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Sample records for alkalinity dissolved oxygen

  1. Bifunctional alkaline oxygen electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swette, L.; Kackley, N.; Mccatty, S. A.

    1991-01-01

    The authors describe the identification and testing of electrocatalysts and supports for the positive electrode of moderate-temperature, single-unit, rechargeable alkaline fuel cells. Recent work on Na(x)Pt3O4, a potential bifunctional catalyst, is described, as well as the application of novel approaches to the development of more efficient bifunctional electrode structures. The three dual-character electrodes considered here showed similar superior performance; the Pt/RhO2 and Rh/RhO2 electrodes showed slightly better performance than the Pt/IrO2 electrode. It is concluded that Na(x)Pt3O4 continues to be a promising bifunctional oxygen electrode catalyst but requires further investigation and development.

  2. The Measurement of Dissolved Oxygen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thistlethwayte, D.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Describes an experiment in environmental chemistry which serves to determine the dissolved oxygen concentration in both fresh and saline water. Applications of the method at the undergraduate and secondary school levels are recommended. (CC)

  3. Dissolved Oxygen Data for Coos Estuary (Oregon)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this product is the transmittal of dissolved oxygen data collected in the Coos Estuary, Oregon to Ms. Molly O'Neill (University of Oregon), for use in her studies on the factors influencing spatial and temporal patterns in dissolved oxygen in this estuary. These d...

  4. Dissolved Oxygen Levels in Lake Chabot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, D.; Pica, R.

    2014-12-01

    Dissolved oxygen levels are crucial in every aquatic ecosystem; it allows for the fish to breathe and it is the best indicator of water quality. Lake Chabot is the main backup water source for Castro Valley, making it crucial that the lake stays in good health. Last year, research determined that the water in Lake Chabot was of good quality and not eutrophic. This year, an experiment was conducted using Lake Chabot's dissolved oxygen levels to ensure the quality of the water and to support the findings of the previous team. After testing three specifically chosen sites at the lake using a dissolved oxygen meter, results showed that the oxygen levels in the lake were within the healthy range. It was then determined that Lake Chabot is a suitable backup water source and it continues to remain a healthy habitat.

  5. A Quantitative Evaluation of Dissolved Oxygen Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pijanowski, Barbara S.

    1971-01-01

    The implications of the presence of dissolved oxygen in water are discussed in terms of its deleterious or beneficial effects, depending on the functional consequences to those affected, e.g., the industrialist, the oceanographer, and the ecologist. The paper is devoted primarily to an examination of the performance of five commercially available dissolved oxygen meters. The design of each is briefly reviewed and ease or difficulty of use in the field described. Specifically, the evaluation program treated a number of parameters and user considerations including an initial check and trial calibration for each instrument and a discussion of the measurement methodology employed. Detailed test results are given relating to the effects of primary power variation, water-flow sensitivity, response time, relative accuracy of dissolved-oxygen readout, temperature accuracy (for those instruments which included this feature), error and repeatability, stability, pressure and other environmental effects, and test results obtained in the field. Overall instrument performance is summarized comparatively by chart.

  6. Water quality and processes affecting dissolved oxygen concentrations in the Blackwater River, Canaan Valley, West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waldron, M.C.; Wiley, J.B.

    1996-01-01

    The water quality and environmental processes affecting dissolved oxygen were determined for the Blackwater River in Canaan Valley, West Virginia. Canaan Valley is oval-shaped (14 miles by 5 miles) and is located in the Allegheny Mountains at an average elevation of 3,200 feet above sea level. Tourism, population, and real estate development have increased in the past two decades. Most streams in Canaan Valley are a dilute calcium magnesium bicarbonate-type water. Streamwater typicaly was soft and low in alkalinity and dissolved solids. Maximum values for specific conductance, hardness, alkalinity, and dissolved solids occurred during low-flow periods when streamflow was at or near baseflow. Dissolved oxygen concentrations are most sensitive to processes affecting the rate of reaeration. The reaeration is affected by solubility (atmospheric pressure, water temperature, humidity, and cloud cover) and processes that determine stream turbulence (stream depth, width, velocity, and roughness). In the headwaters, photosynthetic dissolved oxygen production by benthic algae can result in supersaturated dissolved oxygen concentrations. In beaver pools, dissolved oxygen consumption from sediment oxygen demand and carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand can result in dissolved oxygen deficits.

  7. Modeling Fish Growth in Low Dissolved Oxygen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neilan, Rachael Miller

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a computational project designed for undergraduate students as an introduction to mathematical modeling. Students use an ordinary differential equation to describe fish weight and assume the instantaneous growth rate depends on the concentration of dissolved oxygen. Published laboratory experiments suggest that continuous…

  8. Oxygen electrodes for rechargeable alkaline fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swette, Larry; Giner, Jose

    1987-01-01

    Electrocatalysts and supports for the positive electrode of moderate temperature single unit rechargeable alkaline fuel cells were investigated and developed. The electrocatalysts are defined as the material with a higher activity for the oxygen electrode reaction than the support. Advanced development will require that the materials be prepared in high surface area forms, and may also entail integration of various candidate materials. Eight candidate support materials and seven electrocatalysts were investigated. Of the 8 support, 3 materials meet the preliminary requirements in terms of electrical conductivity and stability. Emphasis is now on preparing in high surface area form and testing under more severe corrosion stress conditions. Of the 7 electrocatalysts prepared and evaluated, at least 5 materials remain as potential candidates. The major emphasis remains on preparation, physical characterization and electrochemical performance testing.

  9. Tracer monitored titrations: measurement of dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Martz, Todd; Takeshita, Yuichiro; Rolph, Rebecca; Bresnahan, Philip

    2012-01-01

    The tracer monitored titration (TMT) technique is evaluated for measurement of dissolved oxygen. The TMT developed in this work uses a simple apparatus consisting of a low-precision pump for titrant delivery and an optical detector based on a white LED and two photodiodes with interference filters. It is shown that the classic Winkler method can be made free of routine volumetric and gravimetric measurements by application of TMT theory, which allows tracking the amounts of titrant and sample using a chemical tracer. The measurement precision of the prototype setup was 0.3% RSD.

  10. Biochemical Oxygen Demand and Dissolved Oxygen. Training Module 5.105.2.77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with the azide modification of the Winkler dissolved oxygen test and the electronic dissolved oxygen meter test procedures for determining the dissolved oxygen and the biochemical oxygen demand of a wastewater sample. Included are…

  11. Oxygen electrodes for rechargeable alkaline fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swette, L.; Kackley, N.

    1989-01-01

    Electrocatalysts and supports for the positive electrode of moderate temperature single-unit rechargeable alkaline fuel cells are being investigated and developed. Candidate support materials were drawn from transition metal carbides, borides, nitrides and oxides which have high conductivity (greater than 1 ohm/cm). Candidate catalyst materials were selected largely from metal oxides of the form ABO sub x (where A = Pb, Cd, Mn, Ti, Zr, La, Sr, Na, and B = Pt, Pd, Ir, Ru, Ni (Co) which were investigated and/or developed for one function only, O2 reduction or O2 evolution. The electrical conductivity requirement for catalysts may be lower, especially if integrated with a higher conductivity support. All candidate materials of acceptable conductivity are subjected to corrosion testing. Materials that survive chemical testing are examined for electrochemical corrosion activity. For more stringent corrosion testing, and for further evaluation of electrocatalysts (which generally show significant O2 evolution at at 1.4 V), samples are held at 1.6 V or 0.6 V for about 100 hours. The surviving materials are then physically and chemically analyzed for signs of degradation. To evaluate the bifunctional oxygen activity of candidate catalysts, Teflon-bonded electrodes are fabricated and tested in a floating electrode configuration. Many of the experimental materials being studied have required development of a customized electrode fabrication procedure. In advanced development, the goal is to reduce the polarization to about 300 to 350 mV. Approximately six support materials and five catalyst materials were identified to date for further development. The test results will be described.

  12. Processes affecting the oceanic distributions of dissolved calcium and alkalinity

    SciTech Connect

    Shiller, A.M.; Gieskes, J.M.

    1980-05-20

    Recent studies of the CO/sub 2/ system have suggested that chemical processes in addition to the dissolution and precipitation of calcium carbonate affect the oceanic calcium and alkalinity distributions. Calcium and alkalinity data from the North Pacific have been examined both by using the simple physical-chemical model of previous workers and by a study involving the broader oceanographic context of these data. The simple model is shown to be an inadequate basis for these studies. Although a proton flux associated with organic decomposition may affect the alkalinity, previously reported deviations of calcium-alkalinity correlations from expected trends appear to be related to boundary processes that have been neglected rather than to this proton flux. The distribution of calcium in the surface waters of the Pacific Ocean is examined.

  13. Dissolved oxygen concentration in culture medium: assumptions and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Newby, D; Marks, L; Lyall, F

    2005-04-01

    Oxygen is a key factor in the regulation of cytotrophoblast differentiation, proliferation and invasion in early pregnancy. Abnormalities in oxygen concentration have also been linked to a number of pregnancy disorders. Cell culture models have been used to study the effect of oxygen on cytotrophoblast behaviour in vitro, however, there is often little or no validation of oxygen levels in these cell culture systems. In this study, dissolved oxygen levels in culture medium maintained in standard culture conditions (18% O(2)) measured 18%. On transfer to a low oxygen environment (2% O(2)), oxygen levels decreased to 6-8% after 4h and reached 2% only after 24h in culture. Culture medium pre-gassed with nitrogen to remove dissolved oxygen quickly absorbed oxygen when exposed to ambient air during dispensing and required further incubation in a 2% oxygen environment before dissolved oxygen levels equilibrated to 2%. Thus, cultured cells placed in a low oxygen environment would be exposed to varying levels of oxygen before the desired level of oxygen exposure is reached. This study highlights the importance of validation of oxygen levels and potential problems associated with in vitro studies on the regulatory effects of oxygen.

  14. Chapter A6. Section 6.2. Dissolved Oxygen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Revised by Lewis, Michael Edward

    2006-01-01

    Accurate data for the concentration of dissolved oxygen in surface and ground waters are essential for documenting changes in environmental water resources that result from natural phenomena and human activities. Dissolved oxygen is necessary in aquatic systems for the survival and growth of many aquatic organisms and is used as an indicator of the health of surface-water bodies. This section of the National Field Manual (NFM) includes U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) guidance and protocols for four methods to determine dissolved-oxygen concentrations: the amperometric, luminescent-sensor, spectrophotometric, and iodometric (Winkler) methods.

  15. Artificial neural network modeling of dissolved oxygen in reservoir.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Bo; Liu, Wen-Cheng

    2014-02-01

    The water quality of reservoirs is one of the key factors in the operation and water quality management of reservoirs. Dissolved oxygen (DO) in water column is essential for microorganisms and a significant indicator of the state of aquatic ecosystems. In this study, two artificial neural network (ANN) models including back propagation neural network (BPNN) and adaptive neural-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) approaches and multilinear regression (MLR) model were developed to estimate the DO concentration in the Feitsui Reservoir of northern Taiwan. The input variables of the neural network are determined as water temperature, pH, conductivity, turbidity, suspended solids, total hardness, total alkalinity, and ammonium nitrogen. The performance of the ANN models and MLR model was assessed through the mean absolute error, root mean square error, and correlation coefficient computed from the measured and model-simulated DO values. The results reveal that ANN estimation performances were superior to those of MLR. Comparing to the BPNN and ANFIS models through the performance criteria, the ANFIS model is better than the BPNN model for predicting the DO values. Study results show that the neural network particularly using ANFIS model is able to predict the DO concentrations with reasonable accuracy, suggesting that the neural network is a valuable tool for reservoir management in Taiwan. PMID:24078053

  16. FIELD MEASUREMENT OF DISSOLVED OXYGEN: A COMPARISON OF TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The measurement and interpretation of geochemical redox parameters are key components of ground water remedial investigations. Dissolved oxygen (DO) is perhaps the most robust geochemical parameter in redox characterization; however, recent work has indicated a need for proper da...

  17. Aquatic insects in Montezuma Well, Arizona, USA: A travertine spring mound with high alkalinity and dissolved carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Blinn, D.W.; Sanderson, M.W. )

    1989-01-31

    An annotated list of aquatic insects from the high carbonate system of Montezuma Well, Arizona, USA, is presented for collections taken during 1976-1986. Fifty-seven taxa in 16 families are reported, including new distribution records for Arizona (Anacaena signaticollis, Laccobius ellipticus, and Crenitulus sp. (nr. debilis)) and the USA (Enochrus sharpi). Larval stages for Trichoptera, Lepidoptera, Megaloptera, Neuroptera, Chironomidae, and Anisoptera were absent even though the habitat lacks fish, and water temperature, dissolved oxygen, available food, and substrata appear adequate in Montezuma Well. The potential importance of alkalinity in restricting these insect groups is discussed.

  18. Reduction of Dissolved Oxygen at a Copper Rotating Disc Electrode

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kear, Gareth; Albarran, Carlos Ponce-de-Leon; Walsh, Frank C.

    2005-01-01

    Undergraduates from chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and environmental science courses, together with first-year postgraduate research students in electrochemical technology, are provided with an experiment that demonstrates the reduction of dissolved oxygen in aerated seawater at 25°C. Oxygen reduction is examined using linear sweep…

  19. Dissolved-oxygen quenching of in-situ fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudyk, Wayne; Tonaszuck, David; Pohlig, Kenneth

    1993-04-01

    In-situ fluorescence measurements of aromatic organic ground water contaminants do not always agree with gas chromatographic methods. Dissolved oxygen quenching of fluorescence may be an interferant in field measurements. Two standard fluorescent aromatics, quinine sulfate and naphthalene, were evaluated in this study. Over the range of dissolved oxygen concentrations expected to be encountered in the field, no effects of oxygen quenching on fluorescence of these compounds was observed. Quenching of quinine sulfate fluorescence by sodium chloride was observed using this system. Sodium chloride quenching was shown to follow the Stern-Volmer relation.

  20. Dissolved oxygen sensing based on fluorescence quenching of ceria nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shehata, Nader; Meehan, Kathleen; Leber, Donald

    2012-10-01

    The development of oxygen sensors has positively impacted the fields of medical science, bioengineering, environmental monitoring, solar cells, industrial process control, and a number of military applications. Fluorescent quenching sensors have an inherent high sensitivity, chemical selectivity, and stability when compared to other types of sensors. While cerium oxide thin films have been used to monitor oxygen in the gas phase, the potential of cerium oxide (ceria) nanoparticles as the active material in sensor for oxygen gas has only recently been investigated. Ceria nanoparticles are one of the most unique nanomaterials that are being studied today due to the diffusion and reactivity of its oxygen vacancies, which contributes to its high oxygen storage capability. The reactivity of the oxygen vacancies, which is also related to conversion of cerium ion from the Ce+4 to Ce+3 state, affects the fluorescence properties of the ceria nanoparticles. Our research demonstrates that the ceria nanoparticles (~7 nm in diameter) have application as a fluorescence quenching sensor to measure dissolved oxygen in water. We have found a strong inverse correlation between the amplitude of the fluorescence emission (λexcitation = 430 nm and λpeak = 520 nm) and the dissolved oxygen concentration between 5 - 13 mg/L. The Stern-Volmer constant, which is an indication of the sensitivity of gas sensing is 184 M-1 for the ceria nanoparticles. The results show that ceria nanoparticles can be used in an improved, robust fluorescence sensor for dissolved oxygen in a liquid medium.

  1. Effect of dissolved oxygen concentration on sludge settleability.

    PubMed

    Martins, A M P; Heijnen, J J; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2003-10-01

    This laboratory study presents a detailed evaluation of the effects of dissolved oxygen concentration and accumulation of storage polymers on sludge settleability in activated sludge systems with an aerobic selector. The oxygen and substrate availability regime were simulated in laboratory sequencing batch reactor systems. The experiments showed that low dissolved oxygen concentration (< or =1.1 mg O2 l(-1)) had a strong negative effect on sludge settleability, leading to the proliferation of filamentous bacteria (Thiothrix spp., Type 021N and Type 1851). This negative effect was stronger at high chemical oxygen demand loading rate. This indicates that a compartmentalised (plug flow) aerobic contact tank, designed at short hydraulic residence time to guarantee a strong substrate gradient, with low dissolved oxygen concentration, might be worse for sludge settleability than an "overdesigned" completely mixed contact tank. Contrary to the general hypothesis, the maximum specific acetate uptake rate, poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate production rate, and resistance to short starvation periods are similar in both poor- and well-settling sludge. The results of this study support our previous hypothesis on the importance of substrate gradients for the development of filamentous structures in biological flocs, from soluble organic substrate gradients to dissolved oxygen gradients in sludge flocs.

  2. Nano-Enriched and Autonomous Sensing Framework for Dissolved Oxygen.

    PubMed

    Shehata, Nader; Azab, Mohammed; Kandas, Ishac; Meehan, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates a nano-enhanced wireless sensing framework for dissolved oxygen (DO). The system integrates a nanosensor that employs cerium oxide (ceria) nanoparticles to monitor the concentration of DO in aqueous media via optical fluorescence quenching. We propose a comprehensive sensing framework with the nanosensor equipped with a digital interface where the sensor output is digitized and dispatched wirelessly to a trustworthy data collection and analysis framework for consolidation and information extraction. The proposed system collects and processes the sensor readings to provide clear indications about the current or the anticipated dissolved oxygen levels in the aqueous media. PMID:26287211

  3. FIELD MEASUREMENT OF DISSOLVED OXYGEN: A COMPARISON OF METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability to confidently measure the concentration of dissolved oxygen (D.O.) in ground water is a key aspect of remedial selection and assessment. Presented here is a comparison of the commonly practiced methods for determining D.O. concentrations in ground water, including c...

  4. Investigating Factors that Affect Dissolved Oxygen Concentration in Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jantzen, Paul G.

    1978-01-01

    Describes activities that demonstrate the effects of factors such as wind velocity, water temperature, convection currents, intensity of light, rate of photosynthesis, atmospheric pressure, humidity, numbers of decomposers, presence of oxidizable ions, and respiration by plants and animals on the dissolved oxygen concentration in water. (MA)

  5. Dissolved oxygen concentration affects hybrid striped bass growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Management of dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in ponds at night during the growing season is important because fish growth and yield are greater in ponds with higher nightly DO concentrations. Three studies were conducted to quantify performance traits and metabolic responses of hybrid striped b...

  6. Alkaline static feed electrolyzer based oxygen generation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, L. D.; Kovach, A. J.; Fortunato, F. A.; Schubert, F. H.; Grigger, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    In preparation for the future deployment of the Space Station, an R and D program was established to demonstrate integrated operation of an alkaline Water Electrolysis System and a fuel cell as an energy storage device. The program's scope was revised when the Space Station Control Board changed the energy storage baseline for the Space Station. The new scope was aimed at the development of an alkaline Static Feed Electrolyzer for use in an Environmental Control/Life Support System as an oxygen generation system. As a result, the program was divided into two phases. The phase 1 effort was directed at the development of the Static Feed Electrolyzer for application in a Regenerative Fuel Cell System. During this phase, the program emphasized incorporation of the Regenerative Fuel Cell System design requirements into the Static Feed Electrolyzer electrochemical module design and the mechanical components design. The mechanical components included a Pressure Control Assembly, a Water Supply Assembly and a Thermal Control Assembly. These designs were completed through manufacturing drawing during Phase 1. The Phase 2 effort was directed at advancing the Alkaline Static Feed Electrolyzer database for an oxygen generation system. This development was aimed at extending the Static Feed Electrolyzer database in areas which may be encountered from initial fabrication through transportation, storage, launch and eventual Space Station startup. During this Phase, the Program emphasized three major areas: materials evaluation, electrochemical module scaling and performance repeatability and Static Feed Electrolyzer operational definition and characterization.

  7. Dissolved oxygen imaging to investigate biodegradation at lab scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, D. N.; Rees, H.; Huang, W. E.; Smith, C. C.; Oswald, S. E.

    2003-04-01

    A novel combination of a non-invasive imaging method with an oxygen sensitive fluorescent indicator was developed to investigate the biodegradation processes occurring at the fringe of a solute plume. A thin transparent porous matrix was made from quartz plates and quartz sand and acetate was continuously injected in the uniform flow field containing dissolved oxygen. Ruthenium (II)-dichlorotris(1,10-phenanthroline) (Ru(phen)3Cl2), a water soluble fluorescent dye, was used as an indicator of dissolved oxygen concentration as its fluorescence intensity is dependent on the concentration of oxygen. The oxygen distribution within the matrix was interpreted from images recorded by a CCD camera. These two-dimensional experimental results show quantitatively how the oxygen concentrations decrease strongly at the narrow plume fringe and that oxygen was exhausted at the core of the plume. Separately, dispersivity was measured in a series of non-reactive transport experiments, and biodegradation parameters were evaluated by batch experiments. This measurement method provides a novel approach to investigate details of behavior of solute transport and biodegradation in porous media.

  8. Modeling impact of storage zones on stream dissolved oxygen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapra, S.C.; Runkel, R.L.

    1999-01-01

    The Streeter-Phelps dissolved oxygen model is modified to incorporate storage zones. A dimensionless number reflecting enhanced decomposition caused by the increased residence time of the biochemical oxygen demand in the storage zone parameterizes the impact. This result provides a partial explanation for the high decomposition rates observed in shallow streams. An application suggests that the storage zone increases the critical oxygen deficit and moves it closer to the point source. It also indicates that the storage zone should have lower oxygen concentration than the main channel. An analysis of a dimensionless enhancement factor indicates that the biochemical oxygen demand decomposition in small streams could be up to two to three times more than anticipated based on the standard Streeter-Phelps model without storage zones. For larger rivers, enhancements of up to 1.5 could occur.The Streeter-Phelps dissolved oxygen model is modified to incorporate storage zones. A dimensionless number reflecting enhanced decomposition caused by the increased residence time of the biochemical oxygen demand in the storage zone parameterizes the impact. This result provides a partial explanation for the high decomposition rates observed in shallow streams. An application suggests that the storage zone increases the critical oxygen deficit and moves it closer to the point source. It also indicates that the storage zone should have lower oxygen concentration than the main channel. An analysis of a dimensionless enhancement factor indicates that the biochemical oxygen demand decomposition in small streams could be up to two to three times more than anticipated based on the standard Streeter-Phelps model without storage zones. For larger rivers, enhancements of up to 1.5 could occur.

  9. Effect of oxygen reduction rate and constant low dissolved oxygen concentrations on two estuarine fish

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, D.T.; Richardson, L.B.; Moore, C.J.

    1980-09-01

    The relationship between mean lethal oxygen concentration and rate of reduction of dissolved oxygen that induces fish kills was determined for Atlantic menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus). Reduction of dissolved oxygen at hourly rates of 1.00 to 0.08 mg/liter had no effect on the mean lethal oxygen concentrations. There was an inverse relationship between the median time to death (LT50) and rate of oxygen reduction that can be used to estimate how quickly a fish kill may occur when oxygen concentrations decrease at a constant rate. Atlantic menhaden were less resistant than spot (Leiostomus xanthurus) when both species were exposed to constant low concentrations of oxygen. The lethal threshold concentrations for Atlantic menhaden and spot at 28/sup 0/C were approximately 1.1 and 0.7 mg/liter, respectively, whereas, the 96-hour, 5% lethal concentrations were approximately 1.6 and 0.8 mg/liter, respectively.

  10. Simulation of hydrodynamics, temperature, and dissolved oxygen in Bull Shoals Lake, Arkansas, 1994-1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Galloway, Joel M.; Green, W. Reed

    2003-01-01

    and dissolved-oxygen concentration through time. However, results from both scenarios for water temperature and dissolved-oxygen concentration were within the boundaries of the error between measured and simulated water column profile values.

  11. Sources of dissolved oxygen in monitoring and pumping wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonte, Matthijs; Wols, Bas; Maas, Kees; Stuyfzand, Pieter

    2016-10-01

    Groundwater monitoring and pumping wells set in anoxic aquifers require attention to keep the groundwater free of dissolved oxygen (DO). In properly constructed monitoring or pumping wells, two processes can however still introduce oxygen to anoxic groundwater: (1) permeation of oxygen through polymer materials such as silicone, PVC, HDPE or Teflon, and (2) thermally driven convection, which can occur in all types of piezometers or wells, regardless of construction material, when the water table or pressure head is close (<10 m) to the land surface. Here, field measurements (temperature and DO well loggings) from a monitoring well in Bilthoven, the Netherlands, are combined with analytical and numerical modelling to investigate the role of both processes on oxygenation of anoxic groundwater in wells. The results of numerical and analytical modeling show that both permeation and convection can introduce oxygen into anoxic wells to near saturation concentrations. In the field data gathered, convection is primarily responsible for oxygen intrusion up to a depth of around 12 m. Oxygen intrusion through convection and permeation in monitoring and pumping wells may influence groundwater sampling and analyses, and may contribute to well clogging, depending on site conditions. The combination of field and modelling provides new insights into these processes, which can be used for both groundwater sampling and pumping well design.

  12. Singlet-Oxygen Generation in Alkaline Periodate Solution.

    PubMed

    Bokare, Alok D; Choi, Wonyong

    2015-12-15

    A nonphotochemical generation of singlet oxygen ((1)O2) using potassium periodate (KIO4) in alkaline condition (pH > 8) was investigated for selective oxidation of aqueous organic pollutants. The generation of (1)O2 was initiated by the spontaneous reaction between IO4(-) and hydroxyl ions, along with a stoichiometric conversion of IO4(-) to iodate (IO3(-)). The reactivity of in-situ-generated (1)O2 was monitored by using furfuryl alcohol (FFA) as a model substrate. The formation of (1)O2 in the KIO4/KOH system was experimentally confirmed using electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements in corroboration with quenching studies using azide as a selective (1)O2 scavenger. The reaction in the KIO4/KOH solution in both oxic and anoxic conditions initiated the generation of superoxide ion as a precursor of the singlet oxygen (confirmed by using superoxide scavengers), and the presence of molecular oxygen was not required as a precursor of (1)O2. Although hydrogen peroxide had no direct influence on the FFA oxidation process, the presence of natural organic matter, such as humic and fulvic acids, enhanced the oxidation efficiency. Using the oxidation of simple organic diols as model compounds, the enhanced (1)O2 formation is attributed to periodate-mediated oxidation of vicinal hydroxyl groups present in humic and fulvic constituent moieties. The efficient and simple generation of (1)O2 using the KIO4/KOH system without any light irradiation can be employed for the selective oxidation of aqueous organic compounds under neutral and near-alkaline conditions.

  13. Dependence of riverine nitrous oxide emissions on dissolved oxygen levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosamond, Madeline S.; Thuss, Simon J.; Schiff, Sherry L.

    2012-10-01

    Nitrous oxide is a potent greenhouse gas, and it destroys stratospheric ozone. Seventeen per cent of agricultural nitrous oxide emissions come from the production of nitrous oxide in streams, rivers and estuaries, in turn a result of inorganic nitrogen input through leaching, runoff and sewage. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and global nitrous oxide budgets assume that riverine nitrous oxide emissions increase linearly with dissolved inorganic nitrogen loads, but data are sparse and conflicting. Here we report measurements over two years of nitrous oxide emissions in the Grand River, Canada, a seventh-order temperate river that is affected by agricultural runoff and outflow from a waste-water treatment plant. Emissions were disproportionately high in urban areas and during nocturnal summer periods. Moreover, annual emission estimates that are based on dissolved inorganic nitrogen loads overestimated the measured emissions in a wet year and underestimated them in a dry year. We found no correlations of nitrous oxide emissions with nitrate or dissolved inorganic nitrogen, but detected negative correlations with dissolved oxygen, suggesting that nitrate concentrations did not limit emissions. We conclude that future increases in nitrate export to rivers will not necessarily lead to higher nitrous oxide emissions, but more widespread hypoxia most likely will.

