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Sample records for alkaline ph ph

  1. Field measurement of alkalinity and pH

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, Ivan

    1964-01-01

    The behavior of electrometric pH equipment under field conditions departs from the behavior predicted from Nernst's law. The response is a linear function of pH, and hence measured pH values may be corrected to true pH if the instrument is calibrated with two reference solutions for each measurement. Alkalinity titrations may also be made in terms of true pH. Standard methods, such as colorimetric titrations, were rejected as unreliable or too cumbersome for rapid field use. The true pH of the end point of the alkalinity titration as a function of temperature, ionic strength, and total alkalinity has been calculated. Total alkalinity in potable waters is the most important factor influencing the end point pH, which varies from 5.38 (0 ? C, 5 ppm (parts per million) HC0a-) to 4.32 (300 ppm HC0a-,35 ? C), for the ranges of variables considered. With proper precautions, the pH may be determined to =i:0.02 pH and the alkalinity to =i:0.6 ppm HCO3- for many naturally occurring bodies of fresh water.

  2. In vitro alkaline pH resistance of Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Weckwerth, Paulo Henrique; Zapata, Ronald Ordinola; Vivan, Rodrigo Ricci; Tanomaru Filho, Mário; Maliza, Amanda Garcia Alves; Duarte, Marco Antonio Hungaro

    2013-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is a bacterial species often found in root canals with failed endodontic treatment. Alkaline pastes are widely used in Endodontics because of their biocompatibility and antimicrobial activity, but this microorganism can resist alkalinity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vitro the alkaline pH resistance of E. faecalis for different periods up to 14 days. Samples were obtained from the oral cavity of 150 patients from the Endodontic clinic. The pH of the experimental tubes (n=84) was first adjusted with 6M NaOH to pH values of 9.5, 10.5, 11.5 and 12.5 (21 tubes per pH). Twenty clinical isolates and the ATCC 29212 strain were tested. The 5 positive controls and experimental tubes of each pH were inoculated with 10 µL of bacterial suspension and incubated at 36 °C for 24, 48 and 72 h, 7 and 14 days. For each period, the turbidity of the medium was visually compared with a 0.5 McFarland standard. The presence of the microorganism was confirmed by seeding on M-Enterococcus agar. Four tubes containing BHI broth adjusted to the tested pHs were incubated for 14 days to verify if pH changes occurred. The pH of inoculated BHI broth was also measured on day 14 to determine if the microorganism acidified the medium. The growth of all E. faecalis strains occurred at pH 9.5 to 11.5 in all periods. Although turbidity was not observed at pH 12.5, there was growth of 13 and 2 strains at 24 and 48 h, respectively, on M-Enterococcus agar. No tube showed growth at pH 12.5 after 72 h. It was concluded that E. faecalis can survive in highly alkaline pH, and some clinical isolates require 72 h at pH 12.5 to be killed. PMID:24474287

  3. Alkaline pH Homeostasis in Bacteria: New Insights

    PubMed Central

    Padan, Etana; Bibi, Eitan; Ito, Masahiro; Krulwich, Terry A.

    2011-01-01

    The capacity of bacteria to survive and grow at alkaline pH values is of widespread importance in the epidemiology of pathogenic bacteria, in remediation and industrial settings, as well as in marine, plant-associated and extremely alkaline ecological niches. Alkali-tolerance and alkaliphily, in turn, strongly depend upon mechanisms for alkaline pH homeostasis, as shown in pH shift experiments and growth experiments in chemostats at different external pH values. Transcriptome and proteome analyses have recently complemented physiological and genetic studies, revealing numerous adaptations that contribute to alkaline pH homeostasis. These include elevated levels of transporters and enzymes that promote proton capture and retention (e.g. the ATP synthase and monovalent cation/proton antiporters), metabolic changes that lead to increased acid production, and changes in the cell surface layers that contribute to cytoplasmic proton retention. Targeted studies over the past decade have followed up the long-recognized importance of monovalent cations in active pH homeostasis. These studies show the centrality of monovalent cation/proton antiporters in this process while microbial genomics provides information about the constellation of such antiporters in individual strains. A comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of both eukaryotic and prokaryotic genome databases has identified orthologes from bacteria to humans that allow better understanding of the specific functions and physiological roles of the antiporters. Detailed information about the properties of multiple antiporters in individual strains is starting to explain how specific monovalent cation/proton antiporters play dominant roles in alkaline pH homeostasis in cells that have several additional antiporters catalyzing ostensibly similar reactions. New insights into the pH-dependent Na+/H+ antiporter NhaA that plays an important role in Escherichia coli have recently emerged from the determination of the structure

  4. Mechanisms of Glucagon Degradation at Alkaline pH

    PubMed Central

    Caputo, Nicholas; Castle, Jessica R.; Bergstrom, Colin P.; Carroll, Julie M.; Bakhtiani, Parkash A.; Jackson, Melanie A.; Roberts, Charles T.; David, Larry L.; Ward, W. Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon is unstable and undergoes degradation and aggregation in aqueous solution. For this reason, its use in portable pumps for closed loop management of diabetes is limited to very short periods. In this study, we sought to identify the degradation mechanisms and the bioactivity of specific degradation products. We studied degradation in the alkaline range, a range at which aggregation is minimized. Native glucagon and analogs identical to glucagon degradation products were synthesized. To quantify biological activity in glucagon and in the degradation peptides, a protein kinase A-based bioassay was used. Aged, fresh, and modified peptides were analyzed by liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry (LCMS). Oxidation of glucagon at the Met residue was common but did not reduce bioactivity. Deamidation and isomerization were also common and were more prevalent at pH 10 than 9. The biological effects of deamidation and isomerization were unpredictable; deamidation at some sites did not reduce bioactivity. Deamidation of Gln 3, isomerization of Asp 9, and deamidation with isomerization at Asn 28 all caused marked potency loss. Studies with molecular-weight-cutoff membranes and LCMS revealed much greater fibrillation at pH 9 than 10. Further work is necessary to determine formulations of glucagon that minimize degradation and fibrillation. PMID:23651991

  5. The Alkaline Diet: Is There Evidence That an Alkaline pH Diet Benefits Health?

    PubMed Central

    Schwalfenberg, Gerry K.

    2012-01-01

    This review looks at the role of an alkaline diet in health. Pubmed was searched looking for articles on pH, potential renal acid loads, bone health, muscle, growth hormone, back pain, vitamin D and chemotherapy. Many books written in the lay literature on the alkaline diet were also reviewed and evaluated in light of the published medical literature. There may be some value in considering an alkaline diet in reducing morbidity and mortality from chronic diseases and further studies are warranted in this area of medicine. PMID:22013455

  6. Interpretation of pH, acidity, and alkalinity in fisheries and aquaculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measurements of pH, acidity, and alkalinity are commonly used to describe water quality. The three variables are interrelated and are sometimes confused. The pH of water is an intensity factor, while the acidity and alkalinity of waters are capacity factors. More precisely, acidity and alkalinity ar...

  7. Decision making in C. elegans chemotaxis to alkaline pH

    PubMed Central

    Murayama, Takashi; Maruyama, Ichi N

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring of environmental and tissue pH is critical for animal survival. The nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), is attracted to mildly alkaline pH, but avoids strongly alkaline pH. However, little is known about how the behavioral switching or decision making occurs. Genetic dissection and Ca2+ imaging have previously demonstrated that ASEL and ASH are the major sensory neurons responsible for attraction and repulsion, respectively. Here we report that unlike C. elegans wild type, mutants deficient in ASEL or ASH were repelled by mildly alkaline pH, or were attracted to strongly alkaline pH, respectively. These results suggest that signals through ASEL and ASH compete to determine the animal’s alkaline-pH chemotaxis. Furthermore, mutants with 2 ASEL neurons were more efficiently attracted to mildly alkaline pH than the wild type with a single ASEL neuron, indicating that higher activity of ASEL induces stronger attraction to mildly alkaline pH. This stronger attraction was overridden by normal activity of ASH, suggesting that ASH-mediated avoidance dominates ASEL-mediated attraction. Thus, C. elegans chemotactic behaviors to alkaline pH seems to be determined by signal strengths from the sensory neurons ASEL and ASH, and the behavior decision making seems to be the result of competition between the 2 sensory neurons. PMID:24563708

  8. SIMPLE WAYS TO IMPROVE PH AND ALKALINITY MEASUREMENTS FOR WATER UTILITIES AND LABORATORIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Both pH and total alkalinity determinations are critical in characterizing chemical properties of water, being important to implementing good process control, determining corrosivity and other water quality properties, and assessing changes in water characteristics. Poor charac...

  9. Improved volatile fatty acids anaerobic production from waste activated sludge by pH regulation: Alkaline or neutral pH?

    PubMed

    Ma, Huijun; Chen, Xingchun; Liu, He; Liu, Hongbo; Fu, Bo

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the anaerobic fermentation was carried out for volatile fatty acids (VFAs) production at different pH (between 7.0 and 10.0) conditions with untreated sludge and heat-alkaline pretreated waste activated sludge. In the fermentation with untreated sludge, the extent of hydrolysis of organic matters and extent of acidification at alkaline pH are 54.37% and 30.37%, respectively, resulting in the highest VFAs yield at 235.46mg COD/gVS of three pH conditions. In the fermentation with heat-alkaline pretreated sludge, the acidification rate and VFAs yield at neutral pH are 30.98% and 240.14mg COD/gVS, respectively, which are higher than that at other pH conditions. With the glucose or bovine serum albumin as substrate for VFAs production, the neutral pH showed a higher VFAs concentration than the alkaline pH condition. The results of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis indicated that the alkaline pH caused low microbial richness. Based on the results in this study, we demonstrated that the alkaline pH is favor of hydrolysis of organic matter in sludge while neutral pH improved the acidogenesis for the VFAs production from sludge. Our finding is obvious different to the previous research and helpful for the understanding of how heat-alkaline pretreatment and alkaline fermentation influence the VFAs production, and beneficial to the development of VFAs production process. PMID:26652215

  10. Alkaline pH activates the transport activity of GLUT1in L929 fibroblast cells

    PubMed Central

    Gunnink, Stephen M.; Kerk, Samuel A.; Kuiper, Benjamin D.; Alabi, Ola D.; Kuipers, David P.; Praamsma, Riemer C.; Wrobel, Kathryn E.; Louters, Larry L.

    2016-01-01

    The widely expressed mammalian glucose transporter, GLUT1, can be acutely activated in L929 fibroblast cells by a variety of conditions, including glucose deprivation, or treatment with various respiration inhibitors. Known thiol reactive compounds including phenylarsine oxide and nitroxyl are the fastest acting stimulators of glucose uptake, implicating cysteine biochemistry as critical to the acute activation of GLUT1. In this study, we report that in L929 cells glucose uptake increases 6-fold as the pH of the uptake solution is increased from 6 to 9 with the half-maximal activation at pH 7.5; consistent with the pKa of cysteine residues. This pH effect is essentially blocked by the pretreatment of the cells with either iodoacetamide or cinnamaldehyde, compounds that form covalent adducts with reduced cysteine residues. In addition, the activation by alkaline pH is not additive at pH 8 with known thiol reactive activators such as phenylarsine oxide or hydroxylamine. Kinetic analysis in L929 cells at pH 7 and 8 indicate that alkaline conditions both increases the Vmax and decreases the Km of transport. This is consistent with the observation that pH activation is additive to methylene blue, which activates uptake by increasing the Vmax, as well as to berberine, which activates uptake by decreasing the Km. This suggests that cysteine biochemistry is utilized in both methylene blue and berberine activation of glucose uptake. In contrast a pH increase from 7 to 8 in HCLE cells does not further activate glucose uptake. HCLE cells have a 25-fold higher basal glucose uptake rate than L929 cells and the lack of a pH effect suggests that the cysteine biochemistry has already occurred in HCLE cells. The data are consistent with pH having a complex mechanism of action, but one likely mediated by cysteine biochemistry. PMID:24333987

  11. Alkaline pH activates the transport activity of GLUT1 in L929 fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Gunnink, Stephen M; Kerk, Samuel A; Kuiper, Benjamin D; Alabi, Ola D; Kuipers, David P; Praamsma, Riemer C; Wrobel, Kathryn E; Louters, Larry L

    2014-04-01

    The widely expressed mammalian glucose transporter, GLUT1, can be acutely activated in L929 fibroblast cells by a variety of conditions, including glucose deprivation, or treatment with various respiration inhibitors. Known thiol reactive compounds including phenylarsine oxide and nitroxyl are the fastest acting stimulators of glucose uptake, implicating cysteine biochemistry as critical to the acute activation of GLUT1. In this study, we report that in L929 cells glucose uptake increases 6-fold as the pH of the uptake solution is increased from 6 to 9 with the half-maximal activation at pH 7.5; consistent with the pKa of cysteine residues. This pH effect is essentially blocked by the pretreatment of the cells with either iodoacetamide or cinnamaldehyde, compounds that form covalent adducts with reduced cysteine residues. In addition, the activation by alkaline pH is not additive at pH 8 with known thiol reactive activators such as phenylarsine oxide or hydroxylamine. Kinetic analysis in L929 cells at pH 7 and 8 indicate that alkaline conditions both increases the Vmax and decreases the Km of transport. This is consistent with the observation that pH activation is additive to methylene blue, which activates uptake by increasing the Vmax, as well as to berberine, which activates uptake by decreasing the Km. This suggests that cysteine biochemistry is utilized in both methylene blue and berberine activation of glucose uptake. In contrast a pH increase from 7 to 8 in HCLE cells does not further activate glucose uptake. HCLE cells have a 25-fold higher basal glucose uptake rate than L929 cells and the lack of a pH effect suggests that the cysteine biochemistry has already occurred in HCLE cells. The data are consistent with pH having a complex mechanism of action, but one likely mediated by cysteine biochemistry. PMID:24333987

  12. Method of determining pH by the alkaline absorption of carbon dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Hobbs, David T.

    1992-01-01

    A method for measuring the concentration of hydroxides in alkaline solutions in a remote location using the tendency of hydroxides to absorb carbon dioxide. The method includes the passing of carbon dioxide over the surface of an alkaline solution in a remote tank before and after measurements of the carbon dioxide solution. A comparison of the measurements yields the absorption fraction from which the hydroxide concentration can be calculated using a correlation of hydroxide or pH to absorption fraction.

  13. TOXICITY OF COPPER TO CUTTHROAT TROUT ('SALMO CLARKI') UNDER DIFFERENT CONDITIONS OF ALKALINITY, PH, AND HARDNESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Median lethal concentration (96-h LC50) values for acute copper toxicity to 3-10 g cutthroat trout (Salmo clarki) have been determined for nine different combinations of alkalinity, hardness, and pH. Equilibrium calculations were performed on the copper LC50 values; seven differe...

  14. Detection of Baking Soda in Flat Bread by Direct pH Metery and Alkalinity Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahed Khaniki, G. H. R.; Vaezi, F.; Yunesian, M.; Nabizadeh, R.; Paseban, G. H. A.

    The objective of this study is evaluation of direct pH metery and alkalinity measurement methods for determination of baking soda in lavash bread (a kind of flat bread) in order to introduce and recommend a good practice of control. For running the experiments, various samples of lavash bread having different concentrations of baking soda were prepared. Ten grams of each sample were mixed with distilled water and then the prepared solutions were filtrated. The filtrates were then analyzed for pH and total alkalinity according to the distractions described in Standard Methods. Results show a significant correlation between the pH values of bread samples and the amount of baking soda. Also, a positive correlation has been observed between the alkalinity of bread samples and used baking soda. By comparing the R2-values specified for these two methods it could be concluded that the direct pH metery method is more reasonable. Furthermore, by this simple method it is possible to accelerate the detection of minute amounts of this chemical in bread.

  15. Method of determining pH by the alkaline absorption of carbon dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1992-10-06

    A method is described for measuring the concentration of hydroxides in alkaline solutions in a remote location using the tendency of hydroxides to absorb carbon dioxide. The method includes the passing of carbon dioxide over the surface of an alkaline solution in a remote tank before and after measurements of the carbon dioxide solution. A comparison of the measurements yields the absorption fraction from which the hydroxide concentration can be calculated using a correlation of hydroxide or pH to absorption fraction. 2 figs.

  16. Anoxic Biodegradation of Isosaccharinic Acids at Alkaline pH by Natural Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Rout, Simon P.; Charles, Christopher J.; Doulgeris, Charalampos; McCarthy, Alan J.; Rooks, Dave J.; Loughnane, J. Paul; Laws, Andrew P.; Humphreys, Paul N.

    2015-01-01

    One design concept for the long-term management of the UK’s intermediate level radioactive wastes (ILW) is disposal to a cementitious geological disposal facility (GDF). Under the alkaline (10.0<pH>13.0) anoxic conditions expected within a GDF, cellulosic wastes will undergo chemical hydrolysis. The resulting cellulose degradation products (CDP) are dominated by α- and β-isosaccharinic acids (ISA), which present an organic carbon source that may enable subsequent microbial colonisation of a GDF. Microcosms established from neutral, near-surface sediments demonstrated complete ISA degradation under methanogenic conditions up to pH 10.0. Degradation decreased as pH increased, with β-ISA fermentation more heavily influenced than α-ISA. This reduction in degradation rate was accompanied by a shift in microbial population away from organisms related to Clostridium sporosphaeroides to a more diverse Clostridial community. The increase in pH to 10.0 saw an increase in detection of Alcaligenes aquatilis and a dominance of hydrogenotrophic methanogens within the Archaeal population. Methane was generated up to pH 10.0 with acetate accumulation at higher pH values reflecting a reduced detection of acetoclastic methanogens. An increase in pH to 11.0 resulted in the accumulation of ISA, the absence of methanogenesis and the loss of biomass from the system. This study is the first to demonstrate methanogenesis from ISA by near surface microbial communities not previously exposed to these compounds up to and including pH 10.0. PMID:26367005

  17. Anoxic Biodegradation of Isosaccharinic Acids at Alkaline pH by Natural Microbial Communities.

    PubMed

    Rout, Simon P; Charles, Christopher J; Doulgeris, Charalampos; McCarthy, Alan J; Rooks, Dave J; Loughnane, J Paul; Laws, Andrew P; Humphreys, Paul N

    2015-01-01

    One design concept for the long-term management of the UK's intermediate level radioactive wastes (ILW) is disposal to a cementitious geological disposal facility (GDF). Under the alkaline (10.0<pH>13.0) anoxic conditions expected within a GDF, cellulosic wastes will undergo chemical hydrolysis. The resulting cellulose degradation products (CDP) are dominated by α- and β-isosaccharinic acids (ISA), which present an organic carbon source that may enable subsequent microbial colonisation of a GDF. Microcosms established from neutral, near-surface sediments demonstrated complete ISA degradation under methanogenic conditions up to pH 10.0. Degradation decreased as pH increased, with β-ISA fermentation more heavily influenced than α-ISA. This reduction in degradation rate was accompanied by a shift in microbial population away from organisms related to Clostridium sporosphaeroides to a more diverse Clostridial community. The increase in pH to 10.0 saw an increase in detection of Alcaligenes aquatilis and a dominance of hydrogenotrophic methanogens within the Archaeal population. Methane was generated up to pH 10.0 with acetate accumulation at higher pH values reflecting a reduced detection of acetoclastic methanogens. An increase in pH to 11.0 resulted in the accumulation of ISA, the absence of methanogenesis and the loss of biomass from the system. This study is the first to demonstrate methanogenesis from ISA by near surface microbial communities not previously exposed to these compounds up to and including pH 10.0. PMID:26367005

  18. Transcriptome Profiling of Shewanella oneidensis Gene Expressionfollowing Exposure to Acidic and Alkaline pH

    SciTech Connect

    Leaphart, Adam B.; Thompson, Dorothea K.; Huang, Katherine; Alm,Eric; Wan, Xiu-Feng; Arkin, Adam P.; Brown, Steven D.; Wu, Liyou; Yan,Tingfen; Liu, Xueduan; Wickham, Gene S.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2007-04-02

    The molecular response of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 tovariations in extracellular pH was investigated based on genomewide geneexpression profiling. Microarray analysis revealed that cells elicitedboth general and specific transcriptome responses when challenged withenvironmental acid (pH 4) or base (pH 10) conditions over a 60-minperiod. Global responses included the differential expression of genesfunctionally linked to amino acid metabolism, transcriptional regulationand signal transduction, transport, cell membrane structure, andoxidative stress protection. Response to acid stress included theelevated expression of genes encoding glycogen biosynthetic enzymes,phosphate transporters, and the RNA polymerase sigma-38 factor (rpoS),whereas the molecular response to alkaline pH was characterized byupregulation of nhaA and nhaR, which are predicted to encode an Na+/H+antiporter and transcriptional activator, respectively, as well assulfate transport and sulfur metabolism genes. Collectively, theseresults suggest that S. oneidensis modulates multiple transporters, cellenvelope components, and pathways of amino acid consumption and centralintermediary metabolism as part of its transcriptome response to changingexternal pH conditions.

  19. The Effects of Alkaline pH on Microleakage of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and Calcium Enriched Mixture Apical Plugs

    PubMed Central

    Mirhadi, Hossein; Moazzami, Fariborz; Rangani Jahromi, Saeed; Safarzade, Sareh

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Alkaline pH can affect the physical and chemical properties and sealing ability of apical plug material. Calcium hydroxide is used as an intracanal medication to complete disinfection of root canals. It raises the pH of environment to alkaline value. Purpose The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the effect of alkaline pH on the sealing ability of calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) apical plugs. Materials and Method Seventy single-rooted human maxillary anterior teeth were randomly divided to two experimental groups for Angelus MTA and CEM cement (n=30) and two control groups (n=5). Each group was divided into two subgroups of 15 for neutral and alkaline pH, and 1 negative and 1 positive control groups of 5. The root canals were cleaned and shaped by using ProTaper rotary system (Dentsply Maillefer; Ballaigues, Switzerland) and the terminal 3mm of the roots were resected. Then, MTA and CEM cement were condensed in apical region with 3mm thickness. The samples were exposed to two environments with different pH values of 13 and 7.4. The leakage was assessed by using the fluid filtration technique at 1, 7, 14, 30 days intervals. Data were analyzed by the repeated measures MANOVA. Results There was no statistically significant difference in the rate of microleakage between neutral and alkaline pH of CEM cement and MTA (p> 0.05). The sealing ability of MTA in an alkaline pH of 13 was significantly less than CEM cement in this pH (p< 0.05). Conclusion An environment with alkaline pH had no adverse effect on the sealing ability of MTA and CEM cement used as apical plugs. CEM cement had better sealing ability in alkaline pH. PMID:26966703

  20. Geographic distance and pH drive bacterial distribution in alkaline lake sediments across Tibetan Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jinbo; Liu, Yongqin; Lin, Xiangui; Zhang, Huayong; Zeng, Jun; Hou, Juzhi; Yang, Yongping; Yao, Tandong; Knight, Rob; Chu, Haiyan

    2012-01-01

    Continent-scale biogeography has been extensively studied in soils and marine systems, but little is known about biogeographical patterns in non-marine sediments. We used barcode pyrosequencing to quantify the effects of local geochemical properties and geographic distance for bacterial community structure and membership, using sediment samples from 15 lakes on the Tibetan Plateau (4–1670 km apart). Bacterial communities were surprisingly diverse, and distinct from soil communities. Four of 26 phyla detected were dominant: Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Actinobacteria, albeit 20.2% of sequences were unclassified at the phylum level. As previously observed in acidic soil, pH was the dominant factor influencing alkaline sediment community structure, phylotype richness and phylogenetic diversity. In contrast, archaeal communities were less affected by pH. More geographically distant sites had more dissimilar communities (r = 0.443, P = 0.030). Variance partitioning analysis showed that geographic distance (historical contingencies) contributed more to bacterial community variation (12.2%) than any other factor, although the environmental factors explained more variance when combined (28.9%). Together, our results show that pH is the best predictor of bacterial community structure in alkaline sediments, and confirm that both geographic distance and chemical factors govern bacterial biogeography in lake sediments. PMID:22676420

  1. Alkalinity, pH, and copper corrosion by-product release

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, M.; Meyer, T.E.; Schock, M.R.

    1996-03-01

    Contrary to expectations, higher bicarbonate concentrations exacerbate copper corrosion rates and by-product release. In fact, as illustrated by monitoring experiences of large utilities and by laboratory data, the concentration of copper corrosion by-products in drinking water increases linearly with bicarbonate concentration at constant pH. This relationship implicates cupric hydroxide solubility in control of copper release from relatively new (less than a few years old) copper plumbing. Decision-marking guidance from a traditional Larson`s ratio or Langelier index approach can aggravate copper corrosion problems; consequently, their use should be discontinued for copper corrosion mitigation. In contrast, aeration-CO{sub 2} stripping is a particularly attractive strategy because benefits from higher pH are realized without adverse effects from higher alkalinity.

  2. Uranium(VI) Diffusion in Sodium-Montmorillonite at Alkaline pH Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinnacher, R. M.; Davis, J. A.; Tournassat, C.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Diffusive transport of uranium(VI) in montmorillonite clay and bentonite has important implications for uranium(VI) mobility in engineered barrier systems or host rocks in high level radioactive waste repositories, and clay-rich soils and sediments in the environment. The prediction of uranium(VI) adsorption and diffusion in clay-rich media, however, is complicated by (1) the complexity of the mineralogical structure of montmorillonite, in terms of its pore-size distributions and available surface site types, and (2) the complex uranium(VI) solution speciation, which can include cationic, uncharged, and anionic complexes, depending on solution conditions. For instance, a partial or full exclusion of anions from negatively charged clay interlayer spaces could change the effective 'anion-accessible' porosity and decrease the diffusive flux of these solutes under steady state conditions. In contrast, weak cation exchange reactions can result in 'surface diffusion' of adsorbed cations, such as UO2OH+, in addition to diffusion in the liquid phase, resulting in greater diffusive fluxes at steady state. In order to investigate these complex interactions, we performed two, lab-scale uranium(VI) through-diffusion experiments in lightly compacted Na-montmorillonite at slightly different, alkaline pH conditions (average pH values of 8.69 and 8.87). Observed uranium(VI) diffusive fluxes were decreased by approximately an order of magnitude in comparison to a tritium tracer. This indicates a relevance of 'anion exclusion' effects, the full or partial exclusion of anionic U(VI)-carbonato species from clay interlayer spaces. In addition, uranium(VI) sorption reactions were shown to be relevant in the diffusion experiments, even at alkaline pH values of around 8.7 and 8.9, where uranium(VI) sorption is low compared to other pH conditions. Despite the similarity of pH conditions, different degrees of uranium(VI) retardation were determined for the two systems. Additionally, we

  3. Use of natural mordenite to remove chromium (III) and to neutralize pH of alkaline waste waters.

    PubMed

    Córdova-Rodríguez, Valduvina; Rodríguez-Iznaga, Inocente; Acosta-Chávez, Raquel María; Chávez-Rivas, Fernando; Petranovskii, Vitalii; Pestryakov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    The natural mordenite from Palmarito de Cauto deposit (PZ), Cuba, was studied in this work as an ion exchanger to remove Cr(3+) cations from alkaline aqueous solutions at different pH and chromium concentrations. The mordenite stability under cyclic treatment processes with alkaline solutions and its capacity to decrease the pH of the solutions was also analyzed. It was shown that PZ removes Cr(3+) ions from alkaline solutions, and it happens independently of the starting chromium concentration and the pH of the exchange solution used. This material has an important neutralizing effect on alkaline solutions, expressed in a significant pH decrease from the early stages of the treatments. For solutions with initial pH equal to 11, it decreases to a value of around seven. The stability of this material is not affected significantly after continuous cyclic treatment with NaOH solution, which shows that mordenite, in particular from Palmarito de Cauto deposit, has high stability in alkaline solutions. The results are important as they suggest that natural zeolites may be of interest in treatments of alkaline industrial waste effluents. PMID:26818904

  4. Fluorescent probes and bioimaging: alkali metals, alkaline earth metals and pH.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Hu, Ying; Yoon, Juyoung

    2015-07-21

    All living species and life forms have an absolute requirement for bio-functional metals and acid-base equilibrium chemistry owing to the critical roles they play in biological processes. Hence, a great need exists for efficient methods to detect and monitor biometals and acids. In the last few years, great attention has been paid to the development of organic molecule based fluorescent chemosensors. The availability of new synthetic fluorescent probes has made fluorescence microscopy an indispensable tool for tracing biologically important molecules and in the area of clinical diagnostics. This review highlights the recent advances that have been made in the design and bioimaging applications of fluorescent probes for alkali metals and alkaline earth metal cations, including lithium, sodium and potassium, magnesium and calcium, and for pH determination within biological systems. PMID:25317749

  5. Zinc ions and alkaline pH alter the phosphorylation state of human erythrocyte membrane proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Fennell, R.L. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Since the phosphorylation state of the red cell membrane proteins in vitro is likely to be regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, this research was carried out to investigate the possible role of membrane-bound phosphatase activities. These studies were conducted with red blood cell ghosts and IOVs from normal individuals and from an individual with hereditary spherocytosis. In vitro phosphorylation with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P) ATP was conducted in the presence and the absence of Zn{sup ++}, or erythrocyte ghosts and IOVs were pretreated for 30 minutes at 37{degree}C and pH 7-11 in the presence and the absence of calf intestine alkaline phosphatase. The resulting phosphoproteins were analyzed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, stained with Coomassie blue, and fluorographed. In the presence of Zn{sup ++}, the red blood ghosts, with or without pretreatment, demonstrated enhanced phosphorylation of membrane proteins, including band 4.2. Preincubation at pH 10 in the presence of absence of exogenous phosphatase further stimulates phosphorylation of these proteins. Under similar conditions, the erythrocyte membranes also demonstrated the ability to hydrolyze p-nitrophenyl phosphate and to remove {sup 32}P from red blood cell phosphoproteins.

  6. Extracellular Alkaline pH Leads to Increased Metastatic Potential of Estrogen Receptor Silenced Endocrine Resistant Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Khajah, Maitham A.; Almohri, Iman; Mathew, Princy M.; Luqmani, Yunus A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Endocrine resistance in breast cancer is associated with enhanced metastatic potential and poor clinical outcome, presenting a significant therapeutic challenge. We have established several endocrine insensitive breast cancer lines by shRNA induced depletion of estrogen receptor (ER) by transfection of MCF-7 cells which all exhibit enhanced expression profile of mesenchymal markers with reduction of epithelial markers, indicating an epithelial to mesenchymal transition. In this study we describe their behaviour in response to change in extracellular pH, an important factor controlling cell motility and metastasis. Methods Morphological changes associated with cell exposure to extracellular alkaline pH were assessed by live cell microscopy and the effect of various ion pumps on this behavior was investigated by pretreatment with chemical inhibitors. The activity and expression profile of key signaling molecules was assessed by western blotting. Cell motility and invasion were examined by scratch and under-agarose assays respectively. Total matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity and specifically of MMP2/9 was assessed in conditioned medium in response to brief alkaline pH exposure. Results Exposure of ER –ve but not ER +ve breast cancer cells to extracellular alkaline pH resulted in cell shrinkage and spherical appearance (termed contractolation); this was reversed by returning the pH back to 7.4. Contractolation was blocked by targeting the Na+/K+ and Na+/H+ pumps with specific chemical inhibitors. The activity and expression profile of key signaling molecules critical for cell adhesion were modulated by the exposure to alkaline pH. Brief exposure to alkaline pH enhanced MMP2/9 activity and the invasive potential of ER –ve cells in response to serum components and epithelial growth factor stimulation without affecting unhindered motility. Conclusions Endocrine resistant breast cancer cells behave very differently to estrogen responsive cells in

  7. HYDROXYL RADICAL/OZONE RATIOS DURING OZONATION PROCESSES. II. THE EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE, PH, ALKALINITY, AND DOM PROPERTIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The influence of temperature, pH, alkalinity, and type and concentration of the dissolved organic matter (DOM) on the rate of ozone (O3) decomposition, O3-exposure, .OH-exposure and the ratio Rct of the concentrations of .OH and O3 has been studied. For a standardized single ozon...

  8. Effect of pH alkaline salts of fatty acids on the inhibition of bacteria associated with poultry processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The agar diffusion assay was used to examine the effect of pH on the ability of alkaline salts of three fatty acids (FA) to inhibit growth of bacteria associated with poultry processing. FA solutions were prepared by dissolving 0.5 M concentrations of caprylic, capric, or lauric acid in separate ali...

  9. Bleb formation is induced by alkaline but not acidic pH in estrogen receptor silenced breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Khajah, Maitham A; Mathew, Princy M; Alam-Eldin, Nada S; Luqmani, Yunus A

    2015-04-01

    De novo and acquired resistance to endocrine-based therapies in breast cancer occurs in parallel with epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), which is associated with enhanced proliferative and metastatic potential, and poor clinical outcome. We have established several endocrine insensitive breast cancer lines by shRNA-induced depletion of estrogen receptor (ER) by transfection of MCF7 cells. All of these exhibit EMT. We have previously reported that brief exposure of specifically ER- breast cancer cells, to extracellular alkaline pH, results in cell rounding and segregation, and leads to enhanced invasive potential. In this study we describe more detailed morphological changes and compare these with cell exposure to acidic pH. Morphological changes and localization of various molecules critical for cell adhesion and motility, associated with pH effects, were assessed by live cell microscopy, electron microscopy, and immunofluorescence. Exposure of either ER- or ER+ breast cancer cells to extracellular acidic pH did not induce significant changes in morphological appearance. Conversely, brief exposure of specifically ER silenced cells, to alkaline pH, resulted in cell contractolation and formation of bleb-like actin-rich structures which were evenly distributed on the outer membrane. Integrin α2, FAK, and JAM-1 were found in the cytoplasm streaming into the newly formed blebs. These blebs appear to be related to cell polarity and movement. Pre-treatment with cytochalasin-D or inhibitors of Rho or MLCK prevented both contractolation and bleb formation. Our data suggest that the effect of pH on the microenvironment of endocrine resistant breast cancer cells needs to be more extensively investigated. Alkaline, rather than acidic pH, appears to induce dramatic morphological changes, and enhances their invasive capabilities, through re-organization of cortical actin. PMID:25672508

  10. Low temperature alkaline pH hydrolysis of oxygen-free Titan tholins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brassé, Coralie; Buch, Arnaud; Raulin, François; Coll, Patrice; Poch, Olivier; Ramirez, Sandra

    2014-05-01

    The largest moon of Saturn, Titan, is known for its dense, nitrogen-rich atmosphere. The organic aerosols which are produced in Titan's atmosphere are of great astrobiological interest, particularly because of their potential evolution when they reach the surface and may interact with putative ammonia-water cryomagma[1]. In this context we have followed the evolution of alkaline pH hydrolysis (25wt% ammonia-water) of Titan tholins (produced by an experimental setup using a plasma DC discharge named PLASMA) at low temperature. Urea has been identified as one of the main product of tholins hydrolysis along with several amino acids (alanine, glycine and aspartic acid). However, those molecules have also been detected in non-hydrolyzed tholins. One explanation is a possible oxygen leak in the PLASMA reactor during the tholins synthesis[2]. Following this preliminary study the synthesis protocol has been improved by isolating the whole device in a specially designed glove box which protect the PLASMA experiment from the laboratory atmosphere. Once we confirmed the non-presence of oxygen in tholins, we performed alkaline pH hydrolysis of oxygen-free tholins. Then we verify that the organic compounds cited above are still produced in-situ. Moreover, a recent study shows that the subsurface ocean may contain a lower fraction of ammonia (about 5wt% or less[3]), than the one used until now in this kind of experimental study[2, 4]. Thus, we have carried out new hydrolysis experiments which take this lower value into account. Additional studies have provided new highlights on the bulk composition of Titan for various gas species. Indeed, the observed Saturn's atmosphere enrichment constrains the composition of the planetesimals present in the feeding zone of Saturn. The enrichment in volatiles in Saturn's atmosphere has been reproduced by assuming the presence of specific gas species[5, 6], in particular CO2 and H2S. In the present study we assume that those gas species have

  11. Sewage sludge pretreatment by microwave irradiation combined with activated carbon fibre at alkaline pH for anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dedong; Guo, Sixiao; Ma, Nina; Wang, Guowen; Ma, Chun; Hao, Jun; Xue, Mang; Zhang, Xinxin

    2016-01-01

    This research focuses on the effects of microwave-assisted activated carbon fibre (ACF) (MW-ACF) treatment on sewage sludge at alkaline pH. The disintegration and biodegradability of sewage sludge were studied. It was found that the MW-ACF process at alkaline pH provided a rapid and efficient process to disrupt the microbial cells in the sludge. The results suggested that when irradiated at 800 W MW for 110 s with a dose of 1.0 g ACF/g solid concentration (SS) at pH 10.5, the MW-ACF pretreatment achieved 55% SS disintegration, 23% greater than the value of MW alone (32%). The concentration of total nitrogen, total phosphorus, supernatant soluble chemical oxygen demand, protein, and polysaccharide increased by 60%, 144%, 145%, 74%, and 77%, respectively. An increase in biogas production by 63.7% was achieved after 20 days of anaerobic digestion (AD), compared to the control. The results indicated that the MW-ACF pretreatment process at alkaline pH provides novel sludge management options in disintegration of sewage sludge for further AD. PMID:27332832

  12. Alkalinity and pH effects on nitrification in a membrane aerated bioreactor: an experimental and model analysis.

    PubMed

    Shanahan, John W; Semmens, Michael J

    2015-05-01

    A nitrifying biofilm was grown in a laboratory-scale membrane aerated bioreactor (MABR) to calibrate and test a one-dimensional biofilm model incorporating chemical equilibria to calculate local pH values. A previously developed model (Shanahan and Semmens, 2004) based upon AQUASIM was modified to incorporate the impact of local pH changes within the biofilm on the kinetics of nitrification. Shielded microelectrodes were used to measure the concentration profiles of dissolved oxygen, ammonium, nitrate, and pH within the biofilm and the overlying boundary layer under actual operating conditions. Operating conditions were varied to assess the impact of bicarbonate loading (alkalinity), ammonium loading, and intra-membrane oxygen partial pressure on biofilm performance. Nitrification performance improved with increased ammonium and bicarbonate loadings over the range of operating conditions tested, but declined when the intra-membrane oxygen partial pressure was increased. Minor discrepancies between the measured and predicted concentration profiles within the biofilm were attributed to changes in biofilm density and vertical heterogeneities in biofilm structure not accounted for by the model. Nevertheless, predicted concentration profiles within the biofilm agreed well with experimental results over the range of conditions studied and highlight the fact that pH changes in the biofilm are significant especially in low alkalinity waters. The influent pH and buffer capacity of a wastewater may therefore have a significant impact on the performance of a membrane-aerated bioreactor with respect to nitrification, and nitrogen removal. PMID:25703659

  13. Carbon Dioxide Addition to Microbial Fuel Cell Cathodes Maintains Sustainable Catholyte pH and Improves Anolyte pH, Alkalinity, and Conductivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioelectrochemical system (BES) pH imbalances develop due to anodic proton-generating oxidation reactions and cathodic hydroxide-ion-generating reduction reactions. Until now, workers added unsustainable buffers to reduce the pH difference between the anode and cathode because the pH imbalance cont...

  14. Tendency for oxidation of annelid hemoglobin at alkaline pH and dissociated states probed by redox titration.

    PubMed

    Bispo, Jose Ailton Conceicao; Landini, Gustavo Fraga; Santos, Jose Luis Rocha; Norberto, Douglas Ricardo; Bonafe, Carlos Francisco Sampaio

    2005-08-01

    The redox titration of extracellular hemoglobin of Glossoscolex paulistus (Annelidea) was investigated in different pH conditions and after dissociation induced by pressure. Oxidation increased with increasing pH, as shown by the reduced amount of ferricyanide necessary for the oxidation of hemoglobin. This behavior was the opposite of that of vertebrate hemoglobins. The potential of half oxidation (E1/2) changed from -65.3 to +146.8 mV when the pH increased from 4.50 to 8.75. The functional properties indicated a reduction in the log P50 from 1.28 to 0.28 in this pH range. The dissociation at alkaline pH or induced by high pressure, confirmed by HPLC gel filtration, suggested that disassembly of the hemoglobin could be involved in the increased potential for oxidation. These results suggest that the high stability and prolonged lifetime common to invertebrate hemoglobins is related to their low tendency to oxidize at acidic pH, in contrast to vertebrate hemoglobins. PMID:15982915

  15. Upper ocean carbon cycling inferred from direct pH observations made by profiling floats and estimated alkalinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, K. S.; Plant, J. N.; Jannasch, H. W.; Coletti, L. J.; Elrod, V.; Sakamoto, C.; Riser, S.

    2015-12-01

    The annual cycle of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) is a key tracer of net community production and carbon export in the upper ocean. In particular, the DIC concentration is much less sensitive to air-sea gas exchange, when compared to oxygen, another key tracer of upper ocean metabolism. However, the annual DIC cycle is observed with a seasonal resolution at only a few time-series stations in the open ocean. Here, we consider the annual carbon cycle that has been observed using profiling floats equipped with pH sensors. Deep-Sea DuraFET pH sensors have been deployed on profiling floats for over three years and they can provide temporal and spatial resolution of 5 to 10 days and 5 to 10 m in the upper ocean over multi-year periods. In addition to pH, a second carbon system parameter is required to compute DIC. Total alkalinity can be derived from the float observations of temperature, salinity and oxygen using equations in these variables that are fitted to shipboard observations of alkalinity obtained in the global repeat hydrography programs (e.g., Juranek et al., GRL, doi:10.1029/2011GL048580, 2011), as the relationships should be stable in time in the open ocean. Profiling floats with pH have been deployed from Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) cruises since late 2012 and an array of floats with pH have been deployed since early 2014 in the Southern Ocean as part of the SOCCOM program. The SOCCOM array should grow to nearly 200 floats over the next 5 years. The sensor data was quality controlled and adjusted by comparing observations at 1500 m depth to the deep climatology of pH (derived from DIC and alkalinity) computed with the GLODAP data set. After adjustment, the surface DIC concentrations were calculated from pH and alkalinity. This yields a data set that is used to examine annual net community production in the oligotrophic North Pacific and in the South Pacific near 150 West from 40 South to 65 South.

  16. The immobilization of all spermatozoa in vitro by bitter lemon drink and the effect of alkaline pH.

    PubMed

    Nwoha, P U

    1992-12-01

    Researchers at Obafemi Awolowo University in Ile-Ife, Nigeria, collected semen samples from 7 healthy men 25-30 years old who had abstained from sex for at least 5 days in order to examine the spermicidal action of 4 soft drinks (Krest bitter lemon, Afri-Cola, Coca-Cola, and Pepsi-Cola), the effect of increased temperature of the drinks on spermicidal action, and the effect of changing the soft drinks from an acid, as it comes from the factory, (ph 2.4) to an alkaline (pH 7.5). Increasing the temperature of the soft drinks from room temperature (22 degrees Celsius) to body temperatures (37 degrees Celsius) did not significantly change the spermicidal action any of the soft drinks. All soft drinks with an acid pH, except Coca-Cola, had a significantly lower percent of sperm motility than those with an alkaline pH (0-42.3% vs. 20-52.1%; p .001). In fact, Krest bitter lemon in its factory form (acid pH) completely immobilized all spermatozoa within 1 minute after the researchers diluted the semen with the soft drink. Alkaline Coca-Cola had a significantly lower percent of sperm motility than did acid Coca-Cola (35.8% vs. 46.5%; p .001). Other than Krest bitter lemon, the significant decreases in sperm motility were not enough to prevent pregnancy. These findings indicated that researchers should test Krest bitter lemon for effectiveness as a postcoital contraceptive. If indeed it proves effective, it has great potential as such a contraceptive among the poor in the densely population developed countries since it is readily available and inexpensive. PMID:1493713

  17. Urine pH test

    MedlinePlus

    A urine pH test measures the level of acid in urine. ... pH - urine ... meat products, or cheese can decrease your urine pH. ... to check for changes in your urine acid levels. It may be done to ... more effective when urine is acidic or non-acidic (alkaline).

  18. Salinity and Alkaline pH in Irrigation Water Affect Marigold Plants: II. Mineral Ion Relations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scarcity of water of good quality for landscape irrigation is of outmost importance in arid and semiarid regions due to the competition with urban population. This is forcing the use of degraded waters with high levels of salinity and high pH, which may affect plant establishment and growth. The o...

  19. Isolation of a Sulfur-oxidizing Bacterium That can Grow under Alkaline pH, from Corroded Concrete.

    PubMed

    Maeda, T; Negishi, A; Oshima, Y; Nogami, Y; Kamimura, K; Sugio, T

    1998-01-01

    To study the early stages of concrete corrosion by bacteria, sulfur-oxidizing bacterium strain RO-1, which grows in an alkaline thiosulfate medium (pH 10.0) was isolated from corroded concreate and characterized. Strain RO-1 was a Gram negative, rod-shaped bacterium (0.5-0.6×0.9-1.5 μm). The mean G+C content of the DNA of strain RO-1 was 65.0 mol%. Optimum pH and temperature for growth were 8.0. and 30-37°C, respectively. When grown in thiosulfate medium with pH 10.0, growth rate of the strain was 48% of that observed at the optimum pH for growth. Strain RO-1 used sulfide, thiosulfate, and glucose, but not elemental sulfur or tetrathionate, as a sole energy source. Strain RO-1 grew under anaerobic conditions in pepton-NO3 (-) medium containing sodium nitrate as an electron acceptor, and had enzyme activities that oxidized sulfide, elemental sulfur, thiosulfate, sulfite, and glucose, but not tetrathionate. The bacterium had an activity to assimilate (14)CO2 into the cells when thiosulfate was used as an energy source. These results suggest that strain RO-1 is Thiobacillus versutus. Strain RO-1 exuded Ca(2+) from concrete blocks added to thiosulfate medium with pH 9.0 and the pH of the medium decreased from 9.0 to 5.5 after 22 days of cultivation. In contrast, Thiobacillus thiooxidans strain NB1-3 could not exude Ca(2+) in the same thiosulfate medium, suggesting that strain RO-1, but not T. thiooxidans NB1-3, is involved in the early stage of concrete corrosion because concrete structures just after construction contain calcium hydroxide and have a pH of 12-13. PMID:27388643

  20. Comparison of Salivary pH, Buffering Capacity and Alkaline Phosphatase in Smokers and Healthy Non-Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi-Motamayel, Fatemeh; Falsafi, Parisa; Goodarzi, Mohammad T.; Poorolajal, Jalal

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Saliva contains alkaline phosphatase (ALP)—a key intracellular enzyme related to destructive processes and cellular damage—and has buffering capacity (BC) against acids due to the presence of bicarbonate and phosphate ions. Smoking may have deleterious effects on the oral environment due to pH changes which can affect ALP activity. This study aimed to evaluate the salivary pH, BC and ALP activity of male smokers and healthy non-smokers. Methods: This retrospective cohort study took place between August 2012 and December 2013. A total of 251 healthy male non-smokers and 259 male smokers from Hamadan, Iran, were selected. Unstimulated whole saliva was collected from each participant and pH and BC were determined using a pH meter. Salivary enzymes were measured by spectrophotometric assay. Results: Mean salivary pH (7.42 ± 0.48 and 7.52 ± 0.43, respectively; P = 0.018) and BC (3.41 ± 0.54 and 4.17 ± 0.71; P = 0.001) was significantly lower in smokers compared to non-smokers. Mean ALP levels were 49.58 ± 23.33 IU/L among smokers and 55.11 ± 27.85 IU/L among non-smokers (P = 0.015). Conclusion: Significantly lower pH, BC and ALP levels were observed among smokers in comparison to a healthy control group. These salivary alterations could potentially be utilised as biochemical markers for the evaluation of oral tissue function and side-effects among smokers. Further longitudinal studies are recommended to evaluate the effects of smoking on salivary components. PMID:27606111

  1. Contrasting pH buffering patterns in neutral-alkaline soils along a 3600 km transect in northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, W.; Nelson, P. N.; Li, M.-H.; Cai, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Shan, Y.; Wang, R.; Han, X.; Jiang, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Soil pH buffering capacity (pHBC) plays a crucial role in predicting acidification rates, yet its large-scale patterns and controls are poorly understood, especially for neutral-alkaline soils. Here, we evaluated the spatial patterns and drivers of pHBC along a 3600 km long transect (1900 km sub-transect with carbonate containing soils and 1700 km sub-transect with non-carbonate containing soils) across northern China. Soil pHBC was greater in the carbonate containing soils than in the non-carbonate containing soils. Acid addition decreased soil pH in the non-carbonate containing soils more markedly than in the carbonate containing soils. Within the carbonate soil sub-transect, soil pHBC was positively correlated with cation exchange capacity (CEC), carbonate content and exchangeable sodium (Na) concentration, but negatively correlated with initial pH and clay content, and not correlated with soil organic carbon (SOC) content. Within the non-carbonate sub-transect, soil pHBC was positively related to initial pH, clay content, CEC and exchangeable Na concentration, but not related to SOC content. Carbonate content was the primary determinant of pHBC in the carbonate containing soils and CEC was the main determinant of buffering capacity in the non-carbonate containing soils. Soil pHBC was positively related to aridity index and carbonate content across the carbonate containing soil sub-transect. Our results indicated that mechanisms controlling pHBC differ among neutral-alkaline soils of northern China, especially between carbonate and non-carbonate containing soils, leading to different rates, risks, and impacts of acidification. This understanding should be incorporated into the acidification risk assessment and landscape management in a changing world.

  2. Contrasting pH buffering patterns in neutral-alkaline soils along a 3600 km transect in northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, W. T.; Nelson, P. N.; Li, M.-H.; Cai, J. P.; Zhang, Y. Y.; Zhang, Y. G.; Yang, S.; Wang, R. Z.; Wang, Z. W.; Wu, Y. N.; Han, X. G.; Jiang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Soil pH buffering capacity (pHBC) plays a crucial role in predicting acidification rates, yet its large-scale patterns and controls are poorly understood, especially for neutral-alkaline soils. Here, we evaluated the spatial patterns and drivers of pHBC along a 3600 km long transect (1900 km sub-transect with carbonate-containing soils and 1700 km sub-transect with non-carbonate-containing soils) across northern China. Soil pHBC was greater in the carbonate-containing soils than in the non-carbonate-containing soils. Acid addition decreased soil pH in the non-carbonate-containing soils more markedly than in the carbonate-containing soils. Within the carbonate soil sub-transect, soil pHBC was positively correlated with cation exchange capacity (CEC), carbonate content and exchangeable sodium (Na) concentration, but negatively correlated with initial pH and clay content, and not correlated with soil organic carbon (SOC) content. Within the non-carbonate sub-transect, soil pHBC was positively related to initial pH, clay content, CEC and exchangeable Na concentration, but not related to SOC content. Carbonate content was the primary determinant of pHBC in the carbonate-containing soils and CEC was the main determinant of buffering capacity in the non-carbonate-containing soils. Along the transect, soil pHBC was different in regions with different aridity index. Soil pHBC was positively related to aridity index and carbonate content across the carbonate-containing soil sub-transect. Our results indicated that mechanisms controlling pHBC differ among neutral-alkaline soils of northern China, especially between carbonate- and non-carbonate-containing soils. This understanding should be incorporated into the acidification risk assessment and landscape management in a changing world.

  3. Geochemical Modeling of pH Neutralization of High Alkaline-Saline Waste Fluids in Unsaturated Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G.; Zheng, Z.

    2004-12-01

    Leakage of high alkaline-saline fluids, such as those stored in Hanford, a site of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in Washington State, has raised attention of scientific community. These fluids have unique thermodynamic and physical properties. Chemical components in the fluids are incompletely dissociated, especially those containing divalent or polyvalent ions. A number of laboratory experiments through injecting synthetic high alkaline-saline fluids (up to 10M of sodium nitrate, pH >12) into the sediments sampled from the DOE Hanford site were conducted to study the reactive transport processes of the fluids in subsurface environments. The experimental results observed show that the composition of the high alkaline sodium nitrate fluids can be drastically changed due to fluid-rock interactions, and eventually lead to pH neutralization of the fluid in the plume front. The dominant fluid-rock interactions are cation exchanges (Na+-K+-Ca+2-Mg+2-H+), precipitation of calcium and magnesium minerals, and dissolution of silica. In order to precisely model the reactive transport of these processes, a coupling of the Pitzer's ion-interaction geochemical model and a flow and transport model would be highly needed. The extended existing reactive geochemical transport code, BIO-CORE2Dc, incorporating a comprehensive Pitzer ion-interaction model, is capable of predicting the experimental observations. In addition, the developed model was tested against two reported cases. In both cases, the measured mean ionic activity coefficients were well reproduced by our model, while the Debye-Hückel model, usually used to calculate aqueous species activities in dilute solutions, was unable to predict the experimental data. Finally, modeling study based on our laboratory column experiment was performed. Our simulation is able to capture the observed pH trends, changes in exchangeable cations such as Ca+2, Mg+2, and formation of secondary precipitation phases in the plume front.

  4. Preliminary evaluation of a constructed wetland for treating extremely alkaline (pH 12) steel slag drainage.

    PubMed

    Mayes, W M; Aumônier, J; Jarvis, A P

    2009-01-01

    High pH (> 12) leachates are an environmental problem associated with drainage from lime (CaO)-rich industrial residues such as steel slags, lime spoil and coal combustion residues. Recent research has highlighted the potential for natural ('volunteer') wetlands to buffer extremely alkaline influent waters. This appears ascribable to high CO(2) partial pressures in the wetland waters from microbial respiration, which accelerates precipitation of calcium carbonate (CaCO(3)), and the high specific surface area for mineral precipitation offered by macrophytes. The research presented here builds on this and provides preliminary evaluation of a constructed wetland built in March 2008 to buffer drainage from steel slag heaps in north-east England. The drainage water from the slag mounds is characterised by a mean pH of 11.9, high concentrations of Ca (up to 700 mg/L), total alkalinity (up to 800 mg/L as CaCO(3)) and are slightly brackish (Na = 300 mg/L; Cl = 400 mg/L) reflecting native groundwaters at this coastal setting. Documented calcite precipitation rates (mean of 5 g CaCO(3)/m(2)/day) from nearby volunteer sites receiving steel slag drainage were used to scale the constructed wetland planted with Phragmites australis; a species found to spontaneously grow in the vicinity of the discharge. Improved performance of the wetland during summer months may at least in part be due to biological activity which enhances rates of calcite precipitation and thus lowering of pH. Secondary Ca-rich precipitates also serve as a sink for some trace elements present at low concentrations in the slag leachate such as Ni and V. The implications for scaling and applying constructed wetlands for highly alkaline drainage are discussed. PMID:19494466

  5. Computational Design of a pH Stable Enzyme: Understanding Molecular Mechanism of Penicillin Acylase's Adaptation to Alkaline Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Suplatov, Dmitry; Panin, Nikolay; Kirilin, Evgeny; Shcherbakova, Tatyana; Kudryavtsev, Pavel; Švedas, Vytas

    2014-01-01

    Protein stability provides advantageous development of novel properties and can be crucial in affording tolerance to mutations that introduce functionally preferential phenotypes. Consequently, understanding the determining factors for protein stability is important for the study of structure-function relationship and design of novel protein functions. Thermal stability has been extensively studied in connection with practical application of biocatalysts. However, little work has been done to explore the mechanism of pH-dependent inactivation. In this study, bioinformatic analysis of the Ntn-hydrolase superfamily was performed to identify functionally important subfamily-specific positions in protein structures. Furthermore, the involvement of these positions in pH-induced inactivation was studied. The conformational mobility of penicillin acylase in Escherichia coli was analyzed through molecular modeling in neutral and alkaline conditions. Two functionally important subfamily-specific residues, Gluβ482 and Aspβ484, were found. Ionization of these residues at alkaline pH promoted the collapse of a buried network of stabilizing interactions that consequently disrupted the functional protein conformation. The subfamily-specific position Aspβ484 was selected as a hotspot for mutation to engineer enzyme variant tolerant to alkaline medium. The corresponding Dβ484N mutant was produced and showed 9-fold increase in stability at alkaline conditions. Bioinformatic analysis of subfamily-specific positions can be further explored to study mechanisms of protein inactivation and to design more stable variants for the engineering of homologous Ntn-hydrolases with improved catalytic properties. PMID:24959852

  6. Thermococcus alcaliphilus sp. nov., a new hyperthermophilic archaeum growing on polysulfide at alkaline pH.

    PubMed

    Keller, M; Braun, F J; Dirmeier, R; Hafenbradl, D; Burggraf, S; Rachel, R; Stetter, K O

    1995-12-01

    A novel coccoid-shaped, hyperthermophilic, heterotrophic member of the archaea was isolated from a shallow marine hydrothermal system at Vulcano Island, Italy. The isolate grew between 56 and 90 degrees C with an optimum around 85 degrees C. The pH range for growth was 6.5 to 10.5, with an optimum around 9.0. Polysulfide and elemental sulfur were reduced to H2S. Sulfur stimulated the growth rate. The isolate fermented yeast extract, peptone, meat extract, tryptone, and casein. Isovalerate, isobutyrate, propionate, acetate, CO2, NH3, and H2S (in the presence of S degrees ) were detected as end products. Growth was not inhibited by H2. Based on DNA-DNA hybridization and 16S rRNA partial sequences, the new isolate represents a new species of Thermococcus, which we named Thermococcus alcaliphilus. The type strain is isolate AEDII12 (DSM 10322). PMID:8588740

  7. Multidrug resistance protein MdtM adds to the repertoire of antiporters involved in alkaline pH homeostasis in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In neutralophilic bacteria, monovalent metal cation/H+ antiporters play a key role in pH homeostasis. In Escherichia coli, only four antiporters (NhaA, NhaB, MdfA and ChaA) are identified to function in maintenance of a stable cytoplasmic pH under conditions of alkaline stress. We hypothesised that the multidrug resistance protein MdtM, a recently characterised homologue of MdfA and a member of the major facilitator superfamily, also functions in alkaline pH homeostasis. Results Assays that compared the growth of an E. coli ΔmdtM deletion mutant transformed with a plasmid encoding wild-type MdtM or the dysfunctional MdtM D22A mutant at different external alkaline pH values (ranging from pH 8.5 to 10) revealed a potential contribution by MdtM to alkaline pH tolerance, but only when millimolar concentrations of sodium or potassium was present in the growth medium. Fluorescence-based activity assays using inverted vesicles generated from transformants of antiporter-deficient (ΔnhaA, ΔnhaB, ΔchaA) E. coli TO114 cells defined MdtM as a low-affinity antiporter that catalysed electrogenic exchange of Na+, K+, Rb+ or Li+ for H+. The K+/H+ antiport reaction had a pH optimum at 9.0, whereas the Na+/H+ exchange activity was optimum at pH 9.25. Measurement of internal cellular pH confirmed MdtM as contributing to maintenance of a stable cytoplasmic pH, acid relative to the external pH, under conditions of alkaline stress. Conclusions Taken together, the results support a role for MdtM in alkaline pH tolerance. MdtM can therefore be added to the currently limited list of antiporters known to function in pH homeostasis in the model organism E. coli. PMID:23701827

  8. Computer simulation of immobilized pH gradients at acidic and alkaline extremes - A quest for extended pH intervals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosher, Richard A.; Bier, Milan; Righetti, Pier Giorgio

    1986-01-01

    Computer simulations of the concentration profiles of simple biprotic ampholytes with Delta pKs 1, 2, and 3, on immobilized pH gradients (IPG) at extreme pH values (pH 3-4 and pH 10-11) show markedly skewed steady-state profiles with increasing kurtosis at higher Delta pK values. Across neutrality, all the peaks are symmetric irrespective of their Delta pK values, but they show very high contribution to the conductivity of the background gel and significant alteration of the local buffering capacity. The problems of skewness, due to the exponential conductivity profiles at low and high pHs, and of gel burning due to a strong electroosmotic flow generated by the net charges in the gel matrix, also at low and high pHs, are solved by incorporating in the IPG gel a strong viscosity gradient. This is generated by a gradient of linear polyacrylamide which is trapped in the gel by the polymerization process.

  9. Catalytically active alkaline molten globular enzyme: Effect of pH and temperature on the structural integrity of 5-aminolevulinate synthase.

    PubMed

    Stojanovski, Bosko M; Breydo, Leonid; Hunter, Gregory A; Uversky, Vladimir N; Ferreira, Gloria C

    2014-12-01

    5-Aminolevulinate synthase (ALAS), a pyridoxal-5'phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme, catalyzes the first step of heme biosynthesis in mammals. Circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopies were used to examine the effects of pH (1.0-3.0 and 7.5-10.5) and temperature (20 and 37°C) on the structural integrity of ALAS. The secondary structure, as deduced from far-UV CD, is mostly resilient to pH and temperature changes. Partial unfolding was observed at pH2.0, but further decreasing pH resulted in acid-induced refolding of the secondary structure to nearly native levels. The tertiary structure rigidity, monitored by near-UV CD, is lost under acidic and specific alkaline conditions (pH10.5 and pH9.5/37°C), where ALAS populates a molten globule state. As the enzyme becomes less structured with increased alkalinity, the chiral environment of the internal aldimine is also modified, with a shift from a 420nm to 330nm dichroic band. Under acidic conditions, the PLP cofactor dissociates from ALAS. Reaction with 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid corroborates increased exposure of hydrophobic clusters in the alkaline and acidic molten globules, although the reaction is more pronounced with the latter. Furthermore, quenching the intrinsic fluorescence of ALAS with acrylamide at pH1.0 and 9.5 yielded subtly different dynamic quenching constants. The alkaline molten globule state of ALAS is catalytically active (pH9.5/37°C), although the kcat value is significantly decreased. Finally, the binding of 5-aminolevulinate restricts conformational fluctuations in the alkaline molten globule. Overall, our findings prove how the structural plasticity of ALAS contributes to reaching a functional enzyme. PMID:25240868

  10. Diversity and food web structure of nematode communities under high soil salinity and alkaline pH.

    PubMed

    Salamún, Peter; Kucanová, Eva; Brázová, Tímea; Miklisová, Dana; Renčo, Marek; Hanzelová, Vladimíra

    2014-10-01

    A long-term and intensive magnesium (Mg) ore processing in Slovenské Magnezitové Závody a.s. in Jelšava has resulted in a high Mg content and alkaline pH of the soil environment, noticeable mainly in the close vicinity of the smelter. Nematode communities strongly reacted to the contamination mostly by a decrease in abundance of the sensitive groups. Nematodes from c-p 1 group and bacterivores, tolerant to pollution played a significant role in establishing the dominance at all sites. With increasing distance from the pollution source, the nematode communities were more structured and complex, with an increase in proportion of sensitive c-p 4 and 5 nematodes, composed mainly of carnivores and omnivores. Various ecological indices (e.g. MI2-5, SI, H') indicated similar improvement of farther soil ecosystems. PMID:24996531

  11. High-resolution Imaging of pH in Alkaline Sediments and Water Based on a New Rapid Response Fluorescent Planar Optode.

    PubMed

    Han, Chao; Yao, Lei; Xu, Di; Xie, Xianchuan; Zhang, Chaosheng

    2016-01-01

    A new dual-lumophore optical sensor combined with a robust RGB referencing method was developed for two-dimensional (2D) pH imaging in alkaline sediments and water. The pH sensor film consisted of a proton-permeable polymer (PVC) in which two dyes with different pH sensitivities and emission colors: (1) chloro phenyl imino propenyl aniline (CPIPA) and (2) the coumarin dye Macrolex(®) fluorescence yellow 10 GN (MFY-10 GN) were entrapped. Calibration experiments revealed the typical sigmoid function and temperature dependencies. This sensor featured high sensitivity and fast response over the alkaline working ranges from pH 7.5 to pH 10.5. Cross-sensitivity towards ionic strength (IS) was found to be negligible for freshwater when IS <0.1 M. The sensor had a spatial resolution of approximately 22 μm and aresponse time of <120 s when going from pH 7.0 to 9.0. The feasibility of the sensor was demonstrated using the pH microelectrode. An example of pH image obtained in the natrual freshwater sediment and water associated with the photosynthesis of Vallisneria spiral species was also presented, suggesting that the sensor held great promise for the field applications. PMID:27199163

  12. High-resolution Imaging of pH in Alkaline Sediments and Water Based on a New Rapid Response Fluorescent Planar Optode

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chao; Yao, Lei; Xu, Di; Xie, Xianchuan; Zhang, Chaosheng

    2016-01-01

    A new dual-lumophore optical sensor combined with a robust RGB referencing method was developed for two-dimensional (2D) pH imaging in alkaline sediments and water. The pH sensor film consisted of a proton-permeable polymer (PVC) in which two dyes with different pH sensitivities and emission colors: (1) chloro phenyl imino propenyl aniline (CPIPA) and (2) the coumarin dye Macrolex® fluorescence yellow 10 GN (MFY-10 GN) were entrapped. Calibration experiments revealed the typical sigmoid function and temperature dependencies. This sensor featured high sensitivity and fast response over the alkaline working ranges from pH 7.5 to pH 10.5. Cross-sensitivity towards ionic strength (IS) was found to be negligible for freshwater when IS <0.1 M. The sensor had a spatial resolution of approximately 22 μm and aresponse time of <120 s when going from pH 7.0 to 9.0. The feasibility of the sensor was demonstrated using the pH microelectrode. An example of pH image obtained in the natrual freshwater sediment and water associated with the photosynthesis of Vallisneria spiral species was also presented, suggesting that the sensor held great promise for the field applications. PMID:27199163

  13. High-resolution Imaging of pH in Alkaline Sediments and Water Based on a New Rapid Response Fluorescent Planar Optode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Chao; Yao, Lei; Xu, Di; Xie, Xianchuan; Zhang, Chaosheng

    2016-05-01

    A new dual-lumophore optical sensor combined with a robust RGB referencing method was developed for two-dimensional (2D) pH imaging in alkaline sediments and water. The pH sensor film consisted of a proton-permeable polymer (PVC) in which two dyes with different pH sensitivities and emission colors: (1) chloro phenyl imino propenyl aniline (CPIPA) and (2) the coumarin dye Macrolex® fluorescence yellow 10 GN (MFY-10 GN) were entrapped. Calibration experiments revealed the typical sigmoid function and temperature dependencies. This sensor featured high sensitivity and fast response over the alkaline working ranges from pH 7.5 to pH 10.5. Cross-sensitivity towards ionic strength (IS) was found to be negligible for freshwater when IS <0.1 M. The sensor had a spatial resolution of approximately 22 μm and aresponse time of <120 s when going from pH 7.0 to 9.0. The feasibility of the sensor was demonstrated using the pH microelectrode. An example of pH image obtained in the natrual freshwater sediment and water associated with the photosynthesis of Vallisneria spiral species was also presented, suggesting that the sensor held great promise for the field applications.

