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Sample records for alkaline spray generator

  1. Study on a novel semidry flue gas desulfurization with multifluid alkaline spray generator

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Y.G.; Zhang, M.C.; Wang, D.F.; Wang, L.

    2005-11-09

    The advantages and disadvantages of the typical semidry flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes are analyzed, and a novel semidry FGD process with multifluid alkaline spray generator is first proposed to improve the colliding contact efficiency between sorbent particles and spray water droplets, and to form a large amount of aqueous lime slurry. The experimental results show that the colliding contact efficiency between lime particles and water droplets in the prefix alkaline spray generator may reach about 70%, which is significantly higher than the colliding contact efficiency of 25% in duct sorbent injection. The SO{sub 2} removal efficiency can reach 64.5% when the Ca/S molar ratio is 1.5, the approach to the saturation temperature is 10.3{sup o}C, and the flue gas residence time is 2.25 s. It is higher than that of in-duct sorbent injection under similar conditions, and the sorbent utilization is improved to 43%. Therefore, the FGD process with a prefix alkaline spray generator can greatly improve SO{sub 2} removal efficiency and sorbent utilization and it will be a new, simple and efficient semidry FGD process for industrial application in the future.

  2. Advanced spray generator of singlet oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spalek, Otomar; Hrubý, Jan; Jirásek, Vít; Čenský, Miroslav; Kodymová, Jarmila; Picková, Irena

    2007-05-01

    A spray type singlet oxygen generator (SOG) for chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) was studied. Mathematical modeling has shown that a high O II(1Δ) yield can be attained with BHP (basic hydrogen peroxide) spray in the Cl II-He atmosphere. It was found experimentally that O II(1Δ) was produced with a >=50% yield at a total pressure up to 50 kPa (375 Torr). A rotating separator was developed that can segregate even very small droplets (>=0.5 μm) from O II(1Δ) flow.

  3. Spray generators for absorption refrigeration systems

    DOEpatents

    Sibley, Howard W.

    1979-06-19

    A spray generator for an absorption refrigeration system that includes a heat exchanger comprised of a multiplicity of variably spaced heat exchange tubes. The tubes are spaced close together near the top of the heat exchanger and spaced more widely apart near the bottom of the heat exchanger. Dilute absorbent solution is sprayed down through the heat exchanger. The close nesting of the tubes in the top portion of the heat exchanger retards liquid flow and aids heating of the solution. The wide spacing of the tubes in the lower section of the heat exchanger facilitate vapor flow out of the heat exchanger and eliminates liquid "blow-off". The top tubes are covered by a baffle to prevent the liquid solution from splashing out of the heat exchanger off of these top tubes.

  4. Measurement Of Water Sprays Generated By Airplane Tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, Robert H.; Stubbs, Sandy M.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental investigation conducted at NASA Langley Research Center to measure rate of flow and trajectory of water spray generated by tire operating on flooded runway. Potential application to both aircraft and automotive industries, with particular application to manufacturers of tires.

  5. Vapor generator steam drum spray head

    DOEpatents

    Fasnacht, Jr., Floyd A.

    1978-07-18

    A typical embodiment of the invention provides a combination feedwater and "cooldown" water spray head that is centrally disposed in the lower portion of a nuclear power plant steam drum. This structure not only discharges the feedwater in the hottest part of the steam drum, but also increases the time required for the feedwater to reach the steam drum shell, thereby further increasing the feedwater temperature before it contacts the shell surface, thus reducing thermal shock to the steam drum structure.

  6. Alkaline static feed electrolyzer based oxygen generation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, L. D.; Kovach, A. J.; Fortunato, F. A.; Schubert, F. H.; Grigger, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    In preparation for the future deployment of the Space Station, an R and D program was established to demonstrate integrated operation of an alkaline Water Electrolysis System and a fuel cell as an energy storage device. The program's scope was revised when the Space Station Control Board changed the energy storage baseline for the Space Station. The new scope was aimed at the development of an alkaline Static Feed Electrolyzer for use in an Environmental Control/Life Support System as an oxygen generation system. As a result, the program was divided into two phases. The phase 1 effort was directed at the development of the Static Feed Electrolyzer for application in a Regenerative Fuel Cell System. During this phase, the program emphasized incorporation of the Regenerative Fuel Cell System design requirements into the Static Feed Electrolyzer electrochemical module design and the mechanical components design. The mechanical components included a Pressure Control Assembly, a Water Supply Assembly and a Thermal Control Assembly. These designs were completed through manufacturing drawing during Phase 1. The Phase 2 effort was directed at advancing the Alkaline Static Feed Electrolyzer database for an oxygen generation system. This development was aimed at extending the Static Feed Electrolyzer database in areas which may be encountered from initial fabrication through transportation, storage, launch and eventual Space Station startup. During this Phase, the Program emphasized three major areas: materials evaluation, electrochemical module scaling and performance repeatability and Static Feed Electrolyzer operational definition and characterization.

  7. Generation of size-monodisperse metal nanoparticles by spray pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung Hyeun

    2003-10-01

    Size-monodisperse pure copper metal particles were formed from metal salt precursors in a spray pyrolysis process that uses ethanol as a co-solvent, thus avoiding the addition of hydrogen or other reducing gases. In addition, the uniform-size particles were classified using a droplet impactor plate, which eliminates larger droplets at the atomizer prior to entering the reactor furnace. To investigate the role of ethanol co-solvent for the formation of phase pure metal particles in the spray pyrolysis process, the generation of phase pure copper and nickel particles from aqueous solutions of copper acetate, copper nitrate, and nickel nitrates over the temperature range of 450°C to 1000°C was demonstrated. Addition of ethanol as a co-solvent played a crucial role in producing phase pure metal powders. Results of a modeling study of ethanol decomposition kinetics suggested that co-solvent decomposition created a strong reducing atmosphere during spray pyrolysis via in-situ production of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. With the size-classified copper spheres as well as monodisperse polystyrene latex (PSL) spheres, the polarization and intensity of light scattered by those spheres, having diameters ranging from 92 nm to 218 nm, deposited on silicon substrates were measured using 442 nm, 532 nm, and 633 nm light. The results showed that accurate calculation of the scattering of light by a metal sphere requires that the near-field interaction between the sphere and its image is included in a complete manner. The normal incidence approximation did not suffice for this interaction, and the existence of any thin oxide layer on the substrate must be included in the calculation. In order to further examine the effects of light scattering by particles on a silicon substrate having an oxide coating, the polarization and intensity of light scattered by 101 nm polystyrene latex (PSL) and 100 nm copper spheres, deposited on silicon substrates containing various thickness of oxide

  8. High mass throughput particle generation using multiple nozzle spraying

    DOEpatents

    Pui, David Y.H.; Chen, Da-Ren

    2004-07-20

    Spraying apparatus and methods that employ multiple nozzle structures for producing multiple sprays of particles, e.g., nanoparticles, for various applications, e.g., pharmaceuticals, are provided. For example, an electrospray dispensing device may include a plurality of nozzle structures, wherein each nozzle structure is separated from adjacent nozzle structures by an internozzle distance. Sprays of particles are established from the nozzle structures by creating a nonuniform electrical field between the nozzle structures and an electrode electrically isolated therefrom.

  9. High mass throughput particle generation using multiple nozzle spraying

    DOEpatents

    Pui, David Y. H.; Chen, Da-Ren

    2009-03-03

    Spraying apparatus and methods that employ multiple nozzle structures for producing multiple sprays of particles, e.g., nanoparticles, for various applications, e.g., pharmaceuticals, are provided. For example, an electrospray dispensing device may include a plurality of nozzle structures, wherein each nozzle structure is separated from adjacent nozzle structures by an internozzle distance. Sprays of particles are established from the nozzle structures by creating a nonuniform electrical field between the nozzle structures and an electrode electrically isolated therefrom.

  10. High mass throughput particle generation using multiple nozzle spraying

    DOEpatents

    Pui, David Y. H.; Chen, Da-Ren

    2015-06-09

    Spraying apparatus and methods that employ multiple nozzle structures for producing multiple sprays of particles, e.g., nanoparticles, for various applications, e.g., pharmaceuticals, are provided. For example, an electrospray dispensing device may include a plurality of nozzle structures, wherein each nozzle structure is separated from adjacent nozzle structures by an internozzle distance. Sprays of particles are established from the nozzle structures by creating a nonuniform electrical field between the nozzle structures and an electrode electrically isolated therefrom.

  11. Spray Cooling And The Next Generation Of NASA Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Eric

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation discusses spray cooling as it applies to thermal management of the new ESMD (Exploration Systems Mission Directorate) programs. It is concluded that given the targeted heat flux and temperature operating regimes, spray cooling is a viable option, although further technology development will be required.

  12. 30 CFR 75.1101 - Deluge-type water sprays, foam generators; main and secondary belt-conveyor drives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Deluge-type water sprays, foam generators; main... Fire Protection § 75.1101 Deluge-type water sprays, foam generators; main and secondary belt-conveyor drives. Deluge-type water sprays or foam generators automatically actuated by rise in temperature,...

  13. 30 CFR 75.1101 - Deluge-type water sprays, foam generators; main and secondary belt-conveyor drives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Deluge-type water sprays, foam generators; main... Fire Protection § 75.1101 Deluge-type water sprays, foam generators; main and secondary belt-conveyor drives. Deluge-type water sprays or foam generators automatically actuated by rise in temperature,...

  14. 30 CFR 75.1101 - Deluge-type water sprays, foam generators; main and secondary belt-conveyor drives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Deluge-type water sprays, foam generators; main... Fire Protection § 75.1101 Deluge-type water sprays, foam generators; main and secondary belt-conveyor drives. Deluge-type water sprays or foam generators automatically actuated by rise in temperature,...

  15. 30 CFR 75.1101 - Deluge-type water sprays, foam generators; main and secondary belt-conveyor drives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Deluge-type water sprays, foam generators; main... Fire Protection § 75.1101 Deluge-type water sprays, foam generators; main and secondary belt-conveyor drives. Deluge-type water sprays or foam generators automatically actuated by rise in temperature,...

  16. 30 CFR 75.1101 - Deluge-type water sprays, foam generators; main and secondary belt-conveyor drives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Deluge-type water sprays, foam generators; main... Fire Protection § 75.1101 Deluge-type water sprays, foam generators; main and secondary belt-conveyor drives. Deluge-type water sprays or foam generators automatically actuated by rise in temperature,...

  17. Computer-Aided Robot Trajectory Auto-generation Strategy in Thermal Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Zhenhua; Liang, Hong; Quan, Shuhai; Deng, Sihao; Zeng, Chunnian; Zhang, Feng

    2015-10-01

    This paper is concerned with a new methodology which is designed to auto-generate the robotic trajectory for thermal spraying process. Based on it, a software package named Thermal Spray Toolkit is developed and integrated in the main frame of off-line programming software RobotStudio™ (Product of ABB Company, Sweden). This toolkit implements the robotic trajectory planning in an interactive manner between RobotStudio™ and the finite element analysis software (FES). It allows rearranging the imported node index created on the surface of workpiece by FES and in turn generating the thermal spraying needed robot trajectories. Several parameters in thermal spraying, such as scanning step and torch-substrate relative velocity which have major influence on the coating deposition, are considered in the trajectory generation process. Experiment is carried out to check the reliability of the generated robot trajectory.

  18. Advances in Thermal Spray Coatings for Gas Turbines and Energy Generation: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardwicke, Canan U.; Lau, Yuk-Chiu

    2013-06-01

    Functional coatings are widely used in energy generation equipment in industries such as renewables, oil and gas, propulsion engines, and gas turbines. Intelligent thermal spray processing is vital in many of these areas for efficient manufacturing. Advanced thermal spray coating applications include thermal management, wear, oxidation, corrosion resistance, sealing systems, vibration and sound absorbance, and component repair. This paper reviews the current status of materials, equipment, processing, and properties' aspects for key coatings in the energy industry, especially the developments in large-scale gas turbines. In addition to the most recent industrial advances in thermal spray technologies, future technical needs are also highlighted.

  19. Generation of 1:1 Carbamazepine:Nicotinamide cocrystals by spray drying.

    PubMed

    Patil, Shashank P; Modi, Sameer R; Bansal, Arvind K

    2014-10-01

    The present study investigates the potential of spray drying as a technique for generation of pharmaceutical cocrystals. Carbamazepine-Nicotinamide cocrystal (CNC) was chosen as model cocrystal system for this study. Firstly, CNC was generated using liquid assisted grinding and used for generation of phase solubility diagram (PSD) and ternary phase diagram (TPD). Both PSD and TPD were carefully evaluated for phase behavior of CNC when equilibrated with solvent. The undersaturated region with respect to CNC, as depicted by TPD, was selected as target region to initiate cocrystallization experiments. Various points in this region, representative of different compositions of Carbamazepine, Nicotinamide and CNC, were selected and spray drying was carried out. The spray dried product was characterized for solid state properties and was compared with CNC generated by liquid assisted grinding. Spray drying successfully generated CNC of similar quality as those generated by liquid assisted grinding. Moreover, there was no significant impact of process variables on formation of CNC. Spray drying, owing to its simplicity and industrial scalability, can be a promising method for large scale cocrystal generation.

  20. Laser-induced plasma generation and evolution in a transient spray.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Nobuyuki; Tsuboi, Kazuya; Tomita, Eiji

    2014-01-13

    The behaviors of laser-induced plasma and fuel spray were investigated by visualizing images with an ultra-high-speed camera. Time-series images of laser-induced plasma in a transient spray were visualized using a high-speed color camera. The effects of a shockwave generated from the laser-induced plasma on the evaporated spray behavior were investigated. The interaction between a single droplet and the laser-induced plasma was investigated using a single droplet levitated by an ultrasonic levitator. Two main conclusions were drawn from these experiments: (1) the fuel droplets in the spray were dispersed by the shockwave generated from the laser-induced plasma; and (2) the plasma position may have shifted due to breakdown of the droplet surface and the lens effect of droplets.

  1. A laboratory study of spray generation in high winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Suslow, D. G.; Haus, B. K.; Mehta, S.; Laxague, N. J. M.

    2016-05-01

    Characterizing the vertical distribution of large spray particles (i.e., spume) in high wind conditions is necessary for better understanding of the development of the atmospheric boundary layer in extreme conditions. To this end a laboratory experiment was designed to observe the droplet concentration in the air above actively breaking waves. The experiments were carried out in hurricane force conditions (U 10 equivalent wind speed of 36 to 54 m/s) and using both fresh water and salt water. While small differences between fresh and salt water were observed in profiles of radius-integrated spray volume fraction, the profiles tend to converge as the wind forcing increases. This supports the assumption that the physical mechanism for spume production is not sensitive to salinity and its corresponding link to the bubble size distribution.

  2. Measurements of Flow Rate and Trajectory of Aircraft Tire-Generated Water Spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, Robert H.; Stubbs, Sandy M.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center to measure the flow rate and trajectory of water spray generated by an aircraft tire operating on a flooded runway. Tests were conducted in the Hydrodynamics Research Facility and made use of a partial airframe and a nose tire from a general aviation aircraft. Nose tires from a commercial transport aircraft were also used. The effects of forward speed, tire load, and water depth on water spray patterns were evaluated by measuring the amount and location of water captured by an array of tubes mounted behind the test tire. Water ejected from the side of the tire footprint had the most significant potential for ingestion into engine inlets. A lateral wake created on the water surface by the rolling tire can dominate the shape of the spray pattern as the distance aft of the tire is increased. Forward speed increased flow rates and moved the spray pattern inboard. Increased tire load caused the spray to become less dense. Near the tire, increased water depths caused flow rates to increase. Tests using a fuselage and partial wing along with the nose gear showed that for certain configurations, wing aerodynamics can cause a concentration of spray above the wing.

  3. Centrifugal spray singlet oxygen generator for a COIL with nitrogen as a buffer gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Å palek, Otomar; Jirásek, Vít.; Čenský, Miroslav; Kodymová, Jarmila

    2012-01-01

    A scalable high pressure centrifugal spray generator of singlet oxygen for chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) was developed. This generator uses nitrogen as chlorine diluting gas. Different spray nozzles were tested which could be assembled together and so enable a high chlorine flow rates for a high-power COIL. The designed generator can produce singlet oxygen, O2(1Δg), with reasonable chlorine utilization and O2(1Δg) yield even at very high generator pressures, which cannot be attained by other O2(1Δg) generators. This high-pressure operation is beneficial for a pressure recovery system of the laser. Another advantage of this generator is a very high BHP utilization. The problem of heating of exit gas was solved by introducing additional nitrogen between the separator rotor and stator.

  4. Modeling breathing-zone concentrations of airborne contaminants generated during compressed air spray painting.

    PubMed

    Flynn, M R; Gatano, B L; McKernan, J L; Dunn, K H; Blazicko, B A; Carlton, G N

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model to predict breathing-zone concentrations of airborne contaminants generated during compressed air spray painting in cross-flow ventilated booths. The model focuses on characterizing the generation and transport of overspray mist. It extends previous work on conventional spray guns to include exposures generated by HVLP guns. Dimensional analysis and scale model wind-tunnel studies are employed using non-volatile oils, instead of paint, to produce empirical equations for estimating exposure to total mass. Results indicate that a dimensionless breathing zone concentration is a nonlinear function of the ratio of momentum flux of air from the spray gun to the momentum flux of air passing through the projected area of the worker's body. The orientation of the spraying operation within the booth is also very significant. The exposure model requires an estimate of the contaminant generation rate, which is approximated by a simple impactor model. The results represent an initial step in the construction of more realistic models capable of predicting exposure as a mathematical function of the governing parameters.

  5. Size distribution of chromate paint aerosol generated in a bench-scale spray booth.

    PubMed

    Sabty-Daily, Rania A; Hinds, William C; Froines, John R

    2005-01-01

    Spray painters are potentially exposed to aerosols containing hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] via inhalation of chromate-based paint sprays. Evaluating the particle size distribution of a paint spray aerosol, and the variables that may affect this distribution, is necessary to determine the site and degree of respiratory deposition and the damage that may result from inhaled Cr(VI)-containing paint particles. This study examined the effect of spray gun atomization pressure, aerosol generation source and aerosol aging on the size distribution of chromate-based paint overspray aerosols generated in a bench-scale paint spray booth. The study also determined the effect of particle bounce inside a Marple personal cascade impactor on measured size distributions of paint spray aerosols. Marple personal cascade impactors with a modified inlet were used for sample collection. The data indicated that paint particle bounce did not occur inside the cascade impactors sufficiently to affect size distribution when using uncoated stainless steel or PVC substrate sampling media. A decrease in paint aerosol mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) from 8.2 to 7.0 mum was observed as gun atomization pressure increased from 6 to 10 psi. Overspray aerosols were sampled at two locations in the spray booth. A downstream sampling position simulated the exposure of a worker standing between the painted surface and exhaust, a situation encountered in booths with multiple workers. The measured mean MMAD was 7.2 mum. The distance between the painted surface and sampler was varied to sample oversprays of varying ages between 2.8 and 7.7 s. Age was not a significant factor for determining MMAD. Overspray was sampled at a 90 degrees position to simulate a worker standing in front of the surface being painted with air flowing to the worker's side, a common situation in field applications. The resulting overspray MMAD averaged 5.9 mum. Direct-spray aerosols were sampled at ages from 5.3 to 11.7 s

  6. Electricity generation from macroalgae Enteromorpha prolifera hydrolysates using an alkaline fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Liu, Susu; Liu, Xianhua; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Pingping

    2016-12-01

    The goal of this work was to develop a method for the direct power generation using macroalgae Enteromorpha prolifera. The process conditions for the saccharification of macroalgae were optimized and a type of alkaline fuel cell contained no precious metal catalysts was developed. Under optimum conditions (170°C and 2% hydrochloric acid for 45min), dilute acid hydrolysis of the homogenized plants yielded 272.25g reducing sugar/kg dry algal biomass. The maximum power density reached 3.81W/m(2) under the condition of 3M KOH and 18.15g/L reducing sugar in hydrolysate, higher than any other reported algae-fed fuel cells. This study represents the first report on direct electricity generation from macroalgae using alkaline fuel cells, suggesting that there is great potential for the production of renewable energy using marine biomass.

  7. Centrifugal Spray Generator of Singlet Oxygen for a COIL

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-23

    mixing tank 1. Liquid is transferred after cooling down to about -28 C into the BHP input tank 2 through isolated stainless steel piping. Pressure ...in this tank is increased to 180-220 kPa (abs.) by means of pressurized nitrogen just before the generator operation. The BHP liquid is then led by...11 Fig. 8. Overall view on the laser from the right side 1 – BHP mixing tank , 2 – pressurized BHP tank , 3 – atomizing nozzle, 4

  8. Large eddy simulations of partially premixed ethanol dilute spray flames using the flamelet generated manifold model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Asrag, Hossam A.; Braun, Markus; Masri, Assaad R.

    2016-07-01

    The paper presents Large Eddy Simulations (LESs) for the Sydney ethanol piloted turbulent dilute spray flames ETF2, ETF6, and ETF7. The Flamelet Generated Manifold (FGM) approach is employed to predict mixing and burning of the evaporating fuel droplets. A methodology to match the experimental inflow spray profiles is presented. The spray statistical time-averaged results show reasonable agreement with mean and RMS data. The Particle Size Distribution (PSD) shows a good match downstream of the nozzle exit and up to x/D = 10. At x/D = 20 and 30 the PSD is under-predicted for droplets with mean diameter D10 > 20μm and over-predicted for the smaller size droplets. The simulations reasonably predict the reported mean flame structure and length. The effect of increasing the carrier velocity (ETF2-ETF7) or decreasing the liquid fuel injection mass flow rate (ETF2-ETF6) is found to result in a leaner, shorter flame and stronger spray-flow interactions. Higher tendency to local extinction is observed for ETF7 which is closer to blow-off compared to ETF2 and has higher scalar dissipation rates, higher range of Stokes number, and faster droplet response. The possible sources of LES-FGM deviations from the measurements are discussed and highlighted. In particular, the spray time-averaged statistical error contribution is quantified and the impact of the inflow uncertainty is studied. Sensitivity analysis to the pre-vaporized nozzle fuel mass fraction show that such small inflow perturbations (by ± 2% for the ETF2 flame) have a strong impact on the flame structure, and the droplets' dynamics. Conditional scatter plots show that the flame exhibits wide range of mixing conditions and bimodal mixing lines particularly at upstream locations (x/D < 20), where the injected droplets are still penetrating the centerline. This is relaxed further downstream as droplets gradually evaporate and burn in a diffusion like mode.

  9. Chemical oxygen-iodine laser with a centrifugal spray generator of singlet oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Špalek, Otomar; Jirásek, Vít; Čenský, Miroslav; Kodymová, Jarmila

    2010-09-01

    A chemical oxygen-iodine laser driven by the centrifugal spray generator of singlet oxygen was developed and experimentally studied. Modeling and experimental studies showed that the designed generator can produce singlet oxygen, O2(1Δg), with a high efficiency (chlorine utilization 0.68 - 0.87 and O2(1Δg) yield 0.35 - 0.7) even at very high generator pressures (25 - 70 kPa), which cannot be attained by other O2(1Δg) generators. This high-pressure operation should be beneficial for a pressure recovery system of the laser. Another specific feature of the generator is a very high BHP utilization (0.24-0.6). The developed separator can effectively remove even small droplets (> 1 μm) from gas at the generator exit. Preliminary experiments on the COIL driven the centrifugal spray generator provided the small signal gain up to 0.5 % cm-1.

  10. Laboratory investigation of spray generation mechanism in wind-wave interaction under strong wind conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandaurov, Alexander; Troitskaya, Yuliya; Sergeev, Daniil; Ermakova, Olga; Kazakov, Vassily

    2015-04-01

    The sea spray is considered as a possible mechanism of the reduction of sea surface aerodynamic drag coefficient at hurricane conditions [1]. In this paper the mechanism of generation of spray in the near-surface layer of the atmosphere in a strong wind through the mechanism of «bag-breakup instability» was investigated in laboratory conditions with the help of high-speed video shooting. The laboratory experiments were performed on the Thermostratified Wind-Wave Channel of the IAP RAS (length 10 m, cross section of air channel 0.4 x 0.4 m, wind velocity up to 24 m/s) [2]. Experiments were carried out for the wind speeds from 14 to 22 m/s. In this range spray generation characteristics change dramatically from almost no spray generation to so called catastrophic regime with multiple cascade breakups on each crest. Shooting was performed with High-speed digital camera NAC Memrecam HX-3 in two different setups to obtain both statistical data and detailed spray generation mechanism overview. In first setup bright LED spotlight with mate screen the side of a channel was used for horizontal shadow-method shooting. Camera was placed in semi-submerged box on the opposite side of the channel. Shooting was performed at the distance of 7.5 m from the beginning of the working section. Series of short records of the surface evolution were made at 10 000 fps with 55 to 119 µm/px scale revealed the dominant mechanism of spray generation - bag-breakup instability. Sequences of high resolution images allowed investigating the details of this "bags" evolution. Shadow method provided better image quality for such conditions than side illumination and fluorescence methods. To obtain statistical data on "bags" sizes and densities vertical shadow method was used. Submerged light box was created with two 300 W underwater lamps and mate screen places at the fetch of 6.5 m. Long records (up to 8 seconds) were made with 4500 fps at 124-256 µm/px scales. Specially developed software

  11. Characterization of the liquid sodium spray generated by a pipework hole

    SciTech Connect

    Torsello, G.; Parozzi, F.; Nericcio, L.; Araneo, L.; Cozzi, F.; Carcassi, M.; Mattei, N.

    2012-07-01

    Due to its advantageous thermodynamic characteristics at high temperature (550 deg. C), liquid sodium is the main candidate to be the cooling fluid for Generation TV nuclear reactors SFR (Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors). Now, sodium reacts very violently, both with the water and the oxygen of the air. Only few data were known about the liquid sodium behaviour when spread in the environment through micro defects. These are often present in a cooling circuit in welded or sealed joints and more rarely in the pipes. Micro defects, on the other hand, can be also generated in a cooling circuit because of the vibrations always present in a circuit into which a fluid runs. A new set-up, named LISOF, was built for testing high temperature liquid sodium when passing through micro defects and generating sprays or jets. Sprays and jets were generated by means of nozzles embedding sub milli-metric holes the diameter of which was: 0.2 mm, 0.4 mm, 0.5 mm. Tests were performed by pressurizing liquid sodium (550 deg. C) at: 3, 6 and 9 barg. Normal and high speed cinematography were used for the direct observation of the liquid sodium sprays while Phase Doppler Interferometry was used for the measurement of the droplets characteristics and velocity. Tests concerning the behaviour of the high temperature liquid sodium firing in air or in contact with the cement cover applied to a scaled down core catcher simulacrum were also performed. The paper presents the built set-up and the collected results. (authors)

  12. Cold-Sprayed Ni-Al2O3 Coatings for Applications in Power Generation Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevillano, F.; Poza, P.; Múnez, C. J.; Vezzù, S.; Rech, S.; Trentin, A.

    2013-06-01

    Cermets coatings are extensively used in energy applications both because of their high wear resistance as required, for example, in components like gas turbine sealants, and because of their specific functionality as required in solar absorbers. So far, high-temperature thermal spraying and physical vapor deposition have traditionally been used to deposit this kind of coatings. In this study, Ni-Al2O3 coatings have been deposited using a Kinetic®3000 cold-spray system starting from Ni and Al2O3 powders blend; five blends have been prepared setting the alumina content in the feedstock to 10, 25, 50, 75, and 90 wt.%. The embedded alumina ranges between a few percent weight up to 16 and 31 wt.%, while the microhardness shows a deep increase from 175 Vickers in the case of pure Ni coatings up to 338 Vickers. The spray and coating growth mechanism have been discussed, with special attention to the fragmentation of the ceramic particles during the impact. Finally, the coating behavior at high temperature was analyzed by oxidation tests performed in air at 520 °C emphasizing a good oxidation resistance that could represent a very promising basis for application in power generation systems.

  13. Investigation of vortex clouds and droplet sizes in heated water spray patterns generated by axisymmetric full cone nozzles.

    PubMed

    Naz, M Y; Sulaiman, S A; Ariwahjoedi, B; Ku Shaari, Ku Zilati

    2013-01-01

    The hot water sprays are an important part of many industrial processes, where the detailed knowledge of physical phenomena involved in jet transportation, interaction, secondary breakup, evaporation, and coalescence of droplets is important to reach more efficient processes. The objective of the work was to study the water spray jet breakup dynamics, vortex cloud formation, and droplet size distribution under varying temperature and load pressure. Using a high speed camera, the spray patterns generated by axisymmetric full cone nozzles were visualized as a function water temperature and load pressure. The image analysis confirmed that the spray cone angle and width do not vary significantly with increasing Reynolds and Weber numbers at early injection phases leading to increased macroscopic spray propagation. The formation and decay of semitorus like vortex clouds were also noticed in spray structures generated at near water boiling point temperature. For the nozzle with smallest orifice diameter (1.19 mm), these vortex clouds were very clear at 90°C heating temperature and 1 bar water load pressure. In addition, the sauter mean diameter (SMD) of the spray droplets was also measured by using Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) at different locations downstream of the nozzle exit. It was noticed that SMD varies slightly w.r.t. position when measured at room temperature whereas at higher temperature values, it became almost constant at distance of 55 mm downstream of the nozzle exit.

  14. Physicochemical Characterization of Lake Spray Aerosol Generated from Great Lakes Water Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ault, A. P.; Axson, J. L.; May, N.; Pratt, K.

    2014-12-01

    Wave breaking across bodies of water releases particles into the air which can impact climate and human health. Similar to sea spray aerosols formed through marine wave breaking, freshwater lakes generate lake spray aerosol (LSA). LSA can impact climate directly through scattering/absorption and indirectly through cloud nucleation. In addition, these LSA are suggested to impact human health through inhalation of these particles during algal bloom periods characterized by toxic cyanobacteria. Few studies have been conducted to assess the physical and chemical properties of freshwater LSA. Herein, we discuss constructing a LSA generation system and preliminary physical and chemical characterization of aerosol generated from water samples collected at various sites across Lake Erie, Lake Huron, Lake Superior, and Lake Michigan. Information on aerosol size distributions, number concentrations, and chemical composition will be discussed as a function of lake water blue-green algae concentration, dissolved organic carbon concentration, temperature, conductivity, and dissolved oxygen concentration. These studies represent a first step towards evaluating the potential for LSA to impact climate and health in the Great Lakes region.

  15. Anditalea andensis ANESC-ST--An Alkaliphilic Halotolerant Bacterium Capable of Electricity Generation under Alkaline-Saline Conditions.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei; Wang, Victor Bochuan; Zhao, Cui-E; Zhang, Qichun; Loo, Say Chye Joachim; Yang, Liang; Xu, Chenjie

    2015-01-01

    A great challenge in wastewater bioremediation is the sustained activity of viable microorganisms, which can contribute to the breakdown of waste contaminants, especially in alkaline pH conditions. Identification of extremophiles with bioremediation capability can improve the efficiency of wastewater treatment. Here, we report the discovery of an electrochemically active alkaliphilic halotolerant bacterium, Anditalea andensis ANESC-ST (=CICC10485T=NCCB 100412T), which is capable of generating bioelectricity in alkaline-saline conditions. A. andensis ANESC-ST was shown to grow in alkaline conditions between pH 7.0-11.0 and also under high salt condition (up to 4 wt% NaCl). Electrical output was further demonstrated in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) with an average current density of ~0.5 µA/cm2, even under the harsh condition of 4 wt% NaCl and pH 9.0. Subsequent introduction of secreted extracellular metabolites into MFCs inoculated with Escherichia coli or Pseudomonas aeruginosa yielded enhanced electrical output. The ability of A. andensis ANESC-ST to generate energy under alkaline-saline conditions points towards a solution for bioelectricity recovery from alkaline-saline wastewater. This is the first report of A.andensis ANESC-ST producing bioelectricity at high salt concentration and pH.

  16. Biodegradation of the alkaline cellulose degradation products generated during radioactive waste disposal.

    PubMed

    Rout, Simon P; Radford, Jessica; Laws, Andrew P; Sweeney, Francis; Elmekawy, Ahmed; Gillie, Lisa J; Humphreys, Paul N

    2014-01-01

    The anoxic, alkaline hydrolysis of cellulosic materials generates a range of cellulose degradation products (CDP) including α and β forms of isosaccharinic acid (ISA) and is expected to occur in radioactive waste disposal sites receiving intermediate level radioactive wastes. The generation of ISA's is of particular relevance to the disposal of these wastes since they are able to form complexes with radioelements such as Pu enhancing their migration. This study demonstrates that microbial communities present in near-surface anoxic sediments are able to degrade CDP including both forms of ISA via iron reduction, sulphate reduction and methanogenesis, without any prior exposure to these substrates. No significant difference (n = 6, p = 0.118) in α and β ISA degradation rates were seen under either iron reducing, sulphate reducing or methanogenic conditions, giving an overall mean degradation rate of 4.7 × 10(-2) hr(-1) (SE ± 2.9 × 10(-3)). These results suggest that a radioactive waste disposal site is likely to be colonised by organisms able to degrade CDP and associated ISA's during the construction and operational phase of the facility.

  17. Biodegradation of the Alkaline Cellulose Degradation Products Generated during Radioactive Waste Disposal

    PubMed Central

    Rout, Simon P.; Radford, Jessica; Laws, Andrew P.; Sweeney, Francis; Elmekawy, Ahmed; Gillie, Lisa J.; Humphreys, Paul N.

    2014-01-01

    The anoxic, alkaline hydrolysis of cellulosic materials generates a range of cellulose degradation products (CDP) including α and β forms of isosaccharinic acid (ISA) and is expected to occur in radioactive waste disposal sites receiving intermediate level radioactive wastes. The generation of ISA's is of particular relevance to the disposal of these wastes since they are able to form complexes with radioelements such as Pu enhancing their migration. This study demonstrates that microbial communities present in near-surface anoxic sediments are able to degrade CDP including both forms of ISA via iron reduction, sulphate reduction and methanogenesis, without any prior exposure to these substrates. No significant difference (n = 6, p = 0.118) in α and β ISA degradation rates were seen under either iron reducing, sulphate reducing or methanogenic conditions, giving an overall mean degradation rate of 4.7×10−2 hr−1 (SE±2.9×10−3). These results suggest that a radioactive waste disposal site is likely to be colonised by organisms able to degrade CDP and associated ISA's during the construction and operational phase of the facility. PMID:25268118

  18. Lake spray aerosol generation: a method for producing representative particles from freshwater wave breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Nathaniel W.; Axson, Jessica L.; Watson, Alexa; Pratt, Kerri A.; Ault, Andrew P.

    2016-09-01

    Wave-breaking action in bodies of freshwater produces atmospheric aerosols via a similar mechanism to sea spray aerosol (SSA) from seawater. The term lake spray aerosol (LSA) is proposed to describe particles formed by this mechanism, which have been observed over the Laurentian Great Lakes. Though LSA has been identified from size distribution measurements during a single measurement campaign, no measurements of LSA composition or relationship to bubble-bursting dynamics have been conducted. An LSA generator utilizing a plunging jet, similar to many SSA generators, was constructed for the generation of aerosol from freshwater samples and model salt solutions. To evaluate this new generator, bubble and aerosol number size distributions were measured for salt solutions representative of freshwater (CaCO3) and seawater (NaCl) at concentrations ranging from that of freshwater to seawater (0.05-35 g kg-1), synthetic seawater (inorganic), synthetic freshwater (inorganic), and a freshwater sample from Lake Michigan. Following validation of the bubble and aerosol size distributions using synthetic seawater, a range of salt concentrations were investigated. The systematic studies of the model salts, synthetic freshwater, and Lake Michigan sample indicate that LSA is characterized by a larger number size distribution mode diameter of 300 nm (lognormal), compared to seawater at 110 nm. Decreasing salt concentrations from seawater to freshwater led to greater bubble coalescence and formation of larger bubbles, which generated larger particles and lower aerosol number concentrations. This resulted in a bimodal number size distribution with a primary mode (180 ± 20 nm) larger than that of SSA, as well as a secondary mode (46 ± 6 nm) smaller than that of SSA. This new method for studying LSA under isolated conditions is needed as models, at present, utilize SSA parameterizations for freshwater systems, which do not accurately predict the different size distributions observed

  19. Transition metal associations with primary biological particles in sea spray aerosol generated in a wave channel.

    PubMed

    Guasco, Timothy L; Cuadra-Rodriguez, Luis A; Pedler, Byron E; Ault, Andrew P; Collins, Douglas B; Zhao, Defeng; Kim, Michelle J; Ruppel, Matthew J; Wilson, Scott C; Pomeroy, Robert S; Grassian, Vicki H; Azam, Farooq; Bertram, Timothy H; Prather, Kimberly A

    2014-01-21

    In the ocean, breaking waves generate air bubbles which burst at the surface and eject sea spray aerosol (SSA), consisting of sea salt, biogenic organic species, and primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP). Our overall understanding of atmospheric biological particles of marine origin remains poor. Here, we perform a control experiment, using an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer to measure the mass spectral signatures of individual particles generated by bubbling a salt solution before and after addition of heterotrophic marine bacteria. Upon addition of bacteria, an immediate increase occurs in the fraction of individual particle mass spectra containing magnesium, organic nitrogen, and phosphate marker ions. These biological signatures are consistent with 21% of the supermicrometer SSA particles generated in a previous study using breaking waves in an ocean-atmosphere wave channel. Interestingly, the wave flume mass spectral signatures also contain metal ions including silver, iron, and chromium. The nascent SSA bioparticles produced in the wave channel are hypothesized to be as follows: (1) whole or fragmented bacterial cells which bioaccumulated metals and/or (2) bacteria-derived colloids or biofilms which adhered to the metals. This study highlights the potential for transition metals, in combination with specific biomarkers, to serve as unique indicators for the presence of marine PBAP, especially in metal-impacted coastal regions.

  20. Room-Temperature Fabrication of a Flexible Thermoelectric Generator Using a Dry-Spray Deposition System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dae-Seob; Choi, Jung-Oh; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-04-01

    We present a flexible thermoelectric (TE) generator with titanium dioxide (TiO2), antimony (Sb), and tellurium (Te) powders fabricated by a nanoparticle deposition system (NPDS). NPDS is a novel low-energy consumption dry-spray method that enables the deposition of inorganic materials on substrates at room temperature and under low vacuum. TiO2 nanopowders were dispersed on a TE powder for improved adhesion between TE films and the substrate. Film morphologies were investigated using field-emission scanning electron microscopy, and the phase structure was analyzed by x-ray diffraction. A TE leg, deposited with 3 wt.% TiO2 content, had the largest Seebeck coefficient of approximately 160 μV/K. The prototype TE generator consisted of 16 TE legs linked by silver interconnects over an area of 20 mm × 60 mm. The prototype produced a voltage of 48.91 mV and a maximum power output of 0.18 μW from a temperature gradient of 20 K. The values are comparable to that of conventional methods. These results suggest that flexible TE generators can be fabricated by energy efficient methods, although internal and contact resistances must be decreased.

  1. Control of alkaline stress corrosion cracking in pressurized-water reactor steam generator tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, I.S. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Park, I.G. . Div. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1999-06-01

    Outer-diameter stress corrosion cracking (ODSCC) of alloy 600 (UNS N06600) tubings in steam generators of the Kori-1 pressurized-water reactor (PWR) caused an unscheduled outage in 1994. Failure analysis and remedy development studies were undertaken to avoid a recurrence. Destructive examination of a removed tube indicated axial intergranular cracks developed at the top of sludge caused by a boiling crevice geometry. A high ODSCC propagation rate was attributed to high local pH and increased corrosion potential resulting from oxidized copper presumably formed during the maintenance outage and plant heatup. Remedial measures included: (1) crevice neutralization by crevice flushing with boric acid (H[sub 3]BO[sub 3]) and molar ratio control using ammonium chloride (NH[sub 4]Cl), (2) corrosion potential reduction by hydrazine (H[sub 2]NNH[sub 2]) soaking and suppression of oxygen below 20 ppb to avoid copper oxide formation, (3) titanium dioxide (TiO[sub 2]) inhibitor soaking, and (4) temperature reduction of 5 C. Since application of the remedy program, no significant ODSCC has been observed, which clearly demonstrates the benefit of departing from an oxidizing alkaline environment. In addition, the TiO[sub 2] inhibitor appeared to have a positive effect, warranting further examination.

  2. Promoting Active Species Generation by Electrochemical Activation in Alkaline Media for Efficient Electrocatalytic Oxygen Evolution in Neutral Media.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kun; Cheng, Han; Liu, Linqi; Lv, Haifeng; Wu, Xiaojun; Wu, Changzheng; Xie, Yi

    2017-01-11

    In this study, by using dicobalt phosphide nanoparticles as precatalysts, we demonstrated that electrochemical activation of metallic precatalysts in alkaline media (comparing with directly electrochemical activation in neutral media) could significantly promote the OER catalysis in neutral media, specifically realizing a 2-fold enhanced activity and meanwhile showing a greatly decreased overpotential of about 100 mV at 10 mA cm(-2). Compared directly with electrochemical activation in neutral media, the electrochemical activation in harsh alkaline media could easily break the strong Co-Co bond and promote active species generation on the surface of metallic Co2P, thus accounting for the enhancement of neutral OER activity, which is also evidenced by HRTEM and the electrochemical double-layer capacitance measurement. The activation of electrochemical oxidation of metallic precatalysts in alkaline media enhanced neutral OER catalysis could also be observed on CoP nanoparticles and Ni2P nanoparticles, suggesting this is a generic strategy. Our work highlights that the activation of electrochemical oxidation of metallic precatalysts in alkaline media would pave new avenues for the design of advanced neutral OER electrocatalysts.

  3. New generation of plasma-sprayed mullite coatings on silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kang N.; Miller, Robert A.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1995-01-01

    Mullite is promising as a protective coating for silicon-based ceramics in aggressive high-temperature environments. Conventionally plasma-sprayed mullite on SiC tends to crack and debond on thermal cycling. It is shown that this behavior is due to the presence of amorphous mullite in the conventionally sprayed mullite. Heating the SiC substrate during the plasma spraying eliminated the amorphous phase and produced coatings with dramatically improved properties. The new coating exhibits excellent adherence and crack resistance under thermal cycling between room temperature and 1000 to 1400 C. Preliminary tests showed good resistance to Na2CO3-induced hot corrosion.

  4. Emissions and Characteristics of Ice Nucleating Particles Associated with Laboratory Generated Nascent Sea Spray Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCluskey, C. S.; Hill, T. C. J.; Beall, C.; Sultana, C. M.; Moore, K.; Cornwell, G.; Lee, C.; Al-Mashat, H.; Laskina, O.; Trueblood, J.; Grassian, V. H.; Prather, K. A.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; DeMott, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate emission rates and activity spectra of atmospheric ice nucleating particles (INPs) are required for proper representation of aerosol-cloud interactions in atmospheric modeling studies. However, few investigations have quantified or characterized oceanic INP emissions. In conjunction with the Center for Aerosol Impacts on the Climate and the Environment, we have directly measured changes in INP emissions and properties of INPs from nascent sea spray aerosol (SSA) through the evolution of phytoplankton blooms. Multiple offline and online instruments were used to monitor aerosol chemistry and size, and bulk water characteristics during two phytoplankton bloom experiments. Two methods were utilized to monitor the number concentrations of INPs from 0 to -34 °C: The online CSU continuous flow diffusion chamber (CFDC) and collections processed offline using the CSU ice spectrometer. Single particle analyses were performed on ice crystal residuals downstream of the CFDC, presumed to be INPs, via scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and Raman microspectroscopy. Preliminary results indicate that laboratory-generated nascent SSA corresponds to number concentrations of INPs that are generally consistent with open ocean regions, based on current knowledge. STEM analyses revealed that the sizes of ice crystal residuals that were associated with nascent SSA ranged from 0.3 to 2.5 μm. Raman microspectroscopy analysis of 1 μm sized residuals found a variety of INP identities, including long chain organics, diatom fragments and polysaccharides. Our data suggest that biological processes play a significant role in ocean INP emissions by generating the species and compounds that were identified during these studies.

  5. Nanofiber Composite Membranes for Alkaline Fuel Cells: Generation of Compositional, Morphological, and Functional Property Relationships

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    properties of nanofiber composite anion-exchange membranes for alkaline fuel cells. A new membrane fabrication strategy, utilizing polymer fiber...electrospinning, will be employed to make hydroxide-conducting membranes with an entirely new morphology, where one electrospun polymer provides pathways...for ion conductivity and the second electrospun polymer restricts ionomer swelling and imparts mechanical strength to the membrane. The functional

  6. The organic fraction of bubble-generated, accumulation mode Sea Spray Aerosol (SSA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modini, R. L.; Harris, B.; Ristovski, Z. D.

    2010-03-01

    Recent studies have detected a dominant accumulation mode (~100 nm) in the Sea Spray Aerosol (SSA) number distribution. There is evidence to suggest that particles in this mode are composed primarily of organics. To investigate this hypothesis we conducted experiments on NaCl, artificial SSA and natural SSA particles with a Volatility-Hygroscopicity-Tandem-Differential-Mobility-Analyser (VH-TDMA). NaCl particles were atomiser generated and a bubble generator was constructed to produce artificial and natural SSA particles. Natural seawater samples for use in the bubble generator were collected from biologically active, terrestrially-affected coastal water in Moreton Bay, Australia. Differences in the VH-TDMA-measured volatility curves of artificial and natural SSA particles were used to investigate and quantify the organic fraction of natural SSA particles. Hygroscopic Growth Factor (HGF) data, also obtained by the VH-TDMA, were used to confirm the conclusions drawn from the volatility data. Both datasets indicated that the organic fraction of our natural SSA particles evaporated in the VH-TDMA over the temperature range 170-200 °C. The organic volume fraction for 71-77 nm natural SSA particles was 8±6%. Organic volume fraction did not vary significantly with varying water residence time (40 s to 24 h) in the bubble generator or SSA particle diameter in the range 38-173 nm. At room temperature we measured shape- and Kelvin-corrected HGF at 90% RH of 2.46±0.02 for NaCl, 2.35±0.02 for artifical SSA and 2.26±0.02 for natural SSA particles. Overall, these results suggest that the natural accumulation mode SSA particles produced in these experiments contained only a minor organic fraction, which had little effect on hygroscopic growth. Our measurement of 8±6% is an order of magnitude below two previous measurements of the organic fraction in SSA particles of comparable sizes. We stress that our results were obtained using coastal seawater and they can't necessarily

  7. The organic fraction of bubble-generated, accumulation mode Sea Spray Aerosol (SSA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modini, R. L.; Harris, B.; Ristovski, Z. D.

    2009-10-01

    Recent studies have detected a dominant accumulation mode (~100 nm) in the Sea Spray Aerosol (SSA) number distribution. There is evidence to suggest that particles in this mode are composed primarily of organics. To investigate this hypothesis we conducted experiments on NaCl, artificial SSA and natural SSA particles with a Volatility-Hygroscopicity-Tandem-Differential-Mobility-Analyser (VH-TDMA). NaCl particles were atomiser generated and a bubble generator was constructed to produce artificial and natural SSA particles. Natural seawater samples for use in the bubble generator were collected from biologically active, terrestrially-affected coastal water in Moreton Bay, Australia. Differences in the VH-TDMA-measured volatility curves of artificial and natural SSA particles were used to investigate and quantify the organic fraction of natural SSA particles. Hygroscopic Growth Factor (HGF) data, also obtained by the VH-TDMA, were used to confirm the conclusions drawn from the volatility data. Both datasets indicated that the organic fraction of our natural SSA particles evaporated in the VH-TDMA over the temperature range 170-200°C. The organic volume fraction for 71-77 nm natural SSA particles was 8±6%. Organic volume fraction did not vary significantly with varying water residence time (40 s0 to 24 h) in the bubble generator or SSA particle diameter in the range 38-173 nm. At room temperature we measured shape- and Kelvin-corrected HGF at 90% RH of 2.46±0.02 for NaCl, 2.35±0.02 for artifical SSA and 2.26±0.02 for natural SSA particles. Overall, these results suggest that the natural accumulation mode SSA particles produced in these experiments contained only a minor organic fraction, which had little effect on hygroscopic growth. Our measurement of 8±6% is an order of magnitude below two previous measurements of the organic fraction in SSA particles of comparable sizes. Further studies with a variety of different seawaters are required to better quantify how

  8. Anditalea andensis ANESC-ST - An Alkaliphilic Halotolerant Bacterium Capable of Electricity Generation under Alkaline-Saline Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wei; Wang, Victor Bochuan; Zhao, Cui-E; Zhang, Qichun; Loo, Say Chye Joachim; Yang, Liang; Xu, Chenjie

    2015-01-01

    A great challenge in wastewater bioremediation is the sustained activity of viable microorganisms, which can contribute to the breakdown of waste contaminants, especially in alkaline pH conditions. Identification of extremophiles with bioremediation capability can improve the efficiency of wastewater treatment. Here, we report the discovery of an electrochemically active alkaliphilic halotolerant bacterium, Anditalea andensis ANESC-ST (=CICC10485T=NCCB 100412T), which is capable of generating bioelectricity in alkaline–saline conditions. A. andensis ANESC-ST was shown to grow in alkaline conditions between pH 7.0–11.0 and also under high salt condition (up to 4 wt% NaCl). Electrical output was further demonstrated in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) with an average current density of ~0.5 µA/cm2, even under the harsh condition of 4 wt% NaCl and pH 9.0. Subsequent introduction of secreted extracellular metabolites into MFCs inoculated with Escherichia coli or Pseudomonas aeruginosa yielded enhanced electrical output. The ability of A. andensis ANESC-ST to generate energy under alkaline–saline conditions points towards a solution for bioelectricity recovery from alkaline–saline wastewater. This is the first report of A.andensis ANESC-ST producing bioelectricity at high salt concentration and pH. PMID:26171779

  9. Charge generation associated with liquid spraying in tank cleaning and comparable processes - preliminary experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Carsten; Losert, Oswald F. J.

    2015-10-01

    The BG RCI has initiated investigations in order to improve the data basis for assessing the ignition hazard by electrostatic charging processes associated with the spraying of liquids. On the base of preliminary experiments, we established procedures for measurements of electric field strength and charging current in the presence of aerosol particles. Results obtained with three different nozzle types, variation of pressure and with built-in deflecting plate are presented.

  10. Alkaline earth silicate wools - A new generation of high temperature insulation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Robert C; Harrison, Paul T C

    2012-11-01

    Intensive study of the natural asbestiform minerals that cause human diseases, and the consequent understanding of their hazardous characteristics, has enabled the development of manufactured fibres whose physical and/or chemical properties, in particular as they relate to biopersistence, have been adjusted to minimize possible harm to health. A strong driver for the developmentof new high temperature insulation materials wasthe perception of the toxicity of refractory ceramic fibres (RCF)and their classification in the EU as a category 2 carcinogen under Directive 67/548/EEC. Such classification carries with it the requirement for substitution by less hazardous materials. This paper focuses on the development of alkaline earth silicate (AES) wools as a new class of high temperature insulation with the capability of such substitution in a number of applications. These wools have only a low potential to cause harm because they do not persist in lung tissue once deposited, and have produced minimal effects in experimental test systems. AES wools are increasingly being used in a wide range of high temperature applications.

  11. Characterization of sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chigier, N.; Mao, C.-P.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that most practical power generation and propulsion systems involve the burning of different types of fuel sprays, taking into account aircraft propulsion, industrial furnaces, boilers, gas turbines, and diesel engines. There has been a lack of data which can serve as a basis for spray model development and validation. A major aim of the present investigation is to fill this gap. Experimental apparatus and techniques for studying the characteristics of fuel sprays are discussed, taking into account two-dimensional still photography, cinematography, holography, a laser diffraction particle sizer, and a laser anemometer. The considered instruments were used in a number of experiments, taking into account three different types of fuel spray. Attention is given to liquid fuel sprays, high pressure pulsed diesel sprays, and coal-water slurry sprays.

  12. Recycling of chemicals from alkaline waste generated during preparation of UO 3 microspheres by sol-gel process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ashok; Vittal Rao, T. V.; Mukerjee, S. K.; Vaidya, V. N.

    2006-05-01

    Internal gelation process, one of the sol-gel processes for nuclear fuel fabrication, offers many advantages over conventional powder pellet route. However, one of the limitation of the process is generation of large volume of alkaline liquid waste containing hexamethylenetetramine, urea, ammonium nitrate, ammonium hydroxide etc. Presence of ammonium nitrate with hexamethylenetetramine and urea presents a fire hazard which prevents direct disposal of the waste as well as its recycle by evaporation. The paper describes the studies carried out to suitably process the waste. Nitrate was removed from the waste by passing through Dowex 1 × 4 anion exchange resin in OH - form. 1.0 M NaOH was used to regenerate the resin. The nitrate-free waste was further treated to recover and recycle hexamethylenetetramine, urea and ammonium hydroxide for preparation of UO 3 microspheres. The quality of the microspheres obtained was satisfactory. An optimized flow sheet for processing of the waste solution has been suggested.

  13. A Strongly Calc-alkaline Suite in the Midst of the Tholeiitic Columbia River Basalt Province: Implications for Generating the Calc-alkaline Trend Without Subduction Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, A. R.; Streck, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    The mid-Miocene lavas of the Strawberry Volcanics (SV), distributed over 3,400 km2 in NE Oregon, comprise a diverse volcanic suite, which span the range of compositions from basalt to rhyolite. The volcanic suite is mainly composed of calc-alkaline (CA) basaltic andesite and andesite, yet tholeiitic (TH) lavas of basalt to andesite occur as well. The SV lies in the heart of nearly coeval flood basalts of the Columbia River province of the Pacific Northwest. The unique combination of strongly CA rocks of the SV in a non-subduction setting provide an excellent opportunity to study controls on inducing CA evolution in the midst of a TH province and independent of processes taking places at an active subduction zone. New 40Ar/39Ar ages indicate CA basaltic andesites to andesites of the SV erupted at least from 14.78±0.13 Ma to 12.44±0.12 Ma demonstrating that CA magmatism of the SV was ongoing during the eruptions of the tholeiitic Wanapum Basalt member of the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG). This range will likely be extended to even older ages in the future because existent age dates did not include samples from near the base of the SV. Thickness of intermediate lavas flows of the SV range from 15 m to as thin as 2 m and lavas are characterized by mostly phenocryst poor lithologies. When phenocrysts are abundant they are very small suggesting growth late during eruption. Single lava flow sections can include on the order of 30 conformable flows, testifying to a vigorous eruption history. The thickest andesitic sections are located in the glacially carved mountains of the Strawberry Mountain Wilderness (i.e. Strawberry Mountain, High Lake, and Slide Lake) where several vent complexes are exposed, which are delineated by dikes and plugs with finely interlocking plutonic textures, cross-cutting SV lava flows. Dikes generally strike NW-SE. Subtle variations in major and trace element compositions exist between TH and CA lavas of the SV. The CA lavas of the SV are

  14. Hydrogen generation from catalytic hydrolysis of alkaline sodium borohydride solution using attapulgite clay-supported Co-B catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Hongjing; Guo, Qingjie; Xu, Dongyan

    An attapulgite clay-supported cobalt-boride (Co-B) catalyst used in portable fuel cell fields is prepared in this paper by impregnation-chemical reduction method. The cost of attapulgite clay is much lower compared with some other inert carriers, such as activated carbon and carbon nanotube. Its microstructure and catalytic activity are analyzed in this paper. The effects of NaOH concentration, NaBH 4 concentration, reacting temperature, catalyst loadings and recycle times on the performance of the catalysts in hydrogen production from alkaline NaBH 4 solutions are investigated. Furthermore, characteristics of these catalysts are carried out in SEM, XRD and TEM analysis. The high catalytic activity of the catalyst indicates that it is a promising and practical catalyst. Activation energy of hydrogen generation using such catalysts is estimated to be 56.32 kJ mol -1. In the cycle test, from the 1st cycle to the 9th cycle, the average hydrogen generation rate decreases gradually from 1.27 l min -1 g -1 Co-B to 0.87 l min -1 g -1 Co-B.

  15. Generating nanoscale aggregates from colloidal nanoparticles by various aerosol spray techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Cheng, Mengdawn

    2007-01-01

    Growing interest in the environmental and health effects of engineered nanostructured materials requires accurate control of cluster morphology and size in order to make valid interpretations of nanomaterial toxicity. We report the comparison of three methods for the generation of aggregated uniform polystyrene latex (PSL) nanospheres from a colloidal suspension. Atomization, ultrasonic generation and electrospray, which utilize distinct mechanisms for the formation of liquid droplets from a PSL colloidal suspension, are explored as potential methods for nanostructured material synthesis. Electrospray produced isolated PSL particles most suited for use in experiments involving exposure to non-aggregated nanoparticles. Though producing the largest cluster size, ultrasonic generation proved to be a relatively straightforward process for reproducibly generating nanoparticle aggregates. Further advantages and disadvantages of each method are presented in relation to future toxicology experiments.

  16. Energetic negative ion and neutral atom beam generation at passage of laser accelerated high energy positive ions through a liquid spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abicht, F.; Prasad, R.; Priebe, G.; Braenzel, J.; Ehrentraut, L.; Andreev, A.; Nickles, P. V.; Schnürer, M.; Tikhonchuk, V.; Ter-Avetisyan, Sargis

    2013-05-01

    Beams of energetic negative ions and neutral atoms are obtained from water and ethanol spray targets irradiated by high intensity (5×1019 W/cm2) and ultrashort (50 fs) laser pulses. The resulting spectra were measured with the Thomson parabola spectrometer, which enabled absolute measurements of both: positive and negative ions. The generation of a beam of energetic neutral hydrogen atoms was confirmed with CR-39 track detectors and their spectral characteristics have been measured using time of flight technique. Generation is ascribed to electron-capture and -loss processes in the collisions of laser-accelerated high-energy protons with spray of droplets. The same method can be applied to generate energetic negative ions and neutral atoms of different species.