  14. Improved Arterial Blood Oxygenation Following Intravenous Infusion of Cold Supersaturated Dissolved Oxygen Solution

    PubMed Central

    Grady, Daniel J; Gentile, Michael A; Riggs, John H; Cheifetz, Ira M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND One of the primary goals of critical care medicine is to support adequate gas exchange without iatrogenic sequelae. An emerging method of delivering supplemental oxygen is intravenously rather than via the traditional inhalation route. The objective of this study was to evaluate the gas-exchange effects of infusing cold intravenous (IV) fluids containing very high partial pressures of dissolved oxygen (>760 mm Hg) in a porcine model. METHODS Juvenile swines were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated. Each animal received an infusion of cold (13 °C) Ringer’s lactate solution (30 mL/kg/hour), which had been supersaturated with dissolved oxygen gas (39.7 mg/L dissolved oxygen, 992 mm Hg, 30.5 mL/L). Arterial blood gases and physiologic measurements were repeated at 15-minute intervals during a 60-minute IV infusion of the supersaturated dissolved oxygen solution. Each animal served as its own control. RESULTS Five swines (12.9 ± 0.9 kg) were studied. Following the 60-minute infusion, there were significant increases in PaO2 and SaO2 (P < 0.05) and a significant decrease in PaCO2 (P < 0.05), with a corresponding normalization in arterial blood pH. Additionally, there was a significant decrease in core body temperature (P < 0.05) when compared to the baseline preinfusion state. CONCLUSIONS A cold, supersaturated dissolved oxygen solution may be intravenously administered to improve arterial blood oxygenation and ventilation parameters and induce a mild therapeutic hypothermia in a porcine model. PMID:25249764

  15. A Dissolved Oxygen Threshold for Shifts in Bacterial Community Structure in a Seasonally Hypoxic Estuary

    PubMed Central

    Spietz, Rachel L.; Williams, Cheryl M.; Rocap, Gabrielle; Horner-Devine, M. Claire

    2015-01-01

    Pelagic ecosystems can become depleted of dissolved oxygen as a result of both natural processes and anthropogenic effects. As dissolved oxygen concentration decreases, energy shifts from macrofauna to microorganisms, which persist in these hypoxic zones. Oxygen-limited regions are rapidly expanding globally; however, patterns of microbial communities associated with dissolved oxygen gradients are not yet well understood. To assess the effects of decreasing dissolved oxygen on bacteria, we examined shifts in bacterial community structure over space and time in Hood Canal, Washington, USA−a glacial fjord-like water body that experiences seasonal low dissolved oxygen levels known to be detrimental to fish and other marine organisms. We found a strong negative association between bacterial richness and dissolved oxygen. Bacterial community composition across all samples was also strongly associated with the dissolved oxygen gradient, and significant changes in bacterial community composition occurred at a dissolved oxygen concentration between 5.18 and 7.12 mg O2 L-1. This threshold value of dissolved oxygen is higher than classic definitions of hypoxia (<2.0 mg O2 L-1), suggesting that changes in bacterial communities may precede the detrimental effects on ecologically and economically important macrofauna. Furthermore, bacterial taxa responsible for driving whole community changes across the oxygen gradient are commonly detected in other oxygen-stressed ecosystems, suggesting that the patterns we uncovered in Hood Canal may be relevant in other low oxygen ecosystems. PMID:26270047

  16. Continuous Dissolved Oxygen Measurements and Modelling Metabolism in Peatland Streams.

    PubMed

    Dick, Jonathan J; Soulsby, Chris; Birkel, Christian; Malcolm, Iain; Tetzlaff, Doerthe

    2016-01-01

    Stream water dissolved oxygen was monitored in a 3.2km2 moorland headwater catchment in the Scottish Highlands. The stream consists of three 1st order headwaters and a 2nd order main stem. The stream network is fringed by peat soils with no riparian trees, though dwarf shrubs provide shading in the lower catchment. Dissolved oxygen (DO) is regulated by the balance between atmospheric re-aeration and the metabolic processes of photosynthesis and respiration. DO was continuously measured for >1 year and the data used to calibrate a mass balance model, to estimate primary production, respiration and re-aeration for a 1st order site and in the 2nd order main stem. Results showed that the stream was always heterotrophic at both sites. Sites were most heterotrophic in the summer reflecting higher levels of stream metabolism. The 1st order stream appeared more heterotrophic which was consistent with the evident greater biomass of macrophytes in the 2nd order stream, with resulting higher primary productivity. Comparison between respiration, primary production, re-aeration and potential physical controls revealed only weak relationships. However, the most basic model parameters (e.g. the parameter linking light and photosynthesis) controlling ecosystem processes resulted in significant differences between the sites which seem related to the stream channel geometry. PMID:27556278

  17. Continuous Dissolved Oxygen Measurements and Modelling Metabolism in Peatland Streams

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Jonathan J.; Soulsby, Chris; Birkel, Christian; Malcolm, Iain; Tetzlaff, Doerthe

    2016-01-01

    Stream water dissolved oxygen was monitored in a 3.2km2 moorland headwater catchment in the Scottish Highlands. The stream consists of three 1st order headwaters and a 2nd order main stem. The stream network is fringed by peat soils with no riparian trees, though dwarf shrubs provide shading in the lower catchment. Dissolved oxygen (DO) is regulated by the balance between atmospheric re-aeration and the metabolic processes of photosynthesis and respiration. DO was continuously measured for >1 year and the data used to calibrate a mass balance model, to estimate primary production, respiration and re-aeration for a 1st order site and in the 2nd order main stem. Results showed that the stream was always heterotrophic at both sites. Sites were most heterotrophic in the summer reflecting higher levels of stream metabolism. The 1st order stream appeared more heterotrophic which was consistent with the evident greater biomass of macrophytes in the 2nd order stream, with resulting higher primary productivity. Comparison between respiration, primary production, re-aeration and potential physical controls revealed only weak relationships. However, the most basic model parameters (e.g. the parameter linking light and photosynthesis) controlling ecosystem processes resulted in significant differences between the sites which seem related to the stream channel geometry. PMID:27556278

  18. Photoacoustic lifetime imaging of dissolved oxygen using methylene blue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashkenazi, Shai

    2010-07-01

    Measuring distribution of dissolved oxygen in biological tissue is of prime interest for cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy optimization. Tumor hypoxia indicates poor prognosis and resistance to radiotherapy. Despite its major clinical significance, no current imaging modality provides direct imaging of tissue oxygen. We present preliminary results demonstrating the potential of photoacoustic lifetime imaging (PALI) for noninvasive, 3-D imaging of tissue oxygen. The technique is based on photoacoustic probing of the excited state lifetime of methylene blue (MB) dye. MB is an FDA-approved water soluble dye with a peak absorption at 660 nm. A double pulse laser system (pump probe) is used to excite the dye and probe its transient absorption by detecting photoacoustic emission. The relaxation rate of MB depends linearly on oxygen concentration. Our measurements show high photoacoustic signal contrast at a probe wavelength of 810 nm, where the excited state absorption is more than four times higher than the ground state absorption. Imaging of a simple phantom is demonstrated. We conclude by discussing possible implementations of the technique in clinical settings and combining it with photodynamic therapy (PDT) for real-time therapy monitoring.

  19. Tolerance of Oncomelania hupensis quadrasi to varying concentrations of dissolved oxygen and organic pollution.

    PubMed

    Garcia, R G

    1972-01-01

    Ecological investigations were made of habitats containing natural populations of the snail Oncomelania hupensis quadrasi and of habitats free from the snail in the island of Leyte, Philippines. This species of snail is a vector of Schistosoma japonicum in the Philippines. Snail-infested habitats had dissolved oxygen levels of 3.8-9.85 ppm but snail-free habitats had levels of only 0.08-3.6 ppm. Snail-infested habitats were less polluted by organic matter than habitats that were snail-free. Larger numbers of chlorophyll-bearing algae were present in both the water and the soil of snail-infested habitats. Other factors, including temperature, pH, hydrogen carbonate alkalinity, and relative humidity, were also investigated.

  20. Influence of dissolved oxygen convection on well sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, D.A.; Casey, C.C.; Lowery, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Convective transport of dissolved oxygen (D.O.) from shallow to deeper parts of wells was observed as the shallow water in wells in South Carolina became cooler than the deeper water in the wells due to seasonal changes. Wells having a relatively small depth to water were more susceptible to thermally induced convection than wells where the depth to water was greater because the shallower water levels were more influenced by air temperature. The potential for convective transport of D.O. to maintain oxygenated conditions in a well screened in an anaerobic aquifer was diminished as ground water exchange through the well screen increased and as oxygen demand increased. Transport of D.O. to the screened interval can adversely affect the ability of passive samplers to produce accurate concentrations of oxygen-sensitive solutes such as iron, other redox indicators, and microbiological data. A comparison of passive sampling to low-flow sampling in a well undergoing convection, however, showed general agreement of volatile organic compound concentrations. During low-flow sampling, the pumped water may be a mixture of convecting water from within the well casing and aquifer water moving inward through the screen. This mixing of water during low-flow sampling can substantially increase equilibration times, can cause false stabilization of indicator parameters, can give false indications of the redox state, and can provide microbiological data that are not representative of the aquifer conditions. Data from this investigation show that simple in-well devices can effectively mitigate convective transport of oxygen. The devices can range from inflatable packers to simple, inexpensive baffle systems. ?? 2007 National Ground Water Association.

  1. Uncertainty analysis in dissolved oxygen modeling in streams.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Maged M; El-Beshry, Manar Z

    2004-08-01

    Uncertainty analysis in surface water quality modeling is an important issue. This paper presents a method based on the first-order reliability method (FORM) to assess the exceedance probability of a target dissolved oxygen concentration in a stream, using a Streeter-Phelps prototype model. Basic uncertainty in the input parameters is considered by representing them as random variables with prescribed probability distributions. Results obtained from FORM analysis compared well with those of the Monte Carlo simulation method. The analysis also presents the stochastic sensitivity of the probabilistic outcome in the form of uncertainty importance factors, and shows how they change with changing simulation time. Furthermore, a parametric sensitivity analysis was conducted to show the effect of selection of different probability distribution functions for the three most important parameters on the design point, exceedance probability, and importance factors.

  2. Climate cycles and dissolved oxygen variability off eastern Luzon, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar, M.; San Diego-McGlone, M.; Jacinto, G.; Siringan, F.; Villanoy, C.; Gordon, A. L.

    2013-12-01

    We assess the effect of El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) on the variability of dissolved oxygen off eastern Luzon, Philippines. In this area, bifurcation of the North Equatorial Current (NEC) into the Kuroshio and Mindanao Currents occurs. Hydrographic parameters and sediment cores obtained during the oceanographic cruises in 2011 and 2012, and data from the World Ocean Atlas 2009 (WOA09) were used in the study. Variability in dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration was observed from surface to the thermocline between the neutral (2011) and La Niña (2012) phase. Based on optimum multiparameter analysis, there was a change in the fraction of water masses in the area. Under neutral conditions, waters off eastern Luzon consist mainly of water (NPSW) from the Kuroshio recirculation gyre that contain higher DO. In contrast, during La Niña conditions the North Equatorial Current becomes stronger bringing in water (NPTW) with lower DO. Thus, variability in DO off eastern Luzon is influenced by the change in the source of the water mass arising from the shift in bifurcation latitude that is linked to ENSO. Longer-term variability in DO was examined using a 2.15m sediment core taken in the shelf off eastern Luzon. The sediment record was used to reconstruct the depositional redox environment in the last 1000 years. The elements V, Ni, Cr, Mn and Fe were normalized to Ti and used as chemical proxies to track DO variability. Results show that DO fluctuations have occurred in the past, and these changes are in agreement with DO variability driven by the Pacific Decadal Oscillation.

  3. Spatial variability of dissolved phosphorous concentrations and alkaline phosphatase activity in the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Chang, J.; Ho, T.; Gong, G.

    2010-12-01

    The concentrations of dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) and alkaline phosphatase activity (APA) have been determined at about 25 sampling stations in the East China Sea since 2003. The stations are mainly distributed from the Changjiang river mouth to northern Taiwan and east to the shelf break. In addition to the Changjiang discharge, we have found a specific nutrient source around a coastal site (122° 2’30’’ E, 28° 40’ N). Elevated DIP and nitrate concentrations have been constantly observed around the sampling station for 8 years, where the surface DIP concentrations are generally around 0.3 µM. The nutrient source may either originate from ground water discharge or coastal upwelling, where lower temperature has been observed in the water column around the station. In general, APA has been negatively correlated with DIP concentrations in the studies sites, with lowest APA around the high DIP station and the Changjiang river mouth.

  4. Dissolved oxygen as an indicator of bioavailable dissolved organic carbon in groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapelle, Francis H.; Bradley, Paul M.; McMahon, Peter B.; Kaiser, Karl; Benner, Ron

    2012-01-01

    Concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO) plotted vs. dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in groundwater samples taken from a coastal plain aquifer of South Carolina (SC) showed a statistically significant hyperbolic relationship. In contrast, DO-DOC plots of groundwater samples taken from the eastern San Joaquin Valley of California (CA) showed a random scatter. It was hypothesized that differences in the bioavailability of naturally occurring DOC might contribute to these observations. This hypothesis was examined by comparing nine different biochemical indicators of DOC bioavailability in groundwater sampled from these two systems. Concentrations of DOC, total hydrolysable neutral sugars (THNS), total hydrolysable amino acids (THAA), mole% glycine of THAA, initial bacterial cell counts, bacterial growth rates, and carbon dioxide production/consumption were greater in SC samples relative to CA samples. In contrast, the mole% glucose of THNS and the aromaticity (SUVA254) of DOC was greater in CA samples. Each of these indicator parameters were observed to change with depth in the SC system in a manner consistent with active biodegradation. These results are uniformly consistent with the hypothesis that the bioavailability of DOC is greater in SC relative to CA groundwater samples. This, in turn, suggests that the presence/absence of a hyperbolic DO-DOC relationship may be a qualitative indicator of relative DOC bioavailability in groundwater systems.

  5. Smart oxygen cuvette for optical monitoring of dissolved oxygen in biological blood samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabhi, Harish; Alla, Suresh Kumar; Shahriari, Mahmoud R.

    2010-02-01

    A smart Oxygen Cuvette is developed by coating the inner surface of a cuvette with oxygen sensitive thin film material. The coating is glass like sol-gel based sensor that has an embedded ruthenium compound in the glass film. The fluorescence of the ruthenium is quenched depending on the oxygen level. Ocean Optics phase fluorometer, NeoFox is used to measure this rate of fluorescence quenching and computes it for the amount of oxygen present. Multimode optical fibers are used for transportation of light from an LED source to cuvette and from cuvette to phase fluorometer. This new oxygen sensing system yields an inexpensive solution for monitoring the dissolved oxygen in samples for biological and medical applications. In addition to desktop fluorometers, smart oxygen cuvettes can be used with the Ocean Optics handheld Fluorometers, NeoFox Sport. The Smart Oxygen Cuvettes provide a resolution of 4PPB units, an accuracy of less than 5% of the reading, and 90% response in less than 10 seconds.

  6. PHYSICAL AND BIOLOGICAL CONTROLS ON DISSOLVED OXYGEN DYNAMICS IN PENSACOLA BAY, FL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nutrient enrichment of estuaries and coastal waters can contribute to hypoxia (low dissolved oxygen) by increasing primary production and biological oxygen demand. Other factors, however, contribute to hypoxia and affect the susceptibility of coastal waters to hypoxia. Hypoxia fo...

  7. Correlation between the sorption of dissolved oxygen onto chitosan and its antimicrobial activity against Esherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gylienė, Ona; Servienė, Elena; Vepštaitė, Iglė; Binkienė, Rima; Baranauskas, Mykolas; Lukša, Juliana

    2015-10-20

    The ability of chitosan to adsorb dissolved oxygen from solution depends on its physical shape and is related to the surface area. Depending on conditions chitosan is capable of adsorbing or releasing oxygen. Chitosan, modificated by the substances possessing antimicrobial activity, such as succinic acid, Pd(II) ions, metallic Pd or Ag, distinctly increases the ability to adsorb the dissolved oxygen. The additional treatment of chitosan with air oxygen or electrochemically produced oxygen also increases the uptake of dissolved oxygen by chitosan. A strong correlation between the amount of oxygen adsorbed onto chitosan and its antimicrobial activity against Esherichia coli has been observed. This finding suggests that one of the sources of antimicrobial activity of chitosan is the ability to sorb dissolved oxygen, along with other well-known factors such as physical state and chemical composition.

  8. Biological Apatite Formed from Polyphosphate and Alkaline Phosphatase May Exchange Oxygen Isotopes from Water through Carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omelon, S. J.; Stanley, S. Y.; Gorelikov, I.; Matsuura, N.

    2011-12-01

    The oxygen isotopic composition in bone mineral phosphate is known to reflect the local water composition, environmental humidity, and diet1. Once ingested, biochemical processes presumably equilibrate PO43- with "body water" by the many biochemical reactions involving PO43- 2. Blake et al. demonstrated that enzymatic release of PO43- from organophosphorus compounds, and microbial metabolism of dissolved orthophosphate, significantly exchange the oxygen in precipitated apatite within environmental water3,4, which otherwise does not exchange with water at low temperatures. One of the enzymes that can cleave phosphates from organic substrates is alkaline phosphastase5, the enzyme also associated with bone mineralization. The literature often states that the mineral in bone in hydroxylapatite, however the mineral in bone is carbonated apatite that also contains some fluoride6. Deprotonation of HPO32- occurs at pH 12, which is impossibly high for biological system, and the predominate carbonate species in solution at neutral pH is HCO3-. To produce an apatite mineral without a significant hydroxyl content, it is possible that apatite biomineralization occurs through a polyphosphate pathway, where the oxygen atom required to transform polyphosphate into individual phosphate ions is from carbonate: [PO3-]n + CO32- -> [PO3-]n-1 + PO43- + CO2. Alkaline phosphatase can depolymerise polyphosphate into orthophosphate5. If alkaline phosphatase cleaves an oxygen atom from a calcium-carbonate complex, then there is no requirement for removing a hydrogen atom from the HCO3- or HPO43- ions of body water to form bioapatite. A mix of 1 mL of 1 M calcium polyphosphate hydogel, or nano-particles of calcium polyphosphate, and amorphous calcium carbonate were reacted with alkaline phosphatase, and maintained at neutral to basic pH. After two weeks, carbonated apatite and other calcium phosphate minerals were identified by powder x-ray diffraction. Orthophosphate and unreacted

  9. Effects of the lampricide 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol on dissolved oxygen in aquatic systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, V.K.; Johnson, D.A.; Sullivan, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of the lampricide 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM) on dissolved oxygen and other water- quality characteristics were evaluated in a series of test chambers under selected combinations of water, sediment, TFM, and exposure to sunlight. Concentrations of TFM gradually decreased over time, especially in the presence of sediment and sunlight. The lampricide did not directly cause a reduction in dissolved oxygen concentration, but appeared to inhibit photosynthetic production of oxygen during daylight. Dissolved oxygen concentrations were significantly reduced by the presence of TFM in chambers exposed to sunlight. Concentrations of total ammonia were significantly higher in chambers with sediment than in those without sediment. In chambers that contained river water and were exposed to sunlight, ammonia concentrations were low because of either oxidation by the elevated dissolved oxygen concentrations or the assimilation of nutrients by algae. The observed changes in dissolved oxygen and ammonia because of the presence of TFM were subtle, but statistically significant.

  10. Links between oxygen fugacity, slab fluids, and calc-alkaline differentiation of arc magmas (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, K. A.; Cottrell, E.; Brounce, M. N.

    2013-12-01

    Calc-alkaline differentiation, a process by which magmas become depleted in Fe early in their crystallization history, is observed in magmas at subduction zone settings and is thought to drive arc magmas towards the bulk composition of continental crust. Basaltic arc magmas may achieve calc-alkaline affinity through some combination of high magmatic H2O, which delays the crystallization of silicates (most notably plagioclase), and high magmatic oxygen fugacity (fO2), which enhances the onset of magnetite crystallization. The relative importance of H2O, fO2, and magmatic bulk composition in generating calc-alkaline magma series, however, is not yet clearly resolved. Here, we present new measurements of the oxidation state of Fe (expressed as Fe3+/∑Fe ratio; a proxy for magmatic fO2), in combination with previously-published analyses, of mafic (Mg#≥0.5) olivine-hosted melt inclusions from global arc volcanoes (Galunggung, Paricutin, Cerro Negro, and several volcnaoes from the Mariana and Aleutian arcs), acquired using X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure spectroscopy. We use the Tholeiitic Index (THI) of Zimmer et al., 2010 to quantify the calc-alkaline affinity of arc magma series (<1 is more calc-alkaline, >1 is more tholeiitic). These volcanoes span a range of calc-alkaline affinity, with THI ranging from 0.65 to 1.3. The Fe3+/∑Fe ratios of arc basalts, corrected for fractional crystallization to 6 wt.% MgO (i.e., Fe3+/∑Fe6.0) range globally from 0.15-0.31 and all but Galunggung are more oxidized than the more tholeiitic basaltic glasses from the Mariana trough back-arc basin (THI=1.4; Fe3+/∑Fe6.0=0.185) or normal MORB (THI=1.6; Fe3+/∑Fe6.0=0.167×0.01). Our results show a strong correlation between THI and Fe3+/∑Fe6.0 ratios at these volcanoes, such that more calc-alkaline magmas contain a greater proportion of oxidized Fe. At the same time, the maximum dissolved H2O contents of basaltic melt inclusions from these volcanoes also strongly correlate

  11. Consumption and diffusion of dissolved oxygen in sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manaka, M.; Takeda, M.

    2016-10-01

    Fe(II)-bearing minerals (e.g., biotite, chlorite, and pyrite) are a promising reducing agent for the consumption of atmospheric oxygen in repositories for the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste. To estimate effective diffusion coefficients (De, in m2 s- 1) for dissolved oxygen (DO) and the reaction rates for the oxidation of Fe(II)-bearing minerals in a repository environment, we conducted diffusion-chemical reaction experiments using intact rock samples of Mizunami sedimentary rock. In addition, we conducted batch experiments on the oxidation of crushed sedimentary rock by DO in a closed system. From the results of the diffusion-chemical reaction experiments, we estimated the values of De for DO to lie within the range 2.69 × 10- 11 < De < 6.30 × 10- 11. Values of the second-order rate constant (k, in L mol-1 s- 1) were in the range - 3.66 < log k < - 2.83 (from batch experiments) and in the range - 3.87 < log k < - 2.22 (from diffusion-chemical reaction experiments). Many of these values are within the range of previously published rates for reaction between O2(aq) and Fe(II) surface complexes. The average value for the total concentration of reactive sites was about 10- 4 mol m- 2 from batch experiments. In contrast, the value of reactive sites estimated from the physical surface area was about 10- 8 mol m- 2, indicating that the reaction within intact rock is limited to the sites that originally existed with accessible porosity for O2(aq). This difference arises because the batch experiments used powdered samples, meaning that new sites which formed during milling were added to the original reaction sites. On the basis of these observations and interpretations, diffusion-chemical reaction experiments make it possible to determine the values of the kinetic parameter and diffusivity for an intact rock sample simultaneously.

  12. Dissolved oxygen conditions in northern Gulf of Mexico estuaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engle, V.D.; Kevin, Summers J.; Macauley, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Because deficient dissolved oxygen (DO) levels may have severe detrimental effects on estuarine and marine life, DO has been widely used as an indicator of ecological conditions by environmental monitoring programs. The U.S. EPA's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program for Estuaries (EMAP-E) monitored DO conditions in the estuaries of the Gulf of Mexico from 1991 to 1994. DO was measured in two ways: 1)instantaneous profiles from the surface to the bottom were taken during the day, and 2) continuous measurements were taken near the bottom at 15 min intervals for at least 12 h. This information was summarized to assess the spatial distribution and severity of DO conditions in these estuaries. Depending on the criteria used to define hypoxia (DO concentrations usually < 2 mg L-1 or 15 mg L-1) and the method by which DO is measured, we estimate that between 5.2 and 29.3% of the total estuarine area in the Louisianian Province was affected by low DO conditions.

  13. Dissolved oxygen in lower Hudson Estuary: 1978--93

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, J.F.; Simpson, H.J.; Bopp, R.F.; Deck, B.L.

    1995-10-01

    During summer months, dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations in the lower Hudson estuary were usually lower than atmospheric equilibrium values. Distributions of DO along the axis of the estuary can be described by three general characteristics. Firstly, surface and bottom values lie on a single trend when plotted against salinity. Secondly, maximum DO concentrations were observed 50--75 km upstream of Manhattan at salinities off 5--15 ppt. Thirdly, the lowest DO concentrations were observed near Manhattan, New York, at salinities of 15--25 ppt and vary systematically with freshwater discharge rate. Minimum DO concentrations during times of similar freshwater discharge were substantially lower for water samples collected between 1978 and 1984 than for those collected between 1989 and 1993. These two periods were also distinguished by occurrences of intense phytoplankton blooms that produced supersaturated DO concentrations at salinities of 5--15 ppt for the period of 1989 to 1993. The increase in the minimum DO concentration in the water near Manhattan is probably in response to improved wastewater treatment at Passaic Valley, NJ; North River, NY; and other wastewater-treatment facilities.

  14. Vertical distribution of triple oxygen isotopic composition of dissolved oxygen in the northwestern Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Osamu; Honda, Makio; Saino, Toshiro

    2013-04-01

    Oxygen-17 excess of dissolved oxygen calculated from δ18O and δ17O is not affected by oxygen consumption process but controlled only by processes of primary production and air-water gas transfer. Evaluating gross primary productivity using the 17O-excess in ocean surface water are one of the most advanced geochemical researches for last 10 years. Oxygen-17 excess below ocean mixed/photic layer has not been much investigated because it might be out of focus for estimating present primary productivity, except for the purpose to correct diapycnal mixing effect on surface water. In principle, water mass which has not been affected both by photosynthesis and gas transfer after its separation from ocean surface could preserve 17O-excess value where the water mass was at the surface. The purpose of this study is to determine the vertical distribution of 17O-excess from the surface to the bottom of northwestern Pacific to know whether 17O-excess could really preserve its "original" value after the long and dark travel. Near stations K2 and KNOT, water mass which has a density of 26.8 ?? is observed at depth between 100 and 300 m. This water mass is mainly originated from bottom water in the Okhotsk Sea and spreading widely to entire northwestern Pacific, which is called North Pacific Intermediate Water (NPIW). NPIW is found at depth of 700 m at station S1. Samplings were conducted by two R/V Mirai cruises (MR10-06, Oct-Nov 2010; MR11-02, Feb-Mar 2011). Dissolved oxygen gas was purified by the method of Sarma et al. (2003) and its isotopic composition was determined by dual-inlet isotope ratio mass spectrometer (Thermo Scientific Delta Plus). Gross primary productivities at mixed layer estimated by 17O-excess were well consistent with those by conventional light and dark bottle incubations for stations K2 and S1.

  15. Diurnal variations in, and influences on, concentrations of particulate and dissolved arsenic and metals in the mildly alkaline Wallkill River, New Jersey, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barringer, J.L.; Wilson, T.P.; Szabo, Z.; Bonin, J.L.; Fischer, J.M.; Smith, N.P.

    2008-01-01

    Diurnal variations in particulate and dissolved As and metal concentrations were observed in mildly alkaline water from a wetlands site on the Wallkill River in northwestern New Jersey. The site, underlain by glacial sediments over dolomite bedrock, is 10 km downstream from a mined area of the Franklin Marble, host to Zn ores, also As and Mn minerals. In mid-September 2005, maxima and minima in dissolved-oxygen-concentration and pH, typically caused by photosynthesis and respiration, occurred at 2000 and 0800 hours. Concentrations of dissolved As (1.52-1.95 ??g/L) peaked at dusk (2000 hours), whereas dissolved Mn and Zn concentrations (76.5-96.9 and 8.55-12.8 ??g/L, respectively) were lowest at dusk and peaked at 1000 hours. These opposing cycles probably reflect sorption and desorption of As (an anion), and Mn and Zn (cations) as pH varied throughout the 24-h period. Doubly-peaked cycles of B, Cl, SO4, and nutrients also were observed; these may result from upstream discharges of septic-system effluent. Both recoverable amd particulate Al, Fe, Mn, and Zn concentrations peaked between 0200 and 0600 hours. The particulate metals cycle, with perturbations at 0400 hours, may be influenced by biological activity. ?? 2007 Springer-Verlag.

