Science.gov

Sample records for alkaline silicate rocks

  1. Alkaline igneous rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Fitton, J.G.; Upton, B.G.J.

    1987-01-01

    In this volume, an international team of scientists provides an up-to-date overview of the nature, origin, and evolution of alkaline magmas. Particular attention is paid to carbonatites, lamprophyres, and lamproites which are rock suites of current interest not recently reviewed elsewhere. Recent work on the classical alkaline provinces of East Africa, South Greenland, and the Kola Peninsula is included together with reviews of other areas of alkaline magmatism in North and South America, East Greenland, Europe, West Africa, and the ocean basins. Other papers discuss the impact of experimental isotopic and geochemical studies of the petrogenesis of alkaline rocks. This book will be of interest to petrologists and geochemists studying alkaline igneous rocks, and to other earth scientists as a reference on the rapidly expanding field of igneous petrology.

  2. Peralkaline silicic volcanic rocks in northwestern nevada.

    PubMed

    Noble, D C; Chipman, D W; Giles, D L

    1968-06-21

    Late Tertiary silicic ashflow tuffs and lavas peralkaline in chemical character (atomic Na + K greater than Al), mainly comendites, occur over wide areas in northwestern Nevada and appear to be widespread in southeastern Oregon. Such peralkaline rocks-which are not uncommon in the western United States-and other chemically unusual silicic rocks are found near the margins rather than toward the center of the Great Basin. PMID:17800671

  3. Siliceous microfossil extraction from altered Monterey rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, C.O.; Casey, R.E.

    1986-04-01

    Samples of altered Monterey rocks of differing lithologies were processed by various methods to develop new techniques for extracting siliceous microfossils. The preliminary use of thin sections made from the same rocks reduced the number of probable samples (samples worth further processing) by about one-third. Most of the siliceous microfossils contained in altered Monterey rocks appear to be highly recrystallized and are extremely fragile; however, some contained silicified and silica-infilled radiolarians and planktonic and benthonic foraminifera, which are very tough. In general the most useful techniques were gently hydrochloric acid, hydrogen peroxide, formic acid, monosodium glutamate, and regular siliceous microfossil extraction techniques. Unsuccessful techniques and a new siliceous microfossil flotation technique are also documented.

  4. Determination of chlorine in silicate rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peck, L.C.

    1959-01-01

    In a rapid accurate method for the determination of chlorine in silicate rocks, the rock powder is sintered with a sodium carbonate flux containing zinc oxide and magnesium carbonate. The sinter cake is leached with water, the resulting solution is filtered, and the filtrate is acidified with nitric acid. Chlorine is determined by titrating this solution with mercuric nitrate solution using sodium nitroprusside as the indicator. The titration is made in the dark with a beam of light shining through the solution. The end point of the titration is found by visually comparing the intensity of this beam of light with that of a similar beam of light in a reference solution.

  5. Lithologic mapping of silicate rocks using TIMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, A. R.

    1986-01-01

    Common rock-forming minerals have thermal infrared spectral features that are measured in the laboratory to infer composition. An airborne Daedalus scanner (TIMS) that collects six channels of thermal infrared radiance data (8 to 12 microns), may be used to measure these same features for rock identification. Previously, false-color composite pictures made from channels 1, 3, and 5 and emittance spectra for small areas on these images were used to make lithologic maps. Central wavelength, standard deviation, and amplitude of normal curves regressed on the emittance spectra are related to compositional information for crystalline igneous silicate rocks. As expected, the central wavelength varies systematically with silica content and with modal quartz content. Standard deviation is less sensitive to compositional changes, but large values may result from mixed admixture of vegetation. Compression of the six TIMS channels to three image channels made from the regressed parameters may be effective in improving geologic mapping from TIMS data, and these synthetic images may form a basis for the remote assessment of rock composition.

  6. Petrogenesis of coeval silica-saturated and silica-undersaturated alkaline rocks: Mineralogical and geochemical evidence from the Saima alkaline complex, NE China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yu-Sheng; Yang, Jin-Hui; Sun, Jin-Feng; Zhang, Ji-Heng; Wu, Fu-Yuan

    2016-03-01

    A combined study of zircon U-Pb ages, mineral chemistry, whole-rock elements and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopes was carried out for the Saima alkaline complex in the northeastern China, in order to investigate the source and petrogenesis of coeval silica-saturated and silica-undersaturated alkaline rocks. The Saima alkaline complex consists of nepheline syenites, quartz-bearing syenites and alkaline volcanic rocks (i.e., phonolite and trachyte), with minor mafic dikes and carbonatitic veins. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) zircon U-Pb dating gives consistent ages of 230-224 Ma for these rocks, suggesting that they are coeval. All alkaline rocks in the Saima complex are enriched in large ion lithophile elements (LILEs) and light rare earth elements (LREEs), and depleted in high field strength elements (HFSEs) with significant negative Nb, Ta and Ti anomalies. Geochemical data and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic compositions indicate that the various alkaline rocks were all derived from partial melting of an ancient, re-enriched lithospheric mantle in the garnet stability field, but experienced variable siliceous- or carbonate-rich crustal contamination. Based on petrographic evidence, mineral compositions, and whole-rock geochemical data, two distinct magmatic evolutionary trends are proposed to explain the coeval emplacement of the various rock types within the Saima alkaline complex. The silica-undersaturated rocks (nepheline syenites and phonolites) result from alkali feldspar + apatite + titanite crystal fractionation of an alkaline mafic parental melt combined with assimilation of marine carbonate host rocks. In contrast, the generation of silica-saturated rocks (quartz-bearing syenites and trachytes) may be attributed to subsequent and continued clinopyroxene + apatite + biotite crystal fractionation coupled with assimilation of siliceous sediments.

  7. Geochemical modeling of the influence of silicate mineral alteration on alkalinity production and carbonate precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herda, Gerhard; Kraemer, Stephan M.; Gier, Susanne; Meister, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    High CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) in deep rock reservoirs causes acidification of the porefluid. Such conditions occur during injection and subsurface storage of CO2 (to prevent the release of greenhouse gas) but also naturally in zones of strong methanogenic microbial activity in organic matter-rich ocean margin sediments. The acidic fluids are corrosive to carbonates and bear the risk of leakage of CO2 gas to the surface. Porefluid acidification may be moderated by processes that increase the alkalinity, i.e. that produce weak acid anions capable of buffering the acidification imposed by the CO2. Often, alkalinity increases as a result of anaerobic microbial activity, such as anaerobic oxidation of methane. However, on a long term the alteration of silicates, in particular, clay minerals, may be a more efficient mechanism of alkalinity production. Under altered temperature, pressure and porefluid composition at depth, clay minerals may change to thermodynamically more stable states, thereby increasing the alkalinity of the porefluid by partial leaching of Mg-(OH)2 and Ca-(OH)2 (e.g. Wallmann et al., 2008; Mavromatis et al., 2014). This alteration may even be enhanced by a high pCO2. Thus, silicate alteration can be essential for a long-term stabilization of volatile CO2 in the form of bicarbonate or may even induce precipitation of carbonate minerals, but these processes are not fully understood yet. The goal of this study is to simulate the alkalinity effect of silicate alteration under diagenetic conditions and high pCO2 by geochemical modeling. We are using the program PHREEQC (Parkhurst and Appelo, 2013) to generate high rock/fluid ratio characteristics for deep subsurface rock reservoirs. Since we are interested in the long-term evolution of diagenetic processes, over millions of years, we do not consider kinetics but calculate the theoretically possible equilibrium conditions. In a first step we are calculating the saturation state of different clay minerals

  8. Magma genesis of the pre-extensional early miocene silicic pyroclastic rocks of the Pannonian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olah, I.; Harangi, Sz.

    2003-04-01

    The Neogene evolution of the Pannonian Basin was accompanied with various volcanic activities started with explosive eruptions of silicic magmas followed by formation of calc-alkaline and alkaline volcanic rocks and subordinate potassic-ultrapotassic volcanic products. The Miocene silicic ignimbrites and pyroclastic fall deposits cover a large region in the Pannonian Basin and therefore have a great stratigraphic significance. In addition, they have strong geodynamic implications because they were formed just before and coeval with the extensional formation of the Pannonian Basin. Traditionally, they are divided into three horizons; however, our new geochemical and volcanologic data do not prove the existence of these three separate units. In this paper, we are focusing on the oldest, pre-extensional silicic pyroclastic rocks. Based on the detailed investigation of the main mineral phases (e.g., plagioclases, amphibole, biotite) and the accessory minerals, especially zircons, we suggest a complex magmagenesis including mixing of mantle derived and crustal derived melts. Detailed zircon morphology studies involving the method of Pupin and CL image analysis proved that it could be used to correlate the scattered localities. In addition, these data showed systematic change in the magmagenesis of the different occurrences. Early Miocene silicic ignimbrites from the southern part of the Pannonian Basin contain greater mantle component, whereas those from the northern regions could involve more crustal component. In addition, zoning patterns and mineral chemical data of the pehnocrysts suggest non-equilibrium crystallization process in an open system magma chamber.

  9. Silicate-melt inclusions in magmatic rocks: applications to petrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frezzotti, Maria-Luce

    2001-01-01

    Silicate-melt inclusions in igneous rocks provide important information on the composition and evolution of magmatic systems. Such inclusions represent accidentally trapped silicate melt (±immiscible H 2O and/or CO 2 fluids) that allow one to follow the evolution of magmas through snapshots, corresponding to specific evolution steps. This information is available on condition that they remained isolated from the enclosing magma after their entrapment. The following steps of investigation are discussed: (a) detailed petrographic studies to characterise silicate-melt inclusion primary characters and posttrapping evolution, including melt crystallisation; (b) high temperature studies to rehomogenise the inclusion content and select chemically representative inclusions: chemical compositions should be compared to relevant phase diagrams. Silicate-melt inclusion studies allow us to concentrate on specific topics; inclusion studies in early crystallising phases allow the characterisation of primary magmas, while in more differentiated rocks, they unravel the subsequent chemical evolution. The distribution of volatile species (i.e., H 2O, CO 2, S, Cl) in inclusion glass can provide information on the degassing processes and on recycling of subducted material. In intrusive rocks, silicate melt inclusions may preserve direct evidence of magmatic stage evolution (e.g., immiscibility phenomena). Melt inclusions in mantle xenoliths indicate that high-silica melts can coexist with mantle peridotites and give information on the presence of carbonate melt within the upper mantle. Thus, combining silicate-melt inclusion data with conventional petrological and geochemical information and experimental petrology can increase our ability to model magmatic processes.

  10. Loss of halogens from crystallized and glassy silicic volcanic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noble, D.C.; Smith, V.C.; Peck, L.C.

    1967-01-01

    One hundred and sixty-four F and Cl analyses of silicic welded tuffs and lavas and glass separates are presented. Comparison of the F and Cl contents of crystallized rocks with those of nonhydrated glass and hydrated glassy rocks from the same rock units shows that most of the halogens originally present were lost on crystallization. An average of about half of the F and four-fifths of the Cl originally present was lost. Analyses of hydrated natural glasses and of glassy rocks indicate that in some cases significant amounts of halogens may be removed from or added to hydrated glass through prolonged contact with ground water. The data show that the original halogen contents of the groundmass of a silicic volcanic rock can be reliably determined only from nonhydrated glass. ?? 1967.

  11. Rapid determination of nanogram amounts of tellurium in silicate rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenland, L.P.; Campbell, E.Y.

    1976-01-01

    A hydride-generation flameless atomic-absorption technique is used to determine as little as 5 ng g-1 tellurium in 0.25 g of silicate rock. After acid decomposition of the sample, tellurium hydride is generated with sodium borohydride and the vapor passed directly to a resistance-heated quartz cell mounted in an atomic-absorption spectrophotometer. Analyses of 11 U.S. Geological Survey standard rocks are presented. ?? 1976.

  12. K-alkaline rocks and lamproites of Tomtor massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladykin, Nikolai

    2015-04-01

    Tomtor massif of the largest volcano-plutonic deep alkaline-carbonatite massifs world central type. Area of massif occupy 240 km2 and carbonatites stock is 40 km2. The super large deposit of Nb, TR, Y, Sc, Sr ,REE (Frolov et al. 2001)is found within the massif. The numerical publication are devoted to the ore mineralization there. But the geological struc-ture of the massif and the chemistry of its constituting rocks are not well understood. We obtained new ages based on U-Pb zircon and mica Ar-Ar method (Kotov, Vladykin et al. 2014 Vladykin et al. 2015). The massif was created in 2 stages: 700 and 400 Ma. We (Vla-dykin et al 1998) found rocks of lamproite series and proposed a new scheme of magmatism and the ore.genesis (Vladykin 2007, 2009). Biotite - pyroxenite, peridotite originated in first stage and then intruded iolites, nepheline and alkali syenite. Syenites occupy 70% of -massif and contain 12-13% K2O and 2-4% Na2O showing the K-alkaline-ultramafic nature of Tomtor volcano-plutonic massif (Vladykin 2009). The first stage was accomplished by nelsonitov calcite, dolomite and ankerite carbonatites. Second stage (400Ma) volcanics picrite - lamproite veins and eruptive breccias meli-lite, melanephelinites, tinguaites appered. These rocks are cut by carbonatites of second stage. It was finished by intensive explosive eruption of a silicate (lamproite) tuffs lavobrec-cia kimberlite formed Ebelyakhdiamondiferous placer, melilite rocks in diatremes (feeders), as well as carbonate-phosphate (kamaforite) explosive tuffs with siderite ores. This carbona-tite complex is preserved within the subsidence caldera. Tuff eruption in conjunction with gas and hydrothermal activity determined its rare metal mineralization. These rocks contain to: Nb- 21%, TR-15%, Y-1.5%, Sc-1%, Zr- 0,5% Zn-, Sr-6%, Ti-8%, Ba-4%, V - 8000 ppm, Be- 300 ppm, Ga- 80 ppm, Cr- 1200ppm, Ni- 230 ppm, Mo- 145 ppm, Pb- 4300 ppm, Th- 1500 ppm, U-193 ppm. Picrite - olivine (rare leucite) lamproite and

  13. Spectrophotometric determination of fluorine in silicate rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peck, L.C.; Smith, V.C.

    1964-01-01

    The rock powder is sintered with a sodium carbonate flux containing zinc oxide and magnesium carbonate, the sinter-cake leached with water and the resulting solution filtered. Fluorine is separated from the acidified filtrate by steam distillation and determined spectrophotometrically by means of a zirconium-SPADNS reagent. If a multiple-unit distillation apparatus is used, 12 determinations can be completed per man-day. ?? 1964.

  14. Spectrofluorimetric determination of thallium in silicate rocks with rhodamine b in the presence of aluminum chloride

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shnepfe, M.M.

    1975-01-01

    A sensitive spectrofluorimetric procedure with rhodamine B in the presence of aluminum chloride is given for determining submicrogram and microgram quantities of thallium in silicate rocks. Samples are decomposed with a mixture of hydrofluoric and nitric acids and then treated with hydrochloric acid. Thallium is extracted as its dithizonate with chloroform from an alkaline medium containing ascorbate, citrate, and cyanide and then back-extracted with dilute nitric acid. After destruction of the organic matter and treatment with bromine, hydrochloric acid, aluminum chloride, and rhodamine B, the {A table is presented}. ?? 1975.

  15. Effects of solvent structure on the distribution of silicate anions in mixed aqueous/organic solutions of alkaline tetramethylammonium silicate

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, W.M.; Bell, A.T.; Radke, C.J. )

    1991-11-14

    Interest in the physical-chemical processes occurring during zeolite synthesis has stimulated the study of dissolved silicate oligomers in aqueous alkaline solution and their possible link to zeolite nucleation and crystal growth. Effects of solvent structure on the equilibrium distribution of silicate oligomers in mixed organic/aqueous solutions of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAOH) have been investigated by using {sup 29}Si NMR spectroscopy. The results indicate that the presence of organic molecules leads to condensation of the silicates, particularly to double-ring structures. Equilibrium calculations indicate that the observed extent of silicate condensation exceeds what would be expected from mass action. The variety of organic solvents used allowed elucidation of structure effects due to the following: carbon chain length, carbon chain morphology, functional group, and placement of the functional group. The structural effects of organic solvents can be attributed to the ordering of water around the solvent molecules.

  16. Lunar highland melt rocks - Chemistry, petrology and silicate mineralogy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaniman, D. T.; Papike, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    A selected suite containing several of the largest samples of lunar highland melt rocks includes impact melt specimens (anorthositic gabbro, low-K Fra Mauro) and volcanic specimens (intermediate-K Fra Mauro). Although previous assumptions of LKFM volcanism have fallen into disfavor, no fatal arguments against this hypothesis have been presented, and the evidence of a possibly 'inherited igneous' olivine-plagioclase cosaturation provides cause for keeping a volcanic LKFM hypothesis viable. Comparisons of silicate mineralogy with melt rock compositions provide information on the specimen's composition and cooling history. Plagioclase-rock compositions can be matched to the experimentally determined equilibria for appropriate samples to identify melt rocks with refractory anorthitic clasts. Olivine-rock compositions indicate that melt rock vitrophyres precipitate anomalously Fe-rich olivine; the cause of this anomaly is not immediately evident. The Al-Ti and Ca-Fe-Mg zonation in pyroxene provide information on relative cooling rates of highland melt rocks, but Cr- and Al-content (where Al-rich low-Ca pyroxene cores are preserved in rapidly cooled samples) can be correlated with composition of the host rock.

  17. Petrological modeling of basaltic rocks from Venus: A case for the presence of silicic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shellnutt, J. Gregory

    2013-06-01

    presence of highly evolved igneous rocks on Venus is a controversial issue. The formations of highland terranes and pancake domes are the two principal tectonic and volcanic features which argue in favor of the presence of silicic igneous rocks; however, the lack of water on Venus casts doubt on whether or not granites and rhyolites can form. Data returned to Earth from the Venera 13 and 14 landers show that the surface of Venus is composed of basaltic rocks similar in composition to those found on Earth. Here it is shown that anhydrous and hydrous fractional crystallization modeling using the Venera 13 and 14 data as starting materials can produce compositions similar to terrestrial phonolites and rhyolites. It is suggested that at shallow crustal levels (i.e., ≤ 0.1 GPa), mafic magmas can differentiate into silicic magmas resembling phonolites or rhyolites which may or may not erupt. Furthermore, the hydrous equilibrium partial melting models can produce rocks similar to terrestrial andesites and rhyolites, whereas anhydrous models suggest that there may be a uniquely Venusian type of silicic rock. The silicic rocks, if present, could act as "continental nucleation" sites and/or their presence may facilitate preferential sites of shearing and deformation of the Venusian crust.

  18. Petrological modeling of basaltic rocks from Venus: a case for the presence of silicic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shellnutt, J. G.

    2013-12-01

    The presence of highly evolved igneous rocks on Venus is debated. The formation of highland terranes and pancake domes are the two principle tectonic and volcanic features which argue in favor of the presence of silicic igneous rocks; however, the lack of water on Venus casts doubt on whether or not granites and rhyolites can form. Data returned to Earth from the Venera 13 and 14 landers show that the surface of Venus is comprised of basaltic rocks similar in composition to those found on Earth. Here is it shown that anhydrous and hydrous fractional crystallization modeling using the Venera 13 and 14 data as starting materials can produce compositions similar to terrestrial phonolites and rhyolites. It is suggested that at shallow crustal levels (i.e. ≤ 0.1 GPa) mafic magmas can differentiate into silicic magmas resembling phonolites or rhyolites which may or may not erupt. Furthermore, the hydrous equilibrium partial melting models can produce rocks similar to terrestrial andesites and rhyolites whereas anhydrous models suggest there may be a uniquely Venusian type of silicic rock. The silicic rocks, if present, could act as ';continental nucleation' sites and/or their presence may facilitate preferential sites of shearing and deformation of the Venusian crust.

  19. Siliceous sedimentary rock-hosted ores and petroleum

    SciTech Connect

    Hein, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Geological, biological, oceanographic, and geochemical principles involved in forming mineral deposits associated with siliceous rocks are integrated in this collection. The book emerged from a decade of research by 142 scientists from 33 countries who worked with the International Geological Correlations Project under editor James R. Hein. It reveals how several economic ores and petroleum were formed in siliceous sediments in coastal ocean basins. This collection places each ore-deposit type into a genetic model emphasizing coastal upwelling; displays all chert occurrences on paleographic maps for each period of the Phanerozoic; covers phosphate, uranium, diatomite, manganese, iron, barite, and petroleum deposits; and gives the first evidence of a bacterially mediated, diagenetic origin for manganese deposits.

  20. Alkaline volcanic rocks from the Columbia Hills, Gusev crater, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McSween, H.Y.; Ruff, S.W.; Morris, R.V.; Bell, J.F., III; Herkenhoff, K.; Gellert, Ralf; Stockstill, K.R.; Tornabene, L.L.; Squyres, S. W.; Crisp, J.A.; Christensen, P.R.; McCoy, T.J.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Schmidt, M.

    2006-01-01

    Irvine, Backstay, and Wishstone are the type specimens for three classes of fine-grained or fragmental, relatively unaltered rocks with distinctive thermal emission spectra, found as float on the flanks of the Columbia Hills. Chemical analyses indicate that these rocks are mildly alkaline basalt, trachybasalt, and tephrite, respectively. Their mineralogy consists of Na- and K-rich feldspar(s), low- and high-Ca pyroxenes, ferroan olivine, Fe-Ti (and possibly Cr) oxides, phosphate, and possibly glass. The texture of Wishstone is consistent with a pyroclastic origin, whereas Irvine and Backstay are lavas or possibly dike rocks. Chemical compositions of these rocks plot on or near liquid lines of descent for most elements calculated for Adirondack class rocks (olivine-rich basalts from the Gusev plains) at various pressures from 0.1 to 1.0 GPa. We infer that Wishstone-, Backstay-, and Irvine-class magmas may have formed by fractionation of primitive, oxidized basaltic magma similar to Adirondack-class rocks. The compositions of all these rocks reveal that the Gusev magmatic province is alkaline, distinct from the subalkaline volcanic rocks thought to dominate most of the planet's surface. The fact that differentiated volcanic rocks were not encountered on the plains prior to ascending Husband Hill may suggest a local magma source for volcanism beneath Gusev crater. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. Solid Inclusions in Au-nuggets, genesis and derivation from alkaline rocks of the Guli Massif, Northern Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorani, Sami N.

    2016-04-01

    A total of 112 Au-nuggets, collected from alluvial placer deposits of the Ingarinda River from the Guli massif, located in northem Siberia, Russia, were investigated. The Guli massif consists of a huge dunite-clinopyroxenite complex (the largest complex in the world), an alkaline to highly alkaline rock suite (melilite, nephelinite, ijolite) enveloping the dunite and carbonatite intrusions, associated with disseminated schlieren type chromitite and Au-Ag, Pt placer deposits. The nuggets are characterized by various sizes and shapes and show chemical compositions Au, Au-Ag and AuCu, typical for a derivate of carbon-atites and/or ultramafic complexes. A great variety of oxide, silicate, REE-minerals, carbonate and sulphide inclusions have been detected in the nuggets, which are identical in mineralogy and chemical composition to mineral constituents of the alkaline to highly alkaline rock suite surrounding the Guli dunite core complex thus, considered as the source for Au-nuggets.

  2. Lithium Isotope Systematics of Rift-related Alkaline Igneous Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halama, R.; McDonough, W. F.; Rudnick, R. L.; Trumbull, R.; Klaudius, J.; Keller, J.; Taubald, H.

    2006-05-01

    Intracontinental alkaline igneous rocks from the Proterozoic Gardar Province (Greenland), the Cretaceous Damaraland Province (Namibia), the Tertiary Kaiserstuhl complex (Germany) and from the Holocene volcano Oldoinyo Lengai (Tanzania) were analyzed to characterize Li isotopic compositions of their mantle sources and to determine the processes affecting δ7Li in alkaline igneous rocks. The inferred mantle Li isotope signatures of the primitive alkaline rocks (δ7Li = +1 to +7) are similar to those of present- day MORB, OIB and carbonatites, and appear to be relatively constant in time and space. Gabbros from the Gardar Province define a relatively small field of Li isotope compositions (δ7Li = +4 to +7). Mineral separates (clinopyroxene, plagioclase) mostly overlap with the whole-rock values, which we interpret to reflect the δ7Li of the mantle sources of the gabbros. Mantle-like δ7Li values are also observed for primitive alkaline rocks from the other regions. Li isotope compositions in more differentiated rocks (syenites, phonolites and rhyolites) are highly variable (+11 to -22 per mil) and reflect a diversity of evolutionary processes that may vary from complex to complex. δ7Li values vary independently of Sr and Nd isotope values and indices of differentiation (e.g. MgO content) or weathering (e.g. LOI). Consistently light δ7Li values (+2 to -22) occur in Gardar syenites associated with a carbonatite. These may be explained by weathering and sub-solidus alteration, as indicated by petrographic observations. Alternatively, fluid-assisted diffusion processes, related to a fenitizing fluid from the carbonatite, may have led to extreme Li isotope fractionation. Whole-rock oxygen isotope analyses will be carried out to evaluate interaction with meteoric water, which would be reflected in a decrease in δ18O compared to magmatic values. The heaviest Li isotopic composition (+11 per mil) was obtained for a rhyolite, probably related to the presence of quartz

  3. On the neutralization of acid rock drainage by carbonate and silicate minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherlock, E. J.; Lawrence, R. W.; Poulin, R.

    1995-02-01

    The net result of acid-generating and-neutralizing reactions within mining wastes is termed acid rock drainage (ARD). The oxidation of sulfide minerals is the major contributor to acid generation. Dissolution and alteration of various minerals can contribute to the neutralization of acid. Definitions of alkalinity, acidity, and buffer capacity are reviewed, and a detailed discussion of the dissolution and neutralizing capacity of carbonate and silicate minerals related to equilibium conditions, dissolution mechanism, and kinetics is provided. Factors that determine neutralization rate by carbonate and silicate minerals include: pH, PCO 2, equilibrium conditions, temperature, mineral composition and structure, redox conditions, and the presence of “foreign” ions. Similar factors affect sulfide oxidation. Comparison of rates shows sulfides react fastest, followed by carbonates and silicates. The differences in the reaction mechanisms and kinetics of neutralization have important implications in the prediction, control, and regulation of ARD. Current static and kinetic prediction methods upon which mine permitting, ARD control, and mine closure plans are based do not consider sample mineralogy or the kinetics of the acid-generating and-neutralizing reactions. Erroneous test interpretations and predictions can result. The importance of considering mineralogy for site-specific interpretation is highlighted. Uncertainty in prediction leads to difficulties for the mine operator in developing satisfactory and cost-effective control and remediation measures. Thus, the application of regulations and guidelines for waste management planning need to beflexible.

  4. Discrimination of alkalinity in granitoid Rocks: A potential TIMS application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, Steven W.

    1995-01-01

    In mineral exploration, the ability to distinguish and map petrochemical variations of magmatic rocks can be a useful reconnaissance tool. Alkalinity is one such petrochemical parameter and is used in the characterization of granitoid rocks. In quartz normative plutonic rocks, alkalinity is related to the composition and abundance of feldspars. Together with quartz abundance, knowledge of feldspar modes allows the classification of these igneous rocks according to the Streckeisen diagram. Alternative classification schemes rely on whole rock geochemistry instead of mineral identifications. The relative ease of obtaining whole rock analyses means that geochemical classifications tend to be favored in exploration geology. But the technique of thermal infrared spectroscopy of rocks yields information on mineralogy and is one that can be applied remotely. The goal of the current work then is to establish whether data from TIMS can be used to distinguish the mineralogical variations that relate to alkalinity. An ideal opportunity to test this thesis arises from the work presented in a paper by Dewitt (1989). This paper contains the results of mapping and analysis of Proterozoic plutonic rocks in north-central Arizona. The map resulting from this work delineates plutons according to alkalinity in an effort to establish a trend or polarity in the regional magmatism. Also contained within this paper are brief descriptions of the mineralogy of half of the region's plutons. This combination of mineralogical and geochemical information was the rationale behind choosing this area as a site for TIMS over flights. A portion of the region centered on the northern Bradshaw Mountains was selected because it contains plutons of all three alkalinity classifications (alkali-calcic, calc-alkalic, and calic) present on DeWitt's map within a relatively small area. The site was flown in August of 1994 and the data received a few days before the writing of this manuscript. Most of this

  5. Precise determination of ferrous iron in silicate rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Tetsuya; Nakamura, Eizo

    2002-03-01

    We have developed a highly precise method for the determination of ferrous iron (Fe 2+) in silicate rocks. Our new method is based on Wilson's procedure (1955) in which surplus V 5+ is used to oxidize Fe 2+ into Fe 3+ while equivalently reducing V 5+ into V 4+. Because V 4+ is more resistant to atmospheric oxidation than Fe 2+, Fe 2+ in the sample can be determined by measuring unreacted V 5+ by adding excess Fe 2+ after sample decomposition and then titrating the unreacted Fe 2+ with Cr 6+. With our method, which involves conditioning the sample solution with 5 M H 2SO 4 in a relatively small beaker (7 mL), the oxidation of Fe 2+ or V 4+ that leads to erroneous results can be completely avoided, even in 100-h sample decompositions at 100°C. We have measured the concentration of FeO in 15 standard silicate rock powders provided by the Geological Survey of Japan (GSJ). Analytical reproducibility was better than 0.5% (1σ) for all but those samples that had small amounts of Fe 2+ (<1.5 wt.% of FeO). Fourteen of these samples gave FeO contents significantly higher than the GSJ reference values. This likely indicates that the GSJ reference values, obtained by compiling previously published data, contain a large number of poor-quality data obtained by methods with lower recovery of Fe 2+ caused by oxidation or insufficient sample decomposition during analyses. To achieve accurate determinations of Fe 2+ in our method, several factors besides the oxidation must be considered, including: (1) long-term variations in the concentration of Fe 2+ solution must be corrected; (2) excess use of the indicator must be avoided; and (3) the formation of inert FeF + complex must be avoided during titration when using boric acid as a masking agent.

  6. Glass Forming Ability of Sub-Alkaline Silicate Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetere, F. P.; Iezzi, G.; Behrens, H.; Holtz, F.; Ventura, G.; Misiti, V.; Mollo, S.; Perugini, D.

    2014-12-01

    The glass forming ability (GFA) and critical cooling rate (Rc) of six natural sub-alkaline melts from basalt to rhyolite (i.e., B100, B80R20, B60R40, B40R60, B20R80, and R100) have been quantified through cooling-induced solidification experiments of 9000, 1800, 180, 60, 7 and 1 °C/h conducted at ambient pressure and air buffering conditions, in a temperature range between 1300 °C (superliquidus region) and 800 °C (glass transition region), The phase proportion in each run-product was determined by image analysis on about 500 BS-SEM microphotographs. The phase assemblage consists of glass, clinopyroxene, spinel, and plagioclase with the occurrence of sporadic olivine, orthopyroxene and melilite. Both the glass and crystalline fractions are well correlated with the composition of residual melt. Generally, the amount of crystals decreases with increasing cooling rate. However, some exceptions occurs showing no correlations or even opposite trends. For the example of, Al2O3 and CaO in clinopyroxenes from B100, B80R20, B60R40 and B40R60, their concentrations scale as a function of both cooling rate and the degree of clinopyroxene crystallization. The value of Rc changes of 5 order of magnitude from <1 to ~9000 °C/h when the melt composition changes from R100 to B100, respectively. The most important Rc variations are measured between B80R20 and B60R40, levelling off towards B100. This trend scales with NBO/T (non bridging oxygen per tetrahedron) and can be modelled by the following master sigmoid equation: Rc = a / 1+e-(NBO/T-xo/b), where a, b and xo are fitting parameters equal to 9214, 0.040 and 0.297, respectively. Our data can be used to retrieve the solidification conditions of aphyric, degassed and oxidised lavas. Indeed, the relationship between crystal content and cooling kinetics suggests that the solidification path is more complex than previously assumed and strongly non-linear. This finding has also implications to design glass-ceramics based on natural

  7. Impedance spectra of hot, dry silicate minerals and rocks: qualitative interpretation of spectra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huebner, J.S.; Dillenburg, R.G.

    1995-01-01

    Impedance spectroscopy helps distinguish the contributions that grain interiors and grain boundaries make to electrical resistance of silicate minerals and rocks. Olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxenes, and both natural and synthetic clinopyroxenite were measured. A network of electrical elements is presented for use in interpreting impedance spectra and conductive paths in hot or cold, wet or dry, minerals and rocks at any pressure. In dry rocks, a series network path predominates; in wet rocks, aqueous pore fluid and crystals both conduct. Finite resistance across the sample-electrode interface is evidence that electronic charge carriers are present at the surface, and presumably within, the silicate minerals and rocks measured. -from Authors

  8. Magnesium Isotope Fractionation By Chemical Diffusion In Natural Silicate Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, R.; Richter, F. M.; Watson, E. B.

    2009-12-01

    The isotopic composition of geologic materials can be altered by natural processes in a number of different ways. Important information about the conditions and the processes that operated can be documented by studying the resulting fractionations. In this study, we document the fractionation of magnesium isotopes by chemical diffusion between coeval felsic and silicic magmas from the Vinal Cove complex of the Vinalhaven Intrusive Complex in Maine. Further, we show that the isotopic fractionation can be used to determine the extent of diffusive transport associated with particular geological processes. The Vinal Cove complex is dominated by felsic porphyry along with substantial volumes of contemporaneous mafic and hybrid rocks. The rocks of the Vinal Cove complex appear to record events during the waning stages of solidification of the Vinalhaven intrusive complex, when a large mafic dike intruded a small, partially molten inner portion of the mostly solidified, coarse-grained Vinalhaven granite (Wiebe et al., 2004). An approximately 20 cm thick zone of felsic porphyry between granite and basalt is thought to have formed by the thermal rejuvenation of a silicic crystal mush by a basaltic influx. The contact between the porphyry and the basalt is irregular and crenulate. The magnesium isotopic compositions of samples from two regions across this contact were measured. In addition, two experimental diffusion couples, made by juxtaposing powders of felsic porphyry and basalt from the natural sample from Vinal Cove, were also used to quantify and to compare the magnesium isotopic fractionations associated with chemical diffusion between the natural and experimental samples. The two diffusion couples were made by annealing the powders in a piston cylinder assembly at temperatures of 1450°C, pressures of 1450 kbar, and for 22.5 and 10 hours respectively. Chemical diffusion of magnesium from basalt to felsic porphyry was driven by a concentration ratio of between 4 and

  9. CO2-dependent fractional crystallization of alkaline silicate magmas and unmixing of carbonatites within the intrusive complexes of Brava Island (Cape Verde)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidendorfer, D.; Schmidt, M. W.; Mattsson, H. B.

    2014-12-01

    Intrusive carbonatites often occur in intimate association with SiO2-undersaturated rocks such as melilitites, nephelinites, syenites and phonolites. The occurrence of carbonatites on five of the 10 main islands of the Cape Verde hotspot argues for a CO2-enriched mantle source. Whether alkali-poor carbonatites on the Cape Verdes directly represent small mantle melt fractions or form by extreme fractionation and/or liquid immiscibility from a CO2-rich silicate magma remains a matter of debate. This study focuses on the pyroxenites, nephelinites, ijolites, syenites, phonolites and carbonatites of the intrusive unit of Brava Island. This relative complete series allows for the deduction of a CO2-dependent fractionation pathway from the most primitive basanitic dikes towards phonolitic compositions through an ijolitic series. Major and trace element whole rock and mineral composition trends can be reproduced by fractionating a sequence of olivine, augite, perovskite, biotite, apatite, sodalite and FeTi-oxides, present as phenocrysts in the rocks corresponding to their fractionation interval. To reproduce the observed chemistry of the alkaline silicate rocks a total fractionation of ~87% is required. The melts evolve towards the carbonatite-silicate miscibility gap, an initial CO2 of 0.5 wt% would be sufficient to maintain CO2-saturation in the more evolved compositions. The modelled carbonatite compositions, conjugate to nepheline-syenites to phonolites, correspond well to the observed ones except for an alkali-enrichment with respect to the natural samples. The alkali-depleted nature of the small carbonatite intrusions and dikes on Brava is likely a consequence of fluid-release to the surrounding wall-rocks during crystallization, where fenitization can be observed. The trace element chemistry of primary carbonates and also cpx within both, the carbonatites and the associated silicate rocks, substantiates our fractionation model. Furthermore, carbonatite and silicate

  10. Testing the role of silicic acid and bioorganic materials in the formation of rock coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Vera M.; Philip, Ajish I.; Perry, Randall S.

    2004-11-01

    Silica, amino acids, and DNA were recently discovered in desert varnish. In this work we experimentally test the proposed role of silicic acid and bio-chemicals in the formation of desert varnish and other rock coatings. We have developed a protocol in which the rocks were treated with a mixture of silicic acid, sugars, amino acids, metals and clays, under the influence of heat and UV light. This protocol reflects the proposed mechanism of the polymerization of silicic acid with the biooganic materials, and the laboratory model for the natural conditions under which the desert varnish is formed. Our experiments produced coatings with a hardness and morphology that resemble the natural ones. These results provide a support for the role of silicic acid in the formation of rock coatings. Since the hard silica-based coatings preserve organic compounds in them, they may serve as a biosignature for life, here or possibly on Mars.

  11. Testing the Role of Silicic Acid and Bioorganic Materials in the Formation of Rock Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, Vera; Philip, Ajish I.; Perry, Randall S.

    2004-12-01

    Silica, amino acids, and DNA were recently discovered in desert varnish. In this work we experimentally test the proposed role of silicic acid and bio-chemicals in the formation of desert varnish and other rock coatings. We have developed a protocol in which hte rocks were treated with a mixture of silicic acid, sugars, amino acids, metals and clays, under the influence of heat and UV light. This protocol reflects the proposed mechanism of hte polymerization of silicic acid with the bioorganic materials, and the laboratory model for the natural conditions under which the desert varnish is formed. Our experiments produced coatings with a hardness and morphology that resemble the nature ones. These results provide a support for the role of silicic acid in the formation of rock coatings. Since the hard silica-based coatings preserve organic compounds in them, they may serve as a biosignature for life, here or possibly Mars.

  12. Evaluation of ASR potential of quartz-rich rocks by alkaline etching of polished rock sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šachlová, Šárka; Kuchařová, Aneta; Pertold, Zdeněk; Přikryl, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Damaging effect of alkali-silica reaction (ASR) on concrete structures has been observed in various countries all over the World. Civil engineers and real state owners are demanding reliable methods in the assessment of ASR potential of aggregates before they are used in constructions. Time feasible methods are expected, as well as methods which enable prediction of long-term behaviour of aggregates in concrete. The most frequently employed accelerated mortar bar test (AMBT) quantifies ASR potential of aggregates according to the expansion values of mortar bars measured after fourteen days testing period. Current study aimed to develop a new methodical approach facilitating identification and quantification of ASR potential of aggregates. Polished rock sections of quartz and amorphous SiO2 (coming from orthoquartzite, quartz meta-greywacke, pegmatite, phyllite, chert, and flint) were subjected to experimental leaching in 1M NaOH solution at 80°C. After 14 days of alkaline etching, the rock sections were analyzed employing scanning electron microscope combined with energy dispersive spectrometer. Representative areas were documented in back scattered electron (BSE) images and measured using fully-automatic petrographic image analysis (PIA). Several features connected to alkaline etching were observed on the surface of polished rock sections: deep alkaline etching, partial leach-out of quartz and amorphous particles, alkaline etching connected to quartz grain boundaries, and alkaline etching without any connection to grain boundaries. All features mentioned above had significant influence on grey-scale spectrum of BSE images. A specific part of the grey-scale spectrum (i.e. grey-shade 0-70) was characteristic of areas affected by alkaline etching (ASR area). By measuring such areas we quantified the extent of alkaline etching in studied samples. Very good correlation was found between the ASR area and ASR potential of investigated rocks measured according to the

  13. Relationship between microstructure and efficiency of lithium silicate scintillating glasses: The effect of alkaline earths

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, M.; Craig, R.A.; Sunberg, D.S.; Weber, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    Lithium silicate glasses containing Ce{sup 3+} are known to be scintillators. Glasses in this family in which the Li is enriched ({sup 6}Li) are used as neutron detectors. The addition of Mg to this glass is known to increase the scintillation efficiency. We have found that substituting other alkaline earths results in a monotonic decrease of the scintillation efficiency with increasing atomic number. The total variation in scintillation efficiency from Mg to Ba is nearly a factor of 3. Prior experiments with this glass family show small differences in Raman and fluorescence spectra; evidence from thermoluminescence experiments indicates that the scintillation efficiency is most strongly correlated with structural effects in the neighborhood of the Ce{sup 3+} activator ion. The results of low-temperature studies of fluorescence and thermoluminescence of these glasses will be reported.

  14. Relationship between microstructure and efficiency of lithium silicate scintillating glasses: The effect of alkaline earths

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, M.; Craig, R.A.; Sunberg, D.S.; Weber, M.J.

    1995-05-01

    Lithium silicate glasses containing Ce{sup 3+} are known to be scintillators. Glasses in this family in which the Li is enriched ({sup 6}Li) are used as neutron detectors. The addition of Mg to this glass is known to increase the scintillation efficiency. We have found that substituting other alkaline earths results in a monotonic decrease of the scintillation efficiency with increasing atomic number. The total variation in scintillation efficiency from Mg to Ba is nearly a factor of 3. Prior experiments with this glass family show small differences in Raman and fluorescence spectra; evidence from thermoluminescence experiments indicates that the scintillation efficiency is most strongly correlated with structural effects in the neighborhood of the Ce{sup 3+} activator ion. The results of low-temperature studies of fluorescence and thermoluminescence of these glasses will be reported.

  15. Zircon saturation in silicate melts: a new and improved model for aluminous and alkaline melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gervasoni, Fernanda; Klemme, Stephan; Rocha-Júnior, Eduardo R. V.; Berndt, Jasper

    2016-03-01

    The importance of zircon in geochemical and geochronological studies, and its presence not only in aluminous but also in alkaline rocks, prompted us to think about a new zircon saturation model that can be applied in a wide range of compositions. Therefore, we performed zircon crystallization experiments in a range of compositions and at high temperatures, extending the original zircon saturation model proposed by Watson and Harrison (Earth Planet Sci Lett 64:295-304, 1983) and Boehnke et al. (Chem Geol 351:324-334, 2013). We used our new data and the data from previous studies in peraluminous melts, to describe the solubility of zircon in alkaline and aluminous melts. To this effect, we devised a new compositional parameter called G [ {( {3 \\cdot {{Al}}2 {{O}}3 + {{SiO}}2 )/({{Na}}2 {{O}} + {{K}}2 {{O}} + {{CaO}} + {{MgO}} + {{FeO}}} )} ] (molar proportions), which enables to describe the zircon saturation behaviour in a wide range of rock compositions. Furthermore, we propose a new zircon saturation model, which depends basically on temperature and melt composition, given by (with 1σ errors): ln [ {{Zr}} ] = ( {4.29 ± 0.34} ) - ( {1.35 ± 0.10} ) \\cdot ln G + ( {0.0056 ± 0.0002} ) \\cdot T( °C ) where [Zr] is the Zr concentration of the melt in µg/g, G is the new parameter representing melt composition and T is the temperature in degrees Celsius. The advantages of the new model are its straightforward use, with the G parameter being calculated directly from the molar proportions converted from electron microprobe measurements, the temperature calculated given in degrees Celsius and its applicability in a wider range of rocks compositions. Our results confirm the high zircon solubility in peralkaline rocks and its dependence on composition and temperature. Our new model may be applied in all intermediate to felsic melts from peraluminous to peralkaline compositions.

  16. Mobility of elements during K-metasomatism of volcanic rocks by alkaline, saline brines

    SciTech Connect

    Chapin, C.E. )

    1992-01-01

    Silicic ignimbrites and interbedded mafic lavas of Oligocene age were altered by alkaline, saline brines in the Popotosa basin of the Rio Grande rift near Socorro, New Mexico. Alteration was toward a fine-grained assemblage of adularia + hematite [+-] quartz irrespective of initial rock composition. Elevated [delta][sup 18]O and the occurrence of zeolites, gypsum, and salt casts in overlying play a deposits indicates that the altering fluids were basin brines. Preliminary analysis of secondary inclusions in fractured quartz phenocrysts indicates temperatures near 100 C and salinities near 20 wt. % NaCl equivalent. To test element mobility, pairs of fresh and altered samples from each of 7 ignimbrite units plus 4 samples of interbedded mafic lavas were analyzed by XRF, INAA, and AA. The elements showing the greatest mobility during alteration of ignimbrites are listed below along with their enrichment factors (altered rock/fresh rock). Ignimbrites: enriched--K[sub 2]O 1.99, Rb 1.89, Ba 1.43, As 12.14, Sb 18.30, Pb 1.23; depleted--Na[sub 2]O 0.25, MgO 0.57, CaO 0.27, MnO 0.50, P[sub 2]O[sub 5] 0.75, Sr 0.54, Li 0.57, U 0.78, Br 0.67, Cu 0.90, Zn 0.69. The dramatic enrichment of As and Sb in both ignimbrites and mafic lavas indicates that these elements are highly mobile in oxidizing basin brine systems. K-metasomatism is a common type of alteration in rift basins, detachment terranes, aquifers through which brines have migrated.

  17. Compositions of magmas and carbonate silicate liquid immiscibility in the Vulture alkaline igneous complex, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovova, I. P.; Girnis, A. V.; Kogarko, L. N.; Kononkova, N. N.; Stoppa, F.; Rosatelli, G.

    2005-11-01

    This paper presents a study of melt and fluid inclusions in minerals of an olivine-leucite phonolitic nephelinite bomb from the Monticchio Lake Formation, Vulture. The rock contains 50 vol.% clinopyroxene, 12% leucite, 10% alkali feldspars, 8% hauyne/sodalite, 7.5% nepheline, 4.5% apatite, 3.2% olivine, 2% opaques, 2.6% plagioclase, and < 1% amphibole. We distinguished three generations of clinopyroxene differing in composition and morphology. All the phenocrysts bear primary and secondary melt and fluid inclusions, which recorded successive stages of melt evolution. The most primitive melts were found in the most magnesian olivine and the earliest clinopyroxene phenocrysts. The melts are near primary mantle liquids and are rich in Ca, Mg and incompatible and volatile elements. Thermometric experiments with the melt inclusions suggested that melt crystallization began at temperatures of about 1200 °C. Because of the partial leakage of all primary fluid inclusions, the pressure of crystallization is constrained only to minimum of 3.5 kbar. Combined silicate-carbonate melt inclusions were found in apatite phenocrysts. They are indicative of carbonate-silicate liquid immiscibility, which occurred during magma evolution. Large hydrous secondary melt inclusions were found in olivine and clinopyroxene. The inclusions in the phenocrysts recorded an open-system magma evolution during its rise towards the surface including crystallization, degassing, oxidation, and liquid immiscibility processes.

  18. Compositional evolution of nepheline in alkaline rocks from Messum Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blancher, Simon; D'Arco, Philippe; Fonteilles, Michel; Pascal, Marie-Lola

    2010-05-01

    Nepheline can be described as a four end-member solid solution between Ne (NaAlSiO4), Ks (KAlSiO4), An (Ca1/2□1/2AlSiO4) and Qz (□Si2O4), where □ is a vacancy in the structure. Few studies have explored its compositional variations, considered by most authors to be small and hardly related to magmatic evolution. In the Messum complex, an alkaline silica-undersaturated series is well exposed from theralites to nepheline-diorites, nepheline-monzonites and nepheline-syenites. This wide range of nepheline-rocks allows to follow an evolution of nepheline composition through the evolution of parageneses. In theralites, olivine, titanaugite and plagioclase are cumulus phases on which pargasite grows. Then, nepheline and diopside appear at the expense of plagioclase and pargasite. In nepheline-diorites, pargasite replaces olivine and titanaugite, and plagioclase becomes more sodic. Next, in nepheline-syenites, alkali feldspar appears, plagioclase then pargasite disappear, and diopside becomes enriched in acmite-content up to 15%. Nepheline is present at all stages of this magmatic evolution. Its own evolution can be correlated with that of feldspars. In theralites, nephelines in equilibrium with a calcic plagioclase are calcic (15% An). The An-content decreases progressively with the An-content of plagioclase, down to 2% in plagioclase-free rocks. Variations in the Ks end-member are small, in the range 10 to 16%, first increasing until alkali feldspar appears, then decreasing as the alkali feldspar evolves towards albite. Qz and Ne contents increase regularly from theralites (3 and 68%, respectively ) to syenites (7 and 75%). This nepheline-series is crosscutted by more alkaline dykes, nephelinites and peralkaline syenites. In nephelinites, the paragenesis resembles that of theralites, except for the absence of plagioclase. Peralkaline syenites contain acmite and unmixed alkali-feldspar. These chemical/mineralogical differences are accompanied by differences in the

  19. Correlation of XANES features with the scintillation efficiencies of Ce doped alkaline earth lithium silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, D.L.; Sunberg, D.S.; Craig, R.A.; Bliss, M.; Weber, M.J.

    1994-11-01

    Cerium-activated, lithium-silicate glasses are widely used as thermal neutron detectors because of their versatility, robustness and low cost. The glasses convert the energy of the neutrons to visible light pulses that may be counted. This process, scintillation, is generally thought to be composed of three steps: ionization, energy transfer, and luminescence. If defects are present, they can trap the excitations, altering the scintillation output. These features have been discussed previously. The presence of magnesium in these glasses increases scintillation efficiency, but as previously observed the effect drops by a factor greater than 2.5 with substitution through the series of alkaline earths. Here, cerium activated glasses of composition 20Li{sub 2}O{center_dot}15MO{center_dot}64.4SiO{sub 2}{center_dot}0.6Ce{sub 3}O{sub 3} (where m is Mg, Ca, Sr, or Ba) exhibit scintillation efficiencies that vary by more than a factor of 2.5 with the alkaline earth. Previous work has suggested a correlation between the microstructure of these glasses and scintillation efficiency. Measurements of the Ce L{sub III} x-ray absorption edge in the Mg, Ca and Sr glasses display a feature near the absorption edge that is suggestive of the presence of Ce{sup 4+}. The area of this peak is, in fact, correlated with the scintillation efficiency of the glass. The amount of Ce{sup 4+} indicated by the intensity of this feature is, however, too high to be a permanent population. The authors suspect that the feature is a transient phenomenon related to creation of Ce{sup 4+} and trapped electrons due to photoionization by the x-ray beam.

  20. Petrographic and crystallographic study of silicate minerals in lunar rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmichael, I. S. E.; Turner, F. J.; Wenk, H. R.

    1974-01-01

    Optical U-stage measurements, chemical microprobe data, and X-ray procession photographs of a bytownite twin group from rock 12032,44 are compared. Sharp but weak b and no c-reflections were observed for this An89 bytownite indicating a partly disordered structure. Euler angles, used to characterize the orientation of the optical indicatrix, compare better with values for plutonic than for volcanic plagioclase. This indicates that structural and optical properties cannot be directly correlated.

  1. Genesis of rare-metal pegmatites and alkaline apatite-fluorite rocks of Burpala massi, Northern Baikal folded zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotnikova, Irina; Vladykin, Nikolai

    2015-04-01

    Burpalinsky rare metal alkaline massif in the Northern Baikal folded zone in southern margin of Siberian Platform, is a of intrusion central type, created 287 Ma covering area of about 250 km2. It is composed of nepheline syenites and pulaskites grading to quartz syenites in the contacts. Veines and dykes are represented by shonkinites, sodalite syenite, leucocratic granophyres, alkali granites and numerous rare metal alkaline syenite pegmatites and two dykes of carbonatites. All rocks except for granites are cut by a large apatite-fluorite dyke rocks with mica and magnetite, which in turn is cut by alaskite granites dyke. The massif has been studied by A.M. Portnov, A.A. Ganzeev et al. (1992) Burpalinsky massif is highly enriched with trace elements, which are concentrated in pegmatite dykes. About 70 rare-metal minerals we found in massif. Zr-silicates: zircon, eudialyte, lovenite, Ti-lovenite, velerite, burpalite, seidozerite, Ca- seidozerite, Rosenbuschite, vlasovite, katapleite, Ca-katapleite, elpidite. Ti- minerals:- sphene, astrophyllite, ramsaite, Mn-neptunite bafertisite, chevkinite, Mn-ilmenite, pirofanite, Sr-perrerit, landauite, rutile, anatase, brookite; TR- minerals - loparite, metaloparite, britolite, rinkolite, melanocerite, bastnesite, parisite, ankilite, monazite, fluocerite, TR-apatite; Nb- minerals - pyrochlore, loparite. Other rare minerals leucophanite, hambergite, pyrochlore, betafite, torite, thorianite, tayniolite, brewsterite, cryolite and others. We have proposed a new scheme massif: shonkinites - nepheline syenites - alkaline syenite - quartz syenites - veined rocks: mariupolites, rare-metal pegmatites, apatite, fluorite rock alyaskite and alkaline granites and carbonatites (Sotnikova, 2009). Apatite-fluorite rocks are found in the central part of massif. This is a large vein body of 2 km length and a 20 m width cutting prevailing pulaskites. Previously, these rocks were regarded as hydrothermal low-temperature phase. New geological and

  2. Characterizing silicic rocks in the Parana Magmatic Province: an update in their origin and emplacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchetti, A. F.; Nardy, A. R.; Machado, F. B.; Gravley, D. M.; Gualda, G. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Paraná Magmatic Province (PMP), a large igneous province in southern Brazil (with correlative rocks in western Africa), includes 800,000 km3 of flood basalts generated during the rifting that ultimately led to the opening of the South Atlantic and covers nearly 75% of the surface of the Paraná Basin. Towards the top of the volcanic pile, silicic rocks are observed in many areas. They comprise a small proportion of the total erupted volume (2.5%), yet correspond to a significant flare-up of silicic volcanism over a period of only a few million years. In Brazil, the silicic rocks are divided into two groups, the Chapecó Member, which appears more northerly and includes porphyritic, crystal-rich, high-Ti dacites and trachydacites; and the Palmas Member, which includes fine-grained, crystal-poor, low-Ti dacites and rhyolites. The mode of emplacement (lavas vs. pyroclastic flows) of the volcanic units has been the subject of much controversy. The aim of this project is to better understand the origin and evolution of the PMP silicic rocks. We are combining information from the regional to the thin section scale to better characterize eruption dynamics and magma distribution prior to eruption. In both Palmas and Chapecó units, we observe features consistent with emplacement in the form of pyroclastic density currents, e.g. fiamme, variable weathering patterns consistent with local variations in welding at the outcrop scale, vertical gas-escape structures, sedimentary dykes, and lythophysae. Some ignimbrite units can be traced for 10's of kilometers and with more research on their spatial distribution could reveal the location of eruptive centers. In the Palmas, ignimbrites can be observed juxtaposed against or overlying discrete eruptive centers in the form of discordant structures that resemble domes and coulees typical of lava extrusion and flow. However, many of the silicic rocks are ambiguous and difficult to characterize, with features that could be related

  3. Mantle-derived sources of syenites from the A-type igneous suites - New approach to the provenance of alkaline silicic magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinovsky, B. A.; Jahn, B. M.; Eyal, M.

    2015-09-01

    Granite is generally dominant in A-type igneous suites but these frequently include also alkali feldspar- and peralkaline- syenite and quartz syenite. Such syenites can provide essential information about magma sources and mode of generation of A-type silicic magma. This paper addresses the petrogenesis of syenites based on comparisons between the Mongolian-Transbaikalian Belt, Russia (MTB), and the northern Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS) as exposed in the Sinai Peninsula, Egypt and adjacent areas of southern Israel. The syenitic rocks from MTB and ANS are characterized by high alkali content (Na2O + K2O = 10.5 to 12.5 wt.%) and are assigned to alkaline metaluminous and peralkaline granitoids. Peralkaline syenites are generally richer in Na and contain slightly less K and Ba than are metaluminous granitoids. REE abundances are similar in all types of syenites. The Eu/Eu* ratios range commonly from 0.35 to 0.65, although higher values, up to 1.15, attributed to presence of accumulated Afs and minor Pl, also occur in some plutons. The geochemical and Sr-Nd isotope characteristics of associated syenite, granite and monzogabbro from five igneous suites (~ 80 samples) suggest that the main rock types, silicic and mafic, are cogenetic in each suite. Syenite magmas were produced from mantle-derived source with little, if any silicic crustal component. The generation of abundant A-type granite and syenite magmas in the young juvenile crust (ANS) argues that old continental crust is not required for generation of highly alkaline silicic magmas, as commonly advocated. The most probable source of both syenite and granite was mantle-derived K-rich shoshonitic monzogabbro. The bimodal character of the A-type suites suggests that partial melting of monzogabbro, rather than fractional crystallization of basic magma, accompanied with enrichment of a cumulate phase in the mafic units, was the dominant mode of granitoid magma formation. Granite magmas were produced in the lower crust

  4. Silicate and carbonate melt inclusions associated with diamonds in deeply subducted carbonate rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korsakov, Andrey V.; Hermann, Jörg

    2006-01-01

    Deeply subducted carbonate rocks from the Kokchetav massif (Northern Kazakhstan) recrystallised within the diamond stability field (P = 4.5-6.0 GPa; T ≈ 1000 °C) and preserve evidence for ultra high-pressure carbonate and silicate melts. The carbonate rocks consist of garnet and K-bearing clinopyroxene embedded in a dolomite or magnesian calcite matrix. Polycrystalline magnesian calcite and polyphase carbonate-silicate inclusions occurring in garnet and clinopyroxene show textural features of former melt inclusions. The trace element composition of such carbonate inclusions is enriched in Ba and light rare earth elements and depleted in heavy rare earth elements with respect to the matrix carbonates providing further evidence that the inclusions represent trapped carbonate melt. Polyphase inclusions in garnet and clinopyroxene within a magnesian calcite marble, consisting mainly of a tight intergrowth of biotite + K-feldspar and biotite + zoisite + titanite, are interpreted to represent two different types of K-rich silicate melts. Both melt types show high contents of large ion lithophile elements but contrasting contents of rare earth elements. The Ca-rich inclusions display high REE contents similar to the carbonate inclusions and show a general trace element characteristic compatible with a hydrous granitic origin. Low SiO2 content in the silicate melts indicates that they represent residual melts after extensive interaction with carbonates. These observations suggest that hydrous granitic melts derived from the adjacent metapelites reacted with dolomite at ultra high-pressure conditions to form garnet, clinopyroxene - a hydrous carbonate melt - and residual silicate melts. Silicate and carbonate melt inclusions contain diamond, providing evidence that such an interaction promotes diamond growth. The finding of carbonate melts in deeply subducted crust might have important consequences for recycling of trace elements and especially C from the slab to the

  5. Importance of Neogene siliceous rocks as the source of petroleum in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyagi, K. ); Omokawa, M. )

    1989-01-01

    Major oil and gas fields in Japan are located in the area from the central Hokkaido through northeast Honshu. Most productive horizons are generally found in formations of the late Middle Miocene (approximately 12-10 Ma) Onnagawa provincial stage of Japan. These formations are composed mainly of hard mudstone, siliceous shale, diatomaceous mudstone, marlite, and acidic pyroclastic rocks. Source rock potentials in argillaceous rocks of the Miocene Ohdoji Formation in Aomori, the Onnagawa Formation in Akita, and the Lower Teradomari Formation in Niigata show the highest values as compared with other formations in these areas. Average contents of organic carbon and hydrocarbons of siliceous sediments such as diatomite, siliceous shale, and chert in the Aomori basin indicate the higher values as compared with other argillaceous sediments. Diatoms, which appeared in the later Cretaceous, are the principal primary producers of organic matter in the marine environment during the Cenozoic. Organic components and biological productivity show that diatoms have been the most important source of petroleum during the Neogene in Japan.

  6. The separation of platinum, palladium and gold from silicate rocks by the anion exchange separation of chloro complexes after a sodium peroxide fusion: an investigation of low recoveries.

    PubMed

    Enzweiler, J; Potts, P J

    1995-10-01

    A series of experiments was undertaken to measure the recovery efficiency of platinum, palladium and gold from silicate rocks using a sodium peroxide fusion followed by anion exchange separation of the analytes as chloro complexes. Results obtained by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric analysis of standard solutions prepared in dilute HCl or HCl-acidified sodium peroxide solution showed that recoveries were near quantitative. However, when standard solutions were added to an alkaline sodium peroxide solution, which was then acidified, low results were obtained for platinum and gold (46% and 76% respectively). Low and variable results were also obtained when standard solutions were added to a peridotite sample that had been dissolved by the state procedure, and in the analysis of the South African Bureau of Standards certified reference material, SARM 7. Various experiments were undertaken to investigate these low recoveries, but the reason proposed here is the formation of hydroxychloro compounds in alkaline solution which are not, on acidification with HCl, converted quantitatively to the chloro complex necessary for quantitative anion exchange separation. It is concluded that a sodium peroxide fusion followed by an anion-exchange separation does not appear to form the basis of a successful technique for the determination of platinum, palladium and gold in silicate rocks. PMID:18966370

  7. Anorthosites and alkaline rocks from the deep crust of peninsular India

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leelanandam, C.; Ratnakar, J.; Reddy, M. Narsimha

    1988-01-01

    The anorthosite and alkaline rock localities in the Precambrian Shield of Peninsular India were reviewed. There are approximately 50 localities of such rocks, generally restricted to the Eastern Ghats mobile belt. The alkaline plutons are typically confined to the margin of the Eastern Ghats. The anorthosites are all greater than 500 sq km, but many exhibit similarities to one another. It was suggested that the anorthosites are associated with cryptic sutures, and are thought to have originated as a result of ponding of basaltic magmas. An analogy was drawn between the Eastern Ghats belt and the Grenville Province of the Canadian Shield.

  8. Geochemistry of silicate-rich rocks can curtail spreading of carbon dioxide in subsurface aquifers.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, S S S; Andres, J T H

    2014-01-01

    Pools of carbon dioxide are found in natural geological accumulations and in engineered storage in saline aquifers. It has been thought that once this CO2 dissolves in the formation water, making it denser, convection streams will transport it efficiently to depth, but this may not be so. Here, we assess theoretically and experimentally the impact of natural chemical reactions between the dissolved CO2 and the rock formation on the convection streams in the subsurface. We show that, while in carbonate rocks the streaming of dissolved carbon dioxide persists, the chemical interactions in silicate-rich rocks may curb this transport drastically and even inhibit it altogether. These results challenge our view of carbon sequestration and dissolution rates in the subsurface, suggesting that pooled carbon dioxide may remain in the shallower regions of the formation for hundreds to thousands of years. The deeper regions of the reservoir can remain virtually carbon free. PMID:25501650

  9. Geochemistry of silicate-rich rocks can curtail spreading of carbon dioxide in subsurface aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, S. S. S.; Andres, J. T. H.

    2014-12-01

    Pools of carbon dioxide are found in natural geological accumulations and in engineered storage in saline aquifers. It has been thought that once this CO2 dissolves in the formation water, making it denser, convection streams will transport it efficiently to depth, but this may not be so. Here, we assess theoretically and experimentally the impact of natural chemical reactions between the dissolved CO2 and the rock formation on the convection streams in the subsurface. We show that, while in carbonate rocks the streaming of dissolved carbon dioxide persists, the chemical interactions in silicate-rich rocks may curb this transport drastically and even inhibit it altogether. These results challenge our view of carbon sequestration and dissolution rates in the subsurface, suggesting that pooled carbon dioxide may remain in the shallower regions of the formation for hundreds to thousands of years. The deeper regions of the reservoir can remain virtually carbon free.

  10. Determination of total tin in silicate rocks by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elsheimer, H.N.; Fries, T.L.

    1990-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of total tin in silicate rocks utilizing a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer with a stabilized-temperature platform furnace and Zeeman-effect background correction. The sample is decomposed by lithium metaborate fusion (3 + 1) in graphite crucibles with the melt being dissolved in 7.5% hydrochloric acid. Tin extractions (4 + 1 or 8 + 1) are executed on portions of the acid solutions using a 4% solution of tricotylphosphine oxide in methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). Ascorbic acid is added as a reducing agent prior to extraction. A solution of diammonium hydrogenphosphate and magnesium nitrate is used as a matrix modifier in the graphite furnace determination. The limit of detection is > 10 pg, equivalent to > 1 ??g l-1 of tin in the MIBK solution or 0.2-0.3 ??g g-61 in the rock. The concentration range is linear between 2.5 and 500 ??g l-1 tin in solution. The precision, measured as relative standard deviation, is < 20% at the 2.5 ??g l-1 level and < 7% at the 10-30 ??g l-1 level of tin. Excellent agreement with recommended literature values was found when the method was applied to the international silicate rock standards BCR-1, PCC-1, GSP-1, AGV-1, STM-1, JGb-1 and Mica-Fe. Application was made to the determination of tin in geological core samples with total tin concentrations of the order of 1 ??g g-1 or less.

  11. Inorganic polymers from laterite using activation with phosphoric acid and alkaline sodium silicate solution: Mechanical and microstructural properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lassinantti Gualtieri, Magdalena

    2015-01-15

    Geopolymers from laterite, an iron-rich soil available in developing countries, have great potential as building materials. In this work, laterite from Togo (Africa) was used to prepare geopolymers using both phosphoric acid and alkaline sodium silicate solution. Microstructural properties were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction and mercury porosimetry, whereas thermal properties were evaluated by thermal analyses. The local environment of iron was studied by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XANES region). The mechanical properties were determined. Modulus of Rupture and Young's modulus fell in the ranges 3.3–4.5 MPa and 12–33 GPa, respectively, rendering the materials good candidates for construction purposes. Heating above 900 °C results in weight-gain, presumably due to iron redox reactions. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy data evidence changes in the chemical and structural environments of iron following thermal treatment of geopolymers. These changes indicate interaction between the geopolymer structure and iron during heating, possibly leading to redox properties. -- Highlights: •Geopolymerization of laterite is promising for fabrication of building materials. •Both phosphoric acid and alkaline sodium silicate solution can be used for activation. •Thermally activated redox properties of the inorganic polymers were observed.

  12. Luminescence properties of Eu-activated alkaline and alkaline-earth silicate Na{sub 2}Ca{sub 3}Si{sub 6}O{sub 16}

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing; Huang, Yanlin; Wang, Xigang; Qin, Lin; Seo, Hyo Jin

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • A novel yellow-emitting alkaline and alkaline-earth silicate Na{sub 2}Ca{sub 3}Si{sub 6}O{sub 16}:Eu{sup 2+} was first developed. • Under excitation with UV or near UV light the silicate presents broad emission band centered at 580 nm. - Abstract: Yellow-emitting phosphors of Na{sub 2}Ca{sub 3}Si{sub 6}O{sub 16}:Eu{sup 2+} was prepared by wet chemistry sol–gel method. X-ray powder diffraction and SEM measurements were applied to characterize the structure and morphology, respectively. The luminescence properties were investigated by the photoluminescence excitation and emission spectra, decay curve (lifetimes), CIE coordinates and the internal quantum efficiencies. The excitation spectra can match well with the emission light of near UV-LED chips (360–400 nm). Na{sub 2}Ca{sub 3}Si{sub 6}O{sub 16}:Eu{sup 2+} presents a symmetric emission band from 4f{sup 6}5d{sup 1} ⟶ 4f{sup 7}({sup 8}S{sub 7/2}) transitions of Eu{sup 2+} ions on doping below 3.0 mol%. On increasing Eu-doping levels, the sample contains two kinds of emission centers, i.e., Eu{sup 2+} and Eu{sup 3+} ions, which present the characteristic broad band (5d ⟶ 4f) and narrower (4f ⟶ 4f) luminescence lines, respectively. The energy transfer, the luminescence thermal stability (activation energy ΔE for thermal quenching) and luminescence mechanism of Na{sub 2}Ca{sub 3}Si{sub 6}O{sub 16}:Eu{sup 2+} phosphors were discussed by analyzing the relationship between the luminescence characteristics and the crystal structure.

  13. Study on the order degree and geochemical characteristics of major elements of siliceous rock in eastern Qinling area, China.

    PubMed

    Ming, Lü; Li, Hong-Zhong; Zhao, Ming-zhen; Ma, Ming-wu; Yang, Zhi-Jun; Liang, Jin

    2014-11-01

    Siliceous rocks were extensively distributed in the marine volcanic sedimentary formation of Erlangping Group in the Early Paleozoic in eastern Qinling area. These siliceous rocks formed in the same age, but had differences in the degree of crystallization and order because of the late diagenetic evolution. In the present study, the major elements and order degree of the siliceous rocks were studied, which were from the Erlangping Group in Xixia area, Songxian area and Nanzhao area of eartern Qinling orogenic belt. As shown in the results, the siliceous rocks contained SiO2 with percentage between 84.75% and 94.12% and average of 89.09%. The SiO2/(K2O+Na2O) values were from 26.69 to 114.78 with 65.67 as its average, and the values of SiO2/Al2O3 were from 10.48 to 61.52 with average of 30.58. These above characteristics excellently agreed with the geochemical characteristics of hydrothermal siliceous rocks, which deposited in the continental margin environment. In the Raman analytical results, the quartz contributed to the characteristic Raman shifts at 394, 464, 465 and 467 cm(-1). In the results of Gaussian fitting the degrees of order increased with the order of siliceous rocks of Songxian area, Nanzhao area and Xixia area, which were witnessed by the descending in FWHM values of quartz in the siliceous rocks of Songxian area, Nanzhao area and Xixia area orderly. Disagreeing with the FWHM values of Gaussian fitting, the silica contents of the siliceous rocks had a rising trend of Songxian (87.36%), Nanzhao (89.57%), Xixia area (90.35%), which meant a descending in impurity elements with the order of Songxian area, Nanzhao area and Xixia areas. According to this, there was high agreement between lower crystallinity degree and higher purity of silica, and this denoted that the rising in order degree of silica would result in lower impurity in siliceous rocks. Although the crystallinity degrees could change with the influences of temperature, pressure and its

  14. Petrology of potassic alkaline ultramafic and carbonatitic rocks from Planalto da Serra (Mato Grosso State), Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comin-Chiaramonti, Piero; Gomes, Celso B.; De Min, Angelo; Ruberti, Excelso; Girardi, Vicente A. V.; Slejko, Francesca; Neder, Renato D.; Pinho, Francisco E. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Planalto da Serra igneous rocks form plugs, necks and dykes of carbonate-rich ultramafic lamprophyres (aillikites and glimmerites with kamafugitic affinity) and carbonatites (alvikites and beforsites). Phlogopite and/or tetraphlogopite, diopside and melanitic garnet are restricted to aillikitic rock-types, whereas pyroclore occurs only in carbonatites. Aillikites and carbonatites are altered to hydrotermalites, having chlorite and serpentine as dominant minerals. Planalto da Serra igneous rock association has kamafugitic affinity (i.e. effusive, ultrapotassic. High LREE/HREE fractionation, incompatible elements data and Sr-Nd isotopes, suggest that the K-ultramafic alkaline and carbonatite rocks originated from a variably metasomatized mantle source enriched in radiogenic Sr. Crustal contamination is negligible or absent. Age values of 600 Ma rule out the geochronological relationship between the investigated intrusions and the Mesozoic alkaline bodies from the Azimuth 125° lineament. The TDM model ages allow to conclude that Planalto da Serra magma is derived from the partial melting of a mantle source metasomatised by K-rich carbonatated melt during the Early to Late Neoproterozoic. On the basis of alkaline magmatism repetitions at 600 Ma and 90-80 Ma we question the subsistence of a stationary mantle plume for so long time.

  15. The role of volatile exsolution and sub-solidus fluid/rock interactions in producing high 56Fe/ 54Fe ratios in siliceous igneous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, Adriana; Beard, Brian L.; Johnson, Clark M.

    2008-09-01

    Highly differentiated igneous rocks can, in some cases, have 56Fe/ 54Fe ratios that are significantly higher than those of mafic- to intermediate-composition igneous rocks. Iron isotope compositions were obtained for bulk rock, magnetite, and Fe silicates from well-characterized suites of granitic and volcanic rocks that span a wide range in major- and trace-element contents. Sample suites studied include granitoids from Questa, N.M. (Latir volcanic field) and the Tuolumne Intrusive Series (Sierra Nevada batholith), and volcanic rocks from Coso, Katmai, Bishop Tuff, Grizzly Peak Tuff, Seguam Island, and Puyehue volcano. The rocks range from granodiorite to high-silica granite and basalt to high-silica rhyolite. The highest δ 56Fe values (up to +0.31‰) are generally restricted to rocks that have high Rb (>100 ppm), Th (>˜15 ppm) and SiO 2 (>70 wt.%) but low Fe (<2 wt.% total Fe as Fe 2O 3) contents. Magnetite separated from these rocks has high δ 56Fe values, whereas Fe silicates have δ 56Fe values close to zero. Although in principle crystal fractionation might explain the high δ 56Fe values, trace-element ratios in high-δ 56Fe igneous rocks indicate that crystal fractionation is an unlikely explanation. The highest δ 56Fe values occur in volcanic and plutonic rocks that contain independent evidence for fluid exsolution, including sub-chondritic Zr/Hf ratios, suggesting that loss of a low-δ 56Fe ferrous chloride fluid is the most likely explanation for the high δ 56Fe values in the bulk rocks. Based on magnetite solubility in chloride solutions and predicted Fe isotope fractionations among Fe silicates, magnetite, and ferrous chloride fluids, the increase in δ 56Fe values of bulk rocks may be explained by isotopic exchange between magnetite and FeCl20, which predicts an increase in the δ 56Fe values of magnetite upon fluid exsolution. This model is consistent with the δ 56Fe values measured in this study for bulk rocks, as well as magnetite and Fe

  16. Spinel-group minerals in rocks of the Khibiny alkaline pluton, Kola Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanyuk, G. Yu.; Pakhomovsky, Ya. A.; Konopleva, N. G.; Yakovenchuk, V. N.; Men'shikov, Yu. P.; Mikhailova, Yu. A.