  17. Dynamical properties of breaking waves: dissipation, air entrainment and spray generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deike, Luc; Melville, W. Kendall; Popinet, Stephane

    2016-11-01

    Wave breaking in the ocean is of fundamental importance in order to quantify wave dissipation and air-sea interaction, including gas and momentum exchange, and to improve parametrization for ocean-atmosphere exchange in weather and climate models. Here, we present 2D and 3D direct numerical simulations of breaking waves, compared with laboratory measurements. The dissipation due to breaking in the 2D and 3D simulations is found to be in good agreement with experimental observations and inertial-scaling arguments. We discuss the transition from a 2D to a 3D flow during breaking. We present a model for air entrainment and bubble statistics that describes well the experimental and numerical data, and is based on turbulent fragmentation of the bubbles and a balance between buoyancy forces and viscous dissipation. Finally we discuss the generation of large drops during the impact and splashing process.

  18. Direct aerosol chemical composition measurements to evaluate the physicochemical differences between controlled sea spray aerosol generation schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, D. B.; Zhao, D. F.; Ruppel, M. J.; Laskina, O.; Grandquist, J. R.; Modini, R. L.; Stokes, M. D.; Russell, L. M.; Bertram, T. H.; Grassian, V. H.; Deane, G. B.; Prather, K. A.

    2014-11-01

    Controlled laboratory studies of the physical and chemical properties of sea spray aerosol (SSA) must be under-pinned by a physically and chemically accurate representation of the bubble-mediated production of nascent SSA particles. Bubble bursting is sensitive to the physico-chemical properties of seawater. For a sample of seawater, any important differences in the SSA production mechanism are projected into the composition of the aerosol particles produced. Using direct chemical measurements of SSA at the single-particle level, this study presents an intercomparison of three laboratory-based, bubble-mediated SSA production schemes: gas forced through submerged sintered glass filters ("frits"), a pulsed plunging-waterfall apparatus, and breaking waves in a wave channel filled with natural seawater. The size-resolved chemical composition of SSA particles produced by breaking waves is more similar to particles produced by the plunging waterfall than those produced by sintered glass filters. Aerosol generated by disintegrating foam produced by sintered glass filters contained a larger fraction of organic-enriched particles and a different size-resolved elemental composition, especially in the 0.8-2 μm dry diameter range. Interestingly, chemical differences between the methods only emerged when the particles were chemically analyzed at the single-particle level as a function of size; averaging the elemental composition of all particles across all sizes masked the differences between the SSA samples. When dried, SSA generated by the sintered glass filters had the highest fraction of particles with spherical morphology compared to the more cubic structure expected for pure NaCl particles produced when the particle contains relatively little organic carbon. In addition to an intercomparison of three SSA production methods, the role of the episodic or "pulsed" nature of the waterfall method on SSA composition was under-taken. In organic-enriched seawater, the continuous

  19. Spray Rolling Aluminum Strip

    SciTech Connect

    Lavernia, E.J.; Delplanque, J-P; McHugh, K.M.

    2006-05-10

    Spray forming is a competitive low-cost alternative to ingot metallurgy for manufacturing ferrous and non-ferrous alloy shapes. It produces materials with a reduced number of processing steps, while maintaining materials properties, with the possibility of near-net-shape manufacturing. However, there are several hurdles to large-scale commercial adoption of spray forming: 1) ensuring strip is consistently flat, 2) eliminating porosity, particularly at the deposit/substrate interface, and 3) improving material yield. Through this program, a new strip/sheet casting process, termed spray rolling, has been developed, which is an innovative manufacturing technique to produce aluminum net-shape products. Spray rolling combines the benefits of twin-roll casting and conventional spray forming, showing a promising potential to overcome the above hurdles associated with spray forming. Spray rolling requires less energy and generates less scrap than conventional processes and, consequently, enables the development of materials with lower environmental impacts in both processing and final products. Spray Rolling was developed as a collaborative project between the University of California-Davis, the Colorado School of Mines, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, and an industry team. The following objectives of this project were achieved: (1) Demonstration of the feasibility of the spray rolling process at the bench-scale level and evaluation of the materials properties of spray rolled aluminum strip alloys; and (2) Demonstration of 2X scalability of the process and documentation of technical hurdles to further scale up and initiate technology transfer to industry for eventual commercialization of the process.

  20. Direct aerosol chemical composition measurements to evaluate the physicochemical differences between controlled sea spray aerosol generation schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, D. B.; Zhao, D. F.; Ruppel, M. J.; Laskina, O.; Grandquist, J. R.; Modini, R. L.; Stokes, M. D.; Russell, L. M.; Bertram, T. H.; Grassian, V. H.; Deane, G. B.; Prather, K. A.

    2014-07-01

    Controlled laboratory studies of the physical and chemical properties of sea spray aerosol (SSA) must be underpinned by a physically and chemically accurate representation of the bubble mediated production of nascent SSA particles. Since bubble bursting is sensitive to the physicochemical properties of seawater, any important differences in the SSA production mechanism are projected into SSA composition. Using direct chemical measurements of SSA at the single-particle level, this study presents an inter-comparison of three laboratory-based, bubble-mediated SSA production schemes: gas forced through submerged sintered glass filters ("frits"), a pulsed plunging waterfall apparatus, and breaking waves in a wave channel filled with natural seawater. The size-resolved chemical composition of SSA particles produced by breaking waves is more similar to particles produced by the plunging waterfall than sintered glass filters. Aerosol generated by disintegrating foam produced by sintered glass filters contained a larger fraction of organic enriched particles and a different size-resolved elemental composition, especially in the 0.8-2 μm size range. These particles, when dried, had more spherical morphologies compared to the more cubic structure expected for pure NaCl particles, which can be attributed to the presence of additional organic carbon. In addition to an inter-comparison of three SSA production methods, the role of the episodic or "pulsed" nature of the waterfall method utilized in this study on SSA composition was undertaken. In organic-enriched seawater, the continuous operation of the plunging waterfall mechanism resulted in the accumulation of surface foam and an over-expression of organic matter in SSA particles compared to pulsed plunging waterfall. Throughout this set of experiments, comparative differences in the SSA number size distribution were coincident with differences in aerosol composition, indicating that the production mechanism of SSA exerts

  1. CO2-Free Power Generation on an Iron Group Nanoalloy Catalyst via Selective Oxidation of Ethylene Glycol to Oxalic Acid in Alkaline Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Takeshi; Sadakiyo, Masaaki; Ooi, Mei Lee; Kitano, Sho; Yamamoto, Tomokazu; Matsumura, Syo; Kato, Kenichi; Takeguchi, Tatsuya; Yamauchi, Miho

    2014-07-01

    An Fe group ternary nanoalloy (NA) catalyst enabled selective electrocatalysis towards CO2-free power generation from highly deliverable ethylene glycol (EG). A solid-solution-type FeCoNi NA catalyst supported on carbon was prepared by a two-step reduction method. High-resolution electron microscopy techniques identified atomic-level mixing of constituent elements in the nanoalloy. We examined the distribution of oxidised species, including CO2, produced on the FeCoNi nanoalloy catalyst in the EG electrooxidation under alkaline conditions. The FeCoNi nanoalloy catalyst exhibited the highest selectivities toward the formation of C2 products and to oxalic acid, i.e., 99 and 60%, respectively, at 0.4 V vs. the reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE), without CO2 generation. We successfully generated power by a direct EG alkaline fuel cell employing the FeCoNi nanoalloy catalyst and a solid-oxide electrolyte with oxygen reduction ability, i.e., a completely precious-metal-free system.

  2. CO2-Free Power Generation on an Iron Group Nanoalloy Catalyst via Selective Oxidation of Ethylene Glycol to Oxalic Acid in Alkaline Media

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Takeshi; Sadakiyo, Masaaki; Ooi, Mei Lee; Kitano, Sho; Yamamoto, Tomokazu; Matsumura, Syo; Kato, Kenichi; Takeguchi, Tatsuya; Yamauchi, Miho

    2014-01-01

    An Fe group ternary nanoalloy (NA) catalyst enabled selective electrocatalysis towards CO2-free power generation from highly deliverable ethylene glycol (EG). A solid-solution-type FeCoNi NA catalyst supported on carbon was prepared by a two-step reduction method. High-resolution electron microscopy techniques identified atomic-level mixing of constituent elements in the nanoalloy. We examined the distribution of oxidised species, including CO2, produced on the FeCoNi nanoalloy catalyst in the EG electrooxidation under alkaline conditions. The FeCoNi nanoalloy catalyst exhibited the highest selectivities toward the formation of C2 products and to oxalic acid, i.e., 99 and 60%, respectively, at 0.4 V vs. the reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE), without CO2 generation. We successfully generated power by a direct EG alkaline fuel cell employing the FeCoNi nanoalloy catalyst and a solid-oxide electrolyte with oxygen reduction ability, i.e., a completely precious-metal-free system. PMID:25004118

  3. Generating power from cellulose in an alkaline fuel cell enhanced by methyl viologen as an electron-transfer catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Miaoqing; Liu, Xianhua; Feng, Mengnan; Zhang, Pingping; Wang, Guangyi

    2014-04-01

    In this work, we developed a single-compartment direct cellulose alkaline fuel cell by using nickel foam as the anode and methyl viologen as an electron transfer catalyst. The maximum power density of the fuel cell at optimal conditions is 450 mW m-2. High-performance liquid chromatography detected short-chain aliphatic carboxylic acids in the oxidation products. Using common reed and red algae as fuels, the fuel cell achieved maximum power densities of 295 mW m-2 and 154 mW m-2, respectively.

  4. Degradation behavior of Ni{sub 3}Al plasma-sprayed boiler tube steels in an energy generation system

    SciTech Connect

    Sidhu, B.S.; Prakash, S.

    2005-06-01

    Boiler steels, namely, low-C steel, ASTM-SA210-Grade A1 (GrA1), 1Cr-0.5Mo steel, ASTM-SA213-T-11 (T11) and 2.25Cr-1Mo steel, ASTM-SA213-T-22 (T22) were plasma sprayed with Ni3Al. The alloy powder was prepared by mixing Ni and Al in the stoichiometric ratio of 3 to 1. The Ni-22Cr-10Al-1Y alloy powder was used as a bond coat, with a 150{mu} m thick layer sprayed onto the surface before applying the 200{mu}m coating of Ni{sub 3}Al. Exposure studies have been performed in the platen superheater zone of a coal-fired boiler at around 755{sup o}C for 10 cycles, each of 100 h duration. The protection to the base steel was minimal for the three steels. Scale spallation and the formation of a porous and nonadherent NiO scale were probably the main reasons for the lack of protection. In the case of T22-coated steel, cracks in the coatings have been observed after the first 100 h exposure cycle.

  5. Reduction of N2O and NO generation in anaerobic-aerobic (low dissolved oxygen) biological wastewater treatment process by using sludge alkaline fermentation liquid.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Yinguang

    2011-03-15

    This paper reported an efficient method to significantly reduce nitrous oxide (N(2)O) and nitric oxide (NO) generation in anaerobic-aerobic (low dissolved oxygen) processes. It was found that by the use of waste-activated sludge alkaline fermentation liquid as the synthetic wastewater-carbon source, compared with the commonly used carbon source in the literature (e.g., acetic acid), the generation of N(2)O and NO was reduced by 68.7% and 50.0%, respectively, but the removal efficiencies of total phosphorus (TP) and total nitrogen (TN) were improved. Both N(2)O and NO were produced in the low dissolved oxygen (DO) stage, and the use of sludge fermentation liquid greatly reduced their generation from the denitrification. The presences of Cu(2+) and propionic acid in fermentation liquid were observed to play an important role in the reduction of N(2)O and NO generation. The analysis of the activities of denitrifying enzymes suggested that sludge fermentation liquid caused the significant decrease of both nitrite reductase activity to NO reductase activity ratio and NO reductase activity to N(2)O reductase activity ratio, which resulted in the lower generation of NO and N(2)O. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis indicated that the number of glycogen accumulating bacteria, which was reported to be relevant to nitrous oxide generation, in sludge fermentation liquid reactor was much lower than that in acetic acid reactor. The quantitative detection of the nosZ gene, encoding nitrous oxide reductase, showed that the use of fermentation liquid increased the number of bacteria capable of reducing N(2)O to N(2). The feasibility of using sludge fermentation liquid to reduce NO and N(2)O generation in an anaerobic-low DO process was finally confirmed for a municipal wastewater.

  6. Evaluation of electricity generation from ultrasonic and heat/alkaline pretreatment of different sludge types using microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sang-Eun; Yoon, Joung Yee; Gurung, Anup; Kim, Dong-Jin

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated the effects of different sludge pretreatment methods (ultrasonic vs. combined heat/alkali) with varied sources of municipal sewage sludge (primary sludge (PS), secondary excess sludge (ES), anaerobic digestion sludge (ADS)) on electricity generation in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Introduction of ultrasonically pretreated sludge (PS, ES, ADS) to MFCs generated maximum power densities of 13.59, 9.78 and 12.67mW/m(2) and soluble COD (SCOD) removal efficiencies of 87%, 90% and 57%, respectively. The sludge pretreated by combined heat/alkali (0.04N NaOH at 120°C for 1h) produced maximum power densities of 10.03, 5.21 and 12.53mW/m(2) and SCOD removal efficiencies of 83%, 75% and 74% with PS, ES and ADS samples, respectively. Higher SCOD by sludge pretreatment enhanced performance of the MFCs and the electricity generation was linearly proportional to the SCOD removal, especially for ES.

  7. Alkaline ceramidase 2 is a novel direct target of p53 and induces autophagy and apoptosis through ROS generation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yitao; Zhang, Chunxue; Jin, Yuelei; Wang; He, Qing; Liu, Zhu; Ai, Qing; Lei, Yunlong; Li, Yi; Song, Fangzhou; Bu, Youquan

    2017-01-01

    ACER2 is a critical sphingolipid metabolizing enzyme, and has been shown to be remarkably up-regulated following various stimuli such as DNA damage. However, the transcriptional regulatory mechanism of ACER2 gene and its potential role in the regulation of autophagy remain unknown. In this study, we have for the first time identified the human ACER2 gene promoter, and found that human ACER2 transcription is directly regulated by p53 and ACER2 is implicated in the induction of autophagy as well as apoptosis. A series of luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that ACER2 major promoter is located within its first intron where the consensus p53-binding sites exist. Consistently, forced expression of p53 significantly stimulated ACER2 transcription. Notably, p53-mediated autophagy and apoptosis were markedly enhanced by ACER2. Depletion of the essential autophagy gene ATG5 revealed that ACER2-induced autophagy facilitates its effect on apoptosis. Further studies clearly showed that ACER2-mediated autophagy and apoptosis are accompanied by ROS generation. In summary, our present study strongly suggests that ACER2 plays a pivotal role in p53-induced autophagy and apoptosis, and thus might serve as a novel and attractive molecular target for cancer treatment. PMID:28294157

  8. Alkaline ceramidase 2 is a novel direct target of p53 and induces autophagy and apoptosis through ROS generation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yitao; Zhang, Chunxue; Jin, Yuelei; Wang; He, Qing; Liu, Zhu; Ai, Qing; Lei, Yunlong; Li, Yi; Song, Fangzhou; Bu, Youquan

    2017-03-15

    ACER2 is a critical sphingolipid metabolizing enzyme, and has been shown to be remarkably up-regulated following various stimuli such as DNA damage. However, the transcriptional regulatory mechanism of ACER2 gene and its potential role in the regulation of autophagy remain unknown. In this study, we have for the first time identified the human ACER2 gene promoter, and found that human ACER2 transcription is directly regulated by p53 and ACER2 is implicated in the induction of autophagy as well as apoptosis. A series of luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that ACER2 major promoter is located within its first intron where the consensus p53-binding sites exist. Consistently, forced expression of p53 significantly stimulated ACER2 transcription. Notably, p53-mediated autophagy and apoptosis were markedly enhanced by ACER2. Depletion of the essential autophagy gene ATG5 revealed that ACER2-induced autophagy facilitates its effect on apoptosis. Further studies clearly showed that ACER2-mediated autophagy and apoptosis are accompanied by ROS generation. In summary, our present study strongly suggests that ACER2 plays a pivotal role in p53-induced autophagy and apoptosis, and thus might serve as a novel and attractive molecular target for cancer treatment.

  9. In situ generation of steam and alkaline surfactant for enhanced oil recovery using an exothermic water reactant (EWR)

    DOEpatents

    Robertson, Eric P

    2011-05-24

    A method for oil recovery whereby an exothermic water reactant (EWR) encapsulated in a water soluble coating is placed in water and pumped into one or more oil wells in contact with an oil bearing formation. After the water carries the EWR to the bottom of the injection well, the water soluble coating dissolves and the EWR reacts with the water to produce heat, an alkali solution, and hydrogen. The heat from the EWR reaction generates steam, which is forced into the oil bearing formation where it condenses and transfers heat to the oil, elevating its temperature and decreasing the viscosity of the oil. The aqueous alkali solution mixes with the oil in the oil bearing formation and forms a surfactant that reduces the interfacial tension between the oil and water. The hydrogen may be used to react with the oil at these elevated temperatures to form lighter molecules, thus upgrading to a certain extent the oil in situ. As a result, the oil can flow more efficiently and easily through the oil bearing formation towards and into one or more production wells.

  10. Second generation of pseudotype-based serum neutralization assay for Nipah virus antibodies: sensitive and high-throughput analysis utilizing secreted alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Kaku, Yoshihiro; Noguchi, Akira; Marsh, Glenn A; Barr, Jennifer A; Okutani, Akiko; Hotta, Kozue; Bazartseren, Boldbaatar; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Broder, Christopher C; Yamada, Akio; Inoue, Satoshi; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2012-01-01

    Nipah virus (NiV), Paramyxoviridae, Henipavirus, is classified as a biosafety level (BSL) 4 pathogen, along with the closely related Hendra virus (HeV). A novel serum neutralization test was developed for measuring NiV neutralizing antibodies under BSL2 conditions using a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) expressing secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) and pseudotyped with NiV F/G proteins (VSV-NiV-SEAP). A unique characteristic of this novel assay is the ability to obtain neutralization titers by measuring SEAP activity in supernatant using a common ELISA plate reader. This confers a remarkable advantage over the first generation of NiV-pseudotypes expressing green fluorescent protein or luciferase, which require expensive and specific measuring equipment. Using panels of NiV- and HeV-specific sera from various species, the VSV-NiV-SEAP assay demonstrated neutralizing antibody status (positive/negative) consistent with that obtained by conventional live NiV test, and gave higher antibody titers than the latter. Additionally, when screening sixty-six fruit bat sera at one dilution, the VSV-NiV-SEAP assay produced identical results to the live NiV test and only required a very small amount (2μl) of sera. The results suggest that this novel VSV-NiV-SEAP assay is safe, useful for high-throughput screening of sera using an ELISA plate reader, and has high sensitivity and specificity.

  11. Agricultural Spraying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    AGDISP, a computer code written for Langley by Continuum Dynamics, Inc., aids crop dusting airplanes in targeting pesticides. The code is commercially available and can be run on a personal computer by an inexperienced operator. Called SWA+H, it is used by the Forest Service, FAA, DuPont, etc. DuPont uses the code to "test" equipment on the computer using a laser system to measure particle characteristics of various spray compounds.

  12. Wire Whip Keeps Spray Nozzle Clean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, H. R.

    1982-01-01

    Air-turbine-driven wire whip is clamped near spray-gun mount. When spray gun is installed, wire whip is in position to remove foam buildup from nozzle face. Two lengths of wire 1 to 2 inches long and about 0.03 inch in thickness are used. Foam spray would be prevented from accumulating on nozzle face by increasing purge flow and cutting vortex-generating grooves inside cap and on nozzle flats.

  13. Plasma sprayed ceria-containing interlayer

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Douglas S.; Folser, George R.

    2006-01-10

    A plasma sprayed ceria-containing interlayer is provided. The interlayer has particular application in connection with a solid oxide fuel cell used within a power generation system. The fuel cell advantageously comprises an air electrode, a plasma sprayed interlayer disposed on at least a portion of the air electrode, a plasma sprayed electrolyte disposed on at least a portion of the interlayer, and a fuel electrode applied on at least a portion of the electrolyte.

  14. Direct and non-destructive proof of authenticity for the 2nd generation of Brazilian real banknotes via easy ambient sonic spray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Eduardo Morgado; Franco, Marcos Fernando; Regino, Karen Gomes; Lehmann, Eraldo Luiz; Arruda, Marco Aurélio Zezzi; de Carvalho Rocha, Werickson Fortunato; Borges, Rodrigo; de Souza, Wanderley; Eberlin, Marcos Nogueira; Correa, Deleon Nascimento

    2014-12-01

    Using a desorption/ionization technique, easy ambient sonic-spray ionization coupled to mass spectrometry (EASI-MS), documents related to the 2nd generation of Brazilian Real currency (R$) were screened in the positive ion mode for authenticity based on chemical profiles obtained directly from the banknote surface. Characteristic profiles were observed for authentic, seized suspect counterfeit and counterfeited homemade banknotes from inkjet and laserjet printers. The chemicals in the authentic banknotes' surface were detected via a few minor sets of ions, namely from the plasticizers bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) and dibutyl phthalate (DBP), most likely related to the official offset printing process, and other common quaternary ammonium cations, presenting a similar chemical profile to 1st-generation R$. The seized suspect counterfeit banknotes, however, displayed abundant diagnostic ions in the m/z 400-800 range due to the presence of oligomers. High-accuracy FT-ICR MS analysis enabled molecular formula assignment for each ion. The ions were separated by 44 m/z, which enabled their characterization as Surfynol® 4XX (S4XX, XX=40, 65, and 85), wherein increasing XX values indicate increasing amounts of ethoxylation on a backbone of 2,4,7,9-tetramethyl-5-decyne-4,7-diol (Surfynol® 104). Sodiated triethylene glycol monobutyl ether (TBG) of m/z 229 (C10H22O4Na) was also identified in the seized counterfeit banknotes via EASI(+) FT-ICR MS. Surfynol® and TBG are constituents of inks used for inkjet printing.

  15. The variable role of slab-derived fluids in the generation of a suite of primitive calc-alkaline lavas from the Southernmost Cascades, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borg, L.E.; Clynne, M.A.; Bullen, T.D.

    1997-01-01

    The compositional continuum observed in primitive calc-alkaline lavas erupted from small volcanoes across the southernmost Cascade arc is produced by the introduction of a variable proportion of slab-derived fluid into the superjacent peridotite layer of the mantle wedge. Magmas derived from fluid-rich sources are erupted primarily in the forearc and are characterized by Sr and Pb enrichment (primitive mantle-normalized Sr/P > 5.5), depletions of Ta and Nb, low incompatible-element abundances, and MORB-like Sr and Pb isotopic ratios. Magmas derived from fluid-poor sources are erupted primarily in the arc axis and behind the arc, and are characterized by weak enrichment in Sr [1.0 < (Sr/P)N < 1.3], weak depletions in Ta and Nb, higher incompatible-element abundances, and OIB-like Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic ratios. Fluxing the mantle wedge above the subducting slab with H2O-rich fluid stabilizes amphibole and enriches the wedge peridotites in incompatible elements, particularly unradiogenic Sr and Pb. The hydrated amphibole-bearing portion of the mantle wedge is downdragged beneath the forearc, where its solidus is exceeded, yielding melts that are enriched in Sr and Pb, and depleted in Ta and Nb (reflecting both high Sr and Pb relative to Ta and Nb in the fluid, and the greater compatibility of Ta and Nb in amphibole compared to other silicate phases in the wedge). A steady decrease of the fluid-contributed geochemical signature away from the trench is produced by the progressive dehydration of the downdragged portion of the mantle wedge with depth, resulting from melt extraction and increased temperature at the slab-wedge interface. Inverse correlation between incompatible-element abundances and the size of the fluid-contributed geochemical signature is generated by melting of more depleted peridotites, rather than by significant differences in the degree of melting. High-(Sr/P)N lavas of the forearc are generated by melting of a MORB-source-like peridotite that has

  16. Modeling Multi-Arc Spraying Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, K.; Öte, M.

    2016-06-01

    The use of plasma as energy source in thermal spraying enables among others the processing of feed stock materials with very high melting temperatures as coating materials. New generation multi-arc plasma spraying systems are widely spread and promise several advantages in comparison to the conventional single-arc systems. Numerical modeling of multi-arc plasma spraying offers the possibility to increase the understanding about this process. This study focuses on the numerical modeling of three-cathode spraying systems, introducing the recent activities in this field and discussing the numerical aspects which influence the prediction power of the models.

  17. A laser tomographic investigation of liquid fuel sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yule, A. J.; Ahseng, C.; Felton, P.; Ungut, A.; Chigier, N. A.

    1980-01-01

    A light scattering technique is combined with a tomographic transformation to convert line of sight integrated data, measured in sprays, to measurements of droplet size and concentration in volume elements within the spray. The technique is developed and assessed by systematic experiments in axisymmetric sprays generated by twin-fluid atomisers. The good agreement found shows that, provided certain conditions are satisfied by the local spray structure, the technique provides information on spray structure, similar in detail and extent to that derived by photography, but with reduced experimental time. The technique is applied to an investigation of a kerosene spray vaporizing in a hot gas stream.

  18. The Effect of Spray Distance and Scanning Step on the Coating Thickness Uniformity in Cold Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Zhenhua; Deng, Sihao; Liao, Hanlin; Zeng, Chunnian; Montavon, Ghislain

    2014-02-01

    In the process of cold spray applications, robot kinematic parameters represent significant influences on the coating quality. Those parameters include: spray distance, spray angle, gun relative velocity to substrate, scanning step, and cycle numbers. The combined effects which are caused by their interactions determine the coating thickness. The increasing requirements of coating productivity lead to the objectivity of analyzing the effect of robot kinematic parameters. So it becomes necessary to optimize the robot trajectory for spraying process in order to obtain a desired coating thickness. This study aims at investigating the relationship between the coating profile and the spray distance, scanning step, and introducing the basic principle of a software toolkit named thermal spray toolkit (TST) developed in our laboratory to generate the optimized robot trajectories in spray processes including thermal spray and cold spray. Experiments have been carried out to check the reliability of the simulated coating profile and the calculated coating thickness by TST.

  19. Spatial distribution visualization of PWM continuous variable-rate spray

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chemical application is a dynamic spatial distribution process, during which spray liquid covers the targets with certain thickness and uniformity. Therefore, it is important to study the 2-D and 3-D (dimensional) spray distribution to evaluate spraying quality. The curve-surface generation methods ...

  20. Pliocene-Quaternary basalts from the Harrat Tufail, western Saudi Arabia: Recycling of ancient oceanic slabs and generation of alkaline intra-plate magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhsh, Rami A.

    2015-12-01

    Harrat Tufail represents a Caenozoic basalt suite at the western margin of the Arabian plate. This rift-related suite includes voluminous Quaternary non-vesicular basalt (with fragments of earlier Pliocene vesicular flow) that forms a cap sheet over Miocene rhyolite and minor vesicular basalt. The contact between rhyolite and the basaltic cap is erosional with remarkable denudations indicating long time gap between the felsic and mafic eruptions. The geochemical data prove alkaline, sodic and low-Ti nature of the olivine basalt cap sheet. The combined whole-rock and mineral spot analyses by the electron microprobe (EMPA) suggest magma generation from low degree of partial melting (∼5%) from spinel- and garnet-lherzolite mantle source. Derivation from a mantle source is supported by low Na content in clinopyroxene (ferroan diopside) whereas high Mg content in ilmenite is an evidence of fractional crystallization trajectory. Accordingly, the Pliocene basaltic cap of Harrat Tufail is a product of mantle melt that originates by recycling in the asthenosphere during subduction of ancient oceanic slab(s). The whole-rock chemistry suggests an ancient ocean island basaltic slab (OIB) whereas the EMPA of Al-rich spinel inclusions in olivine phenocrysts are in favour of a mid-ocean ridge basaltic source (MORB). Calculations of oxygen fugacity based on the composition of co-existing Fe-Ti oxide suggest fluctuation from highly to moderately oxidizing conditions with propagation of crystallization (log10 fO2 from -22.09 to -12.50). Clinopyroxene composition and pressure calculation indicates low-pressure (0.4-2 kbar). Cores of olivine phenocrysts formed at highest temperature (1086-1151 °C) whereas the rims and olivine micro-phenocrysts formed at 712-9-796 °C which is contemporaneous to formation of clinopyroxene at 611-782 °C. Fe-Ti oxides crystallized over a long range (652-992 °C) where it started to form at outer peripheries of olivine phenocrysts and as interstitial

  1. Dynamic characteristics of pulsed supersonic fuel sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pianthong, K.; Matthujak, A.; Takayama, K.; Milton, B. E.; Behnia, M.

    2008-06-01

    This paper describes the dynamic characteristics of pulsed, supersonic liquid fuel sprays or jets injected into ambient air. Simple, single hole nozzles were employed with the nozzle sac geometries being varied. Different fuel types, diesel fuel, bio-diesel, kerosene, and gasoline were used to determine the effects of fuel properties on the spray characteristics. A vertical two-stage light gas gun was employed as a projectile launcher to provide a high velocity impact to produce the liquid jet. The injection pressure was around 0.88-1.24 GPa in all cases. The pulsed, supersonic fuel sprays were visualized by using a high-speed video camera and shadowgraph method. The spray tip penetration and velocity attenuation and other characteristics were examined and are described here. An instantaneous spray tip velocity of 1,542 m/s (Mach number 4.52) was obtained. However, this spray tip velocity can be sustained for only a very short period (a few microseconds). It then attenuates very quickly. The phenomenon of multiple high frequency spray pulses generated by a single shot impact and the changed in the angle of the shock structure during the spray flight, which had already been observed in previous studies, is again noted. Multiple shock waves from the conical nozzle spray were also clearly captured.

  2. Ventilation Guidance for Spray Polyurethane Foam Application

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Properly designed ventilation can reduce airborne levels of aerosols, mists, and vapors generated during spray application and can help protect SPF applicators, helpers, and others who may be working in adjacent areas.

  3. The alkaline and alkaline-carbonatite magmatism from Southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruberti, E.; Gomes, C. D. B.; Comin-Chiaramonti, P.

    2015-12-01

    Early to Late Cretaceous lasting to Paleocene alkaline magmatism from southern Brazil is found associated with major extensional structural features in and around the Paraná Basin and grouped into various provinces on the basis of several data. Magmatism is variable in size, mode of occurrence and composition. The alkaline rocks are dominantly potassic, a few occurrences showing sodic affinity. The more abundant silicate rocks are evolved undersaturated to saturated in silica syenites, displaying large variation in igneous forms. Less evolved types are restricted to subvolcanic environments and outcrops of effusive suites occur rarely. Cumulatic mafic and ultramafic rock types are very common, particularly in the alkali-carbonatitic complexes. Carbonatite bodies are represented by Ca-carbonatites and Mg-carbonatites and more scarcely by Fe-carbonatites. Available radiometric ages for the alkaline rocks fit on three main chronological groups: around 130 Ma, subcoveal with the Early Cretaceous flood tholeiites of the Paraná Basin, 100-110 Ma and 80-90 Ma (Late Cretaceous). The alkaline magmatism also extends into Paleocene times, as indicated by ages from some volcanic lavas. Geochemically, alkaline potassic and sodic rock types are distinguished by their negative and positive Nb-Ta anomalies, respectively. Negative spikes in Nb-Ta are also a feature common to the associated tholeiitic rocks. Sr-Nd-Pb systematics confirm the contribution of both HIMU and EMI mantle components in the formation of the alkaline rocks. Notably, Early and Late Cretaceous carbonatites have the same isotopic Sr-Nd initial ratios of the associated alkaline rocks. C-O isotopic Sr-Nd isotopic ratios indicate typical mantle signature for some carbonatites and the influence of post-magmatic processes in others. Immiscibility of liquids of phonolitic composition, derived from mafic alkaline parental magmas, has been responsible for the origin of the carbonatites. Close association of alkaline

  4. Evidence of the generation of isosaccharinic acids and their subsequent degradation by local microbial consortia within hyper-alkaline contaminated soils, with relevance to intermediate level radioactive waste disposal.

    PubMed

    Rout, Simon P; Charles, Christopher J; Garratt, Eva J; Laws, Andrew P; Gunn, John; Humphreys, Paul N

    2015-01-01

    The contamination of surface environments with hydroxide rich wastes leads to the formation of high pH (>11.0) soil profiles. One such site is a legacy lime works at Harpur Hill, Derbyshire where soil profile indicated in-situ pH values up to pH 12. Soil and porewater profiles around the site indicated clear evidence of the presence of the α and β stereoisomers of isosaccharinic acid (ISA) resulting from the anoxic, alkaline degradation of cellulosic material. ISAs are of particular interest with regards to the disposal of cellulosic materials contained within the intermediate level waste (ILW) inventory of the United Kingdom, where they may influence radionuclide mobility via complexation events occurring within a geological disposal facility (GDF) concept. The mixing of uncontaminated soils with the alkaline leachate of the site resulted in ISA generation, where the rate of generation in-situ is likely to be dependent upon the prevailing temperature of the soil. Microbial consortia present in the uncontaminated soil were capable of surviving conditions imposed by the alkaline leachate and demonstrated the ability to utilise ISAs as a carbon source. Leachate-contaminated soil was sub-cultured in a cellulose degradation product driven microcosm operating at pH 11, the consortia present were capable of the degradation of ISAs and the generation of methane from the resultant H2/CO2 produced from fermentation processes. Following microbial community analysis, fermentation processes appear to be predominated by Clostridia from the genus Alkaliphilus sp, with methanogenesis being attributed to Methanobacterium and Methanomassiliicoccus sp. The study is the first to identify the generation of ISA within an anthropogenic environment and advocates the notion that microbial activity within an ILW-GDF is likely to influence the impact of ISAs upon radionuclide migration.

  5. Evidence of the Generation of Isosaccharinic Acids and Their Subsequent Degradation by Local Microbial Consortia within Hyper-Alkaline Contaminated Soils, with Relevance to Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste Disposal

    PubMed Central

    Rout, Simon P.; Charles, Christopher J.; Garratt, Eva J.; Laws, Andrew P.; Gunn, John; Humphreys, Paul N.

    2015-01-01

    The contamination of surface environments with hydroxide rich wastes leads to the formation of high pH (>11.0) soil profiles. One such site is a legacy lime works at Harpur Hill, Derbyshire where soil profile indicated in-situ pH values up to pH 12. Soil and porewater profiles around the site indicated clear evidence of the presence of the α and β stereoisomers of isosaccharinic acid (ISA) resulting from the anoxic, alkaline degradation of cellulosic material. ISAs are of particular interest with regards to the disposal of cellulosic materials contained within the intermediate level waste (ILW) inventory of the United Kingdom, where they may influence radionuclide mobility via complexation events occurring within a geological disposal facility (GDF) concept. The mixing of uncontaminated soils with the alkaline leachate of the site resulted in ISA generation, where the rate of generation in-situ is likely to be dependent upon the prevailing temperature of the soil. Microbial consortia present in the uncontaminated soil were capable of surviving conditions imposed by the alkaline leachate and demonstrated the ability to utilise ISAs as a carbon source. Leachate-contaminated soil was sub-cultured in a cellulose degradation product driven microcosm operating at pH 11, the consortia present were capable of the degradation of ISAs and the generation of methane from the resultant H2/CO2 produced from fermentation processes. Following microbial community analysis, fermentation processes appear to be predominated by Clostridia from the genus Alkaliphilus sp, with methanogenesis being attributed to Methanobacterium and Methanomassiliicoccus sp. The study is the first to identify the generation of ISA within an anthropogenic environment and advocates the notion that microbial activity within an ILW-GDF is likely to influence the impact of ISAs upon radionuclide migration. PMID:25748643

  6. Laser Doppler velocimeter aerial spray measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalay, A. D.; Eberle, W. R.; Howle, R. E.; Shrider, K. R.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental research program for measuring the location, spatial extent, and relative concentration of airborne spray clouds generated by agricultural aircraft is described. The measurements were conducted with a ground-based laser Doppler velocimeter. The remote sensing instrumentation, experimental tests, and the results of the flight tests are discussed. The cross section of the aerial spray cloud and the observed location, extent, and relative concentration of the airborne particulates are presented. It is feasible to use a mobile laser Doppler velocimeter to track and monitor the transport and dispersion of aerial spray generated by an agricultural aircraft.

  7. The 2016 Thermal Spray Roadmap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardelle, Armelle; Moreau, Christian; Akedo, Jun; Ashrafizadeh, Hossein; Berndt, Christopher C.; Berghaus, Jörg Oberste; Boulos, Maher; Brogan, Jeffrey; Bourtsalas, Athanasios C.; Dolatabadi, Ali; Dorfman, Mitchell; Eden, Timothy J.; Fauchais, Pierre; Fisher, Gary; Gaertner, Frank; Gindrat, Malko; Henne, Rudolf; Hyland, Margaret; Irissou, Eric; Jordan, Eric H.; Khor, Khiam Aik; Killinger, Andreas; Lau, Yuk-Chiu; Li, Chang-Jiu; Li, Li; Longtin, Jon; Markocsan, Nicolaie; Masset, Patrick J.; Matejicek, Jiri; Mauer, Georg; McDonald, André; Mostaghimi, Javad; Sampath, Sanjay; Schiller, Günter; Shinoda, Kentaro; Smith, Mark F.; Syed, Asif Ansar; Themelis, Nickolas J.; Toma, Filofteia-Laura; Trelles, Juan Pablo; Vassen, Robert; Vuoristo, Petri

    2016-12-01

    Considerable progress has been made over the last decades in thermal spray technologies, practices and applications. However, like other technologies, they have to continuously evolve to meet new problems and market requirements. This article aims to identify the current challenges limiting the evolution of these technologies and to propose research directions and priorities to meet these challenges. It was prepared on the basis of a collection of short articles written by experts in thermal spray who were asked to present a snapshot of the current state of their specific field, give their views on current challenges faced by the field and provide some guidance as to the R&D required to meet these challenges. The article is divided in three sections that deal with the emerging thermal spray processes, coating properties and function, and biomedical, electronic, aerospace and energy generation applications.

  8. Delayed efficacy of Beauveria bassiana foliar spray applications against Colorado potato beetle: impacts of number and timing of applications on larval and next-generation adult populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spray programs comprising multiple or single foliar applications of the fungal pathogen Beauveria bassiana strain GHA (Bb) made during morning (AM) vs. evening (PM) hours were tested against Colorado potato beetle Leptinotarsa decemlineata (CPB) in small research plots of potatoes over multiple fiel...

  9. Visual characterization of heated water spray jet breakup induced by full cone spray nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naz, M. Y.; Sulaiman, S. A.; Ariwahjoedi, B.; Zilati, K.

    2015-03-01

    The present work with specific objectives places a greater emphasis on measurements of the breakup lengths and phenomenological analysis of a hot water jet under reduced pumping pressures in still environment. Therefore, visual and comparative studies are conducted on full cone jet disintegration of heated water for low pumping pressures. A further analysis of the grabbed images confirms the strong influence of the input processing parameters on full cone spray patternation. It is also predicted that the heated liquids generate a dispersed spray pattern by utilizing partial evaporation of the spraying medium. The radial spray cone width and angle do not vary significantly with increasing Reynolds and Weber numbers at early injection phases, leading to enhanced macroscopic spray propagation. The discharge coefficient, mean flow rate, and mean flow velocity are significantly influenced by the load pressure, but less affected by the temperature. The fine scale image analysis also predicts toroidal-shaped vortex formation in the spray structure near the water boiling point.

  10. Hair spray poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002705.htm Hair spray poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hair spray poisoning occurs when someone breathes in (inhales) ...

  11. Triamcinolone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... itchy nose and itchy, watery eyes caused by hay fever or other allergies. Triamcinolone nasal spray should not ... germs.Triamcinolone nasal spray controls the symptoms of hay fever and allergies but does not cure these conditions. ...

  12. Mometasone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... sneezing, runny, stuffy, or itchy nose caused by hay fever or other allergies. It is also used to ... using mometasone nasal spray to prevent or relieve hay fever or allergy symptoms, it is usually sprayed in ...

  13. Flunisolide Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... sneezing, runny, stuffy, or itchy nose caused by hay fever or other allergies. Flunisolide nasal spray should not ... germs.Flunisolide nasal spray controls the symptoms of hay fever or allergies but does not cure these conditions. ...

  14. Nasal corticosteroid sprays

    MedlinePlus

    ... or concerns about your symptoms Trouble using the medicine Alternative Names Steroid nasal sprays; Allergies - nasal corticosteroid sprays References American Academy of ... of Medicine, Division of Allergy, Immunology, and Rheumatology, Georgetown University ...

  15. Remotely controlled spray gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, William C. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A remotely controlled spray gun is described in which a nozzle and orifice plate are held in precise axial alignment by an alignment member, which in turn is held in alignment with the general outlet of the spray gun by insert. By this arrangement, the precise repeatability of spray patterns is insured.

  16. Spray bottle apparatus with force multiply pistons

    DOEpatents

    Eschbach, Eugene A.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention comprises a spray bottle in which the pressure resulting from the gripping force applied by the user is amplified and this increased pressure used in generating a spray such as an aerosol or fluid stream. In its preferred embodiment, the invention includes a high pressure chamber and a corresponding piston which is operative for driving fluid out of this chamber at high pressure through a spray nozzle and a low pressure chamber and corresponding piston which is acted upon by the hydraulic pressure within the bottle resulting from the gripping force. The low pressure chamber and piston are of larger size than the high pressure chamber and piston. The pistons are rigidly connected so that the force created by the pressure acting on the piston in the low pressure chamber is transmitted to the piston in the high pressure chamber where it is applied over a more limited area thereby generating greater hydraulic pressure for use in forming the spray.

  17. Spray bottle apparatus with pressure multiplying pistons

    DOEpatents

    Moss, Owen R.; Gordon, Norman R.; DeFord, Henry S.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention comprises a spray bottle in which the pressure resulting from the gripping force applied by the user is amplified and this increased pressure used in generating a spray such as an aerosol or fluid stream. In its preferred embodiment, the invention includes a high pressure chamber and a corresponding piston which is operative for driving fluid out of this chamber at high pressure through a spray nozzle and a low pressure chamber and a corresponding piston which is acted upon the hydraulic pressure within the bottle resulting from the gripping force. The low pressure chamber and piston are of larger size than the high pressure chamber and piston. The pistons are rigidly connected so that the force created by the pressure acting on the piston in the low pressure chamber is transmitted to the piston in the high pressure chamber where it is applied over a more limited area thereby generating greater hydraulic pressure for use in forming the spray.

  18. Anodes for alkaline electrolysis

    DOEpatents

    Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev

    2011-02-01

    A method of making an anode for alkaline electrolysis cells includes adsorption of precursor material on a carbonaceous material, conversion of the precursor material to hydroxide form and conversion of precursor material from hydroxide form to oxy-hydroxide form within the alkaline electrolysis cell.

  19. Bear Spray Safety Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blome, C.D.; Kuzniar, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    A bear spray safety program for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) was officially initiated by the Firearms Safety Committee to address accident prevention and to promote personnel training in bear spray and its transportation, storage, and use for defense against wild animals. Used as part of a system including firearms, or used alone for those who choose not to carry a firearm, bear spray is recognized as an effective tool that can prevent injury in a wild animal attack.

  20. Alkaline battery operational methodology

    DOEpatents

    Sholklapper, Tal; Gallaway, Joshua; Steingart, Daniel; Ingale, Nilesh; Nyce, Michael

    2016-08-16

    Methods of using specific operational charge and discharge parameters to extend the life of alkaline batteries are disclosed. The methods can be used with any commercial primary or secondary alkaline battery, as well as with newer alkaline battery designs, including batteries with flowing electrolyte. The methods include cycling batteries within a narrow operating voltage window, with minimum and maximum cut-off voltages that are set based on battery characteristics and environmental conditions. The narrow voltage window decreases available capacity but allows the batteries to be cycled for hundreds or thousands of times.

  1. Vacuum Plasma Sprayed Metallic Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, S.; Koenig, D. E.; Dardi, L. E.

    1981-10-01

    Recognizing the fundamental cost advantage, technical capabilities, and compositional flexibility of reduced pressure (vacuum) plasma spraying compared to other overlay coating methods, an advanced, second generation, closed chamber deposition process called VPX (a Howmet trademark) was developed. An automated experimental facility for coating gas turbine engine components was also constructed. This paper describes several important features of the process and equipment. It shows that the use of optimized spray parameters combined with an appropriate schedule of relative orientations between the gun and work-piece can be used to produce dense and highly reproducible coatings of either uniform or controlled thickness distributions. The chemical composition, microstructure, and interfacial characteristics of typical MCrAlY coatings are reported. Some effects of operating procedures and MCrAlY chemical composition on coating density are noted. The results of mechanical property and burner rig tests of coated material are also described.

  2. Ciclesonide Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... Wash the dust cap and applicator with warm water. Dry and replace the applicator and press down and release the pump one time or until you see a fine spray. Replace the dust cap. Do not use pins or other sharp objects in the tiny spray hole on the nasal applicator to remove the blockage. ...

  3. Cold spray nozzle design

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Jeffrey D.; Sanders, Stuart A.

    2009-06-09

    A nozzle for use in a cold spray technique is described. The nozzle has a passageway for spraying a powder material, the passageway having a converging section and a diverging section, and at least the diverging section being formed from polybenzimidazole. In one embodiment of the nozzle, the converging section is also formed from polybenzimidazole.

  4. Measuring Spray Droplet Size from Agricultural Nozzles Using Laser Diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Bradley K.; Hoffmann, W. Clint

    2016-01-01

    When making an application of any crop protection material such as an herbicide or pesticide, the applicator uses a variety of skills and information to make an application so that the material reaches the target site (i.e., plant). Information critical in this process is the droplet size that a particular spray nozzle, spray pressure, and spray solution combination generates, as droplet size greatly influences product efficacy and how the spray moves through the environment. Researchers and product manufacturers commonly use laser diffraction equipment to measure the spray droplet size in laboratory wind tunnels. The work presented here describes methods used in making spray droplet size measurements with laser diffraction equipment for both ground and aerial application scenarios that can be used to ensure inter- and intra-laboratory precision while minimizing sampling bias associated with laser diffraction systems. Maintaining critical measurement distances and concurrent airflow throughout the testing process is key to this precision. Real time data quality analysis is also critical to preventing excess variation in the data or extraneous inclusion of erroneous data. Some limitations of this method include atypical spray nozzles, spray solutions or application conditions that result in spray streams that do not fully atomize within the measurement distances discussed. Successful adaption of this method can provide a highly efficient method for evaluation of the performance of agrochemical spray application nozzles under a variety of operational settings. Also discussed are potential experimental design considerations that can be included to enhance functionality of the data collected. PMID:27684589

  5. Environmentally compatible spray cement

    SciTech Connect

    Loeschnig, P.

    1995-12-31

    Within the framework of a European research project, Heidelberger Zement developed a quickly setting and hardening binder for shotcrete, called Chronolith S, which avoids the application of setting accelerators. Density and strength of the shotcrete produced with this spray cement correspond to those of an unaccelerated shotcrete. An increased hazard for the heading team and for the environment, which may occur when applying setting accelerators, can be excluded here. Owing to the special setting properties of a spray cement, the process engineering for its manufacturing is of great importance. The treatment of a spray cement as a dry concrete with kiln-dried aggregates is possible without any problems. The use of a naturally damp pre-batched mixture is possible with Chronolith S but requires special process engineering; spray cement and damp aggregate are mixed with one another immediately before entering the spraying machinery.

  6. Mobile robot based electrostatic spray system for controlling pests on cotton plants in Iraq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Mamury, M.; Manivannan, N.; Al-Raweshidy, H.; Balachandran, W.

    2015-10-01

    A mobile robot based electrostatic spray system was developed to combat pest infestation on cotton plants in Iraq. The system consists of a charged spray nozzle, a CCD camera, a mobile robot (vehicle and arm) and Arduino microcontroller. Arduino microcontroller is used to control the spray nozzle and the robot. Matlab is used to process the image from the CCD camera and to generate the appropriate control signals to the robot and the spray nozzle. COMSOL multi-physics FEM software was used to design the induction electrodes to achieve maximum charge transfer onto the fan spray liquid film resulting in achieving the desired charge/mass ratio of the spray. The charged spray nozzle was operated on short duration pulsed spray mode. Image analysis was employed to investigate the spray deposition on improvised insect targets on an artificial plant.

  7. Structure of high-speed sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracco, Frediano V.

    1995-01-01

    This work covered both measurements and computations and its results are documented in eight appendices. Measurements were made of drop velocity in vaporizing, steady, full-cone sprays and of drop velocity and drop size in non-vaporizing steady full-cone sprays. In similar conditions, measurements had previously been made of the intact core and of the size of the drops in the immediate vicinity of the injector, thus generating an extensive set of data which were particularly useful for the assessment and the development of multidimensional models of engine sprays. On the computational side, a line source technique was introduced to simulate the intact-core in engine sprays and two extensive numerical studies were carried out to explain the strong anisotropy of the drop velocity fluctuations that had been found in the measurements. In another interesting and timely study, the accuracy of the stochastic method of computing drop collisions and coalescence (which is the one universally used) was assessed by corresponding deterministic computations (more accurate but much more time consuming). It was concluded that the accuracy of the stochastic method in practical computations can be wanting. Finally, a numerical study of the structure of hollow-cone sprays was initiated that has since been followed by significant experimental and computational work on liquid-only and air-assisted hollow-cone injectors and sprays.

  8. Two intelligent spraying systems developed for tree crop production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Precision pesticide application technologies are needed to achieve efficient and effective spray deposition on target areas and minimize off-target losses. Two variable-rate intelligent sprayers were developed as an introduction of new generation sprayers for tree crop applications. The first spraye...

  9. An overview of spray drift reduction testing of spray nozzles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The importance of the development and testing of drift reduction technologies (DRTs) is increasing. Common spray drift reduction technologies include spray nozzles and spray adjuvants. Following draft procedures developed for a DRT program, three spray nozzles were tested under high air speed cond...

  10. Thermal Arc Spray Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafiz Abd Malek, Muhamad; Hayati Saad, Nor; Kiyai Abas, Sunhaji; Mohd Shah, Noriyati

    2013-06-01

    Usage of protective coating for corrosion protection was on highly demand during the past decade; and thermal spray coating played a major part during that time. In recent years, the thermal arc spray coating becomes a popular coating. Many big players in oil and gas such as PETRONAS, EXXON MOBIL and SHELL in Malaysia tend to use the coating on steel structure as a corrosion protection. Further developments in coating processes, the devices, and raw materials have led to expansion of functional coatings and applications scope from conventional coating to specialized industries. It is widely used because of its ability to withstand high process temperature, offer advantages in efficiency, lower cost and acts as a corrosion protection. Previous research also indicated that the thermal arc spray offers better coating properties compared to other methods of spray. This paper reviews some critical area of thermal spray coating by discussing the process/parameter of thermal arc spray technology and quality control of coating. Coating performance against corrosion, wear and special characteristic of coating are also described. The field application of arc spray technology are demonstrated and reviewed.

  11. Measuring droplet size of agriuclutral spray nozzles - Measurement distance and airspeed effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With a number of new spray testing laboratories going into operation within the U.S. and each gearing up to measure spray atomization from agricultural spray nozzles using laser diffraction, establishing and following a set of scientific standard procedures is crucial to long term data generation an...

  12. Design of pilot-scale solar photocatalytic reactor for the generation of hydrogen from alkaline sulfide wastewater of sewage treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Priya, R; Kanmani, S

    2013-01-01

    Experiments were conducted for photocatalytic generation of renewable fuel hydrogen from sulphide wastewater from the sewage treatment plant. In this study, pilot-scale solar photocatalytic reactor was designed for treating 1 m3 of sulphide wastewater and also for the simultaneous generation of hydrogen. Bench-scale studies were conducted both in the batch recycle and continuous modes under solar irradiation at similar experimental conditions. The maximum of 89.7% conversion was achieved in the continuous mode. The length of the pilot-scale solar photocatalytic reactor was arrived using the design parameters such as volumetric flow rate (Q) (11 x 10(-2) m3/s), inlet concentration of sulphide ion (C(in)) (28 mol/m3), conversion (89.7%) and average mass flow destruction rate (3.488 x 10(-6) mol/m2 s). The treatment cost of the process was estimated to be 6 US$/m3. This process would be suitable for India like sub-tropical country where sunlight is abundantly available throughout the year.

  13. Budesonide Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... sneezing, runny, stuffy, or itchy nose caused by hay fever or other allergies (caused by an allergy to ... germs.Budesonide nasal spray controls the symptoms of hay fever or allergies but does not cure these conditions. ...

  14. Fluticasone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... itchy nose and itchy, watery eyes caused by hay fever or other allergies (caused by an allergy to ... germs.Fluticasone nasal spray controls the symptoms of hay fever or allergies but does not cure these conditions. ...

  15. Beclomethasone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... runny, stuffy, or itchy nose (rhinitis) caused by hay fever, other allergies, or vasomotor (nonallergic) rhinitis. It is ... germs.Beclomethasone nasal spray controls the symptoms of hay fever or allergies but does not cure these conditions. ...

  16. Supersonic-Spray Cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caimi, Raoul E. B.; Lin, Feng-Nan; Thaxton, Eric A.

    1995-01-01

    Spraying system for cleaning mechanical components uses less liquid and operates at pressures significantly lower. Liquid currently used is water. Designed to replace chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) solvent-based cleaning and cleanliness verification methods. Consists of spray head containing supersonic converging/diverging nozzles, source of gas at regulated pressure, pressurized liquid tank, and various hoses, fittings, valves, and gauges. Parameters of nozzles set so any of large variety of liquids and gases combined in desired ratio and rate of flow. Size and number of nozzles varied so system built in configurations ranging from small hand-held spray heads to large multinozzle cleaners. Also used to verify part adequately cleaned. Runoff liquid from spray directed at part collected. Liquid analyzed for presence of contaminants, and part recleaned if necessary.

  17. Butorphanol Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... spray is used to relieve moderate to severe pain. Butorphanol is in a class of medications called ... works by changing the way the body senses pain. ... This branded product is no longer on the market. Generic alternatives may be available.

  18. Bug spray poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... effective bug sprays contain pyrethrins. Pyrethrins are a pesticide made from the chrysanthemum flower. It is generally ... death. References Borron SW. Pyrethrins, repellants, and other pesticides. In: Shannon MW, Borron SW, Burns MJ, eds. ...

  19. Sumatriptan Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... spray is used to treat the symptoms of migraine headaches (severe, throbbing headaches that sometimes are accompanied ... that cause pain, nausea, and other symptoms of migraine. Sumatriptan does not prevent migraine attacks or reduce ...

  20. Zolmitriptan Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... spray is used to treat the symptoms of migraine headaches (severe, throbbing headaches that sometimes are accompanied ... that cause pain, nausea, and other symptoms of migraine. Zolmitriptan does not prevent migraine attacks or reduce ...

  1. Sensors in Spray Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauchais, P.; Vardelle, M.

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents what is our actual knowledge about sensors, used in the harsh environment of spray booths, to improve the reproducibility and reliability of coatings sprayed with hot or cold gases. First are described, with their limitations and precisions, the different sensors following the in-flight hot particle parameters (trajectories, temperatures, velocities, sizes, and shapes). A few comments are also made about techniques, still under developments in laboratories, to improve our understanding of coating formation such as plasma jet temperature measurements in non-symmetrical conditions, hot gases heat flux, particles flattening and splats formation, particles evaporation. Then are described the illumination techniques by laser flash of either cold particles (those injected in hot gases, or in cold spray gun) or liquid injected into hot gases (suspensions or solutions). The possibilities they open to determine the flux and velocities of cold particles or visualize liquid penetration in the core of hot gases are discussed. Afterwards are presented sensors to follow, when spraying hot particles, substrate and coating temperature evolution, and the stress development within coatings during the spray process as well as the coating thickness. The different uses of these sensors are then described with successively: (i) Measurements limited to particle trajectories, velocities, temperatures, and sizes in different spray conditions: plasma (including transient conditions due to arc root fluctuations in d.c. plasma jets), HVOF, wire arc, cold spray. Afterwards are discussed how such sensor data can be used to achieve a better understanding of the different spray processes, compare experiments to calculations and improve the reproducibility and reliability of the spray conditions. (ii) Coatings monitoring through in-flight measurements coupled with those devoted to coatings formation. This is achieved by either maintaining at their set point both in-flight and

  2. Motion planning for robotic spray cleaning with environmentally safe solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Yong K.; Meirans, L.; Drotning, W.D.

    1993-09-01

    Automatic motion planning of a spray cleaning robot with collision avoidance is presented in this paper. In manufacturing environments, electronic and mechanical components are traditionally cleaned by spraying or dipping them using chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) solvents. As new scientific data show that such solvents are major causes for stratospheric ozone depletion, an alternate cleaning method is needed. Part cleaning with aqueous solvents is environmentally safe, but can require precision spraying at high pressures for extended time periods. Operator fatigue during manual spraying can decrease the quality of the cleaning process. By spraying with a robotic manipulator, the necessary spray accuracy and consistency to manufacture highreliability components can be obtained. Our motion planner was developed to automatically generate motions for spraying robots based on the part geometry and cleaning process parameters. For spraying paint and other coatings a geometric description of the parts and robot may be sufficient for motion planning, since coatings are usually done over the visible surfaces. For spray cleaning, the requirement to reach hidden surfaces necessitates the addition of a rule-based method to the geometric motion planning.

  3. Portable Spray Booth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Timothy D.; Bardwell, Micheal J.

    1996-01-01

    Portable spray booth provides for controlled application of coating materials with high solvent contents. Includes contoured shroud and carbon filter bed limiting concentration of fumes in vicinity. Designed to substitute spraying for brush application of solvent-based adhesive prior to installing rubber waterproof seals over joints between segments of solid-fuel rocket motor. With minor adjustments and modifications, used to apply other solvent-based adhesives, paints, and like.

  4. Metal atomization spray nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Huxford, T.J.

    1993-11-16

    A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal. 6 figures.

  5. Metal atomization spray nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Huxford, Theodore J.

    1993-01-01

    A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal.

  6. Directed spray mast

    DOEpatents

    Nance, Thomas A.; Siddall, Alvin A.; Cheng, William Y.; Counts, Kevin T.