  16. Regulatory approaches for addressing dissolved oxygen concerns at hydropower facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Mark J.; Cada, Glenn F.; Sale, Michael J.; Eddlemon, Gerald K.

    2003-03-01

    Low dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations are a common water quality problem downstream of hydropower facilities. At some facilities, structural improvements (e.g. installation of weir dams or aerating turbines) or operational changes (e.g., spilling water over the dam) can be made to improve DO levels. In other cases, structural and operational approaches are too costly for the project to implement or are likely to be of limited effectiveness. Despite improvements in overall water quality below dams in recent years, many hydropower projects are unable to meet state water quality standards for DO. Regulatory agencies in the U.S. are considering or implementing dramatic changes in their approach to protecting the quality of the Nation’s waters. New policies and initiatives have emphasized flexibility, increased collaboration and shared responsibility among all parties, and market-based, economic incentives. The use of new regulatory approaches may now be a viable option for addressing the DO problem at some hydropower facilities. This report summarizes some of the regulatory-related options available to hydropower projects, including negotiation of site-specific water quality criteria, use of biological monitoring, watershed-based strategies for the management of water quality, and watershed-based trading. Key decision points center on the health of the local biological communities and whether there are contributing impacts (i.e., other sources of low DO effluents) in the watershed. If the biological communities downstream of the hydropower project are healthy, negotiation for site-specific water quality standards or biocriteria (discharge performance criteria based on characteristics of the aquatic biota) might be pursued. If there are other effluent dischargers in the watershed that contribute to low DO problems, watershed-scale strategies and effluent trading may be effective. This report examines the value of regulatory approaches by reviewing their use in

  17. Dissolved-oxygen regimen of the Willamette River, Oregon, under conditions of basinwide secondary treatment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hines, Walter G.; McKenzie, S.W.; Rickert, D.A.; Rinella, F.A.

    1977-01-01

    For nearly half a century the Willamette River in Oregon experienced severe dissolved-oxygen problems related to large loads of organically rich waste waters from industries and municipalities. Since the mid-1950 's dissolved oxygen quality has gradually improved owing to low-flow augmentation, the achievement of basinwide secondary treatment, and the use of other waste-management practices. As a result, summer dissolved-oxygen levels have increased, salmon runs have returned, and the overall effort is widely regarded as a singular water-quality success. To document the improved dissolved-oxygen regimen, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted intensive studies of the Willamette during the summer low-flow seasons of 1973 and 1974. During each summer the mean daily dissolved-oxygen levels were found to be higher than 5 milligrams per liter throughout the river. Because of the basinwide secondary treatment, carbonaceous deoxygenation rates were low. In addition, almost half of the biochemical oxygen demand entering the Willamette was from diffuse (nonpoint) sources rather than outfalls. These results indicated that point-source biochemical oxygen demand was no longer the primary cause of dissolved-oxygen depletion. Instead, the major causes of deoxygenation were nitrification in a shallow ' surface active ' reach below Salem and an anomalous oxygen demand (believed to be primarily of benthal origin) in Portland Harbor. (Woodard-USGS)

  18. Oxygen electrodes for rechargeable alkaline fuel cells-II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swette, L.; Kackley, N.

    1989-01-01

    The primary objective of this program is the investigation and development of electrocatalysts and supports for the positive electrode of moderate temperature single-unit rechargeable alkaline fuel cells. Approximately six support materials and five catalyst materials have been identified to date for further development.

  19. Oxygen electrodes for rechargeable alkaline fuel cells, 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swette, L.; Kackley, N.; Mccatty, S. A.

    1991-01-01

    The investigation and development of electrocatalysts and supports for the positive electrode of moderate temperature single unit rechargeable alkaline fuel cells is described. Focus is on chemical and electrochemical stability and O2 reduction/evolution activity of the electrode in question.

  20. Oxygen electrodes for rechargeable alkaline fuel cells. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swette, L.; Kackley, N.

    1990-01-01

    The primary objective of this program is the investigation and development of electrocatalysts and supports for the positive electrode of moderate temperature, single-unit, rechargeable alkaline fuel cells. Approximately six support materials and five catalyst materials have been identified to date for further development.

  1. A study of trends in dissolved oxygen and fecal coliform bacteria at NASQAN stations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Richard A.; Alexander, Richard B.

    1982-01-01

    Most stations in the U.S. Geological Survey's National Stream Quality Accounting Network show no significant trend in either dissolved oxygen concentration or fecal coliform bacteria population for the period October 1974. through October 1981. Of the stations which do show trends, however, most show improved water quality: thirty-one of a total of 276 stations show rising dissolved oxygen concentrations, while only 17 show decreasing concentrations. Decreases in fecal coliform populations have occurred at 21 stations while increases have occurred at only 12 stations. Approximately half of the stations showing improving trends in dissolved oxygen and fecal coliform bacteria are in the Missouri-Mississippi-Ohio River system. Decreases in dissolved oxygen have occurred at scattered locations in the Western and South-Central States. Rising bacterial populations occur most frequently in the Eastern and Central States Trends in dissolved oxygen concentration resulting from temperature changes occurring during the study period can be separated from trends caused by chemical or biological processes by analyzing computed values of dissolved oxygen deficit. About half of the observed trends in dissolved oxygen appear to be the result of changes in water temperature.

  2. Fiber-optic dissolved oxygen and dissolved carbon dioxide sensors using fluorophores encapsulated in sol gel matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyeog-Chan

    Fiber optic chemical sensors (FOCS) for oxygen, dissolved oxygen (DO), and dissolved CO2 sensing using thin films of fluorophores encapsulated in sol-gel matrices were made and tested. The DO/O2 sensor used ruthenium(II) tris(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline) perchlorate (Ru(Ph 2Phen)Cl2) as the oxygen sensitive fluorophore and methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMS) sol-gel as the encapsulating matrix material. For the DCO2 sensor, 8-hydroxy-1,3,6-pyrenetrisulfonic acid trisodium salt (HPTS) co-doped with sodium bicarbonate was used as the DCO2 sensitive fluorophore-chemical system and diisobutoxy-alumino triethoxysilane (ASE) sol-gel was used as the encapsulating matrix material. It was found that oxygen quenches the excited state Ru(Ph2Phen)Cl 2 by diffusing through the MTMS matrix. Continuous excitation of Ru(Ph 2Phen)Cl2 during MTMS drying resulted in long, single exponential lifetimes of the metal complex and increased sensor sensitivity. When the sensor was field tested, it was found to have an excellent match compared to conventional titration method for determining dissolved oxygen concentrations and had fast response times. It was determined that this sensor measured the vapor pressure of oxygen rather than the absolute concentration of dissolved oxygen. For DCO2 sensing, it was found that the dynamic response of the senor could be tuned by varying the HPTS to NaHCO3 ratios. The sensor had fast response times compared to other fiber optic DCO 2 sensors reported which typically have response times of minutes.

  3. Measurement and interpretation of low levels of dissolved oxygen in ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, A.F.; Peterson, M.L.; Solbau, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    A Rhodazine-D colorimetric technique was adapted to measure low-level dissolved oxygen concentrations in ground water. Prepared samples containing between 0 and 8.0 ??moles L-1 dissolved oxygen in equilibrium with known gas mixtures produced linear spectrophotometric absorbance with a lower detection limit of 0.2 ??moles L-1. Excellent reproducibility was found for solutions ranging in composition from deionized water to sea water with chemical interferences detected only for easily reduced metal species such as ferric ion, cupric ion, and hexavalent chromium. Such effects were correctable based on parallel reaction stoichiometries relative to oxygen. The technique, coupled with a downhole wire line tool, permitted low-level monitoring of dissolved oxygen in wells at the selenium-contaminated Kesterson Reservoir in California. Results indicated a close association between low but measurable dissolved oxygen concentrations and mobility of oxidized forms of selenium. -from Authors

  4. Chesapeake Bay dissolved oxygen goal for restoration of living resource habitats. Reevaluation report No. 7C

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, S.; Stenger, C.; Olson, M.; Batiuk, R.; Mountford, K.

    1992-12-01

    Section I provides an introduction, including background on the need for developing this document, report objectives, and a brief summary of characteristics of dissolved oxygen in Chesapeake Bay. Sections II and III in the document establish and defend a dissolved oxygen restoration goal for Chesapeake Bay, based on extensive analysis and evaluation of research data. Section IV provides applications of the Goal and target concentrations to monitoring and modeling information. This section explains the relationships developed and how to use them to evaluate present and projected dissolved oxygen conditions in the Bay and its tributaries. Appendix B contains further details of the statistical approach used in this analysis.

  5. Climatological variations of total alkalinity and total dissolved inorganic carbon in the Mediterranean Sea surface waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemayel, E.; Hassoun, A. E. R.; Benallal, M. A.; Goyet, C.; Rivaro, P.; Abboud-Abi Saab, M.; Krasakopoulou, E.; Touratier, F.; Ziveri, P.

    2015-12-01

    A compilation of data from several cruises between 1998 and 2013 was used to derive polynomial fits that estimate total alkalinity (AT) and total dissolved inorganic carbon (CT) from measurements of salinity and temperature in the Mediterranean Sea surface waters. The optimal equations were chosen based on the 10-fold cross-validation results and revealed that second- and third-order polynomials fit the AT and CT data respectively. The AT surface fit yielded a root mean square error (RMSE) of ± 10.6 μmol kg-1, and salinity and temperature contribute to 96 % of the variability. Furthermore, we present the first annual mean CT parameterization for the Mediterranean Sea surface waters with a RMSE of ± 14.3 μmol kg-1. Excluding the marginal seas of the Adriatic and the Aegean, these equations can be used to estimate AT and CT in case of the lack of measurements. The identified empirical equations were applied on the 0.25° climatologies of temperature and salinity, available from the World Ocean Atlas 2013. The 7-year averages (2005-2012) showed that AT and CT have similar patterns with an increasing eastward gradient. The variability is influenced by the inflow of cold Atlantic waters through the Strait of Gibraltar and by the oligotrophic and thermohaline gradient that characterize the Mediterranean Sea. The summer-winter seasonality was also mapped and showed different patterns for AT and CT. During the winter, the AT and CT concentrations were higher in the western than in the eastern basin. The opposite was observed in the summer where the eastern basin was marked by higher AT and CT concentrations than in winter. The strong evaporation that takes place in this season along with the ultra-oligotrophy of the eastern basin determines the increase of both AT and CT concentrations.

  6. Numerical Simulation of Salinity and Dissolved Oxygen at Perdido Bay and Adjacent Coastal Ocean

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental Fluid Dynamic Code (EFDC), a numerical estuarine and coastal ocean circulation hydrodynamic model, was used to simulate the distribution of the salinity, temperature, nutrients and dissolved oxygen (DO) in Perdido Bay and adjacent Gulf of Mexico. External forcing fa...

  7. Evaluation of sampling strategies to characterize dissolved oxygen conditions in northern Gulf of Mexico estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, J.K.; Engle, V.D.

    1993-01-01

    Dissolved oxygen was continuously monitored in eight sites of northern Gulf of Mexico estuaries in August, 1990. Monte Carlo analyses on subsamples of the data were used to evaluate several commonly used monitoring strategies. Monitoring strategies which involve single point sampling of dissolved oxygen may often misclassify an estuary as having good water quality. In the case of shallow, often well-mixed estuaries that experience diurnal cycles, such monitoring often does not occur at night, during the time of lowest dissolved oxygen concentration. The authors' objective was to determine the minimum sampling effort required to correctly classify a site in terms of the observed frequency of hypoxia. Tests concluded that the most successful classification strategy used the minimum dissolved oxygen concentration from a continuously sampled 24-hour period. (Copyright (c) 199e Kluwer Academic Publishers.)

  8. Evaluation of sampling strategies to characterize dissolved oxygen conditions in northern Gulf of Mexico estuaries.

    PubMed

    Summers, J K; Engle, V D

    1993-02-01

    Dissolved oxygen was continuously monitored in eight sites of northern Gulf of Mexico estuaries in August, 1990. Monte Carlo analyses on subsamples of the data were used to evaluate several commonly used monitoring strategies. Monitoring strategies which involve single point sampling of dissolved oxygen may often misclassify an estuary as having good water quality. In the case of shallow, often well-mixed estuaries that experience diurnal cycles, such monitoring often does not occur at night, during the time of lowest dissolved oxygen concentration. Our objective was to determine the minimum sampling effort required to correctly classify a site in terms of the observed frequency of hypoxia. Tests concluded that the most successful classification strategy used the minimum dissolved oxygen concentration from a continuously sampled 24-hour period.

  9. Field comparison of optical and clark cell dissolved-oxygen sensors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulford, J.M.; Davies, W.J.; Garcia, L.

    2005-01-01

    Three multi-parameter water-quality monitors equipped with either Clark cell type or optical type dissolved-oxygen sensors were deployed for 30 days in a brackish (salinity <10 parts per thousand) environment to determine the sensitivity of the sensors to biofouling. The dissolved-oxygen sensors compared periodically to a hand-held dissolved oxygen sensor, but were not serviced or cleaned during the deployment. One of the Clark cell sensors and the optical sensor performed similarly during the deployment. The remaining Clark cell sensor was not aged correctly prior to deployment and did not perform as well as the other sensors. All sensors experienced substantial biofouling that gradually degraded the accuracy of the dissolved-oxygen measurement during the last half of the deployment period. Copyright ASCE 2005.

  10. Effects of dissolved oxygen on electrochemical and semiconductor properties of 316L stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhicao; Cheng, Xuequn; Dong, Chaofang; Xu, Lin; Li, Xiaogang

    2010-12-01

    The effects of dissolved oxygen on the electrochemical behavior and semiconductor properties of passive film formed on 316L SS in three solutions with different dissolved oxygen were studied by using polarization curve, Mott-Schottky analysis and the point defect model (PDM). The results show that higher dissolved oxygen accelerates both anodic and cathodic process. Based on Mott-Schottky analysis and PDM, the key parameters for passive film, donor density Nd, flat-band potential Efb and diffusivity of defects D0 were calculated. The results display that Nd(1-7 × 10 27 m -3) and D0(1-18 × 10 -16 cm 2/s) increase and Efb value reduces with the dissolved oxygen in solution.

  11. Dissolved oxygen and pH relationships in northern Australian mangrove waterways

    SciTech Connect

    Boto, K.G.; Bunt, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    Consistent, highly significant linear correlations (R2 greater than or equal to 0.8) between pH and dissolved oxygen levels have been found in northern Australian mangrove waterways. These properties seem to be influenced by dissolved organic matter, mainly polyphenolic compounds, present in the creeks and tidal channel waters.

  12. An Optical Oxygen Sensor for Long-Term Continuous Monitoring of Dissolved Oxygen in Perfused Bioreactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, F. G.; Jeevarajan, A. S.; Anderson, M. M.

    2002-01-01

    For long-term growth of man1ITlalian cells in perfused bioreactors, it is essential to monitor the concentration of dissolved oxygen (DO) present in the culture medium to quantitate and control level of DO. Continuous measurement of the amount of DO in the cell culture medium in-line under sterile conditions in NASA's perfused bioreactor requires that the oxygen sensor provide increased sensitivity and be sterilizable and nontoxic. Additionally, long-term cell culture experiments require that the calibration be maintained several weeks or months. Although there are a number of sensors for dissolved oxygen on the market and under development elsewhere, very few meet these stringent conditions. An optical oxygen sensor (BOXY) based on dynamic fluorescent quenching and a pulsed blue LED light source was developed in our laboratory to address these requirements. Tris( 4,7 -diphenyl-l, 1 O-phenanthroline )ruthenium(II) chloride is employed as the fluorescent dye indicator. The sensing element consists of a glass capillary (OD 4.0 mm; ID 2.0 mm) coated internally with a thin layer of the fluorescent dye in silicone matrix and overlayed with a black shielding layer. Irradiation of the sensing element with blue light (blue LED with emission maximum at 475 nm) generates a red fluorescence centered at 626 nm. The fluorescence intensity is correlated to the concentration of DO present in the culture medium, following the modified non-linear Stern-Volmer equation. By using a pulsed irradiating light source, the problem of dye-bleaching, which is often encountered in long-term continuous measurements of tIns type, 'is minimized. To date we achieved sensor resolution of 0.3 mmHg at 50 mmHg p02, and 0.6 mmHg at 100 mmHg p02, with a response time of about one minute. Calibration was accomplished in sterile phosphate-buffered saline with a blood-gas analyzer (BGA) measurement as reference. Stand-alone software was also developed to control the sensor and bioreactor as well as to

  13. Influence of dissolved oxygen levels on production of L-asparaginase and prodigiosin by Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, B; Howard, A J; Palocz, H J

    1970-05-01

    The effect of dissolved oxygen concentrations on the behavior of Serratia marcescens and on yields of asparaginase and prodigiosin produced in shaken cultures and in a 55-liter stainless-steel fermentor was studied. A range of oxygen transfer rates was obtained in 500-ml Erlenmeyer flasks by using internal, stainless-steel baffles and by varying the volume of medium per flask, and in the fermentor by high speed agitation (375 rev/min) or low rates of aeration (1.5 volumes of air per volume of broth per min), or both. Dissolved oxygen levels in the fermentation medium were measured with a membrane-type electrode. Peak yields of asparaginase were obtained in unbaffled flasks (3.0 to 3.8 IU/ml) and in the fermentor (2.7 IU/ml) when the level of dissolved oxygen in the culture medium reached zero. A low rate of oxygen transfer was accomplished by limited aeration. Production of prodigiosin required a supply of dissolved oxygen that was obtainable in baffled flasks with a high rate of oxygen transfer and in the fermentor with a combination of high-speed agitation and low-rate aeration. The fermentation proceeded at a more rapid rate and changes in pH and cell populations were accelerated by maintaining high levels of dissolved oxygen in the growth medium.

  14. Techniques for the conversion to carbon dioxide of oxygen from dissolved sulfate in thermal waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nehring, N.L.; Bowen, P.A.; Truesdell, A.H.

    1977-01-01

    The fractionation of oxygen isotopes between dissolved sulfate ions and water provides a useful geothermometer for geothermal waters. The oxygen isotope composition of dissolved sulfate may also be used to indicate the source of the sulfate and processes of formation. The methods described here for separation, purification and reduction of sulfate to prepare carbon dioxide for mass spectrometric analysis are modifications of methods by Rafter (1967), Mizutani (1971), Sakai and Krouse (1971), and Mizutani and Rafter (1969). ?? 1976.

  15. Simulation of hydrodynamics, temperature, and dissolved oxygen in Beaver Lake, Arkansas, 1994-1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haggard, Brian; Green, W. Reed

    2002-01-01

    The tailwaters of Beaver Lake and other White River reservoirs support a cold-water trout fishery of significant economic yield in northwestern Arkansas. The Arkansas Game and Fish Commission has requested an increase in existing minimum flows through the Beaver Lake dam to increase the amount of fishable waters downstream. Information is needed to assess the impact of additional minimum flows on temperature and dissolved-oxygen qualities of reservoir water above the dam and the release water. A two-dimensional, laterally averaged hydrodynamic, thermal and dissolved-oxygen model was developed and calibrated for Beaver Lake, Arkansas. The model simulates surface-water elevation, currents, heat transport and dissolved-oxygen dynamics. The model was developed to assess the impacts of proposed increases in minimum flows from 1.76 cubic meters per second (the existing minimum flow) to 3.85 cubic meters per second (the additional minimum flow). Simulations included assessing (1) the impact of additional minimum flows on tailwater temperature and dissolved-oxygen quality and (2) increasing initial water-surface elevation 0.5 meter and assessing the impact of additional minimum flow on tailwater temperatures and dissolved-oxygen concentrations. The additional minimum flow simulation (without increasing initial pool elevation) appeared to increase the water temperature (<0.9 degrees Celsius) and decrease dissolved oxygen concentration (<2.2 milligrams per liter) in the outflow discharge. Conversely, the additional minimum flow plus initial increase in pool elevation (0.5 meter) simulation appeared to decrease outflow water temperature (0.5 degrees Celsius) and increase dissolved oxygen concentration (<1.2 milligrams per liter) through time. However, results from both minimum flow scenarios for both water temperature and dissolved oxygen concentration were within the boundaries or similar to the error between measured and simulated water column profile values.

  16. Measuring Spatial and Temporal Heterogeneity of Dissolved Oxygen in Streambed Sediments Using Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, K. T.; Salus, A.; Xie, M.; Roche, K. R.; Packman, A. I.

    2014-12-01

    Pressure sensitive paints (PSP) have been largely used in aerodynamic applications to measure pressure distributions on complex bodies such as aircraft. One common family of PSPs employ fluorescent pigments that are quenched in the presence of oxygen, yielding an inverse relationship between fluorescence intensity and oxygen concentration that is used to measure pressure in aerodynamic applications through the partial pressure of oxygen. These PSPs offer unexplored potential for visualizing dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration distributions on surfaces underwater. PSP was used to measure dissolved oxygen concentrations in streambed sediments in a laboratory flume. Two PSP-coated 2.5 cm diameter spheres were emplaced in a bed of similar material, and imaged under varying DO concentrations. Calibration curves relating fluorescence intensity to dissolved oxygen concentration were developed on a pixel-by-pixel basis, enabling spatial patterns of oxygen to be resolved in the sediment bed. This method of measuring dissolved oxygen concentration is advantageous because of its fast response time and ability to measure heterogeneous oxygen distributions in sediments. Future work will explore the combined effects of stream flow and biofilm growth on oxygen distributions in streambed sediments.

  17. A New Optical Oxygen Sensor Reveals Spatial and Temporal Variations of Dissolved Oxygen at Ecohydrological Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, T.; Schmidt, C.; Fleckenstein, J. H.; Vieweg, M.; Harjung, A.

    2015-12-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of dissolved oxygen (DO) at highly reactive aquatic interfaces, e.g. in the hyporheic zone (HZ), is a primary indicator of redox and interlinked biogeochemical zonations. However, continuous measuring of DO over time and depths is challenging due to the dynamic and potentially heterogenic nature of the HZ. We further developed a novel technology for spatially continuous in situ vertical oxygen profiling based on optical sensing (Vieweg et al, 2013). Continuous vertical measurements to a depth of 50 cm are obtained by the motor-controlled insertion of a side-firing Polymer Optical Fiber (POF) into tubular DO probes. Our technology allows minimally invasive DO measurements without DO consumption at high spatial resolution in the mm range. The reduced size of the tubular probe (diameter 5 mm) substantially minimizes disturbance of flow conditions. We tested our technology in situ in the HZ of an intermittent stream during the drying period. Repeated DO measurements were taken over a total duration of six weeks at two locations up- and downstream of a pool-cascade sequence. We were able to precisely map the spatial DO distribution which exhibited sharp gradients and rapid temporal changes as a function of changing hydrologic conditions. Our new vertical oxygen sensing technology will help to provide new insights to the coupling of transport of DO and biogeochemical reactions at aquatic interfaces. Vieweg, M., Trauth, N., Fleckenstein, J. H., Schmidt, C. (2013): Robust Optode-Based Method for Measuring in Situ Oxygen Profiles in Gravelly Streambeds. Environmental Science & Technology. doi:10.1021/es401040w

  18. Refining the Use of Sodium Azide to Counteract Nitrite Interference in Dissolved Oxygen Analysis of Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    High nitrite concentrations are known to interfere with the analysis of dissolved oxygen in seawater samples, though the affected range has yet to be defined. This error can be counteracted by the addition of sodium azide to the hydroxide-iodide pickling reagent. The 2013 US GEOTRACES zonal transect included stations off the coast of Peru with nitrite values up to 10μmol/kg in the upper 400 meters of the water column. Low concentrations of dissolved oxygen were also present in the upper 800 meters, providing an opportunity to study the effect of high nitrite levels on dissolved oxygen analysis over a range of concentrations. Without the addition of azide, the error in dissolved oxygen measurement increased linearly with nitrite concentration. The interference was only significant in samples with nitrite concentrations higher than 1.5 μmol/kg, all of which also had low dissolved oxygen concentrations (<45μmol/kg). The unique combination of high nitrite and low dissolved oxygen is present in such well known and relatively small areas of the world's oceans that the addition of azide is not necessary as a standard procedure for the vast majority of oceanographic measurements.

  19. Storage/Turnover rate of inorganic carbon and its dissolvable part in the profile of saline/alkaline soils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yugang; Wang, Zhongyuan; Li, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Soil inorganic carbon is the most common form of carbon in arid and semiarid regions, and has a very long turnover time. However, little is known about dissolved inorganic carbon storage and its turnover time in these soils. With 81 soil samples taken from 6 profiles in the southern Gurbantongute Desert, China, we investigated the soil inorganic carbon (SIC) and the soil dissolved inorganic carbon (SDIC) in whole profiles of saline and alkaline soils by analyzing their contents and ages with radiocarbon dating. The results showed that there is considerable SDIC content in SIC, and the variations of SDIC and SIC contents in the saline soil profile were much larger than that in the alkaline profile. SDIC storage accounted for more than 20% of SIC storage, indicating that more than 1/5 of the inorganic carbon in both saline and alkaline soil is not in non-leachable forms. Deep layer soil contains considerable inorganic carbon, with more than 80% of the soil carbon stored below 1 m, whether for SDIC or SIC. More importantly, SDIC ages were much younger than SIC in both saline soil and alkaline soil. The input rate of SDIC and SIC ranged from 7.58 to 29.54 g C m(-2) yr(-1) and 1.34 to 5.33 g C m(-2) yr(-1) respectively for saline soil, and from 1.43 to 4.9 g C m(-2) yr(-1) and 0.79 to 1.27 g C m(-2) yr(-1)respectively for alkaline soil. The comparison of SDIC and SIC residence time showed that using soil inorganic carbon to estimate soil carbon turnover would obscure an important fraction that contributes to the modern carbon cycle: namely the shorter residence and higher input rate of SDIC. This is especially true for SDIC in deep layers of the soil profile.

  20. Storage/Turnover Rate of Inorganic Carbon and Its Dissolvable Part in the Profile of Saline/Alkaline Soils

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yugang; Wang, Zhongyuan; Li, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Soil inorganic carbon is the most common form of carbon in arid and semiarid regions, and has a very long turnover time. However, little is known about dissolved inorganic carbon storage and its turnover time in these soils. With 81 soil samples taken from 6 profiles in the southern Gurbantongute Desert, China, we investigated the soil inorganic carbon (SIC) and the soil dissolved inorganic carbon (SDIC) in whole profiles of saline and alkaline soils by analyzing their contents and ages with radiocarbon dating. The results showed that there is considerable SDIC content in SIC, and the variations of SDIC and SIC contents in the saline soil profile were much larger than that in the alkaline profile. SDIC storage accounted for more than 20% of SIC storage, indicating that more than 1/5 of the inorganic carbon in both saline and alkaline soil is not in non-leachable forms. Deep layer soil contains considerable inorganic carbon, with more than 80% of the soil carbon stored below 1 m, whether for SDIC or SIC. More importantly, SDIC ages were much younger than SIC in both saline soil and alkaline soil. The input rate of SDIC and SIC ranged from 7.58 to 29.54 g C m-2 yr-1 and 1.34 to 5.33 g C m-2 yr-1 respectively for saline soil, and from 1.43 to 4.9 g C m-2 yr-1 and 0.79 to 1.27 g C m-2 yr-1respectively for alkaline soil. The comparison of SDIC and SIC residence time showed that using soil inorganic carbon to estimate soil carbon turnover would obscure an important fraction that contributes to the modern carbon cycle: namely the shorter residence and higher input rate of SDIC. This is especially true for SDIC in deep layers of the soil profile. PMID:24312399

  1. Effects of Environmental Oxygen Content and Dissolved Oxygen on the Surface Tension and Viscosity of Liquid Nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SanSoucie, M. P.; Rogers, J. R.; Kumar, V.; Rodriguez, J.; Xiao, X.; Matson, D. M.

