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Sample records for alkaline sodium hydroxide

  1. ION RECOGNITION APPROACH TO VOLUME REDUCTION OF ALKALINE TANK WASTE BY SEPARATION AND RECYCLE OF SODIUM HYDROXIDE AND SODIUM NITRATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A 3-year collaborative project between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Bruce A. Moyer) and the University of North Texas (Prof. Alan P. Marchand) is proposed to explore new approaches to the separation of sodium hydroxide and other predominant sodium salts such as sodium nitrate f...

  2. Phase Stability of Chromium(III) Oxide Hydroxide in Alkaline Sodium Phosphate Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    S.E. Ziemniak; E.P. Opalka

    2003-07-08

    Grimaldiite ({alpha}-CrOOH) is shown to transform to a sodium-chromium(III)-hydroxyphosphate compound (SCHP) in alkaline sodium phosphate solutions at elevated temperatures via CrOOH(s) + 4Na{sup +} + 2HPO{sub 4}{sup 2-} = Na{sub 4}Cr(OH)(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}(s) + H{sub 2}O. X-ray diffraction analyses indicate that SCHP possesses an orthorhombic lattice having the same space group symmetry (Ibam, No.72) as sodium ferric hydroxyphosphate. A structurally-consistent designation for SCHP is Na{sub 3}Cr(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} {center_dot} NaOH; the molar volume of SCHP is estimated to be 1552 cm{sup 3}. The thermodynamic equilibrium for the above reaction was defined in the system Na{sub 2}O-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O for Na/P molar ratios between 2.0 and 2.4. On the basis of observed reaction threshold values for sodium phosphate concentration and temperature, the standard molar entropy (S{sup o}), heat capacity (C{sub p}{sup o}) and free energy of formation ({Delta}G{sub f}{sup o}) for SCHP were calculated to be 690 J/(mol-K), 622 J/(mol-K) and -3509.97 kJ/mol, respectively.

  3. Sodium hydroxide poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). Medical Management Guidelines for Sodium Hydroxide (NaOH) . Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service. Available at: www.atsdr.cdc. ...

  4. Optimization of alkaline sulfite pretreatment and comparative study with sodium hydroxide pretreatment for improving enzymatic digestibility of corn stover.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Pang, Bo; Wang, Haisong; Li, Haiming; Lu, Jie; Niu, Meihong

    2015-04-01

    In this study, alkaline sulfite pretreatment of corn stover was optimized. The influences of pretreatments on solid yield, delignification, and carbohydrate recovery under different pretreatment conditions and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis were investigated. The effect of pretreatment was evaluated by enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency and the total sugar yield. The optimum pretreatment conditions were obtained, as follows: the total titratable alkali (TTA) of 12%, liquid/solid ratio of 6:1, temperature of 140 °C, and holding time of 20 min. Under those conditions, the solid yield was 55.24%, and the removal of lignin was 82.68%. Enzymatic hydrolysis rates of glucan and xylan for pretreated corn stover were 85.38% and 70.36%, and the total sugar yield was 74.73% at cellulase loading of 20 FPU/g and β-glucosidase loading of 10 IU/g for 48 h. Compared with sodium hydroxide pretreatment with the same amount of total titratable alkali, the total sugar yield was raised by about 10.43%. Additionally, the corn stover pretreated under the optimum pretreatment conditions was beaten by PFI at 1500 revolutions. After beating, enzymatic hydrolysis rates of glucan and xylan were 89.74% and 74.06%, and the total sugar yield was 78.58% at the same enzymatic hydrolysis conditions. Compared with 1500 rpm of PFI beating after sodium pretreatment with the same amount of total titratable alkali, the total sugar yield was raised by about 14.05%. PMID:25773993

  5. 21 CFR 184.1763 - Sodium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... empirical formula is NaOH. Sodium hydroxide is prepared commercially by the electrolysis of sodium chloride... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium hydroxide. 184.1763 Section 184.1763 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1763 Sodium hydroxide. (a) Sodium hydroxide (NaOH, CAS Reg....

  6. 21 CFR 184.1763 - Sodium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... empirical formula is NaOH. Sodium hydroxide is prepared commercially by the electrolysis of sodium chloride... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium hydroxide. 184.1763 Section 184.1763 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1763 Sodium hydroxide. (a) Sodium hydroxide (NaOH, CAS Reg....

  7. 21 CFR 184.1763 - Sodium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... empirical formula is NaOH. Sodium hydroxide is prepared commercially by the electrolysis of sodium chloride... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium hydroxide. 184.1763 Section 184.1763 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1763 Sodium hydroxide. (a) Sodium hydroxide (NaOH, CAS Reg....

  8. 21 CFR 184.1763 - Sodium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... empirical formula is NaOH. Sodium hydroxide is prepared commercially by the electrolysis of sodium chloride... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium hydroxide. 184.1763 Section 184.1763 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1763 Sodium hydroxide. (a) Sodium hydroxide (NaOH, CAS Reg....

  9. 21 CFR 184.1763 - Sodium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... hydroxide is prepared commercially by the electrolysis of sodium chloride solution and also by reacting... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium hydroxide. 184.1763 Section 184.1763 Food... GRAS § 184.1763 Sodium hydroxide. (a) Sodium hydroxide (NaOH, CAS Reg. No. 1310-73-2) is also known...

  10. 21 CFR 582.1763 - Sodium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium hydroxide. 582.1763 Section 582.1763 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1763 Sodium hydroxide. (a) Product. Sodium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  11. 21 CFR 582.1763 - Sodium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium hydroxide. 582.1763 Section 582.1763 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1763 Sodium hydroxide. (a) Product. Sodium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  12. 21 CFR 582.1763 - Sodium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium hydroxide. 582.1763 Section 582.1763 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1763 Sodium hydroxide. (a) Product. Sodium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  13. 21 CFR 582.1763 - Sodium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium hydroxide. 582.1763 Section 582.1763 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1763 Sodium hydroxide. (a) Product. Sodium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  14. 21 CFR 582.1763 - Sodium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium hydroxide. 582.1763 Section 582.1763 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1763 Sodium hydroxide. (a) Product. Sodium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  15. Complications of sodium hydroxide chemical matrixectomy: nail dystrophy, allodynia, hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Bostancı, Seher; Koçyiğit, Pelin; Güngör, Hilayda Karakök; Parlak, Nehir

    2014-11-01

    Ingrown toenails are seen most commonly in young adults, and they can seriously affect daily life. Partial nail avulsion with chemical matrixectomy, generally by using either sodium hydroxide or phenol, is one of the most effective treatment methods. Known complications of phenol matrixectomy are unpredictable tissue damage, prolonged postoperative drainage, increased secondary infection rates, periostitis, and poor cosmetic results. To our knowledge, there have been no reports about the complications related to sodium hydroxide matrixectomy. Herein, we describe three patients who developed nail dystrophy, allodynia, and hyperalgesia after sodium hydroxide matrixectomy. PMID:25514278

  16. 68. INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING OF THE CAUSTIC SODA (SODIUM HYDROXIDE) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    68. INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING OF THE CAUSTIC SODA (SODIUM HYDROXIDE) BUILDING, LOOKING AT CAUSTIC SODA MEASURING TANKS. (DATE UNKNOWN). - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  17. Sodium-hydroxide solution treatment on sandstone cores

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    This research was performed to study the effect of sodium hydroxide solution on the sandstone core samples and to develop a method whereby the permeability of the samples could be increased by the injection of sodium hydroxide solution. This work should provide the first step in developing a technique that can be used in the stimulation of oil and gas wells. A series of tests was conducted in which sodium hydroxide solution with concentrations ranging from 0.25 N to 2.00 N was injected into a number of Berea sandstone cores. The tests were conducted at room temperature and at 180{degree}F. In some cases the core sample were damaged by the injection of fresh water which resulted in a marked reduction in the permeability of the cores prior to the injection of sodium hydroxide solution. Based on laboratory testing with measurements of uniaxial compressive strength, SEM examination and X-ray analysis, it was found that sodium hydroxide interacted with sandstone to promote (1) partial dissolution of the sandstone minerals; (2) sandstone weight loss; (3) increased porosity; (4) weakening of the sandstone cores; and (5) changes in permeability. The interaction increased with increasing temperature and increasing sodium hydroxide concentration. However, at concentrations higher than 1.00 N, the degree of increase in permeability was not as large even though the sandstone weight loss and the increase in porosity did increase.

  18. An empirical model to estimate density of sodium hydroxide solution: An activator of geopolymer concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajamane, N. P.; Nataraja, M. C.; Jeyalakshmi, R.; Nithiyanantham, S.

    2016-02-01

    Geopolymer concrete is zero-Portland cement concrete containing alumino-silicate based inorganic polymer as binder. The polymer is obtained by chemical activation of alumina and silica bearing materials, blast furnace slag by highly alkaline solutions such as hydroxide and silicates of alkali metals. Sodium hydroxide solutions of different concentrations are commonly used in making GPC mixes. Often, it is seen that sodium hydroxide solution of very high concentration is diluted with water to obtain SHS of desired concentration. While doing so it was observed that the solute particles of NaOH in SHS tend to occupy lower volumes as the degree of dilution increases. This aspect is discussed in this paper. The observed phenomenon needs to be understood while formulating the GPC mixes since this influences considerably the relationship between concentration and density of SHS. This paper suggests an empirical formula to relate density of SHS directly to concentration expressed by w/w.

  19. Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this research involving collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is to explore new approaches to the separation of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, and other sodium salts from high-level alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit is a major reduction in disposed waste volume, obviating the building of expensive new waste tanks and reducing the costs of low-activity waste immobilization. Principles of ion recognition are being researched toward discovery of liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from other waste components. The successful concept of pseudohydroxide extraction using fluorinated alcohols and phenols is being developed at ORNL and PNNL toward a greater understanding of the controlling equilibria, role of solvation, and of synergistic effects involving crown ethers. Studies at PNNL are directed toward new solvent formulation for the practical sodium pseudohydroxide extraction systems.

  20. Sodium hydroxide catalyzed monodispersed high surface area silica nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhakta, Snehasis; Dixit, Chandra K.; Bist, Itti; Abdel Jalil, Karim; Suib, Steven L.; Rusling, James F.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding of the synthesis kinetics and our ability to modulate medium conditions allowed us to generate nanoparticles via an ultra-fast process. The synthesis medium is kept quite simple with tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) as precursor and 50% ethanol and sodium hydroxide catalyst. Synthesis is performed under gentle conditions at 20 °C for 20 min Long synthesis time and catalyst-associated drawbacks are most crucial in silica nanoparticle synthesis. We have addressed both these bottlenecks by replacing the conventional Stober catalyst, ammonium hydroxide, with sodium hydroxide. We have reduced the overall synthesis time from 20 to 1/3 h, ∼60-fold decrease, and obtained highly monodispersed nanoparticles with 5-fold higher surface area than Stober particles. We have demonstrated that the developed NPs with ∼3-fold higher silane can be used as efficient probes for biosensor applications.

  1. Engineering evaluation of a sodium hydroxide thermal energy storage module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perdue, D. G.; Gordon, L. H.

    1980-01-01

    An engineering evaluation of thermal energy storage prototypes was performed in order to assess the development status of latent heat storage media. The testing and the evaluation of a prototype sodium hydroxide module is described. This module stored off-peak electrical energy as heat for later conversion to domestic hot water needs.

  2. Combined Utilization of Cation Exchanger and Neutral Receptor to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Moyer, Bruce A.

    2004-03-29

    In this report, novel approaches to the selective liquid-liquid extraction separation of sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from high-level alkaline tank waste will be discussed. Sodium hydroxide can be successfully separated from alkaline tank-waste supernatants by weakly acidic lipophilic hydroxy compounds via a cation-exchange mechanism referred to as pseudo hydroxide extraction. In a multi-cycle process, as sodium hydroxide in the aqueous phase becomes depleted, it is helpful to have a neutral sodium receptor in the extraction system to exploit the high nitrate concentration in the waste solution to promote sodium removal by an ion-pair extraction process. Simultaneous utilization of an ionizable organic hydroxy compound and a neutral extractant (crown ether) in an organic phase results in the synergistic enhancement of ion exchange and improved separation selectivity due to the receptor's strong and selective sodium binding. Moreover, combination of the hydroxy compound and the crown ether provides for mutually increased solubility, even in a non-polar organic solvent. Accordingly, application of Isopar{reg_sign} L, a kerosene-like alkane solvent, becomes feasible. This investigation involves examination of such dual-mechanism extraction phases for sodium extraction from simulated and actual salt cake waste solutions. Sodium salts can be regenerated upon the contact of the loaded extraction phases with water. Finally, conditions of potential extraction/strip cycling will be discussed.

  3. IR manifestation of water intermediates formation with sodium hydroxide and sodium salts in KBr matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinvald, I. I.; Vorotyntsev, V. M.; Vorotyntsev, I. V.; Kalagaev, I. Yu.; Vorotyntsev, A. V.; Salkina, S. V.; Petukhov, A. N.; Spirin, I. A.; Grushevskaya, A. I.

    2015-12-01

    The association of water with sodium hydroxide, sodium carbonate and sodium nitrate in a KBr matrix at room temperature, exhibited by FTIR data, was established. It was found that water intermediates form due to the intermolecular hydrogen bond and can be stabilized in the solid phase. The revealed clusters can exist in several shape of hydrates shell with different geometry and number of involved water molecules.

  4. Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Custelcean, Radu; Delmau, Laetitia H.; Engle, Nancy L.; Kang, Hyun-Ah; Keever, Tamara J.; Marchand, Alan P.; Gadthula, Srinivas; Gore, Vinayak K.; Huang, Zilin; Sivappa, Rasapalli; Tirunahari, Pavan K.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

    2005-09-26

    The purpose of this research involving collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is to explore new approaches to the separation of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, and other sodium salts from high-level alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit is a major reduction in disposed waste volume, obviating the building of expensive new waste tanks and reducing the costs of vitrification. Principles of ion recognition are being researched toward discovery of liquid-liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from other waste components. The successful concept of pseudo hydroxide extraction using fluorinated alcohols and phenols is being developed at ORNL and PNNL toward a greater understanding of the controlling equilibria, role of solvation, and of synergistic effects involving crown ethers. Synthesis efforts are being directed toward enhanced sodium binding by crown ethers, both neutral and proton-ionizable. Studies with real tank waste at PNNL will provide feedback toward solvent compositions that have promising properties.

  5. Decomposition of Niobium Ore by Sodium Hydroxide Fusion Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiu-Li; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Wei, Chang; Zheng, Shi-Li; Sun, Qing

    2013-02-01

    The decomposition kinetics of niobium ore in the NaOH system was studied experimentally. The results show that the reaction products are sodium metaniobate and sodium niobate formed by the reaction of pyrochlore with sodium hydroxide under roasting. The effects of temperature, particle size, and mass ratio of alkali-to-ore were studied. The conversion rate of niobium exceeded 99 pct after 20 minutes at 923 K (650 °C) with a mass ratio of alkali-to-ore 1.2:1 and with initial particle size 75 to 106 μm. The kinetic study indicates that the shrinking core model is applicable and the process is controlled by a chemical reaction. The activation energy was calculated to be 78.82 kJ mol-1.

  6. Pseudo-hydroxide extraction in the separation of sodium hydroxide from aqueous solutions using alkyl phenols

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Hyun Ah; Moyer, Bruce A

    2006-01-01

    Pseudo-hydroxide extraction of sodium hydroxide from aqueous solution using four alkyl phenols of nearly identical molecular weight in 1-octanol at 25 degrees C was examined to understand the effect of alkyl substituents. The order of extraction strength among the four alkyl phenols tested was 4-tert-octylphenol. 3,5-di-tertbutylphenol. 2,4-di-tert-butylphenol. 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol. A good correlation with phenol pK(a) was observed, indicating that extraction strength is determined by phenol acidity, as modified by steric effects in proximity to the phenol - OH group. The effective partition ratios (P-eff) of two phenols from 1 M NaOH solution were determined, showing that the phenols remain predominantly in the 1-octanol phase even when converted to their sodium salts. However, the hydrophobicity of the tested phenols may not be sufficient for process purposes. The equilibrium constants for the governing extraction equilibria were determined by modeling the data using the program SXLSQI, supporting the cation-exchange extraction mechanism. The proposed mechanism consists of two simple sets of equilibria for a. Ion-pair extraction to give Na+OH- ion pairs and corresponding free ions in 1-octanol the phase and b. Cation exchange by monomeric phenol molecules (HAs) to form monomeric organic-phase Na(+)A(-) ion pairs and corresponding free organic-phase ions.

  7. Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this research involving collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is to explore new approaches to the separation of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, and other sodium salts from high-level alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit is a major reduction in disposed waste volume, obviating the building of expensive new waste tanks and reducing the costs of low-activity waste immobilization. Principles of ion recognition are being researched toward discovery of liquid-liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from other waste components. The successful concept of pseudohydroxide extraction using fluorinated alcohols and phenols is being developed at ORNL and PNNL toward a greater understanding of the controlling equilibria, role of solvation, and of synergistic effects involving crown ethers. Synthesis efforts are being directed toward enhanced sodium binding by crown ethers, both neutral and proton-ionizable. Studies with real tank waste at PNNL will provide feedback toward solvent compositions that have promising properties.

  8. Accidental contamination of a German town's drinking water with sodium hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Lendowski, Luba; Färber, Harald; Holy, Andreas; Darius, Anke; Ehrich, Bernd; Wippermann, Christine; Küfner, Bernd; Exner, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Case report of a very serious drinking water incident putting up to 50,000 inhabitants of a town near Bonn in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany at risk. A concentrated solution of highly alkaline water by sodium hydroxide was accidentally washed into the town's drinking water at a pumping station and increased the pH-value of the water to 12. Residents who came into contact with the contaminated water immediately had a toxic reaction. The incident was detected by complaints from customers and after that was stopped within several hours. The pipes were flushed and the customers were warned not to use the water till the all clear. After this immediate management there was an investigation and the cause of the incident was detected as an accidental release of accumulated sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution. The lack of a network alarm system and the automatic cut-off mechanisms as deficiencies in the design of the station were rectified by the water company immediately after the incident. PMID:25687345

  9. Interaction of Pu(IV,VI) hydroxides/oxides with metal hydroxides/oxides in alkaline media

    SciTech Connect

    Fedoseev, A.M.; Krot, N.N.; Budantseva, N.A.; Bessonov, A.A.; Nikonov, M.V.; Grigoriev, M.S.; Garnov, A.Y.; Perminov, V.P.; Astafurova, L.N.

    1998-08-01

    The primary goal of this investigation was to obtain data on the possibility, extent, and characteristics of interaction of Pu(IV) and (VI) with hydroxides and oxides of d-elements and other metals [Al(III), LA(III), and U(VI)] in alkaline media. Such information is important in fundamental understanding of plutonium disposition and behavior in Hanford Site radioactive tank waste sludge. These results supply essential data for determining criticality safety and in understanding transuranic waste behavior in storage, retrieval, and treatment of Hanford Site tank waste.

  10. Extended development of a sodium hydroxide thermal energy storage module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, R. E.; Rowny, P. E.; Cohen, B. M.

    1980-01-01

    The post-test evaluation of a single heat exchanger sodium hydroxide thermal energy storage module for use in solar electric generation is reported. Chemical analyses of the storage medium used in the experimental model are presented. The experimental verification of the module performance using an alternate heat transfer fluid, Caloria HT-43, is described. Based on these results, a design analysis of a dual heat exchanger concept within the storage module is presented. A computer model and a reference design for the dual system (storage working fluid/power cycle working fluid) were completed. The dual system is estimated to have a capital cost of approximately one half that of the single heat exchanger concept.

  11. Sodium Hydroxide Enhances Extractability and Analysis of Proanthocyanidins in Ensiled Sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia).

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Aina; Drake, Chris; Grosse Brinkhaus, Anja; Girard, Marion; Copani, Giuseppe; Dohme-Meier, Frigga; Bee, Giuseppe; Niderkorn, Vincent; Mueller-Harvey, Irene

    2015-11-01

    Little information exists on the effects of ensiling on condensed tannins or proanthocyanidins. The acetone-butanol-HCl assay is suitable for measuring proanthocyanidin contents in a wide range of samples, silages included, but provides limited information on proanthocyanidin composition, which is of interest for deciphering the relationships between tannins and their bioactivities in terms of animal nutrition or health. Degradation with benzyl mercaptan (thiolysis) provides information on proanthocyanidin composition, but proanthocyanidins in several sainfoin silages have proved resistant to thiolysis. We now report that a pretreatment step with sodium hydroxide prior to thiolysis was needed to enable their analysis. This alkaline treatment increased their extractability from ensiled sainfoin and facilitated especially the release of larger proanthocyanidins. Ensiling reduced assayable proanthocyanidins by 29%, but the composition of the remaining proanthocyanidins in silage resembled that of the fresh plants. PMID:26484985

  12. Recovery of acids and sodium hydroxide from solutions of sodium sulfate and sodium chloride with the use of bipolar membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Bobrinskaya, G.A.; Pavlova, T.V.; Shatalov, A.Ya.

    1985-09-01

    The authors examined the kinetic laws governing the electrodialysis recovery of hydrochloric acid and sulfuric acid, as well as sodium hydroxide, from 1M sodium chloride and 0.5 M sodium sulfate solutions and from a mixture of these salts with the use of the MB-1, MB-2, and MB-3 bipolar membranes. Kinetic plots of the current density and the concentration of the acid and the base in the chambers next to the bipolar membranes during the electrodialysis treatment of 1M sodium chloride, 0.5 M sodium sulfate, and solutions are presented. It was established that it is better to use the MB-3 membrane for the electrodialysis conversion of sodium chloride and sodium sulfate into acids and sodium hydroxide owing to the high rate and current efficiency and low expenditure of electrical energy and degree of contamination of the products obtained by the salts. It was also established that the resistance of the MB-1 and MB-2 bipolar membranes is almost an order of magnitude higher than that of the MB-3 membrane.

  13. Hydrogen embrittlement of type 410 stainless steel in sodium chloride, sodium sulfate, and sodium hydroxide environments at 90 C

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, J.G.; Salinas-Bravo, V.M.; Martinez-Villafane, A.

    1997-06-01

    Susceptibility of martensitic type 410 (UNS S41000) stainless steel (SS) to environmental cracking was evaluated at 90 C in concentrated sodium chloride, sodium sulfate and sodium hydroxide solutions, all of which are environments related to steam turbine conditions, using the slow strain rate testing (SSRT) technique. In NaCl, the effects of solution pH, concentration, and anodic and cathodic polarization were investigated. Tests were supplemented by detailed electron fractography and hydrogen permeation measurements. A clear correlation was found between the degree of embrittlement and the amount of hydrogen permeating the steel, suggesting a hydrogen-induced cracking mechanism.

  14. An improved method for analysis of hydroxide and carbonate in alkaline electrolytes containing zinc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, M. A.

    1978-01-01

    A simplified method for titration of carbonate and hydroxide in alkaline battery electrolyte is presented involving a saturated KSCN solution as a complexing agent for zinc. Both hydroxide and carbonate can be determined in one titration, and the complexing reagent is readily prepared. Since the pH at the end point is shifted from 8.3 to 7.9 - 8.0, m-cresol purple or phenol red are used as indicators rather than phenolphthalein. Bromcresol green is recommended for determination of the second end point of a pH of 4.3 to 4.4.

  15. Kinetics of leaching of the aluminum hydroxide in bauxites by alkaline solutions at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtsev, A. V.; Lainer, Yu. A.; Gorichev, I. G.; Kipriyanov, N. A.; Izotov, A. D.

    2011-11-01

    The kinetics of leaching of the aluminum hydroxide from the gibbsite bauxites of Guinea (Kindia deposit) is studied under atmospheric conditions. The activation energy of the process is found to be 34.75 kJ/mol, which indicates that the process proceeds in a kinetic mode. The leaching of the aluminum hydroxide from bauxite in an alkaline solution is simulated using acid-base equilibria (ion exchange) and the electrochemical theory of the structure of a double electrical layer (Gram-Parsons theory).

  16. An improved method for analysis of hydroxide and carbonate in alkaline electrolytes containing zinc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, M. A.

    1978-01-01

    A simplified method for titration of carbonate and hydroxide in alkaline battery electrolyte is presented involving a saturated KSCN solution as a complexing agent for zinc. Both hydroxide and carbonate can be determined in one titration, and the complexing reagent is readily prepared. Since the pH at the end point is shifted from 8.3 to 7.9-8.0, m-cresol purple or phenol red are used as indicators rather than phenolphthalein. Bromcresol green is recommended for determination of the second end point of a pH of 4.3 to 4.4.

  17. 40 CFR 415.60 - Applicability; description of the chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide production subcategory. 415.60 Section 415.60 Protection of... MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Chlor-alkali Subcategory (Chlorine and Sodium or Potassium Hydroxide Production) § 415.60 Applicability; description of the chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide...

  18. 40 CFR 415.60 - Applicability; description of the chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide production subcategory. 415.60 Section 415.60 Protection of... MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Chlor-alkali Subcategory (Chlorine and Sodium or Potassium Hydroxide Production) § 415.60 Applicability; description of the chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide...

  19. 40 CFR 415.60 - Applicability; description of the chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide production subcategory. 415.60 Section 415.60 Protection of... MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Chlor-alkali Subcategory (Chlorine and Sodium or Potassium Hydroxide Production) § 415.60 Applicability; description of the chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide...

  20. 40 CFR 415.60 - Applicability; description of the chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide production subcategory. 415.60 Section 415.60 Protection of... MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Chlor-alkali Subcategory (Chlorine and Sodium or Potassium Hydroxide Production) § 415.60 Applicability; description of the chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide...

  1. 40 CFR 415.60 - Applicability; description of the chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide production subcategory. 415.60 Section 415.60 Protection of... MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Chlor-alkali Subcategory (Chlorine and Sodium or Potassium Hydroxide Production) § 415.60 Applicability; description of the chlorine and sodium or potassium hydroxide...

  2. Catalytic and inhibiting effects of lithium peroxide and hydroxide on sodium chlorate decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, J.C.; Zhang, Y.

    1995-09-01

    Chemical oxygen generators based on sodium chlorate and lithium perchlorate are used in airplanes, submarines, diving, and mine rescue. Catalytic decomposition of sodium chlorate in the presence of cobalt oxide, lithium peroxide, and lithium hydroxide is studied using thermal gravimetric analysis. Lithium peroxide and hydroxide are both moderately active catalysts for the decomposition of sodium chlorate when used alone, and inhibitors when used with the more active catalyst cobalt oxide.

  3. Ab initio calculations on the positive ions of the alkaline-earth oxides, fluorides, and hydroxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, H.; Langhoff, S. R.; Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical dissociation energies are presented for the alkaline-earth fluoride, hydroxide, and oxide positive ions that are considered to be accurate to 0.1-0.2 eV. The r(e) for the positive ions are found to be consistently shorter than the corresponding neutrals by 0.07 + or -0.02 A. The bonding in the ground states is demonstrated to be of predominantly M + 2 X - character. The a 3 Pi and A 1 Pi are found to lie considerably above the X 1 Sigma + ground states of the alkaline-earth fluoride and hydroxide positive ions. The overall agreement of the theoretical ionization potentials with the available experimental appearance potentials is satisfactory; these values should represent the most accurate and consistent set available.

  4. The mechanism of thermal-gradient mass transfer in the sodium hydroxide-nickel system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Charles E

    1958-01-01

    "Thermal-gradient mass transfer" was investigated in the molten sodium hydroxide-nickel system. Possible mechanisms (physical, electrochemical, and chemical) are discussed in terms of experimental and theoretical evidence. Experimental details are included in appendixes.

  5. Characterization and Oxidation of Chromium(III) by Sodium Hypochlorite in Alkaline Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Huijian; Rao, Linfeng; Zhang, Zhicheng; Rai, Dhanpat

    2006-07-01

    Chromium exists in nuclear waste sludges and is a problematic element in the vitrification process of high-level nuclear wastes. It is therefore necessary to treat the waste sludges to remove chromium prior to vitrification, by caustic leaching or oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI). The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of oligomerization of Cr(III) on its oxidation by hypochlorite in alkaline solutions. Monomeric, dimeric and trimeric Cr(III) species in solution were separated by ion exchange. The kinetics of the oxidation of the separated species by hypochlorite in alkaline solutions was studied by UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy, and compared with the oxidation by hydrogen peroxide previously studied. Results indicate that hypochlorite can oxidize Cr(III) to Cr(VI) in alkaline solutions, but the rate of oxidation by hypochlorite is slower than that by hydrogen peroxide at the same alkalinity and concentrations of oxidants. The rate of oxidation of Cr(III) by both oxidants decreases as the concentration of sodium hydroxide is increased, but the oxidation by hypochlorite seems less affected by the degree of oligomerization of Cr(III) than that by peroxide. Compared with the oxidation by hydrogen peroxide where the major reaction pathway has an inverse order with respect to CNaOH, the oxidation by hypochlorite has a significant reaction pathway independent of [OH?].

  6. Kinetics of pyrite oxidation in sodium hydroxide solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciminelli, V. S. T.; Osseo-Asare, K.

    1995-08-01

    The kinetics of pyrite oxidation in sodium hydroxide solution were investigated in a stirred reactor, under temperatures ranging from 50 °C to 85 °C, oxygen partial pressures of up to 1 atm, particle size fractions from -150 + 106 to -38 + 10µm (-100 + 150 mesh to -400 mesh + 10 µ), and pH values of up to 12.5. The surface reaction is represented by the rate equation:- dN/dt = Sbk″pO0.5 2[oH- 0.25/(1 + k‴ pO2 0.5) where N represents moles of pyrite, S is the surface area of the solid particles, k″ and k″ are constants, b is a stoichiometric factor, pO2 is the oxygen partial pressure, and [OH-] is the hydroxyl ion concentration. The corresponding fractional conversion ( X) vs time behavior follows the shrinking particle model for chemical reaction control: 1 - (1 - X)1/3 = k ct The rate increases with the reciprocal of particle size and has an activation energy of 55.6 kJ/mol (13.6 kcal/mol). The relationship between reaction rate and oxygen partial pressure resembles a Langmuir-type equation and thus suggests that the reaction involves adsorption or desorption of oxygen at the interface. The square-root rate law may be due to the adsorption of a dissociated oxygen molecule. The observed apparent reaction order with respect to the hydroxyl ion concentration is a result of a complex combination of processes involving the oxidation and nydrolysis of iron, oxidation and hydrolysis of sulfur, and the oxygen reduction.

  7. Selective separation of hydroxide from alkaline nuclear tank waste by liquid-liquid extraction with weak hydroxy acids.

    PubMed

    Chambliss, C Kevin; Haverlock, Tamara I; Bonnesen, Peter V; Engle, Nancy L; Moyer, Bruce A

    2002-04-15

    Recovery and recycle of caustic reagents in industrial processes offer potential means of pollution prevention, as investigated herein for particular needs related to the cleanup of alkaline nuclear waste. Specifically, the recovery of hydroxide from alkaline media by liquid-liquid extraction can be effected utilizing weak hydroxy acids, as demonstrated for NaOH utilizing a series of lipophilic fluorinated alcohols and alkylated phenols dissolved in 1-octanol. Extraction efficiency follows the expected order of acidity of the hydroxy acids, the phenols being the most efficient extractants among the compounds tested. After extraction, NaOH is effectively recoverable from the organic phase upon contact with water. The weakest hydroxy acids are the most efficiently stripped, NaOH recovery being nearly quantitative in a single contact. In competitive extraction experiments, good selectivity for hydroxide recovery over other anions such as nitrate and chloride was demonstrated. Since the order of extraction favors larger anions, the exceptional preference for hydroxide implies that the extraction occurs by deprotonation of the hydroxy acids in a cation-exchange process. Stripping therefore occurs by hydrolysis to regenerate the neutral hydroxy acid, liberating NaOH to the aqueous phase. Since hydroxide equivalents rather than actual hydroxide ions are transferred to the solvent, the process is termed "pseudohydroxide extraction." Hydroxide recovery from a simulant of alkaline nuclear tank waste (Hanford DSSF simulant) was also demonstrated in repeated extraction and stripping cycles. PMID:11993889

  8. Sulfur removal from Gediz lignite using aqueous sodium hydroxide solutions under mild oxidative conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yaman, S.; Kuecuekbayrak, S.

    1999-11-01

    Sulfur removal from a high-sulfur Turkish lignite (Gediz) using aqueous sodium hydroxide solutions having dissolved oxygen was investigated under mild oxidative conditions. Effects of the parameters such as sodium hydroxide/lignite weight ratio, temperature, and partial pressure of oxygen were investigated within the ranges of 0.05--0.8, 423--498 K, and 1--2 MPa, respectively. Optimum values of these parameters were determined regarding sulfur removal and coal recovery. Influences of dry oxidation of the lignite sample as a pretreatment at 573 K and subsequent washing of some treated lignite samples with 1 N HCl were investigated.

  9. [Case of alkaline esophagitis due to sodium hypochlorite ingestion].

    PubMed

    Hifumi, Toru; Yoshioka, Hayato; Kanemura, Takashi; Kiriu, Nobuaki; Hasegawa, Eijyu; Kato, Hiroshi; Koido, Yuichi

    2010-12-01

    The severity of alkaline esophagitis due to sodium hypochlorite ingestion is variable and the findings of endoscope within 48 hours of ingestion are reported to be associated with its prognosis. We report a good recovery case of grade 2B of alkaline esophagitis, which was treated with close observation. The patient was 59-year old man. He was found lying on the bed by his wife, after drinking bactericidal agents (Jianok) and kitchen cleaner (Magiclean) for suicide attempt. After his trachea was intubated, he underwent upper gastrointestinal scope, which displayed circumferential ulcers at the lower esophagus. He was diagnosed as having a Grade 2B alkaline esophagitis, which was associated with a higher probability of stricture or perforation. On the 14th day of the admission, the 2nd endoscope was performed and no esophageal strictures were detected. He was extubated and started oral feeding on the 15th day. After that, his hospital course was uneventful and was discharged on the 18th day. 6 months have passed since he left hospital. No esophageal strictures were detected so far. PMID:21268820

  10. Separating hydrogen and oxygen evolution in alkaline water electrolysis using nickel hydroxide

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Long; Dong, Xiaoli; Wang, Yonggang; Xia, Yongyao

    2016-01-01

    Low-cost alkaline water electrolysis has been considered a sustainable approach to producing hydrogen using renewable energy inputs, but preventing hydrogen/oxygen mixing and efficiently using the instable renewable energy are challenging. Here, using nickel hydroxide as a redox mediator, we decouple the hydrogen and oxygen production in alkaline water electrolysis, which overcomes the gas-mixing issue and may increase the use of renewable energy. In this architecture, the hydrogen production occurs at the cathode by water reduction, and the anodic Ni(OH)2 is simultaneously oxidized into NiOOH. The subsequent oxygen production involves a cathodic NiOOH reduction (NiOOH→Ni(OH)2) and an anodic OH− oxidization. Alternatively, the NiOOH formed during hydrogen production can be coupled with a zinc anode to form a NiOOH-Zn battery, and its discharge product (that is, Ni(OH)2) can be used to produce hydrogen again. This architecture brings a potential solution to facilitate renewables-to-hydrogen conversion. PMID:27199009

  11. Separating hydrogen and oxygen evolution in alkaline water electrolysis using nickel hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Long; Dong, Xiaoli; Wang, Yonggang; Xia, Yongyao

    2016-05-01

    Low-cost alkaline water electrolysis has been considered a sustainable approach to producing hydrogen using renewable energy inputs, but preventing hydrogen/oxygen mixing and efficiently using the instable renewable energy are challenging. Here, using nickel hydroxide as a redox mediator, we decouple the hydrogen and oxygen production in alkaline water electrolysis, which overcomes the gas-mixing issue and may increase the use of renewable energy. In this architecture, the hydrogen production occurs at the cathode by water reduction, and the anodic Ni(OH)2 is simultaneously oxidized into NiOOH. The subsequent oxygen production involves a cathodic NiOOH reduction (NiOOH-->Ni(OH)2) and an anodic OH- oxidization. Alternatively, the NiOOH formed during hydrogen production can be coupled with a zinc anode to form a NiOOH-Zn battery, and its discharge product (that is, Ni(OH)2) can be used to produce hydrogen again. This architecture brings a potential solution to facilitate renewables-to-hydrogen conversion.

  12. Separating hydrogen and oxygen evolution in alkaline water electrolysis using nickel hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long; Dong, Xiaoli; Wang, Yonggang; Xia, Yongyao

    2016-01-01

    Low-cost alkaline water electrolysis has been considered a sustainable approach to producing hydrogen using renewable energy inputs, but preventing hydrogen/oxygen mixing and efficiently using the instable renewable energy are challenging. Here, using nickel hydroxide as a redox mediator, we decouple the hydrogen and oxygen production in alkaline water electrolysis, which overcomes the gas-mixing issue and may increase the use of renewable energy. In this architecture, the hydrogen production occurs at the cathode by water reduction, and the anodic Ni(OH)2 is simultaneously oxidized into NiOOH. The subsequent oxygen production involves a cathodic NiOOH reduction (NiOOH→Ni(OH)2) and an anodic OH(-) oxidization. Alternatively, the NiOOH formed during hydrogen production can be coupled with a zinc anode to form a NiOOH-Zn battery, and its discharge product (that is, Ni(OH)2) can be used to produce hydrogen again. This architecture brings a potential solution to facilitate renewables-to-hydrogen conversion. PMID:27199009

  13. Arsenic fractionation and bioaccessibility in two alkaline Texas soils incubated with sodium arsenate.

    PubMed

    Datta, Rupali; Makris, Konstantinos C; Sarkar, Dibyendu

    2007-05-01

    Elevated arsenic (As) concentrations in urban soils with prolonged arsenical pesticide application history have increased the risk associated with accidental hand-to-mouth soil ingestion by children. Earlier work by the authors suggested that the conservative statement of 100% As bioaccessibility in soils was not valid for a set of acidic soils incubated with sodium arsenate. In this study, two alkaline Texas soils incubated with a commonly used As pesticide (sodium arsenate) were evaluated for their potential in reducing soil As bioaccessibility. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of incubation time and As load on soil As fractionation and bioaccessibility. Soils were subjected to a sequential As fractionation scheme, and bioaccessible As was quantified using an in vitro stomach phase test. Results showed a reduction in the water-soluble As fraction with incubation time (after 4 months), which remained unchanged after 12 months. This reduction with time was accompanied by an increase in the NaOH- and H(2)SO(4)-extractable As fractions, suggesting As sorption by amorphous Fe/Al hydroxides and/or Ca/Mg compounds, respectively. Organic/sulfides-bound As increased with incubation time after 12 months but not after 4 months of incubation. The aging effect was also observed with the amount of bioaccessible As at all As loads, showing significant positive correlations with the water-extractable and exchangeable As fractions. Bioaccessible As concentrations even after 12 months of incubation were not significantly reduced, suggesting that natural attenuation might prove inadequate to control As bioaccessibility in these alkaline soils. PMID:17387422

  14. Americium and plutonium association with magnesium hydroxide colloids in alkaline nuclear industry process environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, Zoe; Ivanov, Peter; O'Brien, Luke; Sims, Howard; Taylor, Robin J.; Heath, Sarah L.; Livens, Francis R.; Goddard, David; Kellet, Simon; Rand, Peter; Bryan, Nick D.

    2016-01-01

    The behaviours of Pu, Am and colloids in feed solutions to the Site Ion-exchange Effluent Plant (SIXEP) at the Sellafield nuclear reprocessing site in the U.K. have been studied. For both Pu and Am, fractions were found to be associated with material in the colloidal size range, with ˜50% of the Pu in the range 1-200 nm. The concentration of soluble Pu (<1 nm) was ˜1 nM, which is very similar to the solubility limit for Pu(V). The soluble Am concentration was of the order of 10-11 M, which was below the solubility limit of americium hydroxide. The size, morphology and elemental composition of the particulates and colloids in the feed solutions were investigated. Magnesium is homogeneously distributed throughout the particles, whereas U, Si, Fe, and Ca were present in localised areas only. Amongst some heterogeneous material, particles were identified that were consistent with hydrotalcite. The distribution of 241Am(III) on brucite (magnesium hydroxide) colloids of different sizes was studied under alkaline conditions representative of nuclear fuel storage pond and effluent feed solution conditions. The morphology of the brucite particles in the bulk material observed by ESEM was predominantly hexagonal, while that of the carbonated brucite consisted of hexagonal species mixed with platelets. The association of 241Am(III) with the brucite colloids was studied by ultrafiltration coupled with gamma ray-spectrometry. For carbonate concentrations up to 10-3 M, the 241Am(III) was mainly associated with larger colloids (>300 kDa), and there was a shift from the smaller size fractions to the larger over a period of 6 months. At higher carbonate concentrations (10-2 M), the Am was predominantly detected in the true solution fraction (<3 kDa) and in smaller size colloidal fractions, in the range 3-100 kDa.

  15. Chemically and compositionally modified solid solution disordered multiphase nickel hydroxide positive electrode for alkaline rechargeable electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Ovshinsky, Stanford R.; Corrigan, Dennis; Venkatesan, Srini; Young, Rosa; Fierro, Christian; Fetcenko, Michael A.

    1994-01-01

    A high capacity, long cycle life positive electrode for use in an alkaline rechargeable electrochemical cell comprising: a solid solution nickel hydroxide material having a multiphase structure that comprises at least one polycrystalline .gamma.-phase including a polycrystalline .gamma.-phase unit cell comprising spacedly disposed plates with at least one chemical modifier incorporated around the plates, the plates having a range of stable intersheet distances corresponding to a 2.sup.+ oxidation state and a 3.5.sup.+, or greater, oxidation state; and at least one compositional modifier incorporated into the solid solution nickel hydroxide material to promote the multiphase structure.

  16. Autopsy results of a case of ingestion of sodium hydroxide solution.

    PubMed

    Emoto, Yuko; Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko; Shikata, Nobuaki; Tsubura, Airo; Nagasaki, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Sodium hydroxide is a strongly corrosive alkali. We describe herein a case of suicide by ingestion of sodium hydroxide. A man in his 80s was found dead with a mug and a bottle of caustic soda. Macroscopically, liquefaction and/or disappearance of esophagus, trachea and lung tissue and a grayish discoloration of the mucosa of the stomach were seen along with blackish brown coloration of the skin, mouth, and oral cavity. The contents of the gastrointestinal tract showed a pH level of 7-8 on pH indicator strips. Histopathologically, liquefactive necrosis of remnant lung tissue and the stomach were seen. As biological reactions such as vasodilatation and inflammation were not detected in these organs, only a short number of hours must have passed between ingestion and death. This human case provides valuable information concerning the direct irritation induced by systemic exposure to corrosive substances. PMID:26989301

  17. Spectrophotometric determination of fluoride in fluoride-bearing minerals after decomposition by fusion with sodium hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Adelantado, J V; Martinez, V P; Moreno, A C; Reig, F B

    1985-03-01

    The decomposition of highly insoluble minerals (fluorspar and cryolite) by fusion with molten alkali-metal hydroxides is studied. The introduction of additives such as aluminium compounds or sodium peroxide to obtain total liberation of fluoride from calcium fluoride samples, is tested. The fusion is done in a silver crucible with a Bunsen burner. The cooled melt is easily soluble, giving solutions suitable for spectrophotometric fluoride determination by the Zr(IV)-fluoride-Erichrome Cyanine R method. PMID:18963832

  18. Susceptibility of carbon steel to stress corrosion cracking in sodium hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Flis, J.

    2005-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of carbon steel and decarburized steel was studied in 8.5 M sodium hydroxide at 100 ?C. Potentiodynamic experiments were performed to determine the potential values to be applied in slow strain rate(ssr) experiments. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were used to investigate the surfaces of corroded samples. Severe intergranular stress corrosion cracking was observed on the carbon steel samples in comparison to the decarburized steel samples.

  19. Structural and nano-mechanical properties of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) formed from alite hydration in the presence of sodium and potassium hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza, Oscar; Giraldo, Carolina; Camargo, Sergio S.

    2015-08-15

    This research evaluates the effect of sodium and potassium hydroxide on the structure and nano-mechanical properties of Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C-S-H) formed from the hydration of pure alite. Monoclinic (MIII) alite was synthesized and hydrated, using water-to-alite ratios of 0.5 and 0.6 and additions of 10% NaOH and KOH by weight of alite. Based on results of X-ray diffraction, isothermal calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and nanoindentation, two different effects of the alkaline hydroxides on the hydration reaction of alite, both at early and later ages, can be identified: (i) a differentiated hydration process, attributed to an enhancement in calcium hydroxide (CH) precipitation and a stimulation of the C-S-H nuclei; and (ii) an increase in the elastic modulus of the C-S-H aggregations, attributed to an electrostatic attraction between positive charges from the alkaline cations and negative charges from the C-S-H structure.

  20. Nickel hydroxide deposited indium tin oxide electrodes as electrocatalysts for direct oxidation of carbohydrates in alkaline medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh, V.; Farzana, S.; Berchmans, Sheela

    In this work, the direct electrochemical oxidation of carbohydrates using nickel hydroxide modified indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes in alkaline medium is demonstrated; suggesting the feasibility of using carbohydrates as a novel fuel in alkaline fuel cells applications. The chosen monosaccharides are namely glucose and fructose; disaccharides such as sucrose and lactose; and sugar acid like ascorbic acid for this study. ITO electrodes are chemically modified using a hexagonal lyotropic liquid crystalline phase template electrodeposition of nickel. Structural morphology, growth, orientation and electrochemical behaviour of Ni deposits are characterized using SEM, XRD, XPS and cyclic voltammetry (CV), respectively. Further electrochemical potential cycling process in alkaline medium is employed to convert these Ni deposits into corresponding nickel hydroxide modified electrodes. These electrodes are used as novel platform to perform the electrocatalytic oxidation of various carbohydrates in alkaline medium. It was found that bare and Ni coated ITO electrodes are inactive towards carbohydrates oxidation. The heterogeneous rate constant values are determined and calculated to be two orders of magnitude higher in the case of template method when compared to non-template technique. The observed effect is attributed to the synergistic effect of higher surface area of these deposits and catalytic ability of Ni(II)/Ni(III) redox couple.

  1. Production of cellulosic ethanol from cotton processing residues after pretreatment with dilute sodium hydroxide and enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Fockink, Douglas Henrique; Maceno, Marcelo Adriano Corrêa; Ramos, Luiz Pereira

    2015-01-01

    In this study, production of cellulosic ethanol from two cotton processing residues was investigated after pretreatment with dilute sodium hydroxide. Pretreatment performance was investigated using a 2(2) factorial design and the highest glucan conversion was achieved at the most severe alkaline conditions (0.4g NaOH g(-1) of dry biomass and 120°C), reaching 51.6% and 38.8% for cotton gin waste (CGW) and cotton gin dust (CGD), respectively. The susceptibility of pretreated substrates to enzymatic hydrolysis was also investigated and the best condition was achieved at the lowest total solids (5wt%) and the highest enzyme loading (85mg of Cellic CTec2 g(-1) of dry substrate). However, the highest concentration of fermentable sugars - 47.8 and 42.5gL(-1) for CGD and CGW, respectively - was obtained at 15wt% total solids using this same enzyme loading. Substrate hydrolysates had no inhibitory effects on the fermenting microorganism. PMID:25841187

  2. Countercurrent washing of Pittsburgh No. 8 coal after leaching with molten mixtures of sodium and potassium hydroxides

    SciTech Connect

    Chriswell, C.D.; Shah, N.D.; Markuszewski, R. )

    1991-01-01

    Molten caustic leaching is an advanced chemical coal-cleaning process which results in the removal of over 90% of the sulfur and ash from coal. One of the steps in this process is the water washing of caustic-leached coals to remove unreacted caustic and impurities released by reactions with the molten caustic. A countercurrent procedure, designed for efficient washing with minimal water consumption, has been evaluated in the present work. A Pittsburgh No. 8 coal was leached with a one-to-one mixture of molten sodium and potassium hydroxides, and the resulting coal-caustic cake was washed using this countercurrent procedure. The countercurrent washing did result in recovery of caustic at predicted concentrations, and a relatively ash-free and sulfur-free coal was the final product. However, significant problems occurred during the countercurrent washing, all of which could be linked with the formation of a massive precipitate of carbonates from the alkaline process streams. The mass of the precipitate retained fluids and thus led to far lower than predicted recoveries of caustic solutions. the precipitate also caused a significant decrease in filtration rates.

  3. Desalination and hydrogen, chlorine, and sodium hydroxide production via electrophoretic ion exchange and precipitation.

    PubMed

    Shkolnikov, Viktor; Bahga, Supreet S; Santiago, Juan G

    2012-08-28

    We demonstrate and analyze a novel desalination method which works by electrophoretically replacing sodium and chloride in feed salt water with a pair of ions, calcium and carbonate, that react and precipitate out. The resulting calcium carbonate precipitate is benign to health, and can be filtered or settled out, yielding low ionic strength product water. The ion exchange and precipitation employs self-sharpening interfaces induced by movement of multiple ions in an electric field to prevent contamination of the product water. Simultaneously, the electrolysis associated with the electromigration produces hydrogen gas, chlorine gas, and sodium hydroxide. We conducted an experimental study of this method's basic efficacy to desalinate salt water from 100 to 600 mol m(-3) sodium chloride. We also present physicochemical models of the process, and analyze replacement reagents consumption, permeate recovery ratio, and energy consumption. We hypothesize that the precipitate can be recycled back to replacement reagents using the well-known, commercially implemented Solvay process. We show that the method's permeate recovery ratio is 58% to 46%, which is on par with that of reverse osmosis. We show that the method's energy consumption requirement over and above that necessary to generate electrolysis is 3 to 10 W h l(-1), which is on par with the energy consumed by state-of-the-art desalination methods. Furthermore, the method operates at ambient temperature and pressure, and uses no specialized membranes. The process may be feasible as a part of a desalination-co-generation facility: generating fresh water, hydrogen and chlorine gas, and sodium hydroxide. PMID:22806549

  4. Influence and hydrolysis kinetics in titanyl sulfate solution from the sodium hydroxide molten salt method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weijing; Chen, Desheng; Chu, Jinglong; Li, Jie; Xue, Tianyan; Wang, Lina; Wang, Dong; Qi, Tao

    2013-10-01

    Hydrated titanium dioxide (HTD) was precipitated by thermal hydrolysis in purified titanyl sulfate solution (TSS) obtained through the sodium hydroxide molten salt clean method. Various factors including the stirring speed and initial concentrations of TiOSO4, sulfuric acid, and sodium ion were studied. The main influence factors in the hydrolysis process were the initial concentrations of TiOSO4 and sulfuric acid. Contrary to the ferrous ion, the sodium ion improved the ionic activity of Ti4+, but did not decrease the crystal size. The Boltzman growth model (x=A2+(A1-A2)/{1+exp[(t-t0)/dt)]}, which focuses on two main parameters (CTiOSO4 and CH2SO4), fits the hydrolysis process well with R2>0.97. An increase in sulfuric acid concentration negatively affected the hydrolysis rates and the value of A2, while t0 increased. An increase in titanyl sulfate concentration directly reduced the hydrolysis rates and particle size of HTD, contrary to the trend for the value of t0. A simulation software called 1stopt was used to observe the relationship between Z (A1, A2, t0, dt) and a, b (CTiO2 and CH2SO4).

  5. Survival and stress responses of E. coli exposed to alkaline cleaners

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies were undertaken to evaluate the effects of alkaline cleaners commonly used in food processing environments on survival and stress responses of the foodborne pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7. Alkaline cleaners containing either sodium hydroxide or potassium hydroxide and hypochlorite had gre...

  6. Selective Catalytic Oxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide on Activated Carbons Impregnated with Sodium Hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Viviane; Baskova, Svetlana; Armstrong, Timothy R.

    2009-01-01

    Two activated carbons of different origin were impregnated with the solution of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) of various concentrations up to 10 wt %, and the effect of impregnation on the catalytic performance of the carbons was evaluated. The catalytic activity was analyzed in terms of the capacity of carbons for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) conversion and removal from hydrogen-rich fuel streams and the emission times of H2S and the products of its oxidation [e.g., sulfur dioxide (SO2) and carbonyl sulfide (COS)]. The results of impregnation showed a significant improvement in the catalytic activity of both carbons proportional to the amount of NaOH introduced. NaOH introduces hydroxyl groups (OH-) on the surface of the activated carbon that increase its surface reactivity and its interaction with sulfur-containing compounds.

  7. Effect of Berry Size and Sodium Hydroxide Pretreatment on the Drying Characteristics of Blueberries under Infrared Radiation Heating

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This research studied the effect on the drying characteristics of blueberries under infrared radiation (IR) heating of berry size and dipping pretreatment in hot sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution. Changes in the microstructure and diffusion coefficient of the berries after the NaOH pretreatment were...

  8. Effect of controlled deactivation on the thermochemical characteristics of hydrogen adsorption on skeletal nickel from sodium hydroxide-water solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prozorov, D. A.; Lukin, M. V.; Ulitin, M. V.

    2013-04-01

    Differential heats of adsorption in a wide range of surface coverage and maximum amounts of adsorbed hydrogen are determined by adsorption calorimetry on partially deactivated skeletal nickel from aqueous solutions of sodium hydroxide. The effect of the composition of solutions on the values of limiting adsorption and adsorption equilibria of individual forms of hydrogen is shown.

  9. Effect of additions of sodium hydroxide on the catalytic activity of partially deactivated skeletal nickel in reactions of the liquid-phase hydrogenation of sodium maleate in aqueous-organic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, M. V.; Afineevskii, A. V.

    2015-07-01

    The effect the concentration of sodium hydroxide has on the catalytic activity of skeletal nickel in reactions of the liquid-phase hydrogenation of sodium maleate in ternary methanol-water-sodium hydroxide solutions with a methanol content of 0.11 mole fractions and different concentrations of sodium hydroxide is studied. The key role of the solvent during changes in the activity of skeletal nickel in the hydrogenation reaction of sodium maleate is assumed, based on data on the redistribution of individual forms of adsorbed hydrogen.

  10. An Alkaline-Stable, Metal Hydroxide Mimicking Metal-Organic Framework for Efficient Electrocatalytic Oxygen Evolution.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xue-Feng; Liao, Pei-Qin; Wang, Jia-Wei; Wu, Jun-Xi; Chen, Xun-Wei; He, Chun-Ting; Zhang, Jie-Peng; Li, Gao-Ren; Chen, Xiao-Ming

    2016-07-13

    Postsynthetic ion exchange of [Co2(μ-Cl)2(btta)] (MAF-X27-Cl, H2bbta =1H,5H-benzo(1,2-d:4,5-d')bistriazole) possessing open metal sites on its pore surface yields a material [Co2(μ-OH)2(bbta)] (MAF-X27-OH) functionalized by both open metal sites and hydroxide ligands, giving drastically improved electrocatalytic activities for the oxygen evolution reaction (an overpotential of 292 mV at 10.0 mA cm(-2) in 1.0 M KOH solution). Isotope tracing experiments further confirm that the hydroxide ligands are involved in the OER process to provide a low-energy intraframework coupling pathway. PMID:27356078

  11. Computed phase diagrams for the system: Sodium hydroxide-uric acid-hydrochloric acid-water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, W. E.; Gregory, T. M.; Füredi-Milhofer, H.