  14. The Rim101p/PacC pathway and alkaline pH regulate pattern formation in yeast colonies.

    PubMed

    Piccirillo, Sarah; White, Melissa G; Murphy, Jeffrey C; Law, Douglas J; Honigberg, Saul M

    2010-03-01

    Multicellular organisms utilize cell-to-cell signals to build patterns of cell types within embryos, but the ability of fungi to form organized communities has been largely unexplored. Here we report that colonies of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae formed sharply divided layers of sporulating and nonsporulating cells. Sporulation initiated in the colony's interior, and this region expanded upward as the colony matured. Two key activators of sporulation, IME1 and IME2, were initially transcribed in overlapping regions of the colony, and this overlap corresponded to the initial sporulation region. The development of colony sporulation patterns depended on cell-to-cell signals, as demonstrated by chimeric colonies, which contain a mixture of two strains. One such signal is alkaline pH, mediated through the Rim101p/PacC pathway. Meiotic-arrest mutants that increased alkali production stimulated expression of an early meiotic gene in neighboring cells, whereas a mutant that decreased alkali production (cit1Delta) decreased this expression. Addition of alkali to colonies accelerated the expansion of the interior region of sporulation, whereas inactivation of the Rim101p pathway inhibited this expansion. Thus, the Rim101 pathway mediates colony patterning by responding to cell-to-cell pH signals. Cell-to-cell signals coupled with nutrient gradients may allow efficient spore formation and spore dispersal in natural environments. PMID:20038633

  15. Estimation and Comparison of Salivary Calcium, Phosphorous, Alkaline Phosphatase and pH Levels in Periodontal Health and Disease: A Cross-sectional Biochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rufi Murad; Suragimath, Girish; Zope, Sameer

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In oral diagnostics there is a great challenge to determine biomarkers for screening and evaluating the disease activity. Biomarkers can also serve as a useful tool to measure the efficacy of the therapy. Aim To evaluate and compare the levels of salivary calcium, phosphorous, alkaline phosphatase and pH levels in periodontally healthy subjects and patients with gingivitis and periodontitis. Materials and Methods The present study consisted of 150 subjects aged between 20-45 years who were divided into three groups; periodontally healthy, gingivitis and chronic periodontitis. Prior to the clinical examination the demographic details, relevant information of the subject, gingival index, plaque index, Oral Hygiene Index (OHI) and pH were recorded. Biochemical assay of saliva i.e., inorganic calcium, phosphorous and alkaline phosphatase were estimated by colorimetric method. ANOVA and Tukey’s test were applied for statistical analysis. Results The mean levels of biomarkers studied were; inorganic calcium (12.55μg/dl), phosphorous (14.50μg/dl), alkaline phosphatase (49.62μg/dl) and pH (11.65). There was a gradual increase in these levels as the condition progressed from health to gingivitis or periodontitis which was statistically significant at p<0.001. Conclusion Based on these results, it can be concluded that, the biomarkers like salivary calcium, phosphorous, alkaline phosphatase and pH can be considered for evaluating the diagnosis and prognosis of periodontal tissues in disease and health.

  16. Thin-Layer Chemical Modulations by a Combined Selective Proton Pump and pH Probe for Direct Alkalinity Detection.

    PubMed

    Afshar, Majid Ghahraman; Crespo, Gastón A; Bakker, Eric

    2015-07-01

    We report a general concept based on a selective electrochemical ion pump used for creating concentration perturbations in thin layer samples (∼40 μL). As a first example, hydrogen ions are released from a selective polymeric membrane (proton pump) and the resulting pH is assessed potentiometrically with a second membrane placed directly opposite. By applying a constant potential modulation for 30 s, an induced proton concentration of up to 350 mM may be realized. This concept may become an attractive tool for in situ titrations without the need for sampling, because the thin layer eventually re-equilibrates with the contacting bulk sample. Acid-base titrations of NaOH and Na2 CO3 are demonstrated. The determination of total alkalinity in a river water sample is carried out, giving levels (23.1 mM) comparable to that obtained by standard methods (23.6 mM). The concept may be easily extended to other ions (cations, anions, polyions) and may become attractive for environmental and clinical applications. PMID:26014101

  17. Sensitivity of some marine bacteria, a moderate halophile, and Escherichia coli to uncouplers at alkaline pH.

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, R A; Wisse, G A; Stejskal, F L

    1988-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of uncouplers on amino acid transport into three marine bacteria, Vibrio alginolyticus 118, Vibrio parahaemolyticus 113, and Alteromonas haloplanktis 214, into a moderate halophile, Vibrio costicola NRC 37001, and into Escherichia coli K-12 were found to vary depending upon the uncoupler tested, its concentration, and the pH. Higher concentrations of all of the uncouplers were required to inhibit transport at pH 8.5 than at pH 7.0. The protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone showed the greatest reduction in inhibitory capacity as the pH was increased, carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone showed less reduction, and 3,3',4',5-tetrachlorosalicylanilide was almost as effective as an inhibitor of amino acid transport at pH 8.5 as at pH 7.0 for all of the organisms except A. haloplanktis 214. Differences between the protonophores in their relative activities at pHs 7.0 and 8.5 were attributed to differences in their pK values. 3,3',4',5-Tetrachlorosalicylanilide, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide, and NaCN all inhibited Na+ extrusion from Na+-loaded cells of V. alginolyticus 118 at pH 8.5. The results support the conclusion that Na+ extrusion from this organism at pH 8.5 occurs as a result of Na+/H+ antiport activity. Data are presented indicating the presence in V. alginolyticus 118 of an NADH oxidase which is stimulated by Na+ at pH 8.5. PMID:3045092

  18. Sensitivity of some marine bacteria, a moderate halophile, and Escherichia coli to uncouplers at alkaline pH.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, R A; Wisse, G A; Stejskal, F L

    1988-09-01

    The inhibitory effects of uncouplers on amino acid transport into three marine bacteria, Vibrio alginolyticus 118, Vibrio parahaemolyticus 113, and Alteromonas haloplanktis 214, into a moderate halophile, Vibrio costicola NRC 37001, and into Escherichia coli K-12 were found to vary depending upon the uncoupler tested, its concentration, and the pH. Higher concentrations of all of the uncouplers were required to inhibit transport at pH 8.5 than at pH 7.0. The protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone showed the greatest reduction in inhibitory capacity as the pH was increased, carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone showed less reduction, and 3,3',4',5-tetrachlorosalicylanilide was almost as effective as an inhibitor of amino acid transport at pH 8.5 as at pH 7.0 for all of the organisms except A. haloplanktis 214. Differences between the protonophores in their relative activities at pHs 7.0 and 8.5 were attributed to differences in their pK values. 3,3',4',5-Tetrachlorosalicylanilide, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide, and NaCN all inhibited Na+ extrusion from Na+-loaded cells of V. alginolyticus 118 at pH 8.5. The results support the conclusion that Na+ extrusion from this organism at pH 8.5 occurs as a result of Na+/H+ antiport activity. Data are presented indicating the presence in V. alginolyticus 118 of an NADH oxidase which is stimulated by Na+ at pH 8.5. PMID:3045092

  19. Application of a fluidized bed reactor charged with aragonite for control of alkalinity, pH and carbon dioxide in marine recirculating aquaculture systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paul S Wills, PhD; Pfeiffer, Timothy; Baptiste, Richard; Watten, Barnaby J.

    2016-01-01

    Control of alkalinity, dissolved carbon dioxide (dCO2), and pH are critical in marine recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) in order to maintain health and maximize growth. A small-scale prototype aragonite sand filled fluidized bed reactor was tested under varying conditions of alkalinity and dCO2 to develop and model the response of dCO2 across the reactor. A large-scale reactor was then incorporated into an operating marine recirculating aquaculture system to observe the reactor as the system moved toward equilibrium. The relationship between alkalinity dCO2, and pH across the reactor are described by multiple regression equations. The change in dCO2 across the small-scale reactor indicated a strong likelihood that an equilibrium alkalinity would be maintained by using a fluidized bed aragonite reactor. The large-scale reactor verified this observation and established equilibrium at an alkalinity of approximately 135 mg/L as CaCO3, dCO2 of 9 mg/L, and a pH of 7.0 within 4 days that was stable during a 14 day test period. The fluidized bed aragonite reactor has the potential to simplify alkalinity and pH control, and aid in dCO2 control in RAS design and operation. Aragonite sand, purchased in bulk, is less expensive than sodium bicarbonate and could reduce overall operating production costs.

  20. Combined effects of carbonate alkalinity and pH on survival, growth and haemocyte parameters of the Venus clam Cyclina sinensis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tingting; Lai, Qifang; Yao, Zongli; Lu, Jianxue; Zhou, Kai; Wang, Hui

    2013-08-01

    Carbonate alkalinity (CA) and pH are considered to be two important stress factors that determine the response of aquatic animals to sudden transfers into saline-alkaline water. To evaluate the potential for aquaculture production of Venus clams (Cyclina sinensis) farmed in saline-alkaline water, the combined effects of CA (2.5 (control), 10.0, 20.0 and 40.0 meq/l) and pH (8.0 (control), 8.5, 9.0 and 9.5) on survival rate was monitored every day for 10 days. Length gain rate (LGR) and weight gain rate (WGR) were also monitored for two months, and total haemocyte count (THC), phagocytic rate (PR) and haemocyte mortality (HM) were measured for 3, 6, 12 and 24 days under the same water temperature (20 °C) and salinity (15‰) conditions. The results showed that survival rates in treatments of CA ≤ 20.0, combined with pH ≤ 9.0, were 100%. LGR and WGR in treatments of CA 2.5 & pH 8.0 (control), CA 2.5 & pH 8.5 and CA 10.0 & pH 8.0 exhibited the largest values (P > 0.05), while in other treatments, they showed a decreasing trend with an increase in either CA or pH or both (P < 0.05). Similarly, for THC, PR and HM, no significant differences were observed among the fast growth treatments during the entire experimental period (P > 0.05), however, in other treatments, they presented significant differences, especially on day 3 and 6 (P < 0.05), most notably with increases in CA or pH, but returned to control levels on day 12. In conclusion, in this study, a strong interaction between CA and pH was observed. Additionally, it was ascertained that the Venus clam C. sinensis can withstand the stress of CA 20.0 combined pH 9.0, although individuals grows slowly and may take approximately 12 days to recover to the unstressed condition. PMID:23711470

  1. The impact of pH on floc structure characteristic of polyferric chloride in a low DOC and high alkalinity surface water treatment.

    PubMed

    Cao, Baichuan; Gao, Baoyu; Liu, Xin; Wang, Mengmeng; Yang, Zhonglian; Yue, Qinyan

    2011-11-15

    The adjustment of pH is an important way to enhance removal efficiency in coagulation units, and in this process, the floc size, strength and structure can be changed, influencing the subsequent solid/liquid separation effect. In this study, an inorganic polymer coagulant, polyferric chloride (PFC) was used in a low dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and high alkalinity surface water treatment. The influence of coagulation pH on removal efficiency, floc growth, strength, re-growth capability and fractal dimension was examined. The optimum dosage was predetermined as 0.150 mmol/L, and excellent particle and organic matter removal appeared in the pH range of 5.50-5.75. The structure characteristics of flocs formed under four pH conditions were investigated through the analysis of floc size, effect of shear and particle scattering properties by a laser scattering instrument. The results indicated that flocs formed at neutral pH condition gave the largest floc size and the highest growth rate. During the coagulation period, the fractal dimension of floc aggregates increased in the first minutes and then decreased and larger flocs generally had smaller fractal dimensions. The floc strength, which was assessed by the relationship of floc diameter and velocity gradient, decreased with the increase of coagulation pH. Flocs formed at pH 4.00 had better recovery capability when exposed to lower shear forces, while flocs formed at neutral and alkaline conditions had better performance under higher shear forces. PMID:21959092

  2. The mycorrhiza fungus Piriformospora indica induces fast root-surface pH signaling and primes systemic alkalinization of the leaf apoplast upon powdery mildew infection.

    PubMed

    Felle, Hubert H; Waller, Frank; Molitor, Alexandra; Kogel, Karl-Heinz

    2009-09-01

    We analyze here, by noninvasive electrophysiology, local and systemic plant responses in the interaction of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) with the root-colonizing basidiomycete Piriformospora indica. In the short term (seconds, minutes), a constant flow of P. indica chlamydospores along primary roots altered surface pH characteristics; whereas the root-hair zone transiently alkalized-a typical elicitor response-the elongation zone acidified, indicative of enhanced H(+) extrusion and plasma membrane H(+) ATPase stimulation. Eight to 10 min after treating roots with chlamydospores, the apoplastic pH of leaves began to acidify, which contrasts with observations of an alkalinization response to various stressors and microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs). In the long term (days), plants with P. indica-colonized roots responded to inoculation with the leaf-pathogenic powdery mildew fungus Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei with a leaf apoplastic pH increase of about 2, while the leaf apoplast of noncolonized barley responded to B. graminis f. sp. hordei merely with a pH increase of 0.8. The strong apoplastic pH response is reminiscent of B. graminis f. sp. hordei-triggered pH shifts in resistance gene-mediated resistant barley leaves or upon treatment with a chemical resistance inducer. In contrast, the MAMP N-acetylchito-octaose did not induce resistance to B. graminis f. sp. hordei and did not trigger the primed apoplastic pH shift. We speculate that the primed pH increase is indicative of and supports the potentiated systemic response to B. graminis f. sp. hordei-induced by P. indica in barley. PMID:19656052

  3. Improving the Expression of Recombinant Proteins in E. coli BL21 (DE3) under Acetate Stress: An Alkaline pH Shift Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hengwei; Wang, Fengqing; Wang, Wei; Yao, Xueling; Wei, Dongzhi; Cheng, Hairong; Deng, Zixin

    2014-01-01

    Excess acetate has long been an issue for the production of recombinant proteins in E. coli cells. Recently, improvements in acetate tolerance have been achieved through the use of genetic strategies and medium supplementation with certain amino acids and pyrimidines. The aim of our study was to evaluate an alternative to improve the acetate tolerance of E. coli BL21 (DE3), a popular strain used to express recombinant proteins. In this work we reported the cultivation of BL21 (DE3) in complex media containing acetate at high concentrations. In the presence of 300 mM acetate, compared with pH 6.5, pH 7.5 improved cell growth by approximately 71%, reduced intracellular acetate by approximately 50%, and restored the expression of glutathione S-transferase (GST), green fluorescent protein (GFP) and cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (CYP). Further experiments showed that alkaline pHs up to 8.5 had little inhibition in the expression of GST, GFP and CYP. In addition, the detrimental effect of acetate on the reduction of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) by the cell membrane, an index of cellular metabolic capacity, was substantially alleviated by a shift to alkaline pH values of 7.5–8.0. Thus, we suggest an approach of cultivating E. coli BL21 (DE3) at pH 8.0±0.5 to minimize the effects caused by acetate stress. The proposed strategy of an alkaline pH shift is a simple approach to solving similar bioprocessing problems in the production of biofuels and biochemicals from sugars. PMID:25402470

  4. pH Optrode Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabacco, Mary Beth; Zhou, Quan

    1995-01-01

    pH-sensitive chromophoric reagents immobilized in porous optical fibers. Optoelectronic instrumentation system measures acidity or alkalinity of aqueous nutrient solution. Includes one or more optrodes, which are optical-fiber chemical sensors, in sense, analogous to electrodes but not subject to some of spurious effects distorting readings taken by pH electrodes. Concept of optrodes also described in "Ethylene-Vapor Optrodes" (KSC-11579). pH optrode sensor head, with lead-in and lead-out optical fibers, convenient for monitoring solutions located away from supporting electronic equipment.

  5. Human ASIC3 channel dynamically adapts its activity to sense the extracellular pH in both acidic and alkaline directions

    PubMed Central

    Delaunay, Anne; Gasull, Xavier; Salinas, Miguel; Noël, Jacques; Friend, Valérie; Lingueglia, Eric; Deval, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    In rodent sensory neurons, acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3) has recently emerged as a particularly important sensor of nonadaptive pain associated with tissue acidosis. However, little is known about the human ASIC3 channel, which includes three splice variants differing in their C-terminal domain (hASIC3a, hASIC3b, and hASIC3c). hASIC3a transcripts represent the main mRNAs expressed in both peripheral and central neuronal tissues (dorsal root ganglia [DRG], spinal cord, and brain), where a small proportion of hASIC3c transcripts is also detected. We show that hASIC3 channels (hASIC3a, hASIC3b, or hASIC3c) are able to directly sense extracellular pH changes not only during acidification (up to pH 5.0), but also during alkalization (up to pH 8.0), an original and inducible property yet unknown. When the external pH decreases, hASIC3 display a transient acid mode with brief activation that is relevant to the classical ASIC currents, as previously described. On the other hand, an external pH increase activates a sustained alkaline mode leading to a constitutive activity at resting pH. Both modes are inhibited by the APETx2 toxin, an ASIC3-type channel inhibitor. The alkaline sensitivity of hASIC3 is an intrinsic property of the channel, which is supported by the extracellular loop and involves two arginines (R68 and R83) only present in the human clone. hASIC3 is thus able to sense the extracellular pH in both directions and therefore to dynamically adapt its activity between pH 5.0 and 8.0, a property likely to participate in the fine tuning of neuronal membrane potential and to neuron sensitization in various pH environments. PMID:22829666

  6. Transcriptional analysis of the F0F1 ATPase operon of Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 reveals strong induction by alkaline pH.

    PubMed

    Barriuso-Iglesias, Mónica; Barreiro, Carlos; Flechoso, Fabio; Martín, Juan F

    2006-01-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum, a soil Gram-positive bacterium used for industrial amino acid production, was found to grow optimally at pH 7.0-9.0 when incubated in 5 litre fermenters under pH-controlled conditions. The highest biomass was accumulated at pH 9.0. Growth still occurred at pH 9.5 but at a reduced rate. The expression of the pH-regulated F0 F1 ATPase operon (containing the eight genes atpBEFHAGDC) was induced at alkaline pH. A 7.5 kb transcript, corresponding to the eight-gene operon, was optimally expressed at pH 9.0. The same occurred with a 1.2 kb transcript corresponding to the atpB gene. RT-PCR studies confirmed the alkaline pH induction of the F0 F1 operon and the existence of the atpI gene. The atpI gene, located upstream of the F0 F1 operon, was expressed at a lower level than the polycistronic 7.5 kb mRNA, from a separate promoter (P-atp1). Expression of the major promoter of the F0 F1 operon, designated P-atp2, and the P-atp1 promoter was quantified by coupling them to the pET2 promoter-probe vector. Both P-atp1 and P-atp2 were functional in C. glutamicum and Escherichia coli. Primer extension analysis identified one transcription start point inside each of the two promoter regions. The P-atp1 promoter fitted the consensus sequence of promoters recognized by the vegetative sigma factor of C. glutamicum, whereas the -35 and -10 boxes of P-atp2 fitted the consensus sequence for sigma(H)-recognized Mycobacterium tuberculosis promoters C(C)/(G)GG(A)/(G)AC 17-22 nt (C)/(G)GTT(C)/(G), known to be involved in expression of heat-shock and other stress-response genes. These results suggest that the F0 F1 operon is highly expressed at alkaline pH, probably using a sigma (H) RNA polymerase. PMID:16385111

  7. pH. Agricultural Lesson Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale. Dept. of Agricultural Education and Mechanization.

    This lesson plan is intended for use in conducting classes on the effect of pH on plant growth. Presented first are an attention step/problem statement and a series of questions and answers designed to convey general information about soil pH and its effect on plants. The following topics are among those discussed: acidity and alkalinity; the…

  8. Plant Habitat (PH)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onate, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will soon have a platform for conducting fundamental research of Large Plants. Plant Habitat (PH) is designed to be a fully controllable environment for high-quality plant physiological research. PH will control light quality, level, and timing, temperature, CO2, relative humidity, and irrigation, while scrubbing ethylene. Additional capabilities include leaf temperature and root zone moisture and oxygen sensing. The light cap will have red (630 nm), blue (450 nm), green (525 nm), far red (730 nm) and broad spectrum white LEDs. There will be several internal cameras (visible and IR) to monitor and record plant growth and operations.

  9. pH optrode

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M. Allen; Langry, Kevin C.

    1993-01-01

    A process is provided for forming a long-lasting, stable, pH-sensitive dye-acrylamide copolymer useful as a pH-sensitive material for use in an optrode or other device sensitive to pH. An optrode may be made by mechanically attaching the copolymer to a sensing device such as an optical fiber.

  10. pH Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunelli, Bruno; Scagnolari, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    The exposition of the pervasive concept of pH, of its foundations and implementation as a meaningful quantitative measurement, in nonspecialist university texts is often not easy to follow because too many of its theoretical and operative underpinnings are neglected. To help the inquiring student we provide a concise introduction to the depth just…

  11. Ph.D. shortage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The late 1990s will see a shortage of Ph.D. graduates, according to the Association of American Universities, Washington, D.C. AAU's new comprehensive study, “The Ph.D. Shortage: The Federal Role,” reports that competition for new Ph.D.s is already intense and can only intensify because demand is greater than supply in both academic and nonacademic markets.Doctoral education plays an increasingly important role in U.S. research and development programs. Students have a pivotal part in doing research and enriching it with new ideas. The AAU report says that graduate students are “major determinants of the creativity and productivity of U.S. academic research, the source of more than 50% of the nation's basic research.’ The market for doctoral education extends beyond the university. In 1985, about 43% of all Ph.D.s employed in this country were working outside higher education; the demand for doctorate recipients in nonacademic sectors continues to grow.

  12. Alkaline pH- and cAMP-induced V-ATPase membrane accumulation is mediated by protein kinase A in epididymal clear cells.

    PubMed

    Pastor-Soler, Núria M; Hallows, Kenneth R; Smolak, Christy; Gong, Fan; Brown, Dennis; Breton, Sylvie

    2008-02-01

    In the epididymis, low luminal bicarbonate and acidic pH maintain sperm quiescent during maturation and storage. The vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) in epididymal clear cells plays a major role in luminal acidification. We have shown previously that cAMP, luminal alkaline pH, and activation of the bicarbonate-regulated soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) induce V-ATPase apical accumulation in these cells, thereby stimulating proton secretion into the epididymal lumen. Here we examined whether protein kinase A (PKA) is involved in this response. Confocal immunofluorescence labeling on rat epididymis perfused in vivo showed that at luminal acidic pH (6.5), V-ATPase was distributed between short apical microvilli and subapical endosomes. The specific PKA activator N(6)-monobutyryl-3'-5'-cyclic monophosphate (6-MB-cAMP, 1 mM) induced elongation of apical microvilli and accumulation of V-ATPase in these structures. The PKA inhibitor myristoylated-PKI (mPKI, 10 microM) inhibited the apical accumulation of V-ATPase induced by 6-MB-cAMP. Perfusion at pH 6.5 with 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-2-O-methyl-cAMP (8CPT-2-O-Me-cAMP; 10 microM), an activator of the exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac), did not induce V-ATPase apical accumulation. When applied at a higher concentration (100 microM), 8CPT-2-O-Me-cAMP induced V-ATPase apical accumulation, but this effect was completely inhibited by mPKI, suggesting crossover effects on the PKA pathway with this compound at high concentrations. Importantly, the physiologically relevant alkaline pH-induced apical V-ATPase accumulation was completely inhibited by pretreatment with mPKI. We conclude that direct stimulation of PKA activity by cAMP is necessary and sufficient for the alkaline pH-induced accumulation of V-ATPase in clear cell apical microvilli. PMID:18160485

  13. Extending the working pH of nitrobenzene degradation using ultrasonic/heterogeneous Fenton to the alkaline range via amino acid modification.

    PubMed

    ElShafei, Gamal M S; Yehia, F Z; Dimitry, O I H; Badawi, A M; Eshaq, Gh

    2015-11-01

    Oxides of iron, α-Fe2O3 (I), and copper, CuO (II) prepared by usual precipitation method without surfactant were used at room temperature in the process of nitrobenzene (10mgL(-1)) degradation at different pH values with ultrasonic at 20kHz. The degradation was complete in 20 and 30min for (I) and (II), respectively in the pH range 2-7 using1.0gL(-1) of solids and 10mM of H2O2. A remarkable decrease in degradation efficiency was recorded on increasing the pH to values higher than the neutral range. This loss in efficiency was cancelled to a great extent through modifying the used oxides with amino acids. Arginine showed higher improving effect to (II) (1:1 weight ration) than glycine or glutamic acid. Modification of both oxides with increasing amounts of arginine increased the degradation efficiency of (I) in a more regular way than in case of (II). However, the extent of improvement due to amino acid modification was higher in case of (II) because of its originally low degradation efficiency in strongly alkaline media. PMID:25592465

  14. Chemical equilibrium model for interfacial activity of crude oil in aqueous alkaline solution: the effects of pH, alkali and salt

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, M.; Yen, T.F.

    1980-11-01

    A chemical equilibrium model for interfacial activity of crude in aqueous alkaline solution is proposed. The model predicts the observed effects of pH and concentrations of alkali and salt on the interfacial tension (IFT). The model proposed was shown to describe the observed effects of acid content, pH, and sodium ions on the interfacial activity of crude oil in water. Once the pH of the interface reaches the pKa of the acids, sometimes with the help of addition of some salt, the IFT experiences a sudden steep drop to the range of 10/sup -2/ dynes/cm. After that, further addition of sodium either in the form of NaOH or NaCl is going to increase the IFT due to a shift of equilibriumn to the formation of undissociated soap. This was confirmed by the difference in the observed effect of sodium on the IFT of the extracted soap molecules which are dissociated easily and those which are associated highly and precipitated easily. These soap molecules have dissociation constant values ranging from below 10/sup -2/ to above one. 13 references.

  15. Technical Note: Large overestimation of pCO2 calculated from pH and alkalinity in acidic, organic-rich freshwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abril, G.; Bouillon, S.; Darchambeau, F.; Teodoru, C. R.; Marwick, T. R.; Tamooh, F.; Ochieng Omengo, F.; Geeraert, N.; Deirmendjian, L.; Polsenaere, P.; Borges, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Inland waters have been recognized as a significant source of carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere at the global scale. Fluxes of CO2 between aquatic systems and the atmosphere are calculated from the gas transfer velocity and the water-air gradient of the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2). Currently, direct measurements of water pCO2 remain scarce in freshwaters, and most published pCO2 data are calculated from temperature, pH and total alkalinity (TA). Here, we compare calculated (pH and TA) and measured (equilibrator and headspace) water pCO2 in a large array of temperate and tropical freshwaters. The 761 data points cover a wide range of values for TA (0 to 14 200 μmol L-1), pH (3.94 to 9.17), measured pCO2 (36 to 23 000 ppmv), and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) (29 to 3970 μmol L-1). Calculated pCO2 were >10% higher than measured pCO2 in 60% of the samples (with a median overestimation of calculated pCO2 compared to measured pCO2 of 2560 ppmv) and were >100% higher in the 25% most organic-rich and acidic samples (with a median overestimation of 9080 ppmv). We suggest these large overestimations of calculated pCO2 with respect to measured pCO2 are due to the combination of two cumulative effects: (1) a more significant contribution of organic acids anions to TA in waters with low carbonate alkalinity and high DOC concentrations; (2) a lower buffering capacity of the carbonate system at low pH, which increases the sensitivity of calculated pCO2 to TA in acidic and organic-rich waters. No empirical relationship could be derived from our data set in order to correct calculated pCO2 for this bias. Owing to the widespread distribution of acidic, organic-rich freshwaters, we conclude that regional and global estimates of CO2 outgassing from freshwaters based on pH and TA data only are most likely overestimated, although the magnitude of the overestimation needs further quantitative analysis. Direct measurements of pCO2 are recommended in inland waters in general

  16. A low-temperature-active alkaline pectate lyase from Xanthomonas campestris ACCC 10048 with high activity over a wide pH range.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Peng; Meng, Kun; Wang, Yaru; Luo, Huiying; Shi, Pengjun; Huang, Huoqing; Tu, Tao; Yang, Peilong; Yao, Bin

    2012-11-01

    Alkaline pectate lyases are favorable for the textile industry. Here, we report the gene cloning and expression of a low-temperature-active alkaline pectate lyase (PL D) from Xanthomonas campestris ACCC 10048. Deduced PL D consists of a putative 27-residue signal peptide and a catalytic domain of 320 residues belonging to family PF09492. Recombinant PL D (r-PL D) produced in Escherichia coli was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity with a single step of Ni(2+)-NTA affinity chromatography and showed an apparent molecular weight of ~38 kDa. The pH and temperature optima of r-PL D were found to be 9.0 °C and 30 °C, respectively. Compared with its microbial counterparts, r-PL D had higher activity over a wide pH range (>45 % of the maximum activity at pH 3.0-12.0) and at lower temperatures (>35 % of activity even at 0 °C). The K(m) and V(max) values of r-PL D for polygalacturonic acid were 4.9 gl(-1) and 30.1 μmolmin(-1) mg(-1), respectively. Compared with the commercial compound pectinase from Novozymes, r-PL D showed similar efficacy in reducing the intrinsic viscosity of polygalacturonic acid (35.1 % vs. 36.5 %) and in bioscouring of jute (10.25 % vs. 10.82 %). Thus, r-PL D is a valuable additive candidate for the textile industry. PMID:22983714

  17. 17-4 PH and 15-5 PH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Howard T.

    1995-01-01

    17-4 PH and 15-5 PH are extremely useful and versatile precipitation-hardening stainless steels. Armco 17-4 PH is well suited for the magnetic particle inspection requirements of Aerospace Material Specification. Armco 15-5 PH and 17-4 PH are produced in billet, plate, bar, and wire. Also, 15-5 PH is able to meet the stringent mechanical properties required in the aerospace and nuclear industries. Both products are easy to heat treat and machine, making them very useful in many applications.

  18. Eukaryotic diversity at pH extremes

    PubMed Central

    Amaral-Zettler, Linda A.

    2013-01-01

    Extremely acidic (pH < 3) and extremely alkaline (pH > 9) environments support a diversity of single-cell and to a lesser extent, multicellular eukaryotic life. This study compared alpha and beta diversity in eukaryotic communities from seven diverse aquatic environments with pH values ranging from 2 to 11 using massively-parallel pyrotag sequencing targeting the V9 hypervariable region of the 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. A total of 946 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were recovered at a 6% cut-off level (94% similarity) across the sampled environments. Hierarchical clustering of the samples segregated the communities into acidic and alkaline groups. Similarity percentage (SIMPER) analysis followed by indicator OTU analysis (IOA) and non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) were used to determine which characteristic groups of eukaryotic taxa typify acidic or alkaline extremes and the extent to which pH explains eukaryotic community structure in these environments. Spain's Rio Tinto yielded the fewest observed OTUs while Nebraska Sandhills alkaline lakes yielded the most. Distinct OTUs, including metazoan OTUs, numerically dominated pH extreme sites. Indicator OTUs included the diatom Pinnularia and unidentified opisthokonts (Fungi and Filasterea) in the extremely acidic environments, and the ciliate Frontonia across the extremely alkaline sites. Inferred from NMDS, pH explained only a modest fraction of the variation across the datasets, indicating that other factors influence the underlying community structure in these environments. The findings from this study suggest that the ability for eukaryotes to adapt to pH extremes over a broad range of values may be rare, but further study of taxa that can broadly adapt across diverse acidic and alkaline environments, respectively present good models for understanding adaptation and should be targeted for future investigations. PMID:23335919

  19. Parameters affecting downhole pH

    SciTech Connect

    Garber, J.D.; Jangama, V.R.; Willmon, J.

    1997-09-01

    The presence of acetic and formic acids in the produced water of gas condensate wells has been known for some time by the industry. In traditional water analysis, it has been titrated and reported as alkalinity. The calculation of accurate downhole pH values requires that these ions be analyzed separately in the water and that an organic acid material balance be performed on all three phases in the separator. In this manner, it is then possible to use phase distribution coefficients involving ionic equilibrium to determine how these acids distribute themselves between phases as the pH calculation proceeds downhole. In this paper, the above method of calculation of pH and {Delta}pH is used to examine the effect that various concentrations of these acids have on the downhole pH. Various concentrations of acids are examined, and two cases are calculated in which the effect of condensate on the pH is examined.

  20. AMP-activated protein kinase inhibits alkaline pH- and PKA-induced apical vacuolar H+-ATPase accumulation in epididymal clear cells.

    PubMed

    Hallows, Kenneth R; Alzamora, Rodrigo; Li, Hui; Gong, Fan; Smolak, Christy; Neumann, Dietbert; Pastor-Soler, Núria M

    2009-04-01

    Acidic luminal pH and low [HCO(3)(-)] maintain sperm quiescent during maturation in the epididymis. The vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) in clear cells is a major contributor to epididymal luminal acidification. We have shown previously that protein kinase A (PKA), acting downstream of soluble adenylyl cyclase stimulation by alkaline luminal pH or HCO(3)(-), induces V-ATPase apical membrane accumulation in clear cells. Here we examined whether the metabolic sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates this PKA-induced V-ATPase apical membrane accumulation. Immunofluorescence labeling of rat and non-human primate epididymides revealed specific AMPK expression in epithelial cells. Immunofluorescence labeling of rat epididymis showed that perfusion in vivo with the AMPK activators 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-d-ribofuranoside (AICAR) or A-769662 induced a redistribution of the V-ATPase into subapical vesicles, even in the presence of a luminal alkaline (pH 7.8) buffer compared with that of controls perfused without drug. Moreover, preperfusion with AICAR blocked the PKA-mediated V-ATPase translocation to clear cell apical membranes induced by N(6)-monobutyryl-cAMP (6-MB-cAMP). Purified PKA and AMPK both phosphorylated V-ATPase A subunit in vitro. In HEK-293 cells [(32)P]orthophosphate in vivo labeling of the A subunit increased following PKA stimulation and decreased following RNA interference-mediated knockdown of AMPK. Finally, the extent of PKA-dependent in vivo phosphorylation of the A subunit increased with AMPK knockdown. In summary, our findings suggest that AMPK inhibits PKA-mediated V-ATPase apical accumulation in epididymal clear cells, that both kinases directly phosphorylate the V-ATPase A subunit in vitro and in vivo, and that AMPK inhibits PKA-dependent phosphorylation of this subunit. V-ATPase activity may be coupled to the sensing of acid-base status via PKA and to metabolic status via AMPK. PMID:19211918

  1. Modifying the Cold Gelation Properties of Quinoa Protein Isolate: Influence of Heat-Denaturation pH in the Alkaline Range.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, Outi E; Zannini, Emanuele; Arendt, Elke K

    2015-09-01

    Heat-denaturation of quinoa protein isolate (QPI) at alkali pH and its influence on the physicochemical and cold gelation properties was investigated. Heating QPI at pH 8.5 led to increased surface hydrophobicity and decreases in free and bound sulfhydryl group contents. Heating at pH 10.5 caused a lesser degree of changes in sulfhydryl groups and surface hydrophobicity, and the resulting solutions showed drastically increased solubility. SDS PAGE revealed the presence of large aggregates only in the sample heated at pH 8.5, suggesting that any aggregates present in the sample heated at pH 10.5 were non-covalently bound and disintegrated in the presence of SDS. Reducing conditions partially dissolved the aggregates in the pH 8.5 heated sample indicating the occurrence of disulphide bonding, but caused no major alterations in the separation pattern of the pH 10.5 heated sample. Denaturation pH influenced the cold gelation properties greatly. Solutions heated at pH 8.5 formed a coarse coagulum with maximum G' of 5 Pa. Heat-denaturation at 10.5 enabled the proteins to form a finer and regularly structured gel with a maximum G' of 1140 Pa. Particle size analysis showed that the pH 10.5 heated sample contained a higher level of very small particles (0.1-2 μm), and these readily aggregated into large particles (30-200 μm) when pH was lowered to 5.5. Differences in the nature of aggregates formed during heating may explain the large variation in gelation properties. PMID:25986749

  2. Continuous bioproduction of short-chain fatty acids from sludge enhanced by the combined use of surfactant and alkaline pH.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yinguang; Liu, Kun; Su, Yinglong; Zheng, Xiong; Wang, Qin

    2013-07-01

    This work reported the enhancement of continuous SCFA production from sludge by the combined use of surfactant (sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS)) and pH 10 (i.e., SDBS & pH 10). The maximal SCFA production (2056 mg COD/L) was achieved under the SDBS & pH 10 condition at a sludge retention time (SRT) of 12d, which was much higher than that of the blank, sole SDBS, or pH 10. The mechanisms investigation showed that the combined strategy had greater sludge solubilization, higher protein hydrolysis, and lower activity of methanogens. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis revealed that the abundance of bacteria was increased, whereas that of archaea was decreased by SDBS & pH 10. The excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy assay further suggested that SBDS caused protein structure change, which benefited protein hydrolysis. PMID:23685363

  3. The pH Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemecology, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Describes a game that can be used to teach students about the acidity of liquids and substances around their school and enable them to understand what pH levels tell us about the environment. Students collect samples and measure the pH of water, soil, plants, and other natural material. (DDR)

  4. Sensing pH with TMCs.

    PubMed

    Spalthoff, Christian; Göpfert, Martin C

    2016-07-01

    Transmembrane channel-like (TMC) proteins have been implicated in hair cell mechanotransduction, Drosophila proprioception, and sodium sensing in the nematode C. elegans. In this issue of Neuron, Wang et al. (2016) report that C. elegans TMC-1 mediates nociceptor responses to high pH, not sodium, allowing the nematode to avoid strongly alkaline environments in which most animals cannot survive. PMID:27387645

  5. Esophageal pH monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    pH monitoring - esophageal; Esophageal acidity test ... esophagitis You may need to have the following tests if your doctor suspects esophagitis : Barium swallow Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (also called upper GI endoscopy)

  6. PhEDEx Data Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egeland, Ricky; Wildish, Tony; Huang, Chih-Hao

    2010-04-01

    The PhEDEx Data Service provides access to information from the central PhEDEx database, as well as certificate-authenticated managerial operations such as requesting the transfer or deletion of data. The Data Service is integrated with the "SiteDB" service for fine-grained access control, providing a safe and secure environment for operations. A plug-in architecture allows server-side modules to be developed rapidly and easily by anyone familiar with the schema, and can automatically return the data in a variety of formats for use by different client technologies. Using HTTP access via the Data Service instead of direct database connections makes it possible to build monitoring web-pages with complex drill-down operations, suitable for debugging or presentation from many aspects. This will form the basis of the new PhEDEx website in the near future, as well as providing access to PhEDEx information and certificate-authenticated services for other CMS dataflow and workflow management tools such as CRAB, WMCore, DBS and the dashboard. A PhEDEx command-line client tool provides one-stop access to all the functions of the PhEDEx Data Service interactively, for use in simple scripts that do not access the service directly. The client tool provides certificate-authenticated access to managerial functions, so all the functions of the PhEDEx Data Service are available to it. The tool can be expanded by plug-ins which can combine or extend the client-side manipulation of data from the Data Service, providing a powerful environment for manipulating data within PhEDEx.

  7. Voltammetric pH Nanosensor.

    PubMed

    Michalak, Magdalena; Kurel, Malgorzata; Jedraszko, Justyna; Toczydlowska, Diana; Wittstock, Gunther; Opallo, Marcin; Nogala, Wojciech

    2015-12-01

    Nanoscale pH evaluation is a prerequisite for understanding the processes and phenomena occurring at solid-liquid, liquid-liquid, and liquid-gas interfaces, e.g., heterogeneous catalysis, extraction, partitioning, and corrosion. Research on the homogeneous processes within small volumes such as intracellular fluids, microdroplets, and microfluidic chips also requires nanometer scale pH assessment. Due to the opacity of numerous systems, optical methods are useless and, if applicable, require addition of a pH-sensitive dye. Potentiometric probes suffer from many drawbacks such as potential drift and lack of selectivity. Here, we present a voltammetric nanosensor for reliable pH assessment between pH 2 and 12 with high spatial resolution. It consists of a pyrolytic carbon nanoelectrode obtained by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) inside a quartz nanopipette. The carbon is modified by adsorption of syringaldazine from its ethanolic solution. It exhibits a stable quasi-reversible cyclic voltammogram with nearly Nernstian dependency of midpeak potentials (-54 mV/pH). This sensor was applied as a probe for scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) in order to map pH over a platinum ultramicroelectrode (UME), generating hydroxide ions (OH(-)) by the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at a diffusion-controlled rate in aerated phosphate buffered saline (PBS). The results reveal the alkalization of the electrolyte close to the oxygen reducing electrode, showing the insufficient buffer capacity of PBS to maintain a stable pH at the given conditions. PMID:26516786

  8. Measurement of secretory vesicle pH reveals intravesicular alkalinization by vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 resulting in inhibition of prohormone cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Blackmore, Colin G; Varro, Andrea; Dimaline, Rod; Bishop, Lisa; Gallacher, David V; Dockray, Graham J

    2001-01-01

    The acidic interior of neuroendocrine secretory vesicles provides both an energy gradient for amine-proton exchangers (VMATs) to concentrate small transmitter molecules, for example catecholamines, and an optimal pH for the prohormone convertases which cleave hormone precursors. There is evidence that VMAT activity modulates prohormone cleavage, but in the absence of measurements of pH in secretory vesicles in intact cells, it has not been possible to establish whether these effects are attributable to raised intravesicular pH due to proton transport through VMATs. Clones were generated of the hamster insulinoma cell line HIT-T15 expressing a pH-sensitive form of green fluorescent protein (GFP-F64L/S65T) targeted to secretory vesicles, with and without co-expression of VMAT2. In order to study prohormone cleavage, further clones were generated that expressed preprogastrin with and without co-expression of VMAT2. Confocal microscopy of GFP fluorescence indicated that the pH in the secretory vesicles was 5.6 in control cells, compared with 6.6 in cells expressing VMAT2; the latter was reduced to 5.8 by the VMAT inhibitor reserpine. Using a pulse-chase labelling protocol, cleavage of 34-residue gastrin (G34) was found to be inhibited by co-expression with VMAT2, and this was reversed by reserpine. Similar effects on vesicle pH and G34 cleavage were produced by ammonium chloride. We conclude that VMAT expression confers the linked abilities to store biogenic amines and modulate secretory vesicle pH over a range influencing prohormone cleavage and therefore determining the identity of regulatory peptide secretory products. PMID:11251044

  9. Effects of pH adjustment with phosphates on attributes and functionalities of normal and high pH beef.

    PubMed

    Young, O A; Zhang, S X; Farouk, M M; Podmore, C

    2005-05-01

    Longissimus dorsi muscles from six normal- and six high-ultimate pH bulls were selected for fine mincing and subsequent pH adjustment with acid and alkaline pyrophosphate. Four pH treatments were prepared: initially high remains high (mean of pH 6.37), high becomes normal (5.62); initially normal remains normal (5.65), and normal becomes high (6.21). The addition level of phosphate as P(2)O(5) was the same in all replicates. Before pH adjustment, colour and water holding capacity (WHC) values were strongly affected by higher (initial) pH in expected ways: darker, lower chroma, higher capacity. After pH adjustment, these values were affected only by the final pH, not the initial pH (the pH history). Total protein solubility was likewise affected by final pH but not initial pH. In contrast, the combination high initial pH-high final pH improved sarcoplasmic protein solubility by 20% over the combination normal initial pH-high final pH. Sarcoplasmic protein solubility is an indicator of strain required to fracture cooked batters made from the minced meats; in the event, the rank order of the four treatments for strain-to-fracture matched that of sarcoplasmic protein solubility. Statistically, sarcoplasmic protein solubility and strain-to-fracture were both affected by initial pH (P<0.01) and final pH (P<0.001). However, stress required to fracture cooked batters was entirely controlled by initial pH (P<0.01). In other words, the stress-to-fracture advantage of initially high pH meat was not matched by upward pH adjustment of initially normal pH meat. Emulsion stability, which is better with higher pH meat, was affected by initial and final pH (both P<0.01). Cook yield, like WHC of pH-adjusted raw meat, was more due to final pH than initial pH, similarly cooked batter colour, whereas final pH had a significant effect on quality attributes (generally better when higher). An initially high pH history conferred an enduring advantage on three important batter attributes

  10. Evaluating the role of metal ions in the bathochromic and hyperchromic responses of cyanidin derivatives in acidic and alkaline pH.

    PubMed

    Sigurdson, G T; Robbins, R J; Collins, T M; Giusti, M M

    2016-10-01

    In many food products, colorants derived from natural sources are increasingly popular due to consumer demand. Anthocyanins are one class of versatile and abundant naturally occurring chromophores that produce different hues in nature, especially with metal ions and other copigments assisting. The effects of chelation of metal ions (Mg(2+), Al(3+), Cr(3+), Fe(3+), and Ga(3+)) in factorial excesses to anthocyanin concentration (0-500×) on the spectral characteristics (380-700nm) of cyanidin and acylated cyanidin derivatives were evaluated to better understand the color evolution of anthocyanin-metal chelates in pH 3-8. In all pH, anthocyanins exhibited bathochromic and hyperchromic shifts. Largest bathochromic shifts most often occurred in pH 6; while largest hyperchromic shifts occurred in pH 5. Divalent Mg(2+) showed no observable effect on anthocyanin color while trivalent metal ions caused bathochromic shifts and hue changes. Generally, bathochromic shifts on anthocyanins were greatest with more electron rich metal ions (Fe(3+)≈Ga(3+)>Al(3+)>Cr(3+)). PMID:27132820

  11. Effect of pH and temperature on stability and kinetics of novel extracellular serine alkaline protease (70 kDa).

    PubMed

    Bhunia, Biswanath; Basak, Bikram; Mandal, Tamal; Bhattacharya, Pinaki; Dey, Apurba

    2013-03-01

    A novel extracellular serine protease (70 kDa by SDS-PAGE) was purified and characterized. This enzyme retained more than 93% of its initial activity after preincubation for 30 min at 37 °C in the presence of 25% (v/v) tested organic solvents and showed feather degradation activity. The purified enzyme was deactivated at various combinations of pH and temperature to examine the interactive effect of them on enzyme activity. The deactivation process was modeled as first-order kinetics and the deactivation rate constant (k(d)) was found to be minimum at pH 9 and 37 °C. The kinetic analysis of enzyme over a range of pH values indicated two pK values at 6.21 and at 10.92. The lower pK value was likely due to the catalytic histidine in the free enzyme and higher pK value likely reflected deprotonation of the proline moiety of the substrate but ionization of the active site serine is another possibility. Inhibition kinetic showed that enzyme is serine protease because enzyme was competitively inhibited by antipain and aprotinin as these compounds are known to be competitive inhibitors of serine protease. The organic solvent, thermal and pH tolerances of enzyme suggested that it may have potential for use as a biocatalyst in industry. PMID:23219732

  12. Urine pH test

    MedlinePlus

    ... J. Martin, MD, MPH, ABIM Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Atlanta, GA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Kidney Stones Urinalysis Browse the Encyclopedia A. ...

  13. Making pH Tangible.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Elizabeth; Moss, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Presents a laboratory exercise in which students test the pH of different substances, study the effect of a buffer on acidic solutions by comparing the behavior of buffered and unbuffered solutions upon the addition of acid, and compare common over-the-counter antacid remedies. (MKR)

  14. Deletions of Endocytic Components VPS28 and VPS32 Affect Growth at Alkaline pH and Virulence through both RIM101-Dependent and RIM101-Independent Pathways in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Cornet, Muriel; Bidard, Frédérique; Schwarz, Patrick; Da Costa, Grégory; Blanchin-Roland, Sylvie; Dromer, Françoise; Gaillardin, Claude

    2005-01-01

    Ambient pH signaling involves a cascade of conserved Rim or Pal products in ascomycetous yeasts or filamentous fungi, respectively. Recent evidences in the fungi Aspergillus nidulans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Yarrowia lipolytica, and Candida albicans suggested that components of endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) involved in endocytic trafficking were needed for signal transduction along the Rim pathway. In this study, we confirm these findings with C. albicans and show that Vps28p (ESCRT-I) and Vps32p/Snf7p (ESCRT-III) are required for the transcriptional regulation of known targets of the Rim pathway, such as the PHR1 and PHR2 genes encoding cell surface proteins, which are expressed at alkaline and acidic pH, respectively. We additionally show that deletion of these two VPS genes, particularly VPS32, has a more drastic effect than a RIM101 deletion on growth at alkaline pH and that this effect is only partially suppressed by expression of a constitutively active form of Rim101p. Finally, in an in vivo mouse model, both vps null mutants were significantly less virulent than a rim101 mutant, suggesting that VPS28 and VPS32 gene products affect virulence both through Rim-dependent and Rim-independent pathways. PMID:16299290

  15. Isolated secretion granules from parotid glands of chronically stimulated rats possess an alkaline internal pH and inward-directed H/sup +/ pump activity

    SciTech Connect

    Arvan, P.; Castle, J.D.

    1986-10-01

    Secretion granules have been isolated from the parotid glands of rats that have been chronically stimulated with the ..beta..-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol. These granules are of interest because they package a quantitatively different set of secretory proteins in comparison with granules from the normal gland. Polypeptides enriched in proline, glycine, and glutamine, which are known to have pI's >10, replace ..cap alpha..-amylase (pI's = 6.8) as the principal content species. The internal pH of granules from the treated rats changes from 7.8 in a potassium sulfate medium to 6.9 in a choline chloride medium. The increased pH over that of normal parotid granules (approx.6.8) appears to protect the change in composition of the secretory contents. Whereas normal mature parotide granules have practically negligible levels of H/sup +/ pumping ATPase activity, the isolated granules from isoproterenol-treated rats undergo a time-dependent internal acidification that requires the presence of ATP and is abolished by an H/sup +/ ionophore. Additionally, an inside-positive granule transmembrane potential develops after ATP addition that depends upon ATP hydrolysis. Two independent methods have been used that exclude the possibility that contaminating organelles are the source of the H/sup +/-ATPase activity. Together these data provide clear evidence for the presence of an H/sup +/ pump in the membranes of parotid granules from chronically stimulated rats. However, despite the presence of H/sup +/-pump activity, fluorescence microscopy with the weak base, acridine orange, reveals that the intragranular pH in live cells is greater than that of the cytoplasm.

  16. The Methods Behind PH WINS

    PubMed Central

    Leider, Jonathon P.; Bharthapudi, Kiran; Pineau, Vicki; Liu, Lin; Harper, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey (PH WINS) has yielded the first-ever nationally representative sample of state health agency central office employees. The survey represents a step forward in rigorous, systematic data collection to inform the public health workforce development agenda in the United States. PH WINS is a Web-based survey and was developed with guidance from a panel of public health workforce experts including practitioners and researchers. It draws heavily from existing and validated items and focuses on 4 main areas: workforce perceptions about training needs, workplace environment and job satisfaction, perceptions about national trends, and demographics. This article outlines the conceptualization, development, and implementation of PH WINS, as well as considerations and limitations. It also describes the creation of 2 new data sets that will be available in public use for public health officials and researchers—a nationally representative data set for permanently employed state health agency central office employees comprising over 10 000 responses, and a pilot data set with approximately 12 000 local and regional health department staff responses. PMID:26422490

  17. The Methods Behind PH WINS.

    PubMed

    Leider, Jonathon P; Bharthapudi, Kiran; Pineau, Vicki; Liu, Lin; Harper, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey (PH WINS) has yielded the first-ever nationally representative sample of state health agency central office employees. The survey represents a step forward in rigorous, systematic data collection to inform the public health workforce development agenda in the United States. PH WINS is a Web-based survey and was developed with guidance from a panel of public health workforce experts including practitioners and researchers. It draws heavily from existing and validated items and focuses on 4 main areas: workforce perceptions about training needs, workplace environment and job satisfaction, perceptions about national trends, and demographics. This article outlines the conceptualization, development, and implementation of PH WINS, as well as considerations and limitations. It also describes the creation of 2 new data sets that will be available in public use for public health officials and researchers--a nationally representative data set for permanently employed state health agency central office employees comprising over 10,000 responses, and a pilot data set with approximately 12,000 local and regional health department staff responses. PMID:26422490

  18. Proton Transport and pH Control in Fungi.

    PubMed

    Kane, Patricia M

    2016-01-01

    Despite diverse and changing extracellular environments, fungi maintain a relatively constant cytosolic pH and numerous organelles of distinct lumenal pH. Key players in fungal pH control are V-ATPases and the P-type proton pump Pma1. These two proton pumps act in concert with a large array of other transporters and are highly regulated. The activities of Pma1 and the V-ATPase are coordinated under some conditions, suggesting that pH in the cytosol and organelles is not controlled independently. Genomic studies, particularly in the highly tractable S. cerevisiae, are beginning to provide a systems-level view of pH control, including transcriptional responses to acid or alkaline ambient pH and definition of the full set of regulators required to maintain pH homeostasis. Genetically encoded pH sensors have provided new insights into localized mechanisms of pH control, as well as highlighting the dynamic nature of pH responses to the extracellular environment. Recent studies indicate that cellular pH plays a genuine signaling role that connects nutrient availability and growth rate through a number of mechanisms. Many of the pH control mechanisms found in S. cerevisiae are shared with other fungi, with adaptations for their individual physiological contexts. Fungi deploy certain proton transport and pH control mechanisms not shared with other eukaryotes; these regulators of cellular pH are potential antifungal targets. This review describes current and emerging knowledge proton transport and pH control mechanisms in S. cerevisiae and briefly discusses how these mechanisms vary among fungi. PMID:26721270

  19. Kinetic hindrance of Fe(II) oxidation at alkaline pH and in the presence of nitrate and oxygen in a facultative wastewater stabilization pond.

    PubMed

    Rockne, Karl J

    2007-02-15

    To better understand the dynamics of Fe2 + oxidation in facultative wastewater stabilization ponds, water samples from a three-pond system were taken throughout the period of transition from anoxic conditions with high aqueous Fe2 + levels in the early spring to fully aerobic conditions in late spring. Fe2 + levels showed a highly significant correlation with pH but were not correlated with dissolved oxygen (DO). Water column Fe2 + levels were modeled using the kinetic rate law for Fe2 + oxidation of Sung and Morgan.[5] The fitted kinetic coefficients were 5 +/- 3 x 10(6) M(- 2) atm(-1) min(-1); more than six orders of magnitude lower than typically reported. Comparison of four potential Fe redox couples demonstrated that the rhoepsilon was at least 3-4 orders of magnitude higher than would be expected based on internal equilibrium. Surprisingly, measured nitrate and DO (when present) were typically consistent with both nitrate (from denitrification) and DO levels (from aerobic respiration) predicted from equilibrium. Although the hydrous Fe oxide/FeCO3 couple was closest to equilibrium and most consistent with the observed pH dependence (in contrast to predicted lepidocrocite), Fe2 + oxidation is kinetically hindered, resulting in up to 10(7)-fold higher levels than expected based on both kinetic and equilibrium analyses. PMID:17365293

  20. Photoreversible changes in pH of pea phytochrome solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Tokutomi, S.; Yamamoto, K.T.; Miyoshi, Y.; Furuya, M.

    1982-02-01

    Phytochrome is a chromoprotein that serves as the photoreceptor for a variety of photomorphogenic responses in plants. Phytochrome was isolated from etiolated pea seedlings. Photoinduced pH changes of an unbuffered solution of the phytochrome were monitored with a semimicrocombination pH electrode at pH 6.5. Red-light irradiation increased the pH of the medium. This alkalinization was reversed by a subsequent far-red-light irradiation. The magnitude and direction of the red-light-induced pH changes was dependent on the pH of the photocrome solution, and the maximum alkalinization was observed at pH 6.0, where the number of protons taken up per phytochrome monomer was 0.18. These results suggest that phytochrome is a multifunctional protein composed of a chromophoric domain and a hydrophobic domain. It is probable that the hydrophobic domain is responsible for the photoinduced change of hydrophobicity of phytochrome and that the ionizable groups responsible for the photoinduced pH changes are localized in the chromophoric domain. (JMT)

  1. Anaerobic methanethiol degradation and methanogenic community analysis in an alkaline (pH 10) biological process for liquefied petroleum gas desulfurization.

    PubMed

    van Leerdam, Robin C; Bonilla-Salinas, Monica; de Bok, Frank A M; Bruning, H; Lens, Piet N L; Stams, Alfons J M; Janssen, Albert J H

    2008-11-01

    Anaerobic methanethiol (MT) degradation by mesophilic (30 degrees C) alkaliphilic (pH 10) communities was studied in a lab-scale Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Bed (UASB) reactor inoculated with a mixture of sediments from the Wadden Sea (The Netherlands), Soap Lake (Central Washington), and Russian soda lakes. MT degradation started after 32 days of incubation. During the first 252 days, complete degradation was achieved till a volumetric loading rate of 7.5 mmol MT/L/day, and sulfide, methane, and carbon dioxide were the main reaction products. Temporary inhibition of MT degradation occurred after MT peak loads and in the presence of dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), which is the autooxidation product of MT. From day 252 onwards, methanol was dosed to the reactor as co-substrate at a loading rate of 3-6 mmol/L/day to stimulate growth of methylotrophic methanogens. Methanol was completely degraded and also a complete MT degradation was achieved till a volumetric loading rate of 13 mmol MT/L/day (0.77 mmol MT/gVSS/day). However, from day 354 till the end of the experimental run (day 365), acetate was formed and MT was not completely degraded anymore, indicating that methanol-degrading homoacetogenic bacteria had partially outcompeted the methanogenic MT-degrading archea. The archeal community in the reactor sludge was analyzed by DGGE and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. The methanogenic archea responsible for the degradation of MT in the reactor were related to Methanolobus oregonensis. A pure culture, named strain SODA, was obtained by serial dilutions in medium containing both trimethyl amine and dimethyl sulfide (DMS). Strain SODA degraded MT, DMS, trimethyl amine, and methanol. Flow sheet simulations revealed that for sufficient MT removal from liquefied petroleum gas, the extraction and biological degradation process should be operated above pH 9. PMID:18814290

  2. The pH of Enceladus' ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glein, Christopher R.; Baross, John A.; Waite, J. Hunter

    2015-08-01

    Saturn's moon, Enceladus, is a geologically active waterworld. The prevailing paradigm is that there is a subsurface ocean that erupts to the surface, which leads to the formation of a plume of vapor and ice above the south polar region. The chemistry of the ocean is just beginning to be understood, but is of profound geochemical and astrobiological interest. Here, we determine the pH of the ocean using a thermodynamic model of carbonate speciation. Observational data from the Cassini spacecraft are used to make a chemical model of ocean water on Enceladus. The model suggests that Enceladus' ocean is a Na-Cl-CO3 solution with an alkaline pH of ∼11-12. The dominance of aqueous NaCl is a feature that Enceladus' ocean shares with terrestrial seawater, but the ubiquity of dissolved Na2CO3 suggests that soda lakes are more analogous to the Enceladus ocean. The high pH implies that the hydroxide ion should be relatively abundant, while divalent metals should be present at low concentrations owing to buffering by carbonates and phyllosilicates on the ocean floor. Carboxyl groups in dissolved organic species would be negatively charged, while amino groups would exist predominately in the neutral form. Knowledge of the pH improves our understanding of geochemical processes in Enceladus' ocean. The high pH is interpreted to be a key consequence of serpentinization of chondritic rock, as predicted by prior geochemical reaction path models; although degassing of CO2 from the ocean may also play a role depending on the efficiency of mixing processes in the ocean. Serpentinization leads to the generation of H2, a geochemical fuel that can support both abiotic and biological synthesis of organic molecules such as those that have been detected in Enceladus' plume. Serpentinization and H2 generation should have occurred on Enceladus, like on the parent bodies of aqueously altered meteorites; but it is unknown whether these critical processes are still taking place, or if

  3. Dipstick Spot urine pH does not accurately represent 24 hour urine PH measured by an electrode

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Mohamed; Sarkissian, Carl; Jianbo, Li; Calle, Juan; Monga, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To determine whether spot urine pH measured by dipstick is an accurate representation of 24 hours urine pH measured by an electrode. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed urine pH results of patients who presented to the urology stone clinic. For each patient we recorded the most recent pH result measured by dipstick from a spot urine sample that preceded the result of a 24-hour urine pH measured by the use of a pH electrode. Patients were excluded if there was a change in medications or dietary recommendations or if the two samples were more than 4 months apart. A difference of more than 0.5 pH was considered an inaccurate result. Results A total 600 patients were retrospectively reviewed for the pH results. The mean difference in pH between spot urine value and the 24 hours collection values was 0.52±0.45 pH. Higher pH was associated with lower accuracy (p<0.001). The accuracy of spot urine samples to predict 24-hour pH values of <5.5 was 68.9%, 68.2% for 5.5 to 6.5 and 35% for >6.5. Samples taken more than 75 days apart had only 49% the accuracy of more recent samples (p<0.002). The overall accuracy is lower than 80% (p<0.001). Influence of diurnal variation was not significant (p=0.588). Conclusions Spot urine pH by dipstick is not an accurate method for evaluation of the patients with urolithiasis. Patients with alkaline urine are more prone to error with reliance on spot urine pH. PMID:27286119

  4. The pH of antiseptic cleansers

    PubMed Central

    Kulthanan, Kanokvalai; Varothai, Supenya; Nuchkull, Piyavadee

    2014-01-01

    Background Daily bathing with antiseptic cleansers are proposed by some physicians as an adjunctive management of atopic dermatitis (AD). As atopic skin is sensitive, selection of cleansing products becomes a topic of concern. Objective Our purpose is to evaluate the pH of various antiseptic body cleansers to give an overview for recommendation to patients with AD. Methods Commonly bar and liquid cleansers consisted of antiseptic agents were measured for pH using pH meter and pH-indicator strips. For comparison, mild cleansers and general body cleansers were also measured. Results All cleansing bars had pH 9.8-11.3 except syndet bar that had neutral pH. For liquid cleansers, three cleansing agents had pH close to pH of normal skin, one of antiseptic cleansers, one of mild cleansers and another one of general cleansers. The rest of antiseptic cleansers had pH 8.9-9.6 while mild cleansers had pH 6.9-7.5. Syndet liquid had pH 7 and general liquid cleansers had pH 9.6. Conclusion The pH of cleanser depends on composition of that cleanser. Adding antiseptic agents are not the only factor determining variation of pH. Moreover, benefit of antiseptic properties should be considered especially in cases of infected skin lesions in the selection of proper cleansers for patients with AD. PMID:24527408

  5. Acid loading test (pH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003615.htm Acid loading test (pH) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The acid loading test (pH) measures the ability of the ...

  6. [Ultrasonic study of nucleic acids. Effect of pH].

    PubMed

    Braginskaia, F I; Sadykhova, S Kh

    1979-01-01

    The ultrasonic absorption of nucleic acids in water solutions was studied by the pulse ultrasonic technique depending on pH, at frequency 12 mHz T = 20 dedrees C. The obtained data show the occurrence of structural relaxation in DNA solutions caused by the proton exchange and transfer reactions with the extremal pH at 2.5 and 11.7. Possible mechanisms of the excess ultrasonic absorption were discussed concerning the protolytic processes with the charged DNA groups (N--P1 exchange and the hydrolysis of lactam groups at acid and alkaline pH correspondingly). PMID:36177

  7. pH in atomic scale simulations of electrochemical interfaces.

