Science.gov

Sample records for alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection

  1. COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qui; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling

    2004-05-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding in the swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to the naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of the injected solution bypasses the target pore space containing oil. The objective of this work is to investigate whether combining these two technologies could broaden the applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium--polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 9.2 to 12.9.

  2. COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-04-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent

  3. COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson

    2004-10-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Neither aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide nor silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems produced significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels produced incremental oil with the rigid flowing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential pressures across cores. None of the gels tested

  4. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-12-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in

  5. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-10-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent

  6. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and the Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-12-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding froin swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in

  7. Detailed evaluation of the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer field project and it`s application to mature Minnelusa waterfloods. Technical progress report for the period of April--June, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, M.J.

    1994-09-01

    The objective of this study of the West Kiehl is to (1) quantify the incremental oil produced from the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer project by classical engineering and numerical simulation techniques, (2) quantify the effect of chemical slug volume on incremental oil in the two swept areas of the field, (3) determine the economics of the application of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology, (4) forecast the results of injecting an alkaline--surfactant-polymer solution to mature waterfloods and polymer floods, and (5) provide the basis for independent operators to book additional oil reserves by using the alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology. This report will document the numerical simulation waterflood, polymer flood, alkaline-surfactant flood and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood predictions from the West Kiehl and Prairie Creek South fields.

  8. Detailed evaluation of the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer field project and it`s application to mature Minnelusa waterfloods. Technical progress report, July--September, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, M.J.

    1994-12-31

    The objective is to (1) quantify the incremental oil produced from the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer project by classical engineering and numerical simulation techniques, (2) quantify the effect of chemical slug volume on incremental oil in the two swept areas of the field, (3) determine the economics of the application of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology, (4) forecast the results of injecting an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution to mature waterfloods and polymer floods, and (5) provide the basis for independent operators to book additional oil reserves by using the alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology. A geological study of 72 Minnelusa field surrounding the West Kiehl is complete. Of the 72 fields, 35 were studied in detail and, from these 35 fields, Prairie Creek South and Simpson Ranch were selected for numerical simulation as representative of Minnelusa waterfloods and polymer floods, respectively. This report documents the numerical simulation waterflood, polymer flood, alkaline-surfactant flood and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood predictions from the West Kiehl, Simpson Ranch and Prairie Creek South fields.

  9. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-12-01

    Performance and produced polymer evaluation of four alkaline-surfactant-polymer projects concluded that only one of the projects could have benefited from combining the alkaline-surfactant-polymer and gelation technologies. Cambridge, the 1993 Daqing, Mellott Ranch, and the Wardlaw alkaline-surfacant-polymer floods were studied. An initial gel treatment followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood in the Wardlaw field would have been a benefit due to reduction of fracture flow. Numerical simulation demonstrated that reducing the permeability of a high permeability zone of a reservoir with gel improved both waterflood and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery. A Minnelusa reservoir with both A and B sand production was simulated. A and B sands are separated by a shale layer. A sand and B sand waterflood oil recovery was improved by 196,000 bbls or 3.3% OOIP when a gel was placed in the B sand. Alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery improvement over a waterflood was 392,000 bbls or 6.5% OOIP. Placing a gel into the B sand prior to an alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood resulted in 989,000 bbl or 16.4% OOIP more oil than only water injection. A sand and B sand alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery was improved by 596,000 bbls or 9.9% OOIP when a gel was placed in the B sand.

  10. ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER FLOODING AND RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION OF THE BRIDGEPORT AND CYPRESS RESERVOIRS OF THE LAWRENCE FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Ron Damm; Bev Seyler

    2003-03-01

    Feasibility of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood for the Lawrence Field in Lawrence County, Illinois is being studied. Two injected formulations are being designed; one for the Bridgeport A and Bridgeport B reservoirs and one for Cypress and Paint Creek reservoirs. Fluid-fluid and coreflood evaluations have developed a chemical solution that produces incremental oil in the laboratory from the Cypress and Paint Creek reservoirs. A chemical formulation for the Bridgeport A and Bridgeport B reservoirs is being developed. A reservoir characterization study is being done on the Bridgeport A, B, & D sandstones, and on the Cypress sandstone. The study covers the pilot flood area and the Lawrence Field.

  11. ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER FLOODING AND RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION OF THE BRIDGEPORT AND CYPRESS RESERVOIRS OF THE LAWRENCE FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Ron Damm; Bev Seyler

    2003-04-01

    Feasibility of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood for the Lawrence Field in Lawrence County, Illinois is being studied. Two injected formulations are being designed; one for the Bridgeport A and Bridgeport B reservoirs and one for Cypress and Paint Creek reservoirs. Fluid-fluid and coreflood evaluations have developed a chemical solution that produces incremental oil in the laboratory from the Cypress and Paint Creek reservoirs. A chemical formulation for the Bridgeport A and Bridgeport B reservoirs is being developed. A reservoir characterization study is being done on the Bridgeport A, B, & D sandstones, and on the Cypress sandstone. The study covers the pilot flood area and the Lawrence Field.

  12. Pilot test of alkaline surfactant polymer flooding in Daqing Oil Field

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Demin; Zhang Zhenhua; Cheng Jiecheng; Yang Jingchun; Gao Shutang; Li Lin

    1996-12-31

    After the success of polymer flooding in Daqing, two alkaline-surfactant-polymer (ASP) floods have been conducted to (1) increase oil recovery further (2) study the feasibility of ASP flooding (3) provide technical and practical experience for expanding the ASP pilots. Inverted five spot pattern is adopted in both pilots. Pilot 1 (PO) is located in the West Central area of Daqing Oil Field and consists of 4 injectors and 9 producers. Pilot 2 (XF) is located in the South area of Daqing Oil Field and has 1 injector and 4 producers. The crude oil of both pilots have high paraffin content and low acid value. Compared to PO, XF has characteristics of lower heterogeneity, lighter oil and higher recovery by water flooding. For each pilot, after extensive screening, an ASP system has been determined. The ASP systems all feature very low surfactant concentration and wide range of ultra low interfacial tension with change of concentration of any of the three components. Core flooding and numerical simulation show more than 20% OOIP incremental recovery by ASP over water flooding for both pilots. By the end of May, 1995, 100% of ASP slug and 100% of the polymer buffer have been injected in the pilots. Production wells showed good responses in terms of large decrease in water cut and increase in oil production. The performance of each pilot has followed the numerical simulation predication very well, or even a bit better. Emulsions showed up in producers, but the emulsions are easy to be broken by a special de-emulsifier. No formation damage and scaling have been detected. The ASP flood pilot tests are technically successful and, based on the preliminary evaluation, economically feasible. Therefore, in the near future, much larger scale ASP flood field tests are going to be performed at several districts in Daqing Oil Field.

  13. Detailed evaluation of the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer field project and its application to mature Minnelusa waterfloods. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, M.J.; Surkalo, H.

    1995-03-01

    The combination of an interfacial tension agent and a mobility control agent has the potential to produce additional oil beyond a waterflood. The West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer project is the first application of this chemical enhanced oil recovery technique. The West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood was initiated in September 1987 as a secondary application after primary recovery. The following analysis of the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood indicates that incremental oil greater than waterflooding was produced at a cost of less than $2.00 per incremental barrel. A analysis of approximately 120 Minnelusa oil fields in the Powder River Basin indicates that the total original stock tank oil in place exceeds one billion barrels. If the enhanced oil recovery technology implemented at West Kiehl field could be successfully applied to these fields, the potential incremental oil recovery would approach 130 million barrels. The goals of ``Detailed Evaluation of the West Kield Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Field Project and It`s Application to Mature Minnelusa Waterfloods`` are to evaluate both the field performance of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer enhanced oil recovery technology as well as its potential application to other Minnelusa oil fields.

  14. Detailed evaluation of the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer field project and its application to mature Minnelusa waterfloods. Annual report for the period January 1993--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, M.J.; Surkalo, H.; Mundorf, W.R.

    1994-11-01

    The combination of an interfacial tension agent and a mobility control agent has the potential to produce additional oil beyond a waterflood. The West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer project is the most advanced application of this chemical enhanced oil recovery technique. The West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood was initiated in September 1987 as a secondary application after primary recovery. A preliminary analysis of the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood indicates that incremental oil of 20% of the original stock tank oil in place will be produced above waterflooding. The cost of the incremental oil will be less than $2.50 per incremental barrel. A statistical analysis of approximately 120 Minnelusa oil fields in the Powder River Basin indicates that the original stock tank oil in place exceeds one billion barrels. If the enhanced oil recovery technology implemented at West Kiehl field could be successfully applied to these fields, the potential incremental oil recovery would approach 200 million barrels. {open_quotes}Detailed Evaluation of the West Kiehl Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Field Project and Its Application to Mature Minnelusa Waterfloods{close_quotes} objective is to evaluate both the field performance of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer enhanced oil recovery technology as well as its potential application to other Minnelusa oil fields.

  15. Detailed evaluation of the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer field project and it`s application to mature Minnelusa waterfloods. Annual technical report, January 1993--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, M.J.

    1995-02-01

    The combination of an interfacial tension agent and a mobility control agent has the potential to produce additional oil beyond a waterflood. The West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer project is the most advanced application of this chemical enhanced oil recovery technique. The West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood was initiated in September 1987 as a secondary application after primary recovery. A preliminary analysis of the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood indicates that incremental oil of 20% of the original stock tank oil in place will be produced above waterflooding. The cost of the incremental oil will be less than $2.50 per incremental barrel. A statistical analysis of approximately 120 Minnelusa oil fields in the Powder River Basin indicates that the original stock tank oil in place exceeds one billion barrels. If the enhanced oil recovery technology implemented at West Kiehl field could be successfully applied to these fields, the potential incremental oil recovery would approach 200 million barrels. This project (1) evaluates the geological deposition environment of West Kiehl and adjacent Minneluse sand reservoirs; (2) compares the production performance results of the best geologic and reservoir performance analogs and select two fields for future study; (3) compares the two best field analogs to the west Kiehl field using numerical simulation; (4) predict results of applying the enhancement technology on two mature Minneluse waterflood analog units using engineering and numerical simulation; (5) predict waterflood and polymer flood performance of the West Kiehl field using numerical simulation.

  16. Reservoir Characterization of Bridgeport and Cypress Sandstones in Lawrence Field Illinois to Improve Petroleum Recovery by Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Flood

    SciTech Connect

    Seyler, Beverly; Grube, John; Huff, Bryan; Webb, Nathan; Damico, James; Blakley, Curt; Madhavan, Vineeth; Johanek, Philip; Frailey, Scott

    2012-12-21

    Within the Illinois Basin, most of the oilfields are mature and have been extensively waterflooded with water cuts that range up to 99% in many of the larger fields. In order to maximize production of significant remaining mobile oil from these fields, new recovery techniques need to be researched and applied. The purpose of this project was to conduct reservoir characterization studies supporting Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Floods in two distinct sandstone reservoirs in Lawrence Field, Lawrence County, Illinois. A project using alkaline-surfactantpolymer (ASP) has been established in the century old Lawrence Field in southeastern Illinois where original oil in place (OOIP) is estimated at over a billion barrels and 400 million barrels have been recovered leaving more than 600 million barrels as an EOR target. Radial core flood analysis using core from the field demonstrated recoveries greater than 20% of OOIP. While the lab results are likely optimistic to actual field performance, the ASP tests indicate that substantial reserves could be recovered even if the field results are 5 to 10% of OOIP. Reservoir characterization is a key factor in the success of any EOR application. Reservoirs within the Illinois Basin are frequently characterized as being highly compartmentalized resulting in multiple flow unit configurations. The research conducted on Lawrence Field focused on characteristics that define reservoir compartmentalization in order to delineate preferred target areas so that the chemical flood can be designed and implemented for the greatest recovery potential. Along with traditional facies mapping, core analyses and petrographic analyses, conceptual geological models were constructed and used to develop 3D geocellular models, a valuable tool for visualizing reservoir architecture and also a prerequisite for reservoir simulation modeling. Cores were described and potential permeability barriers were correlated using geophysical logs. Petrographic analyses

  17. Investigation of oil recovery improvement by coupling an interfacial tension agent and a mobility control agent in light oil reservoirs. Technical progress report, October--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    The study will investigate two major areas concerning co-injecting an interfacial tension reduction agent(s) and a mobility control agent into petroleum reservoirs. The first will consist of defining the mechanisms of interaction of an alkaline agent, a surfactant, and a polymer on a fluid-fluid and a fluid-rock basis. The second is the improvement of the economics of the combined technology. This report examines effect of rock type on oil recovery by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. This report also begins a series of evaluations to improve the economics of alkaline-surfactant-polymer oil recovery.

  18. Calculation of injection forces for highly concentrated protein solutions.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Ingo; Schmidt, Astrid; Bryant, Andrew; Besheer, Ahmed

    2015-09-30

    Protein solutions often manifest a high viscosity at high solution concentrations, thus impairing injectability. Accordingly, accurate prediction of the injection force based on solution viscosity can greatly support protein formulation and device development. In this study, the shear-dependent viscosity of three concentrated protein solutions is reported, and calculated injection forces obtained by two different mathematical models are compared against measured values. The results show that accurate determination of the needle dimensions and the shear-thinning behavior of the protein solutions is vital for injection force prediction. Additionally, one model delivered more accurate results, particularly for solutions with prominent shear-thinning behavior.

  19. SNS INJECTION AND EXTRACTION SYSTEMS ? ISSUES AND SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    Beam loss is higher than expected in the Ring injection section and in the injection dump beam line. The primary causes are fairly well understood, and we have made some equipment modifications to reduce the loss. In the ring extraction beam line the beam distribution exhibits cross-plane coupling (tilt), and the cause has been traced to a large skew-quadrupole component in the extraction Lambertson septum magnet. In this paper we will discuss the issues surrounding the ring injection and extraction systems, the solutions we have implemented to date, and our plans for future improvements.

  20. [Formation of oxalate in oxaliplatin injection diluted with infusion solutions].

    PubMed

    Eto, Seiji; Yamamoto, Kie; Shimazu, Kounosuke; Sugiura, Toshimune; Baba, Kaori; Sato, Ayaka; Goromaru, Takeshi; Hagiwara, Yoshiaki; Hara, Keiko; Shinohara, Yoshitake; Takahashi, Kojiro

    2014-01-01

    Oxaliplatin use can cause acute peripheral neuropathy characterized by sensory paresthesias, which are markedly exacerbated by exposure to cold temperatures, and is a dose-limiting factor in the treatment of colorectal cancer.Oxalate is eliminated in a series of nonenzymatic conversions of oxaliplatin in infusion solutions or biological fluids.Elimination of oxalate from oxaliplatin has been suggested as one of the reasons for the development of acute neuropathy.In this study, we developed a high-performance liquid chromatography(HPLC)-based method to detect oxalate formation, and investigated the time dependent formation of oxalate in oxaliplatin diluted with infusion solutions.The results obtained showed that the amount of oxalate in the solution corresponded to 1.6% of oxaliplatin 8 h after oxaliplatin dilution with a 5% glucose solution. On the other hand, oxalate formation from oxaliplatin diluted with a saline solution was ten-fold higher than that from oxaliplatin diluted with the 5% glucose solution.Most patients who were intravenously injected with oxaliplatin experienced venous pain.As a preventive measure against venous pain, dexamethasone was added to the oxaliplatin injection.We measured the amount of oxalate formed in the dexamethasone-containing oxaliplatin injection diluted with a 5% glucose solution.The amount of oxalate formed when dexamethasone was added did not differ significantly from that formed when dexamethasone was not added.Thus, there are no clinical problems associated with the stability of oxaliplatin solutions.

  1. 21 CFR 522.1870 - Praziquantel injectable solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Praziquantel injectable solution. 522.1870 Section 522.1870 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... veterinarian. (2) Cats—(i) Amount. For cats under 5 pounds, 0.2 milliliter (11.4 milligrams); 5 to 10 pounds,...

  2. 21 CFR 522.1870 - Praziquantel injectable solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Praziquantel injectable solution. 522.1870 Section 522.1870 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... veterinarian. (2) Cats—(i) Amount. For cats under 5 pounds, 0.2 milliliter (11.4 milligrams); 5 to 10 pounds,...

  3. Molecular degradation, injectivity, and elastic properties of polymer solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Southwick, J.G. ); Manke, C.W. )

    1988-11-01

    New features of polymer rheology in porous media were observed when hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (HPAM) solutions were flowed through sandstone, gravel packs, and glass-bead packs at high rates. Independent measurement of elongational viscosity, /sub e/, with a ductless-siphon technique demonstrates that the enhanced resistance seen at high flow rates is not directly proportional to /sub e/. Furthermore, significant permeability trends in resistance factor and mechanical degradation are observed when plotted vs. strain rate. When these results are translated to field flow rates and geometries, they indicate that HPAM solutions can be injected at reasonable injection pressures with minimal viscosity losses, provided that perforated completions are designed with either sufficient perforation density or perforation size.

  4. Technology Solutions Case Study: Ducts Sealing Using Injected Spray Sealant

    SciTech Connect

    2014-03-01

    In multifamily and attached buildings, traditional duct sealing methods are often impractical or costly and disruptive because of the difficulty in accessing leakage sites. In this project, the Raleigh Housing Authority worked with Building America team, the Advanced Residential Integrated Solutions Collaborative to determine the most cost-effective ways to reduce duct leakage in its low-rise housing units.Two retrofit duct sealing techniques—manually-applied sealants and injecting a spray sealant—were implemented in several low-rise multiunit buildings. An analysis on the cost and performance of the two methods are presented. Each method was used in twenty housing units: approximately half of each group of units are single story and the remainder two-story. Results show that duct leakage to the outside was reduced by an average of 59% through the use of manual methods, and by 90% in the units where the injected spray sealant was used. Ihe cost of manually-applying sealant ranged from $275 to $511 per unit and for the injected spray sealant the cost was $700 per unit. Modeling suggests a simple payback of 2.2 years for manual sealing and 4.7 years for the injected spray sealant system. Utility bills were collected for one year before and after the retrofits. Utility bill analysis shows 14% and 16% energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing procedure respectively in heating season whereas in cooling season, energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing were both 16%.

  5. Inadvertent subcutaneous injection of hypertonic saline solution during lipofilling.

    PubMed

    Kerfant, N; Philandrianos, C; Alliez, A; Casanova, D

    2013-08-01

    Subcutaneous infiltration with a mixture of plain saline and adrenaline is a useful option in lipoharvesting for autologous fat grafting. This report presents the case of 34-year-old woman who experienced inadvertent subcutaneous injection of hypertonic saline solution during body fat harvesting. Level of Evidence V This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors http://www.springer.com/00266 .

  6. SOLUTIONS APPROXIMATING SOLUTE TRANSPORT IN A LEAKY AQUIFER RECEIVING WASTEWATER INJECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A mathematical model amenable to analytical solution techniques is developed for the investigation of contaminant transport from an injection well into a leaky aquifer system, which comprises a pumped and an unpumped aquifer connected to each other by an aquitard. A steady state ...

  7. The rheological injectability of N-succinyl-chitosan solutions.

    PubMed

    Rogalsky, Allan; Kwon, Hyock Ju; Lee-Sullivan, Pearl

    2016-10-20

    The viscosity of a set of N-succinyl-chitosan (NSC) solutions was characterized near the 0.2Pas rheological injectability limit. This is believed to be the first such report in the open literature. Viscosity was characterized at physiological pH and ionic strength as a function of NSC degree of substitution, NSC concentration, temperature, and shear rate. NSC was synthesized via Yamaguci's method and characterized using H-NMR, membrane osmometry, TGA and isothermal vacuum drying. NSC synthesis results were shown to fit a reproducible log-linear correlation and both optimum drying temperature and thermal decomposition temperature were found to be a function of NSC degree of substitution. Viscosity results were explained using Katchalsky's full model for polyampholyte ionization combined with a charge induced excluded volume model proposed by Higgs. The model predicted a polyelectrolyte/polyampholyte transition which agreed well with experimental data. For minimally injectable formulations a maximum in primary amine concentration is expected at 32sub% amine NSC. PMID:27474658

  8. The rheological injectability of N-succinyl-chitosan solutions.

    PubMed

    Rogalsky, Allan; Kwon, Hyock Ju; Lee-Sullivan, Pearl

    2016-10-20

    The viscosity of a set of N-succinyl-chitosan (NSC) solutions was characterized near the 0.2Pas rheological injectability limit. This is believed to be the first such report in the open literature. Viscosity was characterized at physiological pH and ionic strength as a function of NSC degree of substitution, NSC concentration, temperature, and shear rate. NSC was synthesized via Yamaguci's method and characterized using H-NMR, membrane osmometry, TGA and isothermal vacuum drying. NSC synthesis results were shown to fit a reproducible log-linear correlation and both optimum drying temperature and thermal decomposition temperature were found to be a function of NSC degree of substitution. Viscosity results were explained using Katchalsky's full model for polyampholyte ionization combined with a charge induced excluded volume model proposed by Higgs. The model predicted a polyelectrolyte/polyampholyte transition which agreed well with experimental data. For minimally injectable formulations a maximum in primary amine concentration is expected at 32sub% amine NSC.

  9. [Complications of injections of hypoosmotic solutes in an underage patient].

    PubMed

    Benjoar, M-D; Lepage, C; Hivelin, M; Lantieri, L

    2009-04-01

    Liposuction represents the standard surgical treatment of localized fat excess. Some non-plastic-surgery-board-certified practitioners are likely to offer non-invasive alternatives treatments. We report the clinical case of a 14-year-old female patient who followed a Lipectomy treatment. The Lipectomy technique consists in a hypodermic injection of hypotonic solutions in order to obtain an adipocytes lysis by osmotic shock. No PubMed referenced scientific publication is related to the efficacy or the tolerance of this technique. Postoperative evolution was marked by a polymicrobial subcutaneous abscess that needed two surgical evacuations and 10 days of overnight stay in our department. Through this clinical case, we evoke the possible dangers linked to the application of a non-evaluated medical technique and the necessity of establishing an official validation agency related to innovative techniques in aesthetic medicine and surgery.

  10. Investigation of oil recovery improvement by coupling an interfacial tension agent and a mobility control agent in light oil reservoirs. Technical progress report, January--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, M.J.

    1995-05-01

    Two series of corefloods were performed to improve alkaline-surfactant-polymer oil recovery economics. In these series of corefloods, the objective was to increase oil recovery by changing the chemical injection sequence. An alkaline gradient was evaluated in the first series of corefloods. Radial corefloods using Berea core were performed in which a pre-flush of alkaline-polymer solution was injected before the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. 30% pore volume (PV) of 1.0 wt % Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} plus 0.2 wt % Petrostep B-100 plus 500 mg/l Flopaam 3330S was injected followed by 30% PV 500 mg/l Flopaam 3330S. A 5% PV 2.0 wt % Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} plus 500 mg/l Flopaam 3330S followed by 5% PV 1.5 wt % Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} plus 500 mg/l Flopaam 3330S was injected prior to the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in the coreflood with an alkaline-polymer pre-flush. A water flush of 1.5 to 2 PV followed chemical injection. The pre-flush objective was to inject sufficient alkali to satiate consumption and to force the surfactant to go through optimum interfacial tension and phase behavior states. Incremental oil recovery increased 24% from 0.106 PV (30.3% waterflood residual oil) to 0.131 PV (38.6% waterflood residual oil) when an alkaline-gradient pre-flush was injected. The effect on the oil recovery economics of an alkaline-polymer pre-flush is shown in Table 2. Oil recovery as well as the mass of alkali and polymer injected increased making the cost per incremental barrel of oil unchanged.

  11. Crushed and Injected Buprenorphine Tablets: Characteristics of Princeps and Generic Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Bouquié, Régis; Wainstein, Laura; Pilet, Paul; Mussini, Jean-Marie; Deslandes, Guillaume; Clouet, Johann; Dailly, Eric; Jolliet, Pascale; Victorri-Vigneau, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Self-injection of high-dose buprenorphine is responsible for well-described complications. In 2011, we have been alerted by unusual but serious cutaneous complication among injection buprenorphine users. A prospective data collection identified 30 cases of necrotic cutaneous lesions after injection of filtered buprenorphine solution, among which 25 cases occurred following injection of buprenorphine generics. The main goal of our study was to put forward particularities that could explain the cutaneous complications, by qualitatively and quantitatively confronting particles present in Subutex and generics solutions. We used the same protocol that injected-buprenorphine users: generic or subutex tablets were crushed in sterile water and filtered through 2 filters commonly used (cotton-pad and sterifilt). Solutions were analyzed by laser granulometry, flow cytometry and scanning electron microscopy. We have highlighted the wide variation of the quantity and the size of the particles present in solution between the two drugs after cotton-pad filtration. The proportion of particles <10 µm is systematically higher in the generic solutions than with Subutex. All of the insoluble particles found in generic solutions contain silica, whereas non- organic element was to be identified in the insoluble particles of Subutex. One skin biopsy obtained from one patient who developed a necrotic lesion after intravenous injection of filtrated solution of buprenorphine generic, shows non-organic elements. Identification of particles in situ enables us to confirm the presence of silica in the biopsy. Actually the monitoring of patient receiving generic of buprenorphine must be strengthened. PMID:25474108

  12. Investigation of oil recovery improvement by coupling an interfacial tension agent and a mobility control agent in light oil reservoirs. Technical progress report, July 1995--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, M.J.

    1995-10-01

    This study will investigate two major areas concerning co-injection and interfacial tension reduction agents and a mobility control agent into petroleum reservoirs. The first will consist of defining the mechanisms of interaction of an alkaline agent, a surfactant, and a polymer on a fluid-fluid and a fluid-rock basis. The second is the improvement of the economics of the combined technology. This report examines altering the concentration of alkali and polymer on the oil recovery economics of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution.

  13. Devices for monitoring content of microparticles and bacterium in injection solutions in pharmaceutical production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilyi, Olexander I.; Getman, Vasyl B.; Konyev, Fedir A.; Sapunkov, Olexander; Sapunkov, Pavlo G.

    2001-06-01

    The devices for monitoring of parameters of efficiency of water solutions filtration, which are based on the analysis of scattered light by microparticles are considered in this article. The efficiency of using of devices in pharmaceutics in technological processes of manufacturing medical injection solutions is shown. The examples of monitoring of contents of bacterial cultures Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Micrococcus luteus in water solutions of glucose are indicated.

  14. Heart rate effects of intraosseous injections using slow and fast rates of anesthetic solution deposition.

    PubMed

    Susi, Louis; Reader, Al; Nusstein, John; Beck, Mike; Weaver, Joel; Drum, Melissa

    2008-01-01

    The authors, using a crossover design, randomly administered, in a single-blind manner, 3 primary intraosseous injections to 61 subjects using: the Wand local anesthetic system at a deposition rate of 45 seconds (fast injection); the Wand local anesthetic system at a deposition rate of 4 minutes and 45 seconds (slow injection); a conventional syringe injection at a deposition rate of 4 minutes and 45 seconds (slow injection), in 3 separate appointments spaced at least 3 weeks apart. A pulse oximeter measured heart rate (pulse). The results demonstrated the mean maximum heart rate was statistically higher with the fast intraosseous injection (average 21 to 28 beats/min increase) than either of the 2 slow intraosseous injections (average 10 to 12 beats/min increase). There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 slow injections. We concluded that an intraosseous injection of 1.4 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1 : 100,000 epinephrine with the Wand at a 45-second rate of anesthetic deposition resulted in a significantly higher heart rate when compared with a 4-minute and 45-second anesthetic solution deposition using either the Wand or traditional syringe.

  15. Electrogenerated chemiluminescence induced by sequential hot electron and hole injection into aqueous electrolyte solution.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Kalle; Kuosmanen, Päivi; Pusa, Matti; Kulmala, Oskari; Håkansson, Markus; Kulmala, Sakari

    2016-03-17

    Hole injection into aqueous electrolyte solution is proposed to occur when oxide-coated aluminum electrode is anodically pulse-polarized by a voltage pulse train containing sufficiently high-voltage anodic pulses. The effects of anodic pulses are studied by using an aromatic Tb(III) chelate as a probe known to produce intensive hot electron-induced electrochemiluminescence (HECL) with plain cathodic pulses and preoxidized electrodes. The presently studied system allows injection of hot electrons and holes successively into aqueous electrolyte solutions and can be utilized in detecting electrochemiluminescent labels in fully aqueous solutions, and actually, the system is suggested to be quite close to a pulse radiolysis system providing hydrated electrons and hydroxyl radicals as the primary radicals in aqueous solution without the problems and hazards of ionizing radiation. The analytical power of the present excitation waveforms are that they allow detection of electrochemiluminescent labels at very low detection limits in bioaffinity assays such as in immunoassays or DNA probe assays. The two important properties of the present waveforms are: (i) they provide in situ oxidation of the electrode surface resulting in the desired oxide film thickness and (ii) they can provide one-electron oxidants for the system by hole injection either via F- and F(+)-center band of the oxide or by direct hole injection to valence band of water at highly anodic pulse amplitudes.

  16. Engineered Injection and Extraction for Enhanced In-situ Remediation of Sorbing Solutes in Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, B. D.; Neupauer, R. M.; Piscopo, A. N.; Mays, D. C.

    2012-12-01

    Groundwater remediation is becoming increasingly more important as the world's population grows and the necessity of access to clean drinking water persists. The majority of current groundwater treatment methods involve pumping the contaminated groundwater out of the soil and treating it above ground. Sorbed contaminants are difficult to remediate using this conventional pump-and-treat method, and often produce poor treatment results because sorbed contaminants are difficult to extract from the aquifer; therefore in-situ remediation research is of particular importance. One type of in-situ groundwater remediation involves a treatment solution of varying composition being injected into the polluted aquifer to react with the contaminant and degrade it to an acceptable byproduct. Increasing the amount of spreading between the contaminant and the treatment solution promotes an increase in contact area and more desired reactions. It has been previously determined that sequential injection and extraction using four wells for in-situ remediation can enhance the spreading of an aqueous contaminant and treatment solution and increase degradation through more reactions. In this work, we focus on sorbing contaminants and investigate the effectiveness of the injection and extraction methods on varying degrees of contaminant sorption. Tests were conducted in homogeneous and heterogeneous soil media, and with instantaneous and kinetic reaction. It was determined that engineered injection and extraction methods previously developed for aqueous contaminants also enhance in-situ remediation of sorbing solutes.

  17. Calcium-Citrate-Phosphate Solution Injection for In Situ Strontium-90 Immobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruchter, J. S.; Vermeul, V.; Szecsody, J.; Williams, M. D.; Fritz, B. G.

    2010-12-01

    Sr-90 present in groundwater and the vadose zone at the Hanford 100N area due to past waste disposal practices has reached the nearby Columbia River, as evidenced by Sr-90 concentrations in near river wells and aquifer tubes and near shore sediments. Sr-90 is currently being remediated by adsorption onto apatite (55 times stronger than Sr-90 adsorption to sediment), followed by incorporation of the Sr-90 into the apatite structure. If the Sr-90 can remain immobilized for 300 years (~ten 29.1-yr half-lives of Sr-90 decay), it will have decayed below regulatory limits to Y-90 and to stable Zr-90. Apatite [Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2] is being precipitated in situ by injection of an aqueous solution of Ca-citrate and Na-phosphate through a series of injection wells spaced 30 ft on center, forming a 300-ft-long permeable reactive barrier. Design criteria for the injection operations were based on 1) amendment volume and mass injected, 2) amendment arrival at adjacent wells, 3) water-level elevation during treatment, and 4) injection rate limitations associated with well plugging. An evaluation of compliance with these injection design criteria was used to assess operational performance and identify candidate wells for supplemental treatment. Injection design criteria were not fully met at 8 of the 16 injection well locations, with the primary deficiency at 4 of 8 locations being the limited vertical extent of Hanford formation treatment due to low-river-stage conditions during the injection. Wells whose extent of treatment did not meet design criteria were recommended for retreatment. Although injection design criteria were not fully met at a significant number of well locations, aqueous performance assessment monitoring data collected to date indicate good barrier performance. Aqueous Sr-90 monitoring in four compliance monitoring wells over a year following the high concentration injections indicates 84% to 95% decrease in Sr-90 concentrations (relative to the low and high end

  18. Antitumor and antimetastasis effects of macerating solutions from an injectable chitosan-based hydrogel on hepatocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Song, Fulai; Chen, Quan; Hu, Rui; Jiang, Zhiwen; Yang, Yan; Han, Baoqin

    2015-12-01

    In our previous studies, injectable chitosan-based hydrogel (CH) was prepared and its application in surgery removal of tumor was studied. In this study, the antitumor and antimetastasis effects of the macerating solutions from CH were investigated. Our in vitro results showed that macerating solutions from CH significantly increased the proliferation of human normal liver L02 cells. In contrast, macerating solutions from CH showed significant inhibitory effects on the growth of human hepatoma Bel-7402 cells. In a mouse H22 tumor model, intraperitoneal injection of macerating solutions from CH decreased tumor growth and prevented tumor diffusion. Tumor weight was decreased dramatically in mice treated with macerating solutions from CH. The thymus index and spleen index were significantly increased by treatment with macerating solutions from CH. Administration of macerating solutions from CH also remarkably increased serum levels of TNF-α, IL-2, IFN-γ, and decreased serum VEGF content as compared with the control group treated with saline. The antimetastasis studies showed that the number of pulmonary nodules, pulmonary metastases index, and lymph nodes index were significantly decreased in experimental groups treated with macerating solutions from CH. This study provided more supporting data for the potential clinical application of CH after surgical removal of tumor.

  19. Investigation of oil recovery improvement by coupling an interfacial tension agent and a mobility control agent in light oil reservoirs. Summary annual report, October 1994--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    The study will investigate two major areas concerning co-injecting an interfacial tension reduction agent(s) and a mobility control agent into petroleum reservoirs. The first will consist of defining the mechanisms of interaction of an alkaline agent, a surfactant, and a polymer on a fluid-fluid and a fluid-rock basis. The second is the improvement of the economics of the combined technology. The third year of the study finished the oil recovery coreflood studies and evaluated different techniques to improve alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution economics. The final series of corefloods compared the oil recovery efficiency of the alkali gradient in Berea sandstone and J Sand sandstone. Oil recovery efficiency was essentially the same in both types of core, 13 to 15% PV of oil. Cost of chemical per incremental barrel of oil with 30% pore volume of alkaline-surfactant- polymer solution injected were $3.20 for the Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}- Petrostep B-100-Flopaam 3330S solution in both types of core.

  20. Solute transport and composition profile during direct metal deposition with coaxial powder injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiuli; Song, Lijun; Yu, Gang; Mazumder, Jyoti

    2011-11-01

    Direct metal deposition (DMD) with coaxial powder injection allows fabrication of three-dimensional geometry with rapidly solidified microstructure. During DMD, addition of powder leads to the interaction between laser and powder, and also the redistribution of solute. The concentration distribution of the alloying element is very important for mechanical properties of the deposited clad material. The evolution of concentration distribution of carbon and chromium in the molten pool is simulated using a self-consistent three-dimensional model, based on the solution of the equations of mass, momentum, energy conservation and solute transport in the molten pool. The experimental and calculated molten pool geometry is compared for model validation purposes.

  1. Arginine and lysine reduce the high viscosity of serum albumin solutions for pharmaceutical injection.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Naoto; Takai, Eisuke; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Shiraki, Kentaro

    2014-05-01

    Therapeutic protein solutions for subcutaneous injection must be very highly concentrated, which increases their viscosity through protein-protein interactions. However, maintaining a solution viscosity below 50 cP is important for the preparation and injection of therapeutic protein solutions. In this study, we examined the effect of various amino acids on the solution viscosity of very highly concentrated bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA) at a physiological pH. Among the amino acids tested, l-arginine hydrochloride (ArgHCl) and l-lysine hydrochloride (LysHCl) (50-200 mM) successfully reduced the viscosity of both BSA and HSA solutions; guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl), NaCl, and other sodium salts were equally as effective, indicating the electrostatic shielding effect of these additives. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that BSA is in its native state even in the presence of ArgHCl, LysHCl, and NaCl at high protein concentrations. These results indicate that weakened protein-protein interactions play a key role in reducing solution viscosity. ArgHCl and LysHCl, which are also non-toxic compounds, will be used as additives to reduce the solution viscosity of concentrated therapeutic proteins.

  2. Analytical solution of geological carbon sequestration under constant pressure injection into a horizontal radial reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhang, R.; Liou, T.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is believed to be an economically feasible technology to mitigate global warming by capturing carbon dioxide (CO2), the major component of greenhouse gases, from the atmosphere and injecting it into deep geological formations.Several mechanisms can help trap CO2 in the pore space of a geological reservoir, stratigraphic and structural trapping, hydrodynamic trapping, and geochemical trapping.Besides these trapping mechanisms, another important issue that deserves careful attention is the risk of CO2 leakage. The common ';constant injection rate' scenario may induce high pressure buildup that will endanger the mechanical integrity as well as the sealing capability of the cap rock. Instead of injecting CO2 at a constant mass rate, CO2 can be injected into the reservoir by fixing the pressure (usually the bottom-hole pressure) in the injection borehole. By doing so, the inevitable pressure buildup associated with the constant injection scheme can be completely eliminated in the constant pressure injection scheme. In this paper, a semi-analytical solution for CO2 injection with constant pressure was developed. For simplicity, structural and geochemical trapping mechanisms were not considered. Therefore, a horizontal reservoir with infinite radial extent was considered. Prior to injection, the reservoir is fully saturated with the formation brine. It is assumed that CO2 does not mix with brine such that a sharp interface is formed once CO2 invades the brine-saturated pores. Because of the density difference between CO2 and brine, CO2 resides above the interface. Additional assumptions were also made when building up the brine and CO2 mass balance equations: (1) both of the fluids and the geological formations are incompressible, (2) capillary pressure is neglected, (3)there is no fluid flow in the vertical direction, and the horizontal flow satisfies the Darcy's law.In order to solve for the height of brine-CO2 interface, the two

  3. Approximate solutions for Forchheimer flow during water injection and water production in an unconfined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathias, Simon A.; Moutsopoulos, Konstantinos N.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the hydraulics around injection and production wells in unconfined aquifers associated with rainwater and reclaimed water aquifer storage schemes is an issue of increasing importance. Much work has been done previously to understand the mathematics associated with Darcy's law in this context. However, groundwater flow velocities around injection and production wells are likely to be sufficiently large such as to induce significant non-Darcy effects. This article presents a mathematical analysis to look at Forchheimer's equation in the context of water injection and water production in unconfined aquifers. Three different approximate solutions are derived using quasi-steady-state assumptions and the method of matched asymptotic expansion. The resulting approximate solutions are shown to be accurate for a wide range of practical scenarios by comparison with a finite difference solution to the full problem of concern. The approximate solutions have led to an improved understanding of the flow dynamics. They can also be used as verification tools for future numerical models in this context.

  4. High pressure jet injection of viscous solutions for endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD): first clinical experience

    PubMed Central

    Pioche, Mathieu; Lépilliez, Vincent; Déprez, Pierre; Giovannini, Marc; Caillol, Fabrice; Piessevaux, Hubert; Rivory, Jérôme; Guillaud, Olivier; Ciocîrlan, Mihai; Salmon, Damien; Lienhart, Isabelle; Lafon, Cyril; Saurin, Jean-Christophe; Ponchon, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long lasting elevation is a key factor during endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) and can be obtained by water jet injection of saline solution or by viscous macromolecular solutions. In a previous animal study, we assessed the Nestis Enki II system to combine jet injection and viscous solutions. In the present work, we used this combination in humans in different sites of the digestive tract. Methods: We retrospectively report all of the consecutive ESD procedures performed with jet injection of viscous solutions in four centers. Information was collected about the lesion, the procedure, the histological result, and the outcomes for the patient. Results: In total, 45 resections were completed by six operators: five experts and one beginner with only one previous experience in human ESD. Lesions were located in the esophagus (10), the stomach (11), the duodenum (1), the colon (1) and the rectum (22). Average maximal lesion diameter was 4.8 cm (SD 2.4, range 2 – 11 cm), average lesion surface area was 19.8 cm2 (SD 17.7, range 2.2 – 72 cm2), and average duration of procedure was 79.9 min (SD 50.3 min, range 19 – 225 min). ESD could be conducted while the endoscope was retroflexed at its maximum in 26 cases. Four adverse events were observed: two diminutive perforations and two delayed bleeding occurrences treated conservatively. The R0 resection rate was 91.1 %. The catheter was obstructed in six occurrences of bleeding. Conclusion: Endoscopic submucosal dissection using high pressure injection of viscous macromolecular solutions is safe and effective in different parts of the digestive tract. It does not impede working with the endoscope in the maximal retroflexed position. PMID:26356488

  5. Safety and Treatment Effectiveness of a Single Autologous Protein Solution Injection in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    van Drumpt, Rogier A M; van der Weegen, Walter; King, William; Toler, Krista; Macenski, Mitchell M

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative condition characterized by pain and loss of function. A pathological biochemical environment with excess inflammatory and catabolic proteins is a major contributor to OA. nSTRIDE(®) Autologous Protein Solution (APS) is a new therapy under development for the treatment of OA. This therapy is formed from a patient's blood and contains high concentrations of anti-inflammatory and anabolic proteins. This study assessed the safety and treatment effects of APS. Eleven subjects with early to moderate OA were injected with APS. Subjects were closely monitored for adverse events (AE) following the injection. Treatment outcome measures were obtained before injection. AE and clinical outcomes were assessed at 1 and 2 weeks postinjection and 1, 3, and 6 months postinjection. There were no serious AE or AE that were reported by the investigator as greater than mild in severity. There were no AE that were related to the device. There were minor AE related to the injection procedure, including injection site discomfort (1/11), injection site joint pain (1/11), and procedural nausea (1/11), which resolved quickly and did not require treatment. Mean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) composite scores and pain, stiffness, and function subscale scores all showed significant improvement compared to baseline by 2 weeks postinjection. The data presented here suggest that the treatment is safe and show a complication profile that is mild and consistent with similar treatments. A single injection of APS for treatment of early to moderate knee OA led to symptom improvement over the study course. Based on these results, an adequately powered, well-controlled, randomized multicenter study to establish clinical efficacy is warranted. PMID:27668131

  6. Safety and Treatment Effectiveness of a Single Autologous Protein Solution Injection in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    van Drumpt, Rogier A.M.; van der Weegen, Walter; King, William; Toler, Krista; Macenski, Mitchell M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative condition characterized by pain and loss of function. A pathological biochemical environment with excess inflammatory and catabolic proteins is a major contributor to OA. nSTRIDE® Autologous Protein Solution (APS) is a new therapy under development for the treatment of OA. This therapy is formed from a patient's blood and contains high concentrations of anti-inflammatory and anabolic proteins. This study assessed the safety and treatment effects of APS. Eleven subjects with early to moderate OA were injected with APS. Subjects were closely monitored for adverse events (AE) following the injection. Treatment outcome measures were obtained before injection. AE and clinical outcomes were assessed at 1 and 2 weeks postinjection and 1, 3, and 6 months postinjection. There were no serious AE or AE that were reported by the investigator as greater than mild in severity. There were no AE that were related to the device. There were minor AE related to the injection procedure, including injection site discomfort (1/11), injection site joint pain (1/11), and procedural nausea (1/11), which resolved quickly and did not require treatment. Mean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) composite scores and pain, stiffness, and function subscale scores all showed significant improvement compared to baseline by 2 weeks postinjection. The data presented here suggest that the treatment is safe and show a complication profile that is mild and consistent with similar treatments. A single injection of APS for treatment of early to moderate knee OA led to symptom improvement over the study course. Based on these results, an adequately powered, well-controlled, randomized multicenter study to establish clinical efficacy is warranted.

  7. Safety and Treatment Effectiveness of a Single Autologous Protein Solution Injection in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    van Drumpt, Rogier A.M.; van der Weegen, Walter; King, William; Toler, Krista; Macenski, Mitchell M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative condition characterized by pain and loss of function. A pathological biochemical environment with excess inflammatory and catabolic proteins is a major contributor to OA. nSTRIDE® Autologous Protein Solution (APS) is a new therapy under development for the treatment of OA. This therapy is formed from a patient's blood and contains high concentrations of anti-inflammatory and anabolic proteins. This study assessed the safety and treatment effects of APS. Eleven subjects with early to moderate OA were injected with APS. Subjects were closely monitored for adverse events (AE) following the injection. Treatment outcome measures were obtained before injection. AE and clinical outcomes were assessed at 1 and 2 weeks postinjection and 1, 3, and 6 months postinjection. There were no serious AE or AE that were reported by the investigator as greater than mild in severity. There were no AE that were related to the device. There were minor AE related to the injection procedure, including injection site discomfort (1/11), injection site joint pain (1/11), and procedural nausea (1/11), which resolved quickly and did not require treatment. Mean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) composite scores and pain, stiffness, and function subscale scores all showed significant improvement compared to baseline by 2 weeks postinjection. The data presented here suggest that the treatment is safe and show a complication profile that is mild and consistent with similar treatments. A single injection of APS for treatment of early to moderate knee OA led to symptom improvement over the study course. Based on these results, an adequately powered, well-controlled, randomized multicenter study to establish clinical efficacy is warranted. PMID:27668131

  8. Periodontal ligament injection in the dog primary dentition: spread of local anaesthetic solution.

    PubMed

    Tagger, E; Tagger, M; Sarnat, H; Mass, E

    1994-09-01

    The spread of local anaesthetic solution administered with a pressure syringe has not been studied as extensively in young animals having primary or mixed dentitions as in adult animals. The purpose of this investigation was to study the distribution of local anaesthetic solution injected into the periodontal ligament of young dogs. India ink was added to carpules containing 2% lidocaine and 1:100,000 epinephrine, and the spread of solution was examined macroscopically and microscopically. Injections were made with a pressure syringe (Ligmaject) at 58 sites mesial and distal to primary teeth in five dogs aged 3-9 months. Three dogs were killed within 12 hours, the other two after 5 days. Spread of the ink was studied in non-decalcified slabs, in three-dimensional cleared specimens, and in histological sections. The solution usually reached the alveolar bone crest, seeped under the periosteum and alongside vascular channels into bone marrow, reaching natural cavities such as the crypts of tooth buds and the mandibular canal. The ink did not penetrate into the enamel organ or contact the permanent tooth buds. The solution appeared to spread along the path of least resistance, governed by the intricacies of anatomical structures and fascial planes. Therefore the risk of mechanical damage to permanent tooth germs appears to be minimal. PMID:7811670

  9. Rheological characterization and injection forces of concentrated protein formulations: an alternative predictive model for non-Newtonian solutions.

    PubMed

    Allmendinger, Andrea; Fischer, Stefan; Huwyler, Joerg; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Schwarb, Edward; Zarraga, Isidro E; Mueller, Robert

    2014-07-01

    Development of injection devices for subcutaneous drug administration requires a detailed understanding of user capability and forces occurring during the drug administration process. Injection forces of concentrated protein therapeutics are influenced by syringe properties (e.g., needle diameter) and injection speed, and are driven by solution properties such as rheology. In the present study, it is demonstrated that concentrated protein therapeutics may show significantly reduced injection forces because of shear-thinning (non-Newtonian) behavior. A mathematical model was thus established to predict/correlate injection forces of Newtonian and non-Newtonian solutions with viscosity data from plate/cone rheometry. The model was verified experimentally by glide-force measurements of reference and surrogate solutions. Application of the suggested model was demonstrated for injection force measurements of concentrated protein solutions to determine viscosity data at high shear rates (3 × 10(4)-1.6 × 10(5)s(-1)). By combining these data with viscosity data obtained by different viscosity methods (plate/cone and capillary rheometry), a viscosity-shear rate profile of the protein solution between 10(2) and 1.6 × 10(5)s(-1) was obtained, which was mathematically described by the Carreau model. Characterization of rheological properties allows to accurately predict injection forces for different syringe-needle combinations as well as injection rates, thus supporting the development of injection devices for combination products.

  10. Reacting viscous-shock-layer solutions with multicomponent diffusion and mass injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, J. N.

    1974-01-01

    Numerical solutions of the viscous-shock-layer equation where the chemistry is treated as being either frozen, equilibrium, or nonequilibrium are presented. Also the effects of the diffusion model, surface catalysis, and mass injection on surface transport and flow parameters are considered. The flow is treated as a mixture of five inert and thermally perfect species. The viscous-shock-layer equations are solved by using an implicit-difference scheme. All calculations are for hyperboloids with included angles of 20 and 45. The flight conditions are those for various altitudes and velocities in the earth's atmosphere. Data are presented to show the effects of the chemical models; diffusion models; surface catalysis; and mass injection of air on heat transfer; skin friction; shock standoff distance; wall pressure distribution; and tangential velocity, temperature, and species profiles. The results show that an equilibrium analysis can substantially overpredict the heat-transfer rates for flow conditions experienced by earth-orbital entry vehicles. Moreover, at such conditions surface catalysis significantly influences heat-transfer and flow-field properties. If a binary rather than a multicomponent diffusion model is assumed, negligible errors in most flow properties result. Quantitative results are presented that show the effect of mass injection on flow properties within and downstream of the injection region.

  11. On the existence of solutions of an equation arising in the theory of laminar flow in a uniformly porous channel with injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Ke-Gang

    1987-01-01

    The existence of concave solutions of Berman's equation which describes the laminar flow in channels with injection through porous walls is established. It was found that the (unique) concave solutions exist for all injection Reynolds numbers R less than 0.

  12. The stability of citrate-capped silver nanoparticles in isotonic glucose solution for intravenous injection.

    PubMed

    Park, Kwangsik; Lee, Yeonjin

    2013-01-01

    Citrate-capped silver nanoparticles (AgNP) are widely used in industry, consumer products, and medical appliances. However, information on the environmental toxicity and human health is not comprehensive. Further, the physicochemical properties of AgNP make it difficult to test toxicity, as nanosized particles, due to their size, may increase by aggregation or agglomeration in some administration vehicles. In this study, stability of AgNP was investigated in different types of isotonic solutions, which is important for in vitro testing or toxicokinetic studies using intravenous (iv) injection. Size, morphology, zeta potential, and ion formation were investigated in isotonic solutions for the physicochemical characterization of AgNP. Aggregation and precipitation of AgNP were observed in phosphate-buffered saline or 0.9% NaCl, while AgNP were stable without aggregation or precipitation in 5% glucose in isotonic solution. The average size of AgNP in 5% glucose was approximately 10 nm at different temperatures of 10, 25, or 36°C and at varying concentrations from 10 to 1000 ppm. It is noteworthy that this is almost the same size distribution as that in the water-based suspension of AgNP supplied by the manufacturer. Zeta potential ranged from -40 to -60 mV, suggesting that the repulsion forces of AgNP are not disturbed to a sufficient degree to aggregate while osmolarity is in the isotonic range of 290 ± 10 mOsm/kg in 5% glucose solution. Data suggest that AgNP in a 5% glucose solution may be used in the toxicity test via iv injection without adverse consequences in blood. PMID:24283395

  13. A novel retrofit solution for oily cuttings slurrying and re-injection on the Ula platform

    SciTech Connect

    Minton, R.C.