    2007-12-01

    Seven spinel-group minerals in various geological settings have been revealed in the rocks of the Khibiny pluton. Hercynite, gahnite, and vuorelainenite occur only in xenoliths of hornfels after volcanic and sedimentary rocks, whereas spinel and magnesiochromite occur in alkaline ultramafic rocks of dike series. Franklinite has been discovered in a low-temperature hydrothermal vein. Ubiquitous magnetite is abundant in foyaite, foidolites, alkaline ultrabasic rocks, and pegmatite and hydrothermal veins and may even be the main mineral in some foidolite varieties. The spinel-group minerals are characterized by various chemical compositions due to the fractionation of nepheline syenites resulting in formation of the Main ring of foidolites and apatite-nepheline ore. Like most other minerals found throughout the pluton, magnetite is characterized by variation in the chemical composition along the radial line from the contact with country Proterozoic volcanic rocks to the geometric center of the pluton. Toward the center, the total Ti and Mn contents in magnetite increase from 5 15 up to 40 at %.

  17. Crystal accumulation and compositional trends in a calc-alkaline batholith: implications for correlation of plutonic and volcanic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, C. G.; Coint, N.

    2013-12-01

    The Wooley Creek batholith is a tilted, calc-alkaline intrusive complex in the Klamath Mountain province, California, that can be divided into two main zones: lower (~159.2 × 0.2 Ma) and upper (~158.2 × 0.3 Ma), separated by a central transition zone. The lower zone consists of multiple intrusive units of gabbro through tonalite, with minor mafic synplutonic dikes and intrusive melagabbro and pyroxenite. Major and trace element data plot in two groups: a mafic group that encompasses pyroxenite to diorite, and a tonalitic group. For each group, Mg/Fe in augite was used to determine the approximate composition of equilibrium melt and then major element mass balance was used to calculate proportions of cumulate phases and melt. For the mafic group, no single parental magma can be identified, which is consistent with assembly via many magma batches. However, the most mafic rocks were derived from basaltic andesite magmas and represent 30 to 100% cumulate augite + opx × plagioclase × olivine. Interstitial melt in the tonalitic group was dacitic, and mass balance indicates from 30 to 80% cumulate pyroxenes + plagioclase × accessory apatite and Fe-Ti oxides. The parental magma was probably silicic andesite. The upper zone varies gradationally from structurally low quartz diorite to uppermost granite. Upper zone magmas ';leaked' to form dacitic to rhyodacitic ';roof dikes'. Previous work (Coint et al., Geosphere, in press) showed that the upper zone formed from an approximately homogeneous magma body and that compositional variation was related to upward percolation of melt. Mass balance supports this interpretation and indicates that (1) the parental magmas were andesitic, (2) structurally low rocks are 15 to 65 % cumulate hornblende + plagioclase × pyroxene, and (3) high-level granite and granodiorite are the fractionated products of this accumulation. These results show that the upper zone is a good example of fractional crystallization within a moderate

  18. Photoelectrochemical reduction of CO{sub 2} by silicate rock powders

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, Kiyohisa; Ohguchi, Youko; Kaneco, Satoshi; Mizuno, Takayuki

    1999-06-01

    The reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions by photoelectrochemical conversion of the CO{sub 2} to formic acid and methanol using silicate rock (andesite) powders suspended in water is presented. For photoelectrochemical reduction of CO{sub 2}, a homemade cell with a platinum and a copper electrode was used. 0.1 M KHCO{sub 3} solution was used as the electrolyte. In the photoelectrochemical reduction of CO{sub 2} with a copper cathode in the catholyte dispersing andesite powder, mainly formic acid, methanol, methane, ethylene, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen were produced. Consequently, it was found that this method using a copper electrode was effective for formic acid and methanol formations from carbon dioxide.

  19. Distribution, microfabric, and geochemical characteristics of siliceous rocks in central orogenic belt, China: implications for a hydrothermal sedimentation model.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongzhong; Zhai, Mingguo; Zhang, Lianchang; Gao, Le; Yang, Zhijun; Zhou, Yongzhang; He, Junguo; Liang, Jin; Zhou, Liuyu; Voudouris, Panagiotis Ch

    2014-01-01

    Marine siliceous rocks are widely distributed in the central orogenic belt (COB) of China and have a close connection to the geological evolution and metallogenesis. They display periodic distributions from Mesoproterozoic to Jurassic with positive peaks in the Mesoproterozoic, Cambrian--Ordovician, and Carboniferous--Permian and their deposition is enhanced by the tensional geological settings. The compressional regimes during the Jinning, Caledonian, Hercynian, Indosinian, and Yanshanian orogenies resulted in sudden descent in their distribution. The siliceous rocks of the Bafangshan-Erlihe ore deposit include authigenic quartz, syn-depositional metal sulphides, and scattered carbonate minerals. Their SiO2 content (71.08-95.30%), Ba (42.45-503.0 ppm), and ΣREE (3.28-19.75 ppm) suggest a hydrothermal sedimentation origin. As evidenced by the Al/(Al + Fe + Mn), Sc/Th, (La/Yb) N, and (La/Ce) N ratios and δCe values, the studied siliceous rocks were deposited in a marginal sea basin of a limited ocean. We suggest that the Bafangshan-Erlihe area experienced high- and low-temperature stages of hydrothermal activities. The hydrothermal sediments of the former stage include metal sulphides and silica, while the latter was mainly composed of silica. Despite the hydrothermal sedimentation of the siliceous rocks, minor terrigenous input, magmatism, and biological activity partly contributed to geochemical features deviating from the typical hydrothermal characteristics. PMID:25140349

  20. Distribution, Microfabric, and Geochemical Characteristics of Siliceous Rocks in Central Orogenic Belt, China: Implications for a Hydrothermal Sedimentation Model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongzhong; Zhai, Mingguo; Zhang, Lianchang; Gao, Le; Yang, Zhijun; Zhou, Yongzhang; He, Junguo; Liang, Jin; Zhou, Liuyu; Voudouris, Panagiotis Ch.

    2014-01-01

    Marine siliceous rocks are widely distributed in the central orogenic belt (COB) of China and have a close connection to the geological evolution and metallogenesis. They display periodic distributions from Mesoproterozoic to Jurassic with positive peaks in the Mesoproterozoic, Cambrian—Ordovician, and Carboniferous—Permian and their deposition is enhanced by the tensional geological settings. The compressional regimes during the Jinning, Caledonian, Hercynian, Indosinian, and Yanshanian orogenies resulted in sudden descent in their distribution. The siliceous rocks of the Bafangshan-Erlihe ore deposit include authigenic quartz, syn-depositional metal sulphides, and scattered carbonate minerals. Their SiO2 content (71.08–95.30%), Ba (42.45–503.0 ppm), and ΣREE (3.28–19.75 ppm) suggest a hydrothermal sedimentation origin. As evidenced by the Al/(Al + Fe + Mn), Sc/Th, (La/Yb)N, and (La/Ce)N ratios and δCe values, the studied siliceous rocks were deposited in a marginal sea basin of a limited ocean. We suggest that the Bafangshan-Erlihe area experienced high- and low-temperature stages of hydrothermal activities. The hydrothermal sediments of the former stage include metal sulphides and silica, while the latter was mainly composed of silica. Despite the hydrothermal sedimentation of the siliceous rocks, minor terrigenous input, magmatism, and biological activity partly contributed to geochemical features deviating from the typical hydrothermal characteristics. PMID:25140349

  1. Model VNIR optical constants of silicates mixtures analogues to igneous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carli, C.; Ciarniello, M.; Serventi, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Sgavetti, M.

    2011-12-01

    Remote-sensing studies have revealed that most of the inner planets surfaces are composed of silicate bearing rocks with variable relative mineral abundances and compositions that could be indicative of genetically related rocks. Quantifying and modeling those phases in mineral mixtures is an important task to characterize the surface compositions and to understand the evolution of the crust. One approach to reach this aim is to invert the bidirectional reflectance equation(Hapke,1993), to derive optical constants of powdered materials. This approach has been applied with positive results to obtain the optical constants of mafic silicates, e.g., olivine and pyroxene, and plagioclase taking into account the effects of composition and grain-size variations. Mixtures of those mineral phases were modeled successfully starting from the optical constants of each end-member, but only few works modeled spectra of mixtures where some of the end-members could not be individually characterized. Here we present preliminary results on the determination of the optical constants of complex silicates mixtures obtained applying the Hapke's radiative transfer model to visible-near infrared reflectance spectra. The bidirectional reflectance spectra are acquired at the SLAB (Spectroscopy Laboratory, Iasf-INAF, Roma) in the wavelength range 0.35- 2.50 μm. We prepared mixtures starting from three different plagioclases with variable amount of FeO and two different mafic end-members, mixtures of pyroxenes and pyroxenes + olivine, respectively. For each plagioclase composition, mixtures varying from 20 to 90 wt.% plagioclase and multimineral mafic grains were prepared, in two grain size classes (63-125 μm and 125-250 μm), for a total of 64 samples. Moreover, to optimize the calculation of the optical constant, we have acquired spectra of the end-members in other two different grain size classes (50-75 μm and 100-125 μm). We have retrieved the single scattering albedo (w) for each

  2. Magmatic evolution of the calk-alkaline rock in northern Kita-Hakkoda volcanic group, northern Honshu, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, S.; Ohba, T.

    2014-12-01

    Magmatic evolution in the northern Kita-Hakkoda, northern Honshu, Japan, was investigated from temporal variations of whole-rock chemistry and petrographic characteristics. The temporal variations are based on stratigrahic relation observed by geological survey and geomorphology. The volcanic activity of northern Kita-Hakkoda occurred about 0.4-0.2Ma. Rocks from northern Kita-Hakkoda are classified into two series on the AFM and the Miyashiro diagrams: calc-alkaline and tholeiite series. Calc-alkaline series rocks draw liner trends on Harker's diagrams of compatible elements (Ni, Cr, MgO), whereas the trends of tholeiitic series are convex downward. Some calc-alkaline rocks have disequilibrium mineral assemblages, e.g., coexistence of magnesian olivine and embayed quartz. The calc-alkaline rocks exhibit mineralogical features that indicate open system processes, e.g., coexistence of reversely zoned pyroxenes and normally zoned pyroxenes, dusty zoning in plagioclase. In contrast, no evidence for open system process is recorded in phenocrysts in the tholeiitic rocks. Previous studies (Sasaki et al.,1985; Ohba et al.,2009) accounted for the chemical variation of tholeiitic magma by crystallization differentiation. The calc-alkaline trend intersects the tholeiitic trend on Miyashiro diagram; therefore, the mafic endmember is tholeiitic basalt magma with a composition of the intersection. In this study, we conclude that the calc-alkaline series rocks were formed by magma mixing. Compared with the stratigraphic order, the calc-alkaline rocks changed in composition from SiO2 60wt% to SiO2 50wt% with a stratigraphic order, but the compositional variation accompanied a small fluctuation. Because the magma compositions of calc-alkaline magma were influenced by magma mixing, the chronological chemical variation was caused by temporal variation in mixing ratios of endmember magmas.

  3. Conditions of accumulation of radioactive metals in the process of differentiation of ultrabasic alkaline-carbonatite rock associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogarko, L. N.

    2014-07-01

    The distribution of radioactive elements in alkaline rocks from Polar Siberia and Ukraine shows that U and Th are markedly concentrated in carbonatite complex and nepheline syenite as final products of magma fractionation. Peralkaline nepheline syenites from Polar Siberia are characterized by very high contents of radioactive elements, which are close to the economic level. Radioactive elements are also concentrated in rocks of the carbonatite complex. For example, some soevites contain up to 294 × 10-4%U and 916 × 10-4% Th. In late dolomite carbonatites, the contents of radioactive elements are appreciably lower. The Th/U ratio in alkaline rocks of Polar Siberia is close to the chondrite value in primary high-Mg rocks and increases in late derivatives: phoscorite, calcite and dolomite carbonatites. The main amount of radioactive elements is contained in rare-metal accessory minerals: perovskite, pyrochlore, calzirtite, and apatite. Rock-forming minerals are distinguished by very low concentrations of radioactive elements. In alkaline series of the Chernigovka massif (Ukraine), U and Th also accumulate in the course of crystal fractionation, especially in phoscorites from the carbonatite complex. Mantle xenoliths and alkaline rocks from Ukraine reveal uranium specialization. Most likely, the discrepancy in fractionation of radioactive elements between Polar Siberia and Ukraine is caused by different geodynamic regimes of these provinces. The Mesozoic alkaline magmatism of Polar Siberia is a part of the Siberian superplume, whereas the Proterozoic alkaline complex in Ukraine is related to subduction of the oceanic crust.

  4. High-Silica Rock Coatings on Mars: Constraining Secondary Silicate Mineralogy and Chemical Weathering Processes on Mars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, M. D.; Michalski, J. R.; Sharp, T. G.

    2003-12-01

    Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data have been fundamental to understanding Martian surface mineralogy. These data, however, require careful modeling based on laboratory spectroscopic measurements, and modeling of some minerals for Mars has been equivocal. Due to high degrees of spectral similarity, it is difficult to distinguishing silicate glass, clay minerals, zeolites, palagonitized glass, and other secondary products such as amorphous silica as components of surface rock spectra. Deciphering the nature of secondary mineral products on Mars is of key importance to understanding the role of water at the Martian surface over time. It is of central interest to distinguish primary glass from secondary silicate minerals, and secondary minerals from one another to better constrain the degree and mechanisms of aqueous alteration. Observations of Martian surface materials indicate some degree of atmosphere-water-rock interaction. These include nanophase ferric-iron oxides from visible/near-infrared spectroscopy, concentrated hematite deposits identified with TES, high water contents of rocks measured by the Alpha Proton X-ray Spectrometer, sulfate and halide minerals inferred from lander geochemical measurements, and carbonate minerals identified in Martian dust with TES data. Mass balance suggests that if there are oxides, salts, and carbonates there must also be secondary silicate phases present on Mars, which may be identifiable with TES. Identifying the types, distribution, and abundance (or absence) of secondary silicates will enable better constrains to be placed on Martian chemical weathering processes and the role water has played at the Martian surface. We suggest that rock coatings dominated by amorphous silica are geologically reasonable for Mars and may be consistent with TES data. Laboratory measurements of silica-coated rocks show that thin, micrometer-scale silica coatings have a substantial impact on rock spectra. Consequently, if authegenic

  5. The determination of calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate rocks by flame photometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, Henry

    1956-01-01

    A method has been developed for the determination of calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate rocks using the Beckman flame photometer, with photomultiplier attachement. The sample is dissolved in hydrofluoric, nitric, and perchloric acids, the hydrofluoric and nitric acids are expelled, a radiation buffer consisting of aluminum, magnesium, iron, sodium, potassium, phosphoric acid, and nitric acid is added, and the solution is atomized in an oxy-hydrogen flame with an instrument setting of 554 mµ. Measurements are made by comparison against calcium standards, prepared in the same manner, in the 0 to 50 ppm range. The suppression of calcium emission by aluminum and phosphate was overcome by the addition of a large excess of magnesium. This addition almost completely restores the standard curve obtained from a solution of calcium nitrate. Interference was noted when the iron concentration in the aspirated solution (including the iron from the buffer) exceeded 100 ppm iron. Other common rock-forming elements did not interfere. The results obtained by this procedure are within ± 2 percent of the calcium oxide values obtained by other methods in the range 1 to 95 percent calcium oxide. In the 0 to 1 percent calcium oxide range the method compares favorably with standard methods.

  6. Novel alkaline earth silicate sealing glass for SOFC, Part II: sealing and interfacial microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Gow, Robert N.

    2007-07-10

    This is the second part of a study of a novel Sr-Ca-Ni-Y-B silicate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). Part I of the study addresses the effect of NiO on glass forming, thermal, and mechanical properties, and is presented in the preceding paper. In this paper (Part II), candidate composite glass with 10v percent NiO was tested for sealing standard coupons of Ni/YSZ anode-supported YSZ electrolyte bilayer and metallic interconnect Crofer22APU at various temperatures. Samples sealed at the highest temperature (1050 degrees C) showed hermetic seal after fully reduction and 10 thermal cycles. The interfacial microstructure characterization showed no distinct reactions at the interfaces of glass/YSZ or glass/metal, though some segregation of Ni was found along the glass/metal interface. Possible reactions were discussed. Overall the composite glass with 10v percent NiO appeared to be a good candidate for SOFC sealing.

  7. Novel alkaline earth silicate sealing glass for SOFC. Part II. Sealing and interfacial microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Yeong-Shyung; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Gow, Robert N.

    This is the second part of a study of a novel Sr-Ca-Ni-Y-B silicate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). Part I of the study addresses the effect of NiO on glass forming, thermal, and mechanical properties, and is presented in the preceding paper. In this paper (part II), candidate composite glass with 10 vol.% NiO was tested for sealing standard coupons of Ni/YSZ anode-supported YSZ electrolyte bilayer and metallic interconnect Crofer22APU at various temperatures. Samples sealed at the highest temperature (1050 °C) showed hermetic seal after fully reduction and 10 thermal cycles. The interfacial microstructure characterization showed no distinct reactions at the interfaces of glass/YSZ or glass/metal, though some segregation of Ni was found along the glass/metal interface. Possible reactions were discussed. Overall the composite glass with 10 vol.% NiO appeared to be a good candidate for SOFC sealing.

  8. Thick sequences of silicate and carbonate rocks of sedimentary origin in North America an interim report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, John David

    1956-01-01

    Thick sequences of silicate and carbonate rocks of sedimentary origin have been investigated in 64 areas in North America. The areas containing the thickest and most homogeneous stratigraphic sections more than 1,000 feet thick, buried at depths greater than 10,000 feet are: 1. Uinta Basin, Utah, where the Mancos shale is 1,300 to 5,000 feet thick, the Weber sandstone is 1,000 to 1,600 feet thick, and Mississippian limestones are 1,000 to 1,500 feet thick. 2. Washakie Basin, Wyoming, and Sand Wash Ba.sin, Colorado, where the Lewis shale is 1,000 to 2,000 feet thick and the Cody-Mancos shale is 4,500 to 5,500 feet thick. 3. Green River Basin, Wyoming, where the Cody-Hilliard-Baxter-Mancos shale sequence averages more than 3,000 feet, the siltstone and shale of the Chugwater formation totals 1,000 feet, and the Madison limestone ranges from 1,000 to 1,400 feet thick. 4. Red Desert (Great Divide) Basin, Wyoming, where the Cody shale is 4,000 feet thick. 5. Hanna Basin, Wyoming, where the Steele shale is 4,500 feet thick. 6. Wind River Basin, Wyoming, where the Cody shale is 3,600 to 5,000 feet thick. Geochemical characteristics of these rocks in these areas are poorly known but are being investigated. A summary of the most pertinent recent ana1yses is presented.

  9. Oxygen isotope geochemistry of the silicic volcanic rocks of the Etendeka-Parana province: Source constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, C.; Milner, S.C.; Armstrong, R.A. ); Whittingham, A.M. )

    1990-11-01

    Oxygen isotope ratios of pyroxene phenocrysts in the silicic volcanic rocks from the Cretaceous Etendeka-Parana flood basalt province (Namibia, South America) are believed to reflect the {delta}{sup 18}O values of the original magmas. The authors recognize a high {delta}{sup 18}O value type ({delta}{sup 18}O pyroxene {approximately} +10{per thousand}) found in the south of both regions, and a low {delta}{sup 18}O value type ({delta}{sup 18}O pyroxene {approximately} +6.5{per thousand}) found in the north. Other differences between thee two rhyolite types include higher concentrations of incompatible elements and lower initial {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios in the low {delta}{sup 18}O value type. The authors suggest that the regional distribution of rhyolite types reflects differences in source composition, which can best be explained if the sources are lower crustal, Late Proterozoic mobile belt material (high {delta}{sup 18}O) and Archean lower crust (low {delta}{sup 18}O).

  10. Photoelectrochemical reduction of CO{sub 2} using silicate rock powder

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, Kiyohisa; Ohguchi, Youko; Kaneco, Satochi

    1996-12-31

    Until now, numerous investigators have reported chemical fixation of carbon dioxide, such as electrochemical, photochemical and photoelectrochemical reductions. In these methods, relatively, a few studies on the photoelectrochemical conversion of CO{sub 2} have been reported. We have recently presented a photochemical reduction of carbon dioxide and hydrogen formation by using andesite sands as a photocatalyst under sunlight irradiation. At ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure, 6.5 {times} 10{sup -2} ml g{sup -1} methane and 7.0 {times} 10{sup -2} ml g{sup -1} of hydrogen were formed from carbon dioxide and water on the andesite. This report presents the photoelectrochemical reduction of CO{sub 2} using silicate rock (andesite) powder suspended in water. Carbon dioxide is the end product to complete combustion of all fossil fuels. The generation of carbon dioxide is the primary cause for the greenhouse effect. However, carbon dioxide is a potential carbon source. To utilize such a plentiful carbon source, it has been considered carbon dioxide as a feedstock for organic synthesis of carbonyl- and carboxyl-containing compounds or as an oxidant for oxidative synthesis of more valuable organics.

  11. Corundum-group minerals in rocks of the Khibiny alkaline pluton, Kola Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailova, Yu. A.; Konopleva, N. G.; Yakovenchuk, V. N.; Ivanyuk, G. Yu.; Men'shikov, Yu. P.; Pakhomovsky, Ya. A.

    2007-12-01

    Five minerals of the corundum group have been identified in the Khibiny pluton with certainty. Corundum proper and karelianite occur only in hornfels after volcanic and sedimentary rocks. Xenoliths of hornfels mark the ring faults that bound foidalite within the field of foyaite. Hematite occurs in hydrothermally altered nepheline syenite and crosscutting hydrothermal veins related to the ring faults. Minerals of the ilmenite-pyrophanite series are present in all rocks of the pluton, including veins. Accessory ilmenite in foyaite varies from the manganese variety and pyrophanite in the inner and outer parts of the pluton to manganese-free ilmenite in zone of the Main Ring Fault. In xenoliths of volcanic rocks and alkaline ultramafic rocks, ilmenite is enriched in magnesium. The zoning in distribution of the above-mentioned minerals and the character of variation in their compositions from margins of the pluton to its center are consistent with the petrochemical zoning formed as a result of foyaite alteration of near ring faults.

  12. Matrix diffusion of some alkali- and alkaline earth-metals in granitic rock

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, H.; Byegaard, J.; Skarnemark, G.; Skaalberg, M.

    1997-12-31

    Static through-diffusion experiments were performed to study the diffusion of alkali- and alkaline earth-metals in fine-grained granite and medium-grained Aespoe-diorite. Tritiated water was used as an inert reference tracer. Radionuclides of the alkali- and alkaline earth-metals (mono- and divalent elements which are not influenced by hydrolysis in the pH-range studied) were used as tracers, i.e., {sup 22}Na{sup +}, {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} and {sup 85}Sr{sup 2+}. The effective diffusivity and the rock capacity factor were calculated by fitting the breakthrough curve to the one-dimensional solution of the diffusion equation. Sorption coefficients, K{sub d}, that were derived from the rock capacity factor (diffusion experiments) were compared with K{sub d} determined in batch experiments using crushed material of different size fractions. The results show that the tracers were retarded in the same order as was expected from the measured batch K{sub d}. Furthermore, the largest size fraction was the most representative when comparing batch K{sub d} with K{sub d} evaluated from the diffusion experiments. The observed effective diffusivities tended to decrease with increasing cell lengths, indicating that the transport porosity decreases with increasing sample lengths used in the diffusion experiments.

  13. Crystal chemistry of clinopyroxene from alkaline undersaturated rocks of the Monte Vulture Volcano, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindi, Luca; Cellai, Daniela; Melluso, Leone; Conticelli, Sandro; Morra, Vincenzo; Menchetti, Silvio

    1999-02-01

    The Monte Vulture is a Late Pleistocene stratovolcano, composed of highly undersaturated alkaline potassic to ultrapotassic rocks belonging to the Roman Magmatic Province. These rocks are notably richer in Na 2O if compared to similar rocks of the Roman Province. Two distinct magmatic Series have been recognized: (1) feldspar-bearing series, ranging from basanite to phonolite, and a volumetrically subordinate (2) feldspar-free series, consisting of melilitite, melafoidite, and haüynophyre. The clinopyroxene compositions of the feldspar-bearing series ranges from diopside to ferro-salite (hedenbergite), and shows, from basanite to phonotephrite, increasing FeO tot, Al 2O 3, and TiO 2 and decreasing of MgO contents. Clinopyroxene in basanites and tephrites has generally high Fe 3+ contents, which is typical for clinopyroxene from the Roman Province. Clinopyroxene of the feldspar-free series shows a more restricted variation in MgO, and has often very high Al 2O 3, FeO tot, and TiO 2 contents. In all the crystals examined the Al 3+ content is high and is present mostly on the T site and for a minor part on the M1 site. The M1-O2 distance shows a good correlation with the R M13+ content; clinopyroxene from basanites (feldspar-bearing series) has the lowest R M13+ and that from melilitite and haüynophyre (feldspar-free series) the highest R M13+ contents. Clinopyroxene crystals from feldspar-free rocks have smaller M1 and larger T polyhedral volumes when compared to those in olivine-melilitites and melilitites (kamafugites) from Umbria, but they show similar polyhedral volumes as clinopyroxene crystals from leucite-bearing rocks. Although clinopyroxene from feldspar-free rocks has small M1 volumes due to the high R 3+ contents, M1 volumes of clinopyroxene from melilitites are larger than expected because of the higher (Fe 3+/Al 3+) M1 values. This larger M1 volume of clinopyroxene in melilitites causes a shortening of and a lengthening of the M2-O3 distance

  14. Unusual evolution of silica-under- and -oversaturated alkaline rocks in the Cenozoic Ambohimirahavavy Complex (Madagascar): Mineralogical and geochemical evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrade, Guillaume; Béziat, Didier; Salvi, Stefano; Tiepolo, Massimo; Paquette, Jean-Louis; Rakotovao, Soatsitohaina

    2014-10-01

    The almost unknown Ambohimirahavavy ring complex in the Cenozoic alkaline province of northwestern Madagascar has recently attracted considerable interest because of the discovery of important rare-metal mineralization. The complex consists of arc-shaped bodies made up of silica-under- and -oversaturated syenites and extremely evolved peralkaline granitic dykes, as well as several mafic to felsic volcanic units, including basalt, phonolite and trachyte, all of which have an alkaline affinity. Uranium-lead zircon ages of 24.2 ± 0.6 Ma and 23.5 ± 6.8 Ma have been obtained for nepheline syenites and peralkaline granitic dykes, respectively, which, together with field data and ages of neighboring complexes, support emplacement controlled by regional lithospheric structures, rather than an evolving hot spot. Whole-rock major and trace-element and Sr-Nd isotopic data for the mafic suite suggest that the parental melt of this complex was generated by low degrees of melting of a metasomatized mantle source with residual amphibole. Fractional crystallization of this alkali basaltic melt likely produced the silica-undersaturated suite. We propose that the silica-oversaturated suite evolved from the undersaturated melt after contamination of the latter by crustal material. Further evolution to peralkaline compositions in both suites is attributed mainly to plagioclase and alkali feldspar segregation. Nepheline and feldspar compositions, as well as considerations of mineral equilibria among mafic silicates and Fe-Ti oxide minerals indicate crystallization temperatures of 1000 to 700 °C and an oxygen fugacity of 0.4 to 0.8 log units below the fayalite-magnetite-quartz (FMQ) buffer at 1 kbar for the silica-undersaturated melt, and temperatures of 860 to 570 °C and an oxygen fugacity of 1.5 to 3.8 log units below FMQ for the oversaturated syenitic melt. The undersaturated melt evolved towards a more peralkaline composition. Crystallization of arfvedsonite plus aegirine

  15. Geochemistry and diagenesis of Miocene lacustrine siliceous sedimentary and pyroclastic rocks, Mytilinii basin, Samos Island, Greece

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stamatakis, M.G.; Hein, J.R.; Magganas, A.C.

    1989-01-01

    A Late Miocene non-marine stratigraphic sequence composed of limestone, opal-CT-bearing limestone, porcelanite, marlstone, diatomaceous marlstone, dolomite, and tuffite crops out on eastern Samos Island. This lacustrine sequence is subdivided into the Hora Beds and the underlying Pythagorion Formation. The Hora Beds is overlain by the clastic Mytilinii series which contains Turolian (Late Miocene) mammalian fossils. The lacustrine sequence contains volcanic glass and the silica polymorphs opal-A, opal-CT, and quartz. Volcanic glass predominantly occurs in tuffaceous rocks from the lower and upper parts of the lacustrine sequence. Opal-A (diatom frustules) is confined to layers in the upper part of the Hora Beds. Beds rich in opal-CT underlie those containing opal-A. The occurrence of opal-CT is extensive, encompassing the lower Hora Beds and the sedimentary rocks and tuffs of the Pythagorion Formation. A transition zone between the opal-A and opal-CT zones is identified by X-ray diffraction patterns that are intermediate between those of opal-CT and opal-A, perhaps due to a mixture of the two polymorphs. Diagenesis was not advanced enough for opal-CT to transform to quartz or for volcanic glass to transform to opal-C. Based on geochemical and mineralogical data, we suggest that the rate of diagenetic transformation of opal-A to opal-CT was mainly controlled by the chemistry of pore fluids. Pore fluids were characterized by high salinity, moderately high alkalinity, and high magnesium ion activity. These pore fluid characteristics are indicated by the presence of evaporitic salts (halite, sylvite, niter), high boron content in biogenic silica, and by dolomite in both the opal-A and opal-CT-bearing beds. The absence of authigenic K-feldspar, borosilicates, and zeolites also support these pore fluid characteristics. Additional factors that influenced the rate of silica diagenesis were host rock lithology and the relatively high heat flow in the Aegean region from

  16. Sensitized red luminescence from Ce{sup 3+}, Mn{sup 2+}-doped glaserite-type alkaline-earth silicates

    SciTech Connect

    Yonesaki, Yoshinori; Takei, Takahiro; Kumada, Nobuhiro; Kinomura, Nobukazu

    2010-06-15

    Bright red luminescence is observed from Ce, Mn-doped glaserite-type alkaline-earth silicates with M{sub 2}BaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 8} (M: Ba, Sr, Ca) chemical composition. Under UV excitation, Ce-doped M{sub 2}BaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 8} exhibits strong near-UV emission with asymmetric peak shape. UV-excited Mn-doped M{sub 2}BaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 8} compounds show visible red emission only when Ce{sup 3+} ions are doped together. These results indicate that Mn{sup 2+}-derived red emission is caused by an efficient energy transfer from Ce{sup 3+} to Mn{sup 2+}. The red emission becomes intense with an increase in Ba-amount. This trend originates from the relaxation of the selection rule for 3d-3d transition in Mn{sup 2+} ions, which is caused by the structural deformation due to Ba{sup 2+} occupation for layer-pockets. - Graphical abstract: Glaserite-type red emitting phosphor, M{sub 2}BaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 8}: Ce{sup 3+}, Mn{sup 2+} (M: Ba, Sr, Ca), was prepared by solid state reaction. Under UV excitation, Mn{sup 2+}-derived red emission is observed from the compounds only when Ce{sup 3+} ions are codoped, indicating that the red emission is caused by an energy transfer from Ce{sup 3+} to Mn{sup 2+}.

  17. Defining the Magnetic Field of the Early Earth Through Rock Magnetic and Paleomagnetic Analyses of Single Silicate Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauch, D. G.; Tarduno, J. A.; Cottrell, R. D.; Watkeys, M. K.

    2005-12-01

    The current uncertainty on the age of the inner core, and its role in the geodynamo, highlights the need for improved paleomagnetic constraints based on Proterozoic to Archean-age rocks. However, most of the rocks available for sampling have seen low-grade metamorphic conditions; extreme care is needed in selecting suitable samples, conducting rock magnetic and paleomagnetic analyses, and interpreting the results. David Dunlop's many contributions in rock magnetism, from efforts to understand the time-temperature characteristics crucial for the preservation of magnetizations, to more recent work defining the domain state and recording characteristics of mafic minerals separated from dikes, have greatly assisted our efforts to learn more about the early magnetic field. Here we present new rock magnetic, paleomagnetic and paleointensity data from single silicate crystals separated from plutonic rocks of the Kaapvaal Craton of southern Africa. Magnetic hysteresis data demonstrates that different silicate minerals from these rocks have magnetic inclusions with vastly different magnetic domain states, suggesting that their potential to preserve primary magnetizations should vary considerably. In particular hornblende carries multidomain inclusions, whereas quartz and microcline have single to pseudo-single domain inclusions. Warming of an SIRM acquired at low temperatures (data acquired using the MPMS at the IRM) shows the Verwey transition for quartz and microcline crystals, indicating the presence of magnetite. We also will present joint paleomagnetic and paleointensity data derived from oriented crystals obtained using a stepwise CO2 laser heating approach, and field tests of the age of magnetization. These analyses will be used to discuss the strength of the mid-Archean field (3.0-3.6 Ga), its geometry and variation, and the implications for magnetic shielding in the early Earth.

  18. Melting of the primitive martian mantle at 0.5-2.2 GPa and the origin of basalts and alkaline rocks on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collinet, Max; Médard, Etienne; Charlier, Bernard; Vander Auwera, Jacqueline; Grove, Timothy L.

    2015-10-01

    We have performed piston-cylinder experiments on a primitive martian mantle composition between 0.5 and 2.2 GPa and 1160 to 1550 °C. The composition of melts and residual minerals constrain the possible melting processes on Mars at 50 to 200 km depth under nominally anhydrous conditions. Silicate melts produced by low degrees of melting (<10 wt.%) were analyzed in layers of vitreous carbon spheres or in micro-cracks inside the graphite capsule. The total range of melt fractions investigated extends from 5 to 50 wt.%, and the liquids produced display variable SiO2 (43.7-59.0 wt.%), MgO (5.3-18.6 wt.%) and Na2O + K2O (1.0-6.5 wt.%) contents. We provide a new equation to estimate the solidus temperature of the martian mantle: T (°C) = 1033 + 168.1 P (GPa) - 14.22P2 (GPa), which places the solidus 50 °C below that of fertile terrestrial peridotites. Low- and high-degree melts are compared to martian alkaline rocks and basalts, respectively. We suggest that the parental melt of Adirondack-class basalts was produced by ∼25 wt.% melting of the primitive martian mantle at 1.5 GPa (∼135 km) and ∼1400 °C. Despite its brecciated nature, NWA 7034/7533 might be composed of material that initially crystallized from a primary melt produced by ∼10-30 wt.% melting at the same pressure. Other igneous rocks from Mars require mantle reservoirs with different CaO/Al2O3 and FeO/MgO ratios or the action of fractional crystallization. Alkaline rocks can be derived from mantle sources with alkali contents (∼0.5 wt.%) similar to the primitive mantle.

  19. Origin of metaluminous and alkaline volcanic rocks of the Latir volcanic field, northern Rio Grande rift, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Clark M.; Lipman, Peter W.

    1988-09-01

    Volcanic rocks of the Latir volcanic field evolved in an open system by crystal fractionation, magma mixing, and crustal assimilation. Early high-SiO2 rhyolites (28.5 Ma) fractionated from intermediate compositionmagmas that did not reach the surface. Most precaldera lavas have intermediate-compositions, from olivine basaltic-andesite (53% SiO2) to quartz latite (67% SiO2). The precaldera intermediate-composition lavas have anomalously high Ni and MgO contents and reversely zoned hornblende and augite phenocrysts, indicating mixing between primitive basalts and fractionated magmas. Isotopic data indicate that all of the intermediate-composition rocks studied contain large crustal components, although xenocrysts are found only in one unit. Inception of alkaline magmatism (alkalic dacite to high-SiO2 peralkaline rhyolite) correlates with, initiation of regional extension approximately 26 Ma ago. The Questa caldera formed 26.5 Ma ago upon eruption of the >500 km3 high-SiO2 peralkaline Amalia Tuff. Phenocryst compositions preserved in the cogenetic peralkaline granite suggest that the Amalia Tuff magma initially formed from a trace element-enriched, high-alkali metaluminous magma; isotopic data suggest that the parental magmas contain a large crustal component. Degassing of water- and halogen-rich alkali basalts may have provided sufficient volatile transport of alkalis and other elements into the overlying silicic magma chamber to drive the Amalia Tuff magma to peralkaline compositions. Trace element variations within the Amalia Tuff itself may be explained solely by 75% crystal fractionation of the observed phenocrysts. Crystal settling, however, is inconsistent with mineralogical variations in the tuff, and crystallization is thought to have occurred at a level below that tapped by the eruption. Spatially associated Miocene (15-11 Ma) lavas did not assimilate large amounts of crust or mix with primitive basaltic magmas. Both mixing and crustal assimilation processes

  20. Origin of metaluminous and alkaline volcanic rocks of the Latir volcanic field, northern Rio Grande rift, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.M.; Lipman, P.W.

    1988-01-01

    Volcanic rocks of the Latir volcanic field evolved in an open system by crystal fractionation, magma mixing, and crustal assimilation. Early high-SiO2 rhyolites (28.5 Ma) fractionated from intermediate compositionmagmas that did not reach the surface. Most precaldera lavas have intermediate-compositions, from olivine basaltic-andesite (53% SiO2) to quartz latite (67% SiO2). The precaldera intermediate-composition lavas have anomalously high Ni and MgO contents and reversely zoned hornblende and augite phenocrysts, indicating mixing between primitive basalts and fractionated magmas. Isotopic data indicate that all of the intermediate-composition rocks studied contain large crustal components, although xenocrysts are found only in one unit. Inception of alkaline magmatism (alkalic dacite to high-SiO2 peralkaline rhyolite) correlates with, initiation of regional extension approximately 26 Ma ago. The Questa caldera formed 26.5 Ma ago upon eruption of the >500 km3 high-SiO2 peralkaline Amalia Tuff. Phenocryst compositions preserved in the cogenetic peralkaline granite suggest that the Amalia Tuff magma initially formed from a trace element-enriched, high-alkali metaluminous magma; isotopic data suggest that the parental magmas contain a large crustal component. Degassing of water- and halogen-rich alkali basalts may have provided sufficient volatile transport of alkalis and other elements into the overlying silicic magma chamber to drive the Amalia Tuff magma to peralkaline compositions. Trace element variations within the Amalia Tuff itself may be explained solely by 75% crystal fractionation of the observed phenocrysts. Crystal settling, however, is inconsistent with mineralogical variations in the tuff, and crystallization is thought to have occurred at a level below that tapped by the eruption. Spatially associated Miocene (15-11 Ma) lavas did not assimilate large amounts of crust or mix with primitive basaltic magmas. Both mixing and crustal assimilation processes

  1. The Chon Aike province of Patagonia and related rocks in West Antarctica: A silicic large igneous province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankhurst, R. J.; Leat, P. T.; Sruoga, P.; Rapela, C. W.; Márquez, M.; Storey, B. C.; Riley, T. R.

    1998-04-01

    The field occurrence, age, classification and geochemistry of the Mesozoic volcanic rocks of Patagonia and West Antarctica are reviewed, using published and new information. Dominated by rhyolitic ignimbrites, which form a bimodal association with minor mafic and intermediate lavas, these constitute one of the largest silicic igneous provinces known, equivalent in size to many mafic LIPs. Diachronism is recognized between the Early-Middle Jurassic volcanism of eastern Patagonia (Marifil and Chon Aike formations) and the Middle Jurassic-earliest Cretaceous volcanism of the Andean Cordillera (El Quemado, Ibañez and Tobı´fera formations). This is accompanied by a change in geochemical characteristics, from relatively high-Zr and -Nb types in the east to subalkaline arc-related rocks in the west, although the predominance of rhyolites remains a constant factor. All of the associated mafic rocks are well fractionated compared to direct mantle derivatives. Petrogenetic models favour partial melting of immature lower crust as a result of the intrusion of basaltic magmas, possibly with some hybridisation of the liquids and subsequent fractionation by crystal settling or solidification and remelting. The formation of large amounts of intracrustal silicic melt acted as a density barrier against the further rise of mafic magmas, which are thus rare in the province.

  2. The Distribution and Composition Characteristics of Siliceous Rocks from Qinzhou Bay-Hangzhou Bay Joint Belt, South China: Constraint on the Tectonic Evolution of Plates in South China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongzhong; Zhai, Mingguo; Zhang, Lianchang; Zhou, Yongzhang; Yang, Zhijun; He, Junguo; Liang, Jin; Zhou, Liuyu

    2013-01-01

    The Qinzhou Bay-Hangzhou Bay joint belt is a significant tectonic zone between the Yangtze and Cathaysian plates, where plentiful hydrothermal siliceous rocks are generated. Here, the authors studied the distribution of the siliceous rocks in the whole tectonic zone, which indicated that the tensional setting was facilitating the development of siliceous rocks of hydrothermal genesis. According to the geochemical characteristics, the Neopalaeozoic siliceous rocks in the north segment of the Qinzhou Bay-Hangzhou Bay joint belt denoted its limited width. In comparison, the Neopalaeozoic Qinzhou Bay-Hangzhou Bay joint belt was diverse for its ocean basin in the different segments and possibly had subduction only in the south segment. The ocean basin of the north and middle segments was limited in its width without subduction and possibly existed as a rift trough that was unable to resist the terrigenous input. In the north segment of the Qinzhou Bay-Hangzhou Bay joint belt, the strata of hydrothermal siliceous rocks in Dongxiang copper-polymetallic ore deposit exhibited alternative cycles with the marine volcanic rocks, volcanic tuff, and metal sulphide. These sedimentary systems were formed in different circumstances, whose alternative cycles indicated the release of internal energy in several cycles gradually from strong to weak. PMID:24302882

  3. The distribution and composition characteristics of siliceous rocks from Qinzhou Bay-Hangzhou Bay joint belt, South China: constraint on the tectonic evolution of plates in South China.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongzhong; Zhai, Mingguo; Zhang, Lianchang; Zhou, Yongzhang; Yang, Zhijun; He, Junguo; Liang, Jin; Zhou, Liuyu

    2013-01-01

    The Qinzhou Bay-Hangzhou Bay joint belt is a significant tectonic zone between the Yangtze and Cathaysian plates, where plentiful hydrothermal siliceous rocks are generated. Here, the authors studied the distribution of the siliceous rocks in the whole tectonic zone, which indicated that the tensional setting was facilitating the development of siliceous rocks of hydrothermal genesis. According to the geochemical characteristics, the Neopalaeozoic siliceous rocks in the north segment of the Qinzhou Bay-Hangzhou Bay joint belt denoted its limited width. In comparison, the Neopalaeozoic Qinzhou Bay-Hangzhou Bay joint belt was diverse for its ocean basin in the different segments and possibly had subduction only in the south segment. The ocean basin of the north and middle segments was limited in its width without subduction and possibly existed as a rift trough that was unable to resist the terrigenous input. In the north segment of the Qinzhou Bay-Hangzhou Bay joint belt, the strata of hydrothermal siliceous rocks in Dongxiang copper-polymetallic ore deposit exhibited alternative cycles with the marine volcanic rocks, volcanic tuff, and metal sulphide. These sedimentary systems were formed in different circumstances, whose alternative cycles indicated the release of internal energy in several cycles gradually from strong to weak. PMID:24302882

  4. Magmatic origin of alkaline meta-igneous rocks from Chamberlindalen, SW Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goluchowska, Karolina; Barker, Abigail; Manecki, Maciej; Czerny, Jerzy; Majka, Jaroslaw

    2014-05-01

    This study focuses on the late Neoproterozoic meta-igneous rocks of SW Svalbard to determine their magmatic evolution, conditions of magma storage and origin. The samples from the Chamberlindalen area form an alkaline igneous suite, from which thin dikes and intrusive bodies have been collected. The rocks in question intrude Late Neoproterozoic metasediments and are surrounded by occurrences of Neoproterozoic metabasalts in contrast to highly alkaline the Chamberlindalen intrusions. The rocks from Chamberlindalen are divided into two groups based on their geochemistry, mineralogy and field relationships. The dikes, classify as minettes, belonging to the lamprophyre group and contain mainly euhedral, elongated phlogopite and additionally clinopyroxene and feldspar. The rest of the samples are highly magnesian and are classified as alkali gabbro. The alkali gabbros contain primary magmatic minerals such as clinopyroxene, calcic amphibole and mica in different proportions. The alkali gabbros are enriched in LREE and HFSE and depleted in P, K and HREE. The minette dikes are always more enriched in HFSE and REE in comparison to the alkali gabbros. The mineral chemistry of the alkali gabbros reveals that pyroxenes are represented by diopside with Wo46-51 En35-46 Fs6-14, and calcic amphibole by kaersutite. The Mg# number for diopside is from 72 - 88, whereas for kaersutite Mg# number is 51 - 74. Thermobarometry calculations for diopside and kaersutite have been performed. In the alkali gabbros from Chamberlindalen, diopside crystallized between 0.7 - 8 kbar and 1152 - 1233°C. Results for kaersutite reveal that they crystallized between 5 - 17 kbar and 1043 - 1215°C. For diopside the main crystallization was between 10 and 38 km, whereas for kaersutite, the main crystallization was between 30 and 50 km. Clinopyroxene and minor kaersutite also show a zone of crystallization at 2 to 10 km. This reflects a main crystallization zone at 10 - 50 km throughout the continental

  5. Valid garnet biotite (GB) geothermometry and garnet aluminum silicate plagioclase quartz (GASP) geobarometry in metapelitic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chun-Ming; Cheng, Ben-He

    2006-06-01

    At present there are many calibrations of both the garnet-biotite (GB) thermometer and the garnet-aluminum silicate-plagioclase-quartz (GASP) barometer that may confuse geologists in choosing a reliable thermometer and/or barometer. To test the accuracy of the GB thermometers we have applied the various GB thermometers to reproduce the experimental data and data from natural metapelitic rocks of various prograde sequences, inverted metamorphic zones and thermal contact aureoles. We have concluded that the four GB thermometers (Perchuk, L.L., Lavrent'eva, I.V., 1983. Experimental investigation of exchange equilibria in the system cordierite-garnet-biotite. In: Saxena, S.K. (ed.) Kinetics and equilibrium in mineral reactions. Springer-Verlag New York, Berlin, Heidelberg. pp. 199-239.; Kleemann, U., Reinhardt, J., 1994. Garnet-biotite thermometry revised: the effect of Al VI and Ti in biotite. European Journal of Mineralogy 6, 925-941.; Holdaway, M.J., 2000. Application of new experimental and garnet Margules data to the garnet-biotite geothermometer. American Mineralogist 85, 881-892., Model 6AV; Kaneko, Y., Miyano, T., 2004. Recalibration of mutually consistent garnet-biotite and garnet-cordierite geothermometers. Lithos 73, 255-269. Model B) are the most valid and reliable of this kind of thermometer. More specifically, we prefer the Holdaway (Holdaway, M.J., 2000. Application of new experimental and garnet Margules data to the garnet-biotite geothermometer. American Mineralogist 85, 881-892.) and the Kleemann and Reinhardt (Kleemann, U., Reinhardt, J., 1994. Garnet-biotite thermometry revised: the effect of Al VI and Ti in biotite. European Journal of Mineralogy 6, 925-941.) calibrations due to their small errors in reproducing the experimental temperatures and good accuracy in successfully discerning the systematic temperature changes of the different sequences. In addition, after applying the GASP barometer to 335 natural metapelitic samples containing one kind

  6. Metal-Silicate Segregation in Deforming Dunitic Rocks: Applications to Core Formation in Europa and Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hustoft, J. W.; Kohlstedt, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    Core formation is an important event in the evolution of a planetary body, affecting both the geochemical and geophysical properties of the body. Metal-silicate segregation could have proceeded either by settling of liquid metal through a magma ocean or by percolation of liquid metal through a solid silicate mantle. Percolation of metallic melt had previously been excluded as a viable segregation mechanism because metallic melts do not form an interconnected network under hydrostatic conditions, except at high melt fraction (>5 vol%), due to the high dihedral angle between metals and silicates (>60 ). Without an interconnected network, porous flow of metallic melt is impossible, leaving the magma ocean scenario as the only mechanism to form the core. Moment-of-inertia measurements of Europa and Ganymede from the Galileo probe indicate that they are differentiated. This evidence suggests that a method for segregating metals and silicates at temperatures low enough to retain volatile compounds must exist. We have investigated the effect of deformation on the distribution of metallic melts in silicates. We have deformed samples of olivine + 5-9 vol% Fe-S to strains of 2.5 in simple shear and find that the metallic melt segregates into melt-rich planes oriented at 20 to the shear plane. These metallic melt-rich bands are similar in structure to the silicate melt-rich bands reported by Holtzman, indicating that deformation can interconnect isolated metallic melt pockets and allow porous flow of non-wetting melts. Such a core formation process could have occurred in the jovian satellites.

  7. Phase-equilibrium geobarometers for silicic rocks based on rhyolite-MELTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualda, G. A.; Ghiorso, M. S.; Begue, F.; Pamukcu, A. S.; Gravley, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    Constraining the pressure of crystallization of magmas is an important but elusive task. We propose here a method to derive crystallization pressures for rocks that preserve glass compositions (either glass inclusions or matrix glass) representative of equilibration between melt, quartz, and 1 or 2 feldspars. The method relies on the shift of the quartz-feldspar saturation surface towards higher silica with decreasing pressure. The critical realization is that melt, quartz and feldspars need to be in equilibrium at the liquidus for the melt composition of interest. Thus, this method consists of calculating the saturation surfaces for quartz and feldspars using rhyolite-MELTS over a range of pressures, and searching for the pressure at which the expected assemblage (quartz+1 feldspar or quartz+2 feldspars) is found at the liquidus. We evaluate errors resulting from uncertainties in glass composition using Monte Carlo simulations, which reveal errors of ~20-45 MPa for the quartz+2 feldspars constraint and of ~25-100 MPa for the quartz+1 feldspar constraint; actual errors are likely closer to the lower bounds of these ranges. We demonstrate that the effect of fluid-saturation is more important at higher pressures (~300 MPa) than at lower pressures (~100 MPa), but reasonable pressure estimates can be derived irrespective of fluid saturation for geologically relevant H2O concentrations (>3 wt. %). And, we show that pressures calculated using the rhyolite-MELTS geobarometer compare well with those resulting from H2O-CO2 glass inclusion barometry and Al-in-hornblende barometry for an array of natural systems for which data has been compiled from the literature. We apply the rhyolite-MELTS barometer to three systems we are currently studying in detail: (1) For the Bishop Tuff (CA, USA), we find that quartz-hosted glass inclusion compositions yield indistinguishable crystallization pressures for early-erupted and late-erupted pumice, consistent with the Bishop Tuff having

  8. The flame photometric determination of calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, H.

    1957-01-01

    A flame photometric method of determining calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate locks has been developed Aluminum and phosphate interference was overcome by the addition of a large excess of magnesium. The method is rapid and suitable for routine analysis Results obtained are within ?? 2% of the calcium oxide content. ?? 1957.

  9. La-Ce and Sm-Nd systematics of siliceous sedimentary rocks: A clue to marine environment in their deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Hiroshi Shimizu; Masayo Amano; Akimasa Masuda )

    1991-04-01

    La-Ce isotopic data, together with Sm-Nd isotopic data, were determined on siliceous sedimentary rocks (cherts) in order to elucidate the rare earth element (REE) character of their sources and the nature of their depositional environments. The cherts studied are a late Archean chert from the Gorge Creek Group in the Pilbara block of Western Australia, Triassic cherts from central Japan, and Cretaceous and Paleogene deep-sea cherts from the central Pacific and the Caribbean Sea. The Archean chert from the Gorge Creek Group shows chondritic Ce and Nd isotope ratios at its sedimentation age which indicate that its sources had a time-integrated chondritic REE pattern. Triassic cherts from Japan have initial Ce and Nd isotope ratios that show a direct derivation from their continental source. On the other hand, for Cretaceous and Paleogene deep-sea cherts having negative Ce anomalies in their REE patterns, two different sources for Ce and Nd are revealed from their initial Ce and Nd isotope data: Ce from long-term light-REE-depleted oceanic volcanic rocks and Nd from light-REE-enriched continental rocks. The reverse nature observed for deep-sea cherts is considered to be a reflection of their depositional environment far from a continent. These results confirm that the La-Ce isotope system is highly useful in determining the nature and cause of Ce anomalies observed in marine sedimentary rocks such as chert.

  10. Lack of marked cyto- and genotoxicity of cristobalite in devitrified (heated) alkaline earth silicate wools in short-term assays with cultured primary rat alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ziemann, Christina; Harrison, Paul T C; Bellmann, Bernd; Brown, Robert C; Zoitos, Bruce K; Class, Philippe

    2014-02-01

    Alkaline earth silicate (AES) wools are low-biopersistence high-temperature insulation wools. Following prolonged periods at high temperatures they may devitrify, producing crystalline silica (CS) polymorphs, including cristobalite, classified as carcinogenic to humans. Here we investigated the cytotoxic and genotoxic significance of cristobalite present in heated AES wools. Primary rat alveolar macrophages were incubated in vitro for 2 h with 200 µg/cm² unheated/heated calcium magnesium silicate wools (CMS1, CMS2, CMS3; heat-treated for 1 week at, or 4 weeks 150 °C below, their respective classification temperatures) or magnesium silicate wool (MS; heated for 24 h at 1260 °C). Types and quantities of CS formed, and fiber size distribution and shape were determined by X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. Lactate dehydrogenase release and alkaline and hOGG1-modified comet assays were used, ± aluminum lactate (known to quench CS effects), for cytotoxicity/genotoxicity screening. Cristobalite content of wools increased with heating temperature and duration, paralleled by decreases in fiber length and changes in fiber shape. No marked cytotoxicity, and nearly no (CMS) or only slight (MS) DNA-strand break induction was observed, compared to the CS-negative control Al₂O₃, whereas DQ12 as CS-positive control was highly active. Some samples induced slight oxidative DNA damage, but no biological endpoint significantly correlated with free CS, quartz, or cristobalite. In conclusion, heating of AES wools mediates changes in CS content and fiber length/shape. While changes in fiber morphology can impact biological activity, cristobalite content appears minor or of no relevance to the intrinsic toxicity of heated AES wools in short-term assays with rat alveolar macrophages. PMID:24495247

  11. Suitability of alkaline leaching and etching experiments in the quantification of ASR potential of quartz-rich rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchařová, Aneta; Šachlová, Šárka; Pertold, Zdeněk; Přikryl, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Three groups of methods are conventionally applied in the assessment of the susceptibility of aggregates used in concrete to be affected by alkali-silica reaction (ASR). The most frequently employed expansion tests (accelerated mortar bar test and concrete prism test, e.g. ASTM C1260, RILEM AAR2, RILEM AAR4.1) quantify ASR potential of aggregates according to the expansion values of mortar bars (resp. concrete prisms) measured after certain testing time period. Petrographic methods are based on the quantification of alkali-reactive phases by polarizing microscopy (e.g. RILEM AAR1). Chemical methods quantify ASR potential according to the amount of Si4+ dissolved into alkaline solution combined with the reduction of alkalinity of the solution (e.g. ASTM C289). The current study focused on the comparison of three approaches: the alkaline etching of polished rock sections and standard chemical method (following ASTM C289) with the measuring of expansion values of mortar bars (following ASTM C1260). Various types of quartz and amorphous SiO2 used for the experiments were separated from rock samples of orthoquartzite, quartz meta-greywacke, pegmatite, phyllite, chert, and flint. Polished rock sections (resp. crushed fraction 0.125/0.250) were used and subjected to leaching in 1M NaOH solution at 80°C for 14 days (resp. 24 hours). After alkaline etching in alkaline solution, the rock sections were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive spectrometer. Representative areas were documented in back scattered electron images and quantified using fully-automatic petrographic image analysis. ASR potential of the polished rock sections was evaluated by the vol. % of area affected by alkaline etching. ASR potential of crushed aggregate was estimated by measurements of Si4+ dissolved into the solution versus the reduction of alkalinity of the solution (following ASTM C289). Classification according to the ASTM C289 indicated three of investigated

  12. Experimental high strain-rate deformation products of carbonate-silicate rocks: Comparison with terrestrial impact materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Bogert, C. H.; Schultz, P. H.; Spray, J. G.

    2008-09-01

    Introduction. The response of carbonate to impact processes has thus far been investigated using a combination of thermodynamic modelling, shock experiments, and impact experiments. Localized shear deformation was suggested to play an important role in the failure of carbonate during some shock experiments [1,2], and was invoked to explain significant degassing of carbonates during oblique impact experiments [3]. The results of the impact experiments are at odds with experiments [4] that show back-reaction of CO2 with CaO and MgO could significantly reduce CO2 degassing during impact events. We performed a frictional-welding experiment in order to investigate the effects of high strain-rate deformation on carbonate-silicate target materials, exclusive of shock deformation effects, and to investigate the differing results of other experiments. Samples and Techniques. A frictional melting experiment was performed using dolomitic marble and quartzite samples to simulate conditions during an impact into carbonate-silicate target rocks. The experiment followed the method of Spray (1995) [5]. The 1.5 cm3 samples were mounted onto separate steel cylinders with epoxy. Using a Blacks FWH-3 axial friction-welding rig, the samples were brought into contact at room temperature and under dry conditions with ~5 MPa applied pressure. Contact was maintained for two seconds at 750 rpm for a sustained strain-rate of 102 to 103 s-1. Results. Vapor or fine dust escaped from the interface during the experiment. Immediately after sample separation, the interfaces were incandescent. Once cooled, opaque white material adhered to both the quartzite and dolomitic marble samples. Quartzite sample. Material was injected into cracks that formed in the quartzite sample. Cooling and crystallization of the friction products resulted in the formation of submicron-sized minerals such as periclase and Ca- and Ca,Mg-silicates (Fig. 1) including merwinite and åkermanite. While periclase was observed

  13. Calc-alkaline mafic rocks of the Black Dyke Formation: Remnants of the final activity of a submerged Permian volcano

    SciTech Connect

    Blein, O.; Lapierre, H.; Pecher, A. ); Schweickert, R.A. . Dept. of Geological Science)

    1993-04-01

    The Permian Black Dyke Fm., which occurs as large tectonic slices within the Luning allochthon in the Excelsior Mountains, NV, forms an E-W trending anticline at Black Dyke Mountain. The 800-m thick stratigraphic succession consists of volcanic and pyroclastic rocks overlain conformably by volcaniclastic sediments. Along the northern limb of the anticline, the rocks consist of mafic porphyritic lavas, breccias, and graded and ungraded pyroclastic beds. The sedimentary unit consists of thick volcaniclastic turbidites overlain by conglomerates, sandstones, and mudstones. Along the southern limb of the anticline, the sequence is replaced by reworked breccia, tuffs, and sandstones. Mafic plutonic rocks occur as xenoliths in the lavas and breccias, and as coeval plugs intruding the section. Gabbros show cumulate or porphyritic textures and are composed of amph, cpx, and zoned plag. Their Ti/V (14.5--15) and Nb/Y (0.25--0.3) ratios fall in the range commonly found in calc-alkaline rocks. Diorite porphyry shows high Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], ZrO[sub 2], and REE abundances indicating that this rock is more fractionated. Basalts and andesites are plag-cpx-opx phyric. They often include glomeroporphyritic clots of cpx with amph coronas. Some rocks exhibit fluidal textures. Both volcanic and plutonic rocks show homogeneous geochemical features and similar crystallization sequences: Fe-Ti oxides---->plag---->opx + cpx----> brown zoned hbl, suggesting that they are cogenetic. Thus, the lower part of the Black Dyke Fm. likely represents the final products formed in a calc-alkaline magma chamber because pyroclastic rocks prevail over lava flows and abundant early crystal cumulates occur as plugs or as inclusions in the lavas and breccias.

  14. Cooperative investigation of precision and accuracy: In chemical analysis of silicate rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schlecht, W.G.

    1951-01-01

    This is the preliminary report of the first extensive program ever organized to study the analysis of igneous rocks, a study sponsored by the United States Geological Survey, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the Geophysical Laboratory of the Carnegie Institution of Washington. Large samples of two typical igneous rocks, a granite and a diabase, were carefully prepared and divided. Small samples (about 70 grams) of each were sent to 25 rock-analysis laboratories throughout the world; analyses of one or both samples were reported by 34 analysts in these laboratories. The results, which showed rather large discrepancies, are presented in histograms. The great discordance in results reflects the present unsatisfactory state of rock analysis. It is hoped that the ultimate establishment of standard samples and procedures will contribute to the improvement of quality of analyses. The two rock samples have also been thoroughly studied spectrographically and petrographically. Detailed reports of all the studies will be published.

  15. Neutralization/prevention of acid rock drainage using mixtures of alkaline by-products and sulfidic mine wastes.

    PubMed

    Alakangas, Lena; Andersson, Elin; Mueller, Seth

    2013-11-01

    Backfilling of open pit with sulfidic waste rock followed by inundation is a common method for reducing sulfide oxidation after mine closure. This approach can be complemented by mixing the waste rock with alkaline materials from pulp and steel mills to increase the system's neutralization potential. Leachates from 1 m3 tanks containing sulfide-rich (ca.30 wt %) waste rock formed under dry and water saturated conditions under laboratory conditions were characterized and compared to those formed from mixtures. The waste rock leachate produced an acidic leachate (pH<2) with high concentrations of As (65 mg/L), Cu (6 mg/L), and Zn (150 mg/L) after 258 days. The leachate from water-saturated waste rock had lower concentrations of As and Cu (<2 μg/L), Pb and Zn (20 μg/L and 5 mg/L), respectively, and its pH was around 6. Crushed (<6 mm) waste rock mixed with different fractions (1-5 wt %) of green liquid dregs, fly ash, mesa lime, and argon oxygen decarburization (AOD) slag was leached on a small scale for 65 day, and showed near-neutral pH values, except for mixtures of waste rock with AOD slag and fly ash (5% w/w) which were more basic (pH>9). The decrease of elemental concentration in the leachate was most pronounced for Pb and Zn, while Al and S were relatively high. Overall, the results obtained were promising and suggest that alkaline by-products could be useful additives for minimizing ARD formation. PMID:23740301

  16. Tungsten residence in silicate rocks: implications for interpreting W isotopic compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Pearson, G. D.; Chacko, T.; Luo, Y.

    2015-12-01

    High-precision measurements of W isotopic ratios have boosted recent exploration of early Earth processes from the small W isotope anomalies observable in some Hadean-Archean rocks. However, before applying W isotopic data to understand the geological processes responsible for the formation of these rocks, it is critical to evaluate whether the rocks' present W contents and isotopic compositions reflect that of the protolith or the effects of secondary W addition/mobilization. To investigate this issue, we have carried out in situ concentration measurements of W and other HFSEs in mineral phases and alteration assemblages within a broad spectrum of rocks using LA-ICP-MS. Isotope dilution whole-rock W concentration measurements are used along with modes calculated from mineral and bulk rock major element data to examine the mass balance for W and other elements. In general, W is positively correlated with Nb, Ta, Ti, Sn, Mo and U, indicating similar geochemical behavior. Within granitic gneisses and amphibolites, biotite, hornblende, titanite and ilmenite control the W budget, while plagioclase and k-feldspar have little effect. For granulites, pyroxenites and eclogites, titanite, rutile, ilmenite, magnetite and sulfide, as well as grain boundary alteration assemblages dominate the W budget, while garnet, clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene and plagioclase have little or no W. Within mantle harzburgites and dunites, major phases such as olivine, clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene and spinel/chromite have very low concentrations of W, Nb, Ta, Sn and Mo. Instead, these elements are concentrated along grain boundaries and within sulfide/mss. Mass balance shows that for granitic gneisses and amphibolites, the rock-forming minerals can adequately account for the whole-rock W budget, whereas for ultramafic rocks such as pyroxenites, eclogites and harzburgites and dunites, significant W is hosted along grain boundaries, indicating that metamorphism and melt/fluid metasomatism can

  17. The alkaline and alkaline-carbonatite magmatism from Southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruberti, E.; Gomes, C. D. B.; Comin-Chiaramonti, P.

    2015-12-01

    Early to Late Cretaceous lasting to Paleocene alkaline magmatism from southern Brazil is found associated with major extensional structural features in and around the Paraná Basin and grouped into various provinces on the basis of several data. Magmatism is variable in size, mode of occurrence and composition. The alkaline rocks are dominantly potassic, a few occurrences showing sodic affinity. The more abundant silicate rocks are evolved undersaturated to saturated in silica syenites, displaying large variation in igneous forms. Less evolved types are restricted to subvolcanic environments and outcrops of effusive suites occur rarely. Cumulatic mafic and ultramafic rock types are very common, particularly in the alkali-carbonatitic complexes. Carbonatite bodies are represented by Ca-carbonatites and Mg-carbonatites and more scarcely by Fe-carbonatites. Available radiometric ages for the alkaline rocks fit on three main chronological groups: around 130 Ma, subcoveal with the Early Cretaceous flood tholeiites of the Paraná Basin, 100-110 Ma and 80-90 Ma (Late Cretaceous). The alkaline magmatism also extends into Paleocene times, as indicated by ages from some volcanic lavas. Geochemically, alkaline potassic and sodic rock types are distinguished by their negative and positive Nb-Ta anomalies, respectively. Negative spikes in Nb-Ta are also a feature common to the associated tholeiitic rocks. Sr-Nd-Pb systematics confirm the contribution of both HIMU and EMI mantle components in the formation of the alkaline rocks. Notably, Early and Late Cretaceous carbonatites have the same isotopic Sr-Nd initial ratios of the associated alkaline rocks. C-O isotopic Sr-Nd isotopic ratios indicate typical mantle signature for some carbonatites and the influence of post-magmatic processes in others. Immiscibility of liquids of phonolitic composition, derived from mafic alkaline parental magmas, has been responsible for the origin of the carbonatites. Close association of alkaline

  18. Petrogenesis of siliceous high-Mg series rocks as exemplified by the Early Paleoproterozoic mafic volcanic rocks of the Eastern Baltic Shield: enriched mantle versus crustal contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogina, Maria; Zlobin, Valeriy; Sharkov, Evgenii; Chistyakov, Alexeii

    2015-04-01

    The Early Paleoproterozoic stage in the Earth's evolution was marked by the initiation of global rift systems, the tectonic nature of which was determined by plume geodynamics. These processes caused the voluminous emplacement of mantle melts with the formation of dike swarms, mafic-ultramafic layered intrusions, and volcanic rocks. All these rocks are usually considered as derivatives of SHMS (siliceous high-magnesian series). Within the Eastern Baltic Shield, the SHMS volcanic rocks are localized in the domains with different crustal history: in the Vodlozero block of the Karelian craton with the oldest (Middle Archean) crust, in the Central Block of the same craton with the Neoarchean crust, and in the Kola Craton with a heterogeneous crust. At the same time, these rocks are characterized by sufficiently close geochemical characteristics: high REE fractionation ((La/Yb)N = 4.9-11.7, (La/Sm)N=2.3-3.6, (Gd/Yb)N =1.66-2.74)), LILE enrichment, negative Nb anomaly, low to moderate Ti content, and sufficiently narrow variations in Nd isotope composition from -2.0 to -0.4 epsilon units. The tectonomagmatic interpretation of these rocks was ambiguous, because such characteristics may be produced by both crustal contamination of depleted mantle melts, and by generation from a mantle source metasomatized during previous subduction event. Similar REE patterns and overlapping Nd isotope compositions indicate that the studied basaltic rocks were formed from similar sources. If crustal contamination en route to the surface would play a significant role in the formation of the studied basalts, then almost equal amounts of contaminant of similar composition are required to produce the mafic rocks with similar geochemical signatures and close Nd isotopic compositions, which is hardly possible for the rocks spaced far apart in a heterogeneous crust. This conclusion is consistent with analysis of some relations between incompatible elements and their ratios. In particular, the

  19. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of the late Cretaceous potassic-alkaline volcanic rocks from the Amasya Region (northern Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gülmez, Fatma; Genç, Can; Tüysüz, Okan; Karacık, Zekiye; Roden, Mike; Billor, Zeki; Hames, Willis

    2013-04-01

    The Cretaceous Lokman Formation (Alp, 1972) , is a volcano-sedimantary unit that comprises high- to ultra high-K alkaline volcanic rocks in Amasya Region (40°N, 35°E). The volcanic rocks expose as small outcrops and interfingered with pyroclastic and epiclastic rocks, and are classified as leucitite, tephriphonolite (LT), lamprophyres, trachytes and rarely andesites. LT and lamprophyres occur as dikes cutting each other, and rare lava flows. Trachytes are observed as small domes in the field and lots of pebbles and blocks within the clastic deposits derived from the domes. Samples of LT comprise lct+cpx (diopsite)+plg+mag+ap and classified as leucite-basanite mineralogically and tephri-phonolite geochemically. Ar-Ar age dating from leucites show that the leucite-bearing volcanic activity formed 75.6±3.7 Ma. The mineralogic composition of melanokratic lamprophyre dikes are represented by Kfs+cpx+mica+ap+mag. They defined geochemically as phono-tephrite and phonolite. The Ar-Ar plateau ages from the phlogopites from two different outcrops are 76.78 and 77.48 Ma. The main minerals of trachytic rocks are amp + bt + pl + Kfs + spn + ap +opq. They are classified as alkaline trachyandesite, geochemically. Radiometric age data from Kfs minerals reveal that the trachytic volcanism occurred 75.83±0.09 Ma. Except one andesitic sample, lamprophyres and trachytes of the Lokman Formation are the high- and ultra high-K and alkaline rocks. LT and lamprophyres are characterized by relatively high MgO (3.25-7.04 wt.%), K2O (4.34-6.54 wt.%), Na2O (3.42-5.74 wt.%). Total analcimization of leucite minerals let to decreasing its K2O, and increasing the Na2O contents. Therefore, K2O/Na2O values for LT and the lamprophyres (0.92-2.27) are relatively low. Trachytic suite is also high-K and alkaline in nature. On MORB normalized plots, all of the volcanic rocks from Lokman Formation display enrichment of LIL elements significantly relative to HFSE, and depletions of Nb-Ta and Ti

  20. The determination of silver in silicate rocks by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aruscavage, P. J.; Campbell, E.Y.

    1979-01-01

    Silver is extracted from a 20% tartaric acid solution by using butyl acetate and diphenylthiourea, and the organic layer is analyzed directly by the graphite-furnace technique. The precisions is ca. 8% as estimated from multiple analysis of 13 standard rocks; there are no systematic errors. The detection limit is 2.4 ppb for 250-mg samples. ?? 1979.

  1. Measurement of femtogram quantities of protactinium in silicate rock samples by multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Regelous, Marcel; Turner, Simon P; Elliott, Tim R; Rostami, Kia; Hawkesworth, Chris J

    2004-07-01

    We describe a new method for the chemical separation and analysis of Pa in silicate rock samples by isotope dilution. Our new technique has the following advantages over previous methods: (a) The initial separation of Pa from the rock matrix is carried out using anionic exchange resin and HCl-HF mixtures, avoiding the need to remove F(-) quantitatively from the sample solution prior to this step, (b) Efficient ionization of Pa is achieved using a multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer, so that smaller sample sizes and shorter measurement times are required, compared to previous methods using thermal ionization mass spectrometry or alpha spectrometry. (c) Plasma ionization requires less efficient separation of the high field strength elements from Pa, thus reducing reagent volumes, blanks, and sample preparation times. Instrumental mass fractionation can be corrected for using admixed U of known isotopic composition. Using this method, Pa concentrations can be measured to a precision of approximately 0.5% and an accuracy of approximately 1% using only a few tens of femtograms of Pa. PMID:15228328

  2. Relating Major Silicates and Monazite Growth in Metamorphic Rocks: Application to the Upper Granite Gorge (Grand Canyon, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaz, J.; Williams, M. L.; Jercinovic, M. J.

