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Sample records for alkaline ph range

  1. Extending the working pH of nitrobenzene degradation using ultrasonic/heterogeneous Fenton to the alkaline range via amino acid modification.

    PubMed

    ElShafei, Gamal M S; Yehia, F Z; Dimitry, O I H; Badawi, A M; Eshaq, Gh

    2015-11-01

    Oxides of iron, α-Fe2O3 (I), and copper, CuO (II) prepared by usual precipitation method without surfactant were used at room temperature in the process of nitrobenzene (10mgL(-1)) degradation at different pH values with ultrasonic at 20kHz. The degradation was complete in 20 and 30min for (I) and (II), respectively in the pH range 2-7 using1.0gL(-1) of solids and 10mM of H2O2. A remarkable decrease in degradation efficiency was recorded on increasing the pH to values higher than the neutral range. This loss in efficiency was cancelled to a great extent through modifying the used oxides with amino acids. Arginine showed higher improving effect to (II) (1:1 weight ration) than glycine or glutamic acid. Modification of both oxides with increasing amounts of arginine increased the degradation efficiency of (I) in a more regular way than in case of (II). However, the extent of improvement due to amino acid modification was higher in case of (II) because of its originally low degradation efficiency in strongly alkaline media. PMID:25592465

  2. A low-temperature-active alkaline pectate lyase from Xanthomonas campestris ACCC 10048 with high activity over a wide pH range.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Peng; Meng, Kun; Wang, Yaru; Luo, Huiying; Shi, Pengjun; Huang, Huoqing; Tu, Tao; Yang, Peilong; Yao, Bin

    2012-11-01

    Alkaline pectate lyases are favorable for the textile industry. Here, we report the gene cloning and expression of a low-temperature-active alkaline pectate lyase (PL D) from Xanthomonas campestris ACCC 10048. Deduced PL D consists of a putative 27-residue signal peptide and a catalytic domain of 320 residues belonging to family PF09492. Recombinant PL D (r-PL D) produced in Escherichia coli was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity with a single step of Ni(2+)-NTA affinity chromatography and showed an apparent molecular weight of ~38 kDa. The pH and temperature optima of r-PL D were found to be 9.0 °C and 30 °C, respectively. Compared with its microbial counterparts, r-PL D had higher activity over a wide pH range (>45 % of the maximum activity at pH 3.0-12.0) and at lower temperatures (>35 % of activity even at 0 °C). The K(m) and V(max) values of r-PL D for polygalacturonic acid were 4.9 gl(-1) and 30.1 μmolmin(-1) mg(-1), respectively. Compared with the commercial compound pectinase from Novozymes, r-PL D showed similar efficacy in reducing the intrinsic viscosity of polygalacturonic acid (35.1 % vs. 36.5 %) and in bioscouring of jute (10.25 % vs. 10.82 %). Thus, r-PL D is a valuable additive candidate for the textile industry. PMID:22983714

  3. Field measurement of alkalinity and pH

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, Ivan

    1964-01-01

    The behavior of electrometric pH equipment under field conditions departs from the behavior predicted from Nernst's law. The response is a linear function of pH, and hence measured pH values may be corrected to true pH if the instrument is calibrated with two reference solutions for each measurement. Alkalinity titrations may also be made in terms of true pH. Standard methods, such as colorimetric titrations, were rejected as unreliable or too cumbersome for rapid field use. The true pH of the end point of the alkalinity titration as a function of temperature, ionic strength, and total alkalinity has been calculated. Total alkalinity in potable waters is the most important factor influencing the end point pH, which varies from 5.38 (0 ? C, 5 ppm (parts per million) HC0a-) to 4.32 (300 ppm HC0a-,35 ? C), for the ranges of variables considered. With proper precautions, the pH may be determined to =i:0.02 pH and the alkalinity to =i:0.6 ppm HCO3- for many naturally occurring bodies of fresh water.

  4. Modifying the Cold Gelation Properties of Quinoa Protein Isolate: Influence of Heat-Denaturation pH in the Alkaline Range.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, Outi E; Zannini, Emanuele; Arendt, Elke K

    2015-09-01

    Heat-denaturation of quinoa protein isolate (QPI) at alkali pH and its influence on the physicochemical and cold gelation properties was investigated. Heating QPI at pH 8.5 led to increased surface hydrophobicity and decreases in free and bound sulfhydryl group contents. Heating at pH 10.5 caused a lesser degree of changes in sulfhydryl groups and surface hydrophobicity, and the resulting solutions showed drastically increased solubility. SDS PAGE revealed the presence of large aggregates only in the sample heated at pH 8.5, suggesting that any aggregates present in the sample heated at pH 10.5 were non-covalently bound and disintegrated in the presence of SDS. Reducing conditions partially dissolved the aggregates in the pH 8.5 heated sample indicating the occurrence of disulphide bonding, but caused no major alterations in the separation pattern of the pH 10.5 heated sample. Denaturation pH influenced the cold gelation properties greatly. Solutions heated at pH 8.5 formed a coarse coagulum with maximum G' of 5 Pa. Heat-denaturation at 10.5 enabled the proteins to form a finer and regularly structured gel with a maximum G' of 1140 Pa. Particle size analysis showed that the pH 10.5 heated sample contained a higher level of very small particles (0.1-2 μm), and these readily aggregated into large particles (30-200 μm) when pH was lowered to 5.5. Differences in the nature of aggregates formed during heating may explain the large variation in gelation properties. PMID:25986749

  5. Intermediate range order in alkaline borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crupi, C.; Carini, G.; Ruello, G.; D'Angelo, G.

    2016-03-01

    We describe the neutron diffraction patterns of a series of alkaline borate glasses at different metal oxide content. Strong differences are observed in the intermediate range order as a function of the specific alkaline ion and of its concentration. On these results, we propose that the first sharp diffraction peak arises from correlations of atoms of voids and show that the compositional variation of this peak intensity in alkaline borate glasses is due to changes in the distribution of void sizes within the three-dimensional network. We argue that our interpretation in terms of interstitial (empty and/or filled) voids, having different sizes, provides a general explanation for all anomalous behaviours revealed for the first sharp diffraction peak.

  6. Mechanisms of Glucagon Degradation at Alkaline pH

    PubMed Central

    Caputo, Nicholas; Castle, Jessica R.; Bergstrom, Colin P.; Carroll, Julie M.; Bakhtiani, Parkash A.; Jackson, Melanie A.; Roberts, Charles T.; David, Larry L.; Ward, W. Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon is unstable and undergoes degradation and aggregation in aqueous solution. For this reason, its use in portable pumps for closed loop management of diabetes is limited to very short periods. In this study, we sought to identify the degradation mechanisms and the bioactivity of specific degradation products. We studied degradation in the alkaline range, a range at which aggregation is minimized. Native glucagon and analogs identical to glucagon degradation products were synthesized. To quantify biological activity in glucagon and in the degradation peptides, a protein kinase A-based bioassay was used. Aged, fresh, and modified peptides were analyzed by liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry (LCMS). Oxidation of glucagon at the Met residue was common but did not reduce bioactivity. Deamidation and isomerization were also common and were more prevalent at pH 10 than 9. The biological effects of deamidation and isomerization were unpredictable; deamidation at some sites did not reduce bioactivity. Deamidation of Gln 3, isomerization of Asp 9, and deamidation with isomerization at Asn 28 all caused marked potency loss. Studies with molecular-weight-cutoff membranes and LCMS revealed much greater fibrillation at pH 9 than 10. Further work is necessary to determine formulations of glucagon that minimize degradation and fibrillation. PMID:23651991

  7. The Alkaline Diet: Is There Evidence That an Alkaline pH Diet Benefits Health?

    PubMed Central

    Schwalfenberg, Gerry K.

    2012-01-01

    This review looks at the role of an alkaline diet in health. Pubmed was searched looking for articles on pH, potential renal acid loads, bone health, muscle, growth hormone, back pain, vitamin D and chemotherapy. Many books written in the lay literature on the alkaline diet were also reviewed and evaluated in light of the published medical literature. There may be some value in considering an alkaline diet in reducing morbidity and mortality from chronic diseases and further studies are warranted in this area of medicine. PMID:22013455

  8. Alkaline pH Homeostasis in Bacteria: New Insights

    PubMed Central

    Padan, Etana; Bibi, Eitan; Ito, Masahiro; Krulwich, Terry A.

    2011-01-01

    The capacity of bacteria to survive and grow at alkaline pH values is of widespread importance in the epidemiology of pathogenic bacteria, in remediation and industrial settings, as well as in marine, plant-associated and extremely alkaline ecological niches. Alkali-tolerance and alkaliphily, in turn, strongly depend upon mechanisms for alkaline pH homeostasis, as shown in pH shift experiments and growth experiments in chemostats at different external pH values. Transcriptome and proteome analyses have recently complemented physiological and genetic studies, revealing numerous adaptations that contribute to alkaline pH homeostasis. These include elevated levels of transporters and enzymes that promote proton capture and retention (e.g. the ATP synthase and monovalent cation/proton antiporters), metabolic changes that lead to increased acid production, and changes in the cell surface layers that contribute to cytoplasmic proton retention. Targeted studies over the past decade have followed up the long-recognized importance of monovalent cations in active pH homeostasis. These studies show the centrality of monovalent cation/proton antiporters in this process while microbial genomics provides information about the constellation of such antiporters in individual strains. A comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of both eukaryotic and prokaryotic genome databases has identified orthologes from bacteria to humans that allow better understanding of the specific functions and physiological roles of the antiporters. Detailed information about the properties of multiple antiporters in individual strains is starting to explain how specific monovalent cation/proton antiporters play dominant roles in alkaline pH homeostasis in cells that have several additional antiporters catalyzing ostensibly similar reactions. New insights into the pH-dependent Na+/H+ antiporter NhaA that plays an important role in Escherichia coli have recently emerged from the determination of the structure

  9. In vitro alkaline pH resistance of Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Weckwerth, Paulo Henrique; Zapata, Ronald Ordinola; Vivan, Rodrigo Ricci; Tanomaru Filho, Mário; Maliza, Amanda Garcia Alves; Duarte, Marco Antonio Hungaro

    2013-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is a bacterial species often found in root canals with failed endodontic treatment. Alkaline pastes are widely used in Endodontics because of their biocompatibility and antimicrobial activity, but this microorganism can resist alkalinity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vitro the alkaline pH resistance of E. faecalis for different periods up to 14 days. Samples were obtained from the oral cavity of 150 patients from the Endodontic clinic. The pH of the experimental tubes (n=84) was first adjusted with 6M NaOH to pH values of 9.5, 10.5, 11.5 and 12.5 (21 tubes per pH). Twenty clinical isolates and the ATCC 29212 strain were tested. The 5 positive controls and experimental tubes of each pH were inoculated with 10 µL of bacterial suspension and incubated at 36 °C for 24, 48 and 72 h, 7 and 14 days. For each period, the turbidity of the medium was visually compared with a 0.5 McFarland standard. The presence of the microorganism was confirmed by seeding on M-Enterococcus agar. Four tubes containing BHI broth adjusted to the tested pHs were incubated for 14 days to verify if pH changes occurred. The pH of inoculated BHI broth was also measured on day 14 to determine if the microorganism acidified the medium. The growth of all E. faecalis strains occurred at pH 9.5 to 11.5 in all periods. Although turbidity was not observed at pH 12.5, there was growth of 13 and 2 strains at 24 and 48 h, respectively, on M-Enterococcus agar. No tube showed growth at pH 12.5 after 72 h. It was concluded that E. faecalis can survive in highly alkaline pH, and some clinical isolates require 72 h at pH 12.5 to be killed. PMID:24474287

  10. Interpretation of pH, acidity, and alkalinity in fisheries and aquaculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measurements of pH, acidity, and alkalinity are commonly used to describe water quality. The three variables are interrelated and are sometimes confused. The pH of water is an intensity factor, while the acidity and alkalinity of waters are capacity factors. More precisely, acidity and alkalinity ar...

  11. Decision making in C. elegans chemotaxis to alkaline pH

    PubMed Central

    Murayama, Takashi; Maruyama, Ichi N

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring of environmental and tissue pH is critical for animal survival. The nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), is attracted to mildly alkaline pH, but avoids strongly alkaline pH. However, little is known about how the behavioral switching or decision making occurs. Genetic dissection and Ca2+ imaging have previously demonstrated that ASEL and ASH are the major sensory neurons responsible for attraction and repulsion, respectively. Here we report that unlike C. elegans wild type, mutants deficient in ASEL or ASH were repelled by mildly alkaline pH, or were attracted to strongly alkaline pH, respectively. These results suggest that signals through ASEL and ASH compete to determine the animal’s alkaline-pH chemotaxis. Furthermore, mutants with 2 ASEL neurons were more efficiently attracted to mildly alkaline pH than the wild type with a single ASEL neuron, indicating that higher activity of ASEL induces stronger attraction to mildly alkaline pH. This stronger attraction was overridden by normal activity of ASH, suggesting that ASH-mediated avoidance dominates ASEL-mediated attraction. Thus, C. elegans chemotactic behaviors to alkaline pH seems to be determined by signal strengths from the sensory neurons ASEL and ASH, and the behavior decision making seems to be the result of competition between the 2 sensory neurons. PMID:24563708

  12. SIMPLE WAYS TO IMPROVE PH AND ALKALINITY MEASUREMENTS FOR WATER UTILITIES AND LABORATORIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Both pH and total alkalinity determinations are critical in characterizing chemical properties of water, being important to implementing good process control, determining corrosivity and other water quality properties, and assessing changes in water characteristics. Poor charac...

  13. Method of determining pH by the alkaline absorption of carbon dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Hobbs, David T.

    1992-01-01

    A method for measuring the concentration of hydroxides in alkaline solutions in a remote location using the tendency of hydroxides to absorb carbon dioxide. The method includes the passing of carbon dioxide over the surface of an alkaline solution in a remote tank before and after measurements of the carbon dioxide solution. A comparison of the measurements yields the absorption fraction from which the hydroxide concentration can be calculated using a correlation of hydroxide or pH to absorption fraction.

  14. Alkalinity and pH effects on nitrification in a membrane aerated bioreactor: an experimental and model analysis.

    PubMed

    Shanahan, John W; Semmens, Michael J

    2015-05-01

    A nitrifying biofilm was grown in a laboratory-scale membrane aerated bioreactor (MABR) to calibrate and test a one-dimensional biofilm model incorporating chemical equilibria to calculate local pH values. A previously developed model (Shanahan and Semmens, 2004) based upon AQUASIM was modified to incorporate the impact of local pH changes within the biofilm on the kinetics of nitrification. Shielded microelectrodes were used to measure the concentration profiles of dissolved oxygen, ammonium, nitrate, and pH within the biofilm and the overlying boundary layer under actual operating conditions. Operating conditions were varied to assess the impact of bicarbonate loading (alkalinity), ammonium loading, and intra-membrane oxygen partial pressure on biofilm performance. Nitrification performance improved with increased ammonium and bicarbonate loadings over the range of operating conditions tested, but declined when the intra-membrane oxygen partial pressure was increased. Minor discrepancies between the measured and predicted concentration profiles within the biofilm were attributed to changes in biofilm density and vertical heterogeneities in biofilm structure not accounted for by the model. Nevertheless, predicted concentration profiles within the biofilm agreed well with experimental results over the range of conditions studied and highlight the fact that pH changes in the biofilm are significant especially in low alkalinity waters. The influent pH and buffer capacity of a wastewater may therefore have a significant impact on the performance of a membrane-aerated bioreactor with respect to nitrification, and nitrogen removal. PMID:25703659

  15. TOXICITY OF COPPER TO CUTTHROAT TROUT ('SALMO CLARKI') UNDER DIFFERENT CONDITIONS OF ALKALINITY, PH, AND HARDNESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Median lethal concentration (96-h LC50) values for acute copper toxicity to 3-10 g cutthroat trout (Salmo clarki) have been determined for nine different combinations of alkalinity, hardness, and pH. Equilibrium calculations were performed on the copper LC50 values; seven differe...

  16. Method of determining pH by the alkaline absorption of carbon dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1992-10-06

    A method is described for measuring the concentration of hydroxides in alkaline solutions in a remote location using the tendency of hydroxides to absorb carbon dioxide. The method includes the passing of carbon dioxide over the surface of an alkaline solution in a remote tank before and after measurements of the carbon dioxide solution. A comparison of the measurements yields the absorption fraction from which the hydroxide concentration can be calculated using a correlation of hydroxide or pH to absorption fraction. 2 figs.

  17. Wide pH range tolerance in extremophiles: towards understanding an important phenomenon for future biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Dhakar, Kusum; Pandey, Anita

    2016-03-01

    Microorganisms that inhabit the extreme pH environments are classified as acidophiles and alkaliphiles. A number of studies emerged from extreme high (hot springs, hydrothermal vents) as well as low temperature (arctic and antarctic regions, sea water, ice shelf, marine sediments, cold deserts, glaciers, temperate forests, and plantations) environments have highlighted the occurrence of microorganisms (thermophiles/psychrophiles) with the ability to tolerate wide pH range, from acidic to alkaline (1.5-14.0 in some cases), under laboratory conditions. However, the sampling source (soil/sediment) of these microorganisms showed the pH to be neutral or slightly acidic/alkaline. The aim of the present review is to discuss the phenomenon of wide pH range tolerance possessed by these microorganisms as a hidden character in perspective of their habitats, possible mechanisms, phylogeny, ecological and biotechnological relevance, and future perspectives. It is believed that the genome is a probable reservoir of the hidden variations. The extremophiles have the ability to adapt against the environmental change that is probably through the expression/regulation of the specific genes that were already present in the genome. The phenomenon is likely to have broad implications in biotechnology, including both environmental (such as bioremediation, biodegradation, and biocontrol), and industrial applications (as a source of novel extremozymes and many other useful bioactive compounds with wide pH range tolerance). PMID:26780356

  18. Detection of Baking Soda in Flat Bread by Direct pH Metery and Alkalinity Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahed Khaniki, G. H. R.; Vaezi, F.; Yunesian, M.; Nabizadeh, R.; Paseban, G. H. A.

    The objective of this study is evaluation of direct pH metery and alkalinity measurement methods for determination of baking soda in lavash bread (a kind of flat bread) in order to introduce and recommend a good practice of control. For running the experiments, various samples of lavash bread having different concentrations of baking soda were prepared. Ten grams of each sample were mixed with distilled water and then the prepared solutions were filtrated. The filtrates were then analyzed for pH and total alkalinity according to the distractions described in Standard Methods. Results show a significant correlation between the pH values of bread samples and the amount of baking soda. Also, a positive correlation has been observed between the alkalinity of bread samples and used baking soda. By comparing the R2-values specified for these two methods it could be concluded that the direct pH metery method is more reasonable. Furthermore, by this simple method it is possible to accelerate the detection of minute amounts of this chemical in bread.

  19. Alkaline pH activates the transport activity of GLUT1in L929 fibroblast cells

    PubMed Central

    Gunnink, Stephen M.; Kerk, Samuel A.; Kuiper, Benjamin D.; Alabi, Ola D.; Kuipers, David P.; Praamsma, Riemer C.; Wrobel, Kathryn E.; Louters, Larry L.

    2016-01-01

    The widely expressed mammalian glucose transporter, GLUT1, can be acutely activated in L929 fibroblast cells by a variety of conditions, including glucose deprivation, or treatment with various respiration inhibitors. Known thiol reactive compounds including phenylarsine oxide and nitroxyl are the fastest acting stimulators of glucose uptake, implicating cysteine biochemistry as critical to the acute activation of GLUT1. In this study, we report that in L929 cells glucose uptake increases 6-fold as the pH of the uptake solution is increased from 6 to 9 with the half-maximal activation at pH 7.5; consistent with the pKa of cysteine residues. This pH effect is essentially blocked by the pretreatment of the cells with either iodoacetamide or cinnamaldehyde, compounds that form covalent adducts with reduced cysteine residues. In addition, the activation by alkaline pH is not additive at pH 8 with known thiol reactive activators such as phenylarsine oxide or hydroxylamine. Kinetic analysis in L929 cells at pH 7 and 8 indicate that alkaline conditions both increases the Vmax and decreases the Km of transport. This is consistent with the observation that pH activation is additive to methylene blue, which activates uptake by increasing the Vmax, as well as to berberine, which activates uptake by decreasing the Km. This suggests that cysteine biochemistry is utilized in both methylene blue and berberine activation of glucose uptake. In contrast a pH increase from 7 to 8 in HCLE cells does not further activate glucose uptake. HCLE cells have a 25-fold higher basal glucose uptake rate than L929 cells and the lack of a pH effect suggests that the cysteine biochemistry has already occurred in HCLE cells. The data are consistent with pH having a complex mechanism of action, but one likely mediated by cysteine biochemistry. PMID:24333987

  20. Alkaline pH activates the transport activity of GLUT1 in L929 fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Gunnink, Stephen M; Kerk, Samuel A; Kuiper, Benjamin D; Alabi, Ola D; Kuipers, David P; Praamsma, Riemer C; Wrobel, Kathryn E; Louters, Larry L

    2014-04-01

    The widely expressed mammalian glucose transporter, GLUT1, can be acutely activated in L929 fibroblast cells by a variety of conditions, including glucose deprivation, or treatment with various respiration inhibitors. Known thiol reactive compounds including phenylarsine oxide and nitroxyl are the fastest acting stimulators of glucose uptake, implicating cysteine biochemistry as critical to the acute activation of GLUT1. In this study, we report that in L929 cells glucose uptake increases 6-fold as the pH of the uptake solution is increased from 6 to 9 with the half-maximal activation at pH 7.5; consistent with the pKa of cysteine residues. This pH effect is essentially blocked by the pretreatment of the cells with either iodoacetamide or cinnamaldehyde, compounds that form covalent adducts with reduced cysteine residues. In addition, the activation by alkaline pH is not additive at pH 8 with known thiol reactive activators such as phenylarsine oxide or hydroxylamine. Kinetic analysis in L929 cells at pH 7 and 8 indicate that alkaline conditions both increases the Vmax and decreases the Km of transport. This is consistent with the observation that pH activation is additive to methylene blue, which activates uptake by increasing the Vmax, as well as to berberine, which activates uptake by decreasing the Km. This suggests that cysteine biochemistry is utilized in both methylene blue and berberine activation of glucose uptake. In contrast a pH increase from 7 to 8 in HCLE cells does not further activate glucose uptake. HCLE cells have a 25-fold higher basal glucose uptake rate than L929 cells and the lack of a pH effect suggests that the cysteine biochemistry has already occurred in HCLE cells. The data are consistent with pH having a complex mechanism of action, but one likely mediated by cysteine biochemistry. PMID:24333987

  1. Improved volatile fatty acids anaerobic production from waste activated sludge by pH regulation: Alkaline or neutral pH?

    PubMed

    Ma, Huijun; Chen, Xingchun; Liu, He; Liu, Hongbo; Fu, Bo

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the anaerobic fermentation was carried out for volatile fatty acids (VFAs) production at different pH (between 7.0 and 10.0) conditions with untreated sludge and heat-alkaline pretreated waste activated sludge. In the fermentation with untreated sludge, the extent of hydrolysis of organic matters and extent of acidification at alkaline pH are 54.37% and 30.37%, respectively, resulting in the highest VFAs yield at 235.46mg COD/gVS of three pH conditions. In the fermentation with heat-alkaline pretreated sludge, the acidification rate and VFAs yield at neutral pH are 30.98% and 240.14mg COD/gVS, respectively, which are higher than that at other pH conditions. With the glucose or bovine serum albumin as substrate for VFAs production, the neutral pH showed a higher VFAs concentration than the alkaline pH condition. The results of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis indicated that the alkaline pH caused low microbial richness. Based on the results in this study, we demonstrated that the alkaline pH is favor of hydrolysis of organic matter in sludge while neutral pH improved the acidogenesis for the VFAs production from sludge. Our finding is obvious different to the previous research and helpful for the understanding of how heat-alkaline pretreatment and alkaline fermentation influence the VFAs production, and beneficial to the development of VFAs production process. PMID:26652215

  2. Tendency for oxidation of annelid hemoglobin at alkaline pH and dissociated states probed by redox titration.

    PubMed

    Bispo, Jose Ailton Conceicao; Landini, Gustavo Fraga; Santos, Jose Luis Rocha; Norberto, Douglas Ricardo; Bonafe, Carlos Francisco Sampaio

    2005-08-01

    The redox titration of extracellular hemoglobin of Glossoscolex paulistus (Annelidea) was investigated in different pH conditions and after dissociation induced by pressure. Oxidation increased with increasing pH, as shown by the reduced amount of ferricyanide necessary for the oxidation of hemoglobin. This behavior was the opposite of that of vertebrate hemoglobins. The potential of half oxidation (E1/2) changed from -65.3 to +146.8 mV when the pH increased from 4.50 to 8.75. The functional properties indicated a reduction in the log P50 from 1.28 to 0.28 in this pH range. The dissociation at alkaline pH or induced by high pressure, confirmed by HPLC gel filtration, suggested that disassembly of the hemoglobin could be involved in the increased potential for oxidation. These results suggest that the high stability and prolonged lifetime common to invertebrate hemoglobins is related to their low tendency to oxidize at acidic pH, in contrast to vertebrate hemoglobins. PMID:15982915

  3. The Effects of Alkaline pH on Microleakage of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and Calcium Enriched Mixture Apical Plugs

    PubMed Central

    Mirhadi, Hossein; Moazzami, Fariborz; Rangani Jahromi, Saeed; Safarzade, Sareh

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Alkaline pH can affect the physical and chemical properties and sealing ability of apical plug material. Calcium hydroxide is used as an intracanal medication to complete disinfection of root canals. It raises the pH of environment to alkaline value. Purpose The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the effect of alkaline pH on the sealing ability of calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) apical plugs. Materials and Method Seventy single-rooted human maxillary anterior teeth were randomly divided to two experimental groups for Angelus MTA and CEM cement (n=30) and two control groups (n=5). Each group was divided into two subgroups of 15 for neutral and alkaline pH, and 1 negative and 1 positive control groups of 5. The root canals were cleaned and shaped by using ProTaper rotary system (Dentsply Maillefer; Ballaigues, Switzerland) and the terminal 3mm of the roots were resected. Then, MTA and CEM cement were condensed in apical region with 3mm thickness. The samples were exposed to two environments with different pH values of 13 and 7.4. The leakage was assessed by using the fluid filtration technique at 1, 7, 14, 30 days intervals. Data were analyzed by the repeated measures MANOVA. Results There was no statistically significant difference in the rate of microleakage between neutral and alkaline pH of CEM cement and MTA (p> 0.05). The sealing ability of MTA in an alkaline pH of 13 was significantly less than CEM cement in this pH (p< 0.05). Conclusion An environment with alkaline pH had no adverse effect on the sealing ability of MTA and CEM cement used as apical plugs. CEM cement had better sealing ability in alkaline pH. PMID:26966703

  4. Multidrug resistance protein MdtM adds to the repertoire of antiporters involved in alkaline pH homeostasis in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In neutralophilic bacteria, monovalent metal cation/H+ antiporters play a key role in pH homeostasis. In Escherichia coli, only four antiporters (NhaA, NhaB, MdfA and ChaA) are identified to function in maintenance of a stable cytoplasmic pH under conditions of alkaline stress. We hypothesised that the multidrug resistance protein MdtM, a recently characterised homologue of MdfA and a member of the major facilitator superfamily, also functions in alkaline pH homeostasis. Results Assays that compared the growth of an E. coli ΔmdtM deletion mutant transformed with a plasmid encoding wild-type MdtM or the dysfunctional MdtM D22A mutant at different external alkaline pH values (ranging from pH 8.5 to 10) revealed a potential contribution by MdtM to alkaline pH tolerance, but only when millimolar concentrations of sodium or potassium was present in the growth medium. Fluorescence-based activity assays using inverted vesicles generated from transformants of antiporter-deficient (ΔnhaA, ΔnhaB, ΔchaA) E. coli TO114 cells defined MdtM as a low-affinity antiporter that catalysed electrogenic exchange of Na+, K+, Rb+ or Li+ for H+. The K+/H+ antiport reaction had a pH optimum at 9.0, whereas the Na+/H+ exchange activity was optimum at pH 9.25. Measurement of internal cellular pH confirmed MdtM as contributing to maintenance of a stable cytoplasmic pH, acid relative to the external pH, under conditions of alkaline stress. Conclusions Taken together, the results support a role for MdtM in alkaline pH tolerance. MdtM can therefore be added to the currently limited list of antiporters known to function in pH homeostasis in the model organism E. coli. PMID:23701827

  5. Geographic distance and pH drive bacterial distribution in alkaline lake sediments across Tibetan Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jinbo; Liu, Yongqin; Lin, Xiangui; Zhang, Huayong; Zeng, Jun; Hou, Juzhi; Yang, Yongping; Yao, Tandong; Knight, Rob; Chu, Haiyan

    2012-01-01

    Continent-scale biogeography has been extensively studied in soils and marine systems, but little is known about biogeographical patterns in non-marine sediments. We used barcode pyrosequencing to quantify the effects of local geochemical properties and geographic distance for bacterial community structure and membership, using sediment samples from 15 lakes on the Tibetan Plateau (4–1670 km apart). Bacterial communities were surprisingly diverse, and distinct from soil communities. Four of 26 phyla detected were dominant: Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Actinobacteria, albeit 20.2% of sequences were unclassified at the phylum level. As previously observed in acidic soil, pH was the dominant factor influencing alkaline sediment community structure, phylotype richness and phylogenetic diversity. In contrast, archaeal communities were less affected by pH. More geographically distant sites had more dissimilar communities (r = 0.443, P = 0.030). Variance partitioning analysis showed that geographic distance (historical contingencies) contributed more to bacterial community variation (12.2%) than any other factor, although the environmental factors explained more variance when combined (28.9%). Together, our results show that pH is the best predictor of bacterial community structure in alkaline sediments, and confirm that both geographic distance and chemical factors govern bacterial biogeography in lake sediments. PMID:22676420

  6. Anoxic Biodegradation of Isosaccharinic Acids at Alkaline pH by Natural Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Rout, Simon P.; Charles, Christopher J.; Doulgeris, Charalampos; McCarthy, Alan J.; Rooks, Dave J.; Loughnane, J. Paul; Laws, Andrew P.; Humphreys, Paul N.

    2015-01-01

    One design concept for the long-term management of the UK’s intermediate level radioactive wastes (ILW) is disposal to a cementitious geological disposal facility (GDF). Under the alkaline (10.0<pH>13.0) anoxic conditions expected within a GDF, cellulosic wastes will undergo chemical hydrolysis. The resulting cellulose degradation products (CDP) are dominated by α- and β-isosaccharinic acids (ISA), which present an organic carbon source that may enable subsequent microbial colonisation of a GDF. Microcosms established from neutral, near-surface sediments demonstrated complete ISA degradation under methanogenic conditions up to pH 10.0. Degradation decreased as pH increased, with β-ISA fermentation more heavily influenced than α-ISA. This reduction in degradation rate was accompanied by a shift in microbial population away from organisms related to Clostridium sporosphaeroides to a more diverse Clostridial community. The increase in pH to 10.0 saw an increase in detection of Alcaligenes aquatilis and a dominance of hydrogenotrophic methanogens within the Archaeal population. Methane was generated up to pH 10.0 with acetate accumulation at higher pH values reflecting a reduced detection of acetoclastic methanogens. An increase in pH to 11.0 resulted in the accumulation of ISA, the absence of methanogenesis and the loss of biomass from the system. This study is the first to demonstrate methanogenesis from ISA by near surface microbial communities not previously exposed to these compounds up to and including pH 10.0. PMID:26367005

  7. Anoxic Biodegradation of Isosaccharinic Acids at Alkaline pH by Natural Microbial Communities.

    PubMed

    Rout, Simon P; Charles, Christopher J; Doulgeris, Charalampos; McCarthy, Alan J; Rooks, Dave J; Loughnane, J Paul; Laws, Andrew P; Humphreys, Paul N

    2015-01-01

    One design concept for the long-term management of the UK's intermediate level radioactive wastes (ILW) is disposal to a cementitious geological disposal facility (GDF). Under the alkaline (10.0<pH>13.0) anoxic conditions expected within a GDF, cellulosic wastes will undergo chemical hydrolysis. The resulting cellulose degradation products (CDP) are dominated by α- and β-isosaccharinic acids (ISA), which present an organic carbon source that may enable subsequent microbial colonisation of a GDF. Microcosms established from neutral, near-surface sediments demonstrated complete ISA degradation under methanogenic conditions up to pH 10.0. Degradation decreased as pH increased, with β-ISA fermentation more heavily influenced than α-ISA. This reduction in degradation rate was accompanied by a shift in microbial population away from organisms related to Clostridium sporosphaeroides to a more diverse Clostridial community. The increase in pH to 10.0 saw an increase in detection of Alcaligenes aquatilis and a dominance of hydrogenotrophic methanogens within the Archaeal population. Methane was generated up to pH 10.0 with acetate accumulation at higher pH values reflecting a reduced detection of acetoclastic methanogens. An increase in pH to 11.0 resulted in the accumulation of ISA, the absence of methanogenesis and the loss of biomass from the system. This study is the first to demonstrate methanogenesis from ISA by near surface microbial communities not previously exposed to these compounds up to and including pH 10.0. PMID:26367005

  8. Transcriptome Profiling of Shewanella oneidensis Gene Expressionfollowing Exposure to Acidic and Alkaline pH

    SciTech Connect

    Leaphart, Adam B.; Thompson, Dorothea K.; Huang, Katherine; Alm,Eric; Wan, Xiu-Feng; Arkin, Adam P.; Brown, Steven D.; Wu, Liyou; Yan,Tingfen; Liu, Xueduan; Wickham, Gene S.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2007-04-02

    The molecular response of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 tovariations in extracellular pH was investigated based on genomewide geneexpression profiling. Microarray analysis revealed that cells elicitedboth general and specific transcriptome responses when challenged withenvironmental acid (pH 4) or base (pH 10) conditions over a 60-minperiod. Global responses included the differential expression of genesfunctionally linked to amino acid metabolism, transcriptional regulationand signal transduction, transport, cell membrane structure, andoxidative stress protection. Response to acid stress included theelevated expression of genes encoding glycogen biosynthetic enzymes,phosphate transporters, and the RNA polymerase sigma-38 factor (rpoS),whereas the molecular response to alkaline pH was characterized byupregulation of nhaA and nhaR, which are predicted to encode an Na+/H+antiporter and transcriptional activator, respectively, as well assulfate transport and sulfur metabolism genes. Collectively, theseresults suggest that S. oneidensis modulates multiple transporters, cellenvelope components, and pathways of amino acid consumption and centralintermediary metabolism as part of its transcriptome response to changingexternal pH conditions.

  9. Effect of electrolyte pH on CIEF with narrow pH range ampholytes.

    PubMed

    Páger, Csilla; Vargová, Andrea; Takácsi-Nagy, Anna; Dörnyei, Ágnes; Kilár, Ferenc

    2012-11-01

    CIEF of components following sequential injection of ampholytes and the sample zone offers unique advantages for analysis. The most important one of these is the efficient separation of amphoteric compounds having pIs outside the pH range of the ampholytes applied, but the resolution of the components can be increased by an adequate setup in the injection protocol. In this study, the effect of the pH of the anolyte and catholyte on the selectivity and speed of the isoelectric focusing was investigated. Changes in the pH values significantly influenced the resolution and the length of the pH gradient, while changes in the charge state of components were also observed. Three ampholyte solutions (from different suppliers) covering only two pH units were used for the analyses of substituted nitrophenol dyes in uncoated capillary. With appropriate setup, the components, with pIs not covered by the ampholyte pH range, migrated in charged state outside the pH gradient. This phenomenon is preferable for coupling isoelectric focusing to MS detection, by evading the undesirable ion suppression effect of ampholytes. PMID:23086725

  10. Alkalinity, pH, and copper corrosion by-product release

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, M.; Meyer, T.E.; Schock, M.R.

    1996-03-01

    Contrary to expectations, higher bicarbonate concentrations exacerbate copper corrosion rates and by-product release. In fact, as illustrated by monitoring experiences of large utilities and by laboratory data, the concentration of copper corrosion by-products in drinking water increases linearly with bicarbonate concentration at constant pH. This relationship implicates cupric hydroxide solubility in control of copper release from relatively new (less than a few years old) copper plumbing. Decision-marking guidance from a traditional Larson`s ratio or Langelier index approach can aggravate copper corrosion problems; consequently, their use should be discontinued for copper corrosion mitigation. In contrast, aeration-CO{sub 2} stripping is a particularly attractive strategy because benefits from higher pH are realized without adverse effects from higher alkalinity.

  11. Use of natural mordenite to remove chromium (III) and to neutralize pH of alkaline waste waters.

    PubMed

    Córdova-Rodríguez, Valduvina; Rodríguez-Iznaga, Inocente; Acosta-Chávez, Raquel María; Chávez-Rivas, Fernando; Petranovskii, Vitalii; Pestryakov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    The natural mordenite from Palmarito de Cauto deposit (PZ), Cuba, was studied in this work as an ion exchanger to remove Cr(3+) cations from alkaline aqueous solutions at different pH and chromium concentrations. The mordenite stability under cyclic treatment processes with alkaline solutions and its capacity to decrease the pH of the solutions was also analyzed. It was shown that PZ removes Cr(3+) ions from alkaline solutions, and it happens independently of the starting chromium concentration and the pH of the exchange solution used. This material has an important neutralizing effect on alkaline solutions, expressed in a significant pH decrease from the early stages of the treatments. For solutions with initial pH equal to 11, it decreases to a value of around seven. The stability of this material is not affected significantly after continuous cyclic treatment with NaOH solution, which shows that mordenite, in particular from Palmarito de Cauto deposit, has high stability in alkaline solutions. The results are important as they suggest that natural zeolites may be of interest in treatments of alkaline industrial waste effluents. PMID:26818904

  12. CCD camera full range pH sensor array.

    PubMed

    Safavi, A; Maleki, N; Rostamzadeh, A; Maesum, S

    2007-01-15

    Changes in colors of an array of optical sensors that responds in full pH range were recorded using a CCD camera. The data of the camera were transferred to the computer through a capture card. Simple software was written to read the specific color of each sensor. In order to associate sensor array responses with pH values, a number of different mathematics and chemometrics methods were investigated and compared. The results show that the use of "Microsoft Excel's Solver" provides results which are in very good agreement with those obtained with chemometric methods such as artificial neural network (ANN) and partial least square (PLS) methods. PMID:19071333

  13. High-resolution Imaging of pH in Alkaline Sediments and Water Based on a New Rapid Response Fluorescent Planar Optode.

    PubMed

    Han, Chao; Yao, Lei; Xu, Di; Xie, Xianchuan; Zhang, Chaosheng

    2016-01-01

    A new dual-lumophore optical sensor combined with a robust RGB referencing method was developed for two-dimensional (2D) pH imaging in alkaline sediments and water. The pH sensor film consisted of a proton-permeable polymer (PVC) in which two dyes with different pH sensitivities and emission colors: (1) chloro phenyl imino propenyl aniline (CPIPA) and (2) the coumarin dye Macrolex(®) fluorescence yellow 10 GN (MFY-10 GN) were entrapped. Calibration experiments revealed the typical sigmoid function and temperature dependencies. This sensor featured high sensitivity and fast response over the alkaline working ranges from pH 7.5 to pH 10.5. Cross-sensitivity towards ionic strength (IS) was found to be negligible for freshwater when IS <0.1 M. The sensor had a spatial resolution of approximately 22 μm and aresponse time of <120 s when going from pH 7.0 to 9.0. The feasibility of the sensor was demonstrated using the pH microelectrode. An example of pH image obtained in the natrual freshwater sediment and water associated with the photosynthesis of Vallisneria spiral species was also presented, suggesting that the sensor held great promise for the field applications. PMID:27199163

  14. High-resolution Imaging of pH in Alkaline Sediments and Water Based on a New Rapid Response Fluorescent Planar Optode

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chao; Yao, Lei; Xu, Di; Xie, Xianchuan; Zhang, Chaosheng

    2016-01-01

    A new dual-lumophore optical sensor combined with a robust RGB referencing method was developed for two-dimensional (2D) pH imaging in alkaline sediments and water. The pH sensor film consisted of a proton-permeable polymer (PVC) in which two dyes with different pH sensitivities and emission colors: (1) chloro phenyl imino propenyl aniline (CPIPA) and (2) the coumarin dye Macrolex® fluorescence yellow 10 GN (MFY-10 GN) were entrapped. Calibration experiments revealed the typical sigmoid function and temperature dependencies. This sensor featured high sensitivity and fast response over the alkaline working ranges from pH 7.5 to pH 10.5. Cross-sensitivity towards ionic strength (IS) was found to be negligible for freshwater when IS <0.1 M. The sensor had a spatial resolution of approximately 22 μm and aresponse time of <120 s when going from pH 7.0 to 9.0. The feasibility of the sensor was demonstrated using the pH microelectrode. An example of pH image obtained in the natrual freshwater sediment and water associated with the photosynthesis of Vallisneria spiral species was also presented, suggesting that the sensor held great promise for the field applications. PMID:27199163

  15. High-resolution Imaging of pH in Alkaline Sediments and Water Based on a New Rapid Response Fluorescent Planar Optode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Chao; Yao, Lei; Xu, Di; Xie, Xianchuan; Zhang, Chaosheng

    2016-05-01

    A new dual-lumophore optical sensor combined with a robust RGB referencing method was developed for two-dimensional (2D) pH imaging in alkaline sediments and water. The pH sensor film consisted of a proton-permeable polymer (PVC) in which two dyes with different pH sensitivities and emission colors: (1) chloro phenyl imino propenyl aniline (CPIPA) and (2) the coumarin dye Macrolex® fluorescence yellow 10 GN (MFY-10 GN) were entrapped. Calibration experiments revealed the typical sigmoid function and temperature dependencies. This sensor featured high sensitivity and fast response over the alkaline working ranges from pH 7.5 to pH 10.5. Cross-sensitivity towards ionic strength (IS) was found to be negligible for freshwater when IS <0.1 M. The sensor had a spatial resolution of approximately 22 μm and aresponse time of <120 s when going from pH 7.0 to 9.0. The feasibility of the sensor was demonstrated using the pH microelectrode. An example of pH image obtained in the natrual freshwater sediment and water associated with the photosynthesis of Vallisneria spiral species was also presented, suggesting that the sensor held great promise for the field applications.

  16. Uranium(VI) Diffusion in Sodium-Montmorillonite at Alkaline pH Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinnacher, R. M.; Davis, J. A.; Tournassat, C.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Diffusive transport of uranium(VI) in montmorillonite clay and bentonite has important implications for uranium(VI) mobility in engineered barrier systems or host rocks in high level radioactive waste repositories, and clay-rich soils and sediments in the environment. The prediction of uranium(VI) adsorption and diffusion in clay-rich media, however, is complicated by (1) the complexity of the mineralogical structure of montmorillonite, in terms of its pore-size distributions and available surface site types, and (2) the complex uranium(VI) solution speciation, which can include cationic, uncharged, and anionic complexes, depending on solution conditions. For instance, a partial or full exclusion of anions from negatively charged clay interlayer spaces could change the effective 'anion-accessible' porosity and decrease the diffusive flux of these solutes under steady state conditions. In contrast, weak cation exchange reactions can result in 'surface diffusion' of adsorbed cations, such as UO2OH+, in addition to diffusion in the liquid phase, resulting in greater diffusive fluxes at steady state. In order to investigate these complex interactions, we performed two, lab-scale uranium(VI) through-diffusion experiments in lightly compacted Na-montmorillonite at slightly different, alkaline pH conditions (average pH values of 8.69 and 8.87). Observed uranium(VI) diffusive fluxes were decreased by approximately an order of magnitude in comparison to a tritium tracer. This indicates a relevance of 'anion exclusion' effects, the full or partial exclusion of anionic U(VI)-carbonato species from clay interlayer spaces. In addition, uranium(VI) sorption reactions were shown to be relevant in the diffusion experiments, even at alkaline pH values of around 8.7 and 8.9, where uranium(VI) sorption is low compared to other pH conditions. Despite the similarity of pH conditions, different degrees of uranium(VI) retardation were determined for the two systems. Additionally, we

  17. Fluorescent probes and bioimaging: alkali metals, alkaline earth metals and pH.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Hu, Ying; Yoon, Juyoung

    2015-07-21

    All living species and life forms have an absolute requirement for bio-functional metals and acid-base equilibrium chemistry owing to the critical roles they play in biological processes. Hence, a great need exists for efficient methods to detect and monitor biometals and acids. In the last few years, great attention has been paid to the development of organic molecule based fluorescent chemosensors. The availability of new synthetic fluorescent probes has made fluorescence microscopy an indispensable tool for tracing biologically important molecules and in the area of clinical diagnostics. This review highlights the recent advances that have been made in the design and bioimaging applications of fluorescent probes for alkali metals and alkaline earth metal cations, including lithium, sodium and potassium, magnesium and calcium, and for pH determination within biological systems. PMID:25317749

  18. Zinc ions and alkaline pH alter the phosphorylation state of human erythrocyte membrane proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Fennell, R.L. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Since the phosphorylation state of the red cell membrane proteins in vitro is likely to be regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, this research was carried out to investigate the possible role of membrane-bound phosphatase activities. These studies were conducted with red blood cell ghosts and IOVs from normal individuals and from an individual with hereditary spherocytosis. In vitro phosphorylation with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P) ATP was conducted in the presence and the absence of Zn{sup ++}, or erythrocyte ghosts and IOVs were pretreated for 30 minutes at 37{degree}C and pH 7-11 in the presence and the absence of calf intestine alkaline phosphatase. The resulting phosphoproteins were analyzed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, stained with Coomassie blue, and fluorographed. In the presence of Zn{sup ++}, the red blood ghosts, with or without pretreatment, demonstrated enhanced phosphorylation of membrane proteins, including band 4.2. Preincubation at pH 10 in the presence of absence of exogenous phosphatase further stimulates phosphorylation of these proteins. Under similar conditions, the erythrocyte membranes also demonstrated the ability to hydrolyze p-nitrophenyl phosphate and to remove {sup 32}P from red blood cell phosphoproteins.

  19. HYDROXYL RADICAL/OZONE RATIOS DURING OZONATION PROCESSES. II. THE EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE, PH, ALKALINITY, AND DOM PROPERTIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The influence of temperature, pH, alkalinity, and type and concentration of the dissolved organic matter (DOM) on the rate of ozone (O3) decomposition, O3-exposure, .OH-exposure and the ratio Rct of the concentrations of .OH and O3 has been studied. For a standardized single ozon...

  20. Effect of pH alkaline salts of fatty acids on the inhibition of bacteria associated with poultry processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The agar diffusion assay was used to examine the effect of pH on the ability of alkaline salts of three fatty acids (FA) to inhibit growth of bacteria associated with poultry processing. FA solutions were prepared by dissolving 0.5 M concentrations of caprylic, capric, or lauric acid in separate ali...

  1. Extracellular Alkaline pH Leads to Increased Metastatic Potential of Estrogen Receptor Silenced Endocrine Resistant Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Khajah, Maitham A.; Almohri, Iman; Mathew, Princy M.; Luqmani, Yunus A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Endocrine resistance in breast cancer is associated with enhanced metastatic potential and poor clinical outcome, presenting a significant therapeutic challenge. We have established several endocrine insensitive breast cancer lines by shRNA induced depletion of estrogen receptor (ER) by transfection of MCF-7 cells which all exhibit enhanced expression profile of mesenchymal markers with reduction of epithelial markers, indicating an epithelial to mesenchymal transition. In this study we describe their behaviour in response to change in extracellular pH, an important factor controlling cell motility and metastasis. Methods Morphological changes associated with cell exposure to extracellular alkaline pH were assessed by live cell microscopy and the effect of various ion pumps on this behavior was investigated by pretreatment with chemical inhibitors. The activity and expression profile of key signaling molecules was assessed by western blotting. Cell motility and invasion were examined by scratch and under-agarose assays respectively. Total matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity and specifically of MMP2/9 was assessed in conditioned medium in response to brief alkaline pH exposure. Results Exposure of ER –ve but not ER +ve breast cancer cells to extracellular alkaline pH resulted in cell shrinkage and spherical appearance (termed contractolation); this was reversed by returning the pH back to 7.4. Contractolation was blocked by targeting the Na+/K+ and Na+/H+ pumps with specific chemical inhibitors. The activity and expression profile of key signaling molecules critical for cell adhesion were modulated by the exposure to alkaline pH. Brief exposure to alkaline pH enhanced MMP2/9 activity and the invasive potential of ER –ve cells in response to serum components and epithelial growth factor stimulation without affecting unhindered motility. Conclusions Endocrine resistant breast cancer cells behave very differently to estrogen responsive cells in

  2. Low temperature alkaline pH hydrolysis of oxygen-free Titan tholins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brassé, Coralie; Buch, Arnaud; Raulin, François; Coll, Patrice; Poch, Olivier; Ramirez, Sandra

    2014-05-01

    The largest moon of Saturn, Titan, is known for its dense, nitrogen-rich atmosphere. The organic aerosols which are produced in Titan's atmosphere are of great astrobiological interest, particularly because of their potential evolution when they reach the surface and may interact with putative ammonia-water cryomagma[1]. In this context we have followed the evolution of alkaline pH hydrolysis (25wt% ammonia-water) of Titan tholins (produced by an experimental setup using a plasma DC discharge named PLASMA) at low temperature. Urea has been identified as one of the main product of tholins hydrolysis along with several amino acids (alanine, glycine and aspartic acid). However, those molecules have also been detected in non-hydrolyzed tholins. One explanation is a possible oxygen leak in the PLASMA reactor during the tholins synthesis[2]. Following this preliminary study the synthesis protocol has been improved by isolating the whole device in a specially designed glove box which protect the PLASMA experiment from the laboratory atmosphere. Once we confirmed the non-presence of oxygen in tholins, we performed alkaline pH hydrolysis of oxygen-free tholins. Then we verify that the organic compounds cited above are still produced in-situ. Moreover, a recent study shows that the subsurface ocean may contain a lower fraction of ammonia (about 5wt% or less[3]), than the one used until now in this kind of experimental study[2, 4]. Thus, we have carried out new hydrolysis experiments which take this lower value into account. Additional studies have provided new highlights on the bulk composition of Titan for various gas species. Indeed, the observed Saturn's atmosphere enrichment constrains the composition of the planetesimals present in the feeding zone of Saturn. The enrichment in volatiles in Saturn's atmosphere has been reproduced by assuming the presence of specific gas species[5, 6], in particular CO2 and H2S. In the present study we assume that those gas species have

  3. Sewage sludge pretreatment by microwave irradiation combined with activated carbon fibre at alkaline pH for anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dedong; Guo, Sixiao; Ma, Nina; Wang, Guowen; Ma, Chun; Hao, Jun; Xue, Mang; Zhang, Xinxin

    2016-01-01

    This research focuses on the effects of microwave-assisted activated carbon fibre (ACF) (MW-ACF) treatment on sewage sludge at alkaline pH. The disintegration and biodegradability of sewage sludge were studied. It was found that the MW-ACF process at alkaline pH provided a rapid and efficient process to disrupt the microbial cells in the sludge. The results suggested that when irradiated at 800 W MW for 110 s with a dose of 1.0 g ACF/g solid concentration (SS) at pH 10.5, the MW-ACF pretreatment achieved 55% SS disintegration, 23% greater than the value of MW alone (32%). The concentration of total nitrogen, total phosphorus, supernatant soluble chemical oxygen demand, protein, and polysaccharide increased by 60%, 144%, 145%, 74%, and 77%, respectively. An increase in biogas production by 63.7% was achieved after 20 days of anaerobic digestion (AD), compared to the control. The results indicated that the MW-ACF pretreatment process at alkaline pH provides novel sludge management options in disintegration of sewage sludge for further AD. PMID:27332832

  4. Bleb formation is induced by alkaline but not acidic pH in estrogen receptor silenced breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Khajah, Maitham A; Mathew, Princy M; Alam-Eldin, Nada S; Luqmani, Yunus A

    2015-04-01

    De novo and acquired resistance to endocrine-based therapies in breast cancer occurs in parallel with epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), which is associated with enhanced proliferative and metastatic potential, and poor clinical outcome. We have established several endocrine insensitive breast cancer lines by shRNA-induced depletion of estrogen receptor (ER) by transfection of MCF7 cells. All of these exhibit EMT. We have previously reported that brief exposure of specifically ER- breast cancer cells, to extracellular alkaline pH, results in cell rounding and segregation, and leads to enhanced invasive potential. In this study we describe more detailed morphological changes and compare these with cell exposure to acidic pH. Morphological changes and localization of various molecules critical for cell adhesion and motility, associated with pH effects, were assessed by live cell microscopy, electron microscopy, and immunofluorescence. Exposure of either ER- or ER+ breast cancer cells to extracellular acidic pH did not induce significant changes in morphological appearance. Conversely, brief exposure of specifically ER silenced cells, to alkaline pH, resulted in cell contractolation and formation of bleb-like actin-rich structures which were evenly distributed on the outer membrane. Integrin α2, FAK, and JAM-1 were found in the cytoplasm streaming into the newly formed blebs. These blebs appear to be related to cell polarity and movement. Pre-treatment with cytochalasin-D or inhibitors of Rho or MLCK prevented both contractolation and bleb formation. Our data suggest that the effect of pH on the microenvironment of endocrine resistant breast cancer cells needs to be more extensively investigated. Alkaline, rather than acidic pH, appears to induce dramatic morphological changes, and enhances their invasive capabilities, through re-organization of cortical actin. PMID:25672508

  5. The impact of pH on floc structure characteristic of polyferric chloride in a low DOC and high alkalinity surface water treatment.

    PubMed

    Cao, Baichuan; Gao, Baoyu; Liu, Xin; Wang, Mengmeng; Yang, Zhonglian; Yue, Qinyan

    2011-11-15

    The adjustment of pH is an important way to enhance removal efficiency in coagulation units, and in this process, the floc size, strength and structure can be changed, influencing the subsequent solid/liquid separation effect. In this study, an inorganic polymer coagulant, polyferric chloride (PFC) was used in a low dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and high alkalinity surface water treatment. The influence of coagulation pH on removal efficiency, floc growth, strength, re-growth capability and fractal dimension was examined. The optimum dosage was predetermined as 0.150 mmol/L, and excellent particle and organic matter removal appeared in the pH range of 5.50-5.75. The structure characteristics of flocs formed under four pH conditions were investigated through the analysis of floc size, effect of shear and particle scattering properties by a laser scattering instrument. The results indicated that flocs formed at neutral pH condition gave the largest floc size and the highest growth rate. During the coagulation period, the fractal dimension of floc aggregates increased in the first minutes and then decreased and larger flocs generally had smaller fractal dimensions. The floc strength, which was assessed by the relationship of floc diameter and velocity gradient, decreased with the increase of coagulation pH. Flocs formed at pH 4.00 had better recovery capability when exposed to lower shear forces, while flocs formed at neutral and alkaline conditions had better performance under higher shear forces. PMID:21959092

  6. Upper ocean carbon cycling inferred from direct pH observations made by profiling floats and estimated alkalinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, K. S.; Plant, J. N.; Jannasch, H. W.; Coletti, L. J.; Elrod, V.; Sakamoto, C.; Riser, S.

    2015-12-01

    The annual cycle of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) is a key tracer of net community production and carbon export in the upper ocean. In particular, the DIC concentration is much less sensitive to air-sea gas exchange, when compared to oxygen, another key tracer of upper ocean metabolism. However, the annual DIC cycle is observed with a seasonal resolution at only a few time-series stations in the open ocean. Here, we consider the annual carbon cycle that has been observed using profiling floats equipped with pH sensors. Deep-Sea DuraFET pH sensors have been deployed on profiling floats for over three years and they can provide temporal and spatial resolution of 5 to 10 days and 5 to 10 m in the upper ocean over multi-year periods. In addition to pH, a second carbon system parameter is required to compute DIC. Total alkalinity can be derived from the float observations of temperature, salinity and oxygen using equations in these variables that are fitted to shipboard observations of alkalinity obtained in the global repeat hydrography programs (e.g., Juranek et al., GRL, doi:10.1029/2011GL048580, 2011), as the relationships should be stable in time in the open ocean. Profiling floats with pH have been deployed from Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) cruises since late 2012 and an array of floats with pH have been deployed since early 2014 in the Southern Ocean as part of the SOCCOM program. The SOCCOM array should grow to nearly 200 floats over the next 5 years. The sensor data was quality controlled and adjusted by comparing observations at 1500 m depth to the deep climatology of pH (derived from DIC and alkalinity) computed with the GLODAP data set. After adjustment, the surface DIC concentrations were calculated from pH and alkalinity. This yields a data set that is used to examine annual net community production in the oligotrophic North Pacific and in the South Pacific near 150 West from 40 South to 65 South.

  7. The immobilization of all spermatozoa in vitro by bitter lemon drink and the effect of alkaline pH.

    PubMed

    Nwoha, P U

    1992-12-01

    Researchers at Obafemi Awolowo University in Ile-Ife, Nigeria, collected semen samples from 7 healthy men 25-30 years old who had abstained from sex for at least 5 days in order to examine the spermicidal action of 4 soft drinks (Krest bitter lemon, Afri-Cola, Coca-Cola, and Pepsi-Cola), the effect of increased temperature of the drinks on spermicidal action, and the effect of changing the soft drinks from an acid, as it comes from the factory, (ph 2.4) to an alkaline (pH 7.5). Increasing the temperature of the soft drinks from room temperature (22 degrees Celsius) to body temperatures (37 degrees Celsius) did not significantly change the spermicidal action any of the soft drinks. All soft drinks with an acid pH, except Coca-Cola, had a significantly lower percent of sperm motility than those with an alkaline pH (0-42.3% vs. 20-52.1%; p .001). In fact, Krest bitter lemon in its factory form (acid pH) completely immobilized all spermatozoa within 1 minute after the researchers diluted the semen with the soft drink. Alkaline Coca-Cola had a significantly lower percent of sperm motility than did acid Coca-Cola (35.8% vs. 46.5%; p .001). Other than Krest bitter lemon, the significant decreases in sperm motility were not enough to prevent pregnancy. These findings indicated that researchers should test Krest bitter lemon for effectiveness as a postcoital contraceptive. If indeed it proves effective, it has great potential as such a contraceptive among the poor in the densely population developed countries since it is readily available and inexpensive. PMID:1493713

  8. Thermococcus alcaliphilus sp. nov., a new hyperthermophilic archaeum growing on polysulfide at alkaline pH.

    PubMed

    Keller, M; Braun, F J; Dirmeier, R; Hafenbradl, D; Burggraf, S; Rachel, R; Stetter, K O

    1995-12-01

    A novel coccoid-shaped, hyperthermophilic, heterotrophic member of the archaea was isolated from a shallow marine hydrothermal system at Vulcano Island, Italy. The isolate grew between 56 and 90 degrees C with an optimum around 85 degrees C. The pH range for growth was 6.5 to 10.5, with an optimum around 9.0. Polysulfide and elemental sulfur were reduced to H2S. Sulfur stimulated the growth rate. The isolate fermented yeast extract, peptone, meat extract, tryptone, and casein. Isovalerate, isobutyrate, propionate, acetate, CO2, NH3, and H2S (in the presence of S degrees ) were detected as end products. Growth was not inhibited by H2. Based on DNA-DNA hybridization and 16S rRNA partial sequences, the new isolate represents a new species of Thermococcus, which we named Thermococcus alcaliphilus. The type strain is isolate AEDII12 (DSM 10322). PMID:8588740

  9. Computational Design of a pH Stable Enzyme: Understanding Molecular Mechanism of Penicillin Acylase's Adaptation to Alkaline Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Suplatov, Dmitry; Panin, Nikolay; Kirilin, Evgeny; Shcherbakova, Tatyana; Kudryavtsev, Pavel; Švedas, Vytas

    2014-01-01

    Protein stability provides advantageous development of novel properties and can be crucial in affording tolerance to mutations that introduce functionally preferential phenotypes. Consequently, understanding the determining factors for protein stability is important for the study of structure-function relationship and design of novel protein functions. Thermal stability has been extensively studied in connection with practical application of biocatalysts. However, little work has been done to explore the mechanism of pH-dependent inactivation. In this study, bioinformatic analysis of the Ntn-hydrolase superfamily was performed to identify functionally important subfamily-specific positions in protein structures. Furthermore, the involvement of these positions in pH-induced inactivation was studied. The conformational mobility of penicillin acylase in Escherichia coli was analyzed through molecular modeling in neutral and alkaline conditions. Two functionally important subfamily-specific residues, Gluβ482 and Aspβ484, were found. Ionization of these residues at alkaline pH promoted the collapse of a buried network of stabilizing interactions that consequently disrupted the functional protein conformation. The subfamily-specific position Aspβ484 was selected as a hotspot for mutation to engineer enzyme variant tolerant to alkaline medium. The corresponding Dβ484N mutant was produced and showed 9-fold increase in stability at alkaline conditions. Bioinformatic analysis of subfamily-specific positions can be further explored to study mechanisms of protein inactivation and to design more stable variants for the engineering of homologous Ntn-hydrolases with improved catalytic properties. PMID:24959852

  10. Geochemical Modeling of pH Neutralization of High Alkaline-Saline Waste Fluids in Unsaturated Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G.; Zheng, Z.

    2004-12-01

    Leakage of high alkaline-saline fluids, such as those stored in Hanford, a site of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in Washington State, has raised attention of scientific community. These fluids have unique thermodynamic and physical properties. Chemical components in the fluids are incompletely dissociated, especially those containing divalent or polyvalent ions. A number of laboratory experiments through injecting synthetic high alkaline-saline fluids (up to 10M of sodium nitrate, pH >12) into the sediments sampled from the DOE Hanford site were conducted to study the reactive transport processes of the fluids in subsurface environments. The experimental results observed show that the composition of the high alkaline sodium nitrate fluids can be drastically changed due to fluid-rock interactions, and eventually lead to pH neutralization of the fluid in the plume front. The dominant fluid-rock interactions are cation exchanges (Na+-K+-Ca+2-Mg+2-H+), precipitation of calcium and magnesium minerals, and dissolution of silica. In order to precisely model the reactive transport of these processes, a coupling of the Pitzer's ion-interaction geochemical model and a flow and transport model would be highly needed. The extended existing reactive geochemical transport code, BIO-CORE2Dc, incorporating a comprehensive Pitzer ion-interaction model, is capable of predicting the experimental observations. In addition, the developed model was tested against two reported cases. In both cases, the measured mean ionic activity coefficients were well reproduced by our model, while the Debye-Hückel model, usually used to calculate aqueous species activities in dilute solutions, was unable to predict the experimental data. Finally, modeling study based on our laboratory column experiment was performed. Our simulation is able to capture the observed pH trends, changes in exchangeable cations such as Ca+2, Mg+2, and formation of secondary precipitation phases in the plume front.

  11. Preliminary evaluation of a constructed wetland for treating extremely alkaline (pH 12) steel slag drainage.

    PubMed

    Mayes, W M; Aumônier, J; Jarvis, A P

    2009-01-01

    High pH (> 12) leachates are an environmental problem associated with drainage from lime (CaO)-rich industrial residues such as steel slags, lime spoil and coal combustion residues. Recent research has highlighted the potential for natural ('volunteer') wetlands to buffer extremely alkaline influent waters. This appears ascribable to high CO(2) partial pressures in the wetland waters from microbial respiration, which accelerates precipitation of calcium carbonate (CaCO(3)), and the high specific surface area for mineral precipitation offered by macrophytes. The research presented here builds on this and provides preliminary evaluation of a constructed wetland built in March 2008 to buffer drainage from steel slag heaps in north-east England. The drainage water from the slag mounds is characterised by a mean pH of 11.9, high concentrations of Ca (up to 700 mg/L), total alkalinity (up to 800 mg/L as CaCO(3)) and are slightly brackish (Na = 300 mg/L; Cl = 400 mg/L) reflecting native groundwaters at this coastal setting. Documented calcite precipitation rates (mean of 5 g CaCO(3)/m(2)/day) from nearby volunteer sites receiving steel slag drainage were used to scale the constructed wetland planted with Phragmites australis; a species found to spontaneously grow in the vicinity of the discharge. Improved performance of the wetland during summer months may at least in part be due to biological activity which enhances rates of calcite precipitation and thus lowering of pH. Secondary Ca-rich precipitates also serve as a sink for some trace elements present at low concentrations in the slag leachate such as Ni and V. The implications for scaling and applying constructed wetlands for highly alkaline drainage are discussed. PMID:19494466

  12. Utilization of phosphorus loaded alkaline residue to immobilize lead in a shooting range soil.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yubo; Qi, Fangjie; Seshadri, Balaji; Xu, Yilu; Hou, Jiexi; Ok, Yong Sik; Dong, Xiaoli; Li, Qiao; Sun, Xiuyun; Wang, Lianjun; Bolan, Nanthi

    2016-11-01

    The alkaline residue generated from the production of soda ash using the ammonia-soda method has been successfully used in removing phosphorus (P) from aqueous solution. But the accumulation of P-containing solid after P removal is an undesirable menace to the environment. To achieve the goal of recycling, this study explored the feasibility of reusing the P loaded alkaline residue as an amendment for immobilization of lead (Pb) in a shooting range soil. The main crystalline phase and micromorphology of amendments were determined using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy-electron dispersion spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) methods. The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP), sequential extraction procedure, and physiologically based extraction test (PBET) were employed to evaluate the effectiveness of Pb immobilization in soil after 45 d incubation. Treatment with P loaded alkaline residue was significantly effective in reducing the TCLP and PBET extractable Pb concentrations in contrast to the untreated soil. Moreover, a positive change in the distribution of Pb fractions was observed in the treated soil, i.e., more than 60% of soil-Pb was transformed to the residual fraction compared to the original soil. On the other hand, P loaded amendments also resulted in a drastic reduction in phytoavailable Pb to the winter wheat and a mild release of P as a nutrient in treated soil, which also confirmed the improvement of soil quality. PMID:27513552

  13. Fluorescent pH Sensors for Broad-Range pH Measurement Based on a Single Fluorophore.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jing; Liu, Daying; Liu, Xiaoyan; Guan, Shiquan; Shi, Fengli; Chang, Hexi; He, Huarui; Yang, Guangming

    2015-06-16

    We constructed a series of novel optical sensors for determination of broad-range pH based on a single fluorophore and multi-ionophores with different pK(a) values. These optical sensors use photoinduced electron transfer (PET) as the signal transduction and follow the design concept of "fluorophore-spacer-receptor (ionophore)" which employs 4-amino-1,8-naphthalimide as the single fluorophore, ethyl moiety as the spacer, and a series of phenols and anilines as the receptors. Key to the successful development of this sensor system is that coupling the receptors with six different pK(a) values with a single fluorophore produces the correct optical properties. This rational design affords a series of optical pH sensors with unique fluorescence property and accurately tunable pH measurement ranging from 1 to 14 pH units. Because of covalent immobilization of the indicators, these sensors demonstrate excellent stability, adequate reversibility, and satisfactory dynamic range up to full pH ranges (pH 1-14). PMID:25893705

  14. Contrasting pH buffering patterns in neutral-alkaline soils along a 3600 km transect in northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, W.; Nelson, P. N.; Li, M.-H.; Cai, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Shan, Y.; Wang, R.; Han, X.; Jiang, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Soil pH buffering capacity (pHBC) plays a crucial role in predicting acidification rates, yet its large-scale patterns and controls are poorly understood, especially for neutral-alkaline soils. Here, we evaluated the spatial patterns and drivers of pHBC along a 3600 km long transect (1900 km sub-transect with carbonate containing soils and 1700 km sub-transect with non-carbonate containing soils) across northern China. Soil pHBC was greater in the carbonate containing soils than in the non-carbonate containing soils. Acid addition decreased soil pH in the non-carbonate containing soils more markedly than in the carbonate containing soils. Within the carbonate soil sub-transect, soil pHBC was positively correlated with cation exchange capacity (CEC), carbonate content and exchangeable sodium (Na) concentration, but negatively correlated with initial pH and clay content, and not correlated with soil organic carbon (SOC) content. Within the non-carbonate sub-transect, soil pHBC was positively related to initial pH, clay content, CEC and exchangeable Na concentration, but not related to SOC content. Carbonate content was the primary determinant of pHBC in the carbonate containing soils and CEC was the main determinant of buffering capacity in the non-carbonate containing soils. Soil pHBC was positively related to aridity index and carbonate content across the carbonate containing soil sub-transect. Our results indicated that mechanisms controlling pHBC differ among neutral-alkaline soils of northern China, especially between carbonate and non-carbonate containing soils, leading to different rates, risks, and impacts of acidification. This understanding should be incorporated into the acidification risk assessment and landscape management in a changing world.

  15. Contrasting pH buffering patterns in neutral-alkaline soils along a 3600 km transect in northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, W. T.; Nelson, P. N.; Li, M.-H.; Cai, J. P.; Zhang, Y. Y.; Zhang, Y. G.; Yang, S.; Wang, R. Z.; Wang, Z. W.; Wu, Y. N.; Han, X. G.; Jiang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Soil pH buffering capacity (pHBC) plays a crucial role in predicting acidification rates, yet its large-scale patterns and controls are poorly understood, especially for neutral-alkaline soils. Here, we evaluated the spatial patterns and drivers of pHBC along a 3600 km long transect (1900 km sub-transect with carbonate-containing soils and 1700 km sub-transect with non-carbonate-containing soils) across northern China. Soil pHBC was greater in the carbonate-containing soils than in the non-carbonate-containing soils. Acid addition decreased soil pH in the non-carbonate-containing soils more markedly than in the carbonate-containing soils. Within the carbonate soil sub-transect, soil pHBC was positively correlated with cation exchange capacity (CEC), carbonate content and exchangeable sodium (Na) concentration, but negatively correlated with initial pH and clay content, and not correlated with soil organic carbon (SOC) content. Within the non-carbonate sub-transect, soil pHBC was positively related to initial pH, clay content, CEC and exchangeable Na concentration, but not related to SOC content. Carbonate content was the primary determinant of pHBC in the carbonate-containing soils and CEC was the main determinant of buffering capacity in the non-carbonate-containing soils. Along the transect, soil pHBC was different in regions with different aridity index. Soil pHBC was positively related to aridity index and carbonate content across the carbonate-containing soil sub-transect. Our results indicated that mechanisms controlling pHBC differ among neutral-alkaline soils of northern China, especially between carbonate- and non-carbonate-containing soils. This understanding should be incorporated into the acidification risk assessment and landscape management in a changing world.

  16. Isolation of a Sulfur-oxidizing Bacterium That can Grow under Alkaline pH, from Corroded Concrete.

    PubMed

    Maeda, T; Negishi, A; Oshima, Y; Nogami, Y; Kamimura, K; Sugio, T

    1998-01-01

    To study the early stages of concrete corrosion by bacteria, sulfur-oxidizing bacterium strain RO-1, which grows in an alkaline thiosulfate medium (pH 10.0) was isolated from corroded concreate and characterized. Strain RO-1 was a Gram negative, rod-shaped bacterium (0.5-0.6×0.9-1.5 μm). The mean G+C content of the DNA of strain RO-1 was 65.0 mol%. Optimum pH and temperature for growth were 8.0. and 30-37°C, respectively. When grown in thiosulfate medium with pH 10.0, growth rate of the strain was 48% of that observed at the optimum pH for growth. Strain RO-1 used sulfide, thiosulfate, and glucose, but not elemental sulfur or tetrathionate, as a sole energy source. Strain RO-1 grew under anaerobic conditions in pepton-NO3 (-) medium containing sodium nitrate as an electron acceptor, and had enzyme activities that oxidized sulfide, elemental sulfur, thiosulfate, sulfite, and glucose, but not tetrathionate. The bacterium had an activity to assimilate (14)CO2 into the cells when thiosulfate was used as an energy source. These results suggest that strain RO-1 is Thiobacillus versutus. Strain RO-1 exuded Ca(2+) from concrete blocks added to thiosulfate medium with pH 9.0 and the pH of the medium decreased from 9.0 to 5.5 after 22 days of cultivation. In contrast, Thiobacillus thiooxidans strain NB1-3 could not exude Ca(2+) in the same thiosulfate medium, suggesting that strain RO-1, but not T. thiooxidans NB1-3, is involved in the early stage of concrete corrosion because concrete structures just after construction contain calcium hydroxide and have a pH of 12-13. PMID:27388643

  17. Chemical equilibrium model for interfacial activity of crude oil in aqueous alkaline solution: the effects of pH, alkali and salt

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, M.; Yen, T.F.

    1980-11-01

    A chemical equilibrium model for interfacial activity of crude in aqueous alkaline solution is proposed. The model predicts the observed effects of pH and concentrations of alkali and salt on the interfacial tension (IFT). The model proposed was shown to describe the observed effects of acid content, pH, and sodium ions on the interfacial activity of crude oil in water. Once the pH of the interface reaches the pKa of the acids, sometimes with the help of addition of some salt, the IFT experiences a sudden steep drop to the range of 10/sup -2/ dynes/cm. After that, further addition of sodium either in the form of NaOH or NaCl is going to increase the IFT due to a shift of equilibriumn to the formation of undissociated soap. This was confirmed by the difference in the observed effect of sodium on the IFT of the extracted soap molecules which are dissociated easily and those which are associated highly and precipitated easily. These soap molecules have dissociation constant values ranging from below 10/sup -2/ to above one. 13 references.

  18. Comparison of Salivary pH, Buffering Capacity and Alkaline Phosphatase in Smokers and Healthy Non-Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi-Motamayel, Fatemeh; Falsafi, Parisa; Goodarzi, Mohammad T.; Poorolajal, Jalal

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Saliva contains alkaline phosphatase (ALP)—a key intracellular enzyme related to destructive processes and cellular damage—and has buffering capacity (BC) against acids due to the presence of bicarbonate and phosphate ions. Smoking may have deleterious effects on the oral environment due to pH changes which can affect ALP activity. This study aimed to evaluate the salivary pH, BC and ALP activity of male smokers and healthy non-smokers. Methods: This retrospective cohort study took place between August 2012 and December 2013. A total of 251 healthy male non-smokers and 259 male smokers from Hamadan, Iran, were selected. Unstimulated whole saliva was collected from each participant and pH and BC were determined using a pH meter. Salivary enzymes were measured by spectrophotometric assay. Results: Mean salivary pH (7.42 ± 0.48 and 7.52 ± 0.43, respectively; P = 0.018) and BC (3.41 ± 0.54 and 4.17 ± 0.71; P = 0.001) was significantly lower in smokers compared to non-smokers. Mean ALP levels were 49.58 ± 23.33 IU/L among smokers and 55.11 ± 27.85 IU/L among non-smokers (P = 0.015). Conclusion: Significantly lower pH, BC and ALP levels were observed among smokers in comparison to a healthy control group. These salivary alterations could potentially be utilised as biochemical markers for the evaluation of oral tissue function and side-effects among smokers. Further longitudinal studies are recommended to evaluate the effects of smoking on salivary components. PMID:27606111

  19. Salinity and Alkaline pH in Irrigation Water Affect Marigold Plants: II. Mineral Ion Relations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scarcity of water of good quality for landscape irrigation is of outmost importance in arid and semiarid regions due to the competition with urban population. This is forcing the use of degraded waters with high levels of salinity and high pH, which may affect plant establishment and growth. The o...