    1996-12-31

    Within the North Sea area there are many platforms nearing the end of their initial drilling phase but with the likelihood of significant, if infrequent, side-tracking operations in the future. For a number of these, oil based drilling fluids still offer a cost effective solution, particularly where tortuous trajectories are proposed. The Ula platform is a case in point, but, as with all operations in the Norwegian sector, unprocessed oily cuttings can not be discharged. Cuttings slurrying and re-injection resolves this problem and has been successfully used by BP Norway on the Gyda platform for the last 5 years. The challenge, therefore, was to design a slurrying system for the Ula platform, recognizing both the space limitations and the cost constraints. This paper reports on the novel solution adopted, the costs involved and the subsequent performance of the installation.

  14. The effect of intravitreal injection of vehicle solutions on form deprivation myopia in tree shrews.

    PubMed

    Ward, Alexander H; Siegwart, John T; Frost, Michael R; Norton, Thomas T

    2016-04-01

    lntravitreal injection of substances dissolved in a vehicle solution is a common tool used to assess retinal function. We examined the effect of injection procedures (three groups) and vehicle solutions (four groups) on the development of form deprivation myopia (FDM) in juvenile tree shrews, mammals closely related to primates, starting at 24 days of visual experience (about 45 days of age). In seven groups (n = 7 per group), the myopia produced by monocular form deprivation (FD) was measured daily for 12 days during an 11-day treatment period. The FD eye was randomly selected; the contralateral eye served as an untreated control. The refractive state of both eyes was measured daily, starting just before FD began (day 1); axial component dimensions were measured on day 1 and after eleven days of treatment (day 12). Procedure groups: the myopia (treated eye - control eye refraction) in the FD group was the reference. The sham group only underwent brief daily anesthesia and opening of the conjunctiva to expose the sclera. The puncture group, in addition, had a pipette inserted daily into the vitreous. In four vehicle groups, 5 μL of vehicle was injected daily. The NaCl group received 0.85% NaCl. In the NaCl + ascorbic acid group, 1 mg/mL of ascorbic acid was added. The water group received sterile water. The water + ascorbic acid group received water with ascorbic acid (1 mg/mL). We found that the procedures associated with intravitreal injections (anesthesia, opening of the conjunctiva, and puncture of the sclera) did not significantly affect the development of FDM. However, injecting 5 μL of any of the four vehicle solutions slowed the development of FDM. NaCl had a small effect; myopia development in the last 6 days (-0.15 ± 0.08 D/day) was significantly less than in the FD group (-0.55 ± 0.06 D/day). NaCl + Ascorbic acid further slowed the development of FDM on several treatment days. H2O (-0.09 ± 0.05 D/day) and H2O + ascorbic acid

  15. Laparoscopic Management of Abdominal Pregnancy with Local Injection of Vasopressin Solution: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hishikawa, Kenji; Fukuda, Takanori; Inoue, Hiromi; Kohata, Yutaka; Monma, Mika; Ochiai, Naomi; Kubo, Yuina; Watanabe, Remi; Ako, Shiho; Aihara, Yuri; Kusaka, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 32 Final Diagnosis: Abdominal pregnancy Symptoms: Severe abdominal pain Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Laparoscopic treatment Specialty: Obstetrics and Gynecology Objective: Unusual or unexpected effect of treatment Background: Laparoscopic treatments of abdominal pregnancy have been reported; however, resection of an implanted gestational sac could lead to massive bleeding and treatment failure. Hemostasis of the resected stump is critical for the success of laparoscopic treatment. Case Report: A 32-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with severe abdominal pain. We suspected a ruptured ectopic pregnancy and performed urgent diagnostic laparoscopy. The gestational sac was implanted in the posterior wall of the uterus near the left uterosacral ligament, and bleeding from the gestational sac was noticed. We injected 3 ml of diluted vasopressin solution (0.4 U/ml) directly into the gestational sac and into the posterior uterine wall around the gestational sac. Thereafter, we could resect the gestational product using an ultrasonically activated scalpel. Additional hemostasis in the resected stump was not required. Conclusions: We believe that a local injection of a diluted vasopressin solution helps in maintaining the hemostasis after the laparoscopic resection of the implanted gestational sac in cases of abdominal pregnancy. PMID:27587187

  16. Laparoscopic Management of Abdominal Pregnancy with Local Injection of Vasopressin Solution: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hishikawa, Kenji; Fukuda, Takanori; Inoue, Hiromi; Kohata, Yutaka; Monma, Mika; Ochiai, Naomi; Kubo, Yuina; Watanabe, Remi; Ako, Shiho; Aihara, Yuri; Kusaka, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Laparoscopic treatments of abdominal pregnancy have been reported; however, resection of an implanted gestational sac could lead to massive bleeding and treatment failure. Hemostasis of the resected stump is critical for the success of laparoscopic treatment. CASE REPORT A 32-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with severe abdominal pain. We suspected a ruptured ectopic pregnancy and performed urgent diagnostic laparoscopy. The gestational sac was implanted in the posterior wall of the uterus near the left uterosacral ligament, and bleeding from the gestational sac was noticed. We injected 3 ml of diluted vasopressin solution (0.4 U/ml) directly into the gestational sac and into the posterior uterine wall around the gestational sac. Thereafter, we could resect the gestational product using an ultrasonically activated scalpel. Additional hemostasis in the resected stump was not required. CONCLUSIONS We believe that a local injection of a diluted vasopressin solution helps in maintaining the hemostasis after the laparoscopic resection of the implanted gestational sac in cases of abdominal pregnancy. PMID:27587187

  17. Irreversible and reversible reactive chromatography: analytical solutions and moment analysis for rectangular pulse injections.

    PubMed

    Bibi, Sameena; Qamar, Shamsul; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas

    2015-03-13

    This work is concerned with the analysis of models for linear reactive chromatography describing irreversible A→B and reversible A↔B reactions. In contrast to previously published results rectangular reactant pulses are injected into initially empty or pre-equilibrated columns assuming both Dirichlet and Danckwerts boundary conditions. The models consist of two partial differential equations, accounting for convection, longitudinal dispersion and first order chemical reactions. Due to the effect of involved mechanisms on solute transport, analytical and numerical solutions of the models could be helpful to understand, design and optimize chromatographic reactors. The Laplace transformation is applied to solve the model equations analytically for linear adsorption isotherms. Statistical temporal moments are derived from solutions in the Laplace domain. Analytical results are compared with numerical predictions generated using a high-resolution finite volume scheme for two sets of boundary conditions. Several case studies are carried out to analyze reactive liquid chromatographic processes for a wide range of mass transfer and reaction kinetics. Good agreements in the results validate the correctness of the analytical solutions and accuracy of the proposed numerical algorithm.

  18. Dispersal of radioisotope labelled solution following deep dermal injection in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Oliver, D W; Balan, K K; Burrows, N P; Hall, P N

    2000-06-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is the commonest inherited disorder of connective tissue, affecting around 10 000 patients in the UK. Patients with EDS have reported that local anaesthetic is often ineffective. Patients with less severe skin laxity often have the most problems. We have postulated that this resistance to local anaesthetics is not due to the lax connective tissues as is often assumed. This study used radioactively labelled solution ((99m)Tc-pertechnetate) administered as a deep dermal injection in the forearm. The rate of dispersal of isotope was measured over 60 min and found to be identical between six patients with EDS and three controls. The effects of local anaesthetics are complex and depend on the individual chemical properties of the agent and a number of tissue factors. This study would suggest that the lack of effectiveness of local anaesthetic solutions is not due to rapid dispersal of solution. It is unlikely therefore that its lack of effect can be compensated for by simply increasing the amount used. The diagnosis of EDS should be considered in any patient who complains unexpectedly of pain during their procedure, particularly when the surgeon knows that an adequate volume of local anaesthetic has been used.

  19. Morphine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Morphine injection is used to relieve moderate to severe pain. Morphine is in a class of medications called opiate ( ... Morphine injection comes as a solution (liquid) to inject intramuscularly (into a muscle) or intravenously (into a ...

  20. Investigation of oil recovery improvement by coupling an interfacial tension agent and a mobility control agent in light oil reservoirs. Technical progress report, April--June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, M.J.; Casteel, J.

    1994-09-01

    The study will investigate two major areas concerning co-injecting an interfacial tension reduction agent(s) and a mobility control agent into petroleum reservoirs. The first will consist of defining the mechanisms of interaction of an alkaline agent, a surfactant, and a polymer on a fluid-fluid and a fluid-rock basis. The second is the improvement of the economics of the combined technology. This report examines the changes in the relative permeability characteristics with addition of alkali, surfactant, and polymer to the injected solution, the effect of matrix type on relative permeability characteristics with alkali-surfactant-polymer and the effect of different polymer concentrations on oil recovery by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution.

  1. Single-Channel Flow Injection Spectrophotometric Determination of Nickel Using Furildioxime in Micellar Solution

    PubMed Central

    Memon, Najma; Memon, Saima; Solangi, Amber R.; Soomro, Rubina; Soomro, Rabel

    2012-01-01

    A very simple, selective, and fast flow injection spectrophotometeric method is developed for determination of nickel using furildioxime as complexing agent. Micellar solution of brij-35 is employed to solubilize the sparingly soluble complex of Ni-furildioxime in buffered aqueous system (pH-9.00). Under optimized conditions, absorbance is linear from 0.02 to 10 μg mL−1 using 500 μL sample volume and from 10 to 30 μg mL−1 using 50 μL sample volume of nickel at 480 nm, with R2 = 0.9971 and 0.9916, respectively. The molar absorption coefficient and Sandell's sensitivity were 6.0 × 103 L mol−1 cm−1 and 0.01 ng cm−2, respectively. The sample throughput of the method is 120 samples per hour with RSD of 0.01–0.2% for 0.02 to 10 μg mL−1 nickel (n = 5), indicating that the method is highly precise and reproducible. Interference from cobalt is removed by Nitroso R-salt-modified XAD-16. The developed method is validated by analysing certified reference materials and is applied to assess nickel content of commercially available cigarettes. PMID:22654605

  2. Solution-Processable Transparent Conductive Hole Injection Electrode for OLED SSL

    SciTech Connect

    Pschenitzka, Florian; Mathai, Mathew; Torke, Terri

    2012-07-15

    An interconnected network of silver nanowires has been used as transparent anode in OLED devices. This layer was deposited by spin-coating and slot-die coating from an aqueous nanowire suspension. The sheet resistance of the film was 10ohms/sq with a transmission (including the glass substrate) of higher than 85%. The first phase of the project focused on the implementation of this nanowire layer with a hole-injection-layer (HIL) which has been developed at Plextronics and has been shown to provide good stability and efficiency in conventional OLED devices. We modified the HIL solution such that it coated reasonably well with suitable surface morphology so that actual devices can be manufactured. During the second phase we investigated the hole-injection and stability of hole-onlydevices. We determined that the use of the nanowire network as anode does not introduce an additional degradation mechanism since the observed device characteristics did not differ from those made with ITO anode. We then proceeded to make actual OLED devices with this nanowire / HIL stack and achieved device characteristics similar state-of-the-art OLED devices with a single junction. In order to gain traction with potential OLED manufacturers, we decided to contract Novaled to prepare large-area demonstrators for us. For these devices, we used an allevaporated stack, i.e. we did use Novaled's HIL material instead of Plextronics. We successfully fabricated demonstrators with an area of 25cm2 with a double or triple junction stack. Minor stack optimizations were necessary to achieve efficacies and lifetime equivalent with ITO devices made with the same devices stack. Due to the reduced microcavity effect, the color of the emitted light is significantly more stable with respect to the viewing angle compared to ITO devices. This fact in conjunction with the promise of lower production cost due to the elimination of the ITO sputtering process and the direct patterning of the anode layer are

  3. Helium Bubble Injection Solution To The Cavitation Damage At The Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, M. W.; Ruggles, A. E.

    2009-03-10

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is one of the largest science projects in the United States, with total cost near 1.4 Billion Dollars. The limiting factor of the facility had always been assumed to be the lifetime of the target window due to radiation damage. After further investigation, the lifetime of the target was determined not to be limited by radiation damage but by cavitation damage. The cavitation damage derives from pressure waves caused by the beam energy deposition. Vapor bubbles form when low to negative pressures occur in the mercury near the stainless steel target window due to wave interaction with the structure. Collapse of these bubbles can focus wave energy in small liquid jets that erode the window surface. Compressibility of the mercury can be enhanced to reduce the amplitude of the pressure wave caused by the beam energy deposition. To enhance compressibility, small (10 to 30 micron diameter) gas bubbles could be injected into the bulk of the mercury. Solubility and diffusivity parameters of inert gas in mercury are required for a complete mechanical simulation and engineering of these strategies. Using current theoretical models, one obtains a theoretical Henry coefficient of helium in mercury on the order of 3.9E15 Pa-molHg/molHe at 300 K. This low solubility was confirmed by a direct, offline experimental method. Mercury was charged with helium and any pressure change was recorded. Any pressure change was attributed to gas going into solution. Therefore, with the sensitivity of the experiment, a lower limit of 9E12 Pa-molHg/molHe was placed on the mercury-helium system. These values guarantee a stable bubble lifetime needed within the SNS mercury target to mitigate cavitation issues.

  4. Visualization of diffusion of the drug solution during aluminum potassium tannic acid injection therapy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yutaka; Miwa, Mitsuharu

    2013-06-01

    Sclerotherapy with aluminum potassium tannic acid (ALTA), which was approved in Japan for the treatment of internal hemorrhoids in July 2004 (Takano et al., Int J Colorectal Dis 21:44-51, 2006), has been widely accepted because of its effectiveness and low invasiveness. More than 200,000 patients have received ALTA injection therapy. ALTA is injected directly into 4 points of an internal hemorrhoid (4-step injection) to induce sclerosis and remission of the hemorrhoids, and consequently, resolution of symptoms such as prolapse and bleeding. The precision of the 4-step injection is considered to be a crucial determinant of the success of this therapy and the risk of complications. However, sufficient evidence has not yet been obtained concerning the diffusion and distribution of the injected drug. A pilot study visualized the real-time diffusion/distribution of the drug solution following the 4-step injection, using the ICG (indocyanine green) fluorescence technique, and an infrared camera (Photodynamic EYE; PDE, Hamamatsu Photonics K.K.).

  5. The Clinical Effectiveness of Intralesional Injection of 2% Zinc Sulfate Solution in the Treatment of Common Warts

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Essam-elden Mohamed; Tawfik, Khaled Mohamed; Mahmoud, Asmaa Moneir

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the clinical efficacy and safety of intralesional injection of 2% zinc sulfate solution in the treatment of common warts. Patients and Methods. One hundred and twenty patients (78 females and 42 males) aged 5–55 years with 225 common warts participated in this prospective monocentric randomized study. All lesions were treated with intralesional injection of 2% zinc sulfate. Results. From 225 warts injected, 135 warts (60%) cured from the first session, 51 warts (22.67%) cured from the second session, and 12 warts (5.33%) cured from the third session. There is no significant relation between improvement and patient's ages, duration, or number of warts (P > 0.05). All patients complained from pain during injection, and all treated lesions showed redness, tenderness, and swelling in the first 3 days after injection. Late complications were postinflammatory hyperpigmentation in 90 patients (75%), scaring in 9 patients (7.5%), and ulceration in 3 patients (2.5%). Recurrence occurred in 3 lesions (1.33%). Conclusion. The clinical data indicate that intralesional injection of 2% zinc sulfate is an effective maneuver in the treatment of common warts; however, its associated complications limit its use. PMID:27123361

  6. Laminar and turbulent flow solutions with radiation and ablation injection for Jovian entry. [radiative heating rates for the Galileo probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, A.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1980-01-01

    Laminar and turbulent flow-field solutions with coupled carbon-phenolic mass injection are presented for the forebody of a probe entering a nominal Jupiter atmosphere. Solutions are obtained for a 35-degree hyperboloid and for a 45-degree spherically blunted cone using a time-dependent, finite-difference method. The radiative heating rates for the coupled laminar flow are significantly reduced as compared to the corresponding no-blowing case; however, for the coupled turbulent flow, it is found that the surface radiative heating rates are substantially increased and often exceed the corresponding no-blowing values. Turbulence is found to have no effect on the surface radiative heating rates for the no-blowing solutions. The present results are compared with the other available solutions, and some additional solutions are presented.

  7. Insights into Cold Water Injection Stimulation Effects through Analytical Solutions to Flow and Heat Transport

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Plummer

    2013-09-01

    Wells in traditional hydrothermal reservoirs are used to extract heat and to dispose of cooled water. In the first case, high productivity (the ratio of production flow rate to the pressure differential required to produce that rate) to is preferred in order to maximize power generation, while minimizing the parasitic energy loss of pumping. In the second case, high injectivity (the ratio of injection flow rate to the pressure differential required to produce that rate) is preferred, in order to reduce pumping costs. In order to improve productivity or injectivity, cold water is sometimes injected into the reservoir in an attempt to cool and contract the surrounding rock matrix and thereby induce dilation and/or extension of existing fractures or to generate new fractures. Though the increases in permeability associated with these changes are likely localized, by improving connectivity to more extensive high-permeability fractures they can at least temporarily provide substantially improved productivity or injectivity.

  8. The Role of an Impurity in Ceftriaxone Sodium Preparation for Injection in Determining Compatibility with Calcium-Containing Solutions.

    PubMed

    Tange, Mio; Yoshida, Miyako; Nakai, Yuka; Uchida, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Ceftriaxone sodium preparation for injection is known to form insoluble microparticles with calcium. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of an impurity in the ceftriaxone sodium preparation on this incompatibility. Firstly, using HPLC, two impurities were identified in the ceftriaxone sodium solution. The major impurity (impurity 1) was identified as tetrahydro-2-methyl-3-thioxo-1,2,4-triazine-5,6-dione by LC/MS. Secondly, the role played by this impurity in the incompatibility with calcium was examined. Using seven different ceftriaxone preparations for injection, the effect of adding impurity 1 to mixed solutions of ceftriaxone sodium and calcium chloride on the appearance of insoluble microparticles, was examined using a light obscuration particle counter. Although incompatibility was not completely suppressed by the addition of impurity 1, the number of insoluble microparticles formed with calcium chloride solution was decreased in proportion to the concentration of impurity 1, and the concentration of calcium ion decreased as the concentration of added impurity 1 increased. These results show that impurity 1 plays a concentration-dependent role in incompatibility between ceftriaxone sodium preparation for injection and calcium-containing solutions. PMID:26936047

  9. Displacement and sweep efficiencies in a DNAPL recovery test using micellar and polymer solutions injected in a five-spot pattern.

    PubMed

    Martel, Richard; Hébert, Alain; Lefebvre, René; Gélinas, Pierre; Gabriel, Uta

    2004-11-01

    Soil washing with micellar solutions is a promising alternative for the remediation of DNAPL source zones. As with any flushing technology, the success of soil washing with micellar solutions depends in a very large part on the ability of the solution to contact the contaminant (sweep efficiency) and then on the efficiency of contaminant removal once this contact is made (displacement efficiency). We report here on a field test where a micellar solution was used to recover a DNAPL in an open five-spot pattern in which polymer solutions were also injected before and after the washing solution to improve sweep efficiency. The washing solution formulation was optimised in the laboratory prior to the test to obtain good dissolution capacity. For a high-concentration and low-volume soil flushing remediation test such as the one performed (0.8 pore volumes of actual washing solution injected), slug sizing of the washing solution is critical. It was evaluated by an analytical solution. In a five-spot pattern, the displacement efficiency of the washing solution was observed to vary in the porous medium as a function of the radial distance from the injection well because: (1) the volume of the washing solution flowing through a section of the test cell changes (maximum close to the injection well and minimal at the pumping wells); (2) the in situ velocity changes (maximum at the wells and minimum between the wells) and; (3) the contact time of the washing solution with the NAPL changes as a function of the distance from the injection well. The relative importance of the recovery mechanisms, mobilisation and dissolution, was also observed to vary in the test cell. The reduced velocity increased the contact time of the washing solution with the DNAPL enhancing its dissolution, but the decrease of the capillary number caused less mobilisation. The washing process is much more extensive around the injection well. The use of an injection-pumping pattern allowing a complete sweep

  10. Numerical Solution for the Effect of Suction or Injection on Flow of Nanofluids Past a Stretching Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd Elazem, Nader Y.

    2016-06-01

    The flow of nanofluids past a stretching sheet has attracted much attention owing to its wide applications in industry and engineering. Numerical solution has been discussed in this article for studying the effect of suction (or injection) on flow of nanofluids past a stretching sheet. The numerical results carried out using Chebyshev collocation method (ChCM). Useful results for temperature profile, concentration profile, reduced Nusselt number, and reduced Sherwood number are discussed in tabular and graphical forms. It was also demonstrated that both temperature and concentration profiles decrease by an increase from injection to suction. Moreover, the numerical results show that the temperature profiles decrease at high values of Prandtl number Pr. Finally, the present results showed that the reduced Nusselt number is a decreasing function, whereas the reduced Sherwood number is an increasing function at fixed values of Prandtl number Pr, Lewis number Le and suction (or injection) parameter s for variation of Brownian motion parameter Nb, and thermophoresis parameter Nt.

  11. Diphenhydramine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... the nervous system that causes difficulties with movement, muscle control, and balance). Diphenhydramine injection should not be ... solution (liquid) to be injected intramuscularly (into a muscle) or intravenously (into a vein). Your dosing schedule ...

  12. Effects of injecting calcium-buffer solution on [Ca2+]i in voltage-clamped snail neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, H J; Thomas, R C

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated why fura-2 and Ca(2+)-sensitive microelectrodes report different values for the intracellular free calcium ion concentration ([Ca(2+)]i or its negative log, pCa(i)) of snail neurons voltage-clamped to -50 or -60 mV. Both techniques were initially calibrated in vitro, using calcium calibration solutions that had ionic concentrations similar to those of snail neuron cytoplasm. Pressure injections of the same solutions at resting and elevated [Ca(2+)]i were used to calibrate both methods in vivo. In fura-2-loaded cells these pressure injections generated changes in [Ca(2+)]i that agreed well with those expected from the in vitro calibration. Thus, using fura-2 calibrated in vitro, the average resting [Ca(2+)]i was found to be 38 nM (pCa(i) 7.42 +/- 0.05). With Ca(2+)-sensitive microelectrodes, the first injection of calibration solutions always caused a negative shift in the recorded microelectrode potential, as if the injection lowered [Ca2+]i. No such effects were seen on the fura-2 ratio. When calibrated in vivo the Ca(2+)-sensitive microelectrode gave an average resting [Ca2+]i of approximately 25 nM (pCa(i) 7.6 +/- 0.1), much lower than when calibrated in vitro. We conclude that [Ca(2+)]i in snail neurons is approximately 40 nM and that Ca(2+)-sensitive microelectrodes usually cause a leak at the point of insertion. The effects of the leak were minimized by injection of a mobile calcium buffer. PMID:9172736

  13. Reactivity of Hontomín carbonate rocks to acidic solution injection: reactive "push-pull" tracer tests results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gaspari, Francesca; Cabeza, Yoar; Luquot, Linda; Rötting, Tobias; Saaltink, Maarten W.; Carrera, Jesus

    2014-05-01

    Several field tests will be carried out in order to characterize the reservoir for CO2 injection in Hontomín (Burgos, Spain) as part of the Compostilla project of "Fundación Ciudad de la Energía" (CIUDEN). Once injected, the dissolution of the CO2 in the resident brine will increase the acidity of the water and lead to the dissolution of the rocks, constituted mainly by carbonates. This mechanism will cause changes in the aquifer properties such as porosity and permeability. To reproduce the effect of the CO2 injection, a reactive solution with 2% of acetic acid is going to be injected in the reservoir and extracted from the same well (reactive "push-pull" tracer tests) to identify and quantify the geochemical reactions occurring into the aquifer. The reactivity of the rock will allow us also to evaluate the changes of its properties. Previously, theoretical calculations of Damkhöler numbers were done to determine the acid concentrations and injection flow rates needed to generate ramified-wormholes patterns, during theses "push-pull" experiments. The aim of this work is to present the results and a preliminary interpretation of the field tests.

  14. Performance of Needle-Free Injection of Organic Fiber Solutions for Tissue Elevation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Muh-Rong; Chen, Min; Hu, Chih-Yuan

    This paper investigates the characteristics of endoscopic needle-free injection and the performance of tissue elevation by an endoscopic needle-free injection system. We choose the stomach of six-months-old pig as the test material, with HPMC and MC as the working fluid. The parameters include the mass flow rate, average power of injection, and the height of tissue elevation, and the evolution of tissue elevation. According to the experiment data, the performance of HPMC is much better than MC, because of the difference of their molecular structure. Longer duration of tissue elevation of the submucosal layer is maintained under the pressure of 90bar and the concentration of HPMC at 0.5%. The tissue elevation is 10.6mm suitable for medical surgery with the higher injection pressure under the same concentration of the working fluid because of the increased injection power. Analysis on the evolution of tissue elevation found that duration time is more than 60 minute under higher concentration of HPMC. The duration of tissue elevation is longer for higher concentration of the working fluid because the higher viscosity under high concentration would result in the elongation of the elevation time. A clear separation of the mucosal layer from the muscle layer is achieved by injecting HPMC in the samples with formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded sections stained with H&E. Results of the experiments would provide the data base for endoscopic surgery in order to assure a successful operation.

  15. Dynamic Solution Injection: a new method for preparing pptv-ppbv standard atmospheres of volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardine, K. J.; Henderson, W. M.; Huxman, T. E.; Abrell, L.; Shartsis, T.

    2010-07-01

    Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) and thermal desorption Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) allow for absolute quantification of a wide range of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with concentrations in the ppbv to pptv range. Although often neglected, routine calibration is necessary for accurate quantification of VOCs by PTR-MS and GC-MS. Several gas calibration methods currently exist, including compressed gas cylinders, permeation tubes, diffusion tubes, and liquid injection. While each method has its advantages and limitations, no single technique has emerged that is capable of dynamically generating accurate concentrations of complex mixtures of VOCs over a large concentration range (ppbv to pptv), is technically simple and field portable, and affordable. We present the development of a new VOC calibration technique based on liquid injection with these features termed Dynamic Solution Injection (DSI). This method consists of injecting VOCs (0.1-0.5 mM) dissolved in cyclohexane (PTR-MS) or methanol (GC-MS) into a 1.0 slpm flow of purified dilution gas in an unheated 25 mL glass vial. Upon changes in the injection flow rate (0.5-4.0 μL min-1), new VOC concentrations are reached within seconds to minutes, depending on the compound, with a liquid injection flow rate accuracy and precision of better than 7% and 4%, respectively. We demonstrate the utility of the DSI technique by calibrating a PTR-MS to seven different cyclohexane solutions containing a total of 34 different biogenic compounds including volatile isoprenoids, oxygenated VOCs, fatty acid oxidation products, aromatics, and dimethyl sulfide. In order to validate the new DSI method, a GC-MS and PTR-MS calibration intercomparison with VOC standards generated by dynamic dilution of NIST traceable permeation tubes (α-pinene, acetone, and ethanol) and a compressed gas cylinder (acetaldehyde) was made. The results revealed that while calibration of acetone is

  16. Viscous-shock-layer solutions with coupled radiation and ablation injection for earth entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Roop N.; Lee, Kam-Pui; Moos, James N.; Sutton, Kenneth

    1990-01-01

    Results are obtained for the forebody of a planetary exploration vehicle entering the earth's atmosphere. A viscous-shock-layer analysis is used assuming the flow to be laminar and in chemical equilibrium. Presented results include coupled radiation and ablation injection. This study further includes the effect of different transport and thermodynamic properties and radiation models. A Lewis number of 1.4 appears adequate for the radiation-dominated flows. Five velocities corresponding to different possible trajectory points at an altitude of 70 km have been further analyzed in detail. Sublimation and radiative equilibrium wall temperatures are employed for cases with and without coupled injection, respectively. For the cases analyzed here, the mass injection rates are small. However, the rates could become large if a lower altitude is used for aerobraking and/or the body size is increased. A comparison of the equilibrium results with finite-rate chemistry calculation shows the flowfield to be in chemical equilibrium.

  17. Spectrophotometric determination of trace aluminium content in parenteral solutions by combined cloud point preconcentration-flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Sombra, L; Luconi, M; Silva, M F; Olsina, R A; Fernandez, L

    2001-07-01

    A cloud point preconcentration and flow injection (FI) analysis methodology for aluminium(III) determination has been developed. The analyte in the initial aqueous solution was complexed with Chrome Azurol S (CAS) in the presence of the cationic surfactant benzyldimethyltetradecylammonium chloride (BDTAC). The absorption spectroscopic characteristics of the ternary complex [Al(III)-CAS-BDTAC] were examined in detail. The preconcentration step was carried out by means of the non-ionic surfactant polyethylene glycol p-nonylphenyl ether (PONPE 7.5). The enriched analyte solution was injected into an FI system using an HPLC pump. The chemical variables affecting the analytical performance of the combined methodology were studied and optimised. The developed approach was successfully applied to the determination of trace amounts of aluminium in parenteral solutions without previous treatment. Under the optimum experimental conditions, 99.9% extraction was achieved for a preconcentration factor of 50. The limit of detection was 1.12 x 10(-7) mol(-1). The calibration plot was linear over at least two orders of magnitude of aluminium concentration. The developed coupled methodology, which thoroughly satisfies the typical requirements for pharmaceutical control processes, is appropriate for monitoring the aluminium concentration in parenteral nutrition.

  18. A graphene solution to conductivity mismatch: spin injection from ferromagnetic metal/graphene tunnel contacts into silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van't Erve, Olaf

    2014-03-01

    New paradigms for spin-based devices, such as spin-FETs and reconfigurable logic, have been proposed and modeled. These devices rely on electron spin being injected, transported, manipulated and detected in a semiconductor channel. This work is the first demonstration on how a single layer of graphene can be used as a low resistance tunnel barrier solution for electrical spin injection into Silicon at room temperature. We will show that a FM metal / monolayer graphene contact serves as a spin-polarized tunnel barrier which successfully circumvents the classic metal / semiconductor conductivity mismatch issue for electrical spin injection. We demonstrate electrical injection and detection of spin accumulation in Si above room temperature, and show that the corresponding spin lifetimes correlate with the Si carrier concentration, confirming that the spin accumulation measured occurs in the Si and not in interface trap states. An ideal tunnel barrier should exhibit several key material characteristics: a uniform and planar habit with well-controlled thickness, minimal defect / trapped charge density, a low resistance-area product for minimal power consumption, and compatibility with both the FM metal and semiconductor, insuring minimal diffusion to/from the surrounding materials at temperatures required for device processing. Graphene, offers all of the above, while preserving spin injection properties, making it a compelling solution to the conductivity mismatch for spin injection into Si. Although Graphene is very conductive in plane, it exhibits poor conductivity perpendicular to the plane. Its sp2 bonding results in a highly uniform, defect free layer, which is chemically inert, thermally robust, and essentially impervious to diffusion. The use of a single monolayer of graphene at the Si interface provides a much lower RA product than any film of an oxide thick enough to prevent pinholes (1 nm). Our results identify a new route to low resistance-area product spin

  19. Efficiency of assisted oocyte activation as a solution for failed intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

    PubMed

    Heindryckx, Björn; De Gheselle, Stefanie; Gerris, Jan; Dhont, Marc; De Sutter, Petra

    2008-11-01

    Failed fertilization after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) can occur due to an oocyte activation defect. In these cases assisted oocyte activation (AOA) may help but efficiency is still unknown. Prior to AOA, the mouse oocyte activation test (MOAT) can be carried out by injecting human spermatozoa into mouse oocytes to evaluate their activating capacity. According to the MOAT activation percentage achieved, patients were classified into three groups: 0-20% (16 patients); 20-85% (seven patients); 85-100% (seven patients). For AOA, CaCl(2) was injected together with spermatozoa followed by a double Ca(2+) ionophore treatment. The fertilization rates before application of AOA in 50 cycles were 6%, 22% and 14% in, respectively, groups 1, 2 and 3 without any pregnancy. Fertilization and pregnancy rates after AOA in 61 cycles were significantly increased to 75% and 34% for group 1, 73% and 43% for group 2, and 75% and 17% for group 3 (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.004, respectively). Application of AOA results in normal fertilization and pregnancy rates in patients whose spermatozoa show deficient activation. When MOAT reveals no activation deficiency in spermatozoa, AOA still allows for high fertilization and acceptable pregnancy rates. The obstetric and neonatal outcomes after AOA were normal as no malformations were observed.

  20. Simple and rapid analysis of endocrine disruptors in liquid medicines and intravenous injection solutions by automated in-tube solid-phase microextraction/high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Mitani, Kurie; Narimatsu, Shizuo; Izushi, Fumio; Kataoka, Hiroyuki

    2003-07-14

    A simple and rapid method was developed for analyzing contamination of endocrine disruptors in liquid medicines and intravenous injection solutions. Endocrine disrupting compounds such as bisphenol A (BPA), alkylphenols and phthalates were quantitated by on-line in-tube solid-phase microextraction coupled with high performance liquid chromatography (in-tube SPME/HPLC) with UV detection. The liquid medicines and intravenous injection solutions could be used directly without any pretreatment, and the BPA, alkylphenols and phthalates in these solutions were automatically analyzed. The limits of quantification for these compounds were 1-10 ng/ml. Recoveries of these compounds spiked to the intravenous injection solutions was over 80%, except for some phthalates. Di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) was detected at a concentration of 7-60 ng/ml in most intravenous injection solutions in plastic containers, but it was not detected in solutions in glass bottles. Diethyl phthalate, di-n-propyl phthalate, DBP and di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) were also detected in syrup, lotion and eye drops in plastic containers. On the other hand, BPA and alkylphenols were not detected at all in these solutions. DEHP contamination from an administration set increased when total vitamin formulation was added to the infusion solution. DEHP was easily leached from polyvinyl chloride tubing by polysorbate 80. The in-tube SPME/HPLC method is simple, rapid and automatic, and it provides a useful tool for the screening and determination of endocrine disruptor contamination in liquid medicines and intravenous injection solutions.

  1. Perturbation solutions for a micropolar fluid flow in a semi-infinite expanding or contracting pipe with large injection or suction through porous wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Xinhui; Yuan, Lili; Cao, Limei; Zheng, Liancun; Shen, Yanan; Li, Lin

    2016-07-01

    We investigate an unsteady incompressible laminar micropolar flow in a semi-infinite porous pipe with large injection or suction through a deforming pipe wall. Using suitable similarity transformations, the governing partial differential are transformed into a coupled nonlinear singular boundary value problem. For large injection, the asymptotic solutions are constructed using the Lighthill method, which eliminates singularity of solution in the high order derivative. For large suction, a series expansion matching method is used. Analytical solutions are validated against the numerical solutions obtained by Bvp4c.

  2. Thermogelling Biodegradable Copolymer Aqueous Solutions for Injectable Protein Delivery and Tissue Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Byeongmoon; Lee, Kyeonghee M.; Gutowska, Anna; An, Yuehuei H.

    2002-07-01

    This paper reports on the thermogelling, biodegradable polymer formulations based on poly(DL-lactic acid-co-glycolic acid)(polyethylene glycol) graft copolymers for in-vivo biomedical applications. The description includes diabetic control by sustained insulin delivery and cartilage repair by chondrocyte cell delivery. With one injection of the formula, the blood glucose level could be controlled from 5 to 16 days in diabetic rats by varying the polymer composition. Promising cartilage repair was observed using chondrocyte suspension in the thermogelling biodegradable depot.

  3. Development and Validation of a Successful Microbiological Agar Assay for Determination of Ceftriaxone Sodium in Powder for Injectable Solution

    PubMed Central

    Aléssio, Patrícia V.; Salgado, Hérida R. N.

    2012-01-01

    Ceftriaxone sodium is a cephalosporin with broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and belongs to the third generation of cephalosporins. Regarding the quality control of medicines, a validated microbiological assay for the determination of ceftriaxone sodium in powder for injectable solution has not been reported yet. This paper reports the development and validation of a simple, accurate and reproducible agar diffusion method to quantify ceftriaxone sodium in powder for injectable solution. The assay is based on the inhibitory effect of ceftriaxone sodium on the strain of Bacillus subtilis ATCC 9371 IAL 1027 used as test microorganism. The results were treated statistically by analysis of variance and were found to be linear (r = 0.999) in the selected range of 15.0–60.0 μg/mL, precise with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of repeatability intraday = 1.40%, accurate (100.46%) and robust with a RSD lower than 1.28%. The results demonstrated the validity of the proposed bioassay, which allows reliable ceftriaxone sodium quantitation in pharmaceutical samples and therefore can be used as a useful alternative methodology for the routine quality control of this medicine. PMID:24300294

  4. Influence of polymeric electron injection layers on the electrical properties of solution-processed multilayered polymer light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Eiji; Kurami, Kazuhiko

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we fabricated multilayered polymer-based light-emitting diodes (pLEDs) with various solution-processed electron-injection layers (EILs), and investigated the influence of the EILs on the electrical properties of pLEDs in indium tin oxide (ITO)/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with poly(styrene sulfonic acid) (PEDOT:PSS)/poly[(9,9-dioctylfluorene-alt-(1,4-phenylene((4-sec-butylphenyl)amino)-1,4-phenylene))] (TFB) (HTL)/poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-alt-1,4-benzothiadiazole) (F8BT) (EML)/EIL/Al structures. We have used the quaternized ammonium π-conjugated polyelectrolyte derivative (poly[(9,9-di(3,3‧-N,N‧-trimethylammonium)propylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-co-(1,4-phenylene)]diiodide salt) (PF-PDTA), a mixture of PF-PDTA and CS2CO3, and the aliphatic-amine-based polymer poly(ethylene imine) (PEI) as solution-processed EILs, and compared them with LiF as a solvent-free EIL. The EILs enhanced the electron injection and improve the pLED performance. High external quantum efficiencies of nearly 4% were obtained in the pLEDs with the combination of a multilayered structure fabricated by a transfer printing technique and EILs of a PF-PDTA:CS2CO3 mixture and PEI. On the other hand, the device with PF-PDTA exhibited lower efficiency, higher driving voltage, and larger leakage current at lower voltage. The migration of ionic charges was suggested from the abnormal dielectric behaviors, and serious damage on the electrode material occurred when both an acid hole-injection layer (PEDOT:PSS) and PF-PDTA were used. On the other hand, the pLEDs with ultrathin PEI showed high performance and stable device operation in terms of the influence of ionic charges.

  5. Stability and Sterility of Enoxaparin 8 mg/mL Subcutaneous Injectable Solution

    PubMed Central

    Dinh, Kimberly; Placencia, Jennifer; Pelkey, Gregory; Hui, Shiu-Ki Rocky; Teruya, Jun

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Enoxaparin is often diluted to accurately deliver doses to neonatal and infant patients. Current recommendations for dilutions may not be adequate for the smallest patients. METHODS: Review of dosing at our institution occurred, and an 8 mg/mL concentration of enoxaparin was chosen. A concentration of 8 mg/mL was compounded by diluting 0.4 mL of enoxaparin (100 mg/mL) into 4.6 mL of sterile water for injection into an empty sterile vial. Four syringes of the 8 mg/mL concentration were prepared by 5 technicians (20 total syringes). Stability and sterility testing occurred a 0, 7, 14, and 30 days. One-way repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to detect significant differences in Anti–Factor Xa concentrations at the testing time points. RESULTS: The dilution of enoxaparin was sterile at 30 days but exhibited significant degradation at the 30-day point (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: A dilution of enoxaparin 8 mg/mL is stable and sterile for 14 days refrigerated but is not stable at 30 days.

  6. Mechanisms behind injecting the combination of nano-clay particles and polymer solution for enhanced oil recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalili Nezhad, Seyyed Shahram; Cheraghian, Goshtasp

    2016-08-01

    Laboratory investigations and field applications have proved injection of polymer solution to be an effective means to improve oil recovery for reservoirs of medium oil viscosity. The incremental oil produced in this case is the result of an increase in areal and vertical sweep efficiencies. Biopolymers and synthetic polymers are the major categories used in the petroleum industry for specific reasons. Biopolymers like xanthan are limited in their application as they are more susceptible to biodegradation. Synthetic polymers like Hydrolyzed PolyAcrylaMide (HPAM) have a much wider application as they are less susceptible to biodegradation. Furthermore, development of nanotechnology has successfully provided technical and economical viable alternatives for present materials. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of combining clay nanoparticles with polymer solution on oil recovery. This paper includes a history match of both one-dimensional and two-dimensional polymer floods using a three-dimensional numerical model for fluid flow and mass transport. Results indicated that the amount of polymer adsorption decreased when clay nanoparticles were added to the PolyAcrylaMide solution; however, mobility ratio improvement is believed to be the main contributor for the proposed method in order to enhance much oil recovery compared to xanthan flood and HPAM flood.

  7. On-line preconcentration and determination of chromium in parenteral solutions by flow injection-flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wuilloud, Gustavo M; Wuilloud, Rodolfo G; de Wuilloud, Jorgelina C A; Olsina, Roberto A; Martinez, Luis D

    2003-02-01

    An on-line chromium preconcentration and determination system implemented with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) associated to flow injection (FI) was studied. For the retention of chromium, 4-(2-Thiazolylazo)-resorcinol (TAR) and Amberlite XAD-16 were used, at pH 5.0. The Cr-TAR complex was removed from the micro-column with ethanol. An enrichment factor of 50 was obtained for the preconcentration of 50 ml of sample solution. The detection limit value for the preconcentration of 50 ml of aqueous solution of Cr was 20 ng l(-1). The precision for ten replicate determinations at the 5 microg l(-1) Cr levels was 2.9% relative standard deviation (RSD), calculated from the peak heights obtained. The calibration graph using the preconcentration system for chromium was linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.9997 at levels near the detection limits up to at least 100 microg l(-1). The method was successfully applied to the determination of chromium in parenteral solution samples.

  8. [The perspectives of using the modern technological equipment for preparation of injection solutions in the military drugstores].

    PubMed

    Gushchenko, V A; Miroshnichenko, Iu V; Umarov, S Z; Goriachev, A B

    2007-05-01

    In modern conditions the most rational approach to medicinal support is an optimal combination of nomenclature of ready drugs and drugs prepared extemporary. Independently of the place where the drugs are prepared (industrial production or preparation under conditions of drugstores) they should correspond to the following requirements: to have therapeutic effectiveness, to be harmless for patient and injection solutions (IS) should be sterile, apyretic and with minimal microbial contamination before thermal sterilization. At present it can be achieved only with the wide use of semiautomatic or automatic equipment for IS preparation arranged into technological complexes. Such complexes are home-produced. Besides The Main Military Medical Headquarters has created the complex, which can be used in stationary and field conditions. The use of technological complexes for IS preparation provides their adequate quality and contributes to budget economy at the expense of decreased purchases of IS produced in the factories. PMID:17726966

  9. [The perspectives of using the modern technological equipment for preparation of injection solutions in the military drugstores].

    PubMed

    Gushchenko, V A; Miroshnichenko, Iu V; Umarov, S Z; Goriachev, A B

    2007-05-01

    In modern conditions the most rational approach to medicinal support is an optimal combination of nomenclature of ready drugs and drugs prepared extemporary. Independently of the place where the drugs are prepared (industrial production or preparation under conditions of drugstores) they should correspond to the following requirements: to have therapeutic effectiveness, to be harmless for patient and injection solutions (IS) should be sterile, apyretic and with minimal microbial contamination before thermal sterilization. At present it can be achieved only with the wide use of semiautomatic or automatic equipment for IS preparation arranged into technological complexes. Such complexes are home-produced. Besides The Main Military Medical Headquarters has created the complex, which can be used in stationary and field conditions. The use of technological complexes for IS preparation provides their adequate quality and contributes to budget economy at the expense of decreased purchases of IS produced in the factories.

  10. Panitumumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a solution (liquid) to be given by infusion (injected into a vein). It is usually given ... doctor or nurse in a doctor's office or infusion center. Panitumumab is usually given once every 2 ...

  11. Stability of Melphalan in 0.9% Sodium Chloride Solutions Prepared in Polyvinyl Chloride Bags for Intravenous Injection.

    PubMed

    Desmaris, Romain-Pacôme; Mercier, Lionel; Paci, Angelo

    2015-09-01

    Melphalan is an alkylating agent frequently used in an intravenous formulation to treat hematologic malignancies and solid tumors in both adults and children. According to the manufacturer, melphalan is stable in sterile 0.9% sodium chloride for 90 min at room temperature (RT). Several authors have studied the stability of different concentrations of melphalan; however, most were not adapted to the current manufacturing process applied in pharmaceutical centralized units. This study was conducted to determine the stability of melphalan in 0.9% sodium chloride solutions at concentrations used for intravenous injection in practice. Melphalan is commonly prepared in diluted solutions ranging from 2 to 4 mg/ml for the treatment of adult patients and at lower concentrations (down to 0.5 mg/ml) for pediatric use. Accordingly, these were the three concentrations chosen for this study. Melphalan concentrations were measured with high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC). At RT, admixtures prepared at 4 mg/ml were stable for up to 8 h without protection from light; however, at lower concentrations, such as 0.5 and 2 mg/ml, stability did not exceed 2 h. When refrigerated, melphalan was stable for 24 h at 2 mg/ml; however, at 0.5 and 4 mg/ml, the drug was not stable. Melphalan solutions present with limited stability at 0.5, 2, and 4 mg/ml and are not adapted for delayed administration in pharmaceutical centralized units. However, at 4 mg/ml and at RT, a stability of 8 h is very interesting in practice and allows sufficient time for preparation, pharmaceutical control, transport, and administration.

  12. POISON SPIDER FIELD CHEMICAL FLOOD PROJECT, WYOMING

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas Arnell; Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi

    2004-11-01

    A reservoir engineering and geologic study concluded that approximate 7,852,000 bbls of target oil exits in Poison Spider. Field pore volume, OOIP, and initial oil saturation are defined. Potential injection water has a total dissolved solids content of 1,275 mg/L with no measurable divalent cations. If the Lakota water consistently has no measurable cations, the injection water does not require softening to dissolve alkali. Produced water total dissolved solids were 2,835 mg/L and less than 20 mg/L hardness as the sum of divalent cations. Produced water requires softening to dissolve chemicals. Softened produced water was used to dissolve chemicals in these evaluations. Crude oil API gravity varies across the field from 19.7 to 22.2 degrees with a dead oil viscosity of 95 to 280 cp at 75 F. Interfacial tension reductions of up to 21,025 fold (0.001 dyne/cm) were developed with fifteen alkaline-surfactant combinations at some alkali concentration. An additional three alkaline-surfactant combinations reduced the interfacial tension greater than 5,000 fold. NaOH generally produced the lowest interfacial tension values. Interfacial tension values of less than 0.021 dyne/cm were maintained when the solutions were diluted with produced water to about 60%. Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} when mixed with surfactants did not reduce interfacial tension values to levels at which incremental oil can be expected. NaOH without surfactant interfacial tension reduction is at a level where some additional oil might be recovered. Most of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions producing ultra low interfacial tension gave type II- phase behavior. Only two solutions produced type III phase behavior. Produced water dilution resulted in maintenance of phase type for a number of solutions at produced water dilutions exceeding 80% dilution. The average loss of phase type occurred at 80% dilution. Linear corefloods were performed to determine relative permeability end points, chemical

  13. The self-similar solutions of the problem of carbon dioxide injection into the reservoir saturated with methane and its hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musakaev, N. G.; Khasanov, M. K.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper the research of carbon dioxide injection into a porous medium initially saturated with methane and its hydrate was performed. The mathematical model of heat and mass transfer in a porous media, accompanied by the formation of carbon dioxide hydrate, is presented. The self-similar solutions, for the axisymmetric problem definition, were built. These solutions describe the distribution of the fluid parameters in a reservoir.

  14. Hyphenation of sequential- and flow injection analysis with FTIR-spectroscopy for chemical analysis in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lendl, B.; Schindler, R.; Kellner, R.

    1998-06-01

    A survey of the principles of sequential (SIA)-and flow injection analysis (FIA) systems with FTIR spectroscopic detection is presented to introduce these hyphenations as powerful techniques for performing chemical analysis in aqueous solution. The strength of FIA/SIA-FTIR systems lies in the possibility to perform highly reproducible and automated sample manipulations such as sample clean-up and/or chemical reactions prior to spectrum acquisition. It is shown that the hyphenation of FIA/SIA systems with an FTIR spectrometer enhances the problem solving capabilities of the FTIR spectrometer as also parameters which can not be measured directly (e.g. enzyme activities) can be determined. On the other hand application of FTIR spectroscopic detection in FIA or SIA is also of advantage as it allows to shorten conventional analysis procedures (e.g. sucrose or phosphate analysis) or to establish and apply a multivariate calibration model for simultaneous determinations (e.g. glucose, fructose and sucrose analysis). In addition to these examples two recent instrumental developments in miniaturized FIA/SIA-FTIR systems, a μ-Flow through cell based on IR fiber optics and a micromachined SI-enzyme reactor are presented in this paper.

  15. THE DEVELOPMENT OF IODINE BASED IMPINGER SOLUTIONS FOR THE EFFICIENT CAPTURE OF HG USING DIRECT INJECTION NEBULIZATION - INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRY ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP/MS) with direct injection nebulization (DIN) was used to evaluate novel impinger solution compositions capable of capturing elemental mercury (Hgo) in EPA Method 5 type sampling. An iodine based impinger solutoin proved to be ver...

  16. A Semi-Analytical Solution for Large-Scale Injection-Induced PressurePerturbation and Leakage in a Laterally Bounded Aquifer-AquitardSystem

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Quanlin; Birkholzer, Jens T.; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2008-07-15

    A number of (semi-)analytical solutions are available to drawdown analysis and leakage estimation of shallow aquifer-aquitard systems. These solutions assume that the systems are laterally infinite. When a large-scale pumping from (or injection into) an aquifer-aquitard system of lower specific storativity occurs, induced pressure perturbation (or hydraulic head drawdown/rise) may reach the lateral boundary of the aquifer. We developed semi-analytical solutions to address the induced pressure perturbation and vertical leakage in a 'laterally bounded' system consisting of an aquifer and an overlying/underlying aquitard. A one-dimensional radial flow equation for the aquifer was coupled with a one-dimensional vertical flow equation for the aquitard, with a no-flow condition imposed on the outer radial boundary. Analytical solutions were obtained for (1) the Laplace-transform hydraulic head drawdown/rise in the aquifer and in the aquitard, (2) the Laplace-transform rate and volume of leakage through the aquifer-aquitard interface integrated up to an arbitrary radial distance, (3) the transformed total leakage rate and volume for the entire interface, and (4) the transformed horizontal flux at any radius. The total leakage rate and volume depend only on the hydrogeologic properties and thicknesses of the aquifer and aquitard, as well as the duration of pumping or injection. It was proven that the total leakage rate and volume are independent of the aquifer's radial extent and wellbore radius. The derived analytical solutions for bounded systems are the generalized solutions of infinite systems. Laplace-transform solutions were numerically inverted to obtain the hydraulic head drawdown/rise, leakage rate, leakage volume, and horizontal flux for given hydrogeologic and geometric conditions of the aquifer-aquitard system, as well as injection/pumping scenarios. Application to a large-scale injection-and-storage problem in a bounded system was demonstrated.