    2010-12-01

    Relating deformation and metamorphic conditions with time is a major goal in tectonic studies. The challenge is to find suitable minerals to be dated, and to associate them with specific events and with pressure and temperature (PT) conditions. Monazite has proven to be an excellent chronometer for dating stages in a tectonic history. It contains very little common lead, is highly retentive, and it can be dated by electron microprobe at very high spatial resolution. In addition, it commonly preserves different growth stages in distinct compositional domains that can be identified via EPMA mapping. However, its growth history and relation with major silicate assemblages and reactions are usually poorly constrained. The growth of monazite can be related to the petrology of major silicate assemblages in metamorphic rocks if reactions forming specific monazite compositional domains can be identified and geochemically linked to silicate assemblages. This is accomplished here through use of thermobarometric tools, mainly TWQ [1] for determination of PT-conditions and THERIAK-DOMINO for pseudo-sections [2]. The composition of each monazite domain is then obtained, and microprobe ages using the technique described in [3] are obtained. The next step currently being developed is to identify the metamorphic reaction responsible for each monazite growth stage. The area selected for this study is the Upper Granite Gorge of the Grand Canyon (USA). Paleoproterozoic basement crops out in this area, characterized by a segmented, block-type architecture consisting of km-scale blocks of granitic and psammitic/pelitic rocks, separated by shear zones. Previous work [4] reveals constant P but variable T from block to block. At least one block preserves a T-gradient from upper greenschist to granulite facies. Compositional mapping of hundreds of monazite grains in several samples, revealed a complex growth history within and between samples. Analysis is currently in progress. First

  3. Petrochemistry of late miocene peraluminous silicic volcanic rocks from the Morococala field, Bolivia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, VI G.B.; London, D.; Luedke, R.G.

    1998-01-01

    Late Miocene peraluminous volcanic rocks of the Morococala field, Bolivia, define a layered stratigraphy of basal andalusite-, biotite-(?? Muscovite)-bearing rhyolite tuffs (AR), overlain by cordierite-, biotite-bearing rhyolite tuffs (CR), and capped by biotite-beanng quartz latite tuffs, lavas, and late domal flows (QL). Mineral and whole-rock compositions become more evolved from top to bottom, with differentiation reflected by decreasing Ca, Ba, Mg, Fe, and rare earth elements (REE) versus increasing F, Na/K, and aluminosity from QL to AR. Mineral, whole-rock, and glass inclusion compositions are consistent with derivation of all three rock types from a single stratified magma reservoir, but age and spatial relations between the three units make this unlikely. Genesis of the QL involved biotite-dehydration melting of an aluminous source at T > 750??C and P ??? 4-6 kbar. If not co-magmatic with QL, the other units were generated primarily by muscovite-dehydration melting at T = 730-750??C and P ??? 3??5-4??5 kbar for CR, and T ??? 750??C for AR with pre-emptive residence at low pressure (1??5-3??0 kbar). Low hematite contents (XHem ??? 0??06) of ilmenite grains in AR, CR, and early grains (as inclusions in plagioclase and sanidine cores) in QL indicate reduced conditions imposed by a graphite-bearing source. Compositional variability among texturally later oxides (ilmenite with XHem = 0??06-0??50, primary magnetite), however, apparently records progressive increases in pre-eruptive f(O2) in QL. Plagioclase-melt equilibria and electron microprobe analysis difference for quartz-hosted glass inclusions suggest pre-emptive melt H2O contents ??? 5-7 wt % for the AR, ???4-6 wt % for the CR, and ???3-5 wt % for the QL.

  4. SilMush: A procedure for modeling of the geochemical evolution of silicic magmas and granitic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertogen, Jan; Mareels, Joyce

    2016-07-01

    A boundary layer crystallization modeling program is presented that specifically addresses the chemical fractionation in silicic magma systems and the solidification of plutonic bodies. The model is a Langmuir (1989) type approach and does not invoke crystal settling in high-viscosity silicic melts. The primary aim is to model a granitic rock as a congealed crystal-liquid mush, and to integrate major element and trace element modeling. The procedure allows for some exploratory investigation of the exsolution of H2O-fluids and of the fluid/melt partitioning of trace elements. The procedure is implemented as a collection of subroutines for the MS Excel spreadsheet environment and is coded in the Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) language. To increase the flexibility of the modeling, the procedure is based on discrete numeric process simulation rather than on solution of continuous differential equations. The program is applied to a study of the geochemical variation within and among three granitic units (Senones, Natzwiller, Kagenfels) from the Variscan Northern Vosges Massif, France. The three units cover the compositional range from monzogranite, over syenogranite to alkali-feldspar granite. An extensive set of new major element and trace element data is presented. Special attention is paid to the essential role of accessory minerals in the fractionation of the Rare Earth Elements. The crystallization model is able to reproduce the essential major and trace element variation trends in the data sets of the three separate granitic plutons. The Kagenfels alkali-feldspar leucogranite couples very limited variation in major element composition to a considerable and complex variation of trace elements. The modeling results can serve as a guide for the reconstruction of the emplacement sequence of petrographically distinct units. Although the modeling procedure essentially deals with geochemical fractionation within a single pluton, the modeling results bring up a

  5. A Clinopyroxene-Plagioclase Geobarometer for A-type Silicic Volcanic Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, J.; Iveson, A. A.; Davis, K.; Johnson, T. A.; Gahagan, S.; Ellis, B. S.

    2015-12-01

    Constraining the crustal storage depths of magmas is important in understanding volcanism. The reaction: anorthite (pl) = Ca-Tschermak's (cpx) + silica (Q or liq) has a large volume change and hence offers potential as a geobarometer, but has not been extensively exploited as such. One of the chief barriers to its wide application is consistent estimation of melt silica activity for assemblages that lack quartz. We have skirted this problem by confining attention to metaluminous silicic compositions (SiO2 > 60% by weight), for which silica activity during crystallization is presumed to be close to 1, and calibrated the barometer for the range 0 - 2 GPa using the LEPR database and additional experiments from the literature. Additional improvement is obtained by excluding hydrous phase-bearing assemblages. Despite the analytical uncertainties present in older experimental investigations, with knowledge of temperature, and clinopyroxene, plagioclase and host melt compositions, pressures for amphibole- and biotite-free dacites and rhyolites can be estimated to ±0.17 GPa (1 sigma). The limitations of the barometer render it most applicable to intraplate, A-type rhyolites. Application to one such system, the Snake River Plain rhyolites, indicate that both melt-hosted phenocrysts and clinopyroxene-plagioclase aggregate grains found in these rhyolites formed at low pressures, <0.5 GPa. This is consistent with isotopic evidence for a shallow crustal origin for Snake River Plain rhyolites.

  6. Diagenetic and compositional controls of wettability in siliceous sedimentary rocks, Monterey Formation, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Kristina M.

    Modified imbibition tests were performed on 69 subsurface samples from Monterey Formation reservoirs in the San Joaquin Valley to measure wettability variation as a result of composition and silica phase change. Contact angle tests were also performed on 6 chert samples from outcrop and 3 nearly pure mineral samples. Understanding wettability is important because it is a key factor in reservoir fluid distribution and movement, and its significance rises as porosity and permeability decrease and fluid interactions with reservoir grain surface area increase. Although the low permeability siliceous reservoirs of the Monterey Formation are economically important and prolific, a greater understanding of factors that alter their wettability will help better develop them. Imbibition results revealed a strong trend of decreased wettability to oil with increased detrital content in opal-CT phase samples. Opal-A phase samples exhibited less wettability to oil than both opal-CT and quartz phase samples of similar detrital content. Subsurface reservoir samples from 3 oil fields were crushed to eliminate the effect of capillary pressure and cleansed of hydrocarbons to eliminate wettability alterations by asphaltene, then pressed into discs of controlled density. Powder discs were tested for wettability by dispensing a controlled volume of water and motor oil onto the surface and measuring the time required for each fluid to imbibe into the sample. The syringe and software of a CAM101 tensiometer were used to control the amount of fluid dispensed onto each sample, and imbibition completion times were determined by high-speed photography for water drops; oil drop imbibition was significantly slower and imbibition was timed and determined visually. Contact angle of water and oil drops on polished chert and mineral sample surfaces was determined by image analysis and the Young-Laplace equation. Oil imbibition was significantly slower with increased detrital composition and faster

  7. Trace element partitioning in rock forming minerals of co-genetic, subduction-related alkaline and tholeiitic mafic rocks in the Ural Mountains, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, J.; Brügmann, G. E.; Pushkarev, E. V.

    2009-04-01

    The partitioning of trace elements between rock forming minerals in igneous rocks is largely controlled by physical and chemical parameters e.g. temperature, pressure and chemical composition of the minerals and the coexisting melt. In the present study partition coefficients for REE between hornblende, orthopyroxene, feldspars, apatite and clinopyroxene in a suite of co-genetic alkaline and tholeiitic mafic rocks from the Ural Mountains (Russia) were calculated. The results give insights to the influence of the chemical composition of the parental melt on the partitioning behaviour of the REE. Nepheline-bearing, alkaline melanogabbros (tilaites) are assumed to represent the most fractionated products of the melt that formed the ultramafic cumulates in zoned mafic-ultramafic complexes in the Ural Mountains. Co-genetic with the latter is a suite of olivine gabbros, gabbronorites and hornblende gabbros formed from a tholeiitic parental melt. Negative anomalies for the HFSE along with low Nb and Ta contents and a positive Sr anomaly indicate a subduction related origin of all parental melts. The nepheline gabbros consist predominantly of coarse-grained clinopyroxene phenocrysts in a matrix of fine grained clinopyroxene, olivine, plagioclase, K-feldspar and nepheline with accessory apatite. The tholeiitic gabbros have equigranular to porphyric textures with phenocrysts of olivine, pyroxene and hornblende in a plagioclase rich matrix with olivine hornblende, pyroxene and accessory apatite. Element concentrations of adjacent matrix grains and rims of phenochrysts were measured with LA-ICPMS. The distribution of REE between hornblende and clinopyroxene in the tholeiitic rocks is similar for most of the elements (DHbl•Cpx(La-Tm) = 2.7-2.8, decreasing to 2.6 and 2.4 for Yb and Lu, respectively). These values are about two times higher than published data (e.g. Ionov et al. 1997). Partition coefficients for orthopyroxene/clinopyroxene systematically decrease from the HREE

  8. Analysis of the Local Structure around Eu and Mn Ions in Alkaline-Earth Silicate Phosphors for White Light Illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Kaoru; Yoshino, Masahiko; Shigeiwa, Motoyuki; Mikami, Masayoshi; Akai, Toshio; Kijima, Naoto; Honma, Tetsuo; Nomura, Masaharu

    2007-02-02

    M2SiO4-based phosphors (M: alkaline-earth metal) that emit red to blue light are expected to offer high color rendering to white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) in combination with blue or near-UV excitation sources. It is very important for the complete control of the emission color to understand the crystal field around the active elements (rare-earth and transition metals). XAFS spectroscopy is applied to a (Ba,Ca)2SiO4:Eu,Mn phosphor at Eu L3- and Ba, Ca, Eu, Mn K-edges to elucidate the local environments of Eu and Mn. Eu L3- and Mn K-edge XANES spectra showed that Eu and Mn are both divalent, like Ba and Ca. K-edge EXAFS spectra indicated that the local structures of Eu and Mn are similar to those of Ba and Ca, respectively. However, the curve-fitting analysis showed that the first coordination shell of Eu has two Eu-O bonds that are both shorter than the Ba-O bond. FEFF calculations were also performed based on a BaCaSiO4 model constructed from the crystal structure of KNaSO4. They suggested that Eu substitutes both of Ba and Ca sites with some structural modification while Mn is clearly at the octahedral Ca site that is the smallest of the substitution sites.

  9. Lower Cryogenian calc-alkaline mafic rocks of the Western Anti-Atlas (Morocco): An example of orogenic-like magmatism in an extensional setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Aouli, El Hassan; Gasquet, Dominique; Cheilletz, Alain

    2010-08-01

    The lower Cryogenian mafic magmatism from the Igherm, Ifni and Kerdous inliers (Moroccan Western Anti-Atlas) have calc-alkaline, tholeiitic and alkaline affinities. The calc-alkaline dolerite dykes and gabbros bodies emplaced before the conglomeratic formations of the Upper Cryogenian and after the tholeiitic mafic rocks that characterize the pre-Pan-African rifting. They are similar to rocks from orogenic setting and characterized by high LILE, Th, Ce, P, Sm contents and La/Nb ratio and a low HFSE content with negative anomalies in Nb, Zr and Ti. The geodynamic environment of the sedimentary country rocks corresponds to that of a passive margin in a distensive tectonic context. The calc-alkaline affinity of these magmas can be attributed to the influence of a Palaeoproterozoic subduction zone that contributed to the enrichment of the sub-continental mantle. During the extensional event of the Pan-African orogenesis, the mantle would have produced tholeiitic, alkaline and/or transitional magmas before melting (caused by adiabatic decompression) reached the enriched sub-continental mantle. This mantle was previously enriched during the Eburnean subduction, where it would have generated calc-alkaline magmas.

  10. A Special Issue (Part-II): Mafic-ultramafic rocks and alkaline-carbonatitic magmatism and associated hydrothermal mineralization - dedication to Lia Nikolaevna Kogarko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogarko, Lia N.; Gwalani, Lalchand G.; Downes, Peter J.; Randive, Kirtikumar R.

    2015-10-01

    This is the second part of a two-volumespecial issue of Open Geoscience (formerly Central European Journal of Geosciences) that aims to be instrumental in providing an update of Mafic-Ultramafic Rocks and Alkaline- Carbonatitic Magmatism and Associated Hydrothermal Mineralization. Together, these two volumes provide a detailed and comprehensive coverage of the subjects that are relevant to the research work of P.Comin-Chiaramonti (Italy) and LiaN. Kogarko (Russia) towhomPart-I and Part- II have been respectively dedicated. To a significant extent, the development of advanced sampling technologies related to alkaline and carbonatitic magmatism by Lia N. Kogarko, has allowed geoscientists to measure and sample the deep crust of the planet not only for the exploration for the mineral deposits, but also to answer basic scientific questions about the origin and evolution of alkaline rocks (kimberlites, lamproites and related rocks associated with carbonatites). The papers presented in this Part-II of the special issue cover the petrology and geochemistry of the rocks collected from the surface and penetrated by drilling. Lia Kogarko proposed a new theory for the evolution of alkaline magmatism in the geological history of the Earth - that the appearance of alkaline magmatism at the Archaean-Proterozoic boundary (~2.5 - 2.7 Ga), and its growing intensity, was related to changes in the geodynamic regime of the Earth and oxidation of the mantle due to mantle-crust interaction.

  11. The Kabanga Ni sulfide deposit, Tanzania: I. Geology, petrography, silicate rock geochemistry, and sulfur and oxygen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Wolfgang D.; Barnes, Sarah-Jane; Sarkar, Arindam; Ripley, Ed; Li, Chusi; Livesey, Tim

    2010-06-01

    The Kabanga Ni sulfide deposit represents one of the most significant Ni sulfide discoveries of the last two decades, with current indicated mineral resources of 23.23 Mt at 2.64% Ni and inferred mineral resources of 28.5 Mt at 2.7% Ni (Nov. 2008). The sulfides are hosted by a suite of ˜1.4 Ga ultramafic-mafic, sill-like, and chonolithic intrusions that form part of the approximately 500 km long Kabanga-Musongati-Kapalagulu igneous belt in Tanzania and Burundi. The igneous bodies are up to about 1 km thick and 4 km long. They crystallized from several compositionally distinct magma pulses emplaced into sulfide-bearing pelitic schists. The first magma was a siliceous high-magnesium basalt (approximately 13.3% MgO) that formed a network of fine-grained acicular-textured gabbronoritic and orthopyroxenitic sills (Mg# opx 78-88, An plag 45-88). The magma was highly enriched in incompatible trace elements (LILE, LREE) and had pronounced negative Nb and Ta anomalies and heavy O isotopic signatures (δ18O +6 to +8). These compositional features are consistent with about 20% contamination of primitive picrite with the sulfidic pelitic schists. Subsequent magma pulses were more magnesian (approximately 14-15% MgO) and less contaminated (e.g., δ18O +5.1 to +6.6). They injected into the earlier sills, resulting in the formation of medium-grained harzburgites, olivine orthopyroxenites and orthopyroxenites (Fo 83-89, Mg# opx 86-89), and magmatic breccias consisting of gabbronorite-orthopyroxenite fragments within an olivine-rich matrix. All intrusions in the Kabanga area contain abundant sulfides (pyrrhotite, pentlandite, and minor chalcopyrite and pyrite). In the lower portions and the immediate footwall of two of the intrusions, namely Kabanga North and Kabanga Main, there occur numerous layers, lenses, and veins of massive Ni sulfides reaching a thickness of several meters. The largest amount of high grade, massive sulfide occurs in the smallest intrusion (Kabanga North

  12. Sr isotopic characteristics in two small watersheds draining typical silicate and carbonate rocks: implication for the studies on seawater Sr isotopic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W. H.; Zheng, H. B.; Yang, J. D.

    2013-06-01

    We systematically investigated Sr isotopic characteristics of small silicate watershed - the tributary Xishui River of the Yangtze River, and small carbonate watershed - the tributary Guijiang River of the Pearl River. The results show that the Xishui River has relatively high Sr concentrations (0.468-1.70 μmol L-1 in summer and 1.30-3.17 μmol L-1 in winter, respectively) and low 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.708686-0.709148 in summer and 0.708515-0.709305 in winter), which is similar to the characteristics of carbonate weathering. The Guijiang River has low Sr concentrations (0.124-1.098 μmol L-1) and high 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.710558-0.724605), being characterized by silicate weathering. In the Xishui River catchment, chemical weathering rates in summer are far higher than those in winter, indicating significant influence of climate regime. However, slight differences of 87Sr/86Sr ratios between summer and winter show that influence of climate on Sr isotope is uncertainty owing to very similar Sr isotope values in silicate and carbonate bedrocks. As 87Sr/86Sr ratios in the Xishui River are lower than those in seawater, they will decrease 87Sr/86Sr ratio of seawater after transported into oceans. Previous studies also showed that some basaltic watersheds with extremely high chemical weathering rates reduced the seawater Sr isotope ratios. In other words, river catchments with high silicate weathering rates do not certainly transport highly radiogenic Sr into oceans. Therefore, it may be questionable that using the variations of seawater 87Sr/86Sr ratio to indicate the continental silicate weathering intensity. In the Guijiang River catchment, 87Sr/86Sr ratios of carbonate rocks and other sources (rainwater, domestic and industrial waste water, and agricultural fertilizer) are lower than 0.71. In comparison, some non-carbonate components, such as, sand rocks, mud rocks, shales, have relatively high Sr isotopic compositions. Moreover, granites accounted for only 5% of the

  13. The evolution of young silicic lavas at Medicine Lake Volcano, California: Implications for the origin of compositional gaps in calc-alkaline series lavas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grove, T.L.; Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    At Medicine Lake Volcano, California, the compositional gap between andesite (57-62 wt.% SiO2) and rhyolite (73-74 wt.% SiO2) has been generated by fractional crystallization. Assimilation of silicic crust has also occurred along with fractionation. Two varieties of inclusions found in Holocene rhyolite flows, hornblende gabbros and aphyric andesites, provide information on the crystallization path followed by lavas parental to the rhyolite. The hornblende gabbros are magmatic cumulate residues and their mineral assemblages are preserved evidence of the phases that crystallized from an andesitic precursor lava to generate the rhyolite lavas. The andesitic inclusions represent samples of a parental andesite and record the early part of the differentiation history. Olivine, plagioclase and augite crystallization begins the differentiation history, followed by the disappearance of olivine and augite through reaction with the liquid to form orthopyroxene and amphibole. Further crystallization of the assemblage plagioclase, amphibole, orthopyroxene, magnetite, and apatite from a high-SiO2 andesite leads to rhyolite. This final crystallization process occurs on a cotectic that is nearly horizontal in temperature-composition space. Since a large amount of crystallization occurs over a limited temperature interval, a compositional gap develops between rhyolite and high SiO2 andesite. Liquidus surfaces with shallow slopes in temperature-composition space are characteristic of several late-stage crystallization assemblages in the andesite to rhyolite compositional range. Experimentally produced plagioclase+ amphibole+orthopyroxene+magnetite and plagioclase+ augite+low-Ca pyroxene+magnetite cotectics have liquidus slopes that are nearly flat. At other calc-alkaline volcanic centers crystallization processes involving large compositional changes over small temperature intervals may also be important in the development of bimodal volcanism (i.e. the existence of a composition

  14. Mingling of carbonate and silicate magmas under turbulent flow conditions: Evidence from rock textures and mineral chemistry in sub-volcanic carbonatite dykes, Chagatai, Uzbekistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, K. R.; Wall, F.; Divaev, F. K.; Savatenkov, V. M.

    2009-06-01

    The Triassic Chagatai Complex, Uzbekistan, comprises explosive pipes and dykes, dominantly of silicocarbonatite composition, with cross-cutting relationships indicating multi-stage emplacement. Although the dykes have been reported as diamond-bearing, they have not previously undergone detailed investigation in terms of their mineral chemistry or rock texture. The xenolith-rich dykes contain irregularly-shaped microscopic magmatic enclaves of silicate composition within carbonatite magma and corroded microphenocrysts with crystal overgrowths that record synmagmatic geochemical disequilibrium. Quench crystals of apatite and aegirine, and anhedral baryte, which formed after corrosion of apatite and magnetite microphenocrysts but prior to formation of crystal overgrowths and mantles, indicate contemporaneous rapid undercooling. The anhedral baryte formed as a by-product of an oxidising hydrous reaction from Ba-rich biotite and pyrite to chlorite. The rock and microphenocryst textures suggest that mingling between two magmas occurred and a post-mingling mineral assemblage, including baryte, crystallised in a partially hybridised heterogeneous magma. An initial carbonatite mineral assemblage is identified as calcite + magnetite + apatite ± augite ± barium-rich biotite ± melilite ± pyrite. Changes in mineral chemistry of the carbonatite assemblage that are contemporaneous with the disequilibrium reaction textures suggest addition of a hydrous, Na-Si-Al-rich magma, and the mineral assemblage in the magmatic enclaves is similar to that of trachyte dykes in the Chagatai Complex. Using primarily rock textures and mineral chemistry, supported by mass balance calculations and isotope data, the silicate material is interpreted as a hydrous trachyte magma that had assimilated upper crustal material. The trachyte magma was entrained by carbonatite that was rapidly and turbulently ascending through the crust, shortly before emplacement as silicocarbonatite. The interpretation

  15. Rock-Forming feldspars of the Khibiny alkaline pluton, Kola Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanyuk, G. Yu.; Pakhomovsky, Ya. A.; Konopleva, N. G.; Kalashnikov, A. O.; Korchak, Yu. A.; Selivanova, E. A.; Yakovenchuk, V. N.

    2010-12-01

    This paper describes the structural-compositional zoning of the well-known Khibiny pluton in regard to rock-forming feldspars. The content of K-Na-feldspars increases inward and outward from the Main foidolite ring. The degree of coorientation of tabular K-Na-feldspar crystals sharply increases in the Main ring zone, and microcline-dominant foyaite turns into orthoclase-dominant foyaite. The composition of K-Na-feldspars in the center of the pluton and the Main ring zone is characterized by an enrichment in Al. This shift is compensated by a substitution of some K and Na with Ba (the Main ring zone) or by an addition of K and Na cations to the initially cation-deficient microcline (the central part of the pluton). Feldspars of volcanosedimentary rocks occurring as xenoliths in foyaite primarily corresponded to plagioclase An15-40, but high-temperature fenitization and formation of hornfels in the Main ring zone gave rise to the crystallization of anorthoclase subsequently transformed into orthoclase and albite due to cooling and further fenitization. Such a zoning is the result of filling the Main ring fault zone within the homogeneous foyaite pluton with a foidolite melt, which provided the heating and potassium metasomatism of foyaite and xenoliths of volcanosedimentary rocks therein. The process eventually led to the transformation of foyaite into rischorrite-lyavochorrite, while xenoliths were transformed into aluminum hornfels with anorthoclase, annite, andalusite, topaz, and sekaninaite.

  16. Alkaline fluid circulation in ultramafic rocks and formation of nucleotide constituents: a hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Nils G; Dumont, Marion; Ivarsson, Magnus; Konn, Cécile

    2006-01-01

    Seawater is constantly circulating through oceanic basement as a low-temperature hydrothermal fluid (<150°C). In cases when ultramafic rocks are exposed to the fluids, for instance during the initial phase of subduction, ferromagnesian minerals are altered in contact with the water, leading to high pH and formation of secondary magnesium hydroxide, among other – brucite, that may scavenge borate and phosphate from seawater. The high pH may promote abiotic formation of pentoses, particularly ribose. Pentoses are stabilized by borate, since cyclic pentoses form a less reactive complex with borate. Analyses have shown that borate occupies the 2' and 3' positions of ribose, thus leaving the 5' position available for reactions like phosphorylation. The purine coding elements (adenine, in particular) of RNA may be formed in the same general hydrothermal environments of the seafloor. PMID:16867193

  17. Selective Precipitation of Thorium lodate from a Tartaric Acid-Hydrogen Peroxide Medium Application to Rapid Spectrophotometric Determination of Thorium in Silicate Rocks and in Ores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grimaldi, F.S.

    1957-01-01

    This paper presents a selective iodate separation of thorium from nitric acid medium containing d-tartaric acid and hydrogen peroxide. The catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide is prevented by the use of 8quinolinol. A few micrograms of thorium are separated sufficiently clean from 30 mg. of such oxides as cerium, zirconium, titanium, niobium, tantalum, scandium, or iron with one iodate precipitation to allow an accurate determination of thorium with the thoronmesotartaric acid spectrophotometric method. The method is successful for the determination of 0.001% or more of thorium dioxide in silicate rocks and for 0.01% or more in black sand, monazite, thorite, thorianite, eschynite, euxenite, and zircon.

  18. Alkaline igneous rocks of Magnet Cove, Arkansas: Mineralogy and geochemistry of syenites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flohr, M.J.K.; Ross, M.

    1990-01-01

    Syenites from the Magnet Cove alkaline igneous complex form a diverse mineralogical and geochemical suite. Compositional zoning in primary and late-stage minerals indicates complex, multi-stage crystallization and replacement histories. Residual magmatic fluids, rich in F, Cl, CO2 and H2O, reacted with primary minerals to form complex intergrowths of minerals such as rinkite, fluorite, V-bearing magnetite, F-bearing garnet and aegirine. Abundant sodalite and natrolite formed in pegmatitic segregations within nepheline syenite where Cl- and Na-rich fluids were trapped. During autometasomatism compatible elements such as Mn, Ti, V and Zr were redistributed on a local scale and concentrated in late-stage minerals. Early crystallization of apatite and perovskite controlled the compatible behavior of P and Ti, respectively. The formation of melanite garnet also affected the behaviour of Ti, as well as Zr, Hf and the heavy rare-earth elements. Pseudoleucite syenite and garnet-nepheline syenite differentiated along separate trends, but the two groups are related to the same parental magma by early fractionation of leucite, the presumed precursor of intergrowths of K-feldspar and nepheline. The Diamond Jo nepheline syenite group defines a different differentiation trend. Sphene-nepheline syenite, alkali syenite and several miscellaneous nepheline syenites do not consistently plot with the other syenite groups or each other on element and oxide variation diagrams, indicating that they were derived from still other parental syenite magmas. Mineral assemblages indicate that relatively high f{hook};O2, at or above the fayalite-magnetite-quartz buffer, prevailed throughout the crystallization history of the syenites. ?? 1990.

  19. Petrology of ultramafic xenoliths in Cenozoic alkaline rocks of northern Madagascar (Nosy Be Archipelago)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocco, Ivana; Lustrino, Michele; Zanetti, Alberto; Morra, Vincenzo; Melluso, Leone

    2013-01-01

    Late Miocene basanites of Nosy Be and Nosy Sakatia islands (Nosy Be Archipelago, northern Madagascar) carry spinel-facies anhydrous ultramafic xenoliths (lherzolites, harzburgites and wehrlites). Geothermobarometric estimates indicate that these xenoliths derive from shallow mantle depths of 35-40 km, with those from Nosy Be island showing equilibration T (averages in the range of 945-985 °C) lower than the Nosy Sakatia analogues (averages ranging from 1010 to 1110 °C). One Nosy Sakatia mantle xenolith exhibits relatively fertile lherzolite composition, with trace and major element mineral chemistry consistent with a residual character after low degrees (1-2%) of mafic melt extraction. We interpret this composition as that resembling a depleted mantle (DM)-like lithospheric composition before metasomatic overprints. The other lherzolites and harzburgites display petrochemical characters consistent with variable extent of partial melting (up to 18%), associated with pronounced metasomatic overprints caused by migrating melts, as highlighted by enrichments in highly incompatible trace elements (e.g. light rare earth elements, LREE and Sr), together with the abundant occurrence of wehrlitic lithologies. The variability of petrochemical features points to different styles of metasomatism and metasomatic agents. The estimated composition of the parental melts of wehrlites matches that of host basanites. The combination of this evidence with the petrographic features, characterized by coarse-granular to porphyroclastic textures and by the presence of olivine without kink-banding, suggests that wehrlites are veins or pockets of high pressure cumulates within the mantle peridotite. The same melts also metasomatized via porous-flow percolation some lherzolites and harzburgites. Distinctly, a group of lherzolites and harzburgites was metasomatized by a different alkaline melt having markedly lower incompatible trace element contents. Late infiltration of metasomatic fluids

  20. Application of epithermal neutron activation in multielement analysis of silicate rocks employing both coaxial Ge(Li) and low energy photon detector systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baedecker, P.A.; Rowe, J.J.; Steinnes, E.

    1977-01-01

    The instrumental activation analysis of silicate rocks using epithermal neutrons has been studied using both high resolution coaxial Ge(Li) detectors and low energy photon detectors, and applied to the determination of 23 elements in eight new U.S.G.S. standard rocks. The analytical use X-ray peaks associated with electron capture or internal conversion processes has been evaluated. Of 28 elements which can be considered to be determinable by instrumental means, the epithermal activation approach is capable of giving improved sensitivity and precision in 16 cases, over the normal INAA procedure. In eleven cases the use of the low energy photon detector is thought to show advantages over convertional coaxial Ge(Li) spectroscopy. ?? 1977 Akade??miai Kiado??.

  1. Silicate-carbonate-salt liquid immiscibility and origin of the sodalite-haüyne rocks: study of melt inclusions in olivine foidite from Vulture volcano, S. Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panina, Liya; Stoppa, Francesco

    2009-12-01

    Melt inclusions in clinopyroxenes of olivine foidite bombs from Serra di Constantinopoli pyroclastic flows of the Vulture volcano (Southern Italy) were studied in detail. The rocks contain abundant zoned phenocrysts and xenocrysts of clinopyroxene, scarce grains of olivine, leucite, haüyne, glass with microlites of plagioclase and K-feldspar. The composition of clinopyroxene in xenocrysts (Cpx I), cores (Cpx II), and in rims (Cpx III) of phenocrysts differs in the content of Mg, Fe, Ti, and Al. All clinopyroxenes contain two types of primary inclusion-pure silicate and of silicate-carbonate-salt composition. This fact suggests that the phenomena of silicate-carbonate immiscibility took place prior to crystallization of clinopyroxene. Homogenization of pure silicate inclusions proceeded at 1 225 - 1 190°C. The composition of conserved melts corresponded to that of olivine foidite in Cpx I, to tephrite-phonolite in Cpx II, and phonolite-nepheline trachyte in Cpx III. The amount of water in them was no more than 0.9 wt.%. Silicate-carbonate inclusions decrepitated on heating. Salt globules contained salts of alkali-sulphate, alkali-carbonate, and Ca-carbonate composition somewhat enriched in Ba and Sr. This composition is typical of carbonatite melts when decomposed into immiscible fractions. The formation of sodalite-haüyne rocks from Vulture is related to the presence of carbonate-salt melts in magma chamber. The melts conserved in clinopyroxenes were enriched in incompatible elements, especially in Cpx III. High ratios of La, Nb, and Ta in melts on crystallization of Cpx I and Cpx II suggest the influence of a carbonatite melt as carbonatites have extremely high La/Nb and Nb/Ta and this is confirmed by the appearance of carbonatite melts in magma chamber. Some anomalies in the concentrations and relatives values of Eu and especially Ga seems typical of Italian carbonatite related melts. The mantle source for initial melts was, most likely, rather uniform

  2. Age, geochemical characteristics and petrogenesis of Cenozoic intraplate alkaline volcanic rocks in the Bafang region, West Cameroon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchuimegnie Ngongang, Nicaise Blaise; Kamgang, Pierre; Chazot, Gilles; Agranier, Arnaud; Bellon, Hervé; Nonnotte, Philippe

    2015-02-01

    The origin of the volcanism in the Cameroon Volcanic Line and the nature of its mantle sources are still highly controversial. We present major and trace element compositions as well as Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopic results on mafic and intermediate lavas from the Bafang area in the central part of the Cameroon Volcanic Line. The lavas range from basanites and basalts to hawaiites and mugearites with an alkaline affinity and were emplaced between 10 and 6 Ma ago. The evolution from basalts and basanites to more differentiated rocks involved fractionation of olivine, clinopyroxene and Fe-Ti oxides, but the isotopic compositions show that crustal contamination processes affected some magmas during their ascent in the crust. Basalts and basanites originated from a garnet-bearing mantle source and their differences are mostly due to variable degrees of partial melting. The isotopic composition of the uncontaminated samples imply the participation of three distinct mantle components, the depleted MORB mantle (not dominant), an enriched component and a Pb radiogenic component similar to the source of the Mount Cameroon. Combined with previously published isotopic data from the Cameroon Volcanic Line, our new results indicate that the source of the volcanism mostly reside in the lithospheric mantle and is different from what can be expected from the melting of a mantle accreted from or modified during the emplacement of the St. Helena mantle plume.

  3. Geochronology and geochemistry of Cretaceous Nanshanping alkaline rocks from the Zijinshan district in Fujian Province, South China: Implications for crust-mantle interaction and lithospheric extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Jiang, Shao-Yong

    2014-10-01

    In situ zircon U-Pb ages and Hf isotopic data, major and trace elements, and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions are reported for Nanshanping alkaline rocks from the Zijingshan district in southwestern Fujian Province (the Interior or Western Cathaysia Block) of South China. The Nanshanping alkaline rocks, which consist of porphyritic quartz monzonite, porphyritic syenite, and syenite, revealed a Late Cretaceous age of 100-93 Ma. All of the rocks show high SiO2, K2O + Na2O, and LREE but low CaO, Fe2O3T, MgO, and HFSE (Nb, Ta, P, and Ti) concentrations. These rocks also exhibit uniform initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.7078 to 0.7087 and εNd(t) values of -4.1 to -7.2, thus falling within the compositional field of Cretaceous basalts and mafic dikes occurring in the Cathaysia Block. Additionally, these rocks display initial Pb isotopic compositions with a 206Pb/204Pbi ratio of 18.25 to 18.45, a 207Pb/204Pbi ratio of 15.63 to 15.67, and a 208Pb/204Pbi ratio of 38.45 to 38.88. Combined with the zircon Hf isotopic compositions (εHf(t) = -11.7 to -3.2), which are different from those of the basement rocks, we suggest that Nanshanping alkaline rocks were primarily derived from a subduction-related enriched mantle source. High Rb/Sr (0.29-0.65) and Zr/Hf (37.5-49.2) but relatively low Ba/Rb (4.4-8.1) ratios suggest that the parental magmas of these rocks were most likely formed via partial melting of a phlogopite-bearing mantle source with carbonate metasomatism. The relatively high SiO2 (62.35-70.79 wt.%) and low Nb/Ta (10.0-15.3) ratios, positive correlation between SiO2 and (87Sr/86Sr)I, and negative correlation between SiO2 and εNd(t) of these rocks suggest that the crustal materials were also involved in formation of the Nanshanping alkaline rocks. Combined with geochemical and isotopic features, we infer magmatic processes similar to AFC (assimilation and fractional crystallization) involving early fractionation of clinopyroxene and olivine and subsequent fractionation of

  4. Genetic implications of minor-element and Sr-isotope geochemistry of alkaline rock complexes in the Wet Mountains area, Fremont and Custer counties, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Armbrustmacher, T.J.; Hedge, C.E.

    1982-01-01

    Concentrations of Rb, Sr, and REE (rare earth elements), and Sr-isotopic ratios in rocks of the Cambrian alkaline complexes in the Wet Mountains area, Colorado, show that rocks formed as end-products of a variety of magmas generated from different source materials. The complexes generally contain a bimodal suite of cumulus mafic-ultramafic rocks and younger leucocratic rocks that include nepheline syenite and hornblende-biotite syenite in the McClure Mountain Complex, nepheline syenite pegmatite in the Gem Park Complex, and quartz syenite in the complex at Democrat Creek. The nepheline syenite and hornblende-biotite syenite at McClure Mountain (535??5m.y.) are older than the syenitic rocks at Democrat Creek (511??8m.y.). REE concentrations indicate that the nepheline syenite at McClure Mountain cannot be derived from the hornblende-biotite syenite, which it intrudes, or from the associated mafic-ultramafic rocks. REE also indicate that mafic-ultramafic rocks at McClure Mountain have a source distinct from that of the mafic-ultramafic rocks at Democrat Creek. In the McClure Mountain Complex, initial87Sr/86Sr ratios for mafic-ultramafic rocks (0.7046??0.0002) are similar to those of hornblende-biotite syenite (0.7045??0.0002), suggesting a similar magmatic source, whereas ratios for carbonatites (0.7038??0.0002) are similar to those of nepheline syenite (0.7038??0.0002). At Democrat Creek, initial ratios of syenitic rocks (0.7032??0.0002) and mafic-ultramafic rocks (0.7028??0.0002) are different from those of corresponding rocks at McClure Mountain. ?? 1982 Springer-Verlag.

  5. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of late Ediacaran (605-580 Ma) post-collisional alkaline rocks from the Katherina ring complex, south Sinai, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azer, M. K.; Obeid, M. A.; Ren, M.

    2014-10-01

    The Katherina ring complex (KRC) in the central part of south Sinai, Egypt, is a typical ring complex of late Neoproterozoic age (605-580 Ma). It was developed during the final tectono-magmatic stage of the north Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS) during evolution of the Pan-African crust. The KRC includes Katherina volcanics, subvolcanic bodies, ring dykes and Katherina granitic pluton. The Katherina volcanics represent the earliest stage of the KRC, which was subsequently followed by emplacement of the subvolcanic bodies and ring dykes. The Katherina granitic pluton depicts as the latest evolution stage of the KRC that intruded all the early formed rock units in the concerned area. The Katherina volcanics are essentially composed of rhyolites, ignimbrite, volcanic breccia and tuffs. Mineralogically, the peralkaline rhyolites contain sodic amphiboles and aegirine. The rhyolite whole rock chemistry has acmite-normative character. The subvolcanic bodies of the KRC are represented by peralkaline microgranite and porphyritic quartz syenite. The ring dykes are semicircular in shape and consist mainly of quartz syenite, quartz trachyte and trachybasalt rock types. The Katherina subvolcanic rocks, volcanic rocks as well as the ring dykes are alkaline or/and peralkaline in nature. The alkaline granitic pluton forms the inner core of the KRC, including the high mountainous areas of G. Abbas Pasha, G. Bab, G. Katherina and G. Musa. These mountains are made up of alkaline syenogranite and alkali feldspar granite. The mantle signature recorded in the KRC indicates a juvenile ANS crust partial melting process for the generation of this system. The evolution of the KRC rocks is mainly dominated by crystal fractionation and crustal contamination. Mineral geothermometry points to the high temperature character of the KRC, up to 700-1100 °C.

  6. U-Th-Pb geochronology of meta-carbonatites and meta-alkaline rocks in the southern Canadian Cordillera: A geodynamic perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millonig, Leo J.; Gerdes, Axel; Groat, Lee A.

    2012-11-01

    U-Pb and Th-Pb ages of zircons from seven meta-carbonatite and three meta-alkaline rock samples provide evidence for three distinct episodes of carbonatite and alkaline magmatism in the southern Canadian Cordillera spanning a period of ~ 460 Ma. The earliest, Neoproterozoic event occurred at ~ 800-700 Ma and coincides with the postulated initial break-up of Rodinia. The second, previously undocumented, event of carbonatitic magmatism is constrained to the Late Cambrian at ~ 500 Ma and corresponds to a period of extensional tectonics that affected the western continental margin of North America from the Canadian Cordillera to the southwestern United States. The youngest and most prevalent period of alkaline igneous activity occurred in Late Devonian to Early Carboniferous times at ~ 360-340 Ma and resulted from extensional tectonics, presumably caused by slab rollback. In addition, different episodes of amphibolite-facies metamorphism subsequently affected the igneous rocks between ~ 155 and 50 Ma. This dataset puts new constraints on the timing of carbonatite and alkaline igneous activity and the evolution of (ancestral) North America's western continental margin from Neoproterozoic to Carboniferous times.

  7. Insights into Oceanic Crust Accretion from a Comparison of Rock Magnetic and Silicate Fabrics from Lower Crustal Gabbros from Hess Deep Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horst, A. J.; Morris, A.; Friedman, S. A.; Cheadle, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    between silicate and magnetic fabric data suggests that AMS is a good proxy for bulk silicate fabrics in these samples from Hess Deep. By integrating AMS and EBSD, both sensitive indicators of magnetic and silicate fabrics in gabbroic rocks, we seek a better understanding of the formation of gabbro in oceanic crust.

  8. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopic Analyses of Corrosion Products Formed on Rock Bolt Carbon Steel in Chloride Media with Bicarbonate and Silicate Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Deodeshmukh, Vinay; Venugopal, A; Chandra, Dhanesh; Yilmaz, Ahmet; Daemen, Jack; Jones, D A.; Lea, Alan S.; Engelhard, Mark H.

    2004-11-01

    The passivation behavior of Yucca Mountain Repository rock bolt carbon steel in deaerated 3.5% NaCl solution containing SiO{sub 3}{sup 2} and HCO{sub 3} ions was investigated by potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic methods. Polarization results indicate that combinations of silicate and bicarbonate anions decrease the passive current density and raise the pitting potential. XPS results indicate the enrichment of silica at passive potentials and the formation of mixed FeCO{sub 3} and silica film at lower potentials. This change in film composition was responsible for the changes in corrosion rate at lower and higher potentials. XPS results also support the thermodynamic data with regard to the occurrence of second oxidation peak observed in the polarization curves to be due to the oxidation of FeCO{sub 3} to Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  9. Zircon age range and sources of alkaline rocks from the Kurgusul intrusion, Kuznetsk Alatau: The first U-Pb (SHRIMP II) and Sm-Nd isotope data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrublevskii, V. V.; Gertner, I. F.; Tishin, P. A.; Bayanova, T. B.

    2014-12-01

    U-Pb isotope analysis of basic feldspathoid rocks (juvites) of the Kurgusul intrusion, NE Kuznetsk Alatau, revealed three generations of zircons of various ages (˜1.3-1.5 Ga; 484.3 ± 5.5 and 393.6 ± 9.2Ma). This suggests several stages of regional alkaline basic magmatism in the Middle Cambrian-Early Ordovician and Early-Middle Devonian and melting of the Mesoproterozoic continental crust, which form part of the basement of the Kuznetsk Alatau terrane. The trace element geochemical data indicate a continental margin setting characterized by the complex interaction of a plume-related, supra-subduction zone and crustal materials. A possible model of the magmatic evolution assumes that the ascent of a plume at the Cambrian-Ordovician boundary induced generation of the initial alkaline basaltic magmas and metasomatism and erosion of the lower lithosphere. Repeated partial melting of the lower crust after a 100 Myr period produced new magma batches of alkaline composition, which inherited zircons from the preceding episode of magma generation. The inherited juvenile magmatic source (PREMA + E-type MORB + EM) is confirmed by similarities in the Sm-Nd isotopic signatures (ɛNd( T) ≈ +4.5 to +5.7, T(Nd)DM ≈ 0.8-0.9 Ga) of derivatives of regional alkaline basic complexes of different ages.

  10. The relationship between adakitic, calc-alkaline volcanic rocks and TTGs: implications for the tectonic setting of the Karelian greenstone belts, Baltic Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsonov, A. V.; Bogina, M. M.; Bibikova, E. V.; Petrova, A. Yu.; Shchipansky, A. A.

    2005-01-01

    Two types of coeval acid-intermediate rocks with different petrological, geochemical and isotopic features have been discovered among volcanic rocks and surrounding synkinematic tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG) plutons of Late Archaean greenstone belts in the Karelian granite-greenstone terrane. Type-1 rocks comprise trondhjemites and sub-volcanic, occasionally volcanic dacite-rhyolite rocks. They are characterized by high Sr, low Y and HREE contents, high Sr/Y ratios, and strongly fractionated REE patterns with no significant positive or negative Eu anomaly. Initial ɛNd is positive, indicating a generation from juvenile source with little or no contribution of ancient continental crust. Type 2 is represented by diorite-granodiorites and calc-alkaline basalt-andesite-dacite-rhyolite (BADR) series. As compared to type 1, these rocks differ by their lower Sr, higher Y and HREE contents, lower Sr/Y ratios and less fractionated HREE patterns with negative Eu anomalies. Initial ɛNd varies from negative to positive values, thus indicating a variable contribution of sialic crust. Geochemistry of the two magmatic series suggests their formation in a convergent plate margin setting. The type-1 rocks resemble Phanerozoic adakites, which represent slab-derived melts contaminated by overlying mantle wedge. The type-2 rocks resemble BADR series, which were derived from a mantle wedge metasomatized by slab-derived fluids and melts, with subsequent variable crustal contamination. The spatial distribution of these two types of magmatic series defines the asymmetry of the studied granite-greenstone structures, which presumably reflects the primary lateral zoning of island arc formed under specific thermal conditions in the Archaean mantle. Adakite melts upraised to the surface in the frontal part of the island arc, where mantle wedge was thin, showing no or little interaction with metasomatized mantle, and formed adakite-type plutonic and sub-volcanic rocks. At greater

  11. Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Alice

    This science unit is designed for limited- and non-English speaking students in a Chinese bilingual education program. The unit covers rock material, classification, characteristics of types of rocks, and rock cycles. It is written in Chinese and simple English. At the end of the unit there is a list of main terms in both English and Chinese, and…

  12. A legacy of Hadean silicate differentiation inferred from Hf isotopes in Eoarchean rocks of the Nuvvuagittuq supracrustal belt (Québec, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guitreau, Martin; Blichert-Toft, Janne; Mojzsis, Stephen J.; Roth, Antoine S. G.; Bourdon, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    New Lu-Hf isotopic data for mafic and felsic rocks from the Nuvvuagittuq supracrustal belt (NSB) in northern Québec (Canada) yield an Eoarchean age of 3864±70 Ma consistent with both zircon U-Pb and whole-rock 147Sm-143Nd chronology, but in disagreement with ca. 4400 Ma ages inferred from the 146Sm-142Nd chronometer (O'Neil et al., 2008, 2012). The Lu-Hf result is interpreted as the mean emplacement age of the different autochthonous units of the NSB. An observed alignment of the data along a Lu-Hf "scatterchron" precludes a Hadean age for the NSB because its isotopic characteristics appear to be controlled by long-term radiogenic ingrowth. Emplacement of the NSB in the Hadean (e.g., 4362-54+35 Ma if the decay constant of 146Sm of Kinoshita et al. (2012) is used with the O'Neil et al., 2008 data) should instead have caused age differences of hundreds of millions of years to manifest as strong deviations from the Lu-Hf scatterchron. Combined Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd data on the same NSB amphibolite samples (Ca-poor cummingtonite- and hornblende-bearing) define a mixing hyperbola at ca. 3800 Ma with end-member compositions representative of the compositional groups identified for these lithologies (O'Neil et al., 2011). Anomalously low 142Nd/144Nd values relative to Bulk Silicate Earth are endemic to a group of rocks in the NSB termed "low-TiO2" amphibolites; this is attributable to an ancient multi-stage history of their mantle source. Modeling shows that the 142Nd/144Nd deficits could have developed in response to a re-fertilization episode within a previously fractionated mantle domain at 4510 Ma.

  13. Silicic volcanism on Mars evidenced by tridymite in high-SiO2 sedimentary rock at Gale crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Richard V.; Vaniman, David T.; Blake, David F.; Gellert, Ralf; Chipera, Steve J.; Rampe, Elizabeth B.; Ming, Douglas W.; Morrison, Shaunna M.; Downs, Robert T.; Treiman, Allan H.; Yen, Albert S.; Grotzinger, John P.; Achilles, Cherie N.; Bristow, Thomas F.; Crisp, Joy A.; Des Marais, David J.; Farmer, Jack D.; Fendrich, Kim V.; Frydenvang, Jens; Graff, Trevor G.; Morookian, John-Michael; Stolper, Edward M.; Schwenzer, Susanne P.

    2016-06-01

    Tridymite, a low-pressure, high-temperature (>870 °C) SiO2 polymorph, was detected in a drill sample of laminated mudstone (Buckskin) at Marias Pass in Gale crater, Mars, by the Chemistry and Mineralogy X-ray diffraction instrument onboard the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity. The tridymitic mudstone has ˜40 wt.% crystalline and ˜60 wt.% X-ray amorphous material and a bulk composition with ˜74 wt.% SiO2 (Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer analysis). Plagioclase (˜17 wt.% of bulk sample), tridymite (˜14 wt.%), sanidine (˜3 wt.%), cation-deficient magnetite (˜3 wt.%), cristobalite (˜2 wt.%), and anhydrite (˜1 wt.%) are the mudstone crystalline minerals. Amorphous material is silica-rich (˜39 wt.% opal-A and/or high-SiO2 glass and opal-CT), volatile-bearing (16 wt.% mixed cation sulfates, phosphates, and chlorides‑perchlorates‑chlorates), and has minor TiO2 and Fe2O3T oxides (˜5 wt.%). Rietveld refinement yielded a monoclinic structural model for a well-crystalline tridymite, consistent with high formation temperatures. Terrestrial tridymite is commonly associated with silicic volcanism, and detritus from such volcanism in a “Lake Gale” catchment environment can account for Buckskin's tridymite, cristobalite, feldspar, and any residual high-SiO2 glass. These cogenetic detrital phases are possibly sourced from the Gale crater wall/rim/central peak. Opaline silica could form during diagenesis from high-SiO2 glass, as amorphous precipitated silica, or as a residue of acidic leaching in the sediment source region or at Marias Pass. The amorphous mixed-cation salts and oxides and possibly the crystalline magnetite (otherwise detrital) are primary precipitates and/or their diagenesis products derived from multiple infiltrations of aqueous solutions having variable compositions, temperatures, and acidities. Anhydrite is post lithification fracture/vein fill.

  14. Phase-equilibrium geobarometers for silicic rocks based on rhyolite-MELTS. Part 2: application to Taupo Volcanic Zone rhyolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bégué, Florence; Gualda, Guilherme A. R.; Ghiorso, Mark S.; Pamukcu, Ayla S.; Kennedy, Ben M.; Gravley, Darren M.; Deering, Chad D.; Chambefort, Isabelle

    2014-11-01

    Constraining the pressure of crystallisation of large silicic magma bodies gives important insight into the depth and vertical extent of magmatic plumbing systems; however, it is notably difficult to constrain pressure at the level of detail necessary to understand shallow magmatic systems. In this study, we use the recently developed rhyolite-MELTS geobarometer to constrain the crystallisation pressures of rhyolites from the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ). As sanidine is absent from the studied deposits, we calculate the pressures at which quartz and feldspar are found to be in equilibrium with melt now preserved as glass (the quartz +1 feldspar constraint of Gualda and Ghiorso, Contrib Mineral Petrol 168:1033. doi:10.1007/s00410-014-1033-3. 2014). We use glass compositions (matrix glass and melt inclusions) from seven eruptive deposits dated between ~320 and 0.7 ka from four distinct calderas in the central TVZ, and we discuss advantages and limitations of the rhyolite-MELTS geobarometer in comparison with other geobarometers applied to the same eruptive deposits. Overall, there is good agreement with other pressure estimates from the literature (amphibole geobarometry and H2O-CO2 solubility models). One of the main advantages of this new geobarometer is that it can be applied to both matrix glass and melt inclusions—regardless of volatile saturation. The examples presented also emphasise the utility of this method to filter out spurious glass compositions. Pressure estimates obtained with the new rhyolite-MELTS geobarometer range between ~250 to ~50 MPa, with a large majority at ~100 MPa. These results confirm that the TVZ hosts some of the shallowest rhyolitic magma bodies on the planet, resulting from the extensional tectonic regime and thinning of the crust. Distinct populations with different equilibration pressures are also recognised, which is consistent with the idea that multiple batches of eruptible magma can be present in the crust at the same time and

  15. Silicic volcanism on Mars evidenced by tridymite in high-SiO2 sedimentary rock at Gale crater

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Richard V.; Vaniman, David T.; Blake, David F.; Gellert, Ralf; Chipera, Steve J.; Rampe, Elizabeth B.; Ming, Douglas W.; Morrison, Shaunna M.; Downs, Robert T.; Treiman, Allan H.; Yen, Albert S.; Grotzinger, John P.; Achilles, Cherie N.; Bristow, Thomas F.; Crisp, Joy A.; Des Marais, David J.; Farmer, Jack D.; Fendrich, Kim V.; Graff, Trevor G.; Morookian, John-Michael; Stolper, Edward M.; Schwenzer, Susanne P.

    2016-01-01

    Tridymite, a low-pressure, high-temperature (>870 °C) SiO2 polymorph, was detected in a drill sample of laminated mudstone (Buckskin) at Marias Pass in Gale crater, Mars, by the Chemistry and Mineralogy X-ray diffraction instrument onboard the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity. The tridymitic mudstone has ∼40 wt.% crystalline and ∼60 wt.% X-ray amorphous material and a bulk composition with ∼74 wt.% SiO2 (Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer analysis). Plagioclase (∼17 wt.% of bulk sample), tridymite (∼14 wt.%), sanidine (∼3 wt.%), cation-deficient magnetite (∼3 wt.%), cristobalite (∼2 wt.%), and anhydrite (∼1 wt.%) are the mudstone crystalline minerals. Amorphous material is silica-rich (∼39 wt.% opal-A and/or high-SiO2 glass and opal-CT), volatile-bearing (16 wt.% mixed cation sulfates, phosphates, and chlorides−perchlorates−chlorates), and has minor TiO2 and Fe2O3T oxides (∼5 wt.%). Rietveld refinement yielded a monoclinic structural model for a well-crystalline tridymite, consistent with high formation temperatures. Terrestrial tridymite is commonly associated with silicic volcanism, and detritus from such volcanism in a “Lake Gale” catchment environment can account for Buckskin’s tridymite, cristobalite, feldspar, and any residual high-SiO2 glass. These cogenetic detrital phases are possibly sourced from the Gale crater wall/rim/central peak. Opaline silica could form during diagenesis from high-SiO2 glass, as amorphous precipitated silica, or as a residue of acidic leaching in the sediment source region or at Marias Pass. The amorphous mixed-cation salts and oxides and possibly the crystalline magnetite (otherwise detrital) are primary precipitates and/or their diagenesis products derived from multiple infiltrations of aqueous solutions having variable compositions, temperatures, and acidities. Anhydrite is post lithification fracture/vein fill. PMID:27298370

  16. Silicic volcanism on Mars evidenced by tridymite in high-SiO2 sedimentary rock at Gale crater.

    PubMed

    Morris, Richard V; Vaniman, David T; Blake, David F; Gellert, Ralf; Chipera, Steve J; Rampe, Elizabeth B; Ming, Douglas W; Morrison, Shaunna M; Downs, Robert T; Treiman, Allan H; Yen, Albert S; Grotzinger, John P; Achilles, Cherie N; Bristow, Thomas F; Crisp, Joy A; Des Marais, David J; Farmer, Jack D; Fendrich, Kim V; Frydenvang, Jens; Graff, Trevor G; Morookian, John-Michael; Stolper, Edward M; Schwenzer, Susanne P

    2016-06-28

    Tridymite, a low-pressure, high-temperature (>870 °C) SiO2 polymorph, was detected in a drill sample of laminated mudstone (Buckskin) at Marias Pass in Gale crater, Mars, by the Chemistry and Mineralogy X-ray diffraction instrument onboard the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity The tridymitic mudstone has ∼40 wt.% crystalline and ∼60 wt.% X-ray amorphous material and a bulk composition with ∼74 wt.% SiO2 (Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer analysis). Plagioclase (∼17 wt.% of bulk sample), tridymite (∼14 wt.%), sanidine (∼3 wt.%), cation-deficient magnetite (∼3 wt.%), cristobalite (∼2 wt.%), and anhydrite (∼1 wt.%) are the mudstone crystalline minerals. Amorphous material is silica-rich (∼39 wt.% opal-A and/or high-SiO2 glass and opal-CT), volatile-bearing (16 wt.% mixed cation sulfates, phosphates, and chlorides-perchlorates-chlorates), and has minor TiO2 and Fe2O3T oxides (∼5 wt.%). Rietveld refinement yielded a monoclinic structural model for a well-crystalline tridymite, consistent with high formation temperatures. Terrestrial tridymite is commonly associated with silicic volcanism, and detritus from such volcanism in a "Lake Gale" catchment environment can account for Buckskin's tridymite, cristobalite, feldspar, and any residual high-SiO2 glass. These cogenetic detrital phases are possibly sourced from the Gale crater wall/rim/central peak. Opaline silica could form during diagenesis from high-SiO2 glass, as amorphous precipitated silica, or as a residue of acidic leaching in the sediment source region or at Marias Pass. The amorphous mixed-cation salts and oxides and possibly the crystalline magnetite (otherwise detrital) are primary precipitates and/or their diagenesis products derived from multiple infiltrations of aqueous solutions having variable compositions, temperatures, and acidities. Anhydrite is post lithification fracture/vein fill. PMID:27298370

  17. Chemical characteristics of the volcanic gases from Nyiragongo lava lake and the generation of CH 4-rich fluid inclusions in alkaline rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, T. M.

    1980-10-01

    Methods used previously to remove compositional modifications from volcanic gas analyses for Mount Etna and Erta'Ale lava lake have bean employed to estimate the gas phase composition at Nyiragongo lava lake, based on samples obtained in 1959. H 2O data were not reported in 11 of the 13 original analyses. The restoration methods have been used to estimate the H 2O contents of the samples and to correct the analyses for atmospheric contamination, loss of sulfur and for pre- and pest-collection oxidation of H 2S, S 2, and H 2. The estimated gas compositions are relatively CO 2-rich, low in total sulfur and reduced. They contain approximately 35-50% CO 2 45-55% H 2O, 1-2% SO 2, 1-2% H 2., 2-3% CO, 1.5-2.5% H 2S, 0.5% S 2 and 0.1% COS over,he collection temperature range 102° to 960° C. The oxygen fugacities of the gases are consistently about half an order of magnitude below quartz-magnetite-fayalite. The low total sulfur content and resulting low atomic S/C of the Nyiragongo gases appear to be related to the relatively low fO 2 of the crystallizing lava. At temperatures above 800°C and pressures of 1-1.5 k bar, the Nyiragongo gas compositions resemble those observed in primary fluid inclusions believed to have formed at similar temperatures and pressures in nephelines of intrusive alkaline rocks. Cooling to 300°C, with fO 2 buffered by the rock, results in gas compositions very rich in CH 4 (50-70%) and resembling secondary fluid inclusions formed at 200-500°C in alkaline rocks. Below 600°C the gases become supersaturated in carbon as graphite. These inferences are corroborated by several reports of hydrocarbons in plutonic alkaline rocks, and by the presence of CH 4-rich waters in Lake Kivu — a lake on the flanks of Nyiragongo volcano.

  18. Petrogenesis of coexisting SiO 2-undersaturated to SiO 2-oversaturated felsic igneous rocks: The alkaline complex of Itatiaia, southeastern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brotzu, P.; Gomes, C. B.; Melluso, L.; Morbidelli, L.; Morra, V.; Ruberti, E.

    1997-07-01

    The Itatiaia alkaline complex is a Late Cretaceous intrusion (72 Myr) made up of felsic differentiates, with syenitic rocks dominant throughout and with presence of both nepheline- and quartz-rich varieties. Dykes with phonolitic or trachytic composition cross-cut the coarse-grained facies. The rocks are arranged concentrically, with the core of the complex being formed by SiO 2-oversaturated syenites (with a small outcrop of granites), and are radially displaced by faults related to regional tectonic lineaments. The minerals show gradual but significant changes in composition (salitic and augitic to aegirine-rich pyroxenes, hastingsite and actinolite to richterite and arfvedsonite amphiboles, sodic plagioclase to orthoclase feldspars and so on) and the whole-rock trends are broadly consistent with fractional crystallization processes dominated by alkali feldspar removal. Sr-isotopic data indicate more radiogenic ratios for the SiO 2-oversaturated rocks (0.7062-0.7067 against 0.7048-0.7054 for the SiO 2-undersaturated syenites), consistent with small amounts of crustal input. The favored hypothesis for the petrogenesis of the different syenitic groups is the prolonged differentiation starting from differently SiO 2-undersaturated mafic parental magmas (potassic alkali basalts to ankaratrites, present in the Late Cretaceous dyke swarms of the area), accompanied by variable crustal contamination prior to the final emplacement. The lack of carbonatite as a significant lithotype, the potassic affinity of the Itatiaia complex, and the relatively high Sr-isotopic ratios match the characteristics of the other complexes of the Rio de Janeiro-Sa˜o Paulo states coastline and confirm the ultimate derivation of these differentiated rocks from an enriched lithospheric mantle source.

  19. Scheelite and coexisting F-rich zoned garnet, vesuvianite, fluorite, and apatite in calc-silicate rocks from the Mogok metamorphic belt, Myanmar: Implications for metasomatism in marble and the role of halogens in W mobilization and mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shun; Chen, Yi; Liu, Chuan-Zhou; Wang, Jian-Gang; Su, Bin; Gao, Yi-Jie; Wu, Fu-Yuan; Sein, Kyaing; Yang, Yue-Heng; Mao, Qian

    2016-03-01

    Scheelite, which is an important ore of tungsten and colored gemstone, is well developed in the calc-silicate rocks from the Mogok metamorphic belt (MMB), Myanmar. In this study, the textural, mineralogical, and compositional characteristics of scheelite and its associated minerals were systematically investigated to constrain the petrogenesis of scheelite-bearing calc-silicate rocks and the tungsten transfer and mineralization mechanism in a hydrothermal-metasomatic system. The petrological evidence, bulk and mineral geochemical signatures, and mass-transfer calculations indicate that the calc-silicate rocks formed by local metasomatism of marble via the introduction of an externally derived Si-Al-Fe-W-F-bearing, H2O-rich fluid phase. The distinct compositional zonations [F, Fe, Ca, and heavy rare earth elements (HREEs)] of garnet in the calc-silicate rocks record a two-stage metasomatic process and significant compositional variation in the associated fluid. The late-stage metasomatic fluid that led to the formation of the F-rich garnet rims, scheelite, and most of the calc-silicate minerals has noticeably higher fluorine activity (aF-), oxygen fugacity (fo2), and HREE content than the early-stage metasomatic fluid responsible for the garnet cores. The MMB scheelite exhibits typical "skarn-type" compositional characteristics with a high LaN/YbN ratio (100-180), a negative Eu anomaly (δEu = 0.3-0.5), and a high Mo content (1100-1330 ppm). These geochemical signatures are primarily controlled by the protolith, metasomatic fluid, redox conditions, and coexisting mineral phases. The enrichment of rare earth elements (REEs) and high field strength elements (HFSEs) in the MMB scheelite was dominated by two substitution reactions: Ca2+ + W6+ = REE3+ + HFSE5+ and 3Ca2+ = 2REE3+ + □Ca (where □Ca is a Ca-site vacancy). Considerable amounts of F and OH in the metasomatic fluid substituted for O in the garnet via the substitute reaction 4(F, OH)- = 4O2- + Si4+, leading

  20. Silicic Melt Generation, Segregation, and Injection by Dolerite Partial Melting of Granitic Wall Rock, McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hersum, T. G.; Simon, A. C.; Marsh, B. D.

    2005-12-01

    Numerous, long (100's m), thin (< 30 cm), interconnected fine-grained granitic dikes cut Ferrar dolerite sills in the McMurdo Dry Valleys. The source of at least one dike is completely exposed at the upper contact of the Basement Sill and granite country rock. The dike emanates from a thin (5 cm) melt sheet separating chilled dolerite from partially melted granite. Residual interstitial granophyric melt decreases away from the contact from 55% to zero within a distance of < 20 m. Higher than expected dolerite contact temperatures of 900-950°C calculated using two-pyroxene thermometry suggest that the dolerite feeder acted as an open conduit for sustained flux of magma. As a consequence of this flow, the contact temperature was pinned above the `dry' granite minimum, the most restrictive condition necessary to generate granitic melt. Although closed-system partial melting of granite clearly occurred beyond 50 cm from the dolerite chilled margin, compositional moment balances on the feldspar ternary between the orthoclase-enriched melt sheet and granite dike whole-rock compositions are reconciled by melts segregated from increasingly orthoclase-depleted partially melted granite at 12.3 cm and closer to the dolerite chilled margin. Melting models and mass balance calculations predict a range of between 48 to 83% maximum volumes of segregated granitic melt, but these are only estimates as the samples are not exclusively residuum. If granitic melt segregation occurs by viscous compaction of the restitic crystal matrix, then, employing commonly used properties, the compaction length scale is ~3 m. This is an upper bound as the compaction model assumes constant melt fraction, but the result is nevertheless only an order of magnitude larger than the distance over which the partially melted granite has a composition that differs from unmelted granite. Contraction attending cessation of doleritic magma flow and dolerite solidification likely generated deviatoric stresses

  1. Early differentiation of the silicate Earth : new constraints from isotopic investigation of rocks from the lunar highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyet, M.; Carlson, R.; Borg, L.; Connelly, J.; Horan, M.

    2012-04-01

    The isotopic similarity in O, Mo, W, Si, and Fe between lunar and terrestrial samples suggests that the two planetary bodies were equilibrated in the energetic aftermath of the giant impact that gave birth to the Moon [1]. Coupled 142Nd-143Nd isotope systematics of lunar samples including both low-Ti and high-Ti mare basalts along with KREEP basalts have been used to constrain the age of crystallization of the lunar interior [2-5]. These studies show that the Sm-Nd system in the lunar mantle closed in the interval of 180-250 Ma after the beginning of solar system formation, depending on the model considered for lunar mantle differentiation (1 or 2 stage-model and initial lunar Sm/Nd ratio). Does this age represent the age of Moon formation? A prolonged lunar magma ocean (LMO) might be expected given the insulating effect of the thick plagioclase crust, so closure of the Sm-Nd system in the lunar mantle, particularly in a late stage LMO component like KREEP, might substantially post-date lunar formation. We have recently determined a new age of 4360±3 Ma for the ferroan anorthosite (FAN) 60025 using the 207Pb-206Pb, 147Sm-143Nd and 146Sm-142Nd isotope systems [6]. This study is the first in which a single sample of FAN yielded consistent ages from multiple isotope dating techniques, strongly suggesting that this age indicates the time at which the sample crystallized. In order to pursue the question of whether Moon formation occurred over 100 Ma after solar system formation, we have investigated a number of lunar rocks sampling the highland crust from both the FAN and the Mg-suite groups. Internal Sm-Nd isochron on the norite 77215 yields an age of 4296±20 Ma, in agreement with the young age determined on 60025. We will show that our new data obtained on the 146Sm-142Nd systematics of the lunar crust support the scenario of a relative young age for the Moon. Thus, these results offer a unique opportunity to better constrain the composition of the terrestrial

  2. Distribution of chemical elements in calc-alkaline igneous rocks, soils, sediments and tailings deposits in northern central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyarzún, Jorge; Oyarzun, Roberto; Lillo, Javier; Higueras, Pablo; Maturana, Hugo; Oyarzún, Ricardo

    2016-08-01

    This study follows the paths of 32 chemical elements in the arid to semi-arid realm of the western Andes, between 27° and 33° S, a region hosting important ore deposits and mining operations. The study encompasses igneous rocks, soils, river and stream sediments, and tailings deposits. The chemical elements have been grouped according to the Goldschmidt classification, and their concentrations in each compartment are confronted with their expected contents for different rock types based on geochemical affinities and the geologic and metallogenic setting. Also, the element behavior during rock weathering and fluvial transport is here interpreted in terms of the ionic potentials and solubility products. The results highlight the similarity between the chemical composition of the andesites and that of the average Continental Crust, except for the higher V and Mn contents of the former, and their depletion in Mg, Ni, and Cr. The geochemical behavior of the elements in the different compartments (rocks, soils, sediments and tailings) is highly consistent with the mobility expected from their ionic potentials, their sulfates and carbonates solubility products, and their affinities for Fe and Mn hydroxides. From an environmental perspective, the low solubility of Cu, Zn, and Pb due to climatic, chemical, and mineralogical factors reduces the pollution risks related to their high to extremely high contents in source materials (e.g., rocks, altered zones, tailings). Besides, the complex oxyanions of arsenic get bound by colloidal particles of Fe-hydroxides and oxyhydroxides (e.g., goethite), thus becoming incorporated to the fine sediment fraction in the stream sediments.

  3. Novel alkaline earth silicate sealing glass for SOFC, Part I: the effect of nickel oxide on the thermal and mechanical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Gow, Robert N.

    2007-06-01

    This is a two-part study of a novel Sr-Ca-Ni-Y-B silicate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). In this paper (Part I), the effect of NiO on glass forming, thermal, and mechanical properties was studied with two different approaches: glass making and composite glass. In the following paper (Part II), sealing and interfacial microstructure of candidate composite glass with 10v percent NiO will be addressed. In Part I, higher NiO content in the glass resulted in precipitation during the glass making process, and the sintered powder compacts of these glasses showed extensive macro- and micro-cracks. Coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) showed large decrease for glass with higher NiO contents. On the other hand, glass-based composites showed no fracture even with NiO content as high as 15 percent. The CTE of the composite glass, which increased with increasing NiO content (consistent with the rule of mixtures prediction), could be adjusted to match the CTE of SOFC components. Phase characterization by XRD identified phases of YBO3 and NiO in the glass, which were likely responsible for the poor mechanical and thermal properties for the glass making approach.

