Science.gov

Sample records for alkaline hypersaline mono

  1. Morphological characterization of viruses in the stratified water column of alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake.

    PubMed

    Brum, Jennifer R; Steward, Grieg F

    2010-10-01

    Concentrations of viruses and prokaryotes in the alkaline, moderately hypersaline, seasonally stratified Mono Lake are among the highest reported for a natural aquatic environment. We used electron microscopy to test whether viral morphological characteristics differed among the epilimnion, metalimnion, and the anoxic hypolimnion of the lake and to determine how the properties of viruses in Mono Lake compare to other aquatic environments. Viral capsid size distributions were more similar in the metalimnion and hypolimnion of Mono Lake, while viral tail lengths were more similar in the epilimnion and metalimnion. The percentage of tailed viruses decreased with depth and the relative percentages of tailed phage families changed with depth. The presence of large (>125 nm capsid), untailed viruses in the metalimnion and hypolimnion suggests that eukaryotic viruses are produced in these suboxic and anoxic, hypersaline environments. Capsid diameters of viruses were larger on average in Mono Lake compared to other aquatic environments, and no lemon-shaped or filamentous viruses were found, in contrast to other high-salinity or high-altitude lakes and seas. Our data suggest that the physically and chemically distinct layers of Mono Lake harbor different viral assemblages, and that these assemblages are distinct from other aquatic environments that have been studied. Furthermore, we found that filtration of a sample through a 0.22-µm pore-size filter significantly altered the distribution of viral capsid diameters and tail lengths, resulting in a relative depletion of viruses having larger capsids and longer tails. This observation highlights the potential for bias in molecular surveys of viral diversity, which typically rely on filtration through 0.2- or 0.22-µm pore-size membrane filters to remove bacteria during sample preparation.

  2. Organic osmolytes in aerobic bacteria from mono lake, an alkaline, moderately hypersaline environment.

    PubMed

    Ciulla, R A; Diaz, M R; Taylor, B F; Roberts, M F

    1997-01-01

    The identity and concentrations of intracellular organic solutes were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for two strains of aerobic, gram-negative bacteria isolated from Mono Lake, Calif., an alkaline, moderately hypersaline lake. Ectoine (1,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2-methyl-4-pyrimidinecarboxylic acid) was the major endogenous solute in both organisms. Concentrations of ectoine varied with external NaCl levels in strain ML-D but not in strain ML-G, where the level was high but invariant from 1.5 to 3.0 M NaCl. Hydroxyectoine also occurred in strain ML-D, especially at elevated NaCl concentrations (2.5 and 3.0 M), but at levels lower than those of ectoine. Exogenous organic solutes that might occur in Mono Lake were examined for their effects on the de novo synthesis of ectoine. Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) (0.1 or 1 mM) did not significantly lower ectoine levels in either isolate, and only strain ML-G showed any capacity for DMSP accumulation. With nitrogen limitation, however, DMSP (0.1 mM) substituted for ectoine in strain ML-G and became the main organic solute. Glycine betaine (GB) was more effective than DMSP in affecting ectoine levels, principally in strain ML-D. Strain ML-D accumulated GB to 50 or 67% of its organic solute pool at 2.5 M NaCl, at an external level of 0.1 or 1 mM GB, respectively. Strain ML-D also accumulated arsenobetaine. The methylated zwitterionic compounds, probably metabolic products of phytoplankton (DMSP and GB) or brine shrimps (arsenobetaine) in Mono Lake, may function as osmolytes for indigenous bacteria when present at high concentrations or under conditions of nitrogen limitation or salt stress.

  3. Abundance, distribution, and diversity of viruses in alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake, California.

    PubMed

    Jiang, S; Steward, G; Jellison, R; Chu, W; Choi, S

    2004-01-01

    Mono Lake is a large (180 km2), alkaline (pH approximately 10), moderately hypersaline (70-85 g kg(-1)) lake lying at the western edge of the Great Basin. An episode of persistent chemical stratification (meromixis) was initiated in 1995 and has resulted in depletion of oxygen and accumulation of ammonia and sulfide beneath the chemocline. Although previous studies have documented high bacterial abundances and marked seasonal changes in phytoplankton abundance and community composition, there have been no previous reports on the occurrence of viruses in this unique lake. Based on the high concentrations and diversity of microbial life in this lake, we hypothesized that planktonic viruses are also abundant and diverse. To examine the abundance and distribution of viruses and bacteria, water samples were collected from four stations along 5 to 15 vertical depths at each station. Viral abundance ranged from 1 x 10(8) to 1 x 10(9) mL(-1), among the highest observed in any natural aquatic system examined so far. Increases (p < 0.1) in viral densities were observed in the anoxic bottom water at multiple stations. However, regression analysis indicated that viral abundance could not be predicted by any single environmental parameter. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis revealed a diverse viral community in Mono Lake with genome sizes ranging from approximately 14 to >400 kb with most of the DNA in the 30 to 60 kb size range. Cluster analysis grouped the anoxic bottom-water viral community into a unique cluster differentiating it from surface and mid-water viral communities. A hybridization study using an indigenous viral isolate as a probe revealed an episodic pattern of temporal phage distribution with strong niche stratification between oxic and anoxic waters.

  4. Organic osmolytes in aerobic bacteria from Mono Lake, an alkaline, moderately hypersaline environment

    SciTech Connect

    Ciulla, R.A.; Roberts, M.F.; Diaz, M.R.; Taylor, B.F.

    1997-01-01

    The identity and concentrations of intracellular organic solutes were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for two strains of aerobic, gram-negative bacteria isolated from Mono Lake, California, an alkaline, moderately hypersaline lake. Ectoine (1,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2-methyl-4-pyrimidinecarboxylic acid) was the major endogenous solute in both organisms. Concentrations of ectoine varied with external NaCl levels in strain ML-D but not in strain ML-G, where the level was high but invariant from 1.5 to 3.0 M NaCl. Hydroxyectoine also occurred in strain ML-D, especially at elevated NaCl concentrations (2.5 and 3.0 M), but at levels lower than those of ectoine. Exogenous organic solutes that might occur in Mono Lake were examined for their effects on the de novo synthesis of ectoine. Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) (0.1 or 1 mM) did not significantly lower ectoine levels in either isolate, and only strain ML-G showed any capacity for DMSP accumulation. With nitrogen limitation, however, DMSP (0.1 mM) substituted for ectoine in strain ML-G showed any capacity for DMSP accumulation. With nitrogen limitation, however, DMSP (0.1 mM) substituted for ectoine in strain ML-G and became the main organic solute. Glycine betaine (GB) was more effective than DMSP in affecting ectoine levels, principally in strain ML-D. Strain ML-D accumulated GB to 50 or 67% of its organic solute pool at 2.5 M NaCl, at an external level of 0.1 or 1 mM GB, respectively. Strain ML-D also accumulated arsenobetaine. The methylated zwitterionic compounds, probably metabolic products of phytoplankton (DMSP and GB) or brine shrimps (arsenobetaine) in Mono Lake, may function as osmolytes for indigenous bacteria when present at high concentrations or under conditions of nitrogen limitation or salt stress. 33 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Anaerobic Halo-Alkaliphilic Baterial Community of Athalassic, Hypersaline Mono Lake in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.; Marsic, Damien; Ng, Joseph D.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The microorganisms of soda Mono Lake and other similar athalassic hypersaline alkaline soda lakes are of significance to Astrobiology. The microorganisms of these regimes represent the best known terrestrial analogs for microbial life that might have inhabited the hypersaline alkaline lakes and evaporites confined within closed volcanic basins and impact craters during the late Noachian and early Hesperian epochs (3.6 - 4.2 Gya) of ancient Mars. We have investigated the anaerobic microbiota of soda Mono Lake in northern California. In this paper we discuss the astrobiological significance of these ecosystems and describe several interesting features of two novel new species of anaerobic halo-alkaliphilic bacteria (Spirochaeta americana, sp. nov. and Desulfonatronum paiuteum, sp. nov) that we have isolated from Mono Lake.

  6. Anaerobic Halo-Alkaliphilic Baterial Community of Athalassic, Hypersaline Mono Lake in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.; Marsic, Damien; Ng, Joseph D.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The microorganisms of soda Mono Lake and other similar athalassic hypersaline alkaline soda lakes are of significance to Astrobiology. The microorganisms of these regimes represent the best known terrestrial analogs for microbial life that might have inhabited the hypersaline alkaline lakes and evaporites confined within closed volcanic basins and impact craters during the late Noachian and early Hesperian epochs (3.6 - 4.2 Gya) of ancient Mars. We have investigated the anaerobic microbiota of soda Mono Lake in northern California. In this paper we discuss the astrobiological significance of these ecosystems and describe several interesting features of two novel new species of anaerobic halo-alkaliphilic bacteria (Spirochaeta americana, sp. nov. and Desulfonatronum paiuteum, sp. nov) that we have isolated from Mono Lake.

  7. Thioalkalimicrobium cyclicum sp. nov. and Thioalkalivibrio jannaschii sp. nov., novel species of haloalkaliphilic, obligately chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria from hypersaline alkaline Mono Lake (California).

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Yu; Gorlenko, Vladimir M; Tourova, Tat'yana P; Tsapin, Alexandre I; Nealson, Kenneth H; Kuenen, Gijs J

    2002-05-01

    Two strains of haloalkaliphilic, obligately autotrophic, sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were isolated from the oxygen-sulfide interface water layer of stratified alkaline and saline Mono Lake, California, USA. Strain ALM 1T was a dominant species in enrichment on moderate-saline, carbonate-buffered medium (0.6 M total Na+, pH 10) with thiosulfate as an energy source and nitrate as a nitrogen source. Cells of ALM 1T are open ring-shaped and are non-motile. It has a high growth rate and activity of thiosulfate and sulfide oxidation and very low sulfur-oxidizing activity. Genetic comparison and phylogenetic analysis suggested that ALM 1T (= DSM 14477T = JCM 11371T) represents a new species of the genus Thioalkalimicrobium in the gamma-Proteobacteria, for which the name Thioalkalimicrobium cyclicum sp. nov. is proposed. Another Mono Lake isolate, strain ALM 2T, dominated in enrichment on a medium containing 2 M total Na+ (pH 10). It is a motile vibrio which tolerates up to 4 M Na+ and produces a membrane-bound yellow pigment. Phylogenetic analysis placed ALM 2T as a member of genus Thioalkalivibrio in the gamma-Proteobacteria, although its DNA hybridization with the representative strains of this genus was only about 30%. On the basis of genetic and phenotypic properties, strain ALM 2T (= DSM 14478T = JCM 11372T) is proposed as Thioalkalivibrio jannaschii sp. nov..

  8. Comparison of chitinolytic enzymes from an alkaline, hypersaline lake and an estuary.

    PubMed

    LeCleir, Gary R; Buchan, Alison; Maurer, John; Moran, Mary Ann; Hollibaugh, James T

    2007-01-01

    We examined the genetic and physiological characteristics of chitin degrading enzymes expressed by fosmids cloned from two strains of chitinolytic gammaproteobacteria isolated from alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake, California; and from a metagenomic library derived from an estuarine bacterial community (Dean Creek, Sapelo Island, GA, USA). The Mono Lake chitinolytic enzymes presented unique adaptations in terms of halo- and alkalitolerance. The sequence from one of the Mono Lake isolates (strain 12A) was a conventional family 18 glycosyl hydrolase; however, the expressed protein had a novel secondary activity peak at pH 10. We obtained a novel family 20 glycosyl hydrolase sequence from Mono Lake strain AI21. The activity of the expressed protein had a pH optimum of 10, several pH units higher than any other enzyme currently assigned to this family, and the enzyme retained 80% of its activity at pH 11. The enzyme was also halotolerant, retaining activity in salt solutions of up to 225 g l(-1). Sequence analysis indicated a molecular weight of approximately 90 kDa for the protein, and that it contained two active sites. Culture supernatant contained two chitinolytic proteins, 45 and 31 kDa, suggesting possible post-expression modification of the gene product. In contrast, the sequence found in the estuarine metagenomic library and the functional characteristics of the protein expressed from it were those of a conventional family 18 glycosyl hydrolase.

  9. Alkaline Hypersaline Lakes as Analogs for Ancient Microbial Habitats on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDonald, G. D.; Tsapin, A. I.; Storrie-Lombardi, M. C.; Nealson, K. H.; Brinton, K. L. F.; Sun, H.; Venkateswaren, K.; Tsapin, I.; Melack, J.; Jellison, R.

    1999-01-01

    As the climate of ancient Mars became colder and drier with time, open bodies of water would have entered a regime in which evaporation exceeded input from precipitation or runoff. This would have resulted in increases in salinity and perhaps pH. The last open water on Mars was most likely found in alkaline hypersaline lakes, and these lakes would have been the last surface aquatic habitats for life on Mars. It follows, then, that the biomarkers most likely to be found in ancient sedimentary basins on Mars are those left by organisms adapted to high salt and high pH environments. We have begun to investigate the nature of biological diversity and adaptation to these environments, and the potential for biomarker preservation in them, using Mono Lake as a terrestrial analog environment. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. Alkaline Hypersaline Lakes as Analogs for Ancient Microbial Habitats on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDonald, G. D.; Tsapin, A. I.; Storrie-Lombardi, M. C.; Nealson, K. H.; Brinton, K. L. F.; Sun, H.; Venkateswaren, K.; Tsapin, I.; Melack, J.; Jellison, R.

    1999-01-01

    As the climate of ancient Mars became colder and drier with time, open bodies of water would have entered a regime in which evaporation exceeded input from precipitation or runoff. This would have resulted in increases in salinity and perhaps pH. The last open water on Mars was most likely found in alkaline hypersaline lakes, and these lakes would have been the last surface aquatic habitats for life on Mars. It follows, then, that the biomarkers most likely to be found in ancient sedimentary basins on Mars are those left by organisms adapted to high salt and high pH environments. We have begun to investigate the nature of biological diversity and adaptation to these environments, and the potential for biomarker preservation in them, using Mono Lake as a terrestrial analog environment. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  11. Archaeal Communities in a Heterogeneous Hypersaline-Alkaline Soil

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Noya, Yendi E.; Valenzuela-Encinas, César; Sandoval-Yuriar, Alonso; Jiménez-Bueno, Norma G.; Marsch, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    In this study the archaeal communities in extreme saline-alkaline soils of the former lake Texcoco, Mexico, with electrolytic conductivities (EC) ranging from 0.7 to 157.2 dS/m and pH from 8.5 to 10.5 were explored. Archaeal communities in the 0.7 dS/m pH 8.5 soil had the lowest alpha diversity values and were dominated by a limited number of phylotypes belonging to the mesophilic Candidatus Nitrososphaera. Diversity and species richness were higher in the soils with EC between 9.0 and 157.2 dS/m. The majority of OTUs detected in the hypersaline soil were members of the Halobacteriaceae family. Novel phylogenetic branches in the Halobacteriales class were detected in the soil, and more abundantly in soil with the higher pH (10.5), indicating that unknown and uncharacterized Archaea can be found in this soil. Thirteen different genera of the Halobacteriaceae family were identified and were distributed differently between the soils. Halobiforma, Halostagnicola, Haloterrigena, and Natronomonas were found in all soil samples. Methanogenic archaea were found only in soil with pH between 10.0 and 10.3. Retrieved methanogenic archaea belonged to the Methanosarcinales and Methanomicrobiales orders. The comparison of the archaeal community structures considering phylogenetic information (UniFrac distances) clearly clustered the communities by pH. PMID:26074731

  12. Archaeal Communities in a Heterogeneous Hypersaline-Alkaline Soil.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Noya, Yendi E; Valenzuela-Encinas, César; Sandoval-Yuriar, Alonso; Jiménez-Bueno, Norma G; Marsch, Rodolfo; Dendooven, Luc

    2015-01-01

    In this study the archaeal communities in extreme saline-alkaline soils of the former lake Texcoco, Mexico, with electrolytic conductivities (EC) ranging from 0.7 to 157.2 dS/m and pH from 8.5 to 10.5 were explored. Archaeal communities in the 0.7 dS/m pH 8.5 soil had the lowest alpha diversity values and were dominated by a limited number of phylotypes belonging to the mesophilic Candidatus Nitrososphaera. Diversity and species richness were higher in the soils with EC between 9.0 and 157.2 dS/m. The majority of OTUs detected in the hypersaline soil were members of the Halobacteriaceae family. Novel phylogenetic branches in the Halobacteriales class were detected in the soil, and more abundantly in soil with the higher pH (10.5), indicating that unknown and uncharacterized Archaea can be found in this soil. Thirteen different genera of the Halobacteriaceae family were identified and were distributed differently between the soils. Halobiforma, Halostagnicola, Haloterrigena, and Natronomonas were found in all soil samples. Methanogenic archaea were found only in soil with pH between 10.0 and 10.3. Retrieved methanogenic archaea belonged to the Methanosarcinales and Methanomicrobiales orders. The comparison of the archaeal community structures considering phylogenetic information (UniFrac distances) clearly clustered the communities by pH.

  13. Diversity of Arsenate Respiratory Reductase Genes Along Gradients of Arsenate and Arsenite Within Hypersaline, Alkaline Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltikov, C. W.; Nilsen, J.; Oremland, R. S.; Kulp, T. R.; Hoeft, S. E.; Miller, L. G.; Switzer Blum, J.; Baesman, S.; Han, S.; Lanoil, B.

    2005-12-01

    There are several soda lakes in western United States that contain high arsenic concentrations (up to 4 mM total As). Interestingly, these lakes have high rates of anaerobic arsenate reduction, which is catalyzed by arsenate respiring prokaryotes. Several cultured arsenate respiring prokaryotes have been shown to respire and reduce arsenate via a membrane-associated enzyme, ArrA. This enzyme is present in many diverse arsenate respiring prokaryotes. To investigate arsenate respiring microbial communities within these extreme environments, we used functional gene analysis to detect the presence, abundance, and diversity of the arrA gene in core samples collected from two arsenic enriched, hypersaline, alkaline lakes, Mono Lake and Searles Lake. Each sample exhibited concentration gradients for dissolved arsenic species and oxygen. Porewater arsenite concentration increased with depth and was correlated with oxygen depletion. To investigate the depth dependency of the arrA gene in these core samples we utilized the Malasarn et al. (2004) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers to detect a partial arrA gene fragment in nucleic acids extracted from sediment samples. The arrA gene fragment was detected only in the top 1-2 cm of the Mono Lake core and no detection was observed in the Searles Lake homogenized core. After the primers were redesigned to include the nucleotide codon bias for haloalkaliphilic archaea ( Halobacterium), the arrA gene fragments could be detected at each depth interval throughout the Mono Lake core and in the homogenized core of Searles Lake. Work is currently focused on characterizing the diversity and abundance of the arrA gene fragments obtained in each core sample and at different depths. Although no haloalkaliphilic arsenate respiring archaea have been isolated to date, these results suggest that the arrA gene fragments detected in these soda lakes may be of archaeal origins.

  14. First survey of fungi in hypersaline soil and water of Mono Lake area (California).

    PubMed

    Steiman, Régine; Ford, Larry; Ducros, Véronique; Lafond, Jean-Luc; Guiraud, Pascale

    2004-01-01

    Mono Lake is a closed lake located in central California, east of the Sierra Nevada mountains. It contains dissolved carbonates, sulfates and chlorides at high concentrations. Due to its high salinity, Mono Lake was sometimes compared to the Dead Sea. However, it appears that Mono Lake water and vicinity abound with life. In this work, the fungal flora living in this extreme ecosystem was studied for the first time. Soil, tufa, water and sediment samples were also analyzed for their mineral and salt composition. Results showed that water was particularly rich in sodium, potassium, phosphorus and boron. Soil and sediments contained very high levels of calcium and magnesium, but also barium, boron and strontium. Sodium, phosphorus and iron levels varied in a large extent from one to another sample. Neutral to very alkaline pH were recorded. Water samples were found sterile in the conditions chosen for fungi isolation, while sediment, soil and tufa samples led to the isolation of a total of 67 fungal species (from 23 samples), belonging to various taxonomic groups. From our results no clear effects of the chemical parameters of the samples were observed on fungal life apart from the pH. The methods chosen did not allow the isolation of extremely halotolerant species. We isolated in this work a series of ubiquitous species, suggesting that a selection of resistant and/or adaptable strains of some common species could have occurred. Depending on the medium and the temperature of isolation, it can be hypothesized that some species were present as dormant structures, while some others, isolated at pH 8 on a medium enriched in Na and Ca, could be in a growing form adapted to alkaline and saline conditions. This work contributes to a better knowledge of the mycobiota present in the Mono Lake's ecosystem.

  15. Anaerobic halo- alkaliphilic bacterial community of athalassic, hypersaline Mono lake and Owens Lake in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Detkova, Ekaterina N.; Bej, Asim K.; Marsic, Damien; Hoover, Richard B.

    2003-02-01

    The bacterial diversity of microbial extremophiles from the meromictic, hypersaline Mono Lake and a small evaporite pool in Owens Lake of California was studied. In spite of these regions had differing mineral background and different concentrations of NaCl in water they contain the same halo- alkaliphiles anaerobic bacterial community. Three new species of bacteria were detected in this community: primary anaerobe, dissipotrophic saccharolytic spirochete Spirochaeta americana strain AspG1T, primary anaerobe which is proteolytic Tindallia californiensis strain APOT, and secondary anaerobe, hydrogen using Desulfonatronum thiodismutans strain MLF1T, which is sulfate- reducer with chemo-litho-autotrophic metabolism. All of these bacteria are obligate alkaliphiles and dependent upon Na+ ions and CO32- ions in growth mediums. It is interesting that closest relationships for two of these species were isolates from samples of equatorial African soda Magadi lake: Spirochaeta americana AspG1T has 99.4% similarity on 16S rDNA- analyses with Spirochaeta alkalica Z- 7491T, and Tindallia californiensis APOT has 99.1% similarity with Tindallia magadiensis Z-7934T. But result of DNA-DNA- hybridization demonstrated less then 50% similarity between Spirochaeta americana AspG1T and Spirochaeta alkalica Z-7491T. Percent of homology between Tindallia californiensis APOT and Tindallia magadiensis Z-7934T is only 55%. The sulfate-reducer from the alkalic anaerobic community of Magadi lake Desulfonatronovibrio hydrogenovorans Z-7935T was phylogenetically distant from this sulfate-reducer in Mono lake, but genetically closer (99.7% similarity) to the sulfate-reducer, isolated from Central Asian alkalic lake Khadyn in Siberia Desulfonatronum lacustre Z-7951T. The study of key enzymes (hydrogenase and CO- hydrogenase) in Tindallia californiensis APOT and Desulfonatronum thiodismutans MLF1T showed the presence of high activity of both the enzymes in first and only hydrogenase in second

  16. Complete genome sequence of Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus strain AHT2T, a haloalkaliphilic sulfidogen from Egyptian hypersaline alkaline lakes

    DOE PAGES

    Melton, Emily Denise; Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Overmars, Lex; ...

    2016-09-08

    Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus strain AHT2T is a strictly anaerobic sulfidogenic haloalkaliphile isolated from a composite sediment sample of eight hypersaline alkaline lakes in the Wadi al Natrun valley in the Egyptian Libyan Desert. D. alkaliphilus AHT2T is Gram-negative and belongs to the family Desulfobulbaceae within the Deltaproteobacteria. Here we report its genome sequence, which contains a 3.10 Mbp chromosome. Here, D. alkaliphilus AHT2T is adapted to survive under highly alkaline and moderately saline conditions and therefore, is relevant to the biotechnology industry and life under extreme conditions. For these reasons, D. alkaliphilus AHT2T was sequenced by the DOE Joint Genome Institutemore » as part of the Community Science Program.« less

  17. Complete genome sequence of Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus strain AHT2(T), a haloalkaliphilic sulfidogen from Egyptian hypersaline alkaline lakes.

    PubMed

    Melton, Emily Denise; Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Overmars, Lex; Chertkov, Olga; Clum, Alicia; Pillay, Manoj; Ivanova, Natalia; Shapiro, Nicole; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Woyke, Tanja; Lapidus, Alla L; Muyzer, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus strain AHT2(T) is a strictly anaerobic sulfidogenic haloalkaliphile isolated from a composite sediment sample of eight hypersaline alkaline lakes in the Wadi al Natrun valley in the Egyptian Libyan Desert. D. alkaliphilus AHT2(T) is Gram-negative and belongs to the family Desulfobulbaceae within the Deltaproteobacteria. Here we report its genome sequence, which contains a 3.10 Mbp chromosome. D. alkaliphilus AHT2(T) is adapted to survive under highly alkaline and moderately saline conditions and therefore, is relevant to the biotechnology industry and life under extreme conditions. For these reasons, D. alkaliphilus AHT2(T) was sequenced by the DOE Joint Genome Institute as part of the Community Science Program.

  18. New insights into microbially induced sedimentary structures in alkaline hypersaline El Beida Lake, Wadi El Natrun, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taher, Amany G.; Abdel-Motelib, Ali

    2015-10-01

    Microbially induced sedimentary structures (MISS) were studied in detail in the alkaline hypersaline El Beida Lake of Wadi El Natrun in the western desert sector of Egypt, based on field observations and sampling performed in 2013 and 2014. Geomorphologically, the lake can be subdivided into three zones, each with characteristic sedimentary and biosedimentary structures. The marginal elevated zone that borders the lake is characterized by thick blocky crusts devoid of microbial mats. The middle-lower supratidal zone has luxuriant microbial mats associated with knotty surfaces, mat cracks and wrinkle structures. A zone of ephemeral shallow pools and channels is characterized by reticulate surfaces, pinnacle mats, sieve-like surfaces, gas domes and mat chips. In the microbial mats, authigenic minerals include thenardite Na2SO4, trona Na3(CO3)(HCO3)•2H2O and halite NaCl. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses revealed that the minerals are closely associated with the MISS, suggesting some influence of microorganisms on mineral precipitation. Complex interactions between regional hydrological cycles and diagenetic processes imply low preservation potential. MISS signatures of such saline lakes can serve as key analogues for interpreting the geologic record.

  19. Bacillus locisalis sp. nov., a new haloalkaliphilic species from hypersaline and alkaline lakes of China, Kenya and Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Márquez, M Carmen; Carrasco, Inmaculada J; de la Haba, Rafael R; Jones, Brian E; Grant, William D; Ventosa, Antonio

    2011-09-01

    A polyphasic taxonomic study was performed on seven Bacillus-like bacteria isolated from three hypersaline and alkaline lakes located in China, Kenya and Tanzania. All strains were moderately halophilic and alkaliphilic, Gram positive, motile rods. The DNA G+C content from the seven isolates ranged from 42.2 to 43.4mol% and their major fatty acid was anteiso-C(15:0). Strain CG1(T), selected as representative strain of the isolates, possesses meso-diaminopimelic acid in the cell wall peptidoglycan, MK-7 as the predominant menaquinone and diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylethanolamine as the major polar lipids. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that the isolates belonged to the genus Bacillus. The seven isolates shared 97.7-99.9% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, and formed a branch that was distinct from the type strains of the recognized species of the genus Bacillus. They were most closely related to Bacillus agaradhaerens DSM 8721(T) (92.6-93.8% 16S rRNA sequence similarity). DNA-DNA hybridization values between the seven isolates were 85-100%. According to the polyphasic characterization, the strains represent a novel species, for which the name Bacillus locisalis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CG1(T) (CCM 7370(T)=CECT 7152(T)=CGMCC 1.6286(T)=DSM 18085(T)). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Water miscible mono alcohols' effect on the proteolytic performance of Bacillus clausii serine alkaline protease.

    PubMed

    Duman, Yonca Avci; Kazan, Dilek; Denizci, Aziz Akin; Erarslan, Altan

    2014-01-01

    In this study, our investigations showed that the increasing concentrations of all examined mono alcohols caused a decrease in the Vm, kcat and kcat/Km values of Bacillus clausii GMBE 42 serine alkaline protease for casein hydrolysis. However, the Km value of the enzyme remained almost the same, which was an indicator of non-competitive inhibition. Whereas inhibition by methanol was partial non-competitive, inhibition by the rest of the alcohols tested was simple non-competitive. The inhibition constants (KI) were in the range of 1.32-3.10 M, and the order of the inhibitory effect was 1-propanol>2-propanol>methanol>ethanol. The ΔG(≠) and ΔG(≠)E-T values of the enzyme increased at increasing concentrations of all alcohols examined, but the ΔG(≠)ES value of the enzyme remained almost the same. The constant Km and ΔG(≠)ES values in the presence and absence of mono alcohols indicated the existence of different binding sites for mono alcohols and casein on enzyme the molecule. The kcat of the enzyme decreased linearly by increasing log P and decreasing dielectric constant (D) values, but the ΔG(≠) and ΔG(≠)E-T values of the enzyme increased by increasing log P and decreasing D values of the reaction medium containing mono alcohols.

  1. Dissimilatory arsenate and sulfate reduction in sediments of two hypersaline, arsenic-rich soda lakes: Mono and Searles Lakes, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kulp, T.R.; Hoeft, S.E.; Miller, L.G.; Saltikov, C.; Murphy, J.N.; Han, S.; Lanoil, B.; Oremland, R.S.

    2006-01-01

    A radioisotope method was devised to study bacterial respiratory reduction of arsenate in sediments. The following two arsenic-rich soda lakes in California were chosen for comparison on the basis of their different salinities: Mono Lake (???90 g/liter) and Searles Lake (???340 g/liter). Profiles of arsenate reduction and sulfate reduction were constructed for both lakes. Reduction of [73As] arsenate occurred at all depth intervals in the cores from Mono Lake (rate constant [k] = 0.103 to 0.04 h-1) and Searles Lake (k = 0.012 to 0.002 h-1), and the highest activities occurred in the top sections of each core. In contrast, [35S] sulfate reduction was measurable in Mono Lake (k = 7.6 ?? 104 to 3.2 ?? 10-6 h-1) but not in Searles Lake. Sediment DNA was extracted, PCR amplified, and separated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to obtain phylogenetic markers (i.e., 16S rRNA genes) and a partial functional gene for dissimilatory arsenate reduction (arrA). The amplified arrA gene product showed a similar trend in both lakes; the signal was strongest in surface sediments and decreased to undetectable levels deeper in the sediments. More arrA gene signal was observed in Mono Lake and was detectable at a greater depth, despite the higher arsenate reduction activity observed in Searles Lake. A partial sequence (about 900 bp) was obtained for a clone (SLAS-3) that matched the dominant DGGE band found in deeper parts of the Searles Lake sample (below 3 cm), and this clone was found to be closely related to SLAS-1, a novel extremophilic arsenate respirer previously cultivated from Searles Lake. Copyright ?? 2006, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Dissimilatory arsenate and sulfate reduction in sediments of two hypersaline, arsenic-rich soda lakes: Mono and Searles Lakes, California.

    PubMed

    Kulp, T R; Hoeft, S E; Miller, L G; Saltikov, C; Murphy, J N; Han, S; Lanoil, B; Oremland, R S

    2006-10-01

    A radioisotope method was devised to study bacterial respiratory reduction of arsenate in sediments. The following two arsenic-rich soda lakes in California were chosen for comparison on the basis of their different salinities: Mono Lake (approximately 90 g/liter) and Searles Lake (approximately 340 g/liter). Profiles of arsenate reduction and sulfate reduction were constructed for both lakes. Reduction of [73As]arsenate occurred at all depth intervals in the cores from Mono Lake (rate constant [k] = 0.103 to 0.04 h(-1)) and Searles Lake (k = 0.012 to 0.002 h(-1)), and the highest activities occurred in the top sections of each core. In contrast, [35S]sulfate reduction was measurable in Mono Lake (k = 7.6 x10(4) to 3.2 x 10(-6) h(-1)) but not in Searles Lake. Sediment DNA was extracted, PCR amplified, and separated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to obtain phylogenetic markers (i.e., 16S rRNA genes) and a partial functional gene for dissimilatory arsenate reduction (arrA). The amplified arrA gene product showed a similar trend in both lakes; the signal was strongest in surface sediments and decreased to undetectable levels deeper in the sediments. More arrA gene signal was observed in Mono Lake and was detectable at a greater depth, despite the higher arsenate reduction activity observed in Searles Lake. A partial sequence (about 900 bp) was obtained for a clone (SLAS-3) that matched the dominant DGGE band found in deeper parts of the Searles Lake sample (below 3 cm), and this clone was found to be closely related to SLAS-1, a novel extremophilic arsenate respirer previously cultivated from Searles Lake.

  3. Complete genome sequence of Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus strain AHT2T, a haloalkaliphilic sulfidogen from Egyptian hypersaline alkaline lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Melton, Emily Denise; Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Overmars, Lex; Chertkov, Olga; Clum, Alicia; Pillay, Manoj; Ivanova, Natalia; Shapiro, Nicole; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Woyke, Tanja; Lapidus, Alla L.; Muyzer, Gerard

    2016-09-08

    Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus strain AHT2T is a strictly anaerobic sulfidogenic haloalkaliphile isolated from a composite sediment sample of eight hypersaline alkaline lakes in the Wadi al Natrun valley in the Egyptian Libyan Desert. D. alkaliphilus AHT2T is Gram-negative and belongs to the family Desulfobulbaceae within the Deltaproteobacteria. Here we report its genome sequence, which contains a 3.10 Mbp chromosome. Here, D. alkaliphilus AHT2T is adapted to survive under highly alkaline and moderately saline conditions and therefore, is relevant to the biotechnology industry and life under extreme conditions. For these reasons, D. alkaliphilus AHT2T was sequenced by the DOE Joint Genome Institute as part of the Community Science Program.

  4. Ca isotope fractionation in a high-alkalinity lake system: Mono Lake, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Laura C.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2013-10-01

    Precipitation of calcium carbonate minerals from aqueous solutions causes surface-controlled kinetic stable Ca isotope fractionation. The magnitude of fractionation depends on the relative rates of ion attachment to and detachment from the mineral surface, which in turn is predicted to depend on both the saturation state and the solution stoichiometry or the Ca:CO32- activity ratio. Experimental studies have not directly investigated the effects of varying solution stoichiometry on calcium isotope partitioning during calcite or aragonite growth, but natural alkaline lake systems such as Mono Lake, California provide a test bed for the hypothesized stoichiometry dependence. Mono Lake has a Ca:CO32- activity ratio of about 0.0001, seven orders of magnitude lower than ocean water and typical terrestrial freshwater. We present chemical and isotopic measurements of streams, springs, lake water, and precipitated carbonates from the Mono Basin that yield evidence of stoichiometry-dependent Ca isotope fractionation during calcite, aragonite and Mg-calcite precipitation from the alkaline lake water. To estimate the Ca isotope fractionation factors, it is necessary to characterize the lake Ca balance and constrain the variability of lake water chemistry both spatially and temporally. Streams and springs supply Ca to the lake, and a substantial fraction of this supply is precipitated along the lake shore to form tufa towers. Lake water is significantly supersaturated with respect to carbonate minerals, so CaCO3 also precipitates directly from the water column to form carbonate-rich bottom sediments. Growth rate inhibition by orthophosphate likely preserves the high degree of supersaturation in the lake. Strontium isotope ratios are used to estimate the proportions of fresh and alkaline lake water from which each solid carbonate sample precipitated. Carbonate minerals that precipitate directly from lake water (low Ca:CO32-) experience relatively large Ca isotope fractionation

  5. [The new bacteriochlorophyll a-containing bacterium Roseinatronobacter monicus sp. nov. from the hypersaline soda Mono Lake (California, United States)].

    PubMed

    Boldareva, E N; Briantseva, I A; Tsapin, A; Nelson, K; Sorokin, D Iu; Turova, T P; Boĭchenko, V A; Stadnichuk, I N; Gorlenko, V M

    2007-01-01

    Two strains of pink-colored aerobic bacteriochlorophyll a-containing bacteria were isolated from aerobic (strain ROS 10) and anaerobic (strain ROS 35) zones of the water column of Mono Lake (California, United States). Cells of the bacteria were nonmotile oval gram-negative rods multiplying by binary fission by means of a constriction. No intracellular membranes were detected. Polyphosphates and poly-1-hydroxybutyric acid were the storage compounds. Pigments were represented by bacteriochlorophyll a and carotenoids of the spheroidene series. The strains were obligately aerobic, mesophilic (temperature optimum of 25-30 degrees C), alkaliphilic (pH optimum of 8.5-9.5), and halophilic (optimal NaCl concentration of 40-60 g/l). They were obligately heterotrophic and grew aerobically in the dark and in the light. Respiration was inhibited by light at wavelengths corresponding to the absorption of the cellular pigments. The substrate utilization spectra were strain-specific. In the course of organotrophic growth, the bacteria could oxidize thiosulfate to sulfate; sulfide and polysulfide could also be oxidized. The DNA G+C content was 59.4 mol % in strain ROS 10 and 59 mol % in strain ROS 35. In their phenotypic properties, the new strains were close but not identical to the alkaliphilic bacterium Roseinatronobacter thiooxidans. The distinctions in the nucleotide sequences of the 16S rRNA genes (2%) and low DNA-DNA hybridization level with Rna. thiooxidans (22-25%) allow the new strains to be assigned to a new species of the genus Roseinatronobacter, Roseinatronobacter monicus sp. nov.

  6. Natronotalea proteinilytica gen. nov., sp. nov. and Longimonas haloalkaliphila sp. nov., extremely haloalkaliphilic members of the phylum Rhodothermaeota from hypersaline alkaline lakes.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Khijniak, Tatiana V; Galinski, Erwin A; Kublanov, Ilya V

    2017-09-18

    Two proteolytic bacterial strains, BSker2T and BSker3T, were enriched from sediments of hypersaline alkaline lakes in Kulunda Steppe (Altai, Russia) with chicken feathers as substrate, followed by pure culture isolation on hypersaline alkaline media with casein. The cells were non-motile, filamentous, flexible rods. The isolates were obligately aerobic heterotrophs utilizing proteins and peptides as growth substrates. Both were obligate alkaliphiles, but differed in their pH optimum for growth: pH 9.5-9.8 for Bsker2T and pH 8.5-8.8 for BSker3T. The salt range for growth of both isolates was between 2 and 4.5 M total Na+ with an optimum at 2.5-3 M. No organic osmolytes were detected in cells of BSker2T, but they accumulated high intracellular concentrations of K+. The polar lipid fatty acids were dominated by unsaturated C16 and C18 species. The 16S rRNA gene phylogeny indicated that both strains belong to the recently proposed phylum Rhodothermaeota. BSker2T forms a novel genus-level branch, while BSker3T represents a novel species-level member in the genus Longimonas. On the basis of distinct phenotypic and genotypic properties, strain BSker2T (=JCM 31342T=UNIQEM U1009T) is proposed to be classified as a representative of a novel genus and species, Natronotalea proteinilyticagen. nov., sp. nov., and strain BSker3T (=JCM 31343T=UNIQEM U1010T) as a representative of a novel species, Longimonas haloalkaliphila sp. nov.

  7. Bacterial biodiversity from anthropogenic extreme environments: a hyper-alkaline and hyper-saline industrial residue contaminated by chromium and iron.

    PubMed

    Brito, Elcia M S; Piñón-Castillo, Hilda A; Guyoneaud, Rémy; Caretta, César A; Gutiérrez-Corona, J Félix; Duran, Robert; Reyna-López, Georgina E; Nevárez-Moorillón, G Virginia; Fahy, Anne; Goñi-Urriza, Marisol

    2013-01-01

    Anthropogenic extreme environments are among the most interesting sites for the bioprospection of extremophiles since the selection pressures may favor the presence of microorganisms of great interest for taxonomical and astrobiological research as well as for bioremediation technologies and industrial applications. In this work, T-RFLP and 16S rRNA gene library analyses were carried out to describe the autochthonous bacterial populations from an industrial waste characterized as hyper-alkaline (pH between 9 and 14), hyper-saline (around 100 PSU) and highly contaminated with metals, mainly chromium (from 5 to 18 g kg(-1)) and iron (from 2 to 108 g kg(-1)). Due to matrix interference with DNA extraction, a protocol optimization step was required in order to carry out molecular analyses. The most abundant populations, as evaluated by both T-RFLP and 16S rRNA gene library analyses, were affiliated to Bacillus and Lysobacter genera. Lysobacter related sequences were present in the three samples: solid residue and lixiviate sediments from both dry and wet seasons. Sequences related to Thiobacillus were also found; although strains affiliated to this genus are known to have tolerance to metals, they have not previously been detected in alkaline environments. Together with Bacillus (already described as a metal reducer), such organisms could be of use in bioremediation technologies for reducing chromium, as well as for the prospection of enzymes of biotechnological interest.

  8. Analysis of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria from hypersaline Mono Lake, California, on the basis of 16S rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Ward, B B; Martino, D P; Diaz, M C; Joye, S B

    2000-07-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria were detected by PCR amplification of DNA extracted from filtered water samples throughout the water column of Mono Lake, California. Ammonia-oxidizing members of the beta subdivision of the division Proteobacteria (beta-subdivision Proteobacteria) were detected using previously characterized PCR primers; target sequences were detected by direct amplification in both surface water and below the chemocline. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis indicated the presence of at least four different beta-subdivision ammonia oxidizers in some samples. Subsequent sequencing of amplified 16S rDNA fragments verified the presence of sequences very similar to those of cultured Nitrosomonas strains. Two separate analyses, carried out under different conditions (different reagents, locations, PCR machines, sequencers, etc.), 2 years apart, detected similar ranges of sequence diversity in these samples. It seems likely that the physiological diversity of nitrifiers exceeds the diversity of their ribosomal sequences and that these sequences represent members of the Nitrosomonas europaea group that are acclimated to alkaline, high-salinity environments. Primers specific for Nitrosococcus oceanus, a marine ammonia-oxidizing bacterium in the gamma subdivision of the Proteobacteria, did not amplify target from any samples.

  9. Carbonate microbialites and hardgrounds from Manito Lake, an alkaline, hypersaline lake in the northern Great Plains of Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Last, Fawn M.; Last, William M.; Halden, Norman M.

    2010-03-01

    Manito Lake is a large, perennial, Na-SO 4 dominated saline to hypersaline lake located in the northern Great Plains of western Canada. Significant water level decrease over the past several decades has led to reduction in volume and surface area, as well as an increase in salinity. The salinity has increased from 10 ppt to about 50 ppt TDS. This decrease in water level has exposed large areas of nearshore microbialites. These organogenic structures range in size from several cm to over a meter and often form large bioherms several meters high. They have various external morphologies, vary in mineralogical composition, and show a variety of internal fabrics from finely laminated to massive. In addition to microbiolities and bioherms, the littoral zone of Manito Lake contains a variety of carbonate hardgrounds, pavements, and cemented clastic sediments. Dolomite and aragonite are the most common minerals found in these shoreline structures, however, calcite after ikaite, monohydrocalcite, magnesian calcite, and hydromagnesite are also present. The dolomite is nonstoichiometric and calcium-rich; the magnesian calcite has about 17 mol% MgCO 3. AMS radiocarbon dating of paired organic matter and endogenic carbonate material confirms little or no reservoir affect. Although there is abundant evidence for modern carbonate mineral precipitation and microbialite formation, most of the larger microbialites formed between about 2300 and 1000 cal BP, whereas the hardgrounds, cements, and laminated crusts formed about 1000-500 cal BP.

  10. Novel and unexpected prokaryotic diversity in water and sediments of the alkaline, hypersaline lakes of the Wadi An Natrun, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Mesbah, Noha M; Abou-El-Ela, Soad H; Wiegel, Juergen

    2007-11-01

    The phylogenetic diversity of the bacterial and archaeal community in the water and sediments of three large lakes of the Wadi An Natrun was investigated using 16S rRNA clone libraries. The bacterial community was diverse: 769 clones formed 345 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) defined at 99% 16S rRNA sequence identity. The bacterial community in both the water and sediments of the lakes was dominated by clones affiliated with the low G + C Gram-type-positive group, alpha-proteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes, (11-39, 11-30, and 10-37% of OTUs observed, respectively), patterns that have been observed in previously described alkaline, athalassohaline systems. However, a relatively high proportion of Firmicutess-related clones in the water of the lakes and alpha-proteobacteria in the sediments was observed. The bacterial community composition of the water and sediment of the same lake and of different lakes was significantly different (p < 0.05). Operational taxonomic units related to the gamma-proteobacteria were more abundant in the sediment of Lake Fazda, whereas the sediment of Lake UmRisha was dominated by members of the delta-proteobacteria. The proportion of gamma-proteobacterial and Bacteroidetes-affiliated OTUs were predominant in the water of Lake UmRisha and differed significantly from other lake waters (chi-squared analysis, p < or = 0.01). The more oxygenated and dilute nature of Lake Hamra was reflected in its microbial community composition, with the abundance of Bacillales sequences in the water, the absence of Halanaerobiales, Clostridiales, and Archaea in the water, and the presence of representatives of more phyla such as the Actinobacteria, Spirochaetes, and Verrucomicrobia. The archaeal community composition appeared less diverse: 589 clones resulted in 198 OTUs defined at 99% 16S rRNA sequence identity, and all sequences fell into the phylum Euryarchaeota. Phylogenetic analysis showed that many of the sequences were distantly related (83-90% 16S r

  11. Genome Sequence of Sphingomonas sp. S17, Isolated from an Alkaline, Hyperarsenic, and Hypersaline Volcano-Associated Lake at High Altitude in the Argentinean Puna ▿

    PubMed Central

    Farias, Maria Eugenia; Revale, Santiago; Mancini, Estefania; Ordoñez, Omar; Turjanski, Adrian; Cortez, Néstor; Vazquez, Martin P.

    2011-01-01

    The high-altitude Andean lakes (HAAL) in the Argentinean Puna-high Andes region represent an almost unexplored ecosystem exposed to extreme conditions (high UV irradiation, hypersalinity, drastic temperature changes, desiccation, and high pH). Here we present the first genome sequence, a Sphingomonas sp., isolated from this extreme environment. PMID:21602338

  12. Genome sequence of Sphingomonas sp. S17, isolated from an alkaline, hyperarsenic, and hypersaline volcano-associated lake at high altitude in the Argentinean Puna.

    PubMed

    Farias, Maria Eugenia; Revale, Santiago; Mancini, Estefania; Ordoñez, Omar; Turjanski, Adrian; Cortez, Néstor; Vazquez, Martin P

    2011-07-01

    The high-altitude Andean lakes (HAAL) in the Argentinean Puna-high Andes region represent an almost unexplored ecosystem exposed to extreme conditions (high UV irradiation, hypersalinity, drastic temperature changes, desiccation, and high pH). Here we present the first genome sequence, a Sphingomonas sp., isolated from this extreme environment.

  13. Analysis of methane monooxygenase genes in mono lake suggests that increased methane oxidation activity may correlate with a change in methanotroph community structure.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ju-Ling; Joye, Samantha B; Scholten, Johannes C M; Schäfer, Hendrik; McDonald, Ian R; Murrell, J Colin

    2005-10-01

    Mono Lake is an alkaline hypersaline lake that supports high methane oxidation rates. Retrieved pmoA sequences showed a broad diversity of aerobic methane oxidizers including the type I methanotrophs Methylobacter (the dominant genus), Methylomicrobium, and Methylothermus, and the type II methanotroph Methylocystis. Stratification of Mono Lake resulted in variation of aerobic methane oxidation rates with depth. Methanotroph diversity as determined by analysis of pmoA using new denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis primers suggested that variations in methane oxidation activity may correlate with changes in methanotroph community composition.

  14. Anaerobic bacteria from hypersaline environments.

    PubMed Central

    Ollivier, B; Caumette, P; Garcia, J L; Mah, R A

    1994-01-01

    Strictly anaerobic halophiles, namely fermentative, sulfate-reducing, homoacetogenic, phototrophic, and methanogenic bacteria are involved in the oxidation of organic carbon in hypersaline environments. To date, six anaerobic fermentative genera, containing nine species, have been described. Two of them are homoacetogens. Six species belong to the family Haloanaerobiaceae, as indicated by their unique 16S rRNA oligonucleotide sequences. Desulfohalobium retbaense and Desulfovibrio halophilus represent the only two moderately halophilic sulfate reducers so far reported. Among anoxygenic phototrophic anaerobes, a few purple bacteria with optimal growth at salinities between 6 and 11% NaCl have been isolated from hypersaline habitats. They belong to the genera Rhodospirillum, Chromatium, Thiocapsa, and Ectothiorhodospira. The commonest organisms isolated so far are Chromatium salexigens, Thiocapsa halophila, and Rhodospirillum salinarum. Extremely halophilic purple bacteria have most commonly been isolated from alkaline brines and require about 20 to 25% NaCl for optimal growth. They belong to the family Ectothiorodhospiraceae. Their osmoregulation involves synthesis or uptake of compatible solutes such as glycine-betaine that accumulate in their cytoplasm. The existence of methanogens in hypersaline environments is related to the presence of noncompetitive substrates such as methylamines, which originate mainly from the breakdown of osmoregulatory amines. Methanogenesis probably does not contribute to the mineralization of carbohydrates at NaCl concentrations higher than 15%. Above this concentration, sulfate reduction is probably the main way to oxidize H2 (although at rates too low to use up all the H2 formed) and occupies a terminal function kn the degradation of carbohydrates. Three genera and five species of halophilic methylotrophic methanogens have been reported. A bloom of phototrophic bacteria in the marine salterns of Salins-de-Giraud, located on the

  15. Anaerobic bacteria from hypersaline environments.

    PubMed

    Ollivier, B; Caumette, P; Garcia, J L; Mah, R A

    1994-03-01

    Strictly anaerobic halophiles, namely fermentative, sulfate-reducing, homoacetogenic, phototrophic, and methanogenic bacteria are involved in the oxidation of organic carbon in hypersaline environments. To date, six anaerobic fermentative genera, containing nine species, have been described. Two of them are homoacetogens. Six species belong to the family Haloanaerobiaceae, as indicated by their unique 16S rRNA oligonucleotide sequences. Desulfohalobium retbaense and Desulfovibrio halophilus represent the only two moderately halophilic sulfate reducers so far reported. Among anoxygenic phototrophic anaerobes, a few purple bacteria with optimal growth at salinities between 6 and 11% NaCl have been isolated from hypersaline habitats. They belong to the genera Rhodospirillum, Chromatium, Thiocapsa, and Ectothiorhodospira. The commonest organisms isolated so far are Chromatium salexigens, Thiocapsa halophila, and Rhodospirillum salinarum. Extremely halophilic purple bacteria have most commonly been isolated from alkaline brines and require about 20 to 25% NaCl for optimal growth. They belong to the family Ectothiorodhospiraceae. Their osmoregulation involves synthesis or uptake of compatible solutes such as glycine-betaine that accumulate in their cytoplasm. The existence of methanogens in hypersaline environments is related to the presence of noncompetitive substrates such as methylamines, which originate mainly from the breakdown of osmoregulatory amines. Methanogenesis probably does not contribute to the mineralization of carbohydrates at NaCl concentrations higher than 15%. Above this concentration, sulfate reduction is probably the main way to oxidize H2 (although at rates too low to use up all the H2 formed) and occupies a terminal function kn the degradation of carbohydrates. Three genera and five species of halophilic methylotrophic methanogens have been reported. A bloom of phototrophic bacteria in the marine salterns of Salins-de-Giraud, located on the

  16. Vertical distribution of nitrogen-fixing phylotypes in a meromictic, hypersaline lake.

    PubMed

    Steward, G F; Zehr, J P; Jellison, R; Montoya, J P; Hollibaugh, J T

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the diversity of nitrogenase genes in the alkaline, moderately hypersaline Mono Lake, California to determine (1) whether nitrogen-fixing (diazotrophic) populations were similar to those in other aquatic environments and (2) if there was a pattern of distribution of phylotypes that reflected redox conditions, as well as (3) to identify populations that could be important in N dynamics in this nitrogen-limited lake. Mono Lake has been meromictic for almost a decade and has steep gradients in oxygen and reduced compounds that provide a wide range of aerobic and anaerobic habitats. We amplified a fragment of the nitrogenase gene (nifH) from planktonic DNA samples collected at three depths representing oxygenated surface waters, the oxycline, and anoxic, ammonium-rich deep waters. Forty-three percent of the 90 sequences grouped in nifH Cluster I. The majority of clones (57%) grouped in Cluster III, which contains many known anaerobic bacteria. Cluster I and Cluster III sequences were retrieved at every depth indicating little vertical zonation in sequence types related to the prominent gradients in oxygen and ammonia. One group in Cluster I was found most often at every depth and accounted for 29% of all the clones. These sequences formed a subcluster that contained other environmental clones, but no cultivated representatives. No significant nitrogen fixation was detected by the 15N2 method after 48 h of incubation of surface, oxycline, or deep waters, suggesting that pelagic diazotrophs were contributing little to nitrogen fluxes in the lake. The failure to measure any significant nitrogen fixation, despite the detection of diverse and novel nitrogenase genes throughout the water column, raises interesting questions about the ecological controls on diazotrophy in Mono Lake and the distribution of functional genes in the environment.

  17. Distribution of RuBisCO genotypes along a redox gradient in Mono Lake, California.

    PubMed

    Giri, Bruno J; Bano, Nasreen; Hollibaugh, James T

    2004-06-01

    Partial sequences of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) (EC 4.1.1.39) genes were retrieved from samples taken along a redox gradient in alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake, Calif. The form I gene (cbbL) was found in all samples, whereas form II (cbbM) was not retrieved from any of the samples. None of the RuBisCO sequences we obtained were closely related (nucleotide similarity, <90%) to sequences in the database. Some could be attributed to organisms isolated from the lake (Cyanobium) or appearing in enrichment cultures. Most (52%) of the sequences fell into in one clade, containing sequences that were identical to sequences retrieved from an enrichment culture grown with nitrate and sulfide, and another clade contained sequences identical to those retrieved from an arsenate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing enrichment.

  18. Molecular analysis of the sulfate reducing and archaeal community in a meromictic soda lake (Mono Lake, California) by targeting 16S rRNA, mcrA, apsA, and dsrAB genes.

    PubMed

    Scholten, J C M; Joye, S B; Hollibaugh, J T; Murrell, J C

    2005-07-01

    Sulfate reduction is the most important process involved in the mineralization of carbon in the anoxic bottom waters of Mono Lake, an alkaline, hypersaline, meromictic Lake in California. Another important biogeochemical process in Mono Lake is thought to be sulfate-dependent methane oxidation (SDMO). However little is known about what types of organisms are involved in these processes in Mono Lake. Therefore, the sulfate-reducing and archaeal microbial community in Mono Lake was analyzed by targeting 16S rRNA, methyl-coenzyme M reductase (mcrA), adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate (apsA), and dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsrAB) genes to investigate the sulfate-reducing and archaeal community with depth. Most of the 16S rRNA gene sequences retrieved from the samples fell into the delta-subdivision of the Proteobacteria. Phylogenetic analyses suggested that the clones obtained represented sulfate-reducing bacteria, which are probably involved in the mineralization of carbon in Mono Lake, many of them belonging to a novel line of descent in the delta-Proteobacteria. Only 6% of the sequences retrieved from the samples affiliated to the domain Euryarchaeota but did not represent Archaea, which is considered to be responsible for SDMO [Orphan et al. 2001: Appl Environ Microbiol 67:1922-1934; Teske et al.: Appl Environ Microbiol 68:1994-2007]. On the basis of our results and thermodynamic arguments, we proposed that SDMO in hypersaline environments is presumably carried out by SRB alone. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplifications of the mcrA-, apsA-, and dsrAB genes in Mono Lake samples were, in most cases, not successful. Only the PCR amplification of the apsA gene was partially successful. The amplification of these functional genes was not successful because there was either insufficient "target" DNA in the samples, or the microorganisms in Mono Lake have divergent functional genes.

  19. Mono Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities PLEASE NOTE: Your web browser does not have JavaScript enabled. Unless you enable Javascript , your ability to navigate and access the features of this website will be ... Mononucleosis (Mono) Test Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ...

  20. Microbial diversity and complexity in hypersaline environments: a preliminary assessment.

    PubMed

    Litchfield, C D; Gillevet, P M

    2002-01-01

    The microbial communities in solar salterns and a soda lake have been characterized using two techniques: BIOLOG, to estimate the metabolic potential, and amplicon length heterogeneity analysis, to estimate the molecular diversity of these communities. Both techniques demonstrated that the halophilic Bacteria and halophilic Archaea populations in the Eilat, Israel saltern are dynamic communities with extensive metabolic potentials and changing community structures. Halophilic Bacteria were detected in Mono Lake and the lower salinity ponds at the Shark Bay saltern in Western Australia, except when the crystallizer samples were stressed by exposure to Acid Green Dye #9899. At Shark Bay, halophilic Archaea were found only in the crystallizer samples. These data confirm both the metabolic diversity and the phylogenetic complexity of the microbial communities and assert the need to develop more versatile media for the cultivation of the diversity of bacteria in hypersaline environments.

  1. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in hypersaline environments

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Luiz Fernando; Peixoto, Raquel Silva

    2012-01-01

    Literature on hydrocarbon degradation in extreme hypersaline media presents studies that point to a negative effect of salinity increase on hydrocarbonoclastic activity, while several others report an opposite tendency. Based on information available in the literature, we present a discussion on the reasons that justify these contrary results. Despite the fact that microbial ability to metabolize hydrocarbons is found in extreme hypersaline media, indeed some factors are critical for the occurrence of hydrocarbon degradation in such environments. How these factors affect hydrocarbon degradation and their implications for the assessment of hydrocarbon biodegradation in hypersaline environments are presented in this review. PMID:24031900

  2. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in hypersaline environments.

    PubMed

    Martins, Luiz Fernando; Peixoto, Raquel Silva

    2012-07-01

    Literature on hydrocarbon degradation in extreme hypersaline media presents studies that point to a negative effect of salinity increase on hydrocarbonoclastic activity, while several others report an opposite tendency. Based on information available in the literature, we present a discussion on the reasons that justify these contrary results. Despite the fact that microbial ability to metabolize hydrocarbons is found in extreme hypersaline media, indeed some factors are critical for the occurrence of hydrocarbon degradation in such environments. How these factors affect hydrocarbon degradation and their implications for the assessment of hydrocarbon biodegradation in hypersaline environments are presented in this review.

  3. Analysis of fae and fhcD genes in Mono Lake, California.

    PubMed

    Nercessian, Olivier; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G; Joye, Samantha B; Lidstrom, Mary E; Chistoserdova, Ludmila

    2005-12-01

    Genes for two enzymes of the tetrahydromethanopterin-linked C(1) transfer pathway (fae and fhcD) were detected in hypersaline, hyperalkaline Mono Lake (California), via PCR amplification and analysis. Low diversity for fae and fhcD was noted, in contrast to the diversity previously detected in a freshwater lake, Lake Washington (Washington).

  4. Spirochaeta americana sp. nov.: A New Haloalkaliphilic, Obligately Anaerobic Spirochete Isolated from Soda Mono Lake, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B.; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A novel obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, haloalkaliphilic spirochete, strain ASpG1, was isolated from sediments of the alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake in California, U.S.A. The gram-negative cells are motile and spirochete-shaped with sizes of 0.22 x 10-15 micron. Growth was observed over the temperature range of 10 C to 44 C (optimum 37 C), NaCl concentration range of greater than 1 - 12 % (wt/vol) (optimum 3%), and pH range 7.5 - 10.5 (optimum pH 9.5). The novel isolate is strictly alkaliphilic, requires high concentrations of carbonate in the medium, and is capable of utilizing D-glucose, fructose, maltose, sucrose, starch, and D-mannitol. Main end products of glucose fermentation are: H2, acetate, ethanol, and formate. Strain AspG1 is resistant to kanamycin, but sensitive to chloramphenicol, gentamycin and tetracycline. The G+C content of its DNA is 58.5 mol%. On the basis of its physiological and molecular properties, the isolate appears to be a novel species among the genus Spirochaeta; and the name Spirochaeta americana sp. nov., is proposed for the taxon (type strain ASpG1(sup T) = ATCC BAA_392(sup T) = DSMZ 14872(sup T)).

  5. Spirochaeta americana sp. nov.: A New Haloalkaliphilic, Obligately Anaerobic Spirochete Isolated from Soda Mono Lake, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B.; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A novel obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, haloalkaliphilic spirochete, strain ASpG1, was isolated from sediments of the alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake in California, U.S.A. The gram-negative cells are motile and spirochete-shaped with sizes of 0.22 x 10-15 micron. Growth was observed over the temperature range of 10 C to 44 C (optimum 37 C), NaCl concentration range of greater than 1 - 12 % (wt/vol) (optimum 3%), and pH range 7.5 - 10.5 (optimum pH 9.5). The novel isolate is strictly alkaliphilic, requires high concentrations of carbonate in the medium, and is capable of utilizing D-glucose, fructose, maltose, sucrose, starch, and D-mannitol. Main end products of glucose fermentation are: H2, acetate, ethanol, and formate. Strain AspG1 is resistant to kanamycin, but sensitive to chloramphenicol, gentamycin and tetracycline. The G+C content of its DNA is 58.5 mol%. On the basis of its physiological and molecular properties, the isolate appears to be a novel species among the genus Spirochaeta; and the name Spirochaeta americana sp. nov., is proposed for the taxon (type strain ASpG1(sup T) = ATCC BAA_392(sup T) = DSMZ 14872(sup T)).

  6. Hypersaline Microbial Mat Lipid Biomarkers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda L.; Embaye, Tsegereda; Turk, Kendra A.; Summons, Roger E.

    2002-01-01

    Lipid biomarkers and compound specific isotopic abundances are powerful tools for studies of contemporary microbial ecosystems. Knowledge of the relationship of biomarkers to microbial physiology and community structure creates important links for understanding the nature of early organisms and paleoenvironments. Our recent work has focused on the hypersaline microbial mats in evaporation ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico. Specific biomarkers for diatoms, cyanobacteria, archaea, green nonsulfur (GNS), sulfate reducing, sulfur oxidizing and methanotrophic bacteria have been identified. Analyses of the ester-bound fatty acids indicate a highly diverse microbial community, dominated by photosynthetic organisms at the surface. The delta C-13 of cyanobacterial biomarkers such as the monomethylalkanes and hopanoids are consistent with the delta C-13 measured for bulk mat (-10%o), while a GNS biomarker, wax esters (WXE), suggests a more depleted delta C-13 for GNS biomass (-16%o). This isotopic relationship is different than that observed in mats at Octopus Spring, Yellowstone National Park (YSNP) where GNS appear to grow photoheterotrophic ally. WXE abundance, while relatively low, is most pronounced in an anaerobic zone just below the cyanobacterial layer. The WXE isotope composition at GN suggests that these bacteria utilize photoautotrophy incorporating dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) via the 3-hydroxypropionate pathway using H2S or H2.

  7. Hydrocarbon Biodegradation in Hypersaline Environments

    PubMed Central

    Ward, David M.; Brock, T. D.

    1978-01-01

    When mineral oil, hexadecane, and glutamate were added to natural samples of varying salinity (3.3 to 28.4%) from salt evaporation ponds and Great Salt Lake, Utah, rates of metabolism of these compounds decreased as salinity increased. Rate limitations did not appear to relate to low oxygen levels or to the availability of organic nutrients. Some oxidation of l-[U-14C]glutamic acid occurred even at extreme salinities, whereas oxidation of [1-14C]hexadecane was too low to be detected. Gas chromatographic examination of hexane-soluble components of tar samples from natural seeps at Rozel Point in Great Salt Lake demonstrated no evidence of biological oxidation of isoprenoid alkanes subject to degradation in normal environments. Some hexane-soluble components of the same tar were altered by incubation in a low-salinity enrichment culture inoculated with garden soil. Attempts to enrich for microorganisms in saline waters able to use mineral oil as a sole source of carbon and energy were successful below, but not above, about 20% salinity. This study strongly suggests a general reduction of metabolic rate at extreme salinities and raises doubt about the biodegradation of hydrocarbons in hypersaline environments. PMID:16345276

  8. Hypersaline Microbial Mat Lipid Biomarkers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda L.; Embaye, Tsegereda; Turk, Kendra A.; Summons, Roger E.

    2002-01-01

    Lipid biomarkers and compound specific isotopic abundances are powerful tools for studies of contemporary microbial ecosystems. Knowledge of the relationship of biomarkers to microbial physiology and community structure creates important links for understanding the nature of early organisms and paleoenvironments. Our recent work has focused on the hypersaline microbial mats in evaporation ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico. Specific biomarkers for diatoms, cyanobacteria, archaea, green nonsulfur (GNS), sulfate reducing, sulfur oxidizing and methanotrophic bacteria have been identified. Analyses of the ester-bound fatty acids indicate a highly diverse microbial community, dominated by photosynthetic organisms at the surface. The delta C-13 of cyanobacterial biomarkers such as the monomethylalkanes and hopanoids are consistent with the delta C-13 measured for bulk mat (-10%o), while a GNS biomarker, wax esters (WXE), suggests a more depleted delta C-13 for GNS biomass (-16%o). This isotopic relationship is different than that observed in mats at Octopus Spring, Yellowstone National Park (YSNP) where GNS appear to grow photoheterotrophic ally. WXE abundance, while relatively low, is most pronounced in an anaerobic zone just below the cyanobacterial layer. The WXE isotope composition at GN suggests that these bacteria utilize photoautotrophy incorporating dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) via the 3-hydroxypropionate pathway using H2S or H2.

  9. Exploration Of Mono Lake With An ROV: a prototype experiment for the MAPS AUV program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoker, C. R.; Barch, D.; Farmer, J.; Flagg, M.; Healy, T.; Tengdin, T.; Thomas, H.; Schwer, K.; Stakes, D.

    1996-06-01

    This paper describes a field experiment to explore Mono Lake using the Telepresence Controlled Remotely Operated Vehicle (TROV). This experiment was a prototype study demonstrating the science capabilities defined for a new AUV planned for development by a consortium project called MAPS. The goal of the experiment was to study mineralization processes associated with thermal and non-thermal spring inflow into Mono Lake, a hypersaline, alkaline lake in eastern California located in a volcanically active area. TROV is a tethered ROV, which can be controlled using a virtual reality-based user interface. TROV's video capabilities included a matched pair of stereo video cameras on a rapid pan and tilt platform and a single fixed downward pointing camera. Additional capabilities included high resolution 750 kHz pencil beam SONAR and 1 MHz scanning SONAR for navigating in the murky water, instruments for measuring water column properties (C,T,D, pH), a syringe water sample, and a three function manipulator arm used to collect mineral samples and place them in a sample box mounted on the vehicle. TROV was navigated using a DiveTracker acoustic navigation system. TROV was deployed from the deck of a houseboat anchored above the field sites with control and data recording equipment also onboard. The boat's location was continuously recorded using differential GPS system during 10 days of field operations. TROV had a total of 38 hours of bottom time. We studied 4 sites including (1) a broad, gently sloping, ooze-covered mound SE of Paoha island with copious methane gas seeps, (2) shallow, tufa-coated pinnacles of volcanic origin associated with islets NE of Paoha Island, (3) subaqueous thermal springs located along the SE shore of Paoha Island, and (4) a deep area (~50m) E of Paoha Island.

  10. Nitrogen fixation dynamics of two diazotrophic communities in Mono Lake, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.

    1990-01-01

    Two types of diazotrophic microbial communities were found in the littoral zone of alkaline hypersaline Mono Lake, California. One consisted of anaerobic bacteria inhabiting the flocculent surface layers of sediments. Nitrogen fixation (acetylene reduction) by flocculent surface layers occurred under anaerobic conditions, was not stimulated by light or by additions of organic substrates, and was inhibited by O2, nitrate, and ammonia. The second community consisted of a ball-shaped association of a filamentous chlorophyte (Ctenocladus circinnatus) with diazotrophic, nonheterocystous cyanobacteria, as well as anaerobic bacteria (Ctenocladus balls). Nitrogen fixation by Ctenocladus balls was usually, but not always, stimulated by light. Rates of anaerobic dark fixation equaled those in the light under air. Fixation in the light was stimulated by 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea and by propanil [N-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)propanamide]. 3-(3,4-Dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethyl urea-elicited nitrogenase activity was inhibited by ammonia (96%) and nitrate (65%). Fixation was greatest when Ctenocladus balls were incubated anaerobically in the light with sulfide. Dark anaerobic fixation was not stimulated by organic substrates in short-term (4-h) incubations, but was in long-term (67-h) ones. Areal estimates of benthic N2 fixation were measured seasonally, using chambers. Highest rates (~29.3 ??mol of C2H4 m-2 h-1) occurred under normal diel regimens of light and dark. These estimates indicate that benthic N2 fixation has the potential to be a significant nitrogen source in Mono Lake.

  11. Metatranscriptomic analysis of prokaryotic communities active in sulfur and arsenic cycling in Mono Lake, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Edwardson, Christian F; Hollibaugh, James T

    2017-10-01

    This study evaluates the transcriptionally active, dissimilatory sulfur- and arsenic-cycling components of the microbial community in alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake, CA, USA. We sampled five depths spanning the redox gradient (10, 15, 18, 25 and 31 m) during maximum thermal stratification. We used custom databases to identify transcripts of genes encoding complex iron-sulfur molybdoenzyme (CISM) proteins, with a focus on arsenic (arrA, aioA and arxA) and sulfur cycling (dsrA, aprA and soxB), and assigned them to taxonomic bins. We also report on the distribution of transcripts related to the ars arsenic detoxification pathway. Transcripts from detoxification pathways were not abundant in oxic surface waters (10 m). Arsenic cycling in the suboxic and microaerophilic zones of the water column (15 and 18 m) was dominated by arsenite-oxidizing members of the Gammaproteobacteria most closely affiliated with Thioalkalivibrio and Halomonas, transcribing arxA. We observed a transition to arsenate-reducing bacteria belonging to the Deltaproteobacteria and Firmicutes transcribing arsenate reductase (arrA) in anoxic bottom waters of the lake (25 and 31 m). Sulfur cycling at 15 and 18 m was dominated by Gammaproteobacteria (Thioalkalivibrio and Thioalkalimicrobium) oxidizing reduced S species, with a transition to sulfate-reducing Deltaproteobacteria at 25 and 31 m. Genes related to arsenic and sulfur oxidation from Thioalkalivibrio were more highly transcribed at 15 m relative to other depths. Our data highlight the importance of Thioalkalivibrio to arsenic and sulfur biogeochemistry in Mono Lake and identify new taxa that appear capable of transforming arsenic.

  12. Nitrogen Fixation Dynamics of Two Diazotrophic Communities in Mono Lake, California †

    PubMed Central

    Oremland, Ronald S.

    1990-01-01

    Two types of diazotrophic microbial communities were found in the littoral zone of alkaline hypersaline Mono Lake, California. One consisted of anaerobic bacteria inhabiting the flocculent surface layers of sediments. Nitrogen fixation (acetylene reduction) by flocculent surface layers occurred under anaerobic conditions, was not stimulated by light or by additions of organic substrates, and was inhibited by O2, nitrate, and ammonia. The second community consisted of a ball-shaped association of a filamentous chlorophyte (Ctenocladus circinnatus) with diazotrophic, nonheterocystous cyanobacteria, as well as anaerobic bacteria (Ctenocladus balls). Nitrogen fixation by Ctenocladus balls was usually, but not always, stimulated by light. Rates of anaerobic dark fixation equaled those in the light under air. Fixation in the light was stimulated by 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1, 1-dimethylurea and by propanil [N-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)propanamide]. 3-(3,4-Dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethyl urea-elicited nitrogenase activity was inhibited by ammonia (96%) and nitrate (65%). Fixation was greatest when Ctenocladus balls were incubated anaerobically in the light with sulfide. Dark anaerobic fixation was not stimulated by organic substrates in short-term (4-h) incubations, but was in long-term (67-h) ones. Areal estimates of benthic N2 fixation were measured seasonally, using chambers. Highest rates (∼29.3 μmol of C2H4 m−2 h−1) occurred under normal diel regimens of light and dark. These estimates indicate that benthic N2 fixation has the potential to be a significant nitrogen source in Mono Lake. Images PMID:16348136

  13. Spirochaeta americana sp. nov., a new haloalkaliphilic, obligately anaerobic spirochaete isolated from soda Mono Lake in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Bej, Asim K.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B.; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul

    2003-01-01

    A novel, obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, haloalkaliphilic spirochaete, strain ASpG1(T), was isolated from sediments of the alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake in California, USA. Cells of the Gram-negative strain were motile and spirochaete-shaped with sizes of 0.2-0.22 x 8-18 microm. Growth of the strain was observed between 10 and 44 degrees C (optimum 37 degrees C), in 2-12% (w/v) NaCl (optimum 3% NaCl) and between pH 8 and 10.5 (optimum pH 9.5). The novel strain was strictly alkaliphilic, required high concentrations of carbonates in the medium and was capable of utilizing D-glucose, fructose, maltose, sucrose, starch and D-mannitol. End products of glucose fermentation were H2, acetate, ethanol and formate. Strain ASpG(T) was resistant to kanamycin and rifampicin, but sensitive to gentamicin, tetracycline and chloramphenicol. The G + C content of its DNA was 58.5 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization analysis of strain ASpG1(T) with its most closely related species, Spirochaeta alkalica Z-7491(T), revealed a hybridization value of only 48.7%. On the basis of its physiological and molecular properties, strain ASpG1(T) appears to represent a novel species of the genus Spirochaeta, for which the name Spirochaeta americana is proposed (type strain ASpG1(T) =ATCC BAA-392(T) = DSM 14872(T)).

  14. Spirochaeta americana sp. nov., a new haloalkaliphilic, obligately anaerobic spirochaete isolated from soda Mono Lake in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Bej, Asim K.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B.; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul

    2003-01-01

    A novel, obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, haloalkaliphilic spirochaete, strain ASpG1(T), was isolated from sediments of the alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake in California, USA. Cells of the Gram-negative strain were motile and spirochaete-shaped with sizes of 0.2-0.22 x 8-18 microm. Growth of the strain was observed between 10 and 44 degrees C (optimum 37 degrees C), in 2-12% (w/v) NaCl (optimum 3% NaCl) and between pH 8 and 10.5 (optimum pH 9.5). The novel strain was strictly alkaliphilic, required high concentrations of carbonates in the medium and was capable of utilizing D-glucose, fructose, maltose, sucrose, starch and D-mannitol. End products of glucose fermentation were H2, acetate, ethanol and formate. Strain ASpG(T) was resistant to kanamycin and rifampicin, but sensitive to gentamicin, tetracycline and chloramphenicol. The G + C content of its DNA was 58.5 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization analysis of strain ASpG1(T) with its most closely related species, Spirochaeta alkalica Z-7491(T), revealed a hybridization value of only 48.7%. On the basis of its physiological and molecular properties, strain ASpG1(T) appears to represent a novel species of the genus Spirochaeta, for which the name Spirochaeta americana is proposed (type strain ASpG1(T) =ATCC BAA-392(T) = DSM 14872(T)).

  15. Spirochaeta americana sp. nov., a new haloalkaliphilic, obligately anaerobic spirochaete isolated from soda Mono Lake in California.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Richard B; Pikuta, Elena V; Bej, Asim K; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul

    2003-05-01

    A novel, obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, haloalkaliphilic spirochaete, strain ASpG1(T), was isolated from sediments of the alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake in California, USA. Cells of the Gram-negative strain were motile and spirochaete-shaped with sizes of 0.2-0.22 x 8-18 microm. Growth of the strain was observed between 10 and 44 degrees C (optimum 37 degrees C), in 2-12% (w/v) NaCl (optimum 3% NaCl) and between pH 8 and 10.5 (optimum pH 9.5). The novel strain was strictly alkaliphilic, required high concentrations of carbonates in the medium and was capable of utilizing D-glucose, fructose, maltose, sucrose, starch and D-mannitol. End products of glucose fermentation were H2, acetate, ethanol and formate. Strain ASpG(T) was resistant to kanamycin and rifampicin, but sensitive to gentamicin, tetracycline and chloramphenicol. The G + C content of its DNA was 58.5 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization analysis of strain ASpG1(T) with its most closely related species, Spirochaeta alkalica Z-7491(T), revealed a hybridization value of only 48.7%. On the basis of its physiological and molecular properties, strain ASpG1(T) appears to represent a novel species of the genus Spirochaeta, for which the name Spirochaeta americana is proposed (type strain ASpG1(T) =ATCC BAA-392(T) = DSM 14872(T)).

  16. Heterotrophic Protists in Hypersaline Microbial Mats and Deep Hypersaline Basin Water Columns

    PubMed Central

    Edgcomb, Virginia P.; Bernhard, Joan M.

