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Sample records for alkaline water ph

  1. SIMPLE WAYS TO IMPROVE PH AND ALKALINITY MEASUREMENTS FOR WATER UTILITIES AND LABORATORIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Both pH and total alkalinity determinations are critical in characterizing chemical properties of water, being important to implementing good process control, determining corrosivity and other water quality properties, and assessing changes in water characteristics. Poor charac...

  2. Extremely alkaline (pH > 12) ground water hosts diverse microbial community.

    PubMed

    Roadcap, George S; Sanford, Robert A; Jin, Qusheng; Pardinas, José R; Bethke, Craig M

    2006-01-01

    Chemically unusual ground water can provide an environment for novel communities of bacteria to develop. Here, we describe a diverse microbial community that inhabits extremely alkaline (pH > 12) ground water from the Lake Calumet area of Chicago, Illinois, where historic dumping of steel slag has filled in a wetland. Using microbial 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid gene sequencing and microcosm experiments, we confirmed the presence and growth of a variety of alkaliphilic beta-Proteobacteria, Bacillus, and Clostridium species at pH up to 13.2. Many of the bacterial sequences most closely matched those of other alkaliphiles found in more moderately alkaline water around the world. Oxidation of dihydrogen produced by reaction of water with steel slag is likely a primary energy source to the community. The widespread occurrence of iron-oxidizing bacteria suggests that reduced iron serves as an additional energy source. These results extend upward the known range of pH tolerance for a microbial community by as much as 2 pH units. The community may provide a source of novel microbes and enzymes that can be exploited under alkaline conditions.

  3. Alkaline pH sensor molecules.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Takashi; Maruyama, Ichiro N

    2015-11-01

    Animals can survive only within a narrow pH range. This requires continual monitoring of environmental and body-fluid pH. Although a variety of acidic pH sensor molecules have been reported, alkaline pH sensor function is not well understood. This Review describes neuronal alkaline pH sensors, grouped according to whether they monitor extracellular or intracellular alkaline pH. Extracellular sensors include the receptor-type guanylyl cyclase, the insulin receptor-related receptor, ligand-gated Cl- channels, connexin hemichannels, two-pore-domain K+ channels, and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Intracellular sensors include TRP channels and gap junction channels. Identification of molecular mechanisms underlying alkaline pH sensing is crucial for understanding how animals respond to environmental alkaline pH and how body-fluid pH is maintained within a narrow range.

  4. Use of natural mordenite to remove chromium (III) and to neutralize pH of alkaline waste waters.

    PubMed

    Córdova-Rodríguez, Valduvina; Rodríguez-Iznaga, Inocente; Acosta-Chávez, Raquel María; Chávez-Rivas, Fernando; Petranovskii, Vitalii; Pestryakov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    The natural mordenite from Palmarito de Cauto deposit (PZ), Cuba, was studied in this work as an ion exchanger to remove Cr(3+) cations from alkaline aqueous solutions at different pH and chromium concentrations. The mordenite stability under cyclic treatment processes with alkaline solutions and its capacity to decrease the pH of the solutions was also analyzed. It was shown that PZ removes Cr(3+) ions from alkaline solutions, and it happens independently of the starting chromium concentration and the pH of the exchange solution used. This material has an important neutralizing effect on alkaline solutions, expressed in a significant pH decrease from the early stages of the treatments. For solutions with initial pH equal to 11, it decreases to a value of around seven. The stability of this material is not affected significantly after continuous cyclic treatment with NaOH solution, which shows that mordenite, in particular from Palmarito de Cauto deposit, has high stability in alkaline solutions. The results are important as they suggest that natural zeolites may be of interest in treatments of alkaline industrial waste effluents.

  5. Irrigation water acidification to neutralize alkalinity for nursery crop production: Substrate pH, electrical conductivity, and nutrient concentrations; and plant nutrition and growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Liming agents (LA) in irrigation water, typically associated with carbonates and bicarbonates of calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg), contribute to water alkalinity. Repeated application of LA to container crops can cause media-solution pH to rise overtime, that uncorrected, can lead to a nutrient avail...

  6. Pitting Corrosion of Copper in Waters with High pH and Low Alkalinity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Localized or pitting corrosion of copper pipes used in household drinking-water plumbing is a problem for many water utilities and their customers. Extreme attack can lead to pinhole water leaks that may result in water damage, mold growth, and costly repairs. Water quality has b...

  7. Field measurement of alkalinity and pH

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, Ivan

    1964-01-01

    The behavior of electrometric pH equipment under field conditions departs from the behavior predicted from Nernst's law. The response is a linear function of pH, and hence measured pH values may be corrected to true pH if the instrument is calibrated with two reference solutions for each measurement. Alkalinity titrations may also be made in terms of true pH. Standard methods, such as colorimetric titrations, were rejected as unreliable or too cumbersome for rapid field use. The true pH of the end point of the alkalinity titration as a function of temperature, ionic strength, and total alkalinity has been calculated. Total alkalinity in potable waters is the most important factor influencing the end point pH, which varies from 5.38 (0 ? C, 5 ppm (parts per million) HC0a-) to 4.32 (300 ppm HC0a-,35 ? C), for the ranges of variables considered. With proper precautions, the pH may be determined to =i:0.02 pH and the alkalinity to =i:0.6 ppm HCO3- for many naturally occurring bodies of fresh water.

  8. High-resolution Imaging of pH in Alkaline Sediments and Water Based on a New Rapid Response Fluorescent Planar Optode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Chao; Yao, Lei; Xu, Di; Xie, Xianchuan; Zhang, Chaosheng

    2016-05-01

    A new dual-lumophore optical sensor combined with a robust RGB referencing method was developed for two-dimensional (2D) pH imaging in alkaline sediments and water. The pH sensor film consisted of a proton-permeable polymer (PVC) in which two dyes with different pH sensitivities and emission colors: (1) chloro phenyl imino propenyl aniline (CPIPA) and (2) the coumarin dye Macrolex® fluorescence yellow 10 GN (MFY-10 GN) were entrapped. Calibration experiments revealed the typical sigmoid function and temperature dependencies. This sensor featured high sensitivity and fast response over the alkaline working ranges from pH 7.5 to pH 10.5. Cross-sensitivity towards ionic strength (IS) was found to be negligible for freshwater when IS <0.1 M. The sensor had a spatial resolution of approximately 22 μm and aresponse time of <120 s when going from pH 7.0 to 9.0. The feasibility of the sensor was demonstrated using the pH microelectrode. An example of pH image obtained in the natrual freshwater sediment and water associated with the photosynthesis of Vallisneria spiral species was also presented, suggesting that the sensor held great promise for the field applications.

  9. High-resolution Imaging of pH in Alkaline Sediments and Water Based on a New Rapid Response Fluorescent Planar Optode

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chao; Yao, Lei; Xu, Di; Xie, Xianchuan; Zhang, Chaosheng

    2016-01-01

    A new dual-lumophore optical sensor combined with a robust RGB referencing method was developed for two-dimensional (2D) pH imaging in alkaline sediments and water. The pH sensor film consisted of a proton-permeable polymer (PVC) in which two dyes with different pH sensitivities and emission colors: (1) chloro phenyl imino propenyl aniline (CPIPA) and (2) the coumarin dye Macrolex® fluorescence yellow 10 GN (MFY-10 GN) were entrapped. Calibration experiments revealed the typical sigmoid function and temperature dependencies. This sensor featured high sensitivity and fast response over the alkaline working ranges from pH 7.5 to pH 10.5. Cross-sensitivity towards ionic strength (IS) was found to be negligible for freshwater when IS <0.1 M. The sensor had a spatial resolution of approximately 22 μm and aresponse time of <120 s when going from pH 7.0 to 9.0. The feasibility of the sensor was demonstrated using the pH microelectrode. An example of pH image obtained in the natrual freshwater sediment and water associated with the photosynthesis of Vallisneria spiral species was also presented, suggesting that the sensor held great promise for the field applications. PMID:27199163

  10. Interpretation of pH, acidity, and alkalinity in fisheries and aquaculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measurements of pH, acidity, and alkalinity are commonly used to describe water quality. The three variables are interrelated and are sometimes confused. The pH of water is an intensity factor, while the acidity and alkalinity of waters are capacity factors. More precisely, acidity and alkalinity ar...

  11. Strategies for regulation of hemolymph pH in acidic and alkaline water by the larval mosquito Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera; Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Clark, Thomas M; Vieira, Marcus A L; Huegel, Kara L; Flury, Dawn; Carper, Melissa

    2007-12-01

    The responses of larval Aedes aegypti to media of pH 4, 7 and 11 provide evidence for pH regulatory strategies. Drinking rates in pH 4 media were elevated 3- to 5-fold above those observed in pH 7 or 11. Total body water was elevated during acute exposure to acidic media. During chronic exposure, total body water was decreased and Malpighian tubule mitochondrial luminosity, quantified using Mitotracker Green FM, increased. Malpighian tubule secretion rates and energy demands thus appear to increase dramatically during acid exposure. In alkaline media, drinking rates were quite low. Larvae in pH 11 media excreted net acid (0.12 nequiv H(+) g(-1) h(-1)) and the pH indicators azolitmin and bromothymol blue revealed that the rectal lumen is acidic in vivo at all ambient pH values. The anal papillae (AP) were found to be highly permeant to acid-base equivalents. Ambient pH influenced the length, and the mass-specific length, of the AP in the presence of NaCl (59.9 mmol l(-1)). In contrast, the length and mass-specific length of AP were not influenced by ambient pH in low NaCl conditions. Mitochondrial luminosity was reduced in AP of larvae reared in acidic media, and was not elevated in alkaline media, relative to that of larvae reared in neutral media. These data suggest that the AP may compromise acid-base balance in acidic media, and may also be an important site of trade-offs between H(+) homeostasis and NaCl uptake in dilute, acidic media.

  12. Rhesus glycoprotein and urea transporter genes in rainbow trout embryos are upregulated in response to alkaline water (pH 9.7) but not elevated water ammonia.

    PubMed

    Sashaw, Jessica; Nawata, Michele; Thompson, Sarah; Wood, Chris M; Wright, Patricia A

    2010-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that genes for the putative ammonia transporter, Rhesus glycoproteins (Rh) and the facilitated urea transporter (UT) are expressed before hatching in rainbow trout (Oncorhychus mykiss Walbaum) embryos. We tested the hypothesis that Rh and UT gene expressions are regulated in response to environmental conditions that inhibit ammonia excretion during early life stages. Eyed-up embryos (22 days post-fertilization (dpf)) were exposed to control (pH 8.3), high ammonia (1.70 mmol l(-1) NH4HCO3) and high pH (pH 9.7) conditions for 48h. With exposure to high water ammonia, ammonia excretion rates were reversed, tissue ammonia concentration was elevated by 9-fold, but there were no significant changes in mRNA expression relative to control embryos. In contrast, exposure to high water pH had a smaller impact on ammonia excretion rates and tissue ammonia concentrations, whereas mRNA levels for the Rhesus glycoprotein Rhcg2 and urea transporter (UT) were elevated by 3.5- and 5.6-fold, respectively. As well, mRNAs of the genes for H+ATPase and Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE2), associated with NH3 excretion, were also upregulated by 7.2- and 13-fold, respectively, in embryos exposed to alkaline water relative to controls. These results indicate that the Rhcg2, UT and associated transport genes are regulated in rainbow trout embryos, but in contrast to adults, there is no effect of high external ammonia at this stage of development.

  13. Effects of alkalinity on ammonia removal, carbon dioxide stripping, and system pH in semi-commercial scale water recirculating aquaculture systems operated with moving bed bioreactors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When operating water recirculating systems (RAS) with high make-up water flushing rates in locations that have low alkalinity in the raw water, such as Norway, knowledge about the required RAS alkalinity concentration is important. Flushing RAS with make-up water containing low alkalinity washes out...

  14. Advanced alkaline water electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakabayashi, N.; Torikai, E.; Kawami, Y.; Takenaka, H.

    Results are presented of experimental studies of possible separators and electrodes for use in advanced, high-temperature, high-pressure alkaline water electrolyzers. Material evaluations in alkaline water electrolyzers at temperatures from 100 to 120 C have shown a new type polytetrafluoroethylene membrane impregnated with potassium titanate to be the most promising when the separator is prepared by the hydrothermal treatment of a porous PFTE membrane impregnated with hydrated titanium oxide. Measurements of cell voltages in 30% KOH at current densities from 5 to 100 A/sq dm at temperatures up to 120 C with nickel electrodes of various structures have shown the foamed nickel electrode, with an average pore size of 1-1.5 mm, to have the best performance. When the foamed nickel is coated by fine powdered nickel, carbonyl nickel or Raney nickel to increase electrode surface areas, even lower cell voltages were found, indicating better performance.

  15. Low pH alkaline chemical formulations

    SciTech Connect

    French, T.R.; Peru, D.A.; Thornton, S.D.

    1989-01-01

    This report describes the development of a surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding system that is applicable to specific reservoir conditions in Wilmington (California) field. The cost of the chemicals for an ASP (alkali/surfactant/polymer) flood is calculated to be $3.90/bbl of oil produced, with 78% of that cost attributable to polymer. This research included phase behavior tests, oil displacement tests, mineral dissolution tests, and adsorption measurements. It was discovered that consumption of low pH alkalis is low enough in the Wilmington field to be acceptable. In addition, alkali dramatically reduced surfactant adsorption and precipitation. A mixture of NaHCO3 and Na2CO3 was recommended for use as a preflush and in the ASP formulation. Research was also conducted on the synergistic effect that occurs when a mixture of alkali and synthetic surfactant contacts crude oil. It appears that very low IFT is predominantly a result of the activation of the natural surfactants present in the Wilmington oil, and the sustained low IFT is primarily the result of the synthetic surfactant. It also appears that removal of acids from the crude oil by the alkali renders the oil more interfacially reactive to synthetic surfactant. These phenomena help to explain the synergism that results from combining alkali and synthetic surfactant into a single oil recovery formulation. 19 refs., 24 figs., 10 tabs.

  16. Hypersensitivity of Ranunculus asiaticus to salinity and alkaline pH in irrigation water in sand cultures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ranunculus, grown as a field crop in southern and central coastal California, is highly valued in the cut flower and tuberous root markets. Concerns regarding the sustainability of Ranunculus cultivation have arisen when the plantations are irrigated with municipal-treated waters. Although cut flo...

  17. Cementitious porous pavement in stormwater quality control: pH and alkalinity elevation.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Xuheng; Sansalone, John

    2011-01-01

    A certain level of alkalinity acts as a buffer and maintains the pH value in a stable range in water bodies. With rapid urban development, more and more acidic pollutants flow to watersheds with runoff and drop alkalinity to a very low level and ultimately degrade the water environment. Cementitious porous pavement is an effective tool for stormwater acidic neutralization. When stormwater infiltrates cement porous pavement (CPP) materials, alkalinity and pH will be elevated due to the basic characteristics of cement concrete. The elevated alkalinity will neutralize acids in water bodies and maintain the pH in a stable level as a buffer. It is expected that CPP materials still have a certain capability of alkalinity elevation after years of service, which is important for CPP as an effective tool for stormwater management. However, few previous studies have reported on how CPP structures would elevate runoff alkalinity and pH after being exposed to rainfall-runoff for years. In this study, three groups of CPP specimens, all exposed to rainfall-runoff for 3 years, were used to test the pH and alkalinity elevation properties. It was found that runoff pH values were elevated from 7.4 to the range of 7.8-8.6 after infiltrating through the uncoated specimens, and from 7.4 to 8.5-10.7 after infiltrating through aluminum-coated specimens. Runoff alkalinity elevation efficiencies are 11.5-14.5% for uncoated specimens and 42.2% for coated specimens. The study shows that CPP is an effective passive unit operation for stormwater acid neutralization in our built environment.

  18. The Alkaline Diet: Is There Evidence That an Alkaline pH Diet Benefits Health?

    PubMed Central

    Schwalfenberg, Gerry K.

    2012-01-01

    This review looks at the role of an alkaline diet in health. Pubmed was searched looking for articles on pH, potential renal acid loads, bone health, muscle, growth hormone, back pain, vitamin D and chemotherapy. Many books written in the lay literature on the alkaline diet were also reviewed and evaluated in light of the published medical literature. There may be some value in considering an alkaline diet in reducing morbidity and mortality from chronic diseases and further studies are warranted in this area of medicine. PMID:22013455

  19. The alkaline diet: is there evidence that an alkaline pH diet benefits health?

    PubMed

    Schwalfenberg, Gerry K

    2012-01-01

    This review looks at the role of an alkaline diet in health. Pubmed was searched looking for articles on pH, potential renal acid loads, bone health, muscle, growth hormone, back pain, vitamin D and chemotherapy. Many books written in the lay literature on the alkaline diet were also reviewed and evaluated in light of the published medical literature. There may be some value in considering an alkaline diet in reducing morbidity and mortality from chronic diseases and further studies are warranted in this area of medicine.

  20. Alkaline pH Homeostasis in Bacteria: New Insights

    PubMed Central

    Padan, Etana; Bibi, Eitan; Ito, Masahiro; Krulwich, Terry A.

    2011-01-01

    The capacity of bacteria to survive and grow at alkaline pH values is of widespread importance in the epidemiology of pathogenic bacteria, in remediation and industrial settings, as well as in marine, plant-associated and extremely alkaline ecological niches. Alkali-tolerance and alkaliphily, in turn, strongly depend upon mechanisms for alkaline pH homeostasis, as shown in pH shift experiments and growth experiments in chemostats at different external pH values. Transcriptome and proteome analyses have recently complemented physiological and genetic studies, revealing numerous adaptations that contribute to alkaline pH homeostasis. These include elevated levels of transporters and enzymes that promote proton capture and retention (e.g. the ATP synthase and monovalent cation/proton antiporters), metabolic changes that lead to increased acid production, and changes in the cell surface layers that contribute to cytoplasmic proton retention. Targeted studies over the past decade have followed up the long-recognized importance of monovalent cations in active pH homeostasis. These studies show the centrality of monovalent cation/proton antiporters in this process while microbial genomics provides information about the constellation of such antiporters in individual strains. A comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of both eukaryotic and prokaryotic genome databases has identified orthologes from bacteria to humans that allow better understanding of the specific functions and physiological roles of the antiporters. Detailed information about the properties of multiple antiporters in individual strains is starting to explain how specific monovalent cation/proton antiporters play dominant roles in alkaline pH homeostasis in cells that have several additional antiporters catalyzing ostensibly similar reactions. New insights into the pH-dependent Na+/H+ antiporter NhaA that plays an important role in Escherichia coli have recently emerged from the determination of the structure

  1. Solar light (hv) and H2O2/hv photo-disinfection of natural alkaline water (pH 8.6) in a compound parabolic collector at different day periods in Sahelian region.

    PubMed

    Ndounla, J; Pulgarin, C

    2015-11-01

    The photo-disinfection of natural alkaline surface water (pH 8.6 ± 0.3) for drinking purposes was carried out under solar radiation treatments. The enteric bacteria studied were the wild total coliforms/Escherichia coli (10(4) CFU/ml) and Salmonella spp. (10(4) CFU/ml) naturally present in the water. The photo-disinfection of a 25-l water sample was carried out in a solar compound parabolic collector (CPC) in the absence and in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The addition of H2O2 (10 mg/L) to the sample water was sufficient to enhance the photo-disinfection and ensure an irreversible lethal action on the wild enteric bacteria contents of the sample. The inactivation kinetic of the system was significantly enhanced compared to the one carried out without H2O2 addition. The effect of the solar radiation parameters on the efficiency of the photo-disinfection were assessed. The pH has increased during the treatment in all the photo-disinfection processes (hv and H2O2/hv). The Salmonella spp strain has shown the best effective inactivate time in alkaline water than the one recorded under acidic or near-neutral conditions. The evolution of some physico-chemical parameters of the water (turbidity, NO2(-), NO3(-), NH4(+), HPO4(2-), and bicarbonate (HCO3(-))) was monitored during the treatment. Finally, the possible mechanistic process involved during the enteric bacteria inactivation was suggested.

  2. Biochemical Stabilization of Glucagon at Alkaline pH

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Melanie A.; Castle, Jessica R.; El Youssef, Joseph; Bakhtiani, Parkash A.; Bergstrom, Colin P.; Carroll, Julie M.; Breen, Matthew E.; Leonard, Gerald L.; David, Larry L.; Roberts, Charles T.; Ward, W. Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: For patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, a bihormonal artificial endocrine pancreas system utilizing glucagon and insulin has been found to stabilize glycemic control. However, commercially available formulations of glucagon cannot currently be used in such systems because of physical instability characterized by aggregation and chemical degradation. Storing glucagon at pH 10 blocks protein aggregation but results in chemical degradation. Reductions in pH minimize chemical degradation, but even small reductions increase protein aggregation. We hypothesized that common pharmaceutical excipients accompanied by a new excipient would inhibit glucagon aggregation at an alkaline pH. Methods and Results: As measured by tryptophan intrinsic fluorescence shift and optical density at 630 nm, protein aggregation was indeed minimized when glucagon was formulated with curcumin and albumin. This formulation also reduced chemical degradation, measured by liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry. Biological activity was retained after aging for 7 days in an in vitro cell-based bioassay and also in Yorkshire swine. Conclusions: Based on these findings, a formulation of glucagon stabilized with curcumin, polysorbate-80, l-methionine, and albumin at alkaline pH in glycine buffer may be suitable for extended use in a portable pump in the setting of a bihormonal artificial endocrine pancreas. PMID:24968220

  3. Alkaline Water and Longevity: A Murine Study

    PubMed Central

    Magro, Massimiliano; Corain, Livio; Ferro, Silvia; Baratella, Davide; Bonaiuto, Emanuela; Terzo, Milo; Corraducci, Vittorino; Salmaso, Luigi; Vianello, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The biological effect of alkaline water consumption is object of controversy. The present paper presents a 3-year survival study on a population of 150 mice, and the data were analyzed with accelerated failure time (AFT) model. Starting from the second year of life, nonparametric survival plots suggest that mice watered with alkaline water showed a better survival than control mice. Interestingly, statistical analysis revealed that alkaline water provides higher longevity in terms of “deceleration aging factor” as it increases the survival functions when compared with control group; namely, animals belonging to the population treated with alkaline water resulted in a longer lifespan. Histological examination of mice kidneys, intestine, heart, liver, and brain revealed that no significant differences emerged among the three groups indicating that no specific pathology resulted correlated with the consumption of alkaline water. These results provide an informative and quantitative summary of survival data as a function of watering with alkaline water of long-lived mouse models. PMID:27340414

  4. Decision making in C. elegans chemotaxis to alkaline pH

    PubMed Central

    Murayama, Takashi; Maruyama, Ichi N

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring of environmental and tissue pH is critical for animal survival. The nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), is attracted to mildly alkaline pH, but avoids strongly alkaline pH. However, little is known about how the behavioral switching or decision making occurs. Genetic dissection and Ca2+ imaging have previously demonstrated that ASEL and ASH are the major sensory neurons responsible for attraction and repulsion, respectively. Here we report that unlike C. elegans wild type, mutants deficient in ASEL or ASH were repelled by mildly alkaline pH, or were attracted to strongly alkaline pH, respectively. These results suggest that signals through ASEL and ASH compete to determine the animal’s alkaline-pH chemotaxis. Furthermore, mutants with 2 ASEL neurons were more efficiently attracted to mildly alkaline pH than the wild type with a single ASEL neuron, indicating that higher activity of ASEL induces stronger attraction to mildly alkaline pH. This stronger attraction was overridden by normal activity of ASH, suggesting that ASH-mediated avoidance dominates ASEL-mediated attraction. Thus, C. elegans chemotactic behaviors to alkaline pH seems to be determined by signal strengths from the sensory neurons ASEL and ASH, and the behavior decision making seems to be the result of competition between the 2 sensory neurons. PMID:24563708

  5. An alkaline active xylanase: insights into mechanisms of high pH catalytic adaptation.

    PubMed

    Mamo, Gashaw; Thunnissen, Marjolein; Hatti-Kaul, Rajni; Mattiasson, Bo

    2009-09-01

    The alkaliphilic bacterium, Bacillus halodurans S7, produces an alkaline active xylanase (EC 3.2.1.8), which differs from many other xylanases in being operationally stable under alkaline conditions as well as at elevated temperature. Compared to non-alkaline active xylanases, this enzyme has a high percent composition of acidic amino acids which results in high ratio of negatively to positively charged residues. A positive correlation was observed between the charge ratio and the pH optima of xylanases. The recombinant xylanase was crystallized using a hanging drop diffusion method. The crystals belong to the space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) and the structure was determined at a resolution of 2.1 A. The enzyme has the common eight-fold TIM-barrel structure of family 10 xylanases; however, unlike non-alkaline active xylanases, it has a highly negatively charged surface and a deeper active site cleft. Mutational analysis of non-conserved amino acids which are close to the acid/base residue has shown that Val169, Ile170 and Asp171 are important to hydrolyze xylan at high pH. Unlike the wild type xylanase which has optimum pH at 9-9.5, the triple mutant xylanase (V169A, I170F and D171N), which was constructed using sequence information of alkaline sensitive xylanses was optimally active around pH 7. Compared to non-alkaline active xylanases, the alkaline active xylanases have highly acidic surfaces and fewer solvent exposed alkali labile residues. Based on these results obtained from sequence, structural and mutational analysis, the possible mechanisms of high pH stability and catalysis are discussed. This will provide useful information to understand the mechanism of high pH adaptation and engineering of enzymes that can be operationally stable at high pH.

  6. Method of determining pH by the alkaline absorption of carbon dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Hobbs, David T.

    1992-01-01

    A method for measuring the concentration of hydroxides in alkaline solutions in a remote location using the tendency of hydroxides to absorb carbon dioxide. The method includes the passing of carbon dioxide over the surface of an alkaline solution in a remote tank before and after measurements of the carbon dioxide solution. A comparison of the measurements yields the absorption fraction from which the hydroxide concentration can be calculated using a correlation of hydroxide or pH to absorption fraction.

  7. Change of pH during excess sludge fermentation under alkaline, acidic and neutral conditions.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yue; Peng, Yongzhen; Liu, Ye; Jin, Baodan; Wang, Bo; Wang, Shuying

    2014-12-01

    The change in pH during excess sludge (ES) fermentation of varying sludge concentrations was investigated in a series of reactors at alkaline, acidic, and neutral pHs. The results showed that the changes were significantly affected by fermentative conditions. Under different conditions, pH exhibited changing profiles. When ES was fermented under alkaline conditions, pH decreased in a range of (10±1). At the beginning of alkaline fermentation, pH dropped significantly, at intervals of 4h, 4h, and 5h with sludge concentrations of 8665.6mg/L, 6498.8mg/L, and 4332.5mg/L, then it would become moderate. However, under acidic conditions, pH increased from 4 to 5. Finally, under neutral conditions pH exhibited a decrease then an increase throughout entire fermentation process. Further study showed short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), ammonia nitrogen and cations contributed to pH change under various fermentation conditions. This study presents a novel strategy based on pH change to predict whether SCFAs reach their stable stage.

  8. Low temperature alkaline pH hydrolysis of oxygen-free Titan tholins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brassé, C.; Buch, A.; Raulin, F.; Coll, P.; Poch, O.; Ramirez, S.

    2013-09-01

    Titan, the largest moon of Saturn, is known for its dense and nitrogen-rich atmosphere. The organic aerosols which are produced in Titan's atmosphere are objects of astrobiological interest. In this paper we focus on their potential chemical evolution when they reach the surface and interact with putative ammonia-water cryomagma[1]. In this context we have studied the evolution of alkaline pH hydrolysis of Titan tholins (produced by an experimental setup using a plasma DC discharge named PLASMA) at ambient and low temperature. However, we identified oxygenated molecules in non-hydrolyzed tholins meaning that oxygen gets in the PLASMA reactor during the tholins synthesis [2]. Following this preliminary study the synthesis protocol has been improved by isolating the whole device in a specially designed glove box which protect the PLASMA experiment from the laboratory atmosphere. After confirming the non-presence of oxygen in tholins produced with this new experimental setup, the study of oxygen-free tholins' evolution has been carried out. A recent study shows that the subsurface ocean may contain a lower fraction of ammonia (about 5wt% or less [3]), as previously described by other teams [2,4]. Thus new hydrolysis experiments will take this lower value into account. Additionally, a new report [5] provides upper and lower limits for the bulk content of Titan's interior for various gas species. It also shows that most of them are likely stored and dissolved in the subsurface water ocean. But considering the plausible acido-alkaline properties of the ammonia-water ocean, additional species could be dissolved in the ocean and present in the magma. They were also included in our hydrolysis experiments. Taking into account these new data, four different hydrolysis have been applied to oxygen-free tholins. For each type of hydrolysis, we also follow the influence of the hydrolysis temperature on the organic molecules production. The preliminary qualitative and quantitative

  9. ALKALINITY, PH, AND COPPER CORROSION BY-PRODUCT RELEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contrary to expectations, higher bicarbonate concentrations exacerbate copper corrosion rates and by-product release. In fact, as illustrated by monitoring experiences of large utilities and by laboratory data, the concentration of copper corrosion by-products in drinking water i...

  10. Systemic and local effects of long-term exposure to alkaline drinking water in rats.

    PubMed

    Merne, M E; Syrjänen, K J; Syrjänen, S M

    2001-08-01

    Alkaline conditions in the oral cavity may be caused by a variety of stimuli, including tobacco products, antacids, alkaline drinking water or bicarbonate toothpaste. The effects of alkaline pH on oral mucosa have not been systematically studied. To assess the systemic (organ) and local (oral mucosal) effects of alkalinity, drinking water supplemented with Ca(OH)2 or NaOH, with pH 11.2 or 12 was administered to rats (n = 36) for 52 weeks. Tissues were subjected to histopathological examination; oral mucosal biopsy samples were also subjected to immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses for pankeratin, CK19, CK5, CK4, PCNA, ICAM-1, CD44, CD68, S-100, HSP 60, HSP70, and HSP90. At completion of the study, animals in the study groups had lower body weights (up to 29% less) than controls despite equal food and water intake, suggesting a systemic response to the alkaline treatment. The lowest body weight was found in rats exposed to water with the highest pH value and starting the experiment when young (6 weeks). No histological changes attributable to alkaline exposure occurred in the oral mucosa or other tissues studied. Alkaline exposure did not affect cell proliferation in the oral epithelium, as shown by the equal expression of PCNA in groups. The up-regulation of HSP70 protein expression in the oral mucosa of rats exposed to alkaline water, especially Ca(OH)2 treated rats, may indicate a protective response. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) positivity was lost in 6/12 rats treated with Ca(OH)2 with pH 11.2, and loss of CD44 expression was seen in 3/6 rats in both study groups exposed to alkaline water with pH 12. The results suggest that the oral mucosa in rats is resistant to the effects of highly alkaline drinking water. However, high alkalinity may have some unknown systemic effects leading to growth retardation, the cause of which remains to be determined.

  11. Systemic and local effects of long-term exposure to alkaline drinking water in rats

    PubMed Central

    Merne, Marina ET; Syrjänen, Kari J; Syrjänen, Stina M

    2001-01-01

    Alkaline conditions in the oral cavity may be caused by a variety of stimuli, including tobacco products, antacids, alkaline drinking water or bicarbonate toothpaste. The effects of alkaline pH on oral mucosa have not been systematically studied. To assess the systemic (organ) and local (oral mucosal) effects of alkalinity, drinking water supplemented with Ca(OH)2 or NaOH, with pH 11.2 or 12 was administered to rats (n = 36) for 52 weeks. Tissues were subjected to histopathological examination; oral mucosal biopsy samples were also subjected to immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses for pankeratin, CK19, CK5, CK4, PCNA, ICAM-1, CD44, CD68, S-100, HSP 60, HSP70, and HSP90. At completion of the study, animals in the study groups had lower body weights (up to 29% less) than controls despite equal food and water intake, suggesting a systemic response to the alkaline treatment. The lowest body weight was found in rats exposed to water with the highest pH value and starting the experiment when young (6 weeks). No histological changes attributable to alkaline exposure occurred in the oral mucosa or other tissues studied. Alkaline exposure did not affect cell proliferation in the oral epithelium, as shown by the equal expression of PCNA in groups. The up-regulation of HSP70 protein expression in the oral mucosa of rats exposed to alkaline water, especially Ca(OH)2 treated rats, may indicate a protective response. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) positivity was lost in 6/12 rats treated with Ca(OH)2 with pH 11.2, and loss of CD44 expression was seen in 3/6 rats in both study groups exposed to alkaline water with pH 12. The results suggest that the oral mucosa in rats is resistant to the effects of highly alkaline drinking water. However, high alkalinity may have some unknown systemic effects leading to growth retardation, the cause of which remains to be determined. PMID:11493345

  12. Low temperature alkaline pH hydrolysis of oxygen-free Titan tholins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brassé, Coralie; Buch, Arnaud; Raulin, François; Coll, Patrice; Poch, Olivier; Ramirez, Sandra

    2014-05-01

    The largest moon of Saturn, Titan, is known for its dense, nitrogen-rich atmosphere. The organic aerosols which are produced in Titan's atmosphere are of great astrobiological interest, particularly because of their potential evolution when they reach the surface and may interact with putative ammonia-water cryomagma[1]. In this context we have followed the evolution of alkaline pH hydrolysis (25wt% ammonia-water) of Titan tholins (produced by an experimental setup using a plasma DC discharge named PLASMA) at low temperature. Urea has been identified as one of the main product of tholins hydrolysis along with several amino acids (alanine, glycine and aspartic acid). However, those molecules have also been detected in non-hydrolyzed tholins. One explanation is a possible oxygen leak in the PLASMA reactor during the tholins synthesis[2]. Following this preliminary study the synthesis protocol has been improved by isolating the whole device in a specially designed glove box which protect the PLASMA experiment from the laboratory atmosphere. Once we confirmed the non-presence of oxygen in tholins, we performed alkaline pH hydrolysis of oxygen-free tholins. Then we verify that the organic compounds cited above are still produced in-situ. Moreover, a recent study shows that the subsurface ocean may contain a lower fraction of ammonia (about 5wt% or less[3]), than the one used until now in this kind of experimental study[2, 4]. Thus, we have carried out new hydrolysis experiments which take this lower value into account. Additional studies have provided new highlights on the bulk composition of Titan for various gas species. Indeed, the observed Saturn's atmosphere enrichment constrains the composition of the planetesimals present in the feeding zone of Saturn. The enrichment in volatiles in Saturn's atmosphere has been reproduced by assuming the presence of specific gas species[5, 6], in particular CO2 and H2S. In the present study we assume that those gas species have

  13. Method of determining pH by the alkaline absorption of carbon dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1992-10-06

    A method is described for measuring the concentration of hydroxides in alkaline solutions in a remote location using the tendency of hydroxides to absorb carbon dioxide. The method includes the passing of carbon dioxide over the surface of an alkaline solution in a remote tank before and after measurements of the carbon dioxide solution. A comparison of the measurements yields the absorption fraction from which the hydroxide concentration can be calculated using a correlation of hydroxide or pH to absorption fraction. 2 figs.

  14. Copper release in low and high alkaline water.

    PubMed

    D'Antonio, L; Fabbricino, M; Nasso, M; Trifuoggi, M

    2008-04-01

    Copper release in drinking water, caused by electrochemical corrosion of household distribution systems, was investigated. Experiments were developed testing both low and high alkaline water in stagnant conditions. The effect of varying stagnation time was investigated also. Both soluble and insoluble copper compounds, produced by corrosion processes are quantified, using appropriate experimental procedures. On the basis of obtained results, copper concentration in stagnant water is defined as a function of water alkalinity, while total metal release is defined as a function of stagnation length, and is not dependent on water alkalinity.

  15. Variation of ocean pH in the Indonesia waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putri, Mutiara Rachmat; Setiawan, Agus; Safitri, Mediana

    2015-09-01

    The variation of ocean acidity (pH) in the Indonesia waters is strongly influenced by monsoon. Since the climate change tends to potentially change monsoonal variation over the Indonesian region, it will give also implication to the ocean pH variation. Moreover, changes of ocean pH will give effects to the marine lifes and their environment. In order to investigate this issue, we tried to calculate monthly variation of sea surface pH in the Indonesia waters based on monthly average temperature and salinity over past 18 years data. Temperature and salinity data used in this study were taken from the hydrodynamic model of Hamburg Shelf Ocean Model (HAMSOM), while alkalinity and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were from World Ocean Atlas 2009 (WOA 2009). Algorithm from Ocean Carbon Model Intercomparison Project-version.3 (OCMIP-3) was used to calculate the pH. The estimation results indicate that pH variation in the Indonesia waters changes insignificantly over 18 years. El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) contribute to physical changes of seawater, but did not affect the pH significantly. The average pH of seawater is higher during northwest monsoon than during southeast monsoon.

  16. Specific molten globule conformation of stem bromelain at alkaline pH.

    PubMed

    Dave, Sandeep; Mahajan, Sahil; Chandra, Vemika; Dkhar, H Kitdorlang; Sambhavi; Gupta, Pawan

    2010-07-01

    Stem bromelain (SBM), a therapeutic protein, is rapidly absorbed across the gut epithelium. Because SBM encounters an alkaline pH at its principal site of absorption, we investigated the alkaline-induced denaturation of SBM. From pH 7 to 10, the protein's secondary structure remained the same, although a slight loss of tertiary structure was observed. Above pH 10, there was a significant and irreversible loss of secondary and tertiary structure. At pH 10, SBM showed enhanced tryptophan fluorescence, however, the number of accessible tryptophans remained the same. The thermodynamics of temperature transition at pH 7 and 10 were strikingly different, with the former showing a two-phase transition endotherm, and the latter a broad non-two-state transition. At pH 10, SBM showed a significant increase in 8-anilino-1-naphthalene-sulfonate binding relative to the native state, suggestive of a specific molten globule (SMG) state. These studies suggest a distinct conformational rearrangement in SBM, at the protein's isoelectric point.

  17. Improved volatile fatty acids anaerobic production from waste activated sludge by pH regulation: Alkaline or neutral pH?

    PubMed

    Ma, Huijun; Chen, Xingchun; Liu, He; Liu, Hongbo; Fu, Bo

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the anaerobic fermentation was carried out for volatile fatty acids (VFAs) production at different pH (between 7.0 and 10.0) conditions with untreated sludge and heat-alkaline pretreated waste activated sludge. In the fermentation with untreated sludge, the extent of hydrolysis of organic matters and extent of acidification at alkaline pH are 54.37% and 30.37%, respectively, resulting in the highest VFAs yield at 235.46mg COD/gVS of three pH conditions. In the fermentation with heat-alkaline pretreated sludge, the acidification rate and VFAs yield at neutral pH are 30.98% and 240.14mg COD/gVS, respectively, which are higher than that at other pH conditions. With the glucose or bovine serum albumin as substrate for VFAs production, the neutral pH showed a higher VFAs concentration than the alkaline pH condition. The results of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis indicated that the alkaline pH caused low microbial richness. Based on the results in this study, we demonstrated that the alkaline pH is favor of hydrolysis of organic matter in sludge while neutral pH improved the acidogenesis for the VFAs production from sludge. Our finding is obvious different to the previous research and helpful for the understanding of how heat-alkaline pretreatment and alkaline fermentation influence the VFAs production, and beneficial to the development of VFAs production process.

  18. Design of stability at extreme alkaline pH in streptococcal protein G.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Benjamin; Angus, Katy; Taylor, Linda; Warwicker, Jim; Derrick, Jeremy P

    2008-04-30

    Protein G (PrtG) is widely used as an affinity-based ligand for the purification of IgG. It would be desirable to improve the resistance of affinity chromatography ligands, such as PrtG, to commercial cleaning-in-place procedures using caustic alkali (0.5 M NaOH). It has been shown that Asn residues are the most susceptible at extreme alkaline pH: here, we show that replacement of all three Asn residues within the IgG-binding domain of PrtG only improves stability towards caustic alkali by about 8-fold. Study of the effects of increasing pH on PrtG by fluorescence and CD shows that the protein unfolds progressively between pH 11.5 and 13.0. Calculation of the variation in electrostatic free energy with pH indicated that deprotonation of Tyr, Lys and Arg side-chains at high pH would destabilize PrtG. Introduction of the triple mutation Y3F/T16I/T18I into PrtG stabilized it by an extra 6.8 kcal/mol and the unfolding of the protein occurred at a pH of about 13, or 1.5 pH units higher than wild type. The results show that strategies for the stabilization of proteins at extreme alkaline pH should consider thermodynamic stabilization that will retain the tertiary structure of the protein and modification of surface electrostatics, as well as mutation of alkali-susceptible residues.

  19. Cultivation of marine shrimp in biofloc technology (BFT) system under different water alkalinities.

    PubMed

    Piérri, V; Valter-Severino, D; Goulart-de-Oliveira, K; Manoel-do-Espírito-Santo, C; Nascimento-Vieira, F; Quadros-Seiffert, W

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different levels of alkalinity for the superintensive cultivation of marine shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei in biofloc system. A total of 12 experimental circular units of 1000L were used supplied with 850L water from a nursery, populated at a density of 165 shrimps.m-3 and average weight of 5.6 g. The treatments, in triplicate, consisted in four levels of alkalinity in the water: 40, 80, 120 and 160 mg.L-1 of calcium carbonate. To correct the alkalinity was used calcium hydroxide (CaOH). It was observed a decrease in pH of the water in the treatments with lower alkalinity (p<0.05). The total suspended settleable solids were also lower in the treatment of low alkalinity. No significant difference was observed in other physico-chemical and biological parameters in the water quality assessed, as well as the zootechnical parameters of cultivation between treatments (p≥0.05). The results of survival and growth rate of shrimps were considered suitable for the cultivation system used in the different treatments. The cultivation of marine shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei in biofloc at density of 165 shrimps.m-3 can be performed in waters with alkalinity between 40 and 160 mg.L-1 of CaCO3, without compromising the zootechnical indexes of cultivation.

  20. Long-term evolution of highly alkaline steel slag drainage waters.

    PubMed

    Riley, Alex L; Mayes, William M

    2015-07-01

    The disposal of slag generated by the steel industry can have negative consequences upon the surrounding aquatic environment by the generation of high pH waters, leaching of potentially problematic trace metals, and rapid rates of calcite precipitation which smother benthic habitats. A 36-year dataset was collated from the long-term ambient monitoring of physicochemical parameters and elemental concentrations of samples from two steel slag leachate-affected watercourses in northern England. Waters were typified by elevated pH (>10), high alkalinity, and were rich in dissolved metals (e.g. calcium (Ca), aluminium (Al), and zinc (Zn)). Long-term trend analysis was performed upon pH, alkalinity, and Ca concentration which, in addition to Ca flux calculations, were used to highlight the longevity of pollution arising as a result of the dumping and subsequent leaching of steel slags. Declines in calcium and alkalinity have been modest over the monitoring period and not accompanied by significant declines in water pH. If the monotonic trends of decline in alkalinity and calcium continue in the largest of the receiving streams, it will be in the region of 50-80 years before calcite precipitation would be expected to be close to baseline levels, where ecological impacts would be negligible.

  1. Molecular Basis of pH and Ca2+ Regulation of Aquaporin Water Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Németh-Cahalan, Karin L.; Kalman, Katalin; Hall, James E.

    2004-01-01

    Aquaporins facilitate the diffusion of water across cell membranes. We previously showed that acid pH or low Ca2+ increase the water permeability of bovine AQP0 expressed in Xenopus oocytes. We now show that external histidines in loops A and C mediate the pH dependence. Furthermore, the position of histidines in different members of the aquaporin family can “tune” the pH sensitivity toward alkaline or acid pH ranges. In bovine AQP0, replacement of His40 in loop A by Cys, while keeping His122 in loop C, shifted the pH sensitivity from acid to alkaline. In the killifish AQP0 homologue, MIPfun, with His at position 39 in loop A, alkaline rather than acid pH increased water permeability. Moving His39 to His40 in MIPfun, to mimic bovine AQP0 loop A, shifted the pH sensitivity back to the acid range. pH regulation was also found in two other members of the aquaporin family. Alkaline pH increased the water permeability of AQP4 that contains His at position 129 in loop C. Acid and alkaline pH sensitivity was induced in AQP1 by adding histidines 48 (in loop A) and 130 (in loop C). We conclude that external histidines in loops A and C that span the outer vestibule contribute to pH sensitivity. In addition, we show that when AQP0 (bovine or killifish) and a crippled calmodulin mutant were coexpressed, Ca2+ sensitivity was lost but pH sensitivity was maintained. These results demonstrate that Ca2+ and pH modulation are separable and arise from processes on opposite sides of the membrane. PMID:15078916

  2. The Effects of Alkaline pH on Microleakage of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and Calcium Enriched Mixture Apical Plugs

    PubMed Central

    Mirhadi, Hossein; Moazzami, Fariborz; Rangani Jahromi, Saeed; Safarzade, Sareh

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Alkaline pH can affect the physical and chemical properties and sealing ability of apical plug material. Calcium hydroxide is used as an intracanal medication to complete disinfection of root canals. It raises the pH of environment to alkaline value. Purpose The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the effect of alkaline pH on the sealing ability of calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) apical plugs. Materials and Method Seventy single-rooted human maxillary anterior teeth were randomly divided to two experimental groups for Angelus MTA and CEM cement (n=30) and two control groups (n=5). Each group was divided into two subgroups of 15 for neutral and alkaline pH, and 1 negative and 1 positive control groups of 5. The root canals were cleaned and shaped by using ProTaper rotary system (Dentsply Maillefer; Ballaigues, Switzerland) and the terminal 3mm of the roots were resected. Then, MTA and CEM cement were condensed in apical region with 3mm thickness. The samples were exposed to two environments with different pH values of 13 and 7.4. The leakage was assessed by using the fluid filtration technique at 1, 7, 14, 30 days intervals. Data were analyzed by the repeated measures MANOVA. Results There was no statistically significant difference in the rate of microleakage between neutral and alkaline pH of CEM cement and MTA (p> 0.05). The sealing ability of MTA in an alkaline pH of 13 was significantly less than CEM cement in this pH (p< 0.05). Conclusion An environment with alkaline pH had no adverse effect on the sealing ability of MTA and CEM cement used as apical plugs. CEM cement had better sealing ability in alkaline pH. PMID:26966703

  3. pH neutralization and zonation in alkaline-saline tank waste plumes.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jiamin; Larsen, Joern T; Tokunaga, Tetsu K; Zheng, Zuoping

    2004-03-01

    At the Hanford Site in Washington State, the pH values of contaminant plumes resulting from leaking of initially highly alkaline-saline radioactive waste solutions into the subsurface are now found to be substantially neutralized. However, the nature of plume pH neutralization has not previously been understood. As a master geochemical variable, pH needs to be understood in order to predict the fate and transport of contaminants carried by the waste plumes. Through this laboratory study, we found that the plume pH values spanned a broad range from 14 (within the near-source region) down to the value of 7 (lower than the pH value of the initial soil solution) while the plume was still connected to an actively leaking source. We defined two zones within a plume: the silicate dissolution zone (SDZ, pH 14-10) and the neutralized zone (NZ, pH 10-7). Quartz dissolution at elevated temperature and precipitation of secondary silicates (including sodium metasilicate, cancrinite, and zeolites) are the key reactions responsible for the pH neutralization within the SDZ. The rapid and thorough cation exchange of Na+ replacing Ca2+/Mg2+, combined with transport, resulted in a dynamic Ca2+/Mg2+-enriched plume front. Subsequent precipitation of calcite, sodium silicate, and possibly talc led to dramatically reduced pH within the plume front and the neutralized zone. During aging (after the plume source became inactive), continued quartz dissolution and the secondary silicate precipitation drove the pH value lower, toward pH 11 at equilibrium within the SDZ, whereas the pH values in the NZ remained relatively unchanged with time. A pH profile of 11 from the plume source to pH 7 at the plume front is expected for a historical plume. This laboratory-based study provided realistic plume pH profiles (consistent with that measured from borehole samples) and identified underlying mechanisms responsible for pH evolution.

  4. Advanced alkaline water electrolysis. Task 2 summary report. Model for alkaline water electrolysis systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yaffe, M.R.; Murray, J.N.

    1980-04-01

    Task 2 involved the establishment of an engineering and economic model for the evaluation of various options in water electrolysis. The mode, verification of the specific coding and four case studies are described. The model was tested by evaluation of a nearly commercial technology, i.e., an 80-kW alkaline electrolyte system, operating at 60/sup 0/C, which delivers approximately 255 SLM, hydrogen for applications such as electrical generation cooling or semiconductor manufacturing. The calculated cost of hydrogen from this installed non-optimized case system with an initial cost to the customer of $87,000 was $6.99/Kg H/sub 2/ ($1.67/100 SCF) on a 20-yr levelized basis using 2.5 cents/kWh power costs. This compares favorably to a levelized average merchant hydrogen cost value of $9.11/Kg H/sub 2/ ($2.17/100 SCF) calculated using the same program.

  5. Anoxic Biodegradation of Isosaccharinic Acids at Alkaline pH by Natural Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Rout, Simon P.; Charles, Christopher J.; Doulgeris, Charalampos; McCarthy, Alan J.; Rooks, Dave J.; Loughnane, J. Paul; Laws, Andrew P.; Humphreys, Paul N.

    2015-01-01

    One design concept for the long-term management of the UK’s intermediate level radioactive wastes (ILW) is disposal to a cementitious geological disposal facility (GDF). Under the alkaline (10.0<pH>13.0) anoxic conditions expected within a GDF, cellulosic wastes will undergo chemical hydrolysis. The resulting cellulose degradation products (CDP) are dominated by α- and β-isosaccharinic acids (ISA), which present an organic carbon source that may enable subsequent microbial colonisation of a GDF. Microcosms established from neutral, near-surface sediments demonstrated complete ISA degradation under methanogenic conditions up to pH 10.0. Degradation decreased as pH increased, with β-ISA fermentation more heavily influenced than α-ISA. This reduction in degradation rate was accompanied by a shift in microbial population away from organisms related to Clostridium sporosphaeroides to a more diverse Clostridial community. The increase in pH to 10.0 saw an increase in detection of Alcaligenes aquatilis and a dominance of hydrogenotrophic methanogens within the Archaeal population. Methane was generated up to pH 10.0 with acetate accumulation at higher pH values reflecting a reduced detection of acetoclastic methanogens. An increase in pH to 11.0 resulted in the accumulation of ISA, the absence of methanogenesis and the loss of biomass from the system. This study is the first to demonstrate methanogenesis from ISA by near surface microbial communities not previously exposed to these compounds up to and including pH 10.0. PMID:26367005

  6. Transcriptome Profiling of Shewanella oneidensis Gene Expressionfollowing Exposure to Acidic and Alkaline pH

    SciTech Connect

    Leaphart, Adam B.; Thompson, Dorothea K.; Huang, Katherine; Alm,Eric; Wan, Xiu-Feng; Arkin, Adam P.; Brown, Steven D.; Wu, Liyou; Yan,Tingfen; Liu, Xueduan; Wickham, Gene S.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2007-04-02

    The molecular response of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 tovariations in extracellular pH was investigated based on genomewide geneexpression profiling. Microarray analysis revealed that cells elicitedboth general and specific transcriptome responses when challenged withenvironmental acid (pH 4) or base (pH 10) conditions over a 60-minperiod. Global responses included the differential expression of genesfunctionally linked to amino acid metabolism, transcriptional regulationand signal transduction, transport, cell membrane structure, andoxidative stress protection. Response to acid stress included theelevated expression of genes encoding glycogen biosynthetic enzymes,phosphate transporters, and the RNA polymerase sigma-38 factor (rpoS),whereas the molecular response to alkaline pH was characterized byupregulation of nhaA and nhaR, which are predicted to encode an Na+/H+antiporter and transcriptional activator, respectively, as well assulfate transport and sulfur metabolism genes. Collectively, theseresults suggest that S. oneidensis modulates multiple transporters, cellenvelope components, and pathways of amino acid consumption and centralintermediary metabolism as part of its transcriptome response to changingexternal pH conditions.

  7. Uranium(VI) Diffusion in Sodium-Montmorillonite at Alkaline pH Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinnacher, R. M.; Davis, J. A.; Tournassat, C.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Diffusive transport of uranium(VI) in montmorillonite clay and bentonite has important implications for uranium(VI) mobility in engineered barrier systems or host rocks in high level radioactive waste repositories, and clay-rich soils and sediments in the environment. The prediction of uranium(VI) adsorption and diffusion in clay-rich media, however, is complicated by (1) the complexity of the mineralogical structure of montmorillonite, in terms of its pore-size distributions and available surface site types, and (2) the complex uranium(VI) solution speciation, which can include cationic, uncharged, and anionic complexes, depending on solution conditions. For instance, a partial or full exclusion of anions from negatively charged clay interlayer spaces could change the effective 'anion-accessible' porosity and decrease the diffusive flux of these solutes under steady state conditions. In contrast, weak cation exchange reactions can result in 'surface diffusion' of adsorbed cations, such as UO2OH+, in addition to diffusion in the liquid phase, resulting in greater diffusive fluxes at steady state. In order to investigate these complex interactions, we performed two, lab-scale uranium(VI) through-diffusion experiments in lightly compacted Na-montmorillonite at slightly different, alkaline pH conditions (average pH values of 8.69 and 8.87). Observed uranium(VI) diffusive fluxes were decreased by approximately an order of magnitude in comparison to a tritium tracer. This indicates a relevance of 'anion exclusion' effects, the full or partial exclusion of anionic U(VI)-carbonato species from clay interlayer spaces. In addition, uranium(VI) sorption reactions were shown to be relevant in the diffusion experiments, even at alkaline pH values of around 8.7 and 8.9, where uranium(VI) sorption is low compared to other pH conditions. Despite the similarity of pH conditions, different degrees of uranium(VI) retardation were determined for the two systems. Additionally, we

  8. Improved methane production from waste activated sludge with low organic content by alkaline pretreatment at pH 10.

    PubMed

    Feng, L Y; Yang, L Q; Zhang, L X; Chen, H L; Chen, J

    2013-01-01

    Sludge with low organic content always results in an unsatisfactory performance, even failure of anaerobic digestion. The alkaline pretreatment effect on anaerobic digestion of sludge with low organic content has seldom been studied although it gives many benefits for sludge with high organic content. In this study the influence of alkaline pretreatment (pH 10, an effective alkaline pH) on the solubilization and methane production from waste activated sludge (WAS) with low organic content was investigated. Results from biochemical methane potential (BMP) experiments showed that anaerobic biodegradability of WAS was greatly improved by alkaline pretreatment at pH 10. Methane production from the current WAS under conditions of pretreatment time 4 h and digestion time 15 d was 139.6 mL/g VS (volatile solids), much higher than that from the unpretreated WAS with digestion time of 20 d (75.2 mL/g VS). Also, the solubilization of WAS was significantly accelerated by alkaline pretreatment. Mechanism exploration indicated that the general activities of anaerobic microorganisms, specific activities of key enzymes and the amounts of methanogens were enhanced by alkaline pretreatment at pH 10, showing good agreement with methane production.

  9. Fresh water leaching of alkaline bauxite residue after sea water neutralization.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Neal W; Fulton, Ian M; Kopittke, Rosemary A; Kopittke, Peter M

    2009-01-01

    Processing of bauxite to extract alumina produces a strongly alkaline waste, bauxite refining residue, which is commonly stored in engineered structures. Once full, these waste dumps must be revegetated. In many alumina refineries, the waste is separated into fine-textured red mud and coarse-textured residue sand (RS). The sand component has physical characteristics that make it a suitable plant growth medium, provided the adverse chemical characteristics can be addressed. Neutralization of the highly saline-sodic RS with sea water lowers pH, reduces Na saturation, and adds plant nutrients. However, sea water-neutralized RS remains saline sodic and needs fresh water leaching before use as a plant growth medium. Columns containing sea water-neutralized RS were leached with 30 m depth-equivalent of fresh water to evaluate the effects of rainfall on the RS and its leachate. Entrained cations were rapidly displaced by the fresh water, lowering salinity to non-plant-limiting levels (< or =0.3 dS m(-1)). The percentage of the effective cation exchange capacity (ECEC) saturated by Na decreased from 71 to 62% due to a reduction in soil solution ionic strength (causing a decrease in the ECEC) and the preferential displacement of Na(+) (and K(+)) from the exchange. Fresh water leaching increased pH (leachate pH increased from 8.0 to 10.1). This pH increase is attributed to the slow dissolution of the Na-containing mineral sodalite. Under the current experimental conditions, the application of 30 m depth-equivalent of leaching reduced the total RS sodalite content by <10%.

  10. Growth of water hyacinth in municipal landfill leachate with different pH.

    PubMed

    El-Gendy, A S; Biswas, N; Bewtra, J K

    2004-07-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of municipal landfill leachate pH on the growth of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes). These experiments were carried out in a green house environment on leachate samples collected from Essex-Windsor Regional Landfill, Windsor, Ontario, Canada. It was found that water hyacinth plants survived in a pH range of 4.0 to 8.0. Both alkaline pH (above 8.0) and highly acidic pH (below 4.0) had inhibitory effect on the growth of plants. The pH range, for optimum growth of the water hyacinth plants was found to be 5.8 to 6.0. At optimum growth, water hyacinth had an average mean relative growth rate of 0.043 d-1. It was found that nitrogen compounds underwent different transformations depending on the pH of leachate. Plant uptake, nitrification and volatilization were among these transformations.

  11. Endurance test and evaluation of alkaline water electrolysis cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, K. A.; Schubert, F. H.

    1981-01-01

    Utilization in the development of multi-kW low orbit power systems is discussed. The following technological developments of alkaline water electrolysis cells for space power application were demonstrated: (1) four 92.9 cm2 single water electrolysis cells, two using LST's advanced anodes and two using LST's super anodes; (2) four single cell endurance test stands for life testing of alkaline water electrolyte cells; (3) the solid performance of the advanced electrode and 355 K; (4) the breakthrough performance of the super electrode; (5) the four single cells for over 5,000 hours each significant cell deterioration or cell failure. It is concluded that the static feed water electrolysis concept is reliable and due to the inherent simplicity of the passive water feed mechanism coupled with the use of alkaline electrolyte has greater potential for regenerative fuel cell system applications than alternative electrolyzers. A rise in cell voltage occur after 2,000-3,000 hours which was attributed to deflection of the polysulfone end plates due to creepage of the thermoplastic. More end plate support was added, and the performance of the cells was restored to the initial performance level.

  12. Endurance test and evaluation of alkaline water electrolysis cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, K. A.; Schubert, F. H.

    1981-11-01

    Utilization in the development of multi-kW low orbit power systems is discussed. The following technological developments of alkaline water electrolysis cells for space power application were demonstrated: (1) four 92.9 cm2 single water electrolysis cells, two using LST's advanced anodes and two using LST's super anodes; (2) four single cell endurance test stands for life testing of alkaline water electrolyte cells; (3) the solid performance of the advanced electrode and 355 K; (4) the breakthrough performance of the super electrode; (5) the four single cells for over 5,000 hours each significant cell deterioration or cell failure. It is concluded that the static feed water electrolysis concept is reliable and due to the inherent simplicity of the passive water feed mechanism coupled with the use of alkaline electrolyte has greater potential for regenerative fuel cell system applications than alternative electrolyzers. A rise in cell voltage occur after 2,000-3,000 hours which was attributed to deflection of the polysulfone end plates due to creepage of the thermoplastic. More end plate support was added, and the performance of the cells was restored to the initial performance level.

  13. Kinetic Release of Alkalinity from Particle-Containing Oil-in-Water Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, K.; Chapra, S. C.; Ramsburg, A.

    2014-12-01

    Oil-in-water emulsions are typically employed during remediation to promote biotic reduction of contaminants. Emulsions, however, hold promise for encapsulated delivery of many types of active ingredients required for successful site remediation or long-term site stewardship. Our research is currently focused on using alkalinity-containing particles held within oil-in-water emulsions to sustain control of subsurface pH. Here we describe results from laboratory experiments and mathematical modeling conducted to quantify the kinetics associated with the emulsion delivery and alkalinity release process. Kinetically stable oil-in-water emulsions containing (~60 nmCaCO3 or ~100 nm MgO particles) were previously developed using soybean oil and Gum Arabic as a stabilizing agent. Batch and column experiments were employed to assess the accessibility and release of the alkalinity from the emulsion. Successive additions of HCl were used in batch systems to produce several pH responses (pH rebounds) that were subsequently modeled to elucidate release mechanisms and rates for varying emulsion compositions and particle types. Initial results suggest that a linear-driving-force model is generally able to capture the release behavior in the batch system when the temporally-constant, lumped mass-transfer coefficient is scaled by the fraction of particle mass remaining within the droplets. This result suggests that the rate limiting step in the release process may be the interphase transfer of reactive species at the oil-water interface. 1-d column experiments were also completed in order to quantify the extent and rate of alkalinity release from emulsion droplets retained in a sandy medium. Alkalinity release from the retained droplets treated a pH 4 influent water for 25-60 pore volumes (the duration depended on particle type and mass loading), and the cessation in treatment corresponded to exhaustion of the particle mass held within the oil. Column experiments were simulated

  14. Combined effects of carbonate alkalinity and pH on survival, growth and haemocyte parameters of the Venus clam Cyclina sinensis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tingting; Lai, Qifang; Yao, Zongli; Lu, Jianxue; Zhou, Kai; Wang, Hui

    2013-08-01

    Carbonate alkalinity (CA) and pH are considered to be two important stress factors that determine the response of aquatic animals to sudden transfers into saline-alkaline water. To evaluate the potential for aquaculture production of Venus clams (Cyclina sinensis) farmed in saline-alkaline water, the combined effects of CA (2.5 (control), 10.0, 20.0 and 40.0 meq/l) and pH (8.0 (control), 8.5, 9.0 and 9.5) on survival rate was monitored every day for 10 days. Length gain rate (LGR) and weight gain rate (WGR) were also monitored for two months, and total haemocyte count (THC), phagocytic rate (PR) and haemocyte mortality (HM) were measured for 3, 6, 12 and 24 days under the same water temperature (20 °C) and salinity (15‰) conditions. The results showed that survival rates in treatments of CA ≤ 20.0, combined with pH ≤ 9.0, were 100%. LGR and WGR in treatments of CA 2.5 & pH 8.0 (control), CA 2.5 & pH 8.5 and CA 10.0 & pH 8.0 exhibited the largest values (P > 0.05), while in other treatments, they showed a decreasing trend with an increase in either CA or pH or both (P < 0.05). Similarly, for THC, PR and HM, no significant differences were observed among the fast growth treatments during the entire experimental period (P > 0.05), however, in other treatments, they presented significant differences, especially on day 3 and 6 (P < 0.05), most notably with increases in CA or pH, but returned to control levels on day 12. In conclusion, in this study, a strong interaction between CA and pH was observed. Additionally, it was ascertained that the Venus clam C. sinensis can withstand the stress of CA 20.0 combined pH 9.0, although individuals grows slowly and may take approximately 12 days to recover to the unstressed condition.

  15. Effect of pH alkaline salts of fatty acids on the inhibition of bacteria associated with poultry processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The agar diffusion assay was used to examine the effect of pH on the ability of alkaline salts of three fatty acids (FA) to inhibit growth of bacteria associated with poultry processing. FA solutions were prepared by dissolving 0.5 M concentrations of caprylic, capric, or lauric acid in separate ali...

  16. Quaternary structure of partially liganded intermediates of sheep carbon monoxide hemoglobin at alkaline pH.

    PubMed

    Gray, R D

    1975-01-25

    A rapid change in absorbance was observed in the Soret region during the interval between photolysis of sheep carbon monoxide hemoglobin and the subsequent reassociation of CO in the dark. The rate constant for this spectral change was about 4000 s--1 at 20 degrees in 0.05 M solium borate, pH 9.3. The wavelength dependence of the amplitude of the absorbance change is similar to that observed when deoxygenated alpha and theta chains are allowed to recombine (Brunori, M., Antonini, E., Wyman, J., and Anderson, S. R. (1968) J. Mol. Biol. 34, 357-359), and therefore reflects changes in the quanternary structure of the hemoglobin tetramer induced by ligand displacement. The amplitude of this conformation-dependent spectral change was not a linear function of the fraction of bound CO removed by photolysis. The results suggest that of the possible intermediate species present after partial photolysis, only Hb4 and Hb4(CO) change from the ligand-bound to the ligand-free sturcture prior to CO reassociation under these alkaline conditions.

  17. Sequential Washing with Electrolyzed Alkaline and Acidic Water Effectively Removes Pathogens from Metal Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Yuichiro; Akamatsu, Norihiko; Mori, Tsuyoshi; Sano, Kazunori; Satoh, Katsuya; Nagayasu, Takeshi; Miyoshi, Yoshiaki; Sugio, Tomomi; Sakai, Hideyuki; Sakae, Eiji; Ichimiya, Kazuko; Hamada, Masahisa; Nakayama, Takehisa; Fujita, Yuhzo; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Nishida, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    Removal of pathogenic organisms from reprocessed surgical instruments is essential to prevent iatrogenic infections. Some bacteria can make persistent biofilms on medical devices. Contamination of non-disposable equipment with prions also represents a serious risk to surgical patients. Efficient disinfection of prions from endoscopes and other instruments such as high-resolution cameras remains problematic because these instruments do not tolerate aggressive chemical or heat treatments. Herein, we develop a new washing system that uses both the alkaline and acidic water produced by electrolysis. Electrolyzed acidic water, containing HCl and HOCl as active substances, has been reported to be an effective disinfectant. A 0.15% NaCl solution was electrolyzed and used immediately to wash bio-contaminated stainless steel model systems with alkaline water (pH 11.9) with sonication, and then with acidic water (pH 2.7) without sonication. Two bacterial species (Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and a fungus (Candida albicans) were effectively removed or inactivated by the washing process. In addition, this process effectively removed or inactivated prions from the stainless steel surfaces. This washing system will be potentially useful for the disinfection of clinical devices such as neuroendoscopes because electrolyzed water is gentle to both patients and equipment and is environmentally sound. PMID:27223116

  18. The effect of pH on the survival of leptospires in water*

    PubMed Central

    Smith, C. E. Gordon; Turner, L. H.

    1961-01-01

    One of the factors on which the incidence of leptospirosis is dependent is the survival time of shed leptospires in surface water or soil water, and this time is in turn affected by the acidity or alkalinity of the water. The authors have therefore studied the survival of four leptospiral serotypes in buffered distilled water at pH's ranging from 5.3 to 8.0. All survived longer in alkaline than in acid water, and significant differences between the serotypes were found in response to pH. Survival at pH's under 7.0 ranged from 10 to 117 days and at pH's over 7.0 from 21 to 152 days. Survival was also studied in aqueous extracts of soil samples from different areas in Malaya; no correlation was found between pH and survival time. It was also noted that in a group of Malayan ricefields a low incidence of leptospirosis in man was accompanied by a high infection rate among rodents, and when it was found that this phenomenon could not be explained by pH or salinity, attention was turned to the soil. Bentonite clay, similar to the montmorrillonite clay of the ricefields, was found to adsorb about half the leptospires in suspension. The authors recommend that field study of this laboratory observation be undertaken. PMID:20604084

  19. Sewage sludge pretreatment by microwave irradiation combined with activated carbon fibre at alkaline pH for anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dedong; Guo, Sixiao; Ma, Nina; Wang, Guowen; Ma, Chun; Hao, Jun; Xue, Mang; Zhang, Xinxin

    2016-01-01

    This research focuses on the effects of microwave-assisted activated carbon fibre (ACF) (MW-ACF) treatment on sewage sludge at alkaline pH. The disintegration and biodegradability of sewage sludge were studied. It was found that the MW-ACF process at alkaline pH provided a rapid and efficient process to disrupt the microbial cells in the sludge. The results suggested that when irradiated at 800 W MW for 110 s with a dose of 1.0 g ACF/g solid concentration (SS) at pH 10.5, the MW-ACF pretreatment achieved 55% SS disintegration, 23% greater than the value of MW alone (32%). The concentration of total nitrogen, total phosphorus, supernatant soluble chemical oxygen demand, protein, and polysaccharide increased by 60%, 144%, 145%, 74%, and 77%, respectively. An increase in biogas production by 63.7% was achieved after 20 days of anaerobic digestion (AD), compared to the control. The results indicated that the MW-ACF pretreatment process at alkaline pH provides novel sludge management options in disintegration of sewage sludge for further AD.

  20. The Effect of Carbonate and pH on Hydrogen Oxidation and Oxygen Reduction on Pt-Based Electrocatalysts in Alkaline Media

    DOE PAGES

    John, Samuel St.; Atkinson, Robert W.; Roy, Asa; ...

    2016-01-11

    In this paper, we investigated the performance of several carbon-supported RuxPty electrocatalysts for their alkaline hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction performance in the presence of carbonate and compared their performance with monometallic, carbon-supported Pt. Our results indicate a strong dependence of HOR upon pH for the monometallic Pt catalysts (22 mV/pH) and a weak dependence upon pH for the Ru-containing electrocatalysts (3.7, 2.5, and 4.7 mV/pH on Ru0.2Pt0.8, Ru0.4Pt0.6, and Ru0.8Pt0.2, respectively). These results are consistent with our previous findings that illustrate a change in rds from electron transfer (on monometallic Pt) to dissociative hydrogen adsorption (on RuxPty catalysts). Analysismore » of the kinetic currents to determine the rate-determining step via Tafel slope analysis provides additional data supporting this conclusion. There is no difference in the performance at comparable pH values in the presence or absence of carbonate on monometallic Pt indicating that water/hydroxide is the primary proton acceptor for alkaline HOR in 0.1 M KOH aqueous electrolyte. Finally, we observe no pH or carbonate dependence for the ORR on monometallic Pt.« less

  1. Endurance Test and Evaluation of Alkaline Water Electrolysis Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovach, Andrew J.; Schubert, Franz H.; Chang, B. J.; Larkins, Jim T.

    1985-01-01

    The overall objective of this program is to assess the state of alkaline water electrolysis cell technology and its potential as part of a Regenerative Fuel Cell System (RFCS) of a multikilowatt orbiting powerplant. The program evaluates the endurance capabilities of alkaline electrolyte water electrolysis cells under various operating conditions, including constant condition testing, cyclic testing and high pressure testing. The RFCS demanded the scale-up of existing cell hardware from 0.1 sq ft active electrode area to 1.0 sq ft active electrode area. A single water electrolysis cell and two six-cell modules of 1.0 sq ft active electrode area were designed and fabricated. The two six-cell 1.0 sq ft modules incorporate 1.0 sq ft utilized cores, which allow for minimization of module assembly complexity and increased tolerance to pressure differential. A water electrolysis subsystem was designed and fabricated to allow testing of the six-cell modules. After completing checkout, shakedown, design verification and parametric testing, a module was incorporated into the Regenerative Fuel Cell System Breadboard (RFCSB) for testing at Life Systems, Inc., and at NASA JSC.