  4. Partitioning of lanthanides and Y between immiscible silicate and fluoride melts, fluorite and cryolite and the origin of the lanthanide tetrad effect in igneous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veksler, Ilya V.; Dorfman, Alexander M.; Kamenetsky, Maya; Dulski, Peter; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2005-06-01

    Some F-rich granitic rocks show anomalous, nonchondritic ratios of Y/Ho, extreme negative Eu anomalies, and unusual, discontinuous, segmented chondrite-normalised plots of rare earth elements (REE). The effects of F-rich fluids have been proposed as one of the explanations for the geochemical anomalies in the evolved granitic systems, as the stability of nonsilicate complexes of individual rare earths may affect the fluid-melt element partitioning. The lanthanide tetrad effect, related to different configurations of 4f-electron subshells of the lanthanide elements, is one of the factors affecting such complexing behaviour. We present the first experimental demonstration of the decoupling of Y and Ho, and the tetrad effect in the partitioning of rare earths between immiscible silicate and fluoride melts. Two types of experiments were performed: dry runs at atmospheric pressure in a high-temperature centrifuge at 1100 to 1200°C, and experiments with the addition of H 2O at 700 to 800°C and 100 MPa in rapid-quench cold-seal pressure vessels. Run products were analysed by electron microprobe (major components), solution-based inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) (REE in the centrifuged runs), and laser ablation ICP-MS (REE and Li in the products of rapid-quench runs). All the dry centrifuge runs were performed at super-liquidus, two-phase conditions. In the experiments with water-bearing mixtures, minor amounts of aqueous vapour were present in addition to the melts. We found that lanthanides and Y concentrated strongly in the fluoride liquids, with two-melt partition coefficients reaching values as high as 100-220 in water-bearing compositions. In all the experimental samples, two-melt partition coefficients of lanthanides show subtle periodicity consistent with the tetrad effect, and the partition coefficient of Y is greater than that of Ho. One of the mixtures also produced abundant fluorite (CaF 2) and cryolite (Na 3AlF 6) crystals, which enabled

  5. Shoshonite and sub-alkaline magmas from an ultrapotassic volcano: Sr-Nd-Pb isotope data on the Roccamonfina volcanic rocks, Roman Magmatic Province, Southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conticelli, Sandro; Marchionni, Sara; Rosa, Davide; Giordano, Guido; Boari, Elena; Avanzinelli, Riccardo

    2009-01-01

    The Roccamonfina volcano is characterised by two stages of volcanic activity that are separated by volcano-tectonic caldera collapses. Ultrapotassic leucite-bearing rocks are confined to the pre-caldera stage and display geochemical characteristics similar to those of other volcanoes in the Roman Province. After the major sector collapse of the volcano, occurred at ca. 400 ka, shoshonitic rocks erupted from cinder cones and domes both within the caldera and on the external flanks of the pre-caldera Roccamonfina volcano. On the basis of new trace element and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope data, we show that the Roccamonfina shoshonitic rocks are distinct from shoshonites of the Northern Roman Province, but are very similar to those of the Neapolitan volcanoes. The last phases of volcanic activity erupted sub-alkaline magmas as enclaves in trachytic domes, and as lavas within the Monte Santa Croce dome. Ultrapotassic rocks of the pre-caldera composite volcano are plagioclase-bearing leucitites characterised by high levels of incompatible trace elements with an orogenic signature having troughs at Ba, Ta, Nb, and Ti, and peaks at Cs, K, Th, U, and Pb. Initial values of 87Sr/86Sr range from 0.70926 to 0.70999, 143Nd/144Nd ranges from 0.51213 to 0.51217, while the lead isotope rations vary between 18.788-18.851 for 206Pb/204Pb, 15.685-15.701 for 207Pb/204Pb, and 39.048-39.076 for 208Pb/204Pb. Shoshonites show a similar pattern of trace element depletions and enrichments to the earlier ultrapotassic leucite-bearing rocks but have a larger degree of differentiation and lower concentrations of incompatible trace elements. On the other hand, shoshonitic rocks have Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopes consistently different than pre-caldera ultrapotassic leucite-bearing rocks. 87Sr/86Sr ranges from 0.70665 to 0.70745, 143Nd/144Nd ranges from 0.51234 to 0.51238, 206Pb/204Pb ranges from 18.924 to 19.153, 207Pb/204Pb ranges from 15.661 to 15.694, and 208Pb/204Pb ranges from 39.084 to 39.212. High-K calc-alkaline

  6. The Friction Evolution of Siliceous Rocks during High-Velocity Slip By Thermal Activated Transition from Powder Lubrication and Rolling to Gouge Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Madden, A. S.; Reches, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Experimental analyses of the frictional strength of siliceous rocks (granite, tonalite, and diorite) sheared in a rotary apparatus in the velocity range of 0.002-1 m/s (0.3-7.1 MPa, 0.002 - 1 m/s, total slip up to 60 m) revealed that: (1) During long slip-distances (tens of m) at low to moderate velocity (< 5 cm/s) the friction coefficient evolves with a weakening-strengthening-weakening path (Fig. 1a); and (2) The dependence of the friction coefficient on the slip-velocity is non-monotonous with weakening-strengthening-weakening sections (Fig. 1b) (Reches & Lockner, 2010). In a typical run with granite (Fig. 1a), the friction coefficient dropped from a static value of 0.86 to a steady value of 0.35 after 2.5 m of slip, followed by a sharp increase to 0.5±0.1 after ~7 m that was maintained for the next 10 m. Then, the friction started to increase again at 17 m to 0.78 at ~20 m, and finally dropped rapidly to 0.4. The first weakening stage (< 2.5m) is associated with formation of cohesive gouge flakes made of mixture of partially hydrated and recrystallized fine-grained gouge (20-50 nm). The top of these flakes displayed cylindrical rolls, 1 micron in diameter, oriented normal to slip, and the macroscopic weakening correlates with the presence of abundant rolls. SEM analysis of fault surfaces at the second weakening stage (> 17m) revealed abundant melt features such as stretched melt drops, melt coating of solid grains and abundant voids in the melt matrix, contrasting with the total melt in high velocity experiments. These friction-distance curves in our granite experiments (e.g., Fig. 1a) bears a similar path of gabbro friction curve at high velocity (Hirose and Shimamoto 2005). We propose that this non-monotonous friction evolution can be explained as a phase transition from initial pulverization of the brittle stage (low velocity, low normal stress, small slip distance), that leads to powder lubrication by powder rolling, to partial-to-full melting of the

  7. Ocean alkalinity and the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldeira, K. G.; Rampino, Michael R.

    1988-01-01

    A biogeochemical cycle model resolving ocean carbon and alkalinity content is applied to the Maestrichtian and Danian. The model computes oceanic concentrations and distributions of Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and Sigma-CO2. From these values an atmospheric pCO2 value is calculated, which is used to estimate rates of terrestrial weathering of calcite, dolomite, and calcium and magnesium silicates. Metamorphism of carbonate rocks and the subsequent outgassing of CO2 to the atmosphere are parameterized in terms of carbonate rock reservoir sizes, total land area, and a measure of overall tectonic activity, the sea-floor generation rate. The ocean carbon reservoir computed by the model is used with Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) C-13 data to estimate organic detrital fluxes under a variety of ocean mixing rate assumptions. Using Redfield ratios, the biogenic detrital flux estimate is used to partition the ocean carbon and alkalinity reservoirs between the mixed layer and deep ocean. The calcite flux estimate and carbonate ion concentrations are used to determine the rate of biologically mediated CaCO3 titration. Oceanic productivity was severely limited for approximately 500 kyr following the K/T boundary resulting in significant increases in total ocean alkalinity. As productivity returned to the ocean, excess carbon and alkalinity was removed from the ocean as CaCO3. Model runs indicate that this resulted in a transient imbalance in the other direction. Ocean chemistry returned to near-equilibrium by about 64 mybp.

  8. Effect of silicate ions on electrode overvoltage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gras, J. M.; Seite, C.

    1979-01-01

    The influence of the addition of a silicate to a caustic solution (KOH) is studied in order to determine the degree to which silicates inhibit the corrosion of chrysotile under conditions of electrolysis at working temperatures of 100 C and above. In an alkaline solution containing various silicate concentrations, current density was increased and electrode overvoltage was measured. Results show that silicate ion concentrations in the electrolyte increase with temperature without effecting electrochemical performance up to 115 C at 700 MA/sqcm. At this point the concentration is about 0.5 g Si/100 g KOH. Beyond this limit, electrolytic performance rapidly degenerates due to severe oxidation of the electrodes.

  9. Evidence for a tektosilicate structure and dominance of Fe(III) over Fe(II) in silicic volcanic glasses of the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, R.G.

    1983-01-01

    More than 400 individual analyses have been obtained by electron microprobe for silicic glasses in 58 samples of tuff and lava from the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These samples comprise a wide range in chemical and petrographic types, including calc-alkaline and peralkaline rock types, and include most of the volcanic units of the NTS. Locations and brief petrographic descriptions are given for representative samples.

  10. Two Distinct Sets of Magma Sources in Cretaceous Rocks From Magnet Cove, Prairie Creek, and Other Igneous Centers of the Arkansas Alkaline Province, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, G. I.; Carlson, R. W.; Eby, G. N.

    2008-12-01

    Two distinct sets of magma sources from the Arkansas alkaline province (~106-89 Ma) are revealed by Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions of olivine lamproites vs. other alkalic rock types, including carbonatite, ijolite, lamprophyres, tephrite, malignite, jacupirangite, phonolite, trachyte, and latite. Isotopic compositions of diamond-bearing olivine lamproites from Prairie Creek and Dare Mine Knob point to Proterozoic lithosphere as an important source, and previous Re-Os isotopic data indicate derivation from subcontinental mantle lithosphere. Both sources were probably involved in lamproite generation. Magnet Cove carbonatites and other alkalic magmas were likely derived from an asthenospheric source. Lamproite samples are isotopically quite different from other rock types in Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic space. Although three lamproite samples from Prairie Creek have a large range of SiO2 contents (40-60 wt %), initial values of ɛNd (-10 to -13), 206Pb/204Pb (16.61-16.81), 207Pb/204Pb (15.34-15.36), and 208Pb/204Pb (36.57-36.76) are low and similar. Only 87Sr/86Sr(i) displays a wide range in the Prairie Creek lamproites (0.70627-0.70829). A fourth lamproite from Dare Mine Knob has the most negative ɛNd(i) of -19. Lamproite isotope values show a significant crustal component and isotopically overlap subalkalic rhyolites from the Black Hills (SD), which assimilated Proterozoic crust. Six samples of carbonatite, ijolite, and jacupirangite from Magnet Cove and Potash Sulphur Springs exhibit the most depleted Sr-Nd isotopic signatures of all samples. For these rock types, 87Sr/86Sr(i) is 0.70352 - 0.70396, and ɛNd(i) is +3.8 - +4.3. Eight other rock types have a narrow range of ɛNd(i) (+1.9 - +3.7), but a wide range of 87Sr/86Sr(i) (0.70424 - 0.70629). These 14 samples comprise a fairly tight cluster of Pb isotopic values: 206Pb/204Pb (18.22-19.23), 207Pb/204Pb (15.54-15.62), and 208Pb/204Pb (38.38-38.94), suggesting very little crustal assimilation. They are most similar to EM-2

  11. The Volatile Element Evolution of Intra-plate Alkaline Rocks as Recorded by Apatite: An Example from the Hegau Volcanic Field (Southwest Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Von Der Handt, A.; Rahn, M. K. W.; Wang, L. X.; Marks, M. A. W.

    2014-12-01

    The role of volatiles in the petrogenesis of alkaline intra-plate magmas has been the subject of an increasing number of experimental studies. The study of naturally occurring rocks and their volatile contents is often complicated by syn- and post-eruptive degassing and alteration processes. Minerals that incorporate volatiles into their structure such as apatites are often more faithful recorders of the pre-eruptive volatile budget. The Hegau volcanic field in Southwest Germany is part of the Central European Volcanic Province, lies around 60-70 km to the east of the Upper Rhine graben and of Miocene age. Three main lithological units can be distinguished (1) olivine melilites (2) phonolites and (3) the "Deckentuff" series referring to a series of diatreme-filling pipe breccias and lapilli tuff layers. Carbonatites occur subordinately in the Hegau province. Earlier radiometric age dating suggested distinct phases of volcanic activity of Deckentuffs, melilites and phonolites with little overlap, but new apatite fission-track and (U-Th)/He age data suggest a synchronous activity. Apatite is an abundant accessory phase in the Deckentuff and phonolite series and we investigated its major, trace and volatile element composition by EPMA, SIMS and cathodoluminescence imaging. Pronounced core-rim zoning of apatite in places attests that diffusional equilibration was very limited and they likely retained their primary compositions. This allows us to trace the entire magmatic evolution of the Hegau province from its most primitive to most evolved products as well as resolve it in time by combining age dating with compositional analysis. Apatite compositions fall along the OH-F join with low Cl-contents (<0.5 wt%). Volatile contents (Cl, OH, S) are highest in most primitive compositions and decrease with further evolution while F increases. Multiple magmatic cycles can be discerned with a general trend to the more evolved phonolite compositions toward the end of volcanic

  12. Basaltic injections into floored silicic magma chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, R. A.

    Recent studies have provided compelling evidence that many large accumulations of silicic volcanic rocks erupted from long-lasting, floored chambers of silicic magma that were repeatedly injected by basaltic magma. These basaltic infusions are commonly thought to play an important role in the evolution of the silicic systems: they have been proposed as a cause for explosive silicic eruptions [Sparks and Sigurdsson, 1977], compositional variation in ash-flow sheets [Smith, 1979], mafic magmatic inclusions in silicic volcanic rocks [Bacon, 1986], and mixing of mafic and silicic magmas [Anderson, 1976; Eichelberger, 1978]. If, as seems likely, floored silicic magma chambers have frequently been invaded by basalt, then plutonic bodies should provide records of these events. Although plutonic evidence for mixing and commingling of mafic and silicic magmas has been recognized for many years, it has been established only recently that some intrusive complex originated through multiple basaltic injections into floored chambers of silicic magma [e.g., Wiebe, 1974; Michael, 1991; Chapman and Rhodes, 1992].

  13. Silica in alkaline brines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, B.F.; Rettig, S.L.; Eugster, H.P.

    1967-01-01

    Analysis of sodium carbonate-bicarbonate brines from closed basins in volcanic terranes of Oregon and Kenya reveals silica contents of up to 2700 parts per million at pH's higher than 10. These high concentrations of SiO 2 can be attributed to reaction of waters with silicates, and subsequent evaporative concentration accompanied by a rise in pH. Supersaturation with respect to amorphous silica may occur and persist for brines that are out of contact with silicate muds and undersaturated with respect to trona; correlation of SiO2 with concentration of Na and total CO2 support this interpretation. Addition of moredilute waters to alkaline brines may lower the pH and cause inorganic precipitation of substantial amounts of silica.

  14. Experimental rock-water interactions at temperatures to 300/sup 0/C: implications for fluid flow, solute transport, and silicate mineral zoning in crustal geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Geothermal reservoirs commonly occur in permeable volcanic rock (rhyolite, andesite, basalt) or sedimentary (sandstone) strata at temperatures below 300/sup 0/C. Knowledge of how these reservoirs develop chemically and physically has been based almost entirely on field studies. Four types of experiments were conducted to supplement available data on the chemistry, mineralogy, and fluid flow aspects of hydrothermal processes occurring in crustal geothermal systems: (1) agitated rock-water experiments; (2) high temperature flow through experiments; (3) low temperature permeability experiments; and (4) corrosion monitoring experiments. Initial experiments reacted rhyolite glass and holocrystalline basalt with water-NaCl solutions at 300/sup 0/C in agitated hydrothermal equipment. Concentrations of components in solution depend on initial salinity, rock type, and particle size. The secondary phases consist of zeolites, clay, and feldspar minerals and the alteration assemblage is dependent on both initial salinity, rock type, and duration of the experiment. A second set of experiments were conducted at 300/sup 0/C using the rhyolite glass in a flow through type of apparatus. Compositions of outlet fluids show a dependence of fluid flow rate and core length.

  15. Fluid-rock reaction weakening of fault zones

    SciTech Connect

    Wintsch, R.P.; Christoffersen, R.; Kronenberg, A.K.

    1995-07-10

    The presence of weak phyllosilicates may explain the low shear strengths of fault zones if they define well-developed fabrics. The growth of phyllosilicates is favored in meteoric water-dominated granitic fault systems, where mineral-aqueous fluid equilibria predict that modal phyllosilicate will increase via feldspar replacement reactions. In deeper, more alkaline, rock-dominated regimes, the reactions reverse, and feldspars tend to replace phyllosilicates. In Mg-rich mafic rocks, however, phyllosilicates (chlorite, biotite) can replace stronger framework and chain silicates in both shallower (<{approximately}10 km) meteoric H{sub 2}O-dominated and in deeper, alkaline, rock-dominated regimes. Where these phyllosilicates precipitate in active fault zones, they contribute directly to reaction softening. Because low-temperature deformation of phyllosilicates is not governed by frictional processes alone but can occur by pressure-independent dislocation glide, the strength of phyllosilicate-rich fault rocks can be low at all depths. Low strain rate creep during interseismic periods can align phyllosilicate grains in foliated gouge and phyllonites. Where preferred orientations are strong and contiguity of phyllosilicates is large, strengths of rocks within fault zones may approach minimum strengths defined by single phyllosilicate crystals. Fault zones containing localized high concentrations of phyllosilicates with strong preferred orientations in well-defined folia can exhibit aseismic slip, especially where mafic Mg-rich rocks occur along the fault (like parts of the San Andreas Fault). 104 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. The Indosinian collision-extension event between the South China Block and the Palaeo-Pacific plate: Evidence from Indosinian alkaline granitic rocks in Dashuang, eastern Zhejiang, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Jianren; Ye, Haimin; Liu, Kai; Li, Zilong; Takahashi, Yutaka; Zhao, Xilin; Kee, Weon-Seo

    2013-07-01

    This study reports on the first comprehensive analysis of the geology, petrology and origin of the Dashuang pluton in Jinhua, eastern Zhejiang, South China, which is predominantly composed of quartz monzonite and subordinate quartz syenite that includes variable amounts of aegirine-augite. The quartz monzonite has a porphyritic texture defined by K-feldspar phenocrysts, whereas the quartz syenite shows considerable variation in grain size and is categorised into fine- and coarse-grained types. Zircons from the quartz monzonite and fine-grained quartz syenite yield LA-MC-ICP-MS (laser ablation-multi-collector-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry) U-Pb ages of 231.60 ± 0.86 Ma and 231.7 ± 1.1 Ma, respectively, indicating crystallisation in the Middle Triassic. The chemistry of the quartz monzonite indicates a calc-alkaline to alkaline evolutionary trend, which may reflect partial melting of upper mantle contaminated by Proterozoic basement rocks, subjected to fractional crystallisation during ascent. Both the fine- and coarse-grained quartz syenites are alkaline and have high rare earth element (REE) concentrations, especially light rare earth elements (LREE), and are relatively enriched in large ion lithosphere elements (LILE). The Al2O3 and NaO2 contents of the quartz syenite increase proportionally with SiO2, owing to greater amounts of aegirine-augite and feldspar. The fine-grained quartz syenite has the lowest initial 87Sr/86Sr ratio and lowest Nd model age, and the highest εNd value compared with the quartz monzonite. The quartz syenite compositions are best explained by fractional crystallisation of an enriched mantle-derived alkaline magma. Slight chemical variations result from source heterogeneities, as well as the spatially variable degrees of melting, assimilation, and other factors. Our new age and geochemical data for the alkaline rocks in eastern Zhejiang, considered together with collisional granites from South Korea, support a history of

  17. Nd, Sr, and O isotopic variations in metaluminous ash-flow tuffs and related volcanic rocks at the Timber Mountain/Oasis Valley Caldera, Complex, SW Nevada: implications for the origin and evolution of large-volume silicic magma bodies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farmer, G.L.; Broxton, D.E.; Warren, R.G.; Pickthorn, W.

    1991-01-01

    Nd, Sr and O isotopic data were obtained from silicic ash-flow tuffs and lavas at the Tertiary age (16-9 Ma) Timber (Mountain/Oasis Valley volcanic center (TMOV) in southern Nevada, to assess models for the origin and evolution of the large-volume silicic magma bodies generated in this region. The large-volume (>900 km3), chemically-zoned, Topopah Spring (TS) and Tiva Canyon (TC) members of the Paintbrush Tuff, and the Rainier Mesa (RM) and Ammonia Tanks (AT) members of the younger Timber Mountain Tuff all have internal Nd and Sr isotopic zonations. In each tuff, high-silica rhyolites have lower initial e{open}Nd values (???1 e{open}Nd unit), higher87Sr/86Sr, and lower Nd and Sr contents, than cocrupted trachytes. The TS, TC, and RM members have similar e{open}Nd values for high-silica rhyolites (-11.7 to -11.2) and trachytes (-10.5 to -10.7), but the younger AT member has a higher e{open}Nd for both compositional types (-10.3 and -9.4). Oxygen isotope data confirm that the TC and AT members were derived from low e{open}Nd magmas. The internal Sr and Nd isotopic variations in each tuff are interpreted to be the result of the incorporation of 20-40% (by mass) wall-rock into magmas that were injected into the upper crust. The low e{open}Nd magmas most likely formed via the incorporation of low ??18O, hydrothermally-altered, wall-rock. Small-volume rhyolite lavas and ash-flow tuffs have similar isotopic characteristics to the large-volume ash-flow tuffs, but lavas erupted from extracaldera vents may have interacted with higher ??18O crustal rocks peripheral to the main magma chamber(s). Andesitic lavas from the 13-14 Ma Wahmonie/Salyer volcanic center southeast of the TMOV have low e{open}Nd (-13.2 to -13.8) and are considered on the basis of textural evidence to be mixtures of basaltic composition magmas and large proportions (70-80%) of anatectic crustal melts. A similar process may have occurred early in the magmatic history of the TMOV. The large-volume rhyolites

  18. Transition from alkaline to calc-alkaline volcanism during evolution of the Paleoproterozoic Francevillian basin of eastern Gabon (Western Central Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiéblemont, Denis; Bouton, Pascal; Préat, Alain; Goujou, Jean-Christian; Tegyey, Monique; Weber, Francis; Ebang Obiang, Michel; Joron, Jean Louis; Treuil, Michel

    2014-11-01

    We report new geochemical data for the volcanic and subvolcanic rocks associated with the evolution of the Francevillian basin of eastern Gabon during Paleoproterozoic times (c. 2.1-2 Ga). Filling of this basin has proceeded through four main sedimentary or volcano-sedimentary episodes, namely FA, FB, FC and FD. Volcanism started during the FB episode being present only in the northern part of the basin (Okondja sub-basin). This volcanism is ultramafic to trachytic in composition and displays a rather constant alkaline geochemical signature. This signature is typical of a within-plate environment, consistent with the rift-setting generally postulated for the Francevillian basin during the FB period. Following FB, the FC unit is 10-20 m-thick silicic horizon (jasper) attesting for a massive input of silica in the basin. Following FC, the FD unit is a c. 200-400 m-thick volcano-sedimentary sequence including felsic tuffs and epiclastic rocks. The geochemical signatures of these rocks are totally distinct from those of the FB alkaline lavas. High Th/Ta and La/Ta ratios attest for a calc-alkaline signature and slight fractionation between heavy rare-earth suggests melting at a rather low pressure. Such characteristics are comparable to those of felsic lavas associated with the Taupo zone of New Zealand, a modern ensialic back-arc basin. Following FD, the FE detrital unit is defined only in the Okondja region, probably associated with a late-stage collapse of the northern part of the basin. It is suggested that the alkaline to calc-alkaline volcanic transition reflects the evolution of the Francevillian basin from a diverging to a converging setting, in response to the onset of converging movements in the Eburnean Belt of Central Africa.

  19. Determination of scandium, yttrium and lanthanides in silicate rocks and four new canadian iron-formation reference materials by flame atomic-absorption spectrometry with microsample injection.

    PubMed

    Sen Gupta, J G

    1984-12-01

    Enhancement of sensitivity by factors of up to 1.5 by use of the microsampling technique, coupled with the advantage of using small samples in small solution volumes, permits rapid flame AAS determination of traces of Sc, Y, Nd, Eu, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm and Yb in ultramafic and most other rocks of low rare-earth content, which would be either impossible or very difficult to analyse by direct aspiration because of the need for much larger sample weights and solution volumes. The rare-earths are separated by a modified ion-exchange or a double calcium oxalate and single hydrous ferric oxide co-precipitation procedure, and ultimately determined in an ethanolic perchlorate solution, buffered with 1% lanthanum, by the flame microsample injection technique, with a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame. The results obtained by this technique for six international reference rocks SY-2 (syenite), BCR-1 (basalt), BHVO-1 (Hawaiian basalt), SCo-1 (cody shale), MAG-1 (marine mud) and STM-1 (syenite) are compared with those obtained previously by the direct aspiration method and with other reported data. Results are given for four new Canadian iron formation reference materials FeR-1 to FeR-4. PMID:18963723

  20. A Tale of Two Melt Rocks: Equilibration and Metal/Sulfide-Silicate Segregation in the L7 Chondrites PAT 91501 and LEW 88663

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, R. P.

    1993-07-01

    Type 7 ordinary chondrites have experienced temperatures near or beyond those necessary for partial melting. Two recently collected Antarctic specimens, PAT91501 (PAT) and LEW88663 (LEW), have been tentatively identified as L7 chondrites based on mineral and oxygen isotope compositions [1,2]. The petrology and mineralogy of these meteorites suggests that they have undergone significant metal/sulfide-silicate segregation, with implications for meteorite parent bodies. PAT consists of an equigranular contact-framework of nearly euhedral olivine grains, with interstitial spaces filled by plagioclase, pyroxenes, and several minor phases. Ortho- and clinopyroxene occur in an exsolution relationship. Olivine and pyroxene are highly equilibrated, varying <<1% in Fe-endmember content. Pyroxene equilibration temperatures calculated for PAT using the methods of [3] are self-consistent at about 1180 degrees C. In thin section, PAT contains only traces of metal, as tiny isolated blebs in sulfide grains; large (>1 cm) globular sulfide inclusions are seen in hand-sample [1], but are not present in the section examined. LEW was originally classified as an achondrite with olivine and pyroxene compositions similar to those in L chondrites [2]. Metal is absent in LEW, although the specimen is small and heavily rusted, making it impossible to gauge the original metal content. Olivine grains are commonly rounded in shape and seldom in contact with more than a few other grains. LEW olivine and pyroxene are also highly equilibrated. Veins of Ni-bearing metal oxides and sulfides are common. Both low- and high-Ca pyroxene occur as discrete grains, orthopyroxene often poikilitically enclosing olivine. Pyroxene equilibration temperatures for LEW are more variable than those for PAT and consistently lower, with an average around 900 degrees C. The various textural and compositional characteristics of PAT and LEW suggest they have experienced partial melting to varying degrees. Both visually

  1. Gels composed of sodium-aluminum silicate, Lake Magadi, Kenya

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eugster, H.P.; Jones, B.F.

    1968-01-01

    Sodium-aluminum silicate gels are found in surftcial deposits as thick as 5 centimeters in the Magadi area of Kenya. Chemical data indicate they are formed by the interaction of hot alkaline springwaters (67?? to 82??C; pH, about 9) with alkali trachyte flows and their detritus, rather than by direct precipitation. In the process, Na2O is added from and silica is released to the saline waters of the springs. Algal mats protect the gels from erosion and act as thermal insulators. The gels are probably yearly accumulates that are washed into the lakes during floods. Crystallization of these gels in the laboratory yields analcite; this fact suggests that some analcite beds in lacustrine deposits may have formed from gels. Textural evidence indicates that cherts of rocks of the Pleistocene chert series in the Magadi area may have formed from soft sodium silicate gels. Similar gels may have acted as substrates for the accumulation and preservation of prebiological organic matter during the Precambrian.

  2. Gels composed of sodium-aluminium silicate, lake magadi, kenya.

    PubMed

    Eugster, H P; Jones, B F

    1968-07-12

    Sodium-aluminum silicate gels are found in surficial deposits as thick as 5 centimeters in the Magadi area of Kenya. Chemical data indicate they are formed by the interaction of hot alkaline springwaters (67 degrees to 82 degrees C; pH, about 9) with alkali trachyte flows and their detritus, rather than by direct precipitation. In the process, Na(2)O is added from and silica is released to the saline waters of the springs. Algal mats protect the gels from erosion and act as thermal insulators. The gels are probably yearly accumulates that are washed into the lakes during floods. Crystallization of these gels in the laboratory yields analcite; this fact suggests that some analcite beds in lacustrine deposits may have formed from gels. Textural evidence indicates that cherts of rocks of the Pleistocene chert series in the Magadi area may have formed from soft sodium silicate gels. Similar gels may have acted as substrates for the accumulation and preservation of prebiological organic matter during the Precambrian. PMID:17770594

  3. The Santiago Peak Volcanic rocks of the Peninsular Ranges batholith, Southern California: volcanic rocks associated with coeval gabbros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, H.; Smith, T. E.; Huang, C. H.

    1984-03-01

    Analyses of the latest Jurassic Santiago Peak volcanic rocks from the western zone of the Peninsular Ranges batholith reveal the existence of two independent groups; one comprising basalts and andesites of the island arc tholeiitic series, and the second made up of the dacites and rhyolites of the subalkaline (calc-alkaline?) series or silicic series. The basalts and andesites have V, Co and Ni contents similar to those estimated for the residual melts in equilibrium with the Peninsular Ranges gabbros. This fact together with the tholeiitic nature of the gabbros and the intimate spatial and temporal relationship between the SPV and the gabbros suggests that the basalts and andesites had a common origin with the gabbros. The mafic volcanism and plutonism seems to have occurred in a youthful island arc and the silicic volcanism in a mature island arc or a continental margin.

  4. Rapid quantitative determination of major and trace elements in silicate rocks and soils employing fused glass discs using wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, A. Keshav; Khanna, Tarun C.; Mohan, K. Rama

    2016-08-01

    This paper introduces a calibration procedure and provides the data achieved for accuracy, precision, reproducibility and the detection limits for major (Si, Al, Fe, Mn, Mg, Ca, Na, K, Ti, P) and trace (Ba, Cr, Cu, Hf, La, Nb, Ni, Pb, Rb, Sr, Ta, Th, U, Y, Zn, Zr) elements in the routine analysis of geological and environmental samples. Forty-two rock and soil reference materials were used to calibrate and evaluate the analytical method using a sequential wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Samples were prepared as fused glass discs and analysis performed with a total measuring time of thirty-one minutes. Another set of twelve independent reference materials were analyzed for the evaluation of accuracy. The detection limits and accuracy obtained for the trace elements (1-2 mg/kg) are adequate both for geochemical exploration and environmental studies. The fitness for purpose of the results was also evaluated by the quality criteria test proposed by the International Global Geochemical Mapping Program (IGCP) from which it can be deduced that the method is adequate considering geochemical mapping application and accuracy obtained is within the expected interval of certified values in most cases.

  5. Carbonatite diversity in the Central Andes: the Ayopaya alkaline province, Bolivia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Frank; Lehmann, Bernd; Tawackoli, Sohrab; Rössling, Reinhard; Belyatsky, Boris; Dulski, Peter

    2004-12-01

    The Ayopaya province in the eastern Andes of Bolivia, 100 km NW of Cochabamba, hosts a Cretaceous alkaline rock series within a Palaeozoic sedimentary sequence. The alkaline rock association comprises nepheline-syenitic/foyaitic to ijolitic intrusions, carbonatite, kimberlite, melilititic, nephelinitic to basanitic dykes and diatremes, and a variety of alkaline dykes. The carbonatites display a wide petrographic and geochemical spectrum. The Cerro Sapo area hosts a small calciocarbonatite intrusion and a multitude of ferrocarbonatitic dykes and lenses in association with a nepheline-syenitic stock. The stock is crosscut by a spectacular REE-Sr-Th-rich sodalite-ankerite-baryte dyke system. The nearby Chiaracke complex represents a magnesiocarbonatite intrusion with no evidence for a relationship to igneous silicate rocks. The magnesiocarbonatite (Σ REE up to 1.3 wt%) shows strong HREE depletion, i.e. unusually high La/Yb ratios (520 1,500). Calciocarbonatites (Σ REE up to 0.5 wt%) have a flatter REE distribution pattern (La/Yb 95 160) and higher Nb and Zr contents. The sodalite-ankerite-baryte dyke system shows geochemical enrichment features, particularly in Na, Ba, Cl, Sr, REE, which are similar to the unusual natrocarbonatitic lavas of the recent volcano of Oldoinyo Lengai, Tanzania. The Cerro Sapo complex may be regarded as an intrusive equivalent of natrocarbonatitic volcanism, and provides an example for carbonatite genesis by late-stage crystal fractionation and liquid immiscibility. The magnesiocarbonatite intrusion of Chiaracke, on the other hand, appears to result from a primary carbonatitic mantle melt. Deep seated mantle magmatism/metasomatism is also expressed by the occurrence of a kimberlite dyke. Neodymium and strontium isotope data (ɛNd 1.4 5.4, 87Sr/86 Sralkaline magmatism. The magmatism of the Ayopaya region is attributed to failed rifting of western South America during the Mesozoic and

  6. The rare-metal ore potential of the Proterozoic alkaline ultramafic massifs from eastern part of the Baltic Shield in the Kola alkaline province.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokhtina, Natalia; Kogarko, Lia

    2014-05-01

    The Kola Alkaline Province consists of intrusions of two main stages of the intraplate alkaline magmatism. The early stage of igneous activity occurred in Proterozoic 1.9 billion years ago, the next in Paleozoic at 380 million years. The Proterozoic alkaline magmatism produced Gremyakha-Vyrmes and Elet'ozero large alkaline-ultrabasic massifs, Tiksheozero carbonatite massif and numerous small syenite complexes. Paleozoic magmatism on Baltic Shield exhibited more widely, than Proterozoic. The world largest Khibiny and Lovozero alkaline intrusions, numerous alkaline-ultrabasic massifs with carbonanites, alkaline dike swarms and diatremes were formed. It is well known that carbonatites of Paleozoic alkaline-ultrabasic massifs contain large-scale deposits of rare-metal ores (Afanasiev et al., 1998). The metasomatic rocks on foidolites and carbonatites of Gremyakha-Vyrmes are final products of differentiation of Proterozoic alkaline-ultrabasic magma enriched in incompatible elements, including Nb and Zr similar to Paleozoic carbonatites. The massif Gremyakha-Vyrmes is one of the largest titanomagnetite-ilmenite deposits in Russia associated with ultrabasites. Our investigation showed that albite-microcline and aegirine-albite metasomatites formed rich rare-metal ores consisting of 3.2 wt. % Nb2O5 and 0.7 ZrO2. Zircon and pyrochlore-group minerals represent the main minerals of rare-metal ores. The following evolutionary sequences of pyrochlore group minerals has been observed: betafite or U pyrochlore - Na-Ca pyrochlore - Ba-Sr pyrochlore - "silicified" pyrochlore - Fe-Nb, Al-Nb silicates. Such evolution from primary Nb oxides to secondary silicates under low temperature hydrothermal conditions is similar to the evolution of rare metal phases in Paleozoic alkaline massifs analogous to Lovozero syenites and in carbonatites. The rare metal minerals of Gremyakha-Vyrmes crystallized in high alkaline hydrothermal environment at increased activity of Nb, Ta, Zr, U, Th and at

  7. Diagenetic Iron Cycling in Ancient Alkaline Saline Lacustrine Sedimentary Rocks: A Case Study on the Jurassic Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation, Colorado Plateau, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter-McIntyre, S. L.; Chan, M. A.; McPherson, B. J. O. L.

    2014-12-01

    The upper part of the Brushy Basin Member in the Four Corners region of the U.S. was deposited in an ephemeral alkaline saline lake system with copious input of volcanic ash. The variegated shale formation provides a setting for the study of early diagenetic iron cycling that records the action of alkaline saline fluid chemistries reacting with volcaniclastic sediments in the presence of microbes. A bull's-eye pattern of authigenic minerals with increasing alteration towards the basinal center similar to modern alkaline saline lakes provides evidence for an extreme paleoenvironmental interpretation. The purpose of this research is to document specific factors, such as reactive sediments, microbial influences, and grain size that affect concretion formation and iron cycling in an ancient extreme environment. Three broad diagenetic facies are interpreted by color and associated bioturbation features: red, green and intermediate. Diagenetic facies reflect meter-scale paleotopography: red facies represent shallow water to subaerial, oxidizing conditions; green facies reflect saturated conditions and reducing pore water chemistry shortly after deposition, and intermediate facies represent a combination of the previous two conditions. Evidence of biotic influence is abundant and trace fossils exhibit patterns associated with the diagenetic facies. Red diagenetic facies typically contain burrows and root traces and green diagenetic facies exhibit restricted biotic diversity typically limited to algal molds (vugs). Microbial fossils are well-preserved and are in close proximity to specific iron mineral textures suggesting biotic influence on the crystal morphology. Three categories of concretions are characterized based on mineralogy: carbonate, iron (oxyhydr)oxide and phosphate concretions. Concretion mineralogy and size vary within an outcrop and even within a stratigraphic horizon such that more than one main category is typically present in an outcrop. Variation in

  8. Middle Miocene nepheline-bearing mafic and evolved alkaline igneous rocks at House Mountain, Arizona Transition Zone, north-central Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Wittke, J.; Holm, R.F.; Ranney, W.D.R. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    The Middle Miocene House Mountain shield volcano is located on the northern margin of the Arizona Transition Zone, about 7 km SW of Sedona, AZ. Deep erosion has exposed internal structural and stratigraphic relationships of the volcano. Mapping documents two igneous suites: (1) alkali basalt to trachyte and alkali-feldspar syenite, and (2) olivine melanephelinite, nepheline monzodiorite, nepheline monzosyenite and nepheline syenite. The rocks of the first suite occur as dikes and flows, which, with a thick pyroclastic section, are the principal units of the volcano. The melanephelinite is nonvesicular and intruded as a large irregular dike and several smaller dikes. The nepheline-bearing syenitic rocks, which are phaneritic with nepheline and clinopyroxene crystals up to 1 cm in diameter, occur as pods and sheets within the melanephelinite. Also within the melanephelinite are wispy leucocratic segregations, syenitic fracture-fillings, and ocelli. The largest phaneritic sheet is [approx]18 m thick; it displays crude subhorizontal compositional banding and vuggy surfaces. The latter indicate that the magmas were fluid-rich. Compositions intermediate between the melanephelinite and syenitic rocks have not been found. Although the syenitic rocks are coarse-grained, mapping indicates the they are near the summit of the volcano and were probably emplaced at a depth of less than 1 km, possibly of only a few hundred meters. The field relationships of the phaneritic rocks can be explained by ascent and coalescence of immiscible syenitic liquids within the melanephelinite dike. Calculated density contrasts between melanephelinite and syenitic liquids exceed 0.2 g/cm[sup 3].

  9. Application of Sr and O isotope relations to the petrogenesis of the alkaline rocks of the Red Hill complex, New Hampshire, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foland, K.A.; Friedman, I.

    1977-01-01

    The Red Hill ring complex in central New Hampshire is composed of apparently cogenetic syenites, nepheline-sodalite syenite, and granite. The ages and petrogenetic relations among five of the six recognized units have been investigated by rubidiumstrontium and oxygen isotope analysis of whole rocks and separated minerals. Whole-rock samples from three syenite units are consistent with a single Rb-Sr isochron which gives an age of 198??3 m.y. and an initial (87Sr/86Sr)o ratio of 0.70330??0.00016 (??2 sigma; ??=1.42?? 10-11y-1). However, Sr isotope data for two other units, nepheline syenite and granite, are not consistent with this isochron but rather indicate higher initial ratios which range from 0.7033 to about 0.707. Whole-rock O isotope analyses give ??18O values which range from+6.2 to+9.3??? Sr and O isotope analyses on mineral separates indicate that observed whole-rock variations in (87Sr/86Sr)o are primary and are not due to any secondary process. The fact that the isotope systematics correlate with rock type, suggests that crustal interaction is likely to have played a significant role in the development of this over-and undersaturated association. Such process(es), while still not fully delineated, could be of fundamental importance to the genesis of associations of critically undersaturated and oversaturated intrusives. The data support the idea that interaction between magmas and crustal materials strongly influenced the compositional relations of similar complexes elsewhere including those of the White Mountain magma series. ?? 1977 Springer-Verlag.

  10. High-Temperature, Perhaps Silicic, Volcanism on Mars Evidenced by Tridymite Detection in High-SiO2 Sedimentary Rock at Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, R. V.; Vaniman, D. T.; Blake, D. F.; Gellert, R.; Chipera, S. J.; Rampe, E. B.; Ming, D. W.; Morrison, S. M.; Downs, R. T.; Treiman, A. H.; Yen, A. S.; Achilles, C. N.; Bristow, T. F.; Crisp, J. A.; Des Marais, D. J.; Farmer, J. D.; Fendrich, K. V.; Frydenvang, J.; Graff, T. G.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Morookian, J. M.; Schwenzer, S. P.

    2016-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover, Curiosity, has been exploring sedimentary rocks within Gale crater since landing in August, 2012. On the lower slopes of Aeolis Mons (a.k.a. Mount Sharp), drill powder was collected from a high-silica (74 wt% SiO2) outcrop named Buckskin (BK). It was a surprise to find that the Buckskin sample contained significant amounts of the relatively rare silica polymorph tridymite. We describe the setting of the Buckskin sample, the detection of tridymite by the MSL Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) X-ray diffraction instrument, and detection implications. Geologic setting: The Buckskin outcrop is part of the Murray formation exposed in the Marias Pass area. The formation was previously studied by CheMin in the Pahrump Hills member [1] where three samples of drill fines were analyzed (Confidence Hills (CH), Mojave2 (MJ) and Telegraph Peak (TP) [2]). Assuming approximately horizontal bedding, the Buckskin outcrop is approx.15 m stratigraphically above the bottom of the Pahrump Hills member. Mudstone, generally characterized by fine lamination, is the dominant depositional facies [1]. Buckskin Mineralogical and Chemical Composition: The CheMin instrument and XRD pattern analysis procedures have been previously discussed [3-6]. The diffraction pattern used for quantitative XRD analysis (Fig. 1) is the sum of the first 4 of 45 diffraction images. The remaining images are all characterized by both on-ring and off-ring diffraction spots that we attributed to poor grain motion and particle clumping. Coincident with particle clumping was a significant decrease in the intensity of the tridymite diffraction peaks (Fig. 2a). The derived mineralogical composition of the crystalline component (derived from the first 4 diffraction images) is given in Table 1. The tridymite is well-crystalline and its pattern is refined as monoclinic tridymite (Fig 1). Mineral chemical compositions were derived from XRD unit cell parameters or obtained from

  11. Phase-equilibrium geobarometers for silicic rocks based on rhyolite-MELTS—Part 3: Application to the Peach Spring Tuff (Arizona-California-Nevada, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamukcu, Ayla S.; Gualda, Guilherme A. R.; Ghiorso, Mark S.; Miller, Calvin F.; McCracken, Reba G.

    2015-03-01

    Peach Spring samples are due to alteration. Use of altered whole-pumice compositions in rhyolite-MELTS simulations is likely the cause of the incorrect crystallization sequence reported previously for Peach Spring compositions. Using the rhyolite-MELTS geobarometer, we estimate a more realistic composition for Peach Spring Tuff high-silica rhyolite, and the calculated composition finds close matches with some analyzed rocks and results in the expected sequence of crystallization.

  12. The geochemical signature of fluid-saturated magma determined from silicate melt inclusions in ascension island granite xenoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, J. D.; Rebbert, C. R.

    2001-01-01

    Silicate glasses in crystal-free to crystal-poor melt inclusions from two coarse-grained granite xenoliths in alkaline volcanic rocks of Ascension Island were analyzed for 29 major, minor, and trace elements. For most constituents, the glass compositions are similar to those of the volcanic whole rocks and the xenoliths; we interpret the glasses to be chemically representative of granite melt. The melt inclusions are silicic; alkaline; contain low S and P abundances; and are enriched in H 2O, Cl, F, and Na relative to K. Inclusions from one xenolith contain 1.3 wt.% F, on average, whereas those from the other xenolith contain half that amount. The melt inclusion compositions allow investigation of the means and extent of granite magma evolution. The presence of magmatic fluid inclusions in close proximity to melt inclusions in the phenocrysts indicates that the granite melt was saturated in one or more volatile phases (Roedder and Coombs, 1967). The Cl and H 2O contents of the melt inclusions are consistent with the exsolution of volatile phase(s) at pressures of 3000 to 2000 bars. The glasses also show trends involving the (Cl/H 2O) ratio and the incompatible trace elements in melt that are indicative of melt evolution via crystal fractionation of volatile phase-saturated melt. These trends should be useful for recognizing volatile phase saturation in other Cl-enriched melts.

  13. Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotopic constraints on the origin of silicic lavas in the northern Cascade Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martindale, M.; Mullen, E.; Weis, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Cascade Arc is the type-locality for a 'hot' subduction zone, where the downgoing slab is young and subduction is relatively slow; a unique setting for studying the controls on silicic (>56 wt% SiO2) magma genesis [1,2]. We present high precision Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotopic and trace element data for silicic lavas and country rocks from the major centres of the Garibaldi Volcanic Belt (GVB) in British Columbia, which are hosted by the Mesozoic Coast Plutonic Complex and accreted Coast Belt terranes. In isotopic plots, the silicic GVB lavas define mixing curves between northern Cascadia Basin sediment [3] and Juan de Fuca MORB. The silicic GVB lavas have lower ɛNd, and higher ɛHf, 87Sr/86Sr, 208Pb/204Pb and 207Pb/204Pb for a given 206Pb/204Pb than co-existing alkalic mafic lavas [2,4] which define a separate isotopic cluster. The alkalic mafic lavas have OIB-like trace element compositions [2,4], but the silicic lavas are calc-alkaline with a typical 'arc' trace element signature. Geochemical systematics suggest that a mafic, isotopically 'depleted' contaminant may be affecting the composition of GVB silicic lavas. However, modelling indicates that slab melts do not constitute a major component of the lavas despite high slab temperatures. Geochemical models also rule out the accreted Coast Belt terranes as an assimilant. However, AFC modelling using 147 Ma Cloudburst quartz diorite [5] as the assimilant can explain both the trace element and isotopic compositional range displayed by GVB silicic magmas, consistent with the Coast Plutonic Complex as a major component of the deep crust in this region. Crustal assimilation would have partially overprinted any alkalic mantle-derived signature of parental magmas, while imparting a calc-alkaline arc signature to resulting silicic magmas. [1] Green & Harry (1999) EPSL, 171; [2] Mullen & Weis (2013) G3, 14; [3] Carpentier et al. (2014) Chem Geol, 382; [4] Mullen & Weis (2015) EPSL, 414; [5] Friedman & Armstrong (1995) GSA

  14. Structural paragenesis as an indicator of the origin of alkaline rocks in the ijolite-urtite arc of the Khibiny pluton, Kola Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulakovsky, A. L.

    2015-03-01

    The results of structural analysis of the ore-bearing complex in the Khibiny pluton are presented. A multistage history of the formation of the ijolite-urtite arc structure has been established. The conic shear zone that determines the structural appearance of the ore-bearing complex is related to the early deformation stage. Only massive ijolite and melteigite are rocks of predeformation matrix. All other rock varieties and apatite ore are syndeformation (gneissic ijolite) or postdeformation (urtite, apatite ore) and thus are not magmatic in origin. The formation of the Paleozoic conic shear zone was most likely predetermined by a Precambrian central-type structure, more precisely, by a binucleus vortex structure related to shearing.

  15. Origin and evolution of overlapping calc-alkaline and alkaline magmas: The Late Palaeozoic post-collisional igneous province of Transbaikalia (Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinovsky, B. A.; Tsygankov, A. A.; Jahn, B. M.; Katzir, Y.; Be'eri-Shlevin, Y.

    2011-08-01

    The Late Palaeozoic voluminous magmatism in Transbaikalia, Russia (a territory of > 600,000 km 2 to the east of Lake Baikal) is highly diverse and complex. Of special interest are (1) the significant overlap in time between magmatic suites commonly ascribed to post-collisional and within-plate settings and (2) the provenance of the coeval, but distinct, granitoid magmas that are closely spaced within a large region. Magmatic activity lasted almost continuously from ~ 330 Ma to ~ 275 Ma and included five igneous suites occupying a total area of ~ 200,000 km 2: (1) the Barguzin suite of high-K calc-alkaline granite (330-310 Ma); (2 and 3) the coeval Chivyrkui suite of low-silica calc-alkaline granitoids and the Zaza suite of high-K calc-alkaline to alkaline granite and quartz syenite which were emplaced between 305 and 285 Ma; and (4 and 5) the partially overlapped in time Lower-Selenga monzonite-syenite suite (285-278 Ma) and the Early-Kunalei suite of alkali-feldspar and peralkaline quartz syenite and granite (281-275 Ma). The overall increase in alkalinity of the granitoids with time reflects the progress from post-collisional to within-plate settings. However, a ~ 20 m.y. long transitional period during which both calc-alkaline and alkaline granitoids were emplaced indicates the coexistence of thickened (batholiths) and thinned (rift) crustal tracts. Sr-Nd-O isotope and elemental geochemical data suggest that the relative contribution of mantle-derived components to the generation of silicic magmas progressively increased with time. The high-K calc-alkaline granite magmas that formed the Angara-Vitim batholith were generated by high degree melting of supracrustal metamorphic rocks [ɛNd(t) = - 5.7 to - 7.7; δ 18O(Qtz) = 12‰], with minor contribution of H 2O and K from the underplated mafic magma (the convective diffusion model). The coeval calc-alkaline Chivyrkui suite and the transitional to alkaline Zaza suite formed as a result of mixing of crustal silicic

  16. Silicate weathering and CO2 consumption within agricultural landscapes, the Ohio-Tennessee River Basin, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortner, S. K.; Lyons, W. B.; Carey, A. E.; Shipitalo, M. J.; Welch, S. A.; Welch, K. A.

    2012-03-01

    Myriad studies have shown the extent of human alteration to global biogeochemical cycles. Yet, there is only a limited understanding of the influence that humans have over silicate weathering fluxes; fluxes that have regulated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and global climate over geologic timescales. Natural landscapes have been reshaped into agricultural ones to meet food needs for growing world populations. These processes modify soil properties, alter hydrology, affect erosion, and consequently impact water-soil-rock interactions such as chemical weathering. Dissolved silica (DSi), Ca2+, Mg2+, NO3-, and total alkalinity were measured in water samples collected from five small (0.0065 to 0.383 km2) gauged watersheds at the North Appalachian Experimental Watershed (NAEW) near Coshocton, Ohio, USA. The sampled watersheds in this unglaciated region include: a forested site (70+ year stand), mixed agricultural use (corn, forest, pasture), an unimproved pasture, tilled corn, and a recently (<3 yr) converted no-till corn field. The first three watersheds had perennial streams, but the two corn watersheds only produced runoff during storms and snowmelt. For the perennial streams, total discharge was an important control of dissolved silicate transport. Median DSi yields (2210-3080 kg km-2 yr-1) were similar to the median of annual averages between 1979-2009 for the much larger Ohio-Tennessee River Basin (2560 kg km-2 yr-1). Corn watersheds, which only had surface runoff, had substantially lower DSi yields (<530 kg km-2 yr-1) than the perennial-flow watersheds. The lack of contributions from Si-enriched groundwater largely explained their much lower DSi yields with respect to sites having baseflow. A significant positive correlation between the molar ratio of (Ca2++Mg2+)/alkalinity to DSi in the tilled corn and the forested site suggested, however, that silicate minerals weathered as alkalinity was lost via enhanced nitrification resulting from fertilizer

  17. Magmatic (silicates/saline/sulfur-rich/CO2) immiscibility and zirconium and rare-earth element enrichment from alkaline magma chamber margins : Evidence from Ponza Island, Pontine Archipelago, Italy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belkin, H.E.; de Vivo, B.; Lima, A.; Torok, K.

    1996-01-01

    Fluid inclusions were measured from a feldspathoid-bearing syenite xenolith entrained in trachyte from Ponza, one of the islands of the Pontine Archipelago, located in the Gulf of Gaeta, Italy. The feldspathoid-bearing syenite consists mainly of potassium feldspar, clinopyroxene, amphibole, biotite, titanite, manganoan magnetite, apatite with minor nosean, Na-rich feldspar, pyrrhotite, and rare cheralite. Baddeleyite and zirkelite occur associated with manganoan magnetite. Detailed electron-microprobe analysis reveals enrichments in REE, Y, Nb, U, Th as well as Cl and F in appropriate phases. Fluid inclusions observed in potassium feldspar are either silicate-melt or aqueous inclusions. The aqueous inclusions can be further classified as. (1) one-phase vapor, (2) two-phase (V + L) inclusions, vapor-rich inclusions with a small amount of CO2 in most cases; homogenization of the inclusions always occurred in the vapor phase between 359 and 424??C, salinities vary from 2.9 to 8.5 wt. % NaCl equivalent; and. (3) three-phase and multiphase inclusions (hypersaline/sulfur-rich aqueous inclusions sometimes with up to 8 or more solid phases). Daughter minerals dissolve on heating before vapor/liquid homogenization. Standardless quantitative scanning electron microscope X-ray fluorescence analysis has tentatively identified the following chloride and sulfate daughter crystals; halite, sylvite, glauberite. arcanite, anhydrite, and thenardite. Melting of the daughter crystals occurs between 459 and 536??C (54 to 65 wt. % NaCI equivalent) whereas total homogenization is between 640 and 755??C. The occurrence of silicate-melt inclusions and high-temperature, solute-rich aqueous inclusions suggests that the druse or miarolitic texture of the xenolith is late-stage magmatic. The xenolith from Ponza represents a portion of the peripheral magma chamber wall that has recorded the magmatic/hydrothermal transition and the passage of high solute fluids enriched in chlorides, sulfur, and

  18. Highly silicic compositions on the Moon.

    PubMed

    Glotch, Timothy D; Lucey, Paul G; Bandfield, Joshua L; Greenhagen, Benjamin T; Thomas, Ian R; Elphic, Richard C; Bowles, Neil; Wyatt, Michael B; Allen, Carlton C; Donaldson Hanna, Kerri; Paige, David A

    2010-09-17

    Using data from the Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment, we show that four regions of the Moon previously described as "red spots" exhibit mid-infrared spectra best explained by quartz, silica-rich glass, or alkali feldspar. These lithologies are consistent with evolved rocks similar to lunar granites in the Apollo samples. The spectral character of these spots is distinct from surrounding mare and highlands material and from regions composed of pure plagioclase feldspar. The variety of landforms associated with the silicic spectral character suggests that both extrusive and intrusive silicic magmatism occurred on the Moon. Basaltic underplating is the preferred mechanism for silicic magma generation, leading to the formation of extrusive landforms. This mechanism or silicate liquid immiscibility could lead to the formation of intrusive bodies. PMID:20847267

  19. Liquid immiscibility between silicate, carbonate and sulfide melts in melt inclusions hosted in co-precipitated minerals from Kerimasi volcano (Tanzania): evolution of carbonated nephelinitic magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmics, Tibor; Mitchell, Roger H.; Szabó, Csaba; Berkesi, Márta; Milke, Ralf; Ratter, Kitti

    2012-07-01

    The evolution of a carbonated nephelinitic magma can be followed by the study of a statistically significant number of melt inclusions, entrapped in co-precipitated perovskite, nepheline and magnetite in a clinopyroxene- and nepheline-rich rock (afrikandite) from Kerimasi volcano (Tanzania). Temperatures are estimated to be 1,100°C for the early stage of the melt evolution of the magma, which formed the rock. During evolution, the magma became enriched in CaO, depleted in SiO2 and Al2O3, resulting in immiscibility at ~1,050°C and crustal pressures (0.5-1 GPa) with the formation of three fluid-saturated melts: an alkali- and MgO-bearing, CaO- and FeO-rich silicate melt; an alkali- and F-bearing, CaO- and P2O5-rich carbonate melt; and a Cu-Fe sulfide melt. The sulfide and the carbonate melt could be physically separated from their silicate parent and form a Cu-Fe-S ore and a carbonatite rock. The separated carbonate melt could initially crystallize calciocarbonatite and ultimately become alkali rich in composition and similar to natrocarbonatite, demonstrating an evolution from nephelinite to natrocarbonatite through Ca-rich carbonatite magma. The distribution of major elements between perovskite-hosted coexisting immiscible silicate and carbonate melts shows strong partitioning of Ca, P and F relative to FeT, Si, Al, Mn, Ti and Mg in the carbonate melt, suggesting that immiscibility occurred at crustal pressures and plays a significant role in explaining the dominance of calciocarbonatites (sövites) relative to dolomitic or sideritic carbonatites. Our data suggest that Cu-Fe-S compositions are characteristic of immiscible sulfide melts originating from the parental silicate melts of alkaline silicate-carbonatite complexes.

  20. Early Jurassic high-K calc-alkaline and shoshonitic rocks from the Tongshi intrusive complex, eastern North China Craton: Implication for crust-mantle interaction and post-collisional magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Ting-Guang; Fan, Hong-Rui; Santosh, M.; Hu, Fang-Fang; Yang, Kui-Feng; Yang, Yue-Heng; Liu, Yongsheng

    2012-05-01

    The Tongshi intrusive complex, located within the western Shandong Province (Luxi Block) in the eastern North China Craton, comprises high-K calc-alkaline series (fine-grained quartz monzonite and porphyritic quartz monzonite) and shoshonitic series (coarse- to fine-grained porphyritic syenites). Here we report comprehensive data on petrology, geochemistry, Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes and zircon U-Pb and Hf isotopic compositions from the intrusive complex. LA-ICPMS zircon U-Pb ages show that this complex was emplaced at 180.1-184.7 Ma. The fine-grained quartz monzonite and porphyritic quartz monzonite have similar major and trace elements features, implying a similar petrogenetic history. Coupled with the widespread Neoarchean inherited zircons in these rocks, the high SiO2 and Na2O as well as the low MgO contents and low Pb isotopic ratios ((206Pb/204Pb)i = 15.850-16.881, (207Pb/204Pb)i = 14.932-15.261, (208Pb/204Pb)i = 35.564-36.562) of the quartz monzonites suggest an origin from ancient tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG) crust. However, their higher Nd and Hf isotopic ratios (ɛNd (t) = - 11.7 to - 7.0, ɛHf (t) = - 25.0 to - 10.3) as compared to the basement rocks indicate input of enriched lithospheric mantle-derived materials. The coarse- to fine-grained porphyritic syenites were derived from similar sources as inferred from their comparable major and trace elements contents as well as the Nd, Hf and Pb isotopic compositions. The Neoarchean inherited zircons and depletion of Nb, Ta, P and Ti in these rocks indicate the involvement of ancient crust. However, the high Nd and Hf isotopic ratios (ɛNd (t) = - 0.8 to 1.5, ɛHf (t) = - 4.4 to 4.8) coupled with high Pb isotopic compositions ((206Pb/204Pb)i = 18.082-19.560, (207Pb/204Pb)i = 15.510-15.730, (208Pb/204Pb)i = 37.748-39.498) suggest that the porphyritic syenites were mainly derived from an asthenospheric mantle. Based on the geochemical and isotopic features, a magmatic process similar to MASH (melting

  1. Alkaline assisted thermal oil recovery: Kinetic and displacement studies

    SciTech Connect

    Saneie, S.; Yortsos, Y.C.

    1993-06-01

    This report deals with two major issues of chemical assisted flooding - the interaction of caustic, one of the proposed additives to steam flood, with the reservoir rock, and the displacement of oil by a chemical flood at elevated temperatures. A mathematical model simulating the kinetics of silica dissolution and hydroxyl ion consumption in a typical alkaline flooding environment is first developed. The model is based on the premise that dissolution occurs via hydrolysis of active sites through the formation of an intermediate complex, which is in equilibrium with the silicic acid in solution. Both static (batch) and dynamic (core flood) processes are simulated to examine the sensitivity of caustic consumption and silica dissolution to process parameters, and to determine rates of propagation of pH values. The model presented provides a quantitative description of the quartz-alkali interaction in terms of pH, salinity, ion exchange properties, temperature and contact time, which are of significant importance in the design of soluble silicate flooding processes. The modeling of an adiabatic hot waterflood assisted by the simultaneous injection of a chemical additive is next presented. The model is also applicable to the hot alkaline flooding under conditions of negligible adsorption of the generated anionic surfactant and of hydroxide adsorption being Langmuirian. The theory of generalized simple waves (coherence ) is used to develop solutions for the temperature, concentration, and oil saturation profiles, as well as the oil recovery curves. It is shown that, for Langmuir adsorption kinetics, the chemical resides in the heated region of the reservoir if its injection concentration is below a critical value, and in the unheated region if its concentration exceeds this critical value. Results for a chemical slug injection in a tertiary recovery process indicate recovery performance is maximized when chemical resides in the heated region of the reservior.

  2. The Quaternary calc-alkaline volcanism of the Patagonian Andes close to the Chile triple junction: geochemistry and petrogenesis of volcanic rocks from the Cay and Maca volcanoes (˜45°S, Chile)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Orazio, M.; Innocenti, F.; Manetti, P.; Tamponi, M.; Tonarini, S.; González-Ferrán, O.; Lahsen, A.; Omarini, R.

    2003-08-01

    Major- and trace-element, Sr-Nd isotopes, and mineral chemistry data were obtained for a collection of volcanic rock samples erupted by the Cay and Maca Quaternary volcanoes, Patagonian Andes (˜45°S, Chile). Cay and Maca are two large, adjacent stratovolcanoes that rise from the Chiloe block at the southern end of the southern volcanic zone (SVZ) of the Andes. Samples from the two volcanoes are typical medium-K, calc-alkaline rocks that form two roughly continuous, largely overlapping series from subalkaline basalt to dacite. The overall geochemistry of the samples studied is very similar to that observed for most volcanoes from the southern SVZ. The narrow range of Sr-Nd isotope compositions ( 87Sr/ 86Sr=0.70389-0.70431 and 143Nd/ 144Nd=0.51277-0.51284) and the major- and trace-element distributions indicate that the Cay and Maca magmas differentiated by crystal fractionation without significant contribution by crustal contamination. This is in accordance with the thin (<30 km), relatively young (Paleozoic or more recent) continental crust beneath the volcanoes. The nature of the subduction-derived materials involved in the genesis of the Cay and Maca magmas is investigated by means of the relative concentration of fluid mobile (e.g. Ba) and fluid immobile (e.g. Nb, Ta, Zr, Y) elements and other relevant trace-element ratios (e.g. Sr/Y). The results indicate that small amounts (<1 wt%) of both subducted sediments and slab-released fluids were added to the mantle sources of the Cay and Maca volcanoes and that, despite the very young age (<10 Ma) of the oceanic lithosphere subducted beneath the volcanoes, slab melts were not involved in the magma genesis. Notwithstanding the proximity of the Cay and Maca magma sources to the northern edge of the slab window generated by the subduction of the Chile ridge under the South American plate, we did not find any geochemical evidence for a contribution of a subslab asthenospheric mantle. However, this mantle has been used

  3. The epilog of the western paleo-Pacific subduction: Inferred from spatial and temporal variations and geochemistry of the Late Cretaceous to Early Cenozoic silicic magmatism in coastal South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cheng-Hong; Lee, Chi-Yu; Shinjo, Ryuichi

    2016-01-01

    The Late Cretaceous to Early Cenozoic magmatism in the South China coastal area produced some amounts of rhyolitic rocks in two phases, which may be used to unravel the geohistory of the epilog of the paleo-Pacific plate subduction system. Essence of the Phase I rocks is the high temperature rhyolite (A-type)-trachydacite association in north Fujian (95-91 Ma) that was coeval with regional A-type granites. They succeeded the vast rhyolite-dacite-andesite (RDA) associations and I-type granitoids (113.5-96 Ma) and preceded the silicic-dominating rhyolite/basalt bimodal suites or monolithologic rhyolite in Zhejiang (89-86 Ma). Phase II rocks include (a) the RDA association or rhyolite alone in some drifted continental fragments nearby (83-56 Ma) and (b) the following rift-basin related rhyolite-trachyte/basalt bimodal suites in Guangdong and west Taiwan (56-38 Ma). The silicic volcanism, spatially changed from a NE-SW to the nearly E-W direction after 83 Ma, may reflect tectonic-driven eruptions occurred in the post-orogenic extensional (Phase I), resumed plate subducting (Phase IIa) and continental margin rifting (Phase IIb) stages. Rhyolitic rocks basically are shoshonitic to high-K calc-alkaline affinities while the Phase IIa RDA associations are mostly concentrated in the high-K to medium-K calc-alkaline series. All these rocks generally possess a continental arc character in tectonic discrimination diagrams, except shoshonitic rocks that have within-plate signatures. Based on the trace element and Nd-Pb isotope data, A-type rocks are suggested to have derived from mixing between trachydacitic (or syenitic) magmas and crustal melts of various sources under the high temperature condition (±metasomatism), and the succeeding silicic rocks are derivatives of the contaminated lithospheric mantle melts through crystal fractionation. On the other hand, Phase II silicic rocks are mainly the fractionation products of mafic magmas originated either from the lithospheric or

  4. Production and characterization of a halo-, solvent-, thermo-tolerant alkaline lipase by Staphylococcus arlettae JPBW-1, isolated from rock salt mine.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Mamta; Garlapati, Vijay Kumar

    2013-11-01

    Studies on lipase production and characterization were carried out with a bacterial strain Staphylococcus arlettae JPBW-1 isolated from rock salt mine, Darang, HP, India. Higher lipase activity has been obtained using 10 % inoculum with 5 % of soybean oil as carbon source utilizing a pH 8.0 in 3 h at 35 °C and 100 rpm through submerged fermentation. Partially purified S. arlettae lipase has been found to be active over a broad range of temperature (30-90 °C), pH (7.0-12.0) and NaCl concentration (0-20 %). It has shown extreme stability with solvents such as benzene, xylene, n-hexane, methanol, ethanol and toluene up to 30 % (v/v). The lipase activity has been found to be inhibited by metal ions of K(+), Co(2+) and Fe (2+) and stimulated by Mn(2+), Ca(2+) and Hg(2+). Lipase activity has been diminished with denaturants, but enhanced effect has been observed with surfactants, such as Tween 80, Tween 40 and chelator EDTA. The K m and V max values were found to be 7.05 mM and 2.67 mmol/min, respectively. Thus, the lipase from S. arlettae may have considerable potential for industrial application from the perspectives of its tolerance towards industrial extreme conditions of pH, temperature, salt and solvent. PMID:23955348

  5. Submarine weathering of silicate minerals and the extent of pore water freshening at active continental margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Florian; Hensen, Christian; Schmidt, Mark; Geersen, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    In order to investigate how submarine weathering processes may affect the water balance of sediments at convergent plate margins, six sediment cores were retrieved off Central Chile at water depth between ˜800 and 4000 m. The sediment solid phase was analyzed for its major element composition and the pore fluids were analyzed for dissolved sulfate, sulfide, total alkalinity, major cations, chloride, bromide, iodide, hydrocarbons as well as the carbon isotopic composition of methane. Because of negligible weathering on land, surface sediments off Central Chile are rich in reactive silicate minerals and have a bulk composition similar to volcanic rocks in the adjacent Andes. Deep-sourced fluxes of alkalinity, cations and chloride indicate that silicate minerals are subject to weathering in the forearc during burial. Comparison of deep-sourced signals with data from nearby Ocean Drilling Program Sites reveals two different types of weathering processes: In shallow (tens of meters), methanic sediments of slope basins with high organic carbon burial rates, reactive silicate minerals undergo incongruent dissolution through reaction with CO2 from methanogenesis. At greater burial depth (hundreds of meters), silicate weathering is dominated by authigenic smectite formation. This process is accompanied by uptake of water into the clay interlayers thus leading to elevated salinities in the surrounding pore water. Deep-seated smectite formation is more widespread than shallow silicate dissolution, as it is independent from the availability of CO2 from methanogenesis. Although solute transport is not focused enough to form cold seeps in the proper sense, tectonically induced, diffuse fluid flow transfers the deep-seated signal of smectite formation into the shallow sediments. The temperature-controlled conversion of smectite to illite is considered the most important dehydration process in marine forearc environments (depth of kilometers). However, in agreement with other

  6. Alkaline magmatism in the Amambay area, NE Paraguay: The Cerro Sarambí complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, C. B.; Velázquez, V. F.; Azzone, R. G.; Paula, G. S.

    2011-07-01

    The Early Cretaceous alkaline magmatism in the northeastern region of Paraguay (Amambay Province) is represented by stocks, plugs, dikes, and dike swarms emplaced into Carboniferous to Triassic-Jurassic sediments and Precambrian rocks. This magmatism is tectonically related to the Ponta Porã Arch, a NE-trending structural feature, and has the Cerro Sarambí and Cerro Chiriguelo carbonatite complexes as its most significant expressions. Other alkaline occurrences found in the area are the Cerro Guazú and the small bodies of Cerro Apuá, Arroyo Gasory, Cerro Jhú, Cerro Tayay, and Cerro Teyú. The alkaline rocks comprise ultramafic-mafic, syenitic, and carbonatitic petrographic associations in addition to lithologies of variable composition and texture occurring as dikes; fenites are described in both carbonatite complexes. Alkali feldspar and clinopyroxene, ranging from diopside to aegirine, are the most abundant minerals, with feldspathoids (nepheline, analcime), biotite, and subordinate Ti-rich garnet; minor constituents are Fe-Ti oxides and cancrinite as the main alteration product from nepheline. Chemically, the Amambay silicate rocks are potassic to highly potassic and have miaskitic affinity, with the non-cumulate intrusive types concentrated mainly in the saturated to undersaturated areas in silica syenitic fields. Fine-grained rocks are also of syenitic affiliation or represent more mafic varieties. The carbonatitic rocks consist dominantly of calciocarbonatites. Variation diagrams plotting major and trace elements vs. SiO 2 concentration for the Cerro Sarambí rocks show positive correlations for Al 2O 3, K 2O, and Rb, and negative ones for TiO 2, MgO, Fe 2O 3, CaO, P 2O 5, and Sr, indicating that fractional crystallization played an important role in the formation of the complex. Incompatible elements normalized to primitive mantle display positive spikes for Rb, La, Pb, Sr, and Sm, and negative for Nb-Ta, P, and Ti, as these negative anomalies are

  7. Formation of low-T hydrated silicates in modern microbialites from Mexico and implications for microbial fossilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeyen, Nina; Benzerara, Karim; Li, Jinhua; Groleau, Alexis; Balan, Etienne; Robert, Jean-Louis; Esteve, Imene; Tavera, Rosaluz; Moreira, David; Lopez-Garcia, Purificacion

    2015-10-01

    Microbialites are organo-sedimentary rocks found in abundance throughout the geological record back to ~3.5 Ga. Interpretations of the biological and environmental conditions under which they formed rely on comparisons with modern microbialites. Therefore, a better characterization of diverse modern microbialites is crucial to improve such interpretations. Here, we studied modern microbialites from three Mexican alkaline crater lakes: Quechulac, La Preciosa and Atexcac. The geochemical analyses of water solutions showed that they were supersaturated to varying extents with several mineral phases, including aragonite, calcite, hydromagnesite, as well as hydrated Mg-silicates. Consistently, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses revealed that microbialites are composed of a diversity of mineral phases including aragonite and sometimes calcite, hydromagnesite, and more interestingly, a poorly-crystalline hydrated silicate phase. Coupling of scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry microanalyses on polished sections showed that this latter phase is abundant, authigenic, magnesium-rich and sometimes associated with iron and manganese. This mineral phase is similar to kerolite, a hydrated poorly crystalline talc-like phase (Mg3Si4O10(OH)2·nH2O). Diverse microfossils were permineralized by this silicate phase. Some of them were imaged in 3D by FIB-tomography showing that their morphologically was exquisitely preserved down to the few nm-scale. The structural and chemical features of these fossils were further studied using a combination of transmission electron microscopy and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy at the carbon and magnesium K-edges and iron L2,3-edges. These results showed that organic carbon is pervasively associated with kerolite. Overall, it is suggested that the poorly-crystalline hydrated magnesium-rich silicate forms in many alkaline lakes and has a strong potential for fossilization of

  8. Silicate volcanism on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, M. H.

    1986-01-01

    This paper is mainly concerned with the nature of volcanic eruptions on Io, taking into account questions regarding the presence of silicates or sulfur as principal component. Attention is given to the generation of silicate magma, the viscous dissipation in the melt zone, thermal anomalies at eruption sites, and Ionian volcanism. According to the information available about Io, it appears that its volcanism and hence its surface materials are dominantly silicic. Several percent of volatile materials such as sulfur, but also including sodium- and potassium-rich materials, may also be present. The volatile materials at the surface are continually vaporized and melted as a result of the high rates of silicate volcanism.

  9. Silicate weathering and CO2 consumption within agricultural landscapes, the Ohio-Tennessee River Basin, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortner, S. K.; Lyons, W. B.; Carey, A. E.; Shipitalo, M. J.; Welch, S. A.; Welch, K. A.