    1987-07-01

    Renal stone formation is made complex by the variety of solid phases that are formed, by the number of components in the aqueous phase, and by the multiplicity of ionic dissociation and association processes that are involved. In the present work we apply phase diagrams calculated by the use of equilibrium constants from the ternary system sodium hydroxide-uric acid-water to simplify and make more rigorous the understanding of the factors governing dissolution and precipitation of uric acid (anhydrous and dihydrate) and sodium urate monohydrate. The system is then examined in terms of four components. Finally, procedures are described for fluids containing more than four components. The isotherms, singular points, and fields of supersaturation and undersaturation are shown in various forms of phase diagrams. This system has two notable features: (1) in the coordinates -log[H 2U] versus -log[NaOH], the solubility isotherms for anhydrous uric acid and uric acid dihydrate approximate straight lines with slopes equal to +1 over a wide range of concentrations. As a result, substantial quantities of sodium acid urate monohydrate can precipitate from solution or dissolve without changing the degree of saturation of uric acid significantly. (2) The solubility isotherm for NaHU·H 2O has a deltoid shape with the low-pH branch having a slope of infinity. As a result of the vertical slope of this isotherm, substantial quantities of uric acid can dissolve or precipitate without changing the degree of saturation of sodium acid urate monohydrate significantly. The H 2U-NaOH singular point has a pH of 6.87 at 310 K in the ternary system.

  12. Determination of hydroxide and carbonate contents of alkaline electrolytes containing zinc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otterson, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    A method to prevent zinc interference with the titration of OH- and CO3-2 ions in alkaline electrolytes with standard acid is presented. The Ba-EDTA complex was tested and shown to prevent zinc interference with acid-base titrations without introducing other types of interference. Theoretical considerations indicate that this method can be used to prevent interference by other metals.

  13. Sedimentation and deformation of an aqueous sodium hydroxide drop in vegetable oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Andrew; Hyacinthe, Hyaquino; Ward, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    The addition of water droplets in fuels is known to provide benefits such as decreased Nitrous Oxide NOx emissions. Unfortunately the shelf life of a water-fuel emulsion is limited by the sedimentation rate of the water droplets. It is well known that adding surfactants can significantly slow the sedimentation rate due to the introduction of Marangoni stresses. In the case of a vegetable oil fuel, adding sodium hydroxide (NaOH) to the water droplets will produce surfactants through saponification in the form of sodium-carboxylate salts. Pendant drops of aqueous NaOH solutions with pH between 11 and 13 will be suspended in several oils such as corn, olive, canola and soybean oil in order to measure the interfacial tension. The change in interfacial tension with time will be used to estimate the surfactant concentration and the saponification rate. Then individual drops will be placed in the oils to observe the settling velocity and drop deformation. NSF CBET.

  14. DEVELOPMENT AND SELECTION OF IONIC LIQUID ELECTROLYTES FOR HYDROXIDE CONDUCTING POLYBENZIMIDAZOLE MEMBRANES IN ALKALINE FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, E.

    2012-05-01

    Alkaline fuel cell (AFC) operation is currently limited to specialty applications such as low temperatures and pure HO due to the corrosive nature of the electrolyte and formation of carbonates. AFCs are the cheapest and potentially most efficient (approaching 70%) fuel cells. The fact that non-Pt catalysts can be used, makes them an ideal low cost alternative for power production. The anode and cathode are separated by and solid electrolyte or alkaline porous media saturated with KOH. However, CO from the atmosphere or fuel feed severely poisons the electrolyte by forming insoluble carbonates. The corrosivity of KOH (electrolyte) limits operating temperatures to no more than 80°C. This chapter examines the development of ionic liquids electrolytes that are less corrosive, have higher operating temperatures, do not chemically bond to CO and enable alternative fuels. Work is detailed on the IL selection and characterization as well as casting methods within the polybenzimidazole based solid membrane. This approach is novel as it targets the root of the problem (the electrolyte) unlike other current work in alkaline fuel cells which focus on making the fuel cell components more durable.

  15. Chemical comminution of coal in pressurized binary system of carbon-dioxide and sodium-hydroxide solution

    SciTech Connect

    Mamaghani, A.H.

    1988-01-01

    Chemical comminution of coal involves introduction of reactive chemical agent into a coal seam converting the monolithic coal into a particulate slurry of coal particles. A pressurized binary system of carbon dioxide and sodium hydroxide solution and a pressurized system of carbon dioxide and water were used as the chemical reagents and their comminution ability were studied under different conditions of reactor pressure, reagent concentration, reaction time, and reactor temperature. These variables showed significant effects on the fragmentation rates. It was shown that comminution rates increased with a rise in reactor pressure and temperature. The maximum comminution rates were obtained around 7 molar sodium hydroxide concentration. The activation energy of the chemical comminution was calculated to be around 4650 calories per gram mole. The comminution rates ranged from 0.5 to 355.0 cm{sup 2}/hr-g. The Iowa coal proved to react better with these systems than Ohio coal.

  16. Sodium hydroxide pretreatment of ensiled sorghum forage and wheat straw to increase methane production.

    PubMed

    Sambusiti, C; Ficara, E; Rollini, M; Manzoni, M; Malpei, F

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of sodium hydroxide pretreatment on the chemical composition and the methane production of ensiled sorghum forage and wheat straw. NaOH pretreatment was conducted in closed bottles, at 40 °C for 24 h. Samples were soaked in a NaOH solution at different dosages (expressed in terms of total solids (TS) content) of 1 and 10% gNaOH/gTS, with a TS concentration of 160 gTS/L. At the highest NaOH dosage the reduction of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin was 31, 66 and 44%, and 13, 45 and 3% for sorghum and wheat straw, respectively. The concentration of soluble chemical oxygen demand (CODs) in the liquid phase after the pretreatment was also improved both for wheat straw and sorghum (up to 24 and 33%, respectively). Total sugars content increased up to five times at 10% gNaOH/gTS with respect to control samples, suggesting that NaOH pretreatment improves the hydrolysis of cellulose and hemicelluloses. The Biochemical Methane Potential (BMP) tests showed that the NaOH pretreatment favoured the anaerobic degradability of both substrates. At 1 and 10% NaOH dosages, the methane production increased from 14 to 31% for ensiled sorghum forage and from 17 to 47% for wheat straw. The first order kinetic constant increased up to 65% for sorghum and up to 163% for wheat straw. PMID:23032777

  17. Anaerobic tissue-dissolving abilities of calcium hydroxide and sodium hypochlorite.

    PubMed

    Yang, S F; Rivera, E M; Baumgardner, K R; Walton, R E; Stanford, C

    1995-12-01

    Closed root canals likely have an oxygen-free environment; most bacteria in canals are anaerobic. These bacteria and other debris are difficult to remove. Unknown is tissue dissolution with chemicals under these anaerobic conditions. This study evaluated and compared dissolving properties of calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) on bovine pulp tissue in aerobic and anaerobic environments. Sixty bovine pulp specimens were dried, then randomly divided into six groups. Groups A and B were immersed in Ca(OH)2 + water solution, whereas group C and D were in 2.5% NaOCl. Groups E and F (controls) specimens were placed in distilled water. Groups A, C, and E were incubated anaerobically, and groups B, D, and F were incubated under regular atmospheric conditions, all for 7 days. Percentages of weight loss were compared between groups. Results showed the following: (a) both chemicals partially dissolved pulp tissue, (b) anaerobic environment did not alter tissue-dissolving properties of Ca(OH)2 or NaOCl, and (c) Ca(OH)2 and NaOCl were equal and more effective than water. PMID:8596083

  18. Glycolysis of carbon fiber-epoxy unidirectional mat catalysed by sodium hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaini, Mariana Binti Mohd; Badri, Khairiah Haji

    2014-09-01

    This study was conducted to recycle carbon fibre-epoxy (CFRP) composite in woven sheet/ mat form. The CFRP was recycled through glycolysis with polyethlyene glycol (PEG 200) as the solvent. The CFRP was loaded into the solvent at a ratio of 4:1 (w/w). PEG200 was diluted with water to a ratio of 80:20 (v/v). This reaction was catalysed by sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution with varying concentrations at 1.5, 1.7 and 1.9% (w/v). The glycolysis was conducted at 180-190 °C. The recovered CF (rCF) was analysed using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray (EDX) while the degraded solution was analysed using FTIR and the epoxy content was determined. The FTIR spectrum of the rCF exhibited the disappearance of the COC peak belonged to epoxy and supported by the SEM micrographs that showed clear rCF. On the other hand, the analysed filtrate detected the disappearance of oxygen peak element in the EDX spectrum for all rCF samples. This gave an indication that the epoxy resin has been removed from the surface of the carbon fiber.

  19. Removal of ash from Indian Assam coking coal using sodium hydroxide and acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, M.; Shankar, R.H.

    2000-03-01

    Mineral matter (ash) removal from Assam coking coal by leaching with different concentrations of sodium hydroxide and acid (HCl, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, HNO{sub 3}, and HF) solutions has been investigated at a temperature of 75 C. The parameters tested were concentration of NaOH, type of acid, concentration of acids, and number of acid leaching steps. Total ash removed increased with increase of NaOH and acid concentrations up to the range studied. For the same experimental conditions, treatment of caustic leached coal in HCl acid resulted in better demineralization than in H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} or HNO{sub 3} acid. In the NaOH-HNO{sub 3} leaching method, a higher concentration (>20%) of HNO{sub 3} acid had an adverse effect on the de-ashing of coal. The NaOH-HF leaching process has been found to be the most effective method of coal de-ashing. The two acid treatment steps (HCl-H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/HCl-HNO{sub 3}) after caustic leaching are the next most effective methods of coal de-ashing. The removal of mineral matter (including S) from coal is expected to decrease the graphite reactivity and thus the atmospheric pollution (due to the generation of smaller quantities of CO and SO{sub 2} gases).

  20. Platelets to rings: Influence of sodium dodecyl sulfate on Zn-Al layered double hydroxide morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Yilmaz, Ceren; Unal, Ugur; Yagci Acar, Havva

    2012-03-15

    In the current study, influence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) on the crystallization of Zn-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) was investigated. Depending on the SDS concentration coral-like and for the first time ring-like morphologies were obtained in a urea-hydrolysis method. It was revealed that the surfactant level in the starting solution plays an important role in the morphology. Concentration of surfactant equal to or above the anion exchange capacity of the LDH is influential in creating different morphologies. Another important parameter was the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of the surfactant. Surfactant concentrations well above CMC value resulted in ring-like structures. The crystallization mechanism was discussed. - Graphical abstract: Dependence of ZnAl LDH Morphology on SDS concentration. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In-situ intercalation of SDS in ZnAl LDH was achieved via urea hydrolysis method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Morphology of ZnAl LDH intercalated with SDS depended on the SDS concentration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ring like morphology for SDS intercalated ZnAl LDH was obtained for the first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Growth mechanism was discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Template assisted growth of ZnAl LDH was proposed.

  1. Glycolysis of carbon fiber-epoxy unidirectional mat catalysed by sodium hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Zaini, Mariana Binti Mohd; Badri, Khairiah Haji

    2014-09-03

    This study was conducted to recycle carbon fibre-epoxy (CFRP) composite in woven sheet/ mat form. The CFRP was recycled through glycolysis with polyethlyene glycol (PEG 200) as the solvent. The CFRP was loaded into the solvent at a ratio of 4:1 (w/w). PEG200 was diluted with water to a ratio of 80:20 (v/v). This reaction was catalysed by sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution with varying concentrations at 1.5, 1.7 and 1.9% (w/v). The glycolysis was conducted at 180-190 °C. The recovered CF (rCF) was analysed using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray (EDX) while the degraded solution was analysed using FTIR and the epoxy content was determined. The FTIR spectrum of the rCF exhibited the disappearance of the COC peak belonged to epoxy and supported by the SEM micrographs that showed clear rCF. On the other hand, the analysed filtrate detected the disappearance of oxygen peak element in the EDX spectrum for all rCF samples. This gave an indication that the epoxy resin has been removed from the surface of the carbon fiber.

  2. IGA of alloy 600 in high-temperature solutions of sodium hydroxide contaminated with carbonate. Final report. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Roberge, R.; Bandy, R.; van Rooyen, D.

    1983-05-01

    Alloy 600 was tested in sodium hydroxide contaminated with sodium carbonate at 300/sup 0/C and 315/sup 0/C to examine its resistance to intergranular attack (IGA) under controlled cathodic and anodic potentials. Specimens of alloy 600 were studied as C-rings under constant deflection, wires under constant load and wires without any applied tensile stress. The material was mainly used in its mill annealed condition, although some specimens were studied as solution annealed and solution annealed plus sensitized. Unlike the last two metallurgical states, the mill annealed alloy 600 material was rather sensitive to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in a range of anodic potentials.

  3. Process Flow Chart for Immobilizing of Radioactive High Concentration Sodium Hydroxide Product from the Sodium Processing Facility at the BN-350 Nuclear power plant in Aktau, Kazakhstan

    SciTech Connect

    Burkitbayev, M.; Omarova, K.; Tolebayev, T.; Galkin, A.; Bachilova, N.; Blynskiy, A.; Maev, V.; Wells, D.; Herrick, A.; Michelbacher, J.

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes the results of a joint research investigations carried out by the group of Kazakhstan, British and American specialists in development of a new material for immobilization of radioactive 35% sodium hydroxide solutions from the sodium coolant processing facility of the BN-350 nuclear power plant. The resulting solid matrix product, termed geo-cement stone, is capable of isolating long lived radionuclides from the environment. The physico-mechanical properties of geo-cement stone have been investigated and the flow chart for its production verified in a full scale experiments. (author)

  4. Investigation by bioassay of the efficacy of sodium hydroxide treatment on the inactivation of mouse-adapted scrapie.

    PubMed

    Unal, A; Thyer, J; Uren, E; Middleton, D; Braun, M; Maher, D

    2007-06-01

    Sodium hydroxide (NaOH) has been shown to reduce the infectivity of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) agents. This study investigated the efficacy of sodium hydroxide at 0.1M, 0.25M and 0.5M concentrations for the inactivation of mouse-adapted scrapie strain ME7. Times and temperatures modelled conditions used in an industrial plasma fractionation plant for sanitisation of ultrafilters, and the sodium hydroxide component of Clean In Place sanitisation. The concentration of scrapie ME7 brain homogenate in NaOH test solutions was 1% (w/v). At the end of incubation periods, the samples were adjusted to neutral pH prior to intracerebral inoculation into mice for bioassay. The conditions of 0.1M NaOH at 60 degrees C for 2min and 0.25M NaOH at 30 degrees C for 60min were found to inactivate 3.96 and 3.93logs of scrapie, respectively. Use of 0.5M NaOH at 30 degrees C for 60 or 75min was found to inactivate >or=4.23 and 4.15logs of scrapie. This indicates that the use of these conditions in an industrial process would substantially reduce prion infectivity. PMID:17074508

  5. Preparation of alkaline earth phosphates with sol containing sodium alginate and sodium diphosphate.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Shigeru; Fujii, Minako; Fukuta, Kazuya; Seyama, Kazunori; Sotowa, Ken-Ichiro; Shigemoto, Naoya

    2006-03-01

    Magnesium hydrogen phosphate, calcium hydroxyapatite, and strontium hydroxyapatite were successfully prepared from sol consisting of sodium alginate and Na4P2O7 with Mg2+, Ca2+, and Sr2+ in the corresponding nitrates, respectively. It is revealed that the order of the addition of those substrates and the role of sodium alginate are important factors for the preparation of desired phosphate compounds. According to the previous paper on the preparation of calcium hydroxyapatite, sodium alginate was mixed with aqueous Na4P2O7, followed by the addition of the aqueous divalent cations, resulting in the poor formation of the target phosphates. However, as a revised sol-gel technique, sodium alginate was added to the mixture of Na4P2O7 and aqueous Mg2+ and Sr2+, resulting in a rather favorable formation of MgHPO4 and strontium hydroxyapatite, respectively, while the sol thus obtained was stable within a few days. However for aqueous Ca2+, calcium hydroxyapatite could not be obtained through the revised sol-gel technique. In the preparation of magnesium hydrogen phosphate, sodium alginate contributes mainly to the sol formation of the precursor. The ion exchange between Na+ in sodium alginate and aqueous Ca2+ was important for the preparation of calcium hydroxyapatite. In contrast, the reaction of sodium alginate with the mixture of Na4P2O7 and aqueous Sr2+ afforded strontium hydroxyapatite at the specific ratio of those three substrates. The structure of calcium and strontium phosphates prepared from the revised sol-gel process evidently depended on the amount of sodium alginate introduced into the mixture of Na4P2O7 and the corresponding divalent cations. PMID:16154579

  6. Development of Cobalt Hydroxide as a Bifunctional Catalyst for Oxygen Electrocatalysis in Alkaline Solution.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yi; Du, Guojun; Yang, Shiliu; Xu, Chaohe; Lu, Meihua; Liu, Zhaolin; Lee, Jim Yang

    2015-06-17

    Co(OH)2 in the form of hexagonal nanoplates synthesized by a simple hydrothermal reaction has shown even greater activity than cobalt oxides (CoO and Co3O4) in oxygen reduction and oxygen evolution reactions (ORR and OER) under alkaline conditions. The bifunctionality for oxygen electrocatalysis as shown by the OER-ORR potential difference (ΔE) could be reduced to as low as 0.87 V, comparable to the state-of-the-art non-noble bifunctional catalysts, when the Co(OH)2 nanoplates were compounded with nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (N-rGO). The good performance was attributed to the nanosizing of Co(OH)2 and the synergistic interaction between Co(OH)2 and N-rGO. A zinc-air cell assembled with a Co(OH)2-air electrode also showed a performance comparable to that of the state-of-the-art zinc-air cells. The combination of bifunctional activity and operational stability establishes Co(OH)2 as an effective low-cost alternative to the platinum group metal catalysts. PMID:25997179

  7. Controlling the pH of acid cheese whey in a two-stage anaerobic digester with sodium hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ghaly, A.E.; Ramkumar, D.R.

    1999-07-01

    Anaerobic digestion of cheese whey offers a two-fold benefit: pollution potential reduction and biogas production. The biogas, as an energy source, could be used to reduce the consumption of traditional fuels in the cheese plant. However, as a result of little or no buffering capacity of whey, the pH of the anaerobic digester drops drastically and the process is inhibited. In this study, the effect of controlling the pH of the second chamber of a two-stage, 150 L anaerobic digester operating on cheese whey on the quality and quantity of biogas and the pollution potential reduction, was investigated using sodium hydroxide. The digester was operated at a temperature of 35 C and a hydraulic retention time of 15 days for three runs (no pH control, pH control with no reseeding, and ph control with reseeding) each lasting 50 days. The results indicated that operating the digester without pH control resulted in a low pH (3.3) which inhibited the methanogenic bacteria. The inhibition was irreversible and the digester did not recover (no methane production) when the pH was restored to 7.0 without reseeding, as the observed increased gas production was a false indication of recovery because the gas was mainly carbon dioxide. The addition of base resulted in a total alkalinity of 12,000 mg/L as CaCO{sub 3}. When the system was reseeded and the pH controlled, the total volatile acid concentration was 15,100 mg/L (as acetic acid), with acetic (28%), propionic (21%), butyric (25%), valeric (8%), and caproic (15%) acids as the major constituents. The biogas production was 62.6 L/d (0.84 m{sup 3}/m{sup 3}/d) and the methane content was 60.7%. Reductions of 27.3, 30.4 and 23.3% in the total solids, chemical oxygen demand and total kjeldahl nitrogen were obtained, respectively. The ammonium nitrogen content increased significantly (140%).

  8. Effect of sodium hydroxide on anionic surfactant distribution in a two-phase system based on TBP in n-dodecane

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitin, S.D.; Balakhonov, V.G.; Semenov, E.N.; Shmidt, V.S.

    1988-11-01

    Measurements have been made on the effects of sodium hydroxide on the distributions for the sodium salts of di-2-ethylhexylphosphoric acid (D2EHPA), di-n-butylphosphoric acid (DBPA), and lauric acid in a system composed of a 30% TBP solution in n-dodecane and aqueous sodium hydroxide. As the alkali concentration in the aqueous phase is reduced from 10 to 0.01 M, the distribution coefficients decrease for the anionic surfactants as well as TBP. Dilute sodium hydroxide solution thus enable one to remove extractant and diluent acid decomposition products from the organic phase, particularly ones having long alkyl chains, which tend to stabilize the emulsions in alkali-carbonate treatment. The distribution coefficients for these surfactants have appreciable effects on the type of stabilized emulsion. At 10 M alkali concentration, micellar aggregates are formed by sodium laurate in the organic phase.

  9. NICKEL HYDROXIDES

    SciTech Connect

    MCBREEN,J.

    1997-11-01

    Nickel hydroxides have been used as the active material in the positive electrodes of several alkaline batteries for over a century. These materials continue to attract a lot of attention because of the commercial importance of nickel-cadmium and nickel-metal hydride batteries. This review gives a brief overview of the structure of nickel hydroxide battery electrodes and a more detailed review of the solid state chemistry and electrochemistry of the electrode materials. Emphasis is on work done since 1989.

  10. Oxidation behavior of Cr(III) during thermal treatment of chromium hydroxide in the presence of alkali and alkaline earth metal chlorides.

    PubMed

    Mao, Linqiang; Gao, Bingying; Deng, Ning; Liu, Lu; Cui, Hao

    2016-02-01

    The oxidation behavior of Cr(III) during the thermal treatment of chromium hydroxide in the presence of alkali and alkaline earth metal chlorides (NaCl, KCl, MgCl2, and CaCl2) was investigated. The amounts of Cr(III) oxidized at various temperatures and heating times were determined, and the Cr-containing species in the residues were characterized. During the transformation of chromium hydroxide to Cr2O3 at 300 °C approximately 5% of the Cr(III) was oxidized to form intermediate compounds containing Cr(VI) (i.e., CrO3), but these intermediates were reduced to Cr2O3 when the temperature was above 400 °C. Alkali and alkaline earth metals significantly promoted the oxidation of Cr(III) during the thermal drying process. Two pathways were involved in the influences the alkali and alkaline earth metals had on the formation of Cr(VI). In pathway I, the alkali and alkaline earth metals were found to act as electron transfer agents and to interfere with the dehydration process, causing more intermediate Cr(VI)-containing compounds (which were identified as being CrO3 and Cr5O12) to be formed. The reduction of intermediate compounds to Cr2O3 was also found to be hindered in pathway I. In pathway II, the alkali and alkaline earth metals were found to contribute to the oxidation of Cr(III) to form chromates. The results showed that the presence of alkali and alkaline earth metals significantly increases the degree to which Cr(III) is oxidized during the thermal drying of chromium-containing sludge. PMID:26650573

  11. Hydrothermal treatment of naturally contaminated maize in the presence of sodium metabisulfite, methylamine and calcium hydroxide; effects on the concentration of zearalenone and deoxynivalenol.

    PubMed

    Rempe, Inga; Kersten, Susanne; Valenta, Hana; Dänicke, Sven

    2013-08-01

    Fusarium toxin-contaminated ground maize was hydrothermally treated in the presence of different combinations of chemicals in order to simultaneously reduce zearalenone (ZEA) and deoxynivalenol (DON) concentrations. Treatments were carried out in a laboratory conditioner at 80 °C and 17 % moisture. Six different treatments were performed, consisting of 3 doses of methylamine (MMA; 2.5, 5 and 10 g/kg maize) at a constant dose of 5 g sodium metabisulfite (SBS)/kg, either with or without the addition of 20 g calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2)/kg. The used maize was contaminated with approximately 45.99 mg DON/kg and 3.46 mg ZEA/kg. Without the addition of Ca(OH)2, DON reductions reached approximately 82% after 1-min treatment and the toxin disappeared nearly completely after 10 min when 2.5 or 5 g MMA were applied. ZEA concentrations were only marginally affected. In the presence of Ca(OH)2, reductions in DON concentrations were lower, but were enhanced by increasing doses of MMA. ZEA concentrations were reduced by 72, 85 and 95% within the first 5 min of the treatment at MMA dosages of 2.5, 5 and 10 g/kg maize, respectively. The application of SBS in combination with a strong alkaline during hydrothermal treatment seems to be a promising approach to simultaneously decontaminate even high amounts of DON and ZEA in ground maize and may contribute to reduce the toxin load of diets. PMID:23536360

  12. Rumen fermentation and starch degradation by Holstein steers fed sodium-hydroxide- or formaldehyde-treated wheat.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J; Tóth, T; Fábián, J

    2006-06-01

    The authors investigated the effect of feeding 2% sodium-hydroxide-treated (as-fed basis) or 2% formaldehyde-treated (crude protein basis) wheat to rumen-, duodenal- and ileocaecal-cannulated Holstein steers on rumen fermentation and ruminal and postruminal starch degradation. Feeding 2 kg/day wheat treated with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) or formaldehyde did not affect negatively the main parameters of rumen fermentation, i.e. pH, short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production, and microbial activity. Fibre degradation in the rumen was significantly improved when NaOH-treated wheat was fed. The in vivo experiments demonstrated that feeding NaOH- and formaldehyde-treated wheat to steers significantly increased the amount of starch that reached the small intestine. The amount of starch that entered the duodenum increased by 57% and 75% when steers were fed NaOH- and formaldehyde-treated wheat compared to the control phase, respectively. This higher quantity of starch was digested and absorbed, which can provide an increased glucose supply to the animals. PMID:16841758

  13. Alternative Sodium Recovery Technology—High Hydroxide Leaching: FY10 Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Neiner, Doinita; Peterson, Reid A.; Rapko, Brian M.; Russell, Renee L.; Schonewill, Philip P.

    2011-02-04

    Boehmite leaching tests were carried out at NaOH concentrations of 10 M and 12 M, temperatures of 85°C and 60°C, and a range of initial aluminate concentrations. These data, and data obtained during earlier 100°C tests using 1 M and 5 M NaOH, were used to establish the dependence of the boehmite dissolution rate on hydroxide concentration, temperature, and initial aluminate concentration. A semi-empirical kinetic model for boehmite leaching was fitted to the data and used to calculate the NaOH additions required for leaching at different hydroxide concentrations. The optimal NaOH concentration for boehmite leaching at 85°C was estimated, based on minimizing the amount of Na that had to be added in NaOH to produce a given boehmite conversion.

  14. Anodes for alkaline electrolysis

    DOEpatents

    Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev

    2011-02-01

    A method of making an anode for alkaline electrolysis cells includes adsorption of precursor material on a carbonaceous material, conversion of the precursor material to hydroxide form and conversion of precursor material from hydroxide form to oxy-hydroxide form within the alkaline electrolysis cell.

  15. Inactivation kinetics of model and relevant blood-borne viruses by treatment with sodium hydroxide and heat.

    PubMed

    Borovec, S; Broumis, C; Adcock, W; Fang, R; Uren, E

    1998-09-01

    To determine the efficacy of a clean-in-place system for the inactivation of viruses present in human plasma, the effect of 0.1 M sodium hydroxide at 60 degrees C on viral infectivity was investigated. Inactivation of the following model and relevant viruses were followed as a function of time: human hepatitis A virus (HAV), canine parvovirus (CPV; a model for human parvovirus B-19) pseudorabies virus (PRV, a model for hepatitis B virus), and bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV, a model for hepatitis C virus and human immunodeficiency virus). Infectivity of CPV was determined by a novel in situ EIA method which will prove useful for studies to validate parvovirus inactivation or removal. Infectivity of BVDV, PRV and CPV were shown to be reproducibly inactivated below the limit of detection by 0.1 M NaOH at 60 degrees C within 30 s. HAV was inactivated to below the limit of detection within 2 min. Treatment with heat alone also resulted in some log reduction for all viruses tested except for CPV which remained unaffected after heating at 60 degrees C for 16 min. Treatment of HAV with hydroxide alone (up to 1.0 m) at 15 degrees C did not lead to rapid inactivation. Collectively, these data suggest that 0.1 M NaOH at 60 degrees C for two min should be sufficient to inactivate viruses present in process residues. PMID:10208725

  16. ALUMINUM READINESS EVALUATION FOR ALUMINUM REMOVAL AND SODIUM HYDROXIDE REGENRATION FROM HANFORD TANK WASTE BY LITHIUM HYDROTALCITE PRECIPITATION

    SciTech Connect

    SAMS TL; MASSIE HL

    2011-01-27

    A Technology Readiness Evaluation (TRE) performed by AREV A Federal Services, LLC (AFS) for Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) shows the lithium hydrotalcite (LiHT) process invented and patented (pending) by AFS has reached an overall Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of 3. The LiHT process removes aluminum and regenerates sodium hydroxide. The evaluation used test results obtained with a 2-L laboratory-scale system to validate the process and its critical technology elements (CTEs) on Hanford tank waste simulants. The testing included detailed definition and evaluation for parameters of interest and validation by comparison to analytical predictions and data quality objectives for critical subsystems. The results of the TRE would support the development of strategies to further mature the design and implementation of the LiHT process as a supplemental pretreatment option for Hanford tank waste.

  17. Control of placental alkaline phosphatase gene expression in HeLa cells: induction of synthesis by prednisolone and sodium butyrate

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, J.Y.; Takahashi, S.

    1987-06-16

    HeLa S/sub 3/ cells produce an alkaline phosphatase indistinguishable from the enzyme from human term placenta. The phosphatase activity in these cells was induced by both prednisolone and sodium butyrate. Both agents stimulated de novo synthesis of the enzyme. The increase in phosphatase activity paralleled the increase in immunoactivity and biosynthesis of placental alkaline phosphatase. The fully processed phosphatase monomer in control, prednisolone-treated or butyrate-treated cells was a 64.5 K polypeptide, measured by both incorporation of L-(/sup 35/S)methionine into enzyme protein and active-site labeling. The 64.5K polypeptide was formed by the incorporation of additional N-acetylneuraminic acid moieties to a precursor polypeptide of 61.5K. However, this biosynthetic pathway was identified only in butyrate-treated cells. In prednisolone-treated cells, the processing of 61.5K to 64.5K monomer was accelerated, and the presence of the 61.5 precursor could only be detected by either neuraminidase or monensin treatment. Phosphatase mRNA which comigrated with the term placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA of 2.7 kilobases was induced in the presence of either prednisolone or butyrate. Alkaline phosphatase mRNA is untreated HeLa S/sub 3/ cells migrated slightly faster than the term placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA. Butyrate also induced a second still faster migrating alkaline phosphatase mRNA. Both prednisolone and butyrate increased the steady-state levels of placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA. The data indicate that the increase in phosphatase mRNA by prednisolone and butyrate resulted in the induction of alkaline phosphatase activity and biosynthesis in HeLa S/sub 3/ cells. Furthermore, both agents induced the expression of different alkaline phosphatase gene transcripts without altering its protein product.

  18. EFFECT OF SODIUM HYDROXIDE AND SUPERCRITICAL FLUID TREATMENTS ON UNRETTED KENAF FIBERS

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Kevin L.; Fifield, Leonard S.; Laddha, Sachin; Chen, Feng; Wright, Katherine M.

    2010-05-17

    Kenaf fibers have been gaining great interest for use in the fabrication of both thermoset and thermoplastic composites. However, the inherent fiber surface properties limit their application. In response to the uneconomical, energy inefficient and environmentally unfavorable issues of the standard fiber retting process, we applied chemical modifications of kenaf fibers as alternative retting treatments and investigated the overall performance of the modified fibers. Alkaline solution and super critical alcohol were used as fiber treatments and their effects on the fiber properties were compared. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were used to characterize the thermal properties of fibers. The change of in chemical composition of the fibers with treatment is discussed in the context of the thermal decomposition behavior. The cellulose crystal structure and total crystallinity of the kenaf fibers were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Field emission scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was employed to examine the morphological changes of fiber surface and fiber cross-section after both alkaline and super critical alcohol treatments. The mechanical behavior of fibers before and after treatment was explored by tenacity testing and the fracture mechanism was evidenced by observing the fracture surfaces. The effect of chemical treatment duration on the fiber performance was also discussed. It was found that the alkaline treated kenaf fibers showed higher thermal stability than untreated fibers, while TGA results indicated that supercritical alcohol was more efficient in removing the non-cellulosic portions. XRD data confirmed the removal of amorphous structural components such as pectin, hemicellulose and lignin as well as amorphous cellulose for the treated kenaf fibers. SEM images showed that both treatments were effective in removing impurities and coating materials on the fiber surface. The rough fracture morphology

  19. Preparing alkaline anion exchange membrane with enhanced hydroxide conductivity via blending imidazolium-functionalized and sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Jiang, Zhongyi; Tian, Huimin; Wang, Siwen; Zhang, Bei; Cao, Ying; He, Guangwei; Li, Zongyu; Wu, Hong

    2015-08-01

    The development of alkaline anion exchange membrane (AEM) with both high ion conductivity and stabilities is of great significance for fuel cell applications. In this study, a facile acid-base blending method is designed to improve AEM performances. Basic imidazolium-functionalized poly (ether ether ketone) with a high functionalization degree is employed as polymer matrix to pursue high ion-exchange capacity (IEC) as well as high hydroxide conductivity, meanwhile acidic sulfonated poly (ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) is employed as the cross-linking agent to enhance the stabilities of the blend membranes. Particularly, an in-situ Menshutkin/crosslinking method is exploited to prevent the flocculation in the preparation process of blend membranes. As a result, dense and defect-free blend membranes are obtained. The blend membranes exhibit high level of IEC up to 3.15 mmol g-1, and consequently possess elevated hydroxide conductivity up to 31.59 mS cm-1 at 30 °C. In addition, benefiting from the strong electrostatic interaction introduced by the acid-base blending, the stabilities and methanol resistance of blend membranes are enhanced.

  20. Alkaline extraction of phenolic compounds from intact sorghum kernels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An aqueous sodium hydroxide solution was employed to extract phenolic compounds from whole grain sorghum without decortication or grinding as determined by Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC). The alkaline extract ORAC values were more stable over 32 days compared to neutralized and freeze dri...

  1. Release of bound procyanidins from cranberry pomace by alkaline hydrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Procyanidins in plant products are present as extractable or unextractable/bound forms. We optimized alkaline hydrolysis conditions to liberate bound procyanidins from dried cranberry pomace. Five mL of sodium hydroxide (2, 4, or 6N) was added to 0.5 g of cranberry pomace in screw top glass tubes,...

  2. Decomposition Pathways of Tetraalkylammonium Hydroxides: Experimental and DFT Studies and Their Implications for Alkaline Exchange Fuel Cell Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Pivovar, B. S.; Edson, J. B.; Macomber, C. S.; Long, H.; Boncella, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism of the thermal decomposition of a series of alkyl trimethyl ammonium hydroxides ([RMe{sub 3}N][OH], R = Et, n-Pr, i-Bu, PhCH{sub 2}, Me{sub 3}CCH{sub 2}) was studied using TGA, evolved gas analysis and NMR spectroscopy due to the importance of these and related ions in anion exchange fuel cell membranes. Isotopic labeling with deuterium showed that deprotonation of the methyl groups of the ammonium ions by deuteroxide establishes a rapid equilibrium between the tetraalkyl ammonium ions and the nitrogen ylide species and water that scrambles the deuterium with the proton on the methyl groups. The products of the thermal decomposition when R = Et, n-Pr, i-Bu are predominately olefins arising from Hoffmann elimination, while the neopentyl substituted ammonium ion gives only neopentyl trimethyl amine and methanol, the products of S{sub N}2 attack of hydroxide on the methyl groups. DFT studies of these reactions confirm the relative activation barriers that are observed in the experimental decomposition studies.

  3. ALUMINUM REMOVAL AND SODIUM HYDROXIDE REGENERATION FROM HANFORD TANK WASTE BY LITHIUM HYDROTALCITE PRECIPITATION SUMMARY OF PRIOR LAB-SCALE TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    SAMS TL; GUILLOT S

    2011-01-27

    Scoping laboratory scale tests were performed at the Chemical Engineering Department of the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech), and the Hanford 222-S Laboratory, involving double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) Hanford waste simulants. These tests established the viability of the Lithium Hydrotalcite precipitation process as a solution to remove aluminum and recycle sodium hydroxide from the Hanford tank waste, and set the basis of a validation test campaign to demonstrate a Technology Readiness Level of 3.

  4. Sequential soil washing techniques using hydrochloric acid and sodium hydroxide for remediating arsenic-contaminated soils in abandoned iron-ore mines.

    PubMed

    Jang, Min; Hwang, Jung Sung; Choi, Sang Il

    2007-01-01

    Sequential washing techniques using single or dual agents [sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and hydrochloric acid (HCl) solutions] were applied to arsenic-contaminated soils in an abandoned iron-ore mine area. We investigated the best remediation strategies to maximize arsenic removal efficiency for both soils and arsenic-containing washing solution through conducting a series of batch experiments. Based on the results of a sequential extraction procedure, most arsenic prevails in Fe-As precipitates or coprecipitates, and iron exists mostly in the crystalline forms of iron oxide. Soil washing by use of a single agent was not effective in remediating arsenic-contaminated soils because arsenic extractions determined by the Korean standard test (KST) methods for washed soils were not lower than 6mg kg(-1) in all experimental conditions. The results of X-ray diffraction (XRD) indicated that iron-ore fines produced mobile colloids through coagulation and flocculation in water contacting the soils, containing dissolved arsenic and fine particles of ferric arsenate-coprecipitated silicate. The first washing step using 0.2M HCl was mostly effective in increasing the cationic hydrolysis of amorphous ferrihydrite, inducing high removal of arsenic. Thus, the removal step of arsenic-containing flocs can lower arsenic extractions (KST methods) of washed soils. Among several washing trials, alternative sequential washing using 0.2M HCl followed by 1M HCl (second step) and 1M NaOH solution (third step) showed reliable and lower values of arsenic extractions (KST methods) of washed soils. This washing method can satisfy the arsenic regulation of washed soil for reuse or safe disposal application. The kinetic data of washing tests revealed that dissolved arsenic was easily readsorbed into remaining soils at a low pH. This result might have occurred due to dominant species of positively charged crystalline iron oxides characterized through the sequential extraction procedure. However

  5. CO(2) capture properties of alkaline earth metal oxides and hydroxides: A combined density functional theory and lattice phonon dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yuhua; Sorescu, Dan C

    2010-08-21

    By combining density functional theory and lattice phonon dynamics, the thermodynamic properties of CO(2) absorption/desorption reactions with alkaline earth metal oxides MO and hydroxides M(OH)(2) (where M=Be,Mg,Ca,Sr,Ba) are analyzed. The heats of reaction and the chemical potential changes of these solids upon CO(2) capture reactions have been calculated and used to evaluate the energy costs. Relative to CaO, a widely used system in practical applications, MgO and Mg(OH)(2) systems were found to be better candidates for CO(2) sorbent applications due to their lower operating temperatures (600-700 K). In the presence of H(2)O, MgCO(3) can be regenerated into Mg(OH)(2) at low temperatures or into MgO at high temperatures. This transition temperature depends not only on the CO(2) pressure but also on the H(2)O pressure. Based on our calculated results and by comparing with available experimental data, we propose a general computational search methodology which can be used as a general scheme for screening a large number of solids for use as CO(2) sorbents. PMID:20726653

  6. Development and testing of an economic grid-scale flow-assisted zinc/nickel-hydroxide alkaline battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turney, Damon E.; Shmukler, Michael; Galloway, Kevin; Klein, Martin; Ito, Yasumasa; Sholklapper, Tal; Gallaway, Joshua W.; Nyce, Michael; Banerjee, Sanjoy

    2014-10-01

    An economic design for an alkaline zinc-anode flow-assisted battery without membrane separators was tested at grid-scale of 25 kWh with a string of thirty 833 Wh cells in series, and also at bench scale with individual 28 Wh cells. The bench-scale tests allowed optimization of parameters such as electrolyte flow, choice of hardware material, electrolyte composition, and charge/discharge protocol. The best-performing bench scale cell cycled for over 3300 cycles with energy efficiency above 80%, and was selected as the design basis for scale-up to the 25 kWh battery string. Testing of the grid-scale string demonstrated 1000+ cycles with round trip energy efficiency above 80%. Two challenges observed at the bench scale were overcome for successful scale-up, namely a) passivation of the anode surface, which occurred when the anode experienced voltages 100 mV above zinc's rest voltage, and b) zinc particulates that jammed the gap between the electrodes and caused cathode degradation and passivation of the anode surface. Best practices to overcome these challenges and achieve long cycle life are presented.

  7. Spectrophotometric determination of copper in alkaline solutions and evaluation of some hydroxy-substituted 1,10-phenanthrolines as chromogenic reagents.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, W E; Schilt, A A

    1972-09-01

    Seven new hydroxy-substituted 1,10-phenanthroline derivatives have been evaluated as chromogenic reagents for the determination of copper in strongly alkaline solution. The most sensitive of these, 2,9-dimethyl-4,7-dihydroxy-1,10-phenanthroline, has proven to be highly effective in a simple, rapid procedure for determining trace amounts of copper in sodium hydroxide, potassium carbonate, sodium phosphate or ammonium hydroxide. PMID:18961151

  8. Screening Evaluation of Sodium Nonatitanate for Strontium and Actinide Removal from Alkaline Salt Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.T.

    2001-02-13

    This report describes results from screening tests evaluating strontium and actinide removal characteristics of a sodium titanate material developed by Clearfield and coworkers at Texas A and M University and offered commercially by Honeywell. Sodium nonatitanate may exhibit improved actinide removal kinetics and filtration characteristics compared to MST and thus merit testing.

  9. Sodium hydroxide poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms For skin exposure, the person may receive: Irrigation (washing of the skin). Perhaps every few hours ... For eye exposure, the person may receive: Extensive irrigation to flush out the eye Medicines

  10. Inorganic polymers from laterite using activation with phosphoric acid and alkaline sodium silicate solution: Mechanical and microstructural properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lassinantti Gualtieri, Magdalena

    2015-01-15

    Geopolymers from laterite, an iron-rich soil available in developing countries, have great potential as building materials. In this work, laterite from Togo (Africa) was used to prepare geopolymers using both phosphoric acid and alkaline sodium silicate solution. Microstructural properties were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction and mercury porosimetry, whereas thermal properties were evaluated by thermal analyses. The local environment of iron was studied by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XANES region). The mechanical properties were determined. Modulus of Rupture and Young's modulus fell in the ranges 3.3–4.5 MPa and 12–33 GPa, respectively, rendering the materials good candidates for construction purposes. Heating above 900 °C results in weight-gain, presumably due to iron redox reactions. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy data evidence changes in the chemical and structural environments of iron following thermal treatment of geopolymers. These changes indicate interaction between the geopolymer structure and iron during heating, possibly leading to redox properties. -- Highlights: •Geopolymerization of laterite is promising for fabrication of building materials. •Both phosphoric acid and alkaline sodium silicate solution can be used for activation. •Thermally activated redox properties of the inorganic polymers were observed.

  11. Simulation of carbon dioxide absorption by sodium hydroxide solution in a packed bed and studying the effect of operating parameters on absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Yazdanbakhsh, Farzad; Soltani Goharrizi, Ata'ollah; Hashemipour Rafsanjani, Hassan

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: In this study. simulation of carbon dioxide absorption by Sodium Hydroxide solution in a packed bed has been investigated. At first, mass and energy balances were applied around a differential height of the bed. So, the governing equations were obtained. Surface renewal theory by Danckwerts was used to represent the mass transfer operation Finally, by changing the operating parameters like solvent temperature, inlet gas composition pressure and height of the bed, the effect of these parameters on the absorption and the composition of carbon dioxide in exit stream have been investigated. (authors)

  12. Kinetic Study of Mass Transfer by Sodium Hydroxide in Nickel Under Free-convection Conditions /by Don R. Mosher and Robert A. Lad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosher, Don R; Lad, Robert A

    1954-01-01

    An investigation was conducted using static capsules fabricated from "L" nickel tubing to determine the effect of temperature level, temperature gradient, and test duration on corrosion and mass transfer by molten sodium hydroxide under free-convection conditions. A base temperature range from 1000 degrees to 1600 degrees F with temperature differences to 500 degrees was studied. The rate of mass transfer was found to be strongly dependent on both temperature level and gradient. The rate shows little tendency to decrease for test durations up to 200 hours, although the concentration of nickel in the melt approaches a limited value after 100 hours.

  13. Aluminum Hydroxide and Magnesium Hydroxide

    MedlinePlus

    Aluminum Hydroxide, Magnesium Hydroxide are antacids used together to relieve heartburn, acid indigestion, and upset stomach. They ... They combine with stomach acid and neutralize it. Aluminum Hydroxide, Magnesium Hydroxide are available without a prescription. ...

  14. Sodium bicarbonate protects uranium-induced acute nephrotoxicity through uranium-decorporation by urinary alkalinization in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ohmachi, Yasushi; Imamura, Tomomi; Ikeda, Mizuyo; Shishikura, Eriko; Kim, Eunjoo; Kurihara, Osamu; Sakai, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of sodium bicarbonate (SB) in removing uranium and protecting animals from uranium toxicity, we intramuscularly administered 1 mg/kg of uranyl nitrate to 8-wk-old male SD rats, and 20 min after administration of uranyl nitrate, the animals were given a single oral administration of SB at 0.1, 0.3 or 1 g/kg. The SB treatment at a dose of 0.3 g/kg or more raised the pH of the rats’ urine until 4 h after treatment, and it significantly reduced the uranium amounts in the kidneys at 1 day after treatment. In another experiment, rats were intramuscularly administered 1 mg/kg of uranyl nitrate, and 20 min later, the animals were treated with sodium bicarbonate (0.1 or 1 g/kg). The rats were autopsied at 1, 3 and 7 days after uranium treatment. High-dose SB resulted in a significant increase in urinary uranium excretion in the first 24 h and a reduction of uranium deposition in the kidneys and femurs, and it also significantly suppressed uranium-induced renal toxicity, as shown by both histopathology and clinical chemistry at 3 days after uranium treatment. Low-dose SB did not show such marked effects. Our findings demonstrated that the uranium decorporation effect of sodium bicarbonate was observed at the dosage showing urine alkalinization in rats and that decorporation effect of sodium bicarbonate might be beneficial if it is administered immediately after incorporation of soluble uranium. PMID:26028815

  15. 21 CFR 184.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium hydroxide. 184.1428 Section 184.1428 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH)2, CAS... a white precipitate by the addition of sodium hydroxide to a water soluble magnesium salt or...

  16. Layered double hydroxide formation in Bayer liquor and its promotional effect on oxalate precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Perrotta, A.J.; Williams, F.

    1996-10-01

    Enhancing the precipitation of sodium oxalate from Bayer process liquor to improve the quality of alumina product remains an important objective for Bayer refining. The formation of layered double hydroxides by the reaction of alkaline earth oxides, such as lime and magnesia, with Bayer liquor gives a crystal structure which is capable of intercalating anions, both inorganic and organic, within its structure. Both lime and magnesia, with long contact times in Bayer liquor, show layered double hydroxide formation. This layered double hydroxide formation is accompanied with a decrease in the sodium oxalate content in the liquor from about 3 g/L to below 1 g/L. Short contact times lead to a destabilization of the liquor which facilitates sodium oxalate precipitation. Additional work on magnesium hydroxide shows, in comparison to lime and magnesia, much less layered double hydroxide formation with equivalent residence time in the liquor. Destabilization of the liquor also occurs, giving enhanced oxalate precipitation with less alumina being consumed in agreement with lower layered double hydroxide formation. Thermal regeneration of these structures, followed by in-situ recrystallization in Bayer liquor, also gives enhanced oxalate precipitation, suggesting that there is an opportunity for a regenerable oxalate reduction system. The implementation of these experiments and other related technology into the plant has resulted in the Purox Process for enhancing the precipitation of sodium oxalate from Bayer liquor.

  17. Alkaline sodium borohydride gel as a hydrogen source for PEMFC or an energy carrier for NaBH 4-air battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B. H.; Li, Z. P.; Chen, L. L.

    In this preliminary study, we tried to use sodium polyacrylate as the super absorbent polymer to form alkaline NaBH 4 gel and explored its possibilities for borohydride hydrolysis and borohydride electro-oxidation. It was found that the absorption capacity of sodium polyacrylate decreased with increasing NaBH 4 concentration. The formed gel was rather stable in the sealed vessel but tended to slowly decompose in open air. Hydrogen generation from the gel was carried out using CoCl 2 catalyst precursor solutions. Hydrogen generation rate from the alkaline NaBH 4 gel was found to be higher and impurities in hydrogen were less than that from the alkaline NaBH 4 solution. The NaBH 4 gel also successfully powered a NaBH 4-air battery.

  18. Electroreduction of nitrate ions in concentrated sodium hydroxide solutions at lead, zinc, nickel, and phthalocyanine-modified electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H. |; Chambers, J.Q.; Hobbs, D.T.

    1987-12-31

    The electrochemical reduction of nitrate in strongly alkaline solution has been studied using nickel, lead, zinc, and iron cathodes. Intermediate formation of nitrate ion and ammonia product was observed for all electrode materials. Coating a nickel sponge electrode with phthalocyanine renders it less active toward nitrate reduction, while iron electrodes appear to be activated. Electrolysis between a lead cathode and a nickel anode is an efficient means of removing nitrate from strongly alkaline solutions. Electrode pretreatment and solution conditions were chosen to correspond to those that might be encountered in practical applications, for example, the cleanup of radioactive waste solutions.

  19. Uranium(VI) Diffusion in Sodium-Montmorillonite at Alkaline pH Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinnacher, R. M.; Davis, J. A.; Tournassat, C.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Diffusive transport of uranium(VI) in montmorillonite clay and bentonite has important implications for uranium(VI) mobility in engineered barrier systems or host rocks in high level radioactive waste repositories, and clay-rich soils and sediments in the environment. The prediction of uranium(VI) adsorption and diffusion in clay-rich media, however, is complicated by (1) the complexity of the mineralogical structure of montmorillonite, in terms of its pore-size distributions and available surface site types, and (2) the complex uranium(VI) solution speciation, which can include cationic, uncharged, and anionic complexes, depending on solution conditions. For instance, a partial or full exclusion of anions from negatively charged clay interlayer spaces could change the effective 'anion-accessible' porosity and decrease the diffusive flux of these solutes under steady state conditions. In contrast, weak cation exchange reactions can result in 'surface diffusion' of adsorbed cations, such as UO2OH+, in addition to diffusion in the liquid phase, resulting in greater diffusive fluxes at steady state. In order to investigate these complex interactions, we performed two, lab-scale uranium(VI) through-diffusion experiments in lightly compacted Na-montmorillonite at slightly different, alkaline pH conditions (average pH values of 8.69 and 8.87). Observed uranium(VI) diffusive fluxes were decreased by approximately an order of magnitude in comparison to a tritium tracer. This indicates a relevance of 'anion exclusion' effects, the full or partial exclusion of anionic U(VI)-carbonato species from clay interlayer spaces. In addition, uranium(VI) sorption reactions were shown to be relevant in the diffusion experiments, even at alkaline pH values of around 8.7 and 8.9, where uranium(VI) sorption is low compared to other pH conditions. Despite the similarity of pH conditions, different degrees of uranium(VI) retardation were determined for the two systems. Additionally, we

  20. Solubility of uranium in alkaline salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.T.; Edwards, T.B.

    1994-03-29

    The solubility of uranium in alkaline salt solutions was investigated to screen for significant factors and interactions among the major salt components and temperature. The components included in the study were the sodium salts of hydroxide, nitrate, nitrite, aluminate, sulfate, and carbonate. General findings from the study included: (1) uranium solubilities are very low (1-20 mg/L) for all solution compositions at hydroxide concentrations from 0.1 to 17 molar (2) carbonate, sulfate, and aluminate are not effective complexants for uranium at high hydroxide concentration, (3) uranium solubility decreases with increasing temperature for most alkaline salt solutions, and (4) uranium solubility increases with changes in solution chemistry that reflect aging of high level waste (increase in nitrite and carbonate concentrations, decrease in nitrate and hydroxide concentrations). A predictive model for the concentration of uranium as a function of component concentrations and temperature was fitted to the data. All of the solution components and temperature were found to be significant. There is a significant lack of fit for the model, which suggests that the dependence on the uranium solubility over the wide range of solution compositions is non-linear and/or that there are other uncontrolled parameters which are important to the uranium solubility.

  1. High conversion of sugarcane bagasse into monosaccharides based on sodium hydroxide pretreatment at low water consumption and wastewater generation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen; Wang, Qiong; Tan, Xuesong; Qi, Wei; Yu, Qiang; Zhou, Guixiong; Zhuang, Xinshu; Yuan, Zhenhong

    2016-10-01

    The generation of a great quantity of black liquor (BL) and waste wash water (WWW) has been key problems of the alkaline pretreatment. This work tried to build a sustainable way to recycle the BL for pretreating sugarcane bagasse (SCB) and the WWW for washing the residual solid (RS) of alkali-treated SCB which would be subsequently hydrolysed and fermented. The enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency of the washed RS decreased with the recycling times of BL and WWW increasing. Tween80 at the loading of 0.25% (V/V) could notably improve the enzymatic hydrolysis and had no negative impact on the downstream fermentation. Compared with the non-recycling and BL recycling ways based on alkaline pretreatment, the BL-WWW recycling way could not only maintain high conversion of carbohydrate into monosaccharides and save alkali amount of 45.5%, but also save more than 80% water and generate less than 15% waste water. PMID:27474958

  2. Sodium Sulfate Separation from Aqueous Alkaline Solutions via Crystalline Urea-Functionalized Capsules: Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Crystallization

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Custelcean, Radu; Sloop, Frederick V.; Rajbanshi, Arbin; Wan, Shun; Moyer, Bruce A.

    2014-12-04

    We measured the thermodynamics and kinetics of crystallization of sodium sulfate with a tripodal tris-urea receptor (L1) from aqueous alkaline solutions in the 15 55 C temperature range, with the goal of identifying the optimal conditions for efficient and quick sulfate removal from nuclear wastes. The use of radiolabeled Na235SO4 provided a practical way to monitor the sulfate concentration in solution by liquid scintillation counting. Our results are consistent with a two-step crystallization mechanism, involving relatively quick dissolution of crystalline L1 followed by the rate-limiting crystallization of the Na2SO4(L1)2(H2O)4 capsules. We found that temperature exerted relatively little influence over themore » equilibrium sulfate concentration, which ranged between 0.004 and 0.011 M. Moreover, this corresponds to 77 91% removal of sulfate from a solution containing 0.0475 M initial sulfate concentration, as found in a typical Hanford waste tank. The apparent pseudo-first-order rate constant for sulfate removal increased 20-fold from 15 to 55 C, corresponding to an activation energy of 14.1 kcal/mol. At the highest measured temperature of 55 C, 63% and 75% of sulfate was removed from solution within 8 h and 24 h, respectively.« less

  3. Sodium Sulfate Separation from Aqueous Alkaline Solutions via Crystalline Urea-Functionalized Capsules: Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Custelcean, Radu; Sloop, Frederick V.; Rajbanshi, Arbin; Wan, Shun; Moyer, Bruce A.