  2. Sphagnum establishment in alkaline fens: Importance of weather and water chemistry.

    PubMed

    Vicherová, Eliška; Hájek, Michal; Šmilauer, Petr; Hájek, Tomáš

    2017-02-15

    Sphagnum expansion to alkaline fens has accelerated during the last decades in Europe, leading to changes in diversity, habitat distributions and carbon storage. The causes are still not clearly understood and involve an interplay between climate change, hydrology, nutrient supply and Sphagnum physiology. We conducted a 4-year field experiment in eight fens in Central European highlands and assessed survival and establishment of individual apical shoot fragments of S. flexuosum, S. warnstorfii and S. squarrosum transplanted along the microtopographical gradient. In a laboratory experiment, we tested combined effects of desiccation and high calcium bicarbonate concentration on Sphagnum survival. We found that in unflooded positions, living shoots of Sphagnum and brown mosses lowered [Ca(2+)] and pH in their capillary water, in contrast to dead fragments; yet without differences between species. Survival and expansion of Sphagnum fragments, which did not die of acute calcium toxicity during first weeks/months, was negatively affected by dry weather and alkaline water chemistry, reflecting Sphagnum intolerance to desiccation and to combined high [Ca(2+)] and pH. Shoot fragments expanded to patches only when precipitation was high. Interestingly, non-toxic concentration of calcium bicarbonate reduced desiccation damage in Sphagnum, probably through protection of membranes or other cell components. This mechanism would facilitate Sphagnum survival in elevated, frequently desiccated microhabitats of calcareous fens such as brown-moss hummocks. However, since water-retaining capacity of few Sphagnum shoots is insufficient to change water chemistry in its surroundings, surface acidification may occur only once the environment (e.g. sufficient humidity) enabled expansion to larger mats. Then, the retained rainwater together with hardly decomposable Sphagnum litter would separate mire surface from groundwater, speeding up successional shift towards poor fens. Sphagnum

  3. Recent developments on IME-alkaline water electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenborre, H.; Baetsle, L. H.; Hebel, W.; Leysen, R.; Nackaerts, H.; Spaepen, G.

    Demonstration on a laboratory scale is reported for the substitution of the conventional asbestos diaphragm in alkaline water electrolysis processes by thin sheets of polyantimonic acid and polysulfone. The membranes investigated withstand concentrated KOH solutions at up to 120 C, and have the necessary ion-conducting and gas-separating properties. It was also found that, by increasing the amount of polyantimonic acid in the membrane, electrolyte concentration can be lowered from 30 percent to 5 percent (by weight) without major effect on the cell voltage.

  4. Evaluation of pH, alkalinity and temperature during air stripping process for ammonia removal from landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Campos, Juacyara Carbonelli; Moura, Denise; Costa, Ana Paula; Yokoyama, Lidia; Araujo, Fabiana Valeria da Fonseca; Cammarota, Magali Christe; Cardillo, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the air stripping technology for the removal of ammonia from landfill leachates. In this process, pH, temperature, airflow rate and operation time were investigated. Furthermore, the relationship between the leachate alkalinity and the ammonia removal efficiency during the process was studied. The leachate used in the tests was generated in the Gramacho Municipal Solid Waste Landfill (Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil). The best results were obtained with a temperature of 60(o)C, and they were independent of the pH value for 7 h of operation (the ammonia nitrogen removal was greater than 95%). A strong influence of the leachate alkalinity on the ammonia nitrogen removal was observed; as the alkalinity decreased, the ammonia concentration also decreased because of prior CO2 removal, which increased the pH and consequently favored the NH3 stripping. The air flow rate, in the values evaluated (73, 96 and 120 L air.h(-1).L(-1) of leachate), did not influence the results.

  5. Solid-State Water Electrolysis with an Alkaline Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Leng, YJ; Chen, G; Mendoza, AJ; Tighe, TB; Hickner, MA; Wang, CY

    2012-06-06

    We report high-performance, durable alkaline membrane water electrolysis in a solid-state cell. An anion exchange membrane (AEM) and catalyst layer ionomer for hydroxide ion conduction were used without the addition of liquid electrolyte. At 50 degrees C, an AEM electrolysis cell using iridium oxide as the anode catalyst and Pt black as the cathode catalyst exhibited a current density of 399 mA/cm(2) at 1.80 V. We found that the durability of the AEM-based electrolysis cell could be improved by incorporating a highly durable ionomer in the catalyst layer and optimizing the water feed configuration. We demonstrated an AEM-based electrolysis cell with a lifetime of > 535 h. These first-time results of water electrolysis in a solid-state membrane cell are promising for low-cost, scalable hydrogen production.

  6. Water balance creates a threshold in soil pH at the global scale.

    PubMed

    Slessarev, E W; Lin, Y; Bingham, N L; Johnson, J E; Dai, Y; Schimel, J P; Chadwick, O A

    2016-11-21

    Soil pH regulates the capacity of soils to store and supply nutrients, and thus contributes substantially to controlling productivity in terrestrial ecosystems. However, soil pH is not an independent regulator of soil fertility-rather, it is ultimately controlled by environmental forcing. In particular, small changes in water balance cause a steep transition from alkaline to acid soils across natural climate gradients. Although the processes governing this threshold in soil pH are well understood, the threshold has not been quantified at the global scale, where the influence of climate may be confounded by the effects of topography and mineralogy. Here we evaluate the global relationship between water balance and soil pH by extracting a spatially random sample (n = 20,000) from an extensive compilation of 60,291 soil pH measurements. We show that there is an abrupt transition from alkaline to acid soil pH that occurs at the point where mean annual precipitation begins to exceed mean annual potential evapotranspiration. We evaluate deviations from this global pattern, showing that they may result from seasonality, climate history, erosion and mineralogy. These results demonstrate that climate creates a nonlinear pattern in soil solution chemistry at the global scale; they also reveal conditions under which soils maintain pH out of equilibrium with modern climate.

  7. Water balance creates a threshold in soil pH at the global scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slessarev, E. W.; Lin, Y.; Bingham, N. L.; Johnson, J. E.; Dai, Y.; Schimel, J. P.; Chadwick, O. A.

    2016-12-01

    Soil pH regulates the capacity of soils to store and supply nutrients, and thus contributes substantially to controlling productivity in terrestrial ecosystems. However, soil pH is not an independent regulator of soil fertility—rather, it is ultimately controlled by environmental forcing. In particular, small changes in water balance cause a steep transition from alkaline to acid soils across natural climate gradients. Although the processes governing this threshold in soil pH are well understood, the threshold has not been quantified at the global scale, where the influence of climate may be confounded by the effects of topography and mineralogy. Here we evaluate the global relationship between water balance and soil pH by extracting a spatially random sample (n = 20,000) from an extensive compilation of 60,291 soil pH measurements. We show that there is an abrupt transition from alkaline to acid soil pH that occurs at the point where mean annual precipitation begins to exceed mean annual potential evapotranspiration. We evaluate deviations from this global pattern, showing that they may result from seasonality, climate history, erosion and mineralogy. These results demonstrate that climate creates a nonlinear pattern in soil solution chemistry at the global scale; they also reveal conditions under which soils maintain pH out of equilibrium with modern climate.

  8. Effect of pH on Metal Lability in Drinking Water Treatment Residuals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changhui; Yuan, Nannan; Pei, Yuansheng

    2014-01-01

    Drinking water treatment residuals (WTRs), by-products generated during treatment of drinking water, can be reused as environmental amendments to remediate contamination. However, this beneficial reuse may be hampered by the potential release of toxic contaminants (e.g., metals) in the WTRs. In present study, batch tests and then fractionation, in vitro digestion, and the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure were used to investigate the release and extractability of metals in the Fe/Al hydroxides comprised WTRs under differing pH. The results demonstrated that significant release from WTRs for Ba, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Fe, Mg, Mn, Pb, Sr, and Zn occurred under low pH (acid condition); for As, Mo, and V under high pH (alkaline condition); and for Al, Cu, and Ni under both conditions. In comparison, most metals in the WTRs were more easily released under low pH, but the release was stable at a relatively low level between pH 6 and 9, especially under alkaline conditions. Further analysis indicated that the chemical extractability and bioaccessibility of many metals was found to increase in the WTRs after being leached, even though the leached WTRs could still be considered nonhazardous. These results demonstrated that pH had a substantial effect on the lability of metals in WTRs. Overall, caution should be used when considering pH conditions during WTRs reuse to avoid potential metal pollution.

  9. Upper ocean carbon cycling inferred from direct pH observations made by profiling floats and estimated alkalinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, K. S.; Plant, J. N.; Jannasch, H. W.; Coletti, L. J.; Elrod, V.; Sakamoto, C.; Riser, S.

    2015-12-01

    The annual cycle of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) is a key tracer of net community production and carbon export in the upper ocean. In particular, the DIC concentration is much less sensitive to air-sea gas exchange, when compared to oxygen, another key tracer of upper ocean metabolism. However, the annual DIC cycle is observed with a seasonal resolution at only a few time-series stations in the open ocean. Here, we consider the annual carbon cycle that has been observed using profiling floats equipped with pH sensors. Deep-Sea DuraFET pH sensors have been deployed on profiling floats for over three years and they can provide temporal and spatial resolution of 5 to 10 days and 5 to 10 m in the upper ocean over multi-year periods. In addition to pH, a second carbon system parameter is required to compute DIC. Total alkalinity can be derived from the float observations of temperature, salinity and oxygen using equations in these variables that are fitted to shipboard observations of alkalinity obtained in the global repeat hydrography programs (e.g., Juranek et al., GRL, doi:10.1029/2011GL048580, 2011), as the relationships should be stable in time in the open ocean. Profiling floats with pH have been deployed from Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) cruises since late 2012 and an array of floats with pH have been deployed since early 2014 in the Southern Ocean as part of the SOCCOM program. The SOCCOM array should grow to nearly 200 floats over the next 5 years. The sensor data was quality controlled and adjusted by comparing observations at 1500 m depth to the deep climatology of pH (derived from DIC and alkalinity) computed with the GLODAP data set. After adjustment, the surface DIC concentrations were calculated from pH and alkalinity. This yields a data set that is used to examine annual net community production in the oligotrophic North Pacific and in the South Pacific near 150 West from 40 South to 65 South.

  10. The immobilization of all spermatozoa in vitro by bitter lemon drink and the effect of alkaline pH.

    PubMed

    Nwoha, P U

    1992-12-01

    Researchers at Obafemi Awolowo University in Ile-Ife, Nigeria, collected semen samples from 7 healthy men 25-30 years old who had abstained from sex for at least 5 days in order to examine the spermicidal action of 4 soft drinks (Krest bitter lemon, Afri-Cola, Coca-Cola, and Pepsi-Cola), the effect of increased temperature of the drinks on spermicidal action, and the effect of changing the soft drinks from an acid, as it comes from the factory, (ph 2.4) to an alkaline (pH 7.5). Increasing the temperature of the soft drinks from room temperature (22 degrees Celsius) to body temperatures (37 degrees Celsius) did not significantly change the spermicidal action any of the soft drinks. All soft drinks with an acid pH, except Coca-Cola, had a significantly lower percent of sperm motility than those with an alkaline pH (0-42.3% vs. 20-52.1%; p .001). In fact, Krest bitter lemon in its factory form (acid pH) completely immobilized all spermatozoa within 1 minute after the researchers diluted the semen with the soft drink. Alkaline Coca-Cola had a significantly lower percent of sperm motility than did acid Coca-Cola (35.8% vs. 46.5%; p .001). Other than Krest bitter lemon, the significant decreases in sperm motility were not enough to prevent pregnancy. These findings indicated that researchers should test Krest bitter lemon for effectiveness as a postcoital contraceptive. If indeed it proves effective, it has great potential as such a contraceptive among the poor in the densely population developed countries since it is readily available and inexpensive.

  11. Improvement of the optimum pH of Aspergillus niger xylanase towards an alkaline pH by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Xie, Jingcong; Zhang, Xuesong; Zhao, Linguo

    2015-01-01

    In an attempt to shift the optimal pH of the xylanase B (XynB) from Aspergillus niger towards alkalinity, target mutation sites were selected by alignment between Aspergillus niger xylanase B and other xylanases that have alkalophilic pH optima that highlight charged residues in the eight-residues-longer loop in the alkalophilic xylanase. Multiple engineered XynB mutants were created by site-directed mutagenesis with substitutions Q164K and Q164K+D117N. The variant XynB-117 had the highest optimum pH (at 5.5), which corresponded to a basic 0.5 pH unit shift when compared with the wild-type enzyme. However, the optimal pH of the XynB- 164 mutation was not changed, similar to the wild type. These results suggest that the residues at positions 164 and 117 in the eight-residues-longer loop and the cleft's edge are important in determining the pH optima of XynB from Aspergillus niger.

  12. Carbon dioxide addition to microbial fuel cell cathodes maintains sustainable catholyte pH and improves anolyte pH, alkalinity, and conductivity.

    PubMed

    Fornero, Jeffrey J; Rosenbaum, Miriam; Cotta, Michael A; Angenent, Largus T

    2010-04-01

    Bioelectrochemical system (BES) pH imbalances develop due to anodic proton-generating oxidation reactions and cathodic hydroxide-ion-generating reduction reactions. Until now, workers added unsustainable buffers to reduce the pH difference between the anode and cathode because the pH imbalance contributes to BES potential losses and, therefore, power losses. Here, we report that adding carbon dioxide (CO(2)) gas to the cathode, which creates a CO(2)/bicarbonate buffered catholyte system, can diminish microbial fuel cell (MFC) pH imbalances in contrast to the CO(2)/carbonate buffered catholyte system by Torres, Lee, and Rittmann [Environ. Sci. Technol. 2008, 42, 8773]. We operated an air-cathode and liquid-cathode MFC side-by-side. For the air-cathode MFC, CO(2) addition resulted in a stable catholyte film pH of 6.61 +/- 0.12 and a 152% increase in steady-state power density. By adding CO(2) to the liquid-cathode system, we sustained a steady catholyte pH (pH = 5.94 +/- 0.02) and a low pH imbalance (DeltapH = 0.65 +/- 0.18) over a 2-week period without external salt buffer addition. By migrating bicarbonate ions from the cathode to the anode (with an anion-exchange membrane), we increased the anolyte pH (DeltapH = 0.39 +/- 0.31), total alkalinity (494 +/- 6 to 582 +/- 6 as mg CaCO(3)/L), and conductivity (1.53 +/- 0.49 to 2.16 +/- 0.03 mS/cm) relative to the feed properties. We also verified with a phosphate-buffered MFC that our reaction rates were limited mainly by the reactor configuration rather than limitations due to the bicarbonate buffer.

  13. Computational Design of a pH Stable Enzyme: Understanding Molecular Mechanism of Penicillin Acylase's Adaptation to Alkaline Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Suplatov, Dmitry; Panin, Nikolay; Kirilin, Evgeny; Shcherbakova, Tatyana; Kudryavtsev, Pavel; Švedas, Vytas

    2014-01-01

    Protein stability provides advantageous development of novel properties and can be crucial in affording tolerance to mutations that introduce functionally preferential phenotypes. Consequently, understanding the determining factors for protein stability is important for the study of structure-function relationship and design of novel protein functions. Thermal stability has been extensively studied in connection with practical application of biocatalysts. However, little work has been done to explore the mechanism of pH-dependent inactivation. In this study, bioinformatic analysis of the Ntn-hydrolase superfamily was performed to identify functionally important subfamily-specific positions in protein structures. Furthermore, the involvement of these positions in pH-induced inactivation was studied. The conformational mobility of penicillin acylase in Escherichia coli was analyzed through molecular modeling in neutral and alkaline conditions. Two functionally important subfamily-specific residues, Gluβ482 and Aspβ484, were found. Ionization of these residues at alkaline pH promoted the collapse of a buried network of stabilizing interactions that consequently disrupted the functional protein conformation. The subfamily-specific position Aspβ484 was selected as a hotspot for mutation to engineer enzyme variant tolerant to alkaline medium. The corresponding Dβ484N mutant was produced and showed 9-fold increase in stability at alkaline conditions. Bioinformatic analysis of subfamily-specific positions can be further explored to study mechanisms of protein inactivation and to design more stable variants for the engineering of homologous Ntn-hydrolases with improved catalytic properties. PMID:24959852

  14. Computational design of a pH stable enzyme: understanding molecular mechanism of penicillin acylase's adaptation to alkaline conditions.

    PubMed

    Suplatov, Dmitry; Panin, Nikolay; Kirilin, Evgeny; Shcherbakova, Tatyana; Kudryavtsev, Pavel; Svedas, Vytas

    2014-01-01

    Protein stability provides advantageous development of novel properties and can be crucial in affording tolerance to mutations that introduce functionally preferential phenotypes. Consequently, understanding the determining factors for protein stability is important for the study of structure-function relationship and design of novel protein functions. Thermal stability has been extensively studied in connection with practical application of biocatalysts. However, little work has been done to explore the mechanism of pH-dependent inactivation. In this study, bioinformatic analysis of the Ntn-hydrolase superfamily was performed to identify functionally important subfamily-specific positions in protein structures. Furthermore, the involvement of these positions in pH-induced inactivation was studied. The conformational mobility of penicillin acylase in Escherichia coli was analyzed through molecular modeling in neutral and alkaline conditions. Two functionally important subfamily-specific residues, Gluβ482 and Aspβ484, were found. Ionization of these residues at alkaline pH promoted the collapse of a buried network of stabilizing interactions that consequently disrupted the functional protein conformation. The subfamily-specific position Aspβ484 was selected as a hotspot for mutation to engineer enzyme variant tolerant to alkaline medium. The corresponding Dβ484N mutant was produced and showed 9-fold increase in stability at alkaline conditions. Bioinformatic analysis of subfamily-specific positions can be further explored to study mechanisms of protein inactivation and to design more stable variants for the engineering of homologous Ntn-hydrolases with improved catalytic properties.

  15. Abiotic Synthesis of Methane Under Alkaline Hydrothermal Conditions: the Effect of pH in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foustoukos, D. I.; Qi, F.; Seyfried, W. E.

    2004-12-01

    Abiotic formation of methane in hydrothermal reaction zones at mid-ocean ridges likely occurs by Fischer-Tropsch catalytic processes involving reaction of CO2-bearing fluids with mineral surfaces. The elevated concentrations of dissolved methane and low molecular weight hydrocarbons observed in high temperature vent fluids issuing from ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal systems, in particular, suggest that Fe and Cr-bearing mineral phases attribute as catalysts, enhancing abiotic production of alkanes. The chemi-adsorption of dissolved CO2 on the catalytic mineral surface, however, might be influenced by a pH dependent surface electron charge developed within the mineral-fluid interface. Thus, a series of experiments was conducted to evaluate the role of pH on rates of carbon reduction in fluids coexisting with Fe-oxides at 390 degree C and 400 bars. At two distinct pH conditions, acidic (pH = 5) and alkaline (pH = 8.8), the abiotic production of isotopically labelled CH4(aq) was monitored during FeO reaction with aqueous NaCl-NaHCO3-H2-bearing fluid (0.56 mol/kg NaCl, 0.03 mol/kg NaH13CO3). Despite the lower H2(aq) concentrations (120 mmol/kg) in the high pH system, concentrations of abiogenic methane attained values of 195 umol/kg and 120 umol/kg respectively, suggesting enhanced catalytic properties of mineral under moderately high pH. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), performed on unreacted and final solid products, reveal the significantly greater abundances of alkyl (C-C-) groups on the surface of FeO oxidized at elevated pH, in comparison with mineral reacted at low pH conditions. Thus, enhanced adsorption of dissolved CO2 and the resulting Fischer-Tropsch formation of alkyl groups likely contributes to methane production observed at alkaline conditions. Introducing the effect of pH in the Fischer-Tropsch mechanism of alkane formation has important implications for the recently discovered Lost City ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal system, where elevated pH

  16. Tendency for oxidation of annelid hemoglobin at alkaline pH and dissociated states probed by redox titration.

    PubMed

    Bispo, Jose Ailton Conceicao; Landini, Gustavo Fraga; Santos, Jose Luis Rocha; Norberto, Douglas Ricardo; Bonafe, Carlos Francisco Sampaio

    2005-08-01

    The redox titration of extracellular hemoglobin of Glossoscolex paulistus (Annelidea) was investigated in different pH conditions and after dissociation induced by pressure. Oxidation increased with increasing pH, as shown by the reduced amount of ferricyanide necessary for the oxidation of hemoglobin. This behavior was the opposite of that of vertebrate hemoglobins. The potential of half oxidation (E1/2) changed from -65.3 to +146.8 mV when the pH increased from 4.50 to 8.75. The functional properties indicated a reduction in the log P50 from 1.28 to 0.28 in this pH range. The dissociation at alkaline pH or induced by high pressure, confirmed by HPLC gel filtration, suggested that disassembly of the hemoglobin could be involved in the increased potential for oxidation. These results suggest that the high stability and prolonged lifetime common to invertebrate hemoglobins is related to their low tendency to oxidize at acidic pH, in contrast to vertebrate hemoglobins.

  17. Metabolic flux modeling of detoxification of acetic acid by Ralstonia eutropha at slightly alkaline pH levels.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Wang, J

    2001-06-20

    Ralstonia eutropha grows on and produces polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) from fermentation acids. Acetic acid, one major organic acid from acidogenesis of organic wastes, has an inhibitory effect on the bacterium at slightly alkaline pH (6 g HAc/L at pH 8). The tolerance of R. eutropha to acetate, however, was increased significantly up to 15 g/L at the slightly alkaline pH level with high cell mass concentration. A metabolic cell model with five fluxes is proposed to depict the detoxification mechanism including mass transfer and acetyl-CoA formation of acetic acid and the formation of three final metabolic products, polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB), active biomass, and CO(2). The fluxes were measured under different conditions such as cell mass concentration, acetic acid concentration, and medium composition. The experimental results indicate that the acetate detoxification by high cell mass concentration is attributed to the increased fluxes at high extracellular acetate concentrations. The fluxes could be doubled to reduce and hence detoxify the accumulated intracellular acetate anions.

  18. [Risks associated with unrestricted consumption of alkaline-reduced water].

    PubMed

    Henry, Marc; Chambron, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Consumption of alkaline reduced water produced by domestic electrolysis devices was approved in Japan in 1965 by the Minister of Health, Work and Wellbeing, for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. Today, these devices are also freely available in France. The commercial information provided with the devices recommends the consumption of 1 to 1.5 liters per day, not only for gastrointestinal disorders but also for numerous other illnesses such as diabetes, cancer and inflammation. Academic research on this subject has been undergoing in Japan since 1990, and has established that the active ingredient is dissolved dihydrogen, which eliminates the free radical HO· in vivo. It has also been shown that electrode degradation during use of the devices releases highly reactive platinum nanoparticles, the toxicity of which is unknown. The authors of this report recommend alerting the French health authorities to the uncontrolled availability of these devices that generate drug substances and should therefore be subject to regulatory requirements.

  19. Managing land application of coal seam water: A field study of land amendment irrigation using saline-sodic and alkaline water on a Red Vertisol.

    PubMed

    Bennett, J McL; Marchuk, A; Raine, S R; Dalzell, S A; Macfarlane, D C

    2016-12-15

    Coal seam (CS) gas operations coproduce water with gas from confined CS aquifers. This CS water represents a potential agricultural resource if the water is able to be chemically amended to comply with management guidelines. Stoichiometric quantities of sulphur and gypsum amendments can be used to neutralise the alkalinity and reduce the sodicity of CS water respectively. These amendments can either be mixed in-line at a water treatment plant or applied directly to land prior to the application of CS water (a practice termed land amendment irrigation - LAI). This study compared the efficacy of LAI with in-line chemical amendment of CS water and irrigation with non-saline, non-sodic and non-alkaline (good quality) water under field conditions in southern Queensland. Soil chemical properties, soluble Ca, Mg, K, Na, electrical conductivity (EC), pH, chloride and alkalinity, as well as saturated hydraulic conductivity were measured to determine the impact of the irrigation treatments on soil chemical and physical conditions. Irrigation of lucerne pasture using solid-set sprinklers applied a total of 6.7 ML/ha of each treatment irrigation water to the experimental plots over a 10-month period. Alkalinity was neutralised using LAI, with no increase in soil alkalinity observed. Soil sodicity did not exceed threshold electrolyte concentration values under either CS water irrigation treatment. Soil chemical and physical properties were comparable for both LAI and in-line chemical amendment of CS water. Soil saturated hydraulic conductivity was maintained under all irrigation treatments. Results showed that the constrained capacity of the irrigation system was unable to meet crop evapotranspiration demand. This resulted in accumulation of salt within the root-zone under the CS water treatments compared to the good quality water treatment. LAI successfully chemically amended Bowen Basin CS water facilitating its beneficial use for agricultural irrigation.

  20. Effects of pH on the chlorination process of phenols in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Ge, Fei; Zhu, Lizhong; Chen, Hairong

    2006-05-20

    Toxic organic compounds detected generally in source water could combine with chlorine and contribute significantly to chlorination disinfection by-products (CDBPs). The effects of pH on species distribution of CDBPs and the kinetics of chlorination were investigated using phenol as a model of ionizable toxic organic compounds in the pH range of 6.0-9.0. It was found that five chlorination products including 2-monochlorophenol (2-MCP), 4-monochlorophenol (4-MCP), 2,6-dichlorophenol (2,6-DCP), 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP) were produced by successive chlorination substitution. MCP (2-MCP and 4-MCP) were the dominant products and phenol partly remained in acid media, while TCP and DCP (2,6-DCP and 2,4-DCP) were the main components in neutral and alkaline media. A steady equilibrium of phenol and its chlorination products was reached in 20-30 min in acid-, neutral- and slightly alkaline media, and was delayed to 60-180 min in alkaline media. The difference in properties between phenols and phenolates, and those between HOCl and ClO(-) should be considered simultaneously in explaining the effects of pH on the chlorination process with the theory of electrophilic substitution. These results show that pH plays an important regulating role in the species distribution of CDBPs and the kinetics of chlorination for ionizable toxic organic compounds in chlorination.

  1. Immunomodulatory effects of temperature and pH of water in an Indian freshwater sponge.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Soumalya; Bhunia, Anindya Sundar; Bhunia, Niladri Sekhar; Ray, Mitali; Ray, Sajal

    2016-07-01

    Eunapius carteri, a freshwater sponge of India, inhabits the ponds and lakes and experiences variations of temperature and pH of water throughout the year. Sponges bear evolutionary and ecological importance with limited information on their immunological attribute and adaptational resilience in a changing environment. This paper reports temperature and pH specific responses of immune related parameters in sponge maintained in the experimental conditions of laboratory. Innate immunological parameters like phagocytosis and generation of cytotoxic molecules like superoxide anion, nitric oxide and phenoloxidase activity were estimated in E. carteri at different environmentally realistic water temperatures (10, 20, 30 and 40°C) and pH (6.4, 7.4 and 8.4). Phagocytosis and cytotoxicity are established as important immune parameters of invertebrates. Calalase, an antioxidant enzyme and phosphatases are involved in pathogen destruction and are considered as components of innate immunity. Activities of catalase, acid and alkaline phosphatases were estimated in E. carteri at different thermal regimes and pH. Modulation of phagocytic and cytotoxic responses and the activities of catalase and phosphatases at different water temperatures and pH indicated temperature and pH specific immunological status of E. carteri. Present investigation deals with the effects of selected hydrological parameters on the fundamental immune related parameters in sponge indicating its adaptational plasticity. Immunological resilience of this species in the face of variation of water temperature and pH is thought to be a special adaptive feature of sponge, a reported "living fossil".

  2. The Effect of Carbonate and pH on Hydrogen Oxidation and Oxygen Reduction on Pt-Based Electrocatalysts in Alkaline Media

    SciTech Connect

    John, Samuel St.; Atkinson, Robert W.; Roy, Asa; Unocic, Raymond R.; Papandrew, Alexander B.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.

    2016-01-11

    In this paper, we investigated the performance of several carbon-supported RuxPty electrocatalysts for their alkaline hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction performance in the presence of carbonate and compared their performance with monometallic, carbon-supported Pt. Our results indicate a strong dependence of HOR upon pH for the monometallic Pt catalysts (22 mV/pH) and a weak dependence upon pH for the Ru-containing electrocatalysts (3.7, 2.5, and 4.7 mV/pH on Ru0.2Pt0.8, Ru0.4Pt0.6, and Ru0.8Pt0.2, respectively). These results are consistent with our previous findings that illustrate a change in rds from electron transfer (on monometallic Pt) to dissociative hydrogen adsorption (on RuxPty catalysts). Analysis of the kinetic currents to determine the rate-determining step via Tafel slope analysis provides additional data supporting this conclusion. There is no difference in the performance at comparable pH values in the presence or absence of carbonate on monometallic Pt indicating that water/hydroxide is the primary proton acceptor for alkaline HOR in 0.1 M KOH aqueous electrolyte. Finally, we observe no pH or carbonate dependence for the ORR on monometallic Pt.

  3. Coordinate responses to alkaline pH stress in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Serra-Cardona, Albert; Canadell, David; Ariño, Joaquín

    2015-01-01

    Alkalinization of the medium represents a stress condition for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to which this organism responds with profound remodeling of gene expression. This is the result of the modulation of a substantial number of signaling pathways whose participation in the alkaline response has been elucidated within the last ten years. These regulatory inputs involve not only the conserved Rim101/PacC pathway, but also the calcium-activated phosphatase calcineurin, the Wsc1-Pkc1-Slt2 MAP kinase, the Snf1 and PKA kinases and oxidative stress-response pathways. The uptake of many nutrients is perturbed by alkalinization of the environment and, consequently, an impact on phosphate, iron/copper and glucose homeostatic mechanisms can also be observed. The analysis of available data highlights cases in which diverse signaling pathways are integrated in the gene promoter to shape the appropriate response pattern. Thus, the expression of different genes sharing the same signaling network can be coordinated, allowing functional coupling of their gene products. PMID:28357292

  4. Contrasting pH buffering patterns in neutral-alkaline soils along a 3600 km transect in northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, W.; Nelson, P. N.; Li, M.-H.; Cai, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Shan, Y.; Wang, R.; Han, X.; Jiang, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Soil pH buffering capacity (pHBC) plays a crucial role in predicting acidification rates, yet its large-scale patterns and controls are poorly understood, especially for neutral-alkaline soils. Here, we evaluated the spatial patterns and drivers of pHBC along a 3600 km long transect (1900 km sub-transect with carbonate containing soils and 1700 km sub-transect with non-carbonate containing soils) across northern China. Soil pHBC was greater in the carbonate containing soils than in the non-carbonate containing soils. Acid addition decreased soil pH in the non-carbonate containing soils more markedly than in the carbonate containing soils. Within the carbonate soil sub-transect, soil pHBC was positively correlated with cation exchange capacity (CEC), carbonate content and exchangeable sodium (Na) concentration, but negatively correlated with initial pH and clay content, and not correlated with soil organic carbon (SOC) content. Within the non-carbonate sub-transect, soil pHBC was positively related to initial pH, clay content, CEC and exchangeable Na concentration, but not related to SOC content. Carbonate content was the primary determinant of pHBC in the carbonate containing soils and CEC was the main determinant of buffering capacity in the non-carbonate containing soils. Soil pHBC was positively related to aridity index and carbonate content across the carbonate containing soil sub-transect. Our results indicated that mechanisms controlling pHBC differ among neutral-alkaline soils of northern China, especially between carbonate and non-carbonate containing soils, leading to different rates, risks, and impacts of acidification. This understanding should be incorporated into the acidification risk assessment and landscape management in a changing world.

  5. Contrasting pH buffering patterns in neutral-alkaline soils along a 3600 km transect in northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, W. T.; Nelson, P. N.; Li, M.-H.; Cai, J. P.; Zhang, Y. Y.; Zhang, Y. G.; Yang, S.; Wang, R. Z.; Wang, Z. W.; Wu, Y. N.; Han, X. G.; Jiang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Soil pH buffering capacity (pHBC) plays a crucial role in predicting acidification rates, yet its large-scale patterns and controls are poorly understood, especially for neutral-alkaline soils. Here, we evaluated the spatial patterns and drivers of pHBC along a 3600 km long transect (1900 km sub-transect with carbonate-containing soils and 1700 km sub-transect with non-carbonate-containing soils) across northern China. Soil pHBC was greater in the carbonate-containing soils than in the non-carbonate-containing soils. Acid addition decreased soil pH in the non-carbonate-containing soils more markedly than in the carbonate-containing soils. Within the carbonate soil sub-transect, soil pHBC was positively correlated with cation exchange capacity (CEC), carbonate content and exchangeable sodium (Na) concentration, but negatively correlated with initial pH and clay content, and not correlated with soil organic carbon (SOC) content. Within the non-carbonate sub-transect, soil pHBC was positively related to initial pH, clay content, CEC and exchangeable Na concentration, but not related to SOC content. Carbonate content was the primary determinant of pHBC in the carbonate-containing soils and CEC was the main determinant of buffering capacity in the non-carbonate-containing soils. Along the transect, soil pHBC was different in regions with different aridity index. Soil pHBC was positively related to aridity index and carbonate content across the carbonate-containing soil sub-transect. Our results indicated that mechanisms controlling pHBC differ among neutral-alkaline soils of northern China, especially between carbonate- and non-carbonate-containing soils. This understanding should be incorporated into the acidification risk assessment and landscape management in a changing world.

  6. Isolation of a Sulfur-oxidizing Bacterium That can Grow under Alkaline pH, from Corroded Concrete.

    PubMed

    Maeda, T; Negishi, A; Oshima, Y; Nogami, Y; Kamimura, K; Sugio, T

    1998-01-01

    To study the early stages of concrete corrosion by bacteria, sulfur-oxidizing bacterium strain RO-1, which grows in an alkaline thiosulfate medium (pH 10.0) was isolated from corroded concreate and characterized. Strain RO-1 was a Gram negative, rod-shaped bacterium (0.5-0.6×0.9-1.5 μm). The mean G+C content of the DNA of strain RO-1 was 65.0 mol%. Optimum pH and temperature for growth were 8.0. and 30-37°C, respectively. When grown in thiosulfate medium with pH 10.0, growth rate of the strain was 48% of that observed at the optimum pH for growth. Strain RO-1 used sulfide, thiosulfate, and glucose, but not elemental sulfur or tetrathionate, as a sole energy source. Strain RO-1 grew under anaerobic conditions in pepton-NO3 (-) medium containing sodium nitrate as an electron acceptor, and had enzyme activities that oxidized sulfide, elemental sulfur, thiosulfate, sulfite, and glucose, but not tetrathionate. The bacterium had an activity to assimilate (14)CO2 into the cells when thiosulfate was used as an energy source. These results suggest that strain RO-1 is Thiobacillus versutus. Strain RO-1 exuded Ca(2+) from concrete blocks added to thiosulfate medium with pH 9.0 and the pH of the medium decreased from 9.0 to 5.5 after 22 days of cultivation. In contrast, Thiobacillus thiooxidans strain NB1-3 could not exude Ca(2+) in the same thiosulfate medium, suggesting that strain RO-1, but not T. thiooxidans NB1-3, is involved in the early stage of concrete corrosion because concrete structures just after construction contain calcium hydroxide and have a pH of 12-13.

  7. pH measurement of low-conductivity waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Busenberg, Eurybiades; Plummer, L.N.

    1987-01-01

    pH is an important and commonly measured parameter of precipitation and other natural waters. The various sources of errors in pH measurement were analyzed and procedures for improving the accuracy and precision of pH measurements in natural waters with conductivities of < 100 uS/cm at 25 C are suggested. Detailed procedures are given for the preparation of dilute sulfuric acid standards to evaluate the performance of pH electrodes in low conductivity waters. A daily check of the pH of dilute sulfuric acid standards and deionized water saturated with a gas mixture of low carbon dioxide at partial pressure (air) prior to the measurement of the pH of low conductivity waters is suggested. (Author 's abstract)

  8. Growth of Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL-B523 in an alkaline medium: suboptimal pH growth inhibition of a lactic acid bacterium.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Barry F; Fogler, H Scott

    2005-01-05

    Bacterial profile modification (BPM), a form of tertiary oil recovery, diverts water from the water-flooded high-permeability zone into the oil-bearing low-permeability zone. During field use, exopolymer-producing bacteria plug the high-permeability zone only in the immediate vicinity of the injection point (the near-well bore region). For effective BPM the plug must penetrate far into the formation. Slowing the specific growth rate, lengthening the lag phase, and slowing the polymerization rate are techniques that can prolong the onset of biopolymer gelation and extend the depth of the biological plug. In batch experiments, the growth of Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL-B523 was inhibited by the synergistic effects of high substrate loading and an alkaline pH. Exponential growth was delayed up to 190 h. It was observed that cell division was significantly retarded until the medium pH, reduced by the acid byproducts of fermentation, reached a critical value of 6.79 +/- 0.06. A mathematical model was developed to describe the relationship between specific growth rate, lag time, and medium pH.

  9. Two pore channel 2 (TPC2) inhibits autophagosomal-lysosomal fusion by alkalinizing lysosomal pH.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yingying; Hao, Bai-Xia; Graeff, Richard; Wong, Connie W M; Wu, Wu-Tian; Yue, Jianbo

    2013-08-16

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved lysosomal degradation pathway, yet the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP), one of the most potent Ca(2+) mobilizing messengers, elicits Ca(2+) release from lysosomes via the two pore channel 2 (TPC2) in many cell types. Here we found that overexpression of TPC2 in HeLa or mouse embryonic stem cells inhibited autophagosomal-lysosomal fusion, thereby resulting in the accumulation of autophagosomes. Treatment of TPC2 expressing cells with a cell permeant-NAADP agonist, NAADP-AM, further induced autophagosome accumulation. On the other hand, TPC2 knockdown or treatment of cells with Ned-19, a NAADP antagonist, markedly decreased the accumulation of autophagosomes. TPC2-induced accumulation of autophagosomes was also markedly blocked by ATG5 knockdown. Interestingly, inhibiting mTOR activity failed to increase TPC2-induced autophagosome accumulation. Instead, we found that overexpression of TPC2 alkalinized lysosomal pH, and lysosomal re-acidification abolished TPC2-induced autophagosome accumulation. In addition, TPC2 overexpression had no effect on general endosomal-lysosomal degradation but prevented the recruitment of Rab-7 to autophagosomes. Taken together, our data demonstrate that TPC2/NAADP/Ca(2+) signaling alkalinizes lysosomal pH to specifically inhibit the later stage of basal autophagy progression.

  10. The Aspergillus PacC zinc finger transcription factor mediates regulation of both acid- and alkaline-expressed genes by ambient pH.

    PubMed Central

    Tilburn, J; Sarkar, S; Widdick, D A; Espeso, E A; Orejas, M; Mungroo, J; Peñalva, M A; Arst, H N

    1995-01-01

    The pH regulation of gene expression in Aspergillus nidulans is mediated by pacC, whose 678 residue-derived protein contains three putative Cys2His2 zinc fingers. Ten pacCc mutations mimicking growth at alkaline pH remove between 100 and 214 C-terminal residues, including a highly acidic region containing an acidic glutamine repeat. Nine pacC+/- mutations mimicking acidic growth conditions remove between 299 and 505 C-terminal residues. Deletion of the entire pacC coding region mimics acidity but leads additionally to poor growth and conidiation. A PacC fusion protein binds DNA with the core consensus GCCARG. At alkaline ambient pH, PacC activates transcription of alkaline-expressed genes (including pacC itself) and represses transcription of acid-expressed genes. pacCc mutations obviate the need for pH signal transduction. Images PMID:7882981

  11. Comparison of Salivary pH, Buffering Capacity and Alkaline Phosphatase in Smokers and Healthy Non-Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi-Motamayel, Fatemeh; Falsafi, Parisa; Goodarzi, Mohammad T.; Poorolajal, Jalal

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Saliva contains alkaline phosphatase (ALP)—a key intracellular enzyme related to destructive processes and cellular damage—and has buffering capacity (BC) against acids due to the presence of bicarbonate and phosphate ions. Smoking may have deleterious effects on the oral environment due to pH changes which can affect ALP activity. This study aimed to evaluate the salivary pH, BC and ALP activity of male smokers and healthy non-smokers. Methods: This retrospective cohort study took place between August 2012 and December 2013. A total of 251 healthy male non-smokers and 259 male smokers from Hamadan, Iran, were selected. Unstimulated whole saliva was collected from each participant and pH and BC were determined using a pH meter. Salivary enzymes were measured by spectrophotometric assay. Results: Mean salivary pH (7.42 ± 0.48 and 7.52 ± 0.43, respectively; P = 0.018) and BC (3.41 ± 0.54 and 4.17 ± 0.71; P = 0.001) was significantly lower in smokers compared to non-smokers. Mean ALP levels were 49.58 ± 23.33 IU/L among smokers and 55.11 ± 27.85 IU/L among non-smokers (P = 0.015). Conclusion: Significantly lower pH, BC and ALP levels were observed among smokers in comparison to a healthy control group. These salivary alterations could potentially be utilised as biochemical markers for the evaluation of oral tissue function and side-effects among smokers. Further longitudinal studies are recommended to evaluate the effects of smoking on salivary components. PMID:27606111

  12. Biological Apatite Formed from Polyphosphate and Alkaline Phosphatase May Exchange Oxygen Isotopes from Water through Carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omelon, S. J.; Stanley, S. Y.; Gorelikov, I.; Matsuura, N.

    2011-12-01

    The oxygen isotopic composition in bone mineral phosphate is known to reflect the local water composition, environmental humidity, and diet1. Once ingested, biochemical processes presumably equilibrate PO43- with "body water" by the many biochemical reactions involving PO43- 2. Blake et al. demonstrated that enzymatic release of PO43- from organophosphorus compounds, and microbial metabolism of dissolved orthophosphate, significantly exchange the oxygen in precipitated apatite within environmental water3,4, which otherwise does not exchange with water at low temperatures. One of the enzymes that can cleave phosphates from organic substrates is alkaline phosphastase5, the enzyme also associated with bone mineralization. The literature often states that the mineral in bone in hydroxylapatite, however the mineral in bone is carbonated apatite that also contains some fluoride6. Deprotonation of HPO32- occurs at pH 12, which is impossibly high for biological system, and the predominate carbonate species in solution at neutral pH is HCO3-. To produce an apatite mineral without a significant hydroxyl content, it is possible that apatite biomineralization occurs through a polyphosphate pathway, where the oxygen atom required to transform polyphosphate into individual phosphate ions is from carbonate: [PO3-]n + CO32- -> [PO3-]n-1 + PO43- + CO2. Alkaline phosphatase can depolymerise polyphosphate into orthophosphate5. If alkaline phosphatase cleaves an oxygen atom from a calcium-carbonate complex, then there is no requirement for removing a hydrogen atom from the HCO3- or HPO43- ions of body water to form bioapatite. A mix of 1 mL of 1 M calcium polyphosphate hydogel, or nano-particles of calcium polyphosphate, and amorphous calcium carbonate were reacted with alkaline phosphatase, and maintained at neutral to basic pH. After two weeks, carbonated apatite and other calcium phosphate minerals were identified by powder x-ray diffraction. Orthophosphate and unreacted

  13. Belliella buryatensis sp. nov., isolated from alkaline lake water.

    PubMed

    Kozyreva, Lyudmila; Egorova, Darya; Anan'ina, Lyudmila; Plotnikova, Elena; Ariskina, Elena; Prisyazhnaya, Natalya; Radnaeva, Larisa; Namsaraev, Bair

    2016-01-01

    Two bacterial isolates from water of the alkaline brackish Lake Solenoe (Buryatia, Russia), 2C and 5CT, were characterized by using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. The strains were small, non-motile, Gram-stain-negative rods that formed small orange-red colonies on the surface of marine agar. Studies based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the strains were related closely to Belliella pelovolcani CC-SAL-25T (98.7 % sequence similarity). The G+C content of the DNA was 38-40 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization values between strains 2C and 5CT and B. pelovolcani CC-SAL-25T were 56-58 mol%. A menaquinone with seven isoprene units (MK-7) was the major respiratory quinone. The fatty acid profiles were slightly different from that of B. pelovolcani CC-SAL-25T. The novel strains could be distinguished from the phylogenetically closest species B. pelovolcani CC-SAL-25T based on matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectra of whole cells and a range of physiological and biochemical characteristics. The data obtained suggest that strains 2C and 5CT represent a novel species of the genus Belliella, for which the name Belliella buryatensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 5CT ( = VKM B-2724T = KCTC 32194T).

  14. Proteolytic Activity at Alkaline pH in Oat Leaves, Isolation of an Aminopeptidase 1

    PubMed Central

    Casano, Leonardo M.; Desimone, Marcelo; Trippi, Victorio S.

    1989-01-01

    Proteolytic activity in oat leaf extracts was measured with both azocasein and ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco) as substrates over a wide range of pH (3.0-9.2). With either azocasein or Rubisco activity peaks appeared at pH 4.8, 6.6, and 8.4. An aminopeptidase (AP) which hydrolyzes leucine-nitroanilide was partially purified. Purification consisted of a series of six steps which included ammonium sulfate precipitation, gel filtration, and two ionic exchange chromatographies. The enzyme was purified more than 100-fold. The apparent Km for leucine-nitroanilide is 0.08 millimolar at its pH optimum of 8.4. AP may be a cystein protease since it is inhibited by heavy metals and activated by 2-mercaptoethanol. Isolated chloroplasts were also able to hydrolyze leucine-nitroanilide at a pH optimum of 8.4, indicating that AP could be localized inside the photosynthetic organelles. PMID:16667194

  15. Attributing seasonal pH variability in surface ocean waters to governing factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagens, M.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2016-12-01

    On-going ocean acidification and increasing availability of high-frequency pH data have stimulated interest to understand seasonal pH dynamics in surface waters. Here we show that it is possible to accurately reproduce observed pH values by combining seasonal changes in temperature (T), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), and total alkalinity (TA) from three time series stations with novel pH sensitivity factors. Moreover, we quantify the separate contributions of T, DIC, and TA changes to winter-to-summertime differences in pH, which are in the ranges of -0.0334 to -0.1237, 0.0178 to 0.1169, and -0.0063 to 0.0234, respectively. The effects of DIC and temperature are therefore largely compensatory, and are slightly tempered by changes in TA. Whereas temperature principally drives pH seasonality in low-latitude to midlatitude systems, winter-to-summer DIC changes are most important at high latitudes. This work highlights the potential of pH sensitivity factors as a tool for quantifying the driving mechanisms behind pH changes.

  16. Chemical equilibrium model for interfacial activity of crude oil in aqueous alkaline solution: the effects of pH, alkali and salt

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, M.; Yen, T.F.

    1980-11-01

    A chemical equilibrium model for interfacial activity of crude in aqueous alkaline solution is proposed. The model predicts the observed effects of pH and concentrations of alkali and salt on the interfacial tension (IFT). The model proposed was shown to describe the observed effects of acid content, pH, and sodium ions on the interfacial activity of crude oil in water. Once the pH of the interface reaches the pKa of the acids, sometimes with the help of addition of some salt, the IFT experiences a sudden steep drop to the range of 10/sup -2/ dynes/cm. After that, further addition of sodium either in the form of NaOH or NaCl is going to increase the IFT due to a shift of equilibriumn to the formation of undissociated soap. This was confirmed by the difference in the observed effect of sodium on the IFT of the extracted soap molecules which are dissociated easily and those which are associated highly and precipitated easily. These soap molecules have dissociation constant values ranging from below 10/sup -2/ to above one. 13 references.

  17. Variations in the Alkalinity of Seawater in Coastal Waters of Oahu, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. L.; De Carlo, E. H.; Drupp, P. S.; Terlouw, G.; Guidry, M.; Mackenzie, F. T.; Thompson, R.

    2014-12-01

    Total alkalinity (AT) is an important component of the marine inorganic carbon system that, together with one of the other measurable parameters (i.e., pH, dissolved inorganic carbon-CT , pCO2) allows us to calculate the entire CO2-carbonic acid system. By measuring AT continuously at several coastal locations on coral reefs of Oahu, we can calculate a current rate of change in surface water conditions with respect to biogeochemical processes as well as the globally important issue of ocean acidification (OA). Previous work by Drupp et al (2011, 2013) has shown that parameters of the CO2-carbonic acid system display seasonal fluctuations as well as respond to short term rainfall events. This work expands the period of study through July 2014. The three sampling locations are vastly different in geographic and geochemical conditions. Kaneohe Bay is a protected embayment, with large freshwater inputs and long water residence time compared to the nearshore exposed waters at Kilo Nalu and Ala Wai. Variation in coral reef environments affect AT, thus making it crucial to sample multiple environments over an extended period of time to reveal changes in biogeochemistry. A typical sample from Kaneohe Bay (CRIMP-2) can be expected to have a AT value between 2134 umol/kg and 2279 umol/kg, Kilo Nalu: between 2263 umol/kg and 2350 umol/kg, Ala Wai: between 2263 umol/kg and 2335 umol/kg. In general, total alkalinity values from CRIMP-2 are lower than at Kilo Nalu or Ala Wai due to differences in coral reef environments. Our long-term record allows us to compare the behavior of Hawaiian reef waters to those of other tropical marine ecosystems. Furthermore, monitoring of AT over extended multiple years and multiple locations is essential to develop the time-series data necessary for continued evaluation of the impact of OA on coral reefs of the Hawaiian Islands.

  18. Characterization of steady-state activities of cytochrome c oxidase at alkaline pH: mimicking the effect of K-channel mutations in the bovine enzyme.

    PubMed

    Riegler, David; Shroyer, Lois; Pokalsky, Christine; Zaslavsky, Dmitry; Gennis, Robert; Prochaska, Lawrence J

    2005-01-07

    The cytochrome c oxidase activity of the bovine heart enzyme decreases substantially at alkaline pH, from 650 s(-1) at pH 7.0 to less than 10 s(-1) at pH 9.75. In contrast, the cytochrome c peroxidase activity of the enzyme shows little or no pH dependence (30-50 s(-1)) at pH values greater than 8.5. Under the conditions employed, it is demonstrated that the dramatic decrease in oxidase activity at pH 9.75 is fully reversible and not due to a major alkaline-induced conformational change in the enzyme. Furthermore, the Km values for cytochrome c interaction with the enzyme were also not significantly different at pH 7.8 and pH 9.75, suggesting that the pH dependence of the activity is not due to an altered interaction with cytochrome c at alkaline pH. However, at alkaline pH, the steady-state reduction level of the hemes increased, consistent with a slower rate of electron transfer from heme a to heme a3 at alkaline pH. Since it is well established that the rate of electron transfer from heme a to heme a3 is proton-coupled, it is reasonable to postulate that at alkaline pH, proton uptake becomes rate-limiting. The fact that this is not observed when hydrogen peroxide is used as a substrate in place of O2 suggests that the rate-limiting step is proton uptake via the K-channel associated with the reduction of the heme a3/CuB center prior to the reaction with O2. This step is not required for the reaction with H2O2, as shown previously in the examination of mutants of bacterial oxidases in which the K-channel was blocked. It is concluded that at pH values near 10, the delivery of protons via the K-channel becomes the rate-limiting step in the catalytic cycle with O2, so that the behavior of the bovine enzyme resembles that of the K-channel mutants in the bacterial enzymes.

  19. Effect of Alkaline pH on Polishing and Etching of Single and Polycrystalline Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesh, R. Prasanna; Prasad, Y. Nagendra; Kwon, Tae-Young; Kang, Young-Jae; Park, Jin-Goo

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, the polishing and etching behavior of single and polycrystalline silicon were studied. Prior to chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) process, the surfaces were treated with dilute hydrofluoric acid (DHF) to remove native oxides. The surface analysis shows that the poly contains trace amount of oxygen even after DHF treatment. The static and dynamic etch rates, and removal rates were measured as a function of slurry pH. The single silicon showed a higher static etch rate than the poly. After static etch rate measurements, poly showed higher surface roughness and more hydrophilic which indicates that the surface of poly is different from single crystal silicon. The friction force between pad and substrate and pad temperature was also measured as a function of pH during polishing in order to get more understanding of polishing process. At all the pH values being investigated, poly showed lower dynamic and removal rates, higher friction force and higher temperature. This indicates that the removal of poly in CMP is predominantly by mechanical actions. Also, these results, suggest a mechanism in which the oxygen present in the poly grain boundaries strongly influences the etching and removal mechanism.

  20. Diversity and food web structure of nematode communities under high soil salinity and alkaline pH.

    PubMed

    Salamún, Peter; Kucanová, Eva; Brázová, Tímea; Miklisová, Dana; Renčo, Marek; Hanzelová, Vladimíra

    2014-10-01

    A long-term and intensive magnesium (Mg) ore processing in Slovenské Magnezitové Závody a.s. in Jelšava has resulted in a high Mg content and alkaline pH of the soil environment, noticeable mainly in the close vicinity of the smelter. Nematode communities strongly reacted to the contamination mostly by a decrease in abundance of the sensitive groups. Nematodes from c-p 1 group and bacterivores, tolerant to pollution played a significant role in establishing the dominance at all sites. With increasing distance from the pollution source, the nematode communities were more structured and complex, with an increase in proportion of sensitive c-p 4 and 5 nematodes, composed mainly of carnivores and omnivores. Various ecological indices (e.g. MI2-5, SI, H') indicated similar improvement of farther soil ecosystems.

  1. Catalytically active alkaline molten globular enzyme: Effect of pH and temperature on the structural integrity of 5-aminolevulinate synthase.

    PubMed

    Stojanovski, Bosko M; Breydo, Leonid; Hunter, Gregory A; Uversky, Vladimir N; Ferreira, Gloria C

    2014-12-01

    5-Aminolevulinate synthase (ALAS), a pyridoxal-5'phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme, catalyzes the first step of heme biosynthesis in mammals. Circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopies were used to examine the effects of pH (1.0-3.0 and 7.5-10.5) and temperature (20 and 37°C) on the structural integrity of ALAS. The secondary structure, as deduced from far-UV CD, is mostly resilient to pH and temperature changes. Partial unfolding was observed at pH2.0, but further decreasing pH resulted in acid-induced refolding of the secondary structure to nearly native levels. The tertiary structure rigidity, monitored by near-UV CD, is lost under acidic and specific alkaline conditions (pH10.5 and pH9.5/37°C), where ALAS populates a molten globule state. As the enzyme becomes less structured with increased alkalinity, the chiral environment of the internal aldimine is also modified, with a shift from a 420nm to 330nm dichroic band. Under acidic conditions, the PLP cofactor dissociates from ALAS. Reaction with 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid corroborates increased exposure of hydrophobic clusters in the alkaline and acidic molten globules, although the reaction is more pronounced with the latter. Furthermore, quenching the intrinsic fluorescence of ALAS with acrylamide at pH1.0 and 9.5 yielded subtly different dynamic quenching constants. The alkaline molten globule state of ALAS is catalytically active (pH9.5/37°C), although the kcat value is significantly decreased. Finally, the binding of 5-aminolevulinate restricts conformational fluctuations in the alkaline molten globule. Overall, our findings prove how the structural plasticity of ALAS contributes to reaching a functional enzyme.

  2. Development and operation of a hybrid acid-alkaline advanced water electrolysis cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teschke, O.; Zwanziger, M.

    A hybrid acid-alkaline water electrolysis cell has been developed for hydrogen production. The cell is based on the use of an acidic solution at the cathode and a basic solution at the anode to reduce the minimum theoretical voltage for water decomposition from the thermoneutral potential of 1.47 V to close to 1.4 V at 25 C and 1 atm. The pH differential is maintained by the removal of OH ions from the cathode section and water removal from the anode section, which can be driven by heat energy. A practical cell has been built using a solid polymer electrolyte in which, however, the cathodic compartment is not acidic but neutral. Tests with a platinum black cathode catalyst and a platinum-iridium anode catalyst have resulted in steady-state water hydrolysis at an applied voltage of 0.9 V, and a V-I diagram with a considerably lower slope than that of a conventional cell has been obtained at 90 C.

  3. Hydrogen-rich water affected blood alkalinity in physically active men.

    PubMed

    Ostojic, Sergej M; Stojanovic, Marko D

    2014-01-01

    Possible appliance of effective and safe alkalizing agent in the treatment of metabolic acidosis could be of particular interest to humans experiencing an increase in plasma acidity, such as exercise-induced acidosis. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that the daily oral intake of 2L of hydrogen-rich water (HRW) for 14 days would increase arterial blood alkalinity at baseline and post-exercise as compared with the placebo. This study was a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial involving 52 presumably healthy physically active male volunteers. Twenty-six participants received HRW and 26 a placebo (tap water) for 14 days. Arterial blood pH, partial pressure for carbon dioxide (pCO2), and bicarbonates were measured at baseline and postexercise at the start (day 0) and at the end of the intervention period (day 14). Intake of HRW significantly increased fasting arterial blood pH by 0.04 (95% confidence interval; 0.01 - 0.08; p < 0.001), and postexercise pH by 0.07 (95% confidence interval; 0.01 - 0.10; p = 0.03) after 14 days of intervention. Fasting bicarbonates were significantly higher in the HRW trial after the administration regimen as compared with the preadministration (30.5 ± 1.9 mEq/L vs. 28.3 ± 2.3 mEq/L; p < 0.0001). No volunteers withdrew before the end of the study, and no participant reported any vexatious side effects of supplementation. These results support the hypothesis that HRW administration is safe and may have an alkalizing effect in young physically active men.

  4. Quantification of the dissolved inorganic carbon species and of the pH of alkaline solutions exposed to CO2 under pressure: a novel approach by Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Beuvier, Thomas; Calvignac, Brice; Bardeau, Jean-François; Bulou, Alain; Boury, Frank; Gibaud, Alain

    2014-10-07

    Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) content of aqueous systems is a key function of the pH, of the total alkanility (TA), and of the partial pressure of CO2. However, common analytical techniques used to determine the DIC content in water are unable to operate under high CO2 pressure. Here, we propose to use Raman spectroscopy as a novel alternative to discriminate and quantitatively monitor the three dissolved inorganic carbon species CO2(aq), HCO3(-), and CO3(2-) of alkaline solutions under high CO2 pressure (from P = 0 to 250 bar at T = 40 °C). In addition, we demonstrate that the pH values can be extracted from the molalities of CO2(aq) and HCO3(-). The results are in very good agreement with those obtained from direct spectrophotometric measurements using colored indicators. This novel method presents the great advantage over high pressure conventional techniques of not using breakable electrodes or reference additives and appears of great interest especially in marine biogeochemistry, in carbon capture and storage and in material engineering under high CO2 pressure.

  5. Ionized alkaline water: new strategy for management of metabolic acidosis in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Abol-Enein, Hassan; Gheith, Osama A; Barakat, Nashwa; Nour, Eman; Sharaf, Abd-Elhameed

    2009-06-01

    Metabolic acidosis can occur as a result of either the accumulation of endogenous acids or loss of bicarbonate from the gastrointestinal tract or the kidney, which represent common causes of metabolic acidosis. The appropriate treatment of acute metabolic acidosis has been very controversial. Ionized alkaline water was not evaluated in such groups of patients in spite of its safety and reported benefits. So, we aimed to assess its efficacy in the management of metabolic acidosis in animal models. Two models of metabolic acidosis were created in dogs and rats. The first model of renal failure was induced by ligation of both ureters; and the second model was induced by urinary diversion to gut (gastrointestinal bicarbonate loss model). Both models were subjected to ionized alkaline water (orally and by hemodialysis). Dogs with renal failure were assigned to two groups according to the type of dialysate utilized during hemodialysis sessions, the first was utilizing alkaline water and the second was utilizing conventional water. Another two groups of animals with urinary diversion were arranged to receive oral alkaline water and tap water. In renal failure animal models, acid-base parameters improved significantly after hemodialysis with ionized alkaline water compared with the conventional water treated with reverse osmosis (RO). Similar results were observed in urinary diversion models as there was significant improvement of both the partial pressure of carbon dioxide and serum bicarbonate (P = 0.007 and 0.001 respectively) after utilizing alkaline water orally. Alkaline ionized water can be considered as a major safe strategy in the management of metabolic acidosis secondary to renal failure or dialysis or urinary diversion. Human studies are indicated in the near future to confirm this issue in humans.

  6. Application of a fluidized bed reactor charged with aragonite for control of alkalinity, pH and carbon dioxide in marine recirculating aquaculture systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paul S Wills, PhD; Pfeiffer, Timothy; Baptiste, Richard; Watten, Barnaby J.

    2016-01-01

    Control of alkalinity, dissolved carbon dioxide (dCO2), and pH are critical in marine recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) in order to maintain health and maximize growth. A small-scale prototype aragonite sand filled fluidized bed reactor was tested under varying conditions of alkalinity and dCO2 to develop and model the response of dCO2 across the reactor. A large-scale reactor was then incorporated into an operating marine recirculating aquaculture system to observe the reactor as the system moved toward equilibrium. The relationship between alkalinity dCO2, and pH across the reactor are described by multiple regression equations. The change in dCO2 across the small-scale reactor indicated a strong likelihood that an equilibrium alkalinity would be maintained by using a fluidized bed aragonite reactor. The large-scale reactor verified this observation and established equilibrium at an alkalinity of approximately 135 mg/L as CaCO3, dCO2 of 9 mg/L, and a pH of 7.0 within 4 days that was stable during a 14 day test period. The fluidized bed aragonite reactor has the potential to simplify alkalinity and pH control, and aid in dCO2 control in RAS design and operation. Aragonite sand, purchased in bulk, is less expensive than sodium bicarbonate and could reduce overall operating production costs.

  7. Volatile fatty acids production from anaerobic treatment of cassava waste water: effect of temperature and alkalinity.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Salah Din Mahmud; Giongo, Citieli; Fiorese, Mônica Lady; Gomes, Simone Damasceno; Ferrari, Tatiane Caroline; Savoldi, Tarcio Enrico

    2015-01-01

    The production of volatile fatty acids (VFAs), intermediates in the anaerobic degradation process of organic matter from waste water, was evaluated in this work. A batch reactor was used to investigate the effect of temperature, and alkalinity in the production of VFAs, from the fermentation of industrial cassava waste water. Peak production of total volatile fatty acids (TVFAs) was observed in the first two days of acidogenesis. A central composite design was performed, and the highest yield (3400 mg L(-1) of TVFA) was obtained with 30°C and 3 g L(-1) of sodium bicarbonate. The peak of VFA was in 45 h (pH 5.9) with a predominance of acetic (63%) and butyric acid (22%), followed by propionic acid (12%). Decreases in amounts of cyanide (12.9%) and chemical oxygen demand (21.6%) were observed, in addition to the production of biogas (0.53 cm(3) h(-1)). The process was validated experimentally and 3400 g L(-1) of TVFA were obtained with a low relative standard deviation.

  8. Effect of CaCO3(S) nucleation modes on algae removal from alkaline water.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin Yong; Kinney, Kerry A; Katz, Lynn E

    2016-02-29

    The role of calcite heterogeneous nucleation was studied in a particle coagulation treatment process for removing microalgae from water. Batch experiments were conducted with Scenedesmus sp. and Chlorella sp. in the presence and absence of carbonate and in the presence and absence of Mg to delineate the role of CaCO3(S) nucleation on microalgae removal. The results indicate that effective algae coagulation (e.g., up to 81 % algae removal efficiency) can be achieved via heterogeneous nucleation with CaCO3(S); however, supersaturation ratios between 120 and 200 are required to achieve at least 50% algae removal, depending on ion concentrations. Algae removal was attributed to adsorption of Ca(2+) onto the cell surface which provides nucleation sites for CaCO3(S) precipitation. Bridging of calcite particles between the algal cells led to rapid aggregation and formation of larger flocs. However, at higher supersaturation conditions, algae removal was diminished due to the dominance of homogeneous nucleation of CaCO3(S). Removal of algae in the presence of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) required higher supersaturation values; however, the shift from heteronucleation to homonucleation with increasing supersaturation was still evident. The results suggest that water chemistry, pH, ionic strength, alkalinity and Ca(2+) concentration can be optimized for algae removal via coagulation-sedimentation.

  9. Low-Temperature Alkaline pH Hydrolysis of Oxygen-Free Titan Tholins: Carbonates' Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brassé, Coralie; Buch, Arnaud; Coll, Patrice; Raulin, François

    2017-01-01

    Titan, the largest moon of Saturn, is one of the key planetary objects in the field of exobiology. Its dense, nitrogen-rich atmosphere is the site of important organic chemistry. This paper focuses on the organic aerosols produced in Titan's atmosphere that play an important role in atmospheric and surface processes and in organic chemistry as it applies to exobiological interests. To produce reliable laboratory analogues of these aerosols, we developed, tested, and optimized a device for the synthesis of clean tholins. The potential chemical evolution of Titan aerosols at Titan's surface has been studied, in particular, the possible interaction between aerosols and putative ammonia-water cryomagma. Modeling of the formation of Saturn's atmosphere has permitted the characterization of a composition of salts in the subsurface ocean and cryolava. From this new and original chemical composition, a laboratory study of several hydrolyses of tholins was carried out. The results obtained show the formation of many organic compounds, among them, species identified only in the presence of salts. In addition, a list of potential precursors of these compounds was established, which could provide a database for research of the chemical composition of tholins and/or aerosols of Titan.

  10. Redistribution of wastewater alkalinity with a microbial fuel cell to support nitrification of reject water.

    PubMed

    Modin, Oskar; Fukushi, Kensuke; Rabaey, Korneel; Rozendal, René A; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2011-04-01

    In wastewater treatment plants, the reject water from the sludge treatment processes typically contains high ammonium concentrations, which constitute a significant internal nitrogen load in the plant. Often, a separate nitrification reactor is used to treat the reject water before it is fed back into the plant. The nitrification reaction consumes alkalinity, which has to be replenished by dosing e.g. NaOH or Ca(OH)(2). In this study, we investigated the use of a two-compartment microbial fuel cell (MFC) to redistribute alkalinity from influent wastewater to support nitrification of reject water. In an MFC, alkalinity is consumed in the anode compartment and produced in the cathode compartment. We use this phenomenon and the fact that the influent wastewater flow is many times larger than the reject water flow to transfer alkalinity from the influent wastewater to the reject water. In a laboratory-scale system, ammonium oxidation of synthetic reject water passed through the cathode chamber of an MFC, increased from 73.8 ± 8.9 mgN/L under open-circuit conditions to 160.1 ± 4.8 mgN/L when a current of 1.96 ± 0.37 mA (15.1 mA/L total MFC liquid volume) was flowing through the MFC. These results demonstrated the positive effect of an MFC on ammonium oxidation of alkalinity-limited reject water.

  11. IMPACT OF WATER PH ON ZEBRA MUSSEL MORTALITY

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2002-10-15

    The experiments conducted this past quarter have suggested that the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL0145A is effective at killing zebra mussels throughout the entire range of pH values tested (7.2 to 8.6). Highest mortality was achieved at pH values characteristic of preferred zebra mussel waterbodies, i.e., hard waters with a range of 7.8 to 8.6. In all water types tested, however, ranging from very soft to very hard, considerable mussel kill was achieved (83 to 99% mean mortality), suggesting that regardless of the pH or hardness of the treated water, significant mussel kill can be achieved upon treatment with P. fluorescens strain CL0145A. These results further support the concept that this bacterium has significant potential for use as a zebra mussel control agent in power plant pipes receiving waters with a wide range of physical and chemical characteristics.

  12. Roles of alkaline phosphatase and labile internal mineral in matrix vesicle-mediated calcification. Effect of selective release of membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase and treatment with isosmotic pH 6 buffer.

    PubMed

    Register, T C; McLean, F M; Low, M G; Wuthier, R E

    1986-07-15

    The roles of alkaline phosphatase and labile internal mineral in matrix vesicle-mediated mineralization have been studied by selectively releasing the enzyme from a wide variety of matrix vesicle preparations using treatment with a bacterial phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C and by demineralization of the vesicles using isosmotic pH 6 buffer. Following depletion of 50-90% of the alkaline phosphatase activity or treatment with citrate buffer, the vesicles were tested for their ability to accumulate 45Ca2+ and 32Pi from a synthetic cartilage lymph. Removal of alkaline phosphatase by phospholipase C treatment caused two principal effects, depending on the matrix vesicle preparation. In rapidly mineralizing vesicle fractions which did not require organic phosphate esters (Po) to accumulate mineral ions, release of alkaline phosphatase had only a minor effect. In slowly mineralizing vesicles preparations or those dependent on Po substrates for mineral ion uptake, release of alkaline phosphatase caused significant loss of mineralizing activity. The activity of rapidly calcifying vesicles was shown to be dependent on the presence of labile internal mineral, as demonstrated by major loss in activity when the vesicles were decalcified by various treatments. Ion uptake by demineralized vesicles or those fractionated on sucrose step gradients required Po and was significantly decreased by alkaline phosphatase depletion. Uptake of Pi, however, was not coupled with hydrolysis of the Po substrate. These findings argue against a direct role for alkaline phosphatase as a porter in matrix vesicle Pi uptake, contrary to previous postulates. The results emphasize the importance of internal labile mineral in rapid uptake of mineral ions by matrix vesicles.

  13. Alkaline phosphatase activity of Escherichia coli starved in sterile lake water microcosms.

    PubMed

    Ozkanca, R; Flint, K P

    1996-03-01

    Escherichia coli grown in high or low phosphate medium was inoculated into a lake water starvation medium. The viable count decreased at 37 degrees C but not at the lower temperatures over 70 d. Alkaline phosphatase was monitored using a colorimetric assay with pNPP as the substrate. Derepression of the enzyme occurred in cultures starved for > 30 d in the lake water and within 5 d in lake water microcosms supplemented with carbon and nitrogen sources where there was rarely an increase in viable count. Chloramphenicol prevented the synthesis of alkaline phosphatase suggesting that, even under starvation conditions, de novo synthesis of the enzyme occurs.

  14. Control of alkaline stress corrosion cracking in pressurized-water reactor steam generator tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, I.S. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Park, I.G. . Div. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1999-06-01

    Outer-diameter stress corrosion cracking (ODSCC) of alloy 600 (UNS N06600) tubings in steam generators of the Kori-1 pressurized-water reactor (PWR) caused an unscheduled outage in 1994. Failure analysis and remedy development studies were undertaken to avoid a recurrence. Destructive examination of a removed tube indicated axial intergranular cracks developed at the top of sludge caused by a boiling crevice geometry. A high ODSCC propagation rate was attributed to high local pH and increased corrosion potential resulting from oxidized copper presumably formed during the maintenance outage and plant heatup. Remedial measures included: (1) crevice neutralization by crevice flushing with boric acid (H[sub 3]BO[sub 3]) and molar ratio control using ammonium chloride (NH[sub 4]Cl), (2) corrosion potential reduction by hydrazine (H[sub 2]NNH[sub 2]) soaking and suppression of oxygen below 20 ppb to avoid copper oxide formation, (3) titanium dioxide (TiO[sub 2]) inhibitor soaking, and (4) temperature reduction of 5 C. Since application of the remedy program, no significant ODSCC has been observed, which clearly demonstrates the benefit of departing from an oxidizing alkaline environment. In addition, the TiO[sub 2] inhibitor appeared to have a positive effect, warranting further examination.

  15. Pore water chemistry of an alkaline rift valley lake: Lake Turkana, Kenya

    SciTech Connect

    Cerling, T.E.; Johnson, T.C.; Halfman, J.D.; Lister, G.

    1985-01-01

    Lake Turkana is the largest closed basin lake in the African rift system. It has evolved through the past 5000 years to become a moderately alkaline lake. Previous mass balance argument suggest that sulfate is removed from the lake by sulfate reduction in the sediments, and that the lake is accumulating in chloride, sodium, and alkalinity. Studies of pore water from 12 meter cores collected in November 1984 show that sulfate is reduced in the sediment column with a net production of alkalinity. Some sodium is lost from the lake and diffuses into the sediment to maintain charge balance. At several meters depth, organic matter is destroyed by methanogenic bacteria, as shown by the high delta /sup 13/C values for dissolved inorganic carbon. Magnesium and calcium molar ratios change with depth; chloride, sodium, and alkalinity also change with depth.