    2011-09-01

    Myriad studies have shown the extent of human alteration to global biogeochemical cycles. Yet, there is only a limited understanding of the influence that humans have over silicate weathering fluxes; fluxes that have regulated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and global climate over geologic timescales. Natural landscapes have been reshaped into agricultural ones to meet food needs for growing world populations. These processes modify soil properties, alter hydrology, affect erosion, and consequently impact water-soil-rock interactions such as chemical weathering. Dissolved silica (DSi), Ca2+, Mg2+, NO3-, and total alkalinity were measured in water samples collected from five small (0.65 to 38.3 ha) gauged watersheds at the North Appalachian Experimental Watershed (NAEW) near Coshocton, Ohio, USA. The sampled watersheds in this unglaciated region include: a forested site (70+ yr stand), mixed agricultural use (corn, forest, pasture), an unimproved pasture, tilled corn, and a recently (<3 yr) converted no-till corn field. The first three watersheds had perennial streams, but the two corn watersheds only produced runoff during storms and snowmelt. For the perennial streams, total discharge was an important control of dissolved silicate transport. Median DSi yields (22.1-30.8 kg ha-1 a-1) were similar to the median of annual averages between 1979-2009 for the much larger Ohio-Tennessee River Basin (25.6 kg ha-1 a-1). Corn watersheds, which only had surface runoff, had substantially lower DSi yields (<5.3 kg ha-1 a-1) than the perennial-flow watersheds. The lack of contributions from Si-enriched groundwater largely explained their much lower DSi yields with respect to sites having baseflow. A significant positive correlation between the molar ratio of (Ca2+ + Mg2)/alkalinity to DSi in the tilled corn and the forested site suggested, however, that silicate minerals weathered as alkalinity was lost via enhanced nitrification resulting from fertilizer additions

  10. Petrology of the Plutonic Rocks of west-central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Thomas P.

    1970-01-01

    A series of plutons in west-central Alaska defines the Hogatza plutonic belt which extends for about 200 miles in an east-west direction from the northeastern Seward Peninsula to the Koyukuk River. The plutonic rocks have an aggregate area of about 1,200 square miles and their composition, distribution, and possible petrogenesis are discussed for the first time in this report. Field, petrographic and chemical data supported by K/Ar age dating indicate the plutonic rocks are divisible into two suites differing in age, location, and composition. The western plutons are mid-Cretaceous (~100 m.y.) in age and consist of a heterogeneous assemblage of monzonite, syenite, quartz monzonite. Associated with these granitic rocks is a group of alkaline sub-silicic rocks that forma belt of intrusive complexes extending for a distance of at least 180 miles from west-central Alaska to the Bering Sea. The complex at Granite Mountain shows a rare example of zoning from an alkaline rim to a quartz-bearing core. The occurrence of a similar complex at Cape Dezhnev on the easternmost tip of Siberia suggests the alkaline province may extend into Siberia. The easternmost plutons are Late Cretaceous (180 m.y.) in age and composed primarily of granodiorite and quartz monzonite similar to calc-alkaline plutons found throughout the North America Cordillera. The plutons are epizonal and intrude deformed but unmetamorphosed Lower Cretaceous andesitic volcanics and volcanic graywacke which constitute the highly mobile Yukon-Koyukuk volcanogenic province of west-central Alaska. No older rocks have been found within the confines of this vast tract; the occurrence of a bounding ophiolite sequence has lead to the suggestion that the province was formed by large-scale rifting and is underlain by oceanic crust. The possibility of no juvenile sialic crust over much of the area suggests that the potassium-rich magma now represented by the alkaline rocks originated in the mantle. The distribution of the

  11. Phosphorus Equilibria Among Mafic Silicate Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berlin, Jana; Xirouchakis, Dimitris

    2002-01-01

    Phosphorus incorporation in major rock-forming silicate minerals has the following implications: (1) Reactions between phosphorus-hosting major silicates and accessory phosphates, which are also major trace element carriers, may control the stability of the latter and thus may affect the amount of phosphorus and other trace elements released to the coexisting melt or fluid phase. (2) Less of a phosphate mineral is needed to account for the bulk phosphorus of planetaty mantles. (3) During partial melting of mantle mineral assemblages or equilibrium fractional crystallization of basaltic magmas, and in the absence or prior to saturation with a phosphate mineral, silicate melts may become enriched in phosphorus, especially in the geochemically important low melt fraction regime, Although the small differences in the ionic radii of IVp5+, IVSi4+, and IV Al3+ makes phosphoms incorporation into crystalline silicates perhaps unsurprising, isostructural silicate and phosphate crystalline solids do not readily form solutions, e.g., (Fe, Mg)2SiO4 vs. LiMgPO4, SiO)2 VS. AlPO4. Nonetheless, there are reports of, poorly characterized silico-phosphate phases in angrites , 2-4 wt% P2O5 in olivine and pyroxene grains in pallasites and reduced terestrial basalts which are little understood but potentially useful, and up to 17 wt% P2O5 in olivine from ancient slags. However, such enrichments are rare and only underscore the likelihood of phosphoms incorporation in silicate minerals. The mechanisms that allow phosphorus to enter major rock-forming silicate minerals (e.g., Oliv, Px, Gt) remain little understood and the relevant data base is limited. Nonetheless, old and new high-pressure (5-10 GPa) experimental data suggest that P2O5 wt% decreases from silica-poor to silica-rich compositions or from orthosilicate to chain silicate structures (garnet > olivine > orthopyroxene) which implies that phosphorus incorporation in silicates is perhaps more structure-than site-specific. The

  12. Reply to comment by Marks et al. (2016) on "Apatite: A new redox proxy for silicic magmas?" [Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 132 (2014) 101-119

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Andrew; Graham, Colin; Hawkesworth, Chris; Gillespie, Martin; Hinton, Richard; Bromiley, Geoffrey

    2016-06-01

    Marks et al. (2016) investigate the applicability of the Mn-in-apatite oxybarometer proposed by Miles et al. (2014) across a range of magma compositions using published data on well-characterised samples. The authors show that for magma compositions outside of the calc-alkaline and intermediate to silicic range used in the preliminary calibration, fO2 values calculated from Mn-in-apatite vary significantly from independently constrained estimates. These data are used to reiterate our warnings that other controls that are additional to oxygen fugacity are likely to affect Mn partitioning into apatite in some rock types, and particularly so in magmas that lie outside of the range of compositions and conditions used in the calibration. Marks et al. (2016) highlight that temperature may have an especially important effect on Mn partitioning in apatite in some rock types.

  13. Early Contributions To Silicate Magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Ted

    I have been asked to describe the early work concerning the palaeomagnetic signifi- cance of silicates. In his classic papers published half a century ago, Louis Néel put forward an elegant single-domain (SD) theory to explain the strength and enormous stability of remanent magnetization in rocks. The difficulty was that the predicted size for SD behaviour in magnetite was less than the wavelength of light. This led to the application of electron microscopy to this problem, the first images being obtained in 1969. As it happened, these involved tiny inclusions of magnetite in the pyroxene crystals of a Precambrian gabbro. The technique used in these early investigations was a metallurgical one wherein a carbon film replica of the polished and etched surface of the rock sample is prepared. This provides high spatial resolution but not much com- positional information. Furthermore, the experimental procedures involved are suffi- ciently labour-intensive that this type of work never achieved much popularity. Never- theless, Ssilicate inclusionS remanence has been identified in a variety of oceanic and ´ continental igneous rocks involving ShostS crystals of olivine, pyroxene and feldspar. ´ As far as this session is concerned, the so-called Scloudy feldsparsS found in basic ´ dykes are particularly relevant.

  14. Lithium metaborate flux in silicate analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingamells, C.O.

    1970-01-01

    Lithium metaborate is an effective flux for silicates and other rock-forming minerals. The glass resulting from fusion is mechanically strong, reasonably nonhygroscopic, and is readily soluble in dilute acids. These characteristics lead to its use in X-ray spectrography and in methods which require whole-rock solutions, such as atomic absorption and emission spectrometry. Difficulties have been encountered in the use of such techniques : a high-quality reagent has been difficult to obtain ; fusion conditions must be rather closely controlled; graphite crucibles used in the fusions need special treatment. Methods for overcoming these difficulties are outlined. Selected procedures for various instrumental methods of analysis are described. ?? 1970.

  15. Kizilcaören ore-bearing complex with carbonatites (northwestern Anatolia, Turkey): Formation time and mineralogy of rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikiforov, A. V.; Öztürk, H.; Altuncu, S.; Lebedev, V. A.

    2014-02-01

    The results of isotope-geochronological and mineralogical studies of the rocks making up the Kizilcaören fluorite-barite-REE deposit, northwestern Anatolia, Turkey are discussed in the paper. The ore is a constituent of the subvolcanic complex localized in a large fault zone. The complex combines (from earlier to later rocks): (1) phonolite and trachyte stocks, (2) carbonatite and carbonate-silicate dikelike bodies; and (3) fluorite-barite-bastnaesite ore in the form of thick homogeneous veins and cement in breccia. The K-Ar dating of silicate igneous rocks and carbonatites shows that they were formed in the Chattian Age of the Oligocene 25-24 Ma ago. Mineralogical observations show that the ore is the youngest constituent in the rock complex. Supergene alteration deeply transformed ore-bearing rocks, in particular, resulting in leaching of primary minerals, presumably Ca-Mn-Fe carbonates, and in cementation of the residual bastnaesitefluorite framework by Fe and Mn hydroxides. Most of the studied rocks contain pyrochlore, LREE fluorocarbonates, Nb-bearing rutile, Fe-Mg micas, and K-feldspar. The genetic features of the deposit have been considered. In general, the ore-bearing rock complex is compared in the set of rocks and their mineralogy and geochemistry with deposits of the Gallinas Mountains in the United States, the Arshan and Khalyuta deposits in the western Transbaikalia region, and Mushugai-Khuduk deposit in Mongolia. The Kizilcaören deposit represents a variant of postmagmatic mineralization closely related to carbonatite magmatism associated with alkaline and subalkaline intermediate rocks.

  16. Cumulate Fragments in Silicic Ignimbrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, O.; Ellis, B. S.; Wolff, J.

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly, studies are concluding that silicic ignimbrites are the result of the amalgamation of multiple discrete magma batches. Yet the existence of discrete batches presents a conundrum for magma generation and storage; if silicic magma batches are not generated nearly in situ in the upper crust, they must traverse, and reside within, a thermally hostile environment with large temperature gradients, resulting in low survivability in their shallow magmatic hearths. The Snake River Plain (Idaho, USA) is a type example of this 'multi-batch' assembly with ignimbrites containing multiple populations of pyroxene crystals, glass shards, and crystal aggregates. The ubiquitous crystal aggregates hint at a mechanism to facilitate the existence of multiple, relatively small batches of rhyolite in the upper crust. These aggregates contain the same plagioclase, pyroxene, and oxide mineral compositions as single phenocrysts of the same minerals in their host rocks, but they have significantly less silicic bulk compositions and lack quartz and sanidine, which occur as single phenocrysts in the deposits. This implies significant crystallization followed by melt extraction from mushy reservoir margins. The extracted melt then continues to evolve (crystallizing sanidine and quartz) while the melt-depleted margins provide an increasingly rigid and refractory network segregating the crystal-poor batches of magma. The hot, refractory, margins insulate the crystal-poor lenses, allowing (1) extended residence in the upper crust, and (2) preservation of chemical heterogeneities among batches. In contrast, systems that produce cumulates richer in low-temperature phases (quartz, K-feldspars, and/or biotite) favour remelting upon recharge, leading to less segregation of eruptible melt pockets and the formation of gradationally zoned ignimbrites. The occurrence of similar crystal aggregates from a variety of magmatic lineages suggests the generality of this process.

  17. Origin of silicic magma in Iceland revealed by Th isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Sigmarsson, O.; Condomines, M. ); Hemond, C. ); Fourcade, S. ); Oskarsson, N. )

    1991-06-01

    Th, Sr, Nd, and O isotopes have been determined in a suite of volcanic rocks from Hekla and in a few samples from Askja and Krafla volcanic centers in Iceland. Although {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr and {sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd ratios are nearly the same for all compositions at Hekla, the ({sup 230}Th/{sup 232}Th) ratios differ and thus clearly show that the silicic rocks cannot be derived from fractional crystallization of a more primitive magma. Similar results are obtained for the Krafla and Askja volcanic centers, where the {delta}{sup 18}O values are much lower in the silicic magma than in the mafic magma. These data suggest that large volumes of silicic rocks in central volcanoes of the neovolcanic zones in Iceland are produced by partial melting of the underlying crust.

  18. Natural Weathering Rates of Silicate Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, A. F.

    2003-12-01

    Silicates constitute more than 90% of the rocks exposed at Earth's land surface (Garrels and Mackenzie, 1971). Most primary minerals comprising these rocks are thermodynamically unstable at surface pressure/temperature conditions and are therefore susceptible to chemical weathering. Such weathering has long been of interest in the natural sciences. Hartt (1853) correctly attributed chemical weathering to "the efficacy of water containing carbonic acid in promoting the decomposition of igneous rocks." Antecedent to the recent interest in the role of vegetation on chemical weathering, Belt (1874) observed that the most intense weathering of rocks in tropical Nicaragua was confined to forested regions. He attributed this effect to "the percolation through rocks of rain water charged with a little acid from decomposing vegetation." Chamberlin (1899) proposed that the enhanced rates of chemical weathering associated with major mountain building episodes in Earth's history resulted in a drawdown of atmospheric CO2 that led to periods of global cooling. Many of the major characteristics of chemical weathering had been described when Merrill (1906) published the groundbreaking volume Rocks, Rock Weathering, and Soils.The major advances since that time, particularly during the last several decades, have centered on understanding the fundamental chemical, hydrologic, and biologic processes that control weathering and in establishing quantitative weathering rates. This research has been driven by the importance of chemical weathering to a number environmentally and economically important issues. Undoubtedly, the most significant aspect of chemical weathering is the breakdown of rocks to form soils, a process that makes life possible on the surface of the Earth. The availability of many soil macronutrients such as magnesium, calcium, potassium, and PO4 is directly related to the rate at which primary minerals weather. Often such nutrient balances are upset by anthropogenic

  19. Partitioning of elements between silicate melt and immiscible fluoride, chloride, carbonate, phosphate and sulfate melts, with implications to the origin of natrocarbonatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veksler, Ilya V.; Dorfman, Alexander M.; Dulski, Peter; Kamenetsky, Vadim S.; Danyushevsky, Leonid V.; Jeffries, Teresa; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2012-02-01

    Liquid-liquid partitioning of 42 elements between synthetic silicate melts and immiscible fluoride, chloride, carbonate, phosphate and sulfate liquids was studied at temperatures of 650-1100 °C, pressures 72-100 MPa, with 0-11 wt.% H2O. One series of experiments was performed in a rotating internally-heated autoclave where separation of the immiscible liquids was assisted by centrifugal forces. An analogous series of experiments was done in static rapid-quench cold-seal pressure vessels. The experimentally determined liquid-liquid distribution coefficients (D's) vary over several orders of magnitude, as a result of variable Coulombic interactions between cations and anions. For alkaline, alkaline earth and rare earth elements ther is a strong and systematic dependence of the liquid/liquid D values on the ionic potential Z/r for all the examined systems. In contrast, highly charged cations (e.g., HFSE) show no systematic relationships between the D's and Z/r. New experimental constraints on the carbonate/silicate liquid-liquid D values presented here confirm that rare metals such as Nb, Zr, REE, Th and U concentrate in silicate liquids, and therefore carbonatites that carry economical rare metal mineralization are not likely to have formed by liquid immiscibility. The comparison between experimentally-determined carbonate-silicate liquid-liquid D values and bulk-rock natrocarbonatite vs. nephelinite compositions at the Oldoinyo Lengai in Tanzania reveals significant discrepancies for Cs, Rb, Ba, Be, Zn, heavy REE, Ti, Mo and W, thus rendering a simple, one-stage immiscibility model for Oldoinyo Lengai questionable.

  20. Fractional crystallization of Si-undersaturated alkaline magmas leading to unmixing of carbonatites on Brava Island (Cape Verde) and a general model of carbonatite genesis in alkaline magma suites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidendorfer, Daniel; Schmidt, Max W.; Mattsson, Hannes B.

    2016-05-01

    The carbonatites of Brava Island, Cape Verde hot spot, allow to investigate whether they represent small mantle melt fractions or form through extreme fractionation and/or liquid immiscibility from CO2-bearing silicate magmas. The intrusive carbonatites on Brava Island are part of a strongly silica-undersaturated pyroxenite, ijolite, nephelinite, nepheline syenite, combeite-foiditite, carbonatite series. The major and trace element composition of this suite is reproduced by a model fractionating olivine, clinopyroxene, perovskite, biotite, apatite, titanite, sodalite and FeTi oxides, all present as phenocrysts in the rocks corresponding to their fractionation interval. Fractionation of ~90 wt% crystals reproduces the observed geochemical trend from the least evolved ultramafic dikes (bulk X Mg = 0.64) to syenitic compositions. The modelled fractional crystallization leads to alkali enrichment, driving the melt into the carbonatite-silicate miscibility gap. An initial CO2 content of 4000 ppm is sufficient to saturate in CO2 at the point where the rock record suggests continuing unmixing carbonatites from nephelinites to nepheline syenites after 61 wt% fractionation. Such immiscibility is also manifested in carbonatite and silicate domains on a hand-specimen scale. Furthermore, almost identical primary clinopyroxene, biotite and carbonate compositions from carbonatites and nephelinites to nepheline syenites substantiate their conjugate character and our unmixing model. The modelled carbonatite compositions correspond to the natural ones except for their much higher alkali contents. The alkali-poor character of the carbonatites on Brava and elsewhere is likely a consequence of the release of alkali-rich CO2 + H2O fluids during final crystallization, which cause fenitization in adjacent rocks. We propose a general model for carbonatite generation during alkaline magmatism, where the fractionation of heavily Si-undersaturated, alkaline parent melts results in alkali and

  1. Relationships between ultrapotassic and carbonate-rich volcanic rocks in central Italy: petrogenetic and geodynamic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peccerillo, Angelo

    1998-09-01

    The Pleistocene intra-Apennine volcanic (IAV) centres occurring east of the potassium-rich Roman comagmatic province show variable petrological and geochemical composition. Some rocks have a strongly undersaturated ultrapotassic kamafugitic affinity with K 2O/Na 2O=8-20, whereas the rocks from the southern center of Mt. Vulture are still strongly undersaturated in silica but are enriched in both Na 2O and K 2O with K/Na around unity. Carbonate-rich pyroclastic rocks, believed to represent carbonatitic magmas, are found in the IAV centers. Kamafugites have high abundances of LILE and high LILE/HFSE ratios, and their incompatible element patterns resemble closely those of ultrapotassic rocks from the adjoining Roman province. The Vulture volcanics also display high contents of LILE, but their LILE/HFSE ratios are intermediate between intraplate alkaline rocks and kamafugites. The carbonate-rich rocks exhibit an exotic mineralogy and high enrichments in LILE, which speaks for a carbonatitic affinity. However, they have similar incompatible element patterns but consistently lower abundances of almost all the elements than the associated silicate volcanics. These data favour the hypothesis that the IAV carbonate rocks may represent mixtures of silicate magmas and geochemically depleted carbonate material. The sedimentary carbonates that crop out extensively along the Apennine chain may be the source of barren carbonate material. Overall, geochemical data of IAV centres and of the rocks from the Roman province display strong geochemical and isotopic evidence of being generated in an upper mantle that was modified by addition of upper crustal material brought down by subduction processes. A possible exception is represented by Mt. Vulture which, however, occurs east of the main axis of the Apennines, on the western margin of the foreland Adria plate. The occurrence of strongly undersaturated alkaline rocks requires magma generation at high pressures and XCO 2. This is in

  2. Carbonatite-silicate immiscible melt inclusion in lamprophyre from Kutch, western India: Implication for plume-lithosphere interaction and initiation of Deccan Trap magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Arijit; Paul, Dalim Kumar; Sen, Gautam; Biswas, Sanjib Kumar

    2014-05-01

    Kutch province of western India has undergone repeated rifting and marine transgression events from late Triassic to the late Cretaceous. Magmatic rocks occur in profusion in Kutch Basin. The southern part is characterized by occurrences of thick flows of tholeiitic basalt of Deccan Trap affinity, central part of Kutch Basin has numerous volcanic plugs of alkali basalt which is also considered as member of Deccan Trap, contain thin, discoidal mantle xenoliths of spinel lherzolite and wehrlite composition. Northern Kutch is dominated by suite of alkaline magmatic rocks similar to magmatic rocks of continental rift zone. The alkaline suite contains alkali pyroxenite, theralite, teschenite, basanite, nepheline syenite and kaersutite bearing lamprophyre (Ray et al., 2006, Das et al., 2007, Paul et al., 2008). The newly discovered east-west trending lamprophyre dyke swarm of northern Kutch (Pachham Island) is camptonite in composition and contains kaersutite phenocrysts in large proportion. These kaersutite phencrysts contain immscible melt/glass phases as melt inclusions. The lamprophyre yields an age of ca. 67 Ma.by Ar-Ar method (Sen et al., 2014 in press) synchronous with alkali basalt of central Kutch. The melt inclusions are fundamentally of two types - calciocarbonatite and alkaline silicate melts. We found sphene within carbonatitic melt and the rare mineral rhonite in silicate melt. Petrographic evidence indicates that carbonatite melt always occurs within alkali silicate melt as immiscible fraction. These carbonatite melts are extremely rich in CaCO3 (upto 95%) which contradicts the experimental results of carbonate melt composition (upto 80% CaCO3) in silicate-carbonate immiscible melt pair by Lee and Wyllie. The abundance of wehrlite xenoliths over lherzolite in alkali basalt, petrographic evidence of orthopyroxene to clinopyroxene transformation in wehrlite xenoliths, occurrence of calcite vein in mantle xenoliths indicate carbonatite metasomatism of spinel

  3. Geology and porphyry copper-type alteration-mineralization of igneous rocks at the Christmas Mine, Gila County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koski, Randolph A.

    1979-01-01

    igneous rocks is progressively more alkaline and silicic from basalt to granodiorite. Early (Stage I) chalcopyrite-bornite (-molybdenite) mineralization and genetically related K-silicate alteration are centered on the Christmas stock. K-silicate alteration is manifested by pervasive hornblende-destructive biotitization in the stock, biotitization of basaltic volcanic wall rocks, and a continuous stockwork of K-feldspar veinlets and quartz-K-feldspar veins in the stock and quartz-sulfide veins in volcanic rocks. Younger (Stage II) pyrite-chalcopyrite mineralization and quartz-sericite-chlorite alteration occur in a zone overlapping with but largely peripheral to the zone of Stage I stockwork veins. Within the Christmas intrusive complex, K-silicate-altered rocks in the central stock are flanked east and west by zones of fracture-controlled quartz-sericite alteration and strong pyritization. In volcanic rocks quartz-chlorite-pyrite-chalcopyrite veins are superimposed on earlier biotitization and crosscut Stage I quartz-sulfide veins. Beyond the zones of quartz-sericite alteration, biotite rhyodacite porphyry dikes contain the propylitic alteration assemblage epidote-chlorite-albite-sphene. Chemical analyses indicate the following changes during pervasive alteration of igneous rocks: (1) addition of Si, K, H, S, and Cu, and loss of Fe 3+ and Ca during intense biotitization of basalt; (2) loss of Na and Ca, increase of Fe3+/Fe2+, and strong H-metasomatism during sericitization of quartz diorite; and (3) increase in Ca, Na, and Fe3+/Fe2+, and loss of K during intense propylitization of biotite rhyodacite porphyry dikes. Thorough biotitization of biotite granodiorite porphyry in the Christmas stock was largely an isochemical process. Fluid-inclusion petrography reveals that Stage I veins are characterized by low to moderate populations of moderate-salinity and gas-rich inclusions, and sparse but ubiquitous halite-bearing inclusions. Moderate-salinity an

  4. Polyvinyl alcohol battery separator containing inert filler. [alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Hsu, L. C.; Manzo, M. A. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A cross-linked polyvinyl alcohol battery separator is disclosed. A particulate filler, inert to alkaline electrolyte of an alkaline battery, is incorporated in the separator in an amount of 1-20% by weight, based on the weight of the polyvinyl alcohol, and is dispersed throughout the product. Incorporation of the filler enhances performance and increases cycle life of alkaline batteries when compared with batteries containing a similar separator not containing filler. Suitable fillers include titanates, silicates, zirconates, aluminates, wood floor, lignin, and titania. Particle size is not greater than about 50 microns.

  5. Silicate Stardust in Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2004-06-01

    One of the most exciting discoveries in cosmochemistry during the past 15 years is the presence of presolar grains in meteorites. They are identified by the unusual abundances of isotopes of oxygen, silicon, and other elements. Presolar grains, also called stardust, are exotic compounds such as diamond, graphite, aluminum oxide, and silicon carbide. Why are there no silicates? Spectroscopic observations of young stars show that silicates are abundant. This means that silicates are abundant in molecular clouds like the one in which the solar system formed. Cosmochemists wondered why do we not find silicates in the most primitive extraterrestrial materials: interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and primitive chondrites. These materials are the least altered since they formed and if any preserved presolar silicate grains, IDPs and chondrites would. Were they all destroyed as the solar system formed? Or was it that we were looking for stardust in all the wrong places? As we reported previously [see PSRD article A New Type of Stardust], Scott Messenger and colleagues have found silicates in IDPs. Now, researchers report finding presolar silicate grains in primitive chondritic meteorites. Ann Nguyen and Ernst Zinner (Washington University in St. Louis) and Kazuhide Nagashima and Hisayoshi Yurimoto (Tokyo Institute of Technology), with Alexander Krot (University of Hawaii) used advanced instrumentation to image the isotopic compositions of small regions of the Acfer 094 carbonaceous chondrite and found several silicate grains with isotopically anomalous oxygen isotopes, a clear indicator of presolar origin. Nagashima and his colleagues also investigated the primitive CR2 carbonaceous chondrite Northwest Africa 530, finding presolar grains in it as well. The grains will shed (star)light on the histories of the stars in which they formed. The relative abundances of presolar silicates in different types of meteorites will help cosmochemists understand the processes of heating

  6. Geometries and Facies Distributions in Yellowstone's Siliceous Hotsprings: Implications for Martian Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guidry, S. A.; Chafetz, H. S.

    2001-01-01

    Synthesis of features from several siliceous hotsprings yields a relatively simple facies model. This model facilitates our ability to recognize these hotsprings in the terrestrial and probably extraterrestrial rock record. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  7. Voluminous silicic eruptions during late Permian Emeishan igneous province and link to climate cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianghai; Cawood, Peter A.; Du, Yuansheng

    2015-12-01

    Silicic eruptive units can constitute a substantive component in flood-basalts-dominated large igneous provinces, but usually constitute only a small proportion of the preserved volume due to poor preservation. Thus, their environmental impact can be underestimated or ignored. Establishing the original volume and potential climate-sensitive gas emissions of silicic eruptions is generally lacking for most large igneous provinces. We present a case study for the ˜260 Ma Emeishan province, where silicic volcanic rocks are a very minor component of the preserved rock archive due to extensive erosion during the Late Permian. Modal and geochemical data from Late Permian sandstones derived from the province suggest that silicic volcanic rocks constituted some ˜30% by volume of the total eroded Emeishan volcanic source rocks. This volume corresponds to > 3 ×104 km3 on the basis of two independent estimate methods. Detrital zircon trace element and Hf isotopic data require the silicic source rocks to be formed mainly by fractional crystallization from associated basaltic magmas. Based on experimental and theoretical calculations, these basalt-derived ˜104 km3 silicic eruptions released ˜1017 g sulfur gases into the higher atmosphere and contribute to the contemporaneous climate cooling at the Capitanian-Wuchiapingian transition (˜260 Ma). This study highlights the potentially important impact on climate of silicic eruptions associated with large igneous province volcanism.

  8. Oligocene caldera complex and calc-alkaline tuffs and lavas of the Indian Peak volcanic field, Nevada and Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Best, M.G.; Christiansen, E.H.; Blank, H.R., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The Indian Peak volcanic field is representative of the more than 50 000 km3 of ashflow tuff and tens of calderas in the Great Basin that formed during the Oligocene-early Miocene "ignimbrite flareup' in southwestern North America. These dominantly high-K calc-alkaline rocks are a record of the birth, maturation, and death of a large, open, continental magma system that was probably initiated and sustained by influx of mafic magma derived from a southward-migrating locus of magma production in the mantle. Recurrent production of very large batches (some greater than 3000 km3) of quite uniform dacite magmas appears to have required combination of andesite magma and crustal silicic material in vigorously convecting chambers. Compositional data indicate that rhyolites are polygenetic. As the main locus of mantle magma production shifted southward, trachydacite magma could have been produced by fractionation of andesitic magma within the crust. -from Author

  9. Clastic dikes of the Hatrurim basin (western flank of the Dead Sea) as natural analogues of alkaline concretes: Mineralogy, solution chemistry, and durability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokol, E. V.; Gaskova, O. L.; Kozmenko, O. A.; Kokh, S. N.; Vapnik, E. A.; Novikova, S. A.; Nigmatulina, E. N.

    2014-11-01

    This study shows that the mineral assemblages from clastic dikes in areas adjacent to the Dead Sea graben may be considered as natural analogues of alkaline concretes. The main infilling material of the clastic dikes is composed of well-sorted and well-rounded quartz sand. The cement of these hard rocks contains hydroxylapophyllite, tacharanite, calcium silicate hydrates, opal, calcite, and zeolite-like phases, which is indicative of a similarity of the natural cementation processes and industrial alkaline concrete production from quartz sands and industrial alkaline cements. The quartz grains exhibit a variety of reaction textures reflecting the interaction with alkaline solutions (opal and calcium hydrosilicate overgrowths; full replacement with apophyllite or thomsonite + apophyllite). The physicochemical analysis and reconstruction of the chemical composition of peralkaline Ca, Na, and K solutions that formed these assemblages reveal that the solutions evolved toward a more stable composition of zeolite-like phases, which are more resistant to long-term chemical weathering and atmospheric corrosion. The 40Ar/39Ar age of 6.2 ± 0.7 Ma obtained for apophyllite provides conclusive evidence for the high corrosion resistance of the assemblages consisting of apophyllite and zeolite-like phases.

  10. Alkaline flooding for enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Gittler, W.E.

    1983-09-01

    There are over 12 active projects of varying size using one of 3 major types of alkaline agents. These include sodium silicate, caustic soda, and soda ash. Among the largest pilots currently is the THUMS project in the Wilmington field, California. Plans called for the injection of a 4% weight concentration of sodium orthosilicate over a 60% PV. Through the first 3 yr, over 27 million bbl of chemicals have been injected. Gulf Oil is operating several alkaline floods, one of which is located off shore in the Quarantine Bay field, Louisiana. In this pilot, sodium hydroxide in a weight concentration of 5 to 12% is being injected. Belco Petroleum Corp. has reported that their pilot operating in the Isenhour Unit in Wyoming is using a .5% weight concentration of soda ash in conjunction with a polymer. Other uses for alkaline agents in chemical flooding include the use of silicate as a preflush or sacrificial agent in micellar/polymer and surfactant recovery systems. In addition, caustic has been tested in the surface-mixed caustic emulsion process while orthosilicate has been tested in a recovery method known as mobility-controlled caustic floods.

  11. ALP (Alkaline Phosphatase) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... known as: ALK PHOS; Alkp Formal name: Alkaline Phosphatase Related tests: AST ; ALT ; GGT ; Bilirubin ; Liver Panel ; Bone Markers ; Alkaline Phosphatase Isoenzymes; Bone Specific ALP All content on Lab ...

  12. Calcium silicate insulation structure

    DOEpatents

    Kollie, Thomas G.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    An insulative structure including a powder-filled evacuated casing utilizes a quantity of finely divided synthetic calcium silicate having a relatively high surface area. The resultant structure-provides superior thermal insulating characteristics over a broad temperature range and is particularly well-suited as a panel for a refrigerator or freezer or the insulative barrier for a cooler or a insulated bottle.

  13. Treatability of manganese by sodium silicate and chlorine

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, F.B.; Ronk, S.K. )

    1987-11-01

    Manganese sequestering by nearly simultaneous additions of sodium silicate and sodium hypochlorite was studied in laboratory-prepared waters. Under conditions of near-neutral pH and 150-250 mg/liter of alkalinity as CaCO{sub 3}, 1-2 mg manganese/liter could be sequestered for up to one day. Less effective manganese treatability was found at pH 8 than at pH 7. Additionally, at pH 7 the best results were obtained when neither silicate nor hypochlorite was added because of the slow manganese oxidation rate by oxygen alone. Aging of diluted stock silicate solutions prior to dosing also resulted in poor treatment; the presence of background silica increased the treatment effectiveness only slightly. Overall, manganese was less treatable by this method than iron under the same treatment conditions.

  14. The age and petrogenesis of alkaline magmatism in the Ampasindava Peninsula and Nosy Be archipelago, northern Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucciniello, C.; Tucker, R. D.; Jourdan, F.; Melluso, L.; Morra, V.

    2016-04-01

    The Ampasindava alkaline province consists of a series of circular and elliptical intrusions, lava flows, dyke swarms and plugs of Cenozoic age emplaced into the Mesozoic-Cenozoic sedimentary rocks of the Antsiranana basin (NW Madagascar) and above the crystalline basement. The magmatism in the Ampasindava region is linked to a NW-SE trending extensional tectonic setting. New 40Ar/39Ar age determinations on feldspar separate of alkali granites and basaltic dykes yielded ages of 18.01 ± 0.36 Ma and 26 ± 7 Ma, respectively. Alkali basalts and basanites, nepheline syenites and phonolites, and silica saturated-to-oversaturated syenites, trachytes, granites and rhyolites are the main outcropping lithologies. These rocks have sodic affinity. The felsic rocks are dominant, and range from peraluminous to peralkaline. The mantle-normalized incompatible element patterns of the mafic lavas match those of Na-alkaline lavas in within-plate rift settings. The patterns are identical in shape and absolute concentrations to those of the Bobaomby (Cap d'Ambre) and Massif d'Ambre primitive volcanic rocks. These geochemical features are broadly compatible with variable degrees of partial melting of incompatible element-enriched mantle sources. The mineralogical and geochemical variations are consistent with fractional crystallization processes involving removal of olivine, feldspar, clinopyroxene, amphibole, Fe-Ti oxides and apatite. Removal of small amount of titanite explains the concave upward lanthanide pattern in the evolved nepheline syenites and phonolites, which are additionally rich in exotic silicates typical of agpaitic magmas (eudialyte, F-disilicates).

  15. A reflection seismic study of the Alnö alkaline and carbonatite igneous complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, M.; Malehmir, A.; Dehghannejad, M.; Troll, V. R.; Ask, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Alnö igneous complex in central Sweden is one of the largest (about 5 km by 5 km) of the few well-known alkaline and carbonatite intrusions in the world. It contains a wide variety of lithologies, including alkaline silicate igneous rocks (Ijolite, Nephelinesyenite, and Pyroxenite) and a range of carbonatite dykes with a variable composition (Kresten, 1990). Alnö island is the type locality for Alnöite, a melilite-bearing basic rock that occurs as dykes and contains a complex mineral assemblage with phenocrysts from the deep crust and the upper mantle. Geochronological measurements suggest an age of 553-590 Ma for the main intrusion. The depth extent, dip and dip direction of the carbonatite rocks have been inferred from surface geological mapping, but lack depth-constraints. Our research aims to improve understanding of the intrusion mechanism(s) and the geometry of the Alnö intrusion and through that of alkaline and carbonatite intrusions in general. We have acquired three high-resolution reflection seismic profiles over the main intrusion during winter 2011. Densely sampled surface gravity and magnetic data were also collected along the seismic profiles and on the sea-ice with gravity measurements indicating a strong positive Bouguer anomaly of about 20 mGal over the main intrusion. Petrophysical measurements including compressional- and shear-wave velocities, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS), and density data were gathered from oriented samples of representative lithologies. For the seismic data, nearly 400 active channels were employed with a geophone spacing of 10 meters. A mechanical hammer was used for generating the seismic waves and was activated at most geophone positions. Since the acquisition took part in winter, we also extended the profiles out on the sea-ice close to the shore. The geophones were planted in the frozen ground/ice and covered by snow resulting in improved signal-to-noise ratios. The main profile is about 10 km long

  16. Elastic and Transport Properties of Steam-Cured Pozzolanic-Lime Rock Composites Upon CO2 Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emery, Dan; Vanorio, Tiziana

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the effect of pozzolanic ash-lime reactions on the rock physics properties of the resulting rock microstructure is important for monitoring unrest conditions in volcanic-hydrothermal systems as well as for devising concrete with enhanced performance. By mixing pozzolana ash with lime, the ancient Romans unwittingly incorporated these reactions in the production of their famous concrete. Recently, it has been discovered that a fiber-reinforced, concrete-like rock is forming naturally at depth of 1.5 km within the Campi Flegrei volcanic-hydrothermal systems due to upwelling lime-rich fluids permeating a pozzolana rich layer. This study aims to investigate possible physico-chemical conditions contributing to both enhance and undermine the properties of the subsurface rocks of volcanic-hydrothermal systems and, in turn, build upon those processes that the ancient Romans exploited to create their famous concrete. We prepared samples by mixing the pozzolana volcanic ash, slaked lime, aggregates of Neapolitan Yellow tuff, and seawater from Campi Flegrei in the same ratios as the ancient Romans. To mimic the conditions of the caldera, we used alkaline water from a well in the Campi Flegrei region rich in sulfate, bicarbonate, calcium, potassium, and magnesium ions. Yet, the samples were cured for 28 days in steam-rich environment to favor hydration and hence, enhancing the stability of calcium- alumino-silicate hydrates and setting strength of the rock samples. We measured baseline properties of porosity, permeability, P-wave velocity, and S-wave velocity of the samples as well as imaged the fibrous microstructure. P and S-wave velocities were used to derive bulk, shear, and Young's moduli. Subsequently, samples were injected with an aqueous carbon dioxide, CO2 (aq), solution and the changes in their microstructure and physical properties measured. Exposure of the concrete-like rock samples to CO2 -rich fluid lowers pH below 12.5, thus affecting the stability

  17. Carbonatite melt-CO 2 fluid inclusions in mantle xenoliths from Tenerife, Canary Islands: a story of trapping, immiscibility and fluid-rock interaction in the upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frezzotti, Maria Luce; Andersen, Tom; Neumann, Else-Ragnhild; Simonsen, Siri Lene

    2002-10-01

    Three types of fluid inclusions have been identified in olivine porphyroclasts in the spinel harzburgite and lherzolite xenoliths from Tenerife: pure CO 2 (Type A); carbonate-rich CO 2-SO 2 mixtures (Type B); and polyphase inclusions dominated by silicate glass±fluid±sp±silicate±sulfide±carbonate (Type C). Type A inclusions commonly exhibit a "coating" (a few microns thick) consisting of an aggregate of a platy, hydrous Mg-Fe-Si phase, most likely talc, together with very small amounts of halite, dolomite and other phases. Larger crystals (e.g. (Na,K)Cl, dolomite, spinel, sulfide and phlogopite) may be found on either side of the "coating", towards the wall of the host mineral or towards the inclusion center. These different fluids were formed through the immiscible separations and fluid-wall-rock reactions from a common, volatile-rich, siliceous, alkaline carbonatite melt infiltrating the upper mantle beneath the Tenerife. First, the original siliceous carbonatite melt is separated from a mixed CO 2-H 2O-NaCl fluid and a silicate/silicocarbonatite melt (preserved in Type A inclusions). The reaction of the carbonaceous silicate melt with the wall-rock minerals gave rise to large poikilitic orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene grains, and smaller neoblasts. During the metasomatic processes, the consumption of the silicate part of the melt produced carbonate-enriched Type B CO 2-SO 2 fluids which were trapped in exsolved orthopyroxene porphyroclasts. At the later stages, the interstitial silicate/silicocarbonatite fluids were trapped as Type C inclusions. At a temperature above 650 °C, the mixed CO 2-H 2O-NaCl fluid inside the Type A inclusions were separated into CO 2-rich fluid and H 2O-NaCl brine. At T<650 °C, the residual silicate melt reacted with the host olivine, forming a reaction rim or "coating" along the inclusion walls consisting of talc (or possibly serpentine) together with minute crystals of NaCl, KCl, carbonates and sulfides, leaving a residual CO 2

  18. ASTER spectral sensitivity of carbonate rocks - Study in Sultanate of Oman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendran, Sankaran; Nasir, Sobhi

    2014-02-01

    Remote sensing satellite data plays a vital role and capable in detecting minerals and discriminating rock types for explorations of mineral resources and geological studies. Study of spectral absorption characters of remotely sensed data are under consideration by the exploration and mining companies, and demonstrating the spectral absorption characters of carbonates on the cost-effective multispectral image (rather than the hyperspectral, Lidar image) for easy understanding of all geologists and exploration communities of carbonates is very much important. The present work is an integrated study and an outcome of recently published works on the economic important carbonate rocks, includes limestone, marl, listwaenites and carbonatites occurred in parts of the Sultanate of Oman. It demonstrates the spectral sensitivity of such rocks for simple interpretation over satellite data and describes and distinguishes them based on the absorptions of carbonate minerals in the spectral bands of advanced spaceborne thermal emission and reflection radiometer (ASTER) for mapping and exploration studies. The study results that the ASTER spectral band 8 discriminates the carbonate rocks due to the presence of predominantly occurred carbonate minerals; the ASTER band 5 distinguishes the limestones and marls (more hydroxyl clay minerals) from listwaenite (hydrothermally altered rock) due to the presence of altered minerals and the ASTER band 4 detects carbonatites (ultramafic intrusive alkaline rocks) which contain relatively more silicates. The study on the intensity of the total absorptions against the reflections of these rocks shows that the limestones and marls have low intensity in absorptions (and high reflection values) due to the presence of carbonate minerals (calcite and dolomite) occurred in different proportions. The listwaenites and carbonatites have high intensity of absorptions (low reflection values) due to the occurrence of Mn-oxide in listwaenites and carbonates

  19. Silicates in Alien Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    This plot of data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescopes shows that asteroid dust around a dead 'white dwarf' star contains silicates a common mineral on Earth. The data were taken primarily by Spitzer's infrared spectrograph, an instrument that breaks light apart into its basic constituents. The yellow dots show averaged data from the spectrograph, while the orange triangles show older data from Spitzer's infrared array camera. The white dwarf is called GD 40.

  20. Thermochemistry of Silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, Gustavo; Jacobson, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties of vapor and condensed phases of silicates are crucial in many fields of science. These quantities address fundamental questions on the formation, stability, transformation, and physical properties of silicate minerals and silicate coating compositions. Here the thermodynamic activities of silica and other species in solid solution have been measured by the analysis of the corresponding high temperature vapors using Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometry (KEMS). In first set of experiments KEMS has been used to examine the volatility sequence of species (Fe, SiO, Mg, O2 and O) present in the vapor phase during heating of fosterite-rich olivine (Fo93Fa7) up to 2400 C and to measure the Fe, SiO and Mg activities in its solid solution. The data of fosterite-rich olivine are essential for thermochemical equilibrium models to predict the atmospheric and surface composition of hot, rocky exoplanets (Lava Planets). In the second set of experiments the measured thermodynamic activities of the silica in Y2O3-SiO2 and Yb2O3-SiO2 systems are used to assess their reactivity and degradation recession as environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) in combustion environments (e.g. non-moveable parts of gas turbine engine).

  1. Effects of Silicate, Phosphate, and Calcium on the Stability of Aldopentoses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, Sakiko; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2016-06-01

    Ribose is an important constituent of RNA: ribose connects RNA bases and forms a strand of sugar phosphates. Accumulation of ribose on prebiotic Earth was difficult because of its low stability. Improvement in the yield of ribose by the introduction of borate or silicate in a formose-like reaction has been proposed. The effects of borates have been further analyzed and confirmed in subsequent studies. Nonetheless, the effects of silicates and phosphates remain unclear. In the present study, we incubated aldopentoses in a highly alkaline aqueous solution at a moderate temperature to determine the effects of silicate or phosphate on the degradation rates of ribose and its isomeric aldopentoses. The formation of a complex of silicate (or phosphate) with ribose was also analyzed in experiments with 29Si and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). We found that silicate or phosphate complexes of ribose were not detectable under our experimental conditions. The stability of ribose and lyxose improved after addition of 40-fold molar excess (relative to a pentose) of sodium silicate or sodium phosphate to the alkaline solution. The stability was not improved further when an 80-fold molar excess of sodium silicate or sodium phosphate was added. Calcium was removed from these solutions by precipitation of calcium salts. The drop in Ca2+ concentration might have improved the stability of ribose and lyxose, which are susceptible to aldol addition. The improvement of ribose stability by the removal of Ca2+ and by addition of silicate or phosphate was far smaller than the improvement by borate. Furthermore, all aldopentoses showed similar stability in silicate- and phosphate-containing solutions. These results clearly show that selective stabilization of ribose by borate cannot be replaced by the effects of silicate or phosphate; this finding points to the importance of borate in prebiotic RNA formation.

  2. Effects of Silicate, Phosphate, and Calcium on the Stability of Aldopentoses.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Sakiko; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2016-06-01

    Ribose is an important constituent of RNA: ribose connects RNA bases and forms a strand of sugar phosphates. Accumulation of ribose on prebiotic Earth was difficult because of its low stability. Improvement in the yield of ribose by the introduction of borate or silicate in a formose-like reaction has been proposed. The effects of borates have been further analyzed and confirmed in subsequent studies. Nonetheless, the effects of silicates and phosphates remain unclear. In the present study, we incubated aldopentoses in a highly alkaline aqueous solution at a moderate temperature to determine the effects of silicate or phosphate on the degradation rates of ribose and its isomeric aldopentoses. The formation of a complex of silicate (or phosphate) with ribose was also analyzed in experiments with (29)Si and (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). We found that silicate or phosphate complexes of ribose were not detectable under our experimental conditions. The stability of ribose and lyxose improved after addition of 40-fold molar excess (relative to a pentose) of sodium silicate or sodium phosphate to the alkaline solution. The stability was not improved further when an 80-fold molar excess of sodium silicate or sodium phosphate was added. Calcium was removed from these solutions by precipitation of calcium salts. The drop in Ca(2+) concentration might have improved the stability of ribose and lyxose, which are susceptible to aldol addition. The improvement of ribose stability by the removal of Ca(2+) and by addition of silicate or phosphate was far smaller than the improvement by borate. Furthermore, all aldopentoses showed similar stability in silicate- and phosphate-containing solutions. These results clearly show that selective stabilization of ribose by borate cannot be replaced by the effects of silicate or phosphate; this finding points to the importance of borate in prebiotic RNA formation. PMID:26559965

  3. Evidence for seismogenic fracture of silicic magma.

    PubMed

    Tuffen, Hugh; Smith, Rosanna; Sammonds, Peter R

    2008-05-22

    It has long been assumed that seismogenic faulting is confined to cool, brittle rocks, with a temperature upper limit of approximately 600 degrees C (ref. 1). This thinking underpins our understanding of volcanic earthquakes, which are assumed to occur in cold rocks surrounding moving magma. However, the recent discovery of abundant brittle-ductile fault textures in silicic lavas has led to the counter-intuitive hypothesis that seismic events may be triggered by fracture and faulting within the erupting magma itself. This hypothesis is supported by recent observations of growing lava domes, where microearthquake swarms have coincided with the emplacement of gouge-covered lava spines, leading to models of seismogenic stick-slip along shallow shear zones in the magma. But can fracturing or faulting in high-temperature, eruptible magma really generate measurable seismic events? Here we deform high-temperature silica-rich magmas under simulated volcanic conditions in order to test the hypothesis that high-temperature magma fracture is seismogenic. The acoustic emissions recorded during experiments show that seismogenic rupture may occur in both crystal-rich and crystal-free silicic magmas at eruptive temperatures, extending the range of known conditions for seismogenic faulting. PMID:18497823

  4. Electrochemistry of lunar rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindstrom, D. J.; Haskin, L. A.

    1979-01-01

    Electrolysis of silicate melts has been shown to be an effective means of producing metals from common silicate materials. No fluxing agents need be added to the melts. From solution in melts of diopside (CaMgSi2O6) composition, the elements Si, Ti, Ni, and Fe have been reduced to their metallic states. Platinum is a satisfactory anode material, but other cathode materials are needed. Electrolysis of compositional analogs of lunar rocks initially produces iron metal at the cathode and oxygen gas at the anode. Utilizing mainly heat and electricity which are readily available from sunlight, direct electrolysis is capable of producing useful metals from common feedstocks without the need for expendable chemicals. This simple process and the products obtained from it deserve further study for use in materials processing in space.

  5. Biomimetic Calcium-Silicate Cements Support Differentiation Of Human Orofacial Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gandolfi, Maria Giovanna; Shah, Sara N.; Feng, Ruoxue; Prati, Carlo; Akintoye, Sunday O.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Human orofacial bone mesenchymal stem cells (OFMSCs) from maxilla and mandible have robust osteogenic regenerative properties based on our previous reports that demonstrate phenotypic and functional differences between jaw and axial bone mesenchymal stem cells in same individuals. Furthermore, a combination of OFMSCs with bioactive calcium-releasing cements can potentially improve OFMSC multi-lineage differentiation capacity, but biocompatibility of calcium silicate cements with OFMSCs is still unclear. We tested the hypothesis that material extracts of calcium-releasing calcium-silicate cements support biomimetic microenvironment for survival and differentiation of human OFMSCs. Methods Two experimental calcium-silicate cements 1) calcium-silicate mineral powder (wTC) containing di- and tricalcium-silicate, calcium sulphate, and calcium chloride and 2) wTC doped with alpha-tricalcium phosphate (wTC-αTCP) were designed and prepared. Cement setting times were assessed by Gilmore needles, ability to release calcium and hydroxyl ions was assessed by potentiometric methods and OFMSC attachment to calcium-silicate discs was assessed. Calcium-silicate material extracts were tested for ability to support OFMSCs survival and in vitro/in vivo differentiation. Results Fewer OFMSCs attached to calcium-silicate discs relative to tissue culture plastic (p=0.001). Extracts of calcium-silicate cements sustained OFMSC survival, maintained steady state levels of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, alkaline phosphatase and bone sialoprotein while upregulating their respective gene transcripts. Adipogenic and in vivo bone regenerative capacities of OFMSCs were also unaffected by calcium-silicate extracts. Conclusions Ion-releasing calcium-silicate cements support a biomimetic microenvironment conducive to survival and differentiation of OFMSCs. Combination of OFMSCs and calcium-silicate cement can potentially promote tissue regeneration in periapical bone defects. PMID

  6. Elemental and Sr Nd Pb isotopic geochemistry of Late Paleozoic volcanic rocks beneath the Junggar basin, NW China: Implications for the formation and evolution of the basin basement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jianping; Sun, Min; Zhao, Guochun; Robinson, Paul T.; Wang, Fangzheng

    2007-03-01

    The basement beneath the Junggar basin has been interpreted either as a micro-continent of Precambrian age or as a fragment of Paleozoic oceanic crust. Elemental and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions and zircon Pb-Pb ages of volcanic rocks from drill cores through the paleo-weathered crust show that the basement is composed mainly of late Paleozoic volcanic rock with minor shale and tuff. The volcanic rocks are mostly subalkaline with some minor low-K rocks in the western Kexia area. Some alkaline lavas occur in the central Luliang uplift and northeastern Wulungu depression. The lavas range in composition from basalts to rhyolites and fractional crystallization played an important role in magma evolution. Except for a few samples from Kexia, the basalts have low La/Nb (<1.4), typical for oceanic crust derived from asthenospheric melts. Zircon Pb-Pb ages indicate that the Kexia andesite, with a volcanic arc affinity, formed in the early Carboniferous (345 Ma), whereas the Luliang rhyolite and the Wucaiwan dacite, with syn-collisional to within-plate affinities, formed in the early Devonian (395 and 405 Ma, respectively). Positive ɛNd( t) values (up to +7.4) and low initial 87Sr/ 86Sr isotopic ratios of the intermediate-silicic rocks suggest that the entire Junggar terrain may be underlain by oceanic crust, an interpretation consistent with the juvenile isotopic signatures of many granitoid plutons in other parts of the Central Asia Orogenic Belt. Variation in zircon ages for the silicic rocks, different Ba, P, Ti, Nb or Th anomalies in the mafic rocks, and variable Nb/Y and La/Nb ratios across the basin, suggest that the basement is compositionally heterogeneous. The heterogeneity is believed to reflect amalgamation of different oceanic blocks representing either different evolution stages within a single terrane or possibly derivation from different terranes.

  7. Crystalline-amorphous transition in silicate perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmati, M.; Chizmeshya, A.; Wolf, G.H.; Poole, P.H.; Shao, J.; Angell, C.A.

    1995-06-01

    CaSiO{sub 3} and MgSiO{sub 3} perovskites are known to undergo solid-state crystal to amorphous transitions near ambient pressure when decompressed from their high-pressure stability fields. In order to elucidate the mechanistic aspects of this transition we have performed detailed molecular-dynamics simulations and lattice-dynamical calculations on model silicate perovskite systems using empirical rigid-ion pair potentials. In the simulations at low temperatures, the model perovskite systems transform under tension to a low-density glass composed of corner shared chains of tetrahedral silicon. The amorphization is initiated by a thermally activated step involving a soft polar optic mode in the perovskite phase at the Brillouin zone center. Progression of the system along this reaction coordinate triggers, in succession, multiple barrierless modes of instability ultimately producing a catastrophic decohesion of the lattice. An important intermediary along the reaction path is a crystalline phase where silicon is in a five-coordinate site and the alkaline-earth metal atom is in eightfold coordination. At the onset pressure, this transitory phase is itself dynamically unstable to a number of additional vibrational modes, the most relevant being those which result in transformation to a variety of tetrahedral chain silicate motifs. These results support the conjecture that stress-induced amorphization arises from the near simultaneous accessibility of multiple modes of instability in the highly metastable parent crystalline phase.

  8. Butalón igneous rocks, Neuquén, Argentina: Age, stratigraphic relationships and geochemical features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casé, A. M.; López-Escobar, L.; Danieli, J. C.; Schalamuk, A.

    2008-09-01

    Three main groups of igneous rocks of different age are recognized in the Butalón area, including volcanic rocks of the Choiyoi Group (Permian-Triassic), stocks and dikes of the Granodiorita Varvarcó (Upper Cretaceous-Paleocene) and stocks and dikes of the Tonalita Butalón (Paleocene-Eocene?). The Choiyoi Group consists of ignimbrites, breccias, tuffs and silicic lavas. Most are subalkaline and four groups can be distinguished on the basis of their trace element patterns. Most samples are enriched in Ba, but depleted in Nb, Sr, P, Ti and Eu. The subvolcanic rocks of the Granodiorita Varvarcó and Tonalita Butalón are mainly calc-alkaline, metaluminous to peraluminous, with low to medium potassium contents. They have similar subparallel REE and multielement patterns with low La/Yb and Eu/Eu ∗ ratios. These patterns mimic those observed in Pleistocene-Holocene volcanic rocks, of similar SiO 2 content, from the CSVZ of the Andes. They are depleted in Nb and Ti, have normal to low P, and are enriched in Sr and Zr. Hornfels-skarn type hydrothermal alteration is produced by Tonalita Butalón in the adjacent igneous rocks. Magmatic-hydrothermal breccias are developed on top of some of the stocks. While some of the breccias exhibit Mo anomalies, Au and Ag anomalies are present in the Choiyoi Group.

  9. Surfactant-enhanced low-pH alkaline flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Peru, D.A. and Co., Columbia, MD . Research Div.); Lorenz, P.B. )

    1990-08-01

    This paper reports sodium bicarbonate investigated as a potential alkaline agent in surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding because it has very little tendency to dissolve silicate minerals. In experiments performed with Wilmington, CA, crude oil and three types of surfactants, the bicarbonate/surfactant combination caused a marked lowering of interfacial tension (IFT). Bicarbonate protected the surfactant against divalent cations and reduced adsorption of surfactant and polymer on various minerals. Coreflood test confirm that sodium bicarbonate plus surfactant can be an effective alternative to the high-pH flooding process.

  10. Wadeite (K2ZrSi3O9), an alkali-zirconosilicate from the Saima agpaitic rocks in northeastern China: Its origin and response to multi-stage activities of alkaline fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bin; Wang, Ru-Cheng; Yang, Jin-Hui; Wu, Fu-Yuan; Zhang, Wen-Lan; Gu, Xiang-Ping; Zhang, Ai-Cheng

    2015-05-01

    The Triassic Saima alkaline complex in the Liaodong Peninsula of northeastern China covers an area of about 20 km2 and is dominated by nepheline syenite, with phonolite at its center, and a concealed body of eudialyte-bearing nepheline syenite in the northwest of the complex. The phonolite has similar features to miaskite, while the nepheline syenites are classified in the agpaitic group according to their mineral assemblage, and the alkalinity and aluminum saturation indexes. Zircon is the dominant Zr-bearing mineral in the phonolite, whereas wadeite occurs as the only primary Zr-bearing mineral in the nepheline syenites. The transitional crystallization from zircon to wadeite reveals an increase in alkalis and a high K/Na ratio as the magmas evolved from the volcanic to the intrusive stage. The primary wadeite grains underwent varying degrees of hydrothermal alteration. Overall, the areas of weak, medium, and strong alteration are characterized by the following respective associations: (1) wadeite + secondary catapleiite/gaidonnayite, (2) wadeite + secondary catapleiite/gaidonnayite + zircon, and (3) pseudomorphs after wadeite. The pseudomorphs are widespread and mainly consist of residual wadeite, secondary zircon, catapleiite/gaidonnayite, K-feldspar, calcite, and some Zr-bearing titanite and vesuvianite. All of the secondary zircon grains in the three associations are typically enriched in Ca and Al compared with the primary Ca-free zircons of the phonolite. The progressive alteration of wadeite suggests that the Saima complex underwent multiple episodes of fluid activity during a hydrothermal stage, including an initial Na-metasomatism via alkaline fluids, then stages most likely involving progressively CO2-rich fluids, and an intensive episode involving a mixture of these fluids with externally derived Ca-rich fluids.

  11. Voluminous subalkaline silicic magmas related to intracontinental rifting in the southern Oklahoma aulacogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Richard E.; Al-Shaieb, Zuhair

    1980-04-01

    Extrusive rhyolites and cogenetic granites of the Wichita province genetically related to the southern Oklahoma aulacogen are entirely sub-alkaline in character. Peralkaline granites occur in the province but are volumetrically minor and have been interpreted by earlier workers as differentiation products of subalkaline magma. The large volumes of sub-alkaline silicic magma in the southern Oklahoma aulacogen represent a style of magmatism which contrasts markedly with the alkaline igneous activity generally associated with intracontinental rifting. *Present address: Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory and Department of Geological Sciences of Columbia University, Palisades, New York 10964

  12. Alkaline "Permanent" Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacey, Antony

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of paper manufacturing processes and their effects on library materials focuses on the promotion of alkaline "permanent" paper, with less acid, by Canadian library preservation specialists. Standards for paper acidity are explained; advantages of alkaline paper are described, including decreased manufacturing costs; and recyclability is…

  13. Anodes for alkaline electrolysis

    DOEpatents

    Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev

    2011-02-01

    A method of making an anode for alkaline electrolysis cells includes adsorption of precursor material on a carbonaceous material, conversion of the precursor material to hydroxide form and conversion of precursor material from hydroxide form to oxy-hydroxide form within the alkaline electrolysis cell.

  14. Talking Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Dale; Corley, Brenda

    1987-01-01

    Discusses some of the ways that rocks can be used to enhance children's creativity and their interest in science. Suggests the creation of a dramatic production involving rocks. Includes basic information on sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic rocks. (TW)

  15. The geochemistry and mineralization of alkaline ring complexes in Africa (a review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, P.

    Carbonatites are defined as igneous rocks containing more than 50% carbonate minerals. They are divided into four classes: (1) calcic, (2) dolomitic, (3) ferrocarbonatite, and (4) natrocarbonatite. Carbonatites are characteristically associated with ijolites, but not all carbonatites are entirely magmatic. Many centres show metasomatic replacement features, referred to as fenitization. Most subvolcanic and volcanic carbonatite centres are calcic, but trapped fluids as inclusions in apatite crystals indicate that the bulk composition was alkalic and chemically comparable to natrocarbonatite. Experimental evidence suggests that parental carbonatite magma is the product of immiscibility from an alkali silicate liquid of phonolitic or nephelinitic composition. Alkali loss from the bulk carbonatite magma caused fenitization represented by zones of sodic and potassic metasomatism. Sodic metasomatism is more frequently located at deeper eroded centres and is characterized by the occurrence of albitite. Potassic metasomatism is more common in many carbonatite centres and is represented mineralogically by alkali feldspar and phlogopite. Many fenites carry an alkaline ferromagnesian assemblage consisting principally of alkali amphibole (eckermannite-magnesioarfvedsonite) and/or aegirine. Carbonatites have igneous isotopic ratios and distinctive contents of incompatible trace elements. Associated fenites have elevated Sr isotopic ratios and selected TE enrichment pertinent to the dominant metasomatism. Carbonatites exhibit REE, Nb, U, Th mineralization and, more rarely, sphalerite, galena, and chalcopyrite mineralization. Both disseminated and vein-controlled mineralization are found in many carbonatite centres. The most important economic products of carbonatites include pyrochore, columbite, monozite, apatite and zirconium minerals. The alkaline syenites and alkaline granites as ring complexes have textural, petrological and chemical characteristics which are distinctly

  16. The origin of the silicic domes in the Macolod Corridor, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flood, T. P.; Patino, L. C.; Vogel, T. A.; Arcilla, C.; Stimac, J. A.; Maximo, R. R.; Arpa, M. B.

    2002-12-01

    The petrogenesis of silicic magmas in areas that do not contain continental crust is often unclear. This study examines the composition of domes associated with Mount Makiling stratovolcano, Philippines, to understand the generation of silicic magmas, in an island arc setting. Makiling volcano and associated domes are located in the Macolod Corridor. The corridor is a tectonic depression between the West Luzon Arc (produced by east dipping South China Sea plate) and the East Luzon Arc (produced by the west dipping Philippine Sea plate) with numerous volcanic features. The volcanism in this part of the Macolod Corridor has occurred sporadically over at least the past million years. Sampling of Makiling volcano indicates a continuous range in composition from basaltic andesite to dacite. The range in composition in the domes is wider, from basalt to rhyolite. The chemical variation in samples from individual domes is small, and may be an indication of monogenetic nature of the magmatic activity. Howerver, most of the domes have similar compositions, with SiO2 modes of 70% and with little variation of other chemical parameters that may indicate derivation from a larger silicic magma system. At least one dome has bimodal composition, one set of samples ranges in composition form basalts-basaltic andesite and the other set of samples consists of dacites. There is a dubious association among the magmas from the Macolod corridor with subduction zone magmatism, the rocks from Makiling volcano and most of those sampled from the domes are calc-alkaline with large Nb and Ti depletion on spider diagrams. Conversely, one dome has tholeiitic characteristics with higher FeO/MgO ratios for a given SiO2 content. The major and minor elements data in the samples from Makiling volcano plot on trends that show little scatter. All the samples follow on a single trend for Mg, Fe, and Ca. Though, for other elements (Ti, Al, Sr, Na, K, Rb, and Zr) the samples from the northeastern part of

  17. Evolution and geochemistry of the Tertiary calc-alkaline plutons in the Adak Island region of the central Aleutian oceanic island arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Suzanne; Citron, Gary P.; Kay, Robert W.; Jicha, Brian; Tibbetts, Ashley

    2014-05-01

    Calc-alkaline plutons are major crustal building blocks of continental margin mountain belts like the Mesozoic to Tertiary Andes and the Sierra Nevada, but are rare in oceanic island arcs. Some of the most calc-alkaline I-type island arc plutons are in the Central Aleutians with the most extreme signatures, as indicated by FeO/MgO ratios of < ~2 at 48-70% wt. % SiO2, in the ~10 km wide Oligocene Hidden Bay pluton on southern Adak Island and the 10 km wide Miocene Kagalaska pluton to the north on eastern Adak and the adjacent Kagalaska Island. Although small compared to most continental plutons, similarities in intrusive units, mineralogy and chemistry suggest common formation processes. The Aleutian calc-alkaline plutonic rocks mainly differ from continental plutons in having more oceanic like isotopic (87Sr/86Sr = 0.703-0.7033; Epsilon Nd = 9-7.8) and LIL (e.g., higher K/Rb) ratios. The Adak region plutons differ from Tertiary plutons on Unalaska Island further east in being more K-rich and in having a more oxidized and lower-temperature mineralogy. From a regional perspective, the Adak area plutons intrude Eocene/Oligocene Finger Bay Formation mafic volcanic and sedimentary rocks and postdate the small ~38 Ma tholeiitic Finger Bay pluton. The chemistry of these older magmatic rocks is basically similar to that of young Central Aleutian magmatic rocks with boninites and arc tholeiitic magmas seemingly being absent. The formation of the calc-alkaline plutons seems to require a sufficient crustal thickness, fluid concentration and contractional stress such that magma chambers can stabilize significant amounts of pargasitic hornblende. Seismic receiver function analyses (Janiszewski et al., 2013) indicate the modern Adak crust is ~ 37 km thick. Existing and new hornblende, plagioclase and biotite Ar/Ar ages from 16 Hidden Bay pluton and Gannet Lake stock gabbro, porphyritic diorite, diorite, granodiorite, leucogranodiorite and aplite samples range from 34.6 to 30

  18. Alkaline battery operational methodology

    DOEpatents

    Sholklapper, Tal; Gallaway, Joshua; Steingart, Daniel; Ingale, Nilesh; Nyce, Michael

    2016-08-16

    Methods of using specific operational charge and discharge parameters to extend the life of alkaline batteries are disclosed. The methods can be used with any commercial primary or secondary alkaline battery, as well as with newer alkaline battery designs, including batteries with flowing electrolyte. The methods include cycling batteries within a narrow operating voltage window, with minimum and maximum cut-off voltages that are set based on battery characteristics and environmental conditions. The narrow voltage window decreases available capacity but allows the batteries to be cycled for hundreds or thousands of times.

  19. Characterization of iron-phosphate-silicate chemical garden structures.

    PubMed

    Barge, Laura M; Doloboff, Ivria J; White, Lauren M; Stucky, Galen D; Russell, Michael J; Kanik, Isik

    2012-02-28

    Chemical gardens form when ferrous chloride hydrate seed crystals are added or concentrated solutions are injected into solutions of sodium silicate and potassium phosphate. Various precipitation morphologies are observed depending on silicate and phosphate concentrations, including hollow plumes, bulbs, and tubes. The growth of precipitates is controlled by the internal osmotic pressure, fluid buoyancy, and membrane strength. Additionally, rapid bubble-led growth is observed when silicate concentrations are high. ESEM/EDX analysis confirms compositional gradients within the membranes, and voltage measurements across the membranes during growth show a final potential of around 150-200 mV, indicating that electrochemical gradients are maintained across the membranes as growth proceeds. The characterization of chemical gardens formed with iron, silicate, and phosphate, three important components of an early earth prebiotic hydrothermal system, can help us understand the properties of analogous structures that likely formed at submarine alkaline hydrothermal vents in the Hadean-structures offering themselves as the hatchery of life. PMID:22035594

  20. Hydrogen and carbon abundances and isotopic ratios in apatite from alkaline intrusive complexes, with a focus on carbonatites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, Serge L.; Epstein, Samuel; Stolper, Edward

    1999-06-01

    We report H and C contents and δD and δ 13C values of apatites from 15 alkaline intrusive complexes ranging in age from 110 Ma to 2.6 Ga. Sampling focused on carbonatites, but included silicate rocks as well. Heating at temperatures up to 1500°C is needed to extract fully H 2O and CO 2 from these apatites. Apatites from carbonatite-rich intrusive complexes contain 0.2-1.1 wt% H 2O and 0.05-0.70 wt% CO 2; apatites from two silicate-rich alkaline complexes with little or no carbonatite are generally poorer in both volatile components (0.1-0.2% H 2O and 0.01-0.11% CO 2). D/H ratios in apatites from these rocks are bimodally distributed: group I (δD = -51 to -74‰) and group II (δD = -88 to -104‰). We suggest that the δD values of group I apatites represent primitive, mantle-derived values and that the group II apatites crystallized from degassed magmas, resulting in lower H 2O contents and δD values. Although many factors influence the extent of degassing, the depth of emplacement could represent a major control. In contrast to H 2O contents and δD values, CO 2 contents and δ 13C values of gas released at high temperatures from multiple aliquots of these apatite samples are variable. This suggests the presence of more than one C-bearing component in these apatites, one of which is proposed to be dissolved carbonate; the other, with δ 13C ˜<-25‰, could be associated with hydrocarbons. Group I apatites have δD values similar to those of primitive, mantle-derived basaltic magmas and overlap with (but cover a narrower range than) mantle-derived mica, amphibole, and whole rocks. δ 13C values also overlap typical upper mantle. These results suggest that igneous apatites can retain their primary δD and δ 13C values.

  1. Contrasting siliceous replacement mineralization, east-central Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, M.D.; Ilchik, R.P. . Dept. of Geosciences); Seedorff, C.E. )

    1993-04-01

    Fine-grained siliceous replacement of carbonate-bearing rocks (jasperoid) occurs in most mineral districts in east-central Nevada. In most of these occurrences, jasperoid contains Au and(or) Ag and little or no base metals, although concentrations and ratios vary significantly. Broadly, two end-members are distinguished: (1) silicification as an intermediate- to late-stage part of complex alteration associated with igneous centers, and (2) jasperoids lacking other associated alteration and having few or no associated igneous rocks. Within this region, siliceous replacements are found with all metallic ([+-] magmatic) suites. No single factor in these occurrences relates the distribution, metal contents, fluid geochemistry, igneous rocks and associated alteration. Summarizing these characteristics: geochemical and fluid inclusion evidence shows that fluids in igneous-related jasperoids can be high-salinity magmatic (Ely), low-salinity magmatic (McCullough Butte), or metoric (Ward). Fluids in igneous-poor systems are low-salinity, exchanged meteoric waters from which a minor magmatic component can not be excluded. At this level of detail, the best predictor of Ag:Au are the district-scale alteration characteristics. Siliceous replacement takes place in many kinds systems and probably requires no more than a cooling, mildly acidic hydrothermal fluid. Metal suites, other fluid characteristics, and geological environment all need to be considered in evaluating the significance of any jasperoid.

  2. Carbonate and silicate-carbonate injection complexes in collision systems: The West Baikal region as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sklyarov, E. V.; Fedorovsky, V. S.; Kotov, A. B.; Lavrenchuk, A. V.; Mazukabzov, A. M.; Starikova, A. E.

    2013-05-01

    Two types of carbonate and carbonate-silicate rocks: synmetamorphic marble melange and veined bodies in amphibolites, gabbroic rocks, and syenites are recognized in the Early Paleozoic Ol'khon collision system in the West Baikal region. The marble melange is characterized by the various size of the fragments of the mafic granulite, gneisses, metagabbros, and granites. It is suggested that the melange was injected into the silicate matrix as a result of a ductile flow. The calcite, dolomite, and carbonate-silicate rocks are characterized by their massive and fine-grained texture. They are often associated with coeval granite and dolerite dikes and occasionally reveal indications of carbonate-silicate mingling. It is suggested that carbonate and carbonate-silicate rocks were injected at late stages of the synmetamorphic tectogenesis. In isotopic composition, geochemistry, and mineralogy, these carbonate rocks differ from mantle carbonatites, and their origin is most likely related to the melting of carbonate rocks in the lower crust in the presence of aqueous fluid according to the model proposed by Lentz [29]. The shearing facilitated drainage of the lower crust and the upper mantle and made it possible to inject carbonate material to the upper level as a melt and a ductile mixture along with crustal granitic and mantle-derived basic melts. The injection carbonate rocks have been described from other metamorphic complexes, e.g., in the Caledonides of Norway and in the Himalayan collision system.

  3. Analysis of a Sheet Silicate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, J. M.; Evans, S.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a student project in analytical chemistry using sheet silicates. Provides specific information regarding the use of phlogopite in an experiment to analyze samples for silicon, aluminum, magnesium, iron, potassium, and fluoride. (CS)

  4. Ion implantation in silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, G.W.

    1993-12-01

    This review examines the effects of ion implantation on the physical properties of silicate glasses, the compositional modifications that can be brought about, and the use of metal implants to form colloidal nanosize particles for increasing the nonlinear refractive index.

  5. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be...

  6. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be...

  7. Feldspar-Bearing Igneous Rocks at Gale: A ChemCam Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sautter, V.; Fabre, C.; Toplis, M.; Wiens, R. C.; Gasnault, O.; Forni, O.; Mangold, N.

    2014-09-01

    We present the first in situ evidences of feldspar-rich rocks ranging from granodioritic and alkalin effusive rocks (trachy basalts and syenitic liquids). Implication for primitive noachain crust will be discussed.

  8. Pyroxenes of the Khibiny alkaline pluton, Kola Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovenchuk, V. N.; Ivanyuk, G. Yu.; Pakhomovsky, Ya. A.; Men'shikov, Yu. P.; Konopleva, N. G.; Korchak, Yu. A.

    2008-12-01

    Seven pyroxene varieties were identified in nepheline syenites and foidolites of the Khibiny pluton: enstatite, ferrosilite, diopside, hedenbergite, augite, aegirine-augite, and aegirine. Enstatite and augite are typical of alkaline and ultramafic rocks of dike series. Ferrosilite was found in country quartzitic hornfels. Diopside is a rock-forming mineral in alkaline and ultramafic rocks, alkali gabbroids, hornfels in xenoliths of volcanic and sedimentary rocks and foyaite, melteigite-urtite that assimilate them, and certain hydrothermal pegmatite veins. Hedenbergite was noted in hornfels from xenoliths of volcanic and sedimentary rocks and in a hydrothermal pegmatite vein at Mount Eveslogchorr. Aegirine-augite is the predominant pyroxene in all types of nepheline syenites, phonolites and tinguaites, foidolites, alkaline and ultramafic rocks of dike series, fenitized wall rocks surrounding the pluton, and xenoliths of Devonian volcanic and sedimentary rocks. Aegirine is an abundant primary or, more often, secondary mineral in nepheline syenites, foidolites, and hydrothermal pegmatite veins. It occurs as separate crystals, outer zones of diopside and aegirine-augite crystals, and homoaxial pseudomorphs after Na-Ca amphiboles. Microprobe analyses of 265 pyroxenes samples allowed us to distinguish ten principal trends of isomorphic replacement and corresponding typomorphic features of pyroxenes. Compositional variations in clinopyroxenes along the sampled 35-km profile from the margin of the Khibiny pluton to its center confirm the symmetric zoning of the foyaite pluton relative to semicircular faults of the Minor Arc and the Main (Central) Ring marked by Devonian volcanic and sedimentary rocks, foidolites, and related metasomatic rocks (rischorrite, albitite, and aegirinite). Changes in the composition of pyroxenes are explained mainly by the redistribution of elements between coexisting minerals of foyaites in the process of their intense differentiation under the

  9. Effect of silicate-based corrosion inhibitor from rice husk ash on aluminum alloy in 0.5M HCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, N. K.; Mohamad, N.; Zulkafli, R.; Jalar, A.

