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Sample records for alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution chromium

  1. COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qui; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling

    2004-05-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding in the swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to the naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of the injected solution bypasses the target pore space containing oil. The objective of this work is to investigate whether combining these two technologies could broaden the applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium--polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 9.2 to 12.9.

  2. COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson

    2004-10-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Neither aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide nor silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems produced significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels produced incremental oil with the rigid flowing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential pressures across cores. None of the gels tested

  3. COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-04-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent

  4. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-12-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in

  5. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and the Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-12-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding froin swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in

  6. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-10-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent

  7. Detailed evaluation of the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer field project and it`s application to mature Minnelusa waterfloods. Technical progress report, July--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, M.J.; Surkalo, H.

    1993-01-07

    The objective of ``Detailed Evaluation of the West Kiehl Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Field Project and It`s Application to Mature Minnelusa Waterfloods`` is to (1) quantify the incremental oil produced from the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer project by classical engineering and numerical simulation techniques, (2) to quantify the effect of chemical slug volume injection on incremental oil in the two swept areas of the field, (3) to determine the economic ramifications of the application of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology, (4) to forecast the results of injecting an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution to mature waterfloods and polymer floods, and (5) to provide the basis for independent operators to book additional oil reserves by using the alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology. This report documents the initial geological and reservoir engineering data gathering. In addition, some of the initial laboratory results are discussed. Some evaluation of the West Kiehl has been published.

  8. Detailed evaluation of the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer field project and it`s application to mature Minnelusa waterfloods. Technical progress report, January--March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, M.J.

    1993-06-01

    The objective of this report is to (1) quantify the incremental oil produced from the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer project by classical engineering and numerical simulation techniques,(2) to quantify the effect of chemical slug volume injection on incremental oil in the two swept areas of the field, (3) to determine the economic ramifications of the application of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology, (4) to forecast the results of injecting an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution to mature waterfloods and polymer floods, and (5) to provide the basis for independent operators to book additional oil, reserves by using the alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology. This report document the initial geological and reservoir engineering data gathering. In addition, some of the initial laboratory results are discussed. Some evaluation of the West Kiehl has been published.

  9. Detailed evaluation of the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer field project and it`s application to mature Minnelusa waterfloods. Technical progress report for the period of April--June, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, M.J.

    1994-09-01

    The objective of this study of the West Kiehl is to (1) quantify the incremental oil produced from the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer project by classical engineering and numerical simulation techniques, (2) quantify the effect of chemical slug volume on incremental oil in the two swept areas of the field, (3) determine the economics of the application of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology, (4) forecast the results of injecting an alkaline--surfactant-polymer solution to mature waterfloods and polymer floods, and (5) provide the basis for independent operators to book additional oil reserves by using the alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology. This report will document the numerical simulation waterflood, polymer flood, alkaline-surfactant flood and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood predictions from the West Kiehl and Prairie Creek South fields.

  10. Detailed evaluation of the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer field project and it`s application to mature Minnelusa waterfloods. Technical progress report, July--September, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, M.J.

    1994-12-31

    The objective is to (1) quantify the incremental oil produced from the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer project by classical engineering and numerical simulation techniques, (2) quantify the effect of chemical slug volume on incremental oil in the two swept areas of the field, (3) determine the economics of the application of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology, (4) forecast the results of injecting an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution to mature waterfloods and polymer floods, and (5) provide the basis for independent operators to book additional oil reserves by using the alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology. A geological study of 72 Minnelusa field surrounding the West Kiehl is complete. Of the 72 fields, 35 were studied in detail and, from these 35 fields, Prairie Creek South and Simpson Ranch were selected for numerical simulation as representative of Minnelusa waterfloods and polymer floods, respectively. This report documents the numerical simulation waterflood, polymer flood, alkaline-surfactant flood and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood predictions from the West Kiehl, Simpson Ranch and Prairie Creek South fields.

  11. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-12-01

    Performance and produced polymer evaluation of four alkaline-surfactant-polymer projects concluded that only one of the projects could have benefited from combining the alkaline-surfactant-polymer and gelation technologies. Cambridge, the 1993 Daqing, Mellott Ranch, and the Wardlaw alkaline-surfacant-polymer floods were studied. An initial gel treatment followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood in the Wardlaw field would have been a benefit due to reduction of fracture flow. Numerical simulation demonstrated that reducing the permeability of a high permeability zone of a reservoir with gel improved both waterflood and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery. A Minnelusa reservoir with both A and B sand production was simulated. A and B sands are separated by a shale layer. A sand and B sand waterflood oil recovery was improved by 196,000 bbls or 3.3% OOIP when a gel was placed in the B sand. Alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery improvement over a waterflood was 392,000 bbls or 6.5% OOIP. Placing a gel into the B sand prior to an alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood resulted in 989,000 bbl or 16.4% OOIP more oil than only water injection. A sand and B sand alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery was improved by 596,000 bbls or 9.9% OOIP when a gel was placed in the B sand.

  12. ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER FLOODING AND RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION OF THE BRIDGEPORT AND CYPRESS RESERVOIRS OF THE LAWRENCE FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Ron Damm; Bev Seyler

    2003-03-01

    Feasibility of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood for the Lawrence Field in Lawrence County, Illinois is being studied. Two injected formulations are being designed; one for the Bridgeport A and Bridgeport B reservoirs and one for Cypress and Paint Creek reservoirs. Fluid-fluid and coreflood evaluations have developed a chemical solution that produces incremental oil in the laboratory from the Cypress and Paint Creek reservoirs. A chemical formulation for the Bridgeport A and Bridgeport B reservoirs is being developed. A reservoir characterization study is being done on the Bridgeport A, B, & D sandstones, and on the Cypress sandstone. The study covers the pilot flood area and the Lawrence Field.

  13. ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER FLOODING AND RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION OF THE BRIDGEPORT AND CYPRESS RESERVOIRS OF THE LAWRENCE FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Ron Damm; Bev Seyler

    2003-04-01

    Feasibility of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood for the Lawrence Field in Lawrence County, Illinois is being studied. Two injected formulations are being designed; one for the Bridgeport A and Bridgeport B reservoirs and one for Cypress and Paint Creek reservoirs. Fluid-fluid and coreflood evaluations have developed a chemical solution that produces incremental oil in the laboratory from the Cypress and Paint Creek reservoirs. A chemical formulation for the Bridgeport A and Bridgeport B reservoirs is being developed. A reservoir characterization study is being done on the Bridgeport A, B, & D sandstones, and on the Cypress sandstone. The study covers the pilot flood area and the Lawrence Field.

  14. Pilot test of alkaline surfactant polymer flooding in Daqing Oil Field

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Demin; Zhang Zhenhua; Cheng Jiecheng; Yang Jingchun; Gao Shutang; Li Lin

    1996-12-31

    After the success of polymer flooding in Daqing, two alkaline-surfactant-polymer (ASP) floods have been conducted to (1) increase oil recovery further (2) study the feasibility of ASP flooding (3) provide technical and practical experience for expanding the ASP pilots. Inverted five spot pattern is adopted in both pilots. Pilot 1 (PO) is located in the West Central area of Daqing Oil Field and consists of 4 injectors and 9 producers. Pilot 2 (XF) is located in the South area of Daqing Oil Field and has 1 injector and 4 producers. The crude oil of both pilots have high paraffin content and low acid value. Compared to PO, XF has characteristics of lower heterogeneity, lighter oil and higher recovery by water flooding. For each pilot, after extensive screening, an ASP system has been determined. The ASP systems all feature very low surfactant concentration and wide range of ultra low interfacial tension with change of concentration of any of the three components. Core flooding and numerical simulation show more than 20% OOIP incremental recovery by ASP over water flooding for both pilots. By the end of May, 1995, 100% of ASP slug and 100% of the polymer buffer have been injected in the pilots. Production wells showed good responses in terms of large decrease in water cut and increase in oil production. The performance of each pilot has followed the numerical simulation predication very well, or even a bit better. Emulsions showed up in producers, but the emulsions are easy to be broken by a special de-emulsifier. No formation damage and scaling have been detected. The ASP flood pilot tests are technically successful and, based on the preliminary evaluation, economically feasible. Therefore, in the near future, much larger scale ASP flood field tests are going to be performed at several districts in Daqing Oil Field.

  15. Detailed evaluation of the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer field project and its application to mature Minnelusa waterfloods. Annual report for the period January 1993--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, M.J.; Surkalo, H.; Mundorf, W.R.

    1994-11-01

    The combination of an interfacial tension agent and a mobility control agent has the potential to produce additional oil beyond a waterflood. The West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer project is the most advanced application of this chemical enhanced oil recovery technique. The West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood was initiated in September 1987 as a secondary application after primary recovery. A preliminary analysis of the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood indicates that incremental oil of 20% of the original stock tank oil in place will be produced above waterflooding. The cost of the incremental oil will be less than $2.50 per incremental barrel. A statistical analysis of approximately 120 Minnelusa oil fields in the Powder River Basin indicates that the original stock tank oil in place exceeds one billion barrels. If the enhanced oil recovery technology implemented at West Kiehl field could be successfully applied to these fields, the potential incremental oil recovery would approach 200 million barrels. {open_quotes}Detailed Evaluation of the West Kiehl Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Field Project and Its Application to Mature Minnelusa Waterfloods{close_quotes} objective is to evaluate both the field performance of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer enhanced oil recovery technology as well as its potential application to other Minnelusa oil fields.

  16. Detailed evaluation of the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer field project and its application to mature Minnelusa waterfloods. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, M.J.; Surkalo, H.

    1995-03-01

    The combination of an interfacial tension agent and a mobility control agent has the potential to produce additional oil beyond a waterflood. The West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer project is the first application of this chemical enhanced oil recovery technique. The West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood was initiated in September 1987 as a secondary application after primary recovery. The following analysis of the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood indicates that incremental oil greater than waterflooding was produced at a cost of less than $2.00 per incremental barrel. A analysis of approximately 120 Minnelusa oil fields in the Powder River Basin indicates that the total original stock tank oil in place exceeds one billion barrels. If the enhanced oil recovery technology implemented at West Kiehl field could be successfully applied to these fields, the potential incremental oil recovery would approach 130 million barrels. The goals of ``Detailed Evaluation of the West Kield Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Field Project and It`s Application to Mature Minnelusa Waterfloods`` are to evaluate both the field performance of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer enhanced oil recovery technology as well as its potential application to other Minnelusa oil fields.

  17. Detailed evaluation of the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer field project and it`s application to mature Minnelusa waterfloods. Annual technical report, January 1993--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, M.J.

    1995-02-01

    The combination of an interfacial tension agent and a mobility control agent has the potential to produce additional oil beyond a waterflood. The West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer project is the most advanced application of this chemical enhanced oil recovery technique. The West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood was initiated in September 1987 as a secondary application after primary recovery. A preliminary analysis of the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood indicates that incremental oil of 20% of the original stock tank oil in place will be produced above waterflooding. The cost of the incremental oil will be less than $2.50 per incremental barrel. A statistical analysis of approximately 120 Minnelusa oil fields in the Powder River Basin indicates that the original stock tank oil in place exceeds one billion barrels. If the enhanced oil recovery technology implemented at West Kiehl field could be successfully applied to these fields, the potential incremental oil recovery would approach 200 million barrels. This project (1) evaluates the geological deposition environment of West Kiehl and adjacent Minneluse sand reservoirs; (2) compares the production performance results of the best geologic and reservoir performance analogs and select two fields for future study; (3) compares the two best field analogs to the west Kiehl field using numerical simulation; (4) predict results of applying the enhancement technology on two mature Minneluse waterflood analog units using engineering and numerical simulation; (5) predict waterflood and polymer flood performance of the West Kiehl field using numerical simulation.

  18. Reservoir Characterization of Bridgeport and Cypress Sandstones in Lawrence Field Illinois to Improve Petroleum Recovery by Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Flood

    SciTech Connect

    Seyler, Beverly; Grube, John; Huff, Bryan; Webb, Nathan; Damico, James; Blakley, Curt; Madhavan, Vineeth; Johanek, Philip; Frailey, Scott

    2012-12-21

    Within the Illinois Basin, most of the oilfields are mature and have been extensively waterflooded with water cuts that range up to 99% in many of the larger fields. In order to maximize production of significant remaining mobile oil from these fields, new recovery techniques need to be researched and applied. The purpose of this project was to conduct reservoir characterization studies supporting Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Floods in two distinct sandstone reservoirs in Lawrence Field, Lawrence County, Illinois. A project using alkaline-surfactantpolymer (ASP) has been established in the century old Lawrence Field in southeastern Illinois where original oil in place (OOIP) is estimated at over a billion barrels and 400 million barrels have been recovered leaving more than 600 million barrels as an EOR target. Radial core flood analysis using core from the field demonstrated recoveries greater than 20% of OOIP. While the lab results are likely optimistic to actual field performance, the ASP tests indicate that substantial reserves could be recovered even if the field results are 5 to 10% of OOIP. Reservoir characterization is a key factor in the success of any EOR application. Reservoirs within the Illinois Basin are frequently characterized as being highly compartmentalized resulting in multiple flow unit configurations. The research conducted on Lawrence Field focused on characteristics that define reservoir compartmentalization in order to delineate preferred target areas so that the chemical flood can be designed and implemented for the greatest recovery potential. Along with traditional facies mapping, core analyses and petrographic analyses, conceptual geological models were constructed and used to develop 3D geocellular models, a valuable tool for visualizing reservoir architecture and also a prerequisite for reservoir simulation modeling. Cores were described and potential permeability barriers were correlated using geophysical logs. Petrographic analyses

  19. Diffusion of Chromium in Alpha Cobalt-Chromium Solid Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeton, John W

    1951-01-01

    Diffusion of chromium in cobalt-chromium solid solutions was investigated in the range 0 to 40 atomic percent at temperatures of 1360 degrees, 1300 degrees, 1150 degrees, and 10000 degrees c. The diffusion coefficients were found to be relatively constant within the composition range covered by each specimen. The activation heat of diffusion was determined to be 63,000 calories per mole. This value agrees closely with the value of 63,400 calories per mole calculated by means of the Dushman-Langmuir equation.

  20. Electrodeposition of cobalt-chromium alloy from trivalent chromium solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Dasarathy, H.; Riley, C.; Coble, H.D. . Dept. of Chemistry and Materials Science)

    1994-07-01

    Cobalt-chromium alloy was deposited from plating solutions containing cobalt(II) chloride and chromium(III) chloride at 3.5 pH. The deposits were obtained using both single and mixed complex solutions. Deposit morphology showed significant dependence on the complexing agent(s) used. Partitioning of the two components in the deposit as determined by energy dispersive spectroscopy depended on plating parameters such as concentration ratio of the two salts in the solution, complexing agent, type of current (both dc and pulsed current were studied), and current density. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra collected from as-deposited alloy revealed the presence of both oxides and metals. X-ray diffraction spectra for the alloy deposit indicated solid solution formation.

  1. Chemical behavior of acidified chromium (3) solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Terman, D.K.

    1981-05-01

    A unique energy-storage system has been developed at NASA's Lewis Research Center called REDOX. This NASA-REDOX system is an electrochemical storage device that utilized the oxidation and reduction of two fully soluble redox couples for charging and discharging. The redox couples now being investigated are acidified chloride solutions of chromium (Cr(+2)/Cr(+3)) and iron (Fe(+2)/Fe(+3)).

  2. Bioremediation of chromium solutions and chromium containing wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Malaviya, Piyush; Singh, Asha

    2016-08-01

    Cr(VI) represents a serious threat to human health, living resources and ecological system as it is persistent, carcinogenic and toxic, whereas, Cr(III), another stable oxidation state of Cr, is less toxic and can be readily precipitated out of solution. The conventional methods of Cr(VI) removal from wastewaters comprise of chemical reduction followed by chemical precipitation. However, these methods utilize large amounts of chemicals and generate toxic sludge. This necessitates the need for devising an eco-technological strategy that would use the untapped potential of the biological world for remediation of Cr(VI) containing wastewaters. Among several viable approaches, biotransformation of Cr(VI) to relatively non-toxic Cr(III) by chromium resistant bacteria offers an economical- and environment-friendly option for its detoxification. Various studies on use of Cr(VI) tolerant viable bacterial isolates for treatment of Cr(VI) containing solutions and wastewater have been reported. Therefore, a detailed account of mechanisms and processes involved in bioreduction of Cr(VI) from solutions and wastewaters by bacterial isolates are the focus of this review article in addition to a discussion on toxicity of Cr(VI) on bacterial strains and various factors affecting Cr(VI) bioreduction. PMID:25358056

  3. Electrodialysis regeneration of chromium-containing solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kizim, N.F.; Lar'kov, A.P.; Sharova, E.Yu.

    1987-10-10

    The authors describe a process based on a combination of electrodialysis and continuous ion exchange for the purification of chromium-containing waste water resulting from chromium plating processes and for the recovery and recycling of both the chromium and the water. Treatment and monitoring equipment is described and energy consumption scenarios are optimized for chromium removal efficiency.

  4. Fluidized bed electrowinning of chromium from very dilute solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, X.; Bautista, R.G.

    1988-10-01

    The Fluidized Bed Electrochemical Reactor (FBER) was used to electrowin chromium from very dilute solutions, ranging in concentration from 0.52 to 3.12 g Cr/1 at pH = 2. The cathode consisted of particulate chromium (450-600 ..mu..m diam.) with a current feeder made of carbon bars and a tubular lead anode in a cylindrical cell. The current efficiency was in the range of 0.08-0.22. The bed expansion, deposition rate, conversion ratio of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) and voltage - current characteristic of the cell were studied. The results indicate that the use of the FBER will make possible the removal of chromium from very dilute solutions without the introduction of other chemicals which would need to be removed or treated further downstream to satisfy environmental abatement codes.

  5. Effect of tritium on corrosion behavior of chromium in 0.01 N sulfuric acid solution

    SciTech Connect

    Oyaidzu, M.; Isobe, K.; Hayashi, T.

    2015-03-15

    The effects of tritium on the corrosion behavior of chromium in 0.01 N sulfuric solution have been investigated in the present study. Electrochemical experiments have been carried our for pure chromium. At first, the concentration dependence of sulfuric acid solution on anodic polarization behavior of chromium was experimented, resulting in that 0.01 N one was found appropriate. The dependence of both dissolved oxygen and tritium concentration on anodic behavior of chromium were performed. It was found from that the self-passivation of chromium induced by dissolved oxygen was inhibited in tritiated solution resulting in the enhancement of the corrosion. As a consequence it is highly likely that the elution of chromium by highly oxidative radiolysis products would explain the passivation inhibitory effect of SUS304 stainless steel observed in tritiated solutions.

  6. Chromium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of chromium (Cr) on glucose and insulin metabolism are well documented. Normal dietary intake of Cr appears to be suboptimal because several studies have reported beneficial effects of Cr in people with elevated blood glucose or type 2 diabetes eating conventional diets. Stresses that ...

  7. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by ascorbic acid in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiang-Rong; Li, Hua-Bin; Li, Xiao-Yan; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2004-11-01

    Hexavalent chromium is a priority pollutant in the USA and many other countries. Reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) is environmentally favorable as the latter species is not toxic to most living organisms and also has a low mobility and bioavailability. Reduction of Cr(VI) by ascorbic acid (vitamin C) as a reductant was studied using potassium dichromate solution as the model pollutant. Effects of concentration of vitamin C, pH, temperature, irradiation and reaction time on the reduction of Cr(VI) were examined. Cr(VI) might be reduced by vitamin C not only in acidic conditions but also in weakly alkaline solutions. The reduction of Cr(VI) by vitamin C might occur not only under irradiation but also in the dark. Vitamin C is an important biological reductant in humans and animals, and not toxic. It is water-soluble and can easily permeate through various types of soils. The results indicate that vitamin C could be used in effective remediation of Cr(VI)-contaminated soils and groundwater in a wide range of pH, with or without sunlight. PMID:15488923

  8. Synthesis and characterisation of chromium lutetium gallium garnet solid solution

    SciTech Connect

    Galindo, R.; Badenes, J.A. . E-mail: jbadenes@qio.uji.es; Llusar, M.; Tena, M.A.; Monros, G.

    2007-03-22

    The chromium lutetium gallium garnet system has been studied. Samples with 2xCaOxCr{sub 2}O{sub 3}(3 - 2x)Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}5Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} (x = 0.025, 0.05, 0.075, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3,) and xCr{sub 2}O{sub 3}(3 - x)Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}5Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} (x = 0, 0.05, 0.075 and 0.3) compositions have been prepared in Ca,Cr:LGG and Cr:LGG systems, respectively. Samples were prepared by ceramic method, fired at 1250 deg. C/6 h and characterised by XRD, lattice parameters, UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy, CIE L * a * b * measurements and SEM/EDX. Results indicate that Ca,Cr:LGG and Cr:LGG solid solutions are obtained. In Cr:LGG system only Cr(III) is stabilised in octahedral positions substituting for Lu(III) and Ga(III). Both Cr(III) and Cr(IV) are present in Ca,Cr:LGG. The calcium is a charge compensator to stabilise Cr(IV) and this is the predominant oxidation state up to x = 0.075 composition. From this composition, Cr(III) becomes more stabilised in garnet lattice. Cr(IV) occupies generally tetrahedral and dodecahedral sites substituting for Ga(III) and Lu(III), while Cr(III) is in octahedral site substituting for Ga(III)

  9. An on-site colorimetric technique for routine determination of chromium, iron and copper in bath solutions for chromium(III) conversion coating.

    PubMed

    Kawakubo, Susumu; Shimada, Katsuhisa; Suzuki, Yasutada; Hattori, Kazuya

    2011-01-01

    An on-site colorimetric technique was developed for the routine determination of chromium, iron and copper in bath solutions for the chromium(III) conversion coating. A portable colorimeter with a red-green-blue light emitting diode was used for the absorbance measurements. Iron and copper were determined as Fe(III)-thiocyanate and Cu(I)-bathocuproindisulfonate, respectively. Chromium(III) was determined simultaneously with iron or copper using green and blue light. A correction method of the matrix effect was proposed and its applicability was demonstrated. Analytical errors were within 500, 5 and 0.3 mg L(-1) for chromium(III), iron and copper, respectively. PMID:21415522

  10. Investigations of the Dephosphorization of Liquid Iron Solution Containing Chromium and Nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karbowniczek, Miroslaw; Kawecka-Cebula, Elzbieta; Reichel, Jan

    2012-06-01

    The most up-to-date trends in stainless steel production—aiming at the reduction of production costs—consist of the substitution of steel scrap by hot metal, coming from the reduction of iron-chromium ores. This process requires a more extensive dephosphorization. The dephosphorization process, when applied to chromium steels, requires slag with high dephosphorization properties, as either chromium or chromium oxide entering the slag decreases distinctly the efficiency of the process. The results of laboratory investigations on the dephosphorization of liquid iron solutions containing chromium and nickel are presented. In particular, the study was focused on the selection of the optimal slag composition and the way the slag should be added. The slags based on calcium and fluorite with cryolite additions were considered. It was shown that the variables with the greatest impact on the dephosphorization process include chromium and nickel levels, temperature, and slag basicity. A statistical analysis was performed and regression equations were set. The results may be of use for the design of new methods of production of high-chromium steels.

  11. Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021 Exopolysaccharide as a Flocculant Improving Chromium(III) Oxide Removal from Aqueous Solutions.

    PubMed

    Szewczuk-Karpisz, Katarzyna; Wiśniewska, Małgorzata; Pac, Małgorzata; Choma, Adam; Komaniecka, Iwona

    2014-01-01

    Chromium(III) oxide is an amphoteric, dark green solid. This most stable dye is widely used in construction and ceramic industries as well as in painting. In this study, the attempt is made to determine flocculating properties of exopolysaccharide (EPS) synthesized by the bacteria Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021, which would increase the efficiency of chromium(III) oxide removal from sewages and wastewaters. The conditions under which EPS is the most effective destabilizing component of chromium(III) oxide suspension have been determined too. In order to characterize the structure of electric double layer formed at the solid/supporting electrolyte (EPS) solution interface, electrokinetic potential measurements and potentiometric titration were performed. The EPS amount adsorbed on the chromium(III) oxide surface as a solution pH function was also measured. Moreover, the stability of Cr2O3 suspension in the absence and presence of S. meliloti 1021 EPS was estimated. The pooled analysis of all obtained results showed that EPS causes chromium(III) oxide suspension destabilization in the whole examined pH range. The largest change in the system stability before and after the polymer addition was observed at pH 9. It is probable that under these conditions bridging flocculation occurs in the examined system. PMID:25132693

  12. The chemical behavior of acidified chromium (3) solutions. B.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terman, D. K.

    1981-01-01

    A unique energy-storage system has been developed at NASA's Lewis Research Center called REDOX. This NASA-REDOX system is an electrochemical storage device that utilized the oxidation and reduction of two fully soluble redox couples for charging and discharging. The redox couples now being investigated are acidified chloride solutions of chromium (Cr(+2)/Cr(+3)) and iron (Fe(+2)/Fe(+3)).

  13. Recovery of chromium from spent plating solutions by a chromyl chloride process

    SciTech Connect

    Guddati, S.L.; Holsen, T.M.; Selman, J.R.

    1994-12-31

    A novel chromyl chloride process has been investigated for the recovery of hexavalent chromium from spent plating solutions. In this process chromium is converted to chromyl chloride by reacting it with concentrated hydrochloric acid and then separated as a heavy underlayer, or alternatively, extracted into a solvent as follows: H{sub 2}CrO{sub 4} + 2 HCl {Leftrightarrow} CrO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} + 2 H{sub 2}O. Purified chromyl chloride is then hydrolyzed and the resulting solution dried and chromium trioxide recovered. H{sub 2}CrO{sub 4} [+ 2 HCl] {Leftrightarrow} CrO{sub 3}{down_arrow} + H{sub 2}O{up_arrow} [+ 2 HCl{up_arrow}]. In preliminary experiments more than 98% of the chromium has been separated as chromyl chloride (without using any solvent) from an aqueous solution which originally contained 200 g/L chromic acid. Temperature and reactant concentrations were found to greatly affect the stability and the yield of chromyl chloride respectively. Equilibrium conditions have been identified using a geochemical equilibrium speciation model. A statistical analysis of experimental results has been performed to quantify the effects of various parameters on the yield of chromyl chloride.

  14. Trivalent chromium removal from aqueous solutions by a sol–gel synthesized silica adsorbent functionalized with sulphonic acid groups

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Gonzalez, Sergio Efrain; Carbajal-Arizaga, Gregorio Guadalupe; Manriquez-Gonzalez, Ricardo; De la Cruz-Hernandez, Wencel; Gomez-Salazar, Sergio

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Corpuscular sulphonic acid-functionalized silica holds improved uptake of chromium. • Mesopores on adsorbent facilitate (CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2}Cr{sup +} ion uptake on sulphonate sites. • Formation of chromium acetate sulphonate complex proposed from XPS results. • Fixed bed chromium uptake results suggest potential industrial use. - Abstract: A high capacity hybrid silica adsorbent was synthesized via sol–gel processing with sulphonic acid groups as trivalent chromium complex ions chelators from aqueous solutions. The synthesis included co-condensation of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) with 3-(mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane (MPS), and oxidation of thiol to sulphonic acid groups. Chromium uptake kinetic, batch and fixed-bed experiments were performed to assess the removal of this metal from aqueous solutions. {sup 13}C, {sup 29}Si CPMAS NMR, FTIR, XPS were used to characterize the adsorbent structure and the nature of chromium complexes on the adsorbent surface. Chromium maximum uptake was obtained at pH 3 (72.8 mg/g). Elemental analysis results showed ligand density of 1.48 mmol sulphonic groups/g. About 407 mL of Cr(III) solution (311 mg/L) were treated to breakthrough point reaching ≤0.06 mg/L at the effluent. These results comply with USEPA regulation for chromium concentration in drinking water (≤0.1 mg/L). The adsorbent shows potential to be used in chromium separations to the industrial level.

  15. [Fluorescence emission spectra of petroleumsulfonate and OP-10 in multi-components aqueous solutions].

    PubMed

    Bi, Z; Ye, J; Yu, J

    1998-06-01

    The determination of surfactant(s) in the alkaline/surfactant/polymer flooding solutions was an uneasy job. For this purpose, the method of fluorescence emission by phenoxy-containing surfactants in dilute solutions is suggested. The fluorescence emission intensity changes linearly with in the extent of low surfactant concentrations below the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and is not influenced by the presence of alkali, polymer PHPAM and salts. Under certain conditions the fluorescence emission by petroleum sulfonate and OP-10 in a multi-components aqueous solution can be detected independently. This method is high-selective, sensitive (the lowest detectable concentration 10(-7) mol/L) and microanalytical (the amount of test solution 2-3 microL). PMID:15810288

  16. Absorption spectroscopy in the ultraviolet and visible spectral range of hexavalent chromium aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignani, Anna G.; Spadoni, Lorenzo

    1999-09-01

    In order to demonstrate the possibility of performing direct absorption spectroscopy of Hexavalent Chromium aqueous solutions, absorption measurements were performed at the dual- beam spectrophotometer in the 250 - 850 nm spectral range, with 10 mm and 100 mm path lengths. Low concentration (26 - 520 (mu) g/l) (and high concentration (2.6 - 52 mg/l) solutions were analyzed, showing that it is possible to implement a basic instrumentation for risk condition monitoring and a more advanced instrumentation for quantitative measurements.

  17. Use of modified hydroxy-aluminum bentonites for chromium(III) removal from solutions.

    PubMed

    Volzone, Cristina; Beatriz Garrido, Liliana

    2008-09-01

    The retention of chromium(III) from a 2,000 ppm chromium basic sulfate and tannery waste solution at pH 4.5 using modified hydroxy-aluminum bentonites (OH-Al bentonites) as adsorbents was studied. OH-Al bentonite was prepared by mixing clay with a hydrolyzed commercial chlorohydroxy Al solution. The modified Al bentonites were obtained by (a) a treatment with 0.5M sodium chloride and (b) a treatment with a Na-hexametaphosphate solution (HMP) after adding sodium chloride. The effect of heating the adsorbents at 100, 500, 700 and 800 degrees C on Cr retention as a function of time was also analyzed. Cr retention by modified OH-Al bentonite with HMP increased with time (up to 100 mg Cr/g) where modified OH-Al bentonite was twice that of untreated bentonite. The relatively high uptake of metal from the salt solution by modified OH-Al bentonite treated at 800 degrees C, in which a complete interlayer collapse occurred, indicated the importance of the contribution of external surface sites to the retention capacity. The maximum Cr uptake from a water waste was 24 mg/g, due to interferences and different chromium species in the industrial solution. PMID:17900792

  18. REMOVAL OF CHROMIUM FROM ION EXCHANGE REGENERANT SOLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the present study was to establish means of removing the chromate (Cr(VI)) from spent regenerant solution, thus rendering it a non-toxic brine. In the bench-scale study, the Cr(VI) was reduced to Cr(III) and then precipitated as Cr(OH)3(s). Sulfite, hydrazine, and ...

  19. Growth of Plants in Solution Culture Containing Low Levels of Chromium 1

    PubMed Central

    Huffman, E. W. D.; Allaway, W. H.

    1973-01-01

    Chromium was not required for normal growth of romaine lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. subsp. longifolia), tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.), wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), or bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in solution culture containing 3.8 × 10−4 μM Cr. Plants grown on this purified nutrient solution contained an average of 22 ng Cr/g dry weight. Duckweed (Lemna sp.) grew and reproduced normally on a dilute nutrient solution containing 3.8 × 10−5 μM Cr. PMID:16658503

  20. Hexavalent chromium removal from aqueous solutions by a novel powder prepared from Colocasia esculenta leaves.

    PubMed

    Nakkeeran, E; Saranya, N; Giri Nandagopal, M S; Santhiagu, A; Selvaraju, N

    2016-08-01

    In this study, batch removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solutions by powdered Colocasia esculenta leaves was investigated. Batch experiments were conducted to study the effects of adsorption of Cr(VI) at different pH values, initial concentrations, agitation speeds, temperatures, and contact times. The biosorbent was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer analysis. The biosorptive capacity of the adsorbent was dependent on the pH of the chromium solution in which maximum removal was observed at pH 2. The adsorption equilibrium data were evaluated for various adsorption isotherm models, kinetic models, and thermodynamics. The equilibrium data fitted well with Freundlich and Halsey models. The adsorption capacity calculated was 47.62 mg/g at pH 2. The adsorption kinetic data were best described by pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Thus, Colocasia esculenta leaves can be considered as one of the efficient and cheap biosorbents for hexavalent chromium removal from aqueous solutions. PMID:26853060

  1. Removal of trivalent chromium from aqueous solution using aluminum oxide hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Bedemo, Agaje; Chandravanshi, Bhagwan Singh; Zewge, Feleke

    2016-01-01

    Water is second most essential for human being. Contamination of water makes it unsuitable for human consumption. Chromium ion is released to water bodies from various industries having high toxicity which affects the biota life in these waters. In this study aluminum oxide hydroxide was tested for its efficiency to remove trivalent chromium from aqueous solutions through batch mode experiments. Chromium concentrations in aqueous solutions and tannery waste water before and after adsorption experiments were determined using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The effects of pH, contact time, initial concentration and adsorbent dosage on the adsorption of Cr(III) were studied. The study revealed that more than 99 % removal of Cr(III) was achieved over wide range of initial pH (3-10). The optimum conditions for the removal of Cr(III) were found to be at pH 4-6 with 40 g/L adsorbent dose at 60 min of contact time. The adsorption capacity was assessed using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The equilibrium data at varying adsorbent dose obeyed the two isotherms. The adsorbent was found to be efficient for the removal of Cr(III) from tannery waste effluent. PMID:27547663

  2. Characterization and Oxidation of Chromium(III) by Sodium Hypochlorite in Alkaline Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Huijian; Rao, Linfeng; Zhang, Zhicheng; Rai, Dhanpat

    2006-07-01

    Chromium exists in nuclear waste sludges and is a problematic element in the vitrification process of high-level nuclear wastes. It is therefore necessary to treat the waste sludges to remove chromium prior to vitrification, by caustic leaching or oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI). The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of oligomerization of Cr(III) on its oxidation by hypochlorite in alkaline solutions. Monomeric, dimeric and trimeric Cr(III) species in solution were separated by ion exchange. The kinetics of the oxidation of the separated species by hypochlorite in alkaline solutions was studied by UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy, and compared with the oxidation by hydrogen peroxide previously studied. Results indicate that hypochlorite can oxidize Cr(III) to Cr(VI) in alkaline solutions, but the rate of oxidation by hypochlorite is slower than that by hydrogen peroxide at the same alkalinity and concentrations of oxidants. The rate of oxidation of Cr(III) by both oxidants decreases as the concentration of sodium hydroxide is increased, but the oxidation by hypochlorite seems less affected by the degree of oligomerization of Cr(III) than that by peroxide. Compared with the oxidation by hydrogen peroxide where the major reaction pathway has an inverse order with respect to CNaOH, the oxidation by hypochlorite has a significant reaction pathway independent of [OH?].

  3. Biosorption of chromium(VI) ion from aqueous solutions using walnut, hazelnut and almond shell.

    PubMed

    Pehlivan, Erol; Altun, Türkan

    2008-06-30

    The potential to remove Cr(VI) ion from aqueous solutions through biosorption using, the shells of Walnut (WNS) (Juglans regia), Hazelnut (HNS) (Corylus avellana) and Almond (AS) (Prunus dulcis) was investigated in batch experiments. The equilibrium adsorption level was determined to be a function of the solution contact time and concentration. Kinetic experiments revealed that the dilute chromium solutions reached equilibrium within 100 min. The biosorptive capacity of the shells was dependent on the pH of the chromium solution, with pH 3.5 being optimal. Adsorption of Cr(VI) ion uptake is in all cases pH-dependent showing a maximum at equilibrium pH values between 2.0 and 3.5, depending on the biomaterial, that correspond to equilibrium pH values of 3.5 for (WNS), 3.5 for (HNS) and 3.2 for (AS). The adsorption data fit well with the Langmuir isotherm model. The sorption process conformed to the Langmuir isotherm with maximum Cr(VI) ion sorption capacities of 8.01, 8.28, and 3.40 mg/g for WNS, HNS and AS, respectively. Percentage removal by WNS, HNS and AS was 85.32, 88.46 and 55.00%, respectively at a concentration of 0.5 mM. HNS presented the highest adsorption capacities for the Cr(VI) ion. PMID:18179865

  4. Removal of chromium (VI) from aqueous solution using treated oil palm fibre.

    PubMed

    Isa, Mohamed Hasnain; Ibrahim, Naimah; Aziz, Hamidi Abdul; Adlan, Mohd Nordin; Sabiani, Nor Habsah Md; Zinatizadeh, Ali Akbar Lorestani; Kutty, Shamsul Rahman Mohamed

    2008-04-01

    This study proposed an oil palm by-product as a low-cost adsorbent for the removal of hexavalent chromium [Cr (VI)] from aqueous solution. Adsorption of Cr (VI) by sulphuric acid and heat-treated oil palm fibre was conducted using batch tests. The influence of pH, contact time, initial chromium concentration and adsorbent dosage on the removal of Cr (VI) from the solutions was investigated. The optimum initial pH for maximum uptake of Cr (VI) from aqueous solution was found to be 1.5. The removal efficiency was found to correlate with the initial Cr (VI) concentration, adsorbent dosage as well as the contact time between Cr (VI) and the adsorbent. The adsorption kinetics tested with pseudo first order and pseudo second order models yielded high R(2) values from 0.9254 to 0.9870 and from 0.9936 to 0.9998, respectively. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed significant difference between the R(2) values of the two models at 99% confidence level. The Freundlich isotherm (R(2)=0.8778) described Cr (VI) adsorption slightly better than the Langmuir isotherm (R(2)=0.8715). Difficulty in desorption of Cr (VI) suggests the suitability of treated oil palm fibre as a single-use adsorbent for Cr (VI) removal from aqueous solution. PMID:17714862

  5. Removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution by granular and powdered Peganum Harmala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosravi, Rasoul; Fazlzadehdavil, Mehdi; Barikbin, Behnam; Taghizadeh, Ali Akbar

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, batch removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solutions by granular and powdered seeds of Peganum Harmala was investigated. The Peganum Harmala seeds were collected and after beating slowly, separating and cleaning the Harmala seeds done using a sieve. Batch adsorption studies were performed in 100 ml Erlenmeyer flasks inside an incubator container. The main process parameters considered were pH, initial Cr(VI) concentration for PPH and GPH, adsorbent dose, and contact time. Cr(VI) was measured at a wavelength of 540 nm using a UV-vis T80+ spectrophotometer. The adsorption data were fitted well by Freundlich isotherm. The result shows that the maximum removal of Cr(VI) was observed at pH 1.5 for both adsorbents. Also, by increase adsorption dose, adsorption capacity of Cr(VI) decreased but the chromium adsorption rate increased. The mount of adsorbed Cr(VI) onto both adsorbents increased with an increase in the contact time but by increases initial concentration of Cr(VI), the mount of adsorbed Cr(VI) onto both adsorbents decreased. The results indicate that the powdered Peganum Harmala can be effective adsorbent than the granular Peganum Harmala for the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution.

  6. Fluorescent silver nanoclusters for ultrasensitive determination of chromium(VI) in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian Rong; Zeng, Ai Lian; Luo, Hong Qun; Li, Nian Bing

    2016-03-01

    In this work, a simple and sensitive Cr(VI) sensor is proposed based on fluorescent polyethyleneimine-stabilized Ag nanoclusters, which allows the determination over a wide concentration range of 0.1 nM-3.0 μM and with a detection limit as low as 0.04 nΜ and a good selectivity. The quenching mechanism was discussed in terms of the absorption and fluorescence spectra, suggesting that Cr(VI) is connected to Ag nanoclusters by hydrogen bond between the oxygen atom at the vertex of tetrahedron structure of Cr(VI) and the amino nitrogen of polyethyleneimine that surrounded Ag nanoclusters and electron transfer from Ag nanoclusters to highly electron-deficient Cr(VI) results in fluorescence quenching. Despite the failure to quench the fluorescence efficiently, Cr(III) can also be measured using the proposed Ag nanoclusters by being oxidized to Cr(VI) in alkaline solution (pH ∼ 9) containing H2O2. Therefore, our approach could be used to detect Cr(VI), Cr(III) and the total chromium level in aqueous solution. In addition, Cr(VI) analysis in real water samples were satisfactory, indicating this method could be practically promising for chromium measurements. PMID:26546705

  7. Removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution by calcined Zn/Al-LDHs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui-Duo; Zhao, Yun-Peng; Li, Shi-Feng; Fan, Xing; Wei, Xian-Yong; Zong, Zhi-Min

    2016-01-01

    In this study, Zn/Al-layered double hydroxides (Zn/Al-LDHs) were synthesized by a co-precipitation method and characterized with X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Then the hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) adsorption experiments on calcined Zn/Al-LDHs were carried out to analyze the effects of pH, temperature, adsorption time, initial Cr(VI) concentration and adsorbent dosage on the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions. The maximum adsorption capacity for Cr(VI) on calcined Zn/Al-LDHs under optimal conditions was found to be over 120 mg/g. The kinetic and isotherm of Cr(VI) adsorption on calcined Zn/Al-LDHs can be described with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Langmuir isotherm, respectively. PMID:27387001

  8. Cadmium and chromium removal kinetics from solution by two aquatic macrophytes.

    PubMed

    Suñe, N; Sánchez, G; Caffaratti, S; Maine, M A

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine chromium and cadmium bioaccumulation processes of two free-floating macrophytes commonly used in wetlands for water treatment: Salvinia herzogii and Pistia stratiotes. Metal removal from the solution involves two stages: a fast one and a slow one. The fast stage of the Cd uptake is significantly different for each species, while it is not significantly different in Cr uptake. The most important processes of Cd uptake are biological ones in S. herzogii and adsorption, chelation and ionic exchange are in P. stratiotes. The main processes of Cr uptake in both macrophytes are adsorption, chelation and ion exchange. The slow stage is different for each species and metal. Cr precipitation induced by roots occurs in P. stratiotes. Cr uptake through leaves is probably the main cause of the increase of Cr in the aerial parts of S. herzogii. PMID:16815611

  9. Reduction remediation of hexavalent chromium by bacterial flora in Cr(VI) aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Xu, Xinhua; Zhao, Fanglin; Liu, Zhihao; Xu, Jinan

    2010-01-01

    Chromium(VI) is a priority pollutant in soils and wastewaters and reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) is a solution to this problem. In this study a low-cost method was proposed to adapt indigenous bacteria and use them to reduce Cr(VI) in solutions. The experiment results show that Cr(VI) could be efficiently reduced by indigenous bacteria under anaerobic and pH-unadjusted conditions. After about 24 h the concentration of Cr(VI) could be reduced from 21.74 mg/L to below 0.5 mg/L. The observed Cr(VI) reduction rates were affected by temperature and pH. Cr(VI) in aqueous solutions could be reduced to Cr(III) completely and partly be incepted by the organisms. Cr(VI) reduction was enzyme-mediated. It was not an energy-conserving process but a detoxification reaction. This method could be used in an anaerobic reactor to treat low-concentration wastewater or industrial water as the last step. PMID:20489262

  10. Biosorption of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solutions by Macadamia nutshell powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakade, Vusumzi Emmanuel; Ntuli, Themba Dominic; Ofomaja, Augustine Enakpodia

    2016-04-01

    Macadamia nutshell biosorbents treated in three different activating agents [raw Macadamia nutshell powder (RMN), acid-treated Macadamia nutshell (ATMN) and base-treated Macadamia nutshell (BTMN)] were investigated for the adsorption of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] from aqueous solutions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectra of free and Cr(VI)-loaded sorbents as well as thermogravimetric analysis revealed that the acid and base treatments modified the surface properties of the sorbent. Surface characteristics were also evaluated by the scanning electron microscopy and surface area analyzer. The optimum conditions for the adsorption of Cr(VI) by sorbents were pH 2, contact time 10 h, adsorbent mass 0.2 g and concentration 100 mg L-1. The equilibrium data were fitted into the Langmuir, Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson and Sips isotherms, and no single model could clearly explain the sorption mechanism. Maximum binding capacities of 45.23, 44.83 and 42.44 mg g-1 for RMN, ATMN and BTMN, respectively, were obtained. The kinetic data were analyzed using the pseudo-first, pseudo-second and Elovich kinetic models, and it was observed that the pseudo-second-order model produced the best fit for the experimental data. Macadamia nutshell sorbents showed potential as low-cost adsorbent for the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution.

  11. Phase Stability of Chromium(III) Oxide Hydroxide in Alkaline Sodium Phosphate Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    S.E. Ziemniak; E.P. Opalka

    2003-07-08

    Grimaldiite ({alpha}-CrOOH) is shown to transform to a sodium-chromium(III)-hydroxyphosphate compound (SCHP) in alkaline sodium phosphate solutions at elevated temperatures via CrOOH(s) + 4Na{sup +} + 2HPO{sub 4}{sup 2-} = Na{sub 4}Cr(OH)(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}(s) + H{sub 2}O. X-ray diffraction analyses indicate that SCHP possesses an orthorhombic lattice having the same space group symmetry (Ibam, No.72) as sodium ferric hydroxyphosphate. A structurally-consistent designation for SCHP is Na{sub 3}Cr(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} {center_dot} NaOH; the molar volume of SCHP is estimated to be 1552 cm{sup 3}. The thermodynamic equilibrium for the above reaction was defined in the system Na{sub 2}O-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O for Na/P molar ratios between 2.0 and 2.4. On the basis of observed reaction threshold values for sodium phosphate concentration and temperature, the standard molar entropy (S{sup o}), heat capacity (C{sub p}{sup o}) and free energy of formation ({Delta}G{sub f}{sup o}) for SCHP were calculated to be 690 J/(mol-K), 622 J/(mol-K) and -3509.97 kJ/mol, respectively.

  12. Efficacy of mangrove leaf powder for bioremediation of chromium (VI) from aqueous solutions: kinetic and thermodynamic evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathish, Thadikamala; Vinithkumar, N. V.; Dharani, G.; Kirubagaran, R.

    2014-03-01

    Biosorption of heavy metals by bio-materials has been posited as a potential alternative to the existing physicochemical technologies for detoxification and recovery of toxic and valuable metals from wastewaters. In this context, the role of mangrove leaf powder (MLP) as biosorbent for chromium removal was investigated. In the present study, the effect of process parameters such as particle size, solution pH, initial concentration of Cr(VI) ion and adsorbent dose on chromium removal by MLP was investigated. The maximum sorption was observed at particle size 0.5 mm and pH 2.0. The adsorption data follow the pseudo second-order kinetics model. The isotherms denote that Langmuir model is the best fitted than Freundlich model. The maximum adsorption capacity (Q 0) of 60.24 mg/g of Cr(VI) at 30 min on MLP was determined using the Langmuir model. The adsorption isotherm model indicates that the chromium is adsorbing as monolayer on the surface of MLP with heterogeneous energetic distribution of active sites. Various thermodynamic parameters, such as Gibb's free energy (∆G °), enthalpy (∆H °) and entropy (∆S °) have been calculated. The thermodynamic data revealed that the adsorption of chromium ions onto MLP is endothermic in nature and a spontaneous process. The results of the present study suggest that MLP is an effective bioremediation measure for removal of high concentration of Cr(VI) in waste waters.

  13. Efficacy of mangrove leaf powder for bioremediation of chromium (VI) from aqueous solutions: kinetic and thermodynamic evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathish, Thadikamala; Vinithkumar, N. V.; Dharani, G.; Kirubagaran, R.

    2015-06-01

    Biosorption of heavy metals by bio-materials has been posited as a potential alternative to the existing physicochemical technologies for detoxification and recovery of toxic and valuable metals from wastewaters. In this context, the role of mangrove leaf powder (MLP) as biosorbent for chromium removal was investigated. In the present study, the effect of process parameters such as particle size, solution pH, initial concentration of Cr(VI) ion and adsorbent dose on chromium removal by MLP was investigated. The maximum sorption was observed at particle size 0.5 mm and pH 2.0. The adsorption data follow the pseudo second-order kinetics model. The isotherms denote that Langmuir model is the best fitted than Freundlich model. The maximum adsorption capacity ( Q 0) of 60.24 mg/g of Cr(VI) at 30 min on MLP was determined using the Langmuir model. The adsorption isotherm model indicates that the chromium is adsorbing as monolayer on the surface of MLP with heterogeneous energetic distribution of active sites. Various thermodynamic parameters, such as Gibb's free energy (∆ G °), enthalpy (∆ H °) and entropy (∆ S °) have been calculated. The thermodynamic data revealed that the adsorption of chromium ions onto MLP is endothermic in nature and a spontaneous process. The results of the present study suggest that MLP is an effective bioremediation measure for removal of high concentration of Cr(VI) in waste waters.

  14. Removal of hexavalent chromium in carbonic acid solution by oxidizing slag discharged from steelmaking process in electric arc furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Seiji; Okazaki, Kohei; Sasano, Junji; Izaki, Masanobu

    2014-02-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is well-known to be a strong oxidizer, and is recognized as a carcinogen. Therefore, it is regulated for drinking water, soil, groundwater and sea by the environmental quality standards all over the world. In this study, it was attempted to remove Cr(VI) ion in a carbonic acid solution by the oxidizing slag that was discharged from the normal steelmaking process in an electric arc furnace. After the addition of the slag into the aqueous solution contained Cr(VI) ion, concentrations of Cr(VI) ion and total chromium (Cr(VI) + trivalent chromium (Cr(III)) ions decreased to lower detection limit of them. Therefore, the used slag could reduce Cr(VI) and fix Cr(III) ion on the slag. While Cr(VI) ion existed in the solution, iron did not dissolve from the slag. From the relation between predicted dissolution amount of iron(II) ion and amount of decrease in Cr(VI) ion, the Cr(VI) ion did not react with iron(II) ion dissolved from the slag. Therefore, Cr(VI) ion was removed by the reductive reaction between Cr(VI) ion and the iron(II) oxide (FeO) in the slag. This reaction progressed on the newly appeared surface of iron(II) oxide due to the dissolution of phase composed of calcium etc., which existed around iron(II) oxide grain in the slag.

  15. Chromium adsorption by lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Lalvani, S.B.; Huebner, A.; Wiltowski, T.S.

    2000-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium is a known carcinogen, and its maximum contamination level in drinking water is determined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Chromium in the wastewaters from plating and metal finishing, tanning, and photographic industries poses environmental problems. A commercially available lignin was used for the removal of hexavalent as well as trivalent chromium from aqueous solution. It is known that hexavalent chromium is present as an anionic species in the solution. It was found that lignin can remove up to 63% hexavalent and 100% trivalent chromium from aqueous solutions. The removal of chromium ions was also investigated using a commercially available activated carbon. This absorbent facilitated very little hexavalent and almost complete trivalent chromium removal. Adsorption isotherms and kinetics data on the metal removal by lignin and activated carbon are presented and discussed.

  16. Corrosion, ion release and Mott–Schottky probe of chromium oxide coatings in saline solution with potential for orthopaedic implant applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogwu, A. A.; Oje, A. M.; Kavanagh, J.

    2016-04-01

    We report our investigation on chromium oxide thin film coatings that show a negligible ion release during electrochemical corrosion testing in saline solution. The chemical constituents of the films prepared by reactive magnetron sputtering were identified to be predominantly Cr2O3 based on Raman spectroscopy anti-symmetric stretching vibration modes for CrIII–O and other peaks and an FTIR spectroscopy E u vibrational mode at 409 cm‑1. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, multiplet fitting for 2P 3/2 and 2P 1/2 states also confirmed the predominantly Cr2O3 stoichiometry in the films. The prepared chromium oxide coatings showed superior pitting corrosion resistance compared to the native chromium oxide films on bare uncoated stainless steel when tested under open circuit potential, potentiodynamic polarisation and cyclic voltammetry in saline solution. The chromium ion released into solution during the corrosion testing of stainless steel substrates coated with chromium oxide coatings was found to be negligibly small based on atomic absorption spectroscopy measurements. Our Mott–Schottky analysis investigation showed that the negligibly small ion release from the chromium oxide coated steel substrates is most likely due to a much lower defect density on the surface of the deposited coatings compared to the native oxide layer on the uncoated steel substrates. This opens up the opportunity for using chromium oxide surface coatings in hip, knee and other orthopaedic implants where possible metal ion release in vivo still poses a great challenge.

  17. Sorptive removal of trivalent and hexavalent chromium from binary aqueous solutions by composite alginate-goethite beads.

    PubMed

    Lazaridis, N K; Charalambous, Ch

    2005-11-01

    In this study, the removal of hexavalent and trivalent chromium ions from binary aqueous solutions by composite alginate-goethite beads was investigated in a batch mode. Equilibrium sorption experiments were carried out at different temperatures and pH values. The data were correlated with Langmuir and Freundlich equations. The thermodynamic parameters calculated were: change in free energy, in enthalpy, in entropy and the heat of adsorption. The influence of mixing rate, sorbent concentration and sorbent particle size was studied at kinetic runs. The effective diffusion coefficients were evaluated by employing the homogeneous diffusion model and the shrinking core model for hexavalent and trivalent chromium, respectively. Desorption experiments were conducted by employing various eluants showed that the loaded material could be regenerated satisfactorily. PMID:16233908

  18. Transpassive dissolution of alloy 625, chromium, nickel, and molybdenum in high-temperature solutions containing hydrochloric acid and oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Kritzer, P.; Boukis, N.; Dinjus, E.

    2000-03-01

    Coupons of nickel, molybdenum, chromium, and the nickel-based Alloy 625 (UNS 06625) were corroded in strongly oxidizing hydrochloric acid (HCl) solutions at 350 C and a pressure (p) of 24 MPa, with reaction times between 0.75 h and 50 h. For Alloy 625, the effect of surface roughness also was investigated. Nickel and molybdenum showed strong material loss after only 5 h of reaction as a result of the instability of the solid oxides formed under experimental conditions. The attack on chromium started at the grain boundaries. At longer reaction times, thick, spalling oxide layers formed on the surface. The attack on Alloy 625 also started at the grain boundaries and at inclusions leading to the formation of small pits. On polished surfaces, the growth of these pits occurred faster than on nonpolished surfaces, but fewer pits grew. Corrosion products formed at the surface consisted of oxygen and chromium. On isolated spots, nickel- and chlorine-containing products also were found.

  19. Determination of chromium(III) in aqueous solution using CePO4 :Tb(3+) nanocrystals in a fluorescence resonance energy transfer system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Qi; Wu, Yong; Zhang, Yi-Yan; Guan, Ying-Ying; Wang, Lun

    2014-09-01

    Trivalent chromium is an essential element required for normal carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolism in humans and animals. This article describes an efficient fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) system between CePO4 :Tb(3+) nanocrystals as the donor and chromium(III) as the acceptor. CePO4 :Tb(3+) nanocrystals were synthesized in aqueous solution, and characterized by transmission electron microscopy. Under optimum conditions, a linear calibration graph was obtained (R(2)  = 0.996). The linear range and detection limit of chromium(III) were 0.01-2.2 μM, and 9.1 nM, respectively. The proposed method had a wide linear range and proved to be very sensitive, rapid and simple. Moreover, the method was applied successfully to the determination of chromium(III) in synthetic samples and tap water. PMID:24155180

  20. Assessment of the removal mechanism of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solutions by olive stone.

    PubMed

    Martín-Lara, María Ángeles; Calero de Hoces, Mónica; Ronda Gálvez, Alicia; Pérez Muñoz, Antonio; Trujillo Miranda, Ma Carmen

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to study the removal mechanism of Cr(VI) by natural olive stone (OS) and to present a sequential-batch process for the removal of total chromium (original Cr(VI) and Cr(III) derived from reduction of Cr(VI) during biosorption at acidic conditions). First, experiments were conducted varying pH from 1 to 4, and showed that a combined effect of biosorption and reduction is involved in the Cr(VI) removal. Then, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and desorption tests were employed to verify the oxidation state of the chromium bound to OS and to elucidate the removal mechanism of Cr(VI) by this material. The goal of these tests was to confirm that Cr(III) is the species mainly absorbed by OS. Finally, the possibility of total chromium removal by biosorption in a sequential-batch process was analyzed. In the first stage, 96.38% of Cr(VI) is removed by OS and reduced to Cr(III). In the second stage, approximately 31% of the total Cr concentration was removed. However, the Cr(III) released in the first stage is not completely removed, and it could suggest that the Cr(III) could be in a hydrated compound or a complex, which could be more difficult to remove under these conditions. PMID:27232404

  1. Evaluation of rhamnolipid (RL) as a biosurfactant for the removal of chromium from aqueous solutions by precipitate flotation.