  16. Rapid changes in water hardness and alkalinity: Calcite formation is lethal to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Bogart, Sarah J; Woodman, Samuel; Steinkey, Dylan; Meays, Cindy; Pyle, Greg G

    2016-07-15

    There is growing concern that freshwater ecosystems may be negatively affected by ever-increasing anthropogenic inputs of extremely hard, highly alkaline effluent containing large quantities of Ca(2+), Mg(2+), CO3(2-), and HCO3(-) ions. In this study, the toxicity of rapid and extreme shifts in water hardness (38-600mg/L as CaCO3) and alkalinity (30-420mg/L as CaCO3) to Daphnia magna was tested, both independently and in combination. Within these ranges, where no precipitation event occurred, shifts in water hardness and/or alkalinity were not toxic to D. magna. In contrast, 98-100% of D. magna died within 96h after exposure to 600mg/L as CaCO3 water hardness and 420mg/L as CaCO3 alkalinity (LT50 of 60h with a 95% CI of 54.2-66.0h). In this treatment, a CaCO3 (calcite) precipitate formed in the water column which was ingested by and thoroughly coated the D. magna. Calcite collected from a mining impacted stream contained embedded organisms, suggesting field streams may also experience similar conditions and possibly increased mortality as observed in the lab tests. Although further investigation is required to determine the exact fate of aquatic organisms exposed to rapid calcite precipitation in the field, we caution that negative effects may occur more quickly or at lower concentrations of water hardness and alkalinity in which we observed effects in D. magna, because some species, such as aquatic insects, are more sensitive than cladocerans to changes in ionic strength. Our results provide evidence that both calcite precipitation and the major ion balance of waters should be managed in industrially affected ecosystems and we support the development of a hardness+alkalinity guideline for the protection of aquatic life.

  17. High external pH enables more efficient secretion of alkaline α-amylase AmyK38 by Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bacillus subtilis genome-reduced strain MGB874 exhibits enhanced production of exogenous extracellular alkaline cellulase Egl-237 and subtilisin-like alkaline protease M-protease. Here, we investigated the suitability of strain MGB874 for the production of α-amylase, which was anticipated to provoke secretion stress responses involving the CssRS (Control secretion stress Regulator and Sensor) system. Results Compared to wild-type strain 168, the production of a novel alkaline α-amylase, AmyK38, was severely decreased in strain MGB874 and higher secretion stress responses were also induced. Genetic analyses revealed that these phenomena were attributable to the decreased pH of growth medium as a result of the lowered expression of rocG, encoding glutamate dehydrogenase, whose activity leads to NH3 production. Notably, in both the genome-reduced and wild-type strains, an up-shift of the external pH by the addition of an alkaline solution improved AmyK38 production, which was associated with alleviation of the secretion stress response. These results suggest that the optimal external pH for the secretion of AmyK38 is higher than the typical external pH of growth medium used to culture B. subtilis. Under controlled pH conditions, the highest production level (1.08 g l-1) of AmyK38 was obtained using strain MGB874. Conclusions We demonstrated for the first time that RocG is an important factor for secretory enzyme production in B. subtilis through its role in preventing acidification of the growth medium. As expected, a higher external pH enabled a more efficient secretion of the alkaline α-amylase AmyK38 in B. subtilis. Under controlled pH conditions, the reduced-genome strain MGB874 was demonstrated to be a beneficial host for the production of AmyK38. PMID:22681752

  18. Microprofiles of oxygen, redox potential, and pH, and microbial fermentation products in the highly alkaline gut of the saprophagous larva of Penthetria holosericea (Diptera: Bibionidae).

    PubMed

    Šustr, Vladimír; Stingl, Ulrich; Brune, Andreas

    2014-08-01

    The saprophagous larvae of bibionid flies harbor bacteria in their alkaline intestinal tracts, but little is known about the contribution of the gut microbiota to the digestion of their recalcitrant diet. In this study, we measured oxygen and hydrogen partial pressure, redox potential and pH in the midgut, gastric caeca and hindgut of larvae of the bibionid fly Penthetria holosericea with Clark-type O2 and H2 microsensors, platinum redox microelectrodes, and LIX-type pH microelectrodes. The center of the midgut lumen was anoxic, whereas gastric caeca and hindgut were hypoxic. However, redox potential profiles indicated oxidizing conditions throughout the gut, with lowest values in the midgut (+20 to +60mV). Hydrogen production was not detected. The midgut was extremely alkaline (pH around 11), whereas hindgut and gastric caeca were neutral to slightly alkaline. While HPLC analysis showed high concentrations of glucose in the midgut (15mM) and gastric caeca (27mM), the concentrations of microbial fermentation products such as lactate (2-4mM), acetate (<1mM) and succinate (<0.5mM) were low in all gut regions, suggesting that the contribution of microorganisms to the digestive process, particularly in the alkaline midgut, is only of minor importance. We conclude that the digestive strategy of the saprophytic larva of P. holosericea, which feeds selectively on decomposed leaves and its own microbe-rich faeces, differs fundamentally from those of detritivorous and humivorous insects, which host a highly active, fermentative microbiota in their alkaline midgut or hindgut compartments.

  19. Evaluation of alkaline electrolyzed water to replace traditional phosphate enhancement solutions: Effects on water holding capacity, tenderness, and sensory characteristics.

    PubMed

    Rigdon, Macc; Hung, Yen-Con; Stelzleni, Alexander M

    2017-01-01

    Sixty-four pork loins were randomly assigned to one of four treatments to evaluate the use of alkaline electrolyzed reduced water as a replacement for traditional enhancement solutions. Treatments included: alkaline electrolyzed reduced water (EOH; pH≈11.5), EOH plus 2.5% potassium-lactate (EOK), industry standard (IS; 0.35% sodium tri-polyphosphate, 0.14% sodium chloride, 2.5% potassium-lactate), and no enhancement (CON). After enhancement (targeting 110%) and rest period, chops were cut (2.54-cm) to test treatment effects on water holding capacity, Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF), and sensory attributes. Despite its alkaline nature EOH chops exuded more water (P<0.05) than EOK, IS, or CON chops. Control chops were similar (P>0.05) to EOK, however CON and EOK both lost more moisture (P<0.05) than IS. The use of alkaline electrolyzed reduced water did not improve WBSF or sensory characteristics compared to IS treated chops. As a stand-alone enhancement solution alkaline electrolyzed reduced water was not a suitable replacement for industry standard solutions.

  20. Effect of Strongly Alkaline Electrolyzed Water on Silk Degumming and the Physical Properties of the Fibroin Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Ting-Ting; Wang, Yuan-Jing; Zhang, Yu-Qing

    2013-01-01

    Strongly alkaline electrolyzed water (SAEW) was prepared by electrolysis of tap water in a laboratory-made water electrolyzer. The pH of stored SAEW was stable for more than one month. The hardness of the electrolyzed water was 30% lower and the Na+ concentration was 18% higher than those of the tap water. Silkworm cocoon shells were boiled in pH 11.50 SAEW at a ratio of 1∶40∼80 (W/V) for 20 min and the sericin layers around the silk fibroin fibers were removed completely. The tensile properties and thermal decomposition temperature of a single filament of silk fibroin obtained by the SAEW method were almost the same as those for the fiber obtained by the neutral soap, and much higher than those for the fiber obtained by Na2CO3 degumming. The results demonstrate that SAEW is an environmentally friendly and pollution-free silk degumming agent that allows highly efficient, low cost recovery of sericin. PMID:23824061

  1. The role of low molecular weight organic acids on controlling pH in coastal sea water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, H.

    2015-12-01

    Series investigation of the Jiaozhou Bay, China, observed existences of three low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs), including lactic acid, acetic acid and formic acid, with high concentration in the sea water. Generally, their amount accounted for about 20% of DOC in the sea water of the bay. Human activities around the bay were considered as the major source of the LMWOAs. Also, long term detection showed that the pH value in the Jiaozhou Bay was lower than that in the adjacent Yellow Sea. On average, the difference of pH values between the bay and the Yellow was about 0.2. Due to higher concentrations of the LMWOAs, their contribution to lower pH value of the bay should not be ignored. To validate the effect of LMWOAs on the pH value of the bay, a new software was developed to calculate the pH value in the sea water samples based on alkalinity by adding three items of the three organic acids in the expression. Compared to the traditional pH calculating software, the new software could improve the calculating results significantly. Our results confirmed that LMWOAs was an important control factor to adjust pH values in coastal area.

  2. High pH (and not free ammonia) is responsible for Anammox inhibition in mildly alkaline solutions with excess of ammonium.

    PubMed

    Puyol, D; Carvajal-Arroyo, J M; Li, G B; Dougless, A; Fuentes-Velasco, M; Sierra-Alvarez, R; Field, J A

    2014-10-01

    Ammonium is a substrate of the anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) process but it has been suggested as a substrate-inhibitor because of the action of its unionized form, free ammonia. High pH of the medium is also an important limiting factor of the Anammox bacteria. Both effects are difficult to discriminate. In this work the inhibitory effects of high pH, total ammonia (TA) and NH3 on the Anammox process were investigated simultaneously. Results confirmed that TA caused no inhibition and high pH is a much more important inhibiting factor than NH3 in mildly alkaline conditions, based on a multi-factorial analysis. Values of pH higher than 7.6 caused Anammox inhibition >10 % and should be avoided during the application of the Anammox process in practice.

  3. Carbon Dioxide Addition to Microbial Fuel Cell Cathodes Maintains Sustainable Catholyte pH and Improves Anolyte pH, Alkalinity, and Conductivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioelectrochemical system (BES) pH imbalances develop due to anodic proton-generating oxidation reactions and cathodic hydroxide-ion-generating reduction reactions. Until now, workers added unsustainable buffers to reduce the pH difference between the anode and cathode because the pH imbalance cont...

  4. Alkaline pH Is a signal for optimal production and secretion of the heat labile toxin, LT in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC).

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Lucia; Ali, Zahra Bagher; Nygren, Erik; Wang, Zhiyun; Karlsson, Stefan; Zhu, Baoli; Quiding-Järbrink, Marianne; Sjöling, Åsa

    2013-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) cause secretory diarrhea in children and travelers to endemic areas. ETEC spreads through the fecal-oral route. After ingestion, ETEC passes through the stomach and duodenum before it colonizes the lower part of the small intestine, exposing bacteria to a wide range of pH and environmental conditions. This study aimed to determine the impact of external pH and activity of the Cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) on the regulation of production and secretion of heat labile (LT) enterotoxin. ETEC strain E2863wt and its isogenic mutant E2863ΔCRP were grown in LBK media buffered to pH 5, 7 and 9. GM1 ELISA, cDNA and cAMP analyses were carried out on bacterial pellet and supernatant samples derived from 3 and 5 hours growth and from overnight cultures. We confirm that CRP is a repressor of LT transcription and production as has been shown before but we show for the first time that CRP is a positive regulator of LT secretion both in vitro and in vivo. LT secretion increased at neutral to alkaline pH compared to acidic pH 5 where secretion was completely inhibited. At pH 9 secretion of LT was optimal resulting in 600 percent increase of secreted LT compared to unbuffered LBK media. This effect was not due to membrane leakage since the bacteria were viable at pH 9. The results indicate that the transition to the alkaline duodenum and/or exposure to high pH close to the epithelium as well as activation of the global transcription factor CRP are signals that induce secretion of the LT toxin in ETEC.

  5. Effect of Treatment pH on the End Products of the Alkaline Hydrolysis of TNT and RDX

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    Comparison of final TOC of TNT alkaline hydrolysis solutions at three pHs........................19 Table 7. Results of ion chromatographic analysis ...25 Table 12. Results of ion chromatographic analysis of unlabeled RDX solutions following extended alkaline hydrolysis at three...8330 explo- sives analysis TOC IC Lime Control ERDC/EL TR-07-4 7 3 Materials and Methods Chemicals Chemicals used in this study included

  6. Improving the expression of recombinant proteins in E. coli BL21 (DE3) under acetate stress: an alkaline pH shift approach.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hengwei; Wang, Fengqing; Wang, Wei; Yao, Xueling; Wei, Dongzhi; Cheng, Hairong; Deng, Zixin

    2014-01-01

    Excess acetate has long been an issue for the production of recombinant proteins in E. coli cells. Recently, improvements in acetate tolerance have been achieved through the use of genetic strategies and medium supplementation with certain amino acids and pyrimidines. The aim of our study was to evaluate an alternative to improve the acetate tolerance of E. coli BL21 (DE3), a popular strain used to express recombinant proteins. In this work we reported the cultivation of BL21 (DE3) in complex media containing acetate at high concentrations. In the presence of 300 mM acetate, compared with pH 6.5, pH 7.5 improved cell growth by approximately 71%, reduced intracellular acetate by approximately 50%, and restored the expression of glutathione S-transferase (GST), green fluorescent protein (GFP) and cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (CYP). Further experiments showed that alkaline pHs up to 8.5 had little inhibition in the expression of GST, GFP and CYP. In addition, the detrimental effect of acetate on the reduction of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) by the cell membrane, an index of cellular metabolic capacity, was substantially alleviated by a shift to alkaline pH values of 7.5-8.0. Thus, we suggest an approach of cultivating E. coli BL21 (DE3) at pH 8.0 ± 0.5 to minimize the effects caused by acetate stress. The proposed strategy of an alkaline pH shift is a simple approach to solving similar bioprocessing problems in the production of biofuels and biochemicals from sugars.

  7. Electrochemical alkaline Fe(VI) water purification and remediation.

    PubMed

    Licht, Stuart; Yu, Xingwen

    2005-10-15

    Fe(VI) is an unusual and strongly oxidizing form of iron, which provides a potentially less hazardous water-purifying agent than chlorine. A novel on-line electrochemical Fe(VI) water purification methodology is introduced. Fe(VI) addition had been a barrier to its effective use in water remediation, because solid Fe(VI) salts require complex (costly) syntheses steps and solutions of Fe(VI) decompose. Online electrochemical Fe(VI) water purification avoids these limitations, in which Fe(VI) is directly prepared in solution from an iron anode as the FeO42- ion, and is added to the contaminant stream. Added FeO42- decomposes, by oxidizing a wide range of water contaminants including sulfides (demonstrated in this study) and other sulfur-containing compounds, cyanides (demonstrated in this study), arsenic (demonstrated in this study), ammonia and other nitrogen-containing compounds (previously demonstrated), a wide range of organics (phenol demonstrated in this study), algae, and viruses (each previously demonstrated).

  8. Hydrolysis and volatile fatty acids accumulation of waste activated sludge enhanced by the combined use of nitrite and alkaline pH.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cheng; Liu, Congcong; Sun, Xiuyun; Sun, Yinglu; Li, Rui; Li, Jiansheng; Shen, Jinyou; Han, Weiqing; Liu, Xiaodong; Wang, Lianjun

    2015-12-01

    Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) production from anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS) is often limited by the slow hydrolysis and/or poor substrate availability. Increased attention has been given to enhance the hydrolysis and acidification of WAS recently. This study presented an efficient and green strategy based on the combined use of nitrite pretreatment and alkaline pH to stimulate hydrolysis and VFA accumulation from WAS. Results showed that both proteins and polysaccharides increased in the presence of nitrite, indicating the enhancement of sludge solubilization and hydrolysis processes. Mechanism investigations showed that nitrite pretreatment could disintegrate the sludge particle and disperse extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Then, anaerobic digestion tests demonstrated VFA production increased with nitrite treatment. The maximal VFA accumulation was achieved with 0.1 g N/L nitrite dosage and pH 10.0 at a sludge retention time (SRT) of 7 days, which was much higher VFA production in comparison with the blank, sole nitrite pretreatment, or sole pH 10. The potential analysis suggested that the combined nitrite pretreatment and alkaline pH is capable of enhancing WAS digestion with a great benefit for biological nutrient removal (BNR).

  9. Influence of soil pH on properties of the soil-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, Doerte

    2010-05-01

    Surface characteristics of soils are one of the main factors controlling processes at the soil-water interface like wetting, sorption or dissolution processes and, thereby, have a high impact on natural soil functions like habitat, filter, buffer, storage and transformation functions. Since surface characteristics, like wettability or repellency, are not static soil properties but continuously changing, the relevant processes and mechanisms are in the focus of the presented study. These mechanisms help to gain further insight into the behaviour of soil and its dynamics under changing environmental conditions. The influence of water content, relative air humidity and drying temperature on soil water repellency has been investigated in many studies. In contrast, few studies have systematically investigated the relationship between soil water repellency (SWR) and soil pH. Several studies found alkaline soils to be less prone to SWR compared to acidic soils (e.g., Cerdà, and Doerr 2007; Mataix-Solera et al. 2007). Furthermore, SWR has been successfully reduced in acidic soils by increasing soil pH via liming (e.g., Karnok et al. 1993; Roper 2005). However, SWR has also been reported in calcareous soils in the Netherlands (Dekker and Jungerius 1990), California, USA (Holzhey 1968) and Spain (Mataix-Solera and Doerr 2004). The hypothesis that the pH may control repellency via changes in the variable surface charge of soil material has not yet been tested. Previously it has been shown that it is necessary to eliminate the direct influence of changes in soil moisture content so that the unique relationship between pH and SWR can be isolated (Bayer and Schaumann 2007). A method has been developed which allows adjustment of the pH of soils with low moisture content via the gas phase with minimal change in moisture content. The method was applied to 14 soil samples from Germany, Netherlands, the UK and Australia, using the water drop penetration time (WDPT) as the indicator

  10. Relationships between testate amoeba communities and water quality in Lake Donghu, a large alkaline lake in Wuhan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yangmin; Fournier, Bertrand; Lara, Enrique; Gu, Yansheng; Wang, Hongmei; Cui, Yongde; Zhang, Xiaoke; Mitchell, Edward A. D.

    2013-06-01

    The middle Yangtze Reach is one of the most developed regions of China. As a result, most lakes in this area have suffered from eutrophication and serious environmental pollution during recent decades. The aquatic biodiversity in the lakes of the area is thus currently under significant threat from continuous human activities. Testate amoebae (TA) are benthic (rarely planktonic) microorganisms characterized by an agglutinated or autogenous shell. Owing to their high abundance, preservation potential in lacustrine sediments, and distinct response to environmental stress, they are increasingly used as indicators for monitoring water quality and reconstructing palaeoenvironmental changes. However this approach has not yet been developed in China. This study presents an initial assessment of benthic TA assemblages in eight lakes of Lake Donghu in the region of Wuhan, China. Testate amoeba community structure was most strongly correlated to water pH. In more alkaline conditions, communities were dominated by Centropyxis aculeata, Difflugia oblonga, Pontigulasia compressa, Pon. elisa and Lesquereusia modesta. These results are consistent with previous studies and show that TA could be useful for reconstructing past water pH fluctuations in China. To achieve this, the next step will be to expand the database and build transfer function models.

  11. Development of a selective enterococcus medium based on manganese ion deficiency, sodium azide, and alkaline pH.

    PubMed

    Efthymiou, C J; Joseph, S W

    1974-09-01

    Rogosa broth, without its salt supplement and dissolved in deionized water, was adapted for the selective isolation and enumeration of enterococci. This medium supported good growth of enterococci, but it suppressed growth of other lactic acid bacteria. The sensitivity and specificity of the medium were tested after addition of various increasing concentrations of NaN(3) against known strains of enterococci and other bacteria. Many strains of Streptococcus faecium showed low azide tolerance; optimal growth was obtained at a concentration of 0.01% NaN(3), which totally or partially inhibited unrelated species of lactic acid bacteria. The selectivity of the medium was further increased by pH adjustment to 9.6. Carbonate and Tween 80 were added to overcome partial inhibition of enterococcal growth by the new combination of selective conditions. The final medium was evaluated in agar form in isolations from human and animal feces, polluted water, meat, and dairy products. Counts were obtained after 16 to 17 h of incubation at 37 C. The isolates satisfactorily conformed to the group characteristics of enterococci.

  12. Development of a Selective Enterococcus Medium Based on Manganese Ion Deficiency, Sodium Azide, and Alkaline pH

    PubMed Central

    Efthymiou, C. J.; Joseph, S. W.

    1974-01-01

    Rogosa broth, without its salt supplement and dissolved in deionized water, was adapted for the selective isolation and enumeration of enterococci. This medium supported good growth of enterococci, but it suppressed growth of other lactic acid bacteria. The sensitivity and specificity of the medium were tested after addition of various increasing concentrations of NaN3 against known strains of enterococci and other bacteria. Many strains of Streptococcus faecium showed low azide tolerance; optimal growth was obtained at a concentration of 0.01% NaN3, which totally or partially inhibited unrelated species of lactic acid bacteria. The selectivity of the medium was further increased by pH adjustment to 9.6. Carbonate and Tween 80 were added to overcome partial inhibition of enterococcal growth by the new combination of selective conditions. The final medium was evaluated in agar form in isolations from human and animal feces, polluted water, meat, and dairy products. Counts were obtained after 16 to 17 h of incubation at 37 C. The isolates satisfactorily conformed to the group characteristics of enterococci. Images PMID:4214072

  13. Effects of hardness and alkalinity in culture and test waters on reproduction of Ceriodaphnia dubia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lasier, P.J.; Winger, P.V.; Hardin, I.R.

    2006-01-01

    Ceriodaphnia dubia were cultured in four reconstituted water formulations with hardness and alkalinity concentrations ranging from soft to the moderately hard water that is required by whole-effluent toxicity (WET) testing methods for culturing test organisms. The effects of these culture formulations alone and in combination with two levels of Cl-, SO42, and HCO3- on reproduction of C. dubia were evaluated with the standard three-brood test. Reproduction was significantly reduced when test waters had lower hardness than culture waters. However, reproduction was not significantly different when animals cultured in low-hardness waters were exposed to moderately hard waters. The hardness of the culture water did not significantly affect the sensitivity of C. dubia to the three anions. Conversely, increased hardness in test waters significantly reduced the toxicities of Cl- and SO42-, with HCO3- toxicity following the same pattern. Alkalinity exhibited no consistent effect on Cl- and SO42- toxicity. The physiological stress of placing animals cultured in moderately hard water into softer test waters might contribute to marginal failures of otherwise nontoxic effluents. The standard WET protocol should be revised to allow the culture of C. dubia under lower hardness conditions to better represent local surface water chemistries.

  14. Effects of hardness and alkalinity in culture and test waters on reproduction of Ceriodaphnia dubia.

    PubMed

    Lasier, Peter J; Winger, Parley V; Hardin, Ian R

    2006-10-01

    Ceriodaphnia dubia were cultured in four reconstituted water formulations with hardness and alkalinity concentrations ranging from soft to the moderately hard water that is required by whole-effluent toxicity (WET) testing methods for culturing test organisms. The effects of these culture formulations alone and in combination with two levels of Cl-, SO4(2-), and HCO3- on reproduction of C. dubia were evaluated with the standard three-brood test. Reproduction was significantly reduced when test waters had lower hardness than culture waters. However, reproduction was not significantly different when animals cultured in low-hardness waters were exposed to moderately hard waters. The hardness of the culture water did not significantly affect the sensitivity of C. dubia to the three anions. Conversely, increased hardness in test waters significantly reduced the toxicities of Cl- and SO4(2-), with HCO3- toxicity following the same pattern. Alkalinity exhibited no consistent effect on Cl- and SO4(2-) toxicity. The physiological stress of placing animals cultured in moderately hard water into softer test waters might contribute to marginal failures of otherwise nontoxic effluents. The standard WET protocol should be revised to allow the culture of C. dubia under lower hardness conditions to better represent local surface water chemistries.

  15. Determination of soluble aluminium concentration in alkaline humic water using atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, K L; Lewis, D M; Jolly, M; Robinson, J

    2004-11-01

    The steps of the standard method to determine soluble aluminium concentration are filtering, followed by acidifying, then analysing with the atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS). When applied to alkaline humic water, acidification gives rise to the formation of humic acid as a brown particulate matter. Of the total soluble aluminium in the original water, 49-61% forms complexes with the particulate humic acid upon acidification. Although the AAS is capable of detecting the binding aluminium, the particulate nature of humic acid easily induces inaccurate readings as a result of the non-uniform distribution of the particulate matter. A more precise analysis of soluble aluminium concentration of alkaline humic water is shown to be achievable in basicified solutions instead. Basicified solutions keep humic acid in the soluble form; hence maintain the homogeneity of the sample.

  16. Pho4 Is Essential for Dissemination of Cryptococcus neoformans to the Host Brain by Promoting Phosphate Uptake and Growth at Alkaline pH

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman-Francis, Keren; Desmarini, Desmarini; Juillard, Pierre G.; Li, Cecilia; Stifter, Sebastian A.; Feng, Carl G.; Sorrell, Tania C.; Grau, Georges E. R.; Bahn, Yong-Sun

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Phosphate acquisition by fungi is regulated by the phosphate-sensing and acquisition (PHO) signaling pathway. Cryptococcus neoformans disseminates from the lung to the brain and is the commonest cause of fungal meningitis worldwide. To investigate the contribution of PHO signaling to cryptococcal dissemination, we characterized a transcription factor knockout strain (hlh3Δ/pho4Δ) defective in phosphate acquisition. Despite little similarity with other fungal Pho4 proteins, Hlh3/Pho4 functioned like a typical phosphate-responsive transcription factor in phosphate-deprived cryptococci, accumulating in nuclei and triggering expression of genes involved in phosphate acquisition. The pho4Δ mutant strain was susceptible to a number of stresses, the effect of which, except for alkaline pH, was alleviated by phosphate supplementation. Even in the presence of phosphate, the PHO pathway was activated in wild-type cryptococci at or above physiological pH, and under these conditions, the pho4Δ mutant had a growth defect and compromised phosphate uptake. The pho4Δ mutant was hypovirulent in a mouse inhalation model, where dissemination to the brain was reduced dramatically, and markedly hypovirulent in an intravenous dissemination model. The pho4Δ mutant was not detected in blood, nor did it proliferate significantly when cultured with peripheral blood monocytes. In conclusion, dissemination of infection and the pathogenesis of meningitis are dependent on cryptococcal phosphate uptake and stress tolerance at alkaline pH, both of which are Pho4 dependent. IMPORTANCE Cryptococcal meningitis is fatal without treatment and responsible for more than 500,000 deaths annually. To be a successful pathogen, C. neoformans must obtain an adequate supply of essential nutrients, including phosphate, from various host niches. Phosphate acquisition in fungi is regulated by the PHO signaling cascade, which is activated when intracellular phosphate decreases below a critical

  17. Simulation of Stream Water Alkalinity Under Scenarios of Changing Acidic Deposition and Changing Climate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsch, D. L.; Cosby, B.; Hornberger, G. M.

    2003-12-01

    Models of soil and stream water and catchment acidification have typically been applied without consideration of climate change. Soil air CO2 concentrations have potential to increase as climate warms and becomes wetter. We simulate this increase by applying a coupled series of models which simulate soil temperature, soil tension, catchment hydrology, soil air CO2 concentrations, and soil and stream water chemistry to predict daily stream water alkalinity values for a small catchment in the Blue Ridge of Virginia for 60 years into the future given stochastically generated daily climate values. This is done for four different scenarios of climate change and atmospheric deposition change. We find that stream water alkalinity continues to decline for all scenarios except when climate is gradually warming and becoming more moist, indicating the influence of increasing soil air CO2 concentrations on stream water chemistry. In all other scenarios, base cation removal from catchment soils is responsible for limited alkalinity change resulting from climate change. This has strong implications given the extent that models such as MAGIC are used to establish policy and legislation concerning deposition and emissions.

  18. Alkaline subcritical water gasification of dairy industry waste (Whey).

    PubMed

    Muangrat, Rattana; Onwudili, Jude A; Williams, Paul T

    2011-05-01

    The near-critical water gasification of dairy industry waste in the form of Whey, a product composed of mixtures of carbohydrates (mainly lactose) and amino acids such as glycine and glutamic acid, has been studied. The gasification process involved partial oxidation with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of NaOH. The reactions were studied over the temperature range from 300°C to 390°C, corresponding pressures of 9.5-24.5 MPa and reaction times from 0 min to 120 min. Hydrogen production was affected by the presence of NaOH, the concentration of H(2)O(2), temperature, reaction time and feed concentration. Up to 40% of the theoretical hydrogen gas production was achieved at 390°C. Over 80% of the Whey nitrogen content was found as ammonia, mainly in the liquid effluent.

  19. Effects of cyanobacterial-driven pH increases on sediment nutrient fluxes and coupled nitrification-denitrification in a shallow fresh water estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y.; Cornwell, J. C.; Stoecker, D. K.; Owens, M. S.

    2012-01-01

    Summer cyanobacterial blooms caused an elevation in pH (9 to ~10.5) that lasted for weeks in the shallow and tidal-fresh region of the Sassafras River, a tributary of Chesapeake Bay (USA). Elevated pH promoted desorption of sedimentary inorganic phosphorus and facilitated conversion of ammonium (NH4+) to ammonia (NH3). In this study, we investigated pH effects on exchangeable NH4+ desorption, nutrient pore water diffusion and flux rates of NH4+, soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP), nitrate (NO3-), nitrification, denitrification, and oxygen consumption. pH elevation enhanced the desorption of exchangeable NH4+ because of NH3 formation from both pore water and adsorbed NH4+ pools. Progressive penetration of high pH from the overlying water into sediment promoted the release of SRP and total ammonium (NH4+ and NH3) into pore water. At elevated pH, high sediment-water effluxes of SRP and total ammonium were associated with reduction in nitrification, denitrification and oxygen consumption rates. Alkaline pH and the toxicity of NH3 may inhibit nitrification in the thin aerobic zone, simultaneously constraining coupled nitrification-denitrification with limited NO3- supply and high pH penetration into the anaerobic zone. Geochemical feedbacks to pH elevation, such as enhancement of dissolved nutrient effluxes and reduction in N2 loss via denitrification, may be responsible for the persistence of cyanobacterial blooms in shallow water ecosystems.

  20. Effects of cyanobacterial-driven pH increases on sediment nutrient fluxes and coupled nitrification-denitrification in a shallow fresh water estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y.; Cornwell, J. C.; Stoecker, D. K.; Owens, M. S.

    2012-07-01

    Summer cyanobacterial blooms caused an elevation in pH (9 to ~10.5) that lasted for weeks in the shallow and tidal-fresh region of the Sassafras River, a tributary of Chesapeake Bay (USA). Elevated pH promoted desorption of sedimentary inorganic phosphorus and facilitated conversion of ammonium (NH4+) to ammonia (NH3). In this study, we investigated pH effects on exchangeable NH4+ desorption, pore water diffusion and the flux rates of NH4+, soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) and nitrate (NO3-), nitrification, denitrification, and oxygen consumption. Elevated pH enhanced desorption of exchangeable NH4+ through NH3 formation from both pore water and adsorbed NH4+ pools. Progressive penetration of high pH from the overlying water into sediment promoted the mobility of SRP and the release of total ammonium (NH4+ and NH3) into the pore water. At elevated pH levels, high sediment-water effluxes of SRP and total ammonium were associated with reduction of nitrification, denitrification and oxygen consumption rates. Alkaline pH and the toxicity of NH3 may inhibit nitrification in the thin aerobic zone, simultaneously constraining coupled nitrification-denitrification with limited NO3- supply and high pH penetration into the anaerobic zone. Geochemical feedbacks to pH elevation, such as enhancement of dissolved nutrient effluxes and reduction in N2 loss via denitrification, may enhance the persistence of cyanobacterial blooms in shallow water ecosystems.

  1. Effect of water-column pH on sediment-phosphorus release rates in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon, 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Lawrence H.; Wood, Tamara M.

    2004-01-01

    Sediment-phosphorus release rates as a function of pH were determined in laboratory experiments for sediment and water samples collected from Shoalwater Bay in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon, in 2001. Aerial release rates for a stable sediment/water interface that is representative of the sediment surface area to water column volume ratio (1:3) observed in the lake and volumetric release rates for resuspended sediment events were determined at three different pH values (8.1, 9.2, 10.2). Ambient water column pH (8.1) was maintained by sparging study columns with atmospheric air. Elevation of the water column pH to 9.2 was achieved through the removal of dissolved carbon dioxide by sparging with carbon dioxide-reduced air, partially simulating water chemistry changes that occur during algal photosynthesis. Further elevation of the pH to 10.2 was achieved by the addition of sodium hydroxide, which doubled average alkalinities in the study columns from about 1 to 2 milliequivalents per liter. Upper Klamath Lake sediments collected from the lake bottom and then placed in contact with lake water, either at a stable sediment/water interface or by resuspension, exhibited an initial capacity to take up soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) from the water column rather than release phosphorus to the water column. At a higher pH this initial uptake of phosphorus is slowed, but not stopped. This initial phase was followed by a reversal in which the sediments began to release SRP back into the water column. The release rate of phosphorus 30 to 40 days after suspension of sediments in the columns was 0.5 mg/L/day (micrograms per liter per day) at pH 8, and 0.9 mg/L/day at pH 10, indicating that the higher pH increased the rate of phosphorus release by a factor of about two. The highest determined rate of release was approximately 10% (percent) of the rate required to explain the annual internal loading to Upper Klamath Lake from the sediments as calculated from a lake-wide mass balance

  2. Development of conductometric biosensors based on alkaline phosphatases for the water quality control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhetskyy, A.

    2008-09-01

    Researches are focused on the elaboration of enzymatic microconductometric device for heavy metal ions detection in water solutions. The manuscript includes a general introduction, the first chapter contains bibliographic review, the second chapter described the fundamentals of conductometric transducers, the third chapter examining the possibility to create and to optimize conductometric biosensor based on bovine alkaline phosphatase for heavy metals ions detection, the fourth chapter devoted to creation and optimization of conductometric biosensor based on alkaline phosphatase active microalgae and sol gel technology, the last chapter described application of the proposed algal biosensor for measurements of heavy metal ions toxicity of waste water, general conclusions stating the progresses achieved in the field of environmental monitoring

  3. Stainless steel anodes for alkaline water electrolysis and methods of making

    SciTech Connect

    Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev

    2014-01-21

    The corrosion resistance of stainless steel anodes for use in alkaline water electrolysis was increased by immersion of the stainless steel anode into a caustic solution prior to electrolysis. Also disclosed herein are electrolyzers employing the so-treated stainless steel anodes. The pre-treatment process provides a stainless steel anode that has a higher corrosion resistance than an untreated stainless steel anode of the same composition.

  4. Enhanced production of heterologous proteins by the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei via disruption of the alkaline serine protease SPW combined with a pH control strategy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoxiu; Zhu, Yao; Wei, Dongzhi; Wang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei has received attention as a host for heterologous protein production because of its high secretion capacity and eukaryotic post-translational modifications. However, the heterologous production of proteins in T. reesei is limited by its high expression of proteases. The pH control strategies have been proposed for eliminating acidic, but not alkaline, protease activity. In this study, we verified the expression of a relatively major extracellular alkaline protease (GenBank accession number: EGR49466.1, named spw in this study) from 20 candidates through real-time polymerase chain reaction. The transcriptional level of spw increased about 136 times in response to bovine serum albumin as the sole nitrogen source. Additionally, extracellular protease activity was reduced by deleting the spw gene. Therefore, using this gene expression system, we observed enhanced production and stability of the heterologous alkaline endoglucanase EGV from Humicola insolens using the Δspw strain as compared to the parental strain RUT-C30.

  5. Electrochemical Deposition and Characterization of Ni-Mo Alloys as Cathode for Alkaline Water Electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manazoğlu, Mert; Hapçı, Gökçe; Orhan, Gökhan

    2016-01-01

    In this study, Ni-Mo alloy coatings were electrochemically deposited on a copper plate in citrate solutions. The effects of Ni/Mo mole ratio in the electrolyte and pH value on hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) as well as the electrochemical stability were investigated in the alkaline solution for electrodeposited NiMo. The electrocatalytic activity of the fabricated NiMo alloys for HER in alkaline solutions was investigated by the polarization measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques. The morphology and chemical composition of the electrodeposited Ni-Mo were investigated using SEM and EDS analyses. It was found that NiMo electrode with the highest molybdenum content (ca. 38 wt.%) and high surface area show high electrocatalytic activity in the HER. This was produced from a bath with a pH of 9.5, Ni/Mo ratio of 1/10 and 0.5 M sodium citrate concentration. The stability of this coating was tested by polarization measurements after different anodic and cathodic treatment in 1 M NaOH solution. The open circuit potential ( E ocp) of the electrode as a function of immersion time was also measured.

  6. Electromembrane recycling of highly mineralized alkaline blowdown water from evaporative water treatment plants at thermal power stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chichirova, N. D.; Chichirov, A. A.; Lyapin, A. I.; Minibaev, A. I.; Silov, I. Yu.; Tolmachev, L. I.

    2016-12-01

    Thermal power stations (TPS) are the main source of highly mineralized effluents affecting the environment. An analysis of their water systems demonstrates that alkaline effluents prevail at TPSs. Extraction of an alkali from highly mineralized effluents can make the recycling of effluents economically feasible. A method is proposed of electromembrane recycling of liquid alkaline highly mineralized wastes from TPSs. The process includes electromembrane apparatuses of two types, namely, a diffusion dialysis extractor (DDE) intended for extraction of the alkali from a highly mineralized solution having a complex composition and an electrodialysis concentrator for increasing the concentration of the extracted solution to a value suitable for use in water treatment plants at TPSs. For implementation of the first process (i.e. the extraction of alkali from alkaline-salt solution) various membranes from various manufacturers were studied: CM-PAD and AM-PAD (Ralex, Czechia), MK-40, MA-40, MA-41, MA-414, and MB-2 (OOO OKhK "Shchekinoazot", Russia), AR103-QDF and CR61-CMP (Ionies Inc., USA). The experiments demonstrate that the acceptable degree of separation of the alkali and the salt is achieved in a pair of cation-exchange membranes with the efficiency of separation being higher without an electric field. The highest efficiency was attained with Russian-made membranes (MK-40, OOO OKhK "Shchekinoazot"). A full scale experiment on recycling of highly-mineralized blowdown water from the evaporating water treatment system at the Kazan cogeneration power station No. 3 (TETs-3) was performed in a pilot unit consisting of two electromembrane apparatuses made by UAB "Membraninės Technologijos LT". In the experiments every ton of blowdown water yielded 0.1 t of concentrated alkaline solution with an alkali content of up to 4 wt % and 0.9 t of the softened salt solution suitable for the reuse in the TPS cycle. The power rate is 6 kWh / ton of blowdown water.

  7. Alkaline pretreatment and the synergic effect of water and tetralin enhances the liquefaction efficiency of bagasse.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhixia; Cao, Jiangfei; Huang, Kai; Hong, Yaming; Li, Cunlong; Zhou, Xinxin; Xie, Ning; Lai, Fang; Shen, Fang; Chen, Congjin

    2015-02-01

    Bagasse liquefaction (BL) in water, tetralin, and water/tetralin mixed solvents (WTMS) was investigated, and effects of tetralin content in WTMS, temperature, and alkaline pretreatment of bagasse on liquefaction efficiency were studied. At 300°C, bagasse conversion in WTMS with tetralin content higher than 50 wt% was 86-87 wt%, whereas bagasse conversion in water or tetralin was 67 wt% or 84 wt%, respectively. Because the solid conversion from liquefaction in WTMS with tetralin content higher than 50 wt% was always higher than that in water or tetralin at temperatures between 250 and 300°C, a synergic effect between water and tetralin is suggested. Alkaline pretreatment of bagasse resulted in significantly higher conversion and heavy oil yield from BL in water or WTMS. The effect of deoxygenation by the present liquefaction method is demonstrated by lower oxygen contents (16.01-19.59 wt%) and higher heating values (31.9-34.8 MJ/kg) in the produced oils.

  8. Alkaline water electrolysis technology for Space Station regenerative fuel cell energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, F. H.; Hoberecht, M. A.; Le, M.

    1986-01-01

    The regenerative fuel cell system (RFCS), designed for application to the Space Station energy storage system, is based on state-of-the-art alkaline electrolyte technology and incorporates a dedicated fuel cell system (FCS) and water electrolysis subsystem (WES). In the present study, emphasis is placed on the WES portion of the RFCS. To ensure RFCS availability for the Space Station, the RFCS Space Station Prototype design was undertaken which included a 46-cell 0.93 cu m static feed water electrolysis module and three integrated mechanical components.

  9. Halotolerant cyanobacterium Aphanothece halophytica contains NapA-type Na+/H+ antiporters with novel ion specificity that are involved in salt tolerance at alkaline pH.

    PubMed

    Wutipraditkul, Nuchanat; Waditee, Rungaroon; Incharoensakdi, Aran; Hibino, Takashi; Tanaka, Yoshito; Nakamura, Tatsunosuke; Shikata, Masamitsu; Takabe, Tetsuko; Takabe, Teruhiro

    2005-08-01

    Aphanothece halophytica is a halotolerant alkaliphilic cyanobacterium which can grow at NaCl concentrations up to 3.0 M and at pH values up to 11. The genome sequence revealed that the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 contains five putative Na+/H+ antiporters, two of which are homologous to NhaP of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and three of which are homologous to NapA of Enterococcus hirae. The physiological and functional properties of NapA-type antiporters are largely unknown. One of NapA-type antiporters in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 has been proposed to be essential for the survival of this organism. In this study, we examined the isolation and characterization of the homologous gene in Aphanothece halophytica. Two genes encoding polypeptides of the same size, designated Ap-napA1-1 and Ap-napA1-2, were isolated. Ap-NapA1-1 exhibited a higher level of homology to the Synechocystis ortholog (Syn-NapA1) than Ap-NapA1-2 exhibited. Ap-NapA1-1, Ap-NapA1-2, and Syn-NapA1 complemented the salt-sensitive phenotypes of an Escherichia coli mutant and exhibited strongly pH-dependent Na+/H+ and Li+/H+ exchange activities (the highest activities were at alkaline pH), although the activities of Ap-NapA1-2 were significantly lower than the activities of the other polypeptides. Only one these polypeptides, Ap-NapA1-2, complemented a K+ uptake-deficient E. coli mutant and exhibited K+ uptake activity. Mutagenesis experiments suggested the importance of Glu129, Asp225, and Asp226 in the putative transmembrane segment and Glu142 in the loop region for the activity. Overexpression of Ap-NapA1-1 in the freshwater cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 enhanced the salt tolerance of cells, especially at alkaline pH. These findings indicate that A. halophytica has two NapA1-type antiporters which exhibit different ion specificities and play an important role in salt tolerance at alkaline pH.

  10. Effect of Time, Water Flow, and pH on Centripetal Passage of Radiophosphorus across Roots of Intact Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Emmert, Fred H.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of time, rate of the water flow, and ambient pH on centripetal passage of radiophosphorus across intact bean roots to the xylem were studied. Isotope which completed passage and entered the xylem stream, as well as amounts delivered to the plant top, served to measure centripetal passage. Centripetal passage of radiophosphorus increased parabolically reaching a maximum after 1 hr and maintained this level during the 2nd hr. This pattern was consistent for all conditions studied. The curve suggested that passage did not progress as an abrupt front, but rather that it occurred through a phosphorus pool before reaching the xylem. Differences in rate of water flow through test plants, accomplished by adjusting the humidity of the foliage environment, did not significantly affect centripetal passage of radiophosphorus. Water flow did, however, profoundly influence composition of the xylem stream by altering the solvent to isotope ratio. Centripetal passage of radiophosphorus was not affected by solution pH in the acid range (pH 4.8, 5.2, 6.4), but was inhibited in the more alkaline range (pH 7.0, 7.5, 8.0). The similarity of these findings to those in the literature for phosphorus uptake by individual cells suggests that cell uptake may constitute the primary rate-limiting step in the over-all process of ion passage to the xylem. PMID:16658169

  11. Model-based analysis of water management in alkaline direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinzierl, C.; Krewer, U.

    2014-12-01

    Mathematical modelling is used to analyse water management in Alkaline Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (ADMFCs) with an anion exchange membrane as electrolyte. Cathodic water supply is identified as one of the main challenges and investigated at different operation conditions. Two extreme case scenarios are modelled to study the feasible conditions for sufficient water supply. Scenario 1 reveals that water supply by cathodic inlet is insufficient and, thus, water transport through membrane is essential for ADMFC operation. The second scenario is used to analyse requirements on water transport through the membrane for different operation conditions. These requirements are influenced by current density, evaporation rate, methanol cross-over and electro-osmotic drag of water. Simulations indicate that water supply is mainly challenging for high current densities and demands on high water diffusion are intensified by water drag. Thus, current density might be limited by water transport through membrane. The presented results help to identify important effects and processes in ADMFCs with a polymer electrolyte membrane and to understand these processes. Furthermore, the requirements identified by modelling show the importance of considering water transport through membrane besides conductivity and methanol cross-over especially for designing new membrane materials.

  12. Extracellular pH alkalinization by Cl-/HCO3- exchanger is crucial for TASK2 activation by hypotonic shock in proximal cell lines from mouse kidney.

    PubMed

    L'Hoste, S; Barriere, H; Belfodil, R; Rubera, I; Duranton, C; Tauc, M; Poujeol, C; Barhanin, J; Poujeol, P

    2007-02-01

    We have previously shown that K(+)-selective TASK2 channels and swelling-activated Cl(-) currents are involved in a regulatory volume decrease (RVD; Barriere H, Belfodil R, Rubera I, Tauc M, Lesage F, Poujeol C, Guy N, Barhanin J, Poujeol P. J Gen Physiol 122: 177-190, 2003; Belfodil R, Barriere H, Rubera I, Tauc M, Poujeol C, Bidet M, Poujeol P. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 284: F812-F828, 2003). The aim of this study was to determine the mechanism responsible for the activation of TASK2 channels during RVD in proximal cell lines from mouse kidney. For this purpose, the patch-clamp whole-cell technique was used to test the effect of pH and the buffering capacity of external bath on Cl(-) and K(+) currents during hypotonic shock. In the presence of a high buffer concentration (30 mM HEPES), the cells did not undergo RVD and did not develop outward K(+) currents (TASK2). Interestingly, the hypotonic shock reduced the cytosolic pH (pH(i)) and increased the external pH (pH(e)) in wild-type but not in cftr (-/-) cells. The inhibitory effect of DIDS suggests that the acidification of pH(i) and the alkalinization of pH(e) induced by hypotonicity in wild-type cells could be due to an exit of HCO(3)(-). In conclusion, these results indicate that Cl(-) influx will be the driving force for HCO(3)(-) exit through the activation of the Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchanger. This efflux of HCO(3)(-) then alkalinizes pH(e), which in turn activates TASK2 channels.

  13. A low-temperature-active alkaline pectate lyase from Xanthomonas campestris ACCC 10048 with high activity over a wide pH range.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Peng; Meng, Kun; Wang, Yaru; Luo, Huiying; Shi, Pengjun; Huang, Huoqing; Tu, Tao; Yang, Peilong; Yao, Bin

    2012-11-01

    Alkaline pectate lyases are favorable for the textile industry. Here, we report the gene cloning and expression of a low-temperature-active alkaline pectate lyase (PL D) from Xanthomonas campestris ACCC 10048. Deduced PL D consists of a putative 27-residue signal peptide and a catalytic domain of 320 residues belonging to family PF09492. Recombinant PL D (r-PL D) produced in Escherichia coli was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity with a single step of Ni(2+)-NTA affinity chromatography and showed an apparent molecular weight of ~38 kDa. The pH and temperature optima of r-PL D were found to be 9.0 °C and 30 °C, respectively. Compared with its microbial counterparts, r-PL D had higher activity over a wide pH range (>45 % of the maximum activity at pH 3.0-12.0) and at lower temperatures (>35 % of activity even at 0 °C). The K(m) and V(max) values of r-PL D for polygalacturonic acid were 4.9 gl(-1) and 30.1 μmolmin(-1) mg(-1), respectively. Compared with the commercial compound pectinase from Novozymes, r-PL D showed similar efficacy in reducing the intrinsic viscosity of polygalacturonic acid (35.1 % vs. 36.5 %) and in bioscouring of jute (10.25 % vs. 10.82 %). Thus, r-PL D is a valuable additive candidate for the textile industry.

  14. Reactivity of alkaline lignite fly ashes towards CO2 in water.

    PubMed

    Back, Martin; Kuehn, Michael; Stanjek, Helge; Peiffer, Stefan

    2008-06-15

    The reaction kinetics between alkaline lignite fly ashes and CO2 (pCO2 = 0.01--0.03 MPa)were studied in a laboratory CO2 flow-through reactor at 25--75 degrees C. The reaction is characterized by three phases that can be separated according to the predominating buffering systems and the rates of CO2 uptake. Phase I (pH > 12, < 30 min) is characterized by the dissolution of lime, the onset of calcite precipitation and a maximum uptake, the rate of which seems to be limited by dissolution of CO2. Phase II (pH < 10.5, 10--60 min) is dominated by the carbonation reaction. CO2 uptake in phase III (pH < 8.3) is controlled by the dissolution of periclase (MgO) leading to the formation of dissolved magnesium-bicarbonate. Phase I could be significantly extended by increasing the solid-liquid ratios and temperature, respectively. At 75 degrees C the rate of calcite precipitation was doubled leading to the neutralization of approximately 0.23 kg CO2 per kg fly ash within 4.5 h, which corresponds to nearly 90% of the total acid neutralizing capacity.

  15. Reactivity of alkaline lignite fly ashes towards CO{sub 2} in water

    SciTech Connect

    Martin Back; Michael Kuehn; Helge Stanjek; Stefan Peiffer

    2008-06-15

    The reaction kinetics between alkaline lignite fly ashes and CO{sub 2} (pCO{sub 2} = 0.01-0.03 MPa) were studied in a laboratory CO{sub 2} flow-through reactor at 25-75{sup o}C. The reaction is characterized by three phases that can be separated according to the predominating buffering systems and the rates of CO{sub 2} uptake. Phase I (pH > 12, < 30 min) is characterized by the dissolution of lime, the onset of calcite precipitation and a maximum uptake, the rate of which seems to be limited by dissolution of CO{sub 2}. Phase II (pH < 10.5, 10-60 min) is dominated by the carbonation reaction. CO{sub 2} uptake in phase III (pH < 8.3) is controlled by the dissolution of periclase (MgO) leading to the formation of dissolved magnesium-bicarbonate. Phase I could be significantly extended by increasing the solid-liquid ratios and temperature, respectively. At 75{sup o}C the rate of calcite precipitation was doubled leading to the neutralization of approximately 0.23 kg CO{sub 2} per kg fly ash within 4.5 h, which corresponds to nearly 90% of the total acid neutralizing capacity. 21 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Manipulation of the apoplastic pH of intact plants mimics stomatal and growth responses to water availability and microclimatic variation.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Sally; Davies, William J

    2008-01-01

    The apoplastic pH of intact Forsythiaxintermedia (cv. Lynwood) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants has been manipulated using buffered foliar sprays, and thereby stomatal conductance (g(s)), leaf growth rate, and plant water loss have been controlled. The more alkaline the pH of the foliar spray, the lower the g(s) and/or leaf growth rate subsequently measured. The most alkaline pH that was applied corresponds to that measured in sap extracted from shoots of tomato and Forsythia plants experiencing, respectively, soil drying or a relatively high photon flux density (PFD), vapour pressure deficit (VPD), and temperature in the leaf microclimate. The negative correlation between PFD/VPD/temperature and g(s) determined in well-watered Forsythia plants exposed to a naturally varying summer microclimate was eliminated by spraying the plants with relatively alkaline but not acidic buffers, providing evidence for a novel pH-based signalling mechanism linking the aerial microclimate with stomatal aperture. Increasing the pH of the foliar spray only reduced g(s) in plants of the abscisic acid (ABA)-deficient flacca mutant of tomato when ABA was simultaneously sprayed onto leaves or injected into stems. In well-watered Forsythia plants exposed to a naturally varying summer microclimate (variable PFD, VPD, and temperature), xylem pH and leaf ABA concentration fluctuated but were positively correlated. Manipulation of foliar apoplastic pH also affected the response of g(s) and leaf growth to ABA injected into stems of intact Forsythia plants. The techniques used here to control physiology and water use in intact growing plants could easily be applied in a horticultural context.

  17. Microwave-Initiated Facile Formation of Ni3Se4 Nanoassemblies for Enhanced and Stable Water Splitting in Neutral and Alkaline Media.

    PubMed

    Anantharaj, Sengeni; Kennedy, Jeevarathinam; Kundu, Subrata

    2017-02-28

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) generation through water splitting with minimum energy loss has become practically possible due to the recent evolution of high-performance electrocatalysts. In this study, we fabricated, evaluated, and presented such a high-performance catalyst which is the Ni3Se4 nanoassemblies that can efficiently catalyze water splitting in neutral and alkaline media. A hierarchical nanoassembly of Ni3Se4 was fabricated by functionalizing the surface-cleaned Ni foam using NaHSe solution as the Se source with the assistance of microwave irradiation (300 W) for 3 min followed by 5 h of aging at room temperature (RT). The fabricated Ni3Se4 nanoassemblies were subjected to catalyze water electrolysis in neutral and alkaline media. For a defined current density of 50 mA cm(-2), the Ni3Se4 nanoassemblies required very low overpotentials for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER), viz., 232, 244, and 321 mV at pH 14.5, 14.0, and 13.0 respectively. The associated lower Tafel slope values (33, 30, and 40 mV dec(-1)) indicate the faster OER kinetics on Ni3Se4 surfaces in alkaline media. Similarly, in the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), for a defined current density of 50 mA cm(-2), the Ni3Se4 nanoassemblies required low overpotentials of 211, 206, and 220 mV at pH 14.5, 14.0, and 13.0 respectively. The Tafel slopes for HER at pH 14.5, 14.0, and 13.0 are 165, 156, and 128 mV dec(-1), respectively. A comparative study on both OER and HER was carried out with the state-of-the-art RuO2 and Pt under identical experimental conditions, the results of which revealed that our Ni3Se4 is a far better high-performance catalyst for water splitting. Besides, the efficiency of Ni3Se4 nanoassemblies in catalyzing water splitting in neutral solution was carried out, and the results are better than many previous reports. With these amazing advantages in fabrication method and in catalyzing water splitting at various pH, the Ni3Se4 nanoassemblies can be an efficient, cheaper

  18. On the effect of alkaline pH and cofactor availability in the conformational and oligomeric state of Escherichia coli glutamate decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Giovannercole, F; Mérigoux, C; Zamparelli, C; Verzili, D; Grassini, G; Buckle, M; Vachette, P; De Biase, D

    2017-01-05

    Escherichia coli glutamate decarboxylase (EcGad) is a homohexameric pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme. It is the structural component of the major acid resistance system that protects E. coli from strong acid stress (pH < 3), typically encountered in the mammalian gastrointestinal tract. In fact EcGad consumes one proton/catalytic cycle while yielding γ-aminobutyrate and carbon dioxide from the decarboxylation of l-glutamate. Two isoforms of Gad occur in E. coli (GadA and GadB) that are 99% identical in sequence. GadB is the most intensively investigated. Prompted by the observation that some transcriptomic and proteomic studies show EcGad to be expressed in conditions far from acidic, we investigated the structural organization of EcGadB in solution in the pH range 7.5-8.6. Small angle X-ray scattering, combined with size exclusion chromatography, and analytical ultracentrifugation analysis show that the compact and entangled EcGadB hexameric structure undergoes dissociation into dimers as pH alkalinizes. When PLP is not present, the dimeric species is the most abundant in solution, though evidence for the occurrence of a likely tetrameric species was also obtained. Trp fluorescence emission spectra as well as limited proteolysis studies suggest that PLP plays a key role in the acquisition of a folding necessary for the canonical catalytic activity.

  19. Catalysis and stability of an alkaline protease from a haloalkaliphilic bacterium under non-aqueous conditions as a function of pH, salt and temperature.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sandeep; Rakholiya, Kalpna D; Raval, Vikram H; Singh, Satya P

    2012-09-01

    A haloalkaliphilic bacterium, isolated from Coastal Gujarat (India) was identified as Oceanobacillus sp. (GQ162111) based on 16S rRNA gene sequence. The organism grew and secreted extra cellular protease in presence of various organic solvents. At 30% (v/v) concentration of hexane, heptane, isooctane, dodecane and decane, significant growth and protease production was evident. The alkaline protease was purified in a single step on phenyl sepharose 6 FF with 28% yield. The molecular mass as judged by SDS-PAGE was 30 kDa. The temperature optimum of protease was 50°C and the enzyme retained 70% activity in 10% (v/v) isooctane. Effect of salt and pH was investigated in combination to assess the effect of isooctane. In organic solvents, the enzyme was considerably active at pH 8-11, with optimum activity at pH 10. Salt at 2 M was optimum for activity and enzyme maintained significant stability up to 18 h even at 3 M salt concentration. Patters of growth, protease production, catalysis and stability of the enzyme are presented. The study resumes significance as limited information is available on the interaction of haloalkaliphilic bacteria and their enzymes with organic solvents.

  20. Surface analysis and depth profiling of corrosion products formed in lead pipes used to supply low alkalinity drinking water.

    PubMed

    Davidson, C M; Peters, N J; Britton, A; Brady, L; Gardiner, P H E; Lewis, B D

    2004-01-01

    Modern analytical techniques have been applied to investigate the nature of lead pipe corrosion products formed in pH adjusted, orthophosphate-treated, low alkalinity water, under supply conditions. Depth profiling and surface analysis have been carried out on pipe samples obtained from the water distribution system in Glasgow, Scotland, UK. X-ray diffraction spectrometry identified basic lead carbonate, lead oxide and lead phosphate as the principal components. Scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry revealed the crystalline structure within the corrosion product and also showed spatial correlations existed between calcium, iron, lead, oxygen and phosphorus. Elemental profiling, conducted by means of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and secondary neutrals mass spectrometry (SNMS) indicated that the corrosion product was not uniform with depth. However, no clear stratification was apparent. Indeed, counts obtained for carbonate, phosphate and oxide were well correlated within the depth range probed by SIMS. SNMS showed relationships existed between carbon, calcium, iron, and phosphorus within the bulk of the scale, as well as at the surface. SIMS imaging confirmed the relationship between calcium and lead and suggested there might also be an association between chloride and phosphorus.

  1. Separating hydrogen and oxygen evolution in alkaline water electrolysis using nickel hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Long; Dong, Xiaoli; Wang, Yonggang; Xia, Yongyao

    2016-05-01

    Low-cost alkaline water electrolysis has been considered a sustainable approach to producing hydrogen using renewable energy inputs, but preventing hydrogen/oxygen mixing and efficiently using the instable renewable energy are challenging. Here, using nickel hydroxide as a redox mediator, we decouple the hydrogen and oxygen production in alkaline water electrolysis, which overcomes the gas-mixing issue and may increase the use of renewable energy. In this architecture, the hydrogen production occurs at the cathode by water reduction, and the anodic Ni(OH)2 is simultaneously oxidized into NiOOH. The subsequent oxygen production involves a cathodic NiOOH reduction (NiOOH-->Ni(OH)2) and an anodic OH- oxidization. Alternatively, the NiOOH formed during hydrogen production can be coupled with a zinc anode to form a NiOOH-Zn battery, and its discharge product (that is, Ni(OH)2) can be used to produce hydrogen again. This architecture brings a potential solution to facilitate renewables-to-hydrogen conversion.

  2. Separating hydrogen and oxygen evolution in alkaline water electrolysis using nickel hydroxide

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Long; Dong, Xiaoli; Wang, Yonggang; Xia, Yongyao

    2016-01-01

    Low-cost alkaline water electrolysis has been considered a sustainable approach to producing hydrogen using renewable energy inputs, but preventing hydrogen/oxygen mixing and efficiently using the instable renewable energy are challenging. Here, using nickel hydroxide as a redox mediator, we decouple the hydrogen and oxygen production in alkaline water electrolysis, which overcomes the gas-mixing issue and may increase the use of renewable energy. In this architecture, the hydrogen production occurs at the cathode by water reduction, and the anodic Ni(OH)2 is simultaneously oxidized into NiOOH. The subsequent oxygen production involves a cathodic NiOOH reduction (NiOOH→Ni(OH)2) and an anodic OH− oxidization. Alternatively, the NiOOH formed during hydrogen production can be coupled with a zinc anode to form a NiOOH-Zn battery, and its discharge product (that is, Ni(OH)2) can be used to produce hydrogen again. This architecture brings a potential solution to facilitate renewables-to-hydrogen conversion. PMID:27199009

  3. Separating hydrogen and oxygen evolution in alkaline water electrolysis using nickel hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long; Dong, Xiaoli; Wang, Yonggang; Xia, Yongyao

    2016-05-20

    Low-cost alkaline water electrolysis has been considered a sustainable approach to producing hydrogen using renewable energy inputs, but preventing hydrogen/oxygen mixing and efficiently using the instable renewable energy are challenging. Here, using nickel hydroxide as a redox mediator, we decouple the hydrogen and oxygen production in alkaline water electrolysis, which overcomes the gas-mixing issue and may increase the use of renewable energy. In this architecture, the hydrogen production occurs at the cathode by water reduction, and the anodic Ni(OH)2 is simultaneously oxidized into NiOOH. The subsequent oxygen production involves a cathodic NiOOH reduction (NiOOH→Ni(OH)2) and an anodic OH(-) oxidization. Alternatively, the NiOOH formed during hydrogen production can be coupled with a zinc anode to form a NiOOH-Zn battery, and its discharge product (that is, Ni(OH)2) can be used to produce hydrogen again. This architecture brings a potential solution to facilitate renewables-to-hydrogen conversion.

  4. Activity of alkaline phosphatase in water-in-oil microemulsions containing vegetable oil.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S; Mukhopadhyay, L; Moulik, S P

    1995-10-01

    The hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate by the enzyme alkaline phosphatase has been studied in vegetable oil containing water-in-oil (W/O) microemulsions of six different compositions at four different (water)/(surfactant) mole ratios of 10, 17.6, 24.7 and 37. The vegetable oils used are ricebran oil (RO) and clove oil (CO) and the amphiphiles used are Aerosol OT (AOT), cinnamic alcohol (CA) and Tween-20 (T-20). The hydrolytic process does not follow conventional Michaelis Menten equation normally observed for enzymatic process. In the water/vegetable oil microemulsions, the enzyme seems to lose its activity when AOT is the amphiphile. The amount of p-nitrophenol generated as a result of hydrolysis is independent of the presence of the enzyme. With Tween-20 as the amphiphile, the microemulsion produces an initial retarding effect which ultimately gets appreciably compensated.

  5. Determination of the equilibrium formation constants of two U(VI)-peroxide complexes at alkaline pH.

    PubMed

    Meca, S; Martínez-Torrents, A; Martí, V; Giménez, J; Casas, I; de Pablo, J

    2011-08-21

    The formation of uranyl-peroxide complexes was studied at alkaline media by using UV-Visible spectrophotometry and the STAR code. Two different complexes were found at a H(2)O(2)/U(VI) ratio lower than 2. A graphical method was used in order to obtain the formation constants of such complexes and the STAR program was used to refine the formation constants values because of its capacity to treat multiwavelength absorbance data and refining equilibrium constants. The values obtained for the two complexes identified were: UO(2)(2+) + H(2)O(2) + 4OH(-) <−> UO(2)(O(2))(OH)(2)(2-) + 2H(2)O: log β°(1,1,4) = 28.1 ± 0.1 (1). UO(2)(2+) + 2H(2)O(2) + 6OH(-) <−> UO(2)(O(2))(2)(OH)(2)(4-) + 4H(2)O: log β°(1,2,6) = 36.8 ± 0.2 (2). At hydrogen peroxide concentrations higher than 10(-5) mol dm(-3), and in the absence of carbonate, the UO(2)(O(2))(2)(OH)(2)(4-) complex is predominant in solution, indicating the significant peroxide affinity of peroxide ions for uranium and the strong complexes of uranium(VI) with peroxide.

  6. Alkali doped poly (2,5-benzimidazole) membrane for alkaline water electrolysis: Characterization and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Liliana A.; Hnát, Jaromír; Heredia, Nayra; Bruno, Mariano M.; Viva, Federico A.; Paidar, Martin; Corti, Horacio R.; Bouzek, Karel; Abuin, Graciela C.

    2016-04-01

    The properties and performance of linear and cross-linked KOH doped ABPBI membranes as electrolyte/separator for zero gap alkaline water electrolysis cells are evaluated and compared with a commercial Zirfon® diaphragm. Stability in alkaline environment, swelling, thermal properties, water sorption, KOH uptake and conductivity of linear (L-ABPBI) and cross-linked (C-ABPBI) membranes doped with different concentrations of KOH are analyzed. Linear membranes show stability up to 3.0 mol·dm-3 KOH doping, while cross-linked membranes are stable up to 4.2 mol·dm-3 KOH doping. Both kinds of membranes exhibit good thermal stability and reasonable specific ionic conductivity at 22 °C in the range between 7 and 25 mS·cm-1, being slightly higher the conductivity of C-ABPBI membranes than that of L-ABPBI ones. In short-term electrolysis tests both L-ABPBI and C-ABPBI membranes show better performance than Zirfon diaphragm in the range from 50 to 70 °C. A current density of 335 mA·cm-2 at a cell voltage of 2.0 V is attained with C-ABPBI membranes doped in 3 mol·dm-3 KOH at 70 °C, a performance comparable with that of commercial units operating at temperatures ca. 80 °C and 30 wt% KOH (6.7 mol·dm-3) as electrolyte.

  7. The impact of sedimentary alkalinity release on the water column CO2 system in the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, H.; Braeckman, U.; Le Guitton, M.; Meysman, F. J. R.

    2016-02-01

    It has been previously proposed that alkalinity release from sediments can play an important role in the carbonate dynamics on continental shelves, lowering the pCO2 of seawater and hence increasing the CO2 uptake from the atmosphere. To test this hypothesis, sedimentary alkalinity generation was quantified within cohesive and permeable sediments across the North Sea during two cruises in September 2011 (basin-wide) and June 2012 (Dutch coastal zone). Benthic fluxes of oxygen (O2), alkalinity (AT) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were determined using shipboard closed sediment incubations. Our results show that sediments can form an important source of alkalinity for the overlying water, particularly in the shallow southern North Sea, where high AT and DIC fluxes were recorded in near-shore sediments of the Belgian, Dutch and German coastal zone. In contrast, fluxes of AT and DIC are substantially lower in the deeper, seasonally stratified, northern part of the North Sea. Based on the data collected, we performed a model analysis to constrain the main pathways of alkalinity generation in the sediment, and to quantify how sedimentary alkalinity drives atmospheric CO2 uptake in the southern North Sea. Overall, our results show that sedimentary alkalinity generation should be regarded as a key component in the CO2 dynamics of shallow coastal systems.

  8. Hydration process of alkaline-earth metal atoms in water clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okai, Nobuhiro; Ishikawa, Haruki; Fuke, Kiyokazu

    2005-10-01

    Ionization potentials (IPs) of water clusters containing alkaline-earth metal atoms are measured by a photoionization threshold method to examine the hydration process of the metal atoms in clusters. IPs of Mg(H 2O) n and Ca(H 2O) n are found to decrease with increasing n and become constant at 3.18 eV for n ⩾ 9 and n ⩾ 8, respectively. The observed constant IP agrees with an estimated photoelectric threshold (3.2 eV) of bulk ice. From the comparison with the results on the theoretical calculations as well as the IPs for alkali atom-water clusters, the anomalous size dependence of IPs is ascribed to the formation of an ion-pair state.

  9. Histopathological influence of alkaline ionized water on myocardial muscle of mother rats.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T; Shirai, W; Pan, I; Fukuda, Y; Murasugi, E; Sato, T; Kamata, H; Uwatoko, K

    1998-12-01

    We have reported that a marked necrosis and subsequent fibrosis of myocardium occurred among male rats 15 weeks old given alkaline ionized water (AKW) during gestation and suckling periods, and after weaning. In this study, it was examined whether similar lesions would occur in mother rats which were given AKW from day zero of gestation to day 20 of lactation. The myocardial lesion in the mother rats given AKW showed cell infiltration, vacuolation and fibrosis in the papillary muscle of the left ventricle, as were observed in male rats of 15 weeks old. Myocardial degeneration may cause a leakage of potassium into the blood that results in a higher concentration of potassium in the blood in the test group than in that of the control group given tap water.

  10. Mathematical model of water transport in Bacon and alkaline matrix-type hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokopius, P. R.; Easter, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Based on general mass continuity and diffusive transport equations, a mathematical model was developed that simulates the transport of water in Bacon and alkaline-matrix fuel cells. The derived model was validated by using it to analytically reproduce various Bacon and matrix-cell experimental water transport transients.

  11. Theoretical considerations and a simple method for measuring alkalinity and acidity in low-pH waters by gran titration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barringer, J.L.; Johnsson, P.A.

    1996-01-01

    Titrations for alkalinity and acidity using the technique described by Gran (1952, Determination of the equivalence point in potentiometric titrations, Part II: The Analyst, v. 77, p. 661-671) have been employed in the analysis of low-pH natural waters. This report includes a synopsis of the theory and calculations associated with Gran's technique and presents a simple and inexpensive method for performing alkalinity and acidity determinations. However, potential sources of error introduced by the chemical character of some waters may limit the utility of Gran's technique. Therefore, the cost- and time-efficient method for performing alkalinity and acidity determinations described in this report is useful for exploring the suitability of Gran's technique in studies of water chemistry.

  12. Enhanced bioaccumulation of mercury, cadmium and lead in low-alkalinity waters: An emerging regional environmental problem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiener, J.G.; Stokes, P.M.

    1990-01-01

    During the past decade or so, observations of high mercury concentrations in fish have renewed concerns and mercury, primarily in two groups of fresh waters: low-alkalinity lakes (the topic of this editorial) and newly created impoundments. The recent focus on the chemistry and biota of low-alkalinity (< 50 mu eq/L) waters stemmed largely from concerns about acidic deposition and its effects on sensitive aquatic ecosystems. Such studies have revealed high concentrations of mercury in biota from low-alkalinity waters in some regions--even in seemingly pristine, semi-remote watersheds lacking both identifiable anthropogenic sources of the metal and mercury-enriched ores. Consequently, much of the concern about mercury in aquatic systems has shifted from direct point sources to more diffuse, poorly defined sources, possibly associated with atmospheric transport and deposition.

  13. Influence of Hydration Level on Polymer and Water Dynamics in Alkaline Anion Exchange Fuel Cell Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarver, Jacob; Kim, Jenny; Tyagi, Madhu; Soles, Christopher; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Coughlin, Bryan

    2015-03-01

    Triblock copolymers based on poly(chloromethylstyrene)-b-poly(ethylene)-b-poly(chloromethylstyrene) can be quaternized to different extents to yield anion exchange membranes for alkaline fuel cells. In the absence of moisture, these membranes demonstrate bilayer lamellar morphology. Upon high levels of hydration, however, in-situ small angle neutron scattering reveals the emergence of higher-order diffraction peaks. This phenomena has previously been observed in analogous diblock copolymer-based membranes and has been attributed to the induction of a multilayer lamellar morphology in which selective striping of water occurs in the center of the ion-rich domain. By conducting humidity-resolved quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) measurements using deuterated water, we are able to isolate differences in the pico- to nanosecond timescale dynamics of the hydrogenated membrane upon hydration. QENS measurements in the presence of a hydrogenated water source subsequently permit deconvolution and isolation of the translational and rotational dynamics of water as a function of relative humidity, revealing spatial and temporal changes in polymer and water motion at high levels of hydration.

  14. Chabazite: stable cation-exchanger in hyper alkaline concrete pore water.

    PubMed

    Van Tendeloo, Leen; Wangermez, Wauter; Kurttepeli, Mert; de Blochouse, Benny; Bals, Sara; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Martens, Johan A; Maes, André; Kirschhock, Christine E A; Breynaert, Eric

    2015-02-17

    To avoid impact on the environment, facilities for permanent disposal of hazardous waste adopt multibarrier design schemes. As the primary barrier very often consists of cement-based materials, two distinct aspects are essential for the selection of suitable complementary barriers: (1) selective sorption of the contaminants in the repository and (2) long-term chemical stability in hyperalkaline concrete-derived media. A multidisciplinary approach combining experimental strategies from environmental chemistry and materials science is therefore essential to provide a reliable assessment of potential candidate materials. Chabazite is typically synthesized in 1 M KOH solutions but also crystallizes in simulated young cement pore water, a pH 13 aqueous solution mainly containing K(+) and Na(+) cations. Its formation and stability in this medium was evaluated as a function of temperature (60 and 85 °C) over a timeframe of more than 2 years and was also asessed from a mechanistic point of view. Chabazite demonstrates excellent cation-exchange properties in simulated young cement pore water. Comparison of its Cs(+) cation exchange properties at pH 8 and pH 13 unexpectedly demonstrated an increase of the KD with increasing pH. The combined results identify chabazite as a valid candidate for inclusion in engineered barriers for concrete-based waste disposal.