    2013-01-01

    Although hypersaline environments pose challenges to life because of the low water content (water activity), many such habitats appear to support eukaryotic microbes. This contribution presents brief reviews of our current knowledge on eukaryotes of water-column haloclines and brines from Deep Hypersaline Anoxic Basins (DHABs) of the Eastern Mediterranean, as well as shallow-water hypersaline microbial mats in solar salterns of Guerrero Negro, Mexico and benthic microbialite communities from Hamelin Pool, Shark Bay, Western Australia. New data on eukaryotic diversity from Shark Bay microbialites indicates eukaryotes are more diverse than previously reported. Although this comparison shows that eukaryotic communities in hypersaline habitats with varying physicochemical characteristics are unique, several groups are commonly found, including diverse alveolates, strameonopiles, and fungi, as well as radiolaria. Many eukaryote sequences (SSU) in both regions also have no close homologues in public databases, suggesting that these environments host unique microbial eukaryote assemblages with the potential to enhance our understanding of the capacity of eukaryotes to adapt to hypersaline conditions. PMID:25369746

  17. Uranium Geochemistry in Hypersaline Soda Lakes in Eastern Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linhoff, B. S.; Bennett, P.; Puntsag, T.

    2007-12-01

    Extremely high concentrations of uranium were discovered in water samples from hypersaline soda lakes in eastern Mongolia. The origin and fate of uranium in these lakes was examined using geochemical analyses and modeling, using samples collected from five lakes, six wells and one stream. Samples were analyzed for strontium and uranium isotopes, cations and trace metals, anions, alkalinity, and unstable field parameters. The lakes are small, shallow (<1Km2, <1m) and terminal; their size fluctuates seasonally and they periodically completely desiccate. The region is characterized by rolling semi arid grassland steppe covered by a thick loess deposit of unknown thickness that is underlain by Neogene rhyolite. A typical groundwater in the field area is alkaline (pH = 7.9, 10.7 meq alk/L), 4.4 ° C, with an average T.D.S. of 1500 and low calcium concentration (20 ppm). A strong linear correlation was found between groundwater and lake water chlorine to bromine ratios implying groundwater discharges to lake water and is subsequently evaporated. Evaporation is intense with lake waters having average chlorine concentrations 300 times that of well waters. Uranium in well samples is higher than typical for shallow groundwaters (7-101ppb) suggesting discharging groundwater as a probable source of uranium in lake water. Concentrations of uranium in lake water ranges from 57-14,900ppb making these lakes possibly the highest naturally occurring uranium concentration reported. Lake water alkalinity is strongly correlated to uranium abundance suggesting uranium is complexed with carbonate as the aqueous species UO2CO3. Consequently, the extremely high alkalinity of the most alkaline lake (pH = 9.8, 1288.8 meq alk/L) also has the highest uranium concentrations. Stable strontium isotopes were used to assess the degree of water rock interactions and the presence of 90Sr was checked for to test the possibility of input of nuclear fallout. 90Sr was not detected in lake water samples

  18. The Archaea of a Hypersaline Microbial Mat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, C.; Spear, J. R.; Pace, N. R.

    2006-12-01

    The overarching goal of this work is to describe and understand the organismal composition within the domain Archaea for the microbial ecosystem of a hypersaline microbial mat. Sea salt is crystallized by solar evaporation at North America's largest saltworks, the Exportadora de Sal, in Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur. Sea water flows through a series of evaporative basins with an increase in salinity until saturation is reached and halite crystallization begins. Several of these ponds are underlined with thick microbial mats. To date, it has not been known what kinds of organisms comprise these complex microbial ecosystems. Here, we report a survey of the stratified microbial communities for the distribution of representatives of Archaea in layers of the mats. This survey uses molecular approaches, based on cloning and sequencing of SSU rRNA genes for phylogenetic analyses, to determine the nature and extent of archaeal diversity that constitute these ecosystems. We compiled an altogether new phylogenetic backbone for the domain Archaea and placed representative sequences from this hypersaline analysis onto that framework. Analyses to date indicate the ubiquitous dominance of uncultured organisms of phylogenetic kinds not generally thought to be associated with hypersaline environments. Collectively, the results indicate that the diversity of life is extensive even in this seemingly inhospitable "extreme" environment.

  19. Microbial Fuel Cell as Life Detector: Arsenic Cycling in Hypersaline Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, L. G.; Blum, J. S.; Oremland, R. S.

    2006-12-01

    Detection of extant life on Mars or Europa is a future goal of exobiology. For the present, biosignatures arising from life in extreme environments on Earth suggest how to search for life elsewhere. One such biosignature is the electrical current derived from the metabolic activity of microorganisms, which may be measured using microbial fuel cells (MFCs). MFCs generate electricity by coupling bacterially mediated redox transformations to electrochemical reactions through a circuit. Our laboratory fuel cell employs solid graphite electrodes and uses a proton exchange membrane to separate anode (anaerobic) and cathode (aerobic) chambers. Mineral salts media are circulated by peristaltic pump through the chambers and through temperature-controlled reservoirs that are sparged with nitrogen (anode) or oxygen (cathode). In experiments with pure cultures, bacteria reduced arsenate to arsenite in the anode chamber, and produced electrical power in the process. Power production was sustained in the MFC only while bacteria were active. An arsenate respiring bacterium, Bacillus selenitireducens, isolated from moderately-hypersaline Mono Lake, CA grew on lactate using arsenate as the electron acceptor and also grew without arsenate, using the anode as the electron acceptor. Power densities (per unit area of anode surface) of 60 μW m-2 were achieved during growth without arsenate. Less power (3 μW m-2) was produced when arsenate was available because arsenate acted as an alternate electron acceptor to the anode. Another arsenate respiring bacterium, strain SLAS-1, isolated from extremely-hypersaline Searles Lake, CA respired lactate and reduced arsenate in the MFC, albeit more slowly. An arsenite oxidizing bacterium, Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii, isolated from Mono Lake will also be tested for its ability to generate electricity before proceeding to an examination of biocurrent production using natural sediments and waters from Mono Lake and Searles Lake.

  20. Performance of fungi in low temperature and hypersaline environments.

    PubMed

    Siegel, S M; Speitel, T W

    1976-01-01

    During the past ten years we have observed a broad array of stress capabilities in common fungi including ability to grow in aqueous ammonia and other alkaline solutions, in acids, in the presence of heavy metals, and in various salt media at low temperature. This report is concerned primarily with (a) the performance of Aspergillaceae in a variety of saturated salts, (b) distinctive roles for K+ and Rb+ ions, and (c) the lowest temperatures at which growth in nutrient brines has been observed, namely 267 degrees K in as little as 14 days. We also describe a novel solid medium based upon gelatin, glycerol and water in which fungal cultures growing at 248 degrees K can be directly examined under oil-immersion magnification. The performance capabilities of the fungi show that tolerance or adaptability to harsh and extreme physical-chemical environments cannot be considered a unique feature of prokaryotic life forms. Salt flats, brine pools and other natural hypersaline environments have long been recognized as real ecological niches harboring a range of biota from pseudomonad bacteria and green algae to specialized crustaceans. A notable omission in this ecological record is the fungi, although the group is known to include marine forms.

  1. Organic geochemistry and brine composition in Great Salt, Mono, and Walker Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domagalski, Joseph L.; Orem, William H.; Eugster, Hans P.

    1989-11-01

    aromatic carbon and the absence of chemical structures indicative of the lignin of vascular plants. The dissolved organic carbon of the Mono Lake pore fluids is structurally related to humic acid and is also related to carbohydrate metabolism. The alkaline pore fluids, due to high pH, solubilize high molecular weight organic matter from the sediments. This hydrophilic material is a metal complexing agent. Despite very high algal productivities, organic carbon accumulation can be low in stratified lakes if the anoxic bottom waters are hypersaline with high concentrations of sulfate ion. Labile organic matter is recycled to the water column and the sedimentary organic matter is relatively nonsusceptible to bacterial metabolism. As a result, pore-fluid dissolved organic carbon and metal-organic complexation are low.

  2. Organic geochemistry and brine composition in Great Salt, Mono, and Walker Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Domagalski, J.L.; Orem, W.H.; Eugster, H.P.

    1989-01-01

    aromatic carbon and the absence of chemical structures indicative of the lignin of vascular plants. The dissolved organic carbon of the Mono Lake pore fluids is structurally related to humic acid and is also related to carbohydrate metabolism. The alkaline pore fluids, due to high pH, solubilize high molecular weight organic matter from the sediments. This hydrophilic material is a metal complexing agent. Despite very high algal productivities, organic carbon accumulation can be low in stratified lakes if the anoxic bottom waters are hypersaline with high concentrations of sulfate ion. Labile organic matter is recycled to the water column and the sedimentary organic matter is relatively nonsusceptible to bacterial metabolism. As a result, pore-fluid dissolved organic carbon and metal-organic complexation are low. ?? 1989.

  3. Radionuclides in Mono Lake, California

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, H.J.; Trier, R.M.; Toggweiler, J.R.; Mathieu, G.; Deck, B.L.; Olsen, C.R.; Hammond, D.E.; Fuller, C.; Ku, T.L.

    1982-04-30

    Several radioisotopes of the naturally occurring uranium and thorium decay series, in addition to fallout plutonium, have unusually high concentrations in the water column of Mono Lake, a natural alkaline, saline lake. Complexing by carbonate ions appears to be responsible for the enhanced solubility of actinide elements with oxidation states of IV to VI. In contrast, fallout strontium-90 has been largely removed from the water, probably as a result of coprecipitation with calcium carbonate. The daughter/parent activity ratios of thorium, radium, and uranium isotopes suggest that thorium is removed from the water column to the sediments on time scales substantially longer than a month and that the desorption of thorium from the sediments to the water column requires less than a few years.

  4. Radionuclides in Mono Lake, California

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, H.J.; Trier, R.M.; Toggweiler, J.R.; Mathieu, G.; Deck, B.L.; Olsen, C.R.; Hammond, D.E.; Fuller, C.; Ku, T.L.

    1982-04-01

    Several radioisotopes of the naturally occurring uranium and thorium decay series, in addition to fallout plutonium have unusually high concentrations in the water column of Mono Lake, a natural alkaline, saline lake. Complexing by carbonate ions appears to be responsible for the enhanced solubility of actinide elements with oxidation states of IV to VI. In contrast, fallout strontium-90 has been largely removed from the water, probably as a result of coprecipitation with calcium carbonate. The daughter/parent activity ratios of thorium, radium, and uranium isotopes suggest that thorium is removed from the water column to the sediments on time scales substantially longer than a month and that the desorption of thorium from the sediments to the water column requires less than a few years. 2 tables.

  5. Mono Lake, California

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-03-24

    In eastern California, along the western edge of the Great Basin, sits Mono Lake. This is a salty remnant of a wetter era. Estimates are that the lake existed for at least 760,000 years. Now surrounded by mountain ranges, however, Mono Lake has no outlet; water entering the lake can only evaporate away, so Mono Lake is saltier than the ocean. South of the lake appear some of the geologic features known as Mono Craters. Geologists estimate that the Mono Craters last erupted about 650 years ago. The image was acquired July 7, 2016, covers an area of 22.6 by 34 km, and is located at 37.9 degrees north, 119 degrees west. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21518

  6. Investigations of Methane Production in Hypersaline Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bebout, Brad M.

    2015-01-01

    The recent reports of methane in the atmosphere of Mars, as well as the findings of hypersaline paleo-environments on that planet, have underscored the need to evaluate the importance of biological (as opposed to geological) trace gas production and consumption. Methane in the atmosphere of Mars may be an indication of life but might also be a consequence of geologic activity and/or the thermal alteration of ancient organic matter. Hypersaline environments have now been reported to be extremely likely in several locations in our solar system, including: Mars, Europa, and Enceladus. Modern hypersaline microbial mat communities, (thought to be analogous to those present on the early Earth at a period of time when Mars was experiencing very similar environmental conditions), have been shown to produce methane. However, very little is known about the physical and/or biological controls imposed upon the rates at which methane, and other important trace gases, are produced and consumed in these environments. We describe here the results of our investigations of methane production in hypersaline environments, including field sites in Chile, Baja California Mexico, California, USA and the United Arab Emirates. We have measured high concentrations of methane in bubbles of gas produced both in the sediments underlying microbial mats, as well as in areas not colonized by microbial mats in the Guerrero Negro hypersaline ecosystem, Baja California Mexico, in Chile, and in salt ponds on the San Francisco Bay. The carbon isotopic (d13C) composition of the methane in the bubbles exhibited an extremely wide range of values, (ca. -75 per mille ca. -25 per mille). The hydrogen isotopic composition of the methane (d2H) ranged from -60 to -30per mille and -450 to -350per mille. These isotopic values are outside of the range of values normally considered to be biogenic, however incubations of the sediments in contact with these gas bubbles reveals that the methane is indeed being

  7. Substrate limitation for methanogenesis in hypersaline environments.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Cheryl A; Poole, Jennifer A; Tazaz, Amanda M; Chanton, Jeffrey P; Bebout, Brad M

    2012-02-01

    Motivated by the increasingly abundant evidence for hypersaline environments on Mars and reports of methane in its atmosphere, we examined methanogenesis in hypersaline ponds in Baja California Sur, Mexico, and in northern California, USA. Methane-rich bubbles trapped within or below gypsum/halite crusts have δ¹³C values near -40‰. Methane with these relatively high isotopic values would typically be considered thermogenic; however, incubations of crust samples resulted in the biological production of methane with similar isotopic composition. A series of measurements aimed at understanding the isotopic composition of methane in hypersaline systems was therefore undertaken. Methane production rates, as well as the concentrations and isotopic composition of the particulate organic carbon (POC), were measured. Methane production was highest from microbial communities living within gypsum crusts, whereas POC content at gypsum/halite sites was low, generally less than 1% of the total mass. The isotopic composition of the POC ranged from -26‰ to -10‰. To determine the substrates used by the methanogens, ¹³C-labeled methylamines, methanol, acetate, and bicarbonate were added to individual incubation vials, and the methane produced was monitored for ¹³C content. The main substrates used by the methanogens were the noncompetitive substrates, the methylamines, and methanol. When unlabeled trimethylamine (TMA) was added to incubating gypsum/halite crusts in increasing concentrations, the isotopic composition of the methane produced became progressively lower; the lowest methane δ¹³C values occurred when the most TMA was added (1000 μM final concentration). This decrease in the isotopic composition of the methane produced with increasing TMA concentrations, along with the high in situ methane δ¹³C values, suggests that the methanogens within the crusts are operating at low substrate concentrations. It appears that substrate limitation is decreasing

  8. Bacterial dissimilatory reduction of arsenate and sulfate in meromictic Mono Lake, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Dowdle, P.R.; Hoeft, S.; Sharp, J.O.; Schaefer, J.K.; Miller, L.G.; Switzer, Blum J.; Smith, R.L.; Bloom, N.S.; Wallschlaeger, D.

    2000-01-01

    The stratified (meromictic) water column of alkaline and hypersaline Mono Lake, California, contains high concentrations of dissolved inorganic arsenic (~200 ??mol/L). Arsenic speciation changes from arsenate [As (V)] to arsenite [As (III)] with the transition from oxic surface waters (misolimnion) to anoxic bottom waters (monimolimnion). A radioassay was devised to measure the reduction of 73As (V) to 73As (III) and tested using cell suspensions of the As (V)-respiring Bacillus selenitireducens, which completely reduced the 73As (V). In field experiments, no significant activity was noted in the aerobic mixolimnion waters, but reduction of 73As (V) to 73As (III) was observed in all the monimolimnion samples. Rate constants ranged from 0.02 to 0.3/day, with the highest values in the samples from the deepest depths (24 and 28 m). The highest activities occurred between 18 and 21 m, where As (V) abundant (rate, ~5.9 ??mol/L per day). In contrast, sulfate reduction occurred at depths below 21 m, with the highest rates attained at 28 m (rate, ~2.3 ??mol/L per day). These results indicate that As (V) ranks second in importance, after sulfate, as an electron acceptor for anaerobic bacterial respiration in the water column. Annual arsenate respiration may mineralize as much as 14.2% of the pelagic photosynthetic carbon fixed during meromixis. When combined with sulfate-reduction data, anaerobic respiration in the water column can mineralize 32-55% of this primary production. As lakes of this type approach salt saturation, As (V) can become the most important electron acceptor for the biogeochemical cycling of carbon. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  9. Bacillus arsenicoselenatis, sp. nov., and Bacillus selenitireducens, sp. nov.: two haloalkaliphiles from Mono Lake, California that respire oxyanions of selenium and arsenic.

    PubMed

    Switzer Blum, J; Burns Bindi, A; Buzzelli, J; Stolz, J F; Oremland, R S

    1998-12-01

    Two gram-positive anaerobic bacteria (strains E1H and MLS10) were isolated from the anoxic muds of Mono Lake, California, an alkaline, hypersaline, arsenic-rich water body. Both grew by dissimilatory reduction of As(V) to As(III) with the concomitant oxidation of lactate to acetate plus CO2. Bacillus arsenicoselenatis (strain E1H) is a spore-forming rod that also grew by dissimilatory reduction of Se(VI) to Se(IV). Bacillus selenitireducens (strain MLS10) is a short, non-spore-forming rod that grew by dissimilatory reduction of Se(IV) to Se(0). When the two isolates were cocultured, a complete reduction of Se(VI) to Se(0) was achieved. Both isolates are alkaliphiles and had optimal specific growth rates in the pH range of 8.5-10. Strain E1H had a salinity optimum at 60 g l-1 NaCl, while strain MLS10 had optimal growth at lower salinities (24-60 g l-1 NaCl). Both strains have limited abilities to grow with electron donors and acceptors other than those given above. Strain MLS10 demonstrated weak growth as a microaerophile and was also capable of fermentative growth on glucose, while strain E1H is a strict anaerobe. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis placed the two isolates with other Bacillus spp. in the low G+C gram-positive group of bacteria.

  10. Bacillus arsenicoselenatis, sp. nov., and Bacillus selenitireducens, sp. nov.: Two haloalkaliphiles from Mono Lake, California that respire oxyanions of selenium and arsenic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Switzer, Blum J.; Burns, Bindi A.; Buzzelli, J.; Stolz, J.F.; Oremland, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    Two gram-positive anaerobic bacteria (strains E1H and MLS10) were isolated from the anoxic muds of Mono Lake, California, an alkaline, hypersaline, arsenic-rich water body. Both grew by dissimilatory reduction of As(V) to As(III) with the concomitant oxidation of lactate to acetate plus CO2. Bacillus arsenicoselenatis (strain E1H) is a spore-forming rod that also grew by dissimilatory reduction of Se(VI) to Se(IV). Bacillus selenitireducens (strain MLS 10) is a short, non-spore-forming rod that grew by dissimilatory reduction of Se(IV) to Se(0). When the two isolates were cocultured, a complete reduction of Se(VI) to Se(0) was achieved. Both isolates are alkaliphiles and had optimal specific growth rates in the pH range of 8.5-10. Strain E1H had a salinity optimum at 60 g 1-1 NaCl, while strain MLS10 had optimal growth at lower salinities (24-60 g 1-1 NaCl). Both strains have limited abilities to grow with electron donors and acceptors other than those given above. Strain MLS10 demonstrated weak growth as a microaerophile and was also capable of fermentative growth on glucose, while strain E1H is a strict anaerobe. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis placed the two isolates with other Bacillus spp. in the low G+C gram-positive group of bacteria.

  11. 21 CFR 184.1505 - Mono- and diglycerides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... acids that are derived from edible sources. The most prevalent fatty acids include lauric, linoleic, myristic, oleic, palmitic, and stearic. Mono- and diglycerides are manufactured by the reaction of glycerin with fatty acids or the reaction of glycerin with triglycerides in the presence of an alkaline...

  12. Meromixis in hypersaline Mono Lake, California. 3. Biogeochemical response to stratification and overturn

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, L.G.; Jellison, R.; Oremland, R.S.; Culbertson, C.W.

    1993-01-01

    The monimolimnion remained anoxic and nearly isothermal, while the upper mixolimnion was well oxygenated and exhibited a seasonal thermal regime. Dissolved sulfide and methane increased in the monimolimnion as a result of diffusive flux from the sediments. Winter mixing down to the chemocline distributed sulfide and methane throughout the mixolimnion. Lakewide inventories of dissolved sulfide and methane reflected the balance between increased concentrations and decreased monimolimnion volume over time. At overturn, the entire water column was isothermal and anoxic. Dissolved sulfide (380 ?? 106 mol) was oxidized in one week by molecular oxygen. Methane (12 ?? 106 mol) was removed more slowly by microbial oxidation and ventilation across the air-water interface. -from Authors

  13. Elevated concentrations of actinides in mono lake.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R F; Bacon, M P; Brewer, P G

    1982-04-30

    Tetravalent thorium, pentavalent protactinium, hexavalent uranium, and plutonium (oxidation state uncertain) are present in much higher concentrations in Mono Lake, a saline, alkaline lake in eastern central California, than in seawater. Low ratios of actinium to protactinium and of americium to plutonium indicate that the concentrations of trivalent actinides are not similarly enhanced. The elevated concentrations of the ordinarily very insoluble actinides are maintained in solution by natural ligands, which inhibit their chemical removal from the water column, rather than by an unusually large rate of supply.

  14. Elevated concentrations of actinides in Mono Lake

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.F.; Bacon, M.P.; Brewer, P.G.

    1982-04-30

    Tetravalent thorium, pentavalent protactinium, hexavalent uranium, and plutonium (oxidation state uncertain) are present in much higher concentrations in Mono Lake, a saline, alkaline lake in eastern central California, than in seawater. Low ratios of actinium to protactinium and of americium to plutonium indicate that the concentrations of trivalent actinides are not similarly enhanced. The elevated concentrations of the ordinarily very insoluble actinides are maintained in solution by natural ligands, which inhibit their chemical removal from the water column, rather than by an unusually large rate of supply.

  15. Electricity generation by anaerobic bacteria and anoxic sediments from hypersaline soda lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, L.G.; Oremland, R.S.

    2008-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria and anoxic sediments from soda lakes produced electricity in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). No electricity was generated in the absence of bacterial metabolism. Arsenate respiring bacteria isolated from moderately hypersaline Mono Lake (Bacillus selenitireducens), and salt-saturated Searles Lake, CA (strain SLAS-1) oxidized lactate using arsenate as the electron acceptor. However, these cultures grew equally well without added arsenate using the MFC anode as their electron acceptor, and in the process oxidized lactate more efficiently. The decrease in electricity generation by consumption of added alternative electron acceptors (i.e. arsenate) which competed with the anode for available electrons proved to be a useful indicator of microbial activity and hence life in the fuel cells. Shaken sediment slurries from these two lakes also generated electricity, with or without added lactate. Hydrogen added to sediment slurries was consumed but did not stimulate electricity production. Finally, electricity was generated in statically incubated "intact" sediment cores from these lakes. More power was produced in sediment from Mono Lake than from Searles Lake, however microbial fuel cells could detect low levels of metabolism operating under moderate and extreme conditions of salt stress. ?? 2008 US Government.

  16. Electricity generation by anaerobic bacteria and anoxic sediments from hypersaline soda lakes.

    PubMed

    Miller, Laurence G; Oremland, Ronald S

    2008-11-01

    Anaerobic bacteria and anoxic sediments from soda lakes produced electricity in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). No electricity was generated in the absence of bacterial metabolism. Arsenate respiring bacteria isolated from moderately hypersaline Mono Lake (Bacillus selenitireducens), and salt-saturated Searles Lake, CA (strain SLAS-1) oxidized lactate using arsenate as the electron acceptor. However, these cultures grew equally well without added arsenate using the MFC anode as their electron acceptor, and in the process oxidized lactate more efficiently. The decrease in electricity generation by consumption of added alternative electron acceptors (i.e. arsenate) which competed with the anode for available electrons proved to be a useful indicator of microbial activity and hence life in the fuel cells. Shaken sediment slurries from these two lakes also generated electricity, with or without added lactate. Hydrogen added to sediment slurries was consumed but did not stimulate electricity production. Finally, electricity was generated in statically incubated "intact" sediment cores from these lakes. More power was produced in sediment from Mono Lake than from Searles Lake, however microbial fuel cells could detect low levels of metabolism operating under moderate and extreme conditions of salt stress.

  17. Mono Lake, California

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-10-01

    STS068-150-020 (30 September-11 October 1994) --- An exceptionally clear, high-contrast view of the desert basins east and south of Mono Lake, California. Light clouds dot the mountain ranges; the clouds were transparent to radar beams from the Space Radar Laboratory 2 (SRL-2) payload.

  18. Spirochaeta Americana Sp. Nov., A new Haloalkaliphilic, Obligately Anaerobic Spirochete Isolated from Soda Mono Lake in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Bej, Asim K.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B.; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A novel obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, haloalkaliphilic spirochete, strain ASpG1(sup T), was isolated from sediments of the alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake in California, U.S.A. The Gram-negative cells are motile and spirochete-shaped with sizes of 0.2 - 0.22 X 8-15 microns. Growth was observed over the following ranges: temperature 10 C to 44 C; optimum +37 C; NaCl concentration 2 - 12 % (w/v); optimum NaCl3 % and pH 8 - 10.5; optimum pH 9.5. The novel isolate is strictly alkaliphilic, requires high concentrations of carbonate in the medium, and is capable of utilizing D-glucose, fructose, maltose, sucrose, starch, and D-mannitol. The main end products of glucose fermentation are: H2, acetate, ethanol, and formate. Strain ASpG(sup T) is resistant to kanamycin, and rifampin, but sensitive to chloramphenicol, gentamycin and tetracycline. The G+C content of its DNA is 58.5 mol%, genome size is 2.98 x l0(exp 9) Daltons, Tm of the genomic DNA is 68 +/- 2 C, and DNA-DNA hybridization with the most closely related species, Spirocheta alkalica Strain Z-7491(sup T), exhibited 48.7% homology. On the basis of its physiological and molecular properties, the isolate appears to be a novel species of the genus Spirochaeta; and the name Spirochaeta americana sp. nov., is proposed for the taxon (type strain ASpG1(sup T) = ATCC BAA-392(sup T) = DSMZ 14872(sup T)).

  19. Spirochaeta Americana Sp. Nov., A new Haloalkaliphilic, Obligately Anaerobic Spirochete Isolated from Soda Mono Lake in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Bej, Asim K.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B.; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A novel obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, haloalkaliphilic spirochete, strain ASpG1(sup T), was isolated from sediments of the alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake in California, U.S.A. The Gram-negative cells are motile and spirochete-shaped with sizes of 0.2 - 0.22 X 8-15 microns. Growth was observed over the following ranges: temperature 10 C to 44 C; optimum +37 C; NaCl concentration 2 - 12 % (w/v); optimum NaCl3 % and pH 8 - 10.5; optimum pH 9.5. The novel isolate is strictly alkaliphilic, requires high concentrations of carbonate in the medium, and is capable of utilizing D-glucose, fructose, maltose, sucrose, starch, and D-mannitol. The main end products of glucose fermentation are: H2, acetate, ethanol, and formate. Strain ASpG(sup T) is resistant to kanamycin, and rifampin, but sensitive to chloramphenicol, gentamycin and tetracycline. The G+C content of its DNA is 58.5 mol%, genome size is 2.98 x l0(exp 9) Daltons, Tm of the genomic DNA is 68 +/- 2 C, and DNA-DNA hybridization with the most closely related species, Spirocheta alkalica Strain Z-7491(sup T), exhibited 48.7% homology. On the basis of its physiological and molecular properties, the isolate appears to be a novel species of the genus Spirochaeta; and the name Spirochaeta americana sp. nov., is proposed for the taxon (type strain ASpG1(sup T) = ATCC BAA-392(sup T) = DSMZ 14872(sup T)).

  20. NITZSCHIA OVALIS (BACILLARIOPHYCEAE) MONO LAKE STRAIN ACCUMULATES 1,4/2,5 CYCLOHEXANETETROL IN RESPONSE TO INCREASED SALINITY(1).

    PubMed

    Garza-Sánchez, Fernando; Chapman, David J; Cooper, James B

    2009-04-01

    The growth of microalgae in hypersaline conditions requires that cells accumulate osmoprotectants. In many instances, these are polyols. We isolated the diatom Nitzschia ovalis H. J. Arn. from the saline and alkaline water body Mono Lake (CA, USA). This isolate can grow in salinities ranging from 5 to 120 parts per thousand (ppt) of salt but normally at 90 ppt salinity. In this report, we identified the major polyol osmoprotectant as 1,4/2,5 cyclohexanetetrol by electron ionization-mass spectrometry (EI-MS), (1) H, (13) C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), and infrared (IR) and showed an increase in cellular concentration in response to rising salinity. This increase in the cyclitol concentration was evaluated by gas chromatography of the derived tetraacetylated cyclohexanetetrol obtaining an average of 0.7 fmol · cell(-1) at 5 ppt and rising to 22.5 fmol · cell(-1) at 120 ppt. The 1,4/2,5 cyclohexanetetrol was also detected in the red alga Porphyridium purpureum. Analysis of the free amino acid content in N. ovalis cultures exposed to changes in salinity showed that proline and lysine also accumulate with increased salinity, but the cellular concentration of these amino acids is about 10-fold lower than the concentration of 1,4/2,5 cyclohexanetetrol. The comparison of amino acid concentration per cell with cyclitol suggests that this polyol is important in compensating the cellular osmotic pressure due to increased salinity, but other physiological functions could also be considered.

  1. Pyruvate: A key Nutrient in Hypersaline Environments?

    PubMed

    Oren, Aharon

    2015-08-07

    Some of the most commonly occurring but difficult to isolate halophilic prokaryotes, Archaea as well as Bacteria, require or prefer pyruvate as carbon and energy source. The most efficient media for the enumeration and isolation of heterotrophic prokaryotes from natural environments, from freshwater to hypersaline, including the widely used R2A agar medium, contain pyruvate as a key ingredient. Examples of pyruvate-loving halophiles are the square, extremely halophilic archaeon Haloquadratum walsbyi and the halophilic gammaproteobacterium Spiribacter salinus. However, surprisingly little is known about the availability of pyruvate in natural environments and about the way it enters the cell. Some halophilic Archaea (Halorubrum saccharovorum, Haloarcula spp.) partially convert sugars and glycerol to pyruvate and other acids (acetate, lactate) which are excreted to the medium. Pyruvate formation from glycerol was also shown during a bloom of halophilic Archaea in the Dead Sea. However, no pyruvate transporters were yet identified in the genomes of halophilic Archaea, and altogether, our understanding of pyruvate transport in the prokaryote world is very limited. Therefore, the preference for pyruvate by fastidious and often elusive halophiles and the empirically proven enhanced colony recovery on agar media containing pyruvate are still poorly understood.

  2. Pyruvate: A key Nutrient in Hypersaline Environments?

    PubMed Central

    Oren, Aharon

    2015-01-01

    Some of the most commonly occurring but difficult to isolate halophilic prokaryotes, Archaea as well as Bacteria, require or prefer pyruvate as carbon and energy source. The most efficient media for the enumeration and isolation of heterotrophic prokaryotes from natural environments, from freshwater to hypersaline, including the widely used R2A agar medium, contain pyruvate as a key ingredient. Examples of pyruvate-loving halophiles are the square, extremely halophilic archaeon Haloquadratum walsbyi and the halophilic gammaproteobacterium Spiribacter salinus. However, surprisingly little is known about the availability of pyruvate in natural environments and about the way it enters the cell. Some halophilic Archaea (Halorubrum saccharovorum, Haloarcula spp.) partially convert sugars and glycerol to pyruvate and other acids (acetate, lactate) which are excreted to the medium. Pyruvate formation from glycerol was also shown during a bloom of halophilic Archaea in the Dead Sea. However, no pyruvate transporters were yet identified in the genomes of halophilic Archaea, and altogether, our understanding of pyruvate transport in the prokaryote world is very limited. Therefore, the preference for pyruvate by fastidious and often elusive halophiles and the empirically proven enhanced colony recovery on agar media containing pyruvate are still poorly understood. PMID:27682096

  3. Bacterial Dormancy Is More Prevalent in Freshwater than Hypersaline Lakes

    PubMed Central

    Aanderud, Zachary T.; Vert, Joshua C.; Lennon, Jay T.; Magnusson, Tylan W.; Breakwell, Donald P.; Harker, Alan R.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria employ a diverse array of strategies to survive under extreme environmental conditions but maintaining these adaptations comes at an energetic cost. If energy reserves drop too low, extremophiles may enter a dormant state to persist. We estimated bacterial dormancy and identified the environmental variables influencing our activity proxy in 10 hypersaline and freshwater lakes across the Western United States. Using ribosomal RNA:DNA ratios as an indicator for bacterial activity, we found that the proportion of the community exhibiting dormancy was 16% lower in hypersaline than freshwater lakes. Based on our indicator variable multiple regression results, saltier conditions in both freshwater and hypersaline lakes increased activity, suggesting that salinity was a robust environmental filter structuring bacterial activity in lake ecosystems. To a lesser degree, higher total phosphorus concentrations reduced dormancy in all lakes. Thus, even under extreme conditions, the competition for resources exerted pressure on activity. Within the compositionally distinct and less diverse hypersaline communities, abundant taxa were disproportionately active and localized in families Microbacteriaceae (Actinobacteria), Nitriliruptoraceae (Actinobacteria), and Rhodobacteraceae (Alphaproteobacteria). Our results are consistent with the view that hypersaline communities are able to capitalize on a seemingly more extreme, yet highly selective, set of conditions and finds that extremophiles may need dormancy less often to thrive and survive. PMID:27375575

  4. Hypersalinity drives physiological and morphological changes in Limia perugiae (Poeciliidae)

    PubMed Central

    Tello, Oscar; Krieger, Jonathan; Marmolejo, Arlen; Weaver, Kathleen F.; Garcia, Jerome V.; Cruz, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A fundamental question in biology is how an organism's morphology and physiology are shaped by its environment. Here, we evaluate the effects of a hypersaline environment on the morphology and physiology of a population of livebearing fish in the genus Limia (Poeciliidae). We sampled from two populations of Limia perugiae (one freshwater and one hypersaline) in the southwest Dominican Republic. We evaluated relative abundance of osmoregulatory proteins using western blot analyses and used a geometric morphometric approach to evaluate fine-scale changes to size and shape. Our data show that gill tissue isolated from hypersaline fish contained approximately two and a half times higher expression of Na+/K+ ATPase proteins. We also show evidence for mitochondrial changes within the gills, with eight times more complex I and four times higher expression of ATP synthase within the gill tissue from the hypersaline population. The energetic consequences to Limia living in saline and hypersaline environments may be a driver for phenotypic diversity, reducing the overall body size and changing the relative size and shape of the head, as well as impeding the growth of secondary sex features among the males. PMID:27402966

  5. Mono County update

    SciTech Connect

    Lyster, D. )

    1988-12-01

    The Mono County Board of Supervisors approved the issuance of a use-permit for the Mammoth-Pacific II geothermal power plant. The power plant will be a binary, air-cooled, 10-megawatt, net, project. An appeal was filed by the California Department of Fish and Game, and the permit will not take effect until this appeal is resolved. Mono County also issued a project use-permit to proposers of Bonneville Pacific Corporations Mammoth Chance Geothermal Project, also a 10-megawatt, net, binary and air-cooled project. The permit was appealed by the Sierra Club, Cal-Trout, and the California Department of Fish and Game. Now, a subsequent EIR must be prepared for public review and comment. The subsequent EIR will address the issue of cumulative impacts and will include a discussion of new information.

  6. Mono County update

    SciTech Connect

    Lyster, D.L.

    1987-07-01

    In May 1987, the Mono County Energy Management Department recommended that a two-year moratorium be placed on geothermal power production projects on private lands within the Mono-Long Valley KGRA. The intent of the proposed moratorium was to allow for the collection and evaluation of hydrologic monitoring data in the Long Valley Caldera. Now, to still achieve this end, the Energy Management Department will suggest that mitigation measures and project-specific monitoring requirements be implemented via the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) documentation and the county use permit process. The monitoring data will provide important information to Mono County decision-makers regarding potential adverse impacts from geothermal production on such local resources as Hot Creek Gorge, the Hot Creek Fish Hatchery, and Hot Creek, itself. The Mammoth/Chance Geothermal Project is the proposed construction and operation of a 10 megawatt, net, geothermal binary-cycle power plant and production- and injection-well field by Bonneville Pacific Corporation. The project is currently under environmental review, pursuant to CEQA requirements. The Mono County Energy Management Director is providing assistance to the Town of Mammoth Lakes on its California Energy Commission (CEC) grant-funded resource assessment project. The grant of $220,000 provides for the drilling of at least two temperature-gradient wells (exploratory wells) within the town limits. If a geothermal resource is detected and found to provide adequate flows at a suitable temperature, the Town of Mammoth Lakes will proceed in the development of a geothermal space-heating system to provide heat to such users as the Centinela Mammoth Hospital, Mammoth elementary and high schools, the Gateway Industrial Park, and future residential development projects.

  7. Mono County update

    SciTech Connect

    Lyster, D.L.

    1987-06-01

    On February 9, 1988, the Mono County Board of Supervisors voted to approve Bonneville Pacific Corporation's Mammoth Chance Geothermal Project. The project is an air-cooled, binary, geothermal power plant, 10 megawatts, net. The Mono County Board of Supervisors issued a project use-permit with vigorous and stringent conditions. Specific emphasis was placed on the establishment of a monitoring program designed to detect the effects of geothermal development on the springs at the Hot Creek Fish Hatchery and Hot Creek Gorge. On October 5, 1987, the Mono County Planning Commission granted a use-permit to Mammoth Pacific for its Mammoth Pacific II Project, a binary, air-cooled, geothermal power plant, 10 megawatts, net. The issuance of the use-permit instigated an appeal by the Sierra Club. That appeal was heard on February 22, 1988, At the end of the testimony, the Board of Supervisors voted to uphold the appeal of the Sierra Club, thereby denying the project by a vote of 3 to 2. The main areas of concern voiced by the majority of the Board included potential hydrologic impacts to Hot Creek Gorge and Hot Creek Fish Hatchery, visual impacts, and impacts to mule deer migration and survival. One of the options now available to Mammoth Pacific is to request that the project be denied without prejudice. This would allow Mammoth Pacific to return to the Board immediately with additional material regarding its concerns.

  8. Culture-independent approaches for studying viruses from hypersaline environments.

    PubMed

    Santos, Fernando; Yarza, Pablo; Parro, Víctor; Meseguer, Inmaculada; Rosselló-Móra, Ramon; Antón, Josefa

    2012-03-01

    Hypersaline close-to-saturation environments harbor an extremely high concentration of virus-like particles, but the number of haloviruses isolated so far is still very low. Haloviruses can be directly studied from natural samples by using different culture-independent techniques that include transmission electron microscopy, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and different metagenomic approaches. Here, we review the findings of these studies, with a main focus on the metagenomic approaches. The analysis of bulk viral nucleic acids directly retrieved from the environment allows estimations of viral diversity, activity, and dynamics and tentative host assignment. Results point to a diverse and active viral community in constant interplay with its hosts and to a "hypersalineness" quality common to viral assemblages present in hypersaline environments that are thousands of kilometers away from each other.

  9. Microbial diversity in hypersaline wastewater: the example of tanneries.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, O; Vasudevan, N; Thanasekaran, K; Moletta, R; Godon, J J

    2006-12-01

    In contrast to conventional wastewater treatment plants and saline environments, little is known regarding the microbial diversity of hypersaline wastewater. In this study, the microbial communities of a hypersaline tannery effluent, and those of three treatment systems operating with the tannery effluent, were investigated using 16S rDNA phylogenetic markers. The comparative analysis of 377 bacterial sequences revealed the high diversity of this type of hypersaline environment, clustering within 193 phylotypes (> or = 97% similarity) and covering 14 of the 52 divisions of the bacterial domain, i.e. Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Chlorobi, Planctomycetes, Spirochaetes, Synergistes, Chloroflexi, Thermotogae, Verrucomicrobia, OP3, OP11 and TM7. Most of the phylotypes were related to halophilic and pollutant-degrading bacteria. Using statistical analysis, the diversity of this type of environment was compared to that of other environmental samples selected on the basis of their salinity, oxygen content and organic load.

  10. The enigma of prokaryotic life in deep hypersaline anoxic basins.

    PubMed

    van der Wielen, Paul W J J; Bolhuis, Henk; Borin, Sara; Daffonchio, Daniele; Corselli, Cesare; Giuliano, Laura; D'Auria, Giuseppe; de Lange, Gert J; Huebner, Andreas; Varnavas, Sotirios P; Thomson, John; Tamburini, Christian; Marty, Danielle; McGenity, Terry J; Timmis, Kenneth N

    2005-01-07

    Deep hypersaline anoxic basins in the Mediterranean Sea are a legacy of dissolution of ancient subterranean salt deposits from the Miocene period. Our study revealed that these hypersaline basins are not biogeochemical dead ends, but support in situ sulfate reduction, methanogenesis, and heterotrophic activity. A wide diversity of prokaryotes was observed, including a new, abundant, deeply branching order within the Euryarchaeota. Furthermore, we demonstrated the presence of a unique, metabolically active microbial community in the Discovery basin, which is one of the most extreme terrestrial saline environments known, as it is almost saturated with MgCl2 (5 M).

  11. Mono County geothermal activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lyster, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    Three geothermal projects have been proposed or are underway in Mono County, California. The Mammoth/Chance geothermal development project plans to construct a 10-MW geothermal binary power plant which will include 8 production and 3 injection wells. Pacific Lighting Energy Systems is also planning a 10-MW binary power plant consisting of 5 geothermal wells and up to 4 injection wells. A geothermal research project near Mammoth Lakes has spudded a well to provide a way to periodically measure temperature gradient, pressure, and chemistry of the thermal waters and to investigate the space-heating potential of the area in the vicinity of Mammoth Lakes. All three projects are briefly described.

  12. Capillary electrophoresis of neutral carbohydrates: mono-, oligosaccharides, glycosides.

    PubMed

    Campa, Cristiana; Rossi, Marco

    2008-01-01

    This chapter reports an overview of the recent advances in the analysis of neutral sugars by capillary electrophoresis (CE); furthermore, some relevant reviews and research articles in the field are tabulated. Comparison of CE with chromatography is also presented, with special attention to separation efficiency and sensitivity. The main routes aimed at pretreatment and CE analysis of uncharged mono-, oligosaccharides, and glycosides are described. Representative examples of such procedures are reported in detail, upon describing robust methodologies for the study of (1) neutral mono- and oligosaccharides derivatized by reductive amination and by formation of glycosylamines; (2) underivatized mono- and di-saccharides analyzed using highly alkaline buffers; and (3) anomeric couples of glycosides separated using borate-based buffers.

  13. Depth distribution of microbial diversity in Mono Lake, a meromictic soda lake in California.

    PubMed

    Humayoun, Shaheen B; Bano, Nasreen; Hollibaugh, James T

    2003-02-01

    We analyzed the variation with depth in the composition of members of the domain Bacteria in samples from alkaline, hypersaline, and currently meromictic Mono Lake in California. DNA samples were collected from the mixolimnion (2 m), the base of the oxycline (17.5 m), the upper chemocline (23 m), and the monimolimnion (35 m). Composition was assessed by sequencing randomly selected cloned fragments of 16S rRNA genes retrieved from the DNA samples. Most of the 212 sequences retrieved from the samples fell into five major lineages of the domain Bacteria: alpha- and gamma-Proteobacteria (6 and 10%, respectively), Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides (19%), high-G+C-content gram-positive organisms (Actinobacteria; 25%), and low-G+C-content gram-positive organisms (Bacillus and Clostridium; 19%). Twelve percent were identified as chloroplasts. The remaining 9% represented beta- and delta-Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobiales, and candidate divisions. Mixolimnion and oxycline samples had low microbial diversity, with only 9 and 12 distinct phylotypes, respectively, whereas chemocline and monimolimnion samples were more diverse, containing 27 and 25 phylotypes, respectively. The compositions of microbial assemblages from the mixolimnion and oxycline were not significantly different from each other (P = 0.314 and 0.877), but they were significantly different from those of chemocline and monimolimnion assemblages (P < 0.001), and the compositions of chemocline and monimolimnion assemblages were not significantly different from each other (P = 0.006 and 0.124). The populations of sequences retrieved from the mixolimnion and oxycline samples were dominated by sequences related to high-G+C-content gram-positive bacteria (49 and 63%, respectively) distributed in only three distinct phylotypes, while the population of sequences retrieved from the monimolimnion sample was dominated (52%) by sequences related to low-G+C-content gram-positive bacteria distributed in 12 distinct

  14. How Long Is Mono Contagious?

    MedlinePlus

    ... it is contagious. Once someone gets mono, the virus stays in that person's body for life. That doesn't mean that you are always ... as long as 18 months. After that, the virus remains dormant (inactive) in the body for the rest of a person's life. If you've had mono, the virus can ...

  15. Ophiuroids Discovered in the Middle Triassic Hypersaline Environment

    PubMed Central

    Salamon, Mariusz A.; Niedźwiedzki, Robert; Lach, Rafał; Brachaniec, Tomasz; Gorzelak, Przemysław

    2012-01-01

    Echinoderms have long been considered to be one of the animal phyla that is strictly marine. However, there is growing evidence that some recent species may live in either brackish or hypersaline environments. Surprisingly, discoveries of fossil echinoderms in non-(open)marine paleoenvironments are lacking. In Wojkowice Quarry (Southern Poland), sediments of lowermost part of the Middle Triassic are exposed. In limestone layer with cellular structures and pseudomorphs after gypsum, two dense accumulations of articulated ophiuroids (Aspiduriella similis (Eck)) were documented. The sediments with ophiuroids were formed in environment of increased salinity waters as suggested by paleontological, sedimentological, petrographical and geochemical data. Discovery of Triassic hypersaline ophiuroids invalidates the paleontological assumption that fossil echinoderms are indicators of fully marine conditions. Thus caution needs to be taken when using fossil echinoderms in paleoenvironmental reconstructions. PMID:23185442

  16. Culture-Independent Approaches for Studying Viruses from Hypersaline Environments

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Fernando; Yarza, Pablo; Parro, Víctor; Meseguer, Inmaculada; Rosselló-Móra, Ramon

    2012-01-01

    Hypersaline close-to-saturation environments harbor an extremely high concentration of virus-like particles, but the number of haloviruses isolated so far is still very low. Haloviruses can be directly studied from natural samples by using different culture-independent techniques that include transmission electron microscopy, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and different metagenomic approaches. Here, we review the findings of these studies, with a main focus on the metagenomic approaches. The analysis of bulk viral nucleic acids directly retrieved from the environment allows estimations of viral diversity, activity, and dynamics and tentative host assignment. Results point to a diverse and active viral community in constant interplay with its hosts and to a “hypersalineness” quality common to viral assemblages present in hypersaline environments that are thousands of kilometers away from each other. PMID:22247131

  17. Heterotrophic denitrification at extremely high salt and pH by haloalkaliphilic Gammaproteobacteria from hypersaline soda lakes

    PubMed Central

    Shapovalova, A. A.; Khijniak, T. V.; Tourova, T. P.; Muyzer, G.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we describe denitrification at extremely high salt and pH in sediments from hypersaline alkaline soda lakes and soda soils. Experiments with sediment slurries demonstrated the presence of acetate-utilizing denitrifying populations active at in situ conditions. Anaerobic enrichment cultures at pH 10 and 4 M total Na+ with acetate as electron donor and nitrate, nitrite and N2O as electron acceptors resulted in the dominance of Gammaproteobacteria belonging to the genus Halomonas. Both mixed and pure culture studies identified nitrite and N2O reduction as rate-limiting steps in the denitrification process at extremely haloalkaline conditions. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00792-008-0166-6) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:18452025

  18. Discovery of anaerobic lithoheterotrophic haloarchaea, ubiquitous in hypersaline habitats.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Messina, Enzo; Smedile, Francesco; Roman, Pawel; Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe; Ciordia, Sergio; Mena, Maria Carmen; Ferrer, Manuel; Golyshin, Peter N; Kublanov, Ilya V; Samarov, Nazar I; Toshchakov, Stepan V; La Cono, Violetta; Yakimov, Michail M

    2017-05-01

    Hypersaline anoxic habitats harbour numerous novel uncultured archaea whose metabolic and ecological roles remain to be elucidated. Until recently, it was believed that energy generation via dissimilatory reduction of sulfur compounds is not functional at salt saturation conditions. Recent discovery of the strictly anaerobic acetotrophic Halanaeroarchaeum compels to change both this assumption and the traditional view on haloarchaea as aerobic heterotrophs. Here we report on isolation and characterization of a novel group of strictly anaerobic lithoheterotrophic haloarchaea, which we propose to classify as a new genus Halodesulfurarchaeum. Members of this previously unknown physiological group are capable of utilising formate or hydrogen as electron donors and elemental sulfur, thiosulfate or dimethylsulfoxide as electron acceptors. Using genome-wide proteomic analysis we have detected the full set of enzymes required for anaerobic respiration and analysed their substrate-specific expression. Such advanced metabolic plasticity and type of respiration, never seen before in haloarchaea, empower the wide distribution of Halodesulfurarchaeum in hypersaline inland lakes, solar salterns, lagoons and deep submarine anoxic brines. The discovery of this novel functional group of sulfur-respiring haloarchaea strengthens the evidence of their possible role in biogeochemical sulfur cycling linked to the terminal anaerobic carbon mineralisation in so far overlooked hypersaline anoxic habitats.

  19. MonoColor CMOS sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ynjiun P.

    2009-02-01

    A new breed of CMOS color sensor called MonoColor sensor is developed for a barcode reading application in AIDC industry. The RGBW color filter array (CFA) in a MonoColor sensor is arranged in a 8 x 8 pixels CFA with only 4 pixels of them are color (RGB) pixels and the rest of 60 pixels are transparent or monochrome. Since the majority of pixels are monochrome, MonoColor sensor maintains 98% barcode decode performance compared with a pure monochrome CMOS sensor. With the help of monochrome and color pixel fusion technique, the resulting color pictures have similar color quality in terms of Color Semantic Error (CSE) compared with a Bayer pattern (RGB) CMOS color camera. Since monochrome pixels are more sensitive than color pixels, a MonoColor sensor produces in general about 2X brighter color picture and higher luminance pixel resolution.

  20. Ancient Life at the Extremes: Molecular Fossils and Paleoenvironmental Contexts of a Neoproterozoic Hypersaline Setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schinteie, R.; Brocks, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    We present the first molecular investigation of the biotic composition and biogeochemistry of an evaporitic, hypersaline environment from the Neoproterozoic (~800 Ma). Through detailed analyses of both sedimentary textures and their lipid biomarkers, we provide the oldest evidence of organisms that could exist at extremely saline conditions. Such research is timely, since the discovery of evaporite deposits on Mars highlights the need to understand their capacities as biological archives. Samples for this study were derived from evaporitic sediments of the Neoproterozoic Bitter Springs Formation, Amadeus Basin, central Australia. Due to the broad shallow nature of the basin and a tenuous connection with the ocean, the water was characterized by elevated salinity levels during that time. As a result, thick (100 m to >2000 m) evaporite units were deposited. All samples for this study were derived from drill cores held at Geoscience Australia (Canberra) and at the Northern Territory Geological Survey at Alice Springs. We extracted biomarkers from evaporitic sediments composed of dolomite, anhydrite and/or halite. The dolomite layers commonly assume the shape of microbial mat-like formations that exhibit roll-up structures and tearing. Framboidal pyrite was commonly associated with the dolomite and together with other textural and stable isotopic data provide the oldest putative evidence for biologically-induced dolomite precipitation. Full scan gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS) of the saturate fractions of these evaporites revealed high ratios of mono-and dimethylalkanes relative to n-alkanes. Such a pattern is typical of Precambrian and Cambrian samples. These molecules, together with elevated relative concentrations of n-C17, provide evidence of a photoautotrophic community - especially cyanobacteria. A further outstanding characteristic of these samples are the presence of several pseudohomologous series of both regular (to C25) and irregular (to C40

  1. MAGNESIUM MONO POTASSIUM PHOSPHATE GROUT FOR P-REACTOR VESSEL IN-SITU DECOMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.; Stefanko, D.

    2011-01-05

    The objective of this report is to document laboratory testing of magnesium mono potassium phosphate grouts for P-Reactor vessel in-situ decommissioning. Magnesium mono potassium phosphate cement-based grout was identified as candidate material for filling (physically stabilizing) the 105-P Reactor vessel (RV) because it is less alkaline than portland cement-based grout (pH of about 12.4). A less alkaline material ({<=} 10.5) was desired to address a potential materials compatibility issue caused by corrosion of aluminum metal in highly alkaline environments such as that encountered in portland cement grouts. Information concerning access points into the P-Reactor vessel and amount of aluminum metal in the vessel is provided elsewhere. Fresh and cured properties were measured for: (1) commercially blended magnesium mono potassium phosphate packaged grouts, (2) commercially available binders blended with inert fillers at SRNL, (3) grouts prepared from technical grade MgO and KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} and inert fillers (quartz sands, Class F fly ash), and (4) Ceramicrete{reg_sign} magnesium mono potassium phosphate-based grouts prepared at Argonne National Laboratory. Boric acid was evaluated as a set retarder in the magnesium mono potassium phosphate mixes.

  2. Mono Lake Analog Mars Sample Return Expedition for AMASE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, P. G.; Steele, A.; Younse, P.; DiCicco, M.; Morgan, A. R.; Backes, P.; Eigenbrode, J. E.; Marquardt, D.; Amundsen, H. E. F.

    2011-01-01

    We explored the performance of one robotic prototype for sample acquisition and caching of martian materials that has been developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for potential use in the proposed MAX-C Mars Sample Return architecture in an environment, rich in chemical diversity with a variety of mineralogical textures. Mono Lake State Tufa Reserve in Mono County, CA possesses a variety of minerals including a variety of evaporites, volcanic glass and lava, and sand and mudstones. The lake itself is an interesting chemical system: the water is highly alkaline (pH is approximately 10) and contains concentrations of Cl, K, B, with lesser amounts of S Ca Mg, F, As, Li, I and Wand generally enriched HREEs. There are also traces of radioactive elements U, Th, Pl.

  3. Block Copolymers for Alkaline Fuel Cell Membrane Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-30

    113 CHAPTER 5 MONO METHOXY POLY( ETHYLENE GLYCOL) GRAFTED BLOCK COPOLYMERS FOR ALKALINE EXCHANGE MEMBRANE...polystyrene-poly( ethylene -co-butylene)-polystyrene (SEBS) copolymer.[37, 42] Chloromethylation of the polystyrene block and trimethylamine...temperature. The same graft and functionalization strategy was applied to poly( ethylene -co- tetrafluoroethylene) (ETFE) film leading to a promising

  4. The microbial arsenic cycle in Mono Lake, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, Ronald S.; Stolz, John F.; Hollibaugh, James T.

    2004-01-01

    Significant concentrations of dissolved inorganic arsenic can be found in the waters of a number of lakes located in the western USA and in other water bodies around the world. These lakes are often situated in arid, volcanic terrain. The highest concentrations of arsenic occur in hypersaline, closed basin soda lakes and their remnant brines. Although arsenic is a well-known toxicant to eukaryotes and prokaryotes alike, some prokaryotes have evolved biochemical mechanisms to exploit arsenic oxyanions (i.e., arsenate and arsenite); they can use them either as an electron acceptor for anaerobic respiration (arsenate), or as an electron donor (arsenite) to support chemoautotrophic fixation of CO2 into cell carbon. Unlike in freshwater or marine ecosystems, these processes may assume quantitative significance with respect to the carbon cycle in arsenic-rich soda lakes. For the past several years our research has focused on the occurrence and biogeochemical manifestations of these processes in Mono Lake, a particularly arsenic-rich environment. Herein we review some of our findings concerning the biogeochemical arsenic cycle in this lake, with the hope that it may broaden the understanding of the influence of microorganisms upon the speciation of arsenic in more common, less “extreme” environments, such as drinking water aquifers.

  5. The microbial arsenic cycle in Mono Lake, California.

    PubMed

    Oremland, Ronald S; Stolz, John F; Hollibaugh, James T

    2004-04-01

    Significant concentrations of dissolved inorganic arsenic can be found in the waters of a number of lakes located in the western USA and in other water bodies around the world. These lakes are often situated in arid, volcanic terrain. The highest concentrations of arsenic occur in hypersaline, closed basin soda lakes and their remnant brines. Although arsenic is a well-known toxicant to eukaryotes and prokaryotes alike, some prokaryotes have evolved biochemical mechanisms to exploit arsenic oxyanions (i.e., arsenate and arsenite); they can use them either as an electron acceptor for anaerobic respiration (arsenate), or as an electron donor (arsenite) to support chemoautotrophic fixation of CO(2) into cell carbon. Unlike in freshwater or marine ecosystems, these processes may assume quantitative significance with respect to the carbon cycle in arsenic-rich soda lakes. For the past several years our research has focused on the occurrence and biogeochemical manifestations of these processes in Mono Lake, a particularly arsenic-rich environment. Herein we review some of our findings concerning the biogeochemical arsenic cycle in this lake, with the hope that it may broaden the understanding of the influence of microorganisms upon the speciation of arsenic in more common, less "extreme" environments, such as drinking water aquifers.

  6. Nutrient, sulfur and carbon dynamics in a hypersaline lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotner, James B.; Suplee, Michael W.; Chen, Nai Wei; Shormann, David E.

    2004-04-01

    We measured benthic and water column fluxes in a hypersaline coastal system (Baffin Bay, Texas) in 1996-1997, a period of decreasing salinity (increased freshwater input) and turbidity. Salinity decreased from a mean of 60 to 32 practical salinity units (psu) and turbidity decreased from a mean of 78 to 25 NTU over the study period. Associated with hydrological changes, there were important changes in nutrient fluxes and metabolism. There was a shift of total respiration from the water column to the sediments and an increased amount of the benthic metabolism (2-67%) was attributed to sulfate reduction in this system when salinity was lowest, perhaps a consequence of increased benthic light levels and photosynthetic production of labile carbon in the sediments. The sediments were a large sink for both N and P. Sediment particulate C:N (9.8) and C:P (119) ratios were lower than those in the water column. However, ammonium:phosphate fluxes increased coincident with increased sulfate reduction rates and porewater sulfide concentrations. Efficient N-retention mediated through dissimilative nitrate reduction to ammonium, and high rates of N-fixation in shallow, hypersaline systems may facilitate transitions from N-limitation to P-limitation. During the most hypersaline period, seston exhibited some of the most extreme nutrient ratios ever reported for a marine ecosystem (C:N 10-37 and C:P 200-1200) and suggest that plankton are likely to be P-limited or are very well adapted to low P availability. When salinity and N:P and C:P ratios were highest, the plankton was dominated by a brown tide alga ( Aureoumbra lagunensis), supporting evidence that this organism is adapted to low P, long residence time systems.

  7. Fungal communities of young and mature hypersaline microbial mats.

    PubMed

    Cantrell, Sharon A; Tkavc, Rok; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina; Zalar, Polona; Acevedo, Manuel; Báez-Félix, Claribel

    2013-01-01

    Microbial mats are a laminated organic-sedimentary ecosystem, found in a wide range of habitats. Fluctuating diel and seasonal physicochemical gradients characterize these ecosystems, resulting in both strata and microenvironments that harbor specific microbial communities. This study was undertaken to compare two types of microbial mats across seasons to further understand the structure of fungal communities in hypersaline microbial mats and their seasonal dynamics. The structure and diversity of fungal communities was documented in young transient and mature hypersaline microbial mats from a tropical region (Puerto Rico) using one culture-dependent and three culture-independent molecular techniques based on the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of ribosomal DNA: terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP), denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and clone libraries. Two microbial mats (one young and transient, one mature) were sampled in Nov 2007 (wet season), Jan 2008 (intermediate season) and Mar 2008 (dry season) in the Cabo Rojo Solar Salterns on the southwestern coast of Puerto Rico. Traditional and molecular techniques revealed strong spatial and temporal heterogeneities in both microbial mats. Higher abundance of isolates and phylotypes were observed during the wet season, and diversity decreased from the top (oxic) to the bottom (anoxic) layers in both seasons. Some of the species isolated belong to the genera Aspergillus, Cladosporium, Hortaea, Pichia and Wallemia, which often are isolated from hypersaline environments. The most abundant clones belong to Acremonium strictum and Cladosporium halotolerans, which were not isolated in pure culture. The differences observed using culture-based and molecular techniques demonstrates the need of combining methods to study the diversity of fungi in a given substrate.

  8. Algal fossils from a late precambrian, hypersaline lagoon.

    PubMed

    Oehler, D Z; Oehler, J H; Stewart, A J

    1979-07-27

    Organically preserved algal microfossils from the Ringwood evaporite deposit in the Gillen Member of the Bitter Springs Formation (late Precambrian of central Australia) are of small size, low diversity, and probable prokaryotic affinities. These rather primitive characteristics appear to reflect the stressful conditions that prevailed in a periodically stagnant, hypersaline lagoon. This assemblage (especially in comparison with the much more diverse assemblages preserved in the Loves Creek Member of the same formation) illustrates the potential utility of Proterozoic microbiotas for basin analysis and local stratigraphic correlation and demonstrates the need to base evolutionary considerations and Precambrian intercontinental biostratigraphy on biotas that inhabited less restricted environments.

  9. Anaerobic oxidation of methane in hypersaline cold seep sediments.

    PubMed

    Maignien, Loïs; Parkes, R John; Cragg, Barry; Niemann, Helge; Knittel, Katrin; Coulon, Stephanie; Akhmetzhanov, Andrey; Boon, Nico

    2013-01-01

    Life in hypersaline environments is typically limited by bioenergetic constraints. Microbial activity at the thermodynamic edge, such as the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulphate reduction (SR), is thus unlikely to thrive in these environments. In this study, carbon and sulphur cycling was investigated in the extremely hypersaline cold seep sediments of Mercator mud volcano. AOM activity was partially inhibited but still present at salinity levels of 292 g L(-1) (c. eightfold sea water concentration) with rates of 2.3 nmol cm(-3) day(-1) and was even detectable under saturated conditions. Methane and evaporite-derived sulphate comigrated in the ascending geofluids, which, in combination with a partial activity inhibition, resulted in AOM activity being spread over unusually wide depth intervals. Up to 79% of total cells in the AOM zone were identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) as anaerobic methanotrophs of the ANME-1. Most ANME-1 cells formed monospecific chains without any attached partner. At all sites, AOM activity co-occurred with SR activity and sometimes significantly exceeded it. Possible causes of these unexpected results are discussed. This study demonstrates that in spite of a very low energy yield of AOM, microorganisms carrying this reaction can thrive in salinity up to halite saturation.

  10. Lipid Biomarkers for a Hypersaline Microbial Mat Community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda L.; Embaye, Tsege; Turk, Kendra A.

    2003-01-01

    The use of lipid biomarkers and their carbon isotopic compositions are valuable tools for establishing links to ancient microbial ecosystems. As witnessed by the stromatolite record, benthic microbial mats grew in shallow water lagoonal environments where microorganisms had virtually no competition apart from the harsh conditions of hypersalinity, desiccation and intense light. Today, the modern counterparts of these microbial ecosystems find appropriate niches in only a few places where extremes eliminate eukaryotic grazers. Answers to many outstanding questions about the evolution of microorganisms and their environments on early Earth are best answered through study of these extant analogs. Lipids associated with various groups of bacteria can be valuable biomarkers for identification of specific groups of microorganisms both in ancient organic-rich sedimentary rocks (geolipids) and contemporary microbial communities (membrane lipids). Use of compound specific isotope analysis adds additional refinement to the identification of biomarker source, so that it is possible to take advantage of the 3C-depletions associated with various functional groups of organisms (i.e. autotrophs, heterotrophs, methanotrophs, methanogens) responsible for the cycling of carbon within a microbial community. Our recent work has focused on a set of hypersaline evaporation ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico which support the abundant growth of Microcoleus-dominated microbial mats. Specific biomarkers for diatoms, cyanobacteria, archaea, green nonsulfur (GNS), sulfate reducing, and methanotrophic bacteria have been identified. Analyses of the ester-bound fatty acids indicate a highly diverse microbial community, dominated by photosynthetic organisms at the surface.

  11. Lipid Biomarkers for a Hypersaline Microbial Mat Community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda L.; Embaye, Tsege; Turk, Kendra A.

    2003-01-01

    The use of lipid biomarkers and their carbon isotopic compositions are valuable tools for establishing links to ancient microbial ecosystems. As witnessed by the stromatolite record, benthic microbial mats grew in shallow water lagoonal environments where microorganisms had virtually no competition apart from the harsh conditions of hypersalinity, desiccation and intense light. Today, the modern counterparts of these microbial ecosystems find appropriate niches in only a few places where extremes eliminate eukaryotic grazers. Answers to many outstanding questions about the evolution of microorganisms and their environments on early Earth are best answered through study of these extant analogs. Lipids associated with various groups of bacteria can be valuable biomarkers for identification of specific groups of microorganisms both in ancient organic-rich sedimentary rocks (geolipids) and contemporary microbial communities (membrane lipids). Use of compound specific isotope analysis adds additional refinement to the identification of biomarker source, so that it is possible to take advantage of the 3C-depletions associated with various functional groups of organisms (i.e. autotrophs, heterotrophs, methanotrophs, methanogens) responsible for the cycling of carbon within a microbial community. Our recent work has focused on a set of hypersaline evaporation ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico which support the abundant growth of Microcoleus-dominated microbial mats. Specific biomarkers for diatoms, cyanobacteria, archaea, green nonsulfur (GNS), sulfate reducing, and methanotrophic bacteria have been identified. Analyses of the ester-bound fatty acids indicate a highly diverse microbial community, dominated by photosynthetic organisms at the surface.

  12. Differences in lateral gene transfer in hypersaline versus thermal environments.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Matthew E; Spear, John R; Oren, Aharon; House, Christopher H

    2011-07-08

    The role of lateral gene transfer (LGT) in the evolution of microorganisms is only beginning to be understood. While most LGT events occur between closely related individuals, inter-phylum and inter-domain LGT events are not uncommon. These distant transfer events offer potentially greater fitness advantages and it is for this reason that these "long distance" LGT events may have significantly impacted the evolution of microbes. One mechanism driving distant LGT events is microbial transformation. Theoretically, transformative events can occur between any two species provided that the DNA of one enters the habitat of the other. Two categories of microorganisms that are well-known for LGT are the thermophiles and halophiles. We identified potential inter-class LGT events into both a thermophilic class of Archaea (Thermoprotei) and a halophilic class of Archaea (Halobacteria). We then categorized these LGT genes as originating in thermophiles and halophiles respectively. While more than 68% of transfer events into Thermoprotei taxa originated in other thermophiles, less than 11% of transfer events into Halobacteria taxa originated in other halophiles. Our results suggest that there is a fundamental difference between LGT in thermophiles and halophiles. We theorize that the difference lies in the different natures of the environments. While DNA degrades rapidly in thermal environments due to temperature-driven denaturization, hypersaline environments are adept at preserving DNA. Furthermore, most hypersaline environments, as topographical minima, are natural collectors of cellular debris. Thus halophiles would in theory be exposed to a greater diversity and quantity of extracellular DNA than thermophiles.

  13. Controls on the pH of hyper-saline lakes - A lesson from the Dead Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golan, Rotem; Gavrieli, Ittai; Ganor, Jiwchar; Lazar, Boaz

    2016-01-01

    The pH of aqueous environments is determined by the dominant buffer systems of the water, defined operationally as total alkalinity (TA). The major buffer systems in the modern ocean are carbonic and boric acids of which the species bicarbonate, carbonate and borate make up about 77%, 19% and 4% of the TA, respectively. During the course of seawater evaporation (e.g. lagoons) the residual brine loses considerable portion of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and carbonate alkalinity (CA) already at the early stages of evaporation. DIC and CA decrease due to massive precipitation of CaCO3, while total boron (TB) increases conservatively, turning borate to the dominant alkalinity species in marine derived brines. In the present work we assess the apparent dissociation constant value of boric acid (KB‧) in saline and hypersaline waters, using the Dead Sea (DS) as a case study. We explain the DS low pH (∼6.3) and the effect of the boric and carbonic acid pK‧-s on the behavior of the brine's buffer system, including the pH increase that results from brine dilution. The KB‧ in DS was estimated from TB, TA, DIC and pH data measured in this study and early empirical data on artificial DS brines containing just carbonic acid. The KB‧ value was corroborated by Pitzer ion interaction model calculations using PHREEQC thermodynamic code applied to the chemical composition of the DS. Our results show that KB‧ increases considerably with the brine's ionic strength, reaching in the DS to a factor of 100 higher than in ;mean; seawater. Based on theoretical calculations and analyses of other natural brines it is suggested that brines' composition is a major factor in determining the KB‧ value and in turn the pH of such brines. We show that the higher the proportion of divalent cations in the brine the higher the dissociation constants of the weak acids (presumably due to formation of complexes). The low pH of the Dead Sea is accordingly explained by its extremely

  14. Methanogenesis in hypersaline environments -Analogs for Ancient Mars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebout, Brad; Chanton, Jeff; Kelley, Cheryl; Tazaz, Amanda; Poole, Jennifer; García Maldonado, José Q.; López Cortés, Alejandro

    The recent findings of evidence of large bodies of hypersaline water which existed in the past on Mars have underscored the need to investigate those environments for evidence of past, as well as extant, life. Methane, a key biomarker gas, has been reported in the atmosphere of Mars, and is known to be produced by microbial mats which are present in most hypersaline environments on Earth. Modern microbial mat communities are thought to be extant analogues of communities which were present early in Earth's geologic history, when environmental condition on Earth and Mars were similar. Because methane may be an indication of life (biogenic methane) but might also be a consequence of geologic activity (abiotic methane) and/or the thermal alteration of ancient organic matter (thermogenic methane), the stable isotopic composition of methane (both carbon and hydrogen) will be a key criterion for determining whether or not the methane on Mars is biologically produced, and if so, how recently (i.e., biogenic vs. thermogenic methane). The goals of our study are: a) to document the range of the stable isotopic composition of methane (both carbon and hydrogen) in hypersaline environments, and b) to understand the role of biology in generating that stable isotopic composition. Our results will help provide a framework for the interpretation of methane stable isotopic data from Mars. We have measured high concentrations of methane in bubbles of gas present in the Guerrero Negro hypersaline ecosystem, Baja California Mexico and in salt ponds on the San Francisco Bay. These bubbles are present both in sediments underlying microbial mats (including one site where methane constitutes nearly 40% by volume of the bubbles), as well as in areas not colonized by microbial mats; layers of evaporitic minerals in some areas trap gas containing high concentrations of methane. The carbon isotopic (δ 13 C) composition of the methane in collected bubbles exhibited an extremely wide range of

  15. Impacts of hypersaline acclimation on the acute toxicity of the organophosphate chlorpyrifos to salmonids.

    PubMed

    Maryoung, Lindley A; Lavado, Ramon; Schlenk, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    Acclimation to hypersaline conditions enhances the acute toxicity of certain thioether organophosphate and carbamate pesticides in some species of euryhaline fish. As the organophosphate chlorpyrifos is commonly detected in salmonid waterways, the impacts of hypersaline conditions on its toxicity were examined. In contrast to other previously examined pesticides, time to death by chlorpyrifos was more rapid in freshwater than in hypersaline water (16ppth). The median lethal time (LT50) after 100μg/L chlorpyrifos exposure was 49h (95% CI: 31-78) and 120h (95% CI: 89-162) for rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in freshwater and those acclimated to hypersaline conditions, respectively. Previous studies with hypersaline acclimated fish indicated induction of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes that may detoxify chlorpyrifos. In the current study, chlorpyrifos metabolism was unaltered in liver and gill microsomes of freshwater and hypersaline acclimated fish. Acetylcholinesterase inhibition in brain and bioavailability of chlorpyrifos from the aqueous exposure media were also unchanged. In contrast, mRNA expression of neurological targets: calcium calmodulin dependent protein kinase II delta, chloride intracellular channel 4, and G protein alpha i1 were upregulated in saltwater acclimated fish, consistent with diminished neuronal signaling which may protect animals from cholinergic overload associated with acetylcholinesterase inhibition. These results indicate targets other than acetylcholinesterase may contribute to the altered toxicity of chlorpyrifos in salmonids under hypersaline conditions.

  16. Assessment of the trophic state of a hypersaline-carbonatic environment: Vermelha Lagoon (Brazil).

    PubMed

    Laut, Lazaro; Martins, Maria Virginia Alves; Frontalini, Fabrizio; Ballalai, João M; Belart, Pierre; Habib, Renan; Fontana, Luiz F; Clemente, Iara M M M; Lorini, Maria Lucia; Mendonça Filho, João G; Laut, Vanessa M; Figueiredo, Marcos de Souza Lima

    2017-01-01

    Vermelha Lagoon is a hypersaline shallow transitional ecosystem in the state of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). This lagoon is located in the protected area of Massambaba, between the cities of Araruama and Saquarema (Brazil), and displays two quite uncommon particularities: it exhibits carbonate sedimentation and displays the development of Holocene stromatolites. Due to both particularities, the salt industry and property speculation have been, increasingly, generating anthropic pressures on this ecosystem. This study aims to apply a multiproxy approach to evaluate the trophic state of Vermelha Lagoon based on physicochemical parameters and geochemical data for the quantification and qualification of organic matter (OM), namely total organic carbon (TOC), total sulfur (TS), total phosphorus (TP) and biopolymeric carbon (BPC), including carbohydrates (CHO), lipids (LIP) and proteins (PTN). The CHO/TOC ratio values suggest that OM supplied to the sediment is of autochthonous origin and results, essentially, from microbial activity. The cluster analyses allowed the identification of four regions in Vermelha Lagoon. The Region I included stations located in shallow areas of the eastern sector of Vermelha lagoon affected by the impact of the artificial channel of connection with Araruama Lagoon. The Region II, under the influence of salt pans, is characterized by the highest values of BPC, namely CHO promoted by microbiological activity. The Region III include stations spread through the lagoon with high values of dissolved oxygen and lower values of TP. Stromatolites and microbial mattes growth was observed in some stations of this sector. Region IV, where the highest values of TOC and TS were found, represents depocenters of organic matter, located in general in depressed areas. Results of this work evidences that the Vermelha Lagoon is an eutrophic but alkaline and well oxygenated environment (at both water column and surface sediment) where the autotrophic activity is

  17. Searches with mono-leptons

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Yang; Tait, Tim M. P.

    2013-06-01

    We explore the implications of the mono-lepton plus missing transverse energy signature at the LHC, and point out its significance on understanding how dark matter interacts with quarks, where the signature arises from dark matter pair production together with a leptonically decaying W boson radiated from the initial state quarks. We derive limits using the existing W' searches at the LHC, and find an interesting interference between the contributions from dark matter couplings to up-type and down-type quarks. Mono-leptons can actually furnish the strongest current bound on dark matter interactions for axial-vector (spin-dependent) interactions and iso-spin violating couplings. Should a signal of dark matter production be observed, this process can also help disentangle the dark matter couplings to up- and down-type quarks.

  18. Anammox bacterial populations in deep marine hypersaline gradient systems.

    PubMed

    Borin, Sara; Mapelli, Francesca; Rolli, Eleonora; Song, Bongkeun; Tobias, Craig; Schmid, Markus C; De Lange, Gert J; Reichart, Gert J; Schouten, Stefan; Jetten, Mike; Daffonchio, Daniele

    2013-03-01

    To extend the knowledge of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) habitats, bacterial communities were examined in two hypersaline sulphidic basins in Eastern Mediterranean Sea. The 2 m thick seawater-brine haloclines of the deep anoxic hypersaline basins Bannock and L'Atalante were sampled in intervals of 10 cm with increasing salinity. (15)N isotope pairing incubation experiments showed the production of (29)N2 and (30)N2 gases in the chemoclines, ranging from 6.0 to 9.2 % salinity of the L'Atalante basin. Potential anammox rates ranged from 2.52 to 49.65 nmol N2 L(-1) day(-1) while denitrification was a major N2 production pathway, accounting for more than 85.5 % of total N2 production. Anammox-related 16S rRNA genes were detected along the L'Atalante and Bannock haloclines up to 24 % salinity, and the amplification of the hydrazine synthase genes (hzsA) further confirmed the presence of anammox bacteria in Bannock. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation and sequence analysis of 16S rRNA genes identified representatives of the marine anammox genus 'Candidatus Scalindua' and putatively new operational taxonomic units closely affiliated to sequences retrieved in marine environments that have documented anammox activity. 'Scalindua brodae' like sequences constituted up to 84.4 % of the sequences retrieved from Bannock. The anammox community in L'Atalante was different than in Bannock and was stratified according to salinity increase. This study putatively extends anammox bacterial habitats to extremely saline sulphidic ecosystems.