    2016-07-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's electrostatic levitation (ESL) laboratory has recently added an oxygen partial pressure controller. This system allows the oxygen partial pressure within the vacuum chamber to be measured and controlled in the range from approximately 10^{-28} {to} 10^{-9} bar, while in a vacuum atmosphere. The oxygen control system installed in the ESL laboratory's main chamber consists of an oxygen sensor, oxygen pump, and a control unit. The sensor is a potentiometric device that determines the difference in oxygen activity in two gas compartments (inside the chamber and the air outside of the chamber) separated by an electrolyte. The pump utilizes coulometric titration to either add or remove oxygen. The system is controlled by a desktop control unit, which can also be accessed via a computer. The controller performs temperature control for the sensor and pump, has a PID-based current loop and a control algorithm. Oxygen partial pressure has been shown to play a significant role in the surface tension of liquid metals. Oxide films or dissolved oxygen may lead to significant changes in surface tension. The effects on surface tension and viscosity by oxygen partial pressure in the surrounding environment and the melt dissolved oxygen content will be evaluated, and the results will be presented. The surface tension and viscosity will be measured at several different oxygen partial pressures while the sample is undercooled. Surface tension and viscosity will be measured using the oscillating droplet method.

  2. Evaluation parameters for the alkaline fuel cell oxygen electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, J.; Srinivasan, V.

    1985-01-01

    Studies were made of Pt- and Au-catalyzed porous electrodes, designed for the cathode of the alkaline H2/O2 fuel cell, employing cyclic voltammetry and the floating half-cell method. The purpose was to obtain parameters from the cyclic voltammograms which could predict performance in the fuel cell. It was found that a satisfactory relationship between these two types of measurement could not be established; however, useful observations were made of relative performance of several types of carbon used as supports for noble metal catalysts and of some Au catalysts. The best half-cell performance with H2/O2 in a 35 percent KOH electrolyte at 80 C was given by unsupported fine particle Au on Teflon; this electrode is used in the Orbiter fuel cell.

  3. Watershed modeling of dissolved oxygen and biochemical oxygen demand using a hydrological simulation Fortran program.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhijun; Kieffer, Janna M; Kingery, William L; Huddleston, David H; Hossain, Faisal

    2007-11-01

    Several inland water bodies in the St. Louis Bay watershed have been identified as being potentially impaired due to low level of dissolved oxygen (DO). In order to calculate the total maximum daily loads (TMDL), a standard watershed model supported by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Hydrological Simulation Program Fortran (HSPF), was used to simulate water temperature, DO, and bio-chemical oxygen demand (BOD). Both point and non-point sources of BOD were included in watershed modeling. The developed model was calibrated at two time periods: 1978 to 1986 and 2000 to 2001 with simulated DO closely matched the observed data and captured the seasonal variations. The model represented the general trend and average condition of observed BOD. Water temperature and BOD decay are the major factors that affect DO simulation, whereas nutrient processes, including nitrification, denitrification, and phytoplankton cycle, have slight impacts. The calibrated water quality model provides a representative linkage between the sources of BOD and in-stream DO\\BOD concentrations. The developed input parameters in this research could be extended to similar coastal watersheds for TMDL determination and Best Management Practice (BMP) evaluation.

  4. Photochemistry of Dissolved Black Carbon Released from Biochar: Reactive Oxygen Species Generation and Phototransformation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Heyun; Liu, Huiting; Mao, Jingdong; Chu, Wenying; Li, Qilin; Alvarez, Pedro J J; Qu, Xiaolei; Zhu, Dongqiang

    2016-02-01

    Dissolved black carbon (BC) released from biochar can be one of the more photoactive components in the dissolved organic matter (DOM) pool. Dissolved BC was mainly composed of aliphatics and aromatics substituted by aromatic C-O and carboxyl/ester/quinone moieties as determined by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance. It underwent 56% loss of absorbance at 254 nm, almost complete loss of fluorescence, and 30% mineralization during a 169 h simulated sunlight exposure. Photoreactions preferentially targeted aromatic and methyl moieties, generating CH2/CH/C and carboxyl/ester/quinone functional groups. During irradiation, dissolved BC generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) including singlet oxygen and superoxide. The apparent quantum yield of singlet oxygen was 4.07 ± 0.19%, 2-3 fold higher than many well-studied DOM. Carbonyl-containing structures other than aromatic ketones were involved in the singlet oxygen sensitization. The generation of superoxide apparently depended on electron transfer reactions mediated by silica minerals in dissolved BC, in which phenolic structures served as electron donors. Self-generated ROS played an important role in the phototransformation. Photobleaching of dissolved BC decreased its ability to further generate ROS due to lower light absorption. These findings have significant implications on the environmental fate of dissolved BC and that of priority pollutants. PMID:26717492

  5. Patterns of dissolved oxygen dynamics in a Pacific Northwest slough and tide channel - CERF 2015

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pacific Northwest (PNW) estuaries and tide channels are habitats or migratory corridors for societally prized salmonids. These fish have high oxygen requirements, and an adequate level of dissolved oxygen is considered an important gauge of a PNW water body’s condition. W...

  6. Patterns of dissolved oxygen dynamics in a Pacific Northwest slough and tide channel.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pacific Northwest (PNW) estuaries and tide channels are habitats or migratory corridors for societally prized salmonids. These fish have high oxygen requirements, and an adequate level of dissolved oxygen is considered an important gauge of a PNW water body’s condition. W...

  7. Experimental study of dissolved oxygen transport by regular waves through a perforated breakwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zegao; Yu, Ning; Liang, Bingchen; Zeng, Jixiong; Xie, Shaohua

    2016-02-01

    The perforated breakwater is an environmentally friendly coastal structure, and dissolved oxygen concentration levels are an important index to denote water quality. In this paper, oxygen transport experiments with regular waves through a vertical perforated breakwater were conducted. The oxygen scavenger method was used to reduce the dissolved oxygen concentration of inner water body with the chemicals Na2SO3 and CoCl2. The dissolved oxygen concentration and wave parameters of 36 experimental scenarios were measured with different perforated arrangements and wave conditions. It was found that the oxygen transfer coefficient through wave surface, K1 a 1, is much lower than the oxygen transport coefficient through the perforated breakwater, K2 a 2. If the effect of K1 a 1 is not considered, the dissolved oxygen concentration computation for inner water body will not be greatly affected. Considering the effect of a permeable area ratio a, relative location parameter of perforations δ and wave period T, the aforementioned data of 30 experimental scenarios, the dimensional analysis and the least squares method were used to derive an equation of K2 a 2 (K2 a 2=0.0042 a 0.5 δ 0.2 T -1). It was validated with 6 other experimental scenarios data, which indicates an approximate agreement. Therefore, this equation can be used to compute the DO concentration caused by the water transport through perforated breakwater.

  8. Dissolved oxygen in the Tualatin River, Oregon, during winter flow conditions, 1991 and 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelly, V.J.

    1996-01-01

    Throughout the winter period, November through April, wastewater treatment plants in the Tualatin River Basin discharge from 10,000 to 15,000 pounds per day of biochemical oxygen demand to the river. These loads often increase substantially during storms when streamflow is high. During the early winter season, when streamflow is frequently less than the average winter flow, the treatment plants discharge about 2,000 pounds per day of ammonia. This study focused on the capacity of the Tualatin River to assimilat oxygen-demanding loads under winter streamflow conditions during the 1992 water year, with an emphasis on peak-flow conditions in the river, and winter-base-flow conditions during November 1992. Concentrations of dissolved oxygen throughout the main stem of the river during the winter remained generally high relative to the State standard for Oregon of 6 milligrams per liter. The most important factors controlling oxygen consumption during winter-low-flow conditions were carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand and input of oxygen-depleted waters from tributaries. During peak-flow conditions, reduced travel time and increased dilution associated with the increased streamflow minimized the effect of increased oxygen-demanding loads. During the base-flow period in November 1992, concentrations of dissolved oxygen were consistently below 6 milligrams per liter. A hydrodynamic water-quality model was used to identify the processes depleting dissolved oxygen, including sediment oxygen demand, nitrification, and carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand. Sediment oxygen demand was the most significant factor; nitrification was also important. Hypothetical scenarios were posed to evaluate the effect of different wastewater treatment plant loads during winter-base-flow conditions. Streamflow and temperature were significant factors governing concentrations of dissolved oxygen in the main-stem river.

  9. Simulation of hydrodynamics, temperature, and dissolved oxygen in Norfork Lake, Arkansas, 1994-1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Galloway, Joel M.; Green, W. Reed

    2002-01-01

    Outflow from Norfork Lake and other White River reservoirs support a cold-water trout fishery of significant economic yield in north-central Arkansas and south-central Missouri. The Arkansas Game and Fish Commission has requested an increase in existing minimum flows through the Norfork Lake dam to increase the amount of fishable waters downstream. Information is needed to assess the impact of increased minimum flows on temperature and dissolved-oxygen concentrations of reservoir water and the outflow. A two-dimensional, laterally averaged, hydrodynamic, temperature, and dissolved-oxygen model was developed and calibrated for Norfork Lake, located on the Arkansas-Missouri State line. The model simulates water-surface elevation, heat transport, and dissolved-oxygen dynamics. The model was developed to assess the impacts of proposed increases in minimum flow from 1.6 cubic meter per second (the existing minimum flow) to 8.5 cubic meters per second (the increased minimum flow). Simulations included assessing the impact of (1) increased minimum flows and (2) increased minimum flows with increased water-surface elevation of 1.1 meter in Norfork Lake on outflow temperatures and dissolved-oxygen concentrations. The increased minimum flow simulation (without increasing initial water-surface elevation) appeared to increase the water temperature and decrease dissolved-oxygen concentration in the outflow. Conversely, the increased minimum flow and initial increase in water-surface elevation (1.1 meter) simulation appeared to decrease outflow water temperature and increase dissolved-oxygen concentration through time. However, results from both scenarios for water temperature and dissolved-oxygen concentration were within the boundaries or similar to the error between measured and simulated water column profile values.

  10. Quantifying consumption rates of dissolved oxygen along bed forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boano, Fulvio; De Falco, Natalie; Arnon, Shai

    2016-04-01

    Streambed interfaces represent hotspots for nutrient transformations because they host different microbial species, and the evaluation of these reaction rates is important to assess the fate of nutrients in riverine environments. In this work we analyze a series of flume experiments on oxygen demand in dune-shaped hyporheic sediments under losing and gaining flow conditions. We employ a new modeling code to quantify oxygen consumption rates from observed vertical profiles of oxygen concentration. The code accounts for transport by molecular diffusion and water advection, and automatically determines the reaction rates that provide the best fit between observed and modeled concentration values. The results show that reaction rates are not uniformly distributed across the streambed, in agreement with the expected behavior predicted by hyporheic exchange theory. Oxygen consumption was found to be highly influenced by the presence of gaining or losing flow conditions, which controlled the delivery of labile DOC to streambed microorganisms.

  11. Effect of dissolved oxygen in alcoholic beverages and drinking water on alcohol elimination in humans.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Su-jin; Chae, Jung-woo; Song, Byung-jeong; Lee, Eun-sil; Kwon, Kwang-il

    2013-02-01

    Oxygen plays an important role in the metabolism of alcohol. An increased dissolved oxygen level in alcoholic beverages reportedly accelerates the elimination of alcohol. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of dissolved oxygen in alcohol and the supportive effect of oxygenated water on alcohol pharmacokinetics after the excessive consumption of alcohol, i.e., 540 ml of 19.5% alcohol (v/v). Fifteen healthy males were included in this randomized, 3 × 3 crossover study. Three combinations were tested: X, normal alcoholic beverage and normal water; Y, oxygenated alcoholic beverage and normal water; Z, oxygenated alcoholic beverage and oxygenated water. Blood alcohol concentrations (BACs) were determined by conversion of breath alcohol concentrations. Four pharmacokinetic parameters (C(max), T(max), K(el), and AUCall) were obtained using non-compartmental analysis and the times to reach 0.05% and 0.03% BAC (T(0.05%) and T(0.03%)) were compared using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan's post hoc test. With combination Z, the BAC decreased to 0.05% significantly faster (p < 0.05) than with combination X. Analyzing the pharmacokinetic parameters, the mean K(el) was significantly higher for combination Z than for combinations X and Y (p < 0.05), whereas the mean values of C(max), T(max) and AUCall did not differ significantly among the combinations. Dissolved oxygen in drinks accelerates the decrease in BAC after consuming a large amount of alcohol. However, the oxygen dissolved in the alcoholic beverage alone did not have a sufficient effect in this case. We postulate that highly oxygenated water augments the effect of oxygen in the alcoholic beverage in alcohol elimination. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the supportive effect of ingesting additional oxygenated water after heavy drinking of normal alcoholic beverages.

  12. Oxygen reduction reaction on stepped platinum surfaces in alkaline media.

    PubMed

    Rizo, Ruben; Herrero, Enrique; Feliu, Juan M

    2013-10-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in 0.1 M NaOH on platinum single crystal electrodes has been studied using hanging meniscus rotating disk electrode configuration. Basal planes and stepped surfaces with (111) and (100) terraces have been employed. The results indicate that the Pt(111) electrode has the highest electrocatalytic activity among all the studied surfaces. The addition of steps on this electrode surface significantly diminishes the reactivity of the surface towards the ORR. In fact, the reactivity of the steps on the surfaces with wide terraces can be considered negligible with respect to that measured for the terrace. On the other hand, Pt(100) and Pt(110) electrodes have much lower activity than the Pt(111) electrode. These results have been compared with those obtained in acid media to understand the effect of the pH and the adsorbed OH on the mechanism. It is proposed that the surface covered by adsorbed OH is active for the reduction of the oxygen molecules. PMID:23936903

  13. [Influence of the Concentration of Dissolved Oxygen on Embryonic Development of the Common Toad (Bufo bufo)].

    PubMed

    Dmitrieva, E V

    2015-01-01

    Several series of experiments investigating the influence of dissolved oxygen concentrations on the growth rates and mortality in the embryogenesis of the common toad Bufo bufo were carried out. The experiments showed that, when the eggs develop singly, the lack of oxygen does not lead to an increase in mortality by the time of hatching and results only in a change in the dynamics of mortality: mortality occurs at an earlier stage of development than in the conditions of normal access to oxygen. Taking into account the combined effect of the density of eggs and the dissolved oxygen concentration, we increase the accuracy of analysis of the experimental results and improve the interpretation of the results. In the conditions of different initial density of eggs, the impact of the concentration of dissolved oxygen on mortality and rates of development of the common toad embryos is manifested in different ways. At high density, only a small percentage of embryos survives by the time of hatching, and the embryos are significantly behind in their development compared with the individuals that developed in normal oxygen conditions. The lack of oxygen dissolved in the water slows down the development of embryos of the common toad.

  14. Use of pore-water composition to reconstruct past dissolved inorganic carbon concentration and alkalinity in Pacific bottom water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauvage, J. F.; Spivack, A. J.; D'Hondt, S. L.; Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 329 shipboard scientific party

    2011-12-01

    The carbonate system is a crucial component in controlling the pH of the world's oceans and the distribution of CO2 within the ocean, as well as between the ocean and atmosphere. Consequently, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and alkalinity reconstructions bear lots of promise for improving understanding of the ocean's role in the global carbon cycle and climate. We propose and test a method to quantify in situ concentrations of deep-sea carbonate-system components (DIC, alkalinity, CO32-, Ca2+, and minor component concentrations) in pore fluid of deep-sea sediment cores. These concentrations can in turn be used to reconstruct deep-sea carbonate-system chemistry of the geologic past. Alkalinity, DIC and Ca2+ concentrations measured on research vessels differ from in situ values because temperature and pressure changes during core recovery, storage and extraction induce calcium carbonate precipitation and in this way alter the original composition. To reconstruct in situ values, we developed a method that takes advantage of the mathematically over-determined state of the system if three components are measured, given that CaCO3 is saturated and the dissolved carbonate system is at equilibrium in situ. As a result, based on the measured alkalinity, DIC and Ca2+ concentrations, in situ CO2aq, HCO3-, CO32-, and minor species concentrations are calculated by applying an iteration process. This approach allows us to calculate the amount of CaCO3 precipitated during sediment recovery from the seafloor, and hence in situ carbonate system components. We apply our model to pore-water data from two SPG sites rich in calcium carbonate and drilled by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 329 (Sites 1367 and 1368). We compared two sample types for this study, (i) samples squeezed and processed within minutes of recovery (rapidly processed) and (ii) samples processed in the following hours/days, and as consequence prone to some substantial alteration (slowly processed

  15. Dissolved oxygen content prediction in crab culture using a hybrid intelligent method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Huihui; Chen, Yingyi; Hassan, Shahbazgul; Li, Daoliang

    2016-06-01

    A precise predictive model is needed to obtain a clear understanding of the changing dissolved oxygen content in outdoor crab ponds, to assess how to reduce risk and to optimize water quality management. The uncertainties in the data from multiple sensors are a significant factor when building a dissolved oxygen content prediction model. To increase prediction accuracy, a new hybrid dissolved oxygen content forecasting model based on the radial basis function neural networks (RBFNN) data fusion method and a least squares support vector machine (LSSVM) with an optimal improved particle swarm optimization(IPSO) is developed. In the modelling process, the RBFNN data fusion method is used to improve information accuracy and provide more trustworthy training samples for the IPSO-LSSVM prediction model. The LSSVM is a powerful tool for achieving nonlinear dissolved oxygen content forecasting. In addition, an improved particle swarm optimization algorithm is developed to determine the optimal parameters for the LSSVM with high accuracy and generalizability. In this study, the comparison of the prediction results of different traditional models validates the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed hybrid RBFNN-IPSO-LSSVM model for dissolved oxygen content prediction in outdoor crab ponds.

  16. A highly accurate method for determination of dissolved oxygen: gravimetric Winkler method.

    PubMed

    Helm, Irja; Jalukse, Lauri; Leito, Ivo

    2012-09-01

    A high-accuracy Winkler titration method has been developed for determination of dissolved oxygen concentration. Careful analysis of uncertainty sources relevant to the Winkler method was carried out and the method was optimized for minimizing all uncertainty sources as far as practical. The most important improvements were: gravimetric measurement of all solutions, pre-titration to minimize the effect of iodine volatilization, accurate amperometric end point detection and careful accounting for dissolved oxygen in the reagents. As a result, the developed method is possibly the most accurate method of determination of dissolved oxygen available. Depending on measurement conditions and on the dissolved oxygen concentration the combined standard uncertainties of the method are in the range of 0.012-0.018 mg dm(-3) corresponding to the k=2 expanded uncertainty in the range of 0.023-0.035 mg dm(-3) (0.27-0.38%, relative). This development enables more accurate calibration of electrochemical and optical dissolved oxygen sensors for routine analysis than has been possible before.

  17. Dissolved oxygen content prediction in crab culture using a hybrid intelligent method

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Huihui; Chen, Yingyi; Hassan, ShahbazGul; Li, Daoliang

    2016-01-01

    A precise predictive model is needed to obtain a clear understanding of the changing dissolved oxygen content in outdoor crab ponds, to assess how to reduce risk and to optimize water quality management. The uncertainties in the data from multiple sensors are a significant factor when building a dissolved oxygen content prediction model. To increase prediction accuracy, a new hybrid dissolved oxygen content forecasting model based on the radial basis function neural networks (RBFNN) data fusion method and a least squares support vector machine (LSSVM) with an optimal improved particle swarm optimization(IPSO) is developed. In the modelling process, the RBFNN data fusion method is used to improve information accuracy and provide more trustworthy training samples for the IPSO-LSSVM prediction model. The LSSVM is a powerful tool for achieving nonlinear dissolved oxygen content forecasting. In addition, an improved particle swarm optimization algorithm is developed to determine the optimal parameters for the LSSVM with high accuracy and generalizability. In this study, the comparison of the prediction results of different traditional models validates the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed hybrid RBFNN-IPSO-LSSVM model for dissolved oxygen content prediction in outdoor crab ponds. PMID:27270206

  18. Assessing the Effects of Water Rights Purchases on Dissolved Oxygen, Stream Temperatures, and Fish Habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouzon, N. R.; Null, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    Human impacts from land and water development have degraded water quality and altered the physical, chemical, and biological integrity of Nevada's Walker River. Reduced instream flows and increased nutrient concentrations affect native fish populations through warm daily stream temperatures and low nightly dissolved oxygen concentrations. Water rights purchases are being considered to maintain instream flows, improve water quality, and enhance habitat for native fish species, such as Lahontan cutthroat trout. This study uses the River Modeling System (RMSv4), an hourly, physically-based hydrodynamic and water quality model, to estimate streamflows, temperatures, and dissolved oxygen concentrations in the Walker River. We simulate thermal and dissolved oxygen changes from increased streamflow to prioritize the time periods and locations that water purchases most enhance native trout habitat. Stream temperatures and dissolved oxygen concentrations are proxies for trout habitat. Monitoring results indicate stream temperature and dissolved oxygen limitations generally exist in the 115 kilometers upstream of Walker Lake (about 37% of the study area) from approximately May through September, and this reach currently acts as a water quality barrier for fish passage.

  19. Dissolved oxygen content prediction in crab culture using a hybrid intelligent method.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huihui; Chen, Yingyi; Hassan, ShahbazGul; Li, Daoliang

    2016-01-01

    A precise predictive model is needed to obtain a clear understanding of the changing dissolved oxygen content in outdoor crab ponds, to assess how to reduce risk and to optimize water quality management. The uncertainties in the data from multiple sensors are a significant factor when building a dissolved oxygen content prediction model. To increase prediction accuracy, a new hybrid dissolved oxygen content forecasting model based on the radial basis function neural networks (RBFNN) data fusion method and a least squares support vector machine (LSSVM) with an optimal improved particle swarm optimization(IPSO) is developed. In the modelling process, the RBFNN data fusion method is used to improve information accuracy and provide more trustworthy training samples for the IPSO-LSSVM prediction model. The LSSVM is a powerful tool for achieving nonlinear dissolved oxygen content forecasting. In addition, an improved particle swarm optimization algorithm is developed to determine the optimal parameters for the LSSVM with high accuracy and generalizability. In this study, the comparison of the prediction results of different traditional models validates the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed hybrid RBFNN-IPSO-LSSVM model for dissolved oxygen content prediction in outdoor crab ponds. PMID:27270206

  20. Multi-decadal increases in dissolved organic carbon and alkalinity flux from the Mackenzie drainage basin to the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tank, Suzanne E.; Striegl, Robert G.; McClelland, James W.; Kokelj, Steven V.

    2016-05-01

    Riverine exports of organic and inorganic carbon (OC, IC) to oceans are intricately linked to processes occurring on land. Across high latitudes, thawing permafrost, alteration of hydrologic flow paths, and changes in vegetation may all affect this flux, with subsequent implications for regional and global carbon (C) budgets. Using a unique, multi-decadal dataset of continuous discharge coupled with water chemistry measurements for the Mackenzie River, we show major increases in dissolved OC (DOC) and IC (as alkalinity) fluxes since the early 1970s, for a watershed that covers 1.8 M km2 of northwestern Canada, and provides substantial inputs of freshwater and biogeochemical constituents to the Arctic Ocean. Over a 39-year period of record, DOC flux at the Mackenzie mouth increased by 39.3% (44.5 ± 22.6 Gmol), while alkalinity flux increased by 12.5% (61.5 ± 60.1 Gmol). Isotopic analyses and substantial increases in sulfate flux indicate that increases in alkalinity are driven by accelerating sulfide oxidation, a process that liberates IC from rock and soils in the absence of CO2 consumption. Seasonal and sub-catchment trends suggest that permafrost thaw plays an important role in the observed increases in DOC and alkalinity: sub-catchment increases for all constituents are confined to northern, permafrost-affected regions, while observed increases in autumn to winter are consistent with documented landscape-scale changes that have resulted from changing thaw dynamics. This increase in DOC and sulfide-derived alkalinity represents a substantial intensification of land-to-ocean C mobilization, at a level that is significant within the regional C budget. The change we observe, for example, is similar to current and projected future rates of CO2 consumption by weathering in the Mackenzie basin.

  1. EFFECT OF DISSOLVED OXYGEN ON PHENOLS BREAKTHROUGH FROM GAC ADSORBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study demonstrates that molecular oxygen plays an important role in the adsorption of organic compounds from water by activated carbon. It was determined that the adsorptive capacity of granular activated carbon (GAC) for o-cresol can increase by almost 200% as a result of...

  2. Alkaline oesophageal reflux--an artefact due to oxygen corrosion of antimony pH electrodes.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, F; Gustafsson, U; Tibbling, L

    1992-12-01

    Antimony electrodes are widely used for gastro-oesophageal pH monitoring. They are also sensitive to oxygen, however, especially at low PO2 levels, which are known to shift recorded values in the alkaline direction. This study, which compares antimony and glass electrodes for oesophageal pH monitoring in six adults, shows that values recorded by antimony electrodes are 2.1 +/- 0.8 pH units (mean +/- SD) higher than by glass electrodes (p < 0.001; n = 7642). A further 52 patients with suspected gastro-oesophageal reflux were investigated by 24-h pH monitoring by means of antimony electrodes. In these patients the oesophageal pH was higher than 8.0 for 7% of the time (range, 0-60%). The alkaline periods recorded with antimony electrodes were all protracted in time, smoothly increasing from a neutral pH, and did not correspond to a sudden increase in pH, which would be expected if alkaline reflux had occurred. It is concluded that high pH values obtained by antimony electrodes are due to the oxygen sensitivity of the electrodes. The diagnosis of alkaline reflux seems to be valid only when pH monitoring is performed with glass electrodes or when values obtained with antimony electrodes are adjusted for the influence of the oxygen tension in the oesophagus. PMID:1475627

  3. Measurement in a marine environment using low cost sensors of temperature and dissolved oxygen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godshall, F.A.; Cory, R.L.; Phinney, D.E.

    1974-01-01

    Continuous records of physical parameters of the marine environment are difficult as well as expensive to obtain. This paper describes preliminary results of an investigative program with the purpose of developing low cost time integrating measurement and averaging devices for water temperature and dissolved oxygen. Measurements were made in an estuarine area of the Chesapeake Bay over two week periods. With chemical thermometers average water temperature for the two week period was found to be equal to average water temperature measured with thermocouples plus or minus 1.0 C. The slow diffusion of oxygen through the semipermiable sides of plastic bottles permitted the use of water filled bottles to obtain averaged oxygen measurements. Oxygen measurements for two week averaging times using 500 ml polyethylene bottles were found to vary from conventionally measured and averaged dissolved oxygen by about 1.8 mg/l. ?? 1974 Estuarine Research Federation.

  4. Removal of dissolved actinides from alkaline solutions by the method of appearing reagents

    DOEpatents

    Krot, Nikolai N.; Charushnikova, Iraida A.

    1997-01-01

    A method of reducing the concentration of neptunium and plutonium from alkaline radwastes containing plutonium and neptunium values along with other transuranic values produced during the course of plutonium production. The OH.sup.- concentration of the alkaline radwaste is adjusted to between about 0.1M and about 4M. [UO.sub.2 (O.sub.2).sub.3 ].sup.4- ion is added to the radwastes in the presence of catalytic amounts of Cu.sup.+2, Co.sup.+2 or Fe.sup.+2 with heating to a temperature in excess of about 60.degree. C. or 85.degree. C., depending on the catalyst, to coprecipitate plutonium and neptunium from the radwaste. Thereafter, the coprecipitate is separated from the alkaline radwaste.