    PubMed

    Salmani Abyaneh, Ali; Fazaelipoor, Mohammad Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Rhamnolipid (RL) is a biosurfactant which is produced by the bacterial species Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Although applications of this material have been examined in various fields, its applications in the flotation of heavy metals remain to be explored. In this research, rhamnolipid was applied as a collector in the flotation of Cr(III) from aqueous solutions. FeSO4 was used for the precipitation of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) which was subsequently removed by flotation. A two level full factorial design (with center points) was used to evaluate the effects of pH, air flow rate, RL/Cr and Fe/Cr molar ratios on the performance of the flotation system. The results showed that the biosurfactant was highly effective in the removal of chromium, and all of the factors had significant effects on the flotation performance. The chromium removal efficiencies of greater than 95% were obtained with the initial chromium concentration of 40 ppm within 5 min. Kinetic studies showed that a first order kinetic model was appropriate to describe the precipitate flotation of Cr(III) using rhamnolipid as a collector. The interference of NaCl, CaCl2, CaSO4, and CaCO3 on the Cr removal was also investigated, and it was demonstrated that CaSO4 and CaCO3 as sparingly water soluble salts, and CaCl2 as a contributor to water hardness had significant negative impacts on Cr removal efficiency of rhamnolipid. PMID:26433359

  2. Comparing Nafion and ceramic separators used in electrochemical purification of spent chromium plating solutions: cationic impurity removal and transport.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuo-Lin; Holsen, Thomas M; Chou, Tse-Chuan; Selman, J Robert

    2003-05-01

    This study focuses on the electrolytic regeneration of spent chromium plating solutions. These solutions contain a significant amount of chromium and a lesser amount of other heavy metals, which makes them a significant environmental concern and an obvious target for recycling and reuse. The type of separator used is extremely critical to the performance of the process because they are the major resistance in the transport-related impurity (Cu(II), Ni(II), and Fe(III)) removals from contaminated chromic acid solutions. A Nafion 117 membrane and a ceramic diaphragm separator traditionally used in the industry were tested for comparison. It was found that the mobilities of Cu(II) and Ni(II) were similar and higher than that of Fe(III) using both separators. The mobility of each cation was smaller in the Nafion membrane than in the ceramic diaphragm. The measured conductivity of the ceramic diaphragm was slightly higher than that of Nafion membrane. However, the Nafion membrane was much thinner than the ceramic diaphragm resulting in the system using the Nafion membrane having higher impurity removal rates than the system using the ceramic diaphragm. The removal rates were approximately equal for Cu(II) and Ni(II) and lowest for Fe(III). Both current and initial concentration affected the removal rates of the impurities. Modeling results indicated that a system using a Nafion separator and a small catholyte/anolyte volume ratio was better than a system using a ceramic separator for removing impurities from concentrated plating solutions if the impurities transported into the catholyte are deposited or precipitated. PMID:12775076

  3. Removal of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] from aqueous solutions by the diatomite-supported/unsupported magnetite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Peng; Liu, Dong; Fan, Mingde; Yang, Dan; Zhu, Runliang; Ge, Fei; Zhu, JianXi; He, Hongping

    2010-01-15

    Diatomite-supported/unsupported magnetite nanoparticles were prepared by co-precipitation and hydrosol methods, and characterized by X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption, elemental analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The average sizes of the unsupported and supported magnetite nanoparticles are around 25 and 15 nm, respectively. The supported magnetite nanoparticles exist on the surface or inside the pores of diatom shells, with better dispersing and less coaggregation than the unsupported ones. The uptake of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] on the synthesized magnetite nanoparticles was mainly governed by a physico-chemical process, which included an electrostatic attraction followed by a redox process in which Cr(VI) was reduced into trivalent chromium [Cr(III)]. The adsorption of Cr(VI) was highly pH-dependent and the kinetics of the adsorption followed a pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption data of diatomite-supported/unsupported magnetite fit well with the Langmuir isotherm equation. The supported magnetite showed a better adsorption capacity per unit mass of magnetite than unsupported magnetite, and was more thermally stable than their unsupported counterparts. These results indicate that the diatomite-supported/unsupported magnetite nanoparticles are readily prepared, enabling promising applications for the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution. PMID:19748178

  4. Chromium(VI) adsorption from aqueous solution onto Moroccan Al-pillared and cationic surfactant stevensite.

    PubMed

    Benhammou, Abdelaziz; Yaacoubi, Abdelrani; Nibou, Lahbib; Tanouti, Boumediane

    2007-02-01

    Batch adsorption of the chromium(VI) onto Moroccan stevensite pillared by Keggin aluminium hydroxypolycation (Al-stevensite) and cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammoniumbromide (CTA-stevensite) was investigated. The results showed that the CTA-stevensite has a higher affinity than that of Al-stevensite for chromium(VI) adsorption. The adsorption capacities for natural stevensite, Al-stevensite and CTA-stevensite calculated according to the Dubinin-Kaganer-Radushkevich isotherm (DKR) are 13.7, 75.4 and 195.6mmolkg(-1), respectively. The study of the pH effect showed that the optimal range corresponding to the Cr(VI) maximum adsorption on Al-stevensite is pH 3.5-6 and that on CTA-stevensite is pH 2-6. The adsorption rates evaluated according to the pseudo-second-order model are 7.2, 207.2 and 178.5mmolkg(-1)min(-1) for the natural stevensite, Al-stevensite and CTA-stevensite, respectively. The low values of the adsorption energy calculated by (DKR) suggest that anion exchange is the main mechanism that governs the chromate adsorption. PMID:16876943

  5. The analytical biochemistry of chromium.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, S A

    1991-01-01

    The essentiality and carcinogenicity of chromium depend on its chemical form. Oxidation state and solubility are particularly important in determining the biological effects of chromium compounds. For this reason, total chromium measurements are of little value in assessing its nutritional benefits or its toxicological hazards. Aqueous sodium carbonate-sodium hydroxide solutions have been successfully used for extracting hexavalent chromium from a variety of environmental and biological matrices while preserving its oxidation state. Typical recoveries are 90 to 105% in samples spiked with both trivalent and hexavalent chromium. Determination of hexavalent chromium after extraction with sodium carbonate-sodium hydroxide solution, coupled with the determination of total chromium after nitric acid-hydrogen peroxide digestion, has been applied to the evaluation of chromium speciation in airborne particulates, sludges, and biological tissues. PMID:1935842

  6. Comparison of Field Groundwater Biostimulation Experiments Using Polylactate and Lactate Solutions at the Chromium-Contaminated Hanford 100-H Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazen, T. C.; Faybishenko, B.; Beller, H. R.; Brodie, E. L.; Sonnenthal, E. L.; Steefel, C.; Larsen, J.; Conrad, M. E.; Bill, M.; Christensen, J. N.; Brown, S. T.; Joyner, D.; Borglin, S. E.; Geller, J. T.; Chakraborty, R.; Nico, P. S.; Long, P. E.; Newcomer, D. R.; Arntzen, E.

    2011-12-01

    The primary contaminant of concern in groundwater at the DOE Hanford 100 Area (Washington State) is hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] in Hanford coarse-grained sediments. Three lactate injections were conducted in March, August, and October 2010 at the Hanford 100-H field site to assess the efficacy of in situ Cr(VI) bioreductive immobilization. Each time, 55 gal of lactate solution was injected into the Hanford aquifer. To characterize the biogeochemical regimes before and after electron donor injection, we implemented a comprehensive plan of groundwater sampling for microbial, geochemical, and isotopic analyses. These tests were performed to provide evidence of transformation of toxic and soluble Cr(VI) into less toxic and poorly soluble Cr(III) by bioimmobilization, and to quantify critical and interrelated microbial metabolic and geochemical mechanisms affecting chromium in situ reductive immobilization and the long-term sustainability of chromium bioremediation. The results of lactate injections were compared with data from two groundwater biostimulation tests that were conducted in 2004 and 2008 by injecting Hydrogen Release Compound (HRC°), a slow-release glycerol polylactate, into the Hanford aquifer. In all HRC and lactate injection tests, 13C-labeled lactate was added to the injected solutions to track post-injection carbon pathways. Monitoring showed that despite a very low initial total microbial density (from <104 to 105 cells/mL), both HRC and lactate injections stimulated anaerobic microbial activity, which led to an increase in biomass to >107 cells/mL (including sulfate- and nitrate-reducing bacteria), resulting in a significant decrease in soluble Cr(VI) concentrations to below the MCL. In all tests, lactate was consumed nearly completely within the first week, much faster than HRC. Modeling of biogeochemical and isotope fractionation processes with the reaction-transport code TOUGHREACT captured the biodegradation of lactate, fermentative production

  7. Application of Fe-Cu binary oxide nanoparticles for the removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saif Ullah; Zaidi, Rumman; Hassan, Saeikh Z; Farooqi, I H; Azam, Ameer

    2016-01-01

    The adsorption process has been used as an effective technique for the removal of metal ions from aqueous solutions. Groundwater remediation by nanoparticles has received interest in recent years. In the present study, a binary metal oxide of Fe-Cu was prepared and used for the removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution. Batch experiments were performed to investigate the effects of initial Cr (VI) concentration, dose of adsorbent, and pH of solution on the removal efficiency of Cr (VI). The prepared nanostructured Fe-Cu binary oxides were able to reduce the concentration of Cr (VI) in aqueous solution. Binary metal oxides nanoparticle exhibited an outstanding ability to remove Cr (VI) due to high surface area, low particle size, and high inherent activity. The percentage removal efficiency of Cr (VI) increased with nanoparticles doses (0.1 g L(-1)-2.5 g L(-1)), whereas it decreased with initial Cr (VI) concentration (1 mg L(-1)-25 mg L(-1)) and with pH (3-9). The Freundlich model was found to be the better fit for adsorption isotherm. The prepared nanomaterial was characterized using powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and ultraviolet (UV)-visible spectroscopy. It showed that the Fe-Cu binary oxides were formed in single phase. SEM micrograph showed aggregates with many nano-sized particles. UV-visible spectroscopy showed quantum confinement effect. PMID:27386994

  8. Chromium Biosorption from Cr(VI) Aqueous Solutions by Cupressus lusitanica Bark: Kinetics, Equilibrium and Thermodynamic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Netzahuatl-Muñoz, Alma Rosa; Cristiani-Urbina, María del Carmen; Cristiani-Urbina, Eliseo

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamics of chromium (Cr) ion biosorption from Cr(VI) aqueous solutions by Cupressus lusitanica bark (CLB). CLB total Cr biosorption capacity strongly depended on operating variables such as initial Cr(VI) concentration and contact time: as these variables rose, total Cr biosorption capacity increased significantly. Total Cr biosorption rate also increased with rising solution temperature. The pseudo-second-order model described the total Cr biosorption kinetic data best. Langmuir´s model fitted the experimental equilibrium biosorption data of total Cr best and predicted a maximum total Cr biosorption capacity of 305.4 mg g-1. Total Cr biosorption by CLB is an endothermic and non-spontaneous process as indicated by the thermodynamic parameters. Results from the present kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies suggest that CLB biosorbs Cr ions from Cr(VI) aqueous solutions predominantly by a chemical sorption phenomenon. Low cost, availability, renewable nature, and effective total Cr biosorption make CLB a highly attractive and efficient method to remediate Cr(VI)-contaminated water and wastewater. PMID:26352933

  9. Chromium Biosorption from Cr(VI) Aqueous Solutions by Cupressus lusitanica Bark: Kinetics, Equilibrium and Thermodynamic Studies.

    PubMed

    Netzahuatl-Muñoz, Alma Rosa; Cristiani-Urbina, María del Carmen; Cristiani-Urbina, Eliseo

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamics of chromium (Cr) ion biosorption from Cr(VI) aqueous solutions by Cupressus lusitanica bark (CLB). CLB total Cr biosorption capacity strongly depended on operating variables such as initial Cr(VI) concentration and contact time: as these variables rose, total Cr biosorption capacity increased significantly. Total Cr biosorption rate also increased with rising solution temperature. The pseudo-second-order model described the total Cr biosorption kinetic data best. Langmuir´s model fitted the experimental equilibrium biosorption data of total Cr best and predicted a maximum total Cr biosorption capacity of 305.4 mg g(-1). Total Cr biosorption by CLB is an endothermic and non-spontaneous process as indicated by the thermodynamic parameters. Results from the present kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies suggest that CLB biosorbs Cr ions from Cr(VI) aqueous solutions predominantly by a chemical sorption phenomenon. Low cost, availability, renewable nature, and effective total Cr biosorption make CLB a highly attractive and efficient method to remediate Cr(VI)-contaminated water and wastewater. PMID:26352933

  10. EVALUATION OF AN ELECTRODIALYTIC PROCESS FOR PURIFICATION OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This evaluation addresses the waste reduction and economics of an electrodialytic process that can be used to selectively remove impurities that build up in chromic acid solutions with use. The removal of impurities extends the useful life of the chromic acid solution and avoids ...

  11. Removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solutions using micro zero-valent iron supported by bentonite layer.

    PubMed

    Daoud, Waseem; Ebadi, Taghi; Fahimifar, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) is of particular environmental concern due to its toxicity, mobility, and challenging removal from industrial wastewater. It is a strong oxidizing agent that is carcinogenic and mutagenic and diffuses quickly through soil and aquatic environments. Moreover, it does not form insoluble compounds in aqueous solutions; therefore, separation by precipitation is not feasible. While Cr(VI) oxyanions are very mobile and toxic in the environment, trivalent Cr(III) cations are the opposite and, like many metal cations, Cr(III) forms insoluble precipitates. Thus, reducing Cr(VI)-Cr(III) simplifies its removal from effluent and also reduces its toxicity and mobility. Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) with zero-valent iron (ZVI) have been used to remediate contaminated groundwater with metals, but using ZVI in remediation of contaminated groundwater or wastewater is limited due to its lack of stability, easy aggregation, and difficulty in separation of iron from the treated solution. Thus, the technology used in the present study is developed to address these problems by placing a layer of bentonite after the PRB layer to remove iron from the treated water. The removal rates of Cr(VI) under different values of pH were investigated, and the results indicated the highest adsorption capacity at low pH. PMID:25768212

  12. Impact of polyacrylamide with different contents of carboxyl groups on the chromium (III) oxide adsorption properties in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Wiśniewska, Małgorzata; Chibowski, Stanisław; Urban, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of experiments was determination of solution pH and contents of anionic groups in polyacrylamide (PAM) macromolecules on the stability mechanism of chromium (III) oxide suspension. The spectrophotometry, potentiometric titration, microelectrophoresis, viscosimetry and turbidimetry were applied. They enabled determination of polymer adsorbed amount, surface and diffusion charges of solid particles with and without PAM, thickness of polymer adsorption layer, macromolecule dimensions in the solution and stability of the Cr2O3 - polymer systems, respectively. It was found that adsorption of anionic PAM decreases and thickness of polymeric adsorption layer increases with the increasing pH. Slightly higher adsorption was obtained for the PAM samples containing a greater number of carboxyl groups. At pH 3 and 9 insignificant deterioration of stability conditions of Cr2O3 particle covered with polyacrylamide was observed (neutralization of solid positive charge by the adsorbed polymeric chains (pH 3) and single polymeric bridges formation (pH 9)). The electrosteric repulsion between the solid particles covered with PAM layers at pH 6, is the main reason for significant improvement of Cr2O3 suspension stability in the polymer presence. PMID:25464324

  13. Adsorption of chromium(VI) from aqueous solutions by glycidylmethacrylate-grafted-densified cellulose with quaternary ammonium groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anirudhan, T. S.; Nima, J.; Divya, P. L.

    2013-08-01

    This study successfully synthesized a new adsorbent by ethylation of glycidylmethacrylate grafted aminated titanium dioxide densified cellulose (Et-AMPGDC), to remove chromium(VI) from aqueous solutions. The adsorbent was characterized by the FTIR, XRD, SEM and TG-DTG measurements. Batch adsorption technique using Et-AMPGDC was applied for the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution and waste water. The contact time necessary to attain equilibrium and the optimum pH were found to be 1 h and 4.5, respectively. The kinetics of sorption of Cr(VI) ions was described by a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The equilibrium isotherm data were analyzed using the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm equations and the adsorption process was reflected by Langmuir isotherm. The maximum adsorption capacity was evaluated to be 123.60 mg/g. The electroplating industrial wastewater samples were treated with Et-AMPGDC to demonstrate its efficiency in removing Cr(VI) from wastewater. Almost complete removal was possible with 100 mg of the adsorbent from 50 mL of wastewater sample. Desorption efficiency was achieved by treatment with 0.1 M NaOH and five adsorption-desorption cycles were performed without significant decrease in adsorption capacity.

  14. Corrosion of some chromium-nickel steels and alloys in sulfuric acid solutions of sodium sulfite

    SciTech Connect

    Kopeliovich, D.K.; Glagolenko, Yu.V.; Ermolinskii, S.P.

    1988-05-01

    Steels 12Kh18N1OT and 10Kh17N13M3T and alloys 06KhN28MDT and 46KhNM were studied in sulfuric acid solutions containing sodium sulfite and sulfur dioxide to determine the effects of different concentrations of the corrosive constituents on the anodic and cathodic active and passive corrosion behavior of the metals. Polarization curves were obtained with a P-5827 M potentiostat. Addition of sulfite facilitated both electrode processes and the region of the reactive state was broadened due to the shift of passivation potentials to more positive values. The activating effect of sulfite reduction products were confirmed by tests of alloys in spent solutions. This increased likelihood of activation and the decrease of the solutions's own corrosion potential were both attributed to retardation of the cathodic process by lower valence sulfur compounds.

  15. Chitosan-derived carbonaceous material for highly efficient adsorption of chromium (VI) from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Shen, Feng; Su, Jialei; Zhang, Xiao; Zhang, Keqiang; Qi, Xinhua

    2016-10-01

    A carbonaceous adsorbent for effectively removing Cr(VI) was synthesized by facile hydrothermal carbonization of chitosan (HTC-chitosan). The prepared HTC-chitosan exhibited good stability in acid solution while the amine groups were retained completely after simple and green hydrothermal carbonization treatment. Structure characteristics of the HTC-chitosan as well as its adsorption behaviors for Cr(VI) in aqueous solution were investigated. Under optimal conditions, the adsorption capacity of the HTC-chitosan for Cr(VI) reached as high as 388.60mgg(-1), which was much higher than that of other materials reported previously. The prepared HTC-chitosan adsorbent could be reused at least five times with adsorption efficiency more than 92%. These results indicate that HTC-chitosan exhibited great superiority for Cr(VI) adsoption from aqueous solution both in terms of the preparation process and adsorption performance. PMID:27259645

  16. Self-assembly modified-mushroom nanocomposite for rapid removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution with bubbling fluidized bed.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fei; Liu, Xu; Chen, Yijiao; Zhang, Ke; Xu, Heng

    2016-01-01

    A self-assembled modified Pleurotus Cornucopiae material (SMPM) combined with improved Intermittent Bubbling Fluidized Bed (IBFB) was investigated to remove the hexavalent chromium ions in aqueous solution. After the modification, the powder-like raw material gradually self-assembled together to SMPM, which had crinkly porous structure, improved the Cr-accommodation ability in a sound manner. Optimized by Taguchi method, Cr(VI) removal efficiency was up to 75.91% and 48.01% for 100 mg/L and 500 mg/L initial concentration of Cr(VI), respectively. Results indicated that the metal removal was dependent on dosage of adsorbent, particle diameter and treatment time. The experimental data obtained from the biosorption process was successfully correlated with Freundlich isotherm model. Thermodynamic study indicated the endothermic nature of the process. The results confirmed that self-assembly modified Pleurotus Cornucopiae material could be applied for the removal of heavy metal from wastewater in continuous fluidized bed process. PMID:27188258

  17. Self-assembly modified-mushroom nanocomposite for rapid removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution with bubbling fluidized bed

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fei; Liu, Xu; Chen, Yijiao; Zhang, Ke; Xu, Heng

    2016-01-01

    A self-assembled modified Pleurotus Cornucopiae material (SMPM) combined with improved Intermittent Bubbling Fluidized Bed (IBFB) was investigated to remove the hexavalent chromium ions in aqueous solution. After the modification, the powder-like raw material gradually self-assembled together to SMPM, which had crinkly porous structure, improved the Cr-accommodation ability in a sound manner. Optimized by Taguchi method, Cr(VI) removal efficiency was up to 75.91% and 48.01% for 100 mg/L and 500 mg/L initial concentration of Cr(VI), respectively. Results indicated that the metal removal was dependent on dosage of adsorbent, particle diameter and treatment time. The experimental data obtained from the biosorption process was successfully correlated with Freundlich isotherm model. Thermodynamic study indicated the endothermic nature of the process. The results confirmed that self-assembly modified Pleurotus Cornucopiae material could be applied for the removal of heavy metal from wastewater in continuous fluidized bed process. PMID:27188258

  18. Self-assembly modified-mushroom nanocomposite for rapid removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution with bubbling fluidized bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fei; Liu, Xu; Chen, Yijiao; Zhang, Ke; Xu, Heng

    2016-05-01

    A self-assembled modified Pleurotus Cornucopiae material (SMPM) combined with improved Intermittent Bubbling Fluidized Bed (IBFB) was investigated to remove the hexavalent chromium ions in aqueous solution. After the modification, the powder-like raw material gradually self-assembled together to SMPM, which had crinkly porous structure, improved the Cr-accommodation ability in a sound manner. Optimized by Taguchi method, Cr(VI) removal efficiency was up to 75.91% and 48.01% for 100 mg/L and 500 mg/L initial concentration of Cr(VI), respectively. Results indicated that the metal removal was dependent on dosage of adsorbent, particle diameter and treatment time. The experimental data obtained from the biosorption process was successfully correlated with Freundlich isotherm model. Thermodynamic study indicated the endothermic nature of the process. The results confirmed that self-assembly modified Pleurotus Cornucopiae material could be applied for the removal of heavy metal from wastewater in continuous fluidized bed process.

  19. Polyethylenimine modified biochar adsorbent for hexavalent chromium removal from the aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ying; Liu, Wu-Jun; Zhang, Nan; Li, Yu-Sheng; Jiang, Hong; Sheng, Guo-Ping

    2014-10-01

    A chemical modified biochar with abundant amino groups for heavy metal removal was prepared using polyethylenimine (PEI) as a modification reagent, and used as an adsorbent for the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution. The biochars before and after modification were characterized by Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy etc. The adsorption of Cr(VI) by the modified biochar was obeyed pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Langmuir adsorption isotherm model. Its maximum adsorption capacity was 435.7 mg/g, which was much higher than that of pristine biochar (23.09 mg/g). Results also indicated that the removal of Cr(VI) by the PEI modified biochar depended on solution pH, and a low pH value was favorable for the Cr(VI) removal. The results herein revealed that the PEI modified biochar had a good potential as a suitable material for sorption and detoxification of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution. PMID:25069094

  20. Study of the removal of mercury(II) and chromium(VI) from aqueous solutions by Moroccan stevensite.

    PubMed

    Benhammou, A; Yaacoubi, A; Nibou, L; Tanouti, B

    2005-01-31

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the adsorption of the heavy metals mercury(II) and chromium(VI), from aqueous solutions, onto Moroccan stevensite. A mineralogical and physicochemical characterization of natural stevensite was carried out. In order to improve the adsorption capacity of stevensite for Cr(VI), a preparation of stevensite was carried out. It consists in saturating the stevensite by ferrous iron Fe(II) and reducing the total Fe by Na(2)S(2)O(4). Then, the adsorption experiments were studied in batch reactors at 25+/-3 degrees C. The influence of the pH solution on the Cr(VI) and Hg(II) adsorption was studied in the pH range of 1.5-7.0. The optimum pH for the Cr(VI) adsorption is in the pH range of 2.0-5.0 while that of Hg(II) is at the pH values above 4.0. The adsorption kinetics were tested by a pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption rate of Hg(II) is 54.35 mmol kg(-1)min(-1) and that of Cr(VI) is 7.21 mmol kg(-1)min(-1). The adsorption equilibrium time for Hg(II) and Cr(VI) was reached within 2 and 12 h, respectively. The adsorption isotherms were described by the Dubinin-Radushkevich model. The maximal adsorption capacity for Cr(VI) increases from 13.7 (raw stevensite) to 48.86 mmol kg(-1) (modified stevensite) while that of Hg(II) decreases from 205.8 to 166.9 mmol kg(-1). The mechanism of Hg(II) and Cr(VI) adsorption was discussed. PMID:15629583

  1. Application of dolochar in the removal of cadmium and hexavalent chromium ions from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Panda, L; Das, B; Rao, D S; Mishra, B K

    2011-08-30

    Dolochar, a waste material generated in sponge iron industry, is processed and put to test as an adsorbent for removal of Cd(II) and Cr(VI) ions from aqueous solutions. The dolochar samples were characterised to determine the different phases and their distribution by reflection microscopy. The analysis indicated that the sample consists of metallic iron, fused carbon, and Ca-Mg bearing phases (Ca-Mg-silicate-oxide) along with lots of voids and pores. The fixed carbon (FC) content of the material is 13.8% with a Langmuir surface area of 81.6m(2)/g and micropore area of 34.1m(2)/g. Batch adsorption experiments have been conducted to study the sorption behaviour of Cd(II) and Cr(VI) ions on dolochar as a function of particle size, contact time, adsorbent dosages, pH and temperature. It is observed that higher pH and temperature enhances sorption of Cd(II) ions. In contrast, the adsorption for Cr(VI) is found to be better in acidic pH in comparison to alkaline media. The equilibrium adsorption isotherm data are tested by applying both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. It is observed that Langmuir isotherm model fitted better compared to the Freundlich model indicating monolayer adsorption. The thermodynamic parameters such as ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS° indicate the effectiveness of dolochar to remove Cd(II) and Cr(VI) ions from aqueous solution. The kinetics of adsorption is found to better fit to pseudo second order reaction. PMID:21723036

  2. Chromium speciation in oxide-type compounds: application to minerals, gems, aqueous solutions and silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farges, François

    2009-09-01

    Cr K-edge XANES spectra were obtained for a variety of Cr-bearing model compounds containing Cr(II), Cr(III), Cr(IV), Cr(V) and Cr(VI), in which the Cr-site symmetry is D4h, Oh and Td. The centroid position of the pre-edge feature is a better indicator of the Cr valence than the edge position. In Cr-rich oxides, higher-energy transitions must be excluded in order to refine a robust valence for Cr. The pre-edge for chromates is not unique and varies as a function of the CrO4 2- moiety distortion, which is often related to Cr-polymerization (monochromate vs. dichromate). Both the analogy with the Mn K-pre-edge information and ab initio FEFF calculations of the pre-edge feature for Cr(III) and Cr(VI) confirm the experimental trends. This methodology is applied to the Cr K-edge pre-edge feature collected in gems (emerald, spinel and ruby), the layered minerals fuchsite and kämmererite, two Cr-bearing aqueous solutions and a set of sodo-calcic silicate glasses used for bottling sparkling white wine. In emerald and fuchsite, the Cr-site is differently distorted than its ruby or spinel counterpart. In a Cr(III)-bearing aqueous solution and sodo-calcic glass, no evidence for Cr(III) with Td and C3v symmetry is detected. However, minor amounts of chromate moieties (most likely monomeric) are detected in a glass synthesized in air. Preliminary spectra for the wine bottle glass suggest that only trace amounts of chromates might possibly be present in these glasses.

  3. [Adsorption of chromium (VI) from aqueous solution on bentonite modified by cationic polymers].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Yue, Qin-Yan; Li, Qian; Lu, Guang-Jiang; Gao, Bao-Yu; Yuan, Ai-Juan

    2009-06-15

    Two cationic polymer-epicholorohydrin dimethylamine (EPI-DMA) and poly dimethyldlammonium (PDMDAAC) as the intercalary reagents were used to prepare a series of bentonites (EPI-DMA/Bt and PDMDAAC/Bt) modified by the cationic polymers, respectively. The adsorption of Cr(VI) on cationic polymer/bentonite and major influencing factors were studied. The results show that the sorption capacity of Cr (VI) is increased more than five times compared with the original one. The load of cationic polymers in bentonites, the dosing quantity of EPI-DMA/Bt and PDMDAAC/Bt, the solution pH, temperature (T), time of reaction (t) affect the adsorption. When T = 20 degrees C, pH = 4.0, t = 120 min, EPI-DMA/Bt (the load of cationic polymer is 99.6 mg/g) and PDMDAAC/Bt (the load of cationic polymer is 55.1 mg/g) adsorb 0.71 mg/g and 0.56 mg/g Cr(VI), respectively. The adsorption kinetics are fitted well by pseudo second-order equation. The adsorption isotherms of cationic polymer/bentonites to Cr( VI) are fitted well by the Langmuir equation. PMID:19662861

  4. Precipitating Chromium Impurities in Silicon Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    Two new treatments for silicon wafers improve solar-cell conversion efficiency by precipitating electrically-active chromium impurities. One method is simple heat treatment. Other involves laser-induced damage followed by similar heat treatment. Chromium is one impurity of concern in metallurgical-grade silicon for solar cells. In new treatment, chromium active centers are made electrically inactive by precipitating chromium from solid solution, enabling use of lower grade, lower cost silicon in cell manufacture.

  5. The use of trivalent chromium bath to obtain a solar selective black chromium coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Survilienė, S.; Češūnienė, A.; Juškėnas, R.; Selskienė, A.; Bučinskienė, D.; Kalinauskas, P.; Juškevičius, K.; Jurevičiūtė, I.

    2014-06-01

    Black chromium coatings were electrodeposited from a trivalent chromium bath using a ZnO additive as a second main component. Black chromium was electrodeposited on steel and copper plates and substrates plated with bright nickel prior to black chromium electrodeposition. The black chromium coatings were characterized by XRD and SEM. The XRD data suggest that the phase structure of black chromium may be defined as a zinc solid solution in chromium or a chromium solid solution in zinc depending on the chromium/zinc ratio in the deposit. The role of substrate finish was evaluated through the corrosion resistance and reflectance of black chromium. According to corrosion tests the samples plated with bright nickel prior to black chromium deposition have shown the highest corrosion resistance. The electrodeposited black chromium possesses good optical properties for the absorption of solar energy. The absorption coefficient of black chromium was found to be over 0.99 for the samples obtained without the Ni undercoat and below 0.99 for those obtained with the use of Ni undercoat. However, the use of nickel undercoat before black chromium plating is recommended because it remarkably improves the corrosion resistance of samples.

  6. Development of a Multi-Species Biotic Ligand Model Predicting the Toxicity of Trivalent Chromium to Barley Root Elongation in Solution Culture

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ningning; Zhong, Xu; Li, Bo; Li, Jumei; Wei, Dongpu; Ma, Yibing

    2014-01-01

    Little knowledge is available about the influence of cation competition and metal speciation on trivalent chromium (Cr(III)) toxicity. In the present study, the effects of pH and selected cations on the toxicity of trivalent chromium (Cr(III)) to barley (Hordeum vulgare) root elongation were investigated to develop an appropriate biotic ligand model (BLM). Results showed that the toxicity of Cr(III) decreased with increasing activity of Ca2+ and Mg2+ but not with K+ and Na+. The effect of pH on Cr(III) toxicity to barley root elongation could be explained by H+ competition with Cr3+ bound to a biotic ligand (BL) as well as by the concomitant toxicity of CrOH2+ in solution culture. Stability constants were obtained for the binding of Cr3+, CrOH2+, Ca2+, Mg2+ and H+ with binding ligand: log KCrBL 7.34, log KCrOHBL 5.35, log KCaBL 2.64, log KMgBL 2.98, and log KHBL 4.74. On the basis of those estimated parameters, a BLM was successfully developed to predict Cr(III) toxicity to barley root elongation as a function of solution characteristics. PMID:25119269

  7. Development of a multi-species biotic ligand model predicting the toxicity of trivalent chromium to barley root elongation in solution culture.

    PubMed

    Song, Ningning; Zhong, Xu; Li, Bo; Li, Jumei; Wei, Dongpu; Ma, Yibing

    2014-01-01

    Little knowledge is available about the influence of cation competition and metal speciation on trivalent chromium (Cr(III)) toxicity. In the present study, the effects of pH and selected cations on the toxicity of trivalent chromium (Cr(III)) to barley (Hordeum vulgare) root elongation were investigated to develop an appropriate biotic ligand model (BLM). Results showed that the toxicity of Cr(III) decreased with increasing activity of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) but not with K(+) and Na(+). The effect of pH on Cr(III) toxicity to barley root elongation could be explained by H(+) competition with Cr(3+) bound to a biotic ligand (BL) as well as by the concomitant toxicity of CrOH(2+) in solution culture. Stability constants were obtained for the binding of Cr(3+), CrOH(2+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and H(+) with binding ligand: log KCrBL 7.34, log KCrOHBL 5.35, log KCaBL 2.64, log KMgBL 2.98, and log KHBL 4.74. On the basis of those estimated parameters, a BLM was successfully developed to predict Cr(III) toxicity to barley root elongation as a function of solution characteristics. PMID:25119269

  8. Influence of Chemical Composition on Rupture Properties at 1200 Degrees F. of Forged Chromium-Cobalt-Nickel-Iron Base Alloys in Solution-Treated and Aged Condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, E E; Freeman, J W; White, A E

    1951-01-01

    The influence of systematic variations of chemical composition on rupture properties at 1200 degrees F. was determined for 62 modifications of a basic alloy containing 20 percent chromium, 20 percent nickel, 20 percent cobalt, 3 percent molybdenum, 2 percent tungsten, 1 percent columbium, 0.15 percent carbon, 1.7 percent manganese, 0.5 percent silicon, 0.12 percent nitrogen and the balance iron. These modifications included individual variations of each of 10 elements present and simultaneous variations of molybdenum, tungsten, and columbium. Laboratory induction furnace heats were hot-forged to round bar stock, solution-treated at 2200 degrees F., and aged at 1400 degrees F. The melting and fabrication conditions were carefully controlled in order to minimize all variable effects on properties except chemical composition. Information is presented which indicates that melting and hot-working conditions play an important role in high-temperature properties of alloys of the type investigated.

  9. Kinetic and mechanism of the oxidation of chromium(III) complex with anthranil- N, N-diacetic acid by periodate ion in acidic aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Ismat H.

    2015-06-01

    The kinetics of oxidation of [CrIII(atda)(H2O)2] (atda = anthranil- N, N-diacetato) complex by IO{4/-} was studied spectrophotometrically in aqueous solutions with pH range 2.20-3.34, 0.30 M ionic strength and in 20.0-40.0°C temperature range. The rate law of the reaction exhibited saturation kinetics. Values of the rate constant for the electron transfer process, the equilibrium constant for dissociation of [CrIII (atda)(H2O)2] to [CrIII (atda) (H2O)OH]+ + H+ and the pre-equilibrium formation constant were calculated. The thermodynamic activation parameters are reported. It is proposed that electron transfer proceeds through an inner-sphere mechanism via coordination of the IVII to chromium(III).

  10. Redox Conversion of Chromium(VI) and Arsenic(III) with the Intermediates of Chromium(V) and Arsenic(IV) via AuPd/CNTs Electrocatalysis in Acid Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Sun, Meng; Zhang, Gong; Qin, Yinghua; Cao, Meijuan; Liu, Yang; Li, Jinghong; Qu, Jiuhui; Liu, Huijuan

    2015-08-01

    Simultaneous reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) and oxidation of As(III) to As(V) is a promising pretreatment process for the removal of chromium and arsenic from acid aqueous solution. In this work, the synergistic redox conversion of Cr(VI) and As(III) was efficiently achieved in a three-dimensional electrocatalytic reactor with synthesized AuPd/CNTs particles as electrocatalysts. The AuPd/CNTs facilitated the exposure of active Pd{111} facets and possessed an approximate two-electron-transfer pathway of oxygen reduction with the highly efficient formation of H2O2 as end product, resulting in the electrocatalytic reduction of 97.2 ± 2.4% of Cr(VI) and oxidation of 95.7 ± 4% of As(III). The electrocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) was significantly accelerated prior to the electrocatalytic oxidation of As(III), and the effectiveness of Cr(VI)/As(III) conversion was favored at increased currents from 20 to 150 mA, decreased initial pH from 7 to 1 and concentrations of Cr(VI) and As(III) ranging from 50 to 1 mg/L. The crucial intermediates of Cr(V) and As(IV) and active free radicals HO(•) and O2(•-) were found for the first time, whose roles in the control of Cr(VI)/As(III) redox conversion were proposed. Finally, the potential applicability of AuPd/CNTs was revealed by their stability in electrocatalytic conversion over 10 cycles. PMID:26154110

  11. Removal of chromium hexavalent ion from aqueous solutions using biopolymer chitosan coated with poly 3-methyl thiophene polymer.

    PubMed

    Hena, Sufia

    2010-09-15

    Adsorption capacity of Cr(VI) onto chitosan coated with poly 3-methyl thiophene synthesized chemically was investigated in a batch system by considering the effects of various parameters like contact time, initial concentration, pH and temperature. Cr(VI) removal is pH dependent and found to be maximum at pH 2.0. Increases in adsorption capacity with increase in temperature indicate that the adsorption reaction is endothermic. Based on this study, the thermodynamic parameters like standard Gibb's free energy (DeltaG degrees), standard enthalpy (DeltaH degrees) and standard entropy (DeltaS degrees) were evaluated. Adsorption kinetics of Cr(VI) ions onto chitosan coated with poly 3-methyl thiophene were analyzed by pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order models. The Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherms were used to describe the adsorption equilibrium studies of chitosan coated with poly 3-methyl thiophene at different temperatures. Langmuir isotherm shows better fit than Freundlich and Temkin isotherms in the temperature range studied. The results show that the chitosan coated with poly 3-methyl thiophene can be efficiently used for the treatment of wastewaters containing chromium as a low cost alternative compared to commercial activated carbon and other adsorbents reported. In order to find out the possibility of regeneration and reuse of exhausted adsorbent, desorption studies were also performed. PMID:20627405

  12. Chromium inhibition and size-selected Au nanocluster catalysis for the solution growth of low-density ZnO nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Errico, Vito; Arrabito, Giuseppe; Plant, Simon R.; Medaglia, Pier Gianni; Palmer, Richard E.; Falconi, Christian

    2015-07-01

    The wet chemical synthesis of nanostructures has many crucial advantages over high-temperature methods, including simplicity, low-cost, and deposition on almost arbitrary substrates. Nevertheless, the density-controlled solution growth of nanowires still remains a challenge, especially at the low densities (e.g. 1 to 10 nanowires/100 μm2) required, as an example, for intracellular analyses. Here, we demonstrate the solution-growth of ZnO nanowires using a thin chromium film as a nucleation inhibitor and Au size-selected nanoclusters (SSNCs) as catalytic particles for which the density and, in contrast with previous reports, size can be accurately controlled. Our results also provide evidence that the enhanced ZnO hetero-nucleation is dominated by Au SSNCs catalysis rather than by layer adaptation. The proposed approach only uses low temperatures (≤70 °C) and is therefore suitable for any substrate, including printed circuit boards (PCBs) and the plastic substrates which are routinely used for cell cultures. As a proof-of-concept we report the density-controlled synthesis of ZnO nanowires on flexible PCBs, thus opening the way to assembling compact intracellular-analysis systems, including nanowires, electronics, and microfluidics, on a single substrate.

  13. The effect of heat treatments on the corrosion fatigue properties of 13 Pct Chromium Stainless Steel in 3 Pct NaCI Aqueous Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Hitoshi; Sakakibara, Yuji; Ebara, Ryuichiro

    1982-08-01

    The effect of austenitizing or tempering temperature on the corrosion fatigue properties of 13 pct chromium stainless steel was studied. Three pct NaCI aqueous solution was used as the corrosive environment, and the results were compared with the atmospheric fatigue properties. Strong influence of the tempering temperature on the S-N and FCP behavior of this blading material was found. The damage ratios (corrosion fatigue limit divided by endurance limit) of these various heat treated specimens became very low by this environment. Especially, extremely low corrosion fatigue strength of the specimen tempered at 600 °C was noticed. This microstructure was strategically used to clarify the reduction of pH inside the corrosion pits which were generally formed at the fatigue crack initiation sites. FCP data in the corrosive environment showed higher resistance than the atmospheric ones at the stress intensities below 18 MPa · m1/2, and which is opposite to the generally known influence of the corrosive environments. As for the fractographic feature, an appearance of the intergranular facets was especially noticed in NaCI aqueous solution environment. The fraction of this intergranular cracking was obtained as a function of the stress intensity factor.

  14. Chromium inhibition and size-selected Au nanocluster catalysis for the solution growth of low-density ZnO nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Errico, Vito; Arrabito, Giuseppe; Plant, Simon R.; Medaglia, Pier Gianni; Palmer, Richard E.; Falconi, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The wet chemical synthesis of nanostructures has many crucial advantages over high-temperature methods, including simplicity, low-cost, and deposition on almost arbitrary substrates. Nevertheless, the density-controlled solution growth of nanowires still remains a challenge, especially at the low densities (e.g. 1 to 10 nanowires/100 μm2) required, as an example, for intracellular analyses. Here, we demonstrate the solution-growth of ZnO nanowires using a thin chromium film as a nucleation inhibitor and Au size-selected nanoclusters (SSNCs) as catalytic particles for which the density and, in contrast with previous reports, size can be accurately controlled. Our results also provide evidence that the enhanced ZnO hetero-nucleation is dominated by Au SSNCs catalysis rather than by layer adaptation. The proposed approach only uses low temperatures (≤70 °C) and is therefore suitable for any substrate, including printed circuit boards (PCBs) and the plastic substrates which are routinely used for cell cultures. As a proof-of-concept we report the density-controlled synthesis of ZnO nanowires on flexible PCBs, thus opening the way to assembling compact intracellular-analysis systems, including nanowires, electronics, and microfluidics, on a single substrate. PMID:26202588

  15. Bacterial reduction of chromium

    SciTech Connect

    Schmieman, E.A.; Yonge, D.R.; Johnstone, D.L.

    1997-12-31

    A mixed culture was enriched from surface soil obtained from an eastern United States site highly contaminated with chromate. Growth of the culture was inhibited by a chromium concentration of 12 mg/L. Another mixed culture was enriched from subsurface soil obtained from the Hanford reservation, at the fringe of a chromate plume. The enrichment medium was minimal salts solution augmented with acetate as the carbon source, nitrate as the terminal electron acceptor, and various levels of chromate. This mixed culture exhibited chromate tolerance, but not chromate reduction capability, when growing anaerobically on this medium. However, this culture did exhibit chromate reduction capability when growing anaerobically on TSB. Growth of this culture was not inhibited by a chromium concentration of 12 mg/L. Mixed cultures exhibited decreasing diversity with increasing levels of chromate in the enrichment medium. An in situ bioremediation strategy is suggested for chromate contaminated soil and groundwater. 16 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Investigation of oil recovery improvement by coupling an interfacial tension agent and a mobility control agent in light oil reservoirs. Technical progress report, October--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    The study will investigate two major areas concerning co-injecting an interfacial tension reduction agent(s) and a mobility control agent into petroleum reservoirs. The first will consist of defining the mechanisms of interaction of an alkaline agent, a surfactant, and a polymer on a fluid-fluid and a fluid-rock basis. The second is the improvement of the economics of the combined technology. This report examines effect of rock type on oil recovery by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. This report also begins a series of evaluations to improve the economics of alkaline-surfactant-polymer oil recovery.

  17. Production of Chromium Oxide from Turkish Chromite Concentrate Using Ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aktas, S.; Eyuboglu, C.; Morcali, M. H.; Özbey, S.; Sucuoglu, Y.

    2015-05-01

    In this study, the possibility of chromium extraction from Turkish chromite concentrate and the production of chromium oxide were investigated. For the conversion of chromium(III) into chromium(VI), NaOH was employed, as well as air with a rate of 20 L/min. The effects of the base amount, fusing temperature, and fusing time on the chromium conversion percentage were investigated in detail. The conversion kinetics of chromium(III) to chromium(VI) was also undertaken. Following the steps of dissolving the sodium chromate in water and filtering, aluminum hydroxide was precipitated by adjusting the pH level of the solution. The chromium(VI) solution was subsequently converted to Cr(III) by the combination of sulfuric acid and ethanol. Interestingly, it was observed that ethanol precipitated chromium as chromium(VI) at mildly acidic pH levels, although this effect is more pronounced for K2Cr2O7 than Na2Cr2O7. On the other hand, in the strongly acidic regime, ethanol acted as a reducing agent role in that chromium(VI) was converted into Cr(III) whereas ethanol itself was oxidized to carbon dioxide and water. Subsequently, chromium hydroxide was obtained by the help of sodium hydroxide and converted to chromium oxide by heating at 800 °C, as indicated in thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA).

  18. Natural biosorbents (garlic stem and horse chesnut shell) for removal of chromium(VI) from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Parlayıcı, Şerife; Pehlivan, Erol

    2015-12-01

    The biosorption of Cr(VI) by the garlic stem (GS)-Allium sativum L. and horse chesnut shell (HCS)-Aesculus hippocastanum plant residues in a batch type reactor was studied in detail for the purpose of wastewater treatment. The influence of initial Cr(VI) concentration, time, and pH was investigated to optimize Cr(VI) removal from aqueous solutions and equilibrium isotherms and kinetic data. This influence was evaluated. The adsorption capacity of the GS and the HCS for Cr(VI) was determined with the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models, and the data was fitted to the Langmuir. The adsorption capacity of the GS and the HCS was found to be 103.09 and 142.85 mg/g of adsorbent from a solution containing 3000 ppm of Cr(VI), respectively. The GS's capacity was considerably lower than that of the HCS in its natural form. Gibbs free energy was spontaneous for all interactions, and the adsorption process exhibited exothermic enthalpy values. The HCS was shown to be a promising biosorbent for Cr(VI) removal from aqueous solutions. PMID:26581609

  19. Remediation of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution using clay mineral Fe(II)-montmorillonite: Encompassing anion exclusion impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinuth, Mirle; Bhojya Naik, Halehatty Seethya; Manjanna, Jayappa

    2015-12-01

    We have explored the highly efficient and environmentally benign clay mineral, Fe(II)-montmorillonite, for the reduction of Cr(VI) in aqueous solution. Fe(II)-Mt was treated with K2Cr2O7 solution at different pH, temperature and solid-to-liquid ratio. The [Cr2O7]2- was estimated by UV-vis spectra with a correction for anion exclusion impact. In general, the Cr(VI) reduction was rapid at acidic pH and increased with temperature up to 50 °C. A complete reduction occurred in about 5 min at pH 3-5. The time taken for complete reduction at 0 °C, RT (30 °C) and 40 °C are 12 min, 8 min and 5 min, respectively. The reduction followed by immobilization of Cr(III) on the spent clay mineral was well characterized by EDX and chemical extraction analysis. This remediation process could be easily scaled-up for real system applications.

  20. Adsorption isotherm studies of chromium (VI) from aqueous solutions using sol-gel hydrotalcite-like compounds.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Ramírez, Esthela; Ortega, Norma L Gutiérrez; Soto, Cesar A Contreras; Gutiérrez, Maria T Olguín

    2009-12-30

    In under-developed countries, industries such as paint and pigment manufacturing, leather tanning, chrome plating and textile processing, usually discharge effluents containing Cr(VI) and Cr(III) into municipal sanitary sewers. It has been reported that Cr(VI) acts as a powerful epithelial irritant and as a human carcinogen. In the present work, hydrotalcite-like compounds with a Mg/Al ratio=2 were synthesized by the sol-gel method. The hydrotalcite-like compounds and their corresponding thermally treated products were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy and N(2) adsorption. The hydrotalcite-like compounds and the heated solids were used as adsorbents for Cr(VI) in aqueous solutions. Adsorption isotherm studies of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution are described. The adsorbent capacity was determined using the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich adsorption isotherm models. The Cr(VI) adsorption isotherm data fit best to the Langmuir isotherm model. The maximum Cr(VI) uptake by hydrotalcite and the heated solids was determined using the Langmuir equation and was found to range between 26 and 29 mg Cr(VI)/g adsorbent. PMID:19744787

  1. Metal release and speciation of released chromium from a biomedical CoCrMo alloy into simulated physiologically relevant solutions.

    PubMed

    Hedberg, Yolanda; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the extent of released Co, Cr(III), Cr(VI), and Mo from a biomedical high-carbon CoCrMo alloy exposed in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), without and with the addition of 10 µM H2 O2 (PBS + H2 O2 ), and 10 g L(-1) bovine serum albumin (PBS + BSA) for time periods up to 28 days. Comparative studies were made on AISI 316L for the longest time period. No Cr(VI) release was observed for any of the alloys in either PBS or PBS + H2 O2 at open-circuit potential (no applied potential). However, at applied potentials (0.7 V vs. Ag/AgCl), Cr was primarily released as Cr(VI). Co was preferentially released from the CoCrMo alloy at no applied potential. As a consequence, Cr was enriched in the utmost surface oxide reducing the extent of metal release over time. This passivation effect was accelerated in PBS + H2 O2 . As previously reported for 316L, BSA may also enhance metal release from CoCrMo. However, this was not possible to verify due to the precipitation of metal-protein complexes with reduced metal concentrations in solution as a consequence. This was particularly important for Co-BSA complexes after sufficient time and resulted in an underestimation of metals in solution. PMID:24155151

  2. Enhanced Removal of Hexavalent Chromium in the Presence of H2O2 in Frozen Aqueous Solutions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kitae; Kim, Jaesung; Bokare, Alok D; Choi, Wonyong; Yoon, Ho-Il; Kim, Jungwon

    2015-09-15

    The reductive transformation of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by H2O2 in ice was compared with that in water. The reduction of Cr(VI) was significant at -20 °C (ice), whereas the reduction efficiency was very low at 25 °C (water). This enhanced reduction of Cr(VI) in ice was observed over a wide range of H2O2 concentration (20-1000 μM), pH (3-11), and freezing temperature (-10 to -30 °C). The observed molar ratio of consumed [H2O2] to reduced [Cr(VI)] in ice was in close agreement with the theoretical (stoichiometric) molar ratio (1.5) for H2O2-mediated Cr(VI) reduction through proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET). The synergistic increase in Cr(VI) reduction in water by increasing the H2O2 and proton concentrations confirms that the freeze concentration of both H2O2 and protons in the liquid brine is primarily responsible for the enhanced Cr(VI) reduction in ice. In comparison, the one-electron reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(V) and subsequent reoxidation of Cr(V) to Cr(VI) is the major reaction mechanism in aqueous solution. The reduction efficiency of Cr(VI) by H2O2 in the frozen aqueous electroplating wastewater was similar to that in the frozen aqueous deionized water, which verifies the enhanced reduction of Cr(VI) by freezing in real Cr(VI)-contaminated aquatic systems. PMID:26317508

  3. The effect of manganese additions on the reactive evaporation of chromium in Ni–Cr alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Alman, D.E.

    2006-05-01

    Chromium is used as an alloy addition in stainless steels and nickel-chromium alloys to form protective chromium oxide scales. Chromium oxide undergoes reactive evaporation in high temperature exposures in the presence of oxygen and/or water vapor. The deposition of gaseous chromium species onto solid oxide fuel cell electrodes can reduce the efficiency of the fuel cell. Manganese additions to the alloy can reduce the activity of chromium in the oxide, either from solid solution replacement of chromium with manganese (at low levels of manganese) or from the formation of manganese-chromium spinels (at high levels of manganese). This reduction in chromium activity leads to a predicted reduction in chromium evaporation by as much as a factor of 35 at 800 °C and 55 at 700 °C. Quantifying the effects of manganese additions on chromium evaporation should aid alloy development of metallic interconnects and balance-of-plant alloys.

  4. Solid phase extraction of chromium(VI) from aqueous solutions by adsorption of its diphenylcarbazide complex on a mixed bed adsorbent (acid activated montmorillonite-silica gel) column.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, N; Mishra, Braja Gopal; Pareek, Pawan Kumar

    2008-02-01

    A novel approach has been developed for the solid phase extraction of chromium(VI) based on the adsorption of its diphenylcarbazide complex on a mixture of acid activated montmorillonite (AAM)-silica gel column. The effect of various parameters such as acidity, stability of the column, sample volume, interfering ions, etc., were studied in detail. The adsorbed complex could be easily eluted using polyethylene glycol-sulfuric acid mixture and the concentration of chromium has been determined using visible spectrophotometry. The calibration graph was linear in the range 0-1microgmL(-1) chromium(VI) with a detection limit of 6microgL(-1). A highest preconcentration factor of 25 could be obtained for 250mL sample volume using glass wool as support for the mixed bed adsorbent. Chromium(VI) could be effectively separated from other ions such as nickel, copper, zinc, chloride, sulfate, nitrate, etc., and the method has been successfully applied to study the recovery of chromium in electroplating waste water and spiked water samples. PMID:17604681

  5. Solid phase extraction of chromium(VI) from aqueous solutions by adsorption of its diphenylcarbazide complex on a mixed bed adsorbent (acid activated montmorillonite-silica gel) column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, N.; Mishra, Braja Gopal; Pareek, Pawan Kumar

    2008-02-01

    A novel approach has been developed for the solid phase extraction of chromium(VI) based on the adsorption of its diphenylcarbazide complex on a mixture of acid activated montmorillonite (AAM)-silica gel column. The effect of various parameters such as acidity, stability of the column, sample volume, interfering ions, etc., were studied in detail. The adsorbed complex could be easily eluted using polyethylene glycol-sulfuric acid mixture and the concentration of chromium has been determined using visible spectrophotometry. The calibration graph was linear in the range 0-1 μg mL -1 chromium(VI) with a detection limit of 6 μg L -1. A highest preconcentration factor of 25 could be obtained for 250 mL sample volume using glass wool as support for the mixed bed adsorbent. Chromium(VI) could be effectively separated from other ions such as nickel, copper, zinc, chloride, sulfate, nitrate, etc., and the method has been successfully applied to study the recovery of chromium in electroplating waste water and spiked water samples.

  6. Corrosion Resistance in Sodium Chloride Solution of Ni-Co-P Electro-Brush Amorphous Coatings to Replace Hard Chromium Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaohe; Lv, Biao; Hu, Zhenfeng; Xu, Binshi

    To remanufacture damaged hard chromium plating devices, Ni-Co-P alloy brush coating is developed by electro brush plating technique. Surface morphology, element composition and phase structure are separately investigated by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Energy Spectrometer and X-ray Diffraction. The results show that Ni-Co-P alloy coating gets typical 'packet shape' morphology and amorphous phase structure, with 9.9wt% P element. The corrosion resistance of Ni-Co-P alloy coating is also studied by electrochemical experiments and immersion tests. The results show that its corrosion resistance is superior to that of hard chromium plating, can be applied to the remanufacture of damaged hard chromium plating equipment.

  7. HRTEM/AEM and SEM study of fluid-rock interactions: Interaction of copper, silver, selenium, chromium, and cadmium-bearing solutions with geological materials at near surface conditions, with an emphasis on phyllosilicates

    SciTech Connect

    Veblen, D.R.; Ilton, E.S.

    1992-05-01

    Biotite has been reacted with acidic solutions, at 25'' +/-3''C, bearing silver (Ag{sub 2}SO{sub 4}), selenium (selenite), chromium (hexavalent Cr), and copper (CuSO{sub 4}). The experiments were open to the atmosphere. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) show that biotite sorbs and reduces Ag+(aq) to metallic silver. Polygonal precipitates and inclusions of metallic silver (with diameters ranging from 10's of angstroms to > {ge} {mu}m) are concentrated on the edges of the biotite flakes and also in the interlayer region. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of biotites reacted with selenite-bearing solutions show that the oxidation state of selenium sorbed on the surface of biotite is Se{sup 4+}. XPS of biotites reacted with Cr{sup 6+}-bearing solutions show that the oxidation state of chromium sorbed on the surface of biotite is Cr{sup 3+}. Copper-bearing solutions were reacted with low-F biotite in contrast to our previous work with high-F biotite (Olden et al., in press). Results indicate that low-F biotite absorbs more readily and extensively than high-F biotite. Further work on copper-enriched biotite from the chrysocolla zone has revealed that the mode of copper incorporation in biotite is more complex than previously described.

  8. Hexavalent Chromium Workshop

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is developing an updated IRIS assessment of hexavalent chromium. This assessment will evaluate the potential health effects of hexavalent chromium from oral and inhalation exposures. An important component of determining the cancer causing potential of ingested hexavalent chr...

  9. Potential of Live Spirulina platensis on Biosorption of Hexavalent Chromium and Its Conversion to Trivalent Chromium.

    PubMed

    Colla, Luciane Maria; Dal'Magro, Clinei; De Rossi, Andreia; Thomé, Antônio; Reinehr, Christian Oliveira; Bertolin, Telma Elita; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira

    2015-01-01

    Microalga biomass has been described worldwide according their capacity to realize biosorption of toxic metals. Chromium is one of the most toxic metals that could contaminate superficial and underground water. Considering the importance of Spirulina biomass in production of supplements for humans and for animal feed we assessed the biosorption of hexavalent chromium by living Spirulina platensis and its capacity to convert hexavalent chromium to trivalent chromium, less toxic, through its metabolism during growth. The active biomass was grown in Zarrouk medium diluted to 50% with distilled water, keeping the experiments under controlled conditions of aeration, temperature of 30°C and lighting of 1,800 lux. Hexavalent chromium was added using a potassium dichromate solution in fed-batch mode with the aim of evaluate the effect of several additions contaminant in the kinetic parameters of the culture. Cell growth was affected by the presence of chromium added at the beginning of cultures, and the best growth rates were obtained at lower metal concentrations in the medium. The biomass removed until 65.2% of hexavalent chromium added to the media, being 90.4% converted into trivalent chromium in the media and 9.6% retained in the biomass as trivalent chromium (0.931 mg.g(-1)). PMID:25436450

  10. Determination and evaluation of hexavalent chromium in power plant coal combustion by-products and cost-effective environmental remediation solutions using acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Kingston, H M Skip; Cain, Randy; Huo, Dengwei; Rahman, G M Mizanur

    2005-09-01

    The chromium species leaching from a coal combustion fly ash landfill has been characterized as well as a novel approach to treat leachates rich in hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), by using another natural waste by-product, acid mine drainage (AMD), has been investigated during this study. It is observed that as much as 8% (approximately 10 microg g(-1) in fly ash) of total chromium is converted to the Cr(VI) species during oxidative combustion of coal and remains in the resulting ash as a stable species, however, it is significantly mobile in water based leaching. Approximately 1.23 +/- 0.01 microg g(-1) of Cr(VI) was found in the landfill leachate from permanent deposits of aged fly ash. This study also confirmed the use of AMD, which often is in close proximity to coal combustion by-product landfills, is an extremely effective and economical remediation option for the elimination of hexavalent chromium in fly ash generated leachate. Speciated isotope dilution mass spectrometry (SIDMS), as described in EPA Method 6800, was used to analytically evaluate and validate the field application of the ferrous iron and chromate chemistry in the remediation of Cr(VI) runoff. PMID:16121270

  11. TREATMENT OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM IN CHROMITE ORE PROCESSING SOLID WASTE USING A MIXED REDUCTANT SOLUTION OF FERROUS SULFATE AND SODIUM DITHIONITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We developed a method for disseminating ferrous iron in the subsurface to enhance chemical reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in a chromite ore processing solid waste derived from the production of ferrochrome alloy. The method utilizes ferrous sulfate (FeSO4) in combinati...