  17. Substance P-like peptides and vasopressin release from posterior pituitary lobe incubated in situ after intracarotid injections of hypertonic solution in rats.

    PubMed

    Traczyk, W Z; Strumillo-Dyba, E

    1977-01-01

    The experiments were performed on male rats, drinking 2% NaCl solution ad libitum for 12 days instead of tap water. The pituitary gland was exposed by the transpharyngeal approach under urethane-chloralose anaesthesia. The posterior lobe remained in neural and partial vascular connection with the hypothalamus, whereas the anterior lobe was entirely removed. Samples of the outflow medium from the incubated in situ rat posterior pituitary lobe were collected during 30 min intervals. Substance P-like peptides and vasopressin activities were assayed by the biological tests. Injections of hypertonic solution into the internal carotid artery did not change vasopressin release, but induced an increase in Substance P release from the posterior pituitary lobe into the incubation medium. Under conditions of unexcitability of the osmosensitive cells, triggering vasopressin release, the injection of hypertonic solution into the internal carotid artery stimulated the Substance P-like peptides release from the posterior pituitary lobe. PMID:22985

  18. Comparing (semi-) analytic solutions used to model the impact of deep carbon injection on the displacement and pressurization of the resident brine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandilla, K.; Kraemer, S. R.

    2009-12-01

    Injection of carbon dioxide into deep saline formations is seen as one possible technology for mitigating carbon emissions from utilities. The safety of the sequestered carbon dioxide is the focus of many studies with leakage through faults or abandoned wells as some of the main failure mechanisms. The focus of this study is on the displacement of resident brine and the resulting changes in pressure due to the injection of large volumes of super-critical phase carbon dioxide into the subsurface. The movement of brine becomes important if it travels vertically and reaches an existing or potential underground source of drinking water where an increase in salt content may threaten the viability of the drinking water source. Vertical displacement of brine may occur slowly through confining layers, or more rapidly through faults and abandoned wells. This presentation compares several (semi-) analytic solutions to determine their applicability to the problem of brine pressurization and displacement. The goal is to find ranges of formation parameters (e.g., formation seal conductivity, distance to lateral boundary, … ) for which simplifying assumption are justifiable Each simplification in the conceptual model (e.g., neglecting the lateral boundary turns a bounded domain into an infinite one) leads to a simpler (semi-) analytic solution. The process involves a solution hierarchy from the most complex solution down to the basic Theis solution. A software tool-kit implementing several (semi-) analytic solutions was developed for this study to facilitate the comparison of the solutions.

  19. Validation of a Stability-Indicating Hydrophilic Interaction Liquid Chromatographic Method for the Quantitative Determination of Vitamin K3 (Menadione Sodium Bisulfite) in Injectable Solution Formulation

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Mashhour M.; Abu-Lafi, Saleh A.; Hallak, Hussein O.

    2013-01-01

    A simple, specific, accurate, and stability-indicating method was developed and validated for the quantitative determination of menadione sodium bisulfite in the injectable solution formulation. The method is based on zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (ZIC-HILIC) coupled with a photodiode array detector. The desired separation was achieved on the ZIC-HILIC column (250 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 μm) at 25°C temperature. The optimized mobile phase consisted of an isocratic solvent mixture of 200mM ammonium acetate (NH4AC) solution and acetonitrile (ACN) (20:80; v/v) pH-adjusted to 5.7 by glacial acetic acid. The mobile phase was fixed at 0.5 ml/min and the analytes were monitored at 261 nm using a photodiode array detector. The effects of the chromatographic conditions on the peak retention, peak USP tailing factor, and column efficiency were systematically optimized. Forced degradation experiments were carried out by exposing menadione sodium bisulfite standard and the injectable solution formulation to thermal, photolytic, oxidative, and acid-base hydrolytic stress conditions. The degradation products were well-resolved from the main peak and the excipients, thus proving that the method is a reliable, stability-indicating tool. The method was validated as per ICH and USP guidelines (USP34/NF29) and found to be adequate for the routine quantitative estimation of menadione sodium bisulfite in commercially available menadione sodium bisulfite injectable solution dosage forms. PMID:24106670

  20. Numerical simulation study of silica and calcite dissolution around a geothermal well by injecting high pH solutions with chelating agent.

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tianfu; Rose, Peter; Fayer, Scott; Pruess, Karsten

    2009-02-01

    Dissolution of silica, silicate, and calcite minerals in the presence of a chelating agent (NTA) at a high pH has been successfully performed in the laboratory using a high-temperature flow reactor. The mineral dissolution and porosity enhancement in the laboratory experiment has been reproduced by reactive transport simulation using TOUGHREACT. The chemical stimulation method has been applied by numerical modeling to a field geothermal injection well system, to investigate its effectiveness. Parameters from the quartz monzodiorite unit at the Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) site at Desert Peak (Nevada) were used. Results indicate that the injection of a high pH chelating solution results in dissolution of both calcite and plagioclase minerals, and avoids precipitation of calcite at high temperature conditions. Consequently reservoir porosity and permeability can be enhanced especially near the injection well.

  1. The effect of alkaline agents on retention of EOR chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, P.B.

    1991-07-01

    This report summarizes a literature survey on how alkaline agents reduce losses of surfactants and polymers in oil recovery by chemical injection. Data are reviewed for crude sulfonates, clean anionic surfactants, nonionic surfactants, and anionic and nonionic polymers. The role of mineral chemistry is briefly described. Specific effects of various alkaline anions are discussed. Investigations needed to improve the design of alkaline-surfactant-polymer floods are suggested. 62 refs., 28 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. Solutions for Reacting and Nonreacting Viscous Shock Layers with Multicomponent Diffusion and Mass Injection. Ph.D. Thesis - Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, J. N.

    1971-01-01

    Numerical solutions are presented for the viscous shocklayer equations where the chemistry is treated as being either frozen, equilibrium, or nonequilibrium. Also the effects of the diffusion model, surface catalyticity, and mass injection on surface transport and flow parameters are considered. The equilibrium calculations for air species using multicomponent: diffusion provide solutions previously unavailable. The viscous shock-layer equations are solved by using an implicit finite-difference scheme. The flow is treated as a mixture of inert and thermally perfect species. Also the flow is assumed to be in vibrational equilibrium. All calculations are for a 45 deg hyperboloid. The flight conditions are those for various altitudes and velocities in the earth's atmosphere. Data are presented showing the effects of the chemical models; diffusion models; surface catalyticity; and mass injection of air, water, and ablation products on heat transfer; skin friction; shock stand-off distance; wall pressure distribution; and tangential velocity, temperature, and species profiles.

  3. Rapid and sensitive determination of benzaldehyde arising from benzyl alcohol used as preservative in an injectable formulation solution using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction followed by gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Mashayekhi, Hossein Ali; Rezaee, Mohammad; Garmaroudi, Shirin Sadeghi; Montazeri, Naser; Ahmadi, Seyed Javad

    2011-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive method has been developed for the determination of benzaldehyde, a toxic oxidation product of the widely used preservative and co-solvent benzyl alcohol in injectable formulations of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, diclofenac, vitamin B-complex and Voltaren injection solutions by using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction followed by gas chromatography. This method involves the use of an appropriate mixture of extraction solvent (43.0 µL 1,2-dichloroethane) and disperser solvent (1.0 mL acetonitrile) for the formation of a cloudy solution in a 5.0-mL aqueous sample containing benzaldehyde. The linear range was 1.0-1000 µg L(-1), and the limit of detection was 0.2 µg L(-1) for benzaldehyde.

  4. Numerical Modeling of In-situ Reaction Barrier by Injection of Ca(OH)2 Solution for CO2 Geological Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, T.; Ito, T.

    2008-12-01

    Containment of CO2 in the storage reservoir is a very important issue. We present here an in-situ reaction barrier method to reduce the medium permeability along potential leakage paths of a deep CO2 storage reservoir in a saline formation. An aqueous solution will be injected into the fractures and rocks through injection wells. The solution will have a low viscosity and will not impact formation permeability as long as the solution is left as it is, but when the solution encounters dissolved CO2, precipitation will occur due to chemical reaction. As a result, the permeability will be reduced by filling the pores and fractures in the rocks with the precipitates. This concept has been successfully demonstrated previously through a laboratory experiment using Ca(OH)2 solution. The reduction of permeability in the laboratory experiment has been reproduced by reactive transport modeling using TOUGHREACT. The concept of the in-situ reaction barrier has been applied to a 2-D caprock-aquifer system under field physical and chemical conditions using the modeling tool. Calcite precipitation, permeability reduction, and CO2 leakage mitigation was achieved in the numerical experiment. This concept may be also applicable to prevent the leakage through abandoned wells, to mitigate well cement degradation, and to enhance CO2 mineral trapping.

  5. Counter-Electrode-Free Thin Cu Film Deposition Based on Ballistic Electron Injection into CuSO4 Solution from Nanosilicon Emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Toshiyuki; Gelloz, Bernard; Koshida, Nobuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    It is shown that a nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) ballistic electron emitter acts as an active electrode in a metal-salt solution (such as CuSO4 solution). The nc-Si emitter is composed of a thin Au film (10 nm thick), anodized polycrystalline layer (1 µm thick), and single-crystalline n+-Si substrate. In accordance with the results of an analysis by cyclic-voltammogram measurements under the standard three-electrode configuration, the electron injection effect into the solution is clearly observed at a potential within the electrochemical window where no electrolytic reactions appear. When the nc-Si emitter is driven alone in a CuSO4 solution without using any counter electrodes, a polycrystalline thin Cu film is uniformly formed on the emitting surface. This is presumably due to the preferential reduction of Cu2+ ions at the interface by injected energetic electrons. The observed deposition mode is different from both the conventional electroplating and electroless plating. This technique is an alternative low-temperature wet process that will be applicable to the deposition of various thin metal films.

  6. Hanford 100N Area Apatite Emplacement: Laboratory Results of Ca-Citrate-PO4 Solution Injection and Sr-90 Immobilization in 100N Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Szecsody, James E.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Moore, Robert C.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Williams, Mark D.; Girvin, Donald C.; McKinley, James P.; Truex, Michael J.; Phillips, Jerry L.

    2007-10-01

    This report summarizes laboratory scale studies investigating the remediation of Sr-90 by Ca-citrate-PO4 solution injection/infiltration to support field injection activities in the Hanford 100N area. This study is focused on experimentally testing whether this remediation technology can be effective under field scale conditions to mitigate Sr-90 migration 100N area sediments into the Columbia River. Sr-90 is found primarily adsorbed to sediments by ion exchange (99% adsorbed, < 1% in groundwater) in the upper portion of the unconfined aquifer and lower vadose zone. Although primarily adsorbed, Sr-90 is still considered a high mobility risk as it is mobilized by seasonal river stage increases and by plumes of higher ionic strength relative to groundwater. This remediation technology relies upon the Ca-citrate-PO4 solution forming apatite precipitate [Ca6(PO4)10(OH)2], which incorporates some Sr-90 during initial precipitation and additionally slowly incorporates Sr-90 by solid phase substitution for Ca. Sr substitution occurs because Sr-apatite is thermodynamically more stable than Ca-apatite. Once the Sr-90 is in the apatite structure, Sr-90 will decay to Y-90 (29.1 y half-life) then Zr-90 (64.1 h half-life) without the potential for migration into the Columbia River. For this technology to be effective, sufficient apatite needs to be emplaced in sediments to incorporate Sr and Sr-90 for 300 years (~10 half-lives of Sr-90), and the rate of incorporation needs to exceed the natural groundwater flux rate of Sr in the 100N area. A primary objective of this study is to supply an injection sequence to deliver sufficient apatite into subsurface sediments that minimizes initial mobility of Sr-90, which occurs because the injection solution has a higher ionic strength compared to groundwater. This can be accomplished by sequential injections of low, then high concentration injection of Ca-citrate-PO4 solutions. Assessment of low concentration Ca-citrate-PO4, citrate-PO4

  7. Determination of 2-propanol in surface cleaning solutions used for copper continuous casting process by flow injection-spectrophotometric detection with on-line column separation.

    PubMed

    Hayashibe, Yutaka; Tokuda, Masahiro; Takeya, Minoru

    2003-09-01

    A flow-injection system has been developed for the determination of 2-propanol in the surface cleaning solutions used in the copper continuous cast rod making system. Adsorption chromatography in nitric acid medium was used for the on-line separation of oily substances in the sample solution. Cerium(IV) diammonium nitrate was utilized as the chromogenic reagent for the spectrophotometric detection of 2-propanol. The system permits a throughput of one sample per hour for the oily sample, and of 12 samples per hour for the none-oily sample. The reproducibility has been proven to be satisfactory with a relative standard deviation of less than 6.0% (2.2%(V/V) 2-propanol level, n = 23). The detection limit is 0.01% (V/V).

  8. A solution-processed molybdenum oxide treated silver nanowire network: a highly conductive transparent conducting electrode with superior mechanical and hole injection properties.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jung-Hao; Chiang, Kai-Ming; Kang, Hao-Wei; Chi, Wei-Jung; Chang, Jung-Hung; Wu, Chih-I; Lin, Hao-Wu

    2015-03-14

    We demonstrate the fabrication of solution-processed MoOx-treated (s-MoOx) silver nanowire (AgNW) transparent conductive electrodes (TCEs) utilizing low-temperature (sub-100 °C) processes. The s-MoOx aggregates around the AgNW and forms gauze-like MoOx thin films between the mesh, which can effectively lower the sheet resistance by more than two orders of magnitude. Notably, these s-MoOx-treated AgNW TCEs exhibit a combination of several promising characteristics, such as a high and broad transmittance across a wavelength range of 400 to 1000 nm, transmission of up to 96.8%, a low sheet resistance of 29.8 ohm sq(-1), a low haze value of 0.90%, better mechanical properties against bending and adhesion tests, and preferable gap states for efficient hole injection in optoelectronic applications. By utilizing these s-MoOx-treated AgNW TCEs as the anode in ITO-free organic light emitting diodes, promising performance of 29.2 lm W(-1) and 10.3% external quantum efficiency are demonstrated. The versatile, multi-functional s-MoOx treatment presented here paves the way for the use of low-temperature, solution-processed MoOx as both a nanowire linker and a hole injection interfacial layer for future flexible optoelectronic devices.

  9. The development of iodine based impinger solutions for the efficient capture of Hg0 using direct injection nebulization-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, E; Lee, T G; Biswas, P; Zhuang, Y

    2001-09-15

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP/MS) with direct injection nebulization (DIN) was used to evaluate novel impinger solution compositions capable of capturing elemental mercury (Hg0) in EPA Method 5 type sampling. An iodine based impinger solution proved to be very efficient for Hg0 capture and was amenable to direct analysis by DIN-ICP/MS. Hg0 capture efficiency using aqueous iodine (I3-) was comparable to Hg0 capture using acidified potassium permanganate impinger solutions which were analyzed by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS), with greater than 98% capture of Hg0 in the first oxidizing impinger. Using DIN-ICP/MS, it was demonstrated for the first time that iodine can be generated just prior to impinger sampling for efficiently oxidizing Hg0 and retaining it in solution as HgI4(2-). Due to the increased interest in Hg speciation from combustion sources and the potential for using DIN-ICP/MS for multiple metals analyses, an impinger sampling train for gaseous Hg speciation and multiple metals analyses using DIN-ICP/MS analyses is presented. The unique feature of such a sampling train is that each impinger solution in the series is amenable to direct analysis by DIN-ICP/MS. A bituminous coal was combusted in a bench scale coal system, and gaseous Hg species (oxidized and elemental) were determined using the proposed impinger train. The DIN-ICP/MS instrumental detection limit was 0.003 ppb, and MDLs ranged from 0.007 to 0.116 microg/L (ppb) in a variety of impinger solutions used for Hg capture.

  10. Direct injection method for HPLC/MS/MS analysis of acrylamide in aqueous solutions: application to adsorption experiments.

    PubMed

    Mnif, Ines; Hurel, Charlotte; Marmier, Nicolas

    2015-05-01

    Polyacrylamides are polymers used in many fields and represent the main source of release of the highly toxic acrylamide in the environment. In this work, a simple, rapid, and sensitive analytical method was developed with HPLC/MS/MS and direct injection for acrylamide analysis in water and adsorption samples. AFNOR standards NF T90-210 and NF T90-220 were used for the analytical method validation and uncertainty estimation. Limit of quantification (LOQ) for acrylamide was 1 μg/L, and accuracy was checked at three acrylamide levels (1, 6, and 10 μg/L). Uncertainties were estimated at 34.2, 22, and 12.4 % for acrylamide concentrations at LOQ, 6 μg/L, and 10 μg/L, respectively. Acrylamide adsorption on clays (kaolinite, illite) and sludge was then studied as a function of pH, time, and acrylamide concentrations. Acrylamide adsorption on kaolinite, illite, and sludge was found to be very weak since adsorption percentages were inferior to 10 %, whatever the pH value and the initial acrylamide concentration. The low affinity of acrylamide for clays and sludge is likely due to its hydrophilic property, small size, and charge neutrality.

  11. Solutions to Defect-Related Problems in Implanted Silicon by Controlled Injection of Vacancies by High-Energy Ion Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Duggan, J.L.; Holland, O.W.; Roth, E.

    1998-11-04

    Amorphization and a dual implant technique have been used to manipulate residual defects that persist following implantation and post-implant thermal treatments. Residual defects can often be attributed to ion-induced defect excesses. A defect is considered to be excess when it occurs in a localized region at a concentration greater than its complement. Sources of excess defects include spatially separated Frenkel pairs, excess interstitials resulting from the implanted atoms, and sputtering. Pre-amorphizing prior to dopant implantation has been proposed to eliminate dopant broadening due to ion channeling as well as dopant diffusion during subsequent annealing. However, transient-enhanced diffusion (TED) of implanted boron has been observed in pre-amorphized Si. The defects driving this enhanced boron diffusion are thought to be the extended interstitial-type defects that form below the amorphous-crystalline interface during implantation. A dual implantation process was applied in an attempt to reduce or eliminate this interfacial defect band. High-energy, ion implantation is known to inject a vacancy excess in this region. Vacancies were implanted at a concentration coincident with the excess interstitials below the a-c interface to promote recombination between the two defect species. Preliminary results indicate that a critical fluence, i.e., a sufficient vacancy concentration, will eliminate the interstitial defects. The effect of the reduction or elimination of these interfacial defects upon TED of boron will be discussed. Rutherford backscattering/channeling and cross section transmission electron microscopy analyses were used to characterize the defect structure within the implanted layer. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy was used to profile the dopant distributions.

  12. Interim Report: 100-NR-2 Apatite Treatability Test: Low Concentration Calcium Citrate-Phosphate Solution Injection for In Situ Strontium-90 Immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Mark D.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Thorne, Paul D.; Xie, YuLong; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Mackley, Rob D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Szecsody, James E.; Vermeul, Vincent R.

    2008-07-11

    Following an evaluation of potential Sr-90 treatment technologies and their applicability under 100-NR-2 hydrogeologic conditions, U.S. Department of Energy, Fluor Hanford, Inc., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and the Washington Department of Ecology agreed that the long-term strategy for groundwater remediation at 100-N Area will include apatite sequestration as the primary treatment, followed by a secondary treatment if necessary (most likely phytoremediation). Since then, the agencies have worked together to agree on which apatite sequestration technology has the greatest chance of reducing Sr-90 flux to the river at a reasonable cost. In July 2005, aqueous injection, (i.e., the introduction of apatite-forming chemicals into the subsurface) was endorsed as the interim remedy and selected for field testing. Studies are in progress to assess the efficacy of in situ apatite formation by aqueous solution injection to address both the vadose zone and the shallow aquifer along the 300 ft of shoreline where Sr-90 concentrations are highest. This report describes the field testing of the shallow aquifer treatment.

  13. Light scattering experiments on aqueous solutions of selected cellulose ethers: contribution to the study of polymer-mineral interactions in a new injectable biomaterial.

    PubMed

    Bohic, S; Weiss, P; Roger, P; Daculsi, G

    2001-03-01

    Hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) is used as a ligand for a bioactive calcium phosphate ceramic (the filler) in a ready-to-use injectable sterilized biomaterial for bone and dental surgery. Light scattering experiments were usually used to study high water-soluble polymers and to determine the basic macromolecular parameters. In order to gain a deeper understanding of polymer/mineral interactions in this type of material, we have investigated the effect of divalent and trivalent ions (Ca(2+), PO(4)(3-)) and steam sterilization on dilute solutions of HPMC and hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC). The sterilization process may cause some degradation of HEC taking into account its high molecular weight and some rigidity of the polymer chain. Moreover, in the case of HPMC, the changes in the conformations rather than degradation process are supposed. These effects of degradation and flocculation are strengthened in alkaline medium. Experimental data suggested the formation of chelate complexes between Ca(2+) and HPMC which improve its affinity to the mineral blend and consolidate the injectable biomaterial even in the case of its hydration by biological fluid. PMID:15348303

  14. Light scattering experiments on aqueous solutions of selected cellulose ethers: contribution to the study of polymer-mineral interactions in a new injectable biomaterial

    PubMed Central

    Bohic, Sylvain; Weiss, Pierre; Roger, Philippe; Daculsi, Guy

    2001-01-01

    Hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) is used as a ligand for a bioactive calcium phosphate ceramic (the filler) in a ready-to-use injectable sterilized biomaterial for bone and dental surgery. Light scattering experiments were usually used to study high water-soluble polymers and to determine the basic macromolecular parameters. In order to gain a deeper understanding of polymer/mineral interactions in this type of material, we have investigated the effect of divalent and trivalent ions (Ca2+, PO43−) and steam sterilization on dilute solutions of HPMC and HEC. The sterilization process may cause some degradation of HEC taking into account its high molecular weight and some rigidity of the polymer chain. Moreover, in the case of HPMC, the changes in the conformations rather than degradation process are supposed. These effects of degradation and flocculation are strengthened in alkaline medium. Experimental data suggested the formation of chelate complexes between Ca2+ and HPMC which improve its affinity to the mineral blend and consolidate the injectable biomaterial even in the case of its hydration by biological fluid. PMID:15348303

  15. A solution-processed molybdenum oxide treated silver nanowire network: a highly conductive transparent conducting electrode with superior mechanical and hole injection properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jung-Hao; Chiang, Kai-Ming; Kang, Hao-Wei; Chi, Wei-Jung; Chang, Jung-Hung; Wu, Chih-I.; Lin, Hao-Wu

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate the fabrication of solution-processed MoOx-treated (s-MoOx) silver nanowire (AgNW) transparent conductive electrodes (TCEs) utilizing low-temperature (sub-100 °C) processes. The s-MoOx aggregates around the AgNW and forms gauze-like MoOx thin films between the mesh, which can effectively lower the sheet resistance by more than two orders of magnitude. Notably, these s-MoOx-treated AgNW TCEs exhibit a combination of several promising characteristics, such as a high and broad transmittance across a wavelength range of 400 to 1000 nm, transmission of up to 96.8%, a low sheet resistance of 29.8 ohm sq-1, a low haze value of 0.90%, better mechanical properties against bending and adhesion tests, and preferable gap states for efficient hole injection in optoelectronic applications. By utilizing these s-MoOx-treated AgNW TCEs as the anode in ITO-free organic light emitting diodes, promising performance of 29.2 lm W-1 and 10.3% external quantum efficiency are demonstrated. The versatile, multi-functional s-MoOx treatment presented here paves the way for the use of low-temperature, solution-processed MoOx as both a nanowire linker and a hole injection interfacial layer for future flexible optoelectronic devices.We demonstrate the fabrication of solution-processed MoOx-treated (s-MoOx) silver nanowire (AgNW) transparent conductive electrodes (TCEs) utilizing low-temperature (sub-100 °C) processes. The s-MoOx aggregates around the AgNW and forms gauze-like MoOx thin films between the mesh, which can effectively lower the sheet resistance by more than two orders of magnitude. Notably, these s-MoOx-treated AgNW TCEs exhibit a combination of several promising characteristics, such as a high and broad transmittance across a wavelength range of 400 to 1000 nm, transmission of up to 96.8%, a low sheet resistance of 29.8 ohm sq-1, a low haze value of 0.90%, better mechanical properties against bending and adhesion tests, and preferable gap states for efficient hole

  16. Comparison of L-thyroxine and a saturated solution of potassium iodide in preventing damage to the thyroid following iodine-131-labeled antibody injection

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Nabi, H.; Waldman, W.J.; Hinkle, G.H.; Miller, E.A.; Trembath, L.; Olsen, J.O.; Martin, E.W. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Following injection of radioiodinated antibodies in diagnostic amounts, there is variable uptake of radioiodine by the thyroid. Unless preventive steps are taken, radiation damage to the gland may occur. We have evaluated the role of L-thyroxine and a saturated solution of potassium iodide (SSKI) in preventing radiation damage to the thyroid glands of Sprague-Dawley adult male rats by measuring DNA strand breakage by the nucleoid sedimentation gradient method. Pretreatment with SSKI reduced DNA damage and also reduced /sup 131/I accumulation in the thyroid. Pretreatment with L-thyroxine also reduced DNA damage without significantly reducing /sup 131/I accumulation in the thyroid. The possible mechanisms of action of L-thyroxine and SSKI in preventing radiation damage to the thyroid are addressed.

  17. Miniaturizing and automation of free acidity measurements for uranium (VI)-HNO3 solutions: Development of a new sequential injection analysis for a sustainable radio-analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Néri-Quiroz, José; Canto, Fabrice; Guillerme, Laurent; Couston, Laurent; Magnaldo, Alastair; Dugas, Vincent

    2016-10-01

    A miniaturized and automated approach for the determination of free acidity in solutions containing uranium (VI) is presented. The measurement technique is based on the concept of sequential injection analysis with on-line spectroscopic detection. The proposed methodology relies on the complexation and alkalimetric titration of nitric acid using a pH 5.6 sodium oxalate solution. The titration process is followed by UV/VIS detection at 650nm thanks to addition of Congo red as universal pH indicator. Mixing sequence as well as method validity was investigated by numerical simulation. This new analytical design allows fast (2.3min), reliable and accurate free acidity determination of low volume samples (10µL) containing uranium/[H(+)] moles ratio of 1:3 with relative standard deviation of <7.0% (n=11). The linearity range of the free nitric acid measurement is excellent up to 2.77molL(-1) with a correlation coefficient (R(2)) of 0.995. The method is specific, presence of actinide ions up to 0.54molL(-1) does not interfere on the determination of free nitric acid. In addition to automation, the developed sequential injection analysis method greatly improves the standard off-line oxalate complexation and alkalimetric titration method by reducing thousand fold the required sample volume, forty times the nuclear waste per analysis as well as the analysis time by eight fold. These analytical parameters are important especially in nuclear-related applications to improve laboratory safety, personnel exposure to radioactive samples and to drastically reduce environmental impacts or analytical radioactive waste. PMID:27474315

  18. Miniaturizing and automation of free acidity measurements for uranium (VI)-HNO3 solutions: Development of a new sequential injection analysis for a sustainable radio-analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Néri-Quiroz, José; Canto, Fabrice; Guillerme, Laurent; Couston, Laurent; Magnaldo, Alastair; Dugas, Vincent

    2016-10-01

    A miniaturized and automated approach for the determination of free acidity in solutions containing uranium (VI) is presented. The measurement technique is based on the concept of sequential injection analysis with on-line spectroscopic detection. The proposed methodology relies on the complexation and alkalimetric titration of nitric acid using a pH 5.6 sodium oxalate solution. The titration process is followed by UV/VIS detection at 650nm thanks to addition of Congo red as universal pH indicator. Mixing sequence as well as method validity was investigated by numerical simulation. This new analytical design allows fast (2.3min), reliable and accurate free acidity determination of low volume samples (10µL) containing uranium/[H(+)] moles ratio of 1:3 with relative standard deviation of <7.0% (n=11). The linearity range of the free nitric acid measurement is excellent up to 2.77molL(-1) with a correlation coefficient (R(2)) of 0.995. The method is specific, presence of actinide ions up to 0.54molL(-1) does not interfere on the determination of free nitric acid. In addition to automation, the developed sequential injection analysis method greatly improves the standard off-line oxalate complexation and alkalimetric titration method by reducing thousand fold the required sample volume, forty times the nuclear waste per analysis as well as the analysis time by eight fold. These analytical parameters are important especially in nuclear-related applications to improve laboratory safety, personnel exposure to radioactive samples and to drastically reduce environmental impacts or analytical radioactive waste.

  19. Cartilage Tissue Engineering Application of Injectable Gelatin Hydrogel with In Situ Visible-Light-Activated Gelation Capability in Both Air and Aqueous Solution

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hang; Cheng, Anthony Wai-Ming; Alexander, Peter G.; Beck, Angela M.

    2014-01-01

    Chondroprogenitor cells encapsulated in a chondrogenically supportive, three-dimensional hydrogel scaffold represents a promising, regenerative approach to articular cartilage repair. In this study, we have developed an injectable, biodegradable methacrylated gelatin (mGL)–based hydrogel capable of rapid gelation via visible light (VL)–activated crosslinking in air or aqueous solution. The mild photocrosslinking conditions permitted the incorporation of cells during the gelation process. Encapsulated human-bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) showed high, long-term viability (up to 90 days) throughout the scaffold. To assess the applicability of the mGL hydrogel for cartilage tissue engineering, we have evaluated the efficacy of chondrogenesis of the encapsulated hBMSCs, using hBMSCs seeded in agarose as control. The ability of hBMSC-laden mGL constructs to integrate with host tissues after implantation was further investigated utilizing an in vitro cartilage repair model. The results showed that the mGL hydrogel, which could be photopolymerized in air and aqueous solution, supports hBMSC growth and TGF-β3-induced chondrogenesis. Compared with agarose, mGL constructs laden with hBMSCs are mechanically stronger with time, and integrate well with native cartilage tissue upon implantation based on push-out mechanical testing. VL-photocrosslinked mGL scaffold thus represents a promising scaffold for cell-based repair and resurfacing of articular cartilage defects. PMID:24575844

  20. Assessment of trace aluminium content in parenteral solutions by combined cloud point preconcentration-flow injection inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sombra, Lorena L; Luconi, Marta O; Fernández, Liliana P; Olsina, Roberto A; Silva, María F; Martínez, Luis D

    2003-01-01

    A micelle-mediated phase separation without added chelating agents to preconcentrate trace levels of aluminium in parenteral solutions as a prior step to its determination by flow injection inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry has been developed. The enrichment step is based on the cloud point extraction of aluminium with the non-ionic surfactant polyethyleneglycolmono-p-nonylphenylether (PONPE 7.5). The chemical variables affecting the sensitivity of the extractive-spectrometric procedure were studied in detail. After optimization, a preconcentration factor of 200 and a %E higher than 99.9 were achieved. The detection limit (DL) value of aluminium for the preconcentration of 50 ml of parenteral solution was 0.25 microgl(-1). The calibration graph using the preconcentration system for aluminium was linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.9997 at levels near the DLs up to at least 200 microgl(-1). The developed hyphenated assay, which thoroughly satisfies the typical requirements for pharmaceutical control processes, is appropriate to monitor the aluminium concentration in parenteral nutrition.

  1. Automated flow injection system for the preconcentration of bismuth and lead from acid solutions of alloys and determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomelli, Maria B. O.; Ganzarolli, Edgard M.; Curtius, Adilson J.

    2000-05-01

    An automated flow injection system for the preconcentration of Bi and Pb from acid solutions of alloys is proposed. The system uses three-way solenoid valves, a peristaltic pump, a mixing coil and a minicolumn filled with activated carbon. The valves are time-based controlled by a microcomputer using a program written in Turbo Pascal 4.0. Bismuth(III) and Pb(II) are preconcentrated on activated carbon after complexation with the ammonium salt of dithiophosphoric acid O, O-diethyl ester. Ethanol is used as the eluent in a reverse-flow mode, and is delivered into the autosampler cup of the electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometer. Four certified steel samples and a non-certified aluminum foil, spiked with the analytes, were analyzed after microwave-assisted dissolution with acids. For the steel samples, ascorbic acid was added to the sample solution to reduce Fe(III) to Fe(II). Iron(II) and Al(III) do not react with the complexing agent and are separated in the preconcentration step. The obtained analyte concentrations were in agreement with the certified or recommended values. The recoveries for the spiked aluminum sample were between 88 and 110%. The relative standards deviations were reasonable for a non-commercial flow system, ranging from 4 to 19%.

  2. GC/MS method for determining carbon isotope enrichment and concentration of underivatized short-chain fatty acids by direct aqueous solution injection of biogas digester samples.

    PubMed

    Mulat, Daniel Girma; Feilberg, Anders

    2015-10-01

    In anaerobic digestion of organic matter, several metabolic pathways are involved during the simultaneous production and consumption of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) in general and acetate in particular. Understanding the role of each pathway requires both the determination of the concentration and isotope enrichment of intermediates in conjunction with isotope labeled substrates. The objective of this study was to establish a rapid and simple GC/MS method for determining the isotope enrichment of acetate and concentration of underivatized short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) in biogas digester samples by direct liquid injection of acidified aqueous samples. Sample preparation involves only acidification, centrifugation and filtration of the aqueous solution followed by direct injection of the aqueous supernatant solution onto a polar column. With the sample preparation and GC/MS conditions employed, well-resolved and sharp peaks of underivatized SCFA were obtained in a reasonably short time. Good recovery (96.6-102.3%) as well as low detection (4-7 µmol/L) and quantification limits (14-22 µmol/L) were obtained for all the 6 SCFA studied. Good linearity was achieved for both concentration and isotope enrichment measurement with regression coefficients higher than 0.9978 and 0.9996, respectively. The method has a good intra- and inter-day precision with a relative standard deviation (RSD) below 6% for determining the tracer-to-tracee ratio (TTR) of both [2-(13)C]acetate and [U-(13)C]acetate. It has also a good intra- and inter-day precision with a RSD below 6% and 5% for determining the concentration of standard solution and biogas digester samples, respectively. Acidification of biogas digester samples with oxalic acid provided the low pH required for the protonation of SCFA and thus, allows the extraction of SCFA from the complex sample matrix. Moreover, oxalic acid was the source of formic acid which was produced in the injector set at high temperature. The produced

  3. Improving the Sensitivity, Resolution, and Peak Capacity of Gradient Elution in Capillary Liquid Chromatography with Large-Volume Injections by Using Temperature-Assisted On-Column Solute Focusing.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Rachael E; Groskreutz, Stephen R; Weber, Stephen G

    2016-05-17

    Capillary HPLC (cLC) with gradient elution is the separation method of choice for the fields of proteomics and metabolomics. This is due to the complementary nature of cLC flow rates and electrospray or nanospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The small column diameters result in good mass sensitivity. Good concentration sensitivity is also possible by injection of relatively large volumes of solution and relying on solvent-based solute focusing. However, if the injection volume is too large or solutes are poorly retained during injection, volume overload occurs which leads to altered peak shapes, decreased sensitivity, and lower peak capacity. Solutes that elute early even with the use of a solvent gradient are especially vulnerable to this problem. In this paper, we describe a simple, automated instrumental method, temperature-assisted on-column solute focusing (TASF), that is capable of focusing large volume injections of small molecules and peptides under gradient conditions. By injecting a large sample volume while cooling a short segment of the column inlet at subambient temperatures, solutes are concentrated into narrow bands at the head of the column. Rapidly raising the temperature of this segment of the column leads to separations with less peak broadening in comparison to solvent focusing alone. For large volume injections of both mixtures of small molecules and a bovine serum albumin tryptic digest, TASF improved the peak shape and resolution in chromatograms. TASF showed the most dramatic improvements with shallow gradients, which is particularly useful for biological applications. Results demonstrate the ability of TASF with gradient elution to improve the sensitivity, resolution, and peak capacity of volume overloaded samples beyond gradient compression alone. Additionally, we have developed and validated a double extrapolation method for predicting retention factors at extremes of temperature and mobile phase composition. Using this method

  4. Preparation of Carbon-Doped TiO2 Nanopowder Synthesized by Droplet Injection of Solution Precursor in a DC-RF Hybrid Plasma Flow System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Juyong; Takana, Hidemasa; Ando, Yasutaka; Solonenko, Oleg P.; Nishiyama, Hideya

    2013-08-01

    Carbon-doped titanium dioxide nanopowder has received much attention because of its higher photocatalytic performance, which is practically activated not only by UV, but also by visible light irradiation. In the present study, C-TiO2 nanopowder was synthesized by droplet injection of solution precursor in a DC-RF hybrid plasma flow system, resulting in higher photocatalytic performance even under visible light irradiation. In-flight C-TiO2 nanoparticles reacted with the high concentration of carbon in plasma flow and were then deposited on the surfaces of two quartz tubes in the upstream and downstream regions of this system. The collected C-TiO2 nanopowder contained anatase-rutile mixed-phase TiO2 and TiC, the contents of which depended on the location of the powder collection, the temperature, and the duration of plasma treatment. Highly functional C-TiO2 nanopowder collected in the downstream region exhibited a higher degradation rate of methylene blue than that of single-phase anatase TiO2, even under visible light irradiation, in spite of being TiC.

  5. Evaluation of flow injection-solution cathode glow discharge-atomic emission spectrometry for the determination of major elements in brines.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun; Wang, Lin; Zhu, Zhenli; Jin, Lanlan; Zheng, Hongtao; Belshaw, Nicholas Stanley; Hu, Shenghong

    2016-08-01

    A new method for the determination of major metal elements in high salinity brines was developed by solution cathode glow discharge (SCGD) with flow injection analysis (FIA). The matrix interferences of major cations and anions in brines have been evaluated. It was found that high concentration of Na(+) and K(+) could interfere each other, K(+) at a concentration of 400mgL(-1) enhanced the signal intensity of Na(+) more than 20%. The effect of the anions was observed and it was noted that the signal intensity of both Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) were suppressed significantly when the SO4(2-) reached 100mgL(-1). It was demonstrated that some low molecular weight organic substances such as formic acid, glycerol and ascorbic acid could eliminate interference of SO4(2-) even with volume percentages of 0.5%. Under the optimized condition, the proposed FIA-SCGD can determine K, Na, Ca and Mg with the limits of detection of 0.49 (K), 0.14 (Na), 11 (Ca) and 5.5 (Mg) ngmL(-1). The proposed method has been successfully applied to the analysis of 5 salt lake samples and compared with those obtained with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The advantages of small size, low energy consumption, good stability and repeatability indicated that the SCGD is promising for the determination of major ions in brine samples. PMID:27216688

  6. Pegfilgrastim Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... a pre-filled automatic injection device (On-body Injector) to inject subcutaneously (under the skin). If you ... a pre-filled automatic injection device (On-body Injector), the device will usually be applied to your ...

  7. Cabazitaxel Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used along with prednisone to treat prostate cancer (cancer of a male reproductive organ) that has ... cabazitaxel injection is usually used in men with prostate cancer. If used by pregnant women, cabazitaxel injection can ...

  8. Romidepsin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Romidepsin injection is used to treat cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL; a group of cancers of the ... other medication given by mouth or by injection. Romidepsin injection is in a class of medications called ...

  9. Physico-chemical Stability of MabThera Drug-product Solution for Subcutaneous Injection under in-use Conditions with Different Administration Materials.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Claudia; Dietel, Elke; Heynen, Severin R; Nalenz, Heiko; Goldbach, Pierre; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Schmidt, Johannes; Grauschopf, Ulla; Schoenhamnmer, Karin

    2015-01-01

    MabThera is an essential component of the standard-of-care regimens in the treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and Chronic Lymphatic Leukemia. MabThera for subcutaneous injection is a novel line extension that has been approved by the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of patients with follicular lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. This study aimed to evaluate in-use stability data of MabThera subcutaneous drug-product solution in single-use syringes for subcutaneous administration according to the European Medicines Agency guideline. The drug-product solution was exposed to material contact surfaces of five different administration setups commonly used in subcutaneous drug delivery. MabThera subcutaneous was transferred under aseptic conditions into polypropylene and polycarbonate syringes and stored for 1, 2, and 4 weeks at 2°C to 8°C followed by 24 hours at 30°C. After storage, subcutaneous administration was simulated and MabThera subcutaneous drug-product solution quality attributes were evaluated by using compendial physico-chemical tests, as well as suitable and validated molecule- and formulation-specific analytical methods. MabThera subcutaneous vials were treated and analyzed in parallel. The physico-chemical results of MabThera subcutaneous in the different setups were comparable to the control for all timepoints. No change in drug-product quality after storage and simulated administration was found compared to the control. However, since single-dose products do not contain preservatives, microbial contamination and growth needs to be avoided and product sterility needs to be ensured. The results showed that MabThera subcutaneous remains compatible and stable, from a physico-chemical perspective, for up to 4 weeks at 2°C to 8°C followed by 24 hours at 30°C with the contact materials tested in this study. In order to avoid and minimize microbial growth, MabThera subcutaneous should be used immediately after removal from the original

  10. Physico-chemical Stability of MabThera Drug-product Solution for Subcutaneous Injection under in-use Conditions with Different Administration Materials.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Claudia; Dietel, Elke; Heynen, Severin R; Nalenz, Heiko; Goldbach, Pierre; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Schmidt, Johannes; Grauschopf, Ulla; Schoenhamnmer, Karin

    2015-01-01

    MabThera is an essential component of the standard-of-care regimens in the treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and Chronic Lymphatic Leukemia. MabThera for subcutaneous injection is a novel line extension that has been approved by the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of patients with follicular lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. This study aimed to evaluate in-use stability data of MabThera subcutaneous drug-product solution in single-use syringes for subcutaneous administration according to the European Medicines Agency guideline. The drug-product solution was exposed to material contact surfaces of five different administration setups commonly used in subcutaneous drug delivery. MabThera subcutaneous was transferred under aseptic conditions into polypropylene and polycarbonate syringes and stored for 1, 2, and 4 weeks at 2°C to 8°C followed by 24 hours at 30°C. After storage, subcutaneous administration was simulated and MabThera subcutaneous drug-product solution quality attributes were evaluated by using compendial physico-chemical tests, as well as suitable and validated molecule- and formulation-specific analytical methods. MabThera subcutaneous vials were treated and analyzed in parallel. The physico-chemical results of MabThera subcutaneous in the different setups were comparable to the control for all timepoints. No change in drug-product quality after storage and simulated administration was found compared to the control. However, since single-dose products do not contain preservatives, microbial contamination and growth needs to be avoided and product sterility needs to be ensured. The results showed that MabThera subcutaneous remains compatible and stable, from a physico-chemical perspective, for up to 4 weeks at 2°C to 8°C followed by 24 hours at 30°C with the contact materials tested in this study. In order to avoid and minimize microbial growth, MabThera subcutaneous should be used immediately after removal from the original

  11. Comparison between intralesional injection of zinc sulfate 2 % solution and intralesional meglumine antimoniate in the treatment of acute old world dry type cutaneous leishmaniasis: a randomized double-blind clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Farajzadeh, Saeedeh; Hakimi Parizi, Maryam; Haghdoost, Ali Akbar; Mohebbi, Azadeh; Mohammadi, Saman; Pardakhty, Abbas; Eybpoosh, Sana; Heshmatkhah, Amireh; Vares, Behrooz; Saryazdi, Simin; Fekri, Ali Reza; Mohebbi, Elham

    2016-09-01

    Zinc sulfate (ZS) has been used for the treatment of acute cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in both forms of in vivo and in vitro recently. The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of intralesional injection of ZS 2 % solution with intralesional glucantime in the treatment of acute CL. In this double-blind randomized clinical trial, 80 cases with acute old world dry type CL were enrolled in the study. The treatment protocol in the first group consisted of intralesional injection of ZS 2 % vials once a week for 10 weeks or sooner in case of complete resolution of the lesions. In the second group, intralesional glucantime once a week for 10 weeks or sooner in case of complete resolution of the lesions were used. In both groups cryotherapy was performed once every other week for 10 weeks. In ZS versus second group, partial and complete clinical response was observed with fewer injections although this difference was not statistically significant. In addition, we found that the trend of treatment in second group was faster but again it was not significant [partial treatment: hazard ratio (HR) 1.4, 95 % CI 0.7-2.9; complete treatment: HR 1.3, 95 % CI 0.6-2.8]. The results of this study showed that the intralesional injection of ZS 2 % solution was as effective as glucantime on the healing of the acute old world dry type CL. PMID:27605813

  12. Adalimumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... not improved when treated with other medications, ulcerative colitis (a condition which causes swelling and sores in ... adalimumab injection to treat Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis, your doctor may tell you to inject the ...

  13. Denosumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Denosumab injection (Prolia) is also used to treat bone loss in men with prostate cancer and in women with breast cancer who are receiving certain treatments that increase their risk for fractures. Denosumab injection ( ...

  14. Leucovorin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... red blood cells) caused by low levels of folic acid in the body. Leucovorin injection is also used ... injection is in a class of medications called folic acid analogs. It treats people who are receiving methotrexate ...

  15. Glatiramer Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS; a disease in which ... to inject glatiramer, inject it around the same time every day. Follow the directions on your prescription ...

  16. Naltrexone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Naltrexone injection is used along with counseling and social support to help people who have stopped drinking large ... injection is also used along with counseling and social support to help people who have stopped abusing opiate ...

  17. Estrogen Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... forms of estrogen injection are used to treat hot flushes (hot flashes; sudden strong feelings of heat and sweating) ... If you are using estrogen injection to treat hot flushes, your symptoms should improve within 1 to ...

  18. Cefazolin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Cefazolin injection is also sometimes used for certain penicillin allergic patients who have a heart condition and ... injection is also sometimes used to treat certain penicillin allergic women who are in labor in order ...

  19. Paclitaxel Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... with other medications. Paclitaxel injection manufactured with polyoxyethylated castor oil is used to treat ovarian cancer (cancer that ... cancer, and lung cancer. Paclitaxel injection with polyoxyethylated castor oil is also used to treat Kaposi's sarcoma (a ...

  20. Aripiprazole Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... aripiprazole injection and aripiprazole extended-release injection developed gambling problems or other intense urges or behaviors that ... even if you do not realize that your gambling or any other intense urges or unusual behaviors ...

  1. Testosterone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Testopel) are also used to stimulate puberty in males with delayed puberty. Testosterone enanthate (Delatestryl) injection may ... to the growth, development, and functioning of the male sexual organs and typical male characteristics. Testosterone injection ...

  2. Degarelix Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Degarelix injection is used to treat advanced prostate cancer (cancer that begins in the prostate [a male reproductive gland]). Degarelix injection is in a class of medications called gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) ...

  3. Naloxone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection device.The automatic injection device has an electronic voice system that provides step by step directions ... of opiate withdrawal such as body aches, diarrhea, fast heart beat, fever, runny nose, sneezing, sweating, yawning, ...

  4. Cefoxitin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used to treat infections caused by bacteria including pneumonia and other lower respiratory tract (lung) ... medications called cephamycin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as cefoxitin injection will not work ...

  5. Doripenem Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... tract, kidney, and abdomen that are caused by bacteria. Doripenem injection is not approved by the Food ... medications called carbapenem antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as doripenem injection will not work ...

  6. Chloramphenicol Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat certain types of serious infections caused by bacteria when other antibiotics cannot be used. Chloramphenicol injection ... antibiotics. It works by stopping the growth of bacteria..Antibiotics such as chloramphenicol injection will not work ...

  7. Medroxyprogesterone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medroxyprogesterone subcutaneous injection is also used to treat endometriosis (a condition in which the type of tissue ... parts of the body in women who have endometriosis. Medroxyprogesterone injection is a very effective method of ...

  8. Levoleucovorin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used to prevent harmful effects of methotrexate (Rheumatrex, Trexall) when methotrexate is used to to treat certain types of ... people who have accidentally received an overdose of methotrexate or similar medications. Levoleucovorin injection is in a ...

  9. Vancomycin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Vancomycin injection is used alone or in combination with other medications to treat certain serious infections such ... infections of the lungs, skin, blood, and bones. Vancomycin injection is in a class of medications called ...

  10. THE RHIC INJECTION SYSTEM.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.; GLENN,J.W.; MACKAY,W.W.; PTITSIN,V.; ROBINSON,T.G.; TSOUPAS,N.

    1999-03-29

    The RHIC injection system has to transport beam from the AGS-to-RHIC transfer line onto the closed orbits of the RHIC Blue and Yellow rings. This task can be divided into three problems. First, the beam has to be injected into either ring. Second, once injected the beam needs to be transported around the ring for one turn. Third, the orbit must be closed and coherent beam oscillations around the closed orbit should be minimized. We describe our solutions for these problems and report on system tests conducted during the RHIC Sextant test performed in 1997. The system will be fully commissioned in 1999.

  11. Injection of fish protein solutions of fresh saithe (Pollachius virens) fillets studied by low field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and physicochemical measurements.

    PubMed

    Gudjónsdóttir, María; Karlsdóttir, Magnea Gudrún; Arason, Sigurjón; Rustad, Turid

    2013-04-01

    Low field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance was used in comparison to yield and physicochemical measurements to assess the effects of salt and protein injection on the properties of saithe (Pollachius virens) fillets during chilled and frozen storage. Saithe fillets injected with various combinations of salt, homogenized fish proteins, gelatine and fish protein hydrolyzate, were compared to the properties of untreated fillets. Addition of salt or fish protein hydrolyzate resulted in increased yield after cooking and water holding capacity compared to other treatments. Transversal relaxation data fitting resulted in three water populations with relaxation times of 27-45 ms, 60-99 ms and 187-341 ms. Relaxation times and respective populations showed significant correlation to various physicochemical properties, that muscle water behaviour was changed by salt and protein injection and indicated protein denaturation during frozen storage. Fish protein hydrolyzate injected fillets were most stable through storage, while gelatine injected fillets were most denatured during frozen storage. PMID:24425912

  12. Comparing (Semi-) Analytic Solutions Used to Model the Impact of Deep Carbon Injection on the Displacement and Pressurization of the Resident Brine

    EPA Science Inventory

    Injection of carbon dioxide into deep saline formations is seen as one possible technology for mitigating carbon emissions from utilities. The safety of the sequestered carbon dioxide is the focus of many studies with leakage through faults or abandoned wells as some of the main...