  20. Narrow pH Range of Surface Water Bodies Receiving Pesticide Input in Europe.

    PubMed

    Bundschuh, Mirco; Weyers, Arnd; Ebeling, Markus; Elsaesser, David; Schulz, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Fate and toxicity of the active ingredients (AI's) of plant protection products in surface waters is often influenced by pH. Although a general range of pH values is reported in literature, an evaluation targeting aquatic ecosystems with documented AI inputs is lacking at the larger scale. Results show 95% of European surface waters (n = 3075) with a documented history of AI exposure fall within a rather narrow pH range, between 7.0 and 8.5. Spatial and temporal variability in the data may at least be partly explained by the calcareous characteristics of parental rock material, the affiliation of the sampling site to a freshwater ecoregion, and the photosynthetic activity of macrophytes (i.e., higher pH values with photosynthesis). Nonetheless, the documented pH range fits well with the standard pH of most ecotoxicological test guidelines, confirming the fate and ecotoxicity of AIs are usually adequately addressed. PMID:26424537

  1. Diversity and food web structure of nematode communities under high soil salinity and alkaline pH.

    PubMed

    Salamún, Peter; Kucanová, Eva; Brázová, Tímea; Miklisová, Dana; Renčo, Marek; Hanzelová, Vladimíra

    2014-10-01

    A long-term and intensive magnesium (Mg) ore processing in Slovenské Magnezitové Závody a.s. in Jelšava has resulted in a high Mg content and alkaline pH of the soil environment, noticeable mainly in the close vicinity of the smelter. Nematode communities strongly reacted to the contamination mostly by a decrease in abundance of the sensitive groups. Nematodes from c-p 1 group and bacterivores, tolerant to pollution played a significant role in establishing the dominance at all sites. With increasing distance from the pollution source, the nematode communities were more structured and complex, with an increase in proportion of sensitive c-p 4 and 5 nematodes, composed mainly of carnivores and omnivores. Various ecological indices (e.g. MI2-5, SI, H') indicated similar improvement of farther soil ecosystems. PMID:24996531

  2. Catalytically active alkaline molten globular enzyme: Effect of pH and temperature on the structural integrity of 5-aminolevulinate synthase.

    PubMed

    Stojanovski, Bosko M; Breydo, Leonid; Hunter, Gregory A; Uversky, Vladimir N; Ferreira, Gloria C

    2014-12-01

    5-Aminolevulinate synthase (ALAS), a pyridoxal-5'phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme, catalyzes the first step of heme biosynthesis in mammals. Circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopies were used to examine the effects of pH (1.0-3.0 and 7.5-10.5) and temperature (20 and 37°C) on the structural integrity of ALAS. The secondary structure, as deduced from far-UV CD, is mostly resilient to pH and temperature changes. Partial unfolding was observed at pH2.0, but further decreasing pH resulted in acid-induced refolding of the secondary structure to nearly native levels. The tertiary structure rigidity, monitored by near-UV CD, is lost under acidic and specific alkaline conditions (pH10.5 and pH9.5/37°C), where ALAS populates a molten globule state. As the enzyme becomes less structured with increased alkalinity, the chiral environment of the internal aldimine is also modified, with a shift from a 420nm to 330nm dichroic band. Under acidic conditions, the PLP cofactor dissociates from ALAS. Reaction with 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid corroborates increased exposure of hydrophobic clusters in the alkaline and acidic molten globules, although the reaction is more pronounced with the latter. Furthermore, quenching the intrinsic fluorescence of ALAS with acrylamide at pH1.0 and 9.5 yielded subtly different dynamic quenching constants. The alkaline molten globule state of ALAS is catalytically active (pH9.5/37°C), although the kcat value is significantly decreased. Finally, the binding of 5-aminolevulinate restricts conformational fluctuations in the alkaline molten globule. Overall, our findings prove how the structural plasticity of ALAS contributes to reaching a functional enzyme. PMID:25240868

  3. Technical Note: Large overestimation of pCO2 calculated from pH and alkalinity in acidic, organic-rich freshwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abril, G.; Bouillon, S.; Darchambeau, F.; Teodoru, C. R.; Marwick, T. R.; Tamooh, F.; Ochieng Omengo, F.; Geeraert, N.; Deirmendjian, L.; Polsenaere, P.; Borges, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Inland waters have been recognized as a significant source of carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere at the global scale. Fluxes of CO2 between aquatic systems and the atmosphere are calculated from the gas transfer velocity and the water-air gradient of the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2). Currently, direct measurements of water pCO2 remain scarce in freshwaters, and most published pCO2 data are calculated from temperature, pH and total alkalinity (TA). Here, we compare calculated (pH and TA) and measured (equilibrator and headspace) water pCO2 in a large array of temperate and tropical freshwaters. The 761 data points cover a wide range of values for TA (0 to 14 200 μmol L-1), pH (3.94 to 9.17), measured pCO2 (36 to 23 000 ppmv), and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) (29 to 3970 μmol L-1). Calculated pCO2 were >10% higher than measured pCO2 in 60% of the samples (with a median overestimation of calculated pCO2 compared to measured pCO2 of 2560 ppmv) and were >100% higher in the 25% most organic-rich and acidic samples (with a median overestimation of 9080 ppmv). We suggest these large overestimations of calculated pCO2 with respect to measured pCO2 are due to the combination of two cumulative effects: (1) a more significant contribution of organic acids anions to TA in waters with low carbonate alkalinity and high DOC concentrations; (2) a lower buffering capacity of the carbonate system at low pH, which increases the sensitivity of calculated pCO2 to TA in acidic and organic-rich waters. No empirical relationship could be derived from our data set in order to correct calculated pCO2 for this bias. Owing to the widespread distribution of acidic, organic-rich freshwaters, we conclude that regional and global estimates of CO2 outgassing from freshwaters based on pH and TA data only are most likely overestimated, although the magnitude of the overestimation needs further quantitative analysis. Direct measurements of pCO2 are recommended in inland waters in general

  4. The Rim101p/PacC pathway and alkaline pH regulate pattern formation in yeast colonies.

    PubMed

    Piccirillo, Sarah; White, Melissa G; Murphy, Jeffrey C; Law, Douglas J; Honigberg, Saul M

    2010-03-01

    Multicellular organisms utilize cell-to-cell signals to build patterns of cell types within embryos, but the ability of fungi to form organized communities has been largely unexplored. Here we report that colonies of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae formed sharply divided layers of sporulating and nonsporulating cells. Sporulation initiated in the colony's interior, and this region expanded upward as the colony matured. Two key activators of sporulation, IME1 and IME2, were initially transcribed in overlapping regions of the colony, and this overlap corresponded to the initial sporulation region. The development of colony sporulation patterns depended on cell-to-cell signals, as demonstrated by chimeric colonies, which contain a mixture of two strains. One such signal is alkaline pH, mediated through the Rim101p/PacC pathway. Meiotic-arrest mutants that increased alkali production stimulated expression of an early meiotic gene in neighboring cells, whereas a mutant that decreased alkali production (cit1Delta) decreased this expression. Addition of alkali to colonies accelerated the expansion of the interior region of sporulation, whereas inactivation of the Rim101p pathway inhibited this expansion. Thus, the Rim101 pathway mediates colony patterning by responding to cell-to-cell pH signals. Cell-to-cell signals coupled with nutrient gradients may allow efficient spore formation and spore dispersal in natural environments. PMID:20038633

  5. Estimation and Comparison of Salivary Calcium, Phosphorous, Alkaline Phosphatase and pH Levels in Periodontal Health and Disease: A Cross-sectional Biochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rufi Murad; Suragimath, Girish; Zope, Sameer

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In oral diagnostics there is a great challenge to determine biomarkers for screening and evaluating the disease activity. Biomarkers can also serve as a useful tool to measure the efficacy of the therapy. Aim To evaluate and compare the levels of salivary calcium, phosphorous, alkaline phosphatase and pH levels in periodontally healthy subjects and patients with gingivitis and periodontitis. Materials and Methods The present study consisted of 150 subjects aged between 20-45 years who were divided into three groups; periodontally healthy, gingivitis and chronic periodontitis. Prior to the clinical examination the demographic details, relevant information of the subject, gingival index, plaque index, Oral Hygiene Index (OHI) and pH were recorded. Biochemical assay of saliva i.e., inorganic calcium, phosphorous and alkaline phosphatase were estimated by colorimetric method. ANOVA and Tukey’s test were applied for statistical analysis. Results The mean levels of biomarkers studied were; inorganic calcium (12.55μg/dl), phosphorous (14.50μg/dl), alkaline phosphatase (49.62μg/dl) and pH (11.65). There was a gradual increase in these levels as the condition progressed from health to gingivitis or periodontitis which was statistically significant at p<0.001. Conclusion Based on these results, it can be concluded that, the biomarkers like salivary calcium, phosphorous, alkaline phosphatase and pH can be considered for evaluating the diagnosis and prognosis of periodontal tissues in disease and health.

  6. Application of a fluidized bed reactor charged with aragonite for control of alkalinity, pH and carbon dioxide in marine recirculating aquaculture systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paul S Wills, PhD; Pfeiffer, Timothy; Baptiste, Richard; Watten, Barnaby J.

    2016-01-01

    Control of alkalinity, dissolved carbon dioxide (dCO2), and pH are critical in marine recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) in order to maintain health and maximize growth. A small-scale prototype aragonite sand filled fluidized bed reactor was tested under varying conditions of alkalinity and dCO2 to develop and model the response of dCO2 across the reactor. A large-scale reactor was then incorporated into an operating marine recirculating aquaculture system to observe the reactor as the system moved toward equilibrium. The relationship between alkalinity dCO2, and pH across the reactor are described by multiple regression equations. The change in dCO2 across the small-scale reactor indicated a strong likelihood that an equilibrium alkalinity would be maintained by using a fluidized bed aragonite reactor. The large-scale reactor verified this observation and established equilibrium at an alkalinity of approximately 135 mg/L as CaCO3, dCO2 of 9 mg/L, and a pH of 7.0 within 4 days that was stable during a 14 day test period. The fluidized bed aragonite reactor has the potential to simplify alkalinity and pH control, and aid in dCO2 control in RAS design and operation. Aragonite sand, purchased in bulk, is less expensive than sodium bicarbonate and could reduce overall operating production costs.

  7. Thin-Layer Chemical Modulations by a Combined Selective Proton Pump and pH Probe for Direct Alkalinity Detection.

    PubMed

    Afshar, Majid Ghahraman; Crespo, Gastón A; Bakker, Eric

    2015-07-01

    We report a general concept based on a selective electrochemical ion pump used for creating concentration perturbations in thin layer samples (∼40 μL). As a first example, hydrogen ions are released from a selective polymeric membrane (proton pump) and the resulting pH is assessed potentiometrically with a second membrane placed directly opposite. By applying a constant potential modulation for 30 s, an induced proton concentration of up to 350 mM may be realized. This concept may become an attractive tool for in situ titrations without the need for sampling, because the thin layer eventually re-equilibrates with the contacting bulk sample. Acid-base titrations of NaOH and Na2 CO3 are demonstrated. The determination of total alkalinity in a river water sample is carried out, giving levels (23.1 mM) comparable to that obtained by standard methods (23.6 mM). The concept may be easily extended to other ions (cations, anions, polyions) and may become attractive for environmental and clinical applications. PMID:26014101

  8. A Novel Anisotropic Supramolecular Hydrogel with High Stability over a Wide pH Range

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Fan; Gao, Yuan; Shi, Junfeng; Browdy, Hayley M.; Xu, Bing

    2011-01-01

    The hydrolysis of carboxylic ester bond, by a base or catalyzed by an enzyme at weak basic condition, servers as the only path to obtain a novel anisotropic supramolecular hydrogel that is stable over a wide pH range. This result not only expands the molecular scope of supramolecular hydrogelators, but also illustrates the design principles for creating pH stable supramolecular soft materials. PMID:21138331

  9. Dynamic method as a simple approach for wide range pH measurements using optodes.

    PubMed

    Safavi, A; Banazadeh, A R

    2007-02-01

    In this paper, a flow system equipped with an optode has been suggested for wide range pH measurements. Triacetyl cellulose was used as the optode membrane in which different pH indicators were immobilized. For extending the pH range, the dynamic response rather than the steady-state response of the optode was measured. Since diffusion is the main process governing the system response, different parameters having influence on diffusion of the analyte into the membrane were optimized. Under the optimum conditions, wide range pH determination (up to 11 pH units) is simply achieved regardless of the pKa of the pH indicator immobilized in the membrane. To validate the application of the method different indicators with different structures and pKa values were tested and the results were all confirming the precision and accuracy of the method. The suggested method also has combined advantages of flow systems together with inherent advantages of kinetic systems. PMID:17386563

  10. Carbon Dioxide Addition to Microbial Fuel Cell Cathodes Maintains Sustainable Catholyte pH and Improves Anolyte pH, Alkalinity, and Conductivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioelectrochemical system (BES) pH imbalances develop due to anodic proton-generating oxidation reactions and cathodic hydroxide-ion-generating reduction reactions. Until now, workers added unsustainable buffers to reduce the pH difference between the anode and cathode because the pH imbalance cont...

  11. Combined effects of carbonate alkalinity and pH on survival, growth and haemocyte parameters of the Venus clam Cyclina sinensis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tingting; Lai, Qifang; Yao, Zongli; Lu, Jianxue; Zhou, Kai; Wang, Hui

    2013-08-01

    Carbonate alkalinity (CA) and pH are considered to be two important stress factors that determine the response of aquatic animals to sudden transfers into saline-alkaline water. To evaluate the potential for aquaculture production of Venus clams (Cyclina sinensis) farmed in saline-alkaline water, the combined effects of CA (2.5 (control), 10.0, 20.0 and 40.0 meq/l) and pH (8.0 (control), 8.5, 9.0 and 9.5) on survival rate was monitored every day for 10 days. Length gain rate (LGR) and weight gain rate (WGR) were also monitored for two months, and total haemocyte count (THC), phagocytic rate (PR) and haemocyte mortality (HM) were measured for 3, 6, 12 and 24 days under the same water temperature (20 °C) and salinity (15‰) conditions. The results showed that survival rates in treatments of CA ≤ 20.0, combined with pH ≤ 9.0, were 100%. LGR and WGR in treatments of CA 2.5 & pH 8.0 (control), CA 2.5 & pH 8.5 and CA 10.0 & pH 8.0 exhibited the largest values (P > 0.05), while in other treatments, they showed a decreasing trend with an increase in either CA or pH or both (P < 0.05). Similarly, for THC, PR and HM, no significant differences were observed among the fast growth treatments during the entire experimental period (P > 0.05), however, in other treatments, they presented significant differences, especially on day 3 and 6 (P < 0.05), most notably with increases in CA or pH, but returned to control levels on day 12. In conclusion, in this study, a strong interaction between CA and pH was observed. Additionally, it was ascertained that the Venus clam C. sinensis can withstand the stress of CA 20.0 combined pH 9.0, although individuals grows slowly and may take approximately 12 days to recover to the unstressed condition. PMID:23711470

  12. Design, calibration and application of broad-range optical nanosensors for determining intracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Rikke V; Henriksen, Jonas R; Andresen, Thomas L

    2014-12-01

    Particle-based nanosensors offer a tool for determining the pH in the endosomal-lysosomal system of living cells. Measurements providing absolute values of pH have so far been restricted by the limited sensitivity range of nanosensors, calibration challenges and the complexity of image analysis. This protocol describes the design and application of a polyacrylamide-based nanosensor (∼60 nm) that covalently incorporates two pH-sensitive fluorophores, fluorescein (FS) and Oregon Green (OG), to broaden the sensitivity range of the sensor (pH 3.1-7.0), and uses the pH-insensitive fluorophore rhodamine as a reference fluorophore. The nanosensors are spontaneously taken up via endocytosis and directed to the lysosomes where dynamic changes in pH can be measured with live-cell confocal microscopy. The most important focus areas of the protocol are the choice of pH-sensitive fluorophores, the design of calibration buffers, the determination of the effective range and especially the description of how to critically evaluate results. The entire procedure typically takes 2-3 weeks. PMID:25411952

  13. Improving the Expression of Recombinant Proteins in E. coli BL21 (DE3) under Acetate Stress: An Alkaline pH Shift Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hengwei; Wang, Fengqing; Wang, Wei; Yao, Xueling; Wei, Dongzhi; Cheng, Hairong; Deng, Zixin

    2014-01-01

    Excess acetate has long been an issue for the production of recombinant proteins in E. coli cells. Recently, improvements in acetate tolerance have been achieved through the use of genetic strategies and medium supplementation with certain amino acids and pyrimidines. The aim of our study was to evaluate an alternative to improve the acetate tolerance of E. coli BL21 (DE3), a popular strain used to express recombinant proteins. In this work we reported the cultivation of BL21 (DE3) in complex media containing acetate at high concentrations. In the presence of 300 mM acetate, compared with pH 6.5, pH 7.5 improved cell growth by approximately 71%, reduced intracellular acetate by approximately 50%, and restored the expression of glutathione S-transferase (GST), green fluorescent protein (GFP) and cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (CYP). Further experiments showed that alkaline pHs up to 8.5 had little inhibition in the expression of GST, GFP and CYP. In addition, the detrimental effect of acetate on the reduction of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) by the cell membrane, an index of cellular metabolic capacity, was substantially alleviated by a shift to alkaline pH values of 7.5–8.0. Thus, we suggest an approach of cultivating E. coli BL21 (DE3) at pH 8.0±0.5 to minimize the effects caused by acetate stress. The proposed strategy of an alkaline pH shift is a simple approach to solving similar bioprocessing problems in the production of biofuels and biochemicals from sugars. PMID:25402470

  14. Carbon dots with strong excitation-dependent fluorescence changes towards pH. Application as nanosensors for a broad range of pH.

    PubMed

    Barati, Ali; Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Abdollahi, Hamid

    2016-08-10

    In this study, preparation of novel pH-sensitive N-doped carbon dots (NCDs) using glucose and urea is reported. The prepared NCDs present strong excitation-dependent fluorescence changes towards the pH that is a new behavior from these nanomaterials. By taking advantage of this unique behavior, two separated ratiometric pH sensors using emission spectra of the NCDs for both acidic (pH 2.0 to 8.0) and basic (pH 7.0 to 14.0) ranges of pH are constructed. Additionally, by considering the entire Excitation-Emission Matrix (EEM) of NCDs as analytical signal and using a suitable multivariate calibration method, a broad range of pH from 2.0 to 14.0 was well calibrated. The multivariate calibration method was independent from the concentration of NCDs and resulted in a very low average prediction error of 0.067 pH units. No changes in the predicted pH under UV irradiation (for 3 h) and at high ionic strength (up to 2 M NaCl) indicated the high stability of this pH nanosensor. The practicality of this pH nanosensor for pH determination in real water samples was validated with good accuracy and repeatability. PMID:27282748

  15. Peroxidase-like activity of gold nanoparticles stabilized by hyperbranched polyglycidol derivatives over a wide pH range.

    PubMed

    Drozd, Marcin; Pietrzak, Mariusz; Parzuchowski, Paweł; Mazurkiewicz-Pawlicka, Marta; Malinowska, Elżbieta

    2015-12-11

    The aim of this work was to carry out comparative studies on the peroxidase-like activity of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) stabilized with low molecular weight hyperbranched polyglycidol (HBPG-OH) and its derivative modified with maleic acid residues (HBPG-COOH). The influence of the stabilizer to gold precursor ratio on the size and morphology of nanoparticles obtained was checked, and prepared nanoparticles were characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The results indicated the divergent effect of increasing the concentration of stabilizers (HBPG-OH or HBPG-COOH) on the size of the nanostructures obtained. The gold nanoparticles obtained were characterized as having intrinsic peroxidase-like activity and the mechanism of catalysis in acidic and alkaline mediums was consistent with the standard Michaelis-Menten kinetics, revealing a strong affinity of AuNPs with 2, 2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) and 3, 3', 5, 5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB), and significantly lower affinity towards phenol. By comparing the kinetic parameters, a negligible effect of polymeric ligand charge on activity against various types of substrates (anionic or cationic) was indicated. The superiority of steric stabilization via the application of tested low-weight hyperbranched polymers over typical stabilizers in preventing salt-induced aggregation and maintaining high catalytic activity in time was proved. The applied hyperbranched stabilizers provide a good tool for manufacturing gold-based nanozymes, which are highly stable and active over a wide pH range. PMID:26567596

  16. Transcriptional analysis of the F0F1 ATPase operon of Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 reveals strong induction by alkaline pH.

    PubMed

    Barriuso-Iglesias, Mónica; Barreiro, Carlos; Flechoso, Fabio; Martín, Juan F

    2006-01-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum, a soil Gram-positive bacterium used for industrial amino acid production, was found to grow optimally at pH 7.0-9.0 when incubated in 5 litre fermenters under pH-controlled conditions. The highest biomass was accumulated at pH 9.0. Growth still occurred at pH 9.5 but at a reduced rate. The expression of the pH-regulated F0 F1 ATPase operon (containing the eight genes atpBEFHAGDC) was induced at alkaline pH. A 7.5 kb transcript, corresponding to the eight-gene operon, was optimally expressed at pH 9.0. The same occurred with a 1.2 kb transcript corresponding to the atpB gene. RT-PCR studies confirmed the alkaline pH induction of the F0 F1 operon and the existence of the atpI gene. The atpI gene, located upstream of the F0 F1 operon, was expressed at a lower level than the polycistronic 7.5 kb mRNA, from a separate promoter (P-atp1). Expression of the major promoter of the F0 F1 operon, designated P-atp2, and the P-atp1 promoter was quantified by coupling them to the pET2 promoter-probe vector. Both P-atp1 and P-atp2 were functional in C. glutamicum and Escherichia coli. Primer extension analysis identified one transcription start point inside each of the two promoter regions. The P-atp1 promoter fitted the consensus sequence of promoters recognized by the vegetative sigma factor of C. glutamicum, whereas the -35 and -10 boxes of P-atp2 fitted the consensus sequence for sigma(H)-recognized Mycobacterium tuberculosis promoters C(C)/(G)GG(A)/(G)AC 17-22 nt (C)/(G)GTT(C)/(G), known to be involved in expression of heat-shock and other stress-response genes. These results suggest that the F0 F1 operon is highly expressed at alkaline pH, probably using a sigma (H) RNA polymerase. PMID:16385111

  17. Comparison of Rumen Fluid pH by Continuous Telemetry System and Bench pH Meter in Sheep with Different Ranges of Ruminal pH

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Leonardo F.; Minervino, Antonio H. H.; Araújo, Carolina A. S. C.; Sousa, Rejane S.; Oliveira, Francisco L. C.; Rodrigues, Frederico A. M. L.; Meira-Júnior, Enoch B. S.; Barrêto-Júnior, Raimundo A.; Mori, Clara S.; Ortolani, Enrico L.

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to compare the measurements of sheep ruminal pH using a continuous telemetry system or a bench pH meter using sheep with different degrees of ruminal pH. Ruminal lactic acidosis was induced in nine adult crossbred Santa Ines sheep by the administration of 15 g of sucrose per kg/BW. Samples of rumen fluid were collected at the baseline, before the induction of acidosis (T0) and at six, 12, 18, 24, 48, and 72 hours after the induction for pH measurement using a bench pH meter. During this 72-hour period, all animals had electrodes for the continuous measurement of pH. The results were compared using the Bland-Altman analysis of agreement, Pearson coefficients of correlation and determination, and paired analysis of variance with Student's t-test. The measurement methods presented a strong correlation (r = 0.94, P < 0.05) but the rumen pH that was measured continuously using a telemetry system resulted in lower values than the bench pH meter (overall mean of 5.38 and 5.48, resp., P = 0.0001). The telemetry system was able to detect smaller changes in rumen fluid pH and was more accurate in diagnosing both subacute ruminal lactic acidosis and acute ruminal lactic acidosis in sheep. PMID:24967422

  18. Human ASIC3 channel dynamically adapts its activity to sense the extracellular pH in both acidic and alkaline directions

    PubMed Central

    Delaunay, Anne; Gasull, Xavier; Salinas, Miguel; Noël, Jacques; Friend, Valérie; Lingueglia, Eric; Deval, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    In rodent sensory neurons, acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3) has recently emerged as a particularly important sensor of nonadaptive pain associated with tissue acidosis. However, little is known about the human ASIC3 channel, which includes three splice variants differing in their C-terminal domain (hASIC3a, hASIC3b, and hASIC3c). hASIC3a transcripts represent the main mRNAs expressed in both peripheral and central neuronal tissues (dorsal root ganglia [DRG], spinal cord, and brain), where a small proportion of hASIC3c transcripts is also detected. We show that hASIC3 channels (hASIC3a, hASIC3b, or hASIC3c) are able to directly sense extracellular pH changes not only during acidification (up to pH 5.0), but also during alkalization (up to pH 8.0), an original and inducible property yet unknown. When the external pH decreases, hASIC3 display a transient acid mode with brief activation that is relevant to the classical ASIC currents, as previously described. On the other hand, an external pH increase activates a sustained alkaline mode leading to a constitutive activity at resting pH. Both modes are inhibited by the APETx2 toxin, an ASIC3-type channel inhibitor. The alkaline sensitivity of hASIC3 is an intrinsic property of the channel, which is supported by the extracellular loop and involves two arginines (R68 and R83) only present in the human clone. hASIC3 is thus able to sense the extracellular pH in both directions and therefore to dynamically adapt its activity between pH 5.0 and 8.0, a property likely to participate in the fine tuning of neuronal membrane potential and to neuron sensitization in various pH environments. PMID:22829666

  19. The mycorrhiza fungus Piriformospora indica induces fast root-surface pH signaling and primes systemic alkalinization of the leaf apoplast upon powdery mildew infection.

    PubMed

    Felle, Hubert H; Waller, Frank; Molitor, Alexandra; Kogel, Karl-Heinz

    2009-09-01

    We analyze here, by noninvasive electrophysiology, local and systemic plant responses in the interaction of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) with the root-colonizing basidiomycete Piriformospora indica. In the short term (seconds, minutes), a constant flow of P. indica chlamydospores along primary roots altered surface pH characteristics; whereas the root-hair zone transiently alkalized-a typical elicitor response-the elongation zone acidified, indicative of enhanced H(+) extrusion and plasma membrane H(+) ATPase stimulation. Eight to 10 min after treating roots with chlamydospores, the apoplastic pH of leaves began to acidify, which contrasts with observations of an alkalinization response to various stressors and microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs). In the long term (days), plants with P. indica-colonized roots responded to inoculation with the leaf-pathogenic powdery mildew fungus Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei with a leaf apoplastic pH increase of about 2, while the leaf apoplast of noncolonized barley responded to B. graminis f. sp. hordei merely with a pH increase of 0.8. The strong apoplastic pH response is reminiscent of B. graminis f. sp. hordei-triggered pH shifts in resistance gene-mediated resistant barley leaves or upon treatment with a chemical resistance inducer. In contrast, the MAMP N-acetylchito-octaose did not induce resistance to B. graminis f. sp. hordei and did not trigger the primed apoplastic pH shift. We speculate that the primed pH increase is indicative of and supports the potentiated systemic response to B. graminis f. sp. hordei-induced by P. indica in barley. PMID:19656052

  20. Computer simulation of immobilized pH gradients at acidic and alkaline extremes - A quest for extended pH intervals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosher, Richard A.; Bier, Milan; Righetti, Pier Giorgio

    1986-01-01

    Computer simulations of the concentration profiles of simple biprotic ampholytes with Delta pKs 1, 2, and 3, on immobilized pH gradients (IPG) at extreme pH values (pH 3-4 and pH 10-11) show markedly skewed steady-state profiles with increasing kurtosis at higher Delta pK values. Across neutrality, all the peaks are symmetric irrespective of their Delta pK values, but they show very high contribution to the conductivity of the background gel and significant alteration of the local buffering capacity. The problems of skewness, due to the exponential conductivity profiles at low and high pHs, and of gel burning due to a strong electroosmotic flow generated by the net charges in the gel matrix, also at low and high pHs, are solved by incorporating in the IPG gel a strong viscosity gradient. This is generated by a gradient of linear polyacrylamide which is trapped in the gel by the polymerization process.

  1. Sensitivity of some marine bacteria, a moderate halophile, and Escherichia coli to uncouplers at alkaline pH.

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, R A; Wisse, G A; Stejskal, F L

    1988-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of uncouplers on amino acid transport into three marine bacteria, Vibrio alginolyticus 118, Vibrio parahaemolyticus 113, and Alteromonas haloplanktis 214, into a moderate halophile, Vibrio costicola NRC 37001, and into Escherichia coli K-12 were found to vary depending upon the uncoupler tested, its concentration, and the pH. Higher concentrations of all of the uncouplers were required to inhibit transport at pH 8.5 than at pH 7.0. The protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone showed the greatest reduction in inhibitory capacity as the pH was increased, carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone showed less reduction, and 3,3',4',5-tetrachlorosalicylanilide was almost as effective as an inhibitor of amino acid transport at pH 8.5 as at pH 7.0 for all of the organisms except A. haloplanktis 214. Differences between the protonophores in their relative activities at pHs 7.0 and 8.5 were attributed to differences in their pK values. 3,3',4',5-Tetrachlorosalicylanilide, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide, and NaCN all inhibited Na+ extrusion from Na+-loaded cells of V. alginolyticus 118 at pH 8.5. The results support the conclusion that Na+ extrusion from this organism at pH 8.5 occurs as a result of Na+/H+ antiport activity. Data are presented indicating the presence in V. alginolyticus 118 of an NADH oxidase which is stimulated by Na+ at pH 8.5. PMID:3045092

  2. Sensitivity of some marine bacteria, a moderate halophile, and Escherichia coli to uncouplers at alkaline pH.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, R A; Wisse, G A; Stejskal, F L

    1988-09-01

    The inhibitory effects of uncouplers on amino acid transport into three marine bacteria, Vibrio alginolyticus 118, Vibrio parahaemolyticus 113, and Alteromonas haloplanktis 214, into a moderate halophile, Vibrio costicola NRC 37001, and into Escherichia coli K-12 were found to vary depending upon the uncoupler tested, its concentration, and the pH. Higher concentrations of all of the uncouplers were required to inhibit transport at pH 8.5 than at pH 7.0. The protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone showed the greatest reduction in inhibitory capacity as the pH was increased, carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone showed less reduction, and 3,3',4',5-tetrachlorosalicylanilide was almost as effective as an inhibitor of amino acid transport at pH 8.5 as at pH 7.0 for all of the organisms except A. haloplanktis 214. Differences between the protonophores in their relative activities at pHs 7.0 and 8.5 were attributed to differences in their pK values. 3,3',4',5-Tetrachlorosalicylanilide, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide, and NaCN all inhibited Na+ extrusion from Na+-loaded cells of V. alginolyticus 118 at pH 8.5. The results support the conclusion that Na+ extrusion from this organism at pH 8.5 occurs as a result of Na+/H+ antiport activity. Data are presented indicating the presence in V. alginolyticus 118 of an NADH oxidase which is stimulated by Na+ at pH 8.5. PMID:3045092

  3. Peroxidase-like activity of gold nanoparticles stabilized by hyperbranched polyglycidol derivatives over a wide pH range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozd, Marcin; Pietrzak, Mariusz; Parzuchowski, Paweł; Mazurkiewicz-Pawlicka, Marta; Malinowska, Elżbieta

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this work was to carry out comparative studies on the peroxidase-like activity of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) stabilized with low molecular weight hyperbranched polyglycidol (HBPG-OH) and its derivative modified with maleic acid residues (HBPG-COOH). The influence of the stabilizer to gold precursor ratio on the size and morphology of nanoparticles obtained was checked, and prepared nanoparticles were characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The results indicated the divergent effect of increasing the concentration of stabilizers (HBPG-OH or HBPG-COOH) on the size of the nanostructures obtained. The gold nanoparticles obtained were characterized as having intrinsic peroxidase-like activity and the mechanism of catalysis in acidic and alkaline mediums was consistent with the standard Michaelis-Menten kinetics, revealing a strong affinity of AuNPs with 2, 2‧-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) and 3, 3‧, 5, 5‧-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB), and significantly lower affinity towards phenol. By comparing the kinetic parameters, a negligible effect of polymeric ligand charge on activity against various types of substrates (anionic or cationic) was indicated. The superiority of steric stabilization via the application of tested low-weight hyperbranched polymers over typical stabilizers in preventing salt-induced aggregation and maintaining high catalytic activity in time was proved. The applied hyperbranched stabilizers provide a good tool for manufacturing gold-based nanozymes, which are highly stable and active over a wide pH range.

  4. Alkaline pH- and cAMP-induced V-ATPase membrane accumulation is mediated by protein kinase A in epididymal clear cells.

    PubMed

    Pastor-Soler, Núria M; Hallows, Kenneth R; Smolak, Christy; Gong, Fan; Brown, Dennis; Breton, Sylvie

    2008-02-01

    In the epididymis, low luminal bicarbonate and acidic pH maintain sperm quiescent during maturation and storage. The vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) in epididymal clear cells plays a major role in luminal acidification. We have shown previously that cAMP, luminal alkaline pH, and activation of the bicarbonate-regulated soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) induce V-ATPase apical accumulation in these cells, thereby stimulating proton secretion into the epididymal lumen. Here we examined whether protein kinase A (PKA) is involved in this response. Confocal immunofluorescence labeling on rat epididymis perfused in vivo showed that at luminal acidic pH (6.5), V-ATPase was distributed between short apical microvilli and subapical endosomes. The specific PKA activator N(6)-monobutyryl-3'-5'-cyclic monophosphate (6-MB-cAMP, 1 mM) induced elongation of apical microvilli and accumulation of V-ATPase in these structures. The PKA inhibitor myristoylated-PKI (mPKI, 10 microM) inhibited the apical accumulation of V-ATPase induced by 6-MB-cAMP. Perfusion at pH 6.5 with 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-2-O-methyl-cAMP (8CPT-2-O-Me-cAMP; 10 microM), an activator of the exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac), did not induce V-ATPase apical accumulation. When applied at a higher concentration (100 microM), 8CPT-2-O-Me-cAMP induced V-ATPase apical accumulation, but this effect was completely inhibited by mPKI, suggesting crossover effects on the PKA pathway with this compound at high concentrations. Importantly, the physiologically relevant alkaline pH-induced apical V-ATPase accumulation was completely inhibited by pretreatment with mPKI. We conclude that direct stimulation of PKA activity by cAMP is necessary and sufficient for the alkaline pH-induced accumulation of V-ATPase in clear cell apical microvilli. PMID:18160485

  5. A hydrogel based nanosensor with an unprecedented broad sensitivity range for pH measurements in cellular compartments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, M; Søndergaard, R V; Kumar, E K P; Henriksen, J R; Cui, D; Hammershøj, P; Clausen, M H; Andresen, T L

    2015-11-01

    Optical pH nanosensors have been applied for monitoring intracellular pH in real-time for about two decades. However, the pH sensitivity range of most nanosensors is too narrow, and measurements that are on the borderline of this range may not be correct. Furthermore, ratiometric measurements of acidic intracellular pH (pH < 4) in living cells are still challenging due to the lack of suitable nanosensors. In this paper we successfully developed a multiple sensor, a fluorophore based nanosensor, with an unprecedented broad measurement range from pH 1.4 to 7.0. In this nanosensor, three pH-sensitive fluorophores (difluoro-Oregon Green, Oregon Green 488, and fluorescein) and one pH-insensitive fluorophore (Alexa 568) were covalently incorporated into a nanoparticle hydrogel matrix. With this broad range quadruple-labelled nanosensor all physiological relevant pH levels in living cells can be measured without being too close to the limits of its pH-range. The nanosensor exhibits no susceptibility to interference by other intracellular ions at physiological concentrations. Due to its positive surface charge it is spontaneously internalized by HeLa cells and localizes to the lysosomes where the mean pH was measured at 4.6. This quadruple-labelled nanosensor performs accurate measurements of fluctuations of lysosomal pH in both directions, which was shown by treatment with the V-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1 or its substrate ATP in HeLa cells. These measurements indicate that this novel quadruple-labelled nanosensor is a promising new tool for measuring the pH of acidic compartments in living cells. PMID:26393332

  6. The genome of alkaliphilic Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4 reveals adaptations that support the ability to grow in an external pH range from 7.5 to 11.4

    PubMed Central

    Janto, Benjamin; Ahmed, Azad; Ito, Masahiro; Liu, Jun; Hicks, David B.; Pagni, Sarah; Fackelmayer, Oliver J.; Smith, Terry-Ann; Earl, Joshua; Elbourne, Liam D.H.; Hassan, Karl; Paulsen, Ian T.; Kolstø, Anne-Brit; Tourasse, Nicolas J.; Ehrlich, Garth D.; Boissy, Robert; Ivey, D. Mack; Li, Gang; Xue, Yanfen; Ma, Yanhe; Hu, Fen Z.; Krulwich, Terry A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4 is an extreme but facultative alkaliphile that grows non-fermentatively in a pH range from 7.5 to above 11.4 and can withstand large sudden increases in external pH. It is a model organism for studies of bioenergetics at high pH, at which energy demands are higher than at neutral pH because both cytoplasmic pH homeostasis and ATP synthesis require more energy. The alkaliphile also tolerates a cytoplasmic pH > 9.0 at external pH values at which the pH homeostasis capacity is exceeded, and manages other stresses that are exacerbated at alkaline pH, e.g. sodium, oxidative and cell wall stresses. The genome of B. pseudofirmus OF4 includes two plasmids that are lost from some mutants without viability loss. The plasmids may provide a reservoir of mobile elements that promote adaptive chromosomal rearrangements under particular environmental conditions. The genome also reveals a more acidic pI profile for proteins exposed on the outer surface than found in neutralophiles. A large array of transporters and regulatory genes are predicted to protect the alkaliphile from its overlapping stresses. In addition, unanticipated metabolic versatility was observed, which could ensure requisite energy for alkaliphily under diverse conditions. PMID:21951522

  7. AMP-activated protein kinase inhibits alkaline pH- and PKA-induced apical vacuolar H+-ATPase accumulation in epididymal clear cells.

    PubMed

    Hallows, Kenneth R; Alzamora, Rodrigo; Li, Hui; Gong, Fan; Smolak, Christy; Neumann, Dietbert; Pastor-Soler, Núria M

    2009-04-01

    Acidic luminal pH and low [HCO(3)(-)] maintain sperm quiescent during maturation in the epididymis. The vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) in clear cells is a major contributor to epididymal luminal acidification. We have shown previously that protein kinase A (PKA), acting downstream of soluble adenylyl cyclase stimulation by alkaline luminal pH or HCO(3)(-), induces V-ATPase apical membrane accumulation in clear cells. Here we examined whether the metabolic sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates this PKA-induced V-ATPase apical membrane accumulation. Immunofluorescence labeling of rat and non-human primate epididymides revealed specific AMPK expression in epithelial cells. Immunofluorescence labeling of rat epididymis showed that perfusion in vivo with the AMPK activators 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-d-ribofuranoside (AICAR) or A-769662 induced a redistribution of the V-ATPase into subapical vesicles, even in the presence of a luminal alkaline (pH 7.8) buffer compared with that of controls perfused without drug. Moreover, preperfusion with AICAR blocked the PKA-mediated V-ATPase translocation to clear cell apical membranes induced by N(6)-monobutyryl-cAMP (6-MB-cAMP). Purified PKA and AMPK both phosphorylated V-ATPase A subunit in vitro. In HEK-293 cells [(32)P]orthophosphate in vivo labeling of the A subunit increased following PKA stimulation and decreased following RNA interference-mediated knockdown of AMPK. Finally, the extent of PKA-dependent in vivo phosphorylation of the A subunit increased with AMPK knockdown. In summary, our findings suggest that AMPK inhibits PKA-mediated V-ATPase apical accumulation in epididymal clear cells, that both kinases directly phosphorylate the V-ATPase A subunit in vitro and in vivo, and that AMPK inhibits PKA-dependent phosphorylation of this subunit. V-ATPase activity may be coupled to the sensing of acid-base status via PKA and to metabolic status via AMPK. PMID:19211918

  8. A broad pH range indicator-based spectrophotometric assay for true lipases using tributyrin and tricaprylin.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Ruiz, María de Los Angeles; Mateos-Díaz, Juan Carlos; Carrière, Frédéric; Rodriguez, Jorge A

    2015-05-01

    A continuous assay is proposed for the screening of acidic, neutral, or alkaline lipases using microtiter plates, emulsified short- and medium-chain TGs, and a pH indicator. The lipase activity measurement is based on the decrease of the pH indicator optical density due to protonation which is caused by the release of FFAs during the hydrolysis of TGs and thus acidification. Purified lipases with distinct pH optima and an esterase were used to validate the method. The rate of lipolysis was found to be linear with time and proportional to the amount of enzyme added in each case. Specific activities measured with this microplate assay method were lower than those obtained by the pH-stat technique. Nevertheless, the pH-dependent profiles of enzymatic activity were similar with both assays. In addition, the substrate preference of each enzyme tested was not modified and this allowed discriminating lipase and esterase activities using tributyrin (low water solubility) and tricaprylin (not water soluble) as substrates. This continuous lipase assay is compatible with a high sample throughput and can be applied for the screening of lipases and lipase inhibitors from biological samples. PMID:25748441

  9. A broad pH range indicator-based spectrophotometric assay for true lipases using tributyrin and tricaprylin[S

    PubMed Central

    Camacho-Ruiz, María de los Angeles; Mateos-Díaz, Juan Carlos; Carrière, Frédéric; Rodriguez, Jorge A.

    2015-01-01

    A continuous assay is proposed for the screening of acidic, neutral, or alkaline lipases using microtiter plates, emulsified short- and medium-chain TGs, and a pH indicator. The lipase activity measurement is based on the decrease of the pH indicator optical density due to protonation which is caused by the release of FFAs during the hydrolysis of TGs and thus acidification. Purified lipases with distinct pH optima and an esterase were used to validate the method. The rate of lipolysis was found to be linear with time and proportional to the amount of enzyme added in each case. Specific activities measured with this microplate assay method were lower than those obtained by the pH-stat technique. Nevertheless, the pH-dependent profiles of enzymatic activity were similar with both assays. In addition, the substrate preference of each enzyme tested was not modified and this allowed discriminating lipase and esterase activities using tributyrin (low water solubility) and tricaprylin (not water soluble) as substrates. This continuous lipase assay is compatible with a high sample throughput and can be applied for the screening of lipases and lipase inhibitors from biological samples. PMID:25748441

  10. Wide range pH measurements using a single H(+)-selective chromoionophore and a time-based flow method.

    PubMed

    Safavi, Afsaneh; Rostamzadeh, Abolfazl; Maesum, Saeed

    2006-02-28

    A hydrophilic transparent triacetyl cellulose membrane was adopted as a pH optode by immobilizing highly selective and sensitive Nile blue indicator on the membrane. Contrary to the common procedure for determinations using optodes, in which a steady state response is measured, a new approach is introduced in which the dynamic response of the optode is used as the analytical signal. While in common procedures, pH optodes exhibit limited linear dynamic range (often 2-4 pH units only), it is shown that in a time-based flow method, an optode with only one acid-base indicator can be used for measurement in the pH range of 0-10. The procedure is simple, inexpensive and rapid. PMID:18970487

  11. Proteomic profiling combining solution-phase isoelectric fractionation with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis using narrow-pH-range immobilized pH gradient gels with slightly overlapping pH ranges.

    PubMed

    Lee, KiBeom; Pi, KyungBae

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a simple new approach toward improving resolution of two-dimensional (2-D) protein gels used to explore the mammalian proteome. The method employs sample prefractionation using solution-phase isoelectric focusing (IEF) to split the mammalian proteome into well-resolved pools. As crude samples are thus prefractionated by pI range, very-narrow-pH-range 2-D gels can be subsequently employed for protein separation. Using custom pH partition membranes and commercially available immobilized pH gradient (IPG) strips, we maximized the total separation distance and throughput of seven samples obtained by prefractionation. Both protein loading capacity and separation quality were higher than the values obtained by separation of fractionated samples on narrow-pH-range 2-D gels; the total effective IEF separation distance was ~82 cm over the pH range pH 3-10. This improved method for analyzing prefractionated samples on narrow-pH-range 2-D gels allows high protein resolution without the use of large gels, resulting in decreased costs and run times. PMID:19813004

  12. The characteristic AgcoreAushell nanoparticles as SERS substrates in detecting dopamine molecules at various pH ranges

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Yanru; Lee, Sang-Wha

    2015-01-01

    AgcoreAushell nanoparticles (NPs) are a promising surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate, which can offer a high enhancement factor through the combined effect of the high SERS activity of the Ag core and the biocompatibility of the Au shell. In this study, AgcoreAushell NPs were examined as SERS substrates for the sensitive detection of dopamine (DA) molecules in an aqueous solution. The SERS activity of the AgcoreAushell NPs was strongly dependent on the pH of the solution. When the pH of the solution was acidic (pH <5) or basic (pH >9), the AgcoreAushell NPs exhibited negligible SERS activity toward the DA molecules, due to the weakened interactions (or repulsive forces) between the DA molecules and the core–shell NPs. On the other hand, the AgcoreAushell NPs exhibited a high SERS activity in the intermediate pH ranges (pH 7–9), due to the molecular bridging effect of DA molecules, which allows probe molecules to be located at the interstitial junctions (so-called hot spots) between the core–shell NPs. The results of this study highlight the importance of probe-induced clustering of core–shell NPs in the SERS measurements at physiological pH. PMID:26345418

  13. Hierarchical MoS2@MoP core-shell heterojunction electrocatalysts for efficient hydrogen evolution reaction over a broad pH range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Aiping; Tian, Chungui; Yan, Haijing; Jiao, Yanqing; Yan, Qing; Yang, Guoyu; Fu, Honggang

    2016-05-01

    A low-cost catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) over a broad pH range is highly desired to meet the practical needs in different areas. In this study, hierarchical flower-like MoS2@MoP core-shell heterojunctions (HF-MoSP) are designed as a promising catalyst for HER over a broad pH range. The materials are obtained by the controllable phosphidation of the hierarchical MoS2 flower (HF-MoS2) composed of thin silk belt-like sheets. The phosphidation degree, P/S ratio and work function (WF) of HF-MoSP can be tuned easily over broad range by changing the phosphidation temperature. Under optimized condition, HF-MoSP exhibits excellent electrocatalytic activity for HER with a low onset overpotential of 29 mV and η of 108 mV at 10 mA cm-2 in 0.5 M H2SO4 and retains its good activity for 30 h. In addition, the catalyst shows excellent activity in 1 M KOH with an onset overpotential of 42 mV and η of 119 mV at 10 mA cm-2. The catalysts also exhibit obvious activity in neutral, weak acid and weak alkaline conditions. The good performance is relative to the synergy of the MoP shell and MoS2 core and the high WF of HF-MoSP close to Pt, and the large SBET of HF-MoSP benefited from the hierarchical structure. This study represents the construction of the core-shell heterojunction and provides a new way to provide the low-cost and high-performance catalyst for HER.A low-cost catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) over a broad pH range is highly desired to meet the practical needs in different areas. In this study, hierarchical flower-like MoS2@MoP core-shell heterojunctions (HF-MoSP) are designed as a promising catalyst for HER over a broad pH range. The materials are obtained by the controllable phosphidation of the hierarchical MoS2 flower (HF-MoS2) composed of thin silk belt-like sheets. The phosphidation degree, P/S ratio and work function (WF) of HF-MoSP can be tuned easily over broad range by changing the phosphidation temperature. Under optimized

  14. Hierarchical MoS2@MoP core-shell heterojunction electrocatalysts for efficient hydrogen evolution reaction over a broad pH range.

    PubMed

    Wu, Aiping; Tian, Chungui; Yan, Haijing; Jiao, Yanqing; Yan, Qing; Yang, Guoyu; Fu, Honggang

    2016-06-01

    A low-cost catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) over a broad pH range is highly desired to meet the practical needs in different areas. In this study, hierarchical flower-like MoS2@MoP core-shell heterojunctions (HF-MoSP) are designed as a promising catalyst for HER over a broad pH range. The materials are obtained by the controllable phosphidation of the hierarchical MoS2 flower (HF-MoS2) composed of thin silk belt-like sheets. The phosphidation degree, P/S ratio and work function (WF) of HF-MoSP can be tuned easily over broad range by changing the phosphidation temperature. Under optimized condition, HF-MoSP exhibits excellent electrocatalytic activity for HER with a low onset overpotential of 29 mV and η of 108 mV at 10 mA cm(-2) in 0.5 M H2SO4 and retains its good activity for 30 h. In addition, the catalyst shows excellent activity in 1 M KOH with an onset overpotential of 42 mV and η of 119 mV at 10 mA cm(-2). The catalysts also exhibit obvious activity in neutral, weak acid and weak alkaline conditions. The good performance is relative to the synergy of the MoP shell and MoS2 core and the high WF of HF-MoSP close to Pt, and the large SBET of HF-MoSP benefited from the hierarchical structure. This study represents the construction of the core-shell heterojunction and provides a new way to provide the low-cost and high-performance catalyst for HER. PMID:27172989

  15. Measurement of secretory vesicle pH reveals intravesicular alkalinization by vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 resulting in inhibition of prohormone cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Blackmore, Colin G; Varro, Andrea; Dimaline, Rod; Bishop, Lisa; Gallacher, David V; Dockray, Graham J

    2001-01-01

    The acidic interior of neuroendocrine secretory vesicles provides both an energy gradient for amine-proton exchangers (VMATs) to concentrate small transmitter molecules, for example catecholamines, and an optimal pH for the prohormone convertases which cleave hormone precursors. There is evidence that VMAT activity modulates prohormone cleavage, but in the absence of measurements of pH in secretory vesicles in intact cells, it has not been possible to establish whether these effects are attributable to raised intravesicular pH due to proton transport through VMATs. Clones were generated of the hamster insulinoma cell line HIT-T15 expressing a pH-sensitive form of green fluorescent protein (GFP-F64L/S65T) targeted to secretory vesicles, with and without co-expression of VMAT2. In order to study prohormone cleavage, further clones were generated that expressed preprogastrin with and without co-expression of VMAT2. Confocal microscopy of GFP fluorescence indicated that the pH in the secretory vesicles was 5.6 in control cells, compared with 6.6 in cells expressing VMAT2; the latter was reduced to 5.8 by the VMAT inhibitor reserpine. Using a pulse-chase labelling protocol, cleavage of 34-residue gastrin (G34) was found to be inhibited by co-expression with VMAT2, and this was reversed by reserpine. Similar effects on vesicle pH and G34 cleavage were produced by ammonium chloride. We conclude that VMAT expression confers the linked abilities to store biogenic amines and modulate secretory vesicle pH over a range influencing prohormone cleavage and therefore determining the identity of regulatory peptide secretory products. PMID:11251044

  16. Olivine and chromian spinel in primitive calc-alkaline and tholeiitic lavas from the southernmost cascade range, California: A reflection of relative fertility of the source

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clynne, M.A.; Borg, L.E.

    1997-01-01

    Chromian spinel and coexisting olivine phenocrysts from a geochemically diverse suite of primitive tholeiitic and calc-alkaline basalts and magnesian andesites from the Lassen region, in the southernmost Cascade Range, in California, show that the sub-arc mantle is zoned. Depleted calc-alkaline basalts and magnesian andesites erupt in the forearc region, and calc-alkaline basalts contain increasing abundances of incompatible elements toward the backarc. High-alumina olivine tholeiites erupt from the arc and backarc areas. Olivine from all these lavas displays a limited compositional range, from Fo86 to Fo91, and crystallized at high temperature, generally 1225-1275??C. Chromian spinel trapped in the olivine phenocrysts displays a large range of composition: Cr# values span the range 9-76. Excess Al in the spinel relative to that in 1-atm spinel suggests that it crystallized at elevated pressure. The phenocrysts in these lavas are in equilibrium with their host liquids. The full range of Cr# of the spinel compositions cannot be explained by differentiation or variable pressure, variations in f(O2), subsolidus equilibration or variations in degree of partial melting of a single peridotitic source. Rather, the systematic compositional differences among phenocrysts in these primitive lavas result from bulk chemical variability in their mantle sources. Correlations between spinel and host-rock compositions support the assertion that the geochemical diversity of Lassen basalts reflects the relative fertility of their mantle sources.

  17. Effect of pH and temperature on stability and kinetics of novel extracellular serine alkaline protease (70 kDa).

    PubMed

    Bhunia, Biswanath; Basak, Bikram; Mandal, Tamal; Bhattacharya, Pinaki; Dey, Apurba

    2013-03-01

    A novel extracellular serine protease (70 kDa by SDS-PAGE) was purified and characterized. This enzyme retained more than 93% of its initial activity after preincubation for 30 min at 37 °C in the presence of 25% (v/v) tested organic solvents and showed feather degradation activity. The purified enzyme was deactivated at various combinations of pH and temperature to examine the interactive effect of them on enzyme activity. The deactivation process was modeled as first-order kinetics and the deactivation rate constant (k(d)) was found to be minimum at pH 9 and 37 °C. The kinetic analysis of enzyme over a range of pH values indicated two pK values at 6.21 and at 10.92. The lower pK value was likely due to the catalytic histidine in the free enzyme and higher pK value likely reflected deprotonation of the proline moiety of the substrate but ionization of the active site serine is another possibility. Inhibition kinetic showed that enzyme is serine protease because enzyme was competitively inhibited by antipain and aprotinin as these compounds are known to be competitive inhibitors of serine protease. The organic solvent, thermal and pH tolerances of enzyme suggested that it may have potential for use as a biocatalyst in industry. PMID:23219732

  18. Ultrathin Laminar Ir Superstructure as Highly Efficient Oxygen Evolution Electrocatalyst in Broad pH Range.

    PubMed

    Pi, Yecan; Zhang, Nan; Guo, Shaojun; Guo, Jun; Huang, Xiaoqing

    2016-07-13

    Shape-controlled noble metal nanocrystals (NCs), such as Au, Ag, Pt, Pd, Ru, and Rh are of great success due to their new and enhanced properties and applications in chemical conversion, fuel cells, and sensors, but the realization of shape control of Ir NCs for achieving enhanced electrocatalysis remains a significant challenge. Herein, we report an efficient solution method for a new class of three-dimensional (3D) Ir superstructure that consists of ultrathin Ir nanosheets as subunits. Electrochemical studies show that it delivers the excellent electrocatalytic activity toward oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in alkaline condition with an onset potential at 1.43 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE) and a very low Tafel slope of 32.7 mV decade(-1). In particular, it even shows superior performance for OER in acidic solutions with the low onset overpotential of 1.45 V versus RHE and small Tafel slope of 40.8 mV decade(-1), which are much better than those of small Ir nanoparticles (NPs). The 3D Ir superstructures also exhibit good stability under acidic condition with the potential shift of less than 20 mV after 8 h i-t test. The present work highlights the importance of tuning 3D structures of Ir NCs for enhancing OER performance. PMID:27249544

  19. Earth orientation from lunar laser range-differencing. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leick, A.

    1978-01-01

    For the optimal use of high precision lunar laser ranging (LLR), an investigation regarding a clear definition of the underlying coordinate systems, identification of estimable quantities, favorable station geometry and optimal observation schedule is given.

  20. A single design strategy for dual sensitive pH probe with a suitable range to map pH in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Kang-Kang; Hou, Ji-Ting; Li, Kun; Yao, Qian; Yang, Jin; Wu, Ming-Yu; Xie, Yong-Mei; Yu, Xiao-Qi

    2015-01-01

    Due to the lack of a proper imaging approach, a veracious pH map of normal and abnormal cell is still rare. In this work, we presented a rhodamine-salicylaldehyde combination (Rh-SA2) as a novel pH probe, which has dual sensitive units for both acidic and basic environment. This dual sensitive probe acts like a chameleon in living cells and offers the doubling guarantees for endocellular pH mapping. Moreover, a quantitative measurement of cellular pH changes was allowed and the endocellular pH values under drug-associated stimuli were also investigated. PMID:26486180

  1. Pulsed multiwavelength laser ranging system. Ph.D. Thesis - Maryland Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, J. B.

    1982-01-01

    A pulsed multiwavelength laser ranging system for measuring atmospheric delay was built and tested, and its theoretical performance limits were calculated. The system uses a dye modelocked ND:YAG laser, which transmits 70 psec wide pulses simultaneously at 1064, 532, and 355 nm. The differential delay of the 1064 and 355 nm pulses is measured by a specially calibrated waveform digitizer to estimate the dry atmospheric delay. The delay time of the 532 nm pulse is used to measure the target distance. Static crossed field photomultipliers are used as detectors for all wavelengths. Theoretical analysis shows that path curvature and atmospheric turbulence are fundamental limits to the ranging accuracy of both single and multicolor systems operating over horizontal paths. For two color systems, an additional error is caused by the uncertainty in the path averaged water vapor. The standard deviation of the multicolor instrument's timing measurements is directly proportional to the laser pulse width plus photomultiplier jitter divided by the square root of the received photoelectron number. The prototype system's maximum range is km, which is limited by atmospheric and system transmission losses at 355 nm. System signal detection and false alarm calculations are also presented.

  2. Miniature sodium-selective ion-exchange optode with fluorescent pH chromoionophores and tunable dynamic range.

    PubMed

    Shortreed, M; Bakker, E; Kopelman, R

    1996-08-01

    An extension into the fluorescence mode of ion-exchange optodes is described, allowing miniaturization and its concomitant benefits. A micrometer-size, fluorescent fiber-optic sodium sensor is described, based on a highly sodium-selective, crown ether-capped calix[4]arene ionophore, capable of ratiometric operation. Three sensor configurations are given, employing different lipophilic, fluorescent pH chromoionophores (Nile Blue derivatives), demonstrating the ability to improve the detection limit and tune the dynamic range to the desired region of interest. Two of the sensors are of special interest in that their working ranges lie within those desired for measuring intracellular cytosolic or blood levels of sodium at the respective physiological pH. These optodes have excellent sodium selectivity, with other physiologically relevant cations (e.g., potassium, calcium, and magnesium) being highly discriminated. Three simple mathematical relationships are given for the three experimentally used fluorescent signal mechanisms (intensity, intensity ratios, and inner-filter or energy transfer effects), permitting visualization on a single graph and enabling direct comparison of the different sensors' optical responses on a common platform. Finally, these optodes measure the sample's sodium activity, rather than the concentration, provided that the sample's pH is measured simultaneously by another sensor, such as a glass electrode. PMID:8694263

  3. Continuous fast focusing in a trapezoidal void channel based on bidirectional isotachophoresis in a wide pH range.

    PubMed

    Stastna, Miroslava; Slais, Karel

    2015-10-01

    This study concentrates on development of instrumentation for focusing and separation of analytes in continuous flow. It is based on bidirectional ITP working in wide pH range with separation space of closed void channel of trapezoidal shape and continuous supply of sample. The novel instrumentation is working with electrolyte system formulated previously and on the contrary to devices currently available, it allows preparative separation and concentration of cationic, anionic, and amphoteric analytes simultaneously and in wide pH range. The formation of sharp edges at zone boundaries as well as low conductivity zones are avoided in suggested system and thus, local overheating is eliminated allowing for high current densities at initial stages of focusing. This results in high focusing speed and reduction of analysis time, which is particularly advantageous for separations performed in continuous flow systems. The closed void channel is designed to avoid basic obstacles related to liquid leakage, bubbles formation, contacts with electrodes, channel height and complicated assembling. The performance of designed instrumentation and focusing dynamics were tested by using colored low molecular mass pH indicators for local pH determination, focusing pattern, and completion. In addition, feasibility and separation efficiency were demonstrated by focusing of cytochrome C and myoglobin. The collection of fractions at instrument output allows for subsequent analysis and identification of sample components that are concentrated and conveniently in form of solution for further processing. Since the instrumentation operates with commercially available simple defined buffers and compounds without need of carrier ampholytes background, it is economically favorable. PMID:26104601

  4. COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qui; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling

    2004-05-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding in the swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to the naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of the injected solution bypasses the target pore space containing oil. The objective of this work is to investigate whether combining these two technologies could broaden the applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium--polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 9.2 to 12.9.

  5. Eukaryotic diversity at pH extremes

    PubMed Central

    Amaral-Zettler, Linda A.

    2013-01-01

    Extremely acidic (pH < 3) and extremely alkaline (pH > 9) environments support a diversity of single-cell and to a lesser extent, multicellular eukaryotic life. This study compared alpha and beta diversity in eukaryotic communities from seven diverse aquatic environments with pH values ranging from 2 to 11 using massively-parallel pyrotag sequencing targeting the V9 hypervariable region of the 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. A total of 946 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were recovered at a 6% cut-off level (94% similarity) across the sampled environments. Hierarchical clustering of the samples segregated the communities into acidic and alkaline groups. Similarity percentage (SIMPER) analysis followed by indicator OTU analysis (IOA) and non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) were used to determine which characteristic groups of eukaryotic taxa typify acidic or alkaline extremes and the extent to which pH explains eukaryotic community structure in these environments. Spain's Rio Tinto yielded the fewest observed OTUs while Nebraska Sandhills alkaline lakes yielded the most. Distinct OTUs, including metazoan OTUs, numerically dominated pH extreme sites. Indicator OTUs included the diatom Pinnularia and unidentified opisthokonts (Fungi and Filasterea) in the extremely acidic environments, and the ciliate Frontonia across the extremely alkaline sites. Inferred from NMDS, pH explained only a modest fraction of the variation across the datasets, indicating that other factors influence the underlying community structure in these environments. The findings from this study suggest that the ability for eukaryotes to adapt to pH extremes over a broad range of values may be rare, but further study of taxa that can broadly adapt across diverse acidic and alkaline environments, respectively present good models for understanding adaptation and should be targeted for future investigations. PMID:23335919

  6. Recombinant broad-range phospholipase C from Listeria monocytogenes exhibits optimal activity at acidic pH.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiongying; Gershenson, Anne; Roberts, Mary F

    2016-06-01

    The broad-range phospholipase C (PLC) from Listeria monocytogenes has been expressed using an intein expression system and characterized. This zinc metalloenzyme, similar to the homologous enzyme from Bacillus cereus, targets a wide range of lipid substrates. With monomeric substrates, the length of the hydrophobic acyl chain has significant impact on enzyme efficiency by affecting substrate affinity (Km). Based on a homology model of the enzyme to the B. cereus protein, several active site residue mutations were generated. While this PLC shares many of the mechanistic characteristics of the B. cereus PLC, a major difference is that the L. monocytogenes enzyme displays an acidic pH optimum regardless of substrate status (monomer, micelle, or vesicle). This unusual behavior might be advantageous for its role in the pathogenicity of L. monocytogenes. PMID:26976751

  7. Semimetallic MoP2: an active and stable hydrogen evolution electrocatalyst over the whole pH range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Zonghua; Saana Amiinu, Ibrahim; Wang, Min; Yang, Yushi; Mu, Shichun

    2016-04-01

    Developing efficient non-precious metal hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) electrocatalysts is a great challenge for sustainable hydrogen production from water. In this communication, for the first time, semimetallic MoP2 nanoparticle films on a metal Mo plate (MoP2 NPs/Mo) are fabricated through a facile two-step strategy. When used as a binder-free hydrogen evolution cathode, the as-prepared MoP2 NPs/Mo electrode exhibits superior HER catalytic activity at all pH values. At a current density of 10 mA cm-2, the catalyst displays overpotentials of 143, 211 and 194 mV in 0.5 M H2SO4, 1.0 M phosphate buffer solution and 1.0 M KOH, respectively. Furthermore, it exhibits excellent stability over a wide pH range. Thus, this in situ route opens up a new avenue for the fabrication of highly efficient, cost-effective and binder-free non-precious catalysts for water splitting and other electrochemical devices.Developing efficient non-precious metal hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) electrocatalysts is a great challenge for sustainable hydrogen production from water. In this communication, for the first time, semimetallic MoP2 nanoparticle films on a metal Mo plate (MoP2 NPs/Mo) are fabricated through a facile two-step strategy. When used as a binder-free hydrogen evolution cathode, the as-prepared MoP2 NPs/Mo electrode exhibits superior HER catalytic activity at all pH values. At a current density of 10 mA cm-2, the catalyst displays overpotentials of 143, 211 and 194 mV in 0.5 M H2SO4, 1.0 M phosphate buffer solution and 1.0 M KOH, respectively. Furthermore, it exhibits excellent stability over a wide pH range. Thus, this in situ route opens up a new avenue for the fabrication of highly efficient, cost-effective and binder-free non-precious catalysts for water splitting and other electrochemical devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental section and figures. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00820h

  8. Deletions of Endocytic Components VPS28 and VPS32 Affect Growth at Alkaline pH and Virulence through both RIM101-Dependent and RIM101-Independent Pathways in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Cornet, Muriel; Bidard, Frédérique; Schwarz, Patrick; Da Costa, Grégory; Blanchin-Roland, Sylvie; Dromer, Françoise; Gaillardin, Claude

    2005-01-01

    Ambient pH signaling involves a cascade of conserved Rim or Pal products in ascomycetous yeasts or filamentous fungi, respectively. Recent evidences in the fungi Aspergillus nidulans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Yarrowia lipolytica, and Candida albicans suggested that components of endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) involved in endocytic trafficking were needed for signal transduction along the Rim pathway. In this study, we confirm these findings with C. albicans and show that Vps28p (ESCRT-I) and Vps32p/Snf7p (ESCRT-III) are required for the transcriptional regulation of known targets of the Rim pathway, such as the PHR1 and PHR2 genes encoding cell surface proteins, which are expressed at alkaline and acidic pH, respectively. We additionally show that deletion of these two VPS genes, particularly VPS32, has a more drastic effect than a RIM101 deletion on growth at alkaline pH and that this effect is only partially suppressed by expression of a constitutively active form of Rim101p. Finally, in an in vivo mouse model, both vps null mutants were significantly less virulent than a rim101 mutant, suggesting that VPS28 and VPS32 gene products affect virulence both through Rim-dependent and Rim-independent pathways. PMID:16299290

  9. The potential of selected macroalgal species for treatment of AMD at different pH ranges in temperate regions.

    PubMed

    Oberholster, Paul J; Cheng, Po-Hsun; Botha, Anna-Maria; Genthe, Bettina

    2014-09-01

    The metal bioaccumulation potential of selected macroalgae species at different pH ranges was study for usage as part of a possible secondary passive acid mine drainage (AMD) treatment technology in algae ponds. Two separate studies were conducted to determine the suitability of macroalgae for passive treatment when metabolic processes in macrophytes and microorganisms in constructed wetlands decrease during winter months. In the field study, the bioconcentration of metals (mg/kg dry weight) measured in the benthic macroalgae mats was in the following order: site 1. Oedogonium crassum Al > Fe > Mn > Zn; site 2. Klebsormidium klebsii, Al > Fe > Mn > Zn; site 3. Microspora tumidula, Fe > Al > Mn > Zn and site 4. M. tumidula, Fe > Mn > Al > Zn. In the laboratory study, cultured macroalgae K. klebsii, O. crassum and M. tumidula isolated from the field sampling sites were exposed to three different pH values (3, 5 and 7), while bioaccumulation of the metals, Al, Fe, Mn and Zn and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity were measured in the different selected algae species at a constant water temperature of 14 °C. Bioaccumulation of Al was the highest for O. crassum followed by K. klebsii and M. tumidula (p < 0.0001). From the study it was evident that the highest metal bioaccumulation occurred in the macroalgae O. crassum at all three tested pH values under constant low water temperature. PMID:24835955

  10. Effect of chloride ion on the sedimentation volume and zeta potential of zinc insulin suspensions in neutral pH range.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y; Cuff, G W; Morris, R M

    1995-06-01

    When zinc insulin suspensions of different pH values were prepared in the presence of sodium chloride, an unusually high sedimentation volume was found at about pH 6.9. An experimental investigation was conducted in an effort to understand this phenomenon. The experiments involved measurements of electrophoretic mobilities to calculate zeta potentials and sedimentation volumes of zinc insulin suspensions prepared at different NaCl concentrations (0, 17, and 120 mM) and at various pH values from 5 to 8. The general trend observed was that the magnitude of the zeta potential increased with pH when it was higher than the isoelectric point of 5.3. When the sodium chloride concentration was 120 mM, a very rapid change in zeta potential was observed in the pH range of 6.6 to 7.2, with a maximum magnitude of zeta potential at about pH 6.9, the same pH that was observed to yield the largest sedimentation volume. Our experimental results indicate that the greatest adsorption of chloride ion on the zinc insulin suspension particles occurred in the same pH range, which appeared to be responsible for the rapid change of zeta potential in that pH range. The experimental data were interpreted by DLVO (Derjaguin, Landau, Vervey, and Overbeek) theory, which involves a comparison of the forces of electrostatic repulsion and of the van der Waals attraction. PMID:7562418

  11. Continuous bioproduction of short-chain fatty acids from sludge enhanced by the combined use of surfactant and alkaline pH.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yinguang; Liu, Kun; Su, Yinglong; Zheng, Xiong; Wang, Qin

    2013-07-01

    This work reported the enhancement of continuous SCFA production from sludge by the combined use of surfactant (sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS)) and pH 10 (i.e., SDBS & pH 10). The maximal SCFA production (2056 mg COD/L) was achieved under the SDBS & pH 10 condition at a sludge retention time (SRT) of 12d, which was much higher than that of the blank, sole SDBS, or pH 10. The mechanisms investigation showed that the combined strategy had greater sludge solubilization, higher protein hydrolysis, and lower activity of methanogens. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis revealed that the abundance of bacteria was increased, whereas that of archaea was decreased by SDBS & pH 10. The excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy assay further suggested that SBDS caused protein structure change, which benefited protein hydrolysis. PMID:23685363

  12. Rapid identification of compound mutations in patients with Ph-positive leukemias by long-range next generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Kastner, R.; Zopf, A.; Preuner, S.; Pröll, J.; Niklas, N.; Foskett, P.; Valent, P.; Lion, T.; Gabriel, C.

    2016-01-01

    An emerging problem in patients with Ph-positive leukemias is the occurrence of cells with multiple mutations in the BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase domain (TKD) associated with high resistance to different tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Rapid and sensitive detection of leukemic subclones carrying such changes, referred to as compound mutations, is therefore of increasing clinical relevance. However, current diagnostic methods including next generation sequencing (NGS) of short fragments do not optimally meet these requirements. We have therefore established a long-range (LR) NGS approach permitting massively parallel sequencing of the entire TKD length of 933bp in a single read using 454 sequencing with the GS FLX+ instrument (454 Life Sciences). By testing a series of individual and consecutive specimens derived from six patients with chronic myeloid leukemia, we demonstrate that long-range NGS analysis permits sensitive identification of mutations and their assignment to the same or to separate subclones. This approach also facilitates readily interpretable documentation of insertions and deletions in the entire BCR-ABL1 TKD. The long-range NGS findings were reevaluated by an independent technical approach in select cases. PCR amplicons of the BCR-ABL1 TKD derived from individual specimens were subcloned into pGEM®-T plasmids, and >100 individual clones were subjected to analysis by Sanger sequencing. The NGS results were confirmed, thus documenting the reliability of the new technology. Long-range NGS analysis therefore provides an economic approach to the identification of compound mutations and other genetic alterations in the entire BCR-ABL1 TKD, and represents an important advancement of the diagnostic armamentarium for rapid assessment of impending resistant disease. PMID:24365090

  13. Nitrogen-rich functional groups carbon nanoparticles based fluorescent pH sensor with broad-range responding for environmental and live cells applications.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bingfang; Su, Yubin; Zhang, Liangliang; Liu, Rongjun; Huang, Mengjiao; Zhao, Shulin

    2016-08-15

    A nitrogen-rich functional groups carbon nanoparticles (N-CNs) based fluorescent pH sensor with a broad-range responding was prepared by one-pot hydrothermal treatment of melamine and triethanolamine. The as-prepared N-CNs exhibited excellent photoluminesence properties with an absolute quantum yield (QY) of 11.0%. Furthermore, the N-CNs possessed a broad-range pH response. The linear pH response range was 3.0 to 12.0, which is much wider than that of previously reported fluorescent pH sensors. The possible mechanism for the pH-sensitive response of the N-CNs was ascribed to photoinduced electron transfer (PET). Cell toxicity experiment showed that the as-prepared N-CNs exhibited low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility with the cell viabilities of more than 87%. The proposed N-CNs-based pH sensor was used for pH monitoring of environmental water samples, and pH fluorescence imaging of live T24 cells. The N-CNs is promising as a convenient and general fluorescent pH sensor for environmental monitoring and bioimaging applications. PMID:27085956

  14. Hemoglobin niobate composite based biosensor for efficient determination of hydrogen peroxide in a broad pH range.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lu; Gao, Qiuming

    2007-02-15

    Inorganic layered niobates (HCa2Nb3O10) were used as immobilization matrices of hemoglobin (Hb) because of their tunable interlayer spaces, large surface areas and good biocompatibilities. A pair of well-defined, quasi-reversible cycle voltammertric peaks were obtained at the Hb-HCa2Nb3O10 modified pyrolytic graphite electrode, suggesting that the layered niobates facilitate the electron transfer between the proteins and the electrode. Hb-HCa2Nb3O10 modified electrode exhibited electrocatalytic response for monitoring H2O2 with a large linear detection range from 25 microM to 3.0 mM and a relatively high sensitivity of 172 microA mM-1 cm-2. Based on the stabilizing effect of the layered niobates, Hb-HCa2Nb3O10 modified electrode can detect H2O2 in strongly acidic and basic solutions with pH of 1-12, which greatly expands the application fields of biosensors. PMID:16887346

  15. Mapping the pharyngeal and intestinal pH of Caenorhabditis elegans and real-time luminal pH oscillations using extended dynamic range pH-sensitive nanosensors.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Veeren M; Orsi, Gianni; Brown, Alan; Pritchard, David I; Aylott, Jonathan W

    2013-06-25

    Extended dynamic range pH-sensitive ratiometric nanosensors, capable of accurately mapping the full physiological pH range, have been developed and used to characterize the pH of the pharyngeal and intestinal lumen of Caenorhabditis elegans in real-time. Nanosensors, 40 nm in diameter, were prepared by conjugating pH-sensitive fluorophores, carboxyfluorescein (FAM) and Oregon Green (OG) in a 1:1 ratio, and a reference fluorophore, 5-(and-6)-carboxytetramethylrhodamine (TAMRA) to an inert polyacrylamide matrix. Accurate ratiometric pH measurements were calculated through determination of the fluorescence ratio between the pH-sensitive and reference fluorophores. Nanosensors were calibrated with an automated image analysis system and validated to demonstrate a pH measurement resolution of ±0.17 pH units. The motility of C. elegans populations, as an indicator for viability, showed nematodes treated with nanosensors, for concentrations ranging from 50.00 to 3.13 mg/mL, were not statistically different to nematodes not challenged with nanosensors up to a period of 4 days (p < 0.05). The nanosensors were also found to remain in the C. elegans lumen >24 h after nanosensor challenge was removed. The pH of viable C. elegans lumen was found to range from 5.96 ± 0.31 in the anterior pharynx to 3.59 ± 0.09 in the posterior intestine. The pharyngeal pumping rate, which dictates the transfer of ingested material from the pharynx to the intestine, was found to be temperature dependent. Imaging C. elegans at 4 °C reduced the pharyngeal pumping rate to 7 contractions/min and enabled the reconstruction of rhythmic pH oscillations in the intestinal lumen in real-time with fluorescence microscopy. PMID:23668893

  16. Evaluating the role of metal ions in the bathochromic and hyperchromic responses of cyanidin derivatives in acidic and alkaline pH.

    PubMed

    Sigurdson, G T; Robbins, R J; Collins, T M; Giusti, M M

    2016-10-01

    In many food products, colorants derived from natural sources are increasingly popular due to consumer demand. Anthocyanins are one class of versatile and abundant naturally occurring chromophores that produce different hues in nature, especially with metal ions and other copigments assisting. The effects of chelation of metal ions (Mg(2+), Al(3+), Cr(3+), Fe(3+), and Ga(3+)) in factorial excesses to anthocyanin concentration (0-500×) on the spectral characteristics (380-700nm) of cyanidin and acylated cyanidin derivatives were evaluated to better understand the color evolution of anthocyanin-metal chelates in pH 3-8. In all pH, anthocyanins exhibited bathochromic and hyperchromic shifts. Largest bathochromic shifts most often occurred in pH 6; while largest hyperchromic shifts occurred in pH 5. Divalent Mg(2+) showed no observable effect on anthocyanin color while trivalent metal ions caused bathochromic shifts and hue changes. Generally, bathochromic shifts on anthocyanins were greatest with more electron rich metal ions (Fe(3+)≈Ga(3+)>Al(3+)>Cr(3+)). PMID:27132820

  17. Voltammetric characterization of DNA intercalators across the full pH range: anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate and anthraquinone-2-sulfonate.