  15. Hydrothermal carbonization of sewage sludge: The effect of feed-water pH on fate and risk of heavy metals in hydrochars.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yunbo; Liu, Xiangmin; Zhu, Yun; Peng, Chuan; Wang, Tengfei; Zhu, Luo; Li, Caiting; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the effect of feed-water pH (pH=2-12) on fate and risk of heavy metals (HMs) in hydrochars (HCs) was investigated. Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) of sewage sludge (SS) was carried out with different feed-water pH at 270°C. The research results showed that changing feed-water pH had a positive effect on accumulating Pb, Ni, Cd and Zn in HCs. Chemical forms of Cu and Cr converted from an unstable state to stable in the alkaline environment while in the acidic condition was opposite. The effect of feed-water pH on the chemical forms of HMs was variable but not significant. Risk assessments of Igeo, Er(i), RAC and RI were applied to evaluate the accumulation levels of individual metal, the potential ecological risks, the bio-availabilities and the comprehensive toxicity and sensitivity of HMs, respectively. The lowest pollution level of HMs was obtained at 270°C with pH=11.

  16. Alkaline Cytosolic pH and High Sodium Hydrogen Exchanger 1 (NHE1) Activity in Th9 Cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Yogesh; Zhou, Yuetao; Shi, Xiaolong; Zhang, Shaqiu; Umbach, Anja T; Salker, Madhuri S; Lang, Karl S; Lang, Florian

    2016-11-04

    CD4(+) T helper 9 (Th9) cells are a newly discovered Th cell subset that produce the pleiotropic cytokine IL-9. Th9 cells can protect against tumors and provide resistance against helminth infections. Given their pivotal role in the adaptive immune system, understanding Th9 cell development and the regulation of IL-9 production could open novel immunotherapeutic opportunities. The Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 (NHE1; gene name Slc9α1)) is critically important for regulating intracellular pH (pHi), cell volume, migration, and cell survival. The pHi influences cytokine secretion, activities of membrane-associated enzymes, ion transport, and other effector signaling molecules such as ATP and Ca(2+) levels. However, whether NHE1 regulates Th9 cell development or IL-9 secretion has not yet been defined. The present study explored the role of NHE1 in Th9 cell development and function. Th cell subsets were characterized by flow cytometry and pHi was measured using 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein-acetoxymethyl ester (BCECF-AM) dye. NHE1 functional activity was estimated from the rate of realkalinization following an ammonium pulse. Surprisingly, in Th9 cells pHi and NHE1 activity were significantly higher than in all other Th cell subsets (Th1/Th2/Th17 and induced regulatory T cells (iTregs)). NHE1 transcript levels and protein abundance were significantly higher in Th9 cells than in other Th cell subsets. Inhibition of NHE1 by siRNA-NHE1 or with cariporide in Th9 cells down-regulated IL-9 and ATP production. NHE1 activity, Th9 cell development, and IL-9 production were further blunted by pharmacological inhibition of protein kinase Akt1/Akt2. Our findings reveal that Akt1/Akt2 control of NHE1 could be an important physiological regulator of Th9 cell differentiation, IL-9 secretion, and ATP production.

  17. Seasonal advection of Pacific Equatorial Water alters oxygen and pH in the Southern California Bight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeshita, Y.; Frieder, C.; Nam, S.; Martz, T. R.

    2015-12-01

    Chemical properties of the California Undercurrent (CU) have been changing over the past several decades, yet the mechanisms responsible for the trend are still not fully understood. We present a survey of temperature, salinity, O2, pH, and currents at intermediate depths (defined here as 50-500 m) in the summer (June 30 to July 10) and winter (December 8 to 15) of 2012 in the southern region of the Southern California Bight. Observations of temperature, salinity, and currents reveal that local bathymetry and small gyres play an important role in the flow path of the California Undercurrent (CU). Using spiciness (π) as a tracer, we observe a 10% increase of Pacific Equatorial Water (PEW) in the core of the CU during the summer versus the winter. This is associated with an increase in π of 0.2, and a decrease in O2 and pH of 30 µmol kg-1 and 0.022, respectively; the change in pH is driven by increased CO2, while total alkalinity remains unchanged. The high-π, low-O2, low-pH waters during the summer are not distributed uniformly in the study region. Moreover, mooring observations at the edge of the continental shelf reveal intermittent intrusions of PEW onto the shelf with concomitant decreases in O2 and pH. We estimate that increased advection of PEW in the CU could account for approximately 50% of the observed decrease in O2, and between 49 and 73% of the decrease in pH, over the past three decades.

  18. Comparison of liquid hot water and alkaline pretreatments of giant reed for improved enzymatic digestibility and biogas energy production.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Danping; Ge, Xumeng; Zhang, Quanguo; Li, Yebo

    2016-09-01

    Liquid hot water (LHW) and alkaline pretreatments of giant reed biomass were compared in terms of digestibility, methane production, and cost-benefit efficiency for electricity generation via anaerobic digestion with a combined heat and power system. Compared to LHW pretreatment, alkaline pretreatment retained more of the dry matter in giant reed biomass solids due to less severe conditions. Under their optimal conditions, LHW pretreatment (190°C, 15min) and alkaline pretreatment (20g/L of NaOH, 24h) improved glucose yield from giant reed by more than 2-fold, while only the alkaline pretreatment significantly (p<0.05) increased cumulative methane yield (by 63%) over that of untreated biomass (217L/kgVS). LHW pretreatment obtained negative net electrical energy production due to high energy input. Alkaline pretreatment achieved 27% higher net electrical energy production than that of non-pretreatment (3859kJ/kg initial total solids), but alkaline liquor reuse is needed for improved net benefit.

  19. Vesiculation processes in a water-rich calc-alkaline obsidian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, R. J.; Bagdassarov, N. S.; Romano, C.

    1997-02-01

    The effect of temperature and viscosity on the kinetics of bubble growth was measured for a natural water-rich rhyolite melt. The change in volume of a natural crystal-poor calc-alkaline rhyolitic obsidian with an initial water content of ≈ 1.8 wt% H 2O was determined in the temperature interval 520-624°C. Shear viscosity was measured on the natural sample using the micropenetration method in the temperature interval 450-590°C and water contents before and after viscometry were monitored by FTIR. The time-dependence of the volume increase as a result of vesiculation approximates the Avrami equation: ΔV(t) α 1- exp[-( t/τ) n] . At temperatures close to the glass transition temperature (T g), growing bubbles ruptured the surrounding melt. During diffusion of water from the hydrous melt with ≈ 1.8 wt% H 2O into a bubble, the ΔT g of the melt at the bubble wall increases by ≈ 315°C. In addition, the viscosity of the melt at the bubble wall increases by 5-6 orders of magnitude. The increasing elastic component of shear stress on the bubble wall as a result of bubble growth at ˜ T g may exceed the bubble wall yield strength, resulting in cracking. No time lag in the onset of bubble growth occurred for this water-rich rhyolite. In those parts of volcanic edifices where water contents are of several weight percent (e.g., within the upper parts of volcanic conduits), the probability of melt fracturing due to the degassing of water at ˜ T g increases.

  20. Net alkalinity and net acidity 2: Practical considerations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirby, C.S.; Cravotta, C.A.

    2005-01-01

    The pH, alkalinity, and acidity of mine drainage and associated waters can be misinterpreted because of the chemical instability of samples and possible misunderstandings of standard analytical method results. Synthetic and field samples of mine drainage having various initial pH values and concentrations of dissolved metals and alkalinity were titrated by several methods, and the results were compared to alkalinity and acidity calculated based on dissolved solutes. The pH, alkalinity, and acidity were compared between fresh, unoxidized and aged, oxidized samples. Data for Pennsylvania coal mine drainage indicates that the pH of fresh samples was predominantly acidic (pH 2.5-4) or near neutral (pH 6-7); ??? 25% of the samples had pH values between 5 and 6. Following oxidation, no samples had pH values between 5 and 6. The Standard Method Alkalinity titration is constrained to yield values >0. Most calculated and measured alkalinities for samples with positive alkalinities were in close agreement. However, for low-pH samples, the calculated alkalinity can be negative due to negative contributions by dissolved metals that may oxidize and hydrolyze. The Standard Method hot peroxide treatment titration for acidity determination (Hot Acidity) accurately indicates the potential for pH to decrease to acidic values after complete degassing of CO2 and oxidation of Fe and Mn, and it indicates either the excess alkalinity or that required for neutralization of the sample. The Hot Acidity directly measures net acidity (= -net alkalinity). Samples that had near-neutral pH after oxidation had negative Hot Acidity; samples that had pH < 6.3 after oxidation had positive Hot Acidity. Samples with similar pH values before oxidation had dissimilar Hot Acidities due to variations in their alkalinities and dissolved Fe, Mn, and Al concentrations. Hot Acidity was approximately equal to net acidity calculated based on initial pH and dissolved concentrations of Fe, Mn, and Al minus the

  1. Escherichia coli YqjA, a Member of the Conserved DedA/Tvp38 Membrane Protein Family, Is a Putative Osmosensing Transporter Required for Growth at Alkaline pH

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sujeet

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ability to persist and grow under alkaline conditions is an important characteristic of many bacteria. In order to survive at alkaline pH, Escherichia coli must maintain a stable cytoplasmic pH of about 7.6. Membrane cation/proton antiporters play a major role in alkaline pH homeostasis by catalyzing active inward proton transport. The DedA/Tvp38 family is a highly conserved membrane protein family of unknown function present in most sequenced genomes. YqjA and YghB are members of the E. coli DedA family with 62% amino acid identity and partially redundant functions. We have shown that E. coli with ΔyqjA and ΔyghB mutations cannot properly maintain the proton motive force (PMF) and is compromised in PMF-dependent drug efflux and other PMF-dependent functions. Furthermore, the functions of YqjA and YghB are dependent upon membrane-embedded acidic amino acids, a hallmark of several families of proton-dependent transporters. Here, we show that the ΔyqjA mutant (but not ΔyghB) cannot grow under alkaline conditions (ranging from pH 8.5 to 9.5), unlike the parent E. coli. Overexpression of yqjA restores growth at alkaline pH, but only when more than ∼100 mM sodium or potassium is present in the growth medium. Increasing the osmotic pressure by the addition of sucrose enhances the ability of YqjA to support growth under alkaline conditions in the presence of low salt concentrations, consistent with YqjA functioning as an osmosensor. We suggest that YqjA possesses proton-dependent transport activity that is stimulated by osmolarity and that it plays a significant role in the survival of E. coli at alkaline pH. IMPORTANCE The ability to survive under alkaline conditions is important for many species of bacteria. Escherichia coli can grow at pH 5.5 to 9.5 while maintaining a constant cytoplasmic pH of about 7.6. Under alkaline conditions, bacteria rely upon proton-dependent transporters to maintain a constant cytoplasmic pH. The DedA/Tvp38 protein family

  2. Early changes of the pH of the apoplast are different in leaves, stem and roots of Vicia faba L. under declining water availability.

    PubMed

    Karuppanapandian, T; Geilfus, C-M; Mühling, K-H; Novák, O; Gloser, V

    2017-02-01

    Changes in pH of the apoplast have recently been discussed as an important factor in adjusting transpiration and water relations under conditions of drought via modulatory effect on abscisic acid (ABA) concentration. Using Vicia faba L., we investigated whether changes in the root, shoot and leaf apoplastic pH correlated with (1) a drought-induced reduction in transpiration and with (2) changes in ABA concentration. Transpiration, leaf water potential and ABA in leaves were measured and correlated with root and shoot xylem pH, determined by a pH microelectrode, and pH of leaf apoplast quantified by microscopy-based in vivo ratiometric analysis. Results revealed that a reduction in transpiration rate in the early phase of soil drying could not be linked with changes in the apoplastic pH via effects on the stomata-regulating hormone ABA. Moreover, drought-induced increase in pH of xylem or leaf apoplast was not the remote effect of an acropetal transport of alkaline sap from root, because root xylem acidified during progressive soil drying, whereas the shoot apoplast alkalized. We reason that other, yet unknown signalling mechanism was responsible for reduction of transpiration rate in the early phase of soil drying.

  3. Improvement in the solid-state alkaline fuel cell performance through efficient water management strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshiba, Yuhei; Hiura, Junya; Suzuki, Yuto; Yamaguchi, Takeo

    2017-03-01

    In solid-state alkaline fuel cells (SAFCs), water is generated at the anode and is reacted at the cathode; as such, flooding occurs much more easily at the anode than it does in proton-exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Anode flooding is a reason for the low performance of SAFCs, and so it is important that this flooding phenomenon is mitigated. In this study, we control water transport to suppress anode flooding. We do this through two approaches: changing the thickness of the anion exchange membrane (AEM) and changing the anode flow rate. Among two AEMs with two different thicknesses (27 μm and 6 μm) prepared, thinner AEM shows improved fuel cell performance. Increasing the anode flow rate also improved the performance of SAFCs. To find out what caused this, the water transport inside the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) was analyzed. The flooding region was estimated using calculated relative humidity at anode outlet. On the basis of our experimental and calculation approaches, flooding can be suppressed by using thin AEMs and increasing the anode flow rate.

  4. Hydrology and Alkalinity Regulation of Soft Florida Waters: An Integrated Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, Robert E.; Canfield, Daniel E., Jr.

    1992-06-01

    Natural waters in ridge provinces of Florida and southeast Georgia were classified geographically, by degrees of cultural disturbance, and according to the dominant hydrologic and biogeochemical processes controlling chemistry. The ionic composition of lakes, upland streams, and surficial aquifer (water table) springs in relatively undeveloped catchments reflects the geographic variations in bulk deposition corrected for evapotranspiration (Na, Cl), plus a slight gain (net watershed mobilization) of Mg, and partial to nearly complete losses (net retention) of nitrate, sulfate, Ca, and K. Recharge to the Floridan aquifer in infertile, forested, sandy ridge provinces of northern Florida contains 360-580 μmol CO2. On the basis of indirect geochemical evidence, sulfate retention appears less important in lake sediments than in the region's highly weathered, ferruginous, kaolinitic, sand soils. Silica concentrations in upland streams and water table springs closely reflect the predicted equilibrium between kaolinite and gibbsite. Along with other evidence, the Si concentrations in ridge lakes indicate that seepage inflow is much more important than assumed in Baker et al.'s (1988) regional model. Lakes and streams are acidified either by humic acids or nonmarine sulfate but rarely by both, as reflected by the significant inverse correlation between these two components. Contrary to previous reports, there is no significant difference in alkalinity for culturally undisturbed lakes in the northern Trail versus southern Highlands Ridge areas.

  5. Cadmium triggers Elodea canadensis to change the surrounding water pH and thereby Cd uptake.

    PubMed

    Javed, M Tariq; Greger, Maria

    2011-01-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the influence of Elodea canadensis shoots on surrounding water pH in the presence of cadmium and the effect of plant-induced pH on cadmium uptake. The pH change in the surrounding nutrient solution and Cd uptake by Elodea shoots were investigated after cultivation of various plant densities (1, 3, 6 plants per 500 ml) in hydroponics at a starting pH of 4.0 and in the presence of different concentrations of cadmium (0, 0.1, 0.5 microM). Cadmium uptake was also investigated at different constant pH (4.0, 4.5, 5.5 and 6.5). To investigate if the pH change arose from photosynthetic activities, plants were grown under light, darkness or in the presence of a photosynthetic inhibitor, 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), and 0.5 microM cadmium in the solution. Elodea had an ability to increase the surrounding water pH, when the initial pH was low, which resulted in increased accumulation of Cd. The higher the plant density, the more pronounced was the pH change. The pH increase was not due to the photosynthetic activity since the pH rise was more pronounced under darkness and in the presence of DCMU. The pH increase by Elodea was triggered by cadmium.

  6. High-resolution kinetics of transferrin acidification in BALB/c 3T3 cells: exposure to pH 6 followed by temperature-sensitive alkalinization during recycling.

    PubMed

    Sipe, D M; Murphy, R F

    1987-10-01

    The kinetics of acidification of diferric human transferrin in BALB/c mouse 3T3 cells were determined by flow cytometry using a modification of the fluorescein-rhodamine fluorescence ratio technique. For cells labeled at 0 degrees C and warmed to 37 degrees C, the minimum pH observed was 6.1 +/- 0.2, occurring 5 min after warmup. This step was followed by a slower alkalinization to the pH of the external medium, occurring with a half-time of 5 min. Warmup to 24 degrees C or 17 degrees C resulted in slowing of the time of onset of acidification such that the minimum pH was 6.3 +/- 0.2, attained 15 and 25 min after warmup, respectively; the alkalinization step was completely blocked. The limited acidification observed for transferrin corresponds to the initial phase of acidification normally observed for other (nonrecycled) ligands. Since transferrin is not further acidified, the results confirm the existence of two phases of acidification during endocytosis. Measurements of transferrin dissociation at neutral pH after exposure to mildly acidic pH support the conclusion that the transferrin cycle may be completed without exposure of transferrin to a pH below 6. The mildly acidic pH of the endocytic compartments involved in recycling may play a role in regulating enzymatic processing of endocytosed material.

  7. Negative pH and extremely acidic mine waters from Iron Mountain, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nordstrom, D.K.; Alpers, C.N.; Ptacek, C.J.; Blowes, D.W.

    2000-01-01

    Extremely acidic mine waters with pH values as low as -3.6, total dissolved metal concentrations as high as 200 g/L, and sulfate concentrations as high as 760 g/L, have been encountered underground in the Richmond Mine at Iron Mountain, CA. These are the most acidic waters known. The pH measurements were obtained by using the Pitzer method to define pH for calibration of glass membrane electrodes. The calibration of pH below 0.5 with glass membrane electrodes becomes strongly nonlinear but is reproducible to a pH as low as -4. Numerous efflorescent minerals were found forming from these acid waters. These extreme acid waters were formed primarily by pyrite oxidation and concentration by evaporation with minor effects from aqueous ferrous iron oxidation and efflorescent mineral formation.

  8. Anti-obesity effect of alkaline reduced water in high fat-fed obese mice.

    PubMed

    Ignacio, Rosa Mistica Coles; Kang, Tae-Young; Kim, Cheol-Su; Kim, Soo-Ki; Yang, Young-Chul; Sohn, Joon-Hyung; Lee, Kyu-Jae

    2013-01-01

    Whether or not alkaline reduced water (ARW) has a positive effect on obesity is unclear. This study aims to prove the positive effect of ARW in high-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity (DIO) in C57BL/6 mice model. Toward this, obesity was induced by feeding the C57BL/6 male mice with high-fat diet (w/w 45% fat) for 12 weeks. Thereafter, the animals were administered with either ARW or tap water. Next, the degree of adiposity and DIO-associated parameters were assessed: clinico-pathological parameters, biochemical measurements, histopathological analysis of liver, the expression of cholesterol metabolism-related genes in the liver, and serum levels of adipokine and cytokine. We found that ARW-fed mice significantly ameliorated adiposity: controlled body weight gain, reduced the accumulation of epididymal fats and decreased liver fats as compared to control mice. Accordingly, ARW coordinated the level of adiponectin and leptin. Further, mRNA expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP)7A1 was upregulated. In summary, our data shows that ARW intake inhibits the progression of HF-DIO in mice. This is the first note on anti-obesity effect of ARW, clinically implying the safer fluid remedy for obesity control.

  9. Influences of alkaline ionized water on milk electrolyte concentrations in maternal rats.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T; Kamata, H; Fukuda, Y; Murasugi, E; Sato, T; Uwatoko, K; Pan, I J

    2000-12-01

    We previously reported that body weight on day 14 after birth in male offspring of rats given alkaline ionized water (AKW) was significantly heavier than that in offspring of rats given tap water (TPW), but no significant difference was noted in milk yield and in suckled milk volume between the two groups. Additionally, the offspring in the AKW group and TPW group were given AKW and TPW, respectively, at weaning, and unexpectedly, the necrotic foci in the cardiac muscle were observed at the 15-week-old age in the AKW group, but not in the TPW group. The present study was designed to clarify the factors which are involved in that unusual increase of body weight and occurrence of cardiac necrosis. Eight dams in each group were given AKW or TPW (control) from day 0 of gestation to day 14 of lactation. The milk samples were collected on day 14 of lactation and analyzed for concentrations of calcium (Ca), sodium (Na), potassium (K), magnesium (Mg) and chloride (Cl). The AKW and TPW were also analyzed. Ca, Na and K levels in milk were significantly higher in the AKW group compared to the TPW group. No significant difference was noted in the Mg and Cl levels between the two groups. These data suggested that the Ca cation of AKW enriched the Ca concentration of the milk and accelerated the postnatal growth of the offspring of rats given AKW.

  10. Heavy water reactions with alkaline-earth metal dications in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feil, Stefan; Koyanagi, Greg K.; Bohme, Diethard K.

    2009-02-01

    Room temperature rate coefficients and product distributions are reported for the reactions initiated in D2O with dications of the alkaline-earth metals Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba. The measurements were performed with a selected-ion flow tube (SIFT) tandem mass spectrometer and electrospray ionization (ESI). Mg2+ reacts with water by a fast electron transfer leading to charge separation with a rate coefficient of 1.4 × 10-9 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. Ca2+ reacts with D2O in a first step to form the adduct Ca2+(D2O), with an effective bimolecular rate coefficient of 2.3 × 10-11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1, which then undergoes rapid charge separation by deuteron transfer to form CaOD+ and D3O+ in a second step with k = 7.9 × 10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. The CaOD+ ion reacts further by clustering up to five more D2O molecules. Sr2+ clusters up to eight D2O molecules and Ba2+ up to seven D2O molecules, with the first addition of D2O being rate determining in each case and the last addition being distinctly slower, as might be expected from a transition in the occupation of the added water molecules from an inner to an outer hydration shell.

  11. Sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic and mixotrophic denitrification processes for drinking water treatment: elimination of excess sulfate production and alkalinity requirement.

    PubMed

    Sahinkaya, Erkan; Dursun, Nesrin

    2012-09-01

    This study evaluated the elimination of alkalinity need and excess sulfate generation of sulfur-based autotrophic denitrification process by stimulating simultaneous autotrophic and heterotrophic (mixotrophic) denitrification process in a column bioreactor by methanol supplementation. Also, denitrification performances of sulfur-based autotrophic and mixotrophic processes were compared. In autotrophic process, acidity produced by denitrifying sulfur-oxidizing bacteria was neutralized by the external NaHCO(3) supplementation. After stimulating mixotrophic denitrification process, the alkalinity need of the autotrophic process was satisfied by the alkalinity produced by heterotrophic denitrifiers. Decreasing and lastly eliminating the external alkalinity supplementation did not adversely affect the process performance. Complete denitrification of 75 mg L(-1) NO(3)-N under mixotrophic conditions at 4 h hydraulic retention time was achieved without external alkalinity supplementation and with effluent sulfate concentration lower than the drinking water guideline value of 250 mg L(-1). The denitrification rate of mixotrophic process (0.45 g NO(3)-N L(-1) d(-1)) was higher than that of autotrophic one (0.3 g NO(3)-N L(-1) d(-1)). Batch studies showed that the sulfur-based autotrophic nitrate reduction rate increased with increasing initial nitrate concentration and transient accumulation of nitrite was observed.

  12. Removal of K+, Na+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ from saline-alkaline water using the microalga Scenedesmus obliquus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zongli; Ying, Chengqi; Lu, Jianxue; Lai, Qifang; Zhou, Kai; Wang, Hui; Chen, Ling

    2013-11-01

    The capability of Scenedesmus obliquus to remove cations (K+, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+) from saline-alkaline water was investigated at different salinities (0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25) and carbonate alkalinities (0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 mmol/L). K+, Na+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ in saline-alkaline water were efficiently removed by S. obliquus. The maximum removal of the cations (29.37 mg for K+, 185.85 mg for Na+, 23.07 mg for Ca2+, 66.14 mg for Mg2+) occurred at salinity 25. The maximum removal of K+ (2.28 mg), Na+ (6.62 mg), Ca2+ (1.01 mg), and Mg2+ (0.62 mg) occurred at carbonate alkalinities of 25 mmol/L for K+, 35 mmol/L for Na+, 20 mmol/L for Ca2+, and 25 mmol/L for Mg2+, respectively. Under a salinity stress, the concentration of Na+ in S. obliquus increased significantly, while that of K+ decreased significantly. The concentrations of Ca2+ and Mg2+ decreased as well. The ratios of K+/Na+, Ca2+/Na+, and Mg2+/Na+ were significantly lower in all salinity treatments than those of the control. Under alkaline stress, the concentrations of Na+ and K+ in S. obliquus decreased significantly and the ratios of K+/Na+, Ca2+/Na+, and Mg2+/Na+ were significantly higher in all treatments than in the control. Moreover, the concentrations of Ca2+ and Mg2+ in S. obliquus at alkalinities of 5-10 mmol/L were significantly higher than those of the other treatments. The removal of Na+ by S. obliquus mainly occurs through biosorption, and Mg2+ and Ca2+ were removed through both biosorption and bioaccumulation.

  13. The pH of water from various sources: an overview for recommendation for patients with atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kulthanan, Kanokvalai; Varothai, Supenya

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) have increased susceptibility to irritants. Some patients have questions about types of water for bathing or skin cleansing. Objective We studied the pH of water from various sources to give an overview for physicians to recommend patients with AD. Methods Water from various sources was collected for measurement of the pH using a pH meter and pH-indicator strips. Results Bottled drinking still water had pH between 6.9 and 7.5 while the sparkling type had pH between 4.9 and 5.5. Water derived from home water filters had an approximate pH of 7.5 as same as tap water. Swimming pool water had had pH between 7.2 and 7.5 while seawater had a pH of 8. Normal saline and distilled water had pH of 5.4 and 5.7, respectively. Facial mineral water had pH between 7.5 and 8, while facial makeup removing water had an acidic pH. Conclusion Normal saline, distilled water, bottled sparkling water and facial makeup removing water had similar pH to that of normal skin of normal people. However, other factors including benefits of mineral substances in the water in terms of bacteriostatic and anti-inflammation should be considered in the selection of cleansing water. PMID:23956962

  14. Low pressure ion chromatography with a low cost paired emitter-detector diode based detector for the determination of alkaline earth metals in water samples.

    PubMed

    Barron, Leon; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Diamond, Dermot; O'Toole, Martina; Lau, King Tong; Paull, Brett

    2006-09-01

    The use of a low pressure ion chromatograph based upon short (25 mm x 4.6 mm) surfactant coated monolithic columns and a low cost paired emitter-detector diode (PEDD) based detector, for the determination of alkaline earth metals in aqueous matrices is presented. The system was applied to the separation of magnesium, calcium, strontium and barium in less than 7min using a 0.15M KCl mobile phase at pH 3, with post-column reaction detection at 570 nm using o-cresolphthalein complexone. A comparison of the performance of the PEDD detector with a standard laboratory absorbance detector is shown, with limits of detection for magnesium and calcium using the low cost PEDD detector equal to 0.16 and 0.23 mg L(-1), respectively. Finally, the developed system was used for the determination of calcium and magnesium in a commercial spring water sample.

  15. Climatological variations of total alkalinity and total dissolved inorganic carbon in the Mediterranean Sea surface waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemayel, E.; Hassoun, A. E. R.; Benallal, M. A.; Goyet, C.; Rivaro, P.; Abboud-Abi Saab, M.; Krasakopoulou, E.; Touratier, F.; Ziveri, P.

    2015-12-01

    A compilation of data from several cruises between 1998 and 2013 was used to derive polynomial fits that estimate total alkalinity (AT) and total dissolved inorganic carbon (CT) from measurements of salinity and temperature in the Mediterranean Sea surface waters. The optimal equations were chosen based on the 10-fold cross-validation results and revealed that second- and third-order polynomials fit the AT and CT data respectively. The AT surface fit yielded a root mean square error (RMSE) of ± 10.6 μmol kg-1, and salinity and temperature contribute to 96 % of the variability. Furthermore, we present the first annual mean CT parameterization for the Mediterranean Sea surface waters with a RMSE of ± 14.3 μmol kg-1. Excluding the marginal seas of the Adriatic and the Aegean, these equations can be used to estimate AT and CT in case of the lack of measurements. The identified empirical equations were applied on the 0.25° climatologies of temperature and salinity, available from the World Ocean Atlas 2013. The 7-year averages (2005-2012) showed that AT and CT have similar patterns with an increasing eastward gradient. The variability is influenced by the inflow of cold Atlantic waters through the Strait of Gibraltar and by the oligotrophic and thermohaline gradient that characterize the Mediterranean Sea. The summer-winter seasonality was also mapped and showed different patterns for AT and CT. During the winter, the AT and CT concentrations were higher in the western than in the eastern basin. The opposite was observed in the summer where the eastern basin was marked by higher AT and CT concentrations than in winter. The strong evaporation that takes place in this season along with the ultra-oligotrophy of the eastern basin determines the increase of both AT and CT concentrations.

  16. Effects of Atmospheric Air Plasma Irradiation on pH of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarinont, Thapanut; Koga, Kazunori; Kitazaki, Satoshi; Uchida, Giichirou; Hayashi, Nobuya; Shiratani, Masaharu

    We have studied the effects of atmospheric air plasma irradiation to water using a scalable dielectric barrier discharge device. Measurements of the pH of water treated by the plasmas have shown the pH decreases due to peroxide molecules generated by plasma irradiation and depends on material of water container. We also found this plasma treated water has little effect on the growth enhancement on Radish sprouts compare with plasma irradiation on dry seeds and the plasma irradiation can affect them through the water buffer of 0.2 mm in thickness.

  17. Snow leopard (Panthera uncia) spermatozoa are sensitive to alkaline pH, but motility in vitro is not influenced by protein or energy supplements.

    PubMed

    Roth, T L; Swanson, W F; Collins, D; Burton, M; Garell, D M; Wildt, D E

    1996-01-01

    To better understand the biology of snow leopard spermatozoa and to facilitate developing assisted reproduction, a series of studies was conducted to: 1) identify the component(s) of complex culture media responsible for the detrimental effect on sperm survival in vitro, 2) optimize medium for supporting sperm viability, and 3) evaluate sperm capacitation in vitro. Constituents of complex media were added systematically to phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) to isolate the factor(s) influencing snow leopard sperm motility in vitro. Sperm capacitation was also assessed following incubation in PBS with bovine serum albumin (BSA), fetal calf serum (FCS), or heparin. For maintaining sperm motility, there was no benefit (P > or = 0.05) to supplementing PBS with low (5%) or high (20%) concentrations of snow leopard serum (SLS) versus FCS or BSA. Likewise, adding supplemental energy substrates (pyruvate, glucose, lactate, or glutamine) did not enhance or hinder (P > or = 0.05) sperm motility. However, motility rapidly decreased (P < 0.05) with the addition of NaHCO3 to PBS or Ham's F10 nutrient mixture. Surprisingly, Ham's F10 with no buffering component or with both NaHCO3 and N-Z-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES) maintained sperm motility at levels similar (P > or = 0.05) to PBS. Although sperm motility in all treatments decreased with time, there was a strong inverse relationship (P < 0.01; r = 0.90) between motility and sample pH at 6 hours. Spermatozoa incubated in PBS containing FCS, BSA, or heparin did not undergo the acrosome reaction when exposed to calcium ionophore. In summary, alkaline pH has a profound detrimental effect on snow leopard sperm motility, and capacitation does not occur under conditions that normally promote this event in other felid species. These results clearly demonstrate a high degree of interspecific variation among felids in fundamental sperm function, and they provide evidence for the necessity of basic research when

  18. Effect of pH changes on water release values in hydrophobic interaction chromatographic systems.

    PubMed

    Xia, Fang; Nagrath, Deepak; Cramer, Steven M

    2005-06-24

    The effect on pH on protein binding in HIC systems was investigated. Isocratic experiments were carried out to determine the capacity factors of various proteins as a function of temperature, pH and salt type. This paper presents a framework based on the Maxwell linkage function for estimating the number of released water molecules during the adsorption/desorption process due to a change of buffer pH. This approach also enables one to predict the effect of pH change on the water released values upon binding at any temperature condition. The results indicate that the total number of released water molecules (delta nu) for a pH change increased more on aromatic surfaces (phenyl Sepharose) than on aliphatic resins (butyl Sepharose). The results also indicate that the total number of released water molecules (deltanu) for a pH change increased with salt concentration and when changing from chaotropic to kosmotropic salts. The (deltanu) values also increased as the buffer pH approached the protein's pI, and decreased away from its pI. This work helps to establish a framework for the investigation of pH effects on protein selectivity in HIC systems.

  19. Macrophyte and pH buffering updates to the Klamath River water-quality model upstream of Keno Dam, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, Annett B.; Rounds, Stewart A.; Asbill-Case, Jessica R.; Deas, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    A hydrodynamic, water temperature, and water-quality model of the Link River to Keno Dam reach of the upper Klamath River was updated to account for macrophytes and enhanced pH buffering from dissolved organic matter, ammonia, and orthophosphorus. Macrophytes had been observed in this reach by field personnel, so macrophyte field data were collected in summer and fall (June-October) 2011 to provide a dataset to guide the inclusion of macrophytes in the model. Three types of macrophytes were most common: pondweed (Potamogeton species), coontail (Ceratophyllum demersum), and common waterweed (Elodea canadensis). Pondweed was found throughout the Link River to Keno Dam reach in early summer with densities declining by mid-summer and fall. Coontail and common waterweed were more common in the lower reach near Keno Dam and were at highest density in summer. All species were most dense in shallow water (less than 2 meters deep) near shore. The highest estimated dry weight biomass for any sample during the study was 202 grams per square meter for coontail in August. Guided by field results, three macrophyte groups were incorporated into the CE-QUAL-W2 model for calendar years 2006-09. The CE-QUAL-W2 model code was adjusted to allow the user to initialize macrophyte populations spatially across the model grid. The default CE-QUAL-W2 model includes pH buffering by carbonates, but does not include pH buffering by organic matter, ammonia, or orthophosphorus. These three constituents, especially dissolved organic matter, are present in the upper Klamath River at concentrations that provide substantial pH buffering capacity. In this study, CE-QUAL-W2 was updated to include this enhanced buffering capacity in the simulation of pH. Acid dissociation constants for ammonium and phosphoric acid were taken from the literature. For dissolved organic matter, the number of organic acid groups and each group's acid dissociation constant (Ka) and site density (moles of sites per mole of

  20. Critical anomalies of alkaline fading of phenolphthalein in the critical solution of 2-butoxyethanol + water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Zhongyu; Yin, Handi; Hao, Zhiguo; Zheng, Peizhu; Shen, Weiguo

    2013-12-01

    We have used three-wavelength UV-spectrophotometry to study the reaction of the alkaline fading of phenolphthalein in the critical solution of 2-butoxyethanol + water. It was found that when the temperature was far away from the critical point, the values of the natural logarithm of the rate constant k and the natural logarithm of the chemical equilibrium K determined in our experiments had good linear relationships with the reciprocal of temperature, which served as the backgrounds and were used for correcting k and K in the critical region. The critical slowing down of the reaction and the critical anomaly of the chemical equilibrium were detected near the critical point. The value of the critical exponent characterizing the slowing down effect of the reaction rate was obtained to be 0.156, which was close to the value 0.11 associated with the heat capacity divergence and agreed with the theoretical prediction. The experimental result also confirmed the theoretical prediction of 0.11 for the critical exponent characterizing the weak divergence of the singularity of the chemical equilibrium.

  1. Cobalt phosphide based nanostructures as bifunctional electrocatalysts for low temperature alkaline water splitting

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, Timothy N.; Vigil, Julian A.; Christensen, Ben

    2016-08-22

    Cobalt phosphide based thin films and nanoparticles were prepared by the thermal phosphidation of spinel Co3O4 precursor films and nanoparticles, respectively. CoP films were prepared with overall retention of the Co3O4 nanoplatelet morphology while the spherical/cubic Co3O4 and Ni0.15Co2.85O4 nanoparticles were converted to nanorods or nanoparticles, respectively. The inclusion of nickel in the nanoparticles resulted in a 2.5 fold higher surface area leading to higher gravimetric performance. In each case high surface area structures were obtained with CoP as the primary phase. All materials were found to act as effective bifunctional electrocatalysts for both the HER and the OER and compared well to commercial precious metal benchmark materials in alkaline electrolyte. As a result, a symmetrical water electrolysis cell prepared from the CoP-based film operated at a low overpotential of 0.41-0.51 V.

  2. Cobalt phosphide based nanostructures as bifunctional electrocatalysts for low temperature alkaline water splitting

    DOE PAGES

    Lambert, Timothy N.; Vigil, Julian A.; Christensen, Ben

    2016-08-22

    Cobalt phosphide based thin films and nanoparticles were prepared by the thermal phosphidation of spinel Co3O4 precursor films and nanoparticles, respectively. CoP films were prepared with overall retention of the Co3O4 nanoplatelet morphology while the spherical/cubic Co3O4 and Ni0.15Co2.85O4 nanoparticles were converted to nanorods or nanoparticles, respectively. The inclusion of nickel in the nanoparticles resulted in a 2.5 fold higher surface area leading to higher gravimetric performance. In each case high surface area structures were obtained with CoP as the primary phase. All materials were found to act as effective bifunctional electrocatalysts for both the HER and the OER andmore » compared well to commercial precious metal benchmark materials in alkaline electrolyte. As a result, a symmetrical water electrolysis cell prepared from the CoP-based film operated at a low overpotential of 0.41-0.51 V.« less

  3. Thermo and pH dual-responsive materials for controllable oil/water separation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yingze; Liu, Na; Fu, Changkui; Li, Kan; Tao, Lei; Feng, Lin; Wei, Yen

    2014-02-12

    Thermo and pH dual-controllable oil/water separation materials are successfully fabricated by photo initiated free radical polymerization of dimethylamino ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA). The PDMAEMA hydrogel coated mesh shows superhydrophilicity and underwater superoleophobicity at certain temperature and pH. Due to the double responsiveness of PDMAEMA hydrogel, the as-prepared mesh can selectively separate water from oil/water mixtures and make water and oil permeate through the mesh orderly and be collected separately by adjusting the temperature or pH. Water can pass through the as-prepared mesh under 55 °C (pH 7) and pH less than 13 (T = 25 °C) while oil is kept on the mesh. When the temperature is above 55 °C or pH is larger than 13, the water retention capacity of PDMAEMA hydrogel is significantly reduced and the swelling volume is decreased. Therefore, oil can permeate through the mesh and be collected in situ. Additionally, this material has excellent potential to be used in practical applications and has created a new field for water/oil separation in which the process can be diversified and more intelligent.

  4. Fine-particle water and pH in the southeastern United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    Particle water and pH are predicted using meteorological observations (relative humidity (RH), temperature (T)), gas/particle composition, and thermodynamic modeling (ISORROPIA-II). A comprehensive uncertainty analysis is included, and the model is validated. We investigate mass ...

  5. Fine-particle water and pH in the southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, H.; Xu, L.; Bougiatioti, A.; Cerully, K. M.; Capps, S. L.; Hite, J. R., Jr.; Carlton, A. G.; Lee, S.-H.; Bergin, M. H.; Ng, N. L.; Nenes, A.; Weber, R. J.

    2015-05-01

    Particle water and pH are predicted using meteorological observations (relative humidity (RH), temperature (T)), gas/particle composition, and thermodynamic modeling (ISORROPIA-II). A comprehensive uncertainty analysis is included, and the model is validated. We investigate mass concentrations of particle water and related particle pH for ambient fine-mode aerosols sampled in a relatively remote Alabama forest during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) in summer and at various sites in the southeastern US during different seasons, as part of the Southeastern Center for Air Pollution and Epidemiology (SCAPE) study. Particle water and pH are closely linked; pH is a measure of the particle H+ aqueous concentration and depends on both the presence of ions and amount of particle liquid water. Levels of particle water, in turn, are determined through water uptake by both the ionic species and organic compounds. Thermodynamic calculations based on measured ion concentrations can predict both pH and liquid water but may be biased since contributions of organic species to liquid water are not considered. In this study, contributions of both the inorganic and organic fractions to aerosol liquid water were considered, and predictions were in good agreement with measured liquid water based on differences in ambient and dry light scattering coefficients (prediction vs. measurement: slope = 0.91, intercept = 0.5 μg m-3, R2 = 0.75). ISORROPIA-II predictions were confirmed by good agreement between predicted and measured ammonia concentrations (slope = 1.07, intercept = -0.12 μg m-3, R2 = 0.76). Based on this study, organic species on average contributed 35% to the total water, with a substantially higher contribution (50%) at night. However, not including contributions of organic water had a minor effect on pH (changes pH by 0.15 to 0.23 units), suggesting that predicted pH without consideration of organic water could be sufficient for the purposes of aqueous

  6. Environmentally Asisted Cracking Behavior of Nickel Alloys in Simulated Acidic and Alkaline Ground Waters Using U-bend Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, D V; Estill, J C; Hust, G A; Wong, L L; Rebak, R B

    2003-10-17

    The model for the degradation of the containers for nuclear waste includes three modes of corrosion, namely general corrosion, localized corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). The objective of the current research was to quantify the susceptibility of five nickel alloys to EAC in several environmental conditions with varying solution composition, temperature and electrochemical potential. These alloys included: Alloy 22 (N06022), Alloy C-4 (N06455), Alloy 625 (N06625), Alloy G-3 (N06985) and Alloy 825 (N08825). The susceptibility to EAC was evaluated using constant deformation (deflection) U-bend specimens in both the non-welded (wrought) and welded conditions. Results show that after more than five years exposure in the vapor and liquid phases of alkaline (pH {approx} 10) and acidic (pH {approx} 3) multi-ionic environments at 60 C and 90 C, none of the tested alloys suffered environmentally assisted cracking.

  7. Particle water and pH in the southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, H.; Xu, L.; Bougiatioti, A.; Cerully, K. M.; Capps, S. L.; Hite, J. R.; Carlton, A. G.; Lee, S.-H.; Bergin, M. H.; Ng, N. L.; Nenes, A.; Weber, R. J.

    2014-10-01

    Particle water and pH are predicted using thermodynamic modeling (with ISORROPIA-II), meteorological observations (RH, T), and gas/particle composition. A comprehensive uncertainty analysis is included and the model validated with ammonia partitioning. The method is applied to predict mass concentrations of particle water and related particle pH for ambient fine mode aerosols sampled in a relatively remote Alabama forest during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) in summer, and at various sites in the southeastern US, during different seasons, as part of the Southeastern Center for Air Pollution and Epidemiology (SCAPE) study. Particle water and pH are closely linked; pH is a measure of the particle H+ aqueous concentration, and so depends on both the presence of ions and amount of particle liquid water. Levels of particle water, in-turn, are determined through water uptake by both the ionic species and organic compounds. Particle ion balances, often used to infer pH, do not consider either the dissociation state of individual ions, nor particle liquid water levels and so do not necessarily correlate with particle pH. Thermodynamic calculations based on measured ion concentrations can predict both pH and liquid water, but do not consider contributions of organic species to liquid water and so may also be biased. In this study, contributions of both inorganic and organic fractions to aerosol liquid water were considered and predictions were in good agreement with measured liquid water based on differences in ambient and dry light scattering coefficients (prediction vs. measurement: slope = 0.91, intercept = 0.45 μg m-3, R = 0.87). ISORROPIA-II predictions were evaluated by reproducing the observed gas-particle partitioning of NH3. Based on this study, organic species on average contributed 35% to the total water, with a substantially higher contribution (63%) at night. The mean pH predicted in the Alabama forest (SOAS) was 0.94 ± 0.59 (median 0.93). Not

  8. Dependence of coastal water pH increases on submarine groundwater discharge off a volcanic island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Junghyun; Kim, Guebuem

    2015-09-01

    During the past few decades, excessive input of nutrients and organic matter, in addition to global ocean acidification, has resulted in significant changes in the water pH of coastal ocean. In this study, we investigated the effect of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) on pH variations in the coastal waters of Hwasun Bay off the volcanic island of Jeju, Korea, which is situated in the oligotrophic open ocean. In this region, salinities of all coastal waters depend primarily on SGD because of the lack of any contributions from the river or stream waters. We observed a significant increase in pH along the lower-salinity plume zone, extending 0.5 km horizontally from the bottom to the surface (< 15 m water depth). The observed data for the entire bay-water column showed a significant negative correlation (r2 = 0.82) between salinity and pH. A simple two-endmember (submarine groundwater and offshore seawater) mixing model showed that this pH increase was caused by an enhanced biological production, which resulted from the SGD-driven nutrient inputs, rather than from groundwater dilution itself. Since a number of local and regional studies showed that SGD-driven fluxes of nutrients are comparable to or higher than their riverine fluxes, our results from an SGD-dominated environment suggest that SGD may have a significant influence on the coastal biogeochemical changes such as acidification, deoxygenation, and eutrophication.

  9. The effect of alkaline earth metal ion dopants on photocatalytic water splitting by NaTaO(3) powder.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Akihide; Kato, Hideki; Kudo, Akihiko

    2009-01-01

    Alkaline earth metal ions (Ca, Sr, and Ba) are doped into a NaTaO(3) photocatalyst, yielding fine particles and surface structures with nanometer-scale "steps." The formation of the surface nanostep structure depends on the amount of doped Sr and Ba. The photocatalytic water splitting over NaTaO(3) is enhanced: NaTaO(3) doped with 0.5 and 1.0 mol % of Sr shows high activities for photocatalytic water splitting without loading of a co-catalyst, and the photocatalytic activity is further improved by loading with a NiO co-catalyst.

  10. Mechanism of oxygen reduction reaction on Pt(111) in alkaline solution: Importance of chemisorbed water on surface

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Shizhong; White, Michael G.; Liu, Ping

    2016-06-30

    Here, we report a detailed mechanistic study of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on Pt(111) in alkaline solution, combining density functional theory and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. A complex reaction network including four possible pathways via either 2e– or 4e– transfer is established and is able to reproduce the experimental measured polarization curve at both low- and high-potential regions. Our results show that it is essential to account for solvation by water and the dynamic coverage of *OH to describe the reaction kinetics well. In addition, a chemisorbed water (*H2O)-mediated mechanism including 4e– transfers is identified, where the reduction stepsmore » via *H2O on the surface are potential-independent and only the final removal of *OH from the surface in the form of OH–(aq) contributes to the current. For the ORR in alkaline solutions, such a mechanism is more competitive than the associative and dissociative mechanisms typically used to describe the ORR in acid solution. Finally, *OH and **O2 intermediates are found to be critically important for tuning the ORR activity of Pt in alkaline solution. To enhance the activity, the binding of Pt should be tuned in such a way that *OH binding is weak enough to release more surface sites under working conditions, while **O2 binding is strong enough to enable the ORR via the 4e– transfer mechanism.« less

  11. Optical pH measurements with water dispersion of polyaniline nanoparticles and their redox sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Lindfors, Tom; Harju, Leo; Ivaska, Ari

    2006-05-01

    A new method for optical pH and redox measurements with a commercially available water dispersion of polyaniline (PANI) nanoparticles (mean particle size, 46 nm) is presented. The pH measurements are based on the acid-base equilibrium of PANI and were carried out either by combining both the automated sequential injection analysis (SIA) and UV-visible spectrophotometric techniques or with a fiber-optic light guide. In the former case, the detection was done in continuous mode at lambda = 800 nm by using the SIA technique for transporting the sample to a flow-through cell, which was placed in the light path of the photometer. With the fiber-optic light guide, the detection was done in batch mode at lambda = 400 and 580 nm. In both methods, fresh pH reagent (PANI) solution was used in each measurement, thus overcoming the problem with hysteresis (memory effect), which is usually observed with PANI films. The PANI nanoparticles were characterized with UV-visible spectroscopy in pH buffer solutions between pH 2-12 and a protonation constant of logK(0.5H,L)(H(0.5)L) = 4.4 was calculated from these data. Fast pH measurements can be done between pH 6 and 10.5 depending on the measuring technique. It is possible to determine pH with an accuracy of 0.1 pH unit between pH 8 and 10.5 (RSD, 0.5-2%). Redox transitions typical for PANI films were also observed for water solutions of PANI nanoparticles in the presence of the hexacyanoferrate(II/III) and the iron(II/III) oxalate redox couples. The absorbance at lambda = 875 nm is linearly dependent on the logarithm of the concentration ratio (0.1-10) of the iron oxalate redox couple.

  12. Water soluble drug releasing soft contact lens in response to pH of tears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, G.; Noh, H.

    2016-06-01

    Human tear characteristics including pH and compositions can vary significantly depending on physical and environmental factors. Contact lenses directly contact with human tears can be swelled or de-swelled depending on the pH of the solution due to the nature of the hydrogel. For examples, anionic hydrogels, when the solution's pH is low, is shrunken due to the electric attraction force within the hydrogel network; the opposite phenomenon appears when the solution is basic. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extent of water soluble drug, hydroxyl propyl methyl cellulose, released from contact lens according to the pH of the artificial tears. Artificial tears are prepared by mixing lysozyme, albumin, sodium chloride, potassium chloride, and calcium chloride following physiological concentrations. Hydrogel contact lens was thermally polymerized using HEMA, EGDMA, and AIBN. The prepared hydrogel lens was immersed in drug for 3 hours and the eluted drug mass was measured as a function of the time. As a result, the drug was released from the lens for 12 hours in all the pH of artificial tears. At the lower pH of artificial tears (pH 5.8), the total amount of dye emitted from the lens was increased than the total amount of dye emitted at the basic tear (pH 8.4). Also, initial burst at acidic tears was increased within 1 hour. Release pattern of water-soluble drug from hydrogel lens turned out to be different depending on the pH of the artificial tears. When designing drug releasing contact lens, physiological pH of tears should be considered.

  13. In situ Measurement of Pore-Water pH in Anoxic Sediments Using Laser Raman Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltzer, E. T.; Luna, M.; Walz, P. M.; Zhang, X.; Brewer, P. G.

    2010-12-01

    Accurate measurement of the geochemical properties of sediment pore waters is of fundamental importance in ocean geochemistry and microbiology. Recent work has shown that the properties of pore waters can be measured rapidly in situ with a novel Raman based insertion probe (Zhang et al., 2010), and that data obtained from anoxic sediments on in situ dissolved methane concentrations are very different (~30x) than from recovered cores due the large scale degassing that occurs during core recovery (Zhang et al., submitted). Degassing of methane must carry with it via Henry’s Law partioning significant quantities of H2S, which is clearly detectable by smell during sample processing, and thus in situ measurement of H2S is also highly desirable. In practice, dissolved H2S is partitioned between the HS- and H2S species as a function of pH with pKa ~7 for the acid dissociation reaction. Since both species are Raman active full determination of the sulfide system is possible if the relative Raman cross sections are known. The diagenetic equations for these reactions are commonly summarized as: 2CH2O + SO4= ↔ 2HCO3- + H2S CH4 + SO4= ↔ HCO3- + HS- + H2O Three of the major components of these equations, CH4, SO4=, and H2S/HS-, are all observable directly by Raman spectroscopy; but the detection of HCO3- presents a challenge due to its low Raman cross section and thus poor sensitivity. We show that pore water pH, which is a good estimator of HCO3- if total CO2 or alkalinity are known, can be measured by observing the H2S / HS- ratio via the equation: pH = pKa + log([HS-]/[H2S]) thereby fully constraining these equations within a single measurement protocol. The Raman peak for HS- is at 2573 cm-1 and for H2S is at 2592 cm-1; thus the peaks are well separated and may easily be deconvoluted from the observed spectrum. We have determined the relative Raman cross sections by a series of laboratory measurements over a range of pH and by using the definition that when pH = p

  14. [Effects of temperature and pH on the distribution of aluminum species in drinking water].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-dong; Yang, Hong-wei; Jiang, Jing; Zhu, Wan-peng; Jiang, Zhan-peng

    2009-08-15

    The effects of aluminum on water distribution system and human health are mainly attributable to their presence in drinking water. Laboratory experiments were performed to investigate the influence of temperature and pH on the distribution of aluminum species applying alum synthetic water. Aluminum species studied in the experiments included monomeric aluminum, soluble aluminum, suspended aluminum, and polymeric aluminum, which were determined by fluorescence spectrophotometry method. Results indicated that suspended aluminum was the major species at pH 6.5, occupied about 62.2% in the total aluminum mass concentration. While at pH above 7.0, monomeric aluminum was the major species; and varied little as reaction time increased. Polymeric aluminum mass concentration was low at studied water quality condition and also varied little as reaction time increased. The influence of temperature on aluminum species distribution was similar to solution pH; and both could be explained by pOH. Aluminum species in drinking water could be controlled by adjusting the pOH value, which provided theoretical guidance for the operation of the water distribution system and aluminum toxicity control.

  15. Effect of pH on Rheological Properties of Dysphagia-Oriented Thickened Water.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Seung-No; Yoo, Byoungseung

    2016-03-01

    Flow and dynamic rheological properties of thickened waters prepared with commercial food thickeners were investigated at different pH levels (3, 4, 5, 6, and 7). The commercial xanthan gum (XG)-based thickener (thickener A) and starch-based thickener (thickener B), which have been commonly used in a domestic hospital and nursing home for patients with swallowing difficulty (dysphagia) in Korea, were selected in this study. Thickened samples with both thickeners at different pH levels showed high shear-thinning flow behaviors (n=0.08~0.22). Thickened samples at pH 3 showed higher n values and lower consistency index (K) values when compared to those at other pH levels. The K values of thickener A increased with an increase in pH level, while the n values decreased, showing that the flow properties greatly depended on pH. There were no noticeable changes in the K values of thickener B between pH 4 and 7. At pH 3, the thickened water with thickener A showed a higher storage modulus (G') value, while that with thickener B showed a lower G'. These rheological parameters exhibited differences in rheological behaviors between XG-based and starch-based thickeners, indicating that the rheological properties of thickened waters appear to be greatly influenced by the acidic condition and the type of food thickener. Appropriately selecting a commercial food thickener seems to be greatly important for the preparation of thickened acidic fluids with desirable rheological properties for safe swallowing.

  16. Effect of pH on Rheological Properties of Dysphagia-Oriented Thickened Water

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Seung-No; Yoo, Byoungseung

    2016-01-01

    Flow and dynamic rheological properties of thickened waters prepared with commercial food thickeners were investigated at different pH levels (3, 4, 5, 6, and 7). The commercial xanthan gum (XG)-based thickener (thickener A) and starch-based thickener (thickener B), which have been commonly used in a domestic hospital and nursing home for patients with swallowing difficulty (dysphagia) in Korea, were selected in this study. Thickened samples with both thickeners at different pH levels showed high shear-thinning flow behaviors (n=0.08~0.22). Thickened samples at pH 3 showed higher n values and lower consistency index (K) values when compared to those at other pH levels. The K values of thickener A increased with an increase in pH level, while the n values decreased, showing that the flow properties greatly depended on pH. There were no noticeable changes in the K values of thickener B between pH 4 and 7. At pH 3, the thickened water with thickener A showed a higher storage modulus (G′) value, while that with thickener B showed a lower G′. These rheological parameters exhibited differences in rheological behaviors between XG-based and starch-based thickeners, indicating that the rheological properties of thickened waters appear to be greatly influenced by the acidic condition and the type of food thickener. Appropriately selecting a commercial food thickener seems to be greatly important for the preparation of thickened acidic fluids with desirable rheological properties for safe swallowing. PMID:27069910

  17. Buffering the aqueous phase pH in water-in-CO{sub 2} microemulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, J.D.; Ziegler, K.J.; Audriani, M.; Lee, C.T. Jr.; Bhargava, P.A.; Johnston, K.P.; Steytler, D.C.

    1999-07-08

    Water-in-oil (w/o) microemulsions have been exploited for use in a wide range of applications, including chemical and enzymatic reactions, protein and metal extraction, and the production of nanoparticles. Microemulsions are attractive systems for studying such applications because they have the ability to function as a universal solvent medium by solubilizing high concentrations of both polar and apolar molecules within their dispersed aqueous and continuous oil phases, respectively. The addition of organic and inorganic buffers to nanometer size water-in-CO{sub 2} microemulsion droplets stabilized by ammonium perfluoropolyether (PFPE-NH{sub 4}) results in an increase in pH from 3 to values of 5--7. The effects of temperature, pressure, buffer type, buffer concentration, ionic strength, and CO{sub 2} solubility on the pH inside water-in-CO{sub 2} microemulsions and on biphasic water-CO{sub 2} systems were measured by the hydrophilic indicator 4-nitrophenyl-2-sulfonate and were predicted accurately with thermodynamic models. In both systems, modest buffer loadings result in a steep pH jump from 2.5 pH units. Further increases in pH require large amounts of base to overcome buffering due to the carbonic acid-bicarbonate equilibrium. A pH approaching neutrality was obtained in w/c microemulsions with approximately 1.5 mol kg{sup {minus}1} NaOH. At high buffer loadings, the effects of temperature and pressure on pH values are negligible.

  18. Nanofiltration of Mine Water: Impact of Feed pH and Membrane Charge on Resource Recovery and Water Discharge

    PubMed Central

    Mullett, Mark; Fornarelli, Roberta; Ralph, David

    2014-01-01

    Two nanofiltration membranes, a Dow NF 270 polyamide thin film and a TriSep TS 80 polyamide thin film, were investigated for their retention of ionic species when filtering mine influenced water streams at a range of acidic pH values. The functional iso-electric point of the membranes, characterized by changes in retention over a small pH range, were examined by filtering solutions of sodium sulphate. Both membranes showed changes in retention at pH 3, suggesting a zero net charge on the membranes at this pH. Copper mine drainage and synthetic solutions of mine influenced water were filtered using the same membranes. These solutions were characterized by pH values within 2 and 5, thus crossing the iso-electric point of both membranes. Retention of cations was maximized when the feed solution pH was less than the iso-electric point of the membrane. In these conditions, the membrane has a net positive charge, reducing the transmission rate of cations. From the recoveries of a range of cations, the suitability of nanofiltration was discussed relative to the compliance with mine water discharge criteria and the recovery of valuable commodity metals. The nanofiltration process was demonstrated to offer advantages in metal recovery from mine waste streams, concomitantly enabling discharge criteria for the filtrate disposal to be met. PMID:24957170

  19. Nanofiltration of Mine Water: Impact of Feed pH and Membrane Charge on Resource Recovery and Water Discharge.

    PubMed

    Mullett, Mark; Fornarelli, Roberta; Ralph, David

    2014-03-27

    Two nanofiltration membranes, a Dow NF 270 polyamide thin film and a TriSep TS 80 polyamide thin film, were investigated for their retention of ionic species when filtering mine influenced water streams at a range of acidic pH values. The functional iso-electric point of the membranes, characterized by changes in retention over a small pH range, were examined by filtering solutions of sodium sulphate. Both membranes showed changes in retention at pH 3, suggesting a zero net charge on the membranes at this pH. Copper mine drainage and synthetic solutions of mine influenced water were filtered using the same membranes. These solutions were characterized by pH values within 2 and 5, thus crossing the iso-electric point of both membranes. Retention of cations was maximized when the feed solution pH was less than the iso-electric point of the membrane. In these conditions, the membrane has a net positive charge, reducing the transmission rate of cations. From the recoveries of a range of cations, the suitability of nanofiltration was discussed relative to the compliance with mine water discharge criteria and the recovery of valuable commodity metals. The nanofiltration process was demonstrated to offer advantages in metal recovery from mine waste streams, concomitantly enabling discharge criteria for the filtrate disposal to be met.

  20. Molybdenum Carbide-Embedded Nitrogen-Doped Porous Carbon Nanosheets as Electrocatalysts for Water Splitting in Alkaline Media.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chenbao; Tranca, Diana; Zhang, Jian; Rodrı Guez Hernández, Fermı N; Su, Yuezeng; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Fan; Seifert, Gotthard; Feng, Xinliang

    2017-03-20

    Molybdenum carbide (Mo2C) based catalysts were found to be one of the most promising electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in acid media in comparison with Pt-based catalysts but were seldom investigated in alkaline media, probably due to the limited active sites, poor conductivity, and high energy barrier for water dissociation. In this work, Mo2C-embedded nitrogen-doped porous carbon nanosheets (Mo2C@2D-NPCs) were successfully achieved with the help of a convenient interfacial strategy. As a HER electrocatalyst in alkaline solution, Mo2C@2D-NPC exhibited an extremely low onset potential of ∼0 mV and a current density of 10 mA cm(-2) at an overpotential of ∼45 mV, which is much lower than the values of most reported HER electrocatalysts and comparable to the noble metal catalyst Pt. In addition, the Tafel slope and the exchange current density of Mo2C@2D-NPC were 46 mV decade(-1) and 1.14 × 10(-3) A cm(-2), respectively, outperforming the state-of-the-art metal-carbide-based electrocatalysts in alkaline media. Such excellent HER activity was attributed to the rich Mo2C/NPC heterostructures and synergistic contribution of nitrogen doping, outstanding conductivity of graphene, and abundant active sites at the heterostructures.

  1. Deletions of endocytic components VPS28 and VPS32 affect growth at alkaline pH and virulence through both RIM101-dependent and RIM101-independent pathways in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Cornet, Muriel; Bidard, Frédérique; Schwarz, Patrick; Da Costa, Grégory; Blanchin-Roland, Sylvie; Dromer, Françoise; Gaillardin, Claude

    2005-12-01

    Ambient pH signaling involves a cascade of conserved Rim or Pal products in ascomycetous yeasts or filamentous fungi, respectively. Recent evidences in the fungi Aspergillus nidulans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Yarrowia lipolytica, and Candida albicans suggested that components of endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) involved in endocytic trafficking were needed for signal transduction along the Rim pathway. In this study, we confirm these findings with C. albicans and show that Vps28p (ESCRT-I) and Vps32p/Snf7p (ESCRT-III) are required for the transcriptional regulation of known targets of the Rim pathway, such as the PHR1 and PHR2 genes encoding cell surface proteins, which are expressed at alkaline and acidic pH, respectively. We additionally show that deletion of these two VPS genes, particularly VPS32, has a more drastic effect than a RIM101 deletion on growth at alkaline pH and that this effect is only partially suppressed by expression of a constitutively active form of Rim101p. Finally, in an in vivo mouse model, both vps null mutants were significantly less virulent than a rim101 mutant, suggesting that VPS28 and VPS32 gene products affect virulence both through Rim-dependent and Rim-independent pathways.

  2. Speciation of dissolved silicates in natural waters containing alkaline and alkaline-earth ions. A case study--waters from arid lands (North West China).

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Miho; Takahashi, Kazuya; Sahoo, Yu Vin

    2004-02-01

    The concentration of silica in water samples from the desert area of Xinjiang, N. W. China, has been measured by colorimetry with ammonium molybdate. The observed pattern of dependence of the concentration of silica on the concentration of sodium ion (Na(+)) in the water samples is consistent with the pattern obtained by experiments on in-vitro dissolution of silica gel in sodium chloride (NaCl) solution. This indicates that the dissolution of silica in the hydrologic system in this area depends on the concentration of Na(+). Calcium ion (Ca(2+)), which is known to play an important role on the dissolution of silica on the basis of in-vitro experiments, was observed to take little part in the dissolution of silica in actual natural water samples. This implies that the Ca(2+) is bound to the hydrogen carbonate anion or that the Ca(2+) content of natural water containing salts is very low, owing to precipitation. In these samples silicate-Na(+) was identified as the dissolution species of silica; it was also ascertained that Ca(2+) did not form complexes with silicate species. These observations resulted from direct identification of dissolved chemical species by use of FAB-MS (fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry). The research indicates that in water samples in this critically arid region the concentration of "dissolved" silica is basically determined by the concentration of Na(+), indicative of pure inorganic conditions in the desert area of Xinjiang, N.W. China.

  3. pH buffers for sea water media based on the total hydrogen ion concentration scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Andrew G.

    1993-01-01

    Published e.m.f. values measured using the cell ? where p° = 101.325 kPa, and BH + and B are the conjugate acid-base pairs of 2-aminopyridine, 2-amino-2-hydroxymethyl-1,3-propanediol (tris), tetrahydro-1,4-isoxazine (morpholine), and 2-amino-2-methyl-1, 3-propanediol (bis), have been re-evaluated to assign pH values based on the "total" hydrogen ion concentration scale to equimolal ( m =0.04 mol kg -1) buffer solutions based on these compounds. These pH values are consistent with the best available equilibrium constants for acid-base processes in sea water and such pH buffers can be used as pH calibration standards to measure accurate values for oceanic pH on the "total" hydrogen ion pH scale. In addition, the published e.m.f. results for these various amine bases have been used to calculate their respective acidity constants on this pH scale.

  4. Facile synthesis of water-soluble carbon nano-onions under alkaline conditions.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Gaber Hashem Gaber; Laíño, Rosana Badía; Calzón, Josefa Angela García; García, Marta Elena Díaz

    2016-01-01

    Carbonization of tomatoes at 240 °C using 30% (w/v) NaOH as catalyst produced carbon onions (C-onions), while solely carbon dots (C-dots) were obtained at the same temperature in the absence of the catalyst. Other natural materials, such as carrots and tree leaves (acer saccharum), under the same temperature and alkaline conditions did not produce carbon onions. XRD, FTIR, HRTEM, UV-vis spectroscopy, and photoluminescence analyses were performed to characterize the as-synthesized carbon nanomaterials. Preliminary tests demonstrate a capability of the versatile materials for chemical sensing of metal ions. The high content of lycopene in tomatoes may explain the formation of C-onions in alkaline media and a possible formation mechanism for such structures was outlined.

  5. Facile synthesis of water-soluble carbon nano-onions under alkaline conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Gaber Hashem Gaber; Laíño, Rosana Badía; Calzón, Josefa Angela García

    2016-01-01

    Summary Carbonization of tomatoes at 240 °C using 30% (w/v) NaOH as catalyst produced carbon onions (C-onions), while solely carbon dots (C-dots) were obtained at the same temperature in the absence of the catalyst. Other natural materials, such as carrots and tree leaves (acer saccharum), under the same temperature and alkaline conditions did not produce carbon onions. XRD, FTIR, HRTEM, UV–vis spectroscopy, and photoluminescence analyses were performed to characterize the as-synthesized carbon nanomaterials. Preliminary tests demonstrate a capability of the versatile materials for chemical sensing of metal ions. The high content of lycopene in tomatoes may explain the formation of C-onions in alkaline media and a possible formation mechanism for such structures was outlined. PMID:27335764

  6. Effect of pH and KCl concentration on the octanol-water distribution of methylanilines

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.A.; Westall, J.C. )

    1990-12-01

    The distributions of aniline, 4-methylaniline, 3,4-dimethylaniline, and 2,4,5-trimethylaniline between octanol and water were determined as a function of pH and KCl concentration in the aqueous phase. The data were interpreted in terms of a multicomponent equilibrium model with anilinium in the water-saturated octanol as free ions and ion pairs. The implications of these results to the use of the octanol-water reference system for organic bases and to the sorbent-water distribution of organic bases in the environment is discussed.

  7. Use of solid phase extraction for the sequential injection determination of alkaline phosphatase activity in dynamic water systems.

    PubMed

    Santos, Inês C; Mesquita, Raquel B R; Bordalo, Adriano A; Rangel, António O S S

    2012-08-30

    In this work, a solid phase extraction sequential injection methodology for the determination of alkaline phosphatase activity in dynamic water systems was developed. The determination of the enzymatic activity was based on the spectrophotometric detection of a coloured product, p-nitrophenol, at 405 nm. The p-nitrophenol is the product of the catalytic decomposition of p-nitrophenyl phosphate, a non-coloured substrate. Considering the low levels expected in natural waters and exploiting the fact of alkaline phosphatase being a metalloprotein, the enzyme was pre-concentrated in-line using a NTA Superflow resin charged with Zn(2+) ions. The developed sequential injection method enabled a quantification range of 0.044-0.441 unit mL(-1) of enzyme activity with a detection limit of 0.0082 unit mL(-1) enzyme activity (1.9 μmol L(-1) of pNP) and a determination rate of 17 h(-1). Recovery tests confirmed the accuracy of the developed sequential injection method and it was effectively applied to different natural waters and to plant root extracts.

  8. Impact of pH and DIC on Lead Mineralology and Solubility in Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to remain compliant with the U.S. EPA’s Lead and Copper rule, it is pivotal to understand the relationship between factors affecting lead release in drinking water distribution systems. Lead solids were synthesized in cell experiments using a pH range of 6-11 with both...

  9. Relationship Between Redox Potential, Disinfectant, and pH in Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    This work will examine the effects of pH and oxidant type (chlorine [Cl2], oxygen [O2], hydrogen peroxide [H2O2], monochloramine [MCA], and potassium permanganate [KMnO4]) and concentration (mg/L) on the redox potential of buffered test water. Also, the effects of incrementing ir...

  10. A Framework for Developing pH Guidance for Drinking Water Treatment and Distribution - abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    Worldwide, many agencies have historically limited the range of pH values of distributed water between 6.5 and 8.5. Although this range is not a regulatory limit, many jurisdictions have used it as one. In some cases, the range has been a barrier to optimizing distribution syste...

  11. A Framework for Developing pH Guidance for Drinking Water Treatment and Distribution

    EPA Science Inventory

    Worldwide, many agencies have historically limited the range of pH values of distributed water between 6.5 and 8.5. Although this range is not a regulatory limit, many jurisdictions have used it as one. In some cases, the range has been a barrier to optimizing distribution syste...

  12. Effects of pH and magnetic material on immunomagnetic separation of Cryptosporidium oocysts from concentrated water samples.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Ryan C; Rock, Channah M; Oshima, Kevin H

    2002-04-01

    In this study, we examined the effect that magnetic materials and pH have on the recoveries of Cryptosporidium oocysts by immunomagnetic separation (IMS). We determined that particles that were concentrated on a magnet during bead separation have no influence on oocyst recovery; however, removal of these particles did influence pH values. The optimal pH of the IMS was determined to be 7.0. The numbers of oocysts recovered from deionized water at pH 7.0 were 26.3% higher than those recovered from samples that were not at optimal pH. The results indicate that the buffers in the IMS kit did not adequately maintain an optimum pH in some water samples. By adjusting the pH of concentrated environmental water samples to 7.0, recoveries of oocysts increased by 26.4% compared to recoveries from samples where the pH was not adjusted.

  13. Effect of weak acid preservatives on growth of bakery product spoilage fungi at different water activities and pH values.

    PubMed

    Suhr, K I; Nielsen, P V

    2004-08-15

    Inhibition of spoilage organisms from bakery products by weak acid preservatives in concentrations of 0%, 0.003%, 0.03% and 0.3% (w/v) was investigated experimentally on a substrate media with water activity (a(w)) and pH ranging from sourdough-fermented acidic rye bread to alkaline intermediate moisture sponge cake types (a(w) 0.80-0.95, pH 4.7-7.4). Initially, rye bread conditions (a(w) 0.94-0.97 and pH 4.4-4.8) in combination with calcium propionate were investigated. Results showed that the highest concentration of propionate (0.3%) at all conditions apart from high a(w) (0.97) and high pH (4.8) totally inhibited fungal growth for a 2-week period, with the exception of Penicillium roqueforti, Penicillium commune and Eurotium rubrum. Characteristically for the major spoiler of rye bread, P. roqueforti, all three isolates tested were stimulated by propionate and the stimulation was significantly enhanced at high water activity levels. The effect of propionate on production of secondary metabolites (mycophenolic acid, rugulovasine, echinulin, flavoglaucin) was also studied, and variable or isolate dependent results were found. Subsequently, a screening experiment representing a wider range of bakery products was conducted using calcium propionate, potassium sorbate and sodium benzoate. The obtained data was modelled using survival analysis to determine 'spoilage-free time' for the fungi. At the low a(w) level (0.80) only Eurotium species grew within the test period of 30 days. Higher water activity levels as well as higher pH values decreased spoilage-free times of the fungi. The preservative calcium propionate was less effective than potassium sorbate and sodium benzoate.