    2014-12-04

    We measured the thermodynamics and kinetics of crystallization of sodium sulfate with a tripodal tris-urea receptor (L1) from aqueous alkaline solutions in the 15 55 C temperature range, with the goal of identifying the optimal conditions for efficient and quick sulfate removal from nuclear wastes. The use of radiolabeled Na235SO4 provided a practical way to monitor the sulfate concentration in solution by liquid scintillation counting. Our results are consistent with a two-step crystallization mechanism, involving relatively quick dissolution of crystalline L1 followed by the rate-limiting crystallization of the Na2SO4(L1)2(H2O)4 capsules. We found that temperature exerted relatively little influence over the equilibrium sulfate concentration, which ranged between 0.004 and 0.011 M. Moreover, this corresponds to 77 91% removal of sulfate from a solution containing 0.0475 M initial sulfate concentration, as found in a typical Hanford waste tank. The apparent pseudo-first-order rate constant for sulfate removal increased 20-fold from 15 to 55 C, corresponding to an activation energy of 14.1 kcal/mol. At the highest measured temperature of 55 C, 63% and 75% of sulfate was removed from solution within 8 h and 24 h, respectively.

  4. Kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of nitrocellulose.

    PubMed

    Christodoulatos, C; Su, T L; Koutsospyros, A

    2001-01-01

    Cellulose nitrate (nitrocellulose) is an explosive solid substance used in large quantities in various formulations of rocket and gun propellants. Safe destruction of nitrocellulose can be achieved by alkaline hydrolysis, which converts it to biodegradable products that can then be treated by conventional biological processes. The kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of munitions-grade nitrocellulose in sodium hydroxide solutions were investigated in completely mixed batch reactors. Experiments were conducted using solutions of alkaline strength ranging from 0.1 to 15% by mass and temperatures in the range of 30 to 90 degrees C. Regression analysis of the kinetic data revealed that alkaline hydrolysis of nitrocellulose is of the order 1.0 and 1.5 with respect to nitrocellulose and hydroxide concentration, respectively. The activation energy of the hydrolysis reaction was found to be 100.9 kJ/mol with a preexponential Arrhenius constant of 4.73 x 10(13). Nitrite and nitrate, in a 3:1 ratio, were the primary nitrogen species present in the posthydrolysis solution. The kinetic information is pertinent to the development and optimization of nitrocellulose chemical-biological treatment systems. PMID:11563378

  5. Magnesium Hydroxide

    MedlinePlus

    Magnesium hydroxide is used on a short-term basis to treat constipation.This medication is sometimes prescribed ... Magnesium hydroxide come as a tablet and liquid to take by mouth. It usually is taken as ...

  6. Aluminum Hydroxide

    MedlinePlus

    Aluminum hydroxide is used for the relief of heartburn, sour stomach, and peptic ulcer pain and to ... Aluminum hydroxide comes as a capsule, a tablet, and an oral liquid and suspension. The dose and ...

  7. {sup 27}Al and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR and powder x-ray diffraction studies of sodium aluminate speciation and the mechanistics of aluminum hydroxide precipitation upon acid hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, S.M.; Hanna, J.V.

    1994-08-24

    {sup 27}Al and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR, powder X-ray diffraction, and infrared spectroscopic investigations of freeze-dried sodium aluminates and aluminum hydroxides formed through acid hydrolysis have been undertaken, with OH/Al hydrolysis ratios between 5.3 and 2.8 being analyzed. Numerous {sup 27}AlNMR resonances were observed, the intensities of which vary as a function of OH/Al ratio, and these have been assigned to four-, five-, and six-coordinate aluminum species constituting a variety of structural moieties. The dominant species at an OH/Al ratio above 4.4 appears to be a Q{sup o}Na[Al(OH);{sub 4}] salt, as indicated by a {sup 27}Al resonance at 86.6 ppm. In addition, a second, broader resonance at 71.3 ppm demonstrates the simultaneous existence of further four-coordinate aluminum species linked thorough oxo bonds to other four-coordinate aluminums (e.g., Q{sup 2} [Al(OH);{sub 2}(OAl){sub 2}];{sup x-}). At an OH/Al ratio between 4.4 and 4.1, a water-soluble phase forms that contains both four- and six-coordinate aluminum. At OH/Al ratios fo 4.0 and below, a water-soluble phase forms that contains both four-and six-coordinate aluminum. AT OH/Al ratios of 4.0 and below, a water-insoluble phase exists possessing four-, five-, and six-coordinate aluminum. At OH/Al{le}3.9 range exhibits {sup 27}Al chemical shifts similar to those reported for transitional aluminas such as {gamma}-, {eta}-, and 0-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and an infrared spectrum similar to pseudo-spinel gels, suggesting that a pseudo-spinel intermediate is the first phase involved in the crystallization of gibbsite. The resonance assigned to five-coordinate aluminum probably results from species involved in the transformation of the pseudo-spinal phase to pseudo-boehmite. The formation of gibbssite on the acid hydrolysis of alkaline sodium aluminate solutions thus appears to follow the pathway pseudo-spinel {r_arrow} pseudo-boehmite {r_arrow} bayerite {r_arrow} gibbsite. 82 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Using Riverine Natural Organic Matter to Test the Hypothesis that Soil Organic Matter is Modified by Contact with Sodium Hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdue, E. Michael; Driver, Shamus; Hertkorn, Norbert; Harir, Mourad; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    It has been postulated by some scientists that soil humic acids and fulvic acids are an artifact of alkaline extractions of soil. Riverine natural organic matter (NOM) is obtained in part by dissolution and transport of organic matter from soils by meteoric waters at acidic to circumneutral pH. The NOM may be fractionated into humic acid (HA), fulvic acid (FA), and hydrophilic NOM by adsorption of HA and FA onto XAD-8 resin at pH < 2, followed by their desorption with NaOH at pH 13. Alternatively, riverine NOM may be concentrated using reverse osmosis (RO) and desalted by cation exchange. Several properties of Suwannee River NOM prior to its isolation, after concentration by RO, and after the XAD-8 process are compared to detect modifications that might have resulted from exposure of the sample to low and high pH.

  9. SOLIDIFICATION OF THE HANFORD LAW WASTE STREAM PRODUCED AS A RESULT OF NEAR-TANK CONTINUOUS SLUDGE LEACHING AND SODIUM HYDROXIDE RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M.; Johnson, F.; Crawford, C.; Jantzen, C.

    2011-09-20

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP), is responsible for the remediation and stabilization of the Hanford Site tank farms, including 53 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wasted waste contained in 177 underground tanks. The plan calls for all waste retrieved from the tanks to be transferred to the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The WTP will consist of three primary facilities including pretreatment facilities for Low Activity Waste (LAW) to remove aluminum, chromium and other solids and radioisotopes that are undesirable in the High Level Waste (HLW) stream. Removal of aluminum from HLW sludge can be accomplished through continuous sludge leaching of the aluminum from the HLW sludge as sodium aluminate; however, this process will introduce a significant amount of sodium hydroxide into the waste stream and consequently will increase the volume of waste to be dispositioned. A sodium recovery process is needed to remove the sodium hydroxide and recycle it back to the aluminum dissolution process. The resulting LAW waste stream has a high concentration of aluminum and sodium and will require alternative immobilization methods. Five waste forms were evaluated for immobilization of LAW at Hanford after the sodium recovery process. The waste forms considered for these two waste streams include low temperature processes (Saltstone/Cast stone and geopolymers), intermediate temperature processes (steam reforming and phosphate glasses) and high temperature processes (vitrification). These immobilization methods and the waste forms produced were evaluated for (1) compliance with the Performance Assessment (PA) requirements for disposal at the IDF, (2) waste form volume (waste loading), and (3) compatibility with the tank farms and systems. The iron phosphate glasses tested using the product consistency test had normalized release rates lower than the waste form requirements although the CCC glasses had higher release rates than the

  10. An evaluation of the residual toxicity and chemistry of a sodium hydroxide-based ballast water treatment system for freshwater ships.

    PubMed

    Elskus, Adria A; Ingersoll, Christopher G; Kemble, Nile E; Echols, Kathy R; Brumbaugh, William G; Henquinet, Jeffrey W; Watten, Barnaby J

    2015-06-01

    Nonnative organisms in the ballast water of freshwater ships must be killed to prevent the spread of invasive species. The ideal ballast water treatment system (BWTS) would kill 100% of ballast water organisms with minimal residual toxicity to organisms in receiving waters. In the present study, the residual toxicity and chemistry of a BWTS was evaluated. Sodium hydroxide was added to elevate pH to >11.5 to kill ballast water organisms, then reduced to pH <9 by sparging with wet-scrubbed diesel exhaust (the source of CO2 ). Cladocerans (Ceriodaphnia dubia), amphipods (Hyalella azteca), and fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were exposed for 2 d to BWTS water under an air atmosphere (pH drifted to ≥9) or a 2.5% CO2 atmosphere (pH 7.5-8.2), then transferred to control water for 5 d to assess potential delayed toxicity. Chemical concentrations in the BWTS water met vessel discharge guidelines with the exception of concentrations of copper. There was little to no residual toxicity to cladocerans or fish, but the BWTS water was toxic to amphipods. Maintaining a neutral pH and diluting BWTS water by 50% eliminated toxicity to the amphipods. The toxicity of BWTS water would likely be minimal because of rapid dilution in the receiving water, with subsurface release likely preventing pH rise. This BWTS has the potential to become a viable method for treating ballast water released into freshwater systems. PMID:25693486

  11. Effect of culture complex of BMSCs and sodium hydroxide- and GRGDSPC-treated PET on the reconstruction of injured anterior cruciate ligament in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianming; Chen, Fengrong; Jian, Guojian; Ye, Zhiyang; Wang, Zimin; Liu, Haoyuan; Kang, Yifan

    2015-01-01

    Ligament reconstruction is an effective therapy for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) artificial ligaments have recently gained popularity in clinical ACL reconstruction for its advantage in the improvement of keen function. However, the application of PET in clinical treatment is limited by its poor bioactivity and biocompatibility. Recently, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) have been widely studied in regenerative medical therapy due to their multi-lineage differentiation. Previous study also indicated that BMSCs may promote the healing of tendon-bone interface of injured ligament. We speculate that BMSCs may enhance the curative effect of PET artificial ligament on the tendon-bone-healing in ligament reconstruction. In this study, the PET materials were first modified with sodium hydroxide hydrolysis and GRGDSPC peptide which was able to improve its bioactivity and biocompatibility. Then, the effects of modified PET materials on the adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of BMSCs were examined. The in vitro co-culture of BMSCs and modified PET showed the modified PET promoted the adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of BMSCs. Further, the effect of culture complex of BMSCs and modified PET artificial ligament co-culture system on the injured ligament reconstruction was investigated in vivo. Results showed not only better growth and differentiation of BMSCs but also satisfactory healing of the injured ligament was observed after implantation of this culture complex into the injured ligament of rabbits. Our study provides a brand-new solution for ACL reconstruction. PMID:26221227

  12. Sorbents based on asbestos with a layer of an hydroxyethylcyclam derivative of PVC containing aquacomplexes of sulfuric acid or sodium hydroxide with aza-crown groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsivadze, A. Yu.; Fridman, A. Ya.; Morozova, E. M.; Sokolova, N. P.; Voloshchuk, A. M.; Petukhova, G. A.; Bardyshev, I. I.; Gorbunov, A. M.; Polyakova, I. Ya.; Titova, V. N.; Yavich, A. A.; Novikov, A. K.; Petrova, N. V.

    2016-07-01

    Aquacomplexes of sulfuric acid and sodium hydroxide with aza-crown groups are synthesized in cavities of a sorbent from the porous layer of a PVC cyclam-derivative grafted onto fibers of asbestos fabric. The structure of sorbents with complexes is studied and their adsorption characteristics are determined. It is shown that the affinity of the developed surface toward ethanol, benzene, and hexane depends on the nature of complexes in the pore walls, and the volume of cavities formed as a result of the pores on the developed asbestos surface being coated with networks of aza-crown groups is larger than that of cavities with walls of aza-crown groups in the layers of a PVC cyclam derivative. Indicators of H+- and OH--conductivity of sorbents with complexes as electrochemical bridges are determined. It is shown that the major part of H+- and OH--ions moves through complexes with aza-crown groups in the region of cavities formed of pores on the surface of asbestos.

  13. The Potential of Soft Soil Improvement Through a Coupled Technique Between Electro Kinetic and Alkaline Activation of Soft Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, G. E.; Ismail, H. B.; Huat, B. K.; Afshin, A.; Azhar, A. T. S.

    2016-07-01

    Soil stabilization techniques have been in development for decades with different rates of success. Alkaline activation of soft soil is one of those techniques that has proved to deliver some of the best shear strength values with minor drawbacks in comparison with conventional soil stabilization methods. However, environmental considerations have not been taken into account, as major mineral glassy phase activators are poisoning alkaline solutions, such as sodium-, potassium-hydroxide, and sodium-, potassium-silicate, which poses serious hazards to man and environment. This paper addresses the ways of discarding the involvement of the aforementioned alkaline solutions in soft soil stabilization by investigating the potential of a coupled electro kinetic alkaline activation technique for soft soil strengthening, through which the provision of alkaline pH is governed by electro kinetic potential. Uncertainties in regard to the dissolution of aluminosilicate as well as the dominance of acidic front are challenges that need to be overcome.

  14. Method and system for producing hydrogen using sodium ion separation membranes

    DOEpatents

    Bingham, Dennis N; Klingler, Kerry M; Turner, Terry D; Wilding, Bruce M; Frost, Lyman

    2013-05-21

    A method of producing hydrogen from sodium hydroxide and water is disclosed. The method comprises separating sodium from a first aqueous sodium hydroxide stream in a sodium ion separator, feeding the sodium produced in the sodium ion separator to a sodium reactor, reacting the sodium in the sodium reactor with water, and producing a second aqueous sodium hydroxide stream and hydrogen. The method may also comprise reusing the second aqueous sodium hydroxide stream by combining the second aqueous sodium hydroxide stream with the first aqueous sodium hydroxide stream. A system of producing hydrogen is also disclosed.

  15. Laser-luminescent determination of uranium in natural waters with concentration of titanium hydroxide and using sodium polysilicate

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitina, S.A.; Stepanov, A.V.

    1987-05-01

    Two methods for determining uranium in samples with a high content of quenching agents are compared, taking as an example the analysis of waters from the Vuoksa River, Baltic Sea and Finnish Bay. The first of these methods was developed by the authors and consists in concentrating uranium on TiO/sub 2/ x nH/sub 2/O under dynamic conditions, followed by laser luminescent determination at 77/sup 0/K in 0.1 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. The second method consists in direct recording of the luminescence of uranium in a 0.7% solution of sodium polysilicate at room temperature. The detection limit of the second method is estimated by the authors as 2 x 10/sup -11/ g/ml, while the detection limit of the first method is lower because concentration is used. The method is especially suitable for analysis of natural waters with a high concentration of hydrolyzable elements. Quenching rate constants of uranyl were measured for a large number of ions in a polysilicate medium.

  16. Solvent Extraction of Sodium Hydroxide Using Alkylphenols and Fluorinated Alcohols: Understanding the Extraction Mechanism by Equilibrium Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Hyun-Ah; Engle, Nancy L.; Bonnesen Peter V.; Delmau, Laetitia H.; Haverlock, Tamara J.; Moyer, Bruce A.

    2004-03-29

    In the present work, it has been the aim to examine extraction efficiencies of nine proton-ionizable alcohols (HAs) in 1-octanol and to identify both the controlling equilibria and predominant species involved in the extraction process within a thermochemical model. Distribution ratios for sodium (DNa) extraction were measured as a function of organic-phase HA and aqueous-phase NaOH molarity at 25 °C. Extraction efficiency follows the expected order of acidity of the HAs, 4-(tert-octyl) phenol (HA 1a) and 4-noctyl- a,a-bis-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl alcohol (HA 2a) being the most efficient extractants among the compounds tested. By use of the equilibrium-modeling program SXLSQI, a model for the extraction of NaOH has been advanced based on an ion-pair extraction by the diluent to give organic-phase Na+OH- and corresponding free ions and cation exchange by the weak acids to form monomeric organic-phase Na+A- and corresponding free organic-phase ions.

  17. REDUCTION OF PLUTONIUM TO Pu$sup +3$ BY SODIUM DITHIONITE IN POTASSIUM CARBONATE

    DOEpatents

    Miller, D.R.; Hoekstra, H.R.

    1958-12-16

    Plutonium values are reduced in an alkaline aqueous medlum to the trlvalent state by means of sodium dlthionite. Plutonlum values are also separated from normally assoclated contaminants by metathesizing a lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitate containing plutonium with a hydroxide solution, performing the metathesis in the presence of about 0.2 M sodium dithionite at a temperature of between 40 and 90 icient laborato C.

  18. Alkaline flooding for enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Gittler, W.E.

    1983-09-01

    There are over 12 active projects of varying size using one of 3 major types of alkaline agents. These include sodium silicate, caustic soda, and soda ash. Among the largest pilots currently is the THUMS project in the Wilmington field, California. Plans called for the injection of a 4% weight concentration of sodium orthosilicate over a 60% PV. Through the first 3 yr, over 27 million bbl of chemicals have been injected. Gulf Oil is operating several alkaline floods, one of which is located off shore in the Quarantine Bay field, Louisiana. In this pilot, sodium hydroxide in a weight concentration of 5 to 12% is being injected. Belco Petroleum Corp. has reported that their pilot operating in the Isenhour Unit in Wyoming is using a .5% weight concentration of soda ash in conjunction with a polymer. Other uses for alkaline agents in chemical flooding include the use of silicate as a preflush or sacrificial agent in micellar/polymer and surfactant recovery systems. In addition, caustic has been tested in the surface-mixed caustic emulsion process while orthosilicate has been tested in a recovery method known as mobility-controlled caustic floods.

  19. Influence of sodium dodecyl sulfate concentration on the photocatalytic activity and dielectric properties of intercalated sodium dodecyl sulfate into Zn–Cd–Al layered double hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Abdullah Ahmed Ali; Talib, Zainal Abidin; Hussein, Mohd Zobir

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Zn–Cd–Al–LDH–DS were synthesized with different SDS concentrations. • Photocatalytic activity of samples was improved by increasing SDS concentration. • Dielectric response of LDH can be described by anomalous low frequency dispersion. • The dc conductivity values were calculated for Zn–Cd–Al–LDH–DS samples. • ESR spectra exhibited the successful intercalation of DS molecule into LDH gallery. - Abstract: Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) has been successfully intercalated into Zn–Cd–Al–LDH precursor with different SDS concentrations (0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5 and 1 mol L{sup −1}) using the coprecipitation method at (Zn{sup 2+} + Cd{sup 2+})/Al{sup 3+} molar ratio of 13 and pH 8. The structural, morphological, texture and composition properties of the synthesized (Zn–Cd–Al–LDH–DS) nanostructure were investigated using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), respectively. The photocatalytic activity of these materials was developed by increasing the concentration of intercalated SDS. The absorbance spectra have been used to detect an anion in the LDH interlayer before and after the intercalation process, which confirmed the presence of the dodecyl sulfate (DS{sup −}) anion into LDH gallery after intercalation. The anomalous low frequency dispersion (ALFD) has been used to describe the dielectric response of Zn–Cd–Al–LDH–DS nanostructure using the second type of universal power law. At low frequency, the polarization effect of electrodes caused the rising in dielectric constant and loss values. An important result of the dielectric measurements is the calculated dc conductivity values, which are new in dielectric spectroscopy of LDH materials. An important result of the electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra exhibited the successful intercalation of DS molecule into LDH gallery. The g-factor value was affected by

  20. Chemical Decontamination with N-Acetyl-l-Cysteine–Sodium Hydroxide Improves Recovery of Viable Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Organisms from Cultured Milk

    PubMed Central

    Bradner, L.; Robbe-Austerman, S.; Beitz, D. C.

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is shed into the milk and feces of cows with advanced Johne's disease, allowing the transmission of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis between animals. The objective of this study was to formulate an optimized protocol for the isolation of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk. The parameters investigated included chemical decontamination with N-acetyl-l-cysteine–sodium hydroxide (NALC-NaOH), alone and in combination with antibiotics (vancomycin, amphotericin B, and nalidixic acid), and the efficacy of solid (Herrold's egg yolk medium [HEY]) and liquid (Bactec 12B and para-JEM) culture media. For each experiment, raw milk samples from a known noninfected cow were inoculated with 102 to 108 CFU/ml of live M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis organisms. The results indicate that an increased length of exposure to NALC-NaOH from 5 to 30 min and an increased concentration of NaOH from 0.5 to 2.0% did not affect the viability of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Additional treatment of milk samples with the antibiotics following NALC-NaOH treatment decreased the recovery of viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells more than treatment with NALC-NaOH alone. The Bactec 12B medium was the superior medium of the three evaluated for the isolation of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis from milk, as it achieved the lowest threshold of detection. The optimal conditions for NALC-NaOH decontamination were determined to be exposure to 1.50% NaOH for 15 min followed by culture in Bactec 12B medium. This study demonstrates that chemical decontamination with NALC-NaOH resulted in a greater recovery of viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells from milk than from samples treated with hexadecylpyridinium chloride (HPC). Therefore, it is important to optimize milk decontamination protocols to ensure that low concentrations of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis can be detected. PMID:23637290

  1. Emissions of alkaline elements calcium, magnesium, potassium, and sodium from open sources in the contiguous United States

    SciTech Connect

    Gillette, D.A. ); Stensland, G.J.; Williams, A.L.; Barnard, W.; Gatz, D. ); Sinclair, P.C. ); Johnson, T.C. )

    1992-12-01

    Models of dust emissions by wind erosion (including winds associated with regional activity as well as dust devils) and vehicular disturbances of unpaved roads were developed, calibrated, and used to estimate alkaline dust emissions from elemental soil and road composition data. Emissions from tillage of soils were estimated form the work of previous researchers. The area of maximum dust production by all of those sources is the area of the old Dust Bowl' of the 1930s (the panhandles of Texas and Oklahoma, eastern New Mexico and Colorado, and western Kansas). The areas of maximum alkaline dust production are the arid southwest, the Dust Bowl,' and the midwestern-mideastern states from Iowa to Pennsylvania. Our calculations show that calcium is the dominant alkaline element produced by open sources' (sources too great in extent to be controlled by enclosure or ducting). Although the largest dust mass source is wind erosion (by winds associated with regional activity and convective activity), the largest producer of the alkaline component is road dust because the abundance of alkaline materials in road coverings (which include crushed limestone) is significantly higher than for soils. Comparing the above estimated sources of alkaline material with inventories of SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] emissions by previous investigators gives the rough approximation that alkaline emission rates are of the order of the SO[sub 2] + NO[sub x] emissions in the western United States and that they are much smaller than SO[sub 2] + NO[sub x] in the eastern United States. This approximation is substantiated by data on Ca/(SO[sub 4] + NO[sub 3]) for wet deposition for National Atmospheric Deposition Program sites. 53 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Emissions of alkaline elements calcium, magnesium, potassium, and sodium from open sources in the contiguous United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillette, Dale A.; Stensland, Gary J.; Williams, Allen L.; Barnard, William; Gatz, Donald; Sinclair, Peter C.; Johnson, Tezz C.

    1992-12-01

    Models of dust emissions by wind erosion (including winds associated with regional activity as well as dust devils) and vehicular disturbances of unpaved roads were developed, calibrated,and used to estimate alkaline dust emissions from elemental soil and road composition data. Emissions from tillage of soils were estimated from the work of previous researchers. The area of maximum dust production by all of those sources is the area of the old "Dust Bowl" of the 1930s (the panhandles of Texas and Oklahoma, eastern New Mexico and Colorado, and western Kansas). The areas of maximum alkaline dust production are the arid southwest, the "Dust Bowl," and the midwestern-mideastern states from Iowa to Pennsylvania. Our calculations show that calcium is the dominant alkaline element produced by "open sources" (sources too great in extent to be controlled by enclosure or ducting). Although the largest dust mass source is wind erosion (by winds associated with regional activity and convective activity), the largest producer of the alkaline component is road dust because the abundance of alkaline materials in road coverings (which include crushed limestone) is significantly higher than for soils. Comparing the above estimated sources of alkaline material with inventories of SO2 and NOx emissions by previous investigators gives the rough approximation that alkaline emission rates are of the order of the SO2 + NOx emissions in the western United States and that they are much smaller than SO2 + NOx in the eastern United States. This approximation is substantiated by data on Ca/(SO4 + NO3) for wet deposition for National Atmospheric Deposition Program sites.

  3. Aluminum Hydroxide

    MedlinePlus

    ... penicillamine (Cuprimine, Depen), prednisone (Deltasone, Orasone), products containing iron, tetracycline (Sumycin, Tetracap, and others), ticlopidine (Ticlid), and vitamins.be aware that aluminum hydroxide may interfere with other medicines, making them less effective. Take your other medications 1 ...

  4. Study of nickel hydroxide electrodes. 2: Oxidation products of nickel (2) hydroxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bode, H.; Demelt, K.; White, J.

    1986-01-01

    Pure phases of some oxidized Ni oxides were prepared galvanimetrically with the Ni(2) hydroxide electrode of an alkaline battery. The crystallographic data of these phases, their chemical behavior, and conditions of transition were studied.

  5. Heavy metals stabilization in medical waste incinerator fly ash using alkaline assisted supercritical water technology.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jian; Li, Xiaodong; Chi, Yong; Yan, Jianhua

    2010-12-01

    This study investigated the process of aluminosilicate formation in medical waste incinerator fly ash containing large amounts of heavy metals and treated with alkaline compounds at 375 degrees C and examined how this process affected the mobility and availability of the metals. As a consequence of the treatments, the amount of dissolved heavy metals, and thus their mobility, was greatly reduced, and the metal leaching concentration was below the legislative regulations for metal leachability. Moreover, this process did not produce a high concentration of heavy metals in the effluent. The addition of alkaline compounds such as sodium hydroxide and sodium carbonate can prevent certain heavy metal ions dissolving in water. In comparison with the alkaline-free condition, the extracted concentrations of As, Mn, Pb, Sr and Zn were decreased by about 51.08, 97.22, 58.33, 96.77 and 86.89% by the addition of sodium hydroxide and 66.18, 86.11, 58.33, 83.87 and 81.91% by the addition of sodium carbonate. A mechanism for how the formation of aluminosilicate occurred in supercritical water and affected the mobility and availability of the heavy metals is discussed. The reported results could be useful as basic knowledge for planning new technologies for the hydrothermal stabilization of heavy metals in fly ash. PMID:20430801

  6. A method for making an alkaline battery electrode plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chida, K.; Ezaki, T.

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for making an alkaline battery electrode plate where the desired active substances are filled into a nickel foam substrate. In this substrate an electrolytic oxidation reduction occurs in an alkaline solution containing lithium hydroxide.

  7. Copper Catalyzed Sodium Tetraphenylborate, Triphenylborane, Diphenylborinic Acid and Phenylboronic Acid Decomposition Kinetic Studies in Aqueous Alkaline Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.L.

    1999-03-15

    This work studied the kinetics of copper-catalyzed decomposition of tetraphenylborate, triphenylborane, diphenylborinic acid and phenylboronic acid (NaTPB, 3PB, 2PB and 1PB, respectively) in aqueous alkaline solution over the temperature range of 25 to 70 degrees C. The statistically designed test matrices added copper sulfate to maximum concentrations of 10 mg/L. The relative rates of decomposition increase in the order of NaTPB < 1PB {tilde} 3PB < 2PB. Dependence of decomposition on the amount of added copper increases in the order of 3PB {tilde} 2PB < 1PB {tilde} NaTPB. Activation energies ranged from 82 to 143 kJ/mole over the temperature range studied. Final decomposition products predominately involved benzene and phenol. All 3PB, 2PB and 1PB intermediate phenylborate species proved relatively stable (< 8 percent decomposition over {tilde} 500 h) towards thermal hydrolysis in 1.5 M NaOH when contained in carbon-steel vessels sealed under air at ambient temperature (23 - 25 degrees C) with no added copper. Measurable (> 10-7 Mh-1) thermal hydrolysis of the phenylborate species occurs at 55 to 70 degrees C in alkaline (0.6-2.3 M OH-, 2-4.7 M Na+) solution with no added copper. The experiments suggest an important role for oxygen in copper-catalyzed phenylborate decomposition. NaTPB decomposes promptly under anoxic conditions while 3PB, 2PB and 1PB decompose faster in aerobic solutions. Benzene and phenol form as the predominant end-products from alkaline copper catalysis in static systems sealed under air. Both 2PB and 1PB decompose with near equal rates and quantitatively produce phenol under flowing air-purge conditions at 25 to 60 degrees C. Mechanisms for copper-catalyzed phenylborate decomposition likely involve a redox process giving loss of a phenyl group from the phenylborate with reduction of cupric ion, or dephenylation by reduced cuprous ion involving a phenylated copper intermediate.

  8. Determination of the zincate diffusion coefficient and its application to alkaline battery problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, C. E.; Kautz, Harold E.

    1978-01-01

    The diffusion coefficient for the zincate ion at 24 C was found to be 9.9 X 10 to the minus 7th power squared cm per sec + or - 30 percent in 45 percent potassium hydroxide and 1.4 x 10 to the minus 7 squared cm per sec + or - 25 percent in 40 percent sodium hydroxide. Comparison of these values with literature values at different potassium hydroxide concentrations show that the Stokes-Einstein equation is obeyed. The diffusion coefficient is characteristic of the zincate ion (not the cation) and independent of its concentration. Calculations with the measured value of the diffusion coefficient show that the zinc concentration in an alkaline zincate half cell becomes uniform throughout in tens of hours by diffusion alone. Diffusion equations are derived which are applicable to finite size chambers. Details and discussion of the experimental method are also given.

  9. Determination of the zincate diffusion coefficient and its application to alkaline battery problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, C. E.; Kautz, H. E.

    1978-01-01

    The diffusion coefficient for the zincate ion at 24 C was found to be 9.9 x 10 to the -7th power sq cm/sec + or - 30% in 45% potassium hydroxide and 1.4 x 10 to the -7th power sq cm/sec + or - 25% in 40% sodium hydroxide. Comparison of these values with literature values at different potassium hydroxide concentrations show that the Stokes-Einstein equation is obeyed. The diffusion coefficient is characteristic of the zincate ion (not the cation) and independent of its concentration. Calculations with the measured value of the diffusion coefficient show that the zinc concentration in an alkaline zincate half-cell becomes uniform throughout in tens of hours by diffusion alone. Diffusion equations are derived which are applicable to finite-size chambers. Details and discussion of the experimental method are also given.

  10. Alkaline dechlorination of chlorinated volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, B.; Siegrist, R.L.

    1996-06-01

    The vast majority of contaminated sites in the United States and abroad are contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as trichloroethylene (TCE), trichloroethane (TCA), and chloroform. These VOCs are mobile and persistent in the subsurface and present serious health risks at trace concentrations. The goal of this project was to develop a new chemical treatment system that can rapidly and effectively degrade chlorinated VOCs. The system is based on our preliminary findings that strong alkalis such as sodium hydroxide (NaOH) can absorb and degrade TCE. The main objectives of this study were to determine the reaction rates between chlorinated VOCs, particularly TCE, and strong alkalis, to elucidate the reaction mechanisms and by-products, to optimize the chemical reactions under various experimental conditions, and to develop a laboratory bench- scale alkaline destruction column that can be used to destroy vapor- phase TCE.

  11. Fluoxetine induces alkalinization of astroglial cytosol through stimulation of sodium-hydrogen exchanger 1: dissection of intracellular signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jienan; Song, Dan; Bai, Qiufang; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Peng, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Clinical evidence suggest astrocytic abnormality in major depression (MD) while treatment with anti-psychotic drugs affects astroglial functions. Astroglial cells are involved in pH homeostasis of the brain by transporting protons (through sodium-proton transporter 1, NHE1, glutamate transporters EAAT1/2 and proton-lactate co-transporter MCT1) and bicarbonate (through the sodium-bicarbonate co-transporter NBC or the chloride-bicarbonate exchanger AE). Here we show that chronic treatment with fluoxetine increases astroglial pHi by stimulating NHE1-mediated proton extrusion. At a clinically relevant concentration of 1 μM, fluoxetine significantly increased astroglial pHi from 7.05 to 7.34 after 3 weeks and from 7.18 to 7.58 after 4 weeks of drug treatment. Stimulation of NHE1 is a result of transporter phosphorylation mediated by several intracellular signaling cascades that include MAPK/ERK1/2, PI3K/AKT and ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK). Fluoxetine stimulated phosphorylation of ERK1/2, AKT and RSK in a concentration dependent manner. Positive crosstalk exists between two signal pathways, MAPK/ERK1/2 and PI3K/AKT activated by fluoxetine since ERK1/2 phosphrylation could be abolished by inhibitors of PI3K, LY294002 and AKT, triciribine, and AKT phosphorylation by inhibitor of MAPK, U0126. As a result, RSK phosphorylation was not only inhibited by U0126 but also by inhibitor of LY294002. The NHE1 phoshorylation resulted in stimulation of NHE1 activity as revealed by the NH4Cl-prepulse technique; the increase of NHE1 activity was dependent on fluoxetine concentration, and could be inhibited by both U0126 and LY294002. Our findings suggest that regulation of astrocytic pHi and brain pH may be one of the mechanisms underlying fluoxetine action. PMID:25784857

  12. The effect of alkaline pretreatment methods on cellulose structure and accessibility.

    PubMed

    Bali, Garima; Meng, Xianzhi; Deneff, Jacob I; Sun, Qining; Ragauskas, Arthur J

    2015-01-01

    The effects of different alkaline pretreatments on cellulose structural features and accessibility are compared and correlated with the enzymatic hydrolysis of Populus. The pretreatments are shown to modify polysaccharides and lignin content to enhance the accessibility for cellulase enzymes. The highest increase in the cellulose accessibility was observed in dilute sodium hydroxide, followed by methods using ammonia soaking and lime (Ca(OH)2 ). The biggest increase of cellulose accessibility occurs during the first 10 min of pretreatment, with further increases at a slower rate as severity increases. Low temperature ammonia soaking at longer residence times dissolved a major portion of hemicellulose and exhibited higher cellulose accessibility than high temperature soaking. Moreover, the most significant reduction of degree of polymerization (DP) occurred for dilute sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and ammonia pretreated Populus samples. The study thus identifies important cellulose structural features and relevant parameters related to biomass recalcitrance. PMID:25421020

  13. Positive Active Material For Alkaline Electrolyte Storage Battert Nickel Electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Bernard, Patrick; Baudry, Michelle

    2000-12-05

    A method of manufacturing a positive active material for nickel electrodes of alkaline storage batteries which consists of particles of hydroxide containing mainly nickel and covered with a layer of a hydroxide phase based on nickel and yttrium is disclosed. The proportion of the hydroxide phase is in the range 0.15% to 3% by weight of yttrium expressed as yttrium hydroxide relative to the total weight of particles.

  14. Alkalinity Enrichment Enhances Net Calcification of a Coral Reef Flat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albright, R.; Caldeira, K.

    2015-12-01

    Ocean acidification is projected to shift reefs from a state of net accretion to one of net dissolution sometime this century. While retrospective studies show large-scale changes in coral calcification over the last several decades, it is not possible to unequivocally link these results to ocean acidification due to confounding factors of temperature and other environmental parameters. Here, we quantified the calcification response of a coral reef flat to alkalinity enrichment to test whether reef calcification increases when ocean chemistry is restored to near pre-industrial conditions. We used sodium hydroxide (NaOH) to increase the total alkalinity of seawater flowing over a reef flat, with the aim of increasing carbonate ion concentrations [CO32-] and the aragonite saturation state (Ωarag) to values that would have been attained under pre-industrial atmospheric pCO2 levels. We developed a dual tracer regression method to estimate alkalinity uptake (i.e., calcification) in response to alkalinity enrichment. This approach uses the change in ratios between a non-conservative tracer (alkalinity) and a conservative tracer (a non-reactive dye, Rhodamine WT) to assess the fraction of added alkalinity that is taken up by the reef as a result of an induced increase in calcification rate. Using this method, we estimate that an average of 17.3% ± 2.3% of the added alkalinity was taken up by the reef community. In providing results from the first seawater chemistry manipulation experiment performed on a natural coral reef community (without artificial confinement), we demonstrate that, upon increase of [CO32-] and Ωarag to near pre-industrial values, reef calcification increases. Thus, we conclude that, the impacts of ocean acidification are already being felt by coral reefs. This work is the culmination of years of work in the Caldeira lab at the Carnegie Institution for Science, involving many people including Jack Silverman, Kenny Schneider, and Jana Maclaren.

  15. SEPARATION OF PLUTONIUM HYDROXIDE FROM BISMUTH HYDROXIDE

    DOEpatents

    Watt, G.W.

    1958-08-19

    An tmproved method is described for separating plutonium hydroxide from bismuth hydroxide. The end product of the bismuth phosphate processes for the separation amd concentration of plutonium is a inixture of bismuth hydroxide amd plutonium hydroxide. It has been found that these compounds can be advantageously separated by treatment with a reducing agent having a potential sufficient to reduce bismuth hydroxide to metalltc bisinuth but not sufficient to reduce the plutonium present. The resulting mixture of metallic bismuth and plutonium hydroxide can then be separated by treatment with a material which will dissolve plutonium hydroxide but not metallic bismuth. Sodiunn stannite is mentioned as a preferred reducing agent, and dilute nitric acid may be used as the separatory solvent.

  16. Method of determining pH by the alkaline absorption of carbon dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Hobbs, David T.

    1992-01-01

    A method for measuring the concentration of hydroxides in alkaline solutions in a remote location using the tendency of hydroxides to absorb carbon dioxide. The method includes the passing of carbon dioxide over the surface of an alkaline solution in a remote tank before and after measurements of the carbon dioxide solution. A comparison of the measurements yields the absorption fraction from which the hydroxide concentration can be calculated using a correlation of hydroxide or pH to absorption fraction.

  17. Pyramidal texturing of silicon surface via inorganic-organic hybrid alkaline liquor for heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fengyou; Zhang, Xiaodan; Wang, Liguo; Jiang, Yuanjian; Wei, Changchun; Zhao, Ying

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate a new class of silicon texturing approach based on inorganic (sodium hydroxide, NaOH) and organic (tetramethylammonium hydroxide, TMAH) alkaline liquor etching processes for photovoltaic applications. The first stage of inorganic alkaline etching textures the silicon surface rapidly with large pyramids and reduces the cost. The subsequent organic alkaline second-etching improves the coverage of small pyramids on the silicon surface and strip off the metallic contaminants produced by the first etching step. In addition, it could smoothen the surface of the pyramids to yield good morphology. In this study, the texturing duration of both etching steps was controlled to optimize the optical and electrical properties as well as the surface morphology and passivation characteristics of the silicon substrates. Compared with traditional inorganic NaOH texturing, this hybrid process yields smoother (111) facets of the pyramids, fewer residual Na+ ions on the silicon surface, and a shorter processing period. It also offers the advantage of lower cost compared with the organic texturing method based on the use of only TMAH. We applied this hybrid texturing process to fabricate silicon heterojunction solar cells, which showed a remarkable improvement compared with the cells based on traditional alkaline texturing processes.

  18. Alkaline solution absorption of carbon dioxide method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for measuring the concentration of hydroxides (or pH) in alkaline solutions, using the tendency of hydroxides to adsorb CO{sub 2}. The method comprises passing CO{sub 2} over the surface of an alkaline solution in a remote tank before and after measurements of the CO{sub 2} concentration. Comparison of the measurements yields the adsorption fraction from which the hydroxide concentration can be calculated using a correlation of hydroxide or pH to adsorption fraction. A schematic is given of a process system according to a preferred embodiment of the invention. 2 figs.

  19. 21 CFR 186.1756 - Sodium formate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium formate. 186.1756 Section 186.1756 Food and....1756 Sodium formate. (a) Sodium formate (CHNaO2, CAS Reg. No. 141-53-7) is the sodium salt of formic acid. It is produced by the reaction of carbon monoxide with sodium hydroxide. (b) The ingredient...

  20. Imidazolium-Based Polymeric Materials as Alkaline Anion-Exchange Fuel Cell Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayan, Sri R.; Yen, Shiao-Ping S.; Reddy, Prakash V.; Nair, Nanditha

    2012-01-01

    Polymer electrolyte membranes that conduct hydroxide ions have potential use in fuel cells. A variety of polystyrene-based quaternary ammonium hydroxides have been reported as anion exchange fuel cell membranes. However, the hydrolytic stability and conductivity of the commercially available membranes are not adequate to meet the requirements of fuel cell applications. When compared with commercially available membranes, polystyrene-imidazolium alkaline membrane electrolytes are more stable and more highly conducting. At the time of this reporting, this has been the first such usage for imidazolium-based polymeric materials for fuel cells. Imidazolium salts are known to be electrochemically stable over wide potential ranges. By controlling the relative ratio of imidazolium groups in polystyrene-imidazolium salts, their physiochemical properties could be modulated. Alkaline anion exchange membranes based on polystyrene-imidazolium hydroxide materials have been developed. The first step was to synthesize the poly(styrene-co-(1-((4-vinyl)methyl)-3- methylimidazolium) chloride through a free-radical polymerization. Casting of this material followed by in situ treatment of the membranes with sodium hydroxide solutions provided the corresponding hydroxide salts. Various ratios of the monomers 4-chloromoethylvinylbenzine (CMVB) and vinylbenzine (VB) provided various compositions of the polymer. The preferred material, due to the relative ease of casting the film, and its relatively low hygroscopic nature, was a 2:1 ratio of CMVB to VB. Testing confirmed that at room temperature, the new membranes outperformed commercially available membranes by a large margin. With fuel cells now in use at NASA and in transportation, and with defense potential, any improvement to fuel cell efficiency is a significant development.

  1. Calcium hydroxide poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrate - calcium; Lime milk; Slaked lime ... Calcium hydroxide ... These products contain calcium hydroxide: Cement Limewater Many industrial solvents and cleaners (hundreds to thousands of construction products, flooring strippers, brick cleaners, cement ...

  2. Suitable alkaline for graphene peeling grown on metallic catalysts using chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamat, S.; Sonuşen, S.; Çelik, Ü.; Uysallı, Y.; Oral, A.

    2016-04-01

    In chemical vapor deposition, the higher growth temperature roughens the surface of the metal catalyst and a delicate method is necessary for the transfer of graphene from metal catalyst to the desired substrates. In this work, we grow graphene on Pt and Cu foil via ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition (AP-CVD) method and further alkaline water electrolysis was used to peel off graphene from the metallic catalyst. We used different electrolytes i.e., sodium hydroxide (NaOH), potassium hydroxide (KOH), lithium hydroxide (LiOH) and barium hydroxide Ba(OH)2 for electrolysis, hydrogen bubbles evolved at the Pt cathode (graphene/Pt/PMMA stack) and as a result graphene layer peeled off from the substrate without damage. The peeling time for KOH and LiOH was ∼6 min and for NaOH and Ba(OH)2 it was ∼15 min. KOH and LiOH peeled off graphene very efficiently as compared to NaOH and Ba(OH)2 from the Pt electrode. In case of copper, the peeling time is ∼3-5 min. Different characterizations like optical microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were done to analyze the as grown and transferred graphene samples.

  3. Mechanical properties of untreated and alkaline treated fibers from zalacca midrib wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raharjo, Wahyu Purwo; Soenoko, Rudy; Purnowidodo, Anindito; Choiron, Mochammad Agus; Triyono

    2016-03-01

    The environmental concern has been raised due to the abundance of waste from synthetic materials which cannot be biodegraded after their life-time. It provides opportunity to exploit natural resources which are neglected. For example, midrib wastes from zalacca plants after cutting are able to utilize as composite reinforcement. The aim of this research was to characterize the mechanical properties of zalacca midrib fibers. As other ones, zalacca midrib fibers consisted of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin, which their compositions were 42.54, 34.35 and 28.01 % respectively. To raise their cellulose content, the zalacca fibers were alkaline treated by immersion in the sodium hydroxide for 2 hours and rinsing in the distilled water. The concentration of sodium hydroxide was varied 1 and 5%. To investigate the influence of alkaline treatment, the mechanical testing and morphological analysis was performed. The tensile testing was done to obtain ultimate strength, elastic modulus and strain to fracture. The surface morphology of fibers was observed by SEM. The average ultimate tensile strength of zalacca fibers ranged from 182.12 MPa (untreated) to 417.94 MPa (5%NaOH treated). The diameter measurement showed that the alkaline treatment reduce the average fiber diameters due to the decline of the hemicellulose and lignin content as fiber matrix. This caused the increase of the tensile strength and elastic modulus due to the reduction of diameters as divider meanwhile the cellulose content as structural supporter of the fibers was relatively constant. From the SEM analysis, it was shown that the alkaline treatment reduced the fiber matrix so that its surface morphology became rougher due to the microfibrils appearance.

  4. Synthesis of high capacity cathodes for lithium-ion batteries by morphology-tailored hydroxide co-precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dapeng; Belharouak, Ilias; Ortega, Luis H.; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Xu, Rui; Zhou, Dehua; Zhou, Guangwen; Amine, Khalil

    2015-01-01

    Nickel manganese hydroxide co-precipitation inside a continuous stirred tank reactor was studied with sodium hydroxide and ammonium hydroxide as the precipitation agents. The ammonium hydroxide concentration had an effect on the primary and secondary particle evolution. The two-step precipitation mechanism proposed earlier was experimentally confirmed. In cell tests, Li- and Mn-rich composite cathode materials based on the hydroxide precursors demonstrated good electrochemical performance in terms of cycle life over a wide range of lithium content.

  5. Retail display evaluation of steaks from select beef strip loins injected with a brine containing 1% ammonium hydroxide. Part 2: Cook yield, tenderness, and sensory attributes.

    PubMed

    Parsons, A N; VanOverbeke, D L; Goad, C L; Mireles DeWitt, C A

    2011-01-01

    The impact of 2 different brines on the palatability and tenderness of select beef strip loin steaks was evaluated. Brines were differentiated by the type of alkaline agent, 4.5% sodium-based phosphate (control brine; CON) or 1% ammonium hydroxide (ammonium hydroxide treatment; AHT), incorporated into the formula. Injected steaks were placed in high oxygen (80% O(2)/20% CO(2)) MAP, stored 4 d at 4 °C in dark storage to simulate transportation, and then placed in retail display. Steaks were selected randomly on day 0, 7, and 14 retail display to measure pH, cook loss, shear force, and sensory characteristics. The pH for AHT steaks (pH 5.96) was slightly higher than CON steaks (pH 5.86; P < 0.05). Cook loss was lower (21%) for CON than AHT steaks (23%). There was neither a treatment nor day effect on tenderness as measured by Warner-Braztler shear force (P > 0.05). Sensory evaluation indicated that on day 0, retail display the initial juiciness, sustained juiciness, tenderness 1st impression, tenderness overall impression, and connective tissue in AHT steaks was not different from CON steaks (P > 0.05). A day effect (decrease) for those sensory parameters was observed only for sustained juiciness (P < 0.05). AHT steaks were rated higher in cooked beef flavor while CON steaks were higher in peppery and salty flavor. There was no difference in soapy and ammonia intensity between treatments. Results indicated that despite lower performance in cook loss the replacement of 4.5% sodium-based phosphate in a meat injection brine with 1% ammonium hydroxide produced a beef loin steak with comparable tenderness and palatability. Practical Application: The research in this study compares steaks that have been injected with a commercial brine formulated with sodium phosphates to steaks that have been injected with a brine where the sodium phosphate in the formulation was replaced with 1% ammonium hydroxide. Ammonium hydroxide is an USDA-FSIS approved ingredient in brines

  6. Sulphate removal from sodium sulphate-rich brine and recovery of barium as a barium salt mixture.

    PubMed

    Vadapalli, Viswanath R K; Zvimba, John N; Mulopo, Jean; Motaung, Solly

    2013-01-01

    Sulphate removal from sodium sulphate-rich brine using barium hydroxide and recovery of the barium salts has been investigated. The sodium sulphate-rich brine treated with different dosages of barium hydroxide to precipitate barium sulphate showed sulphate removal from 13.5 g/L to less than 400 mg/L over 60 min using a barium to sulphate molar ratio of 1.1. The thermal conversion of precipitated barium sulphate to barium sulphide achieved a conversion yield of 85% using coal as both a reducing agent and an energy source. The recovery of a pure mixture of barium salts from barium sulphide, which involved dissolution of barium sulphide and reaction with ammonium hydroxide resulted in recovery of a mixture of barium carbonate (62%) and barium hydroxide (38%), which is a critical input raw material for barium salts based acid mine drainage (AMD) desalination technologies. Under alkaline conditions of this barium salt mixture recovery process, ammonia gas is given off, while hydrogen sulfide is retained in solution as bisulfide species, and this provides basis for ammonium hydroxide separation and recovery for reuse, with hydrogen sulfide also recoverable for further industrial applications such as sulfur production by subsequent stripping. PMID:23485244

  7. Multi-stage absorption of rendering plant odours using sodium hypochlorite and other reagents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, D.; Davis, B. J.; Moss, R. L.

    Conditions for using sodium hypochlorite solution as the main component of a multi-stage absorption system for the treatment of malodorous process emissions were studied, together with the additional reagents needed for effective odour control. In laboratory experiments, mixtures containing vpm levels in air of trimethylamine, hydrogen sulphide, methyl mercaptan, dimethyl disulphide, n-butanal and sometimes ammonia were passed through three bubble-plate columns containing some of the following: water, dilute sulphuric acid, sodium hypochlorite solutions (varying in pH and available chlorine content) sodium hydroxide and sodium hydrogen sulphite. Odour removal was monitored by Chromatographic and sensory methods. Conclusions from laboratory experiments were supported by field-tests at four rendering plants in the U.K., treating both ventilation and process gases. Alkaline hypochlorite with considerable excess available chlorine removes many sulphur-compounds and aldehydes but effective odour control requires an acid pre-wash to prevent the generation of odorous chlorinated compounds from ammonia and amines. Acidic hypochlorite solution followed by sodium hydrogen sulphite (to remove aldehyde) and sodium hydroxide was a most effective combination in both laboratory and field tests. Odour generated in chlorination reactions involving acidic hypochlorite solution was analysed by GC-MS and GC-MPD-odour-port and the odour key compounds identified.

  8. Solvent and process for recovery of hydroxide from aqueous mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Chambliss, C. Kevin; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Keever, Tamara J.

    2001-01-01

    Hydroxide values and associated alkali metal may be recovered from alkaline aqueous solutions using classes of fluorinated alcohols in a water immiscible solvent. The alcohols are characterized by fluorine substituents which are proximal to the acidic alcohol protons and are located to adjust the acidity of the extractant and the solubility of the extractant in the solvent. A method for stripping the extractant and solvent to regenerate the extractant and purified aqueous hydroxide solution is described.

  9. Raman spectra of hydroxide-halide melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakiriyanova, I. D.; Khokhlov, V. A.

    2012-08-01

    The Raman spectra of molten binary mixtures based on sodium hydroxide and containing (mol %) 35 NaCl, 30 NaBr, and 30 NaI have been recorded at various temperatures. An increase in the vibrational frequency and the force constant of the O-H bond is detected under isothermal conditions upon a variation of the anionic composition of a melt in the series I → Br → Cl. Based on the experimental data, the viscosity of the hydroxide-halide melts is estimated.

  10. Quaternized graphene oxide nanocomposites as fast hydroxide conductors.

    PubMed

    Zarrin, Hadis; Fu, Jing; Jiang, Gaopeng; Yoo, Skylar; Lenos, Jared; Fowler, Michael; Chen, Zhongwei

    2015-02-24

    Nanocomposites play a key role in performance improvements of hydroxide conductors employed in a wide range of alkaline-electrochemical systems such as fuel cells and metal-air batteries. Graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets are considered to be outstanding nanofillers for polymeric nanocomposites on account of their excellent physicochemical strength and electrochemical properties. In this work, a fast hydroxide conductor was developed on the basis of a chemically modified GO nanocomposite membrane. The high surface area of GO was functionalized with highly stable hydroxide-conductive groups using a dimethyloctadecyl [3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]ammonium chloride (DMAOP) precursor, named QAFGO, and then composed with porous polybenzimidazole PBI (pPBI) as a well-suited polymeric backbone. The nanocomposite exhibited outstanding hydroxide conductivity of 0.085 S cm(-1), high physicochemical strength, and electrochemical stability for 21 days. An alkaline fuel cell (AFC) setup was fabricated to determine the functionality of QAFGO/pPBI nanocomposite in an alkaline-based system. The high AFC performance with peak power density of 86.68 mW cm(-2) demonstrated that QAFGO/pPBI nanocomposite membrane has promising potential to be employed as a reliable hydroxide conductor for electrochemical systems working in alkaline conditions. PMID:25644712

  11. 21 CFR 173.73 - Sodium polyacrylate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium polyacrylate. 173.73 Section 173.73 Food... Polymer Substances and Polymer Adjuvants for Food Treatment § 173.73 Sodium polyacrylate. Sodium... the polyacrylic acid with an aqueous sodium hydroxide solution. As determined by a method...

  12. 21 CFR 186.1750 - Sodium chlorite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium chlorite. 186.1750 Section 186.1750 Food... of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1750 Sodium chlorite. (a) Sodium chlorite (NaCLO2, CAS... passing chlorine dioxide into a solution of sodium hydroxide and hydrogen peroxide. (b) the ingredient...

  13. 21 CFR 186.1750 - Sodium chlorite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium chlorite. 186.1750 Section 186.1750 Food... of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1750 Sodium chlorite. (a) Sodium chlorite (NaCLO2, CAS... passing chlorine dioxide into a solution of sodium hydroxide and hydrogen peroxide. (b) the ingredient...

  14. 21 CFR 173.73 - Sodium polyacrylate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium polyacrylate. 173.73 Section 173.73 Food... Polymer Substances and Polymer Adjuvants for Food Treatment § 173.73 Sodium polyacrylate. Sodium... the polyacrylic acid with an aqueous sodium hydroxide solution. As determined by a method...

  15. 21 CFR 186.1750 - Sodium chlorite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium chlorite. 186.1750 Section 186.1750 Food... of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1750 Sodium chlorite. (a) Sodium chlorite (NaCLO2, CAS... passing chlorine dioxide into a solution of sodium hydroxide and hydrogen peroxide. (b) the ingredient...

  16. 21 CFR 186.1797 - Sodium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium sulfate. 186.1797 Section 186.1797 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1797 Sodium sulfate. (a) Sodium sulfate (Na2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7757-82-6... crystalline powder. It is prepared by the neutralization of sulfuric acid with sodium hydroxide. (b)...

  17. 21 CFR 173.73 - Sodium polyacrylate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium polyacrylate. 173.73 Section 173.73 Food... for Food Treatment § 173.73 Sodium polyacrylate. Sodium polyacrylate (CAS Reg. No. 9003-04-7) may be... aqueous sodium hydroxide solution. As determined by a method entitled “Determination of Weight Average...

  18. 21 CFR 186.1797 - Sodium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium sulfate. 186.1797 Section 186.1797 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1797 Sodium sulfate. (a) Sodium sulfate (Na2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7757-82-6... crystalline powder. It is prepared by the neutralization of sulfuric acid with sodium hydroxide. (b)...

  19. 21 CFR 186.1797 - Sodium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium sulfate. 186.1797 Section 186.1797 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1797 Sodium sulfate. (a) Sodium sulfate (Na2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7757-82-6... crystalline powder. It is prepared by the neutralization of sulfuric acid with sodium hydroxide. (b)...

  20. 21 CFR 186.1797 - Sodium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium sulfate. 186.1797 Section 186.1797 Food and....1797 Sodium sulfate. (a) Sodium sulfate (Na2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7757-82-6), also known as Glauber's salt... by the neutralization of sulfuric acid with sodium hydroxide. (b) The ingredient is used as...