    PubMed

    Batchelor-McAuley, Christopher; Li, Qian; Dapin, Sophie M; Compton, Richard G

    2010-03-25

    The use of anthraquinone and its derivatives, notably the sulfonate and disulfonate salts, for the detection of DNA via electrochemical techniques, has been the focus of a number of recent articles. This study provides a quantitative model of the two redox systems of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate and anthraquinone-2-sulfonate, over the full aqueous pH range (0-13); the model is based upon the theoretical "scheme of squares" for a 2H(+), 2e(-) system, as first proposed by Jacq (Jacq, J. J. Electroanal. Chem. 1971, 29, 149-180). The effect of pH and ionic strength on the observed cyclic voltammetry was investigated experimentally. The variation of the electrochemical response with proton concentration was modeled through use of the commercially available simulation software, DIGISIM; the system was successfully fitted with attention to voltammetric peak height, position, width, and shape. The model demonstrates how the pK(a) values of the anthraquinone intermediates dominate the observed pH dependence of the voltammetry. At high pH (above pH 12), a simple EE process is found to occur. As the pH decreases, the formation of other protonated species becomes possible; this not only causes a Nernstian shift in the measured electrochemical potential for the redox couple but also results in changes in the mechanistic pathway. At pH 10, an EECC process dominates, as the pH is further lowered into the range 4-7, the overall mechanism is an ECEC process, and finally a CECE mechanism operates at around pH 1 and below. This work provides physical insight into the complex mechanistic pathways involved and will aid the future development of more sophisticated and accurate anthraquinone based DNA sensors. PMID:20196578

  18. Solar light (hv) and H2O2/hv photo-disinfection of natural alkaline water (pH 8.6) in a compound parabolic collector at different day periods in Sahelian region.

    PubMed

    Ndounla, J; Pulgarin, C

    2015-11-01

    The photo-disinfection of natural alkaline surface water (pH 8.6 ± 0.3) for drinking purposes was carried out under solar radiation treatments. The enteric bacteria studied were the wild total coliforms/Escherichia coli (10(4) CFU/ml) and Salmonella spp. (10(4) CFU/ml) naturally present in the water. The photo-disinfection of a 25-l water sample was carried out in a solar compound parabolic collector (CPC) in the absence and in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The addition of H2O2 (10 mg/L) to the sample water was sufficient to enhance the photo-disinfection and ensure an irreversible lethal action on the wild enteric bacteria contents of the sample. The inactivation kinetic of the system was significantly enhanced compared to the one carried out without H2O2 addition. The effect of the solar radiation parameters on the efficiency of the photo-disinfection were assessed. The pH has increased during the treatment in all the photo-disinfection processes (hv and H2O2/hv). The Salmonella spp strain has shown the best effective inactivate time in alkaline water than the one recorded under acidic or near-neutral conditions. The evolution of some physico-chemical parameters of the water (turbidity, NO2(-), NO3(-), NH4(+), HPO4(2-), and bicarbonate (HCO3(-))) was monitored during the treatment. Finally, the possible mechanistic process involved during the enteric bacteria inactivation was suggested. PMID:26122565

  19. Preliminary results, Central Gneiss Complex of the Coast Range batholith, southeastern Alaska: the roots of a high-K, calc-alkaline arc?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, F.; Arth, Joseph G.

    1984-01-01

    The Central Gneiss Complex (CGC) of the Coast Range batholith is the oldest unit of the batholith east of Ketchikan, Alaska, being dated by the zircon UPb method (by T.W. Stern) at 128-140 Ma. Heterogeneous, layered, commonly migmatitic, orthogneiss of hornblende-biotite quartz diorite, tonalite, quartz monzodiorite and granodiorite compositions (IUGS terminology) form the major part of the CGC. These gneisses show a range of 50-65% SiO2 and are high in Al2O3 (c. 15-19%), K2O (1.5-4%) and Sr (800-900 ppm). Most major elements show coherent, typically magmatic trends with SiO2. La and Rb show maxima at ??? 58% SiO2. Initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios are relatively high and range from 0.7052 to 0.7066. Wallrocks of the CGC are mostly metagraywacke, pelite and metavolcanic rocks at amphibolite facies; they are geochemically dissimilar to the CGC. Major and minor elements of the CGC are very similar to those of high-K orogenic, calc-alkaline andesitic suites. The CGC may have formed largely by fractionation of mantle-derived, high AlKSr basaltic liquid in an ascending diapir, having hornblende, plagioclase, and biotite as major precipitating phases. The CGC probably represents the plutonic equivalent of a continental-margin or Andean arc that formed when the Taku terrane of the Insular belt on the west collided with the previously emplaced (but also allochthonous) Stikine terrane on the east in Late Jurassic or Early Cretaceous time. ?? 1984.

  20. Is the optimal pH for membrane fusion in host cells by avian influenza viruses related to host range and pathogenicity?

    PubMed

    Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Motohashi, Yurie; Hiono, Takahiro; Tamura, Tomokazu; Nagaya, Kazuki; Matsuno, Keita; Sakoda, Yoshihiro; Kida, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Influenza viruses isolated from wild ducks do not replicate in chickens. This fact is not explained solely by the receptor specificity of the hemagglutinin (HA) from such viruses for target host cells. To investigate this restriction in host range, the fusion activities of HA molecules from duck and chicken influenza viruses were examined. Influenza viruses A/duck/Mongolia/54/2001 (H5N2) (Dk/MNG) and A/chicken/Ibaraki/1/2005 (H5N2) (Ck/IBR), which replicate only in their primary hosts, were used. The optimal pH for membrane fusion of Ck/IBR was 5.9, higher than that of Dk/MNG at 4.9. To assess the relationship between the optimal pH for fusion and the host range of avian influenza viruses, the optimal pH for fusion of 55 influenza virus strains isolated from ducks and chickens was examined. No correlation was found between the host range and optimal pH for membrane fusion by the viruses, and this finding applied also to the H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses. The optimal pH for membrane fusion for avian influenza viruses was shown to not necessarily be correlated with their host range or pathogenicity in ducks and chickens. PMID:27231009

  1. Isolated secretion granules from parotid glands of chronically stimulated rats possess an alkaline internal pH and inward-directed H/sup +/ pump activity

    SciTech Connect

    Arvan, P.; Castle, J.D.

    1986-10-01

    Secretion granules have been isolated from the parotid glands of rats that have been chronically stimulated with the ..beta..-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol. These granules are of interest because they package a quantitatively different set of secretory proteins in comparison with granules from the normal gland. Polypeptides enriched in proline, glycine, and glutamine, which are known to have pI's >10, replace ..cap alpha..-amylase (pI's = 6.8) as the principal content species. The internal pH of granules from the treated rats changes from 7.8 in a potassium sulfate medium to 6.9 in a choline chloride medium. The increased pH over that of normal parotid granules (approx.6.8) appears to protect the change in composition of the secretory contents. Whereas normal mature parotide granules have practically negligible levels of H/sup +/ pumping ATPase activity, the isolated granules from isoproterenol-treated rats undergo a time-dependent internal acidification that requires the presence of ATP and is abolished by an H/sup +/ ionophore. Additionally, an inside-positive granule transmembrane potential develops after ATP addition that depends upon ATP hydrolysis. Two independent methods have been used that exclude the possibility that contaminating organelles are the source of the H/sup +/-ATPase activity. Together these data provide clear evidence for the presence of an H/sup +/ pump in the membranes of parotid granules from chronically stimulated rats. However, despite the presence of H/sup +/-pump activity, fluorescence microscopy with the weak base, acridine orange, reveals that the intragranular pH in live cells is greater than that of the cytoplasm.

  2. Oxidation of iodide and iodine on birnessite (delta-MnO2) in the pH range 4-8.

    PubMed

    Allard, Sébastien; von Gunten, Urs; Sahli, Elisabeth; Nicolau, Rudy; Gallard, Hervé

    2009-08-01

    The oxidation of iodide by synthetic birnessite (delta-MnO(2)) was studied in perchlorate media in the pH range 4-8. Iodine (I(2)) was detected as an oxidation product that was subsequently further oxidized to iodate (IO(3)(-)). The third order rate constants, second order on iodide and first order on manganese oxide, determined by extraction of iodine in benzene decreased with increasing pH (6.3-7.5) from 1790 to 3.1M(-2) s(-1). Both iodine and iodate were found to adsorb significantly on birnessite with an adsorption capacity of 12.7 microM/g for iodate at pH 5.7. The rate of iodine oxidation by birnessite decreased with increasing ionic strength, which resulted in a lower rate of iodate formation. The production of iodine in iodide-containing waters in contact with manganese oxides may result in the formation of undesired iodinated organic compounds (taste and odor, toxicity) in natural and technical systems. The probability of the formation of such compounds is highest in the pH range 5-7.5. For pH <5 iodine is quickly oxidized to iodate, a non-toxic and stable sink for iodine. At pH >7.5, iodide is not oxidized to a significant extent. PMID:19540547

  3. Graft copolymers that exhibit temperature-induced phase transitions over a wide range of pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guohua; Hoffman, Allan S.

    1995-01-01

    THERE are many potential applications of 'intelligent' aqueous polymer systems1-8 in medicine, biotechnology, industry and in environmental problems9-13. Many of these polymer systems undergo reversible phase transitions-for example, abrupt changes in volume-in response to external stimuli such as temperature, pH or the nature of the solvent. Most of the polymers studied previously are responsive to only one kind of stimulus. But for some applications, independent responsiveness to several factors, such as temperature and pH, may be required. Here we describe a polymer that undergoes marked solubility changes in water in response to temperature and/or pH changes. The polymer is prepared by grafting temperature-sensitive side chains onto a pH-sensitive backbone. We also find that block copolymers, in which the temperature- and pH-sensitive units alternate along the chain, show similar behaviour.

  4. Study of retention and peak shape in hydrophilic interaction chromatography over a wide pH range.

    PubMed

    McCalley, David V

    2015-09-11

    Retention factor and column efficiency measurements were made for 14 test compounds comprising acids, bases and neutrals on two pairs of amide and bare silica HILIC columns, each pair obtained from a different manufacturer. The columns were tested with up to 6 different mobile phases with acetonitrile-water containing formic (FA), trifluoroacetic (TFA), heptafluorobutyric acids (HFBA) and ammonium salt buffers at w(w)pH 3, 6 and 9. Measurements of mobile phase pH in water (w(w)pH) and in the aqueous-organic mixture (w(s)pH) were performed, and calculations of ionic strength made, in order to aid interpretation of the chromatographic results. Stronger acids like TFA produced very different selectivity compared with ammonium formate buffers at similar aqueous pH. On a given column using TFA as additive, the retention of strongly acidic solutes was considerably increased relative to that of bases. Some bases even showed exclusion on both amide, and on a hybrid silica column. Conversely, in ammonium formate buffers of similar aqueous pH, bases had increased retention compared with acids, particularly on the bare silica columns. This result can be attributed to the higher pH of the salt buffers when measured in the aqueous-organic phase and interaction with negatively charged silanols. It is possible that the silica surface becomes positively charged at the low pH of TFA, leading to anion exchange properties that become competitive with the cation exchange properties normally attributed to silanol dissociation, although other explanations of these results are possible. Very marked selectivity differences were obtained by use of TFA in the mobile phase. Useful selectivity differences may also be obtained with salt buffers at different pH if the use of TFA is not desired due to its relatively unfavourable properties in mass spectrometry. PMID:26275863

  5. Kinetic hindrance of Fe(II) oxidation at alkaline pH and in the presence of nitrate and oxygen in a facultative wastewater stabilization pond.

    PubMed

    Rockne, Karl J

    2007-02-15

    To better understand the dynamics of Fe2 + oxidation in facultative wastewater stabilization ponds, water samples from a three-pond system were taken throughout the period of transition from anoxic conditions with high aqueous Fe2 + levels in the early spring to fully aerobic conditions in late spring. Fe2 + levels showed a highly significant correlation with pH but were not correlated with dissolved oxygen (DO). Water column Fe2 + levels were modeled using the kinetic rate law for Fe2 + oxidation of Sung and Morgan.[5] The fitted kinetic coefficients were 5 +/- 3 x 10(6) M(- 2) atm(-1) min(-1); more than six orders of magnitude lower than typically reported. Comparison of four potential Fe redox couples demonstrated that the rhoepsilon was at least 3-4 orders of magnitude higher than would be expected based on internal equilibrium. Surprisingly, measured nitrate and DO (when present) were typically consistent with both nitrate (from denitrification) and DO levels (from aerobic respiration) predicted from equilibrium. Although the hydrous Fe oxide/FeCO3 couple was closest to equilibrium and most consistent with the observed pH dependence (in contrast to predicted lepidocrocite), Fe2 + oxidation is kinetically hindered, resulting in up to 10(7)-fold higher levels than expected based on both kinetic and equilibrium analyses. PMID:17365293

  6. Short-range variability of soil pH in a regional geochemical survey, communicating uncertainty to the data user

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ander, Louise; Knights, Kate; Lark, Murray

    2015-04-01

    The north of Ireland is well-furnished with geochemical data after completion of the Tellus survey of Northern Ireland and the Tellus Border survey of six northern counties of the Republic of Ireland. These data are of considerable interest to the agricultural sector, in particular the data on soil pH. However, a geochemical survey at regional scale cannot resolve significant variation of soil pH, in particular effects of soil management and fine-scale variation of superficial material. This leads to uncertainties in the mapped soil pH which must be accounted for when making decisions about management interventions, including more detailed local sampling. In this poster we show how uncertainty of predicted soil pH, relative to established threshold values, can be quantified by disjunctive kriging. The uncertainty is expressed in terms of probabilities. We show how this can be communicated to the data user by means of the calibrated phrases of the IPCC, using results from recent research on its efficacy to modify its presentation.

  7. Anaerobic methanethiol degradation and methanogenic community analysis in an alkaline (pH 10) biological process for liquefied petroleum gas desulfurization.

    PubMed

    van Leerdam, Robin C; Bonilla-Salinas, Monica; de Bok, Frank A M; Bruning, H; Lens, Piet N L; Stams, Alfons J M; Janssen, Albert J H

    2008-11-01

    Anaerobic methanethiol (MT) degradation by mesophilic (30 degrees C) alkaliphilic (pH 10) communities was studied in a lab-scale Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Bed (UASB) reactor inoculated with a mixture of sediments from the Wadden Sea (The Netherlands), Soap Lake (Central Washington), and Russian soda lakes. MT degradation started after 32 days of incubation. During the first 252 days, complete degradation was achieved till a volumetric loading rate of 7.5 mmol MT/L/day, and sulfide, methane, and carbon dioxide were the main reaction products. Temporary inhibition of MT degradation occurred after MT peak loads and in the presence of dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), which is the autooxidation product of MT. From day 252 onwards, methanol was dosed to the reactor as co-substrate at a loading rate of 3-6 mmol/L/day to stimulate growth of methylotrophic methanogens. Methanol was completely degraded and also a complete MT degradation was achieved till a volumetric loading rate of 13 mmol MT/L/day (0.77 mmol MT/gVSS/day). However, from day 354 till the end of the experimental run (day 365), acetate was formed and MT was not completely degraded anymore, indicating that methanol-degrading homoacetogenic bacteria had partially outcompeted the methanogenic MT-degrading archea. The archeal community in the reactor sludge was analyzed by DGGE and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. The methanogenic archea responsible for the degradation of MT in the reactor were related to Methanolobus oregonensis. A pure culture, named strain SODA, was obtained by serial dilutions in medium containing both trimethyl amine and dimethyl sulfide (DMS). Strain SODA degraded MT, DMS, trimethyl amine, and methanol. Flow sheet simulations revealed that for sufficient MT removal from liquefied petroleum gas, the extraction and biological degradation process should be operated above pH 9. PMID:18814290

  8. Characterization of two glycoside hydrolase family 36 α-galactosidases: novel transglycosylation activity, lead-zinc tolerance, alkaline and multiple pH optima, and low-temperature activity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Junpei; Lu, Qian; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Yiyan; Wu, Qian; Li, Junjun; Tang, Xianghua; Xu, Bo; Ding, Junmei; Huang, Zunxi

    2016-03-01

    Two α-galactosidases, AgaAJB07 from Mesorhizobium and AgaAHJG4 from Streptomyces, were expressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant AgaAJB07 showed a 2.9-fold and 22.6-fold increase in kcat with a concomitant increase of 2.3-fold and 16.3-fold in Km in the presence of 0.5mM ZnSO4 and 30.0mM Pb(CH3COO)2, respectively. Recombinant AgaAHJG4 showed apparent optimal activity at pH 8.0 in McIlvaine or Tris-HCl buffer and 9.5 in glycine-NaOH or HCl-borax-NaOH buffer, retention of 23.6% and 43.2% activity when assayed at 10 and 20°C, respectively, and a half-life of approximately 2min at 50°C. The activation energies for p-nitrophenyl-α-d-galactopyranoside hydrolysis by AgaAJB07 and AgaAHJG4 were 71.9±0.8 and 48.2±2.0kJmol(-1), respectively. Both AgaAJB07 and AgaAHJG4 exhibited transglycosylation activity, but they required different acceptors and produced different compounds. Furthermore, potential factors for alkaline and multiple pH optima and low-temperature adaptations of AgaAHJG4 were presumed. PMID:26471539

  9. Sorption of dissolved lead from shooting range soils using hydroxyapatite amendments synthesized from industrial byproducts as affected by varying pH conditions.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yohey; Taki, Tomohiro; Sato, Takeshi

    2009-04-01

    For immobilization technologies to be successful, the use of readily available and cost advantageous amendment is important when the remediation targets vast amounts of contaminated soils. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the byproduct-synthesized hydroxyapatite can be used as an immobilizing amendment for dissolved Pb from a shooting range soil, and to model the kinetic data collected from dissolution experiments. A soil-solution kinetic experiment was conducted under fixed pH conditions as a function of time. A Pb-contaminated soil was reacted with various hydroxyapatite amendments to determine the dissolution rate and mineral products of soil Pb. Three types of amendments used were pure hydroxyapatite (HA), and poorly crystalline hydroxyapatites synthesized from gypsum waste (CHA), and synthesized from incinerated poultry litter (PHA). The dissolved Pb concentration decreased with the addition of amendments at pH 3-7. Both CHA and PHA were more effective than HA for attenuating Pb dissolution at pH 6 and above. According to the thermodynamic calculation at pH 6, the dissolved Pb concentration for CHA and PHA treatments was predicted to be 66% and 50% lower than that of HA treatment, respectively. A better Pb immobilization effect demonstrated by CHA and PHA resulted in their greater solubility at higher pH, which may promote the formation of chloropyromorphite precipitates. Dissolution kinetics of soil Pb was adequately explained by pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order equations in acid pH ranges. According to the ion exchange model, an adequate agreement between the experimental data and regression curves was shown in the initial 40 min of the reaction process, but the accuracy of model predictability decreased thereafter. According to kinetic models and dissolution phenomena, CHA and PHA amendments had better Pb sorption capacity with rapid kinetics than pure hydroxyapatite at weak acid to neutral pH. PMID:19111967

  10. Electron impact total cross sections for H2S and PH3 for a wide energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limbachiya, Chetan; Vinodkumar, Minaxi; Mason, Nigel

    2011-10-01

    In this paper we have computed total cross sections for H2S and PH3 using two different molecular codes, Quantemol N for low energy calculations and Spherical Complex Optical Potential for intermediate and high energies. We present rotationally elastic total cross sections for electron scattering from H2S and PH3, to demonstrate the possibility of producing robust cross sections from 0.01 eV to 2 keV using two different theoretical formalisms. We use the commercial Quantemol-N formalism for calculating total cross sections up to threshold of the target and the Spherical Optical Complex Potential (SCOP) method for calculating total sections beyond threshold up to 2 keV. CGL thanks UGC & MVK thanks DST for the Major research project.

  11. Bio-inspired anti-oil-fouling chitosan-coated mesh for oil/water separation suitable for broad pH range and hyper-saline environments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shiyan; Lu, Fei; Tao, Lei; Liu, Na; Gao, Changrui; Feng, Lin; Wei, Yen

    2013-11-27

    Here, we report a bio-inspired chitosan (CS)-based mesh with high separation efficiency, oil-fouling repellency, and stability in a complex liquid environment. The surface of the CS coating maintains underwater superoleophobicity and low oil adhesion (<1 μN) in pure water and hyper-saline solutions, and it can keep stable special wettability in broad pH range environments after the CS mesh is fully cross-linked with glutaraldehyde and then reduced by sodium borohydride to form a stable carbon-nitrogen single bond. The separation process is solely gravity-driven, and the mesh can separate a range of different oil/water mixtures with >99% separation efficiency in hyper-saline and broad pH range conditions. We envision that such a separation method will be useful in oil spill cleanup and industrial oily wastewater treatment in extreme environments. PMID:24180691

  12. Fluorescence signaling of hydrogen sulfide in broad pH range using a copper complex based on BINOL-benzimidazole ligands.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mingtai; Yu, Huan; Li, Huihui; Xu, Hongda; Huang, Dejian; Wang, Suhua

    2015-04-20

    A weakly fluorescent complex derived from a binaphthol-benzimidazole ligand was designed and synthesized for hydrogen sulfide at different pH conditions. It was demonstrated that the probe showed the same reactivity to various hydrogen sulfide species in a broad range of pH values to generate highly fluorescent product through a displacement reaction mechanism, whereas the product's fluorescence spectrum exhibited a hypsochromic shift of ∼73 nm (2393 cm(-1)) as pH increased from neutral to basic, which can be used for distinguishing the various species of hydrogen sulfide. This turn-on fluorescence probe was highly selective and sensitive to hydrogen sulfide with a detection limit of 0.11 μM. It was then applied for evaluating the total content of sulfide (including hydrogen sulfide, hydrosulfide, and sulfide) as well as for the visual detection of gaseous H2S in air using a simple test paper strip. PMID:25839192

  13. Template-free synthesis of ZnWO{sub 4} powders via hydrothermal process in a wide pH range

    SciTech Connect

    Hojamberdiev, Mirabbos; Zhu, Gangqiang; Xu, Yunhua

    2010-12-15

    ZnWO{sub 4} powders with different morphologies were fabricated through a template-free hydrothermal method at 180 {sup o}C for 8 h in a wide pH range. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-visible and luminescence spectrophotometers were applied to study the effects of pH values on crystallinity, morphology, optical and luminescence properties. The XRD results showed that the WO{sub 3} + ZnWO{sub 4}, ZnWO{sub 4}, and ZnO phases could form after hydrothermal processing at 180 {sup o}C for 8 h with the pH values of 1, 3-11, and 13, respectively. The SEM and TEM observation revealed that the morphological transformation of ZnWO{sub 4} powders occurred with an increase in pH values as follows: star anise-, peony-, and desert rose-like microstructures and soya bean- and rod-like nanostructures. The highest luminescence intensity was found to be in sample consisting of star anise-like crystallites among all the samples due to the presence of larger particles with high crystallinity resulted from the favorable pH under the current hydrothermal conditions.

  14. Zircon age range and sources of alkaline rocks from the Kurgusul intrusion, Kuznetsk Alatau: The first U-Pb (SHRIMP II) and Sm-Nd isotope data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrublevskii, V. V.; Gertner, I. F.; Tishin, P. A.; Bayanova, T. B.

    2014-12-01

    U-Pb isotope analysis of basic feldspathoid rocks (juvites) of the Kurgusul intrusion, NE Kuznetsk Alatau, revealed three generations of zircons of various ages (˜1.3-1.5 Ga; 484.3 ± 5.5 and 393.6 ± 9.2Ma). This suggests several stages of regional alkaline basic magmatism in the Middle Cambrian-Early Ordovician and Early-Middle Devonian and melting of the Mesoproterozoic continental crust, which form part of the basement of the Kuznetsk Alatau terrane. The trace element geochemical data indicate a continental margin setting characterized by the complex interaction of a plume-related, supra-subduction zone and crustal materials. A possible model of the magmatic evolution assumes that the ascent of a plume at the Cambrian-Ordovician boundary induced generation of the initial alkaline basaltic magmas and metasomatism and erosion of the lower lithosphere. Repeated partial melting of the lower crust after a 100 Myr period produced new magma batches of alkaline composition, which inherited zircons from the preceding episode of magma generation. The inherited juvenile magmatic source (PREMA + E-type MORB + EM) is confirmed by similarities in the Sm-Nd isotopic signatures (ɛNd( T) ≈ +4.5 to +5.7, T(Nd)DM ≈ 0.8-0.9 Ga) of derivatives of regional alkaline basic complexes of different ages.

  15. Stepwise error-prone PCR and DNA shuffling changed the pH activity range and product specificity of the cyclodextrin glucanotransferase from an alkaliphilic Bacillus sp.

    PubMed Central

    Melzer, Susanne; Sonnendecker, Christian; Föllner, Christina; Zimmermann, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Cyclodextrin glucanotransferase (EC 2.4.1.19) from the alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. G-825-6 converts starch mainly to γ-cyclodextrin (CD8). A combination of error-prone PCR and DNA shuffling was used to obtain variants of this enzyme with higher product specificity for CD8 and a broad pH activity range. The variant S54 with seven amino acid substitutions showed a 1.2-fold increase in CD8-synthesizing activity and the product ratio of CD7:CD8 was shifted to 1:7 compared to 1:3 of the wild-type enzyme. Nine amino acid substitutions of the cyclodextrin glucanotransferase were performed to generate the variant S35 active in a pH range 4.0–10.0. Compared to the wild-type enzyme which is inactive below pH 6.0, S35 retained 70% of its CD8-synthesizing activity at pH 4.0. PMID:26155461

  16. Wide pH range for fluoride removal from water by MHS-MgO/MgCO₃ adsorbent: kinetic, thermodynamic and mechanism studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kaisheng; Wu, Shibiao; Wang, Xuelong; He, Junyong; Sun, Bai; Jia, Yong; Luo, Tao; Meng, Fanli; Jin, Zhen; Lin, Dongyue; Shen, Wei; Kong, Lingtao; Liu, Jinhuai

    2015-05-15

    A novel environment friendly adsorbent, micro-nano hierarchical structured flower-like MgO/MgCO3 (MHS-MgO/MgCO3), was developed for fluoride removal from water. The adsorbent was characterized and its defluoridation properties were investigated. Adsorption kinetics fitted well the pseudo-second-order model. Kinetic data revealed that the fluoride adsorption was rapid, more than 83-90% of fluoride could be removed within 30 min, and the adsorption equilibrium was achieved in the following 4 h. The fluoride adsorption isotherm was well described by Freundlich model. The maximum adsorption capacity was about 300 mg/g at pH=7. Moreover, this adsorbent possessed a very wide available pH range of 5-11, and the fluoride removal efficiencies even reached up to 86.2%, 83.2% and 76.5% at pH=11 for initial fluoride concentrations of 10, 20 and 30 mg/L, respectively. The effects of co-existing anions indicated that the anions had less effect on adsorption of fluoride except phosphate. In addition, the adsorption mechanism analysis revealed that the wide available pH range toward fluoride was mainly resulted from the exchange of the carbonate and hydroxyl groups on the surface of the MHS-MgO/MgCO3 with fluoride anions. PMID:25668780

  17. Pyridoxamine-5-phosphate enzyme-linked immune mass spectrometric assay substrate for linear absolute quantification of alkaline phosphatase to the yoctomole range applied to prostate specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Florentinus-Mefailoski, Angelique; Marshall, John G

    2014-11-01

    There is a need to measure proteins that are present in concentrations below the detection limits of existing colorimetric approaches with enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assays (ELISA). The powerful enzyme alkaline phosphatase conjugated to the highly specific bacterial protein streptavidin binds to biotinylated macromolecules like proteins, antibodies, or other ligands and receptors with a high affinity. The binding of the biotinylated detection antibody, with resulting amplification of the signal by the catalytic production of reporter molecules, is key to the sensitivity of ELISA. The specificity and amplification of the signal by the enzyme alkaline phosphatase in ELISA together with the sensitivity of liquid chromatography electrospray ionization and mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS) to detect femtomole to picomole amounts of reporter molecules results in an ultrasensitive enzyme-linked immune mass spectrometric assay (ELIMSA). The novel ELIMSA substrate pyridoxamine-5-phosphate (PA5P) is cleaved by the enzyme alkaline phosphatase to yield the basic and hydrophilic product pyridoxamine (PA) that elutes rapidly with symmetrical peaks and a flat baseline. Pyridoxamine (PA) and (13)C PA were both observed to show a linear relationship between log ion intensity and quantity from picomole to femtomole amounts by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization and mass spectrometry. Four independent methods, (i) internal (13)C isotope PA dilution curves, (ii) internal (13)C isotope one-point calibration, (iii) external PA standard curve, and (iv) external (13)C PA standard curve, all agreed within 1 digit in the same order of magnitude on the linear quantification of PA. Hence, a mass spectrometer can be used to robustly detect 526 ymol of the alkaline phosphatase streptavidin probe and accurately quantify zeptomole amounts of PSA against log linear absolute standard by micro electrospray on a simple ion trap. PMID:25259405

  18. Silica in alkaline brines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, B.F.; Rettig, S.L.; Eugster, H.P.

    1967-01-01

    Analysis of sodium carbonate-bicarbonate brines from closed basins in volcanic terranes of Oregon and Kenya reveals silica contents of up to 2700 parts per million at pH's higher than 10. These high concentrations of SiO 2 can be attributed to reaction of waters with silicates, and subsequent evaporative concentration accompanied by a rise in pH. Supersaturation with respect to amorphous silica may occur and persist for brines that are out of contact with silicate muds and undersaturated with respect to trona; correlation of SiO2 with concentration of Na and total CO2 support this interpretation. Addition of moredilute waters to alkaline brines may lower the pH and cause inorganic precipitation of substantial amounts of silica.

  19. Electrostatic Assemblies of Well-Dispersed AgNPs on the Surface of Electrospun Nanofibers as Highly Active SERS Substrates for Wide-Range pH Sensing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tong; Ma, Jun; Zhen, Shu Jun; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2016-06-15

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has shown high promise in analysis and bioanalysis, wherein noble metal nanoparticles (NMNPs) such as silver nanoparticles were employed as substrates because of their strong localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) properties. However, SERS-based pH sensing was restricted because of the aggregation of NMNPs in acidic medium or biosamples with high ionic strength. Herein, by using the electrostatic interaction as a driving force, AgNPs are assembled on the surface of ethylene imine polymer (PEI)/poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) electrospun nanofibers, which are then applied as highly sensitive and reproducible SERS substrate with an enhancement factor (EF) of 10(7)-10(8). When p-aminothiophenol (p-ATP) is used as an indicator with its b2 mode, a good and wide linear response to pH ranging from 2.56 to 11.20 could be available, and the as-prepared nanocomposite fibers then could be fabricated as excellent pH sensors in complicated biological samples such as urine, considering that the pH of urine could reflect the acid-base status of a person. This work not only emerges a cost-effective, direct, and convenient approach to homogeneously decorate AgNPs on the surface of polymer nanofibers but also supplies a route for preparing other noble metal nanofibrous sensing membranes. PMID:27214514

  20. Graduate Students Have an Unprecedented Range of Choices as Ph.D. Offerings in Black Studies Proliferate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cage, Mary Crystal

    1996-01-01

    Sudden growth in the number of doctoral programs in black studies is helping to legitimize the discipline in academe, and diversity of curricula is providing students with many more choices of emphasis. Programs have a wide range of focus, from the broadest, the black American experience, to the African diaspora and comparative black studies.…

  1. Urine pH test

    MedlinePlus

    A urine pH test measures the level of acid in urine. ... pH - urine ... meat products, or cheese can decrease your urine pH. ... to check for changes in your urine acid levels. It may be done to ... more effective when urine is acidic or non-acidic (alkaline).

  2. C-Terminal proline-rich sequence broadens the optimal temperature and pH ranges of recombinant xylanase from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans C5.

    PubMed

    Irfan, Muhammad; Guler, Halil Ibrahim; Ozer, Aysegul; Sapmaz, Merve Tuncel; Belduz, Ali Osman; Hasan, Fariha; Shah, Aamer Ali

    2016-09-01

    Efficient utilization of hemicellulose entails high catalytic capacity containing xylanases. In this study, proline rich sequence was fused together with a C-terminal of xylanase gene from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans C5 and designated as GthC5ProXyl. Both GthC5Xyl and GthC5ProXyl were expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 host in order to determine effect of this modification. The C-terminal oligopeptide had noteworthy effects and instantaneously extended the optimal temperature and pH ranges and progressed the specific activity of GthC5Xyl. Compared with GthC5Xyl, GthC5ProXyl revealed improved specific activity, a higher temperature (70°C versus 60°C) and pH (8 versus 6) optimum, with broad ranges of temperature and pH (60-80°C and 6.0-9.0 versus 40-60°C and 5.0-8.0, respectively). The modified enzyme retained more than 80% activity after incubating in xylan for 3h at 80°C as compared to wild -type with only 45% residual activity. Our study demonstrated that proper introduction of proline residues on C-terminal surface of xylanase family might be very effective in improvement of enzyme thermostability. Moreover, this study reveals an engineering strategy to improve the catalytic performance of enzymes. PMID:27444327

  3. Kinetics of the alkaline dehydrochlorination of the alpha-isomer of hexachlorocyclohexane upon micellar catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sirovskii, F.S.; Berlin, E.R.; Molodchikov, S.I.; Skibinskaya, M.B.; Stepanova, N.N.; Treger, Yu.A.

    1986-11-01

    A study was carried out on the kinetics of the alkaline dehydrochlorination of the ..cap alpha..-isomer of hexachlorocyclohexane in the pH range from 7 to 10 upon catalysis by benzyldimethylalkylammonium chloride (BDMAC) micelles. The activation parameters and kinetic equation were found.

  4. Solid / solution interaction: The effect of carbonate alkalinity on adsorbed thorium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaFlamme, Brian D.; Murray, James W.

    1987-02-01

    Elevated activities of dissolved Th have been found in Soap Lake, an alkaline lake in Eastern Washington. Dissolved 232Th ranges from less than 0.001 to 4.9 dpm/L compared to about 1.3 × 10 -5 dpm/ L in sea water. The enhanced activity in the lake coincides with an increase in carbonate alkalinity. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of pH, ionic strength and carbonate alkalinity on Th adsorption on goethite. Thorium (10 -13 M total) in the presence of 5.22 mg/L α-FeOOH and 0.1 M NaNO 3 has an adsorption edge from pH 2-5. At pH 9.0 ± 0.6 the percent Th absorbed on the solid began to decrease from 100% at 100 meq/L carbonate alkalinity and exhibited no adsorption above 300 meq/L. The experimental data were modeled to obtain the intrinsic adsorption equilibrium constants for Th hydrolysis species. These adsorption constants were incorporated in the model to interpret the observed effect of carbonate alkalinity on Th adsorption. There are two main effects of the alkalinity. To a significant degree the decrease in Th adsorption is due to competition of HCO -3 and CO 2-3 ions for surface sites. Dissolved Th carbonate complexes also contribute to the increase of Th in solution.

  5. BEHAVIOR OF DDT, KEPONE, AND PERMETHRIN IN SEDIMENT-WATER SYSTEMS UNDER DIFFERENT OXIDATION-REDUCTION AND PH CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of pH and oxidation-reduction (redox) conditions of soil and sediment-water systems on the persistence of three insecticide compounds. Three pH levels, ranging from moderately acid to mildy alkaline, were studied for each compound. F...

  6. Fe/Al bimetallic particles for the fast and highly efficient removal of Cr(VI) over a wide pH range: Performance and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Fu, Fenglian; Cheng, Zihang; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Tang, Bing

    2015-11-15

    The iron/aluminum (Fe/Al) bimetallic particles with high efficiency for the removal of Cr(VI) were prepared. Fe/Al bimetallic particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), SEM mapping, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). SEM mapping showed that the core of bimetal was Al, and the planting Fe was deposited on the surface of Al. In acidic and neutral conditions, Fe/Al bimetal can completely remove Cr(VI) from wastewater in 20 min. Even at pH 11.0, the Cr(VI) removal efficiency achieved was 93.5%. Galvanic cell effect and high specific surface area are the main reasons for the enhanced removal of Cr(VI) by bimetallic particles. There were no iron ions released in solutions at pH values ranging from 3.0 to 11.0. The released Al(3+) ions concentrations in acidic and neutral conditions were all less than 0.2mg/L. The bimetal can be used 4 times without losing activity at initial pH 3.0. XPS indicated that the removed Cr(VI) was immobilized via the formation of Cr(III) hydroxide and Cr(III)-Fe(III) hydroxide/oxyhydroxide on the surface of Fe/Al bimetal. The Fe/Al bimetallic particles are promising for further testing for the rapid and effective removal of contaminants from water. PMID:26073381

  7. Technetium recovery from high alkaline solution

    DOEpatents

    Nash, Charles A.

    2016-07-12

    Disclosed are methods for recovering technetium from a highly alkaline solution. The highly alkaline solution can be a liquid waste solution from a nuclear waste processing system. Methods can include combining the solution with a reductant capable of reducing technetium at the high pH of the solution and adding to or forming in the solution an adsorbent capable of adsorbing the precipitated technetium at the high pH of the solution.

  8. Relation of pH to toxicity of lampricide TFM in the laboratory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bills, T.D.; Marking, L.L.; Howe, G.E.; Rach, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    In the control of larval sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus ) with 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM) in tributaries of the Great Lakes, occasional kills of other fishes have caused concern about the effects of the chemical on non-target organisms. Stream treatment rates have been based on previous application rates, alkalinity measurements, results of on-site toxicity tests, or combinations of these. Laboratory studies in 1987 showed that pH is the primary factor that affects the toxicity of TFM (the lower the pH, the greater the toxicity): even small changes in pH alter the toxicity, whereas substantial changes in alkalinity have little effect. In 12-h exposures, the 96-h LC50 for TFM to rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri ) ranged from about 0.9 mg/L at pH 6.5 to > 100 mg/L at pH 9.5, but (at pH 7.5) the LC50's differed little at total alkalinities of about 18 mg/L and 207 mg/L. Decreases in pH as small as 0.5 pH unit caused nontoxic solutions to become toxic to rainbow trout. Some kills of non-target fish during stream treatments were reportedly caused by decreases in pH, and (conversely) that some stream treatments for sea lampreys were ineffective because pH increased.

  9. Alkaline-resistance model of subtilisin ALP I, a novel alkaline subtilisin.

    PubMed

    Maeda, H; Mizutani, O; Yamagata, Y; Ichishima, E; Nakajima, T

    2001-05-01

    The alkaline-resistance mechanism of the alkaline-stable enzymes is not yet known. To clarify the mechanism of alkaline-resistance of alkaline subtilisin, structural changes of two typical subtilisins, subtilisin ALP I (ALP I) and subtilisin Sendai (Sendai), were studied by means of physicochemical methods. Subtilisin NAT (NAT), which exhibits no alkaline resistance, was examined as a control. ALP I gradually lost its activity, accompanied by protein degradation, but, on the contrary, Sendai was stable under alkaline conditions. CD spectral measurements at neutral and alkaline pH indicated no apparent differences between ALP I and Sendai. A significant difference was observed on measurement of fluorescence emission spectra of the tryptophan residues of ALP I that were exposed on the enzyme surface. The fluorescence intensity of ALP I was greatly reduced under alkaline conditions; moreover, the reduction was reversed when alkaline-treated ALP I was neutralized. The fluorescence spectrum of Sendai remained unchanged. The enzymatic and optical activities of NAT were lost at high pH, indicating a lack of functional and structural stability in an alkaline environment. Judging from these results, the alkaline resistance is closely related to the surface structure of the enzyme molecule. PMID:11328588

  10. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-12-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in

  11. FINAL REPORT. ACTINIDE-ALUMINATE SPECIATION IN ALKALINE RADIOACTIVE WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Investigation of behavior of actinides in alkaline media containing Al(III) showed that no aluminate complexes of actinides in oxidation states (III-VII) were formed in alkaline solutions. At alkaline precipitation (pH 10-14) of actinides in presence of Al(III) formation of alumi...

  12. Climate and pH Predict the Potential Range of the Invasive Apple Snail (Pomacea insularum) in the Southeastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Byers, James E.; McDowell, William G.; Dodd, Shelley R.; Haynie, Rebecca S.; Pintor, Lauren M.; Wilde, Susan B.

    2013-01-01

    Predicting the potential range of invasive species is essential for risk assessment, monitoring, and management, and it can also inform us about a species’ overall potential invasiveness. However, modeling the distribution of invasive species that have not reached their equilibrium distribution can be problematic for many predictive approaches. We apply the modeling approach of maximum entropy (MaxEnt) that is effective with incomplete, presence-only datasets to predict the distribution of the invasive island apple snail, Pomacea insularum. This freshwater snail is native to South America and has been spreading in the USA over the last decade from its initial introductions in Texas and Florida. It has now been documented throughout eight southeastern states. The snail’s extensive consumption of aquatic vegetation and ability to accumulate and transmit algal toxins through the food web heighten concerns about its spread. Our model shows that under current climate conditions the snail should remain mostly confined to the coastal plain of the southeastern USA where it is limited by minimum temperature in the coldest month and precipitation in the warmest quarter. Furthermore, low pH waters (pH <5.5) are detrimental to the snail’s survival and persistence. Of particular note are low-pH blackwater swamps, especially Okefenokee Swamp in southern Georgia (with a pH below 4 in many areas), which are predicted to preclude the snail’s establishment even though many of these areas are well matched climatically. Our results elucidate the factors that affect the regional distribution of P. insularum, while simultaneously presenting a spatial basis for the prediction of its future spread. Furthermore, the model for this species exemplifies that combining climatic and habitat variables is a powerful way to model distributions of invasive species. PMID:23451090

  13. Climate and pH predict the potential range of the invasive apple snail (Pomacea insularum) in the southeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Byers, James E; McDowell, William G; Dodd, Shelley R; Haynie, Rebecca S; Pintor, Lauren M; Wilde, Susan B

    2013-01-01

    Predicting the potential range of invasive species is essential for risk assessment, monitoring, and management, and it can also inform us about a species' overall potential invasiveness. However, modeling the distribution of invasive species that have not reached their equilibrium distribution can be problematic for many predictive approaches. We apply the modeling approach of maximum entropy (MaxEnt) that is effective with incomplete, presence-only datasets to predict the distribution of the invasive island apple snail, Pomacea insularum. This freshwater snail is native to South America and has been spreading in the USA over the last decade from its initial introductions in Texas and Florida. It has now been documented throughout eight southeastern states. The snail's extensive consumption of aquatic vegetation and ability to accumulate and transmit algal toxins through the food web heighten concerns about its spread. Our model shows that under current climate conditions the snail should remain mostly confined to the coastal plain of the southeastern USA where it is limited by minimum temperature in the coldest month and precipitation in the warmest quarter. Furthermore, low pH waters (pH <5.5) are detrimental to the snail's survival and persistence. Of particular note are low-pH blackwater swamps, especially Okefenokee Swamp in southern Georgia (with a pH below 4 in many areas), which are predicted to preclude the snail's establishment even though many of these areas are well matched climatically. Our results elucidate the factors that affect the regional distribution of P. insularum, while simultaneously presenting a spatial basis for the prediction of its future spread. Furthermore, the model for this species exemplifies that combining climatic and habitat variables is a powerful way to model distributions of invasive species. PMID:23451090

  14. Antenna Effect on the Organic Spacer-Modified Eu-Doped Layered Gadolinium Hydroxide for the Detection of Vanadate Ions over a Wide pH Range.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Heejin; Lee, Byung-Il; Byeon, Song-Ho

    2016-05-01

    The excitation of the adsorbed vanadate group led to the red emission arising from the efficient energy transfer to Eu-doped layered gadolinium hydroxide (LGdH:Eu). This light-harvesting antenna effect allowed LGdH:Eu to detect selectively a vanadate in aqueous solution at different pHs. Because vanadate exists in various forms by extensive oligomerization and protonation reactions in aqueous solution depending on pH, it is important to detect a vanadate regardless of its form over a wide pH range. In particular, spacer molecules with long alkyl chains greatly facilitated access of a vanadate antenna into the interlayer surface of LGdH:Eu. The concomitant increase in adsorption capacity of LGdH:Eu achieved a strong antenna effect of vanadate on the red emission from Eu(3+). When a suspension containing LGdH:Eu nanosheets (1.0 g/L) was used, the vanadate concentration down to 1 × 10(-5) M could even be visually monitored, and the detection limit based on the (5)D0 → (7)F2 emission intensity could reach 4.5 × 10(-8) M. PMID:27077701

  15. Interconnected Co-Entrapped, N-Doped Carbon Nanotube Film as Active Hydrogen Evolution Cathode over the Whole pH Range.

    PubMed

    Xing, Zhicai; Liu, Qian; Xing, Wei; Asiri, Abdullah M; Sun, Xuping

    2015-06-01

    The use of electrocatalysts with low metal content (metal-deficient) or metal free for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) can prevent or decrease metal ion release, which reduces environmental impact; development of such catalysts with high activity and durability over the whole pH range is thus highly desired but still remains a huge challenge. Herein, we describe the direct growth of a film consisting of interconnected Co-entrapped, N-doped carbon nanotubes on carbon cloth using chemical vapor deposition from dicyanodiamine using a Co3 O4 nanowire array as catalyst. This integrated architecture is used as a flexible 3D electrode for the electrolytic hydrogen evolution with outstanding catalytic activity and durability in acidic media. Moreover, this electrode is also highly efficient under neutral and basic conditions. It offers us an attractive carbon-based metal-deficient HER catalyst outperforming most transition-metal and all metal-free/deficient catalysts. PMID:25916622

  16. XANES Demonstrates the Release of Calcium Phosphates from Alkaline Vertisols to Moderately Acidified Solution.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Karl O; Tighe, Matthew K; Guppy, Christopher N; Milham, Paul J; McLaren, Timothy I; Schefe, Cassandra R; Lombi, Enzo

    2016-04-19

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) minerals may comprise the main phosphorus (P) reserve in alkaline soils, with solubility dependent on pH and the concentration of Ca and/or P in solution. Combining several techniques in a novel way, we studied these phenomena by progressively depleting P from suspensions of two soils (low P) using an anion-exchange membrane (AEM) and from a third soil (high P) with AEM together with a cation-exchange membrane. Depletions commenced on untreated soil, then continued as pH was manipulated and maintained at three constant pH levels: the initial pH (pHi) and pH 6.5 and 5.5. Bulk P K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy revealed that the main forms of inorganic P in each soil were apatite, a second more soluble CaP mineral, and smectite-sorbed P. With moderate depletion of P at pHi or pH 6.5, CaP minerals became more prominent in the spectra compared to sorbed species. The more soluble CaP minerals were depleted at pH 6.5, and all CaP minerals were exhausted at pH 5.5, showing that the CaP species present in these alkaline soils are soluble with decreases of pH in the range achievable by rhizosphere acidification. PMID:26974327

  17. 4-(8-Quinolyl)amino-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole as a new selective and sensitive fluorescent and colorimetric pH probe with dual-responsive ranges in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xutian; Zhang, Min; Liang, Haipeng; Huang, Zhaowei; Tang, Jiang; Chen, Zhi; Yang, Liting; Ma, Li-Jun; Wang, Yuhai; Xu, Baiping

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent and colorimetric pH probe possess many advantages including rapid response time, nondestructive testing, and excellent pH sensitivity. However, they usually cannot be utilized simultaneously in both acidic and basic pH ranges. In this study, a new selective and sensitive fluorescent and colorimetric pH probe, 4-(8- quinolyl)amino-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (1), was designated and synthesized. The optical probe exhibited dual-responsive pH ranges to both acidic and basic aqueous solutions. When the solution pH was gradually increased from 8.5 to 13.3, the absorption spectra of 1 showed an obvious hyperchromicity, accompanied with a red shift of the absorption band at 340 nm, a blue shift of the absorption band at 482 nm, and a distinct color change from orange to violet pink to yellow. Within the pH range from 2.2 to 0.2, the fluorescent spectra of 1 showed a "turn-on" response signal to solution pH. In order to understand the response mechanism of the probe to solution pH, the probe molecule was split into two parts, 8-aminoquinoline (2) and 4-amino-7- nitro-benzofurazan (3). UV-vis absorption and fluorescent experiments of 2 and 3 indicated that both are sensitive optical pH probes. Furthermore, the NMR experiment of 1 was explored in basic and acidic conditions. The results indicated that the colorimetric responses of 1 to pH under basic condition should be attributed to the deprotonation of the imino group on the quinolyl ring, and the fluorescent recognition of 1 to pH under acidic condition was probably due to the protonation of the nitrogen atoms from the benzofurazan and quinolyl rings.

  18. A National Content Analysis of PhD Program Objectives, Structures, and Curricula: Do Programs Address the Full Range of Social Work's Needs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drisko, James; Hunnicutt, Christie; Berenson, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The Group for the Advancement of Doctoral Education (GADE) promotes excellence in PhD education in Social Work. GADE's 2013 Quality Guidelines for PhD Programs heavily emphasize preparation for research. Little is known, however, about the details of the contemporary social work PhD program structure and curriculum. Several prior surveys have…

  19. Purification, biochemical characterization and antifungal activity of a novel Aspergillus tubingensis glucose oxidase steady on broad range of pH and temperatures.

    PubMed

    Kriaa, Mouna; Hammami, Inès; Sahnoun, Mouna; Azebou, Manel Cheffi; Triki, Mohamed Ali; Kammoun, Radhouane

    2015-11-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo antifungal efficiency of Aspergillus tubingensis CTM 507 glucose oxidase (GOD) against plant pathogenic fungi. GOD displayed a wide inhibitory spectrum toward different fungi at a concentration of 20 AU. The GOD had a strong inhibitor effect on mycelia growth and spore germination of Pythium ultimum. Interestingly, the GOD exhibited a potent in vivo antifungal effect against P. ultimum responsible for potato plants disease. The antifungal GOD was purified 13-fold with 27 % yield and a specific activity of 3435 U/mg. The relative molecular mass of the GOD was 180 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The GOD activity was optimum at pH 4.5 and 60 °C. It was found to be stable over a large pH range (3-9). It also displayed a marked thermostability with a 50-min half-life at 65 °C. The 10 residues of the N-terminal sequence of the purified GOD (S-K-G-S-A-V-T-T-P-D) showed no homology to the other reported GOD, identifying a novel GOD. FTIR spectroscopic analysis revealed the presence of C-O and C=O groups corresponding to a D-glucono-lactone. The findings indicated that GOD is the first A. tubingensis-produced fungicide ever reported to exhibit such promising biological properties. It could become a natural alternative to synthetic fungicides to control certain important plant microbial diseases. PMID:26280215

  20. Studies on alkaline serine protease produced by Bacillus clausii GMBE 22.

    PubMed

    Kazan, Dilek; Bal, Hulya; Denizci, Aziz Akin; Ozturk, Nurcin Celik; Ozturk, Hasan Umit; Dilgimen, Aydan Salman; Ozturk, Dilek Coskuner; Erarslan, Altan

    2009-01-01

    An alkali tolerant Bacillus strain having extracellular serine alkaline protease activity was newly isolated from compost and identified as Bacillus clausii GMBE 22. An alkaline protease (AP22) was 4.66-fold purified in 51.5% yield from Bacillus clausii GMBE 22 by ethanol precipitation and DEAE-cellulose anion exchange chromatography. The purified enzyme was identified as serine protease by LC-ESI-MS analysis. Its complete inhibition by phenylmethanesulfonylfluoride (PMSF) also justified that it is a serine alkaline protease. The molecular weight of the enzyme is 25.4 kDa. Optimal temperature and pH values are 60 degrees C and 12.0, respectively. The enzyme showed highest specificity to N-Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-pNA. The K(m) and k(cat) values for hydrolysis of this substrate are 0.347 mM and 1141 min(-1) respectively. The enzyme was affected by surface active agents to varying extents. The enzyme is stable for 2 h at 30 degrees C and pH 10.5. AP22 is also stable for 5 days over the pH range 9.0-11.0 at room temperature. AP22 has good pH stability compared with the alkaline proteases belonging to other strains of Bacillus clausii reported in the literature. PMID:19431045

  1. Polyhydroxyflavones as extractants. Communication 7. Solvent extraction of europrium complexes with morin from alkaline media

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, A.B.

    1985-09-01

    This paper studies the analytical application of europium (III)-morin complex which is formed in alkaline medium and has an intense color. The extent of europium extraction was determined by adding to the extract a morin solution in isoamyl alcohol in a 50-100-fold excess with respect to europium. The dependence of the optical density of the extracts on the ph in the system europium (III)-morin-water-organic solvent for different excesses of the reagent is shown: this indicates formation of two extractable complexes, one being dominant in the pH range 4-7, the other at pH greater than or equal to 8.5. The extraction of the europium (III)-morin complex from alkaline solution is used for direct extraction-photometric determination of europium(III) in compounds of elements having amphoteric properties or forming amines (Zns, Mo0/sub 3/).

  2. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and the Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-12-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding froin swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in

  3. Complexation of trivalent cations (Al(III), Cr(III), Fe(III)) with two phosphonic acids in the pH range of fresh waters.

    PubMed

    Lacour, S; Deluchat, V; Bollinger, J C; Bernard Serpaud

    1998-08-01

    The complex formation constants of two phosphonic acids, HEDP and ATMP, with three trivalent metallic cations, Al(III), Cr(III) and Fe(III), have been determined by acid-base titration at 25 degrees C and constant ionic strength (0.1 mol l(-1), KNO(3)), using Martell and Motekaitis' computer programs. Species distribution curves showed that all three cations are in complex form in the pH range of fresh waters (5-9). The study of different cation/ligand ratios proved that both ligands mainly form anionic soluble complexes for systems having an excess of ligand-as protonated and unprotonated forms and especially ternary complexes with HEDP. For higher metal concentrations (excess of cation), weakly soluble species of HEDP and ATMP were formed with Al(III) and Cr(III). Two insoluble complexes with ATMP have been identified by SEM/EDAX as AlH(3)X((s)) and Cr(2)X((s)). Regarding Fe(III) species, Fe(OH)(3(s)) precipitate seems to predominate in solution. PMID:18967224

  4. Cluster-like molybdenum phosphide anchored on reduced graphene oxide for efficient hydrogen evolution over a broad pH range.

    PubMed

    Yan, Haijing; Jiao, Yanqing; Wu, Aiping; Tian, Chungui; Zhang, Xiaomeng; Wang, Lei; Ren, Zhiyu; Fu, Honggang

    2016-07-21

    Cluster-like molybdenum phosphide particles were anchored on reduced graphene oxide (MoP/rGO) with high uniformity by using phosphomolybdic acid as a molybdenum precursor based on a robust assembly-immobilization method. Benefiting from the small size, and even distribution of the MoP particles, the MoP/rGO hybrid exhibits superior electrocatalytic activity towards the hydrogen evolution reaction both in acidic and alkaline media. PMID:27380736

  5. [Role of Mg2+-dependent alkaline endodnaase of blood serum in tumorigenesis in A/smail mice].

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, G A; Lel'kin, M K; Panin, L E

    2006-01-01

    An enzymoassay of levels of Mg2+-dependent alkaline endoDNAase of protein spectrum of blood serum of noninbred albino mice by SDS-electrophoresis in 10% PAAG established a fairly high heterogeneity of the enzyme. The variety of alkaline endoDNAases must be due to the limited proteolysis of their high-molecular precursor by specific proteases as described in the literature. No alkaline endoDNAase activity was identified by analysis of 10-150 kDa protein spectrum in A/smail line mice without ascites hepatoma. It was detected (pH 8.3) in the 25-45 kDa range on day 10 after tumor transplantation. Considering the gravity of disease (pre-lethal stage), on day 10, it was suggested that the level be accounted for by decay of diseased cells. The lack or extremely low level of endoDNAase activity in original blood serum expressed a mechanism of enhancing sensitivity to tumor cell effects. In mice bearing ascites hepatoma, the enzyme levels (pH 8.3) were much higher on day 10. DNAase activity (pH 7.5) was not induced in response to the heterogenous DNA. Our data point to possible defects in the induction of Mg2+-dependent alkaline endoDNAases (pH 8.3) and DNAses (pH 7.5) as well as their role in raising sensitivity to transplantable ascites hepatoma. PMID:17191709

  6. Association-dissociation and denaturation behaviour of an oligomeric seed protein alpha-globulin of Sesamum indicum L. in acid and alkaline solutions.

    PubMed

    Prakash, V; Nandi, P K

    1977-01-01

    The association-dissociation and denaturation behaviour of the major protein fraction, alpha-globulin of sesame seed (Sesamum indicum L.), in acid and alkaline solutions in the ranges of pH 4.2-1.5 and pH 7-12 have been studied. The results of gel filtration, fluorescence and viscosity measurements indicate dissociation and denaturation of the protein up to pH approximately 3. The difference spectrum in this region arises from a combination of dissociation, denaturation and charge effect on the chromophore. In still stronger acid solution, reassociation of the dissociated fraction takes place by hydrophobic interaction. In alkaline solution dissociation takes place around pH 8, and above pH 10 dissociation and denaturation proceed simultaneously as has been evidenced by sedimentation, fluorescence, spectral change, optical rotation and viscosity measurements. The phenolic group (pKInt=10.6) in the protein is abnormal and denaturation in alkaline solution is irreversible. Above pH 11.5 further dissociation of the protein takes place. Characteristic pH values of transition from 10.6-10.8 indicate that the transition of the protein involves a single step in alkaline solution. PMID:19367

  7. Incorporating graphene oxide and gold nanoclusters: a synergistic catalyst with surprisingly high peroxidase-like activity over a broad pH range and its application for cancer cell detection.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yu; Lin, Youhui; Huang, Zhenzhen; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2013-05-14

    A synergistic graphene oxide-gold nanocluster (GO-AuNC) hybrid has been constructed as an enzyme mimic that is able to show high catalytic activity over a broad pH range, especially at neutral pH. Importantly, the target-functionalized hybrid has been applied as a robust nanoprobe for selective, quantitative, and fast colorimetric detection of cancer cells. PMID:23418013

  8. Kinetics of the oxidation of lactose by copper(II) complexed with bipyridyl in alkaline medium using chloro-complex of rhodium(III) in its nano-concentration range as homogeneous catalyst: a spectrophotometric study.

    PubMed

    Kumar Singh, Ashok; Singh, Manjula; Srivastava, Jaya; Rahmani, Shahla

    2012-06-01

    Kinetics of the oxidation of lactose by Cu(II) complexed with bipyridyl have been investigated at 40 °C for the first time spectrophotometrically using Rh(III) chloride as homogeneous catalyst in aqueous alkaline medium in its nano-concentration range. The order of reaction was found to be fractional positive-order, when the concentration of Rh(III) chloride was varied from 0.30×10(-9) M to 6.00×10(-9) M. The reaction shows fractional positive-order kinetics with respect to [lactose] and [OH(-)] and zeroth-order kinetics with respect to [Cu(II)]. The reaction also shows slight increase in the rate by decreasing dielectric constant of the medium and remains unaffected by the change in ionic strength of the medium. The reaction was carried out at four different temperatures and observed values of rate constants were utilized to calculate various activation parameters specially the entropy of activation (ΔS(#)). The species, [RhCl(3)(H(2)O)(2)OH](-), was postulated as the main reactive species of Rh(III) chloride for the oxidation of lactose by Cu(II) in alkaline medium. On the basis of kinetic and equivalence studies together with spectrophotometric information for the formation of a complex, [formula see text] the most appropriate mechanism for the aforesaid reaction has been proposed. Support to the proposed mechanism was also given by the observed activation parameters and multiple regression analysis. Sodium salts of formic acid, arabinonic acid and lyxonic acid were identified as the main oxidation products of the reaction under investigation. PMID:22541300

  9. A newly high alkaline lipase: an ideal choice for application in detergent formulations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bacterial lipases received much attention for their substrate specificity and their ability to function in extreme environments (pH, temperature...). Many staphylococci produced lipases which were released into the culture medium. Reports of thermostable lipases from Staphylococcus sp. and active in alkaline conditions are not previously described. Results A newly soil-isolated Staphylococcus sp. strain ESW secretes an induced lipase in the culture medium. The effects of temperature, pH and various components in a detergent on the activity and stability of Staphylococcus sp. lipase (SL1) were studied in a preliminary evaluation for use in detergent formulation solutions. The enzyme was highly active over a wide range of pH from 9.0 to 13.0, with an optimum at pH 12.0. The relative activity at pH 13.0 was about 60% of that obtained at pH 12.0. It exhibited maximal activity at 60°C. This novel lipase, showed extreme stability towards non-ionic and anionic surfactants after pre-incubation for 1 h at 40°C, and relative stability towards oxidizing agents. Additionally, the crude enzyme showed excellent stability and compatibility with various commercial solid and liquid detergents. Conclusions These properties added to the high activity in high alkaline pH make this novel lipase an ideal choice for application in detergent formulations. PMID:22123072

  10. Net alkalinity and net acidity 2: Practical considerations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirby, C.S.; Cravotta, C.A., III

    2005-01-01

    The pH, alkalinity, and acidity of mine drainage and associated waters can be misinterpreted because of the chemical instability of samples and possible misunderstandings of standard analytical method results. Synthetic and field samples of mine drainage having various initial pH values and concentrations of dissolved metals and alkalinity were titrated by several methods, and the results were compared to alkalinity and acidity calculated based on dissolved solutes. The pH, alkalinity, and acidity were compared between fresh, unoxidized and aged, oxidized samples. Data for Pennsylvania coal mine drainage indicates that the pH of fresh samples was predominantly acidic (pH 2.5-4) or near neutral (pH 6-7); ??? 25% of the samples had pH values between 5 and 6. Following oxidation, no samples had pH values between 5 and 6. The Standard Method Alkalinity titration is constrained to yield values >0. Most calculated and measured alkalinities for samples with positive alkalinities were in close agreement. However, for low-pH samples, the calculated alkalinity can be negative due to negative contributions by dissolved metals that may oxidize and hydrolyze. The Standard Method hot peroxide treatment titration for acidity determination (Hot Acidity) accurately indicates the potential for pH to decrease to acidic values after complete degassing of CO2 and oxidation of Fe and Mn, and it indicates either the excess alkalinity or that required for neutralization of the sample. The Hot Acidity directly measures net acidity (= -net alkalinity). Samples that had near-neutral pH after oxidation had negative Hot Acidity; samples that had pH < 6.3 after oxidation had positive Hot Acidity. Samples with similar pH values before oxidation had dissimilar Hot Acidities due to variations in their alkalinities and dissolved Fe, Mn, and Al concentrations. Hot Acidity was approximately equal to net acidity calculated based on initial pH and dissolved concentrations of Fe, Mn, and Al minus the

  11. ALP (Alkaline Phosphatase) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... known as: ALK PHOS; Alkp Formal name: Alkaline Phosphatase Related tests: AST ; ALT ; GGT ; Bilirubin ; Liver Panel ; Bone Markers ; Alkaline Phosphatase Isoenzymes; Bone Specific ALP All content on Lab ...

  12. Tailoring aqueous solubility of functionalized single-wall carbon nanotubes over a wide pH range through substituent chain length.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Liling; Zhang, Lei; Barron, Andrew R

    2005-10-01

    Carboxylic acid-functionalized SWNTs prepared via the reaction of an amino acid, NH2(CH2)nCO2H, with fluoronanotubes show similar levels of sidewall functionalization; however, the solubility in water is controlled by the length of the hydrocarbon side chain (i.e., n). The 6-aminohexanoic acid derivative is soluble in aqueous solution (0.5 mg mL(-1)) between pH 4 and 11, whereas the glysine and 11-aminoundecanoic acid derivatives are insoluble across all pH values. PMID:16218726

  13. An experimental study of magnesite dissolution rates at neutral to alkaline conditions and 150 and 200 °C as a function of pH, total dissolved carbonate concentration, and chemical affinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saldi, Giuseppe D.; Schott, Jacques; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Oelkers, Eric H.

    2010-11-01

    Steady-state magnesite dissolution rates were measured in mixed-flow reactors at 150 and 200 °C and 4.6 < pH < 8.4, as a function of ionic strength (0.001 M ⩽ I ⩽ 1 M), total dissolved carbonate concentration (10 -4 M < ΣCO 2 < 0.1 M), and distance from equilibrium. Rates were found to increase with increasing ionic strength, but decrease with increasing temperature from 150 to 200 °C, pH, and aqueous CO 32- activity. Measured rates were interpreted using the surface complexation model developed by Pokrovsky et al. (1999a) in conjunction with transition state theory ( Eyring, 1935). Within this formalism, magnesite dissolution rates are found to be consistent with r=k{>MgOH2+}41-exp (-4ART), where rd represents the BET surface area normalized dissolution rate, {>MgOH2+} stands for the concentration of hydrated magnesium centers on the magnesite surface, kMg designates a rate constant, A refers to the chemical affinity of the overall reaction, R denotes the gas constant, and T symbolizes absolute temperature. Within this model decreasing rates at far-from-equilibrium conditions (1) at constant pH with increasing temperature and (2) at constant temperature with increasing pH and ΣCO 2 stem from a corresponding decrease in {>MgOH2+}. This decrease in {>MgOH2+} results from the increasing stability of the >MgCO3- and >MgOH° surface species with increasing temperature, pH and CO 32- activity. The decrease in constant pH dissolution rates yields negative apparent activation energies. This behavior makes magnesite resistant to re-dissolution if formed as part of mineral carbon sequestration efforts in deep geologic formations.

  14. Effects of pH and precipitation on autohydrogenotrophic denitrification using the hollow-fiber membrane-biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kuan-Chun; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2003-04-01

    Experiments carried out in a hollow-fiber, membrane-biofilm reactor (HFMBR) showed that the optimum pH for autotrophic denitrification was in the range 7.7-8.6, with the maximum efficiency at 8.4. Increasing the pH above 8.6 caused a significant decrease in nitrate removal rate and a dramatic increase in nitrite accumulation. The pH rose by 1.2 units when a large buffer was not added, suggesting that some field applications may require pH control. Precipitation of Ca(2+) occurred in every experiment. Precipitation was the largest sink for carbonate, and it also offset alkalinity production by denitrification. Although the alkalinity increased in most cases, systems with a high carbonate buffer and high pH accentuated precipitation, and the net change in alkalinity was negative. The long-term success of field applications of the HFMBR may depend upon the interactions among calcium concentration, total carbonate concentration, pH, and alkalinity changes. PMID:12600383

  15. Comprehensive study on the structure of the BSA from extended-to aged form in wide (2-12) pH range.

    PubMed

    Varga, N; Hornok, V; Sebők, D; Dékány, I

    2016-07-01

    In this work we studied the structure of the bovine serum albumin (BSA) and the protein-ligand interactions since researchers prefer to use them as carriers in drug delivery systems. Systematic study (between pH 2-12, in double distilled water and physiological salt solution) was carried out to determine the changes in the secondary and the tertiary structures of the BSA, the apparent molecular weight (Mw), the size (dLS) and the electrokinetic potential (ζ). At pH 7, the BSA has higher stability in the absence (ζ=-69mV, dLS=2.2nm, A2=1.4×10(-3)mlmol/g(2)) than in the presence of salt solution (ζ=-2.4mV, dLS=5.3nm, A2=-3.2×10(-4)mlmol/g(2)). The Mw strongly depends on the pH and the ionic strength (at pH 3 in the absence of salt, the Mw is 54.6kDa while in the presence of salt is 114kDa) which determines the geometry of the protein. The protein-ligand interactions were characterized by fluorescence (FL) and isothermal microcalorimetry (ITC) methods; these independent techniques provided similar thermodynamic parameters such as the binding constant (K) and the Gibbs free energy (ΔG). PMID:26995614

  16. Fe(III), Cr(VI), and Fe(III) mediated Cr(VI) reduction in alkaline media using a Halomonas isolate from Soap Lake, Washington.

    PubMed

    VanEngelen, Michael R; Peyton, Brent M; Mormile, Melanie R; Pinkart, Holly C

    2008-11-01

    Hexavalent chromium is one of the most widely distributed environmental contaminants. Given the carcinogenic and mutagenic consequences of Cr(VI) exposure, the release of Cr(VI) into the environment has long been a major concern. While many reports of microbial Cr(VI) reduction are in circulation, very few have demonstrated Cr(VI) reduction under alkaline conditions. Since Cr(VI) exhibits higher mobility in alkaline soils relative to pH neutral soils, and since Cr contamination of alkaline soils is associated with a number of industrial activities, microbial Cr(VI) reduction under alkaline conditions requires attention.Soda lakes are the most stable alkaline environments on earth, and contain a wide diversity of alkaliphilic organisms. In this study, a bacterial isolate belonging to the Halomonas genus was obtained from Soap Lake, a chemically stratified alkaline lake located in central Washington State. The ability of this isolate to reduce Cr(VI) and Fe(III) was assessed under alkaline (pH = 9), anoxic, non-growth conditions with acetate as an electron donor. Metal reduction rates were quantified using Monod kinetics. In addition, Cr(VI) reduction experiments were carried out in the presence of Fe(III) to evaluate the possible enhancement of Cr(VI) reduction rates through electron shuttling mechanisms. While Fe(III) reduction rates were slow compared to previously reported rates, Cr(VI) reduction rates fell within range of previously reported rates. PMID:18401687

  17. pH regulation of an egg cortex tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Jiang, W P; Veno, P A; Wood, R W; Peaucellier, G; Kinsey, W H

    1991-07-01

    Fertilization of the echinoderm egg is known to result in the phosphorylation, on tyrosine, of a high-molecular-weight cortical protein (HMWCP) localized in the egg cortex. Studies using various parthenogenic agents indicate that this phosphorylation event occurs in response to the alkaline shift in cytoplasmic pHi which normally occurs 1 to 2 min after fertilization. In the present study, the purified egg cell surface complex was used as in vitro system to determine whether a small alkaline shift in pH, such as occurs upon fertilization, could stimulate the activity of the egg cortex-associated tyrosine kinase toward endogenous protein substrates. The results demonstrated that the cell surface complex is highly enriched in a tyrosine kinase activity which accounts for the majority of the protein kinase activity in this preparation. The activity of this tyrosine kinase toward the HMWCP and other cortical proteins was highly dependent on pH over the range pH 6.8 to 7.3. This indicates that the fertilization-associated change in cytoplasmic pH would be sufficient to trigger increased tyrosine phosphorylation of the high-molecular-weight cortical protein in vivo. The regulation of tyrosine phosphorylation by small changes in pH represents a novel control mechanism in which a tyrosine protein kinase may act as a pH-sensitive transducer. PMID:2060713

  18. Wetland treatment at extremes of pH: a review.

    PubMed

    Mayes, W M; Batty, L C; Younger, P L; Jarvis, A P; Kõiv, M; Vohla, C; Mander, U

    2009-06-15

    Constructed wetlands are an established treatment technology for a diverse range of polluted effluents. There is a long history of using wetlands as a unit process in treating acid mine drainage, while recent research has highlighted the potential for wetlands to buffer highly alkaline (pH>12) drainage. This paper reviews recent evidence on this topic, looking at wetlands treating acidic mine drainage, and highly alkaline leachates associated with drainage from lime-rich industrial by-products or where such residues are used as filter media in constructed wetlands for wastewater treatment. The limiting factors to the success of wetlands treating highly acidic waters are discussed with regard to design practice for the emerging application of wetlands to treat highly alkaline industrial discharges. While empirically derived guidelines (with area-adjusted contaminant removal rates typically quoted at 10 g Fe m(2)/day for influent waters pH>5.5; and 3.5-7 g acidity/m(2)/day for pH>4 to <5.5) for informing sizing of mine drainage treatment wetlands have generally been proved robust (probably due to conservatism), such data exhibit large variability within and between sites. Key areas highlighted for future research efforts include: (1) wider collation of mine drainage wetland performance data in regionalised datasets to improve empirically-derived design guidelines and (2) obtaining an improved understanding of nature of the extremophile microbial communities, microbially-mediated pollutant attenuation and rhizospheral processes in wetlands at extremes of pH. An enhanced knowledge of these (through multi-scale laboratory and field studies), will inform engineering design of treatment wetlands and assist in the move from the empirically-derived conservative sizing estimates that currently prevail to process-based optimal design guidance that could reduce costs and enhance the performance and longevity of wetlands for treating acidic and highly alkaline drainage waters

  19. Dolomite Dissolution in Alkaline Cementious Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittermayr, Florian; Klammer, Dietmar; Köhler, Stephan; Dietzel, Martin

    2010-05-01

    Chemical alteration of concrete has gained much attention over the past years as many cases of deterioration due to sulphate attack, thaumasite formation (TSA) or alkali silica reactions (ASR) have been reported in various constructions (Schmidt et al, 2009). Much less is known about the so called alkali carbonate reaction (ACR). It is believed that dolomite aggregates can react with the alkalis from the cement, dissolve and form calcite and brucite (Katayama, 2004). Due to very low solubility of dolomite in alkaline solutions this reaction seems doubtful. In this study we are trying to gain new insides about the conditions that can lead to the dissolution of dolomite in concrete. Therefore we investigated concrete samples from Austrian tunnels that show partially dissolved dolomite aggregates. Petrological analysis such as microprobe, SEM and Raman spectroscopy as well as a hydrochemical analysis of interstitial solutions and ground water and modelling with PhreeqC (Parkhurst and Appelo, 1999) are carried out. In addition a series of batch experiments is set up. Modelling approaches by PhreeqC show a thermodynamically possibility in the alkaline range when additional Ca2+ in solution causes dolomite to become more and more undersaturated as calcite gets supersaturated. Interacting ground water is enriched in Ca2+and saturated with respect to gypsum as marine evaporites are found in situ rocks. Furthermore it is more likely that Portlandite (Ca(OH)2) plays a more important role than Na and K in the cement. Portlandite acts as an additional Ca2+ source and is much more abundant than the alkalies. Some interstitial solutions are dominated mainly by Na+ and SO42- and reach concentrations up to 30 g/l TDS. It is believed that solutions can even reach thenardite saturation as efflorescences are found on the tunnel walls. In consequence dolomite solubility increases with increasing ionic strength. pH > 11 further accelerate the process of dedolomitization by the removal

  20. Archaeal Communities in a Heterogeneous Hypersaline-Alkaline Soil.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Noya, Yendi E; Valenzuela-Encinas, César; Sandoval-Yuriar, Alonso; Jiménez-Bueno, Norma G; Marsch, Rodolfo; Dendooven, Luc

    2015-01-01

    In this study the archaeal communities in extreme saline-alkaline soils of the former lake Texcoco, Mexico, with electrolytic conductivities (EC) ranging from 0.7 to 157.2 dS/m and pH from 8.5 to 10.5 were explored. Archaeal communities in the 0.7 dS/m pH 8.5 soil had the lowest alpha diversity values and were dominated by a limited number of phylotypes belonging to the mesophilic Candidatus Nitrososphaera. Diversity and species richness were higher in the soils with EC between 9.0 and 157.2 dS/m. The majority of OTUs detected in the hypersaline soil were members of the Halobacteriaceae family. Novel phylogenetic branches in the Halobacteriales class were detected in the soil, and more abundantly in soil with the higher pH (10.5), indicating that unknown and uncharacterized Archaea can be found in this soil. Thirteen different genera of the Halobacteriaceae family were identified and were distributed differently between the soils. Halobiforma, Halostagnicola, Haloterrigena, and Natronomonas were found in all soil samples. Methanogenic archaea were found only in soil with pH between 10.0 and 10.3. Retrieved methanogenic archaea belonged to the Methanosarcinales and Methanomicrobiales orders. The comparison of the archaeal community structures considering phylogenetic information (UniFrac distances) clearly clustered the communities by pH. PMID:26074731

  1. Archaeal Communities in a Heterogeneous Hypersaline-Alkaline Soil

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Noya, Yendi E.; Valenzuela-Encinas, César; Sandoval-Yuriar, Alonso; Jiménez-Bueno, Norma G.; Marsch, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    In this study the archaeal communities in extreme saline-alkaline soils of the former lake Texcoco, Mexico, with electrolytic conductivities (EC) ranging from 0.7 to 157.2 dS/m and pH from 8.5 to 10.5 were explored. Archaeal communities in the 0.7 dS/m pH 8.5 soil had the lowest alpha diversity values and were dominated by a limited number of phylotypes belonging to the mesophilic Candidatus Nitrososphaera. Diversity and species richness were higher in the soils with EC between 9.0 and 157.2 dS/m. The majority of OTUs detected in the hypersaline soil were members of the Halobacteriaceae family. Novel phylogenetic branches in the Halobacteriales class were detected in the soil, and more abundantly in soil with the higher pH (10.5), indicating that unknown and uncharacterized Archaea can be found in this soil. Thirteen different genera of the Halobacteriaceae family were identified and were distributed differently between the soils. Halobiforma, Halostagnicola, Haloterrigena, and Natronomonas were found in all soil samples. Methanogenic archaea were found only in soil with pH between 10.0 and 10.3. Retrieved methanogenic archaea belonged to the Methanosarcinales and Methanomicrobiales orders. The comparison of the archaeal community structures considering phylogenetic information (UniFrac distances) clearly clustered the communities by pH. PMID:26074731

  2. The effect of pH on phosphorus availability and speciation in an aquaponics nutrient solution.

    PubMed

    Cerozi, Brunno da Silva; Fitzsimmons, Kevin

    2016-11-01

    The interaction between the main ions in aquaponics nutrient solutions affects chemical composition and availability of nutrients, and nutrient uptake by plant roots. This study determined the effect of pH on phosphorus (P) speciation and availability in an aquaponics nutrient solution and used Visual MINTEQ to simulate P species and P activity. In both experimental and simulated results, P availability decreased with increase in pH of aquaponics nutrient solutions. According to simulations, P binds to several cations leaving less free phosphate ions available in solution. High pH values resulted in the formation of insoluble calcium phosphate species. The study also demonstrated the importance of organic matter and alkalinity in keeping free phosphate ions in solution at high pH ranges. It is recommended though that pH in aquaponics systems is maintained at a 5.5-7.2 range for optimal availability and uptake by plants. PMID:27575336

  3. Polypeptide micelles with dual pH activatable dyes for sensing cells and cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Ping; Yang, Yueting; Yi, Huqiang; Fang, Shengtao; Zhang, Pengfei; Sheng, Zonghai; Gao, Guanhui; Gao, Duyang; Cai, Lintao

    2014-04-01

    pH is an important control parameter for maintenance of cell viability and tissue functions. pH monitoring provides valuable information on cell metabolic processes and the living environment. In this study, we prepared dual pH-sensitive, fluorescent dye-loaded polypeptide nanoparticles (DPNs) for ratiometric sensing of pH changes in living cells. DPNs contain two types of dyes: N-(rhodamine B) lactam cystamine (RBLC), an acid activatable fluorescent dye with increased fluorescence in an acidic environment, and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), a base activatable fluorescent dye with enhanced fluorescence in an alkaline environment. Hence, DPNs exhibited a dual response signal with strong red fluorescence and weak green fluorescence under acidic conditions; in contrast, they showed strong green fluorescence and almost no red fluorescence under alkaline and neutral conditions. The favorable inverse pH responses of the two fluorescent dyes resulted in ratiometric pH determination for DPNs with an optimized pH-sensitive range of pH 4.5-7.5. Quantitative analysis of the intracellular pH of intact MCF-7 cells has been successfully demonstrated with our nanosensor. Moreover, single acid activatable fluorescent dye doped polypeptide nanoparticles that only contained RBLC can distinguish tumor tissue from normal tissue by monitoring the acidic extracellular environment.pH is an important control parameter for maintenance of cell viability and tissue functions. pH monitoring provides valuable information on cell metabolic processes and the living environment. In this study, we prepared dual pH-sensitive, fluorescent dye-loaded polypeptide nanoparticles (DPNs) for ratiometric sensing of pH changes in living cells. DPNs contain two types of dyes: N-(rhodamine B) lactam cystamine (RBLC), an acid activatable fluorescent dye with increased fluorescence in an acidic environment, and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), a base activatable fluorescent dye with enhanced fluorescence

  4. Influence of pH on yeast immobilization on polystyrene surfaces modified by energetic ion bombardment.

    PubMed

    Tran, Clara T H; Kondyurin, Alexey; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Bilek, Marcela M M; McKenzie, David R

    2013-04-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) treatment is a novel method for immobilizing yeast on polymer surfaces by covalent linkage. This study of the immobilization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in both rehydrated and cultured forms showed that the density of cell attachment on PIII treated polystyrene (PS) was strongly dependent on the pH of the incubation medium and was higher for rehydrated yeast. A study of the surface charge was undertaken to explain this result. A high density of cell attachment occurs in acidic conditions (pH 3-5) and a significantly reduced cell density occurs in neutral and alkaline buffers (pH 6-10) for both types of yeast. Force measurements using atomic force microscopy show that a negative charge is present on polystyrene after PIII treatment. The charge is close to zero at pH 3 to pH 5 and increasingly negative from pH 6 to pH 10. Both rehydrated yeast and cultured yeast have negative electrophoretic mobility in the pH range studied. The repulsive forces are weak in acidic buffers and stronger in neutral and alkaline buffers, in good agreement with the cell densities observed. Rehydrated yeast cells are found to be more hydrophobic than cultured yeasts in the same buffer. The higher hydrophobicity explains the higher attachment of rehydrated yeast compared to cultured yeast. PMID:23298600

  5. Constituted oxides/nitrides on nitriding 304, 430 and 17-4 PH stainless steel in salt baths over the temperature range 723 to 923 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Teng-Shih; Huang, Yung-Sen; Chen, Chi-Fan

    2011-10-01

    The progressively developed oxides and nitrides that form on nitriding 304, 430 and 17-4 PH stainless steel are analysed by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) in this study. The experimental results show that the Cr contents and matrix structures (ferrite, austenite and martensite) play an important role in forming FeCr 2O 4, Cr 2O 3 and Fe 2O 3 oxides as well as nitrides. After a short immersion time, oxides of Cr 2O 3 and FeCr 2O 4 form in nitride films on 304 stainless steel samples. Fe 2O 3 oxide will subsequently form following an increasing immersion time. For the 430 stainless steel, Cr 2O 3 predominately forms after a short dipping time which hinders the growth of the nitride layer. As a result, this sample had the thinnest nitride film of the three for a given immersion time. After the formation of oxides, both CrN and Cr 2N were detected near the surface of the nitride films of three samples while Cr 2N phases formed in the deeper zone. The greatest amount of Fe 2O 3 oxide among the three samples was obtained on the nitriding 17-4 PH stainless steel which also had a high intensity count of N 1s.