    PubMed

    Rossmeisl, Jan; Chan, Karen; Ahmed, Rizwan; Tripković, Vladimir; Björketun, Mårten E

    2013-07-01

    Electrochemical reaction rates can strongly depend on pH, and there is increasing interest in electrocatalysis in alkaline solution. To date, no method has been devised to address pH in atomic scale simulations. We present a simple method to determine the atomic structure of the metal|solution interface at a given pH and electrode potential. Using Pt(111)|water as an example, we show the effect of pH on the interfacial structure, and discuss its impact on reaction energies and barriers. This method paves the way for ab initio studies of pH effects on the structure and electrocatalytic activity of electrochemical interfaces. PMID:23703376

  8. Intracellular pH and the Control of Multidrug Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Sanford; Roy, Deborshi; Schindler, Melvin

    1994-02-01

    Many anticancer drugs are classified as either weak bases or molecules whose binding to cellular structures is pH dependent. Accumulation of these drugs within tumor cells should be affected by transmembrane pH gradients. Indeed, development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumor cells has been correlated with an alkaline shift of cytosolic pH. To examine the role of pH in drug partitioning, the distribution of two drugs, doxorubicin and daunomycin, was monitored in fibroblasts and myeloma cells. In both cell types the drugs rapidly accumulated within the cells. The highest concentrations were measured in the most acidic compartments-e.g., lysosomes. Modifying the cellular pH in drug-sensitive cells to mimic reported shifts in MDR caused an immediate change in the cellular drug concentration. Drug accumulation was enhanced by acidic shifts and reversed by alkaline shifts. All of these effects were rapid and reversible. These results demonstrate that the alkaline shift observed in MDR is sufficient to prevent the accumulation of chemotherapeutic drugs independent of active drug efflux.

  9. Solar light (hv) and H2O2/hv photo-disinfection of natural alkaline water (pH 8.6) in a compound parabolic collector at different day periods in Sahelian region.

    PubMed

    Ndounla, J; Pulgarin, C

    2015-11-01

    The photo-disinfection of natural alkaline surface water (pH 8.6 ± 0.3) for drinking purposes was carried out under solar radiation treatments. The enteric bacteria studied were the wild total coliforms/Escherichia coli (10(4) CFU/ml) and Salmonella spp. (10(4) CFU/ml) naturally present in the water. The photo-disinfection of a 25-l water sample was carried out in a solar compound parabolic collector (CPC) in the absence and in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The addition of H2O2 (10 mg/L) to the sample water was sufficient to enhance the photo-disinfection and ensure an irreversible lethal action on the wild enteric bacteria contents of the sample. The inactivation kinetic of the system was significantly enhanced compared to the one carried out without H2O2 addition. The effect of the solar radiation parameters on the efficiency of the photo-disinfection were assessed. The pH has increased during the treatment in all the photo-disinfection processes (hv and H2O2/hv). The Salmonella spp strain has shown the best effective inactivate time in alkaline water than the one recorded under acidic or near-neutral conditions. The evolution of some physico-chemical parameters of the water (turbidity, NO2(-), NO3(-), NH4(+), HPO4(2-), and bicarbonate (HCO3(-))) was monitored during the treatment. Finally, the possible mechanistic process involved during the enteric bacteria inactivation was suggested. PMID:26122565

  10. Characterization of two glycoside hydrolase family 36 α-galactosidases: novel transglycosylation activity, lead-zinc tolerance, alkaline and multiple pH optima, and low-temperature activity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Junpei; Lu, Qian; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Yiyan; Wu, Qian; Li, Junjun; Tang, Xianghua; Xu, Bo; Ding, Junmei; Huang, Zunxi

    2016-03-01

    Two α-galactosidases, AgaAJB07 from Mesorhizobium and AgaAHJG4 from Streptomyces, were expressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant AgaAJB07 showed a 2.9-fold and 22.6-fold increase in kcat with a concomitant increase of 2.3-fold and 16.3-fold in Km in the presence of 0.5mM ZnSO4 and 30.0mM Pb(CH3COO)2, respectively. Recombinant AgaAHJG4 showed apparent optimal activity at pH 8.0 in McIlvaine or Tris-HCl buffer and 9.5 in glycine-NaOH or HCl-borax-NaOH buffer, retention of 23.6% and 43.2% activity when assayed at 10 and 20°C, respectively, and a half-life of approximately 2min at 50°C. The activation energies for p-nitrophenyl-α-d-galactopyranoside hydrolysis by AgaAJB07 and AgaAHJG4 were 71.9±0.8 and 48.2±2.0kJmol(-1), respectively. Both AgaAJB07 and AgaAHJG4 exhibited transglycosylation activity, but they required different acceptors and produced different compounds. Furthermore, potential factors for alkaline and multiple pH optima and low-temperature adaptations of AgaAHJG4 were presumed. PMID:26471539

  11. Functional photoacoustic microscopy of pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatni, M. Rameez; Yao, Junjie; Danielli, Amos; Favazza, Christopher P.; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-02-01

    pH is a tightly regulated indicator of metabolic activity. In mammalian systems, imbalance of pH regulation may result from or result in serious illness. Even though the regulation system of pH is very robust, tissue pH can be altered in many diseases such as cancer, osteoporosis and diabetes mellitus. Traditional high-resolution optical imaging techniques, such as confocal microscopy, routinely image pH in cells and tissues using pH sensitive fluorescent dyes, which change their fluorescence properties with the surrounding pH. Since strong optical scattering in biological tissue blurs images at greater depths, high-resolution pH imaging is limited to penetration depths of 1mm. Here, we report photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) of commercially available pH-sensitive fluorescent dye in tissue phantoms. Using both opticalresolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM), and acoustic resolution photoacoustic microscopy (AR-PAM), we explored the possibility of recovering the pH values in tissue phantoms. In this paper, we demonstrate that PAM was capable of recovering pH values up to a depth of 2 mm, greater than possible with other forms of optical microscopy.

  12. pH Meter probe assembly

    DOEpatents

    Hale, Charles J.

    1983-01-01

    An assembly for mounting a pH probe in a flowing solution, such as a sanitary sewer line, which prevents the sensitive glass portion of the probe from becoming coated with grease, oil, and other contaminants, whereby the probe gives reliable pH indication over an extended period of time. The pH probe assembly utilizes a special filter media and a timed back-rinse feature for flushing clear surface contaminants of the filter. The flushing liquid is of a known pH and is utilized to check performance of the probe.

  13. pH Meter probe assembly

    DOEpatents

    Hale, C.J.

    1983-11-15

    An assembly for mounting a pH probe in a flowing solution, such as a sanitary sewer line, which prevents the sensitive glass portion of the probe from becoming coated with grease, oil, and other contaminants, whereby the probe gives reliable pH indication over an extended period of time. The pH probe assembly utilizes a special filter media and a timed back-rinse feature for flushing clear surface contaminants of the filter. The flushing liquid is of a known pH and is utilized to check performance of the probe. 1 fig.

  14. pH in physiological salt solutions: direct measurements.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsen, J; Norrie, B; Andersen, P K; Stokke, D B; Nedergaard, O A

    1990-11-01

    Calculations of pH in modified Krebs solutions by inserting PCO2 and total-CO2 in the Henderson-Hasselbalch (H.-H.) equation are obvious as the equation originally served for this purpose. An exact calculation of the relation between pH and PCO2 is complicated as the concentration of bicarbonate, the dissociation constant and the solubility of CO2 change. Furthermore, the dissociation constant in the H.-H. equation is constant only if activities are used in the equation instead of stoichiometric concentrations. We therefore investigated the influence of different carbon dioxide tensions and bicarbonate concentrations on directly measured pH of organ baths aerated with mass-spectrometric analyzed O2-CO2 gases. For reference precision buffers were used. The measured pH values differed distinctly from calculated pH values in the acidic and alkaline parts of the pH interval investigated (6.57-8.15). Measurements of actual pH with proper calibration standards therefore seem mandatory. PMID:2177306

  15. Impacts of variable pH on stability and nutrient removal efficiency of aerobic granular sludge.

    PubMed

    Lashkarizadeh, Monireh; Munz, Giulio; Oleszkiewicz, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    The impact of pH variation on aerobic granular sludge stability and performance was investigated. A 9-day alkaline (pH=9) and acidic (pH=6) pH shocks were imposed on mature granules with simultaneous chemical oxygen demand (COD), nitrogen and phosphorus removal. The imposed alkaline pH shock (pH 9) reduced nitrogen and phosphorus removal efficiency from 88% and 98% to 66% and 50%, respectively, with no further recovery. However, acidic pH shock (pH 6) did not have a major impact on nutrient removal and the removal efficiencies recovered to their initial values after 3 days of operation under the new pH condition. Operating the reactors under alkaline pH induced granules breakage and resulted in an increased solids concentration in the effluent and a significant decrease in the size of the bio-particles, while acidic pH did not have significant impacts on granules stability. Changes in chemical structure and composition of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) matrix were suggested as the main factors inducing granules instability under high pH. PMID:26744935

  16. pH regulation of an egg cortex tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Jiang, W P; Veno, P A; Wood, R W; Peaucellier, G; Kinsey, W H

    1991-07-01

    Fertilization of the echinoderm egg is known to result in the phosphorylation, on tyrosine, of a high-molecular-weight cortical protein (HMWCP) localized in the egg cortex. Studies using various parthenogenic agents indicate that this phosphorylation event occurs in response to the alkaline shift in cytoplasmic pHi which normally occurs 1 to 2 min after fertilization. In the present study, the purified egg cell surface complex was used as in vitro system to determine whether a small alkaline shift in pH, such as occurs upon fertilization, could stimulate the activity of the egg cortex-associated tyrosine kinase toward endogenous protein substrates. The results demonstrated that the cell surface complex is highly enriched in a tyrosine kinase activity which accounts for the majority of the protein kinase activity in this preparation. The activity of this tyrosine kinase toward the HMWCP and other cortical proteins was highly dependent on pH over the range pH 6.8 to 7.3. This indicates that the fertilization-associated change in cytoplasmic pH would be sufficient to trigger increased tyrosine phosphorylation of the high-molecular-weight cortical protein in vivo. The regulation of tyrosine phosphorylation by small changes in pH represents a novel control mechanism in which a tyrosine protein kinase may act as a pH-sensitive transducer. PMID:2060713

  17. Inexpensive and Disposable pH Electrodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldcamp, Michael J.; Conklin, Alfred; Nelson, Kimberly; Marchetti, Jessica; Brashear, Ryan; Epure, Emily

    2010-01-01

    Inexpensive electrodes for the measurement of pH have been constructed using the ionophore tribenzylamine for sensing H[superscript +] concentrations. Both traditional liquid-membrane electrodes and coated-wire electrodes have been constructed and studied, and both exhibit linear, nearly Nernstian responses to changes in pH. Measurements of pH…

  18. CALCULATING THE PH OF CALCIUM CARBONATE SATURATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two new expressions for the pH of saturation (pH subs) were derived. One is a simplified equation developed from an aqueous carbonate equilibrium system in which correction for ionic strength was considered. The other is a more accurate quadratic formula that involves computerize...

  19. pH [Measure of Acidity].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Paula

    This autoinstructional program deals with the study of the pH of given substances by using litmus and hydrion papers. It is a learning activity directed toward low achievers involved in the study of biology at the secondary school level. The time suggested for the unit is 25-30 minutes (plus additional time for further pH testing). The equipment…

  20. Acid loading test (pH)

    MedlinePlus

    The acid loading test (pH) measures the ability of the kidneys to send acid to the urine when there is too much acid in the ... Urine with a pH less than 5.3 is normal. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different ...

  1. Fetal scalp pH testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Normal pH: 7.25 to 7.35 Borderline pH: 7.20 to 7.25 The examples above are common measurements for results of these tests. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some ...

  2. Middle School and pH?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herricks, Susan

    2007-01-01

    A local middle school requested that the Water Center of Advanced Materials for Purification of Water With Systems (WaterCAMPWS), a National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center, provide an introduction to pH for their seventh-grade water-based service learning class. After sorting through a multitude of information about pH, a…

  3. Determination Of Ph Including Hemoglobin Correction

    DOEpatents

    Maynard, John D.; Hendee, Shonn P.; Rohrscheib, Mark R.; Nunez, David; Alam, M. Kathleen; Franke, James E.; Kemeny, Gabor J.

    2005-09-13

    Methods and apparatuses of determining the pH of a sample. A method can comprise determining an infrared spectrum of the sample, and determining the hemoglobin concentration of the sample. The hemoglobin concentration and the infrared spectrum can then be used to determine the pH of the sample. In some embodiments, the hemoglobin concentration can be used to select an model relating infrared spectra to pH that is applicable at the determined hemoglobin concentration. In other embodiments, a model relating hemoglobin concentration and infrared spectra to pH can be used. An apparatus according to the present invention can comprise an illumination system, adapted to supply radiation to a sample; a collection system, adapted to collect radiation expressed from the sample responsive to the incident radiation; and an analysis system, adapted to relate information about the incident radiation, the expressed radiation, and the hemoglobin concentration of the sample to pH.

  4. Calculation of downhole pH and delta pH in the presence of CO{sub 2} and organic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Garber, J.D.; Perkins, R.S.; Jangama, V.R.; Alapati, R.R.

    1996-08-01

    Acetic and formic acids have been found in the separator water of gas condensate wells containing CO{sub 2} and they are titrated as alkalinity. Traditional pH equations which neglect these acids and calculate pH based on alkalinity greatly over-predict the downhole pH. Since all scale calculations depend on an accurate pH value, a more sophisticated method of calculation has been developed. The methodology can be used to calculate the in-situ bulk pH and the saturation pH at different depths within a well. The difference in the saturation pH and the bulk pH is the delta pH a negative delta pH indicates a potential to scale whereas a positive value indicates a potential to corrode. The saturation pH is discussed with respect to iron carbonate saturation, but can be used for any other scale by making the appropriate changes.

  5. Metal/Metal Oxide Differential Electrode pH Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, William; Buehler, Martin; Keymeulen, Didier

    2007-01-01

    Solid-state electrochemical sensors for measuring the degrees of acidity or alkalinity (in terms of pH values) of liquid solutions are being developed. These sensors are intended to supplant older electrochemical pH sensors that include glass electrode structures and reference solutions. The older sensors are fragile and subject to drift. The present developmental solid-state sensors are more rugged and are expected to be usable in harsh environments. The present sensors are based on a differential-electrode measurement principle. Each sensor includes two electrodes, made of different materials, in equilibrium with the solution of interest.

  6. Stabilization of Mercury in High pH Tank Sludges

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, R.; Barton, J.

    2003-02-24

    DOE complex contains many tank sludges contaminated with mercury. The high pH of these tank sludges typically fails to stabilize the mercury, resulting in these radioactive wastes also being characteristically hazardous or mixed waste. The traditional treatment for soluble inorganic mercury species is precipitation as insoluble mercuric sulfide. Sulfide treatment and a commercial mercury-stabilizing product were tested on surrogate sludges at various alkaline pH values. Neither the sulfide nor the commercial product stabilized the mercury sufficiently at the high pH of the tank sludges to pass the Toxicity Characteristic Leach Procedure (TCLP) treatment standards of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The commercial product also failed to stabilize the mercury in samples of the actual tank sludges.

  7. Molecular Components of the Neurospora crassa pH Signaling Pathway and Their Regulation by pH and the PAC-3 Transcription Factor.

    PubMed

    Virgilio, Stela; Cupertino, Fernanda Barbosa; Bernardes, Natália Elisa; Freitas, Fernanda Zanolli; Takeda, Agnes Alessandra Sekijima; Fontes, Marcos Roberto de Mattos; Bertolini, Maria Célia

    2016-01-01

    Environmental pH induces a stress response triggering a signaling pathway whose components have been identified and characterized in several fungi. Neurospora crassa shares all six components of the Aspergillus nidulans pH signaling pathway, and we investigate here their regulation during an alkaline pH stress response. We show that the N. crassa pal mutant strains, with the exception of Δpal-9, which is the A. nidulans palI homolog, exhibit low conidiation and are unable to grow at alkaline pH. Moreover, they accumulate the pigment melanin, most likely via regulation of the tyrosinase gene by the pH signaling components. The PAC-3 transcription factor binds to the tyrosinase promoter and negatively regulates its gene expression. PAC-3 also binds to all pal gene promoters, regulating their expression at normal growth pH and/or alkaline pH, which indicates a feedback regulation of PAC-3 in the pal gene expression. In addition, PAC-3 binds to the pac-3 promoter only at alkaline pH, most likely influencing the pac-3 expression at this pH suggesting that the activation of PAC-3 in N. crassa results from proteolytic processing and gene expression regulation by the pH signaling components. In N. crassa, PAC-3 is proteolytically processed in a single cleavage step predominately at alkaline pH; however, low levels of the processed protein can be observed at normal growth pH. We also demonstrate that PAC-3 preferentially localizes in the nucleus at alkaline pH stress and that the translocation may require the N. crassa importin-α since the PAC-3 nuclear localization signal (NLS) has a strong in vitro affinity with importin-α. The data presented here show that the pH signaling pathway in N. crassa shares all the components with the A. nidulans and S. cerevisiae pathways; however, it exhibits some properties not previously described in either organism. PMID:27557053

  8. Molecular Components of the Neurospora crassa pH Signaling Pathway and Their Regulation by pH and the PAC-3 Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Virgilio, Stela; Cupertino, Fernanda Barbosa; Bernardes, Natália Elisa; Freitas, Fernanda Zanolli; Takeda, Agnes Alessandra Sekijima; Fontes, Marcos Roberto de Mattos; Bertolini, Maria Célia

    2016-01-01

    Environmental pH induces a stress response triggering a signaling pathway whose components have been identified and characterized in several fungi. Neurospora crassa shares all six components of the Aspergillus nidulans pH signaling pathway, and we investigate here their regulation during an alkaline pH stress response. We show that the N. crassa pal mutant strains, with the exception of Δpal-9, which is the A. nidulans palI homolog, exhibit low conidiation and are unable to grow at alkaline pH. Moreover, they accumulate the pigment melanin, most likely via regulation of the tyrosinase gene by the pH signaling components. The PAC-3 transcription factor binds to the tyrosinase promoter and negatively regulates its gene expression. PAC-3 also binds to all pal gene promoters, regulating their expression at normal growth pH and/or alkaline pH, which indicates a feedback regulation of PAC-3 in the pal gene expression. In addition, PAC-3 binds to the pac-3 promoter only at alkaline pH, most likely influencing the pac-3 expression at this pH suggesting that the activation of PAC-3 in N. crassa results from proteolytic processing and gene expression regulation by the pH signaling components. In N. crassa, PAC-3 is proteolytically processed in a single cleavage step predominately at alkaline pH; however, low levels of the processed protein can be observed at normal growth pH. We also demonstrate that PAC-3 preferentially localizes in the nucleus at alkaline pH stress and that the translocation may require the N. crassa importin-α since the PAC-3 nuclear localization signal (NLS) has a strong in vitro affinity with importin-α. The data presented here show that the pH signaling pathway in N. crassa shares all the components with the A. nidulans and S. cerevisiae pathways; however, it exhibits some properties not previously described in either organism. PMID:27557053

  9. Wetland treatment at extremes of pH: a review.

    PubMed

    Mayes, W M; Batty, L C; Younger, P L; Jarvis, A P; Kõiv, M; Vohla, C; Mander, U

    2009-06-15

    Constructed wetlands are an established treatment technology for a diverse range of polluted effluents. There is a long history of using wetlands as a unit process in treating acid mine drainage, while recent research has highlighted the potential for wetlands to buffer highly alkaline (pH>12) drainage. This paper reviews recent evidence on this topic, looking at wetlands treating acidic mine drainage, and highly alkaline leachates associated with drainage from lime-rich industrial by-products or where such residues are used as filter media in constructed wetlands for wastewater treatment. The limiting factors to the success of wetlands treating highly acidic waters are discussed with regard to design practice for the emerging application of wetlands to treat highly alkaline industrial discharges. While empirically derived guidelines (with area-adjusted contaminant removal rates typically quoted at 10 g Fe m(2)/day for influent waters pH>5.5; and 3.5-7 g acidity/m(2)/day for pH>4 to <5.5) for informing sizing of mine drainage treatment wetlands have generally been proved robust (probably due to conservatism), such data exhibit large variability within and between sites. Key areas highlighted for future research efforts include: (1) wider collation of mine drainage wetland performance data in regionalised datasets to improve empirically-derived design guidelines and (2) obtaining an improved understanding of nature of the extremophile microbial communities, microbially-mediated pollutant attenuation and rhizospheral processes in wetlands at extremes of pH. An enhanced knowledge of these (through multi-scale laboratory and field studies), will inform engineering design of treatment wetlands and assist in the move from the empirically-derived conservative sizing estimates that currently prevail to process-based optimal design guidance that could reduce costs and enhance the performance and longevity of wetlands for treating acidic and highly alkaline drainage waters

  10. Colorimetric Determination of pH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Sheryl; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Presented is an activity in which the pH of a solution can be quantitatively measured using a spectrophotometer. The theory, experimental details, sample preparation and selection, instrumentation, and results are discussed. (CW)

  11. Brenda K. Edwards, PhD

    Cancer.gov

    Brenda K. Edwards, PhD, has been with the Surveillance Research Program (SRP) and its predecessor organizations at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) since 1989, serving as SRP’s Associate Director from 1990-2011.

  12. Relation of pH to toxicity of lampricide TFM in the laboratory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bills, T.D.; Marking, L.L.; Howe, G.E.; Rach, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    In the control of larval sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus ) with 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM) in tributaries of the Great Lakes, occasional kills of other fishes have caused concern about the effects of the chemical on non-target organisms. Stream treatment rates have been based on previous application rates, alkalinity measurements, results of on-site toxicity tests, or combinations of these. Laboratory studies in 1987 showed that pH is the primary factor that affects the toxicity of TFM (the lower the pH, the greater the toxicity): even small changes in pH alter the toxicity, whereas substantial changes in alkalinity have little effect. In 12-h exposures, the 96-h LC50 for TFM to rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri ) ranged from about 0.9 mg/L at pH 6.5 to > 100 mg/L at pH 9.5, but (at pH 7.5) the LC50's differed little at total alkalinities of about 18 mg/L and 207 mg/L. Decreases in pH as small as 0.5 pH unit caused nontoxic solutions to become toxic to rainbow trout. Some kills of non-target fish during stream treatments were reportedly caused by decreases in pH, and (conversely) that some stream treatments for sea lampreys were ineffective because pH increased.

  13. A ph sensor based on a flexible substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen-Ding

    pH sensor is an essential component used in many chemical, food, and bio-material industries. Conventional glass electrodes have been used to construct pH sensors, however, have some disadvantages. Glass electrodes are easily affected by alkaline or HF solution, they require a high input impedance pH meter, they often exhibit a sluggish response. In some specific applications, it is also difficult to use glass electrodes for in vivo biomedical or food monitoring applications due to the difficulty of size miniaturization, planarization and polymerization based on current manufacturing technologies. In this work, we have demonstrated a novel flexible pH sensor based on low-cost sol-gel fabrication process of iridium oxide (IrOx) sensing film (IROF). A pair of flexible miniature IrOx/AgCl electrode generated the action potential from the solution by electrochemical mechanism to obtain the pH level of the reagent. The fabrication process including sol-gel, thermal oxidation, and the electro-plating process of the silver chloride (AgCl) reference electrode were reported in the work. The IrOx film was verified and characterized using electron dispersive analysis (EDAX), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The flexible pH sensor's performance and characterization have been investigated with different testing parameters such as sensitivity, response time, stability, reversibility, repeatability, selectivity and temperature dependence. The flexible IrOx pH sensors exhibited promising sensing performance with a near-Nernstian response of sensitivity which is between --51.1mV/pH and --51.7mV/pH in different pH levels ranging from 1.5 to 12 at 25°C. Two applications including gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) diagnosis and food freshness wireless monitoring using our micro-flexible IrOx pH sensors were demonstrated. For the GERD diagnosing system, we embedded the micro flexible pH sensor on a 1.2cmx3.8cm of the capsule size of wireless sensor

  14. MRF with adjustable pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Stephen D.

    2011-10-01

    Deterministic final polishing of high precision optics using sub-aperture processing with magnetorheological finishing (MRF) is an accepted practice throughout the world. A wide variety of materials can be successfully worked with aqueous (pH 10), magnetorheological (MR) fluids, using magnetic carbonyl iron (CI) and either ceria or nanodiamond nonmagnetic abrasives. Polycrystalline materials like zinc sulfide (ZnS) and zinc selenide (ZnSe) are difficult to polish at pH 10 with MRF, due to their grain size and the relatively low stiffness of the MR fluid lap. If microns of material are removed, the grain structure of the material begins to appear. In 2005, Kozhinova et al. (Appl. Opt. 44 4671-4677) demonstrated that lowering pH could improve MRF of ZnS. However, magnetic CI particle corrosion rendered their low pH approach unstable and unsuitable for commercial implementation. In 2009, Shafrir et al. described a sol-gel coating process for manufacturing a zirconia-coated CI particle that protects the magnetic core from aqueous corrosion (Appl. Opt .48 6797-6810). The coating process produces free nanozirconia polishing abrasives during the coating procedure, thereby creating an MR polishing powder that is "self-charged" with the polishing abrasive. By simply adding water, it was possible to polish optical glasses and ceramics with good stability at pH 8 for three weeks. The development of a corrosion resistant, MR polishing powder, opens up the possibility for polishing additional materials, wherein the pH may be adjusted to optimize effectiveness. In this paper we describe the CI coating process, the characterization of the coated powder, and procedures for making stable MR fluids with adjustable pH, giving polishing results for a variety of optical glasses and crystalline ceramics.

  15. A ph sensor based on a flexible substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen-Ding

    pH sensor is an essential component used in many chemical, food, and bio-material industries. Conventional glass electrodes have been used to construct pH sensors, however, have some disadvantages. Glass electrodes are easily affected by alkaline or HF solution, they require a high input impedance pH meter, they often exhibit a sluggish response. In some specific applications, it is also difficult to use glass electrodes for in vivo biomedical or food monitoring applications due to the difficulty of size miniaturization, planarization and polymerization based on current manufacturing technologies. In this work, we have demonstrated a novel flexible pH sensor based on low-cost sol-gel fabrication process of iridium oxide (IrOx) sensing film (IROF). A pair of flexible miniature IrOx/AgCl electrode generated the action potential from the solution by electrochemical mechanism to obtain the pH level of the reagent. The fabrication process including sol-gel, thermal oxidation, and the electro-plating process of the silver chloride (AgCl) reference electrode were reported in the work. The IrOx film was verified and characterized using electron dispersive analysis (EDAX), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The flexible pH sensor's performance and characterization have been investigated with different testing parameters such as sensitivity, response time, stability, reversibility, repeatability, selectivity and temperature dependence. The flexible IrOx pH sensors exhibited promising sensing performance with a near-Nernstian response of sensitivity which is between --51.1mV/pH and --51.7mV/pH in different pH levels ranging from 1.5 to 12 at 25°C. Two applications including gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) diagnosis and food freshness wireless monitoring using our micro-flexible IrOx pH sensors were demonstrated. For the GERD diagnosing system, we embedded the micro flexible pH sensor on a 1.2cmx3.8cm of the capsule size of wireless sensor

  16. pH. Training Module 5.305.2.77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with pH, measurement of pH with a pH meter and maintenance of pH meter electrodes. Included are objectives, instructor guides, student handouts and transparency masters. This module considers the definition of pH, types of electrodes and…

  17. Low pH myoglobin photoproducts.

    PubMed Central

    Sage, J T; Morikis, D; Li, P; Champion, P M

    1992-01-01

    Recently, there has been interest in determining the conditions under which the iron-histidine bond ruptures in myoglobin at low pH, so that the effect of proximal heme ligation can be studied. A 220-cm-1 Raman mode, assigned to iron-histidine stretching, is clearly visible after photolysis of aqueous MbCO samples below pH4 at room temperature (Sage et al. Biochemistry. 30:1237-1247). In contrast, Iben et al. (Biophys. J. 59:908-919) do not observe this mode upon photolysis of a pH3 MbCO sample in a glycerol/water glass at low temperature. In order to account for both the low temperature and the room temperature experiments, Iben et al. suggest a scheme involving an unusual protonation state of the proximal histidine. Here, we discuss some inconsistencies in their explanation of the room temperature results and offer instead a simple modification of an earlier model. In addition, circular dichroism data are presented that indicate partial unfolding of MbCO in aqueous solution below pH4, and raise questions about the claim of Iben et al. that MbCO remains folded in 75% glycerol at pH3. PMID:1581497

  18. Temperature and pH Changes Associated with the Hydration of Amorphous Silicate Smokes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chizmadia, L. J.; Lebrón-Rivera, S. A.

    2010-03-01

    The hydration of Fe-Si smokes results in acidic pH levels and negligible change in temperature. When mixed with Mg-Si smokes, pH becomes alkaline and temperature increases slightly. Water-rock ratio is a minor variable relative to composition.

  19. Ammonia volatilization from soils amended with biochars of different pH

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A significant amount of nitrogen fertilizer applied to agricultural land is in the form of ammonium. Ammonium nitrogen can be lost through volatilization if applied under certain conditions, mainly to soils with a pH greater than 8. The pH of biochar varies from slightly acidic to highly alkaline ...

  20. Fiber-Optic pH Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh, A. Balaji; Radhakrishnan, T. K.

    The new enhancement in the determination of pH using optical fiber system is described here. This work uses the membrane made of cellulose acetate membrane for reagent immobilization and congo red (pKa 3.7) and neutral red (pKa 7.2) as pH indicators. An effective covalent chemical binding procedure is used to immobilize the indicatorsE The response time, reversibility, linear range, reproducibility, and long-term stability of fiber optic sensor with congo red as well as neutral red have been determined. The linear range measured for the sensor based on the congo red and neutral red is 4.2-6.3 and 4.1-9.0, respectively. The response time of sensor membrane is measured by varying the substance pH values between 11.0 and 2.0.

  1. Evaluation of fluorimetric pH sensors for bioprocess monitoring at low pH.

    PubMed

    Janzen, Nils H; Schmidt, Michael; Krause, Christian; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    Optical chemical sensors are the standard for pH monitoring in small-scale bioreactors such as microtiter plates, shaking flasks or other single-use bioreactors. The dynamic pH range of the so far commercially available fluorescent pH sensors applied in small-scale bioreactors is restricted to pH monitoring around neutral pH, although many fermentation processes are performed at pH < 6 on industrial scale. Thus, two new prototype acidic fluorescence pH sensors immobilized in single-use stirred-tank bioreactors, one with excitation at 470 nm and emission at 550 nm (sensor 470/550) and the other with excitation at 505 nm and emission at 600 nm (sensor 505/600), were characterized with respect to dynamic ranges and operational stability in representative fermentation media. Best resolution and dynamic range was observed with pH sensor 505/600 in mineral medium (dynamic range of 3.9 < pH < 7.2). Applying the same pH sensors to complex medium results in a drastic reduction of resolution and dynamic ranges. Yeast extract in complex medium was found to cause background fluorescence at the sensors' operating wavelength combinations. Optical isolation of the sensor by adding a black colored polymer layer above the sensor spot and fixing an aperture made of adhesive photoresistant foil between the fluorescence reader and the transparent bottom of the polystyrene reactors enabled full re-establishment of the sensor's characteristics. Reliability and operational stability of sensor 505/600 was shown by online pH monitoring (4.5 < pH < 5.8) of parallel anaerobic batch fermentations of Clostridium acetobutylicum for the production of acetone, butanol and ethanol (ABE) with offline pH measurements with a standard glass electrode as reference. PMID:25969385

  2. Ph.D.'s and the Marketplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, James

    Throughout the last decade, Ph.D. recipients were accustomed to a job market in which demand for their services far exceeded supply. During the same period, manpower experts predicted this situation would continue in the foreseeable future. However, when the 60's ended, the employment illusion had been rudely dispelled by frantic reports of a…

  3. First-Principles pH Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Hyun; Zhang, S. B.

    2006-03-01

    Despite being one of the most important macroscopic measures and a long history even before the quantum mechanics, the concept of pH has rarely been mentioned in microscopic theories, nor being incorporated computationally into first-principles theory of aqueous solutions. Here, we formulate a theory for the pH dependence of solution formation energy by introducing the proton chemical potential as the microscopic counterpart of pH in atomistic solution models. Within the theory, the general acid-base chemistry can be cast in a simple pictorial representation. We adopt density-functional molecular dynamics to demonstrate the usefulness of the method by studying a number of solution systems including water, small solute molecules such as NH3 and HCOOH, and more complex amino acids with several functional groups. For pure water, we calculated the auto- ionization constant to be 13.2 with a 95 % accuracy. For other solutes, the calculated dissociation constants, i.e., the so- called pKa, are also in reasonable agreement with experiments. Our first-principles pH theory can be readily applied to broad solution chemistry problems such as redox reactions.

  4. The Ph.D. Value Proposition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Kenneth J.

    2012-01-01

    Atlanta University launched its doctor of arts in humanities (DAH) programs almost 40 years ago, and, since the 1988 merger with Clark College, Clark Atlanta University has continued to award the degrees. This fall, for the first time, its students will be able to earn Ph.D.s in humanities instead. In DAH programs around the country, there's been…

  5. Optoelectronic pH Meter: Further Details

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Antony S.; Anderson, Mejody M.; Macatangay, Ariel V.

    2009-01-01

    A collection of documents provides further detailed information about an optoelectronic instrument that measures the pH of an aqueous cell-culture medium to within 0.1 unit in the range from 6.5 to 7.5. The instrument at an earlier stage of development was reported in Optoelectronic Instrument Monitors pH in a Culture Medium (MSC-23107), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 9 (September 2004), page 4a. To recapitulate: The instrument includes a quartz cuvette through which the medium flows as it is circulated through a bioreactor. The medium contains some phenol red, which is an organic pH-indicator dye. The cuvette sits between a light source and a photodetector. [The light source in the earlier version comprised red (625 nm) and green (558 nm) light-emitting diodes (LEDs); the light source in the present version comprises a single green- (560 nm)-or-red (623 nm) LED.] The red and green are repeatedly flashed in alternation. The responses of the photodiode to the green and red are processed electronically to obtain the ratio between the amounts of green and red light transmitted through the medium. The optical absorbance of the phenol red in the green light varies as a known function of pH. Hence, the pH of the medium can be calculated from the aforesaid ratio.

  6. Teaching Physics Using PhET Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieman, C. E.; Adams, W. K.; Loeblein, P.; Perkins, K. K.

    2010-01-01

    PhET Interactive Simulations (sims) are now being widely used in teaching physics and chemistry. Sims can be used in many different educational settings, including lecture, individual or small group inquiry activities, homework, and lab. Here we will highlight a few ways to use them in teaching, based on our research and experiences using them in…

  7. The Economic Contribution of PhDs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Bernard H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper looks at what the value of a doctorate is, both to employers in particular and to society and the economy at large. Given the emphasis many universities and funding agencies/governments are putting upon the development of PhD programmes, this is an issue deserving attention. The paper tries to show how two separate but interrelated…

  8. pH & Rate of Enzymatic Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clariana, Roy B.

    1991-01-01

    A quantitative and inexpensive way to measure the rate of enzymatic reaction is provided. The effects of different pH levels on the reaction rate of an enzyme from yeast are investigated and the results graphed. Background information, a list of needed materials, directions for preparing solutions, procedure, and results and discussion are…

  9. An experimental study of magnesite dissolution rates at neutral to alkaline conditions and 150 and 200 °C as a function of pH, total dissolved carbonate concentration, and chemical affinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saldi, Giuseppe D.; Schott, Jacques; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Oelkers, Eric H.

    2010-11-01

    Steady-state magnesite dissolution rates were measured in mixed-flow reactors at 150 and 200 °C and 4.6 < pH < 8.4, as a function of ionic strength (0.001 M ⩽ I ⩽ 1 M), total dissolved carbonate concentration (10 -4 M < ΣCO 2 < 0.1 M), and distance from equilibrium. Rates were found to increase with increasing ionic strength, but decrease with increasing temperature from 150 to 200 °C, pH, and aqueous CO 32- activity. Measured rates were interpreted using the surface complexation model developed by Pokrovsky et al. (1999a) in conjunction with transition state theory ( Eyring, 1935). Within this formalism, magnesite dissolution rates are found to be consistent with r=k{>MgOH2+}41-exp (-4ART), where rd represents the BET surface area normalized dissolution rate, {>MgOH2+} stands for the concentration of hydrated magnesium centers on the magnesite surface, kMg designates a rate constant, A refers to the chemical affinity of the overall reaction, R denotes the gas constant, and T symbolizes absolute temperature. Within this model decreasing rates at far-from-equilibrium conditions (1) at constant pH with increasing temperature and (2) at constant temperature with increasing pH and ΣCO 2 stem from a corresponding decrease in {>MgOH2+}. This decrease in {>MgOH2+} results from the increasing stability of the >MgCO3- and >MgOH° surface species with increasing temperature, pH and CO 32- activity. The decrease in constant pH dissolution rates yields negative apparent activation energies. This behavior makes magnesite resistant to re-dissolution if formed as part of mineral carbon sequestration efforts in deep geologic formations.

  10. Effect of pH on fecal recovery of energy derived from volatile fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Kien, C L; Liechty, E A

    1987-01-01

    We assessed the effect of pH on volatilization of short-chain fatty acids during lyophilization. Acetic, propionic, valeric, and butyric acids were added to a fecal homogenate in amounts sufficient to raise the energy density by 18-27%. Fecal homogenate samples were either acidified (pH 2.8-3.2), alkalinized (pH 7.9-8.7), or left unchanged (4.0-4.8) prior to lyophilization and subsequent bomb calorimetry. Alkalinizing the fecal samples prevented the 20% loss of energy derived from each of these volatile fatty acids observed in samples either acidified or without pH adjustment. These data suggest that in energy balance studies involving subjects with active colonic fermentation, fecal samples should be alkalinized prior to lyophilization and bomb calorimetry. PMID:3681570

  11. Interacting effects of pH acclimation, and pH and heavy metals on acute and chronic toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia (Cladocera)

    SciTech Connect

    Belanger, S.E.; Cherry, D.S. )

    1990-05-01

    Understanding the factors that modify the sensitivity of the zooplankton Ceriodaphnia dubia to toxicants is important to the interpretation of chronic toxicity data generated for granting industrial permits. Early reports of high sensitivity of Ceriodaphnia to brief pH excursions led toxicologists to question the use of C. dubia as a test organism. Acute and chronic toxicity of pH and heavy metals, pH acclimation to acidic and alkaline conditions and the role of pH in modifying heavy metal (copper and zinc) toxicities were investigated. Ceriodaphnia dubia acclimated near neutral pH had acute (48-hr) lethal concentrations of 4.6 and 10.3 SU. Reproduction and mortality were not impaired between pH 6.14-8.99 regardless of pH acclimation history. Reproduction was significantly impaired beyond these extremes. Acute exposures to both heavy metals at pH 6, 8 and 9 and in water hardness of 180, 110 and 100 mg/L showed C dubia was consistently most sensitive in low pH and low hardness waters. Reproduction and mortality were not so affected by pH in chronic exposures. Similar concentrations of metals at all pH levels resulted in equivalent reductions in offspring per female. The results strongly suggest that effluent guidelines for pH at 6-9 are sound, and that toxicant activity in chronic time frames is directed primarily by concentration and water hardness, not by pH. 34 refs., 2 figs., 8 tabs.

  12. Effect of electrolyte pH on CIEF with narrow pH range ampholytes.

    PubMed

    Páger, Csilla; Vargová, Andrea; Takácsi-Nagy, Anna; Dörnyei, Ágnes; Kilár, Ferenc

    2012-11-01

    CIEF of components following sequential injection of ampholytes and the sample zone offers unique advantages for analysis. The most important one of these is the efficient separation of amphoteric compounds having pIs outside the pH range of the ampholytes applied, but the resolution of the components can be increased by an adequate setup in the injection protocol. In this study, the effect of the pH of the anolyte and catholyte on the selectivity and speed of the isoelectric focusing was investigated. Changes in the pH values significantly influenced the resolution and the length of the pH gradient, while changes in the charge state of components were also observed. Three ampholyte solutions (from different suppliers) covering only two pH units were used for the analyses of substituted nitrophenol dyes in uncoated capillary. With appropriate setup, the components, with pIs not covered by the ampholyte pH range, migrated in charged state outside the pH gradient. This phenomenon is preferable for coupling isoelectric focusing to MS detection, by evading the undesirable ion suppression effect of ampholytes. PMID:23086725

  13. pH control in biological systems using calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Salek, S S; van Turnhout, A G; Kleerebezem, R; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2015-05-01

    Due to its abundance, calcium carbonate (CaCO3) has high potentials as a source of alkalinity for biotechnological applications. The application of CaCO3 in biological systems as neutralizing agent is, however, limited due to potential difficulties in controlling the pH. The objective of the present study was to determine the dominant processes that control the pH in an acid-forming microbial process in the presence of CaCO3. To achieve that, a mathematical model was made with a minimum set of kinetically controlled and equilibrium reactions that was able to reproduce the experimental data of a batch fermentation experiment using finely powdered CaCO3. In the model, thermodynamic equilibrium was assumed for all speciation, complexation and precipitation reactions whereas, rate limited reactions were included for the biological fatty acid production, the mass transfer of CO2 from the liquid phase to the gas phase and the convective transport of CO2 out of the gas phase. The estimated pH-pattern strongly resembled the measured pH, suggesting that the chosen set of kinetically controlled and equilibrium reactions were establishing the experimental pH. A detailed analysis of the reaction system with the aid of the model revealed that the pH establishment was most sensitive to four factors: the mass transfer rate of CO2 to the gas phase, the biological acid production rate, the partial pressure of CO2 and the Ca(+2) concentration in the solution. Individual influences of these factors on the pH were investigated by extrapolating the model to a continuously stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) case. This case study indicates how the pH of a commonly used continuous biotechnological process could be manipulated and adjusted by altering these four factors. Achieving a better insight of the processes controlling the pH of a biological system using CaCO3 as its neutralizing agent can result in broader applications of CaCO3 in biotechnological industries. PMID:25425281

  14. Relation between pH in the Trunk and Face: Truncal pH Can Be Easily Predicted from Facial pH

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Ae; Kim, Bo Ri; Chun, Mi Young

    2016-01-01

    Background The clinical symptoms of facial and truncal acne differ. Skin surface acidity (pH), which is affected by sebum secretions, reflects the different clinical characteristics of the face and trunk. However, no studies have been conducted on truncal sebum production and skin pH. Objective We evaluated the differences and relationship between pH values of the face and trunk. We also evaluated the relationship between pH and the quantity of sebum produced in the trunk. Methods A total of 35 female patients clinically diagnosed with truncal acne were included. We measured pH on the face and truncal area using the Skin-pH-Meter PH 905®. We measured truncal sebum secretions using the Sebumeter SM 815®. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the correlations and differences between pH and sebum. Results Facial pH was significantly higher than chest and back pH values. The correlation between pH on the trunk and the face was significant. We used linear regression equations to estimate truncal pH using only measured pH from the chin. There was no significant relationship between truncal sebum secretion and pH. Conclusion This was the first study that evaluated the differences and correlations between facial and truncal pH. We found that facial pH can predict truncal pH. In addition, we conclude that differences in pH and sebum secretion between the face and trunk are one of the reasons for differences in acne symptom at those sites. PMID:27081270

  15. What Is a pH Probe Study?

    MedlinePlus

    What is a pH Probe Study ? What is pH a probe study? M easuring the pH in the esophagus helps determine whether or not acid is coming up from the stomach. A pH probe study is usually done in patients where ...

  16. 21 CFR 876.1400 - Stomach pH electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Stomach pH electrode. 876.1400 Section 876.1400...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1400 Stomach pH electrode. (a) Identification. A stomach pH electrode is a device used to measure intragastric and intraesophageal pH...

  17. 21 CFR 876.1400 - Stomach pH electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Stomach pH electrode. 876.1400 Section 876.1400...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1400 Stomach pH electrode. (a) Identification. A stomach pH electrode is a device used to measure intragastric and intraesophageal pH...

  18. 21 CFR 876.1400 - Stomach pH electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stomach pH electrode. 876.1400 Section 876.1400...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1400 Stomach pH electrode. (a) Identification. A stomach pH electrode is a device used to measure intragastric and intraesophageal pH...

  19. 21 CFR 876.1400 - Stomach pH electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Stomach pH electrode. 876.1400 Section 876.1400...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1400 Stomach pH electrode. (a) Identification. A stomach pH electrode is a device used to measure intragastric and intraesophageal pH...

  20. 21 CFR 876.1400 - Stomach pH electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Stomach pH electrode. 876.1400 Section 876.1400...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1400 Stomach pH electrode. (a) Identification. A stomach pH electrode is a device used to measure intragastric and intraesophageal pH...

  1. Complexation Key to a pH Locked Redox Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizvi, Masood Ahmad; Dangat, Yuvraj; Shams, Tahir; Khan, Khaliquz Zaman

    2016-01-01

    An unfavorable pH can block a feasible electron transfer for a pH dependent redox reaction. In this experiment, a series of potentiometric titrations demonstrate the sequential loss in feasibility of iron(II) dichromate redox reaction over a pH range of 0-4. The pH at which this reaction failed to occur was termed as a pH locked reaction. The…

  2. Reactivity of the isolable disilene R*PhSi=SiPhR* (R* = SitBu3).

    PubMed

    Wiberg, Nils; Niedermayer, Wolfgang; Polborn, Kurt; Mayer, Peter

    2002-06-17

    The disilene R*PhSi=SiPhR* (R* = supersilyl = SitBu3), which can be quantitatively prepared by dehalogenation of the disilane R*PhClSi-SiBrPhR* with NaR* (yellow, water- and air-sensitive crystals; decomp at ca. 70 degrees C; Si=Si distance 2.182 A), is comparatively reactive. It transforms 1) with Cl2, Br2, HCl, HBr, and HOH under 1,2-addition into disilanes R*PhXSi-SiX'PhR* (X/X' = Hal/Hal, H/Hal, H/OH), 2) with O2, S8, and Sen under insertion into 1,3-disiletanes R*PhSi(-Y-)2SiPhR* (Y = O, S, Se), 3) with Me2C=CH2 under ene reaction into the disilane R*PhRSi-SiHPhR* (R = CH2-CMe=CH2), 4) with N2O, Ten, tBuN identical to C, and Me3SiN=N=N under [2 + 1] cycloaddition into disiliranes -R*PhSi-Y-SiPhR*- (Y = O, Te, C=NtBu, NSiMe3; P4 adds 2 molecules of disilene), 5) with CO2, COS, PhCHO, and Ph2CS under [2 + 2] cycloaddition into disiletanes -R*PhSi-SiPhR*-Y-CO- (Y = O, S) as well as -R*PhSi-SiPhR*-Y-CRPh- (Y/R = O/H, S/Ph), 6) with CS2 and CSe2 under [2 + 3] cycloaddition into ethenes R*2Ph2Si2Y2C = CY2Si2Ph2R*2 (Y = S, Se), and 7) with CH2 = CMe-CMe=CH2 and Ph2CO under [2 + 4] cycloaddition into "Diels-Alder adducts". X-ray structure analyses of seven of these compounds are presented. PMID:12391651

  3. The Added Value of a PhD in Medicine--PhD Students' Perceptions of Acquired Competences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anttila, Henrika; Lindblom-Ylänne, Sari; Lonka, Kristi; Pyhältö, Kirsi

    2015-01-01

    PhD in the field of medicine is more common than in any other domain. Many medical doctors are driven towards PhD, but also students with other backgrounds (usually MSc) are conducting a PhD in medical schools. Higher education has invested a lot in developing generic and research competences. Still little is known about how PhD students…

  4. The Influence of pH on Prokaryotic Cell Size and Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundararajan, D.; Gutierrez, F.; Heim, N. A.; Payne, J.

    2015-12-01

    The pH of a habitat is essential to an organism's growth and success in its environment. Although most organisms maintain a neutral internal pH, their environmental pH can vary greatly. However, little research has been done concerning an organism's environmental pH across a wide range of taxa. We studied pH tolerance in prokaryotes and its relationship with biovolume, taxonomic classification, and ideal temperature. We had three hypotheses: pH and temperature are not correlated; pH tolerance is similar within taxonomic groups; and extremophiles have small cell sizes. To test these hypotheses, we used pH, size, and taxonomic data from The Prokaryotes. We found that the mean optimum external pH was neutral for prokaryotes as a whole and when divided by domain, phylum, and class. Using ANOVA to test for pH within and among group variances, we found that variation of pH in domains, phyla, classes, and families was greater than between them. pH and size did not show much of a correlation, except that the largest and smallest sized prokaryotes had nearly neutral pH. This seems significant because extremophiles need to divert more of their energy from growth to maintain a neutral internal pH. Acidophiles showed a larger range of optimum pH values than alkaliphiles. A similar result was seen with the minimum and maximum pH values of acidophiles and alkaliphiles. While acidophiles were spread out and had some alkaline maximum values, alkaliphiles had smaller ranges, and unlike some acidophiles that had pH minimums close to zero, alkaliphile pH maximums did not go beyond a pH of 12. No statistically significant differences were found between sizes of acidophiles and alkaliphiles. However, optimum temperatures of acidophiles and alkaliphiles did have a statistically significant difference. pH and temperature had a negative correlation. Therefore, pH seems to have a correlation with cell size, temperature, and taxonomy to some extent.

  5. pH gradients are not associated with tip growth in pollen tubes of Lilium longiflorum.

    PubMed

    Fricker, M D; White, N S; Obermeyer, G

    1997-08-01

    The cytoplasmic pH of growing pollen tubes of Lilium longiflorum Thunb. was measured using the pH-sensitive fluorescent dye 2',7'-bis-(carboxyethyl)-5(6')-carboxyfl uorescein and confocal fluorescence ratio imaging. The average cytoplasmic pH in the clear zone of the pollen tube tip was pH 7.11, and no consistent pH gradients were detected in the clear zone, averaging around -1.00 milli pH unit microm(-1), or along the first 50 microm of the tube (3.62 milli pH units microm[-1]). In addition, no correlation was observed between the absolute tip cytoplasmic pH or the pH gradient and the pollen tube growth rates. Shifts of external pH to more acidic pH values (pH 4.5) caused a relatively small acidification by 0.18 pH units, whereas a more alkaline external pH >7.0 caused a dramatic increase in cytoplasmic pH and growth stopped immediately. Stimulation of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase by fusicoccin, resulted in an increase of tube growth but no change in cytoplasmic pH. On the other hand, vanadate (250-500 microM), a putative inhibitor of the pump, stopped tube growth and a slight cytoplasmic alkalinisation of 0.1 pH units was observed. Vanadate also arrested fusicoccin-stimulated growth and stimulated an increased alkalinisation of around 0.2 pH units. External application of CaCl2 (10 mM) caused a small acidification of less than 0.1 pH units in the clear zone, whilst LaCl3 (250 microM) caused slight and rather variable perturbations in cytoplasmic pH of no more than 0.1 pH units. Both treatments stopped growth. It was inferred from these data that tip-acid cytoplasmic pH gradients do not play a central role in the organisation or maintenance of pollen tube tip growth. PMID:9264460

  6. The panacea toolbox of a PhD biomedical student.

    PubMed

    Skaik, Younis

    2014-01-01

    Doing a PhD (doctor of philosophy) for the sake of contribution to knowledge should give the student an immense enthusiasm through the PhD period. It is the time in one's life that one spends to "hit the nail on the head" in a specific area and topic of interest. A PhD consists mostly of hard work and tenacity; however, luck and genius might also play a little role. You can pass all PhD phases without having both luck and genius. The PhD student should have pre-PhD and PhD toolboxes, which are "sine quibus non" for getting successfully a PhD degree. In this manuscript, the toolboxes of the PhD student are discussed. PMID:25674150

  7. Influence of pH on yeast immobilization on polystyrene surfaces modified by energetic ion bombardment.

    PubMed

    Tran, Clara T H; Kondyurin, Alexey; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Bilek, Marcela M M; McKenzie, David R

    2013-04-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) treatment is a novel method for immobilizing yeast on polymer surfaces by covalent linkage. This study of the immobilization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in both rehydrated and cultured forms showed that the density of cell attachment on PIII treated polystyrene (PS) was strongly dependent on the pH of the incubation medium and was higher for rehydrated yeast. A study of the surface charge was undertaken to explain this result. A high density of cell attachment occurs in acidic conditions (pH 3-5) and a significantly reduced cell density occurs in neutral and alkaline buffers (pH 6-10) for both types of yeast. Force measurements using atomic force microscopy show that a negative charge is present on polystyrene after PIII treatment. The charge is close to zero at pH 3 to pH 5 and increasingly negative from pH 6 to pH 10. Both rehydrated yeast and cultured yeast have negative electrophoretic mobility in the pH range studied. The repulsive forces are weak in acidic buffers and stronger in neutral and alkaline buffers, in good agreement with the cell densities observed. Rehydrated yeast cells are found to be more hydrophobic than cultured yeasts in the same buffer. The higher hydrophobicity explains the higher attachment of rehydrated yeast compared to cultured yeast. PMID:23298600

  8. Recent Ph.D.s; Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-04-01

    Recent Ph.D.s. Atmospheric Sciences. A study of atmospheric ammonia in coastal ecosystems utilizing relaxed eddy accumulation techniques and ion mobility spectrometry, LaToya Myles, Florida A&M University, December 2004, Advisor: Larry Robinson. Honors. Rana A. Fine has been awarded the 2005 Provost Award for Scholarly Activity, presented by the University of Miami. The award ``recognizes faculty for extraordinary research and scholarly pursuits.'' Charles David Keeling and Lonnie G. Thompson will receive the 2005 Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement. The prize is given to individuals whose accomplishments in environmental science, policy, energy, and medicine confer great benefit upon mankind.

  9. Polypeptide micelles with dual pH activatable dyes for sensing cells and cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Ping; Yang, Yueting; Yi, Huqiang; Fang, Shengtao; Zhang, Pengfei; Sheng, Zonghai; Gao, Guanhui; Gao, Duyang; Cai, Lintao

    2014-04-01

    pH is an important control parameter for maintenance of cell viability and tissue functions. pH monitoring provides valuable information on cell metabolic processes and the living environment. In this study, we prepared dual pH-sensitive, fluorescent dye-loaded polypeptide nanoparticles (DPNs) for ratiometric sensing of pH changes in living cells. DPNs contain two types of dyes: N-(rhodamine B) lactam cystamine (RBLC), an acid activatable fluorescent dye with increased fluorescence in an acidic environment, and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), a base activatable fluorescent dye with enhanced fluorescence in an alkaline environment. Hence, DPNs exhibited a dual response signal with strong red fluorescence and weak green fluorescence under acidic conditions; in contrast, they showed strong green fluorescence and almost no red fluorescence under alkaline and neutral conditions. The favorable inverse pH responses of the two fluorescent dyes resulted in ratiometric pH determination for DPNs with an optimized pH-sensitive range of pH 4.5-7.5. Quantitative analysis of the intracellular pH of intact MCF-7 cells has been successfully demonstrated with our nanosensor. Moreover, single acid activatable fluorescent dye doped polypeptide nanoparticles that only contained RBLC can distinguish tumor tissue from normal tissue by monitoring the acidic extracellular environment.pH is an important control parameter for maintenance of cell viability and tissue functions. pH monitoring provides valuable information on cell metabolic processes and the living environment. In this study, we prepared dual pH-sensitive, fluorescent dye-loaded polypeptide nanoparticles (DPNs) for ratiometric sensing of pH changes in living cells. DPNs contain two types of dyes: N-(rhodamine B) lactam cystamine (RBLC), an acid activatable fluorescent dye with increased fluorescence in an acidic environment, and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), a base activatable fluorescent dye with enhanced fluorescence

  10. The pH of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plumb, R. C.; Bishop, J. L.; Edwards, J. O.

    1993-01-01

    The Viking labeled release (LR) experiments provided data that can be used to determine the acid-base characteristics of the regolith. Constraints on the acid-base properties and redox potentials of the Martian surface material would provide additional information for determining what reactions are possible and defining formation conditions for the regolith. Calculations devised to determine the pH of Mars must include the amount of soluble acid species or base species present in the LR regolith sample and the solubility product of the carbonate with the limiting solubility. This analysis shows that CaCO3, either as calcite or aragonite, has the correct K(sub sp) to have produced the Viking LR successive injection reabsorption effects. Thus CaCO3 or another MeCO3 with very similar solubility characteristics must have been present on Mars. A small amount of soluble acid, but no more than 4 micro-mol per sample, could also have been present. It is concluded that the pH of the regolith is 7.2 +/- 0.1.

  11. Histone Acetylation Regulates Intracellular pH

    PubMed Central

    McBrian, Matthew A.; Behbahan, Iman Saramipoor; Ferrari, Roberto; Su, Trent; Huang, Ta-Wei; Li, Kunwu; Hong, Candice S.; Christofk, Heather R.; Vogelauer, Maria; Seligson, David B.; Kurdistani, Siavash K.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Differences in global levels of histone acetylation occur in normal and cancer cells, although the reason why cells regulate these levels has been unclear. Here we demonstrate a role for histone acetylation in regulating intracellular pH (pHi). As pHi decreases, histones are globally deacetylated by histone deacetylases (HDACs), and the released acetate anions are coexported with protons out of the cell by monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs), preventing further reductions in pHi. Conversely, global histone acetylation increases as pHi rises, such as when resting cells are induced to proliferate. Inhibition of HDACs or MCTs decreases acetate export and lowers pHi, particularly compromising pHi maintenance in acidic environments. Global deacetylation at low pH is reflected at a genomic level by decreased abundance and extensive redistribution of acetylation throughout the genome. Thus, acetylation of chromatin functions as a rheostat to regulate pHi with important implications for mechanism of action and therapeutic use of HDAC inhibitors. PMID:23201122

  12. The pH sensitivity of Aqp0 channels in tetraploid and diploid teleosts

    PubMed Central

    Chauvigné, François; Zapater, Cinta; Stavang, Jon Anders; Taranger, Geir Lasse; Cerdà, Joan; Finn, Roderick Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Water homeostasis and the structural integrity of the vertebrate lens is partially mediated by AQP0 channels. Emerging evidence indicates that external pH may be involved in channel gating. Here we show that a tetraploid teleost, the Atlantic salmon, retains 4 aqp0 genes (aqp0a1, -0a2, -0b1, and -0b2), which are highly, but not exclusively, expressed in the lens. Functional characterization reveals that, although each paralog permeates water efficiently, the permeability is respectively shifted to the neutral, alkaline, or acidic pH in Aqp0a1, -0a2, and -0b1, whereas that of Aqp0b2 is not regulated by external pH. Mutagenesis studies demonstrate that Ser38, His39, and His40 residues in the extracellular transmembrane domain of α-helix 2 facing the water pore are critical for the pH modulation of water transport. To validate these findings, we show that both zebrafish Aqp0a and -0b are functional water channels with respective pH sensitivities toward alkaline or acid pH ranges and that an N-terminal allelic variant (Ser19) of Aqp0b exists that abolishes water transport in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The data suggest that the alkaline pH sensitivity is a conserved trait in teleost Aqp0 a-type channels, whereas mammalian AQP0 and some teleost Aqp0 b-type channels display an acidic pH permeation preference.—Chauvigné, F., Zapater, C., Stavang, J. A., Taranger, G. L., Cerdà, J., Finn, R. N. The pH sensitivity of Aqp0 channels in tetraploid and diploid teleosts. PMID:25667219

  13. The Job Market for Ph.D.s: Two Views.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkume, Megan

    1997-01-01

    Offers both optimistic and pessimistic views of the labor market for those with Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degrees. Discusses postdoctoral appointments and jobs for Ph.D.s outside the university. (JOW)

  14. Catalytic Decomposition of PH3 on Heated Tungsten Wire Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umemoto, Hironobu; Nishihara, Yushin; Ishikawa, Takuma; Yamamoto, Shingo

    2012-08-01

    The catalytic decomposition processes of PH3 on heated tungsten surfaces were studied to clarify the mechanisms governing phosphorus doping into silicon substrates. Mass spectrometric measurements show that PH3 can be decomposed by more than 50% over 2000 K. H, P, PH, and PH2 radicals were identified by laser spectroscopic techniques. Absolute density measurements of these radical species, as well as their PH3 flow rate dependence, show that the major products on the catalyst surfaces are P and H atoms, while PH and PH2 are produced in secondary processes in the gas phase. In other words, catalytic decomposition, unlike plasma decomposition processes, can be a clean source of P atoms, which can be the only major dopant precursors. In the presence of an excess amount of H2, the apparent decomposition efficiency is small. This can be explained by rapid cyclic reactions including decomposition, deposition, and etching to reproduce PH3.

  15. Microscopic measurement of pH with iridium oxide microelectrodes

    PubMed

    Wipf; Ge; Spaine; Baur

    2000-10-15

    Microscopic pH electrodes were produced by deposition of hydrous iridium oxide onto carbon fiber microelectrodes. The electrodes exhibit two linear regions of potentiometric response between pH 2-6 and pH 6-12. The electrodes respond to pH changes within 50 ms, and an equilibrium value is reached within 30 s. By using these electrodes as probes in the scanning electrochemical microscope, dynamic pH changes occurring at or near a surface can be measured and pH maps of the surface can be generated. Vertical pH profiles and images of pH were obtained at substrates where electrochemical (oxidation and reduction of H2O2, hydrogen evolution) or enzymatic (glucose oxidase) reactions involving proton transfers occur. PMID:11055710

  16. Development of a porous polymer pH optrode.

    PubMed

    Liu, J N; Shahriari, M R; Sigel, G H

    1992-12-15

    A novel fiber-optic pH sensor has been developed with long-term stability and high sensitivity. The sensor is based on a porous cellulose triacetate fiber immobilized with Congo Red (pH indicator). This intrinsic fiberoptic pH sensor has shown excellent sensitivity, reversibility, and stability. It has also been demonstrated that the pH optrode is immune to metal-ion interferences. PMID:19798326

  17. Effect of pH on phosphorus, copper, and zinc elution from swine wastewater activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Waki, Miyoko; Yasuda, Tomoko; Fukumoto, Yasuyuki; Suzuki, Kazuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    With the goal of reducing the amounts of phosphorus (P), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn) discharged from swine wastewater activated sludge treatment facilities, we studied the elution of these elements from activated sludge at various pH values. Sludge samples with neutral pH collected from three farms were incubated at pH values ranging from 3 to 10. The soluble concentrations of these elements changed dramatically with pH and were highest at pH 3. We assumed that P present in the sludge under neutral and alkaline conditions was in insoluble form bound up with magnesium (Mg) and calcium (Ca), because Ca and Mg also eluted from the sludge at low pH. To clarify forms of Zn and Cu in the sludge, we performed a sequential extraction analysis. Zinc in adsorbed, organically bound, and sulfide fractions made up a large proportion of the total Zn. Copper in organically bound, carbonate, and sulfide fractions made up a large proportion of the total Cu. The soluble P concentrations were lowest at pH 9 or 10 (11-36 mg/L), the soluble Zn concentrations were lowest at pH 8 or 9 (0.07-0.15 mg/L), and the soluble Cu concentrations were lowest at pH 6-9 (0.2 mg/L, the detection limit). PMID:25116486

  18. Primordial soup or vinaigrette: did the RNA world evolve at acidic pH?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The RNA world concept has wide, though certainly not unanimous, support within the origin-of-life scientific community. One view is that life may have emerged as early as the Hadean Eon 4.3-3.8 billion years ago with an atmosphere of high CO2 producing an acidic ocean of the order of pH 3.5-6. Compatible with this scenario is the intriguing proposal that life arose within alkaline (pH 9-11) deep-sea hydrothermal vents like those of the 'Lost City', with the interface with the acidic ocean creating a proton gradient sufficient to drive the first metabolism. However, RNA is most stable at pH 4-5 and is unstable at alkaline pH, raising the possibility that RNA may have first arisen in the acidic ocean itself (possibly near an acidic hydrothermal vent), acidic volcanic lake or comet pond. As the Hadean Eon progressed, the ocean pH is inferred to have gradually risen to near neutral as atmospheric CO2 levels decreased. Presentation of the hypothesis We propose that RNA is well suited for a world evolving at acidic pH. This is supported by the enhanced stability at acidic pH of not only the RNA phosphodiester bond but also of the aminoacyl-(t)RNA and peptide bonds. Examples of in vitro-selected ribozymes with activities at acid pH have recently been documented. The subsequent transition to a DNA genome could have been partly driven by the gradual rise in ocean pH, since DNA has greater stability than RNA at alkaline pH, but not at acidic pH. Testing the hypothesis We have proposed mechanisms for two key RNA world activities that are compatible with an acidic milieu: (i) non-enzymatic RNA replication of a hemi-protonated cytosine-rich oligonucleotide, and (ii) specific aminoacylation of tRNA/hairpins through triple helix interactions between the helical aminoacyl stem and a single-stranded aminoacylating ribozyme. Implications of the hypothesis Our hypothesis casts doubt on the hypothesis that RNA evolved in the vicinity of alkaline hydrothermal vents. The

  19. The effect of pH on phosphorus availability and speciation in an aquaponics nutrient solution.

    PubMed

    Cerozi, Brunno da Silva; Fitzsimmons, Kevin

    2016-11-01

    The interaction between the main ions in aquaponics nutrient solutions affects chemical composition and availability of nutrients, and nutrient uptake by plant roots. This study determined the effect of pH on phosphorus (P) speciation and availability in an aquaponics nutrient solution and used Visual MINTEQ to simulate P species and P activity. In both experimental and simulated results, P availability decreased with increase in pH of aquaponics nutrient solutions. According to simulations, P binds to several cations leaving less free phosphate ions available in solution. High pH values resulted in the formation of insoluble calcium phosphate species. The study also demonstrated the importance of organic matter and alkalinity in keeping free phosphate ions in solution at high pH ranges. It is recommended though that pH in aquaponics systems is maintained at a 5.5-7.2 range for optimal availability and uptake by plants. PMID:27575336

  20. Engineering of a glycosidase Family 7 cellobiohydrolase to more alkaline pH optimum: the pH behaviour of Trichoderma reesei Cel7A and its E223S/ A224H/L225V/T226A/D262G mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Becker, D; Braet, C; Brumer , H; Claeyssens, M; Divne, C; Fagerström, B R; Harris, M; Jones, T A; Kleywegt, G J; Koivula, A; Mahdi, S; Piens, K; Sinnott, M L; Ståhlberg, J; Teeri, T T; Underwood, M; Wohlfahrt, G

    2001-01-01

    The crystal structures of Family 7 glycohydrolases suggest that a histidine residue near the acid/base catalyst could account for the higher pH optimum of the Humicola insolens endoglucanase Cel7B, than the corresponding Trichoderma reesei enzymes. Modelling studies indicated that introduction of histidine at the homologous position in T. reesei Cel7A (Ala(224)) required additional changes to accommodate the bulkier histidine side chain. X-ray crystallography of the catalytic domain of the E223S/A224H/L225V/T226A/D262G mutant reveals that major differences from the wild-type are confined to the mutations themselves. The introduced histidine residue is in plane with its counterpart in H. insolens Cel7B, but is 1.0 A (=0.1 nm) closer to the acid/base Glu(217) residue, with a 3.1 A contact between N(epsilon2) and O(epsilon1). The pH variation of k(cat)/K(m) for 3,4-dinitrophenyl lactoside hydrolysis was accurately bell-shaped for both wild-type and mutant, with pK(1) shifting from 2.22+/-0.03 in the wild-type to 3.19+/-0.03 in the mutant, and pK(2) shifting from 5.99+/-0.02 to 6.78+/-0.02. With this poor substrate, the ionizations probably represent those of the free enzyme. The relative k(cat) for 2-chloro-4-nitrophenyl lactoside showed similar behaviour. The shift in the mutant pH optimum was associated with lower k(cat)/K(m) values for both lactosides and cellobiosides, and a marginally lower stability. However, k(cat) values for cellobiosides are higher for the mutant. This we attribute to reduced non-productive binding in the +1 and +2 subsites; inhibition by cellobiose is certainly relieved in the mutant. The weaker binding of cellobiose is due to the loss of two water-mediated hydrogen bonds. PMID:11336632

  1. INFLUENCE OF PH AND REDOX CONDITIONS ON COPPER LEACHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Leaching behavior of metals from a mineral processing waste at varying pH and redox conditions was studies. Effect of combinations of pH and Eh on leaching of copper is described. Leaching of copper was found to be dependent on both pH and Eh. Higher concentrations of Cu were ...