  19. Differences in lateral gene transfer in hypersaline versus thermal environments

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The role of lateral gene transfer (LGT) in the evolution of microorganisms is only beginning to be understood. While most LGT events occur between closely related individuals, inter-phylum and inter-domain LGT events are not uncommon. These distant transfer events offer potentially greater fitness advantages and it is for this reason that these "long distance" LGT events may have significantly impacted the evolution of microbes. One mechanism driving distant LGT events is microbial transformation. Theoretically, transformative events can occur between any two species provided that the DNA of one enters the habitat of the other. Two categories of microorganisms that are well-known for LGT are the thermophiles and halophiles. Results We identified potential inter-class LGT events into both a thermophilic class of Archaea (Thermoprotei) and a halophilic class of Archaea (Halobacteria). We then categorized these LGT genes as originating in thermophiles and halophiles respectively. While more than 68% of transfer events into Thermoprotei taxa originated in other thermophiles, less than 11% of transfer events into Halobacteria taxa originated in other halophiles. Conclusions Our results suggest that there is a fundamental difference between LGT in thermophiles and halophiles. We theorize that the difference lies in the different natures of the environments. While DNA degrades rapidly in thermal environments due to temperature-driven denaturization, hypersaline environments are adept at preserving DNA. Furthermore, most hypersaline environments, as topographical minima, are natural collectors of cellular debris. Thus halophiles would in theory be exposed to a greater diversity and quantity of extracellular DNA than thermophiles. PMID:21740576

  20. MILLIMETER-SCALE GENETIC GRADIENTS AND COMMUNITY-LEVEL MOLECULAR CONVERGENCE IN A HYPERSALINE MICROBIAL MAT

    SciTech Connect

    Fenner, Marsha W; Kunin, Victor; Raes, Jeroen; Harris, J. Kirk; Spear, John R.; Walker, Jeffrey J.; Ivanova, Natalia; Mering, Christian von; Bebout, Brad M.; Pace, Norman R.; Bork, Peer; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2008-04-30

    To investigate the extent of genetic stratification in structured microbial communities, we compared the metagenomes of 10 successive layers of a phylogenetically complex hypersaline mat from Guerrero Negro, Mexico. We found pronounced millimeter-scale genetic gradients that are consistent with the physicochemical profile of the mat. Despite these gradients, all layers displayed near identical and acid-shifted isoelectric point profiles due to a molecular convergence of amino acid usage indicating that hypersalinity enforces an overriding selective pressure on the mat community.

  1. Enhanced bioremediation of oil-polluted, hypersaline, coastal areas in Kuwait via vitamin-fertilization.

    PubMed

    Al-Mailem, Dina M; Eliyas, Mohamed; Radwan, Samir

    2014-03-01

    There is no research published sofar on managements that could bioremediate hypersaline soils and water polluted with hydrocarbons. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of vitamin amendment on hydrocarbon removal by microorganisms indigenous to such hypersaline environments. We used in this study ten hydrocarbonoclastic bacterial species and five archaeal species that had been isolated by the conventional plating method on media containing oil as a sole carbon source, from a hypersaline (3-4 M NaCl) coastal area in Kuwait, and characterized by sequencing of their 16S rRNA coding genes. The oil and pure hydrocarbon consumption was measured by gas-liquid chromatography. The oil and pure hydrocarbon consumption potential of all microorganisms in media with hypersalinity was enhanced by vitamin fertilization. This was true for individual microorganisms in pure cultures as well as for microbial consortia in hypersaline soil and water samples used as inocula. Most effective vitamins were thiamin, pyridoxine and vitamin B12. Vitamin fertilization using vitamin rich wastes or byproducts could be an effective practice for enhancing bioremediation of oil contaminated hypersaline environments.

  2. Lipid Biomarkers for a Hypersaline Microbial Mat Community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda; Orphan, Victoria; Embaye, Tsegereda; Turk, Kendra; Kubo, Mike; Summons, Roger

    2004-01-01

    The use of lipid biomarkers and their carbon isotopic compositions are valuable tools for establishing links to ancient microbial ecosystems. Various lipids associated with specific microbial groups can serve as biomarkers for establishing organism source and function in contemporary microbial ecosystems (membrane lipids), and by analogy, potential relevance to ancient organic-rich sedimentary rocks (geolipids). As witnessed by the stromatolite record, benthic microbial mats grew in shallow water lagoonal environments. Our recent work has focused on lipid biomarker analysis of a potential analogue for such ancient mats growing in a set of hypersaline evaporation ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico. The aerobic, surface layer of this mat (0 to 1 mm) contained a variety of ester-bound fatty acids (FA) representing a diverse bacterial population including cyanobacteria, sulphate reducers (SRB) and heterotrophs. Biomarkers for microeukaryotes detected in this layer included sterols, C-20 polyunsaturated FA and a highly branched isoprenoid, diagnostic for diatoms. Cyanobacteria were also indicated by the presence of a diagnostic set of mid-chain methylalkanes. C-28, to C-34 wax esters (WXE) present in relatively small amounts in the upper 3 mm of the mat are considered biomarkers for green non-sulphur bacteria. Ether-bound isoprenoids were also identified although in considerably lower abundance than ester-bound FA (approx. 1:l0). These complex ether lipids included archatol, hydroxyarchaeol and a C-40 tetraether, all in small amounts. After ether cleavage with boron tribromide, the major recovered isoprenyl was a C-30:1. This C(sub 30;1) yelded squalane after hydrogenation, a known geobiomarker for hypersaline environments in ancient oils and sediments. In this mat, it represents the dominant Archaeal population. The carbon isotopic composition of biomarker lipids were generally depleted relative to the bulk organic material (delta C-13 TOC -10%). Most

  3. Lipid Biomarkers for a Hypersaline Microbial Mat Community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda; Orphan, Victoria; Embaye, Tsegereda; Turk, Kendra; Kubo, Mike; Summons, Roger

    2004-01-01

    The use of lipid biomarkers and their carbon isotopic compositions are valuable tools for establishing links to ancient microbial ecosystems. Various lipids associated with specific microbial groups can serve as biomarkers for establishing organism source and function in contemporary microbial ecosystems (membrane lipids), and by analogy, potential relevance to ancient organic-rich sedimentary rocks (geolipids). As witnessed by the stromatolite record, benthic microbial mats grew in shallow water lagoonal environments. Our recent work has focused on lipid biomarker analysis of a potential analogue for such ancient mats growing in a set of hypersaline evaporation ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico. The aerobic, surface layer of this mat (0 to 1 mm) contained a variety of ester-bound fatty acids (FA) representing a diverse bacterial population including cyanobacteria, sulphate reducers (SRB) and heterotrophs. Biomarkers for microeukaryotes detected in this layer included sterols, C-20 polyunsaturated FA and a highly branched isoprenoid, diagnostic for diatoms. Cyanobacteria were also indicated by the presence of a diagnostic set of mid-chain methylalkanes. C-28, to C-34 wax esters (WXE) present in relatively small amounts in the upper 3 mm of the mat are considered biomarkers for green non-sulphur bacteria. Ether-bound isoprenoids were also identified although in considerably lower abundance than ester-bound FA (approx. 1:l0). These complex ether lipids included archatol, hydroxyarchaeol and a C-40 tetraether, all in small amounts. After ether cleavage with boron tribromide, the major recovered isoprenyl was a C-30:1. This C(sub 30;1) yelded squalane after hydrogenation, a known geobiomarker for hypersaline environments in ancient oils and sediments. In this mat, it represents the dominant Archaeal population. The carbon isotopic composition of biomarker lipids were generally depleted relative to the bulk organic material (delta C-13 TOC -10%). Most

  4. Layered Thermohaline Convection in Hypersaline GeothermalSystems

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Pruess, Karsten

    1997-01-05

    Thermohaline convection occurs in hypersaline geothermal systems due to thermal and salinity effects on liquid density. Because of its importance in oceanography, thermohaline convection in viscous liquids has received more attention than thermohaline convection in porous media. The fingered and layered convection patterns observed in viscous liquid thermohaline convection have been hypothesized to occur also in porous media. However, the extension of convective dynamics from viscous liquid systems to porous media systems is complicated by the presence of the solid matrix in porous media. The solid grains cause thermal retardation, hydrodynamic dispersion, and permeability effects. We present simulations of thermohaline convection in model systems based on the Salton Sea Geothermal System, California, that serve to point out the general dynamics of porous media thermohaline convection in the diffusive regime, and the effects of porosity and permeability, in particular. We use the TOUGH2 simulator with residual formulation and fully coupled solution technique for solving the strongly coupled equations governing thermohaline convection in porous media. We incorporate a model for brine density that takes into account the effects of NaCl and CaCl2. Simulations show that in forced convection, the increased pore velocity and thermal retardation in low-porosity regions enhances brine transport relative to heat transport. In thermohaline convection, the heat and brine transport are strongly coupled and enhanced transport of brine over heat cannot occur because buoyancy caused by heat and brine together drive the flow. Random permeability heterogeneity has a limited effect if the scale of flow is much larger than the scale of permeability heterogeneity. For the system studied here, layered thermohaline convection persists for more than one million years for a variety of initial conditions. Our simulations suggest that layered thermohaline convection is possible in

  5. Resilience of estuarine phytoplankton and their temporal variability along salinity gradients during drought and hypersalinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nche-Fambo, F. A.; Scharler, U. M.; Tirok, K.

    2015-06-01

    In South African estuaries, there is no knowledge on the resilience and variability in phytoplankton communities under conditions of hypersalinity, extended droughts and reverse salinity gradients. Phytoplankton composition, abundance and biomass vary with changes in environmental variables and taxa richness declines specifically under hypersaline conditions. This research thus investigated the phytoplankton community composition, its resilience and variability under highly variable and extreme environmental conditions in an estuarine lake system (Lake St. Lucia, South Africa) over one year. The lake system was characterised by a reverse salinity gradient with hypersalinity furthest from the estuarine inlet during the study period. During this study, 78 taxa were recorded: 56 diatoms, eight green algae, one cryptophyte, seven cyanobacteria and six dinoflagellates. Taxon variability and resilience depended on their ability to tolerate high salinities. Consequently, the phytoplankton communities as well as total abundance and biomass differed along the salinity gradient and over time with salinity as the main determinant. Cyanobacteria were dominant in hypersaline conditions, dinoflagellates in marine-brackish salinities, green algae and cryptophytes in lower salinities (brackish) and diatoms were abundant in marine-brackish salinities but survived in hypersaline conditions. Total abundance and biomass ranged from 3.66 × 103 to 1.11 × 109 Cells/L and 1.21 × 106 to 1.46 × 1010 pgC/L respectively, with the highest values observed under hypersaline conditions. Therefore, even under highly variable, extreme environmental conditions and hypersalinity the phytoplankton community as a whole was resilient enough to maintain a relatively high biomass throughout the study period. The resilience of few dominant taxa, such as Cyanothece, Spirulina, Protoperidinium and Nitzschia and the dominance of other common genera such as Chlamydomonas, Chroomonas, Navicula, Gyrosigma

  6. Natronospira proteinivora gen. nov., sp. nov, an extremely salt-tolerant, alkaliphilic gammaproteobacterium from hypersaline soda lakes.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Kublanov, Ilya V; Khijniak, Tatiana V

    2017-08-01

    Brine samples from Kulunda Steppe soda lakes (Altai, Russia) were inoculated into a hypersaline alkaline mineral medium with β-keratin (chicken feather) as a substrate. The micro-organisms dominating the enrichment culture were isolated by limiting serial dilution on the same medium with casein as a substrate. The cells of strain BSker1T were motile, curved rods. The strain was an obligately aerobic heterotroph utilizing proteins and peptides as growth substrates. The isolate was an obligate alkaliphile with a pH range for growth from pH 8.5 to 10.25 (optimum at pH 9.5), and it was extremely salt tolerant, growing with between 1 and 4.5 M total Na+ (optimally at 2-2.5 M). BSker1T had a unique composition of polar lipid fatty acids, dominated by two C17 species. The membrane polar lipids included multiple unidentified phospholipids and two aminolipids. According to phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence, the isolate forms a novel branch within the family Ectothiorhodospiraceae (class Gammaproteobacteria) with the highest sequence similarity to the members of this family being 91 %. On the basis of distinct phenotypic and genotypic properties, strain BSker1T (=JCM 31341T=UNIQEM U1008T) is proposed to be classified as a representative of a novel genus and species, Natronospira proteinivora gen. nov., sp. nov.

  7. Characterization of eukaryotic microbial diversity in hypersaline Lake Tyrrell, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Heidelberg, Karla B.; Nelson, William C.; Holm, Johanna B.; Eisenkolb, Nadine; Andrade, Karen; Emerson, Joanne B.

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the community structure of the microbial eukaryotic community from hypersaline Lake Tyrrell, Australia, using near full length 18S rRNA sequences. Water samples were taken in both summer and winter over a 4-year period. The extent of eukaryotic diversity detected was low, with only 35 unique phylotypes using a 97% sequence similarity threshold. The water samples were dominated (91%) by a novel cluster of the Alveolate, Apicomplexa Colpodella spp., most closely related to C. edax. The Chlorophyte, Dunaliella spp. accounted for less than 35% of water column samples. However, the eukaryotic community entrained in a salt crust sample was vastly different and was dominated (83%) by the Dunaliella spp. The patterns described here represent the first observation of microbial eukaryotic dynamics in this system and provide a multiyear comparison of community composition by season. The lack of expected seasonal distribution in eukaryotic communities paired with abundant nanoflagellates suggests that grazing may significantly structure microbial eukaryotic communities in this system. PMID:23717306

  8. Assembly-driven community genomics of a hypersaline microbial ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Podell, Sheila; Ugalde, Juan A; Narasingarao, Priya; Banfield, Jillian F; Heidelberg, Karla B; Allen, Eric E

    2013-01-01

    Microbial populations inhabiting a natural hypersaline lake ecosystem in Lake Tyrrell, Victoria, Australia, have been characterized using deep metagenomic sampling, iterative de novo assembly, and multidimensional phylogenetic binning. Composite genomes representing habitat-specific microbial populations were reconstructed for eleven different archaea and one bacterium, comprising between 0.6 and 14.1% of the planktonic community. Eight of the eleven archaeal genomes were from microbial species without previously cultured representatives. These new genomes provide habitat-specific reference sequences enabling detailed, lineage-specific compartmentalization of predicted functional capabilities and cellular properties associated with both dominant and less abundant community members, including organisms previously known only by their 16S rRNA sequences. Together, these data provide a comprehensive, culture-independent genomic blueprint for ecosystem-wide analysis of protein functions, population structure, and lifestyles of co-existing, co-evolving microbial groups within the same natural habitat. The "assembly-driven" community genomic approach demonstrated in this study advances our ability to push beyond single gene investigations, and promotes genome-scale reconstructions as a tangible goal in the quest to define the metabolic, ecological, and evolutionary dynamics that underpin environmental microbial diversity.

  9. Microbial Biomass and Activity Distribution in an Anoxic, Hypersaline Basin

    PubMed Central

    LaRock, Paul A.; Lauer, Ray D.; Schwarz, John R.; Watanabe, Kathleen K.; Wiesenburg, Denis A.

    1979-01-01

    The Orca Basin is a hypersaline depression in the northern Gulf of Mexico with anoxic conditions observed in the lower 200 m of the water column. Measurements of adenosine 5′-triphosphate, heterotrophic potential, and uridine uptake made above and across the interface into the anoxic zone revealed the presence of an active microbial population approximately 100 m above the interface. Biomass and activity decreased at and just below the interface but increased near the bottom, consistent with similar observations made in the Cariaco Trench. The maximum adenosine 5′-triphosphate concentration above the interface of 5.9 ng/liter (2,173 m) is about eight times greater than the value found in oxygenated waters of corresponding depth in the absence of an anoxic zone. The maximum adenosine 5′-triphosphate concentration in the anoxic zone is approximately 15 times greater than that found in oxygenated water of similar depth, suggesting anoxia will support the development of a larger bacterial population. Our findings suggest that autotrophic bacteria may be the dominant physiological group in the region just above the interface. PMID:16345355

  10. Prokaryotic diversity in a Tunisian hypersaline lake, Chott El Jerid.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Manel Ben; Karray, Fatma; Mhiri, Najla; Mei, Nan; Quéméneur, Marianne; Cayol, Jean-Luc; Erauso, Gaël; Tholozan, Jean-Luc; Alazard, Didier; Sayadi, Sami

    2016-03-01

    Prokaryotic diversity was investigated in a Tunisian salt lake, Chott El Jerid, by quantitative real-time PCR, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting methods targeting the 16S rRNA gene and culture-dependent methods. Two different samples S1-10 and S2-10 were taken from under the salt crust of Chott El Jerid in the dry season. DGGE analysis revealed that bacterial sequences were related to Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, unclassified bacteria, and Deinococcus-Thermus phyla. Anaerobic fermentative and sulfate-reducing bacteria were also detected in this ecosystem. Within the domain archaea, all sequences were affiliated to Euryarchaeota phylum. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that 16S rRNA gene copy numbers of bacteria was 5 × 10(6) DNA copies g(-1) whereas archaea varied between 5 × 10(5) and 10(6) DNA copies g(-1) in these samples. Eight anaerobic halophilic fermentative bacterial strains were isolated and affiliated with the species Halanaerobium alcaliphilum, Halanaerobium saccharolyticum, and Sporohalobacter salinus. These data showed an abundant and diverse microbial community detected in the hypersaline thalassohaline environment of Chott El Jerid.

  11. Halotaxis of cyanobacteria in an intertidal hypersaline microbial mat.

    PubMed

    Kohls, Katharina; Abed, Raeid M M; Polerecky, Lubos; Weber, Miriam; de Beer, Dirk

    2010-03-01

    An intertidal hypersaline cyanobacterial mat from Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates) exhibited a reversible change in its surface colour within several hours upon changes in salinity of the overlying water. The mat surface was orange-reddish at salinities above 15% and turned dark green at lower salinities. We investigated this phenomenon using a polyphasic approach that included denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, microscopy, high-performance liquid chromatography, hyperspectral imaging, absorption spectroscopy, oxygen microsensor measurements and modelling of salinity dynamics. Filaments of Microcoleus chthonoplastes, identified based on 16S rRNA sequencing and morphology, were found to migrate up and down when salinity was decreased below or increased above 15%, respectively, causing the colour change of the mat uppermost layer. Migration occurred in light and in the dark, and could be induced by different salts, not only NaCl. The influence of salinity-dependent and independent physico-chemical parameters, such as water activity, oxygen solubility, H2S, gravity and light, was excluded, indicating that the observed migration was due to a direct response to salt stress. We propose to term this salinity-driven cyanobacterial migration as 'halotaxis', a process that might play a vital role in the survival of cyanobacteria in environments exposed to continuous salinity fluctuations such as intertidal flats.

  12. Diversity of Heterotrophic Protists from Extremely Hypersaline Habitats.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong Soo; Simpson, Alastair G B

    2015-09-01

    Heterotrophic protists (protozoa) are a diverse but understudied component of the biota of extremely hypersaline environments, with few data on molecular diversity within halophile 'species', and almost nothing known of their biogeographic distribution. We have garnered SSU rRNA gene sequences for several clades of halophilic protozoa from enrichments from waters of >12.5% salinity from Australia, North America, and Europe (6 geographic sites, 25 distinct samples). The small stramenopile Halocafeteria was found at all sites, but phylogenies did not show clear geographic clustering. The ciliate Trimyema was recorded from 6 non-European samples. Phylogenies confirmed a monophyletic halophilic Trimyema group that included possible south-eastern Australian, Western Australian and North American clusters. Several halophilic Heterolobosea were detected, demonstrating that Pleurostomum contains at least three relatively distinct clades, and increasing known continental ranges for Tulamoeba peronaphora and Euplaesiobystra hypersalinica. The unclassified flagellate Palustrimonas, found in one Australian sample, proves to be a novel deep-branching alveolate. These results are consistent with a global distribution of halophilic protozoa groups (∼ morphospecies), but the Trimyema case suggests that is worth testing whether larger forms exhibit biogeographic phylogenetic substructure. The molecular detection/characterization of halophilic protozoa is still far from complete at the clade level, let alone the 'species level'. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Mechanisms of fenthion activation in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) acclimated to hypersaline environments

    SciTech Connect

    Lavado, Ramon Rimoldi, John M.; Schlenk, Daniel

    2009-03-01

    Previous studies in rainbow trout have shown that acclimation to hypersaline environments enhances the toxicity to thioether organophosphate and carbamate pesticides. In order to determine the role of biotransformation in this process, the metabolism of the thioether organophosphate biocide, fenthion was evaluated in microsomes from gills, liver and olfactory tissues in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) acclimated to freshwater and 17 per mille salinity. Hypersalinity acclimation increased the formation of fenoxon and fenoxon sulfoxide from fenthion in liver microsomes from rainbow trout, but not in gills or in olfactory tissues. NADPH-dependent and independent hydrolysis was observed in all tissues, but only NADPH-dependent fenthion cleavage was differentially modulated by hypersalinity in liver (inhibited) and gills (induced). Enantiomers of fenthion sulfoxide (65% and 35% R- and S-fenthion sulfoxide, respectively) were formed in liver and gills. The predominant pathway of fenthion activation in freshwater appears to be initiated through initial formation of fenoxon which may be subsequently converted to the most toxic metabolite fenoxon R-sulfoxide. However, in hypersaline conditions both fenoxon and fenthion sulfoxide formation may precede fenoxon sulfoxide formation. Stereochemical evaluation of sulfoxide formation, cytochrome P450 inhibition studies with ketoconazole and immunoblots indicated that CYP3A27 was primarily involved in the enhancement of fenthion activation in hypersaline-acclimated fish with limited contribution of FMO to initial sulfoxidation.

  14. Metagenomic Insights into the Uncultured Diversity and Physiology of Microbes in Four Hypersaline Soda Lake Brines

    PubMed Central

    Vavourakis, Charlotte D.; Ghai, Rohit; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco; Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Muyzer, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Soda lakes are salt lakes with a naturally alkaline pH due to evaporative concentration of sodium carbonates in the absence of major divalent cations. Hypersaline soda brines harbor microbial communities with a high species- and strain-level archaeal diversity and a large proportion of still uncultured poly-extremophiles compared to neutral brines of similar salinities. We present the first “metagenomic snapshots” of microbial communities thriving in the brines of four shallow soda lakes from the Kulunda Steppe (Altai, Russia) covering a salinity range from 170 to 400 g/L. Both amplicon sequencing of 16S rRNA fragments and direct metagenomic sequencing showed that the top-level taxa abundance was linked to the ambient salinity: Bacteroidetes, Alpha-, and Gamma-proteobacteria were dominant below a salinity of 250 g/L, Euryarchaeota at higher salinities. Within these taxa, amplicon sequences related to Halorubrum, Natrinema, Gracilimonas, purple non-sulfur bacteria (Rhizobiales, Rhodobacter, and Rhodobaca) and chemolithotrophic sulfur oxidizers (Thioalkalivibrio) were highly abundant. Twenty-four draft population genomes from novel members and ecotypes within the Nanohaloarchaea, Halobacteria, and Bacteroidetes were reconstructed to explore their metabolic features, environmental abundance and strategies for osmotic adaptation. The Halobacteria- and Bacteroidetes-related draft genomes belong to putative aerobic heterotrophs, likely with the capacity to ferment sugars in the absence of oxygen. Members from both taxonomic groups are likely involved in primary organic carbon degradation, since some of the reconstructed genomes encode the ability to hydrolyze recalcitrant substrates, such as cellulose and chitin. Putative sodium-pumping rhodopsins were found in both a Flavobacteriaceae- and a Chitinophagaceae-related draft genome. The predicted proteomes of both the latter and a Rhodothermaceae-related draft genome were indicative of a “salt-in” strategy of

  15. Metagenomic Insights into the Uncultured Diversity and Physiology of Microbes in Four Hypersaline Soda Lake Brines

    DOE PAGES

    Vavourakis, Charlotte D.; Ghai, Rohit; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco; ...

    2016-02-25

    Soda lakes are salt lakes with a naturally alkaline pH due to evaporative concentration of sodium carbonates in the absence of major divalent cations. Hypersaline soda brines harbor microbial communities with a high species- and strain-level archaeal diversity and a large proportion of still uncultured poly-extremophiles compared to neutral brines of similar salinities. We present the first "metagenomic snapshots" of microbial communities thriving in the brines of four shallow soda lakes from the Kulunda Steppe (Altai, Russia) covering a salinity range from 170 to 400 g/L. Both amplicon sequencing of 16S rRNA fragments and direct metagenomic sequencing showed that themore » top-level taxa abundance was linked to the ambient salinity: Bacteroidetes, Alpha-, and Gamma-proteobacteria were dominant below a salinity of 250 g/L, Euryarchaeota at higher salinities. Within these taxa, amplicon sequences related to Halorubrum, Natrinema, Gracilimonas, purple non-sulfur bacteria (Rhizobiales, Rhodobacter, and Rhodobaca) and chemolithotrophic sulfur oxidizers (Thioalkalivibrio) were highly abundant. Twenty-four draft population genomes from novel members and ecotypes within the Nanohaloarchaea, Halobacteria, and Bacteroidetes were reconstructed to explore their metabolic features, environmental abundance and strategies for osmotic adaptation. The Halobacteria- and Bacteroidetes-related draft genomes belong to putative aerobic heterotrophs, likely with the capacity to ferment sugars in the absence of oxygen. Members from both taxonomic groups are likely involved in primary organic carbon degradation, since some of the reconstructed genomes encode the ability to hydrolyze recalcitrant substrates, such as cellulose and chitin. Putative sodium-pumping rhodopsins were found in both a Flavobacteriaceae- and a Chitinophagaceae-related draft genome. The predicted proteomes of both the latter and a Rhodothermace ae-related draft genome were indicative of a "salt-in" strategy of

  16. Metagenomic Insights into the Uncultured Diversity and Physiology of Microbes in Four Hypersaline Soda Lake Brines

    SciTech Connect

    Vavourakis, Charlotte D.; Ghai, Rohit; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco; Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Muyzer, Gerard

    2016-02-25

    Soda lakes are salt lakes with a naturally alkaline pH due to evaporative concentration of sodium carbonates in the absence of major divalent cations. Hypersaline soda brines harbor microbial communities with a high species- and strain-level archaeal diversity and a large proportion of still uncultured poly-extremophiles compared to neutral brines of similar salinities. We present the first "metagenomic snapshots" of microbial communities thriving in the brines of four shallow soda lakes from the Kulunda Steppe (Altai, Russia) covering a salinity range from 170 to 400 g/L. Both amplicon sequencing of 16S rRNA fragments and direct metagenomic sequencing showed that the top-level taxa abundance was linked to the ambient salinity: Bacteroidetes, Alpha-, and Gamma-proteobacteria were dominant below a salinity of 250 g/L, Euryarchaeota at higher salinities. Within these taxa, amplicon sequences related to Halorubrum, Natrinema, Gracilimonas, purple non-sulfur bacteria (Rhizobiales, Rhodobacter, and Rhodobaca) and chemolithotrophic sulfur oxidizers (Thioalkalivibrio) were highly abundant. Twenty-four draft population genomes from novel members and ecotypes within the Nanohaloarchaea, Halobacteria, and Bacteroidetes were reconstructed to explore their metabolic features, environmental abundance and strategies for osmotic adaptation. The Halobacteria- and Bacteroidetes-related draft genomes belong to putative aerobic heterotrophs, likely with the capacity to ferment sugars in the absence of oxygen. Members from both taxonomic groups are likely involved in primary organic carbon degradation, since some of the reconstructed genomes encode the ability to hydrolyze recalcitrant substrates, such as cellulose and chitin. Putative sodium-pumping rhodopsins were found in both a Flavobacteriaceae- and a Chitinophagaceae-related draft genome. The predicted proteomes of both the latter and a Rhodothermace ae-related draft genome were indicative of a "salt-in" strategy of osmotic

  17. Metagenomic Insights into the Uncultured Diversity and Physiology of Microbes in Four Hypersaline Soda Lake Brines.

    PubMed

    Vavourakis, Charlotte D; Ghai, Rohit; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco; Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Tringe, Susannah G; Hugenholtz, Philip; Muyzer, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Soda lakes are salt lakes with a naturally alkaline pH due to evaporative concentration of sodium carbonates in the absence of major divalent cations. Hypersaline soda brines harbor microbial communities with a high species- and strain-level archaeal diversity and a large proportion of still uncultured poly-extremophiles compared to neutral brines of similar salinities. We present the first "metagenomic snapshots" of microbial communities thriving in the brines of four shallow soda lakes from the Kulunda Steppe (Altai, Russia) covering a salinity range from 170 to 400 g/L. Both amplicon sequencing of 16S rRNA fragments and direct metagenomic sequencing showed that the top-level taxa abundance was linked to the ambient salinity: Bacteroidetes, Alpha-, and Gamma-proteobacteria were dominant below a salinity of 250 g/L, Euryarchaeota at higher salinities. Within these taxa, amplicon sequences related to Halorubrum, Natrinema, Gracilimonas, purple non-sulfur bacteria (Rhizobiales, Rhodobacter, and Rhodobaca) and chemolithotrophic sulfur oxidizers (Thioalkalivibrio) were highly abundant. Twenty-four draft population genomes from novel members and ecotypes within the Nanohaloarchaea, Halobacteria, and Bacteroidetes were reconstructed to explore their metabolic features, environmental abundance and strategies for osmotic adaptation. The Halobacteria- and Bacteroidetes-related draft genomes belong to putative aerobic heterotrophs, likely with the capacity to ferment sugars in the absence of oxygen. Members from both taxonomic groups are likely involved in primary organic carbon degradation, since some of the reconstructed genomes encode the ability to hydrolyze recalcitrant substrates, such as cellulose and chitin. Putative sodium-pumping rhodopsins were found in both a Flavobacteriaceae- and a Chitinophagaceae-related draft genome. The predicted proteomes of both the latter and a Rhodothermaceae-related draft genome were indicative of a "salt-in" strategy of osmotic

  18. Alkaline "Permanent" Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacey, Antony

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of paper manufacturing processes and their effects on library materials focuses on the promotion of alkaline "permanent" paper, with less acid, by Canadian library preservation specialists. Standards for paper acidity are explained; advantages of alkaline paper are described, including decreased manufacturing costs; and…

  19. Anodes for alkaline electrolysis

    DOEpatents

    Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev

    2011-02-01

    A method of making an anode for alkaline electrolysis cells includes adsorption of precursor material on a carbonaceous material, conversion of the precursor material to hydroxide form and conversion of precursor material from hydroxide form to oxy-hydroxide form within the alkaline electrolysis cell.

  20. Hypersalinity toxicity thresholds for nine California ocean plan toxicity test protocols.

    PubMed

    Voorhees, Jennifer P; Phillips, Bryn M; Anderson, Brian S; Siegler, Katie; Katz, Scott; Jennings, Lydia; Tjeerdema, Ron S; Jensen, Joanna; de la Paz Carpio-Obeso, Maria

    2013-11-01

    Currently, several desalination facilities have been proposed to operate or are actually operating in California. These facilities' use of reverse osmosis (RO) may discharge hypersaline reject brine into the marine environment. The risks, if any, this brine would pose to coastal receiving waters are unknown. To test the toxicity of hypersaline brine in the absence of any additional toxic constituents, we prepared brine and tested it with the seven toxicity test organisms listed in the 2009 California Ocean Plan. The most sensitive protocols were the marine larval development tests, whereas the most tolerant to increased salinities were the euryhaline topsmelt, mysid shrimp, and giant kelp tests. Reject brines from the Monterey Bay Aquarium's RO desalination facility were also tested with three species. The effects of the aquarium's brine effluent on topsmelt, mussels, and giant kelp were consistent with those observed in the salinity tolerance experiments. This information will be used by regulators to establish receiving water limitations for hypersaline discharges.

  1. Biogeography of Nocardiopsis strains from hypersaline environments of Yunnan and Xinjiang Provinces, western China

    PubMed Central

    He, Song-Tao; Zhi, Xiao-Yang; Jiang, Hongchen; Yang, Ling-Ling; Wu, Jin-Yuan; Zhang, Yong-Guang; Hozzein, Wael N.; Li, Wen-Jun

    2015-01-01

    The genus Nocardiopsis is a widespread group within the phylum Actinobacteria and has been isolated from various salty environments worldwide. However, little is known about whether biogeography affects Nocardiopsis distribution in various hypersaline environments. Such information is essential for understanding the ecology of Nocardiopsis. Here we analyzed 16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoB and sodA genes of 78 Nocardiopsis strains isolated from hypersaline environments in Yunnan and Xinjiang Provinces of western China. The obtained Nocardiopsis strains were classified into five operational taxonomic units, each comprising location-specific phylo- and genotypes. Statistical analyses showed that spatial distance and environmental factors substantially influenced Nocardiopsis distribution in hypersaline environments: the former had stronger influence at large spatial scales, whereas the latter was more influential at small spatial scales. PMID:26289784

  2. Hypersaline cyanobacterial mats as indicators of elevated tropical hurricane activity and associated climate change.

    PubMed

    Paerl, Hans W; Steppe, Timothy F; Buchan, Kenneth C; Potts, Malcolm

    2003-03-01

    The Atlantic hurricanes of 1999 caused widespread environmental damage throughout the Caribbean and US mid-Atlantic coastal regions. However, these storms also proved beneficial to certain microbial habitats; specifically, cyanobacteria-dominated mats. Modern mats represent the oldest known biological communities on earth, stromatolites. Contemporary mats are dominant biological communities in the hypersaline Bahamian lakes along the Atlantic hurricane track. We examined the impacts of varying levels of hypersalinity on 2 processes controlling mat growth, photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation, in Salt Pond, San Salvador Island, Bahamas. Hypersalinity (> 5 times seawater salinity) proved highly inhibitory to these processes. Freshwater input from Hurricane Floyd and other large storms alleviated this salt-inhibition. A predicted 10 to 40 year increase in Atlantic hurricane activity accompanied by more frequent "freshening" events will enhance mat productivity, CO2 sequestration and nutrient cycling. Cyanobacterial mats are sensitive short- and long-term indicators of climatic and ecological changes impacting these and other waterstressed environments.

  3. Halophiles: biology, adaptation, and their role in decontamination of hypersaline environments.

    PubMed

    Edbeib, Mohamed Faraj; Wahab, Roswanira Abdul; Huyop, Fahrul

    2016-08-01

    The unique cellular enzymatic machinery of halophilic microbes allows them to thrive in extreme saline environments. That these microorganisms can prosper in hypersaline environments has been correlated with the elevated acidic amino acid content in their proteins, which increase the negative protein surface potential. Because these microorganisms effectively use hydrocarbons as their sole carbon and energy sources, they may prove to be valuable bioremediation agents for the treatment of saline effluents and hypersaline waters contaminated with toxic compounds that are resistant to degradation. This review highlights the various strategies adopted by halophiles to compensate for their saline surroundings and includes descriptions of recent studies that have used these microorganisms for bioremediation of environments contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons. The known halotolerant dehalogenase-producing microbes, their dehalogenation mechanisms, and how their proteins are stabilized is also reviewed. In view of their robustness in saline environments, efforts to document their full potential regarding remediation of contaminated hypersaline ecosystems merits further exploration.

  4. Alkaline igneous rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Fitton, J.G.; Upton, B.G.J.

    1987-01-01

    In this volume, an international team of scientists provides an up-to-date overview of the nature, origin, and evolution of alkaline magmas. Particular attention is paid to carbonatites, lamprophyres, and lamproites which are rock suites of current interest not recently reviewed elsewhere. Recent work on the classical alkaline provinces of East Africa, South Greenland, and the Kola Peninsula is included together with reviews of other areas of alkaline magmatism in North and South America, East Greenland, Europe, West Africa, and the ocean basins. Other papers discuss the impact of experimental isotopic and geochemical studies of the petrogenesis of alkaline rocks. This book will be of interest to petrologists and geochemists studying alkaline igneous rocks, and to other earth scientists as a reference on the rapidly expanding field of igneous petrology.

  5. Geo- and biogeochemical processes in a heliothermal hypersaline lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachara, John M.; Moran, James J.; Resch, Charles T.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Bowden, Mark E.; Cory, Alexandra B.; Fredrickson, James K.

    2016-05-01

    Water chemical variations were investigated over three annual hydrologic cycles in hypersaline, heliothermal, meromictic Hot Lake in north-central Washington State, USA. The lake contains diverse biota with dramatic zonation related to salinity and redox state. Water samples were collected at 10-cm depth intervals through the shallow lake (2.4 m) during 2012-2014, with comprehensive monitoring performed in 2013. Inorganic salt species, dissolved carbon forms (DOC, DIC), oxygen, sulfide, and methane were analyzed in lake water samples. Depth sonde measurements of pH and temperature were also performed to track their seasonal variations. A bathymetric survey of the lake was conducted to enable lake water volume and solute inventory calculations. Sediment cores were collected at low water and analyzed by X-ray diffraction to investigate sediment mineralogy. The primary dissolved salt in Hot Lake water was Mg2+-SO42- whereas sediments were dominated by gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O). Lake water concentrations increased with depth, reaching saturation with epsomite (MgSO4·7H2O) that was exposed at lake bottom. At maximum volume in spring, Hot Lake exhibited a relatively dilute mixolimnion; a lower saline metalimnion with stratified oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthetic microbiological communities; and a stable, hypersaline monimolimnion, separated from above layers by a chemocline, containing high levels of sulfide and methane. The thickness of the mixolimnion regulates a heliothermal effect that creates temperatures in excess of 60 °C in the underlying metalimnion and monimolimnion. The mixolimnion was dynamic in volume and actively mixed. It displayed large pH variations, in-situ calcium carbonate precipitation, and large evaporative volume losses. The depletion of this layer by fall allowed deeper mixing into the metalimnion, more rapid heat exchange, and lower winter lake temperatures. Solubility calculations indicate seasonal biogenic and thermogenic aragonite

  6. Geo- and Biogeochemical Processes in a Heliothermal Hypersaline Lake

    SciTech Connect

    Zachara, John M.; Moran, James J.; Resch, Charles T.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Bowden, Mark E.; Cory, Alexandra B.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2016-03-17

    Water chemical variations were investigated over three annual hydrologic cycles in hypersaline, heliothermal, meromictic Hot Lake in north-central Washington State, USA. The lake, originally studied by Anderson (1958), contains diverse biota with dramatic zonation related to salinity and redox state. Water samples were collected at 10 cm depth intervals through the shallow lake (2.4 m) at a consistent location during 2012-2014, with comprehensive monitoring performed in 2013. Inorganic salt species, total dissolved solids (TDS), dissolved carbon forms (DOC, DIC), oxygen, sulfide, and methane were analyzed in lake water samples. Depth sonde measurements of pH and temperature were also performed to track their seasonal variations. A bathymetric survey of the lake was conducted to enable lake water volume and solute inventory calculations. Sediment cores were collected at low water and analyzed by x-ray diffraction to investigate sediment mineralogy. The primary dissolved salt in Hot Lake water was Mg2+-SO42- while sediments were dominated by gypsum (CaSO4•2H2O). Lake water concentrations increased with depth to reach saturation with epsomite that was exposed at lake bottom. At maximum volume in spring, Hot Lake exhibited a relatively dilute mixolimnion containing phyto- and zooplankton; a lower saline metalimnion with stratified oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthetic microbiologic communities; and a stable, hypersaline monimolimnion, separated from above layers by a chemocline, containing high levels of sulfide and methane. The thickness of the mixolimnion regulates a heliothermal effect which creates temperatures in excess of 60 oC in the underlying metalimnion and monimolimnion. The mixolimnion was dynamic and actively mixed. It displayed large pH variations, in-situ calcium carbonate precipitation, and large evaporative volume losses. The depletion of this ephemeral layer by fall allowed deeper mixing into the volume-stable lower mixolimnion, more rapid heat

  7. Diel Metagenomics and Metatranscriptomics of Elkhorn Slough Hypersaline Microbial Mat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Detweiler, A. M.; Everroad, R. C.; Bebout, L. E.; Weber, P. K.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Bebout, B.

    2014-12-01

    To understand the variation in gene expression associated with the daytime oxygenic phototrophic and nighttime fermentation regimes seen in hypersaline microbial mats, a contiguous mat piece was subjected to sampling at regular intervals over a 24-hour diel period. Additionally, to understand the impact of sulfate reduction on biohydrogen consumption, molybdate was added to a parallel experiment in the same run. 4 metagenome and 12 metatranscriptome Illumina HiSeq lanes were completed over day / night, and control / molybdate experiments. Preliminary comparative examination of noon and midnight metatranscriptomic samples mapped using bowtie2 to reference genomes has revealed several notable results about the dominant mat-building cyanobacterium Microcoleus chthonoplastes PCC 7420. Dominant cyanobacterium M. chthonoplastes PCC 7420 shows expression in several pathways for nitrogen scavenging, including nitrogen fixation. Reads mapped to M. chthonoplastes PCC 7420 shows expression of two starch storage and utilization pathways, one as a starch-trehalose-maltose-glucose pathway, another through UDP-glucose-cellulose-β-1,4 glucan-glucose pathway. The overall trend of gene expression was primarily light driven up-regulation followed by down-regulation in dark, while much of the remaining expression profile appears to be constitutive. Co-assembly of quality-controlled reads from 4 metagenomes was performed using Ray Meta with progressively smaller K-mer sizes, with bins identified and filtered using principal component analysis of coverages from all libraries and a %GC filter, followed by reassembly of the remaining co-assembly reads and binned reads. Despite having relatively similar abundance profiles in each metagenome, this binning approach was able to distinctly resolve bins from dominant taxa, but also sulfate reducing bacteria that are desired for understanding molybdate inhibition. Bins generated from this iterative assembly process will be used for downstream

  8. Viral Induced Microbial Mortality in Arctic Hypersaline Spring Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Colangelo-Lillis, Jesse; Wing, Boswell A.; Raymond-Bouchard, Isabelle; Whyte, Lyle G.

    2017-01-01

    Viruses are a primary influence on microbial mortality in the global ocean. The impacts of viruses on their microbial hosts in low-energy environments are poorly explored and are the focus of this study. To investigate the role of viruses in mediating mortality in low-energy environments where contacts between viruses and microbes are infrequent, we conducted a set of in situ time series incubations in the outlet and channel sediments of two cold, hypersaline springs of the Canadian High Arctic. We found microbial and viral populations in dynamic equilibrium, indicating approximately equal birth and death rates for each population. In situ rates of microbial growth were low (0.5–50 × 103 cells cm-3 h-1) as were rates of viral decay (0.09–170 × 104 virions cm-3 h-1). A large fraction of the springs’ viral communities (49–100%) were refractory to decay over the timescales of our experiments. Microcosms amended with lactate or acetate exhibited increased microbial growth rates (up to three-fold) indicating organic carbon as one limiting resource for the microbial communities in these environments. A substantial fraction (15–71%) of the microbial populations contained inducible proviruses that were released- occasionally in multiple pulses- over the eight monitored days following chemical induction. Our findings indicate that viruses in low-energy systems maintain low rates of production and activity, have a small but notable impact on microbial mortality (8–29% attenuation of growth) and that successful viral replication may primarily proceed by non-lethal strategies. In cold, low biomass marine systems of similar character (e.g., subsurface sediments), viruses may be a relatively minor driver of community mortality compared to less energy-limited environments such as the marine water column or surface sediments. PMID:28167930

  9. Chemical modeling for precipitation from hypersaline hydrofracturing brines.

    PubMed

    Zermeno-Motante, Maria I; Nieto-Delgado, Cesar; Cannon, Fred S; Cash, Colin C; Wunz, Christopher C

    2016-10-15

    Hypersaline hydrofracturing brines host very high salt concentrations, as high as 120,000-330,000 mg/L total dissolved solids (TDS), corresponding to ionic strengths of 2.1-5.7 mol/kg. This is 4-10 times higher than for ocean water. At such high ionic strengths, the conventional equations for computing activity coefficients no longer apply; and the complex ion-interactive Pitzer model must be invoked. The authors herein have used the Pitzer-based PHREEQC computer program to compute the appropriate activity coefficients when forming such precipitates as BaSO4, CaSO4, MgSO4, SrSO4, CaCO3, SrCO3, and BaCO3 in hydrofracturing waters. The divalent cation activity coefficients (γM) were computed in the 0.1 to 0.2 range at 2.1 mol/kg ionic strength, then by 5.7 mol/kg ionic strength, they rose to 0.2 for Ba(2+), 0.6 for Sr(2+), 0.8 for Ca(2+), and 2.1 for Mg(2+). Concurrently, the [Formula: see text] was 0.02-0.03; and [Formula: see text] was 0.01-0.02. While employing these Pitzer-derived activity coefficients, the authors then used the PHREEQC model to characterize precipitation of several of these sulfates and carbonates from actual hydrofracturing waters. Modeled precipitation matched quite well with actual laboratory experiments and full-scale operations. Also, the authors found that SrSO4 effectively co-precipitated radium from hydrofracturing brines, as discerned when monitoring (228)Ra and other beta-emitting species via liquid scintillation; and also when monitoring gamma emissions from (226)Ra.

  10. Diversity and stratification of archaea in a hypersaline microbial mat.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Charles E; Spear, John R; Harris, J Kirk; Pace, Norman R

    2009-04-01

    The Guerrero Negro (GN) hypersaline microbial mats have become one focus for biogeochemical studies of stratified ecosystems. The GN mats are found beneath several of a series of ponds of increasing salinity that make up a solar saltern fed from Pacific Ocean water pumped from the Laguna Ojo de Liebre near GN, Baja California Sur, Mexico. Molecular surveys of the laminated photosynthetic microbial mat below the fourth pond in the series identified an enormous diversity of bacteria in the mat, but archaea have received little attention. To determine the bulk contribution of archaeal phylotypes to the pond 4 study site, we determined the phylogenetic distribution of archaeal rRNA gene sequences in PCR libraries based on nominally universal primers. The ratios of bacterial/archaeal/eukaryotic rRNA genes, 90%/9%/1%, suggest that the archaeal contribution to the metabolic activities of the mat may be significant. To explore the distribution of archaea in the mat, sequences derived using archaeon-specific PCR primers were surveyed in 10 strata of the 6-cm-thick mat. The diversity of archaea overall was substantial albeit less than the diversity observed previously for bacteria. Archaeal diversity, mainly euryarchaeotes, was highest in the uppermost 2 to 3 mm of the mat and decreased rapidly with depth, where crenarchaeotes dominated. Only 3% of the sequences were specifically related to known organisms including methanogens. While some mat archaeal clades corresponded with known chemical gradients, others did not, which is likely explained by heretofore-unrecognized gradients. Some clades did not segregate by depth in the mat, indicating broad metabolic repertoires, undersampling, or both.

  11. Viral Induced Microbial Mortality in Arctic Hypersaline Spring Sediments.

    PubMed

    Colangelo-Lillis, Jesse; Wing, Boswell A; Raymond-Bouchard, Isabelle; Whyte, Lyle G

    2016-01-01

    Viruses are a primary influence on microbial mortality in the global ocean. The impacts of viruses on their microbial hosts in low-energy environments are poorly explored and are the focus of this study. To investigate the role of viruses in mediating mortality in low-energy environments where contacts between viruses and microbes are infrequent, we conducted a set of in situ time series incubations in the outlet and channel sediments of two cold, hypersaline springs of the Canadian High Arctic. We found microbial and viral populations in dynamic equilibrium, indicating approximately equal birth and death rates for each population. In situ rates of microbial growth were low (0.5-50 × 10(3) cells cm(-3) h(-1)) as were rates of viral decay (0.09-170 × 10(4) virions cm(-3) h(-1)). A large fraction of the springs' viral communities (49-100%) were refractory to decay over the timescales of our experiments. Microcosms amended with lactate or acetate exhibited increased microbial growth rates (up to three-fold) indicating organic carbon as one limiting resource for the microbial communities in these environments. A substantial fraction (15-71%) of the microbial populations contained inducible proviruses that were released- occasionally in multiple pulses- over the eight monitored days following chemical induction. Our findings indicate that viruses in low-energy systems maintain low rates of production and activity, have a small but notable impact on microbial mortality (8-29% attenuation of growth) and that successful viral replication may primarily proceed by non-lethal strategies. In cold, low biomass marine systems of similar character (e.g., subsurface sediments), viruses may be a relatively minor driver of community mortality compared to less energy-limited environments such as the marine water column or surface sediments.

  12. Preservation of ancestral Cretaceous microflora recovered from a hypersaline oil reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gales, Grégoire; Tsesmetzis, Nicolas; Neria, Isabel; Alazard, Didier; Coulon, Stéphanie; Lomans, Bart P.; Morin, Dominique; Ollivier, Bernard; Borgomano, Jean; Joulian, Catherine

    2016-03-01

    Microbiology of a hypersaline oil reservoir located in Central Africa was investigated with molecular and culture methods applied to preserved core samples. Here we show that the community structure was partially acquired during sedimentation, as many prokaryotic 16S rRNA gene sequences retrieved from the extracted DNA are phylogenetically related to actual Archaea inhabiting surface evaporitic environments, similar to the Cretaceous sediment paleoenvironment. Results are discussed in term of microorganisms and/or DNA preservation in such hypersaline and Mg-rich solutions. High salt concentrations together with anaerobic conditions could have preserved microbial/molecular diversity originating from the ancient sediment basin wherein organic matter was deposited.

  13. Preservation of ancestral Cretaceous microflora recovered from a hypersaline oil reservoir.

    PubMed

    Gales, Grégoire; Tsesmetzis, Nicolas; Neria, Isabel; Alazard, Didier; Coulon, Stéphanie; Lomans, Bart P; Morin, Dominique; Ollivier, Bernard; Borgomano, Jean; Joulian, Catherine

    2016-03-11

    Microbiology of a hypersaline oil reservoir located in Central Africa was investigated with molecular and culture methods applied to preserved core samples. Here we show that the community structure was partially acquired during sedimentation, as many prokaryotic 16S rRNA gene sequences retrieved from the extracted DNA are phylogenetically related to actual Archaea inhabiting surface evaporitic environments, similar to the Cretaceous sediment paleoenvironment. Results are discussed in term of microorganisms and/or DNA preservation in such hypersaline and Mg-rich solutions. High salt concentrations together with anaerobic conditions could have preserved microbial/molecular diversity originating from the ancient sediment basin wherein organic matter was deposited.

  14. Preservation of ancestral Cretaceous microflora recovered from a hypersaline oil reservoir

    PubMed Central

    Gales, Grégoire; Tsesmetzis, Nicolas; Neria, Isabel; Alazard, Didier; Coulon, Stéphanie; Lomans, Bart P.; Morin, Dominique; Ollivier, Bernard; Borgomano, Jean; Joulian, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Microbiology of a hypersaline oil reservoir located in Central Africa was investigated with molecular and culture methods applied to preserved core samples. Here we show that the community structure was partially acquired during sedimentation, as many prokaryotic 16S rRNA gene sequences retrieved from the extracted DNA are phylogenetically related to actual Archaea inhabiting surface evaporitic environments, similar to the Cretaceous sediment paleoenvironment. Results are discussed in term of microorganisms and/or DNA preservation in such hypersaline and Mg-rich solutions. High salt concentrations together with anaerobic conditions could have preserved microbial/molecular diversity originating from the ancient sediment basin wherein organic matter was deposited. PMID:26965360

  15. Alkaline battery operational methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Sholklapper, Tal; Gallaway, Joshua; Steingart, Daniel; Ingale, Nilesh; Nyce, Michael

    2016-08-16

    Methods of using specific operational charge and discharge parameters to extend the life of alkaline batteries are disclosed. The methods can be used with any commercial primary or secondary alkaline battery, as well as with newer alkaline battery designs, including batteries with flowing electrolyte. The methods include cycling batteries within a narrow operating voltage window, with minimum and maximum cut-off voltages that are set based on battery characteristics and environmental conditions. The narrow voltage window decreases available capacity but allows the batteries to be cycled for hundreds or thousands of times.

  16. Continuous CO2 escape from the hypersaline Dead Sea caused by aragonite precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golan, Rotem; Lazar, Boaz; Wurgaft, Eyal; Lensky, Nadav; Ganor, Jiwchar; Gavrieli, Ittai

    2017-06-01

    Chemical precipitation of CaCO3 occurs in diverse marine and lacustrine environments. In the hypersaline Ca-chloride lakes that have been occupying the Dead Sea basin since the late Pleistocene, CaCO3 precipitated, mostly as aragonite. The aragonite sediments precipitated mainly during periods of high lake level stands as a result of mixing of bicarbonate-rich freshwater runoff with Dead Sea brine, that is Ca-rich and have high Mg/Ca ratio. During periods of arid conditions with limited freshwater inflow, water level declined, salinity increased and gypsum and halite became the dominant evaporitic minerals to precipitate. The present study investigates the carbon cycle of the Dead Sea under the current limited water and bicarbonate supply to the brine, representing periods of extremely arid conditions. The decrease of inflows to the Dead Sea in recent years stems mainly from diversion of freshwater from the drainage basin and results in dramatic water level decline and massive halite precipitation. During 2013-2014, bi-monthly depth profiles of total alkalinity, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and its isotopic composition (δ13C) were conducted in the Dead Sea, from surface down to the bottom of the lake (290 m). Mass balance calculations conducted for the period 1993-2013 show that while inventories of conservative ions such as Mg2+ remained constant, the net DIC inventory of the lake decreased by ∼10%. DIC supply to the lake during this period, however, amounted to ∼10% of lake's inventory indicating that during 20 years, the lake lost ∼20% of its 1993s inventory. Compilation of historical data with our data shows that during the past two decades the lake's low DIC (∼1 mmol kg-1) and very high PCO2 (1800 ppm V) remained relatively constant, suggesting that a quasi-steady-state situation prevails. In spite of the surprisingly stable DIC and CO2 concentrations, during this 20 year period δ13CDIC increased significantly, from 1.4‰ to 2.7‰. An isotopic

  17. Digital Bathymetric Model of Mono Lake, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raumann, Christian G.; Stine, Scott; Evans, Alexander; Wilson, Jerry

    2002-01-01

    In 1986 and 1987, Pelagos Corporation of San Diego (now Racal Pelagos) undertook a bathymetric survey of Mono Lake in eastern California for the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (DWP). The result of that survey was a series of maps at various scales and contour intervals. From these maps, the DWP hoped to predict consequences of the drop in lake level that resulted from their diversion of streams in the Mono Basin. No digital models, including shaded-relief and perspective-view renderings, were made from the data collected during the survey. With the permission of Pelagos Corporation and DWP, these data are used to produce a digital model of the floor of Mono Lake. The model was created using a geographic information system (GIS) to incorporate these data with new observations and measurements made in the field. This model should prove to be a valuable tool for enhanced visualization and analyses of the floor of Mono Lake.

  18. Dynamics of Molecular Hydrogen in Hypersaline Microbial Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoehler, Tori M.; Bebout, Brad M.; Visscher, Pieter T.; DesMarais, David J.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Early Earth microbial communities that centered around the anaerobic decomposition of organic molecular hydrogen as a carrier of electrons, regulator of energy metabolism, and facilitator of syntroph'c microbial interactions. The advent of oxygenic photosynthetic organisms added a highly dynamic and potentially dominant term to the hydrogen economy of these communities. We have examined the daily variations of hydrogen concentrations in cyanobacteria-dominated microbial mats from hypersaline ponds in Baja California Sur, Mexico. These mats bring together phototrophic and anaerobic bacteria (along with virtually all other trophic groups) in a spatially ordered and chemically dynamic matrix that provides a good analog for early Earth microbial ecosystems. Hydrogen concentrations in the photic zone of the mat can be three orders of magnitude or more higher than in the photic zone, which are, in turn, an order of magnitude higher than in the unconsolidated sediments underlying the mat community. Within the photic zone, hydrogen concentrations can fluctuate dramatically during the diel (24 hour day-night) cycle, ranging from less than 0.001% during the day to nearly 10% at night. The resultant nighttime flux of hydrogen from the mat to the environment was up to 17% of the daytime oxygen flux. The daily pattern observed is highly dependent on cyanobacterial species composition within the mat, with Lyngbya-dominated systems having a much greater dynamic range than those dominated by Microcoleus; this may relate largely to differing degrees of nitrogen-fixing and fermentative activity in the two mats. The greatest H2 concentrations and fluxes were observed in the absence of oxygen, suggesting an important potential feedback control in the context of the evolution of atmospheric composition. The impact of adding this highly dynamic photosynthetic term to the hydrogen economy of early microbial ecosystems must have been substantial. From an evolutionary standpoint, the H2

  19. Dynamics of Molecular Hydrogen in Hypersaline Microbial Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoehler, Tori M.; Bebout, Brad M.; Visscher, Pieter T.; DesMarais, David J.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Early Earth microbial communities that centered around the anaerobic decomposition of organic molecular hydrogen as a carrier of electrons, regulator of energy metabolism, and facilitator of syntroph'c microbial interactions. The advent of oxygenic photosynthetic organisms added a highly dynamic and potentially dominant term to the hydrogen economy of these communities. We have examined the daily variations of hydrogen concentrations in cyanobacteria-dominated microbial mats from hypersaline ponds in Baja California Sur, Mexico. These mats bring together phototrophic and anaerobic bacteria (along with virtually all other trophic groups) in a spatially ordered and chemically dynamic matrix that provides a good analog for early Earth microbial ecosystems. Hydrogen concentrations in the photic zone of the mat can be three orders of magnitude or more higher than in the photic zone, which are, in turn, an order of magnitude higher than in the unconsolidated sediments underlying the mat community. Within the photic zone, hydrogen concentrations can fluctuate dramatically during the diel (24 hour day-night) cycle, ranging from less than 0.001% during the day to nearly 10% at night. The resultant nighttime flux of hydrogen from the mat to the environment was up to 17% of the daytime oxygen flux. The daily pattern observed is highly dependent on cyanobacterial species composition within the mat, with Lyngbya-dominated systems having a much greater dynamic range than those dominated by Microcoleus; this may relate largely to differing degrees of nitrogen-fixing and fermentative activity in the two mats. The greatest H2 concentrations and fluxes were observed in the absence of oxygen, suggesting an important potential feedback control in the context of the evolution of atmospheric composition. The impact of adding this highly dynamic photosynthetic term to the hydrogen economy of early microbial ecosystems must have been substantial. From an evolutionary standpoint, the H2

  20. Methanogens in hypersaline environments and their substrates for methane production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, J. A.; Kelley, C. A.; Chanton, J.; Tazaz, A.; Bebout, B.

    2009-12-01

    The goal of our study was to determine the dominant substrates being used by methanogens in salt ponds in Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico. These are extreme environments that have been used as analogs for ancient life, terrestrial and extraterrestrial. Microbial mat and/or sediments from the ponds, amended either with site water only (controls) or with site water and various substrates, were incubated in N2 flushed serum vials. We hypothesized that trimethylamine, a degradation product of the osmoregulant glycine betaine, would be a dominant substrate in all ponds, as has been previously reported. Additionally we incubated with methanol, dimethylsulfide, monomethylamine, bicarbonate, and acetate, all reported to be substrates of great importance in other hypersaline environments. Concentrations of methane in the vial headspaces were monitored through time to obtain methane production rates. As expected, trimethylamine stimulated methane production over the controls in all incubations. Dimethylsulfide and methanol also stimulated methane production; the former increased methane production in the lowest salinity pond (55 ppt salinity) and the latter at one of the highest salinity ponds (184 ppt salinity). In addition to methane production data, stable carbon isotopic values of the methane in methane-rich bubbles collected at the sites as well as in the particulate organic carbon (POC) of the microbial mat/sediment were obtained. Fractionation factors, a measure of the isotopic differences between methane and substrate, can help indicate dominant substrates. Published fractionation factors differ depending on the substrate used and increase in the following order of use by methanogens: acetate, dimethylsulfide, CO2 reduction/trimethylamine and methanol. Since trimethylamine was used as a substrate at all of these sites, high fractionation factors in the range of 1.05 to 1.07 (the published range for trimethylamine) were expected. However, the apparent

  1. Contemporary microbes in hypersaline springs that contain fossil carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziolkowski, L. A.; Mykytczuk, N. C.; Whyte, L.; Slater, G. F.

    2011-12-01

    On Axel Heiberg Island, near 80 oN in the Canadian Arctic, perennial hypersaline springs provide a unique environment for cold-active microbes. The neutral pH Gypsum Hill springs originate in a gypsum diaper and flow through 600 m of continuous permafrost before reaching the surface at ~6 oC, 7.5 % NaCl, low dissolved inorganic carbon and rich in both sulfate and sulfide (Pollard et al., 2009). In the first part of the year, when ambient temperatures dip as low as -40 oC, filamentous streamers are abundant under the snow covered run-off channels. These microbial assemblages are not present during the summer, when the snow cover has melted. Culture- and molecular-based analyses of the 16S rRNA gene indicated that the streamers are dominated by a chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing Thiomicrospira species and under in situ conditions the streamers oxidized sulfide and thiosulfate and also fixed CO2 (Perreault et al., 2008). We characterized the isotopic composition (13C and 14C) of the microbial community biomarkers as phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) and glycolipid fatty acid (GLFA) methyl esters. These components represent the cell membranes of the viable microbial community, which are quickly hydrolyzed after cell death and provide insight into the carbon cycling of the organisms. Even though isotopic measurements of the bulk biomass indicate carbon and nitrogen limitation within the system, the streamers are rich in biomass with greater than 109 cells/g. While the PLFA and GLFA profiles were similar, indicating a predominantly gram-negative bacteria community, the 13C composition of these two lipid types was different. The PLFA δ13C indicated a dominant autotrophic signal, while the δ13C of the GLFA had a more heterotrophic signal. While the streamers grow yearly, their 14C age based on the lipid results was 6400 years, indicating utilization of a carbon source that is 14C depleted. We hypothesize that these microbes are using 14C depleted dissolved inorganic

  2. Diversity of bacteria and archaea in hypersaline sediment from Death Valley National Park, California

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to phylogenetically analyze microorganisms from the domains Bacteria and Archaea in hypersaline sediment from Death Valley National Park. Using domain-specific primers, a region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified using PCR, and the product was subsequently used to cr...

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Pantoea anthophila Strain 11-2 from Hypersaline Lake Laysan, Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xuehua; Hou, Shaobin; Phan, Nolwenn; Malone Moss, Jennifer S; Donachie, Stuart P; Alam, Maqsudul

    2015-05-14

    Most Pantoea spp. have been isolated from plant sources or clinical samples. However, we cultivated Pantoea anthophila 11-2 from hypersaline water from the lake on Laysan, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. Draft genome sequencing of 11-2 provides a molecular basis for studies in evolution and pathogenicity in Pantoea spp. Copyright © 2015 Wan et al.

  4. Do copepods inhabit hypersaline waters worldwide? A short review and discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anufriieva, Elena V.

    2015-11-01

    A small number of copepod species have adapted to an existence in the extreme habitat of hypersaline water. 13 copepod species have been recorded in the hypersaline waters of Crimea (the largest peninsula in the Black Sea with over 50 hypersaline lakes). Summarizing our own and literature data, the author concludes that the Crimean extreme environment is not an exception: copepod species dwell in hypersaline waters worldwide. There are at least 26 copepod species around the world living at salinity above 100; among them 12 species are found at salinity higher than 200. In the Crimea Cletocamptus retrogressus is found at salinity 360×10-3 (with a density of 1 320 individuals/m3) and Arctodiaptomus salinus at salinity 300×10-3 (with a density of 343 individuals/m3). Those species are probably the most halotolerant copepod species in the world. High halotolerance of osmoconforming copepods may be explained by exoosmolyte consumption, mainly with food. High tolerance to many factors in adults, availability of resting stages, and an opportunity of long-distance transportation of resting stages by birds and/or winds are responsible for the wide geographic distribution of these halophilic copepods.

  5. A Modeling Comparison of Methanogenesis from Noncompetitive vs Competitive Substrates in a Simulated Hypersaline Microbial Mat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, K. L.; Potter, C.; Hoehler, T.

    2005-12-01

    The well-documented assumption about methanogens that co-occur in hypersaline mat communities with sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is that they rely entirely on non-competitive substrates for methanogenesis. The reason for this is that during sulfate reduction, sulfur-reducing bacteria efficiently utilize H2, leaving a concentration too low for methanogenesis. Early results from recent work on a hypersaline microbial mat from salt evaporation ponds of Guerrero Negro, Baja, Mexico cast doubt that methanogenesis only occurs via non-competitive substrates, because it shows an excess of H2 in the mat rather than a paucity. We explore the use of our simulation model of the microbial biogeochemistry of a hypersaline mat (named MBGC) to compare methane production rates in a 1 cm thick mat when the methanogens use competitive substrates versus noncompetitive substrates. In the `non-competitive substrate' version of the model, methanogens rely exclusively on methylated amines that are accumulated as compatible solutes in cyanobacteria and released after lysis. In contrast, the `competitive substrate' models examine methanogen use of substrates (such as H2 + acetate) with different SRB population sizes (from absent to low). The comparison of these models of methane and sulfide biogeochemistry of a hypersaline mat has both ecological and geobiological significance, as one hypothesis of Archean microbial mats is that they existed in a low sulfate environment.

  6. Mafic replenishment of multiple felsic reservoirs at the Mono domes and Mono Lake islands, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, Brandon; Stix, John; Cousens, Brian

    2017-07-01

    The Mono Basin has been the site of frequent volcanic activity over the past 60,000 years, including the emplacement of the Mono domes and Mono Lake islands. The Mono Basin lavas are the youngest and most poorly understood products of the Long Valley Volcanic Field. We have undertaken a study of Mono Basin volcanism encompassing whole-rock major and trace element, Sr, Nd, Pb, and O isotopic, and electron microprobe glass, plagioclase, and amphibole analyses. Variations in major and trace elements suggest that fractional crystallization of feldspar (Sr, K2O), apatite (P2O5), titanomagnetite (V), zircon (Zr), and allanite (La, Ce) has influenced the evolution of the Mono Basin lavas. Field observations, petrography, and chemistry together demonstrate that injection of more mafic magma is a common process throughout the Mono Basin. Mafic enclaves of the Mono domes are stretched and rounded, with chilled margins between enclave and host rhyolite. Thin sections reveal millimeter-scale inclusions of rhyolite in the enclaves and vice versa along the host-enclave border. Paoha Island dacite has glass with 67-72 wt% SiO2 and contains microscopic clots of more mafic glasses, with SiO2 contents as low as 64 wt%. Isotopically, the June Lake and Black Point basalts and the Mono dome enclaves represent the least evolved material in the Long Valley Volcanic Field, with 87Sr/86Sri <0.7056 and 143Nd/144Nd >0.5126. The silicic Mono Lake lavas and Mono dome rhyolites display a significant crustal component, with 87Sr/86Sri >0.7058 and 143Nd/144Nd <0.5127. Oxygen and Pb isotopes throughout the sample suite also have crustal signatures, with 206Pb/204Pb >19 and δ18O >+6.5‰. The Mono Lake lavas generally are younger and less evolved than the Mono domes, with enrichment in trace elements including Ba and Sr accompanied by lower 143Nd/144Nd and higher 206Pb/204Pb. This implies that the Mono domes and the Mono Lake lavas are derived from different magma batches, if not from separate

  7. Alkaline phosphatase: an overview.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ujjawal; Pal, Deeksha; Prasad, Rajendra

    2014-07-01

    Alkaline phosphatase (ALP; E.C.3.I.3.1.) is an ubiquitous membrane-bound glycoprotein that catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphate monoesters at basic pH values. Alkaline phosphatase is divided into four isozymes depending upon the site of tissue expression that are Intestinal ALP, Placental ALP, Germ cell ALP and tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase or liver/bone/kidney (L/B/K) ALP. The intestinal and placental ALP loci are located near the end of long arm of chromosome 2 and L/B/K ALP is located near the end of the short arm of chromosome 1. Although ALPs are present in many mammalian tissues and have been studied for the last several years still little is known about them. The bone isoenzyme may be involved in mammalian bone calcification and the intestinal isoenzyme is thought to play a role in the transport of phosphate into epithelial cells of the intestine. In this review, we tried to provide an overview about the various forms, structure and functions of alkaline phosphatase with special focus on liver/bone/kidney alkaline phosphatase.

  8. Brackish to hypersaline lake dolostones of the Mississippian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Carys; Kearsey, Timothy; Davies, Sarah; Millward, David; Marshall, John

    2016-04-01

    , and 9% of all dolostone beds in the Norham Core are pedogenically altered. The isotopic composition of dolomite beds is δ18O -3.6‰ to -1.7‰ and δ13C -2.6‰ to 1.6‰ which is consistent with a brackish as opposed to marine origin. The dolostones are categorised by their sedimentary composition: Facies 1: Cemented siltstone and sandstone; Facies 2: Homogeneous micrite to micro-crystaline dolomite, within a clay matrix; Facies 3: Bedded dolomite and siltstone; Facies 4: Mixed calcite and dolomite; Facies 5: Dolomite with gypsum and anhydrite. Formation processes are diverse, and include diagenetic cementation (Facies 1), deposition in saline (brackish) lakes (Facies 2), deposition in saline lakes with clastic sediment input (Facies 3), lagoonal to shallow-marine carbonate deposition (Facies 4), and hypersaline lake to sabkha environments (Facies 5). 60% of the beds are facies 2 or 3 and their sedimentology, fauna, ichnofauna and isotopic composition indicate a brackish-water origin. Other Mississippian dolostones from around the world also contain a fairly restricted fauna and have been interpreted as brackish water deposits. The mechanism of dolomite formation under these conditions is discussed. These dolostones provided extensive coastal lakes that may have been an important habitat for tetrapods and other transitional groups during the Mississippian.

  9. Phylogeny and ecology of the ubiquitous saprobe Cladosporium sphaerospermum, with descriptions of seven new species from hypersaline environments

    PubMed Central

    Zalar, P.; de Hoog, G.S.; Schroers, H.-J.; Crous, P.W.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Gunde-Cimerman, N.

    2007-01-01

    Saprobic Cladosporium isolates morphologically similar to C. sphaerospermum are phylogenetically analysed on the basis of DNA sequences of the ribosomal RNA gene cluster, including the internal transcribed spacer regions ITS1 and ITS2, the 5.8S rDNA (ITS) and the small subunit (SSU) rDNA as well as β-tubulin and actin gene introns and exons. Most of the C. sphaerospermum-like species show halotolerance as a recurrent feature. Cladosporium sphaerospermum, which is characterised by almost globose conidia, is redefined on the basis of its ex-neotype culture. Cladosporium dominicanum, C. psychrotolerans, C. velox, C. spinulosum and C. halotolerans, all with globoid conidia, are newly described on the basis of phylogenetic analyses and cryptic morphological and physiological characters. Cladosporium halotolerans was isolated from hypersaline water and bathrooms and detected once on dolphin skin. Cladosporium dominicanum and C. velox were isolated from plant material and hypersaline water. Cladosporium psychrotolerans, which grows well at 4 °C but not at 30 °C, and C. spinulosum, having conspicuously ornamented conidia with long digitate projections, are currently only known from hypersaline water. We also newly describe C. salinae from hypersaline water and C. fusiforme from hypersaline water and animal feed. Both species have ovoid to ellipsoid conidia and are therefore reminiscent of C. herbarum. Cladosporium langeronii (= Hormodendrum langeronii) previously described as a pathogen on human skin, is halotolerant but has not yet been recorded from hypersaline environments. PMID:18490999

  10. [Advances of alkaline amylase production and applications].

    PubMed

    Yang, Haiquan; Liu, Long; Li, Jianghua; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2012-04-01

    Alkaline amylase is one of alkaline enzymes with optimum pH in the alkaline range, and it could keep stability and efficiently hydrolyze starch under alkaline conditions. Alkaline amylase finds wide applications in textile, detergent, pharmaceutical, food and other fields. Alkaline amylases could be produced by alkaliphilic microorganisms. In this work, the advances of alkaline amylase production and applications were reviewed.

  11. Alkaline flooding injection strategy

    SciTech Connect

    French, T.R.; Josephson, C.B.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to improved alkali-surfactant flooding methods, and this includes determining the proper design of injection strategy. Several different injection strategies have been used or suggested for recovering heavy oils with surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding methods. Oil recovery was compared for four different injection strategies: (1) surfactant followed by polymer, (2) surfactant followed by alkaline polymer, (3) alkaline surfactant followed by polymer, and (4) alkali, surfactant, and polymer mixed in a single formulation. The effect of alkaline preflush was also studied under two different conditions. All of the oil recovery experiments were conducted under optimal conditions with a viscous, non-acidic oil from Hepler (KS) oil field. The coreflood experiments were conducted with Berea sandstone cores since field core was not available in sufficient quantity for coreflood tests. The Tucker sand of Hepler field is a Class I fluvial dominated deltaic reservoir, as classified by the Department of Energy, which has been selected as the site of a DOE-sponsored field pilot test.

  12. Dependence of juvenile reef fishes on semi-arid hypersaline estuary microhabitats as nurseries.

    PubMed

    Sales, N S; Dias, T L P; Baeta, A; Pessanha, A L M

    2016-07-01

    The differences between fish assemblages in three microhabitat types, in relation to vegetation and sediment characteristics of a hypersaline estuary located in an semi-arid zone in north-eastern Brazil, were investigated. Fishes were collected using a beach seine during the rainy and dry seasons in 2012. A total of 78 species were recorded, with the most common families being Gerreidae, Lutjanidae and Tetraodontidae. The majority of species were represented by juveniles, with Eucinostomus argenteus, Ulaema lefroyi and Sphoeroides greeleyi being the dominant species. The fish assemblage structures differed significantly among microhabitat types, with the narrow intertidal flat adjacent to the mangrove fringe supporting the most diverse fish fauna. In addition, only 27 species were common to all of the microhabitats. The results support the hypothesis that hypersaline estuaries serve as important nursery areas for various reef fish species, due to the structural complexity provided by their macroalgae beds and mangroves. © 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  13. Removal performance and microbial communities in a sequencing batch reactor treating hypersaline phenol-laden wastewater.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Wei, Li; Zhang, Huining; Yang, Kai; Wang, Hongyu

    2016-10-01

    Hypersaline phenol-rich wastewater is hard to be treated by traditional biological systems. In this work, a sequencing batch reactor was used to remove phenol from hypersaline wastewater. The removal performance was evaluated in response to the variations of operating parameters and the microbial diversity was investigated by 454 pyrosequencing. The results showed that the bioreactor had high removal efficiency of phenol and was able to keep stable with the increase of initial phenol concentration. DO, pH, and salinity also affected the phenol removal rate. The most abundant bacterial group was phylum Proteobacteria in the two working conditions, and class Gammaproteobacteria as well as Alphaproteobacteria was predominant subgroup. The abundance of bacterial clusters was notably different along with the variation of operation conditions, resulting in changes of phenol degradation rates. The high removal efficiency of phenol suggested that the reactor might be promising in treating phenol-laden industrial wastewater in high-salt condition.

  14. Isotopic measurements of N2O in a hypersaline pond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, B. D.; Casciotti, K.; Samarkin, V.; Joye, S. B.; Madigan, M.; Schutte, C.

    2012-12-01

    Production of nitrous oxide (N2O) in aquatic environments has often been attributed to biological processes. However, reports of abiotic mechanisms of N2O production have suggested that such processes may be substantial in Antarctic Dry Valley soils. It has been proposed that the reduction of nitrate (NO3-) and nitrite (NO2-) coupled to Fe (II) oxidation can produce N2O with a characteristic site preference (SP), where SP is defined as the difference in nitrogen isotope ratio between the center and outside nitrogen atoms in the linear N2O molecule. The current study uses isotopic measurements of N2O, NO2-, and NO3- to examine N2O production mechanisms in Don Juan Pond (DJP), a hypersaline pond in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. [NO3-] and [NO2-] in DJP brine were quite high, ranging from 6,238 to 7,719μM and 23 to 36μM, respectively. N2O samples from pond water (brine) yielded δ15Nbulk of -38±1‰, δ18O of +60±2‰, and SP of +1±7‰. Gas collected from soil had similar N2O isotope ratios, with δ15Nbulk of -45±4‰, δ18O of +56±3‰, and SP of +6±1‰. These field measurements were interpreted using a two end member mixing model, in which the measured N2O was assumed to be a mixture between atmospheric N2O and N2O from a local source. Using the three isotope systems (δ15Nbulk, δ18O, and SP), a series of four equations were constructed with five unknowns: δ15Nbulk, δ18O, and SP of the source, and the fractional contributions of the local source and atmospheric N2O. Solving the equations required an assumption about one of the five unknowns. To do this, we used data from laboratory experiments carried out with sterile brine and DJP soil in order to provide an estimate of the N2O isotope signature of the abiotic source. DJP brine and soil measurements gave similar model results, and thus only results using DJP soil measurements are reported here. Assuming δ18O of the unknown local source is near +82‰(from abiotic laboratory experiments), then

  15. Alloactinosynnema iranicum sp. nov., a rare actinomycete isolated from a hypersaline wetland, and emended description of the genus Alloactinosynnema.