  6. Acid stability of the kinetically stable alkaline serine protease possessing polyproline II fold.

    PubMed

    Rohamare, Sonali; Javdekar, Vaishali; Dalal, Sayli; Nareddy, Pavan Kumar; Swamy, Musti J; Gaikwad, Sushama M

    2015-02-01

    The kinetically stable alkaline serine protease from Nocardiopsis sp.; NprotI, possessing polyproline II fold (PPII) was characterized for its pH stability using proteolytic assay, fluorescence and Circular Dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). NprotI was found to be functionally stable when incubated at pH 1.0, even after 24 h, while after incubation at pH 10.0, drastic loss in the activity was observed. The enzyme showed enhanced activity after incubation at pH 1.0 and 3.0, at higher temperature (50-60 °C). NprotI maintained the overall PPII fold in broad pH range as seen using far UV CD spectroscopy. The PPII fold of NprotI incubated at pH 1.0 remained fairly intact up to 70 °C. Based on the isodichroic point and Tm values revealed by secondary structural transitions, different modes of thermal denaturation at pH 1.0, 5.0 and 10.0 were observed. DSC studies of NprotI incubated at acidic pH (pH 1.0-5.0) showed Tm values in the range of 74-76 °C while significant decrease in Tm (63.8 °C) was observed at pH 10.0. NprotI could be chemically denatured at pH 5.0 (stability pH) only with guanidine thiocynate. NprotI can be classified as type III protein among the three acid denatured states. Acid tolerant and thermostable NprotI can serve as a potential candidate for biotechnological applications. PMID:25576306

  7. Alkaline Band Formation in Chara corallina

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, William J.

    1979-01-01

    The nature of the transport system responsible for the establishment of alkaline bands on cells of Chara corallina was investigated. The transport process was found to be insensitive to external pH, provided the value was above a certain threshold. At this threshold (pH 5.1 to 4.8) the transport process was inactivated. Transport function could be recovered by raising the pH value of the external solution. The fastest rate of recovery was always obtained in the presence of exogenous HCO3−. Experiments in which plasmalemma integrity was modified using 10 millimolar K+ treatment were also performed. Alkaline band transport was significantly reduced in the presence of 10 millimolar K+, but the system did not recover, following return to 0.2 millimolar K+ solutions, until the transport site was reexposed to exogenous HCO3−. The influence of presence and absence of various cations on both alkaline band transport and total H14CO3− assimilation was examined. No specific cation requirement (mono- or divalent) was found for either process, except the previously established role of Ca2+ at the HCO3− transport site. The alkaline band transport process exhibited a general requirement for cations. This transport system could be partially or completely stalled in low cation solutions, or glass-distilled water, respectively. The results indicate that no cationic flux occurs across the plasmalemma in direct association with either the alkaline band or HCO3− transport systems. It is felt that the present results offer support for the hypothesis that an OH− efflux transport system (rather than a H+ influx system) is responsible for alkaline band development in C. corallina. The results support the hypothesis that OH− efflux is an electrogenic process. This OH− transport system also appears to contain two allosteric effector sites, involving an acidic group and a HCO3− ion. PMID:16660706

  8. pH. Agricultural Lesson Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale. Dept. of Agricultural Education and Mechanization.

    This lesson plan is intended for use in conducting classes on the effect of pH on plant growth. Presented first are an attention step/problem statement and a series of questions and answers designed to convey general information about soil pH and its effect on plants. The following topics are among those discussed: acidity and alkalinity; the…

  9. The use of alkaline hydrolysis as a novel strategy for chloroform remediation: the feasibility of using construction wastes and evaluation of carbon isotopic fractionation.

    PubMed

    Torrentó, Clara; Audí-Miró, Carme; Bordeleau, Geneviève; Marchesi, Massimo; Rosell, Mònica; Otero, Neus; Soler, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory and field-scale pilot experiments were performed to evaluate the feasibility of chloroform degradation by alkaline hydrolysis and the potential of δ(13)C values to assess this induced reaction process at contaminated sites. In batch experiments, alkaline conditions were induced by adding crushed concrete (pH 12.33 ± 0.07), a filtered concrete solution (pH 12.27 ± 0.04), a filtered cement solution (pH 12.66 ± 0.02) and a pH 12 buffer solution (pH 11.92 ± 0.11). The resulting chloroform degradation after 28 days was 94, 96, 99, and 72%, respectively. The experimental data were described using a pseudo-first-order kinetic model, resulting in pseudo-first-order rate constant values of 0.10, 0.12, 0.20, and 0.05 d(-1), respectively. Furthermore, the significant chloroform carbon isotopic fractionation associated with alkaline hydrolysis of chloroform (-53 ± 3‰) and its independence from pH in the admittedly limited tested pH range imply a great potential for the use of δ(13)C values for in situ monitoring of the efficacy of remediation approaches based on alkaline hydrolysis. The carbon isotopic fractionation obtained at the lab scale allowed the calculation of the percentage of chloroform degradation in field-scale pilot experiments where alkaline conditions were induced in two recharge water interception trenches filled with concrete-based construction wastes. A maximum of approximately 30-40% of chloroform degradation was achieved during the two studied recharge periods. Although further research is required, the treatment of chloroform in groundwater through the use of concrete-based construction wastes is proposed. This strategy would also imply the recycling of construction and demolition wastes for use in value-added applications to increase economic and environmental benefits. PMID:24410407

  10. Amino acid modified Ni catalyst exhibits reversible H2 oxidation/production over a broad pH range at elevated temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Arnab; DuBois, Daniel L.; Roberts, John A. S.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogenases interconvert H2 and protons at high rates and with high energy efficiencies, providing inspiration for the development of molecular catalysts. Studies designed to determine how the protein scaffold can influence a catalytically active site have led to the synthesis of amino acid derivatives of [Ni(P2RN2R′)2]2+ complexes, [Ni(P2CyN2Amino acid)2]2+ (CyAA). It is shown that these CyAA derivatives can catalyze fully reversible H2 production/oxidation at rates approaching those of hydrogenase enzymes. The reversibility is achieved in acidic aqueous solutions (pH = 0–6), 1 atm 25% H2/Ar, and elevated temperatures (tested from 298 to 348 K) for the glycine (CyGly), arginine (CyArg), and arginine methyl ester (CyArgOMe) derivatives. As expected for a reversible process, the catalytic activity is dependent upon H2 and proton concentrations. CyArg is significantly faster in both directions (∼300 s−1 H2 production and 20 s−1 H2 oxidation; pH = 1, 348 K, 1 atm 25% H2/Ar) than the other two derivatives. The slower turnover frequencies for CyArgOMe (35 s−1 production and 7 s−1 oxidation under the same conditions) compared with CyArg suggests an important role for the COOH group during catalysis. That CyArg is faster than CyGly (3 s−1 production and 4 s−1 oxidation) suggests that the additional structural features imparted by the guanidinium groups facilitate fast and reversible H2 addition/release. These observations demonstrate that outer coordination sphere amino acids work in synergy with the active site and can play an important role for synthetic molecular electrocatalysts, as has been observed for the protein scaffold of redox active enzymes. PMID:25368196

  11. The pH sensitivity of Aqp0 channels in tetraploid and diploid teleosts

    PubMed Central

    Chauvigné, François; Zapater, Cinta; Stavang, Jon Anders; Taranger, Geir Lasse; Cerdà, Joan; Finn, Roderick Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Water homeostasis and the structural integrity of the vertebrate lens is partially mediated by AQP0 channels. Emerging evidence indicates that external pH may be involved in channel gating. Here we show that a tetraploid teleost, the Atlantic salmon, retains 4 aqp0 genes (aqp0a1, -0a2, -0b1, and -0b2), which are highly, but not exclusively, expressed in the lens. Functional characterization reveals that, although each paralog permeates water efficiently, the permeability is respectively shifted to the neutral, alkaline, or acidic pH in Aqp0a1, -0a2, and -0b1, whereas that of Aqp0b2 is not regulated by external pH. Mutagenesis studies demonstrate that Ser38, His39, and His40 residues in the extracellular transmembrane domain of α-helix 2 facing the water pore are critical for the pH modulation of water transport. To validate these findings, we show that both zebrafish Aqp0a and -0b are functional water channels with respective pH sensitivities toward alkaline or acid pH ranges and that an N-terminal allelic variant (Ser19) of Aqp0b exists that abolishes water transport in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The data suggest that the alkaline pH sensitivity is a conserved trait in teleost Aqp0 a-type channels, whereas mammalian AQP0 and some teleost Aqp0 b-type channels display an acidic pH permeation preference.—Chauvigné, F., Zapater, C., Stavang, J. A., Taranger, G. L., Cerdà, J., Finn, R. N. The pH sensitivity of Aqp0 channels in tetraploid and diploid teleosts. PMID:25667219

  12. Alkaline "Permanent" Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacey, Antony

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of paper manufacturing processes and their effects on library materials focuses on the promotion of alkaline "permanent" paper, with less acid, by Canadian library preservation specialists. Standards for paper acidity are explained; advantages of alkaline paper are described, including decreased manufacturing costs; and recyclability is…

  13. Anodes for alkaline electrolysis

    DOEpatents

    Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev

    2011-02-01

    A method of making an anode for alkaline electrolysis cells includes adsorption of precursor material on a carbonaceous material, conversion of the precursor material to hydroxide form and conversion of precursor material from hydroxide form to oxy-hydroxide form within the alkaline electrolysis cell.

  14. Alkaline igneous rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Fitton, J.G.; Upton, B.G.J.

    1987-01-01

    In this volume, an international team of scientists provides an up-to-date overview of the nature, origin, and evolution of alkaline magmas. Particular attention is paid to carbonatites, lamprophyres, and lamproites which are rock suites of current interest not recently reviewed elsewhere. Recent work on the classical alkaline provinces of East Africa, South Greenland, and the Kola Peninsula is included together with reviews of other areas of alkaline magmatism in North and South America, East Greenland, Europe, West Africa, and the ocean basins. Other papers discuss the impact of experimental isotopic and geochemical studies of the petrogenesis of alkaline rocks. This book will be of interest to petrologists and geochemists studying alkaline igneous rocks, and to other earth scientists as a reference on the rapidly expanding field of igneous petrology.

  15. Variation of photoautotrophic fatty acid production from a highly CO2 tolerant alga, Chlorococcum littorale, with inorganic carbon over narrow ranges of pH.

    PubMed

    Ota, Masaki; Takenaka, Motohiro; Sato, Yoshiyuki; Smith, Richard L; Inomata, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Photoautotrophic fatty acid production of a highly CO2 -tolerant green alga Chlorococcum littorale in the presence of inorganic carbon at 295 K and light intensity of 170 µmol-photon m(-2) s(-1) was investigated. CO2 concentration in the bubbling gas was adjusted by mixing pure gas components of CO2 and N2 to avoid photorespiration and β-oxidation of fatty acids under O2 surrounding conditions. Maximum content of total fatty acid showed pH-dependence after nitrate depletion of the culture media and increased with the corresponding inorganic carbon ratio. Namely, [HCO3 (-) ]/([CO2 ]+n[ CO32-]) ratio in the culture media was found to be a controlling factor for photoautotrophic fatty acid production after the nitrate limitation. At a CO2 concentration of 5% (vol/vol) and a pH of 6.7, the fatty acid content was 47.8 wt % (dry basis) at its maximum that is comparable with land plant seed oils. PMID:25919350

  16. The effect of pH on the survival of leptospires in water*

    PubMed Central

    Smith, C. E. Gordon; Turner, L. H.

    1961-01-01

    One of the factors on which the incidence of leptospirosis is dependent is the survival time of shed leptospires in surface water or soil water, and this time is in turn affected by the acidity or alkalinity of the water. The authors have therefore studied the survival of four leptospiral serotypes in buffered distilled water at pH's ranging from 5.3 to 8.0. All survived longer in alkaline than in acid water, and significant differences between the serotypes were found in response to pH. Survival at pH's under 7.0 ranged from 10 to 117 days and at pH's over 7.0 from 21 to 152 days. Survival was also studied in aqueous extracts of soil samples from different areas in Malaya; no correlation was found between pH and survival time. It was also noted that in a group of Malayan ricefields a low incidence of leptospirosis in man was accompanied by a high infection rate among rodents, and when it was found that this phenomenon could not be explained by pH or salinity, attention was turned to the soil. Bentonite clay, similar to the montmorrillonite clay of the ricefields, was found to adsorb about half the leptospires in suspension. The authors recommend that field study of this laboratory observation be undertaken. PMID:20604084

  17. An experimental study of magnesite precipitation rates at neutral to alkaline conditions and 100-200 °C as a function of pH, aqueous solution composition and chemical affinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saldi, Giuseppe D.; Schott, Jacques; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Gautier, Quentin; Oelkers, Eric H.

    2012-04-01

    Magnesite precipitation rates were measured at temperatures from 100 to 200 °C as a function of saturation state and reactive fluid composition in mixed flow reactors. Measured rates were found to increase systematically with increasing saturation state but to decrease with increasing reactive fluid aqueous CO32- activity and pH. Measured rates are interpreted through a combination of surface complexation models and transition state theory. In accord with this formalism, constant saturation state BET surface area normalized magnesite precipitation rates (rMg) are a function of the concentration of protonated Mg sites at the surface (>MgOH2+) and can be described using: rMg=kMg-Kn 1-ΩMgn where kMg- represents a rate constant, KOH and KCO3 stand for equilibrium constants, ai designates the activity of the subscripted aqueous species, n refers to a reaction order equal to 2, and ΩMg denotes the saturation state of the reactive solution with respect to magnesite. Retrieved values of n are consistent with magnesite precipitation control by a spiral growth mechanism. The temperature variation of the rate constant can be described using kMg-=Aaexp(-Ea/RT), where Aa represents a pre-exponential factor equal to 5.9 × 10-5 mol/cm2/s, Ea designates an activation energy equal to 80.2 kJ/mol, R denotes the gas constant, and T corresponds to the absolute temperature. Comparison of measured magnesite precipitation rates with corresponding forsterite dissolution rates suggest that the relatively slow rates of magnesite precipitation may be the rate limiting step in mineral carbonation efforts in ultramafic rocks.

  18. Amino acid modified Ni catalyst exhibits reversible H2 oxidation/production over a broad pH range at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Arnab; DuBois, Daniel L.; Roberts, John A.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2014-11-18

    Hydrogenases interconvert H2 and protons at high rates and with high energy efficiencies, providing inspiration for the development of molecular catalysts. Studies designed to determine how the protein scaffold can influence a catalytically active site has led to the synthesis of amino acid derivatives, [Ni(PCy2NAmino acid2)2]2+ (CyAA), of [Ni(PR2NR'2)2]2+ complexes. It is shown that these CyAA derivatives can catalyze fully reversible H2 production/oxidation, a feature reminiscent of enzymes. The reversibility is achieved in acidic aqueous solutions, 0.25% H2/Ar, and elevated temperatures (tested up to 348 K) for the glycine (CyGly), arginine (CyArg), and arginine methyl ester (CyArgOMe) derivatives. As expected for a reversible process, the activity is dependent upon H2 and proton concentration. CyArg is significantly faster in both directions than the other two derivatives (~300 s-1 H2 production and 20 s-1 H2 oxidation; pH=1, 348 K). The significantly slower rates for CyArgOMe (35 s-1 production and 7 s-1 oxidation) compared to CyArg suggests an important role for the COOH group during catalysis. That CyArg is faster than CyGly (3 s-1 production and 4 s-1 oxidation under the same conditions) suggests that the additional structural features imparted by the guanidinium groups facilitate fast and reversible H2 addition/release. These observations demonstrate that appended, outer coordination sphere amino acids work in synergy with the active site and can play an equally important role for synthetic molecular electrocatalysts as the protein scaffold does for redox active enzymes. This work was funded by the Office of Science Early Career Research Program through the US DOE, BES (AD, WJS), and the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US DOE, BES (DLD, JASR). PNNL is operated by Battelle for the US DOE.

  19. Alkaline battery operational methodology

    DOEpatents

    Sholklapper, Tal; Gallaway, Joshua; Steingart, Daniel; Ingale, Nilesh; Nyce, Michael

    2016-08-16

    Methods of using specific operational charge and discharge parameters to extend the life of alkaline batteries are disclosed. The methods can be used with any commercial primary or secondary alkaline battery, as well as with newer alkaline battery designs, including batteries with flowing electrolyte. The methods include cycling batteries within a narrow operating voltage window, with minimum and maximum cut-off voltages that are set based on battery characteristics and environmental conditions. The narrow voltage window decreases available capacity but allows the batteries to be cycled for hundreds or thousands of times.

  20. Kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene in aqueous solution and highly contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Emmrich, M.

    1999-11-01

    During the two World Wars, large amounts of TNT were released into the environment. Until today, high concentrations of TNT can be found in the soil of former ammunition plants. To obtain basic data for a novel treatment process for highly contaminated soils, the homogeneous aqueous hydrolysis of TNT in the pH range from 10 to 12 and the alkaline treatment of two contaminated soils at pH 11 and pH 12 were investigated. The experimental data were described for their respective pH values using a pseudo-first-order model. In the homogeneous experiments, 95--97% of the TNT was hydrolyzed. During alkaline hydrolysis, up to two nitrogroups per TNT molecule were released, indicating the irreversible destruction of TNT. Except for the formation of small traces of amino dinitrotoluenes and trinitrobenzenes, no nitroaromatic benzenes or toluenes were detected during GC analysis. For the less contaminated soil, ELBP2, with an initial TNT concentration of 116 mg/kg, a destruction of 99% was achieved. The highly contaminated soil, HTNT2 (16.1 g of TNT/kg), showed a hydrolyzation level of 90-94%. The results show that the alkaline treatment of highly contaminated soils may prove to be effective as an alternative treatment technology.

  1. Bacterial colonization of a fumigated alkaline saline soil.

    PubMed

    Bello-López, Juan M; Domínguez-Mendoza, Cristina A; de León-Lorenzana, Arit S; Delgado-Balbuena, Laura; Navarro-Noya, Yendi E; Gómez-Acata, Selene; Rodríguez-Valentín, Analine; Ruíz-Valdiviezo, Victor M; Luna-Guido, Marco; Verhulst, Nele; Govaerts, Bram; Dendooven, Luc

    2014-07-01

    After chloroform fumigating an arable soil, the relative abundance of phylotypes belonging to only two phyla (Actinobacteria and Firmicutes) and two orders [Actinomycetales and Bacillales (mostly Bacillus)] increased in a subsequent aerobic incubation, while it decreased for a wide range of bacterial groups. It remained to be seen if similar bacterial groups were affected when an extreme alkaline saline soil was fumigated. Soil with electrolytic conductivity between 139 and 157 dS m(-1), and pH 10.0 and 10.3 was fumigated and the bacterial community structure determined after 0, 1, 5 and 10 days by analysis of the 16S rRNA gene, while an unfumigated soil served as control. The relative abundance of the Firmicutes increased in the fumigated soil (52.8%) compared to the unfumigated soil (34.2%), while that of the Bacteroidetes decreased from 16.2% in the unfumigated soil to 8.8% in the fumigated soil. Fumigation increased the relative abundance of the genus Bacillus from 14.7% in the unfumigated soil to 25.7%. It was found that phylotypes belonging to the Firmicutes, mostly of the genus Bacillus, were dominant in colonizing the fumigated alkaline saline as found in the arable soil, while the relative abundance of a wide range of bacterial groups decreased. PMID:24846742

  2. The Influence of pH on Prokaryotic Cell Size and Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundararajan, D.; Gutierrez, F.; Heim, N. A.; Payne, J.

    2015-12-01

    The pH of a habitat is essential to an organism's growth and success in its environment. Although most organisms maintain a neutral internal pH, their environmental pH can vary greatly. However, little research has been done concerning an organism's environmental pH across a wide range of taxa. We studied pH tolerance in prokaryotes and its relationship with biovolume, taxonomic classification, and ideal temperature. We had three hypotheses: pH and temperature are not correlated; pH tolerance is similar within taxonomic groups; and extremophiles have small cell sizes. To test these hypotheses, we used pH, size, and taxonomic data from The Prokaryotes. We found that the mean optimum external pH was neutral for prokaryotes as a whole and when divided by domain, phylum, and class. Using ANOVA to test for pH within and among group variances, we found that variation of pH in domains, phyla, classes, and families was greater than between them. pH and size did not show much of a correlation, except that the largest and smallest sized prokaryotes had nearly neutral pH. This seems significant because extremophiles need to divert more of their energy from growth to maintain a neutral internal pH. Acidophiles showed a larger range of optimum pH values than alkaliphiles. A similar result was seen with the minimum and maximum pH values of acidophiles and alkaliphiles. While acidophiles were spread out and had some alkaline maximum values, alkaliphiles had smaller ranges, and unlike some acidophiles that had pH minimums close to zero, alkaliphile pH maximums did not go beyond a pH of 12. No statistically significant differences were found between sizes of acidophiles and alkaliphiles. However, optimum temperatures of acidophiles and alkaliphiles did have a statistically significant difference. pH and temperature had a negative correlation. Therefore, pH seems to have a correlation with cell size, temperature, and taxonomy to some extent.

  3. Two-dimensional gel-based alkaline proteome of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Avishek; Cai, Liyang; Ejby, Morten; Schmidt, Bjarne G; Lahtinen, Sampo J; Jacobsen, Susanne; Svensson, Birte

    2012-04-01

    Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM (NCFM) is a well-documented probiotic bacterium isolated from human gut. Detailed 2D gel-based NCFM proteomics addressed the so-called alkaline range, i.e., pH 6-11. Proteins were identified in 150 of the 202 spots picked from the Coomassie Brilliant Blue stained 2D gel using MALDI-TOF-MS. The 102 unique gene products among the 150 protein identifications were assigned to different functional categories, and evaluated by considering a calculated distribution of abundance as well as grand average of hydrophobicity values. None of the very few available lactic acid bacteria proteome reference maps included the range of pI >7.0. The present report of such data on the proteome of NCFM fundamentally complements current knowledge on protein profiles limited to the acid and neutral pH range. PMID:22522807

  4. Monitoring of crustal movements in the San Andreas fault zone by a satellite-borne ranging system. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, M.

    1976-01-01

    The Close Grid Geodynamic Measurement System is conceived as an orbiting ranging device with a ground base grid of reflectors or transponders (spacing 1.0 to 30 km), which are projected to be of low cost (maintenance free and unattended), and which will permit the saturation of a local area to obtain data useful to monitor crustal movements in the San Andreas fault zone. The system includes a station network of 75 stations covering an area between 36 deg N and 38 deg N latitudes, and 237 deg E and 239 deg E longitudes, with roughly half of the stations on either side of the faults. In addition, the simulation of crustal movements through the introduction of changes in the relative positions between grid stations, weather effect for intervisibility between satellite and station and loss of observations thereof, and comparative evaluation of various observational scheme-patterns have been critically studied.

  5. Miniaturization of cytotoxicity tests for concentration range-finding studies prior to conducting the pH 6.7 Syrian hamster embryo cell-transformation assay.

    PubMed

    Plöttner, Sabine; Käfferlein, Heiko U; Brüning, Thomas

    2013-08-15

    The Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cell-transformation assay (SHE assay) is a promising alternative method to animal testing for the identification of potential carcinogens in vitro. Prior to conducting the SHE assay the appropriate concentration range for each test chemical must be established, with a maximum concentration causing approximately 50% cytotoxicity. Concentration range-finding is done in separate experiments, which are similar to the final SHE assay but with less replicates and more concentrations. Here we present an alternative for the cytotoxicity testing by miniaturization of the test procedure by use of 24-well plates and surpluses from feeder-cell preparations as target cells. In addition, we integrated the photometry-based neutral red (NR) assay. For validation of the assay, incubations with dimethyl sulf-oxide, p-phenylenediamine-2HCl, aniline, o-toluidine-HCl, 2,4-diaminotoluene, and 2-naphthylamine were carried out in the miniaturized approach and compared with the standard procedure in terms of calculating the relative plating efficiencies (RPEs). To directly compare both methods, concentrations that produced 50% cytotoxicity (IC50) were calculated. Excellent associations were observed between the number of colonies and NR uptake. For all test substances a concentration-dependent, concomitant decrease of NR uptake in the miniaturized approach and RPEs in the standard test was observed after a 7-day incubation. The results from both test setups showed a comparable order of magnitude and the IC50 values differed by a factor <2 (1.4-1.9), depending on the substance in question. Overall, the miniaturized approach should be considered an improved alternative for cytotoxicity testing in the SHE assay, as it saves valuable SHE cells and speeds-up the time, to obtain test results more rapidly. PMID:23830925

  6. An overview on fermentation, downstream processing and properties of microbial alkaline proteases.

    PubMed

    Gupta, R; Beg, Q K; Khan, S; Chauhan, B

    2002-12-01

    Microbial alkaline proteases dominate the worldwide enzyme market, accounting for a two-thirds share of the detergent industry. Although protease production is an inherent property of all organisms, only those microbes that produce a substantial amount of extracellular protease have been exploited commercially. Of these, strains of Bacillus sp. dominate the industrial sector. To develop an efficient enzyme-based process for the industry, prior knowledge of various fermentation parameters, purification strategies and properties of the biocatalyst is of utmost importance. Besides these, the method of measurement of proteolytic potential, the selection of the substrate and the assay protocol depends upon the ultimate industrial application. A large array of assay protocols are available in the literature; however, with the predominance of molecular approaches for the generation of better biocatalysts, the search for newer substrates and assay protocols that can be conducted at micro/nano-scale are becoming important. Fermentation of proteases is regulated by varying the C/N ratio and can be scaled-up using fed-batch, continuous or chemostat approaches by prolonging the stationary phase of the culture. The conventional purification strategy employed, involving e.g., concentration, chromatographic steps, or aqueous two-phase systems, depends on the properties of the protease in question. Alkaline proteases useful for detergent applications are mostly active in the pH range 8-12 and at temperatures between 50 and 70 degrees C, with a few exceptions of extreme pH optima up to pH 13 and activity at temperatures up to 80-90 degrees C. Alkaline proteases mostly have their isoelectric points near to their pH optimum in the range of 8-11. Several industrially important proteases have been subjected to crystallization to extensively study their molecular homology and three-dimensional structures. PMID:12466877

  7. pH Optrode Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabacco, Mary Beth; Zhou, Quan

    1995-01-01

    pH-sensitive chromophoric reagents immobilized in porous optical fibers. Optoelectronic instrumentation system measures acidity or alkalinity of aqueous nutrient solution. Includes one or more optrodes, which are optical-fiber chemical sensors, in sense, analogous to electrodes but not subject to some of spurious effects distorting readings taken by pH electrodes. Concept of optrodes also described in "Ethylene-Vapor Optrodes" (KSC-11579). pH optrode sensor head, with lead-in and lead-out optical fibers, convenient for monitoring solutions located away from supporting electronic equipment.

  8. Net alkalinity and net acidity 1: Theoretical considerations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirby, C.S.; Cravotta, C.A., III

    2005-01-01

    Net acidity and net alkalinity are widely used, poorly defined, and commonly misunderstood parameters for the characterization of mine drainage. The authors explain theoretical expressions of 3 types of alkalinity (caustic, phenolphthalein, and total) and acidity (mineral, CO2, and total). Except for rarely-invoked negative alkalinity, theoretically defined total alkalinity is closely analogous to measured alkalinity and presents few practical interpretation problems. Theoretically defined "CO 2-acidity" is closely related to most standard titration methods with an endpoint pH of 8.3 used for determining acidity in mine drainage, but it is unfortunately named because CO2 is intentionally driven off during titration of mine-drainage samples. Using the proton condition/mass- action approach and employing graphs to illustrate speciation with changes in pH, the authors explore the concept of principal components and how to assign acidity contributions to aqueous species commonly present in mine drainage. Acidity is defined in mine drainage based on aqueous speciation at the sample pH and on the capacity of these species to undergo hydrolysis to pH 8.3. Application of this definition shows that the computed acidity in mg L -1 as CaCO3 (based on pH and analytical concentrations of dissolved FeII, FeIII, Mn, and Al in mg L -1):aciditycalculated=50{1000(10-pH)+[2(FeII)+3(FeIII)]/56+2(Mn)/ 55+3(Al)/27}underestimates contributions from HSO4- and H+, but overestimates the acidity due to Fe3+ and Al3+. However, these errors tend to approximately cancel each other. It is demonstrated that "net alkalinity" is a valid mathematical construction based on theoretical definitions of alkalinity and acidity. Further, it is shown that, for most mine-drainage solutions, a useful net alkalinity value can be derived from: (1) alkalinity and acidity values based on aqueous speciation, (2) measured alkalinity minus calculated acidity, or (3) taking the negative of the value obtained in a

  9. Effect of salinity induced pH/alkalinity changes on benthic foraminifera: A laboratory culture experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraswat, Rajeev; Kouthanker, Mamata; Kurtarkar, Sujata R.; Nigam, Rajiv; Naqvi, S. W. A.; Linshy, V. N.

    2015-02-01

    The salinity of coastal waters in the vicinity of seasonally fresh water fed estuaries changes tremendously and reportedly affects the living calcite secreting organisms like foraminifera, as well as their dead remains. The precise mechanism of adverse effect of such seasonal salinity changes on calcite secreting organisms is, however not clear. The seasonal fresh water influx from the estuaries also affects the pH and alkalinity of the coastal seawater. Therefore, to understand the effect of salinity induced pH/alkalinity variations on benthic foraminifera, living specimens of Rosalina globularis were subjected to different salinity. Additionally, water samples were collected from an estuary during both monsoon and post monsoon season to understand the relationship between salinity, pH and total alkalinity (TA). The pH decreased with decreasing salinity during both the seasons. A similar decrease in TA with decreasing salinity was also observed but only till 20 psu salinity, below which the TA increased with decreasing salinity. Even though the maximum growth was reported in specimens kept at 35 psu salinity, growth of specimens maintained at >25 psu salinity, was same. Specimens kept at 10 psu and 15 psu salinity, however were much smaller and turned opaque within two days of lowering the salinity and later on their tests dissolved within 24 and 43 days, respectively. No specimen reproduced at 10 psu and 15 psu salinity, while only a few specimens (3%) reproduced at 20 psu salinity. As compared to 10-20 psu salinity, ∼60% reproduction was observed in specimens subjected to 25-40 salinity. The specimens maintained at 20 psu salinity took twice the time to reach maturity than those subjected to 25-40 psu salinity. Since a big drop in pH was observed at 10-15 psu salinity (pH 7.2 and 7.5, respectively), while the alkalinity was still higher, we suggest that fresh water influx induced drop in pH adversely affects calcification and reproduction in benthic

  10. DNA-based determination of microbial biomass suitable for frozen and alkaline soil samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Mikhail; Blagodatskaya, Evgeniya; Kogut, Boris; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    Microbial biomass is a sensitive indicator of changes due to soil management, long before other basic soil measures such as Corg or Ntot. Improvement of methods for determination of microbial biomass still remains relevant, and these methods should be correctly applicable for the soil samples being in various state. This study was designed to demonstrate the applicability of DNA-based determination of microbial biomass under conditions when the common basic approaches, namely chloroform fumigation-extraction (CFE) and substrate-induced respiration (SIR), are restricted by certain soil properties, experimental designs or research needs, e.g. in frozen, alkaline or carbonaceous soils. We compared microbial biomass determined by CFE, SIR and by DNA approaches in the range of neutral and slightly alkaline Chernozem and alkaline Calcisol of semi-arid climate. The samples of natural and agricultural ecosystems were taken throughout the soil profile from long-term static field experiments in the European part of Russia. Extraction and subsequent quantification of dsDNA revealed a strong agreement with SIR and CFE when analyzing the microbial biomass content in soils with pH below 8. The conversion factors (FDNA) from dsDNA to SIR-Cmic (5.10) and CFE-Cmic (4.41) were obtained by testing a range of the soil samples down to 1.5 m depth and indicated a good reproducibility of DNA-based estimations. In alkaline soils (pH > 8), CO2 retention due to alkaline pH and exchange with carbonates resulted in a strong underestimation of soil microbial biomass by SIR or even in the absence of any CO2 emission, especially at low absolute values of microbial biomass in subsoil. Correction of CO2 efflux by theoretical retention pH-dependent factors caused overestimation of SIR-biomass. In alkaline conditions, DNA extraction proved to be a reliable alternative for microbial biomass determination. Moreover, the DNA-based approach can serve as an excellent alternative enabling correct

  11. Decolorization of alkaline TNT hydrolysis effluents using UV/H(2)O(2).

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sangchul; Bouwer, Edward J; Larson, Steven L; Davis, Jeffrey L

    2004-04-30

    Effects of H(2)O(2) dosage (0, 10, 50, 100 and 300 mg/l), reaction pH (11.9, 6.5 and 2.5) and initial color intensity (85, 80 and 60 color unit) on decolorization of alkaline 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) hydrolysis effluents were investigated at a fixed UV strength (40 W/m(2)). Results indicated that UV/H(2)O(2) oxidation could efficiently achieve decolorization and further mineralization. Pseudo first-order decolorization rate constants, k, ranged between 2.9 and 5.4 h(-1) with higher values for lower H(2)O(2) dosage (i.e., 10 mg/l H(2)O(2)) when the decolorization occurred at the reaction pH of 11.9, whereas a faster decolorization was achieved with increase in H(2)O(2) dosage at both pH 6.5 and 2.5, resulting in the values of k as fast as 15.4 and 26.6 h(-1) with 300 mg/l H(2)O(2) at pH 6.5 and 2.5, respectively. Difference in decolorization rates was attributed to the reaction pH rather than to the initial color intensity, resulting from the scavenging of hydroxyl radical by carbonate ion. About 40% of spontaneous mineralization was achieved with addition of 10 mg/l H(2)O(2) at pH 6.5. Efficient decolorization and extension of H(2)O(2) longevity were observed at pH 6.5 conditions. It is recommended that the colored effluents from alkaline TNT hydrolysis be neutralized prior to a decolorization step. PMID:15081163

  12. Intramolecular dynamics of structure of alkaline phosphatase from Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazhul, Vladimir M.; Mjakinnik, Igor V.; Volkova, Alena N.

    1995-01-01

    The luminescent analysis with nano- and millisecond time resolution of intramolecular dynamics of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase was carried out. The effect of pH within the range 7.2 - 9.0, thermal inactivation, limited proteolysis by trypsin, binding of pyrophosphate, interconversion of enzyme and apoenzyme, the replacement of Zn2+ and Mg2+ in the active site by Cd2+ and Ni2+ on the spectral and kinetic parameters of luminescence was investigated. The essential changes of the level of nano- and millisecond dynamics of protein structure were found to correlate with the shift of enzymatic activity. The importance of small- and large-scale flexibility of protein structure for the act of enzymatic catalysis realization was shown.

  13. Salt- and alkaline-tolerance are linked in Acacia.

    PubMed

    Bui, Elisabeth N; Thornhill, Andrew; Miller, Joseph T

    2014-07-01

    Saline or alkaline soils present a strong stress on plants that together may be even more deleterious than alone. Australia's soils are old and contain large, sometimes overlapping, areas of high salt and alkalinity. Acacia and other Australian plant lineages have evolved in this stressful soil environment and present an opportunity to understand the evolution of salt and alkalinity tolerance. We investigate this evolution by predicting the average soil salinity and pH for 503 Acacia species and mapping the response onto a maximum-likelihood phylogeny. We find that salinity and alkalinity tolerance have evolved repeatedly and often together over 25 Ma of the Acacia radiation in Australia. Geographically restricted species are often tolerant of extreme conditions. Distantly related species are sympatric in the most extreme soil environments, suggesting lack of niche saturation. There is strong evidence that many Acacia have distributions affected by salinity and alkalinity and that preference is lineage specific. PMID:25079493

  14. Isolation and molecular characterisation of alkaline protease producing Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Agasthya, Annapurna S; Sharma, Naresh; Mohan, Anand; Mahal, Prabhpreet

    2013-05-01

    Proteases are of particular interest because of their action on insoluble keratin substrates and generally on a broad range of protein substrates. Proteases are one of the most important groups of industrial enzymes used in detergent, protein, brewing, meat, photographic, leather, dairy, pharmaceutical and food industry. In the present study, the organism isolated from the protein rich soil sample was identified by biochemical and molecular characterisation as Bacillus thuringiensis and further optimum conditions for alkaline protease synthesis were determined. The growth conditions for B. thuringiensis was optimised by inoculating into yeast extract casein medium at different pH and incubating at different temperatures. The maximum protease production occurred at pH 8 and at 37 °C. B. thuringiensis showed proteolytic activity at various culture conditions. Optimum conditions for the protease activity were found to be 47 °C and pH 8. In the later stage, the blood removing action of crude and partially purified protease was found to be effective within 25 min in the presence of commercial detergents indicating the possible use of this enzyme in detergent industry. Enzyme also showed good activity against hair substrate keratin and can be used for dehairing. PMID:22826099

  15. Biomass and production of amphipods in low alkalinity lakes affected by acid precipitation.

    PubMed

    France, R L

    1996-01-01

    Population biomass and production of the amphipod Hyalella azteca (Saussure) were found to be related to alkalinity (ranging from 0.2 to 58.1 mg liter(-1)) in 10 Canadian Shield lakes in south-central Ontario. Biomass and production of amphipods in the two lakes characterized by spring depressions of pH below 5.0 were found to be lower than those for populations inhabiting lakes that did not experience such acid pulses. The proportional biomass of amphipods in relation to the total littoral zoobenthos community was lower in lakes of low alkalinity than in circumneutral or hardwater lakes. Because production in these amphipod populations is known to depend closely on population abundance, the labour-intensive derivation of production rates yields relatively little information for biomonitoring that cannot be obtained from abundance data alone. PMID:15093505

  16. Last-Century Increases in Intrinsic Water-Use Efficiency of Grassland Communities Have Occurred over a Wide Range of Vegetation Composition, Nutrient Inputs, and Soil pH.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Iris H; Macdonald, Andy J; Schnyder, Hans

    2016-02-01

    Last-century climate change has led to variable increases of the intrinsic water-use efficiency (Wi; the ratio of net CO2 assimilation to stomatal conductance for water vapor) of trees and C3 grassland ecosystems, but the causes of the variability are not well understood. Here, we address putative drivers underlying variable Wi responses in a wide range of grassland communities. Wi was estimated from carbon isotope discrimination in archived herbage samples from 16 contrasting fertilizer treatments in the Park Grass Experiment, Rothamsted, England, for the 1915 to 1929 and 1995 to 2009 periods. Changes in Wi were analyzed in relation to nitrogen input, soil pH, species richness, and functional group composition. Treatments included liming as well as phosphorus and potassium additions with or without ammonium or nitrate fertilizer applications at three levels. Wi increased between 11% and 25% (P < 0.001) in the different treatments between the two periods. None of the fertilizers had a direct effect on the change of Wi (ΔWi). However, soil pH (P < 0.05), species richness (P < 0.01), and percentage grass content (P < 0.01) were significantly related to ΔWi. Grass-dominated, species-poor plots on acidic soils showed the largest ΔWi (+14.7 μmol mol(-1)). The ΔWi response of these acidic plots was probably related to drought effects resulting from aluminum toxicity on root growth. Our results from the Park Grass Experiment show that Wi in grassland communities consistently increased over a wide range of nutrient inputs, soil pH, and plant community compositions during the last century. PMID:26620525

  17. Last-Century Increases in Intrinsic Water-Use Efficiency of Grassland Communities Have Occurred over a Wide Range of Vegetation Composition, Nutrient Inputs, and Soil pH1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Iris H.; Macdonald, Andy J.; Schnyder, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Last-century climate change has led to variable increases of the intrinsic water-use efficiency (Wi; the ratio of net CO2 assimilation to stomatal conductance for water vapor) of trees and C3 grassland ecosystems, but the causes of the variability are not well understood. Here, we address putative drivers underlying variable Wi responses in a wide range of grassland communities. Wi was estimated from carbon isotope discrimination in archived herbage samples from 16 contrasting fertilizer treatments in the Park Grass Experiment, Rothamsted, England, for the 1915 to 1929 and 1995 to 2009 periods. Changes in Wi were analyzed in relation to nitrogen input, soil pH, species richness, and functional group composition. Treatments included liming as well as phosphorus and potassium additions with or without ammonium or nitrate fertilizer applications at three levels. Wi increased between 11% and 25% (P < 0.001) in the different treatments between the two periods. None of the fertilizers had a direct effect on the change of Wi (ΔWi). However, soil pH (P < 0.05), species richness (P < 0.01), and percentage grass content (P < 0.01) were significantly related to ΔWi. Grass-dominated, species-poor plots on acidic soils showed the largest ΔWi (+14.7 μmol mol−1). The ΔWi response of these acidic plots was probably related to drought effects resulting from aluminum toxicity on root growth. Our results from the Park Grass Experiment show that Wi in grassland communities consistently increased over a wide range of nutrient inputs, soil pH, and plant community compositions during the last century. PMID:26620525

  18. Engineering of a glycosidase Family 7 cellobiohydrolase to more alkaline pH optimum: the pH behaviour of Trichoderma reesei Cel7A and its E223S/ A224H/L225V/T226A/D262G mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Becker, D; Braet, C; Brumer , H; Claeyssens, M; Divne, C; Fagerström, B R; Harris, M; Jones, T A; Kleywegt, G J; Koivula, A; Mahdi, S; Piens, K; Sinnott, M L; Ståhlberg, J; Teeri, T T; Underwood, M; Wohlfahrt, G

    2001-01-01

    The crystal structures of Family 7 glycohydrolases suggest that a histidine residue near the acid/base catalyst could account for the higher pH optimum of the Humicola insolens endoglucanase Cel7B, than the corresponding Trichoderma reesei enzymes. Modelling studies indicated that introduction of histidine at the homologous position in T. reesei Cel7A (Ala(224)) required additional changes to accommodate the bulkier histidine side chain. X-ray crystallography of the catalytic domain of the E223S/A224H/L225V/T226A/D262G mutant reveals that major differences from the wild-type are confined to the mutations themselves. The introduced histidine residue is in plane with its counterpart in H. insolens Cel7B, but is 1.0 A (=0.1 nm) closer to the acid/base Glu(217) residue, with a 3.1 A contact between N(epsilon2) and O(epsilon1). The pH variation of k(cat)/K(m) for 3,4-dinitrophenyl lactoside hydrolysis was accurately bell-shaped for both wild-type and mutant, with pK(1) shifting from 2.22+/-0.03 in the wild-type to 3.19+/-0.03 in the mutant, and pK(2) shifting from 5.99+/-0.02 to 6.78+/-0.02. With this poor substrate, the ionizations probably represent those of the free enzyme. The relative k(cat) for 2-chloro-4-nitrophenyl lactoside showed similar behaviour. The shift in the mutant pH optimum was associated with lower k(cat)/K(m) values for both lactosides and cellobiosides, and a marginally lower stability. However, k(cat) values for cellobiosides are higher for the mutant. This we attribute to reduced non-productive binding in the +1 and +2 subsites; inhibition by cellobiose is certainly relieved in the mutant. The weaker binding of cellobiose is due to the loss of two water-mediated hydrogen bonds. PMID:11336632

  19. Effect of pH on phosphorus, copper, and zinc elution from swine wastewater activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Waki, Miyoko; Yasuda, Tomoko; Fukumoto, Yasuyuki; Suzuki, Kazuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    With the goal of reducing the amounts of phosphorus (P), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn) discharged from swine wastewater activated sludge treatment facilities, we studied the elution of these elements from activated sludge at various pH values. Sludge samples with neutral pH collected from three farms were incubated at pH values ranging from 3 to 10. The soluble concentrations of these elements changed dramatically with pH and were highest at pH 3. We assumed that P present in the sludge under neutral and alkaline conditions was in insoluble form bound up with magnesium (Mg) and calcium (Ca), because Ca and Mg also eluted from the sludge at low pH. To clarify forms of Zn and Cu in the sludge, we performed a sequential extraction analysis. Zinc in adsorbed, organically bound, and sulfide fractions made up a large proportion of the total Zn. Copper in organically bound, carbonate, and sulfide fractions made up a large proportion of the total Cu. The soluble P concentrations were lowest at pH 9 or 10 (11-36 mg/L), the soluble Zn concentrations were lowest at pH 8 or 9 (0.07-0.15 mg/L), and the soluble Cu concentrations were lowest at pH 6-9 (0.2 mg/L, the detection limit). PMID:25116486

  20. Transpassive electrodissolution of depleted uranium in alkaline electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Weisbrod, K.R.; Schake, A.R.; Morgan, A.N.; Purdy, G.M.; Martinez, H.E.; Nelson, T.O.

    1998-03-01

    To aid in removal of oralloy from the nuclear weapons stockpile, scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility are decontaminating oralloy parts by electrodissolution in neutral to alkaline electrolytes composed of sodium nitrate and sodium sulfate. To improve the process, electrodissolution experiments were performed with depleted uranium to understand the effects of various operating parameters. Sufficient precipitate was also produced to evaluate the feasibility of using ultrafiltration to separate the uranium oxide precipitates from the electrolyte before it enters the decontamination fixture. In preparation for the experiments, a potential-pH diagram for uranium was constructed from thermodynamic data for fully hydrated species. Electrodissolution in unstirred solutions showed that uranium dissolution forms two layers, an acidic bottom layer rich in uranium and an alkaline upper layer. Under stirred conditions results are consistent with the formation of a yellow precipitate of composition UO{sub 3}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O, a six electron process. Amperometric experiments showed that current efficiency remained near 100% over a wide range of electrolytes, electrolyte concentrations, pH, and stirring conditions.

  1. Acidic minespoil reclamation with alkaline biosolids

    SciTech Connect

    Drill, C.; Lindsay, B.J.; Logan, T.L.

    1998-12-31

    The effectiveness of an alkaline stabilized biosolids product, N-Viro Soil (NVS), was studied at a wild animal preserve in Cumberland, OH. The preserve occupies land that was strip mined for high-sulfur coal. While most of the land has been conventionally reclaimed, several highly acidic hot spots remain. Two of these hot spots were studied through concurrent field, greenhouse, and laboratory projects. In April 1995, NVS was applied at rates ranging from 0--960 mt/ha (wet wt.) to plots at the two sites. The plots were seeded using a standard reclamation mix and soil samples were analyzed for chemical characteristics before and after application and also in 1996 and 1997. Soil pH increased from 3.5 to about 11 in the amended plots and soil EC values increased from 21.0 mmho/cm to a maximum of 6.0 mmho/cm in the amended plots immediately after application. Soil Cu and Zn concentrations also increased in the NVS amended plots, but this did not affect plant germination or growth. By the summer of 1996, soil pH values had decreased to 7.3--8.7 and EC values decreased to 0.34--1.36 mmho/cm to the amended plots. Soil samples were collected in September 1995 for physical analyses. N-Viro Soil improved the moisture retention and water conductivity properties of the spoil. The plots were monitored for growth during the summer of 1995 and plant biomass and soil samples were taken in 1996 and 1997 for trace element and nutrient analysis. NVS did not significantly increase trace element concentrations in the biomass. The addition of NVS to acid mine spoil improves the chemical and physical properties of the spoil material thus aiding vegetative establishment and growth. NVS improves the chemical nature of the spoil by increasing pH and providing micro and macronutrients and improves the physical properties of the spoil with the addition of organic matter.

  2. phoD Alkaline Phosphatase Gene Diversity in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Kertesz, Michael A.; Bünemann, Else K.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatase enzymes are responsible for much of the recycling of organic phosphorus in soils. The PhoD alkaline phosphatase takes part in this process by hydrolyzing a range of organic phosphoesters. We analyzed the taxonomic and environmental distribution of phoD genes using whole-genome and metagenome databases. phoD alkaline phosphatase was found to be spread across 20 bacterial phyla and was ubiquitous in the environment, with the greatest abundance in soil. To study the great diversity of phoD, we developed a new set of primers which targets phoD genes in soil. The primer set was validated by 454 sequencing of six soils collected from two continents with different climates and soil properties and was compared to previously published primers. Up to 685 different phoD operational taxonomic units were found in each soil, which was 7 times higher than with previously published primers. The new primers amplified sequences belonging to 13 phyla, including 71 families. The most prevalent phoD genes identified in these soils were affiliated with the orders Actinomycetales (13 to 35%), Bacillales (1 to 29%), Gloeobacterales (1 to 18%), Rhizobiales (18 to 27%), and Pseudomonadales (0 to 22%). The primers also amplified phoD genes from additional orders, including Burkholderiales, Caulobacterales, Deinococcales, Planctomycetales, and Xanthomonadales, which represented the major differences in phoD composition between samples, highlighting the singularity of each community. Additionally, the phoD bacterial community structure was strongly related to soil pH, which varied between 4.2 and 6.8. These primers reveal the diversity of phoD in soil and represent a valuable tool for the study of phoD alkaline phosphatase in environmental samples. PMID:26253682

  3. ALKALINITY, PH, AND COPPER CORROSION BY-PRODUCT RELEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contrary to expectations, higher bicarbonate concentrations exacerbate copper corrosion rates and by-product release. In fact, as illustrated by monitoring experiences of large utilities and by laboratory data, the concentration of copper corrosion by-products in drinking water i...

  4. Alkaline solution absorption of carbon dioxide method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for measuring the concentration of hydroxides (or pH) in alkaline solutions, using the tendency of hydroxides to adsorb CO{sub 2}. The method comprises passing CO{sub 2} over the surface of an alkaline solution in a remote tank before and after measurements of the CO{sub 2} concentration. Comparison of the measurements yields the adsorption fraction from which the hydroxide concentration can be calculated using a correlation of hydroxide or pH to adsorption fraction. A schematic is given of a process system according to a preferred embodiment of the invention. 2 figs.

  5. Production and characterization of thermostable alkaline protease of Bacillus subtilis (ATCC 6633) from optimized solid-state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Joyee; Giri, Sudipta; Maity, Sujan; Sinha, Ankan; Ranjan, Ashish; Rajshekhar; Gupta, Suvroma

    2015-01-01

    Proteases are the most important group of enzymes utilized commercially in various arenas of industries, such as food, detergent, leather, dairy, pharmaceutical, diagnostics, and waste management, accounting for nearly 20% of the world enzyme market. Microorganisms of specially Bacillus genera serve as a vast repository of diverse set of industrially important enzymes and utilized for the large-scale enzyme production using a fermentation technology. Approximately 30%-40% of the cost of industrial enzymes originates from the cost of the growth medium. This study is attempted to produce protease from Bacillus subtilis (ATCC 6633) after optimization of various process parameters with the aid of solid-state fermentation using a cheap nutrient source such as wheat bran. B. subtilis (ATCC 6633) produces proteases of molecular weight 36 and 20 kDa, respectively, in the fermented medium as evident from SDS zymogram. Alkaline protease activity has been detected with optimum temperature at 50 °C and is insensitive to ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. This thermostable alkaline protease exhibits dual pH optimum at 7 and 10 with moderate pH stability at alkaline pH range. It preserves its activity in the presence of detergent such as SDS, Tween 20, and Triton X-100 and may be considered as an effective additive to detergent formulation with some industrial importance. PMID:25323045

  6. Precision and accuracy of spectrophotometric pH measurements at environmental conditions in the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Karoline; Schneider, Bernd; Kuliński, Karol; Schulz-Bull, Detlef E.

    2014-06-01

    The increasing uptake of anthropogenic CO2 by the oceans has raised an interest in precise and accurate pH measurement in order to assess the impact on the marine CO2-system. Spectrophotometric pH measurements were refined during the last decade yielding a precision and accuracy that cannot be achieved with the conventional potentiometric method. However, until now the method was only tested in oceanic systems with a relative stable and high salinity and a small pH range. This paper describes the first application of such a pH measurement system at conditions in the Baltic Sea which is characterized by a wide salinity and pH range. The performance of the spectrophotometric system at pH values as low as 7.0 (“total” scale) and salinities between 0 and 35 was examined using TRIS-buffer solutions, certified reference materials, and tests of consistency with measurements of other parameters of the marine CO2 system. Using m-cresol purple as indicator dye and a spectrophotometric measurement system designed at Scripps Institution of Oceanography (B. Carter, A. Dickson), a precision better than ±0.001 and an accuracy between ±0.01 and ±0.02 was achieved within the observed pH and salinity ranges in the Baltic Sea. The influence of the indicator dye on the pH of the sample was determined theoretically and is presented as a pH correction term for the different alkalinity regimes in the Baltic Sea. Because of the encouraging tests, the ease of operation and the fact that the measurements refer to the internationally accepted “total” pH scale, it is recommended to use the spectrophotometric method also for pH monitoring and trend detection in the Baltic Sea.

  7. Development of pH Sensitive Nanoparticles for Intestinal Drug Delivery Using Chemically Modified Guar Gum Co-Polymer.

    PubMed

    Varma, Vegesna Naga Sravan Kumar; Shivakumar, Hosakote Gurumalappa; Balamuralidhara, Veerna; Navya, Manne; Hani, Umme

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the research work was to chemically modify guargum (GG) as a pH sensitive co-polymer and formulating intestinal targeting ESO nanoparticles (NPs) using the synthesized co-polymer. Poly acrylamide-grafted-guar gum (PAAm-g-GG) co-polymer was synthesized by free radical polymerization. Chemical modification of PAAm-g-GG by alkaline hydrolysis results in formation of a pH-sensitive co-polymer. The effect of GG and acryl amide (AAm) on grafting was studied. Esomeprazole magnesium (ESO) loaded pH sensitive NPs were prepared by nano-emulsification polymer crosslinking method and characterized. Sixteen formulations were prepared and the concentration of process variables wasvaried to obtain nanoparticles of 200-600 nm. The NPs were found to be homogenous in size distribution. The encapsulation efficiency and drug loading ranged from 33.2% to 50.1% and 12.2% to 17.2% respectively. Particle size, encapsulation efficiency and drug loading increasedalong with co-polymer concentration. In-vitro release studies at pH 1.2 for 2 h, followed by pH 6.8 showed that environment pH significantly affected the drug release. SEM has shown that NPsare spherical with smooth surface. The pH sensitive PAAm-g-GGNPs resisted the initial release of the drug from the drug loaded NPs in acidic pH and delayed the release process to a longer period in alkaline environment. PMID:27610149

  8. Development of pH Sensitive Nanoparticles for Intestinal Drug Delivery Using Chemically Modified Guar Gum Co-Polymer

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Vegesna Naga Sravan Kumar; Shivakumar, Hosakote Gurumalappa; Balamuralidhara, Veerna; Navya, Manne; Hani, Umme

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the research work was to chemically modify guargum (GG) as a pH sensitive co-polymer and formulating intestinal targeting ESO nanoparticles (NPs) using the synthesized co-polymer. Poly acrylamide-grafted-guar gum (PAAm-g-GG) co-polymer was synthesized by free radical polymerization. Chemical modification of PAAm-g-GG by alkaline hydrolysis results in formation of a pH-sensitive co-polymer. The effect of GG and acryl amide (AAm) on grafting was studied. Esomeprazole magnesium (ESO) loaded pH sensitive NPs were prepared by nano-emulsification polymer crosslinking method and characterized. Sixteen formulations were prepared and the concentration of process variables wasvaried to obtain nanoparticles of 200-600 nm. The NPs were found to be homogenous in size distribution. The encapsulation efficiency and drug loading ranged from 33.2% to 50.1% and 12.2% to 17.2% respectively. Particle size, encapsulation efficiency and drug loading increasedalong with co-polymer concentration. In-vitro release studies at pH 1.2 for 2 h, followed by pH 6.8 showed that environment pH significantly affected the drug release. SEM has shown that NPsare spherical with smooth surface. The pH sensitive PAAm-g-GGNPs resisted the initial release of the drug from the drug loaded NPs in acidic pH and delayed the release process to a longer period in alkaline environment. PMID:27610149

  9. A C-terminal proline-rich sequence simultaneously broadens the optimal temperature and pH ranges and improves the catalytic efficiency of glycosyl hydrolase family 10 ruminal xylanases.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongyuan; Xue, Xianli; Zhao, Heng; Yang, Peilong; Luo, Huiying; Zhao, Junqi; Huang, Huoqing; Yao, Bin

    2014-06-01

    Efficient degradation of plant polysaccharides in rumen requires xylanolytic enzymes with a high catalytic capacity. In this study, a full-length xylanase gene (xynA) was retrieved from the sheep rumen. The deduced XynA sequence contains a putative signal peptide, a catalytic motif of glycoside hydrolase family 10 (GH10), and an extra C-terminal proline-rich sequence without a homolog. To determine its function, both mature XynA and its C terminus-truncated mutant, XynA-Tr, were expressed in Escherichia coli. The C-terminal oligopeptide had significant effects on the function and structure of XynA. Compared with XynA-Tr, XynA exhibited improved specific activity (12-fold) and catalytic efficiency (14-fold), a higher temperature optimum (50°C versus 45°C), and broader ranges of temperature and pH optima (pH 5.0 to 7.5 and 40 to 60°C versus pH 5.5 to 6.5 and 40 to 50°C). Moreover, XynA released more xylose than XynA-Tr when using beech wood xylan and wheat arabinoxylan as the substrate. The underlying mechanisms responsible for these changes were analyzed by substrate binding assay, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and xylooligosaccharide hydrolysis. XynA had no ability to bind to any of the tested soluble and insoluble polysaccharides. However, it contained more α helices and had a greater affinity and catalytic efficiency toward xylooligosaccharides, which benefited complete substrate degradation. Similar results were obtained when the C-terminal sequence was fused to another GH10 xylanase from sheep rumen. This study reveals an engineering strategy to improve the catalytic performance of enzymes. PMID:24657866

  10. Archaeal Abundance across a pH Gradient in an Arable Soil and Its Relationship to Bacterial and Fungal Growth Rates

    PubMed Central

    Sterngren, Anna E.; Rousk, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Soil pH is one of the most influential factors for the composition of bacterial and fungal communities, but the influence of soil pH on the distribution and composition of soil archaeal communities has yet to be systematically addressed. The primary aim of this study was to determine how total archaeal abundance (quantitative PCR [qPCR]-based estimates of 16S rRNA gene copy numbers) is related to soil pH across a pH gradient (pH 4.0 to 8.3). Secondarily, we wanted to assess how archaeal abundance related to bacterial and fungal growth rates across the same pH gradient. We identified two distinct and opposite effects of pH on the archaeal abundance. In the lowest pH range (pH 4.0 to 4.7), the abundance of archaea did not seem to correspond to pH. Above this pH range, there was a sharp, almost 4-fold decrease in archaeal abundance, reaching a minimum at pH 5.1 to 5.2. The low abundance of archaeal 16S rRNA gene copy numbers at this pH range then sharply increased almost 150-fold with pH, resulting in an increase in the ratio between archaeal and bacterial copy numbers from a minimum of 0.002 to more than 0.07 at pH 8. The nonuniform archaeal response to pH could reflect variation in the archaeal community composition along the gradient, with some archaea adapted to acidic conditions and others to neutral to slightly alkaline conditions. This suggestion is reinforced by observations of contrasting outcomes of the (competitive) interactions between archaea, bacteria, and fungi toward the lower and higher ends of the examined pH gradient. PMID:22706045

  11. Alkaline flooding injection strategy

    SciTech Connect

    French, T.R.; Josephson, C.B.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to improved alkali-surfactant flooding methods, and this includes determining the proper design of injection strategy. Several different injection strategies have been used or suggested for recovering heavy oils with surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding methods. Oil recovery was compared for four different injection strategies: (1) surfactant followed by polymer, (2) surfactant followed by alkaline polymer, (3) alkaline surfactant followed by polymer, and (4) alkali, surfactant, and polymer mixed in a single formulation. The effect of alkaline preflush was also studied under two different conditions. All of the oil recovery experiments were conducted under optimal conditions with a viscous, non-acidic oil from Hepler (KS) oil field. The coreflood experiments were conducted with Berea sandstone cores since field core was not available in sufficient quantity for coreflood tests. The Tucker sand of Hepler field is a Class I fluvial dominated deltaic reservoir, as classified by the Department of Energy, which has been selected as the site of a DOE-sponsored field pilot test.

  12. Microbial Metabolic Landscapes Derived from Complementary Mineralogical, Aqueous Geochemical, and Gas Data Associated with High pH, Actively Serpentinizing Springs in the Coast Range Ophiolite (CA,USA) and Zambales and Palawan Ophiolites (Philippines)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardace, D.; Meyer-Dombard, D. R.; Arcilla, C. A.; Hoehler, T. M.; McCollom, T. M.; Schrenk, M. O.

    2013-12-01

    We applied x-ray diffraction and thin section petrography to profile the mineralogy of serpentinites and relict peridotites pertinent to the Coast Range Ophiolite Microbiological Observatory (CROMO, an array of 8 water monitoring wells installed in serpentinizing ultramafic rocks, sited at the UC-Davis McLaughlin Natural Reserve, Lower Lake, CA) and Zambales and Palawan ophiolites in the Philippines. In general, serpentinization in near surface samples was extensive, obscuring many protolith characteristics, but relict olivine grains are apparent. Upwelling serpentinizing formation fluids react to varying degrees with shallow hydrological regimes impacted by meteoric inputs. In the vicinity of CROMO, modest pH (7 to 8.5) waters form spring deposits. In the Philippines ophiolites, high pH (10.8 to 11. 3) waters form extensive travertines near Manleluag Springs and newly faulted sections of the Poon Bato River. Travertine fabric and chemistry indicate episodic spring flow and suggest that ambient water chemistry shifts over time. A multiprobe meter simultaneously measured pH, temperature, conductivity, oxidation-reduction potential, and dissolved oxygen at selected springs. Filtered water samples from monitoring wells and springs were analyzed for major elements and some ions. Dissolved gases and gas bubbles were captured and transported for analysis of H2, CO, and CH4. Aqueous and gas geochemistry data were transformed into activity data using EQ3: A Computer Program for Geochemical Aqueous Speciation-Solubility Calculations (Wolery, 1992) and the Gibbs Energy values for selected metabolic reactions, given the environmental conditions, were calculated. Metabolisms considered were: methanogenesis, methane oxidation, ferric iron reduction, ferrous iron oxidation, oxidation of S in pyrite, nitrification, denitrification, and N-fixation. At all sites tapping waters sourced in actively serpentinizing systems, regardless of geography, ferrous iron oxidation was the most

  13. pH Responsiveness of Multilayered Films and Membranes Made of Polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Silva, Joana M; Caridade, Sofia G; Costa, Rui R; Alves, Natália M; Groth, Thomas; Picart, Catherine; Reis, Rui L; Mano, João F

    2015-10-20

    We investigated the pH-dependent properties of multilayered films made of chitosan (CHI) and alginate (ALG) and focused on their postassembly response to different pH environments using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D), swelling studies, ζ potential measurements, and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). In an acidic environment, the multilayers presented lower dissipation values and, consequently, higher moduli when compared with the values obtained for the pH used during the assembly (5.5). When the multilayers were exposed to alkaline environments, the opposite behavior occurred. These results were further corroborated by the ability of this multilayered system to exhibit a reversible swelling-deswelling behavior within the pH range from 3 to 9. The changes in the physicochemical properties of the multilayer system were gradual and different from those of individual solubilized polyelectrolytes. This behavior is related to electrostatic interactions between the ionizable groups combined with hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions. Beyond the pH range of 3-9, the multilayers were stabilized by genipin cross-linking. The multilayered films also became more rigid while the pH responsiveness conferred by the ionizable moieties of the polyelectrolytes was preserved. This work demonstrates the versatility and feasibility of LbL methodology to generate inherently pH stimulus-responsive nanostructured films. Surface functionalization using pH responsiveness endows several biomedical applications with abilities such as drug delivery, diagnostics, microfluidics, biosensing, and biomimetic implantable membranes. PMID:26421873

  14. A fungal pathogen secretes plant alkalinizing peptides to increase infection.

    PubMed

    Masachis, Sara; Segorbe, David; Turrà, David; Leon-Ruiz, Mercedes; Fürst, Ursula; El Ghalid, Mennat; Leonard, Guy; López-Berges, Manuel S; Richards, Thomas A; Felix, Georg; Di Pietro, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Plant infections caused by fungi are often associated with an increase in the pH of the surrounding host tissue(1). Extracellular alkalinization is thought to contribute to fungal pathogenesis, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we show that the root-infecting fungus Fusarium oxysporum uses a functional homologue of the plant regulatory peptide RALF (rapid alkalinization factor)(2,3) to induce alkalinization and cause disease in plants. An upshift in extracellular pH promotes infectious growth of Fusarium by stimulating phosphorylation of a conserved mitogen-activated protein kinase essential for pathogenicity(4,5). Fungal mutants lacking a functional Fusarium (F)-RALF peptide failed to induce host alkalinization and showed markedly reduced virulence in tomato plants, while eliciting a strong host immune response. Arabidopsis plants lacking the receptor-like kinase FERONIA, which mediates the RALF-triggered alkalinization response(6), displayed enhanced resistance against Fusarium. RALF homologues are found across a number of phylogenetically distant groups of fungi, many of which infect plants. We propose that fungal pathogens use functional homologues of alkalinizing peptides found in their host plants to increase their infectious potential and suppress host immunity. PMID:27572834

  15. Reductive dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride using buffered alkaline ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ya-Ting; Liang, Chenju

    2015-10-01

    Alkaline ascorbic acid (AA) was recently discovered as a novel in-situ chemical reduction (ISCR) reagent for remediating chlorinated solvents in the subsurface. For this ISCR process, the maintenance of an alkaline pH is essential. This study investigated the possibility of the reduction of carbon tetrachloride (CT) using alkaline AA solution buffered by phosphate and by NaOH. The results indicated that CT was reduced by AA, and chloroform (CF) was a major byproduct at a phosphate buffered pH of 12. However, CT was completely reduced by AA in 2M NaOH without CF formation. In the presence of iron/soil minerals, iron could be reduced by AA and Fe(2+) tends to precipitate on the mineral surface to accelerate CT degradation. A simultaneous transfer of hydrogenolysis and dichloroelimination would occur under phosphate buffered pH 12. This implies that a high alkaline environment is a crucial factor for maintaining the dominant pathway of two electron transfer from dianionic AA to dehydroascorbic acid, and to undergo dichloroelimination of CT. Moreover, threonic acid and oxalic acid were identified to be the major AA decomposition products in alkaline solutions. PMID:25912910

  16. Chemostat Culture of Escherichia coli K-12 Limited by the Activity of Alkaline Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    King, Stagg L.; Francis, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The growth-limiting reaction of a chemostat culture of Escherichia coli K-12 was the hydrolysis of β-glycerophosphate by alkaline phosphatase. The culture was buffered at pH 5.2 where alkaline phosphatase was unable to supply phosphate to the cell at a rate sufficient to sustain the maximum rate of growth. Alkaline phosphatase activity in this system is discussed in terms of the so-called Flip-Flop mechanism. PMID:240310

  17. Titanium corrosion in alkaline hydrogen peroxide environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Been, Jantje

    1998-12-01

    The corrosion of Grade 2 titanium in alkaline hydrogen peroxide environments has been studied by weight loss corrosion tests, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), linear polarization resistance (LPR) measurements and potentiodynamic polarography. Calcium ions and wood pulp were investigated as corrosion inhibitors. In alkaline peroxide, the titanium corrosion rate increased with increasing pH, temperature, and hydrogen peroxide concentration. The corrosion controlling mechanism is thought to be the reaction of the oxide with the perhydroxyl ion. No evidence of thermodynamically stable calcium titanate was found in the surface film of test coupons exposed to calcium-inhibited alkaline peroxide solutions. Calcium inhibition is probably the result of low local alkali and peroxide concentrations at the metal surface produced by reaction of adsorbed calcium with hydrogen peroxide. It has been shown that the inhibiting effect of calcium is temporary, possibly through an effect of calcium on the chemical and/or physical stability of the surface oxide. Pulp is an effective and stable corrosion inhibitor. Raising the pulp concentration decreased the corrosion rate. The inhibiting effect of pulp may be related to the adsorption and interaction of the pulp fibers with H 2O2, thereby decreasing the peroxide concentration and rendering the solution less corrosive. The presence of both pulp and calcium led to higher corrosion rates than obtained by either one inhibitor alone. Replacement of hydrofluoric acid with alkaline peroxide for pickling of titanium was investigated. Titanium corrosion rates in alkaline peroxide exceeded those obtained in the conventional hydrofluoric acid bath. General corrosion was observed with extensive roughening of the surface giving a dull gray appearance. Preferred dissolution of certain crystallographic planes was investigated through the corrosion of a titanium single crystal. Whereas the overall effect on the corrosion rate was small

  18. Alkaline quinone flow battery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kaixiang; Chen, Qing; Gerhardt, Michael R; Tong, Liuchuan; Kim, Sang Bok; Eisenach, Louise; Valle, Alvaro W; Hardee, David; Gordon, Roy G; Aziz, Michael J; Marshak, Michael P

    2015-09-25

    Storage of photovoltaic and wind electricity in batteries could solve the mismatch problem between the intermittent supply of these renewable resources and variable demand. Flow batteries permit more economical long-duration discharge than solid-electrode batteries by using liquid electrolytes stored outside of the battery. We report an alkaline flow battery based on redox-active organic molecules that are composed entirely of Earth-abundant elements and are nontoxic, nonflammable, and safe for use in residential and commercial environments. The battery operates efficiently with high power density near room temperature. These results demonstrate the stability and performance of redox-active organic molecules in alkaline flow batteries, potentially enabling cost-effective stationary storage of renewable energy. PMID:26404834

  19. Alkaline and alkaline earth metal phosphate halides and phosphors

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, Robert Joseph; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Cleaver, Robert John

    2012-11-13

    Compounds, phosphor materials and apparatus related to nacaphite family of materials are presented. Potassium and rubidium based nacaphite family compounds and phosphors designed by doping divalent rare earth elements in the sites of alkaline earth metals in the nacaphite material families are descried. An apparatus comprising the phosphors based on the nacaphite family materials are presented herein. The compounds presented is of formula A.sub.2B.sub.1-yR.sub.yPO.sub.4X where the elements A, B, R, X and suffix y are defined such that A is potassium, rubidium, or a combination of potassium and rubidium and B is calcium, strontium, barium, or a combination of any of calcium, strontium and barium. X is fluorine, chlorine, or a combination of fluorine and chlorine, R is europium, samarium, ytterbium, or a combination of any of europium, samarium, and ytterbium, and y ranges from 0 to about 0.1.