    2005-05-10

    Disclosed is an elongated, tubular, compact high pressure sprayer apparatus for insertion into an access port of vessels having contaminated interior areas that require cleaning by high pressure water spray. The invention includes a spray nozzle and a camera adjacent thereto with means for rotating and raising and lowering the nozzle so that areas identified through the camera may be cleaned with a minimum production of waste water to be removed.

  7. Spray applicator for spraying coatings and other fluids in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuminecz, J. F.; Lausten, M. F. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A self contained spray application is developed for one handed operation in a zero gravity vacuum environment by a free flying astronaut not attached to any spacecraft. This spray applicator eliminates contamination of the operator by back spray. This applicator includes a rigid accumulator containment of a fluid within a flexible bladder the fluid being urged out of the accumulator under pressure through a spray gun. The spray gun includes a spring loaded lockable trigger which controls a valve. When in an open position, the fluid passes through the valve into the ambient environment in the form of a spray. A spray shield is provided which directs the flow of the spray from the applicator by trapping errant particles of spray yet allowing the passage of escaping gases through its material.

  8. Evaporation And Ignition Of Dense Fuel Sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth G.

    1988-01-01

    Simple theoretical model makes useful predictions of trends. Pair of reports presents theoretical model of evaporation and ignition of sprayed liquid fuel. Developed as part of research in combustion of oil and liquid fuels derived from coal, tar sand, and shale in furnace. Work eventually contributes to increase efficiency of combustion and decrease pollution generated by burning of such fuels.

  9. Plasma-sprayed coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, H.

    1988-09-01

    Plasma spraying is one way to apply protective coatings. The hot, high-speed flame of a plasma gun can melt a powder of almost any ceramic or metal and spray it to form a coating for protection against corrosion, wear or high temperature. The technique carries much less risk of degrading the coating and substrate than many other high-temperature processes do, because the gas in the plasma flame is chemically inert and the target can be kept fairly cool. And yet a plasma gun can be only a little more cumbersome than a paint sprayer. Investigators are applying this technique to new materials. The General Electric Company is using vacuum plasma spraying to make freestanding components: intricate aircraft engine parts formed by plasma-spraying a superalloy on a removable substrate. Other workers spray ceramic particles or fibers and metal powder simulatious wrong, stiff composite materials: the ceramic particles dispersed in a matrix of metal. The author and colleagues at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory have fabricated a thick film of high-temperature superconductor by plasma-spraying the compound in the form of a powder. 7 figs.

  10. Alkaline flooding injection strategy

    SciTech Connect

    French, T.R.; Josephson, C.B.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to improved alkali-surfactant flooding methods, and this includes determining the proper design of injection strategy. Several different injection strategies have been used or suggested for recovering heavy oils with surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding methods. Oil recovery was compared for four different injection strategies: (1) surfactant followed by polymer, (2) surfactant followed by alkaline polymer, (3) alkaline surfactant followed by polymer, and (4) alkali, surfactant, and polymer mixed in a single formulation. The effect of alkaline preflush was also studied under two different conditions. All of the oil recovery experiments were conducted under optimal conditions with a viscous, non-acidic oil from Hepler (KS) oil field. The coreflood experiments were conducted with Berea sandstone cores since field core was not available in sufficient quantity for coreflood tests. The Tucker sand of Hepler field is a Class I fluvial dominated deltaic reservoir, as classified by the Department of Energy, which has been selected as the site of a DOE-sponsored field pilot test.

  11. LES/FMDF of High Speed Spray Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irannejad, Abolfazl; Jaberi, Farhad

    2013-11-01

    High speed evaporating and combusting sprays are computed with the hybrid two-phase large eddy simulation (LES)/filtered mass density function (FMDF) methodology. In this methodology, the resolved fluid velocity is obtained by solving the filtered form of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations with high-order finite difference schemes. The scalar (temperature and species mass fractions) field is obtained by solving the FMDF transport equation with a Lagrangian stochastic method. The spray is simulated with the Lagrangian droplets together with stochastic breakup and finite rate heat and mass transfer models. The liquid volume fraction is included in the LES/FMDF for denser spray regions. Simulations of high speed evaporating sprays with and without combustion for a range of gas and spray conditions indicate that the two-phase LES/FMDF results are consistent and compare well with the experimental results for global spray variables such as the spray penetration and flame lift-off lengths. The gas velocity and turbulence generated by the spray are found to be very significant in all simulated cases. A broad spectrum of droplet sizes is also found to be generated by the complex and coupled effects of the gas flow turbulence, droplet breakup, evaporation and combustion.

  12. High velocity pulsed wire-arc spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witherspoon, F. Douglas (Inventor); Massey, Dennis W. (Inventor); Kincaid, Russell W. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Wire arc spraying using repetitively pulsed, high temperature gas jets, usually referred to as plasma jets, and generated by capillary discharges, substantially increases the velocity of atomized and entrained molten droplets. The quality of coatings produced is improved by increasing the velocity with which coating particles impact the coated surface. The effectiveness of wire-arc spraying is improved by replacing the usual atomizing air stream with a rapidly pulsed high velocity plasma jet. Pulsed power provides higher coating particle velocities leading to improved coatings. 50 micron aluminum droplets with velocities of 1500 m/s are produced. Pulsed plasma jet spraying provides the means to coat the insides of pipes, tubes, and engine block cylinders with very high velocity droplet impact.

  13. High power plasma spraying of oxide ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Lugscheider, E.; Jungklaus, H.; Schwier, G.; Mathesius, H.; Heinrich, P.

    1995-12-31

    New developed high power plasma spray (HPPS) systems offer opportunities for generating both high thermal as well as high kinetic energy transfer to the powder particles. The operation level can be elevated up to 250 kW for continuous processing. PLCs and mass flow controls support high power processing under production conditions. The process is designed for applying large quantities even of high melt materials, such as oxide ceramics. High power plasma processing may result in enhanced coating characteristics. The work in this paper shows first conclusions for processing commercial powders such as alumina, alumina-titania, chromia and a recently developed multicomponent oxide with a HPPS system. Particle velocities were measured after optimizing spraying parameters. Coatings were evaluated by optical microscopy (microstructure and porosity), microhardness and pin-on-disc abrasive wear tests. Powder types and sizes as well as the systems configuration are considered for a general discussion of the capability and limitation in high power plasma spraying.

  14. Microalgal cell disruption via ultrasonic nozzle spraying.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Yuan, W

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to understand the effect of operating parameters, including ultrasound amplitude, spraying pressure, nozzle orifice diameter, and initial cell concentration on microalgal cell disruption and lipid extraction in an ultrasonic nozzle spraying system (UNSS). Two algal species including Scenedesmus dimorphus and Nannochloropsis oculata were evaluated. Experimental results demonstrated that the UNSS was effective in the disruption of microalgal cells indicated by significant changes in cell concentration and Nile red-stained lipid fluorescence density between all treatments and the control. It was found that increasing ultrasound amplitude generally enhanced cell disruption and lipid recovery although excessive input energy was not necessary for best results. The effect of spraying pressure and nozzle orifice diameter on cell disruption and lipid recovery was believed to be dependent on the competition between ultrasound-induced cavitation and spraying-generated shear forces. Optimal cell disruption was not always achieved at the highest spraying pressure or biggest nozzle orifice diameter; instead, they appeared at moderate levels depending on the algal strain and specific settings. Increasing initial algal cell concentration significantly reduced cell disruption efficiency. In all UNSS treatments, the effectiveness of cell disruption and lipid recovery was found to be dependent on the algal species treated.

  15. Measurements in liquid fuel sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chigier, N.

    1984-01-01

    Techniques for studying the events directly preceding combustion in the liquid fuel sprays are being used to provide information as a function of space and time on droplet size, shape, number density, position, angle of flight and velocity. Spray chambers were designed and constructed for: (1) air-assist liquid fuel research sprays; (2) high pressure and temperature chamber for pulsed diesel fuel sprays; and (3) coal-water slurry sprays. Recent results utilizing photography, cinematography, and calibration of the Malvern particle sizer are reported. Systems for simultaneous measurement of velocity and particle size distributions using laser Doppler anemometry interferometry and the application of holography in liquid fuel sprays are being calibrated.

  16. Spray nozzle designs for agricultural aviation applications. [relation of drop size to spray characteristics and nozzle efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. W.; Putnam, A. A.; Gieseke, J. A.; Golovin, M. N.; Hale, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    Techniques of generating monodisperse sprays and information concerning chemical liquids used in agricultural aviation are surveyed. The periodic dispersion of liquid jet, the spinning disk method, and ultrasonic atomization are the techniques discussed. Conceptually designed spray nozzles for generating monodisperse sprays are assessed. These are based on the classification of the drops using centrifugal force, on using two opposing liquid laden air jets, and on operating a spinning disk at an overloaded flow. Performance requirements for the designs are described and estimates of the operational characteristics are presented.

  17. Alkaline quinone flow battery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kaixiang; Chen, Qing; Gerhardt, Michael R; Tong, Liuchuan; Kim, Sang Bok; Eisenach, Louise; Valle, Alvaro W; Hardee, David; Gordon, Roy G; Aziz, Michael J; Marshak, Michael P

    2015-09-25

    Storage of photovoltaic and wind electricity in batteries could solve the mismatch problem between the intermittent supply of these renewable resources and variable demand. Flow batteries permit more economical long-duration discharge than solid-electrode batteries by using liquid electrolytes stored outside of the battery. We report an alkaline flow battery based on redox-active organic molecules that are composed entirely of Earth-abundant elements and are nontoxic, nonflammable, and safe for use in residential and commercial environments. The battery operates efficiently with high power density near room temperature. These results demonstrate the stability and performance of redox-active organic molecules in alkaline flow batteries, potentially enabling cost-effective stationary storage of renewable energy.

  18. Advanced alkaline water electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakabayashi, N.; Torikai, E.; Kawami, Y.; Takenaka, H.

    Results are presented of experimental studies of possible separators and electrodes for use in advanced, high-temperature, high-pressure alkaline water electrolyzers. Material evaluations in alkaline water electrolyzers at temperatures from 100 to 120 C have shown a new type polytetrafluoroethylene membrane impregnated with potassium titanate to be the most promising when the separator is prepared by the hydrothermal treatment of a porous PFTE membrane impregnated with hydrated titanium oxide. Measurements of cell voltages in 30% KOH at current densities from 5 to 100 A/sq dm at temperatures up to 120 C with nickel electrodes of various structures have shown the foamed nickel electrode, with an average pore size of 1-1.5 mm, to have the best performance. When the foamed nickel is coated by fine powdered nickel, carbonyl nickel or Raney nickel to increase electrode surface areas, even lower cell voltages were found, indicating better performance.

  19. Miniature spray-painting booth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fee, K. W.

    1970-01-01

    Transparent spray booth provides method for quality painting and repair of surfaces in clean room or other specialized environments. Overspray and virtually all contaminating vapor and odor can be eliminated. Touch-up painting is achieved with spray gun.

  20. Nasal spray flu vaccine (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The flu vaccine can also be administered as a nasal spray instead of the usual injection method. It can be ... the recombinant influenza vaccine (RIV). The nasal spray flu vaccine (live attenuated influenza vaccine or LAIV) should not ...

  1. Controlled overspray spray nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasthofer, W. P. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A spray system for a multi-ingredient ablative material wherein a nozzle A is utilized for suppressing overspray is described. The nozzle includes a cyclindrical inlet which converges to a restricted throat. A curved juncture between the cylindrical inlet and the convergent portion affords unrestricted and uninterrupted flow of the ablative material. A divergent bell-shaped chamber and adjustable nozzle exit B is utilized which provides a highly effective spray pattern in suppressing overspray to an acceptable level and producing a homogeneous jet of material that adheres well to the substrate.

  2. Spray combustion experiments and numerical predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mularz, Edward J.; Bulzan, Daniel L.; Chen, Kuo-Huey

    1993-01-01

    The next generation of commercial aircraft will include turbofan engines with performance significantly better than those in the current fleet. Control of particulate and gaseous emissions will also be an integral part of the engine design criteria. These performance and emission requirements present a technical challenge for the combustor: control of the fuel and air mixing and control of the local stoichiometry will have to be maintained much more rigorously than with combustors in current production. A better understanding of the flow physics of liquid fuel spray combustion is necessary. This paper describes recent experiments on spray combustion where detailed measurements of the spray characteristics were made, including local drop-size distributions and velocities. Also, an advanced combustor CFD code has been under development and predictions from this code are compared with experimental results. Studies such as these will provide information to the advanced combustor designer on fuel spray quality and mixing effectiveness. Validation of new fast, robust, and efficient CFD codes will also enable the combustor designer to use them as additional design tools for optimization of combustor concepts for the next generation of aircraft engines.

  3. Sprayed Coating Renews Butyl Rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. B.

    1982-01-01

    Damaged butyl rubber products are renewed by spray technique originally developed for protective suits worn by NASA workers. A commercial two-part adhesive is mixed with Freon-113 (or equivalent) trichlorotrifluoroethane to obtain optimum viscosity for spraying. Mix is applied with an external-air-mix spray gun.

  4. Nanosized aerosols from consumer sprays: experimental analysis and exposure modeling for four commercial products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Christiane; Hagendorfer, Harald; von Goetz, Natalie; Kaegi, Ralf; Gehrig, Robert; Ulrich, Andrea; Scheringer, Martin; Hungerbühler, Konrad

    2011-08-01

    Consumer spray products are already on the market in the cosmetics and household sector, which suggest by their label that they contain engineered nanoparticles (ENP). Sprays are considered critical for human health, because the lungs represent a major route for the uptake of ENP into the human body. To contribute to the exposure assessment of ENP in consumer spray products, we analyzed ENP in four commercially available sprays: one antiperspirant, two shoe impregnation sprays, and one plant-strengthening agent. The spray dispersions were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) and (scanning-) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM). Aerosols were generated by using the original vessels, and analyzed by scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and (S)TEM. On the basis of SMPS results, the nanosized aerosol depositing in the respiratory tract was modeled for female and male consumers. The derived exposure levels reflect a single spray application. We identified ENP in the dispersions of two products (shoe impregnation and plant spray). Nanosized aerosols were observed in three products that contained propellant gas. The aerosol number concentration increased linearly with the sprayed amount, with the highest concentration resulting from the antiperspirant. Modeled aerosol exposure levels were in the range of 1010 nanosized aerosol components per person and application event for the antiperspirant and the impregnation sprays, with the largest fraction of nanosized aerosol depositing in the alveolar region. Negligible exposure from the application of the plant spray (pump spray) was observed.

  5. Spray combustion stability project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeng, San-Mou; Litchford, Ron J.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes research activity on the Spray Combustion Stability Project, characterizes accomplishments and current status, and discusses projected future work. The purpose is to provide a concise conceptual overview of the research effort to date so the reader can quickly assimilate the gist of the research results and place them within the context of their potential impact on liquid rocket engine design technology.

  6. Picosecond imaging of sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breisacher, Kevin; Liou, Larry; Wang, L.; Liang, X.; Galland, P.; Ho, P. P.; Alfano, R. R.

    1994-01-01

    Preliminary results from applying a Kerr-Fourier imaging system to a water/air spray produced by a shear coaxial element are presented. The physics behind ultrafast time-gated optical techniques is discussed briefly. A typical setup of a Kerr-Fourier time gating system is presented.

  7. Ocean Spray Lubricates Winds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    According to a new study by two University of California, Berkeley, mathematicians and their Russian colleague, the water droplets kicked up by rough seas serve to lubricate the swirling winds of hurricanes and cyclones, letting them build to speeds approaching 200 miles per hour. Without the lubricating effect of the spray, the mathematicians…

  8. Oxymetazoline Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rinse the tip of the dispenser with hot water or wipe it clean after you use it.Follow the directions for using the nasal spray that appear on the package label. If you are using a product that comes in a pump dispenser, press down on the rim several times ...

  9. Optimisation of a vertical spray boom for greenhouse spraying applications.

    PubMed

    Nuyttens, D; Windey, S; Braekman, P; De Moor, A; Sonck, B

    2003-01-01

    The European Crop Protection Association (ECPA) and CLO-DVL joined forces in a project to stimulate a safe use of pesticides in Southern European countries. CLO-DVL optimised a method with mineral chelates to evaluate deposition tests. This quantitative method to evaluate spray deposits and to check spray distributions is used to assess two novel spraying techniques. Deposition tests with water-sensitive paper and mainly with the manganese and molybdenum chelates as tracer elements were performed with a manually pulled trolley and a motorised vehicle both equipped with vertical spray booms. Filter papers were attached to the tomato and pepper plants at several heights to obtain an indication of the spray distribution in the crop. Particular attention was paid to the effect on the spray distribution of the vertical nozzle distance (35 cm vs. 50 cm) and the spray distance to the crop. The tests proved that a nozzle spacing of 35 cm delivers a much better spray distribution than one of 50 cm. The optimal spray distance for flat fan nozzles with a spray angle of 80 degrees and a nozzle spacing of 35 cm is about 30 cm.

  10. Defensive spray of the bombardier beetle: a biological pulse jet.

    PubMed

    Dean, J; Aneshansley, D J; Edgerton, H E; Eisner, T

    1990-06-08

    The defensive spray of the bombardier beetle Stenaptinus insignis is ejected in quick pulses (at about 500 pulses per second) rather than as a continuous stream. The pulsation may be a consequence of intermittency in the explosive chemical process that generates the spray. The ejection system of the beetle shows basic similarity to the pulse jet propulsion mechanism of the German V-1 "buzz" bomb of World War II.

  11. Improved Orifice Plate for Spray Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, W.

    1986-01-01

    Erratic spray pattern of commercial spray gun changed to repeatable one by simple redesign of two parts. In modified spray gun orifice plate and polytetrafluoroethylene bushing redesigned to assure centering and alignment with nozzle. Such improvement useful in many industrial applications requiring repeatable spray patterns. Might include spraying of foam insulation, paint, other protective coatings, detergents, abrasives, adhesives, process chemicals, or fuels. Unmodified spray gun produces erratic spray because lateral misalignment between orifice plate and nozzle.

  12. Further evaluation of spray characterization of sprayers typically used in vector control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Droplet size spectra from different sprayers used to generate sprays for controlling insects that may vector diseases were measured by a laser diffraction instrument. The objective of this work was to measure the droplet size generated by different sprayers with water- and oil-based spray solutions...

  13. Method of producing thermally sprayed metallic coating

    DOEpatents

    Byrnes, Larry Edward; Kramer, Martin Stephen; Neiser, Richard A.

    2003-08-26

    The cylinder walls of light metal engine blocks are thermally spray coated with a ferrous-based coating using an HVOF device. A ferrous-based wire is fed to the HVOF device to locate a tip end of the wire in a high temperature zone of the device. Jet flows of oxygen and gaseous fuel are fed to the high temperature zone and are combusted to generate heat to melt the tip end. The oxygen is oversupplied in relation to the gaseous fuel. The excess oxygen reacts with and burns a fraction of the ferrous-based feed wire in an exothermic reaction to generate substantial supplemental heat to the HVOF device. The molten/combusted metal is sprayed by the device onto the walls of the cylinder by the jet flow of gases.

  14. Alkaline solution/binder ratio as a determining factor in the alkaline activation of aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz-Santaquiteria, C.; Fernandez-Jimenez, A.; Palomo, A.

    2012-09-15

    This study investigates the effect of the alkaline solution/binder (S/B) ratio on the composition and nanostructure of the reaction products generated in the alkaline activation of aluminosilicates. The experiments used two mixtures of fly ash and dehydroxylated white clay and for each of these, varying proportions of the solution components. The alkali activator was an 8 M NaOH solution (with and without sodium silicate) used at three S/B ratios: 0.50, 0.75 and 1.25. The {sup 29}Si, {sup 27}Al MAS NMR and XRD characterisation of the reaction products reveal that for ratios nearest the value delivering suitable paste workability, the reaction-product composition and structure depend primarily on the nature and composition of the starting materials and the alkaline activator used. However, when an excess alkaline activator is present in the system, the reaction products tend to exhibit SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratios of approximately 1, irrespective of the composition of the starting binder or the alkaline activator.

  15. Large-eddy simulation studies of sea spray in the hurricane atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Mark

    The growth and maintenance of hurricanes is highly dependent upon the exchange of heat and momentum between the ocean and atmosphere. Because sea spray can significantly affect this ocean-air exchange, accurate hurricane models need to account for spray effects. We incorporate sea spray into large-eddy simulations (LES) to explore its role in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) of hurricanes, allowing us to assess the validity of and offer improvements to the simple spray parameterizations currently used in hurricane models. We investigate thermodynamic feedback between spray and surface heat fluxes, and examine the effects of spray upon the dynamics of the hurricane boundary layer. Results of preliminary LES, which use a bulk representation of the dominant range of spray sizes and a simplified diagnostic phase change scheme, indicate an appreciable amount of spray-air heat transfer---consistent with theory---and demonstrate a form of spray-induced thermodynamic feedback. The LES model of the hurricane atmospheric boundary layer (HABL) is adapted to account for variations in spray generation due to wave-breaking, momentum transfer between air and spray in both the vertical (liquid loading and stratification) and horizontal (drag), and dissipative heating in an emulsion-like two-phase environment. These modifications are accompanied by extension of the phase change and spray generation schemes to account for different droplet sizes, and implementation of a moving three-dimensional boundary. Collective inclusion of all these pieces of modeled physics in the LES provides results which offer a better view of the limitations of current spray-flux models, and motivates a simpler and improved alternative model. The refined results of the 'full' LES-HABL model are consistent with early simulations, and underscore the significance of boundary-layer scale thermodynamic balance, spray-induced fluxes, and wind-dependent thermodynamic feedback.

  16. Spray combustion stability project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeng, San-Mou; Litchford, Ron J.

    1990-01-01

    This report summarizes research activity on the Spray Combustion Stability Project, characterizes accomplishments and current status, and discusses projected future work. The purpose is to provide a concise conceptual overview of the research effort so the reader can quickly assimilate the gist of the research results and place them within the context of their potential impact on liquid rocket engine design technology. Therefore, this report does not elaborate on many of the detailed technical aspects of the research program.

  17. Spray Nozzle Calibrations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    1984. The manuscript was submitted for publication on October 2, 1985. AEOC-TR-85-eO CONTENTS Page J.O INTRODUCTION 1.1 General 5 1.2...1.1 GENERAL The formation of ice on aircraft surfaces occurs during flight through clouds of supercooled water droplets. Ice accretion on these... wind tunnel. Both the LWC and mean effective droplet size are set and maintained through variations in the water and air supply pressures of the spray

  18. Combustion Characteristics of Sprays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-01

    regarded by implication or otherwise, or in any way licensing the holder or any other person or corporation, or conveying any rights or permission to...00 _’N 1. TI TLE inctuat Security CZaaafication5 Combustion Characteristics of Sprays 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Sohrab, Siavash H. 13& TYPE OF REPORT...to ?!HF of rich butane/air 3unsen flames. .lso, the rotacion speed and :he oerodic temDeracure fluc:uations of rotacfng ?HF are examined. :’!naily

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging measurements of a water spray upstream and downstream of a spray nozzle exit orifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastikhin, Igor; Arbabi, Aidin; Bade, Kyle M.

    2016-05-01

    Sprays are dynamic collections of droplets dispersed in a gas, with many industrial and agricultural applications. Quantitative characterization is essential for understanding processes of spray formation and dynamics. There exists a wide range of measurement techniques to characterize sprays, from direct imaging to phase Doppler interferometry to X-rays, which provide detailed information on spray characteristics in the "far-nozzle" region (≫10 diameters of the nozzle). However, traditional methods are limited in their ability to characterize the "near-nozzle" region where the fluid may be inside the nozzle, optically dense, or incompletely atomized. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) presents potential as a non-invasive technique that is capable of measuring optically inaccessible fluid in a quantitative fashion. In this work, MRI measurements of the spray generated by ceramic flat-fan nozzles were performed. A wide range of flow speeds in the system (0.2 to >25 m/s) necessitated short encoding times. A 3D Conical SPRITE and motion-sensitized 3D Conical SPRITE were employed. The signal from water inside the nozzle was well-characterized, both via proton density and velocity measurements. The signal outside the nozzle, in the near-nozzle region, was detectable, corresponding to the expected flat-fan spray pattern up to 3 mm away. The results demonstrate the potential of MRI for measuring spray characteristics in areas inaccessible by other methods.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging measurements of a water spray upstream and downstream of a spray nozzle exit orifice.

    PubMed

    Mastikhin, Igor; Arbabi, Aidin; Bade, Kyle M

    2016-05-01

    Sprays are dynamic collections of droplets dispersed in a gas, with many industrial and agricultural applications. Quantitative characterization is essential for understanding processes of spray formation and dynamics. There exists a wide range of measurement techniques to characterize sprays, from direct imaging to phase Doppler interferometry to X-rays, which provide detailed information on spray characteristics in the "far-nozzle" region (≫10 diameters of the nozzle). However, traditional methods are limited in their ability to characterize the "near-nozzle" region where the fluid may be inside the nozzle, optically dense, or incompletely atomized. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) presents potential as a non-invasive technique that is capable of measuring optically inaccessible fluid in a quantitative fashion. In this work, MRI measurements of the spray generated by ceramic flat-fan nozzles were performed. A wide range of flow speeds in the system (0.2 to >25m/s) necessitated short encoding times. A 3D Conical SPRITE and motion-sensitized 3D Conical SPRITE were employed. The signal from water inside the nozzle was well-characterized, both via proton density and velocity measurements. The signal outside the nozzle, in the near-nozzle region, was detectable, corresponding to the expected flat-fan spray pattern up to 3mm away. The results demonstrate the potential of MRI for measuring spray characteristics in areas inaccessible by other methods.

  1. Sea Spray Generation at a Rocky Shoreline

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    rigidly attached to a Gill WindMaster sonic 130 anemometer /thermometer (Fig. 2). The sonic’s sample area was 0.48 m above the CIP’s laser 131...a “turbulence tripod” near the high-water line (Fig. 1). This tripod held a three-axis 136 sonic anemometer /thermometer from Applied Technologies...retained its average only 168 if it had counted at least ten droplets during the averaging period. 169 The Gill sonic anemometer attached to the cloud

  2. Thermal sprayed composite melt containment tubular component and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Besser, Matthew F.; Terpstra, Robert L.; Sordelet, Daniel J.; Anderson, Iver E.

    2002-03-19

    A tubular thermal sprayed melt containment component for transient containment of molten metal or alloy wherein the tubular member includes a thermal sprayed inner melt-contacting layer for contacting molten metal or alloy to be processed, a thermal sprayed heat-generating layer deposited on the inner layer, and an optional thermal sprayed outer thermal insulating layer. The thermal sprayed heat-generating layer is inductively heated as a susceptor of an induction field or electrical resistively heated by passing electrical current therethrough. The tubular thermal sprayed melt containment component can comprise an elongated melt pour tube of a gas atomization apparatus where the melt pour tube supplies molten material from a crucible to an underlying melt atomization nozzle.

  3. Fundamental studies of spray combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.C.; Libby, P.A.; Williams, F.A.

    1997-12-31

    Our research on spray combustion involves both experiment and theory and addresses the characteristics of individual droplets and of sprays in a variety of flows: laminar and turbulent, opposed and impinging. Currently our focus concerns water and fuel sprays in two stage laminar flames, i.e., flames arising, for example from a stream of fuel and oxidizer flowing opposite to an air stream carrying a water spray. Our interest in these flames is motivated by the goals of reducing pollutant emissions and extending the range of stable spray combustion. There remains considerable research to be carried out in order to achieve these goals. Thus far our research on the characteristics of sprays in turbulent flows has been limited to nonreacting jets impinging on a plate but this work will be extended to opposed flows with and without a flame. In the following we discuss details of these studies and our plans for future work.

  4. Closed loop spray cooling apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alger, D. L.; Schwab, W. B.; Furman, E. R. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A closed loop apparatus for jet spraying coolant against the back of a radiation target is described. The coolant is circulated through a closed loop with a bubble of inert gas being maintained around the spray. Mesh material is disposed between the bubble and the surface of the liquid coolant which is below the bubble at a predetermined level. In a second arrangement no inert gas is used, the bubble consists of vapor produced when the coolant is sprayed against the target.

  5. Mesozoic mafic alkaline magmatism of southern Scandinavia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tappe, Sebastian

    2004-11-01

    More than 100 volcanic necks in central Scania (southern Sweden) are the product of Jurassic continental rift-related mafic alkaline magmatism at the southwest margin of the Baltic Shield. They are mainly basanites, with rarer melanephelinites. Both rock groups display overlapping primitive Mg-numbers, Cr and Ni contents, steep chondrite-normalized rare earth element patterns (LaN /YbN = 17 27) and an overall enrichment in incompatible elements. However, the melanephelinites are more alkaline and have stronger high field strength element enrichment than the basanites. The existence of distinct primary magmas is also indicated by heterogeneity in highly incompatible element ratios (e.g. Zr/Nb, La/Nb). Trace element modelling indicates that the magmas were generated by comparably low degrees of melting of a heterogeneous mantle source. Such a source can best be explained by a metasomatic overprint of the mantle lithosphere by percolating evolved melts. The former existence of such alkaline trace element-enriched melts can be demonstrated by inversion of the trace element content of green-core clinopyroxenes and anorthoclase which occur as xenocrysts in the melanephelinites and are interpreted as being derived from crystallization of evolved mantle melts. Jurassic magmatic activity in Scania was coeval with the generation of nephelinites in the nearby Egersund Basin (Norwegian North Sea). Both Scanian and North Sea alkaline magmas share similar trace element characteristics. Mantle enrichment processes at the southwest margin of the Baltic Shield and the North Sea Basin generated trace element signatures similar to those of ocean island basalts (e.g. low Zr/Nb and La/Nb) but there are no indications of plume activity during the Mesozoic in this area. On the contrary, the short duration of rifting, absence of extensive lithospheric thinning, and low magma volumes argue against a Mesozoic mantle plume. It seems likely that the metasomatic imprint resulted from the

  6. Photomicrographic Studies of Fuel Sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Dana W; Spencer, Robert C

    1934-01-01

    A large number of photomicrographs of fuel sprays were taken for the purpose of studying the spray structure and the process of spray formation. They were taken at magnifying powers of 2.5, 3.25, and 10, using a spark discharge of very short duration for illumination. Several types and sizes of nozzles were investigated, different liquids were used, and a wide range of injection pressures was employed. The sprays were photographed as they were injected into a glass-walled chamber in which the air density was varied from 14 atmospheres to 0.0013 atmosphere.

  7. Vacuum Plasma Spraying Replaces Electrodeposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard R.; Power, Chris; Burns, David H.; Daniel, Ron; Mckechnie, Timothy N.

    1992-01-01

    Vacuum plasma spraying used to fabricate large parts with complicated contours and inner structures, without uninspectable welds. Reduces time, and expense of fabrication. Wall of combustion chamber built up inside of outer nickel-alloy jacket by plasma spraying. Particles of metal sprayed partially melted in plasma gun and thrown at supersonic speed toward deposition surface. Vacuum plasma-spray produces stronger bond between the grooves and covering layer completing channels and wall of combustion chamber. In tests, bond withstood pressure of 20 kpsi, three times allowable limit by old method.

  8. Impact of occupational health hazards on serum markers of bone formation in spray painters of Chennai region in Tamil Nadu

    PubMed Central

    Muthaiah, Vijaya Prakash Krishnan; Nathan, Abel Arul; Balakrishnan, Anandan; Rose, Rajiv; Gopalsamy, Jayaraman

    2012-01-01

    Context: The association between spray paint exposure and bone remodeling received little attention despite the high usage of spray paints in automobile industries, steel furniture workshops etc. Aim: The present study was aimed at investigating the level of serum markers of bone formation in spray painters. The spray painting subjects were selected from automobile body repair workshops in Chennai region of TamilNadu which constitutes 30% of India's automobile industry. Setting and Design: All the study subjects, exposed to spray paint were working in a workshop without standard spraying room and did not wore any aerosol removing respirator. The controls were selected from random population irrespective of occupation. Data relevant to the socioeconomic features and personal history was collected using a questionnaire. The current study included 50 spray painters and 25 control subjects of same age group. Materials and Methods: We examined the level of serum calcium, serum phosphorus, serum differentiation markers of bone such as alkaline phosphatase (bone specific) and serum osteocalcin in which these levels were found to be high in serum of spray painters. Conclusion: The current study concludes dysregulation in bone remodeling of spray painters exposed to chronic solvents and paint pigments. PMID:23580840

  9. Modelling the Plasma Jet in Multi-Arc Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, K.; Öte, M.; Schein, J.; Zimmermann, S.; Möhwald, K.; Lummer, C.

    2016-08-01

    Particle in-flight characteristics in atmospheric plasma spraying process are determined by impulse and heat energy transferred between the plasma jet and injected powder particles. One of the important factors for the quality of the plasma-sprayed coatings is thus the distribution of plasma gas temperatures and velocities in plasma jet. Plasma jets generated by conventional single-arc plasma spraying systems and their interaction with powder particles were subject matter of intensive research. However, this does not apply to plasma jets generated by means of multi-arc plasma spraying systems yet. In this study, a numerical model has been developed which is designated to dealing with the flow characteristics of the plasma jet generated by means of a three-cathode spraying system. The upstream flow conditions, which were calculated using a priori conducted plasma generator simulations, have been coupled to the plasma jet simulations. The significances of the relevant numerical assumptions and aspects of the models are analyzed. The focus is placed on to the turbulence and diffusion/demixing modelling. A critical evaluation of the prediction power of the models is conducted by comparing the numerical results to the experimental results determined by means of emission spectroscopic computed tomography. It is evident that the numerical models exhibit a good accuracy for their intended use.

  10. Alkaline battery, separator therefore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, George F. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An improved battery separator for alkaline battery cells has low resistance to electrolyte ion transfer and high resistance to electrode ion transfer. The separator is formed by applying an improved coating to an electrolyte absorber. The absorber, preferably, is a flexible, fibrous, and porous substrate that is resistant to strong alkali and oxidation. The coating composition includes an admixture of a polymeric binder, a hydrolyzable polymeric ester and inert fillers. The coating composition is substantially free of reactive fillers and plasticizers commonly employed as porosity promoting agents in separator coatings. When the separator is immersed in electrolyte, the polymeric ester of the film coating reacts with the electrolyte forming a salt and an alcohol. The alcohol goes into solution with the electrolyte while the salt imbibes electrolyte into the coating composition. When the salt is formed, it expands the polymeric chains of the binder to provide a film coating substantially permeable to electrolyte ion transfer but relatively impermeable to electrode ion transfer during use.

  11. Generations.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2005-01-01

    Groups naturally promote their strengths and prefer values and rules that give them an identity and an advantage. This shows up as generational tensions across cohorts who share common experiences, including common elders. Dramatic cultural events in America since 1925 can help create an understanding of the differing value structures of the Silents, the Boomers, Gen Xers, and the Millennials. Differences in how these generations see motivation and values, fundamental reality, relations with others, and work are presented, as are some applications of these differences to the dental profession.

  12. Spray algorithm without interface construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Kadhem Majhool, Ahmed Abed; Watkins, A. P.

    2012-05-01

    This research is aimed to create a new and robust family of convective schemes to capture the interface between the dispersed and the carrier phases in a spray without the need to build up the interface boundary. The selection of the Weighted Average Flux (WAF) scheme is due to this scheme being designed to deal with random flux scheme which is second-order accurate in space and time. The convective flux in each cell face utilizes the WAF scheme blended with Switching Technique for Advection and Capturing of Surfaces (STACS) scheme for high resolution flux limiters. In the next step, the high resolution scheme is blended with the WAF scheme to provide the sharpness and boundedness of the interface by using switching strategy. In this work, the Eulerian-Eulerian framework of non-reactive turbulent spray is set in terms of theoretical proposed methodology namely spray moments of drop size distribution, presented by Beck and Watkins [1]. The computational spray model avoids the need to segregate the local droplet number distribution into parcels of identical droplets. The proposed scheme is tested on capturing the spray edges in modelling hollow cone sprays without need to reconstruct two-phase interface. A test is made on simple comparison between TVD scheme and WAF scheme using the same flux limiter on convective flow hollow cone spray. Results show the WAF scheme gives a better prediction than TVD scheme. The only way to check the accuracy of the presented models is by evaluating the spray sheet thickness.

  13. Substrate system for spray forming

    DOEpatents

    Chu, Men G.; Chernicoff, William P.

    2002-01-01

    A substrate system for receiving a deposit of sprayed metal droplets including a movable outer substrate on which the sprayed metal droplets are deposited. The substrate system also includes an inner substrate disposed adjacent the outer substrate where the sprayed metal droplets are deposited on the outer substrate. The inner substrate includes zones of differing thermal conductivity to resist substrate layer porosity and to resist formation of large grains and coarse constituent particles in a bulk layer of the metal droplets which have accumulated on the outer substrate. A spray forming apparatus and associated method of spray forming a molten metal to form a metal product using the substrate system of the invention is also provided.

  14. Substrate system for spray forming

    DOEpatents

    Chu, Men G.; Chernicoff, William P.

    2000-01-01

    A substrate system for receiving a deposit of sprayed metal droplets including a movable outer substrate on which the sprayed metal droplets are deposited. The substrate system also includes an inner substrate disposed adjacent the outer substrate where the sprayed metal droplets are deposited on the outer substrate. The inner substrate includes zones of differing thermal conductivity to resist substrate layer porosity and to resist formation of large grains and coarse constituent particles in a bulk layer of the metal droplets which have accumulated on the outer substrate. A spray forming apparatus and associated method of spray forming a molten metal to form a metal product using the substrate system of the invention is also provided.

  15. Flow field of a hollow-cone spray in a coflowing airstream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coghe, A.; Cossali, G.; Gamma, F.

    An experimental investigation has been carried out on the flowfield of an isothermal hollow-cone spray generated by a swirl chamber pressure atomizer spraying water into a coflowing confined airstream. The study was limited to the near-field zone from 15 to 75 nozzle diameters, to verify the feasibility of providing the initial conditions required by numerical spray models. Laser Doppler velocimetry and visualization methods have been used to measure the mean and rms drop velocity components and the initial spray angle.

  16. Spray characterization of ultra-low-volume sprayers typically used in vector control.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, W Clint; Walker, Todd W; Fritz, Bradley K; Farooq, Muhammad; Smith, Vincent L; Robinson, Cathy A; Szumlas, Dan; Lan, Yubin

    2009-09-01

    Numerous spray machines are used to apply pesticides for the control of human disease vectors, such as mosquitoes and flies, and the selection and setup of these machines significantly affects the level of control achieved during an application. The droplet spectra produced by 9 different ultra-low-volume sprayers with oil- and water-based spray solutions were evaluated along with 2 thermal foggers with the use of diesel-based spray solutions. The droplet spectra from the sprayers were measured with the use of laser diffraction droplet sizing equipment. The volume median diameter from the sprayers ranged from 14.8 to 61.9 microm for the oil-based spray solutions and 15.5 to 87.5 microm for the water-based spray solutions. The 2 thermal foggers generated sprays with a volume median diameter of 3.5 microm. The data presented will allow spray applicators to select the spray solution and sprayer that generate the droplet-size spectra that meet the desired specific spray application scenarios.

  17. Measuring water ingestion from spray exposures.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Martha; Roddick, Felicity; Nguyen, Thang; O'Toole, Joanne; Leder, Karin

    2016-08-01

    Characterisation of exposure levels is an essential requirement of health risk assessment; however for water exposures other than drinking, few quantitative exposure data exist. Thus, regulatory agencies must use estimates to formulate policy on treatment requirements for non-potable recycled water. We adapted the use of the swimming pool chemical cyanuric acid as a tracer of recreational water ingestion to permit detection of small water volumes inadvertently ingested from spray exposures. By using solutions of 700-1000 mg/L cyanuric acid in an experimental spray exposure scenario, we were able to quantify inadvertent water ingestion in almost 70% of participants undertaking a 10 min car wash activity using a high pressure spray device. Skin absorption was demonstrated to be negligible under the experimental conditions, and the measured ingestion volumes ranged from 0.06 to 3.79 mL. This method could be applied to a range of non-potable water use activities to generate exposure data for risk assessment processes. The availability of such empirical measurements will provide greater assurance to regulatory agencies and industry that potential health risks from exposure to non-potable water supplies are well understood and adequately managed to protect public health.

  18. Spray printing of organic semiconducting single crystals

    PubMed Central

    Rigas, Grigorios-Panagiotis; Payne, Marcia M.; Anthony, John E.; Horton, Peter N.; Castro, Fernando A.; Shkunov, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    Single-crystal semiconductors have been at the forefront of scientific interest for more than 70 years, serving as the backbone of electronic devices. Inorganic single crystals are typically grown from a melt using time-consuming and energy-intensive processes. Organic semiconductor single crystals, however, can be grown using solution-based methods at room temperature in air, opening up the possibility of large-scale production of inexpensive electronics targeting applications ranging from field-effect transistors and light-emitting diodes to medical X-ray detectors. Here we demonstrate a low-cost, scalable spray-printing process to fabricate high-quality organic single crystals, based on various semiconducting small molecules on virtually any substrate by combining the advantages of antisolvent crystallization and solution shearing. The crystals' size, shape and orientation are controlled by the sheer force generated by the spray droplets' impact onto the antisolvent's surface. This method demonstrates the feasibility of a spray-on single-crystal organic electronics. PMID:27874001

  19. Spray printing of organic semiconducting single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigas, Grigorios-Panagiotis; Payne, Marcia M.; Anthony, John E.; Horton, Peter N.; Castro, Fernando A.; Shkunov, Maxim

    2016-11-01

    Single-crystal semiconductors have been at the forefront of scientific interest for more than 70 years, serving as the backbone of electronic devices. Inorganic single crystals are typically grown from a melt using time-consuming and energy-intensive processes. Organic semiconductor single crystals, however, can be grown using solution-based methods at room temperature in air, opening up the possibility of large-scale production of inexpensive electronics targeting applications ranging from field-effect transistors and light-emitting diodes to medical X-ray detectors. Here we demonstrate a low-cost, scalable spray-printing process to fabricate high-quality organic single crystals, based on various semiconducting small molecules on virtually any substrate by combining the advantages of antisolvent crystallization and solution shearing. The crystals' size, shape and orientation are controlled by the sheer force generated by the spray droplets' impact onto the antisolvent's surface. This method demonstrates the feasibility of a spray-on single-crystal organic electronics.

  20. Fluidic spray control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Kuo-Tung

    An original fluidic control method in an axisymmetric spray orifice is investigated using both experiments and existing CFD. Cavitation images, droplet size measurements, discharge coefficient, unsteadiness measurements and CFD are incorporated to find out the causes resulting in small droplets. A flow rig delivering pressurized water flow to an orifice is constructed. A secondary flow is introduced through an annular slot in the orifice wall to control the cavitation, and thus the spray, at pressures up to 550 kPa driving pressure difference. The orifice used is nominally axisymmetric with a diameter 0.81 mm and length 5.08 mm. Two types of orifices are made. Orifice 1 has the slot located 0.81 mm below the orifice inlet, and the slot orientation is angled at 67.5° to the hole axis. Orifice 2 has the slot situated at 0.41 mm below the orifice inlet, and the slot orientation is angled at 15° to the hole axis. Devices, including a CCD camera, a particle-sizer and a He-Ne laser system, were utilized for flow visualization and relevant measurements. The cavitation and spray were photographed with a high resolution CCD digital camera. Droplet size measurements were made with a laser diffraction particle-sizer. Moreover, the cavitation frequencies were explored using a He-Ne laser along with a photodiode and an oscilloscope. CFD codes developed by Chen and Heister were used to model the internal flow. 54 cases were run, including 5 slot locations, 5 slot orientations, and 4 secondary flow rates. Compared with the experimental results, the agreement between CFD and experimental results is good except for hydraulic flip. Generally the high pressure region upstream of the slot, the large high pressure variation over time, and the long cavitation length are the favorable conditions for creating small droplets. The CFD together with experimental measurements correlate the flow structures with droplet sizes. Understanding the relationship between flow structures and droplet

  1. Synthesis of Potassium Silicate Nanoparticles from Rice Straw Ash Using a Flame-assisted Spray-pyrolysis Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandiyanto, A. B. D.; Permatasari, N.; Sucahya, T. N.; Abdullah, A. G.; Hasanah, L.

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to synthesize potassium silicate nanoparticles from rice straw ash using a flame-assisted spray-pyrolysis method. Rice straw, as one of the agricultural wastes, was used as a source of silica. In the experimental procedure, rice straw was burned at 700°C for 3 hours to produce rice straw ash. Then, the rice straw ash was extracted using an alkaline method. We used potassium hydroxide (KOH) as an alkaline chemical agent as well as a source of potassium. The solution was then put into the flame-assisted spray-pyrolysis apparatus to produce potassium silicate nanoparticles. The results showed that the spray method can assist the production of spherical potassium silicate nanoparticles with sizes of about 50 nm.

  2. Production velocity of sea spray droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreas, Edgar L.; Jones, Kathleen F.; Fairall, Christopher W.

    2010-12-01

    The sea spray generation function dF/dr0 predicts the rate at which droplets of initial radius r0 are produced at the sea surface. Because this function is not readily measurable in the marine environment, however, it is often inferred from measurements of the near-surface droplet concentration, C(r0), through an assumed velocity scale, the effective spray production velocity. This paper proceeds in reverse, though: It uses a reliable estimate of dF/dr0 and 13 sets of measurements of C(r0) over the ocean to calculate the implied effective production velocity, Veff, for droplets with initial radii r0 from 5 to 300 μm. It then compares these Veff values with four candidate expressions for this production velocity: the dry-deposition velocity, VDh; the mean wind speed at the significant wave amplitude (A1/3), ? the standard deviation in vertical droplet velocity, σwd; and laboratory measurements of the ejection velocity of jet droplets, Vej. The velocity scales ? and Vej agree best with the implied Veff values for 20 ≤ r0 ≤ 300 μm. The deposition velocity, VDh, which is the velocity most commonly used in this application, agrees worst with the Veff values. For droplets with r0 less than about 20 μm, the analysis also rejects the main hypothesis: that dF/dr0 and C(r0) can be related through a velocity scale. These smaller droplets simply have residence times that are too long for spray concentrations to be in local equilibrium with the spray production rate.

  3. INEL Spray-forming Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mchugh, Kevin M.; Key, James F.

    1993-01-01

    Spray forming is a near-net-shape fabrication technology in which a spray of finely atomized liquid droplets is deposited onto a suitably shaped substrate or mold to produce a coherent solid. The technology offers unique opportunities for simplifying materials processing without sacrificing, and oftentimes substantially improving, product quality. Spray forming can be performed with a wide range of metals and nonmetals, and offers property improvements resulting from rapid solidification (e.g., refined microstructures, extended solid solubilities and reduced segregation). Economic benefits result from process simplification and the elimination of unit operations. Researchers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are developing spray-forming technology for producing near-net-shape solids and coatings of a variety of metals, polymers, and composite materials. Results from several spray forming programs are presented to illustrate the range of capabilities of the technique as well as the accompanying technical and economic benefits. Low-carbon steel strip greater than 0.75 mm thick and polymer membranes for gas/gas and liquid/liquid separations that were spray formed are discussed; recent advances in spray forming molds, dies, and other tooling using low-melting-point metals are described.

  4. Plasma spraying with wire feedstock

    SciTech Connect

    Scholl, M.

    1994-12-31

    Plasma spraying has been limited to using powder feedstocks for a number of reasons. One limitation has been the low energy output of conventional plasma guns. The advent of high energy plasma spraying (HEPS) devices and the associated technology has effectively removed this functional limitation. With HEPS, the combination of high gas velocities and high thermal plasma temperatures coupled with a large exit gas volume enables wire and rod feedstocks to be effectively utilized. Rather than a bulk melting mechanism, a model based on ablation phenomena is considered. The paper examines an analysis of melting phenomena and presents a simple model for molten droplet formation for plasma spraying using wire feedstocks.

  5. Gas Dynamic Spray Technology Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burford, Pattie Lewis

    2011-01-01

    Zinc primer systems are currently used across NASA and AFSPC for corrosion protection of steel. AFSPC and NASA have approved the use of Thermal Spray Coatings (TSCs) as an environmentally preferable alternative. TSCs are approved in NASA-STD-5008 and AFSPC and KSC is currently looking for additional applications in which TSC can be used. Gas Dynamic Spray (GDS, also known as Cold Spray) is being evaluated as a means of repairing TSCs and for areas such as corners and edges where TSCs do not work as well. Other applications could include spot repair/maintenance of steel on structures, facilities, and ground support equipment.

  6. Air-assisted ultrasonic spray pyrolysis for nanoparticles synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Shirley C.; Song, Yu L.; Chen, C. Y.; Tseng, T. K.; Tsai, Chen S.

    2002-11-01

    This paper presents new findings regarding the effects of precursor drop size and concentration on product particle size and morphology in ultrasonic spray pyrolysis of zirconium hydroxyl acetate solutions. Large precursor drops (diameter >30μm) generated by ultrasonic atomization at 120kHz yielded particles with holes. Precursor drops 6-9 μm in diameter, generated by an ultrasonic nebulizer at 1.65MHz and 23.5W electric drive power, yielded uniform spherical particles 150nm in diameter under proper control of heating rate and precursor concentration. Moreover, air-assisted ultrasonic spray pyrolysis at 120kHz and 2.3W yielded spherical particles of which nearly half were smaller than those produced by the ultrasonic spray pyrolysis of the 6-9 μm precursor drops, desprite the much larger precursor drop sizes (28 μm peak diameter versus 7 μm mean diameter). These particles are much smaller than those predicted by the conventional one particle per drop mechanism, suggesting that a vapor condensation mechanism may also be involved in spray pyrolysis. It may be concluded that through this new mechanism air-assisted ultrasonic spray pyrolysis can become a viable process for mass production of nanoparticles.

  7. Alkaline scrubbing of in-situ oil shale retort offgas at Geokinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Taback, H.; Goldstick, R.; Bates, E.

    1985-08-01

    The paper discusses the use of EPA's mobile wet scrubber on a 200-acfm slipstream of Geokinetics' retort offgas to investigate the H2S removal efficiency and selectivity (percent H2S removal/percent CO2 removal) as a function of liquid/gas contact time, alkaline solution OH(minus) concentration, and the specific scrubbing chemical. A venturi and spray tower were used to produce contact times of about 0.003 and 0.2 second, respectively. Three alkaline solutions (NaOH, KOH, and NH4OH) were employed on each contactor at various concentrations for a total of 22 runs. To analyze these results and provide design criteria for future alkaline scrubbers a sophisticated computer model employing the penetration theory for liquid-phase mass transfer was developed.

  8. Exposure of spray-men to dieldrin in residual spraying.

    PubMed

    FLETCHER, T E; PRESS, J M; WILSON, D B

    1959-01-01

    A study of the exposure of spray-men to dieldrin was made in a pilot scheme of residual spraying in the Taveta-Pare area of East Africa. A detailed work study was completed on the operators, and sources of contamination were enumerated. Filter paper pads were placed on the skin and outside clothing and the pick-up was estimated chemically. A spray-man, while using the daily average of 2.12 kg (4.7 pounds) of dieldrin and observing the protective measures laid down, received a dermal exposure of 1.8 mg of dieldrin per kg of body-weight per day. This was possibly reduced somewhat by washing with soap and water upon completion of each day's work. The sixteen spray-men and assistants were exposed for 180 days per year and there was an interim period of 2 months between spray cycles. No clinical symptoms of poisoning were observed.Comparison is made with certain programmes where dieldrin poisoning has occurred. Attention is drawn to the reduced time of exposure in the Taveta-Pare scheme, personal washing, the great value of protective clothing and of its daily washing in soap and water and the need to use a dilute suspension of wettable powder for spraying.

  9. Modifications Of A Commercial Spray Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Peter B.

    1993-01-01

    Commercial spray gun modified to increase spray rate and make sprayed coats more nearly uniform. Consists of gun head and pneumatic actuator. Actuator opens valves for two chemical components, called "A" and "B," that react to produce foam. Components flow through orifices, into mixing chamber in head. Mixture then flows through control orifice to spray tip. New spray tip tapered to reduce area available for accumulation of foam and makes tip easier to clean.

  10. Spray nozzle for fire control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papavergos, Panayiotis G.

    1990-09-01

    The design of a spray nozzle for fire control is described. It produces a spray of gas and liquid having an oval transverse cross section and it comprises a mixing chamber with an oval transverse cross section adapted to induce a toroidal mixing pattern in pressurized gas and liquid introduced to the mixing chamber through a plurality of inlets. In a preferred embodiment the mixing chamber is toroidal. The spray nozzle produces an oval spray pattern for more efficient wetting of narrow passages and is suitable for fire control systems in vehicles or other confined spaces. Vehicles to which this invention may be applied include trains, armoured vehicles, ships, hovercraft, submarines, oil rigs, and most preferably, aircraft.

  11. Modeling of SO(2) scrubbing in spray towers.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Amitava; Biswas, Manindra N

    2007-09-20

    The present article aims at developing simple realistic models in order to describe the gaseous removal process of SO(2) by absorption with and without chemical reaction in spray towers. Effects of droplet size, droplet velocity, superficial gas velocity, liquid flow rate and tower height on the performance of such a system are theoretically predicted. Model calculations bring out some very interesting facets of gas scrubbing as functions of droplet diameter and velocity. Four distinct regimes, viz. droplet lean, dense droplet, rigid droplet and droplet inertia controlling regimes, are found important in spray scrubbing process. Model calculation also elucidates the existence of rigid droplet (sphere) for a distinct droplet size at a specific droplet velocity. Theoretical considerations reveal that best performance can be achieved in the droplet inertia-controlling regime. Effect of turbulence on scrubbing is also considered for modeling. The model development and experimental data are limited to use of water-soluble alkaline scrubbing. However, the predicted values agree reasonably well with the available experimental data at lower gas and liquid flow rates for relatively smaller droplets. Models can also be applied to any gas-liquid spray absorption process subject to the assumptions and conditions necessary to describe the specific physico-chemical hydrodynamics of the system. However, incorporation of various droplet interactions can further refine the models for better prediction of removal efficiency.

  12. Modification of the solid-state nature of sulfathiazole and sulfathiazole sodium by spray drying.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Stefano; Caron, Vincent; Tajber, Lidia; Corrigan, Owen I; Nolan, Lorraine; Hu, Yun; Healy, Anne Marie

    2012-06-01

    Solid-state characterisation of a drug following pharmaceutical processing and upon storage is fundamental to successful dosage form development. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of using different solvents, feed concentrations and spray drier configuration on the solid-state nature of the highly polymorphic model drug, sulfathiazole (ST) and its sodium salt (STNa). The drugs were spray-dried from ethanol, acetone and mixtures of these organic solvents with water. Additionally, STNa was spray-dried from pure water. The physicochemical properties including the physical stability of the spray-dried powders were compared to the unprocessed materials. Spray drying of ST from either acetonic or ethanolic solutions with the spray drier operating in a closed cycle mode yielded crystalline powders. In contrast, the powders obtained from ethanolic solutions with the spray drier operating in an open cycle mode were amorphous. Amorphous ST crystallised to pure form I at ≤35 % relative humidity (RH) or to polymorphic mixtures at higher RH values. The usual crystal habit of form I is needle-like, but spherical particles of this polymorph were generated by spray drying. STNa solutions resulted in an amorphous material upon processing, regardless of the solvent and the spray drier configuration employed. Moisture induced crystallisation of amorphous STNa to a sesquihydrate, whilst crystallisation upon heating gave rise to a new anhydrous polymorph. This study indicated that control of processing and storage parameters can be exploited to produce drugs with a specific/desired solid-state nature.

  13. LN2 spray droplet size measurement via ensemble diffraction technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saiyed, N. H.; Jurns, J.; Chato, David J.

    1991-01-01

    The size of subcooled liquified nitrogen droplets are measured with a 5 mW He-Ne laser as a function of pressure difference (delta P) across flat spray and full cone pressure atomizing nozzles. For delta P's of 3 to 30 psid, the spray sauter mean diameter (SMD) ranged between 250 to 50 microns. The pressure range tested is representative of those expected during cryogenic fluid transfer operations in space. The droplet sizes from the flat spray nozzles were greater than those from the full cone nozzle. A power function of the form, SMD varies as delta P(exp a), describes the spray SMD as a function of the delta P very well. The values of a were -0.36 for the flat spray and -0.87 for the full cone. The reduced dependence of the flat spray SMD on the delta P was probably because of: (1) the absence of a swirler that generates turbulence within the nozzle to enhance atomization, and (2) a possible increase in shearing stress resulting from the delayed atomization due to the absence of turbulence. The nitrogen quality, up to 1.5 percent is based on isenthalpic expansion, did not have a distinct and measurable effect on the spray SMD. Both bimodal and monomodal droplet size population distributions were measured. In the bimodal distribution, the frequency of the first mode was much greater than the frequency of the second mode. Also, the frequency of the second mode was low enough such that a monomodal approximation probably would give reasonable results.

  14. CFD Modeling of Superheated Fuel Sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, M. S.

    2008-01-01

    An understanding of fuel atomization and vaporization behavior at superheat conditions is identified to be a topic of importance in the design of modern supersonic engines. As a part of the NASA aeronautics initiative, we have undertaken an assessment study to establish baseline accuracy of existing CFD models used in the evaluation of a ashing jet. In a first attempt towards attaining this goal, we have incorporated an existing superheat vaporization model into our spray solution procedure but made some improvements to combine the existing models valid at superheated conditions with the models valid at stable (non-superheat) evaporating conditions. Also, the paper reports some validation results based on the experimental data obtained from the literature for a superheated spray generated by the sudden release of pressurized R134A from a cylindrical nozzle. The predicted profiles for both gas and droplet velocities show a reasonable agreement with the measured data and exhibit a self-similar pattern similar to the correlation reported in the literature. Because of the uncertainty involved in the specification of the initial conditions, we have investigated the effect of initial droplet size distribution on the validation results. The predicted results were found to be sensitive to the initial conditions used for the droplet size specification. However, it was shown that decent droplet size comparisons could be achieved with properly selected initial conditions, For the case considered, it is reasonable to assume that the present vaporization models are capable of providing a reasonable qualitative description for the two-phase jet characteristics generated by a ashing jet. However, there remains some uncertainty with regard to the specification of certain initial spray conditions and there is a need for experimental data on separate gas and liquid temperatures in order to validate the vaporization models based on the Adachi correlation for a liquid involving R134A.