  13. Guidance of Block Needle Insertion by Electrical Nerve Stimulation: A Pilot Study of the Resulting Distribution of Injected Solution in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Rigaud, Marcel; Filip, Patrick; Lirk, Philipp; Fuchs, Andreas; Gemes, Geza; Hogan, Quinn

    2009-01-01

    Background Little is known regarding the final needle tip location when various intensities of nerve stimulation are used to guide block needle insertion. Therefore, in control and hyperglycemic dogs, the authors examined whether lower-intensity stimulation results in injection closer to the sciatic nerve than higher-threshold stimulation. Methods During anesthesia, the sciatic nerve was approached with an insulated nerve block needle emitting either 1 mA (high-current group, n = 9) or 0.5 mA (low-current group, n = 9 in control dogs and n = 6 in hyperglycemic dogs). After positioning to obtain a distal motor response, the lowest current producing a response was identified, and ink (0.5 ml) was injected. Frozen sections of the tissue revealed whether the ink was in contact with the epineurium of the nerve, distant to it, or within it. Results In control dogs, the patterns of distribution using high-threshold (final current 0.99 ± 0.03 mA, mean ± SD) and low-threshold (final current 0.33 ± 0.08 mA) stimulation equally showed ink that was in contact with the epineurium or distant to it. One needle placement in the high-threshold group resulted in intraneural injection. In hyperglycemic dogs, all needle insertions used a low-threshold technique (n = 6, final threshold 0.35 ± 0.08 mA), and all resulted in intraneural injections. Conclusions In normal dogs, current stimulation levels in the range of 0.33–1.0 mA result in needle placement comparably close to the sciatic nerve but do not correlate with distance from the target nerve. In this experimental design, low-threshold electrical stimulation does not offer satisfactory protection against intraneural injection in the presence of hyperglycemia. PMID:18719445

  14. Mouse bladder wall injection.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chi-Ling; Apelo, Charity A; Torres, Baldemar; Thai, Kim H; Hsieh, Michael H

    2011-07-12

    Mouse bladder wall injection is a useful technique to orthotopically study bladder phenomena, including stem cell, smooth muscle, and cancer biology. Before starting injections, the surgical area must be cleaned with soap and water and antiseptic solution. Surgical equipment must be sterilized before use and between each animal. Each mouse is placed under inhaled isoflurane anesthesia (2-5% for induction, 1-3% for maintenance) and its bladder exposed by making a midline abdominal incision with scissors. If the bladder is full, it is partially decompressed by gentle squeezing between two fingers. The cell suspension of interest is intramurally injected into the wall of the bladder dome using a 29 or 30 gauge needle and 1 cc or smaller syringe. The wound is then closed using wound clips and the mouse allowed to recover on a warming pad. Bladder wall injection is a delicate microsurgical technique that can be mastered with practice.

  15. Triptorelin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... response to triptorelin injection. Your blood sugar and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) should be checked regularly.Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about triptorelin injection.It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and ...

  16. Leuprolide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... response to leuprolide injection. Your blood sugar and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) should be checked regularly.Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about leuprolide injection.It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and ...

  17. In vitro quantitative determination of the concentration of the polymerization agent methyl 2-benzoylbenzoate in intravenous injection solution and the cytotoxic effects of the chemical on normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Chiaki; Kawasaki, Yoichi; Yoshitome, Kei; Yagi, Kenta; Miura, Taro; Esumi, Satoru; Miyazaki, Ikuko; Asanuma, Masato; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Sendo, Toshiaki

    2016-05-01

    In previous studies, we detected the photoinitiators 1-hydroxycyclohexyl phenyl ketone (1-HCHPK) and 2-methyl-4'-(methylthio)-2-morpholinopropiophenone (MTMP) in an intravenous injection solution. Importantly, 1-HCHPK and MTMP have been demonstrated to be cytotoxic to normal human peripheral blood (PB) mononuclear cells (MNC). Cell death (apoptosis) pathways can be classified into two modes, caspase-dependent and -independent pathways. However, it is unclear whether methyl 2-benzoylbenzoate (MBB) induces the caspase-dependent and/or -independent pathway in normal human PBMNC. In the present in vitro study, we examined the levels of MBB in a solution from an intravenous fluid bag and the cytotoxicity of MBB towards normal human PBMNC via the caspase-8-, caspase-9-, or apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF)-mediated apoptosis pathways. We found that extracts from the injection solution had been contaminated with approximately 80 μM of the photoinitiator MBB. In addition, MBB induced apoptosis in the high concentration range in normal human PBMNC in vitro. Moreover, we found that MBB-induced apoptosis occurs via the caspase-9 pathway, but not the AIF pathway. In conclusion, we suggest that MBB has cytotoxic effects on normal human PBMNC in vitro, which are mediated via the caspase-dependent pathway. PMID:27044286

  18. Musculoskeletal Injection

    PubMed Central

    Wittich, Christopher M.; Ficalora, Robert D.; Mason, Thomas G.; Beckman, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Patients commonly present to primary care physicians with musculoskeletal symptoms. Clinicians certified in internal medicine must be knowledgeable about the diagnosis and management of musculoskeletal diseases, yet they often receive inadequate postgraduate training on this topic. The musculoskeletal problems most frequently encountered in our busy injection practice involve, in decreasing order, the knees, trochanteric bursae, and glenohumeral joints. This article reviews the clinical presentations of these problems. It also discusses musculoskeletal injections for these problems in terms of medications, indications, injection technique, and supporting evidence from the literature. Experience with joint injection and the pharmacological principles described in this article should allow primary care physicians to become comfortable and proficient with musculoskeletal injections. PMID:19720781

  19. Mipomersen Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... the refrigerator at least 30 minutes before you plan to inject it to allow the medication to ... supplements, and herbal products you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention the medications ...

  20. Ibritumomab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is in a class of medications called monoclonal antibodies with radioisotopes. It works by attaching to cancer ... you receive ibritumomab injection, your body may develop antibodies (substances in the blood that help the immune ...

  1. Romiplostim Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... including other medications or surgery to remove the spleen. Romiplostim injection should not be used to treat ... tell your doctor if you have had your spleen removed.tell your doctor if you are pregnant, ...

  2. Golimumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... and swelling and scales on the skin). ulcerative colitis (a condition which causes swelling and sores in ... you are using golimumab injection to treat ulcerative colitis (a condition which causes swelling and sores in ...

  3. Colistimethate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria that cause infection.Antibiotics such as colistimethate injection will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections. Taking or using antibiotics when they are not needed increases your risk ...

  4. Doxycycline Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria that cause infections.Antibiotics such as doxycycline injection will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections. Taking or using antibiotics when they are not needed increases your risk ...

  5. Tigecycline Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... in a person who was not in the hospital), skin infections, and infections of the abdomen (area between the ... that developed in people who were in a hospital or foot infections in people who have diabetes. Tigecycline injection is ...

  6. Thiotepa Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... reproductive organs where eggs are formed), breast, and bladder cancer. It is also used to treat malignant effusions ( ... how you respond to thiotepa.When used for bladder cancer, thiotepa is infused (injected slowly) into your bladder ...

  7. Ferumoxytol Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Ferumoxytol injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood cells due to too little iron) in adults with chronic kidney disease (damage to the kidneys which may worsen over ...

  8. Daclizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS; a disease in which ... injections. Before you use daclizumab yourself the first time, read the written instructions that come with it. ...

  9. Olanzapine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Olanzapine extended-release injection is used to treat schizophrenia (a mental illness that causes disturbed or unusual ... treat episodes of agitation in people who have schizophrenia or in people who have bipolar I disorder ( ...

  10. Risperidone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... release (long-acting) injection is used to treat schizophrenia (a mental illness that causes disturbed or unusual ... do not already have diabetes. If you have schizophrenia, you are more likely to develop diabetes than ...

  11. Acetaminophen Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is also used in combination with opioid (narcotic) medications to relieve moderate to severe pain. Acetaminophen is in a class of medications called analgesics (pain relievers) and antipyretics (fever reducers). It works by changing ...

  12. Dolasetron Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Dolasetron injection is used to prevent and treat nausea and vomiting that may occur after surgery. Dolasetron ... should not be used to prevent or treat nausea and vomiting in people receiving cancer chemotherapy medications. ...

  13. Teduglutide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome in people who need additional nutrition or fluids from intravenous (IV) therapy. Teduglutide injection is in ... analogs. It works by improving the absorption of fluids and nutrients in the intestines.

  14. Ampicillin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is in a class of medications called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ... and pharmacist if you are allergic to ampicillin; penicillins; cephalosporin antibiotics such as cefaclor, cefadroxil, cefazolin (Ancef, ...

  15. Nafcillin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is in a class of medications called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ... and pharmacist if you are allergic to nafcillin; penicillins; cephalosporin antibiotics such as cefaclor, cefadroxil, cefazolin, cefdinir, ...

  16. Oxacillin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is in a class of medications called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ... and pharmacist if you are allergic to oxacillin; penicillins; cephalosporin antibiotics such as cefaclor, cefadroxil, cefazolin, cefdinir, ...

  17. Lacosamide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... drowsiness uncontrollable shaking of a part of the body problems with coordination, balance, or walking weakness itching redness, irritation, pain, or discomfort at the injection spot Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of ...

  18. Epinephrine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... emergency medical treatment to treat life-threatening allergic reactions caused by insect bites or stings, foods, medications, ... at the first sign of a serious allergic reaction.Use epinephrine injection exactly as directed; do not ...

  19. Vedolizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection may cause serious allergic reactions during an infusion and for several hours afterward. A doctor or ... of the following symptoms during or after your infusion: rash; itching; swelling of the face, eyes, mouth, ...

  20. Mitoxantrone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... medications to relieve pain in people with advanced prostate cancer who did not respond to other medications. Mitoxantrone ... doses). When mitoxantrone injection is used to treat prostate cancer, it is usually given once every 21 days. ...

  1. Bendamustine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... leukemia (CLL; a type of cancer of the white blood cells). Bendamustine injection is also used to treat a ... NHL: cancer that begins in a type of white blood cell that normally fights infection) that is slow spreading, ...

  2. Moxifloxacin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria such as pneumonia; ; and , skin, and abdominal (stomach ... antibiotics called fluoroquinolones. It works by killing the bacteria that cause infections.Antibiotics such as moxifloxacin injection ...

  3. Ceftazidime Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria including pneumonia and other lower respiratory tract (lung) ... medications called cephalosporin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ceftazidime injection will not work ...

  4. Gentamicin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat certain serious infections that are caused by bacteria such as meningitis (infection of the membranes that ... medications called aminoglycoside antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as gentamicin injection will not work ...

  5. Meropenem Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin and abdominal (stomach area) infections caused by bacteria and meningitis (infection of the membranes that surround ... of medications called antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria that cause infection.Antibiotics such as meropenem injection ...

  6. Tobramycin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat certain serious infections that are caused by bacteria such as meningitis (infection of the membranes that ... medications called aminoglycoside antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as tobramycin injection will not work ...

  7. Ceftaroline Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... infections and pneumonia (lung infection) caused by certain bacteria. Ceftaroline is in a class of medications called cephalosporin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ceftaroline injection will not work ...

  8. Telavancin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... serious skin infections caused by certain types of bacteria. Telavancin injection is in a class of medications ... antibiotics. It works by stopping the growth of bacteria. Antibiotics will not work for colds, flu, or ...

  9. Daptomycin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood infections or serious skin infections caused by bacteria. Daptomycin injection is in a class of medications called cyclic lipopeptide antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria. Antibiotics will not work for treating colds, flu, ...

  10. Aztreonam Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat certain infections that are caused by bacteria, including respiratory tract (including pneumonia and bronchitis), urinary ... abdominal (stomach area) infections, that are caused by bacteria. Aztreonam injection also may be used before, during, ...

  11. Cefepime Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria including pneumonia, and skin, urinary tract, and kidney ... medications called cephalosporin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as cefepime injection will not work ...

  12. Amikacin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat certain serious infections that are caused by bacteria such as meningitis (infection of the membranes that ... medications called aminoglycoside antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as amikacin injection will not work ...

  13. Ertapenem Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... abdominal (stomach area) infections, that are caused by bacteria. It is also used for the prevention of ... medications called carbapenem antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ertapenem injection will not work ...

  14. Ciprofloxacin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ciprofloxacin injection is also sometimes used to treat cat scratch disease (an infection that may develop after a person is bitten or scratched by a cat), Legionnaires' disease (type of lung infection), and infections of the ...

  15. Ganciclovir Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Ganciclovir injection is used to treat cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis (eye infection that can cause blindness) in people whose immune system is not working normally, including those people who have ...

  16. Levofloxacin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... infections. Levofloxacin injection is also used to prevent anthrax (a serious infection that may be spread on ... in people who may have been exposed to anthrax germs in the air and treat and prevent ...

  17. Ibandronate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ibandronate is in a class of medications called bisphosphonates. It works by preventing bone breakdown and increasing ... while receiving this medication.Being treated with a bisphosphonate medication such as ibandronate injection for osteoporosis may ...

  18. Fondaparinux Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... the leg), which can lead to pulmonary embolism (PE; a blood clot in the lung), in people ... with warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven) to treat DVT or PE. Fondaparinux injection is in a class of medications ...

  19. Pertuzumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... docetaxel (Taxotere) to treat a certain type of breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. Pertuzumab injection is in a class of medications called monoclonal antibodies. It works by stopping the growth of cancer ...

  20. Octreotide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used to decrease the amount of growth hormone (a natural substance) produced by people with acromegaly (condition in which the body produces too much growth hormone, causing enlargement of the hands, feet, and facial ...

  1. Haloperidol Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... release injection are used to treat schizophrenia (a mental illness that causes disturbed or unusual thinking, loss of ... medications); medications for anxiety, depression, irritable bowel disease, mental illness, motion sickness, Parkinson's disease, seizures, ulcers, or urinary ...

  2. Sumatriptan Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... accompanied by nausea and sensitivity to sound and light). Sumatriptan injection is also used to treat the ... children. Store it at room temperature, away from light, excess heat, and moisture (not in the bathroom). ...

  3. Topotecan Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... organs where eggs are formed) and small cell lung cancer (a type of cancer that begins in the ... topotecan injection is used to treat ovarian or lung cancer, it is usually given once a day for ...

  4. Pembrolizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat a certain type of non-small-cell lung cancer that has spread to nearby tissues or to ... successfully with other medications for non-small-cell lung cancer. Pembrolizumab injection is in a class of medications ...

  5. Oritavancin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... for at least 5 days after receiving oritavancin injection.tell your doctor and pharmacist what other prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking ...

  6. Cefuroxime Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... pneumonia and other lower respiratory tract (lung) infections; meningitis (infection of the membranes that surround the brain ... hearing loss, if you are being treated for meningitis Cefuroxime injection may cause other side effects. Call ...

  7. Alirocumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... further decrease the amount of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol ('bad cholesterol') in the blood. Alirocumab injection is ... antibodies. It works by blocking the production of LDL cholesterol in the body to decrease the amount of ...

  8. Secukinumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to see if you need to receive any vaccinations. It is important to have all vaccines appropriate ... treatment with secukinumab injection. Do not have any vaccinations during your treatment without talking to your doctor. ...

  9. A Solution-Processed Heteropoly Acid Containing MoO3 Units as a Hole-Injection Material for Highly Stable Organic Light-Emitting Devices.

    PubMed

    Ohisa, Satoru; Kagami, Sho; Pu, Yong-Jin; Chiba, Takayuki; Kido, Junji

    2016-08-17

    We report hole-injection layers (HILs) comprising a heteropoly acid containing MoO3 units, phosphomolybdic acid (PMA), in organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs). PMA possesses outstanding properties, such as high solubility in organic solvents, very low surface roughness in the film state, high transparency in the visible region, and an appropriate work function (WF), that make it suitable for HILs. We also found that these properties were dependent on the postbaking atmosphere and temperature after film formation. When the PMA film was baked in N2, the Mo in the PMA was reduced to Mo(V), whereas baking in air had no influence on the Mo valence state. Consequently, different baking atmospheres yielded different WF values. OLEDs with PMA HILs were fabricated and evaluated. OLEDs with PMA baked under appropriate conditions exhibited comparably low driving voltages and higher driving stability compared with OLEDs employing conventional hole-injection materials (HIMs), poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(4-styrenesulfonate), and evaporated MoO3, which clearly shows the high suitability of PMA HILs for OLEDs. PMA is also a commercially available and very cheap material, leading to the widespread use of PMA as a standard HIM.

  10. A Solution-Processed Heteropoly Acid Containing MoO3 Units as a Hole-Injection Material for Highly Stable Organic Light-Emitting Devices.

    PubMed

    Ohisa, Satoru; Kagami, Sho; Pu, Yong-Jin; Chiba, Takayuki; Kido, Junji

    2016-08-17

    We report hole-injection layers (HILs) comprising a heteropoly acid containing MoO3 units, phosphomolybdic acid (PMA), in organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs). PMA possesses outstanding properties, such as high solubility in organic solvents, very low surface roughness in the film state, high transparency in the visible region, and an appropriate work function (WF), that make it suitable for HILs. We also found that these properties were dependent on the postbaking atmosphere and temperature after film formation. When the PMA film was baked in N2, the Mo in the PMA was reduced to Mo(V), whereas baking in air had no influence on the Mo valence state. Consequently, different baking atmospheres yielded different WF values. OLEDs with PMA HILs were fabricated and evaluated. OLEDs with PMA baked under appropriate conditions exhibited comparably low driving voltages and higher driving stability compared with OLEDs employing conventional hole-injection materials (HIMs), poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(4-styrenesulfonate), and evaporated MoO3, which clearly shows the high suitability of PMA HILs for OLEDs. PMA is also a commercially available and very cheap material, leading to the widespread use of PMA as a standard HIM. PMID:27456454

  11. Binding interactions between lysozyme and injectable hydrogels derived from albumin-pH/thermo responsive poly(amino urethane) conjugates in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Rapeekan, Jirathititiporn; Songtipya, Ponusa; Lee, Doo Sung; Manokruang, Kiattikhun

    2016-10-01

    Injectable hydrogels are alternative materials for drug and protein delivery in biomedical applications, which can potentially eliminate the need of surgical implantation in the treatment procedures. Prior to administration, such hydrogels, in a liquid state, must demonstrate good interactions with the incorporated molecules to maintain the sustain release of active agents and to avoid unappreciative burst release. The injectable hydrogels derived from BSA-pH/temperature responsive poly(amino urethane) conjugates have been reported to demonstrated good sustainability for delivery of lysozyme, both in vitro and in vivo. However, the interactions between such conjugates and the loading lysozyme were not fully understood. In this present work, we reported the binding interactions between the studied complex systems, BSA-pH/temperature responsive poly(amino urethane) conjugates (CONJ1 and CONJ2) and lysozyme. Fluorescence spectroscopy in a combination with thermodynamic analysis exhibited that the binding between the conjugates and lysozyme occurred through static quenching and the binding interactions in the complexes were mainly van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonds. The binding constants (KA) determined at 300, 308 and 318K of CONJ1 to lysozyme were 7.96×10(4), 6.45×10(4) and 3.20×10(4)M(-1), respectively and those of CONJ2 to lysozyme were 2.63×10(4), 2.53×10(4) and 1.19×10(4)M(-1), respectively. FTIR analysis showed that the complexes between the conjugates and lysozyme demonstrated sufficiently small deviation in the conformational structures from the native lysozyme. In addition, the morphology revealed by TEM and AFM imaging portrayed the behavior of complex formation in such a way that the conjugates, before complex formation, displayed the core-shell structures. After the complex formation, a number of lysozyme particles were noticeably entrapped as if they penetrated into the preformed core-shell conjugates. PMID:27423103

  12. Magnetron injection gun scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, W.

    1988-04-01

    A set of tradeoff equations was simplified to obtain scaling laws for magnetron injection guns (MIGs). The constraints are chosen to examine the maximum-peak-power capabilities of MIGs. The scaling laws are compared with exact solutions of the design equations and are supported by MIG simulations in which each MIG is designed to double the beam power of an existing design by adjusting one of the four fundamental parameters.

  13. Hydromorphone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... the body, vomiting, diarrhea, or failure to gain weight.tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding.if you ... Hydromorphone injection may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these ... vomiting constipation dry mouth lightheadedness dizziness drowsiness ...

  14. Eculizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... which too many red blood cells are broken down in the body, so there are not enough healthy cells to bring oxygen to all parts of the body). Eculizumab injection is also used to treat atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS; an inherited condition in which small blood ...

  15. Fluconazole Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used to treat fungal infections, including yeast infections of the mouth, throat, esophagus (tube leading from the mouth to the stomach), abdomen (area between the chest and waist), lungs, blood, and ... to prevent yeast infections in patients who are likely to become infected ...

  16. Tositumomab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... has not improved or that had improved after treatment with other medications, but later returned. Tositumomab injection is in a class of medications called monoclonal antibodies with radioisotopes. It works by attaching to cancer cells and releasing radiation to damage the cancer ...

  17. Lanreotide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Lanreotide injection is used to treat people with acromegaly (condition in which the body produces too much growth hormone, causing enlargement of the hands, feet, and facial features; joint pain; and other symptoms) who have not successfully, or cannot be treated ...

  18. Eribulin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... tests to check your body's response to eribulin injection.It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring ...

  19. Pegaptanib Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 7 days after you receive each pegaptanib injection.It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring ...

  20. 100-NR-2 Apatite Treatability Test: High-Concentration Calcium-Citrate-Phosphate Solution Injection for In Situ Strontium-90 Immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fritz, Brad G.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Szecsody, James E.; Williams, Mark D.

    2010-09-01

    Following an evaluation of potential strontium-90 (90Sr) treatment technologies and their applicability under 100-NR-2 hydrogeologic conditions, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Fluor Hanford, Inc. (now CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company [CHPRC]), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that the long-term strategy for groundwater remediation at the 100-N Area should include apatite as the primary treatment technology. This agreement was based on results from an evaluation of remedial alternatives that identified the apatite permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technology as the approach showing the greatest promise for reducing 90Sr flux to the Columbia River at a reasonable cost. This letter report documents work completed to date on development of a high-concentration amendment formulation and initial field-scale testing of this amendment solution.

  1. Optical injection in semiconductor ring lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Coomans, W.; Beri, S.; Sande, G. Van der; Gelens, L.; Danckaert, J.

    2010-03-15

    We theoretically investigate optical injection in semiconductor ring lasers and disclose several dynamical regimes. Through numerical simulations and bifurcation continuation, two separate parameter regions in which two different injection-locked solutions coexist are revealed, in addition to a region in which a frequency-locked limit cycle coexists with an injection-locked solution. Finally, an antiphase chaotic regime without the involvement of any carrier dynamics is revealed. Parallels are drawn with the onset of chaos in the periodically forced Duffing oscillator.

  2. Injectable contraception.

    PubMed

    Kaunitz, A M

    1989-06-01

    The most effective, convenient, reversible method of birth control is considered to be long-acting progestogen injections. Used by over 90 countries, Depot medroxy-progesterone acetate (DMPA, Depo-Provera, Upjohn) has yet to be approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The reluctance of the FDA to approve DMPA and much of the controversy surrounding this method revolve around the results of testing done on animals who were given large doses of the progestogen over a long period of time and developed tumors. However, the large body of research and records on this method that have been compiled over the past 30 years is positive. The injectable method works like oral contraceptives, inhibiting ovulation. Changes in menstruation have been the chief complaint of women who use this method; however, the duration and frequency of spotting and bleeding diminish over time. Other side effects of DMPA and Norethindrone enanthate (NET EN, Noristerat, Schering) are discussed. Also discussed is the history of development and testing for the 2 methods and subdermal implants, specifically Norplant.

  3. Epidural Steroid Injections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Assessment Tools Injection Treatments for Spinal Pain Epidural Steroid Injections Lumbar Zygapophysial (Facet) Joint Injections Surgical Options Nonsurgical Treatments Alternative Medicine Epidural Steroid Injections General Information Why Get an Epidural Steroid ...

  4. 21 CFR 522.1086 - Guaifenesin injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Guaifenesin injection. 522.1086 Section 522.1086... Guaifenesin injection. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of sterile aqueous solution contains 50 milligrams of guaifenesin and 50 milligrams of dextrose. (b) Sponsor. See Nos. 037990 and 059130 in §...

  5. Hip joint injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injected so the provider can see where to place the medicine. The steroid medicine is slowly injected into the joint. After the injection, you will remain on the table for another 5 to 10 minutes or so. ...

  6. Intravitreal injection of octreotide acetate.

    PubMed

    Robertson, J E; Westra, I; Woltering, E A; Winthrop, K L; Barrie, R; O'Dorisio, T M; Holmes, D

    1997-04-01

    This study was conducted to determine the feasibility of injecting the somatostatin analogue, octreotide acetate (OA), into the vitreous cavity. Previous work suggests that octreotide effectively inhibits angiogenesis in vitro, thus its use in vivo may slow the progression of proliferative eye disease. Fifty micrograms of aqueous OA in 50 microliters aqueous solution was injected into the mid-vitreous of kitten eyes (n = 6), and OA levels were monitored over 4 days. A long-acting release form of octreotide (OA-LAR) was also injected into the mid-vitreous of rabbit eyes at doses of 0.36 (n = 16), 1.1 (n = 1), 2.1 (n = 1), 4.05 (n = 1), 8.2 (n = 1), and 36 mg (n = 3) in solution; and octreotide concentrations were measured at various time points over 42 days. OA concentrations were determined by a highly specific radioimmunoassay. Aqueous octreotide was eliminated rapidly (t1/2 = 16 hours) from the vitreous of the kitten eye, with only negligible amounts recoverable 4 days post-injection. In the long-acting form, OA in the rabbit eye reached peak levels at 28 days. By 42 days, OA levels had declined to the 14-day level. Doses of OA-LAR of 1.1 mg or less produced no gross evidence of clinical toxicity and elicited no grossly visible ocular side effects. Doses greater than 1.1 mg produced significant toxicity, including cataracts and rubeosis. The 28-day peak release for long-acting OA implies that monthly intravitreal injections could provide continual high levels of OA. Intravitreal injection of long-acting OA provides sustained, high concentrations of drug, and deserves further study as a potential treatment of proliferative eye diseases.

  7. Beam Injection into RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; Mackay, W. W.; Tsoupas, N.

    1997-05-01

    During the RHIC sextant test in January 1997 beam was injected into a sixth of one of the rings for the first time. We describe the injection zone and its bottlenecks, the application program to steer the beam and the injection kickers. We report on the commissioning of the injection systems and on measurements of the kickers.

  8. 21 CFR 522.800 - Droperidol and fentanyl citrate injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Droperidol and fentanyl citrate injection. 522.800... § 522.800 Droperidol and fentanyl citrate injection. (a) Specifications. Droperidol and fentanyl citrate injection is a sterile solution containing 20 milligrams of droperidol and 0.4 milligram of fentanyl...

  9. 21 CFR 522.800 - Droperidol and fentanyl citrate injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Droperidol and fentanyl citrate injection. 522.800... § 522.800 Droperidol and fentanyl citrate injection. (a) Specifications. Droperidol and fentanyl citrate injection is a sterile solution containing 20 milligrams of droperidol and 0.4 milligram of fentanyl...

  10. 21 CFR 522.1468 - Naproxen for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Naproxen for injection. (a) Specifications. The drug is a lyophilized powder which is reconstituted with sterile water for injection to form a 10 percent sterile aqueous solution (100 milligrams per milliliter... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Naproxen for injection. 522.1468 Section...

  11. 21 CFR 522.1468 - Naproxen for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Naproxen for injection. (a) Specifications. The drug is a lyophilized powder which is reconstituted with sterile water for injection to form a 10 percent sterile aqueous solution (100 milligrams per milliliter... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Naproxen for injection. 522.1468 Section...

  12. 21 CFR 522.995 - Fluprostenol sodium injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fluprostenol sodium injection. 522.995 Section 522....995 Fluprostenol sodium injection. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of sterile aqueous solution.... (3) Limitations. Administer by intramuscular injection only. Warning: Not for use in horses...

  13. Slit injection device

    DOEpatents

    Alger, Terry W.; Schlitt, Leland G.; Bradley, Laird P.

    1976-06-15

    A laser cavity electron beam injection device provided with a single elongated slit window for passing a suitably shaped electron beam and means for varying the current density of the injected electron beam.

  14. Deoxycholic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Deoxycholic acid injection is used to improve the appearance and profile of moderate to severe submental fat ('double chin'; fatty tissue located under the chin). Deoxycholic acid injection is in a class of medications called ...

  15. Aminocaproic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Aminocaproic acid injection is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid injection is also used to control bleeding in ...

  16. Calcitonin Salmon Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Calcitonin salmon injection is used to treat osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. Osteoporosis is a disease that causes bones to weaken and break more easily. Calcitonin salmon injection is also used to ...

  17. Sodium Ferric Gluconate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Sodium ferric gluconate injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of ... are also receiving the medication epoetin (Epogen, Procrit). Sodium ferric gluconate injection is in a class of ...

  18. Rich catalytic injection

    DOEpatents

    Veninger, Albert

    2008-12-30

    A gas turbine engine includes a compressor, a rich catalytic injector, a combustor, and a turbine. The rich catalytic injector includes a rich catalytic device, a mixing zone, and an injection assembly. The injection assembly provides an interface between the mixing zone and the combustor. The injection assembly can inject diffusion fuel into the combustor, provides flame aerodynamic stabilization in the combustor, and may include an ignition device.

  19. Beam injection into RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Satogata, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Zhang, W.

    1997-07-01

    During the RHIC sextant test in January 1997 beam was injected into a sixth of one of the rings for the first time. The authors describe the injection zone and its bottlenecks. They report on the commissioning of the injection system, on beam based measurements of the kickers and the application program to steer the beam.

  20. 21 CFR 522.1680 - Oxytocin injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Oxytocin injection. 522.1680 Section 522.1680 Food... Oxytocin injection. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter (mL) of solution contains 20 USP units oxytocin. (b... 10 to 20. Sows 0.25 to 1.0 5 to 20. (2) Indications for use. Oxytocin may be used as a...

  1. Strategies for safe injections.

    PubMed Central

    Battersby, A.; Feilden, R.; Stoeckel, P.; Da Silva, A.; Nelson, C.; Bass, A.

    1999-01-01

    In 1998, faced with growing international concern, WHO set out an approach for achieving injection safety that encompassed all elements from patients' expectations and doctors' prescribing habits to waste disposal. This article follows that lead and describes the implications of the approach for two injection technologies: sterilizable and disposable. It argues that focusing on any single technology diverts attention from the more fundamental need for health services to develop their own comprehensive strategies for safe injections. National health authorities will only be able to ensure that injections are administered safely if they take an approach that encompasses the whole system, and choose injection technologies that fit their circumstances. PMID:10680247

  2. Assessing the variability of injectate distribution following carpal tunnel injection--a cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Jariwala, A; Zaliunaite, R; Soames, R; Wigderowitz, C A

    2013-01-01

    This anatomical study was designed to assess the distribution of a solution (injectate) made up using local anesthetic, steroid and dye into the carpal tunnel using a commonly used injection technique. Dissections were undertaken in 29 embalmed cadaveric wrists. The cadaveric specimens were dissected 24 hours after injection to observe the effect of time on diffusion patterns in both superficial and deep planes. Eighteen of the 29 specimens showed the presence of the injectate in the superficial plane and three preferential patterns of distribution were noted in the deep plane: free in the carpal tunnel, exclusively in the tendon sheath and mixed. This is the first study investigating the delayed diffusion pattern of injectate in the carpal tunnel and illustrates its variability. The findings of variable degree of superficial diffusion and different patterns of intracarpal spread help to offer some explanation regarding the variability of the response following carpal tunnel injection.

  3. The RHIC Injection Kicker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, H.; Tuozzolo, J. E.; Tsoupas, N.

    1997-05-01

    Beam transfer from the AGS to RHIC is performed in single-bunch mode. Close spacing of the bunches in the collider requires an injection kicker with a rise time of <95 nsec, suggesting adoption of a travelling wave solution. The required vertical kick of 0.186 T.m is provided by 4 units, each 1.12 m long with a 48.4× 48.4 mm aperture and operated at 1.6 kA. The kicker is constructed as a ``C'' cross section magnet, in which ferrite and high-permittivity ( ~ 100) dielectric sections alternate. The dielectric blocks provide the capacity necessary for the nominally 25 Ohm characteristic impedance of the travelling wave structure, but impose the practical limit on the peak voltage, and thus current, achievable. Computer studies to minimize local electric field enhancements resulted in a configuration capable of holding >50 kV, with adequate safety margin over the nominal 40 kV. Tests indicated the possibility of lowering the nominal voltage by operating mismatched into 20 Ohm terminations without degrading the pulse shape. In this paper, the experience gained in the fabrication of the four kicker units for the ``Sextant Test'' and the results from various single-unit tests and operation in beam are reported.

  4. Acupuncture Sample Injection for Microchip Capillary Electrophoresis and Electrokinetic Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ha, Ji Won; Hahn, Jong Hoon

    2016-05-01

    A simple nanoliter-scale injection technique was developed for polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices to form the well-defined sample plugs in microfluidic channels. Sample injection was achieved by performing acupuncture on a channel with a needle and applying external pressure to a syringe. This technique allowed us to achieve reproducible injection of a 3-nL segment into a microchannel for PDMS microchip-based capillary electrophoresis (CE). Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and capillary electrochromatography (CEC) with bead packing were successfully performed by applying a single potential in the most simplified straight channel. The advantages of this acupuncture injection over the electrokinetic injection in microchip CE include capability of minimizing sample loss and voltage control hardware, capability of serial injections of different sample solutions into a same microchannel, capability of injecting sample plugs into any position of a microchannel, independence on sample solutions during the loading step, and ease in making microchips due to the straight channel, etc. PMID:27056036

  5. Epidural injections for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ESI; Spinal injection for back pain; Back pain injection; Steroid injection - epidural; Steroid injection - back ... pillow under your stomach. If this position causes pain, you either sit up or lie on your ...

  6. An unfortunate injection.

    PubMed

    Shah, Bhavik Sandip; Yarbrough, Chase; Price, Amy; Biswas, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Intramuscular injection has been used to administer medications for more than a hundred years. However, despite our profession's long experience with intramuscular administration, preventable complications such as injection nerve palsies are still prevalent in developing countries. Injections account for one-fifth of all traumatic nerve injuries. These injuries largely occur due to indiscriminate use of intramuscular injections for treating common illnesses, frequently by unlicensed or undertrained practitioners administering unnecessary treatment to impoverished patients. The sciatic nerve is the most commonly injured, and frequently the resulting muscle weakness and associated disability are irreversible. This case report includes a video of a patient with foot drop 6 weeks after gluteal intramuscular injection. Such injuries can be prevented by proper awareness and training, the implementation of safer injection techniques, and quality assurance methods. PMID:26931130

  7. A chemical EOR benchmark study of different reservoir simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudarzi, Ali; Delshad, Mojdeh; Sepehrnoori, Kamy

    2016-09-01

    Interest in chemical EOR processes has intensified in recent years due to the advancements in chemical formulations and injection techniques. Injecting Polymer (P), surfactant/polymer (SP), and alkaline/surfactant/polymer (ASP) are techniques for improving sweep and displacement efficiencies with the aim of improving oil production in both secondary and tertiary floods. There has been great interest in chemical flooding recently for different challenging situations. These include high temperature reservoirs, formations with extreme salinity and hardness, naturally fractured carbonates, and sandstone reservoirs with heavy and viscous crude oils. More oil reservoirs are reaching maturity where secondary polymer floods and tertiary surfactant methods have become increasingly important. This significance has added to the industry's interest in using reservoir simulators as tools for reservoir evaluation and management to minimize costs and increase the process efficiency. Reservoir simulators with special features are needed to represent coupled chemical and physical processes present in chemical EOR processes. The simulators need to be first validated against well controlled lab and pilot scale experiments to reliably predict the full field implementations. The available data from laboratory scale include 1) phase behavior and rheological data; and 2) results of secondary and tertiary coreflood experiments for P, SP, and ASP floods under reservoir conditions, i.e. chemical retentions, pressure drop, and oil recovery. Data collected from corefloods are used as benchmark tests comparing numerical reservoir simulators with chemical EOR modeling capabilities such as STARS of CMG, ECLIPSE-100 of Schlumberger, REVEAL of Petroleum Experts. The research UTCHEM simulator from The University of Texas at Austin is also included since it has been the benchmark for chemical flooding simulation for over 25 years. The results of this benchmark comparison will be utilized to improve

  8. Preparing injectable medicines safely.

    PubMed

    Beaney, Alison M; Black, Anne

    Risks to patients are greater when injectable medicines are prepared in clinical areas (wards, theatres, clinics or even patients' homes), rather than provided in ready-to-use form. This article describes the risks involved in preparing injectable medicines in such areas and outlines key principles to ensure they are prepared safely. It also suggests that high-risk injectable medicines be provided in ready-to-use form, either in house, by pharmacy or by pharmaceutical companies. PMID:22359855

  9. Botulinum toxin injection - larynx

    MedlinePlus

    Injection laryngoplasty; Botox-larynx: spasmodic dysphonia-BTX; Essential voice tremor (EVT)-btx; Glottic insufficiency; Percutaneous electromyography-guided botulinum toxin treatment; Percutaneous indirect laryngoscopy- ...

  10. Numerical simulation of transverse fuel injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Marlon; Riggins, David W.; Mcclinton, Charles R.

    1991-01-01

    A review of recent work at NASA Langley Research Center to compare the predictions of transverse fuel injector flow fields and mixing performance with experimental results is presented. Various cold (non-reactive) mixing studies were selected for code calibration which include the effects of boundary layer thickness and injection angle for sonic hydrogen injection into supersonic air. Angled injection of helium is also included. This study was performed using both the three-dimensional elliptic and the parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) versions of SPARK. Axial solution planes were passed from PNS to elliptic and elliptic to PNS in order to efficiently generate solutions. The PNS version is used both upstream and far downstream of the injector where the flow can be considered parabolic in nature. The comparisons are used to identify experimental deficiencies and computational procedures to improve agreement.

  11. Glenohumeral Joint Injections

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Christopher; Dhawan, Aman; Harwood, Daniel; Gochanour, Eric; Romeo, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Context: Intra-articular injections into the glenohumeral joint are commonly performed by musculoskeletal providers, including orthopaedic surgeons, family medicine physicians, rheumatologists, and physician assistants. Despite their frequent use, there is little guidance for injectable treatments to the glenohumeral joint for conditions such as osteoarthritis, adhesive capsulitis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Evidence Acquisition: We performed a comprehensive review of the available literature on glenohumeral injections to help clarify the current evidence-based practice and identify deficits in our understanding. We searched MEDLINE (1948 to December 2011 [week 1]) and EMBASE (1980 to 2011 [week 49]) using various permutations of intra-articular injections AND (corticosteroid OR hyaluronic acid) and (adhesive capsulitis OR arthritis). Results: We identified 1 and 7 studies that investigated intra-articular corticosteroid injections for the treatment of osteoarthritis and adhesive capsulitis, respectively. Two and 3 studies investigated the use of hyaluronic acid in osteoarthritis and adhesive capsulitis, respectively. One study compared corticosteroids and hyaluronic acid injections in the treatment of osteoarthritis, and another discussed adhesive capsulitis. Conclusion: Based on existing studies and their level of evidence, there is only expert opinion to guide corticosteroid injection for osteoarthritis as well as hyaluronic acid injection for osteoarthritis and adhesive capsulitis. PMID:24427384

  12. Penicillin G Procaine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Duracillin A-S ® ... Pfizerpen A-S® ... injection should not be used to treat gonorrhea (a sexually transmitted disease) or early in the treatment ... serious infections. Penicillin G procaine injection is in a class of medications called penicillins. It works by ...

  13. Gas injected vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Hardin, K. Dan

    1977-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a gas injected vacuum switch comprising a housing having an interior chamber, a conduit for evacuating the interior chamber, within the chamber an anode and a cathode spaced from the anode, and a detonator for injecting electrically conductive gas into the chamber between the anode and the cathode to provide a current path therebetween.

  14. [Intra-articular injections].

    PubMed

    Chapelle, Ch

    2015-09-01

    It is not unusual for a specialist or general practitioner to be presented with a pathology which necessitates the use of an intra-articular injection of corticosteroids, hyaluronic acid or a local anaesthetic. It would seem to be interesting to update and to precise the techniques and methods of intraarticular injections which have appeared in recent international publications, when we know that 30 % of the injections given into the knee and so called "dry" are incorrect and, therefore, inefficient. The indication of an articular injection depends, firstly, on the diagnosis which should be done with great care; after which should be an objective analysis complete with secondary effects linked to both the injection and the product used. The conditions of asepsis, the choice of needles and quantities of the injection and even the ways of the injections should be reviewed in detail. The last studies clearly question the secondary effects of the cartilage degradations of the cortisone given as an intra-articular injection and shows its efficiency on the pain and inflammatory phenomonen in osteoarthritis. Studies on hyaluronic acid are often contradictory going from a modest result to an important pain relief but it is necessary to be aware that the objective criteria are difficult to interpret. The use of local anaesthetics in intra-articular is limited by the few indications in view of the major risk of aggravating the pre-existing lesions by the disappearing signs of pain.

  15. Injection rate control cam

    SciTech Connect

    Perr, J.P.; Liang, E.; Yu, R.C.; Ghuman, A.S.

    1990-10-16

    This patent describes a cam for controlling the injection rate of fuel in a fuel injection system of an engine. The fuel injection system including a cyclically operating unit injector having a body, an injector plunger mounted for reciprocating movement in the injector body between an advanced position and a retracted portion to pump into the engine during each cycle a variable quantity of fuel up to a maximum quantity under rated engine conditions, and a drive train for converting rotational movement of the cam into reciprocating movement of the pumping plunger depending on the profile of the cam. The cam profile comprises at least a plunger retraction segment and a plunger advancement segment for controlling the velocity if injector plunger retraction and advancement, respectively, the plunger advancement segment including a pre-injection subsequent shaped to cause an initial quantity of fuel to be injected into the engine during each cycle at rated engine conditions while the pre-injection subsegment is in contact with the drive train, and an injection subsegment following the pre-injection subsegment.

  16. Health Instruction Packages: Injections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunkleman, Ellie; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in this set of four learning modules designed to instruct nursing students in techniques and equipment utilized for intramuscular injections. The first module, "Equipment for Intramuscular Injections" by Ellie Dunkleman, presents guidelines for selecting needles of the proper length and gauge…

  17. 75 FR 22524 - Implantation or Injectable Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Butorphanol

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-29

    ... ANADA provides for use of an injectable solution of butorphanol tartrate in cats for the relief of pain... BUTORPHINE (butorphanol tartrate, USP) Veterinary Injection in cats for the relief of pain. Modern...

  18. Chemical Methods for Ugnu Viscous Oils

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore Mohanty

    2012-03-31

    The North Slope of Alaska has large (about 20 billion barrels) deposits of viscous oil in Ugnu, West Sak and Shraeder Bluff reservoirs. These shallow reservoirs overlie existing productive reservoirs such as Kuparuk and Milne Point. The viscosity of the Ugnu reservoir on top of Milne Point varies from 200 cp to 10,000 cp and the depth is about 3300 ft. The same reservoir extends to the west on the top of the Kuparuk River Unit and onto the Beaufort Sea. The depth of the reservoir decreases and the viscosity increases towards the west. Currently, the operators are testing cold heavy oil production with sand (CHOPS) in Ugnu, but oil recovery is expected to be low (< 10%). Improved oil recovery techniques must be developed for these reservoirs. The proximity to the permafrost is an issue for thermal methods; thus nonthermal methods must be considered. The objective of this project is to develop chemical methods for the Ugnu reservoir on the top of Milne Point. An alkaline-surfactant-polymer (ASP) formulation was developed for a viscous oil (330 cp) where as an alkaline-surfactant formulation was developed for a heavy oil (10,000 cp). These formulations were tested in one-dimensional and quarter five-spot Ugnu sand packs. Micromodel studies were conducted to determine the mechanisms of high viscosity ratio displacements. Laboratory displacements were modeled and transport parameters (such as relative permeability) were determined that can be used in reservoir simulations. Ugnu oil is suitable for chemical flooding because it is biodegraded and contains some organic acids. The acids react with injected alkali to produce soap. This soap helps in lowering interfacial tension between water and oil which in turn helps in the formation of macro and micro emulsions. A lower amount of synthetic surfactant is needed because of the presence of organic acids in the oil. Tertiary ASP flooding is very effective for the 330 cp viscous oil in 1D sand pack. This chemical formulation

  19. A study on the steady-state solutions of a Bursian diode in the presence of transverse magnetic field, when the electrons of the injected beam are turned back partially or totally

    SciTech Connect

    Pramanik, Sourav; Chakrabarti, Nikhil

    2015-11-15

    The properties of a steady-state planar vacuum diode driven by a cold electron beam have been investigated in the presence of an external transverse magnetic field, employing both the Eulerian and the Lagrangian formalism. With the help of a numerical scheme, the features of the steady-state solutions have been explored in the Eulerian frame, particularly for the case that corresponds to the potential distributions with a virtual cathode. However, exact analytical formulae for the potential and velocity profiles within the inter-electrode region have been derived with the Lagrangian description. In contrast to the previous work [Phys. Plasmas 22, 042110 (2015)], here we have emphasized the situation when electrons are reflected back to the emitter by the magnetic field. Both partial and complete reflection of the electrons due to the magnetic field have been taken into account. Using the emitter electric field as a characteristic parameter, steady-state solutions have been evaluated for specific values of diode length, applied voltage, and magnetic field strength. It has been shown that, due to the inclusion of the magnetic field, a new region of non-unique solutions appears. An external magnetic field seems to have a profound effect in controlling fast electronic switches based on the Bursian diode.

  20. Reply to comments by Veling on"A Semi-Analytical Solution for Large-Scale Injection-Induced Pressure Perturbation and Leakage in a Laterally Bounded Aquifer-Aquitard System"

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J. T.; Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-05-01

    Veling (2010) pointed to 'a serious mistake' and 'mathematical inconsistency' in Zhou et al. (2009) because the dimensionless flow equations in Equation 4 (in terms of dimensionless hydraulic head rise in the aquifer and the aquitard) would give rise to additional terms when back converting to the groundwater flow equations, in the case that initial conditions for hydraulic head were spatially variable. He added, however, that the conclusions of the paper remain valid when uniform initial conditions are assumed. We accept this comment because we have indeed assumed uniform initial conditions in the system but failed to state this explicitly in the publication, partially because this assumption is very common in groundwater hydrology when deriving analytical and semi-analytical solutions. The same assumption was employed, for example, by Veling in Veling and Maas (2009), as stated 'For the ease of presentation we assume from here on that {phi}{sub i0} (r, z) ... are all equal to zero. An arbitrary initial function ... will complicate the solution, but not essentially'. We shall emphasize that with this assumption, our semi-analytical solutions and their derivations are correct.

  1. 21 CFR 522.995 - Fluprostenol sodium injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fluprostenol sodium injection. 522.995 Section 522....995 Fluprostenol sodium injection. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of sterile aqueous solution contains fluprostenol sodium equivalent to 50 micrograms of fluprostenol. (b) Sponsor. See 000859 in §...

  2. 21 CFR 522.1465 - Naltrexone hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Naltrexone hydrochloride injection. 522.1465... § 522.1465 Naltrexone hydrochloride injection. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of sterile aqueous solution contains 50 milligrams of naltrexone hydrochloride. (b) Sponsor. See 053923 in § 510.600(c)...

  3. 40 CFR 146.5 - Classification of injection wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of Class V injection wells are also described in 40 CFR 144.81. Class V wells include: (1) Air... geothermal energy for heating, aquaculture and production of electric power. (13) Wells used for solution... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Classification of injection wells....

  4. 40 CFR 146.5 - Classification of injection wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... types of Class V injection wells are also described in 40 CFR 144.81. Class V wells include: (1) Air... geothermal energy for heating, aquaculture and production of electric power. (13) Wells used for solution... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Classification of injection wells....

  5. [Intravitreal injections of corticoids].

    PubMed

    Demols, P

    2007-01-01

    Intravitreal injections of triamcinolone acetonide are today widely performed as a therapeutic tool for a large variety of ocular diseases. The risk of toxicity of the product and its vehicle is quite real and is still at the center of investigations. Complications related to the substance and the technique of injections are already well-known (intraocular pressure rise, cataract, endophthalmitis, pseudo-endophthalmitis, vitreous haemorrhage and retinal detachment). Carefulness and rigor in the indication, realization and follow-up of these injections are therefore mandatory.

  6. 40 CFR 146.5 - Classification of injection wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... geothermal energy for heating, aquaculture and production of electric power. (13) Wells used for solution... types of Class V injection wells are also described in 40 CFR 144.81. Class V wells include: (1)...

  7. 40 CFR 146.5 - Classification of injection wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... geothermal energy for heating, aquaculture and production of electric power. (13) Wells used for solution... types of Class V injection wells are also described in 40 CFR 144.81. Class V wells include: (1)...

  8. 40 CFR 146.5 - Classification of injection wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... geothermal energy for heating, aquaculture and production of electric power. (13) Wells used for solution... types of Class V injection wells are also described in 40 CFR 144.81. Class V wells include: (1)...

  9. OnabotulinumtoxinA Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... onabotulinumtoxinA injection may cause loss of strength or muscle weakness all over the body or impaired vision. If you have any of these symptoms, do not drive a car, operate machinery, or do other dangerous activities.

  10. AbobotulinumtoxinA Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... abobotulinumtoxinA injection may cause loss of strength or muscle weakness all over the body; blurred vision; or drooping eyelids. If you have any of these symptoms, do not drive a car, operate machinery, or do other dangerous activities.

  11. IncobotulinumtoxinA Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... incobotulinumtoxinA injection may cause loss of strength or muscle weakness all over the body or impaired vision. If you have any of these symptoms, do not drive a car, operate machinery, or do other dangerous activities.if ...

  12. RimabotulinumtoxinB Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... rimabotulinumtoxinB injection may cause loss of strength or muscle weakness all over the body or impaired vision. If you have any of these symptoms, do not drive a car, operate machinery, or do other dangerous activities.

  13. Urinary incontinence - injectable implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... deficiency repair; ISD repair; Injectable bulking agents for stress urinary incontinence ... RR, Blaivas JM, Gormley EA, et al. Female Stress Urinary Incontinence Update Panel of the American Urological Association Education ...

  14. Sipuleucel-T Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor or nurse in a doctor's office or infusion center. It is usually given once every 2 ... injection may cause serious allergic reactions during an infusion and for about 30 minutes afterwards. A doctor ...

  15. Interferon Alfacon-1 Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... ordered interferon alfacon-1 to help treat your hepatitis C infection. The drug will be injected under your ... a synthetic interferon that helps to prevent the hepatitis C virus from growing inside your body. This medication ...

  16. Ferric Carboxymaltose Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... carboxymaltose injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood ... medication is also used to treat iron deficiency anemia in adults with chronic kidney disease (damage to ...

  17. Penicillin G Benzathine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat and prevent certain infections caused by bacteria. Penicillin G benzathine injection is in a class of antibiotics called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria that cause infections.Antibiotics such as penicillin G ...

  18. Corticotropin, Repository Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... position or distract the child with a noisy toy while you are injecting the medication. You can ... recognizing reality vision problems excessive tiredness increased thirst ... the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting ...