  14. Continuous bioproduction of short-chain fatty acids from sludge enhanced by the combined use of surfactant and alkaline pH.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yinguang; Liu, Kun; Su, Yinglong; Zheng, Xiong; Wang, Qin

    2013-07-01

    This work reported the enhancement of continuous SCFA production from sludge by the combined use of surfactant (sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS)) and pH 10 (i.e., SDBS & pH 10). The maximal SCFA production (2056 mg COD/L) was achieved under the SDBS & pH 10 condition at a sludge retention time (SRT) of 12d, which was much higher than that of the blank, sole SDBS, or pH 10. The mechanisms investigation showed that the combined strategy had greater sludge solubilization, higher protein hydrolysis, and lower activity of methanogens. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis revealed that the abundance of bacteria was increased, whereas that of archaea was decreased by SDBS & pH 10. The excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy assay further suggested that SBDS caused protein structure change, which benefited protein hydrolysis.

  15. The MCVD synthesis and characterization of water tolerant fiber optic waveguides based on alkaline earth-doped silicas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, Kevin F.

    Optical fibers that transmit throughout the entire telecommunications spectrum (1.2--1.7 mum) are presently manufactured by the removal of hydrogen or OH from the host preform glass. Hydrogen-oxygen torches are utilized in the conventional preform manufacturing process, but result in the formation of hydroxyls in germanium-doped silica fiber. The hydroxyl species generate unacceptably high losses for long haul telecommunications systems. This thesis has explored an alternative strategy for reducing OH-related absorption in silica-based glasses. Alkaline earth modifiers have been introduced via the modified chemical vapor deposition (MCVD) process to successfully damp out and dramatically reduce the extrinsic attenuation associated with both water and hydrogen. Specifically, alkaline earth ions were introduced into alumino-silicate glasses to form MgO-Al2O3-SiO2, CaO-Al 2O3-SiO2, and SrO-Al2O3-SiO 2 compositions. The utilization of halide precursors based on the vapor delivery of rare earths was incorporated into the existing MCVD set-up to fabricate these optical preforms. Both the bulk preforms and fibers drawn from them were characterized to determine relevant optical properties, including the attenuation, index profiles and extinction coefficients arising from OH in each host. The data indicate that modification of the silica glass structure through the additions of modifying ions can significantly reduce OH related absorption. For example, the doping of alkaline earth ions decreased the extinction coefficient measured at the 1.39 mum) OH overtone, to values < 0.2 L/(mol*cm). Prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) measurements conducted at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) found OH concentrations in the glasses in the range from 10 to 27.5 ppm. The alkaline earth-doped fibers exhibited lower OH absorption at 1.39 mum) than germanium and aluminum-doped reference fibers. Fibers doped with either magnesium, calcium or strontium displayed up

  16. Mechanism of oxygen reduction reaction on Pt(111) in alkaline solution: Importance of chemisorbed water on surface

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shizhong; White, Michael G.; Liu, Ping

    2016-06-30

    Here, we report a detailed mechanistic study of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on Pt(111) in alkaline solution, combining density functional theory and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. A complex reaction network including four possible pathways via either 2e or 4e transfer is established and is able to reproduce the experimental measured polarization curve at both low- and high-potential regions. Our results show that it is essential to account for solvation by water and the dynamic coverage of *OH to describe the reaction kinetics well. In addition, a chemisorbed water (*H2O)-mediated mechanism including 4e transfers is identified, where the reduction steps via *H2O on the surface are potential-independent and only the final removal of *OH from the surface in the form of OH(aq) contributes to the current. For the ORR in alkaline solutions, such a mechanism is more competitive than the associative and dissociative mechanisms typically used to describe the ORR in acid solution. Finally, *OH and **O2 intermediates are found to be critically important for tuning the ORR activity of Pt in alkaline solution. To enhance the activity, the binding of Pt should be tuned in such a way that *OH binding is weak enough to release more surface sites under working conditions, while **O2 binding is strong enough to enable the ORR via the 4e transfer mechanism.

  17. Influence of alkalinity, hardness and dissolved solids on drinking water taste: A case study of consumer satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Lou, Jie-Chung; Lee, Wei-Li; Han, Jia-Yun

    2007-01-01

    Two surveys of consumer satisfaction with drinking water conducted by Taiwan Water Supply Corp. are presented in this study. The study results show that although a lot of money was invested to modify traditional treatment processes, over 60% of local residents still avoided drinking tap water. Over half of the respondents felt that sample TT (from the traditional treatment process) was not a good drinking water, whether in the first or second survey, whereas almost 60% of respondents felt that samples PA, PB, CCL and CT (from advanced treatment processes) were good to drink. For all drinking water samples, respondent satisfaction with a sample primarily depended on it having no unpleasant flavors. Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration plans to revise the drinking water quality standards for TH and TDS in the near future. The new standards require a lower TH concentration (from currently 400mg/L (as CaCO(3)) to 150mg/L (as CaCO(3))), and a lower TDS maximum admissible concentration from the current guideline of 600 to 250mg/L. Therefore, this study also evaluated the impacts on drinking water tastes caused by variations in TH and TDS concentrations, and assessed the need to issue more strict drinking water quality standards for TH and TDS. The research results showed that most respondents could not tell the difference in water taste among water samples with different TDS, TH and alkalinity. Furthermore, hardness was found to be inversely associated with cardiovascular diseases and cancers, and complying with more strict standards would lead most water facilities to invest billions of dollars to upgrade their treatment processes. Consequently, in terms of drinking water tastes alone, this study suggested that Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration should conduct more thorough reviews of the scientific literature that provides the rationale for setting standards and reconsider if it is necessary to revise drinking water quality standards for TH and

  18. A submersible autonomous sensor for spectrophotometric pH measurements of natural waters.

    PubMed

    Martz, Todd R; Carr, Jeffrey J; French, Craig R; DeGrandpre, Michael D

    2003-04-15

    An autonomous sensor for long-term in situ measurements of the pH of natural waters is described. The system is based upon spectrophotometric measurements of a mixture of sample and sulfonephthalein indicator. A simple plumbing design, using a small, low-power solenoid pump and valve, avoids the need for quantitative addition of indicator. A approximately 50-microL slug of indicator is pulled into the sample stream by the pump, and subsequent pumping and mixing results in a section of indicator and sample where absorbance measurements can be made. The design also permits direct determination of the indicator pH perturbation. Absorbances are recorded at three wavelengths (439, 579, and 735 nm) using a custom-built 1.7-cm path length fiber-optic flow cell. Solution blanks are obtained by periodically flushing the cell with sample. Field tests were performed in a local river over an 8-day period. The in situ accuracy, based on comparison with laboratory spectrophotometric pH measurements, was -0.003 pH unit (n = 16), similar to the measurement precision. No drift was observed during the 8-day period. The absorbance ratio used to calculate pH, in combination with a simple and robust optical design, imparts an inherent stability not achievable with conventional potentiometric methods, making the design feasible for long-term autonomous pH measurements.

  19. PH adjustment of power plant cooling water with flue gas/fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Brady, Patrick V.; Krumhansl, James L.

    2015-09-22

    A system including a vessel including a heat source and a flue; a turbine; a condenser; a fluid conduit circuit disposed between the vessel, the turbine and the condenser; and a diverter coupled to the flue to direct a portion of an exhaust from the flue to contact with a cooling medium for the condenser water. A method including diverting a portion of exhaust from a flue of a vessel; modifying the pH of a cooling medium for a condenser with the portion of exhaust; and condensing heated fluid from the vessel with the pH modified cooling medium.

  20. Solubility of water in lunar basalt at low pH2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newcombe, M. E.; Brett, A.; Beckett, J. R.; Baker, M. B.; Newman, S.; Guan, Y.; Eiler, J. M.; Stolper, E. M.

    2017-03-01

    We report the solubility of water in Apollo 15 basaltic "Yellow Glass" and an iron-free basaltic analog composition at 1 atm and 1350 °C. We equilibrated melts in a 1-atm furnace with flowing H2/CO2 gas mixtures that spanned ∼8 orders of magnitude in fO2 (from three orders of magnitude more reducing than the iron-wüstite buffer, IW-3.0, to IW+4.8) and ∼4 orders of magnitude in pH2/pH2O (from 0.003 to 24). Based on Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), our quenched experimental glasses contain 69-425 ppm total water (by weight). Our results demonstrate that under the conditions of our experiments: (1) hydroxyl is the only H-bearing species detected by FTIR; (2) the solubility of water is proportional to the square root of pH2O in the furnace atmosphere and is independent of fO2 and pH2/pH2O; (3) the solubility of water is very similar in both melt compositions; (4) the concentration of H2 in our iron-free experiments is <∼4 ppm, even at oxygen fugacities as low as IW-2.3 and pH2/pH2O as high as 11; (5) Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analyses of water in iron-rich glasses equilibrated under variable fO2 conditions may be strongly influenced by matrix effects, even when the concentration of water in the glasses is low; and (6) Our results can be used to constrain the entrapment pressure of lunar melt inclusions and the partial pressures of water and molecular hydrogen in the carrier gas of the lunar pyroclastic glass beads. We find that the most water-rich melt inclusion of Hauri et al. (2011) would be in equilibrium with a vapor with pH2O ∼ 3 bar and pH2 ∼ 8 bar. We constrain the partial pressures of water and molecular hydrogen in the carrier gas of the lunar pyroclastic glass beads to be 0.0005 bar and 0.0011 bar respectively. We calculate that batch degassing of lunar magmas containing initial volatile contents of 1200 ppm H2O (dissolved primarily as hydroxyl) and 4-64 ppm C would produce enough vapor to reach the critical vapor

  1. Potential of hot water extraction of birch wood to produce high-purity dissolving pulp after alkaline pulping.

    PubMed

    Borrega, Marc; Tolonen, Lasse K; Bardot, Fanny; Testova, Lidia; Sixta, Herbert

    2013-05-01

    The potential of hot water extraction of birch wood to produce highly purified dissolving pulp in a subsequent soda-anthraquinone pulping process was evaluated. After intermediate extraction intensities, pulps with low xylan content (3-5%) and high cellulose yield were successfully produced. Increasing extraction intensity further decreased the xylan content in pulp. However, below a xylan content of 3%, the cellulose yield dramatically decreased. This is believed to be due to cleavage of glycosidic bonds in cellulose during severe hot water extractions, followed by peeling reactions during alkaline pulping. Addition of sodium borohydride as well as increased anthraquinone concentration in the pulping liquor increased the cellulose yield, but had no clear effects on pulp purity and viscosity. The low intrinsic viscosity of pulps produced after severe extraction intensities and soda-anthraquinone pulping corresponded to the viscosity at the leveling-off degree of polymerization, suggesting that nearly all amorphous cellulose had been degraded.

  2. Electrolytes, sugar, calories, osmolarity and pH of beverages and coconut water.

    PubMed

    Chavalittamrong, B; Pidatcha, P; Thavisri, U

    1982-09-01

    Oral rehydration has been recommended in patients with diarrhoea to replace fluid loss from the gastrointestinal tract and reduce the need for intravenous therapy. Beverages (i.e. Cola, Sprite etc.) and coconut water may be used as sources of oral fluid when glucose-electrolyte solution is not available. To evaluate the usefulness and effectiveness of these soft drinks, the basic data such as electrolytes, sugar, calories, osmolarity and pH were determined. The electrolytes of the beverages were significantly lower (p less than 0.001) than the coconut water, especially potassium. The osmolarity of the beverages, which were 693 mOsm/l, was significantly higher (p less than 0.001) than the coconut water (288 mOsm/l); pH of the beverages (3.1) was more acidic (p less than 0.001) than the coconut water (5.4). While the sugar content of the beverages, which were 8.7 gm/dl, was significantly higher (p less than 0.001) than the coconut water (1.1 gm/dl). On comparison, all brands of beverages would give more calories than the coconut water however the coconut water would be absorbed more easily than any brand of soft drink beverage.

  3. Protoplasmic pH modifies water and solute transfer in beta vulgaris root vacuoles.

    PubMed

    Amodeo, G; Sutka, M; Dorr, R; Parisi, M

    2002-06-01

    Volume changes were studied in Beta vulgaris storage root vacuoles, using video microscopy, when exposed to hypotonic conditions. The osmotic gradient was either step-applied or progressively imposed in perfusion experiments. Preincubation at low pH (6.6) or with HgCl2 strongly reduced the vacuoles' water permeability, measured in step experiments. Furthermore, the volumetric response depended on the rate with which the aniso-osmotic condition was established. In perfusion experiments a "plateau value" (osmotic equilibrium or steady-state volume value) was observed, which was significantly lower than the theoretically expected one. Furthermore, if vacuoles were preincubated in presence of HgCl2 or at low pH and then the hypo-osmotic challenge was applied in perfusion experiments, a still lower "plateau value" was observed. This reduction was concentration-dependent and completely reversible. In these conditions, when HgCl2 concentration was 300 mM or medium pH was 6.6, the volume change was abolished. In other experiments, when urea iso-osmotically replaced mannitol, a reversible, pH-dependent volumetric response was observed. These results can be interpreted accepting that 1) mercury-sensitive water channels, present in the studied structure, were blocked by low pH during the hypo-osmotic challenge; 2) modification of water permeability prevents excessive swelling during the osmotic shock; 3) the effectiveness of this last mechanism depended on the osmotic challenge rate; and 4) additionally, urea reflection coefficients were also modified by reduced medium pH.

  4. Optical fiber pH sensors for high temperature water. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McCrae, D.; Saaski, E.

    1994-11-01

    The goal of this program was the development of an optical pH measurement system capable of operating in a high-temperature aqueous environment. This project built upon a dual-wavelength fiber optic sensing system previously developed by Research International which utilizes light-emitting diodes as light sources and provides remote absorption spectroscopy via a single bidirectional optical fiber. Suitable materials for constructing an optical pH sensing element were identified during the program. These included a sapphire/Ti/Pt/Au thin-film reflector, quartz and sapphire waveguides, a poly(benzimidazole) matrix, and an azo chromophore indicator. By a suitable combination of these design elements, it appears possible to optically measure pH in aqueous systems up to a temperature of about 150{degrees}C. A pH sensing system capable of operating in high-purity, low-conductivity water was built using quasi-evanescent wave sensing techniques. The sensing element incorporated a novel, mixed cellulose/cellulose acetate waveguide to which an azo indicator was bound. Testing revealed that the system could reproducibly respond to pH changes arising from 1 ppm differences in the morpholine content of low-conductivity water without influencing the measurement. The sensing system was stable for 150 hrs at room temperature, and no loss or degradation of the pH-responsive optical indicator was seen in 160 hrs at 50{degrees}C. However, the prototype polymer waveguide lost transparency at 1.7% per day during this same 50{degrees}C test. Additional effort is warranted in the areas of water-compatible waveguides and evanescent-wave detection methods.

  5. Properties of whey protein isolates extruded under acidic and alkaline conditions.

    PubMed

    Onwulata, C I; Isobe, S; Tomasula, P M; Cooke, P H

    2006-01-01

    Whey proteins have wide acceptance and use in many products due to their beneficial nutritional properties. To further increase the amount of whey protein isolates (WPI) that may be added to products such as extruded snacks and meats, texturization of WPI is necessary. Texturization changes the folding of globular proteins to improve interaction with other ingredients and create new functional ingredients. In this study, WPI pastes (60% solids) were extruded in a twin-screw extruder at 100 degrees C with 4 pH-adjusted water streams: acidic (pH 2.0 +/- 0.2) and alkaline (pH 12.4 +/- 0.4) streams from 2 N HCl and 2 N NaOH, respectively, and acidic (pH 2.5 +/- 0.2) and alkaline (pH 11.5 +/- 0.4) electrolyzed water streams; these were compared with WPI extruded with deionized water. The effects of water acidity on WPI solubility at pH 7, color, microstructure, Rapid Visco Analyzer pasting properties, and physical structure were determined. Alkaline conditions increased insolubility caused yellowing and increased pasting properties significantly. Acidic conditions increased solubility and decreased WPI pasting properties. Subtle structural changes occurred under acidic conditions, but were more pronounced under alkaline conditions. Overall, alkaline conditions increased denaturation in the extruded WPI resulting in stringy texturized WPI products, which could be used in meat applications.

  6. Predicted pH at the domestic and public supply drinking water depths, Central Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosecrans, Celia Z.; Nolan, Bernard T.; Gronberg, Jo Ann M.

    2017-03-08

    This scientific investigations map is a product of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) project modeling and mapping team. The prediction grids depicted in this map are of continuous pH and are intended to provide an understanding of groundwater-quality conditions at the domestic and public supply drinking water zones in the groundwater of the Central Valley of California. The chemical quality of groundwater and the fate of many contaminants is often influenced by pH in all aquifers. These grids are of interest to water-resource managers, water-quality researchers, and groundwater modelers concerned with the occurrence of natural and anthropogenic contaminants related to pH. In this work, the median well depth categorized as domestic supply was 30 meters below land surface, and the median well depth categorized as public supply is 100 meters below land surface. Prediction grids were created using prediction modeling methods, specifically boosted regression trees (BRT) with a Gaussian error distribution within a statistical learning framework within the computing framework of R (http://www.r-project.org/). The statistical learning framework seeks to maximize the predictive performance of machine learning methods through model tuning by cross validation. The response variable was measured pH from 1,337 wells and was compiled from two sources: USGS National Water Information System (NWIS) database (all data are publicly available from the USGS: http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ca/nwis/nwis) and the California State Water Resources Control Board Division of Drinking Water (SWRCB-DDW) database (water quality data are publicly available from the SWRCB: http://www.waterboards.ca.gov/gama/geotracker_gama.shtml). Only wells with measured pH and well depth data were selected, and for wells with multiple records, only the most recent sample in the period 1993–2014 was used. A total of 1,003 wells (training dataset) were used to train the BRT

  7. Ethanolamine properties and use for feedwater pH control: A pressurized water reactor case study

    SciTech Connect

    Keeling, D.L.; Polidoroff, C.T.; Cortese, S.; Cushner, M.C.

    1995-12-31

    Ethanolamine (ETA) as a feedwater pH control additive has been recently used to minimize corrosion of secondary water components in the nuclear power industry pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The use of ETA is compared with ammonia. Relative volatility effects on various parts of the system are analyzed and chemistry changes are presented. Materials of construction and the use of existing plant equipment for ETA service are discussed. Properties of ETA as well as safety, storage and handling issues are compared with ammonia. Health d aquatic toxicity are reviewed. warnings, safety, handling guidelines, biodegradability an Diablo Canyon Power Plant used ammonia for pH control from 1985 until a change over to ETA in 1993/1994. Full flow condensate polishers that are required to protect the plant from saltwater cooling incursions limit the amount of pH additive. Iron levels in the secondary water systems are compared before and after changing to ETA and replacement of corrosion-susceptible piping. Iron reduction benefits are assessed along with other effects on the feedwater nozzles, low pressure turbine, polisher resin capacity and polisher regeneration system.

  8. SOLVING COPPER CORROSION PROBLEMS WHILE MAINTAINING LEAD CONTROL IN A HIGH ALKALINITY WATER USING ORTHOPHOSPHATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lead and Copper Rule sampling in 1992 uncovered high copper levels in many homes in the Indian Hill Water Works, Ohio (IHWW) water system. The 90th percentile copper and lead levels were 1.63 mg/L and 0.012 mg/L, respectively. IHWW supplies water to several suburban communities t...

  9. Evaluating the role of metal ions in the bathochromic and hyperchromic responses of cyanidin derivatives in acidic and alkaline pH.

    PubMed

    Sigurdson, G T; Robbins, R J; Collins, T M; Giusti, M M

    2016-10-01

    In many food products, colorants derived from natural sources are increasingly popular due to consumer demand. Anthocyanins are one class of versatile and abundant naturally occurring chromophores that produce different hues in nature, especially with metal ions and other copigments assisting. The effects of chelation of metal ions (Mg(2+), Al(3+), Cr(3+), Fe(3+), and Ga(3+)) in factorial excesses to anthocyanin concentration (0-500×) on the spectral characteristics (380-700nm) of cyanidin and acylated cyanidin derivatives were evaluated to better understand the color evolution of anthocyanin-metal chelates in pH 3-8. In all pH, anthocyanins exhibited bathochromic and hyperchromic shifts. Largest bathochromic shifts most often occurred in pH 6; while largest hyperchromic shifts occurred in pH 5. Divalent Mg(2+) showed no observable effect on anthocyanin color while trivalent metal ions caused bathochromic shifts and hue changes. Generally, bathochromic shifts on anthocyanins were greatest with more electron rich metal ions (Fe(3+)≈Ga(3+)>Al(3+)>Cr(3+)).

  10. Effect of pH and temperature on stability and kinetics of novel extracellular serine alkaline protease (70 kDa).

    PubMed

    Bhunia, Biswanath; Basak, Bikram; Mandal, Tamal; Bhattacharya, Pinaki; Dey, Apurba

    2013-03-01

    A novel extracellular serine protease (70 kDa by SDS-PAGE) was purified and characterized. This enzyme retained more than 93% of its initial activity after preincubation for 30 min at 37 °C in the presence of 25% (v/v) tested organic solvents and showed feather degradation activity. The purified enzyme was deactivated at various combinations of pH and temperature to examine the interactive effect of them on enzyme activity. The deactivation process was modeled as first-order kinetics and the deactivation rate constant (k(d)) was found to be minimum at pH 9 and 37 °C. The kinetic analysis of enzyme over a range of pH values indicated two pK values at 6.21 and at 10.92. The lower pK value was likely due to the catalytic histidine in the free enzyme and higher pK value likely reflected deprotonation of the proline moiety of the substrate but ionization of the active site serine is another possibility. Inhibition kinetic showed that enzyme is serine protease because enzyme was competitively inhibited by antipain and aprotinin as these compounds are known to be competitive inhibitors of serine protease. The organic solvent, thermal and pH tolerances of enzyme suggested that it may have potential for use as a biocatalyst in industry.

  11. pH corrections and protein ionization in water/guanidinium chloride.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Mira, M M; Sanchez-Ruiz, J M

    2001-12-01

    More than 30 years ago, Nozaki and Tanford reported that the pK values for several amino acids and simple substances in 6 M guanidinium chloride differed little from the corresponding values in low salt (Nozaki, Y., and C. Tanford. 1967. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 89:736-742). This puzzling and counter-intuitive result hinders attempts to understand and predict the proton uptake/release behavior of proteins in guanidinium chloride solutions, behavior which may determine whether the DeltaG(N-D) values obtained from guanidinium chloride-induced denaturation data can actually be interpreted as the Gibbs energy difference between the native and denatured states (Bolen, D. W., and M. Yang. 2000. Biochemistry. 39:15208-15216). We show in this work that the Nozaki-Tanford result can be traced back to the fact that glass-electrode pH meter readings in water/guanidinium chloride do not equal true pH values. We determine the correction factors required to convert pH meter readings in water/guanidinium chloride into true pH values and show that, when these corrections are applied, the effect of guanidinium chloride on the pK values of simple substances is found to be significant and similar to that of NaCl. The results reported here allow us to propose plausible guanidinium chloride concentration dependencies for the pK values of carboxylic acids in proteins and, on their basis, to reproduce qualitatively the proton uptake/release behavior for the native and denatured states of several proteins (ribonuclease A, alpha-chymotrypsin, staphylococcal nuclease) in guanidinium chloride solutions. Finally, the implications of the pH correction for the experimental characterization of protein folding energetics are briefly discussed.

  12. Lability of drinking water treatment residuals (WTR) immobilized phosphorus: aging and pH effects.

    PubMed

    Agyin-Birikorang, Sampson; O'Connor, George A

    2007-01-01

    Time constraints associated with conducting long-term (>20 yr) field experiments to test the stability of drinking water treatment residuals (WTR) sorbed phosphorus (P) inhibit improved understanding of the fate of sorbed P in soils when important soil properties (e.g., pH) change. We used artificially aged samples to evaluate aging and pH effects on lability of WTR-immobilized P. Artificial aging was achieved through incubation at elevated temperatures (46 or 70 degrees C) for 4.5 yr, and through repeated wetting and drying for 2 yr. Using a modified isotopic ((32)P) dilution technique, coupled with a stepwise acidification procedure, we monitored changes in labile P concentrations over time. This technique enabled evaluation of the effect of pH on the lability of WTR-immobilized P. Within the pH range of 4 to 7, WTR amendment, coupled with artificial aging, ultimately reduced labile P concentrations by > or = 75% relative to the control (no-WTR) samples. Soil samples with different physicochemical properties from two 7.5-yr-old, one-time WTR-amended field sites were utilized to validate the trends observed with the artificially aged samples. Despite the differences in physicochemical properties among the three (two field-aged and one artificially aged) soil samples, similar trends of aging and pH effects on lability of WTR-immobilized P were observed. Labile P concentrations of the WTR-amended field-aged samples of the two sites decreased 6 mo after WTR amendment and the reduction persisted for 7.5 yr, ultimately resulting in > or = 70% reduction, compared to the control plots. We conclude that WTR application is capable of reducing labile P concentration in P-impacted soils, doing so for a long time, and that within the commonly encountered range of pH values for agricultural soils WTR-immobilized P should be stable.

  13. Reduced Graphene Oxide Bipolar Membranes for Integrated Solar Water Splitting in Optimal pH.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Michael B; Bruce, Jared P; McEleney, Kevin; Freund, Michael S

    2015-08-24

    The integration of light absorbers and catalysts for the water splitting process requires a membrane capable of both ion and electron management and product separation to realize efficient solar fuels systems. Bipolar membranes can maintain a pH gradient for optimal reaction conditions by the dissociation of water. Such membranes that contain graphene in the interfacial layer are fabricated by the chemical reduction of a uniformly deposited graphene oxide layer to convert sp(3) catalyst regions to sp(2) conductive regions. The resulting electrical and water dissociation properties are optimized by adjusting the exposure conditions, and treatments of less than 5 min render an interface that exceeds the conductivity requirements for integrated solar water splitting and increases the overpotential by <0.3 V. Integration with photoelectrodes is examined by characterizing the electrical interface formed between graphene and Si microwires, and we found that efficient Ohmic junctions are possible.

  14. Oxygen evolution reaction characteristics of synthetic nickel-cobalt-oxide electrodes for alkaline anion-exchange membrane water electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Tae Woo; Park, ChanSu; Kim, Yang Do; Lee, Dooyong; Park, Sungkyun; Lee, Jae Ho; Choi, Sung Mook; Choi, Chul Young

    2015-11-01

    A polymer electrolyte membrane water electrolysis system can produce high-purity hydrogen gases in a highly efficient manner. However, the level of hydrogen gas production is still small. In addition, noble-metal catalysts for the reaction in acidic environments, as well as an additional drying step to remove water contained in the hydrogen, are required. Therefore, water electrolysis system with high efficiency and lower cost, an alkaline anion-exchange membrane system that can produce high-purity hydrogen without a noble-metal catalyst, is needed. Nano-size NiCo2O4 powders were prepared by using a sol-gel method to achieve an efficient and economical water electrolysis system. When the powder was calcined at 450 °C, the crystallinity and the cyclic voltammogram measurement showed the best values. In addition, the 15-wt.% polytetrafluoroethylene mixed NiCo2O4 powders exhibited the largest cyclic voltammetry active area and the highest oxygen evolution reaction activity with the appropriate stability.

  15. Accumulation of Al, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb by the bryophyte Scapania undulata in three upland waters of different pH.

    PubMed

    Vincent, C D; Lawlor, A J; Tipping, E

    2001-01-01

    Measurements were made of the contents of Al, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb in Scapania undulata in three streams (D2, D5, D11) in the English Lake District. The stream waters had average pH values of 5.35 (D2), 5.81 (D5) and 7.26 (D11), the main differences in other major chemical components being in Mg, Al, Ca and alkalinity. There was generally more metal accumulation in the older parts of the plants, but this was not significant in all cases. Extents of accumulation varied with stream pH and dissolved metal concentration. For Al, accumulation was greatest in streams D2 and D5. Mn accumulated most in D5 and Fe was without preference. Cu, Zn and Cd accumulated mostly in the plants in stream D11 and Pb accumulated more in D5 and D11. In terms of enrichment factors (amount of metal in the plants divided by stream water concentration) the sequence was Zn < Cd < Cu < Mn < Pb < Al < Fe. Laboratory experiments supported the findings of the field data, providing evidence that uptake increases with pH at constant total metal concentration. The results are interpreted qualitatively in terms of the chemical speciation of the metals in the stream water and competition between metal ions and protons at the plant-water interface. It is suggested that Al, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb behave according to chemical complexation, whereas redox processes and/or colloidal interactions may be significant for Mn and Fe.

  16. Metal bioavailability and toxicity to fish in low-alkalinity lakes - a critical-review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spry, D.J.; Wiener, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    Fish in low-alkalinity lakes having ph of 6.0-6.5 Or less often have higher body or tissue burdens of mercury, cadmium, and lead than do fish in nearby lakes with higher ph. The greater bioaccumulation of these metals in such waters seems to result partly from the greater aqueous abundances of biologically available forms (ch3hg+, cd2+, and pb2+) at low ph. In addition, the low concentrations of aqueous calcium in low-alkalinity lakes increase the permeability of biological membranes to these metals, which in fish may cause greater uptake from both water and food. Fish exposed to aqueous inorganic aluminum in the laboratory and field accumulate the metal in and on the epithelial cells of the gills; however, there is little accumulation of aluminum in the blood or internal organs. In low-ph water, both sublethal and lethal toxicity of aluminum has been clearly demonstrated in both laboratory and field studies at environmental concentrations. In contrast, recently measured aqueous concentrations of total mercury, methylmercury, cadmium, and lead in low-alkalinity lakes are much lower than the aqueous concentrations known to cause acute or chronic toxicity in fish, although the vast majority of toxicological research has involved waters with much higher ionic strength than that in low-alkalinity lakes. Additional work with fish is needed to better assess (1) the toxicity of aqueous metals in low-alkalinity waters, and (2) the toxicological significance of dietary methylmercury and cadmium.

  17. Nitrogen isotope evidence for alkaline lakes on late Archean continents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stüeken, E. E.; Buick, R.; Schauer, A. J.

    2015-02-01

    Nitrogen isotope ratios in ancient sedimentary rocks are generally interpreted as a proxy for metabolic nitrogen pathways and the redox state of the water column. Fractionation processes occurring under anoxic, alkaline conditions during the dissociation of NH4+ to H+ and volatile NH3 are frequently overlooked, although this mechanism imparts large isotopic fractionations. Here we propose that NH3 volatilization is largely responsible for δ15N values of up to + 50 ‰ at high C/N ratios in the late Archean Tumbiana Formation. This sequence of sedimentary rocks represents a system of lakes that formed on subaerial flood basalts and were partly filled by basaltic volcanic ash. Aqueous alteration of volcanic glass followed by evaporative concentration of ions should have led to the development of high alkalinity with a pH of 9 or higher, as in modern analogues. In this sedimentologically unusual setting, nitrogen isotope ratios thus provide indirect evidence for the oldest alkaline lake system in the rock record. These very heavy lacustrine δ15N values contrast markedly with those of Archean marine sedimentary rocks, making a Precambrian "soda ocean" unlikely. Today, alkaline lakes are among the most productive ecosystems on Earth. Some nutrients, in particular molybdenum, are more soluble at high pH, and certain prebiotic reactions would likely have been favored under alkaline conditions in similar settings earlier in Earth's history. Hence alkaline lakes in the Archean could have been significant for the origin and early evolution of life.

  18. Water miscible mono alcohols' effect on the proteolytic performance of Bacillus clausii serine alkaline protease.

    PubMed

    Duman, Yonca Avci; Kazan, Dilek; Denizci, Aziz Akin; Erarslan, Altan

    2014-01-01

    In this study, our investigations showed that the increasing concentrations of all examined mono alcohols caused a decrease in the Vm, kcat and kcat/Km values of Bacillus clausii GMBE 42 serine alkaline protease for casein hydrolysis. However, the Km value of the enzyme remained almost the same, which was an indicator of non-competitive inhibition. Whereas inhibition by methanol was partial non-competitive, inhibition by the rest of the alcohols tested was simple non-competitive. The inhibition constants (KI) were in the range of 1.32-3.10 M, and the order of the inhibitory effect was 1-propanol>2-propanol>methanol>ethanol. The ΔG(≠) and ΔG(≠)E-T values of the enzyme increased at increasing concentrations of all alcohols examined, but the ΔG(≠)ES value of the enzyme remained almost the same. The constant Km and ΔG(≠)ES values in the presence and absence of mono alcohols indicated the existence of different binding sites for mono alcohols and casein on enzyme the molecule. The kcat of the enzyme decreased linearly by increasing log P and decreasing dielectric constant (D) values, but the ΔG(≠) and ΔG(≠)E-T values of the enzyme increased by increasing log P and decreasing D values of the reaction medium containing mono alcohols.

  19. Salinity and Alkaline pH of Irrigation Water Affect Marigold Plants: I. Growth and Shoot Dry Weight Partitioning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marigold, is one of the most popular annual ornamental plants. Both the short-statured cultivars (Tagetes patula L.) and the taller cultivars (T. erecta L.) are used as container plants, in landscape and garden settings. Tagetes erecta varieties make excellent cut and dried flowers for the florist...

  20. Calcium Carbonate Nucleation in an Alkaline Lake Surface Water, Pyramid Lake, Nevada, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, M.M.; Hoch, A.

    2012-01-01

    Calcium concentration and calcite supersaturation (??) needed for calcium carbonate nucleation and crystal growth in Pyramid Lake (PL) surface water were determined during August of 1997, 2000, and 2001. PL surface water has ?? values of 10-16. Notwithstanding high ??, calcium carbonate growth did not occur on aragonite single crystals suspended PL surface water for several months. However, calcium solution addition to PL surface-water samples caused reproducible calcium carbonate mineral nucleation and crystal growth. Mean PL surface-water calcium concentration at nucleation was 2.33 mM (n = 10), a value about nine times higher than the ambient PL surface-water calcium concentration (0.26 mM); mean ?? at nucleation (109 with a standard deviation of 8) is about eight times the PL surface-water ??. Calcium concentration and ?? regulated the calcium carbonate formation in PL nucleation experiments and surface water. Unfiltered samples nucleated at lower ?? than filtered samples. Calcium concentration and ?? at nucleation for experiments in the presence of added particles were within one standard deviation of the mean for all samples. Calcium carbonate formation rates followed a simple rate expression of the form, rate (mM/min) = A (??) + B. The best fit rate equation "Rate (?? mM/?? min) = -0.0026 ?? + 0.0175 (r = 0.904, n = 10)" was statistically significant at greater than the 0.01 confidence level and gives, after rearrangement, ?? at zero rate of 6.7. Nucleation in PL surface water and morphology of calcium carbonate particles formed in PL nucleation experiments and in PL surface-water samples suggest crystal growth inhibition by multiple substances present in PL surface water mediates PL calcium carbonate formation, but there is insufficient information to determine the chemical nature of all inhibitors. ?? 2011 U.S. Government.

  1. Calcium carbonate nucleation in an alkaline lake surface water, Pyramid Lake, Nevada, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, Michael M.; Hoch, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Calcium concentration and calcite supersaturation (Ω) needed for calcium carbonate nucleation and crystal growth in Pyramid Lake (PL) surface water were determined during August of 1997, 2000, and 2001. PL surface water has Ω values of 10-16. Notwithstanding high Ω, calcium carbonate growth did not occur on aragonite single crystals suspended PL surface water for several months. However, calcium solution addition to PL surface-water samples caused reproducible calcium carbonate mineral nucleation and crystal growth. Mean PL surface-water calcium concentration at nucleation was 2.33 mM (n = 10), a value about nine times higher than the ambient PL surface-water calcium concentration (0.26 mM); mean Ω at nucleation (109 with a standard deviation of 8) is about eight times the PL surface-water Ω. Calcium concentration and Ω regulated the calcium carbonate formation in PL nucleation experiments and surface water. Unfiltered samples nucleated at lower Ω than filtered samples. Calcium concentration and Ω at nucleation for experiments in the presence of added particles were within one standard deviation of the mean for all samples. Calcium carbonate formation rates followed a simple rate expression of the form, rate (mM/min) = A (Ω) + B. The best fit rate equation "Rate (Δ mM/Δ min) = -0.0026 Ω + 0.0175 (r = 0.904, n = 10)" was statistically significant at greater than the 0.01 confidence level and gives, after rearrangement, Ω at zero rate of 6.7. Nucleation in PL surface water and morphology of calcium carbonate particles formed in PL nucleation experiments and in PL surface-water samples suggest crystal growth inhibition by multiple substances present in PL surface water mediates PL calcium carbonate formation, but there is insufficient information to determine the chemical nature of all inhibitors.

  2. Long-term alkalinity decrease and acidification of estuaries in northwestern Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xinping; Pollack, Jennifer Beseres; McCutcheon, Melissa R; Montagna, Paul A; Ouyang, Zhangxian

    2015-03-17

    More than four decades of alkalinity and pH data (late 1960s to 2010) from coastal bays along the northwestern Gulf of Mexico were analyzed for temporal changes across a climatic gradient of decreasing rainfall and freshwater inflow, from northeast to southwest. The majority (16 out of 27) of these bays (including coastal waters) showed a long-term reduction in alkalinity at a rate of 3.0-21.6 μM yr(-1). Twenty-two bays exhibited pH decreases at a rate of 0.0014-0.0180 yr(-1). In contrast, a northernmost coastal bay exhibited increases in both alkalinity and pH. Overall, the two rates showed a significant positive correlation, indicating that most of these bays, especially those at lower latitudes, have been experiencing long-term acidification. The observed alkalinity decrease may be caused by reduced riverine alkalinity export, a result of precipitation decline under drought conditions, and freshwater diversion for human consumption, as well as calcification in these bays. A decrease in alkalinity inventory and accompanying acidification may have negative impacts on shellfish production in these waters. In addition, subsequent reduction in alkalinity export from these bays to the adjacent coastal ocean may also decrease the buffer capacity of the latter against future acidification.

  3. Microbial sulfate reduction and metal attenuation in pH 4 acid mine water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, C.D.; Wilkin, R.T.; Alpers, C.N.; Rye, R.O.; Blaine, R.B.

    2007-01-01

    Sediments recovered from the flooded mine workings of the Penn Mine, a Cu-Zn mine abandoned since the early 1960s, were cultured for anaerobic bacteria over a range of pH (4.0 to 7.5). The molecular biology of sediments and cultures was studied to determine whether sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were active in moderately acidic conditions present in the underground mine workings. Here we document multiple, independent analyses and show evidence that sulfate reduction and associated metal attenuation are occurring in the pH-4 mine environment. Water-chemistry analyses of the mine water reveal: (1) preferential complexation and precipitation by H2S of Cu and Cd, relative to Zn; (2) stable isotope ratios of 34S/32S and 18O/16O in dissolved SO4 that are 2-3 ??? heavier in the mine water, relative to those in surface waters; (3) reduction/oxidation conditions and dissolved gas concentrations consistent with conditions to support anaerobic processes such as sulfate reduction. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analyses of sediment show 1.5-micrometer, spherical ZnS precipitates. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analyses of Penn Mine sediment show a high biomass level with a moderately diverse community structure composed primarily of iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Cultures of sediment from the mine produced dissolved sulfide at pH values near 7 and near 4, forming precipitates of either iron sulfide or elemental sulfur. DGGE coupled with sequence and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA gene segments showed populations of Desulfosporosinus and Desulfitobacterium in Penn Mine sediment and laboratory cultures. ?? 2007 Church et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  4. Aggregation behaviors of PEO-PPO-ph-PPO-PEO and PPO-PEO-ph-PEO-PPO at an air/water interface: experimental study and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Gong, Houjian; Xu, Guiying; Liu, Teng; Xu, Long; Zhai, Xueru; Zhang, Jian; Lv, Xin

    2012-09-25

    The block polyethers PEO-PPO-ph-PPO-PEO (BPE) and PPO-PEO-ph-PEO-PPO (BEP) are synthesized by anionic polymerization using bisphenol A as initiator. Compared with Pluronic P123, the aggregation behaviors of BPE and BEP at an air/water interface are investigated by the surface tension and dilational viscoelasticity. The molecular construction can influence the efficiency and effectiveness of block polyethers in decreasing surface tension. BPE has the most efficient ability to decrease surface tension of water among the three block polyethers. The maximum surface excess concentration (Γ(max)) of BPE is larger than that of BEP or P123. Moreover, the dilational modulus of BPE is almost the same as that of P123, but much larger than that of BEP. The molecular dynamics simulation provides the conformational variations of block polyethers at the air/water interface.

  5. Morphological characterization of viruses in the stratified water column of alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake.

    PubMed

    Brum, Jennifer R; Steward, Grieg F

    2010-10-01

    Concentrations of viruses and prokaryotes in the alkaline, moderately hypersaline, seasonally stratified Mono Lake are among the highest reported for a natural aquatic environment. We used electron microscopy to test whether viral morphological characteristics differed among the epilimnion, metalimnion, and the anoxic hypolimnion of the lake and to determine how the properties of viruses in Mono Lake compare to other aquatic environments. Viral capsid size distributions were more similar in the metalimnion and hypolimnion of Mono Lake, while viral tail lengths were more similar in the epilimnion and metalimnion. The percentage of tailed viruses decreased with depth and the relative percentages of tailed phage families changed with depth. The presence of large (>125 nm capsid), untailed viruses in the metalimnion and hypolimnion suggests that eukaryotic viruses are produced in these suboxic and anoxic, hypersaline environments. Capsid diameters of viruses were larger on average in Mono Lake compared to other aquatic environments, and no lemon-shaped or filamentous viruses were found, in contrast to other high-salinity or high-altitude lakes and seas. Our data suggest that the physically and chemically distinct layers of Mono Lake harbor different viral assemblages, and that these assemblages are distinct from other aquatic environments that have been studied. Furthermore, we found that filtration of a sample through a 0.22-µm pore-size filter significantly altered the distribution of viral capsid diameters and tail lengths, resulting in a relative depletion of viruses having larger capsids and longer tails. This observation highlights the potential for bias in molecular surveys of viral diversity, which typically rely on filtration through 0.2- or 0.22-µm pore-size membrane filters to remove bacteria during sample preparation.

  6. Observation of PH-Induced Protein Reorientation at the Water Surface.

    PubMed

    Meister, Konrad; Roeters, Steven Joop; Paananen, Arja; Woutersen, Sander; Versluis, Jan; Szilvay, Géza R; Bakker, Huib J

    2017-03-27

    Hydrophobins are surface-active proteins that form a hydrophobic, water-repelling film around aerial fungal structures. They have a compact, particle-like structure, in which hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions are spatially separated. This surface property renders them amphiphilic and is reminiscent of synthetic Janus particles. Here we report surface-specific chiral and non-chiral vibrational sum-frequency generation spectroscopy (VSFG) measurements of hydrophobins adsorbed to their natural place of action, the air-water interface. We observe that hydrophobin molecules undergo a reversible change in orientation (tilt) at the interface when the pH is varied. We explain this local orientation toggle from the modification of the inter-protein interactions and the interaction of hydrophobin with the water solvent, following the pH-induced change of the charge state of particular amino acids.

  7. The effects of four acidifying sprays, vinegar, and water on canine cutaneous pH levels.

    PubMed

    Matousek, Jennifer L; Campbell, Karen L; Kakoma, Ibulaimu; Schaeffer, David J

    2003-01-01

    This study determined the extent and duration of cutaneous acidification caused by a single application of four acidifying sprays, vinegar, and water. Multivariate repeated measures analysis of variance revealed a significant difference between the six sprays (F = 15.3; P < or = 0.001). Linear contrast tests showed that the effects of the acidifying sprays were significantly different from vinegar and water (F = 6.0; P < or = 0.001), and vinegar was significantly different from water (F = 13.8; P < or = 0.001). The acidifying sprays decreased cutaneous pH to < 6.0 for a mean range of 50 to 65 hours, while vinegar did so for a mean of 12 hours.

  8. Isolated secretion granules from parotid glands of chronically stimulated rats possess an alkaline internal pH and inward-directed H/sup +/ pump activity

    SciTech Connect

    Arvan, P.; Castle, J.D.

    1986-10-01

    Secretion granules have been isolated from the parotid glands of rats that have been chronically stimulated with the ..beta..-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol. These granules are of interest because they package a quantitatively different set of secretory proteins in comparison with granules from the normal gland. Polypeptides enriched in proline, glycine, and glutamine, which are known to have pI's >10, replace ..cap alpha..-amylase (pI's = 6.8) as the principal content species. The internal pH of granules from the treated rats changes from 7.8 in a potassium sulfate medium to 6.9 in a choline chloride medium. The increased pH over that of normal parotid granules (approx.6.8) appears to protect the change in composition of the secretory contents. Whereas normal mature parotide granules have practically negligible levels of H/sup +/ pumping ATPase activity, the isolated granules from isoproterenol-treated rats undergo a time-dependent internal acidification that requires the presence of ATP and is abolished by an H/sup +/ ionophore. Additionally, an inside-positive granule transmembrane potential develops after ATP addition that depends upon ATP hydrolysis. Two independent methods have been used that exclude the possibility that contaminating organelles are the source of the H/sup +/-ATPase activity. Together these data provide clear evidence for the presence of an H/sup +/ pump in the membranes of parotid granules from chronically stimulated rats. However, despite the presence of H/sup +/-pump activity, fluorescence microscopy with the weak base, acridine orange, reveals that the intragranular pH in live cells is greater than that of the cytoplasm.

  9. Fractionation of oil palm frond hemicelluloses by water or alkaline impregnation and steam explosion.

    PubMed

    Sabiha-Hanim, Saleh; Mohd Noor, Mohd Azemi; Rosma, Ahmad

    2015-01-22

    Steam explosion of oil palm frond has been carried out under different temperatures between 180 and 210°C for 4 min (severity of 2.96-3.84) after impregnation of the frond chips with water or KOH solution. The effects of impregnation and steam explosion conditions of oil palm fronds on the water soluble fraction and insoluble fraction were investigated. The maximum yield of hemicelluloses in water soluble fractions recovered was 23.49% and 25.33% for water and KOH impregnation, treated with steam explosion at temperature of 210°C (severity of 3.84) with a fractionation efficiency of 77.30% and 83.32%, respectively. Under this condition, the water insoluble fractions contained celluloses at 60.83% and 64.80% for water and KOH impregnation, respectively. The steam explosion temperature of 210°C for 4 min (logR(o) 3.84) was found to be the best condition in the extraction of hemicelluloses from OPF for both types of impregnation.

  10. Hydrogen Peroxide Formation and pH Changes at Rock-Water Interface during Stressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, S.; Kulahci, I.; Cyr, G.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Balk, M.; Rothschild, L. J.; Freund, F. T.

    2008-12-01

    Common igneous and high-grade metamorphic rocks contain dormant defects, which become activated when stressed. They release electronic charge carriers, in particular defect electrons associated with O- states in a matrix of O2-. Known as 'positive holes' or pholes for short, the O- states can spread out of the stressed rock volume, travel along stress gradients over distances on the order of meters in the lab and probably over kilometers in the field. They carry a current, which can flow through meters of rock in the laboratory, probably tens of kilometers in the field. At rock-water interfaces the O- states turn into O radicals, which subtract H from H2O, forming OH- in the rock surface and PH radicals in the water. Two OH combine to H2O2. In the process the pH becomes more acidic. The discovery of H2O2 formation at rock-water interfaces as part of stress- activated currents on the tectonically active Earth may help us better understand the oxidation of the early Earth and the evolution of early Life.

  11. Quaternized poly (styrene-co-vinylbenzyl chloride) anion exchange membranes for alkaline water electrolysers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vengatesan, S.; Santhi, S.; Jeevanantham, S.; Sozhan, G.

    2015-06-01

    In this study, poly (ST-co-VBC) based anion exchange membranes with different styrene to VBC ratios (1: 0.16, 1: 0.33 and 1: 1) have been prepared via chloromethylation-free synthetic route using aromatic vinyl monomers. The synthesized co-polymers are identified by FTIR and 1H-NMR analysis. Hydroxide (OH-) ion conductivity of the anion exchange membrane with styrene to VBC ratio of 1: 0.33 is as high as 6.8 × 10-3 S cm-1 in de-ionised water at 25 °C. The membrane also acquires the ion-exchange capacity of 2.14 meq. g-1, and the water uptake of 127%. Membrane-electrode-assembly (MEA) using the anion exchange membrane and Ni - foam catalyst demonstrate the current density of 40 mA cm-2 at 2.3 V in a water electrolyser cell.

  12. The Effect of Orthophosphate as a Copper Corrosion Inhibitor in High Alkalinity Drinking Water Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    the cold-water sample faucet was turned on for one minute. The faucet was turned off, then dried with a paper towel . D. The LDPE sample collection...Sussex, England: Ellis Horwood, 1989. McClave, James T., Benson, P. George, and Sincich, Terry . Statistics for Business and Economics, 9th Edition

  13. Recent progress on earth abundant hydrogen evolution reaction and oxygen evolution reaction bifunctional electrocatalyst for overall water splitting in alkaline media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamesh, Mohammed Ibrahim

    2016-11-01

    Electrochemical water-splitting is one of the promising ways for producing clean chemical fuel (Hydrogen) while cheap-earth-abundant-bifunctional-electrocatalyst is one of the possible way for improving the overall cost efficiency of water-splitting. This paper reviews the chemical state, hydrogen and oxygen evolution reaction activity in alkaline media, overall water-splitting performance in alkaline media, stability, and possible-factors for improving its efficiency of various kinds of recently reported electrocatalyst such as Ni-P, Co-P, Ni-Co-P, graphene-Co-P, O/N/C-Co/Ni, Ni-S, B-Ni/Co, Ni-Co, Mo, Se, Fe, Mn/Zn/Ti, and metal-free based earth-abundant-bifunctional-electrocatalyst. This paper also reviews and highlights the remarkable water splitting performance of the earth-abundant-bifunctional-electrocatalyst those exhibit better or well comparable with Pt/C//RuO2.

  14. Anaerobic methanethiol degradation and methanogenic community analysis in an alkaline (pH 10) biological process for liquefied petroleum gas desulfurization.

    PubMed

    van Leerdam, Robin C; Bonilla-Salinas, Monica; de Bok, Frank A M; Bruning, H; Lens, Piet N L; Stams, Alfons J M; Janssen, Albert J H

    2008-11-01

    Anaerobic methanethiol (MT) degradation by mesophilic (30 degrees C) alkaliphilic (pH 10) communities was studied in a lab-scale Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Bed (UASB) reactor inoculated with a mixture of sediments from the Wadden Sea (The Netherlands), Soap Lake (Central Washington), and Russian soda lakes. MT degradation started after 32 days of incubation. During the first 252 days, complete degradation was achieved till a volumetric loading rate of 7.5 mmol MT/L/day, and sulfide, methane, and carbon dioxide were the main reaction products. Temporary inhibition of MT degradation occurred after MT peak loads and in the presence of dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), which is the autooxidation product of MT. From day 252 onwards, methanol was dosed to the reactor as co-substrate at a loading rate of 3-6 mmol/L/day to stimulate growth of methylotrophic methanogens. Methanol was completely degraded and also a complete MT degradation was achieved till a volumetric loading rate of 13 mmol MT/L/day (0.77 mmol MT/gVSS/day). However, from day 354 till the end of the experimental run (day 365), acetate was formed and MT was not completely degraded anymore, indicating that methanol-degrading homoacetogenic bacteria had partially outcompeted the methanogenic MT-degrading archea. The archeal community in the reactor sludge was analyzed by DGGE and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. The methanogenic archea responsible for the degradation of MT in the reactor were related to Methanolobus oregonensis. A pure culture, named strain SODA, was obtained by serial dilutions in medium containing both trimethyl amine and dimethyl sulfide (DMS). Strain SODA degraded MT, DMS, trimethyl amine, and methanol. Flow sheet simulations revealed that for sufficient MT removal from liquefied petroleum gas, the extraction and biological degradation process should be operated above pH 9.

  15. Changes in the water quality and bacterial community composition of an alkaline and saline oxbow lake used for temporary reservoir of geothermal waters.

    PubMed

    Borsodi, Andrea K; Szirányi, Barbara; Krett, Gergely; Márialigeti, Károly; Janurik, Endre; Pekár, Ferenc

    2016-09-01

    Geothermal waters exploited in the southeastern region of Hungary are alkali-hydrogen-carbonate type, and beside the high amount of dissolved salt, they contain a variety of aromatic, heteroaromatic, and polyaromatic hydrocarbons. The majority of these geothermal waters used for heating are directed into surface waters following a temporary storage in reservoir lakes. The aim of this study was to gain information about the temporal and spatial changes of the water quality as well as the bacterial community composition of an alkaline and saline oxbow lake operated as reservoir of used geothermal water. On the basis of the water physical and chemical measurements as well as the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) patterns of the bacterial communities, temporal changes were more pronounced than spatial differences. During the storage periods, the inflow, reservoir water, and sediment samples were characterized with different bacterial community structures in both studied years. The 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences of the bacterial strains and molecular clones confirmed the differences among the studied habitats. Thermophilic bacteria were most abundant in the geothermal inflow, whereas the water of the reservoir was dominated by cyanobacteria and various anoxygenic phototrophic prokaryotes. In addition, members of several facultative anaerobic denitrifying, obligate anaerobic sulfate-reducing and syntrophic bacterial species capable of decomposition of different organic compounds including phenols were revealed from the water and sediment of the reservoir. Most of these alkaliphilic and/or halophilic species may participate in the local nitrogen and sulfur cycles and contribute to the bloom of phototrophs manifesting in a characteristic pink-reddish discoloration of the water of the reservoir.

  16. Effect of Morphology of Co3O4 for Oxygen Evolution Reaction in Alkaline Water Electrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qi-Zhi; Xu, Qi-Zhi; Su, Yu-Zhi; Wu, Hao; Cheng, Hui; Hui, Yun-Ping; Li, Nan; Liu, Zhao-Qing

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, three different morphological Co3O4 electrodes for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) have been synthesized. By comparing the three morphologies of Co3O4, the electrocatalytic properties show that the urchin-like spheres of Co3O4 electrode has relative low overpotential and good electrocatalysis stability, indicating that the structure of urchin-like Co3O4 spheres exhibit an easy OER for water splitting. PMID:25525423

  17. The effect of water on the physical and thermodynamic properties of calc-alkaline basalt and basaltic andesite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, G.; Whittington, A. G.; Stechern, A.; Behrens, H.

    2013-12-01

    We present corresponding viscosity and heat capacity data obtained on a series of hydrated glasses and supercooled melts for Fe-free calc-alkaline basaltic (sb, NBO/T = 0.67) and basaltic andesite analogues (sba, NBO/T = 0.40). Water contents range from nominally anhydrous to 3.76 wt.% H2O. Density measurements on relaxed (1 atm) hydrous glasses (post-viscometry) yield a partial molar volume of H2O of 12.9 and of 11.4 cm3mol-1 for sba and sb, respectively. Viscosity data were obtained at temperatures in the neighbourhood of the glass transition using the parallel-plate method, and at superliquidus temperatures using the concentric-cylinder and falling-sphere methods. The effect of water on viscosity is most dramatic at low temperatures, with the addition of ~2 wt.% H2O resulting in a reduction of the temperature at which the viscosity of the melt is 1012 Pa s (T12) of 170-180°C. The viscosity of a calc-alkaline basaltic andesite magma with 2 wt.% H2O at depth would increase by a factor of ~100 upon complete degassing during ascent. Calorimetric measurements were made with a Perkin-Elmer 8500 Differential Scanning Calorimeter up to 750°C, the limit of the instrument, depending on the sample water content. The increase in heat capacity associated with the transition from a glass to a supercooled liquid is on the order of ~25-30% and is higher in magnitude the more depolymerized the liquid. Our preliminary results suggest that the heat capacity of the hydrous sba and sb liquids decreases with increasing temperature immediately above the glass transition, similar to borosilicate and titanosilicate melts. In the anhydrous titano- and boro-silicate melts, this anomalous behaviour was linked to T-dependent mixing of B or Ti with Si. In sb and sba, the observed decrease in configurational heat capacity with increasing temperature may be related to the interplay of 'polymerizing' (viscosity-increasing) vs. 'depolymerizing' (viscosity-decreasing) solution mechanisms of

  18. The effects of high salt and low pH on the water-holding of meat.

    PubMed

    Puolanne, E; Peltonen, J

    2013-02-01

    The study investigated the water-holding (WH) in meat in the pH-NaCl (ionic strength) combinations that prevail in dry sausages during fermentation and drying. WH in raw beef homogenates, with 230% added water, was determined by centrifugation at pH values of 5.47-4.60, and ionic strengths (μ) 0.50-1.50. The minimum WH in relation to pH was at pH 4.8, but at higher pH values, the WH optimum was at 1.0-1.5 μ; at lower pH-values (<5.0) the optimum was more pronounced at 1.0 μ. The WH reducing effect by pH decrease was stronger than the effect of μ. At lower pH values, the relative effect of μ on WH was higher compared to that of pH than at higher pH values. The pH-salt combinations prevailing in fermented sausage in the beginning of the ripening produced a high WH, which decreased, first with pH decrease and then in the last period of ripening mainly due to the increase of ionic strength.

  19. Effects of pH and Magnetic Material on Immunomagnetic Separation of Cryptosporidium Oocysts from Concentrated Water Samples

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Ryan C.; Rock, Channah M.; Oshima, Kevin H.

    2002-01-01

    In this study, we examined the effect that magnetic materials and pH have on the recoveries of Cryptosporidium oocysts by immunomagnetic separation (IMS). We determined that particles that were concentrated on a magnet during bead separation have no influence on oocyst recovery; however, removal of these particles did influence pH values. The optimal pH of the IMS was determined to be 7.0. The numbers of oocysts recovered from deionized water at pH 7.0 were 26.3% higher than those recovered from samples that were not at optimal pH. The results indicate that the buffers in the IMS kit did not adequately maintain an optimum pH in some water samples. By adjusting the pH of concentrated environmental water samples to 7.0, recoveries of oocysts increased by 26.4% compared to recoveries from samples where the pH was not adjusted. PMID:11916735

  20. Retention of ionizable compounds on HPLC. 4. Mobile-phase pH measurement in methanol/water

    PubMed

    Canals; Portal; Bosch; Roses

    2000-04-15

    The different procedures used in HPLC to measure the pH of a mobile phase are evaluated in terms of the rigorous IUPAC definition of pH. The three procedures evaluated are as follows: measurement of the pH of the aqueous HPLC buffer before mixing it with the organic modifier, measurement of the pH of the HPLC buffer after mixing it with the organic modifier using a pH electrode system calibrated with aqueous buffers, and measurement of the pH of the HPLC buffer after mixing it with the organic modifier but calibrating the electrode system with reference buffers prepared in the same mixed solvent used as mobile phase. Following IUPAC definitions and recommendations, the three pH values can be related with the pH scales: w(w)pH, s(w)pH, and s(s)pH, respectively. The relationships between these three pH scales are also presented. The retention of several compounds with acid/base behavior in a C-18 and a polymeric column with buffered methanol/water as mobile phase is related to the mobile phase pH value measured in the three pH scales. It is demonstrated that the s(w)pH and s(s)pH scales give better relationships than the w(w)pH scale (pH measured in the aqueous buffer before mixing it with the organic modifier), commonly used on HPLC. The s(w)pH scale is specially recommended because of its simplicity of measurement: the pH is measured after mixing the aqueous buffer with the organic modifier, but the pH calibration is performed with the common aqueous reference buffers.

  1. The influence of water pH on the genesis of cadmium-induced cancer in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Alborghetti Nai, Gisele; Soria Golghetto, Gisele Maria; Soriano Estrella, Mariani Paulino; Di Santi Teixeira, Larissa; do Carmo Moura, Felipe; Bremer Neto, Hermann; Santos Parizi, José Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium is a heavy metal that is widely used in industry and can cause tumours in multiple organs. The purpose of our study was to investigate the effect of water pH in the genesis of cadmium-induced cancer. We divided 98 male Wistar rats into 7 groups: group A - 15 rats that received cadmium chloride (CdCl₂- 400 mg/L) in their drinking water at a neutral pH of 7.0; group B - 15 rats that received CdCl₂(400 mg/L) in their drinking water at an acidic pH of 5.0; group C - 15 rats that received CdCl₂(400 mg/L) in their drinking water at a basic pH of 8.0; group D - 15 rats that received water at an acidic pH of 5.0; group E - 15 rats that received water at a basic pH of 8.0; group F - 15 rats that received water at a neutral pH of 7.0; and group G - 8 rats that were subcutaneously injected with a single dose of cyclophosphamide (50 mg/kg). Groups A through F were euthanised 6 months after the start of the experiment and group G was euthanised 24 hours after cyclophosphamide injection. We collected the liver, kidneys, pancreas, prostate, seminal vesicles and testes for histopathological analysis and the bone marrow for micronuclei testing. In all of the groups, neither neoplastic lesions nor an increase in micronuclei (p>0.05) were observed in the liver, kidney, pancreas, seminal vesicles and testes. We found that animals exposed to cadmium had grade one prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, but this was found more frequently in animals from group B (p<0.05). The acidic pH increased the formation of pre-neoplastic lesions in the prostate glands of cadmium-exposed animals.

  2. Predicting Gran alkalinity and calcium concentrations in river waters over a national scale using a novel modification to the G-BASH model.

    PubMed

    Cresser, Malcolm S; Ahmed, Nayan; Smart, Richard P; Arowolo, Toyin; Calver, Louise J; Chapman, Pippa J

    2006-09-01

    Monthly stream water calcium and Gran alkalinity concentration data from 11 sub-catchments of the Nether Beck in the English Lake District have been used to appraise the transferability of the Scottish, River Dee-based G-BASH model. Readily available riparian zone geochemistry and flow paths were used initially to predict minimum and mean stream water concentrations at the Nether Beck, based on calibration equations from the River Dee catchment data. Predicted values significantly exceeded observed values. Differences in runoff between the two areas, leading to a dilution effect in the Nether Beck, explained most of the difference between observed and predicted values. Greater acid deposition in the Lake District also reduced stream water Gran alkalinity concentrations in that area. If regional differences in precipitation, evapotranspiration and pollutant deposition are incorporated into the model, it may then be used reliably to predict catchment susceptibility to acidification over a wide regional (national) scale.

  3. Effects of Low Level Water-soluble Pentosans, Alkaline-extractable Pentosans, and Xylanase on the Growth and Development of Broiler Chicks.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Q K; Yang, L Q; Zhao, H B; Wang, X L; Wang, K

    2013-09-01

    This study investigated the effects of low levels of water-soluble pentosans (WSP), alkaline-extractable pentosans (AEP), and xylanase on the growth and organ development of broiler chicks. Three hundred and fifty 1-d-old female broiler chicks were randomly allocated into seven experimental groups of five pen replicates, with ten chicks per replicate. The control group consumed a corn-soybean meal-based diet. Six dietary treatment groups consumed the basal diet supplemented with one of the following: WSP at 50 mg/kg (WSP50) or 100 mg/kg (WSP100); AEP at 50 mg/kg (AEP50) or 100 mg/kg (AEP100); or xylanase at 3 mg/kg (Xase3) or 6 mg/kg (Xase6). Data including the body weight, digestive organ weights, gut length, rectal digesta viscosity, and gut microflora and pH were collected on d 5, 10, and 15. When compared to the control group, WSP50 promoted body weight gain and organ growth throughout the study, calculated as 3-d averages (p<0.05). WSP100 increased weight gain and enhanced organ development (proventriculus, gizzard, and gut) on d 10 (p<0.05), but the 3-d averages were not different from the control group except for the weight of gizzard. Both Xase3 and Xase6 increased the 3-d average weight gain and the growth of the gizzard (p<0.05). WSP50 increased the digesta viscosity compared to Xase3 on d 10 and 15 (p<0.05). WSP50, Xase3, and Xase6 increased the concentration of Lactobacillus in the rectum when compared to the control group (p<0.05), but only Xase3 lowered the digesta pH in the ileum and cecum on d 10 and 15. AEP had minimal influence on the growth and organ development of broilers. The results showed that low levels of WSP, AEP, and xylanase had different effects and underlying mechanisms on the growth and organ development of broiler chicks. WSP50 could increase the growth performance of broilers fed a corn-soybean meal-based diet.

  4. Phase transformation of the brownmillerite SrCoO2.5 thin film through alkaline water electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tambunan, Octolia Togibasa; Lee, Min Young; Kim, Deok Hyeon; Parwanta, Kadek Juliana; Jung, Chang Uk

    2014-06-01

    A phase transformation from insulating brownmillerite SrCoO2.5 to conducting perovskite SrCoO3 through electrochemical oxidation has been demonstrated for thin films of SrCoOx on a SrTiO3 (001) substrate. The cobalt-oxide film strongly favors the brownmillerite phase of SrCoO2.5 instead of the perovskite phase of SrCoO3 on a SrTiO3 (001) substrate due to its low lattice mismatch. Therefore, the phase transformation has its own retention. The alkaline water electrolysis occurs between the copper cathode and the SrCoO2.5 film anode. The H+ ions are attracted to the cathode and generate H2 gas. The OH- ions are attracted to the film's surface and generate a rich amount of oxygen to fill the oxygen vacancy channel of brownmillerite SrCoO2.5. The phase transformation was verified from the change in the out-of-plane lattice constant and the change in the resistivity of the electrolyzed film.

  5. Alkaline nanoparticle coatings improve resin bonding of 10-methacryloyloxydecyldihydrogenphosphate-conditioned zirconia.

    PubMed

    Qian, Mengke; Lu, Zhicen; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Huaiqin; Xie, Haifeng

    Creating an alkaline environment prior to 10-methacryloyloxydecyldihydrogenphosphate (MDP) conditioning improves the resin bonding of zirconia. The present study evaluated the effects of four alkaline coatings with different water solubilities and pH values on resin bonding of MDP-conditioned zirconia. Two alkaline nanoparticle coatings were studied in particular. Thermodynamics calculations were performed to evaluate the strengths of MDP-tetragonal phase zirconia chemical bonds at different pH values. Zirconia surfaces with and without alkaline coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM)/energy dispersive spectrometer and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy; alkaline coatings included NaOH, Ca(OH)2, nano-MgO, and nano-Zr(OH)4. A shear bond strength (SBS) test was performed to evaluate the effects of the four alkaline coatings on bonding; the alkaline coatings were applied to the surfaces prior to conditioning the zirconia with MDP-containing primers. Gibbs free energies of the MDP-tetragonal zirconia crystal model coordination reaction in different pH environments were -583.892 (NaOH), -569.048 [Ca(OH)2], -547.393 (MgO), and -530.279 kJ/mol [Zr(OH)4]. Thermodynamic calculations indicated that the alkaline coatings improved bonding in the following order: NaOH > Ca(OH)2 > MgO > Zr(OH)4. Statistical analysis of SBS tests showed a different result. SBSs were significantly different in groups that had different alkaline coatings, but it was not influenced by different primers. All four alkaline coatings increased SBS compared to control groups. Of the four coatings, nano-Zr(OH)4 and -MgO showed higher SBS. Therefore, preparing nano-Zr(OH)4 or -MgO coatings prior to conditioning with MDP-containing primers may potentially improve resin bonding of zirconia in the clinic.

  6. Alkaline nanoparticle coatings improve resin bonding of 10-methacryloyloxydecyldihydrogenphosphate-conditioned zirconia

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Mengke; Lu, Zhicen; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Huaiqin; Xie, Haifeng

    2016-01-01

    Creating an alkaline environment prior to 10-methacryloyloxydecyldihydrogenphosphate (MDP) conditioning improves the resin bonding of zirconia. The present study evaluated the effects of four alkaline coatings with different water solubilities and pH values on resin bonding of MDP-conditioned zirconia. Two alkaline nanoparticle coatings were studied in particular. Thermodynamics calculations were performed to evaluate the strengths of MDP-tetragonal phase zirconia chemical bonds at different pH values. Zirconia surfaces with and without alkaline coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM)/energy dispersive spectrometer and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy; alkaline coatings included NaOH, Ca(OH)2, nano-MgO, and nano-Zr(OH)4. A shear bond strength (SBS) test was performed to evaluate the effects of the four alkaline coatings on bonding; the alkaline coatings were applied to the surfaces prior to conditioning the zirconia with MDP-containing primers. Gibbs free energies of the MDP-tetragonal zirconia crystal model coordination reaction in different pH environments were −583.892 (NaOH), −569.048 [Ca(OH)2], −547.393 (MgO), and −530.279 kJ/mol [Zr(OH)4]. Thermodynamic calculations indicated that the alkaline coatings improved bonding in the following order: NaOH > Ca(OH)2 > MgO > Zr(OH)4. Statistical analysis of SBS tests showed a different result. SBSs were significantly different in groups that had different alkaline coatings, but it was not influenced by different primers. All four alkaline coatings increased SBS compared to control groups. Of the four coatings, nano-Zr(OH)4 and -MgO showed higher SBS. Therefore, preparing nano-Zr(OH)4 or -MgO coatings prior to conditioning with MDP-containing primers may potentially improve resin bonding of zirconia in the clinic. PMID:27785013

  7. Alkaline post-treatment of Cd(II)-glutathione coordination polymers: toward green synthesis of water-soluble and cytocompatible CdS quantum dots with tunable optical properties.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pengcheng; Jiang, Qin; Yu, Ping; Yang, Lifen; Mao, Lanqun

    2013-06-12

    In this study, we demonstrate a facile and environmentally friendly method for the synthesis of glutathione (GSH)-capped water-soluble CdS quantum dots (QDs) with a high cytocompatibility and a tunable optical property based on alkaline post-treatment of Cd-GSH coordination polymers (CPs). Cd-GSH CPs are synthesized with the coordination reaction of Cd(2+) with GSH at different pH values, and the CdS QDs are then formed by adding NaOH to the aqueous dispersion of the Cd-GSH CPs to break the coordination interaction between Cd(2+) and GSH with the release of sulfur. The particle size and optical property of the as-formed CdS QDs are found to be easily tailored by simply adjusting the starting pH values of GSH solutions used for the formation of Cd-GSH CPs, in which the wavelengths of trap-state emission of the QDs red-shift with an increase in the sizes of the QDs that is caused by an increase in the starting pH values of GSH solutions. In addition, the use of GSH as the capping reagent eventually endows the as-formed CdS QDs with enhanced water solubility and good cytocompatibility, as demonstrated with HeLa cells. The method demonstrated here is advantageous in that the cadmium precursor and the sulfur source are nontoxic and easily available, and the size, optical properties, water solubility, and cytocompatibilty of the as-formed CdS QDs are simply achieved and experimentally regulated. This study offers a new and green synthetic route to water-soluble and cytocompatible CdS QDs with tunable optical properties.