  12. Chromium and Genomic Stability

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Sandra S.; Wise, John Pierce

    2014-01-01

    Many metals serve as micronutrients which protect against genomic instability. Chromium is most abundant in its trivalent and hexavalent forms. Trivalent chromium has historically been considered an essential element, though recent data indicate that while it can have pharmacological effects and value, it is not essential. There are no data indicating that trivalent chromium promotes genomic stability and, instead may promote genomic instability. Hexavalent chromium is widely accepted as highly toxic and carcinogenic with no nutritional value. Recent data indicate that it causes genomic instability and also has no role in promoting genomic stability. PMID:22192535

  13. Chromium in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... and carbohydrates . It stimulates fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis, which are important for brain function and other body processes. Chromium also aids in insulin action and glucose metabolism.

  14. ACTIVATED CARBON PROCESS FOR TREATMENT OF WASTEWATERS CONTAINING HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The removal of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), from dilute aqueous solution by an activated carbon process has been investigated. Two removal mechanisms were observed; hexavalent chromium species were removed by adsorption onto the interior carbon surface and/or through reduction to...

  15. Sodium sulfur container with chromium/chromium oxide coating

    DOEpatents

    Ludwig, Frank A.; Higley, Lin R.

    1981-01-01

    A coating of chromium/chromium oxide is disclosed for coating the surfaces of electrically conducting components of a sodium sulfur battery. This chromium/chromium oxide coating is placed on the surfaces of the electrically conducting components of the battery which are in contact with molten polysulfide and sulfur reactants during battery operation.

  16. Role of microbial exopolymeric substances (EPS) on chromium sorption and transport in heterogeneous subsurface soils: I. Cr(III) complexation with EPS in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Kantar, C.; Dodge, C.; Demiray, H.; Dogan, N.M.

    2011-01-26

    Chromium (III) binding by exopolymeric substances (EPS) isolated from Pseudomonas putida P18, Pseudomonas aeruginosa P16 and Pseudomonas stutzeri P40 strains were investigated by the determination of conditional stability constants and the concentration of functional groups using the ion-exchange experiments and potentiometric titrations. Spectroscopic (EXAFS) analysis was also used to obtain information on the nature of Cr(III) binding with EPS functional groups. The data from ion-exchange experiments and potentiometric titrations were evaluated using a non-electrostatic discrete ligand approach. The modeling results show that the acid/base properties of EPSs can be best characterized by invoking four different types of acid functional groups with arbitrarily assigned pK{sub a} values of 4, 6, 8 and 10. The analysis of ion-exchange data using the discrete ligand approach suggests that while the Cr binding by EPS from P. aeruginosa can be successfully described based on a reaction stoichiometry of 1:2 between Cr(III) and HL{sub 2} monoprotic ligands, the accurate description of Cr binding by EPSs extracted from P. putida and P. stutzeri requires postulation of 1:1 Cr(III)-ligand complexes with HL{sub 2} and HL{sub 3} monoprotic ligands, respectively. These results indicate that the carboxyl and/or phosphoric acid sites contribute to Cr(III) binding by microbial EPS, as also confirmed by EXAFS analysis performed in the current study. Overall, this study highlights the need for incorporation of Cr-EPS interactions into transport and speciation models to more accurately assess microbial Cr(VI) reduction and chromium transport in subsurface systems, including microbial reactive treatment barriers.

  17. Role of Microbial Exopolymeric Substances (EPS) on Chromium Sorption and Transport in Heterogeneous Subsurface Soils: I. Cr(III) Complexation with EPS in Aqueous Solution

    SciTech Connect

    C Kantar; H Demiray; N Dogan; C Dodge

    2011-12-31

    Chromium (III) binding by exopolymeric substances (EPS) isolated from Pseudomonas putida P18, Pseudomonas aeruginosa P16 and Pseudomonas stutzeri P40 strains were investigated by the determination of conditional stability constants and the concentration of functional groups using the ion-exchange experiments and potentiometric titrations. Spectroscopic (EXAFS) analysis was also used to obtain information on the nature of Cr(III) binding with EPS functional groups. The data from ion-exchange experiments and potentiometric titrations were evaluated using a non-electrostatic discrete ligand approach. The modeling results show that the acid/base properties of EPSs can be best characterized by invoking four different types of acid functional groups with arbitrarily assigned pK{sub a} values of 4, 6, 8 and 10. The analysis of ion-exchange data using the discrete ligand approach suggests that while the Cr binding by EPS from P. aeruginosa can be successfully described based on a reaction stoichiometry of 1:2 between Cr(III) and HL{sub 2} monoprotic ligands, the accurate description of Cr binding by EPSs extracted from P. putida and P. stutzeri requires postulation of 1:1 Cr(III)-ligand complexes with HL{sub 2} and HL{sub 3} monoprotic ligands, respectively. These results indicate that the carboxyl and/or phosphoric acid sites contribute to Cr(III) binding by microbial EPS, as also confirmed by EXAFS analysis performed in the current study. Overall, this study highlights the need for incorporation of Cr-EPS interactions into transport and speciation models to more accurately assess microbial Cr(VI) reduction and chromium transport in subsurface systems, including microbial reactive treatment barriers.

  18. Stabilization and solidification of chromium-contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Cherne, C.A.; Thomson, B.M.; Conway, R.

    1997-11-01

    Chromium-contaminated soil is a common environmental problem in the United States as a result of numerous industrial processes involving chromium. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is the species of most concern because of its toxicity and mobility in groundwater. One method of diminishing the environmental impact of chromium is to reduce it to a trivalent oxidation state [Cr(III)], in which it is relatively insoluble and nontoxic. This study investigated a stabilization and solidification process to minimize the chromium concentration in the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) extract and to produce a solidified waste form with a compressive strength in the range of 150 to 300 pounds per square inch (psi). To minimize the chromium in the TCLP extract, the chromium had to be reduced to the trivalent oxidation state. The average used in this study was an alluvium contaminated with chromic and sulfuric acid solutions. The chromium concentration in the in the in situ soil was 1212 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) total chromium and 275 mg/kg Cr(VI). The effectiveness of iron, ferrous sulfate to reduce Cr(VI) was tested in batch experiments.

  19. Dermatological toxicity of hexavalent chromium.

    PubMed

    Shelnutt, Susan R; Goad, Phillip; Belsito, Donald V

    2007-06-01

    Hexavalent chromium causes two types of dermatological toxicities: allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) and skin ulcers. This report reviews the etiology, prevalence, pathology, dose-response, and prognosis of both of these reactions. Reports in the literature indicate that repeated exposure to hexavalent chromium in concentrations of 4-25 ppm can both induce sensitization and elicit chromium ACD. Exposure to 20 ppm hexavalent chromium can cause skin ulcers in nonsensitized people. The prevalence of chromium sensitivity in cement workers, exposed to 10-20 ppm hexavalent chromium for years, is approximately 4-5%. Chromium ACD can be a chronic debilitating disease, perhaps because chromium is ubiquitous in foods and in the environment and is difficult to avoid. Due to the high rates of sensitization in populations chronically exposed to chromium and the chronic nature of chromium ACD, some investigators recommend reducing the hexavalent chromiumconcentrations in consumer products, such as detergents, to less than 5 ppm. PMID:17612952

  20. The First Chromium-53 Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectra of Diamagnetic Chromium(0) and Chromium(VI) Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Bryce, David L.; Wasylishen, Roderick E.

    2001-01-01

    Chromium-53 is a spin-3/2 nucleus with a relatively small magnetic moment, low natural abundance, and large quadrupole moment. These properties have severely hampered the development of 53Cr NMR, especially in the solid state. In this Communication, the first 53Cr solid-state NMR spectra of prototypal diamagnetic chromium(0) and chromium(VI) compounds are presented. Specifically, analyses of 53Cr NMR spectra of solid hexacarbonylchromium(0), caesium chromate(VI), and potassium chromate(VI) have allowed for the determination of 53Cr quadrupolar coupling parameters and the first chromium chemical shift (CS) tensors. This work demonstrates the potential of 53Cr solid-state NMR, in particular the extreme sensitivity of the 53Cr quadrupolar coupling constant to the local chromium environment. Comparisons are made to known 53Cr NMR parameters available from solution studies, and to the 95Mo solid-state NMR parameters of analogous molybdenum compounds. The influence of crystal symmetry present in isomorphic Cr(CO)6 and Mo(CO)6 is strongly reflected in the magnitudes of the metal nuclei CS tensors and in their orientation with respect to their corresponding electric field gradient tensors.

  1. Biological groundwater treatment for chromium removal at low hexavalent chromium concentrations.

    PubMed

    Mamais, Daniel; Noutsopoulos, Constantinos; Kavallari, Ioanna; Nyktari, Eleni; Kaldis, Apostolos; Panousi, Eleni; Nikitopoulos, George; Antoniou, Kornilia; Nasioka, Maria

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this work is to develop and evaluate biological groundwater treatment systems that will achieve hexavalent chromium reduction and total chromium removal from groundwater at hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) groundwater concentrations in the 0-200 μg/L range. Three lab-scale units operated, as sequencing batch reactors (SBR) under aerobic, anaerobic and anaerobic-aerobic conditions. All systems received groundwater with a Cr(VI) content of 200 μg/L. In order to support biological growth, groundwater was supplemented with milk, liquid cheese whey or a mixture of sugar and milk to achieve a COD concentration of 200 mg/L. The results demonstrate that a fully anaerobic system or an anaerobic-aerobic system dosed with simple or complex external organic carbon sources can lead to practically complete Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(III). The temperature dependency of maximum Cr(VI) removal rates can be described by the Arrhenius relationship. Total chromium removal in the biological treatment systems was not complete because a significant portion of Cr(III) remained in solution. An integrated system comprising of an anaerobic SBR followed by a sand filter achieved more than 95% total chromium removal thus resulting in average effluent total and dissolved chromium concentrations of 7 μg/L and 3 μg/L, respectively. PMID:26971177

  2. Kinetics of chromium(VI) reduction by ferrous iron

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, B.; Schlautman, M.; Hwang, I.; Wang, R.

    1998-09-01

    Chromium is a primary inorganic contaminant of concern at the Pantex Plant. Chromium concentrations have been found to be two orders of magnitude higher than the drinking water standards, particularly in certain wells in the perched aquifer below Zone 12. In situ reduction of a mobile form of chromium, Cr(VI) to an immobile form, Cr(III), was examined as a viable option to active soil restoration. Successfully immobilizing chromium in the vadose zone as Cr(III) will reduce the amount of chromium that reaches the groundwater table. The results from the solution experiments indicated that chromium was rapidly and stoichiometrically reduced by Fe(II) in solution. Also, the slurry experiments showed that the aquifer solids removed Fe(II) from solution, but a portion of the iron removed remained available for reaction with Cr(VI), but at a slower rate. A model to predict different amounts of iron pseudo-components was developed, which allowed prediction of iron amounts required to reduce chromium under in situ conditions.

  3. Processes affecting the remediation of chromium-contaminated sites.

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, C D; Wittbrodt, P R

    1991-01-01

    The remediation of chromium-contaminated sites requires knowledge of the processes that control the migration and transformation of chromium. Advection, dispersion, and diffusion are physical processes affecting the rate at which contaminants can migrate in the subsurface. Heterogeneity is an important factor that affects the contribution of each of these mechanisms to the migration of chromium-laden waters. Redox reactions, chemical speciation, adsorption/desorption phenomena, and precipitation/dissolution reactions control the transformation and mobility of chromium. The reduction of CrVI to CrIII can occur in the presence of ferrous iron in solution or in mineral phases, reduced sulfur compounds, or soil organic matter. At neutral to alkaline pH, the CrIII precipitates as amorphous hydroxides or forms complexes with organic matter. CrIII is oxidized by manganese dioxide, a common mineral found in many soils. Solid-phase precipitates of hexavalent chromium such as barium chromate can serve either as sources or sinks for CrVI. Adsorption of CrVI in soils increases with decreasing chromium concentration, making it more difficult to remove the chromium as the concentration decreases during pump-and-treat remediation. Knowledge of these chemical and physical processes is important in developing and selecting effective, cost-efficient remediation designs for chromium-contaminated sites. PMID:1935849

  4. The Effect of Manganese Additions on the Reactive Evaporation of Chromium in Ni-Cr Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Alman, David E.

    2004-10-20

    Chromium is used as an alloy addition in stainless steels and nickel-chromium alloys to form protective chromium oxide scales. Chromium oxide undergoes reactive evaporation in high temperature exposures in the presence of oxygen and/or water vapor. The deposition of gaseous chromium species onto solid oxide fuel cell electrodes can reduce the efficiency of the fuel cell. Manganese additions to the alloy can reduce the activity of chromium in the oxide, either from solid solution replacement of chromium with manganese (at low levels of manganese) or from the formation of manganese-chromium spinels (at high levels of manganese). This reduction in chromium activity leads to a predicted reduction in chromium evaporation by as much as a factor of 35 at 800 C and 55 at 700 C. The results of evaporation loss measurements on nickel-chromium-manganese alloys are compared with the predicted reduction. Quantifying the effects of manganese additions on chromium evaporation should aid alloy development of metallic interconnects and balance-of-plant alloys.

  5. Mineral of the month: chromium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Papp, John F.

    2005-01-01

    Chromium is one of the most indispensable industrial metals and it plays an essential but hidden role in daily life. Chromium is used in many consumer and building products, and it contributes to a clean, efficient and healthy environment.

  6. HRTEM/AEM and SEM study of fluid-rock interactions: Interaction of copper, silver, selenium, chromium, and cadmium-bearing solutions with geological materials at near surface conditions, with an emphasis on phyllosilicates

    SciTech Connect

    Veblen, D.R.; Ilton, E.S.

    1993-05-01

    TEM of naturally occurring Cu-rich biotites and feldspars from weathered portions of porphyry copper deposits has shown that copper is not in the structure of these minerals, is present in their weathering products such as copper-rich vermiculite layers, submicroscopic iron oxyhydroxides and native copper inclusions, and chrysocoua. Reaction of acidic solutions bearing-Cu[sup 2+], Ag[sup +], Cr[sup 6+], and Se[sup 4+], at 25C, with biotite indicates that ferrous iron in biotite can reduce Cu[sup 2+], Ag+, and Cr[sup 6+] to Cu[degrees], Ag[degrees], and Cr(III), respectively. However, Se[sup 4+] does not appear to be reduced. Copper is reduced in the interlayer region, silver is reduced in the interlayer and on the biotite surfaces, and chromium is reduced at the biotite surface. TEM shows that the reduction of copper and silver by biotite can produce native metal inclusions, whereas reduction of Cr(VI) to CR(III) did not produce any Cr-bearing precipitates. The copper and silver experiments show that iron in biotite can be a much stronger reducing agent than iron in solution. TEM and XPS of biotites reacted with CR(VI) clearly show that edges or (hkO) faces are much more reactive than the basal planes, where the edges are strongly enriched in CR(III) relative to the basal planes. In contrast, biotites reacted with Cr(IH)-bearing solutions show little fractionation between the edges and basal planes. Another important result of our XPS studies is that we demonstrated that the oxidation state of near surface iron in biotite can be quantified.

  7. Treatment of hexavalent chromium in chromite ore processing solid waste using a mixed reductant solution of ferrous sulfate and sodium dithionite.

    PubMed

    Su, Chunming; Ludwig, Ralph D

    2005-08-15

    We investigated a method for delivering ferrous iron into the subsurface to enhance chemical reduction of Cr(VI) in chromite ore processing solid waste (COPSW) derived from the production of ferrochrome alloy. The COPSW is characterized by high pH (8.5-11.5) and high Cr(VI) concentrations in the solid phase (up to 550 mg kg(-1)) and dissolved phase (3-57 mg L(-1)). The dominant solid-phase minerals are forsterite (Mg2SiO4), brucite (Mg-(OH)2), and hydrocalumite [Ca4(Al, Fe)2(OH)12X x 6H2O), X = (OH)2(2-), SO4(2-), CrO4(2-)]. The method utilizes FeSO4 in combination with Na2S2O4 to inhibit oxidation and precipitation of the ferrous iron, thereby preventing well and formation clogging. Laboratory batch tests using a 0.05 M FeSO4 + 0.05 M Na2S2O4 solution indicated effective treatment of both dissolved and solid-phase Cr(VI). Contrary to treatments with FeSO4 and FeCl2 alone, the combination resulted in both complete removal of Cr(VI) from solution and sustained Fe(ll) concentrations in solution after a 24 h period. A field test involving injection of 5700 L of a 0.07 M FeSO4 + 0.07 M Na2S2O4 solution into a COPSW saturated zone (pH 11.5) indicated no well and formation clogging during injection. Examination of a core collected 0.46 m from the injection well following injection indicated effective treatment of the solid phase Cr(VI) based on analysis of water, phosphate solution, and high temperature alkaline extracts. The combined reductant solution also imparted a residual treatment capacity to the COPSW allowing for subsequent treatment of dissolved phase Cr(VI); however, dissemination of the iron in the highly alkaline environment appeared to be impeded by the inability to sufficiently lower the pH with distance from the injection well to avoid precipitation of Fe(OH)2 and likely also FeCO3. Injection of a 0.2 M FeSO4 + 0.2 M Na2S2O4 solution into another COPSW saturated zone (pH 9) indicated much more effective dissemination of the injected iron. PMID:16173583

  8. Abnormal deposits of chromium in the pathological human brain.

    PubMed Central

    Duckett, S

    1986-01-01

    Three patients presented with encephalopathies: an undiagnosed degenerative disease of the brain, a degenerative cerebral disease in a patient with a myeloma but without a myelomatous deposit in the CNS and a malignant astrocytoma. Perivascular pallidal deposits (vascular siderosis) containing chromium, phosphorus and calcium plus sometimes traces of other elements were present in the three cases. Such deposits were present in the pallidal parenchyma and around vessels in the cerebellum in one case. Calcium and phosphorus are always present in any CNS calcification but the presence of chromium has not been reported. Chromium and its compounds (ingested, injected or inhaled) are toxic to humans and animals in trace doses. Approximately 900 cases of chromium intoxication have been reported and usually have had dermatological or pulmonary lesions (including cancer) but there is no report of involvement of the CNS. Sublethal doses of chromium nitrate injected intraperitoneally in rats and rabbits results in the presence of chromium in the brain. A thorough investigation was made to find the source of the chromium in these patients. Chromium was found to be present in trace amounts in the radiological contrast agents administered to these patients and in the KCl replacement solution and in mylanta, an antacid, given to one case. The evidence that chromium induced pathological changes in these three brains is circumstantial but shows that chromium can penetrate the human brain. This study indicates that vascular siderosis found in the brains of the majority of middle-aged and elderly humans is not simply an anecdotal pathological curiosity, but that it can serve as a route of entry for toxic products into the brain. Images PMID:3958742

  9. The determination of nanogram amounts of Chromium in urine by x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beyermann, K.; Rose, H.J., Jr.; Christian, R.P.

    1969-01-01

    Nanogram amounts of chromium can be extracted as oxinate into chloform. By treatment of the chloroform layer 3 M hydrochloric acid, oxinates of other elements and excess of reagent are removed, leaving a chloroform solution of the chromium chelate only. This solution is concentrated and transferred to the top of a small brass rod acting as sample holder. The intensity of the X-ray fluorescence of the Cr K?? line is measured with curved crystal optics. Chromium amounts greater than 5 ng can be detected. The application of the procedure to the analysis of the chromium content of urine is demonstrated. ?? 1969.

  10. Production of basic chromium sulfate by using recovered chromium from ashes of thermally treated leather.

    PubMed

    Dettmer, Aline; Nunes, Keila Guerra Pacheco; Gutterres, Mariliz; Marcílio, Nilson Romeu

    2010-04-15

    Leather wastes tanned with chromium are generated during the production process of leather, hence the wastes from hand crafted goods and footwear industries are a serious environmental problem. The thermal treatment of leather wastes can be one of the treatment options because the wastes are rich in chromium and can be used as a raw material for sodium chromate production and further to obtain several chromium compounds. The objective of this study was to utilize the chromium from leather wastes via basic chromium sulfate production to be subsequently applied in a hide tanning. The obtained results have shown that this is the first successful attempt to achieve desired base properties of the product. The result was achieved when the following conditions were applied: a molar ratio between sodium sulfite and sodium dichromate equal to 6; reaction time equal to 5 min before addition of sulfuric acid; pH of sodium dichromate solution equal to 2. Summarizing, there is an opportunity to utilize the dangerous wastes and reused them in the production scheme by minimizing or annulling the environmental impact and to attend a sustainable process development concept. PMID:20031309

  11. Chromium and aging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aging is associated with increased blood glucose, insulin, blood lipids, and fat mass, and decreased lean body mass leading to increased incidences of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Improved chromium nutrition is associated with improvements in all of these variables. Insulin sensitivity de...

  12. Stabilized chromium oxide film

    DOEpatents

    Nyaiesh, A.R.; Garwin, E.L.

    1986-08-04

    Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150A are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

  13. Stabilized chromium oxide film

    DOEpatents

    Garwin, Edward L.; Nyaiesh, Ali R.

    1988-01-01

    Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150.ANG. are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

  14. Chromium(VI)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Chromium ( VI ) ; CASRN 18540 - 29 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  15. The chemistry of chromium and some resulting analytical problems.

    PubMed Central

    Shupack, S I

    1991-01-01

    Chromium, named for its many-colored compounds, exists in the oxidation states of -2 to +6 inclusively. The compounds exhibit a wide range of geometries including square planar, tetrahedral, octahedral, and various distorted geometries. Chromium is found in nature principally as the chromite ore FeCr2O4 in which chromium is in the +3 state. The existence of a particular oxidation state is dependent on many factors including pH, redox potentials, and kinetics. Thermodynamically, +3 and +2 are the most stable states, while the +3 and +6 oxidation states are the most common ones found in aqueous solution. Kinetically, chromium +3 is substitutionally inert: for water exchange k(sec-1) = 2.5 x 10(-6), due to the presence of the half-filled d(t2g)3.4A2g state. On the other hand, protonation/deprotonation is quite rapid. Polymerization is very slow but is promoted at higher pHs; acid cleavage of the protonated oligomers is also quite slow. Chromium +6 as the chromate ion is strongly oxidizing at low pHs and less so in basic solution. The chromate ion does form some polyacids and polyanions. These factors must be considered in analyzing samples for total chromium and for the amounts of each oxidation state. Images FIGURE 1. PMID:1935853

  16. AES XPS study of chromium carbides and chromium iron carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detroye, M.; Reniers, F.; Buess-Herman, C.; Vereecken, J.

    1999-04-01

    The nature of chromium rich carbides which precipitate at grain boundaries in steels is still not perfectly understood. We performed a multitechnique approach on model chromium carbide and chromium-iron carbide samples: Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), and High Energy Electron Diffraction (HEED) were used to characterise the samples. Significant chemical shifts were observed for the Cr, Fe and C XPS peaks in the M 7C 3 compound (M stands for metal), indicating unambiguously that the compound formed is a mixed iron-chromium carbide.

  17. Studies of chromium gettering

    SciTech Connect

    Simpkins, J.E.; Mioduszewski, P.; Stratton, L.W.

    1982-01-01

    Preliminary results have shown that hydrogen pumping by chromium is a surface effect. Unlike with titanium, the getter material used in many present day tokamaks, there is no significant diffusion into the bulk. Additional experiments have been carried out to measure the basic characteristics of chromium films for gases of interest in tokamak research. These gases include deuterium, oxygen and nitrogen. A vacuum system is described which allowed precise control of the test gas, a constant wall temperature and determination of the projected getter surface area. A quadrupole mass spectrometer, rather than simply a total pressure gauge, was utilized to measure the partial pressure of the test gas as well as the residual gas composition in the system. A quartz crystal monitor was used to measure film thickness. Pumping speeds and sticking coefficients are given as a function of surface coverage for each test gas. A comparison will be made with titanium films deposited in the same vacuum system and under similar conditions.

  18. Isotope shift in chromium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furmann, B.; Jarosz, A.; Stefańska, D.; Dembczyński, J.; Stachowska, E.

    2005-01-01

    Thirty-three spectral lines of chromium atom in the blue-violet region (425-465 nm) have been investigated with the method of laser-induced resonance fluorescence on an atomic beam. For all the lines, the isotope shifts for every pair of chromium isotopes have been determined. The lines can be divided into six groups, according to the configuration of the upper and lower levels. Electronic factors of the field shift and the specific mass shift ( Fik and MikSMS, respectively) have been evaluated and the values for each pure configuration involved have been determined. Comparison of the values Fik and MikSMS to the ab initio calculations results has been performed. The presence of crossed second order (CSO) effects has been observed.

  19. The influence of microstructure on the deformation behavior of beta solution heat treated and aged titanium aluminum tin zirconium molybdenum chromium silicate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broderick, Thomas Froats

    to six characteristic crystallographic and morphological misorientations. Growth directions between pairs of alpha/beta variants were shown to have interface misorientations of (0°/180°), (24.9°/155.1°), (54.5°/125.5°), (60.76°/119.3°), (77.9°/102.1°) and (80.6°/99.4°). This information, combined with that in slip system misorientation diagrams, was used to make qualitative predictions of relative ease and difficulty of slip transmission between combinations of alpha/beta/alpha variants based on in-plane and out-of-plane misorientations of slip planes and slip directions. For example, slip transmission between variants of near parallel alignment (Delta = 1.38°) between (0001) and {10-11} with a common {011}<111> slip system was predicted, then confirmed through Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) imaging techniques. Six variations of the production "Triplex" Ti-62222S heat treatment process were developed and applied to effect large changes in room temperature tensile deformation behavior. Large changes in morphology of primary alpha features and the presence of alpha2-Ti3Al in the alpha promoted large reductions in fracture stress and fracture strain capability of beta solution heat-treated and aged Ti-62222S. These effects were shown to be additive, so that the combination of high amounts of aligned colony alpha + high presence of alpha2-Ti3Al in the alpha produced the lowest fracture stress and fracture strain. Work hardening in all six microstructures was relatively low, e.g. n ranging between ˜0.05 and 0.1. As with fracture behavior, increasing the amount of aligned or colony microstructure and/or increasing the presence of alpha2-Ti 3Al in the alpha were shown to lower work hardening. Examination of fracture surfaces and polished cross sections perpendicular to fracture surfaces revealed an associated transition from transgranular to intergranular fracture with increasing amount of aligned or colony alpha and if the final aging treatment

  20. Hollow tin/chromium whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jing; Vianco, Paul T.; Li, James C. M.

    2010-05-01

    Tin whiskers have been an engineering challenge for over five decades. The mechanism has not been agreed upon thus far. This experiment aimed to identify a mechanism by applying compressive stresses to a tin film evaporated on silicon substrate with an adhesion layer of chromium in between. A phenomenon was observed in which hollow whiskers grew inside depleted areas. Using focused ion beam, the hollow whiskers were found to contain both tin and chromium. At the bottom of the depleted areas, thin tin/tin oxide film remained over the chromium layer. It indicates that tin transport occurred along the interface between tin and chromium layers.

  1. Progress in the chemistry of chromium(V) doping agents used in polarized target materials

    SciTech Connect

    Krumpolc, M. ); Hill, D. ); Struhrmann, H.B. , Hamburg . Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor)

    1990-01-01

    We wish to report progress in two areas of the chromium (V)-based doping agents: Two commonly used chromium (V) complexes, I and II, have been synthesized in perdeuterated form (i.e., all hydrogens replaced by deuterium). They are sodium bis(2-ethyl-2-deuteroxy-butyrato)oxochromate(V)monodeuterate, IV, (acronym EDBA-Cr(V)), and sodium bis(2-deuteroxy-2-methylpropionato)oxochromate(V), III, (acronym DMPA-Cr(V)). A synthetic route leading to the preparation of stable, chromium(III)-free solutions of chromium(V) in diols (1,2-ethanediol/ethylene glycol/and 1,2-propanediol/propylene glycol/) has been outlined.

  2. IN-SITU TREATMENT OF CHROMIUM SOURCE AREA USING REDOX MANIPULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sodium dithionite was used to treat a chromium source zone in soils beneath an old chrome plating shop. The sodium dithionite was injected as a buffered solution into the soils to transform the chromium from the oxidized (+6) state to the reduced (+3) state. Once reduced the chro...

  3. DETERMINING DISSOLVED HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM IN WATER AND WASTEWATER BY ELECTROTHERMAL ATOMIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A procedure is described for separating dissolved hexavalent chromium (Cr(+6)) from trivalent chromium (Cr(+3)) and the water sample matrix by coprecipitation of lead chromate with lead sulfate in acetic acid solution. Precision and accuracy data are presented for tap water and v...

  4. Insulin Resistance and Body Weight: Recent Human Studies Documenting the Benefits of Supplemental Chromium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The essentiality of chromium for humans was confirmed more than three decades ago with the studies showing that patients on total parenteral nutritrion (TPN) developed severe diabetic-like symptoms that could be reversed by the addition of chromium to their parenteral nutrition solutions. Since the...

  5. Electrodeposited tungsten-nickel-boron: A replacement for hexavalent chromium

    SciTech Connect

    Steffani, C.; Meltzer, M.

    1995-04-01

    Chromium, deposited from acidic solutions of its hexavalent ion, has been the rule for wear resistant, corrosion resistant coatings for many years. Although chromium coatings are durable, the plating process generates air emissions, effluent rinse waters, and process solutions that are toxic, suspected carcinogens, and a risk to human health and the environment. Tungsten-nickel-boron (W-Ni-B) alloy deposition is a potential substitute for hexavalent chrome. It has excellent wear, corrosion, and mechanical properties and also may be less of an environmental risk. This study examines the electroplating process and deposit properties of W-Ni-B and compares them with those of hexavalent chrome.

  6. Chromium recovery from exhausted baths generated in plating processes and its reuse in the tanning industry.

    PubMed

    Torras, Josep; Buj, Irene; Rovira, Miquel; de Pablo, Joan

    2012-03-30

    Chromium plating used for functional purposes provides an extremely hard, wear and corrosion resistant layer by means of electrolytic deposition. Typical layer thicknesses range between 2.5 and 500 μm. Chromium electroplating baths contain high concentrations of Cr(VI) with chromium trioxide (CrO(3)) as the chromium source. When because of technical or economic reasons a bath gets exhausted, a waste containing mainly chromium as dichromate as well as other heavy metals is generated. Chromium may then be purified for use in other industrial processes with different requirements. In this work, a sustainable system for using galvanic wastes as reagents in the leather tanning industry, thus reducing quantity of wastes to be treated, is presented. Metal cations present in the chromium exhausted bath were precipitated with NaOH. Then, the solution containing mainly soluble Cr(VI) was separated. By means of sodium sulphite in acidic conditions, Cr(VI) was reduced to Cr(III) as chromium (III) sulphate. From chromium (III) sulphate a basic Cr(III) sulphate may be obtained, which is one of most used compounds in the tanning industry. Cr(III) concentration in the final solution allows its reuse without concentration, but with a slight dilution. PMID:22326242

  7. Method for fabricating cermets of alumina-chromium systems

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, Chester S.

    1983-01-01

    Cermet insulators resistant to thermal and mechanical shock are prepared from alumina-chromium systems by providing an Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 material of about 0.5 to 7.0 micron size with a solid-hydrocarbon overcoating by slurring an effective amount of said solid hydrocarbon in a solvent mixture containing said Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 and thereafter evaporating said solvent, contacting said coated Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 with a solution of chromium precursor compound, heating the resulting mixture in a reducing environment to a temperature above the decomposition temperature of said chromium precursor compound but less than the melting temperature of the Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 or chromium for sufficient duration to yield a particulate compound having chromium essentially dispersed throughout the Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, and then densifying said particulate to provide said cermet characterized by a theoretical density in excess of 96% and having 0.1 to 10.0 vol.% elemental chromium metal present therein as a dispersed phase at the boundaries of the Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 material. Cermet components prepared thereby are useful in high temperature equipment, advanced heat engines, and nuclear-related equipment applications where electrical or thermal insulators are required.

  8. Impurities in chromium deposits produced by electroplating and physical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Dini, J.W.

    1994-05-01

    Impurity contents in electrodeposited (hexavalent and trivalent) chromium deposits and physically vapor deposited (thermal evaporation, electron beam evaporation and rf-sputtering) were compared. Oxygen is the key impurity obtained in electrodeposited films but it can be minimized in hexavalent plating solutions by operating at high temperature, e. g., 85 C. Electrodeposits produced in trivalent chromium plating solutions and physically vapor deposited films have much higher oxygen contents than electrodeposits produced in hexavalent chromium solutions operated at temperatures around 85 C. Depending on the target material used for physically vapor deposited films, these films can also have high amounts of other impurities.

  9. CHROMIUM, METABOLIC SYNDROME AND DIABESITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Suboptimal intakes of the essential nutrient, chromium, are characterized by elevated blood glucose, insulin resistance, obesity, hypertriglyceridemia, and low HDL. These are also signs and symptoms of the metabolic syndrome. Improvements due to increased intake of chromium are related to the degr...

  10. Groundwater contaminant by hexavalent chromium

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, C.

    1995-11-01

    Oxidation of trivalent chromium to hexavalent chromium has been investigated as a function of total manganese in soils as well as various incubation conditions. Chromium and manganese contents were analyzed by atomic absorption (graphite furnace and flame emission respectively) following acid digestion. Total hexavalent chromium generation capacity was determined by addition of 0.001 M CrCL3, incubation, and analysis by s-diphenyl carbazide. Samples were then leached with CaSO{sub 4} and MgSO{sub 4} and incubated in various environments (oven, freeze-drier, field moist, ultrafreeze) to test for geogenic generation of Cr(IV). The degree of geogenic generation of hexavalent chromium was compared with total Mn and Cr content as well as hexavalent generational capacity.

  11. The removal of hexavalent chromium from water by ferrous sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C.J.J.; Vesilind, P.A.

    1995-12-31

    The redox reaction of hexavalent chromium and ferrous sulfate is investigated in his study. Hexavalent chromium, a highly toxic and mobile anion, could exist in raw water used as a public water supply due to the industrial chromium contamination of natural water or due to natural oxidation of trivalent chromium. Ferrous sulfate is one of the widely used coagulants in water treatment plants and has good reducing ability. Because of its reducing capacity, ferrous sulfate can be applied to remove hexavalent chromium from water. The required contact time to reach equilibrium, the effectiveness of Cr(VI) reduction at different initial pH, and the required ferrous sulfate dosage for complete reduction are investigated. The redox reaction can be completed within 10 minutes, allowing 30 mg/L of hexavalent chromium to react with stoichiometric dosage of ferrous sulfate in deionized water, regardless of the initial pH. The pH of the solution is depressed during the progress of the reaction due to the hydrolysis of the produced Fe(III) and Cr(III) ions from the reaction. Dissolved oxygen in water is found to interfere with the redox reaction by consuming ferrous ions when the initial pH of solutions is high. In deionized water, complete Cr(VI) reduction can be achieved by applying excess ferrous sulfate under the condition of this study. It is also achievable when the raw water from Durham Water Treatment Plant is used as the reaction medium, without additional dosage of ferrous sulfate. Based on the results, simultaneous removal of hexavalent chromium in water treatment by applying ferrous sulfate as the coagulant is theoretically feasible.

  12. Hexavalent chromium monitor

    DOEpatents

    Tao, Shiquan; Winstead, Christopher B.

    2005-04-12

    A monitor is provided for use in measuring the concentration of hexavalent chromium in a liquid, such as water. The monitor includes a sample cell, a light source, and a photodetector. The sample cell is in the form of a liquid-core waveguide, the sample cell defining an interior core and acting as a receiver for the liquid to be analyzed, the interior surface of the sample cell having a refractive index of less than 1.33. The light source is in communication with a first end of the sample cell for emitting radiation having a wavelength of about and between 350 to 390 nm into the interior core of the waveguide. The photodetector is in communication with a second end of the waveguide for measuring the absorption of the radiation emitted by the light source by the liquid in the sample cell. The monitor may also include a processor electronically coupled to the photodetector for receipt of an absorption signal to determine the concentration of hexavalent chromium in the liquid.

  13. Release of Chromium from Orthopaedic Arthroplasties

    PubMed Central

    Afolaranmi, G.A.; Tettey, J; Meek, R.M.D; Grant, M.H

    2008-01-01

    Many orthopaedic implants are composed of alloys containing chromium. Of particular relevance is the increasing number of Cobalt Chromium bearing arthroplasies being inserted into young patients with osteoarthritis. Such implants will release chromium ions. These patients will be exposed to the released chromium for over 50 years in some cases. The subsequent chromium ion metabolism and redistribution in fluid and tissue compartments is complex. In addition, the potential biological effects of chromium are also controversial, including DNA and chromosomal damage, reduction in CD8 lymphocyte levels and possible hypersensitivity reactions (ALVAL). The establishment of these issues and the measurement of chromium in biological fluids is the subject of this review. PMID:19461924

  14. Bioaccumulation of chromium from tannery wastewater: an approach for chrome recovery and reuse.

    PubMed

    Aravindhan, Rathinam; Madhan, Balaraman; Rao, Jonnalagadda Raghava; Nair, Balachandran Unni; Ramasami, Thirumalachari

    2004-01-01

    The presence of chromium in the effluent is a major concern for the tanning industry. Currently, chemical precipitation methods are practiced for the removal of chromium from the effluent, but that leads to the formation of chrome-bearing solid wastes. The other membrane separation and ion exchange methods available are unfeasible due to their cost. In this study, the removal of chromium from tannery effluent has been carried out using abundantly available brown seaweed Sargassum wightii. Simulated chrome tanning solution was used for the standardization of experimental trials. Various factors influencing the uptake of chromium, viz., quantity of seaweed, concentrations of chromium, pH of the chrome-bearing wastewater, and duration of treatment, have been studied. Chemical modification of the seaweed through pretreatment with sulfuric acid, magnesium chloride, and calcium chloride showed improved uptake of chromium. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms have been fitted for various quantities of seaweed. The dynamic method of treatment of protonated seaweed with simulated chrome tanning solution at a pH of 3.5-3.8 for a duration of 6 h gave the maximum uptake of about 83%. A similar uptake has been established for commercial chrome tanning wastewater containing the same concentration of chromium. The Sargassum species exhibited a maximum uptake of 35 mg of chromium per gram of seaweed. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, and flame photometry studies have been carried out to understand the mechanistic pathway for the removal of chromium. The potential reuse of chromium-containing seaweed for the preparation of basic chromium sulfate (tanning agent) has been demonstrated. PMID:14740751

  15. High-chromium and high-silicon cast irons

    SciTech Connect

    Reynaud, A.

    1996-02-01

    High-chromium and high-silicon alloyed cast irons are not well known, although they are very corrosion-resistant materials and provide technical solutions to some difficult corrosion problems. This article reviews these alloys` chemical compositions and properties. It also highlights some industrial applications in which they are useful.

  16. Chromium isotopes as indicators of hexavalent chromium reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Thomas M.

    2012-03-20

    This is the final report for a university research project which advanced development of a new technology for identifying chemical reduction of hexavalent chromium contamination in groundwater systems. Reduction renders mobile and toxic hexavalent chromium immobile and less toxic. The new method uses stable isotope ratio measurements, which are made using multicollector ICP-mass spectrometry. The main objectives of this project were completed during the project period and two peer-reviewed articles were published to disseminate the information gained.

  17. Role of paramagnetic chromium in chromium(VI)-induced damage in cultured mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, M

    1994-09-01

    Chromium(VI) compounds are known to be potent toxic and carcinogenic agents. Because chromium(VI) is easily taken up by cells and is subsequently reduced to chromium(III), the formation of paramagnetic chromium such as chromium(V) and chromium(III) is believed to play a role in the adverse biological effects of chromium(VI) compounds. The present report, uses electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy; the importance of the role of paramagnetic chromium in chromium(VI)-induced damage in intact cultured cells is discussed, based upon our studies with antioxidants including vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol), B2 (riboflavin), C (ascorbic acid), and so on. These studies appear to confirm the participation of paramagnetic Cr such as chromium(V) and Chromium(III) in chromium(VI)-induced cellular damage. PMID:7843124

  18. A review of chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klopp, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    The mechanical properties of chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten alloys are reviewed with particular emphasis on high-temperature strength and low-temperature ductility. Precipitate strengthening is highly effective at 0.4 to 0.8 times the melting temperature in these metals, with HfC being most effective in tungsten and molybdenum, and Ta(B,C) most effective in chromium. Low-temperature ductility can be improved by alloying to promote rhenium ductilizing or solution softening. The low-temperature mechanical properties of these alloys appear related to electronic interactions rather than to the usual metallurgical considerations.

  19. Chromium reduction in Pseudomonas putida

    SciTech Connect

    Ishibashi, Y.; Cervantes, C.; Silver, S. )

    1990-07-01

    Reduction of hexavalent chromium (chromate) to less-toxic trivalent chromium was studied by using cell suspensions and cell-free supernatant fluids from Pseudomonas putida PRS2000. Chromate reductase activity was associated with soluble protein and not with the membrane fraction. The crude enzyme activity was heat labile and showed a K{sub m} of 40 {mu}M CrO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}. Neither sulfate nor nitrate affected chromate reduction either in vitro or with intact cells.

  20. Biotreatment of chromium (VI) effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Tavares, T.; Neto, P.; Martins, C.

    1995-12-31

    The presence of heavy metals in industrial wastewaters is still a serious problem for some local small and medium size industries. Particularly electroplating and tanneries produce highly concentrated chromium effluents, which are treated by traditional physico-chemical processes. Those are able to reduce the total chromium concentration from some hundreds of mg.l{sup {minus}1} to very low concentrations, but the allowable final value of 0.1 mg.l{sup {minus}1} is hardly obtained as the referred processes become too costly for those small and medium size industries. The aim of these studies is the definition of an efficient system, economically attractive and friendly to the environment, based on the ability of some microorganisms to concentrate heavy metals. This system would be used as a final treatment step to remove low concentrations of hexavalent chromium. Three different bacteria were used in batch systems to evaluate their resistance to Cr(VI) and their ability to reduce it to the trivalent form. The results were compared with those obtained with microorganisms isolated from sludge of treatment plants receiving wastewater loaded with chromium. One of those bacteria was supported on granular activated carbon and the biofilm was optimized in terms of adhesion and removal efficiency. The chromium adsorption capacity of the support was also studied as albeit it is known that adsorption is not used for heavy metals removal, granular activated carbon is an excellent immobilization support for the biofilm and certainly has some responsibility on the chromium fixation process.

  1. Study of the Thermodynamics of Chromium(III) and Chromium(VI) Binding to Fe3O4 and MnFe2O4 nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Luther, Steven; Brogfeld, Nathan; Kim, Jisoo; Parsons, J.G.

    2013-01-01

    Removal of chromium(III) or (VI) from aqueous solution was achieved using Fe3O4, and MnFe2O4 nanomaterials. The nanomaterials were synthesized using a precipitation method and characterized using XRD. The size of the nanomaterials was determined to be 22.4 ± 0.9 nm (Fe3O4) and 15.5 ± 0.5 nm (MnFe2O4). The optimal binding pH for chromium(III) and chromium(VI) were pH 6 and pH 3. Isotherm studies were performed, under light and dark conditions, to determine the capacity of the nanomaterials. The capacities for the light studies with MnFe2O4 and Fe3O4 were determined to be 7.189 and 10.63 mg/g, respectively, for chromium(III). The capacities for the light studies with MnFe2O4 and Fe3O4 were 3.21 and 3.46 mg/g, respectively, for chromium(VI). Under dark reaction conditions the binding of chromium(III) to the MnFe2O4 and Fe3O4 nanomaterials were 5.74 and 15.9 mg/g, respectively. The binding capacity for the binding of chromium(VI) to MnFe2O4 and Fe3O4 under dark reaction conditions were 3.87 and 8.54 mg/g, respectively. The thermodynamics for the reactions showed negative ΔG values, and positive ΔH values. The ΔS values were positive for the binding of chromium(III) and for chromium(VI) binding under dark reaction conditions. The ΔS values for chromium(VI) binding under the light reaction conditions were determined to be negative. PMID:23558081

  2. Chromium accumulation by the hyperaccumulator plant Leersia hexandra Swartz.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue-Hong; Liu, Jie; Huang, Hai-Tao; Chen, Jun; Zhu, Yi-Nian; Wang, Dun-Qiu

    2007-04-01

    Leersia hexandra Swartz (Gramineae), which occurs in Southern China, has been found to be a new chromium hyperaccumulator by means of field survey and pot-culture experiment. The field survey showed that this species had an extraordinary accumulation capacity for chromium. The maximum Cr concentration in the dry leaf matter was 2978 mg kg(-1) on the side of a pond near an electroplating factory. The average concentration of chromium in the leaves was 18.86 times as that in the pond sediment, and 297.41 times as that in the pond water. Under conditions of the nutrient solution culture, it was found that L. hexandra had a high tolerance and accumulation capacity to Cr(III) and Cr(VI). Under 60 mg l(-1) Cr(III) and 10 mg l(-1) Cr(VI) treatment, there was no significant decrease of biomass in the leaves of L. hexandra (p>0.05). The highest bioaccumulation coefficients of the leaves for Cr(III) and Cr(VI) were 486.8 and 72.1, respectively. However, L. hexandra had a higher accumulation capacity for Cr(III) than for Cr(VI). At the Cr(III) concentration of 10 mg l(-1) in the culture solution, the concentration of chromium in leaves was 4868 mg kg(-1), while at the same Cr(VI) concentration, the concentration of chromium in leaves was only 597 mg kg(-1). These results confirmed that L. hexandra is a chromium hyperaccumulator which grows rapidly with a great tolerance to Cr and broad ecological amplitude. This species could provide a new plant resource that explores the mechanism of Cr hyperaccumulation, and has potential for usage in the phytoremediation of Cr-contaminated soil and water. PMID:17207838

  3. Development of Alkaline Oxidative Dissolution Methods for Chromium (III) Compounds Present in Hanford Site Tank Sludges

    SciTech Connect

    NN Krot; VP Shilov; AM Fedoseev; NA Budantseva; MV Nikonov; AB Yusov; AYu Garnov; IA Charushnikova; VP Perminov; LN Astafurova; TS Lapitskaya; VI Makarenkov

    1999-07-02

    The high-level radioactive waste sludge in the underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site contains various chromium(III)solid phases. Dissolution and removal of chromium from tank waste sludges is desirable prior to high-level waste vitrification because increased volume is required to incorporate the residual chromium. Unfortunately, dissolution of chromium from the sludge to form Cr(OH){sub 4}{sup {minus}} through treatment with heated NaOH solution (also used to dissolve aluminum phases and metathesize phosphates to sodium salts) generally has been unsuccessful in tests with both simulated and genuine Hanford waste sludges. Oxidative dissolution of the Cr(III) compounds to form soluble chromate has been proposed as an alternative chromium solid phase dissolution method and results of limited prior testing have been reported.

  4. Evaluation of aquatic toxicities of chromium and chromium-containing effluents in reference to chromium electroplating industries.

    PubMed

    Baral, A; Engelken, R; Stephens, W; Farris, J; Hannigan, R

    2006-05-01

    This study evaluated aquatic toxicities of chromium and chromium-containing laboratory samples representative of effluents from chromium electroplating industries, and compared the aquatic environmental risks of hexavalent and trivalent chromium electroplating operations. Trivalent chromium electroplating has emerged as an acceptable alternative to hazardous hexavalent chromium electroplating. This process substitution has reduced the human health impact in the workplace and minimized the production of hazardous sludge regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The thrust behind this research was to investigate whether trivalent chromium electroplating operations have lower adverse impacts on standardized toxicity test organisms. Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas were used to investigate toxicities of trivalent chromium (Cr (III)), hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI)), and industrial effluents. In agreement with previous studies, Cr (III) was found to be less toxic than Cr (VI). Despite having several organic and inorganic constituents in the effluents obtained from trivalent chromium plating baths, they exhibited less adverse effects to C. dubia than effluents obtained from hexavalent chromium electroplating baths. Thus, transition from hexavalent to trivalent chromium electroplating processes may be justified. However, because of the presence of organic constituents such as formate, oxalate, and triethylene glycol in effluents, trivalent chromium electroplating operations may face additional regulatory requirements for removal of total organic carbon. PMID:16418891

  5. Mare Chromium Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This crater, located in Mare Chromium, shows evidence of exterior modification, with little interior modification. While the rim is still visible, the ejecta blanket has been removed or covered. There is some material at the bottom of the crater, but the interior retains the bowl shape from the initial formation of the crater.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -34.4, Longitude 174.4 East (185.6 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  6. Hexavalent chromium removal from wastewater using aniline formaldehyde condensate coated silica gel.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P Albino; Ray, Manabendra; Chakraborty, Saswati

    2007-05-01

    A resinous polymer, aniline formaldehyde condensate (AFC) coated on silica gel was used as an adsorbent in batch system for removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution by considering the effects of various parameters like reaction pH, dose of AFC coated silica gel, initial Cr(VI) concentration and aniline to formaldehyde ratio in AFC synthesis. The optimum pH for total chromium [Cr(VI) and Cr(III)] adsorption was observed as 3. Total chromium adsorption was second order and equilibrium was achieved within 90-120 min. Aniline to formaldehyde ratio of 1.6:1 during AFC synthesis was ideal for chromium removal. Total chromium adsorption followed Freundlich's isotherm with adsorption capacity of 65 mg/g at initial Cr(VI) 200mg/L. Total chromium removal was explained as combinations of electrostatic attraction of acid chromate ion by protonated AFC, reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) and bond formation of Cr(III) with nitrogen atom of AFC. Almost 40-84% of adsorbed chromium was recovered during desorption by NaOH, EDTA and mineral acids. AFC coated silica gel can be effectively used for treatment of chromium containing wastewaters as an alternative. PMID:17030417

  7. Toxicity assessment and geochemical model of chromium leaching from AOD slag.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bao; Li, Junguo; Zeng, Yanan; Wang, Ziming

    2016-02-01

    AOD (Argon Oxygen Decarburization) slag is a by-product of the stainless steel refining process. The leaching toxicity of chromium from AOD slag cannot be ignored in the recycling process of the AOD slag. To assess the leaching toxicity of the AOD slag, batch leaching tests have been performed. PHREEQC simulations combined with FactSage were carried out based on the detailed mineralogical analysis and petrophysical data. Moreover, Pourbaix diagram of the Cr-H2O system was protracted by HSC 5.0 software to explore the chromium speciation in leachates. It was found that AOD slag leachate is an alkaline and reductive solution. The Pourbaix diagram of the Cr-H2O system indicated that trivalent chromium, such as Cr(OH)4(-), is the major chromium species in the experimental Eh-pH region considered. However, toxic hexavalent chromium was released with maximum concentrations of 30 µg L(-1) and 18 µg L(-1) at L/S 10 and 100, respectively, during the earlier leaching stage. It concluded that the AOD slag possessed a certain leaching toxicity. After 10 d of leaching, trivalent chromium was the dominant species in the leachates, which corresponded to the results of PHREEQC simulation. Leaching toxicity of AOD slag is based on the chromium speciation and its transformation. Great attention should be focused on such factors as aging, crystal form of chromium-enriched minerals, and electrochemical characteristics of the leachates. PMID:26583286

  8. Kinetics of chromium ion absorption by cross-linked polyacrylate films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    Three cross-linked ion exchange membranes were studied as to their ability to absorb chromium ion from aqueous chromium III nitrate solutions. Attention was given to the mechanism of absorption, composition of the absorbed product, and the chemical bonding. The membranes were: calcium polyacrylate, polyacrylic acid, and a copolymer of acrylic acid and vinyl alcohol. For the calcium polyacrylate and the copolymer, parabolic kinetics were observed, indicating the formation of a chromium polyacrylate phase as a coating on the membrane. The rate of absorption is controlled by the diffusion of the chromium ion through this coating. The product formed in the copolymer involves the formation of a coordination complex of a chromium ion with 6 carboxylic acid groups from the same molecule. The absorption of the chromium ion by the polyacrylic acid membranes appears to be more complicated, involving cross-linking. This is due to the coordination of the chromium ion with carboxylic acid groups from more than one polymer molecule. The absorption rate of the chromium ion by the calcium salt membrane was found to be more rapid than that by the free polyacrylic acid membrane.

  9. Chromium stress induced alterations in biochemical and enzyme metabolism in aquatic and terrestrial plants.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, K Sankar; Baskaran, L; Rajasekaran, S; Sumathi, K; Chidambaram, A L A; Sundaramoorthy, P

    2008-06-01

    Water is seriously polluted by the discharge of various industrial wastewater containing heavy metals. Among them, chromium is considered to be toxic to living organisms and it is released mostly from tanneries. The chromium-contaminated water is discharged into nearby water bodies and it affects both aquatic and terrestrial plants. So the present experiment was conducted with an aquatic plant, water lettuce (Pistia stratiotes L.) and a terrestrial plant soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.). They were treated with different concentrations (0, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100 and 200mg/L) of potassium dichromate solution. The biochemical parameters such as total chlorophyll, carotenoid, protein and amino acid content and the enzymatic activities like catalase and peroxidase were estimated. The accumulation of chromium was also analysed in both the plants. All the biochemical contents and enzyme activities of water lettuce and soybean seedlings showed a great variation with respect to the increase in chromium concentrations. The accumulation of chromium increased gradually with the increase of chromium concentrations. Total inhibition of all the parameters were observed at 300 mg/L chromium concentration. The terrestrial plant soybean was sensitive than the aquatic plant water lettuce towards chromium stress. PMID:18206355

  10. ALUMINUM AND CHROMIUM LEACHING WORKSHOP WHITEPAPER

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, D; Jeff Pike, J; Bill Wilmarth, B

    2007-04-25

    formulations. Disposal of the resulting aluminum and chromium-rich streams are different at the two sites, with vitrification into Low Activity Waste (LAW) glass at Hanford, and solidification in Saltstone at SRS. Prior to disposal, the leachate solutions must be treated to remove radionuclides, resulting in increased operating costs and extended facility processing schedules. Interim storage of leachate can also add costs and delay tank closure. Recent projections at Hanford indicate that up to 40,000 metric tons of sodium would be needed to dissolve the aluminum and maintain it in solution, which nearly doubles the amount of sodium in the entire current waste tank inventory. This underscores the dramatic impact that the aluminum leaching can have on the entire system. A comprehensive view of leaching and the downstream impacts must therefore be considered prior to implementation. Many laboratory scale tests for aluminum and chromium dissolution have been run on Hanford wastes, with samples from 46 tanks tested. Three samples from SRS tanks have been tested, out of seven tanks containing high aluminum sludge. One full-scale aluminum dissolution was successfully performed on waste at SRS in 1982, but generated a very large quantity of liquid waste ({approx}3,000,000 gallons). No large-scale tests have been done on Hanford wastes. Although the data to date give a generally positive indication that aluminum dissolution will work, many issues remain, predominantly because of variable waste compositions and changes in process conditions, downstream processing, or storage limitations. Better approaches are needed to deal with the waste volumes and limitations on disposal methods. To develop a better approach requires a more extensive understanding of the kinetics of dissolution, as well as the factors that effect rates, effectiveness, and secondary species. Models of the dissolution rate that have been developed are useful, but suffer from limitations on applicable compositional

  11. Reduction of hexavalent chromium in aqueous medium with zerovalent iron.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Ratnadeepa; Mohammad, S Saker; Chakrabarti, Sampa; Chaudhuri, Basab; Bhattacharjee, Sekhar; Dutta, Binay K

    2010-02-01

    Hexavalent chromium, emanating primarily from the tannery and electroplating industries, can be reduced to the less toxic trivalent variety by several methods, including reduction with metallic iron. In the present work, electrolytic-grade iron dust was used to reduce chromium(VI) in the form of potassium dichromate. Loading of iron dust was varied from 0.5 to 1.0 g in 50 mL of solution; the pH of the medium was varied from 1.5 to 3.5; and the initial concentration of the dichromate solution was varied from 50 to 125 mg/L. Under the specified experimental conditions, maximum removal of the hexavalent chromium achieved was approximately 90% of its original value. The time-concentration data followed a pseudo-first-order kinetic model. The conversion and rate of reduction increased with an increase in iron loading and acidity of the medium, whereas an increase in the initial concentration of chromium(VI) caused a decrease in the reduction. PMID:20183980

  12. Chromium-induced kidney disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wedeen, R.P. ); Qian, Lifen )

    1991-05-01

    Kidney disease is often cited as one of the adverse effects of chromium, yet chronic renal disease due to occupational or environmental exposure to chromium has not been reported. Occasional cases of acute tubular necrosis (ATN) following massive absorption of chromate have been described. Chromate-induced ATN has been extensively studied in experimental animals following parenteral administration of large doses of potassium chromate (hexavalent). The chromate is selectively accumulated in the convoluted proximal tubule where necrosis occurs. An adverse long-term effect of low-dose chromium exposure on the kidneys is suggested by reports of low molecular weight (LMW) proteinuria in chromium workers. Excessive urinary excretion of {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin, a specific proximal tubule brush border protein, and retinol-binding protein has been reported among chrome palters and welders. However, LMW proteinuria occurs after a variety of physiologic stresses, is usually reversible, and cannot by itself be considered evidence of chromic renal disease. Chromate-induced ATN and LMW proteinuria in chromium workers, nevertheless, raise the possibility that low-level, long-term exposure may produce persistent renal injury. The absence of evidence of chromate-induced chromic renal disease cannot be interpreted as evidence of the absence of such injury.

  13. Carcinogen risk assessment of chromium compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Gibb, H.J.; Chen, C.W.; Hiremath, C.B.