  19. Supersonic Pulsed Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, A. D.; Harding, G. C.; Diskin, G. S.

    2001-01-01

    An injector has been developed to provide high-speed high-frequency (order 10 kHz) pulsed a supersonic crossflow. The injector nozzle is formed between the fixed internal surface of the nozzle and a freely rotating three- or four-sided wheel embedded within the device. Flow-induced rotation of the wheel causes the nozzle throat to open and close at a frequency proportional to the speed of sound of the injected gas. Measurements of frequency and mass flow rate as a function of supply pressure are discussed for various injector designs. Preliminary results are presented for wall-normal injection of helium into a Mach-2 ducted airflow. The data include schlieren images in the injectant plume in a plane normal to the flow, downstream of injection.

  20. Iron Sucrose Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... often you receive iron sucrose injection and your total number of doses based on your condition and ... hands or feet; swelling of the hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs; loss of consciousness; or seizures. ...

  1. Premixed direct injection disk

    SciTech Connect

    York, William David; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Lacy, Benjamin; Zuo, Baifang; Uhm, Jong Ho

    2013-04-23

    A fuel/air mixing disk for use in a fuel/air mixing combustor assembly is provided. The disk includes a first face, a second face, and at least one fuel plenum disposed therebetween. A plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes extend through the pre-mixing disk, each mixing tube including an outer tube wall extending axially along a tube axis and in fluid communication with the at least one fuel plenum. At least a portion of the plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes further includes at least one fuel injection hole have a fuel injection hole diameter extending through said outer tube wall, the fuel injection hole having an injection angle relative to the tube axis. The invention provides good fuel air mixing with low combustion generated NOx and low flow pressure loss translating to a high gas turbine efficiency, that is durable, and resistant to flame holding and flash back.

  2. Tevatron injection timing

    SciTech Connect

    Saritepe, S.; Annala, G.

    1993-06-01

    Bunched beam transfer from one accelerator to another requires coordination and synchronization of many ramped devices. During collider operation timing issues are more complicated since one has to switch from proton injection devices to antiproton injection devices. Proton and antiproton transfers are clearly distinct sequences since protons and antiprotons circulate in opposite directions in the Main Ring (MR) and in the Tevatron. The time bumps are different, the kicker firing delays are different, the kickers and lambertson magnets are different, etc. Antiprotons are too precious to be used for tuning purposes, therefore protons are transferred from the Tevatron back into the Main Ring, tracing the path of antiprotons backwards. This tuning operation is called ``reverse injection.`` Previously, the reverse injection was handled in one supercycle. One batch of uncoalesced bunches was injected into the Tevatron and ejected after 40 seconds. Then the orbit closure was performed in the MR. In the new scheme the lambertson magnets have to be moved and separator polarities have to be switched, activities that cannot be completed in one supercycle. Therefore, the reverse injection sequence was changed. This involved the redefinition of TVBS clock event $D8 as MRBS $D8 thus making it possible to inject 6 proton batches (or coalesced bunches) and eject them one at a time on command, performing orbit closure each time in the MR. Injection devices are clock event driven. The TCLK is used as the reference clock. Certain TCLK events are triggered by the MR beam synchronized clock (MRBS) events. Some delays are measured in terms of MRBS ticks and MR revolutions. See Appendix A for a brief description of the beam synchronized clocks.

  3. Injections--how safe.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Saurabh

    2005-04-01

    Injection, is a skin-piercing event performed by a syringe and needle with the purpose of introducing a curative substance or vaccine in a patient. According to WHO, safe injection is one which does not harm to the recepient, does not expose the health worker to any risk and does not result in waste that is dangerous for the community. To achieve this injection should be prepared on a clean workspace, provider should clean his hands appropriately, sterility of the syringe and needle to be maintained, skin of the recipient should be cleaned and above all sharps waste should be managed appropriately. Common danger of unsafe injection is infection. Most medication used in primary care can be administered orally. So firstly the behaviour of healthcare providers and patients must be changed so as to decrease overuse of injections, secondly provision of sufficient quantities of appropriate injection equipment and infection control supplies should be made available and thirdly a sharp waste management system should be set up. PMID:16173426

  4. Oil recovery process: injection of fatty alcohol followed by soap

    SciTech Connect

    Cardenas, R.; Carlin, J.

    1980-07-22

    A method is described for recovering crude oil from a subterranean reservoir having one or more injection means in fluid communication with one or more producing means. The method comprises injecting into said reservoir through said injection means an effective quantity of a solution of a fatty alcohol wherein the alcohol is selected from the group consisting of n-dodecyl, n-octyl and oleyl alcohols and mixtures thereof ranging in concentration from about 0.1 to about 10.0 weight percent of the injected solution and either a crude oil or a refined fraction of crude oil followed by an effective quantity of a solution comprising a soap and water wherein said soap is a sodium dodecyl sulfate ranging in concentration from about 0.05 to about 5.0 weight percent of the injected solution, said solutions combining with the crude oil present in the reservoir to form an oil-in-water emulsion, driving said solutions and emulsion through the reservoir by injection of a driving fluid and recovering the crude oil through said produciton means.

  5. Fuel injection nozzle

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, M.; Tojo, S.; Arai, K.

    1986-07-22

    A fuel injection nozzle is described connected to a fuel injection pump to inject fuel into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine consisting of: a nozzle housing defining therein a fuel sump chamber, an injection hole communicating with the sump chamber and opened at the outer surface of the nozzle housing, a stepped cylinder bore having a smaller diameter bore section and a larger diameter bore section and a fuel passage communicating at one end with the sump chamber and at the other end with the smaller diameter bore section of the stepped cylinder bore; a stepped plunger fitted in the stepped cylinder bore and having a smaller diameter plunger section fitted into the smaller diameter bore section and a larger diameter plunger section fitted into the larger diameter bore section in which the smaller diameter bore section together with the end face of the smaller diameter plunger section defines a pump chamber communicating with the fuel passage and the larger diameter bore section together with the end face of the larger diameter plunger section defines a main fuel chamber into which a main fuel is supplied from the fuel injection pump; auxiliary fuel supply means for supplying an auxiliary fuel into the sump chamber and pump chamber through the fuel passage; valve means for opening and closing an injection hole; communication means for permitting the main fuel chamber to communicate with the fuel passage when the main fuel is supplied from the injection pump into the main fuel chamber to cause the stepped plunger to be moved a predetermined distance in a direction in which the auxiliary fuel in the pump chamber is pressurized.

  6. Injectable Multiple Sclerosis Medications

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Zung Vu

    2012-01-01

    Although injection-site reactions (ISRs) occur with US Food and Drug Administration–approved injectable disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) for multiple sclerosis, there are currently few reports of real-world data on ISR management strategies or possible correlations between ISRs and patient demographics, disease characteristics, and missed injections. Patient-reported data on the use of DMTs, patient demographic and disease characteristics, missed injections, and ISR reduction strategies were collected via e-mail, a patient registry (www.ms-cam.org), and a Web-based survey. Of the 1380 respondents, 1201 (87%) indicated that they had used injectable DMTs, of whom 377 (31%) had used intramuscular (IM) interferon beta-1a (IFNβ-1a), 172 (14%) had used subcutaneous (SC) IFNβ-1a, 183 (15%) had used SC IFNβ-1b, and 469 (39%) had used glatiramer acetate (GA). The majority of respondents were older (73% were ≥40 years), female (79%), married or living with a partner (72%), white (94%), and nonsmoking (82%). Injection-site reaction incidence, grouped according to severity, varied among DMTs, with IM IFNβ-1a causing significantly (P < .001) fewer mild, moderate, or severe ISRs than the other therapies. Female sex and younger age were significantly (P < .05) associated with more moderate ISRs among users of IM IFNβ-1a, SC IFNβ-1b, and GA. Nonwhites reported severe ISRs more often than whites. For all DMTs injection-site massage and avoidance of sensitive sites were the most frequently used strategies to minimize ISRs. These data may help identify patients with characteristics associated with a higher risk for ISRs, allowing health-care professionals to provide anticipatory guidance to patients at risk for decreased adherence or discontinuation. PMID:24453732

  7. Improved electron injection and transport by use of baking soda as a low-cost, air-stable, n-dopant for solution-processed phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earmme, Taeshik; Jenekhe, Samson A.

    2013-06-01

    Sodium bicarbonate (baking soda, NaHCO3) is found to be an efficient low-cost, air-stable, and environmentally friendly n-dopant for electron-transport layer (ETL) in solution-processed phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PhOLEDs). A 2.0-fold enhancement in power efficiency of blue PhOLEDs is observed by use of NaHCO3-doped 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BPhen) ETL. The bulk conductivity of NaHCO3-doped BPhen film is increased by 5 orders of magnitude. Enhanced performance of PhOLEDs is similarly observed by use of NaHCO3-doped 1,3,5-tris(m-pyrid-3-yl-phenyl)benzene ETL. These results demonstrate that sodium bicarbonate is an effective n-dopant in organic electronics.

  8. Effects of Alcohol Injection in Rat Sciatic Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Mazoch, Mathew J.; Cheema, Gulraiz A.; Suva, Larry J.; Thomas, Ruth L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that the injection of dehydrated alcohol has been successful for the treatment of Morton's neuroma in the foot. In this study, we determined the cellular effect of injection of alcohol into and around the sciatic nerve of rats, and measured the extent of cell necrosis and/or any associated histologic or inflammatory changes. Methods Twenty-two male (~375g) Wistar rats were randomized into two groups each receiving alcohol injections into or around the sciatic nerve after nerve exposure under sterile technique. Group 1 rats were injected with a 0.5ml solution of 0.5% Marcaine in the left sciatic nerve as a control group. In the right sciatic nerve a 0.5ml solution of 4% ethanol with 0.5% Marcaine was injected. Group 2 rats received 0.5ml of 20%ethanol with 0.5% Marcaine injected into the left sciatic nerve and 0.5 ml of 30% ethanol with 0.5% Marcaine injected into the right sciatic nerve. In each group, the rats were placed in 3 subgroups: intraneural, perineural, perimuscular injections. All rats were sacrificed and tissue harvested for histologic evaluation at day 10 post injection. Results No evidence of alcohol-associated cell necrosis, apoptosis or apparent inflammation was observed in histologic specimens of any injected nerves, perineural tissue, or muscles in controls or experimental groups regardless of concentration of ethanol injected on day 10. Conclusion We concluded that alcohol injection (≤30% ethanol) into and/or around the sciatic nerve or the adjacent muscle of rats has no histologic evidence of necrosis or inflammation to the nerve or surrounding tissue. There was no observable histological change in apoptosis, or cell number, in response to the alcohol injection. PMID:25097192

  9. Syringe-injectable electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia; Fu, Tian-Ming; Cheng, Zengguang; Hong, Guosong; Zhou, Tao; Jin, Lihua; Duvvuri, Madhavi; Jiang, Zhe; Kruskal, Peter; Xie, Chong; Suo, Zhigang; Fang, Ying; Lieber, Charles M.

    2015-07-01

    Seamless and minimally invasive three-dimensional interpenetration of electronics within artificial or natural structures could allow for continuous monitoring and manipulation of their properties. Flexible electronics provide a means for conforming electronics to non-planar surfaces, yet targeted delivery of flexible electronics to internal regions remains difficult. Here, we overcome this challenge by demonstrating the syringe injection (and subsequent unfolding) of sub-micrometre-thick, centimetre-scale macroporous mesh electronics through needles with a diameter as small as 100 μm. Our results show that electronic components can be injected into man-made and biological cavities, as well as dense gels and tissue, with >90% device yield. We demonstrate several applications of syringe-injectable electronics as a general approach for interpenetrating flexible electronics with three-dimensional structures, including (1) monitoring internal mechanical strains in polymer cavities, (2) tight integration and low chronic immunoreactivity with several distinct regions of the brain, and (3) in vivo multiplexed neural recording. Moreover, syringe injection enables the delivery of flexible electronics through a rigid shell, the delivery of large-volume flexible electronics that can fill internal cavities, and co-injection of electronics with other materials into host structures, opening up unique applications for flexible electronics.

  10. Syringe-injectable electronics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Fu, Tian-Ming; Cheng, Zengguang; Hong, Guosong; Zhou, Tao; Jin, Lihua; Duvvuri, Madhavi; Jiang, Zhe; Kruskal, Peter; Xie, Chong; Suo, Zhigang; Fang, Ying; Lieber, Charles M

    2015-07-01

    Seamless and minimally invasive three-dimensional interpenetration of electronics within artificial or natural structures could allow for continuous monitoring and manipulation of their properties. Flexible electronics provide a means for conforming electronics to non-planar surfaces, yet targeted delivery of flexible electronics to internal regions remains difficult. Here, we overcome this challenge by demonstrating the syringe injection (and subsequent unfolding) of sub-micrometre-thick, centimetre-scale macroporous mesh electronics through needles with a diameter as small as 100 μm. Our results show that electronic components can be injected into man-made and biological cavities, as well as dense gels and tissue, with >90% device yield. We demonstrate several applications of syringe-injectable electronics as a general approach for interpenetrating flexible electronics with three-dimensional structures, including (1) monitoring internal mechanical strains in polymer cavities, (2) tight integration and low chronic immunoreactivity with several distinct regions of the brain, and (3) in vivo multiplexed neural recording. Moreover, syringe injection enables the delivery of flexible electronics through a rigid shell, the delivery of large-volume flexible electronics that can fill internal cavities, and co-injection of electronics with other materials into host structures, opening up unique applications for flexible electronics.

  11. Fuel injection pump

    SciTech Connect

    Hishinuma, O.; Masuda, A.; Ohmori, T.; Miyaki, M.; Takemoto, E.

    1987-06-09

    This patent describes a fuel injection pump for an internal combustion engine comprising: a housing having a cylindrical inner surface; a shaft having a portion disposed in rotatably sliding engagement with the cylindrical inner surface and having a first axial bore and a second radial bore therein; at least one pumping plunger slidably disposed in the second radial bore to cooperate therewith to define a compression chamber; a pumping plunger is adapted to be moved in the second radial bore to vary the volume of the compression chamber; an injection plunger slidably disposed in the first axial, bore to cooperate in defining the first and second pressure chambers separated from each other by the injection plunger.

  12. Flow regimes for fluid injection into a confined porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Zhong; Guo, Bo; Christov, Ivan C.; Celia, Michael A.; Stone, Howard A.

    2015-02-24

    We report theoretical and numerical studies of the flow behaviour when a fluid is injected into a confined porous medium saturated with another fluid of different density and viscosity. For a two-dimensional configuration with point source injection, a nonlinear convection–diffusion equation is derived to describe the time evolution of the fluid–fluid interface. In the early time period, the fluid motion is mainly driven by the buoyancy force and the governing equation is reduced to a nonlinear diffusion equation with a well-known self-similar solution. In the late time period, the fluid flow is mainly driven by the injection, and the governing equation is approximated by a nonlinear hyperbolic equation that determines the global spreading rate; a shock solution is obtained when the injected fluid is more viscous than the displaced fluid, whereas a rarefaction wave solution is found when the injected fluid is less viscous. In the late time period, we also obtain analytical solutions including the diffusive term associated with the buoyancy effects (for an injected fluid with a viscosity higher than or equal to that of the displaced fluid), which provide the structure of the moving front. Numerical simulations of the convection–diffusion equation are performed; the various analytical solutions are verified as appropriate asymptotic limits, and the transition processes between the individual limits are demonstrated.

  13. Flow regimes for fluid injection into a confined porous medium

    DOE PAGES

    Zheng, Zhong; Guo, Bo; Christov, Ivan C.; Celia, Michael A.; Stone, Howard A.

    2015-02-24

    We report theoretical and numerical studies of the flow behaviour when a fluid is injected into a confined porous medium saturated with another fluid of different density and viscosity. For a two-dimensional configuration with point source injection, a nonlinear convection–diffusion equation is derived to describe the time evolution of the fluid–fluid interface. In the early time period, the fluid motion is mainly driven by the buoyancy force and the governing equation is reduced to a nonlinear diffusion equation with a well-known self-similar solution. In the late time period, the fluid flow is mainly driven by the injection, and the governingmore » equation is approximated by a nonlinear hyperbolic equation that determines the global spreading rate; a shock solution is obtained when the injected fluid is more viscous than the displaced fluid, whereas a rarefaction wave solution is found when the injected fluid is less viscous. In the late time period, we also obtain analytical solutions including the diffusive term associated with the buoyancy effects (for an injected fluid with a viscosity higher than or equal to that of the displaced fluid), which provide the structure of the moving front. Numerical simulations of the convection–diffusion equation are performed; the various analytical solutions are verified as appropriate asymptotic limits, and the transition processes between the individual limits are demonstrated.« less

  14. Water Injected Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Shouse, D. T.; Roquemore, W. M.

    2005-01-01

    From antiquity, water has been a source of cooling, lubrication, and power for energy transfer devices. More recent applications in gas turbines demonstrate an added facet, emissions control. Fogging gas turbine inlets or direct injection of water into gas turbine combustors, decreases NOx and increases power. Herein we demonstrate that injection of water into the air upstream of the combustor reduces NOx by factors up to three in a natural gas fueled Trapped Vortex Combustor (TVC) and up to two in a liquid JP-8 fueled (TVC) for a range in water/fuel and fuel/air ratios.

  15. Injectable controlled release depots for large molecules

    PubMed Central

    Schwendeman, Steven P.; Shah, Ronak B.; Bailey, Brittany A.; Schwendeman, Anna S.

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable, injectable depot formulations for long-term controlled drug release have improved therapy for a number of drug molecules and led to over a dozen highly successful pharmaceutical products. Until now, success has been limited to several small molecules and peptides, although remarkable improvements have been accomplished in some of these cases. For example, twice-a-year depot injections with leuprolide are available compared to the once-a-day injection of the solution dosage form. Injectable depots are typically prepared by encapsulation of the drug in poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), a polymer that is used in children every day as a resorbable suture material, and therefore, highly biocompatible. PLGAs remain today as one of the few “real world” biodegradable synthetic biomaterials used in US FDA-approved parenteral long-acting-release (LAR) products. Despite their success, there remain critical barriers to the more widespread use of PLGA LAR products, particularly for delivery of more peptides and other large molecular drugs, namely proteins. In this review, we describe key concepts in the development of injectable PLGA controlled-release depots for peptides and proteins, and then use this information to identify key issues impeding greater widespread use of PLGA depots for this class of drugs. Finally, we examine important approaches, particularly those developed in our research laboratory, toward overcoming these barriers to advance commercial LAR development. PMID:24929039

  16. Complications Following BellaGen™ Injection.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi Kyung; Kim, Hyun Kyu; Park, Kui Young; Li, Kapsok; Seo, Seong Jun; Hong, Chang Kwun

    2011-12-01

    BellaGen™ is an injectable acellular dermal matrix granule derived from donated human skin tissue that was recently developed for soft tissue augmentation. Its use has been sporadically reported in penile girth enhancement procedures. Many cases of complications have been reported after injecting acellular dermal matrices like AlloDerm or SureDerm™ but few reports on complications associated with BellaGen™ injection. We report here on penile skin inflammation and necrosis following augmentation phalloplasty with BellaGen™, which developed 3 days after the injection and persisted for more than 2 weeks. The patient had a 15 year history of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and he was treated with oral antibiotics and wet dressings with KMNO4 solution to combine preservation of the remaining penile soft tissue with debridement of avascular tissue. The lesion improved with this treatment, but the patient experienced pain for about 2 weeks. All patients should be informed of the potential complications with the use of injectable acellular dermal matrices before treatment. Patient selection for augmentation is also important to have the most desirable results. PMID:22346264

  17. Persulfate injection into a gasoline source zone.

    PubMed

    Sra, Kanwartej S; Thomson, Neil R; Barker, Jim F

    2013-07-01

    One pore volume of unactivated sodium persulfate was delivered into an emplaced gasoline residual source zone at CFB Borden. Concentrations of inorganic species (S2O8(2-), SO4(2-), Na(+), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC)) and selected gasoline compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, trimethylbenzenes and naphthalene) were monitored across a transect equipped with 90 multilevel sampling points for >10months post-injection. Mass loading (M˙) of compounds constructed from the transect data was used for assessment purposes. Breakthrough of inorganic species was observed when the injection slug crossed the monitoring transect. An increase in [Formula: see text] indicated persulfate consumption during oxidation of gasoline compounds or degradation due to the interaction with aquifer materials. M˙DIC increased by >100% suggesting some mineralization of gasoline compounds during treatment. Mass loading for all the monitored gasoline compounds reduced by 46 to 86% as the inorganic slug crossed the monitoring transect. The cumulative mass discharge across the monitoring transect was 19 to 58% lower than that expected without persulfate injection. After the inorganic injection slug was flushed from the source zone a partial rebound (40 to 80% of baseline levels) of mass discharge of the monitored gasoline compounds was observed. The ensemble of data collected provides insight into the fate and transport of the injected persulfate solution, and the accompanying treatment of a gasoline the source zone.

  18. Iron Dextran Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... called iron replacement products. It works by replenishing iron stores so that the body can make more red blood cells. ... and order certain lab tests to check your body's response to iron dextran injection.Before having any laboratory test, tell ...

  19. 75 FR 9333 - Implantation or Injectable Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Tilmicosin

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-02

    ... supplemental new animal drug application (NADA) filed by Elanco Animal Health, A Division of Eli Lilly & Co. The supplemental NADA provides a dose range for use of an injectable solution of tilmicosin phosphate... to NADA 140-929 for MICOTIL 300 (tilmicosin injection, USP) Injection, available by...

  20. More than just someone to inject drugs with: injecting within primary injection partnerships

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Meghan D.; Bates, Anna; Andrew, Erin; Hahn, Judith; Page, Kimberly; Maher, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies have shown intimate injection partners engage in higher rates of syringe and injecting equipment sharing. We examined the drug use context and development of injection drug use behaviors within intimate injection partnerships. Methods In-depth interviews (n=18) were conducted with both members of nine injecting partnerships in Sydney, Australia. Content analysis identified key domains related to the reasons for injecting with a primary injection partner and development of drug injection patterns. Main Findings Most partnerships (n=5) were also sexual; three were blood-relatives and one a friend dyad. The main drug injected was heroin (66%) with high rates of recent sharing behaviors (88%) reported within dyads. Injecting within a primary injection partnership provided perceived protection against overdose events, helped reduce stress, increased control over when, where, and how drugs were used, and promoted the development of an injecting pattern where responsibilities could be shared. Unique to injecting within primary injection partnerships was the social connection and companionship resulted in a feeling of fulfillment while also blinding one from recognizing risky behavior. Conclusions Findings illuminated the tension between protection and risks within primary injection partnerships. Primary injection partnerships provide a potential platform to expand risk reduction strategies. PMID:26460140

  1. Injection-controlled laser resonator

    DOEpatents

    Chang, J.J.

    1995-07-18

    A new injection-controlled laser resonator incorporates self-filtering and self-imaging characteristics with an efficient injection scheme. A low-divergence laser signal is injected into the resonator, which enables the injection signal to be converted to the desired resonator modes before the main laser pulse starts. This injection technique and resonator design enable the laser cavity to improve the quality of the injection signal through self-filtering before the main laser pulse starts. The self-imaging property of the present resonator reduces the cavity induced diffraction effects and, in turn, improves the laser beam quality. 5 figs.

  2. Injection-controlled laser resonator

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Jim J.

    1995-07-18

    A new injection-controlled laser resonator incorporates self-filtering and self-imaging characteristics with an efficient injection scheme. A low-divergence laser signal is injected into the resonator, which enables the injection signal to be converted to the desired resonator modes before the main laser pulse starts. This injection technique and resonator design enable the laser cavity to improve the quality of the injection signal through self-filtering before the main laser pulse starts. The self-imaging property of the present resonator reduces the cavity induced diffraction effects and, in turn, improves the laser beam quality.

  3. Injectable nanocarriers for biodetoxification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroux, Jean-Christophe

    2007-11-01

    Hospitals routinely treat patients suffering from overdoses of drugs or other toxic chemicals as a result of illicit drug consumption, suicide attempts or accidental exposures. However, for many life-threatening situations, specific antidotes are not available and treatment is largely based on emptying the stomach, administering activated charcoal or other general measures of intoxication support. A promising strategy for managing such overdoses is to inject nanocarriers that can extract toxic agents from intoxicated tissues. To be effective, the nanocarriers must remain in the blood long enough to sequester the toxic components and/or their metabolites, and the toxin bound complex must also remain stable until it is removed from the bloodstream. Here, we discuss the principles that govern the use of injectable nanocarriers in biodetoxification and review the pharmacological performance of a number of different approaches.

  4. Fuel injection valve connection

    SciTech Connect

    Eshleman, E.S.; Field, M.J.; Penwright, J.L.

    1987-09-15

    A fuel injection valve connection is described which consists of a fuel injection valve having a cylindrical inlet fitting. The fitting has a threaded internal surface and a cylindrical external surface. A fuel connector has a projection with a threaded external surface that mates with the threaded internal surface of the fitting. The connector also has a sleeve with a cylindrical internal surface surrounding the fitting and an O-ring sealingly engaging the internal surface of the sleeve and the external surface of the fitting, whereby the valve may be rotated relative to the connector without breaking the sealing engagement between the valve and the connector, and wherein the connector also has a tab engageable with the injector to prevent unthreading of the valve from the connector.

  5. INJECTION-MOLDING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Lobell, G.M.

    1958-02-11

    This patent is drawn to an injection molding apparatus for producing a tube closed at one end wherein the normally unsupported end of the core located in the cavity during the injection of the molten material to fill the space between the core and cavity wall, which supporting means is automatically removed from operation during the forming of the closed end of the tube. This support means is a plug extending through the end of the core into a recess in the bottom of the cavity where the closed end of the tube is to be formed. The plug is spring pressed into said recess and is forced out of the recess by a slidable bushing at the top of the cavity which is moved against the force of the spring by the molten material when it fills the uppormost open end portion of the cavity, thereby permitting the closed end of the tube to be formed.

  6. Spear 3 Injection Kicker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebek, J.; Arnett, D.; Langton, J.; Pappas, C.

    2002-08-01

    The design of the SPEAR 3 injection kicker system is presented. This system will include three kicker magnets and their associated pulsers. The magnet design is based on the DELTA kicker magnets, which present a low RF impedance to the beam, and are relatively straightforward to construct. The pulsers use cascaded IGBT stages that are based on the modulator pulsers developed by a SLAC/LLNL collaboration for the NLC. Design considerations and the results of prototype tests will be discussed.

  7. Injection-induced earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellsworth, William L.

    2013-01-01

    Earthquakes in unusual locations have become an important topic of discussion in both North America and Europe, owing to the concern that industrial activity could cause damaging earthquakes. It has long been understood that earthquakes can be induced by impoundment of reservoirs, surface and underground mining, withdrawal of fluids and gas from the subsurface, and injection of fluids into underground formations. Injection-induced earthquakes have, in particular, become a focus of discussion as the application of hydraulic fracturing to tight shale formations is enabling the production of oil and gas from previously unproductive formations. Earthquakes can be induced as part of the process to stimulate the production from tight shale formations, or by disposal of wastewater associated with stimulation and production. Here, I review recent seismic activity that may be associated with industrial activity, with a focus on the disposal of wastewater by injection in deep wells; assess the scientific understanding of induced earthquakes; and discuss the key scientific challenges to be met for assessing this hazard.

  8. Snowplow Injection Front Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. E.; Chandler, M. O.; Buzulukova, N.; Collinson, G. A.; Kepko, E. L.; Garcia-Sage, K. S.; Henderson, M. G.; Sitnov, M. I.

    2013-01-01

    As the Polar spacecraft apogee precessed through the magnetic equator in 2001, Polar encountered numerous substorm events in the region between geosynchronous orbit and 10 RE geocentric distance; most of them in the plasma sheet boundary layers. Of these, a small number was recorded near the neutral sheet in the evening sector. Polar/Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment provides a unique perspective on the lowest-energy ion plasma, showing that these events exhibited a damped wavelike character, initiated by a burst of radially outward flow transverse to the local magnetic field at approximately 80 km/s. They then exhibit strongly damped cycles of inward/outward flow with a period of several minutes. After one or two cycles, they culminated in a hot plasma electron and ion injection, quite similar to those observed at geosynchronous orbit. Cold plasmaspheric plasmas comprise the outward flow cycles, while the inward flow cycles contain counterstreaming field-parallel polar wind-like flows. The observed wavelike structure, preceding the arrival of an earthward moving substorm injection front, suggests an outward displacement driven by the inward motion at local times closer to midnight, that is, a "snowplow" effect. The damped in/out flows are consistent with interchange oscillations driven by the arrival at the observed local time by an injection originating at greater radius and local time.

  9. Peginterferon Beta-1a Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS, a disease in which ... peginterferon beta-1a injection at around the same time of day each time you inject it. Follow ...

  10. Interferon Beta-1b Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS, a disease in which ... interferon beta-1b injection at around the same time of day each time you inject it. Follow ...

  11. Interferon Alfa-2b Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... medication either subcutaneously or intramuscularly three times a week. HBV, inject the medication either subcutaneously or intramuscularly three times a week usually for 16 weeks. hairy cell leukemia, inject ...

  12. Improving polymer injectivity at West Coyote Field, California

    SciTech Connect

    Shuler, P.J.; Kuchne, D.L.; Uhl, J.T.; Walkup, G.W.

    1987-08-01

    This paper presents a case history where laboratory and simulation results were used to model a single-well polymer injectivity field test in the West Coyote field and to improve injectivity in a subsequent field test. The polyacrylamide used in the first test exhibited low injectivity. Laboratory studies were performed to identify the causes of low injectivity and to model the field test physically. Laboratory core data and reservoir properties were used in a mathematical model to calculate the polymer injectivity, which closely matched that observed in the field. The low polymer injectivity at West Coyote was a result of formation damage caused by the polymer and low-salinity polymer makeup water and the high resistance factor developed by the polymer. These problems were overcome by using a lower-molecular-weight polyacrylamide, preshearing the polymer solution before injection, and increasing the salinity of the polymer makeup water. These improvements resulted in a 50% increase in injectivity during the second polymer injectivity field test at West Coyote.

  13. Improving polymer injectivity at West Coyote Field, California

    SciTech Connect

    Shuler, P.J.; Kuehne, D.L.; Uhl, J.T.; Walkup, G.W.

    1985-03-01

    This paper presents a case history where laboratory and simulation results were used to model a single-well polymer injectivity field test in the West Coyote Field and improve the injectivity in a subsequent field test. The polyacrylamide polymer used in the first test exhibited low injectivity. Laboratory studies were performed to identify the causes of low injectivity and physically model the field test. Laboratory core data and reservoir properties were used in a mathematical model to calculate the polymer injectivity, which closely matched that observed in the field. The low polymer injectivity at West Coyote was due to: formation damage caused by the polymer and low salinity polymer makeup water; and the high resistance factor developed by the polymer. These problems were overcome by: using a lower molecular weight polyacrylamide; preshearing the polymer solution before injection; and increasing the salinity of the polymer makeup water. These improvements resulted in a 50% increase in injectivity during the second polymer injectivity field test at West Coyote.

  14. Gaseous Fuel Injection Modeling using a Gaseous Sphere Injection Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Hessel, R P; Aceves, S M; Flowers, D L

    2006-03-06

    The growing interest in gaseous fuels (hydrogen and natural gas) for internal combustion engines calls for the development of computer models for simulation of gaseous fuel injection, air entrainment and the ensuing combustion. This paper introduces a new method for modeling the injection and air entrainment processes for gaseous fuels. The model uses a gaseous sphere injection methodology, similar to liquid droplet in injection techniques used for liquid fuel injection. In this paper, the model concept is introduced and model results are compared with correctly- and under-expanded experimental data.

  15. Reductant injection and mixing system

    DOEpatents

    Reeves, Matt; Henry, Cary A.; Ruth, Michael J.

    2016-02-16

    A gaseous reductant injection and mixing system is described herein. The system includes an injector for injecting a gaseous reductant into an exhaust gas stream, and a mixer attached to a surface of the injector. The injector includes a plurality of apertures through which the gaseous reductant is injected into an exhaust gas stream. The mixer includes a plurality of fluid deflecting elements.

  16. Electroosmotic flow and injection: application to conductimetry.

    PubMed

    Tang, L; Huber, C O

    1994-10-01

    Electroosmotic solution propulsion and sample injection using fused silica tube was investigated. Capillary tube dimensions were 50-100 microm i.d. by 4-7 cm length with a break in the capillary wall near one end through which electrolytic contact with the capillary solution was established. The applied field was typically 150 V/cm. The voltage at the break in the column was monitored by potentiometry with a bridge configuration. Concentrations ranging from 10 microM to 100 mM were accommodated. The basis for high sensitivity, e.g. 70 mV/microM, together with low cell volume, e.g. 20 nl, was established. Tap water conductivity measurements were made using CaCl(2) reference solution.

  17. 21 CFR 522.82 - Aminopropazine fumarate sterile solution injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... equivalent to 25 milligrams of aminopropazine base. (b) Sponsor. See No. 000061 in § 510.600(c) of this..., such as occur in urethral spasms associated with urolithiasis in cats and dogs and in colic spasms in... bioequivalency and safety information. (2) It is administered intramuscularly or intravenously to dogs and...

  18. 21 CFR 522.1870 - Praziquantel injectable solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... of praziquantel. (b) Sponsors. See 000859 and 059130 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) Conditions... veterinarian. (2) Cats—(i) Amount. For cats under 5 pounds, 0.2 milliliter (11.4 milligrams); 5 to 10 pounds,...

  19. 21 CFR 522.82 - Aminopropazine fumarate sterile solution injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... equivalent to 25 milligrams of aminopropazine base. (b) Sponsor. See No. 000061 in § 510.600(c) of this..., such as occur in urethral spasms associated with urolithiasis in cats and dogs and in colic spasms in... bioequivalency and safety information. (2) It is administered intramuscularly or intravenously to dogs and...

  20. 21 CFR 522.82 - Aminopropazine fumarate sterile solution injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... 522.82 Section 522.82 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN..., such as occur in urethral spasms associated with urolithiasis in cats and dogs and in colic spasms in... bioequivalency and safety information. (2) It is administered intramuscularly or intravenously to dogs and...

  1. 21 CFR 522.82 - Aminopropazine fumarate sterile solution injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... 522.82 Section 522.82 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN..., such as occur in urethral spasms associated with urolithiasis in cats and dogs and in colic spasms in... bioequivalency and safety information. (2) It is administered intramuscularly or intravenously to dogs and...

  2. Injectable Hydrogels for Cardiac Tissue Repair after Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Khattab, Ahmad; Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Hweij, Khaled Abou; Zeitouny, Joya; Waters, Renae; Sayegh, Malek; Hossain, Md Monowar; Paul, Arghya

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac tissue damage due to myocardial infarction (MI) is one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide. The available treatments of MI include pharmaceutical therapy, medical device implants, and organ transplants, all of which have severe limitations including high invasiveness, scarcity of donor organs, thrombosis or stenosis of devices, immune rejection, and prolonged hospitalization time. Injectable hydrogels have emerged as a promising solution for in situ cardiac tissue repair in infarcted hearts after MI. In this review, an overview of various natural and synthetic hydrogels for potential application as injectable hydrogels in cardiac tissue repair and regeneration is presented. The review starts with brief discussions about the pathology of MI, its current clinical treatments and their limitations, and the emergence of injectable hydrogels as a potential solution for post MI cardiac regeneration. It then summarizes various hydrogels, their compositions, structures and properties for potential application in post MI cardiac repair, and recent advancements in the application of injectable hydrogels in treatment of MI. Finally, the current challenges associated with the clinical application of injectable hydrogels to MI and their potential solutions are discussed to help guide the future research on injectable hydrogels for translational therapeutic applications in regeneration of cardiac tissue after MI. PMID:27668147

  3. Injectable Hydrogels for Cardiac Tissue Repair after Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Khattab, Ahmad; Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Hweij, Khaled Abou; Zeitouny, Joya; Waters, Renae; Sayegh, Malek; Hossain, Md Monowar; Paul, Arghya

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac tissue damage due to myocardial infarction (MI) is one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide. The available treatments of MI include pharmaceutical therapy, medical device implants, and organ transplants, all of which have severe limitations including high invasiveness, scarcity of donor organs, thrombosis or stenosis of devices, immune rejection, and prolonged hospitalization time. Injectable hydrogels have emerged as a promising solution for in situ cardiac tissue repair in infarcted hearts after MI. In this review, an overview of various natural and synthetic hydrogels for potential application as injectable hydrogels in cardiac tissue repair and regeneration is presented. The review starts with brief discussions about the pathology of MI, its current clinical treatments and their limitations, and the emergence of injectable hydrogels as a potential solution for post MI cardiac regeneration. It then summarizes various hydrogels, their compositions, structures and properties for potential application in post MI cardiac repair, and recent advancements in the application of injectable hydrogels in treatment of MI. Finally, the current challenges associated with the clinical application of injectable hydrogels to MI and their potential solutions are discussed to help guide the future research on injectable hydrogels for translational therapeutic applications in regeneration of cardiac tissue after MI. PMID:27668147

  4. Alkaline injection for enhanced oil recovery: a status report

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, E.H.; Berg, R.L.; Carmichael, J.D.; Weinbrandt, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    In the past several years, there has been renewed interest in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by alkaline injection. Alkaline solutions also are being used as preflushes in micellar/polymer projects. Several major field tests of alkaline flooding are planned, are in progress, or recently have been completed. Considerable basic research on alkaline injection has been published recently, and more is in progress. This paper summarizes known field tests and, where available, the amount of alkali injected and the performance results. Recent laboratory work, much sponsored by the U.S. DOE, and the findings are described. Alkaline flood field test plans for new projects are summarized.

  5. Optical injection of gold nanoparticles into living cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Miao; Lohmüller, Theobald; Feldmann, Jochen

    2015-01-14

    The controlled injection of nanoscopic objects into living cells with light offers promising prospects for the development of novel molecular delivery strategies or intracellular biosensor applications. Here, we show that single gold nanoparticles from solution can be patterned on the surface of living cells with a continuous wave laser beam. In a second step, we demonstrate how the same particles can then be injected into the cells through a combination of plasmonic heating and optical force. We find that short exposure times are sufficient to perforate the cell membrane and inject the particles into cells with a survival rate of >70%.

  6. Rain underscores need for injection

    SciTech Connect

    Stelling, K.F.

    1996-01-01

    Since 1987, steam production totals at The Geysers Geothermal field have fallen and water injection totals have remained quite stable, except for the unusually dry winter months of 1994 when injection fell by a record amount. The heavy rainfall in the first half of 1995 altered the long-term production and injection patterns and underscored the need to increase injection in the field. From January to June 1995, steam production at The Geysers was reduced by 37 percent form the amount produced during the same period in 1994--because the rain increased availability of hydroelectric power. At the same time, water injection in the field rose by 25 percent because more rainwater was available for injection. Consequently, both reservoir pressure and available steam reserves grew, and most power plants that returned on line in the second half of the year produced more megawatts with less steam. This confirmed findings form several injection studies at The Geyser`s.

  7. Epidemiology of Injection Drug Use

    PubMed Central

    Arruda, Nelson; Bruneau, Julie; Jutras-Aswad, Didier

    2016-01-01

    After more than 30 years of research, numerous studies have shown that injection drug use is associated with a wide range of adverse health outcomes such as drug overdoses, drug-related suicidal behaviours, comorbid psychiatric disorders, bloodborne pathogens and other infectious diseases, and traumas. This review explores new trends and prominent issues associated with injection drug use. The dynamic nature of injection drug use is underlined by examining its recent trends and changing patterns in Canada and other “high-income countries.” Three research topics that could further contribute to the development of comprehensive prevention and intervention strategies aimed at people who inject drugs are also discussed: risk behaviours associated with the injection of prescription opioids, binge injection drug use, and mental health problems as determinants of injection risk behaviours. PMID:27254088

  8. Axisymmetric flows from fluid injection into a confined porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Bo; Zheng, Zhong; Celia, Michael A.; Stone, Howard A.

    2016-02-01

    We study the axisymmetric flows generated from fluid injection into a horizontal confined porous medium that is originally saturated with another fluid of different density and viscosity. Neglecting the effects of surface tension and fluid mixing, we use the lubrication approximation to obtain a nonlinear advection-diffusion equation that describes the time evolution of the sharp fluid-fluid interface. The flow behaviors are controlled by two dimensionless groups: M, the viscosity ratio of displaced fluid relative to injected fluid, and Γ, which measures the relative importance of buoyancy and fluid injection. For this axisymmetric geometry, the similarity solution involving R2/T (where R is the dimensionless radial coordinate and T is the dimensionless time) is an exact solution to the nonlinear governing equation for all times. Four analytical expressions are identified as asymptotic approximations (two of which are new solutions): (i) injection-driven flow with the injected fluid being more viscous than the displaced fluid (Γ ≪ 1 and M < 1) where we identify a self-similar solution that indicates a parabolic interface shape; (ii) injection-driven flow with injected and displaced fluids of equal viscosity (Γ ≪ 1 and M = 1), where we find a self-similar solution that predicts a distinct parabolic interface shape; (iii) injection-driven flow with a less viscous injected fluid (Γ ≪ 1 and M > 1) for which there is a rarefaction wave solution, assuming that the Saffman-Taylor instability does not occur at the reservoir scale; and (iv) buoyancy-driven flow (Γ ≫ 1) for which there is a well-known self-similar solution corresponding to gravity currents in an unconfined porous medium [S. Lyle et al. "Axisymmetric gravity currents in a porous medium," J. Fluid Mech. 543, 293-302 (2005)]. The various axisymmetric flows are summarized in a Γ-M regime diagram with five distinct dynamic behaviors including the four asymptotic regimes and an intermediate regime

  9. An Injectable and Drug-loaded Supramolecular Hydrogel for Local Catheter Injection into the Pig Heart

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Cheyenne C. S.; Bastings, Maartje M. C.; Koudstaal, Stefan; Agostoni, Pierfrancesco; Chamuleau, Steven A. J.; Dankers, Patricia Y. W.

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration of lost myocardium is an important goal for future therapies because of the increasing occurrence of chronic ischemic heart failure and the limited access to donor hearts. An example of a treatment to recover the function of the heart consists of the local delivery of drugs and bioactives from a hydrogel. In this paper a method is introduced to formulate and inject a drug-loaded hydrogel non-invasively and side-specific into the pig heart using a long, flexible catheter. The use of 3-D electromechanical mapping and injection via a catheter allows side-specific treatment of the myocardium. To provide a hydrogel compatible with this catheter, a supramolecular hydrogel is used because of the convenient switching from a gel to a solution state using environmental triggers. At basic pH this ureido-pyrimidinone modified poly(ethylene glycol) acts as a Newtonian fluid which can be easily injected, but at physiological pH the solution rapidly switches into a gel. These mild switching conditions allow for the incorporation of bioactive drugs and bioactive species, such as growth factors and exosomes as we present here in both in vitro and in vivo experiments. The in vitro experiments give an on forehand indication of the gel stability and drug release, which allows for tuning of the gel and release properties before the subsequent application in vivo. This combination allows for the optimal tuning of the gel to the used bioactive compounds and species, and the injection system. PMID:26132631

  10. Operator-free flow injection analyser

    PubMed Central

    de Faria, Lourival C.

    1991-01-01

    A flow injection analyser has been constructed to allow an operator-free determination of up to 40 samples. Besides the usual FIA apparatus, the analyser includes a home-made sample introduction device made with three electromechanical three-way valves and an auto-sampler from Technicon which has been adapted to be commanded by an external digital signal. The analyser is controlled by a single board SDK-8085 microcomputer. The necessary interface to couple the analyser components to the microcomputer is also described. The analyser was evaluated for a Cr(VI)-FIA determination showing a very good performance with a relative standard deviation for 15 signals from the injection of 100 μl of a 1.0 mg.ml-1 standard Cr(VI) solution being equal to 0.5%. PMID:18924899

  11. Formulation and Stability of Solutions.

    PubMed

    Akers, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Ready-to-use solutions are the most preferable and most common dosage forms for injectable and topical ophthalmic products. Drugs formulated as solution almost always have chemical and physical stability challenges as well as solubility limitations and the need to prevent inadvertent microbial contamination issues. The first in this series of articles took us through a discussion of optimizing the physical stability of solutions. This article concludes this series of articles with a discussion on foreign particles, protein aggregation, and immunogenicity; optimizing microbiological activity; and osmolality (tonicity) agents, and discusses how these challenges and issues are addressed. PMID:27326440

  12. Tracer injection techniques in flowing surface water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wörman, A.

    2009-04-01

    Residence time distributions for flowing water and reactive matter are commonly used integrated properties of the transport process for determining technical issues of water resource management and in eco-hydrological science. Two general issues for tracer techniques are that the concentration-vs-time relation following a tracer injection (the breakthrough curve) gives unique transport information in different parts of the curve and separation of hydromechanical and reactive mechanisms often require simultaneous tracer injections. This presentation discusses evaluation methods for simultaneous tracer injections based on examples of tracer experiments in small rivers, streams and wetlands. Tritiated water is used as a practically inert substance to reflect the actual hydrodynamics, but other involved tracers are Cr(III)-51, P-32 and N-15. Hydromechanical, in-stream dispersion is reflected as a symmetrical spreading of the spatial concentration distribution. This requires that the transport distance over water depth is larger than about five times the flow Peclet number. Transversal retention of both inert and reactive solutes is reflected in terms of the tail of the breakthrough curve. Especially, reactive solutes can have a substantial magnification of the tailing behaviour depending on reaction rates or partitioning coefficients. To accurately discriminate between the effects of reactions and hydromechanical mixing its is relevant to use simultaneous injections of inert and reactive tracers with a sequential or integrated evaluation procedure. As an example, the slope of the P-32 tailing is consistently smaller than that of a simultaneous tritium injection in Ekeby wetland, Eskilstuna. The same applies to N-15 injected in the same experiment, but nitrogen is affected also by a systematic loss due to denitrification. Uptake in stream-bed sediments can be caused by a pumping effect arising when a variable pressure field is created on the stream bottom due to bed

  13. Saline as the Sole Contrast Agent for Successful MRI-guided Epidural Injections

    SciTech Connect

    Deli, Martin; Mateiescu, Serban Busch, Martin; Becker, Jan Garmer, Marietta Groenemeyer, Dietrich

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To assess the performance of sterile saline solution as the sole contrast agent for percutaneous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided epidural injections at 1.5 T. Methods. A retrospective analysis of two different techniques of MRI-guided epidural injections was performed with either gadolinium-enhanced saline solution or sterile saline solution for documentation of the epidural location of the needle tip. T1-weighted spoiled gradient echo (FLASH) images or T2-weighted single-shot turbo spin echo (HASTE) images visualized the test injectants. Methods were compared by technical success rate, image quality, table time, and rate of complications. Results. 105 MRI-guided epidural injections (12 of 105 with gadolinium-enhanced saline solution and 93 of 105 with sterile saline solution) were performed successfully and without complications. Visualization of sterile saline solution and gadolinium-enhanced saline solution was sufficient, good, or excellent in all 105 interventions. For either test injectant, quantitative image analysis demonstrated comparable high contrast-to-noise ratios of test injectants to adjacent body substances with reliable statistical significance levels (p < 0.001). The mean table time was 22 {+-} 9 min in the gadolinium-enhanced saline solution group and 22 {+-} 8 min in the saline solution group (p = 0.75). Conclusion. Sterile saline is suitable as the sole contrast agent for successful and safe percutaneous MRI-guided epidural drug delivery at 1.5 T.

  14. Particle beam injection system

    DOEpatents

    Jassby, Daniel L.; Kulsrud, Russell M.

    1977-01-01

    This invention provides a poloidal divertor for stacking counterstreaming ion beams to provide high intensity colliding beams. To this end, method and apparatus are provided that inject high energy, high velocity, ordered, atomic deuterium and tritium beams into a lower energy, toroidal, thermal equilibrium, neutral, target plasma column that is magnetically confined along an endless magnetic axis in a strong restoring force magnetic field having helical field lines to produce counterstreaming deuteron and triton beams that are received bent, stacked and transported along the endless axis, while a poloidal divertor removes thermal ions and electrons all along the axis to increase the density of the counterstreaming ion beams and the reaction products resulting therefrom. By balancing the stacking and removal, colliding, strong focused particle beams, reaction products and reactions are produced that convert one form of energy into another form of energy.

  15. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

    PubMed

    Van Steirteghem, André; Devroey, P; Liebaers, I

    2002-01-25

    Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) with ejaculated, epididymal or testicular spermatozoa was first successful in 1992 and has since become the widely accepted treatment for couples with severe male-factor infertility. The outcome of several thousands of ICSI cycles in terms of fertilization, embryo cleavage and implantation is similar to that for conventional in-vitro fertilization in couples with tubal or idiopathic infertility. To evaluate the important issue of safety of the new technique of ICSI, a prospective follow-up study of children born after ICSI was carried out. The aim was to compile data on karyotypes, congenital malformations, growth parameters and developmental milestones. Parents' agreement to genetic counseling was obtained, as well as prenatal diagnosis, followed by a physical examination of the children at 2 months, 1 and 2 years. Important outcome data to be examined comprise information on major and minor congenital malformations obtained prenatally or after birth, as well as on the further development of the children.

  16. Premixed direct injection nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Zuo, Baifang; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Ziminsky, Willy Steve

    2011-02-15

    An injection nozzle having a main body portion with an outer peripheral wall is disclosed. The nozzle includes a plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes disposed within the main body portion and a fuel flow passage fluidly connected to the plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes. Fuel and air are partially premixed inside the plurality of the tubes. A second body portion, having an outer peripheral wall extending between a first end and an opposite second end, is connected to the main body portion. The partially premixed fuel and air mixture from the first body portion gets further mixed inside the second body portion. The second body portion converges from the first end toward said second end. The second body portion also includes cooling passages that extend along all the walls around the second body to provide thermal damage resistance for occasional flame flash back into the second body.

  17. Propagating substorm injection fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. E.; Arnoldy, R. L.; Feynman, J.; Hardy, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    It is argued that a series of two-satellite observations leads to a clarification of substorm plasma injection, in which boundary motion plays a major role. Emphasis is put on a type of event characterized by abrupt, dispersionless changes in electron intensity and a coincident perturbation that consists of both a field magnitude increase and a small rotation toward more dipolar orientation. Comparing plasma observations at two points, it is found that in active, preinjection conditions the two most important features of the plasma sheet are: (1) the low-energy convection boundary for near-zero energy particles, determined by the magnitude of the large-scale convection electric field; and (2) the precipitation-flow boundary layer between the hot plasma sheet and the atmospherically contaminated inner plasma sheet.

  18. Fuel injection pumping apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Rouse, J.A.; Mowbray, D.F.

    1987-10-13

    A liquid fuel injection pumping apparatus is described comprising a rotary and axially movable fuel distributor member housed within a body, a reciprocable pumping plunger housed within a bore formed in the distributor member, cam means mounted in the body for effecting inward movement of the plunger as the distributor member rotates, passage means in the body and distributor member and stop means for limiting the extent of outward movement of the plunger. The extent of outward movement depends on the axial setting of the distributor member in the body, resilient means biasing the distributor member in one axial direction, a chamber defined in the body, means for controlling the fluid pressure in the chamber to control the axial setting of the distributor member.