  15. Microchip sonic spray ionization.

    PubMed

    Pól, Jaroslav; Kauppila, Tiina J; Haapala, Markus; Saarela, Ville; Franssila, Sami; Ketola, Raimo A; Kotiaho, Tapio; Kostiainen, Risto

    2007-05-01

    The first microchip version of sonic spray ionization (SSI) as an atmospheric pressure ionization source for mass spectrometry (MS) is presented. The microchip used for SSI has recently been developed in our laboratory, and it has been used before as an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) source. Now the ionization is achieved simply by applying high (sonic) speed nebulizer gas, without heat, corona discharge, or high voltage. The microchip SSI was applied to the analysis of tetra-N-butylammonium, verapamil, testosterone, angiotensin I, and ibuprofen. The limits of detection were in the range of 15 nM to 4 microM. The technique was found to be highly dependent on the position of the chip toward the mass spectrometer inlet, and on the gas and the sample solution flow rates. The microchip SSI provided dynamic linearity following a pattern similar to that used with electrospray, good quantitative repeatability (RSD=16%), and long-term signal stability.

  16. Zinc electrode in alkaline electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    McBreen, J.

    1995-12-31

    The zinc electrode in alkaline electrolyte is unusual in that supersaturated zincate solutions can form during discharge and spongy or mossy zinc deposits can form on charge at low overvoltages. The effect of additives on regular pasted ZnO electrodes and calcium zincate electrodes is discussed. The paper also reports on in situ x-ray absorption (XAS) results on mossy zinc deposits.

  17. Mechanofused metal-carbide-oxide cermet powders for thermal spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, D.; Yokota, O.; Grimaud, A.; Fauchais, P.; Usmani, S.; Chen, Z.J.; Berndt, C.C.; Herman, H.

    1994-12-31

    By generating a mechano-chemical reaction between two or more materials, the mechanofusion process enables the production of novel powdered materials having different mechanical properties. In this study, different varieties of starting materials have been combined with the aim of manufacturing powders for thermal spraying, the objective being to produce a coating having good wear resistance in severe environments (e.g., high temperatures). Sets of NiCrAlY-TiC-ZrO{sub 2} and NiAl-TiC-ZrO{sub 2} powders with different levels of ceramic have been sprayed and the resultant coatings evaluated for microstructure, microhardness, wear and thermal shock resistance. The principal objective of the present study was to evaluate mechanofusion for the production of thermal spray cermet powders.

  18. Image processing system to analyze droplet distributions in sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertollini, Gary P.; Oberdier, Larry M.; Lee, Yong H.

    1987-01-01

    An image processing system was developed which automatically analyzes the size distributions in fuel spray video images. Images are generated by using pulsed laser light to freeze droplet motion in the spray sample volume under study. This coherent illumination source produces images which contain droplet diffraction patterns representing the droplets degree of focus. The analysis is performed by extracting feature data describing droplet diffraction patterns in the images. This allows the system to select droplets from image anomalies and measure only those droplets considered in focus. Unique features of the system are the totally automated analysis and droplet feature measurement from the grayscale image. The feature extraction and image restoration algorithms used in the system are described. Preliminary performance data is also given for two experiments. One experiment gives a comparison between a synthesized distribution measured manually and automatically. The second experiment compares a real spray distribution measured using current methods against the automatic system.

  19. High-speed imagery captures new sea spray formation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2012-10-01

    When strong winds blow over ocean waves, small droplets of sea spray rise into the air, enhancing the exchange of heat, mass, and energy between the air and the sea. How effective sea spray is at mediating each of these dynamics depends on the rate at which droplets are created and the drop size distribution of the mist. Unfortunately, research has been limited by a dearth of observational evidence that could explain the details of sea spray generation, including understanding the drop size distribution or the effects of different wind speeds. Previous research with high-speed cameras aiming to capture the moment of drop formation was limited by camera resolutions too low to see all but the largest drops.

  20. Plasma Sprayed Hydroxyapatite Coatings: Influence of Spraying Power on Microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Mohd, S. M.; Abd, M. Z.; Abd, A. N.

    2010-03-11

    The plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings are used on metallic implants to enhance the bonding between the implant and bone in human body. The coating process was implemented at different spraying power for each spraying condition. The coatings formed from a rapid solidification of molten and partly molten particles that impact on the surface of substrate at high velocity and high temperature. The study was concentrated on different spraying power that is between 23 to 31 kW. The effect of different power on the coatings microstructure was investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and phase composition was evaluated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The coatings surface morphology showed distribution of molten, partially melted particles and some micro-cracks. The produced coatings were found to be porous as observed from the cross-sectional morphology. The coatings XRD results indicated the presence of crystalline phase of HA and each of the patterns was similar to the initial powder. Regardless of different spraying power, all the coatings were having similar XRD patterns.

  1. Wear mechanisms in thermally-sprayed Mo-based coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wayne, S. F.; Sampath, S.; Anand, V.

    1994-07-01

    The successful development of advanced diesel engines relies heavily on piston ring coating materials which can withstand elevated temperatures and reduce friction. Traditional hard chrome plating and flame-sprayed Mo-wire materials have reached their potential in the diesel engine environment, and alternatives are needed. Thermally-sprayed Mo-based alloys and composites are being evaluated for applications as next-generation ring-face coatings. The alloy development task of producing complex Mo-based alloy powders for use as thermally-sprayed coating materials requires an understanding of their wear resistance under contact stress conditions. In this paper, the wear behavior of Mo and Mo + NiCrBSi thermally sprayed coatings is exmined by pin-on-disc and single-point scratch-test methods. Microstructural analysis beneath worn regions have revealed that fracture of splats and their decohesion constitute the mode of failure. Improved wear resistance and stability of low friction coefficient was obtained by prealloying Mo with NiCrBSi prior to thermal spraying.

  2. Measurement of Spray Drift with a Specifically Designed Lidar System.

    PubMed

    Gregorio, Eduard; Torrent, Xavier; Planas de Martí, Santiago; Solanelles, Francesc; Sanz, Ricardo; Rocadenbosch, Francesc; Masip, Joan; Ribes-Dasi, Manel; Rosell-Polo, Joan R

    2016-04-08

    Field measurements of spray drift are usually carried out by passive collectors and tracers. However, these methods are labour- and time-intensive and only provide point- and time-integrated measurements. Unlike these methods, the light detection and ranging (lidar) technique allows real-time measurements, obtaining information with temporal and spatial resolution. Recently, the authors have developed the first eye-safe lidar system specifically designed for spray drift monitoring. This prototype is based on a 1534 nm erbium-doped glass laser and an 80 mm diameter telescope, has scanning capability, and is easily transportable. This paper presents the results of the first experimental campaign carried out with this instrument. High coefficients of determination (R² > 0.85) were observed by comparing lidar measurements of the spray drift with those obtained by horizontal collectors. Furthermore, the lidar system allowed an assessment of the drift reduction potential (DRP) when comparing low-drift nozzles with standard ones, resulting in a DRP of 57% (preliminary result) for the tested nozzles. The lidar system was also used for monitoring the evolution of the spray flux over the canopy and to generate 2-D images of these plumes. The developed instrument is an advantageous alternative to passive collectors and opens the possibility of new methods for field measurement of spray drift.

  3. Measurement of Spray Drift with a Specifically Designed Lidar System

    PubMed Central

    Gregorio, Eduard; Torrent, Xavier; Planas de Martí, Santiago; Solanelles, Francesc; Sanz, Ricardo; Rocadenbosch, Francesc; Masip, Joan; Ribes-Dasi, Manel; Rosell-Polo, Joan R.

    2016-01-01

    Field measurements of spray drift are usually carried out by passive collectors and tracers. However, these methods are labour- and time-intensive and only provide point- and time-integrated measurements. Unlike these methods, the light detection and ranging (lidar) technique allows real-time measurements, obtaining information with temporal and spatial resolution. Recently, the authors have developed the first eye-safe lidar system specifically designed for spray drift monitoring. This prototype is based on a 1534 nm erbium-doped glass laser and an 80 mm diameter telescope, has scanning capability, and is easily transportable. This paper presents the results of the first experimental campaign carried out with this instrument. High coefficients of determination (R2 > 0.85) were observed by comparing lidar measurements of the spray drift with those obtained by horizontal collectors. Furthermore, the lidar system allowed an assessment of the drift reduction potential (DRP) when comparing low-drift nozzles with standard ones, resulting in a DRP of 57% (preliminary result) for the tested nozzles. The lidar system was also used for monitoring the evolution of the spray flux over the canopy and to generate 2-D images of these plumes. The developed instrument is an advantageous alternative to passive collectors and opens the possibility of new methods for field measurement of spray drift. PMID:27070613

  4. Nozzleless Spray Cooling Using Surface Acoustic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, Kar Man; Yeo, Leslie; Friend, James; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming Kwang

    2015-11-01

    Due to its reliability and portability, surface acoustic wave (SAW) atomization is an attractive approach for the generation of monodispersed microdroplets in microfluidics devices. Here, we present a nozzleless spray cooling technique via SAW atomization with key advantage of downward scalability by simply increasing the excitation frequency. With generation of micron size droplets through surface destabilization using SAW, the clogging issues commonly encountered by spraying nozzle can be neutralized. Using deionised water, cooling is improved when the atomization rate is increased and the position of the device is optimized such that the atomized droplets can be easily seeded into the upstream of the flow circulation. Cooling is further improved with the use of nanofluids; a suspension of nanoparticles in water. By increasing nanoparticle mass concentration from 1% to 3%, cooling is enhanced due to the deposition and formation of nanoparticle clusters on heated surface and eventually increase the surface area. However, further increase the concentration to 10% reduces the cooling efficiency due to drastic increase in viscosity μ that leads to lower atomization rate which scales as ṁ ~μ - 1 / 2 .

  5. Comparison of the performance between a spray gun and a spray boom in ornamentals.

    PubMed

    Foqué, D; Nuyttens, D

    2011-01-01

    Flemish greenhouse growers predominantly use handheld spray guns and spray lances for their crop protection purposes although these techniques are known for their heavy workload and their high operator exposure risks. Moreover, when these techniques are compared with spray boom equipment, they are often found to be less effective. On the other hand, handheld spraying techniques are less expensive and more flexible to use. Additionally, many Flemish growers are convinced that a high spray volume and spray pressure is needed to assure a good plant protection. The aim of this work was to evaluate and compare the spray deposition, penetration and uniformity between a manually pulled horizontal spray boom and a spray gun under controlled laboratory conditions. In total, six different spray application techniques were evaluated. In general, the total deposition results were comparable between the spray boom and the spray gun applications but the boom applications resulted in a more uniform spray distribution over the crop. On a plant level, the spray distribution was not uniform for the different techniques with highest deposits on the upper side of the top leaves. Using spray guns at a higher spray pressure did not improve spray penetration and deposition on the bottom side of the leaves. From the different nozzle types, the XR 80 03 gave the best results. Plant density clearly affected crop penetration and deposition on the bottom side of the leaves.

  6. SPRAY CALCINATION REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, B.M.

    1963-08-20

    A spray calcination reactor for calcining reprocessin- g waste solutions is described. Coaxial within the outer shell of the reactor is a shorter inner shell having heated walls and with open regions above and below. When the solution is sprayed into the irner shell droplets are entrained by a current of gas that moves downwardly within the inner shell and upwardly between it and the outer shell, and while thus being circulated the droplets are calcined to solids, whlch drop to the bottom without being deposited on the walls. (AEC) H03 H0233412 The average molecular weights of four diallyl phthalate polymer samples extruded from the experimental rheometer were redetermined using the vapor phase osmometer. An amine curing agent is required for obtaining suitable silver- filled epoxy-bonded conductive adhesives. When the curing agent was modified with a 47% polyurethane resin, its effectiveness was hampered. Neither silver nor nickel filler impart a high electrical conductivity to Adiprenebased adhesives. Silver filler was found to perform well in Dow-Corning A-4000 adhesive. Two cascaded hot-wire columns are being used to remove heavy gaseous impurities from methane. This purified gas is being enriched in the concentric tube unit to approximately 20% carbon-13. Studies to count low-level krypton-85 in xenon are continuing. The parameters of the counting technique are being determined. The bismuth isotopes produced in bismuth irradiated for polonium production are being determined. Preliminary data indicate the presence of bismuth207 and bismuth-210m. The light bismuth isotopes are probably produced by (n,xn) reactions bismuth-209. The separation of uranium-234 from plutonium-238 solutions was demonstrated. The bulk of the plutonium is removed by anion exchange, and the remainder is extracted from the uranium by solvent extraction techniques. About 99% of the plutonium can be removed in each thenoyltrifluoroacetone extraction. The viscosity, liquid density, and

  7. Miniature paint-spray gun for recessed areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanasse, M. A.

    1968-01-01

    Miniature spray gun regulates paints and other liquids to spray at close range, facilitating spraying of remote or recessed areas. Individual valves for regulating air pressure and paint maximizes atomization for low pressure spraying.

  8. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David B.; Lao, Guifang

    1998-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium.

  9. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, D.B.; Lao, G.

    1998-01-06

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium. 3 figs.

  10. Flow rate and trajectory of water spray produced by an aircraft tire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, Robert H.; Stubbs, Sandy M.

    1986-01-01

    One of the risks associated with wet runway aircraft operation is the ingestion of water spray produced by an aircraft's tires into its engines. This problem can be especially dangerous at or near rotation speed on the takeoff roll. An experimental investigation was conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center Hydrodynamics Research Facility to measure the flow rate and trajectory of water spray produced by an aircraft nose tire operating on a flooded runway. The effects of various parameters on the spray patterns including distance aft of nosewheel, speed, load, and water depth were evaluated. Variations in the spray pattern caused by the airflow about primary structure such as the fuselage and wing are discussed. A discussion of events in and near the tire footprint concerning spray generation is included.

  11. Measuring densities of high-velocity metallic sprays using piezoelectric sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, C. E.; Proud, W. G.

    2007-12-12

    Recent research efforts in large-scale hydrodynamic experiments have concentrated on the possibility of using piezoelectric sensors to study the evolution of ejecta. Ejecta are small (<100 m diameter) particulates that are ejected at high velocity (>1 km s{sup -1}) from a shocked surface. This paper investigates whether Dynasen PZT piezoelectric sensors are reliable and robust enough to measure accurate time-resolved stresses and densities in high-velocity metallic sprays. The sprays are assumed to have similar characteristics to ejecta sprays, and are generated by a gas gun and in a safe and reproducible manner. A complimentary diagnostic technique, utilising high-speed photography and fast x-radiography, measures the densities of the sprays independently, allowing the accuracy of the sensors to be assessed. The Dynasen sensors have been shown to perform relatively well in spray environments. Their accuracy can be improved by taking their mechanical impedance characteristics into account.

  12. [Antibacterial effect of Ankerplast Spray].

    PubMed

    Oehring, H; Karl, P; Döring, K; Herrberger, U

    1979-04-01

    The diffusion test yielded no satisfactory results. In the tube test, both the spray and the solvent (in a dilution of 1:4 and 1:8, respectively) proved to be bacteriostatically active against enterococci, Staphylococcus aureus, Escheria coli, Proteus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These germs were killed within 30 minutes in the test for bactericidal activity, whereas the reference substance (1% phenol) required 1--2 hours, except against the last-named germ. Even the copolymer exerted a bactericidal effect, it is true, but only within 8 or 24 hours. The following results were obtained from the spray test with agar plate cultures: Streptococcus viridans species, streptococci, Diplococcus pneumoniae, Escheria coli, and Proteus were killed, whereas others survived under the plastic film for up to 9 days. Klebsiella and Pseudomonas aeruginosa had grown through the film within 7 days. In vivo experiments demonstrated a very potent antibacterial activity on the skin under the spray film.

  13. Spray coated nanosilver functional layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzemiński, J.; Szałapak, J.; Dybowska-Sarapuk, L.; Jakubowska, M.

    2016-09-01

    Silver coatings are highly conductive functional layers. There are many different ways to product the silver coating but most of them need vacuum or high temperature. Spray coating is a technique that is free of this disadvantages - it doesn't need a cleanroom or high temperature. What's more the layer thickness is about 10 μm. In this article the spray coating process of silver nanolayer is described. Four different inks were tested and measured. The layer resistance was measured and show as a graph. After the layer resistance was measured the adhesion test was performed. The pull-off test was performed on testing machine with special self made module. To conclude the article include the test and measurements of spray coated nanosilver functional layers. The layers was examined for the current conductivity and adhesion force.

  14. Spray casting project final report

    SciTech Connect

    Churnetski, S.R.; Thompson, J.E.

    1996-08-01

    Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), along with other participating organizations, has been exploring the feasibility of spray casting depleted uranium (DU) to near-net shape as a waste minimization effort. Although this technology would be useful in a variety of applications where DU was the material of choice, this effort was aimed primarily at gamma-shielding components for use in storage and transportation canisters for high-level radioactive waste, particularly in the Multipurpose Canister (MPC) application. In addition to the waste-minimization benefits, spray casting would simplify the manufacturing process by allowing the shielding components for MPC to be produced as a single component, as opposed to multiple components with many fabrication and assembly steps. In earlier experiments, surrogate materials were used to simulate the properties (specifically reactivity and density) of DU. Based on the positive results from those studies, the project participants decided that further evaluation of the issues and concerns that would accompany spraying DU was warranted. That evaluation occupied substantially all of Fiscal Year 1995, yielding conceptual designs for both an intermediate facility and a production facility and their associated engineering estimates. An intermediate facility was included in this study to allow further technology development in spraying DU. Although spraying DU to near-net shape seems to be feasible, a number of technical, engineering, and safety issues would need to be evaluated before proceeding with a production facility. This report is intended to document the results from the spray-casting project and to provide information needed by anyone interested in proceeding to the next step.

  15. The secondary alkaline zinc electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLarnon, Frank R.; Cairns, Elton J.

    1991-02-01

    The worldwide studies conducted between 1975 and 1990 with the aim of improving cell lifetimes of secondary alkaline zinc electrodes are overviewed. Attention is given the design features and characteristics of various secondary alkaline zinc cells, including four types of zinc/nickel oxide cell designs (vented static-electrolyte, sealed static-electrolyte, vibrating-electrode, and flowing-electrolyte); two types of zinc/air cells (mechanically rechargeable consolidated-electrode and mechanically rechargeable particulate-electrode); zinc/silver oxide battery; zinc/manganese dioxide cell; and zinc/ferric cyanide battery. Particular consideration is given to recent research in the fields of cell thermodynamics, zinc electrodeposition, zinc electrodissolution, zinc corrosion, electrolyte properties, mathematical and phenomenological models, osmotic pumping, nonuniform current distribution, and cell cycle-life perforamnce.

  16. Development of alkaline fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbs, Michael R.; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Alam, Todd Michael; Janarthanan, Rajeswari; Horan, James L.; Caire, Benjamin R.; Ziegler, Zachary C.; Herring, Andrew M.; Yang, Yuan; Zuo, Xiaobing; Robson, Michael H.; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Patterson, Wendy; Atanassov, Plamen Borissov

    2013-09-01

    This project focuses on the development and demonstration of anion exchange membrane (AEM) fuel cells for portable power applications. Novel polymeric anion exchange membranes and ionomers with high chemical stabilities were prepared characterized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories. Durable, non-precious metal catalysts were prepared by Dr. Plamen Atanassovs research group at the University of New Mexico by utilizing an aerosol-based process to prepare templated nano-structures. Dr. Andy Herrings group at the Colorado School of Mines combined all of these materials to fabricate and test membrane electrode assemblies for single cell testing in a methanol-fueled alkaline system. The highest power density achieved in this study was 54 mW/cm2 which was 90% of the project target and the highest reported power density for a direct methanol alkaline fuel cell.

  17. "Teaching" an Industrial Robot To Spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, A. R.; Sweet, G. K.

    1982-01-01

    Teaching device, consisting of spacer rod or tube with three-pointed tip and line level, is used during pattern "teach-in" to make sure that robot manipulator holds spray gun perpendicular to surface to be sprayed and at right distance from it. For slanted surfaces angle adapter is added between spacer rod and line-level indicator. Angle is determined by slope of surface to be sprayed, thus allowing a perpendicular spray pattern against even slanted surfaces.

  18. Thermal Spray Coatings for Coastal Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, BernardS. Jr.; Cramer, S.D.; Bullard, S.J.

    1997-11-01

    Several protection strategies for coastal infrastructure using thermal-spray technology are presented from research at the Albany Research Center. Thermal-sprayed zinc coatings for anodes in impressed current cathodic protection systems are used to extend the service lives of reinforced concrete bridges along the Oregon coast. Thermal-sprayed Ti is examined as an alternative to the consumable zinc anode. Sealed thermal-sprayed Al is examined as an alternative coating to zinc dust filled polyurethane paint for steel structures.

  19. Feedback enhanced plasma spray tool

    DOEpatents

    Gevelber, Michael Alan; Wroblewski, Donald Edward; Fincke, James Russell; Swank, William David; Haggard, Delon C.; Bewley, Randy Lee

    2005-11-22

    An improved automatic feedback control scheme enhances plasma spraying of powdered material through reduction of process variability and providing better ability to engineer coating structure. The present inventors discovered that controlling centroid position of the spatial distribution along with other output parameters, such as particle temperature, particle velocity, and molten mass flux rate, vastly increases control over the sprayed coating structure, including vertical and horizontal cracks, voids, and porosity. It also allows improved control over graded layers or compositionally varying layers of material, reduces variations, including variation in coating thickness, and allows increasing deposition rate. Various measurement and system control schemes are provided.

  20. Influence of the spray velocity on arc-sprayed coating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffens, H.-D.; Nassenstein, K.

    1999-09-01

    Thermal spray processes such as plasma spraying and HVOF have gained markets due to a steady process of development of materials and equipment. One disadvantage of thermal spray processes is that costs must be competitive compared to techniques such as PTA and electroplating. In order to reduce costs, the more economical spray processes like conventional wire flame spraying, as well as arc spraying, are becoming more popular. There are modern arc spray gun designs on the market that meet the requirements of modern coating properties, for example aviation overhaul applications as well as the processing of cored wires. Nevertheless, the physical basis of arc spraying is well known. The aim of the present investigation is to show how the influence of spray velocity (not particle velocity) affects coating structure with respect to arc spray parameters.

  1. A Review of Recent Developments in X-Ray Diagnostics for Turbulent and Optically Dense Rocket Sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radke, Christopher; Halls, Benjamin; Kastengren, Alan; Meyer, Terrence

    2017-01-01

    Highly efficient mixing and atomization of fuel and oxidizers is an important factor in many propulsion and power generating applications. To better quantify breakup and mixing in atomizing sprays, several diagnostic techniques have been developed to collect droplet information and spray statistics. Several optical based techniques, such as Ballistic Imaging and SLIPI have previously demonstrated qualitative measurements in optically dense sprays, however these techniques have produced limited quantitative information in the near injector region. To complement to these advances, a recent wave of developments utilizing synchrotron based x-rays have been successful been implemented facilitating the collection of quantitative measurements in optically dense sprays.

  2. Rechargeable alkaline manganese dioxide/zinc batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordesh, K.; Weissenbacher, M.

    The rechargeable alkaline manganese dioxide/zinc MnO 2/Zn) system, long established commercial as a primay battery, has reached a high level of performance as a secondary battery system. The operating principles are presented and the technological achievements are surveyed by referencing the recent publications and patent literature. A review is also given of the improvements obtained with newly formulated cathodes and anodes and specially designed batteries. Supported by modelling of the cathode and anode processes and by statistical evidence during cycling of parallel/series-connected modules, the envisioned performance of the next generation of these batteries is described. The possibility of extending the practical use of the improved rechargeable MnO 2/Zn system beyond the field of small electronics into the area of power tools, and even to kW-sized power sources, is demonstrated. Finally, the commercial development in comparison with other rechargeable battery systems is examined.

  3. How to Use Nasal Pump Sprays

    MedlinePlus

    Using Nasal Pump SpraysBlow your nose gently before using the spray. Prime the pump bottle by spraying it into the air a ... Breathe in quickly while squeezing down on the pump bottle one time. Repeat in other nostril. Do ...

  4. Gas Dynamic Spray Technology Demonstration Project Management. Joint Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie

    2011-01-01

    The standard practice for protecting metallic substrates in atmospheric environments is the use of an applied coating system. Current coating systems used across AFSPC and NASA contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). These coatings are sUbject to environmental regulations at the Federal and State levels that limit their usage. In addition, these coatings often cannot withstand the high temperatures and exhaust that may be experienced by Air Force Space Command (AFSPC) and NASA structures. In response to these concerns, AFSPC and NASA have approved the use of thermal spray coatings (TSCs). Thermal spray coatings are extremely durable and environmentally friendly coating alternatives, but utilize large cumbersome equipment for application that make the coatings difficult and time consuming to repair. Other concerns include difficulties coating complex geometries and the cost of equipment, training, and materials. Gas Dynamic Spray (GOS) technology (also known as Cold Spray) was evaluated as a smaller, more maneuverable repair method as well as for areas where thermal spray techniques are not as effective. The technology can result in reduced maintenance and thus reduced hazardous materials/wastes associated with current processes. Thermal spray and GOS coatings also have no VOCs and are environmentally preferable coatings. The primary objective of this effort was to demonstrate GDS technology as a repair method for TSCs. The aim was that successful completion of this project would result in approval of GDS technology as a repair method for TSCs at AFSPC and NASA installations to improve corrosion protection at critical systems, facilitate easier maintenance activity, extend maintenance cycles, eliminate flight hardware contamination, and reduce the amount of hazardous waste generated.

  5. Influence of Cold-Sprayed, Warm-Sprayed, and Plasma-Sprayed Layers Deposition on Fatigue Properties of Steel Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cizek, J.; Matejkova, M.; Dlouhy, I.; Siska, F.; Kay, C. M.; Karthikeyan, J.; Kuroda, S.; Kovarik, O.; Siegl, J.; Loke, K.; Khor, Khiam Aik

    2015-06-01

    Titanium powder was deposited onto steel specimens using four thermal spray technologies: plasma spray, low-pressure cold spray, portable cold spray, and warm spray. The specimens were then subjected to strain-controlled cyclic bending test in a dedicated in-house built device. The crack propagation was monitored by observing the changes in the resonance frequency of the samples. For each series, the number of cycles corresponding to a pre-defined specimen cross-section damage was used as a performance indicator. It was found that the grit-blasting procedure did not alter the fatigue properties of the steel specimens (1% increase as compared to as-received set), while the deposition of coatings via all four thermal spray technologies significantly increased the measured fatigue lives. The three high-velocity technologies led to an increase of relative lives to 234% (low-pressure cold spray), 210% (portable cold spray), and 355% (warm spray) and the deposition using plasma spray led to an increase of relative lives to 303%. The observed increase of high-velocity technologies (cold and warm spray) could be attributed to a combination of homogeneous fatigue-resistant coatings and induction of peening stresses into the substrates via the impingement of the high-kinetic energy particles. Given the intrinsic character of the plasma jet (low-velocity impact of semi/molten particles) and the mostly ceramic character of the coating (oxides, nitrides), a hypothesis based on non-linear coatings behavior is provided in the paper.

  6. The erosion performance of cold spray deposited metal matrix composite coatings with subsequent friction stir processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peat, Tom; Galloway, Alexander; Toumpis, Athanasios; McNutt, Philip; Iqbal, Naveed

    2017-02-01

    This study forms an initial investigation into the development of SprayStir, an innovative processing technique for generating erosion resistant surface layers on a chosen substrate material. Tungsten carbide - cobalt chromium, chromium carbide - nickel chromium and aluminium oxide coatings were successfully cold spray deposited on AA5083 grade aluminium. In order to improve the deposition efficiency of the cold spray process, coatings were co-deposited with powdered AA5083 using a twin powder feed system that resulted in thick (>300 μm) composite coatings. The deposited coatings were subsequently friction stir processed to embed the particles in the substrate in order to generate a metal matrix composite (MMC) surface layer. The primary aim of this investigation was to examine the erosion performance of the SprayStirred surfaces and demonstrate the benefits of this novel process as a surface engineering technique. Volumetric analysis of the SprayStirred surfaces highlighted a drop of approx. 40% in the level of material loss when compared with the cold spray deposited coating prior to friction stir processing. Micro-hardness testing revealed that in the case of WC-CoCr reinforced coating, the hardness of the SprayStirred material exhibits an increase of approx. 540% over the unaltered substrate and 120% over the as-deposited composite coating. Microstructural examination demonstrated that the increase in the hardness of the MMC aligns with the improved dispersion of reinforcing particles throughout the aluminium matrix.

  7. Alkalinity production in intertidal sands intensified by lugworm bioirrigation

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Alexandra M.F.; Malkin, Sairah Y.; Montserrat, Francesc; Meysman, Filip J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Porewater profiles and sediment-water fluxes of oxygen, nutrients, pH, calcium, alkalinity, and sulfide were measured in intertidal sandflat sediments from the Oosterschelde mesotidal lagoon (The Netherlands). The influence of bioturbation and bioirrigation by the deep-burrowing polychaete Arenicola marina on the rates and sources of benthic alkalinity generation was examined by comparing measurements in intact and defaunated sediment cores before and after the addition of A. marina in summer and fall 2011. Higher organic matter remineralization rates, shallower O2 penetration, and greater sediment-water solute fluxes were observed in summer, consistent with higher sediment community metabolic rates at a higher temperature. Lugworm activity stimulated porewater exchange (5.1 × in summer, 1.9 × in fall), organic matter remineralization (6.2 × in summer, 1.9 × in fall), aerobic respiration (2.4 × in summer, 2.1 × in fall), alkalinity release (4.7 × in summer, 4.0 × in fall), nutrient regeneration, and iron cycling. The effects of lugworm activity on net sediment-water fluxes were similar but more pronounced in summer than in fall. Alkalinity release in fall was entirely driven by metabolic carbonate dissolution, while this process explained between 22 and 69% of total alkalinity production in summer, indicating the importance of other processes in this season. By enhancing organic matter remineralization and the reoxidation of reduced metabolites by the sediment microbial community, lugworm activity stimulated the production of dissolved inorganic carbon and metabolic acidity, which in turn enhanced metabolic CaCO3 dissolution efficiency. In summer, evidence of microbial long distance electron transport (LDET) was observed in defaunated sediment. Thus, alkalinity production by net carbonate dissolution was likely supplemented by anaerobic respiration and LDET in summer. PMID:25431515

  8. No Heat Spray Drying Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Beetz, Charles

    2016-06-15

    No Heat Spray Drying Technology. ZoomEssence has developed our Zooming™ spray drying technology that atomizes liquids to powders at ambient temperature. The process of drying a liquid into a powder form has been traditionally achieved by mixing a heated gas with an atomized (sprayed) fluid within a vessel (drying chamber) causing the solvent to evaporate. The predominant spray drying process in use today employs air heated up to 400° Fahrenheit to dry an atomized liquid into a powder. Exposing sensitive, volatile liquid ingredients to high temperature causes molecular degradation that negatively impacts solubility, stability and profile of the powder. In short, heat is detrimental to many liquid ingredients. The completed award focused on several areas in order to advance the prototype dryer to a commercial scale integrated pilot system. Prior to the award, ZoomEssence had developed a prototype ‘no-heat’ dryer that firmly established the feasibility of the Zooming™ process. The award focused on three primary areas to improve the technology: (1) improved ability to formulate emulsions for specific flavor groups and improved understanding of the relationship of emulsion properties to final dry particle properties, (2) a new production atomizer, and (3) a dryer controls system.

  9. Plasma Spraying Reclaims Compressor Housings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leissler, George W.; Yuhas, John S.

    1991-01-01

    Plasma-spraying process used to build up material in worn and pitted areas. Newly applied material remachined to specified surface contours. Effective technique for addition of metal to out-of-tolerance magnesium-alloy turbine-engine compressor housings.

  10. Electrokinetically pumped high pressure sprays

    DOEpatents

    Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Paul, Phillip H.; Schoeniger, Luke

    2005-11-01

    An electrokinetic pump capable of producing high pressure is combined with a nozzle having a submicron orifice to provide a high pressure spray device. Because of its small size, the device can be contained within medical devices such as an endoscope for delivering biological materials such as DNA, chemo therapeutic agents, or vaccines to tissues and cells.

  11. Electrokinetically pumped high pressure sprays

    DOEpatents

    Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Paul, Phillip H.; Schoeniger, Luke

    2002-01-01

    An electrokinetic pump capable of producing high pressure is combined with a nozzle having a submicron orifice to provide a high pressure spray device. Because of its small size, the device can be contained within medical devices such as an endoscope for delivering biological materials such as DNA, chemo therapeutic agents, or vaccines to tissues and cells.

  12. Aqueous-Spray Cleaning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Gene E.; Hoult, William S.; Simpson, Gareth L.

    1996-01-01

    Simple aqueous-spray cleaning system with overall dimensions comparable to large kitchen refrigerator constructed for use in cleaning hardware in shop. Made of commercially available parts and materials. Incorporates economical cleaner-and-rinse-recycling subsystem, as well as programmable logic-controller device for either manual or automatic operation.

  13. The measurement of alkaline phosphatase at nanomolar concentration within 70 s using a disposable microelectrochemical transistor.

    PubMed

    Astier, Y; Bartlett, P N

    2004-08-01

    We report a new approach to the measurement of alkaline phosphatase concentration based on the use of a disposable poly(aniline) microelectrochemical transistor. The measurement is carried out in a two cell configuration in which the poly(aniline) microelectrochemical transistor operates in acid solution and is connected to the alkaline buffer solution containing the analyte by a salt bridge. Disposable microelectrochemical transistors were reproducibly fabricated by electrochemical deposition of poly(aniline) onto photolithographically fabricated gold microband arrays. Using these devices alkaline phosphatase was detected by employing p-aminophenyl phosphate as the substrate for the enzyme and using glucose and glucose oxidase to recycle the p-aminophenol generated upon enzyme catalysed hydrolysis of the phosphate. Recycling the p-aminophenol with glucose and glucose oxidase amplified the detection of alkaline phosphatase approximately tenfold. Using this approach we obtain linear calibration curves for alkaline phosphatase up to 5 nM within 70 s on single use devices.

  14. Diclofenac salts. III. Alkaline and earth alkaline salts.

    PubMed

    Fini, Adamo; Fazio, Giuseppe; Rosetti, Francesca; Angeles Holgado, M; Iruín, Ana; Alvarez-Fuentes, Josefa

    2005-11-01

    Diclofenac salts containing the alkaline and two earth alkaline cations have been prepared and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and EDAX spectroscopy; and by thermal and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA): all of them crystallize as hydrate when precipitated from water. The salts dehydrate at room temperature and more easily on heating, but recovery the hydration, when placed in a humid environment. X-ray diffraction spectra suggest that on dehydration new peaks appear on diffractograms and the lattice of the salts partially looses crystallinity. This phenomenon is readily visible in the case of the calcium and magnesium salts, whose thermograms display a crystallization exotherm, before melting or decomposing at temperatures near or above 200 degrees C; these last salts appear to form solvates, when prepared from methanol. The thermogram of each salt shows a complex endotherm of dehydration about 100 degrees C; the calcium salt displays two endotherms, well separated at about 120 and 160 degrees C, which disappear after prolonged heating. Decomposition exotherms, before or soon after the melting, appear below 300 degrees C. The ammonium salt is thermally unstable and, when heated to start dehydration, dissociates and leaves acidic diclofenac.

  15. Alkaline fuel cell performance investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. E.; Manzo, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    An exploratory experimental fuel cell test program was conducted to investigate the performance characteristics of alkaline laboratory research electrodes. The objective of this work was to establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance and evaluate candidate cathode configurations having the potential for improved performance. The performance characterization tests provided data to empirically establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance for cell temperatures up to 300 F and reactant pressures up to 200 psia. Evaluation of five gold alloy cathode catalysts revealed that three doped gold alloys had more that two times the surface areas of reference cathodes and therefore offered the best potential for improved performance.

  16. Experimental Testing and Numerical Modeling of Spray Cooling Under Terrestrial Gravity Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    is useful to effectively deal with waste heat generated in space -based platforms, such as the International Space Station or shuttle orbiter, as... McQuillen , J., “Design of a Microgravity Spray Cooling Experiment,” 42nd AIAA Aerospace Sciences Conference and Exhibit, 2004. Carslaw, H., Jaeger J...Transfer Characteristics of Spray Cooling in a Closed Loop,” International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer 46, pp. 3737-3746, 2003. 106 Lin

  17. A Review on Liquid Spray Models for Diesel Engine Computational Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    engines), metallurgical processes (spray generated coatings ) for thermal barrier, environmental barrier, substrate corrosion protection , and material...atomizer accelerates the liquid through nozzles known as swirl ports into a central swirl chamber, where the swirling liquid pushes against the chamber...A Review on Liquid Spray Models for Diesel Engine Computational Analysis by Luis Bravo and Chol-Bum Kweon ARL-TR-6932 May 2014

  18. Evaluation of VOC emission measurement methods for paint spray booths.

    PubMed

    Eklund, B M; Nelson, T P

    1995-03-01

    Interest in regulations to control solvent emissions from automotive painting systems is increasing, especially in ozone nonattainment areas. Therefore, an accurate measurement method for VOC emissions from paint spray booths used in the automotive industry is needed to ascertain the efficiency of the spray booth capture and the total emissions. This paper presents the results of a laboratory study evaluating potential VOC sampling and analytical methods used in estimating paint spray booth emissions, and discusses these results relative to other published data. Eight test methods were selected for evaluation. The accuracy of each sampling and analytical method was determined using test atmospheres of known concentration and composition that closely matched the actual exhaust air from paint spray booths. The solvent mixture to generate the test atmospheres contained a large proportion of polar, oxygenated hydrocarbons such as ketones and alcohols. A series of identical tests was performed for each sampling/analytical method with each test atmosphere to assess the precision of the methods. The study identified significant differences among the test methods in terms of accuracy, precision, cost, and complexity.

  19. Development, characterization, and application of paper spray ionization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiangjiang; Wang, He; Manicke, Nicholas E; Lin, Jin-Ming; Cooks, R Graham; Ouyang, Zheng

    2010-03-15

    Paper spray is developed as a direct sampling ionization method for mass spectrometric analysis of complex mixtures. Ions of analyte are generated by applying a high voltage to a paper triangle wetted with a small volume (<10 microL) of solution. Samples can be preloaded onto the paper, added with the wetting solution, or transferred from surfaces using the paper as a wipe. It is demonstrated that paper spray is applicable to the analysis of a wide variety of compounds, including small organic compounds, peptides, and proteins. Procedures are developed for analysis of dried biofluid spots and applied to therapeutic drug monitoring with whole blood samples and to illicit drug detection in raw urine samples. Limits of detection of 50 ng/mL (or 20 pg absolute) are achieved for atenolol in bovine blood. The combination of sample collection from surfaces and paper spray ionization also enables fast chemical screening at high sensitivity, for example 100 pg of heroin distributed on a surface and agrochemicals on fruit peels are detectable. Online derivatization with a preloaded reagent is demonstrated for analysis of cholesterol in human serum. The combination of paper spray with miniature mass spectrometers offers a powerful impetus to wide application of mass spectrometry in nonlaboratory environments.

  20. Japan's research on particle clouds and sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, Jun'ichi

    1995-01-01

    Most of energy used by us is generated by combustion of liquid and solid fuels. These fuels are burned in combustors mainly as liquid sprays and pulverized solids, respectively. A knowledge of the combustion processes in combustors is needed to achieve proper designs that have stable operation, high efficiency, and low emission levels. However, current understanding of liquid and solid particle cloud combustion is far from complete. If combustion experiments for these fuels are performed under a normal gravity field, some experimental difficulties are encountered. These difficulties encountered include, that since the particles fall by the force of gravity it is impossible to stop the particles in the air, the falling speeds of particles are different from each other, and are depend on the particle size, the flame is lifted up and deformed by the buoyancy force, and natural convection makes the flow field more complex. Since these experimental difficulties are attributable to the gravity force, a microgravity field can eliminate the above problems. This means that the flame propagation experiments in static homogeneous liquid and solid particle clouds can be carried out under a microgravity field. This will provide much information for the basic questions related to combustion processes of particle clouds and sprays. In Japan, flame propagation processes in the combustible liquid and solid particle clouds have been studied experimentally by using a microgravity field generated by a 4.5 s dropshaft, a 10 s dropshaft, and by parabolic flight. Described in this presentation are the recent results of flame propagations studies in a homogeneous liquid particle cloud, in a mixture of liquid particles/gas fuel/air, in a PMMA particle cloud, and in a pulverized coal particle cloud.

  1. When can ocean acidification impacts be detected from decadal alkalinity measurements?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, B. R.; Frölicher, T. L.; Dunne, J. P.; Rodgers, K. B.; Slater, R. D.; Sarmiento, J. L.

    2016-04-01

    We use a large initial condition suite of simulations (30 runs) with an Earth system model to assess the detectability of biogeochemical impacts of ocean acidification (OA) on the marine alkalinity distribution from decadally repeated hydrographic measurements such as those produced by the Global Ship-Based Hydrographic Investigations Program (GO-SHIP). Detection of these impacts is complicated by alkalinity changes from variability and long-term trends in freshwater and organic matter cycling and ocean circulation. In our ensemble simulation, variability in freshwater cycling generates large changes in alkalinity that obscure the changes of interest and prevent the attribution of observed alkalinity redistribution to OA. These complications from freshwater cycling can be mostly avoided through salinity normalization of alkalinity. With the salinity-normalized alkalinity, modeled OA impacts are broadly detectable in the surface of the subtropical gyres by 2030. Discrepancies between this finding and the finding of an earlier analysis suggest that these estimates are strongly sensitive to the patterns of calcium carbonate export simulated by the model. OA impacts are detectable later in the subpolar and equatorial regions due to slower responses of alkalinity to OA in these regions and greater seasonal equatorial alkalinity variability. OA impacts are detectable later at depth despite lower variability due to smaller rates of change and consistent measurement uncertainty.

  2. Spatial Patterns of Alkaline Phosphatase Expression within Bacterial Colonies and Biofilms in Response to Phosphate Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ching-Tsan; Xu, Karen D.; McFeters, Gordon A.; Stewart, Philip S.

    1998-01-01

    The expression of alkaline phosphatase in response to phosphate starvation was shown to be spatially and temporally heterogeneous in bacterial biofilms and colonies. A commercial alkaline phosphatase substrate that generates a fluorescent, insoluble product was used in conjunction with frozen sectioning techniques to visualize spatial patterns of enzyme expression in both Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Some of the expression patterns observed revealed alkaline phosphatase activity at the boundary of the biofilm opposite the place where the staining substrate was delivered, indicating that the enzyme substrate penetrated the biofilm fully. Alkaline phosphatase accumulated linearly with time in K. pneumoniae colonies transferred from high-phosphate medium to low-phosphate medium up to specific activities of 50 μmol per min per mg of protein after 24 h. In K. pneumoniae biofilms and colonies, alkaline phosphatase was initially expressed in the region of the biofilm immediately adjacent to the carbon and energy source (glucose). In time, the region of alkaline phosphatase expression expanded inward until it spanned most, but not all, of the biofilm or colony depth. In contrast, expression of alkaline phosphatase in P. aeruginosa biofilms occurred in a thin, sharply delineated band at the biofilm-bulk fluid interface. In this case, the band of activity never occupied more than approximately one-sixth of the biofilm. These results are consistent with the working hypothesis that alkaline phosphatase expression patterns are primarily controlled by the local availability of either the carbon and energy source or the electron acceptor. PMID:9546188

  3. Alkaline detergent recycling via ultrafiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Steffani, C.; Meltzer, M.

    1995-06-01

    The metal finishing industry uses alkaline cleaners and detergents to remove oils and dirt from manufactured parts, often before they are painted or plated. The use of these cleaners has grown because environmental regulations are phasing out ozone depleting substances and placing restrictions on the use and disposal of many hazardous solvents. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is examining ultrafiltration as a cleaning approach that reclaims the cleaning solutions and minimizes wastes. The ultrafiltration membrane is made from sheets of polymerized organic film. The sheets are rolled onto a supporting frame and installed in a tube. Spent cleaning solution is pumped into a filter chamber and filtered through the membrane that captures oils and dirt and allows water and detergent to pass. The membrane is monitored and when pressure builds from oil and dirt, an automatic system cleans the surface to maintain solution flow and filtration quality. The results show that the ultrafiltration does not disturb the detergent concentration or alkalinity but removed almost all the oils and dirt leaving the solution in condition to be reused.

  4. Ocean alkalinity and the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldeira, K. G.; Rampino, Michael R.

    1988-01-01

    A biogeochemical cycle model resolving ocean carbon and alkalinity content is applied to the Maestrichtian and Danian. The model computes oceanic concentrations and distributions of Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and Sigma-CO2. From these values an atmospheric pCO2 value is calculated, which is used to estimate rates of terrestrial weathering of calcite, dolomite, and calcium and magnesium silicates. Metamorphism of carbonate rocks and the subsequent outgassing of CO2 to the atmosphere are parameterized in terms of carbonate rock reservoir sizes, total land area, and a measure of overall tectonic activity, the sea-floor generation rate. The ocean carbon reservoir computed by the model is used with Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) C-13 data to estimate organic detrital fluxes under a variety of ocean mixing rate assumptions. Using Redfield ratios, the biogenic detrital flux estimate is used to partition the ocean carbon and alkalinity reservoirs between the mixed layer and deep ocean. The calcite flux estimate and carbonate ion concentrations are used to determine the rate of biologically mediated CaCO3 titration. Oceanic productivity was severely limited for approximately 500 kyr following the K/T boundary resulting in significant increases in total ocean alkalinity. As productivity returned to the ocean, excess carbon and alkalinity was removed from the ocean as CaCO3. Model runs indicate that this resulted in a transient imbalance in the other direction. Ocean chemistry returned to near-equilibrium by about 64 mybp.

  5. Numerical Analysis of the Effects of Wind and Sprayer Type on Spray Distribution in Different Orchard Training Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duga, Ashenafi T.; Dekeyser, Donald; Ruysen, Kris; Bylemans, Dany; Nuyttens, David; Nicolai, Bart M.; Verboven, Pieter

    2015-12-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of airflow and spray application in orchards was validated using field trials and used to assess the effect of wind and sprayer type on spray distribution in different orchard training systems. Three air-assisted orchard sprayer designs (a cross-flow sprayer, an axial sprayer and a sprayer with individual spouts) and four different training systems of apple and pear trees were used for this analysis. The CFD model integrates the tree architecture into the model geometry, rather than using a generalized canopy profile approach. Predicted vertical on-tree deposition profiles agreed well with measurements. The lower airflow rate generated by the sprayer with individual spouts resulted in a significantly larger deflection of the spray particles under the same wind conditions. A detailed assessment was made on the most common axial sprayer. An increase in the magnitude of the wind speed for flow across the tree row resulted in an increase in the amount of spray detected in the air around the trees and in the ground deposition in front of the tree row. Environmental airflow in the direction of spraying gave the largest deposition on the tree, constraining the spray in the canopy region. A wind direction opposite to the spraying direction, however, resulted in an increase of the ground deposition and the amount of spray remaining in air. The model can be used to analyze the effects of implementation of more sustainable spray application procedures taking into account wind conditions, tree and machine characteristics.

  6. CFD Simulation of Aerial Crop Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, Zamri; Qiang, Kua Yong; Mohd, Sofian; Rosly, Nurhayati

    2016-11-01

    Aerial crop spraying, also known as crop dusting, is made for aerial application of pesticides or fertilizer. An agricultural aircraft which is converted from an aircraft has been built to combine with the aerial crop spraying for the purpose. In recent years, many studies on the aerial crop spraying were conducted because aerial application is the most economical, large and rapid treatment for the crops. The main objective of this research is to study the airflow of aerial crop spraying system using Computational Fluid Dynamics. This paper is focus on the effect of aircraft speed and nozzle orientation on the distribution of spray droplet at a certain height. Successful and accurate of CFD simulation will improve the quality of spray during the real situation and reduce the spray drift. The spray characteristics and efficiency are determined from the calculated results of CFD. Turbulence Model (k-ɛ Model) is used for the airflow in the fluid domain to achieve a more accurate simulation. Furthermore, spray simulation is done by setting the Flat-fan Atomizer Model of Discrete Phase Model (DPM) at the nozzle exit. The interaction of spray from each flat-fan atomizer can also be observed from the simulation. The evaluation of this study is validation and grid dependency study using field data from industry.

  7. Alkaline and alkaline earth metal phosphate halides and phosphors

    DOEpatents

    Lyons, Robert Joseph; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Cleaver, Robert John

    2012-11-13

    Compounds, phosphor materials and apparatus related to nacaphite family of materials are presented. Potassium and rubidium based nacaphite family compounds and phosphors designed by doping divalent rare earth elements in the sites of alkaline earth metals in the nacaphite material families are descried. An apparatus comprising the phosphors based on the nacaphite family materials are presented herein. The compounds presented is of formula A.sub.2B.sub.1-yR.sub.yPO.sub.4X where the elements A, B, R, X and suffix y are defined such that A is potassium, rubidium, or a combination of potassium and rubidium and B is calcium, strontium, barium, or a combination of any of calcium, strontium and barium. X is fluorine, chlorine, or a combination of fluorine and chlorine, R is europium, samarium, ytterbium, or a combination of any of europium, samarium, and ytterbium, and y ranges from 0 to about 0.1.

  8. Predictions of spray combustion interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuen, J. S.; Solomon, A. S. P.; Faeth, G. M.

    1984-01-01

    Mean and fluctuating phase velocities; mean particle mass flux; particle size; and mean gas-phase Reynolds stress, composition and temperature were measured in stationary, turbulent, axisymmetric, and flows which conform to the boundary layer approximations while having well-defined initial and boundary conditions in dilute particle-laden jets, nonevaporating sprays, and evaporating sprays injected into a still air environment. Three models of the processes, typical of current practice, were evaluated. The local homogeneous flow and deterministic separated flow models did not provide very satisfactory predictions over the present data base. In contrast, the stochastic separated flow model generally provided good predictions and appears to be an attractive approach for treating nonlinear interphase transport processes in turbulent flows containing particles (drops).

  9. Sprays and Cartan projective connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, D. J.

    2004-10-01

    Around 80 years ago, several authors (for instance H. Weyl, T.Y. Thomas, J. Douglas and J.H.C. Whitehead) studied the projective geometry of paths, using the methods of tensor calculus. The principal object of study was a spray, namely a homogeneous second-order differential equation, or more generally a projective equivalence class of sprays. At around the same time, E. Cartan studied the same topic from a different point of view, by imagining a projective space attached to a manifold, or, more generally, attached to a `manifold of elements'; the infinitesimal `glue' may be interpreted in modern language as a Cartan projective connection on a principal bundle. This paper describes the geometrical relationship between these two points of view.

  10. High Power Density Spray Cooling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-01

    to subcooled flow boiling . Above this point, the percentage of heat removal attributed to evaporation increases. After the majority of the coolant is...concerning the spray characteristics Was obtained using a laser phase Doppler system . Table 5.1.1: Nozzle characteristics Nozzle Orifice Flow Rate (1/hr...in section 6.2.1. A study of the air/droplet inpingetmet flow field on the surface clearly shows the advantages of such a system . The air jet on

  11. Uniform-droplet spray forming

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, C.A.; Sikka, V.K.; Chun, Jung-Hoon; Ando, T.

    1997-04-01

    The uniform-droplet process is a new method of liquid-metal atomization that results in single droplets that can be used to produce mono-size powders or sprayed-on to substrates to produce near-net shapes with tailored microstructure. The mono-sized powder-production capability of the uniform-droplet process also has the potential of permitting engineered powder blends to produce components of controlled porosity. Metal and alloy powders are commercially produced by at least three different methods: gas atomization, water atomization, and rotating disk. All three methods produce powders of a broad range in size with a very small yield of fine powders with single-sized droplets that can be used to produce mono-size powders or sprayed-on substrates to produce near-net shapes with tailored microstructures. The economical analysis has shown the process to have the potential of reducing capital cost by 50% and operating cost by 37.5% when applied to powder making. For the spray-forming process, a 25% savings is expected in both the capital and operating costs. The project is jointly carried out at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Tuffs University, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Preliminary interactions with both finished parts and powder producers have shown a strong interest in the uniform-droplet process. Systematic studies are being conducted to optimize the process parameters, understand the solidification of droplets and spray deposits, and develop a uniform-droplet-system (UDS) apparatus appropriate for processing engineering alloys.

  12. Magnesium Repair by Cold Spray

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    were conducted using microstructural analysis, hardness, bond strength, and corrosion testing. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Cold spray, magnesium, aluminum ... corrosion pitting are the primary causes for removing the components from service. In addition, any repair must be confined to nonstructural areas of...unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The U.S. Army has experienced significant corrosion problems with magnesium alloys that are used to

  13. Spray combustion at normal and reduced gravity in counterflow and co-flow configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, Alessandro; Chen, Gung

    1995-01-01

    Liquid fuel dispersion in practical systems is typically achieved by spraying the fuel into a polydisperse distribution of droplets evaporating and burning in a turbulent gaseous environment In view of the nearly insurmountable difficulties of this two-phase flow, a systematic study of spray evaporation and burning in configurations of gradually increasing levels of complexity, starting from laminar sprays to fully turbulent ones, would be useful. A few years ago we proposed to use an electrostatic spray of charged droplets for this type of combustion experiments under well-defined conditions. In the simplest configuration, a liquid is fed into a small metal tube maintained at several kilovolts relative to a ground electrode few centimeters away. Under the action of the electric field, the liquid meniscus at the outlet of the capillary takes a conical shape, with a thin jet emerging from the cone tip (cone-jet mode). This jet breaks up farther downstream into a spray of charged droplets - the so-called ElectroSpray (ES). Several advantages distinguish the electrospray from alternative atomization techniques: (1) it can produce quasi-monodisperse droplets over a phenomenal size range; (2) the atomization, that is strictly electrostatic, is decoupled from gas flow processes, which provides some flexibility in the selection and control of the experimental conditions; (3) the Coulombic repulsion of homopolarly charged droplets induces spray self-dispersion and prevents droplet coalescence; (4) the ES provides the opportunity of studying regimes of slip between droplets and host gas without compromising the control of the spray properties; and (5) the compactness and potential controllability of this spray generation system makes it appealing for studies in reduced-gravity environments aimed at isolating the spray behavior from natural convection complications. With these premises, in March 1991 we initiated a series of experiments under NASA sponsorship (NAG3-1259 and

  14. Coanda-assisted Spray Manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabey, Katie; Smith, Barton; Archibald, Reid; West, Brian

    2009-11-01

    An overview of research on a flow control technique called Coanda-assisted Spray Manipulation (CSM) is presented. CSM uses a high-momentum control jet under the influence of the Coanda effect to vector a high volume-flow jet or spray. Actuators provide the capability of moving the location of applied control flow making rotary or arbitrary motion of the vectored flow possible. The presented work includes a fundamental isothermal study on the effects of rotation speed and Reynolds number on a vectored jet using a belt-driven CSM actuator. Three-component velocity data were acquired for three Reynolds numbers and three rotation speeds using timed resolved high-speed stereo Particle Image Velocimetry. A second CSM system with 16 pneumatically-driven control ports has been retrofitted to a flame spray gun. This combination provides the capability to rapidly alter the direction of applied metal powders. High speed video of this process will also be presented. Finally, a fundamental study on the pneumatic system's response to minor losses and connection lines of varying lengths is presented.

  15. Closed type alkaline storage battery

    SciTech Connect

    Hayama, H.

    1980-06-10

    The alkaline storage battery employs a metallic hat shaped terminal closure which has a piercing needle as well as a puncturable metallic diaphragm positioned below the piercing needle. The needle is fixed by caulking at its peripheral edge portion to a edge of the closure. A comparatively thick and hard metal plate is placed on the inner surface of the diaphragm and is applied to an open portion of a tubular metallic container which has a battery element. A peripheral edge portion of the closure, the diaphragm and the metallic plate are clamped in airtight relationship through a packing between the caulked end portion and an inner annular step portion of the metallic container of the battery. A lead wire extends from one polarity electrode of the battery element and is connected to a central portion of the metallic plate.

  16. Planar Droplet Sizing in Dense Sprays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    Transactions of the ASME 121(3): 409-414. Sick, V. and B. Stojkovic (2001). "Attenuation effects on imaging diagnostics of hollow - cone sprays ...considered in the data processing method. Imaging of the scattered light from the spray was performed by a 12bit CCD camera ( Model PCO sensical QE...the spray was performed using a laser power meter. The motorised linear stage was acquired from Thorlabs MTS50 models (Figure 5). The positioning

  17. Spray combustion model improvement study, 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Kim, Y. M.; Shang, H. M.

    1993-01-01

    This study involves the development of numerical and physical modeling in spray combustion. These modeling efforts are mainly motivated to improve the physical submodels of turbulence, combustion, atomization, dense spray effects, and group vaporization. The present mathematical formulation can be easily implemented in any time-marching multiple pressure correction methodologies such as MAST code. A sequence of validation cases includes the nonevaporating, evaporating and_burnin dense_sprays.

  18. Liquid spray cooling of a heated surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grissom, W. M.; Wierum, F. A.

    1981-01-01

    The lowest surface temperature possible for the existance of spray evaporative cooling is determined experimentally to be a linear function of the impinging spray mass flux. A conduction-controlled analytical model of droplet evaporation gives fairly good agreement with experimental measurements at atmospheric pressure. At reduced pressures droplet evaporation rates are decreased significantly such that an optimum operating pressure exists for each desired surface heat flux. The initiation of the 'Leidenfrost state' provides the upper surface temperature bound for spray evaporative cooling.