    1988-06-01

    Hexavalent chromium has been identified as a human carcinogen. Evidence to support this contention derives from epidemiologic, animal, and genotoxicity studies. Although workers exposed to both trivalent and hexavalent chromium have been shown to be at an excess risk of respiratory cancer, only hexavalent chromium has been shown to be carcinogenic in animals. Both hexavalent and trivalent chromium have been shown to be mutagenic, but the evidence for hexavalent chromium is somewhat stronger than that for trivalent chromium. The quantitative estimation of the cancer risk due to hexavalent chromium in the ambient air is calculated on the basis of lung-cancer mortality data for chromate production workers. The lifetime respiratory cancer risk due to 1 microgram/cu m) of hexavalent chromium in the ambient air is estimated to be 1.2 x .002 on the basis of Mancuso's data and 9.4 x .003 on the basis of the Braver et al. data.

  14. Chromium at High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo, Rafael

    2012-02-01

    Chromium has long served as the archetype of spin density wave magnetism. Recently, Jaramillo and collaborators have shown that Cr also serves as an archetype of magnetic quantum criticality. Using a combination of x-ray diffraction and electrical transport measurements at high pressures and cryogenic temperatures in a diamond anvil cell, they have demonstrated that the N'eel transition (TN) can be continuously suppressed to zero, with no sign of a concurrent structural transition. The order parameter undergoes a broad regime of exponential suppression, consistent with the weak coupling paradigm, before deviating from a BCS-like ground state within a narrow but accessible quantum critical regime. The quantum criticality is characterized by mean field scaling of TN and non mean field scaling of the transport coefficients, which points to a fluctuation-induced reconstruction of the critical Fermi surface. A comparison between pressure and chemical doping as means to suppress TN sheds light on different routes to the quantum critical point and the relevance of Fermi surface nesting and disorder at this quantum phase transition. The work by Jaramillo et al. is broadly relevant to the study of magnetic quantum criticality in a physically pure and theoretically tractable system that balances elements of weak and strong coupling. [4pt] [1] R. Jaramillo, Y. Feng, J. Wang & T. F. Rosenbaum. Signatures of quantum criticality in pure Cr at high pressure. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 107, 13631 (2010). [0pt] [2] R. Jaramillo, Y. Feng, J. C. Lang, Z. Islam, G. Srajer, P. B. Littlewood, D. B. McWhan & T. F. Rosenbaum. Breakdown of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer ground state at a quantum phase transition. Nature 459, 405 (2009).

  15. Turkey liver - a chromium enriched food source

    SciTech Connect

    Polansky, M.M.; Bryden, N.A.; Richards, M.; Anderson, R.A.

    1986-03-01

    There are presently no known foods for humans that are particularly good sources of chromium. As a means of obtaining Cr enriched foods, turkeys were fed diets containing various levels of supplemental chromium. Four groups of 6-month old turkey hens were fed either the basal diet for laying hens or this diet supplemented with 25, 100 or 200 ..mu..g of chromium as chromium chloride per g of diet. Liver Cr concentration of the turkeys sacrificed after 1 week increased from 7 ng/g (wet wt) while consuming the basal diet to 15, 48 and 68 ng/g, respectively, while consuming the diets with supplemental chromium. Comparable values for the turkeys sacrificed after 5 weeks were 2, 43, 170 and 325 ng/g. Similar trends but higher chromium values were observed for kidney samples. The chromium contents of the dark and white meat and eggs were not altered significantly. Chromium concentrations of the pancreas, gizzard and heart increased marginally; final chromium concentrations were less than 23 ng/g even after 5 weeks on the highest level of supplemental chromium. Chromium content of spleen and lungs was approximately 2-fold higher than that of the pancreas, gizzard or heart. Therefore, turkey liver is a food source suitable for Cr enrichment while the eggs, dark and white meat and other edible parts do not appear to be enriched following chromium supplementation.

  16. Chromium removal by zeolite-rich materials obtained from an exhausted FCC catalyst: Influence of chromium incorporation on the sorbent structure.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Maximiliano R; Pereyra, Andrea M; Torres Sánchez, Rosa M; Basaldella, Elena I

    2013-10-15

    A spent FCC catalyst was converted into a zeolitic mixture, and the product obtained was afterward used as trapping material for Cr(III) species frequently found in aqueous solutions. Eventual changes in the sorbent structure produced by Cr incorporation were studied by different characterization techniques such as point of zero charge determinations (PZC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), and infrared absorption (FTIR). The XRD and FTIR analyses indicated that chromium incorporation produces an amorphization of the material, and PZC measurements show no surface adsorption of charged chromium species. SEM and EDX analyses clearly show that after chromium sorption, the initial microspheroidal catalyst morphology was maintained, and the presence of chromium species was mainly detected in the outer microsphere surface, where the zeolite crystals were hydrothermally grown. PMID:23910499

  17. Cytogenetic effects of hexavalent chromium in Bulgarian chromium platers.

    PubMed

    Benova, Donka; Hadjidekova, Valeria; Hristova, Rossitza; Nikolova, Teodora; Boulanova, Minka; Georgieva, Ivanka; Grigorova, Mira; Popov, Todor; Panev, Teodor; Georgieva, Rossitza; Natarajan, Adayapalam T; Darroudi, Firouz; Nilsson, Robert

    2002-02-15

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the genotoxic effects of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in vivo in exposed Bulgarian chromium platers by using classical cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic analyses of peripheral lymphocytes and exfoliated buccal cells. No significant difference was observed between the exposed workers and the controls with regard to the frequency of cells with chromosome aberrations (CAs) using conventional Giemsa staining and in the frequency of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs). However, there was a significant increase in the number of cells with micronuclei (MN) in peripheral lymphocytes from chromium exposed workers as compared to the controls. In the buccal cells from these workers, this increase was even more pronounced. Cytosine arabinoside (AraC), an inhibitor of DNA synthesis and repair, was found to significantly increase the levels of MN in vitro in the lymphocytes of both groups. The increase was more expressed in the lymphocytes of chromium exposed workers. Both centromere positive (C(+)) as well as centromere negative (C(-)) MN were observed by the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique in both of the cell types studied. No difference between C(+) and C(-) MN frequencies was found in the lymphocytes as well as in the buccal cells. Thus, Cr(VI) appears to have both clastogenic as well as aneugenic effects in humans. PMID:11815242

  18. Aqueous corrosion of ion beam mixed Ta films on 13% chromium steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, N. K.

    1993-06-01

    The effect of aqueous corrosion of ion beam mixed Ta on 13 wt% chromium steel in 1M H 2SO 4 or 0.1N NaCl solution has been investigated. The results show that Ta ion mixing can evidently improve the corrosion resistance of chromium steel. The corrosion resistances of the ion beam mixed Ta films are affected by the nature of the substrates. Some suggestions are proposed according to microanalysis results by using SEM, RBS and XPS techniques.

  19. Fabrication of chitosan-magnetite nanocomposite strip for chromium removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sureshkumar, Vaishnavi; Kiruba Daniel, S. C. G.; Ruckmani, K.; Sivakumar, M.

    2016-02-01

    Environmental pollution caused by heavy metals is a serious threat. In the present work, removal of chromium was carried out using chitosan-magnetite nanocomposite strip. Magnetite nanoparticles (Fe3O4) were synthesized using chemical co-precipitation method at 80 °C. The nanoparticles were characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction spectrometer, atomic force microscope, dynamic light scattering and vibrating sample magnetometer, which confirm the size, shape, crystalline nature and magnetic behaviour of nanoparticles. Atomic force microscope revealed that the particle size was 15-30 nm and spherical in shape. The magnetite nanoparticles were mixed with chitosan solution to form hybrid nanocomposite. Chitosan strip was casted with and without nanoparticle. The affinity of hybrid nanocomposite for chromium was studied using K2Cr2O7 (potassium dichromate) solution as the heavy metal solution containing Cr(VI) ions. Adsorption tests were carried out using chitosan strip and hybrid nanocomposite strip at different time intervals. Amount of chromium adsorbed by chitosan strip and chitosan-magnetite nanocomposite strip from aqueous solution was evaluated using UV-visible spectroscopy. The results confirm that the heavy metal removal efficiency of chitosan-magnetite nanocomposite strip is 92.33 %, which is higher when compared to chitosan strip, which is 29.39 %.

  20. Simultaneous Electrodialytic Preconcentration and Speciation of Chromium(III) and Chromium(VI).

    PubMed

    Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Nakamura, Koretaka; Shelor, C Phillip; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Toda, Kei

    2015-11-17

    Large amounts of chromium (Cr) compounds are used for manufacturing of various products and various chemical processes. Some inevitably find their way into the environment. Environmental Cr is dominantly inorganic and is either in the cationic +3 oxidation state or in the anionic oxochromium +6 oxidation state. The two differ dramatically in their implications; Cr(III) is essential to human nutrition and even sold as a supplement, while Cr(VI) is a potent carcinogen. Drinking water standards for chromium may be based on total Cr or Cr(VI) only. Thus, Cr speciation analysis is very important. Despite their high sensitivity, atomic spectrometric techniques or induction coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) cannot directly differentiate the oxidation states. We present here a new electrodialytic separation concept. Sample analyte ions are quantitatively transferred via appropriately ionically functionalized dialysis membranes into individual receptors that are introduced into the ICP-MS. There was no significant conversion of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) or vice versa during the very short (6 s) separation process. Effects of salinity (up to ∼20 mM NaCl) can be eliminated with proper membrane functionalization and receptor optimization. With the ICP-MS detector we used, the limits of detection for either form of Cr was 0.1 μg/L without preconcentration. Up to 10-fold preconcentration was readily possible by increasing the donor solution flow rate relative to the acceptor solution flow rates. The proposed approach permits simultaneous matrix isolation, preconcentration, and chromium speciation. PMID:26507203

  1. Chromium content of selected Greek foods.

    PubMed

    Bratakos, Michael S; Lazos, Evangelos S; Bratakos, Sotirios M

    2002-05-01

    The total chromium content of a wide variety of Greek foods was determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (GFAAS). Meat, fish and seafood, cereals and pulses were rich sources of chromium (>0.100 microg/g). Fruits, milk, oils and fats and sugar were poor sources. Differences in chromium content were found between different food classes from Greece and those from some other countries. Based on available food consumption data and chromium levels in this study, it was estimated that the chromium intake of Greeks is 143 microg/day, with vegetables, cereals and meat being the main contributors. PMID:12083715

  2. Thermodynamics, Kinetics, and Activation energy Studies of the sorption of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) to a Mn3O4 nanomaterial

    PubMed Central

    Cantu, Yvette; Remes, Abril; Reyna, Alejandra; Martinez, Denise; Villarreal, Jahaziel; Ramos, Hilda; Trevino, Samantha; Tamez, C.; Martinez, A.; Eubanks, T.; Parsons, J. G.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a manganese oxide, Mn3O4 was used to remove chromium(III) and chromium(VI) from aqueous solutions. The Mn3O4 nanomaterial was synthesized through a precipitation method, and was characterized using XRD, which confirmed the material had a crystal structure similar to hausmannite. In addition, using Scherrer’s equation it was determined that the nanomaterial had an average grain size of 19.5 ± 1.10 nm. A study of the effects of pH on the binding of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) showed that the optimum binding pH was 4 and 3 respectively. Batch isotherm studies were performed to determine the binding capacity of chromium(III), which was determined to be 18.7 mg/g, 41.7 mg/g, and 54.4 mg/g respectively for 4°C, 21°C, and 45°C. Chromium(VI) on the other hand had lower binding capacities of 2.5 mg/g, 4.3 mg/g, and 5.8 mg/g for 4°C, 21°C, 45°C, respectively. Thermodynamic studies performed indicated the sorption process was for the most part controlled by physisorption. The ΔG for the sorption of chromium(III) and Chromium(VI) ranged from −0.9 to −13 kJ/mol, indicating a spontaneous reaction was occurring. The enthalpy indicated a endothermic reaction was occurring during the binding and show ΔH values of 70.6 and 19.1 kJ.mol for chromium(III) and Chromium(VI), respectively. In addition, ΔS for the reaction had positive values of 267 and 73 J/mol for chromium(III) and chromium(VI) which indicate a spontaneous reaction. In addition, the sorption process was found to follow pseudo second order kinetic and the activation energy studies indicated the binding process occurred through chemisorption. PMID:25097453

  3. Transport of trivalent and hexavalent chromium through different ion-selective membranes in acidic aqueous media

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, R.F.D.; Rodrigues, M.A.S.; Ferreira, J.Z.

    1998-06-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the transport of trivalent and hexavalent chromium through anion- and cation-selective membranes using two- and three-compartment electrodialysis cells. Tests were done with acidic solutions of trivalent chromium ions, Cr{sup 3+}, and hexavalent chromium ions, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7}{sup 2{minus}}. In each situation the transport of metallic ions through the membrane was evaluated. In the tests with trivalent chromium, Nafion 417 and Selemion CMT cation-selective membranes were used, and in the tests with hexavalent chromium, Selemion AMT membrane was used. The influence of SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} ions and of the concentration of H{sup +} ions in the solutions was also analyzed. Results showed the oxidation of the Cr{sup 3+} ion at the anode and the reduction of the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7}{sup 2{minus}} ion at the cathode. The maximum yield in the process was reached when hexavalent chromium solutions were used in the absence of sulfate ions and a Selemion AMT membrane in a three-compartment cell.

  4. Chromium Chemistry in the Subsurface

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chromium (VI) (Cr) is carcinogenic and a threat to human and ecological health. There are adequate and acceptable methods to characterize and assess Cr contaminated sites. Cr chemistry in the environment is well understood. There are documented methods to address Cr contaminat...

  5. Chromium(III), insoluble salts

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Chromium ( III ) , insoluble salts ; CASRN 16065 - 83 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments

  6. Evaluation of brush plated alloys as substitutes for tank plated hard chromium

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, H.B.; Hooper, A.M.

    1995-11-01

    This paper summarizes results obtained from a test program conducted in cooperation with Tinker Air Force Base (TAFB) in 1993 for the purpose of evaluating the potential of using brush plated alloys as replacements for tank plated hard chromium which is used in the overhaul of jet engines. Tank plating is energy expensive and generates waste products in several of the plating steps. Test specimens used in this study were fabricated from carbon steel, chromium-based stainless steel, and nickel-based stainless steel. Baseline specimens were tank plated with hard chromium or with a soft nickel capped with hard chromium. The specimens were tested for fatigue, thickness, microhardness, Taber wear, and Falex pin and vee block wear. All test were conducted in accordance with standard procedures of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). Test results obtained from the baseline specimens were compared with those obtained from specimens which had been coated with the three brush plated layered alloy solutions used in this evaluation. Results of this study show that brush plated alloy coatings appear promising as alternatives to tank plated hard chromium. Some data quality problems were encountered during testing, so at this time, definitive statements concerning the use of brush plating alloys as an acceptable alternative to tank plated hard chromium in critical TAFB maintenance, cannot be made. Although these tests results are not positive for TAFB`s operation, users of hard chromium tank plating with less critical applications may find brush plated coatings a suitable alternative. 1 ref.

  7. Chromium stable isotope fractionation during adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, A.; Johnson, T.; Bullen, T.

    2003-04-01

    Chromium is a common anthropogenic contaminant in ground water. It is redox-active; the two common valences in natural waters are Cr(VI), which is highly soluble and toxic, and Cr(III), which is relatively insoluble. Redox reactions control Cr mobility in aqueous solutions with Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(III) controlling the attenuation of Cr in groundwater. Our previous study demonstrated that abiotic Cr(VI) reduction causes an isotope fractionation of -3.5 permil (53Cr/52Cr) and isotopes can therefore be used to calculate the extent of reduction. In the present study, experiments were conducted to measure Cr isotope fractionation during Cr(VI) sorption on Al203. Sorption of Cr(VI) could be important as a small isotope fractionation may get amplified along the edges of a Cr(VI) contaminated plume. A previous study demonstrated a similar process with Fe isotopes on anion exchange resin. Initial solutions of 200 mg/l Cr(VI) (as K2Cr2O7) and 0.1 mM KCl were made up. Sufficient solid Al203 was added to achieve 50% sorption. After equilibration, the solution was extracted by centrifuging and filtering with a 0.2 micron filter. Al203 was then added again to result in a further 50% sorption of the remaining Cr(VI). This process was repeated 10 times to amplify any isotopic fractionation between dissolved and adsorbed Cr(VI). The instantaneous stable isotope fractionation was calculated based on the δ 53Cr values of the initial and final Cr(VI) solutions. The results show that the stable isotope values measured in the solutions after the ten steps were within the uncertainty of the isotope value of the initial solution. Therefore, no significant stable isotope fractionation occurred. We are presently conducting experiments with goethite and expect similar results. Therefore, any fractionation of chromium stable isotopes observed in contaminant plumes are a result of processes other than adsorption (i.e., reduction).

  8. Effect of pH, ionic strength, and background electrolytes on Cr(VI) and total chromium removal by acorn shell of Quercus crassipes Humb. & Bonpl.

    PubMed

    Aranda-García, Erick; Morales-Barrera, Liliana; Pineda-Camacho, Gabriela; Cristiani-Urbina, Eliseo

    2014-10-01

    The ability of Quercus crassipes acorn shells (QCS) to remove Cr(VI) and total chromium from aqueous solutions was investigated as a function of the solution pH, ionic strength, and background electrolytes. It was found that Cr(VI) and total chromium removal by QCS depended strongly on the pH of the solution. Cr(VI) removal rate increased as the solution pH decreased. The optimum pH for total chromium removal varied depending on contact time. NaCl ionic strengths lower than 200 mM did not affect chromium removal. The presence of 20 mM monovalent cations and anions, and of divalent cations, slightly decreased the removal of Cr(VI) and total chromium by QCS; in contrast, divalent anions (SO₄(2-), PO₄(2-), CO₃(2-)) significantly affected the removal of Cr(VI) and total chromium. The biosorption kinetics of chromium ions followed the pseudo-second-order model at all solution pH levels, NaCl ionic strengths and background electrolytes tested. Results suggest that QCS may be a potential low-cost biosorbent for the removal of Cr(VI) and total chromium from aqueous solutions containing various impurities. PMID:24880725

  9. Synthesis of chromium containing pigments from chromium galvanic sludges.

    PubMed

    Andreola, F; Barbieri, L; Bondioli, F; Cannio, M; Ferrari, A M; Lancellotti, I

    2008-08-15

    In this work the screening results of the scientific activity conducted on laboratory scale to valorise chromium(III) contained in the galvanic sludge as chromium precursor for ceramic pigments are reported. The valorisation of this waste as a secondary raw material (SRM) is obtained by achievement of thermal and chemical stable crystal structures able to color ceramic material. Two different pigments pink CaCr(0.04)Sn(0.97)SiO(5) and green Ca(3)Cr(2)(SiO(4))(3) were synthesized by solid-state reactions using dried Cr sludge as chromium oxide precursor. The obtained pigments were characterized by X-ray diffraction and SEM analysis. Furthermore the color developed in a suitable ceramic glaze was investigated in comparison with the color developed by the pigments prepared from pure Cr(2)O(3). The characterization carried out corroborates the thermal and chemical stability of the synthesized pigments and, especially for the Cr-Sn pink pigment, the powders develop an intense color that is very similar to the color developed by the pigments obtained starting from pure Cr(2)O(3). PMID:18289775

  10. Fabrication of Unique Magnetic Bionanocomposite for Highly Efficient Removal of Hexavalent Chromium from Water

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yunlei; Qiu, Xun; Chen, Dongyun; Li, Najun; Xu, Qingfeng; Li, Hua; He, Jinghui; Lu, Jianmei

    2016-01-01

    Biotreatment of hexavalent chromium has attracted widespread interest due to its cost effective and environmental friendliness. However, the difficult separation of biomass from aqueous solution and the slow hexavalent chromium bioreduction rate are bottlenecks for biotechnology application. In this approach, a core-shell structured functional polymer coated magnetic nanocomposite was prepared for enriching the hexavalent chromium. Then the nanocomposite was connected to the bacteria via amines on bacterial (Bacillus subtilis ATCC-6633) surface. Under optimal conditions, a series of experiments were launched to degrade hexavalent chromium from the aqueous solution using the as-prepared bionanocomposite. Results showed that B. subtilis@Fe3O4@mSiO2@MANHE (BFSM) can degrade hexavalent chromium from the water more effectively (a respectable degradation efficiency of about 94%) when compared with pristine B. subtilis and Fe3O4@mSiO2@MANHE (FSM). Moreover, the BFSM could be separated from the wastewater by magnetic separation technology conveniently due to the Fe3O4 core of FSM. These results indicate that the application of BFSM is a promising strategy for effective treating wastewater containing hexavalent chromium. PMID:27502074

  11. Fabrication of Unique Magnetic Bionanocomposite for Highly Efficient Removal of Hexavalent Chromium from Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yunlei; Qiu, Xun; Chen, Dongyun; Li, Najun; Xu, Qingfeng; Li, Hua; He, Jinghui; Lu, Jianmei

    2016-08-01

    Biotreatment of hexavalent chromium has attracted widespread interest due to its cost effective and environmental friendliness. However, the difficult separation of biomass from aqueous solution and the slow hexavalent chromium bioreduction rate are bottlenecks for biotechnology application. In this approach, a core-shell structured functional polymer coated magnetic nanocomposite was prepared for enriching the hexavalent chromium. Then the nanocomposite was connected to the bacteria via amines on bacterial (Bacillus subtilis ATCC-6633) surface. Under optimal conditions, a series of experiments were launched to degrade hexavalent chromium from the aqueous solution using the as-prepared bionanocomposite. Results showed that B. subtilis@Fe3O4@mSiO2@MANHE (BFSM) can degrade hexavalent chromium from the water more effectively (a respectable degradation efficiency of about 94%) when compared with pristine B. subtilis and Fe3O4@mSiO2@MANHE (FSM). Moreover, the BFSM could be separated from the wastewater by magnetic separation technology conveniently due to the Fe3O4 core of FSM. These results indicate that the application of BFSM is a promising strategy for effective treating wastewater containing hexavalent chromium.

  12. Fabrication of Unique Magnetic Bionanocomposite for Highly Efficient Removal of Hexavalent Chromium from Water.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yunlei; Qiu, Xun; Chen, Dongyun; Li, Najun; Xu, Qingfeng; Li, Hua; He, Jinghui; Lu, Jianmei

    2016-01-01

    Biotreatment of hexavalent chromium has attracted widespread interest due to its cost effective and environmental friendliness. However, the difficult separation of biomass from aqueous solution and the slow hexavalent chromium bioreduction rate are bottlenecks for biotechnology application. In this approach, a core-shell structured functional polymer coated magnetic nanocomposite was prepared for enriching the hexavalent chromium. Then the nanocomposite was connected to the bacteria via amines on bacterial (Bacillus subtilis ATCC-6633) surface. Under optimal conditions, a series of experiments were launched to degrade hexavalent chromium from the aqueous solution using the as-prepared bionanocomposite. Results showed that B. subtilis@Fe3O4@mSiO2@MANHE (BFSM) can degrade hexavalent chromium from the water more effectively (a respectable degradation efficiency of about 94%) when compared with pristine B. subtilis and Fe3O4@mSiO2@MANHE (FSM). Moreover, the BFSM could be separated from the wastewater by magnetic separation technology conveniently due to the Fe3O4 core of FSM. These results indicate that the application of BFSM is a promising strategy for effective treating wastewater containing hexavalent chromium. PMID:27502074

  13. Venturi/vortex scrubber technology for controlling/recycling chromium electroplating emissions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, K.J.; Qi, S.; Holden, B.; Helgeson, N.; Fraser, M.E.

    1999-03-01

    Chromium electroplating is an essential DOD process. Chromium has a combination of qualities that are very difficult to substitute, however, the process itself is inefficient, resulting in the production of byproduct gases that rise and create a mist of chromic acid (strongly regulated as an air pollutant) above the plating tank. Venturi/Vortex Scrubber Technology (VVST) was designed to control chromium electroplating emissions by collecting the gas bubbles before they burst at the solution`s surface. This project demonstrated the Venturi/Vortex Scrubber Technology at the Marine Corps Logistics Base (MCLB) in Albany, GA. This study concluded that the PLRS was able to reduce the flow rate of the current conventional ventilation system at the one tank chromium electroplating facility at MCLB Albany by 63 percent. If new ventilation and control equipment were to be installed at MCLB Albany, this system would offer a 25 percent reduction in capital costs and a 48 percent reduction in annual costs, representing 36 percent in life-cycle cost savings. This study also presented a strong case for the use of Spark-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for monitoring real-time chromium emissions above a chromium electroplating tank.

  14. Laboratory scale studies on removal of chromium from industrial wastes.

    PubMed

    Baig, M A; Mir, Mohsin; Murtaza, Shazad; Bhatti, Zafar I

    2003-05-01

    Chromium being one of the major toxic pollutants is discharged from electroplating and chrome tanning processes and is also found in the effluents of dyes, paint pigments, manufacturing units etc. Chromium exists in aqueous systems in both trivalent (Cr(3+)) and hexavalent (Cr(6+)) forms. The hexavalent form is carcinogenic and toxic to aquatic life, whereas Cr(3+) is however comparatively less toxic. This study was undertaken to investigate the total chromium removal from industrial effluents by chemical means in order to achieve the Pakistan NEQS level of 1 mg/L by the methods of reduction and precipitation. The study was conducted in four phases. In phase I, the optimum pH and cost effective reducing agent among the four popular commercial chemicals was selected. As a result, pH of 2 was found to be most suitable and sodium meta bisulfate was found to be the most cost effective reducing agent respectively. Phase II showed that lower dose of sodium meta bisulfate was sufficient to obtain 100% efficiency in reducing Cr(6+) to Cr(3+), and it was noted that reaction time had no significance in the whole process. A design curve for reduction process was established which can act as a tool for treatment of industrial effluents. Phase III studies indicated the best pH was 8.5 for precipitation of Cr(3+) to chromium hydroxide by using lime. An efficiency of 100% was achievable and a settling time of 30 minutes produced clear effluent. Finally in Phase IV actual waste samples from chrome tanning and electroplating industries, when precipitated at pH of 12 gave 100% efficiency at a settling time of 30 minutes and confined that chemical means of reduction and precipitation is a feasible and viable solution for treating chromium wastes from industries. PMID:12938996

  15. Development of ductile high-strength chromium alloys, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filippi, A. M.

    1973-01-01

    Strength and ductility were evaluated for chromium alloys dispersion hardened with the putative TaC, TaB, CbC, and CbB compounds. TaC and TaB proved to be the most potent strengtheners, but when combined, their effect far outweighed that produced individually. Tests at 1422 K (2100 F) on an alloy containing these two compounds at the combined level of 0.5 m/o revealed a 495 MN/sq m (70 ksi) tensile strength for wrought material, and a 100 hour rupture strength of 208 MN/sq m (30 ksi) when solution annealed and aged to maximize creep resistance. These levels of high temperature strength greatly exceed that reported for any other chromium-base alloy. The ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of the two phase strengthened alloy occurred at approximately 588 K (600 F) when heat treated to optimize creep strength and was not improved by fabrication to produce a wrought and recovered microstructure. The lowest DBTT measured on any of the alloys investigated was 422 K (300 F). Strengthening phases actually formed in Cr-Ta-B and Cr-Cb-B compositions are probable M2CrB2 (M=Ta or Cb) compounds of tetragonal crystal structure. The likely habit relationship between these compounds and chromium is postulated. Cube habit coherency was identified for TaC precipitation in chromium by electron microscopy. In another study, the maximum solubility of carbon in chromium was indicated to lie between 3/4 and 1 a/o and that of boron to be 1/2 a/o.

  16. Welding of high chromium steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, W B

    1928-01-01

    A brief description is given of different groups of high chromium steels (rustless iron and stainless steels) according to their composition and more generally accepted names. The welding procedure for a given group will be much the same regardless of the slight variations in chemical composition which may exist within a certain group. Information is given for the tensile properties (yield point and ultimate strength) of metal sheets and welds before and after annealing on coupons one and one-half inches wide. Since welds in rustless iron containing 16 to 18 percent chromium and 7 to 12 percent nickel show the best combination of strength and ductility in the 'as welded' or annealed condition, it is considered the best alloy to use for welded construction.

  17. Food Chromium Contents, Chromium Dietary Intakes And Related Biological Variables In French Free-Living Elderly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chromium (Cr III), an essential trace element, functions in potentiating insulin sensitivity, regulating glucose homeostasis, improving lipid profile, and maintaining lean body mass. Glucose intolerance and chromium deficiency increase with age, and could be aggravating factors of the metabolic synd...

  18. Spectroscopic analysis of chromium bioremediation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadharajan, C.; Nico, P. S.; Yang, L.; Marcus, M. A.; Steefel, C.; Larsen, J. T.; Beller, H. R.; Brodie, E. L.

    2010-12-01

    Remediation of chromium contamination frequently involves reducing the toxic and soluble hexavalent form, Cr(VI), to the relatively harmless and mostly immobile trivalent state, Cr(III). The objective of this study is to identify the biogeochemical reactions that control in situ chromium reduction in the presence of different dominant electron acceptors, i.e., NO3-, Fe(III), and SO42-. It was hypothesized that indirect, abiotic reduction of Cr(VI) by reduced metabolic products [Fe(II) and sulfides] would dominate over direct enzymatic reduction by denitrifying, iron-reducing, or sulfate-reducing bacteria. It is further hypothesized that the enzymatic reduction of Cr(VI) would produce relatively pure chromium hydroxide precipitates, whereas indirect reduction would result in mixed Cr-Fe hydroxide solid phases. Flow-through columns containing homogenized sediments from the 100H site at Hanford, WA were subjected to nitrate-, sulfate- or iron-reducing conditions in the presence of 5 µM Cr(VI) and 5 mM lactate. Cr(VI) was depleted in the effluent solutions from the nitrate- and sulfate-reducing columns; however only a small amount of Cr(VI) was removed under iron-reducing conditions. Preliminary analysis of micro X-ray absorption spectra indicate that the untreated and iron-reducing column sediments contained pre-existing Cr in the form of primary minerals, e.g. chromite and/or Cr-bearing micas. However, there was an increase in the relative abundance of mixed-phase Cr-Fe hydroxides, i.e., Cr1-xFex(OH)3 in the nitrate- and sulfate-treated columns. A possible explanation for the observations is that the production of Fe(II) was enhanced under the nitrate- and sulfate- reducing conditions, and was most likely sulfide-driven in the latter case. The Fe(II) was subsequently available for reduction of Cr(VI) resulting in the mixed-phase precipitates. The results from the spectroscopic analysis support the hypothesis that Fe(II)-mediated Cr reduction prevails over direct

  19. Selective Chromium(VI) Ligands Identified Using Combinatorial Peptoid Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Abigail S.; Zhou, Effie Y.; Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Francis, Matthew B.

    2013-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is a world-wide water contaminant that is currently without cost-effective and efficient remediation strategies. This is in part due to a lack of ligands that can bind it amid an excess of innocuous ions in aqueous solution. We present herein the design and application of a peptoid-based library of ligand candidates for toxic metal ions. A selective screening process was used to identify members of the library that can bind to Cr(VI) species at neutral pH and in the presence of a large excess of spectator ions. Eleven sequences were identified, and their affinities were compared using titrations monitored with UV-Vis spectroscopy. To identify the interactions involved in coordination and specificity, we evaluated the effects of sequence substitutions and backbone variation in the highest affinity structure. Additional characterization of the complex formed between this sequence and Cr(VI) was performed using NMR spectroscopy. To evaluate the ability of the developed sequences to remediate contaminated solutions, the structures were synthesized on a solid-phase resin and incubated with environmental water samples that contained simulated levels of chromium contamination. The synthetic structures demonstrated the ability to reduce the amount of toxic chromium to levels within the range of the EPA contamination guidelines. In addition to providing some of the first selective ligands for Cr(VI), these studies highlight the promise of peptoid sequences as easily-prepared components of environmental remediation materials. PMID:24195610

  20. A simple route to synthesize conductive stimuli-responsive polypyrrole nanocomposite hydrogel particles with strong magnetic properties and their performance for removal of hexavalent chromium ions from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Hasan; Rahman, Mohammad Mostafizar; Ali, Mohammad Azgar; Minami, Hideto; Tauer, Klaus; Gafur, Mohammad Abdul; Rahman, Mohammad Mahbubor

    2016-08-01

    A combination of maghemite polypyrrole (PPy/γ-Fe2O3) and stimuli-responsive properties in the same hydrogel microspheres is expected to enhance their application potential in various fields such as tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, biosensors, biomedical applications and removal of heavy metals from waste water, catalysis etc. In this investigation a simple two step process is used to prepare conductive stimuli-responsive polypyrrole (PPy) composite hydrogel particles with strong magnetic properties. Poly(styrene-methacrylic acid-N-isopropylacrylamide-polyethelene glycol methacrylate) or P(S-NIPAM-MAA-PEGMA) hydrogel seed particles are first prepared by soap-free precipitation copolymerization. The copolymer hydrogel particles exhibited both temperature- and pH-responsive volume phase transition. Conductive P(S-NIPAM-MAA-PEGMA)/PPy/γ-Fe2O3 nanocomposite hydrogel particles are then prepared by seeded chemical oxidative polymerization of pyrrole in the presence of P(S-NIPAM-MAA-PEGMA) hydrogel seed particles using FeCl3 as a oxidant and p-toluene sulfonic acid (p-TSA) as a dopant. In the reaction system FeCl3 functioned as a source of Fe(III) for the formation of γ-Fe2O3. This reaction also requires the initial presence of Fe(II) provided by the addition of FeCl2. The size and size distribution, surface structure, and morphology of the prepared conductive composite hydrogel particles are confirmed by FTIR, electron micrographs, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and UV-visible spectroscopy. The performance of nanocomposite hydrogel particles has been evaluated for the removal of hexavalent chromium (Cr) ions from water.

  1. Box-Behnken experimental design for chromium(VI) ions removal by bacterial cellulose-magnetite composites.

    PubMed

    Stoica-Guzun, Anicuta; Stroescu, Marta; Jinga, Sorin Ion; Mihalache, Nicoleta; Botez, Adriana; Matei, Cristian; Berger, Daniela; Damian, Celina Maria; Ionita, Valentin

    2016-10-01

    In this study bacterial cellulose-magnetite composites were synthesised for the removal of chromium(VI) from aqueous solutions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the bacterial cellulose-magnetite composites and to reveal the uniform dispersion of nanomagnetite in the BC matrix. Magnetic properties were also measured to confirm the magnetite immobilization on bacterial cellulose membrane. The effects of initial Cr(VI) concentration, solution pH and solid/liquid ratio upon chromium removal were examined using the statistical Box-Behnken Design. Because of the possibility of magnetite dissolution during chromium(VI) adsorption, the degree of iron leaching was also analysed in the same conditions as Cr(VI) adsorption. From the factors affecting chromium(VI) adsorption the most important was solution pH. The highest Cr(VI) removal efficiency was observed at pH 4, accompanied by the lowest iron leaching in the solution. The adsorption experiments also indicated that the adsorption process of chromium(VI) is well described by Freundlich adsorption model. Our results proved that the BC-magnetite composites could be used for an efficient removal of chromium(VI) from diluted solutions with a minimum magnetite dissolution during operation. PMID:27343705

  2. Removal of chromium ions from wastewater by duckweed, Lemna minor L. by using a pilot system with continuous flow.

    PubMed

    Uysal, Y

    2013-12-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the ability of Lemna minor to remove Cr (VI) ions from wastewater in a continuous flow pond system. This system was used to simulate a wastewater treatment pond and a natural wetland as habitat of plants. In order to find optimal conditions for chromium removal, ponds were operated with aqueous solutions having different pH (4.0-7.0) and chromium concentration of 0.25 mgCr(+6)/L, then plants were exposed to different chromium concentrations (0.25-5.0 mgCr(+6)/L) at pH 4.0. Chromium concentrations, both in biomass and wastewater, were measured and removal efficiency was determined throughout water flow. Growth factors such as growth rates, chlorophyll contents and dry/fresh weight ratios of plants were also determined to measure toxic effects of chromium. The percentages of chromium uptake (PMU) and bioconcentration factors (BCF) were calculated for each run. The highest accumulated chromium concentration (4.423 mgCr/g) was found in plants grown in the first chamber of pond operated at pH 4.0 and 5.0 mgCr/L, while the minimum accumulated chromium concentration (0.122 mgCr/g) was in plants grown in the last chamber of pond operated at pH 4.0 and 0.25 mgCr(+6)/L. PMID:24231333

  3. The effect of formic acid concentration on the conductivity and corrosion resistance of chromium carbide coatings electroplated with trivalent chromium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chen-En; Pu, Nen-Wen; Hou, Kung-Hsu; Tseng, Chun-Chieh; Ger, Ming-Der

    2013-10-01

    Different concentrations of formic acid were added into a trivalent chromium electroplating solution to produce chromium carbide (Crsbnd C) coatings. The influence of the formic acid concentration on chemical composition, microstructure, surface morphology, corrosion resistance, conductivity and carbon content of the resulting Crsbnd C coatings was studied. Formic acid was found to increase the carbon content in the coatings so as to form Crsbnd C films. These coatings had a nearly amorphous structure containing Cr, Cr2O3, and various Crsbnd C compounds with carbon content uniformly distributed throughout the coatings. The carbon content and the conductivity of the Crsbnd C layer were correlated with formic acid concentration. For a formic acid concentration of 2 M, the Crsbnd C layer had the highest carbon content (∼28%), the lowest contact resistance, and the best corrosion resistance along with a corrosion current density of ∼6.4 × 10-7 A/cm2.

  4. Venturi/vortex technology for controlling chromium electroplating emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, K.J.; Northrup, J.; Heck, S.R.

    1997-12-31

    A new technology has been developed to control air emissions from hexavalent chromium electroplating tanks. The venturi/vortex scrubber uses a patented drain assembly to pull plating solution, air with toxic particulates above the solution, and unpopped bubbles of generated gases down with a gravity generated vortex effect. The recirculated plating solution acts as the scrubbing liquid and air agitation is eliminated. Separated gases are passed through a condenser/filter to remove any remaining fumes. The device is almost entirely constructed of CPVC. This device offers several advantages over conventional end-of-pipe systems including significantly lower cost, no wastewater, no extensive ventilation system, and emissions are recycled. The system can be is easily retrofitted to existing tanks, however, a loose fitting tank lid is recommended. A pilot demonstration has been performed at Benet Laboratory, Watervliet, NY (US Army) with a 1,500 gallon chromic acid electroplating tank and 1,500 Amps of applied current. Overall chromium emissions results were 0.00002 mg/Amp-hr, surpassing the stringent California State requirement of 0.006 mg/Amp-hr. Emission prevention by capturing unpopped bubbles is the method in which this system reduces the most emissions. The system met current ambient worker safety standards. Two major improvements are recommended: an increase in gas flow rate through the system and a solution to the system`s sensitivity to the plating solution level.

  5. Method for fabricating cermets of alumina-chromium systems. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, C.S.

    1981-10-05

    Cermet insulators resistant to thermal and mechanical shock are prepared from alumina-chromium systems in the following way: by providing an Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ material of about 0.5 to 7.0 micron size with a solid-hydrocarbon overcoating by slurrying an effective amount of said solid hydrocarbon in a solvent mixture containing said Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and thereafter evaporating said solvent, contacting said coated Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ with a solution of chromium precursor compound, heating the resulting mixture in a reducing environment to a temperature above the decomposition temperature of said chromium precursor compound but less than the melting temperature of the Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ or chromium for sufficient duration to yield a particulate compound having chromium essentially dispersed throughout the Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and then densifying said particulate to provide said cermet characterized by a theoretical density in excess of 96% and having 0.1 to 10.0 vol. % elemental chromium metal present therein as a dispersed phase at the boundaries of the Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ material. Cermet components prepared thereby are useful in high temperature equipment, advanced heat engines, and nuclear-related equipment applications where electrical or thermal insulators are required.

  6. Removal of Cr(VI) from chromium contaminated sites by washing with hot water

    SciTech Connect

    Ososkov, V.; Bozzelli, J.W.; Kebbekus, B.B.

    1994-12-31

    Extraction of chromium from a mixture of ore processing residue and soil (slag) by hot water and dilute alkali (0.01M NaOH) washing is studied. It was found that hexavalent chromium, which is the most dangerous and mobile form of chromium, can be effectively removed (95--99%) from slag by washing with these extraction solutions. The extracting liquid can be reused after removing the Cr(VI) ions by ion-exchange technologies. Trivalent chromium is strongly adsorbed by clay minerals and remains in the residue after this mild extraction. The hot water or mild hot alkali washing is recommended as a rapid and inexpensive treatment for chromium-contaminated sites to prevent chromium(VI) migration through soils into groundwater or dispersion as a dust into the atmosphere. Cr(III) remaining in the residue may then be left on-site, preferably with the addition of a reducing agent to prevent conversion to CR(VI) until further clean up is mandated.

  7. New ceramics incorporated with industrial by-products as pore formers for sorption of toxic chromium from aqueous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domopoulou, Asimina; Spiliotis, Xenofon; Baklavaridis, Apostolos; Papapolymerou, George; Karayannis, Vayos

    2015-04-01

    The incorporation of secondary resources including various industrial wastes as pore-forming agents into clayey raw material mixtures for the development of tailored porous ceramic microstructures is currently of increasing interest. In the present research, sintered ceramic compacts were developed incorporated with industrial solid by-products as pore formers, and then used as new sorbents for chromium removal from aqueous media. The microstructures obtained were characterized through X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis as well as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX). Sorption potential of chromium from synthetic solutions on the porous ceramics was studied by static adsorption experiments as a function of the pore-former percentage in the ceramic matrix as well as the initial heavy metal (chromium) concentration, solution pH and temperature. Kinetic studies were conducted and adsorption isotherms of chromium were determined using the Langmuir equation. Preliminary experimental results concerning the adsorption characteristics of chromium on the ceramic materials produced appear encouraging for their possible beneficial use as new sorbents for the removal of toxic chromium from aqueous media. Keywords: sorbents, ceramics, industrial solid by-products, pore former, chromium. Acknowledgements: This research has been co-financed by the European Union (European Social Fund - ESF) and Greek national funds through the Operational Program "Education and Lifelong Learning" of the National Strategic Reference Framework (NSRF) - Research Funding Program ARCHIMEDES III: Investing in knowledge society through the European Social Fund.

  8. New ceramics incorporated with industrial by-products as pore formers for sorption of toxic chromium from aqueous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domopoulou, Artemi

    2015-04-01

    The incorporation of secondary resources including various industrial wastes as pore-forming agents into clayey raw material mixtures for the development of tailored porous ceramic microstructures is currently of increasing interest. In the present research, sintered ceramic compacts were developed incorporated with industrial solid by-products as pore formers, and then used as new sorbents for chromium removal from aqueous media. The microstructures obtained were characterized through X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis as well as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX). Sorption potential of chromium from synthetic solutions on the porous ceramics was studied by static adsorption experiments as a function of the pore-former percentage in the ceramic matrix as well as the initial heavy metal (chromium) concentration, solution pH and temperature. Kinetic studies were conducted and adsorption isotherms of chromium were determined using the Langmuir equation. Preliminary experimental results concerning the adsorption characteristics of chromium on the ceramic materials produced appear encouraging for their possible beneficial use as new sorbents for the removal of toxic chromium from aqueous media. Keywords: sorbents, ceramics, industrial solid by-products, pore-former, chromium. Acknowledgements: This research has been co-financed by the European Union (European Social Fund - ESF) and Greek national funds through the Operational Program "Education and Lifelong Learning" of the National Strategic Reference Framework (NSRF) - Research Funding Program ARCHIMEDES III: Investing in knowledge society through the European Social Fund.

  9. Peat and coconut fiber as biofilters for chromium adsorption from contaminated wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Henryk, Kołoczek; Jarosław, Chwastowski; Witold, Żukowski

    2016-01-01

    Batch adsorption experiments were performed for the removal of chromium (III) and chromium (VI) ions from aqueous solutions using Canadian peat and coconut fiber. The Langmuir model was used to describe the adsorption isotherm. The maximum adsorption for peat reached 18.75 mg/g for Cr(III) and 8.02 mg/g for Cr(VI), whereas the value for fiber was slightly higher and reached 19.21 mg/g for Cr(III) and 9.54 mg/g for Cr(VI). Both chromium forms could be easily eluted from the materials. The adsorption of chromium forms to organic matter could be explained in terms of formation of donor-acceptor chemical covalent bound with hydroxyl groups as ligands and chromium as the central atom in the formed complex. The chromate-reducing activities were monitored with the use of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The results showed that both adsorption and reduction occurred simultaneously and the maximum adsorption capacity of hexavalent chromium being equal to 95% for fiber and 92% for peat was obtained at pH 1.5. The reduction of Cr(VI) in wastewaters began immediately and disappeared after 20 h. Both materials contained yeast and fungi species which can be responsible for reduction of chromium compounds, due to their enzymatic activity (Chwastowski and Koloczek (Acta Biochim Pol 60: 829-834, 2013)). The reduction of Cr(VI) is a two-phase process, the first phase being rapid and based on chemical reaction and the second phase having biological features. After the recovery step, both types of organic materials can be used again for chromium adsorption without any loss in the metal uptake. Both of the materials could be used as biofilters in the wastewater treatment plants. PMID:26315594

  10. Sequential Leaching of Chromium Contaminated Sediments - A Study Characterizing Natural Attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musa, D.; Ding, M.; Beroff, S.; Rearick, M.; Perkins, G.; WoldeGabriel, G. W.; Ware, D.; Harris, R.; Kluk, E.; Katzman, D.; Reimus, P. W.; Heikoop, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Natural attenuation is an important process in slowing down the transport of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), an anthropogenic environmental contaminant, either by adsorption of Cr(VI) to sediments, or by reduction to nontoxic trivalent chromium, Cr(III). The capacity and mechanism of attenuation is explored in this sequential leaching study of different particle size fractions of chromium contaminated sediments and similar uncontaminated sediments from the regional aquifer near Los Alamos, New Mexico. Using this leaching protocol each sediment sample is split in two: one half is leached three times using a 0.1 M sodium bicarbonate/carbonate solution, while the second half is leached three times using a 0.01 M nitric acid, followed by two consecutively increasing magnitudes of nitric acid concentrations. Based on the amphoteric nature of chromium, alkaline leaching is used to establish the amount of Cr(VI) sorbed on the sediment, whereas acid leaching is used to establish the amount of Cr(III). The weak acid is predicted to release the attenuated anthropogenic Cr(III), without affecting Cr-bearing minerals. The sequential, stronger, acid is anticipated to leach Cr(III)-incorporated in the minerals. The efficiency and validation of the sequential leaching method is assessed by comparing the leaching behavior of bentonite and biotite samples, with and without loaded Cr(VI). A 97% chromium mass balance of leached Cr(VI)-loaded bentonite and biotite proves the viability of this method for further use on leaching contaminated sediments. By comparing contaminated and uncontaminated sediment leachate results, of chromium and other major and trace elements, the signature of anthropogenic chromium is determined. Further mineralogical characterization of the sediments provides a quantitative measure of the natural attenuation capacity for chromium. Understanding these results is pertinent in delineating the optimal procedure for the remediation of Cr(VI) in the regional aquifer

  11. HRTEM/AEM and SEM study of fluid-rock interactions: Interaction of copper, silver, selenium, chromium, and cadmium-bearing solutions with geological materials at near surface conditions, with an emphasis on phyllosilicates. Progress report, September 1, 1992--September 1, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Veblen, D.R.; Ilton, E.S.

    1993-05-01

    TEM of naturally occurring Cu-rich biotites and feldspars from weathered portions of porphyry copper deposits has shown that copper is not in the structure of these minerals, is present in their weathering products such as copper-rich vermiculite layers, submicroscopic iron oxyhydroxides and native copper inclusions, and chrysocoua. Reaction of acidic solutions bearing-Cu{sup 2+}, Ag{sup +}, Cr{sup 6+}, and Se{sup 4+}, at 25C, with biotite indicates that ferrous iron in biotite can reduce Cu{sup 2+}, Ag+, and Cr{sup 6+} to Cu{degrees}, Ag{degrees}, and Cr(III), respectively. However, Se{sup 4+} does not appear to be reduced. Copper is reduced in the interlayer region, silver is reduced in the interlayer and on the biotite surfaces, and chromium is reduced at the biotite surface. TEM shows that the reduction of copper and silver by biotite can produce native metal inclusions, whereas reduction of Cr(VI) to CR(III) did not produce any Cr-bearing precipitates. The copper and silver experiments show that iron in biotite can be a much stronger reducing agent than iron in solution. TEM and XPS of biotites reacted with CR(VI) clearly show that edges or (hkO) faces are much more reactive than the basal planes, where the edges are strongly enriched in CR(III) relative to the basal planes. In contrast, biotites reacted with Cr(IH)-bearing solutions show little fractionation between the edges and basal planes. Another important result of our XPS studies is that we demonstrated that the oxidation state of near surface iron in biotite can be quantified.

  12. 29 CFR 1915.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Chromium (VI). 1915.1026 Section 1915.1026 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD EMPLOYMENT Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1915.1026 Chromium (VI). (a) Scope....

  13. 29 CFR 1910.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Chromium (VI). 1910.1026 Section 1910.1026 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS (CONTINUED) Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1910.1026 Chromium (VI). (a) Scope. (1) This...

  14. 29 CFR 1926.1126 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Chromium (VI). 1926.1126 Section 1926.1126 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1126 Chromium (VI). (a) Scope. (1) This...

  15. Environmental Durability of Electroplated Black Chromium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Report describes tests of durability of electroplated black chromium coatings on solar-collector panels in rural, industrial, and seacoast environments for 60, 36, and 13 months, respectively. Black-chromium coating showed exceptionally-good optical durability in all three environments.

  16. REACTIVE SPUTTER DEPOSITION OF CHROMIUM NITRIDE COATINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of substrate temperature and sputtering gas compositon on the structure and properties of chromium-chromium nitride films deposited on C-1040 steel using r.f. magnetron sputter deposition was investigated. X-ray diffraction analysis was used to determine the structure ...

  17. CARCINOGEN RISK ASSESSMENT OF CHROMIUM COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hexavalent chromium has been identified as a human carcinogen. Evidence to support this contention derives from epidemiologic, animal, and genotoxicity studies. Although workers exposed to both trivalent and hexavalent chromium have been shown to be at an excess risk of respirato...

  18. Thermodynamic analysis of chromium solubility data in liquid lithium containing nitrogen: Comparison between experimental data and computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasin, Valery P.; Soyustova, Svetlana I.

    2015-10-01

    The mathematical formalism for description of solute interactions in dilute solution of chromium and nitrogen in liquid lithium have been applied for calculating of the temperature dependence of the solubility of chromium in liquid lithium with the various nitrogen contents. It is shown that the derived equations are useful to provide understanding of a relationship between thermodynamic properties and local ordering in the Li-Cr-N melt. Comparison between theory and data reported in the literature for solubility of chromium in nitrogen-contaminated liquid lithium, was allowed to explain the reasons of the deviation of the experimental semi-logarithmic plot of chromium content in liquid lithium as a function of the reciprocal temperature from a straight line.

  19. Nanocrystalline hard chromium electrodeposition from trivalent chromium bath containing carbamide and formic acid: Structure, composition, electrochemical corrosion behavior, hardness and wear characteristics of deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, F. I.; Protsenko, V. S.; Gordiienko, V. O.; Kwon, S. C.; Lee, J. Y.; Kim, M.

    2011-07-01

    The paper is devoted to the structure, composition and properties investigations of coatings obtained from a sulfate trivalent chromium bath containing formic acid and carbamide as the complexing agents. The results indicate that the deposits have a nanocrystalline type of structure-there are regions with atomic ordered arrangement in bulk material with the average size of 3-5 nm. Carbon is present as chromium carbide within the coating and it is distributed uniformly inside of the deposit. The deposits under study exhibit particular electrochemical behavior (absence of the active dissolution range in acid solution). The hardness of these coatings does not differ noticeably from that typical of coatings obtained in Cr(VI)-based baths. The wear characteristics of the deposits from the proposed bath are somewhat better than in the case of a common hexavalent chromium bath.

  20. Chromium coatings by HVOF thermal spraying: Simulation and practical results

    SciTech Connect

    Knotek, O.; Lugscheider, E.; Jokiel, P.; Schnaut, U.; Wiemers, A.

    1994-12-31

    Within recent years High Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spraying has been considered an asset to the family of thermal spraying processes. Especially for spray materials with melting points below 3,000 K it has proven successful, since it shows advantages when compared to coating processes that produce similar qualities. In order to enlarge the fields of thermal spraying applications into regions with rather low thickness, e.g. about 50--100 {micro}m, especially HVOF thermally sprayed coatings seem to be advantageous. The usual evaluation of optimized spraying parameters, including spray distance, traverse speed, gas flow rates etc. is, however, based on numerous and extensive experiments laid out by trial-and-error or statistical experimental design and thus being expensive: man-power and material is required, spray systems are occupied for experimental works and the optimal solution is questioned, for instance, when a new powder fraction or nozzle is used. In this paper the possibility of reducing such experimental efforts by using modeling and simulation is exemplified for producing thin chromium coatings with a CDS{trademark}-HVOF system. The aim is the production of thermally sprayed chromium coatings competing with galvanic hard chromium platings, which are applied to reduce friction and corrosion but are environmentally disadvantageous during their production.

  1. Characterization of titanium chromium nitride nanocomposite protective coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aouadi, S. M.; Wong, K. C.; Mitchell, K. A. R.; Namavar, F.; Tobin, E.; Mihut, D. M.; Rohde, S. L.

    2004-05-01

    The structural, chemical, optical and mechanical properties of titanium chromium nitride nanocrystalline films deposited by ion beam-assisted deposition were studied by means of X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, nanoindentation and wear testing. Coatings were deposited on silicon and stainless steel substrates with growth temperatures of 150 and 400 °C. The concentration of titanium and chromium in the film was regulated by controlling their evaporation rates. The nitrogen concentration was controlled by varying the nitrogen ion current. X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements indicated that the films deposited at 150 °C formed solid solutions whereas those produced at 400 °C formed nanocomposites. The optical constants were measured using spectroscopic ellipsometry. A correlation between the elemental/phase composition and optical constants was established. The mechanical properties of the coatings were evaluated using nanohardness testing and were found to depend on composition. The nanocomposite films were the hardest (hardness of 30 GPa and elastic modulus of 300 GPa). Tribological properties of titanium chromium nitride coated 440 C stainless steel coupons were evaluated using a ball-on-disk tribometer. These tests were conducted under a load of 50 N for 1.5 million cycles at 180 rpm. Coatings deposited at high temperature did not show any signs of wear.

  2. Growth of chromium carbide in a hot wall DLICVD reactor.

    PubMed

    Boisselier, G; Maury, F; Schuster, F

    2011-09-01

    Chromium carbide coatings were grown at 748 K in a hot wall CVD reactor fed by sublimation of bis(benzene)chromium, BBC (MOCVD) and by direct liquid injection using a BBC/toluene solution (DLICVD). The two types of coatings exhibit an amorphous structure and the same C content (22 at.%). DLICVD permits delivering higher mass flow rate of precursors and consequently the growth rate is 3 times higher and the thickness uniformity is better than using MOCVD. Chromium metal deposition has also been investigated by DLICVD in this hot wall reactor using BBC/toluene/additive as precursor. The purpose of the additive is to block carbide formation. Two additives have been studied: (i) hexachlorobenzene (C6Cl6) and (ii) thiophenol (C6H5SH). The ratio additive/BBC required for Cr metal deposition is a few percent. In this process, C6Cl6 is not decomposed and only traces of Cl (0.4 at.%) are found in the coatings. For a ratio C6Cl6/BBC > 27% the growth of any coating is blocked. The gas phase containing C6H5SH is more reactive since the onset of deposition occurs approximately 50 K before the temperature of the chlorinated compound. Furthermore, a sulfur contamination of 3 at.% has been analyzed in the coatings revealing a partial decomposition of the additive. The results are detailed and discussed in relation with previous works. PMID:22097571

  3. Investigation of oil recovery improvement by coupling an interfacial tension agent and a mobility control agent in light oil reservoirs. Technical progress report, January--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, M.J.

    1995-05-01

    Two series of corefloods were performed to improve alkaline-surfactant-polymer oil recovery economics. In these series of corefloods, the objective was to increase oil recovery by changing the chemical injection sequence. An alkaline gradient was evaluated in the first series of corefloods. Radial corefloods using Berea core were performed in which a pre-flush of alkaline-polymer solution was injected before the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. 30% pore volume (PV) of 1.0 wt % Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} plus 0.2 wt % Petrostep B-100 plus 500 mg/l Flopaam 3330S was injected followed by 30% PV 500 mg/l Flopaam 3330S. A 5% PV 2.0 wt % Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} plus 500 mg/l Flopaam 3330S followed by 5% PV 1.5 wt % Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} plus 500 mg/l Flopaam 3330S was injected prior to the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in the coreflood with an alkaline-polymer pre-flush. A water flush of 1.5 to 2 PV followed chemical injection. The pre-flush objective was to inject sufficient alkali to satiate consumption and to force the surfactant to go through optimum interfacial tension and phase behavior states. Incremental oil recovery increased 24% from 0.106 PV (30.3% waterflood residual oil) to 0.131 PV (38.6% waterflood residual oil) when an alkaline-gradient pre-flush was injected. The effect on the oil recovery economics of an alkaline-polymer pre-flush is shown in Table 2. Oil recovery as well as the mass of alkali and polymer injected increased making the cost per incremental barrel of oil unchanged.