  8. Electrodeposition of Sn-Ni Alloy Coatings for Water-Splitting Application from Alkaline Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetty, Sandhya; Hegde, A. Chitharanjan

    2017-02-01

    In this work, Sn-Ni alloy coatings were developed onto the surface of copper from a newly formulated electrolytic bath by a simple and cost-effective electrodeposition technique using gelatin as an additive. The electrocatalytic behavior of coatings deposited at different current densities (c.d.'s) for water-splitting applications, in terms of hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER), has been researched. The experimental results showed that the electrocatalytic activity of Sn-Ni coatings has a close relationship with its composition, surface morphology, and phase structure depending on the c.d. used, supported by scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses. Cyclic voltammetry and chronopotentiometry techniques have demonstrated that Sn-Ni alloy deposited at 4.0 A dm-2 (having 37.6 wt pct Ni) and 1.0 A dm-2 (having 19.6 wt pct Ni) exhibit, respectively, the highest electrocatalytic behavior for HER and OER in 1.0-M KOH solution. Sn-Ni alloy coatings were found to be stable under working conditions of electrolysis, confirmed by electrochemical corrosion tests. High electrocatalytic activity of Sn-Ni alloy coatings for both HER and OER is specific to their composition, surface morphology, and active surface area.

  9. Spatial variability of surface-sediment porewater pH and related water-column characteristics in deep waters of the northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Changgao; Sui, Yi; Tang, Danling; Legendre, Louis

    2016-12-01

    This study analyzes the pH of surface-sediment porewater (i.e. 2-3 cm below the water-sediment interface), and concentrations of CaCO3 and organic carbon (OC) in 1192 sediment cores from the northern South China Sea, in water depths ranging from 137 to 3702 m. This is the first study in the literature to analyze the large-scale spatial variability of deep-water surface-sediment pH over a large ocean basin. The data showed strong spatial variations in pH. The lowest pH values (<7.3) were observed south of Hainan Island, an area that is affected by summer upwelling and freshwater runoff from the Pearl and Red Rivers. Moderately low pH values (generally 7.3-7.5) occurred in two other areas: a submarine canyon, where sediments originated partly from the Pearl River and correspond to a paleo-delta front during the last glacial period; and southwest of Taiwan Island, where waters are affected by the northern branch of the Kuroshio intrusion current (KIC) and runoff from Taiwan rivers. The surface sediments with the highest pH (⩾7.5, and up to 8.3) were located in a fourth area, which corresponded to the western branch of the KIC where sediments have been intensively eroded by bottom currents. The pH of surface-sediment porewater was significantly linearly related to water depth, bottom-water temperature, and CaCO3 concentration (p < 0.05 for the whole sampling area). This study shows that the pH of surface-sediment porewater can be sensitive to characteristics of the overlying water column, and suggests that it will respond to global warming as changes in surface-ocean temperature and pH progressively reach deeper waters.

  10. Responses of an Amazonian teleost, the tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum), to low pH in extremely soft water.

    PubMed

    Wood, C M; Wilson, R W; Gonzalez, R J; Patrick, M L; Bergman, H L; Narahara, A; Val, A L

    1998-01-01

    Our goal was to compare the internal physiological responses to acid challenge in an acidophilic tropical teleost endemic to dilute low-pH waters with those in nonacidophilic temperate species such as salmonids, which have been the subjects of most previous investigations. The Amazonian tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum), which migrates between circumneutral water and dilute acidic "blackwater" of the Rio Negro, was exposed to a graded low-pH and recovery regime in representative soft water (Na+ = 15, Cl- = 16, Ca2+ = 20 mumol L-1). Fish were fitted with arterial catheters for repetitive blood sampling. Water pH was altered from 6.5 (control) to 5.0, 4.0, 3.0, and back to 6.5 (recovery) on successive days. Some deaths occurred at pH 3.0. Throughout the regime, there were no disturbances of blood gases (O2 and CO2 tensions and contents) or lactate levels, and only very minor changes in acid-base status of plasma and red cells. However, erythrocytic guanylate and adenylate levels increased at pH's less than or equal to 5.0. Down to pH 4.0, plasma glucose, cortisol, and total ammonia levels remained constant, but all increased at pH 3.0, denoting a stress response. Plasma Na+ and Cl- levels declined and plasma protein concentration increased at pH 3.0, indicative of ionoregulatory and fluid volume disturbance, and neither recovered upon return to pH 6.5. Cortisol and ammonia elevations also persisted. Transepithelial potential changed progressively from highly negative values (inside) at pH 6.5 to highly positive values at pH 3.0; these alterations were fully reversible. Experimental elevations in water calcium levels drove the transepithelial potential positive at circumneutral pH, attenuated or prevented changes in transepithelial potential at low pH, and reduced Na+ and Cl- loss rates to the water during acute low-pH challenges. In general, tambaqui exhibited responses to low pH that were qualitatively similar but quantitatively more resistant than those previously

  11. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory : evaluation of alkaline persulfate digestion as an alternative to Kjeldahl digestion for determination of total and dissolved nitrogen and phosphorus in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patton, Charles J.; Kryskalla, Jennifer R.

    2003-01-01

    Alkaline persulfate digestion was evaluated and validated as a more sensitive, accurate, and less toxic alternative to Kjeldahl digestion for routine determination of nitrogen and phosphorus in surface- and ground-water samples in a large-scale and geographically diverse study conducted by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) between October 1, 2001, and September 30, 2002. Data for this study were obtained from about 2,100 surface- and ground-water samples that were analyzed for Kjeldahl nitrogen and Kjeldahl phosphorus in the course of routine operations at the USGS National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL). These samples were analyzed independently for total nitrogen and total phosphorus using an alkaline persulfate digestion method developed by the NWQL Methods Research and Development Program. About half of these samples were collected during nominally high-flow (April-June) conditions and the other half were collected during nominally low-flow (August-September) conditions. The number of filtered and whole-water samples analyzed from each flow regime was about equal.By operational definition, Kjeldahl nitrogen (ammonium + organic nitrogen) and alkaline persulfate digestion total nitrogen (ammonium + nitrite + nitrate + organic nitrogen) are not equivalent. It was necessary, therefore, to reconcile this operational difference by subtracting nitrate + nitrite concentra-tions from alkaline persulfate dissolved and total nitrogen concentrations prior to graphical and statistical comparisons with dissolved and total Kjeldahl nitrogen concentrations. On the basis of two-population paired t-test statistics, the means of all nitrate-corrected alkaline persulfate nitrogen and Kjeldahl nitrogen concentrations (2,066 paired results) were significantly different from zero at the p = 0.05 level. Statistically, the means of Kjeldahl nitrogen concentrations were greater than those of nitrate-corrected alkaline persulfate nitrogen concentrations. Experimental evidence strongly

  12. Priming effect of abscisic acid on alkaline stress tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Wei, Li-Xing; Lv, Bing-Sheng; Wang, Ming-Ming; Ma, Hong-Yuan; Yang, Hao-Yu; Liu, Xiao-Long; Jiang, Chang-Jie; Liang, Zheng-Wei

    2015-05-01

    Saline-alkaline stress is characterized by high salinity and high alkalinity (high pH); alkaline stress has been shown to be the primary factor inhibiting rice seedling growth. In this study, we investigated the potential priming effect of abscisic acid (ABA) on tolerance of rice seedlings to alkaline stress simulated by Na2CO3. Seedlings were pretreated with ABA at concentrations of 0 (control), 10, and 50 μM by root-drench for 24 h and then transferred to a Na2CO3 solution that did not contain ABA. Compared to control treatment, pretreatment with ABA substantially improved the survival rate of rice seedlings and increased biomass accumulation after 7 days under the alkaline condition. ABA application at 10 μM also alleviated the inhibitory effects of alkaline stress on the total root length and root surface area. Physiologically, ABA increased relative water content (RWC) and decreased cell membrane injury degree (MI) and Na(+)/K(+) ratios. In contrast, fluridone (an ABA biosynthesis inhibitor) decreased the RWC and increased MI in shoots under the alkaline conditions. These data suggest that ABA has a potent priming effect on the adaptive response to alkaline stress in rice and may be useful for improving rice growth in saline-alkaline paddy fields.

  13. Batch and column adsorption of herbicide fluroxypyr on different types of activated carbons from water with varied degrees of hardness and alkalinity.

    PubMed

    Pastrana-Martínez, L M; López-Ramón, M V; Fontecha-Cámara, M A; Moreno-Castilla, C

    2010-02-01

    There has been little research into the effects of the water hardness and alkalinity of surface waters on the adsorption of herbicides on activated carbons. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of these water characteristics on fluroxypyr adsorption on different activated carbons. At low fluroxypyr surface concentrations, the amount adsorbed from distilled water was related to the surface hydrophobicity. Surface area of carbons covered by fluroxypyr molecules ranged from 60 to 65%. Variations in fluroxypyr solubility with water hardness and alkalinity showed a salting-in effect. Calcium, magnesium and bicarbonate ions were adsorbed to a varied extent on the activated carbons. The presence of fluroxypyr in solution decreased their adsorption due to a competition effect. K(F) from the Freundlich equation linearly increased with water hardness due to salt-screened electrostatic repulsions between charged fluroxypyr molecules. The amount adsorbed from distilled water was largest at high fluroxypyr solution concentrations, because there was no competition between inorganic ions and fluroxypyr molecules. The column breakthrough volume and the amount adsorbed at breakthrough were smaller in tap versus distilled water. Carbon consumption was lower with activated carbon cloth than with the use of granular activated carbon.

  14. Estimation of water activity from pH and °Brix values of some food products.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Alonzo A

    2008-06-01

    In this study, a predictive model for the estimation of water activity (aw(25°C)) as a function of pH (1.00-8.00) and °Brix (0-82.00) values of simulated food solutions (SFS) was developed, through response surface methodology. Response fit analyses resulted in a highly significant (pH<0.0001) square root polynomial model that can predict aw(25°C) of SFS in terms of pH and °Brix values within the defined variable ranges. The linear, quadratic and interactive influences of pH and °Brix on aw(25°C) were all significant (pH<0.0001). Model validations in SFS and in a number of actual food systems showed that the model had acceptable predictive performance, as indicated by the calculated accuracy and bias indices.

  15. Sonochemical decomposition of hydrazine in water: effects of coal ash and pH on the decomposition and adsorption behavior.

    PubMed

    Nakui, Hiroyuki; Okitsu, Kenji; Maeda, Yasuaki; Nishimura, Rokurou

    2009-07-01

    Sonochemical decomposition of hydrazine in aqueous suspension of coal ash particles was investigated in the different pH solutions. It was clearly found that the initial rate of hydrazine decomposition and adsorption is strongly dependent on the amount of coal ash and pH. At pH1, the amount of the hydrazine adsorption on coal ash was very small and hydrazine was mainly decomposed by ultrasonic irradiation. At pH4, hydrazine was mainly adsorbed on coal ash and not decomposed by ultrasonic irradiation. At pH8, the sonochemical decomposition and the adsorption on coal ash proceeded simultaneously. These results were due to the interactions between the degree of the protonation of hydrazine, the electric charge of coal ash and the amount of OH radicals formed in the sonolysis of water.

  16. PIP Water Transport and Its pH Dependence Are Regulated by Tetramer Stoichiometry

    PubMed Central

    Jozefkowicz, Cintia; Sigaut, Lorena; Scochera, Florencia; Soto, Gabriela; Ayub, Nicolás; Pietrasanta, Lía Isabel; Amodeo, Gabriela; González Flecha, F. Luis; Alleva, Karina

    2016-01-01

    Many plasma membrane channels form oligomeric assemblies, and heterooligomerization has been described as a distinctive feature of some protein families. In the particular case of plant plasma membrane aquaporins (PIPs), PIP1 and PIP2 monomers interact to form heterotetramers. However, the biological properties of the different heterotetrameric configurations formed by PIP1 and PIP2 subunits have not been addressed yet. Upon coexpression of tandem PIP2-PIP1 dimers in Xenopus oocytes, we can address, for the first time to our knowledge, the functional properties of single heterotetrameric species having 2:2 stoichiometry. We have also coexpressed PIP2-PIP1 dimers with PIP1 and PIP2 monomers to experimentally investigate the localization and biological activity of each tetrameric assembly. Our results show that PIP2-PIP1 heterotetramers can assemble with 3:1, 1:3, or 2:2 stoichiometry, depending on PIP1 and PIP2 relative expression in the cell. All PIP2-PIP1 heterotetrameric species localize at the plasma membrane and present the same water transport capacity. Furthermore, the contribution of any heterotetrameric assembly to the total water transport through the plasma membrane doubles the contribution of PIP2 homotetramers. Our results also indicate that plasma membrane water transport can be modulated by the coexistence of different tetrameric species and by intracellular pH. Moreover, all the tetrameric species present similar cooperativity behavior for proton sensing. These findings throw light on the functional properties of PIP tetramers, showing that they have flexible stoichiometry dependent on the quantity of PIP1 and PIP2 molecules available. This represents, to our knowledge, a novel regulatory mechanism to adjust water transport across the plasma membrane. PMID:27028641

  17. PIP Water Transport and Its pH Dependence Are Regulated by Tetramer Stoichiometry.

    PubMed

    Jozefkowicz, Cintia; Sigaut, Lorena; Scochera, Florencia; Soto, Gabriela; Ayub, Nicolás; Pietrasanta, Lía Isabel; Amodeo, Gabriela; González Flecha, F Luis; Alleva, Karina

    2016-03-29

    Many plasma membrane channels form oligomeric assemblies, and heterooligomerization has been described as a distinctive feature of some protein families. In the particular case of plant plasma membrane aquaporins (PIPs), PIP1 and PIP2 monomers interact to form heterotetramers. However, the biological properties of the different heterotetrameric configurations formed by PIP1 and PIP2 subunits have not been addressed yet. Upon coexpression of tandem PIP2-PIP1 dimers in Xenopus oocytes, we can address, for the first time to our knowledge, the functional properties of single heterotetrameric species having 2:2 stoichiometry. We have also coexpressed PIP2-PIP1 dimers with PIP1 and PIP2 monomers to experimentally investigate the localization and biological activity of each tetrameric assembly. Our results show that PIP2-PIP1 heterotetramers can assemble with 3:1, 1:3, or 2:2 stoichiometry, depending on PIP1 and PIP2 relative expression in the cell. All PIP2-PIP1 heterotetrameric species localize at the plasma membrane and present the same water transport capacity. Furthermore, the contribution of any heterotetrameric assembly to the total water transport through the plasma membrane doubles the contribution of PIP2 homotetramers. Our results also indicate that plasma membrane water transport can be modulated by the coexistence of different tetrameric species and by intracellular pH. Moreover, all the tetrameric species present similar cooperativity behavior for proton sensing. These findings throw light on the functional properties of PIP tetramers, showing that they have flexible stoichiometry dependent on the quantity of PIP1 and PIP2 molecules available. This represents, to our knowledge, a novel regulatory mechanism to adjust water transport across the plasma membrane.

  18. Bifunctional enhancement of oxygen reduction reaction activity on Ag catalysts due to water activation on LaMnO3 supports in alkaline media

    PubMed Central

    Park, Shin-Ae; Lee, Eun-Kyung; Song, Hannah; Kim, Yong-Tae

    2015-01-01

    Ag is considered to be one of the best candidates for oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalysts in alkaline media for application in various electrochemical energy devices. In this study, we demonstrate that water activation is a key factor in enhancing the ORR activity in alkaline media, unlike in acid environments. Ag supported on LaMnO3 having a high oxophilicity showed a markedly higher ORR activity than that on carbon with inert surfaces. Through various electrochemical tests, it was revealed that the origin of the enhanced ORR activity of Ag/LaMnO3 is the bifunctional effect mainly due to the water activation at the interface between Ag and LaMnO3. Furthermore, the ligand effect due to the charge transfer from Mn to Ag leads to the enhancement of both oxygen activation on Ag and water activation on Mn sites, and hence, an improvement in the ORR activity of Ag/LaMnO3. On the other hand, the strain effect based on the fine structure variation in the lattice was negligible. We therefore suggest that the employment of a co-catalyst or support with highly oxophilic nature and the maximization of the interface between catalyst and support should be considered in the design of electrocatalysts for the ORR in alkaline media. PMID:26310526

  19. Solubility controls on aluminum in drinking water at relatively low and high pH.

    PubMed

    Kvech, Steve; Edwards, Marc

    2002-10-01

    Potential control of soluble aluminum in drinking water by formation of solids other than Al(OH)3 was examined. At pHs below 6.0, Al(+3) solids containing sulfate, silica or potassium are thermodynamically favored versus amorphous Al(OH)3; however, in this work no evidence could be obtained that solids other than Al(OH)3 would form in practice. At pHs above 9, aluminum and magnesium were discovered to form complex solid phases of approximate composition AlMg2(OH)7, AlMg2SiO2(OH)7 or Al(SiO2)2(OH)3 dependent on circumstance. Formation of these solids provide a mechanistic explanation for enhancements to precipitative softening obtained in practice by dosing Al(+3) salts; that is, improved flocculation/settling and removal of silica from water that interferes with calcium precipitation. The solids also maintain residual aluminum below regulatory guidelines at high pH > 9.5.

  20. A chronoamperometric screen printed carbon biosensor based on alkaline phosphatase inhibition for W(IV) determination in water, using 2-phospho-L-ascorbic acid trisodium salt as a substrate.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Gámez, Ana Lorena; Alonso-Lomillo, María Asunción; Domínguez-Renedo, Olga; Arcos-Martínez, María Julia

    2015-01-22

    This paper presents a chronoamperometric method to determine tungsten in water using screen-printed carbon electrodes modified with gold nanoparticles and cross linked alkaline phosphatase immobilized in the working electrode. Enzymatic activity over 2-phospho-l-ascorbic acid trisodium salt, used as substrate, was affected by tungsten ions, which resulted in a decrease of chronoamperometric current, when a potential of 200 mV was applied on 10 mM of substrate in a Tris HCl buffer pH 8.00 and 0.36 M of KCl. Calibration curves for the electrochemical method validation, give a reproducibility of 5.2% (n = 3), a repeatability of 9.4% (n = 3) and a detection limit of 0.29 ± 0.01 µM. Enriched tap water, purified laboratory water and bottled drinking water, with a certified tungsten reference solution traceable to NIST, gave a recovery of 97.1%, 99.1% and 99.1% respectively (n = 4 in each case) and a dynamic range from 0.6 to 30 µM. This study was performed by means of a Lineweaver-Burk plot, showing a mixed kinetic inhibition.

  1. A Chronoamperometric Screen Printed Carbon Biosensor Based on Alkaline Phosphatase Inhibition for W(VI) Determination in Water, Using 2-Phospho-l-Ascorbic Acid Trisodium Salt as a Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Gámez, Ana Lorena; Alonso-Lomillo, María Asunción; Domínguez-Renedo, Olga; Arcos-Martínez, María Julia

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a chronoamperometric method to determine tungsten in water using screen-printed carbon electrodes modified with gold nanoparticles and cross linked alkaline phosphatase immobilized in the working electrode. Enzymatic activity over 2-phospho-l-ascorbic acid trisodium salt, used as substrate, was affected by tungsten ions, which resulted in a decrease of chronoamperometric current, when a potential of 200 mV was applied on 10 mM of substrate in a Tris HCl buffer pH 8.00 and 0.36 M of KCl. Calibration curves for the electrochemical method validation, give a reproducibility of 5.2% (n = 3), a repeatability of 9.4% (n = 3) and a detection limit of 0.29 ± 0.01 μM. Enriched tap water, purified laboratory water and bottled drinking water, with a certified tungsten reference solution traceable to NIST, gave a recovery of 97.1%, 99.1% and 99.1% respectively (n = 4 in each case) and a dynamic range from 0.6 to 30 μM. This study was performed by means of a Lineweaver–Burk plot, showing a mixed kinetic inhibition. PMID:25621602

  2. The impact of sedimentary alkalinity release on the water column CO2 system in the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, H.; Braeckman, U.; Le Guitton, M.; Meysman, F. J. R.

    2015-08-01

    Recently, it has been proposed that alkalinity release from sediments can play an important role in the carbonate dynamics on continental shelves, lowering the pCO2 of seawater and hence increasing the CO2 uptake from the atmosphere. To test this hypothesis, sedimentary alkalinity generation was quantified within permeable and muddy sediments across the North Sea during two cruises in September 2011 (basin-wide) and June 2012 (Dutch coastal zone). Benthic fluxes of alkalinity (AT) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were determined using shipboard closed sediment incubations. These results show that sediments can be an important source for alkalinity, particularly in the shallow southern North Sea, where high AT and DIC fluxes were recorded in near shore sediments of the Belgian, Dutch and German coastal zone. In contrast, fluxes of AT and DIC are substantially lower in the deeper, seasonally stratified, northern part of the North Sea. Overall, our results show that sedimentary alkalinity generation should be considered an important factor in the CO2 dynamics of shallow coastal systems.

  3. Viable but non-culturable state (VBNC) of Escherichia coli related to EnvZ under the effect of pH, starvation and osmotic stress in sea water.

    PubMed

    Darcan, Cihan; Ozkanca, Reşit; Idil, Onder; Flint, Ken P

    2009-01-01

    When exposed extreme environmental conditions such as sea water, bacteria have been shown different survival strategy for continue their life. One of this strategy known as viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state which is very important for nondifferiation bacteria. VBNC cells cause serious human health problems. Little is known, however, about the genetic mechanisms underlying the VBNC state. Under different environmental conditions, porins are important in the survival strategy of bacteria. EnvZ/OmpR work together as regulators of ompF and ompC gene expression. It is known that the EnvZ system has a role in VBNC state. In this study we tried to find out the viability of EnvZ, OmpC and OmpF mutant E. coli under stress effect of osmolarity, pH and starvation. Bacteria were suspended in filtered-autoclaved sea water microcosms and numbers determined over 25 day incubation periods by plate count (PC), direct viable count (DVC) and count of cells capable of respiration (RCC). As regard to results, alkaline pH affected E. coli more than acidic pH, which led to decline in number. On the contrary glycine betaine addition to sea water protected E. coli porin mutants and also reduced the death rate of bacteria. Under the effect of pH, osmotic stress and starvation stress, wild type E. coli and porin mutants entered a dormant state or became VBNC with the exception of MSZ31 (envZ mutant) E. coli cells which did not enter the VBNC state under the three tested stress conditions. This study is the first report to demonstrate that E. coli could not enter the VBNC state in the lack of EnvZ product under the stress of osmolarity, pH and starvation and the relationship between EnvZ and VBNC state are not affected by pH, osmolarity and starvation.

  4. Solid / solution interaction: The effect of carbonate alkalinity on adsorbed thorium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaFlamme, Brian D.; Murray, James W.

    1987-02-01

    Elevated activities of dissolved Th have been found in Soap Lake, an alkaline lake in Eastern Washington. Dissolved 232Th ranges from less than 0.001 to 4.9 dpm/L compared to about 1.3 × 10 -5 dpm/ L in sea water. The enhanced activity in the lake coincides with an increase in carbonate alkalinity. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of pH, ionic strength and carbonate alkalinity on Th adsorption on goethite. Thorium (10 -13 M total) in the presence of 5.22 mg/L α-FeOOH and 0.1 M NaNO 3 has an adsorption edge from pH 2-5. At pH 9.0 ± 0.6 the percent Th absorbed on the solid began to decrease from 100% at 100 meq/L carbonate alkalinity and exhibited no adsorption above 300 meq/L. The experimental data were modeled to obtain the intrinsic adsorption equilibrium constants for Th hydrolysis species. These adsorption constants were incorporated in the model to interpret the observed effect of carbonate alkalinity on Th adsorption. There are two main effects of the alkalinity. To a significant degree the decrease in Th adsorption is due to competition of HCO -3 and CO 2-3 ions for surface sites. Dissolved Th carbonate complexes also contribute to the increase of Th in solution.

  5. Effects of pH on Water-Solubilization of Carbon Nanotube Using Microplasma in Aqueous Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imasaka, Kiminobu; Kato, Yuki; Khaled, Usama; Suehiro, Junya

    2009-06-01

    The authors have previously proposed a novel technique for the preparation of water-soluble carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using microplasma generated by a pulsed streamer discharge in water. This paper describes effects of pH values on water-solubility of single-walled CNT (SWCNT) treated by the microplasma. The SWCNT treated under basic conditions showed two times higher solubility compared to that treated under neutral condition, whereas the SWCNT solubility considerably decreased under acidic conditions. Based on optical emission measurements of microplasma showed that radical formation was not pH sensitive. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis showed that the microplasma treated SWCNT was functionalized with -COO- groups with little pH dependence. In contrary, clear pH dependence was observed for zeta potential of the microplasma-treated SWCNT. The lowest zeta potential was -46 mV, which was obtained with basic solution adjusted by NH3 (pH ≈9). The SWCNT treated under basic conditions was more negatively charged due to suppressed protonation of -COO- groups. As a result, the electrostatic repulsion force between SWCNTs could overcome van der Waals force improving their solubility and dispersibility in water.

  6. Effects of carbon, nitrogen and pH on the growth of Aspergillus parasiticus and aflatoxins production in water.

    PubMed

    Al-Gabr, Hamid Moh; Ye, Chengsong; Zhang, Yongli; Khan, Sardar; Lin, Huirong; Zheng, Tianling

    2013-04-01

    Mycotoxins are considered as the most hazardous fungal metabolites for human, animals and plant health. Recently, more attention has been paid on the occurrence of this group of fungi in different water sources throughout the globe. In this study, Aspergillus parasiticus ATCC strain was used as representative strain producing aflatoxins in drinking water. This study aimed to investigate the activation of fungi in drinking water and their ability to produce aflatoxins (B1, B2, G1, and G2) in water under different ratios of C:N using different concentrations of total organic carbon (TOC) and total nitrogen (TN). Glucose and ammonium sulphate were used for changing the levels of TOC and TN in the selected water media. Similarly, the effects of different water pH levels from 4.5 to 8.2 on the growth of this group of fungi and aflatoxins production were also investigated. The results indicate that the growth of fungi was highest, at C:N ratio of 1:1 as compared to other selected ratios. Furthermore, the findings indicate that the pH levels 5.5-6.5 showed best growth of fungi as compared to other pH levels. Aflatoxin concentrations were measured in the water samples using HPLC technique, but selected fungi were not able to produce aflatoxins in water at applied concentrations of TOC and TN mimicking the ratios and concentrations present in the natural aquatic environment.

  7. Particle water and pH in the eastern Mediterranean: source variability and implications for nutrient availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bougiatioti, Aikaterini; Nikolaou, Panayiota; Stavroulas, Iasonas; Kouvarakis, Giorgos; Weber, Rodney; Nenes, Athanasios; Kanakidou, Maria; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos

    2016-04-01

    Particle water (liquid water content, LWC) and aerosol pH are important parameters of the aerosol phase, affecting heterogeneous chemistry and bioavailability of nutrients that profoundly impact cloud formation, atmospheric composition, and atmospheric fluxes of nutrients to ecosystems. Few measurements of in situ LWC and pH, however, exist in the published literature. Using concurrent measurements of aerosol chemical composition, cloud condensation nuclei activity, and tandem light scattering coefficients, the particle water mass concentrations associated with the aerosol inorganic (Winorg) and organic (Worg) components are determined for measurements conducted at the Finokalia atmospheric observation station in the eastern Mediterranean between June and November 2012. These data are interpreted using the ISORROPIA-II thermodynamic model to predict the pH of aerosols originating from the various sources that influence air quality in the region. On average, closure between predicted aerosol water and that determined by comparison of ambient with dry light scattering coefficients was achieved to within 8 % (slope = 0.92, R2 = 0.8, n = 5201 points). Based on the scattering measurements, a parameterization is also derived, capable of reproducing the hygroscopic growth factor (f(RH)) within 15 % of the measured values. The highest aerosol water concentrations are observed during nighttime, when relative humidity is highest and the collapse of the boundary layer increases the aerosol concentration. A significant diurnal variability is found for Worg with morning and afternoon average mass concentrations being 10-15 times lower than nighttime concentrations, thus rendering Winorg the main form of particle water during daytime. The average value of total aerosol water was 2.19 ± 1.75 µg m-3, contributing on average up to 33 % of the total submicron mass concentration. Average aerosol water associated with organics, Worg, was equal to 0.56 ± 0.37 µg m-3; thus, organics

  8. Empirical algorithms to estimate water column pH in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, N. L.; Juranek, L. W.; Johnson, K. S.; Feely, R. A.; Riser, S. C.; Talley, L. D.; Russell, J. L.; Sarmiento, J. L.; Wanninkhof, R.

    2016-04-01

    Empirical algorithms are developed using high-quality GO-SHIP hydrographic measurements of commonly measured parameters (temperature, salinity, pressure, nitrate, and oxygen) that estimate pH in the Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean. The coefficients of determination, R2, are 0.98 for pH from nitrate (pHN) and 0.97 for pH from oxygen (pHOx) with RMS errors of 0.010 and 0.008, respectively. These algorithms are applied to Southern Ocean Carbon and Climate Observations and Modeling (SOCCOM) biogeochemical profiling floats, which include novel sensors (pH, nitrate, oxygen, fluorescence, and backscatter). These algorithms are used to estimate pH on floats with no pH sensors and to validate and adjust pH sensor data from floats with pH sensors. The adjusted float data provide, for the first time, seasonal cycles in surface pH on weekly resolution that range from 0.05 to 0.08 on weekly resolution for the Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean.

  9. Particle water and pH in the Eastern Mediterranean: sources variability and implications for nutrients availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaou, P.; Bougiatioti, A.; Stavroulas, I.; Kouvarakis, G.; Nenes, A.; Weber, R.; Kanakidou, M.; Mihalopoulos, N.

    2015-10-01

    Particle water (LWC) and aerosol pH drive the aerosol phase, heterogeneous chemistry and bioavailability of nutrients that profoundly impact cloud formation, atmospheric composition and atmospheric fluxes of nutrients to ecosystems. Few measurements of in-situ LWC and pH however exist in the published literature. Using concurrent measurements of aerosol chemical composition, cloud condensation nuclei activity and tandem light scattering coefficients, the particle water mass concentrations associated with the aerosol inorganic (Winorg) and organic (Worg) components are determined for measurements conducted at the Finokalia atmospheric observation station in the eastern Mediterranean between August and November 2012. These data are interpreted using the ISORROPIA-II thermodynamic model to predict pH of aerosols originating from the various sources that influence air quality in the region. On average, closure between predicted aerosol water and that determined by comparison of ambient with dry light scattering coefficients was achieved to within 8 % (slope = 0.92, R2 = 0.8, n = 5201 points). Based on the scattering measurements a parameterization is also derived, capable of reproducing the hygroscopic growth factor (f(RH)) within 15 % of the measured values. The highest aerosol water concentrations are observed during nighttime, when relative humidity is highest and the collapse of the boundary layer increases the aerosol concentration. A significant diurnal variability is found for Worg with morning and afternoon average mass concentrations being 10-15 times lower than nighttime concentrations, thus rendering Winorg the main form of particle water during daytime. The average value of total aerosol water was 2.19 ± 1.75 μg m-3, contributing on average up to 33 % of the total submicron mass concentration. Average aerosol water associated with organics, Worg, was equal to 0.56 ± 0.37 μg m-3, thus organics contributed about 27.5 % to the total aerosol water, mostly

  10. Determination of organic compounds leached from municipal incinerator fly ash by water at different pH levels

    SciTech Connect

    Karasek, F.W.; Charbonneau, G.M.; Reuel, G.J.; Tong, H.Y.

    1987-04-01

    This study concerns the possibility of organic compounds entering the environment through the leaching of municipal incinerator fly ash with water. A Soxhlet extraction of fly ash with water, followed by a benzene/water solvent extraction was used to isolate organic compounds. The pH of the extracting liquid was varied (pH 4, 7, 10) and both the type and amount of compounds extracted differed. Many organic compounds including polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, polychlorinated dibenzofurans, polycyclic aromatic compounds, phenols, and hydrocarbons were found in the water extracts. Gas chromatography/flame ionization detection, gas chromatography/electron capture detection, and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry using electron impact, positive and negative ion chemical ionization techniques were used for compound identification and quantitation.

  11. Effects of root medium pH on root water transport and apoplastic pH in red-osier dogwood (Cornus sericea) and paper birch (Betula papyrifera) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W; Zwiazek, J J

    2016-11-01

    Soil pH is a major factor affecting plant growth. Plant responses to pH conditions widely vary between different species of plants. However, the exact mechanisms of high pH tolerance of plants are largely unknown. In the present study, we compared the pH responses of paper birch (Betula papyrifera) seedlings, a relatively sensitive species to high soil pH, with red-osier dogwood (Cornus sericea), reported to be relatively tolerant of high pH conditions. We examined the hypotheses that tolerance of plants to high root zone pH is linked to effective control of root apoplastic pH to facilitate nutrient and water transport processes In the study, we exposed paper birch and red-osier dogwood seedlings for six weeks to pH 5, 7 and 9 under controlled-environment conditions in hydroponic culture. Then, we measured biomass, gas exchange, root hydraulic conductivity, ferric chelate reductase (FCR) activity, xylem sap pH and the relative abundance of major elements in leaf protoplasts and apoplasts. The study sheds new light on the rarely studied high pH tolerance mechanisms in plants. We found that compared with paper birch, red-osier dogwood showed greater growth, higher gas exchange, and maintained higher root hydraulic conductivity as well as lower xylem sap pH under high pH conditions. The results suggest that the relatively high pH tolerance of dogwood is associated with greater water uptake ability and maintenance of low apoplastic pH. These traits may have a significant impact on the uptake of Fe and Mn by leaf cells.

  12. Technetium recovery from high alkaline solution

    DOEpatents

    Nash, Charles A.

    2016-07-12

    Disclosed are methods for recovering technetium from a highly alkaline solution. The highly alkaline solution can be a liquid waste solution from a nuclear waste processing system. Methods can include combining the solution with a reductant capable of reducing technetium at the high pH of the solution and adding to or forming in the solution an adsorbent capable of adsorbing the precipitated technetium at the high pH of the solution.

  13. Nanoscale Investigation of the Impact of pH and Orthophosphate on the Corrosion of Copper Surfaces in Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advanced surface characterization techniques were used to systematically investigate the passivation of copper during corrosion in water as impacted by pH and orthophosphate. Atomic force microscopy, depth profiling with time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and X-ray d...

  14. Significance of pH on the Cytotoxic Potential of the Water Disinfection By-Product Iodoacetic Acid

    EPA Science Inventory

    Significance of pH on the Cytotoxic Potential of the Water Disinfection By-Product Iodoacetic Acid Vicki Richardson1, Susan D. Richardson2, Mary Moyer3, Jane Ellen Simmons1, and Anthony DeAngelo1, 1U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC, 2University of...

  15. Alkalinity production in intertidal sands intensified by lugworm bioirrigation

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Alexandra M.F.; Malkin, Sairah Y.; Montserrat, Francesc; Meysman, Filip J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Porewater profiles and sediment-water fluxes of oxygen, nutrients, pH, calcium, alkalinity, and sulfide were measured in intertidal sandflat sediments from the Oosterschelde mesotidal lagoon (The Netherlands). The influence of bioturbation and bioirrigation by the deep-burrowing polychaete Arenicola marina on the rates and sources of benthic alkalinity generation was examined by comparing measurements in intact and defaunated sediment cores before and after the addition of A. marina in summer and fall 2011. Higher organic matter remineralization rates, shallower O2 penetration, and greater sediment-water solute fluxes were observed in summer, consistent with higher sediment community metabolic rates at a higher temperature. Lugworm activity stimulated porewater exchange (5.1 × in summer, 1.9 × in fall), organic matter remineralization (6.2 × in summer, 1.9 × in fall), aerobic respiration (2.4 × in summer, 2.1 × in fall), alkalinity release (4.7 × in summer, 4.0 × in fall), nutrient regeneration, and iron cycling. The effects of lugworm activity on net sediment-water fluxes were similar but more pronounced in summer than in fall. Alkalinity release in fall was entirely driven by metabolic carbonate dissolution, while this process explained between 22 and 69% of total alkalinity production in summer, indicating the importance of other processes in this season. By enhancing organic matter remineralization and the reoxidation of reduced metabolites by the sediment microbial community, lugworm activity stimulated the production of dissolved inorganic carbon and metabolic acidity, which in turn enhanced metabolic CaCO3 dissolution efficiency. In summer, evidence of microbial long distance electron transport (LDET) was observed in defaunated sediment. Thus, alkalinity production by net carbonate dissolution was likely supplemented by anaerobic respiration and LDET in summer. PMID:25431515

  16. Energetics of Amino Acid Synthesis in Alkaline Hydrothermal Environments.

    PubMed

    Kitadai, Norio

    2015-12-01

    Alkaline hydrothermal systems have received considerable attention as candidates for the origin and evolution of life on the primitive Earth. Nevertheless, sufficient information has not yet been obtained for the thermodynamic properties of amino acids, which are necessary components for life, at high temperatures and alkaline pH. These properties were estimated using experimental high-temperature volume and heat capacity data reported in the literature for several amino acids, together with correlation algorithms and the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equations of state. This approach enabled determination of a complete set of the standard molal thermodynamic data and the revised HKF parameters for the 20 protein amino acids in their zwitterionic and ionization states. The obtained dataset was then used to evaluate the energetics of amino acid syntheses from simple inorganic precursors (CO2, H2, NH3 and H2S) in a simulated alkaline hydrothermal system on the Hadean Earth. Results show that mixing between CO2-rich seawater and the H2-rich hydrothermal fluid can produce energetically favorable conditions for amino acid syntheses, particularly in the lower-temperature region of such systems. Together with data related to the pH and temperature dependences of the energetics of amino acid polymerizations presented in earlier reports, these results suggest the following. Hadean alkaline hydrothermal settings, where steep pH and temperature gradients may have existed between cool, slightly acidic Hadean ocean water and hot, alkaline hydrothermal fluids at the vent-ocean interface, may be energetically the most suitable environment for the synthesis and polymerization of amino acids.

  17. Energetics of Amino Acid Synthesis in Alkaline Hydrothermal Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitadai, Norio

    2015-12-01

    Alkaline hydrothermal systems have received considerable attention as candidates for the origin and evolution of life on the primitive Earth. Nevertheless, sufficient information has not yet been obtained for the thermodynamic properties of amino acids, which are necessary components for life, at high temperatures and alkaline pH. These properties were estimated using experimental high-temperature volume and heat capacity data reported in the literature for several amino acids, together with correlation algorithms and the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equations of state. This approach enabled determination of a complete set of the standard molal thermodynamic data and the revised HKF parameters for the 20 protein amino acids in their zwitterionic and ionization states. The obtained dataset was then used to evaluate the energetics of amino acid syntheses from simple inorganic precursors (CO2, H2, NH3 and H2S) in a simulated alkaline hydrothermal system on the Hadean Earth. Results show that mixing between CO2-rich seawater and the H2-rich hydrothermal fluid can produce energetically favorable conditions for amino acid syntheses, particularly in the lower-temperature region of such systems. Together with data related to the pH and temperature dependences of the energetics of amino acid polymerizations presented in earlier reports, these results suggest the following. Hadean alkaline hydrothermal settings, where steep pH and temperature gradients may have existed between cool, slightly acidic Hadean ocean water and hot, alkaline hydrothermal fluids at the vent-ocean interface, may be energetically the most suitable environment for the synthesis and polymerization of amino acids.

  18. Fine particle water and pH in the Eastern Mediterranean: Sources, variability and implications for nutrients availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bougiatioti, Aikaterini; Nikolaou, Panayiota; Stavroulas, Iasonas; Kouvarakis, Giorgos; Nenes, Athanasios; Weber, Rodney; Kanakidou, Maria; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric particles have the ability to absorb significant amounts of water, which greatly impacts on their physical and chemical properties. Direclty linked to aerosol pH and LWC is the bioavailability of nutrients contained within mineral dust, involving pH-dependent catalyzed redox-reaction pathways. Liquid water content (LWC) and pH, even though are important constituents of the aerosol phase, are rarely monitored. Direct measurements of aerosol pH "in situ" are scarce and require considerations owing to the non-conserved nature of the hydronium ion and partial dissociation of inorganic and organic electrolytes in the aerosol. To overcome these challenges, indirect alternatives such as measuring the semi-volatile partitioning of key species sensitive to pH, combined with comprehensive models are used to provide a reasonably accurate estimate of pH that can be carried out with routine measurements. Using concurrent measurements of aerosol chemical composition, tandem light scattering coefficients and the thermodynamic model ISORROPIA-II, LWC mass concentrations associated with the aerosol inorganic and organic components are determined for the remote background site of Finokalia, Crete. The predicted water was subsequently compared to the one measured by the ambient versus dry light scattering coefficients. The sum of Winorg and Worg was highly correlated and in close agreement with the measured LWC (on average within 10%), with slope 0.92 (R2=0.8) for the whole measurement period between August and November 2012 (n=5201 points). As expected, the highest fine aerosol water values are observed during night-time, when RH is at its maximum, resulting in important water uptake. The average concentration of total aerosol water was found to be 2.19±1.75 μg m-3, which according to the dry mass measurements, can contribute on average up to 33% to the total aerosol submicron mass. The average Worg was found to be 0.56±0.37 μg m-3, which constitutes about 28% of the

  19. The stability of water- and fat-soluble vitamin in dentifrices according to pH level and storage type.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Eun; Kim, Ki-Eun; Choi, Yong-Jun; Park, Yong-Duk; Kwon, Ha-Jeong

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the vitamin stabilities in dentifrices by analyzing various vitamins according to the level and storage temperature. The stabilities of water- and fat-soluble vitamins were investigated in buffer solution at different pH values (4, 7, 8, 10 and 11) for 14 days and in dentifrices at different pH (7 and 10) for 5 months at two temperature conditions (room and refrigeration temperature) by analyzing the remaining amounts using HPLC methods. In the buffer solution, the stability of vitamins B1 , B6 and C was increased as the pH values increased. Vitamins E and K showed poor stability at pH 4, and vitamin B3 showed poor stability at pH 11. In dentifrices, the storage temperature highly influenced vitamin stability, especially vitamins C and E, but the stabilities of vitamins B1 and C according to pH values did not correspond to the buffer solution tests. Vitamin B group was relatively stable in dentifrices, but vitamin C completely disappeared after 5 months. Vitamin K showed the least initial preservation rates. Vitamins were not detected in commercial dentifrices for adults and detected amounts were less than the advertised contents in dentifrices for children.

  20. Extending the applicability of pressurized hot water extraction to compounds exhibiting limited water solubility by pH control: curcumin from the turmeric rhizome.

    PubMed

    Euterpio, Maria Anna; Cavaliere, Chiara; Capriotti, Anna Laura; Crescenzi, Carlo

    2011-11-01

    Pressurized hot water extraction (PHWE, also known as subcritical water extraction) is commonly considered to be an environmentally friendly extraction technique that could potentially replace traditional methods that use organic solvents. Unfortunately, the applicability of this technique is often limited by the very low water solubility of the target compounds, even at high temperatures. In this paper, the scope for broadening the applicability of PHWE by adjusting the pH of the water used in the extraction is demonstrated in the extraction of curcumin (which exhibits very limited water solubility) from untreated turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) rhizomes. Although poor extraction yields were obtained, even at high temperatures when using degassed water or neutral phosphate buffer as the extraction medium, yields exceeding those obtained by Soxhlet extraction were achieved using highly acidic pH buffers due to curcumin protonation. The influence of the temperature, pH, and buffer concentration on the extraction yield were investigated in detail by means of a series of designed experiments. Optimized conditions for the extraction of curcumin from turmeric by PHWE were estimated at 197 °C using 62 g/L buffer concentration at pH 1.6. The relationships between these variables were subjected to statistical analysis using response surface methodology.

  1. Experimental Study on the pH of Pore water in Compacted Bentonite under Reducing Conditions with Electromigration

    SciTech Connect

    Nessa, S.A.; Idemitsu, K.; Yamazaki, S.; Ikeuchi, H.; Inagaki, Y.; Arima, T.

    2008-07-01

    Compacted bentonite and carbon steel are considered a good buffer and over-pack materials in the repositories of high-level radioactive waste disposal. Sodium bentonite, Kunipia-F contains approximately 95 wt% of montmorillonite. Bentonites prominent properties of high swelling, sealing ability and cation exchange capacity provide retardation against the transport of radionuclides from the waste into the surrounding rocks in the repository and its properties determine the behavior of bentonite. In this regards, the pH of pore water in compacted bentonite is measured with pH test paper wrapped with semi-permeable membrane of collodion sheet under reducing conditions. On 30 days, the pH test paper in the experimental apparatus indicated that the pH of pore water in compacted bentonite is around 8.0 at saturated state. The carbon steel coupon is connected as the working electrode to the potentiostat and is held at a constant supplied potential between +300 and -300 mV vs. Ag/AgCl electrode for up to 7 days. During applying electromigration the pH of pore water in bentonite decreased and it reached 6.0{approx}6.0 on 7 days. The concentration of iron and sodium showed nearly complementary distribution in the bentonite specimen after electromigration. It is expected that iron could migrate as ferrous ion through the interlayer of montmorillonite replacing exchangeable sodium ions in the interlayer. Semi-permeable membrane of collodion sheet does not affect the color change of pH test paper during the experiment. (authors)

  2. Physiological Responses of a Model Marine Diatom to Fast pH Changes: Special Implications of Coastal Water Acidification.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yaping; Beardall, John; Gao, Kunshan

    2015-01-01

    Diatoms and other phytoplankton in coastal waters experience rapid pH changes in milieu due to high biological activities and/or upwelled CO2-rich waters. While CO2 concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) are employed by all diatoms tested to counter low CO2 availability in seawater, little is known how this mechanism responds to fast pH changes. In the present study, the model diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana was acclimated for 20 generations to low pH (7.81) at an elevated CO2 of 1000 μatm (HC) or to high pH (8.18) at ambient CO2 levels of 390 μatm (LC), then its physiological characteristics were investigated as cells were shifted from HC to LC or vice versa. The maximal electron transport rate (ETRmax) in the HC-acclimated cells was immediately reduced by decreased CO2 availability, showing much lower values compared to that of the LC-acclimated cells. However, the cells showed a high capacity to regain their photochemical performance regardless of the growth CO2 levels, with their ETRmax values recovering to initial levels in about 100 min. This result indicates that this diatom might modulate its CCMs quickly to maintain a steady state supply of CO2, which is required for sustaining photosynthesis. In addition, active uptake of CO2 could play a fundamental role during the induction of CCMs under CO2 limitation, since the cells maintained high ETR even when both intracellular and periplasmic carbonic anhydrases were inhibited. It is concluded that efficient regulation of the CCM is one of the key strategies for diatoms to survive in fast changing pH environment, e.g. for the tested species, which is a dominant species in coastal waters where highly fluctuating pH is observed.

  3. An alkaline approach to treating cooling towers for control of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    States, S J; Conley, L F; Towner, S G; Wolford, R S; Stephenson, T E; McNamara, A M; Wadowsky, R M; Yee, R B

    1987-01-01

    Earlier field and laboratory studies have shown that Legionella species survive and multiply in the pH range 5.5 to 9.2. Additionally, the technical feasibility of operating cooling towers at elevated alkalinities and pH has previously been documented by published guidelines. The guidelines indicate that these conditions facilitate corrosion control and favor chlorine persistence which enhances the effectiveness of continuous chlorination in biofouling control. This information suggests that control of Legionella species in cooling towers can be accomplished by operating the towers under alkaline conditions. To test this possibility, we collected water samples over a period of months from a hospital cooling tower. The samples were analyzed for a variety of chemical parameters. Subsamples were pasteurized and inoculated with non-agar-passaged Legionella pneumophila which had been maintained in tap water. Correlation of subsequent Legionella growth with corresponding pH and alkalinity values revealed statistically significant inverse associations. These data support the hypothesis that operating cooling towers outside of the optimal conditions for Legionella growth (e.g., at elevated alkalinities and a pH greater than 9) may be a useful approach to controlling growth in this habitat. PMID:3662515

  4. Effects of water pH on copper toxicity to early life stages of the common carp (Cyprinus carpio)

    SciTech Connect

    Stouthart, X.J.H.X.; Haans, J.L.M.; Lock, R.A.C.; Bonga, S.E.W.

    1996-03-01

    Carp eggs were exposed immediately after fertilization to Cu concentrations of 0.3 and 0.8 {micro}mol/L at water pH 7.6 or pH 6.3. Mortality, the incidence of spinal cord deformation, heart rate, tail movements, hatching success, and whole-body content of K, Na, Mg, Ca, and Cu were determined over time. Light microscopical preparations of eggs (48 h after fertilization) and larvae (168 h after fertilization) were studied. At pH 7.6, Cu did not affect egg mortality, heart rate, tail movements, and whole-body K and Mg content. Hatching success increased only in the 0.3 {micro}mol/L Cu group. Exposure to 0.8 {micro}mol/L Cu increased egg mortality and decreased heart rate and tail movements. Furthermore, premature hatching, a concentration-dependent increase of larval mortality, and larval deformation was observed. Exposure to 0.3 and 0.8 {micro}mol/L Cu decreased the whole-body content of K, Na, Mg, and Ca. Uptake of Cu after hatching increased two-fold at pH 6.3 compared to the pH 7.6 groups. At pH 6.3, all Cu-exposed larvae were unable to fill their swim bladder. Also, after 168 h the yolk sac remained largely unabsorbed in the 0.3 and 0.8 {micro}mol/L Cu group. Exposure to 0.8 {micro}mol/L Cu resulted in coagulation of proteins in eggs and yolk sacs. No significant changes in any of the assessed parameters were observed in control groups of pH 6.3 and pH 7.6.

  5. Season-long Changes in Infiltration Rates Associated with Irrigation Water Sodicity and pH

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is increasing need to substitute low quality waters, including saline sodic waters and treated municipal waste water for fresh water when irrigating land in arid and semi-arid regions of the world. In almost all instances low quality waters are more sodic than the fresh waters currently utili...

  6. Partial oxidation of step-bound water leads to anomalous pH effects on metal electrode step-edges.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Kathleen; Xu, Bingjun; Yan, Yushan; Sundararaman, Ravishankar

    2016-06-28

    The design of better heterogeneous catalysts for applications such as fuel cells and electrolyzers requires a mechanistic understanding of electrocatalytic reactions and the dependence of their activity on operating conditions such as pH. A satisfactory explanation for the unexpected pH dependence of electrochemical properties of platinum surfaces has so far remained elusive, with previous explanations resorting to complex co-adsorption of multiple species and resulting in limited predictive power. This knowledge gap suggests that the fundamental properties of these catalysts are not yet understood, limiting systematic improvement. Here, we analyze the change in charge and free energies upon adsorption using density-functional theory (DFT) to establish that water adsorbs on platinum step edges across a wide voltage range, including the double-layer region, with a loss of approximately 0.2 electrons upon adsorption. We show how this as-yet unreported change in net surface charge due to this water explains the anomalous pH variations of the hydrogen underpotential deposition (Hupd) and the potentials of zero total charge (PZTC) observed in published experimental data. This partial oxidation of water is not limited to platinum metal step edges, and we report the charge of the water on metal step edges of commonly used catalytic metals, including copper, silver, iridium, and palladium, illustrating that this partial oxidation of water broadly influences the reactivity of metal electrodes.

  7. Variability of shelf sea pH and surface water CO2 in response to North Atlantic Oscillation forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salt, L.; Thomas, H.; Prowe, A. E. F.; Borges, A. V.; de Baar, H. J. W.

    2012-04-01

    High biological activity causes a distinct seasonality of surface water pH in the North Sea, which has been identified as a strong sink for atmospheric CO2 via a particularly effective shelf pump. The intimate connection between the North Sea and the North Atlantic suggests that the variability of the CO2 system of the North Atlantic Ocean may in part be responsible for the observed, but hitherto poorly understood variability of pH and CO2 in the North Sea. Here we investigate the role of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), the dominant climate mode for the North Atlantic hemisphere in governing this variability. Based on three extensive observational records covering the relevant levels of the NAO index, we provide evidence that the North Sea pH and CO2 system strongly responds to external and internal expressions of the NAO. We argue that under NAO+ conditions higher rates of inflow of water from the North Atlantic Ocean limits seasonal shoaling of the summer mixed layer in the northern North Sea, diminishing the biological potential to lower pCO2 and raise pH. In addition the faster circulation of the North Sea enhances the shelf pump efficiency. These clear patterns are obscured by changing properties of the North Sea waters, masking or enforcing these effects on various time scales. Such controls indicate that inter-annual trends in the North Sea CO2 system must be carefully examined with consideration to the North Atlantic Oscillation.

  8. Influence of microsprinkler irrigation amount on water, soil, and pH profiles in a coastal saline soil.

    PubMed

    Chu, Linlin; Kang, Yaohu; Wan, Shuqin

    2014-01-01

    Microsprinkler irrigation is a potential method to alleviate soil salinization. After conducting a homogeneous, highly saline, clayey, and coastal soil from the Bohai Gulf in northern China in a column experiment, the results show that the depth of the wetting front increased as the water amount applied increased, low-salinity and low-SAR enlarged after irrigation and water redistribution, and the soil pH increased with an increase in irrigation amount. We concluded that a water amount of 207 mm could be used to reclaim the coastal saline soil in northern China.

  9. Influence of Microsprinkler Irrigation Amount on Water, Soil, and pH Profiles in a Coastal Saline Soil

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Linlin; Kang, Yaohu; Wan, Shuqin

    2014-01-01

    Microsprinkler irrigation is a potential method to alleviate soil salinization. After conducting a homogeneous, highly saline, clayey, and coastal soil from the Bohai Gulf in northern China in a column experiment, the results show that the depth of the wetting front increased as the water amount applied increased, low-salinity and low-SAR enlarged after irrigation and water redistribution, and the soil pH increased with an increase in irrigation amount. We concluded that a water amount of 207 mm could be used to reclaim the coastal saline soil in northern China. PMID:25147843

  10. Synthesis and characterization of NiFe2O4 electrocatalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction in alkaline water electrolysis using different polymer binders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanda, Debabrata; Hnát, Jaromír; Paidar, Martin; Schauer, Jan; Bouzek, Karel

    2015-07-01

    NiFe2O4 electrocatalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) has been synthesized using the co-precipitation method of the respective metal ions from water solution. After calcination of the precipitate, the resulting electrocatalyst was characterized by a broad range of techniques to obtain information on its crystallographic structure, specific surface area, morphology and chemical composition. The electrocatalytic activity towards HER in alkaline water electrolysis was investigated by means of linear sweep voltammetry. The catalyst showed promising electrocatalytic properties. Subsequently three types of binders were used to prepare a cathode catalytic layer based on a catalyst synthesized on top of a nickel foam support, namely an anion-selective quaternized poly(phenylene oxide) (qPPO) ionomer, an electroneutral polymer polytetrafluoroethylene and cation-selective Nafion®. The resulting membrane-electrode assemblies (MEAs), based on an anion-selective membrane, were tested in an alkaline water electrolyzer. In a single-cell test the MEA with a qPPO ionomer exhibited higher HER activity compared to the remaining binders tested. The current density obtained using a MEA containing qPPO binder attained a value of 125 mA cm-2 at a cell voltage of 1.85 V. The stability of the MEA containing qPPO binder was examined by continuous operation for 143 h, followed by 55 h intermittent electrolysis.

  11. Chemical equilibrium modeling of organic acids, pH, aluminum, and iron in Swedish surface waters.

    PubMed

    Sjöstedt, Carin S; Gustafsson, Jon Petter; Köhler, Stephan J

    2010-11-15

    A consistent chemical equilibrium model that calculates pH from charge balance constraints and aluminum and iron speciation in the presence of natural organic matter is presented. The model requires input data for total aluminum, iron, organic carbon, fluoride, sulfate, and charge balance ANC. The model is calibrated to pH measurements (n = 322) by adjusting the fraction of active organic matter only, which results in an error of pH prediction on average below 0.2 pH units. The small systematic discrepancy between the analytical results for the monomeric aluminum fractionation and the model results is corrected for separately for two different fractionation techniques (n = 499) and validated on a large number (n = 3419) of geographically widely spread samples all over Sweden. The resulting average error for inorganic monomeric aluminum is around 1 µM. In its present form the model is the first internally consistent modeling approach for Sweden and may now be used as a tool for environmental quality management. Soil gibbsite with a log *Ks of 8.29 at 25°C together with a pH dependent loading function that uses molar Al/C ratios describes the amount of aluminum in solution in the presence of organic matter if the pH is roughly above 6.0.

  12. Degradation of emerging contaminants from water under natural sunlight: The effect of season, pH, humic acids and nitrate and identification of photodegradation by-products.

    PubMed

    Koumaki, Elena; Mamais, Daniel; Noutsopoulos, Constantinos; Nika, Maria-Christina; Bletsou, Anna A; Thomaidis, Nikolaos S; Eftaxias, Alexander; Stratogianni, Georgia

    2015-11-01

    Both photodegradation and hydrolysis of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) were investigated in order to evaluate their photochemical fate in aquatic environment and to assess the effect of season and specific characteristics of water (pH, humic acids and nitrate concentration) on the removal of target EDCs and NSAIDs through photodegradation. An additional objective was the identification of the photodegradation by-products of specific NSAIDs and their dependence on irradiation time. Selected compounds' transformation was investigated under natural sunlight radiation while control experiments were conducted in the dark. As expected, most of compounds' degradation rate decreased with decreasing light intensity between two different experimental periods. Most of the tested compounds exhibited different rates of degradation during direct and indirect photolysis. The degradation rate of the selected compounds increased in the presence of NO3(-) and the photodegradation rate was higher for some compounds in alkaline than in acidic solution. The effect of humic acids' presence in the water depends on the absorbance spectrum of the compound and the produced photosensitizers. More specifically, humic acids act as inner filter toward most of the selected NSAIDs and as photosensitizers toward most of the EDCs. The results of the irradiation experiments in the presence of both humic acids and NO3(-), indicate that the direct photolysis is much more efficient than indirect photochemical processes. Finally, several degradation by-products of ketoprofen and diclofenac were identified in the samples, exposed to sunlight. The dependence of these by-products on radiation time is also demonstrated.

  13. Effects of co-application of biosolids and water treatment residuals on corn growth and bioavailable phosphorus and aluminum in alkaline soils in egypt.

    PubMed

    Mahdy, A M; Elkhatib, E A; Fathi, N O; Lin, Z-Q

    2009-01-01

    The co-application of biosolids and water treatment residuals (WTRs) has been previously trialed to reduce excessive bioavailable P in the soil treated with biosolids. However, uncertainty still exists regarding the environmental consequences of the co-application of biosolids and WTRs, especially in alkaline soils in Egypt or the Middle East region. A greenhouse pot study was conducted with Egyptian alkaline soils to (i) quantify the effects of co-application of biosolids and drinking WTRs on biomass production of corn (Zea mays L. cultivar single hybrid 10), (ii) determine the co-application effects on Olsen-P and KCl-extractable Al in relation to their accumulation in plant tissues, and (iii) optimize the co-application ratio of biosolids to WTRs for the best yield and effective reduction of soil bioavailable P. The results show that, among the studied soils treated with 1% biosolids along with various rates of WTRs, the corn yield increased significantly (P < 0.01) with increasing WTR application rate from 0 to 3% (w/w), but decreased at 4% application rate. The corn yield also significantly correlated with soil water holding capacity that increased with the addition of WTRs. Phosphorus uptake by plants significantly (P < 0.01) increased when the biosolid application rate was increased from 1 to 3% in the three studied soils that were treated with 1, 2, or 3% WTRs. The application of 4% WTRs in the biosolid-amended soils resulted in a significant reduction in soil Olsen-P values, but without having observable phytotoxicity of metals (such as Al) to corn during the growth period. The effective co-application ratio of biosolids to WTRs, for increasing corn yield and minimizing the potential for bioavailable P in runoff, was approximately 1:1 at the application rate of 3% biosolids and 4% WTRs in the alkaline soils.

  14. Probabilistic modeling of Saccharomyces cerevisiae inhibition under the effects of water activity, pH, and potassium sorbate concentration.

    PubMed

    López-Malo, A; Guerrero, S; Alzamora, S M

    2000-01-01

    Probabilistic microbial modeling using logistic regression was used to predict the boundary between growth and no growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae at selected incubation periods (50 and 350 h) in the presence of growth-controlling factors such as water activity (a(w); 0.97, 0.95, and 0.93), pH (6.0, 5.0, 4.0, and 3.0), and potassium sorbate (0, 50, 100, 200, 500, and 1,000 ppm). The proposed model predicts the probability of growth under a set of conditions and calculates critical values of a(w), pH, and potassium sorbate concentration needed to inhibit yeast growth for different probabilities. The reduction of pH increased the number of combinations of a(w) and potassium sorbate concentration with probabilities to inhibit yeast growth higher than 0.95. With a probability of growth of 0.05 and using the logistic models, the critical pH values were higher for 50 h of incubation than those required for 350 h. With lower a(w) values and increasing potassium sorbate concentration the critical pH values increased. Logistic regression is a useful tool to evaluate the effects of the combined factors on microbial growth.

  15. The influence of seawater pH on U / Ca ratios in the scleractinian cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raddatz, J.; Rüggeberg, A.; Flögel, S.; Hathorne, E. C.; Liebetrau, V.; Eisenhauer, A.; Dullo, W.-Chr.

    2014-04-01

    The increasing pCO2 in seawater is a serious threat for marine calcifiers and alters the biogeochemistry of the ocean. Therefore, the reconstruction of past-seawater properties and their impact on marine ecosystems is an important way to investigate the underlying mechanisms and to better constrain the effects of possible changes in the future ocean. Cold-water coral (CWC) ecosystems are biodiversity hotspots. Living close to aragonite undersaturation, these corals serve as living laboratories as well as archives to reconstruct the boundary conditions of their calcification under the carbonate system of the ocean. We investigated the reef-building CWC Lophelia pertusa as a recorder of intermediate ocean seawater pH. This species-specific field calibration is based on a unique sample set of live in situ collected L. pertusa and corresponding seawater samples. These data demonstrate that uranium speciation and skeletal incorporation for azooxanthellate scleractinian CWCs is pH dependent and can be reconstructed with an uncertainty of ±0.15. Our Lophelia U / Ca-pH calibration appears to be controlled by the high pH values and thus highlighting the need for future coral and seawater sampling to refine this relationship. However, this study recommends L. pertusa as a new archive for the reconstruction of intermediate water mass pH and hence may help to constrain tipping points for ecosystem dynamics and evolutionary characteristics in a changing ocean.

  16. The influence of seawater pH on U / Ca ratios in the scleractinian cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raddatz, J.; Rüggeberg, A.; Flögel, S.; Hathorne, E. C.; Liebetrau, V.; Eisenhauer, A.; Dullo, W.-Chr.

    2013-10-01

    The increasing pCO2 in seawater is a serious threat for marine calcifiers and alters the biogeochemistry of the ocean. Therefore, the reconstruction of past-seawater properties and their impact on marine ecosystems is an important way to investigate the underlying mechanisms and to better constrain the effects of possible changes in the future ocean. Cold-water coral (CWC) ecosystems are biodiversity hotspots. Living close to aragonite-undersaturation, these corals serve as living laboratories as well as archives to reconstruct the boundary conditions of their calcification under the carbonate system of the ocean. We investigated the reef-building CWC Lophelia pertusa as a recorder of intermediate ocean seawater pH. This species-specific field calibration is based on a unique sample set of live in-situ collected L. pertusa and corresponding seawater samples. These data demonstrate that uranium speciation and skeletal incorporation for azooxanthellate scleractinian CWCs is pH dependent. However, this also indicates that internal pH up-regulation of the coral does not play a role in uranium incorporation into the majority of the skeleton of L. pertusa. This study suggests L. pertusa provides a new archive for the reconstruction of intermediate water mass pH and hence may help to constrain tipping points for ecosystem dynamics and evolutionary characteristics in a changing ocean.

  17. Autoionization at the surface of neat water: is the top layer pH neutral, basic, or acidic?

    PubMed

    Vácha, Robert; Buch, Victoria; Milet, Anne; Devlin, J Paul; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2007-09-14

    Autoionization of water which gives rise to its pH is one of the key properties of aqueous systems. Surfaces of water and aqueous electrolyte solutions are traditionally viewed as devoid of inorganic ions; however, recent molecular simulations and spectroscopic experiments show the presence of certain ions including hydronium in the topmost layer. This raises the question of what is the pH (defined using proton concentration in the topmost layer) of the surface of neat water. Microscopic simulations and measurements with atomistic resolution show that the water surface is acidic due to a strong propensity of hydronium (but not of hydroxide) for the surface. In contrast, macroscopic experiments, such as zeta potential and titration measurements, indicate a negatively charged water surface interpreted in terms of preferential adsorption of OH(-). Here we review recent simulations and experiments characterizing autoionization at the surface of liquid water and ice crystals in an attempt to present and discuss in detail, if not fully resolve, this controversy.

  18. Early warning smartphone diagnostics for water security and analysis using real-time pH mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md. Arafat; Canning, John; Ast, Sandra; Rutledge, Peter J.; Jamalipour, Abbas

    2015-12-01

    Early detection of environmental disruption, unintentional or otherwise, is increasingly desired to ensure hazard minimization in many settings. Here, using a field-portable, smartphone fluorimeter to assess water quality based on the pH response of a designer probe, a map of pH of public tap water sites has been obtained. A custom designed Android application digitally processed and mapped the results utilizing the global positioning system (GPS) service of the smartphone. The map generated indicates no disruption in pH for all sites measured, and all the data are assessed to fall inside the upper limit of local government regulations, consistent with authority reported measurements. This implementation demonstrates a new security concept: network environmental forensics utilizing the potential of novel smartgrid analysis with wireless sensors for the detection of potential disruption to water quality at any point in the city. This concept is applicable across all smartgrid strategies within the next generation of the Internet of Things and can be extended on national and global scales to address a range of target analytes, both chemical and biological.

  19. Surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding for light oil recovery. Quarterly report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Wasan, D.T.

    1995-09-01

    The overall objective of this project is to develop a very cost-effective method for formulating a successful surfactant-enhanced alkaline flood by appropriately choosing mixed alkalis which form inexpensive buffers to obtain the desired pH (between 8.5 and 12.0) for ultimate spontaneous emulsification and ultra-low tension. In addition, the novel concept of pH gradient design to optimize flood water conditions will be tested.

  20. MICROBIAL SULFATE REDUCTION AND METAL ATTENUATION IN PH 4 ACID MINE WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediments recovered from the flooded mine workings of the Penn Mine, a Cu-Zn mine abandoned since the early 1960s, were cultured for anaerobic bacteria over a range of pH (4 to 7.5). The molecular biology of sediments and cultures was studied to determine whether sulfate-reducing...

  1. Recovery of phosphorus and nitrogen from alkaline hydrolysis supernatant of excess sludge by magnesium ammonium phosphate.

    PubMed

    Bi, Wei; Li, Yiyong; Hu, Yongyou

    2014-08-01

    Magnesium ammonium phosphate (MAP) method was used to recover orthophosphate (PO₄(3-)-P) and ammonium nitrogen (NH4(+)-N) from the alkaline hydrolysis supernatant of excess sludge. To reduce alkali consumption and decrease the pH of the supernatant, two-stage alkaline hydrolysis process (TSAHP) was designed. The results showed that the release efficiencies of PO₄(3-)-P and NH₄(+)-N were 41.96% and 7.78%, respectively, and the pH of the supernatant was below 10.5 under the running conditions with initial pH of 13, volume ratio (sludge dosage/water dosage) of 1.75 in second-stage alkaline hydrolysis reactor, 20 g/L of sludge concentration in first-stage alkaline hydrolysis reactor. The order of parameters influencing MAP reaction was analyzed and the optimized conditions of MAP reaction were predicted through the response surface methodology. The recovery rates of PO₄(3-)-P and NH₄(+)-N were 46.88% and 16.54%, respectively under the optimized conditions of Mg/P of 1.8, pH 9.7 and reaction time of 15 min.

  2. Efficient Electrocatalytic Water Oxidation at Neutral and High pH by Adventitious Nickel at Nanomolar Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Roger, Isolda; Symes, Mark D

    2015-11-04

    Electrolytic water oxidation using earth-abundant elements is a key challenge in the quest to develop cheap, large surface area arrays for solar-to-hydrogen conversion. There have been numerous studies in this area in recent years, but there remains an imperative to demonstrate that the current densities reported are indeed due to the species under consideration and not due to the presence of adventitious (yet possibly highly active) contaminants at low levels. Herein, we show that adventitious nickel at concentrations as low as 17 nM can act as a water oxidation catalyst in mildly basic aqueous solutions, achieving stable (tens of hours) current densities of 1 mA cm(-2) at overpotentials as low as 540 mV at pH 9.2 and 400 mV at pH 13. This nickel was not added to the electrolysis baths deliberately, but it was found to be present in the electrolytes as an impurity by ICP-MS. The presence of nickel on anodes from extended-time bulk electrolysis experiments was confirmed by XPS. In showing that such low levels of nickel can perform water oxidation at overpotentials comparable to many recently reported water oxidation catalysts, this work serves to raise the burden of proof required of new materials in this field: contamination by adventitious metal ions at trace loadings must be excluded as a possible cause of any observed water oxidation activity.

  3. Effect of pH, temperature, and lead concentration on the bioremoval of lead from water using Lemna minor.

    PubMed

    Uysal, Yağmur; Taner, Fadime

    2009-09-01

    This study examined the ability of the aquatic plant Lemna minor (duckweed) to remove soluble lead under various laboratory conditions. In a batch process L. minor was exposed to different pH values (4.5-8.0) and temperature (15-35 degrees C) in presence of different lead concentrations (0.1-10.0 mg L(-1)) for 168 h. The amount of biomass obtained in the study period on a dry weight basis, the concentrations of lead in tissue and in medium and net uptake of lead by Lemna all have been determined in each condition. The percentages of lead uptake ratios (PMU) and bioconcentration factors (BCF) were also calculated for these conditions. Bioaccumulated lead concentrations and the PMU were obtained at lowest pH of 4.5, and at 30 degrees C. The highest accumulated lead concentration was found at pH 4.5 as 3.599 mg Pb g(-1) in 10.0 mg L(-1). It decreased to pH 6.0, but it did not change at pH 6.0-8.0 range. The maximum lead accumulation was obtained at 30 degrees C as 8.622 mg Pb g(-1) in 10 mg L(-1) at pH 5.0, and the minimum was at 15 degrees C as 0.291 mg g(-1) in 0.1 mg L(-1). Lead accumulation gradually increased with increasing lead in medium, but the opposite trend was observed for PMU. Lead accumulation increased up to 50 mg L(-1), but did not change significantly in the 50.0-100.0 mg L(-1) range. The lead uptake from water was modeled and the equation fit the experimental data very well

  4. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN OXIDATION-REDUCTION, OXIDANT, AND PH IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidation and reduction (redox) reactions are very important in drinking water. Oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) measurements reflect the redox state of water. Redox measurements are not widely made by drinking water utilities in part because they are not well understood. The ...

  5. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN OXIDATION-REDUCTION POTENTIAL, OXIDANT, AND PH IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidation and reduction (redox) reactions are very important in drinking water. Oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) measurements reflect the redox state of water. Redox measurements are not widely made by drinking water utilities in part because they are not well understood. The ...