    PubMed

    Nikou, Mahdi Moshtaghi; Ramezani, Mohaddaseh; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Fazeli, Seyed Abolhassan Shahzadeh; Schumann, Peter; Spröer, Cathrin; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Ventosa, Antonio

    2014-04-01

    A Gram-staining-positive actinobacterial strain, Chem10(T), was isolated from soil around Inche-Broun hypersaline wetland in the north of Iran. Strain Chem10(T) was strictly aerobic, and catalase- and oxidase-positive. The isolate grew with 0-3 % NaCl, at 20-40 °C and at pH 6.0-8.0. The optimum temperature and pH for growth were 30 °C and pH 7.0, respectively. The cell wall of strain Chem10(T) contained meso-diaminopimelic acid as diamino acid and galactose, ribose and arabinose as whole-cell sugars. The polar lipid pattern contained diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylethanolamine. Strain Chem10(T) synthesized cellular fatty acids of the straight-chain saturated and mono-unsaturated, and iso- and anteiso-branched types C14 : 0, C16 : 0, iso-C16 : 1, anteiso-C17 : 0, iso-C16 : 0, iso-C14 : 0 and iso-C15 : 0, and the major respiratory quinone was MK-9(H4). The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 70.7 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain Chem10(T) belonged to the family Pseudonocardiaceae and showed the closest phylogenetic similarity to Alloactinosynnema album KCTC 19294(T) (98.3 %) and Actinokineospora cibodasensis DSM 45658(T) (97.9 %). DNA-DNA relatedness values between the novel strain and strains Alloactinosynnema album KCTC 19294(T) and Actinokineospora cibodasensis DSM 45658(T) were only 52 % and 23 %, respectively. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis, phenotypic characteristics and DNA-DNA hybridization data, a novel species of the genus Alloactinosynnema is proposed, Alloactinosynnema iranicum sp. nov. The type strain is Chem10(T) ( = IBRC-M 10403(T) = CECT 8209(T)). In addition, an emended description of the genus Alloactinosynnema is proposed.

  16. Microbial eukaryotes in the hypersaline anoxic L'Atalante deep-sea basin.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Eva; Stock, Alexandra; Breiner, Hans-Werner; Behnke, Anke; Bunge, John; Yakimov, Michail M; Stoeck, Thorsten

    2009-02-01

    The frontiers of eukaryote life in nature are still unidentified. In this study, we analysed protistan communities in the hypersaline (up to 365 g l(-1) NaCl) anoxic L'Atalante deep-sea basin located in the eastern Mediterranean Sea. Targeting 18S ribosomal RNA retrieved from the basin's lower halocline (3501 m depth) we detected 279 protistan sequences that grouped into 42 unique phylotypes (99% sequence similarity). Statistical analyses revealed that these phylotypes account only for a proportion of the protists inhabiting this harsh environment with as much as 50% missed by this survey. Most phylotypes were affiliated with ciliates (45%), dinoflagellates (21%), choanoflagelates (10%) and uncultured marine alveolates (6%). Sequences from other taxonomic groups like stramenopiles, Polycystinea, Acantharea and Euglenozoa, all of which are typically found in non-hypersaline deep-sea systems, are either missing or very rare in our cDNA clone library. Although many DHAB sequences fell within previously identified environmental clades, a large number branched relatively deeply. Phylotype richness, community membership and community structure differ significantly from a deep seawater reference community (3499 m depth). Also, the protistan community in the L'Atalante basin is distinctively different from any previously described hypersaline community. In conclusion, we hypothesize that extreme environments may exert a high selection pressure possibly resulting in the evolution of an exceptional and distinctive assemblage of protists. The deep hypersaline anoxic basins in the Mediterranean Sea provide an ideal platform to test for this hypothesis and are promising targets for the discovery of undescribed protists with unknown physiological capabilities.

  17. [New isolation methods and phylogenetic diversity of actinobacteria from hypersaline beach in Aksu].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yao; Xia, Zhanfeng; Cao, Xinbo; Li, Jun; Zhang, Lili

    2013-08-04

    We explored 4 new methods to improve the isolation of actinobacterial resources from high salt areas. Optimized media based on 4 new strategies were used for isolating actinobacteria from hypersaline beaches. Glycerin-arginine, trehalose-creatine, glycerol-asparticacid, mannitol-casein, casein-mannitol, mannitol-alanine, chitosan-asparagineand GAUZE' No. 1 were used as basic media. New isolation strategy includes 4 methods: ten-fold dilution culture, simulation of the original environment, actinobacterial culture guided by uncultured molecular technology detected, and reference of actinobacterial media for brackish marine environment. The 16S rRNA genes of the isolates were amplified with bacterial universal primers. The results of 16S rRNA gene sequences were compared with sequences obtained from GenBank databases. We constructed phylogenetic tree with the neighbor-joining method. No actinobacterial strains were isolated by 8 media of control group, while 403 strains were isolated by new strategies. The isolates by new methods were members of 14 genera (Streptomyces, Streptomonospora, Saccharomonospora, Plantactinospora, Nocardia, Amycolatopsis, Glycomyces, Micromonospora, Nocardiopsis, Isoptericola, Nonomuraea, Thermobifida, Actinopolyspora, Actinomadura) of 10 families in 8 suborders. The most abundant and diverse isolates were the two suborders of Streptomycineae (69.96%) and Streptosporangineaesuborder (9.68%) within the phylum Actinobacteria, including 9 potential novel species. New isolation methods significantly improved the actinobacterial culturability of hypersaline areas, and obtained many potential novel species, which provided a new and more effective way to isolate actinobacteria resources in hypersaline environments.

  18. The density-driven circulation of the coastal hypersaline system of the Great Barrier Reef, Australia.

    PubMed

    Salamena, Gerry G; Martins, Flávio; Ridd, Peter V

    2016-04-15

    The coastal hypersaline system of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) in the dry season, was investigated for the first time using a 3D baroclinic model. In the shallow coastal embayments, salinity increases to c.a. 1‰ above typical offshore salinity (~35.4‰). This salinity increase is due to high evaporation rates and negligible freshwater input. The hypersalinity drifts longshore north-westward due to south-easterly trade winds and may eventually pass capes or headlands, e.g. Cape Cleveland, where the water is considerably deeper (c.a. 15m). Here, a pronounced thermohaline circulation is predicted to occur which flushes the hypersalinity offshore at velocities of up to 0.08m/s. Flushing time of the coastal embayments is around 2-3weeks. During the dry season early summer, the thermohaline circulation reduces and therefore, flushing times are predicted to be slight longer due to the reduced onshore-offshore density gradient compared to that in the dry season winter period.

  19. Anaerobic oxidation of methane by sulfate in hypersaline groundwater of the Dead Sea aquifer.

    PubMed

    Avrahamov, N; Antler, G; Yechieli, Y; Gavrieli, I; Joye, S B; Saxton, M; Turchyn, A V; Sivan, O

    2014-11-01

    Geochemical and microbial evidence points to anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) likely coupled with bacterial sulfate reduction in the hypersaline groundwater of the Dead Sea (DS) alluvial aquifer. Groundwater was sampled from nine boreholes drilled along the Arugot alluvial fan next to the DS. The groundwater samples were highly saline (up to 6300 mm chlorine), anoxic, and contained methane. A mass balance calculation demonstrates that the very low δ(13) CDIC in this groundwater is due to anaerobic methane oxidation. Sulfate depletion coincident with isotope enrichment of sulfur and oxygen isotopes in the sulfate suggests that sulfate reduction is associated with this AOM. DNA extraction and 16S amplicon sequencing were used to explore the microbial community present and were found to be microbial composition indicative of bacterial sulfate reducers associated with anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) driving AOM. The net sulfate reduction seems to be primarily controlled by the salinity and the available methane and is substantially lower as salinity increases (2.5 mm sulfate removal at 3000 mm chlorine but only 0.5 mm sulfate removal at 6300 mm chlorine). Low overall sulfur isotope fractionation observed ((34) ε = 17 ± 3.5‰) hints at high rates of sulfate reduction, as has been previously suggested for sulfate reduction coupled with methane oxidation. The new results demonstrate the presence of sulfate-driven AOM in terrestrial hypersaline systems and expand our understanding of how microbial life is sustained under the challenging conditions of an extremely hypersaline environment.

  20. Geologically controlled bi-directional exchange of groundwater with a hypersaline lake in the Canadian prairies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, Laurence R.; Hayashi, Masaki; Zimmerman, Elena P.; Holmden, Chris; Kelley, Lynn I.

    2016-06-01

    Hypersaline lakes occur in hydrologically closed basins due to evaporitic enrichment of dissolved salts transported to the lakes by surface water and groundwater. At the hypersaline Lydden Lake in Saskatchewan, Canada, groundwater/lake-water interaction is strongly influenced by the geological heterogeneity of glacial deposits, whereby a highly permeable glaciofluvial sand/gravel deposit is underlain by glaciolacustrine deposits consisting of dense clay interspersed with silt/sand lenses. Pressure head distribution in a near shore area indicates a bi-directional flow system. It consists of topographically driven flow of fresh groundwater towards the lake in the sand/gravel aquifer and density-driven, landward flow of saline groundwater in the underlying glaciolacustrine deposits. Electrical resistivity tomography, and chemical and isotopic composition of groundwater clearly show the landward intrusion of saline water in the heterogeneous unit. The feasibility of bi-directional flow and transport is supported by numerical simulations of density-coupled groundwater flow and transport. The results suggest that the geologically controlled groundwater exchange processes have substantial influences on both inputs and outputs of dissolved minerals in hypersaline lakes in closed basins.

  1. Characterization of basidiomycetous yeasts in hypersaline soils of the Urmia Lake National Park, Iran.

    PubMed

    Mokhtarnejad, Lachin; Arzanlou, Mahdi; Babai-Ahari, Asadollah; Di Mauro, Simone; Onofri, Andrea; Buzzini, Pietro; Turchetti, Benedetta

    2016-11-01

    Urmia Lake, located in northwest Iran, is an oligotrophic and extremely hypersaline habitat that supports diverse forms of life. Owing to its unique biodiversity and special environmental conditions, Urmia Lake National Park has been designated as one of the biosphere reserves by UNESCO. This study was aimed to characterize basidiomycetous yeasts in hypersaline soils surrounding the Urmia Lake National Park using a polyphasic combination of molecular and physiological data. Soil samples were collected from eight sites in Lake Basin and six islands insides the lake. Yeast strains were identified by sequencing the D1/D2 domains of the 26S rRNA gene. When D1/D2 domain sequencing did not resolve the identity of the species, strain identification was obtained by ITS 1 & 2 sequencing. Twenty-one species belonging to the genera Cystobasidium, Holtermanniella, Naganishia, Rhodotorula, Saitozyma, Solicoccozyma, Tausonia, Vanrija, and Vishniacozyma were identified. Solicoccozyma aeria represented the dominant species. The ability of isolates to grow at 10 and 15 % of NaCl was checked; about two-thirds of the strains grew at 10 %, while about 13 % of the isolates grew in medium with 15 % NaCl. this study is the first study on the culturable yeast diversity in hypersaline soils surrounding an Asian lake.

  2. Vacuolated Beggiatoa-like filaments from different hypersaline environments form a novel genus.

    PubMed

    Hinck, Susanne; Mussmann, Marc; Salman, Verena; Neu, Thomas R; Lenk, Sabine; Beer, Dirk de; Jonkers, Henk M

    2011-12-01

    In this study, members of a specific group of thin (6-14 µm filament diameter), vacuolated Beggiatoa-like filaments from six different hypersaline microbial mats were morphologically and phylogenetically characterized. Therefore, enrichment cultures were established, filaments were stained with fluorochromes to show intracellular structures and 16S rRNA genes were sequenced. Morphological characteristics of Beggiatoa-like filaments, in particular the presence of intracellular vacuoles, and the distribution of nucleic acids were visualized. In the intracellular vacuole nitrate reached concentrations of up to 650 mM. Fifteen of the retrieved 16S rRNA gene sequences formed a monophyletic cluster and were phylogenetically closely related (≥ 94.4% sequence identity). Sequences of known filamentous sulfide-oxidizing genera Beggiatoa and Thioploca that comprise non-vacuolated and vacuolated filaments from diverse habitats clearly delineated from this cluster. The novel monophyletic cluster was furthermore divided into two sub-clusters: one contained sequences originating from Guerrero Negro (Mexico) microbial mats and the other comprised sequences from five distinct Spanish hypersaline microbial mats from Ibiza, Formentera and Lake Chiprana. Our data suggest that Beggiatoa-like filaments from hypersaline environments displaying a thin filament diameter contain nitrate-storing vacuoles and are phylogenetically separate from known Beggiatoa. Therefore, we propose a novel genus for these organisms, which we suggest to name 'Candidatus Allobeggiatoa'.

  3. Physiological responses to hyper-saline waters in sailfin mollies (Poecilia latipinna).

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, R J; Cooper, J; Head, D

    2005-12-01

    We examined the ionoregulatory physiology and biochemistry of the teleost sailfin molly (Poecilia latipinna), an inhabitant of salt marshes along the gulf coast, during exposure to hyper-saline waters (salinity range 35-95 ppt). Mollies were able to tightly control plasma Na(+) and Cl(-) concentrations and tissue water levels up to 65 ppt, but at higher salinities plasma ion levels began to rise and muscle water content dropped. Still, even at the highest salinity (90 ppt) plasma Na(+) and Cl(-) levels were only 32% and 39%, respectively, above levels at 35 ppt. Drinking rates at 60 ppt climbed 35%, while gut Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NAK) activity rose 70% and branchial NAK activity jumped 200%. The relatively small rise in drinking rate, in the face of a more than doubling of the osmotic gradient, suggests that a reduction in branchial water permeability significantly limited water loss and associated salt load. At 80 ppt, a salinity where plasma ion levels just begin to rise, drinking rate rose more rapidly, but gut and gill NAK activity did not, suggesting that mollies employed other pathways (perhaps renal) of salt excretion. At higher salinities, plasma ion levels continued to rise and muscle water content fell slightly indicating the beginnings of internal osmotic disturbances. To evaluate the energetic costs of hyper-salinity on mollies we measured the rate of O(2) consumption and found it rose with salinity, in sharp contrast to virtually all species previously examined. Interestingly, despite higher metabolism, growth was unaffected by hyper-salinity.

  4. Dispersion and transport of hypersaline gravity currents in the presence of internal waves at a pycnocline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogg, C. A. R.; Pietrasz, V. B.; Ouellette, N. T.; Koseff, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Desalination of seawater offers a source of potable water in arid regions and during drought. However, hypersaline discharge from desalination facilities presents environmental risks, particularly to benthic organisms. The risks posed by salt levels and chemical additives, which can be toxic to local ecosystems, are typically mitigated by ensuring high levels of dilution close to the source. We report on laboratory flume experiments examining how internal waves at the pycnocline of a layered ambient density stratification influence the transport of hypersaline effluent moving as a gravity current down the slope. We found that some of the hypersaline fluid from the gravity current was diverted away from the slope into an intrusion along the pycnocline. A parametric study investigated how varying the energy of the internal wave altered the amount of dense fluid that was diverted into the pycnocline intrusion. The results are compared to an analytical framework that compares the incident energy in the internal wave to potential energy used in diluting the gravity current. These results are significant for desalination effluents because fluid diverted into the intrusion avoids the ecologically sensitive benthic layer and disperses more quickly than if it had continued to propagate along the bed.

  5. Identification and Characterization of Bacteria in a Selenium-Contaminated Hypersaline Evaporation Pond

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, M. P.; Amini, A.; Dojka, M. A.; Pickering, I. J.; Dawson, S. C.; Pace, N. R.; Terry, N.

    2001-01-01

    Solar evaporation ponds are commonly used to reduce the volume of seleniferous agricultural drainage water in the San Joaquin Valley, Calif. These hypersaline ponds pose an environmental health hazard because they are heavily contaminated with selenium (Se), mainly in the form of selenate. Se in the ponds may be removed by microbial Se volatilization, a bioremediation process whereby toxic, bioavailable selenate is converted to relatively nontoxic dimethylselenide gas. In order to identify microbes that may be used for Se bioremediation, a 16S ribosomal DNA phylogenetic analysis of an aerobic hypersaline pond in the San Joaquin Valley showed that a previously unaffiliated group of uncultured bacteria (belonging to the order Cytophagales) was dominant, followed by a group of cultured γ-Proteobacteria which was closely related to Halomonas species. Se K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy of selenate-treated bacterial isolates showed that they accumulated a mixture of predominantly selenate and a selenomethionine-like species, consistent with the idea that selenate was assimilated via the S assimilation pathway. One of these bacterial isolates (Halomonas-like strain MPD-51) was the best candidate for the bioremediation of hypersaline evaporation ponds contaminated with high Se concentrations because it tolerated 2 M selenate and 32.5% NaCl, grew rapidly in media containing selenate, and accumulated and volatilized Se at high rates (1.65 μg of Se g of protein−1 h−1), compared to other cultured bacterial isolates. PMID:11525968

  6. Microbial Diversity in a Hypersaline Sulfate Lake: A Terrestrial Analog of Ancient Mars

    PubMed Central

    Pontefract, Alexandra; Zhu, Ting F.; Walker, Virginia K.; Hepburn, Holli; Lui, Clarissa; Zuber, Maria T.; Ruvkun, Gary; Carr, Christopher E.

    2017-01-01

    Life can persist under severe osmotic stress and low water activity in hypersaline environments. On Mars, evidence for the past presence of saline bodies of water is prevalent and resulted in the widespread deposition of sulfate and chloride salts. Here we investigate Spotted Lake (British Columbia, Canada), a hypersaline lake with extreme (>3 M) levels of sulfate salts as an exemplar of the conditions thought to be associated with ancient Mars. We provide the first characterization of microbial structure in Spotted Lake sediments through metagenomic sequencing, and report a bacteria-dominated community with abundant Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes, as well as diverse extremophiles. Microbial abundance and functional comparisons reveal similarities to Ace Lake, a meromictic Antarctic lake with anoxic and sulfidic bottom waters. Our analysis suggests that hypersaline-associated species occupy niches characterized foremost by differential abundance of Archaea, uncharacterized Bacteria, and Cyanobacteria. Potential biosignatures in this environment are discussed, specifically the likelihood of a strong sulfur isotopic fractionation record within the sediments due to the presence of sulfate reducing bacteria. With its high sulfate levels and seasonal freeze-thaw cycles, Spotted Lake is an analog for ancient paleolakes on Mars in which sulfate salt deposits may have offered periodically habitable environments, and could have concentrated and preserved organic materials or their biomarkers over geologic time.

  7. Organismal and spatial partitioning of energy and macronutrient transformations within a hypersaline mat.

    PubMed

    Mobberley, Jennifer M; Lindemann, Stephen R; Bernstein, Hans C; Moran, James J; Renslow, Ryan S; Babauta, Jerome; Hu, Dehong; Beyenal, Haluk; Nelson, William C

    2017-03-15

    Phototrophic mat communities are model ecosystems for studying energy cycling and elemental transformations because complete biogeochemical cycles occur over millimeter-to-centimeter scales. Characterization of energy and nutrient capture within hypersaline phototrophic mats has focused on specific processes and organisms, however little is known about community-wide distribution of and linkages between these processes. To investigate energy and macronutrient capture and flow through a structured community, the spatial and organismal distribution of metabolic functions within a compact hypersaline mat community from Hot Lake have been broadly elucidated through species-resolved metagenomics and geochemical, microbial diversity, and metabolic gradient measurements. Draft reconstructed genomes of 34 abundant organisms revealed three dominant cyanobacterial populations differentially distributed across the top layers of the mat suggesting niche separation along light and oxygen gradients. Many organisms contained diverse functional profiles, allowing for metabolic response to changing conditions within the mat. Organisms with partial nitrogen and sulfur metabolisms were widespread indicating dependence upon metabolite exchange. In addition, changes in community spatial structure were observed over the diel. These results indicate that organisms within the mat community have adapted to the temporally dynamic environmental gradients in this hypersaline mat through metabolic flexibility and fluid syntrophic interactions, including shifts in spatial arrangements.

  8. Clark Canyon (Mono County) Riparian Demonstration Area

    Treesearch

    John W. Key; Mark A. Gish

    1989-01-01

    The Clark Canyon riparian demonstration area was established in 1984 within the East Walker River subbasin of Mono County, California. Destabilization of the meadow sections of the stream and the upper stream reaches contributed to an increase of suspended sediments, turbidity, and stream channel widening in the lower stream reaches where a viable population of rainbow...

  9. Advanced alkaline water electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakabayashi, N.; Torikai, E.; Kawami, Y.; Takenaka, H.

    Results are presented of experimental studies of possible separators and electrodes for use in advanced, high-temperature, high-pressure alkaline water electrolyzers. Material evaluations in alkaline water electrolyzers at temperatures from 100 to 120 C have shown a new type polytetrafluoroethylene membrane impregnated with potassium titanate to be the most promising when the separator is prepared by the hydrothermal treatment of a porous PFTE membrane impregnated with hydrated titanium oxide. Measurements of cell voltages in 30% KOH at current densities from 5 to 100 A/sq dm at temperatures up to 120 C with nickel electrodes of various structures have shown the foamed nickel electrode, with an average pore size of 1-1.5 mm, to have the best performance. When the foamed nickel is coated by fine powdered nickel, carbonyl nickel or Raney nickel to increase electrode surface areas, even lower cell voltages were found, indicating better performance.

  10. Alkaline quinone flow battery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kaixiang; Chen, Qing; Gerhardt, Michael R; Tong, Liuchuan; Kim, Sang Bok; Eisenach, Louise; Valle, Alvaro W; Hardee, David; Gordon, Roy G; Aziz, Michael J; Marshak, Michael P

    2015-09-25

    Storage of photovoltaic and wind electricity in batteries could solve the mismatch problem between the intermittent supply of these renewable resources and variable demand. Flow batteries permit more economical long-duration discharge than solid-electrode batteries by using liquid electrolytes stored outside of the battery. We report an alkaline flow battery based on redox-active organic molecules that are composed entirely of Earth-abundant elements and are nontoxic, nonflammable, and safe for use in residential and commercial environments. The battery operates efficiently with high power density near room temperature. These results demonstrate the stability and performance of redox-active organic molecules in alkaline flow batteries, potentially enabling cost-effective stationary storage of renewable energy. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. Performance of nanowire decorated mono- and multi-crystalline Si solarcells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Es, Fırat; Demircioglu, Olgu; Gunoven, Mete; Kulakci, Mustafa; Unalan, Husnu Emrah; Turan, Rasit

    2013-06-01

    Light trapping ability of a solar cell can be improved by the application of various texturing schemes to the surface of the solar cells. For monocrystalline (mono-c) silicon solar cells, this is practically accomplished through pyramid texturing in a hot alkaline solution. For multicrystalline (multi-c) silicon solar cells, texturing is done by continuous oxidation and random etching of silicon from the surface. In this study, we have used metal assisted etching (MAE) technique to form silicon nanowires on the surface of pyramid textured mono-c, flat mono-c and multi-c silicon solar cells with an area of 156 mm×156 mm using standard solar cell processing protocols. It was shown that nanowire texturing causes a dramatic decrease in the reflectivity of the cell surface. Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics revealed that the solar cells with nanowires on top of pyramid texturing exhibit the best performance among all investigated cell types. This may be attributed to combined effect of nanowires and pyramids on the surface.

  12. Formation of Siliceous Sinters on Paoha Island, Mono Lake USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, M. R.; Miller, L. G.; Oremland, R. S.; Campbell, K. M.; Kane, T.

    2016-12-01

    Small quantities of siliceous sinter are forming from geothermal springs emanating near the shoreline on the eastern shore of Paoha Island, Mono Lake. The location of the springs is linked to the shallow groundwater table of the island because as lake level has lowered over the past 4 years, the spring orifice has migrated downslope with the lake level. Spring water temperatures vary from about 80°C to 40°C with sinters only occurring on the edge of pools at the air- water interface, mostly near spring orifices at water temperatures between 80 and 60°C. Purple photosynthetic bacteria (e.g., Ectothiorhodospira shaposhnikovii) associated with arsenic metabolism, are present under the sinters at the edges of the pools. The location of the sinter may allow them to act as a refuge for bacteria when the pool temperatures are too hot or too cold. After almost 10 years of observation, the sinters do not appear to be accumulating and are formed in different places on the pool edges each year, indicating that they are ephemeral. Where springs have moved downslope, only small patches of sinter remain. Due to the highly alkaline nature of Mono Lake water, wave action during the winter may dissolve and/or erode the previous year's sinter and thereby constrain its accumulation over time. Although live bacteria are present under the sinters, there is little evidence from scanning electron microscopy that bacteria are being coated with silica or that bacteria are chemically taking part in in the precipitation of silica. The amorphous siliceous sinters are also associated with the diagenetic zeolite analcime and clays (mostly various smectites). A conceptual model of sinter formation starts with thermal spring water beginning to cool as the water heads downslope. When the water cools to the optimal temperatures for bacteria, sinter precipitates on the pool edges and is deposited over the entrapped bacteria. If the pool temperature increases above their tolerance, bacteria on the

  13. 40 CFR 721.10505 - Phosphoric acid, mixed mono- and diesters with 2-ethyl-1-hexanol and polyethylene glycol mono-C12...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, mixed mono- and... Phosphoric acid, mixed mono- and diesters with 2-ethyl-1-hexanol and polyethylene glycol mono-C12-16-alkyl... identified as phosphoric acid, mixed mono- and diesters with 2-ethyl-1-hexanol and polyethylene glycol mono...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10505 - Phosphoric acid, mixed mono- and diesters with 2-ethyl-1-hexanol and polyethylene glycol mono-C12...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, mixed mono- and... Phosphoric acid, mixed mono- and diesters with 2-ethyl-1-hexanol and polyethylene glycol mono-C12-16-alkyl... identified as phosphoric acid, mixed mono- and diesters with 2-ethyl-1-hexanol and polyethylene glycol mono...

  15. Viruses, prokaryotes and DNA in the sediments of a deep-hypersaline anoxic basin (DHAB) of the Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Danovaro, R; Corinaldesi, C; Dell'Anno, A; Fabiano, M; Corselli, C

    2005-04-01

    Viral and prokaryote abundance were investigated in a deep-hypersaline anoxic basin of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea (DHAB Atalante basin at c. 3000 m depth). This system was compared with two nearby deep-sea sites characterized by oxic conditions. Viral abundance and virus to prokaryote abundance ratio in hypersaline anoxic sediments displayed values close to those reported in oxic sites. The analysis of vertical profiles of viral abundance in the Atalante basin revealed the lack of significant changes with depth in the sediment, suggesting that benthic viruses in these anoxic and hypersaline conditions are preserved or resistant to decay. The anoxic basin displayed also very high concentrations of labile organic components (proteins and lipids) and extracellular DNA. These findings suggest that the DHAB sediments represent a reservoir for long-term preservation of benthic viruses and nucleic acids.

  16. Alkaline fuel cells applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordesch, Karl; Hacker, Viktor; Gsellmann, Josef; Cifrain, Martin; Faleschini, Gottfried; Enzinger, Peter; Fankhauser, Robert; Ortner, Markus; Muhr, Michael; Aronson, Robert R.

    On the world-wide automobile market technical developments are increasingly determined by the dramatic restriction on emissions as well as the regimentation of fuel consumption by legislation. Therefore there is an increasing chance of a completely new technology breakthrough if it offers new opportunities, meeting the requirements of resource preservation and emission restrictions. Fuel cell technology offers the possibility to excel in today's motive power techniques in terms of environmental compatibility, consumer's profit, costs of maintenance and efficiency. The key question is economy. This will be decided by the costs of fuel cell systems if they are to be used as power generators for future electric vehicles. The alkaline hydrogen-air fuel cell system with circulating KOH electrolyte and low-cost catalysed carbon electrodes could be a promising alternative. Based on the experiences of Kordesch [K. Kordesch, Brennstoffbatterien, Springer, Wien, 1984, ISBN 3-387-81819-7; K. Kordesch, City car with H 2-air fuel cell and lead-battery, SAE Paper No. 719015, 6th IECEC, 1971], who operated a city car hybrid vehicle on public roads for 3 years in the early 1970s, improved air electrodes plus new variations of the bipolar stack assembly developed in Graz are investigated. Primary fuel choice will be a major issue until such time as cost-effective, on-board hydrogen storage is developed. Ammonia is an interesting option. The whole system, ammonia dissociator plus alkaline fuel cell (AFC), is characterised by a simple design and high efficiency.

  17. Magmatic gas emissions at Holocene volcanic features near Mono Lake, California, and their relation to regional magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergfeld, Deborah; Evans, William C.; Howle, James F.; Hunt, Andrew G.

    2015-02-01

    Silicic lavas have erupted repeatedly in the Mono Basin over the past few thousand years, forming the massive domes and coulees of the Mono Craters chain and the smaller island vents in Mono Lake. We report here on the first systematic study of magmatic CO2 emissions from these features, conducted during 2007-2010. Most notably, a known locus of weak steam venting on the summit of North Coulee is actually enclosed in a large area (~ 0.25 km2) of diffuse gas discharge that emits 10-14 t/d of CO2, mostly at ambient temperature. Subsurface gases sampled here are heavily air-contaminated, but after standard corrections are applied, show average δ13C-CO2 of - 4.72‰, 3He/4He of 5.89RA, and CO2/3He of 0.77 × 1010, very similar to the values in fumarolic gas from Mammoth Mountain and the Long Valley Caldera immediately to the south of the basin. If these values also characterize the magmatic gas source at Mono Lake, where CO2 is captured by the alkaline lake water, a magmatic CO2 upflow beneath the lake of ~ 4 t/d can be inferred. Groundwater discharge from the Mono Craters area transports ~ 13 t/d of 14C-dead CO2 as free gas and dissolved carbonate species, and adding in this component brings the estimated total magmatic CO2 output to 29 t/d for the two silicic systems in the Mono Basin. If these emissions reflect intrusion and degassing of underlying basalt with 0.5 wt.% CO2, a modest intrusion rate of 0.00075 km3/yr is indicated. Much higher intrusion rates are required to account for CO2 emissions from Mammoth Mountain and the West Moat of the Long Valley Caldera.

  18. Microbial response to salinity change in Lake Chaka, a hypersaline lake on Tibetan plateau.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hongchen; Dong, Hailiang; Yu, Bingsong; Liu, Xinqi; Li, Yiliang; Ji, Shanshan; Zhang, Chuanlun L

    2007-10-01

    Previous investigations of the salinity effects on the microbial community composition have largely been limited to dynamic estuaries and coastal solar salterns. In this study, the effects of salinity and mineralogy on microbial community composition was studied by using a 900-cm sediment core collected from a stable, inland hypersaline lake, Lake Chaka, on the Tibetan Plateau, north-western China. This core, spanning a time of 17,000 years, was unique in that it possessed an entire range of salinity from freshwater clays and silty sands at the bottom to gypsum and glauberite in the middle, to halite at the top. Bacterial and archaeal communities were studied along the length of this core using an integrated approach combining mineralogy and geochemistry, molecular microbiology (16S rRNA gene analysis and quantitative polymerase chain reaction), cultivation and lipid biomarker analyses. Systematic changes in microbial community composition were correlated with the salinity gradient, but not with mineralogy. Bacterial community was dominated by the Firmicutes-related environmental sequences and known species (including sulfate-reducing bacteria) in the freshwater sediments at the bottom, but by halophilic and halotolerant Betaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes in the hypersaline sediments at the top. Succession of proteobacterial groups along the salinity gradient, typically observed in free-living bacterial communities, was not observed in the sediment-associated community. Among Archaea, the Crenarchaeota were predominant in the bottom freshwater sediments, but the halophilic Halobacteriales of the Euryarchaeota was the most important group in the hypersaline sediments. Multiple isolates were obtained along the whole length of the core, and their salinity tolerance was consistent with the geochemical conditions. Iron-reducing bacteria were isolated in the freshwater sediments, which were capable of reducing structural Fe(III) in the Fe(III)-rich clay minerals

  19. Bacterial Community Response to Petroleum Hydrocarbon Amendments in Freshwater, Marine, and Hypersaline Water-Containing Microcosms

    PubMed Central

    Jurelevicius, Diogo; Alvarez, Vanessa Marques; Marques, Joana Montezano; de Sousa Lima, Laryssa Ribeiro Fonseca; Dias, Felipe de Almeida

    2013-01-01

    Hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial communities from freshwater, marine, and hypersaline Brazilian aquatic ecosystems (with water salinities corresponding to 0.2%, 4%, and 5%, respectively) were enriched with different hydrocarbons (heptadecane, naphthalene, or crude oil). Changes within the different microcosms of bacterial communities were analyzed using cultivation approaches and molecular methods (DNA and RNA extraction, followed by genetic fingerprinting and analyses of clone libraries based on the 16S rRNA-coding gene). A redundancy analysis (RDA) of the genetic fingerprint data and a principal component analysis (PCA) of the clone libraries revealed hydrocarbon-enriched bacterial communities specific for each ecosystem studied. However, within the same ecosystem, different bacterial communities were selected according to the petroleum hydrocarbon used. In general, the results demonstrated that Acinetobacter and Cloacibacterium were the dominant genera in freshwater microcosms; the Oceanospirillales order and the Marinobacter, Pseudomonas, and Cycloclasticus genera predominated in marine microcosms; and the Oceanospirillales order and the Marinobacter genus were selected in the different hydrocarbon-containing microcosms in hypersaline water. Determination of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) in all microcosms after 32 days of incubation showed a decrease in the hydrocarbon concentration compared to that for the controls. A total of 50 (41.3%) isolates from the different hydrocarbon-contaminated microcosms were associated with the dominant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) obtained from the clone libraries, and their growth in the hydrocarbon contaminating the microcosm from which they were isolated as the sole carbon source was observed. These data provide insight into the general response of bacterial communities from freshwater, marine, and hypersaline aquatic ecosystems to petroleum hydrocarbon contamination. PMID:23872573

  20. Preserving the world second largest hypersaline lake under future irrigation and climate change.

    PubMed

    Shadkam, Somayeh; Ludwig, Fulco; van Vliet, Michelle T H; Pastor, Amandine; Kabat, Pavel

    2016-07-15

    Iran Urmia Lake, the world second largest hypersaline lake, has been largely desiccated over the last two decades resulting in socio-environmental consequences similar or even larger than the Aral Sea disaster. To rescue the lake a new water management plan has been proposed, a rapid 40% decline in irrigation water use replacing a former plan which intended to develop reservoirs and irrigation. However, none of these water management plans, which have large socio-economic impacts, have been assessed under future changes in climate and water availability. By adapting a method of environmental flow requirements (EFRs) for hypersaline lakes, we estimated annually 3.7·10(9)m(3) water is needed to preserve Urmia Lake. Then, the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrological model was forced with bias-corrected climate model outputs for both the lowest (RCP2.6) and highest (RCP8.5) greenhouse-gas concentration scenarios to estimate future water availability and impacts of water management strategies. Results showed a 10% decline in future water availability in the basin under RCP2.6 and 27% under RCP8.5. Our results showed that if future climate change is highly limited (RCP2.6) inflow can be just enough to meet the EFRs by implementing the reduction irrigation plan. However, under more rapid climate change scenario (RCP8.5) reducing irrigation water use will not be enough to save the lake and more drastic measures are needed. Our results showed that future water management plans are not robust under climate change in this region. Therefore, an integrated approach of future land-water use planning and climate change adaptation is therefore needed to improve future water security and to reduce the desiccating of this hypersaline lake.

  1. Insights of Phage-Host Interaction in Hypersaline Ecosystem through Metagenomics Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Motlagh, Amir Mohaghegh; Bhattacharjee, Ananda S.; Coutinho, Felipe H.; Dutilh, Bas E.; Casjens, Sherwood R.; Goel, Ramesh K.

    2017-01-01

    Bacteriophages, as the most abundant biological entities on Earth, place significant predation pressure on their hosts. This pressure plays a critical role in the evolution, diversity, and abundance of bacteria. In addition, phages modulate the genetic diversity of prokaryotic communities through the transfer of auxiliary metabolic genes. Various studies have been conducted in diverse ecosystems to understand phage-host interactions and their effects on prokaryote metabolism and community composition. However, hypersaline environments remain among the least studied ecosystems and the interaction between the phages and prokaryotes in these habitats is poorly understood. This study begins to fill this knowledge gap by analyzing bacteriophage-host interactions in the Great Salt Lake, the largest prehistoric hypersaline lake in the Western Hemisphere. Our metagenomics analyses allowed us to comprehensively identify the bacterial and phage communities with Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes as the most dominant bacterial species and Siphoviridae, Myoviridae, and Podoviridae as the most dominant viral families found in the metagenomic sequences. We also characterized interactions between the phage and prokaryotic communities of Great Salt Lake and determined how these interactions possibly influence the community diversity, structure, and biogeochemical cycles. In addition, presence of prophages and their interaction with the prokaryotic host was studied and showed the possibility of prophage induction and subsequent infection of prokaryotic community present in the Great Salt Lake environment under different environmental stress factors. We found that carbon cycle was the most susceptible nutrient cycling pathways to prophage induction in the presence of environmental stresses. This study gives an enhanced snapshot of phage and prokaryote abundance and diversity as well as their interactions in a hypersaline complex ecosystem, which can pave the way for

  2. Microbial community structure and diversity within hypersaline Keke Salt Lake environments.

    PubMed

    Han, Rui; Zhang, Xin; Liu, Jing; Long, Qifu; Chen, Laisheng; Liu, Deli; Zhu, Derui

    2017-08-29

    Keke Salt Lake is located in the Qaidamu Basin of China, and is a unique magnesium sulfate-subtype hypersaline lake that exhibits a halite domain ecosystem, yet its microbial diversity has remained unstudied. Here, the microbial community structure and diversity was investigated via high-throughput sequencing of the V3-V5 regions of 16S rRNA genes. A high diversity of OTUs were detected for Bacteria and Archaea (734 and 747, respectively) which comprised 21 phyla, 43 classes, and 201 genera of Bacteria and 4 phyla, 4 classes, and 39 genera of Archaea. Salt-saturated samples were dominated by the bacterial genera Bacillus (51.52%-58.35% relative abundance), Lactococcus (9.52%-10.51%) and Oceanobacillus (8.82%-9.88%) within the Firmicutes phylum (74.81-80.99%) contrasting with other hypersaline lakes. The dominant Archaea belonged to the Halobacteriaceae family, and in particular, the abundant genera (>10% of communities) Halonotius, Halorubellus, Halapricum, Halorubrum and Natronomonas. Additionally, we report the presence of Nanohaloarchaeota and Woesearchaeota in Qinghai-Tibet Plateau lakes, which has not been previously documented. Total salinity (especially Mg2+, Cl-, Na+ and K+) most correlated to taxonomic distribution across samples. These results expand our understanding of microbial resource utilization within hypersaline lakes and the potential adaptations of dominant microorganisms that allow them to inhabit such environments.

  3. Bacterial community response to petroleum hydrocarbon amendments in freshwater, marine, and hypersaline water-containing microcosms.

    PubMed

    Jurelevicius, Diogo; Alvarez, Vanessa Marques; Marques, Joana Montezano; de Sousa Lima, Laryssa Ribeiro Fonseca; Dias, Felipe de Almeida; Seldin, Lucy

    2013-10-01

    Hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial communities from freshwater, marine, and hypersaline Brazilian aquatic ecosystems (with water salinities corresponding to 0.2%, 4%, and 5%, respectively) were enriched with different hydrocarbons (heptadecane, naphthalene, or crude oil). Changes within the different microcosms of bacterial communities were analyzed using cultivation approaches and molecular methods (DNA and RNA extraction, followed by genetic fingerprinting and analyses of clone libraries based on the 16S rRNA-coding gene). A redundancy analysis (RDA) of the genetic fingerprint data and a principal component analysis (PCA) of the clone libraries revealed hydrocarbon-enriched bacterial communities specific for each ecosystem studied. However, within the same ecosystem, different bacterial communities were selected according to the petroleum hydrocarbon used. In general, the results demonstrated that Acinetobacter and Cloacibacterium were the dominant genera in freshwater microcosms; the Oceanospirillales order and the Marinobacter, Pseudomonas, and Cycloclasticus genera predominated in marine microcosms; and the Oceanospirillales order and the Marinobacter genus were selected in the different hydrocarbon-containing microcosms in hypersaline water. Determination of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) in all microcosms after 32 days of incubation showed a decrease in the hydrocarbon concentration compared to that for the controls. A total of 50 (41.3%) isolates from the different hydrocarbon-contaminated microcosms were associated with the dominant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) obtained from the clone libraries, and their growth in the hydrocarbon contaminating the microcosm from which they were isolated as the sole carbon source was observed. These data provide insight into the general response of bacterial communities from freshwater, marine, and hypersaline aquatic ecosystems to petroleum hydrocarbon contamination.

  4. Anaerobic oxidation of methane by sulfate in hypersaline groundwater of the Dead Sea aquifer

    PubMed Central

    Avrahamov, N; Antler, G; Yechieli, Y; Gavrieli, I; Joye, S B; Saxton, M; Turchyn, A V; Sivan, O

    2014-01-01

    Geochemical and microbial evidence points to anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) likely coupled with bacterial sulfate reduction in the hypersaline groundwater of the Dead Sea (DS) alluvial aquifer. Groundwater was sampled from nine boreholes drilled along the Arugot alluvial fan next to the DS. The groundwater samples were highly saline (up to 6300 mm chlorine), anoxic, and contained methane. A mass balance calculation demonstrates that the very low δ13CDIC in this groundwater is due to anaerobic methane oxidation. Sulfate depletion coincident with isotope enrichment of sulfur and oxygen isotopes in the sulfate suggests that sulfate reduction is associated with this AOM. DNA extraction and 16S amplicon sequencing were used to explore the microbial community present and were found to be microbial composition indicative of bacterial sulfate reducers associated with anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) driving AOM. The net sulfate reduction seems to be primarily controlled by the salinity and the available methane and is substantially lower as salinity increases (2.5 mm sulfate removal at 3000 mm chlorine but only 0.5 mm sulfate removal at 6300 mm chlorine). Low overall sulfur isotope fractionation observed (34ε = 17 ± 3.5‰) hints at high rates of sulfate reduction, as has been previously suggested for sulfate reduction coupled with methane oxidation. The new results demonstrate the presence of sulfate-driven AOM in terrestrial hypersaline systems and expand our understanding of how microbial life is sustained under the challenging conditions of an extremely hypersaline environment. PMID:25039851

  5. Microbial characterization of a subzero, hypersaline methane seep in the Canadian High Arctic.

    PubMed

    Niederberger, Thomas D; Perreault, Nancy N; Tille, Stephanie; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Lacrampe-Couloume, Georges; Andersen, Dale; Greer, Charles W; Pollard, Wayne; Whyte, Lyle G

    2010-10-01

    We report the first microbiological characterization of a terrestrial methane seep in a cryo-environment in the form of an Arctic hypersaline (∼24% salinity), subzero (-5 °C), perennial spring, arising through thick permafrost in an area with an average annual air temperature of -15 °C. Bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA gene clone libraries indicated a relatively low diversity of phylotypes within the spring sediment (Shannon index values of 1.65 and 1.39, respectively). Bacterial phylotypes were related to microorganisms such as Loktanella, Gillisia, Halomonas and Marinobacter spp. previously recovered from cold, saline habitats. A proportion of the bacterial phylotypes were cultured, including Marinobacter and Halomonas, with all isolates capable of growth at the in situ temperature (-5 °C). Archaeal phylotypes were related to signatures from hypersaline deep-sea methane-seep sediments and were dominated by the anaerobic methane group 1a (ANME-1a) clade of anaerobic methane oxidizing archaea. CARD-FISH analyses indicated that cells within the spring sediment consisted of ∼84.0% bacterial and 3.8% archaeal cells with ANME-1 cells accounting for most of the archaeal cells. The major gas discharging from the spring was methane (∼50%) with the low CH(4)/C(2+) ratio and hydrogen and carbon isotope signatures consistent with a thermogenic origin of the methane. Overall, this hypersaline, subzero environment supports a viable microbial community capable of activity at in situ temperature and where methane may behave as an energy and carbon source for sustaining anaerobic oxidation of methane-based microbial metabolism. This site also provides a model of how a methane seep can form in a cryo-environment as well as a mechanism for the hypothesized Martian methane plumes.

  6. Contrasting taxonomic stratification of microbial communities in two hypersaline meromictic lakes

    PubMed Central

    Andrei, Adrian-Ştefan; Robeson, Michael S; Baricz, Andreea; Coman, Cristian; Muntean, Vasile; Ionescu, Artur; Etiope, Giuseppe; Alexe, Mircea; Sicora, Cosmin Ionel; Podar, Mircea; Banciu, Horia Leonard

    2015-01-01

    Hypersaline meromictic lakes are extreme environments in which water stratification is associated with powerful physicochemical gradients and high salt concentrations. Furthermore, their physical stability coupled with vertical water column partitioning makes them important research model systems in microbial niche differentiation and biogeochemical cycling. Here, we compare the prokaryotic assemblages from Ursu and Fara Fund hypersaline meromictic lakes (Transylvanian Basin, Romania) in relation to their limnological factors and infer their role in elemental cycling by matching taxa to known taxon-specific biogeochemical functions. To assess the composition and structure of prokaryotic communities and the environmental factors that structure them, deep-coverage small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA (rDNA) amplicon sequencing, community domain-specific quantitative PCR and physicochemical analyses were performed on samples collected along depth profiles. The analyses showed that the lakes harbored multiple and diverse prokaryotic communities whose distribution mirrored the water stratification patterns. Ursu Lake was found to be dominated by Bacteria and to have a greater prokaryotic diversity than Fara Fund Lake that harbored an increased cell density and was populated mostly by Archaea within oxic strata. In spite of their contrasting diversity, the microbial populations indigenous to each lake pointed to similar physiological functions within carbon degradation and sulfate reduction. Furthermore, the taxonomy results coupled with methane detection and its stable C isotope composition indicated the presence of a yet-undescribed methanogenic group in the lakes' hypersaline monimolimnion. In addition, ultrasmall uncultivated archaeal lineages were detected in the chemocline of Fara Fund Lake, where the recently proposed Nanohaloarchaeota phylum was found to thrive. PMID:25932617

  7. Development of a Halotolerant Community in the St. Lucia Estuary (South Africa) during a Hypersaline Phase

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Nicola K.; Perissinotto, Renzo

    2012-01-01

    Background The St. Lucia Estuary, Africa's largest estuarine lake, is currently experiencing unprecedented freshwater deprivation which has resulted in a northward gradient of drought effects, with hypersaline conditions in its northern lakes. Methodology/Principal Findings This study documents the changes that occurred in the biotic communities at False Bay from May 2010 to June 2011, in order to better understand ecosystem functioning in hypersaline habitats. Few zooplankton taxa were able to withstand the harsh environmental conditions during 2010. These were the flatworm Macrostomum sp., the harpacticoid copepod Cletocamptus confluens, the cyclopoid copepod Apocyclops cf. dengizicus and the ciliate Fabrea cf. salina. In addition to their exceptional salinity tolerance, they were involved in a remarkably simple food web. In June 2009, a bloom of an orange-pigmented cyanobacterium (Cyanothece sp.) was recorded in False Bay and persisted uninterruptedly for 18 months. Stable isotope analysis suggests that this cyanobacterium was the main prey item of F. cf. salina. This ciliate was then consumed by A. cf. dengizicus, which in turn was presumably consumed by flamingos as they flocked in the area when the copepods attained swarming densities. On the shore, cyanobacteria mats contributed to a population explosion of the staphylinid beetle Bledius pilicollis. Although zooplankton disappeared once salinities exceeded 130, many taxa are capable of producing spores or resting cysts to bridge harsh periods. The hypersaline community was disrupted by heavy summer rains in 2011, which alleviated drought conditions and resulted in a sharp increase in zooplankton stock and diversity. Conclusions/Significance Despite the current freshwater deprivation crisis, the False Bay region has shown to be resilient, harboring a unique biodiversity with species that are capable of enduring harsh environmental conditions. However, further freshwater deprivation may extend beyond the

  8. Contrasting taxonomic stratification of microbial communities in two hypersaline meromictic lakes.

    PubMed

    Andrei, Adrian-Ştefan; Robeson, Michael S; Baricz, Andreea; Coman, Cristian; Muntean, Vasile; Ionescu, Artur; Etiope, Giuseppe; Alexe, Mircea; Sicora, Cosmin Ionel; Podar, Mircea; Banciu, Horia Leonard

    2015-12-01

    Hypersaline meromictic lakes are extreme environments in which water stratification is associated with powerful physicochemical gradients and high salt concentrations. Furthermore, their physical stability coupled with vertical water column partitioning makes them important research model systems in microbial niche differentiation and biogeochemical cycling. Here, we compare the prokaryotic assemblages from Ursu and Fara Fund hypersaline meromictic lakes (Transylvanian Basin, Romania) in relation to their limnological factors and infer their role in elemental cycling by matching taxa to known taxon-specific biogeochemical functions. To assess the composition and structure of prokaryotic communities and the environmental factors that structure them, deep-coverage small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA (rDNA) amplicon sequencing, community domain-specific quantitative PCR and physicochemical analyses were performed on samples collected along depth profiles. The analyses showed that the lakes harbored multiple and diverse prokaryotic communities whose distribution mirrored the water stratification patterns. Ursu Lake was found to be dominated by Bacteria and to have a greater prokaryotic diversity than Fara Fund Lake that harbored an increased cell density and was populated mostly by Archaea within oxic strata. In spite of their contrasting diversity, the microbial populations indigenous to each lake pointed to similar physiological functions within carbon degradation and sulfate reduction. Furthermore, the taxonomy results coupled with methane detection and its stable C isotope composition indicated the presence of a yet-undescribed methanogenic group in the lakes' hypersaline monimolimnion. In addition, ultrasmall uncultivated archaeal lineages were detected in the chemocline of Fara Fund Lake, where the recently proposed Nanohaloarchaeota phylum was found to thrive.

  9. Linking Archaeal Molecular Diversity and Lipid Biomarker Composition in a Hypersaline Microbial Mat Community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda; Orphan, Victoria; Turk, Kendra; Embaye, Tsegereda; Kubo, Mike; Summons, Roger

    2005-01-01

    Lipid biomarkers for discrete microbial groups are a valuable tool for establishing links to ancient microbial ecosystems. Lipid biomarkers can establish organism source and function in contemporary microbial ecosystems (membrane lipids) and by analogy, potential relevance to the fossilized carbon skeletons (geolipids) extracted from ancient sedimentary rock. The Mars Exploration Rovers have provided clear evidence for an early wet Mars and the presence of hypersaline evaporitic basins. Ongoing work on an early Earth analog, the hypersaline benthic mats in Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, may provide clues to what may have evolved and flourished on an early wet Mars, if only for a short period. Cyanobacterial mats are a pertinent early Earth analog for consideration of evolutionary and microbial processes within the aerobic photosynthetic and adjacent anoxic layers. Fluctuations in physio-chemical parameters associated with spatial and temporal scales are expressed through vast microbial metabolic diversity. Our recent work hopes to establish the dynamic of archaeal diversity, particularly as it relates to methane production in this high sulfate environment, through the use of lipid biomarker and phylogenetic analyses. Archaeal 16s rRNA and mcrA gene assemblages, demonstrated distinct spatial separation over the 130 mm core of at least three distinct genera within the order Methanosarcinales, as well as an abundance of uncultured members of the Thermoplasmales and Crenarchaeota. Ether-bound lipid analysis identified abundant 0-alkyl and 0-isopranyl chains throughout the core, and the presence of sn-2 hydroxyarchaeol, a biomarker for methylotrophic methanogens. A unique ether isoprenoid chain, a C30:1 , possibly related to the geolipid squalane, a paleobiomarker associated with hypersaline environments, was most abundant within the oxic-anoxic transition zone.

  10. Preserving the World Second Largest Hypersaline Lake under Future Irrigation and Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadkam, Somayeh; Ludwig, Fulco; van Vliet, Michelle; Pastor, Amandine; Kabat, Pavel

    2016-04-01

    Urmia Lake, the world second largest hypersaline lake, has been largely desiccated over the last two decades resulting in socio-environmental consequences similar or even larger than the Aral Sea disaster. To rescue the lake a new water management plan has been proposed, a rapid 40% decline in irrigation water use replacing a former plan which intended to develop reservoirs and irrigation. However, none of these water management plans, which have large socio-economic impacts, have been assessed under future changes in climate and water availability. By adapting a method of environmental flow requirements (EFRs) for hypersaline lakes, we estimated annually 3.9•109 m3 water is needed to preserve Urmia Lake. Then, the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrological model was forced with bias-corrected climate model outputs for both the lowest (RCP2.6) and highest (RCP8.5) greenhouse-gas concentration scenarios to estimate future water availability and impacts of water management strategies. Results showed a 10% decline in future water availability in the basin under RCP2.6 and 27% under RCP8.5. Our results showed that if future climate change is highly limited (RCP2.6) inflow can be just enough to meet the EFRs by implementing the reduction irrigation plan. However, under more rapid climate change scenario (RCP8.5) reducing irrigation water use will not be enough to save the lake and more drastic measures are needed. Our results showed that future water management plans are not robust under climate change in this region. Therefore, an integrated approach of future land-water use planning and climate change adaptation is therefore needed to improve future water security and to reduce the desiccating of this hypersaline lake.

  11. Response of biotic communities to salinity changes in a Mediterranean hypersaline stream

    PubMed Central

    Velasco, Josefa; Millán, Andrés; Hernández, Juan; Gutiérrez, Cayetano; Abellán, Pedro; Sánchez, David; Ruiz, Mar

    2006-01-01

    Background This study investigates the relationship between salinity and biotic communities (primary producers and macroinvertebrates) in Rambla Salada, a Mediterranean hypersaline stream in SE Spain. Since the 1980's, the mean salinity of the stream has fallen from about 100 g L-1 to 35.5 g L-1, due to intensive irrigated agriculture in the watershed. Furthermore, large dilutions occur occasionally when the water irrigation channel suffers cracks. Results Along the salinity gradient studied (3.5 – 76.4 g L-1) Cladophora glomerata and Ruppia maritima biomass decreased with increasing salinity, while the biomass of epipelic algae increased. Diptera and Coleoptera species dominated the community both in disturbed as in re-established conditions. Most macroinvertebrates species found in Rambla Salada stream are euryhaline species with a broad range of salinity tolerance. Eight of them were recorded in natural hypersaline conditions (~100 g L-1) prior to important change in land use of the watershed: Ephydra flavipes, Stratyomis longicornis, Nebrioporus ceresyi, N. baeticus, Berosus hispanicus, Enochrus falcarius, Ochthebius cuprescens and Sigara selecta. However, other species recorded in the past, such as Ochthebius glaber, O. notabilis and Enochrus politus, were restricted to a hypersaline source or absent from Rambla Salada. The dilution of salinity to 3.5 – 6.8 gL-1 allowed the colonization of species with low salininty tolerance, such as Melanopsis praemorsa, Anax sp., Simulidae, Ceratopogonidae and Tanypodinae. The abundance of Ephydra flavipes and Ochthebius corrugatus showed a positive significant response to salinity, while Anax sp., Simulidae, S. selecta, N. ceresyi, N. baeticus, and B. hispanicus showed significant negative correlations. The number of total macroinvertebrate taxa, Diptera and Coleoptera species, number of families, Margalef's index and Shannon's diversity index decreased with increasing salinity. However, the rest of community

  12. On the origins of hypersaline groundwater in the Nile Delta Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Engelen, Joeri; Oude Essink, Gualbert H. P.; Kooi, Henk; Bierkens, Marc F. P.

    2017-04-01

    The fresh groundwater resources in the Nile Delta, Egypt, are of eminent socio-economic importance. These resources are under major stress due to population growth, the anticipated sea level rise and increased groundwater extraction rates, making fresh water availability the most challenging issue in this area. Up till now, numerous groundwater studies mainly focused on sea water intrusion on the top 100m of the groundwater system and assumed salinities not exceeding that of Mediterranean sea water, as there was no knowledge on groundwater in the deeper coastal parts of the Quaternary Nile Delta aquifer (that ranges up to 1000m depth). Recently, however, the Egyptian Research Institute for Groundwater (RIGW) collected salinity measurements and found a widespread occurrence of "hypersaline" groundwater: groundwater with salinities largely exceeding that of sea water at 600m depth (Nofal et al., 2015). This hypersaline groundwater greatly influences flow patterns and the fresh water potential of the aquifer. This research focuses on the origins of the hypersaline groundwater and the possible processes causing its transport. We consider all relevant salinization processes in the Nile Delta aquifer, over a time domain of up to 2.5 million years, which is the time span in which the aquifer got deposited. The following hypotheses were investigated with a combination of analytical solutions and numerical modelling: upward salt transport due to a) molecular diffusion, b) thermal buoyancy, c) consolidation-induced advection and dispersion, or downward transport due to d) composition buoyancy (salt inversion). We conclude that hypotheses a) and b) can be rejected, but c) and d) are both possible with the available information. An enhanced chemical analysis is suggested for further research, to determine the origins of this hypersaline water. This information in combination with the conclusions drawn in this research will give more insight in the potential amount of non

  13. Survival strategies for microorganisms in hypersaline environments and their relevance to life on early Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litchfield, Carol D.

    1998-07-01

    There are two groups of microorganisms that live and grow in hypersaline (>10-15% NaCl) environments: the halophilic Archaea and the halotolerant Bacteria and algae. In order to grow and reproduce in such high salt, low water activity environments, these organisms have made basic biochemical adaptations in their proteins, osmoregulation mechanisms, nucleic acids, and lipids. The environment of the halophiles and especially how the halophilic Archaea have adapted to that environment are reviewed in this paper. Along with this review is a brief description of how these adaptations could be important in the detection of life on early Mars assuming similar types of salts and a carbon-based life.

  14. Silica in alkaline brines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, B.F.; Rettig, S.L.; Eugster, H.P.

    1967-01-01

    Analysis of sodium carbonate-bicarbonate brines from closed basins in volcanic terranes of Oregon and Kenya reveals silica contents of up to 2700 parts per million at pH's higher than 10. These high concentrations of SiO 2 can be attributed to reaction of waters with silicates, and subsequent evaporative concentration accompanied by a rise in pH. Supersaturation with respect to amorphous silica may occur and persist for brines that are out of contact with silicate muds and undersaturated with respect to trona; correlation of SiO2 with concentration of Na and total CO2 support this interpretation. Addition of moredilute waters to alkaline brines may lower the pH and cause inorganic precipitation of substantial amounts of silica.

  15. Bifunctional alkaline oxygen electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swette, L.; Kackley, N.; Mccatty, S. A.

    1991-01-01

    The authors describe the identification and testing of electrocatalysts and supports for the positive electrode of moderate-temperature, single-unit, rechargeable alkaline fuel cells. Recent work on Na(x)Pt3O4, a potential bifunctional catalyst, is described, as well as the application of novel approaches to the development of more efficient bifunctional electrode structures. The three dual-character electrodes considered here showed similar superior performance; the Pt/RhO2 and Rh/RhO2 electrodes showed slightly better performance than the Pt/IrO2 electrode. It is concluded that Na(x)Pt3O4 continues to be a promising bifunctional oxygen electrode catalyst but requires further investigation and development.

  16. Assessing Ecological Impact Assessment: Lessons from Mono Lake, California.

    PubMed

    Wiens, John A; Patten, Duncan T; Botkin, Daniel B

    1993-11-01

    Because of its high salinity and alkalinity, Mono Lake, in eastern California (USA), is a relatively simple ecosystem. It has become the focus of an environmental controversy over the effects of 50 yr of diversions of water from tributary streams to supply water to Los Angeles. Diversions lowered the lake level, increased the salinity, changed the availability of aquatic habitats, and altered the configuration of the shoreline and of islands that support breeding colonies of gulls. We consider (1) how two independent panels of experts synthesized scientific information on the lake ecosystem to assess the environmental consequences of these changes, and (2) how the findings of these groups influenced policy decisions and how well subsequent changes in the lake matched expectations. Despite differences in composition and approach, the two panels reached generally similar conclusions. These conclusions have been a major component of legal activities and the development of management plans for the lake and basin ecosystem. Both panels concluded that, because of the simplicity of the lake ecosystem, ecological consequences of changes in lake level and salinity associated with continuing diversions were likely to be unusually clear-cut. At certain lake levels these changes would be expected to alter algal and invertebrate populations and the populations of aquatic birds that feed upon them or to disrupt breeding activities in gull colonies. Projections about when critical lake levels might be reached, however, have not been met. This is largely because stream flows into the lake have been altered from recent historic patterns by the cessation of water diversions due to governmental and legal actions (prompted in part by the panels' findings) and by a prolonged drought. These events illustrate the difficulty of projecting a timetable for environmental changes, even in simple and well-studied ecosystems.

  17. Mollusc-Microbe Mutualisms Extend the Potential for Life in Hypersaline Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickman, Carole S.

    2003-11-01

    Metazoans in extreme environments have evolved mutualisms with microbes that extend the physical and chemical capabilities of both partners. Some of the best examples are bivalve molluscs in evaporite and hypersaline settings. Mollusc tissue is developmentally and evolutionarily amenable to housing vast numbers of symbiotic microbes. Documented benefits to the host are nutritional. Multiple postulated benefits to the microbes are related to optimizing metabolic performance at interfaces, where heterogeneity and steep gradients that cannot be negotiated by microbes can be spanned by larger metazoan hosts. A small cockle, Fragum erugatum, and its photosymbiotic microbes provide a remarkable example of a mutualistic partnership in the hypersaline reaches of Shark Bay, Western Australia. Lucinid bivalves and their endosymbiotic chemolithotrophic bacteria provide examples in which hosts span oxic/anoxic interfaces on behalf of their symbionts at sites of seafloor venting. Multiple lines of evidence underscore the antiquity of mutualisms and suggest that they may have played a significant role in life's first experiments above the prokaryotic grade of complexity. The study of metazoan-microbe mutualisms and their signatures in extreme environments in the geologic record will provide a significant augmentation to microbial models in paleobiology and astrobiology. There are strong potential links between mutualisms and the early history of life on Earth, the persistence of life in extreme environments at times of global crisis and mass extinction, and the possibilities for life elsewhere in the universe.

  18. Ecology of methanogenesis in two hypersaline biocoenoses: Great Salt Lake and a San Francisco Bay saltern

    SciTech Connect

    Paterek, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    Enrichment cultures were prepared from sediment and brine samples from two hypersaline ecosystems, Great Salt Lake in Utah and a solar saltern located in San Francisco Bay. Methane production was greater when enriched with the biopolymer chitin than with cellulose or peptone. Organisms indigenous to hypersaline ecosystems, brine shrimp (Artemia sp.), halobacteria (Halobacterium sp. and Halococcus sp.) and halophilic algae (Dunaliella sp. and others) were cultivated and added to anaerobic and aerobic microcosms prepared with brine and sediment from the ecosystems studied. Methane production and the concentration of the methanogenic precursor, trimethylamine were greatest with brine shrimp as a supplement. Choline produced the highest concentrations of methane in all samples examined. A number of marine-related ecosystems were also examined for their ability to support methanogenesis at various salinities. Methanogenesis occurred at sea water salinity in the majority of samples, and methane production was observed from three sites at salinity found in Great Salt Lake brine. A halophilic methanogenic bacterium species was isolated from both Great Salt Lake and the San Francisco Bay solar saltern sediments. Cells are irregular, nonmotile cocci, approximately 1.0uM in diameter and stain gram negative.

  19. Leaf Spectral Reflectance Shows Thalassia testudinum Seedlings More Sensitive to Hypersalinity than Hyposalinity.

    PubMed

    Durako, Michael J; Howarth, Jacqueline F

    2017-01-01

    Thalassia testudinum (turtle grass) is the dominant and climax-successional seagrass species in the subtropical/tropical Atlantic and Caribbean region. Two die-offs of T. testudinum in Florida Bay, United States have raised concerns regarding the resilience of this species to environmental disturbances. Seedlings are important in recovery of T. testudinum, following disturbance events. Leaf spectral reflectance [R(λ)] was measured in T. testudinum seedlings exposed for 2 weeks to three salinities (20, 35, and 50) and two light levels (full sun and 50-70% light reduction) in experimental mesocosms. Multivariate analyses indicated that hypersalinity had a greater effect on spectral reflectance than hyposalinity or light reduction. There was an increase in variability and flattening of reflectance spectra at the highest salinity. All three salinity treatments had distinct reflectance spectra across green wavelengths (530-580 nm), with additional discrimination between 20 versus 50 and 35 versus 50 treatments across red wavelengths (630-690 nm). Red:Green reflectance ratios were highest and photochemical reflective index values were lowest for the salinity 50 treatment, but were not significantly different between the salinity 20 and 35 treatments. The changes in the R(λ) spectra for the salinity 50 seedlings were consistent with previously observed reductions in leaf pigments and maximum photochemical efficiency of photosystem II. These observations indicate that leaf spectral reflectance is a sensitive indicator of plant stress in T. testudinum seedlings and that seedlings are more sensitive to short-term exposures to hypersalinity than hyposalinity.

  20. Spatial and temporal distribution of archaeal diversity in meromictic, hypersaline Ocnei Lake (Transylvanian Basin, Romania).

    PubMed

    Baricz, Andreea; Coman, Cristian; Andrei, Adrian Stefan; Muntean, Vasile; Keresztes, Zsolt Gyula; Păuşan, Manuela; Alexe, Mircea; Banciu, Horia Leonard

    2014-03-01

    Saline, meromictic lakes with significant depth are usually formed as a result of salt mining activity. Ocnei Lake is one of the largest Transylvanian (Central Romania) neutral, hypersaline lake of man-made origin. We aimed to survey the seasonal dynamics of archaeal diversity in the water column of Ocnei Lake by employing microbiological methods as well as molecular techniques based on the sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene. We found that archaeal diversity in the water column increased with depth and salinity, with 8 OTUs being detected in the epilimnion compared to 21 found in the chemocline, and 32 OTUs in the monimolimnion. Down to 3.5 m depth, the archaeal community was markedly dominated by the presence of an unclassified archaeon sharing 93% sequence identity to Halogeometricum spp. At the chemocline, the shift in archaeal community composition was associated with an increase in salinity, the main factor affecting the vertical distribution of archaeal assemblages. It appears that the microoxic and hypersaline monimolimnion is populated by several major haloarchaeal taxa, with minor fluctuations in their relative abundances throughout all seasons. The culturable diversity was reasonably correlated to the dominant OTUs obtained by molecular methods. Our results indicate that Ocnei Lake represents a relatively stable extreme habitat, accommodating a diverse and putatively novel archaeal community, as 30% of OTUs could not be classified at the genus level.

  1. Two Fixed Ratio Dilutions for Soil Salinity Monitoring in Hypersaline Wetlands

    PubMed Central

    Herrero, Juan; Weindorf, David C.; Castañeda, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Highly soluble salts are undesirable in agriculture because they reduce yields or the quality of most cash crops and can leak to surface or sub-surface waters. In some cases salinity can be associated with unique history, rarity, or special habitats protected by environmental laws. Yet in considering the measurement of soil salinity for long-term monitoring purposes, adequate methods are required. Both saturated paste extracts, intended for agriculture, and direct surface and/or porewater salinity measurement, used in inundated wetlands, are unsuited for hypersaline wetlands that often are only occasionally inundated. For these cases, we propose the use of 1:5 soil/water (weight/weight) extracts as the standard for expressing the electrical conductivity (EC) of such soils and for further salt determinations. We also propose checking for ion-pairing with a 1:10 or more diluted extract in hypersaline soils. As an illustration, we apply the two-dilutions approach to a set of 359 soil samples from saline wetlands ranging in ECe from 2.3 dS m-1 to 183.0 dS m-1. This easy procedure will be useful in survey campaigns and in the monitoring of soil salt content. PMID:26001130

  2. Virus-Host and CRISPR Dynamics in Archaea-Dominated Hypersaline Lake Tyrrell, Victoria, Australia

    DOE PAGES

    Emerson, Joanne B.; Andrade, Karen; Thomas, Brian C.; ...

    2013-01-01

    The study of natural archaeal assemblages requires community context, namely, a concurrent assessment of the dynamics of archaeal, bacterial, and viral populations. Here, we use filter size-resolved metagenomic analyses to report the dynamics of 101 archaeal and bacterial OTUs and 140 viral populations across 17 samples collected over different timescales from 2007–2010 from Australian hypersaline Lake Tyrrell (LT). All samples were dominated by Archaea (75–95%). Archaeal, bacterial, and viral populations were found to be dynamic on timescales of months to years, and different viral assemblages were present in planktonic, relative to host-associated (active and provirus) size fractions. Analyses of clusteredmore » regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) regions indicate that both rare and abundant viruses were targeted, primarily by lower abundance hosts. Although very few spacers had hits to the NCBI nr database or to the 140 LT viral populations, 21% had hits to unassembled LT viral concentrate reads. This suggests local adaptation to LT-specific viruses and/or undersampling of haloviral assemblages in public databases, along with successful CRISPR-mediated maintenance of viral populations at abundances low enough to preclude genomic assembly. This is the first metagenomic report evaluating widespread archaeal dynamics at the population level on short timescales in a hypersaline system.« less

  3. Viruses Occur Incorporated in Biogenic High-Mg Calcite from Hypersaline Microbial Mats

    PubMed Central

    De Wit, Rutger; Gautret, Pascale; Bettarel, Yvan; Roques, Cécile; Marlière, Christian; Ramonda, Michel; Nguyen Thanh, Thuy; Tran Quang, Huy; Bouvier, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Using three different microscopy techniques (epifluorescence, electronic and atomic force microscopy), we showed that high-Mg calcite grains in calcifying microbial mats from the hypersaline lake “La Salada de Chiprana”, Spain, contain viruses with a diameter of 50–80 nm. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer analysis revealed that they contain nitrogen and phosphorus in a molar ratio of ~9, which is typical for viruses. Nucleic acid staining revealed that they contain DNA or RNA. As characteristic for hypersaline environments, the concentrations of free and attached viruses were high (>1010 viruses per g of mat). In addition, we showed that acid treatment (dissolution of calcite) resulted in release of viruses into suspension and estimated that there were ~15 × 109 viruses per g of calcite. We suggest that virus-mineral interactions are one of the possible ways for the formation of nano-sized structures often described as “nanobacteria” and that viruses may play a role in initiating calcification. PMID:26115121

  4. Multi-temporal water extent analysis of a hypersaline playa lake using Landsat Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilic, Ecenur; Kamil Yilmaz, Koray; Lutfi Suzen, Mehmet

    2016-04-01

    Distinguishing inland water bodies from satellite imagery has always been one of the main practices of remote sensing. In some cases this differentiation can directly be obtained by visual interpretation. However, in case of hyper-saline playa lakes, presence of high albedo salt crust in the lake bed hampers visual interpretation and requires further attention. Lake Tuz is a hypersaline playa lake which is ranked as the second largest lake in Turkey. Spatio-temporal changes in lake water extent are important both economically and hydrologically including salt production, lake water balance, drought and over-exploitation issues. This study investigates the spatiotemporal changes in Lake Tuz water extent during the last decade using single-band thresholding and multi-band indices extracted from the multi-temporal Landsat 5 TM and Landsat 7 ETM+ images. The applicability of different satellite-derived indices including Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI), Modified NDWI (MNDWI), Automated Water Extraction Index (AWEI) and Tasseled Cap Wetness (TCw) were investigated for the extraction of lake water extent from Landsat imagery. Our analysis indicated that, overall, NDWI is superior to other tested indices in separating wet/dry pixels over the lake bottom covered with salt crust. Using a NDWI thresholding procedure, the annual and seasonal variation in the Lake Tuz water extent were determined and further linked to hydro-meteorological variables such as precipitation.

  5. On the viscosity of natural hyper-saline solutions and its importance: The Dead Sea brines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisbrod, Noam; Yechieli, Yoseph; Shandalov, Semion; Lensky, Nadav

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between the density, temperature and viscosity of hypersaline solutions, both natural and synthetic, is explored. An empirical equation of the density-viscosity relationship as a function of temperature was developed for the Dead Sea brine and its dilutions. The viscosity levels of the Dead Sea brine (density of 1.24 ṡ 103 kg/m3; viscosity of 3.6 mPa s at 20 °C) and of the more extremely saline natural brine (density of 1.37 ṡ 103 kg/m3) were found to be ∼3 and ∼10 times greater than that of fresh water, respectively. The combined effect of the above changes in viscosity and density on the hydraulic conductivity is reduction by a factor of 3-7. The chemical composition significantly affects the viscosity of brines with similar densities, whereby solutions with a higher Mg/Na ratio have higher viscosity. This explains the extremely high viscosity of the Dead Sea and related Mg-rich brines in comparison with the much lower values of NaCl and KCl brines with similar density. Possible impacts of the results include reduced settling velocity of grains in hypersaline viscous brines and changing hydraulic dynamics at the freshwater-saltwater and the vicinity of sinkholes.

  6. Virus-host and CRISPR dynamics in Archaea-dominated hypersaline Lake Tyrrell, Victoria, Australia.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Joanne B; Andrade, Karen; Thomas, Brian C; Norman, Anders; Allen, Eric E; Heidelberg, Karla B; Banfield, Jillian F

    2013-01-01

    The study of natural archaeal assemblages requires community context, namely, a concurrent assessment of the dynamics of archaeal, bacterial, and viral populations. Here, we use filter size-resolved metagenomic analyses to report the dynamics of 101 archaeal and bacterial OTUs and 140 viral populations across 17 samples collected over different timescales from 2007-2010 from Australian hypersaline Lake Tyrrell (LT). All samples were dominated by Archaea (75-95%). Archaeal, bacterial, and viral populations were found to be dynamic on timescales of months to years, and different viral assemblages were present in planktonic, relative to host-associated (active and provirus) size fractions. Analyses of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) regions indicate that both rare and abundant viruses were targeted, primarily by lower abundance hosts. Although very few spacers had hits to the NCBI nr database or to the 140 LT viral populations, 21% had hits to unassembled LT viral concentrate reads. This suggests local adaptation to LT-specific viruses and/or undersampling of haloviral assemblages in public databases, along with successful CRISPR-mediated maintenance of viral populations at abundances low enough to preclude genomic assembly. This is the first metagenomic report evaluating widespread archaeal dynamics at the population level on short timescales in a hypersaline system.

  7. Mollusc-microbe mutualisms extend the potential for life in hypersaline systems.

    PubMed

    Hickman, Carole S

    2003-01-01

    Metazoans in extreme environments have evolved mutualisms with microbes that extend the physical and chemical capabilities of both partners. Some of the best examples are bivalve molluscs in evaporite and hypersaline settings. Mollusc tissue is developmentally and evolutionarily amenable to housing vast numbers of symbiotic microbes. Documented benefits to the host are nutritional. Multiple postulated benefits to the microbes are related to optimizing metabolic performance at interfaces, where heterogeneity and steep gradients that cannot be negotiated by microbes can be spanned by larger metazoan hosts. A small cockle, Fragum erugatum, and its photosymbiotic microbes provide a remarkable example of a mutualistic partnership in the hypersaline reaches of Shark Bay, Western Australia. Lucinid bivalves and their endosymbiotic chemolithotrophic bacteria provide examples in which hosts span oxic/anoxic interfaces on behalf of their symbionts at sites of seafloor venting. Multiple lines of evidence underscore the antiquity of mutualisms and suggest that they may have played a significant role in life's first experiments above the prokaryotic grade of complexity. The study of metazoan-microbe mutualisms and their signatures in extreme environments in the geologic record will provide a significant augmentation to microbial models in paleobiology and astrobiology. There are strong potential links between mutualisms and the early history of life on Earth, the persistence of life in extreme environments at times of global crisis and mass extinction, and the possibilities for life elsewhere in the universe.

  8. Unveiling microbial activities along the halocline of Thetis, a deep-sea hypersaline anoxic basin

    PubMed Central

    Pachiadaki, Maria G; Yakimov, Michail M; LaCono, Violetta; Leadbetter, Edward; Edgcomb, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Deep-sea hypersaline anoxic basins (DHABs) in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea are considered some of the most hostile environments on Earth. Little is known about the biochemical adaptations of microorganisms living in these habitats. This first metatranscriptome analysis of DHAB samples provides significant insights into shifts in metabolic activities of microorganisms as physicochemical conditions change from deep Mediterranean sea water to brine. The analysis of Thetis DHAB interface indicates that sulfate reduction occurs in both the upper (7.0–16.3% salinity) and lower (21.4–27.6%) halocline, but that expression of dissimilatory sulfate reductase is reduced in the more hypersaline lower halocline. High dark-carbon assimilation rates in the upper interface coincided with high abundance of transcripts for ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase affiliated to sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. In the lower interface, increased expression of genes associated with methane metabolism and osmoregulation is noted. In addition, in this layer, nitrogenase transcripts affiliated to uncultivated putative methanotrophic archaea were detected, implying nitrogen fixation in this anoxic habitat, and providing evidence of linked carbon, nitrogen and sulfur cycles. PMID:24950109

  9. Extremophile microbiomes in acidic and hypersaline river sediments of Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shipeng; Peiffer, Stefan; Lazar, Cassandre Sara; Oldham, Carolyn; Neu, Thomas R; Ciobota, Valerian; Näb, Olga; Lillicrap, Adam; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen; Küsel, Kirsten

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the microbial community compositions in two sediment samples from the acidic (pH ∼3) and hypersaline (>4.5% NaCl) surface waters, which are widespread in Western Australia. In West Dalyup River, large amounts of NaCl, Fe(II) and sulfate are brought by the groundwater into the surface run-off. The presence of K-jarosite and schwertmannite minerals in the river sediments suggested the occurrence of microbial Fe(II) oxidation because chemical oxidation is greatly reduced at low pH. 16S rRNA gene diversity analyses revealed that sequences affiliated with an uncultured archaeal lineage named Aplasma, which has the genomic potential for Fe(II) oxidation, were dominant in both sediment samples. The acidophilic heterotrophs Acidiphilium and Acidocella were identified as the dominant bacterial groups. Acidiphilium strain AusYE3-1 obtained from the river sediment tolerated up to 6% NaCl at pH 3 under oxic conditions and cells of strain AusYE3-1 reduced the effects of high salt content by forming filamentous structure clumping as aggregates. Neither growth nor Fe(III) reduction by strain AusYE3-1 was observed in anoxic salt-containing medium. The detection of Aplasma group as potential Fe(II) oxidizers and the inhibited Fe(III)-reducing capacity of Acidiphilium contributes to our understanding of the microbial ecology of acidic hypersaline environments.