  2. Acid Rain, pH & Acidity: A Common Misinterpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, David B.; Thompson, Ronald E.

    1989-01-01

    Illustrates the basis for misleading statements about the relationship between pH and acid content in acid rain. Explains why pH cannot be used as a measure of acidity for rain or any other solution. Suggests that teachers present acidity and pH as two separate and distinct concepts. (RT)

  3. pH of organ-culture-stored corneas.

    PubMed

    Lass, J H; Greiner, J V; Meneses, P; Morgan, D C; Medcalf, S K; Collie, D M; Skelnik, D L; Glonek, T

    1988-10-01

    Changes in intracorneal and storage-medium pH values of organ-culture-stored cat corneas were monitored over a 4-week period. The intracorneal pH was determined using the phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P MRS) chemical shift of inorganic orthophosphate in conjunction with a standard pH titration curve. We incubated 32 adult cat corneas using two similar standard organ-culture methods, one with chondroitin sulfate (method 1) and the other without (method 2). Time-course data at 0, 1, 3 and 4 weeks of storage were used to calculate the rate of pH change. The intracorneal pH was not changed significantly for either organ-culture method; however, the storage-medium pH rate of change declined significantly for both methods (method 1, 0.15 pH units/week; method 2, 0.12 pH units/week). The difference between intracorneal and storage-medium pH values over time increased at a rate of 0.12 and 0.11 pH units/week for method 1 and method 2, respectively. The declining storage-medium pH in conjunction with the maintenance of intracorneal pH contributes to an increased metabolic demand on the cornea. PMID:3218477

  4. Ian Douglass Coulter, PhD

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Douglas M

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on Dr. Ian Coulter’s accomplishments from the time he became Executive Vice-President of CMCC in 1981, until he ended his presidency with a year’s administrative leave in 1990. Annual planning initiatives, pedagogy, scholarship, conflicts, and the quest for university affiliation are discussed as well as his legacy to the College and the chiropractic profession. The term “adventurous” was first attributed to Coulter by Oswald Hall, PhD, Professor Emeritus, University of Toronto who had worked closely with Coulter in a major investigation of the chiropractic profession from 1976 to 1979. Throughout this article the author tries to capture the spirit of daring, innovation and intellect that permeated Coulter’s presidency, enthralling his advocates and confounding his detractors. PMID:17549218

  5. Intracellular pH in Sperm Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Nishigaki, Takuya; José, Omar; González-Cota, Ana Laura; Romero, Francisco; Treviño, Claudia L.; Darszon, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) regulation is essential for cell function. Notably, several unique sperm ion transporters and enzymes whose elimination causes infertility are either pHi dependent or somehow related to pHi regulation. Amongst them are: CatSper, a Ca2+ channel; Slo3, a K+ channel; the sperm-specific Na+/H+ exchanger and the soluble adenylyl cyclase. It is thus clear that pHi regulation is of the utmost importance for sperm physiology. This review briefly summarizes the key components involved in pHi regulation, their characteristics and participation in fundamental sperm functions such as motility, maturation and the acrosome reaction. PMID:24887564

  6. Understanding Non-Traditional PhD Students Habitus--Implications for PhD Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naidoo, Devika

    2015-01-01

    Against the background of vast changes in doctoral education and the emergence of non-traditional doctoral programmes, this paper investigates the habitus of non-traditional PhD students at a South African university. Bourdieu's conceptual tool of habitus informed the study. In-depth and open-ended interviews were conducted with 10 non-traditional…

  7. Comparison of Rumen Fluid pH by Continuous Telemetry System and Bench pH Meter in Sheep with Different Ranges of Ruminal pH

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Leonardo F.; Minervino, Antonio H. H.; Araújo, Carolina A. S. C.; Sousa, Rejane S.; Oliveira, Francisco L. C.; Rodrigues, Frederico A. M. L.; Meira-Júnior, Enoch B. S.; Barrêto-Júnior, Raimundo A.; Mori, Clara S.; Ortolani, Enrico L.

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to compare the measurements of sheep ruminal pH using a continuous telemetry system or a bench pH meter using sheep with different degrees of ruminal pH. Ruminal lactic acidosis was induced in nine adult crossbred Santa Ines sheep by the administration of 15 g of sucrose per kg/BW. Samples of rumen fluid were collected at the baseline, before the induction of acidosis (T0) and at six, 12, 18, 24, 48, and 72 hours after the induction for pH measurement using a bench pH meter. During this 72-hour period, all animals had electrodes for the continuous measurement of pH. The results were compared using the Bland-Altman analysis of agreement, Pearson coefficients of correlation and determination, and paired analysis of variance with Student's t-test. The measurement methods presented a strong correlation (r = 0.94, P < 0.05) but the rumen pH that was measured continuously using a telemetry system resulted in lower values than the bench pH meter (overall mean of 5.38 and 5.48, resp., P = 0.0001). The telemetry system was able to detect smaller changes in rumen fluid pH and was more accurate in diagnosing both subacute ruminal lactic acidosis and acute ruminal lactic acidosis in sheep. PMID:24967422

  8. Does pH influence soil hydro-mechanical properties?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaplain, V.; Défossez, P.; Delarue, G.; Dexter, A. R.; Richard, G.; Tessier, D.

    2009-04-01

    Does pH influence soil hydro-mechanical properties ? V. Chaplain1, P. Défossez2, G. Delarue1, A.R. Dexter3, G. Richard3 and D. Tessier1. 1 UR INRA PESSAC RD 10, F-78026 Versailles cedex 2 UMR INRA/URCA FARE, 2 Esplanade Roland Garros, BP 224 F-51686 Reims cedex 2 3 UR INRA Sols 2163 Avenue de la Pomme de Pin - CS 40001 ARDON F-45075 Orléans Cedex 2 Corresponding author : chaplain@versailles.inra.fr Structure of soils and its dynamic, physico-chemistry of the interface are of a great importance in the fate of organic pollutants because it governs the accessibility of pollutants to micro-organisms. The soil structure of soils is related to physical parameters (texture, density, water content) but the physico-chemical properties of the interface is not considered. In this study we performed hydro-mechanical measurements on soil samples taken from the 42-plot long-term experiment in Versailles. Indeed six plots were selected to cover a large range of pH values from acid (3.5) to alkaline (8.2) due to the repeated application of fertilizers. Soils were taken in the 0-20 cm and in the 30-35 cm layer out of the ploughed zone. All soils had similar texture and composition with low organic carbon. Therefore pH changes the surface charges and hydrophobicity that are implied in aggregation process. The two layers had the same pH values. The precompression stress Pc and the compression index Cc were derived from confined compression tests performed on remoulded soil samples (density 1.45 g/cm3) at saturation. Results shows that the precompression stress increased at pH lower than 4. In acid case, precompression stress was higher in subsoil. This increase of Pc was attributed to the hydrophobicity due in part to the condensation of charges probably sensitive to the humectation/dessication processes.

  9. PhD Students' Work Conditions and Study Environment in University- and Industry-Based PhD Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolmos, A.; Kofoed, L. B.; Du, X. Y.

    2008-01-01

    During the last 10 years, new models of funding and training PhD students have been established in Denmark in order to integrate industry into the entire PhD education. Several programmes have been conducted where it is possible to co-finance PhD scholarships or to become an employee as an industrial PhD in a company. An important question is what…

  10. Nitrification enhancement through pH control with rotating biological contractors

    SciTech Connect

    Long, D.A.; Stratta, J.M.; Doherty, M.C.

    1982-04-01

    The need to achieve compliance with ammonia-nitrogen discharge limitations and the current emphasis on energy conservation have resulted in the utilization of RBC (Rotating Biological Contractors) technology for the nitrification of secondary wastewater effluents. The objectives of this research were to: establish the relative rates of nitrification for domestic wastewater treatment within an acclimated RBC fixed-film system as a function of pH; observe and characterize the relative changes in the RBC biofilm as a function of pH; evaluate the efficacy of chemical addition to improve nitrification within an RBC fixed film system through the maintenance of an optimum pH; evaluate alternative alkaline chemicals for pH-controlled nitrification for the RBC; and develop design criteria, as appropriate, for pH controlled nitrification for the RBC. This research examined the short and long-term effect of pH upon the nitrification of wastewater within RBC fixed-film systems. In the long-term, the rate of nitrification within an RBC fixed-film system was dependent upon pH. The rate of nitrification increased with increasing pH up to a maximum at pH 8.5. Approximately five weeks of operation were required to clearly observe these differences. The response of a nitrifying RBC system to short-term changes in pH was relatively constant from pH 7.0 to pH 8.5, the adverse effect of pH becomes more pronounced.

  11. Intracellular pH of acid-tolerant ruminal bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, J B

    1991-01-01

    Acid-tolerant ruminal bacteria (Bacteroides ruminicola B1(4), Selenomonas ruminantium HD4, Streptococcus bovis JB1, Megasphaera elsdenii B159, and strain F) allowed their intracellular pH to decline as a function of extracellular pH and did not generate a large pH gradient across the cell membrane until the extracellular pH was low (less than 5.2). This decline in intracellular pH prevented an accumulation of volatile fatty acid anions inside the cells. PMID:1781695

  12. The Role of pH Regulation in Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Alan; Harris, Adrian L

    2016-01-01

    Frequently observed phenotypes of tumours include high metabolic activity, hypoxia and poor perfusion; these act to produce an acidic microenvironment. Cellular function depends on pH homoeostasis, and thus, tumours become dependent on pH regulatory mechanisms. Many of the proteins involved in pH regulation are highly expressed in tumours, and their expression is often of prognostic significance. The more acidic tumour microenvironment also has important implications with regard to chemotherapeutic and radiotherapeutic interventions. In addition, we review pH-sensing mechanisms, the role of pH regulation in tumour phenotype and the use of pH regulatory mechanisms as therapeutic targets. PMID:27557536

  13. Time course of pH change in plant epidermis using microscopic pH imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Risako; Shimizu, Megumi; Kazama, Haruko; Sakaue, Hirotaka

    2010-11-01

    We established a microscopic pH imaging system to track the time course of pH change in plant epidermis in vivo. In the previous research, we have found out that anthocyanin containing cells have higher pH. However, it was not clear whether the anthocyanin increased the pH or anthocyanin was synthesized result from the higher pH. Therefore, we further investigated the relationship between anthocyanin and pH change. To track the time course of pH change in plant epidermis, we established a system using luminescent imaging technique. We used HPTS (8-Hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-Trisulfonate) as pH indicator and applied excitation ratio imaging method. Luminescent image was converted to a pH distribution by obtained in vitro calibration using known pH solution. Cellular level observation was enabled by merging microscopic color picture of the same region to the pH change image. The established system was applied to epidermal cells of red-tip leaf lettuce, Lactuca Sativa L. and the time course was tracked in the growth process. We would discuss about the relationship between anthocyanin and pH change in plant epidermis.

  14. BEHAVIOR OF DDT, KEPONE, AND PERMETHRIN IN SEDIMENT-WATER SYSTEMS UNDER DIFFERENT OXIDATION-REDUCTION AND PH CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of pH and oxidation-reduction (redox) conditions of soil and sediment-water systems on the persistence of three insecticide compounds. Three pH levels, ranging from moderately acid to mildy alkaline, were studied for each compound. F...

  15. Capturing molten globule state of α-lactalbumin through constant pH molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Nicholus; Rani, Pooja; Biswas, Parbati

    2013-03-01

    The recently developed methods of constant pH molecular dynamics directly captures the correlation between protonation and conformation to probe protein structure, function, and dynamics. In this work, we investigate the effect of pH on the conformational properties of the protein human α-lactalbumin. Constant pH simulations at both acidic and alkaline medium indicate the formation of the molten globule state, which is in accordance with the previous experimental observations (especially, in acidic medium). The size of the protein measured by its radius of gyration (RG) exhibits a marked increase in both acidic and alkaline medium, which matches with the corresponding experimentally observed value of RG found in the molten globule. The probability of native contacts is also considerably reduced at acidic and basic pH as compared to that of native structure crystallized at neutral pH. The mean fractal dimension D2 of the protein records a sharp increase in basic medium as compared to those in neutral and acidic solutions implying a significant pH induced conformational change. The mean square fluctuations of all residues of the entire protein are found to increase by several folds in both acidic and basic medium, which may be correlated with the normalized solvent accessibility of the residues indicating role of solvent accessible surface area on protein internal dynamics. The helices comprising the α-domain of the protein are moderately preserved in the acidic and alkaline pH. However, the β-sheet structures present in the β-domain are completely disrupted in both acidic as well as basic pH.

  16. Tear pH, air pollution, and contact lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Andres, S.; Garcia, M.L.; Espina, M.; Valero, J.; Valls, O.

    1988-08-01

    We analyzed the tear pH of a random sample of 100 subjects, divided into 3 groups according to the stability of their precorneal tear film (normal eyes, borderline; and dry eyes). The average pH value obtained was 7.52. The pH for borderline and dry eyes was higher than for normal eyes. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of air pollution, specifically sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/), on the tear pH. We found that air pollution affected the lacrimal pH, which decreased when the atmospheric SO/sub 2/ increased. Finally, we studied the effect of soft contact lens wear on tear pH after 7 days of contact lens adaptation by assessing the tear pH decrease. We took into account the influence of the sex and age of subjects on the results obtained.

  17. Effects of ph, carbonate, orthophosphate, and redox potential on cuprosolvency

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, M.R.; Lytle, D.A.; Clement, J.A.

    1995-12-01

    A comprehensive solubility model for copper in drinking water has been developed, that is consistent with available data for copper dissolution and passivation in drinking water systems. Copper solubility (cuprosolvency) is greatly affected by the redox conditions of the systems. The concentration of Cu(I) is dominated by Cu{sub 2}O(s) or CuOH(s) solid phases, plus soluble aqueous ammonia and chloride complexes. In new piping, the concentration of Cu(II) is mainly governed by Cu(OH){sub 2}(s) (cupric hydroxide), rather than CuO(s) (tenorite) or Cu{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}CO{sub 3}(s)(malachite). Complexation of Cu(II) by DIC and hydroxide ion is extremely important. Increases in DIC are predicted to cause significant increases in copper solubility in the pH range of 7.5--10. Utilities may trade off increasing cuprosolvency by DIC addition for ensuring adequate buffering intensity in the finished water. Sufficient dosages of orthophosphate in the pH range of 6.5 to 7.5 may reduce cuprosolvency under oxidizing conditions. Sulfate may decrease cuprosolvency under some conditions, or may interfere with the formation of cupric hydroxide films under mildly alkaline conditions. Dissolved oxygen and chlorine residual play complicated roles in determining copper concentrations after various standing times. Frequently, 48--72 hours are necessary to reach equilibrium levels of copper in disinfected systems.

  18. pH regulation of urease levels in Streptococcus salivarius.

    PubMed

    Sissons, C H; Perinpanayagam, H E; Hancock, E M; Cutress, T W

    1990-05-01

    Potential mechanisms for regulation of urease levels in Streptococcus salivarius were examined, including: induction by urea, nitrogen or carbon source repression, and effects of pH and CO2 (because CO2 enrichment enhanced urease detection on urea agar plates). Regulation by either pH or CO2 was confirmed by comparison of the urease accumulation pattern during anaerobic growth under CO2 with that under N2. Under CO2, there was an initial buffering plateau at pH 6.2 and a rate of Streptococcus salivarius urease accumulation three-fold that under N2, with a pH 7.6 plateau. With both gas phases there was also an increase in the rate of urease appearance coincident with the decrease in medium pH following the pH plateau. The effects of pH, CO2, and HCO3- on urease levels and on growth were separately assessed by culture in media containing 0, 25, 100 mmol/L KHCO3 buffered at different pH levels. There was an inverse relationship between the logarithm of the urease level after 24-hour growth and the pH during growth-the urease specific activity was 100-fold higher at pH 5.5, compared with pH 7.0 and above. HCO3-/CO2 (100 mmol/L) had little effect on urease levels, but was essential for growth at pH 5.5. There was no significant urease induction by urea, or repression by ammonia or glucose. There was also evidence of pH regulation of urease levels in some staphylococci, Klebsiella pneumonia, and Corynebacterium renale, but not in Actinomyces naeslundii and several other species. We conclude that the external pH is a major factor regulating urease levels in S. salivarius and possibly some other species-a mechanism equivalent to urease repression by OH-. PMID:2110582

  19. The Effect of pH on the Extracellular Matrix and Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Eleri M.; Cochrane, Christine A.; Percival, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Chronic wounds become caught in a state of inflammation causing an increase in levels of degrading proteases, which destroy components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) that are essential for the wound healing process. This review aims to highlight and provide readers with an overview of what is currently known about the role of pH and its effect on the ECM and biofilms within healing and nonhealing wounds. Recent Advances: The pH profiles of healthy skin, acute wounds, and chronic wounds differ significantly. Chronic wounds have an alkaline pH whereas healthy skin has a slightly acidic pH. Although there is evidence on the effect of pH on protease production and bacterial proliferation in wounds, there is little evidence to show its effect on ECM synthesis and degradation. Critical Issues: The implications for the complex nature of chronic wounds are that no single treatment is relevant for all wounds, but rather a combination of methodologies must be adopted. It is known that pH of a wound reduces throughout the stages of healing, suggesting that wound pH measurements could be beneficial to identify nonhealing wounds earlier and decide on the most appropriate course of treatment. Future Direction: Wound healing is a very complex process with multiple factors known to play a role. All aspects of the nonhealing wound (defective ECM, pH, microbial invasion, and excess proteases) need to be taken into account when investigating or clinically treating a chronic wound. PMID:26155386

  20. Activity and stability trends of perovskite oxides for oxygen evolution catalysis at neutral pH.

    PubMed

    Han, Binghong; Risch, Marcel; Lee, Yueh-Lin; Ling, Chen; Jia, Hongfei; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2015-09-21

    Perovskite oxides (ABO3) have been studied extensively to promote the kinetics of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in alkaline electrolytes. However, developing highly active catalysts for OER at near-neutral pH is desirable for many photoelectrochemical/electrochemical devices. In this paper, we systematically studied the activity and stability of well-known perovskite oxides for OER at pH 7. Previous activity descriptors established for perovskite oxides at pH 13, such as having an eg occupancy close to unity or having an O p-band center close to Fermi level, were shown to scale with OER activity at pH 7. Stability was a greater challenge at pH 7 than at pH 13, where two different modes of instability were identified from combined transmission electron microscopy and density functional theory analyses. Perovskites with O p-band close to Fermi level showed leaching of A-site atoms and surface amorphization under all overpotentials examined at pH 7, while those with O p-band far from Fermi level were stable under low OER current/potential but became unstable at high current/potential accompanied by leaching of B-site atoms. Therefore, efforts are needed to enhance the activity and stability of perovskites against A-site or B-site loss if used at neutral pH. PMID:26271910

  1. Improvement of the Performance of an Electrocoagulation Process System Using Fuzzy Control of pH.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Yavuz; Pekel, Lutfiye Canan; Altinten, Ayla; Alpbaz, Mustafa

    2015-12-01

    The removal efficiencies of electrocoagulation (EC) systems are highly dependent on the initial value of pH. If an EC system has an acidic influent, the pH of the effluent increases during the treatment process; conversely, if such a system has an alkaline influent, the pH of the effluent decreases during the treatment process. Thus, changes in the pH of the wastewater affect the efficiency of the EC process. In this study, we investigated the dynamic effects of pH. To evaluate approaches for preventing increases in the pH of the system, the MATLAB/Simulink program was used to develop and evaluate an on-line computer-based system for pH control. The aim of this work was to study Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) control and fuzzy control of the pH of a real textile wastewater purification process using EC. The performances and dynamic behaviors of these two control systems were evaluated based on determinations of COD, colour, and turbidity removal efficiencies. PMID:26652117

  2. The Spinal Cord Has an Intrinsic System for the Control of pH.

    PubMed

    Jalalvand, Elham; Robertson, Brita; Tostivint, Hervé; Wallén, Peter; Grillner, Sten

    2016-05-23

    For survival of the organism, acid-base homeostasis is vital [1, 2]. The respiratory and renal systems are central to this control. Here we describe a novel mechanism, intrinsic to the spinal cord, with sensors that detect pH changes and act to restore pH to physiological levels by reducing motor activity. This pH sensor consists of somatostatin-expressing cerebrospinal fluid-contacting (CSF-c) neurons, which target the locomotor network. They have a low level of activity at pH 7.4. However, at both alkaline and acidic pH, the activity of the individual CSF-c neuron is markedly enhanced through the action of two separate channel subtypes. The alkaline response depends on PKD2L1 channels that have a large conductance and an equilibrium potential around 0 mV, both characteristics of mouse PKD2L1 channels [3-5]. The acidic response is due to an activation of ASIC3 [6]. The discharge pattern of the CSF-c neurons is U-shaped with a minimum frequency around pH 7.4 and a marked increase already at slightly lower and higher pH. During ongoing locomotor activity in the isolated spinal cord, both an increase and as a decrease of pH will reduce the locomotor burst rate. A somatostatin antagonist blocks these effects, suggesting that CSF-c neurons are responsible for the suppression of locomotor activity. CSF-c neurons thus represent a novel innate homeostatic mechanism, designed to sense any deviation from physiological pH and to respond by causing a depression of the motor activity. Because CSF-c neurons are found in all vertebrates, their pH-sensing function is most likely conserved. PMID:27133867

  3. Intracellular pH of symbiotic dinoflagellates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbin, E. M.; Davy, S. K.

    2013-09-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) is likely to play a key role in maintaining the functional success of cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis, yet until now the pHi of the symbiotic dinoflagellates (genus Symbiodinium) has never been quantified. Flow cytometry was used in conjunction with the ratiometric fluorescent dye BCECF to monitor changes in pHi over a daily light/dark cycle. The pHi of Symbiodinium type B1 freshly isolated from the model sea anemone Aiptasia pulchella was 7.25 ± 0.01 (mean ± SE) in the light and 7.10 ± 0.02 in the dark. A comparable effect of irradiance was seen across a variety of cultured Symbiodinium genotypes (types A1, B1, E1, E2, F1, and F5) which varied between pHi 7.21-7.39 in the light and 7.06-7.14 in the dark. Of note, there was a significant genotypic difference in pHi, irrespective of irradiance.

  4. Precision and accuracy of spectrophotometric pH measurements at environmental conditions in the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Karoline; Schneider, Bernd; Kuliński, Karol; Schulz-Bull, Detlef E.

    2014-06-01

    The increasing uptake of anthropogenic CO2 by the oceans has raised an interest in precise and accurate pH measurement in order to assess the impact on the marine CO2-system. Spectrophotometric pH measurements were refined during the last decade yielding a precision and accuracy that cannot be achieved with the conventional potentiometric method. However, until now the method was only tested in oceanic systems with a relative stable and high salinity and a small pH range. This paper describes the first application of such a pH measurement system at conditions in the Baltic Sea which is characterized by a wide salinity and pH range. The performance of the spectrophotometric system at pH values as low as 7.0 (“total” scale) and salinities between 0 and 35 was examined using TRIS-buffer solutions, certified reference materials, and tests of consistency with measurements of other parameters of the marine CO2 system. Using m-cresol purple as indicator dye and a spectrophotometric measurement system designed at Scripps Institution of Oceanography (B. Carter, A. Dickson), a precision better than ±0.001 and an accuracy between ±0.01 and ±0.02 was achieved within the observed pH and salinity ranges in the Baltic Sea. The influence of the indicator dye on the pH of the sample was determined theoretically and is presented as a pH correction term for the different alkalinity regimes in the Baltic Sea. Because of the encouraging tests, the ease of operation and the fact that the measurements refer to the internationally accepted “total” pH scale, it is recommended to use the spectrophotometric method also for pH monitoring and trend detection in the Baltic Sea.

  5. Mechanisms of cytoplasmic pH regulation in alkaliphilic strains of Bacillus.

    PubMed

    Krulwich, T A; Ito, M; Gilmour, R; Guffanti, A A

    1997-11-01

    The central challenge for extremely alkaliphilic Bacillus species is the need to establish and sustain a cytoplasmic pH that is over two units lower than the highly alkaline medium. Its centrality is suggested by the strong correlation between the growth rate in the upper range of pH for growth, i.e., at values above pH 10.5, and the cytoplasmic pH. The diminishing growth rate at extremely high pH values correlates better with the rise in cytoplasmic pH than with other energetic parameters. There are also general adaptations of alkaliphiles that are crucial prerequisites for pH homeostasis as well as other cell functions, i.e., the reduced basic amino acid content of proteins or segments thereof that are exposed to the medium, and there are other challenges of alkaliphily that emerge from solution of the cytoplasmic pH problem, i.e., reduction of the chemiosmotic driving force. For cells growing on glucose, strong evidence exists for the importance of acidic cell wall components, teichuronic acid and teichuronopeptides, in alkaliphily. These wall macromolecules may provide a passive barrier to ion flux. For cells growing on fermentable carbon sources, this and other passive mechanisms may have a particularly substantial role, but for cells growing on both fermentable and nonfermentable substrates, an active Na+-dependent cycle is apparently required for alkaliphily and the alkaliphile's remarkable capacity for pH homeostasis. The active cycle involves primary establishment of an electrochemical gradient via proton extrusion, a secondary electrogenic Na+/H+ antiport to achieve net acidification of the cytoplasm relative to the outside pH, and mechanisms for Na+ re-entry. Recent work in several laboratories on the critical antiporters involved in this cycle has begun to clarify the number and characteristics of the porters that support active mechanisms of pH homeostasis. PMID:9680297

  6. An electrochemical platform for localized pH control on demand.

    PubMed

    Fomina, N; Johnson, C A; Maruniak, A; Bahrampour, S; Lang, C; Davis, R W; Kavusi, S; Ahmad, H

    2016-06-21

    Solution pH is a powerful tool for regulating many kinds of chemical activity, but is generally treated as a static property defined by a pre-selected buffer. Introducing dynamic control of pH in space, time, and magnitude can enable richer and more efficient chemistries, but is not feasible with traditional methods of titration or buffer exchange. Recent reports have featured electrochemical strategies for modifying bulk pH in constrained volumes, but only demonstrate switching between two preset values and omit spatial control entirely. Here, we use a combination of solution-borne quinones and galvanostatic excitation to enable quantitative control of pH environments that are highly localized to an electrode surface. We demonstrate highly reproducible acidification and alkalinization with up to 0.1 pH s(-1) (±0.002 pH s(-1)) rate of change across the dynamic range of our pH sensor (pH 4.5 to 7.5) in buffered solutions. Using dynamic current control, we generate and sustain 3 distinct pH microenvironments simultaneously to within ±0.04 pH for 13 minutes in a single solution, and we leverage these microenvironments to demonstrate spatially-resolved, pH-driven control of enzymatic activity. In addition to straightforward applications of spatio-temporal pH control (e.g. efficiently studying pH-dependencies of chemical interactions), the technique opens completely new avenues for implementing complex systems through dynamic control of enzyme activation, protein binding affinity, chemical reactivity, chemical release, molecular self-assembly, and many more pH-controlled processes. PMID:27199277

  7. In vitro synthesis and purification of PhIP-deoxyguanosine and PhIP-DNA oligomer covalent complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, J.

    1994-12-01

    2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) is a heterocyclic amine compound formed when meats are cooked at high temperatures. PhIP damages DNA by forming covalent complexes with DNA carcinogen. In an effort to understand how the binding of PhIP to DNA may cause cancer, it is important to characterize the structures of PhIP-damaged DNA molecules. Our HPLC data support fluorescence and {sup 32}P Post-labeling studies which indicate the formation of several species of 2{prime}deoxyguanosine-(dG) or oligodeoxynucleotide-PhIP adducts. The reaction of PhIP with dG resulted in a reddish precipitate that was likely the major adduct, N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-PhIP (dG-C8-PhIP) adduct, with a more polar adduct fraction remaining in the supernatant. Reversed-phase HPLC analysis of the adducts in the supernatant revealed the existence of species of much shorter retention times than the dG-C8-PhIP adduct, confirming that these species are more polar than dG-C8-PhIP. At least four adducts were formed in the reaction of PhIP with DNA oligomer. HPLC analysis of the PhIP-DNA oligomer supernatant after butanol extractions revealed four unresolved peaks which spectra had maximum wavelengths between 340 and 360 nm. Though adduct peaks were not completely resolved, there was {approximately}3 minutes interval between the DNA oligomer peak and the adduct peaks. Furthermore, fluorescence emission data of the DNA oligomer-PhIP adduct solution show heterogeneous binding. The more polar PhIP adducts were fraction-collected and their structures will be solved by nuclear magnetic resonance or x-ray crystallography.

  8. Impact of ruminal pH on enteric methane emissions.

    PubMed

    Hünerberg, M; McGinn, S M; Beauchemin, K A; Entz, T; Okine, E K; Harstad, O M; McAllister, T A

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the impact of ruminal pH on methane (CH4) emission from beef cattle. Ruminal pH and CH4 data were generated in 2 experiments using 16 beef heifers offered high-forage (55% barley silage) or high-grain (92% concentrate; DM basis) diets. Both experiments were designed as a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square with 4 periods and 4 dietary treatments. Methane was measured over 4 consecutive days using open-circuit respiratory chambers with each chamber housing 2 heifers. The ruminal pH of individual heifers was measured using indwelling pH loggers. The mean ruminal pH and CH4 emission (g/h) of 2 heifers in every chamber were summarized in 30-min blocks. Even though rumen methanogens have been described to be inhibited by a pH < 6.0 in vitro, in vivo CH4-production rates (g/h) did not decrease when ruminal pH declined to threshold levels for subacute (5.2 ≤ pH < 5.5) or acute ruminal acidosis (pH < 5.2; P > 0.05). Daily mean CH4 emission (g/d) and ruminal pH were only mildly correlated (r2 = 0.27; P < 0.05), suggesting that additional factors, such as increased propionate formation or passage rate, account for the lower CH4 emissions from cattle fed high-grain as compared to high-forage diets. Lowering ruminal pH alone is, therefore, not an effective CH4-mitigation strategy. Mechanisms permitting methanogens to survive episodes of low-ruminal pH might include changes in community structure toward more pH-tolerant strains or sequestration into microenvironments within biofilms or protozoa where methanogens are protected from low pH. PMID:26020197

  9. The effect of pH on the survival of leptospires in water*

    PubMed Central

    Smith, C. E. Gordon; Turner, L. H.

    1961-01-01

    One of the factors on which the incidence of leptospirosis is dependent is the survival time of shed leptospires in surface water or soil water, and this time is in turn affected by the acidity or alkalinity of the water. The authors have therefore studied the survival of four leptospiral serotypes in buffered distilled water at pH's ranging from 5.3 to 8.0. All survived longer in alkaline than in acid water, and significant differences between the serotypes were found in response to pH. Survival at pH's under 7.0 ranged from 10 to 117 days and at pH's over 7.0 from 21 to 152 days. Survival was also studied in aqueous extracts of soil samples from different areas in Malaya; no correlation was found between pH and survival time. It was also noted that in a group of Malayan ricefields a low incidence of leptospirosis in man was accompanied by a high infection rate among rodents, and when it was found that this phenomenon could not be explained by pH or salinity, attention was turned to the soil. Bentonite clay, similar to the montmorrillonite clay of the ricefields, was found to adsorb about half the leptospires in suspension. The authors recommend that field study of this laboratory observation be undertaken. PMID:20604084

  10. Modeling CO2 degassing and pH in a stream-aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choi, J.; Hulseapple, S.M.; Conklin, M.H.; Harvey, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    Pinal Creek, Arizona receives an inflow of ground water with high dissolved inorganic carbon (57-75 mg/l) and low pH (5.8-6.3). There is an observed increase of in-stream pH from approximately 6.0-7.8 over the 3 km downstream of the point of groundwater inflow. We hypothesized that CO2 gas-exchange was the most important factor causing the pH increase in this stream-aquifer system. An existing transport model, for coupled ground water-surface water systems (OTIS), was modified to include carbonate equilibria and CO2 degassing, used to simulate alkalinity, total dissolved inorganic carbon (C(T)), and pH in Pinal Creek. Because of the non-linear relation between pH and C(T), the modified transport model used the numerical iteration method to solve the non-linearity. The transport model parameters were determined by the injection of two tracers, bromide and propane. The resulting simulations of alkalinity, C(T) and pH reproduced, without fitting, the overall trends in downstream concentrations. A multi-parametric sensitivity analysis (MPSA) was used to identify the relative sensitivities of the predictions to six of the physical and chemical parameters used in the transport model. MPSA results implied that C(T) and pH in stream water were controlled by the mixing of ground water with stream water and CO2 degassing. The relative importance of these two processes varied spatially depending on the hydrologic conditions, such as stream flow velocity and whether a reach gained or lost stream water caused by the interaction with the ground water. The coupled transport model with CO2 degassing and generalized sensitivity analysis presented in this study can be applied to evaluate carbon transport and pH in other coupled stream-ground water systems.An existing transport model for coupled groundwater-surface water systems was modified to include carbonate equilibria and CO2 degassing. The modified model was used to simulate alkalinity, total dissolved inorganic carbon (CT) and

  11. pH Regulation of Electrogenic Sugar/H+ Symport in MFS Sugar Permeases.

    PubMed

    Bazzone, Andre; Madej, M Gregor; Kaback, H Ronald; Fendler, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial sugar symporters in the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) use the H+ (and in a few cases Na+) electrochemical gradients to achieve active transport of sugar into the cell. Because a number of structures of MFS sugar symporters have been solved recently, molecular insight into the transport mechanism is possible from detailed functional analysis. We present here a comparative electrophysiological study of the lactose permease (LacY), the fucose permease (FucP) and the xylose permease (XylE), which reveals common mechanistic principles and differences. In all three symporters energetically downhill electrogenic sugar/H+ symport is observed. Comparison of the pH dependence of symport at symmetrical pH exhibits broad bell-shaped pH profiles extending over 3 to 6 pH units and a decrease at extremely alkaline pH ≥ 9.4 and at acidic to neutral pH = 4.6-7.5. The pH dependence can be described by an acidic to neutral apparent pK (pKapp) and an alkaline pKapp. Experimental evidence suggests that the alkaline pKapp is due to H+ depletion at the protonation site, while the acidic pKapp is due to inhibition of deprotonation. Since previous studies suggest that a single carboxyl group in LacY (Glu325) may be the only side chain directly involved in H+ translocation and a carboxyl side chain with similar properties has been identified in FucP (Asp46) and XylE (Asp27), the present results imply that the pK of this residue is switched during H+/sugar symport in all three symporters. PMID:27227677

  12. pH Regulation of Electrogenic Sugar/H+ Symport in MFS Sugar Permeases

    PubMed Central

    Bazzone, Andre; Madej, M. Gregor; Kaback, H. Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial sugar symporters in the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) use the H+ (and in a few cases Na+) electrochemical gradients to achieve active transport of sugar into the cell. Because a number of structures of MFS sugar symporters have been solved recently, molecular insight into the transport mechanism is possible from detailed functional analysis. We present here a comparative electrophysiological study of the lactose permease (LacY), the fucose permease (FucP) and the xylose permease (XylE), which reveals common mechanistic principles and differences. In all three symporters energetically downhill electrogenic sugar/H+ symport is observed. Comparison of the pH dependence of symport at symmetrical pH exhibits broad bell-shaped pH profiles extending over 3 to 6 pH units and a decrease at extremely alkaline pH ≥ 9.4 and at acidic to neutral pH = 4.6–7.5. The pH dependence can be described by an acidic to neutral apparent pK (pKapp) and an alkaline pKapp. Experimental evidence suggests that the alkaline pKapp is due to H+ depletion at the protonation site, while the acidic pKapp is due to inhibition of deprotonation. Since previous studies suggest that a single carboxyl group in LacY (Glu325) may be the only side chain directly involved in H+ translocation and a carboxyl side chain with similar properties has been identified in FucP (Asp46) and XylE (Asp27), the present results imply that the pK of this residue is switched during H+/sugar symport in all three symporters. PMID:27227677

  13. pH measurement of low-conductivity waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Busenberg, Eurybiades; Plummer, L.N.

    1987-01-01

    pH is an important and commonly measured parameter of precipitation and other natural waters. The various sources of errors in pH measurement were analyzed and procedures for improving the accuracy and precision of pH measurements in natural waters with conductivities of < 100 uS/cm at 25 C are suggested. Detailed procedures are given for the preparation of dilute sulfuric acid standards to evaluate the performance of pH electrodes in low conductivity waters. A daily check of the pH of dilute sulfuric acid standards and deionized water saturated with a gas mixture of low carbon dioxide at partial pressure (air) prior to the measurement of the pH of low conductivity waters is suggested. (Author 's abstract)

  14. Cell wall pH and auxin transport velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenstein, K. H.; Rayle, D.

    1984-01-01

    According to the chemiosmotic polar diffusion hypothesis, auxin pulse velocity and basal secretion should increase with decreasing cell wall pH. Experiments were designed to test this prediction. Avena coleoptile sections were preincubated in either fusicoccin (FC), cycloheximide, pH 4.0, or pH 8.0 buffer and subsequently their polar transport capacities were determined. Relative to controls, FC enhanced auxin (IAA) uptake while CHI and pH 8.0 buffer reduced IAA uptake. Nevertheless, FC reduced IAA pulse velocity while cycloheximide increased velocity. Additional experiments showed that delivery of auxin to receivers is enhanced by increased receiver pH. This phenomenon was overcome by a pretreatment of the tissue with IAA. Our data suggest that while acidic wall pH values facilitate cellular IAA uptake, they do not enhance pulse velocity or basal secretion. These findings are inconsistent with the chemiosmotic hypothesis for auxin transport.

  15. Cell wall pH and auxin transport velocity.

    PubMed Central

    Hasenstein, K H; Rayle, D

    1984-01-01

    According to the chemiosmotic polar diffusion hypothesis, auxin pulse velocity and basal secretion should increase with decreasing cell wall pH. Experiments were designed to test this prediction. Avena coleoptile sections were preincubated in either fusicoccin (FC), cycloheximide, pH 4.0, or pH 8.0 buffer and subsequently their polar transport capacities were determined. Relative to controls, FC enhanced auxin (IAA) uptake while CHI and pH 8.0 buffer reduced IAA uptake. Nevertheless, FC reduced IAA pulse velocity while cycloheximide increased velocity. Additional experiments showed that delivery of auxin to receivers is enhanced by increased receiver pH. This phenomenon was overcome by a pretreatment of the tissue with IAA. Our data suggest that while acidic wall pH values facilitate cellular IAA uptake, they do not enhance pulse velocity or basal secretion. These findings are inconsistent with the chemiosmotic hypothesis for auxin transport. PMID:11540807

  16. Ambient pH Controls Glycogen Levels by Regulating Glycogen Synthase Gene Expression in Neurospora crassa. New Insights into the pH Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cupertino, Fernanda Barbosa; Freitas, Fernanda Zanolli; de Paula, Renato Magalhães; Bertolini, Maria Célia

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen is a polysaccharide widely distributed in microorganisms and animal cells and its metabolism is under intricate regulation. Its accumulation in a specific situation results from the balance between glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase activities that control synthesis and degradation, respectively. These enzymes are highly regulated at transcriptional and post-translational levels. The existence of a DNA motif for the Aspergillus nidulans pH responsive transcription factor PacC in the promoter of the gene encoding glycogen synthase (gsn) in Neurospora crassa prompted us to investigate whether this transcription factor regulates glycogen accumulation. Transcription factors such as PacC in A. nidulans and Rim101p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae play a role in the signaling pathway that mediates adaptation to ambient pH by inducing the expression of alkaline genes and repressing acidic genes. We showed here that at pH 7.8 pacC was over-expressed and gsn was down-regulated in wild-type N. crassa coinciding with low glycogen accumulation. In the pacCKO strain the glycogen levels and gsn expression at alkaline pH were, respectively, similar to and higher than the wild-type strain at normal pH (5.8). These results characterize gsn as an acidic gene and suggest a regulatory role for PACC in gsn expression. The truncated recombinant protein, containing the DNA-binding domain specifically bound to a gsn DNA fragment containing the PacC motif. DNA-protein complexes were observed with extracts from cells grown at normal and alkaline pH and confirmed by ChIP-PCR analysis. The PACC present in these extracts showed equal molecular mass, indicating that the protein is already processed at normal pH, in contrast to A. nidulans. Together, these results show that the pH signaling pathway controls glycogen accumulation by regulating gsn expression and suggest the existence of a different mechanism for PACC activation in N. crassa. PMID:22952943

  17. Structural Insight into and Mutational Analysis of Family 11 Xylanases: Implications for Mechanisms of Higher pH Catalytic Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Wenqin; Zhou, Cheng; Zhao, Yueju; Wang, Qinhong; Ma, Yanhe

    2015-01-01

    To understand the molecular basis of higher pH catalytic adaptation of family 11 xylanases, we compared the structures of alkaline, neutral, and acidic active xylanases and analyzed mutants of xylanase Xyn11A-LC from alkalophilic Bacillus sp. SN5. It was revealed that alkaline active xylanases have increased charged residue content, an increased ratio of negatively to positively charged residues, and decreased Ser, Thr, and Tyr residue content relative to non-alkaline active counterparts. Between strands β6 and β7, alkaline xylanases substitute an α-helix for a coil or turn found in their non-alkaline counterparts. Compared with non-alkaline xylanases, alkaline active enzymes have an inserted stretch of seven amino acids rich in charged residues, which may be beneficial for xylanase function in alkaline conditions. Positively charged residues on the molecular surface and ionic bonds may play important roles in higher pH catalytic adaptation of family 11 xylanases. By structure comparison, sequence alignment and mutational analysis, six amino acids (Glu16, Trp18, Asn44, Leu46, Arg48, and Ser187, numbering based on Xyn11A-LC) adjacent to the acid/base catalyst were found to be responsible for xylanase function in higher pH conditions. Our results will contribute to understanding the molecular mechanisms of higher pH catalytic adaptation in family 11 xylanases and engineering xylanases to suit industrial applications. PMID:26161643

  18. Computer model of unstirred layer and intracellular pH changes. Determinants of unstirred layer pH.

    PubMed

    Marrannes, Roger

    2013-06-01

    Transmembrane acid-base fluxes affect the intracellular pH and unstirred layer pH around a superfused biological preparation. In this paper the factors influencing the unstirred layer pH and its gradient are studied. An analytical expression of the unstirred layer pH gradient in steady state is derived as a function of simultaneous transmembrane fluxes of (weak) acids and bases with the dehydration reaction of carbonic acid in equilibrium. Also a multicompartment computer model is described consisting of the extracellular bulk compartment, different unstirred layer compartments and the intracellular compartment. With this model also transient changes and the influence of carbonic anhydrase (CA) can be studied. The analytical expression and simulations with the multicompartment model demonstrate that in steady state the unstirred layer pH and its gradient are influenced by the size and type of transmembrane flux of acids and bases, their dissociation constant and diffusion coefficient, the concentration, diffusion coefficient and type of mobile buffers and the activity and location of CA. Similar principles contribute to the amplitude of the unstirred layer pH transients. According to these models an immobile buffer does not influence the steady-state pH, but reduces the amplitude of pH transients especially when these are fast. The unstirred layer pH provides useful information about transmembrane acid-base fluxes. This paper gives more insight how the unstirred layer pH and its transients can be interpreted. Methodological issues are discussed. PMID:23860924

  19. Formation of filamentous aerobic granules: role of pH and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wan, Chunli; Yang, Xue; Lee, Duu-Jong; Zhang, Qinlan; Li, Jieni; Liu, Xiang

    2014-10-01

    Filamentous overgrowth in aerobic granular sludge processes can cause reactor failure. In this work, aerobic granules were cultivated in five identical sequencing batch reactors with acetate or glucose as the carbon source with various values of influent pH (4.5-8). Microscopic observations revealed that acidic pH, rather than the species of carbon source, epistatically controls the aerobic granules with filamentous structure. An acidic pH shifted the structure of the microbial community in the granules, such that the fungus Geotrichum fragrans was the predominant filamentous microorganism therein. The acidic pH reduced the intracellular cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) content for increasing the motility of the bacteria to washout and increase the growth rate of G. fragrans on glucose or acetate, together causing overgrowth of the fungus. Maintaining the suspension under alkaline condition is proposed as an effective way to suppress filamentous overgrowth and maintain granule stability. PMID:24928656

  20. Canonical correlation of waste glass compositions and durability, including pH

    SciTech Connect

    Oeksoy, D.; Pye, L.D.; Bickford, D.F.; Ramsey, W.G.

    1993-05-01

    Control of waste glass durability is a major concern in the immobilization of radioactive and mixed wastes. Leaching rate in standardized laboratory tests is being used as a demonstration of consistency of the response of waste glasses in the final disposal environment. The leaching of silicate and borosilicate glasses containing alkali or alkaline earth elements is known to be autocatalytic, in that the initial ion exchange of alkali in the glass for hydrogen ions in water results in the formation of OH and increases the pH of the leachate. The increased pH then increases the rate of silicate network attack, accelerating the leaching effect. In well formulated glasses this effect reaches a thermodynamic equilibrium when leachate saturation of a critical species, such as silica, or a dynamic equilibrium is reached when the pH shift caused by incremental leaching has negligible effect on pH. This report analyzes results of a seven leach test on waste glasses.

  1. Canonical correlation of waste glass compositions and durability, including pH

    SciTech Connect

    Oeksoy, D.; Pye, L.D. ); Bickford, D.F.; Ramsey, W.G. )

    1993-01-01

    Control of waste glass durability is a major concern in the immobilization of radioactive and mixed wastes. Leaching rate in standardized laboratory tests is being used as a demonstration of consistency of the response of waste glasses in the final disposal environment. The leaching of silicate and borosilicate glasses containing alkali or alkaline earth elements is known to be autocatalytic, in that the initial ion exchange of alkali in the glass for hydrogen ions in water results in the formation of OH and increases the pH of the leachate. The increased pH then increases the rate of silicate network attack, accelerating the leaching effect. In well formulated glasses this effect reaches a thermodynamic equilibrium when leachate saturation of a critical species, such as silica, or a dynamic equilibrium is reached when the pH shift caused by incremental leaching has negligible effect on pH. This report analyzes results of a seven leach test on waste glasses.

  2. Chapter A6. Section 6.4. pH

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilde, Franceska D.; Busenberg, Eurybiades; Radtke, Dean B.

    2006-01-01

    Measurement of pH is critical to the understanding of the viability and vulnerability of environmental waters and is considered a master variable in determining the aqueous geochemistry of an aqueous system. pH is a measure that represents the hydrogen-ion concentration (activity) of a solution. This section of the National Field Manual (NFM) describes U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) guidance and protocols for measurement of pH in ground and surface waters.

  3. Fast optical pH manipulation and imaging.

    PubMed

    Filevich, Oscar; Carrone, Guillermo; Pavlovsky, Victoria Andino; Etchenique, Roberto

    2012-07-01

    We describe a complete system for optical pH manipulation and imaging. The system consists of a photoactive Ruthenium complex capable of inducing a change of more than 5 pH units at the nanosecond time scale. A compatible imaging system acquires microscopic pH images at 1200 fps using a nonexpensive commercial digital camera and an LED illumination system. We use the system as a superb tool to investigate flow in Flow Injection Analysis (FIA) models. PMID:22703044

  4. Nanosensor aided photoacoustic measurement of pH in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Aniruddha; Yoon, Hyung Ki; Kopelman, Raoul; Wang, Xueding

    2013-03-01

    pH plays a critical role in many aspects of cell and tissues physiology. Lower pH is also a typical characteristic of arthritic joints and tumor tissues. These pH anomalies are also exploited in different drug delivery mechanisms. Here we present, a new method of pH sensing in vivo using spectroscopic photoacoustic measurements facilitated by pH sensitive nanosensors. The nanosensors consist of Seminaphtharhodafluor (SNARF), a pH sensitive dye, encapsulated in a specially designed polyacrylamide hydrogel matrix with a hydrophobic core. The photoacoustic intensity ratio between the excitation wavelengths of 585nm and 565nm increases in the pH range from 6.0 to 8.0 and is used to determine the pH of the local environment. These nanosensors are biodegradable, biocompatible, have a long plasma lifetime and can be targeted to any type of cells or tissues by surface modification using proper targeting moieties. The encapsulation of the dye prevents the interaction of the dye with proteins in plasma and also reduces the dye degradation. The SNARF dye in its free form loses 90% of its absorbance in presence of albumin, a protein found in abundance in plasma, and this has severely limited its adaptation to in vivo environments. In comparison, the SNARF nanosensors lose only 16% of their absorbance in the same environment. We employ these nanosensors to demonstrate the feasibility of pH sensing in vivo through photoacoustic measurements on a rat joint model.

  5. Molecular aspects of bacterial pH sensing and homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Krulwich, Terry A.; Sachs, George; Padan, Etana

    2011-01-01

    Diverse mechanisms for pH-sensing and cytoplasmic pH homeostasis enable most bacteria to tolerate or grow at external pH values that are outside the cytoplasmic pH range they must maintain for growth. The most extreme cases are exemplified by the extremophiles that inhabit environments whose pH is below 3 or above 11. Here we describe how recent insights into the structure and function of key molecules and their regulators reveal novel strategies of bacterial pH-homeostasis. These insights may help us better target certain pathogens and better harness the capacities of environmental bacteria. PMID:21464825

  6. Gastric fluid pH in patients receiving sodium citrate.

    PubMed

    Viegas, O J; Ravindran, R S; Shumacker, C A

    1981-07-01

    Gastric fluid pH was measured following induction of anesthesia and placement of an endotracheal tube in 30 surgical patients undergoing elective operations. None of the patients received an anticholinergic drug before surgery. Fifteen patients who had been given 15 ml of sodium citrate 15 to 20 minutes before induction of anesthesia had a mean pH of 6.2 +/- 0.8. The control group, which also consisted of 15 patients, had a mean pH of 2.1 +/- 1.4. The increase in gastric pH noted following sodium citrate would result in reduced pulmonary reaction should aspiration occur. PMID:7195668

  7. Effect of varying pH on protein composition and yield of amaranth seed (Amaranthus blitum).

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Reema; Roy, Bijoy K

    2011-09-01

    The isolation procedure of the seed proteins of Amaranthus blitum have been analyzed at different pH conditions. Qualitative studies were carried out by using electrophoretic technique sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Mainly four protein fractions i.e. albumin, globulin, prolamin and glutelin were obtained. Protein isolates were prepared by (a) extraction at different alkaline pH (9, 10, 11 and 12) and precipitation atpH 5 and (b) extraction at pH 9 and precipitation atdifferentpH (4, 5, 6 and 7). The composition of isolates, prepared by method (a), depended on extraction pH. The isolate extracted at pH 8 was mainly composed of albumin and globulin, whereas at pH 9, 10 and 11 showed the presence of prolamin and glutelin. Electrophoretic pattern of different isolates had five major bands with molecular weight of 30, 45, 72, 84 and 90 kDt respectively. The increase of the extraction pH led to the increase in protein yield. With method (b) isolates obtained were variable in composition. At pH 7 albumin and prolamine were present, whereas at pH 4, 5 and 6 all 4 protein fractions were precipitated. According to the quantitative estimation of the albumin, globulin, prolamin and glutelin in the seed flour the contents were 26.4, 25, 5.81 and 42.7%, respectively. The results suggest that composition of protein isolates could be controlled by different extraction and precipitation pH. PMID:22319880

  8. Carbon Dioxide for pH Control

    SciTech Connect

    Wagonner, R.C.

    2001-08-16

    Cardox, the major supplier of carbon dioxide, has developed a diffuser to introduce carbon dioxide into a water volume as small bubbles to minimize reagent loss to the atmosphere. This unit is integral to several configurations suggested for treatment to control alkalinity in water streams.

  9. Hydrolyzed polyacrylamide grafted carboxymethylxyloglucan based microbeads for pH responsive drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Setty, C Mallikarjuna; Deshmukh, Anand S; Badiger, Aravind M

    2014-06-01

    The present study investigates the pharmaceutical application of hydrolyzed polyacrylamide grafted carboxymethylxyloglucan (HPam-g-CMXG), as promising polymeric material for the development of pH responsive microbeads. The graft copolymer was synthesized by conventional free radical polymerization method and saponified to enhance its functionality and characterized. An acute oral toxicity study ensured the bio-safety of developed copolymer for clinical application. Various batches of pH responsive spherical microbeads were developed and evaluated for the effect of process parameters on their overall performance. Result of in vitro drug release study (USP Type-II, paddle method) carried out in two different pH media (pH 1.2 and pH 7.4) showed a triphasic drug release pattern in all the formulations. Both the drug release and swelling of microbeads were significantly higher in simulated intestinal (alkaline) pH compared to simulated gastric (acidic) pH and this nature is desirable for targeted drug delivery. A strong correlation was observed between the process parameters and matrix composition and it directly influenced the drug transport mechanism. In conclusion, the hydrolyzed polyacrylamide grafted carboxymethylxyloglucan holds an immense potential to be explored pharmaceutically as new matrix material for the design of targeted drug delivery system. PMID:24632345

  10. Hydrolyzed polyacrylamide grafted maize starch based microbeads: application in pH responsive drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Setty, C Mallikarjuna; Deshmukh, Anand S; Badiger, Aravind M

    2014-09-01

    The present study details the synthesis, characterization and pharmaceutical application of hydrolysed polyacrylamide grafted maize starch (HPam-g-MS) as promising polymeric material for the development of pH responsive microbeads. Different grades of graft copolymer were synthesized by changing the net microwave irradiation time, while keeping all other factors constant. Acute oral toxicity study performed in rodents ensured the bio-safety of graft copolymer for clinical application. Various batches of aceclofenac loaded microbeads were prepared by ionic gelation method using synthesized graft copolymers and evaluated for formulation parameters. FTIR spectroscopy confirmed the chemical compatibility between drug and graft copolymer. Results of in vitro release study (USP type-II) carried out in two different pH media (pH 1.2 acid buffer and pH 7.4 phosphate buffer) showed that release rate of drug from developed microbeads was a function of both: (a) surrounding pH and (b) the matrix composition. The drug release was relatively higher at alkaline pH as compared to acidic pH and this feature is desirable from viewpoint of site specific drug delivery. A direct correlation was observed between percentage grafting and microbeads performance and it presents a scope for further research on application and optimization of HPam-g-MS based microbeads as drug delivery carriers. PMID:24971555

  11. pH Responsiveness of Multilayered Films and Membranes Made of Polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Silva, Joana M; Caridade, Sofia G; Costa, Rui R; Alves, Natália M; Groth, Thomas; Picart, Catherine; Reis, Rui L; Mano, João F

    2015-10-20

    We investigated the pH-dependent properties of multilayered films made of chitosan (CHI) and alginate (ALG) and focused on their postassembly response to different pH environments using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D), swelling studies, ζ potential measurements, and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). In an acidic environment, the multilayers presented lower dissipation values and, consequently, higher moduli when compared with the values obtained for the pH used during the assembly (5.5). When the multilayers were exposed to alkaline environments, the opposite behavior occurred. These results were further corroborated by the ability of this multilayered system to exhibit a reversible swelling-deswelling behavior within the pH range from 3 to 9. The changes in the physicochemical properties of the multilayer system were gradual and different from those of individual solubilized polyelectrolytes. This behavior is related to electrostatic interactions between the ionizable groups combined with hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions. Beyond the pH range of 3-9, the multilayers were stabilized by genipin cross-linking. The multilayered films also became more rigid while the pH responsiveness conferred by the ionizable moieties of the polyelectrolytes was preserved. This work demonstrates the versatility and feasibility of LbL methodology to generate inherently pH stimulus-responsive nanostructured films. Surface functionalization using pH responsiveness endows several biomedical applications with abilities such as drug delivery, diagnostics, microfluidics, biosensing, and biomimetic implantable membranes. PMID:26421873

  12. Effect of lower pH on settlement and development of coral, Pocillopora damicornis (Linnaeus, 1758)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viyakarn, Voranop; Lalitpattarakit, Wipada; Chinfak, Narainrit; Jandang, Suppakarn; Kuanui, Pataporn; Khokiattiwong, Somkiat; Chavanich, Suchana

    2015-06-01

    The effects of pH reduction on the settlement and development of the coral Pocillopora damicornis were investigated. Three different pH treatments (pH = 7.6, 7.9, and 8.1) were used. In addition, water quality (temperature, salinity, total alkalinity) around the study site was monitored. The results showed significant differences in the settlement rates of Pocillopora damicornis larvae between pH treatments (p ≤ 0.05). A decrease in pH levels caused a strong decline in larval settlement rate. In addition, at pH 7.6 and 7.9, all larvae were unable to complete metamorphosis, and metamorphosis delay was observed. Field monitoring showed low fluctuation of all seawater parameters within 24 hours, and there was no difference between seasons. From this study, a strong negative effect of pH reduction on P. damicornis larvae was observed. Although the function of physiology is still not clearly understood, correlations are likely to exist.

  13. Acidic pH promotes oligomerization and membrane insertion of the BclXL apoptotic repressor.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Vikas; Kurouski, Dmitry; Olenick, Max B; McDonald, Caleb B; Mikles, David C; Deegan, Brian J; Seldeen, Kenneth L; Lednev, Igor K; Farooq, Amjad

    2012-12-01

    Solution pH is believed to serve as an intricate regulatory switch in the induction of apoptosis central to embryonic development and cellular homeostasis. Herein, using an array of biophysical techniques, we provide evidence that acidic pH promotes the assembly of BclXL apoptotic repressor into a megadalton oligomer with a plume-like appearance and harboring structural features characteristic of a molten globule. Strikingly, our data reveal that pH tightly modulates not only oligomerization but also ligand binding and membrane insertion of BclXL in a highly subtle manner. Thus, while oligomerization and the accompanying molten globular content of BclXL is least favorable at pH 6, both of these structural features become more pronounced under acidic and alkaline conditions. However, membrane insertion of BclXL appears to be predominantly favored under acidic conditions. In a remarkable contrast, while ligand binding to BclXL optimally occurs at pH 6, it is diminished by an order of magnitude at lower and higher pH. This reciprocal relationship between BclXL oligomerization and ligand binding lends new insights into how pH modulates functional versatility of a key apoptotic regulator and strongly argues that the molten globule may serve as an intermediate primed for membrane insertion in response to apoptotic cues. PMID:22960132

  14. An experimental study of magnesite precipitation rates at neutral to alkaline conditions and 100-200 °C as a function of pH, aqueous solution composition and chemical affinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saldi, Giuseppe D.; Schott, Jacques; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Gautier, Quentin; Oelkers, Eric H.

    2012-04-01

    Magnesite precipitation rates were measured at temperatures from 100 to 200 °C as a function of saturation state and reactive fluid composition in mixed flow reactors. Measured rates were found to increase systematically with increasing saturation state but to decrease with increasing reactive fluid aqueous CO32- activity and pH. Measured rates are interpreted through a combination of surface complexation models and transition state theory. In accord with this formalism, constant saturation state BET surface area normalized magnesite precipitation rates (rMg) are a function of the concentration of protonated Mg sites at the surface (>MgOH2+) and can be described using: rMg=kMg-Kn 1-ΩMgn where kMg- represents a rate constant, KOH and KCO3 stand for equilibrium constants, ai designates the activity of the subscripted aqueous species, n refers to a reaction order equal to 2, and ΩMg denotes the saturation state of the reactive solution with respect to magnesite. Retrieved values of n are consistent with magnesite precipitation control by a spiral growth mechanism. The temperature variation of the rate constant can be described using kMg-=Aaexp(-Ea/RT), where Aa represents a pre-exponential factor equal to 5.9 × 10-5 mol/cm2/s, Ea designates an activation energy equal to 80.2 kJ/mol, R denotes the gas constant, and T corresponds to the absolute temperature. Comparison of measured magnesite precipitation rates with corresponding forsterite dissolution rates suggest that the relatively slow rates of magnesite precipitation may be the rate limiting step in mineral carbonation efforts in ultramafic rocks.

  15. Macroalgae contribute to nested mosaics of pH variability in a subarctic fjord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause-Jensen, D.; Duarte, C. M.; Hendriks, I. E.; Meire, L.; Blicher, M. E.; Marbà, N.; Sejr, M. K.

    2015-08-01

    The Arctic Ocean is considered the most vulnerable ecosystem to ocean acidification, and large-scale assessments of pH and the saturation state for aragonite (Ωarag) have led to the notion that the Arctic Ocean is already close to a corrosive state. In high-latitude coastal waters the regulation of pH and Ωarag is, however, far more complex than offshore because increased biological activity and input of glacial meltwater affect pH. Effects of ocean acidification on calcifiers and non-calcifying phototrophs occupying coastal habitats cannot be derived from extrapolation of current and forecasted offshore conditions, but they require an understanding of the regimes of pH and Ωarag in their coastal habitats. To increase knowledge of the natural variability in pH in the Arctic coastal zone and specifically to test the influence of benthic vegetated habitats, we quantified pH variability in a Greenland fjord in a nested-scale approach. A sensor array logging pH, O2, PAR, temperature and salinity was applied on spatial scales ranging from kilometre scale across the horizontal extension of the fjord; to 100 m scale vertically in the fjord, 10-100 m scale between subtidal habitats with and without kelp forests and between vegetated tidal pools and adjacent vegetated shores; and to centimetre to metre scale within kelp forests and millimetre scale across diffusive boundary layers of macrophyte tissue. In addition, we assessed the temporal variability in pH on diurnal and seasonal scales. Based on pH measurements combined with point samples of total alkalinity, dissolved inorganic carbon and relationships to salinity, we also estimated variability in Ωarag. Results show variability in pH and Ωarag of up to 0.2-0.3 units at several scales, i.e. along the horizontal and vertical extension of the fjord, between seasons and on a diel basis in benthic habitats and within 1 m3 of kelp forest. Vegetated intertidal pools exhibited extreme diel pH variability of > 1.5 units and

  16. The Semen pH Affects Sperm Motility and Capacitation

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Zhiwei; Xie, Min; Chen, Shengrong; Yao, Bing

    2015-01-01

    As the chemical environment of semen can have a profound effect on sperm quality, we examined the effect of pH on the motility, viability and capacitation of human sperm. The sperm in this study was collected from healthy males to avoid interference from other factors. The spermatozoa cultured in sperm nutrition solution at pH 5.2, 6.2, 7.2 and 8.2 were analyzed for sperm total motility, progressive motility (PR), hypo-osmotic swelling (HOS) rate, and sperm penetration. Our results showed that these parameters were similar in pH 7.2 and 8.2 sperm nutrition solutions, but decreased in pH 5.2 and 6.2 solutions. The HOS rate exhibited positive correlation with the sperm total motility and PR. In addition, the sperm Na+/K+-ATPase activity at different pHs was measured, and the enzyme activity was significantly lower in pH 5.2 and 6.2 media, comparing with that in pH 8.2 and pH 7.2 solutions. Using flow cytometry (FCM) and laser confocal scanning microscopy (LCSM) analysis, the intracellular Ca2+ concentrations of sperm cultured in sperm capacitation solution at pH 5.2, 6.2, 7.2 and 8.2 were determined. Compared with that at pH 7.2, the mean fluorescence intensity of sperm in pH 5.2 and 6.2 media decreased significantly, while that of pH 8.2 group showed no difference. Our results suggested that the declined Na+/K+-ATPase activity at acidic pHs result in decreased sperm movement and capacitation, which could be one of the mechanisms of male infertility. PMID:26173069

  17. Mapping Soil pH Buffering Capacity of Selected Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, A. R.; Kissel, D. E.; Chen, F.; West, L. T.; Adkins, W.; Rickman, D.; Luvall, J. C.