  19. Steam injection method

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, D.R.

    1986-02-25

    A method is described for injecting steam into a subterranean reservoir via a well penetrating the reservoir, comprising adding to steam generator feedwater used to generate the steam or adding to the steam, or adding to both the feedwater and the steam. The mixture consists of: (a) a compound selected from the group consisting of ammonium salts of inorganic acids, ammonium salts of carboxylic acids, quaternary ammonium halides, amine or substituted amine hydrochlorides, and mixtures thereof; and (b) a compound selected from the group consisting of ammonia, salts which decompose to form acid neutralizers or buffers having alkaline pH values, amides of carbamic acid or thiocarbamic acid and derivatives of such amides, tertiary carboxylic acid amides and their substituted and alkylated derivatives, and mixtures thereof.

  20. Injectors for Multipoint Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prociw, Lev Alexander (Inventor); Ryon, Jason (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An injector for a multipoint combustor system includes an inner air swirler which defines an interior flow passage and a plurality of swirler inlet ports in an upstream portion thereof. The inlet ports are configured and adapted to impart swirl on flow in the interior flow passage. An outer air cap is mounted outboard of the inner swirler. A fuel passage is defined between the inner air swirler and the outer air cap, and includes a discharge outlet between downstream portions of the inner air swirler and the outer air cap for issuing fuel for combustion. The outer air cap defines an outer air circuit configured for substantially unswirled injection of compressor discharge air outboard of the interior flow passage.

  1. Diesel fuel injection system

    SciTech Connect

    Schechter, M.M.; Simko, A.O.

    1986-04-22

    A fuel injection pump is described of the multiple plunger spill port type for an automotive type internal combustion engine, the pump including at least four axially spaced engine camshaft driven pump plungers grouped in pairs and sequentially and in succession moved in one direction through a fuel pumping stroke and oppositely through a fuel intake stroke. A fuel pressurization/supply chamber is contiquous to the end of each plunger for pressurization of the fuel therein or supply of fuel thereto from a supply passage upon coordinate movement of the plunger, fill/spill passage means connected to a single fuel return spill port and in parallel flow relationship to each of the plunger bores as a function of the position of the plungers, each plunger having a pair of internal passages connected at all times to its chamber and alternately alignable with the supply or fill/spill passage means as a function of the position of the plunger. A fuel discharge passage is operatively connecting each of the chambers to an individual engine cylinder, a single spill port control valve movable to block or permit the spill of fuel through the spill port to a return line to control the pressurization of fuel in all of the fuel chambers and associated discharge passages, a single solenoid connected to the spill control valve for moving it to block or unblock the spill port, and a single shuttle valve operatively associated with all of the fill/spill passage means and spill port reciprocably movable between positions to sequentially connect the plunger chambers one at a time in succession to the spill port during the pumping pressurization stroke of its plunger for the injection of fuel to an individual cylinder while the other chambers are in various stages of being refilled with fuel and preparing for pressurization upon successive actuation of the plungers by the camshaft.

  2. Convergence rates for {{\\ell }}^{1}-regularization without injectivity-type assumptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flemming, Jens

    2016-09-01

    Existing convergence rate results for sparsity promoting regularization of Tikhonov-type rely on injectivity of the considered operator or at least on slightly weakened injectivity assumptions (finite basis injectivity or restricted isometry property). We extend such results to non-injective operators by formulating a suitable variational source condition, which then is characterized in the language of range conditions with respect to the range of the adjoint operator. As a special case we consider operator equations with uniquely determined 1-norm minimizing solutions. Based on the developed characterization of a variational source condition we also provide convergence rates for the case that solutions are not sparse.

  3. 21 CFR 522.690 - Dinoprost solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dinoprost solution. 522.690 Section 522.690 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.690 Dinoprost solution. (a) Specifications....

  4. The cost of unsafe injections.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, M. A.; Pisani, E.

    1999-01-01

    Unsafe injection practices are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality, particularly from hepatitis B and C and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections. These inadvertently transmitted bloodborne diseases become manifest some considerable time after infection and hence may not be appropriately accounted for. Annually more than 1.3 million deaths and US$ 535 million are estimated to be due to current unsafe injection practices. With the global increase in the number of injections for vaccination and medical services, safer injecting technologies such as auto-disable syringes must be budgeted for. Investment in health education and safer disposal will also reduce infections associated with unsafe injecting practices. Safer injecting practices are more expensive than current less safe practices, but the additional cost is more than offset by the reduction in disease that would result. PMID:10593028

  5. Gene transfer into mammalian cells by jet injection.

    PubMed

    Furth, P A; Shamay, A; Hennighausen, L

    1995-04-01

    Jet injection of DNA in solution is a technique that can be used to transfer DNA into tissues of living animals, where the introduced genes are expressed. The muscle, fat, skin, and mammary tissue of mice, and the fat, skin, and mammary tissue of sheep can be transfected with DNA. A jet injector, such as the Ped-o-jet (Stirn Industries, Dayton, NJ), is used to form a jet from 100 to 300 microliters of a DNA solution. This jet has sufficient force to travel into and through tissues of adult and juvenile animals. The introduced DNA is found in cells surrounding the path of the jet. When jet injection is performed through the surface of intact skin, underlying muscle, mammary, and fat, cells up to 2 cm distant from the point of injection are transfected with DNA. In this study, we demonstrate that the efficiency of DNA transfer is dependent upon the force of injection. Jet injection is an alternative to needle injection, lipofection, and particle bombardment for the introduction of "naked" DNA into the tissues of animals. This technique has potential for the introduction of genes into living organisms for genetic vaccination and gene therapy. PMID:7590772

  6. Worldwide Injection Technique Questionnaire Study: Population Parameters and Injection Practices.

    PubMed

    Frid, Anders H; Hirsch, Laurence J; Menchior, Astrid R; Morel, Didier R; Strauss, Kenneth W

    2016-09-01

    From February 1, 2014, through June 30, 2015, 13,289 insulin-injecting patients from 423 centers in 42 countries took part in one of the largest surveys ever performed in diabetes. The goal was to assess patient characteristics, as well as historical and practical aspects of their injection technique. Results show that 4- and 8-mm needle lengths are each used by nearly 30% of patients and 5- and 6-mm needles each by approximately 20%. Higher consumption of insulin (as measured by total daily dose) is associated with having lipohypertrophy (LH), injecting into LH, leakage from the injection site, and failing to reconstitute cloudy insulin. Glycated hemoglobin values are, on average, 0.5% higher in patients with LH and are significantly higher with incorrect rotation of sites and with needle reuse. Glycated hemoglobin values are lower in patients who distribute their injections over larger injection areas and whose sites are inspected routinely. The frequencies of unexpected hypoglycemia and glucose variability are significantly higher in those with LH, those injecting into LH, those who incorrectly rotate sites, and those who reuse needles. Needles associated with diabetes treatment are the most commonly used medical sharps in the world. However, correct disposal of sharps after use is critically suboptimal. Many used sharps end up in public trash and constitute a major accidental needlestick risk. Use of these data should stimulate renewed interest in and commitment to optimizing injection practices in patients with diabetes.

  7. Worldwide Injection Technique Questionnaire Study: Population Parameters and Injection Practices.

    PubMed

    Frid, Anders H; Hirsch, Laurence J; Menchior, Astrid R; Morel, Didier R; Strauss, Kenneth W

    2016-09-01

    From February 1, 2014, through June 30, 2015, 13,289 insulin-injecting patients from 423 centers in 42 countries took part in one of the largest surveys ever performed in diabetes. The goal was to assess patient characteristics, as well as historical and practical aspects of their injection technique. Results show that 4- and 8-mm needle lengths are each used by nearly 30% of patients and 5- and 6-mm needles each by approximately 20%. Higher consumption of insulin (as measured by total daily dose) is associated with having lipohypertrophy (LH), injecting into LH, leakage from the injection site, and failing to reconstitute cloudy insulin. Glycated hemoglobin values are, on average, 0.5% higher in patients with LH and are significantly higher with incorrect rotation of sites and with needle reuse. Glycated hemoglobin values are lower in patients who distribute their injections over larger injection areas and whose sites are inspected routinely. The frequencies of unexpected hypoglycemia and glucose variability are significantly higher in those with LH, those injecting into LH, those who incorrectly rotate sites, and those who reuse needles. Needles associated with diabetes treatment are the most commonly used medical sharps in the world. However, correct disposal of sharps after use is critically suboptimal. Many used sharps end up in public trash and constitute a major accidental needlestick risk. Use of these data should stimulate renewed interest in and commitment to optimizing injection practices in patients with diabetes. PMID:27594185

  8. Electromarking solution

    DOEpatents

    Bullock, Jonathan S.; Harper, William L.; Peck, Charles G.

    1976-06-22

    This invention is directed to an aqueous halogen-free electromarking solution which possesses the capacity for marking a broad spectrum of metals and alloys selected from different classes. The aqueous solution comprises basically the nitrate salt of an amphoteric metal, a chelating agent, and a corrosion-inhibiting agent.

  9. Scale control in urea solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Dubin, L.; Diep, D.V.

    1997-08-01

    Legislation to control NO{sub x} emissions, one cause of acid rain and ozone induced smog, has created an impetus to control NO{sub x} emissions. Selective Non Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) using urea chemistry is utilized to control NO{sub x} emissions from boilers, municipal waste incinerators, refinery furnaces, recovery boilers, utilities and other stationary combustion sources. Control requires injecting urea-based solutions into the flue gas at specified temperatures. Urea solutions accelerate CaCO{sub 3} precipitation in industrial waters used for dilution, and thereby interfere with proper application of the urea solution. The negative effect of urea solutions on hardness stability is discussed as well as how CaCO{sub 3} precipitation in urea solution can be controlled by suitable scale inhibitors.

  10. A comparison of molding procedures - Contact, injection and vacuum injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathiard, G.

    1980-06-01

    The technical and economic aspects of the contact, injection and vacuum injection molding of reinforced plastic components are compared for the example of a tractor roof with a gel-coated surface. Consideration is given to the possibility of reinforcement, number of smooth faces, condition of the gel-coated surface, reliability, and labor and workplace requirements of the three processes, and advantages of molding between the mold and a countermold in smooth faces, reliability, labor requirements, working surface and industrial hygiene are pointed out. The times and labor requirements of each step in the molding cycles are examined, and material requirements and yields, investment costs, amortization and product cost prices of the processes are compared. It is concluded that, for the specific component examined, the processes of vacuum injection and injection molding appear very interesting, with injection molding processes resulting in lower cost prices than contact molding for any production volume.

  11. Improving Ambipolar Charge Injection in Polymer FETs with Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaumseil, Jana

    2013-03-01

    Efficient charge injection is a key issue for organic field-effect transistors (FET). Various methods can be used to optimize injection of either holes or electrons, for example, by modifying the workfunction of metallic electrodes with self-assembled monolayers. For ambipolar FETs this is much more difficult because injection of both charge carriers has to be improved at the same time. Here we demonstrate a simple process to significantly improve ambipolar charge injection in bottom contact/top gate polymer field-effect transistors by adding single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) to the semiconducting polymer at concentrations well below the percolation limit. Such polymer/carbon nanotube hybrid systems are easily produced by ultrasonication and dispersion of SWNT in a conjugated polymer solution. Even at very low nanotube concentrations the charge injection of both holes and electrons, for example, into poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-co-benzothiadiazole) (F8BT) and poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) (PFO) is significantly enhanced leading to lower contact resistances and threshold voltages than in FETs with pristine polymer films. This method can be extended to other semiconductors like n-type naphthalene-bis(dicarboximide)-based polymers (e.g. P(NDI2OD-T2)) for which hole injection was greatly enhanced. The proposed mechanism for this effect of carbon nanotubes on injection is independent of the polarity of the charge carriers. It can be maximized by patterning layers of pure carbon nanotubes onto the injecting electrodes before spincoating the pristine polymers leading to almost ohmic contacts for polymers, which usually show only strongly Schottky-barrier-limited injection. This improved injection of holes and electrons allows for a wider range of accessible polymers for ambipolar and thus also light-emitting transistors.

  12. Sensor for Injection Rate Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Marcic, Milan

    2006-01-01

    A vast majority of the medium and high speed Diesel engines are equipped with multi-hole injection nozzles nowadays. Inaccuracies in workmanship and changing hydraulic conditions in the nozzles result in differences in injection rates between individual injection nozzle holes. The new deformational measuring method described in the paper allows injection rate measurement in each injection nozzle hole. The differences in injection rates lead to uneven thermal loads of Diesel engine combustion chambers. All today known measuring method, such as Bosch and Zeuch give accurate results of the injection rate in diesel single-hole nozzles. With multihole nozzles they tell us nothing about possible differences in injection rates between individual holes of the nozzle. At deformational measuring method, the criterion of the injected fuel is expressed by the deformation of membrane occurring due to the collision of the pressure wave against the membrane. The pressure wave is generated by the injection of the fuel into the measuring space. For each hole of the nozzle the measuring device must have a measuring space of its own into which fuel is injected as well as its measuring membrane and its own fuel outlet. During measurements procedure the measuring space must be filled with fuel to maintain an overpressure of 5 kPa. Fuel escaping from the measuring device is conducted into the graduated cylinders for measuring the volumetric flow through each hole of the nozzle.The membrane deformation is assessed by strain gauges. They are glued to the membrane and forming the full Wheatstone's bridge. We devoted special attention to the membrane shape and temperature compensation of the strain gauges.

  13. The RHIC injection kicker

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, H.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.E.

    1997-07-01

    Beam transfer from the AGS to RHIC is performed in single-bunch mode. Close spacing of the bunches in the collider requires an injection kicker with a rise time of <90 nsec, suggesting adoption of a travelling wave structure. The required vertical kick of 0.186 t{center_dot}m is provided by 4 magnets, each 1.12 m long with a 48.4 x 48.4 mm aperture and operated at 1.6 kA. The kicker is constructed as a {open_quotes}C{close_quotes} cross section magnet, in which ferrite and high-permittivity dielectric sections alternate. The dielectric blocks provide the capacity necessary for the nominally 25 {Omega} characteristic impedance of the travelling wave structure, but impose the practical limit on the peak voltage, and thus current, achievable. Computer studies to minimize local electric field enhancements resulted in a configuration capable of holding {approximately} 50 kV, with adequate safety margin over the nominal 40 kV. Equivalent circuit analysis indicated the possibility of lowering the nominal voltage by operating mismatched into 20 {Omega} terminations without degrading the pulse shape. In this paper, the experience gained in the fabrication of the production units and the results from various single-unit tests and operation of four kickers with beam in the {open_quotes}Sextant Test{close_quotes} are reported.

  14. SNS Injection Foil Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Cousineau, Sarah M; Galambos, John D; Kim, Sang-Ho; Ladd, Peter; Luck, Chris; Peters, Charles C; Polsky, Yarom; Shaw, Robert W; Macek, Robert James; Raparia, Deepak; Plum, Michael A

    2010-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source comprises a 1 GeV, 1.4 MW linear accelerator followed by an accumulator ring and a liquid mercury target. To manage the beam loss caused by the H0 excited states created during the H charge exchange injection into the accumulator ring, the stripper foil is located inside one of the chicane dipoles. This has some interesting consequences that were not fully appreciated until the beam power reached about 840 kW. One consequence was sudden failure of the stripper foil system due to convoy electrons stripped from the incoming H beam, which circled around to strike the foil bracket and cause bracket failure. Another consequence is that convoy electrons can reflect back up from the electron catcher and strike the foil and bracket. An additional contributor to foil system failure is vacuum breakdown due to the charge developed on the foil by secondary electron emission. In this paper we will detail these and other interesting failure mechanisms, and describe the improvements we have made to mitigate them.

  15. Fuel injection pump

    SciTech Connect

    Iiyama, A.; Nishimura, T.

    1988-12-06

    This patent describes a fuel injection pump comprising: (a) engageable first and second cam members, the first cam member reciprocating axially as the first cam member moves angularly relative to the second cam member when the first and second cam members are in engagement; (b) means for urging the first cam member toward the second cam member to engage the first and second cam members; (c) a plunger connected to the first cam member for reciprocation with the first cam member, the plunger defining at least a part of a pumping chamber, the pumping chamber contracting and expanding as the plunger reciprocates; (d) means for allowing fuel to move into the pumping chamber as the pumping chamber expands in a fuel intake stroke; (e) means for allowing the fuel to move out of the pumping chamber as the pumping chamber contracts in a fuel compression stroke; and (f) means for resisting movement of the plunger in at least part of the fuel compression stroke and relieving resistance to the movement of the plunger in the fuel intake stroke wherein the resisting means comprises a piston slidably mounted on the plunger, a spring urging the piston to seat the piston on a shoulder on the plunger so that the piston reciprocates as the plunger reciprocates, wherein the piston is seated on the shoulder in the fuel compression stroke and separates from the shoulder against the force of the spring in the fuel intake stroke, a second fluid chamber at least partially defined by the piston.

  16. Injectable Biomaterials for Regenerating Complex Craniofacial Tissues**

    PubMed Central

    Kretlow, James D.; Young, Simon; Klouda, Leda; Wong, Mark; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2009-01-01

    Engineering complex tissues requires a precisely formulated combination of cells, spatiotemporally released bioactive factors, and a specialized scaffold support system. Injectable materials, particularly those delivered in aqueous solution, are considered ideal delivery vehicles for cells and bioactive factors and can also be delivered through minimally invasive methods and fill complex 3D shapes. In this review, we examine injectable materials that form scaffolds or networks capable of both replacing tissue function early after delivery and supporting tissue regeneration over a time period of weeks to months. The use of these materials for tissue engineering within the craniofacial complex is challenging but ideal as many highly specialized and functional tissues reside within a small volume in the craniofacial structures and the need for minimally invasive interventions is desirable due to aesthetic considerations. Current biomaterials and strategies used to treat craniofacial defects are examined, followed by a review of craniofacial tissue engineering, and finally an examination of current technologies used for injectable scaffold development and drug and cell delivery using these materials. PMID:19750143

  17. Effects of intracellular injection of calcium buffers on light adaptation in Limulus ventral photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    The calcium sequestering agent, EGTA, was injected into Limulus ventral photoreceptors. Before injection, the inward membrane current induced by a long stimulus had a large initial transient which declined to a smaller plateau. Iontophoretic injection of EGTA tended to prevent the decline from transient to plateau. Before injection the plateau response was a nonlinear function of light intensity. After EGTA injection the response-intensity curves tended to become linear. Before injection, bright lights lowered the sensitivity as determined with subsequent test flashes. EGTA injection decreased the light-induced changes in sensitivity. Ca-EGTA buffers having different levels of free calcium were pressure-injected into ventral photoreceptors; the higher the level of free calcium, the lower the sensitivity measured after injection. The effects of inotophoretic injection of EGTA were not mimicked by injection or similar amounts of sulfate and the effects of pressure injection of EGTA buffer solutions were not mimicked by injection of similar volumes of pH buffer or mannitol. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that light adaptation is mediated by a rise of the intracellular free calcium concentration. PMID:810540

  18. Blast furnace injection symposium: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    These proceedings contain 14 papers related to blast furnace injection issues. Topics include coal quality, coal grinding, natural gas injection, stable operation of the blast furnace, oxygen enrichment, coal conveying, and performance at several steel companies. All papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  19. Injectable Foams for Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Edna M.; Page, Jonathan M.; Harmata, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    The design of injectable biomaterials has attracted considerable attention in recent years. Many injectable biomaterials, such as hydrogels and calcium phosphate cements, have nanoscale pores that limit the rate of cellular migration and proliferation. While introduction of macroporosity has been suggested to increase cellular infiltration and tissue healing, many conventional methods for generating macropores often require harsh processing conditions that preclude their use in injectable foams. In recent years, processes such as porogen leaching, gas foaming, and emulsion-templating have been adapted to generate macroporosity in injectable calcium phosphate cements, hydrogels, and hydrophobic polymers. While some of the more mature injectable foam technologies have been evaluated in clinical trials, there are challenges remaining to be addressed, such as the biocompatibility and ultimate fate of the sacrificial phase used to generate pores within the foam after it sets in situ. Furthermore, while implantable scaffolds can be washed extensively to remove undesirable impurities, all of the components required to synthesize injectable foams must be injected into the defect. Thus, every compound in the foam must be biocompatible and non-cytotoxic at the concentrations utilized. As future research addresses these critical challenges, injectable macroporous foams are anticipated to have an increasingly significant impact on improving patient outcomes for a number of clinical procedures. PMID:24127230

  20. Amphotericin B Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Amphotericin B lipid complex injection is used to treat serious, possibly life-threatening fungal infections in people who did not respond or are ... tolerate conventional amphotericin B therapy. Amphotericin B lipid complex injection is in a class of medications called ...

  1. Main tank injection pressurization program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cady, E. C.; Kendle, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    Computer program predicts performance of fluorine-hydrogen main tank injection pressurization system for full range of liquid-hydrogen-fueled space vehicles. Analytical model includes provisions for heat transfer, injectant jet penetration, and ullage gas mixing. Analysis predicts GF2 usage, ullage gas and tank wall temperatures, and LH2 evaporation.

  2. An analytical approach of CO2 injection induced caprock deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chao; Barès, Paul; Laloui, Lyesse

    2014-05-01

    CO2 storage in geological formation, especially in deep aquifers, is becoming a compromising method to reduce the impact of CO2 on the greenhouse effect. Practically, large-volume (>1Mt/year) of CO2 could be injected into a deep aquifer. However, the response of such system is complex because of coupling between the flow and mechanical responses. High rate injection could result in an abrupt fluid pressures build-up, deforming the aquifer and result in surface uplifting, which highly affect public acceptation to the CO2 storage projects. The study focuses on a specific problem related to the surface uplift induced by the injection of CO2 at depth. The methodology in this study includes the development of a mathematical model that incorporates elastic behaviour of storage mediums and two immiscible fluids (CO2 and water) flow within the aquifers while surface rock layer is modelled as a thin plate. Governing equations are solved for the axisymmetric flexure deflection due to a constant rate injection of CO2. Coupling between porosity and permeability is included via an iterative schema. Numerical integration stability has been improved as well. Results show that this semi-analytical solution is capable to capture the pressure build-up during the very early stage of injection, resulting in a high rate surface uplift. With hydromechanical effects, pressure tends to stabilize and surface deformation rate decreases. Compared to FEM simulation, the calculation time carried out by the semi-analytical solution is very short. It can be employed as a preliminary design tool for risk assessment such as injection rate, porosity, rock properties and geological structures. This semi-analytical solution provides a convenient way to estimate the influence of high rate injection of CO2 on the surface uplift. The methodology in this development can easily incorporate other pressure distributions. Thus one can benefit from the advances in hydrology researches as well.

  3. Mathematical modeling of clearing liquid drop diffusion after intradermal injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolnitz, Mikhail M.; Bashkatov, Alexey N.; Genina, Elina A.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2007-05-01

    The mathematical model of clearing agent diffusion after intradermal injection has been developed. Skin was presented as multilayer medium, but one layer with proper boundary conditions is considered. Analytical solution of the boundary problem for small and large time intervals is obtained.

  4. Prediction of Gas Injection Performance for Heterogeneous Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Blunt, M.J.; Orr, F.M. Jr.

    2001-03-26

    This report was an integrated study of the physics and chemistry affecting gas injection, from the pore scale to the field scale, and involved theoretical analysis, laboratory experiments and numerical simulation. Specifically, advances were made on streamline-based simulation, analytical solutions to 1D compositional displacements, and modeling and experimental measures of three-phase flow.

  5. 21 CFR 522.2474 - Tolazoline hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tolazoline hydrochloride injection. 522.2474 Section 522.2474 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... solution contains tolazoline hydrochloride equivalent to 100 milligrams of base activity. (b) Sponsor....

  6. 21 CFR 522.2474 - Tolazoline hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tolazoline hydrochloride injection. 522.2474 Section 522.2474 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... solution contains tolazoline hydrochloride equivalent to 100 milligrams of base activity. (b) Sponsor....

  7. A Novel Injective Approach For Osgood-schlatter Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nakase, Junsuke; Numata, Hitoaki; Oshima, Takeshi; Takata, Yasushi; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Despite first being reported more than 100 years ago, Osgood-Schlatter disease(OSD) currently has no effective treatment. The recent use of ultrasonography in the orthopedic surgery and sports medicine fields revealed that patellar tendinopathy and deep infrapatellar bursitis contributes to the pain experienced by patients with OSD. Considering the reported effectiveness and safety of hyperosmolar dextrose injection for patellar tendinopathy, here we investigated the efficacy and safety of hyperosmolar dextrose injection as a novel treatment for OSD. Our hypothesis was that hyperosmolar dextrose injection would be safe and well tolerated by patients with OSD. Methods: We performed this prospective randomized double-blind clinical trial between April 2012 and June 2015. A total of 44 knees in 36 boys (average age, 12.3 ± 1.1 years) for whom conventional conservative therapy for >1 month was ineffective were randomly assigned to the double-blind injection of 1% lidocaine (1 mL) with saline (1 mL) (Saline group) or 1% lidocaine (1 mL) with 20% dextrose (1 mL) (Dextrose group). Half of the solution was injected into the distal attachment of the patellar tendon, while the remaining half was injected into the deep infrapatellar bursa or infrapatellar fat pad under ultrasound guidance. Injections were administered monthly for 3 months by a single investigator. The Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment (VISA) score was used to evaluate pain. Results: A total of 40 knees in 33 boys were included in this clinical trial. The mean pre-injection VISA scores of the Dextrose and Saline groups were 59.6 ± 19.1 and 62.5 ± 16.6, while those at the final follow-up were 83.6 ± 19.3 and 84.1 ± 19.1, respectively. There were no significant differences in the two group pre-injection versus at the final follow-up (P = 0.61 and 0.93, respectively). In contrast, the mean VISA score significantly increased in both group between pre-injection and final follow-up (P < 0

  8. Urine Pretreat Injection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A new method of introducing the OXONE (Registered Trademark) Monopersulfate Compound for urine pretreat into a two-phase urine/air flow stream has been successfully tested and evaluated. The feasibility of this innovative method has been established for purposes of providing a simple, convenient, and safe method of handling a chemical pretreat required for urine processing in a microgravity space environment. Also, the Oxone portion of the urine pretreat has demonstrated the following advantages during real time collection of 750 pounds of urine in a Space Station design two-phase urine Fan/Separator: Eliminated urine precipitate buildup on internal hardware and plumbing; Minimized odor from collected urine; and Virtually eliminated airborne bacteria. The urine pretreat, as presently defined for the Space Station program for proper downstream processing of urine, is a two-part chemical treatment of 5.0 grams of Oxone and 2.3 ml of H2SO4 per liter of urine. This study program and test demonstrated only the addition of the proper ratio of Oxone into the urine collection system upstream of the Fan/Separator. This program was divided into the following three major tasks: (1) A trade study, to define and recommend the type of Oxone injection method to pursue further; (2) The design and fabrication of the selected method; and (3) A test program using high fidelity hardware and fresh urine to demonstrate the method feasibility. The trade study was conducted which included defining several methods for injecting Oxone in different forms into a urine system. Oxone was considered in a liquid, solid, paste and powered form. The trade study and the resulting recommendation were presented at a trade study review held at Hamilton Standard on 24-25 October 94. An agreement was reached at the meeting to continue the solid tablet in a bag concept which included a series of tablets suspended in the urine/air flow stream. These Oxone tablets would slowly dissolve at a controlled rate

  9. Low-pressure injection molding

    SciTech Connect

    Mangels, J.A. )

    1994-05-01

    Ceramic injection molding experienced a revival in the 1970s and 1980s with the application of ceramics for gas turbine components. Concurrently, techniques were being developed for the injection molding of powdered metal compositions into complex shaped articles. The impetus for the development of injection molding as a ceramic fabrication process lay in the potential to produce complex-shaped components to near-net shape. In the ceramic injection molding process, ceramic powders are processed to obtain the desired particle size, distribution and morphology and blended to obtain a homogeneous distribution. These powders are then mixed with the organic binders, generally in a heated, highshear mixer at temperatures above the melting point of the organic binders. The injection molding mix is pelletized, cooled and fed into an injection molding machine. The molding mix is reheated to a fluid state and injected under high pressure (7--70 MPa) into a die cavity. The molded part is removed from the tooling after the molding mix has solidified in the die. The organic binders are then removed from the component at temperatures up to 400 C, generally by some combination of wicking and thermal decomposition. Finally, the component is sintered to obtain its final ceramic properties, using conventional ceramic processes.

  10. NEUTRAL-BEAM INJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Kunkel, W.B.

    1980-06-01

    The emphasis in the preceding chapters has been on magnetic confinement of high temperature plasmas. The question of production and heating of such plasmas has been dealt with relatively more briefly. It should not be inferred, however, that these matters must therefore be either trivial or unimportant. A review of the history reveals that in the early days all these aspects of the controlled fusion problem were considered to be on a par, and were tackled simultaneously and with equal vigor. Only the confinement problem turned out to be much more complex than initially anticipated, and richer in challenge to the plasma physicist than the questions of plasma production and heating. On the other hand, the properties of high-temperature plasmas and plasma confinement can only be studied experimentally after the problems of production and of heating to adequate temperatures are solved. It is the purpose of this and the next chapter to supplement the preceding discussions with more detail on two important subjects: neutral-beam injection and radio-frequency heating. These are the major contenders for heating in present and future tokamak and mirror fusion experiments, and even in several proposed reactors. For neutral beams we emphasize here the technology involved, which has undergone a rather remarkable development. The physics of particle and energy deposition in the plasma, and the discussion of the resulting effects on the confined plasma, have been included in previous chapters, and some experimental results are quoted there. Other heating processes of relevance to fusion are mentioned elsewhere in this book, in connection with the experiments where they are used: i.e. ohmic heating, adiabatic compression heating, and alpha-particle heating in Chapter 3 by H.P. Furth; more ohmic heating in Chapter 7, and shock-implosion heating, laser heating, and relativistic-electron beam heating in Chapter 8, both by W. E. Quinn. These methods are relatively straightforward in

  11. Unintended consequences of atmospheric injection of sulphate aerosols.

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Patrick Vane; Kobos, Peter Holmes; Goldstein, Barry

    2010-10-01

    Most climate scientists believe that climate geoengineering is best considered as a potential complement to the mitigation of CO{sub 2} emissions, rather than as an alternative to it. Strong mitigation could achieve the equivalent of up to -4Wm{sup -2} radiative forcing on the century timescale, relative to a worst case scenario for rising CO{sub 2}. However, to tackle the remaining 3Wm{sup -2}, which are likely even in a best case scenario of strongly mitigated CO{sub 2} releases, a number of geoengineering options show promise. Injecting stratospheric aerosols is one of the least expensive and, potentially, most effective approaches and for that reason an examination of the possible unintended consequences of the implementation of atmospheric injections of sulphate aerosols was made. Chief among these are: reductions in rainfall, slowing of atmospheric ozone rebound, and differential changes in weather patterns. At the same time, there will be an increase in plant productivity. Lastly, because atmospheric sulphate injection would not mitigate ocean acidification, another side effect of fossil fuel burning, it would provide only a partial solution. Future research should aim at ameliorating the possible negative unintended consequences of atmospheric injections of sulphate injection. This might include modeling the optimum rate and particle type and size of aerosol injection, as well as the latitudinal, longitudinal and altitude of injection sites, to balance radiative forcing to decrease negative regional impacts. Similarly, future research might include modeling the optimum rate of decrease and location of injection sites to be closed to reduce or slow rapid warming upon aerosol injection cessation. A fruitful area for future research might be system modeling to enhance the possible positive increases in agricultural productivity. All such modeling must be supported by data collection and laboratory and field testing to enable iterative modeling to increase the

  12. 75 FR 59610 - Implantation and Injectable Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Firocoxib

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... prescription use of firocoxib injectable solution in horses for the control of pain and inflammation associated... veterinary prescription use of EQUIOXX (firocoxib) Injection in horses for the control of pain and...) Indications for use. For the control of pain and inflammation associated with osteoarthritis. (3)...

  13. SORBENT/UREA SLURRY INJECTION FOR SIMULTANEOUS SO2/NOX REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The combination of sorbent injection and selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR) technologies has been investigated for simulataneous SO2/NOx removal. A slurry composed of a urea-based solution and various Ca-based sorbents was injected at a range of tempera...

  14. The Case for Synthetic Injectables.

    PubMed

    Joseph, John H

    2015-11-01

    There are several different classes of synthetic dermal fillers and volume enhancers including semipermanent and permanent products available in the United States. Based on clinical and scientific evidence, this article reviews the chemical and polymeric properties, clinical data, patient selection, indications for use, injection technique, and adverse event profiles of permanent synthetic injectables currently used in clinical practice in the United States: medical-grade liquid injectable silicone and polymethyl methacrylate. Understanding the unique characteristics of these two products reinforces the advantages and disadvantages of each, including under what circumstances they should be used and why they perform the way they do. PMID:26505540

  15. Injection nozzle for a turbomachine

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Kim, Kwanwoo

    2012-09-11

    A turbomachine includes a compressor, a combustor operatively connected to the compressor, an end cover mounted to the combustor, and an injection nozzle assembly operatively connected to the combustor. The injection nozzle assembly includes a first end portion that extends to a second end portion, and a plurality of tube elements provided at the second end portion. Each of the plurality of tube elements defining a fluid passage includes a body having a first end section that extends to a second end section. The second end section projects beyond the second end portion of the injection nozzle assembly.

  16. Injectable calcium hydroxylapatite microspheres (Radiesse).

    PubMed

    Ridenour, Brock; Kontis, Theda C

    2009-05-01

    Injectable calcium hydroxylapatite (Radiesse) received FDA approval in 2006 for the correction of facial lipoatrophy and moderate to severe facial wrinkles. This product consists of microspheres of a synthetic bone suspended in a methylcellulose gel matrix. Because the product is thicker than the hyaluronic acids, it is used for the correction of moderate to severe wrinkles, such as deep nasolabial folds. It is also used "off-label" to treat multiple areas of the face, nose, and hands. Radiesse is injected into the subdermal plane, and correction lasts approximately 1 year after injection.

  17. The Case for Synthetic Injectables.

    PubMed

    Joseph, John H

    2015-11-01

    There are several different classes of synthetic dermal fillers and volume enhancers including semipermanent and permanent products available in the United States. Based on clinical and scientific evidence, this article reviews the chemical and polymeric properties, clinical data, patient selection, indications for use, injection technique, and adverse event profiles of permanent synthetic injectables currently used in clinical practice in the United States: medical-grade liquid injectable silicone and polymethyl methacrylate. Understanding the unique characteristics of these two products reinforces the advantages and disadvantages of each, including under what circumstances they should be used and why they perform the way they do.

  18. Non-plugging injection valve

    DOEpatents

    Carey, Jr., Henry S.

    1985-01-01

    A valve for injecting fluid into a conduit carrying a slurry subject to separation to form deposits capable of plugging openings into the conduit. The valve comprises a valve body that is sealed to the conduit about an aperture formed through the wall of the conduit to receive the fluid to be injected and the valve member of the valve includes a punch portion that extends through the injection aperture to the flow passage, when the valve is closed, to provide a clear channel into the conduit, when the valve is opened, through deposits which might have formed on portions of the valve adjacent the conduit.

  19. 75 FR 60307 - Implantation or Injectable Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Dexmedetomidine

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-30

    ... general anesthesia in cats. DATES: This rule is effective September 30, 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION... dexmedetomidine hydrochloride injectable solution as a preanesthetic to general anesthesia in cats. The... dental procedures; and as a preanesthetic to general anesthesia. * * * * * Dated: September 24,...

  20. Identification of the Allergenic Ingredients in Reduning Injection by Ultrafiltration and High-Performance Liquid Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Li, Cun-yu; Zheng, Yun-feng; Li, Hong-yang; Xiao, Wei; Peng, Guo-ping

    2016-01-01

    Reduning injection is a traditional Chinese medicine injection which has multiple functions such as clearing heat, dispelling wind, and detoxification. Although Reduning injection was widely utilized, reports of its allergenicity emerged one after another. However, there is little research on its allergenic substances. The aim of this study is to evaluate the sensitization of Reduning injection and explore the underlying cause of the anaphylactic reaction. The main ingredients in Reduning injection were analyzed before and after ultrafiltration. Ultrafiltrate Reduning injection, unfiltered Reduning injection, egg albumin, Tween-80, and nine effective components in Reduning injection were utilized to sensitize guinea pigs. The serum 5-hydroxytryptamine level was used to assess the sensitization effect of Reduning injection. We found a significant decrease in Tween-80 content comparing to other components in the injection after ultrafiltration. Unfiltered Reduning injection, Tween-80, chlorogenic acid, and cryptochlorogenin acid caused remarkable anaphylactoid reaction on guinea pigs while ultrafiltration Reduning resulted in a significantly lower degree of sensitization. Our results suggest that ultrafiltration could significantly reduce the sensitization of Reduning injection, which is likely due to the decrease of Tween-80. We also conjectured that the form of chlorogenic acid and cryptochlorogenin acid within the complex solution mixture may also affect the sensitizing effect. PMID:27144180

  1. Polyelectrolyte Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colby, Ralph H.

    2008-03-01

    Pierre-Gilles de Gennes once described polyelectrolytes as the ``least understood form of condensed matter''. In this talk, I will describe the state of the polyelectrolyte field before and after de Gennes' seminal contributions published 1976-1980. De Gennes clearly explained why electrostatic interactions only stretch the polyelectrolyte chains on intermediate scales in semidilute solution (between the electrostatic blob size and the correlation length) and why the scattering function has a peak corresponding to the correlation length (the distance to the next chain). Despite many other ideas being suggested since then, the simple de Gennes scaling picture of polyelectrolyte conformation in solution has stood the test of time. How that model is used today, including consequences for dynamics in polyelectrolyte solutions, and what questions remain, will clarify the importance of de Gennes' ideas.

  2. NSLS-II INJECTION CONCEPT.

    SciTech Connect

    SHAFTAN, T.; PINAYEV, I.; ROSE, J.; WANG, X.J.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    Currently the facility upgrade project is in progress at the NSLS (at Brookhaven National Laboratory). The goal of the NSLS-II is a 3 GeV ultra-low-emittance storage ring that will increase radiation brightness by three orders of magnitude over that of the present NSLS X-ray ring. The low emittance of the high brightness ring's lattice results in a short lifetime, so that a top-off injection mode becomes an operational necessity. Therefore, the NSLS-II injection system must provide, and efficiently inject, an electron beam at a high repetition rate. In this paper, we present our concept of the NSLS-II injection system and discuss the conditions for, and constraints on, its design.

  3. Epidural Injections for Spinal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... located outside the dural membrane. Steroids, anesthetics and anti-inflammatory medications are typically delivered in an epidural injection. ... create different effects for patients. Corticosteroids act as anti-inflammatory agents, reducing swelling and nerve irritation to allow ...

  4. Midface volumization with injectable fillers.

    PubMed

    Tan, Marietta; Kontis, Theda C

    2015-05-01

    The aging midface has long been overlooked in cosmetic surgery. Our understanding of facial aging in terms of 3 dimensions has placed increased importance on volume restoration. Although an "off-label" indication for most fillers in this facial region, volumization of the midface with injectable fillers is usually a safe and straightforward procedure technically. Injectors, nevertheless, need to have an excellent understanding of facial anatomy and the characteristics of the injected products should problems arise.

  5. Flow regime analysis for fluid injection into a confined aquifer: implications for CO2 sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, B.; Zheng, Z.; Celia, M. A.; Stone, H.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon dioxide injection into a confined saline aquifer may be modeled as an axisymmetric two-phase flow problem. Assuming the two fluids segregate in the vertical direction due to strong buoyancy, and neglecting capillary pressure and miscibility, the lubrication approximation leads to a nonlinear advection-diffusion equation that describes the evolution of the sharp fluid-fluid interface. The flow behaviors in the system are controlled by two dimensionless groups: M, the viscosity ratio of the displaced fluid relative to injected fluid, and Γ , the gravity number, which represents the relative importance of buoyancy and fluid injection. Four different analytical solutions can be derived as the asymptotic approximations, representing specific values of the parameter pairs. The four solutions correspond to: (1) Γ << 1, M <1; (2) Γ << 1, M =1; (3) Γ << 1, M >1; and (4) Γ >> 1, any M values. The first two of these solutions are new, while the third corresponds to the solution of Nordbotten and Celia (2006) for confined injections and the fourth corresponds to the solution of (Lyle et al., 2005) for gravity currents in an unconfined aquifer. Overall, the various axisymmetric flows can be summarized in a Γ-M regime diagram with five distinct dynamic behaviors including the four asymptotic regimes and an intermediate regime (Fig. 1). Data from a number of CO2 injection sites around the world can be used to compute the two dimensionless groups Γ and M associated with each injection. When plotted on the regime diagram, these values show the flow behavior for each injection and how the values vary from site to site. For all the CO2 injections, M is always larger than 1, while Γ can range from 0.01 up to 100. The pairs of (Γ, M) with lower Γ values correspond to solution (3), while the ones with higher Γ values can move up to the intermediate regime and the flow regime for solution (4). The higher values of Γ correspond to pilot-scale injections with low

  6. Subcutaneous or intramuscular insulin injections.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, C P; Sargent, M A; Wilson, B P; Price, D A

    1991-01-01

    To find out whether diabetic children may inject their insulin intramuscularly rather than subcutaneously, a random sample of 32 patients aged 4.3-17.9 (median 11.3) years was studied. Distance from skin to muscle fascia was measured by ultrasonography at standard injection sites on the outer arm, anterior and lateral thigh, abdomen, buttock, and calf. Distances were greater in girls (n = 15) than in boys (n = 17). Whereas in most boys the distances were less than the length of the needle (12.5 mm) at all sites except the buttock, in most girls, the distances were greater than 12.5 mm except over the calf. Over the fascial plane just lateral to the rectus muscle the distance from skin to peritoneum was less than 12.5 mm in 14 of the 17 boys and one of the 15 girls. Twenty five of the 32 children injected at an angle of 90 degrees, and 24 children raised a skinfold before injecting. By raising a skinfold over the anterior thigh, the distance from skin to muscle fascia was increased by 19% (range 0-38%). We conclude that most boys and some girls who use the perpendicular injection technique may often inject insulin into muscle, and perhaps on occasions into the peritoneal cavity. PMID:1863105

  7. Adaptive engine injection for emissions reduction

    DOEpatents

    Reitz, Rolf D. : Sun, Yong

    2008-12-16

    NOx and soot emissions from internal combustion engines, and in particular compression ignition (diesel) engines, are reduced by varying fuel injection timing, fuel injection pressure, and injected fuel volume between low and greater engine loads. At low loads, fuel is injected during one or more low-pressure injections occurring at low injection pressures between the start of the intake stroke and approximately 40 degrees before top dead center during the compression stroke. At higher loads, similar injections are used early in each combustion cycle, in addition to later injections which preferably occur between about 90 degrees before top dead center during the compression stroke, and about 90 degrees after top dead center during the expansion stroke (and which most preferably begin at or closely adjacent the end of the compression stroke). These later injections have higher injection pressure, and also lower injected fuel volume, than the earlier injections.

  8. Photodegradation of fleroxacin injection: different products with different concentration levels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Li, Wei; Li, Chen-Gui; Hu, Yu-Zhu

    2011-09-01

    Photodegradation of fleroxacin is investigated in different injections and solutions. After UV irradiation, fleroxacin was degraded to afford two major products in large-volume injection (specification, 200 mg:100 ml), while degraded to afford another major product in small-volume injection (specification, 200 mg:2 ml). The photodegradation products were detected and isolated by reversed-phase HPLC. Based on the spectral data (FT-IR, MS(n), TOF-MS, (1)H/(13)C, DEPT, and 2D NMR), the structures of these products were: 8-fluoro-9-(4-methyl-piperazin-1-yl)-6-oxo-2,3-dihydro-6H-1-oxa-3a-aza-phenalene-5-carboxylic acid (impurity-I); 6-fluoro-1-(2-fluoro-ethyl)-7-(2-methylamino-ethylamino)-4-oxo-1,4-dihydro-quinoline-3-carboxylic acid (impurity-II); and 6,8-difluoro-1-(2-fluoro-ethyl)-7-(2-methylamino-ethylamino)-4-oxo-1,4-dihydro-quinoline-3-carboxylic acid (impurity-III), respectively. Different photodegradation pathways of fleroxacin were proposed, which led to the different stability characteristics of fleroxacin in the injections. The fluorine atom at C8 is more photolabile in dilute injection, so defluorination and cyclization reactions are prone to take place, whereas photo irradiation only cause ring-opening oxidation reaction of piperazine side chain in concentrated injection.

  9. Researches on direct injection in internal-combustion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuscher, Jean E

    1941-01-01

    These researches present a solution for reducing the fatigue of the Diesel engine by permitting the preservation of its components and, at the same time, raising its specific horsepower to a par with that of carburetor engines, while maintaining for the Diesel engine its perogative of burning heavy fuel under optimum economical conditions. The feeding of Diesel engines by injection pumps actuated by engine compression achieves the required high speeds of injection readily and permits rigorous control of the combustible charge introduced into each cylinder and of the peak pressure in the resultant cycle.

  10. Sound Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starkman, Neal

    2007-01-01

    Poor classroom acoustics are impairing students' hearing and their ability to learn. However, technology has come up with a solution: tools that focus voices in a way that minimizes intrusive ambient noise and gets to the intended receiver--not merely amplifying the sound, but also clarifying and directing it. One provider of classroom audio…

  11. Polymer solutions

    DOEpatents

    Krawczyk, Gerhard Erich; Miller, Kevin Michael

    2011-07-26

    There is provided a method of making a polymer solution comprising polymerizing one or more monomer in a solvent, wherein said monomer comprises one or more ethylenically unsaturated monomer that is a multi-functional Michael donor, and wherein said solvent comprises 40% or more by weight, based on the weight of said solvent, one or more multi-functional Michael donor.

  12. Severe Scapular Pain Following Unintentional Cervical Epidural Air Injection.

    PubMed

    Henthorn, Randall W; Murray, Kerra

    2016-03-01

    This a unique case of severe scapular pain following unintentional epidural space air injection during epidural steroid injection.A 70-year-old woman presented for a fluoroscopically guided C7-T1 interlaminar epidural steroid injection. Three injection attempts were made using the loss of resistance with air technique. On the first attempt the epidural space was entered, but contrast injection showed that the needle was intravenous. On the second attempt an equivocal loss of resistance with air was perceived and 5 mL of air was lost from the syringe. The needle was withdrawn and redirected, and upon the third needle passage the contrast injection showed appropriate epidural space filling up to the C4-5 level. Injection of betamethasone mixed in lidocaine was initially uneventful.However, 20 minutes post-injection the patient experienced sudden sharp and continuous pain along the medial edge of the scapula. After failing to respond to multiple intravascular analgesics, the patient was transferred to the emergency room. Her pain subsided completely following an intravenous diazepam injection. Cervical spine computerized tomography showed obvious air in the posterior epidural space from C4-5 to C6-7 as well as outside the spinal canal from (C4-T2). Having recovered fully, she was discharged the following morning. In reviewing the procedure, the equivocal loss of resistance on the second passage was actually a true loss of resistance to epidural space and air was unintentionally injected. Surprisingly, severe scapular pain resulted in a delayed manner after the steroid solution was injected. The authors theorize that unintentional prefilling of the epidural space with air prior to the injection of the subsequent steroid mixture added sufficient pressure to the epidural space to cause right-sided C4 nerve root stretching/entrapment and ensuing radicular pain to the right scapular border. The subsequent intravenous diazepam provided cervical muscle relaxation and

  13. Fluid injection and induced seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, Michael; Verdon, James

    2016-04-01

    The link between fluid injection, or extraction, and induced seismicity has been observed in reservoirs for many decades. In fact spatial mapping of low magnitude events is routinely used to estimate a stimulated reservoir volume. However, the link between subsurface fluid injection and larger felt seismicity is less clear and has attracted recent interest with a dramatic increase in earthquakes associated with the disposal of oilfield waste fluids. In a few cases, hydraulic fracturing has also been linked to induced seismicity. Much can be learned from past case-studies of induced seismicity so that we can better understand the risks posed. Here we examine 12 case examples and consider in particular controls on maximum event size, lateral event distributions, and event depths. Our results suggest that injection volume is a better control on maximum magnitude than past, natural seismicity in a region. This might, however, simply reflect the lack of baseline monitoring and/or long-term seismic records in certain regions. To address this in the UK, the British Geological Survey is leading the deployment of monitoring arrays in prospective shale gas areas in Lancashire and Yorkshire. In most cases, seismicity is generally located in close vicinity to the injection site. However, in some cases, the nearest events are up to 5km from the injection point. This gives an indication of the minimum radius of influence of such fluid injection projects. The most distant events are never more than 20km from the injection point, perhaps implying a maximum radius of influence. Some events are located in the target reservoir, but most occur below the injection depth. In fact, most events lie in the crystalline basement underlying the sedimentary rocks. This suggests that induced seismicity may not pose a leakage risk for fluid migration back to the surface, as it does not impact caprock integrity. A useful application for microseismic data is to try and forecast induced seismicity

  14. Initial Injection Pressure for Dental Local Anesthesia: Effects on Pain and Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Kudo, Masaru

    2005-01-01

    This study quantitatively assessed injection pressure, pain, and anxiety at the start of injection of a local anesthetic into the oral mucosa, and confirmed the relationship between injection pressure and pain, as well as between injection pressure and anxiety. Twenty-eight healthy men were selected as subjects and a 0.5-inch (12 mm) 30-gauge disposable needle attached to a computer-controlled local anesthetic delivery system (the Wand) was used. A 0.5 mL volume of local anesthetic solution was injected submucosally at a speed of either 30 or 160 s/mL. Three seconds after the start of local anesthetic injection, injection pressure was measured and pain and anxiety were assessed. Injection pressure was measured continuously in real time by using an invasive sphygmomanometer and analytical software, and pain was assessed on the Visual Analogue Scale and anxiety on the Faces Anxiety Scale. A significant correlation was evident between injection pressure and pain (rs = .579, P = .00124) and between intensity of injection pressure and state anxiety (rs = .479, P = .00979). It is therefore recommended that local anesthetic be injected under low pressure (less than 306 mm Hg) to minimize pain and anxiety among dental patients. PMID:16252739

  15. Formulation development of allopurinol suppositories and injectables.

    PubMed

    Lee, D K; Wang, D P

    1999-11-01

    Allopurinol was formulated into injectable and suppository dosage forms. The injectable formulation was prepared by dissolving allopurinol in a cosolvent system consisting of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and propylene glycol (v/v = 50/50). The stability of allopurinol in the cosolvent system was studied under accelerated storage conditions, and results indicate first-order degradation kinetics with an activation energy of 24.3 kcal/mol. The development of suppository dosage forms was performed by formulating allopurinol with polyethylene glycol (PEG) mixtures of different molecular weights. In vitro release profiles of suppositories formulated with different polyethylene bases were obtained in the pH 7.4 buffer solution using the USP 23 paddle method at 100 rpm. Results indicate that the release rate of the suppository formulations containing PEG 1500/PEG 4000 at the ratio (w/w) of 2.5/10 to 10/2.5 appeared to be similar. However, the addition of sodium lauryl sulfate in the suppository decreased the release rate of allopurinol significantly. A future study to establish in vitro/in vivo correlation (iv/ivc) is suggested.