  1. 21 CFR 173.73 - Sodium polyacrylate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium polyacrylate. 173.73 Section 173.73 Food and... Substances and Polymer Adjuvants for Food Treatment § 173.73 Sodium polyacrylate. Sodium polyacrylate (CAS... polyacrylic acid with an aqueous sodium hydroxide solution. As determined by a method entitled...

  2. 21 CFR 186.1750 - Sodium chlorite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium chlorite. 186.1750 Section 186.1750 Food... GRAS § 186.1750 Sodium chlorite. (a) Sodium chlorite (NaCLO2, CAS Reg. No. 7758-19-2) exists as... solution of sodium hydroxide and hydrogen peroxide. (b) the ingredient is used at levels from 125 to...

  3. 21 CFR 173.73 - Sodium polyacrylate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium polyacrylate. 173.73 Section 173.73 Food... Polymer Substances and Polymer Adjuvants for Food Treatment § 173.73 Sodium polyacrylate. Sodium... the polyacrylic acid with an aqueous sodium hydroxide solution. As determined by a method...

  4. 21 CFR 186.1797 - Sodium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium sulfate. 186.1797 Section 186.1797 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1797 Sodium sulfate. (a) Sodium sulfate (Na2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7757-82-6... crystalline powder. It is prepared by the neutralization of sulfuric acid with sodium hydroxide. (b)...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1768 - Sodium lactate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ....1768 Sodium lactate. (a) Sodium lactate (C3H5O3Na, CAS Reg. No. 72-17-3) is the sodium salt of lactic acid. It is prepared commercially by the neutralization of lactic acid with sodium hydroxide. (b)...

  6. 21 CFR 186.1770 - Sodium oleate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium oleate. 186.1770 Section 186.1770 Food and....1770 Sodium oleate. (a) Sodium oleate (C18H33O2Na, CAS Reg. No. 143-19-1) is the sodium salt of oleic.... Commercially, sodium oleate is made by mixing and heating flaked sodium hydroxide and oleic acid. (b)...

  7. Origin of low sodium capacity in graphite and generally weak substrate binding of Na and Mg among alkali and alkaline earth metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuanyue; Merinov, Boris V.; Goddard, William A., III

    2016-04-01

    It is well known that graphite has a low capacity for Na but a high capacity for other alkali metals. The growing interest in alternative cation batteries beyond Li makes it particularly important to elucidate the origin of this behavior, which is not well understood. In examining this question, we find a quite general phenomenon: among the alkali and alkaline earth metals, Na and Mg generally have the weakest chemical binding to a given substrate, compared with the other elements in the same column of the periodic table. We demonstrate this with quantum mechanics calculations for a wide range of substrate materials (not limited to C) covering a variety of structures and chemical compositions. The phenomenon arises from the competition between trends in the ionization energy and the ion-substrate coupling, down the columns of the periodic table. Consequently, the cathodic voltage for Na and Mg is expected to be lower than those for other metals in the same column. This generality provides a basis for analyzing the binding of alkali and alkaline earth metal atoms over a broad range of systems.

  8. Origin of low sodium capacity in graphite and generally weak substrate binding of Na and Mg among alkali and alkaline earth metals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanyue; Merinov, Boris V; Goddard, William A

    2016-04-01

    It is well known that graphite has a low capacity for Na but a high capacity for other alkali metals. The growing interest in alternative cation batteries beyond Li makes it particularly important to elucidate the origin of this behavior, which is not well understood. In examining this question, we find a quite general phenomenon: among the alkali and alkaline earth metals, Na and Mg generally have the weakest chemical binding to a given substrate, compared with the other elements in the same column of the periodic table. We demonstrate this with quantum mechanics calculations for a wide range of substrate materials (not limited to C) covering a variety of structures and chemical compositions. The phenomenon arises from the competition between trends in the ionization energy and the ion-substrate coupling, down the columns of the periodic table. Consequently, the cathodic voltage for Na and Mg is expected to be lower than those for other metals in the same column. This generality provides a basis for analyzing the binding of alkali and alkaline earth metal atoms over a broad range of systems. PMID:27001855

  9. Process for extracting technetium from alkaline solutions

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Sachleben, Richard A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

    1995-01-01

    A process for extracting technetium values from an aqueous alkaline solution containing at least one alkali metal hydroxide and at least one alkali metal nitrate, the at least one alkali metal nitrate having a concentration of from about 0.1 to 6 molar. The solution is contacted with a solvent consisting of a crown ether in a diluent for a period of time sufficient to selectively extract the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution. The solvent containing the technetium values is separated from the aqueous alkaline solution and the technetium values are stripped from the solvent.

  10. Investigation on the co-precipitation of transuranium elements from alkaline solutions by the method of appearing reagents

    SciTech Connect

    Krot, N.; Shilov, V.; Bessonov, A.; Budantseva, N.; Charushnikova, I.; Perminov, V.; Astafurova, L.

    1996-06-06

    Highly alkaline radioactive waste solutions originating from production of plutonium for military purposes are stored in underground tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. The purification of alkaline solutions from neptunium and plutonium is important in the treatment and disposal of these wastes. This report describes scoping tests with sodium hydroxide solutions, where precipitation techniques were investigated to perform the separation. Hydroxides of iron (III), manganese (II), cobalt (II, III), and chromium (III); manganese (IV) oxide, and sodium uranate were investigated as carriers. The report describes the optimum conditions that were identified to precipitate these carriers homogeneously throughout the solution by reductive, hydrolytic, or catalytic decomposition of alkali-soluble precursor compounds by a technique called the Method of Appearing Reagents. The coprecipitation of pentavalent and hexavalent neptunium and plutonium was investigated for the candidate agents under optimum conditions and is described in this report along with the following results. Plutonium coprecipitated well with all tested materials except manganese (IV) oxide. Neptunium only coprecipitated well with uranate. The report presents a hypothesis to explain these behaviors. Further tests with more complex solution matrices must be performed.

  11. Method of increasing the sulfation capacity of alkaline earth sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Shearer, John A.; Turner, Clarence B.; Johnson, Irving

    1982-01-01

    A system and method for increasing the sulfation capacity of alkaline earth carbonates to scrub sulfur dioxide produced during the fluidized bed combustion of coal in which partially sulfated alkaline earth carbonates are hydrated in a fluidized bed to crack the sulfate coating and convert the alkaline earth oxide to the hydroxide. Subsequent dehydration of the sulfate-hydroxide to a sulfate-oxide particle produces particles having larger pore size, increased porosity, decreased grain size and additional sulfation capacity. A continuous process is disclosed.

  12. Method of increasing the sulfation capacity of alkaline earth sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Shearer, J.A.; Turner, C.B.; Johnson, I.

    1980-03-13

    A system and method for increasing the sulfation capacity of alkaline earth carbonates to scrub sulfur dioxide produced during the fluidized bed combustion of coal in which partially sulfated alkaline earth carbonates are hydrated in a fluidized bed to crack the sulfate coating and convert the alkaline earth oxide to the hydroxide. Subsequent dehydration of the sulfate-hydroxide to a sulfate-oxide particle produces particles having larger pore size, increased porosity, decreased grain size and additional sulfation capacity. A continuous process is disclosed.

  13. Solubility data for U(VI) hydroxide and Np(IV) hydrous oxide: application of MCC-3 methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Krupka, K.M.; Rai, D.; Fulton, R.W.; Strickert, R.G.

    1984-10-01

    Experiments based on a modified MCC-3S test method were conducted to investigate the solubility of U(VI) hydroxide (the mineral schoepite) and Np(IV) hydrous oxide at ambient temperature. The solubility of U(VI) hydroxide was investigated in carbonate-free, oxidizing aqueous solutions in the pH range of 3 to 11. The measured concentrations of dissolved U confirm the amphoteric behavior of U(VI) hydroxide solid and the importance of anionic U(VI) hydroxyl complexes in accurately calculating the solubilities of U(VI) solids under basic pH conditions. the effect of fluoride complexation on the solubility of Np(IV) hydrous oxide was studied in carbonate-free, near-neutral to alkaline solutions that contained 100 ppM total F. For solutions in which sodium dithionite (Na/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 4/) and metallic Fe were used as reducing agents, the addition of 100 ppM F had no measurable effect on the solubility of Np(IV) hydrous oxide.

  14. Solubility data for U(VI) hydroxide and Np(IV) hydrous oxide: application of MCC-3 methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Krupka, K.M.; Rai, D.; Fulton, R.W.; Strickert, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments based on a modified MCC-3S test method were conducted to investigate the solubility of U(VI) hydroxide (the mineral schoepite) and Np(IV) hydrous oxide at ambient temperature. The solubility of U(VI) hydroxide was investigated in carbonate-free, oxidizing aqueous solutions in the pH range of 3 to 11. The measured concentrations of dissolved U confirm the amphoteric behavior of U(VI) hydroxide solid and the importance of anionic U(VI) solids under basic pH conditions. The effect of fluoride complexation on the solubility of Np(IV) hydrous oxide was studied in carbonate-free, near-neutral to alkaline solutions that contained 100 ppm total F. For solutions in which sodium dithionite (Na2S2O4) and metallic Fe were used as reducing agents, the addition of 100 ppm F had no measurable effect on the solubility of Np(IV) hydrous oxide. 20 references, 1 figure.

  15. Aqueous alkali metal hydroxide insoluble cellulose ether membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyt, H. E.; Pfluger, H. L. (Inventor)

    1969-01-01

    A membrane that is insoluble in an aqueous alkali metal hydroxide medium is described. The membrane is a resin which is a water-soluble C2-C4 hydroxyalkyl cellulose ether polymer and an insolubilizing agent for controlled water sorption, a dialytic and electrodialytic membrane. It is particularly useful as a separator between electrodes or plates in an alkaline storage battery.

  16. The effectiveness of ferrous iron and sodium dithionite for decreasing resin-extractable Cr(VI) in Cr(VI)-spiked alkaline soils.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chia-Jung; Lin, Tzu-Huei; Chen, Chiou-Pin; Juang, Kai-Wei; Lee, Dar-Yuan

    2009-05-30

    Ferrous iron, Na(2)S(2)O(4), and a mixture of Fe(II) and Na(2)S(2)O(4) (4:1 mol/mol) were tested for their effectiveness for decreasing resin-extractable Cr(VI) in alkaline Cr(VI)-spiked soils. The results indicated that adding those reductants greatly decreased the amount of resin-extractable Cr(VI) when the application rate of reductants equaled the number of equivalents of dichromate added to the Cr(VI)-spiked soils. This was mainly as a result of the Cr(VI) reduction into Cr(III), as supported by the XANES spectra. Among the tested reductants, a mixture of Fe(II) and Na(2)S(2)O(4) was the most effective to decrease resin-extractable Cr(VI). The extent to which resin-extractable Cr(VI) and soil pH were decreased was affected by the pH of the reductants. Among the tested reductants at various pH, FeSO(4) at pH below 1 was the most effective in decreasing resin-extractable Cr(VI) in alkaline soils. However, the soil pH was the most decreased as well. On the other hand, the mixtures of ferrous iron and dithionite at a wide range of pH were all efficient (>70% efficiency) in decreasing resin-extractable Cr(VI). Moreover, the extent of the decrease in soil pH was much smaller than that by FeSO(4) (pH<1) alone, and thus the possibility of the Cr(III) hazard can be avoided. PMID:18824300

  17. Magnetite solubility and phase stability in alkaline media at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemniak, S.E.; Jones, M.E.; Combs, K.E.S.

    1994-05-01

    Magnetite, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, is the dominant oxide constituent of the indigenous corrosion layers that form on iron base alloys in high purity, high temperature water. The apparent simultaneous stability of two distinct oxidation states of iron in this metal oxide is responsible for its unique solubility behavior. The present work was undertaken to extend the experimental and theoretical bases for estimating solubilities of an iron corrosion product (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Fe(OH){sub 2}) over a broader temperature range and in the presence of complexing, pH-controlling reagents. These results indicate that a surface layer of ferrous hydroxide controls magnetite solubility behavior at low temperatures in much the same manner as a surface layer of nickel(II) hydroxide was previously reported to control the low temperature solubility behavior of NiO. The importance of Fe(III) ion complexes implies not only that most previously-derived thermodynamic properties of the Fe(OH){sub 3}{sup {minus}} ion are incorrect, but that magnetite phase stability probably shifts to favor a sodium ferric hydroxyphosphate compound in alkaline sodium phosphate solutions at elevated temperatures. The test methodology involved pumping alkaline solutions of known composition through a bed of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} granules and analyzing the emerging solution for Fe. Two pH-controlling reagents were tested: sodium phosphate and ammonia. Equilibria for the following reactions were described in thermodynamic terms: (a) Fe(OH){sub 2}/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} dissolution and transformation, (b) Fe(II) and Fe(III) ion hydroxocomplex formation (hydrolysis), (c) Fe(II) ion amminocomplex formation, and (d) Fe(II) and Fe(III) ion phosphatocomplex formation. 36 refs.

  18. Process for extracting technetium from alkaline solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, B.A.; Sachleben, R.A.; Bonnesen, P.V.

    1994-12-31

    This invention relates generally to a process for extracting technetium from nuclear wastes and more particularly to a process for extracting technetium from alkaline waste solutions containing technetium and high concentrations of alkali metal nitrates. A process for extracting technetium values from an aqueous alkaline solution containing at least one alkali metal hydroxide and at least one alkali metal nitrate comprises the steps of: contacting the aqueous alkaline solution with a solvent consisting of a crown ether in a diluent, the diluent being a water-immiscible organic liquid in which the crown ether is soluble, for a period of time sufficient to selectively extract the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution into the solvent; separating the solvent containing the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution; and stripping the technetium values from the solvent by contacting the solvent with water.

  19. Comparison Between Sodium Nitrite & Sodium Hydroxide Spray Accident

    SciTech Connect

    WILLIAMS, J.C.; HEY, B.E.

    2001-11-07

    The purpose of this analysis is to compare the consequences of an 8 molar NaNO2 spray leak to the Tank Farm Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) evaluation of sprays of up to 19 molar (50%) NaOH. Four conditions were evaluated. These are: a spray during transfers from a one-inch pipe, a spray resulting from a truck tank Crack, a spray resulting from a truck tank rupture, and a spray in the 204-AR Waste Unloading Facility.

  20. Potassium hydroxide poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Symptoms from swallowing potassium hydroxide include: Abdominal pain - severe Burns in the mouth and throat Chest pain Collapse Diarrhea Drooling Mouth pain - severe Rapid drop in blood pressure (shock) Throat pain - severe Throat ...

  1. Method of determining pH by the alkaline absorption of carbon dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1992-10-06

    A method is described for measuring the concentration of hydroxides in alkaline solutions in a remote location using the tendency of hydroxides to absorb carbon dioxide. The method includes the passing of carbon dioxide over the surface of an alkaline solution in a remote tank before and after measurements of the carbon dioxide solution. A comparison of the measurements yields the absorption fraction from which the hydroxide concentration can be calculated using a correlation of hydroxide or pH to absorption fraction. 2 figs.

  2. Removal of plutonium and americium from alkaline waste solutions

    DOEpatents

    Schulz, Wallace W.

    1979-01-01

    High salt content, alkaline waste solutions containing plutonium and americium are contacted with a sodium titanate compound to effect removal of the plutonium and americium from the alkaline waste solution onto the sodium titanate and provide an effluent having a radiation level of less than 10 nCi per gram alpha emitters.

  3. Evolution of the corrosion process of AA 2024-T3 in an alkaline NaCl solution with sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate and lanthanum chloride inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Biner; Wang, Yishan; Zuo, Yu

    2015-12-01

    The evolution of the corrosion process of AA 2024-T3 in 0.58 g L-1 NaCl solution (pH 10) with sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS) and lanthanum chloride inhibitors was studied with electrochemical and surface analysis methods. With the addition of the compounded LaCl3 and SDBS inhibitors, in the early stage the polarization behavior of AA 2024-T3 changed from active corrosion to passivation, and both the general corrosion and pitting corrosion were inhibited. However, with the immersion time extended, the passive behavior gradually disappeared and pitting happened at the Cu-rich phases. After 24 h immersion, the compounded inhibitors still showed good inhibition for general corrosion, but the polarization curve again presented the characteristic similar to active polarization. The compounded inhibitors also inhibited the pitting corrosion to some extent. The acting mechanism of the inhibitors SDBS and La3Cl on the corrosion process of AA 2024-T3 in the test solution was discussed.

  4. Chemical equilibria model of strontium-90 adsorption and transport in soil in response to dynamic alkaline conditions.

    PubMed

    Spalding, B P; Spalding, I R

    2001-01-15

    Strontium-90 is a major hazardous contaminant of radioactive wastewater and its processing sludges at many Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. In the past, such contaminated wastewater and sludge have been disposed in soil seepage pits, lagoons, or cribs often under highly perturbed alkaline conditions (pH > 12) where 90Sr solubility is low and its adsorption to surrounding soil is high. As natural weathering returns these soils to near-neutral or slightly acidic conditions, the adsorbed and precipitated calcium and magnesium phases, in which 90Sr is carried, change significantly in both nature and amounts. No comprehensive computational method has been formulated previously to quantitatively simulate the dynamics of 90Sr in the soil-groundwater environment under such dynamic and wide-ranging conditions. A computational code, the Hydrologic Utility Model for Demonstrating Integrated Nuclear Geochemical Environmental Responses (HUMDINGER), was composed to describe the changing equilibria of 90Sr in soil based on its causative chemical reactions including soil buffering, pH-dependent cation-exchange capacity, cation selectivity, and the precipitation/dissolution of calcium carbonate, calcium hydroxide, and magnesium hydroxide in response to leaching groundwater characteristics including pH, acid-neutralizing capacity, dissolved cations, and inorganic carbonate species. The code includes a simulation of one-dimensional transport of 90Sr through a soil column as a series of soil mixing cells where the equilibrium soluble output from one cell is applied to the next cell. Unamended soil leaching and highly alkaline soil treatments, including potassium hydroxide, sodium silicate, and sodium aluminate, were simulated and compared with experimental findings using large (10 kg) soil columns that were leached with 90Sr-contaminated groundwater after treatment. HUMDINGER's simulations were in good agreement with dynamic experimental observations of soil exchange capacity

  5. FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-06-01

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, Furnace Injection of Alkaline Sorbents for Sulfuric Acid Control, during the time period October 1, 2002 through March 31, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The coincident removal of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid is also being determined, as is the removal of arsenic, a known poison for NO{sub x} selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. EPRI, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), FirstEnergy Corporation, American Electric Power (AEP) and the Dravo Lime Company are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. This is the seventh reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During previous reporting periods, two long-term sorbent injection tests were conducted, one on Unit 3 at FirstEnergy's Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) and one on Unit 1 at AEP's Gavin Plant. Those tests determined the effectiveness of injecting alkaline slurries into the upper furnace of the boiler as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions from these units. The alkaline slurries tested included commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Plant), and a byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (both Gavin Plant and BMP). The tests showed that injecting either the commercial or the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry could achieve up to 70-75% overall sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, the overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Plant, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO{sub 3} formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NO{sub x} control than at removing SO{sub 3} formed in the furnace. The SO3 removal results were presented in the semi

  6. Understanding of alkaline pretreatment parameters for corn stover enzymatic saccharification

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous research on alkaline pretreatment has mainly focused on optimization of the process parameters to improve substrate digestibility. To achieve satisfactory sugar yield, extremely high chemical loading and enzyme dosages were typically used. Relatively little attention has been paid to reduction of chemical consumption and process waste management, which has proven to be an indispensable component of the bio-refineries. To indicate alkali strength, both alkali concentration in pretreatment solution (g alkali/g pretreatment liquor or g alkali/L pretreatment liquor) and alkali loading based on biomass solids (g alkali/g dry biomass) have been widely used. The dual approaches make it difficult to compare the chemical consumption in different process scenarios while evaluating the cost effectiveness of this pretreatment technology. The current work addresses these issues through pretreatment of corn stover at various combinations of pretreatment conditions. Enzymatic hydrolysis with different enzyme blends was subsequently performed to identify the effects of pretreatment parameters on substrate digestibility as well as process operational and capital costs. Results The results showed that sodium hydroxide loading is the most dominant variable for enzymatic digestibility. To reach 70% glucan conversion while avoiding extensive degradation of hemicellulose, approximately 0.08 g NaOH/g corn stover was required. It was also concluded that alkali loading based on total solids (g NaOH/g dry biomass) governs the pretreatment efficiency. Supplementing cellulase with accessory enzymes such as α-arabinofuranosidase and β-xylosidase significantly improved the conversion of the hemicellulose by 6–17%. Conclusions The current work presents the impact of alkaline pretreatment parameters on the enzymatic hydrolysis of corn stover as well as the process operational and capital investment costs. The high chemical consumption for alkaline pretreatment technology

  7. Evaluation of high solids alkaline pretreatment of rice straw.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Shen; Zheng, Yi; Yu, Chao Wei; Dooley, Todd M; Jenkins, Bryan M; VanderGheynst, Jean S

    2010-11-01

    Fresh-harvested, air-dried rice straw was pretreated at a water content of 5 g H(2)O/g straw using sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and compared to pretreatment at 10 g H(2)O/g straw by hydrated lime (Ca(OH)(2)). Full factorial experiments including parallel wash-only treatments were completed with both sources of alkali. The experiments were designed to measure the effects of alkaline loading and pretreatment time on delignification and sugar yield upon enzymatic hydrolysis. Reaction temperature was held constant at 95 degrees C for lime pretreatment and 55 degrees C for NaOH pretreatment. The range of delignification was 13.1% to 27.0% for lime pretreatments and was 8.6% to 23.1% for NaOH pretreatments. Both alkaline loading and reaction time had significant positive effects (p < 0.001) on delignification under the design conditions, but only alkaline loading had a significant positive effect on enzymatic hydrolysis. Treatment at higher temperature also improved delignification; delignification with water alone ranged from 9.9% to 14.5% for pretreatment at 95 degrees C, but there was little effect observed at 55 degrees C. Post-pretreatment washing of biomass was not necessary for subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. Maximum glucose yields were 176.3 mg/g dried biomass (48.5% conversion efficiency of total glucose) in lime-pretreated and unwashed biomass and were 142.3 mg/g dried biomass (39.2% conversion efficiency of total glucose) in NaOH-pretreated and unwashed biomass. PMID:20440580

  8. Solubility of Litharge (a-PbO) in Alkaline Media at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    SE Ziemniak; DA Palmer; P Benezeth; LM Anovitz

    2004-11-02

    An inert, flowing autoclave facility is used to investigate the solubility behavior of {alpha}-PbO (litharge, tetragonal) in aqueous solutions of morpholine, ammonia and sodium hydroxide between 38 and 260 C. Lead solubilities increased from about 0.4 mmol kg{sup -1} at 38 C to about 4.5 mmol kg{sup -1} at 260 C and were relatively insensitive to the concentration and identity of the pH-reagent. The measured lead solubilities were interpreted using a Pb(II) ion hydroxocomplexing model and thermodynamic functions for these equilibria were obtained from a least-squares analysis of the data. A consistent set of thermodynamic properties for the species Pb(OH){sup +}, Pb(OH){sub 2}(aq) and Pb(OH){sub 3}{sup -} is provided to permit accurate lead oxide solubility calculations over broad ranges of temperature and alkalinity.

  9. Effect of Operating Parameters and Chemical Additives on Crystal Habit and Specific Cake Resistance of Zinc Hydroxide Precipitates

    SciTech Connect

    Alwin, Jennifer Louise

    1999-08-01

    The effect of process parameters and chemical additives on the specific cake resistance of zinc hydroxide precipitates was investigated. The ability of a slurry to be filtered is dependent upon the particle habit of the solid and the particle habit is influenced by certain process variables. The process variables studied include neutralization temperature, agitation type, and alkalinity source used for neutralization. Several commercially available chemical additives advertised to aid in solid/liquid separation were also examined in conjunction with hydroxide precipitation. A statistical analysis revealed that the neutralization temperature and the source of alkalinity were statistically significant in influencing the specific cake resistance of zinc hydroxide precipitates in this study. The type of agitation did not significantly effect the specific cake resistance of zinc hydroxide precipitates. The use of chemical additives in conjunction with hydroxide precipitation had a favorable effect on the filterability. The morphology of the hydroxide precipitates was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy.

  10. 21 CFR 184.1751 - Sodium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are... hydroxide or sodium carbonate. The product occurs as colorless crystals or a white crystalline powder....

  11. Seeking effective dyes for a mediated glucose-air alkaline battery/fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eustis, Ross; Tsang, Tsz Ming; Yang, Brigham; Scott, Daniel; Liaw, Bor Yann

    2014-02-01

    A significant level of power generation from an abiotic, air breathing, mediated reducing sugar-air alkaline battery/fuel cell has been achieved in our laboratories at room temperature without complicated catalysis or membrane separation in the reaction chamber. Our prior studies suggested that mass transport limitation by the mediator is a limiting factor in power generation. New and effective mediators were sought here to improve charge transfer and power density. Forty-five redox dyes were studied to identify if any can facilitate mass transport in alkaline electrolyte solution; namely, by increasing the solubility and mobility of the dye, and the valence charge carried per molecule. Indigo dyes were studied more closely to understand the complexity involved in mass transport. The viability of water-miscible co-solvents was also explored to understand their effect on solubility and mass transport of the dyes. Using a 2.0 mL solution, 20% methanol by volume, with 100 mM indigo carmine, 1.0 M glucose and 2.5 M sodium hydroxide, the glucose-air alkaline battery/fuel cell attained 8 mA cm-2 at short-circuit and 800 μW cm-2 at the maximum power point. This work shall aid future optimization of mediated charge transfer mechanism in batteries or fuel cells.

  12. Controllable synthesis of layered Co-Ni hydroxide hierarchical structures for high-performance hybrid supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Peng; Zhang, Ning; Zhang, Dan; Liu, Tao; Chen, Limiao; Ma, Renzhi; Qiu, Guanzhou; Liu, Xiaohe

    2016-01-01

    A facile solvothermal method is developed for synthesizing layered Co-Ni hydroxide hierarchical structures by using hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) as alkaline reagent. The electrochemical measurements reveal that the specific capacitances of layered bimetallic (Co-Ni) hydroxides are generally superior to those of layered monometallic (Co, Ni) hydroxides. The as-prepared Co0.5Ni0.5 hydroxide hierarchical structures possesses the highest specific capacitance of 1767 F g-1 at a galvanic current density of 1 A g-1 and an outstanding specific capacitance retention of 87% after 1000 cycles. In comparison with the dispersed nanosheets of Co-Ni hydroxide, layered hydroxide hierarchical structures show much superior electrochemical performance. This study provides a promising method to construct hierarchical structures with controllable transition-metal compositions for enhancing the electrochemical performance in hybrid supercapacitors.

  13. Impact of acid and alkaline pretreatments on the molecular network of wheat gluten and on the mechanical properties of compression-molded glassy wheat gluten bioplastics.

    PubMed

    Jansens, Koen J A; Lagrain, Bert; Brijs, Kristof; Goderis, Bart; Smet, Mario; Delcour, Jan A

    2013-10-01

    Wheat gluten can be converted into rigid biobased materials by high-temperature compression molding at low moisture contents. During molding, a cross-linked protein network is formed. This study investigated the effect of mixing gluten with acid/alkali in 70% ethanol at ambient temperature for 16 h followed by ethanol removal, freeze-drying, and compression molding at 130 and 150 °C on network formation and on types of cross-links formed. Alkaline pretreatment (0-100 mmol/L sodium hydroxide or 25 mmol/L potassium hydroxide) strongly affected gluten cross-linking, whereas acid pretreatment (0-25 mmol/L sulfuric acid or 25 mmol/L hydrochloric acid) had limited effect on the gluten network. Molded alkaline-treated gluten showed enhanced cross-linking but also degradation when treated with high alkali concentrations, whereas acid treatment reduced gluten cross-linking. β-Elimination of cystine and lanthionine formation occurred more pronouncedly at higher alkali concentrations. In contrast, formation of disulfide and nondisulfide cross-links during molding was hindered in acid-pretreated gluten. Bioplastic strength was higher for alkali than for acid-pretreated samples, whereas the flexural modulus was only slightly affected by either alkaline or acid pretreatment. Apparently, the ratio of disulfide to nondisulfide cross-links did not affect the mechanical properties of rigid gluten materials. PMID:24016229

  14. Sodium bicarbonate in chemical flooding: Part 1: Topical report. [Sodium bicarbonate and sodium carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Peru, D.A.; Lorenz, P.B.

    1987-07-01

    To compare oil recovery and alkali consumption in alkaline flooding using sodium bicarbonate with other alkaline agents, coreflooding experiments were performed in turn with viscosified sodium bicarbonate and viscosified sodium carbonate solutions. Oil recovery was monitored, and the effluent brine from these corefloods was analyzed for silicon, aluminum, pH, and total inorganic carbon. The results indicate that viscosified sodium bicarbonate recovered more of the asphaltic Cerro-Negro crude than of the less asphaltic Wilmington crude oil. The recovery efficiency using the viscosified sodium carbonate was similar for the two crudes. For both crudes, the percent oil recovery using viscosified sodium carbonate was slightly higher than that using the viscosified sodium bicarbonate. Mineral dissolution and decrease in pH were found to be greater in corefloods using viscosified sodium carbonate. Total inorganic carbon recovery can be obtained in corefloods with either agent, provided that a sufficient water drive follows the chemical slug. Long-term experiments were performed by recirculating alkaline solutions through oil-free, unfired Berea sandstone to monitor the rock/alkali interactions. The experimental results indicate an eight-fold decrease in quartz dissolution by sodium bicarbonate compared with sodium carbonate. Moderate magnesium solubility was observed at the pH of the bicarbonate solution. Low solubility of magnesium and aluminum at the pH of the carbonate indicates the possible formation of precipitates. In these experiments 13% of the carbonate was converted to bicarbonate. Total alkalinity was not significantly decreased with either agent. 18 refs., 5 tabs.

  15. Degradation of halogenated carbons in alkaline alcohol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Seiko; Shimokawa, Toshinari

    2002-02-01

    1,1,2-Trichloro-trifluoroethane, 1,2-dibromo-tetrafluoroethane, 2,3,4,6-tetrachlorophenol, 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene, and 2,4,6-trichloroanisole were dissolved in alkaline isopropyl alcohol and irradiated with 60Co gamma rays after purged with pure nitrogen gas. The concentration of the hydroxide ions and the parent molecules decreased with the dose, while that of the halide ions and the organic products, with less halogen atoms than the parent, increased. Chain degradation will occur in alkaline isopropyl alcohol.

  16. Process for preparing higher oxides of the alkali and alkaline earth metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadhukhan, P.; Bell, A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    High purity inorganic higher oxides of the alkali and alkaline earth metals are prepared by subjecting the hydroxide of the alkali and alkaline earth metal to a radio frequency discharge sustained in oxygen. The process is particulary adaptable to the production of high purity potassium superoxide by subjecting potassium hydroxide to glow discharge sustained in oxygen under the pressure of about 0.75 to 1.00 torr.

  17. Reductive atmospheric acid leaching of spent alkaline batteries in H2SO4/Na2SO3 solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morcali, Mehmet Hakan

    2015-07-01

    This work studies the optimum reductive leaching process for manganese and zinc recovery from spent alkaline battery paste. The effects of reducing agents, acid concentration, pulp density, reaction temperature, and leaching time on the dissolution of manganese and zinc were investigated in detail. Manganese dissolution by reductive acidic media is an intermediate-controlled process with an activation energy of 12.28 kJ·mol-1. After being leached, manganese and zinc were selectively precipitated with sodium hydroxide. The zinc was entirely converted into zincate (Zn(OH){4/2-}) ions and thus did not co-precipitate with manganese hydroxide during this treatment (2.0 M NaOH, 90 min, 200 r/min, pH > 13). After the manganese was removed from the solution, the Zn(OH){4/2-} was precipitated as zinc sulfate in the presence of sulfuric acid. The results indicated that this process could be effective in recovering manganese and zinc from alkaline batteries.

  18. Implications of alkaline solutions-induced etching on optical and minority carrier lifetime features of monocrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachtouli, N.; Aouida, S.; Laajimi, R. Hadj; Boujmil, M. F.; Bessais, B.

    2012-09-01

    In this work, we search to optimize the surface textures of monocrystalline silicon (c-Si) intended to be used in silicon solar cells. For this purpose, we studied the morphology of formed etch hillocks during anisotropic etching of silicon using alkaline solutions based on sodium hydroxide (NaOH), potassium hydroxide (KOH) and tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH). Such treatments lead to the formation of various pyramids-like textures that can be well optimized to improve the photocurrent of c-Si-based solar cells. The produced textures were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), UV-visible optical reflectivity and minority carrier lifetime measurements. These investigations allow evaluating the size and density of the formed pyramidal textures; the apex angles vary between 75° and 82°, while the heights and bases of the pyramids range from a few hundred nanometers to several micrometers. A minimum reflectivity value of about 6% was obtained at specific conditions using NaOH, whereas it was found that the apparent effective minority carrier lifetime (τeff) is sensitive to the injection level (Δn), which shows an apparent increase from 1.2 μs to 2.4 μs for a minority carrier density of about Δn = 21014 cm-3.

  19. 21 CFR 186.1750 - Sodium chlorite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium chlorite. 186.1750 Section 186.1750 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1750 Sodium chlorite. (a) Sodium chlorite (NaCLO2, CAS Reg. No. 7758-19-2... into a solution of sodium hydroxide and hydrogen peroxide. (b) the ingredient is used at levels...

  20. Ions Release and pH of Calcium Hydroxide-, Chlorhexidine- and Bioactive Glass-Based Endodontic Medicaments.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ceci Nunes; Freire, Laila Gonzales; Carvalho, Alexandre Pinheiro Lima de; Duarte, Marco Antonio Húngaro; Bauer, José; Gavini, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated pH and release of calcium, sodium and phosphate ions from different medications in human dentin. Fifty premolars were prepared and randomly divided into groups: (CHX) - 2% chlorhexidine gel; (CHX + CH) - CHX + calcium hydroxide PA; (CH) - CH + propylene glycol 600; (NPBG) - experimental niobium phosphate bioactive glass + distilled water; (BG) - bioactive glass (Bio-Gran) + distilled water. The specimens were immersed in deionized water and the pH variations were measured. The quantification of ions in the solutions was made by inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP/AES) at 10 min, 24 h, 7, 14, 21 and 30 days. The results were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey`s test, with a significance level of 5%. CH had the highest level of calcium ions release at 30 days, while CHX and BG released more sodium ions. BG, NPBG and CHX released a higher amount of phosphate ions. The pH of CH was significantly higher compared with the other groups. CH favored the greatest increase of pH and calcium ions release. The bioactive glasses released more sodium and phosphate ions and presented an alkaline pH immediately and after 30 days. PMID:27224568

  1. Silica in alkaline brines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, B.F.; Rettig, S.L.; Eugster, H.P.

    1967-01-01

    Analysis of sodium carbonate-bicarbonate brines from closed basins in volcanic terranes of Oregon and Kenya reveals silica contents of up to 2700 parts per million at pH's higher than 10. These high concentrations of SiO 2 can be attributed to reaction of waters with silicates, and subsequent evaporative concentration accompanied by a rise in pH. Supersaturation with respect to amorphous silica may occur and persist for brines that are out of contact with silicate muds and undersaturated with respect to trona; correlation of SiO2 with concentration of Na and total CO2 support this interpretation. Addition of moredilute waters to alkaline brines may lower the pH and cause inorganic precipitation of substantial amounts of silica.

  2. Hydroxide-catalyzed bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwo, Dz-Hung (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method of bonding substrates by hydroxide-catalyzed hydration/dehydration involves applying a bonding material to at least one surface to be bonded, and placing the at least one surface sufficiently close to another surface such that a bonding interface is formed between them. A bonding material of the invention comprises a source of hydroxide ions, and may optionally include a silicate component, a particulate filling material, and a property-modifying component. Bonding methods of the invention reliably and reproducibly provide bonds which are strong and precise, and which may be tailored according to a wide range of possible applications. Possible applications for bonding materials of the invention include: forming composite materials, coating substrates, forming laminate structures, assembly of precision optical components, and preparing objects of defined geometry and composition. Bonding materials and methods of preparing the same are also disclosed.

  3. Intermediate-scale sodium-concrete reaction tests with basalt and limestone concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Hassberger, J.A.; Muhlestein, L.D.

    1981-01-01

    Ten tests were performed to investigate the chemical reactions and rate and extent of attack between sodium and basalt and limestone concretes. Test temperatures ranged from 510 to 870/sup 0/C (950 to 1600/sup 0/F) and test times from 2 to 24 hours. Sodium hydroxide was added to some of the tests to assess the impact of a sodium hydroxide-aided reaction on the overall penetration characteristics. Data suggest that the sodium penetration of concrete surfaces is limited. Penetration of basalt concrete in the presence of sodium hydroxide is shown to be less severe than attack by the metallic sodium alone. Presence of sodium hydroxide changes the characteristics of sodium penetration of limestone concrete, but no major differences in bulk penetration were observed as compared to penetration by metallic sodium.

  4. Separation, Concentration, and Immobilization of Technetium and Iodine from Alkaline Supernate Waste

    SciTech Connect

    James Harvey; Michael Gula

    1998-12-07

    Development of remediation technologies for the characterization, retrieval, treatment, concentration, and final disposal of radioactive and chemical tank waste stored within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex represents an enormous scientific and technological challenge. A combined total of over 90 million gallons of high-level waste (HLW) and low-level waste (LLW) are stored in 335 underground storage tanks at four different DOE sites. Roughly 98% of this waste is highly alkaline in nature and contains high concentrations of nitrate and nitrite salts along with lesser concentrations of other salts. The primary waste forms are sludge, saltcake, and liquid supernatant with the bulk of the radioactivity contained in the sludge, making it the largest source of HLW. The saltcake (liquid waste with most of the water removed) and liquid supernatant consist mainly of sodium nitrate and sodium hydroxide salts. The main radioactive constituent in the alkaline supernatant is cesium-137, but strontium-90, technetium-99, and transuranic nuclides are also present in varying concentrations. Reduction of the radioactivity below Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) limits would allow the bulk of the waste to be disposed of as LLW. Because of the long half-life of technetium-99 (2.1 x 10 5 y) and the mobility of the pertechnetate ion (TcO 4 - ) in the environment, it is expected that technetium will have to be removed from the Hanford wastes prior to disposal as LLW. Also, for some of the wastes, some level of technetium removal will be required to meet LLW criteria for radioactive content. Therefore, DOE has identified a need to develop technologies for the separation and concentration of technetium-99 from LLW streams. Eichrom has responded to this DOE-identified need by demonstrating a complete flowsheet for the separation, concentration, and immobilization of technetium (and iodine) from alkaline supernatant waste.

  5. Alkaline twin-screw extrusion pretreatment for fermentable sugar production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The inevitable depletion of fossil fuels has resulted in an increasing worldwide interest in exploring alternative and sustainable energy sources. Lignocellulose, which is the most abundant biomass on earth, is widely regarded as a promising raw material to produce fuel ethanol. Pretreatment is an essential step to disrupt the recalcitrance of lignocellulosic matrix for enzymatic saccharification and bioethanol production. This paper established an ATSE (alkaline twin-screw extrusion pretreatment) process using a specially designed twin-screw extruder in the presence of alkaline solution to improve the enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency of corn stover for the production of fermentable sugars. Results The ATSE pretreatment was conducted with a biomass/liquid ratio of 1/2 (w/w) at a temperature of 99°C without heating equipment. The results indicated that ATSE pretreatment is effective in improving the enzymatic digestibility of corn stover. Sodium hydroxide loading is more influential factor affecting both sugar yield and lignin degradation than heat preservation time. After ATSE pretreatment under the proper conditions (NaOH loading of 0.06 g/g biomass during ATSE and 1 hour heat preservation after extrusion), 71% lignin removal was achieved and the conversions of glucan and xylan in the pretreated biomass can reach to 83% and 89% respectively via subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis (cellulase loading of 20 FPU/g-biomass and substrate consistency of 2%). About 78% of the original polysaccharides were converted into fermentable sugars. Conclusions With the physicochemical functions in extrusion, the ATSE method can effectively overcome the recalcitrance of lignocellulose for the production of fermentable sugars from corn stover. This process can be considered as a promising pretreatment method due to its relatively low temperature (99°C), high biomass/liquid ratio (1/2) and satisfied total sugar yield (78%), despite further study is needed for process

  6. Alkalinity Analysis. Training Module 5.220.2.77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonte, John L.; Davidson, Arnold C.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with the acid-base titrimetric procedure for determining the hydroxide, carbonate and bicarbonate alkalinity of a water sample. Included are objectives, an instructor guide, student handouts and transparency masters. A video tape is also…

  7. Direct Solar Charging of an Organic-Inorganic, Stable, and Aqueous Alkaline Redox Flow Battery with a Hematite Photoanode.

    PubMed

    Wedege, Kristina; Azevedo, João; Khataee, Amirreza; Bentien, Anders; Mendes, Adélio

    2016-06-13

    The intermittent nature of the sunlight and its increasing contribution to electricity generation is fostering the energy storage research. Direct solar charging of an auspicious type of redox flow battery could make solar energy directly and efficiently dispatchable. The first solar aqueous alkaline redox flow battery using low cost and environmentally safe materials is demonstrated. The electrolytes consist of the redox couples ferrocyanide and anthraquinone-2,7-disulphonate in sodium hydroxide solution, yielding a standard cell potential of 0.74 V. Photovoltage enhancement strategies are demonstrated for the ferrocyanide-hematite junction by employing an annealing treatment and growing a layer of a conductive polyaniline polymer on the electrode surface, which decreases electron-hole recombination. PMID:27151516

  8. Chemical degradation mechanisms of membranes for alkaline membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Yoong-Kee; Henson, Neil J.; Kim, Yu Seung

    2015-12-01

    Chemical degradation mechanisms of membranes for alkaline membrane fuel cells have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT). We have elucidated that the aryl-ether moiety of membranes is one of the weakest site against attack of hydroxide ions. The results of DFT calculations for hydroxide initiated aryl-ether cleavage indicated that the aryl-ether cleavage occurred prior to degradation of cationic functional group. Such a weak nature of the aryl-ether group arises from the electron deficiency of the aryl group as well as the low bond dissociation energy. The DFT results suggests that removal of the aryl-ether group in the membrane should enhance the stability of membranes under alkaline conditions. In fact, an ether fee poly(phenylene) membrane exhibits excellent stability against the attack from hydroxide ions.

  9. Chemical degradation mechanisms of membranes for alkaline membrane fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Choe, Yoong-Kee; Henson, Neil J.; Kim, Yu Seung

    2015-12-31

    Chemical degradation mechanisms of membranes for alkaline membrane fuel cells have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT). We have elucidated that the aryl-ether moiety of membranes is one of the weakest site against attack of hydroxide ions. The results of DFT calculations for hydroxide initiated aryl-ether cleavage indicated that the aryl-ether cleavage occurred prior to degradation of cationic functional group. Such a weak nature of the aryl-ether group arises from the electron deficiency of the aryl group as well as the low bond dissociation energy. The DFT results suggests that removal of the aryl-ether group in the membrane should enhance the stability of membranes under alkaline conditions. In fact, an ether fee poly(phenylene) membrane exhibits excellent stability against the attack from hydroxide ions.

  10. Sodium Recycle Economics for Waste Treatment Plant Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Sevigny, Gary J.; Poloski, Adam P.; Fountain, Matthew S.

    2008-03-01

    Sodium recycle at the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) would reduce the number of glass canisters produced, and has the potential to save the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tens of millions of dollars. The sodium, added in the form of sodium hydroxide, was originally added to minimize corrosion of carbon-steel storage tanks from acidic reprocessing wastes. In the baseline Hanford treatment process, sodium hydroxide is required to leach gibbsite and boehmite from the high level waste (HLW) sludge. In turn, this reduces the amount of HLW glass produced. Currently, a significant amount of additional sodium hydroxide will be added to the process to maintain aluminate solubility at ambient temperatures during ion exchange of cesium. The vitrification of radioactive waste is limited by sodium content, and this additional sodium mass will increase low-activity waste-glass mass.

  11. Intercalation of ethylene glycol into yttrium hydroxide layered materials.

    PubMed

    Xi, Yuanzhou; Davis, Robert J

    2010-04-19

    Intercalation of ethylene glycol into layered yttrium hydroxide containing nitrate counterions was accomplished by heating the reagents in a methanol solution of sodium methoxide under autogenous pressure at 413 K for 20 h. The resulting crystalline material had an expanded interlayer distance of 10.96 A, confirming the intercalation of an ethylene glycol derived species. Characterization of the material by FT-IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and the catalytic transesterification of tributyrin with methanol was consistent with direct bonding of ethylene glycolate anions (O(2)C(2)H(5)(-)) to the yttrium hydroxide layers, forming Y-O-C bonds. The layers of the material are proposed to be held together by H-bonding between the hydroxyls of grafted ethylene glycol molecules attached to adjacent layers. Glycerol can also be intercalated into yttrium hydroxide layered materials by a similar method. PMID:20302308

  12. Standard enthalpies of formation of francium hydroxide hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Burylev, B.P.

    1995-03-01

    Available experimental data on standard enthalpies of formation of alkali metal hydroxide hydrates have been summarized. Using equations derived, the authors have calculated previously unknown enthalpies of formation of some lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, and cesium hydroxide hydrates. Taking into account the contribution of water to the enthalpies of formation of monohydrates, the authors have estimated the enthalpies of formation of francium hydroxide hydrates FrOH{center_dot}H{sub 2}O, FrOH{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O, and FrOH{center_dot}3H{sub 2}O (-745.8, -1085.8, and -1515.8 kJ mol{sup -1}, respectively).

  13. Recovering lead from cathode ray tube funnel glass by mechano-chemical extraction in alkaline solution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chenglong; Wang, Jingwei; Bai, Jianfeng; Guan, Jie; Wu, Wenjie; Guo, Cuixiang

    2013-07-01

    This study evaluates the efficiency of lead (Pb) extraction from cathode ray tube (CRT) funnel glass in strongly alkaline solution using mechanical activation in a ball mill as the chemical breakage and defects formed in the inner structures will contribute to the easy dissolution of the activated Pb glass. The combination of mechanical activation and a chemical leaching process in a single operation (mechano-chemical leaching) is more effective than the mechanical activation and subsequent chemical leaching. More than 97% of Pb in the CRT funnel glass can be extracted with a stirring ball mill leaching process in 5 M sodium hydroxide at 70°C. The diameter of the stainless steel balls as the activation medium is 5 mm; the mass ratio of ball to raw materials is 25:1. Pb powder with a purity of 97% can be obtained by electrowinning from the leaching solution. The Pb-depleted solution can be recycled into the leaching step. After Pb is removed, the solid leaching residues can be used for preparation of foam glass. Thus, a novel hydrometallurgical process for recovering Pb from CRT funnel glass in alkaline solution is proposed. PMID:23592759

  14. Potassium hydroxide clay stabilization process

    SciTech Connect

    Sydansk, R.

    1981-07-28

    An aqueous solution having potassium hydroxide dissolved therein is injected into a subterranean sandstone formation containing water-sensitive fine particles, including clays. Potassium hydroxide stabilizes the fine particles for a substantial period of time thereby substantially preventing formation permeability damage caused by encroachment of aqueous solutions having a distinct ionic makeup into the treated formation.

  15. Caustic Recycling Pilot Unit to Separate Sodium from LLW at Hanford Site - 12279

    SciTech Connect

    Pendleton, Justin; Bhavaraju, Sai; Priday, George; Desai, Aditya; Duffey, Kean; Balagopal, Shekar

    2012-07-01

    As part of the Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored Advanced Remediation Technologies initiative, a scheme was developed to combine Continuous Sludge Leaching (CSL), Near-Tank Cesium Removal (NTCR), and Caustic Recycling Unit (CRU) using Ceramatec technology, into a single system known as the Pilot Near-Tank Treatment System (PNTTS). The Cesium (Cs) decontaminated effluent from the NTCR process will be sent to the caustic recycle process for recovery of the caustic which will be reused in another cycle of caustic leaching in the CSL process. Such an integrated mobile technology demonstration will give DOE the option to insert this process for sodium management at various sites in Hanford, and will minimize the addition of further sodium into the waste tanks. This allows for recycling of the caustic used to remove aluminum during sludge washing as a pretreatment step in the vitrification of radioactive waste which will decrease the Low Level Waste (LLW) volume by as much as 39%. The CRU pilot process was designed to recycle sodium in the form of pure sodium hydroxide. The basis for the design of the 1/4 scale pilot caustic recycling unit was to demonstrate the efficient operation of a larger scale system to recycle caustic from the NTCR effluent stream from the Parsons process. The CRU was designed to process 0.28 liter/minute of NTCR effluent, and generate 10 M concentration of 'usable' sodium hydroxide. The proposed process operates at 40 deg. C to provide additional aluminum solubility and then recover the sodium hydroxide to the point where the aluminum is saturated at 40 deg. C. A system was developed to safely separate and vent the gases generated during operation of the CRU with the production of 10 M sodium hydroxide. Caustic was produced at a rate between 1.9 to 9.3 kg/hr. The CRU was located inside an ISO container to allow for moving of the unit close to tank locations to process the LLW stream. Actual tests were conducted with the NTCR effluent simulant

  16. Investigation on application of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis for alkaline waste treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Shilov, V.P.; Bessonov, A.A.; Garnov, A.Y.; Gelis, A.V.

    1997-09-01

    The stabilization of neptunium(IV) in alkaline solution by chemical reductants under various conditions was studied. Testing showed that neptunium(V) is slowly reduced to Np(IV) by V(IV) at room temperature in alkaline solutions. Increasing temperature accelerates reduction. Complete reduction of 2 x 10{sup -4} M Np(V) occurs in three hours at 80{degrees}C in 1 M NaOH with 0.02 M VOSO{sub 4-}. Under similar conditions, but in 5 M NaOH, only 15 to 20% of the Np(V) was reduced in 5 hours. In all cases, about 98 % of the initial neptunium was found in the precipitate. Thus V(IV) acts both as a reductant and as a precipitation carrier. Tests showed Np(V) reduction by hydrazine hydrate could be catalyzed by Pd(II). Reduction increased with temperature and catalyst concentration and decreased with hydroxide concentration. Reduction of Np(V) also takes place in 1 M NaOH solutions containing 1 M sodium formate and palladium. Increasing temperature accelerates reduction; with three hours` treatment in 5 M NaOH solution at 90{degrees}C, about 95 % of the initial 2 x 10{sup -4} M neptunium(V) is transformed to Np(IV). Organic complexants and organic acid anions hinder the decontamination of alkaline solutions from neptunium and plutonium by coprecipitation with d-element hydroxides (the Method of Appearing Reagents). It was found that ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) and N-(2-hydroxyethyl) ethylenediaminetriacetate (HEDTA) are decomposed by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in alkaline solution in the presence of cobalt compounds with heating and by Na2S208 at moderate temperatures. Citrate, glycolate, and oxalate are decomposed by Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8} with heating. Oxidant amounts must be increased when NaNO{sub 2} also is present in solution. 8 refs., 25 figs., 16 tabs.

  17. A study on the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in hot alkaline-sulfide solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chasse, Kevin Robert

    . Environments having different ionic concentrations of inorganic salts, i.e. sodium hydroxide, sodium sulfide, and sodium chloride, were used to understand the effect of liquor alkalinity, percent sulfidity, and chloride content on the corrosion and SCC behavior. Hydrogen embrittlement of S32205 was studied to understand the electrochemical conditions and fracture features associated with this failure mode. The results showed that there is an appreciable increase in the susceptibility of DSS to SCC in the presence of sulfide and chloride in hot alkaline environments. Sulfide and chloride adsorption at active sites on the metal surface caused unstable passivity and defective film formation. Chloride and sulfide available at the electrolyte/film surface reduced the charge transfer resistance and shifted the response of the films to lower frequencies indicating the films became more defective. The surface films had an outer, discontinuous layer, and an inner, barrier layer. Fe, Mo, and Mn were selectively dissolved in hot alkaline environments. The onset of SCC was related to the extent of selective dissolution and was consistent with a slip-step dissolution mechanism. Selective corrosion of the austenite phase depended on percent sulfidity and liquor alkalinity. Chlorides enhanced crack initiation and coalescence along the austenite/ferrite boundaries. Crack initiation and transgranular growth strongly depended on the phase distribution in the banded microstructure of DSS. These findings will augment understanding of SCC in this alloy-environment combination and facilitate materials selection in hot alkaline-sulfide environments, particularly in the petrochemical, nuclear, chemical processing, and pulp and paper industries.

  18. ALP (Alkaline Phosphatase) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... known as: ALK PHOS; Alkp Formal name: Alkaline Phosphatase Related tests: AST ; ALT ; GGT ; Bilirubin ; Liver Panel ; Bone Markers ; Alkaline Phosphatase Isoenzymes; Bone Specific ALP All content on Lab ...

  19. Hierarchical cobalt-based hydroxide microspheres for water oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ye; Cui, Bai; Derr, Olivia; Yao, Zhibo; Qin, Zhaotong; Deng, Xiangyun; Li, Jianbao; Lin, Hong

    2014-02-01

    3D hierarchical cobalt hydroxide carbonate hydrate (Co(CO3)0.5(OH).0.11H2O) has been synthesized featuring a hollow urchin-like structure by a one-step hydrothermal method at modest temperature on FTO glass substrates. The functionalities of precursor surfactants were isolated and analyzed. A plausible formation mechanism of the spherical urchin-like microclusters has been furnished through time-dependent investigations. Introduction of other transitional metal doping (Cu, Ni) would give rise to a substantial morphological change associated with a surface area drop. The directly grown cobalt-based hydroxide composite electrodes were found to be capable of catalyzing oxygen evolution reaction (OER) under both neutral pH and alkaline conditions. The favorable 3D dendritic morphology and porous structure provide large surface areas and possible defect sites that are likely responsible for their robust electrochemical activity.

  20. 21 CFR 184.1631 - Potassium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium hydroxide. 184.1631 Section 184.1631... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1631 Potassium hydroxide. (a) Potassium hydroxide..., including pellets, flakes, sticks, lumps, and powders. Potassium hydroxide is obtained commercially from...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1631 - Potassium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium hydroxide. 184.1631 Section 184.1631 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1631 Potassium hydroxide. (a) Potassium hydroxide (KOH, CAS Reg... pellets, flakes, sticks, lumps, and powders. Potassium hydroxide is obtained commercially from...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1631 - Potassium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium hydroxide. 184.1631 Section 184.1631... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1631 Potassium hydroxide. (a) Potassium hydroxide..., including pellets, flakes, sticks, lumps, and powders. Potassium hydroxide is obtained commercially from...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1631 - Potassium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium hydroxide. 184.1631 Section 184.1631... GRAS § 184.1631 Potassium hydroxide. (a) Potassium hydroxide (KOH, CAS Reg. No. 1310-58-3) is also... powders. Potassium hydroxide is obtained commercially from the electrolysis of potassium chloride...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1631 - Potassium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium hydroxide. 184.1631 Section 184.1631... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1631 Potassium hydroxide. (a) Potassium hydroxide..., including pellets, flakes, sticks, lumps, and powders. Potassium hydroxide is obtained commercially from...