    2003-01-01

    Soil pH buffering capacity, since it varies spatially within crop production fields, may be used to define sampling zones to assess lime requirement, or for modeling changes in soil pH when acid forming fertilizers or manures are added to a field. Our objective was to develop a procedure to map this soil property. One hundred thirty six soil samples (0 to 15 cm depth) from three Georgia Coastal Plain fields were titrated with calcium hydroxide to characterize differences in pH buffering capacity of the soils. Since the relationship between soil pH and added calcium hydroxide was approximately linear for all samples up to pH 6.5, the slope values of these linear relationships for all soils were regressed on the organic C and clay contents of the 136 soil samples using multiple linear regression. The equation that fit the data best was b (slope of pH vs. lime added) = 0.00029 - 0.00003 * % clay + 0.00135 * % O/C, r(exp 2) = 0.68. This equation was applied within geographic information system (GIS) software to create maps of soil pH buffering capacity for the three fields. When the mapped values of the pH buffering capacity were compared with measured values for a total of 18 locations in the three fields, there was good general agreement. A regression of directly measured pH buffering capacities on mapped pH buffering capacities at the field locations for these samples gave an r(exp 2) of 0.88 with a slope of 1.04 for a group of soils that varied approximately tenfold in their pH buffering capacities.

  18. Notes on the Measurement of pH Values

    SciTech Connect

    Carranza, R M; Rebak, R B

    2005-05-05

    The original definition of pH is: pH = -log a{sub H}. Where a{sub H} is the (relative) hydrogen ion activity. However, a single ion activity cannot be measured. Activities of individual ionic species are necessarily conventional. The pH number, of course, has in itself little absolute significance. As the negative of the logarithm of a product of a concentration (c or m) and an activity coefficient (y or {gamma}), it acquires its magnitude from the numerical scale adopted for the latter. Experimental pH measurements are nonetheless widely applied to the determination of thermodynamic equilibrium data such as pK values, on the assumption that they represent -log a{sub H} (or paH). The single ion activity coefficient approaches unity as the ionic strength goes to zero, so that activity becomes m or c and paH becomes pmH or pcH. pH is therefore defined operationally in terms of the operation or method used to measure it, that is, by means of a cell called an operational cell. The cell is standardized by solutions of assigned pH value (Reference Value pH Standard, Primary pH Standards and Operational Standards). Such standard reference solutions are buffer solutions whose pH values are assigned from measurements on cells with or without liquid junction. It must be emphasized that the definition of pH scale is quite different from the measurement of pH with glass-reference electrode-pH meter assemblies, where several standards are used in order to take into account possible deficiencies in the electrode and meter performance.

  19. Physiological effects of pH gradients on Escherichia coli during plasmid DNA production.

    PubMed

    Cortés, José T; Flores, Noemí; Bolívar, Francisco; Lara, Alvaro R; Ramírez, Octavio T

    2016-03-01

    A two-compartment scale-down system was used to mimic pH heterogeneities that can occur in large-scale bioreactors. The system consisted of two interconnected stirred tank reactors (STRs) where one of them represented the conditions of the bulk of the fluid and the second one the zone of alkali addition for pH control. The working volumes ratio of the STRs was set to 20:1 in order to simulate the relative sizes of the bulk and alkali addition zones, respectively, in large-scale bioreactors. Residence times (tR ) in the alkali addition STR of 60, 120, 180, and 240 s were simulated during batch cultures of an engineered Escherichia coli strain that produced plasmid DNA (pDNA). pH gradients of up to 0.9 units, between the two compartments, were attained. The kinetic, stoichiometric, and pDNA topological changes due to the pH gradients were studied and compared to cultures at constant pH of 7.2 and 8.0. As the tR increased, the pDNA and biomass yields, as well as pDNA final titer decreased, whereas the accumulation of organic acids increased. Furthermore, the transcriptional response of 10 selected genes to alkaline stress (pH 8.0) and pH gradients was monitored at different stages of the cultures. The selected genes coded for ion transporters, amino acids catabolism enzymes, and transcriptional regulators. The transcriptional response of genes coding for amino acids catabolism, in terms of relative transcription level and stage of maximal expression, was different when the alkaline stress was constant or transient. This suggests the activation of different mechanisms by E. coli to cope with pH fluctuations compared to constant alkaline pH. Moreover, the transcriptional response of genes related to negative control of DNA synthesis did not correlate with the lower pDNA yields. This is the first study that reports the effects of pH gradients on pDNA production by E. coli cultures. The information presented can be useful for the design of better bioreactor scale

  20. Cooperative effects in pnicogen bonding: (PH2F)2-7 and (PH2Cl)2-7 clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Vakili, Mahshad; Solimannejad, Mohammad

    2014-08-01

    The cooperative effects between pnicogen bond interactions in open-chain clusters of (PH2F)n and (PH2Cl)n are studied by ab initio calculations, where n = 2-7. These effects are analyzed in terms of geometric and energetic properties of the clusters. The intermolecular distances observed in the PH2F clusters exhibit quite larger bond contractions than those found in the PH2Cl. The contribution of cooperative effects to the interaction energy is quite significant. In order to understand the mechanism of the cooperativity, interaction energy decomposition and molecular electrostatic potential analyses are performed.

  1. Electrocatalytic activity of anodic biofilm responses to pH changes in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yong; Zhao, Bo; Zhou, Shungui; Zhong, Shengkui; Zhuang, Li

    2011-07-01

    This study investigates the effects of anodic pH on electricity generation in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and the intrinsic reasons behind them. In a two-chamber MFC, the maximum power density is 1170 ± 58 mW m(-2) at pH 9.0, which is 29% and 89% higher than those working at pH 7.0 and 5.0, respectively. Electrochemical measurements reveal that pH affects the electron transfer kinetics of anodic biofilms. The apparent electron transfer rate constant (k(app)) and exchange current density (i(0)) are greater whereas the charge transfer resistance (R(ct)) is smaller at pH 9.0 than at other conditions. Scanning electron microscopy verifies that alkaline conditions benefit biofilm formation in MFCs. These results demonstrate that electrochemical interactions between bacteria and electrodes in MFCs are greatly enhanced under alkaline conditions, which can be one of the important reasons for the improved MFC output. PMID:21530241

  2. Wide pH range tolerance in extremophiles: towards understanding an important phenomenon for future biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Dhakar, Kusum; Pandey, Anita

    2016-03-01

    Microorganisms that inhabit the extreme pH environments are classified as acidophiles and alkaliphiles. A number of studies emerged from extreme high (hot springs, hydrothermal vents) as well as low temperature (arctic and antarctic regions, sea water, ice shelf, marine sediments, cold deserts, glaciers, temperate forests, and plantations) environments have highlighted the occurrence of microorganisms (thermophiles/psychrophiles) with the ability to tolerate wide pH range, from acidic to alkaline (1.5-14.0 in some cases), under laboratory conditions. However, the sampling source (soil/sediment) of these microorganisms showed the pH to be neutral or slightly acidic/alkaline. The aim of the present review is to discuss the phenomenon of wide pH range tolerance possessed by these microorganisms as a hidden character in perspective of their habitats, possible mechanisms, phylogeny, ecological and biotechnological relevance, and future perspectives. It is believed that the genome is a probable reservoir of the hidden variations. The extremophiles have the ability to adapt against the environmental change that is probably through the expression/regulation of the specific genes that were already present in the genome. The phenomenon is likely to have broad implications in biotechnology, including both environmental (such as bioremediation, biodegradation, and biocontrol), and industrial applications (as a source of novel extremozymes and many other useful bioactive compounds with wide pH range tolerance). PMID:26780356

  3. The PhD Viva: A Space for Academic Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Share, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the viva experiences of 87 social science PhD graduates from three Irish higher education institutions through a questionnaire that assessed outcome, preparation, conduct and post-viva. The majority were awarded their PhD with minor corrections, considered their viva as a summative assessment, and emphasised its purpose as…

  4. The Early Development of Electronic pH Meters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hines, Wallis G.; de Levie, Robert

    2010-01-01

    A 19-year-old undergraduate at the University of Chicago, Kenneth Goode, in 1921 came up with the idea of an electronic pH meter, worked out some of its initial problems, and set in motion an international scientific effort that culminated in the current, wide availability of electronic pH meters. Except for the replacement of vacuum tubes by…

  5. Research Collaboration and Commercialization: The PhD Candidate Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dooley, Lawrence; Kenny, Breda

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores PhD students' perceptions of their entrepreneurial and commercial capabilities, their attitude towards university supports and the extent to which they engage in external collaboration. The study concentrated on current PhD researchers at one university in Ireland as a unit of analysis and provides encouraging evidence from the…

  6. Rethinking PhD Learning Incorporating Communities of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shacham, Miri; Od-Cohen, Yehudit

    2009-01-01

    This paper grows from research which focuses on the learning characteristics of PhD students, incorporating communities of practice both during their studies and beyond completion of their PhD, and drawing on theories of adult learning and lifelong learning. It shows how professional discourse enhances academic discourse through student engagement…

  7. PhDs in Australia, from the Beginning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobson, Ian R.

    2012-01-01

    The Australian PhD is a relatively recent phenomenon, the first three being awarded in 1948. Before that, most Australian scholars typically went to Britain (predominantly) or the USA to undertake their doctoral studies. The aim of this research note is to provide a brief statistical history of the Australian PhD, noting changes over time between…

  8. Microscale pH Titrations Using an Automatic Pipet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flint, Edward B.; Kortz, Carrie L.; Taylor, Max A.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a microscale pH titration technique that utilizes an automatic pipet. A small aliquot (1-5 mL) of the analyte solution is titrated with repeated additions of titrant, and the pH is determined after each delivery. The equivalence point is determined graphically by either the second derivative method or a Gran plot. The pipet can be…

  9. Jeanne Murphy, PhD, CNM | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Jeanne Murphy, PhD, CNM is a postdoctoral Cancer Prevention Fellow in the Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group in the Division of Cancer Prevention. She comes to BGCRG with a PhD from Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing. She also completed a graduate certificate in Health Disparities and Health Inequality at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. |

  10. The Ph.D. Surplus - Realities and Illusions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Harold P.

    Every 6 years the number of Ph.D.'s produced doubles. At this point about 1 percent of the babies born 27 years ago gets a Ph.D. This production rate will probably increase to 6 percent of the adult population. With the present situation in higher education, which includes an average retirement after 40 years of service, the supply already…

  11. Thermal and pH stability of "beta-benzyme".

    PubMed Central

    D'Souza, V T; Lu, X L; Ginger, R D; Bender, M L

    1987-01-01

    The thermal and pH stability of "beta-benzyme", an artificial chymotrypsin based on beta-cyclodextrin, has been studied and compared with the stability of real chymotrypsin. Artificial chymotrypsin is vastly superior to real chymotrypsin with regard to both temperature and pH stability. The reasons for this increased stability are discussed. PMID:3468505

  12. The Undergraduate Origins of PhD Economists Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stock, Wendy A.; Siegfried, John J.

    2015-01-01

    The authors update prior analyses of the undergraduate origins of individuals who earn a PhD in economics in the United States. They include the list of the top institutions worldwide graduating the largest number of undergraduates who subsequently earn an economics PhD from a U.S. university and lists of American institutions with the largest…

  13. The Importance of Having a Ph.D., Career Advice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A presentation on the importance of having a PhD to motivate Initiative to Maximize Student Diversity Program (IMSD) undergrads towards conducting research, pursuing careers in the biomedical field, applying to grad school, and getting a Ph.D., based upon ARS scientist's experiences as a student, a ...

  14. Earth & Space Science PhDs, Class of 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claudy, Nicholas; Henly, Megan; Migdalski, Chet

    This study documents the employment patterns and demographic characteristics of recent PhDs in earth and space science. It summarizes the latest annual survey of recent earth and space science PhDs conducted by the American Geological Institute, the American Geophysical Union, and the Statistical Research Center of the American Institute of…

  15. Tracking the PhD Students' Daily Computer Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sim, Kwong Nui; van der Meer, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated PhD students' computer activities in their daily research practice. Software that tracks computer usage (Manic Time) was installed on the computers of nine PhD students, who were at their early, mid and final stage in doing their doctoral research in four different discipline areas (Commerce, Humanities, Health Sciences and…

  16. Consideration of Factors Affecting Strip Effluent PH and Sodium Content

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T.

    2015-07-29

    A number of factors were investigated to determine possible reasons for why the Strip Effluent (SE) can sometimes have higher than expected pH values and/or sodium content, both of which have prescribed limits. All of the factors likely have some impact on the pH values and Na content.

  17. What if We Made Fewer Ph.D.'s?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassuto, Leonard

    2012-01-01

    Whenever a discussion opens about nonacademic employment for Ph.D.s, it is not long before someone suggests reducing graduate-school admissions. "The market for full-time scholars has fallen off a cliff lately," this argument goes, "so why not just train fewer of them?" The strategy to reduce the number of Ph.D. students recurs in those…

  18. The Undergraduate Origins of PhD Economists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegfried, John J.; Stock, Wendy A.; Walstad, William

    2007-01-01

    The authors document the types of undergraduate colleges and universities attended by those who earned a doctorate in economics from an American university from 1966 through 2003. They examine relationships between type of undergraduate institution and attrition and time-to-degree in PhD programs. The total number of new economics PhDs awarded to…

  19. [Stop the compulsive PhD trajectory for junior doctors].

    PubMed

    Clevers, J C Hans

    2014-01-01

    It has become the rule rather than the exception that junior doctors in training spend 3-4 years on a research project, culminating in a thesis. Without a PhD, clinical career prospects within and outside academia look rather bleak. Here I argue that PhD degrees should be pursued only by the most talented and motivated young clinicians. PMID:24893817

  20. Predicting Computer Science Ph.D. Completion: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, G. W.; Hughes, W. E., Jr.; Etzkorn, L. H.; Weisskopf, M. E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an analysis of indicators that can be used to predict whether a student will succeed in a Computer Science Ph.D. program. The analysis was conducted by studying the records of 75 students who have been in the Computer Science Ph.D. program of the University of Alabama in Huntsville. Seventy-seven variables were…

  1. Are salivary amylase and pH – Prognostic indicators of cancers?

    PubMed Central

    Ramya, Atmakuri Shanmukha; Uppala, Divya; Majumdar, Sumit; Surekha, Ch.; Deepak, K.G.K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Saliva, “Mirror of body's health” has long been of particular interest as a substitute for blood for disease diagnosis and monitoring. The radiation effects on salivary glands are of particular interest in which salivary amylase is a good indicator of salivary glands function. Thus, estimation of these parameters represents a reasonable approach in evaluation of patient's risk for disease occurrence, intensity and prognosis. Aim of study To evaluate and compare the pH and amylase levels in saliva of cancer patients prior to treatment, patients during treatment. Materials and methods Saliva samples of 90 individuals were taken which were divided into 3 groups - 30 individuals without cancer, 30 cancer patients prior treatment and 30 cancer patients during treatment. Materials used were pH strips and pH meter, Salivary Amylase assay. Results Statistical analysis – ANOVA with post-hoc Tukey's test. 1) Significant decrease in salivary amylase levels – in cancer patients, during treatment when compared to others. 2) Significant decrease in salivary pH levels in newly diagnosed cancer patients prior to treatment. Conclusion To conclude, pH strips and pH meter showed to be a useful tool in the measurement of pH of saliva in individuals with and without cancer. This study showed that cancer patients without treatment have a lower pH of saliva. Treatment increased the pH of the saliva to a more alkaline level whereas amylase levels decreased in those subjects. Therefore those parameters can be an area of further research with an increased sample size, which in-turn may help in opening the doors for new dimension in non invasive prognostic markers. PMID:26258019

  2. 24-Hour Measurement of Gastric pH in Rural South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Sammon, Alastair M.; Ndebia, Eugene J.; Umapathy, Ekambaram; Iputo, Jehu E.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Previous studies have established norms of 24-hour gastric pH profiles for western countries. This study was designed to establish the pattern for a rural African population with a high incidence of oesophageal cancer. Methods. After lower oesophageal manometry a probe was placed 10 cm distal to the lower oesophageal sphincter. We carried out 24-hour ambulatory monitoring of gastric pH on 59 healthy subjects. This was satisfactorily completed on 26 female and 18 male (age 21–64, median 35) subjects in the Transkei region of South Africa. Results. The mean 24 hour gastric pH was 2.84 and the mean night-time pH was 3.7. 40 volunteers recorded a night-time pH reaching over 4. 33 volunteers recorded a night-time pH over 7. Night-time alkalinisation was present for 136.4 minutes (25th centile 22.8, 75th centile 208.1) at pH4 or over, and 79.3 (2.5, 122.7) minutes at pH7 or over. Episodes of rapid alkaline rise were 17 (10, 47). 21.1% of these occurred while supine. 35 of 36 tested subjects were positive for H. pylori IgG. Conclusion. Gastric alkalinisation is common in Transkei, at a higher pH than that reported in other studies, and is sustained longer. Nighttime alkalinisation is frequent. This suggests a high level of duodenogastric reflux. PMID:25861260

  3. Effects of pH and precipitation on autohydrogenotrophic denitrification using the hollow-fiber membrane-biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kuan-Chun; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2003-04-01

    Experiments carried out in a hollow-fiber, membrane-biofilm reactor (HFMBR) showed that the optimum pH for autotrophic denitrification was in the range 7.7-8.6, with the maximum efficiency at 8.4. Increasing the pH above 8.6 caused a significant decrease in nitrate removal rate and a dramatic increase in nitrite accumulation. The pH rose by 1.2 units when a large buffer was not added, suggesting that some field applications may require pH control. Precipitation of Ca(2+) occurred in every experiment. Precipitation was the largest sink for carbonate, and it also offset alkalinity production by denitrification. Although the alkalinity increased in most cases, systems with a high carbonate buffer and high pH accentuated precipitation, and the net change in alkalinity was negative. The long-term success of field applications of the HFMBR may depend upon the interactions among calcium concentration, total carbonate concentration, pH, and alkalinity changes. PMID:12600383

  4. Simultaneous pH measurement in endocytic and cytosolic compartments in living cells using confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lucien, Fabrice; Harper, Kelly; Pelletier, Pierre-Paul; Volkov, Leonid; Dubois, Claire M

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular pH is tightly regulated and differences in pH between the cytoplasm and organelles have been reported(1). Regulation of cellular pH is crucial for homeostatic control of physiological processes that include: protein, DNA and RNA synthesis, vesicular trafficking, cell growth and cell division. Alterations in cellular pH homeostasis can lead to detrimental functional changes and promote progression of various diseases(2). Various methods are available for measuring intracellular pH but very few of these allow simultaneous measurement of pH in the cytoplasm and in organelles. Here, we describe in detail a rapid and accurate method for the simultaneous measurement of cytoplasmic and organellar pH by using confocal microscopy on living cells(3). This goal is achieved with the use of two pH-sensing ratiometric dyes that possess selective cellular compartment partitioning. For instance, SNARF-1 is compartmentalized inside the cytoplasm whereas HPTS is compartmentalized inside endosomal/lysosomal organelles. Although HPTS is commonly used as a cytoplasmic pH indicator, this dye can specifically label vesicles along the endosomal-lysosomal pathway after being taken up by pinocytosis(3,4). Using these pH-sensing probes, it is possible to simultaneously measure pH within the endocytic and cytoplasmic compartments. The optimal excitation wavelength of HPTS varies depending on the pH while for SNARF-1, it is the optimal emission wavelength that varies. Following loading with SNARF-1 and HPTS, cells are cultured in different pH-calibrated solutions to construct a pH standard curve for each probe. Cell imaging by confocal microscopy allows elimination of artifacts and background noise. Because of the spectral properties of HPTS, this probe is better suited for measurement of the mildly acidic endosomal compartment or to demonstrate alkalinization of the endosomal/lysosomal organelles. This method simplifies data analysis, improves accuracy of pH measurements and can

  5. Effect of Different pH Values on the Compressive Strength of Calcium-Enriched Mixture Cement

    PubMed Central

    Sobhnamayan, Fereshte; Sahebi, Safoora; Alborzi, Ali; Ghorbani, Saeed; Shojaee, Nooshin Sadat

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the compressive strength of calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement in contact with acidic, neutral and alkaline pH values. Methods and Materials: The cement was mixed according to the manufacturer’s instructions, it was then condensed into fourteen split molds with five 4×6 mm holes. The specimens were randomly divided into 7 groups (n=10) and were then exposed to environments with pH values of 4.4, 5.4, 6.4, 7.4, 8.4, 9.4 and 10.4 in an incubator at 37° C for 4 days. After removing the samples from the molds, cement pellets were compressed in a universal testing machine. The exact forces required for breaking of the samples were recorded. The data were analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests for individual and pairwise comparisons, respectively. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: The greatest (48.59±10.36) and the lowest (9.67±3.16) mean compressive strength values were observed after exposure to pH value of 9.4 and 7.4, respectively. Alkaline environment significantly increased the compressive strength of CEM cement compared to the control group. There was no significant difference between the pH values of 9.4 and 10.4 but significant differences were found between pH values of 9.4, 8.4 and 7.4. The acidic environment showed better results than the neutral environment, although the difference was not significant for the pH value of 6.4. Alkaline pH also showed significantly better results than acidic and neutral pH. Conclusion: The compressive strength of CEM cement improved in the presence of acidic and alkaline environments but alkaline environment showed the best results. PMID:25598805

  6. Biogeochemical Influences on the Determination of Water Chemistry in a Temperate Forest Basin: Factors Determining the pH value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohte, Nobuhito; Tokuchi, Naoko; Suzuki, Masakazu

    1995-01-01

    In order to clarify the mechanism of pH determination in a temperate forest watershed in Japan, intensive hydrochemical observations that included in situ measurement of dissolved pCO2 were carried out in 1991 and 1992. From the variations of observed pCO2 and pH and estimated alkalinity associated with the hydrological process, the factors determining pH were described. There were two hydrological processes which have different determining hydrochemical processes: (1) rainfall and throughfall to infiltration in the soil layer to stable groundwater and (2) stable groundwater to spring water to stream water. In the first process, pH is influenced by infiltration from the low pCO2 layer to the high CO2 layer and by an increase of alkalinity, which is mainly caused by an exchange reaction and chemical weathering. In the shallow soil layer the protons for alkalinity generation are supplied by acid deposits from rainfall and throughfall, microbial acid production, and CO2 dissolution reaction. In the deeper layer an increase of alkalinity caused by Na+ generation becomes remarkable as depth increases. This process is strongly controlled by chemical weathering. In the second process, pH increases with CO2 degassing around the spring point. The alkalinity is kept at the same level as that of the stable groundwater. These results suggests that the biochemically supplied CO2 in soil not only directly controls the pH determination, but also has influences on the alkalinity generation as another determining factor of pH.

  7. Continuous pH monitoring in a perfused bioreactor system using an optical pH sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Antony S.; Vani, Sundeep; Taylor, Thomas D.; Anderson, Melody M.

    2002-01-01

    Monitoring and regulating the pH of the solution in a bioprocess is one of the key steps in the success of bioreactor operation. An in-line optical pH sensor, based on the optical absorption properties of phenol red present in the medium, was developed and tested in this work for use in NASA space bioreactors based on a rotating wall-perfused vessel system supporting a baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) cell culture. The sensor was tested over three 30-day and one 124-day cell runs. The pH sensor initially was calibrated and then used during the entire cell culture interval. The pH reported by the sensor was compared to that measured by a fiber optically coupled Shimadzu spectrophotometer and a blood gas analyzer. The maximum standard error of prediction for all the four cell runs for development pH sensor against BGA was +/-0.06 pH unit and for the fiber optically coupled Shimadzu spectrophotometer against the blood gas analyzer was +/-0.05 pH unit. The pH sensor system performed well without need of recalibration for 124 days. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Ventilatory regulation of arterial H(+) (pH) during exercise.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, Karlman; Cox, Timothy A; Sietsema, Kathy E

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that exercise ventilation and arterial H(+) ([H(+)]a) are mutually interactive, [H(+)]a stimulating V(E) and V(E) regulating [H(+)]a increase. Fifty-five patients were studied, 10 normal and 45 with cardio-respiratory disorders. Each patient underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing with simultaneous serial arterial blood gas and pH measurements. Subsequently, they were classified into one of 7 clinical groups: (1) normal, (2) exercise-induced hypoxemia (PaO2<50mmHg), (3) exercise-induced myocardial ischemia, (4) heart failure, (5) COPD, (6) interstitial lung disease, and (7) pulmonary vasculopathy. The average resting pHa was 7.42 or 7.43 for each group. At anaerobic (lactic acidosis) threshold (AT), [H(+)]a increased due to PaCO2 increase (+2mmHg), primarily. At peak exercise, [H(+)]a increased further due to arterial HCO3(-) decrease. In summary, [H(+)]a appears to be closely regulated at rest to AT and further to peak exercise by CO2 elimination from the venous return. No evidence was observed for over-ventilation of CO2, causing the arterial blood to become more alkaline during exercise in the patient groups studied. PMID:24369924

  9. Influence of Urinary pH on the Pharmacokinetics of Cinoxacin in Humans and on Antibacterial Activity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Barbhaiya, Rashmi H.; Gerber, Andreas U.; Craig, William A.; Welling, Peter G.

    1982-01-01

    The impact of acidification and alkalinization of the urine on the pharmacokinetics of cinoxacin was examined after single 500-mg oral doses were administered to nine healthy male volunteers. Acidic and alkaline conditions were achieved by repeated oral doses of ammonium chloride or sodium bicarbonate, respectively. Plasma cinoxacin levels in all subjects were adequately described in terms of one-compartment-model kinetics with first-order absorption and elimination. Acidification and alkalinization treatment had no effect on cinoxacin absorption or distribution. The mean elimination half-life of cinoxacin in plasma was 1.1, 2.0, and 0.6 h in control subjects and with acidification and alkalinization of urine, respectively. Recovery of intact cinoxacin in samples of urine collected 0 to 36 h after cinoxacin administration represented 65% of the dose in control subjects and urine acidification and 80% of the dose with alkalinization of urine. The mean renal clearance of cinoxacin was 76, 118, and 278 ml/min with acidification, control, and alkalinization, respectively, and renal clearance was highly correlated with urinary pH. Urine concentrations of cinoxacin were significantly higher with alkalinization compared with control values during the first 4 h after drug administration. Urine cinoxacin concentrations were reduced somewhat by acidification, but these tended not to be significantly different from control values. Changes in cinoxacin elimination owing to urine pH are less pronounced in humans than in dogs. The antibacterial activity of cinoxacin against some common urinary tract pathogens was pH dependent. A four- to eightfold reduction in cinoxacin activity was generally observed at pH 8 compared with lower pH values. However, in view of the high levels of cinoxacin which are obtained in both acidic and basic urine, the impact of urine pH on cinoxacin antibacterial efficacy would be of minor clinical importance. PMID:7103450

  10. Growth of water hyacinth in municipal landfill leachate with different pH.

    PubMed

    El-Gendy, A S; Biswas, N; Bewtra, J K

    2004-07-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of municipal landfill leachate pH on the growth of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes). These experiments were carried out in a green house environment on leachate samples collected from Essex-Windsor Regional Landfill, Windsor, Ontario, Canada. It was found that water hyacinth plants survived in a pH range of 4.0 to 8.0. Both alkaline pH (above 8.0) and highly acidic pH (below 4.0) had inhibitory effect on the growth of plants. The pH range, for optimum growth of the water hyacinth plants was found to be 5.8 to 6.0. At optimum growth, water hyacinth had an average mean relative growth rate of 0.043 d-1. It was found that nitrogen compounds underwent different transformations depending on the pH of leachate. Plant uptake, nitrification and volatilization were among these transformations. PMID:15346865

  11. Effect of altitude on brain intracellular pH and inorganic phosphate levels

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xian-Feng; Carlson, Paul J.; Kim, Tae-Suk; Sung, Young-Hoon; Hellem, Tracy L.; Fiedler, Kristen K.; Kim, Seong-Eun; Glaeser, Breanna; Wang, Kristina; Zuo, Chun S.; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Renshaw, Perry F.; Kondo, Douglas G.

    2015-01-01

    Normal brain activity is associated with task-related pH changes. Although central nervous system syndromes associated with significant acidosis and alkalosis are well understood, the effects of less dramatic and chronic changes in brain pH are uncertain. One environmental factor known to alter brain pH is the extreme, acute change in altitude encountered by mountaineers. However, the effect of long-term exposure to moderate altitude has not been studied. The aim of this two-site study was to measure brain intracellular pH and phosphate-bearing metabolite levels at two altitudes in healthy volunteers, using phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS). Increased brain pH and reduced inorganic phosphate (Pi) levels were found in healthy subjects who were long-term residents of Salt Lake City, UT (4720 ft/1438 m), compared with residents of Belmont, MA (20 ft/6 m). Brain intracellular pH at the altitude of 4720 ft was more alkaline than that observed near sea level. In addition, the ratio of inorganic phosphate to total phosphate signal also shifted toward lower values in the Salt Lake City region compared with the Belmont area. These results suggest that long-term residence at moderate altitude is associated with brain chemical changes. PMID:24768210

  12. Mixed metal oxide films as pH sensing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshak, Khalil; Gill, Edric; Korostynska, Olga; Arshak, Arousian

    2007-05-01

    Due to the demand for accurate, reliable and highly sensitive pH sensors, research is being pursued to find novel materials to achieve this goal. Semiconducting metal oxides, such as TiO, SnO and SnO II and insulating oxides such as Nb IIO 5 and Bi IIO 3, and their mixtures in different proportions are being investigated for this purpose. The films of these materials mixtures are used in conjunction with an interdigitated electrode pattern to produce a conductimetric/capacitive pH sensor. The advantages of this approach include straightforward manufacturing, versatility and cost-effectiveness. It was noted that upon contact with a solution, the electrical parameters of the films, such as resistance etc., change. The correlation of these changes with pH values is the basis for the proposed system development. The ultimate goal is to find materials composition, which would have the highest sensitivity towards the pH level of the solutions. It was found that the materials that produced the highest sensitivity either had a long response time or were unstable over a wide pH range. Those exhibiting lower sensitivities were found to be more stable over a wide pH range. All oxide films tested demonstrated a change in electrical parameters upon contact with buffers of known pH value.

  13. Improved granular activated carbon for the stabilization of wastewater PH

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, R.W.; Dussert, B.W.; Kovacic, S.L.

    1996-12-31

    Laboratory studies have identified the cause of the pH rise, which occurs during water treatment with activated carbon, as an interaction between the naturally occurring anions and protons in the water and the carbon surface. The interaction can be described as an ion exchange type of phenomenon, in which the carbon surface sorbs the anions and corresponding hydronium ions from the water. These studies have shown that the anion sorption and resulting pH increase is independent of the raw material used for the activated carbon production, e.g. bituminous or subbituminous coal, peat, wood or coconut. Also, the pH excursions occur with virgin, reactivated, and acid washed granular carbons. Current pH control technologies focus on adjustment of the wastewater pH prior to discharge or recycle of the initial effluent water until the pH increase abates. However, improved water pH control options have been realized by altering the carbon surface through controlled oxidation rather than the water chemistry or extended preprocessing at the treatment site.

  14. Physical properties of pregelatinized and granular cold water swelling maize starches at different pH values.

    PubMed

    Hedayati, Sara; Shahidi, Fakhri; Koocheki, Arash; Farahnaky, Asgar; Majzoobi, Mahsa

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of pH changes (3, 5, 7 and 9) on physical properties of pregelatinized (PG) and granular cold water swelling (GCWS) maize starches. In acidic pH, PG starches were fragmented; however, GCWS starches mainly reserved their granular integrity but were shriveled. For both modified starches the water absorption, cold water viscosity, textural parameters, turbidity and freeze-thaw stability of the samples decreased whereas water solubility increased at pH 3 and 5. On the other hand, alkaline pH did not bring about evident changes on morphology of PG starch but the surface of GCWS starch became smoother. Water absorption, solubility, rheological and mechanical properties, freeze-thaw stability and turbidity of the starch pastes increased at high pH values. Overall, both starches were more stable at alkaline pH compared to acidic pH values and GCWS starch was more resistance to pH changes than PG starch. PMID:27288699

  15. Titratable acidity of beverages influences salivary pH recovery.

    PubMed

    Tenuta, Livia Maria Andaló; Fernández, Constanza Estefany; Brandão, Ana Carolina Siqueira; Cury, Jaime Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    A low pH and a high titratable acidity of juices and cola-based beverages are relevant factors that contribute to dental erosion, but the relative importance of these properties to maintain salivary pH at demineralizing levels for long periods of time after drinking is unknown. In this crossover study conducted in vivo, orange juice, a cola-based soft drink, and a 10% sucrose solution (negative control) were tested. These drinks differ in terms of their pH (3.5 ± 0.04, 2.5 ± 0.05, and 5.9 ± 0.1, respectively) and titratable acidity (3.17 ± 0.06, 0.57 ± 0.04 and < 0.005 mmols OH- to reach pH 5.5, respectively). Eight volunteers with a normal salivary flow rate and buffering capacity kept 15 mL of each beverage in their mouth for 10 s, expectorated it, and their saliva was collected after 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 s. The salivary pH, determined using a mini pH electrode, returned to the baseline value at 30 s after expectoration of the cola-based soft drink, but only at 90 s after expectoration of the orange juice. The salivary pH increased to greater than 5.5 at 15 s after expectoration of the cola drink and at 30 s after expectoration of the orange juice. These findings suggest that the titratable acidity of a beverage influences salivary pH values after drinking acidic beverages more than the beverage pH. PMID:25715032

  16. A pH dependent Raman and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic studies of citrazinic acid aided by theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Sougata; Chowdhury, Joydeep; Dutta, Soumen; Pal, Tarasankar

    2016-12-01

    A pH dependent normal Raman scattering (NRS) and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectral patterns of citrazinic acid (CZA), a biologically important molecule, have been investigated. The acid, with different pKa values (~ 4 and ~ 11) for the two different functional groups (-COOH and -OH groups), shows interesting range of color changes (yellow at pH ~ 14 and brown at pH ~ 2) with the variation in solution pH. Thus, depending upon the pH of the medium, CZA molecule can exist in various protonated and/or deprotonated forms. Here we have prescribed the existence different possible forms of CZA at different pH (Forms "C", "H" and "Dprot" at pH ~ 14 and Forms "A", "D", and "P" at pH ~ 2 respectively). The NRS spectra of these solutions and their respective SERS spectra over gold nanoparticles were recorded. The spectra clearly differ in their spectral profiles. For example the SERS spectra recorded with the CZA solution at pH ~ 2 shows blue shift for different bands compared to its NRS window e.g. 406 to 450 cm- 1, 616 to 632 cm- 1, 1332 to 1343 cm- 1 etc. Again, the most enhanced peak at ~ 1548 cm- 1 in NRS while in the SERS window this appears at ~ 1580 cm- 1. Similar observation was also made for CZA at pH ~ 14. For example, the 423 cm- 1 band in the NRS profile experience a blue shift and appears at ~ 447 cm- 1 in the SERS spectrum as well as other bands at ~ 850, ~ 1067 and ~ 1214 cm- 1 in the SERS window are markedly enhanced. It is also worth noting that the SERS spectra at the different pH also differ from each other. These spectral differences indicate the existence of various adsorptive forms of the CZA molecule depending upon the pH of the solution. Therefore based on the experimental findings we propose different possible molecular forms of CZA at different pH (acidic and alkaline) conditions. For example forms 'A', 'D' and 'P' existing in acidic pH (pH ~ 2) and three other deprotonated forms 'C', 'H' and 'Dprot' in alkaline pH (pH ~ 14). The DFT

  17. A pH dependent Raman and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic studies of citrazinic acid aided by theoretical calculations.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sougata; Chowdhury, Joydeep; Dutta, Soumen; Pal, Tarasankar

    2016-12-01

    A pH dependent normal Raman scattering (NRS) and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectral patterns of citrazinic acid (CZA), a biologically important molecule, have been investigated. The acid, with different pKa values (~4 and ~11) for the two different functional groups (-COOH and -OH groups), shows interesting range of color changes (yellow at pH~14 and brown at pH~2) with the variation in solution pH. Thus, depending upon the pH of the medium, CZA molecule can exist in various protonated and/or deprotonated forms. Here we have prescribed the existence different possible forms of CZA at different pH (Forms "C", "H" and "Dprot" at pH~14 and Forms "A", "D", and "P" at pH~2 respectively). The NRS spectra of these solutions and their respective SERS spectra over gold nanoparticles were recorded. The spectra clearly differ in their spectral profiles. For example the SERS spectra recorded with the CZA solution at pH~2 shows blue shift for different bands compared to its NRS window e.g. 406 to 450cm(-1), 616 to 632cm(-1), 1332 to 1343cm(-1) etc. Again, the most enhanced peak at ~1548cm(-1) in NRS while in the SERS window this appears at ~1580cm(-1). Similar observation was also made for CZA at pH~14. For example, the 423cm(-1) band in the NRS profile experience a blue shift and appears at ~447cm(-1) in the SERS spectrum as well as other bands at ~850, ~1067 and ~1214cm(-1) in the SERS window are markedly enhanced. It is also worth noting that the SERS spectra at the different pH also differ from each other. These spectral differences indicate the existence of various adsorptive forms of the CZA molecule depending upon the pH of the solution. Therefore based on the experimental findings we propose different possible molecular forms of CZA at different pH (acidic and alkaline) conditions. For example forms 'A', 'D' and 'P' existing in acidic pH (pH~2) and three other deprotonated forms 'C', 'H' and 'Dprot' in alkaline pH (pH~14). The DFT calculations for these

  18. Women Ph.D.'s Careers lag men's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Numerous studies of male and female Ph.D.'s have found wide differences in academic rank and pay. Now a study by a National Research Council committee debunks the traditional reasons given to explain the disparity. This study, which analyzed matched triads of Ph.D.'s, concluded that neither the perceived greater restraints on the career mobility of women nor the greater likelihood that women will interrupt their careers for child rearing explains adequately the differences between male and female Ph.D.'s. Discrimination appears to be the most likely root.

  19. Method for producing rapid pH changes

    DOEpatents

    Clark, John H.; Campillo, Anthony J.; Shapiro, Stanley L.; Winn, Kenneth R.

    1981-01-01

    A method of initiating a rapid pH change in a solution by irradiating the solution with an intense flux of electromagnetic radiation of a frequency which produces a substantial pK change to a compound in solution. To optimize the resulting pH change, the compound being irradiated in solution should have an excited state lifetime substantially longer than the time required to establish an excited state acid-base equilibrium in the solution. Desired pH changes can be accomplished in nanoseconds or less by means of picosecond pulses of laser radiation.

  20. Method for producing rapid pH changes

    DOEpatents

    Clark, J.H.; Campillo, A.J.; Shapiro, S.L.; Winn, K.R.

    A method of initiating a rapid pH change in a solution comprises irradiating the solution with an intense flux of electromagnetic radiation of a frequency which produces a substantial pK change to a compound in solution. To optimize the resulting pH change, the compound being irradiated in solution should have an excited state lifetime substantially longer than the time required to establish an excited state acid-base equilibrium in the solution. Desired pH changes can be accomplished in nanoseconds or less by means of picosecond pulses of laser radiation.

  1. Nicotine concentration, smoke pH and whole tobacco aqueous pH of some cigar brands and types popular in the United States.

    PubMed

    Henningfield, J E; Fant, R V; Radzius, A; Frost, S

    1999-06-01

    The present study examined characteristics relating to nicotine delivery of 17 cigar brands, which included small cigars, cigarillos, and large premium cigar brands. The cigars selected for analysis were intended to represent the range of cigar products currently available and in popular use. In addition to cigar characteristics previously studied such as size, nicotine content, and pH of their tobacco, the present study examined smoke pH on a puff-by-puff basis. The tobacco content of the cigars ranged in weight from 0.53 to 21.5 g. There was considerable variation in total nicotine content, which ranged from 5.9 to 335.2 mg per cigar. The aqueous pH of the tobacco from the cigars also varied widely with values ranging from 5.7 to 7.8. The smoke pH values of the smallest cigars was generally acidic, changed little across puffs, and more closely resembled the profiles previously reported for typical cigarettes. Interestingly, the smoke pH of smaller cigars and cigarillos became acidic after the first third of the cigar was consumed and then remained acidic thereafter, whereas larger cigars became acidic during the first third, then became quite alkaline during the last third. Because of wide variations in nicotine content of the tobacco across brands and of similarly wide variations in smoke pH, cigar size is not an accurate predictor of the nicotine delivery capacity of a particular cigar brand, although, in general, larger cigars are capable of providing larger total nicotine delivery with extraordinarily high delivery levels being possible from many of the large premium cigars. These results demonstrated that the popular cigars in this study contained enough nicotine for the development of dependence when smoking as few as one or two of the larger cigars per day. PMID:11072397

  2. Testing Novel pH Proxies through Inorganic Calcite Precipitations and K/Pg Foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Super, J. R.; Pagani, M.; Wang, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Ocean pH proxies help constrain the carbon system in the paleocean and can be used to infer atmospheric CO2 when coupled with estimates of total alkalinity, aqueous pCO2 or dissolved inorganic carbon. This project investigates two novel pH proxies (cerium abundance and kinetically-controlled oxygen isotopes) through a series of precipitations of inorganic calcite, as well as the previously established boron isotope pH proxy. Precipitations are performed using varied pH and carbonate saturation states that span the range of typical ocean values as well as a 'free drift' that allows pH and saturation state to vary. The light rare earth element cerium speciates, depending on local oxidation-reduction conditions, between the soluble Ce3+ and highly insoluble Ce4+ ions, causing a relative depletion of cerium in ocean water. This project demonstrates how a suite rare earth elements, including cerium, partitions into inorganic calcite and how partitioning varies with changing pH and carbonate saturation state. Oxygen isotope fractionation is primarily controlled by temperature, but this project examines how pH and carbonate saturation state correlate with oxygen isotope values under kinetic conditions during the initial stage of precipitation. The effect of diagenesis on each proxy is simulated by dissolution of precipitated calcite in a pressure vessel. Results from the precipitations are used to inform a record of well-preserved benthic and planktonic foraminifera from DSDP Site 356 that range in age from the K/Pg boundary to the period when the δ13C gradient between the surface and deep ocean returned to pre-event levels. The pH record is used to infer the magnitude and length of the perturbation to the oceanic carbon system following the extinction event, particularly in terms of export productivity.

  3. Plasma membrane domains participate in pH banding of Chara internodal cells.

    PubMed

    Schmölzer, Patric M; Höftberger, Margit; Foissner, Ilse

    2011-08-01

    We investigated the identity and distribution of cortical domains, stained by the endocytic marker FM 1-43, in branchlet internodal cells of the characean green algae Chara corallina and Chara braunii. Co-labeling with NBD C(6)-sphingomyelin, a plasma membrane dye, which is not internalized, confirmed their location in the plasma membrane, and co-labelling with the fluorescent pH indicator Lysotracker red indicated an acidic environment. The plasma membrane domains co-localized with the distribution of an antibody against a proton-translocating ATPase, and electron microscopic data confirmed their identity with elaborate plasma membrane invaginations known as charasomes. The average size and the distribution pattern of charasomes correlated with the pH banding pattern of the cell. Charasomes were larger and more frequent at the acidic regions than at the alkaline bands, indicating that they are involved in outward-directed proton transport. Inhibition of photosynthesis by DCMU prevented charasome formation, and incubation in pH buffers resulted in smaller, homogenously distributed charasomes irrespective of whether the pH was clamped at 5.5 or 8.5. These data indicate that the differential size and distribution of charasomes is not due to differences in external pH but reflects active, photosynthesis-dependent pH banding. The fact that pH banding recovered within several minutes in unbuffered medium, however, confirms that pH banding is also possible in cells with evenly distributed charasomes or without charasomes. Cortical mitochondria were also larger and more abundant at the acid bands, and their intimate association with charasomes and chloroplasts suggests an involvement in carbon uptake and photorespiration. PMID:21659328

  4. Role of pH on antioxidants production by Spirulina (Arthrospira) platensis.

    PubMed

    Ismaiel, Mostafa Mahmoud Sami; El-Ayouty, Yassin Mahmoud; Piercey-Normore, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Algae can tolerate a broad range of growing conditions but extreme conditions may lead to the generation of highly dangerous reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may cause the deterioration of cell metabolism and damage cellular components. The antioxidants produced by algae alleviate the harmful effects of ROS. While the enhancement of antioxidant production in blue green algae under stress has been reported, the antioxidant response to changes in pH levels requires further investigation. This study presents the effect of pH changes on the antioxidant activity and productivity of the blue green alga Spirulina (Arthrospira) platensis. The algal dry weight (DW) was greatly enhanced at pH 9.0. The highest content of chlorophyll a and carotenoids (10.6 and 2.4mg/g DW, respectively) was recorded at pH 8.5. The highest phenolic content (12.1mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/g DW) was recorded at pH 9.5. The maximum production of total phycobiliprotein (159mg/g DW) was obtained at pH 9.0. The antioxidant activities of radical scavenging activity, reducing power and chelating activity were highest at pH 9.0 with an increase of 567, 250 and 206% compared to the positive control, respectively. Variation in the activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POD) was also reported. While the high alkaline pH may favor the overproduction of antioxidants, normal cell metabolism and membrane function is unaffected, as shown by growth and chlorophyll content, which suggests that these conditions are suitable for further studies on the harvest of antioxidants from S. platensis. PMID:26991300

  5. [Phosphatase activity in Amoeba proteus at pH 9.0].

    PubMed

    Sopina, V A

    2007-01-01

    In the free-living amoeba Amoeba proteus (strain B), after PAAG disk-electrophoresis of the homogenate supernatant, at using 1-naphthyl phosphate as a substrate and pH 9.0, three forms of phosphatase activity were revealed; they were arbitrarily called "fast", "intermediate", and "slow" phosphatases. The fast phosphatase has been established to be a fraction of lysosomal acid phosphatase that preserves some low activity at alkaline pH. The question as to which particular class the intermediate phosphatase belongs to has remained unanswered: it can be both acid phosphatase and protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP). Based on data of inhibitor analysis, large substrate specificity, results of experiments with reactivation by Zn ions after inactivation with EDTA, other than in the fast and intermediate phosphatases localization in the amoeba cell, it is concluded that only slow phosphatase can be classified as alkaline phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.1). PMID:17933343

  6. Label-Free Carbon-Dots-Based Ratiometric Fluorescence pH Nanoprobes for Intracellular pH Sensing.

    PubMed

    Shangguan, Jingfang; He, Dinggeng; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin; Xu, Fengzhou; Liu, Jinquan; Tang, Jinlu; Yang, Xue; Huang, Jin

    2016-08-01

    Measuring pH in living cells is of great importance for better understanding cellular functions as well as providing pivotal assistance for early diagnosis of diseases. In this work, we report the first use of a novel kind of label-free carbon dots for intracellular ratiometric fluorescence pH sensing. By simple one-pot hydrothermal treatment of citric acid and basic fuchsin, the carbon dots showing dual emission bands at 475 and 545 nm under single-wavelength excitation were synthesized. It is demonstrated that the fluorescence intensities of the as-synthesized carbon dots at the two emissions are pH-sensitive simultaneously. The intensity ratio (I475 nm/I545 nm) is linear against pH values from 5.2 to 8.8 in buffer solution, affording the capability as ratiometric probes for intracellular pH sensing. It also displays that the carbon dots show excellent reversibility and photostability in pH measurements. With this nanoprobe, quantitative fluorescence imaging using the ratio of two emissions (I475 nm/I545 nm) for the detection of intracellular pH were successfully applied in HeLa cells. In contrast to most of the reported nanomaterials-based ratiometric pH sensors which rely on the attachment of additional dyes, these carbon-dots-based ratiometric probes are low in toxicity, easy to synthesize, and free from labels. PMID:27334762

  7. Effect of pH on the destruction of complexants with ozone in Hanford nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, W.I.

    1981-06-01

    Chemical processing of nuclear waste at Hanford has generated some waste solutions with high concentration (0.1 to 0.5M) of N-(hydroxyethyl)-ethylenediaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA), ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and other organic complexing agents. These complexants must be destroyed bacause they affect radionuclide migration in soils, waste concentration, radionuclide removal, and other waste storage and processing considerations. Previous studies on actual waste solutions demonstrated that preozonation of the alkaline waste significantly improved radionuclide removal. A series of bench-scale experiments using synthetic waste has been performed to determine the optimum pH for most efficient ozone destruction of EDTA. Ozonation of EDTA in synthetic waste was carried out over the pH range of 1 to 14. Potential catalytic materials were examined at different pH levels. The EDTA-ozone reaction rates and stoichiometric requirements were compared and evaluated for the varying conditions.

  8. Ecological Agriculture Research: Increasing Competence through PhD Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieblein, G.; Francis, C. A.; Salomonsson, L.; Sriskandarajah, N.

    1999-01-01

    A Ph.D. course in ecological agriculture included a weeklong intensive workshop and individual research projects. The course demonstrated the usefulness of multiple approaches to learning research methods and perspectives and increased networking among researchers. (SK)

  9. Commentary: PhDs in Biochemistry Education--5 Years Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offerdahl, Erika G.; Momsen, Jennifer L.; Osgood, Marcy

    2014-01-01

    In this commentary, the discussion of PhDs in biochemistry education research is expanded to explore a number of diverse pathways leading to a competitive research program in biochemistry education research.

  10. Ashley Felix, Ph.D., M.P.H.

    Cancer.gov

    NCI Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program (CPFP) alumna, Ashley Felix, Ph.D., M.P.H., details her transition from pre-med student to an epidemiologist who focuses on studying the causes and prevention of disease.

  11. The Training and Work of Ph.D. Physical Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. J.; Schweitzer, A. E.

    2003-05-01

    Doctoral education has often been viewed as the pinnacle of the formal education system. How useful is doctoral training in one's later career? In an NSF-funded project, we set out to perform a study of the training, careers, and work activities of Ph.D. physical scientists. The study included both in-depth interviews and a survey sent out to a sample of Ph.D. holders 4-8 years after graduation. Come and find out the results of this study: What skills are most Ph.D. physical scientists using? What should graduate programs be teaching? Are Ph.D.'s who are working in their specific field of training happier than their counterparts working different jobs? What skills and preparation lead to future job satisfaction, perhaps the most important indicator of the "success" of graduate education? A preprint and further details can be found at the project web site at: spot.colorado.edu/ phdcarer.

  12. Stress-Corrosion Cracking in Martensitic PH Stainless Steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T.; Nelson, E.

    1984-01-01

    Precipitation-hardening alloys evaluated in marine environment tests. Report describes marine-environment stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) tests of three martensitic precipitation hardening (PH) stainless-steel alloys.

  13. Goli Samimi, PhD, MPH | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Samimi received her PhD in Biomedical Sciences from the University of California, San Diego, focusing on molecular mechanisms in ovarian cancer that conferred resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy. |

  14. The bimodal pH distribution of volcanic lake waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marini, Luigi; Vetuschi Zuccolini, Marino; Saldi, Giuseppe

    2003-02-01

    Volcanic lake waters have a bimodal pH distribution with an acidic mode at pH 0.5-1.5 and a near neutral mode at pH 6-6.5, with relatively few samples having pH 3.5-5. To investigate the reasons for this distribution, the irreversible water-rock mass exchanges during the neutralization of acid SO 4-Cl waters with andesite, under both low- and high-temperature conditions, were simulated by means of the EQ3/6 software package, version 7.2. Reaction path modeling under low temperature and atmospheric P CO 2 and f O 2, suggests that several homogeneous and/or heterogeneous pH buffers exist both in the acidic and neutral regions, but no buffer is active in the intermediate, central pH region. Again, the same titration, under high-temperature, hydrothermal-magmatic conditions, is expected to produce comparatively infrequent aqueous solutions with pH values in the 3.5-5 range, upon their cooling below 100°C. Substantially different pH values are obtained depending on the cooling paths, either through boiling or conductive heat losses. These distinct pH values are governed by either HSO 4- and HCl (aq), in poorly neutralized aqueous solutions, or the CO 2(aq)/HCO 3- couple and the P CO 2 value as well, in neutralized aqueous solutions. Finally, mixing of the acid lake water with the aqueous solutions produced through high-temperature titration and cooled below 100°C is unlikely to generate mixtures with pH values higher than 3, unless the fraction of the acidic water originally present in the lake becomes very small, which means its virtually complete substitution. Summing up, the evidence gathered through reaction path modeling of the neutralization of acid lake waters with andesite, both at low and high temperatures, explains the scarcity of volcanic lake waters with measured pH values of 3.5-5.

  15. Modeling carbon dioxide, pH, and un-ionized ammonia relationships in serial reuse systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colt, J.; Watten, B.; Rust, M.

    2009-01-01

    In serial reuse systems, excretion of metabolic carbon dioxide has a significant impact on ambient pH, carbon dioxide, and un-ionized ammonia concentrations. This impact depends strongly on alkalinity, water flow rate, feeding rate, and loss of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. A reduction in pH from metabolic carbon dioxide can significantly reduce the un-ionized ammonia concentration and increase the carbon dioxide concentrations compared to those parameters computed from influent pH. The ability to accurately predict pH in serial reuse systems is critical to their design and effective operation. A trial and error solution to the alkalinity-pH system was used to estimate important water quality parameters in serial reuse systems. Transfer of oxygen and carbon dioxide across the air-water interface, at overflow weirs, and impacts of substrate-attached algae and suspended bacteria were modeled. Gas transfer at the weirs was much greater than transfer across the air-water boundary. This simulation model can rapidly estimate influent and effluent concentrations of dissolved oxygen, carbon dioxide, and un-ionized ammonia as a function of water temperature, elevation, water flow, and weir type. The accuracy of the estimates strongly depends on assumed pollutional loading rates and gas transfer at the weirs. The current simulation model is based on mean daily loading rates; the impacts of daily variation loading rates are discussed. Copies of the source code and executable program are available free of charge.

  16. pH dependence of the dissociation of multimeric hemoglobin probed by high hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Bispo, Jose A C; Santos, Jose L R; Landini, Gustavo F; Goncalves, Juliana M; Bonafe, Carlos F S

    2007-02-01

    We investigated the thermodynamic features of the classic alkaline dissociation of multimeric hemoglobin (3.1 MDa) from Glossoscolex paulistus (Annelidea) using high hydrostatic pressure. Light scattering measurements up to microscopic thermodynamic equilibrium indicated a high pH dependency of dissociation and association. Electron microscopy and gel filtration corroborated these findings. The volume change of dissociation decreased in absolute values from -48.0 mL/mol of subunit at pH 6.0 to -19.2 mL/mol at pH 9.0, suggesting a lack of protein interactions under alkaline conditions. Concomitantly, an increase in pH reduced the Gibbs free energy of dissociation from 37.7 to 27.5 kJ/mol of subunit. The stoichiometry of proton release calculated from the pressure-induced dissociation curves was +0.602 mol of H(+)/mol of subunit. These results provide a direct quantification of proton participation in stabilizing the aggregated state of the hemoglobin, and contribute to our understanding of protein-protein interactions and of the surrounding conditions that modulate the process of aggregation. PMID:17046147

  17. Superoxide reacts with nitric oxide to nitrate tyrosine at physiological pH via peroxynitrite.

    PubMed

    Reiter, C D; Teng, R J; Beckman, J S

    2000-10-20

    Tyrosine nitration is a widely used marker of peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) produced from the reaction of nitric oxide with superoxide. Pfeiffer and Mayer (Pfeiffer, S., and Mayer, B. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 27280-27285) reported that superoxide produced from hypoxanthine plus xanthine oxidase in combination with nitric oxide produced from spermine NONOate did not nitrate tyrosine at neutral pH. They suggested that nitric oxide and superoxide at neutral pH form a less reactive intermediate distinct from preformed alkaline peroxynitrite that does not nitrate tyrosine. Using a stopped-flow spectrophotometer to rapidly mix potassium superoxide with nitric oxide at pH 7.4, we report that an intermediate spectrally and kinetically identical to preformed alkaline cis-peroxynitrite was formed in 100% yield. Furthermore, this intermediate nitrated tyrosine in the same yield and at the same rate as preformed peroxynitrite. Equivalent concentrations of nitric oxide under aerobic conditions in the absence of superoxide did not produce detectable concentrations of nitrotyrosine. Carbon dioxide increased the efficiency of nitration by nitric oxide plus superoxide to the same extent as peroxynitrite. In experiments using xanthine oxidase as a source of superoxide, tyrosine nitration was substantially inhibited by urate formed from hypoxanthine oxidation, which was sufficient to account for the lack of tyrosine nitration previously reported. We conclude that peroxynitrite formed from the reaction of nitric oxide with superoxide at physiological pH remains an important species responsible for tyrosine nitration in vivo. PMID:10906340

  18. Ion release and pH of a new endodontic cement, MTA and Portland cement

    PubMed Central

    Amini Ghazvini, Sara; Abdo Tabrizi, Maryam; Kobarfard, Farzad; Akbarzadeh Baghban, Alireza; Asgary, Saeed

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This in vitro study measured and compared pH and phosphate and calcium ions release of a new endodontic material (CEM cement), mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), and Portland cement (PC) using UV-visible technique, atomic absorption spectrophotometry methods, and pH meter, respectively. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Each material was placed in a plastic tube (n=10) and immersed in a glass flask containing deionized water. Half of the samples were tested for determining pH and released ions after 1h, 3h, 24h, 48h, 7d and 28d. Remaining samples (n=5), were evaluated after 28d. Data was analyzed using one way ANOVA and Tukey tests. RESULTS: Results indicated that all materials were highly alkaline and released calcium and low concentration of phosphate ions in all the time intervals. CEM cement released considerably higher concentration of phosphate during the first hour (P<0.05). CONCLUSION: This novel endodontic cement promoted alkaline pH in a similar manner to MTA and released calcium and phosphate. These conditions can stimulate the calcification process and explain the basic physico-chemical mechanisms of hard tissue regeneration of CEM cement. PMID:23940490

  19. MD-PhD training: looking back and looking forward.

    PubMed

    Bonham, Ann C

    2014-01-01

    MD-PhD programs provide rigorous, integrated training for physician-scientists, enabling them to frame scientific questions in unique ways and to apply clinical insight to fundamental science. Few would question the influential contributions of MD-PhD physician-scientists in advancing medical science. In this issue of Academic Medicine, Jeffe et al affirm high levels of excellence in educational outcomes from MD-PhD training programs at U.S. MD-granting medical schools, especially programs that receive funding from the NIH Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP). The author of this commentary observes that, in the face of current economic pressures, comprehensive, longitudinal national outcomes data from MSTP- and non-MSTP-funded MD-PhD programs will help verify the value provided by MD-PhD physician-scientists. She proposes that MD-PhD programs should better prepare the next generation of physician-scientists for future research environments, which will provide new technologies, venues, and modalities. These research environments will be more closely integrated within health care delivery systems, extend into diverse communities and regions, and employ complex technologies. MD-PhD physician-scientists also will train and gain expertise in broadening areas of research, such as health policy, health economics, clinical epidemiology, and medical informatics. Program leaders are ideally situated to foster innovative learning environments and methodologies. By sharing their innovations, they can help ensure production of a diverse MD-PhD physician-scientist workforce, prepared to engage in myriad research opportunities to meet patient and population needs in a new environment. PMID:24280863

  20. Transport mechanism of a glutamate transporter homologue GltPh.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yurui; Postis, Vincent L G; Wang, Yingying; Bartlam, Mark; Goldman, Adrian

    2016-06-15

    Glutamate transporters are responsible for uptake of the neurotransmitter glutamate in mammalian central nervous systems. Their archaeal homologue GltPh, an aspartate transporter isolated from Pyrococcus horikoshii, has been the focus of extensive studies through crystallography, MD simulations and single-molecule FRET (smFRET). Here, we summarize the recent research progress on GltPh, in the hope of gaining some insights into the transport mechanism of this aspartate transporter. PMID:27284058

  1. Dysregulated pH in Tumor Microenvironment Checkmates Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Barar, Jaleh; Omidi, Yadollah

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The dysregulation of pH by cancerous cells of solid tumors is able to create a unique milieu that is in favor of progression, invasion and metastasis as well as chemo-/immuno-resistance traits of solid tumors. Bioelements involved in pH dysregulation provide new set of oncotargets, inhibition of which may result in better clinical outcome. Methods: To study the impacts of pH dysregulation, we investigated the tumor development and progression in relation with Warburg effect, glycolysis and formation of aberrant tumor microenvironment. Results: The upregulation of glucose transporter GLUT-1 and several enzymes involve in glycolysis exacerbates this phenomenon. The accumulation of lactic acids in cancer cells provokes upregulation of several transport machineries (MCT-1, NHE-1, CA IX and H+ pump V-ATPase) resulting in reinforced efflux of proton into extracellular fluid. This deviant event makes pH to be settled at 7.4 and 6.6 respectively in cancer cells cytoplasm and extracellular fluid within the tumor microenvironment, which in return triggers secretion of lysosomal components (various enzymes in acidic milieu with pH 5) into cytoplasm. All these anomalous phenomena make tumor microenvironment (TME) to be exposed to cocktail of various enzymes with acidic pH, upon which extracellular matrix (ECM) can be remodeled and even deformed, resulting in emergence of a complex viscose TME with high interstitial fluid pressure. Conclusion: It seems that pH dysregulation is able to remodel various physiologic functions and make solid tumors to become much more invasive and metastatic. It also can cause undesired resistance to chemotherapy and immunotherapy. Hence, cancer therapy needs to be reinforced using specific inhibitors of bioelements involved in pH dysregulation of TME in solid tumors. PMID:24455478

  2. Teaching Human Digestion and pH Using Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hanna

    2008-01-01

    Testing the pH of various liquids is one of the most popular activities in 5th- through 8th-grade classrooms. The author presents an extensive pH-testing lesson based on a 5E (engagement, exploration, explanation, extension, and evaluation) teaching model. The activity provides students with the opportunity to learn about pH and how it relates to…

  3. Transport mechanism of a glutamate transporter homologue GltPh

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yurui; Postis, Vincent L.G.; Wang, Yingying; Bartlam, Mark; Goldman, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate transporters are responsible for uptake of the neurotransmitter glutamate in mammalian central nervous systems. Their archaeal homologue GltPh, an aspartate transporter isolated from Pyrococcus horikoshii, has been the focus of extensive studies through crystallography, MD simulations and single-molecule FRET (smFRET). Here, we summarize the recent research progress on GltPh, in the hope of gaining some insights into the transport mechanism of this aspartate transporter. PMID:27284058

  4. Glucosylceramide modulates endolysosomal pH in Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Sillence, Dan J

    2013-06-01

    GlcCer accumulation causes Gaucher disease where GlcCer breakdown is inhibited due to a hereditary deficiency in glucocerebrosidase. Glycolipids are endocytosed and targeted to the Golgi apparatus in normal cells but in Gaucher disease they are mistargeted to lysosomes. To better understand the role of GlcCer in endocytic sorting RAW macrophages were treated with Conduritol B-epoxide to inhibit GlcCer breakdown. Lipid analysis found increases in GlcCer led to accumulation of both triacylglycerol and cholesterol consistent with increased lysosomal pH. Ratio imaging of macrophages using both acridine orange and lysosensor yellow/blue to measure endolysosomal pH revealed increases in Conduritol B-epoxide treated RAW macrophages and Gaucher patient lymphoblasts. Increased endolysosomal pH was restricted to Gaucher lymphoblasts as no significant increases in pH were seen in Fabry, Krabbe, Tay-Sachs and GM1-gangliosidosis lymphoblasts. Substrate reduction therapy utilises inhibitors of GlcCer synthase to reduce storage in Gaucher disease. The addition of inhibitors of GlcCer synthesis to RAW macrophages also led to increases in cholesterol and triacylglycerol and an endolysosomal pH increase of up to 1 pH unit. GlcCer modulation appears specific since glucosylsphingosine but not galactosylsphingosine reversed the effects of GlcCer depletion. Although no acute effects on glycolipid trafficking were observed using bafilomycin A the results are consistent with a multistep model whereby increases in pH lead to altered trafficking via cholesterol accumulation. GlcCer modulates endolysosomal pH in lymphocytes suggesting an important role in normal lysosomes which may be disrupted in Gaucher disease. PMID:23628459

  5. Mouthguard and sports drinks on tooth surface pH.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Y; Yang, T-C; Miyanaga, H; Tanaka, Y; Ikebe, K; Akimoto, N

    2014-09-01

    The influence of sports drinks and mouthguards on the pH level of tooth surface was examined. A custom-made mouthguard was fabricated for each subject. The pH level was measured by electric pH meter with sensitivity of 0.01 up to 30 min. Sports drinks (pH=3.75) containing 9.4% sugar were used in this study. Measurements were performed on a cohort of 23 female subjects without a mouthguard (control), wearing a mouthguard only (MG), wearing a mouthguard after 30 ml sports drink intake (SD+MG), wearing a mouthguard during a 5-min jogging exercise (MG+EX) and wearing a mouthguard during jogging after sports drink intake (SD+MG+EX). For 7 male subjects, the same measurements were performed while a sports drink was taken over the mouthguard (MG+SD, MD+EX+SD). MG showed statistically higher pH level than control (p<0.05). SD+MG exhibited a significant decrease in pH level, and SD+MG+EX exhibited even below the critical level of pH 5.5 in some subjects. When sports drinks were taken over the mouthguard, no significant differences in pH level were observed among the different conditions.Within the limitations of this study, it was suggested that wearing a mouthguard during exercise is in itself not a possible risk factor for dental caries, while wearing a mouthguard after consuming sports drinks is. PMID:24604353

  6. pH profiles in human skin: influence of two in vitro test systems for drug delivery testing.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Heike; Kostka, Karl Heinz; Lehr, Claus Michael; Schaefer, Ulrich F

    2003-01-01

    Investigations to determine pH profiles across human stratum corneum (SC), in vivo as well as in vitro, were carried out using the tape stripping technique and a flat surface pH electrode. This method was extended to the deeper skin layers (=viable epidermis+dermis; DSL) in vitro. Statistically significant changes in the pH values were detected in the SC between in vivo and in vitro investigations and also between male and female skin in vivo. For the DSL, no gender-dependent differences in pH were observed. While the results achieved for the SC are in accordance with data already published in the literature, the values for the DSL were surprising: An alkaline pH, with a steep increase of about two pH units in the first 100 microm of the DSL and a plateau of this level was thereafter detected. Research was also done to examine the influence of different in vitro test systems on the results of pH measurements across the skin. A permeation model (Franz diffusion cell; FD-C) and a penetration model (Saarbruecken penetration model; SB-M) were compared. Experiments were carried out concerning the incubation time as well as the pH of the acceptor solution in the FD-C. Independent of the test system used, no change in the pH profiles could be observed for the SC, but a strong effect of the acceptor medium and its pH on the pH profiles across the DSL could be demonstrated using the FD-C, which showed itself partly after 30 min in statistically significant differences between incubated and formerly frozen skin. The results after the use of buffer solutions with different pH values, the pH across the DSL seemed to come into line with the one of the buffer solution, which was investigated for acidic as well as alkaline pH values. The results obtained with the flat surface pH electrode were confirmed using two different dyes: the pH-dependent fluorescent dye carboxy-SNARF-1 and the pH indicator bromthymolblue. PMID:12551704

  7. Automated high precision secondary pH measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastkowski, F.; Jakobsen, P. T.; Stefan, F.; Kristensen, H. B.; Jensen, H. D.; Kawiecki, R.; Wied, C. E.; Kauert, A.; Seidl, B.; Spitzer, P.; Eberhardt, R.; Adel, B.