    2013-05-01

    Silicate-based corrosion inhibitor prepared by treating silica powder extracted from rice husk ash with concentrated alkaline. The electrochemical behavior of the Al 6061 immersed in 0.5 M hydrochloric acid (HCl) has been studied using the measurements of weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization and optical or scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that, the optimum concentration of silicate-based corrosion inhibitor was prominent at 5 ppm. The small addition of silicate-based corrosion inhibitor was exhibited the decreasing of the weight loss of Al 6061 in acidic medium. SEM micrograph proved that the morphology of untreated Al 6061 with silicate-base corrosion inhibitor contributes more corrosion attack on sample compared to that treated Al 6061. The purpose of this research is to understand the effect of silicate-based corrosion inhibitor concentration yielded from rice husk ash on aluminum alloy.

  10. New estimates of silicate weathering rates and their uncertainties in global rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Seulgi; Chamberlain, C. P.; Hilley, G. E.

    2014-06-01

    This study estimated the catchment- and global-scale weathering rates of silicate rocks from global rivers using global compilation datasets from the GEMS/Water and HYBAM. These datasets include both time-series of chemical concentrations of major elements and synchronous discharge. Using these datasets, we first examined the sources of uncertainties in catchment and global silicate weathering rates. Then, we proposed future sampling strategies and geochemical analyses to estimate accurate silicate weathering rates in global rivers and to reduce uncertainties in their estimates. For catchment silicate weathering rates, we considered uncertainties due to sampling frequency and variability in river discharge, concentration, and attribution of weathering to different chemical sources. Our results showed that uncertainties in catchment-scale silicate weathering rates were due mostly to the variations in discharge and cation fractions from silicate substrates. To calculate unbiased silicate weathering rates accounting for the variations from discharge and concentrations, we suggest that at least 10 and preferably ∼40 temporal chemical data points with synchronous discharge from each river are necessary. For the global silicate weathering rate, we examined uncertainties from infrequent sampling within an individual river, the extrapolation from limited rivers to a global flux, and the inverse model selections for source differentiation. For this weathering rate, we found that the main uncertainty came from the extrapolation to the global flux and the model configurations of source differentiation methods. This suggests that to reduce the uncertainties in the global silicate weathering rates, coverage of synchronous datasets of river chemistry and discharge to rivers from tectonically active regions and volcanic provinces must be extended, and catchment-specific silicate end-members for those rivers must be characterized. With current available synchronous datasets, we

  11. THE BIOCOMPATIBILITY OF MESOPOROUS SILICATES

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Sarah; Padera, Robert F.; Langer, Robert; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2008-01-01

    Micro- and nano- mesoporous silicate particles are considered potential drug delivery systems because of their ordered pore structures, large surface areas and the ease with which they can be chemically modified. However, few cytotoxicity or biocompatibility studies have been reported, especially when silicates are administered in the quantities necessary to deliver low-potency drugs. The biocompatibility of mesoporous silicates of particle sizes ~ 150 nm, ~ 800 nm and ~ 4 µm and pore sizes of 3 nm, 7 nm and 16 nm respectively are examined here. In vitro, mesoporous silicates showed a significant degree of toxicity at high concentrations with mesothelial cells. Following subcutaneous injection of silicates in rats, the amount of residual material decreased progressively over three months, with good biocompatibility on histology at all time points. In contrast, intra peritoneal and intra venous injections in mice resulted in death or euthanasia. No toxicity was seen with subcutaneous injection of the same particles in mice. Microscopic analysis of the lung tissue of the mice indicates that death may be due to thrombosis. Although local tissue reaction to mesoporous silicates was benign, they caused severe systemic toxicity. This toxicity could be mitigated by modification of the materials. PMID:18675454

  12. The petrology of a large intra-oceanic silicic eruption: the Sandy Bay Tephra, Kermadec Arc, Southwest Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Ian E. M.; Stewart, Robert B.; Price, Richard C.

    2003-06-01

    The pumiceous pyroclastic deposits known as the Sandy Bay Tuff on Macauley Island in the Kermadec Group represent a medium-scale silicic eruption in an oceanic subduction setting. The Sandy Bay eruption occurred about 6310 yr BP, forming a large submarine caldera in the summit of the mainly submarine and essentially basaltic Macauley Volcano. The Sandy Bay magma contained <1 vol% phenocrysts of plagioclase, augite, hypersthene and accessory oxides together with crystals and fragments of basaltic origin and lithic fragments representing an earlier silicic eruptive episode. Although prolonged fractionation of basaltic magma to produce silicic daughter is a generic paradigm, it fails in detail to completely explain the observed compositions of the silicic rocks, the variety of compositions, the distribution of rock types, their aphyric nature or their volumes. It also encounters difficulties as a general explanation for silicic magmatism in the Kermadec Arc. An alternative, that silicic magmas represent anatexis of underplated basaltic arc crust, explains more of these details and can be modelled as the logical consequence of the thermal evolution of an oceanic arc. In addition, this model can provide an explanation for the onset of silicic magmatism at the current stage in the evolution of the arc. A precondition for anatectic melting in an oceanic arc is the development of a suitable source at the base of the arc crust; this takes of the order of 10 6 years. The onset of silicic magmatism creates an infertile residue and complementary silicic magmas. Separation of silicic magma from its source and its rise into the upper crust removes heat from the system. Continuation of silicic magmatism depends on replenishment of fertile arc material. An alternative is that generation of silicic magmas is limited to a window of opportunity at an adolescent stage in the evolution of an oceanic arc.

  13. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates

    PubMed Central

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P.; Andreev, Andrey S.; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Flatt, Robert J.; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of 29Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured. PMID:27009966

  14. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates.

    PubMed

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P; Andreev, Andrey S; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F; Flatt, Robert J; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of (29)Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured. PMID:27009966

  15. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P.; Andreev, Andrey S.; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Flatt, Robert J.; D'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-03-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of 29Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured.

  16. The volcanic-subvolcanic rocks of the fernando de noronha archipelago, southern atlantic ocean: Mineral chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Rosana Peporine; Ulbrich, Mabel N. Costas; Ulbrich, Horstpeter

    2014-12-01

    Fernando de Noronha archipelago presents an older Remédios Formation with subvolcanic intrusions, belonging to two different alkaline series, the sodic (undersaturated: basanites, tephrites, essexites, tephriphonolites, phonolites), and potassic ones (mildly undersaturated to silicic, with alkali basalts, basaltic trachyandesites, trachyandesites, trachytes), and lamprophyres. The upper Quixaba Formation presents nephelinite flows and basanites. A third minor unit, São José, is constituted by basanites carrying mantle xenoliths. Magnesian olivines occur in the Remédios basanites and alkali basalts, and in nephelinites. Melilites are present as groundmass grains in melilite melanephelinites (MEM). Clinopyroxenes (cpx) are mostly salites to titaniferous salites (Remédios sodic series), grading into aegirines in the differentiated aphyric phonolites. Cpx in the lamprophyres show disequilibrium textures. In the Quixaba flows, cpx are salites, enriched in Mg (especially in MEM). Amphiboles, remarkably, are common in tephriphonolites and phonolites and in basaltic trachyandesites, sometimes with disequilibrum zoning textures, and a conspicuous phase in lamprophyres. Dark micas are present as groundmass plates in MEM, OLM and PYM (olivine and pyroxene melanephelinites), with compositional variety (enriched in Ti, Ba, Sr) depending on the composition of the parent rock; BaO can be as high as 16-19%. Feldspars crystallize as calcic plagioclases, sanidines and anorthoclases, depending on the rock types, as phenocrysts and in groundmass, both in Quixaba and Remédios rocks; they are absent in nephelinites. Nephelines are found in Remédios sodic series types and Quixaba rocks. Haüyne and noseane are rarely observed in Remédios rocks.

  17. Permissive tracts for incompatible element deposits hosted in pegmatities, alkaline rocks, and carbonatities in Mauritania (phase V, deliverable 86), Chapter Q1 in Second projet de renforcement institutionnel du secteur minier de la République Islamique de Mauritanie (PRISM-II)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Cliff D.; Horton, John D.

    2012-01-01

    This report contains the USGS results of the PRISM-II Mauritania Minerals Project and is presented in cooperation with the Ministry of Petroleum, Energy, and Mines of the Islamic Republic of Mauritania. The Report is composed of separate chapters consisting of multidisciplinary interpretive reports with accompanying plates on the geology, structure, geochronology, geophysics, hydrogeology, geochemistry, remote sensing (Landsat TM and ASTER), and SRTM and ASTER digital elevation models of Mauritania. The syntheses of these multidisciplinary data formed the basis for additional chapters containing interpretive reports on 12 different commodities and deposit types known to occur in Mauritania, accompanied by countrywide mineral resource potential maps of each commodity/deposit type. The commodities and deposit types represented include: (1) Ni, Cu, PGE, and Cr deposits hosted in ultramafic rocks; (2) orogenic, Carlin-like, and epithermal gold deposits; (3) polymetallic Pb-Zn-Cu vein deposits; (4) sediment-hosted Pb-Zn-Ag deposits of the SEDEX and Mississippi Valley-type; (5) sediment-hosted copper deposits; ( 6) volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits; (7) iron oxide copper-gold deposits; (8) uranium deposits; (9) Algoma-, Superior-, and oolitic-type iron deposits; (10) shoreline Ti-Zr placer deposits; (11) incompatible element deposits hosted in pegmatites, alkaline rocks, and carbonatites, and; (12) industrial mineral deposits. Additional chapters include the Mauritanian National Mineral Deposits Database are accompanied by an explanatory text and the Mauritania Minerals Project GIS that contains all of the interpretive layers created by USGS scientists. Raw data not in the public domain may be obtained from the Ministry of Petroleum, Energy, and Mines in Nouakchott, Mauritania.

  18. How mantle heterogeneity can affect geochemistry of magmas and their styles of emplacement: a fascinating tale revealed by Etna alkaline lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viccaro, Marco; Zuccarello, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    Geochemical investigations of Mt. Etna magmas have led to notable findings on the nature of compositional heterogeneity of the mantle source beneath the volcano. Some of the observed features explain the short-term geochemical variability of volcanic rocks erupted at Mt. Etna in recent times, which are characterized by increase of LILE, 87Sr/86Sr and decrease of 143Nd/144Nd, 206Pb/204Pb,176Hf/177Hf. This compositional behavior has not attributed exclusively to differentiation processes such as fractional crystallization, crustal assimilation and effects of volatile flushing. In this study, based on some geochemical similarities of the Etnean and Hyblean alkaline magmas, we have modeled partial melting of a composite source constituted by two rock types, inferred by various observations performed on some Hyblean xenoliths, namely: a spinel lherzolite bearing phlogopite-amphibole and a garnet pyroxenite in form of veins intruded into lherzolite that is interpreted as metasomatic high-temperature fluids (silicate melts) crystallized at mantle conditions. Partial melting modeling has been applied to each rock type and the resulting primary liquids have been then mixed in various proportions. The concentrations of major and trace elements along with the water obtained from the modeling are remarkably comparable with those of Etnean melts re-equilibrated at primary conditions. Different proportions of spinel lherzolite bearing metasomatic phases and garnet pyroxenite can account for the signature of a large spectrum of Etnean alkaline magmas and for their geochemical variability through time. Our study implies that magmas characterized by variable compositions and volatile contents directly inherited from the source can undergo distinct histories of ascent and evolution in the plumbing system at crustal levels, potentially leading to a wide range of eruptive styles. A rather shallow source inferred from the model also excludes the presence of deep mantle structures

  19. Rock Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henn, Cynthia A.

    2004-01-01

    There are many interpretations for the symbols that are seen in rock art, but no decoding key has ever been discovered. This article describes one classroom's experiences with a lesson on rock art--making their rock art and developing their own personal symbols. This lesson allowed for creativity, while giving an opportunity for integration…

  20. Rock Finding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rommel-Esham, Katie; Constable, Susan D.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss a literature-based activity that helps students discover the importance of making detailed observations. In an inspiring children's classic book, "Everybody Needs a Rock" by Byrd Baylor (1974), the author invites readers to go "rock finding," laying out 10 rules for finding a "perfect" rock. In this way, the…

  1. Collecting Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Rachel M.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science topics, the booklet provides those interested in rock collecting with a nontechnical introduction to the subject. Following a section examining the nature and formation of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks, the booklet gives suggestions for starting a rock collection and using…

  2. Spirit Discovers New Class of Igneous Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    During the past two-and-a-half years of traversing the central part of Gusev Crater, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has analyzed the brushed and ground-into surfaces of multiple rocks using the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer, which measures the abundance of major chemical elements. In the process, Spirit has documented the first example of a particular kind of volcanic region on Mars known as an alkaline igneous province. The word alkaline refers to the abundance of sodium and potassium, two major rock-forming elements from the alkali metals on the left-hand side of the periodic table.

    All of the relatively unaltered rocks -- those least changed by wind, water, freezing, or other weathering agents -- examined by Spirit have been igneous, meaning that they crystallized from molten magmas. One way geologists classify igneous rocks is by looking at the amount of potassium and sodium relative to the amount of silica, the most abundant rock-forming mineral on Earth. In the case of volcanic rocks, the amount of silica present gives scientists clues to the kind of volcanism that occurred, while the amounts of potassium and sodium provide clues about the history of the rock. Rocks with more silica tend to erupt explosively. Higher contents of potassium and sodium, as seen in alkaline rocks like those at Gusev, may indicate partial melting of magma at higher pressure, that is, deeper in the Martian mantle. The abundance of potassium and sodium determines the kinds of minerals that make up igneous rocks. If igneous rocks have enough silica, potassium and sodium always bond with the silica to form certain minerals.

    The Gusev rocks define a new chemical category not previously seen on Mars, as shown in this diagram plotting alkalis versus silica, compiled by University of Tennessee geologist Harry McSween. The abbreviations 'Na2O' and 'K2O' refer to oxides of sodium and potassium. The abbreviation 'SiO2' refers to silica. The abbreviation 'wt

  3. Silicic Magma Genesis in Neogene Central Volcanoes in Northeast Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, S. E.; Troll, V. R.; Riishuus, M. S.; Burchardt, S.; Krumbholz, M.

    2012-04-01

    We report on a geological expedition to NE Iceland in August 2011. A comprehensive sample suite of intrusive and extrusive rocks, ranging from basaltic to silicic compositions, was collected from the Neogene silicic central volcanic complexes in the region between Borgarfjörður eystri and Loðmundarfjörður. The area contains the second-most voluminous occurrence of silicic rocks in Iceland, including caldera structures, inclined sheet swarms, extensive ignimbrite sheets, sub-volcanic rhyolites and silicic lava flows. Yet it is one of Iceland's geologically least known areas (c.f. Gústafsson, 1992; Martin & Sigmarsson, 2010; Burchardt et al., 2011). The voluminous occurrence of evolved rocks in Iceland (10-12 %) is very unusual for an ocean island or a mid-oceanic ridge, with a typical signal of magmatic bimodality, often called "Bunsen-Daly" compositional gap (e.g. Bunsen, 1851; Daly, 1925; Barth et al., 1939). The Bunsen-Daly Gap is a long-standing fundamental issue in petrology and difficult to reconcile with continuous fractional crystallization as a dominant process in magmatic differentiation (Bowen, 1928), implying that hydrothermal alteration and crustal melting may play a significant role. Our aim is to contribute to a solution of this issue by unravelling the occurrence of voluminous evolved rhyolites in NE Iceland. We will use a combined petrological, textural, experimental and in-situ isotope approach. We plan to perform major, trace element and Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb-He-O isotope geochemistry, as well as U/Pb and Ar/Ar geochronology on rocks and mineral separates. In addition, high pressure-temperature partial melting experiments aim to reproduce and further constrain natural processes. Using the combined data set we intend to produce a comprehensive and quantitative analysis of rhyolite petrogenesis, and of the temporal, structural and geochemical evolution of the silicic volcanism in NE Iceland. The chosen field area serves as a good analogue for active

  4. Chemistry of the subalkalic silicic obsidians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacDonald, Ray; Smith, Robert L.; Thomas, John E.

    1992-01-01

    Nonhydrated obsidians are quenched magmatic liquids that record in their chemical compositions details of the tectonic environment of formation and of the differentiation mechanisms that affected their subsequent evolution. This study attempts to analyze, in terms of geologic processes, the compositional variations in the subalkalic silicic obsidians (Si02≥70 percent by weight, molecular (Na2O+K20)>Al2O3). New major- and trace-element determinations of 241 samples and a compilation of 130 published major-element analyses are reported and interpreted. Obsidians from five different tectonic settings are recognized: (1) primitive island arcs, (2) mature island arcs, (3) continental margins, (4) continental interiors, and (5) oceanic extensional zones. Tectonomagmatic discrimination between these groups is successfully made on Nb-Ta, Nb-FeOt and Th-Hf-Ta plots, and compositional ranges and averages for each group are presented. The chemical differences between groups are related to the type of crust in which magmas were generated. With increasingly sialic (continental type) crust, the obsidians show overall enrichment in F, Be, Li, Mo, Nb, Rb, Sn, Ta, U, W, Zn, and the rare-earth elements, and depletion in Mg, Ca, Ba, Co, Sc, Sr, and Zr. They become more potassic, have higher Fe/Mg and F/Cl ratios, and lower Zr/Hf, Nb/Ta, and Th/U ratios. Higher values of total rare-earth elements are accompanied by light rare-earth-element enrichment and pronounced negative Eu anomalies. An attempt is made to link obsidian chemistry to genetic mechanlism. Two broad groups of rocks are distinguished: one generated where crystal-liquid processes dominated (CLPD types), which are the products of crustal anatexis, possibly under conditions of low halogen fugacity, ± crystal fractionation ± magma mixing; and a second group represented by rocks formed in the upper parts of large magma chambers by interplays of crystal fractionation, volatile transfer, magma mixing, and possibly various

  5. Comparative pathology of silicate pneumoconiosis.

    PubMed Central

    Brambilla, C.; Abraham, J.; Brambilla, E.; Benirschke, K.; Bloor, C.

    1979-01-01

    A simple pneumoconiosis with lamellar birefringent crystals was observed in animals dying in the San Diego Zoo. We studied 100 autopsies from 11 mammalian and eight avian species. In mammals, mild pulmonary lesions comprised crystal-laden macrophages in alveoli and lymphatics. Interstitial fibrosis was present in 20% of cases. There were no nodules. In birds, dust retention produced large granulomas around tertiary bronchi without fibrosis. Mineralogic analysis using scanning and transmission electron microscopy showed most of the crystals to be silicates. Ninety percent were complex silicates, with aluminum-potassium silicates comprising 70% of the analyzed particles. Electron and x-ray diffraction showed the silicates to be muscovite mica and its hydrothermal degradation product, ie, illite clay. This mica was also present on filtration membranes of atmospheric air samples obtained from the San Diego Zoo. The amount of dust retention was related to the animal's age, anatomic or ecologic variances, and length of stay in the San Diego Zoo. Its semidesert atmosphere is rich in silicates, which are inhaled and deposited in the lungs. Similar mica-induced lesions are found in humans living in this region or the Southwest of the USA. This simple pneumoconiosis is likely to be widespread in human populations living in desert or semidesert climates. Images Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:223447

  6. Stardust silicates from primitive meteorites.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi

    2004-04-29

    Primitive chondritic meteorites contain material (presolar grains), at the level of a few parts per million, that predates the formation of our Solar System. Astronomical observations and the chemical composition of the Sun both suggest that silicates must have been the dominant solids in the protoplanetary disk from which the planets of the Solar System formed, but no presolar silicates have been identified in chondrites. Here we report the in situ discovery of presolar silicate grains 0.1-1 microm in size in the matrices of two primitive carbonaceous chondrites. These grains are highly enriched in 17O (delta17O(SMOW) > 100-400 per thousand ), but have solar silicon isotopic compositions within analytical uncertainties, suggesting an origin in an oxygen-rich red giant or an asymptotic giant branch star. The estimated abundance of these presolar silicates (3-30 parts per million) is higher than reported for other types of presolar grains in meteorites, consistent with their ubiquity in the early Solar System, but is about two orders of magnitude lower than their abundance in anhydrous interplanetary dust particles. This result is best explained by the destruction of silicates during high-temperature processing in the solar nebula. PMID:15118720

  7. Uranium-bearing coal and carbonaceous rocks in the Fall Creek area, Bonneville County, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vine, James D.; Moore, George Winfred

    1952-01-01

    Uraniferous coal, carbonaceous shale, and carbonaceous limestone occur in the Bear River formation of Early Cretaceous age at the Fall Creek prospect, in the Fall Creek area, Bonneville County, Idaho. The uranium compounds are believed to have been derived from mildly radioactive silicic volcanic rocks of Tertiary age that rest unconformably on all older rocks and once overlay the Bear River formation and its coal. Meteoric water, percolating downward through the silicic volcanic rocks and into the older rocks along joints and faults, is believed to have brought the uranium compounds into contact with the coal and carbonaceous rocks in which the uranium was absorbed.

  8. Experimental determination of the Si isotope fractionation factor between liquid metal and liquid silicate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hin, Remco C.; Fitoussi, Caroline; Schmidt, Max W.; Bourdon, Bernard

    2014-02-01

    The conditions of core formation and the abundances of the light elements in Earth's core remain debated. Silicon isotope fractionation provides a tool contributing to this subject. We present experimentally determined Si isotope fractionation factors between liquid metal and liquid silicate at 1450 °C and 1750 °C, which allow calibrating the temperature dependence of Si isotope fractionation. Experiments were performed in a centrifuging piston cylinder at 1 GPa, employing both graphite and MgO capsules. Tin was used to lower the melting temperature of the metal alloys for experiments performed at 1450 °C. Tests reveal that neither Sn nor C significantly affects Si isotope fractionation. An alkaline fusion technique was employed to dissolve silicate as well as metal phases prior to ion exchange chemistry and mass spectrometric analysis. The results show that metal is consistently enriched in light isotopes relative to the silicate, yielding average metal-silicate fractionation factors of -1.48±0.08‰ and -1.11±0.14‰ at 1450 °C and 1750 °C, respectively. The temperature dependence of equilibrium Si isotope fractionation between metal and silicate can thus be described as Δ30SiMetal-Silicate=-4.42(±0.05)×106/T2. The Si isotope equilibrium fractionation is thus about 1.7 times smaller than previously proposed on the basis of experiments. A consequence of this smaller fractionation is that the calculated difference between the Si isotope composition of the bulk Earth and that of the bulk silicate Earth generated by core formation is smaller than previously thought. It is therefore increasingly difficult to match the Si isotope composition of the bulk silicate Earth with that of chondrites for metal-silicate equilibration temperatures above ∼2500 K. This suggests that Si isotopes were more sensitive to the early stages of core formation when low oxygen fugacities allowed significant incorporation of Si into metal.

  9. Enhanced bioactivity of glass ionomer cement by incorporating calcium silicates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Song; Cai, Yixiao; Engqvist, Håkan; Xia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are known as a non-bioactive dental cement. During setting the GIC have an acidic pH, driven by the acrylic acid component. It is a challenge to make GIC alkaline without disturbing its mechanical properties. One strategy was to add slowly reacting systems with an alkaline pH. The aim of the present study is to investigate the possibility of forming a bioactive dental material based on the combination of glass ionomer cement and calcium silicates. Two types of GIC were used as control. Wollastonite (CS also denoted β-CaSiO3) or Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) was incorporated into the 2 types of GIC. The material formulations' setting time, compressive strength, pH and bioactivity were compared between modified GIC and GIC control. Apatite crystals were found on the surfaces of the modified cements but not on the control GIC. The compressive strength of the cement remained with the addition of 20% calcium silicate or 20% MTA after one day immersion. In addition, the compressive strength of GIC modified with 20% MTA had been increased during the 14 d immersion (p < 0 .05). PMID:26787304

  10. Alkaline flood prediction studies, Ranger VII pilot, Wilmington Field, California

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, E.H.; Breit, V.S.

    1982-01-01

    The paper discusses: (1) The design of a simulator to model alkaline displacement mechanisms and the current state-of-the-art understanding of in-situ caustic consumption. (2) Assimilation of laboratory core flood and rock consumption data. Use of this data in 1-D and 2-D limited area simulations, and a 3-D model of the entire pilot project. (3) Simulation studies of alkaline flood behavior in a small 2-D area of the field for various concentrations, slug sizes, long term consumption functions and two relative permeability adjustment mechanisms. (4) Scale up of 2-D simulation results, and their use in a 271 acre 1.097 x 10/sup 6/m/sup 2/), 7 layered 3-D model of the pilot. (5) Comparison of 3-D simulator results with initial field alkaline flood performance. (6) Recommended additional application of the simulator methods developed in this pilot and in other alkaline floods. 10 refs.

  11. Alkaline flooding injection strategy

    SciTech Connect

    French, T.R.; Josephson, C.B.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to improved alkali-surfactant flooding methods, and this includes determining the proper design of injection strategy. Several different injection strategies have been used or suggested for recovering heavy oils with surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding methods. Oil recovery was compared for four different injection strategies: (1) surfactant followed by polymer, (2) surfactant followed by alkaline polymer, (3) alkaline surfactant followed by polymer, and (4) alkali, surfactant, and polymer mixed in a single formulation. The effect of alkaline preflush was also studied under two different conditions. All of the oil recovery experiments were conducted under optimal conditions with a viscous, non-acidic oil from Hepler (KS) oil field. The coreflood experiments were conducted with Berea sandstone cores since field core was not available in sufficient quantity for coreflood tests. The Tucker sand of Hepler field is a Class I fluvial dominated deltaic reservoir, as classified by the Department of Energy, which has been selected as the site of a DOE-sponsored field pilot test.

  12. Alkaline volcanisms in the Proto-Kuril forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yutani, T.; Hirano, N.

    2015-12-01

    The Nemuro Group in the northeasternmost part of Japan represents forearc basin deposits of the Proto-Kuril arc that consist of Upper Cretaceous-Paleocene sedimentary rocks with andesitic volcaniclastics and alkaline lavas. Their occurrence in this setting is unusual because such alkaline lavas and intrusions are not commonly found in forearc environments. Here, we report new petrological and geological data to discuss the nature of magmatic process involved in their petrogenesis. Pillow and massive lava flows represent subaqueous volcanic activity, and the occurrence of inter-pillow sedimentary units indicates their eruption on unconsolidated sediments of the lower Nemuro Group. Sill intrusions with layered structures and thicknesses ranging from 10 to 130 m are also common widely distributed in the Nemuro Group. Major and trace element chemistry and mineralogical data distinguish the analyzed samples as K-rich alkaline rocks with low TiO2 or Nb contents, analogous to island arc-like tholeiites. These K-rich alkaline rocks can be classified into two groups of shoshonites: shoshonites containing olivine phenocrysts and intruding into the lower Nemuro Group (Group 1), and shoshonites with no olivine and making up the middle part of the Nemuro Group (Group 2). Group 1 shoshonites have higher MgO, Cr and Ni contents than those of Group 2. The bulk-rock composition of Group 2, which has lower MgO contents, shows higher SiO2 than that of Group 1. Such compositional differences possibly represent fractional crystallization of magmas between Groups 1 and 2. Based on the limited available data, we conclude that these alkaline rocks intruding into the Nemuro Group represent arc-shoshonites, and that the Group 1 magmas underwent fractional crystallization to produce the Group 2 magmas.

  13. Erosion and the rocks of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, C.

    1976-01-01

    Photographs of the surface of Venus returned by the Venera 9 and 10 spacecraft have revealed the presence of smooth and angular rockline forms. Two mechanisms previously suggested (Sagan, 1975) for erosion of crater ramparts on the surface of Venus might also explain the erosion of rocks. Chemical weathering by the hydrochloric, hydrofluoric, and sulfuric acids present in the atmosphere of Venus may have been sufficient to erode angular projections of silicous rocks. Alternatively, the contours of rocks containing such low-melting materials as NaOH, KOH, HgS and KNO2 may have softened as the result of exposure to the high surface temperatures of the planet.

  14. LOW VELOCITY SHPERE IMPACT OF SODA LIME SILICATE GLASS

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, Timothy G; Fox, Ethan E; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Vuono, Daniel J

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes TARDEC-sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the FY11 involving low velocity ( 30 m/s or 65 mph) ball impact testing of Starphire soda lime silicate glass. The intent was to better understand low velocity impact response in the Starphire for sphere densities that bracketed that of rock. Five sphere materials were used: borosilicate glass, soda-lime silicate glass, steel, silicon nitride, and alumina. A gas gun was fabricated to produce controlled velocity delivery of the spheres against Starphire tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the Starphire were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between the any of the five sphere-Starphire-target combinations.

  15. Final report on the safety assessment of aluminum silicate, calcium silicate, magnesium aluminum silicate, magnesium silicate, magnesium trisilicate, sodium magnesium silicate, zirconium silicate, attapulgite, bentonite, Fuller's earth, hectorite, kaolin, lithium magnesium silicate, lithium magnesium sodium silicate, montmorillonite, pyrophyllite, and zeolite.

    PubMed

    Elmore, Amy R

    2003-01-01

    This report reviews the safety of Aluminum, Calcium, Lithium Magnesium, Lithium Magnesium Sodium, Magnesium Aluminum, Magnesium, Sodium Magnesium, and Zirconium Silicates, Magnesium Trisilicate, Attapulgite, Bentonite, Fuller's Earth, Hectorite, Kaolin, Montmorillonite, Pyrophyllite, and Zeolite as used in cosmetic formulations. The common aspect of all these claylike ingredients is that they contain silicon, oxygen, and one or more metals. Many silicates occur naturally and are mined; yet others are produced synthetically. Typical cosmetic uses of silicates include abrasive, opacifying agent, viscosity-increasing agent, anticaking agent, emulsion stabilizer, binder, and suspending agent. Clay silicates (silicates containing water in their structure) primarily function as adsorbents, opacifiers, and viscosity-increasing agents. Pyrophyllite is also used as a colorant. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has ruled Attapulgite fibers >5 microm as possibly carcinogenic to humans, but fibers <5 microm were not classified as to their carcinogenicity to humans. Likewise, Clinoptilolite, Phillipsite, Mordenite, Nonfibrous Japanese Zeolite, and synthetic Zeolites were not classified as to their carcinogenicity to humans. These ingredients are not significantly toxic in oral acute or short-term oral or parenteral toxicity studies in animals. Inhalation toxicity, however, is readily demonstrated in animals. Particle size, fibrogenicity, concentration, and mineral composition had the greatest effect on toxicity. Larger particle size and longer and wider fibers cause more adverse effects. Magnesium Aluminum Silicate was a weak primary skin irritant in rabbits and had no cumulative skin irritation in guinea pigs. No gross effects were reported in any of these studies. Sodium Magnesium Silicate had no primary skin irritation in rabbits and had no cumulative skin irritation in guinea pigs. Hectorite was nonirritating to the skin of rabbits in a Draize primary skin

  16. Petrochemical features of Miocene volcanism around the Çubukludağ graben and Karaburun peninsula, western Turkey: Implications for crustal melting related silicic volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karacık, Z.; Genç, Ş. C.; Gülmez, F.

    2013-09-01

    Widespread Neogene volcanism, mainly intermediate and rarely mafic and felsic in composition, was controlled by the extensional tectonic regime in western Turkey. The Karaburun and Cumaovası volcanics are the cases for understanding the magma source(s) and petrological processes, producing the extension-related mafic and felsic volcanism. The Karaburun volcanics (KV) are mainly oriented north to south in the Karaburun peninsula and span a wide spectrum from basalt (20 Ma) to rhyolite (16 Ma), and younger trachyte and trachydacites (13 Ma). The products of the subaerial silicic volcanism (the Cumaovası volcanics, CV; 17 Ma) which are represented by cluster of rhyolite domes, related pyroclastics occur within the NE-SW trending Çubukludağ graben, and intermediate and mafic volcanic rocks are lack in this area. The lavas of the Cumaovası volcanics are high silica rhyolites and rare dacites which are calc alkaline, peralumious and enriched significantly in LILE. Extremely low Sr, Ba values, extremely Eu depletions and very low LaN/YbN ratios are typical for the rhyolites of CV, similar to the topaz rhyolites. The Karaburun volcanics, with the exception of the minor alkaline basaltic and trachytic lavas, are mainly calc alkaline and metaluminous intermediate lavas. 87Sr/86Sr ratios of the KV and dacitic samples of CV are close to each other and range from 0.708 to 0.709; while Sr isotopic ratios of the rhyolites are significantly high and variable (0.724-0.786). 143Nd/144Nd ratios of the CV and KV, except for the alkaline samples, are similar for both sequences vary from 0.51230 to 0.51242. Geological, geochemical, isotopic and radiochronologic data reveal that the KV and CV were formed in extensional tectonic setting, but evolved by different petrological processes in different magma chambers. During the Neogene, underplated mafic magma was injected into the crust and hybridized by mantle and crustal derived materials. Geochemical features and trace element

  17. Mount St. Augustine volcano fumarole wall rock alteration: mineralogy, zoning, composition and numerical models of its formation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getahun, Aberra; Reed, Mark H.; Symonds, Robert

    1996-05-01

    Intensely altered wall rock was collected from high-temperature (640 °C) and low-temperature (375 °C) vents at Augustine volcano in July 1989. The high-temperature altered rock exhibits distinct mineral zoning differentiated by color bands. In order of decreasing temperature, the color bands and their mineral assemblages are: (a) white to grey (tridymite-anhydrite); (b) pink to red (tridymite-hematite-Fe hydroxide-molysite (FeCl 3) with minor amounts of anhydrite and halite); and (c) dark green to green (anhydrite-halite-sylvite-tridymite with minor amounts of molysite, soda and potash alum, and other sodium and potassium sulfates). The alteration products around the low-temperature vents are dominantly cristobalite and amorphous silica with minor potash and soda alum, aphthitalite, alunogen and anhydrite. Compared to fresh 1986 Augustine lava, the altered rocks exhibit enrichments in silica, base metals, halogens and sulfur and show very strong depletions in Al in all alteration zones and in iron, alkali and alkaline earth elements in some of the alteration zones. To help understand the origins of the mineral assemblages in altered Augustine rocks, we applied the thermochemical modeling program, GASWORKS, in calculations of: (a) reaction of the 1987 and 1989 gases with wall rock at 640 and 375 °C; (b) cooling of the 1987 gas from 870 to 100 °C with and without mineral fractionation; (c) cooling of the 1989 gas from 757 to 100 °C with and without mineral fractionation; and (d) mixing of the 1987 and 1989 gases with air. The 640 °C gas-rock reaction produces an assemblage consisting of silicates (tridymite, albite, diopside, sanidine and andalusite), oxides (magnetite and hercynite) and sulfides (bornite, chalcocite, molybdenite and sphalerite). The 375 °C gas-rock reaction produces dominantly silicates (quartz, albite, andalusite, microcline, cordierite, anorthite and tremolite) and subordinate amounts of sulfides (pyrite, chalcocite and wurtzite), oxides

  18. Metal-silicate partitioning of Ni and Co in a deep magma ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebert, Julien; Badro, James; Antonangeli, Daniele; Ryerson, Frederick J.

    2012-03-01

    The pattern of siderophile (iron-loving) element abundance in the silicate portion of the Earth is a consequence of metal separation during core formation. The apparent excess of nickel and cobalt in mantle-derived rocks has been attributed to metal-silicate equilibration in a deep terrestrial magma ocean. Based on the extrapolation of phase equilibria and metal-silicate partitioning results obtained at lower pressure (P) and temperature (T), previous estimates of the P-T of equilibration are all greater than 25 GPa and 3000 K. Using the laser-heated diamond anvil cell, we have extended metal-silicate partitioning measurements for Ni and Co to 75 GPa and 4400 K, exceeding the liquidus temperatures for both metal and silicate (basalt or peridotite) and, therefore, achieving thermodynamic conditions directly comparable to those of the magma ocean. The metal-silicate partition coefficients of nickel and cobalt decrease with increasing pressure and reach the values required to yield present mantle concentrations at ~ 50 GPa. At these conditions, silicon and oxygen concentrations measured in the metallic liquid allow to solve the seismically constrained core density deficit. Above 60 GPa, the partition coefficients become too low, resulting in an overabundance of Ni and Co in the silicate mantle. Our data therefore support the paradigm of core formation in a deep mama ocean, providing an upper bound for the depth at which Earth's core may have formed, and explaining the main geophysical (density) and geochemical (excess siderophile elements) observables.

  19. A Calculation of Spatial Range of Colloidal Silicic Acid Deposited Downstream from the Alkali Front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niibori, Yuichi; Iijima, Kazuki; Tamura, Naoyuki; Mimura, Hitoshi

    A high alkali domain spreads out due to the use of cement materials for the construction of the repository of radioactive wastes. Sudden change of pH at this alkali front produces colloidal silicic acid (polymeric silicic acid) in addition to the deposition of supersaturated monomeric silicic acid onto the fracture surface of flow-pathway. The colloidal silicic acid also deposits with relatively small rate-constant in the co-presence of solid phase. Once the flow-path surface is covered with the amorphous silica, the surface seriously degrades the sorption behavior of radionuclides (RNs). Therefore, so far, the authors have examined the deposition rates of supersaturated silicic acid. This study summarized the deposition rate-constants defined by the first-order reaction equation under various conditions of co-presence of amorphous silica powder. Then, using the smallest rate-constant (1.0×10-12 m/s in the co-presence of calcium ions of 1 mM) and a simulation code, COLFRAC-MRL, the spatial range of colloidal silicic acid deposited downstream from the alkali front was estimated. The results suggested the clogging caused by the deposition of colloidal silicic acid in flow-path. The altered spatial range in the flow-path was limited to around 30 m in fracture and to several centimeters in rock matrix.

  20. Battery components employing a silicate binder

    DOEpatents

    Delnick, Frank M.; Reinhardt, Frederick W.; Odinek, Judy G.

    2011-05-24

    A battery component structure employing inorganic-silicate binders. In some embodiments, casting or coating of components may be performed using aqueous slurries of silicates and electrode materials or separator materials.

  1. 'Earhart' Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This false-color image taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a rock informally named 'Earhart' on the lower slopes of 'Endurance Crater.' The rock was named after the pilot Amelia Earhart. Like 'Escher' and other rocks dotting the bottom of Endurance, scientists believe fractures in Earhart could have been formed by one of several processes. They may have been caused by the impact that created Endurance Crater, or they might have arisen when water leftover from the rock's formation dried up. A third possibility is that much later, after the rock was formed, and after the crater was created, the rock became wet once again, then dried up and developed cracks. Rover team members do not have plans to investigate Earhart in detail because it is located across potentially hazardous sandy terrain. This image was taken on sol 219 (Sept. 4) by the rover's panoramic camera, using its 750-, 530- and 430-nanometer filters.

  2. Science Rocks!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prestwich, Dorothy; Sumrall, Joseph; Chessin, Debby A.

    2010-01-01

    It all began one Monday morning. Raymond could not wait to come to large group. In his hand, he held a chunk of white granite he had found. "Look at my beautiful rock!" he cried. The rock was passed around and examined by each student. "I wonder how rocks are made?" wondered one student. "Where do they come from?" asked another. At this moment, a…

  3. Alkaline quinone flow battery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kaixiang; Chen, Qing; Gerhardt, Michael R; Tong, Liuchuan; Kim, Sang Bok; Eisenach, Louise; Valle, Alvaro W; Hardee, David; Gordon, Roy G; Aziz, Michael J; Marshak, Michael P

    2015-09-25

    Storage of photovoltaic and wind electricity in batteries could solve the mismatch problem between the intermittent supply of these renewable resources and variable demand. Flow batteries permit more economical long-duration discharge than solid-electrode batteries by using liquid electrolytes stored outside of the battery. We report an alkaline flow battery based on redox-active organic molecules that are composed entirely of Earth-abundant elements and are nontoxic, nonflammable, and safe for use in residential and commercial environments. The battery operates efficiently with high power density near room temperature. These results demonstrate the stability and performance of redox-active organic molecules in alkaline flow batteries, potentially enabling cost-effective stationary storage of renewable energy. PMID:26404834

  4. Microwave emission from granular silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conel, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental finding is that mass absorption coefficient is independent of frequency but highly dependent on moisture content; effective conductivity increases with frequency, and low tangent is independent of frequency. Computed values of electrical properties are in rough numerical agreement with extrapolated laboratory values on other silicate materials.

  5. Circumstellar Crystalline Silicates: Evolved Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartar, Josh; Speck, A. K.

    2008-05-01

    One of the most exciting developments in astronomy in the last 15 years was the discovery of crystalline silicate stardust by the Short Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) on board of ISO; discovery of the crystalline grains was indeed one of the biggest surprises of the ISO mission. Initially discovered around AGB stars (evolved stars in the range of 0.8 > M/M¤>8) at far-infrared (IR) wavelengths, crystalline silicates have since been seen in many astrophysical environments including young stellar objects (T Tauri and Herbig Ae/Be), comets and Ultra Luminous Infrared Galaxies. Low and intermediate mass stars (LIMS) comprise 95% of the contributors to the ISM, so study of the formation of crystalline silicates is critical to our understanding of the ISM, which is thought to be primarily amorphous (one would expect an almost exact match between the composition of AGB dust shells and the dust in the ISM). Whether the crystalline dust is merely undetectable or amorphized remains a mystery. The FORCAST instrument on SOFIA as well as the PACS instrument on Herschel will provide exciting observing opportunities for the further study of crystalline silicates.

  6. Silicates in Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirocky, M. M.; Levenson, N. A.; Elitzur, M.; Spoon, H. W. W.; Armus, L.

    2008-05-01

    We analyze the mid-infrared (MIR) spectra of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) observed with the Spitzer Space Telescope's Infrared Spectrograph. Dust emission dominates the MIR spectra of ULIRGs, and the reprocessed radiation that emerges is independent of the underlying heating spectrum. Instead, the resulting emission depends sensitively on the geometric distribution of the dust, which we diagnose with comparisons of numerical simulations of radiative transfer. Quantifying the silicate emission and absorption features that appear near 10 and 18 μm requires a reliable determination of the continuum, and we demonstrate that including a measurement of the continuum at intermediate wavelength (between the features) produces accurate results at all optical depths. With high-quality spectra, we successfully use the silicate features to constrain the dust chemistry. The observations of the ULIRGs and local sight lines require dust that has a relatively high 18 μm/10 μm absorption ratio of the silicate features (around 0.5). Specifically, the cold dust of Ossenkopf et al. is consistent with the observations, while other dust models are not. We use the silicate feature strengths to identify two families of ULIRGs, in which the dust distributions are fundamentally different. Optical spectral classifications are related to these families. In ULIRGs that harbor an active galactic nucleus, the spectrally broad lines are detected only when the nuclear surroundings are clumpy. In contrast, the sources of lower ionization optical spectra are deeply embedded in smooth distributions of optically thick dust.

  7. Rock flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matveyev, S. N.

    1986-01-01

    Rock flows are defined as forms of spontaneous mass movements, commonly found in mountainous countries, which have been studied very little. The article considers formations known as rock rivers, rock flows, boulder flows, boulder stria, gravel flows, rock seas, and rubble seas. It describes their genesis as seen from their morphological characteristics and presents a classification of these forms. This classification is based on the difference in the genesis of the rubbly matter and characterizes these forms of mass movement according to their source, drainage, and deposit areas.

  8. Structure and ionic diffusion of alkaline-earth ions in mixed cation glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinou, Konstantinos; Sushko, Petr; Duffy, Dorothy M.

    2015-08-15

    A series of mixed cation silicate glasses of the composition A2O – 2MO – 4SiO2, with A=Li,Na,K and M=Ca,Sr,Ba has been investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations in order to understand the effect of the nature of the cations on the mobility of the alkaline-earth ions within the glass network. The size of the alkaline-earth cation was found to affect the inter-atomic distances, the coordination number distributions and the bond angle distributions , whereas the medium-range order was almost unaffected by the type of the cation. All the alkaline-earth cations contribute to lower vibrational frequencies but it is observed that that there is a shift to smaller frequencies and the vibrational density of states distribution gets narrower as the size of the alkaline-earth increases. The results from our modeling for the ionic diffusion of the alkaline-earth cations are in a qualitative agreement with the experimental observations in that there is a distinct correlation between the activation energy for diffusion of alkaline earth-ions and the cation radii ratio. An asymmetrical linear behavior in the diffusion activation energy with increasing size difference is observed. The results can be described on the basis of a theoretical model that relates the diffusion activation energy to the electrostatic interactions of the cations with the oxygens and the elastic deformation of the silicate network.

  9. Amended Silicated for Mercury Control

    SciTech Connect

    James Butz; Thomas Broderick; Craig Turchi

    2006-12-31

    Amended Silicates{trademark}, a powdered, noncarbon mercury-control sorbent, was tested at Duke Energy's Miami Fort Station, Unit 6 during the first quarter of 2006. Unit 6 is a 175-MW boiler with a cold-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The plant burns run-of-the-river eastern bituminous coal with typical ash contents ranging from 8-15% and sulfur contents from 1.6-2.6% on an as-received basis. The performance of the Amended Silicates sorbent was compared with that for powdered activated carbon (PAC). The trial began with a period of baseline monitoring during which no sorbent was injected. Sampling during this and subsequent periods indicated mercury capture by the native fly ash was less than 10%. After the baseline period, Amended Silicates sorbent was injected at several different ratios, followed by a 30-day trial at a fixed injection ratio of 5-6 lb/MMACF. After this period, PAC was injected to provide a comparison. Approximately 40% mercury control was achieved for both the Amended Silicates sorbent and PAC at injection ratios of 5-6 lbs/MMACF. Higher injection ratios did not achieve significantly increased removal. Similar removal efficiencies have been reported for PAC injection trials at other plants with cold-side ESPs, most notably for plants using medium to high sulfur coal. Sorbent injection did not detrimentally impact plant operations and testing confirmed that the use of Amended Silicates sorbent does not degrade fly ash quality (unlike PAC). The cost for mercury control using either PAC or Amended Silicates sorbent was estimated to be equivalent if fly ash sales are not a consideration. However, if the plant did sell fly ash, the effective cost for mercury control could more than double if those sales were no longer possible, due to lost by-product sales and additional cost for waste disposal. Accordingly, the use of Amended Silicates sorbent could reduce the overall cost of mercury control by 50% or more versus PAC for locations where fly

  10. Magnetotelluric investigation of the Alnö alkaline and carbonatite ring complex, central Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ping; Andersson, Magnus; Garcia Juanatey, Maria A.; Shan, Chunling; Malehmir, Alireza; Pedersen, Laust B.

    2014-05-01

    Alnö complex, 553-590 Ma, located in central Sweden, is one of the largest of few known alkaline and carbonatite ring intrusions in the world. The complex primarily consists of alkaline silicate rocks (ijolite, nepheline-syenite and pyroxenite) and a wide range of carbonatite dykes with different compositions (e.g., sövite). To better understand the intrusion mechanism(s) and the deeper structure of the intrusion, three high-resolution reflection seismic, gravity and magnetic profiles, crossing the main intrusion, were acquired in winter 2010. Together with these, petrophysical measurements on various rock samples have also been carried out. These data not only successfully showed the lateral extension of the intrusion at depth but also suggested a solidified saucer-shaped magma chamber at about 3 km depth that is associated with caldera-related ring-type fault systems. To further elucidate these interpretations, magnetotelluric (MT) data were acquired in summer 2013. The MT data were measured at 34 stations across the intrusion and designed so that a 3D conductivity model can be obtained. Most of the sites are located along the seismic profiles, while the rest is distributed over the intrusion area, to provide lateral and off-profile information. The time series were recorded with four broadband MT instruments simultaneously. The used sampling rates were 1000 Hz (two hours after midnight) and 20 Hz (a full day). The collected MT data are highly influenced by noise from cultural sources. Luckily, higher frequencies are less influenced providing a good coverage of the interest depth of about 5 km. Therefore, the data processing and analysis focused solely on the high frequency data. To decrease the effect of noise, the best quality site in one day was chosen for remote referencing the other three. Even if the sites were only 500 to 1000 m apart, better results were obtained, indicating very localized noise sources in the area. The strike analysis of the obtained

  11. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  12. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  13. 21 CFR 872.6670 - Silicate protector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Silicate protector. 872.6670 Section 872.6670 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6670 Silicate protector. (a) Identification. A silicate protector is a device made of silicone intended to be applied with an absorbent tipped applicator to...

  14. 21 CFR 872.6670 - Silicate protector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Silicate protector. 872.6670 Section 872.6670 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6670 Silicate protector. (a) Identification. A silicate protector is a device made of silicone intended to be applied with an absorbent tipped applicator to...

  15. 21 CFR 872.6670 - Silicate protector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Silicate protector. 872.6670 Section 872.6670 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6670 Silicate protector. (a) Identification. A silicate protector is a device made of silicone intended to be applied with an absorbent tipped applicator to...

  16. 21 CFR 872.6670 - Silicate protector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Silicate protector. 872.6670 Section 872.6670 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6670 Silicate protector. (a) Identification. A silicate protector is a device made of silicone intended to be applied with an absorbent tipped applicator to...

  17. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  18. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  19. 21 CFR 872.6670 - Silicate protector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Silicate protector. 872.6670 Section 872.6670 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6670 Silicate protector. (a) Identification. A silicate protector is a device made of silicone intended to be applied with an absorbent tipped applicator to...

  20. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  1. 21 CFR 582.2906 - Tricalcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tricalcium silicate. 582.2906 Section 582.2906 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Tricalcium silicate. (a) Product. Tricalcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c)...

  2. 21 CFR 182.2906 - Tricalcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tricalcium silicate. 182.2906 Section 182.2906 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Tricalcium silicate. (a) Product. Tricalcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c)...

  3. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  4. 21 CFR 182.2906 - Tricalcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Tricalcium silicate. 182.2906 Section 182.2906 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Tricalcium silicate. (a) Product. Tricalcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c)...

  5. 21 CFR 582.2906 - Tricalcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tricalcium silicate. 582.2906 Section 582.2906 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Tricalcium silicate. (a) Product. Tricalcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c)...

  6. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  7. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  8. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  9. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  10. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  11. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  12. 21 CFR 582.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 582.2437 Section 582.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Magnesium silicate. (a) Product. Magnesium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations,...

  13. COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson

    2004-10-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Neither aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide nor silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems produced significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels produced incremental oil with the rigid flowing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential pressures across cores. None of the gels tested

  14. Effects of ionization on silicate glasses. [Silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Primak, W.

    1982-02-01

    This evaluation of radiation effects in silicate glasses caused by ionization is based on our own investigations, on material collected in our files (reports, articles, and notes), and on a computer literature search through recent issues of Physics Abstracts and Chemical Abstracts (and the apparently pertinent references which appeared). Some of our recent results, available heretofore only in internal correspondence, are presented in some detail. It is concluded that research into the behavior of silicate glasses generally will be required before the specific effects in the radioactive waste storage glasses can be properly understood and evaluated. Two particular neglected areas of investigation are targeted for immediate concern: a kinetic analysis of annealing data and the acquisition of data on effects of irradiation at controlled elevated temperatures.

  15. 'Tetl' Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image, taken by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the rover's trek through the 'Columbia Hills' at 'Gusev Crater,' shows the horizontally layered rock dubbed 'Tetl.' Scientists hope to investigate this rock in more detail, aiming to determine whether the rock's layering is volcanic or sedimentary in origin. If for some reason this particular rock is not favorably positioned for grinding and examination by the toolbox of instruments on the rover's robotic arm, Spirit will be within short reach of another similar rock, dubbed 'Coba.' Spirit took this image on its 264th martian day, or sol (Sept. 29, 2004). This is a false-color composite image generated from the panoramic camera's 750-, 530-, and 430-nanometer filters.

  16. Art Rocks with Rock Art!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickett, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses rock art which was the very first "art." Rock art, such as the images created on the stone surfaces of the caves of Lascaux and Altimira, is the true origin of the canvas, paintbrush, and painting media. For there, within caverns deep in the earth, the first artists mixed animal fat, urine, and saliva with powdered minerals…

  17. Modifying Silicates for Better Dispersion in Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Sandi

    2005-01-01

    An improved chemical modification has been developed to enhance the dispersion of layered silicate particles in the formulation of a polymer/silicate nanocomposite material. The modification involves, among other things, the co-exchange of an alkyl ammonium ion and a monoprotonated diamine with interlayer cations of the silicate. The net overall effects of the improved chemical modification are to improve processability of the nanocomposite and maximize the benefits of dispersing the silicate particles into the polymer. Some background discussion is necessary to give meaning to a description of this development. Polymer/silicate nanocomposites are also denoted polymer/clay composites because the silicate particles in them are typically derived from clay particles. Particles of clay comprise layers of silicate platelets separated by gaps called "galleries." The platelet thickness is 1 nm. The length varies from 30 nm to 1 m, depending on the silicate. In order to fully realize the benefits of polymer/silicate nanocomposites, it is necessary to ensure that the platelets become dispersed in the polymer matrices. Proper dispersion can impart physical and chemical properties that make nanocomposites attractive for a variety of applications. In order to achieve nanometer-level dispersion of a layered silicate into a polymer matrix, it is typically necessary to modify the interlayer silicate surfaces by attaching organic functional groups. This modification can be achieved easily by ion exchange between the interlayer metal cations found naturally in the silicate and protonated organic cations - typically protonated amines. Long-chain alkyl ammonium ions are commonly chosen as the ion-exchange materials because they effectively lower the surface energies of the silicates and ease the incorporation of organic monomers or polymers into the silicate galleries. This completes the background discussion. In the present improved modification of the interlayer silicate surfaces

  18. Mineralization of atmospheric CO2 via fluid reaction with mafic/ultramafic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westfield, I. T.; Kendall, T. A.; Ries, J. B.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric CO2 has increased nearly 50% since the Industrial Revolution, due primarily to increased fossil fuel combustion, cement production, and deforestation. Although subterranean reservoirs are presently considered the most viable sink for anthropogenically liberated CO2, concerns exist over the stability of these systems and their impacts on regional tectonics, aquifers, and subterranean microbial ecosystems. Direct mineralization of CO2 at the Earth's surface provides an alternative capable of generating useful carbon-negative mineral byproducts that may be used to supplement or replace conventional carbon-positive building materials, like cement. However, mineralization of anthropogenic CO2 requires large sources of alkalinity to convert CO2 to CO32-, and divalent cations (e.g., Mg2+, Ca2+, Fe2+, etc.) to bond with the aqueous CO32-. Ultramafic and mafic rocks, such as peridotites, serpentinites, and basalts, are globally abundant, naturally occurring sources of the divalent cations, and alkalinity required for CO2 mineralization. Here, we present the results of accelerated reactions between ultramafic/mafic rocks, water, and CO2/N2 gases, aimed at quantifying the carbonation potential of mafic/ultramafic rocks. Rock-fluid-gas batch reactions were carried out in vented 4 L borosilicate glass flasks filled with 3 L DI water and 200 g acetone-washed, 49-180μm-diameter grains of four ultramafic/mafic rock types: peridotite, dunite, websterite and basalt. Each of the four rock-water mixtures was reacted under pure CO2 and pure N2 and at 25 and 200 °C, for a total of 16 reactions. Mixtures were continuously heated and stirred for 14 days. Samples (330 mL) were obtained at 0, 1, 6, 24, 48, 96, 168, and 336 hrs and filtered at 0.4 μm. The pH of filtered samples was measured with a single-junction Ag/AgCl glass electrode, salinity was determined with a conductivity probe, total alkalinity (TA) was determined by closed-cell potentiometric Gran titration, and DIC

  19. Terby's Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    27 January 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some of the light-toned, layered, sedimentary rock outcrops in northern Terby Crater. Terby is located along the north edge of Hellas Planitia. The sedimentary rocks might have been deposited in a greater, Hellas-filling sea -- or not. Today, the rocks are partly covered by dark-toned sediment and debris.

    Location near: 27.2oS, 285.3oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  20. Apatite: a new redox proxy for silicic magmas?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Andrew; Graham, Colin; Hawkesworth, Chris; Gillespie, Martin; Bromiley, Geoff; Hinton, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The oxidation states of magmas provide valuable information about the release and speciation of volatile elements during volcanic eruptions, metallogenesis, source rock compositions, open system magmatic processes, tectonic settings and potentially titanium (Ti) activity in chemical systems used for Ti-dependent geothermometers and geobarometers. In this presentation we explore the use of Mn in apatite as an oxybarometer in intermediate and silicic igneous rocks. Increased Mn concentrations in apatite in granitic rocks from the zoned Criffell granitic pluton (southern Scotland) correlate with decreasing Fe2O3 (Fe3+) and Mn in the whole-rock and likely reflect increased Mn2+/Mn3+and greater compatibility of Mn2+ relative to Mn3+ in apatite under reduced conditions. Fe3+/Fe2+ ratios in biotites have previously been used to calculate oxygen fugacities (fO2) in the outer zone granodiorites and inner zone granites where redox conditions have been shown to change from close to the magnetite-hematite buffer to close to the nickel-nickel oxide buffer respectively[1]. This trend is apparent in apatite Mn concentrations from a range of intermediate to silicic volcanic rocks that exhibit varying redox states and are shown to vary linearly and negatively with log fO2, such that logfO2=-0.0022(±0.0003)Mn(ppm)-9.75(±0.46) Variations in the Mn concentration of apatites appear to be largely independent of differences in the Mn concentration of the melt. Apatite Mn concentrations may therefore provide an independent oxybarometer that is amenable to experimental calibration, with major relevance to studies on detrital mineral suites, particularly those containing a record of early Earth redox conditions, and on the climatic impact of historic volcanic eruptions[2]. [1] Stephens, W. E., Whitley, J. E., Thirlwall, M. F. and Halliday, A. N. (1985) The Criffell zoned pluton: correlated behaviour of rare earth element abundances with isotopic systems. Contributions to Mineralogy and

  1. Alkaline Phosphatase in Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Štefková, Kateřina; Procházková, Jiřina; Pacherník, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase is an enzyme commonly expressed in almost all living organisms. In humans and other mammals, determinations of the expression and activity of alkaline phosphatase have frequently been used for cell determination in developmental studies and/or within clinical trials. Alkaline phosphatase also seems to be one of the key markers in the identification of pluripotent embryonic stem as well as related cells. However, alkaline phosphatases exist in some isoenzymes and isoforms, which have tissue specific expressions and functions. Here, the role of alkaline phosphatase as a stem cell marker is discussed in detail. First, we briefly summarize contemporary knowledge of mammalian alkaline phosphatases in general. Second, we focus on the known facts of its role in and potential significance for the identification of stem cells. PMID:25767512

  2. Carbonate-silicate liquid immiscibility in the mantle propels kimberlite magma ascent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenetsky, Vadim S.; Yaxley, Gregory M.

    2015-06-01

    Kimberlite is a rare volcanic rock renowned as the major host of diamonds and originated at the base of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle. Although kimberlite magmas are dense in crystals and deeply-derived rock fragments, they ascend to the surface extremely rapidly, enabling diamonds to survive. The unique physical properties of kimberlite magmas depend on the specific compositions of their parental melts that, in absence of historical eruptions and due to pervasive alteration of kimberlite rocks, remain highly debatable. We explain exceptionally rapid ascent of kimberlite magma from mantle depths by combining empirical data on the essentially carbonatite composition of the kimberlite primary melts and experimental evidence on interaction of the carbonate liquids with mantle minerals. Our experimental study shows that orthopyroxene is completely dissolved in a Na2CO3 melt at 2.0-5.0 GPa and 1000-1200 °C. The dissolution of orthopyroxene results in homogeneous silicate-carbonate melt at 5.0 GPa and 1200 °C, and is followed by unmixing of carbonate and carbonated silicate melts and formation of stable magmatic emulsion at lower pressures and temperatures. The dispersed silicate melt has a significant capacity for storing a carbonate component in the deep mantle (13 wt% CO2 at 2.0 GPa). We envisage that this component reaches saturation and is gradually released as CO2 bubbles, as the silicate melt globules are transported upwards through the lithosphere by the carbonatite magma. The globules of unmixed, CO2-rich silicate melt are continuously produced upon further reaction between the natrocarbonatite melt and mantle peridotite. On decompression the dispersed silicate melt phase ensures a continuous supply of CO2 bubbles that decrease density and increase buoyancy and promote rapid ascent of the magmatic emulsion.

  3. Alkaline fuel cells applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordesch, Karl; Hacker, Viktor; Gsellmann, Josef; Cifrain, Martin; Faleschini, Gottfried; Enzinger, Peter; Fankhauser, Robert; Ortner, Markus; Muhr, Michael; Aronson, Robert R.

    On the world-wide automobile market technical developments are increasingly determined by the dramatic restriction on emissions as well as the regimentation of fuel consumption by legislation. Therefore there is an increasing chance of a completely new technology breakthrough if it offers new opportunities, meeting the requirements of resource preservation and emission restrictions. Fuel cell technology offers the possibility to excel in today's motive power techniques in terms of environmental compatibility, consumer's profit, costs of maintenance and efficiency. The key question is economy. This will be decided by the costs of fuel cell systems if they are to be used as power generators for future electric vehicles. The alkaline hydrogen-air fuel cell system with circulating KOH electrolyte and low-cost catalysed carbon electrodes could be a promising alternative. Based on the experiences of Kordesch [K. Kordesch, Brennstoffbatterien, Springer, Wien, 1984, ISBN 3-387-81819-7; K. Kordesch, City car with H 2-air fuel cell and lead-battery, SAE Paper No. 719015, 6th IECEC, 1971], who operated a city car hybrid vehicle on public roads for 3 years in the early 1970s, improved air electrodes plus new variations of the bipolar stack assembly developed in Graz are investigated. Primary fuel choice will be a major issue until such time as cost-effective, on-board hydrogen storage is developed. Ammonia is an interesting option. The whole system, ammonia dissociator plus alkaline fuel cell (AFC), is characterised by a simple design and high efficiency.

  4. Rock Garden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This false color composite image of the Rock Garden shows the rocks 'Shark' and 'Half Dome' at upper left and middle, respectively. Between these two large rocks is a smaller rock (about 0.20 m wide, 0.10 m high, and 6.33 m from the Lander) that was observed close-up with the Sojourner rover (see PIA00989).

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  5. Q-Speciation and Network Structure Evolution in Invert Calcium Silicate Glasses.

    PubMed

    Kaseman, Derrick C; Retsinas, A; Kalampounias, A G; Papatheodorou, G N; Sen, S

    2015-07-01

    Binary silicate glasses in the system CaO-SiO2 are synthesized over an extended composition range (42 mol % ≤ CaO ≤ 61 mol %), using container-less aerodynamic levitation techniques and CO2-laser heating. The compositional evolution of Q speciation in these glasses is quantified using (29)Si and (17)O magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The results indicate progressive depolymerization of the silicate network upon addition of CaO and significant deviation of the Q speciation from the binary model. The equilibrium constants for the various Q species disproportionation reactions for these glasses are found to be similar to (much smaller than) those characteristic of Li (Mg)-silicate glasses, consistent with the corresponding trends in the field strengths of these modifier cations. Increasing CaO concentration results in an increase in the packing density and structural rigidity of these glasses and consequently in their glass transition temperature Tg. This apparent role reversal of conventional network-modifying cations in invert alkaline-earth silicate glasses are compared and contrasted with that in their alkali silicate counterparts. PMID:26047056

  6. Dehydroxylated clay silicates on Mars: Riddles about the Martian regolith solved with ferrian saponites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Roger G.

    1992-01-01

    Clay silicates, resulting from the chemical weathering of volcanic glasses and basaltic rocks of Mars, are generally believed to be major constituents of the martian regolith and atmospheric dust. Because little attention has been given to the role, if any, of Mg-bearing clay silicates on the martian surface, the crystal chemistry, stability, and reactivity of Mg-Fe smectites are examined. Partially dehydroxylated ferrian saponites are suggested to be major constituents of the surface of Mars, regulating several properties of the regolith.

  7. Scenario of Growing Crops on Silicates in Lunar Gargens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyrovska, N.; Kovalchuk, M.; Negutska, V.; Lar, O.; Korniichuk, O.; Alpatov, A.; Rogutskiy, I.; Kordyum, V.; Foing, B.

    Self-perpetuating gardens will be a practical necessity for humans, living in permanently manned lunar bases. A lunar garden has to supplement less appetizing packaged food brought from the Earth, and the ornamental plants have to serve as valuable means for emotional relaxation of crews in a hostile lunar environment. The plants are less prone to the inevitable pests and diseases when they are in optimum condition, however, in lunar greenhouses there is a threat for plants to be hosts for pests and predators. Although the lunar rocks are microorganism free, there will be a problem with the acquired infection (pathogens brought from the Earth) in the substrate used for the plant growing. On the Moon pests can be removed by total fumigation, including seed fumigation. However, such a treatment is not required when probiotics (biocontrol bacteria) for seed inoculation are used. A consortium of bacteria, controlling plant diseases, provides the production of an acceptable harvest under growth limiting factors and a threatening infection. To model lunar conditions we have used terrestrial alumino-silicate mineral anorthosite (Malyn, Ukraine) which served us as a lunar mineral analog for a substrate composition. With the idea to provide a plant with some essential growth elements siliceous bacterium Paenibacillus sp. has been isolated from alumino-silicate mineral, and a mineral leaching has been simulated in laboratory condition. The combination of mineral anorthosite and siliceous bacteria, on one hand, and a consortium of beneficial bacteria for biocontrol of plant diseases, on the other hand, are currently used in model experiments to examine the wheat and potato growth and production in cultivating chambers under controlled conditions.

  8. Effects of Tricalcium Silicate Cements on Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Eid, Ashraf A.; Hussein, Khalid A.; Niu, Li-na; Li, Guo-hua; Watanabe, Ikuya; Al-Shabrawey, Mohamed; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2014-01-01

    Tricalcium silicate cements have been successfully employed in the biomedical field as bioactive bone and dentin substitutes, with widely acclaimed osteoactive properties. This research analyzed the effects of different tricalcium silicate cement formulations on the temporal osteoactivity profile of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMW-MSCs). These cells were exposed to 4 commercially-available tricalcium silicate cement formulations in osteogenic differentiation medium. After 1, 3, 7 and 10 days, quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting were performed to detect the expression of target osteogenic markers ALP, RUNX2, OSX, OPN, MSX2, and OCN. After 3, 7, 14 and 21 days, alkaline phosphatase assay was performed to detect changes in intracellular enzyme level. Alizarin Red S assay was performed after 28 days to detect extracellular matrix mineralization. In the presence of tricalcium silicate cements, target osteogenic markers were downregulated at the mRNA and protein levels at all time-points. Intracellular alkaline phosphatase enzyme levels and extracellular mineralization of the experimental groups were not significantly different from the untreated control. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction results showed increases in downregulation of RUNX2, OSX, MSX2 and OCN with increase in time of exposure to the tricalcium silicate cements, while ALP showed peak downregulation at day 7. For Western blotting, OSX, OPN, MSX2 and OCN showed increased downregulation with increased exposure time to the tested cements. Alkaline phosphatase enzyme levels generally declined after day 7. Based on these results, it is concluded that tricalcium silicate cements do not induce osteogenic differentiation of hBM-MSCs in vitro. PMID:24726977

  9. Experimentally determined Si isotope fractionation between silicate and Fe metal and implications for Earth's core formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahar, Anat; Ziegler, Karen; Young, Edward D.; Ricolleau, Angele; Schauble, Edwin A.; Fei, Yingwei

    2009-10-01

    Stable isotope fractionation amongst phases comprising terrestrial planets and asteroids can be used to elucidate planet-forming processes. To date, the composition of the Earth's core remains largely unknown though cosmochemical and geophysical evidence indicates that elements lighter than iron and nickel must reside there. Silicon is often cited as a light element that could explain the seismic properties of the core. The amount of silicon in the core, if any, can be deduced from the difference in 30Si/ 28Si between meteorites and terrestrial rocks if the Si isotope fractionation between silicate and Fe-rich metal is known. Recent studies (e.g., [Georg R.B., Halliday A.N., Schauble E.A., Reynolds B.C., 2007. Silicon in the Earth's core. Nature 447 (31), 1102-1106.]; [Fitoussi, C., Bourdon, B., Kleine, T., Oberli, F., Reynolds, B. C., 2009. Si isotope systematics of meteorites and terrestrial peridotites: implications for Mg/Si fractionation in the solar nebula and for Si in the Earth's core. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 287, 77-85.]) showing (sometimes subtle) differences between 30Si/ 28Si in meteorites and terrestrial rocks suggest that Si missing from terrestrial rocks might be in the core. However, any conclusion based on Earth-meteorite comparisons depends on the veracity of the 30Si/ 28Si fractionation factor between silicates and metals at appropriate conditions. Here we present the first direct experimental evidence that silicon isotopes are not distributed uniformly between iron metal and rock when equilibrated at high temperatures. High-precision measurements of the silicon isotope ratios in iron-silicon alloy and silicate equilibrated at 1 GPa and 1800 °C show that Si in silicate has higher 30Si/ 28Si than Si in metal, by at least 2.0‰. These findings provide an experimental foundation for using isotope ratios of silicon as indicators of terrestrial planet formation processes. They imply that if Si isotope equilibrium existed during segregation of Earth

  10. Peralkaline- and calc-alkaline-hosted volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits of the Bonnifield District, East-Central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dusel-Bacon, Cynthia; Foley, Nora K.; Slack, John E.; Koenig, Alan E.; Oscarson, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) Zn-Pb-Cu-Ag-Au deposits of the Bonnifield mining district formed during Late Devonian-Early Mississippian magmatism along the western edge of Laurentia. The largest deposits, Dry Creek and WTF, have a combined resource of 5.7 million tonnes at 10% Zn, 4% Pb, 0.3% Cu, 300 grams per tonne (g/t) Ag, and 1.6 g/t Au. These polymetallic deposits are hosted in high field strength element (HFSE)- and rare-earth element (REE)-rich peralkaline (pantelleritic) metarhyolite, and interlayered pyritic argillite and mudstone of the Mystic Creek Member of the Totatlanika Schist Formation. Mystic Creek metarhyolite and alkali basalt (Chute Creek Member) constitute a bimodal pair that formed in an extensional environment. A synvolcanic peralkaline quartz porphyry containing veins of fluorite, sphalerite, pyrite, and quartz intrudes the central footwall at Dry Creek. The Anderson Mountain deposit, located ~32 km to the southwest, occurs within calc-alkaline felsic to intermediate-composition metavolcanic rocks and associated graphitic argillite of the Wood River assemblage. Felsic metavolcanic rocks there have only slightly elevated HFSEs and REEs. The association of abundant graphitic and siliceous argillite with the felsic volcanic rocks together with low Cu contents in the Bonnifield deposits suggests classification as a siliciclastic-felsic type of VMS deposit. Bonnifield massive sulfides and host rocks were metamorphosed and deformed under greenschist-facies conditions in the Mesozoic. Primary depositional textures, generally uncommon, consist of framboids, framboidal aggregates, and spongy masses of pyrite. Sphalerite, the predominant base metal sulfide, encloses early pyrite framboids. Galena and chalcopyrite accompanied early pyrite formation but primarily formed late in the paragenetic sequence. Silver-rich tetrahedrite is a minor late phase at the Dry Creek deposit. Gold and Ag are present in low to moderate amounts in pyrite from all of

  11. Thermodynamics of rock forming crystalline solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxena, S. K.

    1971-01-01

    Analysis of phase diagrams and cation distributions within crystalline solutions as means of obtaining thermodynamic data on rock forming crystalline solutions is discussed along with some aspects of partitioning of elements in coexisting phases. Crystalline solutions, components in a silicate mineral, and chemical potentials of these components were defined. Examples were given for calculating thermodynamic mixing functions in the CaW04-SrW04, olivine-chloride solution, and orthopyroxene systems.

  12. Remelting of cumulates as a process for producing chemical zoning in silicic tuffs: A comparison of cool, wet and hot, dry rhyolitic magma systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, J. A.; Ellis, B. S.; Ramos, F. C.; Starkel, W. A.; Boroughs, S.; Olin, P. H.; Bachmann, O.