  10. PHYLOGENETIC ANALYSIS AND AUTECOLOGY OF SPORE-FORMING BACTERIA FROM HYPERSALINE ENVIRONMENTS.

    PubMed

    Gladka, G V; Romanovskaya, V A; Tashyreva, H O; Tashyrev, O B

    2015-01-01

    Multi-resistant to extreme factors spore-forming bacteria of Bacillus genus are isolated from hypersaline environments of the Crimea (Ukraine) and the Dead Sea (Israel). Phylogenetic analysis showed distinction of dominating extremophilic culturable species in studied regions. In Crimean environments they are B. mojavensis and B. simplex, in the Dead Sea ecosystem--B. subtilis subsp. spizizenii, B. subtilis subsp. subtilis, B. licheniformis and B. simplex. Isolates are simultaneously halotolerant and resistant to UV radiation. Strains isolated from the Dead Sea and the Crimea environments were resistant to UV: LD90 and LD99.99 made 100-170 J/m2 and 750-1500 J/m2 respectively. Spores showed higher UV-resistance (LD99.99-2500 J/m2) than the vegetative cells. However the number of spores made 0.02-0.007% of the whole cell population, and should not significantly affect the UV LD99.99 value. Isolates of both environments were halotolerant in the range of 0.1-10% NaCl and thermotolerant in the range of 20-50 °C, and didn't grow at 15 °C. Survival strategy of spore-forming bacteria from hypersaline environments under high UV radiation level can be performed by spore formation which minimize cell damage as well as efficient DNA-repair systems that remove damages.

  11. Evolution of genomic diversity and sex at extreme environments: Fungal life under hypersaline Dead Sea stress

    PubMed Central

    Kis-Papo, Tamar; Kirzhner, Valery; Wasser, Solomon P.; Nevo, Eviatar

    2003-01-01

    We have found that genomic diversity is generally positively correlated with abiotic and biotic stress levels (1–3). However, beyond a high-threshold level of stress, the diversity declines to a few adapted genotypes. The Dead Sea is the harshest planetary hypersaline environment (340 g·liter–1 total dissolved salts, ≈10 times sea water). Hence, the Dead Sea is an excellent natural laboratory for testing the “rise and fall” pattern of genetic diversity with stress proposed in this article. Here, we examined genomic diversity of the ascomycete fungus Aspergillus versicolor from saline, nonsaline, and hypersaline Dead Sea environments. We screened the coding and noncoding genomes of A. versicolor isolates by using >600 AFLP (amplified fragment length polymorphism) markers (equal to loci). Genomic diversity was positively correlated with stress, culminating in the Dead Sea surface but dropped drastically in 50- to 280-m-deep seawater. The genomic diversity pattern paralleled the pattern of sexual reproduction of fungal species across the same southward gradient of increasing stress in Israel. This parallel may suggest that diversity and sex are intertwined intimately according to the rise and fall pattern and adaptively selected by natural selection in fungal genome evolution. Future large-scale verification in micromycetes will define further the trajectories of diversity and sex in the rise and fall pattern. PMID:14645702

  12. Mono Lake earthquake of October 23, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    McNutt, S.; Bryant, W.; Wilson, R.

    1991-02-01

    On October 23, 1990, a moderate earthquake of local magnitude (M{sub L}) 5.7 shook the Mono Lake area, a region known for its recent volcanic and tectonic activity. The earthquake was centered approximately 5 miles north of Lee Vining and 16 miles southeast of Bridgeport, near Black Point, an isolated flat-topped hill on the north shore of Mono Lake. Shaking from the earthquake was felt at approximately Modified Mercalli Intensity VI in the local area and weakly throughout much of north central California as far west as Sacramento and the San Francisco Bay area. This article summarizes the seismological features of the earthquake and relates the findings made during a surface fault rupture investigation of epicentral area by Division of Mines and Geology (DMG) geologists. To demonstrate how this earthquake fits into the regional tectonic setting, the character of this event is compared to that of other noteworthy seismic events that have occurred over the last 12 years.

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of "Candidatus Halobonum tyrrellensis" Strain G22, Isolated from the Hypersaline Waters of Lake Tyrrell, Australia.

    PubMed

    Ugalde, Juan A; Narasingarao, Priya; Kuo, Sidney; Podell, Sheila; Allen, Eric E

    2013-12-12

    We report the draft 3.675-Mbp genome sequence of "Candidatus Halobonum tyrrellensis" strain G22, a novel halophilic archaeon isolated from the surface hypersaline waters of Lake Tyrrell, Australia. The availability of the first genome from the "Candidatus Halobonum" genus provides a new genomic resource for the comparative genomic analysis of halophilic Archaea.

  14. Alkaline battery, separator therefore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, George F. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An improved battery separator for alkaline battery cells has low resistance to electrolyte ion transfer and high resistance to electrode ion transfer. The separator is formed by applying an improved coating to an electrolyte absorber. The absorber, preferably, is a flexible, fibrous, and porous substrate that is resistant to strong alkali and oxidation. The coating composition includes an admixture of a polymeric binder, a hydrolyzable polymeric ester and inert fillers. The coating composition is substantially free of reactive fillers and plasticizers commonly employed as porosity promoting agents in separator coatings. When the separator is immersed in electrolyte, the polymeric ester of the film coating reacts with the electrolyte forming a salt and an alcohol. The alcohol goes into solution with the electrolyte while the salt imbibes electrolyte into the coating composition. When the salt is formed, it expands the polymeric chains of the binder to provide a film coating substantially permeable to electrolyte ion transfer but relatively impermeable to electrode ion transfer during use.

  15. Evaluation of Alkaline Cleaner Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partz, Earl

    1998-01-01

    Alkaline cleaners used to process aluminum substrates have contained chromium as the corrosion inhibitor. Chromium is a hazardous substance whose use and control are described by environmental laws. Replacement materials that have the characteristics of chromated alkaline cleaners need to be found that address both the cleaning requirements and environmental impacts. This report will review environmentally friendly candidates evaluated as non-chromium alkaline cleaner replacements and methods used to compare those candidates one versus another. The report will also list characteristics used to select candidates based on their declared contents. It will also describe and evaluate methods used to discriminate among the large number of prospective candidates.

  16. Paleoecology of Neoproterozoic hypersaline environments: Biomarker evidence for haloarchaea, methanogens, and cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Schinteie, R; Brocks, J J

    2017-09-01

    While numerous studies have examined modern hypersaline ecosystems, their equivalents in the geologic past, particularly in the Precambrian, are poorly understood. In this study, biomarkers from ~820 million year (Ma)-old evaporites from the Gillen Formation of the mid-Neoproterozoic Bitter Springs Group, central Australia, are investigated to elucidate the antiquity and paleoecology of halophiles. The sediments were composed of alternating laminae of dolomitized microbial mats and up to 90% anhydrite. Solvent extraction of these samples yielded thermally well-preserved hydrocarbon biomarkers. The regularly branched C25 isoprenoid 2,6,10,14,18-pentamethylicosane, the tail-to-tail linked C30 isoprenoid squalane, and breakdown products of the head-to-head linked C40 isoprenoid biphytane, were particularly abundant in the most anhydrite-rich sediments and mark the oldest current evidence for halophilic archaea. Linear correlations between isoprenoid concentrations (normalized to n-alkanes) and the anhydrite/dolomite ratio reveal microbial consortia that fluctuated with changing salinity levels. Halophilic archaea were the dominant organisms during periods of high salinity and gypsum precipitation, while bacteria were prevalent during stages of carbonate formation. The irregularly branched C25 isoprenoid 2,6,10,15,19-pentamethylicosane (PMI), with a central tail-to-tail link, was also abundant during periods of elevated salinity, highlighting the activity of methanogens. By contrast, the irregularly branched C20 isoprenoid 2,6,11,15-tetramethylhexadecane (crocetane) was more common in dolomite-rich facies, revealing that an alternate group of archaea was active during less saline periods. Elevated concentrations of isotopically depleted heptadecane (n-C17 ) revealed the presence of cyanobacteria under all salinity regimes. The combination of biomarkers in the mid-Neoproterozoic Gillen Formation resembles lipid compositions from modern hypersaline cyanobacterial mats

  17. Microbial Mediated Mineralization in the Extreme Hypersaline Sabkha Environment of Abu Dhabi (UAE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bontognali, T.; McKenzie, J.; Warthmann, R.; Vasconcelos, C.

    2005-12-01

    Studies of microbes living in extreme environments provide important information about microbial metabolisms, survival strategies and production of biominerals. Knowledge of these geobiological processes and the ultimate product can be used to better reconstruct the evolution of life during the early Earth, when skeletal fossils are absent. Our study focuses on a well-documented extreme hypersaline environment, the coastal sabkhas of Abu Dhabi (UAE), which is among the rare geological settings where primary dolomite is forming today. The origin of dolomite still remains one of the most debated subjects in sedimentary geology. Although microbial mediation is proposed as a solution for this controversy, the relationship between microbial activity and dolomite precipitation in the sabkha environment has not been fully evaluated. The goal of this study is to investigate this microbial dolomite factor combining sedimentological, geochemical and microbiological approaches. Preliminary results indicate the existence of a new dolomite facies consisting of dolomite spheres enveloped in a biofilm. This association is evidence supporting the microbial hypothesis of dolomite formation. Together with other evaporite minerals, the spheres grow in situ accumulating between 10 and 40 cm depth below the sabkha surface in an organic carbon-rich sediment. The co-existence of dolomite with gypsum leads us to hypothesize a link between the C and S cycles under hypersaline conditions. We propose that formation of significant amounts of gypsum within the zone of dolomite precipitation could be related to the recycling of S compounds during microbial metabolism, such as a combination of sulfate reduction and sulfide oxidation, which could lead to the retention of S in the system. Additionally, the EPS included within the biofilm is widely recognized as an important organic component involved in the precipitation of carbonates. EDS/SEM studies of the biofilm encompassing the dolomite

  18. Unusually high stable carbon isotopic values of methane from low organic carbon Mars analog hypersaline environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, C. A.; Poole, J. A.; Tazaz, A.; Chanton, J.; Bebout, B.

    2010-12-01

    Motivated by the Mars rovers’ findings of past hypersaline environments and the discovery of methane in the atmosphere of Mars, we examined methanogenesis in hypersaline ponds in Baja California Sur and in the Don Edwards National Wildlife Refuge in northern California. Methane-rich bubbles were observed to be released from below gypsum/halite crusts in these environments. The stable carbon isotopic composition of these bubbles ranged from about -30 to -40 ‰. Methane with these relatively high isotopic values would typically be considered non-biogenic, however incubations of crust and sediments samples over time resulted in the production of methane. We therefore undertook a series of measurements aimed at understanding the isotopic composition of methane in these environments. The concentrations and isotopic composition of the particulate organic carbon (POC) in these environments were measured. POC content was low (relative to most methane-producing sedimentary environments), generally less than 1%, and always less than 2% of the total mass. The isotopic composition of the POC ranged from -13 to -22 ‰. To determine the substrates used by the methanogens, 13C-labeled trimethylamine (TMA), monomethylamine, methanol, acetate and bicarbonate were added to incubation vials and the methane produced was monitored for 13C content. The main substrates used by the methanogens in these hypersaline environments were the non-competitive substrates, the methylamines and methanol. When unlabeled, but isotopically known, TMA was added to incubation vials in varying concentrations, the isotopic composition of the methane produced also varied. Little, if any, difference in the isotopic composition between the TMA and methane occurred at the lowest TMA concentration (10 µM final concentration). The lowest methane δ13C values (and so greatest fractionation between methane and TMA) occurred when the most TMA was added (1000 µM final concentration). This change in the

  19. Functional interrelationships in the alkaline phosphatase superfamily: phosphodiesterase activity of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, P J; Herschlag, D

    2001-05-15

    Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase (AP) is a proficient phosphomonoesterase with two Zn(2+) ions in its active site. Sequence homology suggests a distant evolutionary relationship between AP and alkaline phosphodiesterase/nucleotide pyrophosphatase, with conservation of the catalytic metal ions. Furthermore, many other phosphodiesterases, although not evolutionarily related, have a similar active site configuration of divalent metal ions in their active sites. These observations led us to test whether AP could also catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphate diesters. The results described herein demonstrate that AP does have phosphodiesterase activity: the phosphatase and phosphodiesterase activities copurify over several steps; inorganic phosphate, a strong competitive inhibitor of AP, inhibits the phosphodiesterase and phosphatase activities with the same inhibition constant; a point mutation that weakens phosphate binding to AP correspondingly weakens phosphate inhibition of the phosphodiesterase activity; and mutation of active site residues substantially reduces both the mono- and diesterase activities. AP accelerates the rate of phosphate diester hydrolysis by 10(11)-fold relative to the rate of the uncatalyzed reaction [(k(cat)/K(m))/k(w)]. Although this rate enhancement is substantial, it is at least 10(6)-fold less than the rate enhancement for AP-catalyzed phosphate monoester hydrolysis. Mutational analysis suggests that common active site features contribute to hydrolysis of both phosphate monoesters and phosphate diesters. However, mutation of the active site arginine to serine, R166S, decreases the monoesterase activity but not the diesterase activity, suggesting that the interaction of this arginine with the nonbridging oxygen(s) of the phosphate monoester substrate provides a substantial amount of the preferential hydrolysis of phosphate monoesters. The observation of phosphodiesterase activity extends the previous observation that AP has a low level of

  20. Capillary Electrophoresis of Mono- and Oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Toppazzini, Mila; Coslovi, Anna; Rossi, Marco; Flamigni, Anna; Baiutti, Edi; Campa, Cristiana

    2016-01-01

    This chapter reports an overview of the recent advances in the analysis of mono- and oligosaccharides by capillary electrophoresis (CE); furthermore, relevant reviews and research articles recently published in the field are tabulated. Additionally, pretreatments and procedures applied to uncharged and acidic carbohydrates (i.e., monosaccharides and lower oligosaccharides carrying carboxylate, sulfate, or phosphate groups) are described.Representative examples of such procedures are reported in detail, upon describing robust methodologies for the study of (1) neutral oligosaccharides derivatized by reductive amination and by formation of glycosylamines; (2) sialic acid derivatized with 2-aminoacridone, released from human serum immunoglobulin G; (3) anomeric couples of neutral glycosides separated using borate-based buffers; (4) unsaturated, underivatized oligosaccharides from lyase-treated alginate.

  1. Gaylussite formation at Mono Lake, California

    SciTech Connect

    Bischoff, J.L.; Rosenbauer, R.J. ); Herbst, D.B. )

    1991-06-01

    The salinity of Mono Lake has steadily increased since 1941 from 50{per thousand} to about 90{per thousand} due to diversion of tributary streams. This increase has resulted in the newly discovered precipitation of gaylussite (Na{sub 2}Ca(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} {center dot} 5H{sub 2}O). Chemical modeling of the lake water using Pitzer equations suggests that gaylussite has been forming year round since about 1970 when the salinity first exceeded 80{per thousand}, and that it was earlier forming intermittently at lower salinities in the winter shortly after diversion began, breaking down incongruently to aragonite during summers. Lake water appears to remain at a constant 9-fold supersaturation with aragonite at all salinities, perhaps buffered by monohydrocalcite which appears to be just at saturation for all salinities. Other saline lakes also appear to be buffered by monohydrocalcite.

  2. Gaylussite formation at mono lake, california

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bischoff, J.L.; Herbst, D.B.; Rosenbauer, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    The salinity of Mono Lake has steadily increased since 1941 from 50%. to about 90%. due to diversion of tributary streams. This increase has resulted in the newly discovered precipitation of gaylussite (Na2Ca(CO3)2 ?? 5H2O). Chemical modeling of the lake water using Pitzer equations suggests that gaylussite has been forming year round since about 1970 when the salinity first exceeded 80%., and that it was earlier forming intermittently at lower salinities in the winter shortly after diversion began, breaking down incongruently to aragonite during summers. Lake water appears to remain at a constant 9-fold supersaturation with aragonite at all salinities, perhaps buffered by monohydrocalcite which appears to be just at saturation for all salinities. Other saline lakes also appear to be buffered by monohydrocalcite. ?? 1991.

  3. Polymerization under Hypersaline Conditions: A Robust Route to Phenolic Polymer-Derived Carbon Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhi-Long; Li, Guan-Cheng; Fechler, Nina; Yang, Ning; Ma, Zhi-Yuan; Wang, Xin; Antonietti, Markus; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2016-11-14

    Polymer-derived carbon aerogels can be obtained by direct polymerization of monomers under hypersaline conditions using inorganic salts. This allows for significantly increased mechanical robustness and avoiding special drying processes. This concept was realized by conducting the polymerization of phenol-formaldehyde (PF) in the presence of ZnCl2 salt. Afterwards, the simultaneous carbonization and foaming process conveniently converts the PF monolith into a foam-like carbon aerogel. ZnCl2 plays a key role, serving as dehydration agent, foaming agent, and porogen. The carbon aerogels thus obtained are of very low density (25 mg cm(-3) ), high specific surface area (1340 m(2)  g(-1) ), and have a large micro- and mesopore volume (0.75 cm(3)  g(-1) ). The carbon aerogels show very promising potential in the separation/extraction of organic pollutants and for energy storage.

  4. High-pH-induced flocculation-flotation of the hypersaline microalga Dunaliella salina.

    PubMed

    Besson, Alexandre; Guiraud, Pascal

    2013-11-01

    Natural autoflocculation was not observed in a Dunaliella salina hypersaline culture and the microalgae did not float without destabilization of the algal suspension. High-pH-induced flocculation by sodium hydroxide addition was chosen to induce flotation. Recovery efficiencies greater than 90% and concentration factors of around 20 were reached. An autoflocculation mechanism, with precipitation of magnesium hydroxide, is proposed to explain a sweeping flotation of D. salina cells. The influence of the flow rate of sodium hydroxide addition was also studied to anticipate the constraints related to the industrialization of this process. The flow rate of sodium hydroxide addition had no effect on the recovery efficiency and reduced the concentration factor only for abrupt injections. Natural increase of culture pH by photosynthetic activity could reduce the amount of base consumed. Non-harvested cells remained viable during pH increase and could be used as inoculum for a new culture.

  5. Abiotic nitrous oxide emission from the hypersaline Don Juan Pond in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samarkin, Vladimir A.; Madigan, Michael T.; Bowles, Marshall W.; Casciotti, Karen L.; Priscu, John C.; McKay, Christopher P.; Joye, Samantha B.

    2010-05-01

    Nitrous oxide is a potent atmospheric greenhouse gas that contributes to ozone destruction. Biological processes such as nitrification and denitrification are thought to drive nitrous oxide production in soils, which comprise the largest source of nitrous oxide to the atmosphere. Here we present measurements of the concentration and isotopic composition of nitrous oxide in soil pore spaces in samples taken near Don Juan Pond, a metabolically dormant hypersaline pond in Southern Victoria Land, Antarctica in 2006, 2007 and 2008, together with in situ fluxes of nitrous oxide from the soil to the atmosphere. We find fluxes of nitrous oxide that rival those measured in fertilized tropical soils. Laboratory experiments-in which nitrite-rich brine was reacted with a variety of minerals containing Fe(II)-reveal a new mechanism of abiotic water-rock reaction that could support nitrous oxide fluxes at Don Juan Pond. Our findings illustrate a dynamic and unexpected link between the geosphere and atmosphere.

  6. Survival strategies for microorganisms in hypersaline environments and their relevance to life on early Mars.

    PubMed

    Litchfield, C D

    1998-07-01

    There are two groups of microorganisms that live and grow in hypersaline (>10-15% NaCl) environments: the halophilic Archaea and the halotolerant Bacteria and algae. In order to grow and reproduce in such high-salt, low-water activity environments, these organisms have made basic biochemical adaptations in their proteins, osmoregulation mechanisms, nucleic acids, and lipids. The environment of the halophiles and especially how the halophilic Archaea have adapted to that environment are reviewed in this paper. Along with this review is a brief description of how these adaptations could be important in the detection of life on early Mars assuming similar types of salts and a carbon-based life.

  7. Molecular Ecology of Hypersaline Microbial Mats: Current Insights and New Directions

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Hon Lun; Ahmed-Cox, Aria; Burns, Brendan Paul

    2016-01-01

    Microbial mats are unique geobiological ecosystems that form as a result of complex communities of microorganisms interacting with each other and their physical environment. Both the microorganisms present and the network of metabolic interactions govern ecosystem function therein. These systems are often found in a range of extreme environments, and those found in elevated salinity have been particularly well studied. The purpose of this review is to briefly describe the molecular ecology of select model hypersaline mat systems (Guerrero Negro, Shark Bay, S’Avall, and Kiritimati Atoll), and any potentially modulating effects caused by salinity to community structure. In addition, we discuss several emerging issues in the field (linking function to newly discovered phyla and microbial dark matter), which illustrate the changing paradigm that is seen as technology has rapidly advanced in the study of these extreme and evolutionally significant ecosystems. PMID:27681900

  8. SAR Imagery Applied to the Monitoring of Hyper-Saline Deposits: Death Valley Example (CA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasne, Yannick; Paillou, Philippe; Freeman, Anthony; Chapman, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    The present study aims at understanding the influence of salinity on the dielectric constant of soils and then on the backscattering coeff cients recorded by airborne/spaceborne SAR systems. Based on dielectric measurements performed over hyper-saline deposits in Death Valley (CA), as well as laboratory electromagnetic characterization of salts and water mixtures, we used the dielectric constants as input parameters of analytical IEM simulations to model both the amplitude and phase behaviors of SAR signal at C, and L-bands. Our analytical simulations allow to reproduce specif c copolar signatures recorded in SAR data, corresponding to the Cottonball Basin saltpan. We also propose the copolar backscattering ratio and phase difference as indicators of moistened and salt-affected soils. More precisely, we show that these copolar indicators should allow to monitor the seasonal variations of the dielectric properties of saline deposits.

  9. SAR Imagery Applied to the Monitoring of Hyper-Saline Deposits: Death Valley Example (CA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasne, Yannick; Paillou, Philippe; Freeman, Anthony; Chapman, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    The present study aims at understanding the influence of salinity on the dielectric constant of soils and then on the backscattering coeff cients recorded by airborne/spaceborne SAR systems. Based on dielectric measurements performed over hyper-saline deposits in Death Valley (CA), as well as laboratory electromagnetic characterization of salts and water mixtures, we used the dielectric constants as input parameters of analytical IEM simulations to model both the amplitude and phase behaviors of SAR signal at C, and L-bands. Our analytical simulations allow to reproduce specif c copolar signatures recorded in SAR data, corresponding to the Cottonball Basin saltpan. We also propose the copolar backscattering ratio and phase difference as indicators of moistened and salt-affected soils. More precisely, we show that these copolar indicators should allow to monitor the seasonal variations of the dielectric properties of saline deposits.

  10. Use of an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) to Measure Hypersaline Bidirectional Discharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, K.K.; Loving, B.L.; ,

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey measures the exchange of flow between the north and south parts of Great Salt Lake, Utah, as part of a monitoring program. Turbidity and bidirectional flow through the breach in the causeway that divides the lake into two parts makes it difficult to measure discharge with conventional streamflow techniques. An acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) can be used to more accurately define the angles of flow and the location of the interface between the layers of flow. Because of the high salinity levels measured in Great Salt Lake (60-280 parts per thousand), special methods had to be developed to adjust ADCP-computed discharges for the increased speed of sound in hypersaline waters and for water entrained at the interface between flow layers.

  11. Nitrate attenuation potential of hypersaline lake sediments in central Spain: flow-through and batch experiments.

    PubMed

    Carrey, R; Rodríguez-Escales, P; Otero, N; Ayora, C; Soler, A; Gómez-Alday, J J

    2014-08-01

    Complex lacustrine systems, such as hypersaline lakes located in endorheic basins, are exposed to nitrate (NO3(-)) pollution. An excellent example of these lakes is the hypersaline lake located in the Pétrola basin (central Spain), where the lake acts as a sink for NO3(-) from agricultural activities and from sewage from the surrounding area. To better understand the role of the organic carbon (Corg) deposited in the bottom sediment in promoting denitrification, a four-stage flow-through experiment (FTR) and batch experiments using lake bottom sediment were performed. The chemical, multi-isotopic and kinetic characterization of the outflow showed that the intrinsic NO3(-) attenuation potential of the lake bottom sediment was able to remove 95% of the NO3(-) input over 296days under different flow conditions. The NO3(-) attenuation was mainly linked with denitrification but some dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium was observed at early days favored by the high C/N ratio and salinity. Sulfate reduction could be neither confirmed nor discarded during the experiments because the sediment leaching masked the chemical and isotopic signatures of this reaction. The average nitrogen reduction rate (NRR) obtained was 1.25mmold(-1)kg(-1) and was independent of the flow rate employed. The amount of reactive Corg from the bottom sediment consumed during denitrification was 28.8mmol, representing approximately 10% of the total Corg of the sediment (1.2%). Denitrification was produced coupled with an increase in the isotopic composition of both δ(15)N and δ(18)O. The isotopic fractionations (ε of (15)N-NO3(-) and (18)O-NO3(-)) produced during denitrification were calculated using batch and vertical profile samples. The results were -14.7‰ for εN and -14.5‰ for εO. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Authigenic carbonate precipitation in Lake Acigöl, a hypersaline lake in southwestern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Nurgul; Menekse, Meryem; Gül Karagüler, Nevin; Seref Sönmez, M.; Meister, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    Lake Acigöl (Bitter Lake) is a hypersaline lake in southwestern Turkey at an elevation of 836 m above sea level showing authigenic precipitation of several different carbonate mineral phases. It is a perennial lake and closed drainage basin where a semiarid continental climate dominates. Due to the extreme water chemistry (salinity 8-200 mg/l; SO4 112-15232 mg/l; Cl 290-35320 mg/l; Mg, 82-3425 mg/l; Ca 102-745 mg/l) unique microorganisms flourish in the lake. We studied microbial diversity from enrichment cultures and performed precipitation experiments using similar water chemistry and adding bacterial enrichment cultures from lake sediments in order to elucidate whether the mineral assemblages found in the lake can be reproduced. Experiments using moderately halophilic bacteria obtained from the lake sediments demonstrate the formation of various calcium-/magnesium-carbonates: hydromagnesite, dypingite, huntite, monohydrocalcite and aragonite. The relative amounts of different mineral phases, particularly monohydrocalcite, hydromagnesite and dypingite, could be controlled by varying the sulphate concentration in the media from 0 to 56 mM. The similar mineral assemblages identified in the sediments of Lake Acigöl and in the experiments point to similar thermodynamic conditions and kinetics of crystal growth. In particular, the similar spherical morphology points to a rapid crystal growth under strong kinetic inhibition, possibly by organic polymers that are commonly produced by microbial communities. Our results demonstrate that the authigenic carbonate paragenesis of hypersaline lakes as Lake Acigöl can be reproduced in halophilic bacterial cultures. The exact thermodynamic conditions and precipitation kinetics under seasonally changing water chemistry or in batch experiment, however, still have to be constrained in order to establish a microbial model for carbonate precipitation in such environments.

  13. Metagenomic and lipid analyses reveal a diel cycle in a hypersaline microbial ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Karen; Logemann, Jörn; Heidelberg, Karla B; Emerson, Joanne B; Comolli, Luis R; Hug, Laura A; Probst, Alexander J; Keillar, Angus; Thomas, Brian C; Miller, Christopher S; Allen, Eric E; Moreau, John W; Brocks, Jochen J; Banfield, Jillian F

    2015-01-01

    Marine microbial communities experience daily fluctuations in light and temperature that can have important ramifications for carbon and nutrient cycling. Elucidation of such short time scale community-wide dynamics is hindered by system complexity. Hypersaline aquatic environments have lower species richness than marine environments and can be well-defined spatially, hence they provide a model system for diel cycle analysis. We conducted a 3-day time series experiment in a well-defined pool in hypersaline Lake Tyrrell, Australia. Microbial communities were tracked by combining cultivation-independent lipidomic, metagenomic and microscopy methods. The ratio of total bacterial to archaeal core lipids in the planktonic community increased by up to 58% during daylight hours and decreased by up to 32% overnight. However, total organism abundances remained relatively consistent over 3 days. Metagenomic analysis of the planktonic community composition, resolved at the genome level, showed dominance by Haloquadratum species and six uncultured members of the Halobacteriaceae. The post 0.8 μm filtrate contained six different nanohaloarchaeal types, three of which have not been identified previously, and cryo-transmission electron microscopy imaging confirmed the presence of small cells. Notably, these nano-sized archaea showed a strong diel cycle, with a pronounced increase in relative abundance over the night periods. We detected no eukaryotic algae or other photosynthetic primary producers, suggesting that carbon resources may derive from patchily distributed microbial mats at the sediment-water interface or from surrounding land. Results show the operation of a strong community-level diel cycle, probably driven by interconnected temperature, light abundance, dissolved oxygen concentration and nutrient flux effects. PMID:25918833

  14. Recent studies in microbial degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in hypersaline environments

    PubMed Central

    Fathepure, Babu Z.

    2014-01-01

    Many hypersaline environments are often contaminated with petroleum compounds. Among these, oil and natural gas production sites all over the world and hundreds of kilometers of coastlines in the more arid regions of Gulf countries are of major concern due to the extent and magnitude of contamination. Because conventional microbiological processes do not function well at elevated salinities, bioremediation of hypersaline environments can only be accomplished using high salt-tolerant microorganisms capable of degrading petroleum compounds. In the last two decades, there have been many reports on the biodegradation of hydrocarbons in moderate to high salinity environments. Numerous microorganisms belonging to the domain Bacteria and Archaea have been isolated and their phylogeny and metabolic capacity to degrade a variety of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons in varying salinities have been demonstrated. This article focuses on our growing understanding of bacteria and archaea responsible for the degradation of hydrocarbons under aerobic conditions in moderate to high salinity conditions. Even though organisms belonging to various genera have been shown to degrade hydrocarbons, members of the genera Halomonas Alcanivorax, Marinobacter, Haloferax, Haloarcula, and Halobacterium dominate the published literature. Despite rapid advances in understanding microbial taxa that degrade hydrocarbons under aerobic conditions, not much is known about organisms that carry out similar processes in anaerobic conditions. Also, information on molecular mechanisms and pathways of hydrocarbon degradation in high salinity is scarce and only recently there have been a few reports describing genes, enzymes and breakdown steps for some hydrocarbons. These limited studies have clearly revealed that degradation of oxygenated and non-oxygenated hydrocarbons by halophilic and halotolerant microorganisms occur by pathways similar to those found in non-halophiles. PMID:24795705

  15. Phylogenetic analysis of the microbial community in hypersaline petroleum produced water from the Campos Basin.

    PubMed

    Piubeli, Francine; Grossman, Matthew J; Fantinatti-Garboggini, Fabiana; Durrant, Lucia R

    2014-10-01

    In this work the archaea and eubacteria community of a hypersaline produced water from the Campos Basin that had been transported and discharged to an onshore storage facility was evaluated by 16S recombinant RNA (rRNA) gene sequence analysis. The produced water had a hypersaline salt content of 10 (w/v), had a carbon oxygen demand (COD) of 4,300 mg/l and contains phenol and other aromatic compounds. The high salt and COD content and the presence of toxic phenolic compounds present a problem for conventional discharge to open seawater. In previous studies, we demonstrated that the COD and phenolic content could be largely removed under aerobic conditions, without dilution, by either addition of phenol degrading Haloarchaea or the addition of nutrients alone. In this study our goal was to characterize the microbial community to gain further insight into the persistence of reservoir community members in the produced water and the potential for bioremediation of COD and toxic contaminants. Members of the archaea community were consistent with previously identified communities from mesothermic reservoirs. All identified archaea were located within the phylum Euryarchaeota, with 98 % being identified as methanogens while 2 % could not be affiliated with any known genus. Of the identified archaea, 37 % were identified as members of the strictly carbon-dioxide-reducing genus Methanoplanus and 59 % as members of the acetoclastic genus Methanosaeta. No Haloarchaea were detected, consistent with the need to add these organisms for COD and aromatic removal. Marinobacter and Halomonas dominated the eubacterial community. The presence of these genera is consistent with the ability to stimulate COD and aromatic removal with nutrient addition. In addition, anaerobic members of the phyla Thermotogae, Firmicutes, and unclassified eubacteria were identified and may represent reservoir organisms associated with the conversion hydrocarbons to methane.

  16. Quorum-sensing inhibitory compounds from extremophilic microorganisms isolated from a hypersaline cyanobacterial mat.

    PubMed

    Abed, Raeid M M; Dobretsov, Sergey; Al-Fori, Marwan; Gunasekera, Sarath P; Sudesh, Kumar; Paul, Valerie J

    2013-07-01

    In this study, extremely halophilic and moderately thermophilic microorganisms from a hypersaline microbial mat were screened for their ability to produce antibacterial, antidiatom, antialgal, and quorum-sensing (QS) inhibitory compounds. Five bacterial strains belonging to the genera Marinobacter and Halomonas and one archaeal strain belonging to the genus Haloterrigena were isolated from a microbial mat. The strains were able to grow at a maximum salinity of 22-25 % and a maximum temperature of 45-60 °C. Hexanes, dichloromethane, and butanol extracts from the strains inhibited the growth of at least one out of nine human pathogens. Only butanol extracts of supernatants of Halomonas sp. SK-1 inhibited growth of the microalga Dunaliella salina. Most extracts from isolates inhibited QS of the acyl homoserine lactone producer and reporter Chromobacterium violaceum CV017. Purification of QS inhibitory dichloromethane extracts of Marinobacter sp. SK-3 resulted in isolation of four related diketopiperazines (DKPs): cyclo(L-Pro-L-Phe), cyclo(L-Pro-L-Leu), cyclo(L-Pro-L-isoLeu), and cyclo(L-Pro-D-Phe). QS inhibitory properties of these DKPs were tested using C. violaceum CV017 and Escherichia coli-based QS reporters (pSB401 and pSB1075) deficient in AHL production. Cyclo(L-Pro-L-Phe) and cyclo(L-Pro-L-isoLeu) inhibited QS-dependent production of violacein by C. violaceum CV017. Cyclo(L-Pro-L-Phe), cyclo(L-Pro-L-Leu), and cyclo(L-Pro-L-isoLeu) reduced QS-dependent luminescence of the reporter E. coli pSB401 induced by 3-oxo-C6-HSL. Our study demonstrated the ability of halophilic and moderately thermophilic strains from a hypersaline microbial mat to produce biotechnologically relevant compounds that could be used as antifouling agents.

  17. Assembly-driven metagenomics of a hypersaline microbial ecosystem (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Eric

    2013-03-01

    Eric Allen of Scripps and UC San Diego on "Assembly-driven metagenomics of a hypersaline microbial ecosystem" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  18. Intercultural Interactions of Mono-Cultural, Mono-Lingual Local Students in Small Group Learning Activities: A Bourdieusian Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colvin, Cassandra; Fozdar, Farida; Volet, Simone

    2015-01-01

    This research examines the understandings and experiences of mono-cultural, mono-lingual local students in relation to intercultural interactions within small group learning activities at university. Bourdieu's concepts of field, habitus and capital are employed to illuminate a number of barriers to intercultural interaction. Using qualitative…

  19. Intercultural Interactions of Mono-Cultural, Mono-Lingual Local Students in Small Group Learning Activities: A Bourdieusian Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colvin, Cassandra; Fozdar, Farida; Volet, Simone

    2015-01-01

    This research examines the understandings and experiences of mono-cultural, mono-lingual local students in relation to intercultural interactions within small group learning activities at university. Bourdieu's concepts of field, habitus and capital are employed to illuminate a number of barriers to intercultural interaction. Using qualitative…

  20. The alkaline and alkaline-carbonatite magmatism from Southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruberti, E.; Gomes, C. D. B.; Comin-Chiaramonti, P.

    2015-12-01

    Early to Late Cretaceous lasting to Paleocene alkaline magmatism from southern Brazil is found associated with major extensional structural features in and around the Paraná Basin and grouped into various provinces on the basis of several data. Magmatism is variable in size, mode of occurrence and composition. The alkaline rocks are dominantly potassic, a few occurrences showing sodic affinity. The more abundant silicate rocks are evolved undersaturated to saturated in silica syenites, displaying large variation in igneous forms. Less evolved types are restricted to subvolcanic environments and outcrops of effusive suites occur rarely. Cumulatic mafic and ultramafic rock types are very common, particularly in the alkali-carbonatitic complexes. Carbonatite bodies are represented by Ca-carbonatites and Mg-carbonatites and more scarcely by Fe-carbonatites. Available radiometric ages for the alkaline rocks fit on three main chronological groups: around 130 Ma, subcoveal with the Early Cretaceous flood tholeiites of the Paraná Basin, 100-110 Ma and 80-90 Ma (Late Cretaceous). The alkaline magmatism also extends into Paleocene times, as indicated by ages from some volcanic lavas. Geochemically, alkaline potassic and sodic rock types are distinguished by their negative and positive Nb-Ta anomalies, respectively. Negative spikes in Nb-Ta are also a feature common to the associated tholeiitic rocks. Sr-Nd-Pb systematics confirm the contribution of both HIMU and EMI mantle components in the formation of the alkaline rocks. Notably, Early and Late Cretaceous carbonatites have the same isotopic Sr-Nd initial ratios of the associated alkaline rocks. C-O isotopic Sr-Nd isotopic ratios indicate typical mantle signature for some carbonatites and the influence of post-magmatic processes in others. Immiscibility of liquids of phonolitic composition, derived from mafic alkaline parental magmas, has been responsible for the origin of the carbonatites. Close association of alkaline

  1. Enzymatic kinetic parameters for polyfluorinated alkyl phosphate hydrolysis by alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Derek A; Mabury, Scott A

    2012-09-01

    The hydrolysis kinetics of three polyfluorinated alkyl phosphate monoesters (monoPAPs), differing in fluorinated chain length, were measured using bovine intestinal alkaline phosphatase to catalyze the reaction. Kinetic values were also measured for analogous hydrogenated phosphate monoesters to elucidate the effects of the fluorinated chain on the rate of enzymatic hydrolysis. Michaelis constants (K(m)) were obtained by a competition kinetics technique in the presence of p-nitrophenyl phosphate (PNPP) using UV-vis spectroscopy. Compared with K(m) (PNPP), Michaelis constants for monoPAPs ranged from 0.9 to 2.1 compared with hydrogenated phosphates, which ranged from 4.0 to 13.0. Apparent bimolecular rate constants (k(cat)/K(m)) were determined by monitoring rates of product alcohol formation at low substrate concentrations using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The experimental values for k(cat)/K(m) averaged as 1.1 × 10(7) M(-1) s(-1) for monoPAPs compared with 3.8 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) for hexyl phosphate. This suggests that the electron-withdrawing nature of the fluorinated chain enhanced the alcohol leaving group ability. The results were used in a simple model to suggest that monoPAPs in a typical mammalian digestive tract would hydrolyze in approximately 100 s, supporting a previous study that showed its absence after a dosing study in rats.

  2. Three Dimensional Visualization of Mono Basin, California from Geophysical Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, J.; McPhee, D.; Ponce, D. A.; Mangan, M.; MacPherson-Krutsky, C. C.; Matson, G.

    2013-12-01

    Mono Basin, east of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, is an area of great interest not only because of recent volcanic activity, but also as a region of geothermal potential. Not surprisingly, most of the geophysical data collected in the region has been focused on Long Valley Caldera and Mammoth Mountain due to recent seismic activity in the south moat, uplift of a central resurgent dome in the Caldera, and enhanced CO2 emissions near Mammoth Mountain. Consequently, there is a void of geophysical information on the Mono-Inyo Craters, a chemically distinct volcanic chain north of Long Valley. The Mono-Inyo chain is nominally two parts but volcanically similar; the Inyo Craters form a north trending linear chain and the Mono craters form an arcuate chain concave towards the west, bounding the east side of Mono Basin. In the last two years, gravity, high-resolution aeromagnetic, audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) and magnetotelluric (MT) data have been collected around Mono Craters. The focus of this study is the Mono Basin, where interesting features have been found from 3D visualization of these geophysical data. One prominent feature is a large circular magnetic anomaly with a diameter of 10~km stretching from Mono Craters to the base of the Sierra Nevada, where the geometry of Mono Craters follow the eastern part of this anomaly. This circular anomaly has been suggested to be a ring fracture, but sparse surface data leaves this theory unconstrained. Another feature is an interpreted deep (~ 600 m) fault (previously unmapped) just west of Mono Craters inside the circular magnetic anomaly. This structure correlates with a conductive high in the 3D resistivity model found from the AMT data and 2D resistivity model from newly collected MT data, a gravity gradient, and a positive magnetic anomaly in the aeromagnetic data. Moreover, this fault may be an important structural constraint on the formation of Mono Craters, because it may explain why the Mono Craters form an arcuate

  3. MONO FOR CROSS-PLATFORM CONTROL SYSTEM ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Hiroshi; Timossi, Chris

    2006-10-19

    Mono is an independent implementation of the .NET Frameworkby Novell that runs on multiple operating systems (including Windows,Linux and Macintosh) and allows any .NET compatible application to rununmodified. For instance Mono can run programs with graphical userinterfaces (GUI) developed with the C# language on Windows with VisualStudio (a full port of WinForm for Mono is in progress). We present theresults of tests we performed to evaluate the portability of our controlssystem .NET applications from MS Windows to Linux.

  4. Mono Lake, California as seen from STS-59

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-04-14

    STS059-154-160 (9-20 April 1994) --- Orient with Mono Lake, California at the lower right; then the view is westward across the Sierra Nevada into the San Joaquin River drainage. A tiny network of ski trails can be seen on the Mono Lake side of the Sierras, on a line between Mono Lake and the snow-free San Joaquin headwaters. The ski trails mark Mammoth Mountain, where SRL investigators are studying microwave measurements of the water content of snowpacks. Linhof camera.

  5. Travertine Hot Springs, Mono County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Chesterman, C.W.; Kleinhampl, F.J.

    1991-08-01

    This article is an abridgement of Special Report 172, Travertine Hot Springs at Bridgeport, Mono County, California, in preparation at the California Division of Mines and Geology. The Travertine Hot Springs area is on the northern edge of what many consider to be one of the most tectonically active areas in the United States. There is abundant geothermal and seismic activity. The landscape is dotted with volcanic features- cones, craters, domes, flows, fumaroles and hot springs-indicators of unrest in the present as well as reminders of activity in the past. Travertine, also known as calcareous sinter, is limestone formed by chemical precipitation of calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) from ground or surface waters. It forms stalactites and stalagmites in caves, fills some veins and spring conduits and can also be found at the mouths of springs, especially hot springs. The less compact variety is called tufa and the dense, banded variety is known as Mexican onyx, or onyx marble. True onyx, however, is a banded silicate.

  6. Mono-energetic mono-directional resonance neutron activation of natural indium metal target

    SciTech Connect

    Ertek, C.; Oigawa, Hiroyuki

    1994-12-31

    The mono-energetic neutrons of 1.456eV energy are obtained from 2 MWth TR-I swimming pool type research reactor using double collimated beams and BRAGG reflection of pure Beryllium mono-crystal with extremely fine energy resolution. Foil thickness for 3 foils were 26., 28, and 44.10-4 cm and they were perpendicular to the beam of mono-energetic neutrons and were irradiated in sandwich form. After irradiation, the saturation activities were obtained using Phillips two-pie special beta-ray detector in a well controlled and shielded geometry. Counting reproducibility was excellent (better than 0.1%). Special Attention was paid to the irradiated (side A) and non-irradiated (side B) sides of the foils. Usual irradiation and decay corrections were applied to obtain the saturation activities. In this work, the preliminary calculations of reaction rates using Nakazawa M. et al., JENDL Dosimetry file, JAERI 1325, (1992) were performed. Considerable differences are found between the calculations and experiment and possible reasons are still under investigation. The preliminary calculations of reaction rates using ENDFB/VI are in agreement with JENDL-3 estimates. Absolute reaction rate estimates are not yet ready. Considerable numbers of research centers are interested in the experiment and very constructive inputs are expressed and obtained from Hiroyuki Oigawa, Shigeaki Okajima and T. Mukaiyama, JAERI, Japan; N.P. Baumann and K.O. Ott, USA; E. Zsolnay and E. Szondy, Hungary; M.C. Lopes and J. Molina, Portugal; F. Bensch, H. Boeck Austria; and M. Turgut and A. Isyar, Turkey. Investigations using collision theory, multiple scattering and monte-carlo techniques have been undertaken.

  7. Mechanisms of Selenomethionine Developmental Toxicity and the Impacts of Combined Hypersaline Conditions on Japanese Medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential micronutrient that can cause embryotoxicty at levels 7–30 times above essential concentrations. Exposure to hypersaline conditions and 50 μM selenomethionine (SeMet) decreased embryo hatch and depleted glutathione in Japanese medaka embryos without affecting Se accumulation. To better understand the impacts of nonchemical stressors on developmental toxicity of Se in fish, several adverse outcome pathways were evaluated in the Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes). We treated medaka embryos at 12 h post fertilization with 50 μM SeMet for 12 hours in freshwater or in 13 ppth hypersalinity and evaluated the contributions of oxidative stress, the unfolded protein response and apoptosis to reduced hatch. Exposure to SeMet and hypersalinity decreased embryo hatch to 3.7% ± 1.95, and induced teratogenesis in 100% ± 0 of hatched embryos. In contrast, treatments of freshwater, saltwater, and SeMet in freshwater resulted in 89.8% ± 3.91–86.7% ± 3.87 hatch, and no significant increase in deformities. We found no significant differences in lipid peroxidation, indicating that oxidative stress may not be responsible for the observed toxicity in embryos at this time point (24 h). Although significant changes in apoptosis were not observed, we witnessed up to 100 fold increases in transcripts of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone, immunoglobulin binding protein (BiP) and trends toward increasing downstream signals, activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) and ATF6 indicating potential contributions of the unfolded protein response to the effects of SeMet and hypersaline conditions. These data indicate that multiple adverse outcome pathways may be responsible for the developmental toxicity of Se and salinity, and these pathways may be time dependent. PMID:24856650

  8. Corrosion of selected metals and a high-temperature thermoplastic in hypersaline geothermal brine. Report of investigations/1983

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad, R.K.; Carter, J.P.; Cramer, S.D.

    1983-09-01

    The Bureau of Mines conducted corrosion research to determine suitable construction materials for geothermal resource recovery plants. Weight loss, pitting and crevice corrosion, U-bend stress corrosion, and electrochemical polarization measurements were made on selected metals in brine and steam process environments produced from high-enthalpy hypersaline brine from geothermal well Magmamax No. 1 at the Salton Sea Known Geothermal Resources Area, Imperial Valley, Calif.

  9. The modulation of leaf metabolism plays a role in salt tolerance of Cymodocea nodosa exposed to hypersaline stress in mesocosms

    PubMed Central

    Piro, Amalia; Marín-Guirao, Lázaro; Serra, Ilia A.; Spadafora, Antonia; Sandoval-Gil, José M.; Bernardeau-Esteller, Jaime; Fernandez, Juan M. R.; Mazzuca, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Applying proteomics, we tested the physiological responses of the euryhaline seagrass Cymodocea nodosa to deliberate manipulation of salinity in a mesocosm system. Plants were subjected to a chronic hypersaline condition (43 psu) to compare protein expression and plant photochemistry responses after 15 and 30 days of exposure with those of plants cultured under normal/ambient saline conditions (37 psu). Results showed a general decline in the expression level of leaf proteins in hypersaline stressed plants, with more intense reductions after long-lasting exposure. Specifically, the carbon-fixing enzyme RuBisCo displayed a lower accumulation level in stressed plants relative to controls. In contrast, the key enzymes involved in the regulation of glycolysis, cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, enolase 2 and triose-phosphate isomerase, showed significantly higher accumulation levels. These responses suggested a shift in carbon metabolism in stressed plants. Hypersaline stress also induced a significant alteration of the photosynthetic physiology of C. nodosa by means of a down-regulation in structural proteins and enzymes of both PSII and PSI. However we found an over-expression of the cytochrome b559 alpha subunit of the PSII initial complex, which is a receptor for the PSII core proteins involved in biogenesis or repair processes and therefore potentially involved in the absence of effects at the photochemical level of stressed plants. As expected hypersalinity also affects vacuolar metabolism by increasing the leaf cell turgor pressure and enhancing the up-take of Na+ by over-accumulating the tonoplast specific intrinsic protein pyrophosphate-energized inorganic pyrophosphatase (H(+)-PPase) coupled to the Na+/H+-antiporter. The modulation of carbon metabolism and the enhancement of vacuole capacity in Na+ sequestration and osmolarity changes are discussed in relation to salt tolerance of C. nodosa. PMID:26167167

  10. Selectivity of solid phase extraction for dissolved organic matter in the hypersaline Da Qaidam Lake, China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Keli; Zhang, Yaoling; Dong, Yaping; Li, Wu

    2017-09-19

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) was isolated from the hypersaline Da Qaidam Lake using solid-phase extraction (SPE) methods with five different adsorbents: ENVI-Carb (non-porous graphitized carbon), HLB, PPL, and XAD-8 (polymer based), and ENVI-18 (silica based). Structure-selective assessments of SPE-DOM isolated using the different adsorbents were conducted using a combination of complementary analysis techniques, including dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) analysis, as well as elemental analysis, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) and pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS). The results indicated that the modified polymer based adsorbents (PPL and HLB) exhibited higher DOC recoveries than the others. The PPL and ENVI-Carb cartridges can recover representative nitrogen-containing organic components from the hypersaline lake. The SPE-DOM isolates obtained using ENVI-18 and XAD-8 adsorbents contained higher proportions of purely aliphatic, alkene, and aromatic compounds; the ENVI-Carb and PPL adsorbents showed higher affinity for polar functionalized aliphatic and nitrogen-containing compounds; HLB isolate was enriched with oxygen-rich organic compounds and sulphur-bearing components. The structural and compositional features of SPE-DOM from the hypersaline Da Qaidam Lake indicated the predominately autochthonous sources of organic matter in the lake.

  11. Methanogenic diversity and activity in hypersaline sediments of the centre of the Napoli mud volcano, Eastern Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Cassandre Sara; Parkes, R John; Cragg, Barry A; L'Haridon, Stéphane; Toffin, Laurent

    2011-08-01

    Submarine mud volcanoes are a significant source of methane to the atmosphere. The Napoli mud volcano, situated in the brine-impacted Olimpi Area of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, emits mainly biogenic methane particularly at the centre of the mud volcano. Temperature gradients support the suggestion that Napoli is a cold mud volcano with moderate fluid flow rates. Biogeochemical and molecular genetic analyses were carried out to assess the methanogenic activity rates, pathways and diversity in the hypersaline sediments of the centre of the Napoli mud volcano. Methylotrophic methanogenesis was the only significant methanogenic pathway in the shallow sediments (0-40 cm) but was also measured throughout the sediment core, confirming that methylotrophic methanogens could be well adapted to hypersaline environments. Hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis was the dominant pathway below 50 cm; however, low rates of acetoclastic methanogenesis were also present, even in sediment layers with the highest salinity, showing that these methanogens can thrive in this extreme environment. PCR-DGGE and methyl coenzyme M reductase gene libraries detected sequences affiliated with anaerobic methanotrophs (mainly ANME-1) as well as Methanococcoides methanogens. Results show that the hypersaline conditions in the centre of the Napoli mud volcano influence active biogenic methane fluxes and methanogenic/methylotrophic diversity.

  12. 9. GRANT LAKE AND MONO LAKE IN DISTANCE, LOOKING NORTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. GRANT LAKE AND MONO LAKE IN DISTANCE, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  13. 1. LEE VINING INTAKE LOOKING EAST TO MONO LAKE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. LEE VINING INTAKE LOOKING EAST TO MONO LAKE. - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  14. 2. LEE VINING INTAKE, MONO LAKE IN BACKGROUND. Los ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. LEE VINING INTAKE, MONO LAKE IN BACKGROUND. - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  15. Organic geochemistry and brine composition in Great Salt, Mono, and Walker Lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Domagalski, J.L.; Orem, W.H.; Eugster, H.P.

    1989-01-01

    Samples of recent sediments, representing up to 1,000 years of accumulation, were collected from three closed basin lakes to assess the effects of brine composition on the accumulation of effects of brine composition on the accumulation of total organic carbon, the concentration of dissolved organic carbon, humic acid structure and diagenesis, and trace metal complexation. The Great Salt Lake water column is a stratified Na-Mg-Cl-SO{sub 4} brine with low alkalinity. Algal debris is entrained in the high density (1.132-1.190 g/ml) bottom brines, and in this region maximum organic matter decomposition occurs by anaerobic processes, with sulfate ion as the terminal electron acceptor. Organic matter, below 5 cm of the sediment-water interface, degrades at a very slow rate in spite of very high pore-fluid sulfate levels. Mono Lake is an alkaline (Na-CO{sub 3}-Cl-SO{sub 4}) system. The water column is stratified, but the bottom brines are of lower density relative to the Great Salt Lake, and sedimentation of algal debris is rapid. Walker Lake is also an alkaline system. The water column is not stratified, and decomposition of organic matter occurs by aerobic processes at the sediment-water interface and by anaerobic processes below. Total organic carbon and dissolved organic carbon concentrations in Walker Lake sediments vary with location and depth due to changes in input and pore-fluid sulfate concentrations. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of humic substances and dissolved organic carbon provide information on the source of the recent sedimentary organic carbon, its relative state of decomposition, and its chemical structure. 44 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. Plutonium speciation in water from Mono Lake, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cleveland, J.M.; Rees, T.F.; Nash, K.L.

    1983-01-01

    The solubility of plutonium in Mono Lake water is enhanced by the presence of large concentrations of indigenous carbonate ions and moderate concentrations of fluoride ions. In spite of the complex chemical composition of this water, only a few ions govern the behavior of plutonium, as demonstrated by the fact that it was possible to duplicate plutonium speciation in a synthetic water containing only the principal components of Mono Lake water.

  17. Plutonium speciation in water from Mono Lake, California

    SciTech Connect

    Cleveland, J.M.; Rees, T.F.; Nash, K.L.

    1983-12-23

    The solubility of plutonium in Mono Lake water is enhanced by the presence of large concentrations of indigenous carbonate ions and moderate concentrations of fluoride ions. In spite of the complex chemical composition of this water, only a few ions govern the behavior of plutonium, as demonstrated by the fact that it was possible to duplicate plutonium speciation in a synthetic water containing only the principal components of Mono Lake water.

  18. The geomorphology of two hyper-saline springs in the Canadian High Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Melissa; Pollard, Wayne

    2015-04-01

    On Axel Heiberg Island in the Canadian High Arctic, many low temperature perennial saline springs occur despite cold polar desert climate conditions marked by a mean annual air temperature of -18°C. Associated with 2 groups of hyper-saline springs are distinctive landforms resulting from winter deposition of salt minerals. These deposits resemble tufas structurally, but unlike true tufas which are composed of carbonate minerals, these landforms are formed mainly of salt. This study hypothesizes that the extreme cold winter air temperatures cool water temperatures triggering rapid precipitation of various salt minerals [mainly hydrohalite (NaCl*2H2O)]. These newly formed salt minerals subsequently alter the flow hydrology by obstructing summer flow paths. The tufa-like appearance of these salt deposits reflects the interaction between changing water temperature, chemistry and flow.This research characterises the geomorphology and geochemistry of two hyper-saline springs on Axel Heiberg Island: the first is located at Wolf Diapir (79°07'23"N; 90°14'39"W), the deposit at this site resembles a large conical mound (2.5m tall x 3m diameter). The second is located at Stolz Diapir (79°04'30"N; 87°04'30"W). In this case a series of pool and barrage structures staircase down a narrow valley for approximately 300m (several pools are up to 10 m wide x 3 m deep). The springs have very different seasonal surface hydrologic regimes and topographic settings which influence the pattern of mineral precipitates. The accumulation of precipitates occurs during the winter and is dominated by the formation of hydrohalite. In the summer, the accumulated hydrohalite melts incongruently to form halite. In addition, spring water and snowmelt dissolve various parts of the accumulations, changing the morphology of the deposits. This presentation will focus on results from four periods of fieldwork (two in spring for winter conditions and two in summer) including results from time

  19. Ecophysiological Distinctions of Haloarchaea from a Hypersaline Antarctic Lake as Determined by Metaproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Tschitschko, Bernhard; Williams, Timothy J.; Allen, Michelle A.; Zhong, Ling; Raftery, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Deep Lake in the Vestfold Hills is hypersaline and the coldest system in Antarctica known to support microbial growth (temperatures as low as −20°C). It represents a strong experimental model because the lake supports a low-complexity community of haloarchaea, with the three most abundant species totaling ∼72%. Moreover, the dominant haloarchaea are cultivatable, and their genomes are sequenced. Here we use metaproteomics linked to metagenome data and the genome sequences of the isolates to characterize the main pathways, trophic strategies, and interactions associated with resource utilization. The dominance of the most abundant member, Halohasta litchfieldiae, appears to be predicated on competitive utilization of substrates (e.g., starch, glycerol, and dihydroxyacetone) produced by Dunaliella, the lake's primary producer, while also possessing diverse mechanisms for acquiring nitrogen and phosphorus. The second most abundant member, strain DL31, is proficient in degrading complex proteinaceous matter. Hht. litchfieldiae and DL31 are inferred to release labile substrates that are utilized by Halorubrum lacusprofundi, the third most abundant haloarchaeon in Deep Lake. The study also linked genome variation to specific protein variants or distinct genetic capacities, thereby identifying strain-level variation indicative of specialization. Overall, metaproteomics revealed that rather than functional differences occurring at different lake depths or through size partitioning, the main lake genera possess major trophic distinctions, and phylotypes (e.g., strains of Hht. litchfieldiae) exhibit a more subtle level of specialization. This study highlights the extent to which the lake supports a relatively uniform distribution of taxa that collectively possess the genetic capacity to effectively exploit available nutrients throughout the lake. IMPORTANCE Life on Earth has evolved to colonize a broad range of temperatures, but most of the biosphere (∼85

  20. Microbial Diversity in Maras Salterns, a Hypersaline Environment in the Peruvian Andes

    PubMed Central

    Maturrano, Lenin; Santos, Fernando; Rosselló-Mora, Ramon; Antón, Josefa

    2006-01-01

    Maras salterns are located 3,380 m above sea level in the Peruvian Andes. These salterns consist of more than 3,000 little ponds which are not interconnected and act as crystallizers where salt precipitates. These ponds are fed by hypersaline spring water rich in sodium and chloride. The microbiota inhabiting these salterns was examined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis, and cultivation techniques. The total counts per milliliter in the ponds were around 2 × 106 to 3 × 106 cells/ml, while the spring water contained less than 100 cells/ml and did not yield any detectable FISH signal. The microbiota inhabiting the ponds was dominated (80 to 86% of the total counts) by Archaea, while Bacteria accounted for 10 to 13% of the 4′,6′-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) counts. A total of 239 16S rRNA gene clones were analyzed (132 Archaea clones and 107 Bacteria clones). According to the clone libraries, the archaeal assemblage was dominated by microorganisms related to the cosmopolitan square archaeon “Haloquadra walsbyi,” although a substantial number of the sequences in the libraries (31% of the 16S rRNA gene archaeal clones) were related to Halobacterium sp., which is not normally found in clone libraries from solar salterns. All the bacterial clones were closely related to each other and to the γ-proteobacterium “Pseudomonas halophila” DSM 3050. FISH analysis with a probe specific for this bacterial assemblage revealed that it accounted for 69 to 76% of the total bacterial counts detected with a Bacteria-specific probe. When pond water was used to inoculate solid media containing 25% total salts, both extremely halophilic Archaea and Bacteria were isolated. Archaeal isolates were not related to the isolates in clone libraries, although several bacterial isolates were very closely related to the “P. halophila” cluster found in the libraries. As observed for other hypersaline environments, extremely

  1. Calcium Biomineralization in Sediment of Lake Acigol, an Hypersaline Lake in SW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik Balci, Nurgul; Menekse, Meryem; Sonmez, Seref; Gul Karaguler, Nevin

    2010-05-01

    The study of biomineralization in (hyper) saline environments is important for two reasons, 1-it can extend our knowledge about the earliest microbial life on Earth which may have been halophilic 2-because of the presence of hypersaline conditions on Mars, the analog environments in Earth may have implications for the possibility of life on Mars. We examine calcium biomineralization in Lake Acigol, a unique hypersaline lake in southwest Turkey by integrating geochemical and microbiological approaches. Lake Acigol is a perennial lake with a maximum salinity of about 200 g/L and covers an area of 55-60 km2and is one of the main salt reservoirs of Turkey. Water, sediment and core samples were taken from the lake and salty ponds around the lake during the field excursion. The water chemistry revealed relatively high Na and SO4 concentrations both in the lake (30 gr/L, 33.36 gr/L), and the ponds (100 mg/L, 123 mg/L). The mineralogical analyses of sediments showed gypsum, halite, carbonate (aragonite, huntite) precipitation in the lake and ponds. We employed culture-dependent (16s rRNA cloning method, enrichment culture), and -independent techniques to study microbial diversity in Lake Aci gol. Sediment samples were used to isolate Halophilic sp. (e.g. salinicoccus roseus , Dunella sp.) under salinities that were similar to those measured in the lake water to further use in the laboratory Ca-precipitation experiments. For the precipitation experiments, liquid and solid culture media with various salinities ( 6-25 %) in addition to one similar to the lake water were prepared. In order to determine effect of Mg2+-Ca2+ molar ratio on mineralogy and the rate of precipitation, media with different Ca2+and Mg2+ concentrations were also prepared. Our preliminary results indicate that the halophilic bacteria play active role in the precipitation of Ca-minerals but the geochemical conditions are clearly influential. The results also point out that in the Lake Aci gol C, N, P, Ca

  2. Monitoring The Dynamics Of Hyper-Saline Environments With Polarimetric SAR: Death Valley, California Example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasne, Y.; McDonald, K.; Paillou, P.; Freeman, A.; Chapman, B.; Farr, T.; Ruffié, G.; Malézieux, J.

    2008-12-01

    Soil salinization in arid and semi-arid regions still remains one of the most important threats not only for socio-economical issues when dealing with water ressources management, but also for ecological matters such as: desertification, climate changes, and biomass reduction. Then, monitoring and mapping of soil salinity distribution represent today a key challenge in our understanding of such environmental processes. Being highly dependent on the dielectric properties of soils, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) appears to be an efficient tool for the remote sensing of hyper-saline environments. More precisely, the influence of saline deposits on SAR imagery lies in the solubility and ionic properties of the minerals which strongly influence both real and imaginary parts of the complex permittivity of such deposits, and thus the radar backscattering coefficient. Based on temporal series acquired with spaceborne SAR systems (ALOS/PALSAR, SIR-C) over the Death Valley (CA), we show that the copolarized backscattering ratio and phase difference derived from SAR data can be used as suitable indicators to monitor the dynamics of hyper-saline deposits. In particular, we propose these copolar parameters to follow the variations in the dielectric properties of moistened and salt-affected soils on a seasonal time scale because of the close relationship between the salinity (governed by the soil moisture content) and the complex permittivity of the soils. We also highlight a strong temporal correlation between the copolar parameters and weather data since precipitation events control the soil moisture and salinity. In order to allow for a better interpretation of the saline deposits signatures observed on SAR data, we also perform analytical simulations of the radar backscattering associated with saline deposits by means of the IEM scattering model. Using laboratory and in~ situ dielectric measurements as input parameters, we simulate the copolar ratio and phase difference as

  3. Cross-hole ERT monitoring of freshwater injection in a hyper-saline aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haaken, K.; Deidda, G. P.; Cassiani, G.; Kemna, A.; Deiana, R.; Putti, M.; Paniconi, C.; Schirru, F.; Mura, M.

    2012-04-01

    In November 2011 we performed a freshwater injection experiment in the hyper-saline aquifer underlying the Molentargius-Saline Regional Park located near Cagliari in southern Sardinia, very close to the coastline. The subsurface water reaches salinity levels as high as three times the NaCl content of seawater, most likely as a consequence of salt release from the nearby salt works, active from Roman times to the mid-twentieth century. Five ERT boreholes were drilled with 4 inches inner diameter to a depth of 20 m and positioned in the shape of a square with an 8-m long side, with one borehole at the centre. All boreholes are equipped with a fully screened PVC pipe bearing externally twenty-four stainless steel cylindrical electrodes from 0.6 m to 19 m depth with 0.8 m separation. The water table is stable around -5.2 m from the ground surface. The sediments are mostly composed of sands with thin layers of silty sand, clayey sand and silty clay. Electric fluid logs recorded in the boreholes allowed to discriminate two zones, with a transitional layer in between: (a) from the water table to 7.5 m the water electrical conductivity is about 2 S/m; (b) below 12 m depth the water electrical conductivity reaches 18.5 S/m. In November 2011 we injected 19.4 m3 of freshwater in about 4 hours using a double packer system positioned in the central borehole, with an injection chamber located between 13.5 and 14.5 m below ground surface. Time-lapse ERT monitoring was achieved by measuring along two 2D ERT planes corresponding to the two square diagonals, thus involving three boreholes at a time for a total of 72 electrodes. A mixture of skip 0 dipole-dipole and bipole-bipole configurations was used in each acquisition, that required about 1 hour using an IRIS Syscal Pro resistivity meter. The resulting ERT time-lapse images show clearly the development and motion of the injected freshwater bulb, that undergoes a fast vertical migration and a quick disappearance probably caused

  4. Microbial Fe cycling and mineralization in sediments of an acidic, hypersaline lake (Lake Tyrell, Victoria, Australia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roden, E. E.; Blöthe, M.; Shelobolina, E.

    2009-12-01

    Lake Tyrrell is a variably acidic, hypersaline, Fe-rich lake located in Victoria, Australia. Terrestrial acid saline lakes like Lake Tyrrell may be analogs for ancient Martian surface environments, as well as possible extant subsurface environments. To investigate the potential for microbial Fe cycling under acidic conditions and high salt concentration, we collected sediment core samples during three field trips between 2006 and 2008 from the southern, acidic edge of the lake. Materials from the cores were used for chemical and mineralogical analyses, as well as for molecular (16S rRNA genes) and culture-based microbiological studies. Near-surface (< 1 m depth) pore fluids contained low but detectable dissolved oxygen (ca. 50 uM), significant dissolved Fe(II) (ca. 500 uM), and nearly constant pH of around 4 - conditions conducive to enzymatic Fe(II) oxidation. High concentrations of Fe(III) oxides begin accumulate at a depth of ca. 10 cm, and may reflect the starting point for formation of massive iron concretions that are evident at and beneath the sediment surface. MPN analyses revealed low (10-100 cells/mL) but detectable populations of aerobic, halophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing organisms on the sediment surface and in the near-surface ground water. With culture-dependent methods at least three different halotolerant lithoautotrophic cultures growing on Fe(II), thiosulfate, or tetrathionate from different acidic sites were obtained. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that these organisms are similar to previous described gamma proteobacteria Thiobacillus prosperus (95%), Halothiobacillus kellyi (99%), Salinisphaera shabanense (95%) and a Marinobacter species. (98%). 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing data from two different sites with a pH range between 3 and 4.5 revealed a dominance of gamma proteobacteria. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing libraries from both cores were dominated by sequences related to the Ectothiorhodospiraceae family, which includes the taxa

  5. Magmatic gas emissions at Holocene volcanic features near Mono Lake, California, and their relation to regional magmatism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergfeld, D.; Evans, William C.; Howle, James F.; Hunt, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    Silicic lavas have erupted repeatedly in the Mono Basin over the past few thousand years, forming the massive domes and coulees of the Mono Craters chain and the smaller island vents in Mono Lake. We report here on the first systematic study of magmatic CO2 emissions from these features, conducted during 2007–2010. Most notably, a known locus of weak steam venting on the summit of North Coulee is actually enclosed in a large area (~ 0.25 km2) of diffuse gas discharge that emits 10–14 t/d of CO2, mostly at ambient temperature. Subsurface gases sampled here are heavily air-contaminated, but after standard corrections are applied, show average δ13C-CO2 of − 4.72‰, 3He/4He of 5.89RA, and CO2/3He of 0.77 × 1010, very similar to the values in fumarolic gas from Mammoth Mountain and the Long Valley Caldera immediately to the south of the basin. If these values also characterize the magmatic gas source at Mono Lake, where CO2 is captured by the alkaline lake water, a magmatic CO2 upflow beneath the lake of ~ 4 t/d can be inferred. Groundwater discharge from the Mono Craters area transports ~ 13 t/d of 14C-dead CO2 as free gas and dissolved carbonate species, and adding in this component brings the estimated total magmatic CO2 output to 29 t/d for the two silicic systems in the Mono Basin. If these emissions reflect intrusion and degassing of underlying basalt with 0.5 wt.% CO2, a modest intrusion rate of 0.00075 km3/yr is indicated. Much higher intrusion rates are required to account for CO2 emissions from Mammoth Mountain and the West Moat of the Long Valley Caldera.

  6. Alkaline Phosphatase in Normal Infants

    PubMed Central

    Stephen, Joan M. L.; Stephenson, Pearl

    1971-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase was measured in plasma from children receiving vitamin D supplements in day nurseries in the London area, and from children exposed to sunlight in the West Indies. The distribution of values showed that there was no precise upper limit which could be used in the diagnosis of subclinical vitamin D deficiency. PMID:5576029

  7. Mantle metasomatism and alkaline magmatism

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, E.M.; Pasteris, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    The 24 papers in this volume were presented at the Symposium on Alkalic Rocks and Kimberlites, held at the Geological Society of America South-Central Section meeting, April 15-16, 1985, in Fayetteville, Arkansas. This two-day symposium included a total of 55 papers dealing with mantle metasomatism and the origin of alkaline magmas, kimberlites and related rocks, alkalic rocks in oceanic settings, and alkalic rocks in continental settings. Papers presented at this symposium heightened the awareness that alkaline magmatism may occur in virtually all tectonic and petrologic settings. Two papers deal specifically with data from California sites. These research papers on aspects of alkaline rock petrology contribute to a better insight into the complex diversity of alkalic systems, the mantle processes which precede and accompany alkaline magmatism, and kimberlitic and oceanic systems. Abstracts of all papers presented at the symposium and not published in full in the volume are included in an appendix to show the broad scope of data presented at the meeting.

  8. Zinc electrode in alkaline electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    McBreen, J.

    1995-12-31

    The zinc electrode in alkaline electrolyte is unusual in that supersaturated zincate solutions can form during discharge and spongy or mossy zinc deposits can form on charge at low overvoltages. The effect of additives on regular pasted ZnO electrodes and calcium zincate electrodes is discussed. The paper also reports on in situ x-ray absorption (XAS) results on mossy zinc deposits.

  9. Metagenomic insights into strategies of carbon conservation and unusual sulfur biogeochemistry in a hypersaline Antarctic lake

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Sheree; Lauro, Federico M; Williams, Timothy J; DeMaere, Matthew Z; Brown, Mark V; Rich, John; Gibson, John AE; Cavicchioli, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Organic Lake is a shallow, marine-derived hypersaline lake in the Vestfold Hills, Antarctica that has the highest reported concentration of dimethylsulfide (DMS) in a natural body of water. To determine the composition and functional potential of the microbial community and learn about the unusual sulfur chemistry in Organic Lake, shotgun metagenomics was performed on size-fractionated samples collected along a depth profile. Eucaryal phytoflagellates were the main photosynthetic organisms. Bacteria were dominated by the globally distributed heterotrophic taxa Marinobacter, Roseovarius and Psychroflexus. The dominance of heterotrophic degradation, coupled with low fixation potential, indicates possible net carbon loss. However, abundant marker genes for aerobic anoxygenic phototrophy, sulfur oxidation, rhodopsins and CO oxidation were also linked to the dominant heterotrophic bacteria, and indicate the use of photo- and lithoheterotrophy as mechanisms for conserving organic carbon. Similarly, a high genetic potential for the recycling of nitrogen compounds likely functions to retain fixed nitrogen in the lake. Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) lyase genes were abundant, indicating that DMSP is a significant carbon and energy source. Unlike marine environments, DMSP demethylases were less abundant, indicating that DMSP cleavage is the likely source of high DMS concentration. DMSP cleavage, carbon mixotrophy (photoheterotrophy and lithoheterotrophy) and nitrogen remineralization by dominant Organic Lake bacteria are potentially important adaptations to nutrient constraints. In particular, carbon mixotrophy relieves the extent of carbon oxidation for energy production, allowing more carbon to be used for biosynthetic processes. The study sheds light on how the microbial community has adapted to this unique Antarctic lake environment. PMID:23619305

  10. Mineralogy and Microbial Diversity of the Microbialites in the Hypersaline Storr's Lake, the Bahamas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Varun G.; Wronkiewicz, David J.; Mormile, Melanie R.; Foster, Jamie S.

    2016-04-01

    Microbialites found in the low-light-intensity, hypersaline waters of Storr's Lake (SL), San Salvador Island, the Bahamas, were investigated with respect to their morphology, mineralogy, and microbial diversity. Previously described microbialite morphologies, as well as a newly identified "multi-cuspate" morphology, were observed at various depths. Electron microscopy analysis revealed the presence of angular, blocky, and needle-shaped crystals with mineralized cyanobacterial filaments and remains of exopolymeric substances. X-ray diffraction studies confirmed the presence of both Mg-calcite and aragonite in the plateau-mushroom and pinnacle mound microbialites, whereas only Mg-calcite was identified in the other microbialite morphotypes. A comprehensive molecular analysis using barcoded pyrosequencing of five different microbial mat communities identified at least 12 dominant bacterial phyla. Cyanobacteria were generally low in abundance and ranged from ˜0.01% in the deeper pinnacle mounds to ˜3.2% in the shallow calcareous knobs. Other photosynthetic members included green nonsulfur bacteria of the phylum Chloroflexi and purple sulfur bacteria of the class Gammaproteobacteria. All mat types contained significant amounts of sulfate-reducing and dehalogenating bacteria. The low light intensity reaching the deeper microbialites, the lack of dominant cyanobacteria, and the abundance of sulfate reducers and Chloroflexi collectively suggest that sulfate reduction and anoxygenic photosynthetic processes influence the carbonate biomineralization process in these systems.

  11. Diversity of Bacteria and Archaea in hypersaline sediment from Death Valley National Park, California.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Shik; Makama, Mfundi; Petito, Janine; Park, Nyun-Ho; Cohan, Frederick M; Dungan, Robert S

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to phylogenetically analyze microorganisms from the domains Bacteria and Archaea in hypersaline sediment from Death Valley National Park. Using domain-specific primers, a region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the product was subsequently used to create a clone library. A total of 243 bacterial clones, 99 archaeal clones, and 209 bacterial isolates were examined. The 243 clones from Bacteria were affiliated with the following groups: the Bacilli (59 clones) and Clostridia (1) of the Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes (90), Proteobacteria (27), Cyanobacteria (18), Gemmatimonadetes (41), candidate division OP1 (5), Actinobacteria (1), and the Deinococcus-Thermus division (1). Within the class Bacilli, 46 of 59 clones were tentatively identified as 10 unclassified species. The majority of bacterial isolates (130 of 209) were more closely related to the Bacillus subtilis-B. licheniformis clade than to any other recognized taxon, and an Ecotype Simulation analysis of B. subtilis relatives identified four previously unknown ecotypes. Several new genera were discovered within the Bacteroidetes (4) and the Gemmatimonadetes (2). Of the 99 archaeal clones, 94 were tentatively identified as belonging to 3 new genera within the Halobacteriaceae; other clones represented novel species within each of 4 established genera.