  5. Enhanced alkaline hydrolysis and biodegradability studies of nitrocellulose-bearing missile propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidhoum, Mohammed; Christodoulatos, Christos; Su, Tsan-Liang; Redis, Mercurios

    1995-01-01

    Large amounts of energetic materials which have been accumulated over the years in various manufacturing and military installations must be disposed of in an environmentally sound manner. Historically, the method of choice for destruction of obsolete or aging energetic materials has been open burning or open detonation (OB/OD). This destruction approach has become undesirable due to air pollution problems. Therefore, there is a need for new technologies which will effectively and economically deal with the disposal of energetic materials. Along those lines, we have investigated a chemical/biological process for the safe destruction and disposal of a double base solid rocket propellant (AHH), which was used in several 8 inch projectile systems. The solid propellant is made of nitrocellulose and nitroglycerin as energetic components, two lead salts which act as ballistic modifiers, triacetin as a plasticizer and 2-Nitrodiphenylamine (2-NDPA) as a stabilizer. A process train is being developed to convert the organic components of the propellant to biodegradable products and remove the lead from the process stream. The solid propellant is first hydrolyzed through an enhanced alkaline hydrolysis process step. Following lead removal and neutralization, the digested liquor rich in nitrates and nitrites is found to be easily biodegradable. The digestion rate of the intact ground propellant as well as the release of nitrite and nitrate groups were substantially increased when ultrasound were supplied to the alkaline reaction medium compared to the conventional alkaline hydrolysis. The effects of reaction time, temperature, sodium hydroxide concentration and other relevant parameters on the digestion efficiency and biodegradability have been studied. The present work indicates that the AHH propellant can be disposed of safely with a combination of physiochemical and biological processes.

  6. Sodium carbonate facility at Argonne National Laboratory - West

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, M.D.; Henslee, S.P.; Michelbacher, J.A.; Rosenberg, K.E.; Wells, P.B.

    1997-09-01

    The Sodium Carbonate Facility, located at Argonne National Laboratory - West (ANL-W) in Idaho, was designed and built as an addition to the existing Sodium Processing Facility. The Sodium Process and Sodium Carbonate Facilities will convert radioactive sodium into a product that is acceptable for land disposal in Idaho. The first part of the process occurs in the Sodium Process Facility where radioactive sodium is converted into sodium hydroxide (caustic). The second part of the process occurs in the Sodium Carbonate Facility where the caustic solution produced in the Sodium Process Facility is converted into a dry sodium carbonate waste suitable for land disposal. Due to the radioactivity in the sodium, shielding, containment, and HEPA filtered off-gas systems are required throughout both processes.

  7. Electrodialysis recovery of boric acid and potassium hydroxide from eluates of SWC facilities at NPP with VVER

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnik, S.N.; Virich, P.M.; Kramskikh, E.Y.; Masanov, O.L.; Turovsky, I.P.

    1993-12-31

    To extract boric acid and potassium hydroxide from regenerates of SWC-2-46 facilities, an electrodialysis-sorption process has been devised consisting of the following operations: separation of boron-alkaline regenerate solution into desorbate and wash water; filling of desalination and concentration chambers, respectively, with desorbate and was water of electrodialysis equipment; production of boric acid and potassium hydroxide from desorbate by electrodialysis; removal of chloride-ion from boric acid solution on ion-exchange filter AB-17-18. The flow-sheet was tested and boron containing alkaline regeneration solutions were recovered from Novovoronezh NPP.

  8. A new method for the determination of the nitrogen content of nitrocellulose based on the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions released after alkaline hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Alinat, Elodie; Delaunay, Nathalie; Archer, Xavier; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Gareil, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    A new method was proposed to determine the nitrogen content of nitrocelluloses (NCs). It is based on the finding of a linear relationship between the nitrogen content and the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions released after alkaline hydrolysis. Capillary electrophoresis was used to monitor the concentration of nitrite and nitrate ions. The influences of hydrolysis time and molar mass of NC on the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions were investigated, and new insights into the understanding of the alkaline denitration mechanism of NCs, underlying this analytical strategy is provided. The method was then tested successfully with various explosive and non-explosive NC-containing samples such as various daily products and smokeless gunpowders. Inherently to its principle exploiting a concentration ratio, this method shows very good repeatability in the determination of nitrogen content in real samples with relative standard deviation (n = 3) inferior to 1.5%, and also provides very significant advantages with respect to sample extraction, analysis time (1h for alkaline hydrolysis, 3 min for electrophoretic separation), which was about 5 times shorter than for the classical Devarda's method, currently used in industry, and safety conditions (no need for preliminary drying NC samples, mild hydrolysis conditions with 1M sodium hydroxide for 1h at 60 °C). PMID:25562808

  9. 40 CFR 721.6183 - Amides, from ammonium hydroxide - maleic anhydride polymer and hydrogenated tallow alkyl amines...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... - maleic anhydride polymer and hydrogenated tallow alkyl amines, sodium salts, compds. with ethanolamine... Substances § 721.6183 Amides, from ammonium hydroxide - maleic anhydride polymer and hydrogenated tallow... anhydride polymer and hydrogenated tallow alkyl amines, sodium salts, compds. with ethanolamine (PMN...

  10. 40 CFR 721.6183 - Amides, from ammonium hydroxide - maleic anhydride polymer and hydrogenated tallow alkyl amines...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... - maleic anhydride polymer and hydrogenated tallow alkyl amines, sodium salts, compds. with ethanolamine... Substances § 721.6183 Amides, from ammonium hydroxide - maleic anhydride polymer and hydrogenated tallow... anhydride polymer and hydrogenated tallow alkyl amines, sodium salts, compds. with ethanolamine (PMN...

  11. Performed surfactant-optimized aqueous alkaline flood

    SciTech Connect

    Thigpen, D.R.; Lawson, J.B.; Nelson, R.C.

    1991-11-26

    This paper describes improvement in a process for recovering oil from an acidic oil reservoir by injecting an aqueous alkaline solution comprising water, sodium chloride, and alkaline material for reacting with the reservoir oil forming a petroleum acid soap to form an in-situ surfactant system. The improvement comprises: selecting a preformed cosurfactant which is soluble in both the aqueous solution and the reservoir oil and has a solubility ratio which is grater than the solubility ratio of the petroleum acid soap where the solubility ratio is the ratio of solubility in the aqueous alkaline solution to the solubility in the reservoir oil; combining with the alkaline solution an amount of the preformed cosurfactant which will result in the in-situ surfacant system having a salinity about equal to a salinity which results in minimal interfacial tension between the oil in the reservoir and the in-situ surfactant system at reservoir temperature, wherein the amount of the preformed cosurfactant is about 0.3 percent by weight in the aqueous alkaline solution; and injecting the cosurfactant-aqueous alkaline solution mixture into the reservoir to displace oil toward a fluid production location.

  12. Dry cell battery poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Batteries - dry cell ... Acidic dry cell batteries contain: Manganese dioxide Ammonium chloride Alkaline dry cell batteries contain: Sodium hydroxide Potassium hydroxide Lithium dioxide dry cell batteries ...

  13. Solubility of pllutonium in alkaline salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.T.; Edwards, T.B.

    1993-02-26

    Plutonium solubility data from several studies have been evaluated. For each data set, a predictive model has been developed where appropriate. In addition, a statistical model and corresponding prediction intervals for plutonium solubility as a quadratic function of the hydroxide concentration have been developed. Because of the wide range of solution compositions, the solubility of plutonium can vary by as much as three orders of magnitude for any given hydroxide concentration and still remain within the prediction interval. Any nuclear safety assessments that depend on the maximum amount of plutonium dissolved in alkaline salt solutions should use concentrations at least as great as the upper prediction limits developed in this study. To increase the confidence in the prediction model, it is recommended that additional solubility tests be conducted at low hydroxide concentrations and with all of the other solution components involved. To validate the model for application to actual waste solutions, it is recommended that the plutonium solubilities in actual waste solutions be determined and compared to the values predicted by the quadratic model.

  14. Isolation, LC-MS/MS and 2D-NMR characterization of alkaline degradants of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate.

    PubMed

    Anandgaonkar, Vaibhav; Gupta, Abhishek; Kona, Srinivas; Talluri, M V N Kumar

    2015-03-25

    The present work describes the preparative isolation and characterization of two alkaline degradation products of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF). Tenofovir disoproxil is a prodrug of tenofovir (antiviral agent) and co-crystal form of this prodrug with fumaric acid is tenofovir disoproxil fumarate. The drug is subjected to alkaline degradation with 0.1N sodium hydroxide for 2 min at room temperature. The two degradants were detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) at relative retention of 0.26 and 0.73 with respect to the drug. HPLC method involves gradient elution on Kromasil Eternity column (150 mm × 2.1 mm, 2.5 μm) using ammonium acetate (10mM) - acetonitrile as mobile phase at flow rate of 0.3 mL/min and UV detection at 260 nm. Two degradation products were isolated by preparative HPLC and further characterized by LC-MS, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and 2D-NMR. On the basis of this spectral data, the structure of two DPs are confirmed as methyl hydrogen ({[1-(6-amino-9H-purin-9-yl)propan-2-yl]oxy}methyl)phosphonate for DP-I and dimethyl ({[1-(6-amino-9H-purin-9-yl)propan-2-yl]oxy}methyl)phosphonate for DP-II. PMID:25594895

  15. Alkaline Anion-Exchange Membranes Containing Mobile Ion Shuttles.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiaolin; He, Yubin; Guiver, Michael D; Wu, Liang; Ran, Jin; Yang, Zhengjin; Xu, Tongwen

    2016-05-01

    A new class of alkaline anion-exchange membranes containing mobile ion shuttles is developed. It is achieved by threading ionic linear guests into poly(crown ether) hosts via host-guest molecular interaction. The thermal- and pH-triggered shuttling of ionic linear guests remarkably increases the solvation-shell fluctuations in inactive hydrated hydroxide ion complexes (OH(-) (H2 O)4 ) and accelerates the OH(-) transport. PMID:26972938

  16. Electrolytic process to produce sodium hypochlorite using sodium ion conductive ceramic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Balagopal, Shekar; Malhotra, Vinod; Pendleton, Justin; Reid, Kathy Jo

    2012-09-18

    An electrochemical process for the production of sodium hypochlorite is disclosed. The process may potentially be used to produce sodium hypochlorite from seawater or low purity un-softened or NaCl-based salt solutions. The process utilizes a sodium ion conductive ceramic membrane, such as membranes based on NASICON-type materials, in an electrolytic cell. In the process, water is reduced at a cathode to form hydroxyl ions and hydrogen gas. Chloride ions from a sodium chloride solution are oxidized in the anolyte compartment to produce chlorine gas which reacts with water to produce hypochlorous and hydrochloric acid. Sodium ions are transported from the anolyte compartment to the catholyte compartment across the sodium ion conductive ceramic membrane. Sodium hydroxide is transported from the catholyte compartment to the anolyte compartment to produce sodium hypochlorite within the anolyte compartment.

  17. Chemical destruction of HMX-based explosives with ammonium hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Skidmore, C.; Dell`Orco, P.; Flesner, R.; Kramer, J.; Spontarelli, T.

    1995-09-01

    A series of experiments at Los Alamos National Laboratory explored the efficacy of ammonium hydroxide solutions in converting HMX (cyclotetramethylene-tetranitramine, or Octogen) and HMX-based explosives to nonenergetic, nonhazardous materials. When 80 g of explosive was converted in a reactor operating at 85 psig pressure at 140 C, the principal gaseous products were nitrous oxide (46% to 51%), nitrogen (22% to 32%), and ammonia (17% to 28%). Formate and hexamethylene-tetramine (hexamine) account for effectively 100% of the carbon-bearing aqueous species. Nitrate, nitrite, and acetate were present in the liquid in trace amounts. The process effectively treated molding powders of the plastic-bonded explosives PBX 9501 (2.5% estane), LX-04 (15% viton), and PBX 9404 (3% nitrocellulose). Results were compared with those achieved using sodium hydroxide solutions at 150 C in a pressurized reactor.

  18. Adsorptive bubble separation of zinc and cadmium cations in presence of ferric and aluminum hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Jurkiewicz, Kazimierz

    2005-06-15

    The adsorptive bubble separation of zinc and cadmium cations from solution in the presence of ferric and aluminum hydroxides was carried out by means of Tween 80 (nonionic surfactant), and sodium laurate and stearate (anionic surfactants). The mechanism of metal removal is different depending on the nature of the surfactant used. The removal of zinc cations by adsorbing colloid flotation is higher than that of cadmium cations. It increases with increases in the amount of hydroxide precipitate and the concentration of Tween 80. The removal of zinc cations by ion flotation is lower than that of cadmium cations. It does not change with increases in the hydroxide amount. It increases, however, with increased sodium laurate or stearate concentration. Both separation methods turned out to be helpful for studying both the solution's structure and the interactions at the solution-solid interface. PMID:15897071

  19. Chemical gardens without silica: the formation of pure metal hydroxide tubes.

    PubMed

    Batista, Bruno C; Steinbock, Oliver

    2015-08-21

    Contrary to common belief, hollow precipitation tubes form in the absence of silicate if sodium hydroxide solution is injected into solutions of various metal ions. In many cases, the growth speed has a power law dependence on the flow rate. For vanadyl, we observe damped oscillations in the tube height. PMID:26172246

  20. Convenient synthesis of alkyl amines via the reaction of organoboranes with ammonium hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Kabalka, G.W.; Sastry, K.A.R.; McCollum, G.W.; Yoshioka, H.

    1981-10-09

    A process for the preparation of alkyl amines in which the reagents are generated in situ under mild and convenient reaction conditions is described. An organoborane is prepared via hydroboration, aqueous ammonium hydroxide is added, and then aqueous sodium hypochlorite is added to the mixture. Two of the alkyl groups in the trialkylborane are converted to the corresponding amines in good yield. (BLM)

  1. 21 CFR 184.1769a - Sodium metasilicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium metasilicate. 184.1769a Section 184.1769a... GRAS § 184.1769a Sodium metasilicate. (a) Sodium metasilicate (CAS Reg. No. 6834-92-0) is a strongly alkaline white powder. It does not occur naturally but rather is synthesized by melting sand with...

  2. Sodium Hydroxide Pretreatment of Switchgrass for Ethanol Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lignocellulose-to-ethanol conversion is a promising technology to supplement corn-based ethanol production. However, the recalcitrant structure of lignocellulosic material is a major obstacle to the efficient conversion. To improve the enzymatic digestibility of switchgrass for the fermentable sugar...

  3. The Performance of Geopolymers Activated by Sodium Hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hyeontaek; Kang, Seunggu

    2015-08-01

    Geopolymers, a group of promising environmentally friendly materials that can work as cement substitutes, should be fabricated from SiO2-Al2O3-CaO mixtures containing large amounts of amorphous phases to ensure optimal chemical and physical properties. In this study, it was shown that geopolymers with enhanced mechanical strengths, as high as 115 MPa, could be obtained from perfectly amorphous slag from spent catalyst (SSC) discharged during automobile catalyst recycling. Geopolymer processing involved alkali-activation using a 16 M NaOH solution of pH13. The varying SSC grain size was the main experimental factor of interest, in combination with curing temperature and aging time. Variations in the mechanical strengths of the resulting geopolymers are explained by the occurrence of 10-50 nm-sized crystals and the presence of voids and pores dozens to hundreds of micrometers in size. PMID:26369225

  4. 21 CFR 582.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium hydroxide. 582.1428 Section 582.1428 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Product. Magnesium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  5. 21 CFR 582.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium hydroxide. 582.1428 Section 582.1428 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Product. Magnesium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  6. 21 CFR 582.1205 - Calcium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium hydroxide. 582.1205 Section 582.1205 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1205 Calcium hydroxide. (a) Product. Calcium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  7. 21 CFR 184.1205 - Calcium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium hydroxide. 184.1205 Section 184.1205 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1205 Calcium hydroxide. (a) Calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2, CAS Reg. No. 1305-62-0) is also known as slaked lime or calcium hydrate. It is produced by the hydration...

  8. 21 CFR 582.1631 - Potassium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium hydroxide. 582.1631 Section 582.1631 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1631 Potassium hydroxide. (a) Product. Potassium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  9. 21 CFR 582.1631 - Potassium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium hydroxide. 582.1631 Section 582.1631 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1631 Potassium hydroxide. (a) Product. Potassium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  10. 21 CFR 582.1631 - Potassium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium hydroxide. 582.1631 Section 582.1631 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1631 Potassium hydroxide. (a) Product. Potassium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  11. 21 CFR 582.1631 - Potassium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potassium hydroxide. 582.1631 Section 582.1631 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1631 Potassium hydroxide. (a) Product. Potassium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  12. 21 CFR 582.1631 - Potassium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium hydroxide. 582.1631 Section 582.1631 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1631 Potassium hydroxide. (a) Product. Potassium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  13. 21 CFR 582.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium hydroxide. 582.1428 Section 582.1428 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Product. Magnesium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  14. 21 CFR 582.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium hydroxide. 582.1428 Section 582.1428 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Product. Magnesium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  15. 21 CFR 582.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium hydroxide. 582.1428 Section 582.1428 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Product. Magnesium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  16. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Hhhh... - Method for Determining Free-Formaldehyde in Urea-Formaldehyde Resins by Sodium Sulfite (Iced...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... with sodium sulfite to form the sulfite addition products and liberate sodium hydroxide (NaOH); however... degrees Celsius (( °deg;C) to minimize the reaction of the methanol groups. 2.1Apparatus Required....

  17. Alkaline "Permanent" Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacey, Antony

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of paper manufacturing processes and their effects on library materials focuses on the promotion of alkaline "permanent" paper, with less acid, by Canadian library preservation specialists. Standards for paper acidity are explained; advantages of alkaline paper are described, including decreased manufacturing costs; and recyclability is…

  18. High-Efficiency Artificial Photosynthesis Using a Novel Alkaline Membrane Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayan, Sri; Haines, Brennan; Blosiu, Julian; Marzwell, Neville

    2009-01-01

    A new cell designed to mimic the photosynthetic processes of plants to convert carbon dioxide into carbonaceous products and oxygen at high efficiency, has an improved configuration using a polymer membrane electrolyte and an alkaline medium. This increases efficiency of the artificial photosynthetic process, achieves high conversion rates, permits the use of inexpensive catalysts, and widens the range of products generated by this type of process. The alkaline membrane electrolyte allows for the continuous generation of sodium formate without the need for any additional separation system. The electrolyte type, pH, electrocatalyst type, and cell voltage were found to have a strong effect on the efficiency of conversion of carbon dioxide to formate. Indium electrodes were found to have higher conversion efficiency compared to lead. Bicarbonate electrolyte offers higher conversion efficiency and higher rates than water solutions saturated with carbon dioxide. pH values between 8 and 9 lead to the maximum values of efficiency. The operating cell voltage of 2.5 V, or higher, ensures conversion of the carbon dioxide to formate, although the hydrogen evolution reaction begins to compete strongly with the formate production reaction at higher cell voltages. Formate is produced at indium and lead electrodes at a conversion efficiency of 48 mg of CO2/kilojoule of energy input. This efficiency is about eight times that of natural photosynthesis in green plants. The electrochemical method of artificial photosynthesis is a promising approach for the conversion, separation and sequestration of carbon dioxide for confined environments as in space habitats, and also for carbon dioxide management in the terrestrial context. The heart of the reactor is a membrane cell fabricated from an alkaline polymer electrolyte membrane and catalyst- coated electrodes. This cell is assembled and held in compression in gold-plated hardware. The cathode side of the cell is supplied with carbon

  19. Contribution to the knowledge of nickel hydroxide electrodes. 5. Analysis and electrochemical behavior of cadmium nickel hydroxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bode, H.; Dennstedt, W.

    1981-01-01

    Electrochemical experiments performed at sintered and bulk electrodes show that beta nickel hydroxide contains an electrochemically inactive proportion of cadmium hydroxide of up to 10%. The electrochemically ineffective cadmium hydroxide is homogeneously dissolved in beta nickel hydroxide.

  20. Alkaline igneous rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Fitton, J.G.; Upton, B.G.J.

    1987-01-01

    In this volume, an international team of scientists provides an up-to-date overview of the nature, origin, and evolution of alkaline magmas. Particular attention is paid to carbonatites, lamprophyres, and lamproites which are rock suites of current interest not recently reviewed elsewhere. Recent work on the classical alkaline provinces of East Africa, South Greenland, and the Kola Peninsula is included together with reviews of other areas of alkaline magmatism in North and South America, East Greenland, Europe, West Africa, and the ocean basins. Other papers discuss the impact of experimental isotopic and geochemical studies of the petrogenesis of alkaline rocks. This book will be of interest to petrologists and geochemists studying alkaline igneous rocks, and to other earth scientists as a reference on the rapidly expanding field of igneous petrology.

  1. Controlled synthesis of magnesium hydroxide nanoparticles with different morphological structures and related properties in flame retardant ethylene vinyl acetate blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Jianping; Qiu, Longzhen; Qu, Baojun

    2004-11-01

    Magnesium hydroxide nanoparticles with different morphological structures of needle-, lamellar- and rod-like nanocrystals have been synthesized by solution precipitation reactions of alkaline with magnesium chloride in the presence of complex dispersants and characterized in terms of morphology, particle size, crystal habits and thermal behaviour by transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis. The sizes and morphologies of magnesium hydroxide nanocrystals can be controlled mainly by the reaction conditions of temperature, alkaline-injection rate and the concentrations of reactants. The data show that the needle-like morphology is of size 10 × 100 nm2, the lamellar shape 50 nm in diameter and estimated 10 nm in thickness, and the rod-like nanoparticles 4 µm in length and 95 nm in diameter, respectively. All three kinds of nanoparticles are of hexagonal structures. The needle- and lamellar-like nanoparticles can be obtained by the reactions of alkaline injected into magnesium chloride solution at about 2 and 20 °C, respectively, while the rod-like nanoparticles can be prepared by a slower alkaline-injection rate and lower aqueous ammonia concentration at about 10 °C. The results obtained from the ethylene-vinyl acetate nanocomposites blended with the lamellar-like nanoparticles show that magnesium hydroxide nanocrystals possess higher flame retardant efficiency and mechanical reinforcing effect by comparison with common micrometre grade magnesium hydroxide particles.

  2. Surfactant-enhanced low-pH alkaline flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Peru, D.A. and Co., Columbia, MD . Research Div.); Lorenz, P.B. )

    1990-08-01

    This paper reports sodium bicarbonate investigated as a potential alkaline agent in surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding because it has very little tendency to dissolve silicate minerals. In experiments performed with Wilmington, CA, crude oil and three types of surfactants, the bicarbonate/surfactant combination caused a marked lowering of interfacial tension (IFT). Bicarbonate protected the surfactant against divalent cations and reduced adsorption of surfactant and polymer on various minerals. Coreflood test confirm that sodium bicarbonate plus surfactant can be an effective alternative to the high-pH flooding process.

  3. Atmospheric Dispersion of Sodium Aerosol due to a Sodium Leak in a Fast Breeder Reactor Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punitha, G.; Sudha, A. Jasmin; Kasinathan, N.; Rajan, M.

    Liquid sodium at high temperatures (470 K to 825 K) is used as the primary and secondary coolant in Liquid Metal cooled Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBR). In the event of a postulated sodium leak in the Steam Generator Building (SGB) of a LMFBR, sodium readily combusts in the ambient air, especially at temperatures above 523 K. Intense sodium fire results and sodium oxide fumes are released as sodium aerosols. Sodium oxides are readily converted to sodium hydroxide in air due to the presence of moisture in it. Hence, sodium aerosols are invariably in the form of particulate sodium hydroxide. These aerosols damage not only the equipment and instruments due to their corrosive nature but also pose health hazard to humans. Hence, it is essential to estimate the concentration of sodium aerosols within the plant boundary for a sodium leak event. The Gaussian Plume Dispersion Model can obtain the atmospheric dispersion of sodium aerosols in an open terrain. However, this model does not give accurate results for dispersion in spaces close to the point of release and with buildings in between. The velocity field due to the wind is altered to a large extent by the intervening buildings and structures. Therefore, a detailed 3-D estimation of the velocity field and concentration has to be obtained through rigorous computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach. PHOENICS code has been employed to determine concentration of sodium aerosols at various distances from the point of release. The dispersion studies have been carried out for the release of sodium aerosols at different elevations from the ground and for different wind directions.

  4. Alkaline galvanic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenberg, M.

    1993-06-01

    A battery is described having an anode, a cathode and an electrolyte with the anode having zinc or a zinc alloy as an active anodic material, the cathode having a metal oxide or hydroxide as an active cathodic material, and the electrolyte comprising a solution of a first salt formed by the reaction of one or more acids selected from the group consisting of boric acid, phosphoric acid and arsenic acid with an alkali or earth alkali hydroxide present in an amount to produce a stoichiometric, excess of said hydroxide to said acid in the range of 2.5 to 11.0 equivalents per liter, and a solution of a second salt which is a soluble alkali or earth alkali fluoride in an amount corresponding to a concentration range of 0.01 to 1.0 equivalents per liter of total solution.

  5. Alkaline reforming of brominated fire-retardant plastics: fate of bromine and antimony.

    PubMed

    Onwudili, Jude A; Williams, Paul T

    2009-02-01

    High-impact polystyrene (HIPS) flame retarded with decabromodiphenyl ether (DDE), has been reacted in supercritical water from 380 to 450 degrees C and 21.5 to 31.0 MPa pressure in a batch reactor. Different concentrations of sodium hydroxide additive were used in situ to neutralize the corrosive inorganic bromine species released during the reactions. It appeared that supercritical water conditions lowered the decomposition temperature of both the fire-retardant DDE and HIPS. The reaction products included oils (up to 76 wt%), char (up to 18 wt%) and gas (up to 2.4 wt%) which was mainly methane. The presence of the alkaline water led to up to 97 wt% debromination of the product oil, producing virtually bromine-free oil feedstock. The removal of antimony from the oil product during processing was of the order of 98 wt%. The oil consisted of many single- and multiple-ringed aromatic compounds, many of which had alkyl substituents and/or aliphatic C(n)-bridges (n=1-4). The major single-ringed compounds included toluene, xylenes, ethylbenzene, propylbenzene and alpha-methylstyrene. Bibenzyl (diphenylethane), stilbene, diphenylmethane, diphenylpropane, diphenylcyclopropane, diphenylpropene, diphenylbutane, diphenylbutene and diphenylbuta-1,3-diene were the major C(n)-bridged compounds. Diphenyl ether and acetophenone were the major oxygenated compounds found. The process thus has the potential to produce bromine-free and antimony-free oils from fire-retardant plastics. PMID:19054543

  6. Analysis of barium hydroxide and calcium hydroxide slurry carbonation reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Patch, K.D.; Hart, R.P.; Schumacher, W.A.

    1980-05-01

    The removal of CO/sub 2/ from air was investigated by using a continuous-agitated-slurry carbonation reactor containing either barium hydroxide (Ba(OH)/sub 2/) or calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)/sub 2/). Such a process would be applied to scrub /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ from stack gases at nuclear-fuel reprocessing plants. Decontamination factors were characterized for reactor conditions which could alter hydrodynamic behavior. An attempt was made to characterize reactor performance with models assuming both plug flow and various degrees of backmixing in the gas phase. The Ba(OH)/sub 2/ slurry enabled increased conversion, but apparently the process was controlled under some conditions by phenomena differing from those observed for carbonation by Ca(OH)/sub 2/. Overall reaction mechanisms are postulated.

  7. Synthesis of the high temperature superconductor YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ by the hydroxide co-precipitation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schildermans, I.; Van Bael, M.; Knaepen, E.; Yperman, J.; Mullens, J.; Van Poucke, L. C.

    1997-02-01

    A new synthetic route is developed to prepare a hydroxide precursor for the superconductor YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ. In an inert atmosphere and at low temperature the yttrium, barium and copper hydroxides are co-precipitated by adding the metal perchlorates and sodium hydroxide together. The analysis of the precursor proved the absence of ClO 4- and Na + ions. The thermal treatment (12 h calcinating at 950°C, 36 h sintering at 950°C and 6 h annealing at 400°C) gives a superconductor YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ with a transition temperature of 90.2 K.

  8. Recycling of waste printed circuit boards with simultaneous enrichment of special metals by using alkaline melts: A green and strategically advantageous solution.

    PubMed

    Stuhlpfarrer, Philipp; Luidold, Stefan; Antrekowitsch, Helmut

    2016-04-15

    The increasing consumption of electric and electronic equipment has led to a rise in toxic waste. To recover the metal fraction, a separation of the organic components is necessary because harmful substances such as chlorine, fluorine and bromine cause ecological damage, for example in the form of dioxins and furans at temperature above 400°C. Hence, an alternative, environmentally friendly approach was investigated exploiting that a mixture of caustic soda and potassium hydroxide in eutectic composition melts below 200°C, enabling a fast cracking of the long hydrocarbon chains. The trials demonstrate the removal of organic compounds without a loss of copper and precious metals, as well as a suppressed formation of hazardous off-gases. In order to avoid an input of alkaline elements into the furnace and ensuing problems with refractory materials, a washing step generates a sodium and potassium hydroxide solution, in which special metals like indium, gallium and germanium are enriched. Their concentrations facilitate the recovery of these elements, because otherwise they become lost in the typical recycling processes. The aim of this work was to find an environmental solution for the separation of plastics and metals as well as a strategically important answer for the recycling of printed circuit boards and mobile phones. PMID:26775099

  9. Improved quantification of protein in vaccines containing aluminum hydroxide by simple modification of the Lowry method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Naery; Shin, SukJin; Chung, Hye Joo; Kim, Do Keun; Lim, Jong-Mi; Park, Hyunsung; Oh, Ho Jung

    2015-09-22

    Aluminum (Al) components in vaccines are known to act as adsorbents that interfere with accurate protein quantification by the Lowry method. Therefore, certain modifications based on the characteristics and compositions of the vaccine are required for determination of protein contents. We investigated the effects of an additional centrifugal separation and found that protein contents were overestimated by up to 238% without centrifugation through a collaborative study performed with hepatitis B vaccines containing Al. However, addition of a centrifugation step yielded protein concentrations that were similar to the actual values, with small coefficients of variation (CVs). Proficiency testing performed in 11 laboratories showed that four laboratories did not have satisfactory results for vaccines containing aluminum hydroxide, although all laboratories were proficient in protein analysis when samples did not contain aluminum hydroxide. Incomplete resuspension of aluminum hydroxide solution with alkaline copper solution was the major cause of insufficient proficiency in these laboratories. PMID:26275477

  10. Nickel-vanadium monolayer double hydroxide for efficient electrochemical water oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Ke; Chen, Hong; Ji, Yongfei; Huang, Hui; Claesson, Per Martin; Daniel, Quentin; Philippe, Bertrand; Rensmo, Håkan; Li, Fusheng; Luo, Yi; Sun, Licheng

    2016-06-01

    Highly active and low-cost electrocatalysts for water oxidation are required due to the demands on sustainable solar fuels; however, developing highly efficient catalysts to meet industrial requirements remains a challenge. Herein, we report a monolayer of nickel-vanadium-layered double hydroxide that shows a current density of 27 mA cm-2 (57 mA cm-2 after ohmic-drop correction) at an overpotential of 350 mV for water oxidation. Such performance is comparable to those of the best-performing nickel-iron-layered double hydroxides for water oxidation in alkaline media. Mechanistic studies indicate that the nickel-vanadium-layered double hydroxides can provide high intrinsic catalytic activity, mainly due to enhanced conductivity, facile electron transfer and abundant active sites. This work may expand the scope of cost-effective electrocatalysts for water splitting.

  11. Nickel–vanadium monolayer double hydroxide for efficient electrochemical water oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ke; Chen, Hong; Ji, Yongfei; Huang, Hui; Claesson, Per Martin; Daniel, Quentin; Philippe, Bertrand; Rensmo, Håkan; Li, Fusheng; Luo, Yi; Sun, Licheng

    2016-01-01

    Highly active and low-cost electrocatalysts for water oxidation are required due to the demands on sustainable solar fuels; however, developing highly efficient catalysts to meet industrial requirements remains a challenge. Herein, we report a monolayer of nickel–vanadium-layered double hydroxide that shows a current density of 27 mA cm−2 (57 mA cm−2 after ohmic-drop correction) at an overpotential of 350 mV for water oxidation. Such performance is comparable to those of the best-performing nickel–iron-layered double hydroxides for water oxidation in alkaline media. Mechanistic studies indicate that the nickel–vanadium-layered double hydroxides can provide high intrinsic catalytic activity, mainly due to enhanced conductivity, facile electron transfer and abundant active sites. This work may expand the scope of cost-effective electrocatalysts for water splitting. PMID:27306541

  12. Nickel-vanadium monolayer double hydroxide for efficient electrochemical water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ke; Chen, Hong; Ji, Yongfei; Huang, Hui; Claesson, Per Martin; Daniel, Quentin; Philippe, Bertrand; Rensmo, Håkan; Li, Fusheng; Luo, Yi; Sun, Licheng

    2016-01-01

    Highly active and low-cost electrocatalysts for water oxidation are required due to the demands on sustainable solar fuels; however, developing highly efficient catalysts to meet industrial requirements remains a challenge. Herein, we report a monolayer of nickel-vanadium-layered double hydroxide that shows a current density of 27 mA cm(-2) (57 mA cm(-2) after ohmic-drop correction) at an overpotential of 350 mV for water oxidation. Such performance is comparable to those of the best-performing nickel-iron-layered double hydroxides for water oxidation in alkaline media. Mechanistic studies indicate that the nickel-vanadium-layered double hydroxides can provide high intrinsic catalytic activity, mainly due to enhanced conductivity, facile electron transfer and abundant active sites. This work may expand the scope of cost-effective electrocatalysts for water splitting. PMID:27306541

  13. Bactericidal activity of alkaline salts of fatty acids towards bacteria associated with poultry processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibacterial activity of alkaline salts of caproic, caprylic, capric, lauric, and myristic acids were determined using the agar diffusion assay. A 0.5M concentration of each fatty acid (FA) was dissolved in 1.0 M potassium hydroxide (KOH), and pH of the mixtures was adjusted to 10.5 with citric aci...

  14. Alkaline battery operational methodology

    DOEpatents

    Sholklapper, Tal; Gallaway, Joshua; Steingart, Daniel; Ingale, Nilesh; Nyce, Michael

    2016-08-16

    Methods of using specific operational charge and discharge parameters to extend the life of alkaline batteries are disclosed. The methods can be used with any commercial primary or secondary alkaline battery, as well as with newer alkaline battery designs, including batteries with flowing electrolyte. The methods include cycling batteries within a narrow operating voltage window, with minimum and maximum cut-off voltages that are set based on battery characteristics and environmental conditions. The narrow voltage window decreases available capacity but allows the batteries to be cycled for hundreds or thousands of times.

  15. Sodium Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Sodium Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Na Formal name: Sodium Related tests: Chloride , Bicarbonate , Potassium , Electrolytes , Osmolality , Basic ...

  16. Alkaline/peracetic acid as a pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass for ethanol fuel production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, Lincoln Cambraia

    Peracetic acid is a lignin oxidation pretreatment with low energy input by which biomass can be treated in a silo type system for improving enzymatic digestibility of lignocellulosic materials for ethanol production. Experimentally, ground hybrid poplar wood and sugar cane bagasse are placed in plastic bags and a peracetic acid solution is added to the biomass in different concentrations based on oven-dry biomass. The ratio of solution to biomass is 6:1; after initial mixing of the resulting paste, a seven-day storage period at about 20°C is used in this study. As a complementary method, a series of pre-pretreatments using stoichiometric amounts of sodium hydroxide and ammonium hydroxide based on 4-methyl-glucuronic acid and acetyl content in the biomass is been performed before addition of peracetic acid. The alkaline solutions are added to the biomass in a ratio of 14:1 solution to biomass; the slurry is mixed for 24 hours at ambient temperature. The above procedures give high xylan content substrates. Consequently, xylanase/beta-glucosidase combinations are more effective than cellulase preparations in hydrolyzing these materials. The pretreatment effectiveness is evaluated using standard enzymatic hydrolysis and simultaneous saccharification and cofermentation (SSCF) procedures. Hybrid poplar wood pretreated with 15 and 21% peracetic acid based on oven-dry weight of wood gives glucan conversion yields of 76.5 and 98.3%, respectively. Sugar cane bagasse pretreated with the same loadings gives corresponding yields of 85.9 and 93.1%. Raw wood and raw bagasse give corresponding yields of 6.8 and 28.8%, respectively. The combined 6% NaOH/15% peracetic acid pretreatments increase the glucan conversion yields from 76.5 to 100.0% for hybrid poplar wood and from 85.9 to 97.6% for sugar cane bagasse. Respective ethanol yields of 92.8 and 91.9% are obtained from 6% NaOH/15% peracetic acid pretreated materials using recombinant Zymomonas mobilis CP4/pZB5. Peracetic acid

  17. Development of Alkaline Oxidative Dissolution Methods for Chromium (III) Compounds Present in Hanford Site Tank Sludges

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Krot, N N.; Shilov, V P.; Fedoseev, A M.; Budantseva, N A.; Nikonov, M V.; Yusov, A B.; Garnov, A Y.; Charushnikova, I A.; Perminov, V P.; Astafurova, L N.; Lapitskaya, T S.; Makarenkov, V I.

    1999-07-02

    The high-level radioactive waste sludge in the underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site contains various chromium solid phases. Dissolution and removal of chromium from tank waste sludges is desirable prior to high-level waste vitrification because increased volume is required to incorporate the residual chromium. Unfortunately, dissolution of chromium from the sludge to form Cr(OH){sub 4}{sup -} through treatment with heated NaOH solution (also used to dissolve aluminum phases and metathesize phosphates to sodium salts) generally has been unsuccessful in tests with both simulated and genuine Hanford waste sludges. Oxidative dissolution of the Cr(III) compounds to form soluble chromate has been proposed as an alternative chromium solid phase dissolution method and results of limited prior testing have been reported. The present systematic tests investigated oxygen gas, hydrogen peroxide, and sodium persulfate oxidants to dissolve Cr(III) under alkaline conditions to form soluble chromate. Permanganate and ozone also were considered for testing but were thought to be of secondary interest because of the insoluble residue (MnO{sub 2} from permanganate) and complex equipment (necessary to generate ozone) implicit with use of these reagents. The oxygen and hydrogen peroxide reagents leave no condensable residue and sodium persulfate only leaves soluble sodium sulfate. Crystalline Cr(OH){sub 3}, various hydrothermally aged amorphous Cr(III) oxide hydrates, mixed Fe(III)/Cr(III) oxide hydrates, and nickel and iron Cr(III) spinels, all of which have been identified or are likely constituents in Hanford tank wastes, were prepared and characterized for the dissolution tests. The effects of reagent and hydroxide concentrations, reaction temperature, and transition metal catalysts on reaction progress were investigated for each reagent as functions of reaction time. Reaction progress was measured by monitoring chromate concentration. Oxidation of chromium compounds by

  18. Anodic dissolution and protection of aluminum alloy 7075 in hydroxide solutions

    SciTech Connect

    McCafferty, E.; Trzaskoma-Paulette, P.

    1997-03-01

    Dissolution of Al 7075 (UNS A97075) in sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solutions results in formation of a black, loosely adherent film of corrosion products that provides partial protection in the aqueous environment. Optical and scanning microscopy showed the reaction product film is a bilayer, with a thin, adherent inner layer and a thicker, more fragile outer layer. The reaction mechanism involves the dissolution of aluminum followed by formation of a precipitated film. Corrosion protection at moderate hydroxide concentrations is provided by the use of a partially fluorinated amino-surfactant or a silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) coating prepared by ion beam-assisted deposition.

  19. Deterioration of Parabens in Preserved Magnesium Hydroxide Oral Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamedani Morteza, Pirali; Mohamad Reza, Fazeli; Nasrin, Samadi; Ehsan, Nassireslami; Shams Ali, Rezazadeh; Amini, Mohsen

    In this study the chemical stability of methyl and propyl paraben in magnesium hydroxide suspension (pH about 10) was investigated using both real time (32 months incubation at 25±2°C with humidity of 60±5% RH) and also accelerated (3 months incubation at 40±2°C with humidity of 70±5% RH) methods. Preparation with no added preservative was used as control. Concentrations of methyl and propyl paraben decreased to levels lower than the reported MIC values after the first month and fifth months of real time study, respectively. Preservative effectiveness testing against the Pharmacopeal challanging microorganisms in both suspensions with or without parabens conformed the US Pharmacopeia requirements for oral antacids. It is concluded that alkaline pH of the suspension without parabens could preserve the product against Pharmacopeial challenging microorganisms and incorporation of parabens did not add any antimicrobial activity to the test product.

  20. Effects of alkaline hydrogen peroxide treatment on in vitro degradation of cellulosic substrates by mixed ruminal microorganisms and Bacteroides succinogenes S85.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, S M; Montgomery, L; Garleb, K A; Berger, L L; Fahey, G C

    1988-01-01

    The effects of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP) treatments on wheat straw (WS) and various cellulosic substrates were determined by measuring susceptibility to degradation by mixed ruminal organisms or Bacteroides succinogenes S85. In vitro incubations were used to measure differences in fermentation resulting from each successive step in the AHP treatment process. In vitro incubations through 48 or 108 h were conducted to measure these differences. The AHP treatment of WS increased (P less than 0.05) dry matter, neutral detergent fiber, and acid detergent fiber degradation over control WS when these substrates were incubated with mixed ruminal microorganisms or B. succinogenes S85. Fermentations containing AHP-treated WS had greater (P less than 0.05) microbial purine (RNA) and volatile fatty acid concentrations by 12 h compared with those containing untreated or NaOH-treated WS. Xylose in AHP-treated WS was utilized more extensively (P less than 0.05) by 12 h compared with the xylose of untreated or NaOH-treated WS. Treatment with AHP removed 23% of the alkali-labile phenolic compounds from WS. When substrates with high levels of crystalline cellulose (raw cotton fiber, Solka floc, and Sigmacell-50) were treated with NaOH or AHP and incubated for 108 h with B. succinogenes S85, extent of acid detergent fiber degradation of cotton fiber and Sigmacell-50 was similar to that of their respective controls. Sodium hydroxide and AHP treatments were effective in increasing acid detergent fiber degradation of the Solka floc which contained, on average, 3.3 and 4.8 percentage units more acid detergent lignin and hemicellulose, respectively, than cotton fiber and Sigmacell-50.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3291761

  1. Nickel hydroxide and other nanophase cathode materials for rechargeable batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisner, David E.; Salkind, Alvin J.; Strutt, Peter R.; Xiao, T. Danny

    The staff of US Nanocorp, Inc. are developing unique nanostructured materials for a wide range of applications in the areas of energy storage (batteries and ultracapacitors) and energy conversion (fuel cells and thermoelectric) devices. Many of the preparations of these materials exploit a wet synthesis process (patent pending) that is scaleable to large volume manufacturing and anticipated to be low in cost. Specifically, both the β-form of nickel hydroxide and the hollandite form of manganese dioxide have been synthesized. The hexagonal Ni(OH) 2 is anticipated to significantly boost energy densities in nickel-alkaline batteries, including nickel/cadmium, nickel/metal hydride and nickel/zinc. The nanophase MnO 2 microstructure exhibits an unusual tunnelled tubular geometry within a 'bird's nest' superstructure, and is expected to be of interest as an intercalation cathode material in lithium-ion systems as well as a catalyst for fuel cells. Characterization of these materials has been by the techniques of high resolution SEM and TEM, as well as XRD. Both Hg porosimetry and BET surface measurements for conventional and spherical nickel hydroxides are summarized. Pore distribution and electrochemical activity for the nanophase materials will be examined in the future.

  2. Hydroxide Degradation Pathways for Substituted Trimethylammonium Cations: A DFT Study

    SciTech Connect

    Long, H.; Kim, K.; Pivovar, B. S.

    2012-05-03

    Substituted trimethylammonium cations serve as small molecule analogues for tetherable cations in anion exchange membranes. In turn, these membranes serve as the basis for alkaline membrane fuel cells by allowing facile conduction of hydroxide. As these cations are susceptible to hydroxide attack, they degrade over time and greatly limit the lifetime of the fuel cell. In this research, we performed density functional theory calculations to investigate the degradation pathways of substituted trimethylammonium cations to probe the relative durability of cation tethering strategies in alkyl and aromatic tethers. Our results show that significant changes in calculated energy barriers occur when substitution groups change. Specifically, we have found that, when available, the Hofmann elimination pathway is the most vulnerable pathway for degradation; however, this barrier is also found to depend on the carbon chain length and number of hydrogens susceptible to Hofmann elimination. S{sub N}2 barriers were also investigated for both methyl groups and substitution groups. The reported findings give important insight into potential tethering strategies for trimethylammonium cations in anion exchange membranes.

  3. A selective spectrophotometric method for determination of rosoxacin antibiotic using sodium nitroprusside as a chromogenic reagent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askal, Hassan F.; Refaat, Ibrahim H.; Darwish, Ibrahim A.; Marzouq, Mostafa A.

    2008-04-01

    A selective spectrophotometric method for the determination of rosoxacin (ROS), a 4-quinolone antimicrobial agent, has been developed and validated. The method was based on the reaction of ROS with alkaline sodium nitroprusside (SNP) reagent at room temperature forming a red colored chromogen measured at 455 nm. The conditions affecting the reaction (SNP concentration, pH, color-developing time, temperature, diluting solvent and chromogen stability time) were optimized. Under the optimum conditions, good linear relationship ( r = 0.9987) was obtained between the absorbance and the concentration of ROS in the range of 20-50 μg ml -1. The assay limits of detection and quantitation were 2.5 and 8.4 μg ml -1, respectively. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of bulk drug and laboratory-prepared tablets; the mean percentage recoveries were 100.1 ± 0.33 and 101.24 ± 1.28%, respectively. The results were compared favourably with those obtained by the reported method; no significant difference in the accuracy and precision as revealed by the accepted values of t- and F-tests, respectively. The robustness and ruggedness of the method was checked and satisfactory results were obtained. The proposed method was found to be highly selective for ROS among the fluoroquinolone antibiotics. The reaction mechanism was proposed and it proceeded in two steps; the formation of nitroferrocyanide by the action of sodium hydroxide alkalinity on SNP and the subsequent formation of the colored nitrosyl-ROS derivative by the attack at position 6 of ROS.

  4. Phosphatidylinositol anchor of HeLa cell alkaline phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Jemmerson, R.; Low, M.G.

    1987-09-08

    Alkaline phosphatase from cancer cells, HeLa TCRC-1, was biosynthetically labeled with either /sup 3/H-fatty acids or (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine as analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography of immunoprecipitated material. Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) released a substantial proportion of the /sup 3/H-fatty acid label from immunoaffinity-purified alkaline phosphatase but had no effect on the radioactivity of (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine-labeled material. PI-PLC also liberated catalytically active alkaline phosphatase from viable cells, and this could be selectively blocked by monoclonal antibodies to alkaline phosphatase. However, the alkaline phosphatase released from /sup 3/H-fatty acid labeled cells by PI-PLC was not radioactive. By contrast, treatment with bromelain removed both the /sup 3/H-fatty acid and the (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine label from purified alkaline phosphatase. Subtilisin was also able to remove the (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine label from the purified alkaline phosphatase. The /sup 3/H radioactivity in alkaline phosphatase purified from (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine-labeled cells comigrated with authentic (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine by anion-exchange chromatography after acid hydrolysis. The data suggest that the /sup 3/H-fatty acid and (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine are covalently attached to the carboxyl-terminal segment since bromelain and subtilisin both release alkaline phosphatase from the membrane by cleavage at that end of the polypeptide chain. The data are consistent with findings for other proteins recently shown to be anchored in the membrane through a glycosylphosphatidylinositol structure and indicate that a similar structure contributes to the membrane anchoring of alkaline phosphatase.

  5. 21 CFR 184.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... salt or by hydration of reactive grades of magnesium oxide. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium hydroxide. 184.1428 Section 184.1428... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1428 Magnesium hydroxide. (a) Magnesium...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium hydroxide. 184.1428 Section 184.1428 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1428 Magnesium hydroxide....

  7. A soluble alkaline phosphatase from Bacillus licheniformis MC14. Histochemical localization, purification, characterization and comparison with the membrane-associated alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Hansa, J G; Laporta, M; Kuna, M A; Reimschuessel, R; Hulett, F M

    1981-02-13

    Growth conditions affect the quantity and distribution of alkaline phosphatase (orthophosphoric-monoester phosphohydrolase (alkaline optimum), EC 3.1.3.1) in Bacillus licheniformis MC14. The soluble alkaline phosphatase, which has been found in biochemical localization studies between the cell wall and cell membrane (Glynn, J.A., Schaffel, S.D., McNicholas, J.M. and Hulett, F.M. (1977) J. Bacteriol. 129, 1010-1019), was localized via electron microscope histochemistry in cells cultured under conditions which result in increased quantities of this activity. This soluble alkaline phosphatase was stabilized with 20% glycerol and purified to homogeneity as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate(SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The purified enzyme is soluble in dilute buffer. This soluble alkaline phosphatase has been characterized and compared to the membrane-associated alkaline phosphatase from this organism. PMID:6783099

  8. Novel inorganic materials for polymer electrolyte and alkaline fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadanaga, Kiyoharu

    2012-06-01

    Inorganic materials with high ionic conductivity must have big advantages for the thermal and long term stability when the materials are used as the electrolyte of fuel cells. In the present paper, novel ionic conductive inorganic materials for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) and all solid state alkaline fuel cells (AFCs) that have been developed by our group have been reviewed. PEFCs which can operate in temperature range from 100 to 200 °C are intensively studied because of some advantages such as reduction of CO poisoning of Pt catalyst and acceleration of electrode reactions. We showed that the fuel cells using the composite membranes prepared from phosphosilicate gel powder and polyimide precursor can operate in the temperature range from 30 to 180 °C. We also found that the inorganic-organic hybrid membranes with acid-base pairs from 3-aminopropyl triethoxy silane and H2SO4 or H3PO4 show high proton conductivity under dry atmosphere, and the membranes are thermally stable at intermediate temperatures. On the other hand, because the use of noble platinum is the serious problem for the commercialization of PEFCs and because oxidation reactions are usually faster than those of acid-type fuel cells, alkaline type fuel cells, in which a nonplatinum catalyst can be used, are attractive. Recently, we have proposed an alkaline-type direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) using a natural clay electrolyte with non-platinum catalysts. So-called hydrotalcite clay, Mg-Al layered double hydroxide intercalated with CO32- (Mg-Al CO32- LDH), has been proved to be a hydroxide ion conductor. An alkalinetype DEFC using Mg-Al CO32- LDH as the electrolyte and aqueous solution of ethanol and potassium hydroxide as a source of fuel exhibited excellent electrochemical performance.

  9. Alkaline flooding injection strategy

    SciTech Connect

    French, T.R.; Josephson, C.B.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to improved alkali-surfactant flooding methods, and this includes determining the proper design of injection strategy. Several different injection strategies have been used or suggested for recovering heavy oils with surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding methods. Oil recovery was compared for four different injection strategies: (1) surfactant followed by polymer, (2) surfactant followed by alkaline polymer, (3) alkaline surfactant followed by polymer, and (4) alkali, surfactant, and polymer mixed in a single formulation. The effect of alkaline preflush was also studied under two different conditions. All of the oil recovery experiments were conducted under optimal conditions with a viscous, non-acidic oil from Hepler (KS) oil field. The coreflood experiments were conducted with Berea sandstone cores since field core was not available in sufficient quantity for coreflood tests. The Tucker sand of Hepler field is a Class I fluvial dominated deltaic reservoir, as classified by the Department of Energy, which has been selected as the site of a DOE-sponsored field pilot test.

  10. Molten Hydroxide Trapping Process for Radioiodine

    SciTech Connect

    Trowbridge, L.D.

    2003-01-28

    A molten hydroxide trapping process has been considered for removing radioiodine species from off-gas streams whereby iodine is reacted directly with molten hydroxides such as NaOH or KOH. The resulting product is the corresponding iodide, which can be separated by simple cooling of the molten mixture to grow the iodide primary phase once the mixture reaches 70-80 mol% in the iodide component. Thermodynamic analysis indicates that such a chemical process is highly favorable. Experimental testing of the trapping process using molecular iodine showed trapping of up to 96% of the volatile iodine. The trapping efficiency was dependent on operational parameters such as temperature and gas-melt contact efficiency, and higher efficiencies are expected as the process is further developed. While an iodide phase could be effectively isolated by slow cooling of a molten iodide-hydroxide mixture, the persistent appearance of hydroxide indicated that an appreciable solubility of hydroxide occurred in the iodide phase.

  11. Sodium Oxybate

    MedlinePlus

    ... if you use or have ever used street drugs, or if you have overused prescription medications. Sodium oxybate may be harmful when taken by people other than the person for whom it was prescribed. Do not sell or give your sodium oxybate to anyone else; selling or sharing it is against the law. Store ...

  12. Pore water chemistry of an alkaline rift valley lake: Lake Turkana, Kenya

    SciTech Connect

    Cerling, T.E.; Johnson, T.C.; Halfman, J.D.; Lister, G.

    1985-01-01

    Lake Turkana is the largest closed basin lake in the African rift system. It has evolved through the past 5000 years to become a moderately alkaline lake. Previous mass balance argument suggest that sulfate is removed from the lake by sulfate reduction in the sediments, and that the lake is accumulating in chloride, sodium, and alkalinity. Studies of pore water from 12 meter cores collected in November 1984 show that sulfate is reduced in the sediment column with a net production of alkalinity. Some sodium is lost from the lake and diffuses into the sediment to maintain charge balance. At several meters depth, organic matter is destroyed by methanogenic bacteria, as shown by the high delta /sup 13/C values for dissolved inorganic carbon. Magnesium and calcium molar ratios change with depth; chloride, sodium, and alkalinity also change with depth.

  13. Hydrothermal synthesis and formation mechanism of hexagonal yttrium hydroxide fluoride nanobundles

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Li; Sun, QiLiang; Zhao, RuiNi; He, HuiLin; Xue, JianRong; Lin, Jun

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: The formation of yttrium hydroxide fluorides nanobundles can be expressed as a precipitation transformation from cubic NaYF{sub 4} to hexagonal NaYF{sub 4} and to hexagonal Y(OH){sub 2.02}F{sub 0.98} owing to ion exchange. - Highlights: • Novel Y(OH){sub 2.02}F{sub 0.98} nanobundles have been successfully prepared by hydrothermal method. • The branched nanobundles composed of numerous oriented-attached nanoparticles has been studied. • The growth mechanism is proposed to be ion exchange and precipitation transformation. - Abstract: This article presents the fabrication of hexagonal yttrium hydroxide fluoride nanobundles via one-pot hydrothermal process, using yttrium nitrate, sodium hydroxide and ammonia fluoride as raw materials to react in propanetriol solvent. The X-ray diffraction pattern clearly reveals that the grown product is pure yttrium hydroxide fluoride, namely Y(OH){sub 2.02}F{sub 0.98}. The morphology and microstructure of the synthesized product is testified to be nanobundles composed of numerous oriented-attached nanoparticles as observed from the field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The chemical composition was analyzed by the energy dispersive spectrum (EDS), confirming the phase transformation of the products which was clearly consistent with the result of XRD analysis. It is proposed that the growth of yttrium hydroxide fluoride nanobundles be attributed to ion exchange and precipitation transformation.