  20. Actinide-Aluminate Speciation in Alkaline Radioactive Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. David L. Clark; Dr. Alexander M. Fedosseev

    2001-12-21

    Investigation of behavior of actinides in alkaline media containing AL(III) showed that no aluminate complexes of actinides in oxidation states (IIII-VIII) were formed in alkaline solutions. At alkaline precipitation IPH (10-14) of actinides in presence of AL(III) formation of aluminate compounds is not observed. However, in precipitates contained actinides (IIV)<(VI), and to a lesser degree actinides (III), some interference of components takes place that is reflected in change of solid phase properties in comparison with pure components or their mechanical mixture. The interference decreases with rise of precipitation PH and at PH 14 is exhibited very feebly. In the case of NP(VII) the individual compound with AL(III) is obtained, however it is not aluminate of neptunium(VII), but neptunate of aluminium(III) similar to neptunates of other metals obtained earlier.

  1. Laundry detergent compatibility of the alkaline protease from Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Banik, Rathindra Mohan; Prakash, Monika

    2004-01-01

    The endogenous protease activity in various commercially available laundry detergents of international companies was studied. The maximum protease activity was found at 50 degrees C in pH range 10.5-11.0 in all the tested laundry detergents. The endogenous protease activity in the tested detergents retained up to 70% on incubation at 40 degrees C for 1 h, whereas less than 30% activity was only found on incubation at 50 degrees C for 1 h. The alkaline protease from an alkalophilic strain of Bacillus cereus was studied for its compatibility in commercial detergents. The cell free fermented broth from shake flask culture of the organism showed maximum activity at pH 10.5 and 50 degrees C. The protease from B. cereus showed much higher residual activity (more than 80%) on incubation with laundry detergents at 50 degrees C for 1 h or longer. The protease enzyme from B. cereus was found to be superior over the endogenous proteases present in the tested commercial laundry detergents in comparison to the enzyme stability during the washing at higher temperature, e.g., 40-50 degrees C. PMID:15293947

  2. Turbulent acidic jets and plumes injected into an alkaline environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulpre, Hendrik

    2012-11-01

    The characteristics of a strong acidic turbulent jet or plume injected into an alkaline environment comprising of a weak/strong base are examined theoretically and experimentally. A chemistry model is developed to understand how the pH of a fluid parcel of monoprotic acid changes as it is diluted and reacts with the ambient fluid. A standard fluid model, based on a top-hat model for acid concentration and velocity is used to express how the dilution of acid varies with distance from the point of discharge. These models are applied to estimate the point of neutralisation and the travel time with distance within the jet/plume. An experimental study was undertaken to test the theoretical results. These experiments involved injecting jets or vertical plumes of dilute nitric acid into a large tank containing a variety of base salts dissolved in water. The injected fluid contained litmus indicator dye which showed a change in colour from red to blue close to the point of neutralisation. In order to obtain a range of neutralisation distances, additional basic salts were added to the water to increase its pH buffering capacity. The results are applied to discuss the environmental implications of an acidic jet/plume injected into the sea off the South East coast of Great Britain.

  3. Qualitative aspects of the degradation of mitomycins in alkaline solution.

    PubMed

    Beijnen, J H; den Hartigh, J; Underberg, W J

    1985-01-01

    The major degradation product in alkaline solution of mitomycin A, mitomycin C and porfiromycin is the corresponding 7-hydroxymitosane. The isolation and the physico-chemical and analytical properties of these compounds and their derivatized analogues are discussed. Data are presented on the degradation of mitomycin C at extremely high pH values. PMID:16867711

  4. Field screening of cowpea cultivars for alkaline soil tolerance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cowpea or Southernpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.] is an important legume crop used as a feed for livestock, as a green vegetable and for consumption of its dry beans which provide 22-25% protein. The crop is very sensitive to alkaline soil conditions. When grown at soil pH of 7.5 or higher, cowp...

  5. Yield performance of cowpea genotypes grown in alkaline soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cowpea or Southernpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.] is an important legume crop used as a feed for livestock, as a green vegetable and for consumption of its dry beans which provide 22-25% protein. The crop is very sensitive to alkaline soil conditions. When grown at soil pH of 7.5 or higher, cowp...

  6. Purification and characterization of a novel extracellular alkaline protease from Cellulomonas bogoriensis.

    PubMed

    Li, Fan; Yang, Liyuan; Lv, Xue; Liu, Dongbo; Xia, Hongmei; Chen, Shan

    2016-05-01

    An extracellular alkaline protease produced by the alkali-tolerant Cellulomonas bogoriensis was purified by a combination of ammonium sulfate precipitation and cation exchange chromatography. The purity of the protease was detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and its molecular weight was confirmed to be 18.3 kDa. The enzyme showed optimum activity at 60 °C and pH 11. The stability of the protease was maintained at a wide temperature range of 4-60 °C and pH range of 3-12. Irreversible inhibition of the enzyme activity by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and tosyl-l-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone demonstrated that the purified enzyme is a chymotrypsin of the serine protease family. The Km and Vmax of the protease activity on casein were 19.2 mg/mL and 25000 μg/min/mg, respectively. The broad substrate specificity and remarkable stability in the presence of organic solvents, salt, and commercial detergents, as well as its excellent stain removal and dehairing capability, make the purified alkaline protease a promising candidate for industrial applications. PMID:26849962

  7. The fate of added alkalinity in model scenarios of ocean alkalinization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer González, Miriam; Ilyina, Tatiana

    2014-05-01

    The deliberate large-scale manipulation of the Earth's climate (geo-engineering) has been proposed to mitigate climate change and ocean acidification. Whilst the mitigation potential of these technologies could sound promising, they may also pose many environmental risks. Our research aims at exploring the ocean-based carbon dioxide removal method of alkalinity enhancement. Its mitigation potential to reduce atmospheric CO2 and counteract the consequences of ocean acidification, risks and unintended consequences are studied. In order to tackle these questions, different scenarios are implemented in the state-of-the-art Earth system model of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology. The model configuration is based on the 5th phase of the coupled model intercomparison project following a high CO2 future climate change scenario RCP8.5 (in which radiative forcing rises to 8.5 W/m² in 2100). Two different scenarios are performed where the alkalinity is artificially added globally uniformly in the upper ocean. In the first scenario, alkalinity is increased as a pulse by doubling natural values of the first 12 meters. In the second scenario we add alkalinity into the same ocean layer such that the atmospheric CO2 concentration is reduced from RCP8.5 to RCP4.5 levels (with the radiative forcing of 4.5 W/m² in 2100). We investigate the fate of the added alkalinity in these two scenarios and compare the differences in alkalinity budgets. In order to increase oceanic CO2 uptake from the atmosphere, enhanced alkalinity has to stay in the upper ocean. Once the alkalinity is added, it will become part of the biogeochemical cycles and it will be distributed with the ocean currents. Therefore, we are particularly interested in the residence time of the added alkalinity at the surface. Variations in CO2 partial pressure, seawater pH and saturation state of carbonate minerals produced in the implemented scenarios will be presented. Collateral changes in ocean biogeochemistry and

  8. TMC-1 Mediates Alkaline Sensation in C. elegans through Nociceptive Neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Li, Guang; Liu, Jie; Liu, Jianfeng; Xu, X Z Shawn

    2016-07-01

    Noxious pH triggers pungent taste and nocifensive behavior. While the mechanisms underlying acidic pH sensation have been extensively characterized, little is known about how animals sense alkaline pH in the environment. TMC genes encode a family of evolutionarily conserved membrane proteins whose functions are largely unknown. Here, we characterize C. elegans TMC-1, which was suggested to form a Na(+)-sensitive channel mediating salt chemosensation. Interestingly, we find that TMC-1 is required for worms to avoid noxious alkaline environment. Alkaline pH evokes an inward current in nociceptive neurons, which is primarily mediated by TMC-1 and to a lesser extent by the TRP channel OSM-9. However, unlike OSM-9, which is sensitive to both acidic and alkaline pH, TMC-1 is only required for alkali-activated current, revealing a specificity for alkaline sensation. Ectopic expression of TMC-1 confers alkaline sensitivity to alkali-insensitive cells. Our results identify an unexpected role for TMCs in alkaline sensation and nociception. PMID:27321925

  9. A pH dependent Raman and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic studies of citrazinic acid aided by theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Sougata; Chowdhury, Joydeep; Dutta, Soumen; Pal, Tarasankar

    2016-12-01

    A pH dependent normal Raman scattering (NRS) and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectral patterns of citrazinic acid (CZA), a biologically important molecule, have been investigated. The acid, with different pKa values (~ 4 and ~ 11) for the two different functional groups (-COOH and -OH groups), shows interesting range of color changes (yellow at pH ~ 14 and brown at pH ~ 2) with the variation in solution pH. Thus, depending upon the pH of the medium, CZA molecule can exist in various protonated and/or deprotonated forms. Here we have prescribed the existence different possible forms of CZA at different pH (Forms "C", "H" and "Dprot" at pH ~ 14 and Forms "A", "D", and "P" at pH ~ 2 respectively). The NRS spectra of these solutions and their respective SERS spectra over gold nanoparticles were recorded. The spectra clearly differ in their spectral profiles. For example the SERS spectra recorded with the CZA solution at pH ~ 2 shows blue shift for different bands compared to its NRS window e.g. 406 to 450 cm- 1, 616 to 632 cm- 1, 1332 to 1343 cm- 1 etc. Again, the most enhanced peak at ~ 1548 cm- 1 in NRS while in the SERS window this appears at ~ 1580 cm- 1. Similar observation was also made for CZA at pH ~ 14. For example, the 423 cm- 1 band in the NRS profile experience a blue shift and appears at ~ 447 cm- 1 in the SERS spectrum as well as other bands at ~ 850, ~ 1067 and ~ 1214 cm- 1 in the SERS window are markedly enhanced. It is also worth noting that the SERS spectra at the different pH also differ from each other. These spectral differences indicate the existence of various adsorptive forms of the CZA molecule depending upon the pH of the solution. Therefore based on the experimental findings we propose different possible molecular forms of CZA at different pH (acidic and alkaline) conditions. For example forms 'A', 'D' and 'P' existing in acidic pH (pH ~ 2) and three other deprotonated forms 'C', 'H' and 'Dprot' in alkaline pH (pH ~ 14). The DFT

  10. A pH dependent Raman and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic studies of citrazinic acid aided by theoretical calculations.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sougata; Chowdhury, Joydeep; Dutta, Soumen; Pal, Tarasankar

    2016-12-01

    A pH dependent normal Raman scattering (NRS) and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectral patterns of citrazinic acid (CZA), a biologically important molecule, have been investigated. The acid, with different pKa values (~4 and ~11) for the two different functional groups (-COOH and -OH groups), shows interesting range of color changes (yellow at pH~14 and brown at pH~2) with the variation in solution pH. Thus, depending upon the pH of the medium, CZA molecule can exist in various protonated and/or deprotonated forms. Here we have prescribed the existence different possible forms of CZA at different pH (Forms "C", "H" and "Dprot" at pH~14 and Forms "A", "D", and "P" at pH~2 respectively). The NRS spectra of these solutions and their respective SERS spectra over gold nanoparticles were recorded. The spectra clearly differ in their spectral profiles. For example the SERS spectra recorded with the CZA solution at pH~2 shows blue shift for different bands compared to its NRS window e.g. 406 to 450cm(-1), 616 to 632cm(-1), 1332 to 1343cm(-1) etc. Again, the most enhanced peak at ~1548cm(-1) in NRS while in the SERS window this appears at ~1580cm(-1). Similar observation was also made for CZA at pH~14. For example, the 423cm(-1) band in the NRS profile experience a blue shift and appears at ~447cm(-1) in the SERS spectrum as well as other bands at ~850, ~1067 and ~1214cm(-1) in the SERS window are markedly enhanced. It is also worth noting that the SERS spectra at the different pH also differ from each other. These spectral differences indicate the existence of various adsorptive forms of the CZA molecule depending upon the pH of the solution. Therefore based on the experimental findings we propose different possible molecular forms of CZA at different pH (acidic and alkaline) conditions. For example forms 'A', 'D' and 'P' existing in acidic pH (pH~2) and three other deprotonated forms 'C', 'H' and 'Dprot' in alkaline pH (pH~14). The DFT calculations for these

  11. Habit-associated salivary pH changes in oral submucous fibrosis–A controlled cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Donoghue, Mandana; Basandi, Praveen S; Adarsh, H; Madhushankari, GS; Selvamani, M; Nayak, Prachi

    2015-01-01

    Context: Oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) is a multi-causal inflammatory reaction to the chemical or mechanical trauma caused due to exposure to arecanut containing products with or without tobacco (ANCP/T). Arecanut and additional components such as lime and chewing tobacco render ANCP/T highly alkaline. Fibrosing repair is a common reaction to an alkaline exposure in the skin. OSF may be related to the alkaline exposure by ANCP/T in a similar manner. Aims: The study was aimed at establishing the relationship of habit-associated salivary pH changes and OSF. Settings and Design: The study design was controlled cross-sectional. Materials and Methods: Base line salivary pH (BLS pH), salivary pH after chewing the habitual ANCP/T substance, post chew salivary pH (PCSpH) for 2 min and salivary pH recovery time (SpHRT) were compared in 30 OSF patients and 30 sex-matched individuals with ANCP/T habits and apparently healthy oral mucosa. Results: The group's mean BLSpH values were similar and within normal range and representative of the population level values. The average PCSpH was significantly higher (P ˂ 0.0001) than the average BLSpH in both groups. There was no significant difference (P = 0.09) between PCSpH of OSF patients and controls. OSF patients had a significantly longer (P = 0.0076) SpHRT than controls. Factors such as age, daily exposure, cumulative habit years, BLSpH and PCSpH, had varying effects on the groups. Conclusions: Chewing ANCP/T causes a significant rise in salivary pH of all individuals. SpHRT has a significant association with OSF. The effect of salivary changes in OSF patients differs with those in healthy controls. PMID:26604493

  12. Root-to-shoot signalling: apoplastic alkalinization, a general stress response and defence factor in barley (Hordeum vulgare).

    PubMed

    Felle, H H; Herrmann, A; Hückelhoven, R; Kogel, K-H

    2005-12-01

    We used a noninvasive microprobe technique to record in substomatal cavities of barley leaves the apoplastic pH response to different stress situations. When K+ (or Na+) activity at the roots of intact plants was increased from 1 to 50 mM, the leaf apoplastic pH increased by 0.4 to 0.6 units within 8 to 12 min when stomata were open, and within 15 to 20 min when stomata were closed. This reaction was accompanied by a correlative increase in K+ activity. Addition of 1 microM abscisic acid caused an apoplastic alkalinization of 0.5 to 0.8 units, and low temperatures (4 degrees C) increased pH by 0.2 to 0.3 units. Addition of 100 mM sorbitol or pH changes in the range 4.0 to 7.9 had no effect, ruling out that osmotic potential and/or pH is the carried signal. On detached leaves, the same treatments yielded qualitatively similar results, suggesting that the xylem is the most likely signal path. Following the attack of powdery mildew, the apoplastic pH of barley leaves substantially increases. We demonstrate that in susceptible barley, pretreatment (soil drench) with the resistance-inducing chemical benzo- (1,2,3)thiadiazole-7-carbothioic acid S-methyl ester markedly enhances this pH response. This is consistent with previous finding that apoplastic alkalinization is related to the degree of resistance towards this fungus. PMID:16389490

  13. Kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of nitrocellulose.

    PubMed

    Christodoulatos, C; Su, T L; Koutsospyros, A

    2001-01-01

    Cellulose nitrate (nitrocellulose) is an explosive solid substance used in large quantities in various formulations of rocket and gun propellants. Safe destruction of nitrocellulose can be achieved by alkaline hydrolysis, which converts it to biodegradable products that can then be treated by conventional biological processes. The kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of munitions-grade nitrocellulose in sodium hydroxide solutions were investigated in completely mixed batch reactors. Experiments were conducted using solutions of alkaline strength ranging from 0.1 to 15% by mass and temperatures in the range of 30 to 90 degrees C. Regression analysis of the kinetic data revealed that alkaline hydrolysis of nitrocellulose is of the order 1.0 and 1.5 with respect to nitrocellulose and hydroxide concentration, respectively. The activation energy of the hydrolysis reaction was found to be 100.9 kJ/mol with a preexponential Arrhenius constant of 4.73 x 10(13). Nitrite and nitrate, in a 3:1 ratio, were the primary nitrogen species present in the posthydrolysis solution. The kinetic information is pertinent to the development and optimization of nitrocellulose chemical-biological treatment systems. PMID:11563378

  14. Effect of pH on the destruction of complexants with ozone in Hanford nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, W.I.

    1981-06-01

    Chemical processing of nuclear waste at Hanford has generated some waste solutions with high concentration (0.1 to 0.5M) of N-(hydroxyethyl)-ethylenediaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA), ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and other organic complexing agents. These complexants must be destroyed bacause they affect radionuclide migration in soils, waste concentration, radionuclide removal, and other waste storage and processing considerations. Previous studies on actual waste solutions demonstrated that preozonation of the alkaline waste significantly improved radionuclide removal. A series of bench-scale experiments using synthetic waste has been performed to determine the optimum pH for most efficient ozone destruction of EDTA. Ozonation of EDTA in synthetic waste was carried out over the pH range of 1 to 14. Potential catalytic materials were examined at different pH levels. The EDTA-ozone reaction rates and stoichiometric requirements were compared and evaluated for the varying conditions.

  15. Mechanisms of cytoplasmic pH regulation in alkaliphilic strains of Bacillus.

    PubMed

    Krulwich, T A; Ito, M; Gilmour, R; Guffanti, A A

    1997-11-01

    The central challenge for extremely alkaliphilic Bacillus species is the need to establish and sustain a cytoplasmic pH that is over two units lower than the highly alkaline medium. Its centrality is suggested by the strong correlation between the growth rate in the upper range of pH for growth, i.e., at values above pH 10.5, and the cytoplasmic pH. The diminishing growth rate at extremely high pH values correlates better with the rise in cytoplasmic pH than with other energetic parameters. There are also general adaptations of alkaliphiles that are crucial prerequisites for pH homeostasis as well as other cell functions, i.e., the reduced basic amino acid content of proteins or segments thereof that are exposed to the medium, and there are other challenges of alkaliphily that emerge from solution of the cytoplasmic pH problem, i.e., reduction of the chemiosmotic driving force. For cells growing on glucose, strong evidence exists for the importance of acidic cell wall components, teichuronic acid and teichuronopeptides, in alkaliphily. These wall macromolecules may provide a passive barrier to ion flux. For cells growing on fermentable carbon sources, this and other passive mechanisms may have a particularly substantial role, but for cells growing on both fermentable and nonfermentable substrates, an active Na+-dependent cycle is apparently required for alkaliphily and the alkaliphile's remarkable capacity for pH homeostasis. The active cycle involves primary establishment of an electrochemical gradient via proton extrusion, a secondary electrogenic Na+/H+ antiport to achieve net acidification of the cytoplasm relative to the outside pH, and mechanisms for Na+ re-entry. Recent work in several laboratories on the critical antiporters involved in this cycle has begun to clarify the number and characteristics of the porters that support active mechanisms of pH homeostasis. PMID:9680297

  16. An electrochemical platform for localized pH control on demand.

    PubMed

    Fomina, N; Johnson, C A; Maruniak, A; Bahrampour, S; Lang, C; Davis, R W; Kavusi, S; Ahmad, H

    2016-06-21

    Solution pH is a powerful tool for regulating many kinds of chemical activity, but is generally treated as a static property defined by a pre-selected buffer. Introducing dynamic control of pH in space, time, and magnitude can enable richer and more efficient chemistries, but is not feasible with traditional methods of titration or buffer exchange. Recent reports have featured electrochemical strategies for modifying bulk pH in constrained volumes, but only demonstrate switching between two preset values and omit spatial control entirely. Here, we use a combination of solution-borne quinones and galvanostatic excitation to enable quantitative control of pH environments that are highly localized to an electrode surface. We demonstrate highly reproducible acidification and alkalinization with up to 0.1 pH s(-1) (±0.002 pH s(-1)) rate of change across the dynamic range of our pH sensor (pH 4.5 to 7.5) in buffered solutions. Using dynamic current control, we generate and sustain 3 distinct pH microenvironments simultaneously to within ±0.04 pH for 13 minutes in a single solution, and we leverage these microenvironments to demonstrate spatially-resolved, pH-driven control of enzymatic activity. In addition to straightforward applications of spatio-temporal pH control (e.g. efficiently studying pH-dependencies of chemical interactions), the technique opens completely new avenues for implementing complex systems through dynamic control of enzyme activation, protein binding affinity, chemical reactivity, chemical release, molecular self-assembly, and many more pH-controlled processes. PMID:27199277

  17. Hydrothermal and oceanic pH conditions of possible relevance to the origin of life.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, G; McKeown, C; Hall, A J; Russell, M J

    1994-02-01

    Because of the continuous focusing of thermal and chemical energy, ancient submarine hot springs are contenders as sites for the origin of life. But it is generally assumed that these would be of the acid and high-temperature 'black smoker' variety (Corliss et al., 1981). In fact today the greater part of the ocean circulates through off-ridge springs where it issues after modification at temperatures of around 40 degrees C or so but with the potential to reach 200 degrees C. Such offridge or ridge-flank springs remind us that there are other candidate sites for the origin of life. Although there is no firm indication of the pH of these off-ridge springs we have argued that the solutions are likely to be alkaline rather than acid, We test the feasibility of this idea using EQ geochemical water-rock interaction modelling codes (Wolery 1983) and find that for a range of possible initial chemistries of Hadean seawater, the pH of issuing solutions at around 200 degrees C is around one or more units alkaline. Such pH values hold for interaction with both basaltic and komatiitic crust. The robustness of this result suggests to us that alkaline submarine springs of moderate temperature, carrying many hundreds of ppm HS to the ocean basins, are also serious contenders as sites for the origin of life, particularly as Hadean seawater was probably slightly acid, with a dissolved iron concentration approaching 100 ppm. On mixing of these solutions, supersaturation, especially of iron sulphide, would lead to the precipitation of colloidal gels. In our view iron sulphide was the likely substance of, or contributor to, the first vesicle membranes which led to life, as the supply organic molecules would have been limited in the Hadean. Such a membrane would have bid catalytic properties, expansivity, and would have maintained the natural chemiosmotic gradient, a consequence of the acid ocean and the alkaline interior to the vesicles. PMID:11536657

  18. Growth of water hyacinth in municipal landfill leachate with different pH.

    PubMed

    El-Gendy, A S; Biswas, N; Bewtra, J K

    2004-07-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of municipal landfill leachate pH on the growth of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes). These experiments were carried out in a green house environment on leachate samples collected from Essex-Windsor Regional Landfill, Windsor, Ontario, Canada. It was found that water hyacinth plants survived in a pH range of 4.0 to 8.0. Both alkaline pH (above 8.0) and highly acidic pH (below 4.0) had inhibitory effect on the growth of plants. The pH range, for optimum growth of the water hyacinth plants was found to be 5.8 to 6.0. At optimum growth, water hyacinth had an average mean relative growth rate of 0.043 d-1. It was found that nitrogen compounds underwent different transformations depending on the pH of leachate. Plant uptake, nitrification and volatilization were among these transformations. PMID:15346865

  19. Alkaline Phosphatase in Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Štefková, Kateřina; Procházková, Jiřina; Pacherník, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase is an enzyme commonly expressed in almost all living organisms. In humans and other mammals, determinations of the expression and activity of alkaline phosphatase have frequently been used for cell determination in developmental studies and/or within clinical trials. Alkaline phosphatase also seems to be one of the key markers in the identification of pluripotent embryonic stem as well as related cells. However, alkaline phosphatases exist in some isoenzymes and isoforms, which have tissue specific expressions and functions. Here, the role of alkaline phosphatase as a stem cell marker is discussed in detail. First, we briefly summarize contemporary knowledge of mammalian alkaline phosphatases in general. Second, we focus on the known facts of its role in and potential significance for the identification of stem cells. PMID:25767512

  20. Alkaline flocculation of Phaeodactylum tricornutum induced by brucite and calcite

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vandamme, Dries; Pohl, Philip I.; Beuckels, Annelies; Foubert, Imogen; Brady, Patrick Vane; Muylaert, Koenraad; Hewson, John C.

    2015-08-20

    Alkaline flocculation holds great potential as a low-cost harvesting method for marine microalgae biomass production. Alkaline flocculation is induced by an increase in pH and is related to precipitation of calcium and magnesium salts. In this study, we used the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum as model organism to study alkaline flocculation of marine microalgae cultured in seawater medium. Flocculation started when pH was increased to 10 and flocculation efficiency reached 90% when pH was 10.5, which was consistent with precipitation modeling for brucite or Mg(OH)2. Compared to freshwater species, more magnesium is needed to achieve flocculation (>7.5 mM). Zeta potential measurementsmore » suggest that brucite precipitation caused flocculation by charge neutralization. When calcium concentration was 12.5 mM, flocculation was also observed at a pH of 10. Furthermore, zeta potential remained negative up to pH 11.5, suggesting that precipitated calcite caused flocculation by a sweeping coagulation mechanism.« less

  1. Parameters affecting downhole pH

    SciTech Connect

    Garber, J.D.; Jangama, V.R.; Willmon, J.

    1997-09-01

    The presence of acetic and formic acids in the produced water of gas condensate wells has been known for some time by the industry. In traditional water analysis, it has been titrated and reported as alkalinity. The calculation of accurate downhole pH values requires that these ions be analyzed separately in the water and that an organic acid material balance be performed on all three phases in the separator. In this manner, it is then possible to use phase distribution coefficients involving ionic equilibrium to determine how these acids distribute themselves between phases as the pH calculation proceeds downhole. In this paper, the above method of calculation of pH and {Delta}pH is used to examine the effect that various concentrations of these acids have on the downhole pH. Various concentrations of acids are examined, and two cases are calculated in which the effect of condensate on the pH is examined.

  2. Alkaline fuel cells applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordesch, Karl; Hacker, Viktor; Gsellmann, Josef; Cifrain, Martin; Faleschini, Gottfried; Enzinger, Peter; Fankhauser, Robert; Ortner, Markus; Muhr, Michael; Aronson, Robert R.

    On the world-wide automobile market technical developments are increasingly determined by the dramatic restriction on emissions as well as the regimentation of fuel consumption by legislation. Therefore there is an increasing chance of a completely new technology breakthrough if it offers new opportunities, meeting the requirements of resource preservation and emission restrictions. Fuel cell technology offers the possibility to excel in today's motive power techniques in terms of environmental compatibility, consumer's profit, costs of maintenance and efficiency. The key question is economy. This will be decided by the costs of fuel cell systems if they are to be used as power generators for future electric vehicles. The alkaline hydrogen-air fuel cell system with circulating KOH electrolyte and low-cost catalysed carbon electrodes could be a promising alternative. Based on the experiences of Kordesch [K. Kordesch, Brennstoffbatterien, Springer, Wien, 1984, ISBN 3-387-81819-7; K. Kordesch, City car with H 2-air fuel cell and lead-battery, SAE Paper No. 719015, 6th IECEC, 1971], who operated a city car hybrid vehicle on public roads for 3 years in the early 1970s, improved air electrodes plus new variations of the bipolar stack assembly developed in Graz are investigated. Primary fuel choice will be a major issue until such time as cost-effective, on-board hydrogen storage is developed. Ammonia is an interesting option. The whole system, ammonia dissociator plus alkaline fuel cell (AFC), is characterised by a simple design and high efficiency.

  3. Molecular Characterization of a Thermophilic and Salt- and Alkaline-Tolerant Xylanase from Planococcus sp. SL4, a Strain Isolated from the Sediment of a Soda Lake.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoyun; Lin, Juan; Ye, Xiuyun; Wang, Guozeng

    2015-05-01

    To enrich the genetic resource of microbial xylanases with high activity and stability under alkaline conditions, a xylanase gene (xynSL4) was cloned from Planococcus sp. SL4, an alkaline xylanase-producing strain isolated from the sediment of soda lake Dabusu. Deduced XynSL4 consists of a putative signal peptide of 29 residues and a catalytic domain (30-380 residues) of glycosyl hydrolase family 10, and shares the highest identity of 77% with a hypothetical protein from Planomicrobium glaciei CHR43. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that deduced XynSL4 is closely related with thermophilic and alkaline xylanases from Geobacillus and Bacillus species. The gene xynSL4 was expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli and the recombinant enzyme showed some superior properties. Purified recombinant XynSL4 (rXynSL4) was highly active and stable over the neutral and alkaline pH range from 6 to 11, with maximum activity at pH 7 and more than 60% activity at pH 11. It had an apparent temperature optimum of 70°C and retained stable at this temperature in the presence of substrate. rXynSL4 was highly halotolerant, retaining more than 55% activity with 0.25-3.0 M NaCl and was stable at the concentration of NaCl up to 4M. The enzyme activity was significantly enhanced by β-mercaptoethanol and Ca(2+) but strongly inhibited by heavy-metal ions and SDS. This thermophilic and alkaline- and salt-tolerant enzyme has great potential for basic research and industrial applications. PMID:25381738

  4. Autonomous in situ measurements of seawater alkalinity.

    PubMed

    Spaulding, Reggie S; DeGrandpre, Michael D; Beck, James C; Hart, Robert D; Peterson, Brittany; De Carlo, Eric H; Drupp, Patrick S; Hammar, Terry R

    2014-08-19

    Total alkalinity (AT) is an important parameter for describing the marine inorganic carbon system and understanding the effects of atmospheric CO2 on the oceans. Measurements of AT are limited, however, because of the laborious process of collecting and analyzing samples. In this work we evaluate the performance of an autonomous instrument for high temporal resolution measurements of seawater AT. The Submersible Autonomous Moored Instrument for alkalinity (SAMI-alk) uses a novel tracer monitored titration method where a colorimetric pH indicator quantifies both pH and relative volumes of sample and titrant, circumventing the need for gravimetric or volumetric measurements. The SAMI-alk performance was validated in the laboratory and in situ during two field studies. Overall in situ accuracy was -2.2 ± 13.1 μmol kg(-1) (n = 86), on the basis of comparison to discrete samples. Precision on duplicate analyses of a carbonate standard was ±4.7 μmol kg(-1) (n = 22). This prototype instrument can measure in situ AT hourly for one month, limited by consumption of reagent and standard solutions. PMID:25051401

  5. Uptake of alkaline earth metals in Alcyonarian spicules (Octocorallia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taubner, I.; Böhm, F.; Eisenhauer, A.; Garbe-Schönberg, D.; Erez, J.

    2012-05-01

    Alcyonarian corals (Octocorallia) living in shallow tropical seas produce spicules of high-Mg calcite with ˜13 mol% MgCO3. We cultured the tropical alcyonarian coral Rhythisma fulvum in experiments varying temperature (19-32 °C) and pH (8.15-8.44). Alkalinity depletion caused by spicule formation systematically varied in the temperature experiments increasing from 19 to 29 °C. Spicules were investigated for their elemental ratios (Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca) using ICP-OES, δ44/40Ca using TIMS, as well as δ18O and δ13C by IRMS. Mg/Ca increased with temperature from 146 to 164 mmol/mol, in good agreement with the range observed for marine inorganic calcite. Mg/Ca increased by 1.0 ± 0.4 mmol/mol/°C, similar to the sensitivity of Miliolid foraminifera. The pH experiments revealed a linear relationship between Mg/Ca and carbonate ion concentration of +0.03 ± 0.02 mmol/mol/μMol. Sr/Ca ranges from 2.5 to 2.9 mmol/mol being in good agreement with other high-Mg calcites. Temperature and pH experiments showed linear dependencies of Sr/Ca matching inorganic calcite trends and pointing to a decoupling of crystal precipitation rate and calcification rate. Ca isotopes range between 0.7‰ and 0.9‰ in good agreement with aragonitic scleractinian corals and calcitic coccoliths. Presumably Ca isotopes are fractionated by a biological mechanism that may be independent of the skeletal mineralogy. We observe no temperature trend, but a significant decrease of δ44/40Ca with increasing pH. This inverse correlation may characterise biologically controlled intracellular calcification. Oxygen isotope ratios are higher than expected for isotopic equilibrium with a temperature sensitivity of -0.15 ± 0.03‰/°C. Carbon isotope ratios are significantly lower than expected for equilibrium and positively correlated with temperature with a slope of 0.20 ± 0.04‰/°C. Many of our observations on trace element incorporation in R. fulvum may be explained by inorganic processes during crystal

  6. Transcriptome analysis of Enterococcus faecalis in response to alkaline stress

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Shujun; Liu, Bin; Jiang, Wei; Sun, Zhe; Liang, Jingping

    2015-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is the most commonly isolated species from endodontic failure root canals; its persistence in treated root canals has been attributed to its ability to resist high pH stress. The goal of this study was to characterize the E. faecalis transcriptome and to identify candidate genes for response and resistance to alkaline stress using Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing. We found that E. faecalis could survive and form biofilms in a pH 10 environment and that alkaline stress had a great impact on the transcription of many genes in the E. faecalis genome. The transcriptome sequencing results revealed that 613 genes were differentially expressed (DEGs) for E. faecalis grown in pH 10 medium; 211 genes were found to be differentially up-regulated and 402 genes differentially down-regulated. Many of the down-regulated genes found are involved in cell energy production and metabolism and carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism, and the up-regulated genes are mostly related to nucleotide transport and metabolism. The results presented here reveal that cultivation of E. faecalis in alkaline stress has a profound impact on its transcriptome. The observed regulation of genes and pathways revealed that E. faecalis reduced its carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism and increased nucleotide synthesis to adapt and grow in alkaline stress. A number of the regulated genes may be useful candidates for the development of new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of E. faecalis infections. PMID:26300863

  7. Non-specific alkaline phosphomonoesterases of eight species of digenetic trematodes.

    PubMed

    Nizami, W A; Siddiqi, A H; Yusufi, A N

    1975-12-01

    Alkaline phosphatases from different trematodes occupying the same habitat have identical pH otima but different levels of enzyme activities. Isoparorchis hypselobagri, from the fish Wallago attu, shows four to six times more enzyme activity than Fasciolopsis buski, Gastrodiscoides hominis and Echinostoma malayanum, from the pig Sus scrofa, and Fasciola gigantica, Gigantocotyle explanatum, Cotylophoron cotylophorum and Gastrothylax crumenifer, from the buffalo Bubalus bubalis. At least two peaks of activity at different levels of pH were obtained for each trematode examined. Both Gastrodiscoides hominis and Isoparorchis hypselobagri enzymes had three peaks of alkaline phosphatase activity. The optimum temperature for maximum enzyme activity was 40 degrees C, above which rapid inactivation occurred. At temperatures below 40 degrees C, the enzymes of fish and mammalian trematodes did not behave similarly; I. hypselobagri enzyme being active over a wider range of temperature (20 degrees-40 degrees C. Various concentrations of KCN and arsenate proportionately inhibited enzyme activity. NaF Did not significantly influence enzyme activity, while Mg++ and Co++ acted as activators. The extent of inhibition or activation of enzyme activity of different trematodes varied, probably due to species differences. Both inhibition and activation of I. hypselobagri enzyme was higher than in the case of other trematodes. PMID:1442

  8. Capillary electrophoresis of alkali and alkaline-earth cations with imidazole or benzylamine buffers

    SciTech Connect

    Morin, P.; Francois, C.; Dreux, M. . Lab. de Chimie Bioorganique et Analytique)

    1994-01-01

    The separation of alkali, alkaline earth, and ammonium cations in several samples of water was achieved by capillary electrophoresis with indirect UV detection. A solution of imidazole (10[sup [minus]2] M, pH 4.5) was used as a buffer to resolve a mixture of six cations (K[sup +], Na[sup +], Ca[sup 2+], Ba[sup 2+], Li[sup +] and Mg[sup 2+]) by capillary electrophoresis at 214 nm in less than 10 min. The addition of potassium cation to the running buffer has an influence on the resolution of Ca[sup 2+]/Na[sup +] and Na[sup +]/Mg[sup 2+] peaks. A linear relationship between the corrected peak area and concentration was obtained in the 1--10 ppm range for these cations using a hydrodynamic injector. This electrophoretic system permitted the separation of these inorganic cations at a 50 ppb-level concentration with a hydrodynamic injection, thus making it possible to quantitatively determine their presence in mineral waters by capillary electrophoresis. At pH 4.5, potassium and ammonium unfortunately have identical ionic mobilities causing them to comigrate in an imidazole buffer. Using an alkaline solution of benzylamine as carrier electrolyte, their separation can be successfully achieved with excellent resolution at 204 nm. The analyses of tap water and several mineral waters have been achieved by capillary electrophoresis.

  9. Biophysicochemical characterization of an alkaline protease from Beauveria sp. MTCC 5184 with multiple applications.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Shiv; Laxman, Ryali Seeta

    2015-01-01

    This study illustrates the biophysicochemical properties of an alkaline protease, BAP (Beauveria sp. alkaline protease) from Beauveria sp. MTCC 5184. This protease exhibited maximum activity at 50 °C, pH 9.0, and stability in a broad pH range, in the presence of organic solvents, denaturants, as well as detergents. Wash performance studies revealed that BAP was able to remove blood clots/stains from blood-soaked cloth. Peptide mass fingerprinting results demonstrated partial homology of BAP with subtilisin-like proteinase. BAP showed catalytic activity against natural as well as synthetic substrates. Active site characterization of BAP confirmed the involvement of serine, tryptophan, and aspartic acid in catalytic activity. Detailed kinetic and thermodynamic studies of BAP demonstrated that the activation energy (Ea) for casein hydrolysis was 82.55 kJ/M, the specificity constant (Kcat/K m), and the values of ∆G (change in Gibbs free energy) decreased with increase in temperature, whereas ∆H (change in enthalapy) and ∆S (change in entropy) were constant. The results of the present study indicate that BAP has potential for applications as detergent additive, in peptide synthesis, and in basic research. PMID:25338115

  10. Alkaline bioleaching of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash by autochthonous extremophiles.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Thulasya; Ting, Yen-Peng

    2016-10-01

    The increasing demand for energy and the generation of solid waste have caused an alarming rise in fly ash production globally. Since heavy metals continue to be in demand for the production of materials, resource recovery from the recycling of these wastes has the potential to delay the depletion of natural ores. The use of microorganisms for the leaching of metals, in a process called bioleaching, is an eco-friendly and economical way to treat the metal-laden wastes. Bioleaching of fly ash is challenging due largely to the alkaline nature and toxic levels of heavy metals which are detrimental to microbial growth and bioleaching activity. The present work reports the isolation of indigenous bacteria from a local fly ash landfill site and their bioleaching performance. 38 autochthonous strains of bacteria were isolated from eight samples collected and plated on five different media. 18 of the isolates showed bioleaching potential, with significant alkaline pH or fly ash tolerance. Genetic characterization of the strains revealed a dominance of Firmicutes, with Alkalibacterium sp. TRTYP6 showing highest fly ash tolerance of up to 20% w/v fly ash, and growth over a pH range 8-12.5. The organism selectively recovered about 52% Cu from the waste. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time a study on bioleaching with extreme alkaliphiles is reported. PMID:27362528

  11. Identification of a novel alkaline amylopullulanase from a gut metagenome of Hermetia illucens.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Seok; Seo, So-Hyeon; Yoon, Sang-Hong; Kim, Su-Yeon; Hahn, Bum-Soo; Sim, Joon-Soo; Koo, Bon-Sung; Lee, Chang-Muk

    2016-01-01

    A novel pullulanase gene, PulSS4, was identified from the gut microflora of Hermetia illucens by a function-based metagenome screening. The PulSS4 gene had an open reading frame of 4455 base pairs, and encoded a mature protein of 1484 amino acids, with a signal peptide sequence of 44 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence of PulSS4 gene showed 51% identity with that of the amylopullulanase of Amphibacillus xylanus, exhibiting no significant sequence homology to already known pullulanases. A conserved domain analysis revealed it to be a pullulanase type II with respective active sites at the N-terminal pullulanase and C-terminal amylase domain. PulSS4 was active in the temperature range of 10-50°C, with an optimum activity at 40°C. It was active in the pH range of 6.5-10.5, with optimum pH at 9.0, and retained more than 80% of its original activity in a broad pH range of 5-11 for 24h at 30°C. Also, PulSS4 was highly stable against many different chemical reagents, including 10% polar organic solvents and 1% non-ionic detergents. Overall, PulSS4 is expected to have the strong potential for application in biotechnological industries that require high activity at moderate temperature and alkaline conditions. PMID:26526170

  12. The Effect of River Alkalinity on Coastal Aragonite Saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Meo, O.; Salisbury, J.

    2008-12-01

    As atmospheric carbon dioxide levels increase, concern about ocean acidification is rising. Although a great deal of recent research has been focused on this topic, little has been done to explore how land and ocean interactions are affecting coastal acidification. This study addresses the regional variability of total alkalinity (TA) in rivers and its effect on the aragonite saturation state (Ω) at river mouths. The TA concentration of river water is its ability to buffer changes in pH, while Ω is an index that expresses the availability of calcium and carbonate ions (e.g. for shell formation). Local river sampling in New England (USA) and New Brunswick (CAN) showed regional differences in TA concentrations (203-2155 μmol/L), which are likely related to bedrock and land use patterns. USGS alkalinity data for rivers entering the East and Gulf Coasts (USA) ranged from 181-3598 μmol/L and showed a regional pattern of low TA in northern rivers and higher TA in the southern and Gulf rivers. Estimated aragonite saturation states (0.0- 5.6) revealed that most rivers were under-saturated (Ω < 1) and only a few rivers (mainly entering the Gulf) were super-saturated (Ω > 1). This widespread under-saturation near the coast may have detrimental effects for calcifying organisms that rely on aragonite to build their shells. Further study is needed to determine the spatial extent of river influence on acidification of coastal waters and to elucidate the ways in which anticipated climate change will alter the chemistry of river water entering the ocean.

  13. Bifunctional alkaline oxygen electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swette, L.; Kackley, N.; Mccatty, S. A.

    1991-01-01

    The authors describe the identification and testing of electrocatalysts and supports for the positive electrode of moderate-temperature, single-unit, rechargeable alkaline fuel cells. Recent work on Na(x)Pt3O4, a potential bifunctional catalyst, is described, as well as the application of novel approaches to the development of more efficient bifunctional electrode structures. The three dual-character electrodes considered here showed similar superior performance; the Pt/RhO2 and Rh/RhO2 electrodes showed slightly better performance than the Pt/IrO2 electrode. It is concluded that Na(x)Pt3O4 continues to be a promising bifunctional oxygen electrode catalyst but requires further investigation and development.

  14. Continuous Bulk FeCuC Aerogel with Ultradispersed Metal Nanoparticles: An Efficient 3D Heterogeneous Electro-Fenton Cathode over a Wide Range of pH 3-9.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongying; Qian, Lin; Guan, Xiaohong; Wu, Deli; Zhao, Guohua

    2016-05-17

    Novel iron-copper-carbon (FeCuC) aerogel was fabricated through a one-step process from metal-resin precursors and then activated with CO2 and N2 in environmentally friendly way. The activated FeCuC aerogel was applied in a heterogeneous electro-Fenton (EF) process and exhibited higher mineralization efficiency than homogeneous EF technology. High total organic carbon (TOC) removal of organic pollutants with activated FeCuC aerogel was achieved at a wide range of pH values (3-9). The chemical oxygen demand (COD) of real dyeing wastewater was below China's discharge standard after 30 min of treatment, and the specific energy consumption was low (9.2 kW·h·kg(-1)COD(-1)), corresponding to a power consumption of only ∼0.34 kW·h per ton of wastewater. The enhanced mineralization efficiency of FeCuC aerogel was mostly attributable to ultradispersed metallic Fe-Cu nanoparticles embedded in 3D carbon matrix and the CO2-N2 treatment. The CO2 activation enhanced the accessibility of the aerogel's pores, and the secondary N2 activation enlarged the porosity and regenerated the ultradispersed zerovalent iron (Fe(0)) with reductive carbon. Cu(0) acted as a reduction promoter for interfacial electron transfer. Moreover, activated FeCuC aerogel presented low iron leaching (<0.1 ppm) in acidic solution and can be molded into different sizes with high flexibility. Thus, this material could be used as a low-cost cathode and efficient heterogeneous EF technology for actual wastewater treatment. PMID:27082750

  15. Global transcriptional response of the alkali-tolerant cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 to a pH 10 environment.

    PubMed

    Summerfield, Tina C; Sherman, Louis A

    2008-09-01

    Many cyanobacterial strains are able to grow at a pH range from neutral to pH 10 or 11. Such alkaline conditions favor cyanobacterial growth (e.g., bloom formation), and cyanobacteria must have developed strategies to adjust to changes in CO2 concentration and ion availability. Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 exhibits similar photoautotrophic growth characteristics at pH 10 and pH 7.5, and we examined global gene expression following transfer from pH 7.5 to pH 10 to determine cellular adaptations at an elevated pH. The strategies used to develop homeostasis at alkaline pH had elements similar to those of many bacteria, as well as components unique to phototrophic microbes. Some of the response mechanisms previously identified in other bacteria included upregulation of Na+/H+ antiporters, deaminases, and ATP synthase. In addition, upregulated genes encoded transporters with the potential to contribute to osmotic, pH, and ion homeostasis (e.g., a water channel protein, a large-conductance mechanosensitive channel, a putative anion efflux transporter, a hexose/proton symporter, and ABC transporters of unidentified substrates). Transcriptional changes specific to photosynthetic microbes involved NADH dehydrogenases and CO2 fixation. The pH transition altered the CO2/HCO3(-) ratio within the cell, and the upregulation of three inducible bicarbonate transporters (BCT1, SbtA, and NDH-1S) likely reflected a response to this perturbed ratio. Consistent with this was increased transcript abundance of genes encoding carboxysome structural proteins and carbonic anhydrase. Interestingly, the transition to pH 10 resulted in increased abundance of transcripts of photosystem II genes encoding extrinsic and low-molecular-weight polypeptides, although there was little change in photosystem I gene transcripts. PMID:18606800

  16. Characterization of a novel low-temperature-active, alkaline and sucrose-tolerant invertase

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Junpei; He, Limei; Gao, Yajie; Han, Nanyu; Zhang, Rui; Wu, Qian; Li, Junjun; Tang, Xianghua; Xu, Bo; Ding, Junmei; Huang, Zunxi

    2016-01-01

    A glycoside hydrolase family 32 invertase from Bacillus sp. HJ14 was expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified recombinant enzyme (rInvHJ14) showed typical biochemical properties of low-temperature-active and alkaline enzymes: (i) rInvHJ14 was active and stable in the range of pH 7.0–9.5 with an apparent pH optimum of 8.0; (ii) rInvHJ14 was most active but not stable at 30–32.5 °C, with 19.7, 48.2 and 82.1% of its maximum activity when assayed at 0, 10 and 20 °C, respectively, and the Ea, ΔG* (30 °C), Km (30 °C) and kcat (30 °C) values for hydrolysis of sucrose by rInvHJ14 was 47.6 kJ mol−1, 57.6 kJ mol−1, 62.9 mM and 746.2 s−1, respectively. The enzyme also showed strong sucrose tolerance. rInvHJ14 preserved approximately 50% of its highest activity in the presence of 2045.0 mM sucrose. Furthermore, potential factors for low-temperature-active and alkaline adaptations of rInvHJ14 were presumed. Compared with more thermostable homologs, rInvHJ14 has a higher frequency of glycine residues and a longer loop but a lower frequency of proline residues (especially in a loop) in the catalytic domain. The catalytic pockets of acid invertases were almost negatively charged while that of alkaline rInvHJ14 was mostly positively charged. PMID:27553125

  17. Characterization of a novel low-temperature-active, alkaline and sucrose-tolerant invertase.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Junpei; He, Limei; Gao, Yajie; Han, Nanyu; Zhang, Rui; Wu, Qian; Li, Junjun; Tang, Xianghua; Xu, Bo; Ding, Junmei; Huang, Zunxi

    2016-01-01

    A glycoside hydrolase family 32 invertase from Bacillus sp. HJ14 was expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified recombinant enzyme (rInvHJ14) showed typical biochemical properties of low-temperature-active and alkaline enzymes: (i) rInvHJ14 was active and stable in the range of pH 7.0-9.5 with an apparent pH optimum of 8.0; (ii) rInvHJ14 was most active but not stable at 30-32.5 °C, with 19.7, 48.2 and 82.1% of its maximum activity when assayed at 0, 10 and 20 °C, respectively, and the Ea, ΔG(*) (30 °C), Km (30 °C) and kcat (30 °C) values for hydrolysis of sucrose by rInvHJ14 was 47.6 kJ mol(-1), 57.6 kJ mol(-1), 62.9 mM and 746.2 s(-1), respectively. The enzyme also showed strong sucrose tolerance. rInvHJ14 preserved approximately 50% of its highest activity in the presence of 2045.0 mM sucrose. Furthermore, potential factors for low-temperature-active and alkaline adaptations of rInvHJ14 were presumed. Compared with more thermostable homologs, rInvHJ14 has a higher frequency of glycine residues and a longer loop but a lower frequency of proline residues (especially in a loop) in the catalytic domain. The catalytic pockets of acid invertases were almost negatively charged while that of alkaline rInvHJ14 was mostly positively charged. PMID:27553125

  18. Nicotine concentration, smoke pH and whole tobacco aqueous pH of some cigar brands and types popular in the United States.

    PubMed

    Henningfield, J E; Fant, R V; Radzius, A; Frost, S

    1999-06-01

    The present study examined characteristics relating to nicotine delivery of 17 cigar brands, which included small cigars, cigarillos, and large premium cigar brands. The cigars selected for analysis were intended to represent the range of cigar products currently available and in popular use. In addition to cigar characteristics previously studied such as size, nicotine content, and pH of their tobacco, the present study examined smoke pH on a puff-by-puff basis. The tobacco content of the cigars ranged in weight from 0.53 to 21.5 g. There was considerable variation in total nicotine content, which ranged from 5.9 to 335.2 mg per cigar. The aqueous pH of the tobacco from the cigars also varied widely with values ranging from 5.7 to 7.8. The smoke pH values of the smallest cigars was generally acidic, changed little across puffs, and more closely resembled the profiles previously reported for typical cigarettes. Interestingly, the smoke pH of smaller cigars and cigarillos became acidic after the first third of the cigar was consumed and then remained acidic thereafter, whereas larger cigars became acidic during the first third, then became quite alkaline during the last third. Because of wide variations in nicotine content of the tobacco across brands and of similarly wide variations in smoke pH, cigar size is not an accurate predictor of the nicotine delivery capacity of a particular cigar brand, although, in general, larger cigars are capable of providing larger total nicotine delivery with extraordinarily high delivery levels being possible from many of the large premium cigars. These results demonstrated that the popular cigars in this study contained enough nicotine for the development of dependence when smoking as few as one or two of the larger cigars per day. PMID:11072397

  19. Influence of pH and TOC concentration on Cu, Zn, Cd, and Al speciation in rivers.

    PubMed

    Gundersen, Pål; Steinnes, Eiliv

    2003-01-01

    Dissolved ( < approximately 4 nm, dialysis in situ), colloidal ( < 0.45 microm filtered, minus dissolved) and particulate (total, minus < 0.45 microm filtered) concentrations of Cu, Zn, Cd, (Al) in eight (three) mining polluted rivers were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry (flame and graphite furnace). The metal size distribution in the rivers was compared to pH, Ca concentration, alkalinity, conductivity, and total organic carbon (TOC). Data plots based on the present and other studies also yielded information about the interrelations between TOC, pH and metal adsorption in rivers and lakes. Less than 10% of Cu, Zn, and Cd were sorbed on particles or colloids in two rivers with average pH at 3.1 and 5.1, whereas 46%, 21%, and 21% of Cu, Zn, and Cd, respectively, occurred in sorbed form in six pH neutral rivers. In three pH neutral rivers, on average 55% of Al was in colloidal form, whereas the dissolved and particulate fractions were 21% and 23%, respectively. Our data combined with data from similar studies support conclusions from other research suggesting that the percent fraction of metals adsorbed on particles rises steeply from almost zero to nearly 100% within a narrow and element specific pH range. Changes in TOC concentration seem capable of shifting the pH to % metal absorption curves in the order of one pH unit. PMID:12502060

  20. The pH in the microenvironment of human mesenchymal stem cells is a critical factor for optimal osteogenesis in tissue-engineered constructs.

    PubMed

    Monfoulet, Laurent-Emmanuel; Becquart, Pierre; Marchat, David; Vandamme, Katleen; Bourguignon, Marianne; Pacard, Elodie; Viateau, Véronique; Petite, Herve; Logeart-Avramoglou, Delphine

    2014-07-01

    The present study aimed at elucidating the effect of local pH in the extracellular microenvironment of tissue-engineered (TE) constructs on bone cell functions pertinent to new tissue formation. To this aim, we evaluated the osteogenicity process associated with bone constructs prepared from human Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSC) combined with 45S5 bioactive glass (BG), a material that induces alkalinization of the external medium. The pH measured in cell-containing BG constructs was around 8.0, that is, 0.5 U more alkaline than that in two other cell-containing materials (hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate [HA/TCP] and coral) constructs tested. When implanted ectopically in mice, there was no de novo bone tissue in the BG cell-containing constructs, in contrast to results obtained with either HA/TCP or coral ceramics, which consistently promoted the formation of ectopic bone. In addition, the implanted 50:50 composites of both HA/TCP:BG and coral:BG constructs, which displayed a pH of around 7.8, promoted 20-30-fold less amount of bone tissue. Interestingly, hBMSC viability in BG constructs was not affected compared with the other two types of material constructs tested both in vitro and in vivo. Osteogenic differentiation (specifically, the alkaline phosphatase [ALP] activity and gene expression of RUNX2, ALP, and BSP) was not affected when hBMSC were maintained in moderate alkaline pH (≤7.90) external milieu in vitro, but was dramatically inhibited at higher pH values. The formation of mineralized nodules in the extracellular matrix of hBMSC was fully inhibited at alkaline (>7.54) pH values. Most importantly, there is a pH range (specifically, 7.9-8.27) at which hBMSC proliferation was not affected, but the osteogenic differentiation of these cells was inhibited. Altogether, these findings provided evidence that excessive alkalinization in the microenvironment of TE constructs (resulting, for example, from material degradation) affects

  1. The gecko visual pigment: a pH indicator with a salt effect.

    PubMed

    Crescitelli, F

    1981-12-01

    1. Unlike rhodopsin, the extracted 521-pigment of the Tokay gecko (Gekko gekko) is pH-sensitive and changes its spectral absorbance in the pH range of 4.5-7.3. The colour change is reversible and pH can be employed to adjust the spectral maximum anywhere between 490 nm and its native location at 521 nm.2. The hypsochromic shift with increasing acidity is opposite to that expected for the protonation of the Schiff base nitrogen and suggests an action on the secondary system of interacting charges that have long been postulated to adjust vertebrate visual pigment colour within the visible spectrum.3. Chloride ions modulate this pH effect in a systematic and significant manner. For the pigment extracted in the chloride-deficient state the colour change occurs in the pH range of 6.0-7.0, the midpoint being close to 6.5, suggesting the possible participation of the imidazole group of histidine as the functional moiety. With added NaCl the colour shifts to the region below pH 6.2.4. The modulating action of chloride is postulated to be a conformational change of the opsin leading to a shift of the secondary interacting site from one functional group to another or else to a change in pK of a single group due to the conformational alteration of the electrostatics of the system.5. At pH values between 7.5 and 9.0 a different mechanism becomes apparent. In this region a decrease occurs in the photopigment density as well as a shift in absorbance toward the blue. This alkaline effect is readily reversed either by adding NaCl or else by lowering the pH. Along with the other protective effects of chloride these ions serve to reduce or prevent this alkaline loss in density.6. Associated with this reversible photopigment loss is a reversible appearance of a product with a maximum at about 366 nm. The spectrum of this product is like that produced by the addition of 11-cis retinal to the extract. Acidification of the alkaline preparation leads to a restitution of the photopigment

  2. Genomic and exoproteomic analyses of cold- and alkaline-adapted bacteria reveal an abundance of secreted subtilisin-like proteases.

    PubMed

    Lylloff, Jeanette E; Hansen, Lea B S; Jepsen, Morten; Sanggaard, Kristian W; Vester, Jan K; Enghild, Jan J; Sørensen, Søren J; Stougaard, Peter; Glaring, Mikkel A

    2016-03-01

    Proteases active at low temperature or high pH are used in many commercial applications, including the detergent, food and feed industries, and bacteria specifically adapted to these conditions are a potential source of novel proteases. Environments combining these two extremes are very rare, but offer the promise of proteases ideally suited to work at both high pH and low temperature. In this report, bacteria from two cold and alkaline environments, the ikaite columns in Greenland and alkaline ponds in the McMurdo Dry Valley region, Antarctica, were screened for extracellular protease activity. Two isolates, Arsukibacterium ikkense from Greenland and a related strain, Arsukibacterium sp. MJ3, from Antarctica, were further characterized with respect to protease production. Genome sequencing identified a range of potential extracellular proteases including a number of putative secreted subtilisins. An extensive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of proteins secreted by A. ikkense identified six subtilisin-like proteases as abundant components of the exoproteome in addition to other peptidases potentially involved in complete degradation of extracellular protein. Screening of Arsukibacterium genome libraries in Escherichia coli identified two orthologous secreted subtilisins active at pH 10 and 20 °C, which were also present in the A. ikkense exoproteome. Recombinant production of both proteases confirmed the observed activity. PMID:26834075

  3. Macroalgae contribute to nested mosaics of pH variability in a subarctic fjord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause-Jensen, D.; Duarte, C. M.; Hendriks, I. E.; Meire, L.; Blicher, M. E.; Marbà, N.; Sejr, M. K.

    2015-08-01

    The Arctic Ocean is considered the most vulnerable ecosystem to ocean acidification, and large-scale assessments of pH and the saturation state for aragonite (Ωarag) have led to the notion that the Arctic Ocean is already close to a corrosive state. In high-latitude coastal waters the regulation of pH and Ωarag is, however, far more complex than offshore because increased biological activity and input of glacial meltwater affect pH. Effects of ocean acidification on calcifiers and non-calcifying phototrophs occupying coastal habitats cannot be derived from extrapolation of current and forecasted offshore conditions, but they require an understanding of the regimes of pH and Ωarag in their coastal habitats. To increase knowledge of the natural variability in pH in the Arctic coastal zone and specifically to test the influence of benthic vegetated habitats, we quantified pH variability in a Greenland fjord in a nested-scale approach. A sensor array logging pH, O2, PAR, temperature and salinity was applied on spatial scales ranging from kilometre scale across the horizontal extension of the fjord; to 100 m scale vertically in the fjord, 10-100 m scale between subtidal habitats with and without kelp forests and between vegetated tidal pools and adjacent vegetated shores; and to centimetre to metre scale within kelp forests and millimetre scale across diffusive boundary layers of macrophyte tissue. In addition, we assessed the temporal variability in pH on diurnal and seasonal scales. Based on pH measurements combined with point samples of total alkalinity, dissolved inorganic carbon and relationships to salinity, we also estimated variability in Ωarag. Results show variability in pH and Ωarag of up to 0.2-0.3 units at several scales, i.e. along the horizontal and vertical extension of the fjord, between seasons and on a diel basis in benthic habitats and within 1 m3 of kelp forest. Vegetated intertidal pools exhibited extreme diel pH variability of > 1.5 units and

  4. Sensing pH with TMCs.

    PubMed

    Spalthoff, Christian; Göpfert, Martin C

    2016-07-01

    Transmembrane channel-like (TMC) proteins have been implicated in hair cell mechanotransduction, Drosophila proprioception, and sodium sensing in the nematode C. elegans. In this issue of Neuron, Wang et al. (2016) report that C. elegans TMC-1 mediates nociceptor responses to high pH, not sodium, allowing the nematode to avoid strongly alkaline environments in which most animals cannot survive. PMID:27387645

  5. The effectiveness of ferrous iron and sodium dithionite for decreasing resin-extractable Cr(VI) in Cr(VI)-spiked alkaline soils.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chia-Jung; Lin, Tzu-Huei; Chen, Chiou-Pin; Juang, Kai-Wei; Lee, Dar-Yuan

    2009-05-30

    Ferrous iron, Na(2)S(2)O(4), and a mixture of Fe(II) and Na(2)S(2)O(4) (4:1 mol/mol) were tested for their effectiveness for decreasing resin-extractable Cr(VI) in alkaline Cr(VI)-spiked soils. The results indicated that adding those reductants greatly decreased the amount of resin-extractable Cr(VI) when the application rate of reductants equaled the number of equivalents of dichromate added to the Cr(VI)-spiked soils. This was mainly as a result of the Cr(VI) reduction into Cr(III), as supported by the XANES spectra. Among the tested reductants, a mixture of Fe(II) and Na(2)S(2)O(4) was the most effective to decrease resin-extractable Cr(VI). The extent to which resin-extractable Cr(VI) and soil pH were decreased was affected by the pH of the reductants. Among the tested reductants at various pH, FeSO(4) at pH below 1 was the most effective in decreasing resin-extractable Cr(VI) in alkaline soils. However, the soil pH was the most decreased as well. On the other hand, the mixtures of ferrous iron and dithionite at a wide range of pH were all efficient (>70% efficiency) in decreasing resin-extractable Cr(VI). Moreover, the extent of the decrease in soil pH was much smaller than that by FeSO(4) (pH<1) alone, and thus the possibility of the Cr(III) hazard can be avoided. PMID:18824300

  6. Modulators of intestinal alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Bobkova, Ekaterina V; Kiffer-Moreira, Tina; Sergienko, Eduard A

    2013-01-01

    Small molecule modulators of phosphatases can lead to clinically useful drugs and serve as invaluable tools to study functional roles of various phosphatases in vivo. Here, we describe lead discovery strategies for identification of inhibitors and activators of intestinal alkaline phosphatases. To identify isozyme-selective inhibitors and activators of the human and mouse intestinal alkaline phosphatases, ultrahigh throughput chemiluminescent assays, utilizing CDP-Star as a substrate, were developed for murine intestinal alkaline phosphatase (mIAP), human intestinal alkaline phosphatase (hIAP), human placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP), and human tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) isozymes. Using these 1,536-well assays, concurrent HTS screens of the MLSMR library of 323,000 compounds were conducted for human and mouse IAP isozymes monitoring both inhibition and activation. This parallel screening approach led to identification of a novel inhibitory scaffold selective for murine intestinal alkaline phosphatase. SAR efforts based on parallel testing of analogs against different AP isozymes generated a potent inhibitor of the murine IAP with IC50 of 540 nM, at least 65-fold selectivity against human TNAP, and >185 selectivity against human PLAP. PMID:23860652

  7. Alkaline battery, separator therefore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, George F. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An improved battery separator for alkaline battery cells has low resistance to electrolyte ion transfer and high resistance to electrode ion transfer. The separator is formed by applying an improved coating to an electrolyte absorber. The absorber, preferably, is a flexible, fibrous, and porous substrate that is resistant to strong alkali and oxidation. The coating composition includes an admixture of a polymeric binder, a hydrolyzable polymeric ester and inert fillers. The coating composition is substantially free of reactive fillers and plasticizers commonly employed as porosity promoting agents in separator coatings. When the separator is immersed in electrolyte, the polymeric ester of the film coating reacts with the electrolyte forming a salt and an alcohol. The alcohol goes into solution with the electrolyte while the salt imbibes electrolyte into the coating composition. When the salt is formed, it expands the polymeric chains of the binder to provide a film coating substantially permeable to electrolyte ion transfer but relatively impermeable to electrode ion transfer during use.

  8. Testing Novel pH Proxies through Inorganic Calcite Precipitations and K/Pg Foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Super, J. R.; Pagani, M.; Wang, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Ocean pH proxies help constrain the carbon system in the paleocean and can be used to infer atmospheric CO2 when coupled with estimates of total alkalinity, aqueous pCO2 or dissolved inorganic carbon. This project investigates two novel pH proxies (cerium abundance and kinetically-controlled oxygen isotopes) through a series of precipitations of inorganic calcite, as well as the previously established boron isotope pH proxy. Precipitations are performed using varied pH and carbonate saturation states that span the range of typical ocean values as well as a 'free drift' that allows pH and saturation state to vary. The light rare earth element cerium speciates, depending on local oxidation-reduction conditions, between the soluble Ce3+ and highly insoluble Ce4+ ions, causing a relative depletion of cerium in ocean water. This project demonstrates how a suite rare earth elements, including cerium, partitions into inorganic calcite and how partitioning varies with changing pH and carbonate saturation state. Oxygen isotope fractionation is primarily controlled by temperature, but this project examines how pH and carbonate saturation state correlate with oxygen isotope values under kinetic conditions during the initial stage of precipitation. The effect of diagenesis on each proxy is simulated by dissolution of precipitated calcite in a pressure vessel. Results from the precipitations are used to inform a record of well-preserved benthic and planktonic foraminifera from DSDP Site 356 that range in age from the K/Pg boundary to the period when the δ13C gradient between the surface and deep ocean returned to pre-event levels. The pH record is used to infer the magnitude and length of the perturbation to the oceanic carbon system following the extinction event, particularly in terms of export productivity.

  9. Evaluation of Alkaline Cleaner Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partz, Earl

    1998-01-01

    Alkaline cleaners used to process aluminum substrates have contained chromium as the corrosion inhibitor. Chromium is a hazardous substance whose use and control are described by environmental laws. Replacement materials that have the characteristics of chromated alkaline cleaners need to be found that address both the cleaning requirements and environmental impacts. This report will review environmentally friendly candidates evaluated as non-chromium alkaline cleaner replacements and methods used to compare those candidates one versus another. The report will also list characteristics used to select candidates based on their declared contents. It will also describe and evaluate methods used to discriminate among the large number of prospective candidates.

  10. Energetics of Amino Acid Synthesis in Alkaline Hydrothermal Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitadai, Norio

    2015-12-01

    Alkaline hydrothermal systems have received considerable attention as candidates for the origin and evolution of life on the primitive Earth. Nevertheless, sufficient information has not yet been obtained for the thermodynamic properties of amino acids, which are necessary components for life, at high temperatures and alkaline pH. These properties were estimated using experimental high-temperature volume and heat capacity data reported in the literature for several amino acids, together with correlation algorithms and the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equations of state. This approach enabled determination of a complete set of the standard molal thermodynamic data and the revised HKF parameters for the 20 protein amino acids in their zwitterionic and ionization states. The obtained dataset was then used to evaluate the energetics of amino acid syntheses from simple inorganic precursors (CO2, H2, NH3 and H2S) in a simulated alkaline hydrothermal system on the Hadean Earth. Results show that mixing between CO2-rich seawater and the H2-rich hydrothermal fluid can produce energetically favorable conditions for amino acid syntheses, particularly in the lower-temperature region of such systems. Together with data related to the pH and temperature dependences of the energetics of amino acid polymerizations presented in earlier reports, these results suggest the following. Hadean alkaline hydrothermal settings, where steep pH and temperature gradients may have existed between cool, slightly acidic Hadean ocean water and hot, alkaline hydrothermal fluids at the vent-ocean interface, may be energetically the most suitable environment for the synthesis and polymerization of amino acids.

  11. Energetics of Amino Acid Synthesis in Alkaline Hydrothermal Environments.

    PubMed

    Kitadai, Norio

    2015-12-01

    Alkaline hydrothermal systems have received considerable attention as candidates for the origin and evolution of life on the primitive Earth. Nevertheless, sufficient information has not yet been obtained for the thermodynamic properties of amino acids, which are necessary components for life, at high temperatures and alkaline pH. These properties were estimated using experimental high-temperature volume and heat capacity data reported in the literature for several amino acids, together with correlation algorithms and the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equations of state. This approach enabled determination of a complete set of the standard molal thermodynamic data and the revised HKF parameters for the 20 protein amino acids in their zwitterionic and ionization states. The obtained dataset was then used to evaluate the energetics of amino acid syntheses from simple inorganic precursors (CO2, H2, NH3 and H2S) in a simulated alkaline hydrothermal system on the Hadean Earth. Results show that mixing between CO2-rich seawater and the H2-rich hydrothermal fluid can produce energetically favorable conditions for amino acid syntheses, particularly in the lower-temperature region of such systems. Together with data related to the pH and temperature dependences of the energetics of amino acid polymerizations presented in earlier reports, these results suggest the following. Hadean alkaline hydrothermal settings, where steep pH and temperature gradients may have existed between cool, slightly acidic Hadean ocean water and hot, alkaline hydrothermal fluids at the vent-ocean interface, may be energetically the most suitable environment for the synthesis and polymerization of amino acids. PMID:25796392

  12. Production of alkaline protease from Cellulosimicrobium cellulans

    PubMed Central

    Ferracini-Santos, Luciana; Sato, Hélia H

    2009-01-01

    Cellulosimicrobium cellulans is one of the microorganisms that produces a wide variety of yeast cell wall-degrading enzymes, β-1,3-glucanase, protease and chitinase. Dried cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were used as carbon and nitrogen source for cell growth and protease production. The medium components KH2PO4, KOH and dried yeast cells showed a significant effect (p<0.05) on the factorial fractional design. A second design was prepared using two factors: pH and percentage of dried yeast cells. The results showed that the culture medium for the maximum production of protease was 0.2 g/l of MgSO4.7H2O, 2.0 g/l of (NH4)2SO4 and 8% of dried yeast cells in 0.15M phosphate buffer at pH 8.0. The maximum alkaline protease production was 7.0 ± 0.27 U/ml over the center point. Crude protease showed best activity at 50ºC and pH 7.0-8.0, and was stable at 50ºC. PMID:24031317

  13. A new alkaline lipase obtained from the metagenome of marine sponge Ircinia sp.

    PubMed

    Su, Jing; Zhang, Fengli; Sun, Wei; Karuppiah, Valliappan; Zhang, Guangya; Li, Zhiyong; Jiang, Qun

    2015-07-01

    Microorganisms associated with marine sponges are potential resources for marine enzymes. In this study, culture-independent metagenomic approach was used to isolate lipases from the complex microbiome of the sponge Ircinia sp. obtained from the South China Sea. A metagenomic library was constructed, containing 6568 clones, and functional screening on 1 % tributyrin agar resulted in the identification of a positive lipase clone (35F4). Following sequence analysis 35F4 clone was found to contain a putative lipase gene lipA. Sequence analysis of the predicted amino acid sequence of LipA revealed that it is a member of subfamily I.1 of lipases, with 63 % amino acid similarity to the lactonizing lipase from Aeromonas veronii (WP_021231793). Based on the predicted secondary structure, LipA was predicted to be an alkaline enzyme by sequence/structure analysis. Heterologous expression of lipA in E. coli BL21 (DE3) was performed and the characterization of the recombinant enzyme LipA showed that it is an alkaline enzyme with high tolerance to organic solvents. The isolated lipase LipA was active in the broad alkaline range, with the highest activity at pH 9.0, and had a high level of stability over a pH range of 7.0-12.0. The activity of LipA was increased in the presence of 5 mM Ca(2+) and some organic solvents, e.g. methanol, acetone and isopropanol. The optimum temperature for the activity of LipA is 40 °C and the molecular weight of LipA was determined to be ~30 kDa by SDS-PAGE. LipA is an alkaline lipase and shows good tolerance to some organic solvents, which make it of potential utility in the detergent industry and enzyme mediated organic synthesis. The result of this study has broadened the diversity of known lipolytic genes and demonstrated that marine sponges are an important source for new enzymes. PMID:25921581

  14. A ph sensor based on a flexible substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen-Ding

    pH sensor is an essential component used in many chemical, food, and bio-material industries. Conventional glass electrodes have been used to construct pH sensors, however, have some disadvantages. Glass electrodes are easily affected by alkaline or HF solution, they require a high input impedance pH meter, they often exhibit a sluggish response. In some specific applications, it is also difficult to use glass electrodes for in vivo biomedical or food monitoring applications due to the difficulty of size miniaturization, planarization and polymerization based on current manufacturing technologies. In this work, we have demonstrated a novel flexible pH sensor based on low-cost sol-gel fabrication process of iridium oxide (IrOx) sensing film (IROF). A pair of flexible miniature IrOx/AgCl electrode generated the action potential from the solution by electrochemical mechanism to obtain the pH level of the reagent. The fabrication process including sol-gel, thermal oxidation, and the electro-plating process of the silver chloride (AgCl) reference electrode were reported in the work. The IrOx film was verified and characterized using electron dispersive analysis (EDAX), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The flexible pH sensor's performance and characterization have been investigated with different testing parameters such as sensitivity, response time, stability, reversibility, repeatability, selectivity and temperature dependence. The flexible IrOx pH sensors exhibited promising sensing performance with a near-Nernstian response of sensitivity which is between --51.1mV/pH and --51.7mV/pH in different pH levels ranging from 1.5 to 12 at 25°C. Two applications including gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) diagnosis and food freshness wireless monitoring using our micro-flexible IrOx pH sensors were demonstrated. For the GERD diagnosing system, we embedded the micro flexible pH sensor on a 1.2cmx3.8cm of the capsule size of wireless sensor

  15. Treatment of Alkaline Cr(VI)-Contaminated Leachate with an Alkaliphilic Metal-Reducing Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Mathew P.; Khijniak, Tatiana V.; Boothman, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Chromium in its toxic Cr(VI) valence state is a common contaminant particularly associated with alkaline environments. A well-publicized case of this occurred in Glasgow, United Kingdom, where poorly controlled disposal of a cementitious industrial by-product, chromite ore processing residue (COPR), has resulted in extensive contamination by Cr(VI)-contaminated alkaline leachates. In the search for viable bioremediation treatments for Cr(VI), a variety of bacteria that are capable of reduction of the toxic and highly soluble Cr(VI) to the relatively nontoxic and less mobile Cr(III) oxidation state, predominantly under circumneutral pH conditions, have been isolated. Recently, however, alkaliphilic bacteria that have the potential to reduce Cr(VI) under alkaline conditions have been identified. This study focuses on the application of a metal-reducing bacterium to the remediation of alkaline Cr(VI)-contaminated leachates from COPR. This bacterium, belonging to the Halomonas genus, was found to exhibit growth concomitant to Cr(VI) reduction under alkaline conditions (pH 10). Bacterial cells were able to rapidly remove high concentrations of aqueous Cr(VI) (2.5 mM) under anaerobic conditions, up to a starting pH of 11. Cr(VI) reduction rates were controlled by pH, with slower removal observed at pH 11, compared to pH 10, while no removal was observed at pH 12. The reduction of aqueous Cr(VI) resulted in the precipitation of Cr(III) biominerals, which were characterized using transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (TEM-EDX) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The effectiveness of this haloalkaliphilic bacterium for Cr(VI) reduction at high pH suggests potential for its use as an in situ treatment of COPR and other alkaline Cr(VI)-contaminated environments. PMID:26048926

  16. Treatment of Alkaline Cr(VI)-Contaminated Leachate with an Alkaliphilic Metal-Reducing Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Watts, Mathew P; Khijniak, Tatiana V; Boothman, Christopher; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2015-08-15

    Chromium in its toxic Cr(VI) valence state is a common contaminant particularly associated with alkaline environments. A well-publicized case of this occurred in Glasgow, United Kingdom, where poorly controlled disposal of a cementitious industrial by-product, chromite ore processing residue (COPR), has resulted in extensive contamination by Cr(VI)-contaminated alkaline leachates. In the search for viable bioremediation treatments for Cr(VI), a variety of bacteria that are capable of reduction of the toxic and highly soluble Cr(VI) to the relatively nontoxic and less mobile Cr(III) oxidation state, predominantly under circumneutral pH conditions, have been isolated. Recently, however, alkaliphilic bacteria that have the potential to reduce Cr(VI) under alkaline conditions have been identified. This study focuses on the application of a metal-reducing bacterium to the remediation of alkaline Cr(VI)-contaminated leachates from COPR. This bacterium, belonging to the Halomonas genus, was found to exhibit growth concomitant to Cr(VI) reduction under alkaline conditions (pH 10). Bacterial cells were able to rapidly remove high concentrations of aqueous Cr(VI) (2.5 mM) under anaerobic conditions, up to a starting pH of 11. Cr(VI) reduction rates were controlled by pH, with slower removal observed at pH 11, compared to pH 10, while no removal was observed at pH 12. The reduction of aqueous Cr(VI) resulted in the precipitation of Cr(III) biominerals, which were characterized using transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (TEM-EDX) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The effectiveness of this haloalkaliphilic bacterium for Cr(VI) reduction at high pH suggests potential for its use as an in situ treatment of COPR and other alkaline Cr(VI)-contaminated environments. PMID:26048926

  17. Alkaline protease production by a strain of marine yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Wang; Zhenming, Chi; Chunling, Ma

    2006-07-01

    Yeast strain 10 with high yield of protease was isolated from sediments of saltern near Qingdao, China. The protease had the highest activity at pH 9.0 and 45°C. The optimal medium for the maximum alkaline protease production of strain 10 was 2.5g soluble starch and 2.0g NaNO3 in 100mL seawater with initial pH 6.0. The optimal cultivation conditions for the maximum protease production were temperature 24.5°C, aeration rate 8.0L min-1 and agitation speed 150r min-1 Under the optimal conditions, 623.1 U mg-1 protein of alkaline protease was reached in the culture within 30h of fermentation.