  19. Variable Gravity Effects on the Cooling Performance of a Single Phase Confined Spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalak, Travis; Yerkes, Kirk; Baysinger, Karri; McQuillen, John

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to discuss the testing of a spray cooling experiment designed to be flown on NASA's KC-135 Reduced Gravity Testing Platform. Spray cooling is an example of a thermal management technique that may be utilized in high flux heat acquisition and high thermal energy transport concepts. Many researchers have investigated the utility of spray cooling for the thermal management of devices generating high heat fluxes. However, there has been little research addressing the physics and ultimate performance of spray cooling in a variable gravity environment. An experimental package, consisting of a spray chamber coupled to a fluid delivery loop system, was fabricated for variable gravity flight tests. The spray chamber contains two opposing nozzles spraying on target Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) heaters. These heaters are mounted on glass pedestals, which are part of a sump system to remove unconstrained liquid from the test chamber. Liquid is collected in the sumps and returned to the fluid delivery loop. Thermocouples mounted in and around the pedestals are used to determine both the heat loss through the underside of the IT0 heater and the heat extracted by the spray. A series of flight tests were carried out aboard the KC-135, utilizing the ability of the aircraft to produce various gravity conditions. During the flight tests, for a fixed flow rate, heat input was varied at 20, 30, 50, and 80W with variable gravities of 0.01, 0.16, 0.36, and 1.8g. Flight test data was compared to terrestrial baseline data in addition to analytical and numerical solutions to evaluate the heat transfer in the heater and support structure . There were significant differences observed in the spray cooling performance as a result of variable gravity conditions and heat inputs. In general, the Nussult number at the heater surface was found to increase with decreasing gravity conditions for heat loads greater than 30W.

  20. Effect of sprayer settings on spray drift during pesticide application in poplar plantations (Populus spp.).

    PubMed

    Grella, Marco; Marucco, Paolo; Manzone, Marco; Gallart, Montserrat; Balsari, Paolo

    2017-02-01

    This study assessed spray drift generated by sprayer settings commonly used for pesticide application in poplar plantations (Populus spp.). Tests were conducted per the ISO 22866 methodology using a mounted air-assisted sprayer (Tifone VRP600) equipped with a swivel-cannon air conveyor (model Cannone 50S). Trials evaluated sprayer settings, combinations of nozzle types, airflow rates, and air direction in both adult and young poplar plantations. Overall, spray drift amounts registered downwind of poplar plantations were less than those obtained to derive reference drift curves during the EU Plant Protection Product registration process that used late-growth-stage fruit crops. In the adult poplar plantation, Venturi nozzles (TVI 8004 red) yielded the highest drift reductions compared to reference sprayer setting, especially at distances farthest from the sprayed area (86% between 40 and 47m). Highest total drift reductions were achieved when conventional nozzles (1.81mm ceramic disc-core) were combined with their spray direction modified for an inclined cannon spray unit. Alternatively, the young poplar plantation showed no drift reduction for distances farthest from the sprayed area, regardless of sprayer settings, which likely resulted from lower foliage density and widely-spaced rows. Yet, both Venturi nozzles combined with high fan flow rates and conventional nozzles combined with reduced fan flow rate showed total spray drift reductions of over 70% within the downwind sampling area. These experimental results represent the first set of data on spray drift amounts in poplar plantations, which is key for defining the reference curves and best practices to reduce spray drift in tall tree plantations.

  1. Pulsed spray structure and atomisation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yule, A. J.

    1987-08-01

    The process of atomisation from diesel injectors is found to persist for a significant proportion of the spray length before impaction on the cylinder wall. Both aerodynamic shear and cavitation appear to be of importance for the liquid jet breakdown. In addition cyclic variations are found in the atomisation and penetration of sprays. The transient nature of the spray initial conditions can cause pile up and coagulation of droplets at the leading edge of the spray pulse for certain cases. Improved modeling of diesel injection requires recognition of these phenomena and this is supported by both modeling and experimental data which have been obtained under realistic engine conditions in a specially developed rig.

  2. Wind tunnel and field evaluation of drift from aerial spray applications with multiple spray formulations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The impact of different spray tank modifiers into an active ingredient spray mixture on spray atomization and in-field behavior under aerial application conditions were examined. Wind tunnel tests demonstrated that active ingredient solutions potentially results in significantly different atomizati...

  3. Spray drift reduction evaluations of spray nozzles using a standardized testing protocol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The development and testing of drift reduction technologies has come to the forefront of application research in the past few years in the United States. Drift reduction technologies (DRTs) can be spray nozzles, sprayer modifications, spray delivery assistance, spray property modifiers (adjuvants),...

  4. Chopper Gun Trajectory Optimization for Spray Forming in Automotive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Heping; Xi, Ning; Sheng, Weihua; Chen, Yifan; Dahl, Jeffrey

    2004-06-01

    Automatic chopper gun trajectory generation for spray forming is highly desirable for today's automotive manufacturing. Generating chopper gun trajectories for free-form surfaces to satisfy thickness requirements is still highly challenging due to the complex geometry of free-form surfaces. A CAD-guided chopper gun trajectory generation system for free-form surfaces has been developed in our previous work. A complex surface has to be divided into several patches to satisfy the given constraints. Optimization algorithms are developed to integrate the trajectories of patches to form a trajectory for the free-form surface. A thickness verification method is also provided to verify the generated trajectories. The results of experiments and simulations have shown that the trajectory generation system achieves satisfactory performance. This trajectory generation method can also be applied in many other CAD-guided robot trajectory planning applications.

  5. Evolution of alkaline phosphatases in primates.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, D J; Rogers, C; Harris, H

    1982-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase [orthophosphoric-monoester phosphohydrolase (alkaline optimum), EC 3.1.3.1] in placenta, intestine, liver, kidney, bone, and lung from a variety of primate species has been characterized by quantitative inhibition, thermostability, and immunological studies. Characteristic human placental-type alkaline phosphatase occurs in placentas of great apes (chimpanzee and orangutan) but not in placentas of other primates, including gibbon. It is also present in trace amounts in human lung but not in lung or other tissues of various Old and New World monkeys. However, a distinctive alkaline phosphatase resembling it occurs in substantial amounts in lungs from Old World monkeys but not New World monkeys. It appears that duplication of alkaline phosphatase genes and mutations of genetic elements controlling their tissue expression have occurred relatively recently in mammalian evolution. Images PMID:6950431

  6. Alkaline pH sensor molecules.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Takashi; Maruyama, Ichiro N

    2015-11-01

    Animals can survive only within a narrow pH range. This requires continual monitoring of environmental and body-fluid pH. Although a variety of acidic pH sensor molecules have been reported, alkaline pH sensor function is not well understood. This Review describes neuronal alkaline pH sensors, grouped according to whether they monitor extracellular or intracellular alkaline pH. Extracellular sensors include the receptor-type guanylyl cyclase, the insulin receptor-related receptor, ligand-gated Cl- channels, connexin hemichannels, two-pore-domain K+ channels, and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Intracellular sensors include TRP channels and gap junction channels. Identification of molecular mechanisms underlying alkaline pH sensing is crucial for understanding how animals respond to environmental alkaline pH and how body-fluid pH is maintained within a narrow range.

  7. Advanced alkaline water electrolysis. Task 2 summary report. Model for alkaline water electrolysis systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yaffe, M.R.; Murray, J.N.

    1980-04-01

    Task 2 involved the establishment of an engineering and economic model for the evaluation of various options in water electrolysis. The mode, verification of the specific coding and four case studies are described. The model was tested by evaluation of a nearly commercial technology, i.e., an 80-kW alkaline electrolyte system, operating at 60/sup 0/C, which delivers approximately 255 SLM, hydrogen for applications such as electrical generation cooling or semiconductor manufacturing. The calculated cost of hydrogen from this installed non-optimized case system with an initial cost to the customer of $87,000 was $6.99/Kg H/sub 2/ ($1.67/100 SCF) on a 20-yr levelized basis using 2.5 cents/kWh power costs. This compares favorably to a levelized average merchant hydrogen cost value of $9.11/Kg H/sub 2/ ($2.17/100 SCF) calculated using the same program.

  8. Structural and optical characterization of InAs nanocrystals deposited by spray pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mousa, A. M. Mohammed, M. A.; Kadhim, R.

    2015-03-30

    4-5 nm size InAs nanocrystals were prepared by spray pyrolysis technique on glass substrates from alkaline solution containing InCl{sub 3} and As{sub 2}O. X-Ray diffraction and absorption spectra suggested that the deposition conditions (deposition time and temperature) had a profound influence on the structure and thickness of deposited layers. The optical absorption band edges shifted to lower energy when increasing the thickness with respect to the bulk material. The marked blue shift of the optical absorption edge indicated a strong quantum confinement effect in InAs films.

  9. Automated spray cleaning using flammable solvents in a glovebox

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, P.; Meirans, L.

    1998-05-01

    The phase-out of the ozone-depleting solvents has forced industry to look to solvents such as alcohol, terpenes and other flammable solvents to perform the critical cleaning processes. These solvents are not as efficient as the ozone-depleting solvents in terms of soil loading, cleaning time and drying when used in standard cleaning processes such as manual sprays or ultrasonic baths. They also require special equipment designs to meet part cleaning specifications and operator safety requirements. This paper describes a cleaning system that incorporates the automated spraying of flammable solvents to effectively perform precision cleaning processes. Key to the project`s success was the development of software that controls the robotic system and automatically generates robotic cleaning paths from three dimensional CAD models of the items to be cleaned.

  10. Comparison Between Sodium Nitrite & Sodium Hydroxide Spray Accident

    SciTech Connect

    WILLIAMS, J.C.; HEY, B.E.

    2001-11-07

    The purpose of this analysis is to compare the consequences of an 8 molar NaNO2 spray leak to the Tank Farm Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) evaluation of sprays of up to 19 molar (50%) NaOH. Four conditions were evaluated. These are: a spray during transfers from a one-inch pipe, a spray resulting from a truck tank Crack, a spray resulting from a truck tank rupture, and a spray in the 204-AR Waste Unloading Facility.

  11. Spray forming lead strip. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McHugh, K.

    1996-04-10

    A cooperative research project was conducted between the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and Johnson Controls, Inc. (JCI) to adapt the INEL spray forming process to produce near-net-shape lead alloy strip. The emphasis of the work was to spray form lead strip samples at INEL, using a variety of spray conditions, for characterization at JCI. An existing glove box apparatus was modified at INEL to spray form lead. The main spray forming components were housed inside the glove box. They included a spray nozzle, tundish (crucible), substrate assembly, gas heater and furnaces to heat the nozzle and tundish. To spray form metal strip, liquid metal was pressure-fed at a controlled rate through a series of circular orifices that span the width of the nozzle. There the metal contacted high velocity, high temperature inert gas (nitrogen) which atomized the molten material into fine droplets, entrained the droplets in a directed flow, and deposited them onto glass plates that were swept through the spray plume to form strip samples. In-flight convection cooling of the droplets followed by conduction and convection cooling at the substrate resulted in rapid solidification of the deposit. During operation, the inside of the glove box was purged with an inert gas to limit the effects of in-flight oxidation of the particles and spray-formed strips, as well as to protect personnel from exposure to airborne lead particulate. Remote controls were used to start/stop the spray and control the speed and position of the substrate. In addition, substrate samples were loaded into the substrate translator manually using the gloved side ports of the box. In this way, the glove box remained closed during a series of spray trials, and was opened only when loading the crucible with a lead charge or when removing lead strip samples for shipment to JCI.

  12. Size-fractionated characterization and quantification of nanoparticle release rates from a consumer spray product containing engineered nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagendorfer, Harald; Lorenz, Christiane; Kaegi, Ralf; Sinnet, Brian; Gehrig, Robert; Goetz, Natalie V.; Scheringer, Martin; Ludwig, Christian; Ulrich, Andrea

    2010-09-01

    This study describes methods developed for reliable quantification of size- and element-specific release of engineered nanoparticles (ENP) from consumer spray products. A modified glove box setup was designed to allow controlled spray experiments in a particle-minimized environment. Time dependence of the particle size distribution in a size range of 10-500 nm and ENP release rates were studied using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). In parallel, the aerosol was transferred to a size-calibrated electrostatic TEM sampler. The deposited particles were investigated using electron microscopy techniques in combination with image processing software. This approach enables the chemical and morphological characterization as well as quantification of released nanoparticles from a spray product. The differentiation of solid ENP from the released nano-sized droplets was achieved by applying a thermo-desorbing unit. After optimization, the setup was applied to investigate different spray situations using both pump and gas propellant spray dispensers for a commercially available water-based nano-silver spray. The pump spray situation showed no measurable nanoparticle release, whereas in the case of the gas spray, a significant release was observed. From the results it can be assumed that the homogeneously distributed ENP from the original dispersion grow in size and change morphology during and after the spray process but still exist as nanometer particles of size <100 nm. Furthermore, it seems that the release of ENP correlates with the generated aerosol droplet size distribution produced by the spray vessel type used. This is the first study presenting results concerning the release of ENP from spray products.

  13. Atomistic Simulation of Sea Spray Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokturk, H.

    2012-12-01

    Particles generated by ocean wave spray play an important role in many atmospheric processes such as cloud condensation, cycling of elements like chlorine, and scattering of sunlight reaching the ocean surface [1-2]. Indeed, artificially spraying droplets of seawater to the atmosphere by marine vessels roaming the ocean has been suggested as a geoengineering method to combat global warming [3]. One of the interesting aspects of ocean spray particles is that they include dissolved salt ions. Typically a liter of seawater contains about 3.5 g of salt which is mostly sodium chloride. Hydrated salt ions of the particle create a molecular structure which is different from that of pure water. An objective of this research is to investigate the influence of the dissolved ions on the properties of the particles by using first principle quantum mechanical calculations. Another objective is to probe the interaction of carbon dioxide (CO2) with such particles to understand whether the ions might enhance the absorption of atmospheric CO2 into the particles. Atomic models used in the calculations consist of a salt ion, for example sodium (Na+) ion surrounded by water molecules. Calculations are performed by using the DFT method with B3LYP hybrid functional and Pople type basis sets augmented with polarization and diffuse functions. Results of the calculations indicate that average binding energy of water molecules nearest to the ion is 0.7 eV per molecule for Na+ and 0.5 eV per molecule for Cl-. Water molecules are bound to the ion with significantly greater energy than that of the hydrogen bond (~0.2 eV) which is the binding mechanism of pure water. Higher binding energy of the particles explains why they serve well as condensation nuclei. As expected, binding energy decreases with increasing distance from the ion. It becomes comparable to that of the hydrogen bond at a distance of about 2 nm which corresponds to approximately 7 layers of water molecules surrounding the ion

  14. Spheroidized Hydroxyapatite (HA) Powders Plasma Spraying of Combustion Flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khor, K. A.; Wang, Y.; Cheang, P.

    1998-06-01

    Tailoring powder characteristics to suit the plasma spray process can alleviate difficulties associated with the preparation of hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings. Commercial HA feedstock normally exhibit an angular morphology and a wide particle size range that present difficulties in powder transport from the powder hopper to the plasma spray gun and in nonuniform melting of the powders in the plasma flame. Hence, combustion flame spheroidized hydroxyapatite (SHA) was used as the feedstock for plasma spraying. Spherical particles within a narrow particle size range are found to be more effective for the plasma spray processes. Results show coatings generated from spheroidized HA powders have unique surface and microstructure characteristics. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation of the coating surface revealed well-formed splats that spread and flatten into disc configurations with no disintegration, reflecting adequate melting of the HA in the plasma and subsequent deposition consistency. The surface topography is generally flat with good overlapping of subsequent spreading droplets. Porosity in the form of macropores is substantially reduced. The cross-section microstructure reveals a dense coating comprised of randomly stacked lamellae. The tensile bond strengths of the SHA coatings, phase composition, and characteristics of the coatings generated with different particle sizes (125 to 75 µm, 45 to 75 µm, 20 to 45 µm, and 5 to 20 µm) showed that a high bond strength of ˜16 MPa can be obtained with SHA in the size range from 20 to 45 µm. This can be improved further by a postspray treatment by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). However, larger particle size ranges exhibited higher degrees of crystallinity and relatively higher HA content among the various calcium phosphate phases found in the coatings.

  15. Process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Chia-lin W.

    1995-01-01

    A process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification. The process involves acidifying the wastes with an oxidizing agent such as nitric acid, then adding formic acid as a reducing agent, and then mixing with glass formers to produce a melter feed. The nitric acid contributes nitrates that act as an oxidant to balance the redox of the melter feed, prevent reduction of certain species to produce conducting metals, and lower the pH of the wastes to a suitable level for melter operation. The formic acid reduces mercury compounds to elemental mercury for removal by steam stripping, and MnO.sub.2 to the Mn(II) ion to prevent foaming of the glass melt. The optimum amounts of nitric acid and formic acid are determined in relation to the composition of the wastes, including the concentrations of mercury (II) and MnO.sub.2, noble metal compounds, nitrates, formates and so forth. The process minimizes the amount of hydrogen generated during treatment, while producing a redox-balanced feed for effective melter operation and a quality glass product.

  16. Process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, C.L.W.

    1995-07-25

    A process is described for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification. The process involves acidifying the wastes with an oxidizing agent such as nitric acid, then adding formic acid as a reducing agent, and then mixing with glass formers to produce a melter feed. The nitric acid contributes nitrates that act as an oxidant to balance the redox of the melter feed, prevent reduction of certain species to produce conducting metals, and lower the pH of the wastes to a suitable level for melter operation. The formic acid reduces mercury compounds to elemental mercury for removal by steam stripping, and MnO{sub 2} to the Mn(II) ion to prevent foaming of the glass melt. The optimum amounts of nitric acid and formic acid are determined in relation to the composition of the wastes, including the concentrations of mercury (II) and MnO{sub 2}, noble metal compounds, nitrates, formates and so forth. The process minimizes the amount of hydrogen generated during treatment, while producing a redox-balanced feed for effective melter operation and a quality glass product. 4 figs.

  17. Petrogenesis of coeval silica-saturated and silica-undersaturated alkaline rocks: Mineralogical and geochemical evidence from the Saima alkaline complex, NE China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yu-Sheng; Yang, Jin-Hui; Sun, Jin-Feng; Zhang, Ji-Heng; Wu, Fu-Yuan

    2016-03-01

    A combined study of zircon U-Pb ages, mineral chemistry, whole-rock elements and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopes was carried out for the Saima alkaline complex in the northeastern China, in order to investigate the source and petrogenesis of coeval silica-saturated and silica-undersaturated alkaline rocks. The Saima alkaline complex consists of nepheline syenites, quartz-bearing syenites and alkaline volcanic rocks (i.e., phonolite and trachyte), with minor mafic dikes and carbonatitic veins. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) zircon U-Pb dating gives consistent ages of 230-224 Ma for these rocks, suggesting that they are coeval. All alkaline rocks in the Saima complex are enriched in large ion lithophile elements (LILEs) and light rare earth elements (LREEs), and depleted in high field strength elements (HFSEs) with significant negative Nb, Ta and Ti anomalies. Geochemical data and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic compositions indicate that the various alkaline rocks were all derived from partial melting of an ancient, re-enriched lithospheric mantle in the garnet stability field, but experienced variable siliceous- or carbonate-rich crustal contamination. Based on petrographic evidence, mineral compositions, and whole-rock geochemical data, two distinct magmatic evolutionary trends are proposed to explain the coeval emplacement of the various rock types within the Saima alkaline complex. The silica-undersaturated rocks (nepheline syenites and phonolites) result from alkali feldspar + apatite + titanite crystal fractionation of an alkaline mafic parental melt combined with assimilation of marine carbonate host rocks. In contrast, the generation of silica-saturated rocks (quartz-bearing syenites and trachytes) may be attributed to subsequent and continued clinopyroxene + apatite + biotite crystal fractionation coupled with assimilation of siliceous sediments.

  18. Preparation and characterization of microparticles of piroxicam by spray drying and spray chilling methods

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, M.; Kini, A.G.; Kulkarni, P.K.

    2010-01-01

    Piroxicam, an anti-inflammatory drug, exhibits poor water solubility and flow properties, poor dissolution and poor wetting. Consequently, the aim of this study was to improve the dissolution of piroxicam. Microparticles containing piroxicam were produced by spray drying, using isopropyl alcohol and water in the ratio of 40:60 v/v as solvent system, and spray chilling technology by melting the drug and chilling it with a pneumatic nozzle to enhance dissolution rate. The prepared formulations were evaluated for in vitro dissolution and solubility. The prepared drug particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimeter, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Dissolution profile of the spray dried microparticles was compared with spray-chilled microparticles, pure and recrystallized samples. Spray dried microparticles and spray chilled microparticles exhibited decreased crystallinity and improved micromeritic properties. The dissolution of the spray dried microparticle and spray chilled particles were improved compared with recrystallized and pure sample of piroxicam. Consequently, it was believed that spray drying of piroxicam is a useful tool to improve dissolution but not in case of spray chilling. This may be due to the degradation of drug or variations in the resonance structure or could be due to minor distortion of bond angles. Hence, this spray drying technique can be used for formulation of tablets of piroxicam by direct compression with directly compressible tablet excipients. PMID:21589797

  19. Spray Gun With Constant Mixing Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, William G.

    1987-01-01

    Conceptual mechanism mounted in handle of spray gun maintains constant ratio between volumetric flow rates in two channels leading to spray head. With mechanism, possible to keep flow ratio near 1:1 (or another desired ratio) over range of temperatures, orifice or channel sizes, or clogging conditions.

  20. Uniform spray coating for large tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    System employs spray facility located within ventilated plastic booth to uniformly coat exterior of large cylindrical tanks with polyurethane foam insulation. Coating target is rotated on turntable while movable spray guns apply overlapping spirals of foam. Entire operation may be controlled by single operator from remote station.

  1. Non-Markov effects in intersecting sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchagnula, Mahesh; Kumaran, Dhivyaraja; Deevi, Sri Vallabha; Tangirala, Arun

    2016-11-01

    Sprays have been assumed to follow a Markov process. In this study, we revisit that assumption relying on experimental data from intersecting and non-intersecting sprays. A phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) is used to measure particle diameter and velocity at various axial locations in the intersection region of two sprays. Measurements of single sprays, with one nozzle turned off alternatively are also obtained at the same locations. This data, treated as an unstructured time series is classified into three bins each for diameter (small, medium, large) and velocity (slow, medium, fast). Conditional probability analysis on this binned data showed a higher static correlation between droplet velocities, while diameter correlation is significantly alleviated (reduced) in intersecting sprays, compared to single sprays. Further analysis using serial correlation measures: auto-correlation function (ACF) and partial auto-correlation function (PACF) shows that the lagged correlations in droplet velocity are enhanced while those in the droplet diameter are significantly debilitated in intersecting sprays. We show that sprays are not necessarily Markov processes and that memory persists, even though curtailed to fewer lags in case of size, and enhanced in case of droplet velocity.

  2. Spray Drift Issues and Technologies for Mitigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbicide-induced plant damage due to off-target spray drift has become a major problem in some regions prompting States to take regulatory action regarding drift mitigation. For example, the Arkansas Plant Board has proposed new regulations regarding spray of Glyphosate and 2, 4-D. These regulation...

  3. Spray Deflector For Water-Jet Machining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cawthon, Michael A.

    1989-01-01

    Disk on water-jet-machining nozzle protects nozzle and parts behind it from erosion by deflected spray. Consists of stainless-steel backing with neoprene facing deflecting spray so it does not reach nut or other vital parts of water-jet apparatus.

  4. Process for extracting technetium from alkaline solutions

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Sachleben, Richard A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

    1995-01-01

    A process for extracting technetium values from an aqueous alkaline solution containing at least one alkali metal hydroxide and at least one alkali metal nitrate, the at least one alkali metal nitrate having a concentration of from about 0.1 to 6 molar. The solution is contacted with a solvent consisting of a crown ether in a diluent for a period of time sufficient to selectively extract the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution. The solvent containing the technetium values is separated from the aqueous alkaline solution and the technetium values are stripped from the solvent.

  5. Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Deborah A.; Holmes, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

  6. Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Deborah A.; Holmes, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

  7. Combustion of liquid sprays at high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, A. J.; Faeth, G. M.

    1977-01-01

    The combustion of pressure atomized fuel sprays in high pressure stagnant air was studied. Measurements were made of flame and spray boundaries at pressures in the range 0.1-9 MPa for methanol and n-pentane. At the higher test pressure levels, critical phenomena are important. The experiments are compared with theoretical predictions based on a locally homogeneous two-phase flow model. The theory correctly predicted the trends of the data, but underestimates flame and spray boundaries by 30-50 percent, indicating that slip is still important for the present experiments (Sauter mean diameters of 30 microns at atmospheric pressure under cold flow conditions). Since the sprays are shorter at high pressures, slip effects are still important even though the density ratio of the phases approach one another as the droplets heat up. The model indicates the presence of a region where condensed water is present within the spray and provides a convenient means of treating supercritical phenomena.

  8. Tapered plug foam spray apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Peter B. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A two-component foam spray gun is readily disassembled for cleaning. It includes a body (1) with reactant (12, 14) and purge gas (16) inlet ports. A moldable valve packing (32) inside the body has a tapered conical interior surface (142), and apertures which match the reactant ports. A valve/tip (40) has a conical outer surface (48) which mates with the valve packing (32). The valve/tip (40) is held in place by a moldable packing washer (34), held at non-constant pressure by a screw (36, 38). The interior of the valve/tip (40) houses a removable mixing chamber (50). The mixing chamber (50) has direct flow orifices (60) and an auxiliary flow path (58, 60) which ameliorate pressure surges. The spray gun can be disassembled for cleaning without disturbing the seal, by removing the valve/tip (40) to the rear, thereby breaking it free of the conical packing. Rotation of the valve/tip (40) relative to the body (1) shuts off the reactant flow, and starts the purge gas flow.

  9. Spray drying of lipid-based systems loaded with Camellia sinensis polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Secolin, Vanessa A; Souza, Claudia R F; Oliveira, Wanderley P

    2017-03-01

    In this work, spray-dried lipid systems based on soy phosphatidylcholine, cholesterol and lauroyl polyoxylglycerides for entrapping Green tea polyphenols were produced. The aim was to study the effects of the encapsulating composition and spray drying conditions on the system performance and physicochemical product properties. The spray dryer powder production yield falls around 50.7 ± 2.8%, which is typical for lab scale spray dryers. Wrinkled and rounded particles, with low surface porosities were generated, independent of the drying carriers (trehalose or lactose) used. The product showed high encapsulation efficiency of Green tea polyphenols, which was promptly redispersible in water. It presented low density, and good compressive and flow properties. The results herein reported confirm the feasibility of the entrapment of Green tea polyphenols in lipid-based compositions by spray drying in presence of the drying carriers evaluated. The spray-dried microparticles show high potential to be used as additive in food, nutraceutical and pharmaceutical products.

  10. Mobile soak pits improve spray team mobility, productivity and safety of PMI malaria control programs.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, David F; Brown, Annie S; Bouare, Sory Ibrahima; Belemvire, Allison; George, Kristen; Fornadel, Christen; Norris, Laura; Longhany, Rebecca; Chandonait, Peter J

    2016-09-15

    In the President's Malaria Initiative (PMI)-funded Africa Indoor Residual Spraying Project (AIRS), end-of-day clean-up operations require the safe disposal of wash water resulting from washing the exterior of spray tanks and spray operators' personal protective equipment. Indoor residual spraying (IRS) programs typically use soak pits - large, in-ground filters - to adsorb, filter and then safely degrade the traces of insecticide found in the wash water. Usually these soak pits are permanent installations serving 30 or more operators, located in a central area that is accessible to multiple spray teams at the end of their workday. However, in remote areas, it is often impractical for teams to return to a central soak pit location for cleanup. To increase operational efficiency and improve environmental compliance, the PMI AIRS Project developed and tested mobile soak pits (MSP) in the laboratory and in field applications in Madagascar, Mali, Senegal, and Ethiopia where the distance between villages can be substantial and the road conditions poor. Laboratory testing confirmed the ability of the easily-assembled MSP to reduce effluent concentrations of two insecticides (Actellic 300-CS and Ficam VC) used by the PMI AIRS Project, and to generate the minimal practicable environmental "footprint" in these remote areas. Field testing in the Mali 2014 IRS campaign demonstrated ease of installation and use, resulted in improved and more consistent standards of clean-up, decreased transportation requirements, improved spray team working conditions, and reduced potential for operator exposure to insecticide.

  11. Characterization of Modified Tapioca Starch Solutions and Their Sprays for High Temperature Coating Applications

    PubMed Central

    Naz, M. Y.; Sulaiman, S. A.; Ariwahjoedi, B.; Shaari, Ku Zilati Ku

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the research was to understand and improve the unusual physical and atomization properties of the complexes/adhesives derived from the tapioca starch by addition of borate and urea. The characterization of physical properties of the synthesized adhesives was carried out by determining the effect of temperature, shear rate, and mass concentration of thickener/stabilizer on the complex viscosity, density, and surface tension. In later stage, phenomenological analyses of spray jet breakup of heated complexes were performed in still air. Using a high speed digital camera, the jet breakup dynamics were visualized as a function of the system input parameters. The further analysis of the grabbed images confirmed the strong influence of the input processing parameters on full cone spray patternation. It was also predicted that the heated starch adhesive solutions generate a dispersed spray pattern by utilizing the partial evaporation of the spraying medium. Below 40°C of heating temperature, the radial spray cone width and angle did not vary significantly with increasing Reynolds and Weber numbers at early injection phases leading to increased macroscopic spray propagation. The discharge coefficient, mean flow rate, and mean flow velocity were significantly influenced by the load pressure but less affected by the temperature. PMID:24592165

  12. Characterization of modified tapioca starch solutions and their sprays for high temperature coating applications.

    PubMed

    Naz, M Y; Sulaiman, S A; Ariwahjoedi, B; Shaari, Ku Zilati Ku

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the research was to understand and improve the unusual physical and atomization properties of the complexes/adhesives derived from the tapioca starch by addition of borate and urea. The characterization of physical properties of the synthesized adhesives was carried out by determining the effect of temperature, shear rate, and mass concentration of thickener/stabilizer on the complex viscosity, density, and surface tension. In later stage, phenomenological analyses of spray jet breakup of heated complexes were performed in still air. Using a high speed digital camera, the jet breakup dynamics were visualized as a function of the system input parameters. The further analysis of the grabbed images confirmed the strong influence of the input processing parameters on full cone spray patternation. It was also predicted that the heated starch adhesive solutions generate a dispersed spray pattern by utilizing the partial evaporation of the spraying medium. Below 40°C of heating temperature, the radial spray cone width and angle did not vary significantly with increasing Reynolds and Weber numbers at early injection phases leading to increased macroscopic spray propagation. The discharge coefficient, mean flow rate, and mean flow velocity were significantly influenced by the load pressure but less affected by the temperature.

  13. Experimental Studies of Spray Deposition on a Flat Surface in a Vacuum Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golliher, Eric L.; Yao, S. C.

    2015-01-01

    Cooling of spacecraft components in the space environment is an on-going research effort. The electronics used in modern spacecraft are always changing and the heat flux is increasing. New, one-of-a-kind missions require new approaches to thermal control. In this research, under vacuum conditions, a pulsed water spray impinged on a small disc, while a high speed data acquisition system recorded the temperature histories of this copper disc. The water droplets froze quickly and accumulated on the disc as the spray continued. After the spray stopped, the frozen water that remained on the disc then sublimated into the vacuum environment and cooled the disc. This paper examines two important aspects of this process: 1) the difference in spray start up and shutdown in a vacuum environment versus in a standard atmospheric pressure environment, and 2) the water utilization efficiency in a vacuum environment due to the effects of drop trajectories and drop bouncing on the surface. Both phenomena play a role during spray cooling in a vacuum. This knowledge should help spacecraft designers plan for spray cooling as an option to cool spacecraft electronics, human metabolic generated heat, and heat from other sources.

  14. Optimization of Arc-Sprayed Ni-Cr-Ti Coatings for High Temperature Corrosion Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, S.; Schweizer, M.

    2013-04-01

    High Cr content Ni-Cr-Ti arc-spray coatings have proven successful in resisting the high temperature sulfidizing conditions found in black liquor recovery boilers in the pulp and paper industry. The corrosion resistance of the coatings is dependent upon the coating composition, to form chromium sulfides and oxides to seal the coating, and on the coating microstructure. Selection of the arc-spray parameters influences the size, temperature and velocity of the molten droplets generated during spraying, which in turn dictates the coating composition and formation of the critical coating microstructural features—splat size, porosity and oxide content. Hence it is critical to optimize the arc-spray parameters in order to maximize the corrosion resistance of the coating. In this work the effect of key spray parameters (current, voltage, spray distance and gas atomizing pressure) on the coating splat thickness, porosity content, oxide content, microhardness, thickness, and surface profile were investigated using a full factorial design of experiment. Based on these results a set of oxidized, porous and optimized coatings were prepared and characterized in detail for follow-up corrosion testing.

  15. Joint Test Plan for Gas Dynamic Spray Technology Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie

    2008-01-01

    Air Force Space Command (AFSPC) and NASA have similar missions, facilities, and structures located in similar harsh environments. Both are responsible for a number of facilities/structures with metallic structural and non-structural components in highly and moderately corrosive environments. Regardless of the corrosivity of the environment, all metals require periodic maintenance activity to guard against the insidious effects of corrosion and thus ensure that structures meet or exceed design or performance life. The standard practice for protecting metallic substrates in atmospheric environments is the use of an applied coating system. Current coating systems used across AFSPC and NASA contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). These coatings are subject to environmental regulations at the Federal and State levels that limit their usage. In addition, these coatings often cannot withstand the high temperatures and exhaust that may be experienced by AFSPC and NASA structures. In response to these concerns, AFSPC and NASA have approved the use of thermal spray coatings (TSCs). Thermal spray coatings are extremely durable and environmentally friendly coating alternatives, but utilize large cumbersome equipment for application that make the coatings difficult and time consuming to repair. Other concerns include difficulties coating complex geometries and the cost of equipment, training, and materials. Gas Dynamic Spray (GDS) technology (also known as Cold Spray) will be evaluated as a smaller, more maneuverable repair method as well as for areas where thermal spray techniques are not as effective. The technology can result in reduced maintenance and thus reduced hazardous materials/wastes associated with current processes. Thermal spray and GDS coatings also have no VOCs and are environmentally preferable coatings. To achieve a condition suitable for the application of a coating system, including GDS coatings, the substrate must

  16. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Additional Aerosol Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, G. N.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Kurath, Dean E.

    2013-08-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. To expand the data set upon which the WTP accident and safety analyses were based, an aerosol spray leak testing program was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL’s test program addressed two key technical areas to improve the WTP methodology (Larson and Allen 2010). The first technical area was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where slurry particles may plug the hole and prevent high-pressure sprays. The results from an effort to address this first technical area can be found in Mahoney et al. (2012a). The second technical area was to determine aerosol droplet size distribution and total droplet volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, including sprays from larger breaches and sprays of slurries for which literature data are largely absent. To address the second technical area, the testing program collected aerosol generation data at two scales, commonly referred to as small-scale and large-scale. The small-scale testing and resultant data are described in Mahoney et al. (2012b) and the large-scale testing and resultant data are presented in Schonewill et al. (2012). In tests at both scales, simulants were used to mimic the

  17. Large-Scale Spray Releases: Additional Aerosol Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Richard C.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Kurath, Dean E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Mahoney, Lenna A.

    2013-08-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak event involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids that behave as a Newtonian fluid. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and in processing facilities across the DOE complex. To expand the data set upon which the WTP accident and safety analyses were based, an aerosol spray leak testing program was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL’s test program addressed two key technical areas to improve the WTP methodology (Larson and Allen 2010). The first technical area was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where slurry particles may plug the hole and prevent high-pressure sprays. The results from an effort to address this first technical area can be found in Mahoney et al. (2012a). The second technical area was to determine aerosol droplet size distribution and total droplet volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, including sprays from larger breaches and sprays of slurries for which literature data are mostly absent. To address the second technical area, the testing program collected aerosol generation data at two scales, commonly referred to as small-scale and large-scale testing. The small-scale testing and resultant data are described in Mahoney et al. (2012b), and the large-scale testing and resultant data are presented in Schonewill et al. (2012). In tests at both scales, simulants were used

  18. Understanding factors that influence protective glove use among automotive spray painters.

    PubMed

    Ceballos, Diana; Reeb-Whitaker, Carolyn; Glazer, Patricia; Murphy-Robinson, Helen; Yost, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Dermal contact with isocyanate-based coatings may lead to systemic respiratory sensitization. The most common isocyanates found in sprayed automotive coatings are monomeric and oligomeric 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) and isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI). Most spray painters use thin (4-5 mil) latex gloves that are not effective at preventing dermal exposures when spraying isocyanate paints. Personal interviews with collision repair industry personnel and focus groups with spray painters were held to characterize risk awareness, to examine perceptions and challenges concerning protective glove use and selection, and to generate ideas for protective glove use interventions. The most popular gloves among spray painters were thin (4-5 mil) and thick (14 mil) latex. We found that medium to thick (6-8 mil) nitrile were not always perceived as comfortable and were expected to be more expensive than thin (4-5 mil) latex gloves. Of concern is the user's difficulty in distinguishing between nitrile and latex gloves; latex gloves are now sold in different colors including blue, which has traditionally been associated with nitrile gloves. Even though spray painters were familiar with the health hazards related to working with isocyanate paints, most were not always aware that dermal exposure to isocyanates could contribute to the development of occupational asthma. There is a need for more research to identify dermal materials that are protective against sprayed automotive coatings. Automotive spray painters and their employers need to be educated in the selection and use of protective gloves, specifically on attributes such as glove material, color, and thickness.

  19. Mechanism of alcohol-enhanced lucigenin chemiluminescence in alkaline solution.

    PubMed

    Chi, Quan; Chen, Wanying; He, Zhike

    2015-11-01

    The chemiluminescence (CL) of lucigenin (Luc(2+)) can be enhanced by different alcohols in alkaline solution. The effect of different fatty alcohols on the CL of lucigenin was related to the carbon chain length and the number of hydroxyl groups. Glycerol provides the greatest enhancement. UV/Vis absorption spectra and fluorescence spectra showed that N-methylacridone (NMA) was produced in the CL reaction in the presence of different alcohols. The peak of the CL spectrum was located at 470 nm in all cases, indicating that the luminophore was always the excited-state NMA. The quenching of lucigenin CL by superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the electron spin resonance (ESR) results with the spin trap of 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) demonstrated that superoxide anions (O2 (•-)) were generated from dissolved oxygen in the CL reaction and that glycerol and dihydroxyacetone (DHA) can promote O2 (•-) production by the reduction of dissolved oxygen in alkaline solution. It was assumed that the enhancement provided by different alcohols was related to the solvent effect and reducing capacity. Glycerol and DHA can also reduce Luc(2+) into lucigenin cation radicals (Luc(•+) ), which react with O2 (•-) to produce CL, and glycerol can slowly transform into DHA, which is oxidized quickly in alkaline solution.

  20. Difference between Chitosan Hydrogels via Alkaline and Acidic Solvent Systems

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Jingyi; Wang, Zhengke; Hu, Qiaoling

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan (CS) has generated considerable interest for its desirable properties and wide applications. Hydrogel has been proven to be a major and vital form in the applications of CS materials. Among various types of CS hydrogels, physical cross-linked CS hydrogels are popular, because they avoided the potential toxicity and sacrifice of intrinsic properties caused by cross-linking or reinforcements. Alkaline solvent system and acidic solvent system are two important solvent systems for the preparation of physical cross-linked CS hydrogels, and also lay the foundations of CS hydrogel-based materials in many aspects. As members of physical cross-linked CS hydrogels, gel material via alkaline solvent system showed significant differences from that via acidic solvent system, but the reasons behind are still unexplored. In the present work, we studied the difference between CS hydrogel via alkaline system and acidic system, in terms of gelation process, hydrogel structure and mechanical property. In-situ/pseudo in-situ studies were carried out, including fluorescent imaging of gelation process, which provided dynamic visualization. Finally, the reasons behind the differences were explained, accompanied by the discussion about design strategy based on gelation behavior of the two systems. PMID:27786262

  1. Difference between Chitosan Hydrogels via Alkaline and Acidic Solvent Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Jingyi; Wang, Zhengke; Hu, Qiaoling

    2016-10-01

    Chitosan (CS) has generated considerable interest for its desirable properties and wide applications. Hydrogel has been proven to be a major and vital form in the applications of CS materials. Among various types of CS hydrogels, physical cross-linked CS hydrogels are popular, because they avoided the potential toxicity and sacrifice of intrinsic properties caused by cross-linking or reinforcements. Alkaline solvent system and acidic solvent system are two important solvent systems for the preparation of physical cross-linked CS hydrogels, and also lay the foundations of CS hydrogel-based materials in many aspects. As members of physical cross-linked CS hydrogels, gel material via alkaline solvent system showed significant differences from that via acidic solvent system, but the reasons behind are still unexplored. In the present work, we studied the difference between CS hydrogel via alkaline system and acidic system, in terms of gelation process, hydrogel structure and mechanical property. In-situ/pseudo in-situ studies were carried out, including fluorescent imaging of gelation process, which provided dynamic visualization. Finally, the reasons behind the differences were explained, accompanied by the discussion about design strategy based on gelation behavior of the two systems.

  2. Zero Volt Paper Spray Ionization and Its Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wleklinski, Michael; Li, Yafeng; Bag, Soumabha; Sarkar, Depanjan; Narayanan, Rahul; Pradeep, T; Cooks, R Graham

    2015-07-07

    The analytical performance and a suggested mechanism for zero volt paper spray using chromatography paper are presented. A spray is generated by the action of the pneumatic force of the mass spectrometer (MS) vacuum at the inlet. Positive and negative ion signals are observed, and comparisons are made with standard kV paper spray (PS) ionization and nanoelectrospray ionization (nESI). While the range of analytes to which zero volt PS is applicable is very similar to kV PS and nESI, differences in the mass spectra of mixtures are interpreted in terms of the more significant effects of analyte surface activity in the gentler zero volt experiment than in the other methods due to the significantly lower charge. The signal intensity of zero volt PS is also lower than in the other methods. A Monte Carlo simulation based on statistical fluctuation of positive and negative ions in solution has been implemented to explain the production of ions from initially uncharged droplets. Uncharged droplets first break up due to aerodynamics forces until they are in the 2-4 μm size range and then undergo Coulombic fission. A model involving statistical charge fluctuations in both phases predicts detection limits similar to those observed experimentally and explains the effects of binary mixture components on relative ionization efficiencies. The proposed mechanism may also play a role in ionization by other voltage-free methods.

  3. Characterizing Suspension Plasma Spray Coating Formation Dynamics through Curvature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chidambaram Seshadri, Ramachandran; Dwivedi, Gopal; Viswanathan, Vaishak; Sampath, Sanjay

    2016-12-01

    Suspension plasma spraying (SPS) enables the production of variety of microstructures with unique mechanical and thermal properties. In SPS, a liquid carrier (ethanol/water) is used to transport the sub-micrometric feedstock into the plasma jet. Considering complex deposition dynamics of SPS technique, there is a need to better understand the relationships among spray conditions, ensuing particle behavior, deposition stress evolution and resultant properties. In this study, submicron yttria-stabilized zirconia particles suspended in ethanol were sprayed using a cascaded arc plasma torch. The stresses generated during the deposition of the layers (termed evolving stress) were monitored via the change in curvature of the substrate measured using an in situ measurement apparatus. Depending on the deposition conditions, coating microstructures ranged from feathery porous to dense/cracked deposits. The evolving stresses and modulus were correlated with the observed microstructures and visualized via process maps. Post-deposition bi-layer curvature measurement via low temperature thermal cycling was carried out to quantify the thermo-elastic response of different coatings. Lastly, preliminary data on furnace cycle durability of different coating microstructures were evaluated. This integrated study involving in situ diagnostics and ex situ characterization along with process maps provides a framework to describe coating formation mechanisms, process parametrics and microstructure description.

  4. Thermoelectric Device Fabrication Using Thermal Spray and Laser Micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tewolde, Mahder; Fu, Gaosheng; Hwang, David J.; Zuo, Lei; Sampath, Sanjay; Longtin, Jon P.

    2016-02-01

    Thermoelectric generators (TEGs) are solid-state devices that convert heat directly into electricity. They are used in many engineering applications such as vehicle and industrial waste-heat recovery systems to provide electrical power, improve operating efficiency and reduce costs. State-of-art TEG manufacturing is based on prefabricated materials and a labor-intensive process involving soldering, epoxy bonding, and mechanical clamping for assembly. This reduces their durability and raises costs. Additive manufacturing technologies, such as thermal spray, present opportunities to overcome these challenges. In this work, TEGs have been fabricated for the first time using thermal spray technology and laser micromachining. The TEGs are fabricated directly onto engineering component surfaces. First, current fabrication techniques of TEGs are presented. Next, the steps required to fabricate a thermal spray-based TEG module, including the formation of the metallic interconnect layers and the thermoelectric legs are presented. A technique for bridging the air gap between two adjacent thermoelectric elements for the top layer using a sacrificial filler material is also demonstrated. A flat 50.8 mm × 50.8 mm TEG module is fabricated using this method and its performance is experimentally characterized and found to be in agreement with expected values of open-circuit voltage based on the materials used.

  5. Spraying modes in coaxial jet electrospray with outer driving liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaopeng; Jia, Laibing; Yin, Xiezhen; Cheng, Jiusheng; Lu, Jian

    2005-03-01

    Coaxial jet electrospray is a technique to generate microencapsules, which uses electric forces to create a coaxial microjet from two immiscible liquids. Compound droplets with narrow size distribution are produced after the jet breaks up. In this paper, the spraying modes are investigated experimentally with proper flow rates of the inner and outer liquids. Ethanol/glycerol/tween mixture (outer liquid) and cooking oil (inner liquid) are fed into the gap between outer and inner capillaries and the inner capillary, respectively. The spraying modes presented in our experiments are "dripping mode," "dripping mode in spindle," "cone-jet mode," "pulse mode in cone," and "multijets mode" sequentially, as the applied voltage increases. The region of stable cone-jet mode extends with decrease of the outer liquid flow rate and increase of the inner one. It is found that the spray phenomena are mainly determined by properties of the outer liquid, which is viscous and electric conductive enough. A rudimentary physical model is developed, in which both the viscosity and liquid interface tension are taken into account.

  6. Evaluation of subgrid dispersion models for LES of spray flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qing; Zhao, Xinyu; Esclapez, Lucas; Govindaraju, Pavan; Ihme, Matthias

    2016-11-01

    Turbulent dispersion models for particle-laden turbulent flows have been studied extensively over the past few decades, and different modeling approaches have been proposed and tested. However, the significance of the subgrid dispersion model and its influence on the flame dynamics for spray combustion have not been examined. To evaluate the performance of dispersion models for spray combustion, direct numerical simulations (DNS) of three-dimensional counterflow spray flames are studied. The DNS configuration features a series of different droplet sizes to study effects of different Stokes numbers. An a priori comparison of the statistics generated from three subgrid dispersion models is made, for both non-reacting and reacting conditions. Improved agreement with DNS is shown for the stochastic model and the regularized deconvolution model than a closure-free model. The effect of filter sizes in relation to droplet sizes are investigated for all models. Subsequently, a posteriori modeling of the same configuration with different resolutions is performed to compare these models in the presence of other subgrid models. Finally, models for the subgrid closure of scalar transport for multiphase droplet combustion are proposed and evaluated.

  7. Automated spray cleaning using flammable solvents in a glovebox environment

    SciTech Connect

    McKee, R.; Meirans, L.; Watterberg, P.; Drotning, W.

    1997-04-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments that have phased out the use of ozone depleting solvents (ODS) have given the precision cleaning industry a challenge that they must respond to if they are to continuously and economically improve quality of service. The phase out of the ozone depleting solvents has forced industry to look to solvents such as alcohol, terpenes and other flammable solvents to perform the critical cleaning processes. These solvents are not as efficient as their ODS counterparts in terms of soil loading, cleaning time and drying when used in standard cleaning processes such as manual sprays or ultrasonic baths. They also require special equipment designs to meet part cleaning specifications and operator safety requirements. This paper describes a cleaning system that incorporates the automated spraying of flammable solvents to effectively perform precision cleaning processes. The prototype workcell under development uses a robot that sprays Isopropyl Alcohol (IPA) and terpene at pressures ranging to 600 psi in a glovebox environment. Key to the projects success was the development of software that controls the robotic system and automatically generates robotic cleaning paths from three dimensional CAD models of the items to be cleaned. Also key to the success of this prototype development is FM approval of the process and associated hardware which translates directly into operator and facilities safety.

  8. Anti-icing Behavior of Thermally Sprayed Polymer Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koivuluoto, Heli; Stenroos, Christian; Kylmälahti, Mikko; Apostol, Marian; Kiilakoski, Jarkko; Vuoristo, Petri

    2017-01-01

    Surface engineering shows an increasing potential to provide a sustainable approach to icing problems. Currently, several passive anti-ice properties adoptable to coatings are known, but further research is required to proceed for practical applications. This is due to the fact that icing reduces safety, operational tempo, productivity and reliability of logistics, industry and infrastructure. An icing wind tunnel and a centrifugal ice adhesion test equipment can be used to evaluate and develop anti-icing and icephobic coatings for a potential use in various arctic environments, e.g., in wind power generation, oil drilling, mining and logistic industries. The present study deals with evaluation of icing properties of flame-sprayed polyethylene (PE)-based polymer coatings. In the laboratory-scale icing tests, thermally sprayed polymer coatings showed low ice adhesion compared with metals such as aluminum and stainless steel. The ice adhesion strength of the flame-sprayed PE coating was found to have approximately seven times lower ice adhesion values compared with metallic aluminum, indicating a very promising anti-icing behavior.

  9. Assessment of Some Atomization Models Used in Spray Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, M. S.; Bulzin, Dan

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents the results from a validation study undertaken as a part of the NASA s fundamental aeronautics initiative on high altitude emissions in order to assess the accuracy of several atomization models used in both non-superheat and superheat spray calculations. As a part of this investigation we have undertaken the validation based on four different cases to investigate the spray characteristics of (1) a flashing jet generated by the sudden release of pressurized R134A from cylindrical nozzle, (2) a liquid jet atomizing in a subsonic cross flow, (3) a Parker-Hannifin pressure swirl atomizer, and (4) a single-element Lean Direct Injector (LDI) combustor experiment. These cases were chosen because of their importance in some aerospace applications. The validation is based on some 3D and axisymmetric calculations involving both reacting and non-reacting sprays. In general, the predicted results provide reasonable agreement for both mean droplet sizes (D32) and average droplet velocities but mostly underestimate the droplets sizes in the inner radial region of a cylindrical jet.

  10. Optimization of Plasma Spray Process Using Statistical Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, F.; Huang, X.; Liu, R.; Yang, Q.

    2012-01-01

    The microstructure features of coatings produced by a plasma spray process are affected significantly by the process parameters such as powder size, spray gun nozzle size, total plasma gas flow, ratio of H2 + N2 over total gas flow, and so on. This article presents a study of the effects of these parameters on the microstructure (porosity, formation of crack, unmelted particle and oxide phase) of NiCrAlY coatings deposited by the Mettech Axial III™ System. A Taguchi array is used to design the spraying process parameters. The results of the microstructure evaluation are used to generate regression equations for the prediction of coating microstructure based on process parameters. The results predicted from the regression equations are in good agreement with the experimental results according to a confidence level of 0.95. Among the parameters examined, the powder size and the ratio of H2 + N2 over total gas flow rate are the most significant parameters affecting the occurrence of crack, porosity, unmelted particle and oxide. Within the range of the designed process parameters, lower powder size and higher ratio of H2 + N2 over total gas flow rate lead to less cracks, pores, unmelted particles but more oxides. Nozzle size has marginal influence on oxides which increase with nozzle size. Gas flow rate has no direct influence on any coating feature evaluated with the range of variation.

  11. Alkaline tolerant dextranase from streptomyces anulatus

    DOEpatents

    Decker, Stephen R.; Adney, William S.; Vinzant, Todd B.; Himmel, Michael E.

    2003-01-01

    A process for production of an alkaline tolerant dextranase enzyme comprises culturing a dextran-producing microorganism Streptomyces anulatus having accession no. ATCC PTA-3866 to produce an alkaline tolerant dextranase, Dex 1 wherein the protein in said enzyme is characterized by a MW of 63.3 kDa and Dex 2 wherein its protein is characterized by a MW of 81.8 kDa.

  12. Technetium recovery from high alkaline solution

    DOEpatents

    Nash, Charles A.

    2016-07-12

    Disclosed are methods for recovering technetium from a highly alkaline solution. The highly alkaline solution can be a liquid waste solution from a nuclear waste processing system. Methods can include combining the solution with a reductant capable of reducing technetium at the high pH of the solution and adding to or forming in the solution an adsorbent capable of adsorbing the precipitated technetium at the high pH of the solution.

  13. Toxicity of alkalinity to Hyalella azteca

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lasier, P.J.; Winger, P.V.; Reinert, R.E.

    1997-01-01

    Toxicity testing and chemical analyses of sediment pore water have been suggested for use in sediment quality assessments and sediment toxicity identification evaluations. However, caution should be exercised in interpreting pore-water chemistry and toxicity due to inherent chemical characteristics and confounding relationships. High concentrations of alkalinity, which are typical of sediment pore waters from many regions, have been shown to be toxic to test animals. A series of tests were conducted to assess the significance of elevated alkalinity concentrations to Hyalella azteca, an amphipod commonly used for sediment and pore-water toxicity testing. Toxicity tests with 14-d old and 7-d old animals were conducted in serial dilutions of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) solutions producing alkalinities ranging between 250 to 2000 mg/L as CaCO3. A sodium chloride (NaCl) toxicity test was also conducted to verify that toxicity was due to bicarbonate and not sodium. Alkalinity was toxic at concentrations frequently encountered in sediment pore water. There was also a significant difference in the toxicity of alkalinity between 14-d old and 7-d old animals. The average 96-h LC50 for alkalinity was 1212 mg/L (as CaCO3) for 14-d old animals and 662 mg/L for the younger animals. Sodium was not toxic at levels present in the NaHCO3 toxicity tests. Alkalinity should be routinely measured in pore-water toxicity tests, and interpretation of toxicity should consider alkalinity concentration and test-organism tolerance.

  14. Alkaline Water and Longevity: A Murine Study

    PubMed Central

    Magro, Massimiliano; Corain, Livio; Ferro, Silvia; Baratella, Davide; Bonaiuto, Emanuela; Terzo, Milo; Corraducci, Vittorino; Salmaso, Luigi; Vianello, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The biological effect of alkaline water consumption is object of controversy. The present paper presents a 3-year survival study on a population of 150 mice, and the data were analyzed with accelerated failure time (AFT) model. Starting from the second year of life, nonparametric survival plots suggest that mice watered with alkaline water showed a better survival than control mice. Interestingly, statistical analysis revealed that alkaline water provides higher longevity in terms of “deceleration aging factor” as it increases the survival functions when compared with control group; namely, animals belonging to the population treated with alkaline water resulted in a longer lifespan. Histological examination of mice kidneys, intestine, heart, liver, and brain revealed that no significant differences emerged among the three groups indicating that no specific pathology resulted correlated with the consumption of alkaline water. These results provide an informative and quantitative summary of survival data as a function of watering with alkaline water of long-lived mouse models. PMID:27340414

  15. Performed surfactant-optimized aqueous alkaline flood

    SciTech Connect

    Thigpen, D.R.; Lawson, J.B.; Nelson, R.C.

    1991-11-26

    This paper describes improvement in a process for recovering oil from an acidic oil reservoir by injecting an aqueous alkaline solution comprising water, sodium chloride, and alkaline material for reacting with the reservoir oil forming a petroleum acid soap to form an in-situ surfactant system. The improvement comprises: selecting a preformed cosurfactant which is soluble in both the aqueous solution and the reservoir oil and has a solubility ratio which is grater than the solubility ratio of the petroleum acid soap where the solubility ratio is the ratio of solubility in the aqueous alkaline solution to the solubility in the reservoir oil; combining with the alkaline solution an amount of the preformed cosurfactant which will result in the in-situ surfacant system having a salinity about equal to a salinity which results in minimal interfacial tension between the oil in the reservoir and the in-situ surfactant system at reservoir temperature, wherein the amount of the preformed cosurfactant is about 0.3 percent by weight in the aqueous alkaline solution; and injecting the cosurfactant-aqueous alkaline solution mixture into the reservoir to displace oil toward a fluid production location.

  16. Passive Wireless Hermetic Environment Monitoring System for Spray Painting Workshop.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifeng; Ma, Jingjing; Huang, Yan; Tang, Dan; Huang, Qing-An

    2016-08-01

    Passive wireless sensors have the advantages of operating without a power supply and remote sensing capability. Hence, they are very suitable for some harsh environments, such as hermetic environments, rotating parts, or very high temperature environments. The spray painting workshop is such a harsh environment, containing a large amount of flammable paint mist and organic gas. Aiming at this special environment of spray painting workshop, a passive wireless hermetic environment monitoring system was designed, fabricated, and demonstrated. The proposed system is composed of a transponder and a reader, and the circuit design of each part is given in detail in this paper. The power and the data transmission between the transponder and the reader are realized by the inductive coupling mechanism. Utilizing the back scatter modulation and channel multiplexing, the frequency signals generated by three different environmental sensors-together with their interfaces in the transponder-are wirelessly read out by the reader. Because of the harsh environment of the spray painting room, the package of the monitoring system is quite important. Three different kinds of filter films for the system package were compared. The experimental results show that the composite filter film aluminum anodic oxide/polytetrafluoroethylene (AAO/PTFE) has the best performance. After fabrication, the measured temperature, humidity, and pressure sensitivities were measured and found to be 180 Hz/°C in the range of 0~60 °C, 100 Hz/%RH in the range of 15~95 %RH, and 42 Hz/hPa in the range of 600~1100 hPa, respectively. Additionally, the remote sensing distance of the monitoring system reaches 4 cm. Finally, the passive wireless hermetic environment monitoring system was installed on the glass wall of the spray painting workshop and was successfully demonstrated.