  4. Chromium speciation in solid matrices and regulation: a review.

    PubMed

    Unceta, N; Séby, F; Malherbe, J; Donard, O F X

    2010-06-01

    In recent years, the extensive use of chromium in industrial processes has led to the promotion of several directives and recommendations by the European Union, that try to limit and regulate the presence of Cr(VI) in the environment and to protect industrial workers using chromium and end-users of manufactured products. As a consequence, new standard methods and analytical procedures have been published at the EU level for Cr(VI) determination in soil, sludge, sediment, and similar waste materials, workplace atmospheres, cement, packaging materials, industrially produced samples, and corrosion-protection layers on some components of vehicles and electrical and electronic equipment. The objective of this article is to summarize the different directives and recommendations and to critically review the currently existing standard methods and the methods published in the literature for chromium speciation in the above mentioned solid matrices, putting the emphasis on the different extraction procedures which have been developed for each matrix. Particular attention has been paid to Cr(III) and Cr(VI) inter-conversions that can occur during extraction and efforts to minimize these unwanted reactions. Although the use of NaOH-Na(2)CO(3) solutions with hot plate extraction seems to be the more widespread procedure, species transformation can still occur and several studies suggest that speciated isotope-dilution mass spectrometry (SIDMS) could be a suitable tool for correction of these interconversions. Besides, recent studies have proved the role of Cr(III) in chromium toxicology. As a consequence, the authors suggest an update of standard methods in the near future. PMID:20099060

  5. Study of Chromium Oxide Activities in EAF Slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Baijun; Li, Fan; Wang, Hui; Sichen, Du

    2016-02-01

    The activity coefficients of chromium in Cu-Cr melts were determined by equilibrating liquid copper with solid Cr2O3 in CO-CO2 atmosphere. The temperature dependence of the activity coefficients of chromium in Cu-Cr melts could be expressed as lg γ_{Cr}(s)^{0} = { 3 2 5 9( ± 1 8 6} )/T - 0. 5 9( { ± 0. 1} ). Based on the above results, the activities of bivalent and trivalent chromium oxide in some slags at 1873 K (1600 °C) were measured. The slags were equilibrated with Cu-Cr melts under two oxygen partial pressures ( {p_{O}_{ 2} }} } = 6.9 × 10-4 and 1.8 × 10-6 Pa, respectively). The morphology of the quenched slags and the solubility of chromium oxide in the melts were investigated by EPMA, SEM, and XRD. Under both oxygen partial pressures, the slags were saturated by the solid solution MgAl2- x Cr x O4- δ . At the low oxygen partial pressure (1.8 × 10-6 Pa), the content of Cr in the liquid phase varied from 0.4 to 1.6 mass pct with the total Cr content in the slags increasing from 1.3 to 10.8 mass pct. At the high oxygen partial pressure (6.9 × 10-4 Pa), the content of Cr in the liquid phase decreased to the level of 0.2 to 0.6 mass pct. Both the activities of CrO and Cr2O3 in slag were found to increase approximately linearly with the increase of the total Cr content in slag. While the oxygen partial pressure had minor effect on the activity of Cr2O3 in the slag, it had significant effect on the activity of CrO.

  6. Innovative soil treatment process design for removal of trivalent chromium

    SciTech Connect

    Stallings, J.H.; Durkin, M.E.

    1997-12-31

    A soil treatment process has been developed as part of a US Air Force environmental compliance project at Air Force Plant 44, Tucson, AZ for treating soil contaminated with heavy metals including trivalent chromium, cadmium, copper, and nickel. The process was designed to treat a total of 133,000 tons of soil in a 400 ton per day facility. Features of the soil treatment process include physical treatment and separation, and a chemical treatment process of the remaining fines using a hypochlorite leach allowing chromium to be solubilized at a high pH. After treating, fines are washed in three stage countercurrent thickeners and chromium hydroxide cake is recovered as a final produce from the leach solution. Treatability studies were conducted, laboratory and a pilot plant was built. Process design criteria and flow sheet, material balances, as well as preliminary equipment selection and sizing for the facility have been completed. Facility was designed for the removal of Cr at a concentration of an average of 1230 mg/kg from the soil and meeting a risk based clean-closure limit of 400 mg/kg of Cr. Capital costs for the 400 tpd plant were estimated at 9.6 million with an operating and maintenance cost of $54 per ton As process is most economic for large quantities of soil with relatively low concentrations of contaminants, it was not used in final closure when the estimated volume of contaminated soil removed dropped to 65,000 tons and concentration of chromium increased up to 4000 mg/kg. However, the process could have application in situations where economics and location warrant.

  7. Effect of Topical Fluoride on Surface of Cast Titanium and Nickel-Chromium: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Nadiger, Ramesh Khandurao; Shetty, Omkar

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this in-vitro study was to evaluate the effect of topical fluoride on surface of cast titanium and nickel-chromium. Materials and Methods: Thirty-nine rectangular specimens of titanium (grade 2) and 39 rectangular specimens of nickel-chromium were cast in equal dimensions and divided into three groups of 13 samples each. Group one specimens of titanium and nickel-chromium were placed in 2% neutral sodium fluoride (NaF) solution for 16 minutes. Group two specimens of titanium and nickel-chromium were immersed in 1.23% acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) gel for eight minutes. Group three specimens of titanium and nickel-chromium were immersed in distilled water for 16 minutes. The surface roughness of the specimens was evaluated and the data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and post-hoc comparison test with the level of significance set at 5% (P< 0.05). The surface of the specimens was further analyzed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). Results: Group two titanium specimens showed a statistically significant increase in surface roughness (P<0.05); but no statistically significant increase was noted in the surface roughness of nickel-chromium specimens in groups one, two and three (P>0.05). Qualitative SEM and EDS analyses further revealed the surface corrosion of titanium (group two) and localized mild corrosive pitting of nickel-chromium specimens (group two). Conclusion: Topical fluoride with acidic pH affects the surface roughness of titanium and to a certain extent, nickel-chromium. Neutral NaF solutions cause no significant change in corrosion resistance of titanium or nickel-chromium. PMID:26884773

  8. Removal of chromium from groundwater using permeable barriers: An aquifer simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, M.D.; Shelton, S.P.

    1994-12-31

    Previous efforts to remediate groundwater contaminated by chromium-bearing industrial wastes have involved post-extraction methods, whereby groundwater is pumped to the surface treated and returned to the aquifer. This practice has proven effective for removing soluble pollutants. However, it is often costly and labor intensive and requires treating large volumes of water. Also, institutional obstacles such as ground and surface water discharge permits and groundwater rights must be considered. An alternative to conventional remediation methods is the in situ permeable barrier process, which intercepts soluble contaminants from solution but allows groundwater to flow through. Trench-based barriers, backfilled with reactive media, result in the direct adsorption of chemical species or the oxidation reduction of chemical species followed by precipitation. Laboratory studies were conducted to determine the technical feasibility of using trench-based media to remove chromium from groundwater. Removal of soluble hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) to concentrations less than the maximum contaminant level (MCL) for total chromium in drinking water (0.05 mg/l) was demonstrated with all candidate media in the aquifer simulation model. Adsorption appeared to be the principle mechanism of removal for all candidate media considered. Information gained from experience with the physical model was used in developing a computer generated, 1-D solute transport model to predict the movement of hexavalent chromium in an aquifer system.

  9. SELECTIVE LEACHING OF CHROMIUM FROM WASHED 241-S-110 HANFORD TANK SLUDGE

    SciTech Connect

    Rapko, Brian M.); Vienna, John D.)

    2003-08-30

    This report describes our continuing studies directed at enhancing the dissolution of Cr(III) from Hanford tank sludges by treatment with oxidants under alkaline conditions. This study evaluates the use of ferrate, FeO42-, permanganate, MnO4-, and persulfate, S2O82-, at selectively removing chromium from washed Hanford Tank 241-S-110 sludge. Variables examined include the initial hydroxide concentration, time, and temperature. It was found that all oxidants enhanced both the rate and extent of chromium dissolution, with > 90% of the total chromium being dissolved under optimum conditions after 48-h contact times. The dissolved chromium was determined to be present as chromate, CrO42-. Elevated transuranic (TRU) element concentrations in the leach solutions were observed, attributed to enhanced Pu dissolution, but in all cases an immobilized form of the leach solutions would be considered a low-level waste, not a TRU waste. Evaluation of the immobilized high level waste (IHLW) that would be generated following oxidative alkaline leaching indicates that both extensive Al and Cr removal are needed to maximize the benefit of pretreatment. The amount of IHLW waste would be reduced by 20% by the almost quantitative Al removal documented to be possible through an extended caustic leach. Oxidative leaching of chromium sufficient to remove 95% of the remaining Cr provides for a further reduction of almost 50% in the amount of glass produced for a total of roughly 70% volume reduction in glass over that produced from untreated waste.

  10. Chromium speciation in environmental samples by solid phase extraction on Chromosorb 108.

    PubMed

    Tuzen, Mustafa; Soylak, Mustafa

    2006-02-28

    In the present work, a solid phase extraction system has been proposed for speciation of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in the real samples. The procedure based on the adsorption of chromium(III) as dithizonate chelate on the Chromosorb 108 resin. After reduction of Cr(VI) by concentrated H2SO4 and ethanol, the system was applied to the total chromium. Cr(VI) was calculated as the difference between the total Cr content and the Cr(III) content. The influences of the analytical parameters including pH of the aqueous solution, amounts of dithizone, eluent type, sample volume and flow rates of the sample and eluent solution were investigated. No considerable interferences have been observed from other investigated anions and cations on the chromium speciation. The adsorption capacity of sorbent was 4.50 mg/g Cr(III). The detection limit of Cr(III) is 0.75 microg/L. The proposed method was applied to the speciation of chromium in environmental samples including natural waters and total chromium preconcentration in microwave digested Turkish tobacco, coffee and soil samples with satisfactory results. In order to verify the accuracy of the method, two certified reference materials (NIST SRM 1573a Tomato Leaves and RTC-CRM 025-050 Metals on Soil) were analyzed and the results obtained were in good agreement with the certified values. The relative errors and relative standard deviations were below 5% and 9%, respectively. PMID:16236441

  11. Low-chromium reduced-activation chromium-tungsten steels

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1996-10-01

    Bainitic microstructures formed during continuous cooling can differ from classical upper and lower bainite formed during isothermal transformation. Two types of non-classical bainite were observed depending on the cooling rate: carbide-free acicular bainite at rapid cooling rates and granular bainite at slower cooling rates. The Charpy impact toughness of the acicular ferrite was found to be considerably better than for the granular bainite. It was postulated that alloying to improve the hardenability of the steel would promote the formation of acicular bainite, just as increasing the cooling rate does. To test this, chromium and tungsten were added to the 2 1/4Cr-2W and 2 1/4Cr-2WV steel compositions to increase their hardenability, and the microstructures and mechanical properties were examined.

  12. Investigation of oil recovery improvement by coupling an interfacial tension agent and a mobility control agent in light oil reservoirs. Technical progress report, July 1995--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, M.J.

    1995-10-01

    This study will investigate two major areas concerning co-injection and interfacial tension reduction agents and a mobility control agent into petroleum reservoirs. The first will consist of defining the mechanisms of interaction of an alkaline agent, a surfactant, and a polymer on a fluid-fluid and a fluid-rock basis. The second is the improvement of the economics of the combined technology. This report examines altering the concentration of alkali and polymer on the oil recovery economics of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution.

  13. Chromium

    MedlinePlus

    ... the research to date is inconclusive. No large, randomized, controlled clinical trials testing this hypothesis have been ... risk of developing the disease. A review of randomized controlled clinical trials evaluated this hypothesis [ 35 ]. This ...

  14. Chromium Renderserver: Scalable and Open Source Remote RenderingInfrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Brian; Ahern, Sean; Bethel, E. Wes; Brugger, Eric; Cook,Rich; Daniel, Jamison; Lewis, Ken; Owen, Jens; Southard, Dale

    2007-12-01

    Chromium Renderserver (CRRS) is software infrastructure thatprovides the ability for one or more users to run and view image outputfrom unmodified, interactive OpenGL and X11 applications on a remote,parallel computational platform equipped with graphics hardwareaccelerators via industry-standard Layer 7 network protocolsand clientviewers. The new contributions of this work include a solution to theproblem of synchronizing X11 and OpenGL command streams, remote deliveryof parallel hardware-accelerated rendering, and a performance analysis ofseveral different optimizations that are generally applicable to avariety of rendering architectures. CRRSis fully operational, Open Sourcesoftware.

  15. Determination of hexavalent chromium in traditional Chinese medicines by high-performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Li, Li-Min; Xia, Jing; Cao, Shuai; Hu, Xin; Lian, Hong-Zhen; Ji, Shen

    2015-12-01

    An analytical method that combined high-performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry has been developed for the determination of hexavalent chromium in traditional Chinese medicines. Hexavalent chromium was extracted using the alkaline solution. The parameters such as the concentration of alkaline and the extraction temperature have been optimized to minimize the interconversion between trivalent chromium and hexavalent chromium. The extracted hexavalent chromium was separated on a weak anion exchange column in isocratic mode, followed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry determination. To obtain a better chromatographic resolution and sensitivity, 75 mM NH4 NO3 at pH 7 was selected as the mobile phase. The linearity of the proposed method was investigated in the range of 0.2-5.0 μg L(-1) (r(2) = 0.9999) for hexavalent chromium. The limits of detection and quantitation are 0.1 and 0.3 μg L(-1) , respectively. The developed method was successfully applied to the determination of hexavalent chromium in Chloriti lapis and Lumbricus with satisfactory recoveries of 95.8-112.8%. PMID:26541101

  16. Trivalent chromium electrolyte and process employing reducing agents

    SciTech Connect

    Tomaszewski, T.W.

    1984-10-16

    An aqueous acidic trivalent chromium electrolyte and process for electrodepositing chromium platings comprising an electrolyte containing trivalent chromium ions, a complexing agent, halide ions, ammonium ions and a reducing agent comprising an ion selected from the group consisting of scandium, yttrium, lanthanum, titanium, zirconium, hafnium, molybdenum, arsenic, selenium, tellurium, cerium, uranium, and tin present in an amount effective to maintain the concentration of hexavalent chromium ions formed in the bath at a level at which satisfactory chromium electrodeposits are obtained.

  17. Occupational asthma due to chromium.

    PubMed

    Leroyer, C; Dewitte, J D; Bassanets, A; Boutoux, M; Daniel, C; Clavier, J

    1998-01-01

    We describe a 28-year-old subject employed as a roofer in a construction company since the age of 19, who developed work-related symptoms of a cough, shortness of breath, wheezing, rhinitis and headaches. A description of a usual day at work suggested that the symptoms worsened while he was sawing corrugated fiber cement. Baseline spirometry was normal, and there was a mild bronchial hyperresponsiveness to carbachol. A skin patch test to chromium was negative. A specific inhalation challenge showed a boderline fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) after exposure to fiber cement dust. Exposure to nebulization of potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7), at 0.1 mg.ml-1 for 30 min, was followed by an immediate fall by 20% FEV1. Simultaneously, a significant increase in bronchial hyperresponsiveness was demonstrated. PMID:9782225

  18. Determination of chromium(III) and total chromium in marine waters.

    PubMed

    Gardner, M J; Ravenscroft, J E

    1996-03-01

    The development of an analytical technique is described which may be used to determine chromium, chromium(III) and chromium(VI) in estuarine and coastal waters. The method is based on selective micro-solvent extraction with subsequent GFAAS. The technique has been applied in a major North Sea estuary. The results obtained confirm that thermodynamic factors alone cannot be relied upon to describe the form of chromium in estuaries. Kinetic factors appear to have a strong influence over speciation and lead to the persistence of Cr(III) species in environments where Cr(VI) would be expected to be present. PMID:15067453

  19. Performance of advanced chromium electrodes for the NASA Redox Energy Storage System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gahn, R. F.; Charleston, J.; Ling, J. S.; Reid, M. A.

    1981-01-01

    Chromium electrodes were prepared for the NASA Redox Storage System with meet the performance requirements for solar-photovoltaic, wind-turbine and electric utility applications. Gold-lead catalyzed carbon felt electrodes up tp 930 sq cm were fabricated and tested in single cells and multicell stacks for hydrogen evolution, coulombic efficiency, catalyst stability and electrochemical activity. Factors which affect the overall performance of a particular electrode include the carbon felt lot, the cleaning treatment and the gold catalyzation method. Effects of the chromium solution chemistry and impurities on charge/discharge performance are also presented.

  20. Selective and sensitive detection of chromium(VI) in waters using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Weldy, Effie; Wolff, Chloe; Miao, Zhixin; Chen, Hao

    2013-09-01

    From 2000 through 2011, there were 14 criminal cases of violations of the Clean Water Act involving the discharge of chromium, a toxic heavy metal, into drinking and surface water sources. As chromium(VI), a potential carcinogen present in the environment, represents a significant safety concern, it is currently the subject of an EPA health risk assessment. Therefore, sensitive and selective detection of this species is highly desired. This study reports the analysis of chromium(VI) in water samples by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) following its reduction and complexation with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC). The reduction and subsequent complexation produce a characteristic [Cr(III)O]-PDC complex which can be detected as a protonated ion of m/z 507 in the positive ion mode. The detection is selective to chromium(VI) under acidic pH, even in the presence of chromium(III) and other metal ions, providing high specificity. Different water samples were examined, including deionized, tap, and river waters, and sensitive detection was achieved. In the case of deionized water, quantification over the concentration range of 3.7 to 148ppb gave an excellent correlation coefficient of 0.9904 using the enhanced MS mode scan. Using the single-reaction monitoring (SRM) mode (monitoring the characteristic fragmentation of m/z 507 to m/z 360), the limit of detection (LOD) was found to be 0.25ppb. The LOD of chromium(VI) for both tap and river water samples was determined to be 2.0ppb. A preconcentration strategy using simple vacuum evaporation of the aqueous sample was shown to further improve the ESI signal by 15 fold. This method, with high sensitivity and selectivity, should provide a timely solution for the real-world analysis of toxic chromium(VI). PMID:23937937

  1. Efficiency of silicon solar cells containing chromium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, A. M. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    Efficiency of silicon solar cells containing about one quadrillon atoms cu cm of chromium is improved about 26% by thermal annealing of the silicon wafer at a temperature of 200 C to form chromium precipitates having a diameter of less than 1 Angstrom. Further improvement in efficiency is achieved by scribing laser lines onto the back surface of the wafer at a spacing of at least 0.5 mm and at a depth of less than 13 micrometers to preferentially precipitate chromium near the back surface and away from the junction region of the device. This provides an economical way to improve the deleterious effects of chromium, one of the impurities present in metallurgical grade silicon mateial.

  2. Potentiometry: A Chromium (III) -- EDTA Complex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoppe, J. I.; Howell, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experiment that involves the preparation of a chromium (III)-EDTA compound, a study of its infrared spectrum, and the potentiometric determination of two successive acid dissociation constants. (Author/GS)

  3. Efficiency of silicon solar cells containing chromium

    DOEpatents

    Frosch, Robert A. Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space; Salama, Amal M.

    1982-01-01

    Efficiency of silicon solar cells containing about 10.sup.15 atoms/cm.sup.3 of chromium is improved about 26% by thermal annealing of the silicon wafer at a temperature of 200.degree. C. to form chromium precipitates having a diameter of less than 1 Angstrom. Further improvement in efficiency is achieved by scribing laser lines onto the back surface of the wafer at a spacing of at least 0.5 mm and at a depth of less than 13 micrometers to preferentially precipitate chromium near the back surface and away from the junction region of the device. This provides an economical way to improve the deleterious effects of chromium, one of the impurities present in metallurgical grade silicon material.

  4. Chemical Speciation of Chromium in Drilling Muds

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, Takeyoshi; Yoshii, Mitsuru; Shinoda, Kohzo

    2007-02-02

    Drilling muds are made of bentonite and other clays, and/or polymers, mixed with water to the desired viscosity. Without the drilling muds, corporations could not drill for oil and gas and we would have hardly any of the fuels and lubricants considered essential for modern industrial civilization. There are hundreds of drilling muds used and some kinds of drilling muds contain chromium. The chemical states of chromium in muds have been studied carefully due to concerns about the environmental influence. However it is difficult to determine the chemical state of chromium in drilling muds directly by conventional analytical methods. We have studied the chemical form of chromium in drilling muds by using a laboratory XAFS system and a synchrotron facility.

  5. Removal of High Concentration Chromium by a Foam-separating Technique Using Casein Proteins as a Foaming Reagent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Futoshi

    Foam separation of high concentration chromium in leather tanning wastewater was investigated using casein protein as a foaming reagent5mL of5w/v% ammonium acetate buffer was added to the sample chromium water. After adjusting the pH to 9.0,4g/L concentrations of casein and gelatin solution were added to recovery the coagulating flocs of chromium resulting foam separation. The sample water containing chromium flocs was incased in reactor, then mixed with distilled water and 1mL of ethanol to sum 200mL total. The foam separation was performed at time intervals of 3min with an air flow rate of 300mL/min. With casein reagent, the removal rate of chromium was not influenced by the presence of NaCl, however, the rate decreased tendency using with the use of gelatin. The proposed method, utilizing 4g/L of casein solution with water, was not influenced by the presence of calcium (<34mM), magnesium (<1mM), carbonate (<0.5mM), bicarbonate (<1.2mM) nor sulfate (<350mM) ions, and is ideal for foam separation in chromium concentrations of about 100mgCr/L.

  6. Attenuation of chromium toxicity by bioremediation technology.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Monalisa; Patra, Hemanta Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Chromium is an important toxic environmental pollutant. Chromium pollution results largely from industrial activities, but other natural and anthropogenic sources also contribute to the problem. Plants that are exposed to environmental contamination by chromium are affected in diverse ways, including a tendency to suffer metabolic stress. The stress imposed by Cr exposure also extends to oxidative metabolic stress in plants that leads to the generation of active toxic oxygen free radicals. Such active free radicals degrade essential biomolecules and distort plant biological membranes. In this chapter, we describe sources of environmental chromium contamination, and provide information about the toxic impact of chromium on plant growth and metabolism. In addition, we address different phytoremediation processes that are being studied for use worldwide, in contaminated regions, to address and mitigate Cr pollution. There has been a long history of attempts to successfully mitigate the toxic effects of chromium-contaminated soil on plants and other organisms. One common approach, the shifting of polluted soil to landfills, is expensive and imposes environmental risks and health hazards of its own. Therefore, alternative eco-friendly bioremediation approaches are much in demand for cleaning chromium-polluted areas. To achieve its cleaning effects, bioremediation utilizes living organisms (bacteria, algae, fungi, and plants) that are capable of absorbing and processing chromium residues in ways which amend or eliminate it. Phytoremediation (bioremediation with plants) techniques are increasingly being used to reduce heavy metal contamination and to minimize the hazards of heavy metal toxicity. To achieve this, several processes, viz., rhizofiltration, phytoextraction, phytodetoxification, phytostabilization, and phytovolatilization, have been developed and are showing utility in practice, or promise. Sources of new native hyperaccumulator plants for use at contaminated

  7. Electrodeposition of microcrystalline chromium from fused salts

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, T.; Varma, R.; Brown, A.

    1987-01-01

    Chromium can be conveniently electroplated from fused chloride electrolytes. The deposition from LiCl-KCl (eutectic)-CrCl/sub 2/ melts is known to produce large crystal grains. Large grain size and other problems encountered in the electrodeposition of microcrystalline chromium from fused salt are discussed. The results indicate that combined use of forced electrolyte convection and a nucleating pulse in conjunction with a periodic reverse pulse produces fine-grained deposits.

  8. The effects of aluminum, iron, chromium, and yttrium on rat intestinal smooth muscle in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cunat, L; Membre, H; Marchal, L; Chaussidon, M; Burnel, D

    1998-01-01

    The modification of peristaltic activity in the presence of several metal ions has been investigated in the rat intestine by the isolated organ technique. The metals tested modify the intestinal movements: aluminum, chromium, and yttrium cause a decrease of amplitude, while iron showed no effect. By use of microscopic techniques, the presence of yttrium hydroxide was observed in the intestinal tissues. Iron also appears as a precipitate outside of the intestinal serosal, which may explain why iron did not modify the peristaltism. Chromium and aluminum were not apparent to microscope, despite being detected and quantified in the tissues by means of atomic emission spectrometer. We conclude that the trivalent ions of these elements may operate differently on the mechanisms of intestinal contractions: yttrium precipitates in intercellular spaces, iron precipitates outside the intestines, and chromium and aluminum remain in solution and are distributed homogeneously in the smooth intestinal muscle. PMID:9845462

  9. Nanomagnetic domains of chromium deposited on vertically-aligned carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Andrew C.; Faulkner, Michael K.; Harris, Robert C.; Goddard, Alex; Abbott, Andrew P.

    2012-12-01

    The drive to create ever smaller magnetic memory devices has led to the development of new nanomagnetic domains on surfaces. This paper reports the development of nano-chromium magnetic domains obtained using electrodeposition on vertically aligned carbon nanofibers arrays. Attempts to achieve this using conventional aqueous solutions were unsuccessful even after thin nickel underlayers were applied. The use of a novel electrolyte, a deep eutectic solvent, made from choline chloride: chromium (III) chloride enabled highly conformal overcoatings of chromium on individual bare carbon nanotubes to be obtained. Very high aspect ratio metal microstructures could be obtained by this novel technology. Magnetic imaging of the coated nanoarrays showed there to be clear magnetic character to the coating when the thin coatings were applied but this disappeared when the deposits were thicker and more contiguous.

  10. In situ Carica papaya stem matrix and Fusarium oxysporum (NCBT-156) mediated bioremediation of chromium.

    PubMed

    Amatussalam, A; Abubacker, M N; Rajendran, R Babu

    2011-12-01

    Removal of heavy metal chromium was carried out using the fungus Fusarium oxysporum NCBT-156 strain isolated from soil of leather tanning effluent in in situ condition using potassium dichromate solution with 10 per cent Czapek-dox liquid medium. Biosorbent matrix was developed using Carica papaya plant dry stem to colonize the fungal strain to facilitate bioabsorption process. Bioabsorption of chromium was by metabolically mediated intracellular accumulation process. Maximum efficiency of chromium removal by biosorption upto 90 per cent was achieved at the end of 5th day of incubation (120 h of contact time) for 100 and 200 ppm concentration, upto 80 per cent for 300 and 400 ppm, and upto 65 per cent for 500 ppm to 1000 ppm concentrations with pH ranging from 5.8, 5.6, 5.5, 5.4 and 5.2, respectively for 100, 200, 300, 400, 500-1000 ppm concentration. SDS-PAGE protein profile showed significant difference in 34 kDa protein band after chromium absorption by the fungus. FTIR spectroscopic analysis revealed that the main functional groups involved in the uptake of chromium by F. oxysporium strain were carbonyl, carboxyl, amino and hydroxyl groups. PMID:22403866

  11. Direct access to macroporous chromium nitride and chromium titanium nitride with inverse opal structure.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weitian; DiSalvo, Francis J

    2015-03-21

    We report a facile synthesis of single-phase, nanocrystalline macroporous chromium nitride and chromium titanium nitride with an inverse opal morphology. The material is characterized using XRD, SEM, HR-TEM/STEM, TGA and XPS. Interconversion of macroporous CrN to Cr2O3 and back to CrN while retaining the inverse opal morphology is also demonstrated. PMID:25705745

  12. Lateral stress evolution in chromium sulfide cermets with varying excess chromium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petel, O. E.; Appleby-Thomas, G. J.; Wood, D. C.; Capozzi, A.; Nabavi, A.; Goroshin, S.; Frost, D. L.; Hazell, P. J.

    2016-04-01

    The shock response of chromium sulfide-chromium, a cermet of potential interest as a matrix material for ballistic applications, has been investigated at two molar ratios. Using a combustion synthesis technique allowed for control of the molar ratio of the material, which was investigated under near-stoichiometric (cermet) and excess chromium (interpenetrating composite) conditions, representing chromium:sulfur molar ratios of 1.15:1 and 4:1, respectively. The compacts were investigated via the plate-impact technique, which allowed the material to be loaded under a one-dimensional state of strain. Embedded manganin stress gauges were employed to monitor the temporal evolution of longitudinal and lateral components of stress in both materials. Comparison of these two components has allowed assessment of the variation of material shear strength both with impact pressure/strain-rate and time for the two molar ratio conditions. The two materials exhibited identical material strength despite variations in their excess chromium contents.

  13. Chromium, chromium isotopes and selected trace elements, western Mojave Desert, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izbicki, J.A.; Ball, J.W.; Bullen, T.D.; Sutley, S.J.

    2008-01-01

    Chromium(VI) concentrations in excess of the California Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of 50 ??g/L occur naturally in alkaline, oxic ground-water in alluvial aquifers in the western Mojave Desert, southern California. The highest concentrations were measured in aquifers eroded from mafic rock, but Cr(VI) as high as 27 ??g/L was measured in aquifers eroded from granitic rock. Chromium(VI) concentrations did not exceed 5 ??g/L at pH < 7.5 regardless of geology. ??53Cr values in native ground-water ranged from 0.7 to 5.1??? and values were fractionated relative to the average ??53Cr composition of 0??? in the earth's crust. Positive ??53Cr values of 1.2 and 2.3??? were measured in ground-water recharge areas having low Cr concentrations, consistent with the addition of Cr(VI) that was fractionated on mineral surfaces prior to entering solution. ??53Cr values, although variable, did not consistently increase or decrease with increasing Cr concentrations as ground-water flowed down gradient through more oxic portions of the aquifer. However, increasing ??53Cr values were observed as dissolved O2 concentrations decreased, and Cr(VI) was reduced to Cr(III), and subsequently removed from solution. As a result, the highest ??53Cr values were measured in water from deep wells, and wells in discharge areas near dry lakes at the downgradient end of long flow paths through alluvial aquifers. ??53Cr values at an industrial site overlying mafic alluvium having high natural background Cr(VI) concentrations ranged from -0.1 to 3.2???. Near zero ??53Cr values at the site were the result of anthropogenic Cr. However, mixing with native ground-water and fractionation of Cr within the plume increased ??53Cr values at the site. Although ??53Cr was not necessarily diagnostic of anthropogenic Cr, it was possible to identify the extent of anthropogenic Cr at the site on the basis of the ??53Cr values in conjunction with major-ion data, and the ??18O and ??D composition of water from wells.

  14. [Determination of trivalent chromium and hexavalent chromium in dried edible fungi by microwave ashing-liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Ni, Zhanglin; Tang, Fubin; Qu, Minghua; Mo, Runhong

    2014-02-01

    An analytical method using liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LC-ICP-MS) for the determination of trivalent chromium (Cr(III)) and hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in dried edible fungi was established. Edible fungi sample was ashed by a microwave ashing system and Na2 EDTA was added to the ashing sample to stabilize the Cr(III). An anion exchange column (250 mm x 4.6 mm, 10 microm) with a 60 mmol/L nitric acid (pH 9.3) solution as mobile phase was used for the separation and using ICP-MS as a detector for the determination of trivalent chromium and hexavalent chromium. The calibration curves were linear in the range of 0.5-50 microg/L and the correlation coefficients were 0. 999 9 for Cr(III) and Cr(VI). The average recoveries of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) ranged from 78.0% to 90.7% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs, n = 6) less than 4%. The limits of quantification (LOQ) of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) were 0.5 microg/L. The method is efficient, reliable and sensitive, and can meet the requirement for the determination of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in dried edible fungi. PMID:24822453

  15. High strength nickel-chromium-iron austenitic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Gibson, Robert C.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1980-01-01

    A solid solution strengthened Ni-Cr-Fe alloy capable of retaining its strength at high temperatures and consisting essentially of 42 to 48% nickel, 11 to 13% chromium, 2.6 to 3.4% niobium, 0.2 to 1.2% silicon, 0.5 to 1.5% vanadium, 2.6 to 3.4% molybdenum, 0.1 to 0.3% aluminum, 0.1 to 0.3% titanium, 0.02 to 0.05% carbon, 0.002 to 0.015% boron, up to 0.06 zirconium, and the balance iron. After solution annealing at 1038.degree. C. for one hour, the alloy, when heated to a temperature of 650.degree. C., has a 2% yield strength of 307 MPa, an ultimate tensile strength of 513 MPa and a rupture strength of as high as 400 MPa after 100 hours.

  16. Chromium Recycling in the United States in 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Papp, John F.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to illustrate the extent to which chromium was recycled in the United States in 1998 and to identify chromium-recycling trends. The major use of chromium was in the metallurgical industry to make stainless steel; substantially less chromium was used in the refractory and chemical industries. In this study, the only chromium recycling reported was that which was a part of stainless steel scrap reuse. In 1998, 20 percent of the U.S. apparent consumption of chromium was secondary (from recycling); the remaining 80 percent was based on net chromium commodity imports and stock adjustments. Chromite ore was not mined in the United States in 1998. In 1998, 75,300 metric tons (t) of chromium contained in old scrap was consumed in the United States; it was valued at $66.4 million. Old scrap generated contained 132,000 t of chromium. The old scrap recycling efficiency was 87 percent, and the recycling rate was 20 percent. About 18,000 t of chromium in old scrap was unrecovered. New scrap consumed contained 28,600 t of chromium, which yielded a new-to-old-scrap ratio of 28:72. U.S. chromium-bearing stainless steel scrap net exports were valued at $154 million and were estimated to have contained 41,000 t of chromium.

  17. Thermal stabilization of chromium(VI) in kaolin.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yu-Ling; Chiu, Shu-Yuan; Tsai, Hsien-Neng; Yang, Yaw-Wen; Lee, Jyh-Fu

    2002-11-01

    Reduction of Cr(VI) by heating may be a useful detoxification mechanism for thermal immobilization. Using X-ray absorption spectroscopy, the change of speciation of chromium in 105 degrees C dried 3.7% Cr(VI)-sorbed kaolin further heated at 500, 900, or 1100 degrees C was studied. The 105 degrees C dried 3.7% Cr(VI)-sorbed kaolin sample was prepared by mixing 1.5 L of 0.257 M CrO3 solution (pH 0.71) with 0.5 kg of kaolin powder for 48 h, and then the slurry was heated (dried) at 105 degrees C until a constant weight was reached. The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure method was used to determine the percentage of leached chromium from all heated samples. In all 500-900 degrees C heated Cr(VI)-sorbed kaolin samples, Cr2O3 transformed from the hydrated Cr(VI) by a 4-h heat application was identified by the X-ray absorption near edge structure and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy as the key species that is leaching-resistant due to its low solubility. For the 1100 degrees C heated Cr(VI)-sorbed kaolin sample, the Fourier transform of its EXAFS spectrum indicates that the intensity of the peaks at 2.45 (Cr-Cr shell of Cr2O3) and 5.00 A (Cr-Cr and Cr-O shells of Cr2O3) without phase shift correction is either relatively smaller or disappearing, compared with that of the 500-900 degrees C heated Cr(VI)-sorbed kaolin samples. It is suggested that chromium octahedra were bridged to silica tetrahedra and incorporated in minerals formed at 1100 degrees C, such as mullite or sillimanite, since these phases were detected by XRD. Cr of this form is not easily leached. PMID:12433175

  18. Removal of chromium from electroplating industry effluents by ion exchange resins.

    PubMed

    Cavaco, Sofia A; Fernandes, Sandra; Quina, Margarida M; Ferreira, Licínio M

    2007-06-18

    Effluent discharged from the chromium electroplating industry contains a large number of metals, including chromium, copper, nickel, zinc, manganese and lead. The ion exchange process is an alternative technique for application in the treatment of industrial wastewater containing heavy metals and indeed it has proven to be very promising in the removal and recovery of valuable species. The main objective of the present work is to evaluate the performance of commercial ion exchange resins for removing chromium trivalent from industrial effluents, and for this purpose two resins were tested: a chelating exchange resin (Diaion CR11) and a weak cationic resin (Amberlite IRC86). In order to evaluate the sorption capacity of the resins some equilibrium experiments were carried out, being the temperature and pH the main variables considered. The chromium solutions employed in the experiments were synthetic solutions and industrial effluents. In addition, a transient test was also performed as an attempt to understand the kinetic behaviour of the process. PMID:17336455

  19. The enriched chromium neutrino source for GALLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, F.X.; Hahn, R.L.

    1991-01-18

    The preparation and study of an intense source of neutrinos in the form of neutron irradiated materials which are enriched in Cr-50 for use in the GALLEX solar neutrino experiment are discussed. Chromyl fluoride gas is enriched in the Cr-50 isotope by gas centrifugation and subsequently converted to a very stable form of chromium oxide. The results of neutron activation analyses of such chromium samples indicate low levels of any long-lived activities, but show that short-lived activities, in particular Na-24, may be of concern. These results show that irradiating chromium oxide enriched in Cr-50 is preferable to irradiating either natural chromium or argon gas as a means of producing a neutrino source to calibrate the GALLEX detector. These results of the impurity level analysis of the enriched chromyl fluoride gas and its conversion to the oxide are also of interest to work in progress by other members of the Collaboration investigating an alternative conversion of the enriched gas to chromium metal. 35 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. [Occupational exposure to chromium(VI) compounds].

    PubMed

    Skowroń, Jolanta; Konieczko, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the effect of chromium(VI) (Cr(VI)) on human health under conditions of acute and chronic exposure in the workplace. Chromium(VI) compounds as carcinogens and/or mutagens pose a direct danger to people exposed to them. If carcinogens cannot be eliminated from the work and living environments, their exposure should be reduced to a minimum. In the European Union the proposed binding occupational exposure limit value (BOELV) for chromium(VI) of 0.025 mg/m³ is still associated with high cancer risk. Based on the Scientific Commitee of Occupational Exposure Limits (SCOEL) document chromium(VI) concentrations at 0.025 mg/m³ increases the risk of lung cancer in 2-14 cases per 1000 exposed workers. Exposure to chromium(VI) compounds expressed in Cr(VI) of 0.01 mg Cr(VI)/m3; is responsible for the increased number of lung cancer cases in 1-6 per 1000 people employed in this condition for the whole period of professional activity. PMID:26325053

  1. Interactions of chromium ions with starch granules in an aqueous environment.

    PubMed

    Szczygieł, Jadwiga; Dyrek, Krystyna; Kruczała, Krzysztof; Bidzińska, Ewa; Brożek-Mucha, Zuzanna; Wenda, Elżbieta; Wieczorek, Jerzy; Szymońska, Joanna

    2014-06-26

    In this study, interactions of dichromate ions with potato starch granules in highly acidic aqueous solutions and at different temperatures were investigated. It was found that the process underwent a reduction of Cr(2)O(7)(2-) to Cr(3+) accompanied by the formation of intermediate Cr(5+) ions detected by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The reactions took place after the attachment of dichromate anions to the granules and resulted in a lowering of the Cr(2)O(7)(2-) initial content in the solution. The newly formed Cr(3+) ions were both accumulated by the granules or remained in the solution. It was observed for the first time that the quantity of such ions taken by the granules from the solution was noticeably higher than that delivered by trivalent chromium salt solution. It was revealed by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) that the chromium ions were not only adsorbed on the granule surface but also introduced into the granule interior and evenly distributed there. An activation energy of the reduction reaction equal to 65 kJ·mol(-1) and the optimal parameters of the process were established. The proposed mechanism could be useful for the bioremediation of industrial effluents polluted by hexavalent chromium compounds. PMID:24878058

  2. NONCARCINOGENIC EFFECTS OF CHROMIUM: UPDATE TO HEALTH ASSESSMENT DOCUMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This 1990 document updates the 1984 Health Assessment Document for Chromium by addressing issues regarding noncarcinogenic health effects of chromium: oxidation states and persistence of these states in the environment, sampling and analytical methodology to differentiate these o...

  3. Chromium speciation in environmental samples using a solid phase spectrophotometric method.

    PubMed

    Amin, Alaa S; Kassem, Mohammed A

    2012-10-01

    A solid phase extraction technique is proposed for preconcentration and speciation of chromium in natural waters using spectrophotometric analysis. The procedure is based on sorption of chromium(III) as 4-(2-benzothiazolylazo)2,2'-biphenyldiol complex on dextran-type anion-exchange gel (Sephadex DEAE A-25). After reduction of Cr(VI) by 0.5 ml of 96% concentrated H(2)SO(4) and ethanol, the system was applied to the total chromium. The concentration of Cr(VI) was calculated as the difference between the total Cr and the Cr(III) content. The influences of some analytical parameters such as: pH of the aqueous solution, amounts of 4-(2-benzothiazolylazo)2,2'-biphenyldiol (BTABD), and sample volumes were investigated. The absorbance of the gel, at 628 and 750 nm, packed in a 1.0 mm cell, is measured directly. The molar absorptivities were found to be 2.11×10(7) and 3.90×10(7) L mol(-1)cm(-1) for 500 and 1000 ml, respectively. Calibration is linear over the range 0.05-1.45 μg L(-1) with RSD of <1.85% (n=8.0). Using 35 mg exchanger, the detection and quantification limits were 13 and 44 ng L(-1) for 500 ml sample, whereas for 1000 ml sample were 8.0 and 27 ng L(-1), respectively. Increasing the sample volume can enhance the sensitivity. No considerable interferences have been observed from other investigated anions and cations on the chromium speciation. The proposed method was applied to the speciation of chromium in natural waters and total chromium preconcentration in microwave digested tobacco, coffee, tea, and soil samples. The results were simultaneously compared with those obtained using an ET AAS method, whereby the validity of the method has been tested. PMID:22766579

  4. Chromium speciation in environmental samples using a solid phase spectrophotometric method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Alaa S.; Kassem, Mohammed A.

    2012-10-01

    A solid phase extraction technique is proposed for preconcentration and speciation of chromium in natural waters using spectrophotometric analysis. The procedure is based on sorption of chromium(III) as 4-(2-benzothiazolylazo)2,2'-biphenyldiol complex on dextran-type anion-exchange gel (Sephadex DEAE A-25). After reduction of Cr(VI) by 0.5 ml of 96% concentrated H2SO4 and ethanol, the system was applied to the total chromium. The concentration of Cr(VI) was calculated as the difference between the total Cr and the Cr(III) content. The influences of some analytical parameters such as: pH of the aqueous solution, amounts of 4-(2-benzothiazolylazo)2,2'-biphenyldiol (BTABD), and sample volumes were investigated. The absorbance of the gel, at 628 and 750 nm, packed in a 1.0 mm cell, is measured directly. The molar absorptivities were found to be 2.11 × 107 and 3.90 × 107 L mol-1 cm-1 for 500 and 1000 ml, respectively. Calibration is linear over the range 0.05-1.45 μg L-1 with RSD of <1.85% (n = 8.0). Using 35 mg exchanger, the detection and quantification limits were 13 and 44 ng L-1 for 500 ml sample, whereas for 1000 ml sample were 8.0 and 27 ng L-1, respectively. Increasing the sample volume can enhance the sensitivity. No considerable interferences have been observed from other investigated anions and cations on the chromium speciation. The proposed method was applied to the speciation of chromium in natural waters and total chromium preconcentration in microwave digested tobacco, coffee, tea, and soil samples. The results were simultaneously compared with those obtained using an ET AAS method, whereby the validity of the method has been tested.

  5. Chromium isotopic anomalies in the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esat, T. M.; Ireland, T. R.

    1989-02-01

    The abundances of chromium isotopes, in refractory inclusions from the Allende meteorite, show wide-spread anomalies. The chromium isotope anomalies are similar in pattern to the anomalies discovered in Ca and Ti. The largest effects occur at the neutron-rich isotopes Ca-48, Ti-50 and Cr-54. Individual Cr-rich pink spinels, from the Murchison meteorite, exhibit large and variable excesses in Cr-53 and Cr-54 including the largest Cr-53 anomaly so far reported. Magnesium isotopes, in Murchison Cr-poor blue spinels, also show variable anomalies in Mg-26 including mass-dependent fractionation favoring the lighter isotopes. The Cr-53, Cr-54 and Mg-26 anomalies in Murchison spinels are indicative of a heterogeneous distribution of magnesium and chromium isotopes in the early solar nebula and require a contribution from several nucleosynthetic components in addition to physicochemical processing.

  6. High-temperature creep of polycrystalline chromium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Klopp, W. D.

    1972-01-01

    The creep properties of high-purity, polycrystalline chromium were determined over the temperature range 0.51 to 0.78 T sub m, where T sub m is the melting temperature. Creep rates determined from step-load creep tests can be represented by the general creep equation; epsilon/D = k((sigma/E) to the nth power) where epsilon is the minimum creep rate, D is the diffusivity, k is the creep rate constant, sigma is the applied stress, E is the modulus, and n is the stress exponent, equal to 4.3 for chromium. This correlation and metallographic observations suggest a dislocation climb mechanism is operative in the creep of chromium over the temperature range investigated.

  7. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining...

  8. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining...

  9. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining...

  10. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining...

  11. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining...

  12. 48 CFR 252.223-7008 - Prohibition of Hexavalent Chromium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Chromium. 252.223-7008 Section 252.223-7008 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION... of Provisions And Clauses 252.223-7008 Prohibition of Hexavalent Chromium. As prescribed in 223.7306, use the following clause: Prohibition of Hexavalent Chromium (JUN 2013) (a) Definitions. As used...

  13. 48 CFR 252.223-7008 - Prohibition of Hexavalent Chromium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Chromium. 252.223-7008 Section 252.223-7008 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION... of Provisions And Clauses 252.223-7008 Prohibition of Hexavalent Chromium. As prescribed in 223.7306, use the following clause: Prohibition of Hexavalent Chromium (MAY 2011) (a) Definitions. As used...

  14. 21 CFR 73.3111 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chromium oxide greens. 73.3111 Section 73.3111... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3111 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive chromium oxide greens (chromic oxide) (CAS Reg. No....

  15. 21 CFR 73.3111 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chromium oxide greens. 73.3111 Section 73.3111... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3111 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive chromium oxide greens (chromic oxide) (CAS Reg. No....

  16. 21 CFR 73.3111 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium oxide greens. 73.3111 Section 73.3111... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3111 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive chromium oxide greens (chromic oxide) (CAS Reg. No....

  17. 48 CFR 252.223-7008 - Prohibition of Hexavalent Chromium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Chromium. 252.223-7008 Section 252.223-7008 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION... of Provisions And Clauses 252.223-7008 Prohibition of Hexavalent Chromium. As prescribed in 223.7306, use the following clause: Prohibition of Hexavalent Chromium (MAY 2011) (a) Definitions. As used...

  18. Effects of exercise on chromium levels. Is supplementation required?

    PubMed

    Clarkson, P M

    1997-06-01

    It is estimated that most individuals are not ingesting sufficient amounts of chromium in their diets. Although there is little information on chromium intake in athletes, many athletes ingest more calories than do non-athletes so their chromium intake should be adequate. However, athletes who restrict calories to maintain low bodyweights could compromise their chromium status. Some evidence also shows that exercise may increase chromium loss into the urine. At present, it is not known whether this loss necessitates additional chromium in the diet or whether the body will increase retention in response to the loss. Chromium deficiency is thought to contribute to glucose intolerance and unhealthy blood lipid profiles. The primary function of chromium is to potentiate the effects of insulin, and thereby alter glucose, amino acid and fat metabolism. Chromium supplements have been purported to increase muscle mass and decrease body fat. However, the preponderance of evidence has not supported this claim. There is little information available on the long term use of chromium supplements, but at present, supplements within the Estimated Safe and Adequate Daily Dietary Allowance (ESADDI) level do not appear harmful. The prudent course of action for athletes would be to ingest foods rich in chromium and perhaps take a multivitamin/mineral supplement containing no more than the ESADDI of chromium. PMID:9219318

  19. 21 CFR 73.1326 - Chromium hydroxide green.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chromium hydroxide green. 73.1326 Section 73.1326 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1326 Chromium hydroxide green. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive chromium hydroxide...

  20. 21 CFR 73.1327 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chromium oxide greens. 73.1327 Section 73.1327 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1327 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive chromium oxide greens...

  1. REVIEWS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS OF POLLUTANTS: III. CHROMIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a review of the scientific literature on the biological and environmental effects of chromium. Included in the review are a general summary and a comprehensive discussion of the following topics as related to chromium and specific chromium compounds: physical and ch...

  2. Avoidance behavior of young black ducks treated with chromium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.; Haseltine, S.D.

    1981-01-01

    Pairs of adult black ducks (Anas rubripes) were fed a diet containing 0, 20, or 200 ppm chromium in the form of chromium potassium sulfate. Ducklings from these pairs were fed the same diets as adults and were tested for their avoidance responses to a fright stimulus. Neither level of chromium had a significant effect on avoidance behavior.

  3. Hexavalent and trivalent chromium in leather: What should be done?

    PubMed

    Moretto, Angelo

    2015-11-01

    Trivalent chromium compounds are used for leather tanning, and chromium may be released during use of leather goods. In certain instances, small amounts of hexavalent chromium can be formed and released. Both trivalent and hexavalent chromium can elicit allergic skin reaction in chromium sensitised subjects, the latter being significantly more potent. Induction of sensitisation only occurs after exposure to hexavalent chromium. A minority of subjects are sensitised to chromium, and in a fraction of these subjects allergic skin reaction have been described after wearing leather shoes or, less frequently, other leather goods. The evidence that in all these cases the reaction is related to hexavalent chromium is not always strong. The content of hexavalent chromium in leather is regulated in European Union, but rate of release rather than content is relevant for allergic skin reaction. The role of trivalent chromium appear much less relevant if at all. Modern tanning procedure do not pose significant risk due to either hexavalent or trivalent chromium. Dismissing bad quality and worn-off leather goods is relevant in reducing or eliminating the skin reaction. It should also be pointed out that shoe components or substances other than chromium in leather may cause allergic/irritative skin reactions. PMID:26361854

  4. SAFETY OF TRIVALENT CHROMIUM COMPLEXES USED IN NUTRIENT SUPPLEMENTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxicity studies regarding trivalent chromium have often been completed under conditions that are not designed to reflect conditions that would be encountered under normal physiological conditions. We have shown that the incorporation of chromium into tissues of rats from chromium chloride and chro...

  5. Investigation of oil recovery improvement by coupling an interfacial tension agent and a mobility control agent in light oil reservoirs. Summary annual report, October 1994--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    The study will investigate two major areas concerning co-injecting an interfacial tension reduction agent(s) and a mobility control agent into petroleum reservoirs. The first will consist of defining the mechanisms of interaction of an alkaline agent, a surfactant, and a polymer on a fluid-fluid and a fluid-rock basis. The second is the improvement of the economics of the combined technology. The third year of the study finished the oil recovery coreflood studies and evaluated different techniques to improve alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution economics. The final series of corefloods compared the oil recovery efficiency of the alkali gradient in Berea sandstone and J Sand sandstone. Oil recovery efficiency was essentially the same in both types of core, 13 to 15% PV of oil. Cost of chemical per incremental barrel of oil with 30% pore volume of alkaline-surfactant- polymer solution injected were $3.20 for the Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}- Petrostep B-100-Flopaam 3330S solution in both types of core.

  6. Survey of Portions of the Chromium-Cobalt-Nickel-Molybdenum Quaternary System at 1,200 Degrees C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rideout, Sheldon Paul; Beck, Paul A

    1953-01-01

    A survey was made of portions of the chromium-cobalt-nickel-molybdenum quaternary system at 1,200 degrees c by means of microscopic and x-ray diffraction studies. Since the face-centered cubic (alpha) solid solutions form the matrix of almost all practically useful high-temperature alloys, the solid solubility limits of the quaternary alpha phase were determined up to 20 percent molybdenum. The component cobalt-nickel-molybdenum, chromium-cobalt-molybdenum, and chromium-nickel-molybdenum ternary systems were also studied. The survey of these systems was confined to the determination of the boundaries of the face-centered cubic (alpha) solid solutions and of the phases coexisting with alpha at 1,200 degrees c.

  7. [Physiological responses of tubificidae to heavy metal chromium stress].

    PubMed

    Lou, Ju-Qing; Yang, Dong-Ye; Cao, Yong-Qing; Sun, Pei-De; Zheng, Ping

    2014-11-01

    Tubificidae is now used in the wastewater treatment systems to successfully minimize the sludge production, which has been proved an effective, economical and sustainable technology. But the excess sludge inevitably contains a variety of heavy metals, especially the sludge from industrial wastewater treatment plant. In order to apply tubificidae to these systems, Chromium was selected as pollutant object and the physiological responses of tubificidae to Chromium were studied in this paper. Acute toxicity was analyzed and Median lethal concentrations (LC50) were determined over 96 h periods for Cr. Results indicated that 24 h LC50 and 96 h LC50 were 7.94 mg x L(-1) and 0.49 mg x L(-1), respectively. The duration f tubificidae in Cr solution decreased with increasing Cr concentration. Under the Cr stress, a highest respiration rate was obtained when the concentration of Cr(VI), temperature, pH and DO was 2.50 mg x L(-1), 26 degrees C, 6.0 and 6.0 mg x L(-1), respectively. The order of these factors was the concerntration of Cr(VI), temperature, DO and pH. The respiration experiments demonstrated that low concentration (< 2.50 mg x L(-1)) of Cr could promote the respiration rate of tubificidaes. On the other hand, when the concentration of Cr was 8.00 mg x L(-1), it could remarkably inhibit the respiratory rates of tubificidae. PMID:25639096

  8. Hydrolysis of iron and chromium fluorides: mechanism and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Gálvez, José L; Dufour, Javier; Negro, Carlos; López-Mateos, Federico

    2008-06-15

    Fluoride complexes of metallic ions are one of the main problems when processing industrial effluents with high content of fluoride anion. The most important case is derived from pickling treatment of stainless steel, which is performed with HNO3/HF mixtures to remove oxides scale formed over the metal surface. Waste from this process, spent pickling liquor, must be treated for recovering metallic and acid content. Conventional treatments produce a final effluent with high quantity of fluoride complexes of iron and chromium. This work proposes a hydrolysis treatment of these solid metal fluorides by reacting them with a basic agent. Metal oxides are obtained, while fluoride is released to solution as a solved salt, which can be easily recovered as hydrofluoric acid. Solid iron and chromium fluorides, mainly K2FeF5(s) and CrF3(s), obtained in the UCM treatment process, were employed in this work. Optimal hydrolysis operating conditions were obtained by means of a factorial design: media must be basic but pH cannot be higher than 9.5, temperature from 40 to 70 degrees C and alkali concentration (potassium hydroxide) below 1.1 mol L(-1). Secondary reactions have been detected, which are probably due to fluoride adsorption onto obtained oxides surface. Mechanism of reaction consists of several stages, involving solid fluoride dissolution and complexes decomposition. Hydrolysis kinetics has been modeled with classical crystal dissolution kinetics, based on mass transfer phenomena. PMID:17988794

  9. Chromium isotopic anomalies in the Allende meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papanastassiou, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    Abundances of the chromium isotopes in terrestrial and bulk meteorite samples are identical to 0.01 percent. However, Ca-Al-rich inclusions from the Allende meteorite show endemic isotopic anomalies in chromium which require at least three nucleosynthetic components. Large anomalies at Cr-54 in a special class of inclusions are correlated with large anomalies at Ca-48 and Ti-50 and provide strong support for a component reflecting neutron-rich nucleosynthesis at nuclear statistical equilibrium. This correlation suggests that materials from very near the core of an exploding massive star may be injected into the interstellar medium.

  10. Synthesis and characterisation of chromium carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detroye, M.; Reniers, F.; Buess-Herman, C.; Vereecken, J.

    1997-11-01

    This paper presents the synthesis and the characterisation of various chromium carbide compounds. Thin Cr 23C 6 films were deposited by reactive sputtering while Cr 7C 3 films were formed by the carburisation of chromium films in a CH 4/H 2 atmosphere. Cr xC y powders were synthesised from various precursors (Cr, CrN, Cr 2O 3) by reaction with CH 4/H 2 at high temperature. The samples were characterised by AES, XRD and electron diffraction. The effects of the experimental parameters (gas composition, temperature, reaction time) on the purity, the phase formed and the composition of the product of reaction are examined and discussed.

  11. Strategies for chromium bioremediation of tannery effluent.

    PubMed

    Garg, Satyendra Kumar; Tripathi, Manikant; Srinath, Thiruneelakantan

    2012-01-01

    Bioremediation offers the possibility of using living organisms (bacteria, fungi, algae,or plants), but primarily microorganisms, to degrade or remove environmental contaminants, and transform them into nontoxic or less-toxic forms. The major advantages of bioremediation over conventional physicochemical and biological treatment methods include low cost, good efficiency, minimization of chemicals, reduced quantity of secondary sludge, regeneration of cell biomass, and the possibility of recover-ing pollutant metals. Leather industries, which extensively employ chromium compounds in the tanning process, discharge spent-chromium-laden effluent into nearby water bodies. Worldwide, chromium is known to be one of the most common inorganic contaminants of groundwater at pollutant hazardous sites. Hexavalent chromium poses a health risk to all forms of life. Bioremediation of chromium extant in tannery waste involves different strategies that include biosorption, bioaccumulation,bioreduction, and immobilization of biomaterial(s). Biosorption is a nondirected physiochemical interaction that occurs between metal species and the cellular components of biological species. It is metabolism-dependent when living biomass is employed, and metabolism-independent in dead cell biomass. Dead cell biomass is much more effective than living cell biomass at biosorping heavy metals, including chromium. Bioaccumulation is a metabolically active process in living organisms that works through adsorption, intracellular accumulation, and bioprecipitation mechanisms. In bioreduction processes, microorganisms alter the oxidation/reduction state of toxic metals through direct or indirect biological and chemical process(es).Bioreduction of Cr6+ to Cr3+ not only decreases the chromium toxicity to living organisms, but also helps precipitate chromium at a neutral pH for further physical removal,thus offering promise as a bioremediation strategy. However, biosorption, bioaccumulation, and

  12. Protective claddings for high strength chromium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, J. F.

    1971-01-01

    The application of a Cr-Y-Hf-Th alloy as a protective cladding for a high strength chromium alloy was investigated for its effectiveness in inhibiting nitrogen embrittlement of a core alloy. Cladding was accomplished by a combination of hot gas pressure bonding and roll cladding techniques. Based on bend DBTT, the cladding alloy was effective in inhibiting nitrogen embrittlement of the chromium core alloy for up to 720 ks (200hours) in air at 1422 K (2100 F). A significant increase in the bend DBTT occurred with longer time exposures at 1422 K or short time exposures at 1589 K (2400 F).