    2013-04-01

    A new setup for high precision, automated secondary pH measurements together with a reference measurement procedure has been developed and tested in interlaboratory comparisons using buffers pH 4.005, pH 7.000, and pH 10.012 at 25 °C and 37 °C. Using primary buffers as standards, a standard uncertainty in pH better than 0.005 can be reached. The central measuring device is a one piece, thermostatted cell of PFA (perfluoroalkoxy) with a built-in Hamilton® Single Pore™ Glass electrode. Due to its flow-through principle this device allows pH measurements with low consumption of measurement solutions. The very hydrophobic and smooth PFA as construction material facilitates complete emptying of the cell. Furthermore, the tempering unit affords very precise temperature control and hence contributes to the low target uncertainty of the produced secondary buffer solutions. Use of a symmetric measurement sequence and the two point calibration was sufficient to reach high precision and accuracy.

  8. Monitoring pH and ORP in a SHARON reactor.

    PubMed

    Claros, J; Serralta, J; Seco, A; Ferrer, J; Aguado, D

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyses the valuable information provided by the on-line measurements of pH and oxidation reduction potential (ORP) in a continuous single high ammonia removal over nitrite (SHARON) reactor. A laboratory-scale SHARON reactor equipped with pH, ORP, electric conductivity and dissolved oxygen (DO) probes has been operated for more than one year. Nitrogen removal over nitrite has been achieved by adding methanol at the beginning of anoxic stages. Time evolution of pH and ORP along each cycle allows identifying the decrease in nitritation rate when ammonia is consumed during the aerobic phase and the end of the denitrification process during the anoxic phase. Therefore, monitoring pH and ORP can be used to develop a real-time control system aimed at optimizing the length of both aerobic and anoxic stages. Real-time control of methanol addition can be carried out by using the information provided by these probes: excessive methanol addition in the anoxic stage is clearly detected in the ORP profile of the following aerobic phase, while a deficit of methanol is detected in both pH and ORP profiles of that anoxic phase. Moreover, other valuable information such as the amount of ammonia nitrified, failures in DO measurements, excessive stirring during the anoxic stage and methanol dosage in the aerobic phase was also provided by the pH and ORP profiles. PMID:22049741

  9. pH sensing by intracellular Salmonella induces effector translocation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiu-Jun; McGourty, Kieran; Liu, Mei; Unsworth, Kate E; Holden, David W

    2010-05-21

    Salmonella enterica is an important intracellular bacterial pathogen of humans and animals. It replicates within host-cell vacuoles by delivering virulence (effector) proteins through a vacuolar membrane pore made by the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2) type III secretion system (T3SS). T3SS assembly follows vacuole acidification, but when bacteria are grown at low pH, effector secretion is negligible. We found that effector secretion was activated at low pH from mutant strains lacking a complex of SPI-2-encoded proteins SsaM, SpiC, and SsaL. Exposure of wild-type bacteria to pH 7.2 after growth at pH 5.0 caused dissociation and degradation of SsaM/SpiC/SsaL complexes and effector secretion. In infected cells, loss of the pH 7.2 signal through acidification of host-cell cytosol prevented complex degradation and effector translocation. Thus, intravacuolar Salmonella senses host cytosolic pH, resulting in the degradation of regulatory complex proteins and effector translocation. PMID:20395475

  10. Economical wireless optical ratiometric pH sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuppu, Sandeep; Kostov, Yordan; Rao, Govind

    2009-04-01

    The development and application of a portable, wireless fluorescence-based optical pH sensor is presented. The design incorporates the MSP430 microcontroller as the control unit, an RF transceiver for wireless communication, digital filters and amplifiers and a USB-based communication module for data transmission. The pH sensor is based on ratiometric fluorescence detection from pH sensitive dye incorporated in a peel-and-stick patch. The ability of the instrument to detect the pH of the solution with contact only between the sensor patch and the solution makes it partially non-invasive. The instrument also has the ability to transmit data wirelessly, enabling its use in processes that entail stringent temperature control and sterility. The use of the microcontroller makes it a reliable, low-cost and low-power device. The luminous intensity of the light source can be digitally controlled to maximize the sensitivity of the instrument. It has a resolution of 0.05 pH. The sensor is accurate and reversible over the pH range of 6.5-9.

  11. The potentiometric titration of fluoride using pH electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Selig, W.S.

    1987-07-01

    Sodium fluoride solutions with an initial pH of 4.46 yielded poorly defined endpoint breaks with a pH electrode system and Ce(III) or La(III) as titrants. At this initial pH, however, the fluoride ISE yielded acceptable S-shaped titration curves. At an initial pH of 6.30, both electrode systems and titrant combinations yielded acceptable endpoint breaks and titration curves. While a partially nonaqueous medium (50% methanol) enhanced the steepness of the endpoint breaks, the standard deviation also increased. This was possibly caused by evaporation of some of the solvent. We therefore do not see the necessity for, nor recommend a partially nonaqueous medium. There is no advantage in using Ce(III) rather than La(III) as titrant. Increasing the initial pH from 4.46 to 6.3 decreased the mean normality of the titrant (or increased the titration volume) for both electrode systems and titrants. We therefore recommend that the sodium fluoride standard solutions be adjusted to the same pH as the samples to be determined. For the most accurate results, the standardization should be done with a good approximation of the salt content of the unknown solution.

  12. Structure of human saposin A at lysosomal pH

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Chris H.; Read, Randy J.; Deane, Janet E.

    2015-06-27

    A 1.8 Å resolution structure of the sphingolipid activator protein saposin A has been determined at pH 4.8, the physiologically relevant lysosomal pH for hydrolase enzyme activation and lipid-transfer activity. The saposins are essential cofactors for the normal lysosomal degradation of complex glycosphingolipids by acid hydrolase enzymes; defects in either saposin or hydrolase function lead to severe metabolic diseases. Saposin A (SapA) activates the enzyme β-galactocerebrosidase (GALC), which catalyzes the breakdown of β-d-galactocerebroside, the principal lipid component of myelin. SapA is known to bind lipids and detergents in a pH-dependent manner; this is accompanied by a striking transition from a ‘closed’ to an ‘open’ conformation. However, previous structures were determined at non-lysosomal pH. This work describes a 1.8 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure determined at the physiologically relevant lysosomal pH 4.8. In the absence of lipid or detergent at pH 4.8, SapA is observeed to adopt a conformation closely resembling the previously determined ‘closed’ conformation, showing that pH alone is not sufficient for the transition to the ‘open’ conformation. Structural alignments reveal small conformational changes, highlighting regions of flexibility.

  13. Development of in situ CO2 and pH sensor for AUVs and ROVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Yoshiyuki; Kimoto, Hideshi; Miwa, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Hiroshi

    2013-04-01

    Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) has been developing two-type autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs): a cruising AUV and a working AUV, since October 2010. These vehicles will perform carbon dioxide (CO2) and pH observations to explore hydrothermal plume on seabed mineral resources and to monitor a leak of CO2 in carbon capture and storage (CCS) up to depth of 3,000 meters. We here have been developing the compact in situ CO2 and pH sensor (Hybrid CO2-pH sensor: HCS) for the AUVs to obtain vertical and horizontal distributions of CO2 and pH. The HCS consists of an aluminum pressure housing (diameter 84 mm, length 570 mm, weight 4 kg) and an acrylic silicon-oil filled, pressure-compensated vessel (diameter 90 mm, length 355 mm, weight 2 kg) containing valves and pump unit. The HCS is also useful for the observation by remotely operated vehicles (ROVs). The measured data were transmitted to the AUVs or ROVs by serial communications. We can monitor the data of in situ pCO2, pH and so on in real time on board. The measurement principle for the CO2 sensor is based on spectrophotometry. The pCO2 is calculated from the optical absorbance of the pH indicator solution equilibrated with CO2 in seawater through a gas permeable membrane. On the other hand, we adopt potentiometric analysis using original glass and reference electrodes as a pH sensor because of the most commonly used technique for sea water pH measurements and high-speed response (within 20 seconds). From simultaneously measured data of in situ pCO2 and pH, we can also calculate dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA) as other carbonate species in the ocean. The resolutions of HCS are 1 μatm for pCO2 and 0.001 pH. In the laboratory experiment, the HCS obtained precisions within 3 μatm and within 0.01 pH, respectively. Our first in situ observational test of the HSC with cruising AUV was made in the coast of the Japan Sea last August. And also first in situ test

  14. Macroalgae contribute to nested mosaics of pH variability in a sub-Arctic fjord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause-Jensen, D.; Duarte, C. M.; Hendriks, I. E.; Meire, L.; Blicher, M. E.; Marbà, N.; Sejr, M. K.

    2015-03-01

    The Arctic Ocean is considered the most vulnerable ecosystem to ocean acidification (OA) and large-scale assessments of pH and the saturation state for aragonite (Ωarag) indicate that it is already close to corrosive states (Ωarag < 1). In high-latitude coastal waters the regulation of pH and Ωarag is far more complex than offshore because increased biological activity and input of glacial meltwater affect pH. As most calcifiers occupy coastal habitats, the assessment of risks from OA to these vulnerable organisms cannot be derived from extrapolation of current and forecasted offshore conditions, but requires an understanding of the regimes of pH and Ωarag in their coastal habitats. To increase knowledge of the natural variability of pH in the Arctic coastal zone and specifically to test the influence of benthic vegetated habitats, we quantified pH-variability in a Greenland fjord in a nested scale approach. A sensor array logging pH, O2, PAR, temperature and salinity was applied on spatial scales ranging from km-scale across the horizontal extension of the fjord, over 100 m scale vertically in the fjord, 10-100 m scale between subtidal habitats with and without kelp forests and between vegetated tidal pools and adjacent vegetated shores, to cm-m scale within kelp forests and mm-scale across boundary layers of macrophyte tissue. In addition, we assessed the temporal variability in pH on diurnal and seasonal scales. Based on pH-measurements combined with relationships between salinity, total alkalinity and dissolved inorganic carbon we also estimated variability of Ωarag. Results show variability in pH and Ωarag of up to 0.2-0.3 units at several scales, i.e. along the horizontal and vertical extension of the fjord, between seasons and on a diel basis in benthic habitats and within 1 m3 of kelp forest. Vegetated intertidal pools exhibited extreme diel pH variability of > 1.5 units and macrophyte boundary layers a pH-range of up to 0.8 units. Overall, Ωarag was

  15. Agonist-mediated changes in intracellular pH: role in vascular smooth muscle cell function

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, B.C.; Canessa, M.; Vallega, G.; Alexander, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    Changes in intracellular pH (pHi) are likely to play an important role in regulation of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) function. In most blood vessels, acidification is associated with decreased contractile tone and alkalinization with increased tone. However, the nature of agonist-mediated alterations in pHi and the role of pHi in other VSMC responses has been little studied. We have used the pH sensitive dye, BCECF, to study pHi in cultured rat aortic VSMC. Basal pHi at 37 degrees C in physiologic saline buffer (pH 7.3) was 7.08 in suspended VSMC and 7.26 in substrate-attached VSMC. An amiloride-sensitive Na+/H+ exchanger mediated pHi recovery following an acid load. Angiotensin II- and platelet-derived growth factor typified one class of VSMC agonists, causing an initial transient (less than 5 min) acidification followed by a sustained (greater than 20 min) alkalinization. The acidification phase was associated with increased Ca2+ mobilization as demonstrated by increases in intracellular Ca2+ and 45Ca2+ efflux. The alkalinization was associated with Na+ influx and H+ efflux consistent with Na+/H+ exchange. Epidermal growth factor and phorbol esters typified another class of agonists which stimulated only a sustained alkalinization. Alterations in regulation of VSMC pHi may play an important role in VSMC hypertrophy and/or proliferation as suggested by the finding of increased cell growth and Na+/H+ exchange in spontaneously hypertensive rat VSMC compared to Wistar-Kyoto VSMC. Although no functional correlate for initial acidification has been identified, cytoplasmic alkalinization appears to be required for the sustained formation of diacylglycerol following angiotensin II stimulation. These findings suggest that alterations in pHi may regulate several VSMC functions such as agonist-mediated signal transduction, excitation-response coupling, and growth.

  16. Saliva and tongue coating pH before and after use of mouthwashes and relationship with parameters of halitosis

    PubMed Central

    TOLENTINO, Elen de Souza; CHINELLATO, Luiz Eduardo Montenegro; TARZIA, Olinda

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this work was to evaluate saliva and tongue coating pH in oral healthy patients with morning bad breath before and after use of different oral mouthrinses. Material and Methods aliva and tongue coating pH of 50 patients allocated in 5 groups were measured respectively by a digital pHmeter and color pH indicators, before, immediately after and 30 min after rinsing 5 different mouthrinses: cetilpiridine chloride associated with sodium chloride, triclosan, enzymatic solution, essential oil and distilled water. Results Only triclosan and essential oil increased salivary pH immediately after rising. The enzymatic solution decreased salivary and tongue coating pH immediately after rinsing. Conclusion Salivary pH tended to be acidic while tongue coating pH tended to be alkaline, even after rising. Triclosan and essential oil mouthrinses increased salivary pH immediately after rinsing. Enzymatic solution decreased saliva and tongue coating pH immediately after rising. PMID:21552707

  17. Effect of initial pH on anaerobic co-digestion of kitchen waste and cow manure.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Ningning; Zhang, Tong; Yin, Dongxue; Yang, Gaihe; Wang, Xiaojiao; Ren, Guangxin; Feng, Yongzhong

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of different initial pH (6.0, 6.5, 7.0, 7.5 and 8.0) and uncontrolled initial pH (CK) on the lab-scale anaerobic co-digestion of kitchen waste (KW) with cow manure (CM). The variations of pH, alkalinity, volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and total ammonia nitrogen (NH4(+)-N) were analyzed. The modified Gompertz equation was used for selecting the optimal initial pH through comprehensive evaluation of methane production potential, degradation of volatile solids (VS), and lag-phase time. The results showed that CK and the fermentation with initial pH of 6.0 failed. The pH values of the rest treatments reached 7.7-7.9 with significantly increased methane production. The predicted lag-phase times of treatments with initial pH of 6.5 and 7.5 were 21 and 22 days, which were 10 days shorter than the treatments with initial pH of 7.0 and 8.0, respectively. The maximum methane production potential (8579 mL) and VS degradation rate (179.8 mL/g VS) were obtained when the initial pH was 7.5, which is recommended for co-digestion of KW and CM. PMID:25623001

  18. Comparing Metal Leaching and Toxicity from High pH, Low pH, and High Ammonia Fly Ash

    SciTech Connect

    Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Phillips, Jana Randolph; Fagan, Lisa Anne; Drake, Meghan M; Ruther, Rose Emily; Fisher, L. Suzanne; Amonette, J. E.

    2007-01-01

    Previous work with both class F and class C fly ash indicated minimal leaching from most fly ashes tested. However, the addition of NOx removal equipment might result in higher levels of ammonia in the fly ash. We have recently been testing fly ash with a wide range of pH (3.7-12.4) originating from systems with NOx removal equipment. Leaching experiments were done using dilute CaCl2 solutions in batch and columns and a batch nitric acid method. All methods indicated that the leaching of heavy metals was different in the highest ammonia sample tested and the high pH sample. However, toxicity testing with the Microtox system has indicated little potential toxicity in leachates except for the fly ash at the highest pH (12.4). When the leachate from the high pH fly ash was neutralized, toxicity was eliminated.

  19. Comparing metal leaching and toxicity from high pH, low pH, and high ammonia fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Palumbo, Anthony V.; Tarver, Jana R.; Fagan, Lisa A.; McNeilly, Meghan S.; Ruther, Rose; Fisher, L. S.; Amonette, James E.

    2007-07-01

    Previous work with both class F and class C fly ash indicated minimal leaching from most fly ashes tested. However, the addition of NOx removal equipment might result in higher levels of ammonia in the fly ash. We have recently been testing fly ash with a wide range of pH (3.7–12.4) originating from systems with NOx removal equipment. Leaching experiments were done using dilute CaCl2 solutions in batch and columns and a batch nitric acid method. All methods indicated that the leaching of heavy metals was different in the highest ammonia sample tested and the high pH sample. However, toxicity testing with the Microtox* system has indicated little potential toxicity in leachates except for the fly ash at the highest pH (12.4). When the leachate from the high pH fly ash was neutralized, toxicity was eliminated.

  20. Characterisation and deployment of an immobilised pH sensor spot towards surface ocean pH measurements.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Jennifer S; Achterberg, Eric P; Rérolle, Victoire M C; Abi Kaed Bey, Samer; Floquet, Cedric F A; Mowlem, Matthew C

    2015-10-15

    The oceans are a major sink for anthropogenic atmospheric carbon dioxide, and the uptake causes changes to the marine carbonate system and has wide ranging effects on flora and fauna. It is crucial to develop analytical systems that allow us to follow the increase in oceanic pCO2 and corresponding reduction in pH. Miniaturised sensor systems using immobilised fluorescence indicator spots are attractive for this purpose because of their simple design and low power requirements. The technology is increasingly used for oceanic dissolved oxygen measurements. We present a detailed method on the use of immobilised fluorescence indicator spots to determine pH in ocean waters across the pH range 7.6-8.2. We characterised temperature (-0.046 pH/°C from 5 to 25 °C) and salinity dependences (-0.01 pH/psu over 5-35), and performed a preliminary investigation into the influence of chlorophyll on the pH measurement. The apparent pKa of the sensor spots was 6.93 at 20 °C. A drift of 0.00014 R (ca. 0.0004 pH, at 25 °C, salinity 35) was observed over a 3 day period in a laboratory based drift experiment. We achieved a precision of 0.0074 pH units, and observed a drift of 0.06 pH units during a test deployment of 5 week duration in the Southern Ocean as an underway surface ocean sensor, which was corrected for using certified reference materials. The temperature and salinity dependences were accounted for with the algorithm, R=0.00034-0.17·pH+0.15·S(2)+0.0067·T-0.0084·S·1.075. This study provides a first step towards a pH optode system suitable for autonomous deployment. The use of a short duration low power illumination (LED current 0.2 mA, 5 μs illumination time) improved the lifetime and precision of the spot. Further improvements to the pH indicator spot operations include regular application of certified reference materials for drift correction and cross-calibration against a spectrophotometric pH system. Desirable future developments should involve novel

  1. Local pH tracking in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsou, Chieh-Jui; Hsia, Chih-Hao; Chu, Jia-Yin; Hung, Yann; Chen, Yi-Ping; Chien, Fan-Ching; Chou, Keng C.; Chen, Peilin; Mou, Chung-Yuan

    2015-02-01

    Continuous and simultaneous 3D single-particle movement and local pH detection in HeLa cells were demonstrated for the first time by combining fluorescent mesoporous silica nanoparticles (FMSNs) and a single-particle tracking (SPT) technique with a precision of ~10 nm. FMSNs, synthesized by the co-condensation of both pH-sensitive and reference dyes with a silica/surfactant source, allow long-term reliable ratiometric pH measurements with a precision better than 0.3 pH unit because of their excellent brightness and stability. pH variation in the surrounding area of FMSNs during endocytosis was monitored in real-time. Acidification and low mobility of FMSNs were observed at the early endocytic stage, whereas basification and high mobility of FMSNs were observed at the late stage. Our results indicate that it is possible to monitor local pH changes in the environments surrounding nanoparticles during the cellular uptake process of FMSNs, which provides much needed information for designing an efficient drug delivery nanosystem.Continuous and simultaneous 3D single-particle movement and local pH detection in HeLa cells were demonstrated for the first time by combining fluorescent mesoporous silica nanoparticles (FMSNs) and a single-particle tracking (SPT) technique with a precision of ~10 nm. FMSNs, synthesized by the co-condensation of both pH-sensitive and reference dyes with a silica/surfactant source, allow long-term reliable ratiometric pH measurements with a precision better than 0.3 pH unit because of their excellent brightness and stability. pH variation in the surrounding area of FMSNs during endocytosis was monitored in real-time. Acidification and low mobility of FMSNs were observed at the early endocytic stage, whereas basification and high mobility of FMSNs were observed at the late stage. Our results indicate that it is possible to monitor local pH changes in the environments surrounding nanoparticles during the cellular uptake process of FMSNs, which

  2. Development of pH Sensitive Nanoparticles for Intestinal Drug Delivery Using Chemically Modified Guar Gum Co-Polymer.

    PubMed

    Varma, Vegesna Naga Sravan Kumar; Shivakumar, Hosakote Gurumalappa; Balamuralidhara, Veerna; Navya, Manne; Hani, Umme

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the research work was to chemically modify guargum (GG) as a pH sensitive co-polymer and formulating intestinal targeting ESO nanoparticles (NPs) using the synthesized co-polymer. Poly acrylamide-grafted-guar gum (PAAm-g-GG) co-polymer was synthesized by free radical polymerization. Chemical modification of PAAm-g-GG by alkaline hydrolysis results in formation of a pH-sensitive co-polymer. The effect of GG and acryl amide (AAm) on grafting was studied. Esomeprazole magnesium (ESO) loaded pH sensitive NPs were prepared by nano-emulsification polymer crosslinking method and characterized. Sixteen formulations were prepared and the concentration of process variables wasvaried to obtain nanoparticles of 200-600 nm. The NPs were found to be homogenous in size distribution. The encapsulation efficiency and drug loading ranged from 33.2% to 50.1% and 12.2% to 17.2% respectively. Particle size, encapsulation efficiency and drug loading increasedalong with co-polymer concentration. In-vitro release studies at pH 1.2 for 2 h, followed by pH 6.8 showed that environment pH significantly affected the drug release. SEM has shown that NPsare spherical with smooth surface. The pH sensitive PAAm-g-GGNPs resisted the initial release of the drug from the drug loaded NPs in acidic pH and delayed the release process to a longer period in alkaline environment. PMID:27610149

  3. Development of pH Sensitive Nanoparticles for Intestinal Drug Delivery Using Chemically Modified Guar Gum Co-Polymer

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Vegesna Naga Sravan Kumar; Shivakumar, Hosakote Gurumalappa; Balamuralidhara, Veerna; Navya, Manne; Hani, Umme

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the research work was to chemically modify guargum (GG) as a pH sensitive co-polymer and formulating intestinal targeting ESO nanoparticles (NPs) using the synthesized co-polymer. Poly acrylamide-grafted-guar gum (PAAm-g-GG) co-polymer was synthesized by free radical polymerization. Chemical modification of PAAm-g-GG by alkaline hydrolysis results in formation of a pH-sensitive co-polymer. The effect of GG and acryl amide (AAm) on grafting was studied. Esomeprazole magnesium (ESO) loaded pH sensitive NPs were prepared by nano-emulsification polymer crosslinking method and characterized. Sixteen formulations were prepared and the concentration of process variables wasvaried to obtain nanoparticles of 200-600 nm. The NPs were found to be homogenous in size distribution. The encapsulation efficiency and drug loading ranged from 33.2% to 50.1% and 12.2% to 17.2% respectively. Particle size, encapsulation efficiency and drug loading increasedalong with co-polymer concentration. In-vitro release studies at pH 1.2 for 2 h, followed by pH 6.8 showed that environment pH significantly affected the drug release. SEM has shown that NPsare spherical with smooth surface. The pH sensitive PAAm-g-GGNPs resisted the initial release of the drug from the drug loaded NPs in acidic pH and delayed the release process to a longer period in alkaline environment. PMID:27610149

  4. A step-by-step procedure for pH model construction in aquatic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, A. F.; Meysman, F. J. R.; Soetaert, K.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2007-10-01

    We present, by means of a simple example, a comprehensive step-by-step procedure to consistently derive a pH model of aquatic systems. As pH modeling is inherently complex, we make every step of the model generation process explicit, thus ensuring conceptual, mathematical, and chemical correctness. Summed quantities, such as total inorganic carbon and total alkalinity, and the influences of modeled processes on them are consistently derived. The model is subsequently reformulated until numerically and computationally simple dynamical solutions, like a variation of the operator splitting approach (OSA) and the direct substitution approach (DSA), are obtained. As several solution methods are pointed out, connections between previous pH modelling approaches are established. The final reformulation of the system according to the DSA allows for quantification of the influences of kinetic processes on the rate of change of proton concentration in models containing multiple biogeochemical processes. These influences are calculated including the effect of re-equilibration of the system due to a set of acid-base reactions in local equilibrium. This possibility of quantifying influences of modeled processes on the pH makes the end-product of the described model generation procedure a powerful tool for understanding the internal pH dynamics of aquatic systems.

  5. Assessing mine drainage pH from the color and spectral reflectance of chemical precipitates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, D.J.; Bigham, J.M.; Cravotta, C.A., III; Traina, S.J.; Anderson, J.E.; Lyon, J.G.

    2002-01-01

    The pH of mine impacted waters was estimated from the spectral reflectance of resident sediments composed mostly of chemical precipitates. Mine drainage sediments were collected from sites in the Anthracite Region of eastern Pennsylvania, representing acid to near neutral pH. Sediments occurring in acidic waters contained primarily schwertmannite and goethite while near neutral waters produced ferrihydrite. The minerals comprising the sediments occurring at each pH mode were spectrally separable. Spectral angle difference mapping was used to correlate sediment color with stream water pH (r2=0.76). Band-center and band-depth analysis of spectral absorption features were also used to discriminate ferrihydrite and goethite and/or schwertmannite by analyzing the 4T1??? 6A1 crystal field transition (900-1000 nm). The presence of these minerals accurately predicted stream water pH (r2=0.87) and provided a qualitative estimate of dissolved SO4 concentrations. Spectral analysis results were used to analyze airborne digital multispectral video (DMSV) imagery for several sites in the region. The high spatial resolution of the DMSV sensor allowed for precise mapping of the mine drainage sediments. The results from this study indicate that airborne and space-borne imaging spectrometers may be used to accurately classify streams impacted by acid vs. neutral-to-alkaline mine drainage after appropriate spectral libraries are developed.

  6. High Ph, Ammonia Toxicity, and the Search for Life on the Jovian Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deal, P. H.; Souza, K. A.; Mack, H. M.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of pH and ammonia concentration were studied separately, where possible, on a variety of organisms, including some isolated from natural environments of high pH and/or ammonia concentration. Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis are both extremely sensitive to ammonia. An aerobic organism (growth up to pH 11.4) from an alkaline spring is more resistant, but exhibits a toxic response to ammonia at a pH much lower than its maximum for growth. The greatest ammonia resistance has been found in an unidentified organism growing at near neutral pH. Even in this case, however, urvival at ammonia concentrations reasonably expected on the Jovian planets is measured in hours. This is two to three orders of magnitude longer than for E. coli. Results support the tentative conclusion that contamination of the Jovian planets with terrestrial organisms that can grow is unlikely. However, the range of toxic response noted, coupled with the observation that terrestrial life has not been exposed to high ammonia concentrations for millions of years, suggests that adaptation to greater ammonia tolerance may be possible.

  7. Effect of systemic pH on pH sub i and lactic acid generation in exhaustive forearm exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Hood, V.L.; Schubert, C.; Keller, U.; Mueller, S. Univ. of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington )

    1988-09-01

    To investigate whether changes in systemic pH affect intracellular pH (pH{sub i}), energy-rich phosphates, and lactic acid generation in muscle, eight normal volunteers performed exhaustive forearm exercise with arterial blood flow occluded for 2 min on three occasions. Subjects ingested 4 mmol/kg NH{sub 4}Cl (acidosis; A) or NaHCO{sub 3} (alkalosis; B) or nothing (control; C) 3 h before the exercise. Muscle pH{sub i} and phosphocreatine (PCr) content were measured with {sup 31}P-nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 31}P-NMR) spectroscopy during exercise and recovery. Lactate output during 0.5-7 min of recovery was calculated as deep venous-arterial concentration differences times forearm blood flow. Before exercise, blood pH and bicarbonate were lower in acidosis than alkalosis and intermediate in control. Lactic acid output during recovery was less with A than B and intermediate in C. PCr utilization and resynthesis were not affected by extracellular pH changes. pH{sub i} did not differ before exercise or at its end. Hence systemic acidosis inhibited and alkalosis stimulated lactic acid output. These findings suggest that systemic pH regulates cellular acid production, protecting muscle pH, at the expense of energy availability.

  8. Fluorescent pH Sensors for Broad-Range pH Measurement Based on a Single Fluorophore.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jing; Liu, Daying; Liu, Xiaoyan; Guan, Shiquan; Shi, Fengli; Chang, Hexi; He, Huarui; Yang, Guangming

    2015-06-16

    We constructed a series of novel optical sensors for determination of broad-range pH based on a single fluorophore and multi-ionophores with different pK(a) values. These optical sensors use photoinduced electron transfer (PET) as the signal transduction and follow the design concept of "fluorophore-spacer-receptor (ionophore)" which employs 4-amino-1,8-naphthalimide as the single fluorophore, ethyl moiety as the spacer, and a series of phenols and anilines as the receptors. Key to the successful development of this sensor system is that coupling the receptors with six different pK(a) values with a single fluorophore produces the correct optical properties. This rational design affords a series of optical pH sensors with unique fluorescence property and accurately tunable pH measurement ranging from 1 to 14 pH units. Because of covalent immobilization of the indicators, these sensors demonstrate excellent stability, adequate reversibility, and satisfactory dynamic range up to full pH ranges (pH 1-14). PMID:25893705

  9. A survey of beef muscle color and pH.

    PubMed

    Page, J K; Wulf, D M; Schwotzer, T R

    2001-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to define a beef carcass population in terms of muscle color, ultimate pH, and electrical impedance; to determine the relationships among color, pH, and impedance and with other carcasses characteristics; and to determine the effect of packing plant, breed type, and sex class on these variables. One thousand beef carcasses were selected at three packing plants to match the breed type, sex class, marbling score, dark-cutting discount, overall maturity, carcass weight, and yield grade distributions reported for the U.S. beef carcass population by the 1995 National Beef Quality Audit. Data collected on these carcasses included USDA quality and yield grade data and measurements of muscle color (L*, a*, b*), muscle pH, and electrical impedance of the longissimus muscle. About one-half (53.1%) of the carcasses fell within a muscle pH range of 5.40 to 5.49, and 81.3% of the carcasses fell within a longissimus muscle pH range of 5.40 to 5.59. A longissimus muscle pH of 5.87 was the approximate cut-off between normal and dark-cutting carcasses. Frequency distributions indicated that L* values were normally distributed, whereas a* and b* values were abnormally distributed (skewed because of a longer tail for lower values, a tail corresponding with dark-cutting carcasses). Electrical impedance was highly variable among carcasses but was not highly related to any other variable measured. Color measurements (L*, a*, b*) were correlated (P < 0.05) with lean maturity score (-.58, -.31, and -.43, respectively) and with muscle pH (-.40, -.58, and -.56, respectively). In addition, fat thickness was correlated with muscle pH and color (P < 0.05). There was a threshold at approximately .76 cm fat thickness, below which carcasses had higher muscle pH values and lower colorimeter readings. Steer carcasses (L* = 39.62, a* = 25.20, and b* = 11.03) had slightly higher colorimeter readings (P < 0.05) than heifer carcasses (L* = 39.20, a* = 24.78, and b

  10. Measuring Phagosome pH by Ratiometric Fluorescence Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Paula; Guido, Daniele; Demaurex, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Phagocytosis is a fundamental process through which innate immune cells engulf bacteria, apoptotic cells or other foreign particles in order to kill or neutralize the ingested material, or to present it as antigens and initiate adaptive immune responses. The pH of phagosomes is a critical parameter regulating fission or fusion with endomembranes and activation of proteolytic enzymes, events that allow the phagocytic vacuole to mature into a degradative organelle. In addition, translocation of H(+) is required for the production of high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are essential for efficient killing and signaling to other host tissues. Many intracellular pathogens subvert phagocytic killing by limiting phagosomal acidification, highlighting the importance of pH in phagosome biology. Here we describe a ratiometric method for measuring phagosomal pH in neutrophils using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled zymosan as phagocytic targets, and live-cell imaging. The assay is based on the fluorescence properties of FITC, which is quenched by acidic pH when excited at 490 nm but not when excited at 440 nm, allowing quantification of a pH-dependent ratio, rather than absolute fluorescence, of a single dye. A detailed protocol for performing in situ dye calibration and conversion of ratio to real pH values is also provided. Single-dye ratiometric methods are generally considered superior to single wavelength or dual-dye pseudo-ratiometric protocols, as they are less sensitive to perturbations such as bleaching, focus changes, laser variations, and uneven labeling, which distort the measured signal. This method can be easily modified to measure pH in other phagocytic cell types, and zymosan can be replaced by any other amine-containing particle, from inert beads to living microorganisms. Finally, this method can be adapted to make use of other fluorescent probes sensitive to different pH ranges or other phagosomal activities, making it a generalized

  11. Immunomodulatory effects of temperature and pH of water in an Indian freshwater sponge.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Soumalya; Bhunia, Anindya Sundar; Bhunia, Niladri Sekhar; Ray, Mitali; Ray, Sajal

    2016-07-01

    Eunapius carteri, a freshwater sponge of India, inhabits the ponds and lakes and experiences variations of temperature and pH of water throughout the year. Sponges bear evolutionary and ecological importance with limited information on their immunological attribute and adaptational resilience in a changing environment. This paper reports temperature and pH specific responses of immune related parameters in sponge maintained in the experimental conditions of laboratory. Innate immunological parameters like phagocytosis and generation of cytotoxic molecules like superoxide anion, nitric oxide and phenoloxidase activity were estimated in E. carteri at different environmentally realistic water temperatures (10, 20, 30 and 40°C) and pH (6.4, 7.4 and 8.4). Phagocytosis and cytotoxicity are established as important immune parameters of invertebrates. Calalase, an antioxidant enzyme and phosphatases are involved in pathogen destruction and are considered as components of innate immunity. Activities of catalase, acid and alkaline phosphatases were estimated in E. carteri at different thermal regimes and pH. Modulation of phagocytic and cytotoxic responses and the activities of catalase and phosphatases at different water temperatures and pH indicated temperature and pH specific immunological status of E. carteri. Present investigation deals with the effects of selected hydrological parameters on the fundamental immune related parameters in sponge indicating its adaptational plasticity. Immunological resilience of this species in the face of variation of water temperature and pH is thought to be a special adaptive feature of sponge, a reported "living fossil". PMID:27264881

  12. Self-assembly of humic acid: influence of pH and chemical composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilom, G.; Nagy, Z.; Delp, S.; Huff, G.; Rice, J. A.

    2010-12-01

    Interest in enhancing the residence time of soil organic matter (SOM) through natural or engineered mechanisms as a possible means of sequestering organic carbon to mitigate the impacts of carbon-dioxide induced global warming effects has steadily increased over the last decade. Humic substances are major organic constituents of SOM and were recently shown that can self-organize or self-assemble into a composite material with different characteristics than those of the starting materials, and the organized state controls its mineralization by microorganisms. This study examines the role of pH and the relative concentration of humic-like amphiphilic (HA2) and lipid-like (L1) components in the self-assembly of the lipid-humic composite (L0). The L0, L1 and HA2 fractions were isolated using a combination of organic solvent and aqueous alkaline extractions from two humic acid samples at various pH values. HA2 and L1 isolated at low pH were mixed in various mass ratios in organic solvent in order to “reassemble” L0. The data show that the amount of L0 decreased with increasing the pH and reached a constant value from pH 6 to pH 11, and the proportion of L1 increased with the pH. Comparative measurements of the specific heat capacity as a function of temperature of the recombined L0 reveal differences when compared to the physical mixture of the HA2 and L1 depending on the ratio of the components. These differences are an indication that the recombined L0’s solid-state structure is more than just a mixture of components and is determined by specific interactions between its components.

  13. The gecko visual pigment: a pH indicator with a salt effect.

    PubMed

    Crescitelli, F

    1981-12-01

    1. Unlike rhodopsin, the extracted 521-pigment of the Tokay gecko (Gekko gekko) is pH-sensitive and changes its spectral absorbance in the pH range of 4.5-7.3. The colour change is reversible and pH can be employed to adjust the spectral maximum anywhere between 490 nm and its native location at 521 nm.2. The hypsochromic shift with increasing acidity is opposite to that expected for the protonation of the Schiff base nitrogen and suggests an action on the secondary system of interacting charges that have long been postulated to adjust vertebrate visual pigment colour within the visible spectrum.3. Chloride ions modulate this pH effect in a systematic and significant manner. For the pigment extracted in the chloride-deficient state the colour change occurs in the pH range of 6.0-7.0, the midpoint being close to 6.5, suggesting the possible participation of the imidazole group of histidine as the functional moiety. With added NaCl the colour shifts to the region below pH 6.2.4. The modulating action of chloride is postulated to be a conformational change of the opsin leading to a shift of the secondary interacting site from one functional group to another or else to a change in pK of a single group due to the conformational alteration of the electrostatics of the system.5. At pH values between 7.5 and 9.0 a different mechanism becomes apparent. In this region a decrease occurs in the photopigment density as well as a shift in absorbance toward the blue. This alkaline effect is readily reversed either by adding NaCl or else by lowering the pH. Along with the other protective effects of chloride these ions serve to reduce or prevent this alkaline loss in density.6. Associated with this reversible photopigment loss is a reversible appearance of a product with a maximum at about 366 nm. The spectrum of this product is like that produced by the addition of 11-cis retinal to the extract. Acidification of the alkaline preparation leads to a restitution of the photopigment

  14. PH5 for integrating and archiving different data types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, Steve; Hess, Derick; Beaudoin, Bruce

    2016-04-01

    PH5 is IRIS PASSCAL's file organization of HDF5 used for seismic data. The extensibility and portability of HDF5 allows the PH5 format to evolve and operate on a variety of platforms and interfaces. To make PH5 even more flexible, the seismic metadata is separated from the time series data in order to achieve gains in performance as well as ease of use and to simplify user interaction. This separation affords easy updates to metadata after the data are archived without having to access waveform data. To date, PH5 is currently used for integrating and archiving active source, passive source, and onshore-offshore seismic data sets with the IRIS Data Management Center (DMC). Active development to make PH5 fully compatible with FDSN web services and deliver StationXML is near completion. We are also exploring the feasibility of utilizing QuakeML for active seismic source representation. The PH5 software suite, PIC KITCHEN, comprises in-field tools that include data ingestion (e.g. RefTek format, SEG-Y, and SEG-D), meta-data management tools including QC, and a waveform review tool. These tools enable building archive ready data in-field during active source experiments greatly decreasing the time to produce research ready data sets. Once archived, our online request page generates a unique web form and pre-populates much of it based on the metadata provided to it from the PH5 file. The data requester then can intuitively select the extraction parameters as well as data subsets they wish to receive (current output formats include SEG-Y, SAC, mseed). The web interface then passes this on to the PH5 processing tools to generate the requested seismic data, and e-mail the requester a link to the data set automatically as soon as the data are ready. PH5 file organization was originally designed to hold seismic time series data and meta-data from controlled source experiments using RefTek data loggers. The flexibility of HDF5 has enabled us to extend the use of PH5 in several

  15. Noninvasive Ph-telemetric Measurement of Gastrointestinal Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tietze, Karen J.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain experience with and validate the Heidelberg pH-telemetric methodology in order to determine if the pH-telemetric methodology would be a useful noninvasive measure of gastrointestinal transit time for future ground-based and in-flight drug evaluation studies. The Heidelberg pH metering system is a noninvasive, nonradioactive telemetric system that, following oral ingestion, continuously measures intraluminal pH of the stomach, duodenum, small bowel, ileocecal junction, and large bowel. Gastrointestinal motility profiles were obtained in normal volunteers using the lactulose breath-hydrogen and Heidelberg pH metering techniques. All profiles were obtained in the morning after an overnight fast. Heidelberg pH profiles were obtained in the fasting and fed states; lactulose breath-hydrogen profiles were obtained after a standard breakfast. Mouth-to-cecum transit time was measured as the interval from administration of lactulose (30 ml; 20 g) to a sustained increase in breath-hydrogen of 10 ppm or more. Gastric emptying time was measured as the interval from the administration of the Heidelberg capsule to a sustained increase in pH of three units or more.

  16. pH responsive graft copolymers of chitosan.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Elvan; Yalinca, Zulal; Yahya, Kovan; Sirotina, Uliana

    2016-09-01

    Grafting suitable polymers onto chitosan can produce cationic or polyampholyte polymers or hydrogels that are potential smart biomedical materials. Chitosan-graft-[poly(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] has been prepared in three different physical forms as linear free chains in solution, chemical gels crosslinked with glutaraldehyde, and poly(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] grafted onto chitosan tripolyphosphate gel beads. In addition to chemical structure, the graft copolymers were characterized with respect to their dissolution and swelling behavior in aqueous solution. It has been established that solubility of the products is controlled by the grafting yield. While pH sensitive polymers, which collapse at a given pH value are obtained at lower grafting yields, hydrogels form at higher grafting yields with pH responsive swelling behavior. Glutaraldehyde crosslinked chitosan-graft-[poly(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] gels and chitosan tripolyphosphate gel beads grafted with poly[(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] exhibit pH sensitive swelling with highest equilibrium swelling capacity at pH=1.2. PMID:26500176

  17. The Production Rate and Employment of Ph.D. Astronomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, Travis S.

    2008-02-01

    In an effort to encourage self-regulation of the astronomy job market, I examine the supply of, and demand for, astronomers over time. On the supply side, I document the production rate of Ph.D. astronomers from 1970 to 2006 using the UMI Dissertation Abstracts database, along with data from other independent sources. I compare the long-term trends in Ph.D. production with federal astronomy research funding over the same time period, and I demonstrate that additional funding is correlated with higher subsequent Ph.D. production. On the demand side, I monitor the changing patterns of employment using statistics about the number and types of jobs advertised in the AAS Job Register from 1984 to 2006. Finally, I assess the sustainability of the job market by normalizing this demand by the annual Ph.D. production. The most recent data suggest that there are now annual advertisements for about one postdoctoral job, half a faculty job, and half a research/support position for every new domestic Ph.D. recipient in astronomy and astrophysics. The average new astronomer might expect to hold up to 3 jobs before finding a steady position.

  18. Near-infrared noninvasive spectroscopic determination of pH

    DOEpatents

    Alam, Mary K.; Robinson, Mark R.

    1998-08-11

    Methods and apparatus for, preferably, determining noninvasively and in vitro pH in a human. The non-invasive method includes the steps of: generating light at three or more different wavelengths in the range of 1000 nm to 2500 nm; irradiating blood containing tissue; measuring the intensities of the wavelengths emerging from the blood containing tissue to obtain a set of at least three spectral intensities v. wavelengths; and determining the unknown values of pH. The determination of pH is made by using measured intensities at wavelengths that exhibit change in absorbance due to histidine titration. Histidine absorbance changes are due to titration by hydrogen ions. The determination of the unknown pH values is performed by at least one multivariate algorithm using two or more variables and at least one calibration model. The determined pH values are within the physiological ranges observed in blood containing tissue. The apparatus includes a tissue positioning device, a source, at least one detector, electronics, a microprocessor, memory, and apparatus for indicating the determined values.

  19. The Role of Ph Fronts in Tissue Electroporation Based Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Maglietti, Felipe; Michinski, Sebastian; Olaiz, Nahuel; Castro, Marcelo; Suárez, Cecilia; Marshall, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    Treatments based on electroporation (EP) induce the formation of pores in cell membranes due to the application of pulsed electric fields. We present experimental evidence of the existence of pH fronts emerging from both electrodes during treatments based on tissue EP, for conditions found in many studies, and that these fronts are immediate and substantial. pH fronts are indirectly measured through the evanescence time (ET), defined as the time required for the tissue buffer to neutralize them. The ET was measured through a pH indicator imaged at a series of time intervals using a four-cluster hard fuzzy-c-means algorithm to segment pixels corresponding to the pH indicator at every frame. The ET was calculated as the time during which the number of pixels was 10% of those in the initial frame. While in EP-based treatments such as reversible (ECT) and irreversible electroporation (IRE) the ET is very short (though enough to cause minor injuries) due to electric pulse characteristics and biological buffers present in the tissue, in gene electrotransfer (GET), ET is much longer, enough to denaturate plasmids and produce cell damage. When any of the electric pulse parameters is doubled or tripled the ET grows and, remarkably, when any of the pulse parameters in GET is halved, the ET drops significantly. Reducing pH fronts has relevant implications for GET treatment efficiency, due to a substantial reduction of plasmid damage and cell loss. PMID:24278257

  20. Computational Analysis of the Binding Specificities of PH Domains

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhi; Liang, Zhongjie; Shen, Bairong; Hu, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Pleckstrin homology (PH) domains share low sequence identities but extremely conserved structures. They have been found in many proteins for cellular signal-dependent membrane targeting by binding inositol phosphates to perform different physiological functions. In order to understand the sequence-structure relationship and binding specificities of PH domains, quantum mechanical (QM) calculations and sequence-based combined with structure-based binding analysis were employed in our research. In the structural aspect, the binding specificities were shown to correlate with the hydropathy characteristics of PH domains and electrostatic properties of the bound inositol phosphates. By comparing these structure properties with sequence-based profiles of physicochemical properties, PH domains can be classified into four functional subgroups according to their binding specificities and affinities to inositol phosphates. The method not only provides a simple and practical paradigm to predict binding specificities for functional genomic research but also gives new insight into the understanding of the basis of diseases with respect to PH domain structures. PMID:26881206

  1. Interfacial pH during mussel adhesive plaque formation.

    PubMed

    Martinez Rodriguez, Nadine R; Das, Saurabh; Kaufman, Yair; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Waite, J Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Mussel (Mytilus californianus) adhesion to marine surfaces involves an intricate and adaptive synergy of molecules and spatio-temporal processes. Although the molecules, such as mussel foot proteins (mfps), are well characterized, deposition details remain vague and speculative. Developing methods for the precise surveillance of conditions that apply during mfp deposition would aid both in understanding mussel adhesion and translating this adhesion into useful technologies. To probe the interfacial pH at which mussels buffer the local environment during mfp deposition, a lipid bilayer with tethered pH-sensitive fluorochromes was assembled on mica. The interfacial pH during foot contact with modified mica ranged from 2.2 to 3.3, which is well below the seawater pH of ~ 8. The acidic pH serves multiple functions: it limits mfp-Dopa oxidation, thereby enabling the catecholic functionalities to adsorb to surface oxides by H-bonding and metal ion coordination, and provides a solubility switch for mfps, most of which aggregate at pH ≥ 7-8. PMID:25875963

  2. Iron respiration by Acidiphilium cryptum at pH 5.

    PubMed

    Bilgin, Azize Azra; Silverstein, JoAnn; Jenkins, Joy D

    2004-07-01

    The growth of acidophilic iron respiring bacteria at pH > 4.5 may be a key to the transition from acidic to circumneutral conditions that would occur during restoration of acid mine drainage sites. Flasks containing Acidiphilium cryptum ATCC 33463 were incubated initially under aerobic conditions in liquid medium containing Fe(2)(SO(4))(3) and glucose at an initial pH of 5. Significant iron respiration was observed after flasks were sealed to prevent oxygenation; at the same time, medium pH increased from 4.5 to 6. No soluble Fe(III) was detected throughout the experiments, consistent with pH conditions, indicating that bacteria were able to respire using precipitated ferric iron species. In addition, the concentration of soluble Fe(2+) reached a plateau, even though iron respiration appeared to continue, possibly due to precipitation of mixed Fe (II)/Fe(III)-oxide as magnetite. Results suggest that A. cryptum has a wide range of pH tolerance, which may enable it to play a role in controlling acid generation by means of establishing growth conditions favorable to neutrophilic bacteria such as sulfate reduction. PMID:19712391

  3. Interfacial pH during mussel adhesive plaque formation

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Nadine R. Martinez; Das, Saurabh; Kaufman, Yair; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Mussel (Mytilus californianus) adhesion to marine surfaces involves an intricate and adaptive synergy of molecules and spatio-temporal processes. Although the molecules, such as mussel foot proteins (mfps), are well characterized, deposition details remain vague and speculative. Developing methods for the precise surveillance of conditions that apply during mfp deposition would aid both in understanding mussel adhesion and translating this adhesion into useful technologies. To probe the interfacial pH at which mussels buffer the local environment during mfp deposition, a lipid bilayer with tethered pH-sensitive fluorochromes was assembled on mica. The interfacial pH during foot contact with modified mica ranged from 2.2−3.3, which is well below the seawater pH of ~8. The acidic pH serves multiple functions: it limits mfp-Dopa oxidation, thereby enabling the catecholic functionalities to adsorb to surface oxides by H-bonding and metal ion coordination, and provides a solubility switch for mfps, most of which aggregate at pH ≥ 7-8. PMID:25875963

  4. Local pH tracking in living cells.

    PubMed

    Tsou, Chieh-Jui; Hsia, Chih-Hao; Chu, Jia-Yin; Hung, Yann; Chen, Yi-Ping; Chien, Fan-Ching; Chou, Keng C; Chen, Peilin; Mou, Chung-Yuan

    2015-03-01

    Continuous and simultaneous 3D single-particle movement and local pH detection in HeLa cells were demonstrated for the first time by combining fluorescent mesoporous silica nanoparticles (FMSNs) and a single-particle tracking (SPT) technique with a precision of ∼10 nm. FMSNs, synthesized by the co-condensation of both pH-sensitive and reference dyes with a silica/surfactant source, allow long-term reliable ratiometric pH measurements with a precision better than 0.3 pH unit because of their excellent brightness and stability. pH variation in the surrounding area of FMSNs during endocytosis was monitored in real-time. Acidification and low mobility of FMSNs were observed at the early endocytic stage, whereas basification and high mobility of FMSNs were observed at the late stage. Our results indicate that it is possible to monitor local pH changes in the environments surrounding nanoparticles during the cellular uptake process of FMSNs, which provides much needed information for designing an efficient drug delivery nanosystem. PMID:25672786

  5. PhIN: A Protein Pharmacology Interaction Network Database

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z; Li, J; Dang, R; Liang, L; Lin, J

    2015-01-01

    Network pharmacology is a new and hot concept in drug discovery for its ability to investigate the complexity of polypharmacology, and becomes more and more important in drug development. Here we report a protein pharmacology interaction network database (PhIN), aiming to assist multitarget drug discovery by providing comprehensive and flexible network pharmacology analysis. Overall, PhIN contains 1,126,060 target–target interaction pairs in terms of shared compounds and 3,428,020 pairs in terms of shared scaffolds, which involve 12,419,700 activity data, 9,414 targets, 314 viral targets, 652 pathways, 1,359,400 compounds, and 309,556 scaffolds. Using PhIN, users can obtain interacting target networks within or across human pathways, between human and virus, by defining the number of shared compounds or scaffolds under an activity cutoff. We expect PhIN to be a useful tool for multitarget drug development. PhIN is freely available at http://cadd.pharmacy.nankai.edu.cn/phin/. PMID:26225242

  6. Ocean Acidification: Euphausia Pacifica's Response to Decreasing pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, H. N.; Cooper, H.

    2014-12-01

    The increasing rate of CO2 accumulating in Earth's oceans creates a threat to organisms that can lead to disturbances in their reproduction, survival and growth. Euphausia pacifica is the dominant species of krill in Monterey Bay, CA, and a keystone species in the bay's food web. Previous work on the effects of ocean acidification on the survival, growth and molting of E. pacifica have shown they are fairly tolerant to increased CO2 concentrations. However, less is known about energy costs associated with maintaining their internal pH levels which could affect food consumption, swimming behavior or growth activity. We hypothesized that krill exposed to high CO2 will increase their feeding rate on local species of phytoplankton to account for increased energy costs of pH buffering activity. We exposed experimental E. pacifica to waters of pH 7.6 (the expected pH surface waters in year 2100), and pH 8.0 (control) periods.test for acclimation or longer term stress. Feeding rates were calculated as changes in phytoplankton counts over 24 hours of feeding using Frost's equations (Frost 1972). Understanding the way E. pacifica is affected by ocean acidification is important because of the role they play as the primary food source for a variety of predators necessary to maintain the Pacific's ecology.

  7. Tin(IV) halide complexes of AsPh3) The structures of trans-SnCl4(AsPh3)2 and SnBr4(AsPh3).AsPh3.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Mary F; Moldovan, Natalia L; Molloy, Kieran C; Muresan, Alexandra; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Ioan; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Luminita

    2004-12-01

    The structures of two 1 : 2 adducts between tin(IV) halides and AsPh(3) have been determined. SnCl(4)(AsPh(3))(2) adopts a six-coordinate geometry at tin in which the two organoarsine donors are mutually trans. In contrast, SnBr(4)(AsPh(3))(2) is five-coordinate at tin and only one arsine is directly bonded to the metal, in an axial site of the trigonal bipyramid. The second AsPh(3) group has a close contact with the axially bound bromine [As...Br: 3.567(3) angstroms], which is a unique structural variation that depicts an intermediate in a halogen-transfer reaction between Group 14 and Group 15 elements. AACVD using SnCl(4)(AsPh(3))(2) generates a film containing SnO(2) and a second crystalline material which is possibly SnCl(2), but which contains no arsenic. PMID:15558128

  8. Plaque, plaque model systems and pH.

    PubMed

    Sissons, C

    1998-06-01

    Four interlocking lines of research carried out during the Directorship of Dr TW Cutress in the Dental Research Unit were: plaque urea metabolism, which led to the study of plaque pH responses and their control; development of plaque-like biofilm model systems; plaque mineralisation to calculus; and plaque demineralisation of tooth tissue in caries. New modes of regulation of oral bacterial urea metabolism and its role in the mouth were discovered, especially a role as a pH-rise factor and in mineralisation processes. The development of microcosm plaques, consortia of major plaque species, and of the multi-plaque artificial mouth with the ability to measure pH continuously, has substantiated the theory that plaque thickness and fluid flow are important in determining plaque pH. For the first time, formation of large pH gradients inside plaque have been demonstrated and plaque pH experimentally controlled. Plaque growth curves can be accurately measured and procedures established for measuring antiplaque and anticaries agents. These studies exemplify the value of the fundamental approach adopted by Dr Cutress--that integrated, basic, applied, and public-health lines of research reinforce each other. PMID:9676473

  9. Intracellular pH measurements using perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, Michael J.; Janjic, Jelena M.; Teng, Haibing; O’Hear, Meredith R.; Brown, Cortlyn W.; Stokum, Jesse A.; Schmidt, Brigitte F.; Ahrens, Eric T.; Waggoner, Alan S.

    2014-01-01

    We report the synthesis and formulation of unique perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanoemulsions enabling intracellular pH measurements in living cells via fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry. These nanoemulsions are formulated to readily enter cells upon co-incubation and contain two cyanine-based fluorescent reporters covalently bound to the PFC molecules, specifically Cy3-PFC and CypHer5-PFC conjugates. The spectral and pH-sensing properties of the nanoemulsions where characterized in vitro and showed the unaltered spectral behavior of dyes after formulation. In rat 9L glioma cells loaded with nanoemulsion, the local pH of nanoemulsions was longitudinally quantified using optical microscopy and flow cytometry, and displayed a steady decrease in pH to a level of 5.5 over 3 hours, indicating rapid uptake of nanoemulsion to acidic compartments. Overall, these reagents enable real-time optical detection of intracellular pH in living cells in response to pharmacological manipulations. Moreover, recent approaches for in vivo cell tracking using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) employ intracellular PFC nanoemulsion probes to track cells using 19F MRI. However, the intracellular fate of these imaging probes is poorly understood. The pH sensing nanoemulsions allow the study of the fate of the PFC tracer inside the labeled cell, which is important for understanding the PFC cell loading dynamics and nanoemulsion stability and cell viability over time. PMID:24266634

  10. [Effects of simulated acid rain on respiration rate of cropland system with different soil pH].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xue-zhu; Zhang, Gao-chuan; Li, Hui

    2009-10-15

    To evaluate the effects of acid rain on the respiration rate of cropland system, an outdoor pot experiment was conducted with paddy soils of pH 5.48 (S1), pH 6.70 (S1) and pH 8.18 (S3) during the 2005-2007 wheat-growing seasons. The cropland system was exposed to acid rain by spraying the wheat foliage and irrigating the soil with simulated rainwater of T1 (pH 6.0), T2 (pH 6.0, ionic concentration was twice as rainwater T1), and T3 (pH 4.4, ionic concentration was twice as rainwater T1), respectively. The static opaque chamber-gas chromatograph method was used to measure CO2 fluxes from cropland system. The results showed that acid rain affected the respiration rate of cropland system through crop plant, and the cropland system could adapt to acid rain. Acid rainwater significantly increased the average respiration rate in alkaline soil (S3) cropland system, while it had no significant effects on the average respiration rate in neutral soil (S2) and acidic soil (S1) cropland systems. During 2005-2006, after the alkaline soil cropland system was treated with rainwater T3, the average respiration rate was 23.6% and 27.6% higher than that of alkaline soil cropland system treated with rainwater T1 and T2, respectively. During March to April, the respiration rate was enhanced with the increase of rainwater ionic concentration, while it was dropped with the decrease of rainwater pH value in acidic soil cropland system. It was demonstrated that soil pH and crop plant played important roles on the respiration rate of cropland system. PMID:19968099

  11. THE INFLUENCE OF pH UPON THE CONCENTRATION POTENTIALS ACROSS THE SKIN OF THE FROG.

    PubMed

    Amberson, W R; Klein, H

    1928-07-20

    The production of concentration P.D.'s across the skin of the frog is very intimately related to the pH of the applied solutions. On the alkaline side of an isoelectric point the dilute solution is electropositive; on the acid side this solution becomes electronegative. When the pH is suddenly lowered from a value more alkaline than this isoelectric point to one considerably more acid the change in polarity may occur within a few seconds. The effect is reversible. When a series of unbuffered solutions at different pH values are applied reversal curves may be obtained. When the concentration gradient is .1 N-.001 N KCl the reversal points lie between pH 4.1 and 4.8. When studied in acetate buffers this electromotive reversal is found to be closely correlated with the electrical charge upon the membrane, as determined by electroendosmosis through it. Reversal occurs between pH 4.9 and 5.2. It is concluded that the electromotive behavior of this material is controlled by some ampholyte, or group of ampholytes, within the membrane. This ampholyte is probably a protein. On both sides of their isoelectric point these membranes, in common with protein membranes, behave as if they retarded or prevented the movement through them of ions of the same electrical sign as they themselves bear, while permitting the movement of ions of the opposite sign. It is suggested that this correlation arises because of electrostatic effects between the charged surfaces and ions in the solution. PMID:19872437

  12. Chondrocytes, synoviocytes and dermal fibroblasts all express PH-20, a hyaluronidase active at neutral pH

    PubMed Central

    El Hajjaji, Hafida; Cole, Ada Asbury; Manicourt, Daniel-Henri

    2005-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA), an important component of connective tissues, is highly metabolically active, but the mechanisms involved in its catabolism are still largely unknown. We hypothesized that a protein similar to sperm PH-20, the only mammalian hyaluronidase known to be active at neutral pH, could be expressed in connective tissue cells. An mRNA transcript similar to that of PH-20 was found in chondrocytes, synoviocytes, and dermal fibroblasts, and its levels were enhanced upon stimulation with IL-1. In cell layers extracted with Triton X-100 – but not with octylglucoside – and in culture media, a polyclonal antipeptide anti-PH-20 antibody identified protein bands with a molecular weight similar to that of sperm PH-20 (60 to 65 kDa) and exhibiting a hyaluronidase activity at neutral pH. Further, upon stimulation with IL-1, the amounts of the neutral-active hyaluronidase increased in both cell layers and culture media. These findings contribute potential important new insights into the biology of connective tissues. It is likely that PH-20 facilitates cell-receptor-mediated uptake of HA, while overexpression or uncontrolled expression of the enzyme can cause great havoc to connective tissues: not only does HA fragmentation compromise the structural integrity of tissues, but also the HA fragments generated are highly angiogenic and are potent inducers of proinflammatory cytokines. On the other hand, the enzyme activity may account for the progressive depletion of HA seen in osteoarthritis cartilage, a depletion that is believed to play an important role in the apparent irreversibility of this disease process. PMID:15987477

  13. IMPACT OF WATER PH ON ZEBRA MUSSEL MORTALITY

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2002-10-15

    The experiments conducted this past quarter have suggested that the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL0145A is effective at killing zebra mussels throughout the entire range of pH values tested (7.2 to 8.6). Highest mortality was achieved at pH values characteristic of preferred zebra mussel waterbodies, i.e., hard waters with a range of 7.8 to 8.6. In all water types tested, however, ranging from very soft to very hard, considerable mussel kill was achieved (83 to 99% mean mortality), suggesting that regardless of the pH or hardness of the treated water, significant mussel kill can be achieved upon treatment with P. fluorescens strain CL0145A. These results further support the concept that this bacterium has significant potential for use as a zebra mussel control agent in power plant pipes receiving waters with a wide range of physical and chemical characteristics.

  14. PH and Electrochemical Responsive Materials for Corrosion Smart Coating Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wenyan; Calle, Luz M.

    2008-01-01

    Corrosion is a costly issue for military operations and civil industries. While most corrosion initiates from localized corrosion form, such as pitting, failure directly caused by localized corrosion is the most dangerous kind, because it is difficult to anticipate and prevent, occurs very suddenly and can be catastrophic. One way of preventing these failures is with a coating that can detect and heal localized corrosion. pH and other electrochemical changes are often associated with localized corrosion, so it is expected that materials that are pH or otherwise electrochemical responsive can be used to detect and control corrosion. This paper will review various pH and electrochemical responsive materials and their potential applications in corrosion smart coatings. Current research results in this field will also be reported.

  15. An analysis of Ph.D. examiners' reports in engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Elena; Holbrook, Allyson; Bourke, Sid

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, there have been increasing calls for an overall transformation of the nature of engineering Ph.D. programs and the way theses are assessed. There exists a need to understand the examination process to ensure the best quality outcome for candidates in engineering. The work we present in this paper uses data collected between 2003 and 2010 for a total of 1220 Australian Ph.D. theses by analysing examiner reports. Our analysis indicates that Ph.D. theses in engineering, N = 106, differ considerably from those in other fields in areas such as gender of candidates and examiners and the examiners' geographical location. We also found that assessment areas such as significance and contribution of the thesis, publications arising from the thesis, breadth, depth and recency of the literature review and communication and editorial correctness are areas in which the proportion of text of engineering examiners' comments differs significantly from other fields.