  17. Passive Wireless Hermetic Environment Monitoring System for Spray Painting Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lifeng; Ma, Jingjing; Huang, Yan; Tang, Dan; Huang, Qing-An

    2016-01-01

    Passive wireless sensors have the advantages of operating without a power supply and remote sensing capability. Hence, they are very suitable for some harsh environments, such as hermetic environments, rotating parts, or very high temperature environments. The spray painting workshop is such a harsh environment, containing a large amount of flammable paint mist and organic gas. Aiming at this special environment of spray painting workshop, a passive wireless hermetic environment monitoring system was designed, fabricated, and demonstrated. The proposed system is composed of a transponder and a reader, and the circuit design of each part is given in detail in this paper. The power and the data transmission between the transponder and the reader are realized by the inductive coupling mechanism. Utilizing the back scatter modulation and channel multiplexing, the frequency signals generated by three different environmental sensors—together with their interfaces in the transponder—are wirelessly read out by the reader. Because of the harsh environment of the spray painting room, the package of the monitoring system is quite important. Three different kinds of filter films for the system package were compared. The experimental results show that the composite filter film aluminum anodic oxide/polytetrafluoroethylene (AAO/PTFE) has the best performance. After fabrication, the measured temperature, humidity, and pressure sensitivities were measured and found to be 180 Hz/°C in the range of 0~60 °C, 100 Hz/%RH in the range of 15~95 %RH, and 42 Hz/hPa in the range of 600~1100 hPa, respectively. Additionally, the remote sensing distance of the monitoring system reaches 4 cm. Finally, the passive wireless hermetic environment monitoring system was installed on the glass wall of the spray painting workshop and was successfully demonstrated. PMID:27490546

  18. LSPRAY-IV: A Lagrangian Spray Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, M. S.

    2012-01-01

    LSPRAY-IV is a Lagrangian spray solver developed for application with parallel computing and unstructured grids. It is designed to be massively parallel and could easily be coupled with any existing gas-phase flow and/or Monte Carlo Probability Density Function (PDF) solvers. The solver accommodates the use of an unstructured mesh with mixed elements of either triangular, quadrilateral, and/or tetrahedral type for the gas flow grid representation. It is mainly designed to predict the flow, thermal and transport properties of a rapidly vaporizing spray. Some important research areas covered as a part of the code development are: (1) the extension of combined CFD/scalar-Monte- Carlo-PDF method to spray modeling, (2) the multi-component liquid spray modeling, and (3) the assessment of various atomization models used in spray calculations. The current version contains the extension to the modeling of superheated sprays. The manual provides the user with an understanding of various models involved in the spray formulation, its code structure and solution algorithm, and various other issues related to parallelization and its coupling with other solvers.

  19. 40 CFR 61.146 - Standard for spraying.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... spray applied shall comply with the following requirements: (a) For spray-on application on buildings... Microscopy, except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section. (b) For spray-on application of materials... requirements of this paragraph. (2) Discharge no visible emissions to the outside air from spray-on...

  20. DRIFTSIM, A Computer Program for Estimating Spray Drift Distances

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the severe problems with spraying pesticides is the spray drift. Drift is a problem if chemicals are sprayed too close to residential areas, livestock facilities, bodies of water, or sensitive crops. Complaints regarding spray drift are routinely brought to state departments of agriculture,...

  1. The impact of sedimentary alkalinity release on the water column CO2 system in the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, H.; Braeckman, U.; Le Guitton, M.; Meysman, F. J. R.

    2016-02-01

    It has been previously proposed that alkalinity release from sediments can play an important role in the carbonate dynamics on continental shelves, lowering the pCO2 of seawater and hence increasing the CO2 uptake from the atmosphere. To test this hypothesis, sedimentary alkalinity generation was quantified within cohesive and permeable sediments across the North Sea during two cruises in September 2011 (basin-wide) and June 2012 (Dutch coastal zone). Benthic fluxes of oxygen (O2), alkalinity (AT) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were determined using shipboard closed sediment incubations. Our results show that sediments can form an important source of alkalinity for the overlying water, particularly in the shallow southern North Sea, where high AT and DIC fluxes were recorded in near-shore sediments of the Belgian, Dutch and German coastal zone. In contrast, fluxes of AT and DIC are substantially lower in the deeper, seasonally stratified, northern part of the North Sea. Based on the data collected, we performed a model analysis to constrain the main pathways of alkalinity generation in the sediment, and to quantify how sedimentary alkalinity drives atmospheric CO2 uptake in the southern North Sea. Overall, our results show that sedimentary alkalinity generation should be regarded as a key component in the CO2 dynamics of shallow coastal systems.

  2. Coupling alkaline pre-extraction with alkaline-oxidative post-treatment of corn stover to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentability

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A two-stage chemical pretreatment of corn stover is investigated comprising an NaOH pre-extraction followed by an alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP) post-treatment. We propose that conventional one-stage AHP pretreatment can be improved using alkaline pre-extraction, which requires significantly less H2O2 and NaOH. To better understand the potential of this approach, this study investigates several components of this process including alkaline pre-extraction, alkaline and alkaline-oxidative post-treatment, fermentation, and the composition of alkali extracts. Results Mild NaOH pre-extraction of corn stover uses less than 0.1 g NaOH per g corn stover at 80°C. The resulting substrates were highly digestible by cellulolytic enzymes at relatively low enzyme loadings and had a strong susceptibility to drying-induced hydrolysis yield losses. Alkaline pre-extraction was highly selective for lignin removal over xylan removal; xylan removal was relatively minimal (~20%). During alkaline pre-extraction, up to 0.10 g of alkali was consumed per g of corn stover. AHP post-treatment at low oxidant loading (25 mg H2O2 per g pre-extracted biomass) increased glucose hydrolysis yields by 5%, which approached near-theoretical yields. ELISA screening of alkali pre-extraction liquors and the AHP post-treatment liquors demonstrated that xyloglucan and β-glucans likely remained tightly bound in the biomass whereas the majority of the soluble polymeric xylans were glucurono (arabino) xylans and potentially homoxylans. Pectic polysaccharides were depleted in the AHP post-treatment liquor relative to the alkaline pre-extraction liquor. Because the already-low inhibitor content was further decreased in the alkaline pre-extraction, the hydrolysates generated by this two-stage pretreatment were highly fermentable by Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that were metabolically engineered and evolved for xylose fermentation. Conclusions This work demonstrates that this two

  3. [Alkaline phosphatase in Amoeba proteus].

    PubMed

    Sopina, V A

    2005-01-01

    In free-living Amoeba proteus (strain B), 3 phosphatase were found after disc-electrophoresis of 10 microg of protein in PAGE and using 1-naphthyl phosphate as a substrate a pH 9.0. These phosphatases differed in their electrophoretic mobilities - "slow" (1-3 bands), "middle" (one band) and "fast" (one band). In addition to 1-naphthyl phosphate, "slow" phosphatases were able to hydrolyse 2-naphthyl phosphate and p-nitrophenyl phosphate. They were slightly activated by Mg2+, completely inhibited by 3 chelators (EDTA, EGTA and 1,10-phenanthroline), L-cysteine, sodium dodecyl sulfate and Fe2+, Zn2+ and Mn2+ (50 mM), considerably inactivated by orthovanadate, molybdate, phosphatase inhibitor cocktail 1, p-nitrophenyl phosphate, Na2HPO4, DL-dithiothreitol and urea and partly inhibited by H2O2, DL-phenylalanine, 2-mercaptoethanol, phosphatase inhibitor cocktail 2 and Ca2+. Imidazole, L-(+)-tartrate, okadaic acid, NaF and sulfhydryl reagents -p-(hydroxy-mercuri)benzoate and N-ethylmaleimide - had no influence on the activity of "slow" phosphatases. "Middle" and "fast" phosphatases, in contrast to "slow" ones, were not inactivated by 3 chelators. The "middle" phosphatase differed from the "fast" one by smaller resistance to urea, Ca2+, Mn2+, phosphates and H2O2 and greater resistance to dithiothreitol and L-(+)-tartrate. In addition, the "fast" phosphatase was inhibited by L-cysteine but the "middle" one was activated by it. Of 5 tested ions (Mg2+, Cu2+, Mn2+, Ca2+ and Zn2+), only Zn2+ reactivated "slow" phosphatases after their inactivation by EDTA treatment. The reactivation of apoenzyme was only partial (about 35 %). Thus, among phosphatases found in amoebae at pH 9.0, only "slow" ones are Zn-metalloenzymes and may be considered as alkaline phosphatases (EC 3.1.3.1). It still remains uncertain, to which particular phosphatase class "middle" and "fast" phosphatases (pH 9.0) may belong.

  4. Ethylene-air detonation in water spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarsalé, G.; Virot, F.; Chinnayya, A.

    2016-09-01

    Detonation experiments are conducted in a 52 {mm} square channel with an ethylene-air gaseous mixture with dispersed liquid water droplets. The tests were conducted with a fuel-air equivalence ratio ranging from 0.9 to 1.1 at atmospheric pressure. An ultrasonic atomizer generates a polydisperse liquid water spray with droplet diameters of 8.5-12 μm, yielding an effective density of 100-120 g/m3. Pressure signals from seven transducers and cellular structure are recorded for each test. The detonation structure in the two-phase mixture exhibits a gaseous-like behaviour. The pressure profile in the expansion fan is not affected by the addition of water. A small detonation velocity deficit of up to 5 % was measured. However, the investigation highlights a dramatic increase in the cell size (λ ) associated with the increase in the liquid water mass fraction in the two-phase mixture. The detonation structure evolves from a multi-cell to a half-cell mode. The analysis of the decay of the post-shock pressure fluctuations reveals that the ratio of the hydrodynamic thickness over the cell size (x_{{HT}}/{λ }) remains quite constant, between 5 and 7. A slight decrease of this ratio is observed as the liquid water mass fraction is increased, or the ethylene-air mixture is made leaner.

  5. 3D Spray Droplet Distributions in Sneezes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Techet, Alexandra; Scharfman, Barry; Bourouiba, Lydia

    2015-11-01

    3D spray droplet clouds generated during human sneezing are investigated using the Synthetic Aperture Feature Extraction (SAFE) method, which relies on light field imaging (LFI) and synthetic aperture (SA) refocusing computational photographic techniques. An array of nine high-speed cameras are used to image sneeze droplets and tracked the droplets in 3D space and time (3D + T). An additional high-speed camera is utilized to track the motion of the head during sneezing. In the SAFE method, the raw images recorded by each camera in the array are preprocessed and binarized, simplifying post processing after image refocusing and enabling the extraction of feature sizes and positions in 3D + T. These binary images are refocused using either additive or multiplicative methods, combined with thresholding. Sneeze droplet centroids, radii, distributions and trajectories are determined and compared with existing data. The reconstructed 3D droplet centroids and radii enable a more complete understanding of the physical extent and fluid dynamics of sneeze ejecta. These measurements are important for understanding the infectious disease transmission potential of sneezes in various indoor environments.

  6. Spray-formed tooling and aluminum strip

    SciTech Connect

    McHugh, K.M.

    1995-11-01

    Spray forming is an advanced materials processing technology that converts a bulk liquid metal to a near-net-shape solid by depositing atomized droplets onto a suitably shaped substrate. By combining rapid solidification processing with product shape control, spray forming can reduce manufacturing costs while improving product quality. De Laval nozzles offer an alternative method to the more conventional spray nozzle designs. Two applications are described: high-volume production of aluminum alloy strip, and the production of specialized tooling, such as injection molds and dies, for rapid prototyping.

  7. Diazinon residues in insects from sprayed tobacco

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stromborg, K.L.; Beyer, W.N.; Kolbe, E.

    1982-01-01

    Pooled samples of tobacco hornworms collected from a field sprayed with 0.84 kg/ha of diazinon were analyzed for residues at various intervals after application. No residues of the toxic metabolite diazoxon were detected (sensitivity 0.5 ppm) in any sample. Only one sample exceeded 1.0 ppm of the parent compound and was collected 4 hours after spraying. Residues declined over time (P<0.01) and none were detected (sensitivity 0.1 ppm) 18 days after spraying. the potential hazard to birds eating these insects appeared to be minimal.

  8. Laser Sheet Dropsizing of dense sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gal, P.; Farrugia, N.; Greenhalgh, D. A.

    1999-02-01

    A new technique has been developed that produces instantaneous or time-averaged two-dimensional images of Sauter Mean Diameter from a spray. Laser Sheet Dropsizing (LSD) combines elastic and inelastic light scattered from a laser sheet. Compared with Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA), the new technique offers advantages in increased spatial and temporal resolution and more rapid spray characterisation. Moreover, the technique can also be applied to dense sprays. Successful implementation requires careful calibration, particularly of the effect of dye concentration on the dropsize dependence of the inelastic scattered light.

  9. Organophosphate residues in grasshoppers from sprayed rangelands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stromborg, K.L.; McEwen, L.C.; Lamont, Thair

    1984-01-01

    Grasshoppers (Orthoptera) were collected in pastures that had been sprayed with malathion and acephate to estimate the secondary exposure of insectivorous birds to these pesticides. Residues of malathion were below 3 ppm at 30 'and 54 hours after spraying and no malaoxon was detected. In contrast, acephate was found at 8 and 9 ppm 4 hours after spray; 3-5 ppm of the toxic metabolite methamidophos were also detected at that time. By 53 hours postspray, acephate levels declined to 2 ppm and methamidophos to less than 1 ppm. These results suggest that although malathion may not be a hazard to insectivorous species. acephate may be hazardous through metabolic transformation to methamidophos.

  10. Characterization of Schistosome Tegumental Alkaline Phosphatase (SmAP)

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Rita; Skelly, Patrick J.

    2011-01-01

    Schistosomes are parasitic platyhelminths that currently infect over 200 million people globally. The parasites can live for years in a putatively hostile environment - the blood of vertebrates. We have hypothesized that the unusual schistosome tegument (outer-covering) plays a role in protecting parasites in the blood; by impeding host immunological signaling pathways we suggest that tegumental molecules help create an immunologically privileged environment for schistosomes. In this work, we clone and characterize a schistosome alkaline phosphatase (SmAP), a predicted ∼60 kDa glycoprotein that has high sequence conservation with members of the alkaline phosphatase protein family. The SmAP gene is most highly expressed in intravascular parasite life stages. Using immunofluorescence and immuno-electron microscopy, we confirm that SmAP is expressed at the host/parasite interface and in internal tissues. The ability of living parasites to cleave exogenous adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and generate adenosine is very largely abolished when SmAP gene expression is suppressed following RNAi treatment targeting the gene. These results lend support to the hypothesis that schistosome surface enzymes such as SmAP could dampen host immune responses against the parasites by generating immunosuppressants such as adenosine to promote their survival. This notion does not rule out other potential functions for the adenosine generated e.g. in parasite nutrition. PMID:21483710

  11. Large-scale sodium spray fire code validation (SOFICOV) test

    SciTech Connect

    Jeppson, D.W.; Muhlestein, L.D.

    1985-01-01

    A large-scale, sodium, spray fire code validation test was performed in the HEDL 850-m/sup 3/ Containment System Test Facility (CSTF) as part of the Sodium Spray Fire Code Validation (SOFICOV) program. Six hundred fifty eight kilograms of sodium spray was sprayed in an air atmosphere for a period of 2400 s. The sodium spray droplet sizes and spray pattern distribution were estimated. The containment atmosphere temperature and pressure response, containment wall temperature response and sodium reaction rate with oxygen were measured. These results are compared to post-test predictions using SPRAY and NACOM computer codes.

  12. Solvent vapor exposures in booth spray painting and spray glueing, and associated operations.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, L W; Ball, G L; Fine, L J; Langolf, G D

    1984-11-01

    Time-weighted average exposures for all solvents present at detectable levels were obtained for eighty-nine solvent-using workers and thirty-six control-group (unexposed) workers in seven plants of three companies applying paints and glues, primarily by spraying. Over twenty solvents were quantified if detected. Concentrations of specific solvents and cumulative fractions of TLVs were measured for various job types. All spray painting and most spray glueing was conducted in operating spray booths. Only low to moderate exposures were observed, with one TWA exceeding the cumulative TLV and three additional TWAs exceeding 50 percent of the cumulative TLV. It may be concluded that solvent TWA exposures in spraying of paints and glues are often well-controlled by common spray booths, and further, that other solvent-use operations including light-duty solvent wiping and manual paint mixing do not frequently produce high exposures (relative to TLV levels) in the presence of ordinary general room ventilation.

  13. Representation of the vaporization behavior of turbulent polydisperse sprays by 'equivalent' monodisperse sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, S. K.; Shuen, J. S.

    1987-01-01

    The concept of using an equivalent monodisperse spray to represent the vaporization behavior of polydisperse sprays has been examined by numerically solving two turbulent vaporizing sprays. One involves the injection of Freon-11 in a still environment, whereas the other is a methanol spray in a still but hot environment. The use of three different mean sizes, namely, Sauter mean diameter, volume median diameter, and surface-area mean diameter, has been investigated. Results indicate a good degree of correlation between the polydisperse spray and its equivalent monodisperse sprays represented by the volume median diameter and the Sauter mean diameter, the former giving slightly better results. The surface-area mean diameter does not provide as good a correlation as the other two mean diameters.

  14. Representation of the vaporization behavior of turbulent polydisperse sprays by equivalent monodisperse sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, S. K.; Shuen, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    The concept of using an equivalent monodisperse spray to represent the vaporization behavior of polydisperse sprays has been examined by numerically solving two turbulent vaporizing sprays. One involves the injection of Freon-11 in a still environment, whereas the other is a methanol spray in a still but hot environment. The use of three different mean sizes, namely, Sauter mean diameter, volume median diameter, and surface-area mean diameter, has been investigated. Results indicate a good degree of correlation between the polydisperse spray and its equivalent monodisperse sprays represented by the volume median diameter and the Sauter mean diameter, the former giving slightly better results. The surface-area mean diameter does not provide as good a correlation as the other two mean diameters.

  15. Influence of aircraft vortices on spray cloud behavior.

    PubMed

    Mickle, R E

    1996-06-01

    For small droplet spraying, the spray cloud is initially entrained into the wingtip vortices so that the ultimate fate of the spray is controlled by the motion of these vortices. In close to 100 aerial sprays, the emitted spray cloud has been mapped using a scanning laser system that displays diffusion and transport of the spray cloud. Results detailing the concentrations within the spray cloud in space and time are given for sprays in parallel and crosswinds. Wind direction is seen to potentially alter the vortex motion and hence the fate of the spray cloud. In crosswind spraying, the vortex behavior associated with the 2 wings is found to differ, which leads to enhanced deposition from the upwind wing and enhanced drift from the downwind wing.

  16. Spray characterization of thermal fogging equipment typically used in vector control.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, W C; Walker, T W; Fritz, B K; Gwinn, T; Smith, V L; Szumlas, D; Quinn, B; Lan, Y; Huang, Y; Sykes, D

    2008-12-01

    Droplet size spectra from different sprayers used to generate insecticide-laden fogs for controlling flying insects were measured by a laser diffraction instrument and Teflon-coated slides. The objectives of this work were to present not only information on spray-system droplet size generated by different sprayers, but to compare methodologies by which other similar systems can be evaluated and give applicators sprayer-system performance data. Data from 45 replicated spray tests, comprising 11 sprayers and 5 pesticides, showed a wide range in the droplet size spectra produced. The volume median diameter measurements ranged from 2.6 to 75.5 microm for diesel-diluted sprays and from 27.9 to 59.9 microm for water-diluted sprays. Similarly, the percent volume <20 microm ranged between 12.0-100% and 8.5-30.7%, for diesel- and water-diluted sprays, respectively. The droplet sizes measured by the swinging slide and laser diffraction methods were not consistent. The information presented aids users in sprayer selection and operation to produce the specific droplet size spectra required for a particular application.

  17. A New Quantitative 3D Imaging Method for Characterizing Spray in the Near-field of Nozzle Exits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-13

    flow system on spray distribution 2. To measure and validate mass distribution of spray ( iodinated contrast) generated by a scaled nozzle...and the present values for the two atomizers. Using the dimensional geometrical parameters, liq- uid properties of the iodine -based solution, and the...commonly used to improve the image quality and dynamic range of X-ray based measurements. In medical diagnostics, iodine is typically used as a

  18. Evaluation of Convergent Spray Technology(TM) Spray Process for Roof Coating Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarpa, J.; Creighton, B.; Hall, T.; Hamlin, K.; Howard, T.

    1998-01-01

    The overall goal of this project was to demonstrate the feasibility of(CST) Convergent Spray Technology (Trademark) for the roofing industry. This was accomplished by producing an environmentally compliant coating utilization recycled materials, a CST(Trademark) spray process portable application cart, and hand-held applicator with a CST(Trademark) spray process nozzle. The project culminated with application of this coating to a nine hundred sixty square foot metal for NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama.

  19. Low-heat, mild alkaline pretreatment of switchgrass for anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Jin, Guang; Bierma, Tom; Walker, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of alkaline pretreatment under mild heat conditions (100°C or 212°F) on the anaerobic co-digestion of switchgrass. The effects of alkaline concentration, types of alkaline, heating time and rinsing were evaluated. In addition to batch studies, continuous-feed studies were performed in triplicate to identify potential digester operational problems caused by switchgrass co-digestion while accounting for uncertainty due to digester variability. Few studies have examined anaerobic digestion of switchgrass or the effects of mild heating to enhance alkaline pretreatment prior to biomass digestion. Results indicate that pretreatment can significantly enhance digestion of coarse-ground (≤ 0.78 cm particle size) switchgrass. Energy conversion efficiency as high as 63% was observed, and was comparable or superior to fine-grinding as a pretreatment method. The optimal NaOH concentration was found to be 5.5% (wt/wt alkaline/biomass) with a 91.7% moisture level. No evidence of operational problems such as solids build-up, poor mixing, or floating materials were observed. These results suggest the use of waste heat from a generator could reduce the concentration of alkaline required to adequately pretreat lignocellulosic feedstock prior to anaerobic digestion.

  20. Re-epithelialization of the Buccal Mucosa after Alkaline Chemical Injury.

    PubMed

    Takaichi, Saneyuki; Muramatsu, Takashi; Lee, Jong-Min; Jung, Han-Sung; Shinozaki, Naoshi; Katakura, Akira; Yamane, Gen-Yuki

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline conditions in the oral cavity may be caused by a variety of stimuli, including tobacco products, antacids, alkaline drinking water and bicarbonate toothpaste. However, the effects of an alkaline pH on the oral mucosa had not been elucidated. The purpose of this study was to investigate how basal keratinocytes are actively involved in re-epithelialization after alkaline chemical injury. We generated epithelial defects in the oral mucosa of mice by applying an alkaline chemical, and the localization of cytokeratin 13, cytokeratin 14, PCNA and p63 was investigated during the re-epithelialization process. PCNA- and p63-positive staining was seen in basal cells covering the wound surface at 1 day after the chemical injury. Cytokeratin 14-positive and PCNA-negative basal keratinocytes were localized in a few layers of the wound epithelium during epithelial outgrowth. Cytokeratin 14-positive and PCNA-positive basal keratinocytes, indicating proliferation, were localized over the entire layer of the epithelium at the wound margin. These results imply that basal keratinocytes at the wound margin migrate to the wound surface, provoke differentiation and keratinization during epithelial outgrowth and that epithelial cells are supplied from the wound margin to the epithelial outgrowth after alkaline chemical injury.

  1. The National Shipbuilding Research Program. Thermal Spray Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-04-01

    CATAPULT STEAM PACKING CuNi STEAM BOND PP EUTECTIC 21021 FINAL PP METCO 130 BABBITT BEARING TURBINE GENERATOR INSIDE DIAMETER BABBITT OIL FINAL AW...COATING SYSTEM PP-25 444 445 21021 21031 PP-25/130 444/130 445/130 47/130 21021 /130 21031/130 PP-25/143 444/143 445/143 447/143 21021 /143 21031/143 1-8...Machinery Applications” Encl: (1) Puget Sound Naval Shipyard Thermal Spray Procedure Specification No. 4329 Eutectic 21021 /Metco 143 on 410 Stainless

  2. Ballistic Imaging of Liquid Breakup Processes in Dense Sprays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-24

    spray breakup in its entirety. Gas-phase flowfield dynamics can be captured via particle image velocimetry (PIV) and/or laser Doppler velocimetry... Coherent Legend Ti:Sapphire regenerative amplifier, seeded with a Spectra-Physics Tsunami Ti:Sapphire mode-locked laser generating 40 fs, 2.5 mJ pulses...scattering turbid media. Laser Phys. Lett., 3(9):464–7, 2006. [44] B. Kaldvee, A. Ehn, J. Bood, and M. Aldén. Development of a picosecond- LIDAR system

  3. Direct morphological comparison of vacuum plasma sprayed and detonation gun sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings for orthopaedic applications.

    PubMed

    Gledhill, H C; Turner, I G; Doyle, C

    1999-02-01

    Hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium substrates were produced using two thermal spray techniques vacuum plasma spraying and detonation gun spraying. X-ray diffraction was used to compare crystallinity and residual stresses in the coatings. Porosity was measured using optical microscopy in conjunction with an image analysis system. Scanning electron microscopy and surface roughness measurements were used to characterise the surface morphologies of the coatings. The vacuum plasma sprayed coatings were found to have a lower residual stress, a higher crystallinity and a higher level of porosity than the detonation gun coatings. It is concluded that consideration needs to be given to the significance of such variations within the clinical context.

  4. A Design of Experiment approach to predict product and process parameters for a spray dried influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kanojia, Gaurav; Willems, Geert-Jan; Frijlink, Henderik W; Kersten, Gideon F A; Soema, Peter C; Amorij, Jean-Pierre

    2016-09-25

    Spray dried vaccine formulations might be an alternative to traditional lyophilized vaccines. Compared to lyophilization, spray drying is a fast and cheap process extensively used for drying biologicals. The current study provides an approach that utilizes Design of Experiments for spray drying process to stabilize whole inactivated influenza virus (WIV) vaccine. The approach included systematically screening and optimizing the spray drying process variables, determining the desired process parameters and predicting product quality parameters. The process parameters inlet air temperature, nozzle gas flow rate and feed flow rate and their effect on WIV vaccine powder characteristics such as particle size, residual moisture content (RMC) and powder yield were investigated. Vaccine powders with a broad range of physical characteristics (RMC 1.2-4.9%, particle size 2.4-8.5μm and powder yield 42-82%) were obtained. WIV showed no significant loss in antigenicity as revealed by hemagglutination test. Furthermore, descriptive models generated by DoE software could be used to determine and select (set) spray drying process parameter. This was used to generate a dried WIV powder with predefined (predicted) characteristics. Moreover, the spray dried vaccine powders retained their antigenic stability even after storage for 3 months at 60°C. The approach used here enabled the generation of a thermostable, antigenic WIV vaccine powder with desired physical characteristics that could be potentially used for pulmonary administration.

  5. LSPRAY-III: A Lagrangian Spray Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, M. S.

    2008-01-01

    LSPRAY-III is a Lagrangian spray solver developed for application with parallel computing and unstructured grids. It is designed to be massively parallel and could easily be coupled with any existing gas-phase flow and/or Monte Carlo Probability Density Function (PDF) solvers. The solver accommodates the use of an unstructured mesh with mixed elements of either triangular, quadrilateral, and/or tetrahedral type for the gas flow grid representation. It is mainly designed to predict the flow, thermal and transport properties of a rapidly vaporizing spray because of its importance in aerospace application. The manual provides the user with an understanding of various models involved in the spray formulation, its code structure and solution algorithm, and various other issues related to parallelization and its coupling with other solvers. With the development of LSPRAY-III, we have advanced the state-of-the-art in spray computations in several important ways.

  6. LSPRAY-V: A Lagrangian Spray Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    LSPRAY-V is a Lagrangian spray solver developed for application with unstructured grids and massively parallel computers. It is mainly designed to predict the flow, thermal and transport properties of a rapidly vaporizing spray encountered over a wide range of operating conditions in modern aircraft engine development. It could easily be coupled with any existing gas-phase flow and/or Monte Carlo Probability Density Function (PDF) solvers. The manual provides the user with an understanding of various models involved in the spray formulation, its code structure and solution algorithm, and various other issues related to parallelization and its coupling with other solvers. With the development of LSPRAY-V, we have advanced the state-of-the-art in spray computations in several important ways.

  7. Plasma-Sprayed Photocatalytic Zinc Oxide Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navidpour, A. H.; Kalantari, Y.; Salehi, M.; Salimijazi, H. R.; Amirnasr, M.; Rismanchian, M.; Azarpour Siahkali, M.

    2017-03-01

    Fabrication of semiconductor coatings with photocatalytic action for photodegradation of organic pollutants is highly desirable. In this research, pure zinc oxide, which is well known for its promising photocatalytic activity, was deposited on stainless-steel plates by plasma spraying. The phase composition and microstructure of the deposited films were studied by x-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. Despite the low-energy conditions of the plasma spraying process, the zinc oxide coatings showed good mechanical integrity on the substrate. Their photocatalytic activity was evaluated using aqueous solution of methylene blue at concentration of 5 mg L-1. The results showed the potential of the plasma spraying technique to deposit zinc oxide coatings with photocatalytic action under ultraviolet illumination. Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy confirmed that the plasma spraying method could deposit zinc oxide films with higher photoabsorption ability relative to the initial powder.

  8. Spray drying formulation of amorphous solid dispersions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Abhishek; Van den Mooter, Guy

    2016-05-01

    Spray drying is a well-established manufacturing technique which can be used to formulate amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) which is an effective strategy to deliver poorly water soluble drugs (PWSDs). However, the inherently complex nature of the spray drying process coupled with specific characteristics of ASDs makes it an interesting area to explore. Numerous diverse factors interact in an inter-dependent manner to determine the final product properties. This review discusses the basic background of ASDs, various formulation and process variables influencing the critical quality attributes (CQAs) of the ASDs and aspects of downstream processing. Also various aspects of spray drying such as instrumentation, thermodynamics, drying kinetics, particle formation process and scale-up challenges are included. Recent advances in the spray-based drying techniques are mentioned along with some future avenues where major research thrust is needed.

  9. Turbulent group reaction model of spray dryer

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, H.K.; Huang, H.S.; Chiu, H.H.

    1987-01-01

    A turbulent group reaction model consisting of several sub-models was developed for the prediction of SO/sub 2/ removal efficiency in spray dryers. Mathematical models are developed on the basis of Eulerian-type turbulent Navier-Stokes equations for both gas and condensed phases with interphase transport considerations. The group reaction number, G, is defined as the ratio of the SO/sub 2/ absorption rate to a reference convective mass flux. This number represents the fraction of SO/sub 2/ absorbed into the lime slurry. The model is incorporated into a computer code which permits the investigation of spray dryer design concepts and operating conditions. Hence, it provides a theoretical basis for spray dryer performance optimization and scale-up. This investigation can be a practical guide to achieve high SO/sub 2/ removal efficiency in a spray dryer.

  10. Nasal Sprays: How to Use Them Correctly

    MedlinePlus

    ... two different kinds of containers: pressurized canisters and pump bottles.Steps for using a pressurized canisterGently blow ... after using the spray.Steps for using a pump bottleGently blow your nose to clear it of ...

  11. Dynamics of flare sprays. [in sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Martin, S. F.; Hansen, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    During solar cycle No. 20 new insight into the flare-spray phenomenon has been attained due to several innovations in solar optical-observing techniques (higher spatial resolution cinema-photography, tunable passband filters, multislit spectroscopy and extended angular field coronagraphs). From combined analysis of 13 well-observed sprays which occurred between 1969-1974 it is concluded that (1) the spray material originates from a preexisting active region filament which undergoes increased absorption some tens of minutes prior to the abrupt chromospheric brightening at the 'flare-start', and (2) the spray material is confined within a steadily expanding, loop-shaped (presumable magnetically controlled) envelope with part of the materials draining back down along one or both legs of the loop.

  12. LSPRAY-II: A Lagrangian Spray Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, M. S.

    2004-01-01

    LSPRAY-II is a Lagrangian spray solver developed for application with parallel computing and unstructured grids. It is designed to be massively parallel and could easily be coupled with any existing gas-phase flow and/or Monte Carlo Probability Density Function (PDF) solvers. The solver accommodates the use of an unstructured mesh with mixed elements of either triangular, quadrilateral, and/or tetrahedral type for the gas flow grid representation. It is mainly designed to predict the flow, thermal and transport properties of a rapidly vaporizing spray because of its importance in aerospace application. The manual provides the user with an understanding of various models involved in the spray formulation, its code structure and solution algorithm, and various other issues related to parallelization and its coupling with other solvers. With the development of LSPRAY-II, we have advanced the state-of-the-art in spray computations in several important ways.

  13. Influence of pH of spray solution on optoelectronic properties of cadmium oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodlur, R. M.; Rabinal, M. K.

    2015-03-01

    Highly conducting transparent cadmium oxide thin films were prepared by the conventional spray pyrolysis technique. The pH of the spray solution is varied by adding ammonia/hydrochloric acid. The effect of pH on the morphology, crystallinity and optoelectronic properties of these films is studied. The structural analysis showed all the films in the cubic phase. For the films with pH < 7 (acidic condition), the preferred orientation is along the (111) direction and for those with pH >7 (alkaline condition), the preferred orientation is along the (200) direction. A lowest resistivity of 9.9 × 10-4 Ω·cm (with carrier concentration = 5.1 × 1020 cm-3, mobility = 12.4 cm2/(V·s)) is observed for pH ≈ 12. The resistivity is tuned almost by three orders of magnitude by controlling the bath pH with optical transmittance more than 70%. Thus, the electrical conductivity of CdO films could be easily tuned by simply varying the pH of the spray solution without compromising the optical transparency.

  14. Automatic targeting of plasma spray gun

    DOEpatents

    Abbatiello, Leonard A.; Neal, Richard E.

    1978-01-01

    A means for monitoring the material portion in the flame of a plasma spray gun during spraying operations is provided. A collimated detector, sensitive to certain wavelengths of light emission, is used to locate the centroid of the material with each pass of the gun. The response from the detector is then relayed to the gun controller to be used to automatically realign the gun.

  15. Nanofiber spraying method using a supplementary electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, GeunHyung; Kim, WanDoo

    2006-07-01

    Using a supplementary electrode, electrospun poly(ɛ-carprolactone) fibers were deposited on various substrates with different electrical properties. The ability to coat the substrates was independent of the surface electric resistance of the substrates. This was due to the charge reduction of the sprayed fibers, which resulted from passing through the supplementary electrode. The sprayed fibers might find applications in smart textiles, advanced coating technology, and as biomedical wound dressings.

  16. Plasma spray forming metals, intermetallics, and composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampath, Sanjay; Herman, Herbert

    1993-07-01

    Plasma spray processing is a droplet deposition method that combines the steps of melting, rapid solidification, and consolidation into a single step. The versatility of the technology enables the processing of freestanding bulk, near-net shapes of a wide range of alloys, intermetallics, ceramics, and composites, while still retaining the benefits of rapid solidification processing. In particular, it is possible to produce dense forms through vacuum plasma spraying.

  17. Laser modification of thermally sprayed coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uglov, A. A.; Fomin, A. D.; Naumkin, A. O.; Pekshev, P. Iu.; Smurov, I. Iu.

    1987-08-01

    Experimental results are reported on the modification of thermally sprayed coatings on steels and aluminum alloys using pulsed YAG and CW CO2 lasers. In particular, results obtained for self-fluxing Ni9CrBSi powders, ZRO2 ceramic, and titanium are examined. It is shown that the laser treatment of thermally sprayed coatings significantly improves their physicomechanical properties; it also makes it possible to obtain refractory coatings on low-melting substrates with good coating-substrate adhesion.

  18. Dairy products and the French paradox: Could alkaline phosphatases play a role?

    PubMed

    Lallès, Jean-Paul

    2016-07-01

    The French paradox - high saturated fat consumption but low incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality - is still unresolved and continues to be a matter of debate and controversy. Recently, it was hypothesised that the high consumption of dairy products, and especially cheese by the French population might contribute to the explanation of the French paradox, in addition to the "(red) wine" hypothesis. Most notably this would involve milk bioactive peptides and biomolecules from cheese moulds. Here, we support the "dairy products" hypothesis further by proposing the "alkaline phosphatase" hypothesis. First, intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP), a potent endogenous anti-inflammatory enzyme, is directly stimulated by various components of milk (e.g. casein, calcium, lactose and even fat). This enzyme dephosphorylates and thus detoxifies pro-inflammatory microbial components like lipopolysaccharide, making them unable to trigger inflammatory responses and generate chronic low-grade inflammation leading to insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, type-2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome and obesity, known risk factors for CVD. Various vitamins present in high amounts in dairy products (e.g. vitamins A and D; methyl-donors: folate and vitamin B12), and also fermentation products such as butyrate and propionate found e.g. in cheese, all stimulate intestinal alkaline phosphatase. Second, moulded cheeses like Roquefort contain fungi producing an alkaline phosphatase. Third, milk itself contains a tissue nonspecific isoform of alkaline phosphatase that may function as IAP. Milk alkaline phosphatase is present in raw milk and dairy products increasingly consumed in France. It is deactivated by pasteurization but it can partially reactivate after thermal treatment. Experimental consolidation of the "alkaline phosphatase" hypothesis will require further work including: systematic alkaline phosphatase activity measurements in dairy products, live dairy ferments and

  19. Fatigue testing of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruse, T. A.; Nagy, A.; Popelar, C. F.

    1990-01-01

    A plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating for diesel engines were fatigue tested. Candidate thermal barrier coating materials were fatigue screened and a data base was generated for the selected candidate material. Specimen configurations are given for the bend fatigue tests, along with test setup, specimen preparation, test matrix and procedure, and data analysis.

  20. Evaluation of spray droplet spectrum of sprayers used for vector control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Droplet spectra data were collected from spray equipment intended for use in vector control by the US Department of Defense pest management programs to determine if they produce droplets in the ultra-low volume (ULV) spectrum. Droplets generated by 26 sprayers utilizing water + non-ionic surfactant...

  1. Development of a rapid screening protocol for selection of strains resistant to spray drying and storage in dry powder.

    PubMed

    Reimann, S; Grattepanche, F; Baggenstos, C; Rezzonico, E; Berger, B; Arigoni, F; Lacroix, C

    2010-06-01

    An efficient screening method for selection of Bifidobacterium longum strains resistant to spray drying and storage was developed based on randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) for identification of the best survivors in mixed strains bacterial preparations. Three different primers were used to generate RAPD profiles of 22 B. longum strains. All strains were distinguished according to their RAPD profiles except for the strain NCC2705 and its H(2)O(2) resistant derivative variant. The 22 strains were grouped in 3 batches of 7, 7 and 8 strains and subjected to spray drying and storage at 30 and 37 °C under anaerobic conditions. Batch survival rates after spray drying reached 17.1±4.4%. Strains showing the highest prevalence and/or resistance to storage at 37 °C were selected from individual batches for subsequent spray drying and storage testing. After 67 days of storage, NCC572 was identified as the dominant strain in powder. The stability of strain NCC572 was confirmed by performing single spray drying and storage tests. Out of 22 B. longum strains, a robust strain was identified by combining RAPD with a simultaneous screening test for survival under spray drying and storage. The method allowed a fast screening of B. longum strains in mixture for resistance to spray drying and storage compared to traditional screening procedures carried out with individual strains, in the same conditions. This approach could be applied to other stress conditions.

  2. Optimization of the Büchi B-90 spray drying process using central composite design for preparation of solid dispersions.

    PubMed

    Gu, Bing; Linehan, Brian; Tseng, Yin-Chao

    2015-08-01

    A central composite design approach was applied to study the effect of polymer concentration, inlet temperature and air flow rate on the spray drying process of the Büchi B-90 nano spray dryer (B-90). Hypromellose acetate succinate-LF was used for the Design of Experiment (DoE) study. Statistically significant models to predict the yield, spray rate, and drying efficiency were generated from the study. The spray drying conditions were optimized according to the models to maximize the yield and efficiency of the process. The models were further validated using a poorly water-soluble investigational compound (BI064) from Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals. The polymer/drug ratio ranged from 1/1 to 3/1w/w. The spray dried formulations were amorphous determined by differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray powder diffraction. The particle size of the spray dried formulations was 2-10 μm under polarized light microscopy. All the formulations were physically stable for at least 3h when suspended in an aqueous vehicle composed of 1% methyl cellulose. This study demonstrates that DoE is a useful tool to optimize the spray drying process, and the B-90 can be used to efficiently produce amorphous solid dispersions with a limited quantity of drug substance available during drug discovery stages.

  3. SPRAYTRAN 1.0 User’s Guide: A GIS-Based Atmospheric Spray Droplet Dispersion Modeling System

    SciTech Connect

    Allwine, K Jerry; Rutz, Frederick C.; Droppo, James G.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Bird, S. L.; Thistle, Harold W.

    2006-09-20

    SPRAY TRANsport (SPRAYTRAN) is a comprehensive dispersion modeling system that is used to simulate the offsite drift of pesticides from spray applications. SPRAYTRAN functions as a console application within Environmental System Research Institute’s ArcMap Geographic Information System (Version 9.x) and integrates the widely-used, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-approved CALifornia PUFF (CALPUFF) dispersion model and model components to simulate longer-range transport and diffusion in variable terrain and spatially/temporally varying meteorological (e.g., wind) fields. Area sources, which are used to define spray blocks in SPRAYTRAN, are initialized using output files generated from a separate aerial-spray-application model called AGDISP (AGricultural DISPersal). The AGDISP model is used for estimating the amount of pesticide deposited to the spray block based on spraying characteristics (e.g., pesticide type, spray nozzles, and aircraft type) and then simulating the near-field (less than 300-m) drift from a single pesticide application. The fraction of pesticide remaining airborne from the AGDISP near-field simulation is then used by SPRAYTRAN for simulating longer-range (greater than 300 m) drift and deposition of the pesticide.

  4. Amorphization of ZrO2 + CeO2 Powders Through Mechanical Milling for the Use of Kinetic Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Songlin; Wang, Lei; Xiong, Yuming; Bae, Gyuyeol; Lee, Changhee

    2013-12-01

    The coating formation in a kinetic spray process mainly depends on the impact of inflight particles at a high velocity. The plastic deformation at the impact interface would disrupt the native oxide scale on the particle and the substrate to generate the intimate contact of the atomic structures. Accordingly, it poses a challenge in producing ceramic coating during kinetic spray because of the lack of plasticity of ceramic powders at room temperature. In this study, we proposed to prepare ZrO2 ceramic coatings using partially amorphized powder with nanometer size in the kinetic spray process. To prepare the powder for the use of the kinetic spray, the amorphization and grain refinement of ZrO2 powder in mechanical ball milling were studied. The results showed that the amorphization and grain refinement were improved because of the formation of solid solution when the CeO2 agent was added. Subsequently, a nearly spherical powder was achieved via spray drying using the milled powders. The plasticity of the milled powders was tested in the kinetic spray process using Nitrogen as process gas. A dense ZrO2-CeO2 coating with a thickness of 50 μm was formed, whereas spraying milled ZrO2 powder can only lead to an inhomogeneous dispersion of the destructible particles on the surface of the substrate.

  5. Recent INEL spray-forming developments

    SciTech Connect

    McHugh, K.M.; Key, J.F.

    1992-12-31

    Spray forming is a near-net-shape fabrication technology in which a spray of finely atomized liquid droplets is deposited onto a suitably shaped substrate or mold to produce a coherent solid. The technology offers unique opportunities for simplifying materials processing, oftentimes while substantially improving product quality. Spray forming can be performed with a wide range of metals and nonmetals, and offersproperty improvements resulting from rapid solidification (eg. refined microstructures, extended solid solubilities and reduced segregation). Economic benefits result from process simplification and the elimination of unit operations. Researchers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are developing spray-forming technology for producing near-net-shape solids and coatings of a variety of metals, polymers, and composite materials using de Laval nozzles. Results from several spray-forming programs are presented to illustrate the range of capabilities of the approach as well as the technical and economic benefits. These programs involved the production of low-carbon steel strip and SiC particulate reinforced aluminum strip; recent advances in spray forming tooling using low-melting-point metals are also described.

  6. Recent INEL spray-forming developments

    SciTech Connect

    McHugh, K.M.; Key, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    Spray forming is a near-net-shape fabrication technology in which a spray of finely atomized liquid droplets is deposited onto a suitably shaped substrate or mold to produce a coherent solid. The technology offers unique opportunities for simplifying materials processing, oftentimes while substantially improving product quality. Spray forming can be performed with a wide range of metals and nonmetals, and offersproperty improvements resulting from rapid solidification (eg. refined microstructures, extended solid solubilities and reduced segregation). Economic benefits result from process simplification and the elimination of unit operations. Researchers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are developing spray-forming technology for producing near-net-shape solids and coatings of a variety of metals, polymers, and composite materials using de Laval nozzles. Results from several spray-forming programs are presented to illustrate the range of capabilities of the approach as well as the technical and economic benefits. These programs involved the production of low-carbon steel strip and SiC particulate reinforced aluminum strip; recent advances in spray forming tooling using low-melting-point metals are also described.

  7. Monte-Carlo Spray Cooling Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreitzer, Paul J.; Kuhlman, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Spray cooling is a tremendously complex phenomenon that has yet to be completely and successfully modeled. This is due to the complexity of the detailed droplet impingement processes and the subsequent heat transfer process. Numerous assumptions must be made in order to accurately model spray behavior. Current computational limitations restrict CFD simulations to single droplet simulations. Additional complexity due to droplet interactions negates the possibility of combining multiple single droplet studies to represent the complete spray process. Therefore, a need has been established for the development of a comprehensive spray impingement simulation with adequate physical complexity to yield accurate results within a relatively short run time. The present work attempts to develop such a model using modeling assumptions from the best available literature, and to combine them into a single spray impingement simulation. Initial flow parameters that have been chosen include flow rate of 10 GPH with a velocity of 12 m/s and average droplet diameter of 48 μm. These values produce the following non-dimensional number ranges: We 100-1800, Re 200-4500, Oh 0.01-0.05. Numerical and experimental correlations have been identified that represent crater formation, splashing, film thickness, and droplet size and spatial flux distributions. A combination of these methods has resulted in an initial spray impingement simulation that is capable of simulating 100,000 drops or an actual simulation time of 0.0167 seconds. Comparisons of results from this code with experimental results show a similar trend in surface behavior.

  8. Experimental evolution of sprays in a lung model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burguete, Javier; Aliseda, Alberto

    2015-11-01

    We present the first results of an experiment conceived to observe the evolution of sprays inside the lungs. We have built a model that covers the first 6 generations (from the trachea to segmental bronchi of 5th generation). This setup is placed on a wind tunnel, and the flow inside the model is induced by a vacuum pump that emulates the breathing process using a valve. We inject a previously determined distribution of particles (water droplets), whose average diameter can be modified. Then, we measure the droplet distribution in different branches and compare how the droplet distribution is modified at each generation. The parameters that control the behavior are the average diameter of the original distribution, the airflow rate inside the model and the frequency of the breathing cycle.

  9. Porous carbon powders prepared by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Skrabalak, Sara E; Suslick, Kenneth S

    2006-10-04

    New, thermally robust meso- and macroporous carbon powders were prepared by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis (USP) of aqueous solutions using an inexpensive high-frequency ultrasound generator from a household humidifier. We choose our molecular precursors rationally, so that the expected decomposition pathways produce only remnant carbon atoms. Specifically, our rational design criterion led to halo-organic carboxylate salts, whose pyrolysis yields well-defined carbon solids with a temporary template being generated in situ, simply an inorganic salt, which is easily dissolved during aqueous workup. The materials have been characterized by SEM, TEM, XRD, 13C NMR MAS, XPS, FTIR spectroscopy, and BET surface area measurements. Changing the alkali metal alters the morphology and pore structure of the final material, which can be explained in terms of the observed differences in the DSC and TGA of the various precursors. This preparatory method provides an extremely facile and versatile method for the generation of meso- and macroporous carbons.

  10. Intermediate range order in alkaline borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crupi, C.; Carini, G.; Ruello, G.; D'Angelo, G.

    2016-03-01

    We describe the neutron diffraction patterns of a series of alkaline borate glasses at different metal oxide content. Strong differences are observed in the intermediate range order as a function of the specific alkaline ion and of its concentration. On these results, we propose that the first sharp diffraction peak arises from correlations of atoms of voids and show that the compositional variation of this peak intensity in alkaline borate glasses is due to changes in the distribution of void sizes within the three-dimensional network. We argue that our interpretation in terms of interstitial (empty and/or filled) voids, having different sizes, provides a general explanation for all anomalous behaviours revealed for the first sharp diffraction peak.

  11. Quantitative imaging of a non-combusting diesel spray using structured laser illumination planar imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrocal, E.; Kristensson, E.; Hottenbach, P.; Aldén, M.; Grünefeld, G.

    2012-12-01

    Due to its transient nature, high atomization process, and rapid generation of fine evaporating droplets, diesel sprays have been, and still remain, one of the most challenging sprays to be fully analyzed and understood by means of non-intrusive diagnostics. The main limitation of laser techniques for quantitative measurements of diesel sprays concerns the detection of the multiple light scattering resulting from the high optical density of such a scattering medium. A second limitation is the extinction of the incident laser radiation as it crosses the spray, as well as the attenuation of the signal which is to be detected. All these issues have strongly motivated, during the past decade, the use of X-ray instead of visible light for dense spray diagnostics. However, we demonstrate in this paper that based on an affordable Nd:YAG laser system, structured laser illumination planar imaging (SLIPI) can provide accurate quantitative description of a non-reacting diesel spray injected at 1,100 bar within a room temperature vessel pressurized at 18.6 bar. The technique is used at λ = 355 nm excitation wavelength with 1.0 mol% TMPD dye concentration, for simultaneous LIF/Mie imaging. Furthermore, a novel dual-SLIPI configuration is tested with Mie scattering detection only. The results confirm that a mapping of both the droplet Sauter mean diameter and extinction coefficient can be obtained by such complementary approaches. These new insights are provided in this article at late times after injection start. It is demonstrated that the application of SLIPI to diesel sprays provides valuable quantitative information which was not previously accessible.

  12. Metered Cryospray™: a novel uniform, controlled, and consistent in vivo application of liquid nitrogen cryogenic spray

    PubMed Central

    Mulcahey, Thomas I; Coad, James E; Fan, Wei Li; Grasso, Daniel J; Hanley, Brian M; Hawkes, Heather V; McDermott, Sean A; O’Connor, John P; Sheets, Ellen E; Vadala, Charles J

    2017-01-01

    In this article, a novel cryotherapy approach using a uniform, controlled, and consistent in vivo application of liquid nitrogen (LN2) spray as a Metered Cryospray™ (MCS) process is described. Although MCS may be used for many potential clinical applications, this paper focuses on the development that led to the controlled and consistent delivery of radial LN2 cryogen spray in order to generate a uniform circumferential effect and how the amount of MCS can be adapted to specifically ablate targeted diseases within a patient’s lumen such as an airway or esophagus. PMID:28255257

  13. Creep of plasma sprayed zirconia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firestone, R. F.; Logan, W. R.; Adams, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    Specimens of plasma-sprayed zirconia thermal barrier coatings with three different porosities and different initial particle sizes were deformed in compression at initial loads of 1000, 2000, and 3500 psi and temperatures of 1100 C, 1250 C, and 1400 C. The coatings were stabilized with lime, magnesia, and two different concentrations of yttria. Creep began as soon as the load was applied and continued at a constantly decreasing rate until the load was removed. Temperature and stabilization had a pronounced effect on creep rate. The creep rate for 20% Y2O3-80% ZrO2 was 1/3 to 1/2 that of 8% Y2O3-92% ZrO2. Both magnesia and calcia stabilized ZrO2 crept at a rate 5 to 10 times that of the 20% Y2O3 material. A near proportionality between creep rate and applied stress was observed. The rate controlling process appeared to be thermally activated, with an activation energy of approximately 100 cal/gm mole K. Creep deformation was due to cracking and particle sliding.

  14. Laser direct write of planar alkaline microbatteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, C. B.; Kim, H.; Piqué, A.

    We are developing a laser engineering approach to fabricate and optimize alkaline microbatteries in planar geometries. The laser direct-write technique enables multicapability for adding, removing and processing material and provides the ability to pattern complicated structures needed for fabricating complete microbattery assemblies. In this paper, we demonstrate the production of planar zinc-silver oxide alkaline cells under ambient conditions. The microbattery cells exhibit 1.55-V open-circuit potentials, as expected for the battery chemistry, and show a flat discharge behavior under constant-current loads. High capacities of over 450 μAhcm-2 are obtained for 5-mm2 microbatteries.

  15. Alkaline earth filled nickel skutterudite antimonide thermoelectrics

    DOEpatents

    Singh, David Joseph

    2013-07-16

    A thermoelectric material including a body centered cubic filled skutterudite having the formula A.sub.xFe.sub.yNi.sub.zSb.sub.12, where A is an alkaline earth element, x is no more than approximately 1.0, and the sum of y and z is approximately equal to 4.0. The alkaline earth element includes guest atoms selected from the group consisting of Be, Mb, Ca, Sr, Ba, Ra and combinations thereof. The filled skutterudite is shown to have properties suitable for a wide variety of thermoelectric applications.

  16. Alkaline Capacitors Based on Nitride Nanoparticles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldissi, Matt

    2003-01-01

    High-energy-density alkaline electrochemical capacitors based on electrodes made of transition-metal nitride nanoparticles are undergoing development. Transition- metal nitrides (in particular, Fe3N and TiN) offer a desirable combination of high electrical conductivity and electrochemical stability in aqueous alkaline electrolytes like KOH. The high energy densities of these capacitors are attributable mainly to their high capacitance densities, which, in turn, are attributable mainly to the large specific surface areas of the electrode nanoparticles. Capacitors of this type could be useful as energy-storage components in such diverse equipment as digital communication systems, implanted medical devices, computers, portable consumer electronic devices, and electric vehicles.

  17. EVALUATION OF CONVERGENT SPRAY TECHNOLOGYTM SPRAY PROCESS FOR ROOF COATING APPLICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The overall goal of this project was to demonstrate the feasibility of Convergent Spray TechnologyTM for the roofing industry. This was accomplished by producing an environmentally compliant coating utilizing recycled materials, a CSTTM spray process portable application cart, a...

  18. Effects of phosphoric acid sprayed into an incinerator furnace on the flue gas pressure drop at fabric filters.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Shigetoshi; Hwang, In-Hee; Matsuto, Toshihiko

    2016-06-01

    Fabric filters are widely used to remove dust from flue gas generated by waste incineration. However, a pressure drop occurs at the filters, caused by growth of a dust layer on the filter fabric despite regular cleaning by pulsed-jet air. The pressure drop at the fabric filters leads to energy consumption at induced draft fan to keep the incinerator on negative pressure, so that its proper control is important to operate incineration facility efficiently. The pressure drop at fabric filters decreased whenever phosphoric acid wastewater (PAW) was sprayed into an incinerator for treating industrial waste. Operational data obtained from the incineration facility were analyzed to determine the short- and long-term effects of PAW spraying on the pressure drop. For the short-term effect, it was confirmed that the pressure drop at the fabric filters always decreased to 0.3-1.2kPa within about 5h after spraying PAW. This effect was expected to be obtained by about one third of present PAW spraying amount. However, from the long-term perspective, the pressure drop showed an increase in the periods of PAW spraying compared with periods for which PAW spraying was not performed. The pressure drop increase was particularly noticeable after the initial PAW spraying, regardless of the age and type of fabric filters used. These results suggest that present PAW spraying causes a temporary pressure drop reduction, leading to short-term energy consumption savings; however, it also causes an increase of the pressure drop over the long-term, degrading the overall operating conditions. Thus, appropriate PAW spraying conditions are needed to make effective use of PAW to reduce the pressure drop at fabric filters from a short- and long-term point of view.

  19. Ultrafine particles emitted by flame and electric arc guns for thermal spraying of metals.

    PubMed

    Bémer, Denis; Régnier, Roland; Subra, Isabelle; Sutter, Benjamin; Lecler, Marie T; Morele, Yves

    2010-08-01

    The ultrafine aerosol emitted by thermal spraying of metals using flame and electric arc processes has been characterized in terms of particle size distribution and emission rates based on both particle number and mass. Thermal spraying of Zn, Zn/Al, and Al was studied. Measurements taken using an electrical low pressure impactor and a condensation nucleus counter reveal an aerosol made up of very fine particles (80-95% of number distribution <100 nm). Ultrafine particle emission rates produced by the electric arc process are very high, the largest values being recorded during spraying of pure aluminium. This process generates high particle emissions and therefore requires careful consideration and possible rethinking of currently implemented protection measures: ventilated cabins, dust collectors, and personal protective equipment.

  20. Use of spray-dried zirconia microspheres in the separation of immunoglobulins from cell culture supernatant.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, A; Carr, P W; McNeff, C V

    2000-08-18

    A method suitable for the isolation of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) on novel zirconia microspheres (20-30 microm) is described. Zirconia microspheres were generated by spray drying colloidal zirconia. Spray-dried zirconia microspheres were further classified and characterized by X-ray diffraction, BET porosimetry and scanning electron microscopy. Spray-dried zirconia microspheres were modified with ethylenediamine-N,N'-tetra(methylenephosphonic) acid (EDTPA) to create a cation-exchange chromatographic support. The chromatographic behavior of a semi-preparative column packed with EDTPA-modified zirconia microspheres was evaluated and implications for scale-up are provided. EDTPA-modified zirconia microspheres were further used to purify MAbs from cell culture supernatant. Analysis by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and gel electrophoresis demonstrate that MAbs can be recovered from a cell culture supernatant at high yield (92-98%) and high purity (>95%) in a single chromatographic step.

  1. Monte Carlo Method for Predicting a Physically Based Drop Size Distribution Evolution of a Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tembely, Moussa; Lécot, Christian; Soucemarianadin, Arthur

    2010-03-01

    We report in this paper a method for predicting the evolution of a physically based drop size distribution of a spray, by coupling the Maximum Entropy Formalism and the Monte Carlo scheme. Using the discrete or continuous population balance equation, a Mass Flow Algorithm is formulated taking into account interactions between droplets via coalescence. After deriving a kernel for coalescence, we solve the time dependent drop size distribution equation using a Monte Carlo method. We apply the method to the spray of a new print-head known as a Spray On Demand (SOD) device; the process exploits ultrasonic spray generation via a Faraday instability where the fluid/structure interaction causing the instability is described by a modified Hamilton's principle. This has led to a physically-based approach for predicting the initial drop size distribution within the framework of the Maximum Entropy Formalism (MEF): a three-parameter generalized Gamma distribution is chosen by using conservation of mass and energy. The calculation of the drop size distribution evolution by Monte Carlo method shows the effect of spray droplets coalescence both on the number-based or volume-based drop size distributions.