  18. Effects of ph, carbonate, orthophosphate, and redox potential on cuprosolvency

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, M.R.; Lytle, D.A.; Clement, J.A.

    1995-12-01

    A comprehensive solubility model for copper in drinking water has been developed, that is consistent with available data for copper dissolution and passivation in drinking water systems. Copper solubility (cuprosolvency) is greatly affected by the redox conditions of the systems. The concentration of Cu(I) is dominated by Cu{sub 2}O(s) or CuOH(s) solid phases, plus soluble aqueous ammonia and chloride complexes. In new piping, the concentration of Cu(II) is mainly governed by Cu(OH){sub 2}(s) (cupric hydroxide), rather than CuO(s) (tenorite) or Cu{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}CO{sub 3}(s)(malachite). Complexation of Cu(II) by DIC and hydroxide ion is extremely important. Increases in DIC are predicted to cause significant increases in copper solubility in the pH range of 7.5--10. Utilities may trade off increasing cuprosolvency by DIC addition for ensuring adequate buffering intensity in the finished water. Sufficient dosages of orthophosphate in the pH range of 6.5 to 7.5 may reduce cuprosolvency under oxidizing conditions. Sulfate may decrease cuprosolvency under some conditions, or may interfere with the formation of cupric hydroxide films under mildly alkaline conditions. Dissolved oxygen and chlorine residual play complicated roles in determining copper concentrations after various standing times. Frequently, 48--72 hours are necessary to reach equilibrium levels of copper in disinfected systems.

  19. Alkaline Anaerobic Respiration: Isolation and Characterization of a Novel Alkaliphilic and Metal-Reducing Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qi; Roh, Yul; Carroll, Susan L.; Blair, Benjamin; Zhou, Jizhong; Zhang, Chuanlun L.; Fields, Matthew W.

    2004-01-01

    Iron-reducing enrichments were obtained from leachate ponds at the U.S. Borax Company in Boron, Calif. Based on partial small-subunit (SSU) rRNA gene sequences (approximately 500 nucleotides), six isolates shared 98.9% nucleotide identity. As a representative, the isolate QYMF was selected for further analysis. QYMF could be grown with Fe(III)-citrate, Fe(III)-EDTA, Co(III)-EDTA, or Cr(VI) as electron acceptors, and yeast extract and lactate could serve as electron donors. Growth during iron reduction occurred over the pH range of 7.5 to 11.0 (optimum, pH 9.5), a sodium chloride range of 0 to 80 g/liter (optimum, 20 g/liter), and a temperature range of 4 to 45°C (optimum, approximately 35°C), and iron precipitates were formed. QYMF was a strict anaerobe that could be grown in the presence of borax, and the cells were straight rods that produced endospores. Sodium chloride and yeast extract stimulated growth. Phylogenetic analysis of the SSU rRNA gene indicated that the bacterium was a low-G+C gram-positive microorganism and had 96 and 92% nucleotide identity with Alkaliphilus transvaalensis and Alkaliphilus crotonatoxidans, respectively. The major phospholipid fatty acids were 14:1, 16:1ω7c, and 16:0, which were different from those of other alkaliphiles but similar to those of reported iron-reducing bacteria. The results demonstrated that the isolate might represent a novel metal-reducing alkaliphilic species. The name Alkaliphilus metalliredigens sp. nov. is proposed. The isolation and activity of metal-reducing bacteria from borax-contaminated leachate ponds suggest that bioremediation of metal-contaminated alkaline environments may be feasible and have implications for alkaline anaerobic respiration. PMID:15345448

  20. Investigating mechanisms of alkalinization for reducing primary breast tumor invasion.

    PubMed

    Robey, Ian F; Nesbit, Lance A

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular pH (pHe) of many solid tumors is acidic as a result of glycolytic metabolism and poor perfusion. Acidity promotes invasion and enhances metastatic potential. Tumor acidity can be buffered by systemic administration of an alkaline agent such as sodium bicarbonate. Tumor-bearing mice maintained on sodium bicarbonate drinking water exhibit fewer metastases and survive longer than untreated controls. We predict this effect is due to inhibition of tumor invasion. Reducing tumor invasion should result in fewer circulating tumor cells (CTCs). We report that bicarbonate-treated MDA-MB-231 tumor-bearing mice exhibited significantly lower numbers of CTCs than untreated mice (P < 0.01). Tumor pHe buffering may reduce optimal conditions for enzymes involved in tumor invasion such as cathepsins and matrix metalloproteases (MMPs). To address this, we tested the effect of transient alkalinization on cathepsin and MMP activity using enzyme activatable fluorescence agents in mice bearing MDA-MB-231 mammary xenografts. Transient alkalinization significantly reduced the fluorescent signal of protease-specific activatable agents in vivo (P ≤ 0.003). Alkalinization, however, did not affect expression of carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX). The findings suggest a possible mechanism in a live model system for breast cancer where systemic alkalinization slows the rate of invasion. PMID:23936808

  1. Development of a pH/alkalinity treatment model for applications of the lampricide TFM to streams tributary to the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bills, Terry D.; Boogaard, Michael A.; Johnson, David A.; Brege, Dorance C.; Scholefield, Ronald J.; Westman, R. Wayne; Stephens, Brian E.

    2003-01-01

    It has long been known that the toxicity of the lampricide 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM) is influenced by chemical and physical properties of water. As the pH, conductivity, and alkalinity of water increase, greater concentrations of TFM are required to kill sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) larvae. Consequently, the concentration of TFM required for effective treatment varies among streams. Brown trout (Salmo trutta) and sea lamprey larvae were exposed to a series of TFM concentrations in a continuous-flow diluter for 12 h. Twenty five exposures were conducted at various water alkalinities and pHs that treatment personnel encounter during lampricide treatments. Survival/mortality data were analyzed for lampricide concentrations that produced 50 and 99.9% mortality (LC50 and LC99.9) for sea lamprey larvae and 25 and 50% mortality (LC25 and LC50) for brown trout. Linear regression analyses were performed for each set of tests for each selected alkalinity by comparing the 12-h post exposure LC99.9 sea lamprey data and LC25 brown trout data at each pH. Mortality data from on-site toxicity tests conducted by lampricide control personnel were compared to predicted values from the pH/alkalinity prediction model. Of the 31 tests examined, 27 resulted in the LC100s (lowest TFM concentration where 100% mortality of sea lamprey was observed after 12 h of exposure) falling within 0.2 mg/L of the predicted sea lamprey minimum lethal (LC99.9) range. The pH/alkalinity prediction model provides managers with an operational tool that reduces the amount of TFM required for effective treatment while minimizing the impact on non-target organisms.

  2. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator contributes to reacidification of alkalinized lysosomes in RPE cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ji; Lu, Wennan; Guha, Sonia; Baltazar, Gabriel C.; Coffey, Erin E.; Laties, Alan M.; Rubenstein, Ronald C.; Reenstra, William W.

    2012-01-01

    The role of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in lysosomal acidification has been difficult to determine. We demonstrate here that CFTR contributes more to the reacidification of lysosomes from an elevated pH than to baseline pH maintenance. Lysosomal alkalinization is increasingly recognized as a factor in diseases of accumulation, and we previously showed that cAMP reacidified alkalinized lysosomes in retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells. As the influx of anions to electrically balance proton accumulation may enhance lysosomal acidification, the contribution of the cAMP-activated anion channel CFTR to lysosomal reacidification was probed. The antagonist CFTRinh-172 had little effect on baseline levels of lysosomal pH in cultured human RPE cells but substantially reduced the reacidification of compromised lysosomes by cAMP. Likewise, CFTR activators had a bigger impact on cells whose lysosomes had been alkalinized. Knockdown of CFTR with small interfering RNA had a larger effect on alkalinized lysosomes than on baseline levels. Inhibition of CFTR in isolated lysosomes altered pH. While CFTR and Lamp1 were colocalized, treatment with cAMP did not increase targeting of CFTR to the lysosome. The inhibition of CFTR slowed lysosomal degradation of photoreceptor outer segments while activation of CFTR enhanced their clearance from compromised lysosomes. Activation of CFTR acidified RPE lysosomes from the ABCA4−/− mouse model of recessive Stargardt's disease, whose lysosomes are considerably alkalinized. In summary, CFTR contributes more to reducing lysosomal pH from alkalinized levels than to maintaining baseline pH. Treatment to activate CFTR may thus be of benefit in disorders of accumulation associated with lysosomal alkalinization. PMID:22572847

  3. A ph sensor based on a flexible substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen-Ding

    pH sensor is an essential component used in many chemical, food, and bio-material industries. Conventional glass electrodes have been used to construct pH sensors, however, have some disadvantages. Glass electrodes are easily affected by alkaline or HF solution, they require a high input impedance pH meter, they often exhibit a sluggish response. In some specific applications, it is also difficult to use glass electrodes for in vivo biomedical or food monitoring applications due to the difficulty of size miniaturization, planarization and polymerization based on current manufacturing technologies. In this work, we have demonstrated a novel flexible pH sensor based on low-cost sol-gel fabrication process of iridium oxide (IrOx) sensing film (IROF). A pair of flexible miniature IrOx/AgCl electrode generated the action potential from the solution by electrochemical mechanism to obtain the pH level of the reagent. The fabrication process including sol-gel, thermal oxidation, and the electro-plating process of the silver chloride (AgCl) reference electrode were reported in the work. The IrOx film was verified and characterized using electron dispersive analysis (EDAX), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The flexible pH sensor's performance and characterization have been investigated with different testing parameters such as sensitivity, response time, stability, reversibility, repeatability, selectivity and temperature dependence. The flexible IrOx pH sensors exhibited promising sensing performance with a near-Nernstian response of sensitivity which is between --51.1mV/pH and --51.7mV/pH in different pH levels ranging from 1.5 to 12 at 25°C. Two applications including gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) diagnosis and food freshness wireless monitoring using our micro-flexible IrOx pH sensors were demonstrated. For the GERD diagnosing system, we embedded the micro flexible pH sensor on a 1.2cmx3.8cm of the capsule size of wireless sensor

  4. Purification and characterization of a serine alkaline protease from Bacillus clausii GMBAE 42.

    PubMed

    Kazan, Dilek; Denizci, Aziz Akin; Oner, Mine N Kerimak; Erarslan, Altan

    2005-08-01

    An extracellular serine alkaline protease of Bacillus clausii GMBAE 42 was produced in protein-rich medium in shake-flask cultures for 3 days at pH 10.5 and 37 degrees C. Highest alkaline protease activity was observed in the late stationary phase of cell cultivation. The enzyme was purified 16-fold from culture filtrate by DEAE-cellulose chromatography followed by (NH(4))(2)SO(4) precipitation, with a yield of 58%. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed the molecular weight of the enzyme to be 26.50 kDa. The optimum temperature for enzyme activity was 60 degrees C; however, it is shifted to 70 degrees C after addition of 5 mM Ca(2+) ions. The enzyme was stable between 30 and 40 degrees C for 2 h at pH 10.5; only 14% activity loss was observed at 50 degrees C. The optimal pH of the enzyme was 11.3. The enzyme was also stable in the pH 9.0--12.2 range for 24 h at 30 degrees C; however, activity losses of 38% and 76% were observed at pH values of 12.7 and 13.0, respectively. The activation energy of Hammarsten casein hydrolysis by the purified enzyme was 10.59 kcal mol(-1) (44.30 kJ mol(-1)). The enzyme was stable in the presence of the 1% (w/v) Tween-20, Tween-40,Tween-60, Tween-80, and 0.2% (w/v) SDS for 1 h at 30 degrees C and pH 10.5. Only 10% activity loss was observed with 1% sodium perborate under the same conditions. The enzyme was not inhibited by iodoacetate, ethylacetimidate, phenylglyoxal, iodoacetimidate, n-ethylmaleimidate, n-bromosuccinimide, diethylpyrocarbonate or n-ethyl-5-phenyl-iso-xazolium-3'-sulfonate. Its complete inhibition by phenylmethanesulfonylfluoride and relatively high k (cat) value for N-Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-pNA hydrolysis indicates that the enzyme is a chymotrypsin-like serine protease. K (m) and k (cat) values were estimated at 0.655 microM N-Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-pNA and 4.21 x 10(3) min(-1), respectively. PMID:15988584

  5. Effects of the lampricide 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM) on pH, net oxygen production, and respiration by algae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholefield, Ronald J.; Fredricks, Kim T.; Slaght, Karen S.; Seelye, James G.

    1999-01-01

    The lampricide 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM) has been used in the United States and Canada for more than 35 years to control larval sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) in tributaries of the Great Lakes. Occasionally, during stream treatments with TFM, nontarget-fish mortality reaches unacceptable levels. These losses could be due to the presence of sensitive fish species, excess TFM, or a combination of factors that influence the toxicity of TFM, such as delays in daily stream reaeration by algae resulting in extended periods of low pH and low dissolved oxygen (DO). We determined the effects of a broad range of TFM concentrations on net DO production and respiration by two species of algae, in two culture media (high alkalinity and low alkalinity). The pH and DO in cultures of Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Selenastrum capricornutum were recorded at time zero and again after a 9-h exposure to TFM under either lighted or dark conditions. Algal cultures exposed to TFM concentrations typical of those used to control sea lampreys in streams showed only small changes in pH (<0.1) and small reductions in DO (about 8% in lighted conditions and 11% in dark conditions). Changes in pH and DO of this magnitude probably do not change the efficacy of TFM or cause nontarget fish mortality if algae are the predominant photosynthetic organisms in the stream.

  6. Application of ZnO Nanoparticles for Improving the Thermal and pH Stability of Crude Cellulase Obtained from Aspergillus fumigatus AA001

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Neha; Srivastava, Manish; Mishra, P. K.; Ramteke, Pramod W.

    2016-01-01

    Cellulases are the enzymes which are responsible for the hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass. In this study thermal and pH stability of crude cellulase has been investigated in the presence of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles. We synthesized ZnO nanoparticle by sol-gel method and characterized through various techniques including, X-ray Diffraction, ultraviolet-visible spectroscope, field emission scanning electron microscope and high resolution scanning electron microscope. The crude thermostable cellulase has been obtained from the Aspergillus fumigatus AA001 and treated with ZnO nanoparticle which shows thermal stability at 65°C up to 10 h whereas it showed pH stability in the alkaline pH range and retained its 53% of relative activity at pH 10.5. These findings may be promising in the area of biofuels production. PMID:27148203

  7. Priming effect of abscisic acid on alkaline stress tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Wei, Li-Xing; Lv, Bing-Sheng; Wang, Ming-Ming; Ma, Hong-Yuan; Yang, Hao-Yu; Liu, Xiao-Long; Jiang, Chang-Jie; Liang, Zheng-Wei

    2015-05-01

    Saline-alkaline stress is characterized by high salinity and high alkalinity (high pH); alkaline stress has been shown to be the primary factor inhibiting rice seedling growth. In this study, we investigated the potential priming effect of abscisic acid (ABA) on tolerance of rice seedlings to alkaline stress simulated by Na2CO3. Seedlings were pretreated with ABA at concentrations of 0 (control), 10, and 50 μM by root-drench for 24 h and then transferred to a Na2CO3 solution that did not contain ABA. Compared to control treatment, pretreatment with ABA substantially improved the survival rate of rice seedlings and increased biomass accumulation after 7 days under the alkaline condition. ABA application at 10 μM also alleviated the inhibitory effects of alkaline stress on the total root length and root surface area. Physiologically, ABA increased relative water content (RWC) and decreased cell membrane injury degree (MI) and Na(+)/K(+) ratios. In contrast, fluridone (an ABA biosynthesis inhibitor) decreased the RWC and increased MI in shoots under the alkaline conditions. These data suggest that ABA has a potent priming effect on the adaptive response to alkaline stress in rice and may be useful for improving rice growth in saline-alkaline paddy fields. PMID:25780993

  8. Microbial thiocyanate utilization under highly alkaline conditions.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, D Y; Tourova, T P; Lysenko, A M; Kuenen, J G

    2001-02-01

    Three kinds of alkaliphilic bacteria able to utilize thiocyanate (CNS-) at pH 10 were found in highly alkaline soda lake sediments and soda soils. The first group included obligate heterotrophs that utilized thiocyanate as a nitrogen source while growing at pH 10 with acetate as carbon and energy sources. Most of the heterotrophic strains were able to oxidize sulfide and thiosulfate to tetrathionate. The second group included obligately autotrophic sulfur-oxidizing alkaliphiles which utilized thiocyanate nitrogen during growth with thiosulfate as the energy source. Genetic analysis demonstrated that both the heterotrophic and autotrophic alkaliphiles that utilized thiocyanate as a nitrogen source were related to the previously described sulfur-oxidizing alkaliphiles belonging to the gamma subdivision of the division Proteobacteria (the Halomonas group for the heterotrophs and the genus Thioalkalivibrio for autotrophs). The third group included obligately autotrophic sulfur-oxidizing alkaliphilic bacteria able to utilize thiocyanate as a sole source of energy. These bacteria could be enriched on mineral medium with thiocyanate at pH 10. Growth with thiocyanate was usually much slower than growth with thiosulfate, although the biomass yield on thiocyanate was higher. Of the four strains isolated, the three vibrio-shaped strains were genetically closely related to the previously described sulfur-oxidizing alkaliphiles belonging to the genus Thioalkalivibrio. The rod-shaped isolate differed from the other isolates by its ability to accumulate large amounts of elemental sulfur inside its cells and by its ability to oxidize carbon disulfide. Despite its low DNA homology with and substantial phenotypic differences from the vibrio-shaped strains, this isolate also belonged to the genus Thioalkalivibrio according to a phylogenetic analysis. The heterotrophic and autotrophic alkaliphiles that grew with thiocyanate as an N source possessed a relatively high level of cyanase

  9. Microbial Thiocyanate Utilization under Highly Alkaline Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Tourova, Tatyana P.; Lysenko, Anatoly M.; Kuenen, J. Gijs

    2001-01-01

    Three kinds of alkaliphilic bacteria able to utilize thiocyanate (CNS−) at pH 10 were found in highly alkaline soda lake sediments and soda soils. The first group included obligate heterotrophs that utilized thiocyanate as a nitrogen source while growing at pH 10 with acetate as carbon and energy sources. Most of the heterotrophic strains were able to oxidize sulfide and thiosulfate to tetrathionate. The second group included obligately autotrophic sulfur-oxidizing alkaliphiles which utilized thiocyanate nitrogen during growth with thiosulfate as the energy source. Genetic analysis demonstrated that both the heterotrophic and autotrophic alkaliphiles that utilized thiocyanate as a nitrogen source were related to the previously described sulfur-oxidizing alkaliphiles belonging to the gamma subdivision of the division Proteobacteria (the Halomonas group for the heterotrophs and the genus Thioalkalivibrio for autotrophs). The third group included obligately autotrophic sulfur-oxidizing alkaliphilic bacteria able to utilize thiocyanate as a sole source of energy. These bacteria could be enriched on mineral medium with thiocyanate at pH 10. Growth with thiocyanate was usually much slower than growth with thiosulfate, although the biomass yield on thiocyanate was higher. Of the four strains isolated, the three vibrio-shaped strains were genetically closely related to the previously described sulfur-oxidizing alkaliphiles belonging to the genus Thioalkalivibrio. The rod-shaped isolate differed from the other isolates by its ability to accumulate large amounts of elemental sulfur inside its cells and by its ability to oxidize carbon disulfide. Despite its low DNA homology with and substantial phenotypic differences from the vibrio-shaped strains, this isolate also belonged to the genus Thioalkalivibrio according to a phylogenetic analysis. The heterotrophic and autotrophic alkaliphiles that grew with thiocyanate as an N source possessed a relatively high level of cyanase

  10. The alkaline and alkaline-carbonatite magmatism from Southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruberti, E.; Gomes, C. D. B.; Comin-Chiaramonti, P.

    2015-12-01

    Early to Late Cretaceous lasting to Paleocene alkaline magmatism from southern Brazil is found associated with major extensional structural features in and around the Paraná Basin and grouped into various provinces on the basis of several data. Magmatism is variable in size, mode of occurrence and composition. The alkaline rocks are dominantly potassic, a few occurrences showing sodic affinity. The more abundant silicate rocks are evolved undersaturated to saturated in silica syenites, displaying large variation in igneous forms. Less evolved types are restricted to subvolcanic environments and outcrops of effusive suites occur rarely. Cumulatic mafic and ultramafic rock types are very common, particularly in the alkali-carbonatitic complexes. Carbonatite bodies are represented by Ca-carbonatites and Mg-carbonatites and more scarcely by Fe-carbonatites. Available radiometric ages for the alkaline rocks fit on three main chronological groups: around 130 Ma, subcoveal with the Early Cretaceous flood tholeiites of the Paraná Basin, 100-110 Ma and 80-90 Ma (Late Cretaceous). The alkaline magmatism also extends into Paleocene times, as indicated by ages from some volcanic lavas. Geochemically, alkaline potassic and sodic rock types are distinguished by their negative and positive Nb-Ta anomalies, respectively. Negative spikes in Nb-Ta are also a feature common to the associated tholeiitic rocks. Sr-Nd-Pb systematics confirm the contribution of both HIMU and EMI mantle components in the formation of the alkaline rocks. Notably, Early and Late Cretaceous carbonatites have the same isotopic Sr-Nd initial ratios of the associated alkaline rocks. C-O isotopic Sr-Nd isotopic ratios indicate typical mantle signature for some carbonatites and the influence of post-magmatic processes in others. Immiscibility of liquids of phonolitic composition, derived from mafic alkaline parental magmas, has been responsible for the origin of the carbonatites. Close association of alkaline

  11. High Ph, Ammonia Toxicity, and the Search for Life on the Jovian Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deal, P. H.; Souza, K. A.; Mack, H. M.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of pH and ammonia concentration were studied separately, where possible, on a variety of organisms, including some isolated from natural environments of high pH and/or ammonia concentration. Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis are both extremely sensitive to ammonia. An aerobic organism (growth up to pH 11.4) from an alkaline spring is more resistant, but exhibits a toxic response to ammonia at a pH much lower than its maximum for growth. The greatest ammonia resistance has been found in an unidentified organism growing at near neutral pH. Even in this case, however, urvival at ammonia concentrations reasonably expected on the Jovian planets is measured in hours. This is two to three orders of magnitude longer than for E. coli. Results support the tentative conclusion that contamination of the Jovian planets with terrestrial organisms that can grow is unlikely. However, the range of toxic response noted, coupled with the observation that terrestrial life has not been exposed to high ammonia concentrations for millions of years, suggests that adaptation to greater ammonia tolerance may be possible.

  12. Purification and characterization of a cold alkaline protease from a psychrophilic Pseudomonas aeruginosa HY1215.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jian-Hua; Sun, Mi

    2015-01-01

    A novel alkaline protease was purified from Pseudomonas aeruginosa HY1215 using ammonium sulfate, DEAE-Sepharose and Sephacryl S-200 gel filtration chromatographic techniques. The protease had a relative molecular weight of 32.8 KDa by SDS-PAGE, and the optimal temperature and pH for excellent stability and activity were determined as 25 °C and 10.0, respectively. Within the pH range of 7.0-11.0, the protease had a good stability, which could retain more than 80 % of its original activity; in the temperature range of 15-35 °C, the protease had a higher activity, and its activity at 20 °C could amount to 85 % of the maximum activity at 25 °C. Besides, the enzyme activity showed a valuable stability towards several commercially available surfactants (Tween-80, Tween-40, and Triton X-100) and bleaches (H2O2) even when their concentrations ranged up to 2.0 and 1.6 %. PMID:25342263

  13. Increased performance of hydrogen production in microbial electrolysis cells under alkaline conditions.

    PubMed

    Rago, Laura; Baeza, Juan A; Guisasola, Albert

    2016-06-01

    This work reports the first successful enrichment and operation of alkaline bioelectrochemical systems (microbial fuel cells, MFC, and microbial electrolysis cells, MEC). Alkaline (pH=9.3) bioelectrochemical hydrogen production presented better performance (+117%) compared to conventional neutral conditions (2.6 vs 1.2 litres of hydrogen gas per litre of reactor per day, LH2·L(-1)REACTOR·d(-1)). Pyrosequencing results of the anodic biofilm showed that while Geobacter was mainly detected under conventional neutral conditions, Geoalkalibacter sp. was highly detected in the alkaline MFC (21%) and MEC (48%). This is the first report of a high enrichment of Geoalkalibacter from an anaerobic mixed culture using alkaline conditions in an MEC. Moreover, Alkalibacter sp. was highly present in the anodic biofilm of the alkaline MFC (37%), which would indicate its potentiality as a new exoelectrogen. PMID:26855359

  14. Bactericidal and virucidal mechanisms in the alkaline disinfection of compost using calcium lime and ash.

    PubMed

    Hijikata, Nowaki; Tezuka, Rui; Kazama, Shinobu; Otaki, Masahiro; Ushijima, Ken; Ito, Ryusei; Okabe, Satoshi; Sano, Daisuke; Funamizu, Naoyuki

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, the bactericidal and virucidal mechanisms in the alkaline disinfection of compost with calcium lime and ash were investigated. Two indicator microorganisms, Escherichia coli and MS2 coliphage, were used as surrogates for enteric pathogens. The alkaline-treated compost with calcium oxide (CaO) or ash resulted primarily in damage to the outer membrane and enzyme activities of E. coli. The alkaline treatment of compost also led to the infectivity loss of the coliphage because of the partial capsid damage and RNA exteriorization due to a raised pH, which is proportional to the amount of alkaline agents added. These results indicate that the alkaline treatment of compost using calcium oxide and ash is effective and can contribute to the safe usage of compost from a mixing type dry toilet. PMID:27562698

  15. Role of pH on antioxidants production by Spirulina (Arthrospira) platensis.

    PubMed

    Ismaiel, Mostafa Mahmoud Sami; El-Ayouty, Yassin Mahmoud; Piercey-Normore, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Algae can tolerate a broad range of growing conditions but extreme conditions may lead to the generation of highly dangerous reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may cause the deterioration of cell metabolism and damage cellular components. The antioxidants produced by algae alleviate the harmful effects of ROS. While the enhancement of antioxidant production in blue green algae under stress has been reported, the antioxidant response to changes in pH levels requires further investigation. This study presents the effect of pH changes on the antioxidant activity and productivity of the blue green alga Spirulina (Arthrospira) platensis. The algal dry weight (DW) was greatly enhanced at pH 9.0. The highest content of chlorophyll a and carotenoids (10.6 and 2.4mg/g DW, respectively) was recorded at pH 8.5. The highest phenolic content (12.1mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/g DW) was recorded at pH 9.5. The maximum production of total phycobiliprotein (159mg/g DW) was obtained at pH 9.0. The antioxidant activities of radical scavenging activity, reducing power and chelating activity were highest at pH 9.0 with an increase of 567, 250 and 206% compared to the positive control, respectively. Variation in the activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POD) was also reported. While the high alkaline pH may favor the overproduction of antioxidants, normal cell metabolism and membrane function is unaffected, as shown by growth and chlorophyll content, which suggests that these conditions are suitable for further studies on the harvest of antioxidants from S. platensis. PMID:26991300

  16. Heat shock- and alkaline pH-induced proteins of Campylobacter jejuni: characterization and immunological properties.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Y L; Lee, L H; Rollins, D M; Ching, W M

    1994-01-01

    The protein response to physiological stress was characterized in Campylobacter jejuni 81176 after exposure to heat and pH shock and following periods of recovery. Immunoreactivities of major stress-related proteins were determined with anti-Campylobacter immune rabbit serum and intestinal lavage fluid. Distinct proteins with molecular masses ranging from 10 to 120 kDa were induced and/or released by selective heat or pH treatments. The most notable responses were those of two proteins with apparent molecular masses of 45 and 64 kDa that were induced and two other proteins of 10 and 12 kDa that were released by selective heat shock, alkaline pH treatment, or both. On the basis of N-terminal sequence analysis and immunological cross-reactivity data, the 64- and 10-kDa proteins were the C. jejuni homologs of Escherichia coli GroEL and GroES proteins, respectively. Enhanced chemiluminescence Western blotting (immunoblotting) revealed that all four proteins were among the major protein antigens recognized by anti-Campylobacter rabbit serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and immune rabbit intestinal lavage IgA (secretory IgA). The results of this investigation suggest that the C. jejuni 10-, 12-, 45-, and 64-kDa proteins and a number of minor stress-related proteins deserve further evaluation of their respective roles in Campylobacter pathogenesis and immunity. Images PMID:7927682

  17. Enzymatic dehairing of goat skins using alkaline protease from Bacillus sp. SB12.

    PubMed

    Briki, Selmen; Hamdi, Olfa; Landoulsi, Ahmed

    2016-05-01

    The present paper reports the production, purification and biochemical characterization of an extracellular alkaline protease from Bacillus sp. SB12. The enzyme has been used as an alternative to conventional chemicals treatment for dehairing of goat skins. The protease was optimally active at 37 °C and pH 9. Starch at 2% (w/v) was used as the best carbon source and the addition of yeast extract and peptone at 1% each supported the maximum level of protease production in the presence of 5 mM Ca(2+). Protease purification was performed with ammonium sulphate precipitation at 70% saturated fraction followed by dialysis and gel filtration chromatography using Sephadex G-100. The purified enzyme was homogeneous on non-denaturing PAGE and appeared as a single band with an apparent molecular weight of 41 kDa. This enzyme was moderately thermostable and has a wide pH stability range extending from pH 7 to 11. It showed high tolerance toward surfactants agents and organic solvents while it was completely inhibited by PMSF indicating the serine protease type. Purified protease was used to remove hair from goat skin proving its potential application in leather processing industry. The results revealed that the protease has enhanced the quality and physico-chemical properties of the skins while reducing the pollution. PMID:26763763

  18. Simplified seawater alkalinity analysis: Use of linear array spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Wensheng; Byrne, Robert H.

    1998-08-01

    Modified spectrophotometric procedures are presented for the determination of seawater total alkalinity using rapid scan linear array spectrometers. Continuous monitoring of solution pH allows titrations to be terminated at relatively high pH, whereby excess acid terms are very small. Excess acid concentrations are quantified using the sulfonephthalein indicators, bromocresol green and bromocresol purple. The outlined spectrophotometric procedures require no thermal equilibration of samples. Using bromocresol green, solution pH T ([H +] T in moles per kg of solution) is given as: pHT=4.2699+0.002578(35- S)+ log((R(25)-0.00131)/(2.3148-0.1299 R(25))) - log(1-0.001005S) and R(25)= R( t){1+0.00909(25- t)}, where 29⩽S⩽37, 13° C⩽t⩽32° C, and R( t) is the absorbance ratio ( A616/ A444) at temperature t and salinity S. Using bromocresol purple, the solution pH T is given as pH T=5.8182+0.00129(35- S)+log(( R(25)-0.00381)/(2.8729-0.05104 R(25))) and R(25)= R( t){1+0.01869(25- t)}, where 29⩽S⩽37, 13° C⩽t⩽32° C, and R( t)= A589/ A432. Alkalinity measurements using bromocresol purple had a precision on the order of 0.3 μmol kg -1 and were within 0.3-0.9 μmol kg -1 of the alkalinities of certified seawater reference materials.

  19. Molecular and biochemical characterization of a new alkaline active multidomain xylanase from alkaline wastewater sludge.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanyu; Meng, Kun; Luo, Huiying; Huang, Huoqing; Yuan, Tiezheng; Yang, Peilong; Yao, Bin

    2013-02-01

    A xylanase gene, xyn-b39, coding for a multidomain glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 10 protein was cloned from the genomic DNA of the alkaline wastewater sludge of a paper mill. Its deduced amino acid sequence of 1,481 residues included two carbohydrate-binding modules (CBM) of family CBM_4_9, one catalytic domain of GH 10, one family 9 CBM and three S-layer homology (SLH) domains. xyn-b39 was expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant enzyme was purified and characterized. Xyn-b39 exhibited maximum activity at pH 7.0 and 60 °C, and remained highly active under alkaline conditions (more than 80 % activity at pH 9.0 and 40 % activity at pH 10.0). The enzyme was thermostable at 55 °C, retaining more than 90 % of the initial activity after 2 h pre-incubation. Xyn-b39 had wide substrate specificity and hydrolyzed soluble substrates (birchwood xylan, beechwood xylan, oat spelt xylan, wheat arabinoxylan) and insoluble substrates (oat spelt xylan and wheat arabinoxylan). Hydrolysis product analysis indicated that Xyn-b39 was an endo-type xylanase. The K (m) and V (max) values of Xyn-b39 for birchwood xylan were 1.01 mg/mL and 73.53 U/min/mg, respectively. At the charge of 10 U/g reed pulp for 1 h, Xyn-b39 significantly reduced the Kappa number (P < 0.05) with low consumption of chlorine dioxide alone. PMID:23117673

  20. Monodispersed calcium carbonate nanoparticles modulate local pH and inhibit tumor growth in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Som, Avik; Raliya, Ramesh; Tian, Limei; Akers, Walter; Ippolito, Joseph E.; Singamaneni, Srikanth; Biswas, Pratim; Achilefu, Samuel

    2016-06-01

    The acidic extracellular environment of tumors potentiates their aggressiveness and metastasis, but few methods exist to selectively modulate the extracellular pH (pHe) environment of tumors. Transient flushing of biological systems with alkaline fluids or proton pump inhibitors is impractical and nonselective. Here we report a nanoparticles-based strategy to intentionally modulate the pHe in tumors. Biochemical simulations indicate that the dissolution of calcium carbonate nanoparticles (nano-CaCO3) in vivo increases pH asymptotically to 7.4. We developed two independent facile methods to synthesize monodisperse non-doped vaterite nano-CaCO3 with distinct size range between 20 and 300 nm. Using murine models of cancer, we demonstrate that the selective accumulation of nano-CaCO3 in tumors increases tumor pH over time. The associated induction of tumor growth stasis is putatively interpreted as a pHe increase. This study establishes an approach to prepare nano-CaCO3 over a wide particle size range, a formulation that stabilizes the nanomaterials in aqueous solutions, and a pH-sensitive nano-platform capable of modulating the acidic environment of cancer for potential therapeutic benefits.The acidic extracellular environment of tumors potentiates their aggressiveness and metastasis, but few methods exist to selectively modulate the extracellular pH (pHe) environment of tumors. Transient flushing of biological systems with alkaline fluids or proton pump inhibitors is impractical and nonselective. Here we report a nanoparticles-based strategy to intentionally modulate the pHe in tumors. Biochemical simulations indicate that the dissolution of calcium carbonate nanoparticles (nano-CaCO3) in vivo increases pH asymptotically to 7.4. We developed two independent facile methods to synthesize monodisperse non-doped vaterite nano-CaCO3 with distinct size range between 20 and 300 nm. Using murine models of cancer, we demonstrate that the selective accumulation of nano-CaCO3

  1. Effects of temperature, pH and NaCl on protease activity in digestive tract of young turbot, Scophthalmus maximus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Muyan; Zhang, Xiumei; Gao, Tianxiang; Chen, Chao

    2006-09-01

    The protease activity in digestive tract of young turbot Scophthalmus maximum was studied, and the optimal pH, temperature and NaCl concentration were determined for different portions of the fish's internal organs. The optimal activity in the fish's stomach was at pH of 2.2, while that in the intestinal extracts was within the alkaline range from 9.5 to 10.0. In hepatopancreas, the optimal pH was in low alkalinity at 8.5. The optimal reaction temperature was above 40°C in stomach, intestine and hepatopancreas. With increasing temperature, the pH value increased in stomach, while in the intestine, an opposite tendency was observed due to combined effect of pH and temperature. NaCl concentration showed inhibitory impact on protein digestion in hepatopancreas. The main protease for protein digestion in turbot seemed to be pepsin. Moreover, the maximum protease activity in different segments of intestine existed in the hindgut.

  2. Distribution of tetracycline resistance genes in anaerobic treatment of waste sludge: The role of pH in regulating tetracycline resistant bacteria and horizontal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haining; Chen, Yinguang; Zheng, Xiong; Su, Yinglong; Wan, Rui; Yang, Shouye

    2016-10-01

    Although pH value has been widely regarded as an important factor that affects resource recovery of waste sludge, the potential influence of diverse pHs on the distribution of tetracycline resistance genes (TRGs) during sludge anaerobic treatment is largely unknown. Here we reported that in the range of pH 4-10, 0.58-1.18 log unit increase of target TRGs was observed at pH 4, compared with that at pH 7, while 0.70-1.31 log unit further removal were obtained at pH 10. Mechanism study revealed that varied pHs not only altered the community structures of tetracycline resistant bacteria (TRB), but also changed their relative abundances, benefitting the propagation (acidic pHs) or attenuation (alkaline pHs) of TRB. Further investigation indicated that the amount and gene-possessing abilities of key genetic vectors for horizontal TRGs transfer were greatly promoted at acidic pHs but restricted under alkaline conditions. PMID:27485281

  3. Prediction of the speciation of alkaline earths adsorbed on mineral surfaces in salt solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sverjensky, Dimitri A.

    2006-05-01

    Despite the fact that the bulk compositions of most low temperature natural surface waters, groundwaters, and porewaters are heavily influenced by alkaline earths, an understanding of the development of proton surface charge in the presence of alkaline earth adsorption on the surfaces of minerals is lacking. In particular, models of speciation at the mineral-water interface in systems involving alkaline earths need to be established for a range of different minerals. In the present study, X-ray standing wave results for Sr 2+ adsorption on rutile as a tetranuclear complex [Fenter, P., Cheng, L., Rihs, S., Machesky, M., Bedyzk, M.D., Sturchio, N.C., 2000. Electrical double-layer structure at the rutile-water interface as observed in situ with small-period X-ray standing waves. J. Colloid Interface Sci.225, 154-165] are used as constraints for all the alkaline earths in surface complexation simulations of proton surface charge, metal adsorption, and electrokinetic experiments referring to wide ranges of pH, ionic strength, surface coverage, and type of oxide. The tetranuclear reaction 4>SOH+M+H2O=(>SOH)2(>SO-)2_M(OH)++3H+ predominates for the large cations Sr 2+ and Ba 2+ (and presumably Ra 2+), consistent with X-ray results. In contrast, the mononuclear reaction >SOH+M+H2O=>SO-_M(OH)++2H+ predominates for the much smaller Mg 2+ (and presumably Be 2+), with minor amounts of the tetranuclear reaction. Both reaction types appear to be important for the intermediate size Ca 2+. For all the alkaline earths on all oxides, the proportions of the different reaction types vary systematically as a function of pH, ionic strength, and surface coverage. The application of Born solvation and crystal-chemical theory enables estimation of the equilibrium constants of adsorption of all the alkaline earths on all oxides. On high dielectric constant solids (rutile, magnetite, manganese dioxide), where the solvation contribution is negligable, ion adsorption correlates with crystal

  4. Process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Chia-lin W.

    1994-01-01

    According to its major aspects and broadly stated, the present invention is a process for treating alkaline waste materials, including high level radioactive wastes, for vitrification. The process involves adjusting the pH of the wastes with nitric acid, adding formic acid (or a process stream containing formic acid) to reduce mercury compounds to elemental mercury and MnO{sub 2} to the Mn(II) ion, and mixing with class formers to produce a melter feed. The process minimizes production of hydrogen due to noble metal-catalyzed formic acid decomposition during, treatment, while producing a redox-balanced feed for effective melter operation and a quality glass product. An important feature of the present invention is the use of different acidifying and reducing, agents to treat the wastes. The nitric acid acidifies the wastes to improve yield stress and supplies acid for various reactions; then the formic acid reduces mercury compounds to elemental mercury and MnO{sub 2}) to the Mn(II) ion. When the pH of the waste is lower, reduction of mercury compounds and MnO{sub 2}) is faster and less formic acid is needed, and the production of hydrogen caused by catalytically-active noble metals is decreased.

  5. Response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris to Alkaline Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Stolyar, S.; He, Q.; He, Z.; Yang, Z.; Borglin, S.E.; Joyner, D.; Huang, K.; Alm, E.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.; Wall, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.; Stahl, D.A.

    2007-11-30

    The response of exponentially growing Desulfovibrio vulgarisHildenborough to pH 10 stress was studied using oligonucleotidemicroarrays and a study set of mutants with genes suggested by microarraydata to be involved in the alkaline stress response deleted. The datashowed that the response of D. vulgaris to increased pH is generallysimilar to that of Escherichia coli but is apparently controlled byunique regulatory circuits since the alternative sigma factors (sigma Sand sigma E) contributing to this stress response in E. coli appear to beabsent in D. vulgaris. Genes previously reported to be up-regulated in E.coli were up-regulated in D. vulgaris; these genes included three ATPasegenes and a tryptophan synthase gene. Transcription of chaperone andprotease genes (encoding ATP-dependent Clp and La proteases and DnaK) wasalso elevated in D. vulgaris. As in E. coli, genes involved in flagellumsynthesis were down-regulated. The transcriptional data also identifiedregulators, distinct from sigma S and sigma E, that are likely part of aD. vulgaris Hildenborough-specific stress response system.Characterization of a study set of mutants with genes implicated inalkaline stress response deleted confirmed that there was protectiveinvolvement of the sodium/proton antiporter NhaC-2, tryptophanase A, andtwo putative regulators/histidine kinases (DVU0331 andDVU2580).

  6. Alkalinity production in intertidal sands intensified by lugworm bioirrigation

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Alexandra M.F.; Malkin, Sairah Y.; Montserrat, Francesc; Meysman, Filip J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Porewater profiles and sediment-water fluxes of oxygen, nutrients, pH, calcium, alkalinity, and sulfide were measured in intertidal sandflat sediments from the Oosterschelde mesotidal lagoon (The Netherlands). The influence of bioturbation and bioirrigation by the deep-burrowing polychaete Arenicola marina on the rates and sources of benthic alkalinity generation was examined by comparing measurements in intact and defaunated sediment cores before and after the addition of A. marina in summer and fall 2011. Higher organic matter remineralization rates, shallower O2 penetration, and greater sediment-water solute fluxes were observed in summer, consistent with higher sediment community metabolic rates at a higher temperature. Lugworm activity stimulated porewater exchange (5.1 × in summer, 1.9 × in fall), organic matter remineralization (6.2 × in summer, 1.9 × in fall), aerobic respiration (2.4 × in summer, 2.1 × in fall), alkalinity release (4.7 × in summer, 4.0 × in fall), nutrient regeneration, and iron cycling. The effects of lugworm activity on net sediment-water fluxes were similar but more pronounced in summer than in fall. Alkalinity release in fall was entirely driven by metabolic carbonate dissolution, while this process explained between 22 and 69% of total alkalinity production in summer, indicating the importance of other processes in this season. By enhancing organic matter remineralization and the reoxidation of reduced metabolites by the sediment microbial community, lugworm activity stimulated the production of dissolved inorganic carbon and metabolic acidity, which in turn enhanced metabolic CaCO3 dissolution efficiency. In summer, evidence of microbial long distance electron transport (LDET) was observed in defaunated sediment. Thus, alkalinity production by net carbonate dissolution was likely supplemented by anaerobic respiration and LDET in summer. PMID:25431515

  7. Alkalinity production in intertidal sands intensified by lugworm bioirrigation.

    PubMed

    Rao, Alexandra M F; Malkin, Sairah Y; Montserrat, Francesc; Meysman, Filip J R

    2014-07-01

    Porewater profiles and sediment-water fluxes of oxygen, nutrients, pH, calcium, alkalinity, and sulfide were measured in intertidal sandflat sediments from the Oosterschelde mesotidal lagoon (The Netherlands). The influence of bioturbation and bioirrigation by the deep-burrowing polychaete Arenicola marina on the rates and sources of benthic alkalinity generation was examined by comparing measurements in intact and defaunated sediment cores before and after the addition of A. marina in summer and fall 2011. Higher organic matter remineralization rates, shallower O2 penetration, and greater sediment-water solute fluxes were observed in summer, consistent with higher sediment community metabolic rates at a higher temperature. Lugworm activity stimulated porewater exchange (5.1 × in summer, 1.9 × in fall), organic matter remineralization (6.2 × in summer, 1.9 × in fall), aerobic respiration (2.4 × in summer, 2.1 × in fall), alkalinity release (4.7 × in summer, 4.0 × in fall), nutrient regeneration, and iron cycling. The effects of lugworm activity on net sediment-water fluxes were similar but more pronounced in summer than in fall. Alkalinity release in fall was entirely driven by metabolic carbonate dissolution, while this process explained between 22 and 69% of total alkalinity production in summer, indicating the importance of other processes in this season. By enhancing organic matter remineralization and the reoxidation of reduced metabolites by the sediment microbial community, lugworm activity stimulated the production of dissolved inorganic carbon and metabolic acidity, which in turn enhanced metabolic CaCO3 dissolution efficiency. In summer, evidence of microbial long distance electron transport (LDET) was observed in defaunated sediment. Thus, alkalinity production by net carbonate dissolution was likely supplemented by anaerobic respiration and LDET in summer. PMID:25431515

  8. Alkalinity production in intertidal sands intensified by lugworm bioirrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Alexandra M. F.; Malkin, Sairah Y.; Montserrat, Francesc; Meysman, Filip J. R.

    2014-07-01

    Porewater profiles and sediment-water fluxes of oxygen, nutrients, pH, calcium, alkalinity, and sulfide were measured in intertidal sandflat sediments from the Oosterschelde mesotidal lagoon (The Netherlands). The influence of bioturbation and bioirrigation by the deep-burrowing polychaete Arenicola marina on the rates and sources of benthic alkalinity generation was examined by comparing measurements in intact and defaunated sediment cores before and after the addition of A. marina in summer and fall 2011. Higher organic matter remineralization rates, shallower O2 penetration, and greater sediment-water solute fluxes were observed in summer, consistent with higher sediment community metabolic rates at a higher temperature. Lugworm activity stimulated porewater exchange (5.1 × in summer, 1.9 × in fall), organic matter remineralization (6.2 × in summer, 1.9 × in fall), aerobic respiration (2.4 × in summer, 2.1 × in fall), alkalinity release (4.7 × in summer, 4.0 × in fall), nutrient regeneration, and iron cycling. The effects of lugworm activity on net sediment-water fluxes were similar but more pronounced in summer than in fall. Alkalinity release in fall was entirely driven by metabolic carbonate dissolution, while this process explained between 22 and 69% of total alkalinity production in summer, indicating the importance of other processes in this season. By enhancing organic matter remineralization and the reoxidation of reduced metabolites by the sediment microbial community, lugworm activity stimulated the production of dissolved inorganic carbon and metabolic acidity, which in turn enhanced metabolic CaCO3 dissolution efficiency. In summer, evidence of microbial long distance electron transport (LDET) was observed in defaunated sediment. Thus, alkalinity production by net carbonate dissolution was likely supplemented by anaerobic respiration and LDET in summer.

  9. Alkaline and ultrasonic dissolution of biological materials for trace silicon determination

    PubMed Central

    Viveros, Robert D.; Liberman, Alexander; Trogler, William C.; Kummel, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    A simple method for trace elemental determination in biological tissue has been developed. Novel nanomaterials with biomedical applications necessitate the determination of the in vivo fate of the materials to understand their toxicological profile. Hollow iron-doped calcined silica nanoshells have been used as a model to demonstrate that potassium hydroxide and bath sonication at 50 °C can extract elements from alkaline-soluble nanomaterials. After alkali digestion, nitric acid is used to adjust the pH into a suitable range for analysis using techniques such as inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry which require neutral or acidic analytes. In chicken liver phantoms injected with the nanoshells, 96% of the expected silicon concentration was detected. This value was in good agreement with the 94% detection efficiency of nanoshells dissolved in aqueous solution as a control for potential sample matrix interference. Nanoshell detection was further confirmed in a mouse 24 h after intravenous administration; the measured silica above baseline was 35 times greater or more than the standard deviations of the measurements. This method provides a simple and accurate means to quantify alkaline-soluble nanomaterials in biological tissue. PMID:25909037

  10. Metal bioavailability and toxicity to fish in low-alkalinity lakes - a critical-review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spry, D.J.; Wiener, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    Fish in low-alkalinity lakes having ph of 6.0-6.5 Or less often have higher body or tissue burdens of mercury, cadmium, and lead than do fish in nearby lakes with higher ph. The greater bioaccumulation of these metals in such waters seems to result partly from the greater aqueous abundances of biologically available forms (ch3hg+, cd2+, and pb2+) at low ph. In addition, the low concentrations of aqueous calcium in low-alkalinity lakes increase the permeability of biological membranes to these metals, which in fish may cause greater uptake from both water and food. Fish exposed to aqueous inorganic aluminum in the laboratory and field accumulate the metal in and on the epithelial cells of the gills; however, there is little accumulation of aluminum in the blood or internal organs. In low-ph water, both sublethal and lethal toxicity of aluminum has been clearly demonstrated in both laboratory and field studies at environmental concentrations. In contrast, recently measured aqueous concentrations of total mercury, methylmercury, cadmium, and lead in low-alkalinity lakes are much lower than the aqueous concentrations known to cause acute or chronic toxicity in fish, although the vast majority of toxicological research has involved waters with much higher ionic strength than that in low-alkalinity lakes. Additional work with fish is needed to better assess (1) the toxicity of aqueous metals in low-alkalinity waters, and (2) the toxicological significance of dietary methylmercury and cadmium.

  11. Alkaline galvanic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenberg, M.

    1993-06-01

    A battery is described having an anode, a cathode and an electrolyte with the anode having zinc or a zinc alloy as an active anodic material, the cathode having a metal oxide or hydroxide as an active cathodic material, and the electrolyte comprising a solution of a first salt formed by the reaction of one or more acids selected from the group consisting of boric acid, phosphoric acid and arsenic acid with an alkali or earth alkali hydroxide present in an amount to produce a stoichiometric, excess of said hydroxide to said acid in the range of 2.5 to 11.0 equivalents per liter, and a solution of a second salt which is a soluble alkali or earth alkali fluoride in an amount corresponding to a concentration range of 0.01 to 1.0 equivalents per liter of total solution.

  12. Decarbonation, Serpentinization, Abiogenic Methane, and Extreme pH beneath the Mariana Forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottl, M. J.; Wheat, C. G.; Fryer, P.

    2004-12-01

    Low-chlorinity springs sampled from ten sites on nine serpentinite mud volcanoes show systematic chemical gradients across the outer Mariana forearc that result from progressive devolatilization of the subducting Pacific plate. Sites range from 50 to 90 km from the trench axis corresponding to depths to the top of the plate of ˜15 to 29 km. Dissolved sulfate, Na/Cl, K, Rb, Cs, and B in the springs all increase regularly with distance from the trench, leached from the subducting sediment and altered basalt in response to increasing temperature at depth from ˜100-300° C. Sites nearer the trench have high Ca (up to 75 mmol/kg) and Sr, low alkalinity, and pH 10.7, whereas sites farther from the trench have almost no Ca and Sr, alkalinity (some carbonate but mostly hydroxyl) as high as 69 meq/kg, and pH 12.5. Springs with high alkalinity also have high methane (>44 mmol/kg) that feeds sulfate-reducing microbial communities in the shallow subsurface and macrofauna at the seafloor. These distal springs form chimneys and crusts of CaCO3, whereas the proximal springs form chimneys of brucite. High alkalinity at the distal sites apparently results from decarbonation at the top of the subducting plate; because serpentinization during ascent generates both high pH and H2, the resulting dissolved carbonate is reduced to methane such that carbonate alkalinity is replaced by hydroxyl alkalinity: 4H2 + CO3= = CH4 + H2O + 2OH-. This reaction can account for the much higher pH of the distal springs. Chlorinity of the springs varies from 234-546 mmol/kg and is related more to latitude N-S than to distance from the trench. Distal springs have otherwise similar compositions over this entire range of chlorinity, implying that chloride derives from depth rather than from mixing with seawater within the seamounts themselves. The range in chlorinity can readily be explained by serpentinization at reasonable water/rock mass ratios of 0.2-1.0 if 30-40% of the spring water originates as

  13. Kinetic Study of the Alkaline Degradation of Oseltamivir Phosphate and Valacyclovir Hydrochloride using Validated Stability Indicating HPLC.

    PubMed

    Al-Bagary, Ramzia I; El-Zaher, Asmaa A; Morsy, Fahima A; Fouad, Mai M

    2014-01-01

    Aqueous alkaline degradation was performed for oseltamivir phosphate (OP) and valacyclovir hydrochloride (VA). Isocratic stability indicating the use of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was presented for each drug in the presence of its degradation product. The separations were performed using the Nucleosil ODS column and a mobile phase consisting of phosphate buffer (pH = 7), acetonitrile, and methanol 50:25:25 (v/v/v) for OP. For VA separation, a Nucleosil CN column using phosphate buffer (pH = 7) and methanol 85:15 (v/v) was used as a mobile phase. Ultraviolet detection at 210 nm and 254 nm was used for OP and VA, respectively. The method showed high sensitivity concerning linearity, accuracy, and precision over the range 1-250 μg mL(-1) for both drugs. The proposed method was used to determine the drug in its pharmaceutical formulation and to investigate the degradation kinetics of each drug's alkaline-stressed samples. The reactions were found to follow a first-order reaction. The activation energy could also be estimated. International Conference on Harmonisation guidelines were adopted for method validation. PMID:24932100

  14. Influence of operating parameters on neutralzation of alkaline wastewater using CO2 in a jet loop absorption reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jea Keun; Son, Min Ki

    2013-04-01

    The increased focus on global warming has resulted in an increase in studies regarding strategies for the control of CO2 emissions from combustion processes. In this study, we tested the absorption of CO2 in combustion gas into an alkaline dyeing wastewater to simultaneously control CO2 and wastewater. During the experiment, we investigated the effects of operating parameters on neutralization characteristics of the wastewater by using CO2 in a bench-scale semi-batch jet loop absorption reactor (0.1m diameter and 1.0m in height). The operating parameters investigated in the study are gas flow rate of 1.0 - 2.0 L/min and liquid recirculation flow rate of 4 - 32 L/min. We show that the initial pH of wastewater rapidly decreased with increased gas flow rate for a given liquid recirculation flow rate. This was due to the increase in the gas holdup and the interfacial area at higher gas flow rate in the reactor. At constant gas flow rate, the time required to neutralize the wastewater initial pH of 10.1 decreased with liquid recirculation flow rate (QL), reached a minimum value in the range of QL=16L/min and QL=24L/min, and then increased with further increase in QL. The fraction of CO2 utilization, defined as the ratio of CO2 used to neutralize the wastewater to CO2 injected into the reactor, showed a higher value of 0.99 when the wastewater pH was above 9.0. However, the fraction of CO2 utilization decreased to 0.88 as the wastewater pH lowers to 7.0. Our results suggest that CO2 in the combustion gas could effectively be used to neutralize alkaline wastewater instead of sulfuric acid, which is a commercially used neutralizing agent in conventional wastewater treatment processes.

  15. Temperature dependence of the absorbance of alkaline solutions of 4-nitrophenyl phosphate--a potential source of error in the measurement of alkaline phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Burtis, C A; Seibert, L E; Baird, M A; Sampson, E J

    1977-09-01

    The absorbance of an alkaline solution of 4-nitrophenyl phosphate is a function of temperature. Quantitative evaluation of this phenomenon indicates that it (a) depends on the concentration of the compound and is independent of source, buffer concentration, and pH above 9.0; (b) is reversible; (c) is not a result of alkaline hydrolysis or 4-nitrophenol contamination; and (d) correlates with a temperature-induced shift of its absorbance spectrum. The phenomenon may represent a potential analytical problem in methods for alkaline phosphatase in which this compound is the substrate. If thermal equilibrium is not reached and maintained during an alkaline phosphatase assay, the thermochromic response will be included in the measured rate. The magnitude of this error depends on the thermal response and control characteristics of each particular instrument and the reaction conditions under which such an analysis is performed. PMID:19164

  16. Macroalgae contribute to nested mosaics of pH variability in a sub-Arctic fjord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause-Jensen, D.; Duarte, C. M.; Hendriks, I. E.; Meire, L.; Blicher, M. E.; Marbà, N.; Sejr, M. K.

    2015-03-01

    The Arctic Ocean is considered the most vulnerable ecosystem to ocean acidification (OA) and large-scale assessments of pH and the saturation state for aragonite (Ωarag) indicate that it is already close to corrosive states (Ωarag < 1). In high-latitude coastal waters the regulation of pH and Ωarag is far more complex than offshore because increased biological activity and input of glacial meltwater affect pH. As most calcifiers occupy coastal habitats, the assessment of risks from OA to these vulnerable organisms cannot be derived from extrapolation of current and forecasted offshore conditions, but requires an understanding of the regimes of pH and Ωarag in their coastal habitats. To increase knowledge of the natural variability of pH in the Arctic coastal zone and specifically to test the influence of benthic vegetated habitats, we quantified pH-variability in a Greenland fjord in a nested scale approach. A sensor array logging pH, O2, PAR, temperature and salinity was applied on spatial scales ranging from km-scale across the horizontal extension of the fjord, over 100 m scale vertically in the fjord, 10-100 m scale between subtidal habitats with and without kelp forests and between vegetated tidal pools and adjacent vegetated shores, to cm-m scale within kelp forests and mm-scale across boundary layers of macrophyte tissue. In addition, we assessed the temporal variability in pH on diurnal and seasonal scales. Based on pH-measurements combined with relationships between salinity, total alkalinity and dissolved inorganic carbon we also estimated variability of Ωarag. Results show variability in pH and Ωarag of up to 0.2-0.3 units at several scales, i.e. along the horizontal and vertical extension of the fjord, between seasons and on a diel basis in benthic habitats and within 1 m3 of kelp forest. Vegetated intertidal pools exhibited extreme diel pH variability of > 1.5 units and macrophyte boundary layers a pH-range of up to 0.8 units. Overall, Ωarag was

  17. An alkaline spring system within the Del Puerto ophiolite (California USA): A Mars analog site

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, J.G.; Green, S.; Blake, D.; Valley, J.; Kita, N.; Treiman, A.; Dobson, P.F.

    2008-10-01

    Mars appears to have experienced little compositional differentiation of primitive lithosphere, and thus much of the surface of Mars is covered by mafic lavas. On Earth, mafic and ultramafic rocks present in ophiolites, oceanic crust and upper mantle that have been obducted onto land, are therefore good analogs for Mars. The characteristic mineralogy, aqueous geochemistry, and microbial communities of cold-water alkaline springs associated with these mafic and ultramafic rocks represent a particularly compelling analog for potential life-bearing systems. Serpentinization, the reaction of water with mafic minerals such as olivine and pyroxene, yields fluids with unusual chemistry (Mg-OH and Ca-OH waters with pH values up to {approx}12), as well as heat and hydrogen gas that can sustain subsurface, chemosynthetic ecosystems. The recent observation of seeps from pole-facing crater and canyon walls in the higher Martian latitudes supports the hypothesis that even present conditions might allow for a rockhosted chemosynthetic biosphere in near-surface regions of the Martian crust. The generation of methane within a zone of active serpentinization, through either abiogenic or biogenic processes, could account for the presence of methane detected in the Martian atmosphere. For all of these reasons, studies of terrestrial alkaline springs associated with mafic and ultramafic rocks are particularly timely. This study focuses on the alkaline Adobe Springs, emanating from mafic and ultramafic rocks of the California Coast Range, where a community of novel bacteria is associated with the precipitation of Mg-Ca carbonate cements. The carbonates may serve as a biosignature that could be used in the search for evidence of life on Mars.

  18. Impacts of variable pH on stability and nutrient removal efficiency of aerobic granular sludge.

    PubMed

    Lashkarizadeh, Monireh; Munz, Giulio; Oleszkiewicz, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    The impact of pH variation on aerobic granular sludge stability and performance was investigated. A 9-day alkaline (pH=9) and acidic (pH=6) pH shocks were imposed on mature granules with simultaneous chemical oxygen demand (COD), nitrogen and phosphorus removal. The imposed alkaline pH shock (pH 9) reduced nitrogen and phosphorus removal efficiency from 88% and 98% to 66% and 50%, respectively, with no further recovery. However, acidic pH shock (pH 6) did not have a major impact on nutrient removal and the removal efficiencies recovered to their initial values after 3 days of operation under the new pH condition. Operating the reactors under alkaline pH induced granules breakage and resulted in an increased solids concentration in the effluent and a significant decrease in the size of the bio-particles, while acidic pH did not have significant impacts on granules stability. Changes in chemical structure and composition of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) matrix were suggested as the main factors inducing granules instability under high pH. PMID:26744935

  19. Effects of pH adjustment with phosphates on attributes and functionalities of normal and high pH beef.

    PubMed

    Young, O A; Zhang, S X; Farouk, M M; Podmore, C

    2005-05-01

    Longissimus dorsi muscles from six normal- and six high-ultimate pH bulls were selected for fine mincing and subsequent pH adjustment with acid and alkaline pyrophosphate. Four pH treatments were prepared: initially high remains high (mean of pH 6.37), high becomes normal (5.62); initially normal remains normal (5.65), and normal becomes high (6.21). The addition level of phosphate as P(2)O(5) was the same in all replicates. Before pH adjustment, colour and water holding capacity (WHC) values were strongly affected by higher (initial) pH in expected ways: darker, lower chroma, higher capacity. After pH adjustment, these values were affected only by the final pH, not the initial pH (the pH history). Total protein solubility was likewise affected by final pH but not initial pH. In contrast, the combination high initial pH-high final pH improved sarcoplasmic protein solubility by 20% over the combination normal initial pH-high final pH. Sarcoplasmic protein solubility is an indicator of strain required to fracture cooked batters made from the minced meats; in the event, the rank order of the four treatments for strain-to-fracture matched that of sarcoplasmic protein solubility. Statistically, sarcoplasmic protein solubility and strain-to-fracture were both affected by initial pH (P<0.01) and final pH (P<0.001). However, stress required to fracture cooked batters was entirely controlled by initial pH (P<0.01). In other words, the stress-to-fracture advantage of initially high pH meat was not matched by upward pH adjustment of initially normal pH meat. Emulsion stability, which is better with higher pH meat, was affected by initial and final pH (both P<0.01). Cook yield, like WHC of pH-adjusted raw meat, was more due to final pH than initial pH, similarly cooked batter colour, whereas final pH had a significant effect on quality attributes (generally better when higher). An initially high pH history conferred an enduring advantage on three important batter attributes

  20. Evidence for intramolecular aromatic-ring stacking in the physiological pH range of the monodeprotonated xanthine residue in mixed-ligand complexes containing xanthosinate 5'-monophosphate (XMP).

    PubMed

    Sigel, Helmut; Operschall, Bert P; Massoud, Salah S; Song, Bin; Griesser, Rolf

    2006-12-14

    The stability constants of the mixed-ligand complexes formed between Cu(Arm)2+ [Arm = 2,2'-bipyridine (Bpy) or 1,10-phenanthroline (Phen)], and the di- or trianion of xanthosine 5'-monophosphoric acid [= XMP(2-) or (XMP - H)(3-)] were determined by potentiometric pH titration in aqueous solution (25 degrees C; I = 0.1 M, NaNO3). Those for the monoanion, i.e., the Cu(Arm)(H;XMP)+ complexes, could only be estimated; for these species it is concluded that the metal ion is overwhelmingly bound at N7 and the proton resides at the phosphate group. Similarly, in the Cu(Arm)(XMP)+/- [= Cu(Arm)(X - H.MP.H)+/-] complexes Cu(Arm)2+ is also at N7 but the xanthine residue has lost a proton whereas the phosphate group still carries one, i.e., stacking plays, if at all, only a very minor role, yet, the N7-bound Cu(Arm)2+ appears to form an outer-sphere macrochelate with P(O)2(OH)-, its formation degree being about 60%. All this is different in the Cu(Arm)(XMP - H)- complexes, which are formed by the (XMP - H)(3-) species, that occur at the physiological pH of 7.5 and for which previously evidence has been provided that in a tautomeric equilibrium the xanthine moiety loses a proton either from (N1)H or (N3)H. In Cu(Arm)(XMP - H)- the phosphate group is the primary binding site for Cu(Arm)2+ and the observed increased complex stability is mainly due to intramolecular stack (st) formation between the aromatic-ring systems of Phen or Bpy and the monodeprotonated xanthine residue of (XMP - H)(3-); e.g., the stacked Cu(Phen)(XMP - H) isomer occurs with approximately 76%. Regarding biological systems the most important result is that at physiological pH the xanthine moiety has lost a proton from the (N1)H/(N3)H sites forming (XMP - H)(3-) and that its anionic xanthinate residue is able to undergo aromatic-ring stacking. PMID:17117222

  1. Purification and biochemical characterization of an alkaline protease from marine bacteria Pseudoalteromonas sp. 129-1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shimei; Liu, Ge; Zhang, Dechao; Li, Chaoxu; Sun, Chaomin

    2015-12-01

    An extracellular alkaline protease produced by marine bacteria strain Pseudoalteromonas sp. 129-1 was purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation, anion exchange chromatography, and gel filtration. The purity of the protease was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and molecular mass was estimated to be 35 kDa. The protease maintained considerable activity and stability at a wide temperature range of 10-60 °C and pH range of 6-11, and optimum activity was detected at temperature of 50 °C and pH of 8. Metallo-protease inhibitor, EDTA, had no inhibitory effect on protease activity even at concentration up to 15 mM, whereas 15 mM PMSF, a common serine protease inhibitor, greatly inactivated the protease. The high stability of the protease in the presence of surfactants (SDS, Tween 80, and Triton X-100), oxidizing agent H(2)O(2), and commercial detergents was observed. Moreover, the protease was tolerant to most of the tested organic solvents, and saline tolerant up to 30%. Interestingly, biofilm of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 was greatly reduced by 0.01 mg ml(-1) of the protease, and nearly completely abolished with the concentration of 1 mg ml(-1). Collectively, the protease showed valuable feathers as an additive in laundry detergent and non-toxic anti-biofilm agent. PMID:26213994

  2. Thermostable alkaline halophilic-protease production by Natronolimnobius innermongolicus WN18.

    PubMed

    Selim, Samy; Hagagy, Nashwa; Abdel Aziz, Mohamed; El-Meleigy, El Syaed; Pessione, Enrica

    2014-01-01

    This study reports the production and biochemical characterisation of a thermostable alkaline halophilic protease from Natronolimnobius innermongolicus WN18 (HQ658997), isolated from soda Lake of Wadi An-Natrun, Egypt. The enzyme was concentrated by spinning through a centriplus, centrifugal ultrafiltration Millipore membrane with a total yield of 25%. The relative molecular mass of this protease determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis ranged from 67 to 43 kDa. The extracellular protease of N. innermongolicus WN18 was dependent on high salt concentrations for activity and stability, and it had an optimum temperature of 60°C in the presence of 2.5 M NaCl. This enzyme was stable in a broad pH range (6-12) with an optimum pH of 9-10 for azocasein hydrolysis. This extracellular protease, therefore, could be defined as thermostable and haloalkaliphilic with distinct properties that make the enzyme applicable for different industrial purposes. PMID:24716669

  3. Influence of pH on the survival of Dictyosphaerium chlorelloides populations living in aquatic environments highly contaminated with chromium.

    PubMed

    Pereira, María; Bartolomé, M Carmen; Sánchez-Fortún, Sebastián

    2013-12-01

    The accommodation of photosynthetic organisms to adverse conditions, such as pH changes in the aquatic environment, and their response to aquatic pollutants is essential to develop future biosensors. The present study reports the ability of both Cr(VI)-sensitive and tolerant Dyctiosphaerium chlorelloides strains to live in aqueous solutions highly contaminated with hexavalent chromium under varying ranges of pH, by the determination of chromium toxic effects on these strains. Studies of cell growth, photosynthetic quantum yield and gross photosynthesis rate show that both D. chlorelloides strains are able to survive in alkaline and moderately acidified (pH 4.25) aquatic environments. Below this pH value cell populations from both strains exposed for short periods of time to Cr(VI) showed alterations in the three parameters studied. There were no significant differences comparing the response of both strains at pH change in the culture medium. However, Cr(VI)-tolerant strain exhibits a better fit to maintain cell growth than Cr(VI)-sensitive strain when both were subjected to pH 4.25 in the culture medium. The absence of significant differences in photosynthetic activity results for both strains suggests that the lower sensitivity exhibited by Cr(VI)-tolerant strain would be due to cellular morphological changes rather than changes in cellular activity. PMID:24125866

  4. Photoreversible changes in pH of pea phytochrome solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Tokutomi, S.; Yamamoto, K.T.; Miyoshi, Y.; Furuya, M.

    1982-02-01

    Phytochrome is a chromoprotein that serves as the photoreceptor for a variety of photomorphogenic responses in plants. Phytochrome was isolated from etiolated pea seedlings. Photoinduced pH changes of an unbuffered solution of the phytochrome were monitored with a semimicrocombination pH electrode at pH 6.5. Red-light irradiation increased the pH of the medium. This alkalinization was reversed by a subsequent far-red-light irradiation. The magnitude and direction of the red-light-induced pH changes was dependent on the pH of the photocrome solution, and the maximum alkalinization was observed at pH 6.0, where the number of protons taken up per phytochrome monomer was 0.18. These results suggest that phytochrome is a multifunctional protein composed of a chromophoric domain and a hydrophobic domain. It is probable that the hydrophobic domain is responsible for the photoinduced change of hydrophobicity of phytochrome and that the ionizable groups responsible for the photoinduced pH changes are localized in the chromophoric domain. (JMT)

  5. A Constructed Alkaline Consortium and Its Dynamics in Treating Alkaline Black Liquor with Very High Pollution Load

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chunyu; Cao, Guangchun; Li, Yang; Zhang, Xiaojun; Ren, Hongyan; Wang, Xia; Feng, Jinhui; Zhao, Liping; Xu, Ping

    2008-01-01

    Background Paper pulp wastewater resulting from alkaline extraction of wheat straw, known as black liquor, is very difficult to be treated and causes serious environmental problems due to its high pH value and chemical oxygen demand (COD) pollution load. Lignin, semicellulose and cellulose are the main contributors to the high COD values in black liquor. Very few microorganisms can survive in such harsh environments of the alkaline wheat straw black liquor. A naturally developed microbial community was found accidentally in a black liquor storing pool in a paper pulp mill of China. The community was effective in pH decreasing, color and COD removing from the high alkaline and high COD black liquor. Findings Thirty-eight strains of bacteria were isolated from the black liquor storing pool, and were grouped as eleven operational taxonomy units (OTUs) using random amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR profiles (RAPD). Eleven representative strains of each OTU, which were identified as genera of Halomonas and Bacillus, were used to construct a consortium to treat black liquor with a high pH value of 11.0 and very high COD pollution load of 142,600 mg l−1. After treatment by the constructed consortium, about 35.4% of color and 39,000 mg l−1 (27.3%) CODcr were removed and the pH decreased to 7.8. 16S rRNA gene polymerase chain reaction denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis suggested a two-stage treatment mechanism to elucidate the interspecies collaboration: Halomonas isolates were important in the first stage to produce organic acids that contributed to the pH decline, while Bacillus isolates were involved in the degradation of lignin derivatives in the second stage under lower pH conditions. Conclusions/Significance Tolerance to the high alkaline environment and good controllability of the simple consortium suggested that the constructed consortium has good potential for black liquor treatment

  6. Experimental determination of plagioclase dissolution rates as a function of its composition and pH at 22 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudbrandsson, Snorri; Wolff-Boenisch, Domenik; Gislason, Sigurdur R.; Oelkers, Eric H.

    2014-08-01

    The steady-state, far-from-equilibrium dissolution rates of nine distinct plagioclases ranging in composition from An2 to An89 were measured in mixed flow reactors at 22 ± 2 °C and pH from 2 to 11. The dissolution rates of all plagioclases based on silica release show a common U-shaped behaviour as a function of pH, where rates decrease with increasing pH at acid condition but rise with increasing pH at alkaline conditions. Consistent with literature findings, constant pH plagioclase dissolution rates increase with increasing anorthite content at acidic conditions; measured anorthite dissolution rates are ∼2.5 orders of magnitude faster than those of albite at pH ∼2. Perhaps more significantly, rates are independent of plagioclase composition at alkaline conditions. Interpretation and data fitting suggests that plagioclase dissolution rates are consistent with their control by the detachment of Si-rich activated complexes formed by the removal of Al from the mineral framework. Taking account of this mechanism and transition state theory yields equations describing plagioclase dissolution rates (r+) as a function of both the mineral and aqueous fluid compositions found in natural Earth surface systems. For pH ⩾ 6 rates are consistent with Log(r+/(mol/cm/s))=0.35Log(aH3/aAl)-11.53 and for pH < 6 rates are consistent with Log(r+/(mol/cm/s))=nacidLog(aH3/aAl)+0.033An%-14.77 where An% represents the percent anorthite in the plagioclase solid solution, ai corresponds to the activity of the ith aqueous species, and nacid is given by nacid=0.004An%+0.05 .

  7. RECLAMATION OF ALKALINE ASH PILES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the study was to develop methods for reclaiming ash disposal piles for the ultimate use as agricultural or forest lands. The ashes studied were strongly alkaline and contained considerable amounts of salts and toxic boron. The ashes were produced from burning bit...

  8. Characterization and dye decolorization ability of an alkaline resistant and organic solvents tolerant laccase from Bacillus licheniformis LS04.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lei; Zhao, Min; Wang, Tian-Nv; Zhao, Li-Yan; Du, Mei-Hui; Li, Tai-Lun; Li, De-Bin

    2012-07-01

    A new bacterial strain exhibiting laccase activity was isolated from forest soil and was identified as Bacillus licheniformis LS04. The spore laccase of B. licheniformis LS04 demonstrated a broad pH range for catalyzing substrates. It was quite stable at high temperature and alkaline pH. There was no loss of laccase activity after 10 days incubation at pH 9.0, and about 16% of the initial activity was detected after 10h at 80°C. In addition, the spore laccase was tolerant towards 1M of NaCl and 30% of organic solvents. Reactive black 5, reactive blue 19 and indigo carmine were decolorized by the spore laccase in the absence of mediator. Meanwhile, the decolorization process was efficiently promoted when acetosyringone was present, with more than 80% of color removal in 1h at pH 6.6 or 9.0. The unusual properties indicated a high potential in industrial applications for this novel spore laccase. PMID:21868217

  9. Amperometric Nitric Oxide Sensors with Enhanced Selectivity Over Carbon Monoxide via Platinum Oxide Formation Under Alkaline Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Meyerhoff, Mark E.

    2013-01-01

    An improved planar amperometric nitric oxide (NO) sensor with enhanced selectivity over carbon monoxide (CO), a volatile interfering species for NO sensors that has been largely overlooked until recently, is described. Formation of an oxide film on the inner platinum working electrode via anodic polarization using an inner alkaline electrolyte solution provides the basis for improved selectivity. Cyclic voltammetry reveals that formation of oxidized Pt film inhibits adsorption of CO to the electrode surface, which is a necessary initial step in the electrocatalytic oxidation of CO on Pt. Previous NO gas sensors that employ internal electrolyte solutions have been assembled using acidic internal solutions, that inhibit the formation of a dense platinum oxide film on the working electrode surface. It is demonstrated herein that increasing the internal electrolyte pH promotes oxidized platinum film formation, resulting in improved selectivity over CO. Selectivity coefficients (log KNO,j) for sensors assembled with internal solutions at various pH values range from −0.08 at pH 2.0 to −2.06 at pH 11.7 with average NO sensitivities of 1.24 nA/μM and LOD of <1 nM. PMID:24067100

  10. [Impacts of different alkaline soil on canopy spectral characteristics of overlying vegetation].