  13. In Vitro Selection of Chromium-Dependent DNAzymes for Sensing Chromium(III) and Chromium(VI).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenhu; Vazin, Mahsa; Yu, Tianmeng; Ding, Jinsong; Liu, Juewen

    2016-07-01

    Chromium is a very important analyte for environmental monitoring, and developing biosensors for chromium is a long-standing analytical challenge. In this work, in vitro selection of RNA-cleaving DNAzymes was carried out in the presence of Cr(3+) . The most active DNAzyme turned out to be the previously reported lanthanide-dependent Ce13d DNAzyme. Although the Ce13d activity was about 150-fold lower with Cr(3+) than that with lanthanides, the activity of lanthanides and other competing metals was masked by using a phosphate buffer; this left Cr(3+) as the only metal that could activate Ce13d. With 100 μm Cr(3+) , the cleavage rate is 1.6 h(-1) at pH 6. By using a molecular beacon design, Cr(3+) was measured with a detection limit of 70 nm, which was significantly lower than the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) limit (11 μm). Cr(4+) was measured after reduction by NaBH4 to Cr(3+) , and it could be sensed with a similar detection limit of 140 nm Cr(4+) ; this value was lower than the EPA limit of 300 nm. This sensor was tested for chromium speciation analysis in a real sample, and the results supported its application for environmental monitoring. At the same time, it has enhanced our understanding of the interactions between chromium and DNA. PMID:27249536

  14. Chromium and Ruthenium-Doped Zinc Oxide Thin Films for Propane Sensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Pozos, Heberto; González-Vidal, José Luis; Torres, Gonzalo Alberto; Rodríguez-Baez, Jorge; Maldonado, Arturo; de la Luz Olvera, María; Acosta, Dwight Roberto; Avendaño-Alejo, Maximino; Castañeda, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Chromium and ruthenium-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Cr) and (ZnO:Ru) thin solid films were deposited on soda-lime glass substrates by the sol-gel dip-coating method. A 0.6 M solution of zinc acetate dihydrate dissolved in 2-methoxyethanol and monoethanolamine was used as basic solution. Chromium (III) acetylacetonate and Ruthenium (III) trichloride were used as doping sources. The Ru incorporation and its distribution profile into the films were proved by the SIMS technique. The morphology and structure of the films were studied by SEM microscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements, respectively. The SEM images show porous surfaces covered by small grains with different grain size, depending on the doping element, and the immersions number into the doping solutions. The sensing properties of ZnO:Cr and ZnO:Ru films in a propane (C3H8) atmosphere, as a function of the immersions number in the doping solution, have been studied in the present work. The highest sensitivity values were obtained for films doped from five immersions, 5.8 and 900, for ZnO:Cr and ZnO:Ru films, respectively. In order to evidence the catalytic effect of the chromium (Cr) and ruthenium (Ru), the sensing characteristics of undoped ZnO films are reported as well. PMID:23482091

  15. Chromium and ruthenium-doped zinc oxide thin films for propane sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Pozos, Heberto; González-Vidal, José Luis; Torres, Gonzalo Alberto; Rodríguez-Baez, Jorge; Maldonado, Arturo; Olvera, María de la Luz; Acosta, Dwight Roberto; Avendaño-Alejo, Maximino; Castañeda, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Chromium and ruthenium-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Cr) and (ZnO:Ru) thin solid films were deposited on soda-lime glass substrates by the sol-gel dip-coating method. A 0.6 M solution of zinc acetate dihydrate dissolved in 2-methoxyethanol and monoethanolamine was used as basic solution. Chromium (III) acetylacetonate and Ruthenium (III) trichloride were used as doping sources. The Ru incorporation and its distribution profile into the films were proved by the SIMS technique. The morphology and structure of the films were studied by SEM microscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements, respectively. The SEM images show porous surfaces covered by small grains with different grain size, depending on the doping element, and the immersions number into the doping solutions. The sensing properties of ZnO:Cr and ZnO:Ru films in a propane (C3H8) atmosphere, as a function of the immersions number in the doping solution, have been studied in the present work. The highest sensitivity values were obtained for films doped from five immersions, 5.8 and 900, for ZnO:Cr and ZnO:Ru films, respectively. In order to evidence the catalytic effect of the chromium (Cr) and ruthenium (Ru), the sensing characteristics of undoped ZnO films are reported as well. PMID:23482091

  16. The soda-ash roasting of chromite ore processing residue for the reclamation of chromium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antony, M. P.; Tathavadkar, V. D.; Calvert, C. C.; Jha, A.

    2001-12-01

    Sodium chromate is produced via the soda-ash roasting of chromite ore with sodium carbonate. After the reaction, nearly 15 pct of the chromium oxide remains unreacted and ends up in the waste stream, for landfills. In recent years, the concern over environmental pollution from hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) from the waste residue has become a major problem for the chromium chemical industry. The main purpose of this investigation is to recover chromium oxide present in the waste residue as sodium chromate. Cr2O3 in the residue is distributed between the two spinel solid solutions, Mg(Al,Cr)2O4 and γ-Fe2O3. The residue from the sodium chromate production process was analyzed both physically and chemically. The compositions of the mineral phases were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The influence of alkali addition on the overall reaction rate is examined. The kinetics of the chromium extraction reaction resulting from the residue of the soda-ash roasting process under an oxidizing atmosphere is also investigated. It is shown that the experimental results for the roasting reaction can be best described by the Ginstling and Brounshtein (GB) equation for diffusion-controlled kinetics. The apparent activation energy for the roasting reaction was calculated to be between 85 and 90 kJ·mol-1 in the temperature range 1223 to 1473 K. The kinetics of leaching of Cr3+ ions using the aqueous phase from the process residue is also studied by treating the waste into acid solutions with different concentrations.

  17. Adsorption and protein-induced metal release from chromium metal and stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Lundin, M; Hedberg, Y; Jiang, T; Herting, G; Wang, X; Thormann, E; Blomberg, E; Wallinder, I Odnevall

    2012-01-15

    A research effort is undertaken to understand the mechanism of metal release from, e.g., inhaled metal particles or metal implants in the presence of proteins. The effect of protein adsorption on the metal release process from oxidized chromium metal surfaces and stainless steel surfaces was therefore examined by quartz crystal microbalance with energy dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (GFAAS). Differently charged and sized proteins, relevant for the inhalation and dermal exposure route were chosen including human and bovine serum albumin (HSA, BSA), mucin (BSM), and lysozyme (LYS). The results show that all proteins have high affinities for chromium and stainless steel (AISI 316) when deposited from solutions at pH 4 and at pH 7.4 where the protein adsorbed amount was very similar. Adsorption of albumin and mucin was substantially higher at pH 4 compared to pH 7.4 with approximately monolayer coverage at pH 7.4, whereas lysozyme adsorbed in multilayers at both investigated pH. The protein-surface interaction was strong since proteins were irreversibly adsorbed with respect to rinsing. Due to the passive nature of chromium and stainless steel (AISI 316) surfaces, very low metal release concentrations from the QCM metal surfaces in the presence of proteins were obtained on the time scale of the adsorption experiment. Therefore, metal release studies from massive metal sheets in contact with protein solutions were carried out in parallel. The presence of proteins increased the extent of metals released for chromium metal and stainless steel grades of different microstructure and alloy content, all with passive chromium(III)-rich surface oxides, such as QCM (AISI 316), ferritic (AISI 430), austentic (AISI 304, 316L), and duplex (LDX 2205). PMID:22014396

  18. Removal of chromium from wastewater by reverse osmosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çimen, Aysel

    2015-07-01

    Removal of chromium from wastewaters has been studied and the optimal process conditions were determined. The reverse osmosis (RO) technique, the sea water high rejection (SWHR) and high rejection brackish water (AG, SE, and SG) membranes were used. The chromium rejection depended on membrane type, pH of the feed water and operating pressure. The removal of chromium was most effective when the feed water pH 3. The rejection efficiency of the membranes increased in the order AG > SWHR > SG > SE. RO method can be efficiently used (with >91% rejection) for the removal of chromium from wastewater of chromium coating processes.

  19. Formation of chromium carbides in copper matrix during mechanical alloying in carbon-containing media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremina, M. A.; Lomaeva, S. F.; Elsukov, E. P.

    2013-11-01

    Structural and phase transformations that occur during mechanical alloying (MA) and subsequent annealing of nanocrystalline Cu-Cr-C alloys obtained from copper and chromium powders and graphite or xylene as the source of carbon have been studied. It is shown that, when using graphite, a supersaturated Cu(Cr) solid solution and an X-ray amorphous Cr-C phase are formed during MA. Heat treatment leads to their decomposition and the appearance of Cr3C2 in the nanocrystalline copper matrix. When xylene is used as the source of carbon, no strongly supersaturated Cu(Cr) solid solution and no X-ray amorphous Cr-C phase are formed, but the same volume fraction of chromium carbide, i.e., 20-24 vol %, appears. When graphite is used, the carbide is formed after shorter times of MA.

  20. 29 CFR 1926.1126 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... provide change rooms in conformance with 29 CFR 1926.51 Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide washing facilities in conformance with 29 CFR 1926.51. Eating and drinking areas... records are maintained and made available in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.1020. (2) Historical...

  1. 29 CFR 1915.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... change rooms in conformance with 29 CFR 1910.141. Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide washing facilities in conformance with 29 CFR 1915.97. Eating and drinking areas... records are maintained and made available in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.1020. (2) Historical...

  2. 29 CFR 1926.1126 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... provide change rooms in conformance with 29 CFR 1926.51 Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide washing facilities in conformance with 29 CFR 1926.51. Eating and drinking areas... records are maintained and made available in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.1020. (2) Historical...

  3. 29 CFR 1915.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... change rooms in conformance with 29 CFR 1910.141. Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide washing facilities in conformance with 29 CFR 1915.97. Eating and drinking areas... records are maintained and made available in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.1020. (2) Historical...

  4. 29 CFR 1910.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... change rooms in conformance with 29 CFR 1910.141. Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide washing facilities in conformance with 29 CFR 1910.141. Eating and drinking areas... Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1200. (k) Medical surveillance—(1) General. (i) The employer shall...

  5. 29 CFR 1910.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... change rooms in conformance with 29 CFR 1910.141. Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide washing facilities in conformance with 29 CFR 1910.141. Eating and drinking areas... Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1200. (k) Medical surveillance—(1) General. (i) The employer shall...

  6. Method for welding chromium molybdenum steels

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.

    1986-01-01

    Chromium-molybdenum steels exhibit a weakening after welding in an area adjacent to the weld. This invention is an improved method for welding to eliminate the weakness by subjecting normalized steel to a partial temper prior to welding and subsequently fully tempering the welded article for optimum strength and ductility.

  7. 29 CFR 1915.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1200. (3) Cleaning and replacement. (i) The... CFR 1910.141. Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide washing facilities in conformance with 29 CFR 1915.97. Eating and drinking areas provided by the employer shall...

  8. 29 CFR 1926.1126 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1200. (3) Cleaning and replacement. (i) The... CFR 1926.51 Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide washing facilities in conformance with 29 CFR 1926.51. Eating and drinking areas provided by the employer shall...

  9. 29 CFR 1915.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1200. (3) Cleaning and replacement. (i) The... CFR 1910.141. Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide washing facilities in conformance with 29 CFR 1915.97. Eating and drinking areas provided by the employer shall...

  10. 29 CFR 1926.1126 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1200. (3) Cleaning and replacement. (i) The... CFR 1926.51 Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide washing facilities in conformance with 29 CFR 1926.51. Eating and drinking areas provided by the employer shall...

  11. 29 CFR 1910.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... efficient in removing mono-dispersed particles of 0.3 micrometers in diameter or larger. Historical... requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1200. (3) Cleaning and replacement. (i) The... CFR 1910.141. Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide...

  12. HEALTH ASSESSMENT DOCUMENT FOR CHROMIUM. FINAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The full document represents a comprehensive data base that considers all sources of chromium in the environment, the likelihood for its exposure to humans, and the possible consequences to man and lower organisms from its absorption. This information is integrated into a format ...

  13. 29 CFR 1910.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1200. (3) Cleaning and replacement. (i) The... CFR 1910.141. Where skin contact with chromium (VI) occurs, the employer shall provide washing facilities in conformance with 29 CFR 1910.141. Eating and drinking areas provided by the employer shall...

  14. Trace Elements Excluding Iron - Chromium and Zinc

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The percentage of middle-aged US adults who are participating in leisure-time physical activities is growing. These adults also seek credible information about specific supplements that the public press routinely describes as necessary to enable increases in physical performance. Chromium and zinc a...

  15. FATE OF CHROMIUM (III) IN CHLORINATED WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The oxidation of trivalent chromium, Cr(III), to the more toxic Cr(VI) in chlorinated water is thermodynamically feasible and was the subject of the study. The study found that free available chlorine (FAC) readily converts Cr(III) to Cr(VI) at a rate that is highly dependent upo...

  16. Nickel-chromium-silicon brazing filler metal

    DOEpatents

    Martini, Angelo J.; Gourley, Bruce R.

    1976-01-01

    A brazing filler metal containing, by weight percent, 23-35% chromium, 9-12% silicon, a maximum of 0.15% carbon, and the remainder nickel. The maximum amount of elements other than those noted above is 1.00%.

  17. The role of mitochondria in chromium carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, S.C. )

    1987-01-01

    The uptake and reduction of chromium(VI) compounds are crucial to their carcinogenicity. Many cellular systems have been shown to reduce chromium(VI). The ability of mitochondria to reduce chromate in vitro was investigated using rat liver submitochondrial particles (SMPs), which contain the electron transport chain, and isolated rat liver mitochondria. SMPs with NADH as substrate reduced chromate as shown by EPR and UV-VIS spectroscopic studies. Chromate was reduced to a chromium(V) species, which was detectable by EPR. SMPs with succinate as substrate were less effective in reducing chromate relative to NADH-driven chromate-reductase activity. SMPs show a higher rate of oxygen depletion with NADH as substrate as compared to succinate as substrate. In SMPs with NADH as substrate, rotenone, antimycin and cyanide all produced a {approx}40% inhibition of chromate-reductase activity. In SMPs with succinate as substrate, cyanide and antimycin produced {approx}50% inhibition of chromate-reductase activity and rotenone caused no detectable inhibition. In vivo studies of rats injected with sodium dichromate spiked with {sup 51}Cr showed that after 24 hr, chromium was bound preferentially to mitochondrial DNA relative to nuclear DNA by a factor of {approximately}1500.

  18. Development of low-chromium, chromium-tungsten steels for fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klueh, R. L.; Alexander, D. J.; Kenik, E. A.

    1995-12-01

    High-chromium (9-12% Cr) CrMo and CrW ferritic steels are favored as candidates for fusion applications. In early work to develop reduced-activation steels, an Fe2.25Cr2W-0.25V-O.1C steel (designated 2.25Cr-2WV) had better strength than an Fe9Cr2W-0.25V-0.07Tra-0.1C (9Cr-2WVTa) steel (compositions are in weight percent). However, the 2.25Cr-2WV had poor impact properties, as determined by the ductile-brittle transition temperature and upper-shelf energy of subsize Charpy impact specimens. Because low-chromium steels have some advantages over high-chromium steels, a program to develop low-chromium steels is in progress. Microstructural analysis indicated that the reason for the inferior impact toughness of the 2.25Cr-2WV was the granular bainite obtained when the steel was normalized. Properties can be improved by developing an acicular bainite microstructure by increasing the cooling rate after austenitization. Alternatively, acicular bainite can be promoted by increasing the hardenability. Hardenability was changed by adding small amounts of boron and additional chromium to the 2.250-2WV composition. A combination of B, Cr, and Ta additions resulted in low-chromium reduced-activation steels with mechanical properties comparable to those of 9Cr-2WVTa.

  19. Chromium(III) and chromium(VI) surface treated galvanized steel for outdoor constructions: environmental aspects.

    PubMed

    Lindström, David; Hedberg, Yolanda; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger

    2010-06-01

    The long-term degradation of chromium(III) (Zn-Cr(III)) and chromium(VI)-based (Zn-Cr(VI)) surface treatments on galvanized steel and their capacities to hinder the release of zinc induced by atmospheric corrosion at nonsheltered urban and marine exposure conditions for 2 years are investigated. Compared to bare zinc sheet, both surface treatments revealed high corrosion protection abilities and capacities to hinder the release of zinc, still evident after 2 years of exposure. The zinc barrier properties of the thinner Zn-Cr(VI) (10 nm) treatment were during the first 100 days of urban exposure slightly improved compared with Zn-Cr(III) (35 nm). However, their long-term protection capacities were inverse. Released concentrations of total chromium correspond to annual release rates less than 0.000032 (Zn-Cr(III)) and 0.00014 g Cr m(-2) yr(-1) (Zn-Cr(VI)) after 1 year of urban exposure. Aging by indoor storage of the surface treatments prior to outdoor exposure reduced the released Cr concentrations from the surface treatments. No Cr(VI) was released from the aged surfaces but from the freshly exposed Zn-Cr(VI). Marine exposure conditions resulted in a faster reduction of chromate to chromium(III)oxide compared with urban conditions, and a significantly lower amount of both chromium(III) and chromium(VI) released from Zn-Cr(VI) at the marine site compared with the urban site. PMID:20462267

  20. SUMMARY CONCLUSIONS FOR THE PILOT IN-SITU CHROMIUM REDUCTION TEST AT RIVERBANK ARMY AMMUNITIONS PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    Ridley, M

    2007-04-25

    A treatability study was conducted at Riverbank Army Ammunition Plant's (RBAAP) Site 17, to evaluate the effectiveness of a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) for the treatment of hexavalent chromium (Cr{sup 6+}). The chromium contamination at Site 17 is hydrologically isolated and unsuitable for standard extraction and treatment (pump and treat). The majority of the chromium contamination at Site 17 is trapped within the fine grain sediments of a clay/slit zone (45 to 63). The PRB was established above and adjacent to the contaminated zone at Site 17 to reduce the hexavalent chromium as it leaches out of the contaminated clay/silt zone separating the A zone from the A zone. Site 17 and the monitoring network are described in the In-Situ Chromium Reduction Treatability Study Work Plan (CH2MHILL, January 2004). The PRB was created by reducing naturally occurring Fe{sup 3+} to Fe{sup 2+} with the injection of a buffered sodium dithionite solution into subsurface chromium source area. The Cr{sup 6+} leaching out of the contaminated clay/silt zone and migrating through the PRB is reduced by Fe{sup 2+} to Cr{sup 3+} and immobilized (Amonette, et al., 1994). The sodium dithionite will also reduce accessible Cr{sup 6+}, however the long-term reductant is the Fe{sup 2+}. Bench scale tests (Appendix A) were conducted to assess the quantity and availability of the naturally occurring iron at Site 17, the ability of the sodium dithionite to reduce the hexavalent chromium and Fe within the sediments, and the by-products produced during the treatment. Appendix A, provides a detailed description of the laboratory treatability tests, and provides background information on the technologies considered as possible treatment options for Site 17. Following the sodium dithionite treatment, groundwater/treatment solution was extracted to remove treatment by-products (sulfate, manganese, and iron). The following sections briefly discuss the current treatment status, future recommendations

  1. Nephrotoxic and hepatotoxic effects of chromium compounds in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Laborda, R.; Diaz-Mayans, J.; Nunez, A.

    1986-03-01

    The nephrotoxic, hepatotoxic and cardiotoxic actions of hexavalent chromium compounds, as well as their effects on lung, blood and circulation may contribute to the fatal outcome of chromium intoxication. Although trivalent chromium have been regarded as relatively biologically inert, there are a few salts of chromium III that have been found to be carcinogenic when inhaled, ingested or brought in contact with the tissues. Sensitive persons and industry workers have been subjects of dermatitis, respiratory tract injuries and digestive ulcers due to chromium compounds. In this work, the authors have studied the effect of trivalent and hexavalent chromium compounds on rats measuring the transaminases (GOT and GPT), urea and creatinine levels in serum of chromium poisoned animals at different times.

  2. Adsorption behavior comparison of trivalent and hexavalent chromium on biochar derived from municipal sludge.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tan; Zhou, Zeyu; Xu, Sai; Wang, Hongtao; Lu, Wenjing

    2015-08-01

    In this work, static equilibrium experiments were conducted to distinguish the adsorption performance between the two valence states of chromium on biochar derived from municipal sludge. The removal capacity of Cr(VI) is lower than 7mg/g at the initial chromium concentration range of 50-200mg/L, whereas that of Cr(III) higher than 20mg/g. It indicates that Cr(III) is much easier to be stabilized than Cr(VI). No significant changes in the biochar surface functional groups are observed before and after the adsorption equilibrium, demonstrating the poor contribution of organic matter in chromium adsorption. The main mechanism of heavy metal adsorption by biochar involves (1) surface precipitation through pH increase caused by biochar buffer ability, and (2) exchange between cations in solution (Cd(2+)) and in biochar matrix (e.g. Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)). The reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) is necessary to improve removal efficiency of chromium. PMID:25978792

  3. A comparative study of sorption of chromium (III) onto chitin and chitosan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Pooja; Nagendran, R.

    2016-06-01

    Heavy metals have always been the most hazardous components in the wastewater of industries like electroplating, automobiles, mining facilities and fertilizer manufacturers. Treatment of heavy metal laden wastewater requires expensive operational and maintenance systems. Food processing industries create a huge amount of shell waste which is sold to poultry farms in powdered form but the quantity thus used is still not comparable to the left over waste. The shell contains chitin which acts as an adsorbent for the heavy metals and can be used to treat heavy metal wastewater. The paper presents a study on the use of chitin and its processed product, chitosan, to remove chromium. Shake flask experiment was conducted to compare the adsorptive capacity of chitin and chitosan for chromium removal from simulated solution and isotherm studies were carried out. The studies showed that the chitosan was a better adsorbent than chitin. Both chitin and chitosan gave best adsorption results at pH 3. Chitin exhibited maximum chromium removal of 49.98 % in 20 min, whereas chitosan showed 50 % removal efficiency at a contact time of 20 min showing higher adsorptive capacity for chromium than chitin. The Langmiur and Freundlich isotherm studies showed very good adsorption capacity and monolayer interaction according to the regression coefficient 0.973 for chitosan and 0.915 for chitin. The regression coefficient for Freundlich isotherm was 0.894 and 0.831 for chitosan and chitin, respectively.

  4. Electroanalytical sensing of chromium(III) and (VI) utilising gold screen printed macro electrodes.

    PubMed

    Metters, Jonathan P; Kadara, Rashid O; Banks, Craig E

    2012-02-21

    We report the fabrication of gold screen printed macro electrodes which are electrochemically characterised and contrasted to polycrystalline gold macroelectrodes with their potential analytical application towards the sensing of chromium(III) and (VI) critically explored. It is found that while these gold screen printed macro electrodes have electrode kinetics typically one order of magnitude lower than polycrystalline gold macroelectrodes as is measured via a standard redox probe, in terms of analytical sensing, these gold screen printed macro electrodes mimic polycrystalline gold in terms of their analytical performance towards the sensing of chromium(III) and (VI), whilst boasting additional advantages over the macro electrode due to their disposable one-shot nature and the ease of mass production. An additional advantage of these gold screen printed macro electrodes compared to polycrystalline gold is the alleviation of the requirement to potential cycle the latter to form the required gold oxide which aids in the simplification of the analytical protocol. We demonstrate that gold screen printed macro electrodes allow the low micro-molar sensing of chromium(VI) in aqueous solutions over the range 10 to 1600 μM with a limit of detection (3σ) of 4.4 μM. The feasibility of the analytical protocol is also tested through chromium(VI) detection in environmental samples. PMID:22228309

  5. A study of direct- and pulse-current chromium electroplating on rotating cylinder electrode (RCE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, J. H.; Hsu, F. Y.; Liao, M. J.; Huang, C. A.

    2007-06-01

    Direct- and pulse-current (DC and PC) chromium electroplating on Cr-Mo steel were performed in a sulfate-catalyzed chromic acid solution at 50 °C using a rotating cylinder electrode (RCE). The electroplating cathodic current densities were at 30, 40, 50 and 60 A dm -2, respectively. The relationship between electroplating current efficiency and the rotating speed of the RCE was studied. The cross-sectional microstructure of Cr-deposit was examined by transmission electron microscope (TEM). Results showed that DC-plating exhibited higher current efficiency than the PC-plating under the same conditions of electroplating current density and the rotating speed. We found the critical rotating speed of RCE used in the chromium electroplating, above this rotating speed the chromium deposition is prohibited. At the same plating current density, the critical rotating speed for DC-plating was higher than that for PC-plating. The higher plating current density is, the larger difference in critical rotating speeds appears between DC- and PC-electroplating. Equiaxed grains, in a nanoscale size with lower dislocation density, nucleate on the cathodic surface in both DC- and PC-electroplating. Adjacent to the equiaxed grains, textured grains were found in other portion of chromium deposit. Fine columnar grains were observed in the DC-electroplated deposit. On the other hand, very long slender grains with high degree of preferred orientation were detected in PC-electroplated deposit.

  6. A comparative study of sorption of chromium (III) onto chitin and chitosan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Pooja; Nagendran, R.

    2014-07-01

    Heavy metals have always been the most hazardous components in the wastewater of industries like electroplating, automobiles, mining facilities and fertilizer manufacturers. Treatment of heavy metal laden wastewater requires expensive operational and maintenance systems. Food processing industries create a huge amount of shell waste which is sold to poultry farms in powdered form but the quantity thus used is still not comparable to the left over waste. The shell contains chitin which acts as an adsorbent for the heavy metals and can be used to treat heavy metal wastewater. The paper presents a study on the use of chitin and its processed product, chitosan, to remove chromium. Shake flask experiment was conducted to compare the adsorptive capacity of chitin and chitosan for chromium removal from simulated solution and isotherm studies were carried out. The studies showed that the chitosan was a better adsorbent than chitin. Both chitin and chitosan gave best adsorption results at pH 3. Chitin exhibited maximum chromium removal of 49.98 % in 20 min, whereas chitosan showed 50 % removal efficiency at a contact time of 20 min showing higher adsorptive capacity for chromium than chitin. The Langmiur and Freundlich isotherm studies showed very good adsorption capacity and monolayer interaction according to the regression coefficient 0.973 for chitosan and 0.915 for chitin. The regression coefficient for Freundlich isotherm was 0.894 and 0.831 for chitosan and chitin, respectively.

  7. Chromium Mobilization by Microbially-Driven Iron and Manganese Redox Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Arredondo, M.; Hausladen, D.; Ying, S.; Fendorf, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    Chromium, a naturally occurring contaminant, poses a significant threat to California groundwater quality when ultramafic rocks weather leaving Cr-enriched serpentine soils. Benign and of limited solubility, Cr(III) can oxidize into soluble and carcinogenic Cr(VI). Under most environmental conditions, Mn-oxides are the principal oxidant of Cr(III). Here we investigate Cr(III) oxidation by both abiotically synthesized birnessite and biogenically produced Mn-oxides. Further, we explore chromium dynamics within artificial soil aggregates composed of Cr(OH)3- and Cr0.25Fe0.75(OH)3-coated quartz grains surrounded by aerated solute flow. Abiotic aggregates contained synthetic birnessite, while biotic aggregates were inoculated with Leptothrix cholodnii, a manganese-oxidizing bacterium, and Shewanella putrefaciens, an iron-reducing bacterium. Results show aqueous Cr(VI) concentrations scaling with Cr-mineral solubility. When Leptothrix sp.-inoculated Cr(III),Fe(III)-aggregates are supplied with aqueous Mn(II), Mn-oxides precipitate in the aerobic aggregate. Cr(VI) production occurs similar to that via synthetic birnessite. With the addition of Shewanella sp., coupled biotic and abiotic processes occur causing the reduction, and subsequent immobilization, of chromium by microbial metabolites (e.g., Fe(II)). This study shows the importance of microbial community composition on chromium dynamics within diffusion-limited zones, and suggests the potential for biological immobilization of Cr even in the presence of Mn-oxidizing bacteria.

  8. Evaluation of Cajanus cajan (pigeon pea) for phytoremediation of landfill leachate containing chromium and lead.

    PubMed

    Jerez Ch, José A; Romero, Rosaura M

    2016-11-01

    Landfill leachates containing heavy metals are important contaminants and a matter of great concern due to the effect that they might have on ecosystems. We evaluated the use of Cajanus cajan to remove chromium and lead from landfill leachates. Eight-week-old plants were submitted to varied tests to select the experimental conditions. Water assays with a solution (pH 6) containing leachate (25% v/v) were selected; the metals were added as potassium dichromate and lead (II) nitrate salts. Soil matrices that contained leachate (30% v/v) up to field capacity were used. For both water and soil assays, the metal concentrations were 10 mg kg(-1). C. cajan proved able to remove 49% of chromium and 36% of lead, both from dilute leachate. The plants also removed 34.7% of chromium from irrigated soil, but were unable to decrease the lead content. Removal of nitrogen from landfill leachate was also tested, resulting in elimination of 85% of ammonia and 70% of combined nitrite/nitrate species. The results indicate that C. cajan might be an effective candidate for the rhizofiltration of leachates containing chromium and lead, and nitrogen in large concentrations. PMID:27196815

  9. Selective Leaching of Chromium from Hanford Tank Sludge 241-U-108

    SciTech Connect

    Rapko, Brian M.; Vienna, John D.

    2002-09-09

    This study evaluated the oxidants permanganate, MnO4-, and peroxynitrite, ONOO-, as selective chromium-leaching agents from washed 241-U-108 tank sludge under varying conditions of hydroxide concentration, temperature, and time. The mass changes and final sludge compositions were evaluated using glass-property models to ascertain the relative impacts of the various oxidative alkaline leach conditions on the amount of borosilicate glass required to immobilize a given amount of washed 241-U-108 Hanford tank sludge. Only permanganate leaching removes sufficient chromium to make the chromium concentration in the oxidatively alkaline leached solids non-limiting. In the absence of added oxidants, continued washing or caustic leaching have no beneficial effects. Peroxynitrite addition reduces the amount of glass required to immobilize a given amount of washed 241-U-108 tank sludge by approximately a factor of two. Depending on the leach conditions and the exact chromium concentration limits, contact with alkaline permanganate solutions reduces the amount of immobilized high-level waste glass by a factor of 10 to 30.

  10. Electrodeposition of Nanocrystalline Chromium Coatings Based on 1-Butyl-3-Methylimidazolium-Bromide Ionic Liquid.

    PubMed

    He, Xinkuai; Zhu, Qingyun; Hou, Bailong; Cai, Youxing; Li, Chen; Fu, Liqin; Wu, Luye

    2015-12-01

    The electrochemical behavior of trivalent chromium reduction from 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium-bromide ([BMIM]Br) ionic liquid is studied. The result of cyclic voltammetry shows that the Cr(III) reduction is irreversible and occurs in two steps, Cr(III)to Cr(II), and Cr(II) to Cr(0), respectively. In the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements, the preferable equivalent circuit is made to fit the experimental data. The effects of electroplating parameters on coating thickness and electrodepositon rate are investigated by potentiostatic method on Cu electrode from Cr(III)-[BMIM]Br solution. The results show that the temperature and depositing potential have great effect on the coating thickness and electrodeposition rate. The surface morphology and composition of deposited Cr are investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). SEM analysis shows that chromium electrodeposits obtained on Cu electrodes present a ball-like structure. EDS analysis shows that the coatings are composed of Cr. Moreover, the corrosion resistance of the as-deposited chromium layer is evaluated using polarization curves. The results show that the corrosion resistance of the chromium coatings obtained at higher potential is better. PMID:26682363

  11. Chromium as Resonant Donor Impurity in PbTe

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, M.D.; Levin, Evgenii; Jaworski, C.M.; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus; Heremans, J.P.

    2012-01-25

    We synthesize and perform structural, thermoelectric, magnetic, and 125Te NMR characterization measurements on chromium-doped PbTe. 125Te NMR and magnetic measurements show that Pb1−xCrxTe is a solid solution up to x = 0.4 at.% and forms an n-type dilute paramagnetic semiconductor. The Cr level is resonant and pins the Fermi level about 100 meV into the conduction band at liquid nitrogen temperatures and below, but it moves into the gap as the temperature increases to 300 K. 125Te NMR spectra exhibit a Knight shift that correlates well with Hall effect measurements and resolve peaks of Te near Cr. Magnetic behavior indicates that Cr exists mainly as Cr2+. No departure from the Pisarenko relation for PbTe is observed. Secondary Cr2Te3 and Cr3+δTe4 phases are present in samples with x > 0.4%.

  12. Rapid chemical test for the identification of chromium-molybdenum steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmond, John C

    1932-01-01

    This note describes a simple, rapid, qualitative test which can be applied to solutions of drilling or chips for the identification of chromium-molybdenum steel. The test is based on the orange-red compound which is formed when thiocyanate and inequivalent molybdenum react. This test is much more reliable than the potassium ethylxanthate test which has been recommended for a like purpose. A list of the apparatus and reagents which are required, and a description of the procedure follows.

  13. INJECTION OF A FERROUS SULFATE/SODIUM DITHIONITE REDUCTANT FOR IN-SITU TREATMENT OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    An in situ pilot study was conducted to evaluate the performance of a ferrous iron-based reductant solution in treating hexavalent chromium within a saturated zone source area at a former industrial site in Charleston, South Carolina (USA). The hexavalent source area, consisting...

  14. Oral bioavailability of chromium from a specific site.

    PubMed Central

    Witmer, C M; Harris, R; Shupack, S I

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of soil from a specific site in New Jersey indicated a low level of sodium and chromium present as a calcium compound. Chromium was then administered orally to young, mature male rats at a level of 240 micrograms/kg for 14 days as chromium-contaminated soil, as CaCrO4, and as an equimolar mixture of the soil and calcium salts for 14 days. The rats were sacrificed 24 hr after the last dosing, and tissues were taken immediately for chromium analysis. Blood, muscle, and liver contained the highest levels of chromium in these animals, although kidney contained the highest concentration per gram of tissue. The total amount of chromium in the tissues was less than 2% of the administered chromium. In a study of the excretion of chromium, the animals were dosed orally for 8 days (with CaCrO4 or contaminated soil, each at the level of 240 mumole Cr/kg), and the chromium in feces and urine was determined on days 1, 2, 7, and 8. After cessation of dosing for 27 days, the same rats were dosed for 2 days at the same level, and chromium in urine and feces was determined for the 2 days. The animals administered the chromium in soil had higher levels of chromium in both urine and feces on all days compared to the group fed the CaCrO4. The total recovery of chromium in any of the 2-day periods was less than 50% of the chromium administered during that period. PMID:1935839

  15. Determination of Chromium(III), Chromium(VI), and Chromium(III) acetylacetonate in water by ion-exchange disk extraction/metal furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamakura, Nao; Inui, Tetsuo; Kitano, Masaru; Nakamura, Toshihiro

    A new method for the separate determination of Chromium(III) (Cr(III)), Chromium(VI) (Cr(VI)), and Cr(III) acetylacetonate (Cr(acac)3) in water was developed using a cation-exchange extraction disk (CED) and an anion-exchange extraction disk (AED) combined with metal furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (MFAAS). A 100-mL water sample was adjusted to pH 5.6 and passed through the CED placed on the AED. Cr(acac)3 and Cr(III) were adsorbed on the CED, and Cr(VI) was adsorbed on the AED. The adsorbed Cr(acac)3 was eluted with 50 mL of carbon tetrachloride, followed by the elution of Cr(III) with 50 mL of 3 mol L- 1 nitric acid. Cr(VI) was eluted with 50 mL of 3 mol L- 1 nitric acid. The chemical species of Cr eluted from the CED with carbon tetrachloride was identified as Cr(acac)3 using infrared spectroscopy. The eluate of Cr(acac)3 was diluted to 100 mL with carbon tetrachloride, and those of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) were diluted to 100 mL with deionized water. All of the solutions were subsequently analyzed by MFAAS. The calibration curve for the Cr(acac)3 aqueous solutions exhibited good linearity in the range of 0.1 to 1 ng. The detection limit of Cr, which corresponded to three times the standard deviation (n = 10) of the blank values, was 20 pg. The recovery test for Cr(III), Cr(VI), and Cr(acac)3 exhibited desirable results (96.0%-107%) when 5 μg of each species (50 μg L- 1) was added to 100 mL water samples (i.e., tap water, rainwater, and bottled drinking water). In a humic acid solution, Cr(acac)3 was quantitatively recovered (103%), but Cr(III) and Cr(VI) exhibited poor recoveries (i.e., 84.8% and 78.4%, respectively).

  16. Chromium electrodes for REDOX cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalan, V.; Reid, M. A.; Charleston, A. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An improved electrode having a gold coating for use in the anode compartment of a REDOX cell is described. The anode fluid utilizes a chromic/chromous couple. A carbon felt is soaked in methanol, rinsed in water, dried and then heated in KOH after which it is again washed in deionized water and dried. The felt is then moistened with a methanol water solution containing chloroauric acid and is stored in a dark place while still in contact with the gold-containing solution. After all the gold-containing solution is absorbed in the felt, the latter is dried by heat and then heat treated at a substantially greater temperature. The felt is then suitable for use as an electrode and is wetted with water or up to two molar HCl prior to installation in a REDOX cell. The novelty of the invention lies in the use of KOH for cleaning the felt and the use of alcohol as a carrier for the gold together with the heat treating procedure.

  17. Chromium supplementation improved post-stroke brain infarction and hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Ying; Mao, Frank Chiahung; Liu, Chia-Hsin; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Lai, Nai-Wei; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2016-04-01

    Hyperglycemia is common after acute stroke and is associated with a worse outcome of stroke. Thus, a better understanding of stress hyperglycemia is helpful to the prevention and therapeutic treatment of stroke. Chromium is an essential nutrient required for optimal insulin activity and normal carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Beyond its nutritional effects, dietary supplement of chromium causes beneficial outcomes against several diseases, in particular diabetes-associated complications. In this study, we investigated whether post-stroke hyperglycemia involved chromium dynamic mobilization in a rat model of permanent focal cerebral ischemia and whether dietary supplement of chromium improved post-stroke injury and alterations. Stroke rats developed brain infarction, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance. Post-stroke hyperglycemia was accompanied by elevated secretion of counter-regulatory hormones including glucagon, corticosterone, and norepinephrine, decreased insulin signaling in skeletal muscles, and increased hepatic gluconeogenesis. Correlation studies revealed that counter-regulatory hormone secretion showed a positive correlation with chromium loss and blood glucose increased together with chromium loss. Daily chromium supplementation increased tissue chromium levels, attenuated brain infarction, improved hyperglycemia, and decreased plasma levels of glucagon and corticosterone in stroke rats. Our findings suggest that stroke rats show disturbance of tissue chromium homeostasis with a net loss through urinary excretion and chromium mobilization and loss might be an alternative mechanism responsible for post-stroke hyperglycemia. PMID:26477944

  18. Biosorption of cadmium, chromium, lead, and zinc by biomass of Medicago sativa (alfalfa)

    SciTech Connect

    Gardea-Torresdey, J.L.; Gonzalez, J.H.; Tiemann, K.J.; Rodriguez, O.

    1996-12-31

    Previous laboratory batch experiments of Medicago sativa (alfalfa) indicated that the African shoots population had an excellent ability to bind copper(II) and nickel(II) ions from aqueous solution. Batch laboratory pH profile, time dependency, and capacity experiments were performed to determine the binding ability of the African shoots to cadmium(II), chromium(III), chromium(VI), lead(II), and zinc(II). Batch pH profile experiments for the mentioned ions indicated that the optimum pH for metal binding is approximately 5.0. Time dependency experiments for the metal ions showed that for all the metals studied, binding to the African alfalfa shoots occurred within five minutes. Binding capacity experiments revealed the following amounts of metal ions bound per gram of biomass: 7.1 mg Cd, 7.7 mg Cr(III), 43 mg Pb(II), and 4.9 mg Zn(II). However, no binding occurred for chromium(VI). Nearly all of the metals studied were recovered by treatment with 0.1M HCl, with the exception of chromium(III). Column experiments were performed to study the binding of Cd(II), Cr(III), Cr(VI), Pb(II), and Zn(II) to silica-immobilized African alfalfa shoots under flow conditions. These experiments showed that the silica-immobilized African alfalfa shoots were effective for removing metal ions from solution, and over 90% of the bound Pb(II), Cu(II), Ni(II), and Zn(II), and over 70% Cd(II), were recovered after treatment with four bed volumes of 0.1M HCl. The results from these studies will be useful for a novel phytofiltration technology to remove and recover heavy metal ions from aqueous solution.

  19. Ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the speciation of traces of chromium using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    López-García, Ignacio; Briceño, Marisol; Vicente-Martínez, Yesica; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2013-10-15

    A microextraction procedure for the speciation of very low concentrations (0.005-0.2 µg L(-1)) of chromium is discussed. To the aqueous sample (10 mL), diluted hydrochloric acid, sodium chloride and a small amount of tributylphosphate (80 µL) are incorporated, and the mixture is submitted to ultrasounds for 10 min. The organic phase recovered after centrifuging is injected into the electrothermal atomizer, and the signal due to hexavalent chromium obtained. The repetition of the procedure using another aliquot in which all the chromium present is oxidized to Cr (VI) allows the Cr(III) content to be obtained by difference. The enrichment factor is 240 and the detection limit 0.002 µg L(-1) chromium. The relative standard deviation for ten consecutive microextractions of a 0.1 µg L(-1) chromium solution is close to 8%. The procedure is applied to waters and to the leachates obtained from low cost toys made of plastic materials. PMID:24054574

  20. International strategic minerals inventory summary report; chromium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeYoung, J.H., Jr.; Lee, M.P.; Lipin, B.R.

    1984-01-01

    Major world resources of chromium, a strategic mineral commodity, are described in this summary report of information in the International Strategic Minerals Inventory {ISMI}. ISMI is a cooperative data-collection effort of earth-science and mineral-resource agencies in Australia, Canada, the Federal Republic of Germany, the Republic of South Africa, and the United States of America. This report, designed to be of benefit to policy analysts, contains two parts. Part I presents an overview of the resources and potential supply of chromium on the basis of inventory information. Part II contains tables of some of the geologic information and mineral-resource and production data that were collected by ISMI participants.

  1. Colloid mobilization in the field using citrate to remediate chromium.

    PubMed

    Johnson, C R; Hellerich, L A; Nikolaidis, N P; Gschwend, P M

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the feasibility of cleaning aquifer sediments, long contaminated with chromium (Cr) from a metal plating facility, by detaching colloid-sized sorbents from the immobile aquifer solids and then pumping those colloids to the surface for treatment. In laboratory experiments using aquifer solids from the site, several solutions (water at various pHs, phosphate, oxalate, ascorbate, citrate) were examined for their ability to disperse colloids and Cr. Based on these tests, a 5 mM citrate solution at pH 7 was selected. Subsequently, such a citrate solution was used in the field in two single-well injection-withdrawal experiments. Large quantities of colloids were released immediately after injection. The colloidal particles mobilized by citrate in the field had more than 20 times higher Cr concentrations than did the average aquifer sediments, implying success in mobilizing Cr-associated phases. Further, laboratory and field tests showed that anion exchange of citrate for chromate caused some additional release of Cr from these aquifer solids. PMID:11708455

  2. Direct determination of chromium in infant formulas employing high-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and solid sample analysis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Arlene S; Brandao, Geovani C; Matos, Geraldo D; Ferreira, Sergio L C

    2015-11-01

    The present work proposed an analytical method for the direct determination of chromium in infant formulas employing the high-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry combined with the solid sample analysis (SS-HR-CS ET AAS). Sample masses up to 2.0mg were directly weighted on a solid sampling platform and introduced into the graphite tube. In order to minimize the formation of carbonaceous residues and to improve the contact of the modifier solution with the solid sample, a volume of 10 µL of a solution containing 6% (v/v) H2O2, 20% (v/v) ethanol and 1% (v/v) HNO3 was added. The pyrolysis and atomization temperatures established were 1600 and 2400 °C, respectively, using magnesium as chemical modifier. The calibration technique was evaluated by comparing the slopes of calibration curves established using aqueous and solid standards. This test revealed that chromium can be determined employing the external calibration technique using aqueous standards. Under these conditions, the method developed allows the direct determination of chromium with limit of quantification of 11.5 ng g(-1), precision expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD) in the range of 4.0-17.9% (n=3) and a characteristic mass of 1.2 pg of chromium. The accuracy was confirmed by analysis of a certified reference material of tomato leaves furnished by National Institute of Standards and Technology. The method proposed was applied for the determination of chromium in five different infant formula samples. The chromium content found varied in the range of 33.9-58.1 ng g(-1) (n=3). These samples were also analyzed employing ICP-MS. A statistical test demonstrated that there is no significant difference between the results found by two methods. The chromium concentrations achieved are lower than the maximum limit permissible for chromium in foods by Brazilian Legislation. PMID:26452789

  3. Stabilization/solidification on chromium (III) wastes by C(3)A and C(3)A hydrated matrix.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangguo; He, Chao; Bai, Yun; Ma, Baoguo; Wang, Guandong; Tan, Hongbo

    2014-03-15

    Hazardous wastes are usually used in the Portland cement production in order to save energy, costs and/or stabilize toxic substances and heavy metals inside the clinker. This work focus on the stabilization/solidification on chromium (III) wastes by C(3)A and C(3)A hydrated matrix. The immobilization rate of chromium in C(3)A and the leaching characteristics of the C(3)A hydrated matrixes containing chromium were investigated by ICP-AES. The results indicated that C(3)A had a good solidifying effect on chromium using the clinkering process, however, the Cr leaching content of Cr-doped C(3)A was higher than that of hydrated C(3)A matrix in Cr(NO(3))3 solution and was lower than that of the hydrated C(3)A matrix in K(2)CrO(4) solution, no matter the leachant was sulphuric acid & nitric acid or water. To explain this, C(3)A formation, chemical valence states of chromium in C(3)A, hydration products and Cr distribution in the C(3)A-gypsum hydrated matrixes were studied by XRD, XPS and FESEM-EDS. The investigation showed that part of Cr(3+) was oxidized to Cr(6+) in the clinkering process and identified as the chromium compounds Ca(4)Al(6)O(12)CrO(4) (3CaO·Al(20O(3)·CaCrO(4)), which resulted in the higher leaching of hydrated matrix of Cr-doped C(3)A. PMID:24468527

  4. Observational Approach to Chromium Site Remediation - 13266

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Myers, R.

    2013-07-01

    Production reactors at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, required massive quantities of water for reactor cooling and material processing. To reduce corrosion and the build-up of scale in pipelines and cooling systems, sodium dichromate was added to the water feedstock. Spills and other releases at the makeup facilities, as well as leaks from miles of pipelines, have led to numerous areas with chromium-contaminated soil and groundwater, threatening fish populations in the nearby Columbia River. Pump-and-treat systems have been installed to remove chromium from the groundwater, but significant contamination remain in the soil column and poses a continuing threat to groundwater and the Columbia River. Washington Closure Hanford, DOE, and regulators are working on a team approach that implements the observational approach, a strategy for effectively dealing with the uncertainties inherent in subsurface conditions. Remediation of large, complex waste sites at a federal facility is a daunting effort. It is particularly difficult to perform the work in an environment of rapid response to changing field and contamination conditions. The observational approach, developed by geotechnical engineers to accommodate the inherent uncertainties in subsurface conditions, is a powerful and appropriate method for site remediation. It offers a structured means of quickly moving into full remediation and responding to the variations and changing conditions inherent in waste site cleanups. A number of significant factors, however, complicate the application of the observational approach for chromium site remediation. Conceptual models of contamination and site conditions are difficult to establish and get consensus on. Mid-stream revisions to the design of large excavations are time-consuming and costly. And regulatory constraints and contract performance incentives can be impediments to the flexible responses required under the observational

  5. Laser action in chromium-doped forsterite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petricevic, V.; Gayen, S. K.; Alfano, R. R.; Yamagishi, Kiyoshi; Anzai, H.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports on pulsed laser operation obtained in chromium-activated forsterite Cr(3+):Mg2SiO4 at room temperature. The spectrum of the free-running laser peaks at 1235 nm and a bandwidth of about 22 nm. The spectral range of the laser emission is expected to extend from 850 to 1300, provided the parasitic impurity absorption may be minimized by improved crystal growth techique.

  6. Corrosion behavior of chromium in molten carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Vossen, J.P.T.; Makkus, R.C.; Wit, J.H.W. de

    1996-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of Cr in molten carbonate was investigated with electrochemical techniques in combination with quenching after polarization at fixed potentials. Between {minus}1,700 and {minus}1,500 mV carbon deposition takes place on the surface. The stationary corrosion product formed on Cr after polarization at {minus}1,700 mV is probably chromium carbide. Between {minus}1,600 and {minus}300 mV a LiCrO{sub 2}-layer is present on the surface of the Cr. At potentials above approximately {minus}500 mV chromate formation and dissolution take place. When the potential increases, the oxidation rate of the Cr increases due to the larger driving force for oxidation. In the potential region where oxygen vacancies are filled and bivalent chromium ions are oxidized, the conductivity of the scale decreases and the oxidation rate is determined by the transport properties of the scale: the passive properties of the LiCrO{sub 2}-scale have improved. In the anodic scan of a cyclic voltammogram two peaks can be observed, corresponding with the oxidation of point defects, and the formation of instable intermediate chromium oxide. These reactions are accompanied by the formation of lithium chromite. While scanning cathodically, first chromate ions are reduced. At very cathodic potentials trivalent Cr ions are reduced to bivalent Cr ions and point defects, which are incorporated in the LiCrO{sub 2}-lattice, and water is reduced. These reactions may be accompanied by the reduction of the instable chromium oxide formed during the preceding anodic scan. Near {minus}1,700 mV carbonate decomposes, lithium chromite is reduced and possibly carbide formation also takes place.

  7. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by the thermophilic methanogen Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rajesh; Dong, Hailiang; Liu, Deng; Zhao, Linduo; Marts, Amy R.; Farquhar, Erik; Tierney, David L.; Almquist, Catherine B.; Briggs, Brandon R.

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant progress on iron reduction by thermophilic microorganisms, studies on their ability to reduce toxic metals are still limited, despite their common co-existence in high temperature environments (up to 70 °C). In this study, Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, an obligate thermophilic methanogen, was used to reduce hexavalent chromium. Experiments were conducted in a growth medium with H2/CO2 as substrate with various Cr6+ concentrations (0.2, 0.4, 1, 3, and 5 mM) in the form of potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7). Time-course measurements of aqueous Cr6+ concentrations using 1,5-diphenylcarbazide colorimetric method showed complete reduction of the 0.2 and 0.4 mM Cr6+ solutions by this methanogen. However, much lower reduction extents of 43.6%, 13.0%, and 3.7% were observed at higher Cr6+ concentrations of 1, 3 and 5 mM, respectively. These lower extents of bioreduction suggest a toxic effect of aqueous Cr6+ to cells at this concentration range. At these higher Cr6+ concentrations, methanogenesis was inhibited and cell growth was impaired as evidenced by decreased total cellular protein production and live/dead cell ratio. Likewise, Cr6+ bioreduction rates decreased with increased initial concentrations of Cr6+ from 13.3 to 1.9 μM h-1. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy revealed a progressive reduction of soluble Cr6+ to insoluble Cr3+ precipitates, which was confirmed as amorphous chromium hydroxide by selected area electron diffraction pattern. However, a small fraction of reduced Cr occurred as aqueous Cr3+. Scanning and transmission electron microscope observations of M. thermautotrophicus cells after Cr6+ exposure suggest both extra- and intracellular chromium reduction mechanisms. Results of this study demonstrate the ability of M. thermautotrophicus cells to reduce toxic Cr6+ to less toxic Cr3+ and its potential application in metal bioremediation, especially at high temperature subsurface radioactive waste disposal

  8. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by the thermophilic methanogen Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Singh, Rajesh; Dong, Hailiang; Liu, Deng; Zhao, Linduo; Marts, Amy R.; Farquhar, Erik; Tierney, David L.; Almquist, Catherine B.; Briggs, Brandon R.

    2014-10-22

    Despite the significant progress on iron reduction by thermophilic microorganisms, studies on their ability to reduce toxic metals are still limited, despite their common co-existence in high temperature environments (up to 70°C). In this study, Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, an obligate thermophilic methanogen, was used to reduce hexavalent chromium. Experiments were conducted in a growth medium with H2/CO2 as substrate with various Cr6+ concentrations (0.2, 0.4, 1, 3, and 5 mM) in the form of potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7). Time-course measurements of aqueous Cr6+ concentrations with the 1, 5-diphenylcarbazide colorimetric method showed complete reduction of the 0.2 and 0.4 mM Cr6+ solutions bymore » this methanogen. However, much lower reduction extents of 43.6%, 13.0%, and 3.7% were observed at higher Cr6+ concentrations of 1, 3 and 5 mM, respectively. These lower extents of bioreduction suggest a toxic effect of aqueous Cr6+ to cells at this concentration range. At these higher Cr6+ concentrations, methanogenesis was inhibited and cell growth was impaired as evidenced by decreased total cellular protein production and live/dead cell ratio. Likewise, Cr6+ bioreduction rates decreased with increased initial concentrations of Cr6+ from 13.3 to1.9 μM h₋1. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy revealed a progressive reduction of soluble Cr6+ to insoluble Cr3+ precipitates, which was confirmed as amorphous chromium hydroxide by X-ray diffraction and selected area electron diffraction pattern. However, a small fraction of reduced Cr occurred as aqueous Cr3+. Scanning and transmission electron microscope observations of M. thermautotrophicus cells after Cr6+ exposure suggest both extra- and intracellular chromium reduction mechanisms. Results of this study demonstrate the ability of M. thermautotrophicus cells to reduce toxic Cr6+ to less toxic Cr3+ and its potential application in metal bioremediation, especially at high temperature

  9. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by the thermophilic methanogen Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rajesh; Dong, Hailiang; Liu, Deng; Zhao, Linduo; Marts, Amy R.; Farquhar, Erik; Tierney, David L.; Almquist, Catherine B.; Briggs, Brandon R.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the significant progress on iron reduction by thermophilic microorganisms, studies on their ability to reduce toxic metals are still limited, despite their common co-existence in high temperature environments (up to 70°C). In this study, Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, an obligate thermophilic methanogen, was used to reduce hexavalent chromium. Experiments were conducted in a growth medium with H2/CO2 as substrate with various Cr6+ concentrations (0.2, 0.4, 1, 3, and 5 mM) in the form of potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7). Time-course measurements of aqueous Cr6+ concentrations with the 1, 5-diphenylcarbazide colorimetric method showed complete reduction of the 0.2 and 0.4 mM Cr6+ solutions by this methanogen. However, much lower reduction extents of 43.6%, 13.0%, and 3.7% were observed at higher Cr6+ concentrations of 1, 3 and 5 mM, respectively. These lower extents of bioreduction suggest a toxic effect of aqueous Cr6+ to cells at this concentration range. At these higher Cr6+ concentrations, methanogenesis was inhibited and cell growth was impaired as evidenced by decreased total cellular protein production and live/dead cell ratio. Likewise, Cr6+ bioreduction rates decreased with increased initial concentrations of Cr6+ from 13.3 to1.9 µM h−1. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy revealed a progressive reduction of soluble Cr6+ to insoluble Cr3+ precipitates, which was confirmed as amorphous chromium hydroxide by X-ray diffraction and selected area electron diffraction pattern. However, a small fraction of reduced Cr occurred as aqueous Cr3+. Scanning and transmission electron microscope observations of M. thermautotrophicus cells after Cr6+ exposure suggest both extra- and intracellular chromium reduction mechanisms. Results of this study demonstrate the ability of M. thermautotrophicus cells to reduce toxic Cr6+ to less toxic Cr3+ and its potential application in metal bioremediation, especially at high temperature

  10. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by the thermophilic methanogen Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Rajesh; Dong, Hailiang; Liu, Deng; Zhao, Linduo; Marts, Amy R.; Farquhar, Erik; Tierney, David L.; Almquist, Catherine B.; Briggs, Brandon R.

    2014-10-22

    Despite the significant progress on iron reduction by thermophilic microorganisms, studies on their ability to reduce toxic metals are still limited, despite their common co-existence in high temperature environments (up to 70°C). In this study, Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, an obligate thermophilic methanogen, was used to reduce hexavalent chromium. Experiments were conducted in a growth medium with H2/CO2 as substrate with various Cr6+ concentrations (0.2, 0.4, 1, 3, and 5 mM) in the form of potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7). Time-course measurements of aqueous Cr6+ concentrations with the 1, 5-diphenylcarbazide colorimetric method showed complete reduction of the 0.2 and 0.4 mM Cr6+ solutions by this methanogen. However, much lower reduction extents of 43.6%, 13.0%, and 3.7% were observed at higher Cr6+ concentrations of 1, 3 and 5 mM, respectively. These lower extents of bioreduction suggest a toxic effect of aqueous Cr6+ to cells at this concentration range. At these higher Cr6+ concentrations, methanogenesis was inhibited and cell growth was impaired as evidenced by decreased total cellular protein production and live/dead cell ratio. Likewise, Cr6+ bioreduction rates decreased with increased initial concentrations of Cr6+ from 13.3 to1.9 μM h₋1. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy revealed a progressive reduction of soluble Cr6+ to insoluble Cr3+ precipitates, which was confirmed as amorphous chromium hydroxide by X-ray diffraction and selected area electron diffraction pattern. However, a small fraction of reduced Cr occurred as aqueous Cr3+. Scanning and transmission electron microscope observations of M. thermautotrophicus cells after Cr6+ exposure suggest both extra- and intracellular chromium reduction mechanisms. Results of

  11. X-616 Chromium Sludge Lagoons pictorial overview, Piketon, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant uses large quantities of water for process cooling. The X-616 Liquid Effluent Control Facility was placed in operation in December 1976 to treat recirculation cooling water blowdown from the process cooling system. A chromium-based corrosion inhibitor was used in the cooling water system. A chromium sludge was produced in a clarifier to control chromium levels in the water. Chromium sludge produced by this process was stored in two surface impoundments called the X-616 Chromium Sludge Lagoons. The sludge was toxic due to its chromium concentration and therefore required treatment. The sludge was treated, turning it into a sanitary waste, and buried in an Ohio EPA approved landfill. The plant's process cooling water system has changed to a more environmentally acceptable phosphate-based inhibitor. Closure activities at X-616 began in August 1990, with all construction activities completed in June 1991, at a total cost of $8.0 million.