    2015-11-01

    We review petrological and geochemical features of silicic pyroclastic deposits of dominantly low to moderate (0-25%) crystallinity, and volumes in the range of 5-1000 km3, erupted from caldera volcanoes. Chemical gradients in zoned deposits with compositions near the water-saturated granite minimum, for example the Bishop and Bandelier Tuffs, are consistent with mineral/melt partitioning predicted from the observed phenocryst assemblages, and are inconsistent with mixing with more mafic magma. Smaller volume alkaline (phonolite and pantellerite) systems show similar behavior. In contrast, high-temperature ignimbrites of the 'Snake River'-type typically lack compositional zoning. Internal isotopic variations are weak or absent from whole rocks in both types of rhyolite, even in systems where associated volcanic rocks exhibit wide isotopic variation and strong contrasts exist between the isotopic compositions of mantle and crust. An exception to this is 87Sr/86Sr variations in high-silica rhyolite systems, where Sr has been depleted to subchondritic concentrations and is exceptionally sensitive to open-system processes. Both types of ignimbrite commonly contain crystal aggregates, interpreted as fragments of cumulate mush. In zoned systems, these aggregates exhibit evidence for partial resorption of early-formed crystals. We infer that chemical zoning is a near closed-system process and propose that it arises through melting of cognate cumulate mush beneath a crystal-poor body of melt due to heating by invading mafic or intermediate magma with little mass transfer to the eruptible magma. If the crystal mush is fusible (e.g. dominated by sanidine + quartz), part of it melts to yield mobile, water-poor rhyolite that pools at the interface between the mush and overlying rhyolitic liquid. This new, eruptible melt has a cumulate composition and is thus less evolved than the original supernatant melt lens. The result is a chemically zoned crystal-poor rhyolitic magma

  13. Bifunctional alkaline oxygen electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swette, L.; Kackley, N.; Mccatty, S. A.

    1991-01-01

    The authors describe the identification and testing of electrocatalysts and supports for the positive electrode of moderate-temperature, single-unit, rechargeable alkaline fuel cells. Recent work on Na(x)Pt3O4, a potential bifunctional catalyst, is described, as well as the application of novel approaches to the development of more efficient bifunctional electrode structures. The three dual-character electrodes considered here showed similar superior performance; the Pt/RhO2 and Rh/RhO2 electrodes showed slightly better performance than the Pt/IrO2 electrode. It is concluded that Na(x)Pt3O4 continues to be a promising bifunctional oxygen electrode catalyst but requires further investigation and development.

  14. Adsorption kinetics of silicic acid on akaganeite.

    PubMed

    Naren, Gaowa; Ohashi, Hironori; Okaue, Yoshihiro; Yokoyama, Takushi

    2013-06-01

    As part of a series of studies on the interaction between ferric ions and silicic acid in the hydrosphere, the adsorption of silicic acid on akaganeite was investigated kinetically at various pH values. The adsorption of silicic acid increased with increasing pH over an initial pH range of 4-11.5. In the kinetic experiment, the Cl(-) was released from akaganeite much faster than silicic acid was adsorbed. From this result, we concluded that chloride ions bound on the surface of akaganeite are released and Fe-OH or Fe-O(-) sites are formed, which then acts as an adsorption site for silicic acid. The uptake mechanism of silicic acid by akaganeite is significantly different from that by schwertmannite, despite the presence of the same tunnel structure. PMID:23538050

  15. The stable Cr isotopic compositions of chondrites and silicate planetary reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenberg, Ronny; Merdian, Alexandra; Holmden, Chris; Kleinhanns, Ilka C.; Haßler, Kathrin; Wille, Martin; Reitter, Elmar

    2016-06-01

    The depletion of chromium in Earth's mantle (∼2700 ppm) in comparison to chondrites (∼4400 ppm) indicates significant incorporation of chromium into the core during our planet's metal-silicate differentiation, assuming that there was no significant escape of the moderately volatile element chromium during the accretionary phase of Earth. Stable Cr isotope compositions - expressed as the ‰-difference in 53Cr/52Cr from the terrestrial reference material SRM979 (δ53/52CrSRM979 values) - of planetary silicate reservoirs might thus yield information about the conditions of planetary metal segregation processes when compared to chondrites. The stable Cr isotopic compositions of 7 carbonaceous chondrites, 11 ordinary chondrites, 5 HED achondrites and 2 martian meteorites determined by a double spike MC-ICP-MS method are within uncertainties indistinguishable from each other and from the previously determined δ53/52CrSRM979 value of -0.124 ± 0.101‰ for the igneous silicate Earth. Extensive quality tests support the accuracy of the stable Cr isotope determinations of various meteorites and terrestrial silicates reported here. The uniformity in stable Cr isotope compositions of samples from planetary silicate mantles and undifferentiated meteorites indicates that metal-silicate differentiation of Earth, Mars and the HED parent body did not cause measurable stable Cr isotope fractionation between these two reservoirs. Our results also imply that the accretionary disc, at least in the inner solar system, was homogeneous in its stable Cr isotopic composition and that potential volatility loss of chromium during accretion of the terrestrial planets was not accompanied by measurable stable isotopic fractionation. Small but reproducible variations in δ53/52CrSRM979 values of terrestrial magmatic rocks point to natural stable Cr isotope variations within Earth's silicate reservoirs. Further and more detailed studies are required to investigate whether silicate

  16. The Potential of Soft Soil Improvement Through a Coupled Technique Between Electro Kinetic and Alkaline Activation of Soft Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, G. E.; Ismail, H. B.; Huat, B. K.; Afshin, A.; Azhar, A. T. S.

    2016-07-01

    Soil stabilization techniques have been in development for decades with different rates of success. Alkaline activation of soft soil is one of those techniques that has proved to deliver some of the best shear strength values with minor drawbacks in comparison with conventional soil stabilization methods. However, environmental considerations have not been taken into account, as major mineral glassy phase activators are poisoning alkaline solutions, such as sodium-, potassium-hydroxide, and sodium-, potassium-silicate, which poses serious hazards to man and environment. This paper addresses the ways of discarding the involvement of the aforementioned alkaline solutions in soft soil stabilization by investigating the potential of a coupled electro kinetic alkaline activation technique for soft soil strengthening, through which the provision of alkaline pH is governed by electro kinetic potential. Uncertainties in regard to the dissolution of aluminosilicate as well as the dominance of acidic front are challenges that need to be overcome.

  17. COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-04-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent

  18. Silicate stabilization studies in propylene glycol

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, S.A.

    1999-08-01

    In most North American and many European coolant formulations, the corrosion inhibition of heat-rejecting aluminum surfaces is provided by alkali metal silicates. But, their tendency towards polymerization, leading to gelation and/or precipitation, can reduce the effectiveness of a coolant. This paper presents the results of experiments which illustrate formulation-dependent behavior of inorganic silicate in propylene glycol compositions. Specific examples of the effects of glycol matrix, stabilizer type, and hard water on silicate stabilization are provided.

  19. Getting lunar ilmenite: From soils or rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Vaniman, D.T.; Heiken, G.H.

    1989-01-01

    Lunar soils or rocks can be mined as sources of ilmenite for producing oxygen. However, separable crystals of loose ilmenite in lunar soils are rare (<2%) and small (<200 {mu}); most ilmenite in the regolith is locked together with silicate minerals as rock fragments. Since fragmentation of rock sources must be attempted to win appreciable amounts of ilmenite ({approximately}10% or more), selective collection of high-Ti basalt fragments larger than 1 cm for fragmentation and ilmenite beneficiation may be advantageous over extensive processing of fine lunar soil. Many alternative processing schemes for fragmenting rocks on the Moon have been proposed; one process which was tested early in the Apollo program successfully disaggregated lunar and terrestrial basalts by passive exposure to low-pressure alkali (K) vapor. This process is worthy of reinvestigation. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Ion-specific effects influencing the dissolution of tricalcium silicate

    SciTech Connect

    Nicoleau, L.; Schreiner, E.; Nonat, A.

    2014-05-01

    It has been recently demonstrated that the dissolution kinetics of tricalcium silicate (C{sub 3}S) is driven by the deviation from its solubility equilibrium. In this article, special attention is paid to ions relevant in cement chemistry likely to interact with C{sub 3}S. In order to determine whether specific effects occur at the interface C{sub 3}S–water, particular efforts have been made to model ion activities using Pitzer's model. It has been found that monovalent cations and monovalent anions interact very little with the surface of C{sub 3}S. On the other side, divalent anions like sulfate slow down the dissolution more strongly by modifying the surface charging of C{sub 3}S. Third, aluminate ions covalently bind to surface silicate monomers and inhibit the dissolution in mildly alkaline conditions. The formation and the breaking of these bonds depend on pH and on [Ca{sup 2+}]. Thermodynamic calculations performed using DFT combined with the COSMO-RS solvation method support the experimental findings.

  1. Mechanical and acoustic properties of weakly cemented granular rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, S.; Myer, L.R.

    2001-05-09

    This paper presents the results of laboratory measurements on the mechanical and acoustic properties of weakly cemented granular rock. Artificial rock samples were fabricated by cementing sand and glass beads with sodium silicate binder. During uniaxial compression tests, the rock samples showed stress-strain behavior which was more similar to that of soils than competent rocks, exhibiting large permanent deformations with frictional slip. The mechanical behavior of the samples approached that of competent rocks as the amount of binder was increased. For very weak samples, acoustic waves propagating in these rocks showed very low velocities of less than 1000 m/sec for compressional waves. A borehole made within this weakly cemented rock exhibited a unique mode of failure that is called ''anti-KI mode fracture'' in this paper. The effect of cementation, grain type, and boundary conditions on this mode of failure was also examined experimentally.

  2. Thermal-infrared spectra and chemical analyses of twenty-six igneous rock samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vincent, R.K.; Rowan, L.C.; Gillespie, R.E.; Knapp, C.

    1975-01-01

    Emittance spectra in the 7.5 ??m to 14 ??m wavelength region and chemical compositions of 26 igneous rocks are reported. Experimental measurements on the rocks were made under simulated daytime field conditions. Some surface silicate contaminants, such as clayey silt, significantly altered the spectral emittance of a fresh sample, whereas, for these samples, hydrous and anhydrous ferric oxide weathering products did not mask important silicate spectral information. In the 11.75 ??m to 13.75 ??m wavelength region, the mean emittance of all the silicate samples was 0.956 ?? 0.008, except for periodtite, which had an average emittance of 0.895. This region of uniform emittance should be useful in remote sensing experiments for the separation of the effects of temperature and chemical composition on the spectral emittance of silicate rocks. ?? 1976.

  3. Pyroclastic Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahood, Gail A.

    Most of the advances in volcanology during the past 20 years have concerned the recognition, interpretation, and mode of emplacement of pyroclastic rocks. The literature on pyroclastic rocks is widely scattered, in part because the field draws from sedimentology, igneous petrology, physics, and fluid mechanics, and there have been few review papers on the topic. Fisher and Schmincke have done the discipline of volcanology and all field-oriented geologists a great service in assembling material from a wide range of sources in this comprehensive treatment of pyroclastic rocks. With its introduction to the petrology of magmas involved in explosive eruptions in chapter 2 and a complete treatment of magma rheology and the behavior of dissolved and exsolving magmatic volatiles in chapter 3, they lay sufficient groundwork that anyone with a rudimentary knowledge of geology can understand the book.

  4. COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qui; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling

    2004-05-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding in the swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to the naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of the injected solution bypasses the target pore space containing oil. The objective of this work is to investigate whether combining these two technologies could broaden the applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium--polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 9.2 to 12.9.

  5. Temperature and pH Changes Associated with the Hydration of Amorphous Silicate Smokes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chizmadia, L. J.; Lebrón-Rivera, S. A.

    2010-03-01

    The hydration of Fe-Si smokes results in acidic pH levels and negligible change in temperature. When mixed with Mg-Si smokes, pH becomes alkaline and temperature increases slightly. Water-rock ratio is a minor variable relative to composition.

  6. Thermal and mechanical constraints on mixing between mafic and silicic magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, R. S. J.; Marshall, L. A.

    1986-09-01

    -veined complexes. When basaltic magma is intermingled with silicic magma, high proportions (typically 50% or greater) of basalt are necessary to enable mixing to occur. Hybrid magmas involving small proportions of basalr magma with large proportions of silicic magma are notably absent from St. Kilda hybrid rocks and other areas. Many mafic xenoliths may represent less evolved basaltic magma which solidified when commingled with a much larger volume of silicic magma.

  7. Evidence for the reversal of gradients in the uppermost parts of silicic magma reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duffield, W.A.; Ruiz, J.

    1992-01-01

    Evidence from large-volume ignimbrites indicates that the source-magma reservoirs for most of these voluminous silicic pyroclastic deposits contained monotonic vertical chemical gradients at the time of eruption. However, gradients from a large-volume magma reservoir that produced a group of penecontemporaneous silicic lava domes, but no ignimbrite, show a reversal of the usual ignimbrite pattern. This reversal originated by modification of the usual pattern through minor assimilation of partially melted roof rocks. Eruptions that produced these domes apparently just tapped the uppermost part of their source reservoir. They thereby provide a high-resolution instantaneous view of this variably contaminated part of the magma system. The long-standing paradigm for monotonic zoning in large-volume reservoirs of silicic magma may require modification. -from Authors

  8. Silicate Glass Corrosion Mechanism revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, Thorsten; Lenting, Christoph; Dohmen, Lars

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the mechanism(s) of aqueous corrosion of nuclear waste borosilicate glasses is essential to predict their long-term aqueous durability in a geologic repository. Several observations have been made with compositionally different silicate glasses that cannot be explained by any of the established glass corrosion models. These models are based on diffusion-controlled ion exchange and subsequent structural reorganisation of a leached, hydrated residual glass, leaving behind a so-called gel layer. In fact, the common observation of lamellar to more complex pattern formation observed in experiment and nature, the porous structure of the corrosion layer, an atomically sharp boundary between the corrosion zone and the underlying pristine glass, as well as results of novel isotope tracer and in situ, real time experiments rather support an interface-coupled glass dissolution-silica reprecipitation model. In this model, the congruent dissolution of the glass is coupled in space and time to the precipitation and growth of amorphous silica at an inwardly moving reaction front. We suggest that these coupled processes have to be considered to realistically model the long-term performance of silicate glasses in aqueous environments.

  9. TRM Anisotropy in Silicate-Hosted Magnetite Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinberg, J. M.; Scott, G. R.

    2006-05-01

    Currently there is a need for rock magnetic recorders that will allow researchers to examine the direction and intensity of the Earth's Precambrian magnetic field. Silicate-hosted magnetic inclusions (both exsolved and occluded) are uniquely suited to this task because (1) they are physically and chemically isolated from altering fluids, (2) they are at chemical equilibrium with their silicate hosts, (3) they have long relaxation times due to enhanced coercivity, and (4) they are common in mafic intrusive rocks, which are frequently found in Precambrian-aged terranes. Cretaceous-aged gabbros containing exsolved, crystallographically oriented, magnetite inclusions in clinopyroxene and plagioclase accurately record expected magnetic directions and intensities. Here we present new rock magnetic data on the anisotropy of thermal remanent magnetization (aTRM) for single crystals of clinopyroxene and plagioclase containing exsolved inclusions. For clinopyroxene with two arrays of needle-shaped magnetite inclusions, the aTRM is strongly planar, showing two sets of antipodal direction clusters. The component of magnetization perpendicular to the applied TRM (transverse remanence) exceeds the parallel remanence in some crystallographic directions. For triclinic plagioclase with >4 arrays of needle shaped inclusions, the aTRM is subspherical with numerous minor clusters of directions. Transverse remanence is less important than parallel remanence in plagioclase. Thus, the greater number of inclusion arrays in plagioclase decreases the severity of the TRM anisotropy relative to the two arrays in pyroxene. Single crystals containing exsolved inclusions hold enormous potential as recorders of the Earth's magnetic direction and intensity. A statistical approach that combines remanence data from oriented single crystals successfully constrains the orientation and intensity of the ancient magnetic field.

  10. Modulators of intestinal alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Bobkova, Ekaterina V; Kiffer-Moreira, Tina; Sergienko, Eduard A

    2013-01-01

    Small molecule modulators of phosphatases can lead to clinically useful drugs and serve as invaluable tools to study functional roles of various phosphatases in vivo. Here, we describe lead discovery strategies for identification of inhibitors and activators of intestinal alkaline phosphatases. To identify isozyme-selective inhibitors and activators of the human and mouse intestinal alkaline phosphatases, ultrahigh throughput chemiluminescent assays, utilizing CDP-Star as a substrate, were developed for murine intestinal alkaline phosphatase (mIAP), human intestinal alkaline phosphatase (hIAP), human placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP), and human tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) isozymes. Using these 1,536-well assays, concurrent HTS screens of the MLSMR library of 323,000 compounds were conducted for human and mouse IAP isozymes monitoring both inhibition and activation. This parallel screening approach led to identification of a novel inhibitory scaffold selective for murine intestinal alkaline phosphatase. SAR efforts based on parallel testing of analogs against different AP isozymes generated a potent inhibitor of the murine IAP with IC50 of 540 nM, at least 65-fold selectivity against human TNAP, and >185 selectivity against human PLAP. PMID:23860652

  11. Volcanic rock petrochemistry as an exploration technique for geothermal energy

    SciTech Connect

    Fultz, L.A.; Bell, E.J.; Trexler, D.T.

    1983-12-01

    Large high-level silicic magma chambers offer a high potential for economically viable geothermal systems. While purely basic volcanic systems rarely form thermal anomalies, they may provide the necessary long-term heat input to silicic systems, by underplating, to sustain a high-temperature geothermal system. Petrographic and microprobe, geochemical, geochronologic, and isotopic data on young volcanic rocks in west-central Nevada indicate compositions that may result from magmatic differentiation, crystal fractionation, variation in magmatic source regions and in particular, magma mixing. Analysis of the petrochemistry and the recognition of magma mixing textures of extrusive rocks may indicate interacting mafic magma with buried shallow silicic magma systems. These systems may provide a shallow heat source for development of geothermal resources.

  12. Classic Rock

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beem, Edgar Allen

    2004-01-01

    While "early college" programs designed for high-school-age students are beginning to proliferate nationwide, a small New England school has been successfully educating teens for nearly four decades. In this article, the author features Simon's Rock, a small liberal arts college located in the Great Barrington, Massachusetts, that has been…

  13. Alkaline battery, separator therefore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, George F. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An improved battery separator for alkaline battery cells has low resistance to electrolyte ion transfer and high resistance to electrode ion transfer. The separator is formed by applying an improved coating to an electrolyte absorber. The absorber, preferably, is a flexible, fibrous, and porous substrate that is resistant to strong alkali and oxidation. The coating composition includes an admixture of a polymeric binder, a hydrolyzable polymeric ester and inert fillers. The coating composition is substantially free of reactive fillers and plasticizers commonly employed as porosity promoting agents in separator coatings. When the separator is immersed in electrolyte, the polymeric ester of the film coating reacts with the electrolyte forming a salt and an alcohol. The alcohol goes into solution with the electrolyte while the salt imbibes electrolyte into the coating composition. When the salt is formed, it expands the polymeric chains of the binder to provide a film coating substantially permeable to electrolyte ion transfer but relatively impermeable to electrode ion transfer during use.

  14. Geochemistry and argon thermochronology of the Variscan Sila Batholith, southern Italy: source rocks and magma evolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayuso, R.A.; Messina, A.; de Vivo, B.; Russo, S.; Woodruff, L.G.; Sutter, J.F.; Belkin, H.E.

    1994-01-01

    The Sila batholith is the largest granitic massif in the Calabria-Peloritan Arc of southern Italy, consisting of syn to post-tectonic, calc-alkaline and metaluminous tonalite to granodiorite, and post-tectonic, peraluminous and strongly peraluminous, two-mica??cordierite??Al silicate granodiorite to leucomonzogranite. Mineral 40Ar/39Ar thermochronologic analyses document Variscan emplacement and cooling of the intrusives (293-289 Ma). SiO2 content in the granitic rocks ranges from ???57 to 77 wt%; cumulate gabbro enclaves have SiO2 as low as 42%. Variations in absolute abundances and ratios involving Hf, Ta, Th, Rb, and the REE, among others, identify genetically linked groups of granitic rocks in the batholith: (1) syn-tectonic biotite??amphibole-bearing tonalites to granodiorites, (2) post-tectonic two-mica??Al-silicate-bearing granodiorites to leucomonzogranites, and (3) post-tectonic biotite??hornblende tonalites to granodiorites. Chondrite-normalized REE patterns display variable values of Ce/Yb (up to ???300) and generally small negative Eu anomalies. Degree of REE fractionation depends on whether the intrusives are syn- or post-tectonic, and on their mineralogy. High and variable values of Rb/Y (0.40-4.5), Th/Sm (0.1-3.6), Th/Ta (0-70), Ba/Nb (1-150), and Ba/Ta (???50-2100), as well as low values of Nb/U (???2-28) and La/Th (???1-10) are consistent with a predominant and heterogeneous crustal contribution to the batholith. Whole rock ??18O ranges from ???+8.2 to +11.7???; the mafic cumulate enclaves have the lowest ??18O values and the two-mica granites have the highest values. ??18O values for biotite??honblende tonalitic and granodioritic rocks (9.1 to 10.8???) overlap the values of the mafic enclaves and two-mica granodiorites and leucogranites (10.7 to 11.7???). The initial Pb isotopic range of the granitic rocks (206Pb/204Pb ???18.17-18.45, 207Pb/204Pb ???15.58-15.77, 208Pb/204Pb ???38.20-38.76) also indicates the predominance of a crustal source

  15. Evaluation of Alkaline Cleaner Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partz, Earl

    1998-01-01

    Alkaline cleaners used to process aluminum substrates have contained chromium as the corrosion inhibitor. Chromium is a hazardous substance whose use and control are described by environmental laws. Replacement materials that have the characteristics of chromated alkaline cleaners need to be found that address both the cleaning requirements and environmental impacts. This report will review environmentally friendly candidates evaluated as non-chromium alkaline cleaner replacements and methods used to compare those candidates one versus another. The report will also list characteristics used to select candidates based on their declared contents. It will also describe and evaluate methods used to discriminate among the large number of prospective candidates.

  16. Silicate minerals and the interferon system

    SciTech Connect

    Hahon, N.; Booth, J.A.

    1987-08-01

    Natural-occurring minerals representative of six silicate classes were examined for their influence on interferon induction by influenza virus in Rhesus monkey kidney (LLC-MK/sub 2/) cell monolayers. Minerals within the classes nesosilicate, sorosilicate, cyclosilicate, and inosilicate exhibited either little or marked (50% or greater) inhibition of interferon induction. Within the inosilicate class, however, minerals of the pyroxenoid group (wollastonite, pectolite, and rhodonite) all significantly showed a two- to threefold increase in interferon production. Silicate materials in the phyllosilicate and tectosilicate classes all showed inhibitory activity for the induction process. When silicate minerals were coated with the polymer poly(4-vinylpyridine-N-oxide), the inhibitory activity of silicates on viral interferon induction was counteracted. Of nine randomly selected silicate minerals, which inhibited viral interferon induction, none adversely affected the ability of exogenous interferon to confer antiviral cellular resistance. Increased levels of influenza virus multiplication concomitant with decreased levels of interferon occurred in cell monolayers pretreated with silicates. The findings of this study demonstrate the diverse effects of minerals representative of different silicate classes on the interferon system and indicate that certain silicates in comprising the viral interferon induction process may increase susceptibility to viral infection.

  17. 21 CFR 182.2437 - Magnesium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium silicate. 182.2437 Section 182.2437 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Anticaking Agents § 182.2437 Magnesium silicate. (a) Product....

  18. Dolomite Dissolution in Alkaline Cementious Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittermayr, Florian; Klammer, Dietmar; Köhler, Stephan; Dietzel, Martin

    2010-05-01

    Chemical alteration of concrete has gained much attention over the past years as many cases of deterioration due to sulphate attack, thaumasite formation (TSA) or alkali silica reactions (ASR) have been reported in various constructions (Schmidt et al, 2009). Much less is known about the so called alkali carbonate reaction (ACR). It is believed that dolomite aggregates can react with the alkalis from the cement, dissolve and form calcite and brucite (Katayama, 2004). Due to very low solubility of dolomite in alkaline solutions this reaction seems doubtful. In this study we are trying to gain new insides about the conditions that can lead to the dissolution of dolomite in concrete. Therefore we investigated concrete samples from Austrian tunnels that show partially dissolved dolomite aggregates. Petrological analysis such as microprobe, SEM and Raman spectroscopy as well as a hydrochemical analysis of interstitial solutions and ground water and modelling with PhreeqC (Parkhurst and Appelo, 1999) are carried out. In addition a series of batch experiments is set up. Modelling approaches by PhreeqC show a thermodynamically possibility in the alkaline range when additional Ca2+ in solution causes dolomite to become more and more undersaturated as calcite gets supersaturated. Interacting ground water is enriched in Ca2+and saturated with respect to gypsum as marine evaporites are found in situ rocks. Furthermore it is more likely that Portlandite (Ca(OH)2) plays a more important role than Na and K in the cement. Portlandite acts as an additional Ca2+ source and is much more abundant than the alkalies. Some interstitial solutions are dominated mainly by Na+ and SO42- and reach concentrations up to 30 g/l TDS. It is believed that solutions can even reach thenardite saturation as efflorescences are found on the tunnel walls. In consequence dolomite solubility increases with increasing ionic strength. pH > 11 further accelerate the process of dedolomitization by the removal

  19. Contemporaneous trachyandesitic and calc-alkaline volcanism of the Huerto Andesite, San Juan Volcanic Field, Colorado, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parat, F.; Dungan, M.A.; Lipman, P.W.

    2005-01-01

    Locally, voluminous andesitic volcanism both preceded and followed large eruptions of silicic ash-flow tuff from many calderas in the San Juan volcanic field. The most voluminous post-collapse lava suite of the central San Juan caldera cluster is the 28 Ma Huerto Andesite, a diverse assemblage erupted from at least 5-6 volcanic centres that were active around the southern margins of the La Garita caldera shortly after eruption of the Fish Canyon Tuff. These andesitic centres are inferred, in part, to represent eruptions of magma that ponded and differentiated within the crust below the La Garita caldera, thereby providing the thermal energy necessary for rejuvenation and remobilization of the Fish Canyon magma body. The multiple Huerto eruptive centres produced two magmatic series that differ in phenocryst mineralogy (hydrous vs anhydrous assemblages), whole-rock major and trace element chemistry and isotopic compositions. Hornblende-bearing lavas from three volcanic centres located close to the southeastern margin of the La Garita caldera (Eagle Mountain - Fourmile Creek, West Fork of the San Juan River, Table Mountain) define a high-K calc-alkaline series (57-65 wt % SiO2) that is oxidized, hydrous and sulphur rich. Trachyandesitic lavas from widely separated centres at Baldy Mountain-Red Lake (western margin), Sugarloaf Mountain (southern margin) and Ribbon Mesa (20 km east of the La Garita caldera) are mutually indistinguishable (55-61 wt % SiO2); they are characterized by higher and more variable concentrations of alkalis and many incompatible trace elements (e.g. Zr, Nb, heavy rare earth elements), and they contain anhydrous phenocryst assemblages (including olivine). These mildly alkaline magmas were less water rich and oxidized than the hornblende-bearing calc-alkaline suite. The same distinctions characterize the voluminous precaldera andesitic lavas of the Conejos Formation, indicating that these contrasting suites are long-term manifestations of San Juan

  20. The importance of the Maillard-metal complexes and their silicates in astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liesch, Patrick J.; Kolb, Vera M.

    2007-09-01

    The Maillard reaction occurs when sugars and amino acids are mixed together in the solid state or in the aqueous solution. Since both amino acids and sugar-like compounds are found on meteorites, we hypothesized that they would also undergo the Maillard reaction. Our recent work supports this idea. We have shown previously that the water-insoluble Maillard products have substantial similarities with the insoluble organic materials from the meteorites. The Maillard organic materials are also part of the desert varnish on Earth, which is a dark, shiny, hard rock coating that contains iron and manganese and is glazed in silicate. Rocks that are similar in appearance to the desert varnish have been observed on the Martian surface. They may also contain the organic materials. We have undertaken study of the interactions between the Maillard products, iron and other metals, and silicates, to elucidate the role of the Maillard products in the chemistry of desert varnish and meteorites. Specifically, we have synthesized a series of the Maillard-metal complexes, and have tested their reactivity towards silicates. We have studied the properties of these Maillard-metal-silicate products by the IR spectroscopy. The astrobiological potential of the Maillard-metal complexes is assessed.

  1. Comment on "Apatite: A new redox proxy for silicic magmas?" [Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 132 (2014) 101-119

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Michael A. W.; Scharrer, Manuel; Ladenburger, Sara; Markl, Gregor

    2016-06-01

    Recently Miles et al. (2014) proposed that a negative correlation between oxygen fugacity (expressed as logfO2 and the Mn content of apatite from a range of intermediate to silicic igneous rocks could be used as an oxybarometer (Eq. (1)).

  2. Chemical Variation of Silicate Mineral Phases in Lunar Feldspathic Granulitic Impactites: Implications for Thermal Histories and Provenances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fincke, E. M.; Ryder, G.

    2001-01-01

    We report on the internal variation and abundances of minor elements of silicate phases in lunar granulitic impactites to assess their thermal histories and the pre-metamorphic provenances of the minerals and the process that assembled the rocks. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  3. Mesoporous Silicate Materials in Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Melde, Brian J.; Johnson, Brandy J.; Charles, Paul T.

    2008-01-01

    Mesoporous silicas, especially those exhibiting ordered pore systems and uniform pore diameters, have shown great potential for sensing applications in recent years. Morphological control grants them versatility in the method of deployment whether as bulk powders, monoliths, thin films, or embedded in coatings. High surface areas and pore sizes greater than 2 nm make them effective as adsorbent coatings for humidity sensors. The pore networks also provide the potential for immobilization of enzymes within the materials. Functionalization of materials by silane grafting or through co-condensation of silicate precursors can be used to provide mesoporous materials with a variety of fluorescent probes as well as surface properties that aid in selective detection of specific analytes. This review will illustrate how mesoporous silicas have been applied to sensing changes in relative humidity, changes in pH, metal cations, toxic industrial compounds, volatile organic compounds, small molecules and ions, nitroenergetic compounds, and biologically relevant molecules.

  4. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-12-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in

  5. Chemistry of Impact-generated Silicate Melt-vapor Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visscher, Channon; Fegley, Bruce, Jr.

    2013-04-01

    In the giant impact theory for lunar origin, the Moon forms from material ejected by the impact into an Earth-orbiting disk. Here we report the initial results from a silicate melt-vapor equilibrium chemistry model for such impact-generated planetary debris disks. In order to simulate the chemical behavior of a two-phase (melt+vapor) disk, we calculate the temperature-dependent pressure and chemical composition of vapor in equilibrium with molten silicate from 2000 to 4000 K. We consider the elements O, Na, K, Fe, Si, Mg, Ca, Al, Ti, and Zn for a range of bulk silicate compositions (Earth, Moon, Mars, eucrite parent body, angrites, and ureilites). In general, the disk atmosphere is dominated by Na, Zn, and O2 at lower temperatures (<3000 K) and SiO, O2, and O at higher temperatures. The high-temperature chemistry is consistent for any silicate melt composition, and we thus expect abundant SiO, O2, and O to be a common feature of hot, impact-generated debris disks. In addition, the saturated silicate vapor is highly oxidizing, with oxygen fugacity (f_O_2) values (and hence H2O/H2 and CO2/CO ratios) several orders of magnitude higher than those in a solar-composition gas. High f_O_2 values in the disk atmosphere are found for any silicate composition because oxygen is the most abundant element in rock. We thus expect high oxygen fugacity to be a ubiquitous feature of any silicate melt-vapor disk produced via collisions between rocky planets.

  6. CHEMISTRY OF IMPACT-GENERATED SILICATE MELT-VAPOR DEBRIS DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Visscher, Channon; Fegley, Bruce Jr.

    2013-04-10

    In the giant impact theory for lunar origin, the Moon forms from material ejected by the impact into an Earth-orbiting disk. Here we report the initial results from a silicate melt-vapor equilibrium chemistry model for such impact-generated planetary debris disks. In order to simulate the chemical behavior of a two-phase (melt+vapor) disk, we calculate the temperature-dependent pressure and chemical composition of vapor in equilibrium with molten silicate from 2000 to 4000 K. We consider the elements O, Na, K, Fe, Si, Mg, Ca, Al, Ti, and Zn for a range of bulk silicate compositions (Earth, Moon, Mars, eucrite parent body, angrites, and ureilites). In general, the disk atmosphere is dominated by Na, Zn, and O{sub 2} at lower temperatures (<3000 K) and SiO, O{sub 2}, and O at higher temperatures. The high-temperature chemistry is consistent for any silicate melt composition, and we thus expect abundant SiO, O{sub 2}, and O to be a common feature of hot, impact-generated debris disks. In addition, the saturated silicate vapor is highly oxidizing, with oxygen fugacity (f{sub O{sub 2}}) values (and hence H{sub 2}O/H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}/CO ratios) several orders of magnitude higher than those in a solar-composition gas. High f{sub O{sub 2}} values in the disk atmosphere are found for any silicate composition because oxygen is the most abundant element in rock. We thus expect high oxygen fugacity to be a ubiquitous feature of any silicate melt-vapor disk produced via collisions between rocky planets.

  7. Petrology and geochemistry of mafic and ultramafic cumulates occurring as xenoliths in volcanic rocks from Polish part of Central European Volcanic Province.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dajek, Michał; Matusiak-Małek, Magdalena; Puziewicz, Jacek; Ntaflos, Theodoros

    2015-04-01

    of diopside, but its mg# is lower than in other rocks (0.68-0.88). It is always LREE enriched and shows negative Eu, Ti and Sr anomalies. Orthopyroxene occurs only in norite from Wilcza Góra. It composition is strongly heterogenous and the mg# vary from 0.60 to 0.75. Fo- and NiO-poor (62-69% and 0.04-0.10 wt.%, respectively) olivine is present in gabbro from Winna Góra. Feldspar is typically plagioclase (An30-60), but in rims the composition grades toward ternary feldspar (Or up to 45%). Plagioclase is LREE enriched and shows strong positive Eu anomaly. It is enriched in Sr and depleted in Zr-Hf. Composition of opaques is similar to that in plagioclase-free rocks. Modelling based on the trace element composition of clinopyroxene suggest that all the studied xenoliths are precipitates from alkaline silicate magmas, usually similar to the host volcanic-rock. Relatively high content of iron in silicates suggest crystallization at crustal depths or at crust/mantle boundary, but ratios between AIV and AlVI in clinopyroxene suggest that plagioclase¬-bearing rocks crystalized in different conditions than pyroxenites (Aoki and Shiba, 1976). Origin of xenoliths from Złotoryja-Jawor Volcanic Complex is different than that of clinopyroxene-rich mafic rocks from Lutynia basanite (Lądek Zdrój Volcanic Complex (Ackerman et al., 2012; J. of Geosciences). This study was possible thanks to the project NCN 2011/03/B/ST10/06248 of Polish National Centre for Science.

  8. Poohbear Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image, taken by Sojourner's front right camera, was taken when the rover was next to Poohbear (rock at left) and Piglet (not seen) as it looked out toward Mermaid Dune. The textures differ from the foreground soil containing a sorted mix of small rocks, fines and clods, from the area a bit ahead of the rover where the surface is covered with a bright drift material. Soil experiments where the rover wheels dug in the soil revealed that the cloudy material exists underneath the drift.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  9. Meridiani Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    16 September 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the complex surfaces of some of the light- and intermediate-toned sedimentary rock exposed by erosion in eastern Sinus Meridiani. Similar rocks occur at the Mars Exploration Rover, Opportunity, site, but they are largely covered by windblown sand and granules. The dark feature with a rayed pattern is the product of a meteor impact.

    Location near: 0.8oN, 355.2oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  10. Terby's Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    25 August 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows light-toned, layered, sedimentary rock outcrops in the crater, Terby. The crater is located on the north rim of Hellas Basin. If one could visit the rocks in Terby, one might learn from them whether they formed in a body of water. It is possible, for example, that Terby was a bay in a larger, Hellas-wide sea.

    Location near: 27.9oS, 285.7oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Winter

  11. White Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    14 November 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a portion of the famous 'White Rock' feature in Pollack Crater in the Sinus Sabaeus region of Mars. The light-toned rock is not really white, but its light tone caught the eye of Mars geologists as far back as 1972, when it was first spotted in images acquired by Mariner 9. The light-toned materials are probably the remains of a suite of layered sediments that once spread completely across the interior of Pollack Crater. Dark materials in this image include sand dunes and large ripples.

    Location near: 8.1oS, 335.1oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Southern Summer

  12. White Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 19 April 2002) The Science 'White Rock' is the unofficial name for this unusual landform which was first observed during the Mariner 9 mission in the early 1970's. As later analysis of additional data sets would show, White Rock is neither white nor dense rock. Its apparent brightness arises from the fact that the material surrounding it is so dark. Images from the Mars Global Surveyor MOC camera revealed dark sand dunes surrounding White Rock and on the floor of the troughs within it. Some of these dunes are just apparent in the THEMIS image. Although there was speculation that the material composing White Rock could be salts from an ancient dry lakebed, spectral data from the MGS TES instrument did not support this claim. Instead, the White Rock deposit may be the erosional remnant of a previously more continuous occurrence of air fall sediments, either volcanic ash or windblown dust. The THEMIS image offers new evidence for the idea that the original deposit covered a larger area. Approximately 10 kilometers to the southeast of the main deposit are some tiny knobs of similarly bright material preserved on the floor of a small crater. Given that the eolian erosion of the main White Rock deposit has produced isolated knobs at its edges, it is reasonable to suspect that the more distant outliers are the remnants of a once continuous deposit that stretched at least to this location. The fact that so little remains of the larger deposit suggests that the material is very easily eroded and simply blows away. The Story Fingers of hard, white rock seem to jut out like icy daggers across a moody Martian surface, but appearances can be deceiving. These bright, jagged features are neither white, nor icy, nor even hard and rocky! So what are they, and why are they so different from the surrounding terrain? Scientists know that you can't always trust what your eyes see alone. You have to use other kinds of science instruments to measure things that our eyes can

  13. The effect of inversion of matrix and inclusions composition in liquation phospho-silicate glasses.

    PubMed

    Sitarz, M

    2011-08-15

    Silico-phosphate glasses of XCaPO(4)-SiO(2) and XCaPO(4)-AlPO(4)-SiO(2) (X=Na(+) and/or K(+)) system have been the subject of the presented investigations. Glasses belonging to those systems are characterized by a liquation phenomenon-spherical amorphous inclusions dispersed in an amorphous matrix. Thorough EDX investigations have shown that introduction of aluminum ions into the structure of phospho-silicate glasses results in inversion of matrix and inclusions composition, when XCaPO(4) exceeds 25-35% mol. Such a substantial influence of aluminum ions on phospho-silicate glasses texture as well as matrix and inclusions composition (inversion) must be a result of structural changes. (27)Al MAS NMR research stated that aluminum ions in structures of XCaPO(4)-AlPO(4)-SiO(2) phospho-silicate glasses always acts as a glass-forming ion-i.e. aluminum always occupies fourfold coordinated sites. (23)Na and (31)P MAS NMR research has shown that the inversion of matrix and inclusions composition, brought about by introduction of aluminum ions into the structure of phospho-silicate glasses, is an outcome of a change in phosphorous and alkaline ions coordination. PMID:20864392

  14. Groundwater geochemistry and identification of hydrogeochemical processes in a hard rock region, Southern India.

    PubMed

    Subramani, T; Rajmohan, N; Elango, L

    2010-03-01

    Hydrogeochemical investigations were carried out in Chithar River basin, Tamil Nadu, India to identify the major geochemical processes that regulate groundwater chemistry. For this study, long-term (1991-1997) and recent water quality data (2001-2002) for 30 groundwater wells spread over the study area were used to understand the groundwater geochemistry and hydrogeochemical process regulating groundwater quality. Groundwater quality data obtained from more than 400 water samples were employed. Results of electrical conductivity and chloride express large variation between minimum and maximum values and high standard deviation, which suggests that the water chemistry in the study region is not homogeneous and influenced by complex contamination sources and geochemical process. Nitrate and depth to water table expose the influences of surface contamination sources, whereas dissolved silica, fluoride and alkalinity strongly suggest the effect of rock-water interaction. In the study region, weathering of carbonate and silicate minerals and ion exchange reactions predominantly regulate major ion chemistry. Besides, the concentrations of sulphate, chloride and nitrate firmly suggest the impact of agricultural activities such as irrigation return flow, fertiliser application, etc on water chemistry in the study region. PMID:19247793

  15. Geomagnetic field strength 3.2 billion years ago recorded by single silicate crystals.

    PubMed

    Tarduno, John A; Cottrell, Rory D; Watkeys, Michael K; Bauch, Dorothy

    2007-04-01

    The strength of the Earth's early geomagnetic field is of importance for understanding the evolution of the Earth's deep interior, surface environment and atmosphere. Palaeomagnetic and palaeointensity data from rocks formed near the boundary of the Proterozoic and Archaean eons, some 2.5 Gyr ago, show many hallmarks of the more recent geomagnetic field. Reversals are recorded, palaeosecular variation data indicate a dipole-dominated morphology and available palaeointensity values are similar to those from younger rocks. The picture before 2.8 Gyr ago is much less clear. Rocks of the Archaean Kaapvaal craton (South Africa) are among the best-preserved, but even they have experienced low-grade metamorphism. The variable acquisition of later magnetizations by these rocks is therefore expected, precluding use of conventional palaeointensity methods. Silicate crystals from igneous rocks, however, can contain minute magnetic inclusions capable of preserving Archaean-age magnetizations. Here we use a CO2 laser heating approach and direct-current SQUID magnetometer measurements to obtain palaeodirections and intensities from single silicate crystals that host magnetite inclusions. We find 3.2-Gyr-old field strengths that are within 50 per cent of the present-day value, indicating that a viable magnetosphere sheltered the early Earth's atmosphere from solar wind erosion. PMID:17410173

  16. Biological and Organic Chemical Decomposition of Silicates. Chapter 7.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverman, M. P.

    1979-01-01

    The weathering of silicate rocks and minerals, an important concern of geologists and geochemists for many years, traditionally has been approached from strictly physical and chemical points of view. Biological effects were either unrecognized, ignored, or were mentioned in passing to account for such phenomena as the accumulation of organic matter in sediments or the generation of reducing environments. A major exception occurred in soil science where agricultural scientists, studying the factors important in the development of soils and their ability to nourish and sustain various crops, laid the foundation for much of what is known of the biological breakdown of silicate rocks and minerals. The advent of the space age accelerated the realization that many environmental problems and geo- chemical processes on Earth can only be understood in terms of ecosystems. This in turn, spurred renewed interest and activity among modem biologists, geologists and soil scientists attempting to unravel the intimate relations between biology and the weathering of silicate rocks and minerals of the earth surface.

  17. Biological and Organic Chemical Decomposition of Silicates. Chapter 7.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliverman, M. P.

    1979-01-01

    The weathering of silicate rocks and minerals, an important concern of geologists and geochemists for many years, traditionally has been approached from strictly physical and chemical points of view. Biological effects were either unrecognized, ignored, or were mentioned in passing to account for such phenomena as the accumulation of organic matter in sediments or the generation of reducing environments. A major exception occurred in soil science where agricultural scientists, studying the factors important in the development of soils and their ability to nourish and sustain various crops, laid the foundation for much of what is known of the biological breakdown of silicate rocks and minerals. The advent of the space age accelerated the realization that many environmental problems and geochemical processes on Earth can only be understood in terms of ecosystems. This in turn, spurred renewed interest and activity among modem biologists, geologists and soil scientists attempting to unravel the intimate relations between biology and the weathering of silicate rocks and minerals of the earth's surface.

  18. CUMULATE ROCKS ASSOCIATED WITH CARBONATE ASSIMILATION, HORTAVÆR COMPLEX, NORTH-CENTRAL NORWAY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, C. G.; Prestvik, T.; Li, Y.

    2009-12-01

    The Hortavær igneous complex intruded high-grade metamorphic rocks of the Caledonian Helgeland Nappe Complex at ca. 466 Ma. The complex is an unusual mafic-silicic layered intrusion (MASLI) because the principal felsic rock type is syenite and because the syenite formed in situ rather than by deep-seated partial melting of crustal rocks. Magma differentiation in the complex was by assimilation, primarily of calc-silicate rocks and melts with contributions from marble and semi-pelites, plus fractional crystallization. The effect of assimilation of calcite-rich rocks was to enhance stability of fassaitic clinopyroxene at the expense of olivine, which resulted in alkali-rich residual melts and lowering of silica activity. This combination of MASLI-style emplacement and carbonate assimilation produced three types of cumulate rocks: (1) Syenitic cumulates formed by liquid-crystal separation. As sheets of mafic magma were loaded on crystal-rich syenitic magma, residual liquid was expelled, penetrating the overlying mafic sheets in flame structures, and leaving a cumulate syenite. (2) Reaction cumulates. Carbonate assimilation, illustrated by a simple assimilation reaction: olivine + calcite + melt = clinopyroxene + CO2 resulted in cpx-rich cumulates such as clinopyroxenite, gabbro, and mela-monzodiorite, many of which contain igneous calcite. (3) Magmatic skarns. Calc-silicate host rocks underwent partial melting during assimilation, yielding a Ca-rich melt as the principal assimilated material and permitting extensive reaction with surrounding magma to form Kspar + cpx + garnet-rich ‘cumulate’ rocks. Cumulate types (2) and (3) do not reflect traditional views of cumulate rocks but instead result from a series of melt-present discontinuous (peritectic) reactions and partial melting of calc-silicate xenoliths. In the Hortavær complex, such cumulates are evident because of the distinctive peritectic cumulate assemblages. It is unclear whether assimilation of

  19. Low-(18)O Silicic Magmas: Why Are They So Rare?

    SciTech Connect

    Balsley, S.D.; Gregory, R.T.

    1998-10-15

    LOW-180 silicic magmas are reported from only a small number of localities (e.g., Yellowstone and Iceland), yet petrologic evidence points to upper crustal assimilation coupled with fractional crystallization (AFC) during magma genesis for nearly all silicic magmas. The rarity of 10W-l `O magmas in intracontinental caldera settings is remarkable given the evidence of intense 10W-l*O meteoric hydrothermal alteration in the subvolcanic remnants of larger caldera systems. In the Platoro caldera complex, regional ignimbrites (150-1000 km3) have plagioclase 6180 values of 6.8 + 0.1%., whereas the Middle Tuff, a small-volume (est. 50-100 km3) post-caldera collapse pyroclastic sequence, has plagioclase 8]80 values between 5.5 and 6.8%o. On average, the plagioclase phenocrysts from the Middle Tuff are depleted by only 0.3%0 relative to those in the regional tuffs. At Yellowstone, small-volume post-caldera collapse intracaldera rhyolites are up to 5.5%o depleted relative to the regional ignimbrites. Two important differences between the Middle Tuff and the Yellowstone 10W-180 rhyolites elucidate the problem. Middle Tuff magmas reached water saturation and erupted explosively, whereas most of the 10W-l 80 Yellowstone rhyolites erupted effusively as domes or flows, and are nearly devoid of hydrous phenocrysts. Comparing the two eruptive types indicates that assimilation of 10W-180 material, combined with fractional crystallization, drives silicic melts to water oversaturation. Water saturated magmas either erupt explosively or quench as subsurface porphyrins bejiire the magmatic 180 can be dramatically lowered. Partial melting of low- 180 subvolcanic rocks by near-anhydrous magmas at Yellowstone produced small- volume, 10W-180 magmas directly, thereby circumventing the water saturation barrier encountered through normal AFC processes.

  20. Authigenic Mineralization of Silicates at the Organic-water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEvoy, B.; Wallace, A. F.

    2015-12-01

    It is relatively common for some fraction of organic material to be preserved in the sedimentary rock record as disseminated molecular fragments. The survival of wholly coherent tissues from primarily soft-bodied organisms is far more unusual. However, the literature is now well- populated with spectacular examples of soft-tissue preservation ranging from a 2,600 year old human brain to the tissues of the Ediacaran biota that have survived ~600 million years. Some of the most exceptional examples of soft tissue preservation are from the Proterozoic-Cambrian transition, however, nearly all modes of fossil preservation during this time are debated. Clay mineral templates have been implicated as playing a role in several types of soft tissue preservation, including Burgess Shale and Beecher's Trilobite-type preservation, and more recently, Bitter Springs-type silicification. Yet, there is still much debate over whether these clay mineral coatings form during early stage burial and diagenesis, or later stage metamorphism. This research addresses this question by using in situ fluid cell Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to investigate the nucleation and growth of silicate minerals on model biological surfaces. Herein we present preliminary results on the deposition of hydrous magnesium silicates on self-assembled monolayers (-OH, -COOH, -CH3, and -H2PO3 terminated surfaces) at ambient conditions.

  1. Boron in chert and Precambrian siliceous iron formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truscott, Marilyn G.; Shaw, Denis M.

    1984-11-01

    In order to assess the importance of siliceous sediments as a sink for oceanic B and to determine the effect of diagenesis on the mobilization of B, samples were analysed from chert nodules, bedded cherts, and siliceous banded iron formations from a variety of sedimentary environments and geologic ages. Boron analyses on bulk samples were made by prompt gamma neutron activation analysis. The distribution of B in rocks was mapped using α-track methods. Nodular Phanerozoic cherts typically contain 50-150 ppm B, and bedded cherts somewhat less. The B is initially concentrated in tests of silica-secreting organisms, but some is lost in early diagenesis as silica progressively recrystallises to quartz. Banded iron formation silica of Archean and Proterozoic age usually contains < 2 ppm B. This conforms with the view that such silica is not of biogenic origin but, since many iron formations are undoubtedly of marine origin, raises the question whether Precambrian oceans were impoverished in B. Analyses of Precambrian marine argillaceous sediments, averaging 70 ppm B, do not resolve this question.

  2. Iron-magnesium silicate bioweathering on Earth (and Mars?).

    PubMed

    Fisk, M R; Popa, R; Mason, O U; Storrie-Lombardi, M C; Vicenzi, E P

    2006-02-01

    We examined the common, iron-magnesium silicate minerals olivine and pyroxene in basalt and in mantle rocks to determine if they exhibit textures similar to bioweathering textures found in glass. Our results show that weathering in olivine may occur as long, narrow tunnels (1-3 microm in diameter and up to 100 microm long) and as larger irregular galleries, both of which have distinctive characteristics consistent with biological activity. These weathering textures are associated with clay mineral by-products and nucleic acids. We also examined olivine and pyroxene in martian meteorites, some of which experienced preterrestrial aqueous alteration. Some olivines and pyroxenes in the martian meteorite Nakhla were found to contain tunnels that are similar in size and shape to tunnels in terrestrial iron-magnesium silicates that contain nucleic acids. Though the tunnels found in Nakhla are similar to the biosignatures found in terrestrial minerals, their presence cannot be used to prove that the martian alteration features had a biogenic origin. The abundance and wide distribution of olivine and pyroxene on Earth and in the Solar System make bioweathering features in these minerals potentially important new biosignatures that may play a significant role in evaluating whether life ever existed on Mars. PMID:16551226

  3. Alkali Silicate Vehicle Forms Durable, Fireproof Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutt, John B.; Seindenberg, Benjamin

    1964-01-01

    The problem: To develop a paint for use on satellites or space vehicles that exhibits high resistance to cracking, peeling, or flaking when subjected to a wide range of temperatures. Organic coatings will partially meet the required specifications but have the inherent disadvantage of combustibility. Alkali-silicate binders, used in some industrial coatings and adhesives, show evidence of forming a fireproof paint, but the problem of high surface-tension, a characteristic of alkali silicates, has not been resolved. The solution: Use of a suitable non-ionic wetting agent combined with a paint incorporating alkali silicate as the binder.

  4. Optical and microhardness measurement of lead silicate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jogad, Rashmi M.; Kumar, Rakesh; Krishna, P. S. R.; Jogad, M. S.; Kothiyal, G. P.; Mathad, R. D.

    2013-02-01

    Lead silicate glasses, PbO-SiO2, are interesting because these glasses exhibit thermal, optical, and mechanical properties different than other silicate glasses, and they form a thermally and chemically stable glass over a wide composition range. They are also interesting as PbO acts as glass modifier and as glass former depending on the concentration. In the present work we have prepared lead silicate glasses (xPbO-(1-x).SiO2) by melt quenching. We measured UV absorbance, Vickers hardness, and glass transition for these samples. It is found that band gap is proportional to glass transition.

  5. Late Cretaceous intraplate silicic volcanism in the Lake Chad region: incipient continental rift volcanism vs. Cameroon Line volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shellnutt, G.; Lee, T. Y.; Torng, P. K.; Yang, C. C.

    2015-12-01

    The crustal evolution of west-central Africa during the Cretaceous was directly related to plate motion associated with the opening of the central Atlantic Ocean. Late Cretaceous (~66 Ma) to recent magmatism related to the Cameroon Line stretches from Northern Cameroon (i.e. Golda Zuelva) to the Gulf of Guinea (i.e. Pagalu) and is considered to be due to mantle-crust interaction. The volcanic rocks at Hadjer el Khamis, west-central Chad, are considered to be amongst the oldest volcanic rocks of the Cameroon Line but their relationship is uncertain because they erupted during a period of a regional extension associated with the opening of the Late Cretaceous (~75 Ma) Termit basin. The silicic volcanic rocks can be divided into a peraluminous group and a peralkaline group with both rock types having similar chemical characteristics as within-plate granitoids. In situ U/Pb zircon dating yielded a mean 206Pb/238U age of 74.4 ± 1.3 Ma and indicates the rocks erupted ~10 million years before the next oldest eruption attributed to the Cameroon Line. The Sr isotopes (i.e. ISr = 0.7050 to 0.7143) show a wide range but the Nd isotopes (i.e. 143Nd/144Ndi = 0.51268 to 0.51271) are more uniform and indicate that the rocks were derived from a moderately depleted mantle source. Major and trace elemental modeling show that the silicic rocks likely formed by shallow fractionation of a mafic parental magma where the peraluminous rocks experienced crustal contamination and the peralkaline rocks did not. The silicic rocks are more isotopically similar to Late Cretaceous basalts in the Doba and Bongor basins (i.e. ISr = 0.7040 to 0.7060; 143Nd/144Ndi = 0.51267 to 0.51277) of southern Chad than to rocks of the Cameroon Line (i.e. ISr = 0.7026 to 0.7038; 143Nd/144Ndi = 0.51270 to 0.51300). Given the age and isotopic compositions, it is likely that the silicic volcanic rocks of the Lake Chad area are related to Late Cretaceous extensional tectonics rather than to Cameroon Line magmatism.

  6. Low Velocity Sphere Impact of a Soda Lime Silicate Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Wereszczak, Andrew A; Fox, Ethan E; Morrissey, Timothy G; Vuono, Daniel J

    2011-10-01

    This report summarizes TARDEC-sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the FY11 involving low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) ball impact testing of Starphire soda lime silicate glass. The intent was to better understand low velocity impact response in the Starphire for sphere densities that bracketed that of rock. Five sphere materials were used: borosilicate glass, soda-lime silicate glass, steel, silicon nitride, and alumina. A gas gun was fabricated to produce controlled velocity delivery of the spheres against Starphire tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the Starphire were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between the any of the five sphere-Starphire-target combinations. The primary observations from this low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) testing were: (1) Frictional effects contribute to fracture initiation. (2) Spheres with a lower elastic modulus require less force to initiate fracture in the Starphire than spheres with a higher elastic modulus. (3) Contact-induced fracture did not initiate in the Starphire SLS for impact kinetic energies < 150 mJ. Fracture sometimes initiated or kinetic energies between {approx} 150-1100 mJ; however, it tended to occur when lower elastic modulus spheres were impacting it. Contact-induced fracture would always occur for impact energies > 1100 mJ. (4) The force necessary to initiate contact-induced fracture is higher under dynamic or impact conditions than it is under quasi-static indentation conditions. (5) Among the five used sphere materials, silicon nitride was the closest match to 'rock' in terms of both density and (probably) elastic modulus.

  7. Alkaline flood prediction studies, Ranger VII pilot, Wilmington Field, California

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, E.H.; Breit, V.S.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses the design of a simulator to model alkaline displacement mechanisms, along with the current understanding of in-situ caustic consumption. Assimilation of laboratory coreflood and rock consumption data, and their use in one- and two-dimensional (1D and 2D) limited area simulations and in three-dimensional (3D) models of the entire pilot project are given. This paper also reports simulation studies of alkaline flood behavior in a small 2D area of a field for various concentrations, slug sizes, long-term consumption functions, and two relative-permeability adjustment mechanisms. The scale-up of 2D simulation results and their use in a 271-acre (1096.7-ha), seven-layered, 3D model of the pilot are also discussed and 3D simulator results are compared with initial field alkaline flood performance. Finally, recommended additional applications of the simulator methods developed in this pilot and in other alkaline floods are discussed.

  8. Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    6 November 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows outcrops of sedimentary rocks in a crater located just north of the Sinus Meridiani region. Perhaps the crater was once the site of a martian lake.

    Location near: 2.9oN, 359.0oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  9. Thermal Inertia of Rocks and Rock Populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golombek, M. P.; Jakosky, B. M.; Mellon, M. T.

    2001-01-01

    The effective thermal inertia of rock populations on Mars and Earth is derived from a model of effective inertia versus rock diameter. Results allow a parameterization of the effective rock inertia versus rock abundance and bulk and fine component inertia. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. New insights on the occurrence of peperites and sedimentary deposits within the silicic volcanic sequences of the Paraná Magmatic Province, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchetti, A. C. F.; Nardy, A. J. R.; Machado, F. B.; Madeira, J. E. O.; Arnosio, J. M.

    2014-03-01

    The PMP (Paraná Magmatic Province) is characterized by lava flows of the Early Cretaceous Serra Geral Formation which covers about 75% of the Paraná Basin (southern and southeastern Brazil), composed of a thick (up to 1600 m) volcanic sequence formed by a succession of petrographically and geochemically distinct units of basic and silicic composition. The whole package must have been emplaced during approximately 3 million years of nearly uninterrupted activity. A few aeolian sandstone layers, indicating arid environmental conditions (the Botucatu Formation), are interlayered in the lower basalts. Above the basalts, the Palmas and Chapecó Members are composed of silicic volcanic rocks (quartz latites, dacites, rhyodacites and rhyolites) and basalts. This paper presents new evidence of sedimentation episodes separating silicic volcanic events, expressed by the occurrence of sedimentary deposits. Interaction between the volcanic bodies and the coeval unconsolidated sediments formed peperites. The sediments were observed between basaltic lava flows and silicic rocks or interlayered in the Palmas-type rocks, between the Chapecó-type rocks and overlying basaltic flows, between silicic bodies of the Palmas and Chapecó types, and interlayered within Palmas-type units. The observed structures indicate that the sediments were still wet and unconsolidated, or weakly consolidated, at the time of volcanism, which, coupled with the sediment features, reflect environmental conditions that are different from those characterizing the Botucatu arid conditions.

  11. Novel refractory alkaline earth silicate sealing glasses for planar solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

    2007-07-01

    A novel “refractory” Sr-Ca-Y-B-Si sealing glass (glass-ceramic) was developed for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The objective was to develop sealing glass with desired thermal properties and minimal interfacial reactions with SOFC components, ceramic electrolyte and metallic interconnect. The current glass was different from conventional sealing glass in that the sealing temperatures were targeted higher (>950 degree C) and hence more refractory. Six glasses were formulated and made by conventional glass-making process. Thermal properties were characterized in the glass state and the sintered (crystallized) state. The effect of formulation on thermal properties was discussed. Candidate glasses were also aged for 1000 to 2000 h at elevated temperatures. Thermal expansion measurements showed minimal change after aging. A candidate glass (YSO-1) was used in sealing ceramic electrolyte to a metallic interconnect from 900 degree C to 1050 degree C in air. The interfacial microstructure was characterized and SrCrO4 was identified near the metal interface. Possible reaction mechanism for the chromate formation was discussed.

  12. Silicate production and availability for mineral carbonation.

    PubMed

    Renforth, P; Washbourne, C-L; Taylder, J; Manning, D A C

    2011-03-15

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide sequestered as carbonates through the accelerated weathering of silicate minerals is proposed as a climate change mitigation technology with the potential to capture billions of tonnes of carbon per year. Although these materials can be mined expressly for carbonation, they are also produced by human activities (cement, iron and steel making, coal combustion, etc.). Despite their potential, there is poor global accounting of silicates produced in this way. This paper presents production estimates (by proxy) of various silicate materials including aggregate and mine waste, cement kiln dust, construction and demolition waste, iron and steel slag, and fuel ash. Approximately 7-17 billion tonnes are produced globally each year with an approximate annual sequestration potential of 190-332 million tonnes C. These estimates provide justification for additional research to accurately quantify the contemporary production of silicate minerals and to determine the location and carbon capture potential of historic material accumulations. PMID:21332128

  13. Rock Driller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Thomas M.

    2001-01-01

    The next series of planetary exploration missions require a method of extracting rock and soil core samples. Therefore a prototype ultrasonic core driller (UTCD) was developed to meet the constraints of Small Bodies Exploration and Mars Sample Return Missions. The constraints in the design are size, weight, power, and axial loading. The ultrasonic transducer requires a relatively low axial load, which is one of the reasons this technology was chosen. The ultrasonic generator breadboard section can be contained within the 5x5x3 limits and weighs less than two pounds. Based on results attained the objectives for the first phase were achieved. A number of transducer probes were made and tested. One version only drills, and the other will actually provide a small core from a rock. Because of a more efficient transducer/probe, it will run at very low power (less than 5 Watts) and still drill/core. The prototype generator was built to allow for variation of all the performance-effecting elements of the transducer/probe/end effector, i.e., pulse, duty cycle, frequency, etc. The heart of the circuitry is what will be converted to a surface mounted board for the next phase, after all the parameters have been optimized and the microprocessor feedback can be installed.

  14. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Silicate Vaporization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Costa, Gustavo C. C.

    2015-01-01

    Silicates are a common class of materials that are often exposed to high temperatures. The behavior of these materials needs to be understood for applications as high temperature coatings in material science as well as the constituents of lava for geological considerations. The vaporization behavior of these materials is an important aspect of their high temperature behavior and it also provides fundamental thermodynamic data. The application of Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry (KEMS) to silicates is discussed. There are several special considerations for silicates. The first is selection of an appropriate cell material, which is either nearly inert or has well-understood interactions with the silicate. The second consideration is proper measurement of the low vapor pressures. This can be circumvented by using a reducing agent to boost the vapor pressure without changing the solid composition or by working at very high temperatures. The third consideration deals with kinetic barriers to vaporization. The measurement of these barriers, as encompassed in a vaporization coefficient, is discussed. Current measured data of rare earth silicates for high temperature coating applications are discussed. In addition, data on magnesium-iron-silicates (olivine) are presented and discussed.

  15. Silicate complexes of sugars in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Joseph B; Lu, Gang; Singer, Stephanie R; Kolb, Vera M

    2004-08-11

    Certain sugars react readily with basic silicic acid to form soluble 2/1 (sugar/silicic acid) silicate complexes. Failure of monohydroxy compounds to give soluble products under these conditions indicates that the sugar silicates are chelates: five-membered diolato rings. Only furanose forms react. Pyranose sugars are stable under these conditions. Because all glycosides fail to react with silicic acid under these conditions, reaction appears to involve the anomeric position (C1 in aldoses, C2 in ketoses), which has a more acidic hydroxy group. Reaction is completed only when the anomeric hydroxy group is cis to an adjacent hydroxy group. The appropriate furanose form must have sufficient natural abundance and solubility to provide an observable product, as measured by (29)Si and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. These structural and practical constraints rationalize the successful reaction of the monosaccharides ribose, xylose, lyxose, talose, psicose, fructose, sorbose, and tagatose and the disaccharides lactulose, maltulose, and palatinose. Glucose, mannose, galactose, and sucrose, among others, failed to form complexes. This high selectivity for formation of sugar silicates may have ramifications in prebiotic chemistry. PMID:15291565

  16. Simultaneous sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide removal by calcium hydroxide and calcium silicate solids.

    PubMed

    Nelli, C H; Rochelle, G T

    1998-09-01

    At conditions typical of a bag filter exposed to a coal-fired flue gas that has been adiabatically cooled with water, calcium hydroxide and calcium silicate solids were exposed to a dilute, humidified gas stream of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) in a packed-bed reactor. A prior study found that NO2 reacted readily with surface water of alkaline and non-alkaline solids to produce nitrate, nitrite, and nitric oxide (NO). With SO2 present in the gas stream, NO2 also reacted with S(IV), a product of SO2 removal, on the exterior of an alkaline solid. The oxidation of S(IV) to S(VI) by oxygen reduced the availability of S(IV) and lowered removal of NO2. Subsequent acidification of the sorbent by the removal of NO2 and SO2 facilitated the production of NO. However, the conversion of nitrous acid to sulfur-nitrogen compounds reduced NO production and enhanced SO2 removal. A reactor model based on empirical and semi-empirical rate expressions predicted rates of SO2 removal, NO2 removal, and NO production by calcium silicate solids. Rate expressions from the reactor model were inserted into a second program, which predicted the removal of SO2 and NOx by a continuous process, such as the collection of alkaline solids in a baghouse. The continuous process model, depending upon inlet conditions, predicted 30-40% removal for NOx and 50-90% removal for SO2. These results are relevant to dry scrubbing technology for combined SO2 and NOx removal that first oxidizes NO to NO2 by the addition of methanol into the flue duct. PMID:9775761

  17. Co-eruption of carbonate and silicate magmas during volcanism in the Limagne graben (French Massif Central)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chazot, Gilles; Mergoil-Daniel, Juliette

    2012-12-01

    Peperites in the Limagne graben (French Massif Central) have been interpreted up to now as phreatomagmatic eruptions involving fragmentation of sedimentary rocks during magma-water interaction. We report about the possible magmatic origin of the carbonates involved in the peperites from Gergovie and Pileyre localities. In these two volcanic deposits, carbonates are manly dolomitic in composition, while the Limagne sediments are almost exclusively detrital formations or limestones. In the studied rocks, the carbonates can be found in different habits, but are sometimes closely associated with Cr-diopsides and Cr-spinels, minerals never found in the Limagne Miocene volcanic rocks and related to deep mantle processes. Dykes crosscutting the layered deposits are mainly composed of euhedral dolomite grains. Trace elements and Sr isotopes confirm that the carbonates are chemically different compared to the sedimentary rocks from the Limagne and therefore that the studied volcanic rocks are not a mixing between silicate magma and the local sediments. Based on our new petrological and geochemical data, we interpret these carbonates as evidence for the eruption of carbonatitic magmas associated with the silicate magmas found in the deposits. The high Sr isotopic ratios of these rocks imply the melting of an enriched metasomatised mantle for the source of the carbonates, as already advocated for many ultrapotassic or carbonatitic volcanic rocks in Europe. These results call for a reappraisal of the origin of the volcanism in the Limagne volcanic province and more generally of the carbonatitic volcanic provinces in Western Europe.

  18. Mineral potential for incompatible element deposits hosted in pegmatites, alkaline rocks, and carbonatites in the Islamic Republic of Mauritania (phase V, deliverable 87): Chapter Q in Second projet de renforcement institutionnel du secteur minier de la République Islamique de Mauritanie (PRISM-II)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Cliff D.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2015-01-01

    USGS review of PRISM-I data suggests that there is abundant documentation of the Bou Naga alkaline complex and to a lesser degree, the Guelb er Richat carbonatite complex, but that all other occurrences of U, Th, REE, and associated elements are poorly described, and poorly understood (Taylor, 2007)

  19. Petrology and physical conditions of metamorphism of calcsilicate rocks from low- to high-grade transition area, Dharmapuri District, Tamil Nadu

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayana, B. L.; Natarajan, R.; Govil, P. K.

    1988-01-01

    Calc-silicate rocks comprising quartz, plagioclase, diopside, sphene, scapolite, grossularite-andradite and wollastonite occur as lensoid enclaves within the greasy migmatitic and charnockitic gneisses of the Archaean amphibolite- to granulite-facies transition zone in Dharmapuri district, Tamil Nadu. The calc-silicate rocks are characterized by the absence of K-feldspar and primary calcite, presence of large modal quartz and plagioclase and formation of secondary garnet and zoisite rims around scapolite and wollastonite. The mineral distributions suggest compositional layering. The chemical composition and mineralogy of the calc-silicate rocks indicate that they were derived from impure silica-rich calcareous sediments whose composition is similar to that of pelite-limestone mixtures. From the mineral assemblages the temperature, pressure and fluid composition during metamorphism were estimated. The observed mineral reaction sequences require a range of X sub CO2 values demonstrating that an initially CO2-rich metamorphic fluid evolved with time towards considerably more H2O-rich compositions. These variations in fluid composition suggest that there were sources of water-rich fluids external to the calc-silicate rocks and that mixing of these fluids with those of calc-silicate rocks was important in controlling fluid composition in calc-silicate rocks and some adjacent rock types as well.

  20. Preparation of magnetic carbon nanotubes with hierarchical copper silicate nanostructure for efficient adsorption and removal of hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min; Wang, Yongtao; Zhang, Yanwei; Ding, Lei; Zheng, Jing; Xu, Jingli

    2016-07-01

    The controllable synthesis of materials with the desired structure and dimensionality is of great significance in material science. In this work, the hierarchical CNTs/Fe3O4@copper silicate (CNTs/Fe3O4@CuSilicate) composites were synthesized via a simple chemical conversion route by using CNTs/Fe3O4@SiO2 nanocables as template. Firstly, magnetic CNTs composites (CNTs/Fe3O4) were synthesized by the high temperature decomposition process using the iron acetylacetonate as raw materials. Then a layer of SiO2 can be easily coated on the magnetic CNTs by the stöber method, which were then converted into CNTs/Fe3O4@CuSilicate composites by hydrothermal reaction between the silica shell and copper ions in alkaline solution. The resulting CNTs/Fe3O4@CuSilicate composites hold merits such as magnetic responsivity, good dispersibility, and large specific surface area. Moreover, the CNTs/Fe3O4@copper silicate composites have strong affinity toward bovine hemoglobin (BHb), which were successfully applied to convenient, efficient, and fast removal of abundant proteins (HHb and HSA) in human blood.

  1. A framework for predicting global silicate weathering and CO2 drawdown rates over geologic time-scales.

    PubMed

    Hilley, George E; Porder, Stephen

    2008-11-01

    Global silicate weathering drives long-time-scale fluctuations in atmospheric CO(2). While tectonics, climate, and rock-type influence silicate weathering, it is unclear how these factors combine to drive global rates. Here, we explore whether local erosion rates, GCM-derived dust fluxes, temperature, and water balance can capture global variation in silicate weathering. Our spatially explicit approach predicts 1.9-4.6 x 10(13) mols of Si weathered globally per year, within a factor of 4-10 of estimates of global silicate fluxes derived from riverine measurements. Similarly, our watershed-based estimates are within a factor of 4-18 (mean of 5.3) of the silica fluxes measured in the world's ten largest rivers. Eighty percent of total global silicate weathering product traveling as dissolved load occurs within a narrow range (0.01-0.5 mm/year) of erosion rates. Assuming each mol of Mg or Ca reacts with 1 mol of CO(2), 1.5-3.3 x 10(8) tons/year of CO(2) is consumed by silicate weathering, consistent with previously published estimates. Approximately 50% of this drawdown occurs in the world's active mountain belts, emphasizing the importance of tectonic regulation of global climate over geologic timescales. PMID:18952842

  2. A framework for predicting global silicate weathering and CO2 drawdown rates over geologic time-scales

    PubMed Central

    Hilley, George E.; Porder, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Global silicate weathering drives long-time-scale fluctuations in atmospheric CO2. While tectonics, climate, and rock-type influence silicate weathering, it is unclear how these factors combine to drive global rates. Here, we explore whether local erosion rates, GCM-derived dust fluxes, temperature, and water balance can capture global variation in silicate weathering. Our spatially explicit approach predicts 1.9–4.6 × 1013 mols of Si weathered globally per year, within a factor of 4–10 of estimates of global silicate fluxes derived from riverine measurements. Similarly, our watershed-based estimates are within a factor of 4–18 (mean of 5.3) of the silica fluxes measured in the world's ten largest rivers. Eighty percent of total global silicate weathering product traveling as dissolved load occurs within a narrow range (0.01–0.5 mm/year) of erosion rates. Assuming each mol of Mg or Ca reacts with 1 mol of CO2, 1.5–3.3 × 108 tons/year of CO2 is consumed by silicate weathering, consistent with previously published estimates. Approximately 50% of this drawdown occurs in the world's active mountain belts, emphasizing the importance of tectonic regulation of global climate over geologic timescales. PMID:18952842

  3. Genesis of post-collisional calc-alkaline and alkaline granitoids in Qiman Tagh, East Kunlun, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Miao; Feng, Chengyou; Zhao, Yiming; Li, Daxin

    2015-12-01

    The post-collisional magmatism of Qiman Tagh is characterized by the intrusion of voluminous intermediate to felsic granitoids, including syenogranite, monzogranite, granodiorite, tonalite and diorite. The granitoids can be divided into two magmatic suites: Calc-alkaline (CA) and alkaline (Alk), which were emplaced from ~ 236 Ma to ~ 204 Ma. The CA suite contains metaluminous granodiorites and monzogranites. Typical Qiman Tagh CA granodiorites show moderately fractionated REE patterns ((La/Yb)N = 4.35-25.11) with significant negative Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu* = 0.54-1.34), and the primitive mantle-normalized spidergrams show strong depletion of Nb and Sr. The Qiman Tagh CA monzogranites show similar fractionated REE patterns ((La/Yb)N = 2.70-13.5) with less prominent negative Eu anomalies, and the chondrite-normalized spidergrams show strongly depleted Ba, Nb and Sr. The Alk suite, including syenogranite, is highly potassic (K2O/Na2O = 1.09-3.56) and peraluminous (A/CNK = 0.91-1.06). Compared to typical Qiman Tagh CA granodiorites, the Qiman Tagh Alk granitoids can be distinguished by their higher Rb, Nb, Ga/Al, FeO*/MgO, Y/Sr and Rb/Sr, as well as their lower Mg#, MgO, CaO, Al2O3, Sr, Co, V, Eu/Eu*, Ba/Nb, La/Nb, Ba/La and Ce/Nb. The Qiman Tagh CA rocks were most likely to be derived from the partial melting of garnet-amphibolite-facies rocks in the lower crust, leaving behind anhydrous granulite-facies rocks with plagioclase and garnet in the residue. The Alk rocks may have formed by the continued partial melting of granulite-facies rocks at elevated temperatures (> 830 °C).