  6. Efficacy of pH elevation as a bactericidal strategy for treating ballast water of freight carriers

    PubMed Central

    Starliper, Clifford E.; Watten, Barnaby J.; Iwanowicz, Deborah D.; Green, Phyllis A.; Bassett, Noel L.; Adams, Cynthia R.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of ship ballast water with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) is one method currently being developed to minimize the risk to introduce aquatic invasive species. The bactericidal capability of sodium hydroxide was determined for 148 bacterial strains from ballast water collected in 2009 and 2010 from the M/V Indiana Harbor, a bulk-freight carrier plying the Laurentian Great Lakes, USA. Primary culture of bacteria was done using brain heart infusion agar and a developmental medium. Strains were characterized based on PCR amplification and sequencing of a portion of the 16S rRNA gene. Sequence similarities (99+ %) were determined by comparison with the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) GenBank catalog. Flavobacterium spp. were the most prevalent bacteria characterized in 2009, comprising 51.1% (24/47) of the total, and Pseudomonas spp. (62/101; 61.4%) and Brevundimonas spp. (22/101; 21.8%) were the predominate bacteria recovered in 2010; together, comprising 83.2% (84/101) of the total. Testing was done in tryptic soy broth (TSB) medium adjusted with 5 N NaOH. Growth of each strain was evaluated at pH 10.0, pH 11.0 and pH 12.0, and 4 h up to 72 h. The median cell count at 0 h for 148 cultures was 5.20 × 106 cfu/mL with a range 1.02 × 105–1.60 × 108 cfu/mL. The TSB adjusted to pH 10.0 and incubation for less than 24 h was bactericidal to 52 (35.1%) strains. Growth in pH 11.0 TSB for less than 4 h was bactericidal to 131 (88.5%) strains and pH 11.0 within 12 h was bactericidal to 141 (95.3%). One strain, Bacillus horikoshii, survived the harshest treatment, pH 12.0 for 72 h. PMID:26257948

  7. Efficacy of pH elevation as a bactericidal strategy for treating ballast water of freight carriers.

    PubMed

    Starliper, Clifford E; Watten, Barnaby J; Iwanowicz, Deborah D; Green, Phyllis A; Bassett, Noel L; Adams, Cynthia R

    2015-05-01

    Treatment of ship ballast water with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) is one method currently being developed to minimize the risk to introduce aquatic invasive species. The bactericidal capability of sodium hydroxide was determined for 148 bacterial strains from ballast water collected in 2009 and 2010 from the M/V Indiana Harbor, a bulk-freight carrier plying the Laurentian Great Lakes, USA. Primary culture of bacteria was done using brain heart infusion agar and a developmental medium. Strains were characterized based on PCR amplification and sequencing of a portion of the 16S rRNA gene. Sequence similarities (99+ %) were determined by comparison with the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) GenBank catalog. Flavobacterium spp. were the most prevalent bacteria characterized in 2009, comprising 51.1% (24/47) of the total, and Pseudomonas spp. (62/101; 61.4%) and Brevundimonas spp. (22/101; 21.8%) were the predominate bacteria recovered in 2010; together, comprising 83.2% (84/101) of the total. Testing was done in tryptic soy broth (TSB) medium adjusted with 5 N NaOH. Growth of each strain was evaluated at pH 10.0, pH 11.0 and pH 12.0, and 4 h up to 72 h. The median cell count at 0 h for 148 cultures was 5.20 × 10(6) cfu/mL with a range 1.02 × 10(5)-1.60 × 10(8) cfu/mL. The TSB adjusted to pH 10.0 and incubation for less than 24 h was bactericidal to 52 (35.1%) strains. Growth in pH 11.0 TSB for less than 4 h was bactericidal to 131 (88.5%) strains and pH 11.0 within 12 h was bactericidal to 141 (95.3%). One strain, Bacillus horikoshii, survived the harshest treatment, pH 12.0 for 72 h.

  8. Separation of switchgrass bio-oil by water/organic solvent addition and pH adjustment

    DOE PAGES

    Park, Lydia Kyoung-Eun; Ren, Shoujie; Yiacoumi, Sotira; ...

    2016-01-29

    Applications of bio-oil are limited by its challenging properties including high moisture content, low pH, high viscosity, high oxygen content, and low heating value. Separation of switchgrass bio-oil components by adding water, organic solvents (hexadecane and octane), and sodium hydroxide may help to overcome these issues. Acetic acid and phenolic compounds were extracted in aqueous and organic phases, respectively. Polar chemicals, such as acetic acid, did not partition in the organic solvent phase. Acetic acid in the aqueous phase after extraction is beneficial for a microbial-electrolysis-cell application to produce hydrogen as an energy source for further hydrodeoxygenation of bio-oil. Organicmore » solvents extracted more chemicals from bio-oil in combined than in sequential extraction; however, organic solvents partitioned into the aqueous phase in combined extraction. When sodium hydroxide was added to adjust the pH of aqueous bio-oil, organic-phase precipitation occurred. As the pH was increased, a biphasic aqueous/organic dispersion was formed, and phase separation was optimized at approximately pH 6. The neutralized organic bio-oil had approximately 37% less oxygen and 100% increased heating value than the initial centrifuged bio-oil. In conclusion, the less oxygen content and increased heating value indicated a significant improvement of the bio-oil quality through neutralization.« less

  9. Separation of switchgrass bio-oil by water/organic solvent addition and pH adjustment

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Lydia Kyoung-Eun; Ren, Shoujie; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Ye, X. Philip; Borole, Abhijeet P.; Tsouris, Costas

    2016-01-29

    Applications of bio-oil are limited by its challenging properties including high moisture content, low pH, high viscosity, high oxygen content, and low heating value. Separation of switchgrass bio-oil components by adding water, organic solvents (hexadecane and octane), and sodium hydroxide may help to overcome these issues. Acetic acid and phenolic compounds were extracted in aqueous and organic phases, respectively. Polar chemicals, such as acetic acid, did not partition in the organic solvent phase. Acetic acid in the aqueous phase after extraction is beneficial for a microbial-electrolysis-cell application to produce hydrogen as an energy source for further hydrodeoxygenation of bio-oil. Organic solvents extracted more chemicals from bio-oil in combined than in sequential extraction; however, organic solvents partitioned into the aqueous phase in combined extraction. When sodium hydroxide was added to adjust the pH of aqueous bio-oil, organic-phase precipitation occurred. As the pH was increased, a biphasic aqueous/organic dispersion was formed, and phase separation was optimized at approximately pH 6. The neutralized organic bio-oil had approximately 37% less oxygen and 100% increased heating value than the initial centrifuged bio-oil. In conclusion, the less oxygen content and increased heating value indicated a significant improvement of the bio-oil quality through neutralization.

  10. Guidelines for collection and field analysis of water-quality samples from streams in Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, F.C.; Gibbons, W.J.; Dorsey, M.E.

    1990-01-01

    Analyses for unstable constituents or properties are by necessity performed in the field. This manual addresses analytical techniques and quality assurance for: (1) Water temperature; (2) specific conductance; (3) pH; (4) alkalinity; (5) dissolved oxygen; and (6) bacteria.

  11. Theory of the effect of the change in the pH of water upon contact with the surface of finely dispersed solids (flint)

    SciTech Connect

    Olodovskii, P.P.

    1995-10-01

    Based on estimates of the parameters of the structure of water in a water-flint powder system and the structure of water adsorbed on the surface of the flint, an explanation is given for the effect of the increase in the pH of water in contact with the flint.

  12. Insights into the effect of dilute acid, hot water and alkaline pretreatment on cellulose accessible surface area and overall porosity of Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Xianzhi; Wells, Tyrone; Sun, Qining; Huang, Fang; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2015-06-19

    Pretreatment is known to render biomass more reactive to cellulase by altering the chemical compositions as well as physical structures of biomass. Simons stain technique along with mercury porosimetry were applied on the acid, neutral, and alkaline pretreated materials to measure the accessible surface area of cellulose and pore size distribution of Populus. Results indicated that acid pretreatment is much more effective than water and alkaline pretreatment in terms of cellulose accessibility increase. Further investigation suggests that lignin does not dictate cellulose accessibility to the extent that hemicellulose does, but it does restrict xylan accessibility which in turn controls the access of cellulase to cellulose. The most interesting finding is that severe acid pretreatment significantly decreases the average pore size, i.e., 90% average size decrease could be observed after 60 min dilute acid pretreatment at 160 °C; moreover, the nano-pore space formed between coated microfibrils is increased after pretreatment, especially for the acid pretreatment, suggesting this particular type of biomass porosity is probably the most fundamental barrier to effective enzymatic hydrolysis.

  13. Insights into the effect of dilute acid, hot water and alkaline pretreatment on cellulose accessible surface area and overall porosity of Populus

    DOE PAGES

    Meng, Xianzhi; Wells, Tyrone; Sun, Qining; ...

    2015-06-19

    Pretreatment is known to render biomass more reactive to cellulase by altering the chemical compositions as well as physical structures of biomass. Simons stain technique along with mercury porosimetry were applied on the acid, neutral, and alkaline pretreated materials to measure the accessible surface area of cellulose and pore size distribution of Populus. Results indicated that acid pretreatment is much more effective than water and alkaline pretreatment in terms of cellulose accessibility increase. Further investigation suggests that lignin does not dictate cellulose accessibility to the extent that hemicellulose does, but it does restrict xylan accessibility which in turn controls themore » access of cellulase to cellulose. The most interesting finding is that severe acid pretreatment significantly decreases the average pore size, i.e., 90% average size decrease could be observed after 60 min dilute acid pretreatment at 160 °C; moreover, the nano-pore space formed between coated microfibrils is increased after pretreatment, especially for the acid pretreatment, suggesting this particular type of biomass porosity is probably the most fundamental barrier to effective enzymatic hydrolysis.« less

  14. Polyhydroxyflavones as extractants. Communication 7. Solvent extraction of europrium complexes with morin from alkaline media

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, A.B.

    1985-09-01

    This paper studies the analytical application of europium (III)-morin complex which is formed in alkaline medium and has an intense color. The extent of europium extraction was determined by adding to the extract a morin solution in isoamyl alcohol in a 50-100-fold excess with respect to europium. The dependence of the optical density of the extracts on the ph in the system europium (III)-morin-water-organic solvent for different excesses of the reagent is shown: this indicates formation of two extractable complexes, one being dominant in the pH range 4-7, the other at pH greater than or equal to 8.5. The extraction of the europium (III)-morin complex from alkaline solution is used for direct extraction-photometric determination of europium(III) in compounds of elements having amphoteric properties or forming amines (Zns, Mo0/sub 3/).

  15. Optimal Soil Eh, pH, and Water Management for Simultaneously Minimizing Arsenic and Cadmium Concentrations in Rice Grains.

    PubMed

    Honma, Toshimitsu; Ohba, Hirotomo; Kaneko-Kadokura, Ayako; Makino, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Ken; Katou, Hidetaka

    2016-04-19

    Arsenic (As) and cadmium (Cd) concentrations in rice grains are a human health concern. We conducted field experiments to investigate optimal conditions of Eh and pH in soil for simultaneously decreasing As and Cd accumulation in rice. Water managements in the experiments, which included continuous flooding and intermittent irrigation with different intervals after midseason drainage, exerted striking effects on the dissolved As and Cd concentrations in soil through changes in Eh, pH, and dissolved Fe(II) concentrations in the soil. Intermittent irrigation with three-day flooding and five-day drainage was found to be effective for simultaneously decreasing the accumulation of As and Cd in grain. The grain As and Cd concentrations were, respectively, linearly related to the average dissolved As and Cd concentrations during the 3 weeks after heading. We propose a new indicator for expressing the degree to which a decrease in the dissolved As or Cd concentration is compromised by the increase in the other. For minimizing the trade-off relationship between As and Cd in rice grains in the field investigated, water management strategies should target the realization of optimal soil Eh of -73 mV and pH of 6.2 during the 3 weeks after heading.

  16. The use of aluminum oxychlorides to coagulate water having high content of organic impurities and low alkalinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evsyutin, A. V.; Boglovskii, A. V.

    2007-07-01

    Results from laboratory investigations and industrial tests of the coagulation of source water at the Pskov district power station are presented. It is shown that the source water may not be alkalified if it is treated with aluminum oxychlorides. As a result, the clarified water becomes less corrosive and a lower salt load is placed on water treatment plants as compared with the case when aluminum sulfate is used for coagulation.

  17. Release of bound procyanidins from cranberry pomace by alkaline hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    White, Brittany L; Howard, Luke R; Prior, Ronald L

    2010-07-14

    Procyanidins in plant products are present as extractable or unextractable/bound forms. We optimized alkaline hydrolysis conditions to liberate procyanidins and depolymerize polymers from dried cranberry pomace. Alkaline extracts were neutralized (pH 6-7) and then procyanidins were extracted with ethyl acetate and analyzed by normal phase high performance liquid chromatography. Alkaline hydrolysis resulted in an increase in low molecular weight procyanidins, and the increase was greater at higher temperature, short time combinations. The most procyanidins (DP1-DP3) were extracted at 60 degrees C for 15 min with each concentration of NaOH. When compared to conventional extraction using homogenization with acetone/water/acetic acid (70:29.5:0.5 v/v/v), treatment with NaOH increased procyanidin oligomer extraction by 3.8-14.9-fold, with the greatest increase being DP1 (14.9x) and A-type DP2 (8.4x) procyanidins. Alkaline treatment of the residue remaining after conventional extraction resulted in further procyanidin extraction, indicating that procyanidins are not fully extracted by conventional extraction methods.

  18. Viability of Leptospira isolates from a human outbreak in Thailand in various water types, pH, and temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Stoddard, Robyn A; Bui, Duy; Haberling, Dana L; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Thaipadungpanit, Janjira; Hoffmaster, Alex R

    2014-11-01

    Leptospira spp. isolated from patients during a multiyear outbreak in Thailand were genotyped using multilocus sequence typing and a majority were identified as ST34, especially in earlier years. We tested whether ST34 isolates were better adapted to survive in various pH levels, temperatures, and water sources. Motility and growth were monitored over a 12-week period. Early year ST34 isolates did not appear to have a significant fitness advantage over non-ST34, however, this may have been because a majority of the isolates survived to the termination of the study, with the exception being at high temperature (37°C) and/or basic pH (8.65). Failure to detect a significant fitness advantage of ST34 may be a result of the length of the study or the small sample size. Lengthening the study and looking at virulence and maintenance in the host could yield additional information about this outbreak.

  19. The Martian ocean: First acid, then alkaline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, M. W.

    1992-01-01

    In Mars' distant past, carbon dioxide and water may have been plentiful. Values of total outgassed CO2 from several to about 10 bar are consistent with present knowledge, and this amount of CO2 implies an amount of water outgassed equal to an equivalent depth of 500 to 1000 m. It is quite reasonable, therefore, to envision an early Mars in which there was a body or bodies of liquid water, perhaps in the northern plains, and a dense carbon dioxide atmosphere. Under such conditions, the pH of the water will be low, due to the dissolution of carbon dioxide in the water to form carbonic acid. This acidic water is capable of weathering the available rock quite intensely, particularly because this rock is likely to be heavily fractured (from meteorite bombardment) or even consist of fine particles (such as pyroclastic deposits). As time goes on, however, the carbon dioxide atmosphere will rapidly pass through the ocean to form carbonate deposits. As the density of the atmosphere decreases, so will the flux of carbonic acid into the ocean. Without this input of carbonic acid, the effect of the dissolved weathering products will be to increase the pH of the water. The ocean will then become alkaline. To study this process, I have developed a geochemical cycle model for the atmosphere-hydrosphere-regolith system of Mars. The treatment of geochemical cycles as complex kinetic chemical reactions has been undertaken for terrestrial systems in recent years with much success. This method is capable of elegantly handling the interactions between the simultaneous chemical reactions needed to understand such a system.

  20. The pH sensitivity of Aqp0 channels in tetraploid and diploid teleosts

    PubMed Central

    Chauvigné, François; Zapater, Cinta; Stavang, Jon Anders; Taranger, Geir Lasse; Cerdà, Joan; Finn, Roderick Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Water homeostasis and the structural integrity of the vertebrate lens is partially mediated by AQP0 channels. Emerging evidence indicates that external pH may be involved in channel gating. Here we show that a tetraploid teleost, the Atlantic salmon, retains 4 aqp0 genes (aqp0a1, -0a2, -0b1, and -0b2), which are highly, but not exclusively, expressed in the lens. Functional characterization reveals that, although each paralog permeates water efficiently, the permeability is respectively shifted to the neutral, alkaline, or acidic pH in Aqp0a1, -0a2, and -0b1, whereas that of Aqp0b2 is not regulated by external pH. Mutagenesis studies demonstrate that Ser38, His39, and His40 residues in the extracellular transmembrane domain of α-helix 2 facing the water pore are critical for the pH modulation of water transport. To validate these findings, we show that both zebrafish Aqp0a and -0b are functional water channels with respective pH sensitivities toward alkaline or acid pH ranges and that an N-terminal allelic variant (Ser19) of Aqp0b exists that abolishes water transport in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The data suggest that the alkaline pH sensitivity is a conserved trait in teleost Aqp0 a-type channels, whereas mammalian AQP0 and some teleost Aqp0 b-type channels display an acidic pH permeation preference.—Chauvigné, F., Zapater, C., Stavang, J. A., Taranger, G. L., Cerdà, J., Finn, R. N. The pH sensitivity of Aqp0 channels in tetraploid and diploid teleosts. PMID:25667219

  1. All-Atom Continuous Constant pH Molecular Dynamics With Particle Mesh Ewald and Titratable Water.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yandong; Chen, Wei; Wallace, Jason A; Shen, Jana

    2016-11-08

    Development of a pH stat to properly control solution pH in biomolecular simulations has been a long-standing goal in the community. Toward this goal recent years have witnessed the emergence of the so-called constant pH molecular dynamics methods. However, the accuracy and generality of these methods have been hampered by the use of implicit-solvent models or truncation-based electrostatic schemes. Here we report the implementation of the particle mesh Ewald (PME) scheme into the all-atom continuous constant pH molecular dynamics (CpHMD) method, enabling CpHMD to be performed with a standard MD engine at a fractional added computational cost. We demonstrate the performance using pH replica-exchange CpHMD simulations with titratable water for a stringent test set of proteins, HP36, BBL, HEWL, and SNase. With the sampling time of 10 ns per replica, most pKa's are converged, yielding the average absolute and root-mean-square deviations of 0.61 and 0.77, respectively, from experiment. Linear regression of the calculated vs experimental pKa shifts gives a correlation coefficient of 0.79, a slope of 1, and an intercept near 0. Analysis reveals inadequate sampling of structure relaxation accompanying a protonation-state switch as a major source of the remaining errors, which are reduced as simulation prolongs. These data suggest PME-based CpHMD can be used as a general tool for pH-controlled simulations of macromolecular systems in various environments, enabling atomic insights into pH-dependent phenomena involving not only soluble proteins but also transmembrane proteins, nucleic acids, surfactants, and polysaccharides.

  2. Modelling biofilm formation of Salmonella enterica ser. Newport as a function of pH and water activity.

    PubMed

    Dimakopoulou-Papazoglou, Dafni; Lianou, Alexandra; Koutsoumanis, Konstantinos P

    2016-02-01

    The effect of pH and water activity (aw) on the formation of biofilm by Salmonella enterica ser. Newport, previously identified as a strong biofilm producer, was assessed. Biofilm formation was evaluated in tryptone soy broth at 37 °C and at different combinations of pH (3.3-7.8) and aw (0.894-0.997). In total, 540 biofilm formation tests in 108 pH and aw combinations were carried out in polystyrene microtiter plates using crystal violet staining and optical density (OD; 580 nm) measurements. Since the individual effects of pH and aw on biofilm formation had a similar pattern to that observed for microbial growth rate, cardinal parameter models (CPMs) were used to describe these effects. CPMs described successfully the effects of these two environmental parameters, with the estimated cardinal values of pHmin, pHopt, pHmax, awmin and awopt being 3.58, 6.02, 9.71, 0.894 and 0.994, respectively. The CPMs assumption of the multiplicative inhibitory effect of environmental factors was validated in the case of biofilm formation using additional independent data (i.e. 430 OD data at 86 different combinations of pH and aw). The validation results showed a good agreement (r(2) = 0.938) between observed and predicted OD with no systematic error. In the second part of this study, a probabilistic model predicting the pathogen's biofilm formation boundaries was developed, and the degree of agreement between predicted probabilities and observations was as high as 99.8%. Hence, the effect of environmental parameters on biofilm formation can be quantitatively expressed using mathematical models, with the latter models, in turn, providing useful information for biofilm control in food industry environments.

  3. Effect of temperature, pH, and oxygen level on the multiplication of naturally occurring Legionella pneumophila in potable water.

    PubMed Central

    Wadowsky, R M; Wolford, R; McNamara, A M; Yee, R B

    1985-01-01

    A water culture containing naturally occurring Legionella pneumophila and associated microbiota was maintained in the laboratory by serially transferring the culture in tap water which had been sterilized by membrane filtration. Successful maintenance of the water culture depended upon transferring the culture when the growth of L. pneumophila was in the late-exponential to early-stationary phase. The water culture was used as a source of naturally occurring bacteria to determine some of the parameters which affect the multiplication of L. pneumophila in tap water. Naturally occurring L. pneumophila multiplied at a temperature between 25 and 37 degrees C, at pH levels of 5.5 to 9.2, and at concentrations of dissolved oxygen of 6.0 to 6.7 mg/liter. Multiplication did not occur in tap water which contained less than 2.2 mg of dissolved oxygen per liter. An association was observed between the multiplication of L. pneumophila and the non-Legionellaceae bacteria which were also present in the water culture. The method of preserving naturally occurring L. pneumophila and associated microbiota may facilitate studies on the symbiosis of L. pneumophila with other microorganisms. PMID:4004233

  4. Degradation of Kresoxim-Methyl in Water: Impact of Varying pH, Temperature, Light and Atmospheric CO2 Level.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Ashish; Gupta, Suman; Gajbhiye, Vijay T; Varghese, Eldho

    2016-01-01

    In the present investigation, persistence of kresoxim-methyl (a broad spectrum strobilurin fungicide) was studied in water. Results revealed that kresoxim-methyl readily form acid metabolite. Therefore, residues of kresoxim-methyl were quantified on the basis of parent molecule alone and sum total of kresoxim-methyl and its acid metabolite. In water, influence of various abiotic factors like pH, temperature, light and atmospheric carbon dioxide level on dissipation of kresoxim-methyl was studied. The half life value for kresoxim-methyl and total residue varied from 1 to 26.1 and 6.1 to 94.0 days under different conditions. Statistical analysis revealed the significant effect of abiotic factors on the dissipation of kresoxim-methyl from water.

  5. Distributed sensor for water and pH measurements using fiber optics and swellable polymeric systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michie, W. C.; Culshaw, B.; McKenzie, I.; Konstantakis, M.; Graham, N. B.; Moran, C.; Santos, F.; Bergqvist, E.; Carlstrom, B.

    1995-01-01

    We report on the design, construction and test of a generic form of sensor for making distributed measurements of a range of chemical parameters. The technique combines optical time-domain reflectometry with chemically sensitive water-swellable polymers (hydrogels). Initial experiments have concentrated on demonstrating a distributed water detector; however, gels have been developed that enable this sensor to be

  6. Enhanced coagulation with polyaluminum chlorides: role of pH/alkalinity and speciation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Mingquan; Wang, Dongsheng; Yu, Jianfeng; Ni, Jinren; Edwards, Marc; Qu, Jiuhui

    2008-04-01

    Enhanced coagulation is considered to be among the best available techniques (BAT) for disinfection by-product (DBP) precursor removal in water treatment. Improving existing understanding requires further consideration of nuances of chemical speciation relative to source water chemistry. In this paper, the effect of alkalinity/pH and speciation on inorganic polymer flocculants, polyaluminum chlorides (PACls) for enhanced particle and natural organic matter (NOM) removal was investigated. Three kinds of well-characterized typical source waters in China with low, moderate, and high alkalinity were selected. Performance of coagulants is controlled not only by preformed species but also by those formed in situ. At neutral and basic pH values, PACls with higher basicity (ratio of OH(-)/Al), which have more stable preformed Alb (the rapid reacted species as in ferron assay), are more efficient for turbidity and NOM removal. At slightly acidic pH, PACls with lower basicity are more efficient since more Alb can be formed in situ. Optimal NOM removal was achieved at pH 5.5-6.5 for all PACls. Basicity, speciation, and dosage of coagulant should be optimized based on raw water alkalinity to enhance the removal efficiency of NOM.

  7. Water oxidation with mononuclear ruthenium(II) polypyridine complexes involving a direct Ru(IV)═O pathway in neutral and alkaline media.

    PubMed

    Badiei, Yosra M; Polyansky, Dmitry E; Muckerman, James T; Szalda, David J; Haberdar, Rubabe; Zong, Ruifa; Thummel, Randolph P; Fujita, Etsuko

    2013-08-05

    The catalytic water oxidation mechanism proposed for many single-site ruthenium complexes proceeds via the nucleophilic attack of a water molecule on the Ru(V)═O species. In contrast, Ru(II) complexes containing 4-t-butyl-2,6-di-1',8'-(naphthyrid-2'-yl)-pyridine (and its bisbenzo-derivative), an equatorial water, and two axial 4-picolines follow the thermodynamically more favorable "direct pathway" via [Ru(IV)═O](2+), which avoids the higher oxidation state [Ru(V)═O](3+) in neutral and basic media. Our experimental and theoretical results that focus on the pH-dependent onset catalytic potentials indicative of a PCET driven low-energy pathway for the formation of products with an O-O bond (such as [Ru(III)-OOH](2+) and [Ru(IV)-OO](2+)) at an applied potential below the Ru(V)═O/Ru(IV)═O couple clearly support such a mechanism. However, in the cases of [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(OH2)](2+) and [Ru(tpy)(bpm)(OH2)](2+), the formation of the Ru(V)═O species appears to be required before O-O bond formation. The complexes under discussion provide a unique functional model for water oxidation that proceeds by four consecutive PCET steps in neutral and alkaline media.

  8. Modified atmosphere packaging for prevention of mold spoilage of bakery products with different pH and water activity levels.

    PubMed

    Guynot, M E; Marín, S; Sanchis, V; Ramos, A J

    2003-10-01

    A sponge cake analog was used to study the influence of pH, water activity (aw), and carbon dioxide (CO2) levels on the growth of seven fungal species commonly causing bakery product spoilage (Eurotium amstelodami, Eurotium herbariorum, Eurotium repens, Eurotium rubrum, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, and Penicillium corylophilum). A full factorial design was used. Water activity, CO2, and their interaction were the main factors significantly affecting fungal growth. Water activity at levels of 0.80 to 0.90 had a significant influence on fungal growth and determined the concentration of CO2 needed to prevent cake analog spoilage. At an aw level of 0.85, lag phases increased twofold when the level of CO2 in the headspace increased from 0 to 70%. In general, no fungal growth was observed for up to 28 days of incubation at 25 degrees C when samples were packaged with 100% CO2, regardless of the aw level. Partial least squares projection to latent structures regression was used to build a polynomial model to predict sponge cake shelf life on the basis of the lag phases of all seven species tested. The model developed explained quite well (R2 = 79%) the growth of almost all species, which responded similarly to changes in tested factors. The results of this study emphasize the importance of combining several hurdles, such as modified atmosphere packaging, aw, and pH, that have synergistic or additive effects on the inhibition of mold growth.

  9. Survival of the faucet snail after chemical disinfection, pH extremes, and heated water bath treatments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mitchell, A.J.; Cole, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    The faucet snail Bithynia tentaculata, a nonindigenous aquatic snail from Eurasia, was introduced into Lake Michigan in 1871 and has spread to the mid-Atlantic states, the Great Lakes region, Montana, and most recently, the Mississippi River. The faucet snail serves as intermediate host for several trematodes that have caused large-scale mortality among water birds, primarily in the Great Lakes region and Montana. It is important to limit the spread of the faucet snail; small fisheries equipment can serve as a method of snail distribution. Treatments with chemical disinfection, pH extremes, and heated water baths were tested to determine their effectiveness as a disinfectant for small fisheries equipment. Two treatments eliminated all test snails: (1) a 24-h exposure to Hydrothol 191 at a concentration of at least 20 mg/L and (2) a treatment with 50??C heated water for 1 min or longer. Faucet snails were highly resistant to ethanol, NaCl, formalin, Lysol, potassium permanganate, copper sulfate, Baquacil, Virkon, household bleach, and pH extremes (as low as 1 and as high as 13).

  10. Modeling growth of three bakery product spoilage molds as a function of water activity, temperature and pH.

    PubMed

    Dagnas, Stéphane; Onno, Bernard; Membré, Jeanne-Marie

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the effect of water activity, pH and storage temperature on the growth of Eurotium repens, Aspergillus niger and Penicillium corylophilum, isolated from spoiled bakery products. Moreover, the behaviors of these three mold species were compared to assess whether a general modeling framework may be set and re-used in future research on bakery spoilage molds. The mold growth was modeled by building two distinct Gamma-type secondary models: one on the lag time for growth and another one on the radial growth rate. A set of 428 experimental growth curves was generated. The effect of temperature (15-35 °C), water activity (0.80-0.98) and pH (3-7) was assessed. Results showed that it was not possible to apply the same set of secondary model equations to the three mold species given that the growth rate varied significantly with the factors pH and water activity. In contrast, the temperature effect on both growth rate and lag time of the three mold species was described by the same equation. The equation structure and model parameter values of the Gamma models were also compared per mold species to assess whether a relationship between lag time and growth rate existed. There was no correlation between the two growth responses for E. repens, but a slight one for A. niger and P. corylophilum. These findings will help in determining bakery product shelf-life and guiding future work in the predictive mycology field.

  11. Unimolecular and hydrolysis channels for the detachment of water from microsolvated alkaline earth dication (Mg2+, Ca2+, Sr2+, Ba2+) clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Miliordos, Evangelos; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2014-02-07

    We examine theoretically the three channels that are associated with the detachment of a single water molecule from the aqueous clusters of the alkaline earth dications, [M(H2O)n]2+, M = Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, n ≤ 6. These are the unimolecular water loss (M2+(H2O)n-1 + H2O) and the two hydrolysis channels resulting to the loss of hydronium ([MOH(H2O)n-2]+ + H3O+) and Zundel ([MOH(H2O)n-3]+ + H3O+(H2O)) cations. The Potential Energy Curves (PECs) corresponding to those three channels were constructed at the Møller-Plesset second order perturbation (MP2) level of theory with basis sets of double- and triple-ζ quality. We furthermore investigated the water and hydronium loss channels from the mono-hydroxide water clusters with up to four water molecules, [MOH(H2O)n]+, 1 ≤ n ≤ 4. Our results indicate the preference of the hydronium loss and possibly the Zundel cation loss channels for the smallest size clusters, whereas the unimolecular water loss channel is preferred for the larger ones as well as the mono-hydroxide clusters. Although the charge separation (hydronium and Zundel cation loss) channels produce more stable products when compared to the ones for the unimolecular water loss, they also require the surmounting of high energy barriers, a fact that makes the experimental observation of fragments related to these hydrolysis channels difficult.

  12. Mathematical modelling of the combined effect of water activity, pH and redox potential on the heat destruction.

    PubMed

    Reichart, O; Mohácsi-Farkas, C

    1994-12-01

    Heat destruction of seven foodborne microorganisms (Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus brevis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Yarrowia lipolytica, Paecilomyces varioti and Neosartoria fischeri) as a function of the temperature, pH, redox potential and water activity was studied in synthetic heating media. Several mathematical models were developed for describing the heat destruction rate, most of them resulted in a good correlation between the fitted and measured values. The determination coefficients of the model-fitting were the best in case of lactobacilli and moulds (0.96-0.99) and the worst in case of the yeasts (0.81-0.88).

  13. Spectroscopic studies of water and water/regolith mixtures on planetary surfaces at low temperatures. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, R. N.

    1980-01-01

    New reflectance spectra of Ganymede, Europe, Callisto, Io, Saturn's rings, and Mars were obtained. The new data is combined with data covering other spectral regions for compositional interpretation. The spectral properties of water and mixtures of water plus other minerals were studied in the laboratory at the low temperatures typical of Mars, the Galilean satellites, and Saturn's rings. High precision reflectance spectra of water ice were studied.

  14. Visible-infrared remote-sensing model and applications for ocean waters. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Zhongping

    1994-01-01

    Remote sensing has become important in the ocean sciences, especially for research involving large spatial scales. To estimate the in-water constituents through remote sensing, whether carried out by satellite or airplane, the signal emitted from beneath the sea surface, the so called water-leaving radiance (L(w)), is of prime importance. The magnitude of L(w) depends on two terms: one is the intensity of the solar input, and the other is the reflectance of the in-water constituents. The ratio of the water-leaving radiance to the downwelling irradiance (E(d)) above the sear surface (remote-sensing reflectance, R(sub rs)) is independent of the intensity of the irradiance input, and is largely a function of the optical properties of the in-water constituents. In this work, a model is developed to interpret r(sub rs) for ocean water in the visible-infrared range. In addition to terms for the radiance scattered from molecules and particles, the model includes terms that describe contributions from bottom reflectance, fluorescence of gelbstoff or colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM), and water Raman scattering. By using this model, the measured R(sub rs) of waters from the West Florida Shelf to the Mississippi River plume, which covered a (concentration of chlorophyll a) range of 0.07 - 50 mg/cu m, were well interpreted. The average percentage difference (a.p.d.) between the measured and modeled R(sub rs) is 3.4%, and, for the shallow waters, the model-required water depth is within 10% of the chart depth. Simple mathematical simulations for the phytoplankton pigment absorption coefficient (a(sub theta)) are suggested for using the R(sub rs) model. The inverse problem of R(sub rs), which is to analytically derive the in-water constituents from R(sub rs) data alone, can be solved using the a(sub theta) functions without prior knowledge of the in-water optical properties. More importantly, this method avoids problems associated with a need for knowledge of the shape

  15. Modeling effects of pH and counterions on surfactant adsorption at the oxide/water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Hankins, N.P.; O`Haver, J.H.; Harwell, J.H.

    1996-09-01

    The adsorption of surfactants on minerals is important in areas such as enhanced oil recovery, surfactant-enhanced soil remediation, formation of organic thin films, ore flotation, wetting, adhesion, detergency, and dispersion stability. A model is presented that describes the effect of pH on the adsorption of an isomerically pure anionic surfactant species at a mineral oxide/water interface. A site-binding model, to account for effects of pH, surface heterogeneities, and counterions, is incorporated into a patchwise, phase-separation modeling approach, making it possible to predict both the surface charge and the counterion association beneath an adsorbed surfactant aggregate. Parameters for the site binding model on {alpha}-alumina are obtained from experimental surface charge measurements. The formation of both local monolayers (hemimicelles) and bilayers (admicelles) is allowed, although the isotherms studied in this paper are fit by parameter values that predict admicelle formation only. The model is able to predict experimental measurements of the adsorption of an isomerically pure, anionic surfactant species on {alpha}-alumina as a function of pH. It reproduces several previously unexplained experimental observations; in particular, it offers an explanation for the observation of significant adsorption of anionic surfactant above the point of zero charge (pzc) of a mineral oxide surface.

  16. Facile electrochemical co-deposition of a graphene-cobalt nanocomposite for highly efficient water oxidation in alkaline media: direct detection of underlying electron transfer reactions under catalytic turnover conditions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Si-Xuan; Liu, Yuping; Bond, Alan M; Zhang, Jie; Esakki Karthik, P; Maheshwaran, I; Senthil Kumar, S; Phani, K L N

    2014-09-21

    A facile electrochemical co-deposition method has been developed for the fabrication of graphene-cobalt nanocomposite modified electrodes that achieve exceptionally efficient water oxidation in highly alkaline media. In the method reported, a graphene-cobalt nanocomposite film was deposited electrochemically from a medium containing 1 mg ml(-1) graphene oxide, 0.8 mM cobalt nitrate and 0.05 M phytic acid (pH 7). The formation of the nanocomposite film was confirmed using electrochemical, Raman spectroscopic and scanning electron microscopic techniques. The nanocomposite film exhibits excellent activity and stability towards water oxidation to generate oxygen in 1 M NaOH aqueous electrolyte media. A turn over frequency of 34 s(-1) at an overpotential of 0.59 V and a faradaic efficiency of 97.7% were deduced from analysis of data obtained by rotating ring disk electrode voltammetry. Controlled potential electrolysis data suggests that the graphene supported catalyst exhibits excellent stability under these harsh conditions. Phytate anion acts as stabilizer for the electrochemical formation of cobalt nanoparticles. Fourier transformed ac voltammetry allowed the redox chemistry associated with catalysis to be detected directly under catalytic turnover conditions. Estimates of formal reversible potentials obtained from this method and derived from the overall reactions 3Co(OH)2 + 2OH(-) ⇌ Co3O4 + 4H2O + 2e(-), Co3O4 + OH(-) ⇌ 3CoOOH + e(-) and CoOOH + OH(-) ⇌ CoO2 + H2O + e(-) are 0.10, 0.44 and 0.59 V vs. Ag/AgCl, respectively.

  17. Effects of chlorine and pH on efficacy of electrolyzed water for inactivating Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Park, Hoon; Hung, Yen-Con; Chung, Donghwan

    2004-02-15

    The effects of chlorine and pH on the bactericidal activity of electrolyzed (EO) water were examined against Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes. The residual chlorine concentration of EO water ranged from 0.1 to 5.0 mg/l, and the pH effect was examined at pH 3.0, 5.0, and 7.0. The bactericidal activity of EO water increased with residual chlorine concentration for both pathogens, and complete inactivation was achieved at residual chlorine levels equal to or higher than 1.0 mg/l. The results showed that both pathogens are very sensitive to chlorine, and residual chlorine level of EO water should be maintained at 1.0 mg/l or higher for practical applications. For each residual chlorine level, bactericidal activity of EO water increased with decreasing pH for both pathogens. However, with sufficient residual chlorine (greater than 2 mg/l), EO water can be applied in a pH range between 2.6 (original pH of EO water) and 7.0 while still achieving complete inactivation of E. coli O157:H7 and L. monocytogenes.

  18. Design of a Water Soluble Fluorescent 3-Hydroxy-4-Pyridinone Ligand Active at Physiological pH Values.

    PubMed

    Leite, Andreia; Silva, Ana M G; Coutinho, Catarina; Cunha-Silva, Luís; de Castro, Baltazar; Rangel, Maria

    2016-09-01

    In the present work we report the structure and the spectroscopic characterization of a new fluorescent 3-hydroxy-4-pyridinone ligand D-3,4-HPO. The synthesis of the compound was performed in two steps, which involve the reaction of the commercially available fluorophore dansyl chloride with a 3-hydroxy-4-pyridinone chelating unit and further deprotection. The new fluorescent chelator was characterized in the solid state by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and in solution by NMR, MS, absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies. The analysis of the variation of the absorption spectrum with pH allowed the determination of four pK a values (pK a1  = 3.50, pK a2  = 4.50, pK a3  = 9.60, pK a4  = 10.20) and establishment of the corresponding distribution diagram. The study of the fluorescence properties of the ligand show that in the pH range between 4 and 9 the fluorescence intensity is constant and has its maximum value thus allowing its further use at physiological pH values. The interaction of the ligand with copper(II) was accessed by fluorescence spectroscopy in MOPS buffer and the results show that the presence of copper(II) quenches the fluorescence of the ligand in ca 94 % at a ligand: metal ratio of 2:1. The latter result is consistent with the formation of a copper(II) complex with the bidentate ligand, as confirmed by the EPR spectroscopy. Graphical Abstract New water soluble fluorescent ligand active at physiological pH values.

  19. In situ generation of steam and alkaline surfactant for enhanced oil recovery using an exothermic water reactant (EWR)

    DOEpatents

    Robertson, Eric P

    2011-05-24

    A method for oil recovery whereby an exothermic water reactant (EWR) encapsulated in a water soluble coating is placed in water and pumped into one or more oil wells in contact with an oil bearing formation. After the water carries the EWR to the bottom of the injection well, the water soluble coating dissolves and the EWR reacts with the water to produce heat, an alkali solution, and hydrogen. The heat from the EWR reaction generates steam, which is forced into the oil bearing formation where it condenses and transfers heat to the oil, elevating its temperature and decreasing the viscosity of the oil. The aqueous alkali solution mixes with the oil in the oil bearing formation and forms a surfactant that reduces the interfacial tension between the oil and water. The hydrogen may be used to react with the oil at these elevated temperatures to form lighter molecules, thus upgrading to a certain extent the oil in situ. As a result, the oil can flow more efficiently and easily through the oil bearing formation towards and into one or more production wells.

  20. Re-epithelialization of the Buccal Mucosa after Alkaline Chemical Injury.

    PubMed

    Takaichi, Saneyuki; Muramatsu, Takashi; Lee, Jong-Min; Jung, Han-Sung; Shinozaki, Naoshi; Katakura, Akira; Yamane, Gen-Yuki

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline conditions in the oral cavity may be caused by a variety of stimuli, including tobacco products, antacids, alkaline drinking water and bicarbonate toothpaste. However, the effects of an alkaline pH on the oral mucosa had not been elucidated. The purpose of this study was to investigate how basal keratinocytes are actively involved in re-epithelialization after alkaline chemical injury. We generated epithelial defects in the oral mucosa of mice by applying an alkaline chemical, and the localization of cytokeratin 13, cytokeratin 14, PCNA and p63 was investigated during the re-epithelialization process. PCNA- and p63-positive staining was seen in basal cells covering the wound surface at 1 day after the chemical injury. Cytokeratin 14-positive and PCNA-negative basal keratinocytes were localized in a few layers of the wound epithelium during epithelial outgrowth. Cytokeratin 14-positive and PCNA-positive basal keratinocytes, indicating proliferation, were localized over the entire layer of the epithelium at the wound margin. These results imply that basal keratinocytes at the wound margin migrate to the wound surface, provoke differentiation and keratinization during epithelial outgrowth and that epithelial cells are supplied from the wound margin to the epithelial outgrowth after alkaline chemical injury.

  1. Dolomite Dissolution in Alkaline Cementious Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittermayr, Florian; Klammer, Dietmar; Köhler, Stephan; Dietzel, Martin

    2010-05-01

    Chemical alteration of concrete has gained much attention over the past years as many cases of deterioration due to sulphate attack, thaumasite formation (TSA) or alkali silica reactions (ASR) have been reported in various constructions (Schmidt et al, 2009). Much less is known about the so called alkali carbonate reaction (ACR). It is believed that dolomite aggregates can react with the alkalis from the cement, dissolve and form calcite and brucite (Katayama, 2004). Due to very low solubility of dolomite in alkaline solutions this reaction seems doubtful. In this study we are trying to gain new insides about the conditions that can lead to the dissolution of dolomite in concrete. Therefore we investigated concrete samples from Austrian tunnels that show partially dissolved dolomite aggregates. Petrological analysis such as microprobe, SEM and Raman spectroscopy as well as a hydrochemical analysis of interstitial solutions and ground water and modelling with PhreeqC (Parkhurst and Appelo, 1999) are carried out. In addition a series of batch experiments is set up. Modelling approaches by PhreeqC show a thermodynamically possibility in the alkaline range when additional Ca2+ in solution causes dolomite to become more and more undersaturated as calcite gets supersaturated. Interacting ground water is enriched in Ca2+and saturated with respect to gypsum as marine evaporites are found in situ rocks. Furthermore it is more likely that Portlandite (Ca(OH)2) plays a more important role than Na and K in the cement. Portlandite acts as an additional Ca2+ source and is much more abundant than the alkalies. Some interstitial solutions are dominated mainly by Na+ and SO42- and reach concentrations up to 30 g/l TDS. It is believed that solutions can even reach thenardite saturation as efflorescences are found on the tunnel walls. In consequence dolomite solubility increases with increasing ionic strength. pH > 11 further accelerate the process of dedolomitization by the removal

  2. Water properties in cream cheeses with variations in pH, fat, and salt content and correlation to microbial survival.

    PubMed

    Møller, Sandie M; Hansen, Tina B; Andersen, Ulf; Lillevang, Søren K; Rasmussen, Anitha; Bertram, Hanne C

    2012-02-22

    Water mobility and distribution in cream cheeses with variations in fat (4, 15, and 26%), added salt (0, 0.625, and 1.25%), and pH (4.2, 4.7, and 5.2) were studied using (1)H NMR relaxometry. The cheese samples were inoculated with a mixture of Listeria innocua, Escherichia coli O157 and Staphylococcus aureus, and partial least-squares regression revealed that (1)H T(2) relaxation decay data were able to explain a large part of the variation in the survival of E. coli O157 (64-83%). However, the predictions of L. innocua and S. aureus survival were strongly dependent on the fat/water content of the samples. Consequently, the present results indicate that NMR relaxometry is a promising technique for predicting the survival of these bacteria; however, the characteristics of the sample matrix are substantial.

  3. Copolymers sensitive to temperature and pH in water and in water+oil mixtures: A DSC, ITC and volumetric study.

    PubMed

    De Lisi, Rosario; Giammona, Gabriele; Lazzara, Giuseppe; Milioto, Stefana

    2011-02-15

    Block copolymer micelles are receiving an increasing interest because of the variety of structures and the possibilities to tune them by changing external and internal parameters achieving the desired properties for a specific purpose. We have investigated the acid/base behavior, self-assembling and solubilization ability towards polar oils of star-like copolymers named Tetronics. They are composed of branched four-arms each one consisting of two blocks made of EO and PO units linked to the diethylenediamine group, which confers pH response ability. The copolymers T1107 and T90R4 were studied with a sequential and reverse architecture. The thermodynamics of the acid/base equilibrium was studied by ITC. The aggregation of T1107 in water was analyzed as functions of pH, composition and temperature. The enhanced oil solubilization in the aqueous T1107 aggregates was widely investigated highlighting the role of the oil structure, composition, temperature and pH. As a general result, the oil induces the copolymer aggregation and the solubilization power of micelles is tunable by changing the pH. Efforts have been devoted to model the calorimetric data in order to achieve the thermodynamic properties of the involved process. Finally, we showed that the Tetronic micelles are more promising than the conventional surfactants micelles because of the larger solubilization power and flexibility of the macromolecular system.

  4. Dynamics of pH modification of an acidic protein bait used for tropical fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    PubMed

    Heath, Robert R; Vazquez, Aime; Schnell, Elena Q; Villareal, Janett; Kendra, Paul E; Epsky, Nancy D

    2009-12-01

    Several species of Anastrepha and Bactrocera fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) are captured in traps baited with the protein bait NuLure combined with borax (sodium tetraborate decahydrate) in an aqueous solution, typically 9% NuLure (vol:vol) with 3% borax (wt:vol). NuLure is an acid hydrolysate of corn and has an acidic pH. Addition of borax makes the solution more alkaline, and increase in alkalinity results in increase of ammonia release from the bait solution. This is a very dynamic system, with resultant pH affected by factors such as the amount of borax added, the pH of the water used for preparation, the age of the bait solution, and the development of microbial growth. Problems with borax include amount needed to increase alkalinity of NuLure solutions, which creates difficulties in disposing of spent bait in fruit fly trapping programs. Therefore, research was conducted to evaluate NaOH as an alternative method to increase alkalinity of NuLure solutions. Laboratory experiments compared effect of NaOH versus borax for pH modification on changes in pH and ammonia content of NuLure solutions over time. Although NuLure/NaOH solutions could be adjusted to a more alkaline pH than NuLure/borax solutions, borax plays a critical role in pH stability over time. However, the pH of NuLure/NaOH is stabilized when propylene glycol (10% vol:vol) was used to prepare the bait solution. The use of NaOH can provide an alternative to the use of borax to increase bait solution alkalinity.

  5. In situ Determination of Pore-water pH in Reducing Sediments near Methane Seeps and Vents by Laser Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltzer, E. T.; Walz, P. M.; Luna, M.; Zhang, X.; Brewer, P. G.

    2015-12-01

    Sediments near methane vents and seeps are often anoxic in nature due to the microbial oxidation of organic matter. When the pore-water oxygen is consumed, the microbial population resorts to using sulfate as the terminal electron receptor. For the anaerobic oxidation of methane, the net reaction is: CH4 + SO42- = HCO3- + HS- + H2O. Hydrogen sulfide produced by this reaction dissociates into bisulfide in proportion to the pore-water pH. Since the first pK of H2S is about 7 and close to the in situ pore-water pH, it satisfies the criteria for a useful pH indicating dye. Although the two forms of hydrogen sulfide are not visually discernable by the human eye, these two forms have distinct Raman spectra and thus can be easily quantified using an in situ spectrometer. The relative Raman cross-sections of the hydrogen sulfide species were determined in the laboratory across a range of relevant pH values and at the approximate salinity (ionic strength) and temperature of deep-sea pore waters. With this calibration, it is simple to compute the pore-water pH from the relative abundance of the two sulfide species: pH = pK1 + log10([HS-]/[H2S]). Pore-water profiles were investigated at several sites in the Santa Monica basin around methane mounds, gas vents and cold seeps. A titanium pore-water probe with a stainless steel frit was used to filter and collect pore-water samples at 5-10 cm intervals in the top 50-60 cm of sediment. Filtration and collection of the pore-water samples was usually accomplished in 5-10 minutes, with acquisition of the laser Raman spectra requiring only 2-4 minutes additional time. Vertical profiles of sulfate, total sulfide (H2S + HS-), methane and pH were collected simultaneously using the laser Raman spectrometer and pore-water profile sampler. Sulfate was observed to decrease from seawater concentrations to below detection limits while both methane and total sulfide increased proportionally to the sulfate loss. Once total sulfide concentrations

  6. Modeling CO2 degassing and pH in a stream-aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choi, J.; Hulseapple, S.M.; Conklin, M.H.; Harvey, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    Pinal Creek, Arizona receives an inflow of ground water with high dissolved inorganic carbon (57-75 mg/l) and low pH (5.8-6.3). There is an observed increase of in-stream pH from approximately 6.0-7.8 over the 3 km downstream of the point of groundwater inflow. We hypothesized that CO2 gas-exchange was the most important factor causing the pH increase in this stream-aquifer system. An existing transport model, for coupled ground water-surface water systems (OTIS), was modified to include carbonate equilibria and CO2 degassing, used to simulate alkalinity, total dissolved inorganic carbon (C(T)), and pH in Pinal Creek. Because of the non-linear relation between pH and C(T), the modified transport model used the numerical iteration method to solve the non-linearity. The transport model parameters were determined by the injection of two tracers, bromide and propane. The resulting simulations of alkalinity, C(T) and pH reproduced, without fitting, the overall trends in downstream concentrations. A multi-parametric sensitivity analysis (MPSA) was used to identify the relative sensitivities of the predictions to six of the physical and chemical parameters used in the transport model. MPSA results implied that C(T) and pH in stream water were controlled by the mixing of ground water with stream water and CO2 degassing. The relative importance of these two processes varied spatially depending on the hydrologic conditions, such as stream flow velocity and whether a reach gained or lost stream water caused by the interaction with the ground water. The coupled transport model with CO2 degassing and generalized sensitivity analysis presented in this study can be applied to evaluate carbon transport and pH in other coupled stream-ground water systems.An existing transport model for coupled groundwater-surface water systems was modified to include carbonate equilibria and CO2 degassing. The modified model was used to simulate alkalinity, total dissolved inorganic carbon (CT) and

  7. Stochastic modeling of filtrate alkalinity in water filtration devices: Transport through micro/nano porous clay based ceramic materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clay and plant materials such as wood are the raw materials used in manufacture of ceramic water filtration devices around the world. A step by step manufacturing procedure which includes initial mixing, molding and sintering is used. The manufactured ceramic filters have numerous pores which help i...

  8. Effect of water on mantle melting and magma differentiation, as modeled using Adiabat_1ph 3.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoshechkina, P. M.; Asimow, P. D.; Hauri, E. H.; Luffi, P. I.

    2010-12-01

    MELTS [1] and pMELTS [2] are widely used for modeling hydrous magma differentiation and water-saturated mantle melting, respectively. In pHMELTS [3] the water species can partition into melt, pure vapor, and hydrous or nominally anhydrous minerals so that phase relations for water-undersaturated systems may also be constructed. Adiabat_1ph is a text-based front end to the (pH)MELTS algorithms; in version 3.0 (Antoshechkina and Asimow, this meeting) we have added tools to further explore the effect of water on melting and fractional crystallization. Asimow and coworkers developed two schemes for fractionation-correction of major and trace elements: a forward model that considers the effects of water, pressure, and fO2 on the liquid line of descent (LLD) [3] and a hybrid back- and forward-fractionation model that may be used for individual samples when trends are poorly defined [4]. An extensive melt inclusion dataset for the Mariana Trough [5] shows evidence for simultaneous fractionation and degassing, so we have adapted routines from [4] to cope with hydrous conditions. For H2O < 1.5 wt% the path predicted by the ‘reverse-fractionation’ algorithm passes from cotectic assimilation to olivine accumulation as MgO increases. Higher water contents lend themselves to the ‘amoeba’ routine that, given an initial estimate, varies the parental melt composition until isobaric forward fractionation yields a specified target [4]. The adiabat_1ph version is flexible in the choice of varied oxides and fO2 constraint, and offers optional fitting to the LLD of a whole suite. In test runs, using glass compositions from the 9N region of the East Pacific Rise, we optimize the primary melt composition for fixed initial H2O. A grid search gives the quality of LLD fit as a function of initial H2O and pressure of crystallization. The overall best-fit LLD model and our preferred LLD model (H2O-CO2 vapor saturation pressure and maximum measured H2O) are in excellent agreement

  9. Hydrology and water quality of the Forest County Potawatomi Indian Reservation, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lidwin, R.A.; Krohelski, J.T.

    1993-01-01

    Water quality of three lakes on the Reservation is variable and depends on the degree of connection with the ground-water system. In general, Bug Lake and Devils Lake are in poor hydraulic connection with the ground-water system, and their waters contain low concentrations of dissolved solids and alkalinity and low pH. King Lake is in good hydraulic connection with the ground-water system, and its waters contain higher concentrations of dissolved solids and alkalinity and higher pH than Bug and Devils Lakes.

  10. An HPLC method with UV detection, pH control, and reductive ascorbic acid for cyanuric acid analysis in water.

    PubMed

    Cantú, R; Evans, O; Kawahara, F K; Shoemaker, J A; Dufour, A P

    2000-12-01

    Every year over 250 million pounds of cyanuric acid (CA) and chlorinated isocyanurates are produced industrially. These compounds are standard ingredients in formulations for household bleaches, industrial cleansers, dishwasher compounds, general sanitizers, and chlorine stabilizers. The method developed for CA using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with UV detection simplifies and optimizes certain parameters of previous methodologies by effective pH control of the eluent (95% phosphate buffer: 5% methanol, v/v) to the narrow pH range of 7.2-7.4. UV detection was set at the optimum wavelength of 213 nm where the cyanuric ion absorbs strongly. Analysis at the lower pH range of 6.8-7.1 proved inadequate due to CA keto-enol tautomerism, while at pHs of <6.8 there were substantial losses in analytical sensitivity. In contrast, pHs of >7.4 proved more sensitive but their use was rejected because of CA elution at the chromatographic void volume and due to chemical interferences. The complex equilibria of chlorinated isocyanurates and associated species were suppressed by using reductive ascorbic acid to restrict the products to CA. UV, HPLC-UV, and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry techniques were combined to monitor the reactive chlorinated isocyanurates and to support the use of ascorbic acid. The resulting method is reproducible and measures CA in the 0.5-125 mg/L linear concentration range with a method detection limit of 0.05 mg/L in water.

  11. Differences in the Effect of Coal Pile Runoff (Low pH, High Metal Concentrations) Versus Natural Carolina Bay Water (Low pH, Low Metal Concentrations) on Plant Condition and Associated Bacterial Epiphytes of Salvinia minima.

    PubMed

    Lindell, A H; Tuckfield, R C; McArthur, J V

    2016-05-01

    Numerous wetlands and streams have been impacted by acid mine drainage (AMD) resulting in lowered pH and increased levels of toxic heavy metals. Remediation of these contaminated sites requires knowledge on the response of microbial communities (especially epiphytic) and aquatic plants to these altered environmental conditions. We examined the effect of coal pile runoff waters as an example of AMD in contrast to natural water from Carolina Bays with low pH and levels of metals on Salvinia minima, a non-native, metal accumulating plant and associated epiphytic bacteria. Treatments included water from two Carolina Bays, one AMD basin and Hoagland's Solution at two pH levels (natural and adjusted to 5.0-5.5). Using controlled replicated microcosms (N = 64) we determined that the combination of low pH and high metal concentrations has a significant negative impact (p < 0.05) on plant condition and epiphytes. Solution metal concentrations dropped indicating removal from solution by S. minima in all microcosms.

  12. Potential of electrolyzed water for disinfection of foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Bui, Vuong N; Nguyen, Khong V; Pham, Nga T; Bui, Anh N; Dao, Tung D; Nguyen, Thanh T; Nguyen, Hoa T; Trinh, Dai Q; Inui, Kenjiro; Uchiumi, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Haruko; Imai, Kunitoshi

    2017-02-18

    Acidic electrolyzed water (EW) (pH 2.6-5.8) and alkaline EW (pH 11.2-12.1) were examined as potential disinfectants against foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Using acidic EW with pH 2.6 and alkaline EW with pH>11.7, the viral titer decreased in vitro by >4.0 log values, 2 min after the virus was mixed with EW at a 1:10 dilution. The strong virucidal effect of acidic EW (pH 2.6), but not that of alkaline EW (>11.7), seemed to depend on the chlorine level in the solution. Genetic analysis revealed that viral RNA was substantially reduced, especially by alkaline EW.

  13. Crystal structure of alkaline cellulase K: insight into the alkaline adaptation of an industrial enzyme.

    PubMed

    Shirai, T; Ishida, H; Noda, J; Yamane, T; Ozaki, K; Hakamada, Y; Ito, S

    2001-07-27

    The crystal structure of the catalytic domain of alkaline cellulase K was determined at 1.9 A resolution. Because of the most alkaliphilic nature and it's highest activity at pH 9.5, it is used commercially in laundry detergents. An analysis of the structural bases of the alkaliphilic character of the enzyme suggested a mechanism similar to that previously proposed for alkaline proteases, that is, an increase in the number of Arg, His, and Gln residues, and a decrease in Asp and Lys residues. Some ion pairs were formed by the gained Arg residues, which is similar to what has been found in the alkaline proteases. Lys-Asp ion pairs are disfavored and partly replaced with Arg-Asp ion pairs. The alkaline adaptation appeared to be a remodeling of ion pairs so that the charge balance is kept in the high pH range.

  14. Improving structural stability of water-dispersed MCM-41 silica nanoparticles through post-synthesis pH aging process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varache, Mathieu; Bezverkhyy, Igor; Bouyer, Florence; Chassagnon, Rémi; Baras, Florence; Bouyer, Frédéric

    2015-09-01

    The colloidal and structural stabilities of MCM-41 mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) are of great importance in order to prepare optimal nanovectors. In this paper, MSNs (approximatively 160 nm in diameter) were synthesized using n-cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as a template and tetraethyl orthosilicate as a silica source under high N2 flow (MSN/N2) to obtain stable dispersions in water. The degradation of the porous nanoparticles was investigated by immersion in water. The morphology and the porous structure were studied by TEM, XRD, N2 sorption, and 29Si MAS NMR and were compared to that of MSNs prepared in ambient air (MSN/air). The volumetric properties of the MSN/N2 after 1 day in water were drastically more decreased than MSN/air (a pore volume decrease of 85 % for MSN/N2 and 59 % for MSN/air) and the 2D-hexagonal porous structure was totally lost. Furthermore, synthesizing MSNs under a high N2 flow leads to a decrease in the synthesis yield (45 % MSN/N2 and 75 % for MSN/air). The lower structural stability of the MSN/N2 is explained by the lower polycondensation degree of the MSN/N2 observed by 29Si MAS NMR (Q4/Q3 = 0.86 for MSN/N2 and 1.61 for MSN/air) and the lower silica molar ratio in the nanomaterials (SiO2/CTA = 3.9 for MSN/N2 7.1 for MSN/air). This allows for enhanced solubilization of silica in water. Four strategies were hence evaluated in order to reinforce the porous structure of the MSNs. Among them, the most efficient route was based on a pH adjustment of the colloidal suspension (pH 7.5) after 2 h of synthesis without any purification and while keeping a N2 static atmosphere (called MSN/N2/7.5). After 1 day in water, the volumetric and structural properties of MSN/N2/7.5 were similar to that obtained for MSN/air. The improvement of the stability arose as a result of the increase in the silica condensation (Q4/Q3 = 1.58) and silica molar ratio in the nanomaterials (SiO2/CTA = 6.8). After the post-treatment, the silica framework

  15. Straddling the tholeiitic/calc-alkaline transition: the effects of modest amounts of water on magmatic differentiation at Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandler, Ben E.; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Grove, Timothy L.

    2014-10-01

    Melting experiments have been performed at 1 bar (anhydrous) and 1- and 2-kbar H2O-saturated conditions to study the effect of water on the differentiation of a basaltic andesite. The starting material was a mafic pumice from the compositionally zoned tuff deposited during the ~75 ka caldera-forming eruption of Newberry Volcano, a rear-arc volcanic center in the central Oregon Cascades. Pumices in the tuff of Newberry caldera (TNC) span a continuous silica range from 53 to 74 wt% and feature an unusually high-Na2O content of 6.5 wt% at 67 wt% SiO2. This wide range of magmatic compositions erupted in a single event makes the TNC an excellent natural laboratory in which to study the conditions of magmatic differentiation. Our experimental results and mineral-melt hygrometers/thermometers yield similar estimates of pre-eruptive H2O contents and temperatures of the TNC liquids. The most primitive (mafic) basaltic andesites record a pre-eruptive H2O content of 1.5 wt% and a liquidus temperature of 1,060-1,070 °C at upper crustal pressure. This modest H2O content produces a distinctive fractionation trend that is much more enriched in Na, Fe, and Ti than the calc-alkaline trend typical of wetter arc magmas, but slightly less enriched in Fe and Ti than the tholeiitic trend of dry magmas. Modest H2O contents might be expected at Newberry Volcano given its location in the Cascade rear arc, and the same fractionation trend is also observed in the rim andesites of the rear-arc Medicine Lake volcano in the southern Cascades. However, the Na-Fe-Ti enrichment characteristic of modest H2O (1-2 wt%) is also observed to the west of Newberry in magmas erupted from the arc axis, such as the Shevlin Park Tuff and several lava flows from the Three Sisters. This shows that modest-H2O magmas are being generated directly beneath the arc axis as well as in the rear arc. Because liquid lines of descent are particularly sensitive to water content in the range of 0-3 wt% H2O, they provide a

  16. On the pH dependent behavior of the firefly bioluminescence: protein dynamics and water content in the active pocket.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Woo; Rhee, Young Min

    2013-06-20

    Understanding bioluminescence presents fascinating challenges for fundamental sciences and numerous opportunities for practical applications. As a representative example, the firefly bioluminescent system has been intensively studied in both experimental and computational areas. However, there are still remaining questions regarding especially the detailed protein dynamics and the mechanisms of its color modulation. Here, we report on the pH dependent behavior of the firefly bioluminescence primarily based on molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the overall protein structure is generally resilient to pH variations. As the protein does not exhibit any structural distortions that can affect the emission property, we next focus on the dynamics in the active pocket and its effect on color modulation by adopting different protonation states in the pocket. With this, we observe red-shifted emissions at acidic conditions as consistent with previous studies. Most importantly, we find that a water molecule in the active pocket can mediate flexible motions of neighboring groups, which can subsequently modify the emission properties to a substantial degree. Based on the observations, we propose that the active pocket is in a dry condition during the luminescence process. Our results highlight the importance of understanding the role of the dynamics near the active pocket in modulating bioluminescence.

  17. Temperature, water activity and pH during conidia production affect the physiological state and germination time of Penicillium species.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Van Long, Nicolas; Vasseur, Valérie; Coroller, Louis; Dantigny, Philippe; Le Panse, Sophie; Weill, Amélie; Mounier, Jérôme; Rigalma, Karim

    2017-01-16

    Conidial germination and mycelial growth are generally studied with conidia produced under optimal conditions to increase conidial yield. Nonetheless, the physiological state of such conidia most likely differs from those involved in spoilage of naturally contaminated food. The present study aimed at investigating the impact of temperature, pH and water activity (aw) during production of conidia on the germination parameters and compatible solutes of conidia of Penicillium roqueforti and Penicillium expansum. Low temperature (5°C) and reduced aw (0.900 aw) during sporulation significantly reduced conidial germination times whereas the pH of the sporulation medium only had a slight effect at the tested values (2.5, 8.0). Conidia of P. roqueforti produced at 5°C germinated up to 45h earlier than those produced at 20°C. Conidia of P. roqueforti and P. expansum produced at 0.900 aw germinated respectively up to 8h and 3h earlier than conidia produced at 0.980 aw. Furthermore, trehalose and mannitol assessments suggested that earlier germination might be related to delayed conidial maturation even though no ultra-structural modifications were observed by transmission electron microscopy. Taken together, these results highlight the importance of considering environmental conditions during sporulation in mycological studies. The physiological state of fungal conidia should be taken into account to design challenge tests or predictive mycology studies. This knowledge may also be of interest to improve the germination capacity of fungal cultures commonly used in fermented foods.

  18. Viability of Leptospira Isolates from a Human Outbreak in Thailand in Various Water Types, pH, and Temperature Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Stoddard, Robyn A.; Bui, Duy; Haberling, Dana L.; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Thaipadungpanit, Janjira; Hoffmaster, Alex R.

    2014-01-01

    Leptospira spp. isolated from patients during a multiyear outbreak in Thailand were genotyped using multilocus sequence typing and a majority were identified as ST34, especially in earlier years. We tested whether ST34 isolates were better adapted to survive in various pH levels, temperatures, and water sources. Motility and growth were monitored over a 12-week period. Early year ST34 isolates did not appear to have a significant fitness advantage over non-ST34, however, this may have been because a majority of the isolates survived to the termination of the study, with the exception being at high temperature (37°C) and/or basic pH (8.65). Failure to detect a significant fitness advantage of ST34 may be a result of the length of the study or the small sample size. Lengthening the study and looking at virulence and maintenance in the host could yield additional information about this outbreak. PMID:25200260

  19. Influence of temperature, pH and water activity on "in vitro" inhibition of Penicillium glabrum (Wehmer) Westling by yeasts.

    PubMed

    Sinigaglia, M; Corbo, M R; Ciccarone, C

    1998-08-01

    Four different yeast species (Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Saccharomycopsis vini, Kluyveromyces marxianus, Cryptococcus albidus), isolated from surface of grapes, were evaluated for biocontrol potential against Penicillium glabrum. In order to investigate the influence of temperature, pH, water activity and yeast cell concentration on Penicillium glabrum inhibition, the individual effects and the interaction of these factors were analyzed by means of a Central Composite Design (CCD). All yeast species tested showed antagonistic effects which were more pronounced at high cell concentrations. The other variables affected the antagonistic effect differentially depending on the yeast species. Results of the experimental design showed that the selective success of a competitive microflora is under environmental control; moreover, when microbial cells are subjected to multiple factors, the effects and the reciprocal interactions of the individual variables cannot be independently evaluated.

  20. Effect of water pH on the toxicity of 2,4,5-trichlorophenol to four species of freshwater animals

    SciTech Connect

    Brooke, L.T.; Markee, T.; Vande Venter, F.; Spehar, R.; Erickson, R.

    1994-12-31

    2,4,5-Trichlorophenol (TCP) is a weak acid with a pH of approximately 7.2 which is expected to have a significant effect upon its toxicity. Lumbriculus variegatus, Oncorhynchus mykiss, Pimephales promelas, and Hyalella azteca were exposed to TCP in 96 h flow-through toxicity tests. For the first two species, simultaneous tests were conducted at three pH values (7.0, 7.8, 8.6). The other two species were tested at six pH values conducted in two sets of three simultaneous tests (6.2, 7.4, 8.6 and 6.8, 8.0, 9.2). All species tested showed decreased sensitivity to TCP with increased pH of the water. Over the pH range tested, LC50s for L. variegatus varied by about 5-fold, for P. promelas by 12-fold, for H. azteca by 10-fold, and for O. mykiss by 1.5-fold. The effects of pH on TCP toxicity to P. promelas was also tested in 30 day chronic tests at pH 7.0, 7.8 and 8.6. Survival in these tests was affected by pH similarly to the acute tests. Growth also was less severely affected at higher pH.

  1. Influence of Soil and Irrigation Water pH on the Availability of Phosphorus in Struvite Derived from Urine through a Greenhouse Pot Experiment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoning; Tao, Yi; Wen, Guoqi; Kong, Fanxin; Zhang, Xihui; Hu, Zhengyi

    2016-05-04

    One greenhouse pot experiment was used to investigate the availability of phosphorus in struvite derived from urine affected by soil pH (cinnamon soil, pH 7.3; paddy soil, pH 5.3) and irrigation water (pH 6.0 and 7.5) with bird rapeseed (Brassica campestris L.). The biomass of applied struvite in paddy soil was significantly greater than that of applied calcium superphosphate. However, statistically significant differences were not observed in cinnamon soil. Soil-applied struvite had a higher Olsen P compared to soil-applied calcium superphosphate irrespective of soil type. The biomass of applied struvite and irrigation with pH 6.0 water was greater compared to that with irrigation with pH 7.3 water irrespective of soil type, accompanied with significantly higher leaf chlorophyll concentration. Therefore, struvite has the potential to be an effective P fertilizer, and acidic irrigation water has greater influence on the availability of phosphorus in struvite than does acidic soil.

  2. Sources of alkalinity and acidity along an acid mine drainage remediated stream in SE Ohio: Hewett Fork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleich, K. L.; Lopez, D. A.; Bowman, J. R.; Kruse, N. A.; Mackey, A. L.; VanDervort, D.; Korenowsky, R.

    2013-12-01

    In the remediation of acid mine drainage impacted streams, it is important to locate and quantify the sources of acidity and alkalinity inputs. These parameters affect the long-term recovery of the stream habitat. Previous studies have focused on treating the remediation of AMD as point source pollution, targeting the main acid seep for remediation. However, in the interest of biological and chemical recovery, it is important to understand how sources of alkalinity and acidity, throughout the stream, affect water and sediment quality. The Hewett Fork watershed in Southeastern Ohio is impacted by AMD from the AS-14 mine complex in Carbondale, Ohio. In attempts to remediate the stream, the water is being treated with a continuous alkaline input from a calcium oxide doser. While the section of watershed furthest downstream from the doser is showing signs of recovery, the water chemistry and aquatic life near the doser are still impacted. The objective of this study is to examine and model the chemistry of the tributaries of Hewett Fork to see how they contribute to the alkalinity and acidity budgets of the main stem of the stream. By examining the inputs of tributaries into the main stem, this project aims to understand processes occurring during remediation throughout the entire stream. Discharge was measured during a dry period in October, 2012 and at a high flow in May, 2013. Field parameters such as pH, TDS, DO, alkalinity and acidity were also determined. Low flow data collected during fall sampling shows variable flow along the stream path, the stream gains water from ground water at some points while it loses water at others, potentially due to variable elevation of the water table. Flow data collected during spring sampling shows that Hewett Fork is a gaining stream during that period with inputs from groundwater contributing to increasing flow downstream. When using this data to calculate the net alkalinity load along the stream, there are areas with alkaline

  3. Modelling exchange kinetics of copper at the water-aquatic moss (Fontinalis antipyretica) interface: influence of water cationic composition (Ca, Mg, Na and pH).

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Daniel; Ciffroy, Philippe; Tusseau-Vuillemin, Marie-Hélène; Garnier, Cédric; Garnier, Jean-Marie

    2009-02-01

    The present study investigated the effect of water cationic composition (Ca, Mg, Na, pH) on the bioaccumulation and elimination rates of copper by an aquatic moss (Fontinalis antipyretica), under laboratory conditions. For this purpose, mosses were exposed to copper at an environmentally relevant and usually non-toxic concentration (5 microg L(-1)) in natural waters where cationic composition and concentrations were varied. To describe copper bioaccumulation by aquatic mosses, a two-compartment model was the first-order kinetics, was developed and calibrated under a wide range of water cationic composition. Bioaccumulation rates of Cu in mosses were significantly reduced as the concentrations of competitive cations in solution increased. Hence, in hard-water, Ca and Mg cations play a protective role as they compete with Cu2+ ions for the absorption on transport sites at the organism-water interface. Based on the relationships between each major cation concentration and the exchange kinetics on mosses, the binding constants (K(Ci)(BL)) of each competing cations to the biological surfaces were derived. Using the present cationic-dependent kinetic model, it is now feasible to incorporate water cationic composition in the (re)interpretation of bryophytes contamination levels and in the (re)definition of Water Quality Criteria (WQC) as illustrated through two selected examples of biomonitoring programmes. In the framework of future national water quality guidelines revisions, a such flexible and mechanistic biomonitoring tool (integrating the protective effects of competing cations) may greatly improve the ability of regulators to derive site-specific Cu (metal) guidelines for protecting aquatic biota, while limiting the use of conservative assumptions.