  12. Luminescence from chromium-neodymium-doped lithium niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahpoud, S.; Chamiel, N.; Weiss, A. M.; Rosenbluh, M.; Herman, A.; Shoham, A.; Lipavsky, B.; Rotman, S. R.

    1999-10-01

    Luminescence from chromium-neodymium-doped lithium niobate (LiNbO 3) was experimentally measured to determine the degree of non-radiative energy transfer between chromium and neodymium ions. Evidence is presented for two different time constants for emission from chromium ions in the material, indicating that non-radiative transfer does occur. Differences between quasi-continuous pumping and pulsed excitation are discussed.

  13. Contingency plans for chromium utilization. Publication NMAB-335

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The United States depends entirely on foreign sources for the critical material, chromium, making it very vulnerable to supply disruptions. The effectiveness of programs such as stockpiling, conservation, and research and development for substitutes to reduce the impact of disruption of imports of chromite and ferrochromium are discussed. Alternatives for decreasing chromium consumption also are identified for chromium-containing materials in the areas of design, processing, and substitution.

  14. Determination of iron: In the presence of chromium and titanium with the jones reductor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grimaldi, F.S.; Stevens, R.E.; Carron, M.K.

    1943-01-01

    Sulfuric acid solutions of titanous and chromous sulfates, obtained by passage through the Jones reductor, are oxidized by aeration for from 5 to 10 minutes in the presence of a trace of copper sulfate as a catalyst. Ferrous sulfate is essentially unoxidized and is titrated with permanganate after aeration. Best results are obtained by using 0.0003 millimole of copper sulfate in about 300 ml. of solution. Larger quantities of copper sulfate lead to slightly low results when both chromium and titanium are present.

  15. Method of trivalent chromium concentration determination by atomic spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Reheulishvili, Aleksandre N.; Tsibakhashvili, Neli Ya.

    2006-12-12

    A method is disclosed for determining the concentration of trivalent chromium Cr(III) in a sample. The addition of perchloric acid has been found to increase the atomic chromium spectrometric signal due to Cr(III), while leaving the signal due to hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) unchanged. This enables determination of the Cr(III) concentration without pre-concentration or pre-separation from chromium of other valences. The Cr(III) concentration may be measured using atomic absorption spectrometry, atomic emission spectrometry or atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

  16. Effect of processing cement to concrete on hexavalent chromium levels.

    PubMed

    Turk, K; Rietschel, R L

    1993-04-01

    Hexavalent chromium sensitization is known to occur from exposure to cement. Concrete is a mixture of cement, sand, rock, and water. Admixtures are compounds used to retard or accelerate concrete setting time. Some countries use ferrous sulfate to reduce hexavalent chromium in cement. We evaluated and compared hexavalent chromium levels in cement, rock (aggregate), and wet and dry concrete in samples from Singapore, Ireland, Denmark, Australia, and the United States. Cement from Denmark contains ferrous sulfate. The effect of representative admixtures on hexavalent chromium concentration in concrete was also evaluated, but technical limitations made evaluation difficult. Soluble chromium levels in cement ranged from 0.225 mg/kg in the US sample to 0.036 mg/kg in the Singapore sample. Aggregate chromium levels ranged from 0.083 mg/kg in the Denmark sample to < 0.002 mg/kg in the Ireland sample. Fresh US concrete, with 1.27 mg/kg hexavalent chromium, contained the highest level. The Denmark sample, with ferrous sulfate added, was lowest (< 0.01 mg/kg). Hardened concrete levels ranged from 0.104 mg/kg from the Ireland sample to 0.002 mg/kg from the Singapore sample. Therefore, hexavalent chromium levels do appear to be influenced by admixtures and by processing from powdered cement to dry concrete. Ferrous sulfate significantly reduced hexavalent chromium levels in fresh cement. PMID:8508629

  17. Studies on the essentiality of chromium in ruminants

    SciTech Connect

    Samsell, L.J.; Spears, J.W.

    1986-03-01

    Although chromium has been established as an essential trace element for certain animal species, no requirement has been shown for ruminants. Sixteen female lambs (35 kg) were used in an attempt to determine if chromium is essential in the ruminant. Animals were individually housed in all plastic pens and fed twice daily either a low chromium (100 ppb) torula yeast based diet or the basal diet supplemented with 10 ppm chromium as CrCl/sub 3/. Blood samples obtained prior to the morning feeding and 2 and 6 hr post-feeding on days 28 and 56 indicated no significant treatment differences in plasma glucose or serum free fatty acids. By day 56, serum cholesterol tended to be lower in chromium supplemented lambs (60.9 vs 71.7 mg/dl). Lambs in the chromium supplemented treatment also tended to gain more efficiently through 56 days (.130 vs .118 gain/fed). On day 84, lambs were bled after a 48 hr fast, refed, then bled again at 2 and 6 hr post-feeding. Plasma glucose and serum free fatty acids were not affected by chromium at the end of the 48 hr fast or when lambs were refed following fasting. At 84 days both total serum cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol were lower in lambs receiving supplemental chromium. These results suggest that chromium may have a biological role in the ruminant.

  18. Quantitative chemical analysis of nickel-chromium dental casting alloys.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, K; Kuroiwa, A; Ando, Y; Hashimoto, H

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-nine brands of dental casting nickel-chromium alloys made in Japan for small castings were analyzed by electron probe X-ray microanalyzer. Nickel-chromium alloys for metal-ceramic application were composed primarily of nickel, chromium, and molybdenum with the exception of one brand. Of the nickel-chromium alloys for inlay, crown, and bridgework applications, 11 of the 22 alloys were up to the standard of the Ministry of Welfare specifications. And additive metal elements of these alloys were molybdenum, iron, copper, manganese, aluminum, silicon, tin, indium, silver, titanium, and gallium. PMID:2134288

  19. Lifetime and regeneration of immobilized titania for photocatalytic removal of aqueous hexavalent chromium.

    PubMed

    Tuprakay, Seree; Liengcharernsit, Winai

    2005-09-30

    Immobilized titania (TiO2) batch reactors reduced hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in the form of potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7) to trivalent chromium (Cr(III)) in aqueous solution at pH 3 under 171 W/m2 light intensity. The light source was a 125-W ultraviolet (UV) lamp. The Cr(VI) reduction showed zero-order kinetics (k0), while the Cr(VI) adsorption fitted with first-order kinetics (k(1st)). Adsorption capacity increased with increasing initial Cr(VI) concentration, and the area of immobilized TiO2 limited the reduction efficiency. The lifetime of fresh immobilized TiO2 was approximately 14 h. In addition, the regeneration of TiO2 with 3M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) was necessary to improve adsorption reaction. PMID:16046253

  20. Mössbauer study of the iron atom state in modified chromium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarevskii, S. I.; Eremin, V. V.; Panchuk, V. V.; Semenov, V. G.; Osmolovsky, M. G.

    2016-01-01

    Powders of modified chromium dioxide produced by the hydrothermal method were studied using 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy at a temperature of 298 K. The content of the modifier, i.e., 57Fe compound, was varied from 2 to 10 mmol/mol Cr at a Sb content of 2.2 and 10 mmol/mol Cr. It was shown that, independently of concentrations, Fe3+ ions are distributed between three magnetic solid solutions (sextets): based on CrO2 (bulk material and iron-enriched surface layer), based on Cr2O3, and surface β-CrOOH (doublet). In this case, chromium atoms were not substituted in the CrSbO4 nucleation (12 nm in size) phase with an accuracy up to the Mössbauer factor. It was assumed that the powder coercivity, in addition to the size factor, is controlled by the iron concentration in the CrO2 surface layer.

  1. PIXE analysis of chromium phytoaccumulation by the aquatic macrophytes Eicchornia crassipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinoza-Quiñones, F. R.; Rizzutto, M. A.; Added, N.; Tabacniks, M. H.; Módenes, A. N.; Palácio, S. M.; Silva, E. A.; Rossi, F. L.; Martin, N.; Szymanski, N.

    2009-04-01

    The uptake of hexavalent chromium in free living floating aquatic macrophytes Eicchornia crassipes cultivated in non-toxic chromium-doped hydroponic solutions is presented. A Cr-uptake bioaccumulation experiment was carried out using healthy macrophytes grown in a temperature controlled greenhouse. Six samples of nutrient media and plants were collected during the 23 day experiment. Roots and leaves were acid digested with the addition of an internal Gallium standard, for thin film sample preparation and quantitative Cr analysis by PIXE method. The Cr 6+ mass uptake by the macrophytes reached up to 70% of the initial concentration, comparable to former results and literature data. The Cr-uptake data were described using a non-structural first order kinetic model. Due to low cost and high removal efficiency, living aquatic macrophytes E. crassipes are a viable biosorbent in an artificial wetland of a water effluent treatment plant.

  2. 40 CFR Appendix Xii to Part 266 - Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery Furnaces XII Appendix XII to Part 266... Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery Furnaces A. Exempt Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials...

  3. 40 CFR Appendix Xii to Part 266 - Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery Furnaces XII Appendix XII to Part 266... Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery Furnaces A. Exempt Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials...

  4. 40 CFR Appendix Xii to Part 266 - Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery Furnaces XII Appendix XII to Part 266... Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery Furnaces A. Exempt Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials...

  5. 40 CFR Appendix Xii to Part 266 - Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery Furnaces XII Appendix XII to Part 266... Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery Furnaces A. Exempt Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials...

  6. 40 CFR Appendix Xii to Part 266 - Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery Furnaces XII Appendix XII to Part 266... Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery Furnaces A. Exempt Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials...

  7. Rapid-extraction oxidation process to recover and reuse copper chromium and arsenic from industrial wood preservative sludge.

    PubMed

    Kazi, F K M; Cooper, P A

    2002-01-01

    Chromated copper arsenate (CCA) wood preservative can form insoluble sludges when the hexavalent chromium component is reduced by wood extractives, wood particles and preservative additives in the solution. This sludge accumulates in treating solution work tanks, sumps and in-line filters and must be disposed of as hazardous wastes by waste disposal companies at high costs. A number of commercial sludges were investigated and found to contain 18-94% copper, chromium and arsenic as oxides combined with sand, oil, wood particles, additives and wood extractives. We have developed a multi-stage recycling process whereby approximately 97% of the CCA components are recovered from the sludge. It involves extraction with sodium hypochlorite to remove and oxidize chromium (more than 90%) and extract most of the arsenic (approx. 80%) followed by extraction of the copper and remaining arsenic and chromium with phosphoric acid. The phosphoric acid extract contains some trivalent chromium, which is subsequently oxidized by sodium hypochlorite. The combined oxidized extract containing CrVI, CuII and AsV was compatible with CCA treating solutions and could be re-used commercially for treating wood without having a significant effect on the preservative fixation rate or the leach resistance of the treated wood. A cost analysis showed that the economic savings from recovery of CCA chemicals and reduced landfill costs exceeded the variable costs for materials and energy for the process by as much as Can $966 per tonne of sludge if sodium sulfite can be acquired in bulk quantities for the process. PMID:11952176

  8. COST EFFECTIVE CONTROL OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM AIR EMISSIONS FROM FUNCTIONAL CHROMIUM ELECTROPLATING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper will summrize thie pollution prevention (p2) method to control stack emissions from hard chromium plating operations performed by the USEPA's National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) over the last four years. During literature research and user surveys, it...

  9. A Laboratory Procedure for the Reduction of Chromium(VI) to Chromium(III).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunn, George; Sansone, Eric B.

    1989-01-01

    Chromium(VI) compounds are classified as oxidizers and must be specially packaged and transported for disposal while Cr(III) compounds are considered nonoxidizers. A process which reduces Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by adding sodium metabisulfite followed by neutralization with magnesium hydroxide is explored. (MVL)

  10. Urinary chromium concentrations in humans following ingestion of safe doses of hexavalent and trivalent chromium: Implications for biomonitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, B.L.; Scott, P.K.; Norton, R.L.

    1996-08-09

    This study evaluates the significance of increased urinary chromium concentrations as a marker of chromium exposure and potential health risk. Six human volunteers ingested trivalent chromium [Cr(III)] and hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] at doses that are known to be safe but higher than typical levels. The following dosing regimen was used: d 1-7, 200 {mu}g/d chromium picolinate; d 8-10, Cr(VI) ingestion at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reference dose (RfD) of 0.005 mg/kg/d; d 11-13, no dose; d 14-16, Cr(III) ingestion at the U.S. EPA RfD of 1.0 mg/kg/d; and 17-18, postdose. Findings are as follows: (1) ingestion of 200 {mu}g/d of chromium picolinate yielded significantly elevated urine concentrations such that each participant routinely exceeded background, (2) ingestion of the Cr(VI) RfD (0.005 mg/kg/d) yielded individual mean urinary chromium levels (1.2-2.3 {mu}g/L) and a pooled mean urinary chromium level (2.4 {mu}g/L) that significantly exceeded background, and (3) ingestion of the Cr(III) RfD yielded no significantly exceeded background, and (3) ingestion of the Cr(III) RfD yielded no significant increase in urinary chromium concentrations, indicating that little, if any, absorption occurred. Our work identified three critical issues that need to be accounted for in any future studies that will use urinary chromium as a marker of exposure. First, a minimum urinary chromium concentration of approximately 2 {mu}g/L should be used as a screening level to critically identify individuals who may have experienced elevated exposures to chromium. Second, if Cr(III) levels in soils are known to be less than 80,000 ppm and the Cr(III) is insoluble, urinary chromium concentrations are not an appropriate marker of exposure. Third, newer forms of chromium supplements that contain organic forms of Cr(III) must be considered potential confounders and their contribution to residential chromium uptake must be carefully evaluated. 19 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Improved Atmospheric Sampling of Hexavalent Chromium

    PubMed Central

    Torkmahalleh, Mehdi Amouei; Yu, Chang-Ho; Lin, Lin; Fan, Zhihua (Tina); Swift, Julie L.; Bonanno, Linda; Rasmussen, Don H.; Holsen, Thomas M.; Hopke, Philip K.

    2015-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and trivalent chromium (Cr(III)) are the primary chromium oxidation states found in ambient atmospheric particulate matter. While Cr(III) is relatively nontoxic, Cr(VI) is toxic and exposure to Cr(VI) may lead to cancer, nasal damage, asthma, bronchitis, and pneumonitis. Accurate measurement of the ambient Cr(VI) concentrations is an environmental challenge since Cr(VI) can be reduced to Cr(III) and vice versa during sampling. In the present study, a new Cr(VI) sampler (Clarkson sampler) was designed, constructed, and field tested to improve the sampling of Cr(VI) in ambient air. The new Clarkson Cr(VI) sampler was based on the concept that deliquescence during sampling leads to aqueous phase reactions. Thus, the relative humidity of the sampled air was reduced below the deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) of the ambient particles. The new sampler was operated to collect Total Suspended Particles (TSP), and compared side-by-side with the current National Air Toxics Trends Stations (NATTS) Cr(VI) sampler that is utilized in the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) air toxics monitoring program. Side-by-side field testing of the samplers occurred in Elizabeth, NJ during the winter and summer of 2012. The average recovery values of Cr(VI) spikes after 24 hour sampling intervals during summer and winter sampling were 57 and 72%, respectively, for the Clarkson sampler, while the corresponding average values for NATTS samplers were 46% for both summer and winter sampling, respectively. Preventing the ambient aerosol collected on the filters from deliquescing is a key to improving the sampling of Cr(VI). PMID:24344574

  12. Improved atmospheric sampling of hexavalent chromium.

    PubMed

    Torkmahalleh, Mehdi Amouei; Yu, Chang-Ho; Lin, Lin; Fan, Zhihua; Swift, Julie L; Bonanno, Linda; Rasmussen, Don H; Holsen, Thomas M; Hopke, Philip K

    2013-11-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and trivalent chromium (Cr(III)) are the primary chromium oxidation states found in ambient atmospheric particulate matter. While Cr(III) is relatively nontoxic, Cr(VI) is toxic and exposure to Cr(VI) may lead to cancer, nasal damage, asthma, bronchitis, and pneumonitis. Accurate measurement of the ambient Cr(VI) concentrations is an environmental challenge since Cr(VI) can be reduced to Cr(III) and vice versa during sampling. In the present study, a new Cr(VI) sampler (Clarkson sampler) was designed, constructed, and field tested to improve the sampling of Cr(VI) in ambient air. The new Clarkson Cr(VI) sampler was based on the concept that deliquescence during sampling leads to aqueous phase reactions. Thus, the relative humidity of the sampled air was reduced below the deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) of the ambient particles. The new sampler was operated to collect total suspended particles (TSP), and compared side-by-side with the current National Air Toxics Trends Stations (NATTS) Cr(VI) sampler that is utilized in the US. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) air toxics monitoring program. Side-by-side field testing of the samplers occurred in Elizabeth, NJ during the winter and summer of 2012. The average recovery values of Cr(VI) spikes after 24-hr sampling intervals during summer and winter sampling were 57 and 72%, respectively, for the Clarkson sampler while the corresponding average values for NATTS samplers were 46% for both summer and winter sampling, respectively. Preventing the ambient aerosol collected on the filters from deliquescing is a key to improving the sampling of Cr(VI). PMID:24344574

  13. Toxicity and adaptation of Dictyosphaerium chlorelloides to extreme chromium contamination.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Fortún, Sebastián; López-Rodas, Victoria; Navarro, Macarena; Marvá, Fernando; D'ors, Ana; Rouco, Mónica; Haigh-Florez, David; Costas, Eduardo

    2009-09-01

    Metals are often spilled by industries into inland water environments, with adverse consequences. Numerous papers have reported that heavy metals produce massive destruction of algae. Nevertheless, algal populations seem to become tolerant when they have had previous exposures to heavy metals. Because the mechanisms allowing heavy metal tolerance of algae are not yet known, the present study analyzed the effect of hexavalent chromium on growth and photosynthetic performance of Dictyosphaerium chlorelloides, stressing on the adaptation mechanisms to chromium contamination. Growth and photosynthetic performance of algal cells were inhibited by Cr(VI) at 10 mg/L, and the 72-h median inhibition concentration was established as 1.64 and 1.54 mg/L, respectively. However, after further incubation for a three month period in an environment with 25 mg/L of chromium, some rare, chromium-resistant cells occasionally were found. A Luria-Delbrück fluctuation analysis was performed to distinguish between resistant algae arising from rare, spontaneous mutations and resistant algae arising from physiological adaptation and other adaptive mechanisms. Resistant cells arose only by spontaneous mutations before the addition of chromium, with a rate of 1.77 x 10(-6) mutants per cell division. From a practical point of view, the use of both chromium-sensitive and chromium-resistant genotypes could make possible a specific algal biosensor for chromium. PMID:19323601

  14. Chromium and Polyphenols From Cinnamon Improve Insulin Sensitivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Naturally occurring compounds that have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity include chromium and polyphenols found in cinnamon. These compounds also have similar effects on insulin signaling and glucose control. The signs of chromium deficiency are similar to those for the metabolic syndrome ...

  15. 21 CFR 73.1326 - Chromium hydroxide green.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) The color additive chromium hydroxide green is principally hydrated chromic sesquioxide (Cr2O3·XH2O). (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with chromium hydroxide green may contain only those diluents listed in this subpart as safe and suitable for use in color additive mixtures for coloring...

  16. 21 CFR 73.1326 - Chromium hydroxide green.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) The color additive chromium hydroxide green is principally hydrated chromic sesquioxide (Cr2O3·XH2O). (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with chromium hydroxide green may contain only those diluents listed in this subpart as safe and suitable for use in color additive mixtures for coloring...

  17. 21 CFR 73.1326 - Chromium hydroxide green.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) The color additive chromium hydroxide green is principally hydrated chromic sesquioxide (Cr2O3·XH2O). (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with chromium hydroxide green may contain only those diluents listed in this subpart as safe and suitable for use in color additive mixtures for coloring...

  18. AMORPHOUS ALLOY SURFACE COATINGS FOR HARD CHROMIUM REPLACEMENT - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hard chromium coatings (0.25 to10 mil thick) are used extensively for imparting wear and erosion resistance to components in both industrial and military applications. The most common means of depositing hard chromium has been through the use of chromic acid baths containing ...

  19. 21 CFR 73.1326 - Chromium hydroxide green.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) The color additive chromium hydroxide green is principally hydrated chromic sesquioxide (Cr2O3·XH2O). (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with chromium hydroxide green may contain only those diluents listed in this subpart as safe and suitable for use in color additive mixtures for coloring...

  20. 21 CFR 73.3111 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chromium oxide greens. 73.3111 Section 73.3111 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3111 Chromium oxide greens. (a)...

  1. 21 CFR 73.3111 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chromium oxide greens. 73.3111 Section 73.3111 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3111 Chromium oxide greens. (a)...

  2. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium (2010 External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

  1. Corrosion behavior and surface characterization of Ti-20Cr alloy in a solution containing fluoride.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Shinji; Hattori, Masayuki; Yoshinari, Masao; Kawada, Eiji; Asami, Katsuhiko; Oda, Yutaka

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between corrosion resistance and surface composition of an experimental Ti-20 mass% Cr casting alloy in a saline solution containing fluoride. The alloy had a greater resistance to corrosion in a fluoride-containing saline solution than did commercially pure titanium. However, with confirmed dissolution of titanium and chromium, it meant that the fluoride in the saline solution corroded the alloy slightly. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis revealed that the surface composition of the alloy consisted of titanium and chromium oxides containing hydroxide. The [Ti]/([Ti] + [Cr]) ratio in the surface oxide film decreased when immersed in fluoride-containing saline solution, that is, the surface oxide film became chromium-rich oxide. Therefore, the alloy obtained good corrosion resistance to fluoride due to formation of a chromium-rich oxide film. PMID:15510869

  2. Recoating mirrors having a chromium underlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khounsary, Ali M.; Eng, Peter J.; Assoufid, Lahsen; Macrander, Albert T.; Qian, Jun

    2004-01-01

    X-ray mirrors and multilayers are used to reflect, focus, or monochromatize x-ray beams. Substrate materials are typically silicon, fused silica, Zerodur, ULE, or metals such as molybdenum, copper, or stainless steel. Substrates are polished to a few angstroms rms roughness and often coated with one or more layers to provide the desired spectral reflectivity. Coatings can be damaged as a result of mishandling, contamination and/or chemical reaction, prolonged exposure to x-rays, exposure to poor vacuum, aging, or peeling due to poor coating adhesion and/or high stress. Incomplete or out-of-spec coatings may render an optic unacceptable. In all these cases, it is highly desirable to be able to completely strip off a coating and recoat the substrate without the need for repolishing it. This is particularly important for optical substrates that are expensive or have a long fabrication lead-time. This paper describes one such scheme. It involves pre-coating of mirror reflecting surfaces with a thin layer of chromium. Subsequent coatings can be stripped by etching away the chromium underlayer without damaging the substrate. Experimental results show that surface roughness is unaffected by the etching process in silicon and zerodur, the two substrate material tested so far. The process is expected to be equally applicable to other glasses and can be extended to other substrate materials using appropriate underlayer / etchant combinations.

  3. Chromium(VI) bioremediation by probiotics.

    PubMed

    Younan, Soraia; Sakita, Gabriel Z; Albuquerque, Talita R; Keller, Rogéria; Bremer-Neto, Hermann

    2016-09-01

    Chromium is a common mineral in the earth's crust and can be released into the environment from anthropogenic sources. Intake of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) through drinking water and food causes toxic effects, leading to serious diseases, and is a commonly reported environmental problem. Microorganisms can mitigate or prevent the toxic effects caused by heavy metals in addition to having effective resistance mechanisms to prevent cell damage and bind to these metals, sequestering them from the cell surface and removing them from the body. Species of Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, Bacillus and Bifidobacterium present in the human mouth and gut and in fermented foods have the ability to bind and detoxify some of these substances. This review address the primary topics related to Cr(VI) poisoning in animals and humans and the use of probiotics as a way to mitigate or prevent the toxic effects caused by Cr(VI). Further advances in the genetic knowledge of such microorganisms may lead to discoveries which will clarify the most active microorganisms that act as bioprotectants in bodies exposed to Cr(VI) and are an affordable option for people and animals intoxicated by the oral route. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:26997541

  4. Use of natural mordenite to remove chromium (III) and to neutralize pH of alkaline waste waters.

    PubMed

    Córdova-Rodríguez, Valduvina; Rodríguez-Iznaga, Inocente; Acosta-Chávez, Raquel María; Chávez-Rivas, Fernando; Petranovskii, Vitalii; Pestryakov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    The natural mordenite from Palmarito de Cauto deposit (PZ), Cuba, was studied in this work as an ion exchanger to remove Cr(3+) cations from alkaline aqueous solutions at different pH and chromium concentrations. The mordenite stability under cyclic treatment processes with alkaline solutions and its capacity to decrease the pH of the solutions was also analyzed. It was shown that PZ removes Cr(3+) ions from alkaline solutions, and it happens independently of the starting chromium concentration and the pH of the exchange solution used. This material has an important neutralizing effect on alkaline solutions, expressed in a significant pH decrease from the early stages of the treatments. For solutions with initial pH equal to 11, it decreases to a value of around seven. The stability of this material is not affected significantly after continuous cyclic treatment with NaOH solution, which shows that mordenite, in particular from Palmarito de Cauto deposit, has high stability in alkaline solutions. The results are important as they suggest that natural zeolites may be of interest in treatments of alkaline industrial waste effluents. PMID:26818904

  5. Chromium-Removal Processes during Groundwater Remediation by a Zerovalent Iron Permeable Reactive Barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkin, Richard T.; Su, Chunming; Ford, Robert G.; Paul, Cynthia J.

    2008-06-09

    Solid-phase associations of chromium were examined in core materials collected from a full-scale, zerovalent iron permeable reactive barrier (PRB) at the U.S. Coast Guard Support Center located near Elizabeth City, NC. The PRB was installed in 1996 to treat groundwater contaminated with hexavalent chromium. After eight years of operation, the PRB remains effective at reducing concentrations of Cr from average values >1500 {micro}g L{sup -1} in groundwater hydraulically upgradient of the PRB to values <1 {micro}g L{sup -1} in groundwater within and hydraulically downgradient of the PRB. Chromium removal from groundwater occurs at the leading edge of the PRB and also within the aquifer immediately upgradient of the PRB. These regions also witness the greatest amount of secondary mineral formation due to steep geochemical gradients that result from the corrosion of zerovalent iron. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy indicated that chromium is predominantly in the trivalent oxidation state, confirming that reductive processes are responsible for Cr sequestration. XANES spectra and microscopy results suggest that Cr is, in part, associated with iron sulfide grains formed as a consequence of microbially mediated sulfate reduction in and around the PRB. Results of this study provide evidence that secondary iron-bearing mineral products may enhance the capacity of zerovalent iron systems to remediate Cr in groundwater, either through redox reactions at the mineral-water interface or by the release of Fe(II) to solution via mineral dissolution and/or metal corrosion.

  6. Soil washing of chromium- and cadmium-contaminated sludge using acids and ethylenediaminetetra acetic acid chelating agent.

    PubMed

    Gitipour, Saeid; Ahmadi, Soheil; Madadian, Edris; Ardestani, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    In this research, the effect of soil washing in the removal of chromium- and cadmium-contaminated sludge samples collected from Pond 2 of the Tehran Oil Refinery was investigated. These metals are considered as hazardous substances for human health and the environment. The carcinogenicity of chromate dust has been established for a long time. Cadmium is also a potential environmental toxicant. This study was carried out by collecting sludge samples from different locations in Pond 2. Soil washing was conducted to treat the samples. Chemical agents, such as acetic acid, ethylenediaminetetra acetic acid (EDTA) and hydrochloric acid, were used as washing solutions to remove chromium and cadmium from sludge samples. The results of this study indicated that the highest removal efficiencies from the sludge samples were achieved using a 0.3 M HCl solution with 82.69% and 74.47% for chromium and cadmium, respectively. EDTA (0.1 M) in the best condition extracted 66.81% of cadmium and 72.52% of chromium from the sludges. The lowest efficiency values for the samples, however, were achieved using 3 M acetic acid with 41.7% and 46.96% removals for cadmium and chromium, respectively. The analysis of washed sludge indicated that the heavy metals removal decreased in the order of 3 M acetic acid < 0.1 M EDTA<0.3 M HCl, thus hydrochloric acid appears to offer a greater potential as a washing agent in remediating the sludge samples. PMID:26599728

  7. Workshop on effects of chromium coating on Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductor strand: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-12

    This report discusses the following topics: Chromium coating on superconductor strand -- an overview; technology of chromium plating; comparison of wires plated by different platers; search for chromium in copper; strand manufactures` presentations; chromium plating at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; a first look at a chromium plating process development project tailored for T.P.X. and I.T.E.R. strand; and influence of chromium diffusion and related phenomena on the reference ratios of bare and chromium plated Nb{sub 3}Sn strand.

  8. Bioavailability of a potato chromium complex to the laboratory rat

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, H.K.

    1985-01-01

    Research objectives were to study the effect of food source, preparation method and chemical form on bioavailability of chromium. Chromium concentration in potatoes was determined and tubers labeled either intrinsically or extrinsically with radioactive chromate. A labeled chromium complexes was isolated from preparations of raw, baked or fried potatoes and chromatographed on gel permeation media. Availability of the potato chromium complex to the rat was examined in three feeding studies. Animals were dosed with radioactive extrinsically or intrinsically labeled potato extract or with chromate. A labeled chromium complex was isolated from gastrointestinal contents of rats and chromatographed. Potato pulp and peel contained 1.63 and 2.70 ..mu..g Cr/g tissue respectively. True and apparent absorption from extrinsically labeled feedings were 33.4 +/- 4.7 and 29.8 +/- 11.2% respectively, and no differences existed between absorption from raw and cooked potatoes. Absorption from the extrinsic labeled potatoes differed significantly from absorption of inorganic chromatium. Apparent absorption of raw (11.1 +/- 7.9%) and cooked (-0.7 +/- 2.8%) intrinsically labeled feedings differed significantly. Absorption of inorganic chromium was 17.8% (true) and 11.5% (apparent). Examination of the chromium complex isolated from gastrointestinal tract contents showed enlargement of the complex in the stomach after consumption.

  9. Mode of occurrence of chromium in four US coals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huggins, Frank E.; Shah, N.; Huffman, G.P.; Kolker, A.; Crowley, S.; Palmer, C.A.; Finkelman, R.B.

    2000-01-01

    The mode of occurrence of chromium in three US bituminous coals and one US subbituminous has been examined using both X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy and a selective leaching protocol supplemented by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron microprobe measurements. A synthesis of results from both methods indicates that chromium occurs principally in two forms in the bituminous coals: the major occurrence of chromium is associated with the macerals and is not readily leached by any reagent, whereas a second, lesser occurrence, which is leachable in hydrofluoric acid (HF), is associated with the clay mineral, illite. The former occurrence is believed to be a small particle oxyhydroxide phase (CrO(OH)). One coal also contained a small fraction (<5%) of the chromium in the form of a chromian magnetite, and the leaching protocol indicated the possibility of a similar small fraction of chromium in sulfide form in all three coals. There was little agreement between the two techniques on the mode of occurrence of chromium in the subbituminous coal; however, only a limited number of subbituminous coals have been analyzed by either technique. The chromium in all four coals was trivalent as no evidence was found for the Cr6+ oxidation state in any coal.

  10. Biosorption of Hexavalent Chromium from Aqueous Medium with Opuntia Biomass

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The biosorption of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solutions by Opuntia cladodes and ectodermis from cactus fruits was investigated. Both types of biomass are considered low-cost, natural, and ecofriendly biosorbents. Batch experiments were carried out to determine Cr(VI) biosorption capacity and the efficiency of the biosorption process under different pH, initial Cr(VI) concentration, and sorbent dosage. The biosorption of Cr(VI) by Opuntia biomass was highly pH dependent, favoring higher metal uptake at low pH. The higher biosorption capacity was exhibited at pH 2. The optimal conditions were obtained at a sorbent dosage of 1 g L−1 and initial metal concentration of 10 mg L−1. Biosorption kinetic data were properly fitted with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The rate constant, the initial biosorption rate, and the equilibrium biosorption capacity were determined. The experimental equilibrium data obtained were analyzed using two-parameter isotherm models (Langmuir, Freundlich, and Temkin). The Langmuir maximum monolayer biosorption capacity (qmax) was 18.5 mg g−1 for cladodes and 16.4 mg g−1 for ectodermis. The results suggest that Opuntia biomass could be considered a promising low-cost biosorbent for the ecofriendly removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous systems. PMID:24982975

  11. Tetravalent chromium doped laser materials and NIR tunable lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfano, Robert R. (Inventor); Petricevic, Vladimir (Inventor); Bykov, Alexey (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A method is described to improve and produce purer Cr.sup.4+-doped laser materials and lasers with reduced co-incorporation of chromium in any other valence states, such as Cr.sup.3+, Cr.sup.2+, Cr.sup.5+, and Cr.sup.6+. The method includes: 1) certain crystals of olivine structure with large cation (Ca) in octahedral sites such as Cr.sup.4+:Ca.sub.2GeO.sub.4, Cr.sup.4+:Ca.sub.2SiO.sub.4, Cr.sup.4+:Ca.sub.2Ge.sub.xSi.sub.1-xO.sub.4 (where 0solution growth techniques that enable the growth of the crystals below the temperature of polymorphic transitions by using low melting point solvent based on oxide, fluoride and/or chloride compounds. Purer Cr.sup.4+-doped laser materials are characterized by a relatively high concentration of Cr.sup.4+-lasing ion in crystalline host that makes these materials suitable for compact high power (thin disk/wedge) NIR laser applications.

  12. Zinc recovery and waste sludge minimization from chromium passivation baths.

    PubMed

    Diban, Nazely; Mediavilla, Rosa; Urtiaga, Ane; Ortiz, Inmaculada

    2011-08-30

    This work reports the feasibility of applying emulsion pertraction technology (EPT) aiming at zinc recovery and waste minimization in the zinc electroplating processes that include Cr (III) passivation. The assessment consists of firstly the lifetime extension of the passivation baths by selective removal of the tramp ions zinc and iron, and secondly, the recovery of zinc for further reuse. Spent passivation baths from a local industry were tested, being the major metallic content: Cr(3+) 9000mg L(-1), Zn(2+) 12,000mg L(-1), Fe(3+) 100mg L(-1). Working in a Liqui-Cel hollow fiber membrane contactor and using the extractant bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl) phosphinic acid, reduction of zinc and iron concentrations below 60mg L(-1) and 2mg L(-1), respectively were obtained, while trivalent chromium, the active metal that generates the passivation layer, was retained in the baths. Zinc was selectively transferred to an acidic stripping phase that in the experimental time reached a concentration of 157,000mg L(-1). Zinc recovery by electrowinning from the acidic stripping phase without any pretreatment of the electrolyte solution provided a purity of 98.5%, matching the lower commercial zinc grade. As a result of the extension of the life time of the passivation bath, significant environmental advantages are derived such as minimization of the volume of hazardous wastes and savings in the consumption of raw materials. PMID:21704452

  13. Investigation of the threshold for allergic reactivity to chromium.

    PubMed

    Basketter, D; Horev, L; Slodovnik, D; Merimes, S; Trattner, A; Ingber, A

    2001-02-01

    Allergy to chromium is relatively common, often in association with exposure to cement or in leather manufacture. However, in certain locations, there appears to be a relatively large cohort of chromium-sensitive individuals whose allergy cannot be explained by these common sources. In particular, this group include Israeli housewives with persistent hand eczema and concomitant patch test positivity to chromium. The causation of their allergy has been linked with relatively high levels of chromium contamination in household products. To provide further information in respect of the definition of safe levels for such products, we examined 17 chromium-allergic individuals to determine their threshold for reaction under closed patch test and repeated open application test (ROAT) conditions. The data derived indicated that, on normal skin, the patch test threshold was 10 ppm chromium; in the presence of an irritant (sodium lauryl sulfate) the threshold was closer to 1 ppm, 2/17 subjects giving 1+ reactions at this concentration. In the more realistic exposure conditions of the ROAT, 8/14 individuals failed to react to 50 ppm, whilst 3/15 reacted to 5 ppm. Interestingly, there was very poor correlation between patch test sensitivity and ROAT sensitivity. To ensure the large majority of chromium-allergic individuals do not suffer elicitation of their allergy, as well as to limit the development of new chromium-sensitive subjects, it is recommended that household products adhere to a previously published standard of a maximum limit of 5 ppm, with an ultimate target of 1 ppm contamination by chromium. PMID:11205406

  14. Synthesis and characterization of new copper-chromium layered double hydroxides pillared with polyoxovanadates

    SciTech Connect

    Depege, C.; Bigey, L.; Forano, C.

    1996-11-01

    In this study, the authors have focused on the intercalation by ion-exchange of some polyoxovanadate anions from aqueous solution (decavanadate V{sub 10}O{sub 28{sup 6-}}, tetravanadate V{sub 4}O{sub 12}{sup 4-}, and pyrovanadate V{sub 2}O{sub 7}{sup 4-}) into the layers of a copper chromium hydrotalcite-like compound, PXRD, FTIR, TGA, and EXAFS studies have provided information about the specific oxovanadate ions in the interlayers and their orientation. Thermal treatment of these LDHs was also examined. A grafting process of pyrovanadate anions onto the hydroxylated sheets has been demonstrated at room temperature.

  15. Round Heat-treated Chromium-molybdenum-steel Tubing Under Combined Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osgood, William R

    1943-01-01

    The results of tests of round heat-treated chromium-molybdenum-steel tubing are presented. Tests were made on tubing under axial load, bending load, torsional load, combined bending and axial load, combined bending and torsional load, and combined axial, bending, and torsional load. Tensile and compressive tests were made to determine the properties of the material. Formulas are given for the evaluation of the maximum strength of this steel tubing under individual or combined loads. The solution of an example is included to show the procedure to be followed in designing a tubular cantilever member to carry combined loads.

  16. Effect of coatings obtanied by sputtering of chromium catode on the corrosion resistance of AISI H13 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval, A.; Peña, D.; Piratoba, U.

    2013-11-01

    Corrosion resistance of coatings obtained by sputtering a chromium target were evaluated. The films were deposited on substrates of disk-shaped AISI H13 steel. By means of potentiodynamic polarization curves were able to determine the current density vs. potential for the coated and uncoated substrate and the difference in the corrosion potential Ecorr. All samples with coating showed an increase in Ecorr respect to substrate. The electrochemical tests were conducted in an electrolytic solution of 3% NaCl.

  17. TREATMENT OF A SATURATED ZONE HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM SOURCE AREA USING A FERROUS SULFATE/SODIUM DITHIONITE MIXTURE: A FIELD PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field pilot study was conducted to evaluate the performance of a combined ferrous sulfate/sodium dithionite solution for in situ treatment of a saturated zone hexavalent chromium source area at a former ferrochromium alloy production facility in Charleston, S.C. The saturate...

  18. Microbial Diversity of Chromium-Contaminated Soils and Characterization of Six Chromium-Removing Bacteria.

    PubMed

    He, Zhiguo; Hu, Yuting; Yin, Zhen; Hu, Yuehua; Zhong, Hui

    2016-06-01

    Three soil samples obtained from different sites adjacent to a chromium slag heap in a steel alloy factory were taken to examine the effect of chromium contamination on soil bacterial diversity as determined by construction of 16S rDNA clone libraries and sequencing of selected clones based on restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Results revealed that Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Alphaproteobacteria occurred in all three soil samples, although the three samples differed in their total diversity. Sample 1 had the highest microbial diversity covering 12 different classes, while Sample 3 had the lowest microbial diversity. Strains of six different species were successfully isolated, one of which was identified as Zobellella denitrificans. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a strain belonging to the genus Zobellella able to resist and reduce chromium. Among all isolates studied, Bacillus odysseyi YH2 exhibited the highest Cr(VI)-reducing capability, with a total removal of 23.5 % of an initial Cr(VI) concentration of 350 mg L(-1). PMID:26894618

  19. Microbial Diversity of Chromium-Contaminated Soils and Characterization of Six Chromium-Removing Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhiguo; Hu, Yuting; Yin, Zhen; Hu, Yuehua; Zhong, Hui

    2016-06-01

    Three soil samples obtained from different sites adjacent to a chromium slag heap in a steel alloy factory were taken to examine the effect of chromium contamination on soil bacterial diversity as determined by construction of 16S rDNA clone libraries and sequencing of selected clones based on restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Results revealed that Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Alphaproteobacteria occurred in all three soil samples, although the three samples differed in their total diversity. Sample 1 had the highest microbial diversity covering 12 different classes, while Sample 3 had the lowest microbial diversity. Strains of six different species were successfully isolated, one of which was identified as Zobellella denitrificans. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a strain belonging to the genus Zobellella able to resist and reduce chromium. Among all isolates studied, Bacillus odysseyi YH2 exhibited the highest Cr(VI)-reducing capability, with a total removal of 23.5 % of an initial Cr(VI) concentration of 350 mg L-1.

  20. [Blood and urine chromium: compared values between chromium exposed workers and common people].

    PubMed

    Provenzani, A; Verso, M G; Picciotto, D

    2008-01-01

    Aim of present study is the valutation and quantification of chromium in blood and urine. We compared 3 groups of persons formed by building workers, in particular masons, because cement contains potassium chromate that is dangerous for health, and by common people: urban population and outside the town population. In fact, exposure to CrVI risk is high for people who live near chromate industries. We maked a medical examination, blood and instrumental tests, chromium measuring in blood (recent exposure indicator) and urine (recent and previous indicator). Then we used statistical methods to estimate obtained values of blood and urine chromium among professional exposed people and common people. At the end we think that preventive measures in working environment reduced exposure to CrVI but environmental exposure (for example road dust from catalytic converter erosion, from brake lining erosion, cement dust and tobacco smoke), in the last years, has increased. So there are no difference between urban population and outside the town population and there are also no difference with professional exposed people for work prevention according to law in force, that let down professional risk using safe limits. PMID:18700674

  1. Fluid-rock interactions between xanthan-chromium(III) gel systems and dolomite core material

    SciTech Connect

    McCool, C.S.; Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.

    1995-11-01

    Gelation of chromium(III)-xanthan systems in dolomite core material was investigated. Compositional changes in the gelant caused by interactions with the dolomite core material resulted in low permeability reductions for gelants prepared with chromium chloride, chromium acetate and a chromium diamine salt. The primary cause of incomplete gelation in the dolomite material was the increase in gelant pH that resulted in precipitation of chromium.

  2. Evaluation of chromium in red blood cells as an indicator of exposure to hexavalent chromium: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Devoy, Jérôme; Géhin, Antoine; Müller, Samuel; Melczer, Mathieu; Remy, Aurélie; Antoine, Guillaume; Sponne, Isabelle

    2016-07-25

    Chromium(VI) compounds are classified as carcinogenic to humans. Whereas chromium measurements in urine and whole blood (i.e., including plasma) are indicative of recent exposure, chromium in red blood cells (RBC) is attributable specifically to Cr(VI) exposure. Before recommending Cr in RBC as a biological indicator of Cr(VI) exposure, in-vitro studies must be undertaken to assess its reliability. The present study examines the relationship between the chromium added to a blood sample and that subsequently found in the RBC. After incubation of total blood with chromium, RBC were isolated, counted and their viability assessed. Direct analysis of chromium in RBC was conducted using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. Hexavalent, but not trivalent Cr, was seen to accumulate in the RBC and we found a strong correlation between the Cr(VI) concentration added to a blood sample and the amount of Cr in RBC. This relationship appears to be independent of the chemical properties of the human blood samples (e.g., different blood donors or different reducing capacities). Even though in-vivo studies are still needed to integrate our understanding of Cr(VI) toxicokinetics, our findings reinforce the idea that a single determination of the chromium concentration in RBC would enable biomonitoring of critical cases of Cr(VI) exposure. PMID:27178267

  3. Aqueous trivalent chromium photoproduction in natural waters

    SciTech Connect

    Kaczynski, S.E.; Kieber, R.J. )

    1993-08-01

    Field studies indicate Cr(III) is photochemically produced at two freshwater lakes in southeastern North Carolina. Results of controlled photolysis experiments with marine and estuarine samples suggest this process may be common to many natural water systems. This photogeneration mechanism sheds new insight into the existence of the thermodynamically unstable Cr(III) ion in oxygenated surface waters. Sixty-eight water samples from seven water bodies in the southeastern United States (fresh, estuarine, and marine) displayed a range of total aqueous inorganic chromium from <0.01 nM to 1.05 nM, with variable amounts of the trivalent and hexavalent species. These are the first Cr(III) and Cr(VI) values reported for all these aqueous systems and some of the first ever for nonmarine environments. 24 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Self-Lubricating Composite Containing Chromium Oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher (Inventor); Edmonds, Brian J. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A self lubricating. friction and wear reducing composite material useful over a wide temperature range of from cryogenic temperature up to about 900 C. contains 60 80 wt. % of particulate Cr2O3, dispersed in a metal binder of a metal alloy containing Cr and at least 50 wt. % of Ni, Cr or a mature of Ni and Cr. It also contains 5-20 wt. % of a fluoride of at least one Group I, Group II or rare earth metal and. optionally, 5-20 wt. % of a low temperature lubricant metal, such as Ag. Au, Pt, Pd, Rh and Cu. This composite exhibits less oxidation instability and less abrasiveness than composites containing chromium carbide, is readily applied using plasma spray and can be ground and polished with a silicon carbide abrasive.

  5. The gelation mechanism of chromium(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, P.

    1988-05-01

    Chromium(III) is commonly used crosslinker for preparing profile control gels with polymers having carboxylate and amide functionalities. Cr(III) is applied in many forms. For example, it can be used in the form of simple chromic salts of chloride and sulfate, or as complexed Cr(III) used in leather tanning, or as in-situ generated Cr(III) from the redox reaction of dichromate and bisulfite or thiourea. The gelation rate, and gel quality, doped on which form of Cr(III) is used. The author has found that the Cr olates, produced by hydrolysis of Cr(III) ions, are the reactive crosslinking species. The different gelation rates are due to the different degrees of olation. Furthermore, by controlling the degree of hydrolysis Cr(III) derived from various sources mentioned above can exhibit the same gelation rate.

  6. Effects of Chromium(VI) and Chromium(III) on Desulfovibrio vulgaris Cells

    SciTech Connect

    M.E. Clark; A. Klonowska; S.B. Thieman; B. Giles; J.D. Wall; and M.W. Fields

    2007-04-19

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris ATCC 29579 is a well studied sulfate reducer that has known capabilities of reducing heavy metals and radionuclides, like chromium and uranium. Cultures grown in a defined medium (i.e. LS4D) had a lag period of approximately 40 h when exposed to 50 μMof Cr(VI). Substrate analysis revealed that although chromium is reduced within the first 5 h, growth does not resume for another 35 h. During this time, small amounts of lactate are still utilized but the reduction of sulfate does not occur. Sulfate reduction occurs concurrently with the accumulation of acetate approximately 40 h after inoculation, when growth resumes. Similar amounts of hydrogen are produced during this time compared to hydrogen production by cells not exposed to Cr(VI); therefore an accumulation of hydrogen cannot account for the utilization of lactate. There is a significant decrease in the carbohydrate to protein ratio at approximately 25 h, and this result indicated that lactate is not converted to glycogen. Most probable number analysis indicated that cell viability decreased steadily after inoculation and reached approximately 6 x 104 cells/ml 20 h post-chromium exposure. Regeneration of reducing conditions during chromium exposure does not induce growth and in fact may make the growth conditions even more unfavorable. This result suggested that an increase in Eh was not solely responsible for the decline in viability. Cell pellets collected 10 h after chromium-exposure were unable to resume growth when suspended into fresh medium. Supernatants from these pellets were able to support cell growth upon re- inoculation. D. vulgaris cells treated with a non-dose dependent addition of ascorbate at the same time of Cr(VI) addition did not enter a lag period. Ascorbate added 3 h post-Cr(VI) exposure did not prevent the growth lag. These results indicated that Desulfovibrio utilized lactate to reduce Cr(VI) without the reduction of sulfate, that the decline in cell viability and

  7. Enhancing collagen stability through nanostructures containing chromium(III) oxide.

    PubMed

    Sangeetha, Selvam; Ramamoorthy, Usha; Sreeram, Kalarical Janardhanan; Nair, Balachandran Unni

    2012-12-01

    Stabilization of collagen for various applications employs chemicals such as aldehydes, metal ions, polyphenols, etc. Stability against enzymatic, thermal and mechanical degradation is required for a range of biomedical applications. The premise of this research is to explore the use of nanoparticles with suitable functionalization/encapsulation to crosslink with collagen, such that the three dimensional architecture had the desired stability. Collagen solution prepared as per standard protocols is treated with chromium(III) oxide nanoparticules encapsulated within a polymeric matrix (polystyrene-block-polyacrylic acid copolymer). Selectivity towards encapsulation was ensured by the reaction in dimethyl sulfoxide, where the PS groups popped out and encapsulated the Cr(2)O(3). Subsequently when immersed in aqueous solution, PAA units popped up to react with functional groups of collagen. The interaction with collagen was monitored through techniques such as CD, FTIR, viscosity measurements, stress analysis. CD studies and FTIR showed no degradation of collagen. Thermal stability was enhanced upon interaction of nanostructures with collagen. Self-assembly of collagen was delayed but not inhibited, indicating a compete binding of the metal oxide encapsulated polymer to collagen. Metal oxide nanoparticles encapsulated within a polymeric matrix could provide thermal and mechanical stability to collagen. The formed fibrils of collagen could serve as ideal material for various smart applications such as slow/sustained drug release. The study is also relevant to the leather industry in that the nanostructures can diffuse through the highly networked collagen fibre bundles in skin matrix easily, thus overcoming the rate limiting step of diffusion. PMID:22766281

  8. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium (Peer Review Plan)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is conducting a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of hexavalent chromium that will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database.

  9. USE OF FUME SUPPRESSANTS IN HARD CHROMIUM BATHS - QUALITY TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA Common Sense Initiative (CSI) is a cooperative effort of government, industry, environmental and other stakeholder groups to find "cleaner, cheaper, smarter" approaches to environmental management in industrial sectors. The purpose of the project is to help hard chromium ...

  10. Chromate allergy: total chromium and hexavalent chromate in the air.

    PubMed

    Goh, C L; Wong, P H; Kwok, S F; Gan, S L

    1986-01-01

    This is a study on atmospheric concentration of total chromium and hexavalent chromate and its role in chromate sensitivity. Air concentration of total chromium and hexavalent chromate in a construction factory, a busy city area, a suburban area, a residential area, and a heavy industrial area were measured by air sampling pumps. Hexavalent chromate was not detected in any sampled areas. Two (concreting areas) of 8 locations in the construction factory had total chromium of 0.2 and 2.3 micrograms/m3 in the atmosphere. It appeared that the atmospheric concentration of total chromium and hexavalent chromate was negligible. These findings indicate that unexplained chromate sensitivity, as so often seen in patients attending a contact dermatitis clinic, is not attributable to exposure to hexavalent chromate in the air. PMID:2947791

  11. Corrosion behavior of porous chromium carbide in supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ziqiang; Chen, Weixing; Zheng, Wenyue; Guzonas, Dave

    2012-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of highly porous chromium carbide (Cr 3C 2) prepared by a reactive sintering process was characterized at temperatures ranging from 375 °C to 625 °C in a supercritical water environment with a pressure of 25-30 MPa. The test results show that porous chromium carbide is stable in SCW environments at temperatures under 425 °C, above which disintegration occurred. The porous carbide was also tested under hydrothermal conditions of pressures between 12 MPa and 50 MPa at constant temperatures of 400 °C and 415 °C, respectively. The pressure showed little effect on the stability of chromium carbide in the tests at those temperatures. The mechanism of disintegration of chromium carbide in SCW environments is discussed.

  12. PBI REVERSE OSMOSIS MEMBRANE FOR CHROMIUM PLATING RINSE WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A laboratory research study was carried out to select and optimize polybenzimidazole (PBI) reverse osmosis (RO) membranes for the treatment of chromium plating rinse water. The effects of important film casting and annealing variables on RO properties were investigated. Membranes...

  13. Structure and magnetic properties of chromium doped cobalt molybdenum nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guskos, Niko; Żołnierkiewicz, Grzegorz; Typek, Janusz; Guskos, Aleksander; Adamski, Paweł; Moszyński, Dariusz

    2016-09-01

    Four nanocomposites containing mixed phases of Co3Mo3N and Co2Mo3N doped with chromium have been prepared. A linear fit is found for relation between Co2Mo3N and chromium concentrations. The magnetization in ZFC and FC modes at different temperatures (2-300 K) and in applied magnetic fields (up to 70 kOe) have been investigated. It has been detected that many magnetic characteristics of the studied four nanocomposites correlate not with the chromium concentration but with nanocrystallite sizes. The obtained results were interpreted in terms of magnetic core-shell model of a nanoparticle involving paramagnetic core with two magnetic sublattices and a ferromagnetic shell related to chromium doping.

  14. High performance supercapacitor from chromium oxide-nanotubes based electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lota, Grzegorz; Frackowiak, Elzbieta; Mittal, Jagjiwan; Monthioux, Marc

    2007-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) filled and doped with chromium oxide have been used as attractive electrodes for supercapacitors. Pseudocapacitance effects related to the presence of nanosized chromium oxide finely dispersed at the nanoscale together with high conducting properties of SWNTs allow building efficient electrodes from this hybrid material. Even if capacitance values are not very high (ca. 60 F g -1), however, extremely quick charge propagation was observed, doubtless due to the overall physical and textural properties of SWNT material. The positive effect - with respect to empty-SWNTs - brought by the presence of chromium oxide in and probably in-between the SWNTs indicates that chromium oxide is accessible to the electrolyte in spite of its encapsulated location, because of the numerous side entries created all along the SWNT walls during the filling step.

  15. 21 CFR 73.2326 - Chromium hydroxide green.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2326 Chromium hydroxide green. (a) Identity and... in coloring externally applied cosmetics, including those intended for use in the area of the eye,...

  16. 21 CFR 73.2326 - Chromium hydroxide green.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2326 Chromium hydroxide green. (a) Identity and... in coloring externally applied cosmetics, including those intended for use in the area of the eye,...

  17. 21 CFR 73.2327 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2327 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity and... may be safely used in externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics intended for use in the...

  18. 21 CFR 73.2327 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2327 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity and... may be safely used in externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics intended for use in the...

  19. 21 CFR 73.2327 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2327 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity and... may be safely used in externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics intended for use in the...

  20. 21 CFR 73.2326 - Chromium hydroxide green.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2326 Chromium hydroxide green. (a) Identity and... in coloring externally applied cosmetics, including those intended for use in the area of the eye,...

  1. 21 CFR 73.2327 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2327 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity and... may be safely used in externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics intended for use in the...

  2. 21 CFR 73.2326 - Chromium hydroxide green.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2326 Chromium hydroxide green. (a) Identity and... in coloring externally applied cosmetics, including those intended for use in the area of the eye,...

  3. 21 CFR 73.2326 - Chromium hydroxide green.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2326 Chromium hydroxide green. (a) Identity and... in coloring externally applied cosmetics, including those intended for use in the area of the eye,...

  4. 21 CFR 73.2327 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2327 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity and... may be safely used in externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics intended for use in the...

  5. Fabrication of high rate chromium getter sources for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gabbard, W.A.; Simpkins, J.E.; Mioduszewski, P.; Edmonds, P.H.

    1983-01-01

    Design and fabrication techniques are described for the manufacture of large-capacity chromium getter sources, analogous to the commercially available titanium getter source known as Ti-Ball, manufactured by Varian Associates.

  6. Molecular Mechanisms of Chromium in Alleviating Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Yinan; Clark, Suzanne; Ren, Jun; Sreejayan, Nair

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is often associated with obesity, dyslipidemia, and cardiovascular anomalies and is a major health problem approaching global epidemic proportions. Insulin resistance, a prediabetic condition, precedes the onset of frank type 2 diabetes and offers potential avenues for early intervention to treat the disease. Although lifestyle modifications and exercise can reduce the incidence of diabetes, compliance has proved to be difficult, warranting pharmacological interventions. However, most of the currently available drugs that improve insulin sensitivity have adverse effects. Therefore, attractive strategies to alleviate insulin resistance include dietary supplements. One such supplement is chromium, which has been shown reduce insulin resistance in some, but not all, studies. Furthermore, the molecular mechanisms of chromium in alleviating insulin resistance remain elusive. This review examines emerging reports on the effect of chromium, as well as molecular and cellular mechanisms by which chromium may provide beneficial effects in alleviating insulin resistance. PMID:22423897

  7. The effect of chromium oxyhydroxide on solid oxide fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Krumpelt, M.; Cruse, T. A.; Ingram, B. J.; Routbort, J. L.; Wang, S.; Salvador, P. A.; Chen, G.; Carnegie Mellon Univ.; NETL; Ohio Univ.

    2010-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium species like the oxyhydroxide, CrO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}, or hexoxide, CrO{sub 3}, are electrochemically reduced to Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} in solid oxide fuel cells and adversely affect the cell operating potentials. Using a narrowly focused beam from the Advanced Photon Source, such chromium oxide deposits were unequivocally identified in the active region of the cathode by X-ray diffraction, suggesting that the triple phase boundaries were partially blocked. Under fuel cell operating conditions, the reaction has an equilibrium potential of about 0.9 V and the rate of chromium oxide deposition is therefore dependent on the operating potential of the cell. It becomes diffusion limited after several hours of steady operation. At low operating potentials, lanthanum manganite cathodes begin to be reduced to MnO, which reacts with the chromium oxide to form the MnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel.

  8. Chromium and Polyphenols from Cinnamon and Insulin Sensitivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Factors that improve insulin sensitivity usually lead to improvements in risk factors associated with the metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. Naturally occurring bioactive compounds that have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity include chromium and polyphenols found in ...