  5. Simulation of Temperature, Nutrients, Biochemical Oxygen Demand, and Dissolved Oxygen in the Catawba River, South Carolina, 1996-97

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feaster, Toby D.; Conrads, Paul A.; Guimaraes, Wladmir B.; Sanders, Curtis L.; Bales, Jerad D.

    2003-01-01

    Time-series plots of dissolved-oxygen concentrations were determined for various simulated hydrologic and point-source loading conditions along a free-flowing section of the Catawba River from Lake Wylie Dam to the headwaters of Fishing Creek Reservoir in South Carolina. The U.S. Geological Survey one-dimensional dynamic-flow model, BRANCH, was used to simulate hydrodynamic data for the Branched Lagrangian Transport Model. Waterquality data were used to calibrate the Branched Lagrangian Transport Model and included concentrations of nutrients, chlorophyll a, and biochemical oxygen demand in water samples collected during two synoptic sampling surveys at 10 sites along the main stem of the Catawba River and at 3 tributaries; and continuous water temperature and dissolved-oxygen concentrations measured at 5 locations along the main stem of the Catawba River. A sensitivity analysis of the simulated dissolved-oxygen concentrations to model coefficients and data inputs indicated that the simulated dissolved-oxygen concentrations were most sensitive to watertemperature boundary data due to the effect of temperature on reaction kinetics and the solubility of dissolved oxygen. Of the model coefficients, the simulated dissolved-oxygen concentration was most sensitive to the biological oxidation rate of nitrite to nitrate. To demonstrate the utility of the Branched Lagrangian Transport Model for the Catawba River, the model was used to simulate several water-quality scenarios to evaluate the effect on the 24-hour mean dissolved-oxygen concentrations at selected sites for August 24, 1996, as simulated during the model calibration period of August 23 27, 1996. The first scenario included three loading conditions of the major effluent discharges along the main stem of the Catawba River (1) current load (as sampled in August 1996); (2) no load (all point-source loads were removed from the main stem of the Catawba River; loads from the main tributaries were not removed); and (3

  6. The importance of dissolved free oxygen during formation of sandstone-type uranium deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Granger, Harry Clifford; Warren, C.G.

    1979-01-01

    One factor which distinguishes t, he genesis of roll-type uranium deposits from the Uravan Mineral Belt and other sandstone-type uranium deposits may be the presence and concentration of dissolved free oxygen in the ore-forming. solutions. Although dissolved oxygen is a necessary prerequisite for the formation of roll-type deposits, it is proposed that a lack of dissolved oxygen is a prerequisite for the Uravan deposits. Solutions that formed both types of deposits probably had a supergene origin and originated as meteoric water in approximate equilibrium with atmospheric oxygen. Roll-type deposits were formed where the Eh dropped abruptly following consumption of the oxygen by iron sulfide minerals and creation of kinetically active sulfur species that could reduce uranium. The solutions that formed the Uravan deposits, on the other hand, probably first equilibrated with sulfide-free ferrous-ferric detrital minerals and fossil organic matter in the host rock. That is, the uraniferous solutions lost their oxygen without lowering their Eh enough to precipitate uranium. Without oxygen, they then. became incapable of oxidizing iron sulfide minerals. Subsequent localization and formation of ore bodies from these oxygen-depleted solutions, therefore, was not necessarily dependent on large reducing capacities.

  7. Amphiphilic Fluorinated Polymer Nanoparticle Film Formation and Dissolved Oxygen Sensing Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yu; Zhu, Huie; Yamamoto, Shunsuke; Miyashita, Tokuji; Mitsuishi, Masaya

    2016-04-01

    Fluorinated polymer nanoparticle films were prepared by dissolving amphiphilic fluorinated polymer, poly (N-1H, 1H-pentadecafluorooctylmethacrylamide) (pC7F15MAA) in two miscible solvents (AK-225 and acetic acid). A superhydrophobic and porous film was obtained by dropcasting the solution on substrates. With higher ratios of AK-225 to acetic acid, pC7F15MAA was densified around acetic acid droplets, leading to the formation of pC7F15MAA nanoparticles. The condition of the nanoparticle film preparation was investigated by varying the mixing ratio or total concentration. A highly sensitive dissolved oxygen sensor system was successfully prepared utilizing a smart surface of superhydrophobic and porous pC7F15MAA nanoparticle film. The sensitivity showed I0/I40 = 126 in the range of dissolved oxygen concentration of 0 ~ 40 mg L-1. The oxygen sensitivity was compared with that of previous reports.

  8. Remote Sensing of Dissolved Oxygen and Nitrogen in Water Using Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganoe, Rene; DeYoung, Russell J.

    2013-01-01

    The health of an estuarine ecosystem is largely driven by the abundance of dissolved oxygen and nitrogen available for maintenance of plant and animal life. An investigation was conducted to quantify the concentration of dissolved molecular oxygen and nitrogen in water by means of Raman spectroscopy. This technique is proposed for the remote sensing of dissolved oxygen in the Chesapeake Bay, which will be utilized by aircraft in order to survey large areas in real-time. A proof of principle system has been developed and the specifications are being honed to maximize efficiency for the final application. The theoretical criteria of the research, components of the experimental system, and key findings are presented in this report

  9. Hypolimnetic concentrations of dissolved oxygen, nutrients, and trace elements in Coeur d'Alene Lake, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woods, P.F.

    1989-01-01

    A reconnaissance study of Coeur d'Alene Lake, Idaho done from May through November 1987 assessed water quality throughout the lake. Particular emphasis was on hypolimnetic concentrations of dissolved oxygen, nutrients, and trace elements. Study results enabled refinement of the sampling protocol in a U.S. Geological Survey research proposal for a large-scale investigation of nutrient enrichment and trace element contamination problems affecting the 129.5 sq kilometer lake in northern Idaho. Hypolimnetic dissolved-oxygen concentrations as low as 4.1 mg/L in November and the frequent occurrence of supersaturated dissolved-oxygen concentrations during June through August indicated nutrient enrichment. Secchi-disc depths in the lake 's central and southern areas were typical of mesotrophic conditions, whereas oligotrophic conditions prevailed in the northern area. Throughout the study, hypolimnetic concentrations of total recoverable zinc exceeded chronic and acute toxicity criteria for freshwater aquatic life. (USGS)

  10. Nitrosamine formation pathway revisited: the importance of chloramine speciation and dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, I Marie; Mitch, William A

    2006-10-01

    Nitrosamine formation during chloramination previously has been linked to a reaction between monochloramine and organic nitrogen precursors via unsymmetrical dialkylhydrazine intermediates. Our results demonstrate the critical importance of dichloramine and dissolved oxygen. We propose a new nitrosamine formation pathway in which dichloramine reacts with secondary amine precursors to form chlorinated unsymmetrical dialkylhydrazine intermediates. Oxidation of these intermediates by dissolved oxygen to form nitrosamines competes with their oxidation by chloramines. Even when preformed monochloramine was applied, our model explained nearly all N-nitrosodimethylamine formation from the traces of dichloramine formed via monochloramine disproportionation. We suggest that, in contrast to unsymmetrical dialkylhydrazines, the weak, nonpolar nature of the N-Cl linkage in chlorinated unsymmetrical dialkylhydrazine intermediates enables incorporation of dissolved oxygen to form nitrosamines. With the improved understanding of the nitrosamine formation pathway, strategies are suggested that could significantly reduce nitrosamine formation during chloramination.

  11. Simulation of hydrodynamics, temperature, and dissolved oxygen in Table Rock Lake, Missouri, 1996-1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, W. Reed; Galloway, Joel M.; Richards, Joseph M.; Wesolowski, Edwin A.

    2003-01-01

    Outflow from Table Rock Lake and other White River reservoirs support a cold-water trout fishery of substantial economic yield in south-central Missouri and north-central Arkansas. The Missouri Department of Conservation has requested an increase in existing minimum flows through the Table Rock Lake Dam from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to increase the quality of fishable waters downstream in Lake Taneycomo. Information is needed to assess the effect of increased minimum flows on temperature and dissolved- oxygen concentrations of reservoir water and the outflow. A two-dimensional, laterally averaged, hydrodynamic, temperature, and dissolved-oxygen model, CE-QUAL-W2, was developed and calibrated for Table Rock Lake, located in Missouri, north of the Arkansas-Missouri State line. The model simulates water-surface elevation, heat transport, and dissolved-oxygen dynamics. The model was developed to assess the effects of proposed increases in minimum flow from about 4.4 cubic meters per second (the existing minimum flow) to 11.3 cubic meters per second (the increased minimum flow). Simulations included assessing the effect of (1) increased minimum flows and (2) increased minimum flows with increased water-surface elevations in Table Rock Lake, on outflow temperatures and dissolved-oxygen concentrations. In both minimum flow scenarios, water temperature appeared to stay the same or increase slightly (less than 0.37 ?C) and dissolved oxygen appeared to decrease slightly (less than 0.78 mg/L) in the outflow during the thermal stratification season. However, differences between the minimum flow scenarios for water temperature and dissolved- oxygen concentration and the calibrated model were similar to the differences between measured and simulated water-column profile values.

  12. The loss of dissolved oxygen in Nansen bottle samples from the deep Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worthington, L. V.

    1982-10-01

    In the tropical and subtropical Atlantic Ocean loss of dissolved oxygen nearly always takes place within Nansen bottles between the time they close, in deep water, and the time the samples are drawn for analysis. The principal cause of this oxygen loss, in routine stations, is shown to be degassing; deep samples, rich in oxygen, are heated to above their saturation point as they are brought up through the thermocline and surface layers. Niskin bottles, which are better insulated, are immune from the fault. Examples of oxygen loss due to chemical reaction within the Nansen bottle and loss due, possibly, to bacterial respiration, are also described.

  13. Dissolved-oxygen regime of the Jordan River, Salt Lake County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephens, D.W.

    1984-01-01

    Concentrations of dissolved oxygen in the Jordan River in Salt Lake County decrease considerably as the river flows northward. Mean concentrations of dissolved oxygen decreased from 8.1 milligrams per liter at the Jordan Narrows to 4.7 milligrams per liter at 500 North Street during April 1981 to September 1982. Coincident with the decrease, the biochemical-oxygen demand increased from 5 to 7 milligrams per liter. About 50 percent of the dissolved-oxygen concentrations and 90 percent of the 5-day biochemical-oxygen demand measured downstream from 1700 South Street exceeded the State intended-use standards. An estimated 6. million pounds of oxygen-demanding substances as measured by 5-day biochemical-oxygen demand were discharged to the Jordan River during 1981 from point sources downstream from 9000 South Street. Seven wastewater-treatment plants contributed 77 percent of this load, nonstorm base flows contributed 22 percent, and storm flows less than 1 percent. The Surplus Canal diversion at 2100 South Street removed about 70 percent of this load, and travel time of about 1 day also decreased the actual effects of the load on the river. Reaeration rates during September and October were quite high (average K2 at 20 degrees Celsius was about 12 per day) between the Jordan Narrows and 9000 South Street, but they decreased to 2.4 per day in the reach from 1330 South to 1800 North Streets. (USGS)

  14. A dissolved cobalt plume in the oxygen minimum zone of the eastern tropical South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawco, Nicholas J.; Ohnemus, Daniel C.; Resing, Joseph A.; Twining, Benjamin S.; Saito, Mak A.

    2016-10-01

    Cobalt is a nutrient to phytoplankton, but knowledge about its biogeochemical cycling is limited, especially in the Pacific Ocean. Here, we report sections of dissolved cobalt and labile dissolved cobalt from the US GEOTRACES GP16 transect in the South Pacific. The cobalt distribution is closely tied to the extent and intensity of the oxygen minimum zone in the eastern South Pacific with highest concentrations measured at the oxycline near the Peru margin. Below 200 m, remineralization and circulation produce an inverse relationship between cobalt and dissolved oxygen that extends throughout the basin. Within the oxygen minimum zone, elevated concentrations of labile cobalt are generated by input from coastal sources and reduced scavenging at low O2. As these high cobalt waters are upwelled and advected offshore, phytoplankton export returns cobalt to low-oxygen water masses underneath. West of the Peru upwelling region, dissolved cobalt is less than 10 pM in the euphotic zone and strongly bound by organic ligands. Because the cobalt nutricline within the South Pacific gyre is deeper than in oligotrophic regions in the North and South Atlantic, cobalt involved in sustaining phytoplankton productivity in the gyre is heavily recycled and ultimately arrives from lateral transport of upwelled waters from the eastern margin. In contrast to large coastal inputs, atmospheric deposition and hydrothermal vents along the East Pacific Rise appear to be minor sources of cobalt. Overall, these results demonstrate that oxygen biogeochemistry exerts a strong influence on cobalt cycling.

  15. Dissolved organic phosphorus utilization and alkaline phosphatase activity of the dinoflagellate Gymnodinium impudicum isolated from the South Sea of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Seok Jin; Kwon, Hyeong Kyu; Noh, Il Hyeon; Yang, Han-Soeb

    2010-09-01

    This study investigated alkaline phosphatase (APase) activity and dissolved organic and inorganic phosphorus utilization by the harmful dinoflagellate Gymnodinium impudicum (Fraga et Bravo) Hansen et Moestrup isolated from the South Sea of Korea. Under conditions of limited phosphorus, observation of growth kinetics in batch culture yielded a maximum growth rate (μmax) of 0.41 /day and a half saturation constant (Ks) of 0.71 μM. In time-course experiments, APase was induced as dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) concentrations fell below 0.83 μM, a threshold near the estimated Ks; APase activity increased with further DIP depletion to a maximum of 0.70 pmol/cell/h in the senescent phase. Thus, Ks may be an important index of the threshold DIP concentration for APase induction. G. impudicum utilizes a wide variety of dissolved organic phosphorus compounds in addition to DIP. These results suggest that DIP limitation in the Southern Sea of Korea may have led to the spread of G. impudicum along with the harmful dinoflagellate Cochlodinium polykrikoides in recent years.

  16. New instrumentation for optical measuring of oxygen in gas or dissolved in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trettnak, W.; Gruber, W.; Reininger, F.; O'Leary, P.; Klimant, I.

    The optical oxygen sensor is a novel device for the determination of oxygen in gases or dissolved in liquids. It is based on the measurement principle of fluorescence quenching, which is completely different from that of polarographic oxygen sensors (today the most widespread devices for oxygen detection). The new instrument offers features and advantages, which render it not only a realistic alternative, but, for specific applications, make it superior to existing electrochemical methods. The system is based on low-cost semiconductor devices (light-emitting diodes, photodiodes, low-cost analogue and digital components) and new LED-compatible oxygen-sensitive membranes. The flow cell of the instrument may be thermostatted and the sensor can be calibrated by a simple two-point calibration procedure. The optical oxygen sensor is particularly suitable for measuring dissolved oxygen in respirometry, since no oxygen is consumed by the device and the signal is independent of sample flowrate or stirring speed. Typical fields of application are monitoring of oxygen in ground and drinking water, in process controll in bioreactors and in breath gas and blood gas analysis.

  17. High-pressure injection of dissolved oxygen for hydrocarbon remediation in a fractured dolostone aquifer.

    PubMed

    Greer, K D; Molson, J W; Barker, J F; Thomson, N R; Donaldson, C R

    2010-10-21

    A field experiment was completed at a fractured dolomite aquifer in southwestern Ontario, Canada, to assess the delivery of supersaturated dissolved oxygen (supersaturated with respect to ambient conditions) for enhanced bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater. The injection lasted for 1.5h using iTi's gPro® oxygen injection technology at pressures of up to 450 kPa and at concentrations of up to 34 mg O₂/L. A three-dimensional numerical model for advective-dispersive transport of dissolved oxygen within a discretely-fractured porous medium was calibrated to the observed field conditions under a conservative (no-consumption) scenario. The simulation demonstrated that oxygen rapidly filled the local intersecting fractures as well as the porous matrix surrounding the injection well. Following injection, the local fractures were rapidly flushed by the natural groundwater flow system but slow back-diffusion ensured a relatively longer residence time in the matrix. A sensitivity analysis showed significant changes in behaviour with varying fracture apertures and hydraulic gradients. Applying the calibrated model to a 7-day continuous injection scenario showed oxygen residence times (at the 3mg/L limit), within a radius of 2-4m from the injection well, of up to 100 days. This study has demonstrated that supersaturated dissolved oxygen can be effectively delivered to this type of a fractured and porous bedrock system at concentrations and residence times potentially sufficient for enhanced aerobic biodegradation. PMID:20727615

  18. High-pressure injection of dissolved oxygen for hydrocarbon remediation in a fractured dolostone aquifer.

    PubMed

    Greer, K D; Molson, J W; Barker, J F; Thomson, N R; Donaldson, C R

    2010-10-21

    A field experiment was completed at a fractured dolomite aquifer in southwestern Ontario, Canada, to assess the delivery of supersaturated dissolved oxygen (supersaturated with respect to ambient conditions) for enhanced bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater. The injection lasted for 1.5h using iTi's gPro® oxygen injection technology at pressures of up to 450 kPa and at concentrations of up to 34 mg O₂/L. A three-dimensional numerical model for advective-dispersive transport of dissolved oxygen within a discretely-fractured porous medium was calibrated to the observed field conditions under a conservative (no-consumption) scenario. The simulation demonstrated that oxygen rapidly filled the local intersecting fractures as well as the porous matrix surrounding the injection well. Following injection, the local fractures were rapidly flushed by the natural groundwater flow system but slow back-diffusion ensured a relatively longer residence time in the matrix. A sensitivity analysis showed significant changes in behaviour with varying fracture apertures and hydraulic gradients. Applying the calibrated model to a 7-day continuous injection scenario showed oxygen residence times (at the 3mg/L limit), within a radius of 2-4m from the injection well, of up to 100 days. This study has demonstrated that supersaturated dissolved oxygen can be effectively delivered to this type of a fractured and porous bedrock system at concentrations and residence times potentially sufficient for enhanced aerobic biodegradation.

  19. High-pressure injection of dissolved oxygen for hydrocarbon remediation in a fractured dolostone aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greer, K. D.; Molson, J. W.; Barker, J. F.; Thomson, N. R.; Donaldson, C. R.

    2010-10-01

    A field experiment was completed at a fractured dolomite aquifer in southwestern Ontario, Canada, to assess the delivery of supersaturated dissolved oxygen (supersaturated with respect to ambient conditions) for enhanced bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater. The injection lasted for 1.5 h using iTi's gPro® oxygen injection technology at pressures of up to 450 kPa and at concentrations of up to 34 mg O 2/L. A three-dimensional numerical model for advective-dispersive transport of dissolved oxygen within a discretely-fractured porous medium was calibrated to the observed field conditions under a conservative (no-consumption) scenario. The simulation demonstrated that oxygen rapidly filled the local intersecting fractures as well as the porous matrix surrounding the injection well. Following injection, the local fractures were rapidly flushed by the natural groundwater flow system but slow back-diffusion ensured a relatively longer residence time in the matrix. A sensitivity analysis showed significant changes in behaviour with varying fracture apertures and hydraulic gradients. Applying the calibrated model to a 7-day continuous injection scenario showed oxygen residence times (at the 3 mg/L limit), within a radius of 2-4 m from the injection well, of up to 100 days. This study has demonstrated that supersaturated dissolved oxygen can be effectively delivered to this type of a fractured and porous bedrock system at concentrations and residence times potentially sufficient for enhanced aerobic biodegradation.

  20. Bifunctional Perovskite Oxide Catalysts for Oxygen Reduction and Evolution in Alkaline Media.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shiva; Kellogg, William; Xu, Hui; Liu, Xien; Cho, Jaephil; Wu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen electrocatalysis, namely of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER), governs the performance of numerous electrochemical energy systems such as reversible fuel cells, metal-air batteries, and water electrolyzers. However, the sluggish kinetics of these two reactions and their dependency on expensive noble metal catalysts (e.g, Pt or Ir) prohibit the sustainable commercialization of these highly innovative and in-demand technologies. Bifunctional perovskite oxides have emerged as a new class of highly efficient non-precious metal catalysts (NPMC) for oxygen electrocatalysis in alkaline media. In this review, we discuss the state-of-the-art understanding of bifunctional properties of perovskites with regards to their OER/ORR activity in alkaline media and review the associated reaction mechanisms on the oxides surface and the related activity descriptors developed in the recent literature. We also summarize the present strategies to modify their electronic structure and to further improve their performance for the ORR/OER through highlighting the new concepts relating to the role of surface redox chemistry and oxygen deficiency of perovskite oxides for the ORR/OER activity. In addition, we provide a brief account of recently developed advanced perovskite-nanocarbon hybrid bifunctional catalysts with much improved performances. PMID:26247625

  1. Bifunctional Perovskite Oxide Catalysts for Oxygen Reduction and Evolution in Alkaline Media.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shiva; Kellogg, William; Xu, Hui; Liu, Xien; Cho, Jaephil; Wu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen electrocatalysis, namely of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER), governs the performance of numerous electrochemical energy systems such as reversible fuel cells, metal-air batteries, and water electrolyzers. However, the sluggish kinetics of these two reactions and their dependency on expensive noble metal catalysts (e.g, Pt or Ir) prohibit the sustainable commercialization of these highly innovative and in-demand technologies. Bifunctional perovskite oxides have emerged as a new class of highly efficient non-precious metal catalysts (NPMC) for oxygen electrocatalysis in alkaline media. In this review, we discuss the state-of-the-art understanding of bifunctional properties of perovskites with regards to their OER/ORR activity in alkaline media and review the associated reaction mechanisms on the oxides surface and the related activity descriptors developed in the recent literature. We also summarize the present strategies to modify their electronic structure and to further improve their performance for the ORR/OER through highlighting the new concepts relating to the role of surface redox chemistry and oxygen deficiency of perovskite oxides for the ORR/OER activity. In addition, we provide a brief account of recently developed advanced perovskite-nanocarbon hybrid bifunctional catalysts with much improved performances.

  2. The fabrication of a bifunctional oxygen electrode without carbon components for alkaline secondary batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Stephen W. T.; Thompson, Stephen J.; Li, Xiaohong; Gorman, Scott F.; Pletcher, Derek; Russell, Andrea E.; Walsh, Frank C.; Wills, Richard G. A.

    2014-08-01

    The fabrication of a gas diffusion electrode (GDE) without carbon components is described. It is therefore suitable for use as a bifunctional oxygen electrode in alkaline secondary batteries. The electrode is fabricated in two stages (a) the formation of a PTFE-bonded nickel powder layer on a nickel foam substrate and (b) the deposition of a NiCo2O4 spinel electrocatalyst layer by dip coating in a nitrate solution and thermal decomposition. The influence of modifications to the procedure on the performance of the GDEs in 8 M NaOH at 333 K is described. The GDEs can support current densities up to 100 mA cm-2 with state-of-the-art overpotentials for both oxygen evolution and oxygen reduction. Stable performance during >50 successive, 1 h oxygen reduction/evolution cycles at a current density of 50 mA cm-2 has been achieved.

  3. Productivity Estimation of Hypersaline Microbial Mat Communities - Diurnal Cycles of Dissolved Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Less, G.; Cohen, Y.; Luz, B.; Lazar, B.

    2002-05-01

    Hypersaline microbial mat communities (MMC) are the modern equivalents of the Archean stromatolities, the first photosynthetic organisms on Earth. An estimate of their oxygen production rate is important to the understanding of oxygen evolution on Earth ca. 2 b.y.b.p. Here we use the diurnal cycle of dissolved oxygen, O2/Ar ratio and the isotopic composition of dissolved oxygen to calculate net and gross primary productivity of MMC growing in a large scale (80 m2) experimental pan. The pan is inoculated with MMC taken from the Solar Lake, Sinai, Egypt and filled with 90\\permil evaporated Red Sea water brine up to a depth of ca. 0.25 m. It is equipped with computerized flow through system that is programmed to pump pan water at selected time intervals into a sampling cell fitted with dissolved oxygen, pH, conductivity and temperature sensors connected to a datalogger. Manual brine samples were taken for calibrating the sensors, mass spectrometric analyses and for measurements of additional relevant parameters. Dissolved oxygen concentrations fluctuate during the diurnal cycle being highly supersaturated except for the end of the night. The O2 curve varies seasonally and has a typical "shark fin" shape due to the MMC metabolic response to the shape of the diurnal light curve. The dissolved oxygen data were fitted to a smooth curve that its time derivative (dO2 /dt) is defined as: Z dO2 /dt=GP-R-k(O2(meas)- O2(sat)) where z is the depth (m); GP and R are the MMC gross production and respiration (mol m-2 d-1), respectively; k is the gas exchange coefficient (m d-1); O2(meas) and O2(sat) (mol L-1) are the measured and equilibrium dissolved oxygen concentrations, respectively. The high resolution sampling of the automated system produces O2 curves that enable the calculation of smooth and reliable time derivatives. The calculations yield net production values that vary between 1,000 10-6 to -100 10-6 mol O2 m-2 h-1 and day respiration rates between 60 10-6 to 30 10

  4. SIMULATED CLIMATE CHANGE EFFECTS ON DISSOLVED OXYGEN CHARACTERISTICS IN ICE-COVERED LAKES. (R824801)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A deterministic, one-dimensional model is presented which simulates daily dissolved oxygen (DO) profiles and associated water temperatures, ice covers and snow covers for dimictic and polymictic lakes of the temperate zone. The lake parameters required as model input are surface ...

  5. Effects of Low Dissolved Oxygen on Organisms Used in Freshwater Sediment Toxicity Tests

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manuscript describes the results of tests to determine the tolerance of three benthic organisms to reduced dissolved oxygen (DO). These three organisms are those recommended by EPA for use in toxicity testing of contaminated sediments. The results of the exposures indicate ...

  6. Dissolved oxygen in two Oregon estuaries: The importance of the ocean-estuary connection

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the role of the ocean –estuary connection in influencing periodic reductions in dissolved oxygen (DO) levels in Yaquina and Yachats estuaries, Oregon, USA. In the Yaquina Estuary, there is close coupling between the coastal ocean and the estuary. As a result, low DO ...

  7. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN NEAR-BOTTOM DISSOLVED OXYGEN AND SEDIMENT PROFILE CAMERA MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) and other environmental authorities regulate concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO) as a measure of nutrient-related eutrophication in estuarine and coastal waters. However, in situ DO concentrations are extremely var...

  8. USE OF SEDIMENT PROFILE IMAGERY TO ESTIMATE NEAR-BOTTOM DISSOLVED OXYGEN REGIMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA, Atlantic Ecology Division is developing empirical stressor-response models for nitrogen pollution in partially enclosed coastal systems using dissolved oxygen (DO) as one of the system responses. We are testing a sediment profile image camera as a surrogate indicat...

  9. Miniature dissolved oxygen and turbulence optical sensor for river and coastal environmental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carapezza, Edward M.; Lombardi, Gabrial; Butman, Jerry; Babb, Ivar

    2009-09-01

    This paper describes an innovative miniature optical sensor for predicting dissolved oxygen concentrations and measuring turbulence in river and littoral water columns. The dissolved oxygen and turbulence sensor consists of a single-frequency laser transmitter and a photodetector on which the scattered light from the turbulent water at the base of a dam or spillway is coherently mixed with a sample of the transmitted beam. This miniature sensor could be used both upstream and downsteam of dams and weirs to predict the amount of dissolved oxygen and turbulence in these waters. It could also be used on mobile platforms, such as unmanned underwater vehicles (UUV's), to monitor the edges of biological or chemical plumes or for wake follow platforms, schools of fish or marine mammals or on stationary unattended underwater sensors to monitor natural aeration and turbulence in littoral and riverine waters. Arrays of fixed unattended sensors could be used to detect the wake of transiting submerged vehicles, scuba divers, marine mammals or large schools of fish. A mobile platform equipped with a miniature sensor could to be cued to the general location and depth of an underwater target and then the platform could use this small aperture sensor to acquire and follow the wake. This dissolved oxygen and turbulence sensor system could be miniaturized and packaged into a very small volume; approximately the size of a wristwatch.