    PubMed

    Jia, Ke-Li; Zhang, Jun-Hua

    2014-03-01

    The relationship between alkalinity and pH of the soil, reflectance spectra and red-edge parameters of the sunflower canopy in different growth periods under different alkalinity soil were analyzed, respectively. The results showed that the spectral reflectance of the sunflower canopy in different stage under different alkalinity soil is the same as the spectral reflectance characters of the other greenery canopy. Along with the advancement of the sunflower growth period, sunflower canopy spectral reflectance increases gradually at different stages, the spectral reflectance is higher at flowering stage than 7-leaf stage and budding stage, and there exists a high reflection peak at 809nm at flowering period. At the same time, the spectral reflectance is affected by salinity-alkalinity stress at different stages, in the near infrared shortwave band, the spectral reflectance of the sunflower canopy in different stage increases with the decreases in soil alkalinity. When the derivatives are applied to determine the wavelength of the red-edge, there is a shift phenomenon of the red edge. The red edges were at 702-720 nm during every growth period of the sunflower. The "blue shift" phenomenon is also emerged for red edge position and red edge sloped with the increase in the soil alkalinity. Conversely, at the same growth periods, the red edge positions and red edge slope move to longer wave bands with the decrease in soil alkalinity. There is a "red shift" phenomenon before flowering period and "blue shift" phenomenon after flowering period for the red edge position and red edge slope of canopy spectrum at the same soil alkalinity. Respectively. The red edges at different growth stages of the sunflower show very significant positive correlation and quadratic polynomial to alkalinity and pH of the soil. Therefore, we thought used the red edge features of greenery could indicate the soil alkalization degree, it providing scientific basis for monitoring soil alkalization

  11. COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson

    2004-10-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Neither aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide nor silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems produced significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels produced incremental oil with the rigid flowing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential pressures across cores. None of the gels tested

  12. Effects of alkaline concentration, temperature, and additives on the strength of alkaline-induced egg white gel.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Tu, Yonggang; Li, Jianke; Xu, Mingsheng; Yang, Youxian; Nie, Xuliang; Yao, Yao; Du, Huaying

    2014-10-01

    Egg whites can undergo gelation at extreme pH. In this paper, the effects of NaOH concentration (1.5, 2, 2.5, and 3%), temperature (10, 20, 30, and 40°C), and additives (metallic compounds, carbohydrates, stabilizers, and coagulants) on the strength of alkaline-induced egg white gel were investigated. Results showed that NaOH concentration and induced temperature significantly affected the rate of formation and peak strength of the egg white gel. Of the 6 metallic compounds used in this experiment, CuSO₄exhibited the optimal effect on the strength of alkaline-induced egg white gel, followed by MgCl₂, ZnSO4, PbO, and CaCl₂. When CuSO₄concentration was 0.2%, the gel strength increased by 31.92%. The effect of Fe₂(SO₄)₃was negligible. Of the 5 carbohydrate additives, xanthan gum (0.2%) caused the highest increase (54.31%) in the strength of alkaline-induced egg white gel, followed by sodium alginate, glucose, starch, and sucrose. Meanwhile, propylene glycol (0.25%) caused the highest improvement (15.78%) in the strength of alkaline-induced egg white gel among the 3 stabilizing agents and coagulants used, followed by Na₂HPO₄and glucono-δ-lactone. PMID:25125561

  13. Characterization of the Alkaline Laccase Ssl1 from Streptomyces sviceus with Unusual Properties Discovered by Genome Mining

    PubMed Central

    Gunne, Matthias; Urlacher, Vlada B.

    2012-01-01

    Fungal laccases are well investigated enzymes with high potential in diverse applications like bleaching of waste waters and textiles, cellulose delignification, and organic synthesis. However, they are limited to acidic reaction conditions and require eukaryotic expression systems. This raises a demand for novel laccases without these constraints. We have taken advantage of the laccase engineering database LccED derived from genome mining to identify and clone the laccase Ssl1 from Streptomyces sviceus which can circumvent the limitations of fungal laccases. Ssl1 belongs to the family of small laccases that contains only few characterized enzymes. After removal of the twin-arginine signal peptide Ssl1 was readily expressed in E. coli. Ssl1 is a small laccase with 32.5 kDa, consists of only two cupredoxin-like domains, and forms trimers in solution. Ssl1 oxidizes 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) and phenolic substrates like 2,6-dimethoxy phenol, guaiacol, and syringaldazine. The kcat value for ABTS oxidation was at least 20 times higher than for other substrates. The optimal pH for oxidation reactions is substrate dependent: for phenolic substrates the highest activities were detected at alkaline conditions (pH 9.0 for 2,6-dimethoxy phenol and guaiacol and pH 8.0 for syringaldazine), while the highest reaction rates with ABTS were observed at pH 4.0. Though originating from a mesophilic organism, Ssl demonstrates remarkable stability at elevated temperatures (T1/2,60°C = 88 min) and in a wide pH range (pH 5.0 to 11.0). Notably, the enzyme retained 80% residual activity after 5 days of incubation at pH 11. Detergents and organic co-solvents do not affect Ssl1 stability. The described robustness makes Ssl1 a potential candidate for industrial applications, preferably in processes that require alkaline reaction conditions. PMID:23285009

  14. Isolation of alkaline mutagens from complex mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C.H.; Guerin, M.R.; Clark, B.R.; Rao, T.K.; Epler, J.L.

    1981-05-01

    A method for the preparative-scale enrichment of alkaline mutagens from complex natural and anthropogenic mixtures is described. Mutagenic alkaline fractions were isolated from cigarette smoke, crude petroleum, and petroleum substitutes derived from coal and shale.

  15. Intracellular pH and the Control of Multidrug Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Sanford; Roy, Deborshi; Schindler, Melvin

    1994-02-01

    Many anticancer drugs are classified as either weak bases or molecules whose binding to cellular structures is pH dependent. Accumulation of these drugs within tumor cells should be affected by transmembrane pH gradients. Indeed, development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumor cells has been correlated with an alkaline shift of cytosolic pH. To examine the role of pH in drug partitioning, the distribution of two drugs, doxorubicin and daunomycin, was monitored in fibroblasts and myeloma cells. In both cell types the drugs rapidly accumulated within the cells. The highest concentrations were measured in the most acidic compartments-e.g., lysosomes. Modifying the cellular pH in drug-sensitive cells to mimic reported shifts in MDR caused an immediate change in the cellular drug concentration. Drug accumulation was enhanced by acidic shifts and reversed by alkaline shifts. All of these effects were rapid and reversible. These results demonstrate that the alkaline shift observed in MDR is sufficient to prevent the accumulation of chemotherapeutic drugs independent of active drug efflux.

  16. Ethanol production from glycerol-containing biodiesel waste by Klebsiella variicola shows maximum productivity under alkaline conditions.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toshihiro; Nishikawa, Chiaki; Seta, Kohei; Shigeno, Toshiya; Nakajima-Kambe, Toshiaki

    2014-05-25

    Biodiesel fuel (BDF) waste contains large amounts of crude glycerol as a by-product, and has a high alkaline pH. With regard to microbial conversion of ethanol from BDF-derived glycerol, bacteria that can produce ethanol at alkaline pH have not been reported to date. Isolation of bacteria that shows maximum productivity under alkaline conditions is essential to effective production of ethanol from BDF-derived glycerol. In this study, we isolated the Klebsiella variicola TB-83 strain, which demonstrated maximum ethanol productivity at alkaline pH. Strain TB-83 showed effective usage of crude glycerol with maximum ethanol production at pH 8.0-9.0, and the culture pH was finally neutralized by formate, a by-product. In addition, the ethanol productivity of strain TB-83 under various culture conditions was investigated. Ethanol production was more efficient with the addition of yeast extract. Strain TB-83 produced 9.8 g/L ethanol (0.86 mol/mol glycerol) from cooking oil-derived BDF waste. Ethanol production from cooking oil-derived BDF waste was higher than that of new frying oil-derived BDF and pure-glycerol. This is the first report to demonstrate that the K. variicola strain TB-83 has the ability to produce ethanol from glycerol at alkaline pH. PMID:24681408

  17. [Ultrasonic study of nucleic acids. Effect of pH].

    PubMed

    Braginskaia, F I; Sadykhova, S Kh

    1979-01-01

    The ultrasonic absorption of nucleic acids in water solutions was studied by the pulse ultrasonic technique depending on pH, at frequency 12 mHz T = 20 dedrees C. The obtained data show the occurrence of structural relaxation in DNA solutions caused by the proton exchange and transfer reactions with the extremal pH at 2.5 and 11.7. Possible mechanisms of the excess ultrasonic absorption were discussed concerning the protolytic processes with the charged DNA groups (N--P1 exchange and the hydrolysis of lactam groups at acid and alkaline pH correspondingly). PMID:36177

  18. Metabolic Microenvironmental Control by Photosynthetic Biofilms under Changing Macroenvironmental Temperature and pH Conditions▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Bissett, Andrew; Reimer, Andreas; de Beer, Dirk; Shiraishi, Fumito; Arp, Gernot

    2008-01-01

    Ex situ microelectrode experiments, using cyanobacterial biofilms from karst water creeks, were conducted under various pH, temperature, and constant-alkalinity conditions to investigate the effects of changing environmental parameters on cyanobacterial photosynthesis-induced calcification. Microenvironmental chemical conditions around calcifying sites were controlled by metabolic activity over a wide range of photosynthesis and respiration rates, with little influence from overlying water conditions. Regardless of overlying water pH levels (from 7.8 to 8.9), pH at the biofilm surface was approximately 9.4 in the light and 7.8 in the dark. The same trend was observed at various temperatures (4°C and 17°C). Biological processes control the calcium carbonate saturation state (Ω) in these and similar systems and are able to maintain Ω at approximately constant levels over relatively wide environmental fluctuations. Temperature did, however, have an effect on calcification rate. Calcium flux in this system is limited by its diffusion coefficient, resulting in a higher calcium flux (calcification and dissolution) at higher temperatures, despite the constant, biologically mediated pH. The ability of biological systems to mitigate the effects of environmental perturbation is an important factor that must be considered when attempting to predict the effects of increased atmospheric partial CO2 pressure on processes such as calcification and in interpreting microfossils in the fossil record. PMID:18689512

  19. /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of intracellular pH in giant barnacle muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, J.R.; Yue, G.M.

    1987-01-01

    The accuracy of intracellular pH (pH/sub i/) measurements by /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was examined in single muscle fibers from the giant barnacle, Balanus nubilis. The pH/sub i/ was derived from the chemical shifts of 2-deoxy-D-glucose-6-phosphate and inorganic phosphate. In fibers superfused with sea water at pH 7.7, pH/sub i/ = 7.30 +/- 0.02 at 20/sup 0/C. Experimentally induced pH/sub i/ changes were followed with a time resolution of 3 min. Intracellular alkalinization was induced by exposure to NH/sub 3/Cl and intracellular acidification followed when NH/sub 3/ was removed. Then acid extrusion was stimulated by exposure to bicarbonate containing sea water. In single muscle fibers /sup 31/P NMR results were in excellent agreement with microelectrode studies over the pH range of 6.5 to 8.0. The initial acid extrusion rate was 1.7 +/- 0.3 mmol x 1/sup -1/ x min/sup -1/ at pH/sub i/ 6.75. The authors results showed that /sup 31/P NMR is a reliable in vivo pH probe.

  20. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of intracellular pH in giant barnacle muscle.

    PubMed

    Hamm, J R; Yue, G M

    1987-01-01

    The accuracy of intracellular pH (pHi) measurements by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was examined in single muscle fibers from the giant barnacle, Balanus nubilis. The pHi was derived from the chemical shifts of 2-deoxy-D-glucose-6-phosphate and inorganic phosphate. In fibers superfused with sea water at pH 7.7, pHi = 7.30 +/- 0.02 at 20 degrees C. Experimentally induced pHi changes were followed with a time resolution of 3 min. Intracellular alkalinization was induced by exposure to NH4Cl and intracellular acidification followed when NH3 was removed. Then acid extrusion was stimulated by exposure to bicarbonate containing sea water. In single muscle fibers 31P NMR results were in excellent agreement with microelectrode studies over the pH range of 6.5 to 8.0. The initial acid extrusion rate was 1.7 +/- 0.3 mmol X l-1 X min-1 at pHi 6.75. Our results showed that 31P NMR is a reliable in vivo pH probe. PMID:3812665

  1. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David B.; Lao, Guifang

    1998-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium.

  2. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, D.B.; Lao, G.

    1998-01-06

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium. 3 figs.

  3. Effects of saline-alkaline stress on benzo[a]pyrene biotransformation and ligninolytic enzyme expression by Bjerkandera adusta SM46.

    PubMed

    Andriani, Ade; Tachibana, Sanro; Itoh, Kazutaka

    2016-03-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) accumulates in marine organisms and contaminated coastal areas. The biotreatment of waste water using saline-alkaline-tolerant white rot fungi (WRF) represents a promising method for removing BaP under saline-alkaline conditions based on WRF's ability to produce ligninolytic enzymes. In a pre-screening for degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons of 82 fungal strains using Remazol brilliant blue R, Bjerkandera adusta SM46 exhibited the highest tolerance to saline-alkaline stress. Moreover, a B. adusta culture grown in BaP-containing liquid medium exhibited resistance to salinities up to 20 g l(-1). These conditions did not inhibit fungal growth or the expression of manganese peroxidase (MnP) or lignin peroxidase (LiP). The degradation rate also became higher as salinity increased to 20 g l(-1). Fungal growth and enzyme expression were inhibited at a salinity of 35 g l(-1). These inhibitory effects directly decreased the degradation rate (>24%). The presence of MnSO4 as an inducer improved the degradation rate and enzyme expression. MnP and LiP activity also increased by seven- and fivefold, respectively. SM46 degraded BaP (38-89% over 30 days) in an acidic environment (pH 4.5) and under saline-alkaline stress conditions (pH 8.2). Investigating the metabolites produced revealed BaP-1,6-dione as the main product, indicating the important role of ligninolytic enzymes in initializing BaP cleavage. The other metabolites detected, naphthalene acetic acid, hydroxybenzoic acid, benzoic acid, and catechol, may have been ring fission products. The wide range of activities observed suggests that B. adusta SM46 is a potential agent for biodegrading BaP under saline conditions. PMID:26867600

  4. Neutralisation of an acidic pit lake by alkaline waste products.

    PubMed

    Allard, Bert; Bäckström, Mattias; Karlsson, Stefan; Grawunder, Anja

    2014-01-01

    A former open pit where black shale (alum shale) was excavated during 1942-1965 has been water filled since 1966. The water chemistry was dominated by calcium and sulphate and had a pH of 3.2-3.4 until 1997-1998, when pH was gradually increasing. This was due to the intrusion of leachates from alkaline cement waste deposited close to the lake. A stable pH of around 7.5 was obtained after 6-7 years. The chemistry of the pit lake has changed due to the neutralisation. Concentrations of some dissolved metals, notably zinc and nickel, have gone down, as a result of adsorption/co-precipitation on solid phases (most likely iron and aluminium hydroxides), while other metals, notably uranium and molybdenum, are present at elevated levels. Uranium concentration is reaching a minimum of around pH 6.5 and is increasing at higher pH, which may indicate a formation of neutral and anionic uranyl carbonate species at high pH (and total carbonate levels around 1 mM). Weathering of the water-exposed shale is still in progress. PMID:23913161

  5. Influence of pigments and pH of urine on the determination of N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase activity with 2-methoxy-4-(2'-nitrovinyl)-phenyl-N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminide.

    PubMed

    Aćimović, Jelena M; Jovanović, Vesna B; Mandić, Ljuba M

    2005-01-01

    The influence of urinary pigments and urine pH on the spectrophotometric determination of N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase (NAG; EC 3.2.1.30) activity with 2-methoxy-4-(2'-nitrovinyl)-phenyl-N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminide as a substrate was studied. The investigation was performed with human and rabbit urine samples. It was found that alkaline urine pH values influenced NAG activity in two ways: 1) NAG activity decreased due to enzyme instability with pH increase, and 2) NAG activity increased because of the contribution of urinary pigments to absorbance of 2-methoxy-4-(2'-nitrovinyl)-phenol (MNP) at 505 nm. It was shown that besides the maximum (I) in the range of 350-360 nm of the absorption spectra of alkaline urine, there was a maximum (II) in the range of 380-460 nm. With the increase of pH, maximum II was shifted toward higher wavelengths and contributed to MNP absorption (5-90%). On the other hand, the maximum of MNP absorption was shifted toward lower wavelengths (495-400 nm) with increasing pH. Two procedures to eliminate the influence of urinary pigments are presented. The justification of applying a correction to the values of NAG activity in human and rabbit urine (a model system for studying the toxic effects of cadmium) was discussed. PMID:16302206

  6. Thermostable, alkaline and detergent-tolerant lipase from a newly isolated thermophilic Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Ben Bacha, Abir; Moubayed, Nadine M S; Abid, Islam

    2015-04-01

    Lipases are the enzymes of choice for laundry detergent industries, owing to their triglyceride removing ability from the soiled fabric, which eventually reduces the usage of phosphate-based chemical cleansers in the detergent formulation. In this study, a novel thermo-alkaline lipase-producing strain identified as Bacillus stearothermophilus was isolated from the soil samples of olive oil mill. Enhanced lipase production was observed at 55 degrees C, pH 11 and after 48 h of incubation. Among the substrates tested, xylose (a carbon source), peptone (a nitrogen source) and olive oil at a concentration of 1% were suitable substrates for enhancing lipase production. MgSO4 and Tween-80 were suitable substrates for maximizing lipase production. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity by a single CM-Sephadex column chromatography and revealed molecular mass of 67 kDa. The enzyme (BL1) was active over a wide range of pH from 9.0 to 13.0, with an optimum at pH 11.0, exhibited maximal activity at 55 degreesC and retained more than 70% of its activity after incubation at 70 degrees C or pH 13 for 0.5 h or 24 h, respectively. The enzyme hydrolyzed both short and long-chain triacylglycerols at comparable rates. BL1 was studied in a preliminary evaluation for use in detergent formulation solutions. This novel lipase showed extreme stability towards non-ionic and anionic surfactants after pre-incubation for 1 h at 40 degrees C, and good stability towards oxidizing agents. Additionally, the enzyme showed excellent stability and compatibility with various commercial detergents, suggesting its potential as an additive in detergent formulations. PMID:26118130

  7. An Alkaline Protease from Bacillus pumilus MP 27: Functional Analysis of Its Binding Model toward Its Applications As Detergent Additive

    PubMed Central

    Baweja, Mehak; Tiwari, Rameshwar; Singh, Puneet K.; Nain, Lata; Shukla, Pratyoosh

    2016-01-01

    A proteolytic strain of Bacillus pumilus MP 27 was isolated from water samples of Southern ocean produced alkaline protease. Since protease production need expensive ingredients, an economically viable process was developed by using low cost carbon source, wheat straw, supplemented with peptone. This protease was active within temperature ranges 10–70°C at pH 9. This process was optimized by response surface methodology using a Box Bekhman design by Design Expert 7.0 software that increased the protease activity to 776.5 U/ml. Moreover, the enzyme was extremely stable at a broad range of temperature and pH retaining 69% of its activity at 50°C and 70% at pH 11. The enzyme exhibited excellent compatibility with surfactants and commercial detergents, showing 87% stability with triton X-100 and 100% stability with Tide commercial detergent. The results of the wash performance analysis demonstrated considerably good de-staining at 50 and 4°C with low supplementation (109 U/ml). Molecular modeling of the protease revealed the presence of serine proteases, subtilase family and serine active site and further docking supported the association of catalytic site with the various substrates. Certainly, such protease can be considered as a good detergent additive in detergent industry with a possibility to remove the stains effectively even in a cold wash. PMID:27536284

  8. An Alkaline Protease from Bacillus pumilus MP 27: Functional Analysis of Its Binding Model toward Its Applications As Detergent Additive.

    PubMed

    Baweja, Mehak; Tiwari, Rameshwar; Singh, Puneet K; Nain, Lata; Shukla, Pratyoosh

    2016-01-01

    A proteolytic strain of Bacillus pumilus MP 27 was isolated from water samples of Southern ocean produced alkaline protease. Since protease production need expensive ingredients, an economically viable process was developed by using low cost carbon source, wheat straw, supplemented with peptone. This protease was active within temperature ranges 10-70°C at pH 9. This process was optimized by response surface methodology using a Box Bekhman design by Design Expert 7.0 software that increased the protease activity to 776.5 U/ml. Moreover, the enzyme was extremely stable at a broad range of temperature and pH retaining 69% of its activity at 50°C and 70% at pH 11. The enzyme exhibited excellent compatibility with surfactants and commercial detergents, showing 87% stability with triton X-100 and 100% stability with Tide commercial detergent. The results of the wash performance analysis demonstrated considerably good de-staining at 50 and 4°C with low supplementation (109 U/ml). Molecular modeling of the protease revealed the presence of serine proteases, subtilase family and serine active site and further docking supported the association of catalytic site with the various substrates. Certainly, such protease can be considered as a good detergent additive in detergent industry with a possibility to remove the stains effectively even in a cold wash. PMID:27536284

  9. The Buffering Balance: Modeling Arctic river total-, inorganic-, and organic-alkalinity fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, C. W.; Salisbury, J.; Wollheim, W. M.; Mineau, M.; Stewart, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    River-borne inputs of alkalinity influence the pH and pCO2 of coastal ocean waters, and changes in alkalinity inputs also have implications for responses to climate-driven ocean acidification. Recent work has shown that alkalinity fluxes from rivers are not always dominated by inorganic carbon species, and can instead be composed somewhat or mostly of non-carbonate, presumably organic species. Concentrations and proportions of organic alkalinity (O-Alk) are correlated to dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations and fluxes, which are predicted to rise as Arctic permafrost thaws and the hydrologic cycle intensifies. We have scaled results from watershed studies to develop a process-based model to simulate and aggregate Arctic river exports of total alkalinity, DOC, and O-Alk to the coastal sea. Total alkalinity, DOC, and O-Alk were loaded to a river network and routed through a 6-minute hydrologic model (FrAMES). We present results contrasting poorly buffered (e.g. the Kolyma river) and highly buffered (e.g. the Yukon river) systems, the impact of O-Alk on river pH and pCO2, and examine the seasonalities of inorganic and organic influences on coastal ocean carbonate chemistry.

  10. The combined effect of temperature and pH on albite dissolution rate under far-from-equilibrium conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, Chen; Kutuzov, Ilya; Ganor, Jiwchar

    2016-08-01

    Two of the most studied aspects of albite dissolution kinetics are the effects of temperature and pH. Previous studies quantified the effect of pH on albite dissolution rate under constant temperature. These studies suggested that the effect of pH on dissolution rate can be attributed to three independent dissolution mechanisms that are dominant in different pH region: acidic - proton-promoted, neutral - water-promoted and alkaline - hydroxide-promoted. Based on experimental results, those studies developed a rate law to predict albite dissolution rate as a function of pH, assuming that the effect of pH is temperature independent. The effect of temperature was attributed either to the temperature dependency of the rate under constant pH or that of the rate law coefficients. Nevertheless no unified rate law that combines both effects was suggested. When applying the effects of temperature and pH assuming they are independent of each other in order to predict the dissolution rate at pH of about 5 and various temperatures, the predicted rate overestimate the rate by 0.5-1 order of magnitude. The current study develops and suggests the use of new rate law that is based on two fast adsorption reactions of protons and hydroxides on two different surface sites. The new rate law considers the effect of surface coverage of protons and hydroxides that is temperature dependent. The new rate law successfully describes the variation of albite dissolution rate (about 8 orders of magnitude) under wide temperature (3.6-300 °C) and pH (1.20-12.40) ranges. Under slightly acidic conditions (pH 5-7) the new rate law predicts a minimum rate zone that was not observed before. In order to confirm whether this minimum rate zone does exist, three SPBE (single-point-batch-experiment) of albite dissolution were conducted at pH 5 and temperatures of 3.6, 25 and 50 °C. The SPBE experiments confirm the existence of minimum rate zone predicted by the independent new rate law. The new rate law

  11. MudPIT analysis of alkaline tolerance by Listeria monocytogenes strains recovered as persistent food factory contaminants.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Rolf E; Latham, Roger; Mellefont, Lyndal; Ross, Tom; Bowman, John P

    2012-05-01

    Alkaline solutions are used to clean food production environments but the role of alkaline resistance in persistent food factory contamination by Listeria monocytogenes is unknown. We used shotgun proteomics to characterise alkaline adapted L. monocytogenes recovered as persistent and transient food factory contaminants. Three unrelated strains were studied including two persistent and a transient food factory contaminant determined using multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The strains were adapted to growth at pH 8.5 and harvested in exponential phase. Protein extracts were analysed using multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT) and protein abundance compared by spectra counting. The strains elicited core responses to alkaline growth including modulation of intracellular pH, stabilisation of cellular processes and reduced cell-division, independent to lineage, MLST or whether the strains were transient or persistent contaminants. Alkaline adaptation by all strains corresponded to that expected in stringent-response induced cells, with protein expression supporting metabolic shifts concordant with elevated alarmone production and indicating that the alkaline-stringent response results from energy rather than nutrient limitation. We believe this is the first report describing induction of a stringent response in different L. monocytogenes strains by alkaline pH under non-limiting growth conditions. The work emphasises the need for early intervention to avoid persistent food factory contamination by L. monocytogenes. PMID:22265300

  12. Anaerobic digestion of tomato processing waste: Effect of alkaline pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Calabrò, Paolo S; Greco, Rosa; Evangelou, Alexandros; Komilis, Dimitrios

    2015-11-01

    The objective of the work was to assess the effect of mild alkaline pretreatment on the anaerobic biodegradability of tomato processing waste (TPW). Experiments were carried out in duplicate BMP bottles using a pretreatment contact time of 4 and 24 h and a 1% and 5% NaOH dosage. The cumulative methane production during a 30 d period was recorded and modelled. The alkaline pretreatment did not significantly affect methane production in any of the treatments in comparison to the control. The average methane production for all runs was 320 NmL/gVS. Based on first order kinetic modelling, the alkaline pretreatment was found to slow down the rate of methanogenesis, mainly in the two reactors with the highest NaOH dosage. The biodegradability of the substrates ranged from 0.75 to 0.82 and from 0.66 to 0.72 based on two different approaches. PMID:26292773

  13. A satellite measurement of cosmic-ray abundances and spectra in the charge range 2 less than or equal to 7 less than or equal to 10. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    The composition of the nuclear component of the cosmic radiation was studied to yield information concerning the source, propagation, and confinement of cosmic rays within the galaxy. The first comprehensive satellite measurement is presented of cosmic-ray composition and spectra in the charge range 2 equal to or less than Z equal to or less than 10 using the geomagnetic field as a rigidity analyzer through the entire range of vertical cutoffs. The results indicate that the spectra of all the elements in the observed range are similar, and thus that various ratios of elemental abundances are nearly independent of rigidity over the range 2 equal to or less than P equal to or less than 15 GV. Calculations of the propagation of cosmic rays through the interstellar and interplanetary media predict that there should be a variation with rigidity of ratios of various elements, because of the charge-dependent effects of ionization of the interstellar gas by the cosmic rays. The absence of this variation can be explained by assuming a rigidity-dependent confinement of the cosmic rays in the galaxy.

  14. Temperature and pH Changes Associated with the Hydration of Amorphous Silicate Smokes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chizmadia, L. J.; Lebrón-Rivera, S. A.

    2010-03-01

    The hydration of Fe-Si smokes results in acidic pH levels and negligible change in temperature. When mixed with Mg-Si smokes, pH becomes alkaline and temperature increases slightly. Water-rock ratio is a minor variable relative to composition.

  15. Ammonia volatilization from soils amended with biochars of different pH

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A significant amount of nitrogen fertilizer applied to agricultural land is in the form of ammonium. Ammonium nitrogen can be lost through volatilization if applied under certain conditions, mainly to soils with a pH greater than 8. The pH of biochar varies from slightly acidic to highly alkaline ...

  16. Scales and sources of pH and dissolved oxygen variability in a shallow, upwelling-driven ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, C. A.; Martz, T.; Levin, L. A.

    2011-12-01

    semidiurnal pH variability increases 5-fold relative to the magnitude of change during northward alongshore. Applying an empirically-determined alkalinity relationship, we conclude that changes in the carbonate chemistry parameters are largely driven by changes in total carbon. On small spatial scales, cross-shore differences exist in mean oxygen and pH but differences in alongshore mean oxygen and pH at a given depth appears to be negligible. Cross-shore differences can equate to a 0.05 pH unit decrease and 25 μmol kg-1 oxygen decrease over 1 km at a given depth. Strong spatial variability in pH and oxygen conditions exist over vertical gradients in the kelp forest, with mean pH at the surface (7m) being 0.2 pH units greater than at the bottom (17m) and mean oxygen being 104 μmol kg-1 greater. The observed range of pH (7.55-8.22) observed in this shallow environment during the course of a year is greater than open ocean predictions for a global mean pH reduction of 0.2-0.3 units predicted by the year 2100. These results suggest that organisms on exposed upwelling coasts may be adapted to a range of pH conditions and highlight the need for scientists to consider biological response to varying scales of pH change in order to develop more realistic predictions of the impacts of climate change for the coastal zone.

  17. Molecular Components of the Neurospora crassa pH Signaling Pathway and Their Regulation by pH and the PAC-3 Transcription Factor.

    PubMed

    Virgilio, Stela; Cupertino, Fernanda Barbosa; Bernardes, Natália Elisa; Freitas, Fernanda Zanolli; Takeda, Agnes Alessandra Sekijima; Fontes, Marcos Roberto de Mattos; Bertolini, Maria Célia

    2016-01-01

    Environmental pH induces a stress response triggering a signaling pathway whose components have been identified and characterized in several fungi. Neurospora crassa shares all six components of the Aspergillus nidulans pH signaling pathway, and we investigate here their regulation during an alkaline pH stress response. We show that the N. crassa pal mutant strains, with the exception of Δpal-9, which is the A. nidulans palI homolog, exhibit low conidiation and are unable to grow at alkaline pH. Moreover, they accumulate the pigment melanin, most likely via regulation of the tyrosinase gene by the pH signaling components. The PAC-3 transcription factor binds to the tyrosinase promoter and negatively regulates its gene expression. PAC-3 also binds to all pal gene promoters, regulating their expression at normal growth pH and/or alkaline pH, which indicates a feedback regulation of PAC-3 in the pal gene expression. In addition, PAC-3 binds to the pac-3 promoter only at alkaline pH, most likely influencing the pac-3 expression at this pH suggesting that the activation of PAC-3 in N. crassa results from proteolytic processing and gene expression regulation by the pH signaling components. In N. crassa, PAC-3 is proteolytically processed in a single cleavage step predominately at alkaline pH; however, low levels of the processed protein can be observed at normal growth pH. We also demonstrate that PAC-3 preferentially localizes in the nucleus at alkaline pH stress and that the translocation may require the N. crassa importin-α since the PAC-3 nuclear localization signal (NLS) has a strong in vitro affinity with importin-α. The data presented here show that the pH signaling pathway in N. crassa shares all the components with the A. nidulans and S. cerevisiae pathways; however, it exhibits some properties not previously described in either organism. PMID:27557053

  18. Molecular Components of the Neurospora crassa pH Signaling Pathway and Their Regulation by pH and the PAC-3 Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Virgilio, Stela; Cupertino, Fernanda Barbosa; Bernardes, Natália Elisa; Freitas, Fernanda Zanolli; Takeda, Agnes Alessandra Sekijima; Fontes, Marcos Roberto de Mattos; Bertolini, Maria Célia

    2016-01-01

    Environmental pH induces a stress response triggering a signaling pathway whose components have been identified and characterized in several fungi. Neurospora crassa shares all six components of the Aspergillus nidulans pH signaling pathway, and we investigate here their regulation during an alkaline pH stress response. We show that the N. crassa pal mutant strains, with the exception of Δpal-9, which is the A. nidulans palI homolog, exhibit low conidiation and are unable to grow at alkaline pH. Moreover, they accumulate the pigment melanin, most likely via regulation of the tyrosinase gene by the pH signaling components. The PAC-3 transcription factor binds to the tyrosinase promoter and negatively regulates its gene expression. PAC-3 also binds to all pal gene promoters, regulating their expression at normal growth pH and/or alkaline pH, which indicates a feedback regulation of PAC-3 in the pal gene expression. In addition, PAC-3 binds to the pac-3 promoter only at alkaline pH, most likely influencing the pac-3 expression at this pH suggesting that the activation of PAC-3 in N. crassa results from proteolytic processing and gene expression regulation by the pH signaling components. In N. crassa, PAC-3 is proteolytically processed in a single cleavage step predominately at alkaline pH; however, low levels of the processed protein can be observed at normal growth pH. We also demonstrate that PAC-3 preferentially localizes in the nucleus at alkaline pH stress and that the translocation may require the N. crassa importin-α since the PAC-3 nuclear localization signal (NLS) has a strong in vitro affinity with importin-α. The data presented here show that the pH signaling pathway in N. crassa shares all the components with the A. nidulans and S. cerevisiae pathways; however, it exhibits some properties not previously described in either organism. PMID:27557053

  19. Solubility of uranium in alkaline salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.T.; Edwards, T.B.

    1994-03-29

    The solubility of uranium in alkaline salt solutions was investigated to screen for significant factors and interactions among the major salt components and temperature. The components included in the study were the sodium salts of hydroxide, nitrate, nitrite, aluminate, sulfate, and carbonate. General findings from the study included: (1) uranium solubilities are very low (1-20 mg/L) for all solution compositions at hydroxide concentrations from 0.1 to 17 molar (2) carbonate, sulfate, and aluminate are not effective complexants for uranium at high hydroxide concentration, (3) uranium solubility decreases with increasing temperature for most alkaline salt solutions, and (4) uranium solubility increases with changes in solution chemistry that reflect aging of high level waste (increase in nitrite and carbonate concentrations, decrease in nitrate and hydroxide concentrations). A predictive model for the concentration of uranium as a function of component concentrations and temperature was fitted to the data. All of the solution components and temperature were found to be significant. There is a significant lack of fit for the model, which suggests that the dependence on the uranium solubility over the wide range of solution compositions is non-linear and/or that there are other uncontrolled parameters which are important to the uranium solubility.

  20. [DNA degradation during standard alkaline of thermal denaturation].

    PubMed

    Drozhdeniuk, A P; Sulimova, G E; Vaniushin, B F

    1976-01-01

    Essential degradation 8 DNA (up to 10 per cent) with liberation of acid-soluble fragments takes place on the standard alkaline (0,01 M sodium phosphate, pH 12, 60 degrees, 15 min) or thermal (0.06 M sodium phosphate buffer, pH 6.8, 102 degrees C, 15 min) denaturation. This degradation is more or less selective: fraction of low molecular weight fragments, isolated by hydroxyapatite cromatography and eluted by 0.06 M sodium phosphate buffer, pH 6.8 is rich in adenine and thymine and contains about 2 times less 5-methylcytosine than the total wheat germ DNA. The degree of degradation of DNA on thermal denaturation is higher than on alkaline degradation. Therefore while studying reassociation of various DNA, one and the same standard method of DNA denaturation should be used. Besides, both the level of DNA degradation and the nature of the resulting products (fragments) should be taken into account. PMID:999984

  1. On the apparent CO2 absorption by alkaline soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Wang, W. F.

    2014-02-01

    Alkaline soils in the Gubantonggut Desert were recently demonstrated socking away large quantities of CO2 in an abiotic form. This demands a better understanding of abiotic CO2 exchange in alkaline sites. Reaction of CO2 with the moisture or dew in the soil was conjectured as a potential mechanism. The main goal of this study is to determine the extent to which the dew deposition modulates Land-Atmosphere CO2 exchange at highly alkaline sites (pH ~ 10). Experiments were conducted at the most barren sites (canopy coverage < 5%) to cut down uncertainty. Dew quantities and soil CO2 fluxes were measured using a micro-lysimeters and an automated flux system (LI-COR, Lincoln, Nebraska, USA), respectively. There is an evident increase of dew deposition in nocturnal colder temperatures and decrease in diurnal warmer temperatures. Variations of soil CO2 flux are almost contrary, but the increase in diurnal warmer temperatures is obscure. It was shown that the accumulation and evaporation of dew in the soil motivates the apparent absorption and release of CO2. It was demonstrated that dew amounts in the soil has an exponential relation with the part in Fc beyond explanations of the worldwide utilized Q10 model. Therefore dew deposition in highly alkaline soils exerted a potential CO2 sink and can partly explain the apparent CO2 absorption. This implied a crucial component in the net ecosystem carbon balance (NECB) at alkaline sites which occupies approximately 5% of the Earth's land surface (7 million km). Further explorations for its mechanisms and representativeness over other arid climate systems have comprehensive perspectives in the quaternary research.

  2. Development of alkaline fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbs, Michael R.; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Alam, Todd Michael; Janarthanan, Rajeswari; Horan, James L.; Caire, Benjamin R.; Ziegler, Zachary C.; Herring, Andrew M.; Yang, Yuan; Zuo, Xiaobing; Robson, Michael H.; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Patterson, Wendy; Atanassov, Plamen Borissov

    2013-09-01

    This project focuses on the development and demonstration of anion exchange membrane (AEM) fuel cells for portable power applications. Novel polymeric anion exchange membranes and ionomers with high chemical stabilities were prepared characterized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories. Durable, non-precious metal catalysts were prepared by Dr. Plamen Atanassov's research group at the University of New Mexico by utilizing an aerosol-based process to prepare templated nano-structures. Dr. Andy Herring's group at the Colorado School of Mines combined all of these materials to fabricate and test membrane electrode assemblies for single cell testing in a methanol-fueled alkaline system. The highest power density achieved in this study was 54 mW/cm2 which was 90% of the project target and the highest reported power density for a direct methanol alkaline fuel cell.

  3. Effect of solution pH on SO2, NO(x), and Hg removal from simulated coal combustion flue gas in an oxidant-enhanced wet scrubber.

    PubMed

    Krzyzynska, Renata; Hutson, Nick D

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents a study on the simultaneous removal of SO2, NO(x) and Hg (both Hg0 and Hg2+) from a simulated flue gas by oxidant injection in a bench-simulated wet limestone scrubber for a wide range of slurry pH. The slurry pH strongly influenced the chemical mechanism in the scrubber and, therefore, affected pollutant removal. This paper also examines the potential ClO2(gas) reemission from a developed multipollutant scrubber at different slurry pHs. To better understand the chemical mechanisms at each slurry pH and to apply a mass balance to the process, detailed product ion analyses were performed for all experiments. Ion analysis covered three different chlorine species (chlorite, chloride, chlorate), sulfate, nitrite and nitrate. Different NO(x) removal efficiencies and mechanisms were found in acidic and alkaline pHs in the multipollutant scrubber. The acidic solution was favorable for NO and Hg0 oxidation, but increasing the slurry pH above 7.0 was disadvantageous for NO and Hg oxidation/removal. However the rate of NO(x) absorption (by percentage) was higher for the alkaline solution. PMID:22442937

  4. Acid loading test (pH)

    MedlinePlus

    The acid loading test (pH) measures the ability of the kidneys to send acid to the urine when there is too much acid in the ... Urine with a pH less than 5.3 is normal. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different ...

  5. Fetal scalp pH testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Normal pH: 7.25 to 7.35 Borderline pH: 7.20 to 7.25 The examples above are common measurements for results of these tests. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some ...

  6. Monodispersed calcium carbonate nanoparticles modulate local pH and inhibit tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Som, Avik; Raliya, Ramesh; Tian, Limei; Akers, Walter; Ippolito, Joseph E; Singamaneni, Srikanth; Biswas, Pratim; Achilefu, Samuel

    2016-07-01

    The acidic extracellular environment of tumors potentiates their aggressiveness and metastasis, but few methods exist to selectively modulate the extracellular pH (pHe) environment of tumors. Transient flushing of biological systems with alkaline fluids or proton pump inhibitors is impractical and nonselective. Here we report a nanoparticles-based strategy to intentionally modulate the pHe in tumors. Biochemical simulations indicate that the dissolution of calcium carbonate nanoparticles (nano-CaCO3) in vivo increases pH asymptotically to 7.4. We developed two independent facile methods to synthesize monodisperse non-doped vaterite nano-CaCO3 with distinct size range between 20 and 300 nm. Using murine models of cancer, we demonstrate that the selective accumulation of nano-CaCO3 in tumors increases tumor pH over time. The associated induction of tumor growth stasis is putatively interpreted as a pHe increase. This study establishes an approach to prepare nano-CaCO3 over a wide particle size range, a formulation that stabilizes the nanomaterials in aqueous solutions, and a pH-sensitive nano-platform capable of modulating the acidic environment of cancer for potential therapeutic benefits. PMID:26745389

  7. Permeability Modification Using a Reactive Alkaline-Soluble Biopolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Snadra L. Fox; X. Xie; K. D. Schaller; E. P. Robertson; G. A. Bala

    2003-10-01

    Polymer injection has been used in reservoirs to alleviate contrasting permeability zones. Current technology relies on the use of cross-linking agents to initiate gelation. The use of biological polymers are advantageous in that they can block high permeability areas, are environmentally friendly, and have potential to form reversible gels without the use of hazardous cross-linkers. Recent efforts at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) have produced a reactive alkaline-soluble biopolymer from Agrobacterium sp. ATCC no. 31749 that gels upon decreasing the pH of the polymeric solution. The focus of this study was to determine the impact an alkaline-soluble biopolymer can have on sandstone permeability. Permeability modification was investigated by injecting solubilized biopolymer into Berea sandstone cores and defining the contribution of pH, salt, temperature, and Schuricht crude oil on biopolymer gelation. The biopolymer was soluble in KOH at a pH greater than 11.4 and gelled when the pH dropped below 10.8. The Berea sandstone core buffered the biopolymer solution, decreasing the pH sufficiently to form a gel, which subsequently decreased the permeability. The effluent pH of the control cores injected with 0.01 {und M} KOH (pH 12.0) and 0.10{und M} KOH (pH 13.0) decreased to 10.6 and 12.7, respectively. The permeability of the sandstone core injected with biopolymer was decreased to greater than 95% of the original permeability at 25 C in the presence of 2% NaCl, and Schuricht crude oil; however, the permeability increased when the temperature of the core was increased to 60 C. Residual resistance factors as high as 792 were seen in Berea cores treated with biopolymer. The buffering capacity of sandstone has been demonstrated to reduce the pH of a biopolymer solution sufficiently to cause the polymer to form a stable in-situ gel. This finding could potentially lead to alternate technology for permeability modification, thus

  8. Column leaching test to evaluate the use of alkaline industrial wastes to neutralize acid mine tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Doye, I.; Duchesne, J.

    2005-08-01

    Acid mine drainage is a serious environmental problem caused by the oxidation of sulfide minerals that releases highly acidic, sulfate, and metals-rich drainage. In this study, alkaline industrial wastes were mixed with acid mine tailings in order to obtain neutral conditions. A series of column leaching tests were performed to evaluate the behavior of reactive mine tailings amended with alkaline-additions under dynamic conditions. Column tests were conducted of oxidized mine tailings combined with cement kiln dust, red mud bauxite, and mixtures of cement kiln dust with red mud bauxite. The pH results show the addition of 10% of alkaline materials permits the maintenance of near neutral conditions. In the presence of 10% alkaline material, the concentration of toxic metals such as Al, Cu, Fe, Zn are significantly reduced as well as the number of viable cells (Thiobacillus ferrooxidans) compared to control samples.

  9. Effect of pH on the Preparation of {alpha}-Calcium Sulfate Hemihydrate from FGD Gypsum with the Hydrothermal Method

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, B.H.; Shen, Z.X.; Wu, Z.B.; Yang, L.C.; Ma, X.F.

    2008-12-15

    pH is one of the most important parameters that determine the crystallization process, but it is always neglected in the preparation of {alpha}-calcium sulfate hemihydrate ({alpha}-HH) from calcium sulfate dihydrate (DH) with the hydrothermal method. Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum, which is mainly composed of DH, was used as raw material to obtain {alpha}-HH through dehydration in a Ca-Mg-K-Cl-solution medium at 95{sup o}C under atmospheric pressure. The initial pH values of the suspensions were adjusted from 1.2 to 8.0 to explore the influence of pH on the dehydration process and the product characteristics. The results showed that {alpha}-HH crystal was the only dehydration product with the pH ranging from 1.2 to 8.0. With the increase of initial pH, the dehydration rate decreased and the formed {alpha}-HH crystal had a larger particle size. The length/width ratio decreased markedly from 4.8 to 2.9 as the initial pH increased from 1.2 to 7.3. pH had a profound influence on the dehydration of DH and the morphology of alpha-HH via its effect on the supersaturation and perhaps also the precipitation of Ca(OH){sub 2} in an alkaline environment.

  10. Effect of pH on fecal recovery of energy derived from volatile fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Kien, C L; Liechty, E A

    1987-01-01

    We assessed the effect of pH on volatilization of short-chain fatty acids during lyophilization. Acetic, propionic, valeric, and butyric acids were added to a fecal homogenate in amounts sufficient to raise the energy density by 18-27%. Fecal homogenate samples were either acidified (pH 2.8-3.2), alkalinized (pH 7.9-8.7), or left unchanged (4.0-4.8) prior to lyophilization and subsequent bomb calorimetry. Alkalinizing the fecal samples prevented the 20% loss of energy derived from each of these volatile fatty acids observed in samples either acidified or without pH adjustment. These data suggest that in energy balance studies involving subjects with active colonic fermentation, fecal samples should be alkalinized prior to lyophilization and bomb calorimetry. PMID:3681570

  11. Structural Insight into and Mutational Analysis of Family 11 Xylanases: Implications for Mechanisms of Higher pH Catalytic Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Wenqin; Zhou, Cheng; Zhao, Yueju; Wang, Qinhong; Ma, Yanhe

    2015-01-01

    To understand the molecular basis of higher pH catalytic adaptation of family 11 xylanases, we compared the structures of alkaline, neutral, and acidic active xylanases and analyzed mutants of xylanase Xyn11A-LC from alkalophilic Bacillus sp. SN5. It was revealed that alkaline active xylanases have increased charged residue content, an increased ratio of negatively to positively charged residues, and decreased Ser, Thr, and Tyr residue content relative to non-alkaline active counterparts. Between strands β6 and β7, alkaline xylanases substitute an α-helix for a coil or turn found in their non-alkaline counterparts. Compared with non-alkaline xylanases, alkaline active enzymes have an inserted stretch of seven amino acids rich in charged residues, which may be beneficial for xylanase function in alkaline conditions. Positively charged residues on the molecular surface and ionic bonds may play important roles in higher pH catalytic adaptation of family 11 xylanases. By structure comparison, sequence alignment and mutational analysis, six amino acids (Glu16, Trp18, Asn44, Leu46, Arg48, and Ser187, numbering based on Xyn11A-LC) adjacent to the acid/base catalyst were found to be responsible for xylanase function in higher pH conditions. Our results will contribute to understanding the molecular mechanisms of higher pH catalytic adaptation in family 11 xylanases and engineering xylanases to suit industrial applications. PMID:26161643

  12. Thermodynamic modelling of the effect of hydroxycarboxylic acids on the solubility of plutonium at high pH

    SciTech Connect

    Moreton, A.D.

    1993-12-31

    A number of the hydroxycarboxlyic acids generated by the alkaline degradation of cellulosic wastes under reducing conditions in a cementitious repository can significantly increase the solubility of the actinides at high pH, especially plutonium. The solubility of plutonium at pH 12, in the presence of a range of hydroxycarboxylic acids containing a number of hydroxyl groups and between one and three carboxylate groups, has been modelled using the HARPHRQ code. All the plutonium-organic complexes assumed in the model are based on a stable unit in which a central plutonium ion is bound by four oxygen atoms. The oxygen atoms can be provided either by a deprotonated hydroxyl group on one of the ligands, or by hydroxide ions.

  13. Health Effects of Alkaline Diet and Water, Reduction of Digestive-tract Bacterial Load, and Earthing.

    PubMed

    Mousa, Haider Abdul-Lateef

    2016-04-01

    In the article, the author discusses the issue of chronic, low-grade acidosis that is thought to be brought about primarily by 2 factors: (1) advancing age, with a consequent decline in renal function; and (2) diet. An acid-forming diet can induce low-grade metabolic acidosis, which causes very small decreases in blood pH and plasma bicarbonate (HCO3-) that remain within the range considered to be normal. However, if the duration of the acidosis is prolonged or chronically present, even a low degree of acidosis can become significant. This article reviews supporting evidence in the literature that has shown that consumption of abundant alkaline-forming foods can result in improvement in bone mineral density (BMD) and muscle mass, protection from chronic illnesses, reduced tumor-cell invasion and metastasis, and effective excretion of toxins from the body. In addition, a large number of studies showing the benefits of alkaline water (mineral water) have revealed that people consuming water with a high level of total dissolved solids (TDS) (ie, with a high mineral content) have shown a lower incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD), cardiovascular disease (CVD), and cancer and lower total mortality rates. Consumption of alkaline water also may prevent osteoporosis and protect pancreatic beta cells with its antioxidant effects. In addition, this article discusses the literature that shows that reducing digestive-tract bacterial load can play an important role in increasing blood alkalinity toward the normal upper limit. That change occurs through good oral hygiene, flossing of teeth, perfect chewing of food, and bowel evacuation as soon as possible. Finally, the author reviews the literature that shows that earthing (ie, the direct contact of the human body with the earth) can supply a current of plentiful electrons. Earthing has been shown to reduce acute and chronic inflammation, blood glucose in patients with diabetes, red blood cell (RBC) aggregation, and blood

  14. Probing effects of pH change on dynamic response of Claudin-2 mediated adhesion using single molecule force spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Tong Seng; Vedula, Sri Ram Krishna; Hui Shi; Kausalya, P. Jaya; Hunziker, Walter; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2008-08-15

    Claudins belong to a large family of transmembrane proteins that localize at tight junctions (TJs) where they play a central role in regulating paracellular transport of solutes and nutrients across epithelial monolayers. Their ability to regulate the paracellular pathway is highly influenced by changes in extracellular pH. However, the effect of changes in pH on the strength and kinetics of claudin mediated adhesion is poorly understood. Using atomic force microscopy, we characterized the kinetic properties of homophilic trans-interactions between full length recombinant GST tagged Claudin-2 (Cldn2) under different pH conditions. In measurements covering three orders of magnitude change in force loading rate of 10{sup 2}-10{sup 4} pN/s, the Cldn2/Cldn2 force spectrum (i.e., unbinding force versus loading rate) revealed a fast and a slow loading regime that characterized a steep inner activation barrier and a wide outer activation barrier throughout pH range of 4.5-8. Comparing to the neutral condition (pH 6.9), differences in the inner energy barriers for the dissociation of Cldn2/Cldn2 mediated interactions at acidic and alkaline environments were found to be < 0.65 k{sub B}T, which is much lower than the outer dissociation energy barrier (> 1.37 k{sub B}T). The relatively stable interaction of Cldn2/Cldn2 in neutral environment suggests that electrostatic interactions may contribute to the overall adhesion strength of Cldn2 interactions. Our results provide an insight into the changes in the inter-molecular forces and adhesion kinetics of Cldn2 mediated interactions in acidic, neutral and alkaline environments.

  15. Probing effects of pH change on dynamic response of Claudin-2 mediated adhesion using single molecule force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lim, Tong Seng; Vedula, Sri Ram Krishna; Hui, Shi; Kausalya, P Jaya; Hunziker, Walter; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2008-08-15

    Claudins belong to a large family of transmembrane proteins that localize at tight junctions (TJs) where they play a central role in regulating paracellular transport of solutes and nutrients across epithelial monolayers. Their ability to regulate the paracellular pathway is highly influenced by changes in extracellular pH. However, the effect of changes in pH on the strength and kinetics of claudin mediated adhesion is poorly understood. Using atomic force microscopy, we characterized the kinetic properties of homophilic trans-interactions between full length recombinant GST tagged Claudin-2 (Cldn2) under different pH conditions. In measurements covering three orders of magnitude change in force loading rate of 10(2)-10(4) pN/s, the Cldn2/Cldn2 force spectrum (i.e., unbinding force versus loading rate) revealed a fast and a slow loading regime that characterized a steep inner activation barrier and a wide outer activation barrier throughout pH range of 4.5-8. Comparing to the neutral condition (pH 6.9), differences in the inner energy barriers for the dissociation of Cldn2/Cldn2 mediated interactions at acidic and alkaline environments were found to be <0.65 k(B)T, which is much lower than the outer dissociation energy barrier (>1.37 k(B)T). The relatively stable interaction of Cldn2/Cldn2 in neutral environment suggests that electrostatic interactions may contribute to the overall adhesion strength of Cldn2 interactions. Our results provide an insight into the changes in the inter-molecular forces and adhesion kinetics of Cldn2 mediated interactions in acidic, neutral and alkaline environments. PMID:18602630

  16. Sorption/desorption behavior of triclosan in sediment-water-rhamnolipid systems: Effects of pH, ionic strength, and DOM.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenjin; Hu, Yongyou; Guo, Qian; Yan, Jia; Chen, Yuancai; Cheng, Jianhua

    2015-10-30

    Effects of pH, ionic strength and DOM on the sorption and desorption of triclosan (TCS) in sediment-water-rhamnolipid systems were systematically investigated through controlled batch experiments. Results showed that solubilization enhancement of TCS by rhamnolipid was higher in acid pH range than in alkaline pH range and was the highest at the ionic strength of 5×10(-2) M. Sorption of rhamnolipid onto sediment decreased with the increase of pH while the result was contrary to ionic strength. Moreover, the apparent distribution coefficients of TCS (Kd(*)) decreased from 73.35 to 32.30 L/kg with an increase of solution pH, as varying pH had significant influence on sorption of RL onto sediment and degree of ionization of TCS. Rhamnolipid presented the largest distribution capacity of TCS into the aqueous phase at moderate ionic strength (5×10(-2) M) with the Kd(*) of 17.26 L/kg. Further results also indicated that the presence of humic acid in aqueous phase could increase the desorption of TCS from contaminated sediment. The desorption enhancement was much higher in the system containing both rhamnolipid and DOM than in the single system. These findings provide meaningful information for enhanced migration of TCS from sediment to water by rhamnolipid. PMID:25938643

  17. High-Efficiency Artificial Photosynthesis Using a Novel Alkaline Membrane Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayan, Sri; Haines, Brennan; Blosiu, Julian; Marzwell, Neville

    2009-01-01

    A new cell designed to mimic the photosynthetic processes of plants to convert carbon dioxide into carbonaceous products and oxygen at high efficiency, has an improved configuration using a polymer membrane electrolyte and an alkaline medium. This increases efficiency of the artificial photosynthetic process, achieves high conversion rates, permits the use of inexpensive catalysts, and widens the range of products generated by this type of process. The alkaline membrane electrolyte allows for the continuous generation of sodium formate without the need for any additional separation system. The electrolyte type, pH, electrocatalyst type, and cell voltage were found to have a strong effect on the efficiency of conversion of carbon dioxide to formate. Indium electrodes were found to have higher conversion efficiency compared to lead. Bicarbonate electrolyte offers higher conversion efficiency and higher rates than water solutions saturated with carbon dioxide. pH values between 8 and 9 lead to the maximum values of efficiency. The operating cell voltage of 2.5 V, or higher, ensures conversion of the carbon dioxide to formate, although the hydrogen evolution reaction begins to compete strongly with the formate production reaction at higher cell voltages. Formate is produced at indium and lead electrodes at a conversion efficiency of 48 mg of CO2/kilojoule of energy input. This efficiency is about eight times that of natural photosynthesis in green plants. The electrochemical method of artificial photosynthesis is a promising approach for the conversion, separation and sequestration of carbon dioxide for confined environments as in space habitats, and also for carbon dioxide management in the terrestrial context. The heart of the reactor is a membrane cell fabricated from an alkaline polymer electrolyte membrane and catalyst- coated electrodes. This cell is assembled and held in compression in gold-plated hardware. The cathode side of the cell is supplied with carbon

  18. Proteomic analysis of protein expression in Lactobacillus plantarum in response to alkaline stress.

    PubMed

    Lee, KiBeom; Rho, Beom-Seop; Pi, KyungBae; Kim, Ho-Jin; Choi, Yun-Jaie

    2011-04-20

    Lactobacillus plantarum, a probiotic organism that plays an important role in the microbial fermentation of alkaline materials in fermenting foods, faces alkaline stress during the fermentation process. Here, we report the patterns of protein expression in L. plantarum subjected to transient (1h) alkaline stress at pH 7.7, 8.7 or 9.7. Thirty-three alkaline-responsive proteins were identified by two-dimensional electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Identification of proteins showing differential expression in response to alkaline stress revealed that the alkaline stress response of L. plantarum is a complex process. Some proteins appear to be induced, others repressed. These proteins could be clustered into nine groups based on their probable functions: energy metabolism, transport system, purine/pyrimidine metabolism, amino acid metabolism, proteolytic activity, transcription-translation, stress-related, general function, and unknown functions. These proteomic analyses are expected to prove useful in understanding the adaptive response of L. plantarum strains to alkaline stress and may facilitate future investigations into the genetic and physiological aspects of this response. PMID:21356255

  19. The Martian ocean: First acid, then alkaline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, M. W.

    1992-01-01

    In Mars' distant past, carbon dioxide and water may have been plentiful. Values of total outgassed CO2 from several to about 10 bar are consistent with present knowledge, and this amount of CO2 implies an amount of water outgassed equal to an equivalent depth of 500 to 1000 m. It is quite reasonable, therefore, to envision an early Mars in which there was a body or bodies of liquid water, perhaps in the northern plains, and a dense carbon dioxide atmosphere. Under such conditions, the pH of the water will be low, due to the dissolution of carbon dioxide in the water to form carbonic acid. This acidic water is capable of weathering the available rock quite intensely, particularly because this rock is likely to be heavily fractured (from meteorite bombardment) or even consist of fine particles (such as pyroclastic deposits). As time goes on, however, the carbon dioxide atmosphere will rapidly pass through the ocean to form carbonate deposits. As the density of the atmosphere decreases, so will the flux of carbonic acid into the ocean. Without this input of carbonic acid, the effect of the dissolved weathering products will be to increase the pH of the water. The ocean will then become alkaline. To study this process, I have developed a geochemical cycle model for the atmosphere-hydrosphere-regolith system of Mars. The treatment of geochemical cycles as complex kinetic chemical reactions has been undertaken for terrestrial systems in recent years with much success. This method is capable of elegantly handling the interactions between the simultaneous chemical reactions needed to understand such a system.

  20. Does pH influence soil hydro-mechanical properties?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaplain, V.; Défossez, P.; Delarue, G.; Dexter, A. R.; Richard, G.; Tessier, D.

    2009-04-01

    Does pH influence soil hydro-mechanical properties ? V. Chaplain1, P. Défossez2, G. Delarue1, A.R. Dexter3, G. Richard3 and D. Tessier1. 1 UR INRA PESSAC RD 10, F-78026 Versailles cedex 2 UMR INRA/URCA FARE, 2 Esplanade Roland Garros, BP 224 F-51686 Reims cedex 2 3 UR INRA Sols 2163 Avenue de la Pomme de Pin - CS 40001 ARDON F-45075 Orléans Cedex 2 Corresponding author : chaplain@versailles.inra.fr Structure of soils and its dynamic, physico-chemistry of the interface are of a great importance in the fate of organic pollutants because it governs the accessibility of pollutants to micro-organisms. The soil structure of soils is related to physical parameters (texture, density, water content) but the physico-chemical properties of the interface is not considered. In this study we performed hydro-mechanical measurements on soil samples taken from the 42-plot long-term experiment in Versailles. Indeed six plots were selected to cover a large range of pH values from acid (3.5) to alkaline (8.2) due to the repeated application of fertilizers. Soils were taken in the 0-20 cm and in the 30-35 cm layer out of the ploughed zone. All soils had similar texture and composition with low organic carbon. Therefore pH changes the surface charges and hydrophobicity that are implied in aggregation process. The two layers had the same pH values. The precompression stress Pc and the compression index Cc were derived from confined compression tests performed on remoulded soil samples (density 1.45 g/cm3) at saturation. Results shows that the precompression stress increased at pH lower than 4. In acid case, precompression stress was higher in subsoil. This increase of Pc was attributed to the hydrophobicity due in part to the condensation of charges probably sensitive to the humectation/dessication processes.

  1. Stability of thermostable alkaline protease from Bacillus licheniformis RP1 in commercial solid laundry detergent formulations.

    PubMed

    Sellami-Kamoun, Alya; Haddar, Anissa; Ali, Nedra El-Hadj; Ghorbel-Frikha, Basma; Kanoun, Safia; Nasri, Moncef

    2008-01-01

    The stability of crude extracellular protease produced by Bacillus licheniformis RP1, isolated from polluted water, in various solid laundry detergents was investigated. The enzyme had an optimum pH and temperature at pH 10.0-11.0 and 65-70 degrees C. Enzyme activity was inhibited by PMSF, suggesting that the preparation contains a serine-protease. The alkaline protease showed extreme stability towards non-ionic (5% Tween 20% and 5% Triton X-100) and anionic (0.5% SDS) surfactants, which retained 100% and above 73%, respectively, of its initial activity after preincubation 60 min at 40 degrees C. The RP1 protease showed excellent stability and compatibility with a wide range of commercial solid detergents at temperatures from 40 to 50 degrees C, suggesting its further application in detergent industry. The enzyme retained 95% of its initial activity with Ariel followed by Axion (94%) then Dixan (93.5%) after preincubation 60 min at 40 degrees C in the presence of 7 mg/ml of detergents. In the presence of Nadhif and New Det, the enzyme retained about 83.5% of the original activity. The effects of additives such as maltodextrin, sucrose and PEG 4000 on the stability of the enzyme during spray-drying and during subsequent storage in New Det detergent were also examined. All additives tested enhanced stability of the enzyme. PMID:16872818

  2. Digestive alkaline proteases from thornback ray (Raja clavata): Characteristics and applications.

    PubMed

    Lassoued, Imen; Hajji, Sawssen; Mhamdi, Samiha; Jridi, Mourad; Bayoudh, Ahmed; Barkia, Ahmed; Nasri, Moncef

    2015-09-01

    This study describes the characterization of a crude protease extract from thornback ray (Raja clavata) and its evaluation in liquid detergent and in deproteinizattion of shrimp waste. At least five clear caseinolytic proteases bands were observed in a zymogram. The crude protease showed optimum activity at pH 8.0 and 50 °C, and it was highly stable over pH range from 8.0 to 11.0. Proteolytic enzymes were very stable in non-ionic surfactants and in the presence of oxidizing agents, maintaining 70% of their activity after incubation for 1 h at 30 °C in the presence of 1% sodium perborate. In addition, they showed high stability and compatibility with various liquid laundry-detergents available in the Tunisian market. The crude extract retained 100% of its activity after preincubation for 60 min at 30 °C in the presence of Nadhif Perfect, Textil and Carrefour laundry detergents. Further, proteases from R. clavata viscera were used for shrimp waste deproteinization in the process of chitin preparation. The percent of protein removal after 3 h hydrolysis at 45 °C with an enzyme/substrate ratio of 30 U/mg of proteins was 74%. These results suggest that enzymatic deproteinization of shrimp wastes by fish endogenous alkaline proteases could be applicable to the chitin production process. PMID:26208858

  3. Mechanistic study of nickel based catalysts for oxygen evolution and methanol oxidation in alkaline medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dayi; Minteer, Shelley D.

    2015-06-01

    Nickel based catalysts have been studied as catalysts for either organic compound (especially methanol) oxidation or oxygen evolution reactions in alkaline medium for decades, but methanol oxidation and oxygen evolution reactions occur at a similar potential range and pH with nickel based catalysts. In contrast to previous studies, we studied these two reactions simultaneously under various pH and methanol concentrations with electrodes containing a series of NiOOH surface concentrations. We found that nickel based catalysts are more suitable to be used as oxygen evolution catalysts than methanol oxidation catalysts based on the observation that: The rate-determining step of methanol oxidation involves NiOOH, OH- and methanol while high methanol to OH- ratio could poison the NiOOH sites. Since NiOOH is involved in the rate-determining step, methanol oxidation suffers from high overpotential and oxygen evolution is favored over methanol oxidation in the presence of an equivalent amount (0.1 M) of alkali and methanol.

  4. COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-04-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent

  5. Chemical equilibria model of strontium-90 adsorption and transport in soil in response to dynamic alkaline conditions.

    PubMed

    Spalding, B P; Spalding, I R

    2001-01-15

    Strontium-90 is a major hazardous contaminant of radioactive wastewater and its processing sludges at many Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. In the past, such contaminated wastewater and sludge have been disposed in soil seepage pits, lagoons, or cribs often under highly perturbed alkaline conditions (pH > 12) where 90Sr solubility is low and its adsorption to surrounding soil is high. As natural weathering returns these soils to near-neutral or slightly acidic conditions, the adsorbed and precipitated calcium and magnesium phases, in which 90Sr is carried, change significantly in both nature and amounts. No comprehensive computational method has been formulated previously to quantitatively simulate the dynamics of 90Sr in the soil-groundwater environment under such dynamic and wide-ranging conditions. A computational code, the Hydrologic Utility Model for Demonstrating Integrated Nuclear Geochemical Environmental Responses (HUMDINGER), was composed to describe the changing equilibria of 90Sr in soil based on its causative chemical reactions including soil buffering, pH-dependent cation-exchange capacity, cation selectivity, and the precipitation/dissolution of calcium carbonate, calcium hydroxide, and magnesium hydroxide in response to leaching groundwater characteristics including pH, acid-neutralizing capacity, dissolved cations, and inorganic carbonate species. The code includes a simulation of one-dimensional transport of 90Sr through a soil column as a series of soil mixing cells where the equilibrium soluble output from one cell is applied to the next cell. Unamended soil leaching and highly alkaline soil treatments, including potassium hydroxide, sodium silicate, and sodium aluminate, were simulated and compared with experimental findings using large (10 kg) soil columns that were leached with 90Sr-contaminated groundwater after treatment. HUMDINGER's simulations were in good agreement with dynamic experimental observations of soil exchange capacity

  6. pH Regulates White-Opaque Switching and Sexual Mating in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuan; Cao, Chengjun; Jia, Wei; Tao, Li; Guan, Guobo; Huang, Guanghua

    2015-11-01

    As a successful commensal and pathogen of humans, Candida albicans encounters a wide range of environmental conditions. Among them, ambient pH, which changes frequently and affects many biological processes in this species, is an important factor, and the ability to adapt to pH changes is tightly linked with pathogenesis and morphogenesis. In this study, we report that pH has a profound effect on white-opaque switching and sexual mating in C. albicans. Acidic pH promotes white-to-opaque switching under certain culture conditions but represses sexual mating. The Rim101-mediated pH-sensing pathway is involved in the control of pH-regulated white-opaque switching and the mating response. Phr2 and Rim101 could play a major role in acidic pH-induced opaque cell formation. Despite the fact that the cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling pathway does not play a major role in pH-regulated white-opaque switching and mating, white and opaque cells of the cyr1/cyr1 mutant, which is defective in the production of cAMP, showed distinct growth defects under acidic and alkaline conditions. We further discovered that acidic pH conditions repressed sexual mating due to the failure of activation of the Ste2-mediated α-pheromone response pathway in opaque A: cells. The effects of pH changes on phenotypic switching and sexual mating could involve a balance of host adaptation and sexual reproduction in C. albicans. PMID:26342021

  7. Recovery of phosphorus and nitrogen from alkaline hydrolysis supernatant of excess sludge by magnesium ammonium phosphate.

    PubMed

    Bi, Wei; Li, Yiyong; Hu, Yongyou

    2014-08-01

    Magnesium ammonium phosphate (MAP) method was used to recover orthophosphate (PO₄(3-)-P) and ammonium nitrogen (NH4(+)-N) from the alkaline hydrolysis supernatant of excess sludge. To reduce alkali consumption and decrease the pH of the supernatant, two-stage alkaline hydrolysis process (TSAHP) was designed. The results showed that the release efficiencies of PO₄(3-)-P and NH₄(+)-N were 41.96% and 7.78%, respectively, and the pH of the supernatant was below 10.5 under the running conditions with initial pH of 13, volume ratio (sludge dosage/water dosage) of 1.75 in second-stage alkaline hydrolysis reactor, 20 g/L of sludge concentration in first-stage alkaline hydrolysis reactor. The order of parameters influencing MAP reaction was analyzed and the optimized conditions of MAP reaction were predicted through the response surface methodology. The recovery rates of PO₄(3-)-P and NH₄(+)-N were 46.88% and 16.54%, respectively under the optimized conditions of Mg/P of 1.8, pH 9.7 and reaction time of 15 min. PMID:24880806

  8. Long-term evolution of highly alkaline steel slag drainage waters.

    PubMed

    Riley, Alex L; Mayes, William M

    2015-07-01

    The disposal of slag generated by the steel industry can have negative consequences upon the surrounding aquatic environment by the generation of high pH waters, leaching of potentially problematic trace metals, and rapid rates of calcite precipitation which smother benthic habitats. A 36-year dataset was collated from the long-term ambient monitoring of physicochemical parameters and elemental concentrations of samples from two steel slag leachate-affected watercourses in northern England. Waters were typified by elevated pH (>10), high alkalinity, and were rich in dissolved metals (e.g. calcium (Ca), aluminium (Al), and zinc (Zn)). Long-term trend analysis was performed upon pH, alkalinity, and Ca concentration which, in addition to Ca flux calculations, were used to highlight the longevity of pollution arising as a result of the dumping and subsequent leaching of steel slags. Declines in calcium and alkalinity have been modest over the monitoring period and not accompanied by significant declines in water pH. If the monotonic trends of decline in alkalinity and calcium continue in the largest of the receiving streams, it will be in the region of 50-80 years before calcite precipitation would be expected to be close to baseline levels, where ecological impacts would be negligible. PMID:26108748

  9. Bactericidal activity of alkaline salts of fatty acids towards bacteria associated with poultry processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibacterial activity of alkaline salts of caproic, caprylic, capric, lauric, and myristic acids were determined using the agar diffusion assay. A 0.5M concentration of each fatty acid (FA) was dissolved in 1.0 M potassium hydroxide (KOH), and pH of the mixtures was adjusted to 10.5 with citric aci...

  10. Lysinibacillus halotolerans sp. nov., isolated from saline-alkaline soil.

    PubMed

    Kong, Delong; Wang, Yanwei; Zhao, Bingqiang; Li, Yanting; Song, Jinlong; Zhai, Yi; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Huimin; Chen, Xiaorong; Zhao, Bin; Ruan, Zhiyong

    2014-08-01

    A novel aerobic, halotolerant bacterium, designated strain LAM612(T), was isolated from saline-alkaline soil samples from Lingxian County, Shandong Province, China. Cells of strain LAM612(T) were Gram-reaction-positive, endospore-forming, motile and rod-shaped. The optimal temperature and pH for growth were 35 °C and pH 6.0, respectively. Strain LAM612(T) could grow in the presence of up to 10% (w/v) NaCl. The genomic DNA G+C conten was 36.4 mol% as detected by the T(m) method. Comparative analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that LAM612(T) was closely related to Lysinibacillus sinduriensis KACC 16611(T) (98.0%), L. chungkukjangi KACC 16626(T) (97.5%), L. massiliensis KCTC 13178(T) (97.4%), L. xylanilyticus KACC 15113(T) (97.2%), L. macroides DSM 54(T) (97.0%) and L. manganicus DSM 26584(T) (96.5%). The DNA-DNA hybridization values between strain LAM612(T) and its closest relatives ranged from 20.6% to 41.9%. The major fatty acids of strain LAM612(T) were iso-C(15 : 0) (40.8%), iso-C(16 : 0) (15.2%) and anteiso-C(15 : 0) (10.8%). The cell-wall peptidoglycan content was A4α (L-Lys-D-Asp). The predominant menaquinone was MK-7 and the main polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, three unknown phospholipids, five unknown glycolipids and an unknown lipid. Based on the DNA-DNA hybridization results and phenotypic, phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic properties, strain LAM612(T) could be distinguished from the recognized species of the genus Lysinibacillus, and was suggested to represent a novel species of this genus, for which the name Lysinibacillus halotolerans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is LAM612(T) ( = ACCC 00718(T) = JCM 19611(T)). PMID:24814335

  11. Proton Transport and pH Control in Fungi.

    PubMed

    Kane, Patricia M

    2016-01-01

    Despite diverse and changing extracellular environments, fungi maintain a relatively constant cytosolic pH and numerous organelles of distinct lumenal pH. Key players in fungal pH control are V-ATPases and the P-type proton pump Pma1. These two proton pumps act in concert with a large array of other transporters and are highly regulated. The activities of Pma1 and the V-ATPase are coordinated under some conditions, suggesting that pH in the cytosol and organelles is not controlled independently. Genomic studies, particularly in the highly tractable S. cerevisiae, are beginning to provide a systems-level view of pH control, including transcriptional responses to acid or alkaline ambient pH and definition of the full set of regulators required to maintain pH homeostasis. Genetically encoded pH sensors have provided new insights into localized mechanisms of pH control, as well as highlighting the dynamic nature of pH responses to the extracellular environment. Recent studies indicate that cellular pH plays a genuine signaling role that connects nutrient availability and growth rate through a number of mechanisms. Many of the pH control mechanisms found in S. cerevisiae are shared with other fungi, with adaptations for their individual physiological contexts. Fungi deploy certain proton transport and pH control mechanisms not shared with other eukaryotes; these regulators of cellular pH are potential antifungal targets. This review describes current and emerging knowledge proton transport and pH control mechanisms in S. cerevisiae and briefly discusses how these mechanisms vary among fungi. PMID:26721270

  12. pH in atomic scale simulations of electrochemical interfaces.

    PubMed

    Rossmeisl, Jan; Chan, Karen; Ahmed, Rizwan; Tripković, Vladimir; Björketun, Mårten E

    2013-07-01

    Electrochemical reaction rates can strongly depend on pH, and there is increasing interest in electrocatalysis in alkaline solution. To date, no method has been devised to address pH in atomic scale simulations. We present a simple method to determine the atomic structure of the metal|solution interface at a given pH and electrode potential. Using Pt(111)|water as an example, we show the effect of pH on the interfacial structure, and discuss its impact on reaction energies and barriers. This method paves the way for ab initio studies of pH effects on the structure and electrocatalytic activity of electrochemical interfaces. PMID:23703376

  13. Hydrocarbon potential of an alkaline lake basin

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Jian Yu; Wang Gijun ); Ma Wanyi )

    1991-03-01

    The Biyan basin is an oil-rich intermountain basin in the central part of China. It is a half graben with a marginal normal fault in the south and a slope in the north. The thickest Eogene reaches 7 km in the center of the depression. This basin became a typical alkaline lake with specific sedimentary sequences composed of oil shale, trona, dolomite, and dark mudstone during Early Tertiary because of dry climate and peripheral source areas rich in Na-containing minerals. The source rock is characterized by abundant organic matter with a mean TOC of 2.5% and kerogen of good quality with H/C 1.4-1.7, and IH up to 800 mg/g. The study of biomarkers reveals a low Pr/Ph ratio and an abundant gammacerane and {minus}carotane, thus indicating an environment of high salinity and reduction. All geochemical data demonstrate multiple provinces of primary organic matter, of which halophilous prokaryotic organisms are likely contributors. Crude oil in the Biyan oil field contains high wax and low sulfur. The low-mature oil is discovered in dolomite beds. The high hydrocarbon potential of this basin is due to particularly favorable conditions for preservation and transformation of organic matter and high subsidence rates.

  14. Process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Chia-lin W.

    1995-01-01

    A process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification. The process involves acidifying the wastes with an oxidizing agent such as nitric acid, then adding formic acid as a reducing agent, and then mixing with glass formers to produce a melter feed. The nitric acid contributes nitrates that act as an oxidant to balance the redox of the melter feed, prevent reduction of certain species to produce conducting metals, and lower the pH of the wastes to a suitable level for melter operation. The formic acid reduces mercury compounds to elemental mercury for removal by steam stripping, and MnO.sub.2 to the Mn(II) ion to prevent foaming of the glass melt. The optimum amounts of nitric acid and formic acid are determined in relation to the composition of the wastes, including the concentrations of mercury (II) and MnO.sub.2, noble metal compounds, nitrates, formates and so forth. The process minimizes the amount of hydrogen generated during treatment, while producing a redox-balanced feed for effective melter operation and a quality glass product.