  4. Catalytic Diversity in Alkaline Hydrothermal Vent Systems on Ocean Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Ryan D.; Barge, Laura; Chin, Keith B.; Doloboff, Ivria J.; Flores, Erika; Hammer, Arden C.; Sobron, Pablo; Russell, Michael J.; Kanik, Isik

    2016-10-01

    Hydrothermal systems formed by serpentinization can create moderate-temperature, alkaline systems and it is possible that this type of vent could exist on icy worlds such as Europa which have water-rock interfaces. It has been proposed that some prebiotic chemistry responsible for the emergence of life on Earth and possibly other wet and icy worlds could occur as a result ofredox potential and pH gradients in submarine alkaline hydrothermal vents (Russell et al., 2014). Hydrothermal chimneys formed in laboratory simulations of alkaline vents under early Earth conditions have precipitate membranes that contain minerals such as iron sulfides, which are hypothesized to catalyze reduction of CO2 (Yamaguchi et al. 2014, Roldan et al. 2014) leading to further organic synthesis. This CO2 reduction process may be affected by other trace components in the chimney, e.g. nickel or organic molecules. We have conducted experiments to investigate catalytic properties of iron and iron-nickel sulfides containing organic dopants in slightly acidic ocean simulants relevant to early Earth or possibly ocean worlds. We find that the electrochemical properties of the chimney as well as the morphology/chemistry of the precipitate are affected by the concentration and type of organics present. These results imply that synthesis of organics in water-rock systems on ocean worlds may lead to hydrothermal precipitates which can incorporate these organic into the mineral matrix and may affect the role of gradients in alkaline vent systems.Therefore, further understanding on the electroactive roles of various organic species within hydrothermal chimneys will have important implications for habitability as well as prebiotic chemistry. This work is funded by NASA Astrobiology Institute JPL Icy Worlds Team and a NAI Director's Discretionary Fund award.Yamaguchi A. et al. (2014) Electrochimica Acta, 141, 311-318.Russell, M. J. et al. (2014), Astrobiology, 14, 308-43.Roldan, A. (2014) Chem. Comm. 51

  5. The effect of pristine carbon-based nanomaterial on the growth of green gram sprouts and pH of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaolin; Zhou, Zhihua; Lu, Dejiong; Dong, Xinwei; Xu, Minghan; Wei, Liangming; Zhang, Yafei

    2014-10-01

    We examined the toxicity of four carbon-based nanomaterials (unmodified) by using carbon quantum dots (CQDs), graphene quantum dots (GQDs), graphene oxide (GO), and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) to cultivate bean sprout. Results showed that the toxicity of these four carbon nanomaterials increases with the increasing of concentration and cultivating time. In addition, pH test was applied to study the effect of carbon-based nanomaterials on water. pH of culture solution displayed unconspicuous dose-dependent, but nanomaterials indeed have a considerable impact on the pH even at low concentration.

  6. The effect of pristine carbon-based nanomaterial on the growth of green gram sprouts and pH of water

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We examined the toxicity of four carbon-based nanomaterials (unmodified) by using carbon quantum dots (CQDs), graphene quantum dots (GQDs), graphene oxide (GO), and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) to cultivate bean sprout. Results showed that the toxicity of these four carbon nanomaterials increases with the increasing of concentration and cultivating time. In addition, pH test was applied to study the effect of carbon-based nanomaterials on water. pH of culture solution displayed unconspicuous dose-dependent, but nanomaterials indeed have a considerable impact on the pH even at low concentration. PMID:25346649

  7. Differences in the chemical composition of Enterococcus faecalis biofilm under conditions of starvation and alkalinity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weixu; Liang, Jingping; He, Zhiyan; Jiang, Wei

    2017-01-02

    ABSTACT This study aimed to investigate the dynamic changes that occur in the chemical composition of an Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) biofilm under conditions of starvation and in an alkaline environment and to explore the function of chemical composition changes in the resistance of the E. faecalis biofilm to an extreme environment. This study established an in vitro E. faecalis biofilm model under starvation and in an alkaline environment. During the formation of the biofilm, the pH value and nutritional condition of the culture medium were changed, and the changes in chemical composition were observed using biochemical measures. The results showed that, when the pH value of the culture medium was 11, the percentage of water-insoluble polysaccharides in the biofilm was significantly lower than under other conditions. In addition, the percentage of water-soluble polysaccharides in culture medium with pH values of 9 and 11 gradually decreased. The level of the water-soluble polysaccharides in each milligram of dry weight of biofilm at pH 11 increased compared to that under other conditions. The results from this study indicate that the chemical composition of E. faecalis biofilm changed in extreme environments. These changes served as a defensive mechanism for E. faecalis against environmental pressures.

  8. Toxicity of alkalinity to Hyalella azteca

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lasier, P.J.; Winger, P.V.; Reinert, R.E.

    1997-01-01

    Toxicity testing and chemical analyses of sediment pore water have been suggested for use in sediment quality assessments and sediment toxicity identification evaluations. However, caution should be exercised in interpreting pore-water chemistry and toxicity due to inherent chemical characteristics and confounding relationships. High concentrations of alkalinity, which are typical of sediment pore waters from many regions, have been shown to be toxic to test animals. A series of tests were conducted to assess the significance of elevated alkalinity concentrations to Hyalella azteca, an amphipod commonly used for sediment and pore-water toxicity testing. Toxicity tests with 14-d old and 7-d old animals were conducted in serial dilutions of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) solutions producing alkalinities ranging between 250 to 2000 mg/L as CaCO3. A sodium chloride (NaCl) toxicity test was also conducted to verify that toxicity was due to bicarbonate and not sodium. Alkalinity was toxic at concentrations frequently encountered in sediment pore water. There was also a significant difference in the toxicity of alkalinity between 14-d old and 7-d old animals. The average 96-h LC50 for alkalinity was 1212 mg/L (as CaCO3) for 14-d old animals and 662 mg/L for the younger animals. Sodium was not toxic at levels present in the NaHCO3 toxicity tests. Alkalinity should be routinely measured in pore-water toxicity tests, and interpretation of toxicity should consider alkalinity concentration and test-organism tolerance.

  9. The effect of high pH on ion balance, nitrogen excretion and behaviour in freshwater fish from an eutrophic lake: a laboratory and field study.

    PubMed

    Scott, Dawn M; Lucas, Martyn C; Wilson, Rod W

    2005-06-01

    Slapton Ley is a freshwater hyper-eutrophic lake of two basins connected by a narrow channel. One part of the lake experiences summer blooms of cyanobacteria and poor water quality, including elevated water pH (maximum pH recorded=10.54), the other part is shaded by reed beds, and remains clear and neutral. This study used laboratory and field physiological measurements together with radio-tracking to investigate the potential impacts of alkaline pH on the physiology and behaviour of fish from Slapton Ley. Exposure of perch (Perca fluviatilis) from Slapton Ley to pH 9.50 water in the laboratory caused an immediate inhibition of sodium uptake and ammonia excretion to 34 and 32% of control levels, respectively. Net sodium balance recovered by day 3 of exposure whereas ammonia excretion only partially recovered to 60-70% of the control value from 8 h onwards. Urea excretion did not increase as a result of high pH exposure. Fish from the alkaline part of the lake (pH 9.90) had almost three-fold greater plasma ammonia compared to fish from neutral waters, indicating a pronounced disruption of ammonia excretion in the field. There was no significant disturbance to plasma sodium, chloride or total protein in fish sampled from the alkaline water of Slapton Ley. The radio-tracking provided no evidence of adult perch and pike (Esox lucius) trying to seek refuge from the alkaline conditions, despite having access to adjacent parts of the lake with neutral pH. It seems likely that there are advantages (e.g. better foraging, less predation) of withstanding the high pH conditions that outweigh the benefit of moving into more pH neutral parts of the lake.

  10. On the Response of pH to Inorganic Nutrient Enrichment in Well-Mixed Coastal Marine Waters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent concerns about declining pH in the surface ocean in response to anthropogenic increases of CO2 in the atmosphere have raised the question of how this declining baseline of oceanic pH might interact with the much larger diel and seasonal variations of pH in coastal marine e...

  11. DBP formation in hot and cold water across a simulated distribution system: effect of incubation time, heating time, pH, chlorine dose, and incubation temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Boning; Reckhow, David A

    2013-10-15

    This paper demonstrates that disinfection byproducts (DBP) concentration profiles in heated water were quite different from the DBP concentrations in the cold tap water. Chloroform concentrations in the heated water remained constant or even decreased slightly with increasing distribution system water age. The amount of dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) was much higher in the heated water than in the cold water; however, the maximum levels in heated water with different distribution system water ages did not differ substantially. The levels of trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) in the heated water were similar to the TCAA levels in the tap water, and a slight reduction was observed after the tap water was heated for 24 h. Regardless of water age, significant reductions of nonregulated DBPs were observed after the tap water was heated for 24 h. For tap water with lower water ages, there were significant increases in dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN), chloropicrin (CP), and 1,1-dichloropropane (1,1-DCP) after a short period of heating. Heating of the tap water with low pH led to a more significant increase of chloroform and a more significant short-term increase of DCAN. High pH accelerated the loss of the nonregulated DBPs in the heated water. The results indicated that as the chlorine doses increased, levels of chloroform and DCAA in the heated water increased significantly. However, for TCAA, the thermally induced increase in concentration was only notable for the chlorinated water with very high chlorine dose. Finally, heating may lead to higher DBP concentrations in chlorinated water with lower distribution system temperatures.

  12. A Virtual Mixture Approach to the Study of Multistate Equilibrium: Application to Constant pH Simulation in Explicit Water.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiongwu; Brooks, Bernard R

    2015-10-01

    Chemical and thermodynamic equilibrium of multiple states is a fundamental phenomenon in biology systems and has been the focus of many experimental and computational studies. This work presents a simulation method to directly study the equilibrium of multiple states. This method constructs a virtual mixture of multiple states (VMMS) to sample the conformational space of all chemical states simultaneously. The VMMS system consists of multiple subsystems, one for each state. The subsystem contains a solute and a solvent environment. The solute molecules in all subsystems share the same conformation but have their own solvent environments. Transition between states is implicated by the change of their molar fractions. Simulation of a VMMS system allows efficient calculation of relative free energies of all states, which in turn determine their equilibrium molar fractions. For systems with a large number of state transition sites, an implicit site approximation is introduced to minimize the cost of simulation. A direct application of the VMMS method is for constant pH simulation to study protonation equilibrium. Applying the VMMS method to a heptapeptide of 3 ionizable residues, we calculated the pKas of those residues both with all explicit states and with implicit sites and obtained consistent results. For mouse epidermal growth factor of 9 ionizable groups, our VMMS simulations with implicit sites produced pKas of all 9 ionizable groups and the results agree qualitatively with NMR measurement. This example demonstrates the VMMS method can be applied to systems of a large number of ionizable groups and the computational cost scales linearly with the number of ionizable groups. For one of the most challenging systems in constant pH calculation, SNase Δ+PHS/V66K, our VMMS simulation shows that it is the state-dependent water penetration that causes the large deviation in lysine66's pKa.

  13. pH effects on the molecular structure of β-lactoglobulin modified air-water interfaces and its impact on foam rheology.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Kathrin; Lexis, Meike; Gochev, Georgi; Konnerth, Christoph; Miller, Reinhard; Willenbacher, Norbert; Peukert, Wolfgang; Braunschweig, Björn

    2013-09-17

    Macroscopic properties of aqueous β-lactoglobulin (BLG) foams and the molecular properties of BLG modified air-water interfaces as their major structural element were investigated with a unique combination of foam rheology measurements and interfacial sensitive methods such as sum-frequency generation and interfacial dilatational rheology. The molecular structure and protein-protein interactions at the air-water interface can be changed substantially with the solution pH and result in major changes in interfacial dilational and foam rheology. At a pH near the interfacial isoelectric point BLG molecules carry zero net charge and disordered multilayers with the highest interfacial dilatational elasticity are formed at the air-water interface. Increasing or decreasing the pH with respect to the isoelectric point leads to the formation of a BLG monolayer with repulsive electrostatic interactions among the adsorbed molecules which decrease the interfacial dilational elasticity. The latter molecular information does explain the behavior of BLG foams in our rheological studies, where in fact the highest apparent yield stresses and storage moduli are established with foams from electrolyte solutions with a pH close to the isoelectric point of BLG. At this pH the gas bubbles of the foam are stabilized by BLG multilayers with attractive intermolecular interactions at the ubiquitous air-water interfaces, while BLG layers with repulsive interactions decrease the apparent yield stress and storage moduli as stabilization of gas bubbles with a monolayer of BLG is less effective.

  14. Effects of pH on aquatic biodegradation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krachler, R. F.; Krachler, R.; Stojanovic, A.; Wielander, B.; Herzig, A.

    2009-01-01

    To date, little is known about the pH-stimulated mineralization of organic matter in aquatic environments. In this study, we investigated biodegradation processes in alkaline waters. Study site is a large shallow soda lake in Central Europe (Neusiedler See/Ferto). The decomposition rate of plant litter was measured as a function of pH by incubating air-saturated lake-water samples in contact with Phragmites litter (leaves) from the littoral vegetation. All samples showed high decomposition rates (up to 32% mass loss within 35 days) and a characteristic two-step degradation mechanism. During the degradation process, the solid plant litter was dissolved forming humic colloids. Subsequently, the humic colloids were mineralized to CO2 in the water column. The decomposition rate was linearly related to pH. Increasing pH values accelerated significantly the leaching of humic colloids as well as the final degradation process. The observed two-step mechanism controls the wetland/lake/air carbon fluxes, since large quantities of humic colloids are currently produced in the reed belt, exported through wind-driven circulations and incorporated into the open lake foodweb. At present, the lake is rapidly shrinking due to peat deposition in the littoral zone, whereas it has been resistant to silting-up processes for thousands of years. In order to investigate the cause of this abrupt change, the chemical composition of the lake-water was measured during 1995-2007. A thorough analysis of these data revealed that major lake-water discharges through the lake's artificial outlet channel led to a decline in salinity and alkalinity. According to our estimates, the lake's original salinity and alkalinity was 70-90% higher compared to the present conditions, with the consequence of substantially lower pH values in the present lake. The observed pH dependence of reed litter biodegradation rates points to a causal connection between low pH values and accumulation of peat in the lake basin

  15. pH dependence of Fenton reagent generation and As(III) oxidation and removal by corrosion of zero valent iron in aerated water.

    PubMed

    Katsoyiannis, Ioannis A; Ruettimann, Thomas; Hug, Stephan J

    2008-10-01

    Corrosion of zerovalent iron (ZVI) in oxygen-containing water produces reactive intermediates that can oxidize various organic and inorganic compounds. We investigated the kinetics and mechanism of Fenton reagent generation and As(III) oxidation and removal by ZVI (0.1m2/g) from pH 3-11 in aerated water. Observed half-lives for the oxidation of initially 500 microg/L As(III) by 150 mg Fe(0)/L were 26-80 min at pH 3-9. At pH 11, no As(III) oxidation was observed during the first two hours. Dissolved Fe(III) reached 325, 140, and 6 microM at pH 3, 5, and 7. H2O2 concentrations peaked within 10 min at 1.2, 0.4, and < 0.1 microM at pH 3, 5, and 7, and then decreased to undetectable levels. Addition of 2,2'-bipyridine (1-3 mM), prevented Fe(II) oxidation by O2 and H2O2 and inhibited As(III)oxidation. 2-propanol (14 mM), scavenging OH-radicals, quenched the As(III) oxidation at pH 3, but had almost no effect at pH 5 and 7. Experimental data and kinetic modeling suggest that As(III) was oxidized mainly in solution by the Fenton reaction and removed by sorption on newly formed hydrous ferric oxides. OH-radials are the main oxidant for As(III) at low pH, whereas a more selective oxidant oxidizes As(III) at circumneutral pH.

  16. Relative acute effects of low pH and high iron on the hatching and survival of the water mite (Arrenurus manubriator) and the aquatic insect (Chironomus riparius)

    SciTech Connect

    Rousch, J.M.; Simmons, T.W.; Kerans, B.L.; Smith, B.P.

    1997-10-01

    The authors investigated the relative effects of low pH and high iron on a water mite, Arrenurus manubriator and an aquatic insect, Chironomus riparius. Eggs and active stages were exposed in static renewal toxicity tests to pH 6, 5, 4, 3, and 2, made by adding sulfuric acid to reconstituted soft water, or to iron levels of 200, 400, 600, 800, and 1,000 mg/L, made by adding ferrous sulfate to soft water at pH 4. Experiments were conducted at 22 C with a 16:8-h photoperiod, and treatments were replicated three times with at least nine individuals per treatment. Data were analyzed with a logistic response function and one-way ANOVA for pH and iron tests, respectively. Egg hatching was reduced at pH 2 for midges and at pH 3 for mites. Iron had no effect on hatching for either species. Survival of midge larvae was partially reduced at pH 4, and survival of mite deutonymphs, larvae, female and male adults was reduced at pH 3. Survival of midge larvae, and mite deutonymphs and male adults was reduced at 400, 200, and 1,000 mg Fe/L, respectively. Mite female adults and larvae were unaffected by iron. Higher metabolic requirements of unfed immature stages, the gelatinous covering of mite and insect eggs, the longer incubation period of mite eggs, and the greater osmoregulatory potential of adult mites may have contributed to the differences observed.

  17. Application of maize tassel for the removal of Pb, Se, Sr, U and V from borehole water contaminated with mine wastewater in the presence of alkaline metals.

    PubMed

    Zvinowanda, Caliphs M; Okonkwo, Jonathan O; Sekhula, Mahlatse M; Agyei, Nana M; Sadiku, Rotimi

    2009-05-30

    In this study, the removal of Pb(II) from aqueous solutions by tassel powder was studied and optimised. Batch experiments were conducted on simulated solutions using tassel powder adsorbent and the effects of contact time, pH and concentration on the extent of Pb (II) removal was studied. Equilibrium and kinetic models for Pb(II) sorption were developed by considering the effect of contact time and concentration at optimum pH 4 and fixed temperature(25 degrees C). The Freundlich model was found to describe the sorption energetics of Pb(II) on tassel more fully than the Langmuir. A maximum Pb(II) loading capacity of 333.3mg/g on tassel was obtained. The adsorption process could be well described by both the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms with R(2) values of 0.957 and 0.972, respectively. The kinetic parameters were obtained by fitting data from the effect of contact time on adsorption capacity into the pseudo-first, pseudo-second-order and intra-particle diffusion equations. The kinetics of Pb(II) on tassel surface was well defined using linearity coefficients (R(2)) by pseudo-second-order (0.999), followed by pseudo-first-order (0.795) and lastly intra-particle diffusion (0.6056), respectively. The developed method was then applied to environmental samples taken from borehole waters contaminated with mine wastewater. The removal of Pb (ND-100%), Se (100%), Sr (5.41-59.0%), U (100%) and V (46.1-100%) was attained using tassel. The uptake of the metals from environmental samples was dependent on pH, ionic strength and levels of other competing species.

  18. Osmotically unresponsive water fraction on proteins: non-ideal osmotic pressure of bovine serum albumin as a function of pH and salt concentration.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, Gary D; Kanal, Kalpana M; Cameron, Ivan L

    2006-01-01

    How much does protein-associated water differ in colligative properties (freezing point, boiling point, vapor pressure and osmotic behavior) from pure bulk water? This question was approached by studying the globular protein bovine serum albumin (BSA), using changes in pH and salt concentration to alter its native structural conformation and state of aggregation. BSA osmotic pressure was investigated experimentally and analyzed using the molecular model of Fullerton et al. [Biochem Cell Biol 1992;70(12):1325]. Analysis yielded both the extent of osmotically unresponsive water (OUW) and the effective molecular weight values of the membrane-impermeable BSA solute. Manipulation of BSA conformation and aggregation by membrane-penetrating cosolutes show that alterations in pH and salt concentration change the amount of bulk water that escapes into BSA from a minimum of 1.4 to a maximum of 11.7 g water per g dry mass BSA.

  19. Interfacial activity in alkaline flooding enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, M.K.

    1981-01-01

    The ionization of long-chained organic acids in the crude oil to form soaps was shown to be primarily responsible for the lowering of oil-water interfacial tension at alkaline pH. These active acids can be concentrated by silica gel chromatography into a minor polar fraction. An equilibrium chemical model was proposed based on 2 competing reactions: the ionization of acids to form active anions, and the formation of undissociated soap between acid anions and sodium ions. It correlates the interfacial activity with the interfacial concentration of active acid anions which is expressed in terms of the concentrations of the chemical species in the system. The model successfully predicts the observed oil-alkaline solution interfacial phenomenon, including its dependence on pH, alkali and salt concentrations, type of acid present and type of soap formed. Flooding at different alkali concentrations to activate different acid species present in the crude was shown to give better recovery than flooding at a single high alkali concentration. Treating the crude oil with a dilute solution of mineral acids liberates additional free active acids and yields better interfacial activity during subsequent alkali contact.

  20. Modeling of formation and prevention of a pure water zone in capillary isoelectric focusing with narrow pH range carrier ampholytes.

    PubMed

    Takácsi-Nagy, Anna; Kilár, Ferenc; Thormann, Wolfgang

    2017-03-01

    This paper comprises a continuation of computer simulation studies dealing with carrier ampholyte based CIEF in presence of narrow pH gradients. With this technique, amphoteric sample components with pI values outside the pH gradient are migrating isotachophoretically toward the cathode or anode whereas components with pI values within the gradient become focused. In order to understand the processes occurring in presence of the electric field, the behavior of both carrier ampholytes and amphoteric sample components is investigated by computer modeling. Characteristics of two pH unit gradients with end components having pI values at or around 7.00 and conditions that lead to the formation of a water zone at neutrality were investigated. Data obtained reveal that a zone of water is formed in focusing with carrier ampholytes when the applied pH range does not cover the neutral region, ends at pH 7.00 or begins at pH 7.00. The presence of additional amphoteric components that cover the neutrality region prevent water zone formation under current flow. This situation is met in experiments with narrow pH gradients that end or begin around neutrality. Simulation data reveal that no water zone evolves when atmospheric carbon dioxide dissolved in the catholyte causes the migration of carbonic acid (in the form of carbonate and/or hydrogen carbonate ions) from the catholyte through the focusing structure. An electrolyte change in the electrode solution does not have an impact on the focusing part but does change the isotachophoretic pattern migrating behind the leading ion.

  1. In situ arsenic removal in an alkaline clastic aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welch, A.H.; Stollenwerk, K.G.; Paul, A.P.; Maurer, D.K.; Halford, K.J.

    2008-01-01

    In situ removal of As from ground water used for water supply has been accomplished elsewhere in circum-neutral ground water containing high dissolved Fe(II) concentrations. The objective of this study was to evaluate in situ As ground-water treatment approaches in alkaline ground-water (pH > 8) that contains low dissolved Fe (water in the two aquifers studied are similar except for the inorganic As species. Although total inorganic As concentrations were similar, one aquifer has dominantly aqueous As(III) and the other has mostly As(V). Dissolved O2, Fe(II), and HCl were added to water and injected into the two aquifers to form Fe-oxide and lower the pH to remove As. Cycles of injection and withdrawal involved varying Fe(II) concentrations in the injectate. The As concentrations in water withdrawn from the two aquifers were as low as 1 and 6 ??g/L, with greater As removal from the aquifer containing As(V). However, Fe and Mn concentrations increased to levels greater than US drinking water standards during some of the withdrawal periods. A balance between As removal and maintenance of low Fe and Mn concentrations may be a design consideration if this approach is used for public-supply systems. The ability to lower As concentrations in situ in high-pH ground water should have broad applicability because similar high-As ground water is present in many parts of the world. ?? 2008.

  2. An evaluation of in-situ measurements of water temperature, specific conductance, and pH in low ionic strength streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ranalli, A.J.

    1998-01-01

    Survey for continuous measurement of water temperature, specific conductance, and pH in four low ionic strength streams in the Catskill Mountains of New York was evaluated through a calculation of their bias, precision, and accuracy and by comparison with laboratory measurements of specific conductance and pH on samples collected concurrently. Results indicate that the mini-monitor measurements of specific conductance and pH in an acidic stream (acid-neutralizing capacity always less than 0) agreed with laboratory measurements well enough that the minimonitors can be used to supplement laboratory measurements (mean difference in pH was 0.02 pH unit and mean difference in specific conductance was 0.72 ??S cm-1. This mean difference was 0.32 ??S cm-1 if the minimonitor data were adjusted by the bias). In less acidic streams (two streams in which the acid-neutralizing capacity was always greater than 0 and one in which the acid-neutralizing capacity was greater than 0 except during high flows), there was poor agreement between laboratory and minimonitor measurements of specific conductance at high flows and pH at all flows. The water-temperature probes measured with sufficiently small bias (-0.1 ??C) and adequate precision (??0.70 ??C) for use with most applications.

  3. Solute-solvent friction kernels and solution properties of methyl oxazoline-phenyl oxazoline (MeOx-PhOx) copolymers in binary ethanol-water mixtures.

    PubMed

    Das, Ashok K; Hong, Po-Da

    2011-07-07

    Solvent mixtures often alter the solubility of polymeric substances. Statistical copolymers made from 2-methyl-2-oxazoline (MeOx) and 2-phenyl-2-oxazoline (PhOx) are known for their varying solubilities in pure ethanol, pure water and in binary mixtures of ethanol-water. Constrained Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations have been carried out with an aim to explain the varying solubilities of the statistical MeOx-PhOx copolymers. The solute-solvent dynamic friction kernels calculated through constrained MD simulations corroborate the solubility pattern in these copolymers. The solvation characteristics have been analyzed in terms of the solute-solvent radial distribution functions (RDFs). The ethanol-soluble MeOx-PhOx copolymers exhibit characteristic solute-composition dependence in the dynamic solute-solvent friction kernels, indicating the strength of the solute-solvent correlations. The aggressive solvation by the ethanol molecules in the binary solvent mixtures has been brought out by the O(solute)-H(ethanol) RDFs which exhibit a characteristic dependence on the ethanol content in the solvent composition. The corresponding O(solute)-H(water) RDFs are devoid of any such composition dependence. For all the MeOx-PhOx copolymers, the O-site solvation is strongly dominated by the water molecules and the N-sites are solvated equally by both ethanol and water molecules.

  4. Water chemical shift in 1H NMR of red cells: effects of pH when transmembrane magnetic susceptibility differences are low.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Timothy J; Bubb, William A; Kuchel, Philip W

    2008-04-01

    The (1)H magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectrum of water in erythrocyte suspensions shows peaks from each of the intracellular and extracellular water pools. The splitting is a true chemical shift and is brought about by the elimination of water exchange under MAS conditions due to physical separation of the two water populations. The size of the chemical shift difference is determined by the concentration of intracellular protein affecting the average extent of hydrogen bonding of water. We present here a model of the chemical shift behavior for water in erythrocytes under normal high-resolution NMR conditions based on results from MAS experiments on these cells exposed to different pH and osmotic conditions. The model accurately predicts the chemical shift of water for a static sample, and the results demonstrate that in high-resolution NMR experiments the chemical shift of water will appear to be invariant if differences in magnetic susceptibility across the cell membrane are minimal (<10% of the magnetic susceptibility of water). Thus, changes in the shape and chemical shift of the water resonance are not due to pH changes in the physiological range. The findings are fundamental to an interpretation of the mechanism of chemical shift effects on the water resonance that may occur in functional MRI.

  5. Surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding for light oil recovery. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Wasan, D.T.

    1994-06-01

    The overall objective of this project is to develop a very cost-effective method for formulating a successful surfactant-enhanced alkaline flood by appropriately choosing mixed alkalis which form inexpensive buffers to obtain the desired pH (between 8.5 and 12.0) for ultimate spontaneous emulsification and ultra-low tension. In addition, the novel concept of pH gradient design to optimize flood water conditions will be tested. Last quarter we investigated the phase behavior and the regions where in the middle phase occurs. The optimum phase was found to go through a maximum with pH, sodium concentration and surfactant concentration. The optimum pH is about 12.0 to 13.5, the optimum sodium concentration is about 0.513 mol/liter, and the optimum surfactant concentration is about 0.2%. The effect of surfactant type was also investigated. Petrostep B-105 was found to give the most middle phase production. This quarter, we investigated the contact angle of Long Beach oil, Adena oil, and a model oil on a solid glass surface in contact with an aqueous alkaline solution both with and without added preformed surfactant. The contact angle with Long Beach and Adena oils showed oil-wet conditions, whereas the model oil showed both oil-wet and water-wet conditions depending on the pH of the aqueous phase. The addition of surfactant to the alkaline solution resulted in making the system less oil-wet. Spreading of the oil on the glass surface was observed in all three systems investigated.

  6. Palm olein-in-water Pickering emulsion stabilized by Fe3O4-cellulose nanocrystal nanocomposites and their responses to pH.

    PubMed

    Low, Liang Ee; Tey, Beng Ti; Ong, Boon Hoong; Chan, Eng Seng; Tang, Siah Ying

    2017-01-02

    We studied the formation of palm olein-in-water (O/W) Pickering emulsion stabilized by Fe3O4-cellulose nanocrystals (MCNC) nanocomposites obtained by ultrasound assisted in-situ co-precipitation method. The synthesized MCNC nanocomposites successfully stabilized Pickering emulsion with dual responses. The magnetic tests revealed a direct-relation between attractability of MCNC-stabilized Pickering emulsions and the emulsion droplet diameter. The Pickering emulsions were stable under pH ranging from 3 to 6. The stability substantially reduced around pH 8-10, and regained slowly when approaching pH 13. From microscopic and mastersizer analysis, monodisperse emulsion droplets were noticed at pH 3-6, and 13, while polydisperse emulsion were obtained at pH 8-12. The Pickering emulsions prepared at pH 6 are stable up to 14 days, while Pickering emulsions at pH 8 experienced coalescence. In this study, the dual stimuli-responsive Pickering emulsion stabilized by MCNC may hold potentials for biomedical and drug delivery as new generation of smart nanotherapeutic carrier.

  7. Advanced water alkaline electrolysis - A two years running of a test plant: 120 C - 160 C, 20 bars /about 300 p.s.i./

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailleux, C.

    Results acquired in the two-year operation of an advanced pressurized forced-flow alkaline water electrolysis test plant are reported. The test loop consists of eight monopolar cells, circulator, filter units and heat exchangers designed to operate with a 40 wt percent KOH electrolyte at a temperature between 120 and 160 C, a pressure of 20 bars, a current density of 10 kA/sq M and input electric power of 1.75 W. Each cell is made up of two shells of 290 mm external diameter and thickness 40 mm on either side of an FEP-coated diaphragm with a working area of 120 x 120 mm. During the two years of operation, the duty factor for temperature operation has increased from 44 percent to more than 80 percent and that for electrolysis operation has increased from 27 percent to 60 percent, with continuous steady state operation for as long as 35 days. Tests have confirmed the stability of a chrysotile asbestos diaphragm when the electrolyte is doped with silica ions, and revealed deteriorations in materials stability due to gasket creep and metal corrosion. The behavior of the nickel electrodes was observed to be influenced by operating temperatures, cathodic deposits, electrode structure and thermal treatment. In spite of the careful design of the gravity separating tanks, purity of the produced O2 was found unsatifactory, although no trouble arose on the hydrogen side. Results of the operation of the test loop have been scaled up in order to predict the performance of a large-scale pilot plant.

  8. The use of alkaline hydrolysis as a novel strategy for chloroform remediation: the feasibility of using construction wastes and evaluation of carbon isotopic fractionation.

    PubMed

    Torrentó, Clara; Audí-Miró, Carme; Bordeleau, Geneviève; Marchesi, Massimo; Rosell, Mònica; Otero, Neus; Soler, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory and field-scale pilot experiments were performed to evaluate the feasibility of chloroform degradation by alkaline hydrolysis and the potential of δ(13)C values to assess this induced reaction process at contaminated sites. In batch experiments, alkaline conditions were induced by adding crushed concrete (pH 12.33 ± 0.07), a filtered concrete solution (pH 12.27 ± 0.04), a filtered cement solution (pH 12.66 ± 0.02) and a pH 12 buffer solution (pH 11.92 ± 0.11). The resulting chloroform degradation after 28 days was 94, 96, 99, and 72%, respectively. The experimental data were described using a pseudo-first-order kinetic model, resulting in pseudo-first-order rate constant values of 0.10, 0.12, 0.20, and 0.05 d(-1), respectively. Furthermore, the significant chloroform carbon isotopic fractionation associated with alkaline hydrolysis of chloroform (-53 ± 3‰) and its independence from pH in the admittedly limited tested pH range imply a great potential for the use of δ(13)C values for in situ monitoring of the efficacy of remediation approaches based on alkaline hydrolysis. The carbon isotopic fractionation obtained at the lab scale allowed the calculation of the percentage of chloroform degradation in field-scale pilot experiments where alkaline conditions were induced in two recharge water interception trenches filled with concrete-based construction wastes. A maximum of approximately 30-40% of chloroform degradation was achieved during the two studied recharge periods. Although further research is required, the treatment of chloroform in groundwater through the use of concrete-based construction wastes is proposed. This strategy would also imply the recycling of construction and demolition wastes for use in value-added applications to increase economic and environmental benefits.

  9. The Origin of Life in Alkaline Hydrothermal Vents.

    PubMed

    Sojo, Victor; Herschy, Barry; Whicher, Alexandra; Camprubí, Eloi; Lane, Nick

    2016-02-01

    Over the last 70 years, prebiotic chemists have been very successful in synthesizing the molecules of life, from amino acids to nucleotides. Yet there is strikingly little resemblance between much of this chemistry and the metabolic pathways of cells, in terms of substrates, catalysts, and synthetic pathways. In contrast, alkaline hydrothermal vents offer conditions similar to those harnessed by modern autotrophs, but there has been limited experimental evidence that such conditions could drive prebiotic chemistry. In the Hadean, in the absence of oxygen, alkaline vents are proposed to have acted as electrochemical flow reactors, in which alkaline fluids saturated in H2 mixed with relatively acidic ocean waters rich in CO2, through a labyrinth of interconnected micropores with thin inorganic walls containing catalytic Fe(Ni)S minerals. The difference in pH across these thin barriers produced natural proton gradients with equivalent magnitude and polarity to the proton-motive force required for carbon fixation in extant bacteria and archaea. How such gradients could have powered carbon reduction or energy flux before the advent of organic protocells with genes and proteins is unknown. Work over the last decade suggests several possible hypotheses that are currently being tested in laboratory experiments, field observations, and phylogenetic reconstructions of ancestral metabolism. We analyze the perplexing differences in carbon and energy metabolism in methanogenic archaea and acetogenic bacteria to propose a possible ancestral mechanism of CO2 reduction in alkaline hydrothermal vents. Based on this mechanism, we show that the evolution of active ion pumping could have driven the deep divergence of bacteria and archaea.

  10. Surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding for light oil recovery. Annual report, 1992--1993

    SciTech Connect

    Wasan, D.T.

    1994-08-01

    In this report, the authors present the results of experimental and theoretical studies in surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding for light oil recovery. The overall objective of this work is to develop a very cost-effective method for formulating a successful surfactant-enhanced alkaline flood by appropriately choosing mixed alkalis which form inexpensive buffers to obtain the desired pH (between 8.5 and 12.0) for ultimate spontaneous emulsification and ultralow interfacial tension. In addition, the authors have (1) developed a theoretical interfacial activity model for determining equilibrium interfacial tension, (2) investigated the mechanisms for spontaneous emulsification, (3) developed a technique to monitor low water content in oil, and (4) developed a technique to study water-in-oil emulsion film properties.

  11. Anodes for alkaline electrolysis

    DOEpatents

    Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev

    2011-02-01

    A method of making an anode for alkaline electrolysis cells includes adsorption of precursor material on a carbonaceous material, conversion of the precursor material to hydroxide form and conversion of precursor material from hydroxide form to oxy-hydroxide form within the alkaline electrolysis cell.

  12. Potentiometric and voltammetric polymer lab chip sensors for determination of nitrate, pH and Cd(II) in water

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Am; Zou, Zhiwei; Lee, Kang Kug; Ahn, Chong H.; Bishop, Paul L.

    2010-01-01

    Due to their toxicity to humans and animals, heavy metals and nitrate in groundwater are of particular concern. The combination of high toxicity and widespread occurrence has created a pressing need for effective monitoring and measurement of nitrate and heavy metals in soil pore water and groundwater at shallow depths. In this work, a new electrochemical sensing platform with the self-assembly nanobeads packed (nBP) hetero columns has been developed for the pH and nitrate measurements. In addition, for on-site determination of cadmium (Cd(II)), a bismuth (Bi(III)) based polymer lab chip sensor using the square-wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) sensing principle has been designed, fabricated and successfully characterized. Factors affecting sensitivity and precision of the sensor, including deposition potential and deposition time, were studied. Miniaturized electrochemical lab chip sensors could be very valuable in environmental monitoring area due to their many benefits, such as greatly reduced sensing cost, sensing system portability, and ease of use. PMID:21035635

  13. Predation or scavenging? Thoracic muscle pH and rates of water loss reveal cause of death in arthropods.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Erin E; Young, Christine V; Holway, David A

    2010-08-01

    The difficulty of directly observing predatory events hinders a complete understanding of how predation structures food webs. Indirect approaches such as PCR-based and isotopic analyses clarify patterns of resource consumption but fail to distinguish predation from scavenging. Given that facultative scavenging is a ubiquitous and phylogenetically widespread foraging strategy, an improved ability to discriminate prey from carrion is needed to enhance an understanding of the demographic effects of consumption and the true nature of trophic interactions. Using physiological properties of muscle tissue - specifically pH and rate of water loss - we develop a novel method to discriminate prey from carrion collected by scavenging hymenopteran predators. Our focal system is the western yellowjacket (Vespula pensylvanica), a common scavenging predator in Hawaii and western North America. Prior to consumption, the physical properties of hymenopteran muscle tissue change in a quantifiable and deterministic manner post mortem and can be used to estimate the time and putative cause of death of diet items. Applying this method in laboratory and field situations resulted in the correct identification of prey and carrion in 49 out of 56 cases (88%). Although further investigation is needed to determine how post-mortem physiology of diet items changes in the guts of consumers, the approaches developed in this study can be used to distinguish predation from scavenging by central-place foragers (particularly arthropods). Such information will provide a more definitive characterization of species interactions and food webs.

  14. Effect of temperature, pH, and water activity on Mucor spp. growth on synthetic medium, cheese analog and cheese.

    PubMed

    Morin-Sardin, Stéphanie; Rigalma, Karim; Coroller, Louis; Jany, Jean-Luc; Coton, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    The Mucor genus includes a large number of ubiquitous fungal species. In the dairy environment, some of them play a technological role providing typical organoleptic qualities to some cheeses while others can cause spoilage. In this study, we compared the effect of relevant abiotic factors for cheese production on the growth of six strains representative of dairy technological and contaminant species as well as of a non cheese related strain (plant endophyte). Growth kinetics were determined for each strain in function of temperature, water activity and pH on synthetic Potato Dextrose Agar (PDA), and secondary models were fitted to calculate the corresponding specific cardinal values. Using these values and growth kinetics acquired at 15 °C on cheese agar medium (CA) along with three different cheese types, optimal growth rates (μopt) were estimated and consequently used to establish a predictive model. Contrarily to contaminant strains, technological strains showed higher μopt on cheese matrices than on PDA. Interestingly, lag times of the endophyte strain were strongly extended on cheese related matrices. This study offers a relevant predictive model of growth that may be used for better cheese production control but also raises the question of adaptation of some Mucor strains to the cheese.

  15. Potentiometric and voltammetric polymer lab chip sensors for determination of nitrate, pH and Cd(II) in water.

    PubMed

    Jang, Am; Zou, Zhiwei; Lee, Kang Kug; Ahn, Chong H; Bishop, Paul L

    2010-11-15

    Due to their toxicity to humans and animals, heavy metals and nitrate in groundwater are of particular concern. The combination of high toxicity and widespread occurrence has created a pressing need for effective monitoring and measurement of nitrate and heavy metals in soil pore water and groundwater at shallow depths. In this work, a new electrochemical sensing platform with the self-assembly nanobeads-packed (nBP) hetero columns has been developed for the pH and nitrate measurements. In addition, for on-site determination of cadmium (Cd(II)), a bismuth (Bi(III)) based polymer lab chip sensor using the square-wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) sensing principle has been designed, fabricated and successfully characterized. Factors affecting sensitivity and precision of the sensor, including deposition potential and deposition time, were studied. Miniaturized electrochemical lab chip sensors could be very valuable in environmental monitoring area due to their many benefits, such as greatly reduced sensing cost, sensing system portability, and ease of use.

  16. Effect of shear force, solution pH and breakage period on characteristics of flocs formed by Titanium tetrachloride (TiCl4) and Polyaluminum chloride (PACl) with surface water treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y X; Gao, B Y; Shon, H K; Kim, J-H; Yue, Q Y

    2011-03-15

    The growth, breakage and regrowth nature of flocs formed by Titanium tetrachloride (TiCl(4)) and polyaluminum chloride (PACl) was comparatively evaluated with surface water treatment. A series of jar experiments were conducted to investigate the impacts of different operating parameters such as shear force, solution pH and a breakage period on floc strength and re-aggregation potential. Results indicated that the responses of flocs to different operating parameters depend on the coagulant used. The ability of floc to resist breakage decreased with the increase of shear force and breakage period. Floc strength properties were also measured in response to increasing shear force, with the results suggesting that the order of floc strength was TiCl(4)>PACl. Floc regrowth of the two coagulants after exposure to high shear was limited, and flocs formed by TiCl(4) displayed weaker recoverability. The flocs generated in acid conditions were more recoverable than those generated in alkaline conditions no matter which coagulant was used.

  17. Modeling carbon dioxide, pH, and un-ionized ammonia relationships in serial reuse systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colt, J.; Watten, B.; Rust, M.

    2009-01-01

    In serial reuse systems, excretion of metabolic carbon dioxide has a significant impact on ambient pH, carbon dioxide, and un-ionized ammonia concentrations. This impact depends strongly on alkalinity, water flow rate, feeding rate, and loss of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. A reduction in pH from metabolic carbon dioxide can significantly reduce the un-ionized ammonia concentration and increase the carbon dioxide concentrations compared to those parameters computed from influent pH. The ability to accurately predict pH in serial reuse systems is critical to their design and effective operation. A trial and error solution to the alkalinity-pH system was used to estimate important water quality parameters in serial reuse systems. Transfer of oxygen and carbon dioxide across the air-water interface, at overflow weirs, and impacts of substrate-attached algae and suspended bacteria were modeled. Gas transfer at the weirs was much greater than transfer across the air-water boundary. This simulation model can rapidly estimate influent and effluent concentrations of dissolved oxygen, carbon dioxide, and un-ionized ammonia as a function of water temperature, elevation, water flow, and weir type. The accuracy of the estimates strongly depends on assumed pollutional loading rates and gas transfer at the weirs. The current simulation model is based on mean daily loading rates; the impacts of daily variation loading rates are discussed. Copies of the source code and executable program are available free of charge.

  18. Changes in /sup 22/Na influx and outflux in Daphnia magna (Straus) as a function of elevated Al concentrations in soft water at low pH

    SciTech Connect

    Havas, M.; Likens, G.E.

    1985-11-01

    The effects of aluminum on sodium regulation by the freshwater crustacean Daphnia magna were determined. /sup 22/Na influx and outflux experiments were conducted in soft water adjusted to pH 4.5, 5.0, and 6.5 (reference pH) with either ambient (0.02 mg/liter) or high (1.02 mg/liter) concentrations of total Al. The results indicate that Al toxicity was pH dependent. Aluminum increased the rate of morbidity of D. magna at pH 6.5, had no additional effect to those of hydrogen ions (H/sup +/) at pH 5.0, and reduced the rate of morbidity at pH 4.5. Both H/sup +/ and total Al concentrations interfered with Na regulation, although it was possible to distinguish between their respective effects by using /sup 22/Na. At pH 6.5, Al decreased /sup 22/Na influx (by 46%) and increased /sup 22/Na outflux (by 25%), which led to a net loss of Na. At pH 5.0, Al reduced /sup 22/Na influx (by 58%) but had not additional effect to that of H/sup +/ on /sup 22/Na outflux. At pH 4.5, /sup 22/Na influx was significantly inhibited (by 73%) compared with the reference pH 6.5 treatment even in the absence of Al. Aluminum decreased /sup 22/Na outflux (by 31%) at pH 4.5, which reduced the net loss of Na and temporarily prolonged survival of the daphnids. These results indicate that Al affects both /sup 22/Na influx and outflux in D. magna. The lower rate of Na uptake may involve a denaturation of the enzyme responsible for the active uptake of Na. At pH 6.5, the increased outflux of /sup 22/Na may be due to either increased membrane permeability or increased renal losses (or both). At pH 4.5, the reduced outflux of /sup 22/Na resembles the amelioration that occurs in the presence of elevated Ca concentrations.

  19. Coral records of reef-water pH across the central Great Barrier Reef, Australia: assessing the influence of river runoff on inshore reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Olivo, J. P.; McCulloch, M. T.; Eggins, S. M.; Trotter, J.

    2014-07-01

    The boron isotopic (δ11Bcarb) compositions of long-lived Porites coral are used to reconstruct reef-water pH across the central Great Barrier Reef (GBR) and assess the impact of river runoff on inshore reefs. For the period from 1940 to 2009, corals from both inner as well as mid-shelf sites exhibit the same overall decrease in δ11Bcarb of 0.086 ± 0.033‰ per decade, equivalent to a~decline in seawater pH (pHsw) of ~ 0.017 ± 0.007 pH units per decade. This decline is consistent with the long-term effects of ocean acidification based on estimates of CO2 uptake by surface waters due to rising atmospheric levels. We also find that compared to the mid-shelf corals, the δ11Bcarb compositions for inner shelf corals subject to river discharge events, have higher and more variable values and hence higher inferred pHsw values. These higher δ11Bcarb values for inner-shelf corals are particularly evident during wet years, despite river waters having lower pH. The main effect of river discharge on reef-water carbonate chemistry thus appears to be from higher nutrients driving increased phytoplankton productivity, resulting in the drawdown of pCO2 and increase in pHsw. Increased primary production therefore has the potential to counter the more transient effects of low pH river water (pHrw) discharged into near-shore environments. Importantly however, inshore reefs also show a consistent pattern of sharply declining coral growth that coincides with periods of high river discharge. This occurs despite these reefs having higher pHsw values and hence higher seawater aragonite saturation states, demonstrating the over-riding importance of local reef-water quality on coral reef health.

  20. A New Mechanism in Electrochemical Process for Arsenic Oxidation: Production of H2O2 from Anodic O2 Reduction on the Cathode under Automatically Developed Alkaline Conditions.

    PubMed

    Qian, Ao; Yuan, Songhu; Zhang, Peng; Tong, Man

    2015-05-05

    Electrochemical cathodes are often used to reduce contaminants or produce oxidizing substances (i.e., H2O2). Alkaline conditions develop automatically around the cathode in electrochemical processes, and O2 diffuses onto the cathode easily. However, limited attention is paid to contaminant transformation by the reactive species produced on the cathode under oxic and alkaline conditions due to the inapplicability of pH for Fenton reaction. In this study, a new oxidation mechanism on the cathode is presented for contaminant transformation under automatically developed alkaline conditions. In an electrochemical sand column, 6.67 μM As(III) was oxidized by 36% when it passed through the cathode under the conditions of 30 mA current, an initial pH of 7.5 and a flow rate of 2 mL/min. Under the alkaline conditions (pH 10.0-11.0) that developed automatically around the cathode, the reduction potential of As(III) decreased greatly, allowing a pronounced oxidation by the small quantities of H2O2 produced from O2 reduction on the cathode. As(III) oxidation was further increased by the presence of soil pore water and groundwater solutes of HCO3-, Ca2+, Mg2+ and humic acid. The new oxidation mechanism found for the cathode under localized alkaline conditions supplements the fundamentals of contaminant transformation in electrochemical processes.

  1. Impact of pH, dissolved inorganic carbon, and polyphosphates for the initial stages of water corrosion of copper surfaces investigated by AFM and NEXAFS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanoscale studies at the early stages of the exposure of copper surfaces after systematic treatments in synthesized water solutions can provide useful information about corrosion processes. The corrosion and passivation of copper surfaces as influenced by pH, dissolved inorganic ...

  2. Long-term, High Frequency, High Precision pH Measurements on the MBARI deep-water FOCE Experiment at the MARS Cabled Observatory in Monterey Bay, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltzer, E. T.; Maughan, T.; Barry, J. P.; Brewer, P. G.; Headley, K. L.; Herlien, R.; Kirkwood, W. J.; Matsumoto, G. I.; O'Reilly, T. C.; Salamy, K. A.; Scholfield, J.; Shane, F. F.; Walz, P. M.

    2012-12-01

    The MBARI deep-water FOCE experiment was deployed on the MARS cabled observatory in Monterey Bay on May 4th, 2011. It has been in continuous operation (excluding a few minor shore based power outages) ever since. During the fifteen months of deployment, we have been able to observe both the daily variation in pH in response to water mass movements associated with the semi-diurnal tides, internal waves and longer-term trends as a function of the seasonal variations in the water masses within the Monterey Bay Canyon. Our experimental site is located at 890 meters, just below the oxygen minimum for Monterey Bay, and we clearly see the anticipated inverse correlation between seawater temperature and pH. Daily variation in pH is on the order of 0.020-0.030 pH units with longer term trends adding an additional variation of similar magnitude. Instrumentation on this experiment included two CTDs with oxygen sensors (Sea-Bird 52). One CTD is mounted on the external FOCE framework to measure the background conditions, and one CTD is installed within the FOCE pH control area to monitor the experimentally manipulated conditions. In addition, 6 MBARI modified Sea-Bird 18 pH sensors were mounted on the FOCE apparatus. Four of these pH sensors monitored pH inside the experimental chamber and two monitored the external background seawater conditions. Although we originally intended to conduct several in situ CO2 enrichment experiments to study the impact of ocean acidification on the benthic biology and then recover the apparatus after one year, unanticipated changes in the ship schedule have left the FOCE experiment in place for nearly fifteen months at the time of this writing. Throughout this time period, all sensor data has been logged by the MBARI Shore-Side Data System (SSDS) resulting in the longest continuous record of high precision pH measurements in the intermediate water column. We present an analysis of the data obtained from this unique data set, and discuss our in

  3. Mechanistic information from volume profiles for water exchange and complex-formation reactions of aquated Ni(II). pH, buffer and medium effects.

    PubMed

    Gazzaz, Hanaa Asaad; Ember, Erika; Zahl, Achim; van Eldik, Rudi

    2009-11-21

    Rate and activation parameters for the complex-formation reaction of Ni(2+) with 4-(2-pyridylazo)-N,N-dimethyl aniline (PADA) were studied as a function of pH in different buffers in both aqueous and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelle solutions. In aqueous Tris buffer solution, the forward and backward rate constants increased with increasing pH, while the complex-formation constant decreased due to a larger increase in the backward rate constant. The activation entropy, DeltaS(#), and activation volume, DeltaV(#), changed with increasing pH from positive to negative values, suggesting an apparent changeover from a dissociative to a more associative mechanism. Complex-formation reactions with 2,2'-bipyridine in Tris buffer showed almost no increase in the forward and backward rate constants on increasing the pH, but the DeltaS(#) and DeltaV(#) values became more negative. N-ethylmorpholine buffer showed no pH effect on the rate constants and activation parameters. Water exchange reactions of aquated Ni(2+) were also studied as a function of pH under the same conditions. The reported rate and activation parameters for water exchange in Tris and N-ethylmorpholine buffers are consistent with those found for the complex-formation reactions of Ni(2+) with PADA. The observed pH and buffer effects for both the complex-formation and water exchange reactions of aquated Ni(2+) can be accounted for in terms of the formation of a Ni(2+)-Tris complex in Tris buffer and general base catalysis by the buffer components. In SDS micelle solution, the complex-formation reaction with PADA was much faster than in aqueous solution, but the increase in rate constant with increasing pH was less significant, while DeltaS(#) and DeltaV(#) became more positive, pointing to a more dissociative mechanism. For SDS micelle solutions there was no effect on the water exchange rate constant or activation volume. Mechanistic interpretations are offered for all observed pH, buffer and medium

  4. Interacting effects of pH acclimation, and pH and heavy metals on acute and chronic toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia (Cladocera)

    SciTech Connect

    Belanger, S.E.; Cherry, D.S. )

    1990-05-01

    Understanding the factors that modify the sensitivity of the zooplankton Ceriodaphnia dubia to toxicants is important to the interpretation of chronic toxicity data generated for granting industrial permits. Early reports of high sensitivity of Ceriodaphnia to brief pH excursions led toxicologists to question the use of C. dubia as a test organism. Acute and chronic toxicity of pH and heavy metals, pH acclimation to acidic and alkaline conditions and the role of pH in modifying heavy metal (copper and zinc) toxicities were investigated. Ceriodaphnia dubia acclimated near neutral pH had acute (48-hr) lethal concentrations of 4.6 and 10.3 SU. Reproduction and mortality were not impaired between pH 6.14-8.99 regardless of pH acclimation history. Reproduction was significantly impaired beyond these extremes. Acute exposures to both heavy metals at pH 6, 8 and 9 and in water hardness of 180, 110 and 100 mg/L showed C dubia was consistently most sensitive in low pH and low hardness waters. Reproduction and mortality were not so affected by pH in chronic exposures. Similar concentrations of metals at all pH levels resulted in equivalent reductions in offspring per female. The results strongly suggest that effluent guidelines for pH at 6-9 are sound, and that toxicant activity in chronic time frames is directed primarily by concentration and water hardness, not by pH. 34 refs., 2 figs., 8 tabs.

  5. Effect of pH on the concentrations of lead and trace contaminants in drinking water: a combined batch, pipe loop and sentinel home study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Jung; Herrera, Jose E; Huggins, Dan; Braam, John; Koshowski, Scott

    2011-04-01

    High lead levels in drinking water are still a concern for households serviced by lead pipes in many parts of North America and Europe. This contribution focuses on the effect of pH on lead concentrations in drinking water delivered through lead pipes. Though this has been addressed in the past, we have conducted a combined batch, pipe loop and sentinel study aiming at filling some of the gaps present in the literature. Exhumed lead pipes and water quality data from the City of London's water distribution system were used in this study. As expected, the lead solubility of corrosion scale generally decreased as pH increased; whereas dissolution of other accumulated metals present in the corrosion scale followed a variety of trends. Moreover, dissolved arsenic and aluminum concentrations showed a strong correlation, indicating that the aluminosilicate phase present in the scale accumulates arsenic. A significant fraction of the total lead concentration in water was traced to particulate lead. Our results indicate that particulate lead is the primary contributor to total lead concentration in flowing systems, whereas particulate lead contribution to total lead concentrations for stagnated systems becomes significant only at high water pH values.

  6. Acid Mine Drainage Passive Remediation: Potential Use of Alkaline Clay, Optimal Mixing Ratio and Long Term Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaza, F.; Liang, X.; Wen, Y.; Perone, H.

    2015-12-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is one of the most adverse environmental problems of the mine industry. Surface water and ground water affected by this pollution are characterized by their acidity and the high content of sulfates and heavy metals. In this study, alkaline clay, an industrial waste with a high pH, which is utilized in the alumina refining process, was used as the remediation material to inhibit pyrite oxidation. Through a series of batch and column experiments, complemented with field measurements and geochemical modeling, three important issues associated with this passive and auto sustainable acid mine drainage remediation method were investigated: 1) the potential use of alkaline clay as an AMD remediation material, 2) the adequate alkaline clay/coal refuse mixing ratio (AC/CR) to ensure pH values near to neutral conditions, and, 3) the prediction of long term impacts, in terms of the trends of the main parameters involved in this process such as pH, concentrations of sulfate, iron and other dissolved contaminants. Both field measurements and the samples used for the experiments came from a coal waste site located in Mather, Pennsylvania. Alkaline clay proved to be an effective remediation material for AMD. It was found that 10% AC/CR is an adequate mixing ratio (i.e. the upper limit), which has been also indicated by field measurements. The concentrations of some contaminants such as iron, manganese or sulfate are significantly reduced with the remediation approach, compared to those representative concentrations found in mine tailings. Moreover, results suggest a very reliable long-term stability of the remediation (i.e. neutral pH conditions are maintained), thus enhancing the generation of iron precipitates that could produce pyrite grain coating and hardpan (i.e. cemented layer) on the surface. These processes also made the amended layer less porous, thus increasing water retention and hindering oxygen diffusion.

  7. pH. Agricultural Lesson Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale. Dept. of Agricultural Education and Mechanization.

    This lesson plan is intended for use in conducting classes on the effect of pH on plant growth. Presented first are an attention step/problem statement and a series of questions and answers designed to convey general information about soil pH and its effect on plants. The following topics are among those discussed: acidity and alkalinity; the…

  8. pH pre-corrected liquid hot water pretreatment on corn stover with high hemicellulose recovery and low inhibitors formation.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Qiang; Jiang, Wei; Jia, Jing-Xia; Xu, Jian

    2014-02-01

    A challenge for lignocellulosic pretreatment is how to retain hemicellulose as much as possible. To reduce the degradation of hemicellulose and increase the recovery of sugars, an effective pH pre-corrected liquid hot water pretreatment (LHWP) was developed by employing a small amount of NaOH (⩽5/100g substrate) to accelerate the hemicellulose deacetylation and simultaneously pre-correct the acid hydrolyzate in situ. The results showed that the pH pre-correction can control the hydrolyzate pH. Under the pretreatment severity (PS) of 4.0, the pH pre-corrected LHWP reduced the hemicellulose degradation by 35.3-92.3%, decreased furfural formation by 90.5-99.8%. The highest hemicellulose recovery of 96.38% was obtained with pH pre-corrected by 2g NaOH/100g substrate. Enzymatic hydrolysis (EH) and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) on the whole slurry from the pH pre-corrected LHWP showed that the hemicellulose retained in the solid residue did not bring significant resistance to cellulose EH (p=0.837).

  9. Oxidative stress parameters in silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen) juveniles infected with Ichthyophthirius multifiliis and maintained at different levels of water pH.

    PubMed

    Garcia, L O; Becker, A G; Bertuzzi, T; Cunha, M A; Kochhann, D; Finamor, I A; Riffel, A P K; Llesuy, S; Pavanato, M A; Baldisserotto, B

    2011-05-31

    The aim of this study was to determine oxidative stress parameters in the liver, gill and muscle of silver catfish juveniles infected with Ichthyophthirius multifiliis and maintained at pH 5.0 or 7.0 for three days. Juveniles were infected by adding one I. multifiliis-infected juvenile and water containing theronts to tanks. After the appearance of white spots on the skin, infected juveniles exposed to pH 5.0 and 7.0 showed significantly higher thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) levels in the liver and gills compared to uninfected juveniles. Liver of infected juveniles exposed to pH 7.0 showed higher catalase (CAT) and lower glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activities, but those maintained at pH 5.0 showed significantly higher GST activity than uninfected juveniles. The gills of infected juveniles showed significantly higher CAT (day two) and GST activity at both pH 5.0 and 7.0 compared to uninfected juveniles. Muscle of infected juveniles showed significantly lower CAT and GST activity and TBARS levels (at day three) when maintained at both pH 5.0 and 7.0 compared to uninfected juveniles. In conclusion, I. multifiliis infection induces liver and gill damage via lipid peroxidation products in silver catfish, but higher antioxidant enzyme activity could indicate a greater degree of protection against this parasite.

  10. Heavy metals removal from acid mine drainage water using biogenic hydrogen sulphide and effluent from anaerobic treatment: effect of pH.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Rodríguez, A M; Durán-Barrantes, M M; Borja, R; Sánchez, E; Colmenarejo, M F; Raposo, F

    2009-06-15

    Four alternatives (runs A, B, C and D) for heavy metals removal (Fe, Cu, Zn and Al) from acid mine drainage water (AMDW) produced in the mining areas of the Huelva Province, Spain, were evaluated. In run A, the anaerobic effluent from the treatment of acid mine drainage water (cheese whey added as a source of carbon) was mixed with the raw AMDW. The pH increased to 3.5 with the addition of KOH. In run B, biogas with around 30% of hydrogen sulphide obtained in the anaerobic reactor was sparged to the mixture obtained in run A, but in this case at a pH of 5.5. In run C, the pH of the raw AMDW was increased to 3.5 by the addition of KOH solution. Finally, in run D, the pH of the raw AMDW was increased to 5.5 by the addition of KOH solution and further biogas was sparged under the same conditions as in run A. It was found that heavy metal removal was a function of pH. At a pH of 3.5 most of the iron was removed while Zn and Cu were partially removed. At a pH of 5.5 the removal of all metals increased considerably. The best results were obtained in run B where the percentages of removal of Fe, Cu, Zn and Al achieved values of 91.3, 96.1, 79.0 and 99.0%, respectively. According to the experimental results obtained tentative schemas of the flow diagram of the processes were proposed.

  11. Alkaline battery operational methodology

    DOEpatents

    Sholklapper, Tal; Gallaway, Joshua; Steingart, Daniel; Ingale, Nilesh; Nyce, Michael

    2016-08-16

    Methods of using specific operational charge and discharge parameters to extend the life of alkaline batteries are disclosed. The methods can be used with any commercial primary or secondary alkaline battery, as well as with newer alkaline battery designs, including batteries with flowing electrolyte. The methods include cycling batteries within a narrow operating voltage window, with minimum and maximum cut-off voltages that are set based on battery characteristics and environmental conditions. The narrow voltage window decreases available capacity but allows the batteries to be cycled for hundreds or thousands of times.

  12. Hydrogeochemistry of Lake Turkana, Kenya: Mass balance and mineral reactions in an alkaline lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuretich, Richard F.; Cerling, Thure E.

    1983-06-01

    Lake Turkana, in northwestern Kenya, is a closed-basin, alkaline ( pH = 9.2) lake of moderate salinity ( TDS = 2500 ppm). Principal ions are Na +, HCO -3 and CI -. The lake is essentially polymictic in the northern basin and little compositional variation occurs in surface waters. The Omo River is the principal influent, providing some 80-90% of water input to the lake. Chloride has an apparent accumulation time of about 2500 years after accounting for burial of interstitial water. The bottom sediments are predominantly detrital and fine-grained, yet mineral-water reactions are very important for the geochcmical budget. Ca 2+ is precipitated as calcite; Na + is removed as an exchangeable cation on smectite; Mg 2+ is probably incorporated into a Mg-silicate phase, most likely poorlycrystalline smectite, as it enters the lake water; K + may be used in illite regradation. Cation exchange is a very important process in the mass balance of this lake. Over 40% of incoming Na is removed as an exchangeable cation. After cation exchange and interstitial water burial, Na has a response time of 2650 years, which compares favorably with that of chloride. These processes seem to occur rapidly within the water mass of the lake: other reactions may be important in regulating interstitial water compositions. Several changes occur in the upper 3m of sediment: interstitial-water pH drops to 8.3 and alkalinity increases slightly with depth, SO 2-4 decreases slightly, and amorphous silica saturation is approached. These changes are a response to organic matter oxidation and the dissolution of unstable silicates rather than a reversal of reactions occurring in the lake water. High rates of sedimentation (up to 1 cm per year) may minimize the effects of diffusion between the interstitial waters and the lake water, although burial of interstitial water assumes considerable importance.

  13. Adsorption of natural organic matter and disinfection byproduct precursors from surface water onto TiO2 nanoparticles: pH effects, isotherm modelling and implications for using TiO2 for drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Gora, Stephanie L; Andrews, Susan A

    2017-05-01

    Titanium dioxide is a photocatalyst that can remove organic contaminants of interest to the drinking water treatment industry, including natural organic matter (NOM) and disinfection byproduct (DBP) precursors. The photocatalytic reaction occurs in two steps: adsorption of the contaminant followed by degradation of the adsorbed contaminant upon irradiation with UV light. The second part of this process can lead to the formation of reactive intermediates and negative impacts on treated water quality, such as increased DBP formation potential (DBPfp). Adsorption alone does not result in the formation of reactive intermediates and thus may prove to be a safe way to incorporate TiO2 into drinking water treatment processes. The goal of this study was to expand on the current understanding of NOM adsorption on TiO2 and examine it in a drinking water context by observing NOM adsorption from real water sources and evaluating the effects of the resulting reductions on the DBPfp of the treated water. Bottle point isotherm tests were conducted with raw water from two Canadian water treatment plants adjusted to pH 4, pH 6 and pH 8 and dosed with TiO2 nanoparticles. The DOC results were a good fit to a modified Freundlich isotherm. DBP precursors and liquid chromatography with organic carbon detection NOM fractions associated with DBP formation were removed to some extent at all pHs, but most effectively at pH 4.

  14. Soil carbon cycle of different saline and alkaline soils under cotton fields in Tarim River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaoning; Zhao, Chengyi; Stahr, Karl; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    Calcium carbonate is the most common form of carbon (C) in semiarid and arid soils. Depending on pH and salinity changes, soils can act as sink or source of atmospheric CO2 as well as contribute to C exchange between CO2 and CaCO3 leading to formation of pedogenic carbonates. However, the rates of these processes and the effects of environmental factors remains unknown. 14CO2 was used to assess carbonate recrystallization in 4 saline and alkaline soils (Aksu alkaline, Aksu saline, Yingbazar alkaline, Yingbazar saline) (EC = 0.32, 1.35, 1.72, 3.67 (1:20) mS cm-1, pH = 8.5, 8.2, 8.9, 7.9 respectively) and to trace the C exchange in the soils of the Tarim River basin depending on CO2 concentrations in soils (0.02%, 0.04%, 0.2%, 0.4% and 4%). 14C was traced in soil water and air as well as in carbonates. The highest 14C in 14CO2 (95% of the 14C input) was observed in Aksu alkaline soil and the highest 14C incorporation in CaCO3 (54%) was observed in Yingbazar saline soil. There were close negative linear relationships between initial CO2 concentrations (0.04%, 0.4% and 4%) and the 14C in Ca14CO3 and in 14CO2. The carbonate recrystallization rate increased with the CO2 concentration and were depended on the recrystalliztion period. The average carbonate recrystallization rate was highest at 4% CO2 concentration for Yingbazar saline soil (6.59×10-4 % per day) and the lowest at 0.04% CO2 concentration for Aksu alkaline soil (0.03×10-4 % per day). The carbonate recrystallization rate linearly increased with the soil EC and with 0.04% and 0.4% CO2 concentration , whereas the carbonate recrystallization rate decreased with pH. The highest CO2 concentration of 4% can 10 to 100 times shorten the full carbonate recrystallization of the remaining primary carbonates compared to lower CO2 concentrations 0.4% and 0.04% for complete (95%) recrystallization of soil carbonate. We conclude that microbial and root respiration affecting CO2 concentration in soil is the most important

  15. Ocean circulation and biogeochemistry moderate interannual and decadal surface water pH changes in the Sargasso Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nathalie F. Goodkin,; Bo-Shian Wang,; Chen-Feng You,; Konrad Hughen,; Prouty, Nancy G.; Bates, Nicholas; Scott Doney,

    2015-01-01

    The oceans absorb anthropogenic CO2 from the atmosphere, lowering surface ocean pH, a concern for calcifying marine organisms. The impact of ocean acidification is challenging to predict as each species appears to respond differently and because our knowledge of natural changes to ocean pH is limited in both time and space. Here we reconstruct 222 years of biennial seawater pH variability in the Sargasso Sea from a brain coral, Diploria labyrinthiformis. Using hydrographic data from the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study and the coral-derived pH record, we are able to differentiate pH changes due to surface temperature versus those from ocean circulation and biogeochemical changes. We find that ocean pH does not simply reflect atmospheric CO2 trends but rather that circulation/biogeochemical changes account for >90% of pH variability in the Sargasso Sea and more variability in the last century than would be predicted from anthropogenic uptake of CO2 alone.

  16. Ocean circulation and biogeochemistry moderate interannual and decadal surface water pH changes in the Sargasso Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodkin, Nathalie F.; Wang, Bo-Shian; You, Chen-Feng; Hughen, Konrad A.; Grumet-Prouty, Nancy; Bates, Nicholas R.; Doney, Scott C.

    2015-06-01

    The oceans absorb anthropogenic CO2 from the atmosphere, lowering surface ocean pH, a concern for calcifying marine organisms. The impact of ocean acidification is challenging to predict as each species appears to respond differently and because our knowledge of natural changes to ocean pH is limited in both time and space. Here we reconstruct 222 years of biennial seawater pH variability in the Sargasso Sea from a brain coral, Diploria labyrinthiformis. Using hydrographic data from the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study and the coral-derived pH record, we are able to differentiate pH changes due to surface temperature versus those from ocean circulation and biogeochemical changes. We find that ocean pH does not simply reflect atmospheric CO2 trends but rather that circulation/biogeochemical changes account for >90% of pH variability in the Sargasso Sea and more variability in the last century than would be predicted from anthropogenic uptake of CO2 alone.

  17. Double pH control on humic substance-borne trace elements distribution in soil waters as inferred from ultrafiltration.

    PubMed

    Pédrot, Mathieu; Dia, Aline; Davranche, Mélanie

    2009-11-15

    Colloidal dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is an important carrier phase for trace elements (TE) in subsurface environments. As suggested by previously published field observations, preferential sorption of DOC onto mineral surfaces tends to enrich the solid phase in humic acids. This DOC fractionation may affect the mobility of TE. pH is known to play an important role in the stability of colloids. This study was therefore dedicated to identifying the influence of DOC fractionation on TE mobility. Sequential extraction has been used to provide information on the possible TE carriers within soil (as exchangeable, weak acid soluble, reducible, oxidizable, and nonextractible metal fractions). Batch experiments were carried out to investigate the influence of pH on the detachment of colloids and associated TE. Different groups of elements were identified according to TE behavior during pH changes. Several elements displayed increasing concentrations with decreasing pH. These concentrations can represent an important fraction of the total soil concentration. By contrast, other elements showed increasing concentrations following increasing pH, in association with an increasing amount of colloids in soil solution. Concerning this latter group, two colloidal carrier phases were identified during the pH increase: (i) the first one concerned the majority of elements, which were associated with humic substances remaining in solution, and (ii) the second one involved several TE rather associated with nanooxides. Therefore, DOC fractionation plays a key role in the TE concentration in soil solution during pH changes.

  18. Enhancement of bromate formation by pH depression during ozonation of bromide-containing water in the presence of hydroxylamine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jingxin; Li, Ji; Dong, Wenyi; Ma, Jun; Yang, Yi; Li, Jiayin; Yang, Zhichao; Zhang, Xiaolei; Gu, Jia; Xie, Wanying; Cang, Yan

    2017-02-01

    This work investigated the fate of bromate formation during ozonation in the presence of hydroxylamine (HA). Results indicated that pH depression, as a commonly feasible control strategy for bromate formation during ozonation, unexpectedly enhanced the bromate formation during ozonation in the presence of HA. A dramatically high level of bromate was observed at acidic pH in the ozone/HA process. The scavenging experiments demonstrated the essential role of OH produced in the reaction of ozone with HA in bromate formation. In the process, OH mainly oxidizes bromide to Br, which is further oxidized by ozone and eventually converts to bromate. Further i