  10. Dissolved oxygen in two Oregon estuaries: Importance of the ocean-estuary connection

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the role of the ocean –estuary connection in influencing periodic reductions in dissolved oxygen (DO) levels in Yaquina and Yachats estuaries, Oregon, USA. In the Yaquina Estuary, there is close coupling between the coastal ocean and the estuary. As a result, low DO ...

  11. Dissolved oxygen in two Oregon estuaries: Importance of the ocean-estuary connection - March 2011

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the role of the ocean–estuary connection in influencing periodic reductions in dissolved oxygen (DO) levels in Yaquina and Yachats estuaries, Oregon, USA. In the Yaquina Estuary, there is close coupling between the coastal ocean and the estuary. As a result, low DO w...

  12. DETERMINATION OF LETHAL DISSOLVED OXYGEN LEVELS FOR SELECTED MARINE AND ESTUARINE FISHES, CRUSTACEANS AND A BIVALVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to provide a database of the incipient lethal concentrations for reduced dissolved oxygen (DO) for selected marine and estuarine species including 12 species of fish, 9 crustaceans, and 1 bivalve. All species occur in the Virginian Province, USA, w...

  13. Effect of dissolved oxygen concentration on growth of fingerling hybrid striped bass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Management of dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in production ponds is important because fish growth and yield are greater in ponds with higher DO concentrations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate growth and metabolic responses of hybrid striped bass (Morone chrysops x M. saxatilis; HSB) f...

  14. Effect of daily minimum pond dissolved oxygen concentration on hybrid striped bass fingerling yield

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Management of dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in ponds at night during the growing season is important because fish growth and yield are greater in ponds with higher nightly DO concentrations. The purpose of this study was to quantify the production and water quality responses of hybrid striped ...

  15. Organic carbon and dissolved oxygen budgets for a commerical-size, in-pond raceway system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intensive production of Ictalurid catfish in the United States has increased over the past several years and a better understanding of the amount of organic carbon (OC) and dissolved oxygen (DO) in these culture environments is needed. Budgets for OC and DO were estimated over a production season (M...

  16. A Simplified and Inexpensive Method for Measuring Dissolved Oxygen in Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, John

    1983-01-01

    A modified Winkler method for determining dissolved oxygen in water is described. The method does not require use of a burette or starch indicator, is simple and inexpensive and can be used in the field or laboratory. Reagents/apparatus needed and specific procedures are included. (JN)

  17. ACUTE SENSITIVITY OF JUVENILE SHORTNOSE STURGEON TO LOW DISSOLVED OXYGEN CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Campbell, Jed G. and Larry R. Goodman. 2004. Acute Sensitivity of Juvenile Shortnose Sturgeon to Low Dissolved Oxygen Concentrations. EPA/600/J-04/175. Trans. Am. Fish. Soc. 133(3):772-776. (ERL,GB 1155).

    There is considerable concern that factors such as eutrophication, ...

  18. RESEARCH AT THE GULF ECOLOGY DIVISION ON THE EFFECTS OF LOW DISSOLVED OXYGEN ON ESTUARINE ANIMALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concerns about hypoxia and its effects on saltwater organisms are increasing as environmental conditions in the inshore and nearshore marine environments are better understood. Along the Gulf of Mexico coast, periods of very low dissolved oxygen (D.O.) concentrations have been re...

  19. DISSOLVED OXYGEN AND METHANE IN WATER BY A GC HEADSPACE EQUILIBRATION TECHNIQUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An analytical procedure is described for the determination of dissolved oxygen and methane in groundwater samples. The method consists of generating a helium gas headspace in a water filled bottle, and analysis of the headspace by gas chromatography. Other permanent gases such as...

  20. Improving estimates of ecosystem metabolism by reducing effects of tidal advection on dissolved oxygen time series

    EPA Science Inventory

    In aquatic systems, time series of dissolved oxygen (DO) have been used to compute estimates of ecosystem metabolism. Central to this open-water method is the assumption that the DO time series is a Lagrangian specification of the flow field. However, most DO time series are coll...

  1. Dissolved phosphorus pools and alkaline phosphatase activity in the euphotic zone of the Western north pacific ocean.

    PubMed

    Suzumura, Masahiro; Hashihama, Fuminori; Yamada, Namiha; Kinouchi, Shinko

    2012-01-01

    We measured pools of dissolved phosphorus (P), including dissolved inorganic P (DIP), dissolved organic P (DOP) and alkaline phosphatase (AP)-hydrolyzable labile DOP (L-DOP), and kinetic parameters of AP activity (APA) in the euphotic zone in the western North Pacific Ocean. Samples were collected from one coastal station in Sagami Bay, Japan, and three offshore stations between the North Pacific subtropical gyre (NPSG) and the Kuroshio region. Although DIP concentrations in the euphotic zone at all stations were equally low, around the nominal method detection limit of 20 nmol L(-1), chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentrations were one order of magnitude greater at the coastal station. DOP was the dominant P pool, comprising 62-92% of total dissolved P at and above the Chl a maximum layer (CML). L-DOP represented 22-39% of the total DOP at the offshore stations, whereas it accounted for a much higher proportion (about 85%) in the coastal surface layers. Significant correlations between maximum potential AP hydrolysis rates and DIP concentrations or bacterial cell abundance in the offshore euphotic zone suggest that major APA in the oligotrophic surface ocean is from bacterial activity and regulated largely by DIP availability. Although the range of maximum potential APA was comparable among the environmental conditions, the in situ hydrolysis rate of L-DOP in the coastal station was 10 times those in the offshore stations. L-DOP turnover time at the CML ranged from 4.5 days at the coastal station to 84.4 days in the NPSG. The ratio of the APA half-saturation constant to the ambient L-DOP concentration decreased markedly from the NPSG to the coastal station. There were substantial differences in the rate and efficiency of DOP remineralization and its contribution as the potential P source between the low-phosphate/high-biomass coastal ecosystem and the low-phosphate/low biomass oligotrophic ocean. PMID:22457661

  2. Dissolved phosphorus pools and alkaline phosphatase activity in the euphotic zone of the Western north pacific ocean.

    PubMed

    Suzumura, Masahiro; Hashihama, Fuminori; Yamada, Namiha; Kinouchi, Shinko

    2012-01-01

    We measured pools of dissolved phosphorus (P), including dissolved inorganic P (DIP), dissolved organic P (DOP) and alkaline phosphatase (AP)-hydrolyzable labile DOP (L-DOP), and kinetic parameters of AP activity (APA) in the euphotic zone in the western North Pacific Ocean. Samples were collected from one coastal station in Sagami Bay, Japan, and three offshore stations between the North Pacific subtropical gyre (NPSG) and the Kuroshio region. Although DIP concentrations in the euphotic zone at all stations were equally low, around the nominal method detection limit of 20 nmol L(-1), chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentrations were one order of magnitude greater at the coastal station. DOP was the dominant P pool, comprising 62-92% of total dissolved P at and above the Chl a maximum layer (CML). L-DOP represented 22-39% of the total DOP at the offshore stations, whereas it accounted for a much higher proportion (about 85%) in the coastal surface layers. Significant correlations between maximum potential AP hydrolysis rates and DIP concentrations or bacterial cell abundance in the offshore euphotic zone suggest that major APA in the oligotrophic surface ocean is from bacterial activity and regulated largely by DIP availability. Although the range of maximum potential APA was comparable among the environmental conditions, the in situ hydrolysis rate of L-DOP in the coastal station was 10 times those in the offshore stations. L-DOP turnover time at the CML ranged from 4.5 days at the coastal station to 84.4 days in the NPSG. The ratio of the APA half-saturation constant to the ambient L-DOP concentration decreased markedly from the NPSG to the coastal station. There were substantial differences in the rate and efficiency of DOP remineralization and its contribution as the potential P source between the low-phosphate/high-biomass coastal ecosystem and the low-phosphate/low biomass oligotrophic ocean.

  3. Development of a novel electrochemical system for oxygen control (ESOC) to examine dissolved oxygen inhibition on algal activity.

    PubMed

    Keymer, Philip C; Pratt, Steven; Lant, Paul A

    2013-09-01

    The development of an Electrochemical System for Oxygen Control (ESOC) for examining algal photosynthetic activity as a function of dissolved oxygen (DO) is outlined. The main innovation of the tool is coulombic titration in order to balance the electrochemical reduction of oxygen with the oxygen input to achieve a steady DO set-point. ESOC allows quantification of algal oxygen production whilst simultaneously maintaining a desired DO concentration. The tool was validated abiotically by comparison with a mass transfer approach for quantifying oxygenation. It was then applied to quantify oxygen inhibition of algal activity. Five experiments, using an enriched culture of Scenedesmus sp. as the inoculum, are presented. For each experiment, ESOC was used to quantify algal activity at a series of DO set-points. In all experiments substantial oxygen inhibition was observed at DO >30 mgO2 L-1. Inhibition was shown to fit a Hill inhibition model, with a common Hill coefficient of 0.22±0.07 L mg-1 and common log10  CI50 of 27.2±0.7 mg L-1. This is the first time that the oxygen inhibition kinetic parameters have been quantified under controlled DO conditions.

  4. Oxygen isotope fractionation in phosphates: the role of dissolved complex anions in isotope exchange.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yong-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen isotope fractionation factors for phosphates were calculated by means of the increment method. The results suggest that Ag3PO4 and BiPO4 are enriched in (18)O relative to AgPO4, and the three phosphates are consistently depleted in (18)O relative to Ba3[PO4]2; fluorapatite and chlorapatite exhibit a similar behaviour of oxygen isotope fractionation with consistent enrichment of (18)O relative to hydroxyapatite. The valence, radii and coordination of metal cations play a quantitative role in dictating the (18)O/(16)O partitioning in these phosphates of different compositions. The calculated fractionation factors for the Ag3PO4-H2O system are in agreement with experimental determinations derived from enzyme-catalysed isotope exchange between dissolved inorganic phosphate and water at the longest reaction durations at low temperatures. This demonstrates that the precipitated Ag3PO4 has completely captured the oxygen isotope fractionation in the dissolved inorganic phosphate. The calculated fractionation factors for the F/Cl-apatite-water systems are in agreement with the enzyme-catalysed experimental fractionations for the dissolved phosphate-water system at the longest reaction durations but larger than fractionations derived from bacteria-facilitated exchange and inorganic precipitation experiments as well as natural observations. For the experimental calibrations of oxygen isotope fractionation involving the precipitation of dissolved phosphate species from aqueous solutions, the fractionation between precipitate and water is primarily dictated by the isotope equilibration between the dissolved complex anions and water prior to the precipitation. Therefore, the present results provide a quantitative means to interpret the temperature dependence of oxygen isotope fractionation in inorganic and biogenic phosphates.

  5. Effect of Dissolved Oxygen on Cu Corrosion in Single Wafer Cleaning Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Masayoshi; Yamashita, Yukinari; Futatsuki, Takashi; Shiohara, Morio; Kondo, Seiichi; Saito, Shuichi

    2009-04-01

    We investigated Cu corrosion at the via bottom of multi-layered Cu interconnects that occurred after post-etching wet cleaning and caused via open failures. We found that oxygen was dissolved into de-ionized water (DIW) on the wafer edge from the air atmosphere during the rinse step after chemical cleaning and that Cu was oxidized due to the high oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) of the rinse DIW. To prevent Cu interconnects from being corroded, control of the dissolved oxygen and the ORP of the rinse DIW by decreasing the oxygen concentration of the atmosphere in the cleaning machine as well as by using H2 water is required. This will become indispensable in the cleaning process of the next generation Cu interconnects.

  6. Striped bass, temperature, and dissolved oxygen: a speculative hypothesis for environmental risk

    SciTech Connect

    Coutant, C.C.

    1985-01-01

    Striped bass Morone saxatilis has a paradoxical record of distribution and abundance, including population declines in coastal waters and variable success of freshwater introductions. This record is analyzed for consistency with a hypothesis that striped bass are squeezed between their thermal and dissolved oxygen preferences or requirements. A commonality among diverse field and laboratory observations supports an inherent thermal niche for the species that changes to lower temperatures as fish age. This shift can cause local conditions, especially warm surface strata and deoxygenated deep water, to be incompatible with the success of large fish. Crowding due to temperature preferences alone or coupled with avoidance of low oxygen concentrations can lead to pathology and overfishing, which may contribute to population declines. Through a mixture of evidence and conjecture, the thermal niche-dissolved oxygen hypothesis is proposed as a unified perspective of the habitat requirements of the species that can aid in its study and management. 139 references, 12 figures.

  7. Dissolved Oxygen and Sulfide Define the Boundaries of Thermophilic Microbial Iron Mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St Clair, B.; Shock, E.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial iron cycling can be found in hot springs throughout Yellowstone National Park, where the process is often visibly apparent as red iron oxyhydroxide staining. We measured rates of microbial and abiotic iron oxidation and reduction in systems ranging from pH 2 to 6 and 40° to 90°C. Measurements of numerous solutes, including oxygen, sulfide, and iron, were also made on outflow channels of springs containing apparent iron metabolism. In all cases, > 16 μM dissolved oxygen was required for visible iron oxidation products to occur. Oxygen concentrations below this level do not necessarily preclude microbial iron oxidation coupled to oxygen, only the accumulation of oxidation products. Kinetics experiments conducted at these iron mats suggest that the rate of microbial iron oxidation falls below the rate of microbial reduction when dissolved oxygen falls below this concentration. In outflow channels, this is often visibly apparent as a sharp boundary between the presence and lack of red iron oxidation products. Locations with changing temperature, pH, flow rate and other factors experience changing oxygen concentrations, which causes the boundary to shift from year to year. The boundaries of iron mats are also influenced in several locations by the concentration of total dissolved sulfide. Experiments with enrichment cultures and field observations show that sulfide is not toxic to iron oxidizers, but rather inhibits the accumulation of dissolved oxygen. Microbial and abiotic sulfide oxidation, leading to visible sulfur precipitation, together with degassing of hydrogen sulfide, contribute to keeping oxygen levels low. Typically, only where sulfide concentrations fall below 20 μM are iron mats able to form. Enrichment cultures of iron oxidizers, however, grow easily at levels exceeding 100 μM sulfide. Only a handful of field locations appear to have simultaneous sulfur and iron precipitation zones. Formation of iron oxidation mats occurs at highly

  8. Alkaline earth metal doped tin oxide as a novel oxygen storage material

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Qiang; Yin, Shu; Yoshida, Mizuki; Wu, Xiaoyong; Liu, Bin; Miura, Akira; Takei, Takahiro; Kumada, Nobuhiro; Sato, Tsugio

    2015-09-15

    Alkaline earth metal doped tin oxide (SnO{sub 2}) hollow nanospheres with a diameter of 50 nm have been synthesized successfully via a facial solvothermal route in a very simple system composed of only ethanol, acetic acid, SnCl{sub 4}·5H{sub 2}O and A(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·xH{sub 2}O (A = Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba). The synthesized undoped SnO{sub 2} and A-doped SnO{sub 2} hollow nanospheres were characterized by the oxygen storage capacity (OSC), X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and the Brunauer–Emmet–Teller (BET) technique. The OSC values of all samples were measured using thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis. The incorporation of alkaline earth metal ion into tin oxide greatly enhanced the thermal stability and OSC. Especially, Ba-doped SnO{sub 2} hollow nanospheres calcined at 1000 °C for 20 h with a BET surface area of 61 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} exhibited the considerably high OSC of 457 μmol-O g{sup −1} and good thermal stability. Alkaline earth metal doped tin oxide has the potential to be a novel oxygen storage material.

  9. Optimizations on supply and distribution of dissolved oxygen in constructed wetlands: A review.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huaqing; Hu, Zhen; Zhang, Jian; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Liang, Shuang; Fan, Jinlin; Lu, Shaoyong; Wu, Haiming

    2016-08-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) is one of the most important factors that can influence pollutants removal in constructed wetlands (CWs). However, problems of insufficient oxygen supply and inappropriate oxygen distribution commonly exist in traditional CWs. Detailed analyses of DO supply and distribution characteristics in different types of CWs were introduced. It can be concluded that atmospheric reaeration (AR) served as the promising point on oxygen intensification. The paper summarized possible optimizations of DO in CWs to improve its decontamination performance. Process (tidal flow, drop aeration, artificial aeration, hybrid systems) and parameter (plant, substrate and operating) optimizations are particularly discussed in detail. Since economic and technical defects are still being cited in current studies, future prospects of oxygen research in CWs terminate this review.

  10. Alkaline earth metal cation exchange: effect of mobile counterion and dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Indarawis, Katrina; Boyer, Treavor H

    2012-04-17

    The goal of this research was to provide an improved understanding of the interactions between alkaline earth metals and DOM under conditions that are encountered during drinking water treatment with particular focus on cation exchange. Both magnetically enhanced and nonmagnetic cation exchange resins were converted to Na, Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba mobile counterion forms as a novel approach to investigate the exchange behavior between the cations and the interactions between the cations and DOM. The results show that cation exchange is a robust process for removal of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) considering competition with cations on the resin surface and presence of DOM. DOM was actively involved during the cation exchange process through complexation, adsorption, and coprecipitation reactions. In addition to advancing the understanding of ion exchange processes for water treatment, the results of this work are applicable to membrane pretreatment to minimize fouling, treatment of membrane concentrate, and precipitative softening.

  11. PdNi hollow nanoparticles for improved electrocatalytic oxygen reduction in alkaline environments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Zhang, Weimin; Wang, Jiazhao; Wexler, David; Poynton, Simon D; Slade, Robert C T; Liu, Huakun; Winther-Jensen, Bjorn; Kerr, Robert; Shi, Dongqi; Chen, Jun

    2013-12-11

    Palladium-nickel (PdNi) hollow nanoparticles were synthesized via a modified galvanic replacement method using Ni nanoparticles as sacrificial templates in an aqueous medium. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy show that the as-synthesized nanoparticles are alloyed nanostructures and have hollow interiors with an average particle size of 30 nm and shell thickness of 5 nm. Compared with the commercially available Pt/C or Pd/C catalysts, the synthesized PdNi/C has superior electrocatalytic performance towards the oxygen reduction reaction, which makes it a promising electrocatalyst for alkaline anion exchange membrane fuel cells and alkali-based air-batteries. The electrocatalyst is finally examined in a H2/O2 alkaline anion exchange membrane fuel cell; the results show that such electrocatalysts could work in a real fuel cell application as a more efficient catalyst than state-of-the-art commercially available Pt/C. PMID:24199836

  12. Heterocarbon nanosheets incorporating iron phthalocyanine for oxygen reduction reaction in both alkaline and acidic media.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Koangyong; Ueno, Tomonaga; Panomsuwan, Gasidit; Li, Oi Lun; Saito, Nagahiro

    2016-04-28

    Heterocarbon nanosheets incorporating iron phthalocyanine (FP-NCNs-SP) have been successfully synthesized by a facile one-pot solution plasma process at high repetition frequency. It was found that the Fe-N4 catalytic active sites could be preserved on the FP-NCNs-SP without degradation. The FP-NCNs-SP also possessed large surface area, good conductivity and high degree of graphitization. Electrochemical evaluations demonstrated that NCNs-SP had excellent electrocatalytic activity and selectivity toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline medium through a direct four-electron pathway. Although the significant improvement in ORR activity was clearly observed in acidic medium, it was much poorer than in alkaline medium. We believe that the results presented in this work will shed light on the advanced synthesis and design of ORR electrocatalysts at room temperature with an abundance of catalytically active sites and high ORR performance. PMID:27055883

  13. Heterocarbon nanosheets incorporating iron phthalocyanine for oxygen reduction reaction in both alkaline and acidic media.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Koangyong; Ueno, Tomonaga; Panomsuwan, Gasidit; Li, Oi Lun; Saito, Nagahiro

    2016-04-28

    Heterocarbon nanosheets incorporating iron phthalocyanine (FP-NCNs-SP) have been successfully synthesized by a facile one-pot solution plasma process at high repetition frequency. It was found that the Fe-N4 catalytic active sites could be preserved on the FP-NCNs-SP without degradation. The FP-NCNs-SP also possessed large surface area, good conductivity and high degree of graphitization. Electrochemical evaluations demonstrated that NCNs-SP had excellent electrocatalytic activity and selectivity toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline medium through a direct four-electron pathway. Although the significant improvement in ORR activity was clearly observed in acidic medium, it was much poorer than in alkaline medium. We believe that the results presented in this work will shed light on the advanced synthesis and design of ORR electrocatalysts at room temperature with an abundance of catalytically active sites and high ORR performance.

  14. Derivation of habitat-specific dissolved oxygen criteria for Chesapeake Bay and its tidal tributaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Batiuk, R.A.; Breitburg, D.L.; Diaz, R.J.; Cronin, T. M.; Secor, D.H.; Thursby, G.

    2009-01-01

    The Chesapeake 2000 Agreement committed its state and federal signatories to "define the water quality conditions necessary to protect aquatic living resources" in the Chesapeake Bay (USA) and its tidal tributaries. Hypoxia is one of the key water quality issues addressed as a result of the above Agreement. This paper summarizes the protection goals and specific criteria intended to achieve those goals for addressing hypoxia. The criteria take into account the variety of Bay habitats and the tendency towards low dissolved oxygen in some areas of the Bay. Stressful dissolved oxygen conditions were characterized for a diverse array of living resources of the Chesapeake Bay by different aquatic habitats: migratory fish spawning and nursery, shallow-water, open-water, deep-water, and deep-channel. The dissolved oxygen criteria derived for each of these habitats are intended to protect against adverse effects on survival, growth, reproduction and behavior. The criteria accommodate both spatial and temporal aspects of low oxygen events, and have been adopted into the Chesapeake Bay states - Maryland, Virginia, and Delaware - and the District of Columbia's water quality standards regulations. These criteria, now in the form of state regulatory standards, are driving an array of land-based and wastewater pollution reduction actions across the six-watershed.

  15. Fiber optic spectrophotometry for monitoring dissolved oxygen in a tropical ornamental fish tank environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asundi, Anand K.; Chen, Jun-Wei; He, Duo-Min

    1999-05-01

    Using Fiber Optic Spectro-Photometry (FOSP) methodology, a set of high sensitivity fiber optic oxygen monitoring system performing NDT is developed for fish farming environment. The working principle of the sensor is based on the detection signal at a particular wavelength due to the fluorescence and quenching of coated dye (ruthenium complex) in response to oxygen concentration at the tip of the probe. This paper looks into the application of fiber optics oxygen sensor in an aquatic environment. A comparison study of the optical probe was made with a conventional electrochemical oxygen sensor. Both sensors were setup to monitor the dissolved oxygen of an aquatic system for a period of time. This new methodology offers an alternative choice for monitoring dissolved oxygen. Apart from the possibility to miniaturize the monitoring equipment for aquatic environment, it is also feasible to 'bundle' other chemical sensors together into one single cable, thus achieving compactness, effectiveness and yet without forgoing whatever the traditional electrochemical sensors could offer.

  16. Separating hydrogen and oxygen evolution in alkaline water electrolysis using nickel hydroxide

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Long; Dong, Xiaoli; Wang, Yonggang; Xia, Yongyao

    2016-01-01

    Low-cost alkaline water electrolysis has been considered a sustainable approach to producing hydrogen using renewable energy inputs, but preventing hydrogen/oxygen mixing and efficiently using the instable renewable energy are challenging. Here, using nickel hydroxide as a redox mediator, we decouple the hydrogen and oxygen production in alkaline water electrolysis, which overcomes the gas-mixing issue and may increase the use of renewable energy. In this architecture, the hydrogen production occurs at the cathode by water reduction, and the anodic Ni(OH)2 is simultaneously oxidized into NiOOH. The subsequent oxygen production involves a cathodic NiOOH reduction (NiOOH→Ni(OH)2) and an anodic OH− oxidization. Alternatively, the NiOOH formed during hydrogen production can be coupled with a zinc anode to form a NiOOH-Zn battery, and its discharge product (that is, Ni(OH)2) can be used to produce hydrogen again. This architecture brings a potential solution to facilitate renewables-to-hydrogen conversion. PMID:27199009

  17. Separating hydrogen and oxygen evolution in alkaline water electrolysis using nickel hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long; Dong, Xiaoli; Wang, Yonggang; Xia, Yongyao

    2016-05-20

    Low-cost alkaline water electrolysis has been considered a sustainable approach to producing hydrogen using renewable energy inputs, but preventing hydrogen/oxygen mixing and efficiently using the instable renewable energy are challenging. Here, using nickel hydroxide as a redox mediator, we decouple the hydrogen and oxygen production in alkaline water electrolysis, which overcomes the gas-mixing issue and may increase the use of renewable energy. In this architecture, the hydrogen production occurs at the cathode by water reduction, and the anodic Ni(OH)2 is simultaneously oxidized into NiOOH. The subsequent oxygen production involves a cathodic NiOOH reduction (NiOOH→Ni(OH)2) and an anodic OH(-) oxidization. Alternatively, the NiOOH formed during hydrogen production can be coupled with a zinc anode to form a NiOOH-Zn battery, and its discharge product (that is, Ni(OH)2) can be used to produce hydrogen again. This architecture brings a potential solution to facilitate renewables-to-hydrogen conversion.

  18. Separating hydrogen and oxygen evolution in alkaline water electrolysis using nickel hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Long; Dong, Xiaoli; Wang, Yonggang; Xia, Yongyao

    2016-05-01

    Low-cost alkaline water electrolysis has been considered a sustainable approach to producing hydrogen using renewable energy inputs, but preventing hydrogen/oxygen mixing and efficiently using the instable renewable energy are challenging. Here, using nickel hydroxide as a redox mediator, we decouple the hydrogen and oxygen production in alkaline water electrolysis, which overcomes the gas-mixing issue and may increase the use of renewable energy. In this architecture, the hydrogen production occurs at the cathode by water reduction, and the anodic Ni(OH)2 is simultaneously oxidized into NiOOH. The subsequent oxygen production involves a cathodic NiOOH reduction (NiOOH-->Ni(OH)2) and an anodic OH- oxidization. Alternatively, the NiOOH formed during hydrogen production can be coupled with a zinc anode to form a NiOOH-Zn battery, and its discharge product (that is, Ni(OH)2) can be used to produce hydrogen again. This architecture brings a potential solution to facilitate renewables-to-hydrogen conversion.

  19. Reactive oxygen species accelerate degradation of anion exchange membranes based on polyphenylene oxide in alkaline environments.

    PubMed

    Parrondo, Javier; Wang, Zhongyang; Jung, Min-Suk J; Ramani, Vijay

    2016-07-20

    Anion exchange membranes (AEM) based on polyphenylene oxide (PPO) suffered quaternary-ammonium-cation-site degradation in alkaline environments. Surprisingly, the degradation rate was considerably faster in the presence of molecular oxygen. We postulated that the AEM cation-site catalyzes the reduction of dioxygen by hydroxide ions to yield the superoxide anion radical and the highly reactive hydroxyl free radical. We substantiated our hypothesis by using a phosphorous-containing spin trap (5-diisopropoxy-phosphoryl-5-methyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide) to detect the adducts for both free radicals in situ using (31)P-NMR spectroscopy. PMID:27381009

  20. Shallow Remineralization in the Sargasso Sea Estimated from Seasonal Variations in Oxygen and Dissolved Inorganic Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ono, S.; Ennyu, A.; Najjar, R. G.; Bates, N.

    1998-01-01

    A diagnostic model of the mean annual cycles of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and oxygen below the mixed layer at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) site is presented and used to estimate organic carbon remineralization in the seasonal thermocline. The model includes lateral and vertical advection as well as vertical, diffusion. Very good agreement is found for the remineralization estimates based on oxygen and DIC. Net remineralization averaged from mid-spring to early fall is found to be a maximum between 120 and 140 in. Remineralization integrated between 100 (the compensation depth) and 250 m during this period is estimated to be about 1 mol C/sq m. This flux is consistent with independent estimates of the loss of particulate and dissolved organic carbon.