  12. Flow dynamics in hyper-saline aquifers: hydro-geophysical monitoring and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haaken, Klaus; Piero Deidda, Gian; Cassiani, Giorgio; Deiana, Rita; Putti, Mario; Paniconi, Claudio; Scudeler, Carlotta; Kemna, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    Saline-freshwater interaction in porous media is a phenomenon of practical interest particularly for the management of water resources in arid and semi-arid environments, where precious freshwater resources are threatened by seawater intrusion and where storage of freshwater in saline aquifers can be a viable option. Saline-freshwater interactions are controlled by physico-chemical processes that need to be accurately modeled. This in turn requires monitoring of these systems, a non-trivial task for which spatially extensive, high-resolution non-invasive techniques can provide key information. In this paper we present the field monitoring and numerical modeling components of an approach aimed at understanding complex saline-freshwater systems. The approach is applied to a freshwater injection experiment carried out in a hyper-saline aquifer near Cagliari (Sardinia, Italy). The experiment was monitored using time-lapse cross-hole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). To investigate the flow dynamics, coupled numerical flow and transport modeling of the experiment was carried out using an advanced three-dimensional (3-D) density-driven flow-transport simulator. The simulation results were used to produce synthetic ERT inversion results to be compared against real field ERT results. This exercise demonstrates that the evolution of the freshwater bulb is strongly influenced by the system's (even mild) hydraulic heterogeneities. The example also highlights how the joint use of ERT imaging and gravity-dependent flow and transport modeling give fundamental information for this type of study.

  13. Microbial weeds in hypersaline habitats: the enigma of the weed-like Haloferax mediterranei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oren, Aharon; Hallsworth, John E.

    2014-10-01

    Heterotrophic prokaryotic communities that inhabit saltern crystallizer ponds are typically dominated by two species, the archaeon Haloquadratum walsbyi and the bacterium Salinibacter ruber, regardless of location. These organisms behave as 'microbial weeds' as defined by Cray et al. (Microb Biotechnol6: 453–492, 2013) that possess the biological traits required to dominate the microbiology of these open habitats. Here, we discuss the enigma of the less abundant Haloferax mediterranei, an archaeon that grows faster than any other, comparable extreme halophile. It has a wide window for salt tolerance, can grow on simple as well as on complex substrates and degrade polymeric substances, has different modes of anaerobic growth, can accumulate storage polymers, produces gas vesicles, and excretes halocins capable of killing other Archaea. Therefore, Hfx. mediterranei is apparently more qualified as a 'microbial weed' than Haloquadratum and Salinibacter. However, the former differs because it produces carotenoid pigments only in the lower salinity range and lacks energy-generating retinal-based, light-driven ion pumps such as bacteriorhodopsin and halorhodopsin. We discuss these observations in relation to microbial weed biology in, and the open-habitat ecology of, hypersaline systems.

  14. Archaeal Populations in Hypersaline Sediments Underlying Orange Microbial Mats in the Napoli Mud Volcano▿†

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Cassandre Sara; L'Haridon, Stéphane; Pignet, Patricia; Toffin, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Microbial mats in marine cold seeps are known to be associated with ascending sulfide- and methane-rich fluids. Hence, they could be visible indicators of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and methane cycling processes in underlying sediments. The Napoli mud volcano is situated in the Olimpi Area that lies on saline deposits; from there, brine fluids migrate upward to the seafloor. Sediments associated with a brine pool and microbial orange mats of the Napoli mud volcano were recovered during the Medeco cruise. Based on analysis of RNA-derived sequences, the “active” archaeal community was composed of many uncultured lineages, such as rice cluster V or marine benthic group D. Function methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) genes were affiliated with the anaerobic methanotrophic Archaea (ANME) of the ANME-1, ANME-2a, and ANME-2c groups, suggesting that AOM occurred in these sediment layers. Enrichment cultures showed the presence of viable marine methylotrophic Methanococcoides in shallow sediment layers. Thus, the archaeal community diversity seems to show that active methane cycling took place in the hypersaline microbial mat-associated sediments of the Napoli mud volcano. PMID:21335391

  15. Modeling of membrane bioreactor treating hypersaline oily wastewater by artificial neural network.

    PubMed

    Pendashteh, Ali Reza; Fakhru'l-Razi, A; Chaibakhsh, Naz; Abdullah, Luqman Chuah; Madaeni, Sayed Siavash; Abidin, Zurina Zainal

    2011-08-30

    A membrane sequencing batch reactor (MSBR) treating hypersaline oily wastewater was modeled by artificial neural network (ANN). The MSBR operated at different total dissolved solids (TDSs) (35,000; 50,000; 100,000; 150,000; 200,000; 250,000mg/L), various organic loading rates (OLRs) (0.281, 0.563, 1.124, 2.248, and 3.372kg COD/(m(3)day)) and cyclic time (12, 24, and 48h). A feed-forward neural network trained by batch back propagation algorithm was employed to model the MSBR. A set of 193 operational data from the wastewater treatment with the MSBR was used to train the network. The training, validating and testing procedures for the effluent COD, total organic carbon (TOC) and oil and grease (O&G) concentrations were successful and a good correlation was observed between the measured and predicted values. The results showed that at OLR of 2.44kg COD/(m(3)day), TDS of 78,000mg/L and reaction time (RT) of 40h, the average removal rate of COD was 98%. In these conditions, the average effluent COD concentration was less than 100mg/L and met the discharge limits.

  16. Assessing the potential of Landsat 8 OLI for retrieving salinity in the hypersaline Arabian Gulf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jun; Temimi, Marouane

    2016-04-01

    The Arabian Gulf, located in an arid region in the Middle East, has high salinity that can exceed 43 practical salinity units (psu) due to its special conditions, such as high evaporation, low precipitation, and desalination discharge. In this study, a regional algorithm was developed to retrieve salinity using in situ measurements conducted between June 2013 and November 2014 along the western coast of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (UAE). A multivariate linear regression model using the visible bands of Operational Land Imager (OLI) was proposed and indicated good performance with a determination coefficient (R2) of 0.7. The algorithm was then applied to an OLI scene, which revealed the spatial distribution of salinity over the study area. The findings are favorable for better interpretation of the complex water mass exchange between the Arabian Gulf and the Sea of Oman through the Strait of Hormuz, validating salinity from numerical models, studying the effects of anthropogenic activities and climate change on ecosystem in the hypersaline Arabian Gulf, etc.

  17. Sulfidogenesis in hypersaline chloride-sulfate lakes of Kulunda Steppe (Altai, Russia).

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Zacharova, Elena E; Pimenov, Nikolai V; Tourova, Tatjana P; Panteleeva, Anjela N; Muyzer, Gerard

    2012-02-01

    The activity and culturable diversity of sulfidogens were investigated in anoxic sediments of four hypersaline lakes with pH 7.6-8.2 in the Kulunda Steppe (Altai, Russia). Sulfate reduction rates were low, varying from 0.1 to 6.0 nmol HS(-) /(cm(3) h) with a maximum in the top 10 cm layer. Potential sulfidogenic rates with thiosulfate and sulfur as the e-acceptors were higher than with sulfate and were stimulated by formate, lactate, and acetate. Sulfidogenesis was optimal at salt concentrations below 2 M NaCl. Cultivation at 2 M NaCl resulted in the isolation of several strains of moderately halophilic SRB, but no growth of SRB was observed at 4 M NaCl. At lithotrophic conditions (i.e., with formate or H(2) as e-donors), several closely related alkalitolerant strains belonging to the genus Desulfonatronovibrio were isolated. Enrichments at heterotrophic conditions with lactate, propionate, acetate, or butyrate using sulfate or thiosulfate as e-acceptors yielded isolates related to Desulfosalsimonas propionicica, Desulfohalobium utahense, and Desulfocella halophila. Sulfur-reducing enrichments at 2 M NaCl with ethanol produced a member of the genus Halanaerobium, while enrichments at 4 M NaCl with acetate were dominated by archaea, demonstrating for the first time such type of catabolism in haloarchaea. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Culturable diversity of aerobic halophilic archaea (Fam. Halobacteriaceae) from hypersaline, meromictic Transylvanian lakes.

    PubMed

    Baricz, Andreea; Cristea, Adorján; Muntean, Vasile; Teodosiu, Gabriela; Andrei, Adrian-Ştefan; Molnár, Imola; Alexe, Mircea; Rakosy-Tican, Elena; Banciu, Horia Leonard

    2015-03-01

    Perennially stratified salt lakes situated in the Transylvanian Basin (Central Romania) were surveyed for the diversity of culturable halophilic archaea (Fam. Halobacteriaceae). The physical and chemical characteristics of the waters indicated that all the investigated lakes were meromictic and neutral hypersaline. Samples collected from upper, intermediate, and deeper water layers and sediments were used for the isolation of halophilic strains followed by 16S rRNA gene-based identification and phenotypic characterization. The phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that all 191 isolates reported in this study and 43 strains previously isolated were affiliated with the family Halobacteriaceae and classified to 18 genera. Haloferax was the most frequently isolated genus (~47 %), followed by Halobacterium spp. (~12 %), and Halorubrum spp. (~11 %). Highest culturable diversity was detected in Brâncoveanu Lake, the oldest and saltiest of all studied lakes, while the opposite was observed in the most stable and least human-impacted Fără Fund Lake. One strain from Ursu Lake might possibly constitute a novel Halorubrum species as shown by phylogenetic analysis. Several haloarchaeal taxa recently described in Asian (i.e., Iran, China) saline systems were also identified as inhabiting the Transylvanian salt lakes thus expanding our knowledege on the geographic distribution of Halobacteriaceae.

  19. Mineralogy and Microbial Diversity of the Microbialites in the Hypersaline Storr's Lake, the Bahamas.

    PubMed

    Paul, Varun G; Wronkiewicz, David J; Mormile, Melanie R; Foster, Jamie S

    2016-04-01

    Microbialites found in the low-light-intensity, hypersaline waters of Storr's Lake (SL), San Salvador Island, the Bahamas, were investigated with respect to their morphology, mineralogy, and microbial diversity. Previously described microbialite morphologies, as well as a newly identified "multi-cuspate" morphology, were observed at various depths. Electron microscopy analysis revealed the presence of angular, blocky, and needle-shaped crystals with mineralized cyanobacterial filaments and remains of exopolymeric substances. X-ray diffraction studies confirmed the presence of both Mg-calcite and aragonite in the plateau-mushroom and pinnacle mound microbialites, whereas only Mg-calcite was identified in the other microbialite morphotypes. A comprehensive molecular analysis using barcoded pyrosequencing of five different microbial mat communities identified at least 12 dominant bacterial phyla. Cyanobacteria were generally low in abundance and ranged from ∼0.01% in the deeper pinnacle mounds to ∼3.2% in the shallow calcareous knobs. Other photosynthetic members included green nonsulfur bacteria of the phylum Chloroflexi and purple sulfur bacteria of the class Gammaproteobacteria. All mat types contained significant amounts of sulfate-reducing and dehalogenating bacteria. The low light intensity reaching the deeper microbialites, the lack of dominant cyanobacteria, and the abundance of sulfate reducers and Chloroflexi collectively suggest that sulfate reduction and anoxygenic photosynthetic processes influence the carbonate biomineralization process in these systems.

  20. Effect of near infrared (NIR) light on oxygenic photosynthesis in hypersaline microbial mat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finke, N.; Thamdrup, B.; Hoehler, T. M.

    2008-12-01

    Oxygen profiles and gross oxygenic photosynthesis were measured in hypersaline microbial mats under light conditions with and without near infrared (NIR) illumination. During illumination without NIR light oxygen concentrations and oxygenic photosynthesis rates were increased compared to incubations with full artificial light or artificial light with added NIR light to simulate sun light. Photosynthetic communities in these mats consist of two major groups. Oxygenic phototrophs using light at wavelengths below 700 nm producing oxygen on the one hand and anoxygenic phototrophs with absorption maxima in the near infrared (NIR), above 700 nm, which oxidize reduced sulfur on the other hand. The absence of NIR light might directly stimulate oxygenic photosynthesis, but to our knowledge no such effect has been reported from culture studies. Alternatively, the effect of increased photosynthetic activity under no NIR conditions might be indirect by eliminating either a competition between oxygenic and anoxygenic phototrophs for a common resource or an inhibitory effect of the action of the anoxygenic phototrophs on the oxygenic phototrophs. As the effect is most pronounced in the low sulfate treatment, competition in question might be for a reduced sulfur species.

  1. Potential for plant growth promotion of rhizobacteria associated with Salicornia growing in Tunisian hypersaline soils.

    PubMed

    Mapelli, Francesca; Marasco, Ramona; Rolli, Eleonora; Barbato, Marta; Cherif, Hanene; Guesmi, Amel; Ouzari, Imen; Daffonchio, Daniele; Borin, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Soil salinity and drought are among the environmental stresses that most severely affect plant growth and production around the world. In this study the rhizospheres of Salicornia plants and bulk soils were collected from Sebkhet and Chott hypersaline ecosystems in Tunisia. Depiction of bacterial microbiome composition by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis unveiled the occurrence of a high bacterial diversity associated with Salicornia root system. A large collection of 475 halophilic and halotolerant bacteria was established from Salicornia rhizosphere and the surrounding bulk soil, and the bacteria were characterized for the resistance to temperature, osmotic and saline stresses, and plant growth promotion (PGP) features. Twenty Halomonas strains showed resistance to a wide set of abiotic stresses and were able to perform different PGP activities in vitro at 5% NaCl, including ammonia and indole-3-acetic acid production, phosphate solubilisation, and potential nitrogen fixation. By using a gfp-labelled strain it was possible to demonstrate that Halomonas is capable of successfully colonising Salicornia roots in the laboratory conditions. Our results indicated that the culturable halophilic/halotolerant bacteria inhabiting salty and arid ecosystems have a potential to contribute to promoting plant growth under the harsh salinity and drought conditions. These halophilic/halotolerant strains could be exploited in biofertilizer formulates to sustain crop production in degraded and arid lands.

  2. Novel active kinetoplastids associated with hypersaline anoxic basins in the Eastern Mediterranean deep-sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgcomb, V. P.; Orsi, W.; Breiner, H.-W.; Stock, A.; Filker, S.; Yakimov, M. M.; Stoeck, T.

    2011-10-01

    The combination of nearly saturated salt concentration and corresponding high density, high hydrostatic pressure, absence of light, anoxia, and a sharp chemocline make the deep hypersaline anoxic basins in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea some of the most polyextreme habitats on Earth. Using kinetoplastid-specific primers, we detected kinetoplastid flagellates in some of the harshest deep-sea environments known to date, including some whose small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequences are not closely related to cultured representatives. Kinetoplastids, including presumably novel representatives appear to be specialists of halocline environments in the Eastern Mediterranean, and to comprise a significant fraction of the protist communities in the brines and haloclines of several basins. Fluorescent in situ hybridization data indicate a novel 'unidentified' sequence clade of kinetoplastids related to bodonids represents as much as 10% of the total protist community in the Discovery Basin halocline. Different kinetoplastid groups are unevenly represented in the different basins and habitats we sampled, which we discuss as a result of environmental selection.

  3. Environmental selection of protistan plankton communities in hypersaline anoxic deep-sea basins, Eastern Mediterranean Sea

    PubMed Central

    Filker, Sabine; Stock, Alexandra; Breiner, Hans-Werner; Edgcomb, Virginia; Orsi, William; Yakimov, Michail M; Stoeck, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    High salt concentrations, absence of light, anoxia, and high hydrostatic pressure make deep hypersaline anoxic basins (DHABs) in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea one of the most polyextreme habitats on Earth. Taking advantage of the unique chemical characteristics of these basins, we tested the effect of environmental selection and geographic distance on the structure of protistan communities. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analyses were performed on water samples from the brines and seawater/brine interfaces of five basins: Discovery, Urania, Thetis, Tyro, and Medee. Using statistical analyses, we calculated the partitioning of diversity among the ten individual terminal restriction fragment (T-RF) profiles, based on peak abundance and peak incidence. While a significant distance effect on spatial protistan patterns was not detected, hydrochemical gradients emerged as strong dispersal barriers that likely lead to environmental selection in the DHAB protistan plankton communities. We identified sodium, magnesium, sulfate, and oxygen playing in concerto as dominant environmental drivers for the structuring of protistan plankton communities in the Eastern Mediterranean DHABs. PMID:23239531

  4. Archaeal populations in hypersaline sediments underlying orange microbial mats in the Napoli mud volcano.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Cassandre Sara; L'haridon, Stéphane; Pignet, Patricia; Toffin, Laurent

    2011-05-01

    Microbial mats in marine cold seeps are known to be associated with ascending sulfide- and methane-rich fluids. Hence, they could be visible indicators of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and methane cycling processes in underlying sediments. The Napoli mud volcano is situated in the Olimpi Area that lies on saline deposits; from there, brine fluids migrate upward to the seafloor. Sediments associated with a brine pool and microbial orange mats of the Napoli mud volcano were recovered during the Medeco cruise. Based on analysis of RNA-derived sequences, the "active" archaeal community was composed of many uncultured lineages, such as rice cluster V or marine benthic group D. Function methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) genes were affiliated with the anaerobic methanotrophic Archaea (ANME) of the ANME-1, ANME-2a, and ANME-2c groups, suggesting that AOM occurred in these sediment layers. Enrichment cultures showed the presence of viable marine methylotrophic Methanococcoides in shallow sediment layers. Thus, the archaeal community diversity seems to show that active methane cycling took place in the hypersaline microbial mat-associated sediments of the Napoli mud volcano.

  5. New approaches indicate constant viral diversity despite shifts in assemblage structure in an Australian hypersaline lake.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Joanne B; Thomas, Brian C; Andrade, Karen; Heidelberg, Karla B; Banfield, Jillian F

    2013-11-01

    It is widely stated that viruses represent the most significant source of biodiversity on Earth, yet characterizing the diversity of viral assemblages in natural systems remains difficult. Viral diversity studies are challenging because viruses lack universally present, phylogenetically informative genes. Here, we developed an approach to estimate viral diversity using a series of functional and novel conserved genes. This approach provides direct estimates of viral assemblage diversity while retaining resolution at the level of individual viral populations in a natural system. We characterized viral assemblages in eight samples from hypersaline Lake Tyrrell (LT), Victoria, Australia, using 39,636 viral contigs. We defined viral operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in two ways. First, we used genes with three different functional predictions that were abundantly represented in the data set. Second, we clustered proteins of unknown function based on sequence similarity, and we chose genes represented by three clusters with numerous members to define OTUs. In combination, diversity metrics indicated between 412 and 735 sampled populations, and the number of populations remained relatively constant across samples. We determined the relative representation of each viral OTU in each sample and found that viral assemblage structures correlate with salinity and solution chemistry. LT viral assemblages were near-replicates from the same site sampled a few days apart but differed significantly on other spatial and temporal scales. The OTU definition approach proposed here paves the way for metagenomics-based analyses of viral assemblages using ecological models previously applied to bacteria and archaea.

  6. Potential for Plant Growth Promotion of Rhizobacteria Associated with Salicornia Growing in Tunisian Hypersaline Soils

    PubMed Central

    Mapelli, Francesca; Marasco, Ramona; Rolli, Eleonora; Barbato, Marta; Cherif, Hanene; Guesmi, Amel; Ouzari, Imen; Daffonchio, Daniele; Borin, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Soil salinity and drought are among the environmental stresses that most severely affect plant growth and production around the world. In this study the rhizospheres of Salicornia plants and bulk soils were collected from Sebkhet and Chott hypersaline ecosystems in Tunisia. Depiction of bacterial microbiome composition by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis unveiled the occurrence of a high bacterial diversity associated with Salicornia root system. A large collection of 475 halophilic and halotolerant bacteria was established from Salicornia rhizosphere and the surrounding bulk soil, and the bacteria were characterized for the resistance to temperature, osmotic and saline stresses, and plant growth promotion (PGP) features. Twenty Halomonas strains showed resistance to a wide set of abiotic stresses and were able to perform different PGP activities in vitro at 5% NaCl, including ammonia and indole-3-acetic acid production, phosphate solubilisation, and potential nitrogen fixation. By using a gfp-labelled strain it was possible to demonstrate that Halomonas is capable of successfully colonising Salicornia roots in the laboratory conditions. Our results indicated that the culturable halophilic/halotolerant bacteria inhabiting salty and arid ecosystems have a potential to contribute to promoting plant growth under the harsh salinity and drought conditions. These halophilic/halotolerant strains could be exploited in biofertilizer formulates to sustain crop production in degraded and arid lands. PMID:23781499

  7. Neutral monosaccharides from a hypersaline tropical environment: Applications to the characterization of modern and ancient ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Moers, M.E.C.; Larter, S.R. )

    1993-07-01

    Surficial and buried sediment samples from a hypersaline lagoon-sabkha system (Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates) were analyzed for carbohydrates (as neutral monosaccharides) to distinguish and characterize various types of recent and ancient tropical ecosystems on a molecular level. The samples consisted of surficial and buried microbial mats, lagoonal sediments containing seagrass (Halodule uninervis), and mangrove (Avicennia marine) paleosoils and handpicked mangrove leaves, ranging in age from contemporary to ca. 6000 yr BP. Analysis of quantitative neutral monosaccharide data by multivariate techniques shows that various groups can be distinguished: intact vascular plant material (mangrove leaf) contains high amounts of arabinose and glucose and hardly any partially methylated monosaccharides, whereas microbial mats in general and lagoonal seagrass sediments show high contributions of fucose, ribose, mannose, galactose, and partially methylated monosaccharides. Moreover, surficial microbial mats consisting of filamentous cyanobacteria (Microcoleus chtonoplastes, Lyngbya aestuarii) can be distinguished from other mats and sediments containing coccoid cyanobacteria (Entophysalis major) and/or fermenting, sulphate reducing, and methanogenic bacteria on the basis of high contributions of specific groups of partially methylated monosaccharides and other [open quotes]minor[close quotes] saccharides. The neutral monosaccharides present in mangrove paleosoils are for a substantial part derived from microorganisms. 22 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Effects of salinity and light on organic carbon and nitrogen uptake in a hypersaline microbial mat.

    PubMed

    Yannarell, Anthony C; Paerl, Hans W

    2007-12-01

    Utilization of dissolved organic matter (DOM) is thought to be the purview of heterotrophic microorganisms, but photoautotrophs can take up dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). This study investigated DOC and DON uptake in a laminated cyanobacterial mat community from hypersaline Salt Pond (San Salvador, Bahamas). The total community uptake of (3)H-labeled substrates was measured in the light and in the dark and under conditions of high and low salinity. Salinity was the primary control of DOM uptake, with increased uptake occurring under low-salinity, 'freshened' conditions. DOC uptake was also enhanced in the light as compared with the dark and in samples incubated with the photosystem II inhibitor 3(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1, 1-dimethylurea, suggesting a positive association between photosynthetic activity and DOC uptake. Microautoradiography revealed that some DOM uptake was attributed to cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria DOM uptake was negatively correlated with that of smaller filamentous microorganisms, and DOM uptake by individual coccoid cells was negatively correlated with uptake by colonial coccoids. These patterns of activity suggest that Salt Pond microorganisms are engaged in resource partitioning, and DOM utilization may provide a metabolic boost to both heterotrophs and photoautrophs during periods of lowered salinity.

  9. Low viral predation pressure in cold hypersaline Arctic sediments and limits on lytic replication.

    PubMed

    Colangelo-Lillis, Jesse; Wing, Boswell A; Whyte, Lyle G

    2016-04-01

    Viruses are ubiquitous drivers of microbial ecology and evolution and contribute to biogeochemical cycling. Attention to these attributes has been more substantial for marine viruses than viruses of other environments. Microscopy-based investigation of the viral communities from two cold, hypersaline Arctic springs was undertaken to explore the effects of these conditions on microbe-viral ecology. Sediments and water samples were collected along transects from each spring, from anoxic spring outlets through oxygenated downstream channels. Viral abundance, virus-microbe ratios and modelled virus-microbe contact rates were lower than comparable aqueous and sedimentary environments and most similar to deep subsurface sediments. No individual cell from either spring was visibly infected. Viruses in these springs appear to play a smaller role in controlling microbial populations through lytic activity than in marine water column or surface sedimentary environments. Relief from viral predation indicates the microbial communities are primarily controlled by nutrient limitation. The similarity of these springs to deep subsurface sediments suggests a biogeographic divide in viral replication strategy in marine sediments. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. New Approaches Indicate Constant Viral Diversity despite Shifts in Assemblage Structure in an Australian Hypersaline Lake

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Brian C.; Andrade, Karen; Heidelberg, Karla B.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2013-01-01

    It is widely stated that viruses represent the most significant source of biodiversity on Earth, yet characterizing the diversity of viral assemblages in natural systems remains difficult. Viral diversity studies are challenging because viruses lack universally present, phylogenetically informative genes. Here, we developed an approach to estimate viral diversity using a series of functional and novel conserved genes. This approach provides direct estimates of viral assemblage diversity while retaining resolution at the level of individual viral populations in a natural system. We characterized viral assemblages in eight samples from hypersaline Lake Tyrrell (LT), Victoria, Australia, using 39,636 viral contigs. We defined viral operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in two ways. First, we used genes with three different functional predictions that were abundantly represented in the data set. Second, we clustered proteins of unknown function based on sequence similarity, and we chose genes represented by three clusters with numerous members to define OTUs. In combination, diversity metrics indicated between 412 and 735 sampled populations, and the number of populations remained relatively constant across samples. We determined the relative representation of each viral OTU in each sample and found that viral assemblage structures correlate with salinity and solution chemistry. LT viral assemblages were near-replicates from the same site sampled a few days apart but differed significantly on other spatial and temporal scales. The OTU definition approach proposed here paves the way for metagenomics-based analyses of viral assemblages using ecological models previously applied to bacteria and archaea. PMID:23995931

  11. Sulfur cycling and methanogenesis primarily drive microbial colonization of the highly sulfidic Urania deep hypersaline basin.

    PubMed

    Borin, Sara; Brusetti, Lorenzo; Mapelli, Francesca; D'Auria, Giuseppe; Brusa, Tullio; Marzorati, Massimo; Rizzi, Aurora; Yakimov, Michail; Marty, Danielle; De Lange, Gert J; Van der Wielen, Paul; Bolhuis, Henk; McGenity, Terry J; Polymenakou, Paraskevi N; Malinverno, Elisa; Giuliano, Laura; Corselli, Cesare; Daffonchio, Daniele

    2009-06-09

    Urania basin in the deep Mediterranean Sea houses a lake that is >100 m deep, devoid of oxygen, 6 times more saline than seawater, and has very high levels of methane and particularly sulfide (up to 16 mM), making it among the most sulfidic water bodies on Earth. Along the depth profile there are 2 chemoclines, a steep one with the overlying oxic seawater, and another between anoxic brines of different density, where gradients of salinity, electron donors and acceptors occur. To identify and differentiate the microbes and processes contributing to the turnover of organic matter and sulfide along the water column, these chemoclines were sampled at a high resolution. Bacterial cell numbers increased up to a hundredfold in the chemoclines as a consequence of elevated nutrient availability, with higher numbers in the upper interface where redox gradient was steeper. Bacterial and archaeal communities, analyzed by DNA fingerprinting, 16S rRNA gene libraries, activity measurements, and cultivation, were highly stratified and metabolically more active along the chemoclines compared with seawater or the uniformly hypersaline brines. Detailed analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that in both chemoclines delta- and epsilon-Proteobacteria, predominantly sulfate reducers and sulfur oxidizers, respectively, were the dominant bacteria. In the deepest layers of the basin MSBL1, putatively responsible for methanogenesis, dominated among archaea. The data suggest that the complex microbial community is adapted to the basin's extreme chemistry, and the elevated biomass is driven largely by sulfur cycling and methanogenesis.

  12. Neutral monosaccharides from a hypersaline tropical environment: Applications to the characterization of modern and ancient ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moers, M. E. C.; Larter, S. R.

    1993-07-01

    Surficial and buried sediment samples from a hypersaline lagoon-sabkha system (Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates) were analysed for carbohydrates (as neutral monosaccharides) to distinguish and characterise various types of recent and ancient tropical ecosystems on a molecular level. The samples consisted of surficial and buried microbial mats, lagoonal sediments containing seagrass ( Halodule uninervis), and mangrove ( Avicennia marina) paleosoils and handpicked mangrove leaves, ranging in age from contemporary to ca. 6000 yr Bp. Analysis of quantitative neutral monosaccharide data by multivariate techniques shows that various groups can be distinguished: intact vascular plant material (mangrove leaf) contains high amounts of arabinose and glucose and hardly any partially methylated monosaccharides, whereas microbial mats in general and lagoonal seagrass sediments show high contributions of fucose, ribose, mannose, galactose and partially methylated monosaccharides. Moreover, surficial microbial mats consisting of filamentous cyanobacteria ( Microcoleus chtonoplastes, Lyngbya aestuarii) can be distinguished from other mats and sediments containing coccoid cyanobacteria ( Entophysalis major) and/or fermenting, sulphate reducing, and methanogenic bacteria on the basis of high contributions of specific groups of partially methylated monosaccharides and other "minor" saccharides. The neutral monosaccharides present in mangrove paleosoils are for a substantial part derived from microorganisms.

  13. Sustainable Hypersaline Microbial Fuel Cells: Inexpensive Recyclable Polymer Supports for Carbon Nanotube Conductive Paint Anodes.

    PubMed

    Grattieri, Matteo; Shivel, Nelson D; Sifat, Iram; Bestetti, Massimiliano; Minteer, Shelley D

    2017-02-28

    Microbial fuel cells are an emerging technology for wastewater treatment, but to be commercially viable and sustainable, the electrode materials must be inexpensive, recyclable, and reliable. In this study, recyclable polymeric supports were explored for the development of anode electrodes to be applied in single-chamber microbial fuel cells operated in field under hypersaline conditions. The support was covered with a carbon nanotube (CNT) based conductive paint, and biofilms were able to colonize the electrodes. The single-chamber microbial fuel cells with Pt-free cathodes delivered a reproducible power output after 15 days of operation to achieve 12±1 mW m(-2) at a current density of 69±7 mA m(-2) . The decrease of the performance in long-term experiments was mostly related to inorganic precipitates on the cathode electrode and did not affect the performance of the anode, as shown by experiments in which the cathode was replaced and the fuel cell performance was regenerated. The results of these studies show the feasibility of polymeric supports coated with CNT-based paint for microbial fuel cell applications.

  14. Biogeochemistry of hypersaline springs supporting a mid-continent marine ecosystem: an analogue for martian springs?

    PubMed

    Grasby, Stephen E; Londry, Kathleen L

    2007-08-01

    Hypersaline springs that host unique mid-continent marine ecosystems were examined in central Manitoba, Canada. The springs originate from a reflux of glacial meltwater that intrudes into underlying bedrock and dissolved buried salt beds. Two spring types were distinguished based both on flow rate and geochemistry. High flow springs (greater than 10 L/s) hosted extensive marine microbial mats, which were dominated by algae but also included diverse microbes. These varied somewhat between springs as indicated by changes in profiles of fatty acid methyl esters. Culture studies confirmed the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria in sediments at the high flow sites. In contrast, low flow springs were affected by solar evaporation, increasing salinity, and temperature. These low flow springs behaved more like closed nutrient-limited systems and did not support microbial mats. Direct comparison of the high and low flow springs revealed interesting implications for the potential to record biosignatures in the rock record. High flow springs have abundant, well-developed microbial mats, which desiccate and are cemented along the edges of the spring pools; however, the high mass flux overwhelms any geochemical signature of microbial activity. In contrast, the nutrient-limited low flow sites develop strong geochemical signatures of sulfate reduction, even in the absence of microbial mats, due to less dilution with the lower flows. Geochemical and physical evidence for life did not correlate with the abundance of microbial life but, rather, with the extent to which the biological system formed a closed ecosystem.

  15. Photosynthetic performance and resource utilization of two mangrove species coexisting in a hypersaline scrub forest.

    PubMed

    Lovelock, Catherine E; Feller, Ilka C

    2003-03-01

    In a hypersaline mangrove scrub forest in northern Florida, coexisting trees of Laguncularia racemosa and Avicennia germinans were either fertilized with nitrogen or phosphorus, or not fertilized (controls). We aimed to test whether nutrient additions differentially altered photosynthetic performance and resource utilization in these two species. In control trees, photosynthetic rates were higher in L. racemosa than A. germinans. However, leaf nitrogen concentrations were higher in A. germinans than L. racemosa. Avicennia germinans responded to fertilization with nitrogen by increasing leaf nitrogen concentrations and rates of photosynthesis such that they were equivalent to photosynthesis in L. racemosa. Laguncularia racemosa did not show a response to nitrogen additions. Neither species showed strong responses to phosphorus fertilization. Avicennia germinans had high photosynthetic water-use efficiency (photosynthesis/transpiration), but low photosynthetic nitrogen-use efficiency (photosynthesis/leaf nitrogen). In contrast, L. racemosa had comparatively low photosynthetic water use efficiency and high photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency. Leaf level characteristics lead us to hypothesize that coexistence of A. germinans and L. racemosa should occur where nitrogen levels are low and salinity is moderate, or at least moderate for some period of the year.

  16. Spatial distribution of Chloroflexus-like bacteria in the hypersaline artificial microbial mat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachar, A.; Polerecky, L.; Vamvakopoulos, K.; de Beer, D.; Jonkers, H. M.

    An artificial microbial mat grown in a mesocosm originated from the Hypersaline Lake of La Salada de Chiprana NE Spain was examined with respect to its organism s spatial distribution via high resolution methods A special attention was given to the elucidative Chloroflexus -like bacteria on which spatial distribution data is not available We have characterized this thick 1cm and developed mat for photopigments HPLC and obtained the general pigment distribution pattern Furthermore fiberoptic and photosynthetic microsensor measurements gave inner light attenuations and flux rates of oxygen within the different layers respectively Using fluorescence and spectral imaging we were able to detect characteristic pigmentation in the different layers FISH probes targeting Chloroflexus -like bacteria confirmed the visualization techniques and showed a single hybridized layer below the cyanobacterial layer as did the HPLC fiberoptic microsensor and fluorescence imaging We conclude that Chloroflexus -like bacteria are located below the cyanobacterial layer and above the purple sulfur bacteria and for the firs time we are able to show it by different independent state of the art techniques These approaches can be important for rapid community investigations within a millimeter scale microniches

  17. Biogeochemistry of Hypersaline Springs Supporting a Mid-Continent Marine Ecosystem: An Analogue for Martian Springs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasby, Stephen E.; Londry, Kathleen L.

    2007-08-01

    Hypersaline springs that host unique mid-continent marine ecosystems were examined in central Manitoba, Canada. The springs originate from a reflux of glacial meltwater that intrudes into underlying bedrock and dissolved buried salt beds. Two spring types were distinguished based both on flow rate and geochemistry. High flow springs (greater than 10 L/s) hosted extensive marine microbial mats, which were dominated by algae but also included diverse microbes. These varied somewhat between springs as indicated by changes in profiles of fatty acid methyl esters. Culture studies confirmed the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria in sediments at the high flow sites. In contrast, low flow springs were affected by solar evaporation, increasing salinity, and temperature. These low flow springs behaved more like closed nutrient-limited systems and did not support microbial mats. Direct comparison of the high and low flow springs revealed interesting implications for the potential to record biosignatures in the rock record. High flow springs have abundant, well-developed microbial mats, which desiccate and are cemented along the edges of the spring pools; however, the high mass flux overwhelms any geochemical signature of microbial activity. In contrast, the nutrient-limited low flow sites develop strong geochemical signatures of sulfate reduction, even in the absence of microbial mats, due to less dilution with the lower flows. Geochemical and physical evidence for life did not correlate with the abundance of microbial life but, rather, with the extent to which the biological system formed a closed ecosystem.

  18. Microbial weeds in hypersaline habitats: the enigma of the weed-like Haloferax mediterranei.

    PubMed

    Oren, Aharon; Hallsworth, John E

    2014-10-01

    Heterotrophic prokaryotic communities that inhabit saltern crystallizer ponds are typically dominated by two species, the archaeon Haloquadratum walsbyi and the bacterium Salinibacter ruber, regardless of location. These organisms behave as 'microbial weeds' as defined by Cray et al. (Microb Biotechnol 6: 453-492, 2013) that possess the biological traits required to dominate the microbiology of these open habitats. Here, we discuss the enigma of the less abundant Haloferax mediterranei, an archaeon that grows faster than any other, comparable extreme halophile. It has a wide window for salt tolerance, can grow on simple as well as on complex substrates and degrade polymeric substances, has different modes of anaerobic growth, can accumulate storage polymers, produces gas vesicles, and excretes halocins capable of killing other Archaea. Therefore, Hfx. mediterranei is apparently more qualified as a 'microbial weed' than Haloquadratum and Salinibacter. However, the former differs because it produces carotenoid pigments only in the lower salinity range and lacks energy-generating retinal-based, light-driven ion pumps such as bacteriorhodopsin and halorhodopsin. We discuss these observations in relation to microbial weed biology in, and the open-habitat ecology of, hypersaline systems.

  19. Egg banks in hypersaline lakes of the South-East Europe

    PubMed Central

    Moscatello, Salvatore; Belmonte, Genuario

    2009-01-01

    The cyst banks of 6 coastal hypersaline lakes of South-East Europe have been investigated. The study concerned the bottom sediments of Khersonesskoe and Koyashskoe lakes in the Crimea (Ukraine), Nartë saltworks (Albania), Vecchia Salina at Torre Colimena (Apulia, Italy), Pantano Grande and Pantano Roveto at Vendicari (Sicily, Italy). A total of 19 cyst types were recognised. The cyst banks of lakes were found to be well separated in the representation derived from a statistical multivariate data analysis. For all the lakes examined a comparison was possible between the resting community in sediments (cyst bank) and the active one in the water. The cyst banks contained more species than those recorded over a multi-year sampling effort in the water column. The study of cyst hatching, performed on 5 cyst types under lab conditions, demonstrated that cysts do not hatch under the same conditions. Furthermore, each cyst type shows a wide range of preferential hatching conditions, which allow us to confirm the ecological generalism of salt lake species. PMID:19292906

  20. New mono-organotin (IV) dithiocarbamate complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthalib, Amirah Faizah Abdul; Baba, Ibrahim

    2014-09-01

    Eighteen new mono-organotin dithiocarbamate compounds derived each nine from methyltin(IV) and phenyltin(IV) reacted using in-situ method with various type of N-dialkylamine together with carbon disulphide with the ratio of 1:3:3. Elemental and gravimetric analysis showed that the general formula of these compounds were RSnCl[S2CNR'R″]2 (R= Ph, CH3, R' = CH3, C2H5, C7H7 and R″ = C2H5, C6H11, iC3H7, C7H7). These compounds had been characterized by infrared spectroscopy, ultraviolet spectroscopy, 1H, 13C NMR spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray crystallography. The infrared spectra of these compounds showed three important peaks indicating the formation of dithiocarbamate compounds, ν(CN), ν(CS) and ν(Sn-S) band which present in the region of 1444-1519, 954-1098 and 318-349 cm-1 respectively. The ultraviolet-visible spectra showed an absorption band for the π - π* transition of NCS group in the range of 253 - 259 nm due to the intramolecular charge transfer of the ligand. The 13C NMR spectra showed an important shift for δ(N13CS2) in the range of 196.8 - 201.9 ppm.. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies showed three new structures with the general formula of PhSnCl[S2CN(Et)(i-Pr)]2, MeSnCl[S2CN(Me)(Cy)]2 and MeSnCl[S2CN(i-Pr)(CH2Ph)]2. All structures having a distorted octahedral geometry set by CClS4 donor atom from the two chelating dithiocarbamate ligands.

  1. New mono-organotin (IV) dithiocarbamate complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Muthalib, Amirah Faizah Abdul; Baba, Ibrahim

    2014-09-03

    Eighteen new mono-organotin dithiocarbamate compounds derived each nine from methyltin(IV) and phenyltin(IV) reacted using in-situ method with various type of N-dialkylamine together with carbon disulphide with the ratio of 1:3:3. Elemental and gravimetric analysis showed that the general formula of these compounds were RSnCl[S{sub 2}CNR′R″]{sub 2} (R= Ph, CH{sub 3}, R′ = CH{sub 3}, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}, C{sub 7}H{sub 7} and R″ = C{sub 2}H{sub 5}, C{sub 6}H{sub 11}, iC{sub 3}H{sub 7}, C{sub 7}H{sub 7}). These compounds had been characterized by infrared spectroscopy, ultraviolet spectroscopy, {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray crystallography. The infrared spectra of these compounds showed three important peaks indicating the formation of dithiocarbamate compounds, ν(CN), ν(CS) and ν(Sn-S) band which present in the region of 1444–1519, 954–1098 and 318–349 cm{sup −1} respectively. The ultraviolet-visible spectra showed an absorption band for the π - π* transition of NCS group in the range of 253 – 259 nm due to the intramolecular charge transfer of the ligand. The {sup 13}C NMR spectra showed an important shift for δ(N{sup 13}CS{sub 2}) in the range of 196.8 – 201.9 ppm.. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies showed three new structures with the general formula of PhSnCl[S{sub 2}CN(Et)(i−Pr)]{sub 2}, MeSnCl[S{sub 2}CN(Me)(Cy)]{sub 2} and MeSnCl[S{sub 2}CN(i−Pr)(CH{sub 2}Ph)]{sub 2}. All structures having a distorted octahedral geometry set by CClS{sub 4} donor atom from the two chelating dithiocarbamate ligands.

  2. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, D.B.; Lao, G.

    1998-01-06

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium. 3 figs.

  3. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David B.; Lao, Guifang

    1998-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium.

  4. Genome sequence of the photoarsenotrophic bacterium Ectothiorhodospira sp. strain BSL-9, isolated from a hypersaline alkaline arsenic-rich extreme environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hernandez-Maldonado, Jaime; Stoneburner, Brendon; Boren, Alison; Miller, Laurence; Rosen, Michael R.; Oremland, Ronald S.; Saltikov, Chad W

    2016-01-01

    The full genome sequence of Ectothiorhodospira sp. strain BSL-9 is reported here. This purple sulfur bacterium encodes an arxA-type arsenite oxidase within the arxB2AB1CD gene island and is capable of carrying out “photoarsenotrophy” anoxygenic photosynthetic arsenite oxidation. Its genome is composed of 3.5 Mb and has approximately 63% G+C content.

  5. Eco-morphological differentiation in Lake Magadi tilapia, an extremophile cichlid fish living in hot, alkaline and hypersaline lakes in East Africa.

    PubMed

    Kavembe, Geraldine D; Kautt, Andreas F; Machado-Schiaffino, Gonzalo; Meyer, Axel

    2016-04-01

    Ecological diversification through divergent selection is thought to be a major force during the process of adaptive radiations. However, the large sizes and complexity of most radiations such as those of the cichlids in the African Great Lakes make it impossible to infer the exact evolutionary history of any population divergence event. The genus Alcolapia, a small cichlid lineage endemic to Lakes Magadi and Natron in East Africa, exhibits phenotypes similar to some of those found in cichlids of the radiations of the African Great Lakes. The simplicity within Alcolapia makes it an excellent model system to investigate ecological diversification and speciation. We used an integrated approach including population genomics based on RAD-seq data, geometric morphometrics and stable isotope analyses to investigate the eco-morphological diversification of tilapia in Lake Magadi and its satellite lake Little Magadi. Additionally, we reconstructed the demographic history of the species using coalescent simulations based on the joint site frequency spectrum. The population in Little Magadi has a characteristically upturned mouth--possibly an adaptation to feeding on prey from the water surface. Eco-morphological differences between populations within Lake Magadi are more subtle, but are consistent with known ecological differences between its lagoons such as high concentrations of nitrogen attributable to extensive guano deposits in Rest of Magadi relative to Fish Springs Lagoon. All populations diverged simultaneously only about 1100 generations ago. Differences in levels of gene flow between populations and the effective population sizes have likely resulted in the inferred heterogeneous patterns of genome-wide differentiation.

  6. Pairing preferences of the model mono-valence mono-atomic ions investigated by molecular simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Ruiting; Zhao, Ying; Li, HuanHuan; Gao, Yi Qin; Zhuang, Wei

    2014-05-14

    We carried out a series of potential of mean force calculations to study the pairing preferences of a series of model mono-atomic 1:1 ions with evenly varied sizes. The probabilities of forming the contact ion pair (CIP) and the single water separate ion pair (SIP) were presented in the two-dimensional plots with respect to the ion sizes. The pairing preferences reflected in these plots largely agree with the empirical rule of matching ion sizes in the small and big size regions. In the region that the ion sizes are close to the size of the water molecule; however, a significant deviation from this conventional rule is observed. Our further analysis indicated that this deviation originates from the competition between CIP and the water bridging SIP state. The competition is mainly an enthalpy modulated phenomenon in which the existing of the water bridging plays a significant role.

  7. Pairing preferences of the model mono-valence mono-atomic ions investigated by molecular simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Ruiting; Zhao, Ying; Li, HuanHuan; Zhuang, Wei E-mail: gaoyq@pku.edu.cn; Gao, Yi Qin E-mail: gaoyq@pku.edu.cn

    2014-05-14

    We carried out a series of potential of mean force calculations to study the pairing preferences of a series of model mono-atomic 1:1 ions with evenly varied sizes. The probabilities of forming the contact ion pair (CIP) and the single water separate ion pair (SIP) were presented in the two-dimensional plots with respect to the ion sizes. The pairing preferences reflected in these plots largely agree with the empirical rule of matching ion sizes in the small and big size regions. In the region that the ion sizes are close to the size of the water molecule; however, a significant deviation from this conventional rule is observed. Our further analysis indicated that this deviation originates from the competition between CIP and the water bridging SIP state. The competition is mainly an enthalpy modulated phenomenon in which the existing of the water bridging plays a significant role.

  8. Alkaline hydrothermal conversion of cellulose to bio-oil: influence of alkalinity on reaction pathway change.

    PubMed

    Yin, Sudong; Mehrotra, Anil K; Tan, Zhongchao

    2011-06-01

    The effects of alkalinity on alkaline hydrothermal conversion (alkaline-HTC) of cellulose to bio-oil were investigated in this study. The results showed that the initial alkalinity greatly influenced the reaction pathways. Under initial strong alkaline conditions with final pH greater than 7, alkaline-HTC only followed the alkaline pathway. However, under initial weak alkaline conditions with final pH of less than 7, acidic as well as alkaline pathways were involved. The main mechanism behind this change of reaction pathways under weak alkaline conditions was that carboxylic acids were first formed from cellulose via the alkaline pathway and then neutralized/acidified the alkaline solutions. Once the pH of the alkaline solutions decreased to less than 7, the acidic instead of the alkaline reaction pathway occurred. This change of the reaction pathways with initial alkalinity partly explained the inconsistent results in the literature of alkaline-HTC bio-oil compositions and yields. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Development of alkaline fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbs, Michael R.; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Alam, Todd Michael; Janarthanan, Rajeswari; Horan, James L.; Caire, Benjamin R.; Ziegler, Zachary C.; Herring, Andrew M.; Yang, Yuan; Zuo, Xiaobing; Robson, Michael H.; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Patterson, Wendy; Atanassov, Plamen Borissov

    2013-09-01

    This project focuses on the development and demonstration of anion exchange membrane (AEM) fuel cells for portable power applications. Novel polymeric anion exchange membranes and ionomers with high chemical stabilities were prepared characterized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories. Durable, non-precious metal catalysts were prepared by Dr. Plamen Atanassovs research group at the University of New Mexico by utilizing an aerosol-based process to prepare templated nano-structures. Dr. Andy Herrings group at the Colorado School of Mines combined all of these materials to fabricate and test membrane electrode assemblies for single cell testing in a methanol-fueled alkaline system. The highest power density achieved in this study was 54 mW/cm2 which was 90% of the project target and the highest reported power density for a direct methanol alkaline fuel cell.

  10. The secondary alkaline zinc electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLarnon, Frank R.; Cairns, Elton J.

    1991-02-01

    The worldwide studies conducted between 1975 and 1990 with the aim of improving cell lifetimes of secondary alkaline zinc electrodes are overviewed. Attention is given the design features and characteristics of various secondary alkaline zinc cells, including four types of zinc/nickel oxide cell designs (vented static-electrolyte, sealed static-electrolyte, vibrating-electrode, and flowing-electrolyte); two types of zinc/air cells (mechanically rechargeable consolidated-electrode and mechanically rechargeable particulate-electrode); zinc/silver oxide battery; zinc/manganese dioxide cell; and zinc/ferric cyanide battery. Particular consideration is given to recent research in the fields of cell thermodynamics, zinc electrodeposition, zinc electrodissolution, zinc corrosion, electrolyte properties, mathematical and phenomenological models, osmotic pumping, nonuniform current distribution, and cell cycle-life perforamnce.

  11. Metagenome sequencing of the prokaryotic microbiota of the hypersaline and meromictic soap lake, washington.

    PubMed

    Hawley, Erik R; Hess, Matthias

    2014-01-23

    Soap Lake is a small saline lake in central eastern Washington that is sharply stratified into two layers. In addition to being highly alkaline (~pH 10), Soap Lake also contains high concentrations of sulfide. Here, we report the community profile of the prokaryotic microbiota associated with Soap Lake surface water.

  12. Gas exchange on Mono Lake and Crowley Lake, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanninkhof, Rik; Ledwell, James R.; Broecker, Wallace S.

    1987-01-01

    Gas exchange coefficients (k) have been determined for freshwater Crowley Lake and saline Mono Lake through the use of a man-made purposefully injected gas, SF6. The concentration decreased from an initial value of 40 to 4 pmol/L for Mono Lake and from 20 to 1 pmol/L for Crowley lake over a period of 6 wks. Wind-speed (u) records from anemometers on the shore of each lake made it possible to determine the relationship between k and u. The average u and k values for the experiment were identical for the two lakes, despite the large chemical differences. It is estimated that, for the u values observed over Mono Lake from July to December 1984, the exchange of CO2 occurred 2.5 times faster than without chemical enhancement. This is a factor of 4 lower than needed to explain the high invasion rate of C-14 produced by nuclear bomb tests.

  13. [A new implant system for orbital prosthetic rehabilitation: "epiplating mono"].

    PubMed

    Schneider, M; Federspil, P A; Neumann, A; Schick, B

    2014-06-01

    A New Implant System for Orbital Prosthetic Rehabilitation: "Epiplating Mono" Prosthetic or episthetic rehabilitation of ear, eye and nose are currently most common performed using magnetic fixation. While at the beginning single implants have been used, now-a-days a more extended approach with plate fixation are recommended to enhance the stability of the anchored magnets. A newly designed implant system epiplating mono is presented that combines the structure of a single implant with additional fixation elements. In a pilot study this new implant system was used in 4 patients for prosthetic orbital rehabilitation. Further experiences with this new implant system are required necessitating long-term experiences of implant stability to define the value of the presented epiplating mono system for prosthetic rehabilitation. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Mono-isotope Prediction for Mass Spectra Using Bayes Network

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Rwebangira, Mugizi Robert; Burge, Legand

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is one of the widely utilized important methods to study protein functions and components. The challenge of mono-isotope pattern recognition from large scale protein mass spectral data needs computational algorithms and tools to speed up the analysis and improve the analytic results. We utilized naïve Bayes network as the classifier with the assumption that the selected features are independent to predict mono-isotope pattern from mass spectrometry. Mono-isotopes detected from validated theoretical spectra were used as prior information in the Bayes method. Three main features extracted from the dataset were employed as independent variables in our model. The application of the proposed algorithm to publicMo dataset demonstrates that our naïve Bayes classifier is advantageous over existing methods in both accuracy and sensitivity. PMID:25620856

  15. Modification of end phosphate gruops in mono- and oligonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Shumyantzeva, V V; Sokolova, N I; Shabarova, Z A

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for selective activation of phosphomonoester end groups of oligonucleotides and nucleosidedi-(tri) phosphates via mixed anhydrides with mesitoic acid. Mixed anhydrides are synthesized in high yield and isolated by paper or DEAE-cellulose column chromatography. The ability of such anhydrides to phosphorylate different nucleophilic agents was used for synthesis of amidates, imidazolidates, esters, thioesters and pyrophosphates of mono- and oligonucleotides. Mixed anhydrides mono-, oligonucleotides and nucleosidedi-(tri)phosphates and mesitoic acid were also applied to achieve immobilization of the mono- and oligonucleotides via their end groups on hexamethylenediamine - Sepharose support. Mixed anhydrides studied may be efficiently used for affinity labeling of proteins and nucleic acids and also as material for preparating reagents for template reactions. PMID:1272808

  16. Gas exchange on Mono Lake and Crowley Lake, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanninkhof, Rik; Ledwell, James R.; Broecker, Wallace S.

    1987-01-01

    Gas exchange coefficients (k) have been determined for freshwater Crowley Lake and saline Mono Lake through the use of a man-made purposefully injected gas, SF6. The concentration decreased from an initial value of 40 to 4 pmol/L for Mono Lake and from 20 to 1 pmol/L for Crowley lake over a period of 6 wks. Wind-speed (u) records from anemometers on the shore of each lake made it possible to determine the relationship between k and u. The average u and k values for the experiment were identical for the two lakes, despite the large chemical differences. It is estimated that, for the u values observed over Mono Lake from July to December 1984, the exchange of CO2 occurred 2.5 times faster than without chemical enhancement. This is a factor of 4 lower than needed to explain the high invasion rate of C-14 produced by nuclear bomb tests.

  17. The geomorphology of two hyper-saline springs in the Canadian High Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, M. K.; Pollard, W. H.

    2013-12-01

    On Axel Heiberg Island in the Canadian High Arctic a number of low temperature perennial saline springs occur despite being subject to a cold polar desert climate with a mean annual air temperature of -18°C. Associated with 2 groups of hyper-saline springs are distinctive landforms resulting from winter deposition of salt minerals. These deposits resemble tufas structurally but unlike true tufas which are composed of carbonate minerals, these landforms are formed mainly of salt. This study hypothesizes that the extreme cold winter air temperatures cools water temperatures triggering rapid precipitation of various salt minerals (mainly hydrohalite, NaCl*2H2O) which subsequently alters the flow hydrology by obstructing summer flow paths. The tufa-like appearance of these salt deposits reflects the interaction between changing water temperature, chemistry and flow. This research characterises the geomorphology and geochemistry of two hyper-saline springs on Axel Heiberg Island: the first is located at Wolf Diapir (79°07'23'N; 90°14'39'W), the deposit at this site resembles a large conical mound (2.5m tall x 3m diameter). The second is located at Stolz Diapir (79°04'30'N; 87°04'30'W), in this case a series of pool and barrage structures staircase down a narrow valley for approximately 300m (several pools are 10 m wide x 3 m deep). The springs have very different seasonal surface hydrologic regimes and topographic settings which influence the pattern of mineral precipitates. The accumulation of precipitates occurs during the winter and is dominated by the formation of hydrohalite. In the summer, the accumulated hydrohalite melts incongruently to form halite; spring water and snowmelt dissolves various parts of the accumulations, changing the morphology of the deposits. The aim of this poster is to present preliminary observations characterising the processes driving tufa formation in a permafrost environment, a process that has not been described in detail in

  18. Microbial Mg-carbonate Precipitation and Early Diagenetic Dolomite Crust Formation at Hypersaline Lagoon, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahniuk Rumbelsperger, A. M.; McKenzie, J. A.; Perri, E.; Vögeli, N.; Vasconcelos, C.

    2015-12-01

    Sedimentary dolomite rocks are commonly considered to be primarily a replacement product of the calcium carbonate components comprising the original limestone, a process known as secondary replacement dolomitization. Although numerous dolomite formations in the geologic record are composed of fine-grained crystals of micritic dolomite, an alternative process, i.e., direct precipitation, is often excluded because of the absence of visible or geochemical indicators supporting primary precipitation. We present a study of a modern coastal hypersaline lagoon, Brejo do Espinho, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil, which is located in a special climatic regime where a well-defined seasonal cycle of wet and dry conditions occur. The direct precipitation of modern high-Mg calcite and Ca-dolomite mud from the lagoonal waters under low-temperature hypersaline conditions is associated with the activity of microbial organisms living in this restricted environment. The mud undergoes an early diagenetic transformation into a 100% dolomite crust on the margins of the lagoon. The biomineralization process, characterized by the variations of the physico-chemical conditions in this environment during the annual hydrologic cycle, is integrated with isotopic analysis to define the early diagenetic processes responsible for the formation of both dolomitic mud and crust. The carbon isotope values indicate a contribution of respired organic carbon, which is greater for the crust (δ13C = -9.5‰ VPDB) than mud (δ13C = -1.2‰ VPDB). The oxygen isotope values reflect a moderate degree of evaporation during mud formation (δ18O = 1.1‰ VPDB), whereas it is greatly enhanced during early diagenetic crust formation (δ18O = 4.2‰ VPDB). The clumped isotope formation temperatures derived for the Brejo do Espinho mud is 34°C and 32°C for the crust. These temperatures are consistent with the upper range of measured values during the dry season when the lagoon experiences the most hypersaline

  19. Exploration of Microbial Diversity and Community Structure of Lonar Lake: The Only Hypersaline Meteorite Crater Lake within Basalt Rock

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Dhiraj; Kumbhare, Shreyas V.; Mhatre, Snehit S.; Chowdhury, Somak P.; Shetty, Sudarshan A.; Marathe, Nachiket P.; Bhute, Shrikant; Shouche, Yogesh S.

    2016-01-01

    Lonar Lake is a hypersaline and hyperalkaline soda lake and the only meteorite impact crater in the world situated in basalt rocks. Although culture-dependent studies have been reported, a comprehensive understanding of microbial community composition and structure in Lonar Lake remains elusive. In the present study, microbial community structure associated with Lonar Lake sediment and water samples was investigated using high-throughput sequencing. Microbial diversity analysis revealed the existence of diverse, yet largely consistent communities. Proteobacteria (30%), Actinobacteria (24%), Firmicutes (11%), and Cyanobacteria (5%) predominated in the sequencing survey, whereas Bacteroidetes (1.12%), BD1-5 (0.5%), Nitrospirae (0.41%), and Verrucomicrobia (0.28%) were detected in relatively minor abundances in the Lonar Lake ecosystem. Within the Proteobacteria phylum, the Gammaproteobacteria represented the most abundantly detected class (21–47%) within sediment samples, but only a minor population in the water samples. Proteobacteria and Firmicutes were found at significantly higher abundance (p ≥ 0.05) in sediment samples, whereas members of Actinobacteria, Candidate division TM7 and Cyanobacteria (p ≥ 0.05) were significantly abundant in water samples. Compared to the microbial communities of other hypersaline soda lakes, those of Lonar Lake formed a distinct cluster, suggesting a different microbial community composition and structure. Here we report for the first time, the difference in composition of indigenous microbial communities between the sediment and water samples of Lonar Lake. An improved census of microbial community structure in this Lake ecosystem provides a foundation for exploring microbial biogeochemical cycling and microbial function in hypersaline lake environments. PMID:26834712

  20. Exploration of Microbial Diversity and Community Structure of Lonar Lake: The Only Hypersaline Meteorite Crater Lake within Basalt Rock.

    PubMed

    Paul, Dhiraj; Kumbhare, Shreyas V; Mhatre, Snehit S; Chowdhury, Somak P; Shetty, Sudarshan A; Marathe, Nachiket P; Bhute, Shrikant; Shouche, Yogesh S

    2015-01-01

    Lonar Lake is a hypersaline and hyperalkaline soda lake and the only meteorite impact crater in the world situated in basalt rocks. Although culture-dependent studies have been reported, a comprehensive understanding of microbial community composition and structure in Lonar Lake remains elusive. In the present study, microbial community structure associated with Lonar Lake sediment and water samples was investigated using high-throughput sequencing. Microbial diversity analysis revealed the existence of diverse, yet largely consistent communities. Proteobacteria (30%), Actinobacteria (24%), Firmicutes (11%), and Cyanobacteria (5%) predominated in the sequencing survey, whereas Bacteroidetes (1.12%), BD1-5 (0.5%), Nitrospirae (0.41%), and Verrucomicrobia (0.28%) were detected in relatively minor abundances in the Lonar Lake ecosystem. Within the Proteobacteria phylum, the Gammaproteobacteria represented the most abundantly detected class (21-47%) within sediment samples, but only a minor population in the water samples. Proteobacteria and Firmicutes were found at significantly higher abundance (p ≥ 0.05) in sediment samples, whereas members of Actinobacteria, Candidate division TM7 and Cyanobacteria (p ≥ 0.05) were significantly abundant in water samples. Compared to the microbial communities of other hypersaline soda lakes, those of Lonar Lake formed a distinct cluster, suggesting a different microbial community composition and structure. Here we report for the first time, the difference in composition of indigenous microbial communities between the sediment and water samples of Lonar Lake. An improved census of microbial community structure in this Lake ecosystem provides a foundation for exploring microbial biogeochemical cycling and microbial function in hypersaline lake environments.

  1. Wind effects on prey availability: How northward migrating waders use brackish and hypersaline lagoons in the sivash, Ukraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkuil, Yvonne; Koolhaas, Anita; Van Der Winden, Jan

    Large numbers of waders migrating northward in spring use the Sivash, a large system of shallow, brackish and hypersaline lagoons in the Black Sea and Azov Sea region (Ukraine). The bottoms of these lagoons are often uncovered by the wind. Hence, for waders the time and space available for feeding depend on wind conditions. In hypersaline lagoons the benthic and pelagic fauna was very poor, consisting mainly of chironomid larvae (0.19 g AFDM·m -2) and brine shrimps Artemia salina, respectively. Brine shrimp abundance was correlated with salinity, wind force, wind direction and water depth. Dunlin Calidris alpina and curlew sandpiper Calidris ferruginea were the only species feeding on brine shrimp. As brine shrimp densities are higher in deeper water, smaller waders such as broad-billed sandpipers Limicola falcinellus are too short-legged to reach exploitable densities of brine shrimp. In brackish lagoons the benthic and pelagic fauna was rich, consisting of polychaetes, bivalves, gastropods, chironomid larvae, isopods and amphipods (8.9 to 30.5 g AFDM·m -2), but there were no brine shrimps. Prey biomass increased with the distance from the coast, being highest on the site that was most frequently inundated. Dunlin, broad-billed sandpiper and grey plover Pluvialis squatarola were the most abundant birds in the brackish lagoon. Due to the effects of wind-tides only a small area was usually available as a feeding site. Gammarus insensibilis was the alternative prey resource in the water layer, and their density varied with wind direction in the same way as brine shrimp. Curlew sandpipers and dunlins in the hypersaline lagoons and broad-billed sandpipers in the brackish lagoons often changed feeding sites, probably following the variation in prey availability. Only because of the large size and variety of lagoons are waders in the Sivash always able to find good feeding sites.

  2. Natronoarchaeum persicum sp. nov., a haloarchaeon isolated from a hypersaline lake.

    PubMed

    Naghoni, Ali; Emtiazi, Giti; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Rasooli, Mehrnoosh; Etemadifar, Zahra; Shahzadeh Fazeli, Seyed Abolhassan; Minegishi, Hiroaki; Ventosa, Antonio

    2017-09-01

    A novel halophilic archaeon, designated strain WIIAL99T, was isolated from Lake Meyghan, a hypersaline lake in Iran. Cells of strain WIIAL99T were non-motile, catalase-positive and oxidase-negative. Strain WIIAL99T required at least 2.5 M NaCl and 0.05 M MgCl2 for growth. Optimal growth was achieved at 3.5 M NaCl and 0.1 M MgCl2. The optimum pH and temperature for growth were pH 7.0 and 37-40 °C; it was able to grow at pH 6.0-8.5 and 20-55 °C. Cells lysed in distilled water and the minimal NaCl concentration to prevent cell lysis was 8 % (w/v). The major polar lipids of strain WIIAL99T were phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester, disulfated diglycosyl diether and one unidentified glycolipid. The DNA G+C content of strain WIIAL99T was 66.7 mol%. The closest relative was Natronoarchaeum rubrum JCM 17119T with 98.2 % similarity in the orthologous 16S rRNA gene sequence. Analysis of 16S rRNA and rpoB' gene sequences indicated that strain WIIAL99T is a member of the genus Natronoarchaeum in the family Halobacteriaceae and forms a distinct cluster. It was concluded that strain WIIAL99T (=IBRC-M 11062T=LMG 29814T) represents a novel species of the genus Natronoarchaeum, for which the name Natronoarchaeum persicum sp. nov. is proposed.

  3. Fermentation couples Chloroflexi and sulfate-reducing bacteria to Cyanobacteria in hypersaline microbial mats

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jackson Z.; Burow, Luke C.; Woebken, Dagmar; Everroad, R. Craig; Kubo, Mike D.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Weber, Peter K.; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Bebout, Brad M.; Hoehler, Tori M.

    2014-01-01

    Past studies of hydrogen cycling in hypersaline microbial mats have shown an active nighttime cycle, with production largely from Cyanobacteria and consumption from sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). However, the mechanisms and magnitude of hydrogen cycling have not been extensively studied. Two mats types near Guerrero Negro, Mexico$-$ permanently submerged Microcoleus microbial mat (GN-S), and intertidal Lyngbya microbial mat (GN-I)$-$were used in microcosm diel manipulation experiments with 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), molybdate, ammonium addition, and physical disruption to understand the processes responsible for hydrogen cycling between mat microbes. Across microcosms, H2 production occurred under dark anoxic conditions with simultaneous production of a suite of organic acids. H2 production was not significantly affected by inhibition of nitrogen fixation, but rather appears to result from constitutive fermentation of photosynthetic storage products by oxygenic phototrophs. Comparison to accumulated glycogen and to CO2 flux indicated that, in the GN-I mat, fermentation released almost all of the carbon fixed via photosynthesis during the preceding day, primarily as organic acids. Across mats, although oxygenic and anoxygenic phototrophs were detected, cyanobacterial [NiFe]-hydrogenase transcripts predominated. Molybdate inhibition experiments indicated that SRBs from a wide distribution of DsrA phylotypes were responsible for H2 consumption. Incubation with 13C-acetate and NanoSIMS (secondary ion mass-spectrometry) indicated higher uptake in both Chloroflexi and SRBs relative to other filamentous bacteria. These manipulations and diel incubations confirm that Cyanobacteria were the main fermenters in Guerrero Negro mats and that the net flux of nighttime fermentation byproducts (not only hydrogen) was largely regulated by the interplay between Cyanobacteria, SRBs, and Chloroflexi.

  4. Microbial diversity of the hypersaline and lithium-rich Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Haferburg, Götz; Gröning, Janosch A D; Schmidt, Nadja; Kummer, Nicolai-Alexeji; Erquicia, Juan Carlos; Schlömann, Michael

    2017-06-01

    Salar de Uyuni, situated in the Southwest of the Bolivian Altiplano, is the largest salt flat on Earth. Brines of this athalassohaline hypersaline environment are rich in lithium and boron. Due to the ever- increasing commodity demand, the industrial exploitation of brines for metal recovery from the world's biggest lithium reservoir is likely to increase substantially in the near future. Studies on the composition of halophilic microbial communities in brines of the salar have not been published yet. Here we report for the first time on the prokaryotic diversity of four brine habitats across the salar. The brine is characterized by salinity values between 132 and 177 PSU, slightly acidic to near-neutral pH and lithium and boron concentrations of up to 2.0 and 1.4g/L, respectively. Community analysis was performed after sequencing the V3-V4 region of the 16S rRNA genes employing the Illumina MiSeq technology. The mothur software package was used for sequence processing and data analysis. Metagenomic analysis revealed the occurrence of an exclusively archaeal community comprising 26 halobacterial genera including only recently identified genera like Halapricum, Halorubellus and Salinarchaeum. Despite the high diversity of the halobacteria-dominated community in sample P3 (Shannon-Weaver index H'=3.12 at 3% OTU cutoff) almost 40% of the Halobacteriaceae-assigned sequences could not be classified on the genus level under stringent filtering conditions. Even if the limited taxonomic resolution of the V3-V4 region for halobacteria is considered, it seems likely to discover new, hitherto undescribed genera of the family halobacteriaceae in this particular habitat of Salar de Uyuni in future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Microbial communities inhabiting hypersaline microbial mats from the Abu Dhabi sabkha

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Luiza; Dutton, Kirsten; Paul, Andreas; van der Land, Cees; Sherry, Angela; Lokier, Stephen; Head, Ian

    2017-04-01

    Microbial mats are organo-sedimentary structures that are typically found in areas with extreme environmental conditions. Since these ecosystems are considered to be representative of the oldest forms of life on Earth, the study of microbial mats can inform our understanding of the development of life early in the history of our planet. In this study, we used hypersaline microbial mats from the Abu Dhabi sabkha (coastal salt flats). Cores of microbial mats (ca. 90 mm depth) were collected within an intertidal region. The cores were sliced into layers 2-3 mm thick and genomic DNA was extracted from each layer. A fragment of the 16S rRNA encoding gene was amplified in all DNA extracts, using barcoded primers, and the amplicons sequenced with the Ion Torrent platform to investigate the composition of the microbial communities down the depth of the cores. Preliminary results revealed a high proportion of Archaea (15.5-40.8% abundance) in all layers, with Halobacteria appearing to be more significant in the first 40 mm (0.4-10.3% of the total microbial community). Members of the Deltaproteobacteria were dominant in almost all layers of the microbial mat (≤ 48.6% relative abundance); however this dominance was not reflected in the first 8 mm, where the abundance was less than 2%. Chloroflexi and Anaerolinea, representing 93% of bacterial abundance, dominated the first 8 mm depth and decreased at greater depth (≤ 3% relative abundance). Cyanobacteria were found only in the top 10 mm, with unexpected low abundance (≤ 3% of the total number of reads). These results show a vertical zonation of microbial communities and processes in the microbial mats. Further analyses are underway to investigate if these patterns are repeated at other sites along a transect of the sabkha, and to relate the microbial composition to the physical-chemical conditions of the sites.

  6. Seasonal fluctuations in ionic concentrations drive microbial succession in a hypersaline lake community

    PubMed Central

    Podell, Sheila; Emerson, Joanne B; Jones, Claudia M; Ugalde, Juan A; Welch, Sue; Heidelberg, Karla B; Banfield, Jillian F; Allen, Eric E

    2014-01-01

    Microbial community succession was examined over a two-year period using spatially and temporally coordinated water chemistry measurements, metagenomic sequencing, phylogenetic binning and de novo metagenomic assembly in the extreme hypersaline habitat of Lake Tyrrell, Victoria, Australia. Relative abundances of Haloquadratum-related sequences were positively correlated with co-varying concentrations of potassium, magnesium and sulfate, but not sodium, chloride or calcium ions, while relative abundances of Halorubrum, Haloarcula, Halonotius, Halobaculum and Salinibacter-related sequences correlated negatively with Haloquadratum and these same ionic factors. Nanohaloarchaea and Halorhabdus-related sequence abundances were inversely correlated with each other, but not other taxonomic groups. These data, along with predicted gene functions from nearly-complete assembled population metagenomes, suggest different ecological phenotypes for Nanohaloarchaea and Halorhabdus-related strains versus other community members. Nucleotide percent G+C compositions were consistently lower in community metagenomic reads from summer versus winter samples. The same seasonal G+C trends were observed within taxonomically binned read subsets from each of seven different genus-level archaeal groups. Relative seasonal abundances were also linked to percent G+C for assembled population genomes. Together, these data suggest that extreme ionic conditions may exert selective pressure on archaeal populations at the level of genomic nucleotide composition, thus contributing to seasonal successional processes. Despite the unavailability of cultured representatives for most of the organisms identified in this study, effective coordination of physical and biological measurements has enabled discovery and quantification of unexpected taxon-specific, environmentally mediated factors influencing microbial community structure. PMID:24335829

  7. New insights into the archaeal diversity of a hypersaline microbial mat obtained by a metagenomic approach.

    PubMed

    López-López, A; Richter, M; Peña, A; Tamames, J; Rosselló-Móra, R

    2013-05-01

    A metagenomic approach was carried out in order to study the genetic pool of a hypersaline microbial mat, paying more attention to the archaeal community and, specifically, to the putatively methanogenic members. The main aim of the work was to expand the knowledge of a likely ecologically important archaeal lineage, candidate division MSBL1, which is probably involved in methanogenesis at very high salinities. The results obtained in this study were in accordance with our previous report on the bacterial diversity encountered by using a number of molecular techniques, but remarkable differences were found in the archaeal diversity retrieval by each of the procedures used (metagenomics and 16S rRNA-based methods). The lack of synteny for most of the metagenomic fragments with known genomes, together with the low degree of similarity of the annotated open reading frames (ORFs) with the sequences in the databases, reflected the high degree of novelty in the mat community studied. Linking the sequenced clones with representatives of division MSBL1 was not possible because of the lack of additional information concerning this archaeal group in the public gene repositories. However, given the high abundance of representatives of this division in the 16S rRNA clone libraries and the low identity of the archaeal clones with known genomes, it was hypothesized that some of them could arise from MSBL1 genomes. In addition, other prokaryotic groups known to be relevant in organic matter mineralization at high salinities were detected. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Biostimulation of indigenous microorganisms for bioremediation of oily hypersaline microcosms from the Arabian Gulf Kuwaiti coasts.

    PubMed

    Al-Mailem, Dina M; Al-Deieg, Maha; Eliyas, Mohamed; Radwan, Samir S

    2017-05-15

    Hypersaline soil and water samples were collected in summer and winter from the "sabkha" area at the Kuwaiti shore of the Arabian Gulf. Physicochemical parameters were analyzed, and found suitable for microbial oil-removal. Summer- and winter-microcosms were treated with individual cation (K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Fe(3+)) salts, and with animal blood and commercial yeast, as cost-effective vitamin sources. Those microcosms were exposed to the open environment for six winter and six summer months, and analyzed for their hydrocarbonoclastic microorganisms at time zero and in two month intervals. The hydrocarbonoclastic microbial communities in the microcosms consisted of halophilic bacteria and haloarchaea. The constituent bacterial species varied according to the season. Three species, Dietzia kunjamensis, Marinobacter lacisalsi and Halomonas oxialensis consistently occurred both in summer- and winter-samples, but the remaining species were different. On the other hand, the haloarchaeal communities in summer and winter were quite similar, and consisted mainly of Haloferax spp and Halobacterium spp. Treating the microcosms with cations and with vitamin-containing natural products enhanced microbial numbers and oil-removal. The effectiveness of the cations in oil-removal was in the order; Fe(3+) (94%) > Ca(2+) (89%) > Mg(2+) (85%) > K(+) (82%). Thus, oily microcosms amended with trivalent and divalent cations lost most of the oil, and those amended with commercial yeast and with animal blood, as vitamin sources, lost 78% and 72% oil, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Diversity of culturable halophilic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in hypersaline habitats.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Yu; Tourova, Tatjana P; Lysenko, Anatoly M; Muyzer, Gerard

    2006-10-01

    Unexpectedly high culturable diversity of moderately and extremely halophilic obligately chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) was discovered in the sediments of various hypersaline habitats, including chloride-sulfate lakes in Mongolia, Russia and Ukraine, a sea saltern in Slovenia and a deep-sea salt brine from the Mediterranean. Six different groups of halophilic SOB, including four new genera, all belonging to the Gammaproteobacteria, were found. Two groups of moderately halophilic strictly aerobic SOB dominated at 2 M NaCl, including representatives of the genus Halothiobacillus (in fully aerobic conditions) and Thiomicrospira (in micro-oxic conditions). Under denitrifying conditions at 2 M NaCl, a group of moderately halophilic and facultatively anaerobic SOB was selected, capable of complete denitrification of nitrate. The group represents a new genus with closest relatives among as yet undescribed marine thiodenitrifying isolates. With thiocyanate as a substrate, an enrichment culture at 2 M NaCl yielded a pure culture of moderately halophilic SOB capable of aerobic growth with thiocyanate and thiosulfate at up to 4 M NaCl. Furthermore, this bacterium also grew anaerobically using nitrite as electron acceptor. It formed a new lineage distantly related to the genus Thiomicrospira. Enrichments at 4 M NaCl resulted in the domination of two different, previously unknown, groups of extremely halophilic SOB. Under oxic conditions, they were represented by strictly aerobic spiral-shaped bacteria, related to the Ectothiorhodospiraceae, while under denitrifying conditions a group of facultatively anaerobic nitrate-reducing bacteria with long rod-shaped cells was selected, distantly related to the genus Acidithiobacillus.

  10. Morphological responses of mitochondria-rich cells to hypersaline environment in the Australian mudskipper, Periophthalmus minutus.

    PubMed

    Itoki, Naoko; Sakamoto, Tatsuya; Hayashi, Masahiro; Takeda, Tatsusuke; Ishimatsu, Atsushi

    2012-07-01

    A population of the Australian mudskipper, Periophthalmus minutus, was found to inhabit mudflat that remained uncovered by tide for more than 20 days in some neap tides. During these prolonged emersion periods, P. minutus retreated into burrows containing little water, with a highest recorded salinity of 84 ± 7.4 psu (practical salinity unit). To explore the mechanical basis for this salinity tolerance in P. minutus, we determined the densities of mitochondria-rich cells (MRCs) in the inner and outer opercula and the pectoral fin skin, in comparison with P. takita, [corrected] from an adjacent lower intertidal habitat, and studied morphological responses of MRCs to exposure to freshwater (FW), and 100% (34-35 psu) and 200% seawater (SW). Periophthalmus minutus showed a higher density of MRCs in the inner operculum (3365 ± 821 cells mm(-2)) than in the pectoral fin skin (1428 ± 161) or the outer operculum (1100 ± 986), all of which were higher than the MRC densities in p. takita. [corrected]. No mortality occurred in 100% or 200% SW, but half of the fish died within four days in FW. Neither 200% SW nor FW exposure affected MRC density. Transfer to 200% SW doubled MRC size after 9-14 days with no change in the proportion of MRCs with apical pits or plasma sodium concentration. In contrast, transfer to FW resulted in a rapid closing of pits and a significant reduction in plasma sodium concentration. These results suggest that P. minutus has evolved morphological and physiological mechanisms to withstand hypersaline conditions that they may encounter in their habitat.