  16. Staged direct injection diesel engine

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Quentin A.

    1985-01-01

    A diesel engine having staged injection for using lower cetane number fuels than No. 2 diesel fuel. The engine includes a main fuel injector and a pilot fuel injector. Pilot and main fuel may be the same fuel. The pilot injector injects from five to fifteen percent of the total fuel at timings from 20.degree. to 180.degree. BTDC depending upon the quantity of pilot fuel injected, the fuel cetane number and speed and load. The pilot fuel injector is directed toward the centerline of the diesel cylinder and at an angle toward the top of the piston, avoiding the walls of the cylinder. Stratification of the early injected pilot fuel is needed to reduce the fuel-air mixing rate, prevent loss of pilot fuel to quench zones, and keep the fuel-air mixture from becoming too fuel lean to become effective. In one embodiment, the pilot fuel injector includes a single hole for injection of the fuel and is directed at approximately 48.degree. below the head of the cylinder.

  17. Controlled delivery of antibodies from injectable hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Nathan A; Babcock, Lyndsey R; Murray, Ellen A; Krebs, Melissa D

    2016-02-01

    Therapeutic antibodies are currently used for the treatment of various diseases, but large doses delivered systemically are typically required. Localized controlled delivery techniques would afford major benefits such as decreasing side effects and required doses. Injectable biopolymer systems are an attractive solution due to their minimally invasive potential for controlled release in a localized area. Here, alginate-chitosan hydrogels are demonstrated to provide controlled delivery of IgG model antibodies and also of Fab antibody fragments. Also, an alternate delivery system comprised of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres loaded with antibodies and encapsulated in alginate was shown to successfully provide another level of control over release. These biopolymer systems that offer controlled delivery for antibodies and antibody fragments will be promising for many applications in drug delivery and regenerative medicine.

  18. ArteFill permanent injectable for soft tissue augmentation: I. Mechanism of action and injection techniques.

    PubMed

    Lemperle, Gottfried; Knapp, Terry R; Sadick, Neil S; Lemperle, Stefan M

    2010-06-01

    After more than 25 years of research and development, in October 2006 ArteFill became the first and only permanent injectable wrinkle filler to receive FDA approval. ArteFill is a third-generation polymeric microsphere-based filler, following its predecessor Artecoll, which was marketed outside the United States between 1994 and 2006. ArteFill is approved for the correction of nasolabial folds and has been used in over 15,000 patients since its U.S. market introduction in February 2007. No serious side effects have been reported to date according to the FDA's MAUDE reporting database. ArteFill consists of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) microspheres (20% by volume), 30-50 microm in diameter, suspended in 3.5% bovine collagen solution (80% by volume) and 0.3% lidocaine. The collagen carrier is absorbed within 1 month after injection and completely replaced by the patient's own connective tissue within 3 months. Each cc of ArteFill contains approximately six million microspheres and histological studies have shown that long-term wrinkle correction consists of 80% of the patient's own connective tissue and 20% microspheres. The standard injection technique is subdermal tunneling that delivers a strand of ArteFill at the dermal-subdermal junction. This strand beneath a wrinkle or fold acts like a support structure that protects against further wrinkling and allows the diminished thickness of the dermis to recover to its original thickness.

  19. Rapid response gas injection technique.

    PubMed

    Komar, J J

    1978-10-01

    A unique gas injection technique has been developed which has rapid response and is capable of supplying gas flowrates up to 5 kg/s at pressures of 3.45 x 10(6) N/m(2). Rise times to equilibrium pressure varied from 7 to 15 ms over the operating range. The reliability, excellent repeatibility, and uniform pressure have shown the system to be superior to previously utilized expansion tube gas injection techniques associated with very short duration impulse test facilities. The achievement of precise timing control of the valve opening permitted a complex electronic sequencing of facility events. An additional feature of automatic gas supply shut-off resulted in significant cost savings when rare gases were used as injectants. PMID:18698978

  20. Line10 Charge Injection Biases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggett, Sylvia

    2012-10-01

    Radiation damage on-orbit, in the form of charge traps, gradually reduces the charge transfer efficiency {CTE} of CCDs over time. In WFC3, one option for mitigating CTE losses is charge injection i.e. electronically inserting charge every Nth row. The benefit of this method is the significantly lower noise penalty, much less than the traditional Poissonian noise imparted by a pre- or post-flash of the same charge level. This program acquires the calibration data necessary to support science observations using charge injection.

  1. Sodium storage and injection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keeton, A. R. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A sodium storage and injection system for delivering atomized liquid sodium to a chemical reactor employed in the production of solar grade silicon is disclosed. The system is adapted to accommodate start-up, shut-down, normal and emergency operations, and is characterized by (1) a jacketed injection nozzle adapted to atomize liquefied sodium and (2) a supply circuit connected to the nozzle for delivering the liquefied sodium. The supply circuit is comprised of a plurality of replaceable sodium containment vessels, a pump interposed between the vessels and the nozzle, and a pressurizing circuit including a source of inert gas connected with the vessels for maintaining the sodium under pressure.

  2. ATF neutral beam injection system

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, M.M.; Morris, R.N.; Edmonds, P.H.

    1985-01-01

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility is a stellarator torsatron being built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to investigate improved plasma confinement schemes. Plasmas heating will be carried out predominantly by means of neutral beam injection. This paper describes the basic parameters of the injection system. Numerical calculations were done to optimize the aiming of the injectors. The results of these calculations and their implications on the neutral power to the machine are elaborated. The effects of improving the beam optics and altering the focal length on the power transmitted to the plasma are discussed.

  3. Polarization switching and injection locking in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers subject to parallel optical injection.

    PubMed

    Quirce, Ana; Pérez, Pablo; Popp, Alexandra; Valle, Ángel; Pesquera, Luis; Hong, Yanhua; Thienpont, Hugo; Panajotov, Krassimir

    2016-06-01

    Polarization switching in a long-wavelength vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) under parallel optical injection is analyzed in a theoretical and experimental way. For the first time, to our knowledge, we report experimentally a state in which injection locking of the parallel polarization and excitation of the free-running orthogonal polarization of the VCSEL are simultaneously obtained. We obtain very simple analytical expressions that describe both linear polarizations. We show that the power of both linear polarizations depend linearly on the injected power in such a way that the total power emitted by the VCSEL is constant. We perform a linear stability analysis of this solution to characterize the region of parameters in which it can be observed. Our measurements qualitatively confirm the previous theoretical predictions. PMID:27244440

  4. Bifurcation to polarization switching and locking in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with optical injection

    SciTech Connect

    Gatare, I.; Sciamanna, M.; Nizette, M.; Panajotov, K.

    2007-09-15

    We unveil the bifurcations underlying polarization switching and injection locking in a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser subject to optical injection. A Hopf bifurcation, not reported for conventional edge-emitting lasers, delimits the injection locking region and influences the polarization switching conditions. We furthermore theoretically show and experimentally observe periodic dynamics at the relaxation oscillation frequency in the noninjected mode together with wave-mixing dynamics in the injected mode. These dynamics precede the polarization switching leading to injection locking and are attributed to a torus bifurcation arising on a two-polarization mode solution.

  5. Sequential injection spectrophotometric determination of oxybenzone in lipsticks.

    PubMed

    Salvador, A; Chisvert, A; Camarasa, A; Pascual-Martí, M C; March, J G

    2001-08-01

    A sequential injection (SI) procedure for the spectrophotometric determination of oxybenzone in lipsticks is reported. The colorimetric reaction between nickel and oxybenzone was used. SI parameters such as sample solution volume, reagent solution volume, propulsion flow rate and reaction coil length were studied. The limit of detection was 3 microg ml(-1). The sensitivity was 0.0108+/-0.0002 ml microg(-1). The relative standard deviations of the results were between 6 and 12%. The real concentrations of samples and the values obtained by HPLC were comparable. Microwave sample pre-treatment allowed the extraction of oxybenzone with ethanol, thus avoiding the use of toxic organic solvents. Ethanol was also used as carrier in the SI system. Seventy-two injections per hour can be performed, which means a sample frequency of 24 h(-1) if three replicates are measured for each sample.

  6. Aquifer washing by micellar solutions: 2. DNAPL recovery mechanisms for an optimized alcohol surfactant solvent solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, Richard; Lefebvre, René; Gélinas, Pierre J.

    1998-03-01

    A large sand column experiment is used to illustrate the principles of complex organic contaminants (DNAPL) recovery by a chemical solution containing an alcohol ( n-butanol), a surfactant (Hostapur SAS), and two solvents ( d-limonene and toluene). The washing solution is pushed by viscous polymer solutions to keep the displacement stable. The main NAPL recovery mechanisms identified are: (1) immiscible displacement by oil saturation increase (oil swelling), oil viscosity reduction, interfacial tension lowering, and relative permeability increase; (2) miscible NAPL displacement by solubilization. Most of the NAPL was recovered in a Winsor, type II system ahead of the washing solution. The 0.8 pore volume (PV) of alcohol-surfactant-solvent solution injected recovered more than 89% of the initial residual DNAPL saturation (0.195). Winsor system types were determined by visual observation of phases and confirmed by electrical resistivity measurements of phases and water content measurements in the oleic phase. Viscosity and density lowering of the oleic phase was made using solvents and alcohol transfer from the washing solution. Small sand column tests are performed to check different rinsing strategies used to minimize washing solution residual ingredients which can be trapped in sediments. An alcohol/surfactant rinsing solution without solvent, injected behind the washing solution, minimizes solvent trapping in sediments. More than five pore volumes of polymer solution and water must be injected after the rinsing solution to decrease alcohol and SAS concentrations in sediments to an acceptable level. To obtain reasonable trapped surfactant concentrations in sediments, the displacement front between the rinsing solution and the subsequent the following polymer solution has to be stable.

  7. Effect of intravenously injected zinc on tissue zinc and metallothionein gene expression of broilers.

    PubMed

    Shen, S F; Wang, R L; Lu, L; Li, S F; Liu, S B; Xie, J J; Zhang, L Y; Wang, M L; Luo, X G

    2013-06-01

    1. The effect of intravenously injected zinc (Zn) on tissue Zn concentrations and pancreas metallothionein (MT) gene expression in broilers was investigated to detect differences in the tissue utilisation of Zn from different Zn sources. 2. A total of 432 male chickens were randomly allotted on d 22 post-hatch to one of nine treatments in a completely randomised design. Chickens were injected with either a 0.9% (w/v) NaCl solution (control) or a saline solution supplemented with Zn sulphate or one of three organic Zn chelates with weak (Zn-AA W), moderate (Zn-Pro M) or strong (Zn-Pro S) chelation strengths at two injected Zn dosages calculated according to two Zn absorbability levels (6 and 12%). 3. Bone and pancreas Zn concentrations, pancreas MT mRNA levels and MT concentrations increased on d 6 and 12 after Zn injections as the injected Zn dosages increased. Chickens injected with the Zn-Pro S had lower bone Zn concentration than those injected with the Zn-Pro M or Zn-AA W on d 6 after injections. However, no differences among Zn sources were observed in bone Zn concentration on d 12 after injections, pancreas Zn concentrations, pancreas MT mRNA levels and MT concentrations on both d 6 and d 12 after injections. 4. It was concluded that the injected Zn-Pro S was the least favourable for bone Zn utilisation of broilers. The pancreas Zn concentration and pancreas MT gene expressions might not be sensitive enough to detect differences in the tissue utilisation of injected Zn in broilers between organic and inorganic Zn sources or among organic Zn sources.

  8. Suppression of Tip Vortex Cavitation by Water and Polymer Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Natasha; Yakushiji, Ryo; Ceccio, Steven

    2008-11-01

    Tip vortex cavitation (TVC) is typically the first form of cavitation observed in propellers; therefore a delay of its inception is desirable. In this study, TVC inception was delayed via mass injection from the tip of a modified NACA-66 elliptic plan-form hydrofoil. The injected mass used were water and Polyox WSR 301 solutions with concentrations from 10 to 500 ppm. The free-stream nuclei content was measured using a Cavitation Susceptibility Meter, and the TVC inception event rate was quantified with a light scattering system. The vortical flow field in the region of inception was characterized using Stereo Particle Imaging and Velocimetry (SPIV), with measurements taken from 0.25 to 1 chord length at various concentrations and injection rates. It was observed that TVC inception was delayed with injection by a δσ of 0.03 to 1.8 from a baseline of σ = 3.5. Injection with higher polymer concentrations and higher volume flux led to larger delays. A saturation effect for the TVC suppression was observed for both the polymer concentration (125ppm) and volume flux rate (Qj/Qc = 0.48). These effects are related to the SPIV flow field.

  9. Sciatica and epidural corticosteroid injections.

    PubMed

    2015-02-01

    According to trials conducted in hundreds of patients with sciatica, epidural corticosteroid injections have no demonstrated efficacy beyond the placebo effect, either in the short-term or the long-term. However, they expose patients to a risk of sometimes serious neurological adverse effects.

  10. 21 CFR 522.690 - Dinoprost solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dinoprost solution. 522.690 Section 522.690 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS §...

  11. 21 CFR 522.2012 - Prostalene solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prostalene solution. 522.2012 Section 522.2012 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS §...

  12. Solution Leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Tiejun; Zhu, Deqing; Pan, Jian; He, Zhen

    2014-06-01

    Recovery of alumina from magnetic separation tailings of red mud has been investigated by Na2CO3 solution leaching. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results show that most of the alumina is present as 12CaO·7Al2O3 and CaO·Al2O3 in the magnetic separation tailings. The shrinking core model was employed to describe the leaching kinetics. The results show that the calculated activation energy of 8.31 kJ/mol is characteristic for an internal diffusion-controlled process. The kinetic equation can be used to describe the leaching process. The effects of Na2CO3 concentration, liquid-to-solid ratio, and particle size on recovery of Al2O3 were examined.

  13. Theory of Gas Injection: Interaction of Phase Behavior and Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dindoruk, B.

    2015-12-01

    The theory of gas injection processes is a central element required to understand how components move and partition in the reservoir as one fluid is displacing another (i.e., gas is displacing oil). There is significant amount of work done in the area of interaction of phase-behavior and flow in multiphase flow conditions. We would like to present how the theory of gas injection is used in the industry to understand/design reservoir processes in various ways. The tools that are developed for the theory of gas injection originates from the fractional flow theory, as the first solution proposed by Buckley-Leveret in 1940's, for water displacing oil in porous media. After 1960's more and more complex/coupled equations were solved using the initial concept(s) developed by Buckley-Leverett, and then Welge et al. and others. However, the systematic use of the fractional flow theory for coupled set of equations that involves phase relationships (EOS) and phase appearance and disappearance was mainly due to the theory developed by Helfferich in early 80's (in petroleum literature) using method of characteristics primarily for gas injection process and later on by the systematic work done by Orr and his co-researchers during the last two decades. In this talk, we will present various cases that use and extend the theory developed by Helfferich and others (Orr et al., Lake et al. etc.). The review of various injection systems reveals that displacement in porous media has commonalities that can be represented with a unified theory for a class of problems originating from the theory of gas injection (which is in a way generalized Buckley-Leverett problem). The outcome of these solutions can be used for (and are not limited to): 1) Benchmark solutions for reservoir simulators (to quantify numerical dispersion, test numerical algorithms) 2) Streamline simulators 3) Design of laboratory experiments and their use (to invert the results) 4) Conceptual learning and to investigate

  14. Sequential injection gas guns for accelerating projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Lacy, Jeffrey M.; Chu, Henry S.; Novascone, Stephen R.

    2011-11-15

    Gas guns and methods for accelerating projectiles through such gas guns are described. More particularly, gas guns having a first injection port located proximate a breech end of a barrel and a second injection port located longitudinally between the first injection port and a muzzle end of the barrel are described. Additionally, modular gas guns that include a plurality of modules are described, wherein each module may include a barrel segment having one or more longitudinally spaced injection ports. Also, methods of accelerating a projectile through a gas gun, such as injecting a first pressurized gas into a barrel through a first injection port to accelerate the projectile and propel the projectile down the barrel past a second injection port and injecting a second pressurized gas into the barrel through the second injection port after passage of the projectile and to further accelerate the projectile are described.

  15. Diesel engine fuel injection pump capable of injection timing adjustment

    SciTech Connect

    Wakasa, S.; Okazaki, T.

    1987-12-15

    A diesel engine fuel injection pump capable of injection timing adjustment is described comprising: (a) housing means; (b) a plunger assembly reciprocably mounted within the housing means and defining a pumping chamber therein; (c) the housing means having defined therein a fuel inlet port to the pumping chamber in a predetermined position in the longitudinal direction of the pumping chamber; (d) drive means for reciprocably moving the plunger assembly within the pumping chamber between a first extreme position; (e) the plunger assembly being formed of at least two transversely split segments movable toward and away from each other within limits and including resilient means biasing the segments of the plunger assembly toward each other; and (f) the housing means further including a timing fluid inlet port for introduction of a timing fluid under variable pressure between the segments of the plunger assembly to move the plunger assembly segments away from each other to an extent that timing fluid pressure is counterbalanced by force of the resilient means for controllably varying the distance therebetween and, in consequence, for varying the prestroke of the plunger assembly solely in response to variation of the timing fluid pressure to effect adjustment of injection timing.

  16. Economic Implementation and Optimization of Secondary Oil Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Cary D. Brock

    2006-01-09

    The St Mary West Barker Sand Unit (SMWBSU or Unit) located in Lafayette County, Arkansas was unitized for secondary recovery operations in 2002 followed by installation of a pilot injection system in the fall of 2003. A second downdip water injection well was added to the pilot project in 2005 and 450,000 barrels of saltwater has been injected into the reservoir sand to date. Daily injection rates have been improved over initial volumes by hydraulic fracture stimulation of the reservoir sand in the injection wells. Modifications to the injection facilities are currently being designed to increase water injection rates for the pilot flood. A fracture treatment on one of the production wells resulted in a seven-fold increase of oil production. Recent water production and increased oil production in a producer closest to the pilot project indicates possible response to the water injection. The reservoir and wellbore injection performance data obtained during the pilot project will be important to the secondary recovery optimization study for which the DOE grant was awarded. The reservoir characterization portion of the modeling and simulation study is in progress by Strand Energy project staff under the guidance of University of Houston Department of Geosciences professor Dr. Janok Bhattacharya and University of Texas at Austin Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering professor Dr. Larry W. Lake. A geologic and petrophysical model of the reservoir is being constructed from geophysical data acquired from core, well log and production performance histories. Possible use of an outcrop analog to aid in three dimensional, geostatistical distribution of the flow unit model developed from the wellbore data will be investigated. The reservoir model will be used for full-field history matching and subsequent fluid flow simulation based on various injection schemes including patterned water flooding, addition of alkaline surfactant-polymer (ASP) to the injected water

  17. S Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dezhi, Zeng; Gang, Tian; Junying, Hu; Zhi, Zhang; Taihe, Shi; Wanying, Liu; Qiang, Lu; Shaobo, Feng

    2014-11-01

    During drilling process, if oil and gas overflow containing H2S enters drilling fluids, the performance of drill pipes will decline significantly within a short time. In this paper, S135 drill pipe specimen was immersed in the saturated solution of H2S at room temperature for 6, 12, 18, and 24 h, respectively. The tensile properties and impact properties of S135 drill pipe were determined before and after immersion for comparison. In addition, the S135 specimens were immersed for 3 days at 80 °C to determine the changes in fatigue performance. The test results indicated that the yield strength of S135 material fluctuated with immersion time increasing and the tensile strength slightly varied with immersion time. But the plasticity index of S135 decreased significantly with the increase in immersion time. The impact energy of S135 steel also fluctuated with the increase in immersion time. After 3-day immersion at 80 °C, the fatigue properties of S135 steel decreased, and fatigue life showed the one order of magnitude difference under the same stress conditions. Moreover, fatigue strength was also decreased by about 10%. The study can guide security management of S135 drill pipe under the working conditions with oil and gas overflow containing H2S, reduce drilling tool failures, and provide technical support for drilling safety.

  18. Life's Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Simon Conway

    2004-11-01

    Life's Solution builds a persuasive case for the predictability of evolutionary outcomes. The case rests on a remarkable compilation of examples of convergent evolution, in which two or more lineages have independently evolved similar structures and functions. The examples range from the aerodynamics of hovering moths and hummingbirds to the use of silk by spiders and some insects to capture prey. Going against the grain of Darwinian orthodoxy, this book is a must read for anyone grappling with the meaning of evolution and our place in the Universe. Simon Conway Morris is the Ad Hominen Professor in the Earth Science Department at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of St. John's College and the Royal Society. His research focuses on the study of constraints on evolution, and the historical processes that lead to the emergence of complexity, especially with respect to the construction of the major animal body parts in the Cambrian explosion. Previous books include The Crucible of Creation (Getty Center for Education in the Arts, 1999) and co-author of Solnhofen (Cambridge, 1990). Hb ISBN (2003) 0-521-82704-3

  19. Life's Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Simon Conway

    2003-09-01

    Life's Solution builds a persuasive case for the predictability of evolutionary outcomes. The case rests on a remarkable compilation of examples of convergent evolution, in which two or more lineages have independently evolved similar structures and functions. The examples range from the aerodynamics of hovering moths and hummingbirds to the use of silk by spiders and some insects to capture prey. Going against the grain of Darwinian orthodoxy, this book is a must read for anyone grappling with the meaning of evolution and our place in the Universe. Simon Conway Morris is the Ad Hominen Professor in the Earth Science Department at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of St. John's College and the Royal Society. His research focuses on the study of constraints on evolution, and the historical processes that lead to the emergence of complexity, especially with respect to the construction of the major animal body parts in the Cambrian explosion. Previous books include The Crucible of Creation (Getty Center for Education in the Arts, 1999) and co-author of Solnhofen (Cambridge, 1990). Hb ISBN (2003) 0-521-82704-3

  20. Miniaturized flow injection analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Folta, James A.

    1997-01-01

    A chemical analysis technique known as flow injection analysis, wherein small quantities of chemical reagents and sample are intermixed and reacted within a capillary flow system and the reaction products are detected optically, electrochemically, or by other means. A highly miniaturized version of a flow injection analysis system has been fabricated utilizing microfabrication techniques common to the microelectronics industry. The microflow system uses flow capillaries formed by etching microchannels in a silicon or glass wafer followed by bonding to another wafer, commercially available microvalves bonded directly to the microflow channels, and an optical absorption detector cell formed near the capillary outlet, with light being both delivered and collected with fiber optics. The microflow system is designed mainly for analysis of liquids and currently measures 38.times.25.times.3 mm, but can be designed for gas analysis and be substantially smaller in construction.

  1. Miniaturized flow injection analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Folta, J.A.

    1997-07-01

    A chemical analysis technique known as flow injection analysis is described, wherein small quantities of chemical reagents and sample are intermixed and reacted within a capillary flow system and the reaction products are detected optically, electrochemically, or by other means. A highly miniaturized version of a flow injection analysis system has been fabricated utilizing microfabrication techniques common to the microelectronics industry. The microflow system uses flow capillaries formed by etching microchannels in a silicon or glass wafer followed by bonding to another wafer, commercially available microvalves bonded directly to the microflow channels, and an optical absorption detector cell formed near the capillary outlet, with light being both delivered and collected with fiber optics. The microflow system is designed mainly for analysis of liquids and currently measures 38{times}25{times}3 mm, but can be designed for gas analysis and be substantially smaller in construction. 9 figs.

  2. Alloy solution hardening with solute pairs

    DOEpatents

    Mitchell, John W.

    1976-08-24

    Solution hardened alloys are formed by using at least two solutes which form associated solute pairs in the solvent metal lattice. Copper containing equal atomic percentages of aluminum and palladium is an example.

  3. Model for pneumatic pellet injection

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, J.T.; Milora, S.L.; Schuresko, D.D.

    1983-07-01

    A hydrodynamic code has been developed to model the performance of pneumatic pellet injection systems. The code describes one dimensional, unsteady compressible gas dynamics, including gas friction and heat transfer to the walls in a system with variable area. The mass, momentum, and energy equations are solved with an iterated Lax-Wendroff scheme with additional numerical viscosity. The code is described and comparisons with experimental data are presented.

  4. Radial lean direct injection burner

    DOEpatents

    Khan, Abdul Rafey; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2012-09-04

    A burner for use in a gas turbine engine includes a burner tube having an inlet end and an outlet end; a plurality of air passages extending axially in the burner tube configured to convey air flows from the inlet end to the outlet end; a plurality of fuel passages extending axially along the burner tube and spaced around the plurality of air passage configured to convey fuel from the inlet end to the outlet end; and a radial air swirler provided at the outlet end configured to direct the air flows radially toward the outlet end and impart swirl to the air flows. The radial air swirler includes a plurality of vanes to direct and swirl the air flows and an end plate. The end plate includes a plurality of fuel injection holes to inject the fuel radially into the swirling air flows. A method of mixing air and fuel in a burner of a gas turbine is also provided. The burner includes a burner tube including an inlet end, an outlet end, a plurality of axial air passages, and a plurality of axial fuel passages. The method includes introducing an air flow into the air passages at the inlet end; introducing a fuel into fuel passages; swirling the air flow at the outlet end; and radially injecting the fuel into the swirling air flow.

  5. Catalytic combustion with steam injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, D. N.; Tacina, R. R.

    The effects of steam injection on (1) catalytic combustion performance, and (2) the tendency of residual fuel to burn in the premixing duct upstream of the catalytic reactor were determined. A petroleum residual, no. 2 diesel, and a blend of middle and heavy distillate coal derived fuels were tested. Fuel and steam were injected together into the preheated airflow entering a 12 cm diameter catalytic combustion test section. The inlet air velocity and pressure were constant at 10 m/s and 600 kPa, respectively. Steam flow rates were varied from 24 percent to 52 percent of the air flow rate. The resulting steam air mixture temperatures varied from 630 to 740 K. Combustion temperatures were in the range of 1200 to 1400 K. The steam had little effect on combustion efficiency or emissions. It was concluded that the steam acts as a diluent which has no adverse effect on catalytic combustion performance for no. 2 diesel and coal derived liquid fuels. Tests with the residual fuel showed that upstream burning could be eliminated with steam injection rates greater than 30 percent of the air flow rate, but inlet mixture temperatures were too low to permit stable catalytic combustion of this fuel.

  6. Catalytic combustion with steam injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. N.; Tacina, R. R.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of steam injection on (1) catalytic combustion performance, and (2) the tendency of residual fuel to burn in the premixing duct upstream of the catalytic reactor were determined. A petroleum residual, no. 2 diesel, and a blend of middle and heavy distillate coal derived fuels were tested. Fuel and steam were injected together into the preheated airflow entering a 12 cm diameter catalytic combustion test section. The inlet air velocity and pressure were constant at 10 m/s and 600 kPa, respectively. Steam flow rates were varied from 24 percent to 52 percent of the air flow rate. The resulting steam air mixture temperatures varied from 630 to 740 K. Combustion temperatures were in the range of 1200 to 1400 K. The steam had little effect on combustion efficiency or emissions. It was concluded that the steam acts as a diluent which has no adverse effect on catalytic combustion performance for no. 2 diesel and coal derived liquid fuels. Tests with the residual fuel showed that upstream burning could be eliminated with steam injection rates greater than 30 percent of the air flow rate, but inlet mixture temperatures were too low to permit stable catalytic combustion of this fuel.

  7. Helpful tips for performing musculoskeletal injections.

    PubMed

    Metz, John P

    2010-01-01

    Injections are valuable procedures for managing musculoskeletal conditions commonly encountered by family physicians. Corticosteroid injections into articular, periarticular, or soft tissue structures relieve pain, reduce inflammation, and improve mobility. Injections can provide diagnostic information and are commonly used for postoperative pain control. Local anesthetics may be injected with corticosteroids to provide additional, rapid pain relief. Steroid injection is the preferred and definitive treatment for de Quervain tenosynovitis and trochanteric bursitis. Steroid injections can also be helpful in controlling pain during physical rehabilitation from rotator cuff syndrome and lateral epicondylitis. Intra-articular steroid injection provides pain relief in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. There is little systematic evidence to guide medication selection for therapeutic injections. The medication used and the frequency of injection should be guided by the goal of the injection (i.e., diagnostic or therapeutic), the underlying musculoskeletal diagnosis, and clinical experience. Complications from steroid injections are rare, but physicians should understand the potential risks and counsel patients appropriately. Patients with diabetes who receive periarticular or soft tissue steroid injections should closely monitor their blood glucose for two weeks following injection. PMID:20052957

  8. Musculoskeletal injections: a review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Mark B; Beutler, Anthony I; O'Connor, Francis G

    2008-10-15

    Injections are valuable procedures for managing musculoskeletal conditions commonly encountered by family physicians. Corticosteroid injections into articular, periarticular, or soft tissue structures relieve pain, reduce inflammation, and improve mobility. Injections can provide diagnostic information and are commonly used for postoperative pain control. Local anesthetics may be injected with corticosteroids to provide additional, rapid pain relief. Steroid injection is the preferred and definitive treatment for de Quervain tenosynovitis and trochanteric bursitis. Steroid injections can also be helpful in controlling pain during physical rehabilitation from rotator cuff syndrome and lateral epicondylitis. Intra-articular steroid injection provides pain relief in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. There is little systematic evidence to guide medication selection for therapeutic injections. The medication used and the frequency of injection should be guided by the goal of the injection (i.e., diagnostic or therapeutic), the underlying musculoskeletal diagnosis, and clinical experience. Complications from steroid injections are rare, but physicians should understand the potential risks and counsel patients appropriately. Patients with diabetes who receive periarticular or soft tissue steroid injections should closely monitor their blood glucose for two weeks following injection. PMID:18953975

  9. Field injection of microscale zerovalent iron for groundwater remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethi, Rajandrea; Tosco, Tiziana; Luna, Michela; Gastone, Francesca; Velimirovic, Milica; Gemoets, Johan; Muyshond, Rob; Sapion, Hans; Klaas, Norbert; Bastiaens, Leen

    2014-05-01

    In the framework of the research project AQUAREHAB (FP7 - G. A. Nr. 226565), a pilot injection test of guar gum stabilized microsized zerovalent iron has been designed and performed under low pressure in a CAHs contaminated site in Belgium, characterized by fine sand (hydraulic conductivity in the order of 2·10-5m/s) and an effective velocity equal to 0.005 m/day (1). The field application was aimed to overcome those critical aspects which hinder mZVI particles field injection, mainly due to ZVI-based colloidal suspensions instability. A shear thinning guar gum solution (2 g/l) was selected as an environmentally friendly stabilizer. The relevant properties of the iron slurry (iron particles size and concentration, polymeric stabilizer type and concentration, slurry viscosity) were designed in the laboratory based on several tests (namely iron reactivity tests towards contaminants, sedimentation tests and rheological measurements).The slurry preparation was successfully up-scaled to the field application, allowing a fast preparation of large volumes (1 m3 at a time) of slurry with good dissolution of guar gum and effective dispersion of mZVI. Since the injection regime of iron slurries depends on subsurface geotechnical parameters, aquifer hydraulic conductivity, and fluid properties, a specific injection well and monitoring strategy have been developed in order to achieve high discharge rates and radii of influence, and a more homogeneous distribution of the iron particles through low pressure injection. The injection well has been designed and sealed in order to sustain average to high discharge rates, preventing the daylighting of the product. Moreover the well has been hydraulically tested by means of innovative water and guar gum step rate tests in order to determine the most suitable injection rate for the iron slurry. The injection of 50 kg of microsized iron particles (BASF, Germany), dispersed in 5 m3 of a 2 g/l guar gum suspension, was performed at a

  10. Riboflavin concentration in corneal stroma after intracameral injection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Na; Peng, Xiu-Jun; Fan, Zheng-Jun; Pang, Xu; Xia, Yu; Wu, Teng-Fei

    2015-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the enrichment of riboflavin in the corneal stroma after intracameral injection to research the barrier ability of the corneal endothelium to riboflavin in vivo. METHODS The right eyes of 30 New Zealand white rabbits were divided into three groups. Different concentrations riboflavin-balanced salt solutions (BSS) were injected into the anterior chamber (10 with 0.5%, 10 with 1%, and 10 with 2%). Eight corneal buttons of 8.5 mm in diameter from each group were dissected at 30min after injection and the riboflavin concentrations in the corneal stroma were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) after removing the epithelium and endothelium. The other two rabbits in every group were observed for 24h and sacrificed. As a comparison, the riboflavin concentrations from 16 corneal stromal samples were determined using HPLC after instillation of 0.1% riboflavin-BSS solution for 30min on the corneal surface (8 without epithelium and 8 with intact epithelium). RESULTS The mean riboflavin concentrations were 11.19, 18.97, 25.08, 20.18, and 1.13 µg/g for 0.5%, 1%, 2%, de-epithelialzed samples, and the transepithelial groups, respectively. The color change of the corneal stroma and the HPLC results showed that enrichment with riboflavin similar to classical de-epithelialized corneal collagen crosslinking (CXL) could be achieved by intracameral 1% riboflavin-BSS solution after 30min; the effect appeared to be continuous for at least 30min. CONCLUSION Riboflavin can effectively penetrate the corneal stroma through the endothelium after an intracameral injection in vivo, so it could be an enhancing method that could improve the corneal riboflavin concentration in transepithelial CXL. PMID:26085993

  11. Tracing Injection Fluids in Engineered Geothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, P. E.; Leecaster, K.; Mella, M.; Ayling, B.; Bartl, M. H.

    2011-12-01

    The reinjection of produced fluids is crucial to the effective management of geothermal reservoirs, since it provides a mechanism for maintaining reservoir pressures while allowing for the disposal of a toxic byproduct. Tracers are essential to the proper location of injection wells since they are the only known tool for reliably characterizing the flow patterns of recirculated fluids. If injection wells are placed too close to production wells, then reinjected fluids do not have sufficient residence time to extract heat from the reservoir and premature thermal breakthrough results. If injection wells are placed too far away, then the reservoir risks unacceptable pressure loss. Several thermally stable compounds from a family of very detectable fluorescent organic compounds (the naphthalene sulfonates) were characterized and found to be effective for use as geothermal tracers. Through batch-autoclave reactions, their Arrhenius pseudo-first-order decay-rate constants were determined. An analytical method was developed that allows for the laboratory determination of concentrations in the low parts-per-trillion range. Field experiments in numerous geothermal reservoirs throughout the world have confirmed the laboratory findings. Whereas conservative tracers such as the naphthalene sulfonates are effective tools for indicating interwell flow patterns and for measuring reservoir pore volumes, 'reactive' tracers can be used to constrain fracture surface area, which is the effective area for heat extraction. This is especially important for engineered geothermal system (EGS) wells, since reactive tracers can be used to measure fracture surface area immediately after drilling and while the well stimulation equipment is still on site. The reactive properties of these tracers that can be exploited to constrain fracture surface area are reversible sorption, contrasting diffusivity, and thermal decay. Laboratory batch- and flow-reactor experiments in combination with numerical

  12. Corticosteroid Injections for Common Musculoskeletal Conditions.

    PubMed

    Foster, Zoë J; Voss, Tyler T; Hatch, Jacquelynn; Frimodig, Adam

    2015-10-15

    Family physicians considering corticosteroid injections as part of a comprehensive treatment plan for musculoskeletal diagnoses will find few high-quality studies to assist with evidence-based decision making. Most studies of corticosteroid injections for the treatment of osteoarthritis, tendinopathy, bursitis, or neuropathy include only small numbers of patients and have inconsistent long-term follow-up. Corticosteroid injections for the treatment of adhesive capsulitis result in short-term improvements in pain and range of motion. For subacromial impingement syndrome, corticosteroid injections provide short-term pain relief and improvement in function. In medial and lateral epicondylitis, corticosteroid injections offer only short-term improvement of symptoms and have a high rate of symptom recurrence. Corticosteroid injections for carpal tunnel syndrome may help patients avoid or delay surgery. Trigger finger and de Quervain tenosynovitis may be treated effectively with corticosteroid injections. Patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis may have short-term symptom relief with corticosteroid injections.

  13. Interferon Beta-1a Subcutaneous Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS, a disease in which ... under the skin). It is usually injected three times a week. You should inject this medication on ...

  14. Side Effects of Injectable Fertility Drugs (Gonadotropins)

    MedlinePlus

    ... usually are used during fertility treatments such as intrauterine insemination (IUI) or in vitro fertilization (IVF). Injections of gonadotropins ... Gestation. When using injectable gonadotropins alone or with IUI, up to 30% of pregnancies are associated with ...

  15. The Effects of Intracellular Iontophoretic Injection of Calcium and Sodium Ions on the Light Response of Limulus Ventral Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Lisman, J. E.; Brown, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    During intracellular iontophoretic injection of Ca++ into Limulus ventral photoreceptor cells, there is a progressive diminution of the light response. Following Ca++ injection, the size of the light response slowly recovers. Similarly, there is a progressive diminution of the light response during intracellular injection of Na+ and recovery after the injection is stopped. The rate of diminution during Na+ injection is greater for higher [Ca++]out. In solutions which contain 0.1 mM Ca++, there is nearly no progressive decrease in the size of the light response during Na+ injection. Intracellular injections of Li+ or K+ do not progressively decrease the size of the light response. We propose that an increase in [Na+]in leads to an increase in [Ca++]in and that an increase in [Ca++]in by any means leads to a reduction in responsiveness to light. PMID:5025746

  16. Active control of asymmetric vortical flows around cones using injection and heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Sharaf, Hazem H.; Liu, C. H.

    1992-01-01

    The effectiveness of certain active-control methods for asymmetric flows around circular cones is investigated by using computational solution of the unsteady, compressible full Navier-Stokes equations. Two main methods of active control which include flow injection and surface heating are used. For the flow-injection-control method, flow injection is used either in the normal direction to the surface or in the tangential direction to the surface. For the surface-heating-control method, the temperature of the cone surface is increased. The effectiveness of a hybrid method of flow control which combines normal injection with surface heating has also been studied. The Navier-Stokes equations, subjected to various surface boundary conditions, are solved by using an implicit, upwind, flux-difference splitting, finite-volume scheme for locally-conical flow solutions.

  17. Continuum Modeling of the Dynamics of Externally Injection-locked Coupled Oscillator Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pogorzelski, Ronald J.; Maccarini, Paolo F.; York, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Mutually injection-locked arrays of electronic oscillators provide a novel means of controlling the aperture phase of a phased-array antenna, thus achieving the advantages of spatial power combining while retaining the ability to steer the radiated beam. In a number of design concepts, one or more of the oscillators are injection locked to a signal from an external master-oscillator. The behavior of such a system has been analyzed by numerical solution of a system of nonlinear differential equations which, due to its complexity, yields limited insight into the relationship between the injection signals and the aperture phase. In this paper, we develop a continuum model, which results in a single partial differential equation for the aperture phase as a function of time. Solution of the equation is effected by means of the Laplace transformation and yields detailed information concerning the dynamics of the array under the influence of the external injection signals.

  18. Using ultrasonography in evaluating the intramuscular injection techniques used for administering drug treatments to schizophrenic patients in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yasuhara, Yuko; Hirai, Eri; Sakamaki, Sakiko; Tanioka, Tetsuya; Motoki, Kazushi; Takase, Kensaku; Locsin, Rozzano; Kawanishi, Chiemi; Inui, Tatsuya; Watari, Chie; Makiguchi, Kouichi

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted with six patients with schizophrenia, four of whom received the atypical antipsychotic risperidone long-acting injectable (RLAI), and two patients receiving the typical depot injection (TDI). The purpose of this study was to determine the location (gluteus medius or maximus; deltoid muscles) and diffusion of typical and atypical antipsychotic medications administered intramuscularly using ultrasonography. When using the standardized depth of needle insertion, in some cases, the drug was injected into the gluteus maximus instead of the gluteus medius. Similarly, in some cases the TDI was not visible in the ultrasonographic images until sixteen days after the injection. This verifies how hard the injection site becomes when microspheres of RLAI is injected as compared to other muscle areas. These results confirmed that the gluteus muscle structure was the ideal muscle for depot injection as evidenced by the injection solution being dispersed and rendered not visible immediately after intramuscular injection (IM). With the use of ultrasonography, injection sites and drug dispersions were evaluated under a direct visual guidance, suggesting that ultrasonography is a useful method for establishing evidence for determining correct insertion of IM injection, diffusion of medications, and the effective administration of IM injections.

  19. 21 CFR 522.1156 - Imidocarb dipropionate solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Imidocarb dipropionate solution. 522.1156 Section 522.1156 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... § 522.1156 Imidocarb dipropionate solution. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of injectable...

  20. 21 CFR 522.1156 - Imidocarb dipropionate solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Imidocarb dipropionate solution. 522.1156 Section 522.1156 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... § 522.1156 Imidocarb dipropionate solution. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of injectable...

  1. A New Look at Trigger Point Injections

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Clara S. M.; Wong, Steven H. S.

    2012-01-01

    Trigger point injections are commonly practised pain interventional techniques. However, there is still lack of objective diagnostic criteria for trigger points. The mechanisms of action of trigger point injection remain obscure and its efficacy remains heterogeneous. The advent of ultrasound technology in the noninvasive real-time imaging of soft tissues sheds new light on visualization of trigger points, explaining the effect of trigger point injection by blockade of peripheral nerves, and minimizing the complications of blind injection. PMID:21969825

  2. Injectivity Testing for Vapour Dominated Feed Zones

    SciTech Connect

    Clotworthy, A.W.; Hingoyon, C.S.

    1995-01-01

    Wells with vapor dominated feed zones yield abnormal pressure data. This is caused by the condensation of vapor during water injection. A revised injectivity test procedure currently applied by PNOC at the Leyte Geothermal Power Project has improved the injectivity test results.

  3. An automatic system for acidity determination based on sequential injection titration and the monosegmented flow approach.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Joanna; Wójtowicz, Marzena; Gawenda, Nadzieja; Kościelniak, Paweł

    2011-06-15

    An automatic sequential injection system, combining monosegmented flow analysis, sequential injection analysis and sequential injection titration is proposed for acidity determination. The system enables controllable sample dilution and generation of standards of required concentration in a monosegmented sequential injection manner, sequential injection titration of the prepared solutions, data collecting, and handling. It has been tested on spectrophotometric determination of acetic, citric and phosphoric acids with sodium hydroxide used as a titrant and phenolphthalein or thymolphthalein (in the case of phosphoric acid determination) as indicators. Accuracy better than |4.4|% (RE) and repeatability better than 2.9% (RSD) have been obtained. It has been applied to the determination of total acidity in vinegars and various soft drinks. The system provides low sample (less than 0.3 mL) consumption. On average, analysis of a sample takes several minutes. PMID:21641455

  4. Nitrocobinamide, a new cyanide antidote that can be administered by intramuscular injection.

    PubMed

    Chan, Adriano; Jiang, Jingjing; Fridman, Alla; Guo, Ling T; Shelton, G Diane; Liu, Ming-Tao; Green, Carol; Haushalter, Kristofer J; Patel, Hemal H; Lee, Jangwoen; Yoon, David; Burney, Tanya; Mukai, David; Mahon, Sari B; Brenner, Matthew; Pilz, Renate B; Boss, Gerry R

    2015-02-26

    Currently available cyanide antidotes must be given by intravenous injection over 5-10 min, making them ill-suited for treating many people in the field, as could occur in a major fire, an industrial accident, or a terrorist attack. These scenarios call for a drug that can be given quickly, e.g., by intramuscular injection. We have shown that aquohydroxocobinamide is a potent cyanide antidote in animal models of cyanide poisoning, but it is unstable in solution and poorly absorbed after intramuscular injection. Here we show that adding sodium nitrite to cobinamide yields a stable derivative (referred to as nitrocobinamide) that rescues cyanide-poisoned mice and rabbits when given by intramuscular injection. We also show that the efficacy of nitrocobinamide is markedly enhanced by coadministering sodium thiosulfate (reducing the total injected volume), and we calculate that ∼1.4 mL each of nitrocobinamide and sodium thiosulfate should rescue a human from a lethal cyanide exposure.

  5. Novel modified method for injection into the cerebrospinal fluid via the cerebellomedullary cistern in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yili; Imai, Hideaki; Ito, Akihiro; Saito, Nobuhito

    2013-01-01

    A modified method of injection into the cerebellomedullary (CM) cistern of mice was developed based on fixation of the mouse with a special mask under inhalation anesthesia, and exposure of the sagittal suture of the cranium and midline of the nape to allow us to visualize injection point directly. The accuracy of the modified method was evaluated using the temporal and spatial intracranial distribution of dye by intracisternal injection of 6- microliter methylene blue aqueous solution. A high concentration of dye was found in the CM cistern, the ventral cisterns, and intracranial proximal portion of the main cranial nerves at 1 hour after injection. The color of the dye in the CM cistern and the ventral cisterns was lighter, and the dye had reached the intracranial distal portion of the main cranial nerves at 6 hours after injection. The dye was completely eliminated by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation at 24 hours after injection. No severe brain injury was found in any of the 20 mice. Intracisternal injection was successful in all 14 mice sacrificed 1 hour or 6 hours after injection according to the confirmation of dye distribution. The effects of central administration of endothelin-1 (ET1) were evaluated on cerebral blood supply, constriction of cerebral arteries, and change of respiration in mice. Three doses of ET1 were studied: 2 micrograms (0.8 nmol), 4 micrograms (1.6 nmol), and 6 micrograms (2.4 nmol). Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was monitored for 60 minutes following injection using a laser Doppler probe. Intracisternal ET1 injection induced dose-dependent reduction of CBF, constriction of cerebral arteries, and respiratory depression in mice. This modified method of injection into the CM cistern under direct visualization provides accurate and reproducible injection into the CSF, and can be used to investigate the effects of various chemical substances on the central nervous system in mice. PMID:23823990

  6. Trans-Corneal Subretinal Injection in Mice and Its Effect on the Function and Morphology of the Retina

    PubMed Central

    He, Ying; Zhang, Yangyang; Han, Juanjuan; Zhu, Ping; Zhang, Yuxin; Zheng, Qinxiang; Li, Xia; Zhao, Chen; Pang, Jijing

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To introduce a practical method of subretinal injection in mice and evaluate injection-induced retinal detachment (RD) and damage using a dynamic imaging system, electrophysiology, and histology. Methods After full dilation of a 2-month-old C57BL/6J mouse pupil, the cornea near the limbus was punctured with a 30 ½-gague disposable beveled needle. A 33 ½-gauge blunt needle was inserted through the corneal perforation into the anterior chamber, avoiding the lens before going deeper into the vitreous cavity, and penetrating the inner retina to reach the subretinal space. The mice were divided into four groups: in group 1, about 80–100% of the retina was filled with subretinally injected solution; in group 2, approximately 50–70% of the retina was filled with injected solution; in group 3, the procedures were stopped before solution injection; and non-injected eyes were used as the negative control in group 4. An optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging system was used to monitor retinal reattachment during the first three days following the injections. Histological and functional changes were examined by light microscopy and electroretinography (ERG) at five weeks post-injection. Results After a short-term training, a 70% success rate with 50% or more coverage (i.e., retinal blebs occupied 50% or more retinal area and filled with the injected solution) with minimal injection-related damages can be achieved. Bleb formation was associated with retinal detachment (RD) between the neuroretina and the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) layer. Partial RD could be observed at post-injection day 1, and by day 2 most of the retina had reattached. At 5 weeks post-injection, compared to uninjected control group 4, the b-wave amplitudes of ERG decreased 22% in group 1, 16% in group 2, and 7% in group 3; the b-wave amplitudes were statistically different between the uninjected group and the groups with either 50–70% or 80–100% coverage. The subretinal injection

  7. Injection dynamics of gelled propellants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Changjin

    Gel propellants have been recognized as attractive candidates for future propulsion systems due to the reduced tendency to spill and the energy advantages over solid propellants. One of strong benefits emphasized in gel propellant applications is a throttling capability, but the accurate flow control is more complicated and difficult than with conventional Newtonian propellants because of the unique rheological behaviors of gels. This study is a computational effort directed to enhance understanding of the injector internal flow characteristics for gel propellants under rocket injection conditions. In simulations, the emphasized rheology is a shear-thinning which represents a viscosity decrease with increasing a shear rate. It is described by a generalized Newtonian fluid constitutive equation and Carreau-Yasuda model. Using this rheological model, two injection schemes are considered in the present study: axially-fed and cross-fed injection for single-element and multi-element impinging injectors, respectively. An axisymmetric model is developed to describe the axially-fed injector flows and fully three-dimensional model is utilized to simulate cross-fed injector flows. Under axially-fed injection conditions investigated, three distinct modes, an unsteady, steady, and hydraulic flip mode, are observed and mapped in terms of Reynolds number and orifice design. In an unsteady mode, quasi-periodic oscillations occur near the inlet lip leading mass pulsations and viscosity fluctuations at the orifice exit. This dynamic behavior is characterized using a time-averaged discharge coefficient, oscillation magnitude and frequency by a parametric study with respect to an orifice design, Reynolds number and rheology. As a result, orifice exit flows for gel propellants appear to be significantly influenced by a viscous damping and flow resistance due to a shear thinning behavior and these are observed in each factors considered. Under conditions driven by a manifold crossflow

  8. Seven consecutive successful clinical islet isolations with pancreatic ductal injection.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Shinichi; Noguichi, Hirofumi; Shimoda, Masayuki; Ikemoto, Tetsuya; Naziruddin, Bashoo; Jackson, Andrew; Tamura, Yoshiko; Olson, Greg; Fujita, Yasutaka; Chujo, Daisuke; Takita, Morihito; Kobayashi, Naoya; Onaca, Nicholas; Levy, Marlon

    2010-01-01

    Inconsistent islet isolation is one of the issues of clinical islet transplantation. In the current study, we applied ductal injection to improve the consistency of islet isolation. Seven islet isolations were performed with the ductal injection of ET-Kyoto solution (DI group) and eight islet isolations were performed without the ductal injection (standard group) using brain-dead donor pancreata. Isolated islets were evaluated based on the Edmonton protocol for transplantation. The DI group had significantly higher islet yields (588,566 +/- 64,319 vs. 354,836 +/- 89,649 IE, p < 0.01) and viability (97.3 +/- 1.2% vs. 92.6 +/- 1.2%, p < 0.02) compared with the standard group. All seven isolated islet preparations in the DI group (100%), versus only three out of eight isolated islet preparations (38%) in the standard group met transplantation criteria. The islets from the DI group were transplanted into three type 1 diabetic patients and all three patients became insulin independent. Ductal injection significantly improved quantity and quality of isolated islets and resulted in high success rate of clinical islet transplantation. This simple modification will reduce the risk of failure of clinical islet isolation.