  1. Dissolved oxygen in the Tualatin River, Oregon, during winter flow conditions, 1991 and 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelly, Valerie J.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the capacity of the Tualatin River to assimilate oxygen-demanding material during winter streamflow conditions, with an emphasis on peak-flow and winter base-flow conditions. The study examined major processes governing concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO) in the river under different streamflow conditions, as well as the effect of streamflow and temperature on these processes. Water-quality modeling was used to evaluate various wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) loading scenarios during winter based-flow conditions as an aid to management decisions in the basin.

  2. Dissolved oxygen alteration of the spectrophotometric analysis and quantification of nucleic acid solutions.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Rupak; Day, Philip J R; Tirelli, Nicola

    2009-04-01

    Nucleic acids are routinely and readily analysed using the A(260)/A(280) ratio, although this method is known to be prone to erroneous results owing to contaminants in solution that absorb at similar wavelengths. The aim of the present review, while highlighting the problems and alternatives of using UV spectrophotometry for nucleic acid measurements, is to bring forth an observational result from our recent studies, namely that DO (dissolved oxygen) and nitrogen can alter the A(260) of aqueous DNA solutions. Our finding is of importance because DO is highly variable between protocols and storage conditions of DNA preparations. The physicochemical nature of the oxygen-DNA interactions is briefly discussed.

  3. Episodes of low dissolved oxygen indicated by ostracodes and sediment geochemistry at Crystal Lake, Illinois, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curry, B. Brandon; Filippelli, G.M.

    2010-01-01

    Low dissolved oxygen during the summer and early fall controls profundal continental ostracode distribution in Crystal Lake (McHenry County), Illinois, favoring Cypria ophthalmica and Physocypria globula at water depths from 6 to 13 m. These species also thrived in the lake's profundal zone from 14,165 to 9600 calendar year before present (cal yr b.p.) during the late Boiling, Allerod, and Younger Dryas chronozones, and early Holocene. Characterized by sand, cemented tubules, large aquatic gastropod shells, and littoral ostracode valves, thin (1-6 cm) tempestite deposits punctuate thicker deposits of organic gyttja from 16,080 to 11,900 cal yr b.p. The succeeding 2300 yr (11,900-9600 cal yr b.p.) lack tempestites, and reconstructed water depths were at their maximum. Deposition of marl under relatively well-oxygenated conditions occurred during the remainder of the Holocene until the arrival of Europeans, when the lake returned to a pattern of seasonally low dissolved oxygen. Such conditions are also indicated in the lake sediment by the speciation of phosphorus, high concentrations of organic carbon, and abundant iron and manganese occluded to mineral grains. Initial low dissolved oxygen was probably caused by the delivery of dissolved P and Fe in shallow groundwater, the chemistry of which was influenced by Spodosol pedogenesis under a spruce forest. The triggering may have been regionally warm and wet conditions associated with retreat of the Lake Michigan lobe (south-central Laurentide Ice Sheet). ?? 2010, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography Inc.

  4. Hydrographic and dissolved oxygen variability in a seasonal Pacific Northwest estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, David A.; O'Neill, Molly A.

    2016-04-01

    Hypoxia is an issue of growing concern for coastal communities. In the California Current System, a prototypical eastern boundary current, attention has been focused on explaining the trend of increasing shelf hypoxia. Despite the regional focus on hypoxia in eastern boundary regions, relatively few studies have examined smaller estuarine systems. Here, we present results from an observational study in Coos Bay, a small estuary on the southern Oregon coast, subject to seasonal upwelling/downwelling winds, strong tides, and wide fluctuations in freshwater input. Coos Bay exhibits characteristics of a salt-wedge type estuary under high river discharge conditions (>150 m3 s-1), a well-mixed estuary under low discharge conditions (0-30 m3 s-1), and partially-mixed estuary during times of moderate discharge (30-150 m3 s-1). The observed vertical stratification and along-estuary salinity gradients correlate significantly with river discharge and tidal forcing. Despite a strong coupling with coastal waters where hypoxia has been present, we do not find evidence for pervasive hypoxia in Coos Bay. We find that upwelling on the shelf advects low dissolved oxygen water into the estuary on synoptic timescales. Early in the upwelling season (April and May), dissolved oxygen minima are found at the estuary mouth, while later in the summer (September), dissolved oxygen minima are found at the riverine end, presumably due to decreased discharge and increased productivity. However, in a given year, the overall strength of the upwelling season is not a good predictor of low dissolved oxygen levels in the estuary.

  5. Laser induced fluorescence measurements of dissolved oxygen concentration fields near air bubble surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sabita; Duke, Steve R.

    2000-09-01

    This article describes a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique for measuring dissolved oxygen concentration gradients in water near the surface of an air bubble. Air bubbles are created at the tip of a needle in a rectangular bubble column filled with water that contains pyrenebutyric acid (PBA). The fluorescence of the PBA is induced by a planar pulse of nitrogen laser light. Oxygen transferring from the air bubble to the deoxygenated water quenches the fluorescence of the PBA. Images of the instantaneous and two-dimensional fluorescence field are obtained by a UV-intensified charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. Quenching of fluorescence intensity is determined at each pixel in the CCD image to measure dissolved oxygen concentration. Two-dimensional concentration fields are presented for a series of measurements of oxygen transfer from 1.6 mm bubbles suspended on the tip of a needle in a quiescent fluid. The images show the spatially varying concentration profiles, gradients, and boundary layer thicknesses at positions around the bubble surfaces. These direct and local measurements of concentration behavior within the mass transfer boundary layer show the potential of this LIF technique for the development of general and mechanistic models for oxygen transport across the air-water interface.

  6. Direct measurement of local dissolved oxygen concentration spatial profiles in a cell culture environment.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Yuki; Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Tsuneda, Satoshi

    2015-06-01

    Controlling local dissolved oxygen concentration (DO) in media is critical for cell or tissue cultures. Various biomaterials and culture methods have been developed to modulate DO. Direct measurement of local DO in cultures has not been validated as a method to test DO modulation. In the present study we developed a DO measurement system equipped with a Clark-type oxygen microelectrode manipulated with 1 μm precision in three-dimensional space to explore potential applications for tissue engineering. By determining the microelectrode tip position precisely against the bottom plane of culture dishes with rat or human cardiac cells in static monolayer culture, we successfully obtained spatial distributions of DO in the medium. Theoretical quantitative predictions fit the obtained data well. Based on analyses of the variance between samples, we found the data reflected "local" oxygen consumption in the vicinity of the microelectrode and the detection of temporal changes in oxygen consumption rates of cultured cells was limited by the diffusion rate of oxygen in the medium. This oxygen measuring system monitors local oxygen consumption and production with high spatial resolution, and can potentially be used with recently developed oxygen modulating biomaterials to design microenvironments and non-invasively monitor local DO dynamics during culture.

  7. Dissolved oxygen concentration in the medium during cell culture: Defects and improvements.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kuan; Zhao, Tong; Huang, Xin; He, Yunlin; Zhou, Yanzhao; Wu, Liying; Wu, Kuiwu; Fan, Ming; Zhu, Lingling

    2016-03-01

    In vitro cell culture has provided a useful model to study the effects of oxygen on cellular behavior. However, it remains unknown whether the in vitro operations themselves affect the medium oxygen levels and the living states of cells. In addition, a prevailing controversy is whether reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is induced by continuous hypoxia or reoxygenation. In this study, we have measured the effects of different types of cell culture containers and the oxygen environment where medium replacement takes place on the actual oxygen tension in the medium. We found that the deviations of oxygen concentrations in the medium are much greater in 25-cm(2) flasks than in 24-well plates and 35-mm dishes. The dissolved oxygen concentrations in the medium were increased after medium replacement in normoxia, but remained unchanged in glove boxes in which the oxygen tension remained at a low level (11.4, 5.7, and 0.5% O2 ). We also found that medium replacement in normoxia increased the number of ROS-positive cells and reduced the cell viability; meanwhile, medium replacement in a glove box did not produce the above effects. Therefore, we conclude that the use of 25-cm(2) flasks should be avoided and demonstrate that continuous hypoxia does not produce ROS, whereas the reoxygenation that occurs during the harvesting of cells leads to ROS and induces cell death.

  8. Evaluation studies on carbon supported catalysts for oxygen reduction in alkaline medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Vakula S.; Singer, Joseph

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes tests designed to predict the performance of fuel cell electrodes, as applied to an alkaline oxygen-fuel cell having specially fabricated porous-carbon electrodes with various amounts of dispersed platinum or gold as active catalysts. The tests are based on information obtained from the techniques of cyclic voltammetry and polarization. The parameters obtained from cyclic voltammetry were of limited use in predicting fuel cell performance of the cathode. On the other hand, half-cell polarization measurements offered close simulation of the oxygen electrode, although a predictor of the electrode life is still lacking. The very low polarization of the Au-10 percent Pt catalytic electrode suggests that single-phase catalysts should be considered.

  9. Enhanced alkalinity and dissolved inorganic carbon release in intertidal sands from the Oosterschelde (The Netherlands) induced by a natural macrofaunal community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, Heiko; Montserrat, Francesc; Meysman, Filip

    2014-05-01

    The influence of bioturbation and bioirrigation in intertidal sandflat sediments from the Oosterschelde (The Netherlands) on the rates and sources of benthic alkalinity (TA) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) generation was examined using measurements of sediment-water fluxes of bromide, oxygen, nutrients, TA and DIC. Sediments from the Oosterschelde typically contain the deep-burrowing polychaete Arenicola marina, the sub-surface bioturbator Macoma balthica and the surface bioturbator Cerastoderma edule. Measurements were carried out in six tanks (106 cm x 87 cm x 20 cm). The sediment was collected in November 2012. Measurements were started in June 2013. Each tank was sampled twice for benthic fluxes over the course of one month. Prior measurements three tanks were defaunated by covering the sediment surface with a black plastic sheet. Benthic flux measurements were carried out in closed plastic chambers (diameter 66 cm). These chambers typically contained about 10 cm sediment and 20 cm overlying water. The tank was completely covered with opaque a black plastic sheet during measurements. The incubation time ranged from 6 to 8 hours. Here we present preliminary results from both experimental runs. High benthic fluxes of TA (10 - 70 mmol m-2 d-1) and DIC (35 - 150 mmol m-2 d-1) were observed in all tanks. Whereas benthic TA and DIC fluxes were significantly higher in faunated tanks, total oxygen uptake (TOU: 30 - 75 mmol m-2 d-1) did not show any meaningful trend between the two treatments. Therefore, the apparent community respiratory quotient (CRQ = DIC/TOU) varied between 0.9 and 3.3, with significant higher values in faunated tanks, suggesting enhanced flushing of DIC produced in deeper layers and released by bioirrigation. This DIC was either produced by anaerobic respiration or carbonate dissolution. To unravel the contribution of carbonate dissolution and anaerobic respiration on the observed TA and DIC fluxes, we further present estimations for relevant

  10. One-dimensional simulation of stratification and dissolved oxygen in McCook Reservoir, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, Dale M.

    2000-01-01

    As part of the Chicagoland Underflow Plan/Tunnel and Reservoir Plan, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Chicago District, plans to build McCook Reservoir.a flood-control reservoir to store combined stormwater and raw sewage (combined sewage). To prevent the combined sewage in the reservoir from becoming anoxic and producing hydrogen sulfide gas, a coarse-bubble aeration system will be designed and installed on the basis of results from CUP 0-D, a zero-dimensional model, and MAC3D, a three-dimensional model. Two inherent assumptions in the application of MAC3D are that density stratification in the simulated water body is minimal or not present and that surface heat transfers are unimportant and, therefore, may be neglected. To test these assumptions, the previously tested, one-dimensional Dynamic Lake Model (DLM) was used to simulate changes in temperature and dissolved oxygen in the reservoir after a 1-in-100-year event. Results from model simulations indicate that the assumptions made in MAC3D application are valid as long as the aeration system, with an air-flow rate of 1.2 cubic meters per second or more, is operated while the combined sewage is stored in the reservoir. Results also indicate that the high biochemical oxygen demand of the combined sewage will quickly consume the dissolved oxygen stored in the reservoir and the dissolved oxygen transferred through the surface of the reservoir; therefore, oxygen must be supplied by either the rising bubbles of the aeration system (a process not incorporated in DLM) or some other technique to prevent anoxia.

  11. Effects of reduced dissolved oxygen concentrations on physiology and fluorescence of hermatypic corals and benthic algae.

    PubMed

    Haas, Andreas F; Smith, Jennifer E; Thompson, Melissa; Deheyn, Dimitri D

    2014-01-01

    While shifts from coral to seaweed dominance have become increasingly common on coral reefs and factors triggering these shifts successively identified, the primary mechanisms involved in coral-algae interactions remain unclear. Amongst various potential mechanisms, algal exudates can mediate increases in microbial activity, leading to localized hypoxic conditions which may cause coral mortality in the direct vicinity. Most of the processes likely causing such algal exudate induced coral mortality have been quantified (e.g., labile organic matter release, increased microbial metabolism, decreased dissolved oxygen availability), yet little is known about how reduced dissolved oxygen concentrations affect competitive dynamics between seaweeds and corals. The goals of this study were to investigate the effects of different levels of oxygen including hypoxic conditions on a common hermatypic coral Acropora yongei and the common green alga Bryopsis pennata. Specifically, we examined how photosynthetic oxygen production, dark and daylight adapted quantum yield, intensity and anatomical distribution of the coral innate fluorescence, and visual estimates of health varied with differing background oxygen conditions. Our results showed that the algae were significantly more tolerant to extremely low oxygen concentrations (2-4 mg L(-1)) than corals. Furthermore corals could tolerate reduced oxygen concentrations, but only until a given threshold determined by a combination of exposure time and concentration. Exceeding this threshold led to rapid loss of coral tissue and mortality. This study concludes that hypoxia may indeed play a significant role, or in some cases may even be the main cause, for coral tissue loss during coral-algae interaction processes.

  12. Effects of reduced dissolved oxygen concentrations on physiology and fluorescence of hermatypic corals and benthic algae.

    PubMed

    Haas, Andreas F; Smith, Jennifer E; Thompson, Melissa; Deheyn, Dimitri D

    2014-01-01

    While shifts from coral to seaweed dominance have become increasingly common on coral reefs and factors triggering these shifts successively identified, the primary mechanisms involved in coral-algae interactions remain unclear. Amongst various potential mechanisms, algal exudates can mediate increases in microbial activity, leading to localized hypoxic conditions which may cause coral mortality in the direct vicinity. Most of the processes likely causing such algal exudate induced coral mortality have been quantified (e.g., labile organic matter release, increased microbial metabolism, decreased dissolved oxygen availability), yet little is known about how reduced dissolved oxygen concentrations affect competitive dynamics between seaweeds and corals. The goals of this study were to investigate the effects of different levels of oxygen including hypoxic conditions on a common hermatypic coral Acropora yongei and the common green alga Bryopsis pennata. Specifically, we examined how photosynthetic oxygen production, dark and daylight adapted quantum yield, intensity and anatomical distribution of the coral innate fluorescence, and visual estimates of health varied with differing background oxygen conditions. Our results showed that the algae were significantly more tolerant to extremely low oxygen concentrations (2-4 mg L(-1)) than corals. Furthermore corals could tolerate reduced oxygen concentrations, but only until a given threshold determined by a combination of exposure time and concentration. Exceeding this threshold led to rapid loss of coral tissue and mortality. This study concludes that hypoxia may indeed play a significant role, or in some cases may even be the main cause, for coral tissue loss during coral-algae interaction processes. PMID:24482757

  13. Concentrations of dissolved oxygen in the lower Puyallup and White rivers, Washington, August and September 2000 and 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ebbert, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, Washington State Department of Ecology, and Puyallup Tribe of Indians conducted a study in August and September 2001 to assess factors affecting concentrations of dissolved oxygen in the lower Puyallup and White Rivers, Washington. The study was initiated because observed concentrations of dissolved oxygen in the lower Puyallup River fell to levels ranging from less than 1 milligram per liter (mg/L) to about 6 mg/L on several occasions in September 2000. The water quality standard for the concentration of dissolved oxygen in the Puyallup River is 8 mg/L.This study concluded that inundation of the sensors with sediment was the most likely cause of the low concentrations of dissolved oxygen observed in September 2000. The conclusion was based on (1) knowledge gained when a dissolved-oxygen sensor became covered with sediment in August 2001, (2) the fact that, with few exceptions, concentrations of dissolved oxygen in the lower Puyallup and White Rivers did not fall below 8 mg/L in August and September 2001, and (3) an analysis of other mechanisms affecting concentrations of dissolved oxygen.The analysis of other mechanisms indicated that they are unlikely to cause steep declines in concentrations of dissolved oxygen like those observed in September 2000. Five-day biochemical oxygen demand ranged from 0.22 to 1.78 mg/L (mean of 0.55 mg/L), and river water takes only about 24 hours to flow through the study reach. Photosynthesis and respiration cause concentrations of dissolved oxygen in the lower Puyallup River to fluctuate as much as about 1 mg/L over a 24-hour period in August and September. Release of water from Lake Tapps for the purpose of hydropower generation often lowered concentrations of dissolved oxygen downstream in the White River by about 1 mg/L. The effect was smaller farther downstream in the Puyallup River at river mile 5.8, but was still observable as a slight decrease in concentrations of dissolved oxygen caused by

  14. Cycling of Dissolved Organic Phosphorus and Alkaline Phosphatase Activity in Euphotic Zone of the Western North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzumura, M.

    2010-12-01

    Phosphorus is an essential nutrient for marine organisms. In oligotrophic environments, concentrations of dissolved inorganic phosphate (SRP), the most bioavailable form of phosphorus, are low and have been hypothesized to constrain the primary productivity. Evidence has been found that dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) supports a significant fraction of primary production through hydrolytic remineralization of DOP to SRP by alkaline phosphatase (APA). In this study, DOP biogeochemistry was investigated at three locations of the open-ocean environment in the Kuroshio region and at a semi-eutrophic coastal site of the western North Pacific. Concentrations of SRP, DOP and hydrolyzable ester-P were measured in the euphotic zone. Kinetic parameters of APA were determined using a fluorogenic substrate, including potential maximum velocity (Vmax), apparent Michaelis-Menten half-saturation constant (Km), and turnover time (TA) of APA hydrolyzable DOP. SRP concentrations were quite low (≤ 10 nM) in the surface seawater and rapidly increased below the chlorophyll a maximum layer (CML). DOP concentration ranged from 29 to 223 nM. Above the CML, DOP composed a major fraction accounting for 60-100% of dissolved total P. A significant linear relationship was found between the concentrations of SRP and hydrolyzable ester-P (R2 = 0.83, P < 0.01). This suggests active utilization of ester-P under phosphate-depleted conditions. In the Kuroshio region, Vmax of APA exhibited the highest value at the surface water (0 m) and decreased rapidly with depth, while at the coastal site the peak value was found at CML. TA of hydrolyzable DOP was quite variable among the locations and increased with depth especially below CML. The estimated values of in situ hydrolysis rate were much lower (2-34%) than the potential Vmax which was determined with the addition of an excess amount of the substrate. The results suggest that marine microbes can efficiently and rapidly utilize hydrolyzable DOP

  15. Self-emulsification of alkaline-dissolved clove bud oil by whey protein, gum arabic, lecithin, and their combinations.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yangchao; Zhang, Yue; Pan, Kang; Critzer, Faith; Davidson, P Michael; Zhong, Qixin

    2014-05-14

    Low-cost emulsification technologies using food ingredients are critical to various applications. In the present study, a novel self-emulsification technique was studied to prepare clove bud oil (CBO) emulsions, without specialized equipment or organic solvents. CBO was first dissolved in hot alkaline solutions, added at 1% v/v into neutral solutions with 1% w/v emulsifier composed of whey protein concentrate (WPC), gum arabic, lecithin, or their equal mass mixtures, and adjusted to pH 7.0. The self-emulsification process did not affect UV-vis absorption spectrum, reversed-phase HPLC chromatogram, or antimicrobial activity of CBO against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes Scott A, and Salmonella Enteritidis. The entrapment efficiency after extraction by petroleum ether was determined to be about 80%. Most emulsions were stable during 7 days of storage. Emulsions prepared with WPC had smaller particles, whereas emulsions prepared with emulsifier mixtures had more stable particle dimensions. The studied self-emulsification technique may find numerous applications in the preparation of low-cost food emulsions.

  16. Self-emulsification of alkaline-dissolved clove bud oil by whey protein, gum arabic, lecithin, and their combinations.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yangchao; Zhang, Yue; Pan, Kang; Critzer, Faith; Davidson, P Michael; Zhong, Qixin

    2014-05-14

    Low-cost emulsification technologies using food ingredients are critical to various applications. In the present study, a novel self-emulsification technique was studied to prepare clove bud oil (CBO) emulsions, without specialized equipment or organic solvents. CBO was first dissolved in hot alkaline solutions, added at 1% v/v into neutral solutions with 1% w/v emulsifier composed of whey protein concentrate (WPC), gum arabic, lecithin, or their equal mass mixtures, and adjusted to pH 7.0. The self-emulsification process did not affect UV-vis absorption spectrum, reversed-phase HPLC chromatogram, or antimicrobial activity of CBO against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes Scott A, and Salmonella Enteritidis. The entrapment efficiency after extraction by petroleum ether was determined to be about 80%. Most emulsions were stable during 7 days of storage. Emulsions prepared with WPC had smaller particles, whereas emulsions prepared with emulsifier mixtures had more stable particle dimensions. The studied self-emulsification technique may find numerous applications in the preparation of low-cost food emulsions. PMID:24758517

  17. Mechanistic study of nickel based catalysts for oxygen evolution and methanol oxidation in alkaline medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dayi; Minteer, Shelley D.

    2015-06-01

    Nickel based catalysts have been studied as catalysts for either organic compound (especially methanol) oxidation or oxygen evolution reactions in alkaline medium for decades, but methanol oxidation and oxygen evolution reactions occur at a similar potential range and pH with nickel based catalysts. In contrast to previous studies, we studied these two reactions simultaneously under various pH and methanol concentrations with electrodes containing a series of NiOOH surface concentrations. We found that nickel based catalysts are more suitable to be used as oxygen evolution catalysts than methanol oxidation catalysts based on the observation that: The rate-determining step of methanol oxidation involves NiOOH, OH- and methanol while high methanol to OH- ratio could poison the NiOOH sites. Since NiOOH is involved in the rate-determining step, methanol oxidation suffers from high overpotential and oxygen evolution is favored over methanol oxidation in the presence of an equivalent amount (0.1 M) of alkali and methanol.

  18. Direct and dissolved oxygen involved photodegradation of MeO-PBDEs in water.

    PubMed

    Xue, Weifeng; Chen, Jingwen; Xie, Qing

    2016-04-15

    Photodegradation has been proved to be a crucial way of elimination for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and hydroxylated PBDEs (HO-PBDEs). However, it is still unknown whether methoxylated PBDEs (MeO-PBDEs) can also undergo photodegradation. In this study, 4'-MeO-BDE-17, 5-MeO-BDE-47, 5'-MeO-BDE-99, 6-MeO-BDE-47 and 6-MeO-BDE-85 were selected as targets to investigate their photodegradation in water. Meanwhile, the effects of dissolved oxygen on the photoreactions of MeO-PBDEs were also unveiled. Simulated sunlight experiments indicate that 6-MeO-BDE-47 resisted photodegradation for 20h, while other MeO-PBDEs underwent relatively fast photodegradation, which was greatly susceptible to the substitution patterns of methoxyl and bromine. Photo-excited MeO-PBDEs (except 6-MeO-BDE-47) can sensitize dissolved oxygen to generate singlet oxygen ((1)O2) and superoxide anion radical (O2(-)). The generated (1)O2 cannot degrade the MeO-PBDEs, whereas O2(-) was reactive with MeO-PBDEs. The contribution of dissolved oxygen to the photodegradation of 4'-MeO-BDE-17 and 6-MeO-BDE-85 was negligible; while the negative contribution was observed for 5-MeO-BDE-47 and 5'-MeO-BDE-99. Hydrodebromination was a crucial photodegradation pathway for MeO-PBDEs (excluding 4'-MeO-BDE-17 and 6-MeO-BDE-47). Eventually, direct photolysis half-lives of MeO-PBDEs except 6-MeO-BDE-47 in the surface waters at 40 N latitude were calculated to be 1.35-3.46d in midsummer and 6.39-17.47d in midwinter. PMID:26802632

  19. PHOTOGENERATION OF SINGLET OXYGEN AND FREE RADICALS IN DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER ISOLATED FROM THE MISSISSIPPI AND ATCHAFALAYA RIVER PLUMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The photoreactivity to UV light of ultrafiltered dissolved organic matter (DOM) collected during cruises along salinity transects in the Mississippi and Atchafalaya River plumes was examined by measuring photogenerated free radicals and singlet molecular oxygen (1O2) photosensiti...

  20. The Influence of Physical Forcing on Bottom-water Dissolved Oxygen within the Caloosahatchee River Estuary, FL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental Fluid Dynamic Code (EFDC), a numerical estuarine and coastal ocean circulation hydrodynamic model, was used to simulate the distribution of dissolved oxygen (DO), salinity, temperature, nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus), and chlorophyll a in the Caloosahatchee Riv...

  1. Characterization of water quality and simulation of temperature, nutrients, biochemical oxygen demand, and dissolved oxygen in the Wateree River, South Carolina, 1996-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feaster, Toby D.; Conrads, Paul A.