  9. Reduction and immobilization of hexavalent chromium with coal- and humate-based sorbents.

    PubMed

    Janos, Pavel; Hůla, Václav; Bradnová, Petra; Pilarová, Vera; Sedlbauer, Josef

    2009-05-01

    Two kinds of the commercially available sorbents containing humic acids as active constituents were used for Cr(VI) reduction and removal, namely oxihumolite (naturally occurring weathered young brown coal) and iron humate (IH) (waste material produced during industrial manufacturing of humic substances). The mechanisms of the chromium removal involve the reduction of Cr(VI) (by humic substances or by Fe(II) ions) and subsequent binding of Cr(III) to a humic acid matrix. Other metal-binding mechanisms possibly effective in the process of Cr(VI) removal, e.g., coprecipitation or surface precipitation of Fe(III)/Cr(III) hydroxides, are also discussed. Oxihumolite was able to remove Cr(VI) from strongly acidic solutions with pH below ca. 2. IH, on the other hand, exhibited a maximum sorption capability in slightly acidic solutions with pH above ca. 3. Over the whole examined range (pH 1-5), however, IH was able to reduce Cr(VI) almost completely to its less toxic trivalent state. A sufficiently high sorption capacity (20 mg g(-1)) was found for chromium removal with IH in an unbuffered system, where the "natural" pH values governed by the buffering capacity of the sorbent itself ranged from 3.9 to 4.6. It follows from extraction studies with the loaded (spent) sorbents that chromium is bound strongly to the sorbent, and thus risks of its subsequent liberation into the environment are minimized. Similarity in the extraction behavior of the Cr(III)-loaded and Cr(VI)-loaded sorbents supported the above-mentioned mechanisms of the Cr(VI) removal. PMID:19215962

  10. Chromium and copper substituted lanthanum nano-ferrites: Their synthesis, characterization and application studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauhar, Sheenu; Singhal, Sonal

    2014-10-01

    Nano-crystalline lanthanum ferrites substituted by chromium and copper having formula LaMxFe1-xO3 (M = Cr, Cu; 0.0 ⩽ x ⩽ 0.5) were synthesized using sol-gel auto-combustion method. The formation of ferrite particles was confirmed using Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FT-IR) spectra and powder X-ray Diffraction (XRD) techniques. The entire ferrite compositions were found to be pure phased with same symmetry as LaFeO3. The average crystallite size was calculated to be ∼60 nm. The ferrite compositions were observed to behave as semi-conductors, as their resistivity decreased with increasing temperature. These ferrite compositions were employed as catalysts in the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide solution (0.17 M). Pure LaFeO3 was found to have a very low catalytic activity towards the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide solution, while presence of copper in the lanthanum ferrite lattice was found to significantly enhance its catalytic activity. The rate constant in case of reactions catalysed by LaCu0.5Fe0.5O3 was nearly 25 times larger than that obtained from reactions catalysed by pure LaFeO3. However, chromium substitution was not found to influence the catalytic activity of lanthanum ferrites as chromium substituted lanthanum ferrites exhibited very low catalytic activity. This was explained on the basis of relative stability of oxidation states of the substituent ions and the presence of defects in the crystal lattice.

  11. Chromium induced contact dermatitis and indices for diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Khalil, S; Shouman, A E; El, S H; Moussa, E M

    1999-01-01

    Chromium exposure plays an important role in development of contact dermatitis. The prevalence of contact dermatitis among tannery workers and cement-exposed workers is high. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of contact dermatitis among some Egyptian workers exposed to chromium and to investigate the role of patch test and IgE immunoassay in diagnosis of contact dermatitis. Eighty-three male workers who were exposed to chromium were selected after application of certain exclusion criteria to be the target population of this study. Forty male workers away from exposure to chromium were taken to be the controls. All the exposed and non exposed workers were investigated through an interview questionnaire, clinical examination, patch test and determination of blood and urine chromium levels, absolute eosinophilic count and total IgE level. The results showed that there was no significant difference between exposed workers with clinically diagnosed contact dermatitis and the clinically free exposed workers regarding age and work duration. 7.7% of exposed workers with positive patch test suffered from contact dermatitis while 31.6% of exposed workers with negative patch test suffered from contact dermatitis. There was no statistically significant difference between clinically diagnosed contact dermatitis workers and clinically free workers regarding blood and urine chromium levels. IgE level and absolute eosinophilic count were statistically higher among exposed workers with contact dermatitis than among clinically free exposed workers. According to the results of this study, it is concluded that the diagnosis of skin hypersensitivity to chromium should depend upon the history of chromium exposure, clinical examination and a battery of investigations including IgE level, eosinophilic count and patch test. PMID:17219860

  12. Chromium Ions Improve Moisure Resistance of Epoxy Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, A. K.; St. Clair, T. L.; Stoakley, D. M.; Singh, J. J.; Sprinkle, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    Broad spectrum of thermosetting epoxy resins used on commercial and military aircraft, primarily as composite matrices and adhesives. In new technique, chromium-ion containing epoxy with improved resistance to moisture produced where chromium ions believed to prevent absorption of water molecules by coordinating themselves to hydroxyl groups on epoxy chain. Anticipated that improved epoxy formulation useful as composite matrix resin, adhesive, or casting resin for applications on commercial and advanced aircraft. Improvement made without sacrifice in mechanical properties of polymer.

  13. Chromium (V) compounds as cathode material in electrochemical power sources

    DOEpatents

    Delnick, Frank M.; Guidotti, Ronald A.; McCarthy, David K.

    1985-01-01

    A cathode for use in a thermal battery, comprising a chromium (V) compound. The preferred materials for this use are Ca.sub.5 (CrO.sub.4).sub.3 Cl, Ca.sub.5 (CrO.sub.4).sub.3 OH, and Cr.sub.2 O.sub.5. The chromium (V) compound can be employed as a cathode material in ambient temperature batteries when blended with a suitably conductive filler, preferably carbon black.

  14. Chromium (V) compounds as cathode material in electrochemical power sources

    DOEpatents

    Delnick, F.M.; Guidotti, R.A.; McCarthy, D.K.

    A cathode for use in a thermal battery, comprising a chromium (V) compound. The preferred materials for this use are Ca/sub 5/(CrO/sub 4/)/sub 3/Cl, Ca/sub 5/(CrO/sub 4/)OH, and Cr/sub 2/O/sub 5/. The chromium (V) compound can be employed as a cathode material in ambient temperature batteries when blended with a suitably conductive filler, preferably carbon black.

  15. Electrodeposition of amorphous ternary nickel-chromium-phosphorus alloy

    DOEpatents

    Guilinger, Terry R.

    1990-01-01

    Amorphous ternary nickel-chromium-phosphorus alloys are electrodeposited from a bath comprising a nickel salt, a chromium salt, a phosphorus source such as sodium hypophosphite, a complexing agent for the nickel ions, supporting salts to increase conductivity, and a buffering agent. The process is carried out at about room temperature and requires a current density between about 20 to 40 A/dm.sup.2.

  16. SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ACTIVITIES FOR CHROMIUM IN THE 100 AREAS

    SciTech Connect

    PETERSEN SW

    2009-07-02

    {sm_bullet} Primary Objective: Protect the Columbia River - Focus is control and treatment of contamination at or near the shoreline, which is influenced by bank storage {sm_bullet} Secondary Objective: Reduce hexavalent chromium to <48 parts per billion (ppb) in aquifer (drinking water standard) - Large plumes with isolated areas of high chromium concentrations (> 40,000 ppb), - Unknown source location(s); probably originating in reactor operation areas

  17. EMISSIONS OF METALS, CHROMIUM AND NICKEL SPECIES, AND ORGANICS FROM MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER SLUDGE INCINERATORS - VOLUME II: SITE 5 EMISSION TEST REPORT - HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM METHOD EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    At Site 5, three candidate samplIng methods and two candIdate analytical methods for hexavalent chromium were assessed. he conversion of hexavalent chromium (Cr+8) to ther valence states of chromium during sampling and sample storage was of primary concern. ethod 5-type samples a...

  18. Speciation of chromium and its distribution in tea leaves and tea infusion using titanium dioxide nanotubes packed microcolumn coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shizhong; Zhu, Shengping; He, Yuanyuan; Lu, Dengbo

    2014-05-01

    Titanium dioxide nanotubes (TDNTs) were used as a solid phase extraction adsorbent for chromium species by a packed microcolumn coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), including total, suspended and soluble chromium as well as Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in tea leaves and tea infusion. The experimental results indicated that Cr(III) was quantitatively retained on TDNTs in the pH range of 5.0-8.0, while Cr(VI) remained in the solution. The total chromium was determined after reducing Cr(VI) to Cr(III). The concentration of Cr(VI) is calculated by the difference between total chromium and Cr(III). Under optimal conditions, the detection limits of this method were 0.0075ngmL(-1) for Cr(III). The relative standard deviation was 3.8% (n=9, c=1.0ngmL(-1)). This method was applied for the analysis of the speciation of chromium and its distribution and content in tea leaves, tea infusion and a certified reference material of tea leaves with satisfactory results. PMID:24360447

  19. Evaluating trivalent chromium toxicity on wild terrestrial and wetland plants.

    PubMed

    Lukina, A O; Boutin, C; Rowland, O; Carpenter, D J

    2016-11-01

    Elevated chromium levels in soil from mining can impact the environment, including plants. Mining of chromium is concentrated in South Africa, several Asian countries, and potentially in Northern Ontario, Canada, raising concerns since chromium toxicity to wild plants is poorly understood. In the first experiment, concentration-response tests were conducted to evaluate effects of chromium on terrestrial and wetland plants. Following established guidelines using artificial soil, seeds of 32 species were exposed to chromium (Cr(3+)) at concentrations simulating contamination (0-1000 mg kg(-1)). This study found that low levels of chromium (250 mg kg(-1)) adversely affected the germination of 22% of species (33% of all families), while higher levels (500 and 1000 mg kg(-1)) affected 69% and 94% of species, respectively, from 89% of the families. Secondly, effects on seedbanks were studied using soil collected in Northern Ontario and exposed to Cr(3+) at equivalent concentrations (0-1000 mg kg(-1)). Effects were less severe in the seedbank study with significant differences only observed at 1000 mg kg(-1). Seeds exposed to Cr(3+) during stratification were greatly affected. Seed size was a contributing factor as was possibly the seed coat barrier. This study represents an initial step in understanding Cr(3+) toxicity on wild plants and could form the basis for future risk assessments. PMID:27543852

  20. Environmental monitoring of chromium in air, soil, and water.

    PubMed

    Vitale, R J; Mussoline, G R; Rinehimer, K A

    1997-08-01

    Historical uses of chromium have resulted in its widespread release into the environment. In recent years, a significant amount of research has evaluated the impact of chromium on human health and the environment. Additionally, numerous analytical methods have been developed to identify and quantitate chromium in environmental media in response to various state and federal mandates such as CERCLA, RCRA, CWA, CAA, and SWDA. Due to the significant toxicity differences between trivalent [Cr(III)] and hexavalent [Cr(VI)] chromium, it is essential that chromium be quantified in these two distinct valence states to assess the potential risks to exposure to each in environmental media. Speciation is equally important because of their marked differences in environmental behavior. As the knowledge of risks associated with each valence state has grown and regulatory requirements have evolved, methods to accurately quantitate these species at ever-decreasing concentrations within environmental media have also evolved. This paper addresses the challenges of chromium species quantitation and some of the most relevant current methods used for environmental monitoring, including ASTM Method D5281 for air, SW-846 Methods 3060A, 7196A and 7199 for soils, sediments, and waste, and U.S. EPA Method 218.6 for water. PMID:9380841

  1. Chromium Exposure and Hygienic Behaviors in Printing Workers in Southern Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Decharat, Somsiri

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The main objective of this study was to assess the chromium exposure levels in printing workers. The study evaluated the airborne, serum, and urinary chromium levels and determines any correlation between level of chromium in specimen and airborne chromium levels. Material and Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 75 exposed and 75 matched nonexposed subjects. Air breathing zone was measured by furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Serum and urine samples were collected to determine chromium levels by graphite furnaces atomic absorption spectrometer chromium analyzer. Results and Discussion. The printing workers' urinary chromium levels (6.86 ± 1.93 μg/g creatinine) and serum chromium levels (1.24 ± 1.13 μg/L) were significantly higher than the control group (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001). Work position, duration of work, personal protective equipment (PPE), and personal hygiene were significantly associated with urinary chromium level and serum chromium levels (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001). This study found a correlation between airborne chromium levels and urinary chromium levels (r = 0.247, p = 0.032). A multiple regression model was constructed. Significant predictors of urinary and serum chromium levels were shown in this study. Conclusion. Improvements in working conditions, occupational health training, and PPE use are recommended to reduce chromium exposure. PMID:26448746

  2. [Chromium content in foods and dietary intake estimation in the Northwest of Mexico].

    PubMed

    Grijalva Haro, M I; Ballesteros Vázquez, M N; Cabrera Pacheco, R M

    2001-03-01

    Chromium is an indispensable nutrient for the carbohydrates and lipids metabolism. In this study the chromium content in the twenty main foods of the diet from Northwestern Mexico was determined, as well as the daily mean intake which was estimated based on the food intake basket of this region. Chromium content was analyzed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry using the graphite furnace technique and previous digestion of foods in microwave oven. The chromium mean intake was estimated considering the chromium daily mean intake for person per day and the chromium content of the foods analyzed in this study. The range chromium content in the foods analyzed was between 0.0004 and 0.1641 microgram/g dry weight. White cheese showed the highest chromium content followed by pasta soup, wheat tortilla, bread and meat. The main foods chromium contributors in the diet were: wheat tortilla (20%), white cheese (11%), corn tortilla (11%), pasta soup (10%), milk (10%), meat (9%) and white bread (8%). The daily chromium intake was 30.43 +/- 1.6 micrograms/d. Chromium values obtained in the food analyzed are considered low. Moreover, chromium intake obtained from the diet is not enough to meet the safety and adequate daily chromium intake. Therefore, the population from the Northwestern Mexico has a suboptimal dietary chromium intake. PMID:11515227

  3. Welding procedure specification: gas tungsten arc welding of nickel-chromium-iron and nickel-chromium-molybdenum

    SciTech Connect

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1985-08-01

    Procedure WPS-1303-ASME-8 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for gas tungsten arc welding of nickel-chromium-iron, N06600 (P-43), with filler metal ERNiCrFe-5 (F-43); and nickel-chromium-molybdenum, N06625 (P-43), with filler metal ERNiCrMo-3 (F-43); thickness range is 0.020 to 0.432 in.; shielding gas is argon.

  4. Chromium released from leather – I: exposure conditions that govern the release of chromium(III) and chromium(VI)

    PubMed Central

    Hedberg, Yolanda S; Lidén, Carola; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger

    2015-01-01

    Background Approximately 1–3% of the adult population in Europe is allergic to chromium (Cr). A new restriction in REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals) based on the ISO 17075 standard has recently been adopted in the EU to limit Cr(VI) in consumer and occupational leather products. Objectives The aim of this study was to critically assess key experimental parameters in this standard on the release of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) and their relevance for skin exposure. Material and methods Four differently tanned, unfinished, leather samples were systematically investigated for their release of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in relation to surface area, key exposure parameters, temperature, ultraviolet irradiation, and time. Results Although the total release of Cr was largely unaffected by all investigated parameters, except exposure duration and temperature, the Cr oxidation state was highly dynamic, with reduced amounts of released Cr(VI) with time, owing to the simultaneous release of reducing agents from the leather. Significantly more Cr(III) than Cr(VI) was released from the Cr-tanned leather for all conditions tested, and it continued to be released in artificial sweat up to at least 1 week of exposure. Conclusions Several parameters were identified that influenced the outcome of the ISO 17075 test. PMID:25653094

  5. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by Sphaerotilus natans a filamentous micro-organism present in activated sludges.

    PubMed

    Caravelli, Alejandro H; Giannuzzi, Leda; Zaritzky, Noemí E

    2008-08-15

    Wastewaters produced by various industries may contain undesirable amounts of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), as chromate and dichromate, a hazardous metal affecting flora and animals of aquatic ecosystems as well as human health. One removal strategy comprises the microbial reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III), a less soluble chemical species that is less toxic than Cr(VI). In this work, the ability to reduce Cr(VI) of Sphaerotilus natans, a filamentous bacterium usually found in activated sludge systems, was evaluated. In aerobic conditions, S. natans was able to efficiently reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III) from dichromate solutions ranging between 4.5 and 80 mg Cr(VI)l(-1) in the presence of a carbonaceous source. A simultaneous evaluation of the microbial respiratory activity inhibition was also carried out to analyze the toxic effect of Cr(VI). Cr(VI) reduction by S. natans was mathematically modeled; chromium(VI) reduction rate depended on both Cr(VI) concentration and active biomass concentration. Although it is known that S. natans removes heavy metal cations such as Cr(III) by biosorption, the ability of this micro-organism to reduce Cr(VI), which behaves as an oxyanion in aqueous solutions, is a novel finding. The distinctive capacity to reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III) than remain soluble or precipitated becomes S. natans a potential micro-organism to decontaminate wastewaters. PMID:18215460

  6. Enhancement of oxidative vaporization of chromium (III) oxide and chromium by oxygen atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryburg, G. C.; Kohl, F. J.; Stearns, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    Rates of oxidative vaporization of Cr2O3 were found to be markedly enhanced in the presence of O atoms. Investigations were conducted over the temperature range 470 to 1520 K. For Cr2O3 the enhancement was about 10 to the 9th power at 820 K in oxygen containing 2.5 percent atoms. Rapid oxidative vaporization of bare chromium was observed below 1070 K, the rate being about one-half that of Cr2O3. Results are interpreted in terms of thermochemical analysis.

  7. Chromium-chromium interaction in a binuclear mixed-valent Cr(I)-Cr(II) complex.

    PubMed

    Alzamly, Ahmed; Gorelsky, Serge I; Gambarotta, Sandro; Korobkov, Ilia; Le Roy, Jennifer; Murugesu, Muralee

    2014-11-01

    A mixed-valent Cr(I)-Cr(II) binuclear complex, {κ(1),κ(2),κ(3)-N,P,P-cyclo[(Ph)PCH2N(CH2Ph)CH2]}2(CrCl2)[Cr(μ-Cl)(AlClMe2)]·4toluene (1), of a P2N2 cyclic ligand was obtained upon treatment of the chromium precursor with alkylaluminum. Complex 1 was accessible from either its trivalent or divalent precursors, and density functional theory calculations revealed the presence of only σ- and π-orbital interactions in the Cr-Cr bond. PMID:25310604

  8. Investigation of oil recovery improvement by coupling an interfacial tension agent and a mobility control agent in light oil reservoirs. Technical progress report, April--June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, M.J.; Casteel, J.

    1994-09-01

    The study will investigate two major areas concerning co-injecting an interfacial tension reduction agent(s) and a mobility control agent into petroleum reservoirs. The first will consist of defining the mechanisms of interaction of an alkaline agent, a surfactant, and a polymer on a fluid-fluid and a fluid-rock basis. The second is the improvement of the economics of the combined technology. This report examines the changes in the relative permeability characteristics with addition of alkali, surfactant, and polymer to the injected solution, the effect of matrix type on relative permeability characteristics with alkali-surfactant-polymer and the effect of different polymer concentrations on oil recovery by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution.

  9. A Rare Terminal Dinitrogen Complex of Chromium

    SciTech Connect

    Mock, Michael T.; Chen, Shentan; Rousseau, Roger J.; O'Hagan, Molly J.; Dougherty, William G.; Kassel, W. S.; DuBois, Daniel L.; Bullock, R. Morris

    2011-10-12

    The reduction of dinitrogen to ammonia from N2 and H2 is currently carried out by the Haber-Bosch process, an energy intensive process that requires high pressures and high temperatures and accounts for the production of millions of tons of ammonia per year. The development of a catalytic, energy-efficient process for N2 reduction is of great interest and remains a formidable challenge. In this communication, we are reporting the preparation, characterization and computational electronic structure analysis of a rare 'Chatt-type' ((P-P)2M(N2)2, P-P = diphosphine ligand) complex of chromium, cis-[Cr(N2)2(PPh2NBn2)2] and its reactivity with CO. This complex is supported by the diphosphine ligand PPh2NBn2, containing non-coordinating pendant amine bases, to serve as proton relays. Future studies for this complex are aimed at answering fundamental questions regarding the role of proton relays in the second coordination sphere in their ability to facilitate proton movement from an external acid to metal-bound dinitrogen ligands in the challenging multi-proton/electron reduction of N2 to ammonia.

  10. Uptake, Distribution and Speciation of Chromium

    SciTech Connect

    Bluskov,S.; Arocena, J.; Omotoso, O.; Young, J.

    2005-01-01

    Brassica juncea (Indian mustard) has been widely used in phytoremediation because of its capacity to accumulate high levels of chromium (Cr) and other metals. The present study was conducted to investigate mechanism(s) involved in Cr binding and sequestration by B. juncea. The plants were grown under greenhouse conditions in field-moist or air-dried soils, amended with 100 mg kg -1 of Cr (III or VI). The plant concentrated Cr mainly in the roots. B. juncea removed an average of 48 and 58 {mu}g Cr per plant from Cr (III) and Cr (VI)-treated soils, respectively. The uptake of Cr was not affected by the moisture status of the soils. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy measurements showed only Cr (III) bound predominantly to formate and acetate ligands, in the bulk and rhizosphere soils, respectively. In the plant tissues, Cr (III) was detected, primarily as acetate in the roots and oxalate in the leaves. X-ray microprobe showed the sites of Cr localization, and probably sequestration, in epidermal and cortical cells in the roots and epidermal and spongy mesophyll cells in the leaves. These findings demonstrate the ability of B. juncea to detoxify more toxic Cr (VI), thereby making this plant a potential candidate for phytostabilization.

  11. Low energy spin excitations in chromium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.; Azuah, R.T.; Stirling, W.G.; Kulda, J.

    1997-12-31

    Neutron scattering experiments with full polarization analysis have been performed with a single crystal of chromium to study the low-energy spin fluctuations in the transverse spin density wave (TSDW) state. A number of remarkable results have been found. Inelastic scattering observed close to the TSDW satellite positions at (1 {+-} {delta},0,0) does not behave as expected for magnon scattering. In particular, the scattering corresponds to almost equally strong magnetization fluctuations both parallel and perpendicular to the ordered moments of the TSDW phase. As the Neel temperature is approached from below, scattering at the commensurate wavevector (1,0,0) increases in intensity as a result of critical scattering at silent satellites (1,0, {+-} {delta}) being included within the spectrometer resolution function. This effect, first observed by Sternlieb et al, does not account for all of the inelastic scattering around the (1,0,0) position, however, Rather, there are further collective excitations, apparently emanating from the TSDW satellites, which correspond to magnetic fluctuations parallel to the ordered TSDW moments. These branches have a group velocity that is close to that of (1,0,0) longitudinal acoustic (LA) phonons, but assigning their origin to magneto-elastic scattering raises other unanswered questions.

  12. Effects of vitamins on chromium(VI)-induced damage

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, Masayasu )

    1991-05-01

    The effects of vitamin E and vitamin B{sub 2} on DNA damage and cellular reduction of chromium (VI) were investigated using Chinese hamster V-79 cells. pretreatment with {alpha}-tocopherol succinate (vitamin E) resulted in a decrease of DNA single-strand breaks produced by Na{sub 2}CrO{sub 4}, while similar treatment with riboflavin (vitamin B{sub 2}) enhanced levels of DNA breaks. Electron spin resonance (ESR) studies showed that incubation of cells with Na{sub 2}CrO{sub 4} resulted in the formation of both chromium (V) and chromium (III) complexes, and cellular pretreatment with vitamin E reduced the level of the chromium (V) complex, whereas pretreatment with vitamin B{sub 2} enhanced the level of this intermediate. ESR studies demonstrated that a chromium (V) species was formed by the reaction of Na{sub 2}CrO{sub 4} with vitamin B{sub 2} and that vitamin B{sub 2} enhanced the formation of hydroxyl radicals during the reaction of Na{sub 2}CrO{sub 4} and hydrogen peroxide. These results indicate that vitamin E and vitamin B{sub 2} are capable of altering the biological effects of carcinogenic chromium (VI) compounds, possibly through their abilities to modify levels of chromium (V) in cells. The results also suggest that chromate-induced cytotoxicity may not be directly correlated with the genotoxic effects of this metal. The importance of the role of vitamins in chromate-induced toxicity is discussed.

  13. Effect Of Oxidation On Chromium Leaching And Redox Capacity Of Slag-Containing Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Almond, P. M.; Stefanko, D. B.; Langton, C. A.

    2013-03-01

    The rate of oxidation is important to the long-term performance of reducing salt waste forms because the solubility of some contaminants, e.g., technetium, is a function of oxidation state. TcO4- in the salt solution is reduced to Tc(IV) and has been shown to react with ingredients in the waste form to precipitate low solubility sulfide and/or oxide phases [Shuh, et al., 1994, Shuh, et al., 2000, Shuh, et al., 2003]. Upon exposure to oxygen, the compounds containing Tc(IV) oxidize to the pertechnetate ion, Tc(VII)O4-, which is very soluble. Consequently the rate of technetium oxidation front advancement into a monolith and the technetium leaching profile as a function of depth from an exposed surface are important to waste form performance and ground water concentration predictions. An approach for measuring contaminant oxidation rate (effective contaminant specific oxidation rate) based on leaching of select contaminants of concern is described in this report. In addition, the relationship between reduction capacity and contaminant oxidation is addressed. Chromate was used as a non-radioactive surrogate for pertechnetate in simulated waste form samples. Depth discrete subsamples were cut from material exposed to Savannah River Site (SRS) field cured conditions. The subsamples were prepared and analyzed for both reduction capacity and chromium leachability. Results from field-cured samples indicate that the depth at which leachable chromium was detected advanced further into the sample exposed for 302 days compared to the sample exposed to air for 118 days (at least 50 mm compared to at least 20 mm). Data for only two exposure time intervals is currently available. Data for additional exposure times are required to develop an equation for the oxidation front progression. Reduction capacity measurements (per the Angus-Glasser method, which is a measurement of the ability of a material to chemically reduce Ce(IV) to Ce

  14. Cr(III)/Cr(VI) speciation determination of chromium in water samples by luminescence quenching of quercetin.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Mohammad Saeid; Belador, Foroogh

    2009-06-15

    A highly sensitive and selective method has been proposed for direct speciation determination of trace amounts of chromium in water samples using quercetin. The method is based on mixing 5 mL of diluted quercetin solution dissolved in n-amyl alcohol with 5 mL of acidic solution (pH 1) of Cr(VI), which is accomplished with luminescence quenching of the organic phase due to partially oxidation of quercetin content. Cr(VI) is determined by measuring the diminished content of quercetin with spectrofluorometric method (lambda(ex)=276 nm, lambda(em)=331 nm). After oxidation of the Cr(III) content to Cr(VI) and determination of the total chromium as Cr(VI), the Cr(III) is obtained by subtracting. All the variables were studied in order to optimize the reaction conditions. No considerable interference was observed due to the presence of co-existing anions and cations. The calibration graphs were linear in the range 1.0 x 10(-7) to 2.0 x 10(-6)M with the detection limits of 9.1 x 10(-9)M. The R.S.D. obtained for 1.0 x 10(-6)M of Cr(VI) was 1.7% (n=7). Validation of the measurements was confirmed using standard reference materials. The method was applied to determine the chromium species in natural water samples. The recoveries obtained for the spiked amount of chromium species were >98%, which denote on satisfactorily application of the method. PMID:19135303

  15. Removal of hexavalent chromium by biosorption process in rotating packed bed.

    PubMed

    Panda, M; Bhowal, A; Datta, S

    2011-10-01

    Removal of hexavalent chromium ions from an aqueous solution by crude tamarind (Tamarindus indica) fruit shell was examined in a rotating packed bed contactor by continuously recirculating a given volume of solution through the bed. Reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) within the biosorbent appeared to be the removal mechanism. Depletion rate of Cr(VI) from, and release of reduced Cr(III) ions into the aqueous phase, was influenced by mass transfer resistance besides pH and packing depth. A mathematical model considering the reduction reaction to be irreversible and incorporating intraparticle and external phase mass transfer resistances represented the experimental data adequately. The study indicated that the limitations of fixed bed contactor operating under terrestrial gravity in intensifying mass transfer rates for this system can be overcome with rotating packed bed due to liquid flow under centrifugal acceleration. PMID:21819035

  16. Electron-irradiation damage in chromium nitrides and chromium oxynitride thin films.

    PubMed

    Mitterbauer, Christoph; Grogger, Werner; Wilhartitz, Peter; Hofer, Ferdinand

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this work is to monitor changes of the N-K electron energy-loss near-edge structure (ELNES) of chromium nitride layers (CrN) introduced by electron irradiation in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). These changes are different for each sample material and seem to give an indication for a particular composition. The CrN samples (CrN and Cr(0.47)N(0.53)) were prepared on silicon wafers by reactive magnetron sputtering of a metallic chromium target in nitrogen plasma. In addition, a CrON sample (Cr(0.5)O(0.2)N(0.3)) was also investigated. This sample was prepared by the addition of oxygen to the plasma during film deposition. The ELNES of the N-K ionization edge of stoichiometric CrN shows a typical fine structure (peaks at 399.0 and 401.1 eV) and remains nearly unaffected even after high-current-density irradiation. On the other hand the N-K fine structures of Cr(0.47)N(0.53) and Cr(0.5)O(0.2)N(0.3) show a change of the ELNES with irradiation dose. This presumably arises from a 1s-pi*-transition of molecular nitrogen located at interstitial positions in these samples. PMID:16554164

  17. Oxidative damage of DNA by chromium(V) complexes: relative importance of base versus sugar oxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Bose, R N; Moghaddas, S; Mazzer, P A; Dudones, L P; Joudah, L; Stroup, D

    1999-01-01

    Chromium(V)-mediated oxidative damage of deoxy-ribonucleic acids was investigated at neutral pH in aqueous solution by utilizing bis(2-ethyl-2-hydroxy-butanato)oxochromate(V) (I) and bis(hydroxyethyl)-amino-tris(hydroxymethyl)methane)oxochromate(V) (II). Single-stranded and double-stranded (ds) calf thymus and human placenta DNA, as well as two oligomers, 5'-GATCTAGTAGGAGGACAAATAGTGTTTG-3' and 5'-GATCCAAGCAAACACTATTTGTCCTCCTACTA-3', were reacted with the chromium(V) complexes. Most products were separated and characterized by chroma-tographic and spectroscopic methods. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis experiments reveal more damage at G sites in comparison to other bases. Three primary oxidation products, 5-methylene-2-furanone (5-MF), furfural and 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine, were characterized. A minor product, which appears to be thymine propenal, was also observed. The dsDNA produces more furfural than furanone. The formation of these two products resulted from hydrogen ion or hydride transfer from C1' and C5' positions of the ribose to the oxo-chromium(V) center. Since no enhancements of these products (except propenal) were observed in the presence of oxygen, mechanisms pertaining to the participation of activated oxygen species may be ruled out. The oxidation of the G base is most likely associated with an oxygen atom transfer from the oxo-metallates to the double bond between C8 and N7 of the purine ring. The formation of the propenal may be associated with an oxygen-activated species, since a marginal enhancement of this product was observed in the presence of oxygen. The formation of furfural in higher abundance over 5-MF for dsDNA was attributed to the ease of hydrogen ion (or hydride transfer) from the C5' compared to C1' position of the ribose within a Cr(V)-DNA intermediate in which the metal center is bound to the phosphate diester moiety. PMID:10219096

  18. Oxidative damage of DNA by chromium(V) complexes: relative importance of base versus sugar oxidation.

    PubMed

    Bose, R N; Moghaddas, S; Mazzer, P A; Dudones, L P; Joudah, L; Stroup, D

    1999-05-15

    Chromium(V)-mediated oxidative damage of deoxy-ribonucleic acids was investigated at neutral pH in aqueous solution by utilizing bis(2-ethyl-2-hydroxy-butanato)oxochromate(V) (I) and bis(hydroxyethyl)-amino-tris(hydroxymethyl)methane)oxochromate(V) (II). Single-stranded and double-stranded (ds) calf thymus and human placenta DNA, as well as two oligomers, 5'-GATCTAGTAGGAGGACAAATAGTGTTTG-3' and 5'-GATCCAAGCAAACACTATTTGTCCTCCTACTA-3', were reacted with the chromium(V) complexes. Most products were separated and characterized by chroma-tographic and spectroscopic methods. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis experiments reveal more damage at G sites in comparison to other bases. Three primary oxidation products, 5-methylene-2-furanone (5-MF), furfural and 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine, were characterized. A minor product, which appears to be thymine propenal, was also observed. The dsDNA produces more furfural than furanone. The formation of these two products resulted from hydrogen ion or hydride transfer from C1' and C5' positions of the ribose to the oxo-chromium(V) center. Since no enhancements of these products (except propenal) were observed in the presence of oxygen, mechanisms pertaining to the participation of activated oxygen species may be ruled out. The oxidation of the G base is most likely associated with an oxygen atom transfer from the oxo-metallates to the double bond between C8 and N7 of the purine ring. The formation of the propenal may be associated with an oxygen-activated species, since a marginal enhancement of this product was observed in the presence of oxygen. The formation of furfural in higher abundance over 5-MF for dsDNA was attributed to the ease of hydrogen ion (or hydride transfer) from the C5' compared to C1' position of the ribose within a Cr(V)-DNA intermediate in which the metal center is bound to the phosphate diester moiety. PMID:10219096

  19. Evaluating the risk of chromium reoxidation in aquifer sediments following a reductive bioremediation treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadharajan, C.; Nico, P. S.; Yang, L.; Han, R.; Bill, M.; Larsen, J.; Van Hise, A.; Molins, S.; Steefel, C.; Conrad, M. E.; Lim, H.; Brodie, E. L.; Beller, H. R.

    2011-12-01

    Remediation of chromium contamination typically involves reducing the toxic and soluble hexavalent form, Cr(VI), to the relatively harmless and mostly immobile trivalent state, Cr(III). The objective of this study is to investigate the potential for reduced chromium precipitates to be remobilized under oxidizing conditions that are expected to be prevalent some time after the bioremediation treatment is completed. In an initial phase of the experiment, reduction under anaerobic conditions was observed for over 12 months by subjecting flow-through columns containing homogenized sediments from the Hanford 100H aquifer to different dominant electron acceptors, i.e. NO3-, Fe(III), or SO42-, in the presence of 5 μM Cr(VI) and 5 mM lactate. Cr(VI) was depleted in the effluent solutions of the nitrate-treated columns, all of which exhibited denitrification, as well as in sulfate-amended columns in which fermentative conditions became dominant (with a minor amount of sulfate reduction). In the second phase of the study, oxygenated water with 2 mM nitrate was flowed through the denitrifying and fermentative columns for several months, without addition of Cr(VI) or lactate. The results show that the chromium that precipitated in the denitrifying columns was steadily mobilized under the oxidizing conditions, although the concentration of Cr(VI) in the effluent remained low (<0.25 μM). However, measurable Cr(VI) was not detected in the effluent from the fermentative sulfate-amended column. Reducing conditions were sustained in the fermentative column despite the continuous influx of O2, as indicated by the decrease of nitrate and accumulation of nitrite, potentially due to the presence of sulfides precipitated during the initial reducing phase of the experiment. The results from this study suggest that the biogeochemical conditions present during the reductive treatment phase can substantially impact the long-term sustainability of the remediation effort.

  20. Hexavalent chromium reduction by bacteria from tannery effluent.

    PubMed

    Batool, Rida; Yrjala, Kim; Hasnain, Shahida

    2012-04-01

    Chromium is generated from several industrial processes. It occurs in different oxidation states, but Cr(III) and Cr(VI) are the most common ones. Cr(VI) is a toxic, soluble environmental contaminant. Some bacteria are able to reduce hexavalent chromium to the insoluble and less toxic Cr(III), and thus chromate bioremediation is of considerable interest. An indigenous chromium-reducing bacterial strain, Rb-2, isolated from a tannery water sample, was identified as Ochrobactrum intermedium, on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The influence of factors like temperature of incubation, initial concentration of Cr, mobility of bacteria, and different carbon sources were studied to test the ability of the bacterium to reduce Cr(VI) under variable environmental conditions. The ability of the bacterial strain to reduce hexavalent chromium in artificial and industrial sewage water was evaluated. It was observed that the mechanism of resistance to metal was not due to the change in the permeability barrier of the cell membrane, and the enzyme activity was found to be inductive. Intracellular reduction of Cr(VI) was proven by reductase assay using cell-free extract. Scanning electron microscopy revealed chromium precipitates on bacterial cell surfaces, and transmission electron microscopy showed the outer as well as inner distribution of Cr(VI). This bacterial strain can be useful for Cr(VI) detoxification under a wide range of environmental conditions. PMID:22534304

  1. A possible role for chromium(III) in genotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Snow, E T

    1991-01-01

    Chromium is found in the environment in two major forms: reduced CrIII and CrVI, or chromate. Chromate, the most biologically active species, is readily taken up by living cells and reduced intracellularly, via reactive intermediates, to stable CrIII species. CrIII, the most abundant form of chromium in the environment, does not readily cross cell membranes and is relatively inactive in vivo. However, intracellular CrIII can react slowly with both nucleic acids and proteins and can be genotoxic. We have investigated the genotoxicity of CrIII in vitro using a DNA replication assay and in vivo by CaCl2-mediated transfection of chromium-treated DNA into Escherichia coli. When DNA replication was measured on a CrIII-treated template using purified DNA polymerases (either bacterial or mammalian), both the rate of DNA replication and the amount of incorporation per polymerase binding event (processivity) were greatly increased relative to controls. When transfected into E. coli, CrIII-treated M13mp2 bacteriophage DNA showed a dose-dependent increase in mutation frequency. These results suggest that CrIII alters the interaction between the DNA template and the polymerase such that the binding strength of the DNA polymerase is increased and the fidelity of DNA replication is decreased. These interactions may contribute to the mutagenicity of chromium ions in vivo and suggest that CrIII can contribute to chromium-mediated carcinogenesis. Images FIGURE 3. PMID:1935855

  2. Anthropogenic chromium emissions in china from 1990 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hongguang; Zhou, Tan; Li, Qian; Lu, Lu; Lin, Chunye

    2014-01-01

    An inventory of chromium emission into the atmosphere and water from anthropogenic activities in China was compiled for 1990 through to 2009. We estimate that the total emission of chromium to the atmosphere is about 1.92×10⁵ t. Coal and oil combustion were the two leading sources of chromium emission to the atmosphere in China, while the contribution of them showed opposite annual growth trend. In total, nearly 1.34×10⁴ t of chromium was discharged to water, mainly from six industrial categories in 20 years. Among them, the metal fabrication industry and the leather tanning sector were the dominant sources of chromium emissions, accounting for approximately 68.0% and 20.0% of the total emissions and representing increases of 15.6% and 10.3% annually, respectively. The spatial trends of Cr emissions show significant variation based on emissions from 2005 to 2009. The emission to the atmosphere was heaviest in Hebei, Shandong, Guangdong, Zhejiang and Shanxi, whose annual emissions reached more than 1000t for the high level of coal and oil consumption. In terms of emission to water, the largest contributors were Guangdong, Jiangsu, Shandong and Zhejiang, where most of the leather production and metal manufacturing occur and these four regions accounted for nearly 47.4% of the total emission to water. PMID:24505309

  3. Thermodynamics of chromium in UO2 fuel: A solubility model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riglet-Martial, Ch.; Martin, Ph.; Testemale, D.; Sabathier-Devals, C.; Carlot, G.; Matheron, P.; Iltis, X.; Pasquet, U.; Valot, C.; Delafoy, C.; Largenton, R.

    2014-04-01

    The solubility and speciation of chromium in doped uranium oxide are measured in carefully controlled temperature and oxygen potential conditions using electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and scanning electron spectroscopy (SEM). The examination of the samples by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) provides evidence that (i) chromium is soluble in the UO2 matrix under the +3 oxidation state only regardless of the sintering conditions which is in accordance with a soluble species of type CrO3/2 and (ii) soluble chromium exhibits octahedral symmetry with 6 atoms of oxygen forming CrO6 patterns in the UO2 structure. In consistency with all available experimental information including previously published data, the solubility of chromium in UO2 corresponding to each two-phase field with either Cr, CrO and Cr2O3 may be described in the ranges 1500 °C < T < 2000 °C and -460 < μO2 < -360 kJ/mol using the standard thermodynamic equations governing solubility equilibria. The characteristic parameters of the solubility laws in UO2 for the three chromium phases are derived.

  4. Predicting the impact of chromium on flow-accelerated corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Chexal, B.; Goyette, L.F.; Horowitz, J.S.; Ruscak, M.

    1996-12-01

    Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) continues to cause problems in nuclear and fossil power plants. Many experiments have been performed to understand the mechanism of FAC. For approximately twenty years, it has ben widely recognized that the presence of small amounts of chromium will reduce the rate of FAC. This effect was quantified in the eighties by research performed in France, Germany and the Netherlands. The results of this research has been incorporated into the computer-based tools used by utility engineers to deal with this issue. For some time, plant data from Diablo Canyon has suggested that the existing correlations relating the concentration of chromium to the rate of FAC are conservative. Laboratory examinations have supported this observation. It appears that the existing correlations fail to capture a change in mechanism from a FAC process with linear kinetics to a general corrosion process with parabolic kinetics. This change in mechanism occurs at a chromium level of approximately 0.1%, within the allowable alloy range of typical carbon steel (ASTM/ASME A106 Grade B) used in power piping in most domestic plants. It has been difficult to obtain plant data that has sufficient chromium to develop a new correlation. Data from Diablo Canyon and the Dukovany Power Plant in the Czech Republic will be used to develop a new chromium correlation for predicting FAC rate.

  5. Treatability study for the stabilization of chromium contaminated waste

    SciTech Connect

    McGahan, J.F.; Martin, D.

    1994-12-31

    A process has been developed which immobilizes chromium in calcined uranyl nitrate mixed waste, resulting in a waste form disposable as radioactive, non hazardous waste. A prime contractor at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory generates a radioactive waste contaminated with chromium. During handling, the waste becomes contaminated at a concentration sufficiently high to cause the waste to exceed the EPA`s Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) leachable limit for chromium. A treatability test program was instigated to define the optimum conditions for the chemical reduction pretreatment step necessary for the stabilization of the contaminated waste. Sodium dithionite was determined to be the reducing agent of choice. A dithionite demand experiment was run to determine optimum dithionite dose. This dose, plus 67 percent excess, was added to each sample. Four different stabilization systems, at three different dosage levels, were investigated. The best performing reagent system was chosen for scale-up and more stringent performance testing. In one of the tested reagent systems, Portland cement sodium silicate and dithionite, all of the samples exhibited TCLP extract concentrations for chromium well below the regulatory limit. Portland cement/blast furnace slag blend had one passing sample, and for cement/fly ash and cement alone none of the samples had passing values for leachable chromium. The samples scaled-up passed the performance criteria and the process which is currently undergoing implementation at INEL has successfully converted mixed waste into radioactive waste for disposal.

  6. Enhancement of chromium uptake in tanning using oxazolidine.

    PubMed

    Sundarapandiyan, S; Brutto, Patrick E; Siddhartha, G; Ramesh, R; Ramanaiah, B; Saravanan, P; Mandal, A B

    2011-06-15

    Monocyclic and bicyclic oxazolidines were offered at three different junctures of chrome tanning process viz. prior to BCS offer, along with BCS and after basification. It was found that oxazolidine when offered after basification brought about better chromium uptake and reduction of chromium load in the wastewater. Offer of oxazolidine was also varied. Increase in offer of oxazolidine from 0.25% to 1% was found to enhance the chromium uptake and decrease the chromium load in wastewater. But the increase in uptake was not proportionate to the increase in oxazolidine offer more than 0.75%. Offer of 1% Zoldine ZA 78 (monocyclic oxazolidine) and Zoldine ZE (bicyclic oxazolidine) after basification brought about 63.4% and 73.1% enhancement in chrome content in leather compared to control where oxazolidine was not offered. The tone of the wetblue was found to be altered moderately. However this did not call for any process adjustments in wet-finishing. The oxazolidine treated leathers were found to be immensely fuller and tighter. It was found experimentally that offer of 1% of oxazolidine facilitated reduction in the offer of syntans administered for filling and grain tightening by around 46%. Oxazolidine could bring about significant reduction in cost of chemicals apart from resulting environmental benefits due to enhancement of chromium uptake during tanning. PMID:21536383

  7. Low-chromium reduced-activation ferritic steels for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Kenik, E.A.

    1996-04-01

    Development of reduced-activation ferritic steels has concentrated on high-chromium (8-10 wt% Cr) steels. However, there are advantages for a low-chromium steel, and initial ORNL studies on reduced-activation steels were on compositions with 2.25 to 12% Cr. Those studies showed an Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.25V-0.1C (2 1/4Cr-2WV) steel to have the highest strenglth of the steels studied. Although this steel had the best strength, Charpy impact properties were inferior to those of an Fe-9Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C (9Cr-2WVTa) and an Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.1C (2 1/4Cr-2W) steel. Therefore, further development of the low-chromium Cr-W steels was required. These results indicate that it is possible to develop low-chromium reduced-activation ferritic steels that have tensile and impact properties as good or better than those of high-chromium (7-9% Cr) steels. Further improvement of properties should be possible by optimizing the composition.

  8. Microbial exudate promoted dissolution and transformation of chromium containing minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, E. M.; Sun, J.; Tang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Because of its utility in many industrial processes, chromium has become the second most common metal contaminant in the United States. The two most common oxidation states of chromium in nature are Cr(III), which is highly immobile, and Cr(VI), which is highly mobile and toxic. In both natural and engineered environments, the most common remediation of Cr(VI) is through reduction, which results in chromium sequestration in the low solubility mixed Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxide phases. Consequently, the stability of these minerals must be examined to assess the fate of chromium in the subsurface. We examined the dissolution of mixed Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides in the presence of common microbial exudates, including the siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB; a common organic ligand secreted by most microbes with high affinity for ferric iron and other trivalent metal ions) and oxalate (a common organic acid produced by microbes). The solids exhibited incongruent dissolution with preferential leaching of Fe from the solid phase. Over time, this leads to a more Cr rich mineral, which is known to be more soluble than the corresponding mixed mineral phase. We are currently investigating the structure of the reacted mineral phases and soluble Cr(III) species, as well as the potential oxidation and remobilization of the soluble Cr species. Results from this study will provide insights regarding the long term transport and fate of chromium in the natural environment in the presence of microbial activities.

  9. Induction of SOS genes of Escherichia coli by chromium compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Llagostera, M.; Garrido, S.; Guerrero, R.; Barbe, J.

    1986-01-01

    The induction of several SOS genes of Escherichia coli such as recA, umuC, and sfiA by hexavalent (K/sub 2/Cr/sub 2/O/sub 7/, K/sub 2/CrO/sub 4/, and CrO/sub 3/) and trivalent (CrCl/sub 3/, Cr(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/, and (CH/sub 3/COO)/sub 3/Cr) compounds of chromium was studied. Induction was measured as ..beta..-galactosidase activity, using lacZ gene fusions under the control region of different SOS genes. The hexavalent chromium forms induced the genes responsible for massive synthesis of RecA protein, error-prone repair, and inhibition of cell division. On the other hand, the trivalent chromium compounds were unable to induce any of the SOS genes tested. Individual assay of hexavalent chromium compounds showed that K/sub 2/Cr/sub 2/O/sub 7/ was a stronger inducing agent of those three SOS genes tested than K/sub 2/CrO/sub 4/, which, in turn, was stronger than CrO/sub 3/. All this data led to the conclusion that hexavalent chromium compounds, but not trivalent, are proficient agents of induction of the SOS system and can produce indirect mutagenesis in Escherichia coli.

  10. Anthropogenic Chromium Emissions in China from 1990 to 2009

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hongguang; Zhou, Tan; Li, Qian; Lu, Lu; Lin, Chunye

    2014-01-01

    An inventory of chromium emission into the atmosphere and water from anthropogenic activities in China was compiled for 1990 through to 2009. We estimate that the total emission of chromium to the atmosphere is about 1.92×105t. Coal and oil combustion were the two leading sources of chromium emission to the atmosphere in China, while the contribution of them showed opposite annual growth trend. In total, nearly 1.34×104t of chromium was discharged to water, mainly from six industrial categories in 20 years. Among them, the metal fabrication industry and the leather tanning sector were the dominant sources of chromium emissions, accounting for approximately 68.0% and 20.0% of the total emissions and representing increases of15.6% and 10.3% annually, respectively. The spatial trends of Cr emissions show significant variation based on emissions from 2005 to 2009. The emission to the atmosphere was heaviest in Hebei, Shandong, Guangdong, Zhejiang and Shanxi, whose annual emissions reached more than 1000t for the high level of coal and oil consumption. In terms of emission to water, the largest contributors were Guangdong, Jiangsu, Shandong and Zhejiang, where most of the leather production and metal manufacturing occur and these four regions accounted for nearly 47.4% of the total emission to water. PMID:24505309

  11. Chromium accumulation in three species of central Florida centrarchids

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, K.R. |

    1995-02-01

    Stormwater ponds are required in Central Florida when land is developed to treat the resulting stormwater. The St. Johns River Water Management District, the agency that regulates stormwater discharges in Central Florida, frequently approves plans that create habitat for fish and wildlife by planting desirable wetland and aquatic vegetation in the littoral zones of stormwater ponds to compensate for the loss of wetlands. The various species of fish that inhabit stormwater ponds serve as a food source to wildlife, especially wading birds. The objective of this study was to determine if fish that live in stormwater treatment ponds in Orlando, Florida contained significant concentrations of chromium. In order to determine if there were differences in chromium concentrations in fish with different foraging strategies, three species of sunfish (Centrarchidae) with substantially different foraging strategies were selected for this study: largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), a predator; redear sunfish (Lepomis microlophus), a bottom feeder; and bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus), an omnivore. Many researchers have shown that large quantities of chromium are found in urban runoff. Chromium sources are largely associates with the operation of motor vehicles. Several investigators have determined that chromium from urban runoff concentrates in the sediment of stormwater ponds. Sediments represent the most concentrated physical pool of metals in aquatic environments, and they are ingested by many types of aquatic organisms. Most fish are capable of accumulating heavy metals from their diet and from water through their gills. 17 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  12. Thiocyanato Chromium (III) Complexes: Separation by Paper Electrophoresis and Estimate of Stability Constants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Erik; Eriksen, J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experiment wherein the student can demonstrate the existence of all the thiocyanato chromium complexes, estimate the stepwise formation constants, demonstrate the robustness of chromium III complexes, and show the principles of paper electrophoresis. (GS)

  13. Process for improving moisture resistance of epoxy resins by addition of chromium ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; Stoakley, D. M.; St.clair, T. L.; Singh, J. J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A process for improving the moisture resistance properties of epoxidized TGMDA and DGEBA resin system by chemically incorporating chromium ions is described. The addition of chromium ions is believed to prevent the absorption of water molecules.

  14. CHROMIUM ELECTROANALYSIS AT SCREEN PRINTED ELECTRODE MODIFIED BY THIN FILMS OF NICKEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and potentially cost-effective electrochemical method is reported for analysis of chromium (VI) and Chromium(III) using a nickel modified screen printed carbon ink electrode. Electrochemical characteristics of nickel modified electrode as well voltammetric behavior f...

  15. FORMATION AND DESTRUCTION OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM IN A LABORATORY SWIRL FLAME INCINERATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The partitioning of chromium (Cr) in combustion systems was investigated theoretically and experimentally. Theoretical predictions were based on chemical equilibrium and suggested that hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] was favored by the presence of chlorine (Cl) and diminished by the...

  16. Final response to BDAT related comments document. D007. Characteristic wastes for chromium. Volume 1-G

    SciTech Connect

    Rosengrant, L.; Craig, R.

    1990-05-01

    The contents of this article include the following: treatment standards; treatment data; treatability of waste/group; total chromium vs hexavalent or trivalent chromium; miscellaneous; and comments on data.

  17. Development of analytical procedures for determination of total chromium by quadrupole ICP-MS and high-resolution ICP-MS, and hexavalent chromium by HPLC-ICP-MS, in different materials used in the automotive industry.

    PubMed

    Séby, F; Gagean, M; Garraud, H; Castetbon, A; Donard, O F X

    2003-10-01

    A European directive was recently adopted limiting the use of hazardous substances such as Pb, Hg, Cd, and Cr(VI) in vehicle manufacturing. From July 2003 a maximum of 2 g Cr(VI) will be authorised per vehicle in corrosion-preventing coatings of key components. As no standardised procedures are available to check if produced vehicles are in agreement with this directive, the objective of this work was to develop analytical procedures for total chromium and Cr(VI) determination in these materials. The first step of this study was to optimise digestion procedures for total chromium determination in plastic and metallic materials by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). High resolution (HR) ICP-MS was used to examine the influence of polyatomic interferences on the detection of the (52)Cr(+) and (53)Cr(+) isotopes. If there was strong interference with m/ z 52 for plastic materials, it was possible to use quadrupole ICP-MS for m/ z 53 if digestions were performed with HNO(3)+H(2)O(2). This mixture was also necessary for digestion of chromium from metallic materials. Extraction procedures in alkaline medium (NH(4)(+)/NH(3) buffer solution at pH 8.9) assisted by sonication were developed for determining Cr(VI) in four different corrosion-preventing coatings by HPLC-ICP-MS. After optimisation and validation with the only solid reference material certified for its Cr(VI) content (BCR 545; welding dusts), the efficiency of this extraction procedure for screw coatings was compared with that described in the EN ISO 3613 standard generally used in routine laboratories. For coatings comprising zinc and aluminium passivated in depth with chromium oxides the extraction procedure developed herein enabled determination of higher Cr(VI) concentrations. This was also observed for the screw covered with a chromium passivant layer on zinc-nickel. For coating comprising a chromium passivant layer on alkaline zinc the standardized extraction procedure was more efficient

  18. Chromium solubility in anhydrous Phase B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindi, Luca; Sirotkina, Ekaterina A.; Bobrov, Andrey V.; Nestola, Fabrizio; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2016-02-01

    The crystal structure and chemical composition of a crystal of (Mg14- x Cr x )(Si5- x Cr x )O24 ( x ≈ 0.30) anhydrous Phase B (Anh-B) synthesized in the model system MgCr2O4-Mg2SiO4 at 12 GPa and 1600 °C have been investigated. The compound was found to be orthorhombic, space group Pmcb, with lattice parameters a = 5.900(1), b = 14.218(2), c = 10.029(2) Å, V = 841.3(2) Å3 and Z = 2. The structure was refined to R 1 = 0.065 using 1492 independent reflections. Chromium was found to substitute for both Mg at the M3 site (with a mean bond distance of 2.145 Å) and Si at the octahedral Si1 site (mean bond distance: 1.856 Å), according to the reaction Mg2+ + Si4+ = 2Cr3+. Such substitutions cause a reduction in the volume of the M3 site and an increase in the volume of the Si-dominant octahedron with respect to the values typically observed for pure Anh-B and Fe2+-bearing Anh-B. Taking into account that Cr3+ is not expected to be Jahn-Teller active, it appears that both the Cr3+-for-Mg and Cr3+-for-Si substitutions in the Anh-B structure decrease the distortion of the octahedra. Electron microprobe analysis gave the Mg13.66(8)Si4.70(6)Cr0.62(4)O24 stoichiometry for the studied phase. The successful synthesis of this phase provides new information for the possible mineral assemblages occurring in the Earth's deep upper mantle and shed new light on the so-called X discontinuity that has been observed at 275-345 km depth in several subcontinental and subduction zone environments.

  19. Chromium enhances insulin responsiveness via AMPK.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Nolan J; Penque, Brent A; Habegger, Kirk M; Sealls, Whitney; Tackett, Lixuan; Elmendorf, Jeffrey S

    2014-05-01

    Trivalent chromium (Cr(3+)) is known to improve glucose homeostasis. Cr(3+) has been shown to improve plasma membrane-based aspects of glucose transporter GLUT4 regulation and increase activity of the cellular energy sensor 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). However, the mechanism(s) by which Cr(3+) improves insulin responsiveness and whether AMPK mediates this action is not known. In this study we tested if Cr(3+) protected against physiological hyperinsulinemia-induced plasma membrane cholesterol accumulation, cortical filamentous actin (F-actin) loss and insulin resistance in L6 skeletal muscle myotubes. In addition, we performed mechanistic studies to test our hypothesis that AMPK mediates the effects of Cr(3+) on GLUT4 and glucose transport regulation. Hyperinsulinemia-induced insulin-resistant L6 myotubes displayed excess membrane cholesterol and diminished cortical F-actin essential for effective glucose transport regulation. These membrane and cytoskeletal abnormalities were associated with defects in insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation and glucose transport. Supplementing the culture medium with pharmacologically relevant doses of Cr(3+) in the picolinate form (CrPic) protected against membrane cholesterol accumulation, F-actin loss, GLUT4 dysregulation and glucose transport dysfunction. Insulin signaling was neither impaired by hyperinsulinemic conditions nor enhanced by CrPic, whereas CrPic increased AMPK signaling. Mechanistically, siRNA-mediated depletion of AMPK abolished the protective effects of CrPic against GLUT4 and glucose transport dysregulation. Together these findings suggest that the micronutrient Cr(3+), via increasing AMPK activity, positively impacts skeletal muscle cell insulin sensitivity and glucose transport regulation. PMID:24725432

  20. Factors affecting the adsorption of chromium (VI) on activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Yavuz, R.; Orbak, I.; Karatepe, N.

    2006-09-15

    The aim of this investigation was to determine the adsorption behavior of chromium (VI) on two different activated carbon samples produced from Tuncbilek lignite. The effects of the initial chromium (VI) concentration (250-1000 mg/L), temperature (297-323 K) and pH (2.0-9.5) on adsorption were investigated systematically. The effectiveness of the parameters on chromium adsorption was found to be in the order of pH, the initial Cr(VI) concentration and the temperature. Increasing the pH from 2.0 to 9.5 caused a decrease in adsorption. However, the adsorption was increased by increasing the initial Cr(VI) concentration and temperature. The multilinear mathematical model was also developed to predict the Cr(VI) adsorption on activated carbon samples within the experimental conditions.