  15. Process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, C.L.W.

    1995-07-25

    A process is described for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification. The process involves acidifying the wastes with an oxidizing agent such as nitric acid, then adding formic acid as a reducing agent, and then mixing with glass formers to produce a melter feed. The nitric acid contributes nitrates that act as an oxidant to balance the redox of the melter feed, prevent reduction of certain species to produce conducting metals, and lower the pH of the wastes to a suitable level for melter operation. The formic acid reduces mercury compounds to elemental mercury for removal by steam stripping, and MnO{sub 2} to the Mn(II) ion to prevent foaming of the glass melt. The optimum amounts of nitric acid and formic acid are determined in relation to the composition of the wastes, including the concentrations of mercury (II) and MnO{sub 2}, noble metal compounds, nitrates, formates and so forth. The process minimizes the amount of hydrogen generated during treatment, while producing a redox-balanced feed for effective melter operation and a quality glass product. 4 figs.

  16. Effect of immersion into solutions at various pH on the color stability of composite resins with different shades

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Ji-Deok; Seon, Eun-Mi; Son, Sung-Ae; Jung, Kyoung-Hwa; Kwon, Yong-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study examined the color changes of a resin composite with different shades upon exposure to water with different pH. Materials and Methods Nanohybrid resin composites (Filtek Z350XT, 3M ESPE) with four different shades (A2, A3, B1, and B2) were immersed in water with three different pH (pH 3, 6, and 9) for 14 day. The CIE L*a*b* color coordinates of the specimens were evaluated before and after immersion in the solutions. The color difference (ΔE*) and the translucency parameter (TP) were calculated using the color coordinates. Results ΔE* ranged from 0.33 to 1.58, and the values were affected significantly by the pH. The specimens immersed in a pH 6 solution showed the highest ΔE* values (0.87 - 1.58). The specimens with a B1 shade showed the lowest ΔE* change compared to the other shades. TP ranged from 7.01 to 9.46 depending on the pH and resin shade. The TP difference between before and after immersion in the pH solutions was less than 1.0. Conclusions The resulting change of color of the tested specimens did not appear to be clinically problematic because the color difference was < 1.6 in the acidic, neutral, and alkaline solutions regardless of the resin shade, i.e., the color change was imperceptible. PMID:26587412

  17. The electrochemistry of SIMFUEL in dilute alkaline hydrogen peroxide solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldik, Jon

    The work described in this thesis is a study of the electrochemistry of SIMFUEL (SIMulated nuclear FUEL) in dilute, alkaline hydrogen peroxide solutions. In the first set of experiments, the reaction of H2O 2 on SIMFUEL electrodes was studied electrochemically and under open circuit conditions in 0.1 mol L-1 NaCl solutions at pH 9.8. The composition of the oxidized UO2 surface was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Hydrogen peroxide reduction was found to be catalyzed by the formation of a mixed UIV/UV (UO 2+x) surface layer, but to be blocked by the accumulation of UVI species (UO3· yH2O or adsorbed (UO2)2+) on the electrode surface. The formation of this UVI layer blocks both H2O2 reduction and oxidation, thereby inhibiting the potentially rapid H2O2 decomposition reaction to H2O and O2. Decomposition is found to proceed at a rate controlled by the desorption of the adsorbed (UO2)2+ or reduction of adsorbed O2 species. Reduction of (O2) ads is coupled to the slow oxidative dissolution of UO2 and formation of a corrosion product deposit of UO3· yH2O. In the second series of experiments, the electrochemical reduction of hydrogen peroxide on SIMFUEL was studied using the steady-state polarization technique. Kinetic parameters for the reaction, such as Tafel slopes and reaction orders, were determined. The results were interpreted in terms of a chemical-electrochemical mechanism involving UIV/UV donor-acceptor reduction sites. The large values of the Tafel slopes and the fractional reaction orders with respect to H2O2 can be understood in terms of the potential-dependent surface coverage of active sites, similar to that observed in the reduction of hydrogen peroxide on oxidized copper surfaces. The effects of pH over the range 10-13 were also investigated. The H2O 2 reduction currents were nearly independent of pH in the range 10-11, but were slowed at more alkaline values. The change in pH dependence appears to be related to the acid-base properties

  18. Calculation of downhole pH and delta pH in the presence of CO{sub 2} and organic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Garber, J.D.; Perkins, R.S.; Jangama, V.R.; Alapati, R.R.

    1996-08-01

    Acetic and formic acids have been found in the separator water of gas condensate wells containing CO{sub 2} and they are titrated as alkalinity. Traditional pH equations which neglect these acids and calculate pH based on alkalinity greatly over-predict the downhole pH. Since all scale calculations depend on an accurate pH value, a more sophisticated method of calculation has been developed. The methodology can be used to calculate the in-situ bulk pH and the saturation pH at different depths within a well. The difference in the saturation pH and the bulk pH is the delta pH a negative delta pH indicates a potential to scale whereas a positive value indicates a potential to corrode. The saturation pH is discussed with respect to iron carbonate saturation, but can be used for any other scale by making the appropriate changes.

  19. Effect of salicylic acid upon trace-metal sorption (Cd, Zn, Co, and Mn) onto alumina, silica, and kaolinite as a function of pH

    SciTech Connect

    Benyahya, L.; Garnier, J.M.

    1999-05-01

    The sorption of four trace metals (Cd, Zn, Co, and Mn) onto alumina, silica, and kaolinite, in the presence or absence of salicylic acid was investigated in batch experiments in the pH range from 4 to 9. The sorption was interpreted in terms of surface complexation using the diffuse layer model (DLM). Equilibrium parameters were optimized using the FITEQL program. The salicylic acid was only significantly sorbed onto the alumina and the sorption was modeled using the anionic monodentate surface complex. In the absence of salicylic acid, the sorption of the trace metals presented different pH edge behaviors, depending on the substrate. Using the cationic monodendate surface complex, the model fitted the experimental data well. In the presence of salicylic acid, at a given pH and depending on the substrate, the sorption of metals was (1) increased, suggesting the occurrence of ternary complexes; (2) reduced (sometimes totally inhibited), due to the complexation with dissolved salicylic acid; or (3) very weakly changed in terms of net effect compared to free-organic-ligand systems. Modeling of the trace-metal sorption in the presence of salicylic acid was performed using ternary surface complexes. In the acidic pH range, this allowed the experimental data to be simulated, but in the alkaline pH range, the model failed to simulate the decrease in sorption. Probable causes of the discrepancies between the experimental data and modeling results are discussed.

  20. Complexation Key to a pH Locked Redox Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizvi, Masood Ahmad; Dangat, Yuvraj; Shams, Tahir; Khan, Khaliquz Zaman

    2016-01-01

    An unfavorable pH can block a feasible electron transfer for a pH dependent redox reaction. In this experiment, a series of potentiometric titrations demonstrate the sequential loss in feasibility of iron(II) dichromate redox reaction over a pH range of 0-4. The pH at which this reaction failed to occur was termed as a pH locked reaction. The…

  1. A Molecular Chameleon: Reversible pH- and Cation-Induced Control of the Optical Properties of Phthalocyanine-Based Complexes in the Visible and Near-Infrared Spectral Ranges.

    PubMed

    Safonova, Evgeniya A; Martynov, Alexander G; Nefedov, Sergey E; Kirakosyan, Gayane A; Gorbunova, Yulia G; Tsivadze, Aslan Yu

    2016-03-01

    A series of novel nonperipherally substituted tetra-15-crown-5-dibutoxyoxanthrenocyanines (H2, Mg, Zn), acting as chameleons with the unique properties of switchable absorption and emission in the near-infrared (NIR) spectral range have been synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction. The attachment of 15-crown-5-α-dibutoxyoxanthreno moieties to phthalocyanine is responsible for the high solubility of the resulting molecules and the red shift of the Q band to the NIR region and offers a unique possibility for postsynthetic modification of the optical properties of the molecules. Both aggregation of phthalocyanine and its participation in an acid-base equilibrium strongly alter their optical properties. For example, the absorption of complexes can be reversibly tuned from 686 up to 1028 nm because of the cation-induced formation of supramolecular dimers or subsequent protonation of meso-N atoms orf macrocycle, in contrast to peripherally substituted tetra-15-crown-5-phthalocyanines without oxanthrene moieties. The reversibility of these processes can be controlled by the addition of [2.2.2]cryptand or amines. All investigated compounds exhibit fluorescence with moderate quantum yield, which can also be switched between the ON and OFF states by the action of similar agents. PMID:26910047

  2. Membrane interactions in nerve myelin. I. Determination of surface charge from effects of pH and ionic strength on period.

    PubMed Central

    Inouye, H.; Kirschner, D. A.

    1988-01-01

    We have used x-ray diffraction to study the interactions between myelin membranes in the sciatic nerve (PNS) and optic nerve (CNS) as a function of pH (2-10) and ionic strength (0-0.18). The period of myelin was found to change in a systematic manner with pH and ionic strength. PNS periods ranged from 165 to 250 A or more, while CNS periods ranged from 150 to 230 A. The native periods were observed only near physiological ionic strength at neutral or alkaline pH. The smallest periods were observed in the pH range 2.5-4 for PNS myelin and pH 2.5-5 for CNS myelin. The minimum period was also observed for PNS myelin after prolonged incubation in distilled water. At pH 4, within these acidic pH ranges, myelin period increased slightly with ionic strength; however, above these ranges, the period increased with pH and decreased with ionic strength. Electron density profiles calculated at different pH and ionic strength showed that the major structural alteration underlying the changes in period was in the width of the aqueous space at the extracellular apposition of membranes; the width of the cytoplasmic space was virtually constant. Assuming that the equilibrium myelin periods are determined by a balance of nonspecific forces/i.e., the electrostatic repulsion force and the van der Walls attractive force, as well as the short-range repulsion force (hydration force, or steric stabilization), then values in the period-dependency curve can be used to define the isoelectric pH and exclusion length of the membrane. The exclusion length, which is related to the minimum period at isoelectric pH, was used to calculate the electrostatic repulsion force given the other forces. The electrostatic repulsion was then used to calculate the surface potential, which in turn was used to calculate the surface charge density (at different pH and ionic strength). We found the negative surface charge increases with pH at constant ionic strength and with ionic strength at constant pH. We

  3. The Potential of Soft Soil Improvement Through a Coupled Technique Between Electro Kinetic and Alkaline Activation of Soft Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, G. E.; Ismail, H. B.; Huat, B. K.; Afshin, A.; Azhar, A. T. S.

    2016-07-01

    Soil stabilization techniques have been in development for decades with different rates of success. Alkaline activation of soft soil is one of those techniques that has proved to deliver some of the best shear strength values with minor drawbacks in comparison with conventional soil stabilization methods. However, environmental considerations have not been taken into account, as major mineral glassy phase activators are poisoning alkaline solutions, such as sodium-, potassium-hydroxide, and sodium-, potassium-silicate, which poses serious hazards to man and environment. This paper addresses the ways of discarding the involvement of the aforementioned alkaline solutions in soft soil stabilization by investigating the potential of a coupled electro kinetic alkaline activation technique for soft soil strengthening, through which the provision of alkaline pH is governed by electro kinetic potential. Uncertainties in regard to the dissolution of aluminosilicate as well as the dominance of acidic front are challenges that need to be overcome.

  4. Are mangroves drivers or buffers of coastal acidification? Insights from alkalinity and dissolved inorganic carbon export estimates across a latitudinal transect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sippo, James Z.; Maher, Damien T.; Tait, Douglas R.; Holloway, Ceylena; Santos, Isaac R.

    2016-05-01

    Mangrove forests are hot spots in the global carbon cycle, yet the fate for a majority of mangrove net primary production remains unaccounted for. The relative proportions of alkalinity and dissolved CO2 [CO2*] within the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) exported from mangroves is unknown, and therefore, the effect of mangrove DIC exports on coastal acidification remains unconstrained. Here we measured dissolved inorganic carbon parameters over complete tidal and diel cycles in six pristine mangrove tidal creeks covering a 26° latitudinal gradient in Australia and calculated the exchange of DIC, alkalinity, and [CO2*] between mangroves and the coastal ocean. We found a mean DIC export of 59 mmol m-2 d-1 across the six systems, ranging from import of 97 mmol m-2 d-1 to an export of 85 mmol m-2 d-1. If the Australian transect is representative of global mangroves, upscaling our estimates would result in global DIC exports of 3.6 ± 1.1 Tmol C yr-1, which accounts for approximately one third of the previously unaccounted for mangrove carbon sink. Alkalinity exchange ranged between an import of 1.2 mmol m-2 d-1 and an export of 117 mmol m-2 d-1 with an estimated global export of 4.2 ± 1.3 Tmol yr-1. A net import of free CO2 was estimated (-11.4 ± 14.8 mmol m-2 d-1) and was equivalent to approximately one third of the air-water CO2 flux (33.1 ± 6.3 mmol m-2 d-1). Overall, the effect of DIC and alkalinity exports created a measurable localized increase in coastal ocean pH. Therefore, mangroves may partially counteract coastal acidification in adjacent tropical waters.

  5. Anode conductor for alkaline cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schrenk, D.J.; Murphy, P.E.

    1988-12-13

    This patent describes an electrochemical cell comprised of an anode comprised of zinc; a cathode; and alkaline electrolyte; and a current collector comprised of a silicon bronze alloy that is comprised of 85-98% by weight copper and 1-5% by weight silicon with the remainder being comprised of at least one of manganese, iron, zinc, aluminum, tin, lead, or mixtures thereof; and a strip of metal tab stock welded to the current collector, the tab stock being a metal other than silicon bronze alloy.

  6. Alkaline fuel cell performance investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. E.; Manzo, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    An exploratory experimental fuel cell test program was conducted to investigate the performance characteristics of alkaline laboratory research electrodes. The objective of this work was to establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance and evaluate candidate cathode configurations having the potential for improved performance. The performance characterization tests provided data to empirically establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance for cell temperatures up to 300 F and reactant pressures up to 200 psia. Evaluation of five gold alloy cathode catalysts revealed that three doped gold alloys had more than two times the surface areas of reference cathodes and therefore offered the best potential for improved performance.

  7. Alkaline fuel cell performance investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. E.; Manzo, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    An exploratory experimental fuel cell test program was conducted to investigate the performance characteristics of alkaline laboratory research electrodes. The objective of this work was to establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance and evaluate candidate cathode configurations having the potential for improved performance. The performance characterization tests provided data to empirically establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance for cell temperatures up to 300 F and reactant pressures up to 200 psia. Evaluation of five gold alloy cathode catalysts revealed that three doped gold alloys had more that two times the surface areas of reference cathodes and therefore offered the best potential for improved performance.

  8. Alkaline protease from Thermoactinomyces sp. RS1 mitigates industrial pollution.

    PubMed

    Verma, Amit; Ansari, Mohammad W; Anwar, Mohmmad S; Agrawal, Ruchi; Agrawal, Sanjeev

    2014-05-01

    Proteases have found a wide application in the several industrial processes, such as laundry detergents, protein recovery or solubilization, prion degradation, meat tenderizations, and in bating of hides and skins in leather industries. But the main hurdle in industrial application of proteases is their economical production on a large scale. The present investigation aimed to exploit the locally available inexpensive agricultural and household wastes for alkaline protease production using Thermoactinomyces sp. RS1 via solid-state fermentation (SSF) technique. The alkaline enzyme is potentially useful as an additive in commercial detergents to mitigate pollution load due to extensive use of caustic soda-based detergents. Thermoactinomyces sp. RS1 showed good protease production under SSF conditions of 55 °C, pH 9, and 50 % moisture content with potato peels as solid substrate. The presented findings revealed that crude alkaline protease produced by Thermoactinomyces sp. RS1 via SSF is of potential application in silver recovery from used X-ray films. PMID:24122212

  9. Development of Natural Alkalinity in Appalachian Deep Coal Mine Discharges, Irwin Syncline, Pennsylvania, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, E. M.; Winters, W. R.; Winters, W. R.; Capo, R. C.

    2001-12-01

    Geochemical processes in flooded underground coal mine complexes are controlled by the relationship between overburden mineralogy and the hydrogeologic system, which is influenced by mining methodology and discharge location. Numerous large flow (over 2,000 L/min), historically acidic, deep mine discharges in Appalachian bituminous coal basins are now net alkaline, with circumneutral pH and high concentrations of dissolved iron (20-80 ppm) and sodium (100-500 ppm) [1]. Understanding natural alkalinity production offers alternative approaches for neutralizing acid mine drainage (AMD) and has implications for predictive models, mining regulations, mine discharge remediation, and resource recovery. To determine the subsurface processes involved in the generation of natural alkalinity, we focused on the Irwin syncline, a 240 sq.-km bituminous coal basin in southwestern Pennsylvania. All major streams that arise within or cross the syncline are affected by polluted mine drainage. The pollution ranges from highly acidic iron- and aluminum-contaminated discharges in the northern portion of the basin to highly alkaline, iron and sulfate-contaminated discharges in the southern portion. Underground mine barrier data were used to divide the basin into six hydraulically related sub-basins; mine waters were collected from nine discharges across the basin [2]. Sub-basin hydrology was integrated with infiltration, discharge, and overburden geochemistry and mineralogy. Modeling of Irwin syncline flows using a solute modeling program (PHREEQC 2.4.2; [3]) indicates that the spatial and temporal change in mine water chemistry involves processes other than simple carbonate dissolution or dilution with uncontaminated water. Results indicate that the acidic discharges in the northeastern end of the basin are the product of surface water modified by pyrite oxidation and dissolution of aluminosilicate minerals. Sodium concentrations in those flows are likely the result of minor halite

  10. Dipstick Spot urine pH does not accurately represent 24 hour urine PH measured by an electrode

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Mohamed; Sarkissian, Carl; Jianbo, Li; Calle, Juan; Monga, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To determine whether spot urine pH measured by dipstick is an accurate representation of 24 hours urine pH measured by an electrode. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed urine pH results of patients who presented to the urology stone clinic. For each patient we recorded the most recent pH result measured by dipstick from a spot urine sample that preceded the result of a 24-hour urine pH measured by the use of a pH electrode. Patients were excluded if there was a change in medications or dietary recommendations or if the two samples were more than 4 months apart. A difference of more than 0.5 pH was considered an inaccurate result. Results A total 600 patients were retrospectively reviewed for the pH results. The mean difference in pH between spot urine value and the 24 hours collection values was 0.52±0.45 pH. Higher pH was associated with lower accuracy (p<0.001). The accuracy of spot urine samples to predict 24-hour pH values of <5.5 was 68.9%, 68.2% for 5.5 to 6.5 and 35% for >6.5. Samples taken more than 75 days apart had only 49% the accuracy of more recent samples (p<0.002). The overall accuracy is lower than 80% (p<0.001). Influence of diurnal variation was not significant (p=0.588). Conclusions Spot urine pH by dipstick is not an accurate method for evaluation of the patients with urolithiasis. Patients with alkaline urine are more prone to error with reliance on spot urine pH. PMID:27286119

  11. Microbial processes and factors controlling their activities in alkaline lakes of the Mongolian plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namsaraev, Zorigto B.; Zaitseva, Svetlana V.; Gorlenko, Vladimir M.; Kozyreva, Ludmila P.; Namsaraev, Bair B.

    2015-11-01

    A striking feature of the Mongolian plateau is the wide range of air temperatures during a year, -30 to 30°C. High summer temperatures, atmospheric weathering and the arid climate lead to formation of numerous alkaline soda lakes that are covered by ice during 6-7 months per year. During the study period, the lakes had pH values between 8.1 to 10.4 and salinity between 1.8 and 360 g/L. According to chemical composition, the lakes belong to sodium carbonate, sodium chloride-carbonate and sodium sulfate-carbonate types. This paper presents the data on the water chemical composition, results of the determination of the rates of microbial processes in microbial mats and sediments in the lakes studied, and the results of a Principal Component Analysis of environmental variables and microbial activity data. Temperature was the most important factor that influenced both chemical composition and microbial activity. pH and salinity are also important factors for the microbial processes. Dark CO2 fixation is impacted mostly by salinity and the chemical composition of the lake water. Total photosynthesis and sulfate-reduction are impacted mostly by pH. Photosynthesis is the dominant process of primary production, but the highest rate (386 mg C/(L•d)) determined in the lakes studied were 2-3 times lower than in microbial mats of lakes located in tropical zones. This can be explained by the relatively short warm period that lasts only 3-4 months per year. The highest measured rate of dark CO2 assimilation (59.8 mg C/(L•d)) was much lower than photosynthesis. The highest rate of sulfate reduction was 60 mg S/(L•d), while that of methanogenesis was 75.6 μL CN4/(L•d) in the alkaline lakes of Mongolian plateau. The rate of organic matter consumption during sulfate reduction was 3-4 orders of magnitude higher than that associated with methanogenesis.

  12. Purification and properties of detergent-compatible extracellular alkaline protease from Scopulariopsis spp.

    PubMed

    Niyonzima, Francois Niyongabo; More, Sunil

    2014-10-01

    A fungal alkaline protease of Scopulariopsis spp. was purified to homogeneity with a recovery of 32.2% and 138.1 U/mg specific activity on lectin-agarose column. The apparent molecular mass was 15 ± 1 kD by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacryalamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). It was a homogenous monomeric glycoprotein as shown by a single band and confirmed by native PAGE and gelatin zymography. The enzyme was active and stable over pH range 8.0-12.0 with optimum activity at pH 9.0. The maximum activity was recorded at 50°C and remained unaltered at 50°C for 24 hr. The enzyme was stimulated by Co(2+) and Mn(2+) at 10 mM but was unaffected by Ba(2+), Mg(2+), Cu(2+), Na(+), K(+), and Fe(2+). Ca(2+) and Fe(3+) moderately reduced the activity (∼18%); however, a reduction of about 40% was seen for Zn(2+) and Hg(2+). The enzyme activity was completely inhibited by 5 mM phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) and partially by N-bromosuccinimide (NBS) and tocylchloride methylketone (TLCK). The serine, tryptophan, and histidine may therefore be at or near the active site of the enzyme. The protease was more active against gelatin compared to casein, fibrinogen, egg albumin, and bovine serum albumin (BSA). With casein as substrate, Km and Vmax were 4.3 mg/mL and 15.9 U/mL, respectively. An activation was observed with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), Tween-80, and Triton X-100 at 2% (v/v); however, H2O2 and NaClO did not affect the protease activity. Storage stability was better for all the temperatures tested (-20, 4, and 28 ± 2°C) with a retention of more than 85% of initial activity after 40 days. The protease retained more than 50% activity after 24 hr of incubation at 28, 60, and 90°C in the presence (0.7%, w/v) of commercial enzymatic and nonenzymatic detergents. The Super Wheel-enzyme solution was able to completely remove blood staining, differing from the detergent solution alone. The stability at alkaline pH and high temperatures, broad substrate specificity

  13. Investigation of gelling behavior of thiolated chitosan in alkaline condition and its application in stent coating.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Kong, Ming; Feng, Chao; Cheng, Xiaojie; Liu, Ya; Chen, Xiguang

    2016-01-20

    The gelling behaviors of thiolated chitosan (TCS) in alkaline condition were investigated. Thioglycolic acid was conjugated onto chitosan backbone through amide bond formation. The variations of thiol group content were monitored in presence of H2O2 or different pH values (pH 7.0, 8.0, 9.0) in dialysis mode. Different from the decreasing thiol group content upon time in acidic condition, increasing amount of thiol groups was detected in alkaline pH during 120 min dialysis attributed to alkaline hydrolysis of intra-molecular disulfide bonds. The extent of which was larger at higher pH values. Higher degree of thiolation, thiomer concentration or pH values promoted gelation of TCS. Entanglement and coagulation of chitosan molecule chains and re-arrangement of disulfide bonds acted closely and dynamically in the gelation process. Disulfide bonds, especially inter-molecular type, are formed by synergetic effects of thiol/disulfide interchange and thiol/thiol oxidation reactions. TCS coated vascular stent displayed wave-like microstructure of parallel ridges and grooves, which favored HUVECs adhesion and proliferation. The biocompatibility, peculiar morphology and thiol moieties of TCS as stent coating material appear application potential for vascular stent. PMID:26572360

  14. Alkaline flocculation of Phaeodactylum tricornutum induced by brucite and calcite

    SciTech Connect

    Vandamme, Dries; Pohl, Philip I.; Beuckels, Annelies; Foubert, Imogen; Brady, Patrick Vane; Muylaert, Koenraad; Hewson, John C.

    2015-08-20

    Alkaline flocculation holds great potential as a low-cost harvesting method for marine microalgae biomass production. Alkaline flocculation is induced by an increase in pH and is related to precipitation of calcium and magnesium salts. In this study, we used the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum as model organism to study alkaline flocculation of marine microalgae cultured in seawater medium. Flocculation started when pH was increased to 10 and flocculation efficiency reached 90% when pH was 10.5, which was consistent with precipitation modeling for brucite or Mg(OH)2. Compared to freshwater species, more magnesium is needed to achieve flocculation (>7.5 mM). Zeta potential measurements suggest that brucite precipitation caused flocculation by charge neutralization. When calcium concentration was 12.5 mM, flocculation was also observed at a pH of 10. Furthermore, zeta potential remained negative up to pH 11.5, suggesting that precipitated calcite caused flocculation by a sweeping coagulation mechanism.

  15. Alkaline transition of horse heart cytochrome c in the presence of ZnO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šimšíková, Michaela; Antalík, Marián

    2013-01-01

    The effect of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) on cytochrome c (cyt c) in alkaline pH was studied with absorption spectroscopy and UV circular dichroism (CD). Spectral data from UV-vis spectroscopy and circular dichroism indicate only small changes in the native structure of the protein at neutral pH after the interaction with ZnO nanoparticles. The stability around the heme crevice of cyt c and therefore the switch of the axial ligand Met80 to Lys which occurs in conditions of higher pH was proven following the interaction of cytochrome c with ZnO nanoparticles. The formation of cyt c-ZnO NPs complex based on electrostatic attraction was accompanied by a significant increase in the apparent pKa constant of the alkaline transition of cyt c.

  16. Alkaline detergent recycling via ultrafiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Steffani, C.; Meltzer, M.

    1995-06-01

    The metal finishing industry uses alkaline cleaners and detergents to remove oils and dirt from manufactured parts, often before they are painted or plated. The use of these cleaners has grown because environmental regulations are phasing out ozone depleting substances and placing restrictions on the use and disposal of many hazardous solvents. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is examining ultrafiltration as a cleaning approach that reclaims the cleaning solutions and minimizes wastes. The ultrafiltration membrane is made from sheets of polymerized organic film. The sheets are rolled onto a supporting frame and installed in a tube. Spent cleaning solution is pumped into a filter chamber and filtered through the membrane that captures oils and dirt and allows water and detergent to pass. The membrane is monitored and when pressure builds from oil and dirt, an automatic system cleans the surface to maintain solution flow and filtration quality. The results show that the ultrafiltration does not disturb the detergent concentration or alkalinity but removed almost all the oils and dirt leaving the solution in condition to be reused.

  17. Grace DAKASEP alkaline battery separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovannoni, R. T.; Lundquist, J. T.; Choi, W. M.

    1987-01-01

    The Grace DAKASEP separator was originally developed as a wicking layer for nickel-zinc alkaline batteries. The DAKASEP is a filled non-woven separator which is flexible and heat sealable. Through modification of formulation and processing variables, products with a variety of properties can be produced. Variations of DAKASEP were tested in Ni-H2, Ni-Zn, Ni-Cd, and primary alkaline batteries with good results. The properties of DAKASEP which are optimized for Hg-Zn primary batteries are shown in tabular form. This separator has high tensile strength, 12 micron average pore size, relatively low porosity at 46-48 percent, and consequently moderately high resistivity. Versions were produced with greater than 70 percent porosity and resistivities in 33 wt percent KOH as low as 3 ohm cm. Performance data for Hg-Zn E-1 size cells containing DAKASEP with the properties shown in tabular form, are more reproducible than data obtained with a competitive polypropylene non-woven separator. In addition, utilization of active material is in general considerably improved.

  18. An extremophile Microbacterium strain and its protease production under alkaline conditions.

    PubMed

    Lü, Jin; Wu, Xiaodan; Jiang, Yali; Cai, Xiaofeng; Huang, Luyao; Yang, Yongbo; Wang, Huili; Zeng, Aibing; Li, Aiying

    2014-05-01

    Extremophiles are potential resources for alkaline protease production. In order to search for alkaline protease producers, we isolated and screened alkaliphilic microorganisms from alkaline saline environments. The microorganism HSL10 was identified as a member of the genus Microbacterium by morphological observation, Gram staining and sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene and the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region. By colony-forming unit counting under alkali or salt stress, it was further identified as an alkaliphilic microbe with mild halotolerance. In addition, it was capable of secreting alkaline proteases, evidenced by larger hydrolyzation zones in the skim milk-containing medium at pH 9.0 than at pH 7.0. Subsequently, we demonstrated that both NaCl and yeast extract significantly promoted protease production by HSL10. Finally, we established a sensitive colorimetric method for the detection of protease production by HSL10 under neutral and alkaline conditions, by using the Bradford reagent for substrate staining to improve the contrast between the hydrolyzation zone and the substrate background on agar plates. HSL10 was the first example of an alkaliphilic protease-producing member in Microbacterium, and its isolation and characterization have both academic and commercial importance. PMID:23686381

  19. Statistical optimization of alkaline protease production from Penicillium citrinum YL-1 under solid-state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yun-Zhu; Wu, Duan-Kai; Zhao, Si-Yang; Lin, Wei-Min; Gao, Xiang-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Proteases from halotolerant and halophilic microorganisms were found in traditional Chinese fish sauce. In this study, 30 fungi were isolated from fermented fish sauce in five growth media based on their morphology. However, only one strain, YL-1, which was identified as Penicillium citrinum by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence analysis, can produce alkaline protease. This study is the first to report that a protease-producing fungus strain was isolated and identified in traditional Chinese fish sauce. Furthermore, the culture conditions of alkaline protease production by P. citrinum YL-1 in solid-state fermentation were optimized by response surface methodology. First, three variables including peptone, initial pH, and moisture content were selected by Plackett-Burman design as the significant variables for alkaline protease production. The Box-Behnken design was then adopted to further investigate the interaction effects between the three variables on alkaline protease production and determine the optimal values of the variables. The maximal production (94.30 U/mL) of alkaline protease by P. citrinum YL-1 took place under the optimal conditions of peptone, initial pH, and moisture content (v/w) of 35.5 g/L, 7.73, and 136%, respectively. PMID:24840211

  20. Microbial reduction of Fe(III) under alkaline conditions relevant to geological disposal.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Adam J; Morris, Katherine; Shaw, Sam; Byrne, James M; Boothman, Christopher; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2013-06-01

    To determine whether biologically mediated Fe(III) reduction is possible under alkaline conditions in systems of relevance to geological disposal of radioactive wastes, a series of microcosm experiments was set up using hyperalkaline sediments (pH ~11.8) surrounding a legacy lime working site in Buxton, United Kingdom. The microcosms were incubated for 28 days and held at pH 10. There was clear evidence for anoxic microbial activity, with consumption of lactate (added as an electron donor) concomitant with the reduction of Fe(III) as ferrihydrite (added as the electron acceptor). The products of microbial Fe(III) reduction were black and magnetic, and a range of analyses, including X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism confirmed the extensive formation of biomagnetite in this system. The addition of soluble exogenous and endogenous electron shuttles such as the humic analogue anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate and riboflavin increased both the initial rate and the final extent of Fe(III) reduction in comparison to the nonamended experiments. In addition, a soluble humic acid (Aldrich) also increased both the rate and the extent of Fe(III) reduction. These results show that microbial Fe(III) reduction can occur in conditions relevant to a geological disposal facility containing cement-based wasteforms that has evolved into a high pH environment over prolonged periods of time (>100,000 years). The potential impact of such processes on the biogeochemistry of a geological disposal facility is discussed, including possible coupling to the redox conditions and solubility of key radionuclides. PMID:23524677

  1. Microbial Reduction of Fe(III) under Alkaline Conditions Relevant to Geological Disposal

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Adam J.; Morris, Katherine; Shaw, Sam; Byrne, James M.; Boothman, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    To determine whether biologically mediated Fe(III) reduction is possible under alkaline conditions in systems of relevance to geological disposal of radioactive wastes, a series of microcosm experiments was set up using hyperalkaline sediments (pH ∼11.8) surrounding a legacy lime working site in Buxton, United Kingdom. The microcosms were incubated for 28 days and held at pH 10. There was clear evidence for anoxic microbial activity, with consumption of lactate (added as an electron donor) concomitant with the reduction of Fe(III) as ferrihydrite (added as the electron acceptor). The products of microbial Fe(III) reduction were black and magnetic, and a range of analyses, including X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism confirmed the extensive formation of biomagnetite in this system. The addition of soluble exogenous and endogenous electron shuttles such as the humic analogue anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate and riboflavin increased both the initial rate and the final extent of Fe(III) reduction in comparison to the nonamended experiments. In addition, a soluble humic acid (Aldrich) also increased both the rate and the extent of Fe(III) reduction. These results show that microbial Fe(III) reduction can occur in conditions relevant to a geological disposal facility containing cement-based wasteforms that has evolved into a high pH environment over prolonged periods of time (>100,000 years). The potential impact of such processes on the biogeochemistry of a geological disposal facility is discussed, including possible coupling to the redox conditions and solubility of key radionuclides. PMID:23524677

  2. Interfacial activity in alkaline flooding enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, M.K.

    1981-01-01

    The ionization of long-chained organic acids in the crude oil to form soaps was shown to be primarily responsible for the lowering of oil-water interfacial tension at alkaline pH. These active acids can be concentrated by silica gel chromatography into a minor polar fraction. An equilibrium chemical model was proposed based on 2 competing reactions: the ionization of acids to form active anions, and the formation of undissociated soap between acid anions and sodium ions. It correlates the interfacial activity with the interfacial concentration of active acid anions which is expressed in terms of the concentrations of the chemical species in the system. The model successfully predicts the observed oil-alkaline solution interfacial phenomenon, including its dependence on pH, alkali and salt concentrations, type of acid present and type of soap formed. Flooding at different alkali concentrations to activate different acid species present in the crude was shown to give better recovery than flooding at a single high alkali concentration. Treating the crude oil with a dilute solution of mineral acids liberates additional free active acids and yields better interfacial activity during subsequent alkali contact.

  3. Prebiotic synthesis of protobiopolymers under alkaline ocean conditions.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Bermejo, Marta; Rivas, Luis A; Palacín, Arantxa; Menor-Salván, César; Osuna-Esteban, Susana

    2011-08-01

    Clasically, prebiotic chemistry has focused on the production and identification of simple organic molecules, many of them forming part of "intractable polymers" named tholins. In a previous work, we demonstrated that in experiments using an external energy source and inorganic carbon the aqueous aerosols improved the formation of hydrophilic tholins. Herein, we elucidate the role of pH (from 4 to 12) in prebiotic experiments using saline aqueous aerosols, spark discharges and an atmosphere containing CH(4). At all values of pH, the saline aqueous aerosols increased the production of a significant variety of carboxylic acids that could have been present in a primitive Krebs cycle. Moreover, the study for the first time of hydrophilic tholins by 2-D electrophoresis revealed that these are formed by a set of unexpected heavy polymeric species. The initial alkaline conditions significantly increased both the apparent molecular weight of polymeric species up to 80 kDa and their diversity. We propose the term of protobiopolymers to denote those polymeric species fractionated by 2-D electrophoresis since these are formed by biomolecules present in living systems and show diversity in length as well as in functional groups. Thus, aerosols formed in simulated alkaline ocean conditions could provide an optimal medium for the formation of the primeval materials that could be precursors to the emergence of life. PMID:21161385

  4. Permeability Modification Using a Reactive Alkaline-Soluble Biopolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Sandra L. Fox; Xina Xie; Greg Bala

    2004-11-01

    Polymer injection has been used in reservoirs to alleviate contrasting permeability zones to enhance oil recovery (EOR). Polymer technology relies mainly on the use of polyacrylamides cross-linked by a hazardous metal or organic. Contemporary polymer plugging has investigated the stimulation of in-situ microorganisms to produce polymers (Jenneman et. al., 2000) and the use of biocatalysts to trigger gelling (Bailey et. al., 2000). The use of biological polymers are advantageous in that they can block high permeability areas, are environmentally friendly, and have potential to form reversible gels without the use of hazardous cross-linkers. Recent efforts have produced a reactive alkaline-soluble biopolymer from Agrobacterium species ATCC # 31749 that gels upon decreasing the pH of the polymeric solution. Microbial polymers are of interest due to their potential cost savings, compared to conventional use of synthetic chemical polymers. Numerous microorganisms are known to produce extracellular polysaccharides. One microbiological polymer of interest is curdlan, â - (1, 3) glucan, which has demonstrated gelling properties by a reduction in pH. The focus of this study was to determine the impact an alkaline-soluble biopolymer can have on sandstone permeability.

  5. Prebiotic Synthesis of Protobiopolymers Under Alkaline Ocean Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Bermejo, Marta; Rivas, Luis A.; Palacín, Arantxa; Menor-Salván, César; Osuna-Esteban, Susana

    2011-08-01

    Clasically, prebiotic chemistry has focused on the production and identification of simple organic molecules, many of them forming part of "intractable polymers" named tholins. In a previous work, we demonstrated that in experiments using an external energy source and inorganic carbon the aqueous aerosols improved the formation of hydrophilic tholins. Herein, we elucidate the role of pH (from 4 to 12) in prebiotic experiments using saline aqueous aerosols, spark discharges and an atmosphere containing CH4. At all values of pH, the saline aqueous aerosols increased the production of a significant variety of carboxylic acids that could have been present in a primitive Krebs cycle. Moreover, the study for the first time of hydrophilic tholins by 2-D electrophoresis revealed that these are formed by a set of unexpected heavy polymeric species. The initial alkaline conditions significantly increased both the apparent molecular weight of polymeric species up to 80 kDa and their diversity. We propose the term of protobiopolymers to denote those polymeric species fractionated by 2-D electrophoresis since these are formed by biomolecules present in living systems and show diversity in length as well as in functional groups. Thus, aerosols formed in simulated alkaline ocean conditions could provide an optimal medium for the formation of the primeval materials that could be precursors to the emergence of life.

  6. On-chip surface modified nanostructured ZnO as functional pH sensors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Liu, Wenpeng; Sun, Chongling; Zhang, Hao; Pang, Wei; Zhang, Daihua; Duan, Xuexin

    2015-09-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures are promising candidates as electronic components for biological and chemical applications. In this study, ZnO ultra-fine nanowire (NW) and nanoflake (NF) hybrid structures have been prepared by Au-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) under ambient pressure. Their surface morphology, lattice structures, and crystal orientation were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Two types of ZnO nanostructures were successfully integrated as gate electrodes in extended-gate field-effect transistors (EGFETs). Due to the amphoteric properties of ZnO, such devices function as pH sensors. We found that the ultra-fine NWs, which were more than 50 μm in length and less than 100 nm in diameter, performed better in the pH sensing process than NW-NF hybrid structures because of their higher surface-to-volume ratio, considering the Nernst equation and the Gouy-Chapman-Stern model. Furthermore, the surface coating of (3-Aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) protects ZnO nanostructures in both acidic and alkaline environments, thus enhancing the device stability and extending its pH sensing dynamic range. PMID:26266876

  7. On-chip surface modified nanostructured ZnO as functional pH sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qing; Liu, Wenpeng; Sun, Chongling; Zhang, Hao; Pang, Wei; Zhang, Daihua; Duan, Xuexin

    2015-09-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures are promising candidates as electronic components for biological and chemical applications. In this study, ZnO ultra-fine nanowire (NW) and nanoflake (NF) hybrid structures have been prepared by Au-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) under ambient pressure. Their surface morphology, lattice structures, and crystal orientation were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Two types of ZnO nanostructures were successfully integrated as gate electrodes in extended-gate field-effect transistors (EGFETs). Due to the amphoteric properties of ZnO, such devices function as pH sensors. We found that the ultra-fine NWs, which were more than 50 μm in length and less than 100 nm in diameter, performed better in the pH sensing process than NW-NF hybrid structures because of their higher surface-to-volume ratio, considering the Nernst equation and the Gouy-Chapman-Stern model. Furthermore, the surface coating of (3-Aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) protects ZnO nanostructures in both acidic and alkaline environments, thus enhancing the device stability and extending its pH sensing dynamic range.

  8. The Origin of Life in Alkaline Hydrothermal Vents.

    PubMed

    Sojo, Victor; Herschy, Barry; Whicher, Alexandra; Camprubí, Eloi; Lane, Nick

    2016-02-01

    Over the last 70 years, prebiotic chemists have been very successful in synthesizing the molecules of life, from amino acids to nucleotides. Yet there is strikingly little resemblance between much of this chemistry and the metabolic pathways of cells, in terms of substrates, catalysts, and synthetic pathways. In contrast, alkaline hydrothermal vents offer conditions similar to those harnessed by modern autotrophs, but there has been limited experimental evidence that such conditions could drive prebiotic chemistry. In the Hadean, in the absence of oxygen, alkaline vents are proposed to have acted as electrochemical flow reactors, in which alkaline fluids saturated in H2 mixed with relatively acidic ocean waters rich in CO2, through a labyrinth of interconnected micropores with thin inorganic walls containing catalytic Fe(Ni)S minerals. The difference in pH across these thin barriers produced natural proton gradients with equivalent magnitude and polarity to the proton-motive force required for carbon fixation in extant bacteria and archaea. How such gradients could have powered carbon reduction or energy flux before the advent of organic protocells with genes and proteins is unknown. Work over the last decade suggests several possible hypotheses that are currently being tested in laboratory experiments, field observations, and phylogenetic reconstructions of ancestral metabolism. We analyze the perplexing differences in carbon and energy metabolism in methanogenic archaea and acetogenic bacteria to propose a possible ancestral mechanism of CO2 reduction in alkaline hydrothermal vents. Based on this mechanism, we show that the evolution of active ion pumping could have driven the deep divergence of bacteria and archaea. PMID:26841066

  9. The Nickel(111)/Alkaline Electrolyte Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Kuilong; Chottiner, G. S.; Scherson, D. A.; Reid, Margaret A.

    1991-01-01

    The electrochemical properties of Ni (111) prepared and characterized in ultra high vacuum, UHV, by surface analytical techniques have been examined in alkaline media by cyclic voltammetry using an UHV-electrochemical cell transfer system designed and built in this laboratory. Prior to the transfer, the Ni(111) surfaces were exposed to saturation coverages of CO in UHV in an attempt to protect the surface from possible contamination with other gases during the transfer. Temperature Programmed Desorption, TPD, of CO-dosed Ni (111) surfaces displaying sharp c(4x2), LEED patterns, subsequently exposed to water-saturated Ar at atmospheric pressure in an auxiliary UHV compatible chamber and finally transferred back to the main UHV chamber, yielded CO2 and water as the only detectable products. This indicates that the CO-dosed surfaces react with water and/or bicarbonate and hydroxide as the most likely products. Based on the integration of the TPD peaks, the combined amounts of H2O and CO2 were found to be on the order of a single monolayer. The reacted c(4x2)CO/Ni(111) layer seems to protect the surface from undergoing spontaneous oxidation in strongly alkaline solutions. This was evidenced by the fact that the open circuit potential observed immediately after contact with deaerated 0.1 M KOH was about 0.38 V vs. DHE, drifting slightly towards more negative values prior to initiating the voltametric scans. The average ratio of the integrated charge obtained in the first positive linear scan in the range of 0.35 to 1.5 V vs. DHE (initiated at the open circuit potential) and the first (and subsequent) linear negative scans in the same solution yielded for various independent runs a value of 3.5 +/- 0.3. Coulometric analysis of the cyclic voltammetry curves indicate that the electrochemically formed oxyhydroxide layer involves a charge equivalent to 3.2 +/- 0.4 layers of Ni metal.

  10. Optimization and characterization of alkaline protease and carboxymethyl-cellulase produced by Bacillus pumillus grown on Ficus nitida wastes.

    PubMed

    Gomaa, Eman Zakaria

    2013-01-01

    The potentiality of 23 bacterial isolates to produce alkaline protease and carboxymethyl-cellulase (CMCase) on Ficus nitida wastes was investigated. Bacillus pumillus ATCC7061 was selected as the most potent bacterial strain for the production of both enzymes. It was found that the optimum production of protease and CMCase were recorded at 30 °C, 5% Ficus nitida leaves and incubation period of 72 h. The best nitrogen sources for protease and CMCase production were yeast extract and casein, respectively. Also maximum protease and CMCase production were reported at pH 9 and pH 10, respectively. The enzymes possessed a good stability over a pH range of 8-10, expressed their maximum activities at pH10 and temperature range of 30-50 °C, expressed their maximum activities at 50 °C. Ions of Hg(2+), Fe2+ and Ag(+) showed a stimulatory effect on protease activity and ions of Fe(2+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Cu(2+) and Ag(+) caused enhancement of CMCase activity. The enzymes were stable not only towards the nonionic surfactants like Triton X-100 and Tween 80 but also the strong anionic surfactant, SDS. Moreover, the enzymes were not significantly inhibited by EDTA or cystein. Concerning biotechnological applications, the enzymes retained (51-97%) of their initial activities upon incubation in the presence of commercials detergents for 1 h. The potential use of the produced enzymes in the degradation of human hair and cotton fabric samples were also assessed. PMID:24294252

  11. Optimization and characterization of alkaline protease and carboxymethyl-cellulase produced by Bacillus pumillus grown on Ficus nitida wastes

    PubMed Central

    Gomaa, Eman Zakaria

    2013-01-01

    The potentiality of 23 bacterial isolates to produce alkaline protease and carboxymethyl-cellulase (CMCase) on Ficus nitida wastes was investigated. Bacillus pumillus ATCC7061 was selected as the most potent bacterial strain for the production of both enzymes. It was found that the optimum production of protease and CMCase were recorded at 30 °C, 5% Ficus nitida leaves and incubation period of 72 h. The best nitrogen sources for protease and CMCase production were yeast extract and casein, respectively. Also maximum protease and CMCase production were reported at pH 9 and pH 10, respectively. The enzymes possessed a good stability over a pH range of 8–10, expressed their maximum activities at pH10 and temperature range of 30–50 °C, expressed their maximum activities at 50 °C. Ions of Hg2+, Fe2+ and Ag+ showed a stimulatory effect on protease activity and ions of Fe2+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cu2+ and Ag+ caused enhancement of CMCase activity. The enzymes were stable not only towards the nonionic surfactants like Triton X-100 and Tween 80 but also the strong anionic surfactant, SDS. Moreover, the enzymes were not significantly inhibited by EDTA or cystein. Concerning biotechnological applications, the enzymes retained (51–97%) of their initial activities upon incubation in the presence of commercials detergents for 1 h. The potential use of the produced enzymes in the degradation of human hair and cotton fabric samples were also assessed. PMID:24294252

  12. Anditalea andensis ANESC-ST--An Alkaliphilic Halotolerant Bacterium Capable of Electricity Generation under Alkaline-Saline Conditions.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei; Wang, Victor Bochuan; Zhao, Cui-E; Zhang, Qichun; Loo, Say Chye Joachim; Yang, Liang; Xu, Chenjie

    2015-01-01

    A great challenge in wastewater bioremediation is the sustained activity of viable microorganisms, which can contribute to the breakdown of waste contaminants, especially in alkaline pH conditions. Identification of extremophiles with bioremediation capability can improve the efficiency of wastewater treatment. Here, we report the discovery of an electrochemically active alkaliphilic halotolerant bacterium, Anditalea andensis ANESC-ST (=CICC10485T=NCCB 100412T), which is capable of generating bioelectricity in alkaline-saline conditions. A. andensis ANESC-ST was shown to grow in alkaline conditions between pH 7.0-11.0 and also under high salt condition (up to 4 wt% NaCl). Electrical output was further demonstrated in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) with an average current density of ~0.5 µA/cm2, even under the harsh condition of 4 wt% NaCl and pH 9.0. Subsequent introduction of secreted extracellular metabolites into MFCs inoculated with Escherichia coli or Pseudomonas aeruginosa yielded enhanced electrical output. The ability of A. andensis ANESC-ST to generate energy under alkaline-saline conditions points towards a solution for bioelectricity recovery from alkaline-saline wastewater. This is the first report of A.andensis ANESC-ST producing bioelectricity at high salt concentration and pH. PMID:26171779

  13. Effect of organics and alkalinity on the sulfur oxidizing bacteria (SOB) biosensor.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Sedky H A; Van Ginkel, Steven W; Oh, Sang-Eun

    2013-01-01

    The environmental risk assessment of toxic chemicals in stream water requires the use of a low cost standardized toxicity bioassay. Here, a biosensor for detection of toxic chemicals in stream water was studied using sulfur oxidizing bacteria (SOB) in continuous mode. The biosensor depends on the ability of SOB to oxidize sulfur particles under aerobic conditions to produce sulfuric acid. The reaction results in an increase in electrical conductivity (EC) and a decrease in pH. The biosensor is based on the inhibition of SOB in the presence of toxic chemicals by measuring changes in EC and pH. We found that the SOB biosensor can detect Cr(6+)at a low concentration (50 ppb) which is lower than many whole-cell biosensors. The effect of organic material in real stream water on SOB activity was studied. Due to the presence of mixotrophic SOB, we found that the presence of organic matter increases SOB activity which decreases the biosensor start up period. Low alkalinity (22 mg L(-1) CaCO(3)) increased effluent EC and decreased effluent pH which is optimal for biosensor operation. While at high alkalinity (820 mg L(-1) CaCO(3), the activity of SOB little decreased. We found that system can detect 50 ppb of Cr(6+) at low alkalinity (22 mg L(-1) CaCO(3)) in few hours while, complete inhibition was observed after 35 h of operation at high alkalinity (820 mg L(-1) CaCO(3)). PMID:22840537

  14. Downcore sulphur isotope ratios and diatom inferred pH in an artificially acidified Canadian shield lake.

    PubMed

    Dickman, M; Thode, H G; Rao, S; Anderson, R

    1988-01-01

    Three gravity cores were removed from near the deepest point in Lake 223 on 9 June 1984, eight years after the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) staff began the artificial acidification of the lake with sulphuric acid. The first of these cores was analysed for diatoms and pollen stratigraphy while the second and third were analysed for downcore sulphur isotope ratios (H. Thode) and downcore changes in sulphur reducing bacterial densities (S. Rao). Sediment core chronologies were based on lead-210 and cesium-137 data (R. Anderson) and the Ambrosia pollen rise (M. Dickman). Analysis of the first core to the depth of the Ambrosia pollen rise (9 cm) indicated that diatom inferred pH in Lake 223 at the time of the Ambrosia rise (circa 1890) was 6.8-7.0. At a sediment depth of 3 cm the diatom inferred pH was 6.7. Thereafter diatom inferred pH began a decline culminating in the present day (observed) pH range for 1984 (5.3-5.5). At a sediment depth of 1 cm, an increase in the abundance of two benthic alkalophilic diatoms occurred. The increase in the abundance of these diatoms was ascribed to an increase in hypolimnetic alkalinity following the artificial acidification of Lake 223. This is the first time that lake acidification has been linked to an increase in benthic alkalophilic diatoms associated with hypolimnetic alkalinity production following sulphate reduction. Sulphur in the anaerobic (black) sediment layers (0-1.5 cm) was isotopically light relative to the sulphur in the deeper layers. This was due to sulphur isotope fractionation resulting from the bacterial reduction of sulphate to hydrogen sulphide in the anaerobic portion of the water column. A jet black FeS-rich layer in the uppermost 1.5 cm of the lake's sediments was associated with an increase in the abundance of sulphate reducing bacteria (e.g. Desulfovibrio spp.). PMID:15092659

  15. The alkaline pH-adapted skin barrier is disrupted severely by SLS-induced irritation.

    PubMed

    Kim, E; Kim, S; Nam, G W; Lee, H; Moon, S; Chang, I

    2009-08-01

    The pH of the healthy skin is 5.5 and maintained by many regulatory mechanisms. The pH of the skin care product we use on a daily basis can have an influence on the skin properties. To investigate how the physical properties of skin change after the alkaline or acidic pH of the skin care products are applied on the skin for a long term, we adjusted the pH of the skin care products to 3, 5 and 8 (A, B, C), with glycolic acid and triethanolamine. For 5 weeks the skin care products were applied on 20 healthy subjects' ventral forearm and the skin physical properties were measured. After 5 weeks, skin responses to the external stress of 1% (w/v) SLS (sodium lauryl sulphate) irritation and erythema by UV were measured. Skin colour and skin UV response were not altered by the pH. However, on the C-applied site (pH 8) the transepidermal water loss of stratum corneum (SC) increased significantly, the water content increased and desquamation decreased, respectively, and the SLS significantly impaired the skin barrier in comparison with other sites. The alkaline skin care product impaired the skin barrier after repeated application over 5-week period and the skin barrier was disrupted severely by 1% SLS exposure because SC was already impaired by alkaline pH and sensitive to external stress. This suggests that the pH of daily skin care products is very important for skin barrier homeostasis. PMID:19467032

  16. Metal/Metal Oxide Differential Electrode pH Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, William; Buehler, Martin; Keymeulen, Didier

    2007-01-01

    Solid-state electrochemical sensors for measuring the degrees of acidity or alkalinity (in terms of pH values) of liquid solutions are being developed. These sensors are intended to supplant older electrochemical pH sensors that include glass electrode structures and reference solutions. The older sensors are fragile and subject to drift. The present developmental solid-state sensors are more rugged and are expected to be usable in harsh environments. The present sensors are based on a differential-electrode measurement principle. Each sensor includes two electrodes, made of different materials, in equilibrium with the solution of interest.

  17. Seawater neutralization of alkaline bauxite residue and implications for revegetation.

    PubMed

    Menzies, N W; Fulton, I M; Morrell, W J

    2004-01-01

    Reaction of bauxite residue with seawater results in neutralization of alkalinity through precipitation of Mg-, Ca-, and Al-hydroxide and carbonate minerals. In batch studies, the initial pH neutralization reaction was rapid (<5 min), with further reaction continuing to reduce pH for several weeks. Reaction with seawater produced a residue pH of 8 to 8.5. Laboratory leaching column studies were undertaken to provide information on seawater neutralization of the coarse-textured fraction of the waste, residue sand (RS), under conditions comparable with those that might be applied in the field. An 0.80-m-deep column of RS was neutralized by the application of the equivalent of 2-m depth of seawater. In addition to lowering the pH and Na content of the residue, seawater neutralization resulted in the addition of substantial amounts of the plant nutrients Ca, Mg, and K to the profile. Similar results were also obtained from a field-scale assessment of neutralization. However, the accumulation of precipitate, consisting of hydrotalcite, aragonite, and pyroaurite, in the drainage system may preclude the use of in situ seawater neutralization as a routine rehabilitation practice. Following seawater neutralization, RS remains too saline to support plant growth and would require fresh water leaching before revegetation. PMID:15356249

  18. Positive Active Material For Alkaline Electrolyte Storage Battert Nickel Electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Bernard, Patrick; Baudry, Michelle

    2000-12-05

    A method of manufacturing a positive active material for nickel electrodes of alkaline storage batteries which consists of particles of hydroxide containing mainly nickel and covered with a layer of a hydroxide phase based on nickel and yttrium is disclosed. The proportion of the hydroxide phase is in the range 0.15% to 3% by weight of yttrium expressed as yttrium hydroxide relative to the total weight of particles.

  19. Passive aerobic treatment of net-alkaline, iron-laden drainage from a flooded underground anthracite mine, Pennsylvania, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cravotta, C.A., III

    2007-01-01

    This report evaluates the results of a continuous 4.5-day laboratory aeration experiment and the first year of passive, aerobic treatment of abandoned mine drainage (AMD) from a typical flooded underground anthracite mine in eastern Pennsylvania, USA. During 1991-2006, the AMD source, locally known as the Otto Discharge, had flows from 20 to 270 L/s (median 92 L/s) and water quality that was consistently suboxic (median 0.9 mg/L O2) and circumneutral (pH ??? 6.0; net alkalinity >10) with moderate concentrations of dissolved iron and manganese and low concentrations of dissolved aluminum (medians of 11, 2.2, and <0.2 mg/L, respectively). In 2001, the laboratory aeration experiment demonstrated rapid oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe 2+) without supplemental alkalinity; the initial Fe2+ concentration of 16.4 mg/L decreased to less than 0.5 mg/L within 24 h; pH values increased rapidly from 5.8 to 7.2, ultimately attaining a steady-state value of 7.5. The increased pH coincided with a rapid decrease in the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) from an initial value of 10 -1.1atm to a steady-state value of 10-3.1atm. From these results, a staged aerobic treatment system was conceptualized consisting of a 2 m deep pond with innovative aeration and recirculation to promote rapid oxidation of Fe2+, two 0.3 m deep wetlands to facilitate iron solids removal, and a supplemental oxic limestone drain for dissolved manganese and trace-metal removal. The system was constructed, but without the aeration mechanism, and began operation in June 2005. During the first 12 months of operation, estimated detention times in the treatment system ranged from 9 to 38 h. However, in contrast with 80-100% removal of Fe2+ over similar elapsed times during the laboratory aeration experiment, the treatment system typically removed less than 35% of the influent Fe2+. Although concentrations of dissolved CO2 decreased progressively within the treatment system, the PCO2 values for treated effluent

  20. Review of the complexation of tetravalent actinides by ISA and gluconate under alkaline to hyperalkaline conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaona, X.; Montoya, V.; Colàs, E.; Grivé, M.; Duro, L.

    2008-12-01

    Isosaccharinic (ISA) and gluconic acids (GLU) are polyhydroxy carboxylic compounds showing a high affinity to metal complexation. Both organic ligands are expected in the cementitious environments usually considered for the disposal of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes. The hyperalkaline conditions imposed by cementitious materials contribute to the formation of ISA through cellulose degradation, whereas GLU is commonly used as a concrete additive. Despite the high stability attributed to ISA/GLU complexes of tetravalent actinides, the number and reliability of available experimental studies is still limited. This work aims at providing a general and comprehensive overview of the state of the art regarding Th, U(IV), Np(IV), and Pu(IV) complexes with ISA and GLU. In the presence of ISA/GLU concentrations in the range 10 - 5 -10 - 2 M and absence of calcium, An(IV)(OH) x(L) y complexes (An(IV) = Th, U(IV), Np(IV), Pu(IV); L = ISA, GLU) are expected to dominate the aqueous speciation of tetravalent actinides in the alkaline pH range. There is a moderate agreement among their stability, although the stoichiometry of certain An(IV)-GLU complexes is still ill-defined. Under hyperalkaline conditions and presence of calcium, the species CaTh(OH) 4(L) 2(aq) has been described for both ISA and GLU, and similar complexes may be expected to form with other tetravalent actinides. In the present work, the available thermodynamic data for An(IV)-ISA/GLU complexes have been reviewed and re-calculated to ensure the internal consistency of the stability constants assessed. Further modelling exercises, estimations based on Linear Free-Energy Relationships (LFER) among tetravalent actinides, as well as direct analogies between ISA and GLU complexes have also been performed. This approach has led to the definition of a speciation scheme for the complexes of Th, U(IV), Np(IV) and Pu(IV) with ISA and GLU forming in alkaline to hyperalkaline pH conditions, both in the

  1. Nitrogenous Waste Handling by Larval Zebrafish Danio rerio in Alkaline Water.

    PubMed

    Kumai, Yusuke; Harris, Jessica; Al-Rewashdy, Hasanen; Kwong, Raymond W M; Perry, Steve F

    2015-01-01

    Although adult fish excrete their nitrogenous waste primarily as ammonia, larval fish may excrete a higher proportion as urea, an evolutionary strategy that lessens nitrogenous waste toxicity during early development. Previous studies firmly established that ammonia excretion is inhibited in adult fish acutely exposed to alkaline water. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that total nitrogen excretion is maintained in larval zebrafish raised in alkaline water (pH ∼ 10.0) as a result of compensatory adjustments to urea and/or ammonia transport pathways. Raising zebrafish in alkaline water from 0 to 4 d postfertilization (dpf) reduced ammonia excretion at 4 dpf, whereas urea excretion was elevated by 141%. The increase in urea excretion at 4 dpf served to maintain total nitrogen excretion constant, despite the persistent inhibition of ammonia excretion. Whole body ammonia and urea contents were not significantly altered by exposure to alkaline water. Protein and mRNA expression of Rhcg1, an apically expressed ammonia-conducting channel, were significantly elevated after 4-d exposure to alkaline water, whereas the mRNA expression of Rhag, Rhbg, and urea transporter were unaffected. The acute exposure to alkaline water of 4-dpf larvae reared in control water caused a rapid inhibition of ammonia excretion that had partially recovered within 6 h of continued exposure. The partial recovery of ammonia excretion despite continued exposure to alkaline water suggested an increased ammonia excretion capacity. In agreement with an increased capacity to excrete ammonia, the transfer of larvae back to the control (normal pH) water was accompanied by increased rates of ammonia excretion. Urea excretion was not stimulated during 6-h exposure to alkaline water. Following both chronic and acute exposure to alkaline water, the rate of uptake of methylamine (an ammonia analog) was significantly elevated, consistent with increased protein expression of the apical ammonia

  2. Development of a capillary electrophoresis method for the analysis in alkaline media as polyoxoanions of two strategic metals: Niobium and tantalum.

    PubMed

    Deblonde, Gauthier J-P; Chagnes, Alexandre; Cote, Gérard; Vial, Jérôme; Rivals, Isabelle; Delaunay, Nathalie

    2016-03-11

    Tantalum (Ta) and niobium (Nb) are two strategic metals essential to several key sectors, like the aerospace, gas and oil, nuclear and electronic industries, but their separation is really difficult due to their almost identical chemical properties. Whereas they are currently produced by hydrometallurgical processes using fluoride-based solutions, efforts are being made to develop cleaner processes by replacing the fluoride media by alkaline ones. However, methods to analyze Nb and Ta simultaneously in alkaline samples are lacking. In this work, we developed a capillary zone electrophoresis (CE) method able to separate and quantify Nb and Ta directly in alkaline media. This method takes advantage of the hexaniobate and hexatantalate ions which are naturally formed at pH>9 and absorb in the UV domain. First, the detection conditions, the background electrolyte (BGE) pH, the nature of the BGE co-ion and the internal standard (IS) were optimized by a systematic approach. As the BGE counter-ion nature modified the speciation of both ions, sodium- and lithium-based BGE were tested. For each alkaline cation, the BGE ionic strength and separation temperature were optimized using experimental designs. Since changes in the migration order of IS, Nb and Ta were observed within the experimental domain, the resolution was not a monotonic function of ionic strength and separation temperature. This forced us to develop an original data treatment for the prediction of the optimum separation conditions. Depending on the consideration of either peak widths or peak symmetries, with or without additional robustness constraints, four optima were predicted for each tested alkaline cation. The eight predicted optima were tested experimentally and the best experimental optimum was selected considering analysis time, resolution and robustness. The best separation was obtained at 31.0°C and in a BGE containing 10mM LiOH and 35mM LiCH3COO.The separation voltage was finally optimized

  3. Akaline, saline and mixed saline-alkaline stresses induce physiological and morpho-anatomical changes in Lotus tenuis shoots.

    PubMed

    Paz, R C; Reinoso, H; Espasandin, F D; González Antivilo, F A; Sansberro, P A; Rocco, R A; Ruiz, O A; Menéndez, A B

    2014-11-01

    Saline, alkaline and mixed saline-alkaline conditions frequently co-occur in soil. In this work, we compared these plant stress sources on the legume Lotus tenuis, regarding their effects on shoot growth and leaf and stem anatomy. In addition, we aimed to gain insight on the plant physiological status of stressed plants. We performed pot experiments with four treatments: control without salt (pH = 5.8; EC = 1.2 dS·m(-1)) and three stress conditions, saline (100 mM NaCl, pH = 5.8; EC = 11.0 dS·m(-1)), alkaline (10 mM NaHCO3, pH = 8.0, EC = 1.9 dS·m(-1)) and mixed salt-alkaline (10 mM NaHCO3 + 100 mM NaCl, pH = 8.0, EC = 11.0 dS·m(-1)). Neutral and alkaline salts produced a similar level of growth inhibition on L. tenuis shoots, whereas their mixture exacerbated their detrimental effects. Our results showed that none of the analysed morpho-anatomical parameters categorically differentiated one stress from the other. However, NaCl- and NaHCO3 -derived stress could be discriminated to different extents and/or directions of changes in some of the anatomical traits. For example, alkalinity led to increased stomatal opening, unlike NaCl-treated plants, where a reduction in stomatal aperture was observed. Similarly, plants from the mixed saline-alkaline treatment characteristically lacked palisade mesophyll in their leaves. The stem cross-section and vessel areas, as well as the number of vascular bundles in the sectioned stem were reduced in all treatments. A rise in the number of vessel elements in the xylem was recorded in NaCl-treated plants, but not in those treated exclusively with NaHCO3. PMID:24597843

  4. Alkaline volcanisms in the Proto-Kuril forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yutani, T.; Hirano, N.

    2015-12-01

    The Nemuro Group in the northeasternmost part of Japan represents forearc basin deposits of the Proto-Kuril arc that consist of Upper Cretaceous-Paleocene sedimentary rocks with andesitic volcaniclastics and alkaline lavas. Their occurrence in this setting is unusual because such alkaline lavas and intrusions are not commonly found in forearc environments. Here, we report new petrological and geological data to discuss the nature of magmatic process involved in their petrogenesis. Pillow and massive lava flows represent subaqueous volcanic activity, and the occurrence of inter-pillow sedimentary units indicates their eruption on unconsolidated sediments of the lower Nemuro Group. Sill intrusions with layered structures and thicknesses ranging from 10 to 130 m are also common widely distributed in the Nemuro Group. Major and trace element chemistry and mineralogical data distinguish the analyzed samples as K-rich alkaline rocks with low TiO2 or Nb contents, analogous to island arc-like tholeiites. These K-rich alkaline rocks can be classified into two groups of shoshonites: shoshonites containing olivine phenocrysts and intruding into the lower Nemuro Group (Group 1), and shoshonites with no olivine and making up the middle part of the Nemuro Group (Group 2). Group 1 shoshonites have higher MgO, Cr and Ni contents than those of Group 2. The bulk-rock composition of Group 2, which has lower MgO contents, shows higher SiO2 than that of Group 1. Such compositional differences possibly represent fractional crystallization of magmas between Groups 1 and 2. Based on the limited available data, we conclude that these alkaline rocks intruding into the Nemuro Group represent arc-shoshonites, and that the Group 1 magmas underwent fractional crystallization to produce the Group 2 magmas.

  5. Remediation of Former Manufactured Gas Plant Tars Using Alkaline Flushing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauswirth, S.; Rylander, S.; Birak, P. S.; Miller, C. T.

    2010-12-01

    The remediation of former manufactured gas plant (FMGP) tars in the subsurface is particularly difficult due to the wetting behavior and high viscosities of these dense non-aqueous liquids (DNAPLs). Alkaline flooding is a technique which has proven effective in improving the recovery of crude oils, which share some characteristics with FMGP tars. For this study, we measured the effect of NaOH solutions on interfacial tension and conducted column experiments to investigate the feasibility of applying this technique to FMGP tars. The pendant drop technique was used to measure interfacial tensions for solutions ranging from 0-1% NaOH. Column experiments were conducted by contaminating sands with tars recovered from a FMGP then flushing the columns with NaOH solutions. A final, 70% v/v ethanol cosolvent flush was conducted to investigate the effectiveness of a two-stage remediation approach. The mass removal of tar, as well as 26 individual PAHs, was measured, along with the aqueous phase mass flux of PAHs after each flushing stage. The interfacial tension was reduced from about 20 mN/m with pure water to a minimum of 0.05 mN/m at a concentration of 0.1% NaOH. In the column experiments, alkaline flushing resulted in a 50% reduction of the residual saturation. Aqueous phase PAH concentrations, however, were similar before and after the alkaline flushing stage. The combination of alkaline and cosolvent flushing resulted in an overall reduction of 95% of the total mass of the 16 EPA PAHs. Final aqueous phase concentrations were reduced significantly for lower molecular weight PAHs, but increased slightly for the higher molecular weight compounds, likely due to their increased mole fraction within the remaining tar. Additional work is being conducted to improve the effectiveness of the alkaline flushing through the use of surfactants and polymers.

  6. Process for extracting technetium from alkaline solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, B.A.; Sachleben, R.A.; Bonnesen, P.V.

    1994-12-31

    This invention relates generally to a process for extracting technetium from nuclear wastes and more particularly to a process for extracting technetium from alkaline waste solutions containing technetium and high concentrations of alkali metal nitrates. A process for extracting technetium values from an aqueous alkaline solution containing at least one alkali metal hydroxide and at least one alkali metal nitrate comprises the steps of: contacting the aqueous alkaline solution with a solvent consisting of a crown ether in a diluent, the diluent being a water-immiscible organic liquid in which the crown ether is soluble, for a period of time sufficient to selectively extract the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution into the solvent; separating the solvent containing the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution; and stripping the technetium values from the solvent by contacting the solvent with water.

  7. Enhanced alkaline cellulases production by the thermohalophilic Aspergillus terreus AUMC 10138 mutated by physical and chemical mutagens using corn stover as substrate

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, George Saad; Abu-Tahon, Medhat Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A thermohalophilic fungus, Aspergillus terreus AUMC 10138, isolated from the Wadi El-Natrun soda lakes in northern Egypt was exposed successively to gamma and UV-radiation (physical mutagens) and ethyl methan-sulfonate (EMS; chemical mutagen) to enhance alkaline cellulase production under solid state fermentation (SSF) conditions. The effects of different carbon sources, initial moisture, incubation temperature, initial pH, incubation period, inoculum levels and different concentrations of NaCl on production of alkaline filter paper activity (FPase), carboxymethyl cellulase (CMCase) and β-glucosidase by the wild-type and mutant strains of A. terreus were evaluated under SSF. The optimum conditions for maximum production of FPase, CMCase and β-glucosidase were found to be the corn stover: moisture ratio of 1:3(w/v), temperature 45 °C, pH range, 9.0–11.0, and fermentation for 4, 4 and 7 day, respectively. Inoculum levels of 30% for β-glucosidase and 40% for FPase, CMCase gave the higher cellulase production by the wild-type and mutant strains, respectively. Higher production of all three enzymes was obtained at a 5% NaCl. Under the optimized conditions, the mutant strain A. terreus M-17 produced FPase (729 U/g), CMCase (1,783 U/g), and β-glucosidase (342 U/g), which is, 1.85, 1.97 and 2.31-fold higher than the wild-type strain. Our results confirmed that mutant strain M-17 could be a promising alkaline cellulase enzyme producer employing lignocellulosics especially corn stover. PMID:26691490

  8. Evaluation of fluorimetric pH sensors for bioprocess monitoring at low pH.

    PubMed

    Janzen, Nils H; Schmidt, Michael; Krause, Christian; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    Optical chemical sensors are the standard for pH monitoring in small-scale bioreactors such as microtiter plates, shaking flasks or other single-use bioreactors. The dynamic pH range of the so far commercially available fluorescent pH sensors applied in small-scale bioreactors is restricted to pH monitoring around neutral pH, although many fermentation processes are performed at pH < 6 on industrial scale. Thus, two new prototype acidic fluorescence pH sensors immobilized in single-use stirred-tank bioreactors, one with excitation at 470 nm and emission at 550 nm (sensor 470/550) and the other with excitation at 505 nm and emission at 600 nm (sensor 505/600), were characterized with respect to dynamic ranges and operational stability in representative fermentation media. Best resolution and dynamic range was observed with pH sensor 505/600 in mineral medium (dynamic range of 3.9 < pH < 7.2). Applying the same pH sensors to complex medium results in a drastic reduction of resolution and dynamic ranges. Yeast extract in complex medium was found to cause background fluorescence at the sensors' operating wavelength combinations. Optical isolation of the sensor by adding a black colored polymer layer above the sensor spot and fixing an aperture made of adhesive photoresistant foil between the fluorescence reader and the transparent bottom of the polystyrene reactors enabled full re-establishment of the sensor's characteristics. Reliability and operational stability of sensor 505/600 was shown by online pH monitoring (4.5 < pH < 5.8) of parallel anaerobic batch fermentations of Clostridium acetobutylicum for the production of acetone, butanol and ethanol (ABE) with offline pH measurements with a standard glass electrode as reference. PMID:25969385

  9. Strong alkalinization of Chara cell surface in the area of cell wall incision as an early event in mechanoperception.

    PubMed

    Bulychev, Alexander A; Alova, Anna V; Bibikova, Tatiana N

    2013-11-01

    Mechanical wounding of cell walls occurring in plants under the impact of pathogens or herbivores can be mimicked by cell wall incision with a glass micropipette. Measurements of pH at the surface of Chara corallina internodes following microperforation of cell wall revealed a rapid (10-30s) localized alkalinization of the apoplast after a lag period of 10-20s. The pH increase induced by incision could be as large as 3 pH units and relaxed slowly, with a halftime up to 20min. The axial pH profile around the incision zone was bell-shaped and localized to a small area, extending over a distance of about 100μm. The pH response was suppressed by lowering cell turgor upon the replacement of artificial pond water (APW) with APW containing 50mM sorbitol. Stretching of the plasma membrane during its impression into the cell wall defect is likely to activate the Ca(2+) channels, as evidenced from sensitivity of the incision-induced alkalinization to the external calcium concentration and to the addition of Ca(2+)-channel blockers, such as La(3+), Gd(3+), and Zn(2+). The maximal pH values attained at the incision site (~10.0) were close to pH in light-dependent alkaline zones of Chara cells. The involvement of cytoskeleton in the origin of alkaline patch was documented by observations that the incision-induced pH transients were suppressed by the inhibitors of microtubules (oryzalin and taxol) and, to a lesser extent, by the actin inhibitor (cytochalasin B). The results indicate that the localized increase in apoplastic pH is an early event in mechanoperception and depends on light, cytoskeleton, and intracellular calcium. PMID:23850637

  10. Identification of differentially expressed genes in flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) under saline-alkaline stress by digital gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ying; Huang, Wengong; Chen, Hongyu; Wu, Guangwen; Yuan, Hongmei; Song, Xixia; Kang, Qinghua; Zhao, Dongsheng; Jiang, Weidong; Liu, Yan; Wu, Jianzhong; Cheng, Lili; Yao, Yubo; Guan, Fengzhi

    2014-10-01

    The salinization and alkalization of soil are widespread environmental problems, and alkaline salt stress is more destructive than neutral salt stress. Therefore, understanding the mechanism of plant tolerance to saline-alkaline stress has become a major challenge. However, little attention has been paid to the mechanism of plant alkaline salt tolerance. In this study, gene expression profiling of flax was analyzed under alkaline-salt stress (AS2), neutral salt stress (NSS) and alkaline stress (AS) by digital gene expression. Three-week-old flax seedlings were placed in 25 mM Na2CO3 (pH11.6) (AS2), 50mM NaCl (NSS) and NaOH (pH11.6) (AS) for 18 h. There were 7736, 1566 and 454 differentially expressed genes in AS2, NSS and AS compared to CK, respectively. The GO category gene enrichment analysis revealed that photosynthesis was particularly affected in AS2, carbohydrate metabolism was particularly affected in NSS, and the response to biotic stimulus was particularly affected in AS. We also analyzed the expression pattern of five categories of genes including transcription factors, signaling transduction proteins, phytohormones, reactive oxygen species proteins and transporters under these three stresses. Some key regulatory gene families involved in abiotic stress, such as WRKY, MAPKKK, ABA, PrxR and ion channels, were differentially expressed. Compared with NSS and AS, AS2 triggered more differentially expressed genes and special pathways, indicating that the mechanism of AS2 was more complex than NSS and AS. To the best of our knowledge, this was the first transcriptome analysis of flax in response to saline-alkaline stress. These data indicate that common and diverse features of saline-alkaline stress provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms of plant saline-alkaline tolerance and offer a number of candidate genes as potential markers of tolerance to saline-alkaline stress. PMID:25058012