  14. Kinetic study on the degradation of meclophenoxate hydrochloride in alkaline aqueous solutions by high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    El-Bardicy, Mohammad Galal; Lotfy, Hayam Mahmoud; El-Sayed, Mohammad Abdalla; El-Tarras, Mohammad Fayez

    2007-01-01

    A high performance liquid chromatographic method was developed and validated for determination of meclophenoxate hydrochloride (I) in the presence of its degradation product (p-chlorophenoxy acetic acid) (II). Separation of (I) from (II) was performed using a ZORBAX ODS column with a mobile phase consisting of 0.2% triethylamine in 0.01 M ammonium carbonate: acetonitrile (70:30 v/v). The method showed high sensitivity with good linearity over the concentration range of 50 to 400 mug/ml. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of a pharmaceutical formulation containing (I) with excellent recovery. A kinetics investigation of the alkaline hydrolysis of (I) was carried out in sodium hydroxide solutions of 1, 1.5 and 2 N by monitoring the parent compound itself. The reaction order of (I) followed pseudo-first order kinetics. The activation energy could be estimated from the Arrhenius plot and it was found to be 12.331 kcal/mole. PMID:17202800

  15. Investigating mechanisms of alkalinization for reducing primary breast tumor invasion.

    PubMed

    Robey, Ian F; Nesbit, Lance A

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular pH (pHe) of many solid tumors is acidic as a result of glycolytic metabolism and poor perfusion. Acidity promotes invasion and enhances metastatic potential. Tumor acidity can be buffered by systemic administration of an alkaline agent such as sodium bicarbonate. Tumor-bearing mice maintained on sodium bicarbonate drinking water exhibit fewer metastases and survive longer than untreated controls. We predict this effect is due to inhibition of tumor invasion. Reducing tumor invasion should result in fewer circulating tumor cells (CTCs). We report that bicarbonate-treated MDA-MB-231 tumor-bearing mice exhibited significantly lower numbers of CTCs than untreated mice (P < 0.01). Tumor pHe buffering may reduce optimal conditions for enzymes involved in tumor invasion such as cathepsins and matrix metalloproteases (MMPs). To address this, we tested the effect of transient alkalinization on cathepsin and MMP activity using enzyme activatable fluorescence agents in mice bearing MDA-MB-231 mammary xenografts. Transient alkalinization significantly reduced the fluorescent signal of protease-specific activatable agents in vivo (P ≤ 0.003). Alkalinization, however, did not affect expression of carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX). The findings suggest a possible mechanism in a live model system for breast cancer where systemic alkalinization slows the rate of invasion. PMID:23936808

  16. Actinide solubility and spectroscopic speciation in alkaline Hanford waste solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, L.; Felmy, A.R.; Rai, D.

    1996-10-01

    Information on the solubility and the speciation of actinide elements, especially plutonium and neptunium, in alkaline solutions is of importance in the development of separation techniques for the Hanford tank HLW supernatant. In the present study, experimental data on the solubilities of plutonium in simulated Hanford tank solutions were analyzed with Pitzer`s specific ion-interaction approach, which is applicable in dilute to highly concentrated electrolyte solutions. In order to investigate the formation of actinide species in alkaline solutions with ligands (e.g., hydroxide, aluminate and carbonate), spectroscopic measurements of neptunium (V), as a chemical analog of plutonium (V), were conducted. Based on the solubility data and available information on both solid and aqueous species, a thermodynamic model was proposed. The applicability and limitations of this model are discussed.

  17. Synthesis of a novel green fluorescent material Ca3Al2O6:Tb3+ based on a layered double hydroxide precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiaorui; Jiang, Kangle; Hao, Yongjing; Chang, Tao; Yin, Yaobing

    2015-08-01

    A novel green light emitting material, Ca3Al2O6:Tb3+ was synthesized by calcination of a terbium doped Ca/Al layered double hydroxide precursor at 1350°C. The precursor was prepared by coprecipitation from metal nitrates with sodium hydroxide. The material shows characteristic green emission at 543 nm when excited with 266 nm UV source. The photoluminescence intensity reaches its maximum at Tb3+ concentration of 0.5 mol %.

  18. Investigation of Unexpected Reaction Intermediates in the Alkaline Hydrolysis of Methyl 3,5-Dinitrobenzoate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Clesia C.; Silva, Ricardo O.; Navarro, Daniela M. A. F.; Navarro, Marcelo

    2009-01-01

    An experimental project aimed at identifying stable reaction intermediates is described. Initially, the studied reaction appears to involve the simple hydrolysis, by aqueous sodium hydroxide, of methyl 3,5-dinitrobenzoate dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide. On mixing the substrates, however, the reaction mixture unexpectedly turns an intense red in…

  19. Alkaline quinone flow battery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kaixiang; Chen, Qing; Gerhardt, Michael R; Tong, Liuchuan; Kim, Sang Bok; Eisenach, Louise; Valle, Alvaro W; Hardee, David; Gordon, Roy G; Aziz, Michael J; Marshak, Michael P

    2015-09-25

    Storage of photovoltaic and wind electricity in batteries could solve the mismatch problem between the intermittent supply of these renewable resources and variable demand. Flow batteries permit more economical long-duration discharge than solid-electrode batteries by using liquid electrolytes stored outside of the battery. We report an alkaline flow battery based on redox-active organic molecules that are composed entirely of Earth-abundant elements and are nontoxic, nonflammable, and safe for use in residential and commercial environments. The battery operates efficiently with high power density near room temperature. These results demonstrate the stability and performance of redox-active organic molecules in alkaline flow batteries, potentially enabling cost-effective stationary storage of renewable energy. PMID:26404834

  20. Thermodynamics of Volatile Silicon Hydroxides Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copland, Evan H.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    2001-01-01

    Silicon-based ceramics are promising candidate structural materials for heat engines. The long-term stability of these materials to environmental degradation is dependent on the formation and retention of a protective SiO2 layer. It is well known that SiO2 forms stable volatile hydroxides in the presence of water vapor at elevated temperatures. Combustion conditions, which characteristically are at high velocities, contain significant water vapor pressures, and high temperatures tend to promote continuous formation of these hydroxides with resulting material degradation. For the degradation of silicon-based ceramics to be predicted, accurate thermodynamic data on the formation of silicon hydroxides are needed.

  1. Plasma graft-polymerization for synthesis of highly stable hydroxide exchange membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jue; Zhang, Chengxu; Jiang, Lin; Fang, Shidong; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wang, Xiangke; Meng, Yuedong

    2014-02-01

    A novel plasma graft-polymerization approach is adopted to prepare hydroxide exchange membranes (HEMs) using cardo polyetherketone powders (PEK-C) and vinylbenzyl chloride. The benzylic chloromethyl groups can be successfully introduced into the PEK-C polymer matrix via plasma graft-polymerization. This approach enables a well preservation in the structure of functional groups and formation of a highly cross-linked structure in the membrane, leading to an improvement on the stability and performance of HEMs. The chemical stabilities, including alkaline and oxidative stability, are evaluated under severe conditions by measuring hydroxide conductivity and weight changes during aging. The obtained PGP-NOH membrane retains 86% of the initial hydroxide conductivity in 6 mol L-1 KOH solution at 60 °C for 120 h, and 94% of the initial weight in 3 wt% H2O2 solution at 60 °C for 262 h. The PGP-NOH membrane also possesses excellent thermal stability (safely used below 120 °C), alcohol resistance (ethanol permeability of 6.6 × 10-11 m2 s-1 and diffusion coefficient of 3.7 × 10-13 m2 s-1), and an acceptable hydroxide conductivity (8.3 mS cm-1 at 20 °C in deionized water), suggesting a good candidate of PGP-NOH membrane for HEMFC applications.

  2. Chemical dechlorination of hexachlorobenzene with polyethylene glycol and hydroxide: Dominant effect of temperature and ionic potential

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Ye; Jiang, Jianguo; Huang, Hai

    2014-01-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) originating from POP waste are playing an increasingly important role in the elevation of regional POP levels. In this study we realized the complete dechlorination of high concentration hexachlorobenzene (HCB) waste in the presence of polyethylene glycol and hydroxide, rather than using conventional high temperature incineration. Here, we demonstrate the dominant effect of temperature and hydroxide on HCB dechlorination in this process. Complete dechlorination of HCB was only observed at temperature about 200°C or above within 4 h reaction, and the apparent activation energy of this process was 43.1 kJ/mol. The alkalinity of hydroxides had notable effects on HCB dechlorination, and there was a considerable linear relationship between the natural logarithm of the HCB dechlorination rate constant and square root of the ionic potential of metal cation (R2 = 0.9997, p = 0.0081, n = 3). This study highlights a promising technology to realize complete dechlorination of POP waste, especially at high concentrations, in the presence of PEG in conjunction with hydroxide. PMID:25200551

  3. Stereochemistry of the epoxidation of internal perfluoroalkenes with sodium hypochlorite

    SciTech Connect

    Filyakova, T.I.; Peschanskii, N.V.; Kodess, M.I.; Zapevalov, A.Ya.; Kolenko, I.P.

    1988-07-20

    The authors studied the epoxidation of the mixture of cis and trans isomers of internal disubstituted perfluoroalkenes with sodium hypochlorite. Epoxidation was realized with an alkaline aqueous solution of sodium hypochlorite in the presence of acetonitrile. The epoxidation of the geometric isomers of internal disubstituted perfluoroalkenes by sodium hypochlorite is stereospecific. The /sup 19/F NMR spectra of the cis and trans isomers of internal perfluoroolefin oxides were obtained, and the relationships are discussed.

  4. Tested Demonstrations: Buffer Capacity of Various Acetic Acid-Sodium Acetate Systems: A Lecture Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donahue, Craig J.; Panek, Mary G.

    1985-01-01

    Background information and procedures are provided for a lecture experiment which uses indicators to illustrate the concept of differing buffer capacities by titrating acetic acid/sodium acetate buffers with 1.0 molar hydrochloric acid and 1.0 molar sodium hydroxide. A table with data used to plot the titration curve is included. (JN)

  5. Solar-thermal Water Splitting Using the Sodium Manganese Oxide Process & Preliminary H2A Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, Todd M; Lichty, Paul R; Perkins, Christopher; Tucker, Melinda; Kreider, Peter B; Funke, Hans H; Lewandowski, A; Weimer, Alan W

    2012-10-24

    There are three primary reactions in the sodium manganese oxide high temperature water splitting cycle. In the first reaction, Mn2O3 is decomposed to MnO at 1,500°C and 50 psig. This reaction occurs in a high temperature solar reactor and has a heat of reaction of 173,212 J/mol. Hydrogen is produced in the next step of this cycle. This step occurs at 700°C and 1 atm in the presence of sodium hydroxide. Finally, water is added in the hydrolysis step, which removes NaOH and regenerates the original reactant, Mn2O3. The high temperature solar-driven step for decomposing Mn2O3 to MnO can be carried out to high conversion without major complication in an inert environment. The second step to produce H2 in the presence of sodium hydroxide is also straightforward and can be completed. The third step, the low temperature step to recover the sodium hydroxide is the most difficult. The amount of energy required to essentially distill water to recover sodium hydroxide is prohibitive and too costly. Methods must be found for lower cost recovery. This report provides information on the use of ZnO as an additive to improve the recovery of sodium hydroxide.

  6. Alternatives to Nitric Acid Stripping in the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Process for Cesium Removal from Alkaline High-Level Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Delmau, Laetitia Helene; Haverlock, Tamara; Bazelaire, Eve; Bonnesen, Peter V; Ditto, Mary E; Moyer, Bruce A

    2009-01-01

    Effective alternatives to nitric acid stripping in the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) solvent have been demonstrated in this work. The CSSX solvent employs calix[4]arene-bis(tert-octylbenzo-18-crown-6) (BOBCalixC6) as the cesium extractant in a modified alkane diluent for decontamination of alkaline high-level wastes. Results reported in this paper support the idea that replacement of the nitrate anion by a much more hydrophilic anion like borate can substantially lower cesium distribution ratios on stripping. Without any other change in the CSSX flowsheet, however, the use of a boric acid stripping solution in place of the 1 mM nitric acid solution used in the CSSX process marginally, though perhaps still usefully, improves stripping. The less-than-expected improvement was explained by the carryover of nitrate from scrubbing into stripping. Accordingly, more effective stripping is obtained after a scrub of the solvent with 0.1 M sodium hydroxide. Functional alternatives to boric acid include sodium bicarbonate or cesium hydroxide as strip solutions. Profound stripping improvement is achieved when trioctylamine, one of the components of the CSSX solvent, is replaced with a commercial guanidine reagent (LIX 79). The more basic guanidine affords greater latitude in selection of aqueous conditions in that it protonates even at mildly alkaline pH values. Under process-relevant conditions, cesium distributions on stripping are decreased on the order of 100-fold compared with current CSSX performance. The extraction properties of the solvent were preserved unchanged over three successive extract-scrub-strip cycles. From the point of view of compatibility with downstream processing, boric acid represents an attractive stripping agent, as it is also a potentially ideal feed for borosilicate vitrification of the separated 137Cs product stream. Possibilities for use of these results toward a dramatically better next-generation CSSX process, possibly one employing the

  7. Copper, silver, gold and zinc, cadmium, mercury oxides and hydroxides

    SciTech Connect

    Dirkse, T.P.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides a compilation of solubility data published up to 1984, including evaluations of the data. Data are presented on the following: copper (I) oxide; copper (II) oxide and hydroxide; silver (I) oxide; silver (II) oxide; gold (III) hydroxide; zinc oxide and hydroxide; cadmium oxide and hydroxide; and mercury (II) oxide.

  8. Cellulose degradation in alkaline media upon acidic pretreatment and stabilisation.

    PubMed

    Testova, Lidia; Nieminen, Kaarlo; Penttilä, Paavo A; Serimaa, Ritva; Potthast, Antje; Sixta, Herbert

    2014-01-16

    The present study reports on a revised kinetic model for alkaline degradation of cellulose accounting for primary peeling/stopping reactions as well as for alkaline hydrolysis followed by secondary peeling. Oxalic acid pretreated cotton linters was utilised as the model substrate for the prehydrolysis-soda anthraquinone process. The main emphasis was investigating the effect of end-group stabilising additives such as sodium borohydride (BH), anthraquinone (AQ), and anthraquinone-2-sulphonic acid sodium salt (AQS) on the rates of the yield loss reactions. BH and AQS ensured a cellulose yield gain of 13% and 11%, respectively, compared to the reference. Both stabilisation agents decreased the content of the reducing end groups in the samples, while in the case of AQS stabilisation a 25% increase in carboxyl group content compared to the reference was also observed. As expected, the addition of end group stabilisers resulted in a significant decrease in the peeling-to-stopping rate constants ratio. PMID:24188853

  9. Enhanced electrochromic property of nickel hydroxide thin films prepared by anodic deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Chigane, Masaya; Ishikawa, Masami . Dept. of Inorganic Chemistry)

    1994-12-01

    Nickel hydroxide and nickel oxide thin films have received much attention as electrochromic (EC) materials, particularly as the materials for a complementary counterlayer against an EC tungsten oxide layer in smart window systems. Nickel hydroxide thin films were prepared onto transparent conductive tin oxide (NESA) substrates by potentiostatic electrolysis of a nickel amine complex solution at various potentials (0.6 to 1.5 V vs. Ag/AgCl). Nickel hydroxide thin film (F0.7) obtained at relatively lower anodic potential (0.7 V) showed enhanced electrochromism between colorless and dark brown in a sodium borate buffer solution at pH 12; the absorption spectrum in the colored (oxidized) state was broadened in the visible and near-infrared region compared with the nickel hydroxide films prepared at the higher anodic potential (1.1 V). characterization of the films revealed that crystal structure of F0.7 is assigned to [alpha]-Ni(OH)[sub 2], and that its electrochromism is based on the reversible oxidation to hexagonal [gamma][sub 2]-2NiO[sub 2] [center dot] NiOOH structure. Composite nickel hydroxide film, i.e., by the electrolytic deposition at 1.1 V followed by that at 0.7 V, showed electrochromic property similar to F0.7 and its durability in repeated redox cycles were much improved in comparison with that of F0.7. Electrochromic properties in switching performance of this composite nickel hydroxide film were investigated.

  10. The Nickel(111)/Alkaline Electrolyte Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Kuilong; Chottiner, G. S.; Scherson, D. A.; Reid, Margaret A.

    1991-01-01

    The electrochemical properties of Ni (111) prepared and characterized in ultra high vacuum, UHV, by surface analytical techniques have been examined in alkaline media by cyclic voltammetry using an UHV-electrochemical cell transfer system designed and built in this laboratory. Prior to the transfer, the Ni(111) surfaces were exposed to saturation coverages of CO in UHV in an attempt to protect the surface from possible contamination with other gases during the transfer. Temperature Programmed Desorption, TPD, of CO-dosed Ni (111) surfaces displaying sharp c(4x2), LEED patterns, subsequently exposed to water-saturated Ar at atmospheric pressure in an auxiliary UHV compatible chamber and finally transferred back to the main UHV chamber, yielded CO2 and water as the only detectable products. This indicates that the CO-dosed surfaces react with water and/or bicarbonate and hydroxide as the most likely products. Based on the integration of the TPD peaks, the combined amounts of H2O and CO2 were found to be on the order of a single monolayer. The reacted c(4x2)CO/Ni(111) layer seems to protect the surface from undergoing spontaneous oxidation in strongly alkaline solutions. This was evidenced by the fact that the open circuit potential observed immediately after contact with deaerated 0.1 M KOH was about 0.38 V vs. DHE, drifting slightly towards more negative values prior to initiating the voltametric scans. The average ratio of the integrated charge obtained in the first positive linear scan in the range of 0.35 to 1.5 V vs. DHE (initiated at the open circuit potential) and the first (and subsequent) linear negative scans in the same solution yielded for various independent runs a value of 3.5 +/- 0.3. Coulometric analysis of the cyclic voltammetry curves indicate that the electrochemically formed oxyhydroxide layer involves a charge equivalent to 3.2 +/- 0.4 layers of Ni metal.

  11. Alkaline Phosphatase in Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Štefková, Kateřina; Procházková, Jiřina; Pacherník, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase is an enzyme commonly expressed in almost all living organisms. In humans and other mammals, determinations of the expression and activity of alkaline phosphatase have frequently been used for cell determination in developmental studies and/or within clinical trials. Alkaline phosphatase also seems to be one of the key markers in the identification of pluripotent embryonic stem as well as related cells. However, alkaline phosphatases exist in some isoenzymes and isoforms, which have tissue specific expressions and functions. Here, the role of alkaline phosphatase as a stem cell marker is discussed in detail. First, we briefly summarize contemporary knowledge of mammalian alkaline phosphatases in general. Second, we focus on the known facts of its role in and potential significance for the identification of stem cells. PMID:25767512

  12. FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2001-11-06

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, Furnace Injection of Alkaline Sorbents for Sulfuric Acid Control, during the time period April 1, 2001 through September 30, 2001. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The coincident removal of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid is also being determined, as is the removal of arsenic, a known poison for NO{sub x} selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. EPRI, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), FirstEnergy Corporation, and the Dravo Lime Company are project co-funders. URS Corporation is the prime contractor. During the current period, American Electric Power (AEP) joined the project as an additional co-funder and as a provider of a host site for testing. This is the fourth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, two long-term sorbent injection tests were conducted, one on Unit 3 at FirstEnergy's Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) and one on Unit 1 at AEP's Gavin Station. These tests determined the effectiveness of injecting alkaline slurries into the upper furnace of the boiler as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions from these units. The alkaline slurries tested included commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Station), and a byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (both Gavin Station and BMP). The tests showed that injecting either the commercial or the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry could achieve up to 70 to 75% sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, the overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Station, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO{sub 3} formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NO{sub x

  13. FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2002-04-29

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, Furnace Injection of Alkaline Sorbents for Sulfuric Acid Control, during the time period October 1, 2001 through March 31, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The coincident removal of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid is also being determined, as is the removal of arsenic, a known poison for NO{sub X} selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. EPRI, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), FirstEnergy Corporation, American Electric Power (AEP) and the Dravo Lime Company are project co-funders. URS Corporation is the prime contractor. This is the fifth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During the previous (fourth) period, two long-term sorbent injection tests were conducted, one on Unit 3 at FirstEnergy's Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) and one on Unit 1 at AEP's Gavin Plant. Those tests determined the effectiveness of injecting alkaline slurries into the upper furnace of the boiler as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions from these units. The alkaline slurries tested included commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Plant) and a byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (at both Gavin and BMP). The tests showed that injecting either the commercial or the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry could achieve up to 70-75% overall sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, the overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Plant, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO{sub 3} formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NO{sub X} control than at removing SO{sub 3} formed in the furnace. The SO{sub 3} removal results were presented in the

  14. Alkaline fuel cells applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordesch, Karl; Hacker, Viktor; Gsellmann, Josef; Cifrain, Martin; Faleschini, Gottfried; Enzinger, Peter; Fankhauser, Robert; Ortner, Markus; Muhr, Michael; Aronson, Robert R.

    On the world-wide automobile market technical developments are increasingly determined by the dramatic restriction on emissions as well as the regimentation of fuel consumption by legislation. Therefore there is an increasing chance of a completely new technology breakthrough if it offers new opportunities, meeting the requirements of resource preservation and emission restrictions. Fuel cell technology offers the possibility to excel in today's motive power techniques in terms of environmental compatibility, consumer's profit, costs of maintenance and efficiency. The key question is economy. This will be decided by the costs of fuel cell systems if they are to be used as power generators for future electric vehicles. The alkaline hydrogen-air fuel cell system with circulating KOH electrolyte and low-cost catalysed carbon electrodes could be a promising alternative. Based on the experiences of Kordesch [K. Kordesch, Brennstoffbatterien, Springer, Wien, 1984, ISBN 3-387-81819-7; K. Kordesch, City car with H 2-air fuel cell and lead-battery, SAE Paper No. 719015, 6th IECEC, 1971], who operated a city car hybrid vehicle on public roads for 3 years in the early 1970s, improved air electrodes plus new variations of the bipolar stack assembly developed in Graz are investigated. Primary fuel choice will be a major issue until such time as cost-effective, on-board hydrogen storage is developed. Ammonia is an interesting option. The whole system, ammonia dissociator plus alkaline fuel cell (AFC), is characterised by a simple design and high efficiency.

  15. Sodium Recycle Economics for Waste Treatment Plant Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Sevigny, Gary J.; Poloski, Adam P.; Fountain, Matthew S.

    2008-08-31

    Sodium recycle at the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) would reduce the number of glass canisters produced, and has the potential to significantly reduce the cost to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) of treating the tank wastes by hundreds of millions of dollars. The sodium, added in the form of sodium hydroxide, was originally added to minimize corrosion of carbon-steel storage tanks from acidic reprocessing wastes. In the baseline Hanford treatment process, sodium hydroxide is required to leach gibbsite and boehmite from the high level waste (HLW) sludge. In turn, this reduces the amount of HLW glass produced. Currently, a significant amount of additional sodium hydroxide will be added to the process to maintain aluminate solubility at ambient temperatures during ion exchange of cesium. The vitrification of radioactive waste is limited by sodium content, and this additional sodium mass will increase low-activity waste-glass mass. An electrochemical salt-splitting process, based on sodium-ion selective ceramic membranes, is being developed to recover and recycle sodium hydroxide from high-salt radioactive tank wastes in DOE’s complex. The ceramic membranes are from a family of materials known as sodium (Na)—super-ionic conductors (NaSICON)—and the diffusion of sodium ions (Na+) is allowed, while blocking other positively charged ions. A cost/benefit evaluation was based on a strategy that involves a separate caustic-recycle facility based on the NaSICON technology, which would be located adjacent to the WTP facility. A Monte Carlo approach was taken, and several thousand scenarios were analyzed to determine likely economic results. The cost/benefit evaluation indicates that 10,000–50,000 metric tons (MT) of sodium could be recycled, and would allow for the reduction of glass production by 60,000–300,000 MT. The cost of the facility construction and operation was scaled to the low-activity waste (LAW) vitrification facility, showing cost would be

  16. Synthesis of aluminum oxy-hydroxide nanofibers from porous anodic alumina.

    PubMed

    Jha, Himendra; Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Sakairi, Masatoshi; Takahashi, Hideaki

    2008-10-01

    A novel method for the synthesis of aluminum oxy-hydroxide nanofibers from a porous anodic oxide film of aluminum is demonstrated. In the present method, the porous anodic alumina not only acts as a template, but also serves as the starting material for the synthesis. The porous anodic alumina film is hydrothermally treated for pore-sealing, which forms aluminum oxy-hydroxide inside the pores of the oxide film as well as on the surface of the film. The hydrothermally sealed porous oxide film is immersed in the sodium citrate solution, which selectively etches the porous aluminum oxide from the film, leaving the oxy-hydroxide intact. The method is simple and gives highly uniform aluminum oxy-hydroxide nanofibers. Moreover, the diameter of the nanofibers can be controlled by controlling the pore size of the porous anodic alumina film, which depends on the anodizing conditions. Nanofibers with diameters of about 38-85 nm, having uniform shape and size, were successfully synthesized using the present method. PMID:21832599

  17. Acifluorfen, sodium

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acifluorfen , sodium ; CASRN 62476 - 59 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcino

  18. Sodium diethyldithiocarbamate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Sodium diethyldithiocarbamate ; CASRN 148 - 18 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Non

  19. Sodium fluoroacetate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Sodium fluoroacetate ; CASRN 62 - 74 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogen

  20. Sodium azide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Sodium azide ; CASRN 26628 - 22 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  1. Sodium cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Jump to main content . Integrated Risk Information System Recent Additions | Contact Us Search : All EPA IRIS • You are here : EPA Home • Research • Environmental Assessment • IRIS • IRIS Summaries Redirect Page As of September 28 , 2010 , the assessment summary for sodium cyanide is included in the

  2. Bifunctional alkaline oxygen electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swette, L.; Kackley, N.; Mccatty, S. A.

    1991-01-01

    The authors describe the identification and testing of electrocatalysts and supports for the positive electrode of moderate-temperature, single-unit, rechargeable alkaline fuel cells. Recent work on Na(x)Pt3O4, a potential bifunctional catalyst, is described, as well as the application of novel approaches to the development of more efficient bifunctional electrode structures. The three dual-character electrodes considered here showed similar superior performance; the Pt/RhO2 and Rh/RhO2 electrodes showed slightly better performance than the Pt/IrO2 electrode. It is concluded that Na(x)Pt3O4 continues to be a promising bifunctional oxygen electrode catalyst but requires further investigation and development.

  3. Iodine Sequestration Using Delafossites and Layered Hydroxides

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Pless; J.B. Chwirka; J.L. Krumhansl

    2006-03-28

    The objective of this document is to report on early success for sequestering {sup 129}I. Sorption coefficients (K{sub d}) for I{sup -} and IO{sub 3}{sup -} onto delafossites, spinels and layered metal hydroxides were measured in order to compare their applicability for sequestering {sup 129}I. The studies were performed using a dilute fluid composition representative of groundwater indigenous to the Yucca mountain area. Delafossites generally exhibited relatively poor sorption coefficients (< 10{sup 1.7} mL/g). In contrast, the composition of the layered hydroxides significantly affects their ability to sorb I. Cu/Al and Cu/Cr layered hydroxide samples exhibit K{sub d}'s greater than 10{sup 3} mL/g for both I{sup -} and IO{sub 3}{sup -}.

  4. FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-10-01

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, Furnace Injection of Alkaline Sorbents for Sulfuric Acid Control, during the time period April 1, 2003 through September, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The coincident removal of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid is also being determined, as is the removal of arsenic, a known poison for NO{sub x} selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. EPRI, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), FirstEnergy Corporation, American Electric Power (AEP) and the Dravo Lime Company are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. This is the eighth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During previous reporting periods, two long-term sorbent injection tests were conducted, one on Unit 3 at FirstEnergy's Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) and one on Unit 1 at AEP's Gavin Plant. Those tests determined the effectiveness of injecting alkaline slurries into the upper furnace of the boiler as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions from these units. The alkaline slurries tested included commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Plant), and a byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (both Gavin Plant and BMP). The tests showed that injecting either the commercial or the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry could achieve up to 70-75% overall sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, the overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Plant, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO{sub 3} formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NO{sub x} control than at removing SO{sub 3} formed in the furnace. The SO{sub 3} removal results were presented in the semi

  5. Test Your Sodium Smarts

    MedlinePlus

    ... You may be surprised to learn how much sodium is in many foods. Sodium, including sodium chloride ... foods with little or no salt. Test your sodium smarts by answering these 10 questions about which ...

  6. Low sodium level

    MedlinePlus

    Low sodium level is a condition in which the amount of sodium (salt) in the blood is lower ... and this causes many of the symptoms of low sodium. With low sodium level (hyponatremia), the imbalance of ...

  7. Sodium conversion experiments in the Inert Carrier Process demonstration plant

    SciTech Connect

    Keneshea, F.J.; Hobart, S.A.; Kelly, M.T.; Pohl, C.S.; Riley, D.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of the sodium treatment studies reported here was to evaluate the use of the Inert Carrier Process (ICP) for converting sodium metal to a stable disposal form. The ICP demonstration plant consists of a closed loop of silicone oil that is circulated through a reservoir called a disperser. Solid sodium particles were fed to the disperser and kept suspended in the silicone oil carrier by turbulence. The sodium did not react with the silicone oil carrier. The dispersion of sodium in silicone oil was fed to an in-line mixer (''jet'' mixer) where it was mixed with a reactant. Water was used as the reactant in most of the tests, generating sodium hydroxide and hydrogen as the initial products. Analysis of the final solid product from the reaction indicated that the sodium hydroxide initial product interacted with the silicone oil. Complete reaction of the sodium in the demonstration plant required at least a 6/1 molar ratio of water to sodium. Good separation of the product solution was difficult because of the small difference in density between the aqueous product phase and the organic carrier phase. Emulsification of the silicone oil-aqueous solution was minimized by applying heat to the separator. Foaming of the silicone oil in the separator occurred, aggravated by the evolution of hydrogen from the sodium conversion reaction. Bench-scale tests were conducted to analyze and resolve several problems encountered in the plant experiments, such as incomplete reaction in the jet mixer, poor separation of the product from the silicone oil, formation of an oil aqueous solution emulsion in the separator, and oil foaming in the separator. Solidification tests were carried out to immobilize the sodium conversion product by mixing it with various binders. The most satisfactory binder was EPON 828, an epoxy resin.

  8. Recent Sodium Technology Development for the Decommissioning of the Rapsodie and Superphenix Reactors and the Management of Sodium Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, G.; Gastaldi, O.; Baque, F.

    2005-04-15

    The Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) has recently developed and/or conducted experiments on several processes in support of the decommissioning of two French liquid-metal fast reactors (LMFRs), Rapsodie and Superphenix, as well as on the treatment of CEA sodium wastes. CEA has demonstrated that it is possible to define appropriate and efficient processes to meet the different situations encountered in decommissioning LMFRs. Mechanical techniques derived from standard technologies have been successfully applied to fast reactor decommissioning to complete primary vessel draining from sodium. In addition, specific chemical processes have been developed to deal safely with metallic sodium reactivity. Sodium-contaminated equipment has been successfully cleaned by reacting sodium with water mist in an atmosphere with carbon dioxide to form inert sodium carbonate. Bulk sodium has been successfully converted into aqueous caustic soda by injection of liquid-metallic sodium into sodium hydroxide solution. Several processes were also defined to deal with specific sodium wastes. In all cases the principle is based on a sodium/water chemical reaction where the released hydrogen and heat are controlled. With the development of a wide variety of processes, all steps in the decommissioning of LMFRs are assumed to be now properly mastered.

  9. Method of manufacturing positive nickel hydroxide electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Gutjahr, M.A.; Schmid, R.; Beccu, K.D.

    1975-12-16

    A method of manufacturing a positive nickel hydroxide electrode is discussed. A highly porous core structure of organic material having a fibrous or reticular texture is uniformly coated with nickel powder and then subjected to a thermal treatment which provides sintering of the powder coating and removal of the organic core material. A consolidated, porous nickel support structure is thus produced which has substantially the same texture and porosity as the initial core structure. To provide the positive electrode including the active mass, nickel hydroxide is deposited in the pores of the nickel support structure.

  10. Enhanced biomethane potential from wheat straw by low temperature alkaline calcium hydroxide pre-treatment.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Matthew; Dinsdale, Richard; Guwy, Alan

    2015-08-01

    A factorially designed experiment to examine the effectiveness of Ca(OH)2 pre-treatment, enzyme addition and particle size, on the mesophilic (35 °C) anaerobic digestion of wheat straw was conducted. Experiments used a 48 h pre-treatment with Ca(OH)2 7.4% (w/w), addition of Accellerase®-1500, with four particle sizes of wheat straw (1.25, 2, 3 and 10mm) and three digestion time periods (5, 15 and 30 days). By combining particle size reduction and Ca(OH)2 pre-treatment, the average methane potential was increased by 315% (from 48 NmL-CH4 g-VS(-1) to 202 NmL-CH4 g-VS(-1)) after 5 days of anaerobic digestion compared to the control. Enzyme addition or Ca(OH)2 pre-treatment with 3, 2 and 1.25 mm particle sizes had 30-day batch yields of between 301 and 335 NmL-CH4 g-VS(-1). Alkali pre-treatment of 3mm straw was shown to have the most potential as a cost effective pre-treatment and achieved 290 NmL-CH4 g-VS(-1), after only 15 days of digestion. PMID:25898087

  11. Effect of calcination temperature on the activity of solid Ca/Al composite oxide-based alkaline catalyst for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yong-Lu; Wang, Bo-Yang; Li, Shu-Fen; Tian, Song-Jiang; Zhang, Min-Hua

    2013-01-01

    A solid Ca/Al composite oxide-based alkaline catalyst containing Ca(12)Al(14)O(33) and CaO was prepared by chemical synthesis and thermal activation from sodium aluminate solution and calcium hydroxide emulsion. The effect of calcination temperatures ranging from 120 °C to 1000 °C on activity of the catalyst was investigated. The catalyst calcined at 600 °C showed the highest activity with >94% yield of fatty acid methyl esters (i.e. biodiesel) when applied to the transesterification of rapeseed oil at a methanol:oil molar ratio of 15:1 at 65 °C for 3h. Structure and properties of the catalyst were studied and the characterizations with XRD, TGA, FTIR, BET, and SEM demonstrated that the performance of the catalyst was closely related to its specific surface area and crystalline structure. In particular, the generation of crystalline Ca(12)Al(14)O(33) improved the catalytic activity due its synergistic effect with CaO. PMID:23196252

  12. Low sodium diet (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... for you. Look for these words on labels: low-sodium, sodium-free, no salt added, sodium-reduced, or ... for you. Look for these words on labels: low-sodium, sodium-free, no salt added, sodium-reduced, or ...

  13. Biochemical localization of the alkaline phosphatase of Bacillus licheniformis as a function of culture age.

    PubMed Central

    Glynn, J A; Schaffel, S D; McNicholas, J M; Hulett, F M

    1977-01-01

    Biochemical localization of the enzyme as a function of age of cell culture showed the alkaline phosphatase (orthophosphoric monoester phosphohydrolase, EC 3.1.3.1) activity of Bacillus licheniformis MC14 predominantly in the particulate cell fraction in early- and mid-log cells. However, in late-log and stationary cells, increasing amounts of activity were found in the soluble fraction of lysed cells. Upon protoplast formation of these cells, the activity was released into the soluble fraction. No alkaline phosphatase activity was found in either the cytoplasmic fraction or in the cell medium during any phase of cell growth. The soluble fraction released on protoplast formation that contained alkaline phosphatase activity showed immunological cross-reactivity with antibody to the purified heat--salt-solubilized membrane alkaline phosphatase (F. M. Hulett-Cowling and L. L. Campbell, 1971). Theparticulate membrane fraction containing a firmly associated alkaline phosphatase also showed similar cross-reactivity. Further, the effectiveness of nonionic detergents, ionic detergents, bile salts, and various concentrations of magnesium and sodium as solubilizing agents for this membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase was investigated. Hexadecyl pyridinium chloride (0.03 M) and magnesium and sodium salts (above 0.2 M) were effective solubilizing agents. The substrate specificities of the various fractions were determined and compared to the substrate specificities of the purified membrane alkaline phosphatase. Images PMID:838674

  14. Biochemical localization of the alkaline phosphatase of Bacillus licheniformis as a function of culture age.

    PubMed

    Glynn, J A; Schaffel, S D; McNicholas, J M; Hulett, F M

    1977-02-01

    Biochemical localization of the enzyme as a function of age of cell culture showed the alkaline phosphatase (orthophosphoric monoester phosphohydrolase, EC 3.1.3.1) activity of Bacillus licheniformis MC14 predominantly in the particulate cell fraction in early- and mid-log cells. However, in late-log and stationary cells, increasing amounts of activity were found in the soluble fraction of lysed cells. Upon protoplast formation of these cells, the activity was released into the soluble fraction. No alkaline phosphatase activity was found in either the cytoplasmic fraction or in the cell medium during any phase of cell growth. The soluble fraction released on protoplast formation that contained alkaline phosphatase activity showed immunological cross-reactivity with antibody to the purified heat--salt-solubilized membrane alkaline phosphatase (F. M. Hulett-Cowling and L. L. Campbell, 1971). Theparticulate membrane fraction containing a firmly associated alkaline phosphatase also showed similar cross-reactivity. Further, the effectiveness of nonionic detergents, ionic detergents, bile salts, and various concentrations of magnesium and sodium as solubilizing agents for this membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase was investigated. Hexadecyl pyridinium chloride (0.03 M) and magnesium and sodium salts (above 0.2 M) were effective solubilizing agents. The substrate specificities of the various fractions were determined and compared to the substrate specificities of the purified membrane alkaline phosphatase. PMID:838674

  15. Synthesis and Characterization of Imidazolium Linear Bisphenol Polycarbonate Hydroxides for Anion Exchange Membrane.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hohyoun; Hossain, Md Awlad; Lee, Soonho; Ha, Jaesung; Yoo, Jihoo; Kim, Kyungchul; Kim, Whangi

    2015-11-01

    A novel anion exchange membrane of imidazolium functionalized bisphenol polycarbonate was prepared for application in alkaline fuel cell. Di-imidazolium polycarbonate anionic membrane was synthesized by sequential interfacial polymerization, chloromethylation, substitution with 1-methylimidazole and ion exchange with 1.0 M KOH. Chloromethylation reaction was quantitative to achieve a high content of hydroxide ions. Introduction of conjugated imidazole ring in polymer plays an important role to improve both thermal and chemical stability. Bisphenol polycarbonate is a flexible polymer and shows a good solubility in polar organic solvent. The alkaline imidazolium bisphenol polycarbonate rendered an elevated molecular weight with excellent solubility in polar aprotic solvent. Different levels of substitution and ion exchange were investigated; the resulting membranes showed high ion exchange capacities (IECs) of up to 2.15 mmol g(-1). The imidazolium-functionalized copolymer membranes showed lower water affinity (14.2-42.8% at 30 degrees C) that satisfied an essential criterion for fuel cell application. The chemical structure of the imidazolium functionalized polycarbonate membrane was confirmed by 1H NMR spectroscopy, and also the membrane properties were evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and water uptake (WU), IEC and conductivity assessment. They exhibited hydroxide conductivity above 10(-2) S cm(-1) at room temperature and good chemical stability for up to five days without significant losses of ion conductivity. PMID:26726604

  16. The role of SO42- surface distribution in arsenic removal by iron oxy-hydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tresintsi, S.; Simeonidis, K.; Pliatsikas, N.; Vourlias, G.; Patsalas, P.; Mitrakas, M.

    2014-05-01

    This study investigates the contribution of chemisorbed SO42- in improving arsenic removal properties of iron oxy-hydroxides through an ion-exchange mechanism. An analytical methodology was developed for the accurate quantification of sulfate ion (SO42-) distribution onto the surface and structural compartments of iron oxy-hydroxides synthesized by FeSO4 precipitation. The procedure is based on the sequential determination of SO42- presence in the diffuse and Stern layers, and the structure of these materials as defined by the sulfate-rich environments during the reaction and the variation in acidity (pH 3-12). Physically sorbed SO42-, extracted in distilled water, and physically/chemically adsorbed ions on the oxy-hydroxide's surface leached by a 5 mM NaOH solution, were determined using ion chromatography. Total sulfate content was gravimetrically measured by precipitation as BaSO4. To validate the suggested method, results were verified by X-ray photoelectron and Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy. Results showed that low precipitation pH-values favor the incorporation of sulfate ions into the structure and the inner double layer, while under alkaline conditions ions shift to the diffuse layer.

  17. Modulators of intestinal alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Bobkova, Ekaterina V; Kiffer-Moreira, Tina; Sergienko, Eduard A

    2013-01-01

    Small molecule modulators of phosphatases can lead to clinically useful drugs and serve as invaluable tools to study functional roles of various phosphatases in vivo. Here, we describe lead discovery strategies for identification of inhibitors and activators of intestinal alkaline phosphatases. To identify isozyme-selective inhibitors and activators of the human and mouse intestinal alkaline phosphatases, ultrahigh throughput chemiluminescent assays, utilizing CDP-Star as a substrate, were developed for murine intestinal alkaline phosphatase (mIAP), human intestinal alkaline phosphatase (hIAP), human placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP), and human tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) isozymes. Using these 1,536-well assays, concurrent HTS screens of the MLSMR library of 323,000 compounds were conducted for human and mouse IAP isozymes monitoring both inhibition and activation. This parallel screening approach led to identification of a novel inhibitory scaffold selective for murine intestinal alkaline phosphatase. SAR efforts based on parallel testing of analogs against different AP isozymes generated a potent inhibitor of the murine IAP with IC50 of 540 nM, at least 65-fold selectivity against human TNAP, and >185 selectivity against human PLAP. PMID:23860652

  18. Alkaline battery, separator therefore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, George F. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An improved battery separator for alkaline battery cells has low resistance to electrolyte ion transfer and high resistance to electrode ion transfer. The separator is formed by applying an improved coating to an electrolyte absorber. The absorber, preferably, is a flexible, fibrous, and porous substrate that is resistant to strong alkali and oxidation. The coating composition includes an admixture of a polymeric binder, a hydrolyzable polymeric ester and inert fillers. The coating composition is substantially free of reactive fillers and plasticizers commonly employed as porosity promoting agents in separator coatings. When the separator is immersed in electrolyte, the polymeric ester of the film coating reacts with the electrolyte forming a salt and an alcohol. The alcohol goes into solution with the electrolyte while the salt imbibes electrolyte into the coating composition. When the salt is formed, it expands the polymeric chains of the binder to provide a film coating substantially permeable to electrolyte ion transfer but relatively impermeable to electrode ion transfer during use.

  19. Structural transformation of nickel hydroxide films during anodic oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Crocker, R.W.; Muller, R.H.

    1992-05-01

    The transformation of anodically formed nickel hydroxide/oxy-hydroxide electrodes has been investigated. A mechanism is proposed for the anodic oxidation reaction, in which the reaction interface between the reduced and oxidized phases of the electrode evolves in a nodular topography that leads to inefficient utilization of the active electrode material. In the proposed nodular transformation model for the anodic oxidation reaction, nickel hydroxide is oxidized to nickel oxy-hydroxide in the region near the metal substrate. Since the nickel oxy-hydroxide is considerably more conductive than the surrounding nickel hydroxide, as further oxidation occurs, nodular features grow rapidly to the film/electrolyte interface. Upon emerging at the electrolyte interface, the reaction boundary between the nickel hydroxide and oxy-hydroxide phases spreads laterally across the film/electrolyte interface, creating an overlayer of nickel oxy-hydroxide and trapping uncharged regions of nickel hydroxide within the film. The nickel oxy-hydroxide overlayer surface facilitates the oxygen evolution side reaction. Scanning tunneling microscopy of the electrode in its charged state revealed evidence of 80 {endash} 100 Angstrom nickel oxy-hydroxide nodules in the nickel hydroxide film. In situ spectroscopic ellipsometer measurements of films held at various constant potentials agree quantitatively with optical models appropriate to the nodular growth and subsequent overgrowth of the nickel oxy-hydroxide phase. A two-dimensional, numerical finite difference model was developed to simulate the current distribution along the phase boundary between the charged and uncharged material. The model was used to explore the effects of the physical parameters that govern the electrode behavior. The ratio of the conductivities of the nickel hydroxide and oxy-hydroxide phases was found to be the dominant parameter in the system.

  20. Use of agar diffusion assay to measure bactericidal activity of alkaline salts of fatty acids against bacteria associated with poultry processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The agar diffusion assay was used to examine antibacterial activity of alkaline salts of caproic, caprylic, capric, lauric, and myristic acids. A 0.5M concentration of each fatty acid was dissolved in 1.0 M potassium hydroxide (KOH), and pH of the mixtures was adjusted to 10.5 with citric acid. Solu...

  1. Use of agar diffusion assay to evaluate bactericidal activity of formulations of alkaline salts of fatty acids against bacteria associated with poultry processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The agar diffusion assay was used to examine antibacterial activity of alkaline salts of fatty acids (FA). Wells in agar media seeded with bacteria were filled with FA-potassium hydroxide (KOH) solutions, plates were incubated, and zones of inhibition were measured. The relationship between bacteric...

  2. 21 CFR 582.1139 - Ammonium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ammonium hydroxide. 582.1139 Section 582.1139 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE General Purpose...

  3. 21 CFR 582.1205 - Calcium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium hydroxide. 582.1205 Section 582.1205 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE General Purpose...

  4. 21 CFR 582.1139 - Ammonium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ammonium hydroxide. 582.1139 Section 582.1139 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE General Purpose...

  5. 21 CFR 582.1139 - Ammonium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ammonium hydroxide. 582.1139 Section 582.1139 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE General Purpose...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium hydroxide. 184.1428 Section 184.1428 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS §...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1428 - Magnesium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium hydroxide. 184.1428 Section 184.1428 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS §...

  8. Recycling Lithium Carbonate/Lithium Hydroxide Waste

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flowers, J.; Flowers, J.

    1983-01-01

    Hazardous waste disposal problem eliminated by regeneration. Li2CO3/ LiOH recycling process relies on low solubility of alkali carbonates in corresponding hydroxides. Li2CO3 precipitate calcined to LI2O, then rehydrated LiOH. Regeneration eliminates need to dispose caustic waste and uses less energy than simple calcination of entire waste mass.

  9. 21 CFR 184.1139 - Ammonium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... specifications of the Food Chemicals Codex, 3d Ed. (1981), p. 20, which is incorporated by reference. Copies are... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium hydroxide. 184.1139 Section 184.1139 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  10. Evaluation of Alkaline Cleaner Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partz, Earl

    1998-01-01

    Alkaline cleaners used to process aluminum substrates have contained chromium as the corrosion inhibitor. Chromium is a hazardous substance whose use and control are described by environmental laws. Replacement materials that have the characteristics of chromated alkaline cleaners need to be found that address both the cleaning requirements and environmental impacts. This report will review environmentally friendly candidates evaluated as non-chromium alkaline cleaner replacements and methods used to compare those candidates one versus another. The report will also list characteristics used to select candidates based on their declared contents. It will also describe and evaluate methods used to discriminate among the large number of prospective candidates.

  11. 21 CFR 73.1326 - Chromium hydroxide green.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chromium hydroxide green. 73.1326 Section 73.1326 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1326 Chromium hydroxide green. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive chromium hydroxide...

  12. 40 CFR 721.4600 - Recovered metal hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Recovered metal hydroxide. 721.4600... Substances § 721.4600 Recovered metal hydroxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a recovered metal hydroxide (PMN...

  13. 40 CFR 721.4600 - Recovered metal hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Recovered metal hydroxide. 721.4600... Substances § 721.4600 Recovered metal hydroxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a recovered metal hydroxide (PMN...

  14. 40 CFR 721.4600 - Recovered metal hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Recovered metal hydroxide. 721.4600... Substances § 721.4600 Recovered metal hydroxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a recovered metal hydroxide (PMN...

  15. 40 CFR 721.4600 - Recovered metal hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Recovered metal hydroxide. 721.4600... Substances § 721.4600 Recovered metal hydroxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a recovered metal hydroxide (PMN...

  16. 40 CFR 721.4600 - Recovered metal hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recovered metal hydroxide. 721.4600... Substances § 721.4600 Recovered metal hydroxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a recovered metal hydroxide (PMN...

  17. 21 CFR 73.1010 - Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). 73.1010... GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1010 Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). (a) Identity. (1) The color additive alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide) is a white,...

  18. 21 CFR 73.1010 - Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). 73.1010... GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1010 Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). (a) Identity. (1) The color additive alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide) is a white,...

  19. 21 CFR 73.1010 - Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). 73.1010... GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1010 Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). (a) Identity. (1) The color additive alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide) is a white,...

  20. 21 CFR 73.1010 - Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). 73.1010... GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1010 Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). (a) Identity. (1) The color additive alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide) is a white,...

  1. 21 CFR 73.1010 - Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). 73.1010... GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1010 Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). (a) Identity. (1) The color additive alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide) is a white,...

  2. 21 CFR 872.3250 - Calcium hydroxide cavity liner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium hydroxide cavity liner. 872.3250 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3250 Calcium hydroxide cavity liner. (a) Identification. A calcium hydroxide cavity liner is a device material intended to be applied to the interior of...

  3. 21 CFR 872.3250 - Calcium hydroxide cavity liner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium hydroxide cavity liner. 872.3250 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3250 Calcium hydroxide cavity liner. (a) Identification. A calcium hydroxide cavity liner is a device material intended to be applied to the interior of...

  4. 21 CFR 872.3250 - Calcium hydroxide cavity liner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium hydroxide cavity liner. 872.3250 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3250 Calcium hydroxide cavity liner. (a) Identification. A calcium hydroxide cavity liner is a device material intended to be applied to the interior of...

  5. 21 CFR 872.3250 - Calcium hydroxide cavity liner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium hydroxide cavity liner. 872.3250 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3250 Calcium hydroxide cavity liner. (a) Identification. A calcium hydroxide cavity liner is a device material intended to be applied to the interior of...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10504 - Surface modified magnesium hydroxide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Surface modified magnesium hydroxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10504 Surface modified magnesium hydroxide (generic). (a) Chemical... as surface modified magnesium hydroxide (PMN P-06-682) is subject to reporting under this section...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10504 - Surface modified magnesium hydroxide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Surface modified magnesium hydroxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10504 Surface modified magnesium hydroxide (generic). (a) Chemical... as surface modified magnesium hydroxide (PMN P-06-682) is subject to reporting under this section...

  8. Poly(phenylene) and m-Terphenyl as Powerful Protecting Groups for the Preparation of Stable Organic Hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Wright, Andrew G; Weissbach, Thomas; Holdcroft, Steven

    2016-04-01

    Four benzimidazolium hydroxide compounds, in which the C2-position is attached to a phenyl group possessing hydrogen, bromine, methyl groups, or phenyl groups at the ortho positions, are prepared and investigated for stability in a quantitative alkaline stability test. The differences between the stability of the various protecting groups in caustic solutions are rationalized on the basis of their crystal structures and DFT calculations. The highest stability was observed for the m-terphenyl-protected benzimidazolium, showing a half-life in 3 M NaOD/CD3OD/D2O at 80 °C of 3240 h. A high-molecular-weight polymer analogue of this model compound is prepared that exhibits excellent mechanical properties, high ionic conductivity and ion-exchange capacity, as well as remarkable hydroxide stability in alkaline solutions: only 5% degradation after 168 h in 2 M KOH at 80 °C. This is the most stable hydroxide-conducting benzimidazolium polymer to date. PMID:26948285

  9. Investigation of electrode materials for alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arcand, G. M.

    1971-01-01

    A number of amalgam electrode systems were investigated for possible use as high rate anodes and cathodes. The systems examined include: lithium, sodium, and potassium in Group 1, magnesium, calcium, and barium in Group 2, aluminum in Group 3, lead in Group 4, copper in Group 1b, and zinc and cadmium in Group 2b. The K(Hg) and Na(Hg) anodes in 10 VF and 15 VF (an unambiguous expression of concentration that indicates the number of formula weights of solute dissolved in a liter of solution) hydroxide solutions have proven satisfactory; some of these have produced current densities of more than 8 A/sq cm. None of the amalgam cathodes have approached this performance although the TI(Hg) has delivered 1 A/sq cm. Se(Hg) and Te(Hg) cathodes have given very stable discharges. Zn(Hg) and Cd(Hg) electrodes did not show good high rate characteristics, 200 to 300 mA/sq cm being about the maximum current densities obtainable. Both anodes are charged through a two-step process in which M(Hg) is first formed electrochemically and subsequently reduces Zn(II or Cd(II) to form the corresponding amalgam. The second step is extremely rapid for zinc and very slow for cadmium.

  10. Space Shuttle Upgrades: Long Life Alkaline Fuel Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCurdy, Kerri

    2004-01-01

    NASA has utilized the alkaline fuel cell technology to provide electrical power for manned launch vehicles such as Gemini, Apollo, and the Space Shuttle. The current Shuttle alkaline fuel cells are procured from UTC Fuel Cells, a United Technologies Company. The alkaline fuel cells are very reliable but the operating life is limited to 2600 hours due to voltage degradation of the individual cells. The main limiting factor in the life of the cells is corrosion of the cell's fiberglass/epoxy frame by the aqueous potassium hydroxide electrolyte. To reduce operating costs, the orbiter program office approved the Long Life Alkaline Fuel Cell (LLAFC) program as a shuttle upgrade in 1999 to increase the operating life of the fuel cell powerplant to 5000 hours. The LLAFC program incorporates improving the cell by extending the length of the corrosion path, which reduces the cell frame corrosion. UTCFC performed analysis to understand the fundamental mechanisms that drive the cell frame corrosion. The analysis indicated that the corrosion path started along the bond line between the cathode and the cell frame. Analysis also showed that the oxygen available at the cathode, the catalyst on the electrode, and the electrode substrate all supported or intensified the corrosion. The new cell design essentially doubled the corrosion path to mitigate the problem. A 10-cell stack was tested for 5000 hours during the development phase of this program to verify improved cell performance. A complete 96-cell stack was then tested for 5000 hours during the full manned-space qualification phase of this program. Additional upgrades to the powerplant under this program are: replacing the aluminum body in the pressure regulator with stainless steel to reduce corrosion, improving stack insulator plate with improved resistance to stress failure and improved temperature capability, and replacing separator plate elastomer seals with a more durable material and improved seal retention.

  11. Solid-State Water Electrolysis with an Alkaline Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Leng, YJ; Chen, G; Mendoza, AJ; Tighe, TB; Hickner, MA; Wang, CY

    2012-06-06

    We report high-performance, durable alkaline membrane water electrolysis in a solid-state cell. An anion exchange membrane (AEM) and catalyst layer ionomer for hydroxide ion conduction were used without the addition of liquid electrolyte. At 50 degrees C, an AEM electrolysis cell using iridium oxide as the anode catalyst and Pt black as the cathode catalyst exhibited a current density of 399 mA/cm(2) at 1.80 V. We found that the durability of the AEM-based electrolysis cell could be improved by incorporating a highly durable ionomer in the catalyst layer and optimizing the water feed configuration. We demonstrated an AEM-based electrolysis cell with a lifetime of > 535 h. These first-time results of water electrolysis in a solid-state membrane cell are promising for low-cost, scalable hydrogen production.