  11. Mathematical simulation of the diel O, S, and C biogeochemistry of a hypersaline microbial mat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, K.; Potter, C.

    2003-12-01

    The creation of a mathematical simulation model of photosynthetic microbial mats is an important step in our understanding of key biogeochemical cycles that may have altered the atmospheres of early Earth and of other terrestrial planets. A modeling investigation is presented here as a tool to utilize and integrate empirical results from research on hypersaline mats from Baja California, Mexico into a computational system that can be used to simulate biospheric inputs of trace gases to the atmosphere. An early version of our model calculates fluxes and cycling of oxygen, sulfide, and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) via abiotic components and via the major bacterial guilds: cyanobacteria (CYA), sulfur reducing bacteria (SRB), purple sulfur bacteria (PSB) and colorless sulfur bacteria (CSB). We used generalized monod-type equations that incorporate substrate and energy limits upon maximum rates of metabolic processes such as photosynthesis and sulfate reduction. We ran a simulation using temperature and irradiance inputs from data collected from a microbial mat in Guerrero Negro in Baja Mexico. Model oxygen, sulfide, and DIC results compared well with data collected in the field mats. A divergence from the field data was an initial large negative DIC flux early in the morning and little flux into the mat thereafter in the simulation. We hypothesize that this divergence will be reduced or eliminated if the salinity of the water surrounding the mat were used as an environmental input and as a limit to photosynthesis rates. Salinity levels, organic carbon, methane, methanogens and green nonsulfur bacteria will be added to this model before it is incorporated into a global model to simulate geological time scales.

  12. Seasonal fluctuations in ionic concentrations drive microbial succession in a hypersaline lake community.

    PubMed

    Podell, Sheila; Emerson, Joanne B; Jones, Claudia M; Ugalde, Juan A; Welch, Sue; Heidelberg, Karla B; Banfield, Jillian F; Allen, Eric E

    2014-05-01

    Microbial community succession was examined over a two-year period using spatially and temporally coordinated water chemistry measurements, metagenomic sequencing, phylogenetic binning and de novo metagenomic assembly in the extreme hypersaline habitat of Lake Tyrrell, Victoria, Australia. Relative abundances of Haloquadratum-related sequences were positively correlated with co-varying concentrations of potassium, magnesium and sulfate, but not sodium, chloride or calcium ions, while relative abundances of Halorubrum, Haloarcula, Halonotius, Halobaculum and Salinibacter-related sequences correlated negatively with Haloquadratum and these same ionic factors. Nanohaloarchaea and Halorhabdus-related sequence abundances were inversely correlated with each other, but not other taxonomic groups. These data, along with predicted gene functions from nearly-complete assembled population metagenomes, suggest different ecological phenotypes for Nanohaloarchaea and Halorhabdus-related strains versus other community members. Nucleotide percent G+C compositions were consistently lower in community metagenomic reads from summer versus winter samples. The same seasonal G+C trends were observed within taxonomically binned read subsets from each of seven different genus-level archaeal groups. Relative seasonal abundances were also linked to percent G+C for assembled population genomes. Together, these data suggest that extreme ionic conditions may exert selective pressure on archaeal populations at the level of genomic nucleotide composition, thus contributing to seasonal successional processes. Despite the unavailability of cultured representatives for most of the organisms identified in this study, effective coordination of physical and biological measurements has enabled discovery and quantification of unexpected taxon-specific, environmentally mediated factors influencing microbial community structure.

  13. Fermentation couples Chloroflexi and sulfate-reducing bacteria to Cyanobacteria in hypersaline microbial mats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jackson Z.; Burow, Luke C.; Woebken, Dagmar; Everroad, R. Craig; Kubo, Mike D.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Weber, Peter K.; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Bebout, Brad M.; Hoehler, Tori M.

    2013-01-01

    Past studies of hydrogen cycling in hypersaline microbial mats have shown an active nighttime cycle, with production largely from Cyanobacteria and consumption from sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). However, the mechanisms and magnitude of hydrogen cycling have not been extensively studied. Two mats types near Guerrero Negro, Mexico—permanently submerged Microcoleus microbial mat (GN-S), and intertidal Lyngbya microbial mat (GN-I)—were used in microcosm diel manipulation experiments with 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), molybdate, ammonium addition, and physical disruption to understand the processes responsible for hydrogen cycling between mat microbes. Across microcosms, H2 production occurred under dark anoxic conditions with simultaneous production of a suite of organic acids. H2 production was not significantly affected by inhibition of nitrogen fixation, but rather appears to result from constitutive fermentation of photosynthetic storage products by oxygenic phototrophs. Comparison to accumulated glycogen and to CO2 flux indicated that, in the GN-I mat, fermentation released almost all of the carbon fixed via photosynthesis during the preceding day, primarily as organic acids. Across mats, although oxygenic and anoxygenic phototrophs were detected, cyanobacterial [NiFe]-hydrogenase transcripts predominated. Molybdate inhibition experiments indicated that SRBs from a wide distribution of DsrA phylotypes were responsible for H2 consumption. Incubation with 13C-acetate and NanoSIMS (secondary ion mass-spectrometry) indicated higher uptake in both Chloroflexi and SRBs relative to other filamentous bacteria. These manipulations and diel incubations confirm that Cyanobacteria were the main fermenters in Guerrero Negro mats and that the net flux of nighttime fermentation byproducts (not only hydrogen) was largely regulated by the interplay between Cyanobacteria, SRBs, and Chloroflexi. PMID:24616716

  14. Diversity and Stratification of Archaea in a Hypersaline Microbial Mat▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Charles E.; Spear, John R.; Harris, J. Kirk; Pace, Norman R.

    2009-01-01

    The Guerrero Negro (GN) hypersaline microbial mats have become one focus for biogeochemical studies of stratified ecosystems. The GN mats are found beneath several of a series of ponds of increasing salinity that make up a solar saltern fed from Pacific Ocean water pumped from the Laguna Ojo de Liebre near GN, Baja California Sur, Mexico. Molecular surveys of the laminated photosynthetic microbial mat below the fourth pond in the series identified an enormous diversity of bacteria in the mat, but archaea have received little attention. To determine the bulk contribution of archaeal phylotypes to the pond 4 study site, we determined the phylogenetic distribution of archaeal rRNA gene sequences in PCR libraries based on nominally universal primers. The ratios of bacterial/archaeal/eukaryotic rRNA genes, 90%/9%/1%, suggest that the archaeal contribution to the metabolic activities of the mat may be significant. To explore the distribution of archaea in the mat, sequences derived using archaeon-specific PCR primers were surveyed in 10 strata of the 6-cm-thick mat. The diversity of archaea overall was substantial albeit less than the diversity observed previously for bacteria. Archaeal diversity, mainly euryarchaeotes, was highest in the uppermost 2 to 3 mm of the mat and decreased rapidly with depth, where crenarchaeotes dominated. Only 3% of the sequences were specifically related to known organisms including methanogens. While some mat archaeal clades corresponded with known chemical gradients, others did not, which is likely explained by heretofore-unrecognized gradients. Some clades did not segregate by depth in the mat, indicating broad metabolic repertoires, undersampling, or both. PMID:19114531

  15. Rhodococcus sovatensis sp. nov., an actinomycete isolated from the hypersaline and heliothermal Lake Ursu.

    PubMed

    Táncsics, András; Máthé, István; Benedek, Tibor; Tóth, Erika M; Atasayar, Ewelina; Spröer, Cathrin; Márialigeti, Károly; Felföldi, Tamás; Kriszt, Balázs

    2017-02-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, strictly aerobic, mesophilic bacterium, designated H004T, was isolated from a water sample of the hypersaline and heliothermal Lake Ursu, Sovata, Romania. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain H004T formed a distinct phyletic lineage within the genus Rhodococcus. It shared the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with Rhodococcus yunnanensis YIM 70056T (98.80 %), followed by Rhodococcus fascians LMG 3623T (98.73 %), Rhodococcus cercidiphylli YIM 65003T (98.73 %), Rhodococcus cerastii C5T (98.58 %) and Rhodococcus kyotonensis DS472T (98.53 %). The alkB-based phylogenetic analysis further confirmed that this strain constitutes a highly unique lineage within the genus. Chemotaxonomic characteristics, including the predominant fatty acids acids C15 : 0, C18 : 1ω9c, C19 : 1ω11c/C19 : 1ω9c and C16 : 1ω7c/iso-C15 : 0 2-OH, the major quinone MK-8(H2), the presence of mycolic acids and cell-wall chemotype IV were also consistent with the properties of members of the genus Rhodococcus. The DNA G+C content of strain H004T was 65.4 mol%. The results of DNA-DNA hybridization analyses with the closest relatives, in combination with the alkB-based phylogenetic analysis, as well as the chemotaxonomic and physiological data, demonstrated that isolate H004T represents a novel species of the genus Rhodococcus, for which the name Rhodococcus sovatensissp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is H004T (=DSM 102881T=NCAIM B.02632T).

  16. Rapid instrument prototyping with open source hardware and software: Application to water quality in hypersaline estuaries.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loose, B.; O'Shea, R.

    2016-02-01

    We describe the design and deployment of a water quality sonde that utilizes mobile phone networks for near-real time data telemetry. The REOL or Realtime Estuary Ocean Logger has the unique and valuable capability of logging data internally and simultaneously relaying the information to a webserver using a cellular modem. The internal circuitry consists of a GSM cellular modem, a microcontroller, and an SD card for data storage - these components are low cost, and backed up with circuit diagrams and programming libraries that are published under open source license. This configuration is versatile and is capable of reading instrument output from a broad spectrum of devices, including serial, TTL, analog voltage (0 - 5V), and analog current (typically 4-20 mA). We find the greatest challenges lie in development of smart software that is capable of handling the conditions brought on by this harsh environment. We have programmed the sonde to first determine whether it is submerged by water, and record the temperature on the electronics before deciding whether to telemeter measurements over the cellular network. The Google App EngineTM provides an interactive visualization platform. We have tested the REOL with a variety of water quality sensors. In the configuration described here, we use a thermistor, depth gauge and torroidal conductivity sensor to measure water temperature, water level and conductivity up to 200 mS/cm. The latter is necessary for studies in hypersaline estuaries, where porewater salinity can exceed 100 g/kg. We present data from two estuaries in West Africa and from a longer-term deployment in the Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island.

  17. Effect of oxygen concentration on photosynthesis and respiration in two hypersaline microbial mats.

    PubMed

    Grötzschel, S; de Beer, D

    2002-10-01

    The effects of oxygen concentration on photosynthesis and respiration in two hypersaline cyanobacterial mats were investigated. Experiments were carried out on mats from Eilat, Israel, with moderate photosynthetic activity, and mats from Mallorca, Spain, with high photosynthetic activity. The oxygen concentration in the overlying water above the mats was increased stepwise from 0% to 100% O2. Subsequent changes in oxygen concentration, gross photosynthetic rates, and pH values inside the mats were measured with microelectrodes. According to published reports on the regulation of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), the key enzyme in the CO2-fixation pathway of phototrophs, we expected photosynthetic activity to decrease with increasing oxygen concentration. Gross photosynthetic and total respiration rates in both mats were highest when the O2 concentration was at 0% in the overlying water. Net oxygen production rates under these conditions were the same as under air saturation (21% O2), while gross photosynthetic and respiration rates were lowest at air saturation. In both mats, gross photosynthetic and respiration rates increased upon gradually increasing the oxygen concentration in the overlying water from 21% to 100%. These results contradict the expectation that photosynthesis decreases with increasing oxygen concentration. Increased photosynthetic rates at oxygen concentrations above 21% were probably caused by enhanced oxidation of organic matter and concomitant CO2 production due to the increased oxygen availability. The cause of the high respiration rates at 0% O2 in the overlying water was presumably the enhanced excretion of photosynthetic products during increased photosynthesis. We conclude that the effect of the O2/CO2 concentration ratio on the activity of Rubisco as demonstrated in vitro on enzyme extracts cannot be extrapolated to the situation in intact microbial mats, because the close coupling of the activity of primary

  18. Impact of solar radiation on bacterioplankton in Laguna Vilama, a hypersaline Andean lake (4650 m)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    FaríAs, MaríA. Eugenia; FernáNdez-Zenoff, Verónica; Flores, Regina; OrdóñEz, Omar; EstéVez, Cristina

    2009-06-01

    Laguna Vilama is a hypersaline Lake located at 4660 m altitude in the northwest of Argentina high up in the Andean Puna. The impact of ultraviolet (UV) radiation on bacterioplankton was studied by collecting samples at different times of the day. Molecular analysis (DGGE) showed that the bacterioplankton community is characterized by Gamma-proteobacteria (Halomonas sp., Marinobacter sp.), Alpha-proteobacteria (Roseobacter sp.), HGC (Agrococcus jenensis and an uncultured bacterium), and CFB (uncultured Bacteroidetes). During the day, minor modifications in bacterial diversity such as intensification of Bacteroidetes' signal and an emergence of Gamma-proteobacteria (Marinobacter flavimaris) were observed after solar exposure. DNA damage, measured as an accumulation of Cyclobutane Pyrimidine Dimers (CPDs), in bacterioplankton and naked DNA increased from 100 CPDs MB-1 at 1200 local time (LT) to 300 CPDs MB-1 at 1600 LT, and from 80 CPDs MB-1 at 1200 LT to 640 CPDs MB-1 at 1600 LT, respectively. In addition, pure cultures of Pseudomonas sp. V1 and Brachybacterium sp. V5, two bacteria previously isolated from this environment, were exposed simultaneously with the community, and viability of both strains diminished after solar exposure. No CPD accumulation was observed in either of the exposed cultures, but an increase in mutagenesis was detected in V5. Of both strains only Brachybacterium sp. V5 showed CPD accumulation in naked DNA. These results suggest that the bacterioplankton community is well adapted to this highly solar irradiated environment showing little accumulation of CPDs and few changes in the community composition. They also demonstrate that these microorganisms contain efficient mechanisms against UV damage.

  19. The sources and evolution of sulfur in the hypersaline Lake Lisan (paleo-Dead Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torfstein, Adi; Gavrieli, Ittai; Stein, Mordechai

    2005-07-01

    δ34S values in gypsum are used to evaluate the fate of sulfur in the hypersaline Lake Lisan, the late Pleistocene precursor of the Dead Sea (70-14 ka BP), and applied as a paleo-limnological tracer. The Ca-chloride Lake Lisan evolved through meromictic periods characterized by precipitation of authigenic aragonite and holomictic episodes characterized by enhanced gypsum precipitation. The lake deposited two major gypsum units: the "Lower Gypsum unit" (deposited at ˜56 ka) showing δ34S values of 18-20‰, and the "Upper Gypsum unit" (deposited at 17 ka) displaying significantly higher δ34S values of 26-28‰. Laminated and disseminated gypsum, residing within the aragonite, exhibit δ34S values in the range of - 26‰ to 1‰. The isotopic composition of the gypsum was dictated by freshwater sulfate input that replenished the upper layer of the lake (the mixolimnion), bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR) that occurred under the anoxic conditions of the lower brine (the monimolimnion), and mixing between these two layers. During meromictic periods, the sulfate reservoir in the lower brine was replenished by precipitation of gypsum from the upper layer, and its subsequent dissolution due to sulfate deficiency induced by BSR activity. This process describes a "sulfur pump" mechanism and its effect on δ34S in the water can be modeled by a modified Rayleigh distillation equation. Steady state δ34S values (˜40‰) were reached in the lower brine after long meromictic periods. Following overturn episodes, induced by diminishing freshwater input and lake level decline, large quantities of δ34S enriched gypsum precipitated. The negative δ34S values in laminated and disseminated gypsum provide evidence for BSR activity in the lower brine that removed isotopically depleted sulfides from the water column, causing significant isotopic enrichment of remaining sulfate. Following the lake desiccation, the sediments were exposed and the latter sulfides oxidized and re

  20. Anoxygenic Photosynthesis and Nitrogen Fixation by a Microbial Mat Community in a Bahamian Hypersaline Lagoon

    PubMed Central

    Pinckney, J. L.; Paerl, H. W.

    1997-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements of photosynthesis (both oxygenic and anoxygenic) and N(inf2) fixation were conducted to discern the relationships between photosynthesis, N(inf2) fixation, and environmental factors potentially regulating these processes in microbial mats in a tropical hypersaline lagoon (Salt Pond, San Salvador Island, Bahamas). Major photoautotrophs included cyanobacteria, purple phototrophic bacteria, and diatoms. Chemosystematic photopigments were used as indicators of the relative abundance of mat phototrophs. Experimental manipulations consisted of light and dark incubations of intact mat samples exposed to the photosystem II inhibitor DCMU [3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea], a dissolved organic carbon source (D-glucose), and normal seawater (37(permil)). Photosynthetic rates were measured by both O(inf2) and (sup14)C methods, and nitrogenase activity (NA) was estimated by the acetylene reduction assay. Moderate reductions in salinity (from 74 to 37(permil)) had no measurable effect on photosynthesis, O(inf2) consumption, or NA. CO(inf2) fixation in DCMU-amended samples was (symbl)25% of that in the control (nonamended) samples and demonstrated photosynthetic activity by anoxygenic phototrophs. NA in DCMU-amended samples, which was consistently higher (by a factor of 2 to 3) than the other (light and dark) treatments, was also attributed to purple phototrophic bacteria. The ecological implication is that N(inf2) fixation by anoxygenic phototrophs (purple phototrophic bacteria and possibly cyanobacteria) may be regulated by the activity of oxygenic phototrophs (cyanobacteria and diatoms). Consortial interactions that enhance the physiological plasticity of the mat community may be a key for optimizing production, N(inf2) fixation, and persistence in these extreme environments. PMID:16535506

  1. Fermentation couples Chloroflexi and sulfate-reducing bacteria to Cyanobacteria in hypersaline microbial mats

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Jackson Z.; Burow, Luke C.; Woebken, Dagmar; ...

    2014-01-01

    Past studies of hydrogen cycling in hypersaline microbial mats have shown an active nighttime cycle, with production largely from Cyanobacteria and consumption from sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). However, the mechanisms and magnitude of hydrogen cycling have not been extensively studied. Two mats types near Guerrero Negro, Mexico$-$ permanently submerged Microcoleus microbial mat (GN-S), and intertidal Lyngbya microbial mat (GN-I)$-$were used in microcosm diel manipulation experiments with 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), molybdate, ammonium addition, and physical disruption to understand the processes responsible for hydrogen cycling between mat microbes. Across microcosms, H2 production occurred under dark anoxic conditions with simultaneous production of a suite ofmore » organic acids. H2 production was not significantly affected by inhibition of nitrogen fixation, but rather appears to result from constitutive fermentation of photosynthetic storage products by oxygenic phototrophs. Comparison to accumulated glycogen and to CO2 flux indicated that, in the GN-I mat, fermentation released almost all of the carbon fixed via photosynthesis during the preceding day, primarily as organic acids. Across mats, although oxygenic and anoxygenic phototrophs were detected, cyanobacterial [NiFe]-hydrogenase transcripts predominated. Molybdate inhibition experiments indicated that SRBs from a wide distribution of DsrA phylotypes were responsible for H2 consumption. Incubation with 13C-acetate and NanoSIMS (secondary ion mass-spectrometry) indicated higher uptake in both Chloroflexi and SRBs relative to other filamentous bacteria. These manipulations and diel incubations confirm that Cyanobacteria were the main fermenters in Guerrero Negro mats and that the net flux of nighttime fermentation byproducts (not only hydrogen) was largely regulated by the interplay between Cyanobacteria, SRBs, and Chloroflexi.« less

  2. Climatic change and evaporative processes in the development of Common Era hypersaline lakes, East Antarctica: A study of Lake Suribati

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, H.; Seto, K.; Katsuki, K.; Kaneko, H.; yamada, K.; Imura, S.; Dettman, D. L.

    2011-12-01

    The Antarctic continent was uplifted by glacioisostatic rebound due to the regression of ice sheets after the last glacial period. Today's saline lakes were formed in shallow basins originally below sea level. Antarctic hypersaline lakes are formed by concentration of isolated seawater bodies as affected by recent climate change. Many saline lakes are found in the ice-free area of the Soya coast, East Antarctica. Lake Suribati is located in Sukarvsnes on the Soya coast. It is a hypersaline lake with maximum salinity ~200 psu, and an observable stable halocline at 7~12m depth. This study uses Lake Suribati sediment core Sr4C-01, collected by the 46th Japanese Antarctica Research Expedition, to examine the relationship of climatic change to evaporative processes and solute concentration in Lake Suribati in the Common Era. Sr4C-01 core was collected at 9.53m water depth in Lake Suribati in 2005 (core length is 63cm). This core primarily consists of black mud and laminated black organic mud. In the interval from 10 to 24cm below the sediment surface evaporite crystals occur. The age of the Sr4C-01 core bottom is estimated to be ~3,500 cal yrs BP, based on AMS carbon-14 dating at 6 core horizons. The evaporite crystals were indentified as aragonite based on XRD. Total inorganic carbon (TIC) content is low, around 0.5%, throughout the Sr4C-01 core, with higher values, approximately 1~4%, in two intervals, 57~52cm and 29~10cm core depth. Variation in CaO content tracks TIC content. We suggest that synchronous change in CaO and TIC contents indicate the vertical change in the amount of aragonite. Two intervals of evaporite precipition imply two intervals of evaporation and concentration of lake water. Hypersaline lake conditions did not occur soon after the isolation from the sea, rather these occurred under repeated concentration and dilution of lake water. Dilution of saline lake water could occur through the inflow of melt water from local snow or ice, indicating a warm

  3. Methane as a biomarker in the search for extraterrestrial life: Lessons learned from Mars analog hypersaline environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebout, B.; Tazaz, A.; Kelley, C. A.; Poole, J. A.; Davila, A.; Chanton, J.

    2010-12-01

    Methane released from discrete regions on Mars, together with previous reports of methane determined with ground-based telescopes, has revived the possibility of past or even extant life near the surface on Mars, since 90% of the methane on Earth has a biological origin. This intriguing possibility is supported by the abundant evidence of large bodies of liquid water, and therefore of conditions conducive to the origin of life, early in the planet's history. The detection and analysis of methane is at the core of NASA’s strategies to search for life in the solar system, and on extrasolar planets. Because methane is also produced abiotically, it is important to generate criteria to unambiguously assess biogenicity. The stable carbon and hydrogen isotopic signature of methane, as well as its ratio to other low molecular weight hydrocarbons (the methane/(ethane + propane) ratio: C1/(C2 + C3)), has been suggested to be diagnostic for biogenic methane. We report measurements of the concentrations and stable isotopic signature of methane from hypersaline environments. We focus on hypersaline environments because spectrometers orbiting Mars have detected widespread chloride bearing deposits resembling salt flats. Other evaporitic minerals, e.g., sulfates, are also abundant in several regions, including those studied by the Mars Exploration Rovers. The presence of evaporitic minerals, together with the known evolution of the Martian climate, from warmer and wetter to cold and hyper-arid, suggest that evaporitic and hypersaline environments were common in the past. Hypersaline environments examined to date include salt ponds located in Baja California, the San Francisco Bay, and the Atacama Desert. Methane was found in gas produced both in the sediments, and in gypsum- and halite-hosted (endolithic) microbial communities. Maximum methane concentrations were as high as 40% by volume. The methane carbon isotopic (δ13C) composition showed a wide range of values, from about

  4. Experimental and theoretical studies on mono-iodohistamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnuszek, P.; Dobrowolski, J. Cz; Sitkowski, J.; Bednarek, E.; Witowska, J.; Mazurek, A. P.

    2001-05-01

    The structure of mono-iodohistamine cation was determined by the 1H, 13C NMR, supported by ab initio calculations. Theoretical NMR spectra of the two mono-iodohistamine tautomers were calculated by using the CHF-GIAO approach. The N3-H tautomer of 4-I-histamine cationic form has been predicted to be the most stable, and its potential energy surface has been scanned at the HF/3-21G ∗∗ level. Reasons for higher stability of the 4-I-histamine comparing to the other iodohistamine isomers are also discussed.

  5. Diclofenac salts. III. Alkaline and earth alkaline salts.

    PubMed

    Fini, Adamo; Fazio, Giuseppe; Rosetti, Francesca; Angeles Holgado, M; Iruín, Ana; Alvarez-Fuentes, Josefa

    2005-11-01

    Diclofenac salts containing the alkaline and two earth alkaline cations have been prepared and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and EDAX spectroscopy; and by thermal and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA): all of them crystallize as hydrate when precipitated from water. The salts dehydrate at room temperature and more easily on heating, but recovery the hydration, when placed in a humid environment. X-ray diffraction spectra suggest that on dehydration new peaks appear on diffractograms and the lattice of the salts partially looses crystallinity. This phenomenon is readily visible in the case of the calcium and magnesium salts, whose thermograms display a crystallization exotherm, before melting or decomposing at temperatures near or above 200 degrees C; these last salts appear to form solvates, when prepared from methanol. The thermogram of each salt shows a complex endotherm of dehydration about 100 degrees C; the calcium salt displays two endotherms, well separated at about 120 and 160 degrees C, which disappear after prolonged heating. Decomposition exotherms, before or soon after the melting, appear below 300 degrees C. The ammonium salt is thermally unstable and, when heated to start dehydration, dissociates and leaves acidic diclofenac.

  6. The occurrence and identification of series of organic sulphur compounds in oils and sediment extracts: II. Their presence in samples from hypersaline and non-hypersaline palaeoenvironments and possible application as source, palaeoenvironmental and maturity indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Rijpstra, W. Irene C.; De Leeuw, Jan W.; Schenck, P. A.

    1989-06-01

    The organic sulphur compounds (OSC) present in sixteen immature samples (both crude oils and bitumens) from different geographical locations and of different ages representing different palaeoenvironments have been analysed by GC-MS. In all samples OSC (thiolanes, thianes, thiophenes and benzo[ b]thiophenes) with structures related to well-known geologically occurring hydrocarbons ( n-alkanes, isoprenoid alkanes, steranes, triterpanes) occur, although the relative amounts and distribution patterns of the various OSC classes vary considerably. This variation is interpreted as a result of different sources of organic matter and different degrees of thermal maturation. The palaeoenvironments of the samples were anoxic and H 2S, produced by sulphate-reducing bacteria, probably has exceeded the input of reactive iron minerals. These conditions resulted in a surplus of free H 2S, which reacted with organic matter, leading to the formation of OSC. The distributions of OSC may be useful as molecular indicators for the assessment of sources of organic matter, palaeoenvironment and thermal maturity and for oil-oil and oil-source rock correlation studies. The distributions of the C 20 isoprenoid thiophenes in combination with those of the methylated 2-methyl-2-(4,8,12-trimethyltridecyl) chromans can be used to discriminate non-hypersaline from hypersaline palaeoenvironments.

  7. Alkaline fuel cell performance investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. E.; Manzo, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    An exploratory experimental fuel cell test program was conducted to investigate the performance characteristics of alkaline laboratory research electrodes. The objective of this work was to establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance and evaluate candidate cathode configurations having the potential for improved performance. The performance characterization tests provided data to empirically establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance for cell temperatures up to 300 F and reactant pressures up to 200 psia. Evaluation of five gold alloy cathode catalysts revealed that three doped gold alloys had more that two times the surface areas of reference cathodes and therefore offered the best potential for improved performance.

  8. Developments in Alkaline Tin Electrorefining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saba, A. E.; Afifi, S. E.; El Sherief, A. E.

    1988-08-01

    Although alkaline stannate baths for electrorefining of tin have been used for some time, there is still room for improvement The effects of alkali concentration, current density and temperature on the cathodic current efficiency have been studied, and a bath temperature of 75°C is recommended. To avoid unstable conditions in the bath, a special treatment to the anode and application of an auxiliary cathode are necessary. Many of the metallic impurities present in the crude tin anode go into the slimes in the form of hydroxides, but lead impurities can only be tolerated if concentrations are less than one percent.

  9. Alkaline fuel cell performance investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. E.; Manzo, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    An exploratory experimental fuel cell test program was conducted to investigate the performance characteristics of alkaline laboratory research electrodes. The objective of this work was to establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance and evaluate candidate cathode configurations having the potential for improved performance. The performance characterization tests provided data to empirically establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance for cell temperatures up to 300 F and reactant pressures up to 200 psia. Evaluation of five gold alloy cathode catalysts revealed that three doped gold alloys had more than two times the surface areas of reference cathodes and therefore offered the best potential for improved performance.

  10. The Effect of Acid Neutralization on Analytical Results Produced from SW846 Method 8330 after the Alkaline Hydrolysis of Explosives in Soil

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    alkaline hydrolysis for treatment of soil involves mixing a caustic source material with soil. Two caustic materials have been explored, calcitic ...OH)2 Calcitic hydrated lime HCOO- Formate HCl Hydrochloric acid H3PO Phosphoric acid H2SO4 Sulfuric acic NaOH Sodium hydroxide NaH2PO4 Mono...of caustic source material with soil. Two caustic materials have been explored, calcitic hydrated lime (Ca(OH)2, HL) and sodium hydroxide (NaOH

  11. A mono harvest of California black oak acorns

    Treesearch

    Jonathan W. Long; Ron W. Goode

    2017-01-01

    In about 1925 or 1926, Margaret Baty, a tribal member of Big Sandy Rancheria, displayed a collection of acorns from California black oak (Quercus kelloggii, wi-yap' in Mono) and an acorn cooking basket. This photograph, taken by George Holt and courtesy of the Flegal Collection of the Jesse Peter Museum at Santa Rosa Junior College,...

  12. Risperidone Mono - Therapy as Prophylaxis in Bipolar Affective Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Mohit; Pinto, Denzil; Safeekh, A.T.

    2004-01-01

    Risperidone has been found to be useful in the treatment of acute bipolar disorders. This is a case report where risperidone mono therapy has been found to be effective in prophylaxis of bipolar affective disorder. The pharmacological and clinical implications of risperidone in the management of BPAD are discussed PMID:21224912

  13. Air quality in bedded mono-slope beef barns

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bedded mono-slope barns are becoming more common in the upper Midwest. Because these are new facilities, little research has been published regarding environmental quality, building management and animal performance in these facilities. A team of researchers from South Dakota State University, USDA ...

  14. TOXICOLOGY OF MONO- AND DI-ALKYLTIN CHLORIDES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mono- and di-alkyltin chlorides are reactive compounds used in the production of stabilizers for polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastics, primarily used for water distribution pipes. Health effects data were compiled or developed by the manufacturers for the EPA's HPV Challenge progra...

  15. TOXICOLOGY OF MONO- AND DI-ALKYLTIN CHLORIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mono- and di-alkyltin chlorides are reactive compounds used in the production of stabilizers for polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastics, primarily used for water distribution pipes. Health effects data were compiled or developed by the manufacturers for the EPA's HPV Challenge progra...

  16. TOXICOLOGY OF MONO- AND DI-ALKYLTIN CHLORIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mono- and di-alkyltin chlorides are reactive compounds used in the production of stabilizers for polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastics, primarily used for water distribution pipes. Health effects data were compiled or developed by the manufacturers for the EPA's HPV Challenge progra...

  17. TOXICOLOGY OF MONO- AND DI-ALKYLTIN CHLORIDES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mono- and di-alkyltin chlorides are reactive compounds used in the production of stabilizers for polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastics, primarily used for water distribution pipes. Health effects data were compiled or developed by the manufacturers for the EPA's HPV Challenge progra...

  18. 21 CFR 172.834 - Ethoxylated mono- and diglycerides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ethoxylated mono- and diglycerides. 172.834 Section 172.834 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives §...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1505 - Mono- and diglycerides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... prepared from fats or oils or fat-forming acids that are derived from edible sources. The most prevalent fatty acids include lauric, linoleic, myristic, oleic, palmitic, and stearic. Mono- and diglycerides are manufactured by the reaction of glycerin with fatty acids or the reaction of glycerin with triglycerides in...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1505 - Mono- and diglycerides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... prepared from fats or oils or fat-forming acids that are derived from edible sources. The most prevalent fatty acids include lauric, linoleic, myristic, oleic, palmitic, and stearic. Mono- and diglycerides are manufactured by the reaction of glycerin with fatty acids or the reaction of glycerin with triglycerides in...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1505 - Mono- and diglycerides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... prepared from fats or oils or fat-forming acids that are derived from edible sources. The most prevalent fatty acids include lauric, linoleic, myristic, oleic, palmitic, and stearic. Mono- and diglycerides are manufactured by the reaction of glycerin with fatty acids or the reaction of glycerin with triglycerides in...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1505 - Mono- and diglycerides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... prepared from fats or oils or fat-forming acids that are derived from edible sources. The most prevalent fatty acids include lauric, linoleic, myristic, oleic, palmitic, and stearic. Mono- and diglycerides are manufactured by the reaction of glycerin with fatty acids or the reaction of glycerin with triglycerides in...

  3. IRIS Toxicological Review of Ethylene Glycol Mono Butyl ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has finalized the Toxicological Review of Ethylene Glycol Mono Butyl Ether: in support of the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS). Now final, this assessment may be used by EPA’s program and regional offices to inform decisions to protect human health. N/A

  4. Alkaline Water and Longevity: A Murine Study.

    PubMed

    Magro, Massimiliano; Corain, Livio; Ferro, Silvia; Baratella, Davide; Bonaiuto, Emanuela; Terzo, Milo; Corraducci, Vittorino; Salmaso, Luigi; Vianello, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The biological effect of alkaline water consumption is object of controversy. The present paper presents a 3-year survival study on a population of 150 mice, and the data were analyzed with accelerated failure time (AFT) model. Starting from the second year of life, nonparametric survival plots suggest that mice watered with alkaline water showed a better survival than control mice. Interestingly, statistical analysis revealed that alkaline water provides higher longevity in terms of "deceleration aging factor" as it increases the survival functions when compared with control group; namely, animals belonging to the population treated with alkaline water resulted in a longer lifespan. Histological examination of mice kidneys, intestine, heart, liver, and brain revealed that no significant differences emerged among the three groups indicating that no specific pathology resulted correlated with the consumption of alkaline water. These results provide an informative and quantitative summary of survival data as a function of watering with alkaline water of long-lived mouse models.

  5. Alkaline detergent recycling via ultrafiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Steffani, C.; Meltzer, M.

    1995-06-01

    The metal finishing industry uses alkaline cleaners and detergents to remove oils and dirt from manufactured parts, often before they are painted or plated. The use of these cleaners has grown because environmental regulations are phasing out ozone depleting substances and placing restrictions on the use and disposal of many hazardous solvents. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is examining ultrafiltration as a cleaning approach that reclaims the cleaning solutions and minimizes wastes. The ultrafiltration membrane is made from sheets of polymerized organic film. The sheets are rolled onto a supporting frame and installed in a tube. Spent cleaning solution is pumped into a filter chamber and filtered through the membrane that captures oils and dirt and allows water and detergent to pass. The membrane is monitored and when pressure builds from oil and dirt, an automatic system cleans the surface to maintain solution flow and filtration quality. The results show that the ultrafiltration does not disturb the detergent concentration or alkalinity but removed almost all the oils and dirt leaving the solution in condition to be reused.

  6. Grace DAKASEP alkaline battery separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovannoni, R. T.; Lundquist, J. T.; Choi, W. M.

    1987-01-01

    The Grace DAKASEP separator was originally developed as a wicking layer for nickel-zinc alkaline batteries. The DAKASEP is a filled non-woven separator which is flexible and heat sealable. Through modification of formulation and processing variables, products with a variety of properties can be produced. Variations of DAKASEP were tested in Ni-H2, Ni-Zn, Ni-Cd, and primary alkaline batteries with good results. The properties of DAKASEP which are optimized for Hg-Zn primary batteries are shown in tabular form. This separator has high tensile strength, 12 micron average pore size, relatively low porosity at 46-48 percent, and consequently moderately high resistivity. Versions were produced with greater than 70 percent porosity and resistivities in 33 wt percent KOH as low as 3 ohm cm. Performance data for Hg-Zn E-1 size cells containing DAKASEP with the properties shown in tabular form, are more reproducible than data obtained with a competitive polypropylene non-woven separator. In addition, utilization of active material is in general considerably improved.

  7. Geophysical studies of Mono Lake, east-central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athens, N. D.; Ponce, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetic and gravity investigations were undertaken in Mono Lake, California to study regional crustal structures and to aid understanding the geologic framework of Mono Lake, in particular regarding potential geothermal resources and volcanic hazards throughout Mono Basin. Recent geophysical surveys included over 600 line-kilometers of high-resolution ship-borne magnetometer data that augmented existing airborne data, 22 line-kilometers of ground magnetic data that were collected along six traverses across Paoha Island, 56 gravity stations that were collected on Paoha and Negit Islands, and 28 rock samples that were collected for physical property data. Magnetic highs in the study area occur to the east and west of Mono Lake, where pre-Tertiary basement is exposed. Magnetic data indicate that Mono Lake itself is dominated by three prominent magnetic anomalies that are from west to east: a magnetic high along the northwest part of the lake associated with the moderately magnetic basalt cinder cone at Black Point, a magnetic high associated with the young volcanic centers at Paoha and Negit Islands, and a broad magnetic high along the eastern margin of the lake probably associated with moderately magnetic granitic basement rocks at depth. Because volcanic rocks exposed at the surface of Paoha and Negit Islands are only weakly magnetic, magnetic data suggest that more mafic volcanic rocks probably occur at depth and are the source of the anomaly. The linear and steep magnetic gradient across the eastern part of the lake may reflect a fault. A fault may also be imaged in the northeastern part of the lake, where a possible laterally offset magnetic anomaly may be present. Within Mono Lake, gravity station control is poor because land-based gravity stations are limited to Paoha and Negit Islands. The gravity low in the basin reflects a moderately deep sedimentary basin filled with low density lacustrine and volcanic deposits. Isostatic gravity data indicate the central

  8. Dormant stages of crustaceans as a mechanism of propagation in the extreme and unpredictable environment in the Crimean hypersaline lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadrin, Nickolai V.; Anufriieva, Elena V.; Amat, Francisco; Eremin, Oleg Yu.

    2015-11-01

    A pool of dormant stages of planktonic organisms in saline lakes is a substantial component in the plankton communities; we need to take it into account to understand plankton dynamics. Hypersaline water bodies in Crimea, the largest peninsula in the Black Sea, constitute a very characteristic and peculiar habitat type in the region. We examined the presence of crustacean resting stages in sediments of dried up sites of the Crimean hypersaline lakes. Sediment samples were taken in 9 different lakes. Experiments performed on the hatching of these resting stages showed the presence of Moina salina (Cladocera), parthenogenetic Artemia and Artemia urmiana (Anostraca), Eucypris mareotica ( inflata) (Ostracoda), and Cletocamptus retrogressus (Harpacticoida). Comparing the experimental results obtained with clean dried brine shrimp cysts and those kept in sediment samples, it was noted that clean cysts hatched much faster than those from sediments did. Some components in bottom sediments slow down and desynchronize hatching from resting eggs in different groups of crustaceans. The sediments of different lakes inhibited the nauplii output from Artemia and ostracod resting eggs to different degrees. More data are needed before we can discuss the reasons of this inhibition. The nonsynchronous output of active stages from the bottom resting ones may be an adaptation that allows crustacean species to exist in extreme and unpredictably changing environments, avoiding the risk that all may emerge at once under unsuitable conditions.

  9. Sodium toxicity and pathology associated with exposure of waterfowl to hypersaline playa lakes of southeast New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meteyer, C.U.; Dubielzig, R.D.; Dein, F.J.; Baeten, L.A.; Moore, M.K.; Jehl, J.R.; Wesenberg, K.E.

    1997-01-01

    Cause of mortality was studied in waterfowl in hypersaline playa lakes of southeast New Mexico during spring and fall migration. Mortality was not common in wild ducks resting on the playas during good weather. However, when birds remained on the lakes for prolonged periods of time, such as during experimental trials and stormy weather, a heavy layer of salt precipitated on their feathers. Sodium toxicity was the cause of death for all experimental mallards housed on playa water and for 50% of the wild waterfowl found moribund or dead during the spring of 1995. Gross lesions included heavy salt precipitation on the feathers, ocular lens opacities, deeply congested brains, and dilated, thin-walled, fluid-filled cloacae. Microscopic lesions in the more severely affected birds included liquefaction of ocular lens cortex with lens fiber swelling and multifocal to diffuse ulcerative conjunctivitis with severe granulocytic inflammation, edema, and granulocytic vasculitis resulting in thrombosis. Inflammation similar to that seen in the conjunctiva occasionally involved the mucosa of the mouth, pharynx, nasal turbinates, cloaca, and bursa. Transcorneal movement of water in response to the hypersaline conditions on the playa lakes or direct contact with salt crystals could induce anterior segment dehydration of the aqueous humor and increased osmotic pressure on the lens, leading to cataract formation.

  10. Salt resistance genes revealed by functional metagenomics from brines and moderate-salinity rhizosphere within a hypersaline environment

    PubMed Central

    Mirete, Salvador; Mora-Ruiz, Merit R.; Lamprecht-Grandío, María; de Figueras, Carolina G.; Rosselló-Móra, Ramon; González-Pastor, José E.

    2015-01-01

    Hypersaline environments are considered one of the most extreme habitats on earth and microorganisms have developed diverse molecular mechanisms of adaptation to withstand these conditions. The present study was aimed at identifying novel genes from the microbial communities of a moderate-salinity rhizosphere and brine from the Es Trenc saltern (Mallorca, Spain), which could confer increased salt resistance to Escherichia coli. The microbial diversity assessed by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene libraries revealed the presence of communities that are typical in such environments and the remarkable presence of three bacterial groups never revealed as major components of salt brines. Metagenomic libraries from brine and rhizosphere samples, were transferred to the osmosensitive strain E. coli MKH13, and screened for salt resistance. Eleven genes that conferred salt resistance were identified, some encoding for well-known proteins previously related to osmoadaptation such as a glycerol transporter and a proton pump, whereas others encoded proteins not previously related to this function in microorganisms such as DNA/RNA helicases, an endonuclease III (Nth) and hypothetical proteins of unknown function. Furthermore, four of the retrieved genes were cloned and expressed in Bacillus subtilis and they also conferred salt resistance to this bacterium, broadening the spectrum of bacterial species in which these genes can function. This is the first report of salt resistance genes recovered from metagenomes of a hypersaline environment. PMID:26528268

  11. Syntrophic associations from hypersaline soda lakes converting organic acids and alcohols to methane at extremely haloalkaline conditions.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Abbas, Ben; Geleijnse, Mitchell; Kolganova, Tatjana V; Kleerebezem, Robbert; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2016-09-01

    Until now anaerobic oxidation of VFA at high salt-pH has been demonstrated only at sulfate-reducing conditions. Here, we present results of a microbiological investigation of anaerobic conversion of organic acids and alcohols at methanogenic conditions by syntrophic associations enriched from hypersaline soda lakes in Central Asia. Sediment incubation experiments showed active, albeit very slow, methane formation from acetate, propionate, butyrate and C2 C4 alcohols at pH 10 and various levels of salinity. Enrichments of syntrophic associations using hydrogenotrophic members of the genus Methanocalculus from soda lakes as partners resulted in several highly enriched cultures converting acetate, propionate, butyrate, benzoate and EtOH to methane. Most syntrophs belonged to Firmicutes, while the propionate-oxidizer formed a novel lineage within the family Syntrophobacteraceae in the Deltaproteobacteria. The acetate-oxidizing syntroph was identified as 'Ca. Syntrophonatronum acetioxidans' previously found to oxidize acetate at sulfate-reducing conditions up to salt-saturating concentrations. Butyrate and a benzoate-degrading syntrophs represent novel genus-level lineages in Syntrophomonadales which are proposed as Candidatus taxons 'Syntrophobaca', 'Syntrophocurvum' and 'Syntropholuna'. Overall, despite very slow growth, the results indicated the presence of a functionally competent syntrophic community in hypersaline soda lakes, capable of efficient oxidation of fermentation products to methane at extremely haloalkaline conditions.

  12. Regulation of photosynthesis and oxygen consumption in a hypersaline cyanobacterial mat (Camargue, France) by irradiance, temperature and salinity.

    PubMed

    Wieland, Andrea; Kühl, Michael

    2006-02-01

    Short-term effects of irradiance (0-1560 micromol photons m(-2) s(-1)), temperature (10-25 degrees C), and salinity (40-160) on oxygenic photosynthesis and oxygen consumption in a hypersaline mat (Salin-de-Giraud, France) were investigated with microsensors under controlled laboratory conditions. Dark O(2) consumption rates were mainly regulated by the mass transfer limitations imposed by the diffusive boundary layer. Areal rates of net photosynthesis increased with irradiance and saturated at irradiances >400 micromol photons m(-2) s(-1). At low irradiances, oxygen consumption increased more strongly with temperature than photosynthesis, whereas the opposite was observed at saturating irradiances. Net photosynthesis vs. irradiance curves were almost unaffected by decreasing salinity (100 to 40), whereas increasing salinities (100 to 160) led to a decrease of net photosynthesis at each irradiance. Dark O(2) consumption rates, maximal gross and net photosynthesis at light saturation were relatively constant over a broad salinity range (60-100) and decreased at salinities above the in situ salinity of 100. Within the range of natural variation, temperature was more important than salinity in regulating photosynthesis and oxygen consumption. At higher salinities the inhibitory impact of salinity on these processes and therefore the importance of salinity as a regulating environmental parameter increased, indicating that in more hypersaline systems, salinity has a stronger limiting effect on microbial activity.

  13. Salt resistance genes revealed by functional metagenomics from brines and moderate-salinity rhizosphere within a hypersaline environment.

    PubMed

    Mirete, Salvador; Mora-Ruiz, Merit R; Lamprecht-Grandío, María; de Figueras, Carolina G; Rosselló-Móra, Ramon; González-Pastor, José E

    2015-01-01

    Hypersaline environments are considered one of the most extreme habitats on earth and microorganisms have developed diverse molecular mechanisms of adaptation to withstand these conditions. The present study was aimed at identifying novel genes from the microbial communities of a moderate-salinity rhizosphere and brine from the Es Trenc saltern (Mallorca, Spain), which could confer increased salt resistance to Escherichia coli. The microbial diversity assessed by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene libraries revealed the presence of communities that are typical in such environments and the remarkable presence of three bacterial groups never revealed as major components of salt brines. Metagenomic libraries from brine and rhizosphere samples, were transferred to the osmosensitive strain E. coli MKH13, and screened for salt resistance. Eleven genes that conferred salt resistance were identified, some encoding for well-known proteins previously related to osmoadaptation such as a glycerol transporter and a proton pump, whereas others encoded proteins not previously related to this function in microorganisms such as DNA/RNA helicases, an endonuclease III (Nth) and hypothetical proteins of unknown function. Furthermore, four of the retrieved genes were cloned and expressed in Bacillus subtilis and they also conferred salt resistance to this bacterium, broadening the spectrum of bacterial species in which these genes can function. This is the first report of salt resistance genes recovered from metagenomes of a hypersaline environment.

  14. Quaternary Eruptions of the Mono-Inyo Craters, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bursik, M. I.; Pouget, S.; Mangan, M.; Marcaida, M.; Vazquez, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    The eruptive products of the Mono-Inyo Craters volcanic chain include the tephra and associated volcanic rocks of Black Point, islands of Mono Lake, Mono Craters, Inyo Craters, late eruptions of Mammoth Mountain and Red Cones. Most of the eruptions were explosive, and generated numerous pyroclastic flows, surges and falls as well as the prominent domes and lava flows that now cover vents. The eruptions range in age from several hundred years to at least 60,000 yr BP. The Mono-Inyo tephras are dispersed throughout the Sierra Nevada and Basin and Range, providing key time-stratigraphic marker layers. Recent work has not only resulted in high-precision radiometric dating of many of the tephras, but also detailed geochemical data that for the first time provides fingerprinting sufficiently precise to discriminate among the tephras. Lithostratigraphy of many of the layers is herein described for the first time, based on careful sampling and description in the field, and laboratory grain size, grain shape and componentry analyses of the late Pleistocene tephras of the Wilson Creek Formation. Most of the Wilson Creek volcanic layers are fall deposits accumulated within paleolake Russell, which were generated by eruptions of variable intensity and influenced by paleowinds of different orientation. Prevailing winds were generally to the North and East, but often the Pleistocene layers less than 25 ka were dispersed to the West. Many of the fall layers show evidence of wave reworking, generally near the top, although in some cases it is pervasive. Only near the vent do some layers of apparent debris flow origin occur. Maximum pumice sizes range up to nearly 3 cm, and lithics range up to 1 cm in the rhyolitic fall beds, while thicknesses range up to c. 30 cm. These data are consistent with relatively low volume, subplinian style eruptive behavior for most of the life of the Mono-Inyo Craters.

  15. Alkaline and alkaline earth metal phosphate halides and phosphors

    DOEpatents

    Lyons, Robert Joseph; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Cleaver, Robert John

    2012-11-13

    Compounds, phosphor materials and apparatus related to nacaphite family of materials are presented. Potassium and rubidium based nacaphite family compounds and phosphors designed by doping divalent rare earth elements in the sites of alkaline earth metals in the nacaphite material families are descried. An apparatus comprising the phosphors based on the nacaphite family materials are presented herein. The compounds presented is of formula A.sub.2B.sub.1-yR.sub.yPO.sub.4X where the elements A, B, R, X and suffix y are defined such that A is potassium, rubidium, or a combination of potassium and rubidium and B is calcium, strontium, barium, or a combination of any of calcium, strontium and barium. X is fluorine, chlorine, or a combination of fluorine and chlorine, R is europium, samarium, ytterbium, or a combination of any of europium, samarium, and ytterbium, and y ranges from 0 to about 0.1.

  16. Chemical evolution of shallow groundwater along the northeast shore of Mono Lake, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connell, Tracy L.; Dreiss, Shirley J.

    We attempted to quantitatively discriminate between hypothesized sources and geochemical processes responsible for the chemical evolution of shallow groundwater along the northeast shore of Mono Lake, an alkaline saline lake located in a hydrologically closed basin in east central California. Shallow groundwater samples from 17 sites perpendicular and 11 sites parallel to the lakeshore were analyzed for major ions. The shallow groundwater contains remnant solutes from higher lake stands, which are transported toward the lake by lateral flow and surface runoff. The flow system appears to be segregated into two different regions: a concentrated, highly saline groundwater underlying much of the northeast shore and pockets of more localized lower-salinity groundwater. The saturation state of the groundwater with respect to certain minerals was determined, and simulations for both evaporative concentration of inflow and mixing of lake water with inflow coupled with mineral precipitation were performed. Solute trends in the shallow groundwater result primarily from the degree of mixing with historical lake water; however, evaporative concentration and redissolution cycles along with various chemical fractionation mechanisms including Ca, Mg, and Na carbonate precipitation, sulfate reduction, ion exchange, and potentially Mg silicate formation are also important controls.

  17. Aerobic methane oxidation and methanotroph community composition during seasonal stratification in Mono Lake, California (USA).

    PubMed

    Carini, Stephen; Bano, Nasreen; LeCleir, Gary; Joye, Samantha B

    2005-08-01

    Patterns of aerobic methane (CH4) oxidation and associated methanotroph community composition were investigated during the development of seasonal stratification in Mono Lake, California (USA). CH4 oxidation rates were measured using a tritiated CH4 radiotracer technique. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and sequence analysis were used to characterize methanotroph community composition. A temporally shifting zone of elevated CH4 oxidation (59-123 nM day(-1)) was consistently associated with a suboxycline, microaerophilic zone that migrated upwards in the water column as stratification progressed. FISH analysis revealed stable numbers of type I (4.1-9.3 x 10(5) cells ml(-1)) and type II (1.4-3.4 x 10(5) cells ml(-1)) methanotrophs over depth and over time. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequence analysis indicated slight shifts in methanotroph community composition despite stable absolute cell numbers. Variable CH4 oxidation rates in the presence of a relatively stable methanotroph population suggested that zones of high CH4 oxidation resulted from an increase in activity of a subset of the existing methanotroph population. These results challenge existing paradigms suggesting that zones of elevated CH4 oxidation activity result from the accumulation of methanotrophic biomass and illustrate that type II methanotrophs may be an important component of the methanotroph population in saline and/or alkaline pelagic environments.

  18. Rare earth element and uranium-thorium variations in tufa deposits from the Mono Basin, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, E. S.; Tomascak, P. B.; Hemming, N.; Hemming, S. R.; Rasbury, T.; Stine, S.; Zimmerman, S. R.

    2009-12-01

    Samples of fossil tufa deposits from several localities in the Mono Basin, eastern California, were analyzed for trace element concentrations in order to better understand changes in lake composition in the past. These deposits were formed during the last glacial cycle, mostly during deglaciation (Benson et al., 1990, PPP). Three elevations are represented by the analyses. Samples from near Highway 167 were sampled between 2063 and 2069 m asl. Samples from near Thompson Road were sampled between 2015 and 2021 m. One layered mound was sampled at 1955 m. Concentrations of the lanthanide rare earth elements (REE), in particular the heavy/light (HREE/LREE) distributions, have been shown to be sensitive to alkalinity in modern saline lakes (e.g., Johannesson et al., 1994, GRL, 21, 773-776), and the same has been suggested for U/Th (Anderson et al., 1982, Science, 216, 514-516). Holocene to near-modern tufa towers exist in shallow water and around the current shoreline (1945 m). Tufa towers above 2000 m include a characteristic morphology termed thinolite, interpreted to represent pseudomorphs after the very cold water mineral ikaite. Most lower elevation towers do not have the thinolite morphology, but some layered tufa mounds at low elevations include several layers of thinolite, such as the one sampled for this project. Analyses were made on millimeter-scale bulk samples from tufa towers. Measurements were made on sample solutions with a Varian 820MS quadrupole ICP-MS. Mono Basin tufa samples have total REE concentrations ranging from 0.029 to 0.77 times average shales. Samples have flat to moderately HREE-enriched shale-normalized patterns with limited overall variability ([La/Lu]SN of 1.8 to 9.6) but with some variability in the slope of the HREE portion of the patterns. Tufa towers sampled from three elevations have (Gd/Lu)SN of 0.40 to 1.5. The REE patterns of most samples have small positive Ce anomalies, but a minority of samples, all from the layered tufa mound

  19. Lanthanide behavior in hypersaline evaporation ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California, Mexico - an environment with halophiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choumiline, K.; López-Cortés, A.; Grajeda-Muñoz, M.; Shumilin, E.; Sapozhnikov, D.

    2013-12-01

    Lanthanides are known, in some cases, to be sensitive to changes in water column or sediment chemistry, a fact that allows them to be used as environmental fingerprints. Nevertheless, the behavior of these elements in hypersaline environments is insufficiently understood, especially in those colonized by bacteria, archaea and eukarya halophiles. Extreme environments like the mentioned exist in the artificially-controlled ponds of the 'Exportadora de Sal' salt-producing enterprise located in Guerrero Negro (Baja California, Mexico). Sediment cores from various ponds were collected, subsampled and measured by ICP-MS and INAA. This allowed differencing the behavior of lanthanides and trace elements under a water column salinity gradient along the evaporation sequence of ponds. Sediment profiles (30 mm long), obtained in Pond 5, dominated by Ca and Mg precipitation and at the same time rich in organic matter due to bacterial mat presence, showed highs and lows of the shale-normalized patterns along different in-core depths. Two groups of elements could be distinguished with similar trends: set A (La, Ce, Pr and Nd) and set B (Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Lu). The first 'group A' had two prominent peaks at 15 mm and around 22 mm, whereas the 'group B' showed only slight increase at 15 mm and none at 22 mm. Microscopic analyses of prokaryotic cells of a stratified mat in Pond 5 (collected in 2004) showed filamentous bacteria and cyanobacteria with a cell abundance and morphotype richness maxima of prokaryotic cells in a chemocline from 3 mm to 7 mm depth which co-exists nine morphotypes of aerobic and anaerobic prokaryotes Microcoleus chthonoplastes, Leptolyngbya, Cyanothece, Geitlerinema, Spirulina, Chloroflexus, Beggiatoa, Chromatium and Thioploca. Below the 7 mm depth, oxygenic photosynthesis depletes and sulfur reducing compounds increase. The highs of the shale-normalized lanthanide contents of the 'group A' (at 15 mm depth) seem to correlate with the

  20. Hypersaline Subsurface Microbial Communities from the Dead Sea Viewed from Their Metagenomes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C.; Ionescu, D.; Ariztegui, D.

    2014-12-01

    The Dead Sea Deep Drilling Project (DSDDP) is an international research initiative aiming to reconstruct the paleoenvironmental and paleoseismic history of the Dead Sea Basin (DSB) in the Levantine region. Within this framework, analysis of microbial communities intend to qualify the extent of life in this extreme environment, the factors allowing its development and their contribution to the sedimentary and geochemical record. The extreme chemistry of the Dead Sea prevents the use of common in situ imaging techniques leaving little information on the general activity of the subsurface biosphere. Cloning and metagenomic techniques have however been implemented at different levels of a 457 m deep core. Results suggest a differential development or survival of the microbial community along the sedimentary column. Reasons for such distribution remain unclear but cannot only be imparted to salinity. Poorly known communities (e.g. Candidate Divisions MSBL1 and KB1) with strong potential for adaptations to anoxic hypersaline environments are recovered in some intervals. Halobacteria classes generally dominate the assemblages. Metagenomic data allowed characterizing their presence in two evaporitic facies of the core (aragonite at 2.7 m and gypsum at 90.6 m below lake floor), where they exhibit both salt-in and salt-out strategies to cope with the high salinities of the Dead Sea. Metabolisms are also adapted to the high heavy metal concentrations and low nutrient availability in the sediment. Although more work is needed in order to infer the impact of these microorganisms on the sediment and element cycles, indices of methanogenesis, fermentation and sulfate reducing activity imply influence on the carbon and sulfur cycle of the Dead Sea subsurface. This is highlighted by traces of microbial degradation of organic matter viewed under SEM, and by the formation of euhedral Fe-S mineralizations as a result of reduction of sulfur. Overall, this work calls for the importance

  1. Spatially-resolved stable isotope analysis of a hypersaline microbial mat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, J.; Cory, A. B.; Lindemann, S. R.; Fredrickson, J. K.

    2012-12-01

    Hot Lake is a hypersaline, meromictic lake located in north-central Washington. High rates of evapotranspiration coupled with its location in an endorrheic basin contribute to the lake's high salinity. The predominant dissolved salt is magnesium sulfate; hypolimnion waters may seasonally exceed 2 M magnesium sulfate concentrations. In addition to extreme salinity, horizons within the lake seasonally exceed 50 °C, in part due to the enhanced light absorption by magnesium sulfate-saturated water. Despite extreme and highly variable seasonal conditions (salinity, temperature, photon flux), dense benthic microbial mats composed of cyanobacteria and bacterial heterotroph populations develop annually at the lake. These mats may exceed 5 mm in thickness and display stratification observable by eye associated with dominant bacterial phototrophic pigments. Typical mat stratification includes an orange surface layer followed by green and purple layers at increasing depth into the mat. Carbonates including aragonite and magnesite are observed within the mat and their formation is likely induced or influenced by microbial activities. While not exclusively limited to the green stratum in the mat, maximum carbonate content is within this layer. We are exploring the role Hot Lake's microbial mats play in carbon cycling within the system. Namely, we seek to understand the rates of carbon accumulation in the mat and associated sediments and the various forms this carbon takes (organic or inorganic species). We are assessing mat development, community composition, and carbon accumulation in pre-cleaned devices installed at the lake as they are colonized by native mat. We are using laser ablation isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LA-IRMS) to provide spatially-resolved stable isotope analysis of mat cross-sections. Currently, this technique permits isotope analysis at the 50 μm scale, and can provide multiple isotope analyses within the thickness of each major layer of the mat. We

  2. Diversity, distribution, and morphological deformities among living Foraminifera in hypersaline Salwa Bay, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olalekan Amao, Abduljamiu; Kaminski, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The Arabian Gulf is considered a naturally stressed environment due to extremes of salinity and summer temperatures. Anthropogenic influences such as rapid urbanisation projects, maritime transport, and large numbers of desalination plants and oil-related activities compounds the problem. Foraminifera are known to be resilient under such stressful conditions. The purpose of our study is to document the foraminiferal diversity and abundance in the hypersaline Salwa Bay area, near the Saudi Arabian-Qatar Border. We expect the foraminiferal fauna in Salwa Bay to be adapted to extremes in salinity, and we wish to document any species that might be endemic or uniquely adapted to the area. Shannon-Wiener index, relative abundance, species richness, and the percentage of morphological deformities were determined for samples collected from the bay. Salwa Bay is the most saline extension of the Arabian Gulf with high salinity, water temperature and evaporation rate, which is attributed to slow flushing rates, coral reef barriers and higher residency time of the water. Environmental parameters measured at the time of collection were depth (10-110 cm), salinity (52.6-53.0) total dissolved solids (48.8-49.4 g/l), and temperature (27-27.6°C). The foraminiferal assemblages in Salwa Bay are dominated by porcelaneous foraminifera, which include Peneroplis pertusus, Peneroplis planatus, Coscinospira hemprichii and Coscinospira acicularis. The most common species across the sampled transect is Peneroplis pertusus. Hyaline species were also found, but agglutinated foraminifera are absent. Diversity in Salwa Bay is lower compared with localities that have "normal" salinity, and many of the foraminifera display conspicuous morphological deformities. Approximately 55% of the assemblage exhibits mild to severe deformities such as fusion of two adults or double tests, protuberance on the spiral side, abnormal arrangement of the chambers, abnormal shape of the proloculus and modification

  3. Productivity Estimation of Hypersaline Microbial Mat Communities - Diurnal Cycles of Dissolved Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Less, G.; Cohen, Y.; Luz, B.; Lazar, B.

    2002-05-01

    Hypersaline microbial mat communities (MMC) are the modern equivalents of the Archean stromatolities, the first photosynthetic organisms on Earth. An estimate of their oxygen production rate is important to the understanding of oxygen evolution on Earth ca. 2 b.y.b.p. Here we use the diurnal cycle of dissolved oxygen, O2/Ar ratio and the isotopic composition of dissolved oxygen to calculate net and gross primary productivity of MMC growing in a large scale (80 m2) experimental pan. The pan is inoculated with MMC taken from the Solar Lake, Sinai, Egypt and filled with 90\\permil evaporated Red Sea water brine up to a depth of ca. 0.25 m. It is equipped with computerized flow through system that is programmed to pump pan water at selected time intervals into a sampling cell fitted with dissolved oxygen, pH, conductivity and temperature sensors connected to a datalogger. Manual brine samples were taken for calibrating the sensors, mass spectrometric analyses and for measurements of additional relevant parameters. Dissolved oxygen concentrations fluctuate during the diurnal cycle being highly supersaturated except for the end of the night. The O2 curve varies seasonally and has a typical "shark fin" shape due to the MMC metabolic response to the shape of the diurnal light curve. The dissolved oxygen data were fitted to a smooth curve that its time derivative (dO2 /dt) is defined as: Z dO2 /dt=GP-R-k(O2(meas)- O2(sat)) where z is the depth (m); GP and R are the MMC gross production and respiration (mol m-2 d-1), respectively; k is the gas exchange coefficient (m d-1); O2(meas) and O2(sat) (mol L-1) are the measured and equilibrium dissolved oxygen concentrations, respectively. The high resolution sampling of the automated system produces O2 curves that enable the calculation of smooth and reliable time derivatives. The calculations yield net production values that vary between 1,000 10-6 to -100 10-6 mol O2 m-2 h-1 and day respiration rates between 60 10-6 to 30 10

  4. Distribution of picophytoplankton communities from brackish to hypersaline waters in a South Australian coastal lagoon

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Picophytoplankton (i.e. cyanobacteria and pico-eukaryotes) are abundant and ecologically critical components of the autotrophic communities in the pelagic realm. These micro-organisms colonized a variety of extreme environments including high salinity waters. However, the distribution of these organisms along strong salinity gradient has barely been investigated. The abundance and community structure of cyanobacteria and pico-eukaryotes were investigated along a natural continuous salinity gradient (1.8% to 15.5%) using flow cytometry. Results Highest picophytoplankton abundances were recorded under salinity conditions ranging between 8.0% and 11.0% (1.3 × 106 to 1.4 × 106 cells ml-1). Two populations of picocyanobacteria (likely Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus) and 5 distinct populations of pico-eukaryotes were identified along the salinity gradient. The picophytoplankton cytometric-richness decreased with salinity and the most cytometrically diversified community (4 to 7 populations) was observed in the brackish-marine part of the lagoon (i.e. salinity below 3.5%). One population of pico-eukaryote dominated the community throughout the salinity gradient and was responsible for the bloom observed between 8.0% and 11.0%. Finally only this halotolerant population and Prochlorococcus-like picocyanobacteria were identified in hypersaline waters (i.e. above 14.0%). Salinity was identified as the main factor structuring the distribution of picophytoplankton along the lagoon. However, nutritive conditions, viral lysis and microzooplankton grazing are also suggested as potentially important players in controlling the abundance and diversity of picophytoplankton along the lagoon. Conclusions The complex patterns described here represent the first observation of picophytoplankton dynamics along a continuous gradient where salinity increases from 1.8% to 15.5%. This result provides new insight into the distribution of pico-autotrophic organisms along strong

  5. [Carotenogenesis of five strains of the algae Dunaliella sp. (Chlorophyceae) isolated from Venezuelan hypersaline lagoons].

    PubMed

    Guevara, Miguel; Lodeiros, César; Gómez, Olga; Lemus, Nathalie; Núñez, Paulino; Romero, Lolymar; Vásquez, Aléikar; Rosales, Néstor

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated discontinuous cultures (Algal medium at 0.5 mM of NaNO3, and 27% NaCI) of five strains of Dunaliella sp. isolated from Venezuelan hypersaline lagoons (Araya, Coche, Peonia, Cumaraguas. and Boca Chica) and one strain from a reference collection (Dunaliella salina, LB1644). Cultures were maintained to 25+/-1 degrees C, with constant aeration, photoperiod 12:12, and two light intensities (195 and 390 microE.m(-2).s(-1)) during 30 days. Cell count was recorded on a daily basis using a Neubaüer camera. Totals of chlorophyll a and carotenoids were measured at the end of the experiment. The largest cellular densities were measured during the smallest light intensities. The strain with the largest cellular density was isolated from Boca Chica (8 xl0(6) and 2.5 xl0(6) cel.ml(-1) a 390 and 195microE.m(-2).s(-1), respectively). The increment of light intensity produced a significant reduction of growth rates in all strains. Totals of carotenoids by volume were as large as 390 microE.m(-2).s(-1). Strains LB 1644, from Coche and Araya were those that produced the largest amount of carotenoids (38.4; 32.8 and 21.0 microg.ml(-1), respectively). Differences total carotenoids by cell between treatments were significant. The largest concentration was 390 microE.m(-2).s(-1). The strains LB 1644 and Coche produced the highest values of carotenes (137.14 and 106.06 pg.cel(-1), respectively). Differences in the relation carotenoid:chlorophyll a between the strains at various light intensities was significant. Strains LB1644 presented the largest value of the relation carotenoids:chlorophyll a (20:1) at 195 microE.m(-2).s(-1). No significant differences were detected in the strain Coche (15:1). All the other strains showed relations lower than one. Our results suggest that the strains of Coche and Araya show potential to be used in the biotechnology of carotenoids production.

  6. Amino Acid Coding Bias of the Hypersaline Dead Sea on an Environmental Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, M. E.; Fitz-Gibbon, S.; Bodaker, I.; Beja, O.; Oren, A.; House, C.

    2008-12-01

    relatively diverse hypersaline environment to one in which only the most extreme of hyperhalophiles could cope. It also suggests that the amino acid composition of the microbial community of an environment can serve as a proxy for salinity and potentially other environmental factors as well.

  7. Characterization of Sporohalobacter salinus sp. nov., an anaerobic, halophilic, fermentative bacterium isolated from a hypersaline lake.

    PubMed

    Ben Abdallah, Manel; Karray, Fatma; Mhiri, Najla; Cayol, Jean-Luc; Tholozan, Jean-Luc; Alazard, Didier; Sayadi, Sami

    2015-02-01

    Halophilic, obligately anaerobic, Gram-stain-negative bacterial strains were isolated from a sediment sample taken from under the salt crust of El-Jerid hypersaline lake in southern Tunisia by using tryptone or glucose as the substrate. One strain, CEJFT1B(T), was characterized phenotypically and phylogenetically. Cells were non-motile, non-spore-forming, short rods. Strain CEJFT1B(T) was able to grow in the presence of 5-30 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum 20 %) and at 30-60 °C (optimum 45 °C). It grew at pH 5.5-7.8 and the optimum pH for growth was 6.8. The isolate required yeast extract for growth. Substrates utilized by strain CEJFT1B(T) as the sole carbon source included glucose, fructose, sucrose, pyruvate, Casamino acids and starch. Individual amino acids such as glutamate, lysine, methionine, serine, tyrosine, and amino acid mixtures formed by the Stickland reaction such as alanine-glycine, valine-proline, leucine-proline, isoleucine-proline were also utilized. Products of glucose fermentation were acetate (major product), butyrate, H2 and CO2. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain CEJFT1B(T) was 32.3 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain CEJFT1B(T) should be assigned to the genus Sporohalobacter. The sequence similarity between strain CEJFT1B(T) and Sporohalobacter lortetii was 98.5 %, but DNA-DNA hybridization between the two strains revealed a relatedness value of 56.4 %, indicating that they are not related at the species level. The combination of phylogenetic analysis, DNA-DNA hybridization data, and differences in substrate utilization support the view that strain CEJFT1B(T) represents a novel species of the genus Sporohalobacter, for which the name Sporohalobacter salinus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CEJFT1B(T) ( = DSM 26781(T) = JCM 19279(T)).

  8. A proteomic investigation of Fusobacterium nucleatum alkaline-induced biofilms

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Gram negative anaerobe Fusobacterium nucleatum has been implicated in the aetiology of periodontal diseases. Although frequently isolated from healthy dental plaque, its numbers and proportion increase in plaque associated with disease. One of the significant physico-chemical changes in the diseased gingival sulcus is increased environmental pH. When grown under controlled conditions in our laboratory, F. nucleatum subspecies polymorphum formed mono-culture biofilms when cultured at pH 8.2. Biofilm formation is a survival strategy for bacteria, often associated with altered physiology and increased virulence. A proteomic approach was used to understand the phenotypic changes in F. nucleatum cells associated with alkaline induced biofilms. The proteomic based identification of significantly altered proteins was verified where possible using additional methods including quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), enzyme assay, acidic end-product analysis, intracellular polyglucose assay and Western blotting. Results Of 421 proteins detected on two-dimensional electrophoresis gels, spot densities of 54 proteins varied significantly (p < 0.05) in F. nucleatum cultured at pH 8.2 compared to growth at pH 7.4. Proteins that were differentially produced in biofilm cells were associated with the functional classes; metabolic enzymes, transport, stress response and hypothetical proteins. Our results suggest that biofilm cells were more metabolically efficient than planktonic cells as changes to amino acid and glucose metabolism generated additional energy needed for survival in a sub-optimal environment. The intracellular concentration of stress response proteins including heat shock protein GroEL and recombinational protein RecA increased markedly in the alkaline environment. A significant finding was the increased abundance of an adhesin, Fusobacterial outer membrane protein A (FomA). This surface protein is known for its capacity to bind to a vast number of

  9. Expression of key ion transporters in the gill and esophageal-gastrointestinal tract of euryhaline Mozambique tilapia Oreochromis mossambicus acclimated to fresh water, seawater and hypersaline water.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengjun; Lui, Eei Yin; Wilson, Jonathan M; Ip, Yuen Kwong; Lin, Qingsong; Lam, Toong Jin; Lam, Siew Hong

    2014-01-01

    The ability of euryhaline Mozambique tilapia to tolerate extreme environmental salinities makes it an excellent model for investigating iono-regulation. This study aimed to characterize and fill important information gap of the expression levels of key ion transporters for Na(+) and Cl(-) in the gill and esophageal-gastrointestinal tract of Mozambique tilapia acclimated to freshwater (0 ppt), seawater (30 ppt) and hypersaline (70 ppt) environments. Among the seven genes studied, it was found that nkcc2, nkcc1a, cftr, nka-α1 and nka-α3, were more responsive to salinity challenge than nkcc1b and ncc within the investigated tissues. The ncc expression was restricted to gills of freshwater-acclimated fish while nkcc2 expression was restricted to intestinal segments irrespective of salinity challenge. Among the tissues investigated, gill and posterior intestine were found to be highly responsive to salinity changes, followed by anterior and middle intestine. Both esophagus and stomach displayed significant up-regulation of nka-α1 and nka-α3, but not nkcc isoforms and cftr, in hypersaline-acclimated fish suggesting a response to hypersalinity challenge and involvement of other forms of transporters in iono-regulation. Changes in gene expression levels were partly corroborated by immunohistochemical localization of transport proteins. Apical expression of Ncc was found in Nka-immunoreactive cells in freshwater-acclimated gills while Nkcc co-localized with Nka-immunoreactive cells expressing Cftr apically in seawater- and hypersaline-acclimated gills. In the intestine, Nkcc-stained apical brush border was found in Nka-immunoreactive cells at greater levels under hypersaline conditions. These findings provided new insights into the responsiveness of these genes and tissues under hypersalinity challenge, specifically the posterior intestine being vital for salt absorption and iono-osmoregulation in the Mozambique tilapia; its ability to survive in hypersalinity may be in

  10. Expression of Key Ion Transporters in the Gill and Esophageal-Gastrointestinal Tract of Euryhaline Mozambique Tilapia Oreochromis mossambicus Acclimated to Fresh Water, Seawater and Hypersaline Water

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhengjun; Lui, Eei Yin; Wilson, Jonathan M.; Ip, Yuen Kwong; Lin, Qingsong; Lam, Toong Jin; Lam, Siew Hong

    2014-01-01

    The ability of euryhaline Mozambique tilapia to tolerate extreme environmental salinities makes it an excellent model for investigating iono-regulation. This study aimed to characterize and fill important information gap of the expression levels of key ion transporters for Na+ and Cl− in the gill and esophageal-gastrointestinal tract of Mozambique tilapia acclimated to freshwater (0 ppt), seawater (30 ppt) and hypersaline (70 ppt) environments. Among the seven genes studied, it was found that nkcc2, nkcc1a, cftr, nka-α1 and nka-α3, were more responsive to salinity challenge than nkcc1b and ncc within the investigated tissues. The ncc expression was restricted to gills of freshwater-acclimated fish while nkcc2 expression was restricted to intestinal segments irrespective of salinity challenge. Among the tissues investigated, gill and posterior intestine were found to be highly responsive to salinity changes, followed by anterior and middle intestine. Both esophagus and stomach displayed significant up-regulation of nka-α1 and nka-α3, but not nkcc isoforms and cftr, in hypersaline-acclimated fish suggesting a response to hypersalinity challenge and involvement of other forms of transporters in iono-regulation. Changes in gene expression levels were partly corroborated by immunohistochemical localization of transport proteins. Apical expression of Ncc was found in Nka-immunoreactive cells in freshwater-acclimated gills while Nkcc co-localized with Nka-immunoreactive cells expressing Cftr apically in seawater- and hypersaline-acclimated gills. In the intestine, Nkcc-stained apical brush border was found in Nka-immunoreactive cells at greater levels under hypersaline conditions. These findings provided new insights into the responsiveness of these genes and tissues under hypersalinity challenge, specifically the posterior intestine being vital for salt absorption and iono-osmoregulation in the Mozambique tilapia; its ability to survive in hypersalinity may be in

  11. 40 CFR 721.8340 - Mono esters from 2- propenoic acid (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mono esters from 2- propenoic acid... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8340 Mono esters from 2- propenoic acid (generic). (a) Chemical... as mono esters from 2-propenoic acid (PMN P-01-85) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  12. 40 CFR 721.8340 - Mono esters from 2- propenoic acid (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mono esters from 2- propenoic acid... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8340 Mono esters from 2- propenoic acid (generic). (a) Chemical... as mono esters from 2-propenoic acid (PMN P-01-85) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  13. 40 CFR 721.8340 - Mono esters from 2- propenoic acid (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mono esters from 2- propenoic acid... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8340 Mono esters from 2- propenoic acid (generic). (a) Chemical... as mono esters from 2-propenoic acid (PMN P-01-85) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  14. 21 CFR 172.824 - Sodium mono- and dimethyl naphthalene sulfonates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium mono- and dimethyl naphthalene sulfonates... sulfonates. The food additive sodium mono- and dimethyl naphthalene sulfonates may be safely used in... statement declaring the presence of sodium mono- and dimethyl naphthalene sulfonates....