  4. A Microscopic View of Mass Transport in Silicate Melts by Quasielastic Neutron Scattering and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Andreas; Kargl, Florian; Horbach, Jürgen

    The application of quasielastic neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulation to the study of mass transport in silicate melts is outlined. It is shown how the knowledge of atomic dynamics and structure reveals the mechanisms of mass transport. Peculiar properties of atomic diffusion and viscous flow behaviour as a function of melt composition are discussed in terms of the formation of alkali diffusion channels in the static structure. This non-homogeneous distribution of alkali ions in a disrupted tetrahedral Si-O network is investigated in binary lithium, sodium and potassium silicate melts and in ternary sodium aluminosilicates and sodium ironsilicates representing the main compositions of natural volcanic rocks.

  5. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and the Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-12-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding froin swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in

  6. Steps toward interstellar silicate dust mineralogy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorschner, J.; Guertler, J.; Henning, TH.

    1989-01-01

    One of the most certain facts on interstellar dust is that it contains grains with silicon oxygen tetrahedra (SOT), the internal vibrations of which cause the well known silicate bands at 10 and 18 microns. The broad and almost structureless appearance of them demonstrates lack of translation symmetry in these solids that must be considered amorphous or glassy silicates. There is no direct information on the cations in these interstellar silicates and on the number of bridging oxygens per tetrahedron (NBO). Comparing experimental results gained on amorphous silicates, e.g., silicate glasses, of cosmically most abundant metals (Mg, Fe, Ca, Al) with the observations is the only way to investigate interstellar silicate dust mineralogy (cf, Dorschner and Henning, 1986). At Jena University Observatory IR spectra of submicrometer-sized grains of pyroxene glasses (SSG) were studied. Pyroxenes are common minerals in asteroids, meteorites, interplanetary, and supposedly also cometary dust particles. Pyroxenes consist of linearly connected SOT (NBO=2). In the vitreous state reached by quenching melted minerals, the SOT remain nearly undistorted (Si-O bond length unchanged); the Si-O-Si angles at the bridging oxygens of pyroxenes, however, scatter statistically. Therefore, the original cation oxygen symmetry of the crystal (octahedral and hexahedral coordination by O) is completely lost. The blended bands at 10 and 18 microns lose their diagnostic differences and become broad and structureless. This illustrates best the basic problem of interstellar silicate mineral diagnostics. Optical data of glasses of enstatite, bronzite, hypersthene, diopside, salite, and hedenbergite have been derived. Results of enstatite (E), bronzite (B), and hypersthene (H) show very good agreement with the observed silicate features in the IR spectra of evolutionarily young objects that show P-type silicate signature according to the classification by Gurtler and Henning (1986). Compositional

  7. Complex interaction of aluminous metasedimentary xenoliths and siliceous magma; an example from Mt. Amiata (Central Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Bergen, Manfred J.; Barton, Michael

    1984-12-01

    Aluminous, silica-deficient metasedimentary xenoliths in siliceous lavas of Mt. Amiata have preserved composite zoning-patterns indicative for complex processes of magma-rock interaction. Petrographic observations and small-scale mineralogical and chemical differences between up to five distinct zones (including the core and envelope of lava) provide evidence that: 1. Partial melt formed in and extracted from the xenoliths was more mafic than the host magma and had a Mg/Fe ratio higher than that of the restite, at least during the peak of thermometamorphism. 2. Liquid-state interdiffusion occurred at the interface between partial melt and the enclosing magma. 3. Certain mineral phases in the restite (notably, hercynitic spinel) became unstable in the presence of a siliceous liquid. Quartz-poor muscovite-biotite schists are considered to be the most likely parent rocks and it is believed that release of volatiles from decomposing micas played a significant role in the high-temperature metamorphic evolution of the xenoliths and their interaction with the magma. The conditions favourable for assimilation were enhanced by injection of mafic magma into the magma chamber. Although this concurrent operation of magma-mixing precludes a quantitative estimate of contamination from the wall-rocks (which was probably of minor importance) the present example indicates that dry acid magma may potentially become more mafic by interaction with partially melted hydrous rocks.

  8. RECLAMATION OF ALKALINE ASH PILES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the study was to develop methods for reclaiming ash disposal piles for the ultimate use as agricultural or forest lands. The ashes studied were strongly alkaline and contained considerable amounts of salts and toxic boron. The ashes were produced from burning bit...

  9. Mount St. Augustine volcano fumarole wall rock alteration: Mineralogy, zoning, composition and numerical models of its formation process

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Getahun, A.; Reed, M.H.; Symonds, R.

    1996-01-01

    Intensely altered wall rock was collected from high-temperature (640??C) and low-temperature (375??C) vents at Augustine volcano in July 1989. The high-temperature altered rock exhibits distinct mineral zoning differentiated by color bands. In order of decreasing temperature, the color bands and their mineral assemblages are: (a) white to grey (tridymite-anhydrite); (b) pink to red (tridymite-hematite-Fe hydroxide-molysite (FeCl3) with minor amounts of anhydrite and halite); and (c) dark green to green (anhydrite-halite-sylvite-tridymite with minor amounts of molysite, soda and potash alum, and other sodium and potassium sulfates). The alteration products around the low-temperature vents are dominantly cristobalite and amorphous silica with minor potash and soda alum, aphthitalite, alunogen and anhydrite. Compared to fresh 1986 Augustine lava, the altered rocks exhibit enrichments in silica, base metals, halogens and sulfur and show very strong depletions in Al in all alteration zones and in iron, alkali and alkaline earth elements in some of the alteration zones. To help understand the origins of the mineral assemblages in altered Augustine rocks, we applied the thermochemical modeling program, GASWORKS, in calculations of: (a) reaction of the 1987 and 1989 gases with wall rock at 640 and 375??C; (b) cooling of the 1987 gas from 870 to 100??C with and without mineral fractionation; (c) cooling of the 1989 gas from 757 to 100??C with and without mineral fractionation; and (d) mixing of the 1987 and 1989 gases with air. The 640??C gas-rock reaction produces an assemblage consisting of silicates (tridymite, albite, diopside, sanidine and andalusite), oxides (magnetite and hercynite) and sulfides (bornite, chalcocite, molybdenite and sphalerite). The 375??C gas-rock reaction produces dominantly silicates (quartz, albite, andalusite, microcline, cordierite, anorthite and tremolite) and subordinate amounts of sulfides (pyrite, chalcocite and wurtzite), oxides (magnetite

  10. The Martian ocean: First acid, then alkaline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, M. W.

    1992-01-01

    In Mars' distant past, carbon dioxide and water may have been plentiful. Values of total outgassed CO2 from several to about 10 bar are consistent with present knowledge, and this amount of CO2 implies an amount of water outgassed equal to an equivalent depth of 500 to 1000 m. It is quite reasonable, therefore, to envision an early Mars in which there was a body or bodies of liquid water, perhaps in the northern plains, and a dense carbon dioxide atmosphere. Under such conditions, the pH of the water will be low, due to the dissolution of carbon dioxide in the water to form carbonic acid. This acidic water is capable of weathering the available rock quite intensely, particularly because this rock is likely to be heavily fractured (from meteorite bombardment) or even consist of fine particles (such as pyroclastic deposits). As time goes on, however, the carbon dioxide atmosphere will rapidly pass through the ocean to form carbonate deposits. As the density of the atmosphere decreases, so will the flux of carbonic acid into the ocean. Without this input of carbonic acid, the effect of the dissolved weathering products will be to increase the pH of the water. The ocean will then become alkaline. To study this process, I have developed a geochemical cycle model for the atmosphere-hydrosphere-regolith system of Mars. The treatment of geochemical cycles as complex kinetic chemical reactions has been undertaken for terrestrial systems in recent years with much success. This method is capable of elegantly handling the interactions between the simultaneous chemical reactions needed to understand such a system.

  11. The basis for the spectral behaviour of silicates in the thermal infrared and applications to remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, L. S.; Salisbury, J. W.

    1988-01-01

    Variations in the thermal infrared (TIR) spectral response of silicate rocks is related to changes in the structures and divalent cation contents of the minerals which form the rocks. These considerations lead to a chemical parameter, SCFM, which reflects mineral structures, rock types, and their spectra. The parameter is the ratio of silica to the abundance of depolymerizing cations, defined as SCFM = SiO2/SiO2 + CaO + MgO + FeO. Parameter SCFM is therefore proposed for use in TIR remote sensing of igneous rocks. It is also demonstrated that two or three broad bands are sufficient for distinguishing among major rock types and the system noise has little effect on the quality of the results. These factors can be traded off against improved spatial resolution in instrument design.

  12. The physical basis for spectral variations in thermal infrared emittance of silicates and application to remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Louis S.

    1986-01-01

    The use of infrared spectroscopy for the remote characterization of planetary surfaces has received attention due to efforts in the investigation of these bodies from space. In the 8 to 14 micron region, a depression in the emittance spectra of rocks (sometimes called reststrahlen) is related to the fundamental stretching vibrations of Si-O bonds and shifts in the locations of this feature are ascribed to variations in rock composition. Thus, it should be possible to investigate, quantify, and model the relationships of reststrahlen spectral band location through silicate mineralogical composition to rock classification. This concept will be tested first through the use of laboratory-acquired data on the infrared spectra and mineralogy of selected mineral and rock samples. As a suitable classification model is developed, it will be tested through overflights of appropriate rock outcrops using the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS).

  13. Dynamic crystallization of silicate melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, W. J.

    1984-01-01

    Two types of furnaces with differing temperature range capabilities were used to provide variations in melt temperatures and cooling rates in a study of the effects of heterogeneous nucleation on crystallization. Materials of chondrule composition were used to further understanding of how the disequilibrium features displayed by minerals in rocks are formed. Results show that the textures of natural chondrules were duplicated. It is concluded that the melt history is dominant over cooling rate and composition in controlling texture. The importance of nuclei, which are most readily derived from preexisting crystalline material, support an origin for natural chondrules based on remelting of crystalline material. This would be compatible with a simple, uniform chondrule forming process having only slight variations in thermal histories resulting in the wide range of textures.

  14. Rock comminution as a source of hydrogen for subglacial ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telling, J.; Boyd, E. S.; Bone, N.; Jones, E. L.; Tranter, M.; Macfarlane, J. W.; Martin, P. G.; Wadham, J. L.; Lamarche-Gagnon, G.; Skidmore, M. L.; Hamilton, T. L.; Hill, E.; Jackson, M.; Hodgson, D. A.

    2015-11-01

    Substantial parts of the beds of glaciers, ice sheets and ice caps are at the pressure melting point. The resulting water harbours diverse subglacial microbial ecosystems capable of affecting global biogeochemical cycles. Such subglacial habitats may have acted as refugia during Neoproterozoic glaciations. However, it is unclear how life in subglacial environments could be supported during glaciations lasting millions of years because energy from overridden organic carbon would become increasingly depleted. Here we investigate the potential for abiogenic H2 produced during rock comminution to provide a continual source of energy to support subglacial life. We collected a range of silicate rocks representative of subglacial environments in Greenland, Canada, Norway and Antarctica and crushed them with a sledgehammer and ball mill to varying surface areas. Under an inert atmosphere in the laboratory, we added water, and measured H2 production with time. H2 was produced at 0 °C in all silicate-water experiments, probably through the reaction of water with mineral surface silica radicals formed during rock comminution. H2 production increased with increasing temperature or decreasing silicate rock grain size. Sufficient H2 was produced to support previously measured rates of methanogenesis under a Greenland glacier. We conclude that abiogenic H2 generation from glacial bedrock comminution could have supported life and biodiversity in subglacial refugia during past extended global glaciations.

  15. Silicate Weathering and Pervasive Authigenic Carbonate Precipitation Coupled to Methanogenesis in the Krishna-Godavari Basin, Offshore India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, E. A.; Spivack, A. J.; Kastner, M.; Torres, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    The cycling of methane in marine sediments has been actively studied for the past several decades, but less attention has been paid to the cycling of CO2 produced in methanogenic sediments. The National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01 cored 10 sites with the Joides Resolution drillship in the Krishna-Godavari basin, located on the southeastern margin of India. A comprehensive suite of pore water solute concentrations and isotope ratios were analyzed to investigate the distribution and concentration of gas hydrate along the margin, in situ diagenetic and metabolic reactions, fluid migration and flow pathways, and fluid and gas sources. This represents one of the most comprehensive pore water geochemical datasets collected at a continental margin to date, and provides the necessary tracers to better understand the processes and sinks controlling CO2 in margin sediments. Our results show that the CO2 produced through net microbial methanogenesis is effectively neutralized through silicate weathering throughout the sediment column drilled at each site (~100-300 m), buffering the pH of the sedimentary pore water and generating excess alkalinity through the same reaction sequence as continental silicate weathering. Most of the excess alkalinity produced through silicate weathering in the Krishna-Godavari basin is sequestered in Ca- and Fe-carbonates as a result of ubiquitous calcium release from weathering detrital silicates and Fe-reduction within the methanogenic sediments. Formation of secondary hydrous silicates (e.g. smectite) related to incongruent primary silicate dissolution acts as a significant sink for pore water Mg, K, Li, Rb, and B. The consumption of methane through anaerobic oxidation of methane, sequestration of methane in gas hydrate, and sequestration of dissolved inorganic carbon in authigenic carbonates keeps methanogenesis as a thermodynamically feasible catabolic pathway. Our results combined with previous indications of silicate weathering in

  16. Evidence for the reversal of gradients in the uppermost parts of silicic magma reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffield, Wendell A.; Ruiz, Joaquin

    1992-12-01

    Evidence from large-volume ignimbrites indicates that the source-magma reservoirs for most of these voluminous silicic pyroclastic deposits contained monotonic vertical chemical gradients at the time of eruption. However, gradients from a large-volume magma reservoir that produced a group of penecontemporaneous silicic lava domes, but no ignimbrite, show a reversal of the usual ignimbrite pattern. This reversal originated by modification of the usual pattern through minor assimilation of partially melted roof rocks. Eruptions that produced these domes apparently just tapped the uppermost part of their source reservoir. They thereby provide a high-resolution instantaneous view of this variably contaminated part of the magma system. Although not yet reported in the literature, similar reversals should be recorded in other groups of penecontemporaneous silicic domes and perhaps also in the lowermost parts of ignimbrites or in their underlying coeruptive Plinian deposits. The long-standing paradigm for monotonic zoning in large-volume reservoirs of silicic magma may require modification.

  17. Isolation of alkaline mutagens from complex mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C.H.; Guerin, M.R.; Clark, B.R.; Rao, T.K.; Epler, J.L.

    1981-05-01

    A method for the preparative-scale enrichment of alkaline mutagens from complex natural and anthropogenic mixtures is described. Mutagenic alkaline fractions were isolated from cigarette smoke, crude petroleum, and petroleum substitutes derived from coal and shale.

  18. A Rock Encyclopedia That Includes Rock Samples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laznicka, Peter

    1981-01-01

    Described is a rock encyclopedia combining rock sample sets and encyclopedic word and picture entries which can be used as a realistic information resource for independent study or as a part of a course. (JT)

  19. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David B.; Lao, Guifang

    1998-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium.

  20. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, D.B.; Lao, G.

    1998-01-06

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium. 3 figs.

  1. Hydrocarbon potential of an alkaline lake basin

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Jian Yu; Wang Gijun ); Ma Wanyi )

    1991-03-01

    The Biyan basin is an oil-rich intermountain basin in the central part of China. It is a half graben with a marginal normal fault in the south and a slope in the north. The thickest Eogene reaches 7 km in the center of the depression. This basin became a typical alkaline lake with specific sedimentary sequences composed of oil shale, trona, dolomite, and dark mudstone during Early Tertiary because of dry climate and peripheral source areas rich in Na-containing minerals. The source rock is characterized by abundant organic matter with a mean TOC of 2.5% and kerogen of good quality with H/C 1.4-1.7, and IH up to 800 mg/g. The study of biomarkers reveals a low Pr/Ph ratio and an abundant gammacerane and {minus}carotane, thus indicating an environment of high salinity and reduction. All geochemical data demonstrate multiple provinces of primary organic matter, of which halophilous prokaryotic organisms are likely contributors. Crude oil in the Biyan oil field contains high wax and low sulfur. The low-mature oil is discovered in dolomite beds. The high hydrocarbon potential of this basin is due to particularly favorable conditions for preservation and transformation of organic matter and high subsidence rates.

  2. Preparation of calcium silicate absorbent from iron blast furnace slag.

    PubMed

    Brodnax, L F; Rochelle, G T

    2000-09-01

    Calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) solids were prepared from hydrated lime and iron blast furnace slag in an aqueous agitated slurry at 92 degrees C. While it was hoped a minimal lime/slag ratio could be used to create near-amorphous CSH, the surface area of the product improved by increasing the lime/slag weight ratio to 2. The addition of gypsum to the lime/slag system dramatically improved the formation of surface area, creating solids with 139 m2/g after 30 hr of reaction when only a minimal amount of lime was present. The SO2 reactivity of solids prepared with gypsum greatly exceeded that of hydrated lime, achieving greater than 70-80% conversion of the alkalinity after 1 hr of reaction with SO2. The use of CaCl2 as an additive to the lime/slag system, in lieu of gypsum, also produced high-surface-area solids, 115 m2/g after 21 hr of reaction. However, the SO2 reactivity of these sorbents was relatively low given the high surface area. This emphasized that the correlation between surface area and SO2 reactivity was highly dependent on the solid phase, which was subsequently dependent on slurry composition. PMID:11055162

  3. Molybdenum Valence in Basaltic Silicate Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, L. R.; Righter, K.; Newville, M.; Sutton, S.; Pando, K.

    2010-01-01

    The moderately siderophile element molybdenum has been used as an indicator in planetary differentiation processes, and is particularly relevant to core formation [for example, 1-6]. However, models that apply experimental data to an equilibrium differentiation scenario infer the oxidation state of molybdenum from solubility data or from multivariable coefficients from metal-silicate partitioning data [1,3,7]. Partitioning behavior of molybdenum, a multivalent element with a transition near the J02 of interest for core formation (IW-2) will be sensitive to changes in JO2 of the system and silicate melt structure. In a silicate melt, Mo can occur in either 4+ or 6+ valence state, and Mo6+ can be either octahedrally or tetrahedrally coordinated. Here we present first XANES measurements of Mo valence in basaltic run products at a range of P, T, and JO2 and further quantify the valence transition of Mo.

  4. ROCK PHYSICS. Rock physics of fibrous rocks akin to Roman concrete explains uplifts at Campi Flegrei Caldera.

    PubMed

    Vanorio, Tiziana; Kanitpanyacharoen, Waruntorn

    2015-08-01

    Uplifts in the Campi Flegrei caldera reach values unsurpassed anywhere in the world (~2 meters). Despite the marked deformation, the release of strain appears delayed. The rock physics analysis of well cores highlights the presence of two horizons, above and below the seismogenic area, underlying a coupled process. The basement is a calc-silicate rock housing hydrothermal decarbonation reactions, which provide lime-rich fluids. The caprock above the seismogenic area has a pozzolanic composition and a fibril-rich matrix that results from lime-pozzolanic reactions. These findings provide evidence for a natural process reflecting that characterizing the cementitious pastes in modern and Roman concrete. The formation of fibrous minerals by intertwining filaments confers shear and tensile strength to the caprock, contributing to its ductility and increased resistance to fracture. PMID:26160377

  5. Silicic magma generation at Askja volcano, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigmarsson, O.

    2009-04-01

    Rate of magma differentiation is an important parameter for hazard assessment at active volcanoes. However, estimates of these rates depend on proper understanding of the underlying magmatic processes and magma generation. Differences in isotope ratios of O, Th and B between silicic and in contemporaneous basaltic magmas have been used to emphasize their origin by partial melting of hydrothermally altered metabasaltic crust in the rift-zones favoured by a strong geothermal gradient. An alternative model for the origin of silicic magmas in the Iceland has been proposed based on U-series results. Young mantle-derived mafic protolith is thought to be metasomatized and partially melted to form the silicic end-member. However, this model underestimates the compositional variations of the hydrothermally-altered basaltic crust. New data on U-Th disequilibria and O-isotopes in basalts and dacites from Askja volcano reveal a strong correlation between (230Th/232Th) and delta 18O. The 1875 AD dacite has the lowest Th- and O isotope ratios (0.94 and -0.24 per mille, respectively) whereas tephra of evolved basaltic composition, erupted 2 months earlier, has significantly higher values (1.03 and 2.8 per mille, respectively). Highest values are observed in the most recent basalts (erupted in 1920 and 1961) inside the Askja caldera complex and out on the associated fissure swarm (Sveinagja basalt). This correlation also holds for older magma such as an early Holocene dacites, which eruption may have been provoked by rapid glacier thinning. Silicic magmas at Askja volcano thus bear geochemical signatures that are best explained by partial melting of extensively hydrothermally altered crust and that the silicic magma source has remained constant during the Holocene at least. Once these silicic magmas are formed they appear to erupt rapidly rather than mixing and mingling with the incoming basalt heat-source that explains lack of icelandites and the bi-modal volcanism at Askja

  6. Factors affecting lead release in sodium silicate-treated partial lead service line replacements.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Emily; Payne, Sarah Jane O; Hofmann, Ron; Andrews, Robert C

    2015-01-01

    Water quality parameters affecting sodium silicate performance in partial lead service line replacements were examined using a fractional factorial experimental design and static pipe systems. An external copper wire was used to create a galvanic connection between a former lead service line and a new copper pipe. The pipe systems were filled with lab prepared water made to mimic real water quality. Water was changed on a three times per week basis. A 2(4-1) fractional factorial design was used to evaluate the impact of alkalinity (15 mg L(-1) or 250 mg L(-1) as CaCO3), nitrate (1 mg L(-1) or 7 mg L(-1) as N), natural organic matter (1 mg L(-1) or 7 mg L(-1) as dissolved organic carbon), and disinfectant type (1 mg L(-1) chlorine or 3 mg L(-1) monochloramine), resulting in eight treatment conditions. Fractional factorial analysis revealed that alkalinity, natural organic matter and monochloramine had a significant positive effect on galvanic current. Natural organic matter and monochloramine also had a significant positive effect with respect to both total and dissolved lead release. For the treatment conditions examined, 67-98% of the lead released through galvanic currents was stored as corrosion scales and predominantly comprised of particulate lead (96.1-99.9%) for all eight treatments. The use of monochloramine and the presence of natural organic matter (7 mg L(-1)) were not favourable for corrosion control in sodium silicate-treated partial lead service line replacements, although further studies would be required to characterize optimal water quality parameters for specific water quality types. For utilities operating with sodium silicate as a corrosion inhibitor, this work offers further evidence regarding the consideration of chlorine as a secondary disinfectant instead of monochloramine, as well as the value of controlling natural organic matter in distributed water. PMID:26061205

  7. Development of alkaline fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbs, Michael R.; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Alam, Todd Michael; Janarthanan, Rajeswari; Horan, James L.; Caire, Benjamin R.; Ziegler, Zachary C.; Herring, Andrew M.; Yang, Yuan; Zuo, Xiaobing; Robson, Michael H.; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Patterson, Wendy; Atanassov, Plamen Borissov

    2013-09-01

    This project focuses on the development and demonstration of anion exchange membrane (AEM) fuel cells for portable power applications. Novel polymeric anion exchange membranes and ionomers with high chemical stabilities were prepared characterized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories. Durable, non-precious metal catalysts were prepared by Dr. Plamen Atanassov's research group at the University of New Mexico by utilizing an aerosol-based process to prepare templated nano-structures. Dr. Andy Herring's group at the Colorado School of Mines combined all of these materials to fabricate and test membrane electrode assemblies for single cell testing in a methanol-fueled alkaline system. The highest power density achieved in this study was 54 mW/cm2 which was 90% of the project target and the highest reported power density for a direct methanol alkaline fuel cell.

  8. Core formation in silicate bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmo, F.; O'Brien, D. P.; Kleine, T.

    2008-12-01

    Differentiation of a body into a metallic core and silicate mantle occurs most efficiently if temperatures are high enough to allow at least the metal to melt [1], and is enhanced if matrix deformation occurs [2]. Elevated temperatures may occur due to either decay of short-lived radio-isotopes, or gravitational energy release during accretion [3]. For bodies smaller than the Moon, core formation happens primarily due to radioactive decay. The Hf-W isotopic system may be used to date core formation; cores in some iron meteorites and the eucrite parent body (probably Vesta) formed within 1 My and 1-4~My of solar system formation, respectively [4]. These formation times are early enough to ensure widespread melting and differentiation by 26Al decay. Incorporation of Fe60 into the core, together with rapid early mantle solidification and cooling, may have driven early dynamo activity on some bodies [5]. Iron meteorites are typically depleted in sulphur relative to chondrites, for unknown reasons [6]. This depletion contrasts with the apparently higher sulphur contents of cores in larger planetary bodies, such as Mars [7], and also has a significant effect on the timing of core solidification. For bodies of Moon-size and larger, gravitational energy released during accretion is probably the primary cause of core formation [3]. The final stages of accretion involve large, stochastic collisions [8] between objects which are already differentiated. During each collision, the metallic cores of the colliding objects merge on timescales of a few hours [9]. Each collision will reset the Hf-W isotopic signature of both mantle and core, depending on the degree to which the impactor core re-equilibrates with the mantle of the target [10]. The re-equilibration efficiency depends mainly on the degree to which the impactor emulsifies [11], which is very uncertain. Results from N-body simulations [8,12] suggest that significant degrees of re- equilibration are required [4,10]. Re

  9. Making Earth's earliest continental crust - an analogue from voluminous Neogene silicic volcanism in NE-Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Sylvia E.; Troll, Valentin R.; Burchardt, Steffi; Riishuus, Morten S.; Deegan, Frances M.; Harris, Chris; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Gústafsson, Ludvik E.

    2014-05-01

    Borgarfjörður Eystri in NE-Iceland represents the second-most voluminous exposure of silicic eruptive rocks in Iceland and is a superb example of bimodal volcanism (Bunsen-Daly gap), which represents a long-standing controversy that touches on the problem of crustal growth in early Earth. The silicic rocks in NE-Iceland approach 25 % of the exposed rock mass in the region (Gústafsson et al., 1989), thus they significantly exceed the usual ≤ 12 % in Iceland as a whole (e.g. Walker, 1966; Jonasson, 2007). The origin, significance, and duration of the voluminous (> 300 km3) and dominantly explosive silicic activity in Borgarfjörður Eystri is not yet constrained (c.f. Gústafsson, 1992), leaving us unclear as to what causes silicic volcanism in otherwise basaltic provinces. Here we report SIMS zircon U-Pb ages and δ18O values from the region, which record the commencement of silicic igneous activity with rhyolite lavas at 13.5 to 12.8 Ma, closely followed by large caldera-forming ignimbrite eruptions from the Breiðavik and Dyrfjöll central volcanoes (12.4 Ma). Silicic activity ended abruptly with dacite lava at 12.1 Ma, defining a ≤ 1 Myr long window of silicic volcanism. Magma δ18O values estimated from zircon range from 3.1 to 5.5 (± 0.3; n = 170) and indicate up to 45 % assimilation of a low-δ18O component (e.g. typically δ18O = 0 ‰, Bindeman et al., 2012). A Neogene rift relocation (Martin et al., 2011) or the birth of an off-rift zone to the east of the mature rift associated with a thermal/chemical pulse in the Iceland plume (Óskarsson & Riishuus, 2013), likely brought mantle-derived magma into contact with fertile hydrothermally-altered basaltic crust. The resulting interaction triggered large-scale crustal melting and generated mixed-origin silicic melts. Such rapid formation of silicic magmas from sustained basaltic volcanism may serve as an analogue for generating continental crust in a subduction-free early Earth (e.g. ≥ 3 Ga, Kamber et

  10. The formation of cobalt-bearing ferromanganese crusts under fluid destruction of silicate matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimov, S. O.; Safronov, P. P.

    2016-02-01

    The processes of fluid destruction of various silicate rocks under diffusion of flows of compressed gases (mainly carbonaceous) were studied. The gas condensate nature was ascertained for the forming alumoslilicate and ore (cobalt-iron-manganese hydroxide) substances produced under this fluid destruction in the forms of microcrusts and microconcretions. The ore condensates contained in high concentrations the typomorphic elements of oceanic ferromanganese formations (Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Pb, Ce, and Pt). The elemental composition of the ore oxide substance formed under the destruction of various silicate matrices exhibits a definite degree of endemism with prevalence of the Co-Mn association. The pronounced concentration of barium is related to the substantially carbonaceous composition of the fluid systems. A cerium paradox is revealed: Ce3+ is oxidized into Ce4+ and absorbed by ferromanganese hydrogel and the minimum of cerium appears in rare-earth phosphates.

  11. Zircon from historic eruptions in Iceland: Reconstructing storage and evolution of silicic magmas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carley, T.L.; Miller, C.F.; Wooden, J.L.; Bindeman, I.N.; Barth, A.P.

    2011-01-01

    Zoning patterns, U-Th disequilibria ages, and elemental compositions of zircon from eruptions of Askja (1875 AD), Hekla (1158 AD), ??r??faj??kull (1362 AD) and Torfaj??kull (1477 AD, 871 AD, 3100 BP, 7500 BP) provide insights into the complex, extended, histories of silicic magmatic systems in Iceland. Zircon compositions, which are correlated with proximity to the main axial rift, are distinct from those of mid-ocean ridge environments and fall at the low-Hf edge of the range of continental zircon. Morphology, zoning patterns, compositions, and U-Th ages all indicate growth and storage in subvolcanic silicic mushes or recently solidified rock at temperatures above the solidus but lower than that of the erupting magma. The eruptive products were likely ascending magmas that entrained a zircon "cargo" that formed thousands to tens of thousands of years prior to the eruptions. ?? 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  12. Mafic silicates in the Orgueil carbonaceous meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerridge, J. F.; Macdougall, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    Iron-bearing olivines and pyroxenes occurring in Orgueil may represent a separate population distinct from the magnesian varieties previously reported. Compositions of these iron-bearing silicates are inconsistent with an origin by direct equilibrium condensation in the nebula. Such an origin is more plausible for the magnesian silicates, but lacks conclusive evidence. An extra-solar system origin for either mafic population is possible, though similarly lacking in evidence. About 15% of the olivines, randomly distributed with respect to iron content, retain particle track evidence of a precompaction irradiation.

  13. Late Triassic alkaline complex in Sulu UHP terrane: Implications for post-collisional magmatism along the continental subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Song, Y.; Liu, Q.

    2014-12-01

    In order to insight into crust-mantle interaction triggered by partial melting of the subudcted continental crust during its exhumation, we carried out a combined study on Shidao alkaline complex in the Sulu ultrahigh pressure (UHP) terrane. The alkaline complex is composed of shoshonitic to ultrapotassic gabbro, pyroxene syenite, amphibole syenite, quartz syenite, and granite. Field researches suggest that the mafic rocks are earlier than the felsic ones in sequence. LA-ICPMS zircon U-Pb dating on them gives Late Triassic ages of 214 ± 2 to 200 ± 3 Ma from mafic to felsic rocks. These ages are a bit younger than Late Triassic ages for partial melting of the Sulu UHP terrane during exhumation, indicating syn-exhumation magmatism during continental collision. The alkaline rocks have wide ranges of SiO2 (49.7 - 76.7 wt.%), MgO (8.25 - 0.03 wt.%),total Fe2O3 (9.23 - 0.47 wt.%), CaO (8.39 - 0.39 wt.%), Ni (126.0 - 0.07 ppm), and Cr (182.0 - 0.45 ppm) contents. Other major oxides are regularly changed with SiO2. The alkaline rocks have characteristics of arc-like patterns in the trace element distribution, e.g., enrichment of LREE and LILE (Rb, Ba, Th and U), depletion of HFSE (Nb, Ta, P and Ti), and positive Pb anomalies. From the mafic to felsic rocks, (La/Yb)N ratios and contents of the total REE, Sr and Ba are decreased but Rb contents are increased. The alkaline rocks also display features of A2-type granitoids, suggesting a post-collisional magmatism. They have high initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.70575 and 0.70927) and negative ɛNd(t) values (-18.6 to -15.0) for whole-rock. The homogeneous initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios and ɛNd(t) values of the alkaline rocks are almost unchanged with SiO2 and MgO contents, suggesting a fractional crystallization (FC) process from a same parental magma. Our studies suggest a series of crust-mantle interaction processes along the continental subduction interface as follows: (1) melts from partial melting of the subducted continental

  14. Production of mildly alkaline basalts at complex ocean ridge settings: Perspectives from basalts emitted during the 2010 eruption at the Eyjafjallajökull volcano, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viccaro, Marco; Nicotra, Eugenio; Urso, Salvatore

    2015-11-01

    The early phase of the 2010 eruption at the Eyjafjallajökull volcano (Iceland) produced poorly evolved mildly alkaline basalts that have a signature more enriched with respect to the typically depleted basalts emitted at ocean ridges. The whole rock geochemistry of these basaltic magmas offers a great opportunity to investigate the mantle source characteristics and reasons leading to this enriched fingerprint in proximity of the ocean ridge system. Some basaltic products of Katla volcano, ∼25 km east of Eyjafjallajökull, have been chosen from the literature, as they display a similar mildly alkaline signature and can be therefore useful to explore the same target. Major and trace element variations of the whole rock suggest a very limited evolutionary degree for the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull products and the selected Katla magmas, highlighting the minor role played by differentiation processes such as fractional crystallization. Nevertheless, effects of the limited fractionation have been erased through re-equilibration of the major and trace element abundances at primary conditions. Concentrations of Th after re-equilibration have been assumed as indexes of the partial melting degree, given the high incompatibility of the element, and enrichment ratios calculated for each trace element. Especially for LILE (Rb, Ba, K, Sr), the pattern of resulting enrichment ratios well matches that obtained from fractional melting of peridotite bearing hydrous phases (amphibole/phlogopite). This put forward the idea that magmas have been generated through partial melting of enriched mantle domains where hydrous minerals have been stabilized as a consequence of metasomatic processes. Refertilization of the mantle has been attributed to intrusion of hydrous silicate melts and fractional crystallization of hydrous cumulates. These refertilizing melts, inherited from an ancient subducted oceanic crust, intruded into a depleted oceanic lithosphere that remained stored for a long time

  15. Geochemistry of large river suspended sediments: Silicate weathering or recycling tracer?

    SciTech Connect

    Gaillardet, J.; Dupre, B.; Allegre, C.J.

    1999-12-01

    This study focuses on the major and trace element composition of suspended sediments transported by the world's largest rivers. Its main purpose is to answer the following question: is the degree of weathering of modern river-borne particles consistent with the estimated river dissolved loads derived from silicate weathering? In agreement with the well known mobility of elements during weathering of continental rocks, the authors confirm that river sediments are systematically depleted in Na, K, Ba with respect to the Upper Continental Crust. For each of these mobile elements, a systematics of weathering indexes of river-borne solids is attempted. A global consistency is found between all these indexes. Important variations in weathering intensities exist. A clear dependence of weathering intensities with climate is observed for the rivers draining mostly lowlands. However, no global correlation exists between weathering intensities and climatic or relief parameters because the trend observed for lowlands is obscured by rivers draining orogenic zones. An inverse correlation between weathering intensities and suspended sediment concentrations is observed showing that the regions having the highest rates of physical denudation produce the least weathered sediments. Finally, chemical and physical weathering are compared through the use of a simple steady state model. The authors show that the weathering intensities of large river suspended sediments can only be reconciled with the (silicate-derived) dissolved load or rivers, by admitting that most of the continental rocks submitted to weathering in large river basins have already suffered previous weathering cycles. A simple graphical method is proposed for calculating the proportion of sedimentary recycling in large river basins. Finally, even if orogenic zones produce weakly weathered sediments, the authors emphasize the fact that silicate chemical weathering rates (and hence CO{sub 2} consumption rates by silicate

  16. The Lassell Massif - a Silicic Lunar Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashley, J.; Robinson, M. S.; Stopar, J. D.; Glotch, T. D.; Hawke, B. R.; Lawrence, S. J.; Jolliff, B. L.; Greenhagen, B. T.; Paige, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    Lunar volcanic processes were dominated by mare-producing basaltic extrusions. However, limited occurrences of non-mare, geochemically evolved (Si-enriched) volcanic deposits have long been suspected on the basis of spectral anomalies (red spots), landform morphologies, and the occurrence of minor granitic components in Apollo sample suites [e.g., 1-5]. The LRO Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment (Diviner) measured thermal emission signatures considered diagnostic of highly silicic rocks in several red spot areas [6,7], within the Marius domes [8], and from the Compton-Belkovich feature on the lunar farside [9]. The present study focuses on the Lassell massif red spot (14.73°S, 350.97°E) located in northeastern Mare Nubium near the center of Alphonsus A crater. Here we use Diviner coverage co-projected with Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) images [10] and digital elevation models to characterize the Lassell massif geomorphology and composition. Localized Diviner signatures indicating relatively high silica contents correlate with spatially distinct morphologic features across the Lassell massif. These features include sub-kilometer scale deposits with clear superposing relationships between units of different silica concentrations. The zone with the strongest signal corresponds to the southern half of the massif and the Lassell G and K depressions (formerly thought to be impact craters [11]). These steep-walled pits lack any obvious raised rims or ejecta blankets that would identify them as impact craters; they are likely explosive volcanic vents or collapse calderas. This silica-rich area is contained within the historic red spot area [4], but does not appear to fully overlap with it, implying compositionally distinct deposits originating from the same source region. Low-reflectance deposits, exposed by impact craters and mass wasting across the massif, suggest either basaltic pyroclastics or minor late-stage extrusion of basaltic lavas through vents

  17. New insights on the occurrence of peperites and sedimentary deposits within the silicic volcanic sequences of the Paraná Magmatic Province, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchetti, A. C. F.; Nardy, A. J. R.; Machado, F. B.; Madeira, J.; Arnosio, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    In the Paraná Basin (southern and southeastern Brazil), the stratigraphy of the Paraná Magmatic Province (PMP) is composed of a thick (up to 1600 m) volcanic sequence formed by a succession of petrographically and geochemically distinct units of basic and acidic composition. The whole package may have been emplaced in approximately 3 million yr of almost uninterrupted activity. A few aeolian sandstone layers, indicating arid environmental conditions (Botucatu Formation), are interlayered in the lower basalts. Above the basalts, the Palmas and Chapecó Members of the Early Cretaceous Serra Geral Formation, are composed of silicic volcanic rocks (trachydacites, dacites, rhyolites, and rhyodacites) and basalts. This paper presents new evidence of episodes of sedimentation separating silicic volcanic events, expressed by occurrences of sedimentary deposits. Interaction between the volcanic bodies and the coeval unconsolidated sediments formed peperites. The sediments were observed between basaltic lava flows and silicic rocks or interlayered in the Palmas type rocks, between Chapecó type rocks and underlying basaltic flows, between silicic bodies of Palmas and Chapecó types, and interlayered with Palmas type units. The observed structures indicate that the sediments were still wet and unconsolidated, or weakly consolidated, at the time of volcanism, which coupled with the sediment features reflect environmental conditions that are different from those characterizing the Botucatu arid conditions.

  18. Microfabrics in Siliceous Hotsprings: Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guidry, S. A.; Chafetz, H. S.; Westall, F.

    2001-01-01

    Microfabrics shed light on the mechanisms governing siliceous sinter precipitation, the profound effects of microorganisms, as well as a conventional facies model for siliceous hotsprings. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  19. Silicate Inclusions in the Kodaikanal IIE Iron Meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurat, G.; Varela, M. E.; Zinner, E.

    2005-03-01

    II-E iron meteorites are particularly interesting because they contain an exotic zoo of silicate inclusions including some chemically strongly fractionated ones. Here we present preliminary findings in our study of Kodaikanal silicate inclusions.

  20. Modern estuarine siliceous spiculites, Tasmania, Australia: A non-polar link to Phanerozoic spiculitic cherts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, C. M.; James, N. P.; Kyser, T. K.; Barrett, N.; Hirst, A. J.

    2008-02-01

    Biosiliceous sedimentary rocks are well known from the geologicrecord and many are correctly interpreted to have formed indeep-water or cold-water environments. Shallow non-polar spiculitesare also known from the rock record, yet no modern analog hasbeen documented for such environments. Bathurst Harbour, anestuarine system in southwest Tasmania, provides this much-neededmodern analog. In this system a sharp halocline separates tannin-richlow-salinity surface waters from clear marine bottom waters.Tannins supply few nutrients and substantially reduce lightpenetration to bottom environments, resulting in a thinned photiczone and the mixing of deeper-water sub-photic biotas of softcorals, bryozoans, and sponges with other organisms more typicalof this temperate shallow-water environment. The well-definedhalocline allows a typically marine biota, including echinoderms,to live in bottom waters of this estuarine setting. The bioclasticfactory, producing both carbonate and siliceous particles, existsin marine subphotic bottom waters of incised channel and shallowrocky environments along the shoreline. Extensive organic-richsoft sediments in protected embayments generate few bioclasts,but contain allochthonous sponge spicules transported from theadjacent bioclastic factory. Trapping of organic material withinthe estuarine system lowers sediment pH and promotes dissolutionof carbonate biofragments, resulting in preferential preservationof siliceous sponge spicules. This situation implies that manybiosiliceous neritic deposits in the rock record may be theresult of similar preferential preservation.

  1. Metal-silicate partitioning of lithophile elements at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chidester, B.; Rahman, Z.; Righter, K.; Campbell, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Trace element abundances in Earth's core were established during core-mantle differentiation and metal-silicate equilibration processes early in the planet's history. The core has been suggested as a possible reservoir in which the presence of nominally lithophile elements can explain the observance of non-chondritic ratios of some of these elements in surface rocks (e.g. Nb/Ta, Th/U and Mg/Si)[1-2]. Additionally, several of these elements (U, Th and K) are long-lived sources of radiogenic heat and could be important for explaining the geomagnetic field early in Earth's history. Based on their metal-silicate partitioning behavior at near ambient conditions, it is frequently assumed that uranium and other strongly lithophile elements are present in the core at only trivial abundances. However, core formation took place at a variety of conditions, reaching pressures and temperatures well above those in which most metal-silicate partitioning measurements were obtained[3]. Here we report metal-silicate partitioning data of lithophile elements such as U and Mg, as well as partially siderophile elements Si and S, at conditions more relevant to metal segregation and core formation in a magma ocean. Laser heated diamond anvil methods were used to obtain pressures of 30-70 GPa and temperatures up to 5200 K. FIB/EM methods were used to section the recovered samples and measure the quenched metal and silicate melt compositions. We find that even strongly lithophile elements such as U and Mg partition measurably into the metal phase under extreme P-T conditions. References: [1]Wade, J. and Wood, B. J., Nature, 109 (2001) [2]Allegre et al. EPSL, 134 (1995) [3]Rubie, et al. Icarus, 248 (2015)

  2. Sulfide in the core and the composition of the silicate Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, K. W.

    2015-12-01

    The chemical composition of the Earth is traditionally explained in terms of evolution from a solar-like composition, similar to that found in primitive 'chondritic' meteorites. It now appears, however, that the silicate Earth is not 'chondritic', but depleted in incompatible elements, including refractory lithophile and heat-producing elements. Either Earth lost material during planet-building due to collisional erosion or else internal differentiation processes produced a hidden reservoir deep in the early Earth. Sulfide in the core may provide a reservoir capable of balancing the composition of the silicate Earth. Recent experimental work suggests that the core contains a significant proportion of sulfide, added during the final stages of accretion and new data suggests that at high pressures sulfide can incorporate a substantial amount of refractory lithophile and heat-producing elements [1]. Pioneering work using the short-lived 146Sm-142Nd system strongly suggests that Earth's silicate mantle is non-chondritic [e.g. 2]. The drawback of such radiogenic isotope systems is that it is not possible to distinguish the fractionation of Sm/Nd that occurs during silicate melting from that occurring during the segregation of a sulfide-melt to form the core. Neodymium stable isotopes have the potential to provide just such a tracer of sulfide segregation, because there is a significant contrast in bonding environment between sulfide and silicate, where heavy isotopes should be preferentially incorporated into high force-constant bonds involving REE3+ (i.e. the silicate mantle). Preliminary data indicate that mantle rocks do indeed possess heavier 146Nd/144Nd values than chondritic meteorites, consistent with the removal of light Nd into sulfide in the core, driving the residual mantle to heavy values. Overall, our isotope and elemental data indicate that the rare earths and other incompatible elements are substantially incorporated into sulfide. While Nd Stable isotope

  3. Rollerjaw Rock Crusher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Gregory; Brown, Kyle; Fuerstenau, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The rollerjaw rock crusher melds the concepts of jaw crushing and roll crushing long employed in the mining and rock-crushing industries. Rollerjaw rock crushers have been proposed for inclusion in geological exploration missions on Mars, where they would be used to pulverize rock samples into powders in the tens of micrometer particle size range required for analysis by scientific instruments.

  4. Dynamic Fatigue of a Titanium Silicate Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Nettles, Alan T.; Cagle, Holly A.; Smith, W. Scott (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A dynamic fatigue study was performed on a Titanium Silicate Glass in order to assess its susceptibility to delayed failure. Fracture mechanics techniques were used to analyze the results for the purpose of making lifetime predictions for optical elements made from this material. The material has reasonably good resistance (N=23 to stress corrosion in ambient conditions).

  5. Synthesis of non-siliceous mesoporous oxides.

    PubMed

    Gu, Dong; Schüth, Ferdi

    2014-01-01

    Mesoporous non-siliceous oxides have attracted great interest due to their unique properties and potential applications. Since the discovery of mesoporous silicates in 1990s, organic-inorganic assembly processes by using surfactants or block copolymers as soft templates have been considered as a feasible path for creating mesopores in metal oxides. However, the harsh sol-gel conditions and low thermal stabilities have limited the expansion of this method to various metal oxide species. Nanocasting, using ordered mesoporous silica or carbon as a hard template, has provided possibilities for preparing novel mesoporous materials with new structures, compositions and high thermal stabilities. This review concerns the synthesis, composition, and parameter control of mesoporous non-siliceous oxides. Four synthesis routes, i.e. soft-templating (surfactants or block copolymers as templates), hard-templating (mesoporous silicas or carbons as sacrificial templates), colloidal crystal templating (3-D ordered colloidal particles as a template), and super lattice routes, are summarized in this review. Mesoporous metal oxides with different compositions have different properties. Non-siliceous mesoporous oxides are comprehensively described, including a discussion of constituting elements, synthesis, and structures. General aspects concerning pore size control, atomic scale crystallinity, and phase control are also reviewed. PMID:23942521

  6. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food...

  7. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food...

  8. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food...

  9. Lithium Manganese Silicate Positive Electrode Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qiong

    As the fast development of the electronic portable devices and drastic fading of fossil energy sources. The need for portable secondary energy sources is increasingly urgent. As a result, lithium ion batteries are being investigated intensely to meet the performance requirements. Among various electrode materials, the most expensive and capacity limiting component is the positive materials. Based on this, researches have been mostly focused on the development of novel cathode materials with high capacity and energy density and the lithium transition metal orthosilicates have been identified as possible high performance cathodes. Here in, we report the synthesis of a kind of lithium transition metal orthosilicates electrode lithium manganese silicate. Lithium manganese silicate has the advantage of high theoretical capacity, low cost raw material and safety. In this thesis, lithium manganese silicate are prepared using different silicon sources. The structure of silicon sources preferred are examined. Nonionic block copolymers surfactant, P123, is tried as carbon source and mophology directing agent. Lithium manganese silicate's performances are improved by adding P123.

  10. Chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, Arun S.; Jeong, Seung Y.; Lohan, Dirk; Elizabeth, Anne

    2003-01-01

    A chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramic formed by chemically reacting a monovalent alkali metal phosphate (or ammonium hydrogen phosphate) and a sparsely soluble oxide, with a sparsely soluble silicate in an aqueous solution. The monovalent alkali metal phosphate (or ammonium hydrogen phosphate) and sparsely soluble oxide are both in powder form and combined in a stochiometric molar ratio range of (0.5-1.5):1 to form a binder powder. Similarly, the sparsely soluble silicate is also in powder form and mixed with the binder powder to form a mixture. Water is added to the mixture to form a slurry. The water comprises 50% by weight of the powder mixture in said slurry. The slurry is allowed to harden. The resulting chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramic exhibits high flexural strength, high compression strength, low porosity and permeability to water, has a definable and bio-compatible chemical composition, and is readily and easily colored to almost any desired shade or hue.

  11. Alkaline basaltic volcanism of the Sea of Japan and the Philippine Sea: Similar and distinct geochemical and genetic features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelikov, E. P.; Emelyanova, T. A.

    2016-05-01

    The results of study of the deep sources of volcanic rocks from the Sea of Japan and the Philippine Sea with continental and oceanic basements, respectively, are presented. This problem is considered with the example of alkaline volcanic rocks of the Middle Miocene to Pliocene complex of the Sea of Japan and the Eocene-Oligocene Urdaneta Plateau of the Philippine Sea. The rocks have a similar geochemistry typical of OIBs, which indicates their deep (plume) origin. The presence of the Oligocene calc-alkaline volcanic rocks, which were formed prior to the marginal sea volcanism in the Sea of Japan, however, is the main difference in volcanism of the Sea of Japan from that of the Urdaneta Plateau, and this is explained by the different basements of these seas.

  12. A mid-Permian chert event: widespread deposition of biogenic siliceous sediments in coastal, island arc and oceanic basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murchey, B.L.; Jones, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    Radiolarian and conodont of Permian siliceous rocks from twenty-three areas in teh the circum-Pacific and Mediterranean regions reveal a widespread Permian Chert Event during the middle Leonardian to Wordian. Radiolarian- and (or) sponge spicule-rich siliceous sediments accumulated beneath high productivity zones in coastal, island arc and oceanic basins. Most of these deposits now crop out in fault-bounded accreted terranes. Biogenic siliceous sediments did not accumulate in terranes lying beneath infertile waters including the marine sequences in terranes of northern and central Alaska. The Permian Chert Event is coeval with major phosphorite deposition along the western margin of Pangea (Phosphoria Formation and related deposits). A well-known analogue for this event is middle Miocene deposition of biogenic siliceous sediments beneath high productivity zones in many parts of the Pacific and concurrent deposition of phosphatic as well as siliceous sediments in basins along the coast of California. Interrelated factors associated with both the Miocene and Permian depositional events include plate reorientations, small sea-level rises and cool polar waters. ?? 1992.

  13. Physical and chemical weathering. [of Martian surface and rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooding, James L.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Zolotov, Mikhail IU.

    1992-01-01

    Physical and chemical weathering processes that might be important on Mars are reviewed, and the limited observations, including relevant Viking results and laboratory simulations, are summarized. Physical weathering may have included rock splitting through growth of ice, salt or secondary silicate crystals in voids. Chemical weathering probably involved reactions of minerals with water, oxygen, and carbon dioxide, although predicted products vary sensitively with the abundance and physical form postulated for the water. On the basis of kinetics data for hydration of rock glass on earth, the fate of weathering-rind formation on glass-bearing Martian volcanic rocks is tentatively estimated to have been on the order of 0.1 to 4.5 cm/Gyr; lower rates would be expected for crystalline rocks.

  14. 40 CFR 721.10495 - Metal silicate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Metal silicate (generic). 721.10495... Substances § 721.10495 Metal silicate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as metal silicate (PMN P-05-634) is subject...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10495 - Metal silicate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Metal silicate (generic). 721.10495... Substances § 721.10495 Metal silicate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as metal silicate (PMN P-05-634) is subject...

  16. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  17. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  18. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  19. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  20. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  1. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  2. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  3. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  4. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182...) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Anticaking Agents § 182.2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  5. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent....

  6. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  7. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  8. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  9. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  10. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical... as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN P-98-604) is subject to reporting under this section...

  11. Grain Growth and Silicates in Dense Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendeleton, Yvonne J.; Chiar, J. E.; Ennico, K.; Boogert, A.; Greene, T.; Knez, C.; Lada, C.; Roellig, T.; Tielens, A.; Werner, M.; Whittet, D.

    2006-01-01

    Interstellar silicates are likely to be a part of all grains responsible for visual extinction (Av) in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) and dense clouds. A correlation between Av and the depth of the 9.7 micron silicate feature (measured as optical depth, tau(9.7)) is expected if the dust species are well 'mixed. In the di&se ISM, such a correlation is observed for lines of sight in the solar neighborhood. A previous study of the silicate absorption feature in the Taurus dark cloud showed a tendency for the correlation to break down at high Av (Whittet et al. 1988, MNRAS, 233,321), but the scatter was large. We have acquired Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph data of several lines of sight in the IC 5 146, Barnard 68, Chameleon I and Serpens dense clouds. Our data set spans an Av range between 2 and 35 magnitudes. All lines of sight show the 9.7 micron silicate feature. The Serpens data appear to follow the diffuse ISM correlation line whereas the data for the other clouds show a non-linear correlation between the depth of the silicate feature relative to Av, much like the trend observed in the Taurus data. In fact, it appears that for visual extinctions greater than about 10 mag, tau(9.7) begins to level off. This decrease in the growth of the depth of the 9.7 micron feature with increasing Av could indicate the effects of grain growth in dense clouds. In this poster, we explore the possibility that grain growth causes an increase in opacity (Av) without causing a corresponding increase in tau(9.7).

  12. The effect of land plants on weathering rates of silicate minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Drever, J.I. )

    1994-05-01

    Land plants and their associated microbiota directly affect silicate mineral weathering in several ways: by generation of chelating ligands, by modifying pH through production of CO[sub 2] or organic acids, and by altering the physical properties of a soil, particularly the exposed surface areas of minerals and the residence time of water. In laboratory experiments far from equilibrium, 1 mM oxalate (a strong chelator of Al) has a negligible effect on the dissolution rate of alkali feldspars, but some effect on calcic feldspars and olivine. By analogy to oxalate, the overall effect of organic ligands on the weathering rate of silicate minerals in nature is likely to be small, except perhaps in microenvironments adjacent to roots and fungal hyphae. The effect of pH on silicate mineral dissolution rate depends on pH: below pH 4-5, the rate increases with decreasing pH, in the circumneutral region the rate is pH-independent, and at pH values above around 8 the rate increases with increasing pH. Vegetation should thus cause an increase in weathering rate through the pH effect only where the pH is below 4-5. As an overall generalization, the effect of plants on weathering rate through changes in soil-solution chemistry is probably small for granitic rocks; it may be greater for more mafic rocks. It is the release of Ca and Mg from mafic rocks that has the greatest influence on the global CO[sub 2] budget.

  13. Basalt as a solid source of calcium and alkalinity for the sequestration of carbon dioxide in building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, N. C.; Westfield, I.; Lu, P.; Bourcier, W. L.; Kendall, T.; Constantz, B. R.

    2010-12-01

    Motivated by the idea of converting waste carbon dioxide into usable building products, Calera Corporation has developed a multi-step process that sequesters CO2 as carbonate minerals in cementitious materials. Process inputs include dissolved divalent cations and alkalinity, both of which can be extracted from basalt. In one mode of the Calera process, the electrochemical production of alkalinity generates large volumes of hydrochloric acid as a by-product, which has been shown to effectively leach divalent cations from basalt while being neutralized by the basalt dissolution reaction. Using a 10:1 1M HCl solution to rock ratio, 3500 ppm Ca was extracted while the initial solution was neutralized to a pH of 2.60 in two weeks at a temperature of 80oC in an anoxic batch reactor. In this scenario, mineral carbonation occurs via three steps: electrochemical production of alkalinity, CO2 absorption by the alkaline stream, then precipitation by mixing the basalt-derived divalent cation stream and the CO2-containing alkaline stream. In a second scenario, alkalinity is extracted from basalt using an alkalinity capacitor, a weak acid. This solution may contain a proton source, such as ammonium chloride, or a hydroxyl acceptor, such as boric acid, but the main design constraint is that the pKa of the capacitor be high enough to deprontonate carbonic acid. The weak acid solution is mixed with basalt in an anoxic batch reactor and the dissolving rock consumes protons from the weak acid, generating the conjugate base. The solution rich in conjugate base then absorbs CO2 and the carbonate-rich solution is mixed with a calcium-rich stream to precipitate carbonate minerals. We have extracted up to 1100 mmol alkalinity per kg rock using an alkalinity capacitor, versus no more than 50 mmol alkalinity per kg rock using DI water as a solvent. Again, carbon sequestration occurs via three steps: alkalinity extraction from basalt, CO2 absorption, and finally carbonate precipitation

  14. Investigation of sodium silicate-derived gels as encapsulants for hazardous materials--the case of scorodite.

    PubMed

    Adelman, J G; Elouatik, S; Demopoulos, G P

    2015-07-15

    High content arsenic waste generated in the metallurgical industry can be converted into a synthetic mineral, scorodite, FeAsO4·2H2O, and deposited into a landfill site. Scorodite is most stable in weakly acidic to neutral pH range under oxic conditions. A novel way to enhance the range of stability for scorodite is to encapsulate it with an inert material. In this work, silicate gel is developed and investigated as a possible encapsulating material for scorodite. The initial method of gel formation in this study produced a silicate gel with high alkalinity (pH 10) that was incompatible with scorodite. A reverse titration method was developed producing a gel with optimum pH profile (5-6.5). This technique proved to have only marginal effect on scorodite stabilization prompting an investigation of different ageing techniques (drying; 22, 44°C and hydrothermal treatment; 110, 160°C) as a means of producing silica-like coatings with better stabilization potential. Interestingly most of these measures proved counterproductive as aged scorogels showed a higher release of As than scorodite alone. Through surface-sensitive depth profile analysis (XPS), and molecular-sensitive analysis (Raman and FTIR mapping), it was discovered that the silicate engaged into an "ion-exchange" type reaction on the surface of scorodite by bonding to iron, hence the observed release of arsenic. Development of a hydrothermally-induced iron silicate layer may lead to an effective encapsulant. PMID:25797929

  15. Cripple Creek and other alkaline-related gold deposits in the Southern Rocky Mountains, USA: Influence of regional tectonics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelley, K.D.; Ludington, S.

    2002-01-01

    Alkaline-related epithermal vein, breccia, disseminated, skarn, and porphyry gold deposits form a belt in the southern Rocky Mountains along the eastern edge of the North American Cordillera. Alkaline igneous rocks and associated hydrothermal deposits formed at two times. The first was during the Laramide orogeny (about 70-40 Ma), with deposits restricted spatially to the Colorado mineral belt (CMB). Other alkaline igneous rocks and associated gold deposits formed later, during the transition from a compressional to an extensional regime (about 35-27 Ma). These younger rocks and associated deposits are more widespread, following the Rocky Mountain front southward, from Cripple Creek in Colorado through New Mexico. All of these deposits are on the eastern margin of the Cordillera, with voluminous calc-alkaline rocks to the west. The largest deposits in the belt include Cripple Creek and those in the CMB. The most important factor in the formation of all of the gold deposits was the near-surface emplacement of relatively oxidized volatile-rich alkaline magmas. Strontium and lead isotope compositions suggest that the source of the magmas was subduction-modified subcontinental lithosphere. However, Cripple Creek alkaline rocks and older Laramide alkaline rocks in the CMB that were emplaced through hydrously altered LREE-enriched rocks of the Colorado (Yavapai) province have 208Pb/204Pb ratios that suggest these magmas assimilated and mixed with significant amounts of lower crust. The anomalously hot, thick, and light crust beneath Colorado may have been a catalyst for large-scale transfer of volatiles and crustal melting. Increased dissolved H2O (and CO2, F, Cl) of these magmas may have resulted in more productive gold deposits due to more efficient magmatic-hydrothermal systems. High volatile contents may also have promoted Te and V enrichment, explaining the presence of fluorite, roscoelite (vanadium-rich mica) and tellurides in the CMB deposits and Cripple Creek as

  16. Early Miocene Kirka-Phrigian caldera, western Anatolia - an example of large volume silicic magma generation in extensional setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seghedi, Ioan; Helvacı, Cahit

    2014-05-01

    Large rhyolitic ignimbrite occurrences are close connected to the Early Miocene initiation of extensional processes in the central-west Anatolia along Taşvanlı-Afyon zones. Field correlations, petrographical, geochemical and geochronological data lead to a substantial reinterpretation of the ignimbrite surrounding Kırka area, known from its world-class borate deposits, as representing the climatic event of a caldera collapse, unknown up to now and newly named "Kırka-Phrigian caldera". The caldera, which is roughly oval (24 km x 15km) in shape, one of the largest in Turkey, is supposed to have been formed in a single stage collapse event, at ~19 Ma that generated huge volume extracaldera outflow ignimbrites. Transtensive/distensive tectonic stresses since 25 Ma ago resulted in the NNW-SSE elongation of the magma chamber and influenced the roughly elliptical shape of the subsided block (caldera floor) belonging to the apex of Eskişehir-Afyon-Isparta volcanic area. Intracaldera post-collapse sedimentation and volcanism (at ~ 18 Ma) was controlled through subsidence-related faults with generation of a series of volcanic structures (mainly domes) showing a large compositional range from saturated silicic rhyolites and crystal-rich trachytes to undersaturated lamproites. Such volcanic rock association is typical for lithospheric extension. In this scenario, enriched mantle components within the subcontinental lithospheric mantle will begin to melt via decompression melting during the initiation of extension. Interaction of these melts with crustal rocks, fractionation processes and crustal anatexis driven by the heat contained in the ascending mantle melts produced the silicic compositions in a large crustal reservoir. Such silicic melts generated the initial eruptions of Kırka-Phrigian caldera ignimbrites. The rock volume and geochemical evidence suggests that silicic volcanic rocks come from a long-lived magma chamber that evolved episodically; after caldera

  17. Zircon Hf isotopic constraints on the mantle source of felsic magmatic rocks in the Phan Si Pan uplift and Tu Le basin, northern Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usuki, T.; Lan, C.; Tran, T.; Pham, T.; Wang, K.

    2013-12-01

    Permian plume-related rocks, such as picrites, flood basalts and silicic volcanic rocks occur in northern Vietnam. This area was displaced 600 km southeastward along the Ailao Shan-Red River fault during mid-Tertiary in response to the India-Eurasia collision. The original location of the area was situated at the central Emeishan Large Igneous Province (ELIP) in SW China before Tertiary. The picrites and flood basalts in northern Vietnam have been investigated by many authors and are comparable with the ELIP. While, felsic magmatisms in northern Vietnam has been poorly studied. Zircon U-Pb age and Hf isotopic data are useful to compare the felsic magmatism in northern Vietnam with that in the ELIP, because the magmatisms of the ELIP had a characteristic time period (260-250 Ma) and the Hf isotopes show a remarkable mantle signature. Therefore, this study carried out in-situ U-Pb ages and Hf isotopic compositions for 300 zircon grains in eighteen granitoids and rhyolites in Phan Si Pan uplift and Tu Le basin in northern Vietnam. Zircons from the granitoids and rhyolites occasionally show development of {101} pyramid and {100} prism crystal facies, suggesting typical zircons crystallized from high temperature alkaline granite. 206Pb/238U ages of granitoid and rhyolite yield consistently in a narrow range of 260 to 250 Ma, which coincides with those from peralkaline to metaluminous granites in the ELIP. ɛHf(t) values of zircons in rhyolites and granites of this study dominate in the range of +5 to +10, which is consistent with those from the ELIP. U-Pb ages and Hf isotopic compositions of zircons indicate that felsic magmatic rocks in the Phan Si Pan uplift and Tu La basin have been derived from the same mantle source with the ELIP.

  18. CO2-related explosive alkaline magmatism in Gusev crater, Mars: Implications for oxygen fugacity and carbon inventory in the Noachian Martian mantle (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usui, T.; McSween, H. Y.; Clark, B. C.

    2010-12-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has encountered volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks having diverse alkaline compositions in the Noachian-age (~3.8-4.5 Ga) Gusev crater. Among them, we focus on Wishstone Class tephrites which have pyroclastic textures and are unusually enriched in incompatible elements (e.g. >5 wt% P2O5) with low silica contents. The high-phosphorous tephrite signature is not attributable to secondary aqueous alteration but represents an igneous rock composition. Moreover, these high-P2O5 whole-rock compositions cannot readily be explained by fractionation of other magmas in Gusev. We show that the high-P2O5 whole-rock compositions plot above solubility curves of merrillite (Ca-phosphate) in a diagram of P2O5 versus aluminosity, suggesting that mechanical admixture of merrillite is required. A source supplying merrillite cannot be a common silicate magma; instead, it could be a carbonatitic. Considering the pyroclastic textures of Wishstone Class and their geologic context, we propose that the Wishstone Class represents an alkaline-rich igneous rock suite that has mechanically mixed xenocrystic merrillites, probably during explosive volcanic eruption; the merrillites crystallized from carbonatitic melt produced by melting of a carbon-bearing Martian mantle. It has been debated whether CO2 was the effective greenhouse gas in the early Mars. To maintain persistent liquid water on the Martian surface, several bars pressure of CO2 is required, which is approximately three orders of magnitude higher than that on present-day Mars. In contrast, other greenhouse gases (e.g. methane) have been proposed, because no large carbonate deposits or significant atmospheric loss that accounts for the early CO2-rich atmosphere have been observed. Moreover, a recent thermodynamic calculation suggests that, under the redox state of the Martian meteorite source mantle (IW to IW+1), transport of CO2 to the Martian atmosphere has been quite limited and may not be

  19. A physical basis for remote rock mapping of igneous rocks using spectral variations in thermal infrared emittance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, L. S.; Labovitz, M. L.

    1980-01-01

    Results of a theoretical investigation of the relation between spectral features in the 8-12 micrometer region and rock type are presented. Data on compositions of a suite of rocks and measurements of their spectral intensities in 8.2-10.9 and 9.4-12.1 micrometer bands published by Vincent (1973) were subjected to various quantitative procedures. There was no consistent direct relationship between rock group names and the relative spectral intensities. However, there is such a relationship between the Thornton-Tuttle (1960) Differentiation Index and the relative spectral intensities. This relationship is explicable on the basis of the change in average Si-O bond length which is a function of the degree of polymerization of the SiO4 tetrahedra of the silicate minerals in the igneous rocks.

  20. Simultaneous determination of tantalum and hafnium in silicates by neutron activation analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenland, L.P.

    1968-01-01

    A neutron activation procedure suitable for the routine determination of tantalum and hafnium in silicates is described. The irradiated sample is fused with sodium peroxide and leached, and the insoluble hydroxides are dissolved in dilute hydrofluoric acid-hydrochloric acid. After LaF3 and AgCl scavenges, tantalum and hafnium are separated by anion exchange. Tantalum is obtained radiochemically pure; 233Pa and 95Zr contaminants in the hafnium fraction are resolved by ??-ray spectrometry. The chemical yield of the procedure is detemined after counting by re-irradiation. Values for the 8 U.S. Geological Survey standard rocks are reported. ?? 1968.

  1. Opening-mode fracture in siliceous mudstone at high homologous temperature—effect of surface forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhubl, Peter; Aydin, Atilla; Lore, Jason

    In analogy to high-temperature sintering of ceramics and metal powder compacts, the formation of opening-mode fractures in siliceous mudstone during natural in-situ combustion of hydrocarbons is attributed to contractile surface forces between mineral grains and an interstitial melt phase. A comparison between bulk density increase during sintering and created fracture space indicates that fracturing resulted from contraction of the rock matrix due to porosity reduction, grain-scale mass transfer, and high-temperature mineral formation. It is suggested that contractile surface forces between mineral grains and between mineral grains and pore fluid contribute to subcritical fracture formation under a wide range of subsurface conditions.

  2. Anode conductor for alkaline cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schrenk, D.J.; Murphy, P.E.

    1988-12-13

    This patent describes an electrochemical cell comprised of an anode comprised of zinc; a cathode; and alkaline electrolyte; and a current collector comprised of a silicon bronze alloy that is comprised of 85-98% by weight copper and 1-5% by weight silicon with the remainder being comprised of at least one of manganese, iron, zinc, aluminum, tin, lead, or mixtures thereof; and a strip of metal tab stock welded to the current collector, the tab stock being a metal other than silicon bronze alloy.

  3. Alkaline fuel cell performance investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. E.; Manzo, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    An exploratory experimental fuel cell test program was conducted to investigate the performance characteristics of alkaline laboratory research electrodes. The objective of this work was to establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance and evaluate candidate cathode configurations having the potential for improved performance. The performance characterization tests provided data to empirically establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance for cell temperatures up to 300 F and reactant pressures up to 200 psia. Evaluation of five gold alloy cathode catalysts revealed that three doped gold alloys had more than two times the surface areas of reference cathodes and therefore offered the best potential for improved performance.

  4. Alkaline fuel cell performance investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. E.; Manzo, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    An exploratory experimental fuel cell test program was conducted to investigate the performance characteristics of alkaline laboratory research electrodes. The objective of this work was to establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance and evaluate candidate cathode configurations having the potential for improved performance. The performance characterization tests provided data to empirically establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance for cell temperatures up to 300 F and reactant pressures up to 200 psia. Evaluation of five gold alloy cathode catalysts revealed that three doped gold alloys had more that two times the surface areas of reference cathodes and therefore offered the best potential for improved performance.

  5. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-10-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent

  6. Imaging Extraterrestrial Rocks with Scanning Magnetic Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade Lima, E.; Weiss, B. P.; Gattacceca, J.

    2013-05-01

    Scanning magnetic microscopes map the magnetic field produced by a geological sample at submillimeter scales. Such magnetic field maps reveal invaluable information about rocks with complex fine-scale structures. In particular, instruments based on high-sensitivity SQUID sensors can detect magnetic moments as weak as 10^-16 Am2, outperforming by four orders of magnitude the detection limit of the best commercial moment magnetometers. This unique combination of high spatial resolution and high moment sensitivity enables paleomagnetic analyses on samples that have not been accessible to standard moment magnetometry. Targets for scanning magnetic microscopy include extended samples (such as thin sections of meteorites, lunar rocks, and earth rocks) and individual particles of small size (< 500 μm) comprising impact melt spherules, zircon and other silicate cristals, chondrules, and cosmic dust. Here we present applications of the technique focusing on extraterrestrial samples and discuss how it can be an important tool in investigating the effects of shock on the magnetic record in rocks.

  7. The calc-alkaline and adakitic volcanism of the Sabzevar structural zone (NE Iran): Implications for the Eocene magmatic flare-up in Central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Hadi Shafaii; Rossetti, Federico; Lucci, Federico; Chiaradia, Massimo; Gerdes, Axel; Martinez, Margarita Lopez; Ghorbani, Ghasem; Nasrabady, Mohsen

    2016-04-01

    A major magmatic flare-up is documented along the Bitlis-Zagros suture zone in Eocene-Oligocene times. The Cenozoic magmatism of intraplate Central Iran is an integrant part of this tectono-magmatic scenario. The Cenozoic magmatism of the Sabzevar structural zone consists of mostly intermediate to felsic intrusions and volcanic products. These igneous rocks have calc-alkaline and adakitic geochemical signatures, with nearly coincident zircon U-Pb and mica Ar-Ar ages of ca. 45 Ma. Adakitic rocks have quite low HREE and high Sr/Y ratio, but share most of their geochemical features with the calc-alkaline rocks. The Sabzevar volcanic rocks have similar initial Sr, Nd and Pb isotope ratios, showing their cogenetic nature. Nd model ages cluster tightly around ~ 0.2-0.3 Ga. The geochemistry of the Sabzevar volcanic rocks, along with their isotopic signatures, might strangle that an upper mantle source, metasomatized by slab-derived melts was involved in generating the Sabzevar calc-alkaline rocks. A bulk rock trace element modeling suggests that amphibole-plagioclase-titanite-dominated replenishment-fractional crystallization (RFC) is further responsible for the formation of the middle Eocene Sabzevar adakitic rocks. Extensional tectonics accompanied by lithospheric delamination, possibly assisted by slab break-off and melting at dep