  12. The alkaline zinc electrode as a mixed potential system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fielder, W. L.

    1979-01-01

    Cathodic and anodic processes for the alkaline zinc electrode in 0.01 molar zincate electrolyte (9 molar hydroxide) were investigated. Cyclic voltammograms and current-voltage curves were obtained by supplying pulses through a potentiostat to a zinc rotating disk electrode. The data are interpreted by treating the system as one with a mixed potential; the processes are termed The zincate and corrosion reactions. The relative proportions of the two processes vary with the supplied potential. For the cathodic region, the cathodic corrosion process predominates at higher potentials while both processes occur simultaneously at a lower potential (i.e., 50 mV). For the anodic region, the anodic zincate process predominates at higher potentials while the anodic corrosion process is dominant at lower potential (i.e., 50 mV) if H2 is present.

  13. Alkaline extraction of polonium from liquid lead bismuth eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinitz, S.; Neuhausen, J.; Schumann, D.

    2011-07-01

    The production of highly radiotoxic polonium isotopes poses serious safety concerns for the development of future nuclear systems cooled by lead bismuth eutectic (LBE). In this paper it is shown that polonium can be extracted efficiently from LBE using a mixture of alkaline metal hydroxides (NaOH + KOH) in a temperature range between 180 and 350 °C. The extraction ratio was analyzed for different temperatures, gas blankets and phase ratios. A strong dependence of the extraction performance on the redox properties of the cover gas was found. While hydrogen facilitates the removal of polonium, oxygen has a negative influence on the extraction. These findings open new possibilities to back up the safety of future LBE based nuclear facilities.

  14. Understanding Arsenate Reaction Kinetics with Ferric Hydroxides

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, James; Chaudhary, Binod K.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding arsenic reactions with ferric hydroxides is important in understanding arsenic transport in the environment and in designing systems for removing arsenic from potable water. Many experimental studies have shown that the kinetics of arsenic adsorption on ferric hydroxides is biphasic, where a fraction of the arsenic adsorption occurs on a time scale of seconds while full equilibrium may require weeks to attain. This research employed density functional theory modeling in order to understand the mechanisms contributing to biphasic arsenic adsorption kinetics. The reaction energies and activation barriers for three modes of arsenate adsorption to ferric hydroxides were calculated. Gibbs free energies of reaction depended on the net charge of the complexes, which is a function of the system pH value. Physical adsorption of arsenate to ferric hydroxide proceeded with no activation barrier, with Gibbs free energies of reaction ranging from −21 to −58 kJ/mol. The highest Gibbs free energies of reaction for physical adsorption resulted from negative charge assisted hydrogen bonding between H atoms on the ferric hydroxide and O atoms in arsenate. The conversion of physically adsorbed arsenate into monodentate surface complexes had Gibbs free energies of activation ranging from 62 to 73 kJ/mol, and Gibbs free energies of reaction ranging from −23 to −38 kJ/mol. The conversion of monodentate surface complexes to bidentate, binuclear complexes had Gibbs free energies of activation ranging from 79 to 112 kJ/mol, and Gibbs free energies of reaction ranging from −11 to −55 kJ/mol. For release of arsenate from uncharged bidentate complexes, energies of activation as high as 167 kJ/mol were encountered. Increasingly negative charges on the complexes lowered the activation barriers for desorption of arsenate, and in complexes with −2 charges, the highest activation barrier was 65 kJ/mol. This study shows that the slow kinetics associated with arsenic

  15. Isolation of a Sulfur-oxidizing Bacterium That can Grow under Alkaline pH, from Corroded Concrete.

    PubMed

    Maeda, T; Negishi, A; Oshima, Y; Nogami, Y; Kamimura, K; Sugio, T

    1998-01-01

    To study the early stages of concrete corrosion by bacteria, sulfur-oxidizing bacterium strain RO-1, which grows in an alkaline thiosulfate medium (pH 10.0) was isolated from corroded concreate and characterized. Strain RO-1 was a Gram negative, rod-shaped bacterium (0.5-0.6×0.9-1.5 μm). The mean G+C content of the DNA of strain RO-1 was 65.0 mol%. Optimum pH and temperature for growth were 8.0. and 30-37°C, respectively. When grown in thiosulfate medium with pH 10.0, growth rate of the strain was 48% of that observed at the optimum pH for growth. Strain RO-1 used sulfide, thiosulfate, and glucose, but not elemental sulfur or tetrathionate, as a sole energy source. Strain RO-1 grew under anaerobic conditions in pepton-NO3 (-) medium containing sodium nitrate as an electron acceptor, and had enzyme activities that oxidized sulfide, elemental sulfur, thiosulfate, sulfite, and glucose, but not tetrathionate. The bacterium had an activity to assimilate (14)CO2 into the cells when thiosulfate was used as an energy source. These results suggest that strain RO-1 is Thiobacillus versutus. Strain RO-1 exuded Ca(2+) from concrete blocks added to thiosulfate medium with pH 9.0 and the pH of the medium decreased from 9.0 to 5.5 after 22 days of cultivation. In contrast, Thiobacillus thiooxidans strain NB1-3 could not exude Ca(2+) in the same thiosulfate medium, suggesting that strain RO-1, but not T. thiooxidans NB1-3, is involved in the early stage of concrete corrosion because concrete structures just after construction contain calcium hydroxide and have a pH of 12-13. PMID:27388643

  16. The Role of Oxygen in the Copper-Catalyzed Decomposition of Phenylborates in Aqueous Alkaline Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Hyder, M.L.

    1997-03-17

    The effect of oxygen on the copper-catalyzed hydrolysis of phenyl borates containing from one to four phenyl groups was studied in 1 M aqueous sodium hydroxide solution at 59 degrees C. The results are tentatively explained if the effective catalyst for each of the reactions is either cupric or cuprous ion, with the latter being present in significant concentration only in the absence of air.

  17. The study of modified calcium hydroxides with surfactants for acid gas removal during incineration.

    PubMed

    Tseng, H H; Wey, M Y; Lu, C Y

    2002-01-01

    The primary objective of the present work is to use additives to extend the sulfation reaction of the calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) used to control SO2 emission from incineration processes. There are two reasons for adding surfactants (surface-active agent): (1) to provide an appropriate dispersion of the Ca(OH)2', thus preventing particle agglomeration due to humidity; (2) to alter the sulfation reaction environment by adsorbing heterogeneous materials on the surface of the Ca(OH)2 to extend the adsorption equilibrium. A dry scrubber integrated with a fabric filter was employed to study the effect of surfactants on the removal efficiency of acid gas in the flue gas with Ca(OH)2 as the sorbent. The operating parameters evaluated include: (1) the different surfactants (calcium lignosulfonate, sodium lignosulfonate, alkyl naphthalene sodium sulfonate and beta-naphthalene sodium sulfonate condensates) and (2) the composition of acid gas (i.e. sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen oxide (NO) and hydrogen chloride (HCl)). The results show that modified Ca(OH)2 with surfactants could effectively decrease the emission of acid gas during incineration. Different additives had individual absorption efficiencies on different acid gases. On the whole, sodium lignosulfonate and beta-naphthalene sodium sulfonate condensates had better sorption capacity for SO2 and NO, but not for HCl. In addition, when SO2 coexisted with NO and HCl, the concentration of NO and HCl will result in decrease or increase of the removal efficiency of SO2. PMID:11924579

  18. The alkaline and alkaline-carbonatite magmatism from Southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruberti, E.; Gomes, C. D. B.; Comin-Chiaramonti, P.

    2015-12-01

    Early to Late Cretaceous lasting to Paleocene alkaline magmatism from southern Brazil is found associated with major extensional structural features in and around the Paraná Basin and grouped into various provinces on the basis of several data. Magmatism is variable in size, mode of occurrence and composition. The alkaline rocks are dominantly potassic, a few occurrences showing sodic affinity. The more abundant silicate rocks are evolved undersaturated to saturated in silica syenites, displaying large variation in igneous forms. Less evolved types are restricted to subvolcanic environments and outcrops of effusive suites occur rarely. Cumulatic mafic and ultramafic rock types are very common, particularly in the alkali-carbonatitic complexes. Carbonatite bodies are represented by Ca-carbonatites and Mg-carbonatites and more scarcely by Fe-carbonatites. Available radiometric ages for the alkaline rocks fit on three main chronological groups: around 130 Ma, subcoveal with the Early Cretaceous flood tholeiites of the Paraná Basin, 100-110 Ma and 80-90 Ma (Late Cretaceous). The alkaline magmatism also extends into Paleocene times, as indicated by ages from some volcanic lavas. Geochemically, alkaline potassic and sodic rock types are distinguished by their negative and positive Nb-Ta anomalies, respectively. Negative spikes in Nb-Ta are also a feature common to the associated tholeiitic rocks. Sr-Nd-Pb systematics confirm the contribution of both HIMU and EMI mantle components in the formation of the alkaline rocks. Notably, Early and Late Cretaceous carbonatites have the same isotopic Sr-Nd initial ratios of the associated alkaline rocks. C-O isotopic Sr-Nd isotopic ratios indicate typical mantle signature for some carbonatites and the influence of post-magmatic processes in others. Immiscibility of liquids of phonolitic composition, derived from mafic alkaline parental magmas, has been responsible for the origin of the carbonatites. Close association of alkaline

  19. [DNA degradation during standard alkaline of thermal denaturation].

    PubMed

    Drozhdeniuk, A P; Sulimova, G E; Vaniushin, B F

    1976-01-01

    Essential degradation 8 DNA (up to 10 per cent) with liberation of acid-soluble fragments takes place on the standard alkaline (0,01 M sodium phosphate, pH 12, 60 degrees, 15 min) or thermal (0.06 M sodium phosphate buffer, pH 6.8, 102 degrees C, 15 min) denaturation. This degradation is more or less selective: fraction of low molecular weight fragments, isolated by hydroxyapatite cromatography and eluted by 0.06 M sodium phosphate buffer, pH 6.8 is rich in adenine and thymine and contains about 2 times less 5-methylcytosine than the total wheat germ DNA. The degree of degradation of DNA on thermal denaturation is higher than on alkaline degradation. Therefore while studying reassociation of various DNA, one and the same standard method of DNA denaturation should be used. Besides, both the level of DNA degradation and the nature of the resulting products (fragments) should be taken into account. PMID:999984

  20. Alkaline Leaching of Key, Non-Radioactive Components from Simulants and Hanford Tank Sludge 241-S-110: Results of FY01 Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Rapko, Brian M.; Vienna, John D.; Sinkov, Serguei I.; Kim, Jinseong; Cisar, Alan J.

    2002-09-10

    This study addressed three aspects in selected alkaline leaching: first, the use of oxidants persulfate, permanganate, and ferrate as selective chromium-leaching agents from washed Hanford Tank S-110 solids under varying conditions of hydroxide concentration, temperature, and time was investigated. Second, the selective dissolution of solids containing mercury(II) oxide under alkaline conditions was examined. Various compounds were studied for their effectiveness in dissolving mercury under varying conditions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration in the leachate. Three compounds were studied: cysteine, iodide, and diethyldithiophosphoric acid (DEDTPA). Finally, the possibility of whether an oxidant bound to an anion-exchange resin can be used to effectively oxidize chromium(III) in alkaline solutions was addressed. The experimental results remain ambiguous to date; further work is required to reach any definitive conclusions as to the effectiveness of this approach.

  1. Enzymatic Dehairing of Cattlehide with an Alkaline Protease Isolated from Aspergillus tamarii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An enzymatic dehairing protocol based on the alkaline serine protease isolated from Aspergillus tamarii required 16h, and we observed concomitant grain damage. The use of sodium dodecyl sulfate as a pretreatment to remove the lipids from the hide allowed a shortening of the dehairing time to 6 h wi...

  2. Predicting As removal during metal hydroxide precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    McNeill, L.S.; Edwards, M.

    1997-01-01

    A simplified isotherm is described that can predict the extent of arsenate removal at drinking water utilities practicing coagulation or iron-manganese (Fe-Mn) removal. If all possible sources of particulate iron and aluminum hydroxide present in the system are accounted for, the model predicts arsenic (As) removal to within {+-}13 percent (90 percent confidence) for Fe coagulation at pH 6.5--8 and alum coagulation at pH < 7.6. Analysis of full-scale treatment data suggests that colloidal aluminum (Al) flocs with sorbed arsenate [As(V)] may pass through filters, thereby decreasing overall As removal efficiency. Thus, Al solubility and particle stability must be minimized to improve As removal. If stability and solubility of aluminum hydroxide flocs are not a problem, alum and Fe coagulants have nearly equal capacity for sorbing As(V). Survey results also demonstrate the importance of particulate As.

  3. Mixed metal hydroxides for thickening water or hydrophylic fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Burba, J.L.; Strothers, G.W.

    1991-02-05

    This paper discusses a composition for use as a drilling fluid component. The composition comprises: a liquid having dispersed therein at least one monodispersed monolayer crystalline metal hydroxide conforming essentially to the empirical formula Li{sub m}D{sub d}T(OH)(m + 2d + 3 + na)A{sub a}{sup n}, where D represents divalent metal ions, T represents trivalent metal ions, A represents monovalent or polyvalent anions or negative-valence radicals other than OH{sup {minus}} ions, m is from about zero to about 1, representing the amount of Li ion, d is from about zero to about 4, (m + d) is greater than zero, and na is from about zero to about {minus} 3; and a is an amount of A ions of valence n, where (m + 2d + 3 + na) is equal to or greater than 3 wherein the drilling fluid also contains at least one fluid loss control agent. This patent also describes a drilling fluid component, wherein the drilling fluid also contains at least one fluid loss control agent selected from the group consisting of hydroxyethylcarboxymethyl-cellulose, cornstarch, sodium polyacrylate, starch, polyacrylates, and carboxymethyl-cellulose.

  4. Experimental data developed to support the selection of a treatment process for West Valley alkaline supernatant

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, L.A.; Holton, L.K.; Myers, T.R.; Richardson, G.M.; Wise, B.M.

    1984-01-01

    At the request of West Valley Nuclear Services Co., Inc., the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has studied alternative treatment processes for the alkaline PUREX waste presently being stored in Tank 8D2 at West Valley, New York. Five tasks were completed during FY 1983: (1) simulation and characterization of the alkaline supernatant and sludge from the tank. The radiochemical and chemical distributions between the aqueous and solid phase were determined, and the efficiency of washing sludge with water to remove ions such as Na/sup +/ and SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ was investigated; (2) evaluation of a sodium tetraphenylboron (Na-TPB) precipitation process to recover cesium (Cs) and a sodium titanate (Na-TiA) sorption process to recover strontium (Sr) and plutonium (Pu) from the West Valley Alkaline supernatant. These processes were previously developed and tested at the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant; (3) evaluation of an organic cation-exchange resin (Duolite CS-100) to recover Cs and Pu from the alkaline supernatant followed by an organic macroreticular cation exchange resin (Amberlite IRC-718) to recover Sr; (4) evaluation of an inorganic ion exchanger (Linde Ionsiv IE-95) to recover Cs, Sr, and Pu from the alkaline supernatant; and (5) evaluation of Dowex-1,X8 organic anion exchange resin to recover technetium (Tc) from alkaline supernatant. The findings of these tasks are reported. 21 references, 36 figures, 34 tables.

  5. Effects of alkaline concentration, temperature, and additives on the strength of alkaline-induced egg white gel.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Tu, Yonggang; Li, Jianke; Xu, Mingsheng; Yang, Youxian; Nie, Xuliang; Yao, Yao; Du, Huaying

    2014-10-01

    Egg whites can undergo gelation at extreme pH. In this paper, the effects of NaOH concentration (1.5, 2, 2.5, and 3%), temperature (10, 20, 30, and 40°C), and additives (metallic compounds, carbohydrates, stabilizers, and coagulants) on the strength of alkaline-induced egg white gel were investigated. Results showed that NaOH concentration and induced temperature significantly affected the rate of formation and peak strength of the egg white gel. Of the 6 metallic compounds used in this experiment, CuSO₄exhibited the optimal effect on the strength of alkaline-induced egg white gel, followed by MgCl₂, ZnSO4, PbO, and CaCl₂. When CuSO₄concentration was 0.2%, the gel strength increased by 31.92%. The effect of Fe₂(SO₄)₃was negligible. Of the 5 carbohydrate additives, xanthan gum (0.2%) caused the highest increase (54.31%) in the strength of alkaline-induced egg white gel, followed by sodium alginate, glucose, starch, and sucrose. Meanwhile, propylene glycol (0.25%) caused the highest improvement (15.78%) in the strength of alkaline-induced egg white gel among the 3 stabilizing agents and coagulants used, followed by Na₂HPO₄and glucono-δ-lactone. PMID:25125561

  6. Design Criteria, Operating Conditions, and Nickel-Iron Hydroxide Catalyst Materials for Selective Seawater Electrolysis.

    PubMed

    Dionigi, Fabio; Reier, Tobias; Pawolek, Zarina; Gliech, Manuel; Strasser, Peter

    2016-05-10

    Seawater is an abundant water resource on our planet and its direct electrolysis has the advantage that it would not compete with activities demanding fresh water. Oxygen selectivity is challenging when performing seawater electrolysis owing to competing chloride oxidation reactions. In this work we propose a design criterion based on thermodynamic and kinetic considerations that identifies alkaline conditions as preferable to obtain high selectivity for the oxygen evolution reaction. The criterion states that catalysts sustaining the desired operating current with an overpotential <480 mV in alkaline pH possess the best chance to achieve 100 % oxygen/hydrogen selectivity. NiFe layered double hydroxide is shown to satisfy this criterion at pH 13 in seawater-mimicking electrolyte. The catalyst was synthesized by a solvothermal method and the activity, surface redox chemistry, and stability were tested electrochemically in alkaline and near-neutral conditions (borate buffer at pH 9.2) and under both fresh seawater conditions. The Tafel slope at low current densities is not influenced by pH or presence of chloride. On the other hand, the addition of chloride ions has an influence in the temporal evolution of the nickel reduction peak and on both the activity and stability at high current densities at pH 9.2. Faradaic efficiency close to 100 % under the operating conditions predicted by our design criteria was proven using in situ electrochemical mass spectrometry. PMID:27010750

  7. Hydroxide catalysis bonding for astronomical instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Veggel, Anna-Maria A.; Killow, Christian J.

    2014-06-01

    Hydroxide catalysis bonding (HCB) as a jointing technique has been under development for astronomical applications since ˜1998 (patented by D.-H. Gwo). It uses an aqueous hydroxide solution to form a chemical bond between oxide or oxidisable materials (e.g., SiO2, sapphire, silicon and SiC). It forms strong, extremely thin bonds, and is suitable for room temperature bonding, precision alignment, operation in ultra-low vacuum and down to temperatures of 2.5 K. It has been applied in the NASA satellite mission Gravity Probe B and in the ground-based gravitational wave (GW) detector GEO600. It will soon fly again on the ESA LISA Pathfinder mission and is currently being implemented in the Advanced LIGO and Virgo ground-based GW detectors. This technique is also of considerable interest for use in other astronomical fields and indeed more broadly, due to its desirable, and adjustable, combination of properties. This paper gives an overview of how HCB has been and can be applied in astronomical instruments, including an overview of the current literature on the properties of hydroxide catalysis bonds.

  8. Sodium to sodium carbonate conversion process

    DOEpatents

    Herrmann, Steven D.

    1997-01-01

    A method of converting radioactive alkali metal into a low level disposable solid waste material. The radioactive alkali metal is atomized and introduced into an aqueous caustic solution having caustic present in the range of from about 20 wt % to about 70 wt % to convert the radioactive alkali metal to a radioactive alkali metal hydroxide. The aqueous caustic containing radioactive alkali metal hydroxide and CO.sub.2 are introduced into a thin film evaporator with the CO.sub.2 present in an amount greater than required to convert the alkali metal hydroxide to a radioactive alkali metal carbonate, and thereafter the radioactive alkali metal carbonate is separated from the thin film evaporator as a dry powder. Hydroxide solutions containing toxic metal hydroxide including one or more metal ions of Sb, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Pb, Hg, Ni, Se, Ag and T1 can be converted into a low level non-hazardous waste using the thin film evaporator of the invention.

  9. Sodium to sodium carbonate conversion process

    DOEpatents

    Herrmann, S.D.

    1997-10-14

    A method is described for converting radioactive alkali metal into a low level disposable solid waste material. The radioactive alkali metal is atomized and introduced into an aqueous caustic solution having caustic present in the range of from about 20 wt % to about 70 wt % to convert the radioactive alkali metal to a radioactive alkali metal hydroxide. The aqueous caustic containing radioactive alkali metal hydroxide and CO{sub 2} are introduced into a thin film evaporator with the CO{sub 2} present in an amount greater than required to convert the alkali metal hydroxide to a radioactive alkali metal carbonate, and thereafter the radioactive alkali metal carbonate is separated from the thin film evaporator as a dry powder. Hydroxide solutions containing toxic metal hydroxide including one or more metal ions of Sb, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Pb, Hg, Ni, Se, Ag and Tl can be converted into a low level non-hazardous waste using the thin film evaporator of the invention. 3 figs.

  10. Low sodium level

    MedlinePlus

    Low sodium level is a condition in which the amount of sodium (salt) in the blood is lower than normal. The ... Sodium is found mostly in the body fluids outside the cells. It is very important for maintaining ...

  11. Efficacy of the NaviTip FX irrigation needle in removing calcium hydroxide from root canal

    PubMed Central

    Bramante, Clovis M.; Pinheiro, Bethânia C.; Garcia, Roberto B.; Bramante, Alexandre S.; Bernardineli, Norberti; de Moraes, Ivaldo G.; Húngaro-Duarte, Marco A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of the NaviTip FX, brush-covered irrigation needle, in removing calcium hydroxide from the root canal. Study Design: Thirty single-rooted teeth were randomly divided into three groups: A - irrigation with a hypodermic needle inserted as far as possible without binding and activation with #30 K-type file; B - Irrigation with a hypodermic needle without activation; C - irrigation with NaviTip FX needle. Sodium hypoclorite 1% was used in irrigation. The root canals were examined trough scanning electron microscopy. Calcium hydroxide removal was recorded at 1, 5, and 10mm from the working length (WL) and the data were analysed using one-way ANOVA test (p<0.05). Results: NaviTip FX and hypodermic needle activated with #30K-type file showed lower score at 10 and 5mm with no significant difference between them. Comparison within groups did not show significant differences. All groups showed significantly better smear layer removal at 5 and 10 mm from the WL. Conclusion: The apical third (1mm) of the root canal was found to be the most critical site for Ca(OH)2 removal. Key words:Calcium hydroxide, irrigation, scanning electron microscope, NaviTip FX. PMID:24558560

  12. Crystallization behaviour of hydroxide cobalt carbonates by aging: Environmental implications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-López, Jorge; Fernández-González, Angeles; Jimenez, Amalia

    2014-05-01

    Cobalt is a naturally occurring element widely distributed in water, sediments and air that is essential for living species, since it is a component of B12 vitamin and it is also a strategic and critical element used in a number of commercial, industrial and military applications. However, relatively high accumulations of cobalt in environment can be toxic for human and animal health. Cobalt usually occurs as Co2+ and Co3+ in aqueous solutions, where Co2+ is the most soluble and hence its mobility in water is higher. The study of the precipitation of cobalt carbonates is of great interest due to the abundance of carbonate minerals in contact with surface water and groundwater which can be polluted with Co2+. Previous works have demonstrated that the formation of Co-bearing calcium carbonates and Co-rich low crystallinity phases takes place at ambient conditions. With the aim of investigating the crystallization behavior of Co- bearing carbonates at ambient temperature, macroscopic batch-type experiments have been carried out by mixing aqueous solutions of CoCl2 (0.05M) and Na2CO3 (0.05M) during increasing reaction times (5 minutes and 1, 5, 24, 48, 96, 168, 720 and 1440 hours). The main goals of this work were (i) to analyse the physicochemical evolution of the system and (ii) to study the evolution of the crystallinity of the solid phases during aging. After a given reaction period, pH, alkalinity and dissolved Co2+ in the aqueous solutions were analysed. The evolution of the morphology and chemical composition of the solids with aging time was examined by SEM and TEM. The precipitates were also analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and the crystallinity degree was followed by the intensity and the full width at high medium (FWHM) of the main peaks. The results show that a low crystallinity phase was obtained at the very beginning of aging. This phase evolves progressively to form hydroxide carbonate cobalt (Co2CO3(OH)2) which crystallize with the spatial

  13. Layered double hydroxide stability. 1. Relative stabilities of layered double hydroxides and their simple counterparts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boclair, J. W.; Braterman, P. S.

    1999-01-01

    Solutions containing di- and trivalent metal chlorides [M(II) = Mg2+, Zn2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Mn2+; M(III) = Al3+, Fe3+] were titrated with NaOH to yield hydrotalcite-like layered double hydroxides (LDH), [[M(II)]1-x[M(III)]x(OH)2][Cl]x yH2O, by way of M(III) hydroxide/hydrous oxide intermediates. Analysis of the resultant titration curves yields nominal solubility constants for the LDH. The corresponding LDH stabilities are in the order Mg < Mn < Co approximately Ni < Zn for M(II) and Al < Fe for M(III). The stability of LDH relative to the separate metal hydroxides/hydrous oxides is discussed.

  14. Application of the SCC-DFTB method to hydroxide water clusters and aqueous hydroxide solutions.

    PubMed

    Choi, Tae Hoon; Liang, Ruibin; Maupin, C Mark; Voth, Gregory A

    2013-05-01

    The self-consistent charge density functional tight binding (SCC-DFTB) method has been applied to hydroxide water clusters and a hydroxide ion in bulk water. To determine the impact of various implementations of SCC-DFTB on the energetics and dynamics of a hydroxide ion in gas phase and condensed phase, the DFTB2, DFTB2-γ(h), DFTB2-γ(h)+gaus, DFTB3-diag, DFTB3-diag+gaus, DFTB3-Full+gaus, and DFTB3-3OB implementations have been tested. Energetic stabilities for small hydroxide clusters, OH(-)(H2O)n, where n = 4-7, are inconsistent with the results calculated with the B3LYP and second order Møller-Plesset (MP2) levels of ab initio theory. The condensed phase simulations, OH(-)(H2O)127, using the DFTB2, DFTB2-γ(h), DFTB2-γ(h)+gaus, DFTB3-diag, DFTB3-diag+gaus, DFTB3-Full+gaus and DFTB3-3OB methods are compared to Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations using the BLYP functional. The SCC-DFTB method including a modified O-H repulsive potential and the third order correction (DFTB3-diag/Full+gaus) is shown to poorly reproduce the CPMD computational results, while the DFTB2 and DFTB2-γ(h) method somewhat more closely describe the structural and dynamical nature of the hydroxide ion in condensed phase. The DFTB3-3OB outperforms the MIO parameter set but is no more accurate than DFTB2. It is also shown that the overcoordinated water molecules lead to an incorrect bulk water density and result in unphysical water void formation. The results presented in this paper point to serious drawbacks for various DFTB extensions and corrections for a hydroxide ion in aqueous environments. PMID:23566052

  15. Orthophosphate and metaphosphate ion removal from aqueous solution using alum and aluminum hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Georgantas, D A; Grigoropoulou, H P

    2007-11-01

    The removal of orthophosphates (10(-2) kg P m(-3)), condensed phosphates (10(-2) kg P m(-3)), and mixtures of both (5 x 10(-3) kg P m(-3) as orthophosphate and 5 x 10(-3) kg P m(-3) as metaphosphate) in aqueous solution is studied using alum and aluminum hydroxide. The effects of coagulant dose, pH, temperature, aging of aluminum hydroxide, and presence of different ions are investigated. On the basis of the experimental results, alum is much more efficient in phosphorus removal than aluminum hydroxide even if, in both cases, at the conditions studied, the active coagulant form is Al(OH)(3). The differences then could be due to the higher activity of the in situ formed hydroxide. Orthophosphates and metaphosphates seem to have similar behavior vs pH variation: maximum removal is achieved at pH values 5-6 in all cases. On the other hand, in the simultaneous presence of both P forms, orthophosphate and metaphosphate ions have different affinities for the surface sites of aluminum hydroxide, since for both alum and aluminum hydroxide, orthophosphates are preferentially removed compared to metaphosphates, due probably to orientation effects and the charge per P atom. The presence of sodium, potassium, magnesium, sulfate, chloride, and magnesium, at the concentrations studied and for a pH value of 6, does not influence P removal. Temperature variation, between 25 and 60 degrees C, does not affect alum efficiency but both P forms are increasingly removed with increasing temperature, probably due to polymer Al(OH)(3) breaking, producing new surfaces for adsorption. Aging decreases sorption capacity of Al(OH)(3), while crystallites of increasing size are formed. Finally adsorption of both P forms is best described by the Freundlich isotherm [[K(F)=(49.1-69.1) x 10(-3) (m(3)kg(-1))(1/N), 1/N: 0.14-0.19 for T=25-60 degrees C] and [ K(F)=(1.58-2.79) x 10(-3) (m(3)kg(-1))(1/N), 1/N: 2.17-2.47 for T=25-60 degrees C] for orthophosphate and metaphosphate, respectively. PMID

  16. The effects of potassium and rubidium hydroxide on the alkali-silica reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Shomglin, K.; Turanli, L.; Wenk, H.-R.; Monteiro, P.J.M.; Sposito, G

    2003-11-01

    Expansion of mortar specimens prepared with an aggregate of mylonite from the Santa Rosa mylonite zone in southern California was studied to investigate the effect of different alkali ions on the alkali-silica reaction in concrete. The expansion tests indicate that mortar has a greater expansion when subjected to a sodium hydroxide bath than in a sodium-potassium-rubidium hydroxide bath. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) of mortar bars at early ages show that rubidium ions, used as tracer, were present throughout the sample by the third day of exposure. The analysis also shows a high concentration of rubidium in silica gel from mortar bars exposed to bath solutions containing rubidium. The results suggest that expansion of mortar bars using ASTM C 1260 does not depend on the diffusion of alkali ions. The results indicate that the expansion of alkali-silica gel depends on the type of alkali ions present. Alkali-silica gel containing rubidium shows a lower concentration of calcium, suggesting competition for the same sites.

  17. Surfactant-coated aluminum hydroxide for the rapid removal and biodegradation of hydrophobic organic pollutants in water.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Tohru; Yamaguchi, Masato; Hiraide, Masataka

    2011-02-01

    The removal of hydrophobic organic pollutants in water to surfactant-coated aluminum hydroxide [surfactant-Al(OH)(3)] was investigated. Anionic surfactants such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT), and sodium oleate were sorbed on positively charged aluminum hydroxide at pH 7 and formed hydrophobic aggregates that can incorporate hydrophobic organic pollutants in water. Because of the hydrophobic interaction and decrease in the positive charge, surfactant-Al(OH)(3) was coagulated into precipitates that can readily be separated from water. Hydrophobic organic pollutants such as alkylphenols, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, estrogens, chlorinated antifungals, and pesticides were well collected to the precipitates and thus efficiently removed from water. The collection of hydrophobic organic pollutants was correlated to their aqueous-octanol distribution coefficient. The decomposition of hydrophobic organic pollutants was examined using a bacterial agent (Bacillus subtilis). Hydrophobic organic compounds collected to AOT-Al(OH)(3) or sodium oleate-Al(OH)(3) were insufficiently decomposed. On the other hand, nonylphenol, octylphenol, and pendimethalin collected to SDS-Al(OH)(3) were decomposed within 1 week. The decomposition was accelerated by the collection to SDS-Al(OH)(3). PMID:21193213

  18. Hydroxide stabilization as a new tool for ballast disinfection: Efficacy of treatment on zooplankton

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moffitt, Christine M.; Watten, Barnaby J.; Barenburg, Amber; Henquinet, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Effective and economical tools are needed for treating ship ballast to meet new regulatory requirements designed to reduce the introduction of invasive aquatic species from ship traffic. We tested the efficacy of hydroxide stabilization as a ballast disinfection tool in replicated, sequential field trials on board the M/V Ranger III in waters of Lake Superior. Ballast water was introduced into each of four identical 1,320 L stainless steel tanks during a simulated ballasting operation. Two tanks were treated with NaOH to elevate the pH to 11.7 and the remaining two tanks were held as controls without pH alteration. After retention on board for 14–18 h, CO2-rich gas recovered from one of two diesel propulsion engines was sparged into tanks treated with NaOH for 2 h to force conversion of NaOH ultimately to sodium bicarbonate, thereby lowering pH to about 7.1. Prior to gas sparging, the engine exhaust was treated by a unique catalytic converter/wet scrubber process train to remove unwanted combustion byproducts and to provide cooling. The contents of each tank were then drained and filtered through 35-µm mesh plankton nets to collect all zooplankton. The composition and relative survival of zooplankton in each tank were evaluated by microscopy. Zooplankton populations were dominated by rotifers, but copepods and cladocerans were also observed. Hydroxide stabilization was 100% effective in killing all zooplankton present at the start of the tests. Our results suggest hydroxide stabilization has potential to be an effective and practical tool to disinfect ship ballast. Further, using CO2 released from the ship engine reduces emissions and the neutralized by product, sodium bicarbonate, can have beneficial impacts on the aquatic environment.

  19. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Hhhh... - Method for Determining Free-Formaldehyde in Urea-Formaldehyde Resins by Sodium Sulfite (Iced...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... samples that decompose to yield formaldehyde under the conditions of other free-formaldehyde methods. The... g methanol). 2.2.5Sodium chloride (NaCl) (reagent grade). 2.2.6Sodium hydroxide (NaOH). 2.3Procedure... American Chemical Society analytical reagent grade or better. 3.2.1One 1-liter (L) volumetric flask...

  20. Block copolymers for alkaline fuel cell membrane materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yifan

    Alkaline fuel cells (AFCs) using anion exchange membranes (AEMs) as electrolyte have recently received considerable attention. AFCs offer some advantages over proton exchange membrane fuel cells, including the potential of non-noble metal (e.g. nickel, silver) catalyst on the cathode, which can dramatically lower the fuel cell cost. The main drawback of traditional AFCs is the use of liquid electrolyte (e.g. aqueous potassium hydroxide), which can result in the formation of carbonate precipitates by reaction with carbon dioxide. AEMs with tethered cations can overcome the precipitates formed in traditional AFCs. Our current research focuses on developing different polymer systems (blend, block, grafted, and crosslinked polymers) in order to understand alkaline fuel cell membrane in many aspects and design optimized anion exchange membranes with better alkaline stability, mechanical integrity and ionic conductivity. A number of distinct materials have been produced and characterized. A polymer blend system comprised of poly(vinylbenzyl chloride)-b-polystyrene (PVBC-b-PS) diblock copolymer, prepared by nitroxide mediated polymerization (NMP), with poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene oxide) (PPO) or brominated PPO was studied for conversion into a blend membrane for AEM. The formation of a miscible blend matrix improved mechanical properties while maintaining high ionic conductivity through formation of phase separated ionic domains. Using anionic polymerization, a polyethylene based block copolymer was designed where the polyethylene-based block copolymer formed bicontinuous morphological structures to enhance the hydroxide conductivity (up to 94 mS/cm at 80 °C) while excellent mechanical properties (strain up to 205%) of the polyethylene block copolymer membrane was observed. A polymer system was designed and characterized with monomethoxy polyethylene glycol (mPEG) as a hydrophilic polymer grafted through substitution of pendent benzyl chloride groups of a PVBC

  1. Antimicrobial Activity of Calcium Hydroxide in Endodontics: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Shalavi, S; Yazdizadeh, M

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of endodontic therapy is to preserve the patient's natural teeth without compromising the patient's local or systemic health. Calcium hydroxide has been included in several materials and antimicrobial formulations that are used in several treatment modalities in endodontics, such as inter-appointment intracanal medicaments. The purpose of this article was to review the antimicrobial properties of calcium hydroxide in endodontics. Calcium hydroxide has a high pH (approximately 12.5-12.8) and is classified chemically as a strong base. The lethal effects of calcium hydroxide on bacterial cells are probably due to protein denaturation and damage to DNA and cytoplasmic membranes. Calcium hydroxide has a wide range of antimicrobial activity against common endodontic pathogens but is less effective against Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans. Calcium hydroxide is also a valuable anti-endotoxin agent. However, its effect on microbial biofilms is controversial. PMID:23323217

  2. Selective adsorption of lead, copper and antimony in runoff water from a small arms shooting range with a combination of charcoal and iron hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Mariussen, Espen; Johnsen, Ida Vaa; Strømseng, Arnljot Einride

    2015-03-01

    Metals and metalloids from ammunition residues at small arms shooting ranges leach into the soil and surrounding watercourses and may pose a threat to exposed wildlife and humans. To reduce the potential impact of heavy metal on the environment a field study was performed with different sorbents in order to reduce the metal concentration in polluted water from a shooting range. Two sorbents were tested in situ for their ability to reduce the concentration of Cu, Sb and Pb: Brimac(®) charcoal and Kemira(®) iron hydroxide. The mean sorption of Cu, Sb and Pb was 85%, 65%, and 88% respectively when using the charcoal and 60%, 85% and 92% respectively with the iron hydroxide. Even better sorption of the elements was achieved when the two sorbents were combined in order to increase their selectivity. The best results were achieved in the filter in which the water percolated the charcoal first and the iron hydroxide last, with a mean sorption of Cu, Sb and Pb of 89%, 90% and 93% respectively. This preparation gave a significant better sorption of Cu compared to the filter in which the water percolated the iron hydroxide first and the charcoal last. The different effect between the two filters may be due to pH, since charcoal has alkaline properties and iron hydroxide has acidic properties. For large scale experiments or in filter devices we therefore recommend use of a combination of different reactive sorbents. PMID:25527987

  3. Diclofenac sodium.

    PubMed

    Small, R E

    1989-08-01

    The pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy, adverse effects, and dosage of diclofenac sodium are reviewed. Diclofenac, the first nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent (NSAID) to be approved that is a phenylacetic acid derivative, competes with arachidonic acid for binding to cyclo-oxygenase, resulting in decreased formation of prostaglandins. The drug has both analgesic and antipyretic activities. Diclofenac is efficiently absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract; peak plasma concentrations occur 1.5 to 2.0 hours after ingestion in fasting subjects. Even though diclofenac has a relatively short elimination half-life in plasma (1.5 hours), it persists in synovial fluid. The drug is metabolized in the liver and is eliminated by urinary and biliary excretion. In clinical trials, diclofenac was as effective as aspirin, diflunisal, indomethacin, sulindac, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, and naproxen in improving function and reducing pain in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. For treatment of osteoarthritis, diclofenac was equivalent in efficacy to aspirin, diflunisal, indomethacin, sulindac, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, naproxen, flurbiprofen, mefenamic acid, and piroxicam. Diclofenac was as effective as indomethacin or sulindac in treating ankylosing spondylitis. The most frequent adverse effects reported for diclofenac were gastrointestinal, but these effects were fewer and less serious than occurred with aspirin or indomethacin; in addition, diclofenac caused fewer central nervous system reactions than indomethacin. Diclofenac is administered in divided doses with meals. The recommended total daily dosage is 100 to 150 mg (osteoarthritis and ankylosing spondylitis) or 150 to 200 mg (rheumatoid arthritis). Diclofenac is effective, but no more so than other NSAIDs. It is structurally distinct and offers another choice in the treatment of rheumatological conditions. PMID:2670397

  4. Chemical equilibria in the binary and ternary uranyl(VI)-hydroxide-peroxide systems.

    PubMed

    Zanonato, Pier Luigi; Di Bernardo, Plinio; Grenthe, Ingmar

    2012-03-28

    The composition and equilibrium constants of the complexes formed in the binary U(VI)-hydroxide and the ternary U(VI)-hydroxide-peroxide systems have been studied using potentiometric and spectrophotometric data at 25 °C in a 0.100 M tetramethylammonium nitrate medium. The data for the binary U(VI) hydroxide complexes were in good agreement with previous studies. In the ternary system two complexes were identified, [UO(2)(OH)(O(2))](-) and [(UO(2))(2)(OH)(O(2))(2)](-). Under our experimental conditions the former is predominant over a broad p[H(+)] region from 9.5 to 11.5, while the second is found in significant amounts at p[H(+)] < 10.5. The formation of the ternary peroxide complexes results in a strong increase in the molar absorptivity of the test solutions. The absorption spectrum for [(UO(2))(2)(OH)(O(2))(2)](-) was resolved into two components with peaks at 353 and 308 nm with molar absorptivity of 16200 and 20300 M(-1) cm(-1), respectively, suggesting that the electronic transitions are dipole allowed. The molar absorptivity of [(UO(2))(OH)(O(2))](-) at the same wave lengths are significantly lower, but still about one to two orders of magnitude larger than the values for UO(2)(2+)(aq) and the binary uranyl(VI) hydroxide complexes. It is of interest to note that [(UO(2))(OH)(O(2))](-) might be the building block in cluster compounds such as [UO(2)(OH)(O(2))](60)(60-) studied by Burns et al. (P. C. Burns, K. A. Kubatko, G. Sigmon, B. J. Fryer, J. E. Gagnon, M. R. Antonio and L. Soderholm, Angew. Chem. 2005, 117, 2173-2177). Speciation calculations using the known equilibrium constants for the U(vi) hydroxide and peroxide complexes show that the latter are important in alkaline solutions even at very low total concentrations of peroxide, suggesting that they may be involved when the uranium minerals Studtite and meta-Studtite are formed by α-radiolysis of water. Radiolysis will be much larger in repositories for spent nuclear fuel where hydrogen peroxide

  5. Effects of pH adjustment and sodium ions on sour taste intensity of organic acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protonated organic acid species have been shown to be the primary stimuli responsible for sour taste of organic acids. However, we have observed that sour taste may be modulated when the pH of acid solutions is raised using sodium hydroxide. Objectives were to evaluate the effect of pH adjustment on...

  6. RECLAMATION OF ALKALINE ASH PILES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the study was to develop methods for reclaiming ash disposal piles for the ultimate use as agricultural or forest lands. The ashes studied were strongly alkaline and contained considerable amounts of salts and toxic boron. The ashes were produced from burning bit...

  7. Sodium blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... foods. The most common form of sodium is sodium chloride, which is table salt. This test is usually done as part of an electrolyte or basic metabolic panel blood test . Your blood sodium level represents a balance between the sodium and ...

  8. Simultaneous sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide removal by calcium hydroxide and calcium silicate solids.

    PubMed

    Nelli, C H; Rochelle, G T

    1998-09-01

    At conditions typical of a bag filter exposed to a coal-fired flue gas that has been adiabatically cooled with water, calcium hydroxide and calcium silicate solids were exposed to a dilute, humidified gas stream of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) in a packed-bed reactor. A prior study found that NO2 reacted readily with surface water of alkaline and non-alkaline solids to produce nitrate, nitrite, and nitric oxide (NO). With SO2 present in the gas stream, NO2 also reacted with S(IV), a product of SO2 removal, on the exterior of an alkaline solid. The oxidation of S(IV) to S(VI) by oxygen reduced the availability of S(IV) and lowered removal of NO2. Subsequent acidification of the sorbent by the removal of NO2 and SO2 facilitated the production of NO. However, the conversion of nitrous acid to sulfur-nitrogen compounds reduced NO production and enhanced SO2 removal. A reactor model based on empirical and semi-empirical rate expressions predicted rates of SO2 removal, NO2 removal, and NO production by calcium silicate solids. Rate expressions from the reactor model were inserted into a second program, which predicted the removal of SO2 and NOx by a continuous process, such as the collection of alkaline solids in a baghouse. The continuous process model, depending upon inlet conditions, predicted 30-40% removal for NOx and 50-90% removal for SO2. These results are relevant to dry scrubbing technology for combined SO2 and NOx removal that first oxidizes NO to NO2 by the addition of methanol into the flue duct. PMID:9775761

  9. Response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris to Alkaline Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Stolyar, S.; He, Q.; He, Z.; Yang, Z.; Borglin, S.E.; Joyner, D.; Huang, K.; Alm, E.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.; Wall, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.; Stahl, D.A.

    2007-11-30

    The response of exponentially growing Desulfovibrio vulgarisHildenborough to pH 10 stress was studied using oligonucleotidemicroarrays and a study set of mutants with genes suggested by microarraydata to be involved in the alkaline stress response deleted. The datashowed that the response of D. vulgaris to increased pH is generallysimilar to that of Escherichia coli but is apparently controlled byunique regulatory circuits since the alternative sigma factors (sigma Sand sigma E) contributing to this stress response in E. coli appear to beabsent in D. vulgaris. Genes previously reported to be up-regulated in E.coli were up-regulated in D. vulgaris; these genes included three ATPasegenes and a tryptophan synthase gene. Transcription of chaperone andprotease genes (encoding ATP-dependent Clp and La proteases and DnaK) wasalso elevated in D. vulgaris. As in E. coli, genes involved in flagellumsynthesis were down-regulated. The transcriptional data also identifiedregulators, distinct from sigma S and sigma E, that are likely part of aD. vulgaris Hildenborough-specific stress response system.Characterization of a study set of mutants with genes implicated inalkaline stress response deleted confirmed that there was protectiveinvolvement of the sodium/proton antiporter NhaC-2, tryptophanase A, andtwo putative regulators/histidine kinases (DVU0331 andDVU2580).

  10. Chemical kinetic studies on dry sorbents. Final report. [Sodium bicarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, W.T.; Keener, T.C.

    1982-02-15

    The scope of this research investigation has included a review of potential additives suitable for dry flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) and a bench scale laboratory study to determine the chemical kinetics for the reaction of five different sorbents with sulfur dioxide. The sorbents chosen included sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO/sub 3/), soda ash (Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/), trona, lime (CaO) and hydrated lime (Ca(OH)/sub 2/). This study has shown that: (1) The reaction rate increases with temperature for soda ash and calcium oxide. The reaction temperature has an inverse effect on sodium bicarbonate and trona due, primarily, to the simultaneous thermal activation reaction. The calcium hydroxide-SO/sub 2/ reaction increased up to 550/sup 0/F, and then decreased, due to uneven gas flow distribution. (2) The reaction rates for soda ash, calcium oxide and calcium hydroxide were increased by decreasing their particle size. This effect was not confirmed for sodium bicarbonate and trona where reaction temperature was the most important reaction parameter. (3) Reaction with soda ash was found to be limited by the presence of an impervious ash layer which prevented interparticle gaseous diffusion. Calcium oxide and calcium hydroxide were found to be limited by a slow chemical reaction rate. Results on the rate-limiting steps for sodium bicarbonate and trona were inconclusive because of the simultaneous thermal activation reaction. (4) The effect of thermal activation was to increase the reaction rate for sodium bicarbonate and trona at lower temperatures. This effect was less pronounced at higher temperatures. (5) Results obtained for nitric oxide show limited adsorption for the five sorbents tested as compared to the finding for sulfur dioxide.

  11. Electrodeposited inorganic separators for alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, W. N., Jr.; Consiglio, J. A.; Mc Quade, J. M.

    1970-01-01

    Coating electrodes of silver-cadmium cells with thermostable electrodeposits of calcium hydroxide or magnesium hydroxide reduces silver migration and increases cell life. Absence of organic matter enables assembled cells to be sterilized without oxidation of the material of the separators.

  12. The alpha-form of the hydroxides of bivalent metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feitknecht, W.

    1984-01-01

    X-ray analyses were made of the hydroxides of the bivalent metals. The freshly pptd. hydroxide is usually in the alpha-form, which on standing is converted to another form or other forms. The alpha and c grating dimensions of the alpha-form and the C6-type of Co, Zn, C, Co-Zn and Ni-Zn hydroxides are tabulated. Ni hydroxide does not exhibit an alpha-form. The alpha-Co(OH)2, the blue form, is stabilized by sugar or by the higher alcohols: these compounds do not stabilize alpha-Zn(OH)2.

  13. Infrared band intensities in ammonium hydroxide and ammonium salts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sethna, P. P.; Downing, H. D.; Pinkley, L. W.; Williams, D.

    1978-01-01

    We have applied Kramers-Kronig analysis to reflection spectra to determine the optical constants of ammonium hydroxide and of aqueous solutions of ammonium chloride and bromide. From considerations of the absorption indices k(nu) we conclude that ammonium hydroxide consists of a solution of NH3 in water, in which NH3 molecules are hydrogen bonded to neighboring water molecules. The spectrum of ammonium hydroxide differs from the spectra of ammonium salts, in which bands characteristic of NH4(+) ions are prominent. The existence of ammonium hydroxide as an aerosol in planetary atmospheres is briefly discussed

  14. Hierarchical construction of an ultrathin layered double hydroxide nanoarray for highly-efficient oxygen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qiu; Li, Tian; Lu, Zhiyi; Sun, Xiaoming; Liu, Junfeng

    2014-09-01

    Efficient and low-cost electrocatalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) are essential components of renewable energy technologies, such as solar fuel synthesis and water splitting processes for powering fuel cells. Here, ultrathin NiCoFe layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanoplates, which directly grow on a cobalt-based nanowire array, forming a hierarchical nanoarray structure, are constructed as efficient oxygen evolution electrodes. In alkaline media, the ordered ultrathin hierarchical LDH nanoarray electrode shows dramatically increased catalytic activity compared to that of LDH nanoparticles and pure nanowire arrays due to the small size, large surface area, and high porosity of the NiCoFe LDH nanoarray. Only a small water oxidation overpotential (η) of 257 mV is needed for a current density of 80 mA cm-2 with a Tafel slope of 53 mV per decade. The hierarchical LDH nanoarray also shows excellent structural stability in alkaline media. After continuous testing under a high OER current density (~300 mA cm-2) for 10 h, the sample maintains the ordered hierarchical structure with no significant deactivation of the catalytic properties.Efficient and low-cost electrocatalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) are essential components of renewable energy technologies, such as solar fuel synthesis and water splitting processes for powering fuel cells. Here, ultrathin NiCoFe layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanoplates, which directly grow on a cobalt-based nanowire array, forming a hierarchical nanoarray structure, are constructed as efficient oxygen evolution electrodes. In alkaline media, the ordered ultrathin hierarchical LDH nanoarray electrode shows dramatically increased catalytic activity compared to that of LDH nanoparticles and pure nanowire arrays due to the small size, large surface area, and high porosity of the NiCoFe LDH nanoarray. Only a small water oxidation overpotential (η) of 257 mV is needed for a current density of 80 mA cm-2 with a

  15. Reactive oxygen species accelerate degradation of anion exchange membranes based on polyphenylene oxide in alkaline environments.

    PubMed

    Parrondo, Javier; Wang, Zhongyang; Jung, Min-Suk J; Ramani, Vijay

    2016-07-20

    Anion exchange membranes (AEM) based on polyphenylene oxide (PPO) suffered quaternary-ammonium-cation-site degradation in alkaline environments. Surprisingly, the degradation rate was considerably faster in the presence of molecular oxygen. We postulated that the AEM cation-site catalyzes the reduction of dioxygen by hydroxide ions to yield the superoxide anion radical and the highly reactive hydroxyl free radical. We substantiated our hypothesis by using a phosphorous-containing spin trap (5-diisopropoxy-phosphoryl-5-methyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide) to detect the adducts for both free radicals in situ using (31)P-NMR spectroscopy. PMID:27381009

  16. Solvent Processable Tetraalkylammonium-Functionalized Polyethylene for Use as an Alkaline Anion Exchange Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Kostalik, IV, Henry A.; Clark, Timothy J.; Robertson, Nicholas J.; Mutolo, Paul F.; Longo, Julie M.; Abruña, Héctor D.; Coates, Geoffrey W.

    2010-08-02

    We report the synthesis of a solvent processable, tetraalkylammonium-functionalized polyethylene for use as an alkaline anion exchange membrane (AAEM). The membranes are insoluble in both pure water and aqueous methanol (50 vol % water) at 50 °C but exhibit excellent solubility in a variety of other aqueous alcohols (e.g., 5 wt % AAEM in aqueous n-propanol, 50 vol % water). These solubility characteristics extend the potential utility of this system for use as both an AAEM and ionomer electrode material from a single polymer composition. The AAEMs generated are mechanically strong and exhibit high hydroxide and carbonate conductivities.

  17. Pitting corrosion of iron in weakly alkaline chloride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Makar, G.L.; Tromans, D.

    1996-04-01

    Chloride-induced pitting corrosion of iron at pH 10.5 and 25 C was examined by conducting quasi-steady-state (potentiostatic) polarization experiments in borate-buffered 0.1 M sodium chloride solutions with buffer concentrations from 0 M to 0.075 M. Values of the film breakdown potential (E{sub b}) were scattered at each buffer concentration, and the scatter band moved to higher potentials with increasing concentrations, indicating increased resistance to pitting. Consistent with this, pitting did not always occur at the higher buffer concentrations. E{sub b} measurements, optical and electron microscopy, X-ray microanalysis, and supplementary polarization experiments in lower-pH borate solutions suggested pitting in the iron -Cl{sup {minus}} system initiated within occluded regions, such as matrix-inclusion interfaces and exposed voids, where pH control was lost because of an inadequate local supply of buffer species. Pitting behavior was consistent with a mechanism dominated by mass transport, in which the presence of Cl{sup {minus}} prevented buffering of occluded regions by the borate specie H{sub 2}BO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, allowing the ph to be driven into an acidic domain where the solubilities of ferrous hydroxide and ferric hydroxide are high.

  18. Silicon Micromachining Based on Surfactant-Added Tetramethyl Ammonium Hydroxide: Etching Mechanism and Advanced Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Prem; Gosalvez, Miguel A.; Sato, Kazuo

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents the mechanism behind the accused macroscopic changes in the etched profiles and etch rates caused by the addition of small amounts of surfactants (e.g., Triton X-100) in typical alkaline etchants (e.g., tetramethylammonium hydroxide or TMAH) for silicon micromachining applications targeting the fabrication of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). In order to stress the technological importance of the surfactant addition in TMAH, the paper presents an overview of novel fabrication methods for the realization of new fixed and freestanding structures in Si{100} wafers using an inexpensive combination of wet anisotropic etching in pure and surfactant-added TMAH. The fixed structures contain perfectly sharp edges and a smooth etched surface finish. Thermally deposited oxide is used as the material for the freestanding structures. The fixed structures serve as molds for the realization of new structural shapes using poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS).

  19. Isolation of alkaline mutagens from complex mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C.H.; Guerin, M.R.; Clark, B.R.; Rao, T.K.; Epler, J.L.

    1981-05-01

    A method for the preparative-scale enrichment of alkaline mutagens from complex natural and anthropogenic mixtures is described. Mutagenic alkaline fractions were isolated from cigarette smoke, crude petroleum, and petroleum substitutes derived from coal and shale.