  16. Designing pH induced fold switch in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruah, Anupaul; Biswas, Parbati

    2015-05-01

    This work investigates the computational design of a pH induced protein fold switch based on a self-consistent mean-field approach by identifying the ensemble averaged characteristics of sequences that encode a fold switch. The primary challenge to balance the alternative sets of interactions present in both target structures is overcome by simultaneously optimizing two foldability criteria corresponding to two target structures. The change in pH is modeled by altering the residual charge on the amino acids. The energy landscape of the fold switch protein is found to be double funneled. The fold switch sequences stabilize the interactions of the sites with similar relative surface accessibility in both target structures. Fold switch sequences have low sequence complexity and hence lower sequence entropy. The pH induced fold switch is mediated by attractive electrostatic interactions rather than hydrophobic-hydrophobic contacts. This study may provide valuable insights to the design of fold switch proteins.

  17. Intracellular pH Modulates Autophagy and Mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Berezhnov, Alexey V; Soutar, Marc P M; Fedotova, Evgeniya I; Frolova, Maria S; Plun-Favreau, Helene; Zinchenko, Valery P; Abramov, Andrey Y

    2016-04-15

    The specific autophagic elimination of mitochondria (mitophagy) plays the role of quality control for this organelle. Deregulation of mitophagy leads to an increased number of damaged mitochondria and triggers cell death. The deterioration of mitophagy has been hypothesized to underlie the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases, most notably Parkinson disease. Although some of the biochemical and molecular mechanisms of mitochondrial quality control are described in detail, physiological or pathological triggers of mitophagy are still not fully characterized. Here we show that the induction of mitophagy by the mitochondrial uncoupler FCCP is independent of the effect of mitochondrial membrane potential but dependent on acidification of the cytosol by FCCP. The ionophore nigericin also reduces cytosolic pH and induces PINK1/PARKIN-dependent and -independent mitophagy. The increase of intracellular pH with monensin suppresses the effects of FCCP and nigericin on mitochondrial degradation. Thus, a change in intracellular pH is a regulator of mitochondrial quality control. PMID:26893374

  18. Controllable dissociations of PH3 molecules on Si(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qin; Lei, Yanhua; Shao, Xiji; Ming, Fangfei; Xu, Hu; Wang, Kedong; Xiao, Xudong

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate for the first time to our knowledge that controllable dissociation of PH3 adsorption products PH x (x = 2, 1) can be realized by STM (scanning tunneling microscope) manipulation techniques at room temperature. Five dissociative products and their geometric structures are identified via combining STM experiments and first-principle calculations and simulations. In total we realize nine kinds of controllable dissociations by applying a voltage pulse among the PH3-related structures on Si(001). The dissociation rates of the five most common reactions are measured by the I-t spectrum method as a function of voltage. The suddenly increased dissociation rate at 3.3 V indicates a transition from multivibrational excitation to single-step excitation induced by inelastic tunneling electrons. Our studies prove that selectively breaking the chemical bonds of a single molecule on semiconductor surface by STM manipulation technique is feasible.

  19. Earth and Space Science PhD Employment Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giesler, J. L.

    2001-05-01

    A recent report by the American Geophysical Union and the American Geological Institute, "Earth and Space Science PhDs, Class of 1999" looked at employment trends of recent graduates. Demographically, our graduates are, as a population, older than those who graduated in any other physical science. While almost one-third of graduates are employed in a different subfield than that of their degree, more than 80% of Earth and space science PhDs secure initial employment in the geosciences. Graduates are finding employment in less than 6 months and the unemployment rate has dropped significantly below that of two years ago. The PhD classes of 1996, 1997, and 1998 had ~ 50% of their graduates taking postdoctoral appointments. In 1999, this declined to only 38% postdocs with an increase in permanent employment in both the education and government sectors. Perception of the job market is improving as well. Respondents are considerably happier than they were in 1996.

  20. Photonic porous silicon as a pH sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, Stephanie; Vasani, Roshan B.; Zhao, Wei; Perrier, Sébastien; Voelcker, Nicolas H.

    2014-08-01

    Chronic wounds do not heal within 3 months, and during the lengthy healing process, the wound is invariably exposed to bacteria, which can colonize the wound bed and form biofilms. This alters the wound metabolism and brings about a change of pH. In this work, porous silicon photonic films were coated with the pH-responsive polymer poly(2-diethylaminoethyl acrylate). We demonstrated that the pH-responsive polymer deposited on the surface of the photonic film acts as a barrier to prevent water from penetrating inside the porous matrix at neutral pH. Moreover, the device demonstrated optical pH sensing capability visible by the unaided eye.

  1. Nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite prepared under various pH conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanivelu, R.; Mary Saral, A.; Ruban Kumar, A.

    2014-10-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) has sovereign biomedical application due to its excellent biocompatibility, chemical and crystallographic similitude with natural human bone. In this present work, we discussed about the role of pH in the synthesis of calcium phosphate compound using calcium nitrate tetrahydrate and di-ammonium hydrogen phosphate as starting materials by chemical precipitation method assisted with ultrasonic irradiation technique. 5% polyethylene glycol (PEG600) is added along with the precursors under various pH condition of 7, 9 and 11 respectively. The functional group analysis, crystallized size and fraction of crystallized size are confirmed using Fourier Transformation Infra-Red spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction pattern. Morphological observations are done by scanning electron microscope. The results revealed the presence of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite at pH above 9.

  2. Photonic porous silicon as a pH sensor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Chronic wounds do not heal within 3 months, and during the lengthy healing process, the wound is invariably exposed to bacteria, which can colonize the wound bed and form biofilms. This alters the wound metabolism and brings about a change of pH. In this work, porous silicon photonic films were coated with the pH-responsive polymer poly(2-diethylaminoethyl acrylate). We demonstrated that the pH-responsive polymer deposited on the surface of the photonic film acts as a barrier to prevent water from penetrating inside the porous matrix at neutral pH. Moreover, the device demonstrated optical pH sensing capability visible by the unaided eye. PMID:25177227

  3. The pH dependent Raman spectroscopic study of caffeine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jian; Gu, Huaimin; Zhong, Liang; Hu, Yongjun; Liu, Fang

    2011-02-01

    First of all the surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and normal Raman spectra of caffeine aqueous solution were obtained at different pH values. In order to obtain the detailed vibrational assignments of the Raman spectroscopy, the geometry of caffeine molecule was optimized by density functional theory (DFT) calculation. By comparing the SERS of caffeine with its normal spectra at different pH values; it is concluded that pH value can dramatically affect the SERS of caffeine, but barely affect the normal Raman spectrum of caffeine aqueous solution. It can essentially affect the reorientation of caffeine molecule to the Ag colloid surface, but cannot impact the vibration of functional groups and chemical bonds in caffeine molecule.

  4. Role of pH changes in primary uraninite mineralization

    SciTech Connect

    Shmariovich, Ye.M.; Zhil'tsova, I.G.; Pakul'nis, G.V.; Shugina, G.A.

    1982-10-01

    Uranyl minerals form a distinct series based on their solubilities in environments of different pH, beginning with the molybdenates, and proceeding through the arsenates, phosphates, vanadates, and silicates of the soddyite groups. Unlike exogenetic-epigenetic uranium deposits with pitchblende, infiltrational deposits with uranyl mineralization are primarily the result of changes in the pH of the environment. The model presented gives the precipitation of uranyl vanadates at an acidic geochemical barrier, and it can be used to explain the genesis of carnotite deposits in calcretes. A geochemically opposite model for the formation of uranyl minerals as the result of the neutralization of interstitial waters that have been strongly acidified (to pH 2) in conjunction with the oxidation of sulfide-bearing rocks must be adopted to explain the distribution and conditions of the formation of the uraninite deposits in black shales. (JMT)

  5. Hydrothermal and oceanic pH conditions of possible relevance to the origin of life.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, G; McKeown, C; Hall, A J; Russell, M J

    1994-02-01

    Because of the continuous focusing of thermal and chemical energy, ancient submarine hot springs are contenders as sites for the origin of life. But it is generally assumed that these would be of the acid and high-temperature 'black smoker' variety (Corliss et al., 1981). In fact today the greater part of the ocean circulates through off-ridge springs where it issues after modification at temperatures of around 40 degrees C or so but with the potential to reach 200 degrees C. Such offridge or ridge-flank springs remind us that there are other candidate sites for the origin of life. Although there is no firm indication of the pH of these off-ridge springs we have argued that the solutions are likely to be alkaline rather than acid, We test the feasibility of this idea using EQ geochemical water-rock interaction modelling codes (Wolery 1983) and find that for a range of possible initial chemistries of Hadean seawater, the pH of issuing solutions at around 200 degrees C is around one or more units alkaline. Such pH values hold for interaction with both basaltic and komatiitic crust. The robustness of this result suggests to us that alkaline submarine springs of moderate temperature, carrying many hundreds of ppm HS to the ocean basins, are also serious contenders as sites for the origin of life, particularly as Hadean seawater was probably slightly acid, with a dissolved iron concentration approaching 100 ppm. On mixing of these solutions, supersaturation, especially of iron sulphide, would lead to the precipitation of colloidal gels. In our view iron sulphide was the likely substance of, or contributor to, the first vesicle membranes which led to life, as the supply organic molecules would have been limited in the Hadean. Such a membrane would have bid catalytic properties, expansivity, and would have maintained the natural chemiosmotic gradient, a consequence of the acid ocean and the alkaline interior to the vesicles. PMID:11536657

  6. Manganese toxicity to fungi: influence of pH

    SciTech Connect

    Babich, H.; Stotzky, G.

    1981-10-01

    The effects of Mn on mycelial proliferation of fungi and the effect of pH on Mn toxicity were evaluated. Results indicated that the fungi exhibited wide differences in their sensitivities to Mn. Incipient inhibition (i.e., the level of Mn at which growth inhibition was noted initially, P < 0.05) for Scopulariopsis brevicaulis and Aspergillus giganteus occurred at 100 ppM Mn; for Rhizopus stolonifer, Arthrobotrys conoides, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Trichoderma viride, and Penicillium vermiculatum at 500 ppM Mn; for Cephalosporium sp. at 1000 ppM Mn; and for Gliocladium sp. at 1000 to 1500 ppM Mn; growth of Aspergillus clavatus was not inhibited even at 2000 ppM Mn. No growth of S. brevicaulis occurred at 500 ppM Mn and of R. stolonifer at 1500 ppM Mn. The levels of Mn causing incipient and/or total inhibition of mycelial growth of the fungi studied were comparable to the levels reported to inhibit mycelial proliferation of some phylloplane fungi. Only A. conoides showed significant (P < 0.5) stimulation of mycelial growth by Mn; 10, 50, and 100 ppM Mn increased growth rates over control (0 ppM Mn) values. There was no consistent trend in the effect of pH on Mn toxicity to the fungi. However, each fungus showed a definitive response to Mn at the different pH levels. Thus, increasing the pH from 5.5 to 8.5 did not significantly affect the toxicity of Mn to Gliocladium sp., P. vermiculatum, or A. niger. The toxicity of Mn to R. stolonifer and T. viride was not different at pH 5.5 and 6.5, but increasing the pH to 7.5 or 8.5 significantly enhanced the toxicity.

  7. pH sensing and regulation in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Damaghi, Mehdi; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W.; Gillies, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Cells maintain intracellular pH (pHi) within a narrow range (7.1–7.2) by controlling membrane proton pumps and transporters whose activity is set by intra-cytoplasmic pH sensors. These sensors have the ability to recognize and induce cellular responses to maintain the pHi, often at the expense of acidifying the extracellular pH. In turn, extracellular acidification impacts cells via specific acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) and proton-sensing G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). In this review, we will discuss some of the major players in proton sensing at the plasma membrane and their downstream consequences in cancer cells and how these pH-mediated changes affect processes such as migration and metastasis. The complex mechanisms by which they transduce acid pH signals to the cytoplasm and nucleus are not well understood. However, there is evidence that expression of proton-sensing GPCRs such as GPR4, TDAG8, and OGR1 can regulate aspects of tumorigenesis and invasion, including cofilin and talin regulated actin (de-)polymerization. Major mechanisms for maintenance of pHi homeostasis include monocarboxylate, bicarbonate, and proton transporters. Notably, there is little evidence suggesting a link between their activities and those of the extracellular H+-sensors, suggesting a mechanistic disconnect between intra- and extracellular pH. Understanding the mechanisms of pH sensing and regulation may lead to novel and informed therapeutic strategies that can target acidosis, a common physical hallmark of solid tumors. PMID:24381558

  8. Bicarbonate Increases Tumor pH and Inhibits Spontaneous Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Robey, Ian F.; Baggett, Brenda K.; Kirkpatrick, Nathaniel D.; Roe, Denise J.; Dosescu, Julie; Sloane, Bonnie F.; Hashim, Arig Ibrahim; Morse, David L.; Raghunand, Natarajan; Gatenby, Robert A.; Gillies, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    The external pH of solid tumors is acidic as a consequence of increased metabolism of glucose and poor perfusion. Acid pH has been shown to stimulate tumor cell invasion and metastasis in vitro and in cells before tail vein injection in vivo. The present study investigates whether inhibition of this tumor acidity will reduce the incidence of in vivo metastases. Here, we show that oral NaHCO3 selectively increased the pH of tumors and reduced the formation of spontaneous metastases in mouse models of metastatic breast cancer. This treatment regimen was shown to significantly increase the extracellular pH, but not the intracellular pH, of tumors by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the export of acid from growing tumors by fluorescence microscopy of tumors grown in window chambers. NaHCO3 therapy also reduced the rate of lymph node involvement, yet did not affect the levels of circulating tumor cells, suggesting that reduced organ metastases were not due to increased intravasation. In contrast, NaHCO3 therapy significantly reduced the formation of hepatic metastases following intrasplenic injection, suggesting that it did inhibit extravasation and colonization. In tail vein injections of alternative cancer models, bicarbonate had mixed results, inhibiting the formation of metastases from PC3M prostate cancer cells, but not those of B16 melanoma. Although the mechanism of this therapy is not known with certainty, low pH was shown to increase the release of active cathepsin B, an important matrix remodeling protease. PMID:19276390

  9. Harvard College Observatory: Shapley's Factory for PhD Degrees?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welther, B. L.

    2000-12-01

    When Harlow Shapley assumed the Directorship of Harvard College Observatory in 1921, there was no program in place there to train the next generation of astronomers. In 1923, using the Pickering Fund for women assistants, Shapley hired a young English woman, Cecilia Payne, to work on stellar spectra. Just two short years later, Payne completed her research and wrote a celebrated thesis on stellar atmospheres. Because Harvard University was not prepared to confer a PhD degree on a woman at that time, Payne presented her thesis to Radcliffe College. Thus, in 1925 she became the first person to receive a PhD in astronomy for a research project at HCO. By 1933, a PhD in Astronomy had been conferred on eight graduate students who had undertaken research projects at HCO: four men who received their degree from Harvard, and four women, from Radcliffe. In subsequent years, however, the equal distribution of degrees for men and women quickly changed. When the 30th degree was bestowed in 1943, only 10 of the candidates were women. By 1955, when the 60th degree was conferred, only 14 women had received a PhD. In just two decades, then, the ratio of women astronomers had steadily dropped from a solid 50% at the height of the Shapley era to slightly less than 25% at his retirement. Also, until the mid-1960s, the women astronomers still had to apply to Radcliffe for their PhD degrees. This paper will briefly examine the funding and research topics of some of the HCO PhD candidates in the Shapley Era (1921-1955). It will also highlight some of their subsequent contributions to 20th-century American Astronomy.

  10. pH sensitive quantum dot-anthraquinone nanoconjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria Jose; Hall, Elizabeth A. H.

    2014-05-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have been shown to be highly sensitive to electron or charge transfer processes, which may alter their optical properties. This feature can be exploited for different sensing applications. Here, we demonstrate that QD-anthraquinone conjugates can function as electron transfer-based pH nanosensors. The attachment of the anthraquinones on the surface of QDs results in the reduction of electron hole recombination, and therefore a quenching of the photoluminescence intensity. For some anthraquinone derivatives tested, the quenching mechanism is simply caused by an electron transfer process from QDs to the anthraquinone, functioning as an electron acceptor. For others, electron transfer and energy transfer (FRET) processes were found. A detailed analysis of the quenching processes for CdSe/ZnS QD of two different sizes is presented. The photoluminescence quenching phenomenon of QDs is consistent with the pH sensitive anthraquinone redox chemistry. The resultant family of pH nanosensors shows pKa ranging ˜5-8, being ideal for applications of pH determination in physiological samples like blood or serum, for intracellular pH determination, and for more acidic cellular compartments such as endosomes and lysosomes. The nanosensors showed high selectivity towards many metal cations, including the most physiologically important cations which exist at high concentration in living cells. The reversibility of the proposed systems was also demonstrated. The nanosensors were applied in the determination of pH in samples mimicking the intracellular environment. Finally, the possibility of incorporating a reference QD to achieve quantitative ratiometric measurements was investigated.

  11. The capacity of biochar made from common reeds to neutralise pH and remove dissolved metals in acid drainage.

    PubMed

    Mosley, Luke M; Willson, Philip; Hamilton, Benjamin; Butler, Greg; Seaman, Russell

    2015-10-01

    We tested the capacity of biochar (made at 450 °C from a common reed species) to neutralise pH and remove metals in two acid drainage waters (pH 2.6 and 4.6) using column leaching and batch mixing experiments. In the column experiments, the acid drainage water was neutralised upon passage through the biochar with substantial increases (4-5 pH units) in the leachate pH. In the batch experiments, the leachate pH remained above 6.5 when the drainage:biochar ratio was less than approximately 700:1 (L acid drainage:kg biochar) and 20:1 for the pH 4.6 and pH 2.6 drainage waters, respectively. Dissolved metal concentrations were reduced by 89-98 % (Fe ≈ Al > Ni ≈ Zn > Mn) in the leachate from the biochar. A key mechanism of pH neutralisation appears to be solid carbonate dissolution as calcite (CaCO3) was identified (via X-ray diffraction) in the biochar prior to contact with acid drainage, and dissolved alkalinity and Ca was observed in the leachate. Proton and metal removal by cation exchange, direct binding to oxygen-containing functional groups, and metal oxide precipitation also appears important. Further evaluation of the treatment capacity of other biochars and field trials are warranted. PMID:26004563

  12. Suitability of the isolated chicken eye test for classification of extreme pH detergents and cleaning products.

    PubMed

    Cazelle, Elodie; Eskes, Chantra; Hermann, Martina; Jones, Penny; McNamee, Pauline; Prinsen, Menk; Taylor, Hannah; Wijnands, Marcel V W

    2015-04-01

    A.I.S.E. investigated the suitability of the regulatory adopted ICE in vitro test method (OECD TG 438) with or without histopathology to identify detergent and cleaning formulations having extreme pH that require classification as EU CLP/UN GHS Category 1. To this aim, 18 extreme pH detergent and cleaning formulations were tested covering both alkaline and acidic extreme pHs. The ICE standard test method following OECD Test Guideline 438 showed good concordance with in vivo classification (83%) and good and balanced specificity and sensitivity values (83%) which are in line with the performances of currently adopted in vitro test guidelines, confirming its suitability to identify Category 1 extreme pH detergent and cleaning products. In contrast to previous findings obtained with non-extreme pH formulations, the use of histopathology did not improve the sensitivity of the assay whilst it strongly decreased its specificity for the extreme pH formulations. Furthermore, use of non-testing prediction rules for classification showed poor concordance values (33% for the extreme pH rule and 61% for the EU CLP additivity approach) with high rates of over-prediction (100% for the extreme pH rule and 50% for the additivity approach), indicating that these non-testing prediction rules are not suitable to predict Category 1 hazards of extreme pH detergent and cleaning formulations. PMID:25614451

  13. Influence of pH and TOC concentration on Cu, Zn, Cd, and Al speciation in rivers.

    PubMed

    Gundersen, Pål; Steinnes, Eiliv

    2003-01-01

    Dissolved ( < approximately 4 nm, dialysis in situ), colloidal ( < 0.45 microm filtered, minus dissolved) and particulate (total, minus < 0.45 microm filtered) concentrations of Cu, Zn, Cd, (Al) in eight (three) mining polluted rivers were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry (flame and graphite furnace). The metal size distribution in the rivers was compared to pH, Ca concentration, alkalinity, conductivity, and total organic carbon (TOC). Data plots based on the present and other studies also yielded information about the interrelations between TOC, pH and metal adsorption in rivers and lakes. Less than 10% of Cu, Zn, and Cd were sorbed on particles or colloids in two rivers with average pH at 3.1 and 5.1, whereas 46%, 21%, and 21% of Cu, Zn, and Cd, respectively, occurred in sorbed form in six pH neutral rivers. In three pH neutral rivers, on average 55% of Al was in colloidal form, whereas the dissolved and particulate fractions were 21% and 23%, respectively. Our data combined with data from similar studies support conclusions from other research suggesting that the percent fraction of metals adsorbed on particles rises steeply from almost zero to nearly 100% within a narrow and element specific pH range. Changes in TOC concentration seem capable of shifting the pH to % metal absorption curves in the order of one pH unit. PMID:12502060

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of intracellular pH and pH homeostasis in the hog carotid artery

    SciTech Connect

    Grieder, T.A.

    1989-01-01

    Intracellular pH (pH{sub i}) is an important determinant of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) contractility and relaxation. Most NMR measurement of pH have been calculated from the chemical shift of inorganic phosphate (P{sub i}) in {sup 31}P spectra. An alternative approach is to calculate pH from the difference in chemical shifts of signals in the {sup 19}F spectrum of cells loaded with difluoromethylalanine. This technique has higher sensitivity to pH changes and provides better time resolution than other NMR methods. In this study we report simultaneous measurements of pH{sub i} and the contractile state of single, intact hog carotid arterial segments, closed at both ends and superfused with HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-buffered Krebs solution at physiological pressures. At 28{degree}C, resting arteries maintained a pH{sub i} of 7.15 {+-} 0.03 units (n = 16). In a parallel study, helically cut strips studied with {sup 31}P NMR maintained a similar resting pH (7.18 {+-} 0.09).

  15. Lipid-conjugated fluorescent pH sensors for monitoring pH changes in reconstituted membrane systems.

    PubMed

    Kemmer, Gerdi Christine; Bogh, Sidsel Ammitzbøll; Urban, Michael; Palmgren, Michael G; Vosch, Tom; Schiller, Jürgen; Günther Pomorski, Thomas

    2015-09-21

    Accurate real-time measurements of the dynamics of proton concentration gradients are crucial for detailed molecular studies of proton translocation by membrane-bound enzymes. To reduce complexity, these measurements are often carried out with purified, reconstituted enzyme systems. Yet the most paramount problem to detect pH changes in reconstituted systems is that soluble pH reporters leak out of the vesicle system during the reconstitution procedure. This requires loading of substantial amounts of pH-sensors into the lumen of unilamellar liposomes during reconstitution. Here, we report the synthesis and detailed characterisation of two lipid-linked pH sensors employing amine-reactive forms of seminaphthorhodafluors (SNARF®-1 dye) and rhodamine probes (pHrodo™ Red dye). Lipid-conjugation of both dyes allowed for efficient detergent-based reconstitution of these pH indicators into liposomes. Vesicle-embedded pHrodo™ displayed excellent photostability and an optimal pH-response between 4 and 7. The suitability of the lipid-linked pHrodo™ probe as a pH reporter was demonstrated by assaying the activity of a plant plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase (proton pump) reconstituted in proteoliposomes. PMID:26280031

  16. CCD camera full range pH sensor array.

    PubMed

    Safavi, A; Maleki, N; Rostamzadeh, A; Maesum, S

    2007-01-15

    Changes in colors of an array of optical sensors that responds in full pH range were recorded using a CCD camera. The data of the camera were transferred to the computer through a capture card. Simple software was written to read the specific color of each sensor. In order to associate sensor array responses with pH values, a number of different mathematics and chemometrics methods were investigated and compared. The results show that the use of "Microsoft Excel's Solver" provides results which are in very good agreement with those obtained with chemometric methods such as artificial neural network (ANN) and partial least square (PLS) methods. PMID:19071333

  17. PhET: Interactive Simulations for Teaching and Learning Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Katherine; Adams, Wendy; Dubson, Michael; Finkelstein, Noah; Reid, Sam; Wieman, Carl; LeMaster, Ron

    2006-01-01

    The Physics Education Technology (PhET) project creates useful simulations for teaching and learning physics and makes them freely available from the PhET website (http://phet.colorado.edu). The simulations (sims) are animated, interactive, and game-like environments in which students learn through exploration. In these sims, we emphasize the connections between real-life phenomena and the underlying science, and seek to make the visual and conceptual models of expert physicists accessible to students. We use a research-based approach in our design—incorporating findings from prior research and our own testing to create sims that support student engagement with and understanding of physics concepts.

  18. Stress corrosion cracking properties of 15-5PH steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosa, Ferdinand

    1993-01-01

    Unexpected occurrence of failures, due to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of structural components, indicate a need for improved characterization of materials and more advanced analytical procedures for reliably predicting structures performance. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to determine the stress corrosion susceptibility of 15-5PH steel over a wide range of applied strain rates in a highly corrosive environment. The selected environment for this investigation was a highly acidified sodium chloride (NaCl) aqueous solution. The selected alloy for the study was a 15-5PH steel in the H900 condition. The slow strain rate technique was selected to test the metals specimens.

  19. Doping of germanium nanowires grown in presence of PH3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutuc, E.; Chu, J. O.; Ott, J. A.; Guha, S.

    2006-12-01

    The authors study the Au-catalyzed chemical vapor growth of germanium (Ge) nanowires in the presence of phosphine (PH3), used as a dopant precursor. The device characteristics of the ensuing nanowire field effect transistors (FETs) indicate n-type, highly doped nanowires. Using a combination of different nanowire growth sequences and their FET characteristics, the authors determine that phosphorus incorporates predominately via the conformal growth, which accompanies the acicular, nanowire growth. As such, the Ge nanowires grown in the presence of PH3 contain a phosphorus doped shell and an undoped core. The authors determine the doping level in the shell to be ≃(1-4)×1019cm-3.

  20. Measurement and control of pH in hydrothermal solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Wesolowski, D.J.; Palmer, D.A.; Mesmer, R.E.

    1995-12-31

    Hydrogen-electrode concentration cells with liquid junction are routinely used to measure the pH of aqueous solutions from 0 to 300 C. Results include the dissociation constants of common acids and bases and the hydrolysis and complexation of metal ions in aqueous electrolytes over a wide range of salinities. Recently, we have utilized these cells to examine the sorption of H{sup +} on mineral surfaces, the solubility of minerals with continuous in situ pH measurement, and the thermal decompositon rates of organic acids.

  1. An analysis of the UCF Optics Ph.D. curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagan, David J.

    2005-10-01

    Graduate degrees specializing in optics have been offered at the University of Central Florida since 1987, with stand-alone Optics degrees being offered since 1998. In 2002, the Optics Ph.D. core was radically changed to allow students to take the PhD qualifying examination earlier in their studies, while still providing a broad and rigorous grounding in optics. This involved the creation of several new courses. We describe how this new system has worked over the first three years. We also discuss results of a study on how well typical admission criteria such as GRE exam results, grade point average, etc. predict student performance in our program.

  2. Plastic optical fiber sensor for gastric ph detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldini, Francesco; Bracci, Susanna; Cosi, Franco

    1994-02-01

    An optical fiber sensor for gastric pH detection is described, making use of plastic fibers as light carriers and a proper electronic system for both source driving and signal processing. The use of a suitable microprocessor and an internal buffer allows the realization of a portable and reliable device, fed by batteries. The indicators, bromophenol blue (BPB) or thymol blue (TB), are immobilized on controlled pore glass (CPG) fixed at the end of plastic optical fibers following a proprietary process. The realized optrode, satisfying clinical requirements, was tested `in vitro.' A precision of pH units and a response time of (

  3. Barrier recovery is impeded at neutral pH, independent of ionic effects: implications for extracellular lipid processing.

    PubMed

    Mauro, T; Holleran, W M; Grayson, S; Gao, W N; Man, M Q; Kriehuber, E; Behne, M; Feingold, K R; Elias, P M

    1998-04-01

    Epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis requires the postsecretory processing of polar lipid precursors into nonpolar lipid products within the stratum corneum (SC) interstices by a family of lipid hydrolases. A specific requirement for beta-glucocerebrosidase (beta-GlcCer'ase), which exhibits a distinct acidic pH optimum, is particularly well documented. Therefore, we sought to determine whether the recovery of the barrier after acute insults requires acidification of the SC. We examined permeability barrier recovery by assessing changes in transepidermal water loss (TEWL), SC membrane ultrastructure utilizing ruthenium tetroxide (RuO4) postfixation, and beta-GlcCer'ase activity by in situ zymography at an acidic vs neutral pH. Barrier recovery proceeded normally when acetone-treated skin was exposed to solutions buffered to an acidic pH. In contrast, the initiation of barrier recovery was slowed when treated skin was exposed to neutral or alkaline pH, regardless of buffer composition. In addition, enhancement of the alkaline buffer-induced delay in barrier recovery occurred with Ca2+ and K+ inclusion in the buffer. Moreover, the pH-dependent alteration in barrier recovery appeared to occur through a mechanism that was independent of Ca(2+)- or K(+)-controlled lamellar body secretion, since both the formation and secretion of lamellar bodies proceeded comparably at pH 5.5 and pH 7.4. In contrast, exposure to pH 7.4 (but not pH 5.5) resulted in both the persistence of immature, extracellular lamellar membrane structures, and a marked decrease in the in situ activity of beta-GlcCer'ase. These results suggest first that an acidic extracellular pH is necessary for the initiation of barrier recovery, and second that the delay in barrier recovery is a consequence of inhibition of postsecretory lipid processing. PMID:9617442

  4. Evolution of extreme stomach pH in bilateria inferred from gastric alkalization mechanisms in basal deuterostomes

    PubMed Central

    Stumpp, Meike; Hu, Marian Y.; Tseng, Yung-Che; Guh, Ying-Jeh; Chen, Yi-Chih; Yu, Jr-Kai; Su, Yi-Hsien; Hwang, Pung-Pung

    2015-01-01

    The stomachs of most vertebrates operate at an acidic pH of 2 generated by the gastric H+/K+-ATPase located in parietal cells. The acidic pH in stomachs of vertebrates is believed to aid digestion and to protect against environmental pathogens. Little attention has been placed on whether acidic gastric pH regulation is a vertebrate character or a deuterostome ancestral trait. Here, we report alkaline conditions up to pH 10.5 in the larval digestive systems of ambulacraria (echinoderm + hemichordate), the closest relative of the chordate. Microelectrode measurements in combination with specific inhibitors for acid-base transporters and ion pumps demonstrated that the gastric alkalization machinery in sea urchin larvae is mainly based on direct H+ secretion from the stomach lumen and involves a conserved set of ion pumps and transporters. Hemichordate larvae additionally utilized HCO3− transport pathways to generate even more alkaline digestive conditions. Molecular analyses in combination with acidification experiments supported these findings and identified genes coding for ion pumps energizing gastric alkalization. Given that insect larval guts were also reported to be alkaline, our discovery raises the hypothesis that the bilaterian ancestor utilized alkaline digestive system while the vertebrate lineage has evolved a strategy to strongly acidify their stomachs. PMID:26051042

  5. In vitro stability of pancreatic zymogen granules: roles of pH and calcium.

    PubMed

    Lebel, D; Grondin, G; Paquette, J

    1988-01-01

    Purified preparations of pancreatic zymogen granules have the peculiar property of lysing instantaneously at neutral pH, a property clearly irreconcilable with the cytoplasmic pH of the acinar cell. Two important factors known for regulating the stability of secretory granules are calcium and pH. Fluorescence microscopy of acinar cells in the presence of weak bases showed that zymogen granules have an acidic pH. In vivo, abolition of the delta pH by NH4Cl did not induce any lysis of the granules. In vitro, with purified granules, an acidic intragranular pH was measured. This delta pH was produced by a Donnan potential. The importance for granule stability of keeping the intragranular pH acidic has been confirmed in vitro by addition of K+ and nigericin to the suspension medium. These conditions produced alkalinization of the granule matrix and caused instantaneous solubilization of the granules. Concentrations of 15 mM total, and 10 mM free calcium were measured in purified granules. The importance of intragranular Ca2+ was evaluated by means of the ionophore A23187 which induced calcium efflux and granule lysis. The lysis induced by the calcium ionophore was in direct relation with the calcium efflux, since addition of Ca2+ to the medium, at concentrations corresponding to that measured in the granule, relieved the effect. The role of calcium-binding sites on the cytoplasmic surface of the granules was investigated with Ca2+, EGTA, and La3+. Calcium did not have any damaging effects; EGTA induced a slight lysis, while lanthanum yielded a strong and spontaneous lysis at micromolar concentrations. In addition to calcium-binding sites, La3+ would bind to specific sites on the granule that would be directly coupled to maintenance of its stability. These findings suggest that the intragranular acidic pH and calcium are both important for the in vitro stability of the zymogen granule and that purified granules have lost, in the course of purification, some cytoplasmic

  6. Archaeal Abundance across a pH Gradient in an Arable Soil and Its Relationship to Bacterial and Fungal Growth Rates

    PubMed Central

    Sterngren, Anna E.; Rousk, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Soil pH is one of the most influential factors for the composition of bacterial and fungal communities, but the influence of soil pH on the distribution and composition of soil archaeal communities has yet to be systematically addressed. The primary aim of this study was to determine how total archaeal abundance (quantitative PCR [qPCR]-based estimates of 16S rRNA gene copy numbers) is related to soil pH across a pH gradient (pH 4.0 to 8.3). Secondarily, we wanted to assess how archaeal abundance related to bacterial and fungal growth rates across the same pH gradient. We identified two distinct and opposite effects of pH on the archaeal abundance. In the lowest pH range (pH 4.0 to 4.7), the abundance of archaea did not seem to correspond to pH. Above this pH range, there was a sharp, almost 4-fold decrease in archaeal abundance, reaching a minimum at pH 5.1 to 5.2. The low abundance of archaeal 16S rRNA gene copy numbers at this pH range then sharply increased almost 150-fold with pH, resulting in an increase in the ratio between archaeal and bacterial copy numbers from a minimum of 0.002 to more than 0.07 at pH 8. The nonuniform archaeal response to pH could reflect variation in the archaeal community composition along the gradient, with some archaea adapted to acidic conditions and others to neutral to slightly alkaline conditions. This suggestion is reinforced by observations of contrasting outcomes of the (competitive) interactions between archaea, bacteria, and fungi toward the lower and higher ends of the examined pH gradient. PMID:22706045

  7. Vibrational investigation on the copper(II) binding mode of carcinine and its pH dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torreggiani, Armida; Reggiani, Matteo; Manco, Immacolata; Tinti, Anna

    2007-05-01

    A comparative FT-Raman and FT-IR study of Carcinine (Carc), a natural imidazole dipeptide, and its complexes with Cu(II) ions was performed at different pH's. Both Raman and IR spectra present marker bands useful for the identification of the predominant complexes; in particular, Raman spectroscopy appears useful for identifying the metal-coordination site of the imidazole ring (N π or N τ atoms) of Carc. Free Carc shows a strong network of H-bonds and tautomer I (N τ-H) is the preferred form of the imidazolic ring (bands at 1578, 1292 and 988 cm -1). The presence of Cu(II) does not affect the tautomeric equilibrium at pH 7, whereas the deprotonation of both N-imidazolic nitrogens is strongly induced at higher pH. Under neutral and alkaline conditions the primary amino group takes part to the Cu(II) chelation, whereas all the peptidic moieties are involved in coordination only at pH 7. Thus, Carc acts as a tri-dentate ligand at neutral pH, mainly giving a monomeric complex, [CuLH -1], containing tautomer I, whereas an oligonuclear complex, probably [Cu 4L 4H -8], where metal-imidazolate ions connect different ligand molecules, predominates at alkaline pH.

  8. X-ray Diffraction Analysis of ProRoot Mineral Trioxide Aggregate Hydrated at Different pH Values

    PubMed Central

    Akhavan, Hengameh; Mohebbi, Pooneh; Firouzi, Amir; Noroozi, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to compare the chemical compounds of white ProRoot mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA) hydrated at different pH environments. Methods and Materials: Mixed samples of WMTA were kept in acidic (pH=5.4), neutral (pH=7.4) and alkaline (pH=9.4) environments for 48 h. Then, X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was performed for both hydrated and powder forms of WMTA. Portlandite crystalline structures of environments were compared from three aspects: intensity (height of the peak, corresponding to the concentration), crystallinity (peak area/total area) and crystal size (full-width at half-maximum of the peak). Results: After matching the peaks of each sample with those of the International Center for Diffraction Data (ICDD) database, the main constituent of all set cements and powder form was found to be bismuth oxide. Acidic environment exhibited lower intensity and crystallinity of portlandite in comparison with neutral environment. Conclusion: The highest concentration and crystallinity of portlandite were observed in WMTA samples hydrated at neutral pH and the highest crystal size was detected after hydration in alkaline pH. PMID:27141218

  9. A step-by-step procedure for pH model construction in aquatic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, A. F.; Meysman, F. J. R.; Soetaert, K.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2008-02-01

    We present, by means of a simple example, a comprehensive step-by-step procedure to consistently derive a pH model of aquatic systems. As pH modelling is inherently complex, we make every step of the model generation process explicit, thus ensuring conceptual, mathematical, and chemical correctness. Summed quantities, such as total inorganic carbon and total alkalinity, and the influences of modeled processes on them are consistently derived. The different time scales of processes involved in the pH problem (biological and physical reactions: days; aquatic chemical reactions: fractions of seconds) give rise to a stiff equation system. Subsequent reformulations of the system reduce its stiffness, accepting higher non-linear algebraic complexity. The model is reformulated until numerically and computationally simple dynamical solutions, like a variation of the operator splitting approach (OSA) and the direct substitution approach (DSA), are obtained. As several solution methods are pointed out, connections between previous pH modelling approaches are established. The final reformulation of the system according to the DSA allows for quantification of the influences of kinetic processes on the rate of change of proton concentration in models containing multiple biogeochemical processes. These influences are calculated including the effect of re-equilibration of the system due to a set of acid-base reactions in local equilibrium. This possibility of quantifying influences of modeled processes on the pH makes the end-product of the described model generation procedure a powerful tool for understanding the internal pH dynamics of aquatic systems.

  10. Altered intracellular pH regulation in cells with high levels of P-glycoprotein expression.

    PubMed

    Young, Gregory; Reuss, Luis; Altenberg, Guillermo A

    2011-01-01

    P-glycoprotein is an ATP-binding-cassette transporter that pumps many structurally unrelated drugs out of cells through an ATP-dependent mechanism. As a result, multidrug-resistant cells that overexpress P-glycoprotein have reduced intracellular steady-state levels of a variety of chemotherapeutic agents. In addition, increased cytosolic pH has been a frequent finding in multidrug-resistant cells that express P-glycoprotein, and it has been proposed that this consequence of P-glycoprotein expression may contribute to the lower intracellular levels of chemotherapeutic agents. In these studies, we measured intracellular pH and the rate of acid extrusion in response to an acid load in two cells with very different levels of P-glycoprotein expression: V79 parental cells and LZ-8 multidrug resistant cells. Compared to the wild-type V79 cells, LZ-8 cells have a lower intracellular pH and a slower recovery of intracellular pH after an acid load. The data also show that LZ-8 cells have reduced ability to extrude acid, probably due to a decrease in Na(+)/H(+) exchanger activity. The alterations in intracellular pH and acid extrusion in LZ-8 cells are reversed by 24-h exposure to the multidrug-resistance modulator verapamil. The lower intracellular pH in LZ-8 indicates that intracellular alkalinization is not necessary for multidrug resistance. The reversal by verapamil of the decreased acid-extrusion suggests that P-glycoprotein can affect other membrane transport mechanism. PMID:22003434

  11. pH Regulates White-Opaque Switching and Sexual Mating in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuan; Cao, Chengjun; Jia, Wei; Tao, Li; Guan, Guobo; Huang, Guanghua

    2015-11-01

    As a successful commensal and pathogen of humans, Candida albicans encounters a wide range of environmental conditions. Among them, ambient pH, which changes frequently and affects many biological processes in this species, is an important factor, and the ability to adapt to pH changes is tightly linked with pathogenesis and morphogenesis. In this study, we report that pH has a profound effect on white-opaque switching and sexual mating in C. albicans. Acidic pH promotes white-to-opaque switching under certain culture conditions but represses sexual mating. The Rim101-mediated pH-sensing pathway is involved in the control of pH-regulated white-opaque switching and the mating response. Phr2 and Rim101 could play a major role in acidic pH-induced opaque cell formation. Despite the fact that the cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling pathway does not play a major role in pH-regulated white-opaque switching and mating, white and opaque cells of the cyr1/cyr1 mutant, which is defective in the production of cAMP, showed distinct growth defects under acidic and alkaline conditions. We further discovered that acidic pH conditions repressed sexual mating due to the failure of activation of the Ste2-mediated α-pheromone response pathway in opaque A: cells. The effects of pH changes on phenotypic switching and sexual mating could involve a balance of host adaptation and sexual reproduction in C. albicans. PMID:26342021

  12. ALKALINITY, PH, AND COPPER CORROSION BY-PRODUCT RELEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contrary to expectations, higher bicarbonate concentrations exacerbate copper corrosion rates and by-product release. In fact, as illustrated by monitoring experiences of large utilities and by laboratory data, the concentration of copper corrosion by-products in drinking water i...

  13. Covalent organic frameworks as pH responsive signaling scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuwei; Shen, Xiaochen; Feng, Xiao; Xia, Hong; Mu, Ying; Liu, Xiaoming

    2016-09-25

    A β-ketoenamine based covalent organic framework, COF-JLU4, was synthesized by condensation of 2,5-dimethoxyterephthalohydrazide with triformylphloroglucinol under solvothermal conditions. This COF has strong crystallinity, good porosity, photoluminescence properties and wettability for water. It can serve as the first COF-based fluorescent pH sensor in aqueous solutions. PMID:27545686

  14. Online Ph.D. Program Delivery Models and Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorissen, Shari L.; Keen, James P.; Riedel, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide information to an online university that offers Ph.D. programs in three formats: knowledge area modules (or KAM, a type of faculty-led, self-directed doctoral study), course-based model, and mixed model (a combination of the KAM and course-based models). The investigators sought to determine why students…

  15. An Analysis of Ph.D. Examiners' Reports in Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prieto, Elena; Holbrook, Allyson; Bourke, Sid

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there have been increasing calls for an overall transformation of the nature of engineering Ph.D. programs and the way theses are assessed. There exists a need to understand the examination process to ensure the best quality outcome for candidates in engineering. The work we present in this paper uses data collected between 2003…

  16. Measures for Ph.D. Evaluation: The Recruitment Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Agostino, Antonella; Fruzzetti, Stefania; Ghellini, Giulio; Neri, Laura

    2011-01-01

    In the last years the quality of Higher Education (HE) system and its evaluation have been key issues of the political and scientific debate on education policies all over Europe. In the wide landscape that involves the entire HE system we draw attention on the third level of its organization, i.e. the Ph.D. In particular, this paper discusses the…

  17. Application of SERS Nanoparticles for Intracellular pH Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Laurence, T; Talley, C; Colvin, M; Huser, T

    2004-10-21

    We present an alternative approach to optical probes that will ultimately allow us to measure chemical concentrations in microenvironments within cells and tissues. This approach is based on monitoring the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) response of functionalized metal nanoparticles (50-100 nm in diameter). SERS allows for the sensitive detection of changes in the state of chemical groups attached to individual nanoparticles and small clusters. Here, we present the development of a nanoscale pH meter. The pH response of these nanoprobes is tested in a cell-free medium, measuring the pH of the solution immediately surrounding the nanoparticles. Heterogeneities in the SERS signal, which can result from the formation of small nanoparticle clusters, are characterized using SERS correlation spectroscopy and single particle/cluster SERS spectroscopy. The response of the nanoscale pH meters is tested under a wide range of conditions to approach the complex environment encountered inside living cells and to optimize probe performance.

  18. Cytosolic pH: A conserved regulator of cell growth?

    PubMed Central

    Dechant, Reinhard; Peter, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Although target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase and Ras are central regulators of cell growth in yeast and mammals, the molecular mechanisms underlying their regulation by nutrients are still poorly understood. Interestingly, recent studies identified cytosolic pH as a critical regulatory signal for both pathways, which might have widespread implications for tumor cell biology PMID:27308377

  19. The PhD Project: How Successful Is It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Bill N.; Williams, Satina V.; Walden, W. Darrell

    2011-01-01

    The PhD Project's mission to diversify the work force by increasing the diversity of business school faculty is quite admirable, but is the Project successful? To gather insights toward responding to that question and to offer suggestions, we reviewed three of the Project's objectives that relate most closely to minority doctoral students and…

  20. [Regulation effects of tourmaline on seawater pH value].

    PubMed

    Xia, Meisheng; Zhang, Hongmei; Hu, Caihong; Xu, Zirong

    2005-10-01

    In this paper, chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy were employed to examine the characteristics of tourmaline produced in east Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, and batch experiments were conducted to study its regulation effects on seawater pH value. The factors affecting the regulation, such as the dosage of tourmaline and the salinity and initial pH value of seawater, were also studied. The results showed that tourmaline could regulate the seawater pH value from its initial 3 and 10 to 7.1 and 8.9, respectively, and the regulation effect was greater in the seawater with lower salinity, e.g., after 120 minutes treatment, the initial pH value (5.0) of the seawater with a salinity of 5, 10, 15, 20 and 35 was increased by 3.24, 3.16, 3.06, 2.99 and 2.85 unit, respectively. Tourmaline had little effect on seawater conductivity. This study would provide an experimental base for the application of tourmaline in aquaculture. PMID:16422525

  1. PHYSICOCHEMICAL FACTORS AFFECTING TOXICITY IN FRESHWATER: HARDNESS, PH, AND TEMPERATURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A search of the literature for effects of hardness, pH, or temperature on the toxicity of chemicals to freshwater organisms suggested that the amount of reliable and useful data is limited. uch of the disparity among results reported in the literature was caused by improperly des...

  2. The Production Rate and Employment of Ph.D. Astronomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, Travis S.

    2007-05-01

    As in many sciences, the production rate of new Ph.D. astronomers is decoupled from the global demand for trained scientists. As noted by Thronson (1991, PASP, 103, 90), overproduction appears to be built into the system, making the mathematical formulation of surplus astronomer production similar to that for industrial pollution models -- an unintended side effect of the process. Following Harris (1994, ASP Conf., 57, 12), I document the production of Ph.D. astronomers from 1990 to 2005 using the online Dissertation Abstracts database. To monitor the changing patterns of employment, I examine the number of postdoctoral, tenure-track, and other jobs advertised in the AAS Job Register during this same period. Although the current situation is clearly unsustainable, it was much worse a decade ago with nearly 7 new Ph.D. astronomers in 1995 for every new tenure-track job. While the number of new permanent positions steadily increased throughout the late 1990's, the number of new Ph.D. recipients gradually declined. After the turn of the century, the production of new astronomers leveled off, but new postdoctoral positions grew dramatically. There has also been recent growth in the number of non-tenure-track lecturer, research, and support positions. This is just one example of a larger cultural shift to temporary employment that is happening throughout society -- it is not unique to astronomy.

  3. Promoting Creativity in PhD Supervision: Tensions and Dilemmas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitelock, Denise; Faulkner, Dorothy; Miell, Dorothy

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we argue that the processes of collaborative creativity are just as important within the sociocultural context of PhD supervisory practice, as they are in other organizational and educational settings. In order to test this claim a series of interviews with supervisors and students were undertaken to uncover the pedagogic processes…

  4. Earth and Space Science PhDs: Class of 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giesler, J.

    2001-12-01

    The American Geophysical Union (AGU) and the American Geological Institute (AGI) have been collecting data on recent PhDs in the geosciences for 5 years (1996-2000). Over these years continual improvement has been recorded in the job market through indicators such as time to find employment and starting salaries. As these indicators continue to improve, so too does the perception of the job market in general. There are several characteristics that are unique to PhDs in the geosciences. Unlike physical science graduates, there is a significant number who have been working full-time at least one year prior to earning their PhD. Recent graduates employed prior to graduation are heavily concentrated in Solid Earth Geology (41%) followed by Atmospheric Sciences (19%) and Oceanography (12%). A second distinguishable feature of Earth & space science PhDs is their age. Each year there is a higher percentage of recent graduates over the age of 40: 16% in 1998, 20% in 1999, and 23% in 2000. In 2000, the average time between earning a B.S. and starting a graduate program was 4.6 years. Both 1999 and 2000 show a drop in the overall numbers of postdoctoral appointments. This suggests that greater than 50% of the recent graduates are finding full-time permanent employment. Of the geoscience subfields, oceanography has greatest number of people obtaining employment outside the field.

  5. Gender Differences in Research Patterns among PhD Economists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbezat, Debra A.

    2006-01-01

    This study is based on a 1996 survey of PhD economists working in the academic and nonacademic sectors since 1989. Despite a raw gender difference in all types of research output, the male dummy variable proves statistically significant in predicting only one publication measure. In a full sample and faculty subsample, number of years since…

  6. PH-sensitive fluorescence detection by diffuse fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiao; Gao, Feng; Duan, Linjing; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Limin; Zhao, Huijuan

    2012-03-01

    The importance of cellular pH has been shown clearly in the study of cell activity, pathological feature, drug metabolism, etc. Monitoring pH changes of living cells and imaging the regions with abnormal pH values in vivo could provide the physiologic and pathologic information for the research of the cell biology, pharmacokinetics, diagnostics and therapeutics of certain diseases such as cancer. Thus, pH-sensitive fluorescence imaging of bulk tissues has been attracting great attention in the regime of near-infrared diffuse fluorescence tomography (DFT), an efficient small-animal imaging tool. In this paper, the feasibility of quantifying pH-sensitive fluorescence targets in turbid medium is investigated using both time-domain and steady-state DFT methods. By use of the specifically designed time-domain and continuous-wave systems and the previously proposed image reconstruction scheme, we validate the method through 2-dimensional imaging experiments on a small-animal-sized phantom with multiply targets of distinct pH values. The results show that the approach can localize the targets with reasonable accuracy and achieve quantitative reconstruction of the pH-sensitive fluorescent yield.

  7. Legitimate Peripheral Participation and Supervising Ph.D. Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasrati, Mostafa

    2005-01-01

    This article is part of a larger scale project on some aspects of the process of academic socialization of a group of Iranian Ph.D. students studying in five UK universities, particularly focusing on the relationship between these students and their supervisors. The study included eight engineering and five social sciences/humanities students, as…

  8. Lignocellulose pretreatment severity - relating pH to biomatrix opening.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Mads; Meyer, Anne S

    2010-12-31

    In cellulose-to-ethanol processes a physico-chemical pretreatment of the lignocellulosic feedstock is a crucial prerequisite for increasing the amenability of the cellulose to enzymatic attack. Currently published pretreatment strategies span over a wide range of reaction conditions involving different pH values, temperatures, types of catalysts and holding times. The consequences of the pretreatment on lignocellulosic biomass are described with special emphasis on the chemical alterations of the biomass during pretreatment, especially highlighting the significance of the pretreatment pH. We present a new illustration of the pretreatment effects encompassing the differential responses to the pH and temperature. A detailed evaluation of the use of severity factor calculations for pretreatment comparisons signifies that the multiple effects of different pretreatment factors on the subsequent monosaccharide yields after enzymatic hydrolysis cannot be reliably compared by a one-dimensional severity factor, even within the same type of pretreatment strategy. However, a quantitative comparison of published data for wheat straw pretreatment illustrates that there is some correlation between the hydrolysis yields (glucose and xylose) and the pretreatment pH, but no correlation with the pretreatment temperature (90-200°C). A better recognition and understanding of the factors affecting biomatrix opening, and use of more standardized evaluation protocols, will allow for the identification of new pretreatment strategies that improve biomass utilization and permit rational enzymatic hydrolysis of the cellulose. PMID:20460178

  9. PhOLKS Lore: Learning from Photographs, Families, and Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, JoBeth; Fabregas, Vinette; Hankins, Karen Hale; Hull, Gregory; Labbo, Linda; Lawson, Hattie Spruill; Michalove, Barabara; Piazza, Steve; Piha, Cyndy; Sprague, Linda; Townsend, Sybil; Urdanivia-English, Carmen

    2002-01-01

    Considers how children can develop personal, social, and cultural connections through photography and narratives in order to envision other possibilities for their lives. Concludes that they found a "web of complex and engaging social relationships" that provided a solid foundation for learning with children and families. Describes the PhOLKS…

  10. Improved pH buffering agent for sodium hypochlorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, J. R.; Veeder, L. N.

    1969-01-01

    Sodium citrate/citric acid was found to be an effective buffer for pH control when used with sodium hypochlorite. The mixture does not corrode aluminum. The buffer appears to form a type of conversion coating that may provide corrosion-resistant properties to aluminum in other applications.

  11. Supervising the PhD: A Guide to Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delamont, Sara; Atkinson, Paul; Parry, Odette

    This handbook is a practical guide for the novice and experienced supervisor of Ph.D. students focusing on the British system. The book is organized to follow the progress of a student from starting out to a career after the viva voce examination. The chapters are: (1) "A Most Persuasive Piece of Argument"; (2) "Caught and Held by a Cobweb:…

  12. The pH tolerance of Chlamydomonas applanata (Volvocales, Chlorophyta).

    PubMed

    Visviki, I; Santikul, D

    2000-02-01

    The effects of hydrogen ions on the growth and ultrastructure of Chlamydomonas applanata Pringsheim were examined. This species exhibits wide tolerance growing at pH values ranging from 3.4 to 8.4, with optimum growth obtained at 7.4. Growth is noticeably depressed at pH 4.4 and 3.4. At the ultrastructural level, exposure to pH 4.4 results in a 10% decrease in cell volume of single vegetative cells, an increase in pyrenoidal volume, and reduction of starch reserves. Palmelloid colonies also appear. pH 3.4 induces excessive production of mucilage and leads to the preponderance of palmelloid colonies. Cell death of both colony and single cells is seen, as well as loss of motility and abnormal cell division. Surviving single cells are significantly larger than controls, with thicker cell walls, smaller chloroplasts, and larger vacuome. Such cells entering dormancy ensure the survival of the species in times of stress. PMID:10629274

  13. Miniaturized metal oxide pH sensors for bacteria detection.

    PubMed

    Uria, Naroa; Abramova, Natalia; Bratov, Andrey; Muñoz-Pascual, Francesc-Xavier; Baldrich, Eva

    2016-01-15

    It is well known that the metabolic activity of some microorganisms results in changes of pH of the culture medium, a phenomenon that can be used for detection and quantification of bacteria. However, conventional glass electrodes that are commonly used for pH measurements are bulky, fragile and expensive, which hinders their application in miniaturized systems and encouraged to the search for alternatives. In this work, two types of metal oxide pH sensors have been tested to detect the metabolic activity of the bacterium Escherichia coli (E. coli). These pH sensors were produced on silicon chips with platinum metal contacts, onto which thin layers of IrOx or Ta2O5 were incorporated by two different methods (electrodeposition and e-beam sputtering, respectively). In order to facilitate measurement in small sample volumes, an Ag/AgCl pseudo-reference was also screen-printed in the chip and was assayed in parallel to an external Ag/AgCl reference electrode. As it is shown, the developed sensors generated results indistinguishable from those provided by a conventional glass pH-electrode but could be operated in significantly smaller sample volumes. After optimization of the detection conditions, the metal oxide sensors are successfully applied for detection of increasing concentrations of viable E. coli, with detection of less than 10(3)cfu mL(-1) in undiluted culture medium in just 5h. PMID:26592620

  14. Karl Krueger, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Karl Krueger received a PhD in biochemistry from Vanderbilt University and continued his research training at NIH as a postdoctoral fellow before joining the faculty at Georgetown University School of Medicine. His research throughout this period focused on different aspects of drug receptors and their role in the nervous system. |

  15. Vance Berger, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Vance Berger completed his PhD in statistics at Rutgers University in 1995, and then began working at the FDA. This is where he developed his research focus on biases and threats to the validity of medical studies, especially clinical trials. In 1999, Dr. Berger joined the NCI, and has remained ever since. |

  16. Richard Mazurchuk, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Richard Mazurchuk received a BS in Physics and MS and PhD in Biophysics from SUNY Buffalo. His research focused on developing novel multi-modality imaging techniques, contrast (enhancing) agents and methods to assess the efficacy of experimental therapeutics. |

  17. Christos Patriotis, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Christos Patriotis obtained his MSc in Biochemistry from the University of Sofia, Bulgaria in 1985 and his PhD in Molecular Biology from the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences in 1990. Postdoctoral training focused on signal transduction and tumor cell biology. |

  18. 2D luminescence imaging of pH in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Schreml, Stephan; Meier, Robert J.; Wolfbeis, Otto S.; Landthaler, Michael; Szeimies, Rolf-Markus; Babilas, Philipp

    2011-01-01

    Luminescence imaging of biological parameters is an emerging field in biomedical sciences. Tools to study 2D pH distribution are needed to gain new insights into complex disease processes, such as wound healing and tumor metabolism. In recent years, luminescence-based methods for pH measurement have been developed. However, for in vivo applications, especially for studies on humans, biocompatibility and reliability under varying conditions have to be ensured. Here, we present a referenced luminescent sensor for 2D high-resolution imaging of pH in vivo. The ratiometric sensing scheme is based on time-domain luminescence imaging of FITC and ruthenium(II)tris-(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline). To create a biocompatible 2D sensor, these dyes were bound to or incorporated into microparticles (aminocellulose and polyacrylonitrile), and particles were immobilized in polyurethane hydrogel on transparent foils. We show sensor precision and validity by conducting in vitro and in vivo experiments, and we show the versatility in imaging pH during physiological and chronic cutaneous wound healing in humans. Implementation of this technique may open vistas in wound healing, tumor biology, and other biomedical fields. PMID:21262842

  19. Carbon Nanotube Chemiresistor for Wireless pH Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Gou, Pingping; Kraut, Nadine D.; Feigel, Ian M.; Bai, Hao; Morgan, Gregory J.; Chen, Yanan; Tang, Yifan; Bocan, Kara; Stachel, Joshua; Berger, Lee; Mickle, Marlin; Sejdić, Ervin; Star, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The ability to accurately measure real-time pH fluctuations in-vivo could be highly advantageous. Early detection and potential prevention of bacteria colonization of surgical implants can be accomplished by monitoring associated acidosis. However, conventional glass membrane or ion-selective field-effect transistor (ISFET) pH sensing technologies both require a reference electrode which may suffer from leakage of electrolytes and potential contamination. Herein, we describe a solid-state sensor based on oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (ox-SWNTs) functionalized with the conductive polymer poly(1-aminoanthracene) (PAA). This device had a Nernstian response over a wide pH range (2–12) and retained sensitivity over 120 days. The sensor was also attached to a passively-powered radio-frequency identification (RFID) tag which transmits pH data through simulated skin. This battery-less, reference electrode free, wirelessly transmitting sensor platform shows potential for biomedical applications as an implantable sensor, adjacent to surgical implants detecting for infection. PMID:24667793

  20. Carbon Nanotube Chemiresistor for Wireless pH Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Pingping; Kraut, Nadine D.; Feigel, Ian M.; Bai, Hao; Morgan, Gregory J.; Chen, Yanan; Tang, Yifan; Bocan, Kara; Stachel, Joshua; Berger, Lee; Mickle, Marlin; Sejdić, Ervin; Star, Alexander

    2014-03-01

    The ability to accurately measure real-time pH fluctuations in-vivo could be highly advantageous. Early detection and potential prevention of bacteria colonization of surgical implants can be accomplished by monitoring associated acidosis. However, conventional glass membrane or ion-selective field-effect transistor (ISFET) pH sensing technologies both require a reference electrode which may suffer from leakage of electrolytes and potential contamination. Herein, we describe a solid-state sensor based on oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (ox-SWNTs) functionalized with the conductive polymer poly(1-aminoanthracene) (PAA). This device had a Nernstian response over a wide pH range (2-12) and retained sensitivity over 120 days. The sensor was also attached to a passively-powered radio-frequency identification (RFID) tag which transmits pH data through simulated skin. This battery-less, reference electrode free, wirelessly transmitting sensor platform shows potential for biomedical applications as an implantable sensor, adjacent to surgical implants detecting for infection.

  1. Peer Mentorship and Transformational Learning: PhD Student Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, Jane P.; Ogenchuk, Marcella J.; Nsiah, Joseph K.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to describe our peer mentorship experiences and explain how these experiences fostered transformational learning during our PhD graduate program in educational administration. As a literature backdrop, we discuss characteristics of traditional forms of mentorship and depict how our experiences of peer mentorship was…

  2. PhDs by Publications: An "Easy Way Out"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niven, Penelope; Grant, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    PhDs by publications are a relatively new model for doctoral research, especially in the context of the Humanities or Education. This paper describes two writers' experiences of conducting doctoral studies in this genre and in these faculties. Each discover alternative ways of employing a body of published research papers in development of an…

  3. Troubling Talk: Assembling the PhD Candidate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mewburn, I.

    2011-01-01

    When PhD students complain it is assumed there are problems and that troubles talk is evidence of a "sick" research candidature or culture. This paper argues that such a one-dimensional reading fails to attend closely to the academic identity work that is done when students talk together. Identity work has become a useful way of thinking about the…

  4. Ph.D.'s and the Academic Labor Market.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartter, Allan M.

    How can new candidates for a Ph.D. tell whether a job in teaching or research will be waiting for them when they finally get their doctorates? How can colleges and universities plan now for adequate and efficient academic staffing in the 1980's? This document attempts to improve academic manpower forecasts and forecasting methods that reduce…

  5. Consistency and Inconsistency in PhD Thesis Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holbrook, Allyson; Bourke, Sid; Lovat, Terry; Fairbairn, Hedy

    2008-01-01

    This is a mixed methods investigation of consistency in PhD examination. At its core is the quantification of the content and conceptual analysis of examiner reports for 804 Australian theses. First, the level of consistency between what examiners say in their reports and the recommendation they provide for a thesis is explored, followed by an…

  6. Intracellular pH measurements using perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Michael J; Janjic, Jelena M; Teng, Haibing; O'Hear, Meredith R; Brown, Cortlyn W; Stokum, Jesse A; Schmidt, Brigitte F; Ahrens, Eric T; Waggoner, Alan S

    2013-12-11

    We report the synthesis and formulation of unique perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanoemulsions enabling intracellular pH measurements in living cells via fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry. These nanoemulsions are formulated to readily enter cells upon coincubation and contain two cyanine-based fluorescent reporters covalently bound to the PFC molecules, specifically Cy3-PFC and CypHer5-PFC conjugates. The spectral and pH-sensing properties of the nanoemulsions were characterized in vitro and showed the unaltered spectral behavior of dyes after formulation. In rat 9L glioma cells loaded with nanoemulsion, the local pH of nanoemulsions was longitudinally quantified using optical microscopy and flow cytometry and displayed a steady decrease in pH to a level of 5.5 over 3 h, indicating rapid uptake of nanoemulsion to acidic compartments. Overall, these reagents enable real-time optical detection of intracellular pH in living cells in response to pharmacological manipulations. Moreover, recent approaches for in vivo cell tracking using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) employ intracellular PFC nanoemulsion probes to track cells using (19)F MRI. However, the intracellular fate of these imaging probes is poorly understood. The pH-sensing nanoemulsions allow the study of the fate of the PFC tracer inside the labeled cell, which is important for understanding the PFC cell loading dynamics, nanoemulsion stability and cell viability over time. PMID:24266634

  7. Asad Umar, DVM, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Asad Umar received his PhD in Biochemistry and Immunology at the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, MD, in 1993. He conducted his postdoctoral training in the laboratories of Patricia Gearhart in Baltimore, MD and Thomas Kunkel at the National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences in Research Triangle Park, NC. Dr. |

  8. Investigation of mechanisms of oxidation of EDTA and NTA by permanganate at high pH.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hyun-Shik; Korshin, Gregory V; Ferguson, John F

    2006-08-15

    Permanganate has been used for oxidation of nuclear wastes containing chelating agents such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic and nitrilotriacetic acids (EDTA and NTA) to improve separation of radionuclides and heavy metals from the wastes, butthe mechanisms of degradation of these and related organic ligands at high pHs have not been studied. EDTA, NTA, and the model compound ethylenediamine (EN) were found to be readily oxidized by permanganate at pH 12-14. The reduction of permangante was accompanied by formation of unstable manganate and dispersed MnO2 particles, which constituted the final product of permanganate reduction. The yields and speciation of EDTA, NTA, and EN breakdown products were affected by the pH and permanganate dose. Iminodiacetic acid (IDA), oxalate, formate, and ammonia were the predominant EDTA and NTA oxidation products. Mineralization of EDTA, NTA, and EN to CO2 was more significant at pH 12. At pH 14 formation of oxalate and deamination to NH3 were the most important reactions. IDA was released upon the oxidation of both EDTA and NTA, but EDTA oxidation yielded no ethylenediaminediacetic acid (EDDA). The speciation of the reaction products indicated that the ethylene group in EDTA was the preferred attack site in oxidations by alkaline permanganate. PMID:16955912

  9. Modeling Carbon Dioxide, pH and Un-Ionized Ammonia Relationships in Serial Reuse Systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watten, Barnaby J.; Rust, Michael; Colt, John

    2009-01-01

    In serial reuse systems, excretion of metabolic carbon dioxide has a significant impact on ambient pH, carbon dioxide, and un-ionized ammonia concentrations. This impact depends strongly on alkalinity, water flow rate, feeding rate, and loss of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. A reduction in pH from metabolic carbon dioxide can significantly reduce the un-ionized ammonia concentration and increase the carbon dioxide concentrations compared to those parameters computed from influent pH. The ability to accurately predict pH in serial reuse systems is critical to their design and effective operation. A trial and error solution to the alkalinity–pH system was used to estimate important water quality parameters in serial reuse systems. Transfer of oxygen and carbon dioxide across the air–water interface, at overflow weirs, and impacts of substrate-attached algae and suspended bacteria were modeled. Gas transfer at the weirs was much greater than transfer across the air–water boundary. This simulation model can rapidly estimate influent and effluent concentrations of dissolved oxygen, carbon dioxide, and un-ionized ammonia as a function of water temperature, elevation, water flow, and weir type. The accuracy of the estimates strongly depends on assumed pollutional loading rates and gas transfer at the weirs. The current simulation model is based on mean daily loading rates; the impacts of daily variation loading rates are discussed. Copies of the source code and executable program are available free of charge.