  2. Two-phase measurements of a spray in the wake of a bluff body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudoff, R. C.; Houser, M. J.; Bachalo, W. D.

    1987-01-01

    The dynamics of spray drop interaction with the turbulent, recirculating wake of a flat disk bluff body were investigated using a phase Doppler particle analyzer to determine drop size and velocity and the gas-phase velocity. Detailed measurements obtained included spray drop size, axial and radial velocity, angle of trajectory, and size-velocity correlations. The gas-phase velocity was determined from seeding of the two-phase flow. Results showed dramatic differences in drop behavior for various size classes when interacting with the turbulent flow field. Small drops were quickly entrained and recirculated, while initially, the larger drops continued in the general direction of the spray cone. Further downstream, significant numbers of large drops recirculated, generating a bifurcated size-velocity correlation. These lateral convections and streamwise accelerations and decelerations strongly influenced the number density along with size and velocity distributions. The complex interaction of the spray with the turbulent air-flow points out the need for spatially-resolved measurements that determine drop behavior for individual size classes, rather than characterizing a spray only via simple integral quantities such as the Sauter mean diameter.

  3. Method and closing pores in a thermally sprayed doped lanthanum chromite interconnection layer

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Prabhakar; Ruka, Roswell J.

    1995-01-01

    A dense, substantially gas-tight electrically conductive interconnection layer is formed on an air electrode structure of an electrochemical cell by (A) providing an air electrode surface; (B) forming on a selected portion of the electrode surface, a layer of doped LaCrO.sub.3 particles doped with an element or elements selected from Ca, Sr, Ba, Mg, Co, Ni, Al and mixtures thereof by thermal spraying doped LaCrO.sub.3 particles, either by plasma arc spraying or flame spraying; (C) depositing a mixture of CaO and Cr.sub.2 O.sub.3 on the surface of the thermally sprayed layer; and (D) heating the doped LaCrO.sub.3 layer coated with CaO and Cr.sub.2 O.sub.3 surface deposit at from about 1000.degree. C. to 1200.degree. C. to substantially close the pores, at least at a surface, of the thermally sprayed doped LaCrO.sub.3 layer. The result is a dense, substantially gas-tight, highly doped, electrically conductive interconnection material bonded to the electrode surface. A solid electrolyte layer can be applied to the nonselected portion of the air electrode. A fuel electrode can be applied to the solid electrolyte, to form an electrochemical cell, for example for generation of electrical power.

  4. Method and closing pores in a thermally sprayed doped lanthanum chromite interconnection layer

    DOEpatents

    Singh, P.; Ruka, R.J.

    1995-02-14

    A dense, substantially gas-tight electrically conductive interconnection layer is formed on an air electrode structure of an electrochemical cell by (A) providing an air electrode surface; (B) forming on a selected portion of the electrode surface, a layer of doped LaCrO{sub 3} particles doped with an element or elements selected from Ca, Sr, Ba, Mg, Co, Ni, Al and mixtures thereof by thermal spraying doped LaCrO{sub 3} particles, either by plasma arc spraying or flame spraying; (C) depositing a mixture of CaO and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the surface of the thermally sprayed layer; and (D) heating the doped LaCrO{sub 3} layer coated with CaO and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface deposit at from about 1,000 C to 1,200 C to substantially close the pores, at least at a surface, of the thermally sprayed doped LaCrO{sub 3} layer. The result is a dense, substantially gas-tight, highly doped, electrically conductive interconnection material bonded to the electrode surface. A solid electrolyte layer can be applied to the nonselected portion of the air electrode. A fuel electrode can be applied to the solid electrolyte, to form an electrochemical cell, for example for generation of electrical power. 5 figs.

  5. From Powders to Thermally Sprayed Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauchais, Pierre; Montavon, Ghislain; Bertrand, Ghislaine

    2010-01-01

    Since the early stages of thermal spray, it has been recognized that the powder composition, size distribution, shape, mass density, mechanical resistance, components distribution for composite particles play a key role in coating microstructure and thermo mechanical properties. The principal characteristics of particles are strongly linked to the manufacturing process. Coatings also depend on the process used to spray particles and spray parameters. Many papers have been devoted to the relationships existing between coating properties and structures at different scales and manufacturing processes. In many conventional spray conditions resulting in micrometric structures, among the different parameters, good powder flow ability, and dense particles are important features. Thermal plasma treatment, especially by RF plasma, of particles, prepared by different manufacturing processes, allows achieving such properties and it is now developed at an industrial scale. Advantages and drawbacks of this process will be discussed. Another point, which will be approached, is the self-propagating high-temperature synthesis, depending very strongly upon the starting composite particle manufacturing. However, as everybody knows, "small is beautiful" and nano- or finely structured coatings are now extensively studied with spraying of: (i) very complex alloys containing multiple elements which exhibit a glass forming capability when cooled-down, their under-cooling temperature being below the glass transition temperature; (ii) conventional micrometer-sized particles (in the 30-90 μm range) made of agglomerated nanometer-sized particles; (iii) sub-micrometer- or nanometer-sized particles via a suspension in which also, instead of particles, stable sol of nanometer-sized particles can be introduced; and (iv) spray solutions of final material precursor. These different processes using plasma, HVOF or sometimes flame and also cold-gas spray will be discussed together with the

  6. Spray forming of superplastic aluminum sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Lavender, C.A.; Smith, M.T.; McHugh, K.M.; Key, J.F.

    1995-12-31

    Ingot metallurgy (I/M) processing methods for superplastic aluminum sheet require substantial hot, warm and final cold rolling reduction steps to produce the desired fine grain size and thermally-stable microstructure necessary for superplastic forming (SPF). The rapid solidification rates associated with spray forming offer the potential for economic processing of near net-thickness SPF sheet having alloy compositions that are not possible with conventional ingot metallurgy. To evaluate the application of spray forming for SPF aluminum sheet, a modified 5083 alloy was supplied to Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for processing using laboratory spray-forming equipment. Spray-formed sheet specimens were then supplied to the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory for characterization and comparison with conventional I/M-based SPF sheet. Results show that the spray formed material, when processed using appropriate homogenization and cold reduction steps (3:1 total reduction), has an equiaxed grain size of 2--4 {micro}m near the deposition substrate. However, microstructural examination indicates that grain size increases as a function of the distance from the deposition substrate. Tensile tests were conducted at a temperature of 550 C and constant strain rates over a range of 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} to 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} s{sup {minus}1} to evaluate the superplastic behavior of the spray-formed samples. Results show that the spray-formed material having a 3:1 cold rolling reduction has superplastic elongation equivalent to I/M materials processed with a 60:1 reduction.

  7. Thermal spraying of coatings using the hydrogen-oxygen flame

    SciTech Connect

    Korzh, V.N.; Popil`, Y.S.; Alexandrovskii, N.V.

    1995-12-31

    Use of hydrogen instead of acetylene in thermal spraying has not become popular up to now because of the limited amount of information on the technological capabilities of the oxy-hydrogen flame. The data given in technical publications on the lower calorific power and temperature of the flame as compared to the oxy-acetylene flame, explosion hazard and the operational and transportation costs which have to be incurred when using the cylinders held back the use of hydrogen. The advent of mobile water electrolysis generators (WEG) which permit generation of the combustible mixture directly in site, thus eliminating the cost of using the cylinder facilities and significantly reducing the transportation costs, improved the cost-effectiveness of applying hydrogen as the gas to replace acetylene in flame spraying and other processes of flame treatment of materials. The work performed in the Kiev Polytechnic Institute showed that the use of WEG in the production of the oxy-hydrogen mixture permits a 1.5 time reduction of the power consumption, as compared to the power consumed for the production of the oxy-acetylene mixture volume equivalent as to its technological potential, if the power consumed for fabrication of the calcium carbide is taken into account.

  8. Current Status of Superheat Spray Modeling With NCC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, M. S.; Bulzan, Dan L.

    2012-01-01

    An understanding of liquid fuel behavior at superheat conditions is identified to be a topic of importance in the design of modern supersonic engines. As a part of the NASA's supersonics project office initiative on high altitude emissions, we have undertaken an effort to assess the accuracy of various existing CFD models used in the modeling of superheated sprays. As a part of this investigation, we have completed the implementation of a modeling approach into the national combustion code (NCC), and then applied it to investigate the following three cases: (1) the validation of a flashing jet generated by the sudden release of pressurized R134A from a cylindrical nozzle, (2) the differences between two superheat vaporization models were studied based on both hot and cold flow calculations of a Parker-Hannifin pressure swirl atomizer, (3) the spray characteristics generated by a single-element LDI (Lean Direct Injector) experiment were studied to investigate the differences between superheat and non-superheat conditions. Further details can be found in the paper.

  9. Comparison of alkaline industrial wastes for aqueous mineral carbon sequestration through a parallel reactivity study.

    PubMed

    Noack, Clinton W; Dzombak, David A; Nakles, David V; Hawthorne, Steven B; Heebink, Loreal V; Dando, Neal; Gershenzon, Michael; Ghosh, Rajat S

    2014-10-01

    Thirty-one alkaline industrial wastes from a wide range of industrial processes were acquired and screened for application in an aqueous carbon sequestration process. The wastes were evaluated for their potential to leach polyvalent cations and base species. Following mixing with a simple sodium bicarbonate solution, chemistries of the aqueous and solid phases were analyzed. Experimental results indicated that the most reactive materials were capable of sequestering between 77% and 93% of the available carbon under experimental conditions in four hours. These materials - cement kiln dust, spray dryer absorber ash, and circulating dry scrubber ash - are thus good candidates for detailed, process-oriented studies. Chemical equilibrium modeling indicated that amorphous calcium carbonate is likely responsible for the observed sequestration. High variability and low reactive fractions render many other materials less attractive for further pursuit without considering preprocessing or activation techniques.

  10. The Alkaline Diet: Is There Evidence That an Alkaline pH Diet Benefits Health?

    PubMed Central

    Schwalfenberg, Gerry K.

    2012-01-01

    This review looks at the role of an alkaline diet in health. Pubmed was searched looking for articles on pH, potential renal acid loads, bone health, muscle, growth hormone, back pain, vitamin D and chemotherapy. Many books written in the lay literature on the alkaline diet were also reviewed and evaluated in light of the published medical literature. There may be some value in considering an alkaline diet in reducing morbidity and mortality from chronic diseases and further studies are warranted in this area of medicine. PMID:22013455

  11. The alkaline diet: is there evidence that an alkaline pH diet benefits health?

    PubMed

    Schwalfenberg, Gerry K

    2012-01-01

    This review looks at the role of an alkaline diet in health. Pubmed was searched looking for articles on pH, potential renal acid loads, bone health, muscle, growth hormone, back pain, vitamin D and chemotherapy. Many books written in the lay literature on the alkaline diet were also reviewed and evaluated in light of the published medical literature. There may be some value in considering an alkaline diet in reducing morbidity and mortality from chronic diseases and further studies are warranted in this area of medicine.

  12. Heat Flux Analysis of a Reacting Thermite Spray Impingent on a Substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Eric S. Collins; Michelle L. Pantoya; Michael A. Daniels; Daniel J. Prentice; Eric D. Steffler; Steven P. D'Arche

    2012-03-01

    Spray combustion from a thermite reaction is a new area of research relevant to localized energy generation applications, such as welding or cutting. In this study, we characterized the heat flux of combustion spray impinging on a target from a nozzle for three thermite mixtures. The reactions studied include aluminum (Al) with iron oxide (Fe2O3), Al with copper oxide (CuO), and Al with molybdenum oxide (MoO3). Several standoff distances (i.e., distance from the nozzle exit to the target) were analyzed. A fast response heat flux sensor was engineered for this purpose and is discussed in detail. Results correlated substrate damage to a threshold heat flux of 4550 W/cm2 for a fixed-nozzle configuration. Also, higher gas-generating thermites were shown to produce a widely dispersed spray and be less effective at imparting kinetic energy damage to a target. These results provide an understanding of the role of thermal and physical properties (i.e., such as heat of combustion, gas generation, and particle size) on thermite spray combustion performance measured by damaging a target substrate.

  13. What Can We Learn From Laboratory Studies of Inorganic Sea Spray Aerosol?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salter, M. E.; Zieger, P.; Acosta Navarro, J. C.; Grythe, H.; Kirkevag, A.; Rosati, B.; Riipinen, I.; Nilsson, E. D.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2013 we have been operating a temperature-controlled plunging-jet sea spray aerosol chamber at Stockholm University using inorganic artificial seawater. Using size-resolved measurements of the foam bubbles responsible for the aerosol production we were able to show that it is changes to these foam bubbles which drive the observed changes in aerosol production and size distribution as water temperature changes (Salter et al., 2014). Further, by combining size-resolved measurements of aerosol production as a function of water temperature with measurements of air entrainment by the plunging-jet we have developed a temperature-dependent sea spray source function for deployment in large-scale models (Salter et al., 2015). We have also studied the hygroscopicity, morphology, and chemical composition of the inorganic sea spray aerosol produced in the chamber. The sea spray aerosol generated from artificial seawater exhibited lower hygroscopic growth than both pure NaCl and output from the E-AIM aerosol thermodynamics model when all relevant inorganic ions in the sea salt were included. Results from sensitivity tests using a large-scale earth system model suggest that the lower hygroscopicity observed in our laboratory measurements has important implications for calculations of the radiative balance of the Earth. In addition, size-dependent chemical fractionation of several inorganic ions was observed relative to the artificial seawater with potentially important implications for the chemistry of the marine boundary layer. Each of these studies suggest that there is still much to be learned from rigorous experiments using inorganic seawater proxies. Salter et al., (2014), On the seawater temperature dependence of the sea spray aerosol generated by a continuous plunging jet. J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 119, 9052-9072, doi: 10.1002/2013JD021376 Salter et al., (2015), An empirically derived inorganic sea spray source function incorporating sea surface temperature. Atmos

  14. Alkaline phosphatase revisited: hydrolysis of alkyl phosphates.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Patrick J; Herschlag, Daniel

    2002-03-05

    Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase (AP) is the prototypical two metal ion catalyst with two divalent zinc ions bound approximately 4 A apart in the active site. Studies spanning half a century have elucidated many structural and mechanistic features of this enzyme, rendering it an attractive model for investigating the potent catalytic power of bimetallic centers. Unfortunately, fundamental mechanistic features have been obscured by limitations with the standard assays. These assays generate concentrations of inorganic phosphate (P(i)) in excess of its inhibition constant (K(i) approximately 1 muM). This tight binding by P(i) has affected the majority of published kinetic constants. Furthermore, binding limits k(cat)/K(m) for reaction of p-nitrophenyl phosphate, the most commonly employed substrate. We describe a sensitive (32)P-based assay for hydrolysis of alkyl phosphates that avoids the complication of product inhibition. We have revisited basic mechanistic features of AP with these alkyl phosphate substrates. The results suggest that the chemical step for phosphorylation of the enzyme limits k(cat)/K(m). The pH-rate profile and additional results suggest that the serine nucleophile is active in its anionic form and has a pK(a) of < or = 5.5 in the free enzyme. An inactivating pK(a) of 8.0 is observed for binding of both substrates and inhibitors, and we suggest that this corresponds to ionization of a zinc-coordinated water molecule. Counter to previous suggestions, inorganic phosphate dianion appears to bind to the highly charged AP active site at least as strongly as the trianion. The dependence of k(cat)/K(m) on the pK(a) of the leaving group follows a Brønsted correlation with a slope of beta(lg) = -0.85 +/- 0.1, differing substantially from the previously reported value of -0.2 obtained from data with a less sensitive assay. This steep leaving group dependence is consistent with a largely dissociative transition state for AP-catalyzed hydrolysis of

  15. Air/fuel ratio visualization in a diesel spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carabell, Kevin David

    1993-01-01

    To investigate some features of high pressure diesel spray ignition, we have applied a newly developed planar imaging system to a spray in an engine-fed combustion bomb. The bomb is designed to give flow characteristics similar to those in a direct injection diesel engine yet provide nearly unlimited optical access. A high pressure electronic unit injector system with on-line manually adjustable main and pilot injection features was used. The primary scalar of interest was the local air/fuel ratio, particularly near the spray plumes. To make this measurement quantitative, we have developed a calibration LIF technique. The development of this technique is the key contribution of this dissertation. The air/fuel ratio measurement was made using biacetyl as a seed in the air inlet to the engine. When probed by a tripled Nd:YAG laser the biacetyl fluoresces, with a signal proportional to the local biacetyl concentration. This feature of biacetyl enables the fluorescent signal to be used as as indicator of local fuel vapor concentration. The biacetyl partial pressure was carefully controlled, enabling estimates of the local concentration of air and the approximate local stoichiometry in the fuel spray. The results indicate that the image quality generated with this method is sufficient for generating air/fuel ratio contours. The processes during the ignition delay have a marked effect on ignition and the subsequent burn. These processes, vaporization and pre-flame kinetics, very much depend on the mixing of the air and fuel. This study has shown that poor mixing and over-mixing of the air and fuel will directly affect the type of ignition. An optimal mixing arrangement exists and depends on the swirl ratio in the engine, the number of holes in the fuel injector and the distribution of fuel into a pilot and main injection. If a short delay and a diffusion burn is desired, the best mixing parameters among those surveyed would be a high swirl ratio, a 4-hole nozzle and a

  16. Negative Electrode For An Alkaline Cell

    DOEpatents

    Coco, Isabelle; Cocciantelli, Jean-Michel; Villenave, Jean-Jacques

    1998-07-14

    The present invention concerns a negative electrode for an alkaline cell, comprising a current collector supporting a paste containing an electrochemically active material and a binder, characterized in that said binder is a polymer containing hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups, said polymer being selected from an acrylic homopolymer, copolymer and terpolymer, an unsaturated organic acid copolymer and an unsaturated acid anhydride copolymer.

  17. Alkaline electrochemical cells and method of making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyt, H. E.; Pfluger, H. L. (Inventor)

    1970-01-01

    Equilibrated cellulose ether membranes of increased electrolytic conductivity for use as separators in concentrated alkaline electrochemical cells are investigated. The method of making such membranes by equilibration to the degree desired in an aqueous alkali solution mantained at a temperature below about 10 C is described.

  18. Kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of nitrocellulose.

    PubMed

    Christodoulatos, C; Su, T L; Koutsospyros, A

    2001-01-01

    Cellulose nitrate (nitrocellulose) is an explosive solid substance used in large quantities in various formulations of rocket and gun propellants. Safe destruction of nitrocellulose can be achieved by alkaline hydrolysis, which converts it to biodegradable products that can then be treated by conventional biological processes. The kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of munitions-grade nitrocellulose in sodium hydroxide solutions were investigated in completely mixed batch reactors. Experiments were conducted using solutions of alkaline strength ranging from 0.1 to 15% by mass and temperatures in the range of 30 to 90 degrees C. Regression analysis of the kinetic data revealed that alkaline hydrolysis of nitrocellulose is of the order 1.0 and 1.5 with respect to nitrocellulose and hydroxide concentration, respectively. The activation energy of the hydrolysis reaction was found to be 100.9 kJ/mol with a preexponential Arrhenius constant of 4.73 x 10(13). Nitrite and nitrate, in a 3:1 ratio, were the primary nitrogen species present in the posthydrolysis solution. The kinetic information is pertinent to the development and optimization of nitrocellulose chemical-biological treatment systems.

  19. MERCURIC CHLORIDE CAPTURE BY ALKALINE SORBENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of bench-scale mechanistic studies of mercury/sorbent reactions that showed that mercuric chloride (HgC12) is readily adsorbed by alkaline sorbents, which may offers a less expensive alternative to the use of activated carbons. A laboratory-scale, fixed-b...

  20. ISSUES WITH ALKALINE TREATMENT OF SLUDGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation begins with a discussion of the use of lime and other alkaline materials from the very earliest times to the present for killing bacteria, viruses and parasites and for controlling odors in wastewaters and sludge. It answers the question "How did EPA arrive at i...

  1. The feasibility study of hot cell decontamination by the PFC spray method

    SciTech Connect

    Hui-Jun Won; Chong-Hun Jung; Jei-Kwon Moon

    2008-01-15

    The characteristics of per-fluorocarbon compounds (PFC) are colorless, non-toxic, easily vaporized and nonflammable. Also, some of them are liquids of a high density, low surface tension, low latent heat and low specific heat. These particular chemical and physical properties of fluoro-organic compounds permit their use in very different fields such as electronics, medicine, tribology, nuclear and material science. The Sonatol process was developed under a contract with the DOE. The Sonatol process uses an ultrasonic agitation in a PFC solution that contains a fluorinated surfactant to remove radioactive particles from surfaces. Filtering the suspended particles allows the solutions to be reused indefinitely. They applied the Sonatol process to the decontamination of a heterogeneous legacy Pu-238 waste that exhibited an excessive hydrogen gas generation, which prevents a transportation of such a waste to a Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is developing dry decontamination technologies applicable to a decontamination of a highly radioactive area loosely contaminated with radioactive particles. This contamination has occurred as a result of an examination of a post-irradiated material or the development of the DUPIC process. The dry decontamination technologies developed are the carbon dioxide pellet spray method and the PFC spray method. As a part of the project, PFC ultrasonic decontamination technology was developed in 2004. The PFC spray decontamination method which is based on the test results of the PFC ultrasonic method has been under development since 2005. The developed PFC spray decontamination equipment consists of four modules (spray, collection, filtration and distillation). Vacuum cup of the collection module gathers the contaminated PFC solution, then the solution is moved to the filtration module and it is recycled. After a multiple recycling of the spent PFC solution, it is purified in the distillation

  2. De Novo Transcriptional Analysis of Alfalfa in Response to Saline-Alkaline Stress

    PubMed Central

    An, Yi-Min; Song, Li-Li; Liu, Ying-Rui; Shu, Yong-Jun; Guo, Chang-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Saline-alkaline stress, caused by high levels of harmful carbonate salts and high soil pH, is a major abiotic stress that affects crop productivity. Alfalfa is a widely cultivated perennial forage legume with some tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses, especially to saline-alkaline stress. To elucidate the mechanism underlying plant saline-alkaline tolerance, we conducted transcriptome analysis of whole alfalfa seedlings treated with saline-alkaline solutions for 0 day (control), 1 day (short-term treatment), and 7 days (long-term treatment) using ion torrent sequencing technology. A transcriptome database dataset of 53,853 unigenes was generated, and 2,286 and 2,233 genes were differentially expressed in the short-term and long-term treatment, respectively. Gene ontology analysis revealed 14 highly enriched pathways and demonstrated the differential response of metabolic pathways between the short-term and long-term treatment. The expression levels of 109 and 96 transcription factors were significantly altered significantly after 1 day and 7 days of treatment, respectively. Specific responses of peroxidase, flavonoids, and the light pathway component indicated that the antioxidant capacity was one of the central mechanisms of saline-alkaline stress tolerance response in alfalfa. Among the 18 differentially expressed genes examined by real time PCR, the expression levels of eight genes, including inositol transporter, DNA binding protein, raffinose synthase, ferritin, aldo/keto reductase, glutathione S-transferase, xyloglucan endotrans glucosylase, and a NAC transcription factor, exhibited different patterns in response to saline and alkaline stress. The expression levels of the NAC transcription factor and glutathione S-transferase were altered significantly under saline stress and saline-alkaline stress; they were upregulated under saline-alkaline stress and downregulated under salt stress. Physiology assays showed an increased concentration of reactive oxygen

  3. Alkaline earth metal catalysts for asymmetric reactions.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shū; Yamashita, Yasuhiro

    2011-01-18

    The group 2 alkaline earth metals calcium (Ca), strontium (Sr), and barium (Ba) are among the most common elements on Earth, abundant in both the sea and the Earth's crust. Although they are familiar in our daily lives, their application to organic synthesis has, so far, been limited. Some particularly useful properties of these elements include (i) low electronegativity, (ii) a stable oxidation state of +2, meaning that they can potentially form two covalent bonds with anions, and (iii) the ability to occupy a variety of coordination sites due to their large ionic radius. Furthermore, the alkaline earth metals, found between the group 1 and group 3 elements, show mild but significant Lewis acidity, which can be harnessed to control coordinative molecules via a Lewis acid-base interaction. Taken together, these characteristics make the metals Ca, Sr, and Ba very promising components of highly functionalized acid-base catalysts. In this Account, we describe the development of chiral alkaline earth metal catalysts for asymmetric carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions. Recently prepared chiral alkaline earth metal complexes have shown high diastereo- and enantioselectivities in fundamental and important chemical transformations. We chose chiral bisoxazoline (Box) derivatives bearing a methylene tether as a ligand for chiral modification. These molecules are very useful because they can covalently coordinate to alkaline earth metals in a bidentate fashion through deprotonation of the tether portion. It was found that chiral calcium-Box complexes could successfully promote catalytic asymmetric 1,4-addition and [3 + 2] cycloaddition reactions with high diastereo- and enantioselectivities. Both the calcium-Box complexes and chiral strontium-bis-sulfonamide and chiral barium-BINOLate complexes could catalyze asymmetric 1,4-addition reactions with high enantioselectivities. Furthermore, we designed a calcium-neutral coordinative ligand complex as a new type of chiral alkaline

  4. Brief reconnaissance study for the addition of hydropower for Spray Dam, Eden, North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Gebhard, T.G. Jr.

    1981-01-30

    The feasibility of retrofitting the Spray Dam near Eden, North Carolina for power generation was examined. This dam has a developable head of 10 ft., was built in 1898 for hydroelectric power generation with one of 2 installed units currently operating. The study of environmental, institutional, safety and economic factors showed that hydroelectric power development at this site is possible and that the economics of retrofits will depend on whether existing equipment can be repaired or will have to be replaced. (LCL)

  5. Dense spray evaporation as a mixing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rivas, A.; Villermaux, E.

    2016-05-01

    We explore the processes by which a dense set of small liquid droplets (a spray) evaporates in a dry, stirred gas phase. A dense spray of micron-sized liquid (water or ethanol) droplets is formed in air by a pneumatic atomizer in a closed chamber. The spray is conveyed in ambient air as a plume whose extension depends on the relative humidity of the diluting medium. Standard shear instabilities develop at the plume edge, forming the stretched lamellar structures familiar with passive scalars. Unlike passive scalars however, these lamellae vanish in a finite time, because individual droplets evaporate at their border in contact with the dry environment. Experiments demonstrate that the lifetime of an individual droplet embedded in a lamellae is much larger than expected from the usual d2 law describing the fate of a single drop evaporating in a quiescent environment. By analogy with the way mixing times are understood from the convection-diffusion equation for passive scalars, we show that the lifetime of a spray lamellae stretched at a constant rate γ is tv=1/γ ln(1/+ϕ ϕ ) , where ϕ is a parameter that incorporates the thermodynamic and diffusional properties of the vapor in the diluting phase. The case of time-dependent stretching rates is examined too. A dense spray behaves almost as a (nonconserved) passive scalar.

  6. M-52 spray booth qualification test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The procedures, performance, and results obtained from the M-52 spray booth qualification test are documented. The test was conducted at Thiokol Corporation, Space Operations, M-52 Inert Parts Preparation facility. The purpose of this testing sequence was to ensure the spray booth would produce flight qualified hardware. The testing sequence was conducted in two series. The first series was conducted under CTP-0142, Revision 1. The second series was conducted in accordance with CTP-0142, Revision 2. The test sequence started with CTP-0142, Revision 1. The series consisted of the contamination removal test and the performance test. The contamination removal test was used to assess the Teflon level in the spray booth. The performance test consisted of painting and Chemloking a forward dome inside the spray booth per flight procedures. During the performance test, two sets of witness panels (case/insulation and steel/epoxy/steel) were prepared and pull tested. The CTP-0142, Revision 2, series of testing consisted of re-testing the steel/epoxy/steel witness panels. The pull tests analysis indicates the results of the tensile tests were comparable to the systems tunnel witness panel database. The exposed panel set and the control panel set average tensile values were above the 1-basis lower limits established on the systems tunnel witness panel database. It is recommended that the M-52 spray booth be qualified for producing flight hardware.

  7. Preliminary Photomicrographic Studies of Fuel Sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Dana W; Spencer, Robert C

    1932-01-01

    Photomicrographs were taken of fuel sprays injected into air at various densities for the purpose of studying the spray structure and the stages in the atomization of the fuel. The photomicrographs were taken at magnifying powers of 2.5, 3.25, and 10, using a spark discharge of very short duration for illumination. The results indicate that the theory advanced by Dr. R. A. Castleman, Jr., on the atomization of fuel in carburetors may also be applied to the atomization of fuel sprays of the solid-injection type. The fuel leaves the nozzle as a solid column, is ruffled and then torn into small, irregular ligaments by the action of the air. These ligaments are then quickly broken up into drops by the surface tension of the fuel. The photomicrographs also show that the dispersion of a fuel spray at a given distance from the nozzle increases with an increase in the jet velocity or an increase in the air density. The first portions of fuel sprays injected from an automatic injection valve into air at atmospheric density have a much greater dispersion than the later portions, but this difference decreases rapidly as the air density is increased.

  8. Containment atmosphere response to external sprays

    SciTech Connect

    Green, J.; Almenas, K.

    1995-09-01

    The application of external sprays to a containment steel shell can be an effective energy removal method and has been proposed in the passive AP-600 design. Reduction of the steel shell temperature in contact with the containment atmosphere enhances both heat and mass transfer driving forces. Large scale experimental data in this area is scarce, therefore the measurements obtained from the E series tests conducted at the German HDR facility deserve special attention. These long term tests simulated various severe accident conditions, including external spraying of the hemispherical steel shell. This investigation focuses upon the integral response of the HDR containment atmosphere during spray periods and upon methods by which lumped parameter system codes, like CONTAIN, model the underlying condensation phenomena. Increases in spray water flowrates above a minimum value were ineffective at improving containment pressure reduction since the limiting resistance for energy transfer lies in the noncondensable-vapor boundary layer at the inner condensing surface. The spray created an unstable condition by cooling the upper layers of a heated atmosphere and thus inducing global natural circulation flows in the facility and subsequently, abrupt changes in lighter-than-air noncondensable (J{sub 2}/He) concentrations. Modeling results using the CONTAIN code are outlined and code limitations are delineated.

  9. Crystal structure of alkaline cellulase K: insight into the alkaline adaptation of an industrial enzyme.

    PubMed

    Shirai, T; Ishida, H; Noda, J; Yamane, T; Ozaki, K; Hakamada, Y; Ito, S

    2001-07-27

    The crystal structure of the catalytic domain of alkaline cellulase K was determined at 1.9 A resolution. Because of the most alkaliphilic nature and it's highest activity at pH 9.5, it is used commercially in laundry detergents. An analysis of the structural bases of the alkaliphilic character of the enzyme suggested a mechanism similar to that previously proposed for alkaline proteases, that is, an increase in the number of Arg, His, and Gln residues, and a decrease in Asp and Lys residues. Some ion pairs were formed by the gained Arg residues, which is similar to what has been found in the alkaline proteases. Lys-Asp ion pairs are disfavored and partly replaced with Arg-Asp ion pairs. The alkaline adaptation appeared to be a remodeling of ion pairs so that the charge balance is kept in the high pH range.

  10. Spray cooling simulation implementing time scale analysis and the Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreitzer, Paul Joseph

    Spray cooling research is advancing the field of heat transfer and heat rejection in high power electronics. Smaller and more capable electronics packages are producing higher amounts of waste heat, along with smaller external surface areas, and the use of active cooling is becoming a necessity. Spray cooling has shown extremely high levels of heat rejection, of up to 1000 W/cm 2 using water. Simulations of spray cooling are becoming more realistic, but this comes at a price. A previous researcher has used CFD to successfully model a single 3D droplet impact into a liquid film using the level set method. However, the complicated multiphysics occurring during spray impingement and surface interactions increases computation time to more than 30 days. Parallel processing on a 32 processor system has reduced this time tremendously, but still requires more than a day. The present work uses experimental and computational results in addition to numerical correlations representing the physics occurring on a heated impingement surface. The current model represents the spray behavior of a Spraying Systems FullJet 1/8-g spray nozzle. Typical spray characteristics are indicated as follows: flow rate of 1.05x10-5 m3/s, normal droplet velocity of 12 m/s, droplet Sauter mean diameter of 48 microm, and heat flux values ranging from approximately 50--100 W/cm2 . This produces non-dimensional numbers of: We 300--1350, Re 750--3500, Oh 0.01--0.025. Numerical and experimental correlations have been identified representing crater formation, splashing, film thickness, droplet size, and spatial flux distributions. A combination of these methods has resulted in a Monte Carlo spray impingement simulation model capable of simulating hundreds of thousands of droplet impingements or approximately one millisecond. A random sequence of droplet impingement locations and diameters is generated, with the proper radial spatial distribution and diameter distribution. Hence the impingement, lifetime

  11. The use of cold sprayed alloys for metallic stents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AL-Mangour, Bandar

    With the invention of the coronary stent, which is a wire metal mesh tube designed to keep the arteries open in the treatment of heart diseases, promising clinical outcomes were generated. However, the long term successes of stents have been delayed by significant in-stent restenosis (blockages) and stent fracture. In this research work, it has been proposed to use Cold Gas Dynamic Spraying (CGDS) coating material as an alternative choice to manufacture metallic stent. In CGDS, fine particles are accelerated to a high velocity and undergo solid-state plastic deformation upon impact on the substrate, which leads to particle-particle bonding. The feature of CGDS distinct from other thermal spray techniques is that the processing gas temperature is below the melting point of the feedstock. Therefore, unwanted effects of high temperatures, such as oxidation, grain growth and thermal stresses, are absent. In response to the fact that the majority of stents are made from stainless steel (316L) or Co-Cr alloy (L605), this study specifically addresses the development and characterization of 316L and 316L mixed with L605 coatings produced by the CGDS process. Scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction were used to investigate the microstructural changes of these coatings before and after annealing. The effect of gas type on the microstructure of 316L coatings and the role of post-heat treatment in the microstructure and properties are also studied. Of particular interest are grain refinement, heat treatment, mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of the cold sprayed material.

  12. Integrated computational study of ultra-high heat flux cooling using cryogenic micro-solid nitrogen spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimoto, Jun; Oh, U.; Tan, Daisuke

    2012-10-01

    A new type of ultra-high heat flux cooling system using the atomized spray of cryogenic micro-solid nitrogen (SN2) particles produced by a superadiabatic two-fluid nozzle was developed and numerically investigated for application to next generation super computer processor thermal management. The fundamental characteristics of heat transfer and cooling performance of micro-solid nitrogen particulate spray impinging on a heated substrate were numerically investigated and experimentally measured by a new type of integrated computational-experimental technique. The employed Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis based on the Euler-Lagrange model is focused on the cryogenic spray behavior of atomized particulate micro-solid nitrogen and also on its ultra-high heat flux cooling characteristics. Based on the numerically predicted performance, a new type of cryogenic spray cooling technique for application to a ultra-high heat power density device was developed. In the present integrated computation, it is clarified that the cryogenic micro-solid spray cooling characteristics are affected by several factors of the heat transfer process of micro-solid spray which impinges on heated surface as well as by atomization behavior of micro-solid particles. When micro-SN2 spraying cooling was used, an ultra-high cooling heat flux level was achieved during operation, a better cooling performance than that with liquid nitrogen (LN2) spray cooling. As micro-SN2 cooling has the advantage of direct latent heat transport which avoids the film boiling state, the ultra-short time scale heat transfer in a thin boundary layer is more possible than in LN2 spray. The present numerical prediction of the micro-SN2 spray cooling heat flux profile can reasonably reproduce the measurement results of cooling wall heat flux profiles. The application of micro-solid spray as a refrigerant for next generation computer processors is anticipated, and its ultra-high heat flux technology is expected

  13. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Orifice Plugging Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Kimura, Marcia L.; Kurath, Dean E.

    2012-09-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities, is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations published in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials present in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty introduced by extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches in which the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are largely absent. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine the aerosol release fractions and aerosol generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents (AFA) was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices

  14. Water jet/spray measurement analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lala, G. G.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this study was to provide analysis of data obtained under a previous contract entitled Characterization of Drop Spectra from High Volume Flow Water Jets. Measurements of drop spectra were obtained in the spray resulting from the breakup of high volume flow water jets from a variety of nozzle types. The drop spectra measurements were obtained from two drop spectrometers covering a range from 10 microns to 12 millimeters diameter. The task addressed was to select representative spectra from the individual tests and provide analyses in both numerical and graphical formats as outlined in the proposal. The intended application of these results is an evaluation of the feasibility of fog clearing by high volume water sprays. During the tests, a fog event occurred making it possible to test the concept of fog clearing. Visual range data and fog drop spectra were analyzed, with particular emphasis placed on the modification of these parameters due to the water spray.

  15. Tomographical transformation of Malvern spray measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, H. M.; Sun, T. Y.; Chigier, N.

    1987-01-01

    A new method is described which directly transforms Malvern line-integral data into point measurements of the radial drop mean size distribution and liquid volume concentration distribution. The transformed results have been compared with experimental point measurements by photography and the phase/Doppler spray analyzer. The comparison reveals the relation between point measurements and line-of-sight measurements. Three kinds of nozzles were investigated. After tomographical transformation of the Malvern results the different structures of the spray are revealed. A newly derived formula simplifies the transformation procedure. This method provides a direct means to extend the applicability of the Malvern particle sizer and has the potential to be developed for use in unsymmetric sprays.

  16. Density of Spray-Formed Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin M. McHugh; Volker Uhlenwinkel; Nils Ellendr

    2008-06-01

    Spray Forming is an advanced materials processing technology that transforms molten metal into a near-net-shape solid by depositing atomized droplets onto a substrate. Depending on the application, the spray-formed material may be used in the as-deposited condition or it may undergo post-deposition processing. Regardless, the density of the as-deposited material is an important issue. Porosity is detrimental because it can significantly reduce strength, toughness, hardness and other properties. While it is not feasible to achieve fully-dense material in the as-deposited state, density greater than 99% of theoretical density is possible if the atomization and impact conditions are optimized. Thermal conditions at the deposit surface and droplet impact angle are key processing parameters that influence the density of the material. This paper examines the factors that contribute to porosity formation during spray forming and illustrates that very high as-deposited density is achieved by optimizing processing parameters.

  17. Current problems in plasma spray processing

    SciTech Connect

    Berndt, C.C.; Brindley, W.; Goland, A.N.; Herman, H.; Houck, D.L.; Jones, K.; Miller, R.A.; Neiser, R.; Riggs, W.; Sampath, S.; Smith, M.; Spanne, P. . Thermal Spray Lab.)

    1991-01-01

    This detailed report summarizes 8 contributions from a thermal spray conference that was held in late 1991 at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Upton, Long Island, NY, USA). The subject of Plasma Spray Processing'' is presented under subject headings of Plasma-particle interactions, Deposit formation dynamics, Thermal properties of thermal barrier coatings, Mechanical properties of coatings, Feed stock materials, Porosity: An integrated approach, Manufacture of intermetallic coatings, and Synchrotron x-ray microtomographic methods for thermal spray materials. Each section is intended to present a concise statement of a specific practical and/or scientific problem, then describe current work that is being performed to investigate this area, and finally to suggest areas of research that may be fertile for future activity.

  18. A new HVOF thermal spray concept

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, J.A.; Matus, R.J.; Richter, H.J.

    1995-12-31

    HVOF plays an important role in the commercial production of thermal spray coatings from powder. Initially, both the chamber and duct modes were used. Today, the best coatings are produced by high-pressure chamber guns with some manufacturers having switched their designs from the duct to the chamber mode. There has been little or no spraying of wire with HVOF equipment. A new HVOF process -- the shock-stabilized mode -- compliments chamber powder spraying by offering the user a very simple device for wire use. Calculations show that the much higher jet velocities of the chamber mode make that design the better suited for use with powder. Conversely, the greatly increased jet temperatures offered by shock-stabilized combustion give extremely high wire melt-off rates.

  19. Current problems in plasma spray processing

    SciTech Connect

    Berndt, C.C.; Brindley, W.; Goland, A.N.; Herman, H.; Houck, D.L.; Jones, K.; Miller, R.A.; Neiser, R.; Riggs, W.; Sampath, S.; Smith, M.; Spanne, P.

    1991-12-31

    This detailed report summarizes 8 contributions from a thermal spray conference that was held in late 1991 at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Upton, Long Island, NY, USA). The subject of ``Plasma Spray Processing`` is presented under subject headings of Plasma-particle interactions, Deposit formation dynamics, Thermal properties of thermal barrier coatings, Mechanical properties of coatings, Feed stock materials, Porosity: An integrated approach, Manufacture of intermetallic coatings, and Synchrotron x-ray microtomographic methods for thermal spray materials. Each section is intended to present a concise statement of a specific practical and/or scientific problem, then describe current work that is being performed to investigate this area, and finally to suggest areas of research that may be fertile for future activity.

  20. Thermophysical properties of plasma sprayed coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, K. E.; Lagedrost, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    Thermophysical properties of plasma sprayed materials were determined for the following plasma sprayed materials: CaO - stabilized ZrO2, Y2O3 - stabilized ZerO2, Al2O3, HfO2 Mo, nichrome, NiAl, Mo-ZrO2, and MoAl2O3 mixtures. In all cases the thermal conductivity of the as-sprayed materials was found to be considerably lower than that of the bulk material. The flash-laser thermal diffusivity technique was used both for diffusivity determination of single-layer materials and to determine the thermal contact resistance at the interface of two-layer specimens.

  1. Spray Drying of Mosambi Juice in Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. V.; Verma, A.

    2014-01-01

    The studies on spray drying of mosambi juice were carried out with Laboratory spray dryer set-up (LSD-48 MINI SPRAY DRYER-JISL). Inlet and outlet air temperature and maltodextrin (drying agent) concentration was taken as variable parameters. Experiments were conducted by using 110 °C to 140 °C inlet air temperature, 60 °C to 70 °C outlet air temperature and 5-7 % maltodextrin concentration. The free flow powder of mosambi juice was obtained with 7 % maltodextrin at 140 °C inlet air temperature and 60 °C outlet air temperature. Fresh and reconstituted juices were evaluated for vitamin C, titrable acidity and sensory characteristics. The reconstituted juice was found slightly acceptable by taste panel.

  2. Design of a Microgravity Spray Cooling Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baysinger, Kerri M.; Yerkes, Kirk L.; Michalak, Travis E.; Harris, Richard J.; McQuillen, John

    2004-01-01

    An analytical and experimental study was conducted for the application of spray cooling in a microgravity and high-g environment. Experiments were carried out aboard the NASA KC-135 reduced gravity aircraft, which provided the microgravity and high-g environments. In reduced gravity, surface tension flow was observed around the spray nozzle, due to unconstrained liquid in the test chamber and flow reversal at the heat source. A transient analytical model was developed to predict the temperature and the spray heat transfer coefficient within the heated region. Comparison of the experimental transient temperature variation with analytical results showed good agreement for low heat input values. The transient analysis also verified that thermal equilibrium within the heated region could be reached during the 20-25s reduced gravity portion of the flight profile.

  3. Thermal spray manual for machinery components

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, R.; Ginther, C.; Herbstritt, M.; Herbstritt, J.

    1995-12-31

    The Thermal Spray Manual For Machinery Components is a National Shipbuilding Research (SP-7) Project. This Manual is being developed by Puget Sound Naval Shipyard with the help of other government thermal spray facilities and SP-7 panel members. The purpose of the manual is to provide marine repair facilities with a ``how to do`` document that will be ``user friendly`` and known to be technically sound through production experience. The manual`s intent is to give marine repair facilities the ability to maximize the thermal spray process as a repair method for machinery components and to give these facilities guidelines on how to become qualified to receive certification that they meet the requirements of Military Standard 1687A.

  4. Analysis of polydisperse fuel spray flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, Ophir; Lehavi, Yaron; Ajadi, Suraju; Gol'dshtein, Vladimir

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we analyzed the model of polydisperse fuel spray flame by using the sectional approach to describe the droplet-droplet interaction within the spray. The radii of the droplets are described by a probability density function. Our numerical simulations include a comparative analysis between three empirical droplet size distributions: the Rosin-Rammler distribution, the log-normal distribution and the Nakiyama-Tanasawa distribution. The log-normal distribution was found to produce a reasonable approximation to both the number and volume size distribution function. In addition our comparative analysis includes the application of the homotopy analysis method which yields convergent solutions for all values of the relevant parameters. We compared the above results to experimental fuel spray data such as {it{Tetralin}}, n-{it{Decane}}, and n-{it{Heptane}}.

  5. Prebiotic Synthesis of Glycine from Ethanolamine in Simulated Archean Alkaline Hydrothermal Vents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianlong; Tian, Ge; Gao, Jing; Han, Mei; Su, Rui; Wang, Yanxiang; Feng, Shouhua

    2016-09-23

    Submarine hydrothermal vents are generally considered as the likely habitats for the origin and evolution of early life on Earth. In recent years, a novel hydrothermal system in Archean subseafloor has been proposed. In this model, highly alkaline and high temperature hydrothermal fluids were generated in basalt-hosted hydrothermal vents, where H2 and CO2 could be abundantly provided. These extreme conditions could have played an irreplaceable role in the early evolution of life. Nevertheless, sufficient information has not yet been obtained for the abiotic synthesis of amino acids, which are indispensable components of life, at high temperature and alkaline condition. This study aims to propose a new method for the synthesis of glycine in simulated Archean submarine alkaline vent systems. We investigated the formation of glycine from ethanolamine under conditions of high temperature (80-160 °C) and highly alkaline solutions (pH = 9.70). Experiments were performed in an anaerobic environment under mild pressure (0.1-8.0 MPa) at the same time. The results suggested that the formation of glycine from ethanolamine occurred rapidly and efficiently in the presence of metal powders, and was favored by high temperatures and high pressures. The experiment provides a new pathway for prebiotic glycine formation and points out the phenomenal influence of high-temperature alkaline hydrothermal vents in origin of life in the early ocean.

  6. Prebiotic Synthesis of Glycine from Ethanolamine in Simulated Archean Alkaline Hydrothermal Vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xianlong; Tian, Ge; Gao, Jing; Han, Mei; Su, Rui; Wang, Yanxiang; Feng, Shouhua

    2016-09-01

    Submarine hydrothermal vents are generally considered as the likely habitats for the origin and evolution of early life on Earth. In recent years, a novel hydrothermal system in Archean subseafloor has been proposed. In this model, highly alkaline and high temperature hydrothermal fluids were generated in basalt-hosted hydrothermal vents, where H2 and CO2 could be abundantly provided. These extreme conditions could have played an irreplaceable role in the early evolution of life. Nevertheless, sufficient information has not yet been obtained for the abiotic synthesis of amino acids, which are indispensable components of life, at high temperature and alkaline condition. This study aims to propose a new method for the synthesis of glycine in simulated Archean submarine alkaline vent systems. We investigated the formation of glycine from ethanolamine under conditions of high temperature (80-160 °C) and highly alkaline solutions (pH = 9.70). Experiments were performed in an anaerobic environment under mild pressure (0.1-8.0 MPa) at the same time. The results suggested that the formation of glycine from ethanolamine occurred rapidly and efficiently in the presence of metal powders, and was favored by high temperatures and high pressures. The experiment provides a new pathway for prebiotic glycine formation and points out the phenomenal influence of high-temperature alkaline hydrothermal vents in origin of life in the early ocean.

  7. Real-time materials evolution visualized within intact cycling alkaline batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Gallaway, JW; Erdonmez, CK; Zhong, Z; Croft, M; Sviridov, LA; Sholklapper, TZ; Turney, DE; Banerjee, S; Steingart, DA

    2014-01-01

    The scientific community has focused on the problem of inexpensive, safe, and sustainable large-scale electrical energy storage, which is needed for a number of emerging societal reasons such as stabilizing intermittent renewables-based generation like solar and wind power. The materials used for large-scale storage will need to be low cost, earth-abundant, and safe at the desired scale. The Zn-MnO2 "alkaline" battery chemistry is associated with one-time use, despite being rechargeable. This is due to material irreversibilities that can be triggered in either the anode or cathode. However, as Zn and MnO2 have high energy density and low cost, they are economically attractive even at limited depth of discharge. As received, a standard bobbin-type alkaline cell costs roughly $20 per kW h. The U. S. Department of Energy ARPA-E $100 per kW h cost target for grid storage is thus close to the cost of alkaline consumer primary cells if re-engineered and/or cycled at 5-20% nominal capacity. Herein we use a deeply-penetrating in situ technique to observe ZnO precipitation near the separator in an alkaline cell anode cycled at 5% DOD, which is consistent with cell failures observed at high cycle life. Alkaline cells designed to avoid such causes of cell failure could serve as a low-cost baseload for large-scale storage.

  8. Synthesis of functional oxides through plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xianzhong

    Thermal spray coatings have become an important part of modern industry, offering customized surface properties for a variety of industrial applications, e.g. thermal barrier coatings, wear resistant coatings, erosion resistant coatings and functional coatings. Although the usage of thermal spray coatings has increased dramatically, the scientific research of these coatings has lagged behind. Good understanding of thermal spray processes can provide the optimistic combination of operation parameters to obtain high quality of coating, improve service life of the product, and lower cost of the system. The research presented in this dissertation focuses on the synthesis of functional oxide coatings through plasma spraying techniques. The materials studied in this research are: yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) which can be the thermal barrier coating and environmental barrier coating; doped YAG as phosphor; yttrium iron garnet (YIG) applied in telecommunication and data storage; aluminum substituted YIG for biomedical applications; and zirconium substituted yttrium titanate pyrochlore in developing solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The synthesis processes, phase formation, microstructure, and physical properties of above materials have been investigated in a comprehensive and integrated way. The precursor powders or solutions were prepared via different chemical routes. The experiments suggest that formation of phase-pure oxides occurs through different phase evolution pathways and depending on the reaction conditions. Chemically derived precursors and/or powders were used as feedstock in plasma spray to form functional oxide coatings. Due to its rapid heating and cooling features, plasma spraying techniques provide a novel opportunity for functional oxides to transfer from amorphous into crystallized structure at a relatively low temperature in a single step. The properties of assprayed and post-heated coatings strongly depend on their microstructure and phase content.

  9. Effects of primary breakup modeling on spray and combustion characteristics of compression ignition engines

    SciTech Connect

    Som, S.; Aggarwal, S.K.

    2010-06-15

    Injector flow dynamics and primary breakup processes are known to play a pivotal role in determining combustion and emissions in diesel engines. In the present study, we examine the effects of primary breakup modeling on the spray and combustion characteristics under diesel engine conditions. The commonly used KH model, which considers the aerodynamically induced breakup based on the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, is modified to include the effects of cavitation and turbulence generated inside the injector. The KH model and the new (KH-ACT) model are extensively evaluated by performing 3-D time-dependent simulations with detailed chemistry under diesel engine conditions. Results indicate that the inclusion of cavitation and turbulence enhances primary breakup, leading to smaller droplet sizes, decrease in liquid penetration, and increase in the radial dispersion of spray. Predictions are compared with measurements for non-evaporating and evaporating sprays, as well as with flame measurements. While both the models are able to reproduce the experimentally observed global spray and combustion characteristics, predictions using the KH-ACT model exhibit closer agreement with measurements in terms of liquid penetration, cone angle, spray axial velocity, and liquid mass distribution for non-evaporating sprays. Similarly, the KH-ACT model leads to better agreement with respect to the liquid length and vapor penetration distance for evaporating sprays, and with respect to the flame lift-off location for combusting sprays. The improved agreement is attributed to the ability of the new model to account for the effects of turbulence and cavitation generated inside the injector, which enhance the primary breakup. Results further indicate that the combustion under diesel engine conditions is characterized by a double-flame structure with a rich premixed reaction zone near the flame stabilization region and a non-premixed reaction zone further downstream. This flame structure is

  10. Deodorant spray: a newly identified cause of cold burn.

    PubMed

    May, Ulrich; Stirner, Karl-Heinz; Lauener, Roger; Ring, Johannes; Möhrenschlager, Matthias

    2010-09-01

    Two patients encountered a first-degree cold burn after use of a deodorant spray. The spray-nozzle to skin-surface distance was approximately 5 cm, and the spraying lasted approximately 15 seconds. Under laboratory conditions, the deodorant in use was able to induce a decline in temperature of >60 degrees C. These 2 cases highlight a little-known potential for skin damage by deodorant sprays if used improperly.

  11. Low VOC, Plural Component Spray (PCS) Coatings Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-07

    Continuous Application Method Plural Component Spray Benefits • Automated proportioning • Precision mixing • Utilizes HVLP spray guns • Accommodates...255 - 3541 roddy.keish@wpafb.af.mil Birthplace, Home and Future of Aerospace Low VOC, Plural Component Spray (PCS) Coatings Program 7 May 2009 Report...2009 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Low VOC, Plural Component Spray (PCS) Coatings Program 5a

  12. Turning of thick thermal spray coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López de Lacalle, L. N.; Lamikiz, A.; Fernandes, M. H.; Gutiérrez, A.; Sánchez, J. A.

    2001-06-01

    This technical note looks at several attempts to machine parts coated with Ni5Al thermal spray. This coating is used in the overhaul and repair of gas turbine components. Machining the thermal sprays to achieve the dimensional tolerances and surface finish is needed. Turning tests were performed with small carbide inserts and with CBN. A study was made of tool performance and cutting process. In this way, tool life, wear mechanism, chip formation process, and actual roughness of turned parts were analyzed. In addition to the good performance of CBN inserts, some disadvantages of using coolant with CBN tools were detected and analyzed.

  13. Spray Rolling Aluminum Strip for Transportation Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin M. McHugh; Y. Lin; Y. Zhou; E. J. Lavernia; J.-P. Delplanque; S. B. Johnson

    2005-02-01

    Spray rolling is a novel strip casting technology in which molten aluminum alloy is atomized and deposited into the roll gap of mill rolls to produce aluminum strip. A combined experimental/modeling approach has been followed in developing this technology with active participation from industry. The feasibility of this technology has been demonstrated at the laboratory scale and it is currently being scaled-up. This paper provides an overview of the process and compares the microstructure and properties of spray-rolled 2124 aluminum alloy with commercial ingot-processed material

  14. Microencapsulation of phenobarbital by spray polycondensation.

    PubMed

    Voellmy, C; Speiser, P; Soliva, M

    1977-05-01

    A new method for the microencapsulation of solids is described. It is based on the polycondensation of amphiphilic and, thus, tensioactive precondensates on a melamine-formaldehyde base on the surface of suspended particles during spray drying. A film-forming agent, preferably one that reacts chemically with the resin, is indispensable for spray drying and also for the formation of an efficient membrane around the drug particles. The resulting microcapsules are essentially spherical and have, after appropriate curing, a sustained-release effect in vitro. The factors that most influence the formation and properties of the microcapsules are the composition (qualitative and quantitative), pH, and viscosity of the suspension.

  15. Plasma-Spray Metal Coating On Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cranston, J.

    1994-01-01

    Molds, forms, and other substrates made of foams coated with metals by plasma spraying. Foam might be ceramic, carbon, metallic, organic, or inorganic. After coat applied by plasma spraying, foam left intact or removed by acid leaching, conventional machining, water-jet cutting, or another suitable technique. Cores or vessels made of various foam materials plasma-coated with metals according to method useful as thermally insulating containers for foods, liquids, or gases, or as mandrels for making composite-material (matrix/fiber) parts, or making thermally insulating firewalls in automobiles.

  16. The sulphate-reduction alkalinity pump tested

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, Patrick; Petrishcheva, Elena

    2016-04-01

    Carbonate precipitation has been suggested to be induced by alkalinity increase during sulphate reduction under anoxic conditions. This mechanism may explain the formation of carbonate deposits in shallow marine environments, either within a redox stratified sediment inhabited by phototrophic microbial mats or in shallow water within the photic zone where sulphidic water is upwelling onto the shelf. The alkalinity pump may work as long as the sulphide is not reoxidized to sulphate, a process that would acidify the surrounding. The alkalinity effect of sulphate reduction was recently tested by Aloisi (2008) for microbial mats using a model approach. He found that sulphate reduction does not significantly increase or even decrease carbonate saturation and is unlikely to have played a significant role through Earth history. The model considers many environmental factors, including the effect of carbonate precipitation itself on the carbonate equilbrium and on the alkalinity. We used a modified version of Aloisi's (2008) model to simulate the saturation states of aragonite, calcite and dolomite without the effects of carbonate precipitation. This is necessary to evaluate the effect of microbial metabolisms exclusively on carbonate saturation, since carbonate precipitation is only the consequence, but not the cause of oversaturation. First results show that the saturation state is increased in the zone of phototrophic CO2 uptake. In contrast, the saturation state is strongly decreased in the zone where dissolved oxygen overlaps with dissolved sulphide. Aerobic sulphide oxidation consumes most of the HS- and dissipates most of the alkalinity produced in the sulphate reduction zone below. Hence, our results are consistent with the findings of Aloisi (2008), and they even more clearly show that sulphate reduction does not induce carbonate precipitation nor contributes to carbonate precipitation in combination with phototrophic CO2 uptake. The alkalinity effect of sulphate

  17. [Leucocyte alkaline phosphatase in normal and pathological pregnancy (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Stark, K H; Zaki, I; Sobolewski, K

    1981-01-01

    The activities of leucocyte alkaline phosphatase were determined in 511 patients with normal and pathological pregnancy. Mean values were compared and the enzyme followed up, and the conclusion was drawn that leucocyte alkaline phosphatase was no safe indicator of foetal condition. No direct relationship were found to exist between leucocyte alkaline phosphatase, total oestrogens, HSAP, HLAP, HPL, and oxytocinase.

  18. Update: HFC 245fa Blown Foam Development with External Tank Spray Foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, S.

    2001-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) Materials Research Laboratory is currently investigating environmentally friendly blowing agents for use in the insulations of the Space Shuttle's External Tank. The original TPS foam materials of the External Tank were blown with chlorofluorocarbon 11, which is now regulated because of its high Ozone Depletion Potential (ODP). Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), with an ODP that is one tenth that of CFCs, have been widely adopted as an interim blowing agent in urethane insulations. In FY96, Lockheed Martin completed the production qualification and validation of HCFC 141b blown insulations. Because of the expected limited commercial lifetime of HCFC 141b, research efforts are underway to identify and develop alternatives with zero ODP. HFC245fa (1,1,1,3,3-pentaflouropropane) has been chosen by the manufacturer as a third-generation blowing agent to be marketed commercially. Preliminary work evaluating this third-generation candidate has demonstrated promising material mechanical property data. Favorable results from small-scale spray activities have justified evaluations using production foam processing spray parameters. With the scale-up of the spray equipment, however, additional processing issues have been identified. This paper will present data collected to date regarding the use of this blowing agent in External Tank spray foams.