  9. Injectable micellar supramolecular hydrogel for delivery of hydrophobic anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Fu, CuiXiang; Lin, XiaoXiao; Wang, Jun; Zheng, XiaoQun; Li, XingYi; Lin, ZhengFeng; Lin, GuangYong

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, an injectable micellar supramolecular hydrogel composed of α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) and monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(ε-caplactone) (MPEG5000-PCL5000) micelles was developed by a simple method for hydrophobic anticancer drug delivery. By mixing α-CD aqueous solution and MPEG5000-PCL5000 micelles, an injectable micellar supramolecular hydrogel could be formed under mild condition due to the inclusion complexation between α-CD and MPEG segment of MPEG5000-PCL5000 micelles. The resultant supramolecular hydrogel was thereafter characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effect of α-CD amount on the gelation time, mechanical strength and thixotropic property was studied by a rheometer. Payload of hydrophobic paclitaxel (PTX) to supramolecular hydrogel was achieved by encapsulation of PTX into MPEG5000-PCL5000 micelles prior mixing with α-CD aqueous solution. In vitro release study showed that the release behavior of PTX from hydrogel could be modulated by change the α-CD amount in hydrogel. Furthermore, such supramolecular hydrogel could enhance the biological activity of encapsulated PTX compared to free PTX, as indicated by in vitro cytotoxicity assay. All these results indicated that the developed micellar supramolecular hydrogel might be a promising injectable drug delivery system for anticancer therapy. PMID:26886821

  10. High-Resolution Simulations of Coal Injection in A Gasifier

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tingwen; Gel, Aytekin; Syamlal, M; Guenther, Chris; Pannala, Sreekanth

    2010-01-01

    This study demonstrates an approach to effectively combine high- and low-resolution simulations for design studies of industrial coal gasifier. The flow-field data from a 10 million cell full-scale simulation of a commercial-scale gasifier were used to construct a reduced configuration to economically study the coal injection in detail. High-resolution numerical simulations of the coal injection were performed using the open-source code MFIX running on a high performance computing system. Effects of grid resolution and numerical discretization scheme on the predicted behavior of coal injection and gasification kinetics were analyzed. Pronounced differences were predicted in the devolatilization and steam gasification rates because of different discretization schemes, implying that a high-order numerical scheme is required to predict well the unsteady gasification process on an adequately resolved grid. Computational costs for simulations of varying resolutions are presented to illustrate the trade-off between the accuracy of solution and the time-to-solution, an important consideration when engineering simulations are used for the design of commercial-scale units.

  11. Acoustic fault injection tool (AFIT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoess, Jeffrey N.

    1999-05-01

    On September 18, 1997, Honeywell Technology Center (HTC) successfully completed a three-week flight test of its rotor acoustic monitoring system (RAMS) at Patuxent River Flight Test Center. This flight test was the culmination of an ambitious 38-month proof-of-concept effort directed at demonstrating the feasibility of detecting crack propagation in helicopter rotor components. The program was funded as part of the U.S. Navy's Air Vehicle Diagnostic Systems (AVDS) program. Reductions in Navy maintenance budgets and available personnel have dictated the need to transition from time-based to 'condition-based' maintenance. Achieving this will require new enabling diagnostic technologies. The application of acoustic emission for the early detection of helicopter rotor head dynamic component faults has proven the feasibility of the technology. The flight-test results demonstrated that stress-wave acoustic emission technology can detect signals equivalent to small fatigue cracks in rotor head components and can do so across the rotating articulated rotor head joints and in the presence of other background acoustic noise generated during flight operation. During the RAMS flight test, 12 test flights were flown from which 25 Gbyte of digital acoustic data and about 15 hours of analog flight data recorder (FDR) data were collected from the eight on-rotor acoustic sensors. The focus of this paper is to describe the CH-46 flight-test configuration and present design details about a new innovative machinery diagnostic technology called acoustic fault injection. This technology involves the injection of acoustic sound into machinery to assess health and characterize operational status. The paper will also address the development of the Acoustic Fault Injection Tool (AFIT), which was successfully demonstrated during the CH-46 flight tests.

  12. Governor for fuel injection pump

    SciTech Connect

    Yogome, Y.; Itsuki, S.; Shimizu, T.; Shimizu, T.; Hamada, H.

    1987-05-19

    This patent describes double-lever type governor for a fuel injection pump comprising: a governor case; a governor lever and a tension lever rotatably supported in the case and operatively associated with each other; a start spring interposed between the governor lever and the tension lever securing a start fuel increment stroke in the governor lever; a fuel regulating rack connected to the governor lever; a supporting shaft mounted in the case supporting both the governor lever and the tension lever for rotation; and a locking mechanism which connects both levers at the time when the start fuel increment stroke of the governor lever becomes zero or approximately zero to be eliminated.

  13. Semipermanent and permanent injectable fillers.

    PubMed

    Jones, Derek H

    2009-10-01

    Today, an impressive array of injectable dermal fillers for facial soft-tissue augmentation is available in the United States. These agents, most of which were introduced in the last half decade, represent a variety of semipermanent and permanent fillers across several categories. Physicians can choose between semipermanent fillers, such as hyaluronic acid derivatives (HA), calcium hydroxylapatite (CaHA), and poly-L-lactic acid (PLA), and longer-lasting, so-called "permanent fillers," such as polymethyl methacrylate microspheres (PMMA), highly purified forms of liquid silicone, and hydrogel polymers. PMID:19850193

  14. Injectable collagen implant--update.

    PubMed

    Castrow, F F; Krull, E A

    1983-12-01

    Injectable collagen implant (ICI), a new biomaterial reportedly useful for correction of scars and certain aging skin lines (wrinkles), was recently introduced. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of this product. Data for this study were obtained from a survey which was sent to a group of cutaneous surgeons. They were asked about test site and treatment site reactions and about their satisfaction with ICI. The incidence of adverse reactions is low, and the severity of the reactions does not appear to be serious. The long-term benefit of ICI has not been established.

  15. Fuel injection device and method

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Larry W.

    1986-02-04

    A fuel injection system and method provide for shaping a combustion plume within a combustion chamber to effectively recirculate hot combustion gases for stable combustion conditions while providing symmetrical combustion conditions. Char and molten slag are passed to the outer boundary layer to complete combustion of char while permitting initial substoichiometric combustion in a reductive atmosphere for reducing discharge of nitrogen oxides. Shaping of the plume is accomplished by an axially adjustable pintle which permits apportionment of driving pressure between elements which contribute tangential and those which contribute radial directional components to oxidant flow entering the combustion chamber.

  16. Impact of the underground injection control program on energy resource development

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, E.P.

    1983-10-01

    Part C of the Safe Drinking Water Act requires that underground sources of drinking water be protected from endangerment by well injection. The Act, as amended through 1980, and the resultant Underground Injection Control (UIC) program regulations and guidance describe minimum requirements for achieving this protection. Injection wells used in the development of energy resources, for example, those related to oil and natural gas production, and the solution mining of uranium, are regulated under the UIC program. The major features of the program requirements that affect such energy related wells are considered here from the Federal-Regional perspective.

  17. Semianalytical solution for CO2 leakage through an abandoned well.

    PubMed

    Nordbotten, Jan Martin; Celia, Michael A; Bachu, Stefan; Dahle, Helge K

    2005-01-15

    Capture and subsequent injection of carbon dioxide into deep geological formations is being considered as a means to reduce anthropogenic emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere. If such a strategy is to be successful, the injected CO2 must remain within the injection formation for long periods of time, at least several hundred years. Because mature continental sedimentary basins have a century-long history of oil and gas exploration and production, they are characterized by large numbers of existing oil and gas wells. For example, more than 1 million such wells have been drilled in the state of Texas in the United States. These existing wells represent potential leakage pathways for injected CO2. To analyze leakage potential, modeling tools are needed that predict leakage rates and patterns in systems with injection and potentially leaky wells. A new semianalytical solution framework allows simple and efficient prediction of leakage rates for the case of injection of supercritical CO2 into a brine-saturated deep aquifer. The solution predicts the extent of the injected CO2 plume, provides leakage rates through an abandoned well located at an arbitrary distance from the injection well, and estimates the CO2 plume extent in the overlying aquifer into which the fluid leaks. Comparison to results from a numerical multiphase flow simulator show excellent agreement. Example calculations show the importance of outer boundary conditions, the influence of both density and viscosity contrasts in the resulting solutions, and the potential importance of local upconing around the leaky well. While several important limiting assumptions are required, the new semianalytical solution provides a simple and efficient procedure for estimation of CO2 leakage for problems involving one injection well, one leaky well, and multiple aquifers separated by impermeable aquitards. PMID:15707061

  18. Porous media heat transfer for injection molding

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Neil Reginald

    2016-05-31

    The cooling of injection molded plastic is targeted. Coolant flows into a porous medium disposed within an injection molding component via a porous medium inlet. The porous medium is thermally coupled to a mold cavity configured to receive injected liquid plastic. The porous medium beneficially allows for an increased rate of heat transfer from the injected liquid plastic to the coolant and provides additional structural support over a hollow cooling well. When the temperature of the injected liquid plastic falls below a solidifying temperature threshold, the molded component is ejected and collected.

  19. Dependence of injection locking of a TEA CO2 laser on intensity of injected radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oppenheim, U. P.; Menzies, R. T.; Kavaya, M. J.

    1982-01-01

    The results of an experimental study to determine the minimum required injected power to control the output frequency of a TEA CO2 laser are reported. A CW CO2 waveguide laser was used as the injection oscillator. Both the power and the frequency of the injected radiation were varied, while the TEA resonator cavity length was adjusted to match the frequency of the injected signal. Single-longitudinal mode (SLM) TEA laser radiation was produced for injected power levels which are several orders of magnitude below those previously reported. The ratio of SLM output power to injection power exceeded 10 to the 12th at the lowest levels of injected intensity.

  20. Micro-flow injection analysis system: on-chip sample preconcentration, injection and delivery using coupled monolithic electroosmotic pumps.

    PubMed

    Nie, Fu-Qiang; Macka, Mirek; Paull, Brett

    2007-11-01

    A micro-fluidic chip, within which two monolithic electroosmotic pumps are utilised for sample preconcentration, injection and delivery is presented. The monolithic pumps were capable of producing stable and bubble free flow rates at applied voltages below 2 kV, with a current <10 microA. Electrokinetic (EK) sample injection, down to low nano-litre volumes, was quantitatively controlled through applied voltage and injection times, whilst the sample pump delivered a carrier solution to indirectly dispense the sample. A nano-flow sensor (NFS) was used to continuously monitor the flow rate stability of each pump, showing response times of <5-10 s for changes in applied voltage. A capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detector (C(4)D), as an off-chip on-capillary detector, was used to complete the micro-flow injection analysis (FIA) system. A monolithic electroosmotic pump (EOP), modified with an anionic surfactant, was used to demonstrate a novel approach to on-chip cation preconcentration and elution.

  1. A buffer direct injection and direct injection readout circuit with mode selection design for infrared focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tai-Ping; Lu, Yi-Chuan; Kang, Lai-Li; Shieh, Hsiu-Li

    2014-03-01

    This paper proposes a solution to the excessive area penalty associated with traditional buffer direct injection (BDI) for single pixel. The proposed solution reduces the area and power consumption of BDI to combine the direct injection (DI) within a shared architecture, while a dual-mode readout circuit expands the functionality and performance of the array readout circuit of infrared sensor. An experimental array of 10 × 8 readout circuits was fabricated using TSMC 2P4M 0.35 μm 5 V technology. Measurements were obtained using a main clock with a frequency of 3 MHz and power consumption of 9.94 mW. The minimum input current was 119 pA in BDI and 1.85 pA in DI. The signal swing was 2 V, the root mean square noise voltage was 1.84 mV, and the signal-to-noise ratio was 60 dB. This approach is applicable to mid- and long-band sensors to increase injection efficiency and resolution.

  2. Compressor Stability Enhancement Using Discrete Tip Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suder, Kenneth L.; Hathaway, Michael D.; Thorp, Scott A.; Strazisar, Anthony J.; Bright, Michelle B.

    2001-01-01

    Mass injection upstream of the tip of a high-speed axial compressor rotor is a stability enhancement approach known to be effective in suppressing small in tip-critical rotors. This process is examined in a transonic axial compressor rotor through experiments and time-averaged Navier-Stokes CFD simulations. Measurements and simulations for discrete injection are presented for a range of injection rates and distributions of injectors around the annulus. The simulations indicate that tip injection increases stability by unloading the rotor tip and that increasing injection velocity improves the effectiveness of tip injection. For the tested rotor, experimental results demonstrate that at 70 percent speed the stalling flow coefficient can be reduced by 30 percent using an injected mass- flow equivalent to 1 percent of the annulus flow. At design speed, the stalling flow coefficient was reduced by 6 percent using an injected mass-fiow equivalent to 2 percent of the annulus flow. The experiments show that stability enhancement is related to the mass-averaged axial velocity at the tip. For a given injected mass-flow, the mass-averaged axial velocity at the tip is increased by injecting flow over discrete portions of the circumference as opposed to full-annular injection. The implications of these results on the design of recirculating casing treatments and other methods to enhance stability will be discussed.

  3. Maximum magnitude earthquakes induced by fluid injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGarr, A.

    2014-02-01

    Analysis of numerous case histories of earthquake sequences induced by fluid injection at depth reveals that the maximum magnitude appears to be limited according to the total volume of fluid injected. Similarly, the maximum seismic moment seems to have an upper bound proportional to the total volume of injected fluid. Activities involving fluid injection include (1) hydraulic fracturing of shale formations or coal seams to extract gas and oil, (2) disposal of wastewater from these gas and oil activities by injection into deep aquifers, and (3) the development of enhanced geothermal systems by injecting water into hot, low-permeability rock. Of these three operations, wastewater disposal is observed to be associated with the largest earthquakes, with maximum magnitudes sometimes exceeding 5. To estimate the maximum earthquake that could be induced by a given fluid injection project, the rock mass is assumed to be fully saturated, brittle, to respond to injection with a sequence of earthquakes localized to the region weakened by the pore pressure increase of the injection operation and to have a Gutenberg-Richter magnitude distribution with a b value of 1. If these assumptions correctly describe the circumstances of the largest earthquake, then the maximum seismic moment is limited to the volume of injected liquid times the modulus of rigidity. Observations from the available case histories of earthquakes induced by fluid injection are consistent with this bound on seismic moment. In view of the uncertainties in this analysis, however, this should not be regarded as an absolute physical limit.

  4. Acetaminophen injection: a review of clinical information.

    PubMed

    Jones, Virginia M

    2011-01-01

    Acetaminophen injection is an antipyretic and analgesic agent recently marketed in the United States as Ofirmev. Five published trials directly compare acetaminophen injection to drugs available in the United States. For management of pain in adults, acetaminophen injection was at least as effective as morphine injection in renal colic, oral ibuprofen after cesarean delivery, and oral acetaminophen after coronary artery bypass surgery. In children (3 to 16 years old), single-dose acetaminophen injection was similar to meperidine intramuscular (i.m.) for pain after tonsillectomy; readiness for discharge from the recovery room was shorter with acetaminophen injection (median 15 minutes) compared with meperidine i.m. (median 25 minutes), P = .005. In children (2 to 5 years old) postoperative adenotonsillectomy or adenoidectomy, the time to rescue analgesia was superior with high-dose acetaminophen rectal suppository (median 10 hours) compared with acetaminophen injection (median 7 hours), P = .01. One published trial demonstrated acetaminophen injection is noninferior to propacetamol injection for fever related to infection in pediatric patients. Dosing adjustments are not required when switching between oral and injectable acetaminophen formulations in adult and adolescent patients. Acetaminophen injection represents another agent for multimodal pain management. PMID:21936636

  5. FDDI network test adaptor error injection circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckenrode, Thomas (Inventor); Stauffer, David R. (Inventor); Stempski, Rebecca (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus for injecting errors into a FDDI token ring network is disclosed. The error injection scheme operates by fooling a FORMAC into thinking it sent a real frame of data. This is done by using two RAM buffers. The RAM buffer normally accessed by the RBC/DPC becomes a SHADOW RAM during error injection operation. A dummy frame is loaded into the shadow RAM in order to fool the FORMAC. This data is just like the data that would be used if sending a normal frame, with the restriction that it must be shorter than the error injection data. The other buffer, the error injection RAM, contains the error injection frame. The error injection data is sent out to the media by switching a multiplexor. When the FORMAC is done transmitting the data, the multiplexor is switched back to the normal mode. Thus, the FORMAC is unaware of what happened and the token ring remains operational.

  6. Anthropological perspectives on injections: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Reeler, A. V.

    2000-01-01

    Qualitative studies from developing countries have pointed to the widespread popularity of injections. In addition to their use by formal and informal providers and traditional healers, there is now increasing evidence of the use of injections and injection equipment by lay people. Epidemiological research links the large number of unsafe injections to serious bloodborne infections such as viral hepatitis B and C and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The present article examines the reasons behind the demand for injections by consumers and the administration of unnecessary or unsafe injections by different types of provider. Interventions aimed at reducing the risk of unsafe injections are discussed in relation to cultural and social factors as well as those factors associated with health systems. Suggestions are made for approaches to the design of such interventions. PMID:10686748

  7. Robotic ICSI (intracytoplasmic sperm injection).

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhe; Zhang, Xuping; Leung, Clement; Esfandiari, Navid; Casper, Robert F; Sun, Yu

    2011-07-01

    This paper is the first report of robotic intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). ICSI is a clinical procedure performed worldwide in fertility clinics, requiring pick-up of a single sperm and insertion of it into an oocyte (i.e., egg cell). Since its invention 20 years ago, ICSI has been conducted manually by a handful of highly skilled embryologists; however, success rates vary significantly among clinics due to poor reproducibility and inconsistency across operators. We leverage our work in robotic cell injection to realize robotic ICSI and aim ultimately, to standardize how clinical ICSI is performed. This paper presents some of the technical aspects of our robotic ICSI system, including a cell holding device, motion control, and computer vision algorithms. The system performs visual tracking of single sperm, robotic immobilization of sperm, aspiration of sperm with picoliter volume, and insertion of sperm into an oocyte with a high degree of reproducibility. The system requires minimal human involvement (requiring only a few computer mouse clicks), and is human operator skill independent. Using the hamster oocyte-human sperm model in preliminary trials, the robotic system demonstrated a high success rate of 90.0% and survival rate of 90.7% (n=120). PMID:21521663

  8. Robotic ICSI (intracytoplasmic sperm injection).

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhe; Zhang, Xuping; Leung, Clement; Esfandiari, Navid; Casper, Robert F; Sun, Yu

    2011-07-01

    This paper is the first report of robotic intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). ICSI is a clinical procedure performed worldwide in fertility clinics, requiring pick-up of a single sperm and insertion of it into an oocyte (i.e., egg cell). Since its invention 20 years ago, ICSI has been conducted manually by a handful of highly skilled embryologists; however, success rates vary significantly among clinics due to poor reproducibility and inconsistency across operators. We leverage our work in robotic cell injection to realize robotic ICSI and aim ultimately, to standardize how clinical ICSI is performed. This paper presents some of the technical aspects of our robotic ICSI system, including a cell holding device, motion control, and computer vision algorithms. The system performs visual tracking of single sperm, robotic immobilization of sperm, aspiration of sperm with picoliter volume, and insertion of sperm into an oocyte with a high degree of reproducibility. The system requires minimal human involvement (requiring only a few computer mouse clicks), and is human operator skill independent. Using the hamster oocyte-human sperm model in preliminary trials, the robotic system demonstrated a high success rate of 90.0% and survival rate of 90.7% (n=120).

  9. Prevalence and correlates of neck injection among people who inject drugs in Tijuana, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    RAFFUL, CLAUDIA; WAGNER, KARLA D.; WERB, DAN; GONZÁLEZ-ZÚÑIGA, PATRICIA E.; VERDUGO, SILVIA; RANGEL, GUDELIA; STRATHDEE, STEFFANIE A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and Aims Injecting drugs in the neck has been related to adverse health conditions such as jugular vein thrombosis, deep neck infections, aneurysm, haematomas, airway obstruction, vocal cord paralysis and wound botulism, among others. We identified prevalence and correlates of neck injection among people who inject drugs (PWID) in Tijuana, Mexico. Design and Methods Beginning in 2011, PWID aged ≥18 years who injected drugs within the last month were recruited into a prospective cohort. At baseline and semi-annually, PWID completed interviewer-administered surveys soliciting data on drug-injecting practices. Logistic regression was used to identify predictors of injecting in the neck as the most frequent injection site at a single visit. Results Of 380 PWID, 35.3% injected in the neck at least once in the past 6 months, among whom 71.6% reported it as their most common injection site, the most common injecting site after the arms (47%). Controlling for age, years injecting and injecting frequency, injecting heroin and methamphetamine two or more times per day and having sought injection assistance were associated with injecting in the neck [adjusted odds ratios (AOR): 2.12; 95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.27–3.53 and AOR: 2.65; 95% CI: 1.52–4.53 respectively]. Discussion and Conclusions Injecting in the neck was very common among PWID in Tijuana and was associated with polydrug use and seeking injection assistance. Tailoring harm reduction education interventions for individuals who provide injection assistance (‘hit doctors’) may allow for the dissemination of safe injecting knowledge to reduce injection-related morbidity and mortality. PMID:25867795

  10. Injectable hydrogels derived from phosphorylated alginic acid calcium complexes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han-Sem; Song, Minsoo; Lee, Eun-Jung; Shin, Ueon Sang

    2015-06-01

    Phosphorylation of sodium alginate salt (NaAlg) was carried out using H3PO4/P2O5/Et3PO4 followed by acid-base reaction with Ca(OAc)2 to give phosphorylated alginic acid calcium complexes (CaPAlg), as a water dispersible alginic acid derivative. The modified alginate derivatives including phosphorylated alginic acid (PAlg) and CaPAlg were characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for (1)H, and (31)P nuclei, high resolution inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. CaPAlg hydrogels were prepared simply by mixing CaPAlg solution (2w/v%) with NaAlg solution (2w/v%) in various ratios (2:8, 4:6, 6:4, 8:2) of volume. No additional calcium salts such as CaSO4 or CaCl2 were added externally. The gelation was completed within about 3-40min indicating a high potential of hydrogel delivery by injection in vivo. Their mechanical properties were tested to be ≤6.7kPa for compressive strength at break and about 8.4kPa/mm for elastic modulus. SEM analysis of the CaPAlg hydrogels showed highly porous morphology with interconnected pores of width in the range of 100-800μm. Cell culture results showed that the injectable hydrogels exhibited comparable properties to the pure alginate hydrogel in terms of cytotoxicity and 3D encapsulation of cells for a short time period. The developed injectable hydrogels showed suitable physicochemical and mechanical properties for injection in vivo, and could therefore be beneficial for the field of soft tissue engineering. PMID:25842118

  11. Synovial fluid bupivacaine concentrations following single intra-articular injection in normal and osteoarthritic canine stifles.

    PubMed

    Barry, S L; Martinez, S A; Davies, N M; Remsberg, C M; Sayre, C L; Bachelez, A

    2015-02-01

    Intra-articular bupivacaine helps alleviate pain in animals receiving joint surgery, but its use has become controversial as ex vivo studies have illuminated the potential for chondrotoxicity. Such studies typically involve cell cultures incubated in solutions containing high bupivacaine concentrations for long durations. The aim of this study was to measure the actual synovial fluid bupivacaine concentrations after intra-articular injection. Eight healthy beagles with normal stifles and 22 large and giant-breed dogs with stifle osteoarthritis (OA) were treated with a single intra-articular injection of bupivacaine (1 mg/kg) into a stifle. Joint fluid samples were taken from the treated stifle immediately after injection and 30 min after injection and analyzed for bupivacaine concentrations. Immediately after injection, the median bupivacaine concentrations in normal and OA stifles were 3.6 and 2.5 mg/mL, respectively. Thirty minutes after injection, bupivacaine concentrations in normal and OA stifles were 0.4 and 0.6 mg/mL, respectively. These results provide insight into the pharmacokinetics of bupivacaine after injection into a joint. Given its immediate dilution and rapid drop in synovial fluid concentration, bupivacaine is unlikely to damage chondrocytes when administered as a single intra-articular injection.

  12. Large-eddy simulation of shock-cooling-film interaction at helium and hydrogen injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konopka, Martin; Meinke, Matthias; Schröder, Wolfgang

    2013-10-01

    Laminar helium and hydrogen films at a Mach number 1.3 are injected through a slot into a fully turbulent freestream air flow at a Mach number 2.44. To numerically study by large-eddy simulations the impact of an impinging shock on various cooling films, first, reference solutions without shock impingement are computed and then, the helium and hydrogen cooling films interacting with an oblique shock at a pressure ratio of p3/p1 = 2.5 are analyzed. The comparison of the helium and hydrogen injections without shock shows the hydrogen injection to have a 1.14-fold better cooling effectiveness at 60% of the blowing rate of the helium injection. The shock-cooling-film interaction causes a massive separation bubble that is 23% larger at the hydrogen than at the helium injection. Nevertheless, the shock influenced cooling effectiveness at the hydrogen injection is only 30% reduced compared to a 40% decrease at the helium injection 100 slot heights downstream of the injection. The intense mixing in the shock-cooling-film interaction region shows a more rapid reduction of the helium and hydrogen mass fractions than in the zero-pressure gradient reference configurations. Overall, the cooling effectiveness of the hydrogen film is superior to that of the helium film independent from the streamwise pressure gradient.

  13. Electrokinetic injection of samples into a short electrophoretic capillary controlled by piezoelectric micropumps.

    PubMed

    Opekar, František; Nesměrák, Karel; Tůma, Petr

    2016-02-01

    Electrokinetic sample injection using two piezoelectric micropumps has been proposed for electrophoresis in short capillaries. The sample is brought to the injection end of the capillary using one of them. Then, the high-voltage source is turned on and the sample is injected electrokinetically for a defined time. The injection is terminated by removal of the sample zone by the flowing separation electrolyte pumped by the second piezoelectric micropump. The RSD value, expressing the repeatability of the injection, does not exceed 4%. The injection apparatus does not contain any mobile mechanical components, there is no movement of the capillary and both its ends remain constantly in the solution during both the sample injection and separation. Thus, the micropumps replace the six-way injection valve and linear pump in similar types of injection apparatuses. The injection was tested in the separation and determination of ammonium and potassium ions in two samples of mineral fertilizers. The separation was performed in background electrolyte containing 500 mM of acetic acid + 20 mM Tris + 2 mM 18-crown-6 (pH 3.3) in a capillary with id 50 μm and total length/length to the contactless conductivity detector of 10.5/8 cm. The injection and separation took place at a voltage of 5 kV and the separation time equaled 20 s. The measured values of the analyte contents corresponded to the value declared by the manufacturer within the reliability interval, where RSD equaled between 3.5 and 4.7%.

  14. Distribution of radioisotopic beryllium in mice after administration by various routes of injection.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, T; Sakaguchi, S; Nakamura, I; Kudo, Y

    1993-08-01

    A 7BeCl2 solution containing 0.5 micrograms Be per mouse was injected subcutaneously, intraperitoneally, intramuscularly, intrathoracically, and intravenously, and distribution was observed for periods up to 1 wk. 7Be was excreted more rapidly following intravenous injection than by the other routes of injection. The amount of Be found in the liver or the spleen was substantial at 1 d after intraperitoneal injection. It increased more in the spleen at 7 d after either intraperitoneal or intrathoracic injection. On the other hand, the amounts of Be stayed almost constant in the kidneys, by the various routes of injection. When injected intrathoracically, the amounts of Be in the heart and the lung were greater than when administered by the other routes of injection. The amounts of Be in the femurs of mice administered by these routes of injection, except with intravenous injection, were greater than in the other organs. The percentage of 7Be in the mineralized bone was 90% of that of 7Be in the femurs when injected intraperitoneally or intrathoracically. However, the ratio of Be in the mineralized bone to that in the bone marrow was 3 to 2. Beryllium had thus a closer affinity for the femurs than for the other organs investigated, with the different modes of administration used. The amount of Be in the entire skeleton was estimated to be substantial. Within the limitations of 1 wk of exposure, the skeleton would appear to be a critical organ. This would suggest that osteosarcomas may occur following administration of Be to laboratory animals for a long-term period.

  15. Modeling injection well performance during deep-well injection of liquid wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saripalli, K. P.; Sharma, M. M.; Bryant, S. L.

    2000-01-01

    Deep-well injection of municipal and industrial wastes, and liquid hazardous wastes is an important waste disposal practice worldwide. Performance of injection wells during the deep-well injection of liquid wastes and waste waters is critically dependent upon the physico-chemical properties of the waste, the operational parameters such as injection rates and pressures, as well as the hydrogeologic and geochemical character of the host formation. Development of theories and models that can predict the injection well performance as a function of these parameters is a vital research need. This paper presents the development and application of a well injectivity decline (WID) simulator, that can be used to model injection well performance during deep-well injection. Injectivity decline due to particulates in the injection fluid is modeled for various types of well completions. Results from the simulator are presented with an emphasis on the resulting well plugging and injectivity decline. The significant role played by injected wastewater quality, host formation properties, injection rate and pressure, well completion type, initial damage to the well/formation and the presence of gravel packs around the wellbore is discussed. The results quantitatively show that under typical injection conditions a high total suspended solids (TSS) concentration in the waste stream, low injection rate, low injection pressures, formation heterogeneity (layering), low porosity and permeability of the formation all contribute to a rapid decline in injection well performance. The simulator provides a tool for predicting well performance during waste injection as a function of the waste, formation and operational characteristics. Such simulations can be valuable during planning and operating injection wells to achieve and sustain satisfactory well performance.

  16. Safety of intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Gianpiero D; Neri, Queenie V; Rosenwaks, Zev

    2014-01-01

    Early follow-up studies of IVF children showed that the frequency of birth anomalies resembled those arising with natural conception. More detailed analyses confirmed these findings, reinforcing the concept of the preimplantation period as teratologically "safe." The use of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) to achieve fertilization introduced another variable.ICSI's safety has often been criticized because the fertilizing spermatozoon neither binds to the zona pellucida nor fuses with oolemma. Bypassing these physiologic steps together with the arbitrary selection of the spermatozoon has been reason for concern. Thus far, ICSI offspring undergoing adolescence and beyond has provided sufficient information to reassure these qualms. In fact, the health of the offspring generated through ICSI, once taken into consideration the gestational order, the age and the genetic makeup of the couples are generally reassuring.

  17. Fault Injection Techniques and Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsueh, Mei-Chen; Tsai, Timothy K.; Iyer, Ravishankar K.

    1997-01-01

    Dependability evaluation involves the study of failures and errors. The destructive nature of a crash and long error latency make it difficult to identify the causes of failures in the operational environment. It is particularly hard to recreate a failure scenario for a large, complex system. To identify and understand potential failures, we use an experiment-based approach for studying the dependability of a system. Such an approach is applied not only during the conception and design phases, but also during the prototype and operational phases. To take an experiment-based approach, we must first understand a system's architecture, structure, and behavior. Specifically, we need to know its tolerance for faults and failures, including its built-in detection and recovery mechanisms, and we need specific instruments and tools to inject faults, create failures or errors, and monitor their effects.

  18. Distinguishing among electron injection types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feynman, J.

    1987-01-01

    Three types of electron injections taking place in the near-earth region of the magnetotail have been distinguished previously using SCATHA particle and field data. Defining characteristics are given here for each type of event, and the positions of the magnetosphere where they are expected to occur are discussed. These three event types can be difficult to distinguish in data sets that are more limited than the SCATHA set that carried instruments detecting magnetic fields and charged particles over an energy range from eVs to MeVs. It is suggested that determining the magnetospheric regions at which each of these event types occurs will considerably clarify the phenomenological description of substorms available for theoretical analysis.

  19. Injectable fillers: an American perspective.

    PubMed

    Curcio, N M; Parish, L C

    2009-06-01

    Since 1981, there has been a significant repertoire of United States Food and Drug Administrtion (FDA) approved fillers for both cosmetic rejuvenation and facial lipoatrophy. Currently available dermal fillers include bovine, human and porcine collagens, hyaluronic acids of animal and biosynthetic origin, poly-L-lactic acid, calcium hydroxylapatite, and polymethylmethacrylate. Many of these fillers were first available in Europe and Canada before their arrival in the United States (USA) and many of the complications known about these products have come from studies conducted both in the USA and abroad. Several of the fillers that are currently available abroad or are used in the USA off-label have been associated with significant complications. The authors review three of these fillers: liquid injectable silicone, DermaLive/DermaDeep, and Bio-Alcamid.

  20. Common rail fuel injection system

    SciTech Connect

    Hilsbos, R.L.; Wieland, H.L.; Straub, R.D.; Teerman, R.F.; Timmer, R.C.

    1993-07-27

    A high-pressure pump is described for a fuel injection system having a fuel supply means for supplying fuel at a relatively constant pressure to the pump, the pump comprising: a pump body having a pumping chamber defined therein; a mechanically driven linearly reciprocating plunger disposed in the pumping chamber, the plunger having a head end and a tail end, the plunger being linearly reciprocatable over a stroke range between an extended position and a retracted position, the pumping chamber extending beyond the extended position of the plunger to define a head portion of the pumping chamber; plunger spring means for resiliently biasing the plunger to its retracted position; an inlet valve disposed in the pump body for admitting fuel to the pumping chamber within the stroke range of the head end of the plunger; inlet valve spring means for resiliently biasing the inlet valve to a closed position, the inlet valve being opened by a pressure differential when the head end of the plunger is retracted; an outlet valve disposed in the pump body for discharging fuel from the head portion of the pumping chamber; and outlet valve spring means for resiliently biasing the outlet valve to a closed position; the inlet valve being a ball valve; a piston, the pump body further defining therein a leakage accumulator chamber, the leakage accumulator chamber being slidably divided by the piston into an anterior portion and a posterior portion, the posterior portion being at substantially atmospheric pressure, the collector groove communicating with the anterior portion of the leakage accumulator chamber, recaptured fuel from the fuel injection nozzles also being communicated to the anterior portion of the accumulator chamber; and piston spring means for resiliently biasing the piston away from the posterior portion of the leakage accumulator chamber.

  1. Novel approaches to analysis by flow injection gradient titration.

    PubMed

    Wójtowicz, Marzena; Kozak, Joanna; Kościelniak, Paweł

    2007-09-26

    Two novel procedures for flow injection gradient titration with the use of a single stock standard solution are proposed. In the multi-point single-line (MP-SL) method the calibration graph is constructed on the basis of a set of standard solutions, which are generated in a standard reservoir and subsequently injected into the titrant. According to the single-point multi-line (SP-ML) procedure the standard solution and a sample are injected into the titrant stream from four loops of different capacities, hence four calibration graphs are able to be constructed and the analytical result is calculated on the basis of a generalized slope of these graphs. Both approaches have been tested on the example of spectrophotometric acid-base titration of hydrochloric and acetic acids with using bromothymol blue and phenolphthalein as indicators, respectively, and sodium hydroxide as a titrant. Under optimized experimental conditions the analytical results of precision less than 1.8 and 2.5% (RSD) and of accuracy less than 3.0 and 5.4% (relative error (RE)) were obtained for MP-SL and SP-ML procedures, respectively, in ranges of 0.0031-0.0631 mol L(-1) for samples of hydrochloric acid and of 0.1680-1.7600 mol L(-1) for samples of acetic acid. The feasibility of both methods was illustrated by applying them to the total acidity determination in vinegar samples with precision lower than 0.5 and 2.9% (RSD) for MP-SL and SP-ML procedures, respectively.

  2. Injectable biomaterials: a perspective on the next wave of injectable therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Spector, Myron; Lim, Teck Chuan

    2016-02-02

    We are experiencing a new wave of injectable therapeutics (namely/injectable biomaterials) to complement injectable drugs and injectable biologics, and to serve as the basis for injectable combinatorial therapeutics. Injectable biomaterials contribute to the treatment of the fluid-filled defects which often result from disease and injury, by providing the missing physical framework (i.e. the stroma). However, while injectable matrices may be necessary for the successful treatment of certain lesions, they will not likely be sufficient. Chemoattractants for select endogenous cells, or cells themselves, may need to be incorporated into the matrix prior to its injection to ensure the necessary cellular repopulation of the cavitary defect. These agents and others (drugs and biologics) delivered by the matrix represent the new category of injectable combinatorial therapeutics.

  3. Parametric study of injection rates with solenoid injectors in an injection quantity and rate measuring device

    DOE PAGES

    Busch, Stephen; Miles, Paul C.

    2015-03-31

    A Moehwald HDA (HDA is a German acronym: Hydraulischer Druckanstieg: hydraulic pressure increase) injection quantity and rate measuring unit is used to investigate injection rates obtained with a fast-acting, preproduction diesel solenoid injector. Experimental parametric variations are performed to determine their impact on measured injection rate traces. A pilot–main injection strategy is investigated for various dwell times; these preproduction injectors can operate with very short dwell times with distinct pilot and main injection events. Dwell influences the main injection rate shape. Furthermore, a comparison between a diesel-like fuel and a gasoline-like fuel shows that injection rates are comparable for amore » single injection but dramatically different for multiple injections with short dwells.« less

  4. Parametric study of injection rates with solenoid injectors in an injection quantity and rate measuring device

    SciTech Connect

    Busch, Stephen; Miles, Paul C.

    2015-03-31

    A Moehwald HDA (HDA is a German acronym: Hydraulischer Druckanstieg: hydraulic pressure increase) injection quantity and rate measuring unit is used to investigate injection rates obtained with a fast-acting, preproduction diesel solenoid injector. Experimental parametric variations are performed to determine their impact on measured injection rate traces. A pilot–main injection strategy is investigated for various dwell times; these preproduction injectors can operate with very short dwell times with distinct pilot and main injection events. Dwell influences the main injection rate shape. Furthermore, a comparison between a diesel-like fuel and a gasoline-like fuel shows that injection rates are comparable for a single injection but dramatically different for multiple injections with short dwells.

  5. Injection molding and debinding of micro gears fabricated by micro powder injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Xin-lei; Yin, Hai-qing; Liu, Lin; Yi, Shan-jie; Qu, Xuan-hui

    2013-01-01

    Micro powder injection molding (μPIM) was investigated for possible mass production of micro-components at relatively low cost. However, scaling down to such a level produces challenges in injection molding and debinding. Micro gears were fabricated by μPIM from in-house feedstock. The effect of injection speed and injection pressure on the replication of the micro gear cavity was investigated. Solvent debinding and thermal debinding processes were discussed. The results show that micro gears can be successfully fabricated under the injection pressure of 70 MPa and the 60% injection speed. Either too low or too high injection speed can cause incomplete filling of micro gears. The same is the case with too low injection pressure. Too high injection pressure can bring cracks. Solvent debinding of micro gears was performed in a mixture of petroleum ether and ethanol. Subsequently, micro gears were successfully debound by a multistep heating schedule.

  6. Forum for Injection Techniques, India: The First Indian Recommendations for Best Practice in Insulin Injection Technique

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Balhara, Yatan Pal Singh; Baruah, Manash P.; Chadha, Manoj; Chandalia, Hemraj B.; Chowdhury, Subhankar; Kumar, K. M. Prasanna; Modi, Sonal; Pitale, Shailesh; Shukla, Rishi; Sahay, Rakesh; Sundaram, Annamalai; Unnikrishnan, Ambika G.; Wangnoo, Subhash K.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in the treatment of diabetes have led to an increase in the number of injectable therapies, such as human insulin, insulin analogues, and glucagon-like peptide-1 analogues. The efficacy of injection therapy in diabetes depends on correct injection technique, among many other factors. Good injection technique is vital in achieving glycemic control and thus preventing complications of diabetes. From the patients’ and health-care providers’ perspective, it is essential to have guidelines to understand injections and injection techniques. The abridged version of the First Indian Insulin Injection technique guidelines developed by the Forum for Injection Technique (FIT) India presented here acknowledge good insulin injection techniques and provide evidence-based recommendations to assist diabetes care providers in improving their clinical practice. PMID:23226630

  7. A simple model for assessing ammonia emission from ammoniacal fertilisers as affected by pH and injection into soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyord, T.; Schelde, K. M.; Søgaard, H. T.; Jensen, L. S.; Sommer, S. G.

    Ammonia (NH 3) volatilisation following the application of ammoniacal fertilisers and liquid manure to agricultural land is a significant source of atmospheric NH 3, which not only poses a risk to the environment, but may also result in a loss of plant available nitrogen (N). This study examined the potential for reducing NH 3 emission through acidifying an ammoniacal solution and by injecting the solution. The combination of the two technologies was studied and a model for predicting the most optimal treatment was developed. In the laboratory, ammonium (NH 4+) hydroxide (aqueous NH 3) was dissolved in water (pH 11) and injected into a loamy sand soil. The NH 3 emission was measured with a dynamic chamber technology. Injecting the solution to 10 mm below the soil surface reduced NH 3 emission by 10% compared to surface application, and injection to 30 mm reduced emission by 20% compared to surface application. Acidifying the ammoniacal solution by adding sulphuric acid and reducing pH to 10 reduced the emission by 60% at a 10 mm injection depth and 90% at 30 mm compared with non-acidified and surface-spread ammoniacal solution. The results show that there is an important interaction of pH and injection depth and that there is a need for models predicting a combined effect. This type of model could contribute to reduce cost and energy (traction force) by providing the optimal combination of acidifying and injection depth that gives a specific reduction in NH 3 emission, which in this study was reducing pH to 10 and inject the fertiliser to 30 mm below surface. This study showed that relatively simple models can predict the NH 3 emission from injected ammoniacal fertilisers, but that there is still a need for developing algorithms that predict the effect of pH, including the pH buffering capacity of the fertiliser and the soil.

  8. Liquid injection plasma deposition method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.; Watkins, Arthur D.

    1999-01-01

    A liquid injection plasma torch deposition apparatus for depositing material onto a surface of a substrate may comprise a plasma torch for producing a jet of plasma from an outlet nozzle. A plasma confinement tube having an inlet end and an outlet end and a central bore therethrough is aligned with the outlet nozzle of the plasma torch so that the plasma jet is directed into the inlet end of the plasma confinement tube and emerges from the outlet end of the plasma confinement tube. The plasma confinement tube also includes an injection port transverse to the central bore. A liquid injection device connected to the injection port of the plasma confinement tube injects a liquid reactant mixture containing the material to be deposited onto the surface of the substrate through the injection port and into the central bore of the plasma confinement tube.

  9. Liquid injection plasma deposition method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kong, P.C.; Watkins, A.D.

    1999-05-25

    A liquid injection plasma torch deposition apparatus for depositing material onto a surface of a substrate may comprise a plasma torch for producing a jet of plasma from an outlet nozzle. A plasma confinement tube having an inlet end and an outlet end and a central bore therethrough is aligned with the outlet nozzle of the plasma torch so that the plasma jet is directed into the inlet end of the plasma confinement tube and emerges from the outlet end of the plasma confinement tube. The plasma confinement tube also includes an injection port transverse to the central bore. A liquid injection device connected to the injection port of the plasma confinement tube injects a liquid reactant mixture containing the material to be deposited onto the surface of the substrate through the injection port and into the central bore of the plasma confinement tube. 8 figs.

  10. [Process for producing fluorescein for injection purposes (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Friedrich, F; Kottke, K; Kühmstedt, H

    1980-01-01

    The authors report of a process for producing high-purity fluorescein for injection purposes which is characterized by the fact that synthesis-induced by-products are separated from the raw fluorescein, obtained by any process, by means of a clean-up chain consisting in step-by-step monoacetylation in an aqueous-alkaline solution, subsequent diacetylation in pyridine or a pyridine-glacial acetic acid mixture, saponification of the diacetyl product by sodium methoxide in methanol, and precipitation of the fluorescein with anhydrous formic acid.

  11. Bifurcation routes in a laser with injected signal

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Y.; Bandy, D.K.; Yuan, J.; Narducci, L.M.

    1985-01-01

    With the help of time-dependent solutions, their power spectra, Poincare maps, and the complete set of Lyapunov exponents, we have carried out a detailed investigation of the bifurcation routes of three attractors in a single-mode model of a laser with injected signal. In addition to a sequence of ordinary period-doubling bifurcations leading to chaos, we have observed subcritical and supercritical Hopf bifurcations of limit cycles. We have also observed the sudden disappearance of trajectories due to the coalescence of a pair of stable and unstable tori and the possible collision of a limit cycle with an unstable torus.

  12. Thermodynamics of Dilute Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jancso, Gabor; Fenby, David V.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses principles and definitions related to the thermodynamics of dilute solutions. Topics considered include dilute solution, Gibbs-Duhem equation, reference systems (pure gases and gaseous mixtures, liquid mixtures, dilute solutions), real dilute solutions (focusing on solute and solvent), terminology, standard states, and reference systems.…

  13. INJECTION CHOICE FOR SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE RING.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.; BEEBE-WANG,J.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; BRODOWSKI,J.; FEDOTOV,A.; GARDNER,C.; LEE,Y.Y.; RAPARIA,D.; DANILOV,V.; HOLMES,J.; PRIOR,C.; REES,G.; MACHIDA,S.

    2001-06-18

    Injection is key in the low-loss design of high-intensity proton facilities like the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). During the design of both the accumulator and the rapid-cycling-synchrotron version of the SNS, extensive comparison has been made to select injection scenarios that satisfy SNS's low-loss design criteria. This paper presents issues and considerations pertaining to the final choice of the SNS injection systems.

  14. Injected Water Augments Cooling In Turboshaft Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biesiadny, Thomas J.; Berger, Brett; Klann, Gary A.; Clark, David A.

    1989-01-01

    Report describes experiments in which water injected into compressor-bleed cooling air of aircraft turboshaft engine. Injection of water previously suggested as way to provide additional cooling needed to sustain operation at power levels higher than usual. Involves turbine-inlet temperatures high enough to shorten lives of first-stage high-pressure turbine blades. Latent heat of vaporization of injected water serves as additional heat sink to maintain blades at design operating temperatures during high-power operation.

  15. Fuel injection system for internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Nagao, A.; Yoshioka, S.; Oda, H.; Tokushima, T.

    1988-11-22

    This patent describes a fuel injection system for an internal combustion engine having a crankshaft and a combustion chamber, the system comprising (a) an intake passage for introducing an intake gas into the combustion chamber and provided with an intake valve; (b) a fuel injection valve for injecting fuel into the intake passage in the vicinity of the combustion chamber; (c) operating condition detecting means for detecting the operating condition of the engine and outputting a signal corresponding to the thus detected operating condition; (d) fuel injection amount determining means which receives an output signal of the operating conditions detecting means, thereby determining the amount of fuel to be supplied to the combustion chamber, and outputs a signal corresponding to thus determined amount; (e) crankshaft angle detecting means for detecting the rotation angle of the crankshaft; (f) injection timing control means which receives signals from the fuel injection amount determining means and crankshaft angle detecting means, outputs a start signal for actuating the fuel injection valve and a termination signal for terminating the actuation of the fuel injection valve, and actuates the fuel injection valve for the duration between the start and termination signals, thereby supplying an amount of fuel determined by the fuel injection amount determining means; (g) the start and termination signals being set against the crankshaft angle so that the whole fuel injection from the injection valve to the intake passage under light load operation of the engine reaches the combustion chamber substantially in the latter half of the intake stroke before the intake valve is closed.

  16. Corrosion control in water injection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, C.C. )

    1993-08-01

    Corrosion control in water injection systems encompasses a wide range of technologies, including chemicals (corrosion inhibitors, biocides, and oxygen scavengers); corrosion-resistant materials (metallic and nonmetallic); internal coatings and linings; mechanical removal of dissolved oxygen; velocity control; and prevention of oxygen entry and galvanic couples. This article reviews the way that these technologies are used in modern water-injection systems (both seawater and produced water) to provide an acceptable service life and high-quality injection water.

  17. Potential Risk Factors for Injecting Among Mexican American Non-Injecting Heroin Users

    PubMed Central

    Valdez, Avelardo; Neaigus, Alan; Cepeda, Alice

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY This study examines potential risk factors for resuming and transitioning to injecting among a prospective cohort of 300 Mexican American non-injecting heroin users (NIUs) with distinct injecting histories (i.e., never vs. former injectors). Overall. findings revealed NIUs with an injecting history are more likely to be at greater risk for resuming injecting practices. Of interest, scoring high on acculturation decreased the risk of being a former injector. The present analysis supports previous research, and more importantly further identifies potential risk factors for injecting that are unique to the cultural and social context of the Mexican American community. PMID:18192204

  18. Polyacrylamide hydrogel injection for breast augmentation: Another injectable failure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenxiang; Li, Shirong; Wang, Lingli; Zhang, Shu; Jiang, Yan; Chen, Jinping; Luo, Donglin

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Increasing complications of polyacrylamide hydrogel (PAAG) augmentation mammoplasty, such as chronic persistent infection, have recently caught the attention of both the medical field and the general public. Material/Methods A total of 96 patients with severe chronic infection following PAAG augmentation mammoplasty were treated in the present study including 63 cases with infection confined to the breast and 33 with systemic infection. Endoscopy and surgery were performed to completely remove the materials and clear the infected tissues followed by drug-irrigation and vacuum-assisted closure for several days. Results In patients with severe infection there were large amounts of PAAG, fibers and infiltration of numerous neutrophils and macrophages. The infection-inducing materials were extensively dispersed in the mammary and subcutaneous tissues, pectoral fascia and intermuscular space. In addition, there was scattered distribution of PAAG materials in the armpit, chest wall and abdominal wall, which were mixed with necrotic tissues and surrounded by lymphocytes, giant cells, macrophages and other inflammatory cells, forming chronic granulomatous and fibrous lesions. Infection was controlled following surgical intervention. No residual infectious foci or recurrent infections were noted among these patients. Although the severe infection did not result in mastectomy, patients had breast atrophy and various degrees of deformation. Conclusions Chronic infection following PAAG augmentation mammaplasty usually causes systemic infection and other devastating adverse reactions. This study confirms PAAG augmentation mammaplasty is another failed attempt. More attention should be paid to the injection of large doses of liquid filler. PMID:22648256

  19. Precision injection molding of freeform optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fengzhou; Zhang, Nan; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2016-08-01

    Precision injection molding is the most efficient mass production technology for manufacturing plastic optics. Applications of plastic optics in field of imaging, illumination, and concentration demonstrate a variety of complex surface forms, developing from conventional plano and spherical surfaces to aspheric and freeform surfaces. It requires high optical quality with high form accuracy and lower residual stresses, which challenges both optical tool inserts machining and precision injection molding process. The present paper reviews recent progress in mold tool machining and precision injection molding, with more emphasis on precision injection molding. The challenges and future development trend are also discussed.

  20. Creating fluid injectivity in tar sands formations

    DOEpatents

    Stegemeier, George Leo; Beer, Gary Lee; Zhang, Etuan

    2010-06-08

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods for treating a tar sands may include heating a portion of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the portion. The heat may be controlled to increase the permeability of at least part of the portion to create an injection zone in the portion with an average permeability sufficient to allow injection of a fluid through the injection zone. A drive fluid and/or an oxidizing fluid may be provided into the injection zone. At least some hydrocarbons are produced from the portion.