  10. Metabolic Microenvironmental Control by Photosynthetic Biofilms under Changing Macroenvironmental Temperature and pH Conditions▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Bissett, Andrew; Reimer, Andreas; de Beer, Dirk; Shiraishi, Fumito; Arp, Gernot

    2008-01-01

    Ex situ microelectrode experiments, using cyanobacterial biofilms from karst water creeks, were conducted under various pH, temperature, and constant-alkalinity conditions to investigate the effects of changing environmental parameters on cyanobacterial photosynthesis-induced calcification. Microenvironmental chemical conditions around calcifying sites were controlled by metabolic activity over a wide range of photosynthesis and respiration rates, with little influence from overlying water conditions. Regardless of overlying water pH levels (from 7.8 to 8.9), pH at the biofilm surface was approximately 9.4 in the light and 7.8 in the dark. The same trend was observed at various temperatures (4°C and 17°C). Biological processes control the calcium carbonate saturation state (Ω) in these and similar systems and are able to maintain Ω at approximately constant levels over relatively wide environmental fluctuations. Temperature did, however, have an effect on calcification rate. Calcium flux in this system is limited by its diffusion coefficient, resulting in a higher calcium flux (calcification and dissolution) at higher temperatures, despite the constant, biologically mediated pH. The ability of biological systems to mitigate the effects of environmental perturbation is an important factor that must be considered when attempting to predict the effects of increased atmospheric partial CO2 pressure on processes such as calcification and in interpreting microfossils in the fossil record. PMID:18689512

  11. Cytoplasmic pH influences cytoplasmic calcium in MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, H. S.; Hughes-Fulford, M.; Kumegawa, M.; Pitts, A. C.; Snowdowne, K. W.

    1993-01-01

    We found that the cytoplasmic concentration of calcium (Cai) of MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts was influenced by the type of pH buffer we used in the perfusing medium, suggesting that intracellular pH (pHi) might influence Cai. To study this effect, the Cai and pHi were monitored as we applied various experimental conditions known to change pHi. Exposure to NH4Cl caused a transient increase in both pHi and Cai without a change in extracellular pH (pHo). Decreasing pHo and pHi by lowering the bicarbonate concentration of the medium decreased Cai, and increasing pHi by the removal of 5% CO2 increased Cai. Clamping pHi to known values with 10 microM nigericin, a potassium proton ionophore, also influenced Cai: acid pHi lowered Cai, whereas alkaline pHi increased it. The rise in Cai appears to be very sensitive to the extracellular concentration of calcium, suggesting the existence of a pH-sensitive calcium influx mechanism. We conclude that physiologic changes in pH could modulate Cai by controlling the influx of calcium ions and could change the time course of the Cai transient associated with hormonal activation.

  12. Trends and drivers in global surface ocean pH over the past three decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauvset, S. K.; Gruber, N.; Landschützer, P.; Olsen, A.; Tjiputra, J.

    2014-11-01

    We report global long-term trends in surface ocean pH using a new pH data set computed by combining fCO2 observations from the Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT) version 2 with surface alkalinity estimates based on temperature and salinity. Trends were determined over the periods 1981-2011 and 1991-2011 for a set of 17 biomes using a weighted linear least squares method. We observe significant decreases in surface ocean pH in ~70% of all biomes and a global mean rate of decrease of -0.0018 ± 0.0004 yr-1 for 1991-2011. We are not able to calculate a global trend for 1981-2011 because too few biomes have enough data for this. In two-thirds of the biomes, the rate of change is commensurate with the trends expected based on the assumption that the surface ocean pH change is only driven by the surface ocean carbon chemistry remaining in a transient equilibrium with the increase in atmospheric CO2. In the remaining biomes deviations from such equilibrium may reflect changes in the trend of surface ocean fCO2, most notably in the equatorial Pacific Ocean, or changes in the oceanic buffer (Revelle) factor. We conclude that well-planned and long-term sustained observational networks are key to reliably document the ongoing and future changes in ocean carbon chemistry due to anthropogenic forcing.

  13. Trends and drivers in global surface ocean pH over the past 3 decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauvset, S. K.; Gruber, N.; Landschützer, P.; Olsen, A.; Tjiputra, J.

    2015-03-01

    We report global long-term trends in surface ocean pH using a new pH data set computed by combining fCO2 observations from the Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT) version 2 with surface alkalinity estimates based on temperature and salinity. Trends were determined over the periods 1981-2011 and 1991-2011 for a set of 17 biomes using a weighted linear least squares method. We observe significant decreases in surface ocean pH in ~70% of all biomes and a mean rate of decrease of 0.0018 ± 0.0004 yr-1 for 1991-2011. We are not able to calculate a global trend for 1981-2011 because too few biomes have enough data for this. In half the biomes, the rate of change is commensurate with the trends expected based on the assumption that the surface ocean pH change is only driven by the surface ocean CO2 chemistry remaining in a transient equilibrium with the increase in atmospheric CO2. In the remaining biomes, deviations from such equilibrium may reflect that the trend of surface ocean fCO2 is not equal to that of the atmosphere, most notably in the equatorial Pacific Ocean, or may reflect changes in the oceanic buffer (Revelle) factor. We conclude that well-planned and long-term sustained observational networks are key to reliably document the ongoing and future changes in ocean carbon chemistry due to anthropogenic forcing.

  14. Precious metal oxides for electrochemical energy converters: Pseudocapacitance and pH dependence of redox processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzweil, P.

    The mechanism of charge storage in hydrous platinum metal oxides is considered in more detail with respect to the pH dependence of redox capacitance for applications in double-layer capacitors, fuel cells, and pH sensors. An amorphous RuO 2 electrode is able to work like a pH glass electrode during the titration of hydrochloric acid with sodium hydroxide solution. It is shown that the proton exchange mechanism at a glass membrane can be reproduced by platinum metal oxide-hydrates bound in a polymer matrix. Hydrous RuO 2, obtained by alkaline precipitation or thermal decomposition from RuCl 3, as well as single crystal RuO 2, were characterized by TOF-SIMS, NMR spectroscopy, and electrochemical techniques. The proton conductivity of hydrous RuO 2 appears to be due to the dissociative adsorption of water and the formation of acidic OH groups in Ru(III,IV) cluster ions. Depending on the pH of the solution, the electrode potential is determined by the formal hydrogen oxidation or oxygen reduction in ruthenium cluster ions. During aging, the active Ru(III) surface sites are partially oxidized to Ru(IV).

  15. Acidic pH increases airway surface liquid viscosity in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiao Xiao; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Hoegger, Mark J; Moninger, Thomas O; Karp, Philip H; McMenimen, James D; Choudhury, Biswa; Varki, Ajit; Stoltz, David A; Welsh, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) disrupts respiratory host defenses, allowing bacterial infection, inflammation, and mucus accumulation to progressively destroy the lungs. Our previous studies revealed that mucus with abnormal behavior impaired mucociliary transport in newborn CF piglets prior to the onset of secondary manifestations. To further investigate mucus abnormalities, here we studied airway surface liquid (ASL) collected from newborn piglets and ASL on cultured airway epithelia. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching revealed that the viscosity of CF ASL was increased relative to that of non-CF ASL. CF ASL had a reduced pH, which was necessary and sufficient for genotype-dependent viscosity differences. The increased viscosity of CF ASL was not explained by pH-independent changes in HCO3- concentration, altered glycosylation, additional pH-induced disulfide bond formation, increased percentage of nonvolatile material, or increased sulfation. Treating acidic ASL with hypertonic saline or heparin largely reversed the increased viscosity, suggesting that acidic pH influences mucin electrostatic interactions. These findings link loss of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator-dependent alkalinization to abnormal CF ASL. In addition, we found that increasing Ca2+ concentrations elevated ASL viscosity, in part, independently of pH. The results suggest that increasing pH, reducing Ca2+ concentration, and/or altering electrostatic interactions in ASL might benefit early CF. PMID:26808501

  16. /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of intracellular pH in giant barnacle muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, J.R.; Yue, G.M.

    1987-01-01

    The accuracy of intracellular pH (pH/sub i/) measurements by /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was examined in single muscle fibers from the giant barnacle, Balanus nubilis. The pH/sub i/ was derived from the chemical shifts of 2-deoxy-D-glucose-6-phosphate and inorganic phosphate. In fibers superfused with sea water at pH 7.7, pH/sub i/ = 7.30 +/- 0.02 at 20/sup 0/C. Experimentally induced pH/sub i/ changes were followed with a time resolution of 3 min. Intracellular alkalinization was induced by exposure to NH/sub 3/Cl and intracellular acidification followed when NH/sub 3/ was removed. Then acid extrusion was stimulated by exposure to bicarbonate containing sea water. In single muscle fibers /sup 31/P NMR results were in excellent agreement with microelectrode studies over the pH range of 6.5 to 8.0. The initial acid extrusion rate was 1.7 +/- 0.3 mmol x 1/sup -1/ x min/sup -1/ at pH/sub i/ 6.75. The authors results showed that /sup 31/P NMR is a reliable in vivo pH probe.

  17. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of intracellular pH in giant barnacle muscle.

    PubMed

    Hamm, J R; Yue, G M

    1987-01-01

    The accuracy of intracellular pH (pHi) measurements by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was examined in single muscle fibers from the giant barnacle, Balanus nubilis. The pHi was derived from the chemical shifts of 2-deoxy-D-glucose-6-phosphate and inorganic phosphate. In fibers superfused with sea water at pH 7.7, pHi = 7.30 +/- 0.02 at 20 degrees C. Experimentally induced pHi changes were followed with a time resolution of 3 min. Intracellular alkalinization was induced by exposure to NH4Cl and intracellular acidification followed when NH3 was removed. Then acid extrusion was stimulated by exposure to bicarbonate containing sea water. In single muscle fibers 31P NMR results were in excellent agreement with microelectrode studies over the pH range of 6.5 to 8.0. The initial acid extrusion rate was 1.7 +/- 0.3 mmol X l-1 X min-1 at pHi 6.75. Our results showed that 31P NMR is a reliable in vivo pH probe. PMID:3812665

  18. Acidic pH increases airway surface liquid viscosity in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiao Xiao; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Hoegger, Mark J.; Moninger, Thomas O.; Karp, Philip H.; McMenimen, James D.; Choudhury, Biswa; Varki, Ajit; Stoltz, David A.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) disrupts respiratory host defenses, allowing bacterial infection, inflammation, and mucus accumulation to progressively destroy the lungs. Our previous studies revealed that mucus with abnormal behavior impaired mucociliary transport in newborn CF piglets prior to the onset of secondary manifestations. To further investigate mucus abnormalities, here we studied airway surface liquid (ASL) collected from newborn piglets and ASL on cultured airway epithelia. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching revealed that the viscosity of CF ASL was increased relative to that of non-CF ASL. CF ASL had a reduced pH, which was necessary and sufficient for genotype-dependent viscosity differences. The increased viscosity of CF ASL was not explained by pH-independent changes in HCO3– concentration, altered glycosylation, additional pH-induced disulfide bond formation, increased percentage of nonvolatile material, or increased sulfation. Treating acidic ASL with hypertonic saline or heparin largely reversed the increased viscosity, suggesting that acidic pH influences mucin electrostatic interactions. These findings link loss of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator–dependent alkalinization to abnormal CF ASL. In addition, we found that increasing Ca2+ concentrations elevated ASL viscosity, in part, independently of pH. The results suggest that increasing pH, reducing Ca2+ concentration, and/or altering electrostatic interactions in ASL might benefit early CF. PMID:26808501

  19. Habit-associated salivary pH changes in oral submucous fibrosis–A controlled cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Donoghue, Mandana; Basandi, Praveen S; Adarsh, H; Madhushankari, GS; Selvamani, M; Nayak, Prachi

    2015-01-01

    Context: Oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) is a multi-causal inflammatory reaction to the chemical or mechanical trauma caused due to exposure to arecanut containing products with or without tobacco (ANCP/T). Arecanut and additional components such as lime and chewing tobacco render ANCP/T highly alkaline. Fibrosing repair is a common reaction to an alkaline exposure in the skin. OSF may be related to the alkaline exposure by ANCP/T in a similar manner. Aims: The study was aimed at establishing the relationship of habit-associated salivary pH changes and OSF. Settings and Design: The study design was controlled cross-sectional. Materials and Methods: Base line salivary pH (BLS pH), salivary pH after chewing the habitual ANCP/T substance, post chew salivary pH (PCSpH) for 2 min and salivary pH recovery time (SpHRT) were compared in 30 OSF patients and 30 sex-matched individuals with ANCP/T habits and apparently healthy oral mucosa. Results: The group's mean BLSpH values were similar and within normal range and representative of the population level values. The average PCSpH was significantly higher (P ˂ 0.0001) than the average BLSpH in both groups. There was no significant difference (P = 0.09) between PCSpH of OSF patients and controls. OSF patients had a significantly longer (P = 0.0076) SpHRT than controls. Factors such as age, daily exposure, cumulative habit years, BLSpH and PCSpH, had varying effects on the groups. Conclusions: Chewing ANCP/T causes a significant rise in salivary pH of all individuals. SpHRT has a significant association with OSF. The effect of salivary changes in OSF patients differs with those in healthy controls. PMID:26604493

  20. Preferential intracellular pH regulation: hypotheses and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Shartau, Ryan B; Baker, Daniel W; Crossley, Dane A; Brauner, Colin J

    2016-08-01

    The regulation of vertebrate acid-base balance during acute episodes of elevated internal PCO2  is typically characterized by extracellular pH (pHe) regulation. Changes in pHe are associated with qualitatively similar changes in intracellular tissue pH (pHi) as the two are typically coupled, referred to as 'coupled pH regulation'. However, not all vertebrates rely on coupled pH regulation; instead, some preferentially regulate pHi against severe and maintained reductions in pHe Preferential pHi regulation has been identified in several adult fish species and an aquatic amphibian, but never in adult amniotes. Recently, common snapping turtles were observed to preferentially regulate pHi during development; the pattern of acid-base regulation in these species shifts from preferential pHi regulation in embryos to coupled pH regulation in adults. In this Commentary, we discuss the hypothesis that preferential pHi regulation may be a general strategy employed by vertebrate embryos in order to maintain acid-base homeostasis during severe acute acid-base disturbances. In adult vertebrates, the retention or loss of preferential pHi regulation may depend on selection pressures associated with the environment inhabited and/or the severity of acid-base regulatory challenges to which they are exposed. We also consider the idea that the retention of preferential pHi regulation into adulthood may have been a key event in vertebrate evolution, with implications for the invasion of freshwater habitats, the evolution of air breathing and the transition of vertebrates from water to land. PMID:27489212

  1. Regulation of Vacuolar pH in Citrus limon

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln Taiz

    2005-06-22

    The primary objective of this grant was to characterize the vacuolar V-ATPase of lemon fruits. Lemon fruit vacuoles have an internal pH of about 2.5. Since a typical plant vacuole has a luminal pH of around 5.5, the lemon fruit V-APTase must have special properties which allow it to acidify the lumen to such a low pH: (1) it might have a different structure; (2) it might have a different H{sup +}/ATP stoichiometry; and (3) it might be regulated differently. During the course of the investigations (which began in 1996) they characterized these aspects of the V-ATPases of both lemon fruits and lime fruits. They examined lime fruits because of the availability of both acidic limes with a low vacuolar pH and sweet limes, which have a much higher vacuolar pH. The existence of two types of lime fruits allowed a comparison of the V-ATPases of the two varieties. In this report they are including two publications from 1996 and 1997 as background for the later publications. A review article with Heven Sze on V-ATPase nomenclature was also generated during the funding period. In addition to the studies on citrus fruit vacuoles, they also initiated studies in two new areas: polar auxin transport and the regulation of stomatal opening by UV-B irradiation. These studies were intended to serve as a basis of future separate grants, but the proposals they submitted on these topics were not funded.

  2. pH Regulation of ammonia secretion by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and its effect on appressorium formation and pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Miyara, Itay; Shafran, Hadas; Davidzon, Maayan; Sherman, Amir; Prusky, Dov

    2010-03-01

    Host-tissue alkalinization via ammonia accumulation is key to Colletotrichum spp. colonization. Using macroarrays carrying C. gloeosporioides cDNAs, we monitored gene expression during the alkalinization process. A set of genes involved in synthesis and catabolism of ammonia accumulation were identified. Expression of NAD(+)-specific glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH2, encoding ammonia synthesis) and the ammonia exporter AMET were induced at pH 4.0 to 4.5. Conversely, ammonia uptake and transcript activation of the ammonia and glutamate importers (MEP and GLT, respectively) and glutamine synthase (GS1) were higher at pH 6.0 to 7.0. Accumulated ammonia in the wild-type mycelium decreased during ambient alkalinization, concurrent with increased GS1 expression. Deltapac1 mutants of C. gloeosporioides, which are sensitive to alkaline pH changes, showed upregulation of the acid-expressed GDH2 and downregulation of the alkaline-expressed GS1, resulting in 60% higher ammonia accumulation inside the mycelium. Deltagdh2 strains of C. gloeosporioides, impaired in ammonia production, showed 85% inhibition in appressorium formation followed by reduced colonization on avocado fruit (Persea americana cv. Fuerte) pericarp, while exogenic ammonia addition restored appressoria formation. Thus the modulation of genes involved in ammonia metabolism and catabolism by C. gloeosporioides is ambient pH-dependent. Aside from its contribution to necrotrophic stages, ammonia accumulation by germinating spores regulates appressorium formation and determines the initiation of biotrophic stages of avocado-fruit colonization by Colletotrichum spp. PMID:20121452

  3. Influence of pH on the Motion of Catalytic Janus Particles and Tubular Bubble-Propelled Micromotors.

    PubMed

    Moo, James Guo Sheng; Wang, Hong; Pumera, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Self-propelled miniaturized machines harness the chemical potential of their environment for movement. Locomotion of chemically powered micromotors have been hugely dependent on the surroundings. The use of pH to alter the mobility of micromotors is demonstrated in this work through the manipulation of hydrogen peroxide chemistry in different acidity/alkalinity. The sequential addition of sodium hydroxide to increase the pH of the solution led to a consequent increase in activity of micromotors. Meanwhile, addition of hydrochloric acid compromised the structural integrity of the microstructures, culminating in locomotive changes. Such dramatic changes in activity and velocities of the micromotors allow the usage of this behavior for pH detection. This concept was illustrated with Janus silver micromotors and tubular bimetallic Cu/Pt micromotors. Alteration of pH serves as a useful general strategy for increasing hydrogen peroxide decomposition for enhanced oxygen-bubble propulsion in catalytic micromotors. PMID:26526004

  4. An ester derivative of the drug gabapentin: pH dependent crystal stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Vânia; Marques, M. Matilde; da Piedade, M. F. Minas; Duarte, M. Teresa

    2010-06-01

    Gabapentin solutions with different pHs were prepared and slow crystallization was allowed to occur. Different crystalline forms were obtained at pHs up to 7, whereas alkaline media (pH 9) gave rise to an amorphous product. A new crystal structure of an ethyl ester derivative, obtained at pH 2 under Fischer esterification conditions, is described herein. Esterification blocked the supramolecular interactions typically observed through the carboxyl group of gabapentin, which resulted in a dramatic change in the solid-state structure. As it is known, this change could have a marked influence on the physiological absorption characteristics of the drug, which supports the search for ester-based gabapentin prodrugs as a means of improving the limited bioavailability of the drug.

  5. Ruthenium capping layer preservation for 100X clean through pH driven effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dattilo, Davide; Dietze, Uwe; Hsu, Jyh-Wei

    2015-10-01

    In the absence of pellicle a EUVL reticle is expected to withstand up to 100x cleaning cycles. Surface damage upon wet and dry cleaning methods has been investigated and reported in recent years. [1] Thermal stress, direct photochemical oxidation and underlying Silicon layer oxidation are reported as the most relevant root-causes for metal damage and peeling off. [2,3] An investigation of final clean performance is here reported as a function of operating pH; the results show increased Ruthenium durability in moderately alkaline environment. The electrochemical rationale and the dependency of the reducing strength of the media with the pH will be presented as possible explanations for reduced damage.

  6. Modeling the Role of pH on Baltic Sea Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hinners, Jana; Hofmeister, Richard; Hense, Inga

    2015-01-01

    We simulate pH-dependent growth of cyanobacteria with an ecosystem model for the central Baltic Sea. Four model components—a life cycle model of cyanobacteria, a biogeochemical model, a carbonate chemistry model and a water column model—are coupled via the framework for aquatic biogeochemical models. The coupled model is forced by the output of a regional climate model, based on the A1B emission scenario. With this coupled model, we perform simulations for the period 1968–2098. Our simulation experiments suggest that in the future, cyanobacteria growth is hardly affected by the projected pH decrease. However, in the simulation phase prior to 1980, cyanobacteria growth and N2-fixation are limited by the relatively high pH. The observed absence of cyanobacteria before the 1960s may thus be explained not only by lower eutrophication levels, but also by a higher alkalinity. PMID:25830591

  7. Sulfate reduction at low pH to remediate acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Andrea, Irene; Sanz, Jose Luis; Bijmans, Martijn F M; Stams, Alfons J M

    2014-03-30

    Industrial activities and the natural oxidation of metallic sulfide-ores produce sulfate-rich waters with low pH and high heavy metals content, generally termed acid mine drainage (AMD). This is of great environmental concern as some heavy metals are highly toxic. Within a number of possibilities, biological treatment applying sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is an attractive option to treat AMD and to recover metals. The process produces alkalinity, neutralizing the AMD simultaneously. The sulfide that is produced reacts with the metal in solution and precipitates them as metal sulfides. Here, important factors for biotechnological application of SRB such as the inocula, the pH of the process, the substrates and the reactor design are discussed. Microbial communities of sulfidogenic reactors treating AMD which comprise fermentative-, acetogenic- and SRB as well as methanogenic archaea are reviewed. PMID:24444599

  8. Separation of 'Uncharged' Oligodeoxynucleotide Analogs by Anion-Exchange Chromatography at High pH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Jurgen G.; Orgel, Leslie E.; Nielsen, Peter E.

    1996-01-01

    Ion-exchange chromatography is a well-established method for the analysis and purification of phosphodiester-linked oligonucleotides. If elution is carried out under alkaline conditions, the secondary structure of G- and C-rich oligomers is disrupted. Furthermore, elution times become more sensitive to the G and T content of the oligomer, because G and T are deprotonated at pH 10. In recent work on peptide-nucleic acids (PNAs) we noted that mixtures of PNA oligomers G(sub 4), G(sub 6), G(sub 8), and G9(sub 10) are readily separated by elution at pH 12 on an RPC-5 column. Here we show that this separation method is more generally applicable.

  9. Separation of Uncharged Oligodeoxynucleotide Analogs by Anion-Exchange Chromatography at High pH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Jurgen G.; Nielsen, Peter E.; Orgel, Leslie

    1996-01-01

    Ion-exchange chromatography is a well-established method for the analysis and purification of phosphodiester-linked oligonucleotides. If elution is carried out under alkaline conditions, the secondary structure of G- and C-rich oligomers is disrupted. Furthermore, elution times become more sensitive to the G and T content of the oligomer, because G and T are deprotonated at pH 10. In recent work on peptide-nucleic acids (PNAs) we noted that mixtures of PNA oligomers G(sub 4), G(Sub 6), G(sub 8), and G(sub 10) are readily separated by elution at pH 12 on an RPC-5 column. Here we show that this separation method is more generally applicable.

  10. Pork Quality Traits According to Postmortem pH and Temperature in Berkshire.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Wan; Kim, Chul Wook; Yang, Mi Ra; No, Gun Ryoung; Kim, Sam Woong; Kim, Il-Suk

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the role of pH and temperature postmortem, and to demonstrate the importance of these factors in determining meat quality. Postmortem pH 45min (pH at 45 min postmortem or initial pH) via analysis of Pearson's correlation showed high positive correlation with pH change pH c24 (pH change from pH 45min to pH 24h postmortem). However, postmortem pH after 24 h (pH 24h or ultimate pH) had a high negative correlation with pH change, pH c24 , CIE L*, and protein content. Initial temperature postmortem (T 1h ) was positively associated with a change in temperature from 45 min to 24 h postmortem (T c24 ) and cooking loss, but negatively correlated with water holding capacity. Temperature at 24 h postmortem (T 24h ) was negatively associated with T c24 . Collectively, these results indicate that higher initial pH was associated with higher pH c24 , T 1h , and T c24 . However, higher initial pH was associated with a reduction in carcass weight, backfat thickness, CIE a* and b*, water holding capacity, collagen and fat content, drip loss, and cooking loss as well as decreased shear force. In contrast, CIE a* and b*, drip loss, cooking loss, and shear force in higher ultimate pH was showed by a similar pattern to higher initial pH, whereas pH c24 , carcass weight, backfat thickness, water holding capacity, fat content, moisture content, protein content, T 1h , T 24h , and T c24 were exhibited by completely differential patterns (p<0.05). Therefore, we suggest that initial pH, ultimate pH, and temperatures postmortem are important factors in determining the meat quality of pork. PMID:27499661

  11. Dissolved Divalent Metal and pH Effects on Amino Acid Polymerization: A Thermodynamic Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitadai, Norio

    2016-06-01

    Polymerization of amino acids is a fundamentally important step for the chemical evolution of life. Nevertheless, its response to changing environmental conditions has not yet been well understood because of the lack of reliable quantitative information. For thermodynamics, detailed prediction over diverse combinations of temperature and pH has been made only for a few amino acid-peptide systems. This study used recently reported thermodynamic dataset for the polymerization of the simplest amino acid "glycine (Gly)" to its short peptides (di-glycine and tri-glycine) to examine chemical and structural characteristics of amino acids and peptides that control the temperature and pH dependence of polymerization. Results showed that the dependency is strongly controlled by the intramolecular distance between the amino and carboxyl groups in an amino acid structure, although the side-chain group role is minor. The polymerization behavior of Gly reported earlier in the literature is therefore expected to be a typical feature for those of α-amino acids. Equilibrium calculations were conducted to examine effects of dissolved metals as a function of pH on the monomer-polymer equilibria of Gly. Results showed that metals shift the equilibria toward the monomer side, particularly at neutral and alkaline pH. Metals that form weak interaction with Gly (e.g., Mg2+) have no noticeable influence on the polymerization, although strong interaction engenders significant decrease of the equilibrium concentrations of Gly peptides. Considering chemical and structural characteristics of Gly and Gly peptides that control their interactions with metals, it can be expected that similar responses to the addition of metals are applicable in the polymerization of neutral α-amino acids. Neutral and alkaline aqueous environments with dissolved metals having high affinity with neutral α-amino acids (e.g., Cu2+) are therefore not beneficial places for peptide bond formation on the primitive

  12. Live imaging of intra- and extracellular pH in plants using pHusion, a novel genetically encoded biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Gjetting, Kisten Sisse Krag; Ytting, Cecilie Karkov; Schulz, Alexander; Fuglsang, Anja Thoe

    2012-01-01

    Changes in pH are now widely accepted as a signalling mechanism in cells. In plants, proton pumps in the plasma membrane and tonoplast play a key role in regulation of intracellular pH homeostasis and maintenance of transmembrane proton gradients. Proton transport in response to external stimuli can be expected to be finely regulated spatially and temporally. With the ambition to follow such changes live, a new genetically encoded sensor, pHusion, has been developed. pHusion is especially designed for apoplastic pH measurements. It was constitutively expressed in Arabidopsis and targeted for expression in either the cytosol or the apoplast including intracellular compartments. pHusion consists of the tandem concatenation of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP1), and works as a ratiometric pH sensor. Live microscopy at high spatial and temporal resolution is highly dependent on appropriate immobilization of the specimen for microscopy. Medical adhesive often used in such experiments destroys cell viability in roots. Here a novel system for immobilizing Arabidopsis seedling roots for perfusion experiments is presented which does not impair cell viability. With appropriate immobilization, it was possible to follow changes of the apoplastic and cytosolic pH in mesophyll and root tissue. Rapid pH homeostasis upon external pH changes was reflected by negligible cytosolic pH fluctuations, while the apoplastic pH changed drastically. The great potential for analysing pH regulation in a whole-tissue, physiological context is demonstrated by the immediate alkalinization of the subepidermal apoplast upon external indole-3-acetic acid administration. This change is highly significant in the elongation zone compared with the root hair zone and control roots. PMID:22407646

  13. THE EFFECT OF THE PH OF PH BUFFERED NUTRIENT SOLUTIONS ON NICKEL HYPERACCUMULATION BY ALYSSUM CORSICUM AND BERKHEYA CODDII

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is hypothesized that plant hyperaccumulation of Ni evolved as a defense mechanism against diseases and insects. Two hyperaccumulators, Alyssum corsicum and Berkheya coddii, were compared to cabbage (Brassica oleracea) grown in MES-HEPES buffered nutrient solutions and maintained at four pH levels...

  14. Simultaneous analysis of PhIP, 4'-OH-PhIP, and their precursors using UHPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yan; Zeng, Mao-Mao; Zheng, Zong-Ping; He, Zhi-Yong; Tao, Guan-Jun; Zhang, Shuang; Gao, Ya-Hui; Chen, Jie

    2014-12-01

    A novel method allowing simultaneous analysis of PhIP, 4'-OH-PhIP, and their precursors (phenylalanine, tyrosine, creatine, creatinine, glucose) has been developed as a robust kinetic study tool by using ultra high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). A direct hydrochloric acid (HCl) extraction was applied to achieve the simultaneous extraction of all seven analytes, with the mean recoveries ranging from 60% to 120% at two concentration levels. Then, an Atlantis dC18 column selected from four different chromatographic columns was ultimately used to separate these compounds within 15 min. The limits of detection range of allseven analytes were calculated as 0.14-325.00 μg L(-1). The intra- and interday precision of the proposed method were less than 15.4 and 19.9%, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to depict the kinetic profiles of PhIP, 4'-OH-PhIP, and their precursors in pork model, reducing the analysis time and cost in the kinetic study. PMID:25407701

  15. On the sol pH and the structural, optical and electrical properties of ZnO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meziane, K.; El Hichou, A.; El Hamidi, A.; Mansori, M.; Liba, A.; Almaggoussi, A.

    2016-05-01

    Zinc oxide thin films were prepared by the sol-gel method and deposed on glass substrate using spin coating technique. The variation of the structural, optical and electrical properties with various pH values is investigated. pH values of the sol were adjusted with glacial acetic acid and ammonia. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the films with alkaline sol are crystallized while those with acidic sol are amorphous. High values of texture coefficient and a high diffraction intensity of the (002) peak, ensuring better growth along c-axis, were obtained for an optimal pH value of 9.5. The crystallite size of the obtained films strongly depends on the sol pH. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images confirm that the morphology and grain size of the films are affected significantly by pH. The optical transmission was recorded to analyze the optical properties of the studied films. It was found that the optical gap increased with pH. The electrical properties were measured by Hall-effect and reveal an increase of the resistivity when the sol pH increases. A minimum residual intrinsic electrons density suitable for p-type ZnO was reached.

  16. The role of low molecular weight organic acids on controlling pH in coastal sea water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, H.

    2015-12-01

    Series investigation of the Jiaozhou Bay, China, observed existences of three low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs), including lactic acid, acetic acid and formic acid, with high concentration in the sea water. Generally, their amount accounted for about 20% of DOC in the sea water of the bay. Human activities around the bay were considered as the major source of the LMWOAs. Also, long term detection showed that the pH value in the Jiaozhou Bay was lower than that in the adjacent Yellow Sea. On average, the difference of pH values between the bay and the Yellow was about 0.2. Due to higher concentrations of the LMWOAs, their contribution to lower pH value of the bay should not be ignored. To validate the effect of LMWOAs on the pH value of the bay, a new software was developed to calculate the pH value in the sea water samples based on alkalinity by adding three items of the three organic acids in the expression. Compared to the traditional pH calculating software, the new software could improve the calculating results significantly. Our results confirmed that LMWOAs was an important control factor to adjust pH values in coastal area.

  17. Effect of pH and temperature on antioxidant responses of the thick shell mussel Mytilus coruscus.

    PubMed

    Hu, Menghong; Li, Lisha; Sui, Yanming; Li, Jiale; Wang, Youji; Lu, Weiqun; Dupont, Sam

    2015-10-01

    This study evaluated the combined effects of seawater pH decrease and temperature increase on the activity of antioxidant enzymes in the thick shell mussel Mytilus coruscus, an ecological and economic bivalve species widely distributed along the East China Sea. Mussels were exposed to three pH levels (8.1, 7.7 and 7.3) and two temperatures (25 °C and 30 °C) for 14 days. Activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione (GSH), acid phosphatase (ACP), alkaline phosphatase (AKP) and glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (GPT) were measured in gills and digestive glands after 1, 3, 7 and 14 days of exposure. All enzymatic activities were significantly impacted by pH, temperature. Enzymatic activities at the high temperature were significantly higher than those at the low temperature, and the mussels exposed to pH 7.3 showed significantly higher activities than those under higher pH condition for all enzymes except ACP. There was no interaction between temperature and pH in two third of the measured activities suggesting similar mode of action for both drivers. Interaction was only consistently significant for GPX. PCA revealed positive relationships between the measured biochemical indicators in both gills and digestive glands. Overall, our results suggest that decreased pH and increased temperature induce a similar anti-oxidative response in the thick shell mussel. PMID:26235981

  18. Effect of Different pH Criteria on Dual-sensor pH Monitoring in the Evaluation of Supraesophageal Gastric Reflux in Children

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, Eric; Rosen, Rachel; Nurko, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aim Existing tests for supraesophageal gastric reflux (SEGR) that focus on pH drops <4 in the proximal esophagus have had limited sensitivity and specificity. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of newly proposed pH criteria on SEGR detection. Patients and Methods Twenty-four-hour dual-sensor pH tracings of 32 patients were reviewed. Proximal esophageal pH data were evaluated according to the conventional definition of pH drop <4 and 2 proposed definitions: pH drop <5.5 while upright and <5.0 while supine and pH drop of >10% from a running baseline. For each potential SEGR event, the preceding 1-minute window was examined for corresponding distal acid reflux. Results Of the 542 distal acid reflux events detected, 200 were associated with a proximal pH drop <4; this number increased to 295 using the definition of proximal pH drop <5.5 (upright)/<5.0 (supine) and 301 using the definition of proximal pH drop >10%. A proportion of proximal events, however, was not associated with distal acid reflux: 21 of 200 (10.5%) proximal pH <4 events, 119 of 414 (29%) proximal pH <5.5 (upright)/<5.0 (supine) events, and 272 of 573 (47%) proximal pH drop >10% events lacked a preceding or simultaneous drop in distal pH <4. Conclusions Although the use of more liberal pH criteria increased the diagnostic yield for SEGR events with dual-sensor monitoring, a significant proportion of proximal pH events did not correlate with distal acid reflux. These events could represent either false-positive measurements or association with weakly acid reflux. PMID:21206381

  19. Origin, Emission, and Propagation of P-H Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, H.

    2007-05-01

    Origin, Emission, and Propagation of P-H Pulses H. Kikuchi Institute for Environmental Electromagnetics 3-8-18, Komagome, Toshima-ku, Tokyo 170, Japan e-mail: hkikuchi@mars.dti.ne.jp Abstract According to Pulinets, characters of P-H pulses is following. The registered emission has not continuous but pulsed character and has very wide frequency spectrum from kHz to more than hundred MHz. These two facts imply that should be the electric discharge-like emission similar to thunderstorm flashes emission. The emission is connected in some way with seismic activity and the emission intensity increases 12-24 hour before the seismic shock. Another intriguing factor is that emission is registered at large distances up to 500 km (some witness claim up to 1500 km). Taking into account that emission is registered at VHF band also, the source of emission cannot be situated on the ground. This paper puts forwards a model of P-H pulses generation based on "dust dynamics". Rotating ions ascending, for instance erupped metalic ions in the earth's crust into the atmosphere incorporating aerosols might be captured by diffuse dust layers which may exist below or beyond the electric mirror point produced by quadrupole-like thunder- cloud configurations or even form a portion of dust layers and could be a source-origin of P-H pulses that might be emitted by local electric discharges within diffuse dust layers somewhat similar to thundercloud discharges, though emission frequencies and characters are quite different, namely P-H pulses are over a wide range of frequencies, say from kHz to more than hundred MHz with pulsed character in contrast to lightning emission with more continuous character whose frequencies are 1 to 10 kHz. Such diffuse dust layers could be formed over a wide range of height in the troposphere, stratosphere, mesosphere and the thermosphere. Propagation distance of P-H pulses are very large up to 500-1500 km.

  20. The PhEDEx next-gen website

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egeland, R.; Huang, C.-H.; Rossman, P.; Sundarrajan, P.; Wildish, T.

    2012-12-01

    PhEDEx is the data-transfer management solution written by CMS. It consists of agents running at each site, a website for presentation of information, and a web-based data-service for scripted access to information. The website allows users to monitor the progress of data-transfers, the status of site agents and links between sites, and the overall status and behaviour of everything about PhEDEx. It also allows users to make and approve requests for data-transfers and for deletion of data. It is the main point-of-entry for all users wishing to interact with PhEDEx. For several years, the website has consisted of a single perl program with about 10K SLOC. This program has limited capabilities for exploring the data, with only coarse filtering capabilities and no context-sensitive awareness. Graphical information is presented as static images, generated on the server, with no interactivity. It is also not well connected to the rest of the PhEDEx codebase, since much of it was written before the data-service was developed. All this makes it hard to maintain and extend. We are re-implementing the website to address these issues. The UI is being rewritten in Javascript, replacing most of the server-side code. We are using the YUI toolkit to provide advanced features and context-sensitive interaction, and will adopt a Javascript charting library for generating graphical representations client-side. This relieves the server of much of its load, and automatically improves server-side security. The Javascript components can be re-used in many ways, allowing custom pages to be developed for specific uses. In particular, standalone test-cases using small numbers of components make it easier to debug the Javascript than it is to debug a large server program. Information about PhEDEx is accessed through the PhEDEx data-service, since direct SQL is not available from the clients’ browser. This provides consistent semantics with other, externally written monitoring tools, which

  1. The mechanical properties of polyimide films after exposure to high pH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croall, Catharine I.; St.clair, Terry L.

    1992-01-01

    Wiring failures linked to insulation damage have drawn much attention in the aerospace industry and concerns have developed regarding the stability and safety of polyimide insulated electrical wire. Several polyimides were selected for evaluation for resistance to degradation by various aqueous alkaline solutions. The polyimides under evaluation include commercially available films such as Kapton (tk), Apical (tk), LaRC(tk)-TPI, and Upilex(tk)R and S, as well as a number of experimental films prepared by NASA Langley. Thermally imidized films were studied for their retention of mechanical properties after exposure to high pH solutions under stressed conditions.

  2. Monodispersed calcium carbonate nanoparticles modulate local pH and inhibit tumor growth in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Som, Avik; Raliya, Ramesh; Tian, Limei; Akers, Walter; Ippolito, Joseph E.; Singamaneni, Srikanth; Biswas, Pratim; Achilefu, Samuel

    2016-06-01

    The acidic extracellular environment of tumors potentiates their aggressiveness and metastasis, but few methods exist to selectively modulate the extracellular pH (pHe) environment of tumors. Transient flushing of biological systems with alkaline fluids or proton pump inhibitors is impractical and nonselective. Here we report a nanoparticles-based strategy to intentionally modulate the pHe in tumors. Biochemical simulations indicate that the dissolution of calcium carbonate nanoparticles (nano-CaCO3) in vivo increases pH asymptotically to 7.4. We developed two independent facile methods to synthesize monodisperse non-doped vaterite nano-CaCO3 with distinct size range between 20 and 300 nm. Using murine models of cancer, we demonstrate that the selective accumulation of nano-CaCO3 in tumors increases tumor pH over time. The associated induction of tumor growth stasis is putatively interpreted as a pHe increase. This study establishes an approach to prepare nano-CaCO3 over a wide particle size range, a formulation that stabilizes the nanomaterials in aqueous solutions, and a pH-sensitive nano-platform capable of modulating the acidic environment of cancer for potential therapeutic benefits.The acidic extracellular environment of tumors potentiates their aggressiveness and metastasis, but few methods exist to selectively modulate the extracellular pH (pHe) environment of tumors. Transient flushing of biological systems with alkaline fluids or proton pump inhibitors is impractical and nonselective. Here we report a nanoparticles-based strategy to intentionally modulate the pHe in tumors. Biochemical simulations indicate that the dissolution of calcium carbonate nanoparticles (nano-CaCO3) in vivo increases pH asymptotically to 7.4. We developed two independent facile methods to synthesize monodisperse non-doped vaterite nano-CaCO3 with distinct size range between 20 and 300 nm. Using murine models of cancer, we demonstrate that the selective accumulation of nano-CaCO3

  3. B/Ca in coccoliths and relationship to calcification vesicle pH and dissolved inorganic carbon concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, Heather; Langer, Gerald; Shimizu, Nobumichi; Kanamaru, Kinuyo

    2012-03-01

    Coccolithophorid algae are microscopic but prolific calcifiers in modern and ancient oceans. When the pH of seawater is modified, as may occur in the future due to ocean acidification, different species and strains of coccolithophorids have exhibited diverse calcification responses in laboratory culture. Since their biomineralization is a completely intracellular process, it is unclear why their response should be affected by extracellular seawater pH. Variations in the B/Ca in coccoliths are potential indicators of pH shifts in the intracellular coccolith vesicle where calcification occurs, because B/Ca in abiogenic calcites increases at higher pH due to the greater abundance of borate ions, the only B species incorporated into calcite. We used a SIMS ion probe to measure B/Ca of coccoliths from three different strains of Emiliania huxleyi and one strain of Coccolithus braarudii braarudii cultured under different seawater pH conditions to ascertain if the B/Ca can be used to elucidate how coccolithophorids respond to changing ocean pH. These data are interpreted with the aid of a conceptual model of cellular boron acquisition by coccolithophorids. Based on uptake in other plants, we infer that boron uptake by coccolithophorid cells is dominated by passive uptake of boric acid across the lipid bilayer. Subsequently, in the alkaline coccolith vesicle (C.V.), boron speciates according to the C.V. pH, and borate is incorporated into the coccolith. At increasing seawater pH, the relative abundance of the neutral boric acid in seawater decreases, lowering the potential B flux into the cell. Homeostasis or constant pH of the coccolith vesicle results in a decrease of the B/Ca in the coccolith with increasing seawater pH. In contrast, if coccolith vesicle pH increases with increasing seawater pH, then the B/Ca will increase as the fraction of borate in the coccolith vesicle increases. The coccolith B/Ca is also expected to depend inversely on the dissolved inorganic

  4. 21 CFR 868.1170 - Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH... Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer is a device that consists of a catheter-tip pH electrode and that...

  5. 21 CFR 868.1170 - Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH... Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer is a device that consists of a catheter-tip pH electrode and that...

  6. 21 CFR 868.1170 - Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH... Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer is a device that consists of a catheter-tip pH electrode and that...

  7. 21 CFR 868.1170 - Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH... Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer is a device that consists of a catheter-tip pH electrode and that...

  8. 21 CFR 868.1170 - Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH... Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer is a device that consists of a catheter-tip pH electrode and that...

  9. DETERMINATION OF PH BY FLOW INJECTION ANALYSIS AND BY FIBER OPTRODE ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two new procedures for measuring pH have been developed. The first measures pH colorimetrically using a proprietary indicator dye mixture in a flow injection analysis (FIA) procedure. The second measures pH using a fiber optic chemical sensor (FOCS) specifically developed for pH ...

  10. 27 CFR 19.386 - Adjusting pH of denatured spirits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adjusting pH of denatured... of Articles Rules for Denaturing Spirits and Testing Denaturants § 19.386 Adjusting pH of denatured... neutralize the pH of denatured spirits. However, a proprietor may not adjust the pH with any substance...

  11. 27 CFR 19.386 - Adjusting pH of denatured spirits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Adjusting pH of denatured... of Articles Rules for Denaturing Spirits and Testing Denaturants § 19.386 Adjusting pH of denatured... neutralize the pH of denatured spirits. However, a proprietor may not adjust the pH with any substance...

  12. 27 CFR 19.386 - Adjusting pH of denatured spirits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Adjusting pH of denatured... of Articles Rules for Denaturing Spirits and Testing Denaturants § 19.386 Adjusting pH of denatured... neutralize the pH of denatured spirits. However, a proprietor may not adjust the pH with any substance...

  13. From Rumors to Facts: Career Outcomes of English PhDs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nerad, Maresi; Cerny, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    Studies career paths of doctorates, examining the actual employment patterns of English PhDs 10 years after finishing their degrees. Discusses the many career paths of this cohort of English PhDs; characteristics of respondents; career paths within and outside of academe; satisfaction with current employment and value of the PhD; advice from PhDs;…

  14. 27 CFR 19.386 - Adjusting pH of denatured spirits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adjusting pH of denatured... of Articles Rules for Denaturing Spirits and Testing Denaturants § 19.386 Adjusting pH of denatured... neutralize the pH of denatured spirits. However, a proprietor may not adjust the pH with any substance...

  15. Ocean acidification in the subpolar North Atlantic: rates and mechanisms controlling pH changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Ibáñez, Maribel I.; Zunino, Patricia; Fröb, Friederike; Carracedo, Lidia I.; Ríos, Aida F.; Mercier, Herlé; Olsen, Are; Pérez, Fiz F.

    2016-06-01

    Repeated hydrographic sections provide critically needed data on and understanding of changes in basin-wide ocean CO2 chemistry over multi-decadal timescales. Here, high-quality measurements collected at twelve cruises carried out along the same track between 1991 and 2015 have been used to determine long-term changes in ocean CO2 chemistry and ocean acidification in the Irminger and Iceland basins of the North Atlantic Ocean. Trends were determined for each of the main water masses present and are discussed in the context of the basin-wide circulation. The pH has decreased in all water masses of the Irminger and Iceland basins over the past 25 years with the greatest changes in surface and intermediate waters (between -0.0010 ± 0.0001 and -0.0018 ± 0.0001 pH units yr-1). In order to disentangle the drivers of the pH changes, we decomposed the trends into their principal drivers: changes in temperature, salinity, total alkalinity (AT) and total dissolved inorganic carbon (both its natural and anthropogenic components). The increase in anthropogenic CO2 (Cant) was identified as the main agent of the pH decline, partially offset by AT increases. The acidification of intermediate waters caused by Cant uptake has been reinforced by the aging of the water masses over the period of our analysis. The pH decrease of the deep overflow waters in the Irminger basin was similar to that observed in the upper ocean and was mainly linked to the Cant increase, thus reflecting the recent contact of these deep waters with the atmosphere.

  16. Reconstructing Ocean pH with Boron Isotopes in Foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Gavin L.; Rae, James W. B.

    2016-06-01

    In order to better understand the effect of CO2 on the Earth system in the future, geologists may look to CO2-induced environmental change in Earth's past. Here we describe how CO2 can be reconstructed using the boron isotopic composition (δ11B) of marine calcium carbonate. We review the chemical principles that underlie the proxy, summarize the available calibration data, and detail how boron isotopes can be used to estimate ocean pH and ultimately atmospheric CO2 in the past. δ11B in a variety of marine carbonates shows a coherent relationship with seawater pH, in broad agreement with simple models for this proxy. Offsets between measured and predicted δ11B may in part be explained by physiological influences, though the exact mechanisms of boron incorporation into carbonate remain unknown. Despite these uncertainties, we demonstrate that δ11B may provide crucial constraints on past ocean acidification and atmospheric CO2.

  17. Morphosynthesis of alanine mesocrystals by pH control.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yurong; Cölfen, Helmut; Antonietti, Markus

    2006-06-01

    Crystallization of DL-alanine is studied as a single polymorph model case to analyze the different modes of crystallization of polar organic molecules in absence of any structure directing additives. Depending on supersaturation, which is controlled either by temperature or by pH, and in the absence of additives, crystallization by mesoscale assembly of nanoparticles is found over a wide range of conditions, leading to so-called mesocrystals. This supplements the classical molecule-based crystallization mechanism, which is identified at lower supersaturations and at pH values away from the isoelectric point (IEP). The resulting alanine crystals are characterized by SEM, XRD, and single-crystal analysis. Time-resolved conductivity measurements and dynamic light scattering of the reaction solutions reveal information about precursor structures and reaction kinetics. A formation mechanism is proposed for the alanine mesocrystals. PMID:16771332

  18. Flexible high-temperature pH probe

    DOEpatents

    Bielawski, John C.; Outwater, John O.; Halbfinger, George P.

    2003-04-22

    A flexible pH probe device is provided for use in hot water and other high temperature environments up to about 590.degree. F. The pH probe includes a flexible, inert tubular probe member, an oxygen anion conducting, solid state electrolyte plug located at the distal end of the tubular member, oxide powder disposed at the distal end of the tubular member; a metal wire extending along the tubular member and having a distal end in contact with the oxide powder so as to form therewith an internal reference electrode; and a compression fitting forming a pressure boundary seal around a portion of the tubular member remote from the distal end thereof. Preferably, the tubular member is made of polytetrafluoroethylene, and the solid state electrolyte plug is made of stabilized zirconia. The flexibility of the probe member enables placement of the electrode into the area of interest, including around corners, into confined areas and the like.

  19. SAMPLING DEVICE FOR pH MEASUREMENT IN PROCESS STREAMS

    DOEpatents

    Michelson, C.E.; Carson, W.N. Jr.

    1958-11-01

    A pH cell is presented for monitoring the hydrogen ion concentration of a fluid in a process stream. The cell is made of glass with a side entry arm just above a reservoir in which the ends of a glass electrode and a reference electrode are situated. The glass electrode contains the usual internal solution which is connected to a lead. The reference electrode is formed of saturated calomel having a salt bridge in its bottom portion fabricated of a porous glass to insure low electrolyte flow. A flush tube leads into the cell through which buffer and flush solutions are introduced. A ground wire twists about both electrode ends to insure constant electrical grounding of the sample. The electrode leads are electrically connected to a pH meter of aay standard type.

  20. Biona-C Cell Culture pH Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedericks, C.

    1999-01-01

    Sensors 2000! is developing a system to demonstrate the ability to perform accurate, real-time measurements of pH and CO2 in a cell culture media in Space. The BIONA-C Cell Culture pH Monitoring System consists of S2K! developed ion selective sensors and control electronics integrated with the fluidics of a cell culture system. The integrated system comprises a "rail" in the Cell Culture Module (CCM) of WRAIR (Space Biosciences of Walter Read Army Institute of Research). The CCM is a Space Shuttle mid-deck locker experiment payload. The BIONA-C is displayed along with associated graphics and text explanations. The presentation will stimulate interest in development of sensor technology for real-time cell culture measurements. The transfer of this technology to other applications will also be of interest. Additional information is contained in the original document.

  1. Hot Ductility of the 17-4 PH Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera Lara, V.; Guerra Fuentes, L.; Covarrubias Alvarado, O.; Salinas Rodriguez, A.; Garcia Sanchez, E.

    2016-03-01

    The mechanisms of loss of hot ductility and the mechanical behavior of 17-4 PH alloys were investigated using hot tensile testing at temperatures between 700 and 1100 °C and strain rates of 10-4, 10-2, and 10-1 s-1. Scanning electron microscopy was used in conjunction with the results of the tensile tests to find the temperature region of loss of ductility and correlate it with cracking observed during processing by hot upsetting prior to ring rolling. It is reported that 17-4 PH alloys lose ductility in a temperature range around 900 °C near to the duplex austenite + ferrite phase field. Furthermore, it is found that niobium carbides precipitated at austenite/ferrite interfaces and grain boundaries have a pronounced effect on the mechanical behavior of the alloy during high-temperature deformation.

  2. Factors affecting intra-oral pH - a review.

    PubMed

    Loke, C; Lee, J; Sander, S; Mei, L; Farella, M

    2016-10-01

    One of the greatest challenges to modern dentistry is the progressive destruction of tooth material due to chemical erosion. Dental erosion is the loss of dental hard tissue, without the action of bacteria, in which demineralisation of enamel and dentine results due to a decrease in intra-oral pH. The aim of this review was to appraise the scientific literature on the factors that can affect intra-oral pH. The review will examine (i) the protective role of human saliva, in terms of its mineral composition, flow rates and buffering systems and (ii) sources of in-mouth acids such as extrinsic acids, which are derived from the diet and environment, as well as intrinsic acids, which are related to disorders of the gastro-oesophageal tract. This review may assist clinicians to identify the risk factors for tooth wear and to recommend adequate preventive measures to patients. PMID:27573678

  3. phMRI: methodological considerations for mitigating potential confounding factors

    PubMed Central

    Bourke, Julius H.; Wall, Matthew B.

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacological Magnetic Resonance Imaging (phMRI) is a variant of conventional MRI that adds pharmacological manipulations in order to study the effects of drugs, or uses pharmacological probes to investigate basic or applied (e.g., clinical) neuroscience questions. Issues that may confound the interpretation of results from various types of phMRI studies are briefly discussed, and a set of methodological strategies that can mitigate these problems are described. These include strategies that can be employed at every stage of investigation, from study design to interpretation of resulting data, and additional techniques suited for use with clinical populations are also featured. Pharmacological MRI is a challenging area of research that has both significant advantages and formidable difficulties, however with due consideration and use of these strategies many of the key obstacles can be overcome. PMID:25999812

  4. Controllable dissociations of PH3 molecules on Si(001).

    PubMed

    Liu, Qin; Lei, Yanhua; Shao, Xiji; Ming, Fangfei; Xu, Hu; Wang, Kedong; Xiao, Xudong

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate for the first time to our knowledge that controllable dissociation of PH3 adsorption products PHx (x = 2, 1) can be realized by STM (scanning tunneling microscope) manipulation techniques at room temperature. Five dissociative products and their geometric structures are identified via combining STM experiments and first-principle calculations and simulations. In total we realize nine kinds of controllable dissociations by applying a voltage pulse among the PH3-related structures on Si(001). The dissociation rates of the five most common reactions are measured by the I-t spectrum method as a function of voltage. The suddenly increased dissociation rate at 3.3 V indicates a transition from multivibrational excitation to single-step excitation induced by inelastic tunneling electrons. Our studies prove that selectively breaking the chemical bonds of a single molecule on semiconductor surface by STM manipulation technique is feasible. PMID:26894452

  5. Biochar contribution to soil pH buffer capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonutare, Tonu; Krebstein, Kadri; Utso, Maarius; Rodima, Ako; Kolli, Raimo; Shanskiy, Merrit

    2014-05-01

    Biochar as ecologically clean and stable form of carbon has complex of physical and chemical properties which make it a potentially powerful soil amendment (Mutezo, 2013). Therefore during the last decade the biochar application as soil amendment has been a matter for a great number of investigations. For the ecological viewpoint the trend of decreasing of soil organic matter in European agricultural land is a major problem. Society is faced with the task to find possibilities to stabilize or increase soil organic matter content in soil and quality. The availability of different functional groups (e.g. carboxylic, phenolic, acidic, alcoholic, amine, amide) allows soil organic matter to buffer over a wide range of soil pH values (Krull et al. 2004). Therefore the loss of soil organic matter also reduces cation exchange capacity resulting in lower nutrient retention (Kimetu et al. 2008). Biochar can retain elements in soil directly through the negative charge that develops on its surfaces, and this negative charge can buffer acidity in the soil. There are lack of investigations about the effect of biochar to soil pH buffering properties, The aim of our investigation was to investigate the changes in soil pH buffer capacity in a result of addition of carbonizated material to temperate region soils. In the experiment different kind of softwood biochars, activated carbon and different soil types with various organic matter and pH were used. The study soils were Albeluvisols, Leptosols, Cambisols, Regosols and Histosols . In the experiment the series of the soil: biochar mixtures with the biochar content 0 to 100% were used. The times of equiliberation between solid and liquid phase were from 1 to 168 hours. The suspension of soil: biochar mixtures was titrated with HCl solution. The titration curves were established and pH buffer capacities were calculated for the pH interval from 3.0 to 10.0. The results demonstrate the dependence of pH buffer capacity from soil type

  6. Sex differentials in the earnings of Ph.D.s.

    PubMed

    Ferber, M A; Kordick, B

    1978-01-01

    Using a survey of two cohorts of men and women who received Ph.D.s in the years 1958-63 and 1967-72, the authors test two hypotheses: (1) that the relatively lower earnings of highly educated women can be explained largely by their career interruptions and by their lesser willingness to accumulate human capital in anticipation of such interruptions, and (2) that the differential in earnings between men and women increases with age because of career interruptions and that the gap narrows once women reenter the labor force on a permanent basis The findings do not lend support to either of these hypotheses, leading the authors to reject the proposition that the lower rewards of women Ph.D.s are primarily caused by their own voluntary decisions. PMID:10306321

  7. Miniature Chemical Optical Fiber Sensors For Ph Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisde, G.; Perez, J. J.

    1987-10-01

    A miniature optode (diameter about 1 mm) was built with 200/280 all-silica fibers usable over long distances. The immobilized indicator is fixed on a cross-linked styrene/divinyl-benzene copolymer (XADZI). The sensors are constructed so that measurements can be taken either by absorption at many different points in the single optical fiber, or by reflection from the end of the fiber. A wide range of pH values are encountered with radioactive wastes, and experiments are performed either with bromophenol blue (3.0 to 6.0) or a double-indicator (thymol blue) between 0.8 and 3.2, and 9 and 13 pH, as well as other indicators. Lifetimes, reversibility and kinetics are considered. A new low-cost device is proposed for chemical process control and medical applications.

  8. Cancer Nanomedicines Targeting Tumor Extracellular pH

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Li; Bae, You Han

    2011-01-01

    Tumors have been a highlight in the research of nanomedicine for decades. Despite all the efforts in the decoration of the nano systems, tumor specific targeting is still an issue due to the heterogeneous nature of tumors. Hypoxia is frequently observed in solid tumors. The consequent acidification of tumor extracellular matrices may bring new insight to tumor targeting. In this review, we present the polymeric nano systems that target tumor extracellular pH (pHe). PMID:22078927

  9. Adaptations of proteins to cellular and subcellular pH

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Bioinformatics-based searches for correlations between subcellular localization and pI or charge distribution of proteins have failed to detect meaningful correlations. Recent work published in BMC Biology finds that a physicochemical metric of charge distribution correlates better with subcellular pH than does pI. See research article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/7/69 PMID:20017887

  10. Adaptations of proteins to cellular and subcellular pH.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Moreno, Bertrand

    2009-01-01

    Bioinformatics-based searches for correlations between subcellular localization and pI or charge distribution of proteins have failed to detect meaningful correlations. Recent work published in BMC Biology finds that a physicochemical metric of charge distribution correlates better with subcellular pH than does pI. See research article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/7/69. PMID:20017887

  11. Application of CGEAN's Research Priorities: PhD, DNP Scholarship.

    PubMed

    Warshawsky, Nora E; Scott, Elaine S; Murphy, Lyn Stankiewicz

    2016-05-01

    The Accountable Care Act of 2010 is stimulating rapid transformations of healthcare systems. The shift from a focus on providing healthcare in a closed system to improving the health of communities demands rapid innovation by nurse leaders. Nurse leaders prepared at the doctorate of nursing practice level and PhD-prepared nursing health services researchers are needed to develop and evaluate best practices as they emerge. This column expands on the findings from CGEAN's Delphi study. PMID:27093178

  12. Young Kim, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Young S Kim, PhD, joined the Division of Cancer Prevention at the National Cancer Institute in 1998 as a Program Director who oversees and monitors NCI grants in the area of Nutrition and Cancer. She serves as an expert in nutrition, molecular biology, and genomics as they relate to cancer prevention. Dr. Kim assists with research initiatives that will advance nutritional science and lead to human health benefits. |

  13. Modeling of glucose pH enzyme electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Sarbolouki, M.N.; Ghoorchian, H.; Mozaffari, S. )

    1990-08-01

    Fabrication of a modified glucose pH enzyme electrode, using cellulose acetate instead of cellophane, and its performance are described. A physico-mathematical model that considers glucose transport across the membrane from the bulk into the enzyme solution layer, subsequent proton generation as a consequence of glucose oxidation by the enzyme glucose oxidase, and proton transport back through the membrane into the bulk solution is developed. Proper rate equations are simultaneously solved. Experimental and theoretical results are compared.

  14. The Research Doctorate in Nursing: The PhD.

    PubMed

    Rice, David

    2016-03-01

    When nurses are considering an advanced degree beyond the master's level of educational preparation, a number of considerations may direct the decision-making process. The doctorate of philosophy (PhD) in nursing is a research degree that will well serve nurses who have the desire to apply theory and develop formal programs of research, become faculty of nursing, combine clinical practice with formal research, and advance through professional leadership in the ranks of hospitals and health systems organizations. 
. PMID:26906125

  15. Lynn Sorbara, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Lynn Sorbara earned her PhD from Albert Einstein College of Medicine in 1986. Her thesis research was in the areas of the mechanism of action of the drug, Taxol, and of multidrug resistance. After postdoctoral fellowships at the Rockefeller University and the Mount Sinai College of Medicine in Manhattan, she came to the NIH as a Senior Staff Fellow in the Diabetes Branch of NIDDK. |

  16. Testing the pH of Soft Drinks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christmann, Edwin P.; Holy, Adam J.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how to use a TI-73/83/84 graphing calculator and Vernier's LabPro/CBL2 probe system to take pH readings. This is not an endorsement of these products, but simply the authors' attempt to give readers an idea of what is involved in using this technology in the classroom. This activity can be accomplished using a…

  17. Iranian PhD student wins human-rights prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Jon

    2013-11-01

    A physicist imprisoned in Iran while on a break from his PhD studies in the US has been awarded a human-rights prize. Omid Kokabee, who had been based at the University of Texas in Austin, has been given the Andrei Sakharov Prize from the American Physical Society (APS) for "his courage in refusing to use his physics knowledge to work on projects that he deemed harmful to humanity, in the face of extreme physical and psychological pressure".

  18. Vernon Steele, PhD, MPH | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Vernon Steele is a Program Director and Group Leader for the Chemoprevention Agent Development Research Group in the NCI Division of Cancer Prevention. He earned his MS and PhD degrees in Radiation Biology at the University of Rochester in 1975 studying radiation effects on cell differentiation. He recently received his Masters of Public Health degree from Johns Hopkins University focusing on environmental toxicology. |

  19. Boost in minorities doing PhDs in the US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2009-05-01

    The number of people from underrepresented minorities doing PhDs in the physical sciences in the US has increased "dramatically" since 2000, according to a new report by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). While there was little difference in the number of African, Hispanic and Native American students studying subjects such as economics and sociology, the numbers doing physical sciences increased by almost 50%.

  20. Modeling pH variation in reverse osmosis.

    PubMed

    Nir, Oded; Bishop, Noga Fridman; Lahav, Ori; Freger, Viatcheslav

    2015-12-15

    The transport of hydronium and hydroxide ions through reverse osmosis membranes constitutes a unique case of ionic species characterized by uncommonly high permeabilities. Combined with electromigration, this leads to complex behavior of permeate pH, e.g., negative rejection, as often observed for monovalent ions in nanofiltration of salt mixtures. In this work we employed a rigorous phenomenological approach combined with chemical equilibrium to describe the trans-membrane transport of hydronium and hydroxide ions along with salt transport and calculate the resulting permeate pH. Starting from the Nernst-Planck equation, a full non-linear transport equation was derived, for which an approximate solution was proposed based on the analytical solution previously developed for trace ions in a dominant salt. Using the developed approximate equation, transport coefficients were deduced from experimental results obtained using a spiral wound reverse osmosis module operated under varying permeate flux (2-11 μm/s), NaCl feed concentrations (0.04-0.18 M) and feed pH values (5.5-9.0). The approximate equation agreed well with the experimental results, corroborating the finding that diffusion and electromigration, rather than a priori neglected convection, were the major contributors to the transport of hydronium and hydroxide. The approach presented here has the potential to improve the predictive capacity of reverse osmosis transport models for acid-base species, thereby improving process design/control. PMID:26447944