  19. Including latent and sensible heat fluxes from sea spray in global weather and climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copsey, Dan

    2016-04-01

    Most standard weather and climate models calculate interfacial latent (evaporation) and sensible heat fluxes over the ocean based on parameterisations of atmospheric turbulence, using the wave state only in the calculation of surface roughness length. They ignore latent and sensible heat fluxes generated by sea spray, which is an acceptable assumption at low wind speeds. However at high wind speeds (> 15 m/s) a significant amount of sea spray is generated from the sea surface which, while airborne, cools to an equilibrium temperature, absorbs heat and releases moisture before re-impacting the sea surface. This could impact, for example, the total heat loss from the Southern Ocean (which is anomalously warm in Met Office coupled models) or the accuracy of tropical cyclone forecasts. A modified version of the Fairall sea spray parameterisation scheme has been tested in the Met Office Unified Model including the JULES surface exchange model in both climate and NWP mode. The fast part of the scheme models the temperature change of the droplets to an equilibrium temperature and the slow part of the scheme models the evaporation and heat absorption while the droplets remain airborne. Including this scheme in the model cools and moistens the near surface layers of the atmosphere during high wind events, including tropical cyclones. Sea spray goes on to increase the convection intensity and precipitation near the high wind events in the model.

  20. The effect of microbubble cavity formation on the breakup of glowing sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Voort, Dennis; Dam, Nico; van de Water, Willem; Kunnen, Rudie; Clercx, Herman; van Heijst, Gertjan

    2016-11-01

    Spray atomization is affected by an interplay of several physical phenomena. To understand the breakup as a whole, it is essential to understand the contribution of individual phenomena (turbulence,cavitation,etc). This work investigates the contribution of cavity formation inside the nozzle by seeding a system with microbubbles, generating transient cavities. Using transparent nozzles, pressure sensors, and high-speed imaging, we find that the pressure pulses generated by cavity collapse can be used to correlate the time and magnitude of the spray angle increase, valuable for application in non-transparant setups. Laser-induced phosphorescence is used to quantitatively measure liquid dispersion, which excites ('tags') 10-20 nL of fluid at the nozzle exit and tracks the spread of glowing fluid. The dispersion correlated to cavity formation events is compared to the average. We show that the dispersion (which is independent of the starting tagged spray width) does not increase with the formation of a cavity. This indicates that, while the spray angle may increase, the turbulent processes (both liquid and gas phase) that governs the dispersion remains the same, and the cavitation events do not influence this process.

  1. 3D-printed paper spray ionization cartridge with fast wetting and continuous solvent supply features.

    PubMed

    Salentijn, Gert I J; Permentier, Hjalmar P; Verpoorte, Elisabeth

    2014-12-02

    We report the development of a 3D-printed cartridge for paper spray ionization (PSI) that can be used almost immediately after solvent introduction in a dedicated reservoir and allows prolonged spray generation from a paper tip. The fast wetting feature described in this work is based on capillary action through paper and movement of fluid between paper and the cartridge material (polylactic acid, PLA). The influence of solvent composition, PLA conditioning of the cartridge with isopropanol, and solvent volume introduced into the reservoir have been investigated with relation to wetting time and the amount of solvent consumed for wetting. Spray has been demonstrated with this cartridge for tens of minutes, without any external pumping. It is shown that fast wetting and spray generation can easily be achieved using a number of solvent mixtures commonly used for PSI. The PSI cartridge was applied to the analysis of lidocaine from a paper tip using different solvent mixtures, and to the analysis of lidocaine from a serum sample. Finally, a demonstration of online paper chromatography-mass spectrometry is given.

  2. The Impact of Aerosol Particle Mixing State on the Hygroscopicity of Sea Spray Aerosol.

    PubMed

    Schill, Steven R; Collins, Douglas B; Lee, Christopher; Morris, Holly S; Novak, Gordon A; Prather, Kimberly A; Quinn, Patricia K; Sultana, Camille M; Tivanski, Alexei V; Zimmermann, Kathryn; Cappa, Christopher D; Bertram, Timothy H

    2015-06-24

    Aerosol particles influence global climate by determining cloud droplet number concentrations, brightness, and lifetime. Primary aerosol particles, such as those produced from breaking waves in the ocean, display large particle-particle variability in chemical composition, morphology, and physical phase state, all of which affect the ability of individual particles to accommodate water and grow into cloud droplets. Despite such diversity in molecular composition, there is a paucity of methods available to assess how particle-particle variability in chemistry translates to corresponding differences in aerosol hygroscopicity. Here, an approach has been developed that allows for characterization of the distribution of aerosol hygroscopicity within a chemically complex population of atmospheric particles. This methodology, when applied to the interpretation of nascent sea spray aerosol, provides a quantitative framework for connecting results obtained using molecular mimics generated in the laboratory with chemically complex ambient aerosol. We show that nascent sea spray aerosol, generated in situ in the Atlantic Ocean, displays a broad distribution of particle hygroscopicities, indicative of a correspondingly broad distribution of particle chemical compositions. Molecular mimics of sea spray aerosol organic material were used in the laboratory to assess the volume fractions and molecular functionality required to suppress sea spray aerosol hygroscopicity to the extent indicated by field observations. We show that proper accounting for the distribution and diversity in particle hygroscopicity and composition are important to the assessment of particle impacts on clouds and global climate.

  3. Numerical Simulation and Experimental Characterization of a Binary Aluminum Alloy Spray - Application to the Spray Rolling Process

    SciTech Connect

    S. B. Johnson; J.-P. Delplanque; Y. Lin; Y. Zhou; E. J. Lavernia; K. M. McHugh

    2005-02-01

    A stochastic, droplet-resolved model has been developed to describe the behavior of a binary aluminum alloy spray during the spray-rolling process. In this process, a molten aluminum alloy is atomized and the resulting spray is depostied on the rolls of a twin-roll caster to produce aluminum strip. The one-way coupled spray model allows the prediction of spray characteristics such as enthalph and solid fraction, and their distribution between the nozzle and the depostion surface. This paper outlines the model development and compares the predicted spray dynamics to PDI measurements performed in a controlled configuration. Predicted and measured droplet velocity and size distributions are presented for two points along the spray centerline along with predicted spray averaged specific enthalph and solid fraction curves.

  4. Alignment Fixtures For Vacuum-Plasma-Spray Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodford, William H.; Mckechnie, Timothy N.; Power, Christopher A.; Daniel, Ronald L., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Fixtures for alignment of vacuum-plasma-spray guns built. Each fixture designed to fit specific gun and holds small, battery-powered laser on centerline of gun. Laser beam projects small red dot where centerline intersects surface of workpiece to be sprayed. After laser beam positioned on surface of workpiece, fixture removed from gun and spraying proceeds.

  5. 9 CFR 590.542 - Spray process drying operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Spray process drying operations. 590..., Processing, and Facility Requirements § 590.542 Spray process drying operations. (a) The drying room shall be... interrupted. (1) Spray nozzles, orifices, cores, or whizzers shall be cleaned immediately after cessation...

  6. Influence of eye surface area on spray vaccination dosage rates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spray application of Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) vaccine saves both time and labor for the table egg industry. Optimization of spray application of vaccine is important in maintaining animal health and productivity. Previous work has shown that droplets produced by popular nozzles used for spray...

  7. Effects of nozzle spray angle on droplet size and velocity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spray applicators have many choices in selecting a spray nozzle to make an application of an agricultural product. They must balance flowrate, spray pressure, and nozzle type and setup to deliver their agrochemical in the right droplet size for their particular needs. Studies were conducted to det...

  8. Quantitative Assessment of Spray Deposition with Water-Sensitive Paper

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spray droplets, discharged from the lower six nozzles of an airblast sprayer, were sampled on pairs of absorbent filter and water-sensitive papers at nine distances from sprayer. Spray deposition on filter targets were measured by fluorometry and spray distribution on WSP targets were assessed by t...

  9. VERIFYING THE PERFORMANCE OF PESTICIDE SPRAY DRIFT REDUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Application of pesticide sprays usually results in formation of small spray droplets which can drift with air currents to nearby sensitive sites. A number of technologies offer the potential to reduce the amount of spray drift from pesticide applications. Acceptance and use of ...

  10. Review of the MDF-LSA 100 Spray Decontamination System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Review of the MDF -LSA 100 Spray Decontamination System Rodi Sferopoulos Human Protection and Performance Division...and performance of the Modec Decontamination Foam ( MDF )-LSA 100 Spray Decontamination System as well as information regarding the decontamination...RELEASE UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Review of the MDF -LSA 100 Spray Decontamination System Executive Summary DSTO were

  11. High Fidelity Simulation of Atomization in Diesel Engine Sprays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    structure of the high speed jet. The turbulent Atomization in diesel engine sprays 9 !"# $ $"# % %"# &’$! ï...ARL-RP-0555 ● SEP 2015 US Army Research Laboratory High Fidelity Simulation of Atomization in Diesel Engine Sprays by L Bravo...ARL-RP-0555 ● SEP 2015 US Army Research Laboratory High Fidelity Simulation of Atomization in Diesel Engine Sprays by L

  12. Transient removal of alkaline zones after excitation of Chara cells is associated with inactivation of high conductance in the plasmalemma

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The action potential (AP) of excitable plant cells is a multifunctional physiological signal. Its generation in characean algae suppresses the pH banding for 15–30 min and enhances the heterogeneity of spatial distribution of photosynthetic activity. This suppression is largely due to the cessation of H+ influx (OH− efflux) in the alkaline cell regions. Measurements of local pH and membrane conductance in individual space-clamped alkaline zones (small cell areas bathed in an isolated pool of external medium) showed that the AP generation is followed by the transient disappearance of alkaline zone in parallel with a large decrease in membrane conductance. These changes, specific to alkaline zones, were only observed under continuous illumination following a relaxation period of at least 15 min after previous excitation. The excitation of dark-adapted cells produced no conductance changes in the post-excitation period. The results indicate that the origin of alkaline zones in characean cells is not due to operation of electroneutral H+/HCO3− symport or OH−/HCO3− antiport. It is concluded that the membrane excitation is associated with inactivation of plasmalemma high conductance in the alkaline cell regions. PMID:19820298

  13. Investigations on the Initial Stress Evolution During Atmospheric Plasma Spraying of YSZ by In Situ Curvature Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutter, Markus; Mauer, Georg; Mücke, Robert; Vaßen, Robert; Back, Hyoung Chul; Gibmeier, Jens

    2016-04-01

    The residual stresses within plasma-sprayed coatings are an important factor that can influence the lifetime as well as the performance in operation. The investigation of stresses evolving during deposition and post-deposition cooling for atmospheric plasma spraying of yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings using in situ measurement of the samples curvature is a powerful tool for identifying the factors that contribute to stress generation. Under various spray conditions, the first deposition pass leads to a significantly larger increase in samples curvature than the subsequent passes. It is shown in this work that the amount of curvature change at the onset of spraying is significantly influenced by the spray conditions, as well as by the substrate material. More information on the origin of this steep curvature increase at the onset of spraying was obtained by single splat experiments, which yielded information on the splat bonding behavior under various conditions. A comparison of the compressive yield strength for different substrate materials indicated the influence of substrate residual stress relaxation. Residual stress measurements using the incremental hole-drilling method and x-ray diffraction confirmed that the coating deposition affects the substrate residual stress level. The yield strength data were combined with the substrate near-surface temperature during deposition, obtained by finite element simulations, and with the measured residual stress-profile. This revealed that residual stress relaxation is the key factor for the initial curvature increase.

  14. High-volume use of self-cementing spray dry absorber material for structural applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Charles E.

    Spray dry absorber (SDA) material, or spray dryer ash, is a byproduct of energy generation by coal combustion and sulfur emissions controls. Like any resource, it ought to be used to its fullest potential offsetting as many of the negative environmental impacts of coal combustion as possible throughout its lifecycle. Its cementitious and pozzolanic properties suggest it be used to augment or replace another energy and emissions intensive product: Portland cement. There is excellent potential for spray dryer ash to be used beneficially in structural applications, which will offset CO2 emissions due to Portland cement production, divert landfill waste by further utilizing a plentiful coal combustion by-product, and create more durable and sustainable structures. The research into beneficial use applications for SDA material is relatively undeveloped and the material is highly underutilized. This dissertation explored a specific self-cementing spray dryer ash for use as a binder in structural materials. Strength and stiffness properties of hydrated spray dryer ash mortars were improved by chemical activation with Portland cement and reinforcement with polymer fibers from automobile tire recycling. Portland cement at additions of five percent of the cementitious material was found to function effectively as an activating agent for spray dryer ash and had a significant impact on the hardened properties. The recycled polymer fibers improved the ductility and toughness of the material in all cases and increased the compressive strength of weak matrix materials like the pure hydrated ash. The resulting hardened materials exhibited useful properties that were sufficient to suggest that they be used in structural applications such as concrete, masonry block, or as a hydraulic cement binder. While the long-term performance characteristics remain to be investigated, from an embodied-energy and carbon emissions standpoint the material investigated here is far superior to

  15. Basalt as a solid source of calcium and alkalinity for the sequestration of carbon dioxide in building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, N. C.; Westfield, I.; Lu, P.; Bourcier, W. L.; Kendall, T.; Constantz, B. R.

    2010-12-01

    Motivated by the idea of converting waste carbon dioxide into usable building products, Calera Corporation has developed a multi-step process that sequesters CO2 as carbonate minerals in cementitious materials. Process inputs include dissolved divalent cations and alkalinity, both of which can be extracted from basalt. In one mode of the Calera process, the electrochemical production of alkalinity generates large volumes of hydrochloric acid as a by-product, which has been shown to effectively leach divalent cations from basalt while being neutralized by the basalt dissolution reaction. Using a 10:1 1M HCl solution to rock ratio, 3500 ppm Ca was extracted while the initial solution was neutralized to a pH of 2.60 in two weeks at a temperature of 80oC in an anoxic batch reactor. In this scenario, mineral carbonation occurs via three steps: electrochemical production of alkalinity, CO2 absorption by the alkaline stream, then precipitation by mixing the basalt-derived divalent cation stream and the CO2-containing alkaline stream. In a second scenario, alkalinity is extracted from basalt using an alkalinity capacitor, a weak acid. This solution may contain a proton source, such as ammonium chloride, or a hydroxyl acceptor, such as boric acid, but the main design constraint is that the pKa of the capacitor be high enough to deprontonate carbonic acid. The weak acid solution is mixed with basalt in an anoxic batch reactor and the dissolving rock consumes protons from the weak acid, generating the conjugate base. The solution rich in conjugate base then absorbs CO2 and the carbonate-rich solution is mixed with a calcium-rich stream to precipitate carbonate minerals. We have extracted up to 1100 mmol alkalinity per kg rock using an alkalinity capacitor, versus no more than 50 mmol alkalinity per kg rock using DI water as a solvent. Again, carbon sequestration occurs via three steps: alkalinity extraction from basalt, CO2 absorption, and finally carbonate precipitation

  16. Structurally Integrated, Damage-Tolerant, Thermal Spray Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vackel, Andrew; Dwivedi, Gopal; Sampath, Sanjay

    2015-07-01

    Thermal spray coatings are used extensively for the protection and life extension of engineering components exposed to harsh wear and/or corrosion during service in aerospace, energy, and heavy machinery sectors. Cermet coatings applied via high-velocity thermal spray are used in aggressive wear situations almost always coupled with corrosive environments. In several instances (e.g., landing gear), coatings are considered as part of the structure requiring system-level considerations. Despite their widespread use, the technology has lacked generalized scientific principles for robust coating design, manufacturing, and performance analysis. Advances in process and in situ diagnostics have provided significant insights into the process-structure-property-performance correlations providing a framework-enhanced design. In this overview, critical aspects of materials, process, parametrics, and performance are discussed through exemplary studies on relevant compositions. The underlying connective theme is understanding and controlling residual stresses generation, which not only addresses process dynamics but also provides linkage for process-property relationship for both the system (e.g., fatigue) and the surface (wear and corrosion). The anisotropic microstructure also invokes the need for damage-tolerant material design to meet future goals.

  17. Surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding field project

    SciTech Connect

    French, T.R.

    1991-10-01

    The Tucker sand of Helper (KS) field is a candidate for surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding. The geology of the Helper site is typical of many DOE Class I reservoirs. The Tucker sand of Helper field was deposited in a fluvial dominated deltaic environment. Helper oil can be mobilized with either chemical system 2 or chemical system 3, as described in this report. Oil fields in the Gulf Coast region are also good candidates for surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding. The results from laboratory tests conducted in Berea sandstone cores with oil brine from Helper (KS) field are encouraging. The crude oil is viscous and non-acidic and, yet, was mobilized by the chemical formulations described in this report. Significant amounts of the oil were mobilized under simulated reservoir conditions. The results in Berea sandstone cores were encouraging and should be verified by tests with field core. Consumption of alkali, measured with field core, was very low. Surfactant loss appeared to be acceptable. Despite the good potential for mobilization of Helper oil, certain reservoir characteristics such as low permeability, compartmentalization, and shallow depth place constraints on applications of any chemical system in the Tucker sand. These constraints are typical of many DOE Class I reservoirs. Although Hepler field is not a perfect reservoir in which to apply surfactant- enhanced alkaline flooding, Hepler oil is particularly amenable to mobilization by surfactant-enhanced alkaline systems. A field test is recommended, dependent upon final evaluation of well logs and cores from the proposed pilot area. 14 refs., 21 figs., 10 tabs.

  18. The alkaline earth intercalates of molybdenum disulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somoano, R. B.; Hadek, V.; Rembaum, A.; Samson, S.; Woollam, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Molybdenum disulfide has been intercalated with calcium and strontium by means of the liquid ammonia technique. Chemical, X-ray, and superconductivity data are presented. The X-ray data reveal a lowering of crystal symmetry and increase of complexity of the structure upon intercalation with the alkaline earth metals. The Ca and Sr intercalates start to superconduct at 4 and 5.6 K, respectively, and show considerable anisotropy regarding the critical magnetic field.

  19. Alkaline earth cation extraction from acid solution

    DOEpatents

    Dietz, Mark; Horwitz, E. Philip

    2003-01-01

    An extractant medium for extracting alkaline earth cations from an aqueous acidic sample solution is described as are a method and apparatus for using the same. The separation medium is free of diluent, free-flowing and particulate, and comprises a Crown ether that is a 4,4'(5')[C.sub.4 -C.sub.8 -alkylcyclohexano]18-Crown-6 dispersed on an inert substrate material.

  20. Oxidation catalysts on alkaline earth supports

    DOEpatents

    Mohajeri, Nahid

    2017-03-21

    An oxidation catalyst includes a support including particles of an alkaline earth salt, and first particles including a palladium compound on the support. The oxidation catalyst can also include precious metal group (PMG) metal particles in addition to the first particles intermixed together on the support. A gas permeable polymer that provides a continuous phase can completely encapsulate the particles and the support. The oxidation catalyst may be used as a gas sensor, where the first particles are chemochromic particles.

  1. Inhibition of Alkaline Phosphatase by Several Diuretics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    August 20th, 1979) . . Summary , . Acetazolamide, furosemide, ethacrynic acid and chlorothiazide, diuretics of considerable structural diversity, inhibit...Ki is calculated to be 8.4, 7.0, 2.8 and 0.1 mmol/l for acetazolamide, furosemide, ethacrynic acid and chlorothiazide, respectively. Chlorothiazide...is a much more potent inhibitor of alkaline phos- phatase than the other three diuretics. The combination of ethacrynic acid and cysteine, itself an

  2. Alkaline flooding for enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Gittler, W.E.

    1983-09-01

    There are over 12 active projects of varying size using one of 3 major types of alkaline agents. These include sodium silicate, caustic soda, and soda ash. Among the largest pilots currently is the THUMS project in the Wilmington field, California. Plans called for the injection of a 4% weight concentration of sodium orthosilicate over a 60% PV. Through the first 3 yr, over 27 million bbl of chemicals have been injected. Gulf Oil is operating several alkaline floods, one of which is located off shore in the Quarantine Bay field, Louisiana. In this pilot, sodium hydroxide in a weight concentration of 5 to 12% is being injected. Belco Petroleum Corp. has reported that their pilot operating in the Isenhour Unit in Wyoming is using a .5% weight concentration of soda ash in conjunction with a polymer. Other uses for alkaline agents in chemical flooding include the use of silicate as a preflush or sacrificial agent in micellar/polymer and surfactant recovery systems. In addition, caustic has been tested in the surface-mixed caustic emulsion process while orthosilicate has been tested in a recovery method known as mobility-controlled caustic floods.

  3. Alkaline phosphatase of Physarum polycephalum is insoluble.

    PubMed

    Furuhashi, Kiyoshi

    2008-02-01

    The plasmodia of Physarum polycephalum grow as multinucleated cells in the presence of sufficient humidity and nutriment. Under non-illuminating conditions, stresses such as low temperature or high concentrations of salts transform the plasmodia into spherules whereas dehydration induces sclerotization. Some phosphatases including protein phosphatase and acid phosphatase have been purified from the plasmodia, but alkaline phosphatase remains to be elucidated. Phosphatase of the plasmodia, spherules and sclerotia was visualized by electrophoresis gel-staining assay using 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl phosphate. Insoluble fractions of the sclerotia were abundant in phosphatase activity. The phosphatase which was extracted by nonionic detergent was subjected to column chromatography and preparative electrophoresis. Purified phosphatase showed the highest activity at pH 8.8, indicating that this enzyme belongs to alkaline phosphatase. The apparent molecular mass from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under non-reducing condition was estimated to be 100 kDa whereas that under reducing was 105 kDa. An amount of 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate or 0.5 M NaCl had no effects on the activity although the phosphatase showed heat instability, Mg(2+)-dependency and sensitivity to 2-glycerophosphate or NaF. The extracting conditions and enzymatic properties suggest that this alkaline phosphatase which is in a membrane-bound form plays important roles in phosphate metabolism.

  4. Alkaline regenerative fuel cell systems for energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, F. H.; Reid, M. A.; Martin, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    A description is presented of the results of a preliminary design study of a regenerative fuel cell energy storage system for application to future low-earth orbit space missions. The high energy density storage system is based on state-of-the-art alkaline electrolyte cell technology and incorporates dedicated fuel cell and electrolysis cell modules. In addition to providing energy storage, the system can provide hydrogen and oxygen for attitude control of the satellite and for life support. During the daylight portion of the orbit the electrolysis module uses power provided by the solar array to generate H2 and O2 from the product water produced by the fuel cell module. The fuel cell module supplies electrical power during the dark period of the orbit.

  5. [Risks associated with unrestricted consumption of alkaline-reduced water].

    PubMed

    Henry, Marc; Chambron, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Consumption of alkaline reduced water produced by domestic electrolysis devices was approved in Japan in 1965 by the Minister of Health, Work and Wellbeing, for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. Today, these devices are also freely available in France. The commercial information provided with the devices recommends the consumption of 1 to 1.5 liters per day, not only for gastrointestinal disorders but also for numerous other illnesses such as diabetes, cancer and inflammation. Academic research on this subject has been undergoing in Japan since 1990, and has established that the active ingredient is dissolved dihydrogen, which eliminates the free radical HO· in vivo. It has also been shown that electrode degradation during use of the devices releases highly reactive platinum nanoparticles, the toxicity of which is unknown. The authors of this report recommend alerting the French health authorities to the uncontrolled availability of these devices that generate drug substances and should therefore be subject to regulatory requirements.

  6. Spray drift reduction test method correlation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ASTM Standard E609 Terminology Relating to Pesticides defines drift as “The physical movement of an agrochemical through the air at the time of application or soon thereafter to any non or off target site.” Since there are many commercial tank mix adjuvants designed to reduce spray drift, ASTM esta...

  7. Producing Quantum Dots by Spray Pyrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banger, Kulbinder; Jin, Michael H.; Hepp, Aloysius

    2006-01-01

    An improved process for making nanocrystallites, commonly denoted quantum dots (QDs), is based on spray pyrolysis. Unlike the process used heretofore, the improved process is amenable to mass production of either passivated or non-passivated QDs, with computer control to ensure near uniformity of size.

  8. Spray Forming Aluminum - Final Report (Phase II)

    SciTech Connect

    D. D. Leon

    1999-07-08

    The U.S. Department of Energy - Office of Industrial Technology (DOE) has an objective to increase energy efficient and enhance competitiveness of American metals industries. To support this objective, ALCOA Inc. entered into a cooperative program to develop spray forming technology for aluminum. This Phase II of the DOE Spray Forming Program would translate bench scale spray forming technology into a cost effective world class process for commercialization. Developments under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC07-94ID13238 occurred during two time periods due to budgetary constraints; April 1994 through September 1996 and October 1997 and December 1998. During these periods, ALCOA Inc developed a linear spray forming nozzle and specific support processes capable of scale-up for commercial production of aluminum sheet alloy products. Emphasis was given to alloys 3003 and 6111, both being commercially significant alloys used in the automotive industry. The report reviews research performed in the following areas: Nozzel Development, Fabrication, Deposition, Metal Characterization, Computer Simulation and Economics. With the formation of a Holding Company, all intellectual property developed in Phases I and II of the Project have been documented under separate cover for licensing to domestic producers.

  9. Spray Cooling Processes for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizito, John P.; VanderWal, Randy L.; Berger, Gordon; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2004-01-01

    The present paper reports ongoing work to develop numerical and modeling tools used to design efficient and effective spray cooling processes and to determine characteristic non-dimensional parametric dependence for practical fluids and conditions. In particular, we present data that will delineate conditions towards control of the impingement dynamics of droplets upon a heated substrate germane to practical situations.

  10. PAINT SPRAY BOOTH MODIFICATIONS FOR RECIRCULATION VENTILATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The control of emissions from spray painting operations has historically been cost prohibitive, due to the high exhaust flow rates coupled with low volatile organic compound (VOC) and hazardous air pollutant (HAP) Concentrations. Past studies, conducted by the U.S. EPA and U.S. ...

  11. Thermal NDE method for thermal spray coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.R.; Schmeller, M.D.; Sulit, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes a feasibility demonstration of a thermal scanning NDE system for thermal spray coatings. Non-bonds were detected between several types of coatings and their substrates. Aluminum anti-skid coatings having very rough surfaces were included. A technique for producing known non-bond areas for calibrating and demonstrating NDE methods was developed.

  12. Turbulence Modulation and Dense-Spray Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    experiments. Finally, Magnus and Saffman-lift forces and static pressure gradients can be ignored with little error (Faeth, 1977, 1983, 1988). Under...full-cone sprays. Recent Advances in Gas ] DInamics (C. Casci, ed.), Plenum Publishing Corporation, New York 78 Chehroudi, B., Onuma, Y., Chen, S.-H

  13. Sodium Spray Would Speed Silicon Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sancier, K. M.

    1983-01-01

    Production rate of solar-grade silicon in sodium/silicon tetrafluoride reactor increase by spray feed. Liquid-sodium droplet size is controlled by pressure of argon gas and by nozzle design. Baffle helps to prevent reactor opening from becoming clogged by reaction products.

  14. Long-term evolution of highly alkaline steel slag drainage waters.

    PubMed

    Riley, Alex L; Mayes, William M

    2015-07-01

    The disposal of slag generated by the steel industry can have negative consequences upon the surrounding aquatic environment by the generation of high pH waters, leaching of potentially problematic trace metals, and rapid rates of calcite precipitation which smother benthic habitats. A 36-year dataset was collated from the long-term ambient monitoring of physicochemical parameters and elemental concentrations of samples from two steel slag leachate-affected watercourses in northern England. Waters were typified by elevated pH (>10), high alkalinity, and were rich in dissolved metals (e.g. calcium (Ca), aluminium (Al), and zinc (Zn)). Long-term trend analysis was performed upon pH, alkalinity, and Ca concentration which, in addition to Ca flux calculations, were used to highlight the longevity of pollution arising as a result of the dumping and subsequent leaching of steel slags. Declines in calcium and alkalinity have been modest over the monitoring period and not accompanied by significant declines in water pH. If the monotonic trends of decline in alkalinity and calcium continue in the largest of the receiving streams, it will be in the region of 50-80 years before calcite precipitation would be expected to be close to baseline levels, where ecological impacts would be negligible.

  15. Optimization of the bake-on siliconization of cartridges. Part I: Optimization of the spray-on parameters.

    PubMed

    Funke, Stefanie; Matilainen, Julia; Nalenz, Heiko; Bechtold-Peters, Karoline; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Friess, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    Biopharmaceutical products are increasingly commercialized as drug/device combinations to enable self-administration. Siliconization of the inner syringe/cartridge glass barrel for adequate functionality is either performed at the supplier or drug product manufacturing site. Yet, siliconization processes are often insufficiently investigated. In this study, an optimized bake-on siliconization process for cartridges using a pilot-scale siliconization unit was developed. The following process parameters were investigated: spray quantity, nozzle position, spray pressure, time for pump dosing and the silicone emulsion concentration. A spray quantity of 4mg emulsion showed best, immediate atomization into a fine spray. 16 and 29mg of emulsion, hence 4-7-times the spray volume, first generated an emulsion jet before atomization was achieved. Poor atomization of higher quantities correlated with an increased spray loss and inhomogeneous silicone distribution, e.g., due to runlets forming build-ups at the cartridge lower edge and depositing on the star wheel. A prolonged time for pump dosing of 175ms led to a more intensive, long-lasting spray compared to 60ms as anticipated from a higher air-to-liquid ratio. A higher spray pressure of 2.5bar did not improve atomization but led to an increased spray loss. At a 20mm nozzle-to-flange distance the spray cone exactly reached the cartridge flange, which was optimal for thicker silicone layers at the flange to ease piston break-loose. Initially, 10μg silicone was sufficient for adequate extrusion in filled cartridges. However, both maximum break-loose and gliding forces in filled cartridges gradually increased from 5-8N to 21-22N upon 80weeks storage at room temperature. The increase for a 30μg silicone level from 3-6N to 10-12N was moderate. Overall, the study provides a comprehensive insight into critical process parameters during the initial spray-on process and the impact of these parameters on the characteristics of the

  16. Permeability of alkaline magmas: a study from Campi Flegrei, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polacci, M.; Bouvet de Maissoneuve, C.; Giordano, D.; Piochi, M.; Degruyter, W.; Bachmann, O.; Mancini, L.

    2012-04-01

    Knowledge of permeability is of paramount importance for understanding the evolution of magma degassing during pre-, syn- and post-eruptive volcanic processes. Most permeability estimates existing to date refer to magmas of calc-alkaline compositions. We report here the preliminary results of permeability measurements performed on alkali-trachyte products erupted from the Campanian Ignimbrite (CI) and Monte Nuovo (MTN), two explosive eruptions from Campi Flegrei (CF), an active, hazardous caldera west of Naples, Southern Italy. Darcian (viscous) permeability spans a wide range between 10^-11 and 10^-14 m^2. We observe that the most permeable samples are the scoria clasts from the upper units of MTN; pumice samples from the Breccia Museo facies of CI are instead the least permeable. Non-Darcian (inertial) permeability follows the same trend as Darcian permeability. The first implication of this study is that porosity in alkaline as well as calc-alkaline magmas does not exert a first order control on permeability (e.g. the MTN samples are the most permeable but not the most porous). Second, sample geometry exhibits permeability anisotropy (higher permeability in the direction of vesicle elongation), suggesting stronger degassing in the vertical direction in the conduit. In addition, inertial effects are higher across the sample. As inertial effects are potentially generated by tortuosity (or tortuous vesicle paths), tortuosity is likely higher horizontally than vertically in the conduit. Finally, the measured CF permeability values overlap with those of rhyolitic pumice clasts from the Kos Plateau Tuff (Bouvet de Maisonneuve et al., 2009), together with CI one of the major Quaternary explosive eruptions of the Mediterranean region. This indicates that gas flow is strongly controlled by the geometry of the porous media, which is generated by the bubble dynamics during magma ascent. Therefore, permeability will depend on composition through the rheological properties

  17. Enhanced early osteogenic differentiation by silicon-substituted hydroxyapatite ceramics fabricated via ultrasonic spray pyrolysis route.

    PubMed

    Honda, Michiyo; Kikushima, Koichi; Kawanobe, Yusuke; Konishi, Toshiisa; Mizumoto, Minori; Aizawa, Mamoru

    2012-12-01

    The influence of silicon-substituted hydroxyapatite (Si-HAp) on osteogenic differentiation was assessed by biological analysis. Si-HAp was prepared by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis (USSP) technique using various amounts of Si (0, 0.8, and 1.6 mass%). Chemical analysis revealed that Si was incorporated into the hydroxyapatite (HAp) lattice with no other crystalline phase and which caused the change of crystal structure. Biological analyses showed that the Si contents affected the cell proliferation and morphology, suggesting that there is an optimal Si content for cell culture. As for differentiation, alkaline phosphatase activity and osteocalcin production of Si-HAp were higher than those of HAp. Gene expression profiles also revealed that substitution of Si (0.8 mass%) up-regulated the expression levels of osteocalcin and especially Runx2, a master gene for osteoblast development. These results suggest that incorporating Si into the HAp lattice may enhance the bioactivity, particularly during early osteoblast development.

  18. Water spray ventilator system for continuous mining machines

    DOEpatents

    Page, Steven J.; Mal, Thomas

    1995-01-01

    The invention relates to a water spray ventilator system mounted on a continuous mining machine to streamline airflow and provide effective face ventilation of both respirable dust and methane in underground coal mines. This system has two side spray nozzles mounted one on each side of the mining machine and six spray nozzles disposed on a manifold mounted to the underside of the machine boom. The six spray nozzles are angularly and laterally oriented on the manifold so as to provide non-overlapping spray patterns along the length of the cutter drum.

  19. Potential hazard from spray cleaning of floors in hospital wards.

    PubMed

    Medcraft, J W; Hawkins, J M; Fletcher, B N; Dadswell, J V

    1987-03-01

    The potential hazard from using contaminated spray cleaning fluid to clean hospital floors was investigated. Eight of 10 sprays in daily hospital use failed the 'in-use' test of Kelsey & Maures. Contamination was due to Gram-negative bacilli, mainly Pseudomonas spp. An experiment showed that freshly diluted cleaning fluid in a new spray container became contaminated in 6 days, although the route of contamination of the fluid is not clear. Air samples and samples from bedding collected during spray cleaning with contaminated fluid showed the presence of Pseudomonas spp. Use of freshly diluted cleaning fluid and daily cleaning of spray containers is recommended.

  20. Alkaline and ultrasound assisted alkaline pretreatment for intensification of delignification process from sustainable raw-material.

    PubMed

    Subhedar, Preeti B; Gogate, Parag R

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline and ultrasound-assisted alkaline pretreatment under mild operating conditions have been investigated for intensification of delignification. The effect of NaOH concentration, biomass loading, temperature, ultrasonic power and duty cycle on the delignification has been studied. Most favorable conditions for only alkaline pretreatment were alkali concentration of 1.75 N, solid loading of 0.8% (w/v), temperature of 353 K and pretreatment time of 6 h and under these conditions, 40.2% delignification was obtained. In case of ultrasound-assisted alkaline approach, most favorable conditions obtained were alkali concentration of 1N, paper loading of 0.5% (w/v), sonication power of 100 W, duty cycle of 80% and pretreatment time of 70 min and the delignification obtained in ultrasound-assisted alkaline approach under these conditions was 80%. The material samples were characterized by FTIR, SEM, XRD and TGA technique. The lignin was recovered from solution by precipitation method and was characterized by FTIR, GPC and TGA technique.

  1. Agrochemical spray drift; assessment and mitigation--a review.

    PubMed

    Felsot, Allan S; Unsworth, John B; Linders, Jan B H J; Roberts, Graham; Rautman, Dirk; Harris, Caroline; Carazo, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    During application of agrochemicals spray droplets can drift beyond the intended target to non-target receptors, including water, plants and animals. Factors affecting this spray drift include mode of application, droplet size, which can be modified by the nozzle types, formulation adjuvants, wind direction, wind speed, air stability, relative humidity, temperature and height of released spray relative to the crop canopy. The rate of fall of spray droplets depends upon the size of the droplets but is modified by entrainment in a mobile air mass and is also influenced by the rate of evaporation of the liquid constituting the aerosol. The longer the aerosol remains in the air before falling to the ground (or alternatively striking an object above ground) the greater the opportunity for it to be carried away from its intended target. In general, all size classes of droplets are capable of movement off target, but the smallest are likely to move the farthest before depositing on the ground or a non-target receptor. It is not possible to avoid spray drift completely but it can be minimized by using best-management practices. These include using appropriate nozzle types, shields, spray pressure, volumes per area sprayed, tractor speed and only spraying when climatic conditions are suitable. Field layout can also influence spray drift, whilst crop-free and spray-free buffer zones and windbreak crops can also have a mitigating effect. Various models are available to estimate the environmental exposure from spray drift at the time of application.

  2. Degradation of insecticides used for indoor spraying in malaria control and possible solutions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The insecticide dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT) is widely used in indoor residual spraying (IRS) for malaria control owing to its longer residual efficacy in the field compared to other World Health Organization (WHO) alternatives. Suitable stabilization to render these alternative insecticides longer lasting could provide a less controversial and more acceptable and effective alternative insecticide formulations than DDT. Methods This study sought to investigate the reasons behind the often reported longer lasting behaviour of DDT by exposing all the WHO approved insecticides to high temperature, high humidity and ultra-violet light. Interactions between the insecticides and some mineral powders in the presence of an aqueous medium were also tested. Simple insecticidal paints were made using slurries of these mineral powders whilst some insecticides were dispersed into a conventional acrylic paint binder. These formulations were then spray painted on neat and manure coated mud plaques, representative of the material typically used in rural mud houses, at twice the upper limit of the WHO recommended dosage range. DDT was applied directly onto mud plaques at four times the WHO recommended concentration and on manure plaques at twice WHO recommended concentration. All plaques were subjected to accelerated ageing conditions of 40°C and a relative humidity of 90%. Results The pyrethroids insecticides outperformed the carbamates and DDT in the accelerated ageing tests. Thus UV exposure, high temperature oxidation and high humidity per se were ruled out as the main causes of failure of the alternative insecticides. Gas chromatography (GC) spectrograms showed that phosphogypsum stabilised the insecticides the most against alkaline degradation (i.e., hydrolysis). Bioassay testing showed that the period of efficacy of some of these formulations was comparable to that of DDT when sprayed on mud surfaces or cattle manure coated surfaces. Conclusions

  3. Experiments on the Distribution of Fuel in Fuel Sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Dana W

    1933-01-01

    The distribution of fuel in sprays for compression-ignition engines was investigated by taking high-speed spark photographs of fuel sprays reproduced under a wide variety of conditions, and also by injecting them against pieces of plasticine. A photographic study was made of sprays injected into evacuated chambers, into the atmosphere, into compressed air, and into transparent liquids. Pairs of identical sprays were injected counter to each other and their behavior analyzed. Small high velocity air jets were directed normally to the axes of fuel sprays, with the result that the envelope of spray which usually obscures the core was blown aside, leaving the core exposed on one side. The results showed that the distribution of the fuel within the sprays was very uneven.

  4. Physical mechanisms for atomization of a jet spray

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, G.; Chang, S.K.; Corradini, M.L.; El-Beshbeeshy, M.; Martin, J.K.; Krueger, J.

    1988-01-01

    Because combustion in direct injection engines is strongly influenced by the details of the fuel spray in thes engines, the authors have begun a broad research effort of jet breakup experiments and modelling of these high pressure sprays. The main objective of this effort is to better understand fuel injection from the study of the spray-jet breakup process and the associated fuel-oxidant mixing. The focus of this paper is the development of specific models for atomization of the spray-jet. These models are then compared to each other and to preliminary data from the spray-jet breakup experiments. Initial results indicate that KIVA with this proposed spray model shows good agreement with low pressure data (69 MPa) but underestimates spray penetration for higher pressures (104 MPa).

  5. A simplified model of aerosol removal by containment sprays

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, D.A. ); Burson, S.B. . Div. of Safety Issue Resolution)

    1993-06-01

    Spray systems in nuclear reactor containments are described. The scrubbing of aerosols from containment atmospheres by spray droplets is discussed. Uncertainties are identified in the prediction of spray performance when the sprays are used as a means for decontaminating containment atmospheres. A mechanistic model based on current knowledge of the physical phenomena involved in spray performance is developed. With this model, a quantitative uncertainty analysis of spray performance is conducted using a Monte Carlo method to sample 20 uncertain quantities related to phenomena of spray droplet behavior as well as the initial and boundary conditions expected to be associated with severe reactor accidents. Results of the uncertainty analysis are used to construct simplified expressions for spray decontamination coefficients. Two variables that affect aerosol capture by water droplets are not treated as uncertain; they are (1) [open quote]Q[close quote], spray water flux into the containment, and (2) [open quote]H[close quote], the total fall distance of spray droplets. The choice of values of these variables is left to the user since they are plant and accident specific. Also, they can usually be ascertained with some degree of certainty. The spray decontamination coefficients are found to be sufficiently dependent on the extent of decontamination that the fraction of the initial aerosol remaining in the atmosphere, m[sub f], is explicitly treated in the simplified expressions. The simplified expressions for the spray decontamination coefficient are given. Parametric values for these expressions are found for median, 10 percentile, and 90 percentile values in the uncertainty distribution for the spray decontamination coefficient. Examples are given to illustrate the utility of the simplified expressions to predict spray decontamination of an aerosol-laden atmosphere.

  6. Comparative study of low-energy ultrasonic and alkaline treatment on biosludge from secondary industrial wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongzhe; Tan, Youming; Zhou, Yan; Pathak, Santosh; Sendjaja, Antonius Yudi; Abdul Majid, Maszenan; Chowdhury, Prannoy; Ng, Wun Jern

    2015-01-01

    In this study, low-energy ultrasonic (3 and 6 kJ/g volatile solids of feed biomass (FB) which was lower than the heat value of the FB), alkaline, and ultrasonic-alkaline pretreatments were applied on FB, a biosludge from secondary industrial wastewater treatment. Biochemical methane potential (BMP), particle size distribution, Biomass Stress Index (BSI™), soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD), protein, carbohydrate, and size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) fingerprints were used to comparatively study the mechanisms of these pretreatment methods. The results indicated that low-energy ultrasonication and alkali exhibited significantly different impacts on the FB. After ultrasonication with energy input of 6 kJ/g-VS, the average particle size of FB was reduced from 102.6 to 19.4 µm. However, ultrasonication had no obvious effect on microbial cells rupture, solubilization of protein and carbohydrate, and SEC fingerprint. Consequently, low-energy ultrasonication could not enhance methane generation. However, after alkaline pretreatment with dosage of 0.3 g-NaOH/g-VS, SCOD, soluble protein, and soluble carbohydrate concentration of FB increased from 0.66, 0.00, 0.07 to 2.83, 0.83, 0.47 g/L, respectively. At the same time, BSI™ increased from 5.3% to 96.8%, and the SEC fingerprint changed significantly. Consequently, the methane generation in the BMP test increased from 68.9 to 135.0 mL. Ultrasonic-alkaline pretreatment was similar to alkaline pretreatment in terms of methane generation. Based on this study, alkaline pretreatment is recommended over both low-energy ultrasonic and low-energy ultrasonic-alkaline pretreatment to enhance the biodegradability of FB.

  7. Magnetic and porous nanospheres from ultrasonic spray pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Suh, Won Hyuk; Suslick, Kenneth S

    2005-08-31

    We have used an inexpensive high-frequency ultrasound generator from a household humidifier to create a useful source for ultrasonic spray pyrolysis and produced submicrometer silica particles that are porous on the nanometer scale. By using two heated zones, we first initiate polymerization of organic monomers in the presence of silica colloid, which creates in situ a composite of silica with an organic polymer, followed by a second heating to pyrolyze and remove the polymer. The morphology and surface area of the final porous silica are controlled by varying the silica-to-organic monomer ratio. In a single flow process, ferromagnetic cobalt nanoparticles can be easily encapsulated in the porous silica, and the resulting nanospheres are extremely resistant to air oxidation. Products were characterized by SEM, (S)TEM, EDS, XPS, and SQUID.

  8. Effects of injection pressure difference on droplet size distribution and spray cone angle in spray cooling of liquid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiufang; Xue, Rong; Ruan, Yixiao; Chen, Liang; Zhang, Xingqun; Hou, Yu

    2017-04-01

    Spray cooling with liquid nitrogen as the working fluid has been widely employed in a plenty of fields requiring cooling at cryogenic temperature, such as the cryogenic wind tunnels and cooling super-conducting magnets. In this study, we built a liquid nitrogen spray system and experimentally investigated the influence of injection pressure difference on the droplet size distribution and the spray cone angle. The measurements using particle size analyser show increasing the injection pressure difference improves the atomization, as indicated by the homogenization and reduction of the droplet size. The initial spray cone angle is insensitive to the injection pressure difference. However, the far-field spray cone angle decreases dramatically with increasing the injection pressure difference. The results could enrich our knowledge of spray cooling of cryogenic fluids and benefit the design of cryogenic spray cooling systems.

  9. Spray dried inhalable ciprofloxacin powder with improved aerosolisation and antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Osman, Rihab; Kan, Pei Lee; Awad, Gehanne; Mortada, Nahed; El-Shamy, Abd-Elhameed; Alpar, Oya

    2013-06-05

    In this study, the spray drying technique was used to prepare ciprofloxacin microparticles (CFX-MPs) for pulmonary administration. By virtue of its amphoteric properties, CFX was dissolved in either a slightly alkaline or acidic solution depending on the used polymer. Dextran and chitosan were used to prepare the MPs and modify the release characteristics of the drug. Particle surface modification was done with either DPPC or PEG. The effects of the manufacturing and formulation parameters on the drug-polymer interactions were investigated by thermal analysis and infrared spectroscopy. CFX-MPs showed improved aerosolisation properties and the encapsulated drug possessed high antimicrobial activity against two of the common and resistant respiratory pathogens: Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococus aureus. MPs were safe on the lung epithelial cells. Modulation of particle characteristics and drug release was possible by altering not only the polymer but also the type of the acid from which the powders were spray dried. MPs prepared with glutamic and aspartic acids showed better characteristics than those prepared with acetic and hydrochloric acids. Dextran modified particles showed improved aerosolisation properties and safety on lung epithelial cells.

  10. Experimental Study in a Swirl-Stabilized Combustor with and Without Spray Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffarpour, Mohammad-Reza

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the combustion characteristics and structure of hollow-cone spray flames similar to those occurring in the primary zone of gas turbine combustion chambers, a swirl-stabilized combustor and a water-cooled stainless-steel gas sampling probe were designed. A kerosene spray was generated by a simplex atomizer with a nominal angle of 30 degrees. Swirling air with swirl number of 1.5 was produced from an air swirl plate. Video imaging and photography were employed to document the flame stability and its structure with changes in both design and operating conditions. A Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) was used to measure the drop size, mean and rms values of axial drop velocity and other relevant parameters with and without combustion. Air and fuel flow rates and other conditions were kept identical for reacting and non-reacting cases to investigate effects of combustion alone on the spray. A thermocouple was used to measure the average uncorrected temperature in this turbulent spray flame. A gas chromatograph was also employed to measure the gaseous species concentrations such as hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, methane, and carbon dioxide in this combustor.

  11. Release of VOCs and particles during use of nanofilm spray products.

    PubMed

    Nørgaard, Asger W; Jensen, Keld A; Janfelt, Christian; Lauritsen, Frants R; Clausen, Per A; Wolkoff, Peder

    2009-10-15

    Here, we present emission data on VOCs and particles emitted during simulated use of four commercial nanofilm spray products (NFPs) used for making easy-to-clean or self-cleaning surfaces on floors, ceramic tiles, and windows. The aim was to characterize the emitted VOCs and to provide specific source strength data for VOCs and particles released to the airduring use of the products. Containers with NFP were mounted on a spray-stand inside a closed stainless steel chamber with no air exchange. NFPs were sprayed in amounts corresponding to 1 m2 surface toward a target plate at a distance of 35 cm. Released VOCs were measured by a combination of air sampling on Tenax TA adsorbent followed by thermal desorption GC/MS and GC/FID analysis and real time measurements using a miniature membrane inlet mass spectrometer. Particles were measured using a fast mobility particle sizer and an aerosol particle sizer. A number of VOCs were identified, including small alcohols, ketones and ethers, chlorinated acetones, a perfluorinated silane, limonene, and cyclic siloxanes. The number of generated particles was on the order of 3 x 10(8) to 2 x 10(10) particles/m3 per g sprayed NFP and were dominated by nanosize particles.

  12. Spray Formation during the Impact of a Flat Plate on Water Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, An; Duncan, James H.

    2015-11-01

    Spray formation during the impact of a flat plate on a water surface is studied experimentally. The plate is mounted on a two-axis carriage that can slam the plate vertically into the water surface as the carriage moves horizontally along a towing tank. The plate is 122 cm by 38 cm and oriented with adjustable pitch and roll angle. The port (lower) edge of the plate is positioned with a 3-mm gap from one of the tank walls. A laser sheet is created in a plane oriented perpendicular to the axis of the horizontal motion of the carriage. The temporal evolution of the spray within the light sheet is measured with a cinematic laser induced fluorescence technique at a frame rate of 800 Hz. Experiments are performed with a fixed plate trajectory in a vertical plane, undertaken at various speeds. Two types of spray are found when the plate has nonzero pitch and roll angles. The first type is composed of a cloud of high-speed droplets and ligaments generated as the port edge of the plate hits the water surface during the initial impact. The second type is a thin sheet of water that grows from the starboard edge of the plate as it moves below the local water level. The geometrical features of the spray are found to be dramatically affected by the impact velocity. The support of the Office of Naval Research under grant N000141310587 is gratefully acknowledged.

  13. Enhancement of Heat Transfer with Pool and Spray Impingement Boiling on Microporous and Nanowire Surface Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Thiagarajan, S. J.; Wang, W.; Yang, R.; Narumanchi, S.; King, C.

    2010-09-01

    The DOE National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is leading a national effort to develop next-generation cooling technologies for hybrid vehicle electronics. The goal is to reduce the size, weight, and cost of power electronic modules that convert direct current from batteries to alternating current for the motor, and vice versa. Aggressive thermal management techniques help to increase power density and reduce weight and volume, while keeping chip temperatures within acceptable limits. The viability of aggressive cooling schemes such as spray and jet impingement in conjunction with enhanced surfaces is being explored. Here, we present results from a series of experiments with pool and spray boiling on enhanced surfaces, such as a microporous layer of copper and copper nanowires, using HFE-7100 as the working fluid. Spray impingement on the microporous coated surface showed an enhancement of 100%-300% in the heat transfer coefficient at a given wall superheat with respect to spray impingement on a plain surface under similar operating conditions. Critical heat flux also increased by 7%-20%, depending on flow rates.

  14. Ultrafast high-repetition imaging of fuel sprays using picosecond fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Purwar, Harsh; Wang, Hongjie; Tang, Mincheng; Idlahcen, Saïd; Rozé, Claude; Blaisot, Jean-Bernard; Godin, Thomas; Hideur, Ammar

    2015-12-28

    Modern diesel injectors operate at very high injection pressures of about 2000 bar resulting in injection velocities as high as 700 m/s near the nozzle outlet. In order to better predict the behavior of the atomization process at such high pressures, high-resolution spray images at high repetition rates must be recorded. However, due to extremely high velocity in the near-nozzle region, high-speed cameras fail to avoid blurring of the structures in the spray images due to their exposure time. Ultrafast imaging featuring ultra-short laser pulses to freeze the motion of the spray appears as an well suited solution to overcome this limitation. However, most commercial high-energy ultrafast sources are limited to a few kHz repetition rates. In the present work, we report the development of a custom-designed picosecond fiber laser generating ∼ 20 ps pulses with an average power of 2.5 W at a repetition rate of 8.2 MHz, suitable for high-speed imaging of high-pressure fuel jets. This fiber source has been proof tested by obtaining backlight images of diesel sprays issued from a single-orifice injector at an injection pressure of 300 bar. We observed a consequent improvement in terms of image resolution compared to standard white-light illumination. In addition, the compactness and stability against perturbations of our fiber laser system makes it particularly suitable for harsh experimental conditions.

  15. Mechanical Properties of Yttria- and Ceria-Stabilized Zirconia Coatings Obtained by Suspension Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łatka, Leszek; Cattini, Andrea; Chicot, Didier; Pawłowski, Lech; Kozerski, Stefan; Petit, Fabrice; Denoirjean, Alain

    2013-03-01

    Plasma generated by the SG-100 torch was applied to spray suspension formulated with the use of ZrO2 + 8 wt.% Y2O3 (8YSZ) and ZrO2 + 24 wt.% CeO2 + 2.5 wt.% Y2O3 (24CeYSZ) as solid phases. The suspensions were formulated with the use of 20 wt.% solid phase, 40 wt.% water, and 40 wt.% ethanol. The plasma spray parameters were optimized by keeping constant: (a) the electric power of 40 kW and (b) the working gas compositions of 45 slpm for Ar and 5 slpm for H2. On the other hand, the spray distance was varied from 40 to 60 mm and the torch linear speed was varied from 300 to 500 mm/s. The coatings were sprayed onto stainless steel substrates, and their thicknesses were in the range from 70 to 110 μm. The coating microstructures were analyzed with a scanning electron microscope. Mechanical properties were tested with the different methods including the indentation and scratch tests. The indentation test, carried out with various loads ranging from 100 to 10,000 mN, enabled to determine elastic modulus and Martens microhardness. Young's modulus of the coatings was in the range of 71-107 GPa for 8YSZ and 68-130 GPa for 24CeYSZ coatings. The scratch test enabled the authors to find the scratch macrohardness.

  16. Desialylated alkaline phosphatase: activation by 4-nitrophenol.

    PubMed

    Nayudu, P R

    1984-01-01

    Mouse ileal alkaline phosphatase is a sialyl enzyme (12-14 moles per mole of enzyme). When partially desialylated by treatment with neuraminidase, the enzyme loses most of its activity, associated with reduced apparent Vmax and Km. Part of that loss, however, is recovered as the product 4-nitrophenol's concentration builds up in the cuvette. Experimental results are presented to demonstrate that the activation is due to the binding of 4-nitrophenol as a ligand by the partially desialylated enzyme and that both the loss of activity by sialic acid removal and activation by ligand-binding are correlated with changes in protein conformation.

  17. To spray or not to spray? Understanding participation in an indoor residual spray campaign in Arequipa, Peru.

    PubMed

    Paz-Soldán, Valerie A; Bauer, Karin M; Hunter, Gabrielle C; Castillo-Neyra, Ricardo; Arriola, Vanessa D; Rivera-Lanas, Daniel; Rodriguez, Geoffrey H; Toledo Vizcarra, Amparo M; Mollesaca Riveros, Lina M; Levy, Michael Z; Buttenheim, Alison M

    2016-05-17

    Current low participation rates in vector control programmes in Arequipa, Peru complicate the control of Chagas disease. Using focus groups (n = 17 participants) and semi-structured interviews (n = 71) conducted in March and May 2013, respectively, we examined barriers to and motivators of household participation in an indoor residual spray (IRS) campaign that had taken place one year prior in Arequipa. The most common reported barriers to participation were inconvenient spray times due to work obligations, not considering the campaign to be necessary, concerns about secondary health impacts (e.g. allergic reactions to insecticides), and difficulties preparing the home for spraying (e.g. moving heavy furniture). There was also a low perception of risk for contracting Chagas disease that might affect participation. The main motivator to participate was to ensure personal health and well-being. Future IRS campaigns should incorporate more flexible hours, including weekends; provide appropriate educational messages to counter concerns about secondary health effects; incorporate peer educators to increase perceived risk to Chagas in community; obtain support from community members and leaders to build community trust and support for the campaign; and assist individuals in preparing their homes. Enhancing community trust in both the need for the campaign and its operations is key.

  18. Comparison of liquid hot water and alkaline pretreatments of giant reed for improved enzymatic digestibility and biogas energy production.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Danping; Ge, Xumeng; Zhang, Quanguo; Li, Yebo

    2016-09-01

    Liquid hot water (LHW) and alkaline pretreatments of giant reed biomass were compared in terms of digestibility, methane production, and cost-benefit efficiency for electricity generation via anaerobic digestion with a combined heat and power system. Compared to LHW pretreatment, alkaline pretreatment retained more of the dry matter in giant reed biomass solids due to less severe conditions. Under their optimal conditions, LHW pretreatment (190°C, 15min) and alkaline pretreatment (20g/L of NaOH, 24h) improved glucose yield from giant reed by more than 2-fold, while only the alkaline pretreatment significantly (p<0.05) increased cumulative methane yield (by 63%) over that of untreated biomass (217L/kgVS). LHW pretreatment obtained negative net electrical energy production due to high energy input. Alkaline pretreatment achieved 27% higher net electrical energy production than that of non-pretreatment (3859kJ/kg initial total solids), but alkaline liquor reuse is needed for improved net benefit.

  19. The Effect of Variable Gravity on the Cooling Performance of a 16-Nozzle Spray Array

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    heater phen Phenolic base r Heater resistive layer s Side sat Saturated condition sc Subcooling surf Heater surface exposed to spray u Upward ACRONYMS ABS ...tubes. The wettability of the tube material, tube diameter, and hole size all contributed to its operability. Issues with this separator type involved...software and generated using an ABS plastic rapid prototyping machine. To verify proper operation, the vane was housed within a transparent acrylic tube

  20. Combustion of Drops and Sprays of Heavy Fuel Oils and Their Emulsions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    of isolated drops can be generated by supplying the fuel from a pressurized fuel tank through a fine needle shaped hypodermic tube. For spray...Another severe problem that arose during these tests was clogging of the hypodermic needle through which single drops were injected. This was thought to be...caused essentially by the liquid phase cracking of the fuel inside the hypodermic needle . Therefore, we decided to use a slightly larger inside