  20. Frog striated muscle is permeable to hydroxide and buffer anions.

    PubMed

    Venosa, R A; Kotsias, B A; Horowicz, P

    1994-04-01

    Hydroxide, bicarbonate and buffer anion permeabilities in semitendinosus muscle fibers of Rana pipiens were measured. In all experiments, the fibers were initially equilibrated in isotonic, high K2SO4 solutions at pHo = 7.2 buffered with phosphate. Two different methods were used to estimate permeabilities: (i) membrane potential changes were recorded in response to changes in external ion concentrations, and (ii) intracellular pH changes were recorded in response to changes in external concentrations of ions that alter intracellular pH. Constant field equations were used to calculate relative or absolute permeabilities. In the first method, to increase the size of the membrane potential change produced by a sudden change in anion entry, external K+ was replaced by Cs+ prior to changes of the anion under study. At constant external Cs+ activity, a hyperpolarization results from increasing external pH from 7.2 to 10.0 or higher, using either CAPS (3-[cyclohexylamino]-1-propanesulfonic acid) or CHES (2-[N-cyclohexylamino]-ethanesulfonic acid) as buffer. For each buffer, the protonated form is a zwitterion of zero net charge and the nonprotonated form is an anion. Using reported values of H+ permeability, calculations show that the reduction in [H+]o cannot account for the hyperpolarizations produced by alkaline solutions. Membrane hyperpolarization increases with increasing total external buffer concentration at constant external pH, and with increasing external pH at constant external buffer anion concentration. Taken together, these observations indicate that both OH- and buffer anions permeate the surface membrane. The following relative permeabilities were obtained at pHo = 10.0 +/- 0.3: (POH/PK) = 890 +/- 150, (PCAPS/PK) = 12 +/- 2, (PCHES/PK) = 5.3 +/- 0.9, and (PNO3/PK) = 4.7 +/- 0.5. PNO3/PK was independent of pHo up to 10.75. At pHo = 9.6, (PHCO3/PK) = 0.49 +/- 0.03; at pHo = 8.9, (PCl/PK) = 18 +/- 2 and at pHo = 7.1, (PHEPES/PK) = 20 +/- 2. In the second

  1. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David B.; Lao, Guifang

    1998-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium.

  2. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, D.B.; Lao, G.

    1998-01-06

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium. 3 figs.

  3. Hydroxide absorption heat pumps with spray absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Summerer, F.; Alefeld, G.; Zeigler, F.; Riesch, P.

    1996-11-01

    The absorber is one of the most expensive components of an absorption heat pump or chiller, respectively. In order to reduce the cost of a heat exchanger, much effort is invested into searching for additives for heat transfer enhancement. Another way to reduce heat exchanger cost, especially for machines with low capacities, is to use an adiabatic spray absorber. The basic principles of the spray absorber is to perform heat and mass transfer separated from each other in two different components. In this way the heat can be rejected effectively in a liquid-liquid heat exchanger, whereas the mass transfer occurs subsequently in a simple vessel. The spray technique can not only save heat exchanger cost in conventional absorption systems working with water and lithium bromide, it also allows the use of quite different working fluids such as hydroxides, which have lower heat transfer coefficients in falling films. Moreover, the separated heat transfer can easily be performed in a liquid-to-air heat exchanger. Hence it is obvious to use hydroxides that allow for a high temperature lift for building an air-cooled chiller with spray absorber. In this presentation theoretical and experimental investigations of the spray absorber as well as the setup will be described. Finally, possible applications will be outlined.

  4. Protons and Hydroxide Ions in Aqueous Systems.

    PubMed

    Agmon, Noam; Bakker, Huib J; Campen, R Kramer; Henchman, Richard H; Pohl, Peter; Roke, Sylvie; Thämer, Martin; Hassanali, Ali

    2016-07-13

    Understanding the structure and dynamics of water's constituent ions, proton and hydroxide, has been a subject of numerous experimental and theoretical studies over the last century. Besides their obvious importance in acid-base chemistry, these ions play an important role in numerous applications ranging from enzyme catalysis to environmental chemistry. Despite a long history of research, many fundamental issues regarding their properties continue to be an active area of research. Here, we provide a review of the experimental and theoretical advances made in the last several decades in understanding the structure, dynamics, and transport of the proton and hydroxide ions in different aqueous environments, ranging from water clusters to the bulk liquid and its interfaces with hydrophobic surfaces. The propensity of these ions to accumulate at hydrophobic surfaces has been a subject of intense debate, and we highlight the open issues and challenges in this area. Biological applications reviewed include proton transport along the hydration layer of various membranes and through channel proteins, problems that are at the core of cellular bioenergetics. PMID:27314430

  5. A portable air-aluminum power source with an alkaline electrolytic solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseenko, S. V.; Galkin, P. S.; Kashinskii, O. N.; Markovich, D. M.; Novopashin, S. A.; Randin, V. V.; Kharlamov, S. M.

    2014-04-01

    The results from development of a portable air-aluminum chemical power source (AA CPS) with an alkaline electrolytic solution without any additional service circuits are presented. The feasibility of making air cathodes on the basis of a metal-carbon composite produced by the plasma method has been shown. Special features of the operational conditions of a portable AA CPS have been investigated. It has been found that the aluminum cathode passivation when aluminum hydroxide precipitates from a solution significantly restricts the specific capacity of such power sources. It was shown that it is possible to overcome the anode passivation and to considerably increase the specific capacity of an AA CPS with an alkaline electrolytic solution by means of modifying an anode alloy.

  6. Ab initio study of the alkali and alkaline-earth monohydroxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Langhoff, S. R.; Partridge, H.

    1986-01-01

    A systematic study of the structures and dissociation energies of all the alkali and alkaline-earth monohydroxides is conducted. A theoretical model for determining accurate dissociation energies of ionic molecules is discussed. The obtained theoretical structures and dissociation energies of the alkali and alkaline-earth monohydroxides, respectively, are compared with experimental data. It is found that the theoretical studies of the bending potentials of BeOH, MgOH, and CaOH reveal the different admixture of covalent character in these systems. The BeOH molecule with the largest degree of covalent character is found to be bent (theta equals 147 deg). The MgOH is also linear. The theoretical dissociation energies for the alkali and akaline-earth hydroxides are thought to be accurate to 0.1 eV.

  7. Transpassive electrodissolution of depleted uranium in alkaline electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Weisbrod, K.R.; Schake, A.R.; Morgan, A.N.; Purdy, G.M.; Martinez, H.E.; Nelson, T.O.

    1998-03-01

    To aid in removal of oralloy from the nuclear weapons stockpile, scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility are decontaminating oralloy parts by electrodissolution in neutral to alkaline electrolytes composed of sodium nitrate and sodium sulfate. To improve the process, electrodissolution experiments were performed with depleted uranium to understand the effects of various operating parameters. Sufficient precipitate was also produced to evaluate the feasibility of using ultrafiltration to separate the uranium oxide precipitates from the electrolyte before it enters the decontamination fixture. In preparation for the experiments, a potential-pH diagram for uranium was constructed from thermodynamic data for fully hydrated species. Electrodissolution in unstirred solutions showed that uranium dissolution forms two layers, an acidic bottom layer rich in uranium and an alkaline upper layer. Under stirred conditions results are consistent with the formation of a yellow precipitate of composition UO{sub 3}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O, a six electron process. Amperometric experiments showed that current efficiency remained near 100% over a wide range of electrolytes, electrolyte concentrations, pH, and stirring conditions.

  8. Conversion of Saccharides into Formic Acid using Hydrogen Peroxide and a Recyclable Palladium(II) Catalyst in Aqueous Alkaline Media at Ambient Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Zargari, N.; Kim, Y.; Jung, K. W.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an effective method that converts a variety of mono- and disaccharides into formic acid predominantly. Our recyclable NHC-amidate palladium(II) catalyst facilitated oxidative degradation of carbohydrates without using excess oxidant. Stoichiometric amounts of hydrogen peroxide and sodium hydroxide were employed at ambient temperatures. PMID:26421000

  9. Development of alkaline fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbs, Michael R.; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Alam, Todd Michael; Janarthanan, Rajeswari; Horan, James L.; Caire, Benjamin R.; Ziegler, Zachary C.; Herring, Andrew M.; Yang, Yuan; Zuo, Xiaobing; Robson, Michael H.; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Patterson, Wendy; Atanassov, Plamen Borissov

    2013-09-01

    This project focuses on the development and demonstration of anion exchange membrane (AEM) fuel cells for portable power applications. Novel polymeric anion exchange membranes and ionomers with high chemical stabilities were prepared characterized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories. Durable, non-precious metal catalysts were prepared by Dr. Plamen Atanassov's research group at the University of New Mexico by utilizing an aerosol-based process to prepare templated nano-structures. Dr. Andy Herring's group at the Colorado School of Mines combined all of these materials to fabricate and test membrane electrode assemblies for single cell testing in a methanol-fueled alkaline system. The highest power density achieved in this study was 54 mW/cm2 which was 90% of the project target and the highest reported power density for a direct methanol alkaline fuel cell.

  10. 21 CFR 73.1326 - Chromium hydroxide green.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) The color additive chromium hydroxide green is principally hydrated chromic sesquioxide (Cr2O3·XH2O). (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with chromium hydroxide green may contain only those diluents listed in this subpart as safe and suitable for use in color additive mixtures for coloring...

  11. 21 CFR 73.1326 - Chromium hydroxide green.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) The color additive chromium hydroxide green is principally hydrated chromic sesquioxide (Cr2O3·XH2O). (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with chromium hydroxide green may contain only those diluents listed in this subpart as safe and suitable for use in color additive mixtures for coloring...

  12. 21 CFR 73.1326 - Chromium hydroxide green.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) The color additive chromium hydroxide green is principally hydrated chromic sesquioxide (Cr2O3·XH2O). (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with chromium hydroxide green may contain only those diluents listed in this subpart as safe and suitable for use in color additive mixtures for coloring...

  13. Hydroxide Solvation and Transport in Anion Exchange Membranes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Tse, Ying-Lung Steve; Lindberg, Gerrick E; Knight, Chris; Voth, Gregory A

    2016-01-27

    Understanding hydroxide solvation and transport in anion exchange membranes (AEMs) can provide important insight into the design principles of these new membranes. To accurately model hydroxide solvation and transport, we developed a new multiscale reactive molecular dynamics model for hydroxide in aqueous solution, which was then subsequently modified for an AEM material. With this model, we investigated the hydroxide solvation structure and transport mechanism in the membrane. We found that a relatively even separation of the rigid side chains produces a continuous overlapping region for hydroxide transport that is made up of the first hydration shell of the tethered cationic groups. Our results show that hydroxide has a significant preference for this overlapping region, transporting through it and between the AEM side chains with substantial contributions from both vehicular (standard diffusion) and Grotthuss (proton hopping) mechanisms. Comparison of the AEM with common proton exchange membranes (PEMs) showed that the excess charge is less delocalized in the AEM than the PEMs, which is correlated with a higher free energy barrier for proton transfer reactions. The vehicular mechanism also contributes considerably more than the Grotthuss mechanism for hydroxide transport in the AEM, while our previous studies of PEM systems showed a larger contribution from the Grotthuss mechanism than the vehicular mechanism for proton transport. The activation energy barrier for hydroxide diffusion in the AEM is greater than that for proton diffusion in PEMs, implying a more significant enhancement of ion transport in the AEM at elevated temperatures. PMID:26716727

  14. Astronauts Newman, Walz and Bursch change out lithium hydroxide canister

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Three members of the astronaut class of 1990 change out a lithium hydroxide canister beneath Discovery's middeck during STS-51 mission. Left to right are astronauts James H. Newman, Carl E. Walz and Daniel W. Bursch, all mission specialists. Note the lithium hydroxide canister floating between them.

  15. 21 CFR 872.3250 - Calcium hydroxide cavity liner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium hydroxide cavity liner. 872.3250 Section 872.3250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3250 Calcium hydroxide cavity liner....

  16. 21 CFR 73.1326 - Chromium hydroxide green.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) The color additive chromium hydroxide green is principally hydrated chromic sesquioxide (Cr2O3·XH2O). (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with chromium hydroxide green may contain only those diluents listed in this subpart as safe and suitable for use in color additive mixtures for coloring...

  17. Evaluation of sealing ability, pH and flow rate of three calcium hydroxide-based sealers.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, F J; Fraga, R C; Garcia, P F

    1995-10-01

    Three endodontic sealers containing calcium hydroxide (Sealapex, Sealer 26 and Apexit) and a zinc oxide-eugenol cement (Grossman's sealer) were examined for sealing ability, release of hydroxyl ions and flow rate. Dye penetration test was used to assess the sealing ability of the endodontic sealers. The pH test was accomplished to evaluate the release of hydroxyl ions from sealers and the pH readings were done at intervals of 30 min, 60 min and 7 days. In the flow test the sealers were placed between two glass slabs and a weight of 500 g was placed on the top of the glass. The diameters of the formed discs were recorded. The results revealed no statistically significant difference between apical seal provided by the four sealers. All of the calcium hydroxide based sealers alkalinized the surrounding medium. Sealer 26 cement presented significantly superior flow rate when compared with the other cements. These findings indicated that endodontic sealers containing calcium hydroxide presented satisfactory physicochemical properties when compared with a zinc oxide-eugenol sealer commonly used in endodontics. PMID:8625936

  18. Intercalation studies of zinc hydroxide chloride: Ammonia and amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arízaga, Gregorio Guadalupe Carbajal

    2012-01-01

    Zinc hydroxide chloride (ZHC) is a layered hydroxide salt with formula Zn5(OH)8Cl2·2H2O. It was tested as intercalation matrix for the first time and results were compared with intercalation products of the well-known zinc hydroxide nitrate and a Zn/Al layered double hydroxide. Ammonia was intercalated into ZHC, while no significant intercalation occurred in ZHN. Aspartic acid intercalation was only achieved by co-precipitation at pH=10 with ZHC and pH=8 with zinc hydroxide nitrate. Higher pH resistance in ZHC favored total deprotonation of both carboxylic groups of the Asp molecule. ZHC conferred more thermal protection against Asp combustion presenting exothermic peaks even at 452 °C while the exothermic event in ZHN was 366 °C and in the LDH at 276 °C.

  19. Calcium hydroxide-based root canal sealers: a review.

    PubMed

    Desai, Shalin; Chandler, Nicholas

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this review was to consider laboratory experiments and clinical studies of calcium hydroxide-based root canal sealers. An extensive search of the endodontic literature was made to identify publications related to calcium hydroxide-based root canal sealers. The articles were assessed for the outcome of laboratory and clinical studies on their biological properties and physical characteristics. Comparative studies with other sealers were also considered. Several studies were evaluated covering different properties of calcium hydroxide-based sealers including physical properties, biocompatibility, leakage, adhesion, solubility, antibacterial properties, and periapical healing effect. Calcium hydroxide-based root canal sealers have a variety of physical and biological properties. Comparative studies reveal their mild cytotoxicity, but their antibacterial effects are variable. Further research is required to establish the tissue healing properties of calcium hydroxide in root canal sealers. PMID:19345790

  20. FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID REMOVAL

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this project has been to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, along with EPRI, the American Electric Power Company (AEP), FirstEnergy Corporation, the Tennessee Valley Authority, and Carmeuse North America. Sulfuric acid controls are becoming of increased interest for coal-fired power generating units for a number of reasons. In particular, sulfuric acid can cause plant operation problems such as air heater plugging and fouling, back-end corrosion, and plume opacity. These issues will likely be exacerbated with the retrofit of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) for NOX control, as SCR catalysts are known to further oxidize a portion of the flue gas SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. The project tested the effectiveness of furnace injection of four different magnesium-based or dolomitic alkaline sorbents on full-scale utility boilers. These reagents were tested during one- to two-week tests conducted on two FirstEnergy Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) units. One of the sorbents tested was a magnesium hydroxide slurry byproduct from a modified Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime wet flue gas desulfurization process. The other three sorbents are available commercially and include dolomite, pressure-hydrated dolomitic lime, and commercially available magnesium hydroxide. The dolomite reagent was injected as a dry powder through out-of-service burners. The other three reagents were injected as slurries through air-atomizing nozzles inserted through the front wall of the upper furnace. After completing the four one- to two-week tests, the most promising sorbents were selected for longer-term (approximately 25-day) full-scale tests on two different units. The longer-term tests were conducted to confirm sorbent effectiveness over extended operation on two

  1. Alkaline Hydrolysis/Polymerization of 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene: Characterization of Products by 13C and 15N NMR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Thorne, P.G.; Cox, L.G.

    2004-01-01

    Alkaline hydrolysis has been investigated as a nonbiological procedure for the destruction of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in explosives contaminated soils and munitions scrap. Nucleophilic substitutions of the nitro and methyl groups of TNT by hydroxide ion are the initial steps in the alkaline degradation of TNT. Potential applications of the technique include both in situ surface liming and ex situ alkaline treatment of contaminated soils. A number of laboratory studies have reported the formation of an uncharacterized polymeric material upon prolonged treatment of TNT in base. As part of an overall assessment of alkaline hydrolysis as a remediation technique, and to gain a better understanding of the chemical reactions underlying the hydrolysis/polymerization process, the soluble and precipitate fractions of polymeric material produced from the calcium hydroxide hydrolysis of unlabeled and 15N-labeled TNT were analyzed by elemental analysis and 13C and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Spectra indicated that reactions leading to polymerization included nucleophilic displacement of nitro groups by hydroxide ion, formation of ketone, carboxyl, alcohol, ether, and other aliphatic carbons, conversion of methyl groups to diphenyl methylene carbons, and recondensation of aromatic amines and reduced forms of nitrite, including ammonia and possibly hydroxylamine, into the polymer. Compared to the distribution of carbons in TNT as 14% sp 3- and 86% sp2-hybridized, the precipitate fraction from hydrolysis of unlabeled TNT contained 33% sp3- and 67% sp 2-hybridized carbons. The concentration of nitrogen in the precipitate was 64% of that in TNT. The 15N NMR spectra showed that, in addition to residual nitro groups, forms of nitrogen present in the filtrate and precipitate fractions include aminohydroquinone, primary amide, indole, imine, and azoxy, among others. Unreacted nitrite was recovered in the filtrate fraction. The toxicities and susceptibilities to

  2. Starch sodium dodecenyl succinate prepared by one-step extrusion and its properties.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yaoqi; Zhang, Xiwen; Sun, Binhua; Jin, Zhengyu; Wu, Shengjun

    2015-11-20

    One-step extrusion was developed to prepare starch sodium dodecenyl succinate (SSDS). Effects of screwing speed, reaction temperature, moisture content, sodium hydroxide amount (as catalyst), and dodecenly succinic anhydride (DDSA) amount on the degree of substitution (DS) were investigated. Optimum conditions were determined and found to be as follows: screwing speed, 110rpm; temperature, 120°C; moisture content, 30%; sodium hydroxide amount, 0.5%; DDSA amount, 3%. Under these conditions, the DS of SSDS was 0.014%, and the reaction efficiency was 78%. The structure of SSDS prepared by one-step extrusion was partially characterised. Infrared absorption spectra showed peaks of ester bond and carbonyl group at 1707 and 1564cm(-1), respectively, indicating that dodecenyl succinic groups were introduced into starch molecule backbone by esterification agent. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that compared with native starch, the particle morphology of SSDS prepared by extrusion became irregular, and its crystallinity was partially destroyed. PMID:26344259

  3. Intercalation studies of zinc hydroxide chloride: Ammonia and amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Arizaga, Gregorio Guadalupe Carbajal

    2012-01-15

    Zinc hydroxide chloride (ZHC) is a layered hydroxide salt with formula Zn{sub 5}(OH){sub 8}Cl{sub 2}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O. It was tested as intercalation matrix for the first time and results were compared with intercalation products of the well-known zinc hydroxide nitrate and a Zn/Al layered double hydroxide. Ammonia was intercalated into ZHC, while no significant intercalation occurred in ZHN. Aspartic acid intercalation was only achieved by co-precipitation at pH=10 with ZHC and pH=8 with zinc hydroxide nitrate. Higher pH resistance in ZHC favored total deprotonation of both carboxylic groups of the Asp molecule. ZHC conferred more thermal protection against Asp combustion presenting exothermic peaks even at 452 Degree-Sign C while the exothermic event in ZHN was 366 Degree-Sign C and in the LDH at 276 Degree-Sign C. - Graphical abstract: The zinc hydroxide chloride (ZHC) with formula Zn{sub 5}(OH){sub 8}Cl{sub 2}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O was tested as intercalation matrix. In comparison with the well-known zinc hydroxide nitrate (ZHN) and layered double hydroxides (LDH), ZHC was the best matrix for thermal protection of Asp combustion, presenting exothermic peaks even at 452 Degree-Sign C, while the highest exothermic event in ZHN was at 366 Degree-Sign C, and in the LDH it was at 276 Degree-Sign C. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zinc hydroxide chloride (ZHC) was tested as intercalation matrix for the first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZHC has higher chemical and thermal stability than zinc hydroxide nitrate and LDH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NH{sub 3} molecules can be intercalated into ZHC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The amino group of amino acids limits the intercalation by ion-exchange.

  4. High pseudocapacitive cobalt carbonate hydroxide films derived from CoAl layered double hydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhiyi; Zhu, Wei; Lei, Xiaodong; Williams, Gareth R.; O'Hare, Dermot; Chang, Zheng; Sun, Xiaoming; Duan, Xue

    2012-05-01

    A thin nanosheet of mesoporous cobalt carbonate hydroxide (MPCCH) has been fabricated from a CoAl-LDH nanosheet following removal of the Al cations by alkali etching. The basic etched electrode exhibits enhanced specific capacitance (1075 F g-1 at 5 mA cm-2) and higher rate capability and cycling stability (92% maintained after 2000 cycles).A thin nanosheet of mesoporous cobalt carbonate hydroxide (MPCCH) has been fabricated from a CoAl-LDH nanosheet following removal of the Al cations by alkali etching. The basic etched electrode exhibits enhanced specific capacitance (1075 F g-1 at 5 mA cm-2) and higher rate capability and cycling stability (92% maintained after 2000 cycles). Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed experimental procedure, specific capacitance calculation, EDS and FTIR results, electrochemical results of CoAl-LDH and SEM image. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30617d

  5. Synthesis of yttrium hydroxide and oxide nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qun; Liu, Zhaoping; Li, Shu; Zhang, Shuyuan; Liu, Xianming; Qian, Yitai

    2003-11-01

    Yttrium hydroxide nanotubes were hydrothermally synthesized via a metastable precursor, PEG-Y(NO 3) 3 complex. XRD patterns showed the product was a pure hexagonal phase of Y(OH) 3. TEM images displayed that the nanotubes have outer diameters ranging from 80 to 200 nm, wall thicknesses of about 30 nm, and lengths up to several micrometers. The nanotube growth may have three stages: formation of a metastable PEG-Y(NO 3) 3 complex; nucleation and formation of Y(OH) 3 nanorods; developing Y(OH) 3 nanotubes. We proposed the Y(OH) 3 nanotubes growth mechanism to be a nucleation-diffusion growth based on the characterization results. Y 2O 3 nanotubes were formed with smaller diameters after post-treatment at 500°C for 2 h.

  6. Complex Microfiltration Behavior of Metal Hydroxide Slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Shimskey, Rick W.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Daniel, Richard C.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2011-02-28

    Crossflow filtration is to be a key process in the treatment and disposal of approximately 60,000 metric tons of high-level waste stored at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is assessing filter performance against waste simulant materials that mimic the chemical and physical properties of Hanford tank waste. Prior simulant studies indicate that waste filtration performance may be limited by pore and cake fouling. To limit the shutdown of waste treatment operations, the pre-treatment facility plans to recover filter flux loses from cake formation and filter fouling by frequently backpulsing the filter elements. The objective of the current research is to develop an understanding of the roles of cake and pore fouling and potential flux recovery through backpulsing of the filters for Hanford waste filtration operations. Metal hydroxide wastes were tested to examine the role of particle-filter interaction on filter performance.

  7. Carcinogenicity of beryllium hydroxide and alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Groth, D.H.; Kommineni, C.; Mackay, G.R.

    1980-02-01

    Animal experiments are presented which show that Be metal, BeAl alloy, passivated Be metal, and beryllium hydroxide are pulmonary carcinogens in rats. These findings are supported by successful transplantation experiments. In addition, other alloys of Be, VBe/sub 12/, TiBe/sub 12/, TaBe/sub 12/, NbBe/sub 12/, Be/sub 2/B, and Be/sub 4/B were found to produce pulmonary metaplasia, frequently a preneoplastic lesion in rats. Old rats are shown to be more susceptible to the induction of pulmonary metaplasia than young adult rats. These results indicate that a lower dose of Be would be required to produce cancer in old animals compared to young adult animals. A discussion on the lung cancer incidence in beryllium production workers is presented.

  8. Alkaline Waterflooding Demonstration Project, Ranger Zone, Long Beach Unit, Wilmington Field, California. Fourth annual report, June 1979-May 1980. Volume 3. Appendices II-XVII

    SciTech Connect

    Carmichael, J.D.

    1981-03-01

    Volume 3 contains Appendices II through XVII: mixing instructions for sodium orthosilicate; oil displacement studies using THUMS C-331 crude oil and extracted reservoir core material from well B-110; clay mineral analysis of B-827-A cores; sieve analysis of 4 Fo sand samples from B-110-IA and 4 Fo sand samples from B-827-A; core record; delayed secondary caustic consumption tests; long-term alkaline consumption in reservoir sands; demulsification study for THUMS Long Beach Company, Island White; operating plans and instructions for DOE injection demonstration project, alkaline injection; caustic pilot-produced water test graphs; well test irregularities (6/1/79-5/31/80); alkaline flood pump changes (6/1/79-5/31/80); monthly DOE pilot chemical waterflood injection reports (preflush injection, alkaline-salt injection, and alkaline injection without salt); and caustic safety procedures-alkaline chemicals.

  9. Calcium hydroxide nanoparticles for the conservation of cultural heritage: new formulations for the deacidification of cellulose-based artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poggi, G.; Toccafondi, N.; Melita, L. N.; Knowles, J. C.; Bozec, L.; Giorgi, R.; Baglioni, P.

    2014-03-01

    Alkaline earth metal hydroxide nanoparticles dispersions have demonstrated to be efficient for the preservation of cellulose-based artifacts, providing a stable neutral environment and, if in excess, turning into mild alkaline species. New formulations tailored for specific conservation issues have been recently obtained via a solvothermal reaction, starting from bulk metal, and short chain alcohols. Using this synthetic procedure, stable, and high concentrated calcium hydroxide nanoparticles dispersions can be obtained. The characterization of nanoparticles was carried out by dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray powder diffraction and showed that the dispersed systems are particularly suitable for the application on porous substrates. In a direct application of this technology, acidic paper and canvas samples were artificially aged after deacidification using calcium hydroxide nanoparticles dispersed in short chain alcohols. Cellulose viscosimetric polymerization degree (DPv), cellulose pyrolysis temperature, and samples' pH were evaluated upon the aging and in terms of protective action arising from the applied treatment. In particular, determinations of DPv clearly showed that the degradation of acidic paper and canvas samples proceeds at higher rates with respect to deacidified samples. These evidences were also confirmed by the thermogravimetric analysis of samples, in which the benefits due to the deacidification treatments are measured in terms of pyrolysis temperature of cellulose. These new formulations of nanoparticles dispersions expand the palette of available tools for the conservation of cellulose-based works of art, such as easel paintings, and manuscripts, potentially opening the way for the intervention on parchment and leather, whose preservation is a particularly challenging task.

  10. Dissolution kinetics of magnesium hydroxide for CO2 separation from coal-fired power plants.

    PubMed

    Bharadwaj, Hari Krishna; Lee, Joo-Youp; Li, Xin; Liu, Zhouyang; Keener, Tim C

    2013-04-15

    The dissolution of magnesium hydroxide in water for the release of magnesium and hydroxyl ions into the solution to maintain suitable alkalinity is a crucial step in the Mg(OH)2-based CO2 absorption process. In this study, the rate of dissolution of Mg(OH)2 was investigated under different operating conditions using a pH stat apparatus. The dissolution process was modeled using a shrinking core model and the overall Mg(OH)2 dissolution process was found to be controlled by the surface chemical reaction of Mg(OH)2 with H(+) ions. Under the chemical reaction control regime, the dissolution of Mg(OH)2 in alkaline conditions was found not to follow a first-order reaction, and the fractional order of reaction was estimated to lie between 0.20 and 0.31. This suggests that the dissolution reaction is a non-elementary reaction, consisting of a sequence of elementary reactions, via most likely forming a surface magnesium complex. The true activation energy value of 76 ± 11 kJ/gmol was found to be almost twice as much as the observed activation energy value of 42 ± 6 kJ/gmol determined at pH 8.6, and was comparable with the previously reported values. The particle sizes predicted from the intrinsic kinetics determined from the model were in good agreement with the experimentally measured particle sizes during the dissolution process. PMID:23474403

  11. Fluoride stimulates ( sup 3 H)thymidine incorporation and alkaline phosphatase production by human osteoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Khokher, M.A.; Dandona, P. )

    1990-11-01

    The effect of sodium fluoride on alkaline phosphatase (ALP) release and ({sup 3}H)thymidine uptake by human osteoblasts in culture was investigated. Sodium fluoride stimulated both ALP release and ({sup 3}H)thymidine uptake at concentrations of sodium fluoride greater than 250 mumol/L. This stimulation was similar in magnitude to that induced by 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol. The fluoride-induced increase in ALP was inhibited by verapamil, a calcium channel blocker. We conclude that sodium fluoride stimulates osteoblasts to proliferate and to release ALP. This stimulation by fluoride is dependent on calcium influx. Fluoride-induced stimulation of human osteoblasts may be relevant to its effect in enhancing bone formation in patients with osteoporosis.

  12. Diclofenac sodium overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Diclofenac sodium is a prescription medicine used to relieve pain and swelling. It is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). Diclofenac sodium overdose occurs when someone takes more than the ...

  13. Sodium Ferric Gluconate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Sodium ferric gluconate injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of ... are also receiving the medication epoetin (Epogen, Procrit). Sodium ferric gluconate injection is in a class of ...

  14. Docusate Sodium and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... live chat Live Help Fact Sheets Share Docusate Sodium Friday, 01 April 2016 In every pregnancy, a ... This sheet talks about whether exposure to docusate sodium may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  15. Sodium carbonate poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Sodium carbonate (known as washing soda or soda ash) is a chemical found in many household and ... products. This article focuses on poisoning due to sodium carbonate. This article is for information only. Do ...

  16. Diclofenac sodium overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002630.htm Diclofenac sodium overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Diclofenac sodium is a prescription medicine used to relieve pain ...

  17. Fractional excretion of sodium

    MedlinePlus

    FE sodium; FENa ... to a lab. There, they are examined for salt (sodium) and creatinine levels. Creatinine is a chemical waste ... your normal foods with a normal amount of salt, unless otherwise instructed by your health care provider. ...

  18. Sodium blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... able to conserve water) Too much salt or sodium bicarbonate in the diet Use of certain medicines, including corticosteroids, laxatives, lithium, and medicines such as ibuprofen or naproxen Lower than normal sodium level is called hyponatremia. It may be due ...

  19. Cu sbnd Al sbnd Fe layered double hydroxides with CO32- and anionic surfactants with different alkyl chains in the interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillano, Raquel; Holgado, María Jesús; González, José Luis; Rives, Vicente

    2005-08-01

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs), with the hydrotalcite-like structure containing Cu(II), Al(III) and Fe(III) in the layers, and different alkyl sulfonates in the interlayer, have been prepared and characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, FT-IR spectroscopy, differential thermal analysis and thermogravimetric analysis. Pure crystalline phases have been obtained in all cases. Upon heating, combustion of the organic chain takes place at lower temperature than the corresponding sodium salts.

  20. Modeling the Sodium Recovery Resulting from Using Concentrated Caustic for Boehmite Dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Rapko, Brian M.; Schonewill, Philip P.

    2011-10-19

    Boehmite dissolution experiments were conducted at NaOH concentrations of 10 M and 12 M to determine whether the increased aluminum solubility at high hydroxide concentration would offset the increase in added sodium, leading to an overall decrease in the amount of sodium added during the boehmite dissolution process. A shrinking-core dissolution rate model that assumed reversible reaction was used to fit the test data. The resulting model accounted for the effects of temperature, hydroxide concentration, and dissolved aluminum concentration. The rate was found to be dependent on the {approx}1.5 power of hydroxide molarity. When the dissolution rate model was used in simulations of batch boehmite dissolution, a concentration range of 7 to 9 M NaOH was found to minimize the mass of sodium needed to dissolve a given mass of aluminum, potentially reducing it by as much as two-thirds. The time required to dissolve the boehmite was also found to be decreased by using hydroxide concentrations greater than {approx}10 M.

  1. Poly(arylene ether sulfone)s ionomers containing quaternized triptycene groups for alkaline fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhuo; Gong, Feixiang; Zhang, Suobo; Li, Shenghai

    2012-11-01

    A series of poly(arylene ether sulfone)s containing quaternized triptycene groups are synthesized through a chloromethylation reaction following a quaternization process. The resulting ionomers are soluble in polar aprotic solvents; thus, flexible, tough membranes could be prepared by solution casting. Novel anion exchange membranes based on these ionomers are obtained by anion exchange with hydroxide ions. All anion exchange membranes show conductivities above 10-2 S cm-1 at room temperature. The highest hydroxide conductivity is 7.2 × 10-2 S cm-1, which is achieved by the anion exchange membrane with ion exchange capacity (IEC) = 2.61 mmol g-1. Meanwhile, these anion exchange membranes have low water uptake and good dimensional stability even at high IEC values. For example, the membrane water uptake (IEC = 1.97 mmol g-1) is only 21% at room temperature, and the swelling ratio is 11%. The anion exchange membranes are stable in alkaline conditions. All the membranes have no significant change in 4 M NaOH solution at 25 °C after 30 days. All results suggest that these anion exchange membranes have potential application in alkaline fuel cells.

  2. Plutonium(IV) precipitates formed in alkaline media in the presence of various anions

    SciTech Connect

    Krot, N.N.; Shilov, V.P.; Yusov, A.B.; Tananaev, I.G.; Grigoriev, M.S.; Garnov, A.Yu.; Perminov, V.P.; Astafurova, L.N.

    1998-09-01

    The tendency of Pu(IV) to hydrolyze and form true solutions, colloid solutions, or insoluble precipitates has been known since the Manhattan Project. Since then, specific studies have been performed to examine in detail the equilibria of Pu(IV) hydrolytic reactions in various media. Great attention also has been paid to the preparation, structure, and properties of Pu(IV) polymers or colloids. These compounds found an important application in sol-gel technology for the preparation of nuclear fuel materials. A most important result of these works was the conclusion that Pu(IV) hydroxide, after some aging, consists of very small PuO{sub 2} crystallites and should therefore be considered to be Pu(IV) hydrous oxide. However, studies of the properties and behavior of solid Pu(IV) hydroxide in complex heterogeneous systems are rare. The primary goal of this investigation was to obtain data on the composition and properties of Pu(IV) hydrous oxide or other compounds formed in alkaline media under different conditions. Such information is important to understand Pu(IV) behavior and the forms of its existence in the Hanford Site alkaline tank waste sludge. This knowledge then may be applied in assessing plutonium criticality hazards in the storage, retrieval, and treatment of Hanford Site tank wastes as well as in understanding its contribution to the transuranic waste inventory (threshold at 100 nCi/g or about 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} M) of the separate solution and solid phases.

  3. Tunable high performance cross-linked alkaline anion exchange membranes for fuel cell applications.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Nicholas J; Kostalik, Henry A; Clark, Timothy J; Mutolo, Paul F; Abruña, Héctor D; Coates, Geoffrey W

    2010-03-17

    Fuel cells are energy conversion devices that show great potential in numerous applications ranging from automobiles to portable electronics. However, further development of fuel cell components is necessary for them to become commercially viable. One component critical to their performance is the polymer electrolyte membrane, which is an ion conductive medium separating the two electrodes. While proton conducting membranes are well established (e.g., Nafion), hydroxide conducting membranes (alkaline anion exchange membranes, AAEMs) have been relatively unexplored by comparison. Operating under alkaline conditions offers significant efficiency benefits, especially for the oxygen reduction reaction; therefore, effective AAEMs could significantly advance fuel cell technologies. Here we demonstrate the use of ring-opening metathesis polymerization to generate new cross-linked membrane materials exhibiting high hydroxide ion conductivity and good mechanical properties. Cross-linking allows for increased ion incorporation, which, in turn supports high conductivities. This facile synthetic approach enables the preparation of cross-linked materials with the potential to meet the demands of hydrogen-powered fuel cells as well as direct methanol fuel cells. PMID:20178312

  4. Tunable High Performance Cross-Linked Alkaline Anion Exchange Membranes for Fuel Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Nicholas J.; Kostalik, IV, Henry A.; Clark, Timothy J.; Mutolo, Paul F.; Abruña, Héctor D.; Coates, Geoffrey W.

    2010-02-23

    Fuel cells are energy conversion devices that show great potential in numerous applications ranging from automobiles to portable electronics. However, further development of fuel cell components is necessary for them to become commercially viable. One component critical to their performance is the polymer electrolyte membrane, which is an ion conductive medium separating the two electrodes. While proton conducting membranes are well established (e.g., Nafion), hydroxide conducting membranes (alkaline anion exchange membranes, AAEMs) have been relatively unexplored by comparison. Operating under alkaline conditions offers significant efficiency benefits, especially for the oxygen reduction reaction; therefore, effective AAEMs could significantly advance fuel cell technologies. Here we demonstrate the use of ring-opening metathesis polymerization to generate new cross-linked membrane materials exhibiting high hydroxide ion conductivity and good mechanical properties. Cross-linking allows for increased ion incorporation, which, in turn supports high conductivities. This facile synthetic approach enables the preparation of cross-linked materials with the potential to meet the demands of hydrogen-powered fuel cells as well as direct methanol fuel cells.

  5. Alkaline hydrolysis of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine: M06-2X investigation.

    PubMed

    Sviatenko, Liudmyla K; Gorb, Leonid; Hill, Frances C; Leszczynska, Danuta; Okovytyy, Sergiy I; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2015-09-01

    Alkaline hydrolysis mechanism of possible environmental contaminant RDX (hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine) was investigated computationally at the PCM(Pauling)/M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. Results obtained show that the initial deprotonation of RDX by hydroxide leads to nitrite elimination and formation of a denitrated cyclohexene intermediate. Further nucleophilic attack by hydroxide onto cyclic CN double bond results in ring opening. It was shown that the presence of hydroxide is crucial for this stage of the reaction. The dominant decomposition pathway leading to a ring-opened intermediate was found to be formation of 4-nitro-2,4-diazabutanal. Hydrolytic transformation of its byproduct (methylene nitramine) leads to end products such as formaldehyde and nitrous oxide. Computational results are in a good agreement with experimental data on hydrolysis of RDX, suggesting that 4-nitro-2,4-diazabutanal, nitrite, formaldehyde, and nitrous oxide are main products for early stages of RDX decomposition under alkaline conditions. PMID:25911044

  6. Deposition and removal of sodium contamination on silicon wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constant, I.; Tardif, F.; Derrien, J.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper investigations are performed in order to understand the source of sodium contamination in clean-room environments and to find different cleaning processes able to limit or suppress sodium deposition. In a clean-room environment, the human being has been identified as one of the major sources of sodium. The airborne sodium contamination is essentially transmitted in particle form. In order to limit sodium deposition from the air, the wafers awaiting subsequent processing need to be stored in a protective box or placed far from the human environment and should not be left for much more than 1 week in a class 1 clean room. Also, wet chemistries could cause sodium contamination on wafers particularly during the deionized water rinse. In order to limit the possible contamination, the sodium deposition mechanisms have been studied: they show the typical characteristics of Langmuir adsorption. Temperature and ionic concentration are both parameters which influence the deposition. In water, sodium deposition can be avoided by introducing acid or alkaline solutions or increasing the temperature: it can be drastically reduced by adding traces of HCl (0.01%). Finally, other cleaning chemistries such as SC1 (NH4 OH-H2 O2 -H2 O) in 0.25:1:5 proportion, SC2 (HCl-H2 O2 -H2 O) in 1:1:5 proportion, 0.1% HF and SPM (H2 SO4 -H2 O2 ) in 3:1 proportion reduce the contamination as well.

  7. The role of SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} surface distribution in arsenic removal by iron oxy-hydroxides

    SciTech Connect

    Tresintsi, S.; Simeonidis, K.; Pliatsikas, N.; Vourlias, G.; Patsalas, P.; Mitrakas, M.

    2014-05-01

    This study investigates the contribution of chemisorbed SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} in improving arsenic removal properties of iron oxy-hydroxides through an ion-exchange mechanism. An analytical methodology was developed for the accurate quantification of sulfate ion (SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}) distribution onto the surface and structural compartments of iron oxy-hydroxides synthesized by FeSO{sub 4} precipitation. The procedure is based on the sequential determination of SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} presence in the diffuse and Stern layers, and the structure of these materials as defined by the sulfate-rich environments during the reaction and the variation in acidity (pH 3–12). Physically sorbed SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}, extracted in distilled water, and physically/chemically adsorbed ions on the oxy-hydroxide's surface leached by a 5 mM NaOH solution, were determined using ion chromatography. Total sulfate content was gravimetrically measured by precipitation as BaSO{sub 4}. To validate the suggested method, results were verified by X-ray photoelectron and Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy. Results showed that low precipitation pH-values favor the incorporation of sulfate ions into the structure and the inner double layer, while under alkaline conditions ions shift to the diffuse layer. - Graphical abstract: An analytical methodology for the accurate quantification of sulfate ions (SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}) distribution onto the diffuse layer, the Stern layer and the structure of iron oxy-hydroxides used as arsenic removal agents. - Highlights: • Quantification of sulfate ions presence in FeOOH surface compartments. • Preparation pH defines the distribution of sulfates. • XPS and FTIR verify the presence of SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} in the structure, the Stern layer the diffuse layer of FeOOH. • Chemically adsorbed sulfates control the arsenic removal efficiency of iron oxyhydroxides.

  8. The Effects of Alkaline pH on Microleakage of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and Calcium Enriched Mixture Apical Plugs

    PubMed Central

    Mirhadi, Hossein; Moazzami, Fariborz; Rangani Jahromi, Saeed; Safarzade, Sareh

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Alkaline pH can affect the physical and chemical properties and sealing ability of apical plug material. Calcium hydroxide is used as an intracanal medication to complete disinfection of root canals. It raises the pH of environment to alkaline value. Purpose The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the effect of alkaline pH on the sealing ability of calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) apical plugs. Materials and Method Seventy single-rooted human maxillary anterior teeth were randomly divided to two experimental groups for Angelus MTA and CEM cement (n=30) and two control groups (n=5). Each group was divided into two subgroups of 15 for neutral and alkaline pH, and 1 negative and 1 positive control groups of 5. The root canals were cleaned and shaped by using ProTaper rotary system (Dentsply Maillefer; Ballaigues, Switzerland) and the terminal 3mm of the roots were resected. Then, MTA and CEM cement were condensed in apical region with 3mm thickness. The samples were exposed to two environments with different pH values of 13 and 7.4. The leakage was assessed by using the fluid filtration technique at 1, 7, 14, 30 days intervals. Data were analyzed by the repeated measures MANOVA. Results There was no statistically significant difference in the rate of microleakage between neutral and alkaline pH of CEM cement and MTA (p> 0.05). The sealing ability of MTA in an alkaline pH of 13 was significantly less than CEM cement in this pH (p< 0.05). Conclusion An environment with alkaline pH had no adverse effect on the sealing ability of MTA and CEM cement used as apical plugs. CEM cement had better sealing ability in alkaline pH. PMID:26966703

  9. Anode conductor for alkaline cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schrenk, D.J.; Murphy, P.E.

    1988-12-13

    This patent describes an electrochemical cell comprised of an anode comprised of zinc; a cathode; and alkaline electrolyte; and a current collector comprised of a silicon bronze alloy that is comprised of 85-98% by weight copper and 1-5% by weight silicon with the remainder being comprised of at least one of manganese, iron, zinc, aluminum, tin, lead, or mixtures thereof; and a strip of metal tab stock welded to the current collector, the tab stock being a metal other than silicon bronze alloy.

  10. Alkaline fuel cell performance investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. E.; Manzo, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    An exploratory experimental fuel cell test program was conducted to investigate the performance characteristics of alkaline laboratory research electrodes. The objective of this work was to establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance and evaluate candidate cathode configurations having the potential for improved performance. The performance characterization tests provided data to empirically establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance for cell temperatures up to 300 F and reactant pressures up to 200 psia. Evaluation of five gold alloy cathode catalysts revealed that three doped gold alloys had more than two times the surface areas of reference cathodes and therefore offered the best potential for improved performance.

  11. Alkaline fuel cell performance investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. E.; Manzo, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    An exploratory experimental fuel cell test program was conducted to investigate the performance characteristics of alkaline laboratory research electrodes. The objective of this work was to establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance and evaluate candidate cathode configurations having the potential for improved performance. The performance characterization tests provided data to empirically establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance for cell temperatures up to 300 F and reactant pressures up to 200 psia. Evaluation of five gold alloy cathode catalysts revealed that three doped gold alloys had more that two times the surface areas of reference cathodes and therefore offered the best potential for improved performance.

  12. Rechargeable sodium alloy anode

    SciTech Connect

    Jow, T.R.

    1988-06-28

    A secondary battery is described comprising: (a) an anode which comprises an alloy of sodium and one or metals selected from the group consisting of tin, lead antimony, bismuth, selenium and tellerium, (b) an electrolyte comprising one or more organic solvents and one or more sodium salts dissolved therein forming dissolved sodium cations in solution; and (c) a cathode; the sodium cations from the electrolyte alloying with the one or more metals of the alloy in the anode during the charging of the battery and sodium in the alloy disoloving in the electrolyte during the discharging of the battery.

  13. Nickel hydroxide/cobalt-ferrite magnetic nanocatalyst for alcohol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Pooja B; Inam, Fawad; Bhat, Badekai Ramachandra

    2014-08-11

    A magnetically separable, active nickel hydroxide (Brønsted base) coated nanocobalt ferrite catalyst has been developed for oxidation of alcohols. High surface area was achieved by tuning the particle size with surfactant. The surface area of 120.94 m2 g(-1) has been achieved for the coated nanocobalt ferrite. Improved catalytic activity and selectivity were obtained by synergistic effect of transition metal hydroxide (basic hydroxide) on nanocobalt ferrite. The nanocatalyst oxidizes primary and secondary alcohols efficiently (87%) to corresponding carbonyls in good yields. PMID:25075969

  14. Alkaline assisted thermal oil recovery: Kinetic and displacement studies

    SciTech Connect

    Saneie, S.; Yortsos, Y.C.

    1993-06-01

    This report deals with two major issues of chemical assisted flooding - the interaction of caustic, one of the proposed additives to steam flood, with the reservoir rock, and the displacement of oil by a chemical flood at elevated temperatures. A mathematical model simulating the kinetics of silica dissolution and hydroxyl ion consumption in a typical alkaline flooding environment is first developed. The model is based on the premise that dissolution occurs via hydrolysis of active sites through the formation of an intermediate complex, which is in equilibrium with the silicic acid in solution. Both static (batch) and dynamic (core flood) processes are simulated to examine the sensitivity of caustic consumption and silica dissolution to process parameters, and to determine rates of propagation of pH values. The model presented provides a quantitative description of the quartz-alkali interaction in terms of pH, salinity, ion exchange properties, temperature and contact time, which are of significant importance in the design of soluble silicate flooding processes. The modeling of an adiabatic hot waterflood assisted by the simultaneous injection of a chemical additive is next presented. The model is also applicable to the hot alkaline flooding under conditions of negligible adsorption of the generated anionic surfactant and of hydroxide adsorption being Langmuirian. The theory of generalized simple waves (coherence ) is used to develop solutions for the temperature, concentration, and oil saturation profiles, as well as the oil recovery curves. It is shown that, for Langmuir adsorption kinetics, the chemical resides in the heated region of the reservoir if its injection concentration is below a critical value, and in the unheated region if its concentration exceeds this critical value. Results for a chemical slug injection in a tertiary recovery process indicate recovery performance is maximized when chemical resides in the heated region of the reservior.

  15. Adsorption of phosphonate antiscalant from reverse osmosis membrane concentrate onto granular ferric hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Boels, Luciaan; Keesman, Karel J; Witkamp, Geert-Jan

    2012-09-01

    Adsorptive removal of antiscalants offers a promising way to improve current reverse osmosis (RO) concentrate treatment processes and enables the reuse of the antiscalant in the RO desalination process. This work investigates the adsorption and desorption of the phosphonate antiscalant nitrilotris(methylenephosphonic acid) (NTMP) from RO membrane concentrate onto granular ferric hydroxide (GFH), a material that consists predominantly of akaganéite. The kinetics of the adsorption of NTMP onto GFH was predicted fairly well with two models that consider either combined film-pore or combined film-surface diffusion as the main mechanism for mass transport. It is also demonstrated that NTMP is preferentially adsorbed over sulfate by GFH at pH 7.85. The presence of calcium causes a transformation in the equilibrium adsorption isotherm from a Langmuir type to a Freundlich type with much higher adsorption capacities. Furthermore, calcium also increases the rate of adsorption substantially. GFH is reusable after regeneration with sodium hydroxide solution, indicating that NTMP can be potentially recovered from the RO concentrate. This work shows that GFH is a promising adsorbent for the removal and recovery of NTMP antiscalant from RO membrane concentrates. PMID:22873428

  16. A closed loop system for the conversion of uranium turnings to uranyl oxy-hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Forman, T.M.; Sauer, N.N.; Smith, W.H.; Ogden, G.

    1997-12-31

    The machine shops at Los Alamos National Laboratory generate up to 5 Kgs of uranium turnings daily. Presently, the turnings are packed in diesel fuel in 55 gallon drums and shipped off site for treatment and disposal. In response to a request for an in-situ generator treatment plan, a three-part closed loop system has been designed to dissolve the turnings and leave them in a non-reactive form for either storage or disposal. The system uses electrochemically generated sodium hypochlorite to dissolve the turnings, converting them to uranyl oxy-hydroxide precipitate. The precipitate is continually centrifuged to separate the liquids from solids. The supernant, spent hypochlorite, feeds into the electrochemical cell, the hypochlorite is regenerated and pumped back into the dissolution reactor. This closed loop system accomplishes both conversion of the uranium turnings to an acceptable form and minimizes the treatment wastestream.

  17. Alkaline detergent recycling via ultrafiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Steffani, C.; Meltzer, M.

    1995-06-01

    The metal finishing industry uses alkaline cleaners and detergents to remove oils and dirt from manufactured parts, often before they are painted or plated. The use of these cleaners has grown because environmental regulations are phasing out ozone depleting substances and placing restrictions on the use and disposal of many hazardous solvents. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is examining ultrafiltration as a cleaning approach that reclaims the cleaning solutions and minimizes wastes. The ultrafiltration membrane is made from sheets of polymerized organic film. The sheets are rolled onto a supporting frame and installed in a tube. Spent cleaning solution is pumped into a filter chamber and filtered through the membrane that captures oils and dirt and allows water and detergent to pass. The membrane is monitored and when pressure builds from oil and dirt, an automatic system cleans the surface to maintain solution flow and filtration quality. The results show that the ultrafiltration does not disturb the detergent concentration or alkalinity but removed almost all the oils and dirt leaving the solution in condition to be reused.

  18. Grace DAKASEP alkaline battery separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovannoni, R. T.; Lundquist, J. T.; Choi, W. M.

    1987-01-01

    The Grace DAKASEP separator was originally developed as a wicking layer for nickel-zinc alkaline batteries. The DAKASEP is a filled non-woven separator which is flexible and heat sealable. Through modification of formulation and processing variables, products with a variety of properties can be produced. Variations of DAKASEP were tested in Ni-H2, Ni-Zn, Ni-Cd, and primary alkaline batteries with good results. The properties of DAKASEP which are optimized for Hg-Zn primary batteries are shown in tabular form. This separator has high tensile strength, 12 micron average pore size, relatively low porosity at 46-48 percent, and consequently moderately high resistivity. Versions were produced with greater than 70 percent porosity and resistivities in 33 wt percent KOH as low as 3 ohm cm. Performance data for Hg-Zn E-1 size cells containing DAKASEP with the properties shown in tabular form, are more reproducible than data obtained with a competitive polypropylene non-woven separator. In addition, utilization of active material is in general considerably improved.

  19. Homogeneous Precipitation of Nickel Hydroxide Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Bora Mavis

    2003-12-12

    Precipitation and characterization of nickel hydroxide powders were investigated. A comprehensive precipitation model incorporating the metal ion hydrolysis, complexation and precipitation reactions was developed for the production of the powders with urea precipitation method. Model predictions on Ni{sup 2+} precipitation rate were confirmed with precipitation experiments carried out at 90 C. Experimental data and model predictions were in remarkable agreement. Uncertainty in the solubility product data of nickel hydroxides was found to be the large contributor to the error. There were demonstrable compositional variations across the particle cross-sections and the growth mechanism was determined to be the aggregation of primary crystallites. This implied that there is a change in the intercalate chemistry of the primary crystallites with digestion time. Predicted changes in the concentrations of simple and complex ions in the solution support the proposed mechanism. The comprehensive set of hydrolysis reactions used in the model described above allows the investigation of other systems provided that accurate reaction constants are available. the fact that transition metal ions like Ni{sup 2+} form strong complexes with ammonia presents a challenge in the full recovery of the Ni{sup 2+}. On the other hand, presence of Al{sup 3+} facilitates the complete precipitation of Ni{sup 2+} in about 3 hours of digestion. A challenge in their predictive modeling studies had been the fact that simultaneous incorporation of more than one metal ion necessitates a different approach than just using the equilibrium constants of hydrolysis, complexation and precipitation reactions. Another limitation of using equilibrium constants is that the nucleation stage of digestion, which is controlled mainly by kinetics, is not fully justified. A new program released by IBM Almaden Research Center (Chemical Kinetics Simulator{trademark}, Version 1.01) lets the user change the order of

  20. Form and stability of aluminum hydroxide complexes in dilute solution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hem, John David; Roberson, Charles Elmer

    1967-01-01

    Laboratory studies of solutions 4.53 x 10 -4 to 4.5 x 10 -5 molal (12.2-1.2 ppm) in aluminum, in 0.01 molal sodium perchlorate, were conducted to obtain information as to the probable behavior of aluminum in natural water. When the solutions were brought to pH 7.5-9.5 and allowed to stand for 24 hours, a precipitate was obtained which was virtually amorphous as shown by X-rays, and which had a solubility equivalent to that of boehmite. This precipitate had a hydrolysis constant (*Ks4) of 1.93 x 10 -13a. When solutions were allowed to stead at this pH range for 10 days, their precipitates gave the X-ray pattern of bayerite (*Ks4 = 1.11 > (10- 4). These hydrolysis constants were obtained at 25?C. and corrected to zero ionic strength and are in close agreement with other published values. The predominant dissolved form in this pH range is Al(OH) -4. Below neutral pH (7.0) the dissolved aluminum species consist of octahedral units in which each aluminum ion is surrounded by six water molecules or hydroxide ions. Single units such as Al(OH2)6 + 3 and AlOH(OH2)5+2 are most abundant below pH 5.0, and where the molar ratio (r) of combined hydroxide to total dissolved aluminum is low. When r is greater than 1.0, polymerization of the octahedral units occurs. When r is between 2.0 and 3.0, solutions aged for 10 days or more contained colloidal particles between 0.10 and 0.45 ? in diameter. Particles whose diameters were greater than 0.10 ? were identified by X-ray diffraction as gibbsite. Particles smaller than 0.10 ? were also present and were shown by means of the electron microscope to have a hexagonal crystal pattern. Structured material consisting of sheets of coalesced six-membered rings of aluminum ions held together by double OH bridges has a distinctive kinetic behavior. This property was used to determine amounts of polymerized material in solutions having r between 1.0 and 3.0 after aging times ranging from a few hours to more than 4 months. Aging increased the