  15. 21 CFR 172.824 - Sodium mono- and dimethyl naphthalene sulfonates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium mono- and dimethyl naphthalene sulfonates... sulfonates. The food additive sodium mono- and dimethyl naphthalene sulfonates may be safely used in... statement declaring the presence of sodium mono- and dimethyl naphthalene sulfonates....

  16. 40 CFR 747.115 - Mixed mono and diamides of an organic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mixed mono and diamides of an organic... Substances § 747.115 Mixed mono and diamides of an organic acid. This section identifies activities with... subject to this section: P-84-529, mixed mono and diamides of an organic acid. (b)...

  17. 40 CFR 747.115 - Mixed mono and diamides of an organic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mixed mono and diamides of an organic... Substances § 747.115 Mixed mono and diamides of an organic acid. This section identifies activities with... subject to this section: P-84-529, mixed mono and diamides of an organic acid. (b)...

  18. 40 CFR 747.115 - Mixed mono and diamides of an organic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mixed mono and diamides of an organic... Substances § 747.115 Mixed mono and diamides of an organic acid. This section identifies activities with... subject to this section: P-84-529, mixed mono and diamides of an organic acid. (b)...

  19. 40 CFR 747.115 - Mixed mono and diamides of an organic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mixed mono and diamides of an organic... Substances § 747.115 Mixed mono and diamides of an organic acid. This section identifies activities with... subject to this section: P-84-529, mixed mono and diamides of an organic acid. (b)...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1101 - Diacetyl tartaric acid esters of mono- and diglycerides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Diacetyl tartaric acid esters of mono- and... acid esters of mono- and diglycerides. (a) Diacetyl tartaric acid esters of mono- and diglycerides, also know as DATEM, are composed of mixed esters of glycerin in which one or more of the...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1101 - Diacetyl tartaric acid esters of mono- and diglycerides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Diacetyl tartaric acid esters of mono- and... acid esters of mono- and diglycerides. (a) Diacetyl tartaric acid esters of mono- and diglycerides, also know as DATEM, are composed of mixed esters of glycerin in which one or more of the...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1101 - Diacetyl tartaric acid esters of mono- and diglycerides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Diacetyl tartaric acid esters of mono- and... acid esters of mono- and diglycerides. (a) Diacetyl tartaric acid esters of mono- and diglycerides, also know as DATEM, are composed of mixed esters of glycerin in which one or more of the...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1101 - Diacetyl tartaric acid esters of mono- and diglycerides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Diacetyl tartaric acid esters of mono- and... acid esters of mono- and diglycerides. (a) Diacetyl tartaric acid esters of mono- and diglycerides, also know as DATEM, are composed of mixed esters of glycerin in which one or more of the...

  4. 40 CFR 721.8340 - Mono esters from 2- propenoic acid (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mono esters from 2- propenoic acid... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8340 Mono esters from 2- propenoic acid (generic). (a) Chemical... as mono esters from 2-propenoic acid (PMN P-01-85) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1101 - Diacetyl tartaric acid esters of mono- and diglycerides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Diacetyl tartaric acid esters of mono- and... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1101 Diacetyl tartaric acid esters of mono- and diglycerides. (a) Diacetyl tartaric acid esters of mono- and diglycerides, also know as DATEM, are composed of mixed...

  6. 40 CFR 721.8340 - Mono esters from 2- propenoic acid (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mono esters from 2- propenoic acid... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8340 Mono esters from 2- propenoic acid (generic). (a) Chemical... as mono esters from 2-propenoic acid (PMN P-01-85) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  7. Magmatic storage conditions along the Mono Craters chain, Eastern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, M.; Befus, K.; Gardner, J. E.

    2012-12-01

    We employ a variety of petrologic tools to characterize the pre-eruptive storage conditions of individual units erupted from Mono Craters. The Mono Craters chain represents one of the systems within the Long Valley volcanic field in Eastern California, which has been a regional center for effusive to cataclysmic volcanism from 800 ka until recent times. The Long Valley system has been the focus of much research; however, there are little published petrologic data for the Mono Craters chain. Understanding the Mono Craters chain is critical because it was the center for the most recent eruptions in the region. Eruptions along the chain occurred from 20 ka to ~660 years ago, and it is the most likely focus for future volcanic activity in the Long Valley region. Thus, petrologic data from Mono Craters must provide excellent constraints on the development and nature of the existing magmatic system. The Mono Craters chain contains 27 high silica rhyolite domes and flows and 1 dacite dome that were erupted along a gently arcuate trend that extends for ~15 km south of Mono Lake. The high silica rhyolites can be subdivided based on phenocryst assemblages into the following groups: biotite-bearing rhyolite, orthopyroxene-bearing rhyolite, fayalite-bearing rhyolite, sparsely porphyritic rhyolite, and aphyric rhyolite. We collected samples from 14 of the domes and flows within the Mono Craters chain, obtaining samples from each of the groups except the orthopyroxene-bearing rhyolite. We examined the composition of the mineral phases using electron microprobe analyses. Biotite-bearing rhyolites contain phenocrysts of quartz, plagioclase (Ab74-77), sanidine (Or66-68), Fe-rich hornblende, Ti-rich biotite, pyroxene, and magnetite with lamellae of ilmenite. Fayalite-bearing rhyolites contain phenocrysts of quartz, plagioclase (Ab75-80), sanidine (Or61-69), fayalite (Fa92-93), Fe-rich hornblende, Ti-rich biotite, pyroxene, magnetite and ilmenite. Sparsely porphyritic rhyolites

  8. The Magma Transport System of the Mono Craters, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, M. R.; Putirka, K. D.

    2013-12-01

    The Mono Craters are a series of 28 volcanic domes, coulees, and craters, just 16 km north of Long Valley. The magmatic products of the Mono Craters include mostly small magmatic bodies, sills, and dikes set in a transtensional tectonic setting. New high-density sampling of the domes reveals a wider range of magma compositions than heretofore recognized, and thus reveals what is likely a more complex magmatic system, involving a greater number of batches of magma and a more complex magma storage/delivery system. Here, we present a model for the magma plumbing system based on space-composition patterns and preliminary estimates of crystallization temperatures and pressures based on olivine-, feldspar- and clinopyroxene-liquid equilibria. Whole rock analyses show three compositionally distinct batches of magma within the Mono Craters proper: a felsic (73-78.4% SiO2), intermediate (64.4-68% SiO2) and mafic (52.7-61% SiO2) group. The Mono Lake Islands (Paoha and Negit) fall into the intermediate group, but contain distinctly lower TiO2 and Fe2O3 at a given SiO2 compared to all other Mono Craters; on this basis, we surmise that the Paoha and Negit eruptions represent a distinct episode of magmatism that is not directly related to the magmatic activity that created the Mono Craters proper. The discontinuous nature of the three groups indicates that magma mixing, while evident to some degree within and between certain domes, did not encompass the entire range of compositions at any given time. The three groups, however, do form a rough linear trend, and some subsets of domes have compositions that fall on distinctly linear (if still discontinuous) trends that cannot be reproduced by fractional crystallization, but rather are indicative of magma mixing. Our high-density sampling also reveals interesting geographical patterns: for example, felsic magmas erupt throughout the entire Mono Craters chain, erupting at a wide range of temperatures, ranging from 650-995°C, but

  9. Anosmia in Alkaline Battery Workers

    PubMed Central

    Adams, R. G.; Crabtree, Norman

    1961-01-01

    The sense of smell of 106 alkaline battery workmen exposed at their work to cadmium and nickel dust has been compared with a control group of 84 men matched for age. The battery workers reported significantly more anosmia than the controls (15% to zero) and did less well in the phenol smelling test (27·3% to 4·8%). Cadmium proteinuria was found in 17 of the battery workers, 11 of whom showed virtual anosmia. Figures of recent concentrations of cadmium and nickel in the atmosphere are given. The noses of 85 battery workers and 75 controls were examined. Signs of non-specific chronic irritation were more frequent in the battery workers but no significant relationship was established between this appearance and the presence of anosmia. It is concluded that the anosmia is due to exposure to cadmium or nickel dust or a mixture of the two. PMID:13681418

  10. Closed type alkaline storage battery

    SciTech Connect

    Hayama, H.

    1980-06-10

    The alkaline storage battery employs a metallic hat shaped terminal closure which has a piercing needle as well as a puncturable metallic diaphragm positioned below the piercing needle. The needle is fixed by caulking at its peripheral edge portion to a edge of the closure. A comparatively thick and hard metal plate is placed on the inner surface of the diaphragm and is applied to an open portion of a tubular metallic container which has a battery element. A peripheral edge portion of the closure, the diaphragm and the metallic plate are clamped in airtight relationship through a packing between the caulked end portion and an inner annular step portion of the metallic container of the battery. A lead wire extends from one polarity electrode of the battery element and is connected to a central portion of the metallic plate.

  11. Holocene and Late Pleistocene Tephra Stratigraphy of the Mono Craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyn, C. R.; Bursik, M. I.

    2007-05-01

    The Mono Craters consists of ~30 high-silica rhyolitic domes and flows and one rhyodacite dome. The exposed domes were emplaced during eruptions from the late Pleistocene to the most recent eruption 600 y BP. The ages of the eruptions with exposed domes were constrained by obsidian hydration rind dating by previous workers to two distinct phases; between 20,000 and 13,000 y BP and from 6,000 y BP to 600 y BP. The first eruptive phase consists of a biotite bearing assemblage while the more recent suite of eruptions began with alternating orthopyroxene and fayalite bearing rhyolites, which gave way to sparsely porphyritic and most recently aphyric rhyolites. By studying the Holocene tephra stratigraphy of the Mono Craters, this work aims to confirm the apparent gap in late Pleistocene and Holocene activity from 13,000 to 6,000 y BP and better constrain the local volcanic chronology. Excavation of a number of sites of tephra deposition from the Mono Craters were conducted and the various tephras were analyzed for petrology geochemistry and radiocarbon. The tephras include the full range of petrologic assemblages of the Mono Craters and range from the most recent eruptions to the biotite bearing eruptions of the late Pleistocene. Results of radiometric carbon dating are consistent with the cessation of the emplacement of a biotite bearing high silica porphyritic suite of eruptions prior to the 13,300 y BP eruption of the Black Point basalt, and the resumption of activity with alternating orthopyroxene and fayalite bearing assemblages. Between a pair of proximal radiocarbon dated layers (1672 +/- 36 and 1688 +/- 47 14C y BP) are four volcanic units, representing three of the petrological assemblages (aphyric, sparsely porphyritic, and porphyritic orthopyroxene-bearing); indicating that the different assemblages were, at least in this eruptive sequence, erupted contemporaneously. This indicates that the chamber beneath the Mono Chain is likely weakly zoned. Major and

  12. Pediatric reference intervals for alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Zierk, Jakob; Arzideh, Farhad; Haeckel, Rainer; Cario, Holger; Frühwald, Michael C; Groß, Hans-Jürgen; Gscheidmeier, Thomas; Hoffmann, Reinhard; Krebs, Alexander; Lichtinghagen, Ralf; Neumann, Michael; Ruf, Hans-Georg; Steigerwald, Udo; Streichert, Thomas; Rascher, Wolfgang; Metzler, Markus; Rauh, Manfred

    2017-01-01

    Interpretation of alkaline phosphatase activity in children is challenging due to extensive changes with growth and puberty leading to distinct sex- and age-specific dynamics. Continuous percentile charts from birth to adulthood allow accurate consideration of these dynamics and seem reasonable for an analyte as closely linked to growth as alkaline phosphatase. However, the ethical and practical challenges unique to pediatric reference intervals have restricted the creation of such percentile charts, resulting in limitations when clinical decisions are based on alkaline phosphatase activity. We applied an indirect method to generate percentile charts for alkaline phosphatase activity using clinical laboratory data collected during the clinical care of patients. A total of 361,405 samples from 124,440 patients from six German tertiary care centers and one German laboratory service provider measured between January 2004 and June 2015 were analyzed. Measurement of alkaline phosphatase activity was performed on Roche Cobas analyzers using the IFCC's photometric method. We created percentile charts for alkaline phosphatase activity in girls and boys from birth to 18 years which can be used as reference intervals. Additionally, data tables of age- and sex-specific percentile values allow the incorporation of these results into laboratory information systems. The percentile charts provided enable the appropriate differential diagnosis of changes in alkaline phosphatase activity due to disease and changes due to physiological development. After local validation, integration of the provided percentile charts into result reporting facilitates precise assessment of alkaline phosphatase dynamics in pediatrics.

  13. Alkaline pH sensor molecules.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Takashi; Maruyama, Ichiro N

    2015-11-01

    Animals can survive only within a narrow pH range. This requires continual monitoring of environmental and body-fluid pH. Although a variety of acidic pH sensor molecules have been reported, alkaline pH sensor function is not well understood. This Review describes neuronal alkaline pH sensors, grouped according to whether they monitor extracellular or intracellular alkaline pH. Extracellular sensors include the receptor-type guanylyl cyclase, the insulin receptor-related receptor, ligand-gated Cl- channels, connexin hemichannels, two-pore-domain K+ channels, and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Intracellular sensors include TRP channels and gap junction channels. Identification of molecular mechanisms underlying alkaline pH sensing is crucial for understanding how animals respond to environmental alkaline pH and how body-fluid pH is maintained within a narrow range.

  14. Evolution of alkaline phosphatases in primates.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, D J; Rogers, C; Harris, H

    1982-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase [orthophosphoric-monoester phosphohydrolase (alkaline optimum), EC 3.1.3.1] in placenta, intestine, liver, kidney, bone, and lung from a variety of primate species has been characterized by quantitative inhibition, thermostability, and immunological studies. Characteristic human placental-type alkaline phosphatase occurs in placentas of great apes (chimpanzee and orangutan) but not in placentas of other primates, including gibbon. It is also present in trace amounts in human lung but not in lung or other tissues of various Old and New World monkeys. However, a distinctive alkaline phosphatase resembling it occurs in substantial amounts in lungs from Old World monkeys but not New World monkeys. It appears that duplication of alkaline phosphatase genes and mutations of genetic elements controlling their tissue expression have occurred relatively recently in mammalian evolution. Images PMID:6950431

  15. Functional Role of Native and Invasive Filter-Feeders, and the Effect of Parasites: Learning from Hypersaline Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Green, Andy J.

    2016-01-01

    Filter-feeding organisms are often keystone species with a major influence on the dynamics of aquatic ecosystems. Studies of filtering rates in such taxa are therefore vital in order to understand ecosystem functioning and the impact of natural and anthropogenic stressors such as parasites, climate warming and invasive species. Brine shrimps Artemia spp. are the dominant grazers in hypersaline systems and are a good example of such keystone taxa. Hypersaline ecosystems are relatively simplified environments compared with much more complex freshwater and marine ecosystems, making them suitable model systems to address these questions. The aim of this study was to compare feeding rates at different salinities and temperatures between clonal A. parthenogenetica (native to Eurasia and Africa) and the invasive American brine shrimp A. franciscana, which is excluding native Artemia from many localities. We considered how differences observed in laboratory experiments upscale at the ecosystem level across both spatial and temporal scales (as indicated by chlorophyll-a concentration and turbidity). In laboratory experiments, feeding rates increased at higher temperatures and salinities in both Artemia species and sexes, whilst A. franciscana consistently fed at higher rates. A field study of temporal dynamics revealed significantly higher concentrations of chlorophyll-a in sites occupied by A. parthenogenetica, supporting our experimental findings. Artemia parthenogenetica density and biomass were negatively correlated with chlorophyll-a concentration at the spatial scale. We also tested the effect of cestode parasites, which are highly prevalent in native Artemia but much rarer in the invasive species. The cestodes Flamingolepis liguloides and Anomotaenia tringae decreased feeding rates in native Artemia, whilst Confluaria podicipina had no significant effect. Total parasite prevalence was positively correlated with turbidity. Overall, parasites are likely to reduce

  16. Functional Role of Native and Invasive Filter-Feeders, and the Effect of Parasites: Learning from Hypersaline Ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Marta I; Paredes, Irene; Lebouvier, Marion; Green, Andy J

    2016-01-01

    Filter-feeding organisms are often keystone species with a major influence on the dynamics of aquatic ecosystems. Studies of filtering rates in such taxa are therefore vital in order to understand ecosystem functioning and the impact of natural and anthropogenic stressors such as parasites, climate warming and invasive species. Brine shrimps Artemia spp. are the dominant grazers in hypersaline systems and are a good example of such keystone taxa. Hypersaline ecosystems are relatively simplified environments compared with much more complex freshwater and marine ecosystems, making them suitable model systems to address these questions. The aim of this study was to compare feeding rates at different salinities and temperatures between clonal A. parthenogenetica (native to Eurasia and Africa) and the invasive American brine shrimp A. franciscana, which is excluding native Artemia from many localities. We considered how differences observed in laboratory experiments upscale at the ecosystem level across both spatial and temporal scales (as indicated by chlorophyll-a concentration and turbidity). In laboratory experiments, feeding rates increased at higher temperatures and salinities in both Artemia species and sexes, whilst A. franciscana consistently fed at higher rates. A field study of temporal dynamics revealed significantly higher concentrations of chlorophyll-a in sites occupied by A. parthenogenetica, supporting our experimental findings. Artemia parthenogenetica density and biomass were negatively correlated with chlorophyll-a concentration at the spatial scale. We also tested the effect of cestode parasites, which are highly prevalent in native Artemia but much rarer in the invasive species. The cestodes Flamingolepis liguloides and Anomotaenia tringae decreased feeding rates in native Artemia, whilst Confluaria podicipina had no significant effect. Total parasite prevalence was positively correlated with turbidity. Overall, parasites are likely to reduce

  17. Modification and performance evaluation of a mono-valve engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, Justin W.

    A four-stroke engine utilizing one tappet valve for both the intake and exhaust gas exchange processes has been built and evaluated. The engine operates under its own power, but has a reduced power capacity than the conventional 2-valve engine. The reduction in power is traced to higher than expected amounts of exhaust gases flowing back into the intake system. Design changes to the cylinder head will fix the back flow problems, but the future capacity of mono-valve engine technology cannot be estimated. The back flow of exhaust gases increases the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) rate and deteriorates combustion. Intake pressure data shows the mono-valve engine requires an advanced intake valve closing (IVC) time to prevent back flow of charge air. A single actuation camshaft with advanced IVC was tested in the mono-valve engine, and was found to improve exhaust scavenging at TDC and nearly eliminated all charge air back flow at IVC. The optimum IVC timing is shown to be approximately 30 crank angle degrees after BDC. The mono-valve cylinder head utilizes a rotary valve positioned above the tappet valve. The open spaces inside the rotary valveand between the rotary valve and tappet valve represent a common volume that needs to be reduced in order to reduce the base EGR rate. Multiple rotary valve configurations were tested, and the size of the common volume was found to have no effect on back flow but a direct effect on the EGR rate and engine performance. The position of the rotary valve with respect to crank angle has a direct effect on the scavenging process. Optimum scavenging occurs when the intake port is opened just after TDC.

  18. A Lane Following Mobile Robot Navigation System Using Mono Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Yeongcheol; Kim, Seungwoo; Park, Seongkeun

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we develop a lane following mobile robot using mono camera. By using camera, robot can recognize its left and right side lane, and maintain the center line of robot track. We use Hough Transform for detecting lane, and PID controller for control direction of mobile robot. The validity of our robot system is performed in a real world robot track environment which is built up in our laboratory.

  19. Multisystemic functions of alkaline phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Buchet, René; Millán, José Luis; Magne, David

    2013-01-01

    Human and mouse alkaline phosphatases (AP) are encoded by a multigene family expressed ubiquitously in multiple tissues. Gene knockout (KO) findings have helped define some of the precise exocytic functions of individual isozymes in bone, teeth, the central nervous system, and in the gut. For instance, deficiency in tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) in mice (Alpl (-/-) mice) and humans leads to hypophosphatasia (HPP), an inborn error of metabolism characterized by epileptic seizures in the most severe cases, caused by abnormal metabolism of pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (the predominant form of vitamin B6) and by hypomineralization of the skeleton and teeth featuring rickets and early loss of teeth in children or osteomalacia and dental problems in adults caused by accumulation of inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi). Enzyme replacement therapy with mineral-targeting TNAP prevented all the manifestations of HPP in mice, and clinical trials with this protein therapeutic are showing promising results in rescuing life-threatening HPP in infants. Conversely, TNAP induction in the vasculature during generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI), type II diabetes, obesity, and aging can cause medial vascular calcification. TNAP inhibitors, discussed extensively in this book, are in development to prevent pathological arterial calcification. The brush border enzyme intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) plays an important role in fatty acid (FA) absorption, in protecting gut barrier function, and in determining the composition of the gut microbiota via its ability to dephosphorylate lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Knockout mice (Akp3 (-/-)) deficient in duodenal-specific IAP (dIAP) become obese, and develop hyperlipidemia and hepatic steatosis when fed a high-fat diet (HFD). These changes are accompanied by upregulation in the jejunal-ileal expression of the Akp6 IAP isozyme (global IAP, or gIAP) and concomitant upregulation of FAT/CD36, a phosphorylated fatty acid

  20. Age of the Mono Lake excursion and associated tephra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benson, L.; Liddicoat, J.; Smoot, J.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A.; Negrini, R.; Lund, S.

    2003-01-01

    The Mono Lake excursion (MLE) is an important time marker that has been found in lake and marine sediments across much of the Northern Hemisphere. Dating of this event at its type locality, the Mono Basin of California, has yielded controversial results with the most recent effort concluding that the MLE may actually be the Laschamp excursion (Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 197 (2002) 151). We show that a volcanic tephra (Ash #15) that occurs near the midpoint of the MLE has a date (not corrected for reservoir effect) of 28,620 ?? 300 14C yr BP (??? 32,400 GISP2 yr BP) in the Pyramid Lake Basin of Nevada. Given the location of Ash #15 and the duration of the MLE in the Mono Basin, the event occurred between 31,500 and 33,300 GISP2 yr BP, an age range consistent with the position and age of the uppermost of two paleointensity minima in the NAPIS-75 stack that has been associated with the MLE (Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London Ser. A 358 (2000) 1009). The lower paleointensity minimum in the NAPIS-75 stack is considered to be the Laschamp excursion (Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London Ser. A 358 (2000) 1009).

  1. Bacterial oxidation of methyl bromide in Mono Lake, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Connell, T.L.; Joye, S.B.; Miller, L.G.; Oremland, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    The oxidation of methyl bromide (MeBr) in the water column of Mono Lake, CA, was studied by measuring the formation of H14CO3 from [14C]MeBr. Potential oxidation was detected throughout the water column, with highest rates occurring in the epilimnion (5-12 m depth). The oxidation of MeBr was eliminated by filter-sterilization, thereby demonstrating the involvement of bacteria. Vertical profiles of MeBr activity differed from those obtained for nitrification and methane oxidation, indicating that MeBr oxidation is not simply a co-oxidation process by either nitrifiers or methanotrophs. Furthermore, specific inhibitors of methane oxidation and/or nitrification (e.g., methyl fluoride, acetylene, allyl sulfide) had no effect upon the rate of MeBr oxidation in live samples. Of a variety of potential electron donors added to Mono Lake water, only trimethylamine resulted in the stimulation of MeBr oxidation. Cumulatively, these results suggest that the oxidation of MeBr in Mono Lake waters is attributable to trimethylamine-degrading methylotrophs. Neither methyl chloride nor methanol inhibited the oxidation of [14C]MeBr in live samples, indicating that these bacteria directly oxidized MeBr rather than the products of MeBr nucleophilic substitution reactions.

  2. Mono-Higgs signature in a fermionic dark matter model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorbani, Karim; Khalkhali, Leila

    2017-10-01

    In light of the discovery of the Higgs boson we explore a mono-Higgs signature in association with dark matter pair production at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in a renormalizable model with a fermionic dark matter candidate. For two channels with γγ+MET and b\\bar{b}+MET in the final state we simulate the standard model (SM) backgrounds and signal events at \\sqrt{s} =14 TeV. We then estimate the LHC sensitivities for various benchmark points for two integrated luminosities { L }=300 {{fb}}-1 and { L }=3 {{ab}}-1. We constrain the Yukawa coupling of the dark matter-SM interaction, taking into account bounds from mono-Higgs signature, observed dark matter relic density, Higgs physics, perturbativity requirement and electroweak measurements. Concerning the mono-Higgs search, it turns out that the channel with the largest branching ratio, the b\\bar{b} channel, provides better sensitivity. There are found regions in the parameter space of the model compatible with all the bounds mentioned above which can be reached in future LHC studies.

  3. Mono- versus polydrug abuse patterns among publicly funded clients.

    PubMed

    Kedia, Satish; Sell, Marie A; Relyea, George

    2007-11-08

    To examine patterns of mono- versus polydrug abuse, data were obtained from intake records of 69,891 admissions to publicly funded treatment programs in Tennessee between 1998 and 2004. While descriptive statistics were employed to report frequency and patterns of mono- and polydrug abuse by demographic variables and by study years, bivariate logistic regression was applied to assess the probability of being a mono- or polydrug abuser for a number of demographic variables. The researchers found that during the study period 51.3% of admissions reported monodrug abuse and 48.7% reported polydrug abuse. Alcohol, cocaine, and marijuana were the most commonly abused substances, both alone and in combination. Odds ratio favored polydrug abuse for all but one drug category-other drugs. Gender did not affect drug abuse patterns; however, admissions for African Americans and those living in urban areas exhibited higher probabilities of polydrug abuse. Age group also appeared to affect drug abuse patterns, with higher odds of monodrug abuse among minors and adults over 45 years old. The discernable prevalence of polydrug abuse suggests a need for developing effective prevention strategies and treatment plans specific to polydrug abuse.

  4. Mono- versus polydrug abuse patterns among publicly funded clients

    PubMed Central

    Kedia, Satish; Sell, Marie A; Relyea, George

    2007-01-01

    To examine patterns of mono- versus polydrug abuse, data were obtained from intake records of 69,891 admissions to publicly funded treatment programs in Tennessee between 1998 and 2004. While descriptive statistics were employed to report frequency and patterns of mono- and polydrug abuse by demographic variables and by study years, bivariate logistic regression was applied to assess the probability of being a mono- or polydrug abuser for a number of demographic variables. The researchers found that during the study period 51.3% of admissions reported monodrug abuse and 48.7% reported polydrug abuse. Alcohol, cocaine, and marijuana were the most commonly abused substances, both alone and in combination. Odds ratio favored polydrug abuse for all but one drug category–other drugs. Gender did not affect drug abuse patterns; however, admissions for African Americans and those living in urban areas exhibited higher probabilities of polydrug abuse. Age group also appeared to affect drug abuse patterns, with higher odds of monodrug abuse among minors and adults over 45 years old. The discernable prevalence of polydrug abuse suggests a need for developing effective prevention strategies and treatment plans specific to polydrug abuse. PMID:17996066

  5. Nongeocentric axial dipole field behavior during the Mono Lake excursion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrini, Robert M.; McCuan, Daniel T.; Horton, Robert A.; Lopez, James D.; Cassata, William S.; Channell, James E. T.; Verosub, Kenneth L.; Knott, Jeffrey R.; Coe, Robert S.; Liddicoat, Joseph C.; Lund, Steven P.; Benson, Larry V.; Sarna-Wojcicki, Andrei M.

    2014-04-01

    A new record of the Mono Lake excursion (MLE) is reported from the Summer Lake Basin of Oregon, USA. Sediment magnetic properties indicate magnetite as the magnetization carrier and imply suitability of the sediments as accurate recorders of the magnetic field including relative paleointensity (RPI) variations. The magnitudes and phases of the declination, inclination, and RPI components of the new record correlate well with other coeval but lower resolution records from western North America including records from the Wilson Creek Formation exposed around Mono Lake. The virtual geomagnetic pole (VGP) path of the new record is similar to that from another high-resolution record of the MLE from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 919 in the Irminger Basin between Iceland and Greenland but different from the VGP path for the Laschamp excursion (LE), including that found lower in the ODP-919 core. Thus, the prominent excursion recorded at Mono Lake, California, is not the LE but rather one that is several thousands of years younger. The MLE VGP path contains clusters, the locations of which coincide with nonaxial dipole features found in the Holocene geomagnetic field. The clusters are occupied in the same time progression by VGPs from Summer Lake and the Irminger Basin, but the phase of occupation is offset, a behavior that suggests time-transgressive decay and return of the principal field components at the beginning and end of the MLE, respectively, leaving the nonaxial dipole features associated with the clusters dominant during the excursion.

  6. Lipid Biomarkers for Methanogens in Hypersaline Cyanobacterial Mats for Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnke, Linda L.; Embaye, Tsegereda; Summons, Roger E.; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Analyses of sediments from the vicinity of active methane seeps have uncovered a particular suite of lipid biomarker patterns that characterize methane consuming archaea and their syntrophic, sulfate reducing partners. These isoprenoid biomarkers, largely identified by their anomalously light carbon isotopic signatures, have been a topic of intense research activity and are recorded in numerous methane-rich environments from Holocene to Cenozoic. This phenomenon has implications for depleted kerogens at 2.7 Ga on early Earth (Hinrichs 2002). In contrast, the lipid biosignatures of methane producing archaea are not readily identified through distinct isotopic labels and have received comparably little attention in analyses of archaea in environmental samples. Indeed, environmental analyses generally detect only free archaeal lipids, not the intact, polar molecules found in the membrane of living organisms. As part of the Ames NAI, the 'Early Microbial Ecosystem Research Group' (EMERG) is working to understand microbial processes in the hypersaline cyanobacterial mats growing in the salt evaporation ponds of the Exportadora de Sal at Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico. The aim of this study was to develop methods by which we could identify the organisms responsible for methane generation in this environment. While the ester-bound fatty acids, hopanoids and wax esters provide a means to identify most of the bacterial components of these mats, the archaea which Ere evidently present through genomic assays and the fact of intense methane production (Hoehler et al. 200l), have not been identified through their corresponding lipid signatures. Archaeal core lipids present a number of analytical challenges. The core lipids of methanogens comprise C20, C40 and sometimes C25 isoprenoid chains, linked through ether bonds to glycerol. As well as archaeal (C20), sn-2- and sn-3-hydroxyarchaeol are associated particularly with methylotrophic methanogens. Recently, we have

  7. Chemical, crystallographic and stable isotopic properties of alunite and jarosite from acid-Hypersaline Australian lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alpers, C.N.; Rye, R.O.; Nordstrom, D.K.; White, L.D.; King, B.-S.

    1992-01-01

    Chemical, crystallographic and isotopic analyses were made on samples containing alunite and jarosite from the sediments of four acid, hypersaline lakes in southeastern and southwestern Australia. The alunite and jarosite are K-rich with relatively low Na contents based on chemical analysis and determination of unit cell dimensions by powder X-ray diffraction. Correcting the chemical analyses of fine-grained mineral concentrates from Lake Tyrrell, Victoria, for the presence of halite, silica and poorly crystalline aluminosilicates, the following formulas indicate best estimates for solid-solution compositions: for alunite, K0.87Na0.04(H3O)0.09(Al 0.92Fe0.08)3(SO4)2(OH) 6 and for jarosite, K0.89Na0.07(H3O)0.04(Fe 0.80Al0.20)3(SO4)2(OH) 6. The ??D-values of alunite are notably larger than those for jarosite from Lake Tyrrell and it appears that the minerals have closely approached hydrogen isotope equilibrium with the acidic regional groundwaters. The ??D results are consistent with a fractionation ???60-70??? between alunite and jarosite observed in other areas. However, interpretation of ??D results is complicated by large variability in fluid ??DH2O from evaporation, mixing and possible ion hydration effects in the brine. ??D-values of water derived from jarosite by step-wise heating tend to be smaller at 250??C, at which temperature hydronium and other non-hydroxyl water is liberated, than at 550??C, where water is derived from the hydroxyl site, but the differences are not sufficiently different to invalidate measurements of total ??D obtained by conventional, single-step heating methods. ??34S-values for alunite and jarosite from the four lakes (+19.7 to +21.2??? CDT) and for aqueous sulfate from Lake Tyrrell (+18.3 to +19.8???) are close to the values for modern evaporites (+21.5 ??0.3???) and seawater (+20??0.5???) and are probably typical of seawater-derived aerosols in arid coastal environments. ??34-S-values slightly smaller than that for seawater may

  8. Spatially-resolved carbon flow through a hypersaline phototrophic microbial mat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, J.; Lindemann, S. R.; Cory, A. B.; Courtney, S.; Cole, J. K.; Fredrickson, J.

    2013-12-01

    Hot Lake is a hypersaline, meromictic lake located in an endorheic basin in north-central Washington. Low annual rainfall and high evaporation rates contribute to the lake's high salinity. The predominant dissolved salt is magnesium sulfate, of which monimolimnion waters may seasonally exceed 2 M concentrations. Induced by its high salinity and meromictic nature, Hot Lake displays an inverse thermal gradient with deep horizons seasonally exceeding 50 °C. Despite extreme conditions, dense benthic microbial mats composed of cyanobacteria, anoxygenic photoheterotrophs, and bacterial heterotroph populations develop in the lake. These mats can exceed 1 cm in thickness and display vertical stratification in color due to bacterial pigmentation. Typical mat stratification includes an orange surface layer underlain by green and purple layers at increasing depth. Carbonates, including aragonite and magnesite, are observed within the mat and their formation is likely induced or influenced by microbial metabolic activities and associated pH excursions. We are exploring the role Hot Lake's microbial mats play in carbon cycling. Cyanobacteria are the dominant CO2-fixing organisms in the mat and we seek to understand the spatial and metabolic controls on how the carbon initially fixed by mat cyanobacteria is transferred to associated heterotrophic populations spread throughout the mat strata. Secondly, we seek to understand the overall net carbon balance of the mat through a growing season. We are using a stable isotope probing approach for assessing carbon uptake and migration through representative mat samples. We performed a series of ex situ incubations of freshly harvested mat samples in lake water amended with 13C-labeled bicarbonate or substrates commonly consumed by heterotrophs (including acetate and glucose) and using multiple stable isotope techniques to track label uptake, residence time, remineralization, and location within the mat. In addition to bulk isotope

  9. Effect of salinity on the concentrations of radioisotopes in the aquatic environment of a hypersaline coastal lagoon.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Khaled A; Seddeek, Mostafa K; Sharshar, Taher; Elnimr, Tarek; Badran, Hussein M

    2014-06-01

    Research of the effect of salinity on the fate of radionuclides has been focused on seas or estuarine systems while there is almost no information on marine environments with a salinity higher than that of sea water. The hypersaline Bardawil lagoon is a concentration basin, with evaporation exceeding precipitation. This study presents the characteristics of some environmental factors including salinity and their influence on the distribution of natural and artificial radionuclides in different compartments of the lagoon. The concentrations of (238)U, (234)Th, (228)Ra and (137)Cs in sediments show some degree of dependency on the water's salinity. Migration of these radionuclides in the lagoon's sediments must take place from high salinity to low-salinity regions. Cluster analysis revealed the data structure for sediment by separating (137)Cs and (40)K from (232)Th, (226)Ra, and (234)Th and for sand by separating (40)K from the other radioisotopes.

  10. Remotely sensed sea surface salinity in the hyper-saline Arabian Gulf: Application to landsat 8 OLI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jun; Temimi, Marouane; Ghedira, Hosni

    2017-03-01

    In this study, a multivariable linear algorithm was developed to derive sea surface salinity (SSS) from remote sensing reflectance (Rrs) in the hyper-saline Arabian Gulf. In situ measured Rrs at Operational Land Imager (OLI) bands 1-4 were involved in the algorithm development. Comparisons between estimated and in situ measured SSS produced R2s reaching 0.74 and RMSEs <2%. The proposed algorithm was applied to OLI scenes collected in November 2013 and March 2016 to demonstrate SSS changes from normal conditions when extreme events were encountered. The good agreement between satellite-derived and in situ Rrs suggested that the algorithm uncertainties were primarily attributed to the algorithm parameterization and more measurements were required for performance improving. Compared with OLI-derived products, numerical simulations overestimated SSS by 3.4%. Our findings demonstrate the potential of high resolution satellite products to study short-lasting events and capture fine-scale features in the marine environment.

  11. Effects of selenite on Microcystis aeruginosa: Growth, microcystin production and its relationship to toxicity under hypersalinity and copper sulfate stresses.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chuanqi; Huang, Jung-Chen; Liu, Fang; He, Shengbing; Zhou, Weili

    2017-04-01

    Se laden freshwater algae that enter the Salton Sea with river water pose ecorisks to wildlife in the lake by transferring selenium (Se) to higher trophic levels. The aim of this study was to investigate impacts of Se on Microcystis aeruginosa, widely distributed in freshwater bodies, and its relationship with toxicity, such as microcystins and Se residues. When supplied with selenite, the 96 h-IC50 was calculated 2.60 mg Se/L. However, these inhibitory effects did not extend to microcystin production, and the extracellular fraction significantly increased with selenite as well as sulfate. As M. aeruginosa assimilated selenite very efficiently, 97% of the removed Se was through accumulation, compared to 3% via volatilization, raising a concern about ecotoxicity caused by the remaining Se in the algae. The XAS analysis suggests the dominant Se species accumulated in the algal cells was elemental Se (81%), which is relatively nonbioavailable to aquatic organisms. We further investigated the potential fate of Se carried into the Salton Sea by M. aeruginosa with river water. Under hypersalinity stress, the biomass Se and intracellular microcystins were released and reduced by 47% and 74%, respectively, resulting in the increasing levels of Se and microcystins in the water column. CuSO4 was then applied as an algaecide to prevent M. aeruginosa from entering the lake. The results indicate a similar response to that under hypersalinity stress: the volatilization process was blocked and the Se and microcystins were released from the damaged algal cells in the presence of CuSO4, further raising toxicity levels by 8% and 60%, respectively, in the water column within 24 h. Overall, the coexistence of selenite and M. aeruginosa in river waters might negatively impact aquatic ecosystems of the Salton Sea and further research is required on how to harvest Se from M. aeruginosa to protect local wildlife. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Hypersalinity reduces the risk of cyanide toxicosis to insectivorous bats interacting with wastewater impoundments at gold mines.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Stephen R; Donato, David B; Lumsden, Linda F; Coulson, Graeme

    2014-01-01

    Wildlife and livestock that ingest bioavailable cyanide compounds in gold mining tailings dams are known to experience cyanide toxicosis. Elevated levels of salinity in open impoundments have been shown to prevent wildlife cyanide toxicosis by reducing drinking and foraging. This finding appears to be consistent for diurnal wildlife interacting with open impoundments, however the risks to nocturnal wildlife of cyanide exposure are unknown. We investigated the activity of insectivorous bats in the airspace above both fresh (potable to wildlife) and saline water bodies at two gold mines in the goldfields of Western Australian. During this study, cyanide-bearing solutions stored in open impoundments at both mine sites were hypersaline (range=57,000-295,000 mg/L total dissolved solids (TDS)), well above known physiological tolerance of any terrestrial vertebrate. Bats used the airspace above each water body monitored, but were more active at fresh than saline water bodies. In addition, considerably more terminal echolocation buzz calls were recorded in the airspace above fresh than saline water bodies at both mine sites. However, it was not possible to determine whether these buzz calls corresponded to foraging or drinking bouts. No drinking bouts were observed in 33 h of thermal video footage recorded at one hypersaline tailings dam, suggesting that this water is not used for drinking. There is no information on salinity tolerances of bats, but it could be assumed that bats would not tolerate salinity in drinking water at concentrations greater than those documented as toxic for saline-adapted terrestrial wildlife. Therefore, when managing wastewater impoundments at gold mines to avoid wildlife mortalities, adopting a precautionary principle, bats are unlikely to drink solutions at salinity levels ≥50,000 mg/L TDS.

  13. Hypersalinity and hydrogen peroxide upregulation of gene expression of antioxidant enzymes in Ulva fasciata against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sung, Ming-Shiuan; Hsu, Yi-Ting; Hsu, Yuan-Ting; Wu, Tzure-Meng; Lee, Tse-Min

    2009-01-01

    The modulation of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), FeSOD, ascorbate peroxidase (APX), glutathione reductase (GR), and catalase (CAT) gene expression and activities and antioxidants in Ulva fasciata against hypersalinity (90 per thousand)-induced oxidative stress was studied. Increases in H(2)O(2) contents but no changes in lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl group contents suggest oxidative damage did not occur in 90 per thousand condition. Antioxidants were consumed for reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging indicated by decreased ascorbate and glutathione contents by 90 per thousand. Antioxidant enzymes were differently expressed by 90 per thousand for ROS removal. MnSOD activity and transcript increased 1 h after 90 per thousand treatment with a peak at hour 3, while FeSOD activity increased fast to the plateau after 1 h and its transcript increased after 3 h. APX activity increased 1 h after 90 per thousand but its transcript rose till 3 h, and GR activity increased after 1 h with a peak at hour 3 but its transcript increased till 3 h. CAT activity and transcript increased after 12 h. Enzyme activity is transcriptionally regulated by 90 per thousand except a fast increase in FeSOD, APX, and GR activities during 1 h. APX is responsible for early H(2)O(2) decomposition while CAT scavenges H(2)O(2) in the later period. The inhibition of 90 per thousand induced increase of H(2)O(2) content and FeSOD activity and transcript by treatment of a H(2)O(2) scavenger, dimethylthiourea, and the increase of FeSOD transcript of 30 per thousand grown thalli by H(2)O(2) treatment suggest that H(2)O(2) mediates the upregulation of FeSOD by hypersalinity while other enzymes is modulated by factors other than H(2)O(2).

  14. Community structure and activity of a highly dynamic and nutrient-limited hypersaline microbial mat in Um Alhool Sabkha, Qatar.

    PubMed

    Al-Thani, Roda; Al-Najjar, Mohammad A A; Al-Raei, Abdul Munem; Ferdelman, Tim; Thang, Nguyen M; Al Shaikh, Ismail; Al-Ansi, Mehsin; de Beer, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    The Um Alhool area in Qatar is a dynamic evaporative ecosystem that receives seawater from below as it is surrounded by sand dunes. We investigated the chemical composition, the microbial activity and biodiversity of the four main layers (L1-L4) in the photosynthetic mats. Chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentration and distribution (measured by HPLC and hyperspectral imaging, respectively), the phycocyanin distribution (scanned with hyperspectral imaging), oxygenic photosynthesis (determined by microsensor), and the abundance of photosynthetic microorganisms (from 16S and 18S rRNA sequencing) decreased with depth in the euphotic layer (L1). Incident irradiance exponentially attenuated in the same zone reaching 1% at 1.7-mm depth. Proteobacteria dominated all layers of the mat (24%-42% of the identified bacteria). Anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria (dominated by Chloroflexus) were most abundant in the third red layer of the mat (L3), evidenced by the spectral signature of Bacteriochlorophyll as well as by sequencing. The deep, black layer (L4) was dominated by sulfate reducing bacteria belonging to the Deltaproteobacteria, which were responsible for high sulfate reduction rates (measured using 35S tracer). Members of Halobacteria were the dominant Archaea in all layers of the mat (92%-97%), whereas Nematodes were the main Eukaryotes (up to 87%). Primary productivity rates of Um Alhool mat were similar to those of other hypersaline microbial mats. However, sulfate reduction rates were relatively low, indicating that oxygenic respiration contributes more to organic material degradation than sulfate reduction, because of bioturbation. Although Um Alhool hypersaline mat is a nutrient-limited ecosystem, it is interestingly dynamic and phylogenetically highly diverse. All its components work in a highly efficient and synchronized way to compensate for the lack of nutrient supply provided during regular inundation periods.

  15. Isotopic composition of methane and inferred methanogenic substrates along a salinity gradient in a hypersaline microbial mat system.

    PubMed

    Potter, Elyn G; Bebout, Brad M; Kelley, Cheryl A

    2009-05-01

    The importance of hypersaline environments over geological time, the discovery of similar habitats on Mars, and the importance of methane as a biosignature gas combine to compel an understanding of the factors important in controlling methane released from hypersaline microbial mat environments. To further this understanding, changes in stable carbon isotopes of methane and possible methanogenic substrates in microbial mat communities were investigated as a function of salinity here on Earth. Microbial mats were sampled from four different field sites located within salterns in Baja California Sur, Mexico. Salinities ranged from 50 to 106 parts per thousand (ppt). Pore water and microbial mat samples were analyzed for the carbon isotopic composition of dissolved methane, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), and mat material (particulate organic carbon or POC). The POC delta(13)C values ranged from -6.7 to -13.5 per thousand, and DIC delta(13)C values ranged from -1.4 to -9.6 per thousand. These values were similar to previously reported values. The delta(13)C values of methane ranged from -49.6 to -74.1 per thousand; the methane most enriched in (13)C was obtained from the highest salinity area. The apparent fractionation factors between methane and DIC, and between methane and POC, within the mats were also determined and were found to change with salinity. The apparent fractionation factors ranged from 1.042 to 1.077 when calculated using DIC and from 1.038 to 1.068 when calculated using POC. The highest-salinity area showed the least fractionation, the moderate-salinity area showed the highest fractionation, and the lower-salinity sites showed fractionations that were intermediate. These differences in fractionation are most likely due to changes in the dominant methanogenic pathways and substrates used at the different sites because of salinity differences.

  16. Genetic Structure and Hierarchical Population Divergence History of Acer mono var. mono in South and Northeast China

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hailong; Hu, Lijiang; Saito, Yoko; Ide, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the genetic structure and evolutionary history of tree species across their ranges is essential for the development of effective conservation and forest management strategies. Acer mono var. mono, an economically and ecologically important maple species, is extensively distributed in Northeast China (NE), whereas it has a scattered and patchy distribution in South China (SC). In this study, the genetic structure and demographic history of 56 natural populations of A. mono var. mono were evaluated using seven nuclear microsatellite markers. Neighbor-joining tree and STRUCTURE analysis clearly separated populations into NE and SC groups with two admixed-like populations. Allelic richness significantly decreased with increasing latitude within the NE group while both allelic richness and expected heterozygosity showed significant positive correlation with latitude within the SC group. Especially in the NE region, previous studies in Quercus mongolica and Fraxinus mandshurica have also detected reductions in genetic diversity with increases in latitude, suggesting this pattern may be common for tree species in this region, probably due to expansion from single refugium following the last glacial maximum (LGM). Approximate Bayesian Computation-based analysis revealed two major features of hierarchical population divergence in the species’ evolutionary history. Recent divergence between the NE group and the admixed-like group corresponded to the LGM period and ancient divergence of SC groups took place during mid-late Pleistocene period. The level of genetic differentiation was moderate (FST = 0.073; G′ST = 0.278) among all populations, but significantly higher in the SC group than the NE group, mirroring the species’ more scattered distribution in SC. Conservation measures for this species are proposed, taking into account the genetic structure and past demographic history identified in this study. PMID:24498039

  17. The Relationship between Mono-abundance and Mono-age Stellar Populations in the Milky Way Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minchev, I.; Steinmetz, M.; Chiappini, C.; Martig, M.; Anders, F.; Matijevic, G.; de Jong, R. S.

    2017-01-01

    Studying the Milky Way disk structure using stars in narrow bins of [Fe/H] and [α/Fe] has recently been proposed as a powerful method to understand the Galactic thick and thin disk formation. It has been assumed so far that these mono-abundance populations (MAPs) are also coeval, or mono-age, populations. Here we study this relationship for a Milky Way chemodynamical model and show that equivalence between MAPs and mono-age populations exists only for the high-[α/Fe] tail, where the chemical evolution curves of different Galactic radii are far apart. At lower [α/Fe]-values an MAP is composed of stars with a range in ages, even for small observational uncertainties and a small MAP bin size. Due to the disk inside-out formation, for these MAPs younger stars are typically located at larger radii, which results in negative radial age gradients that can be as large as 2 Gyr kpc-1. Positive radial age gradients can result for MAPs at the lowest [α/Fe] and highest [Fe/H] end. Such variations with age prevent the simple interpretation of observations for which accurate ages are not available. Studying the variation with radius of the stellar surface density and scale height in our model, we find good agreement to recent analyses of the APOGEE red-clump (RC) sample when 1-4 Gyr old stars dominate (as expected for the RC). Our results suggest that the APOGEE data are consistent with a Milky Way model for which mono-age populations flare for all ages. We propose observational tests for the validity of our predictions and argue that using accurate age measurements, such as from asteroseismology, is crucial for putting constraints on Galactic formation and evolution.

  18. Genetic structure and hierarchical population divergence history of Acer mono var. mono in South and Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunping; Tsuda, Yoshiaki; Shen, Hailong; Hu, Lijiang; Saito, Yoko; Ide, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the genetic structure and evolutionary history of tree species across their ranges is essential for the development of effective conservation and forest management strategies. Acer mono var. mono, an economically and ecologically important maple species, is extensively distributed in Northeast China (NE), whereas it has a scattered and patchy distribution in South China (SC). In this study, the genetic structure and demographic history of 56 natural populations of A. mono var. mono were evaluated using seven nuclear microsatellite markers. Neighbor-joining tree and STRUCTURE analysis clearly separated populations into NE and SC groups with two admixed-like populations. Allelic richness significantly decreased with increasing latitude within the NE group while both allelic richness and expected heterozygosity showed significant positive correlation with latitude within the SC group. Especially in the NE region, previous studies in Quercus mongolica and Fraxinus mandshurica have also detected reductions in genetic diversity with increases in latitude, suggesting this pattern may be common for tree species in this region, probably due to expansion from single refugium following the last glacial maximum (LGM). Approximate Bayesian Computation-based analysis revealed two major features of hierarchical population divergence in the species' evolutionary history. Recent divergence between the NE group and the admixed-like group corresponded to the LGM period and ancient divergence of SC groups took place during mid-late Pleistocene period. The level of genetic differentiation was moderate (FST  = 0.073; G'ST  = 0.278) among all populations, but significantly higher in the SC group than the NE group, mirroring the species' more scattered distribution in SC. Conservation measures for this species are proposed, taking into account the genetic structure and past demographic history identified in this study.

  19. Inorganic-organic separators for alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A flexible separator is reported for use between the electrodes of Ni-Cd and Ni-Zn batteries using alkaline electrolytes. The separator was made by coating a porous substrate with a battery separator composition. The coating material included a rubber-based resin copolymer, a plasticizer and inorganic and organic fillers which comprised 55% by volume or less of the coating as finally dried. One or more of the filler materials, whether organic or inorganic, is preferably active with the alkaline electrolyte to produce pores in the separator coating. The plasticizer was an organic material which is hydrolyzed by the alkaline electrolyte to improve conductivity of the separator coating.

  20. Process for extracting technetium from alkaline solutions

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Sachleben, Richard A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

    1995-01-01

    A process for extracting technetium values from an aqueous alkaline solution containing at least one alkali metal hydroxide and at least one alkali metal nitrate, the at least one alkali metal nitrate having a concentration of from about 0.1 to 6 molar. The solution is contacted with a solvent consisting of a crown ether in a diluent for a period of time sufficient to selectively extract the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution. The solvent containing the technetium values is separated from the aqueous alkaline solution and the technetium values are stripped from the solvent.

  1. Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Deborah A.; Holmes, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

  2. Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Deborah A.; Holmes, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

  3. Ecophysiological plasticity of shallow and deep populations of the Mediterranean seagrasses Posidonia oceanica and Cymodocea nodosa in response to hypersaline stress.

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Gil, Jose Miguel; Ruiz, Juan Manuel; Marín-Guirao, Lázaro; Bernardeau-Esteller, Jaime; Sánchez-Lizaso, Jose Luis

    2014-04-01

    The differential expression of the plant phenotypic plasticity due to inter- and intraspecific divergences can determine the plant physiological tolerance under stress. In this work, we examined the interspecific ecophysiological plasticity that the main Mediterranean seagrass species with distinct marine environmental distribution (Posidonia oceanica and Cymodocea nodosa) can exhibit in response to hypersaline stress. We also tested the potential implication of ecotypic intraspecific divergences in the development of such plasticities. To this end, plants from shallow (5-7 m) and deep (18-20 m) meadows of both were maintained under two salinity treatments (natural salinity level of 37, and hypersaline treatment of 43; Practical Salinity Scale) during a long-term experiment (i.e. 62 days) developed in a highly controlled mesocosm system. Hypersaline stress caused notable plastic physiological alterations in P. oceanica and C. nodosa, with appreciable inter- and intraspecific differences. Although both species were similarly able to osmoregulate by means of organic solute accumulation (proline and sugars) in response to hypersalinity stress, higher carbon balance reductions were detected in P. oceanica plants from the deep meadow and in shallower C. nodosa plants, due to both photosynthetic inhibition and enhancement of respiration. None of these deleterious effects were found in C. nodosa plants form the deeper meadow. Leaf photosynthetic pigments generally increased in P. oceanica from both depths, but light absorbance capacities by leaves and photosynthetic efficiency followed contrasting patterns, increasing and decreasing in plants from the deep and the shallow meadows, respectively, indicating distinct strategies to cope with photosynthetic dysfunctions. Despite the significant reduction of pigments in the shallower C. nodosa plants, their leaves were able to increase their light capture capacities under hypersaline stress, by means of particular leaf optics

  4. Technetium recovery from high alkaline solution

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, Charles A.

    2016-07-12

    Disclosed are methods for recovering technetium from a highly alkaline solution. The highly alkaline solution can be a liquid waste solution from a nuclear waste processing system. Methods can include combining the solution with a reductant capable of reducing technetium at the high pH of the solution and adding to or forming in the solution an adsorbent capable of adsorbing the precipitated technetium at the high pH of the solution.

  5. Alkaline tolerant dextranase from streptomyces anulatus

    DOEpatents

    Decker, Stephen R.; Adney, William S.; Vinzant, Todd B.; Himmel, Michael E.

    2003-01-01

    A process for production of an alkaline tolerant dextranase enzyme comprises culturing a dextran-producing microorganism Streptomyces anulatus having accession no. ATCC PTA-3866 to produce an alkaline tolerant dextranase, Dex 1 wherein the protein in said enzyme is characterized by a MW of 63.3 kDa and Dex 2 wherein its protein is characterized by a MW of 81.8 kDa.

  6. Alkaline Water and Longevity: A Murine Study

    PubMed Central

    Magro, Massimiliano; Corain, Livio; Ferro, Silvia; Baratella, Davide; Bonaiuto, Emanuela; Terzo, Milo; Corraducci, Vittorino; Salmaso, Luigi; Vianello, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The biological effect of alkaline water consumption is object of controversy. The present paper presents a 3-year survival study on a population of 150 mice, and the data were analyzed with accelerated failure time (AFT) model. Starting from the second year of life, nonparametric survival plots suggest that mice watered with alkaline water showed a better survival than control mice. Interestingly, statistical analysis revealed that alkaline water provides higher longevity in terms of “deceleration aging factor” as it increases the survival functions when compared with control group; namely, animals belonging to the population treated with alkaline water resulted in a longer lifespan. Histological examination of mice kidneys, intestine, heart, liver, and brain revealed that no significant differences emerged among the three groups indicating that no specific pathology resulted correlated with the consumption of alkaline water. These results provide an informative and quantitative summary of survival data as a function of watering with alkaline water of long-lived mouse models. PMID:27340414

  7. Characterization and quantification of biochar alkalinity.

    PubMed

    Fidel, Rivka B; Laird, David A; Thompson, Michael L; Lawrinenko, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Lack of knowledge regarding the nature of biochar alkalis has hindered understanding of pH-sensitive biochar-soil interactions. Here we investigate the nature of biochar alkalinity and present a cohesive suite of methods for its quantification. Biochars produced from cellulose, corn stover and wood feedstocks had significant low-pKa organic structural (0.03-0.34 meq g(-1)), other organic (0-0.92 meq g(-1)), carbonate (0.02-1.5 meq g(-1)), and other inorganic (0-0.26 meq g(-1)) alkalinities. All four categories of biochar alkalinity contributed to total biochar alkalinity and are therefore relevant to pH-sensitive soil processes. Total biochar alkalinity was strongly correlated with base cation concentration, but biochar alkalinity was not a simple function of elemental composition, soluble ash, fixed carbon, or volatile matter content. More research is needed to characterize soluble biochar alkalis other than carbonates and to establish predictive relationships among biochar production parameters and the composition of biochar alkalis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Performed surfactant-optimized aqueous alkaline flood

    SciTech Connect

    Thigpen, D.R.; Lawson, J.B.; Nelson, R.C.

    1991-11-26

    This paper describes improvement in a process for recovering oil from an acidic oil reservoir by injecting an aqueous alkaline solution comprising water, sodium chloride, and alkaline material for reacting with the reservoir oil forming a petroleum acid soap to form an in-situ surfactant system. The improvement comprises: selecting a preformed cosurfactant which is soluble in both the aqueous solution and the reservoir oil and has a solubility ratio which is grater than the solubility ratio of the petroleum acid soap where the solubility ratio is the ratio of solubility in the aqueous alkaline solution to the solubility in the reservoir oil; combining with the alkaline solution an amount of the preformed cosurfactant which will result in the in-situ surfacant system having a salinity about equal to a salinity which results in minimal interfacial tension between the oil in the reservoir and the in-situ surfactant system at reservoir temperature, wherein the amount of the preformed cosurfactant is about 0.3 percent by weight in the aqueous alkaline solution; and injecting the cosurfactant-aqueous alkaline solution mixture into the reservoir to displace oil toward a fluid production location.

  9. Intracellular Mono-ADP-Ribosylation in Signaling and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bütepage, Mareike; Eckei, Laura; Verheugd, Patricia; Lüscher, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    A key process in the regulation of protein activities and thus cellular signaling pathways is the modification of proteins by post-translational mechanisms. Knowledge about the enzymes (writers and erasers) that attach and remove post-translational modifications, the targets that are modified and the functional consequences elicited by specific modifications, is crucial for understanding cell biological processes. Moreover detailed knowledge about these mechanisms and pathways helps to elucidate the molecular causes of various diseases and in defining potential targets for therapeutic approaches. Intracellular adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribosylation refers to the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)-dependent modification of proteins with ADP-ribose and is catalyzed by enzymes of the ARTD (ADP-ribosyltransferase diphtheria toxin like, also known as PARP) family as well as some members of the Sirtuin family. Poly-ADP-ribosylation is relatively well understood with inhibitors being used as anti-cancer agents. However, the majority of ARTD enzymes and the ADP-ribosylating Sirtuins are restricted to catalyzing mono-ADP-ribosylation. Although writers, readers and erasers of intracellular mono-ADP-ribosylation have been identified only recently, it is becoming more and more evident that this reversible post-translational modification is capable of modulating key intracellular processes and signaling pathways. These include signal transduction mechanisms, stress pathways associated with the endoplasmic reticulum and stress granules, and chromatin-associated processes such as transcription and DNA repair. We hypothesize that mono-ADP-ribosylation controls, through these different pathways, the development of cancer and infectious diseases. PMID:26426055

  10. Treatment of menstrual migraine; multidisciplinary or mono-disciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Witteveen, Hester; van den Berg, Peter; Vermeulen, Guus

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare a multidisciplinary approach of menstrual (related) migraine, combining the neurological and gynaecological consultation, to a mono-disciplinary approach involving neurological treatment. There is a clear relationship between the menstruation cycle and the occurrence of migraine (menstrual migraine). Nowadays the treatment of menstrual (related) migraine is performed by a neurologist. A treatment with attention to hormonal treatment seems more convenient. This retrospective study was performed in a cohort using data of 88 women with menstrual (related) migraine who visited the menstrual migraine clinic between 2012 and 2014 (intervention group). The results were compared to a historical control group, which consisted of women with menstrual (related) migraine who were treated before 2012 and received a mono-disciplinary approach. In the intervention group the Headache Impact (HIT) score significantly improved (65 to 59 points). The mean headache days per month declined significantly (from 6 to 3.83 days) and these women needed less use of pain medication. In the control group the decline in HIT score was less striking (65 to 63.5 points) and the mean headache days per month increased (6 to 6,5 days). It appeared that 20 out of 27 patients in the control group required a gynaecological consultation in course of time. A multidisicplinary treatment of women with menstrual (related) migraine gives better results compared to a mono-disciplinary approach. These results should be interpreted with caution as we performed a retrospective study with a relative small control group.

  11. Treatment outcome of patients with isoniazid mono-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chien, J-Y; Chen, Y-T; Wu, S-G; Lee, J-J; Wang, J-Y; Yu, C-J

    2015-01-01

    Isoniazid mono-resistance is the most common first-line drug resistance in tuberculosis (TB), but its treatment outcome remains unclear. From January 2004 to October 2011, 425 (5.1%) of 8414 patients with culture-confirmed pulmonary TB from four hospitals in Taiwan were identified as having isoniazid mono-resistant TB. Among them, 395 (92.9%) were included and followed up for 2 years after complete treatment. Although 328 (83.0%) patients were successfully treated, 67 (17.0%) had unfavourable outcomes, including death in 56 (14.2%) and treatment failure in 11 (2.8%). The treatment success rate was similar in patients with high-level and low-level isoniazid-resistant TB (82.2% versus 83.4%, p 0.785) and among those taking anti-TB treatment with and without isoniazid (83.1% versus 83.0%, p 1.000). Patients without rifampicin interruption had lower risk of unfavourable outcome (14.3% versus 37.0%, p <0.001), especially those with low-level isoniazid resistance (11.5% versus 56.5%, p <0.001). Supplementation with a new-generation fluoroquinolone improved treatment success (60.0% versus 12.5%, p 0.003). The presence of cavitary lesions was significantly associated with a higher relapse rate (4.1% versus 0.0%, p 0.006) and extended treatment of 7-9, 10-12 and >12 months had less relapse than 6-month treatment (3.2%, 0%, 3.7% and 25.0%, respectively, p 0.037). Multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis revealed that co-morbidity with cancer (hazard ratio, 2.43) and rifampicin interruption (hazard ratio 1.91) were independent factors associated with unfavourable outcomes. Treatment throughout with rifampicin and extended treatment for cavitary disease are crucial for improving outcomes in patients with isoniazid mono-resistant TB.

  12. Oxidation of ammonia and methane in an alkaline, saline lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Joye, S.B.; Connell, T.L.; Miller, L.G.; Oremland, R.S.; Jellison, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    The oxidation of ammonia (NH3) and methane (CH4) was investigated in an alkaline saline lake, Mono Lake, California (U.S.A.). Ammonia oxidation was examined in April and July 1995 by comparing dark 14CO2 fixation rates in the presence or absence of methyl fluoride (MeF), an inhibitor of NH3 oxidation. Ammonia oxidizer-mediated dark 14CO2 fixation rates were similar in surface (5-7 m) and oxycline (11-15 m) waters, ranging between 70-340 and 89-186 nM d-1, respectively, or 1-7% of primary production by phytoplankton. Ammonia oxidation rates ranged between 580-2,830 nM d-1 in surface waters and 732-1,548 nM d-1 in oxycline waters. Methane oxidation was examined using a 14CH4 tracer technique in July 1994, April 1995, and July 1995. Methane oxidation rates were consistently higher in July, and rates in oxycline and anaerobic bottom waters (0.5-37 and 7-48 nM d-1, respectively) were 10-fold higher than those in aerobic surface waters (0.04-3.8 nM d-1). The majority of CH4 oxidation, in terms of integrated activity, occurred within anoxic bottom waters. Water column oxidation reduced the potential lake-atmosphere CH4 flux by a factor of two to three. Measured oxidation rates and water column concentrations were used to estimate the biological turnover times of NH3 and CH4. The NH3 pool turns over rapidly, on time scales of 0.8 d in surface waters and 10 d within the oxycline, while CH4 is cycled on 103-d time scales in surface waters and 102-d time scales within oxycline and bottom waters. Our data suggest an important role for NH3 oxidation in alkaline, saline lakes since the process converts volatile NH3 to soluble NO2-, thereby reducing loss via lake-atmosphere exchange and maintaining nitrogen in a form that is readily available to phytoplankton.

  13. Bio-inspired anti-oil-fouling chitosan-coated mesh for oil/water separation suitable for broad pH range and hyper-saline environments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shiyan; Lu, Fei; Tao, Lei; Liu, Na; Gao, Changrui; Feng, Lin; Wei, Yen

    2013-11-27

    Here, we report a bio-inspired chitosan (CS)-based mesh with high separation efficiency, oil-fouling repellency, and stability in a complex liquid environment. The surface of the CS coating maintains underwater superoleophobicity and low oil adhesion (<1 μN) in pure water and hyper-saline solutions, and it can keep stable special wettability in broad pH range environments after the CS mesh is fully cross-linked with glutaraldehyde and then reduced by sodium borohydride to form a stable carbon-nitrogen single bond. The separation process is solely gravity-driven, and the mesh can separate a range of different oil/water mixtures with >99% separation efficiency in hyper-saline and broad pH range conditions. We envision that such a separation method will be useful in oil spill cleanup and industrial oily wastewater treatment in extreme environments.

  14. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Mono-Silane Siemens Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Hosub; Park, Jong Hoon; Kang, Seung Oh; Jeong, Jong Hyun; Jeon, Soyoung; Jung, Jae Hak; Kim, Woo Kyoung

    2012-10-01

    The computational fluid dynamics-based FLUENT program was employed to model the heat transfer and chemical reaction in a mono-silane Siemens reactor. The kinetic parameters for the 1-step overall reaction SiH4→Si+ 2H2, such as the pre-exponential factor, temperature coefficient, and activation energy, were carefully optimized to satisfy experimental data obtained from the 4-rod Siemens pilot reactor. Established models were successfully used to evaluate the effects of rod diameter, reaction temperature, and reactant gas flow rate on the deposition rate of silicon.

  15. Dust Storms From Owens and Mono Valleys, California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    developed a model that predicts that the level of Mono Lake will stabilize at 6.223 feet just after the year 2050, if the present water export and...done on the behavior of the saline components. and models were c’nstructed usint! lake-bed clays and brines. We visited the plava monthly in 1985. 21...lake bed. Spiralling streamers of dust arose from south of the water body to the region of the sand dunes, where an opaque cloud rose to 8,500 feet

  16. IRIS Toxicological Review of Ethylene Glycol Mono-Butyl ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA released the draft report, Toxicological Review for Ethylene Glycol Mono-Butyl Ether , that was distributed to Federal agencies and White House Offices for comment during the Science Discussion step of the IRIS Assessment Development Process. Comments received from other Federal agencies and White House Offices are provided below with external peer review panel comments. EPA is conducting a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of EGBE that will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database.

  17. Biogeochemistry of natural gases in three alkaline, permanently stratified (meromictic) lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Oremland, R.S.; Miller, L.G. )

    1993-01-01

    Methane and associated light hydrocarbons are present as dissolved gases in the water columns of three alkaline, permanently stratified (meromictic) lakes: Big Soda Lake (Nevada), Mono Lake (California), and Soap Lake (Washington). Methane originates in the bottom sediments, but higher gaseous hydrocarbons (that is, gaseous hydrocarbons of higher molecular weight) have either microbial or thermal sources in the different lakes. Stable isotopic composition, hydrocarbon indices, radiocarbon dating, abundance-versus-depth profiles, and biological experiments indicate that methane is formed in the sediments by microbial processes. Methanogenesis and sulfate-reduction have much higher activity in the shallow littoral sediments than in the colder, more saline pelagic sediments of all three lakes. Methane-rich gas seeps are common in Mono Lake and emanate from a natural-gas deposit underlying the current lakebed. Seeps do not occur in either Big Soda Lake or Soap Lake. Ethane and higher alkanes are present in Big Soda Lake and Mono Lake, but are not present in significant quantities in Soap Lake. It is not clear if the presence of these higher alkanes is a consequence of biological activity, a result of mixing with thermogenic gases, or a combination of both factors. These results indicate the potential complexity and diversity encountered in studying light-hydrocarbon biogeochemistry in thermally and microbially active systems. Hence, in the case of methane, detailed multidisciplinary studies are often needed to determine its origin. For ethane and higher alkanes, there is currently a paucity of basic scientific information to allow for unequivocal identification of microbial and thermogenetic sources. 61 refs., 12 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. [Alkaline phosphatase in Amoeba proteus].

    PubMed

    Sopina, V A

    2005-01-01

    In free-living Amoeba proteus (strain B), 3 phosphatase were found after disc-electrophoresis of 10 microg of protein in PAGE and using 1-naphthyl phosphate as a substrate a pH 9.0. These phosphatases differed in their electrophoretic mobilities - "slow" (1-3 bands), "middle" (one band) and "fast" (one band). In addition to 1-naphthyl phosphate, "slow" phosphatases were able to hydrolyse 2-naphthyl phosphate and p-nitrophenyl phosphate. They were slightly activated by Mg2+, completely inhibited by 3 chelators (EDTA, EGTA and 1,10-phenanthroline), L-cysteine, sodium dodecyl sulfate and Fe2+, Zn2+ and Mn2+ (50 mM), considerably inactivated by orthovanadate, molybdate, phosphatase inhibitor cocktail 1, p-nitrophenyl phosphate, Na2HPO4, DL-dithiothreitol and urea and partly inhibited by H2O2, DL-phenylalanine, 2-mercaptoethanol, phosphatase inhibitor cocktail 2 and Ca2+. Imidazole, L-(+)-tartrate, okadaic acid, NaF and sulfhydryl reagents -p-(hydroxy-mercuri)benzoate and N-ethylmaleimide - had no influence on the activity of "slow" phosphatases. "Middle" and "fast" phosphatases, in contrast to "slow" ones, were not inactivated by 3 chelators. The "middle" phosphatase differed from the "fast" one by smaller resistance to urea, Ca2+, Mn2+, phosphates and H2O2 and greater resistance to dithiothreitol and L-(+)-tartrate. In addition, the "fast" phosphatase was inhibited by L-cysteine but the "middle" one was activated by it. Of 5 tested ions (Mg2+, Cu2+, Mn2+, Ca2+ and Zn2+), only Zn2+ reactivated "slow" phosphatases after their inactivation by EDTA treatment. The reactivation of apoenzyme was only partial (about 35 %). Thus, among phosphatases found in amoebae at pH 9.0, only "slow" ones are Zn-metalloenzymes and may be considered as alkaline phosphatases (EC 3.1.3.1). It still remains uncertain, to which particular phosphatase class "middle" and "fast" phosphatases (pH 9.0) may belong.

  19. Mono-Energy Coronary Angiography with a Compact Synchrotron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggl, Elena; Mechlem, Korbinian; Braig, Eva; Kulpe, Stephanie; Dierolf, Martin; Günther, Benedikt; Achterhold, Klaus; Herzen, Julia; Gleich, Bernhard; Rummeny, Ernst; Noёl, Peter B.; Pfeiffer, Franz; Muenzel, Daniela

    2017-02-01

    X-ray coronary angiography is an invaluable tool for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. However, the use of iodine-based contrast media can be contraindicated for patients who present with chronic renal insufficiency or with severe iodine allergy. These patients could benefit from a reduced contrast agent concentration, possibly achieved through application of a mono-energetic x-ray beam. While large-scale synchrotrons are impractical for daily clinical use, the technology of compact synchrotron sources strongly advanced during the last decade. Here we present a quantitative analysis of the benefits a compact synchrotron source can offer in coronary angiography. Simulated projection data from quasi-mono-energetic and conventional x-ray tube spectra is used for a CNR comparison. Results show that compact synchrotron spectra would allow for a significant reduction of contrast media. Experimentally, we demonstrate the feasibility of coronary angiography at the Munich Compact Light Source, the first commercial installation of a compact synchrotron source.

  20. Mono-Energy Coronary Angiography with a Compact Synchrotron Source

    PubMed Central

    Eggl, Elena; Mechlem, Korbinian; Braig, Eva; Kulpe, Stephanie; Dierolf, Martin; Günther, Benedikt; Achterhold, Klaus; Herzen, Julia; Gleich, Bernhard; Rummeny, Ernst; Noёl, Peter B.; Pfeiffer, Franz; Muenzel, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    X-ray coronary angiography is an invaluable tool for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. However, the use of iodine-based contrast media can be contraindicated for patients who present with chronic renal insufficiency or with severe iodine allergy. These patients could benefit from a reduced contrast agent concentration, possibly achieved through application of a mono-energetic x-ray beam. While large-scale synchrotrons are impractical for daily clinical use, the technology of compact synchrotron sources strongly advanced during the last decade. Here we present a quantitative analysis of the benefits a compact synchrotron source can offer in coronary angiography. Simulated projection data from quasi-mono-energetic and conventional x-ray tube spectra is used for a CNR comparison. Results show that compact synchrotron spectra would allow for a significant reduction of contrast media. Experimentally, we demonstrate the feasibility of coronary angiography at the Munich Compact Light Source, the first commercial installation of a compact synchrotron source. PMID:28181544

  1. Biosynthesis and Degradation of Mono-, Oligo-, and Polysaccharides: Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Iain B. H.

    Glycomolecules, whether they be mono-, oligo-, or polysaccharides or simple glycosides, are—as any biological molecules—the products of biosynthetic processes; on the other hand, at the end of their lifespan, they are also subject to degradation. The beginning point, biochemically, is the fixation of carbon by photosynthesis; subsequent metabolism in plants and other organisms results in the generation of the various monosaccharides. These must be activated—typically as nucleotide sugars or lipid-phosphosugars—before transfer by glycosyltransferases can take place in order to produce the wide variety of oligo- and polysaccharides seen in Nature; complicated remodelling processes may take place—depending on the pathway—which result in partial trimming of a precursor by glycosidases prior to the addition of further monosaccharide units. Upon completion of the 'life' of a glycoconjugate, glycosidases will degrade the macromolecule finally into monosaccharide units which can be metabolized or salvaged for incorporation into new glycan chains. In modern glycoscience, a wide variety of methods—genetic, biochemical, analytical—are being employed in order to understand these various pathways and to place them within their biological and medical context. In this chapter, these processes and relevant concepts and methods are introduced, prior to elaboration in the subsequent more specialized chapters on biosynthesis and degradation of mono-, oligo-, and polysaccharides.

  2. MonoSLAM: real-time single camera SLAM.

    PubMed

    Davison, Andrew J; Reid, Ian D; Molton, Nicholas D; Stasse, Olivier

    2007-06-01

    We present a real-time algorithm which can recover the 3D trajectory of a monocular camera, moving rapidly through a previously unknown scene. Our system, which we dub MonoSLAM, is the first successful application of the SLAM methodology from mobile robotics to the "pure vision" domain of a single uncontrolled camera, achieving real time but drift-free performance inaccessible to Structure from Motion approaches. The core of the approach is the online creation of a sparse but persistent map of natural landmarks within a probabilistic framework. Our key novel contributions include an active approach to mapping and measurement, the use of a general motion model for smooth camera movement, and solutions for monocular feature initialization and feature orientation estimation. Together, these add up to an extremely efficient and robust algorithm which runs at 30 Hz with standard PC and camera hardware. This work extends the range of robotic systems in which SLAM can be usefully applied, but also opens up new areas. We present applications of MonoSLAM to real-time 3D localization and mapping for a high-performance full-size humanoid robot and live augmented reality with a hand-held camera.

  3. Crustal structure between Lake Mead, Nevada, and Mono Lake, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Lane R.

    1964-01-01

    Interpretation of a reversed seismic-refraction profile between Lake Mead, Nevada, and Mono Lake, California, indicates velocities of 6.15 km/sec for the upper layer of the crust, 7.10 km/sec for an intermediate layer, and 7.80 km/sec for the uppermost mantle. Phases interpreted to be reflections from the top of the intermediate layer and the Mohorovicic discontinuity were used with the refraction data to calculate depths. The depth to the Moho increases from about 30 km near Lake Mead to about 40 km near Mono Lake. Variations in arrival times provide evidence for fairly sharp flexures in the Moho. Offsets in the Moho of 4 km at one point and 2 1/2 km at another correspond to large faults at the surface, and it is suggested that fracture zones in the upper crust may displace the Moho and extend into the upper mantle. The phase P appears to be an extension of the reflection from the top of the intermediate layer beyond the critical angle. Bouguer gravity, computed for the seismic model of the crust, is in good agreement with the measured Bouguer gravity. Thus a model of the crustal structure is presented which is consistent with three semi-independent sources of geophysical data: seismic-refraction, seismic-reflection, and gravity.

  4. Mono-W dark matter signals at the LHC: simplified model analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Nicole F.; Cai, Yi; Leane, Rebecca K. E-mail: yi.cai@unimelb.edu.au

    2016-01-01

    We study mono-W signals of dark matter (DM) production at the LHC, in the context of gauge invariant renormalizable models. We analyze two simplified models, one involving an s-channel Z' mediator and the other a t-channel colored scalar mediator, and consider examples in which the DM-quark couplin