    2000-01-01

    In May 1996, the U.S. Geological Survey entered into a cooperative agreement with the Kershaw County Water and Sewer Authority to characterize and simulate the water quality in the Wateree River, South Carolina. Longitudinal profiling of dissolved-oxygen concentrations during the spring and summer of 1996 revealed dissolved-oxygen minimums occurring upstream from the point-source discharges. The mean dissolved-oxygen decrease upstream from the effluent discharges was 2.0 milligrams per liter, and the decrease downstream from the effluent discharges was 0.2 milligram per liter. Several theories were investigated to obtain an improved understanding of the dissolved-oxygen dynamics in the upper Wateree River. Data suggest that the dissolved-oxygen concentration decrease is associated with elevated levels of oxygen-consuming nutrients and metals that are flowing into the Wateree River from Lake Wateree. Analysis of long-term streamflow and water-quality data collected at two U.S. Geological Survey gaging stations suggests that no strong correlation exists between streamflow and dissolved-oxygen concentrations in the Wateree River. However, a strong negative correlation does exist between dissolved-oxygen concentrations and water temperature. Analysis of data from six South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control monitoring stations for 1980.95 revealed decreasing trends in ammonia nitrogen at all stations where data were available and decreasing trends in 5-day biochemical oxygen demand at three river stations. The influence of various hydrologic and point-source loading conditions on dissolved-oxygen concentrations in the Wateree River were determined by using results from water-quality simulations by the Branched Lagrangian Transport Model. The effects of five tributaries and four point-source discharges were included in the model. Data collected during two synoptic water-quality samplings on June 23.25 and August 11.13, 1997, were used to calibrate

  2. The Fluorescent Properties of Dissolved Organic Matter and Assessment of Total Nitrogen in Overlying Water with Different Dissolved Oxygen Conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang Hua; Kuan, Wang; Song, Jian; Zhang, Yong; Huang, Ming; Huang, Jian; Zhu, Jing; Huang, Shan; Wang, Meng

    2016-03-01

    This paper used excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy (EEMs) to probe the fluorescence properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the overlying water with different dissolved oxygen (DO) conditions, investigating the relationship between protein-like fluorescence intensity and total nitrogen concentration. The resulting fluorescence spectra revealed three protein-like components (high-excitation wavelength tyrosine, low-excitation wavelength tyrosine, low-excitation wavelength tryptophan) and two fulvic-like components (ultraviolet fulvic-like components, visible fulvic-like components) in the overlying water. Moreover, the protein-like components were dominant in the overlying water's DOM. The fluorescence intensity of the protein-like components decreased significantly after aeration. Two of the protein-like components--the low-excitation wavelength tyrosine and the low-excitation wavelength tryptophan--were more susceptible to degradation by microorganisms within the degradable organic matter with respect to the high-excitation wavelength tyrosine. In contrast, the ultraviolet and visible fulvic-like fluorescence intensity increased along with increasing DO concentration, indicating that the fulvic-like components were part of the refractory organics. The fluorescence indices of the DOM in the overlying water were between 1.65-1.80, suggesting that the sources of the DOM were related to terrigenous sediments and microbial metabolic processes, with the primary source being the contribution from microbial metabolism. The fluorescence indices increased along with DO growth, which showed that microbial biomass and microbial activity gradually increased with increasing DO while microbial metabolism also improved, which also increased the biogenic components in the overlying water. The fluorescence intensity of the high-excitation wavelength tyrosine peak A showed a good linear relationship with the total nitrogen concentration at higher DO concentrations of 2

  3. The Fluorescent Properties of Dissolved Organic Matter and Assessment of Total Nitrogen in Overlying Water with Different Dissolved Oxygen Conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang Hua; Kuan, Wang; Song, Jian; Zhang, Yong; Huang, Ming; Huang, Jian; Zhu, Jing; Huang, Shan; Wang, Meng

    2016-03-01

    This paper used excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy (EEMs) to probe the fluorescence properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the overlying water with different dissolved oxygen (DO) conditions, investigating the relationship between protein-like fluorescence intensity and total nitrogen concentration. The resulting fluorescence spectra revealed three protein-like components (high-excitation wavelength tyrosine, low-excitation wavelength tyrosine, low-excitation wavelength tryptophan) and two fulvic-like components (ultraviolet fulvic-like components, visible fulvic-like components) in the overlying water. Moreover, the protein-like components were dominant in the overlying water's DOM. The fluorescence intensity of the protein-like components decreased significantly after aeration. Two of the protein-like components--the low-excitation wavelength tyrosine and the low-excitation wavelength tryptophan--were more susceptible to degradation by microorganisms within the degradable organic matter with respect to the high-excitation wavelength tyrosine. In contrast, the ultraviolet and visible fulvic-like fluorescence intensity increased along with increasing DO concentration, indicating that the fulvic-like components were part of the refractory organics. The fluorescence indices of the DOM in the overlying water were between 1.65-1.80, suggesting that the sources of the DOM were related to terrigenous sediments and microbial metabolic processes, with the primary source being the contribution from microbial metabolism. The fluorescence indices increased along with DO growth, which showed that microbial biomass and microbial activity gradually increased with increasing DO while microbial metabolism also improved, which also increased the biogenic components in the overlying water. The fluorescence intensity of the high-excitation wavelength tyrosine peak A showed a good linear relationship with the total nitrogen concentration at higher DO concentrations of 2

  4. Biomarkers of Dissolved Oxygen Stress in Oysters: A Tool for Restoration and Management Efforts

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Heather K.; Boettcher, Anne; Carmichael, Ruth H.

    2014-01-01

    The frequency and intensity of anoxic and hypoxic events are increasing worldwide, creating stress on the organisms that inhabit affected waters. To understand the effects of low dissolved oxygen stress on oysters, hatchery-reared oysters were placed in cages and deployed along with continuously recording environmental data sondes at a reef site in Mobile Bay, AL that typically experiences low oxygen conditions. To detect and measure sublethal stress, we measured growth and survival of oysters as well as expression of three biomarkers, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) and phospho-p38 MAP kinase, in tissues from juvenile and adult oysters. Survival rates were high for both juvenile and adult oysters. Expression levels of each of the 3 isoforms of HSP 70 were negatively correlated to dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations, suggesting that HSP 70 is useful to quantify sublethal effects of DO stress. Results for HIF and phospho-p38 MAP kinase were inconclusive. Test deployments of oysters to assess expression of HSP 70 relative to environmental conditions will be useful, in addition to measuring abiotic factors, to identify appropriate sites for restoration, particularly to capture negative effects of habitat quality on biota before lethal impacts are incurred. PMID:25116465

  5. An optical sensor for monitoring of dissolved oxygen based on phase detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Weiwei; Zhou, Na; Chen, Lingxin; Li, Bowei

    2013-05-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) monitoring is of vital importance to water treatment, sewage treatment, aquaculture and biological research. The traditional method for DO detection is an electrochemical method called the Clark electrode. This electrochemical method has been widely used as it is simple and inexpensive; however, the critical drawback for this kind of sensor is that it is easily affected by pH variations, and by the concentration of H2S and SO2. Optical sensing for DO detection is a newly developed technology, which can avoid most of the drawbacks of the electrochemical sensors. A DO sensor using fluorescence detection is described in this paper. The oxygen concentration measurement principle is based on optical phase detection, which is more precise than the traditional intensity detection method. Emission is carried out by a low-cost, specially designed light emitting diode (LED) source. To avoid an unwanted phase shift, a reference LED is used to improve the degree of accuracy. The sensing material for fluorescence is a ruthenium complex. A discrete Fourier transform (DFT) algorithm was used for the phase calculation. The system was designed into a stainless steel probe, and dissolved oxygen concentration measurement results for various applications are presented in this paper.

  6. Effects of temperature and dissolved oxygen content on oxygen consumption rate of Chinese prawn, giant tiger prawn and giant freshwater prawn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xi-Lin; Zang, Wei-Ling; Wang, Wei-Dong; Shi, Yong-Hai; Liu, Wen-Cui; Xu, Gui-Rong; Li, Shi-Hua

    1999-06-01

    Temperature and the dissolved oxygen content affect the oxygen consumption of juveniles of Chinese prawn ( Penaeus chinensis), giant tiger prawn ( P. monodon) and giant freshwater prawn ( Macrobrachium rosenbergii). There is good correlation between the oxygen consumption rate ( V, mg/g·h) of the above three prawn species and the water temperature, and dissolved oxygen. In the range of test temperature, V increased with water temperature and dissolved oxygen content. The V of the above three prawn species increased 0.085 mg/g·h, 0.093 mg/g·h and 0.08 mg/g·h respectively with each °C of rising temperature. The comatose point and stifling point of the juveniles rose obviously at unsuitable temperature.

  7. Development of Cobalt Hydroxide as a Bifunctional Catalyst for Oxygen Electrocatalysis in Alkaline Solution.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yi; Du, Guojun; Yang, Shiliu; Xu, Chaohe; Lu, Meihua; Liu, Zhaolin; Lee, Jim Yang

    2015-06-17

    Co(OH)2 in the form of hexagonal nanoplates synthesized by a simple hydrothermal reaction has shown even greater activity than cobalt oxides (CoO and Co3O4) in oxygen reduction and oxygen evolution reactions (ORR and OER) under alkaline conditions. The bifunctionality for oxygen electrocatalysis as shown by the OER-ORR potential difference (ΔE) could be reduced to as low as 0.87 V, comparable to the state-of-the-art non-noble bifunctional catalysts, when the Co(OH)2 nanoplates were compounded with nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (N-rGO). The good performance was attributed to the nanosizing of Co(OH)2 and the synergistic interaction between Co(OH)2 and N-rGO. A zinc-air cell assembled with a Co(OH)2-air electrode also showed a performance comparable to that of the state-of-the-art zinc-air cells. The combination of bifunctional activity and operational stability establishes Co(OH)2 as an effective low-cost alternative to the platinum group metal catalysts. PMID:25997179

  8. Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes as catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mei; Yang, Duangguang; Chen, Hongbiao; Gao, Yong; Li, Huaming

    2015-04-01

    A novel electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is fabricated by directly annealing oxidized carbon nanotubes and tripyrrolyl[1,3,5]triazine in nitrogen. The structural and chemical properties of the resultant N-doped carbon nanotubes (NCNTs) are systematically investigated. The electrocatalytic activity of the NCNTs towards ORR in O2-saturated 0.1 M KOH electrolyte is evaluated using rotating disk electrode voltammetry. The results demonstrate that the as-prepared NCNT-900 (annealed at 900 °C) exhibits excellent electrochemical performance towards ORR in alkaline medium with an onset potential of -0.038 V (vs Ag/AgCl), a high kinetic current density of 31.26 mA cm-2 at -0.25 V, a dominant four-electron transfer mechanism (n = 3.88 at -0.25 V), and excellent methanol tolerance and durability. The results obtained are significant for the development of N-doped carbon-based electrocatalysts for alkaline fuel cells.

  9. Novel VN/C nanocomposites as methanol-tolerant oxygen reduction electrocatalyst in alkaline electrolyte

    PubMed Central

    Huang, K.; Bi, K.; Liang, C.; Lin, S.; Zhang, R.; Wang, W. J.; Tang, H. L.; Lei, M.

    2015-01-01

    A novel VN/C nanostructure consisting of VN nanoparticles and graphite-dominant carbon layers is synthesized by nitridation of V2O5 using melamine as reductant under inert atmosphere. High crystalline VN nanoparticles are observed to be uniformly distributed in carbon layers with an average size of ca13.45 nm. Moreover, the electrocatalytic performance of VN/C towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline electrolyte is fascinating. The results show that VN/C has a considerable ORR activity, including a 75 percent value of the diffusion-limited current density and a 0.11 V smaller value about the onset potential with respect to Pt/C catalyst. Moreover, the excellent methanol-tolerance performance of VN/C has also been verified with 3 M methanol. Combined with the competitive prices, this VN/C nanocomposite can serve as an appropriate non-precious methanol-tolerant ORR catalyst for alkaline fuel cells. PMID:26100367

  10. Temperature dependent surface electrochemistry on Pt singlecrystals in alkaline electrolyte: Part 3: The oxygen reductionreaction

    SciTech Connect

    tom.schmidt@psi.ch

    2002-08-01

    The kinetics of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) was studied in alkaline electrolyte at 293-333K on Pt(hkl) surfaces by means of the rotating ring-disk electrode technique with solution phase peroxide detected at the ring electrode. The ORR on Pt(hkl) was found to be highly structure sensitive with activities increasing in the sequence (111) > (100) > (110)(1x2). Very similar apparent activation energies (37-45 {+-} 5 kJmol-1, {eta} = 0.35 V) were found on all three surfaces. Furthermore, at elevated temperature, significantly smaller amounts of peroxide are formed in agreement with enhanced peroxide reduction rates by increasing temperature. We found that the Tafel slopes on all three single crystal surfaces decrease with increasing temperature, indicating that the logi-E relationship is not represented by a classical Butler-Volmer expression. Based on the kinetic analysis of the polarization curves and from simulations of logi-E curves, we propose that the rate of the ORR on Pt(hkl) in alkaline solution is mainly determined by the potential/temperature dependent surface coverage by OH{sub ad}. We propose two modes of action of the OH{sub ad}: (i) OH{sub ad} blocks the adsorption of O{sub 2} on active platinum sites; and (ii) OH{sub ad} alters the adsorption energy of intermediates which are formed during the ORR on Pt sites.

  11. Novel VN/C nanocomposites as methanol-tolerant oxygen reduction electrocatalyst in alkaline electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Huang, K; Bi, K; Liang, C; Lin, S; Zhang, R; Wang, W J; Tang, H L; Lei, M

    2015-01-01

    A novel VN/C nanostructure consisting of VN nanoparticles and graphite-dominant carbon layers is synthesized by nitridation of V2O5 using melamine as reductant under inert atmosphere. High crystalline VN nanoparticles are observed to be uniformly distributed in carbon layers with an average size of ca13.45 nm. Moreover, the electrocatalytic performance of VN/C towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline electrolyte is fascinating. The results show that VN/C has a considerable ORR activity, including a 75 percent value of the diffusion-limited current density and a 0.11 V smaller value about the onset potential with respect to Pt/C catalyst. Moreover, the excellent methanol-tolerance performance of VN/C has also been verified with 3 M methanol. Combined with the competitive prices, this VN/C nanocomposite can serve as an appropriate non-precious methanol-tolerant ORR catalyst for alkaline fuel cells. PMID:26100367

  12. The effect of the use of plastic sampling containers on laboratory measurements of dissolved oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Fehring, J.P.

    1990-10-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations are often used to define the water quality of a stream or reservoir. In the Tennessee Valley, there is a commonly held belief that water quality in general, and DO in particular, is declining in TVA reservoirs. In 1980, TVA conducted a study of DO trends in the tailraces of Tennessee River Dams and found a downward trend in most reservoirs, with the greatest decrease in the downstream reservoirs. This report examines a change in sampling procedures which may have contributed to the perception of declining DO. 6 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  13. Synergy among transition element, nitrogen, and carbon for oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhou Peng; Liu, Zi Xuan; Zhu, Kun Ning; Li, Zhuo; Liu, Bin Hong

    2012-12-01

    A series of M-doped polypyrrole (PPy)-modified BP2000 catalysts (M = Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu) are synthesized using the hydrothermal method. The synergy among a transition element, nitrogen, and carbon for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline medium is discussed based on the physical characterization and electrochemical analyses of the Co-doped PPy-modified BP2000. PPy is found to adhere carbon black particles together to form a porous 3D network during the PPy modification on BP2000. PPy reconfiguration occurs during the hydrothermal treatment process. The individual interactions between BP and PPy, BP and Co, and Co and PPy exhibit insignificant effects on the enhancement of ORR. The cooperative interaction among Co, N, and C plays a very important role in the enhancement of ORR. The doping effect of transition-metal salt on ORR enhancement depends on the nature of the transition element and the corresponding anion.

  14. A simple fluorescent probe for the determination of dissolved oxygen based on the catalytic activation of oxygen by iron(II) chelates.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wei; Abbas, M E; Zhu, Lihua; Zhou, Wenyi; Li, Kejing; Tang, Heqing; Liu, Shushen; Li, Weiying

    2009-04-27

    This work aims at establishing a simple fluorescent probe for the determination of dissolved oxygen. It is found that iron(II) ions activate oxygen to produce reactive species being capable of oxidizing non-fluorescent coumarin to fluorescent 7-hydroxycoumarin. However, this process is not effective because the yield of the reactive species is very low in the presence of simple iron(II) salts alone. The addition of organic ligands such as oxalate results in the formation of complexes between iron(II) ions, which leads to considerable increase in the yield of reactive species (such as hydroxyl radicals) and then increase in the fluorescence intensity of 7-hydroxycoumarin to a significant level. It has been observed that in the mixture solution of iron(II) ions, ligand, coumarin, and dissolved oxygen, there is an excellent linear response between the fluorescence and dissolved oxygen. Therefore, a new spectrofluorimetric method has been proposed for the determination of dissolved oxygen by using catalytic activation of O(2) by iron(II) chelates. Under optimized conditions, a linear correlation (r=0.995) has been observed between the fluorescence intensity of 7-hydroxycoumarin at 456 nm and the concentration of dissolved oxygen over the range of 0.96-9.22 mg L(-1). The limit of detection for dissolved oxygen at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 has been estimated to be 0.35 mg L(-1). The proposed method has been applied to determine the concentration of dissolved oxygen in practical water samples with results as satisfactory as that obtained by the standard iodometric method.

  15. Simulating unsteady transport of nitrogen, biochemical oxygen demand, and dissolved oxygen in the Chattahoochee River downstream from Atlanta, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jobson, Harvey E.

    1985-01-01

    As part of an intensive water-quality assessment of the Chattahoochee River, repetitive water-quality measurements were made at 12 sites along a 69-kilometer reach of the river downstream of Atlanta, Georgia. Concentrations of seven constituents (temperature, dissolved oxygen, ultimate carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), organic nitrogen, ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate) were obtained during two periods of 36 hours, one starting on August 30, 1976, and the other starting on May 31, 1977. The study reach contains one large and several small sewage outfalls and receives the cooling water from two large powerplants. An unsteady water-quality model of the Lagrangian type was calibrated using the 1977 data and verified using the 1976 data. The model provided a good means of interpreting these data even though both the flow and the pollution loading rates were highly unsteady. A kinetic model of the cascade type accurately described the physical and biochemical processes occurring in the river. All rate coefficients, except reaeration coefficients and those describing the resuspension of BOD, were fitted to the 1977 data and verified using the 1976 data. The study showed that, at steady low flow, about 38 percent of the BOD settled without exerting an oxygen demand. At high flow, this settled BOD was resuspended and exerted an immediate oxygen demand. About 70 percent of the ammonia extracted from the water column was converted to nitrite, but the fate of the remaining 30 percent is unknown. Photosynthetic production was not an important factor in the oxygen balance during either run.

  16. Singlet oxygen in the coupled photochemical and biochemical oxidation of dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Cory, Rose M; McNeill, Kristopher; Cotner, James P; Amado, Andre; Purcell, Jeremiah M; Marshall, Alan G

    2010-05-15

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is a significant (>700 Pg) global C pool. Transport of terrestrial DOM to the inland waters and coastal zones represents the largest flux of reduced C from land to water (215 Tg yr(-1)) (Meybeck, M. Am. J. Sci. 1983, 282, 401-450). Oxidation of DOM by interdependent photochemical and biochemical processes largely controls the fate of DOM entering surface waters. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been hypothesized to play a significant role in the photooxidation of DOM, because they may oxidize the fraction of DOM that is inaccessible to direct photochemical degradation by sunlight. We followed the effects of photochemically produced singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)) on DOM by mass spectrometry with (18)O-labeled oxygen, to understand how (1)O(2)-mediated transformations of DOM may lead to altered DOM bioavailability. The photochemical oxygen uptake by DOM attributed to (1)O(2) increased with DOM concentration, yet it remained a minority contributor to photochemical oxygen uptake even at very high DOM concentrations. When DOM samples were exposed to (1)O(2)-generating conditions (Rose Bengal and visible light), increases were observed in DOM constituents with higher oxygen content and release of H(2)O(2) was detected. Differential effects of H(2)O(2) and (1)O(2)-treated DOM showed that (1)O(2)-treated DOM led to slower bacterial growth rates relative to unmodified DOM. Results of this study suggested that the net effect of the reactions between singlet oxygen and DOM may be production of partially oxidized substrates with correspondingly lower potential biological energy yield.

  17. An Estimate of the Dissolved oxygen Concentration in Subglacial Lake Vostok

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipenkov, V.; Istomin, V.; Bulat, S.; Raynaud, D.; Petit, J.

    2002-05-01

    The upper section of 3.5 km thick glacier ice overlying Lake Vostok is characterized by abundance of air bubbles trapped during pore closure near the surface of the ice sheet. As the pressure increases with depth, the air occluded in ice gradually transforms to mixed air clathrate hydrate. In the region of interest the bubble-to-hydrate transition is complete at about 1300 mbs below which depth most of the air (about 99%) in the ice sheet is located within hydrate crystals. The basal-ice melting prevails in the north of Lake Vostok and the ice accretion occurs in the south. The concentration of air in the melting glacier ice is typically about 113 mg l-1 (86 mg N2 L-1 + 27 mg O2 L-1), whereas that in accreted ice is nearly zero. This suggests a net transfer of the atmospheric air (in the form of gas hydrate) through the ice-sheet thickness to Lake Vostok water. Available laboratory data and thermodynamic models indicate that, under conditions appropriate to Lake Vostok, the air-hydrate crystals released from the melting ice will persist within the water body provided there is enough air present in the system for a hydrate phase to coexist with dissolved N2 and O2. Neglecting biogeochemical inputs and losses of dissolved gases we have calculated the solubility of nitrogen (2.25 103 mg L-1) and oxygen (1.3 103 mg L-1) in equilibrium with air hydrate in lake water. Accordingly, the dissolved oxygen concentration is predicted to be between 27 and 1.3 103 mg L-1 (compare to 15 mg O2 L-1 for standard conditions). Assuming a steady state and taking 20 kyr for the residence time of the lake water, we have estimated that a 630 kyr period is needed to reach the upper bond of the dissolved O2 concentration, which is a prerequisite for air hydrate stability in the lake. Metabolic consumption of oxygen in the lake could only make this transition longer. We also demonstrate that strong hydrate-forming gases such as CO2 and CH4, if present in the lake together with N2 and O2

  18. Efficient metal-free oxygen reduction in alkaline medium on high-surface-area mesoporous nitrogen-doped carbons made from ionic liquids and nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen; Fellinger, Tim-Patrick; Antonietti, Markus

    2011-01-19

    Mesoporous nitrogen-doped carbon materials with high surface areas up to 1500 m(2) g(-1) were conveniently made by the carbonization of nucleobases dissolved in an all-organic ionic liquid (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide). Using hard templating with silica nanoparticles, this process yields high-surface-area nitrogen-doped carbon materials with nitrogen contents as high as 12 wt %, narrow mesopore size distribution of ca. 12 nm diameter, and local graphitic carbon structure. It is demonstrated that the resulting nitrogen-doped carbons show very high catalytic activity, even in the metal-free case in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) for fuel cells. Specifically, the as-prepared materials exhibit a low onset voltage for ORR in alkaline medium and a high methanol tolerance, compared with those of commercial 20 wt % Pt/C catalyst. We regard this as a first step toward an all-sustainable fuel cell, avoiding noble metals. PMID:21155583

  19. Fast Oxidation Processes in a Naturally Reduced Aquifer Zone Caused by Dissolved Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J. A.; Jemison, N. E.; Williams, K. H.; Hobson, C.; Bush, R. P.

    2014-12-01

    The occurrence of naturally reduced zones is quite common in alluvial aquifers in the western U.S.A. due to the burial of woody debris in flood plains. The naturally reduced zones are heterogeneously dispersed in such aquifers and are characterized by high concentrations of organic carbon and reduced phases, including iron sulfides and reduced forms of metals, including uranium(IV). The persistence of high concentrations of dissolved uranium(VI) at uranium-contaminated aquifers on the Colorado Plateau has been attributed to slow oxidation of insoluble uranium(IV) mineral phases that are found in association with these natural reducing zones, although there is little understanding of the relative importance of various potential oxidants. Three field experiments were conducted within an alluvial aquifer adjacent to the Colorado River near Rifle, CO wherein groundwater associated with naturally reduced zones was pumped into a gas-impermeable tank, mixed with a conservative tracer (Br-), bubbled with a gas phase composed of 97% O2 and 3% CO2, and then returned to the subsurface in the same well from which it was withdrawn. Within minutes of re-injection of the oxygenated groundwater, dissolved uranium(VI) concentrations increased from less than 1 μM to greater than 2.5 μM, demonstrating that oxygen can be an important oxidant for uranium in these field systems if supplied to the naturally reduced zones. Small concentrations of nitrate were also observed in the previously nitrate-free groundwater, and Fe(II) decreased to the detection limit. These results contrast with other laboratory and field results in which oxygen was introduced to systems containing high concentrations of mackinawite (FeS) rather than the more crystalline iron sulfides found in aged, naturally reduced zones. The flux of oxygen to the naturally reduced zones in the alluvial aquifers occurs mainly through interactions between groundwater and gas phases at the water table, and seasonal variations

  20. In situ bioreduction of uranium (VI) to submicromolar levels and reoxidation by dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei-Min; Carley, Jack; Luo, Jian; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew A; Cardenas, Erick; Leigh, Mary Beth; Hwang, Chiachi; Kelly, Shelly D; Ruan, Chuanmin; Wu, Liyou; Van Nostrand, Joy; Gentry, Terry; Lowe, Kenneth; Mehlhorn, Tonia; Carroll, Sue; Luo, Wensui; Fields, Matthew W; Gu, Baohua; Watson, David; Kemner, Kenneth M; Marsh, Terence; Tiedje, James; Zhou, Jizhong; Fendorf, Scott; Kitanidis, Peter K; Jardine, Philip M; Criddle, Craig S

    2007-08-15

    Groundwater within Area 3 of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Remediation Sciences Program (ERSP) Field Research Center at Oak Ridge, TN (ORFRC) contains up to 135 microM uranium as U(VI). Through a series of experiments at a pilot scale test facility, we explored the lower limits of groundwater U(VI) that can be achieved by in-situ biostimulation and the effects of dissolved oxygen on immobilized uranium. Weekly 2 day additions of ethanol over a 2-year period stimulated growth of denitrifying, Fe(III)-reducing, and sulfate-reducing bacteria, and immobilization of uranium as U(IV), with dissolved uranium concentrations decreasing to low levels. Following sulfite addition to remove dissolved oxygen, aqueous U(VI) concentrations fell below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agengy maximum contaminant limit (MCL) for drinking water (< 30/microg L(-1) or 0.126 microM). Under anaerobic conditions, these low concentrations were stable, even in the absence of added ethanol. However, when sulfite additions stopped, and dissolved oxygen (4.0-5.5 mg L(-1)) entered the injection well, spatially variable changes in aqueous U(VI) occurred over a 60 day period, with concentrations increasing rapidly from < 0.13 to 2.0 microM at a multilevel sampling (MLS) well located close to the injection well, but changing little at an MLS well located further away. Resumption of ethanol addition restored reduction of Fe(III), sulfate, and U(VI) within 36 h. After 2 years of ethanol addition, X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy (XANES) analyses indicated that U(IV) comprised 60-80% of the total uranium in sediment samples. Atthe completion of the project (day 1260), U concentrations in MLS wells were less than 0.1 microM. The microbial community at MLS wells with low U(VI) contained bacteria that are known to reduce uranium, including Desulfovibrio spp. and Geobacter spp., in both sediment and groundwater. The dominant Fe(III)-reducing species were Geothrix spp

  1. In situ bioreduction of uranium (VI) to submicromolar levels and reoxidation by dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei-Min; Carley, Jack; Luo, Jian; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew A; Cardenas, Erick; Leigh, Mary Beth; Hwang, Chiachi; Kelly, Shelly D; Ruan, Chuanmin; Wu, Liyou; Van Nostrand, Joy; Gentry, Terry; Lowe, Kenneth; Mehlhorn, Tonia; Carroll, Sue; Luo, Wensui; Fields, Matthew W; Gu, Baohua; Watson, David; Kemner, Kenneth M; Marsh, Terence; Tiedje, James; Zhou, Jizhong; Fendorf, Scott; Kitanidis, Peter K; Jardine, Philip M; Criddle, Craig S

    2007-08-15

    Groundwater within Area 3 of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Remediation Sciences Program (ERSP) Field Research Center at Oak Ridge, TN (ORFRC) contains up to 135 microM uranium as U(VI). Through a series of experiments at a pilot scale test facility, we explored the lower limits of groundwater U(VI) that can be achieved by in-situ biostimulation and the effects of dissolved oxygen on immobilized uranium. Weekly 2 day additions of ethanol over a 2-year period stimulated growth of denitrifying, Fe(III)-reducing, and sulfate-reducing bacteria, and immobilization of uranium as U(IV), with dissolved uranium concentrations decreasing to low levels. Following sulfite addition to remove dissolved oxygen, aqueous U(VI) concentrations fell below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agengy maximum contaminant limit (MCL) for drinking water (< 30/microg L(-1) or 0.126 microM). Under anaerobic conditions, these low concentrations were stable, even in the absence of added ethanol. However, when sulfite additions stopped, and dissolved oxygen (4.0-5.5 mg L(-1)) entered the injection well, spatially variable changes in aqueous U(VI) occurred over a 60 day period, with concentrations increasing rapidly from < 0.13 to 2.0 microM at a multilevel sampling (MLS) well located close to the injection well, but changing little at an MLS well located further away. Resumption of ethanol addition restored reduction of Fe(III), sulfate, and U(VI) within 36 h. After 2 years of ethanol addition, X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy (XANES) analyses indicated that U(IV) comprised 60-80% of the total uranium in sediment samples. Atthe completion of the project (day 1260), U concentrations in MLS wells were less than 0.1 microM. The microbial community at MLS wells with low U(VI) contained bacteria that are known to reduce uranium, including Desulfovibrio spp. and Geobacter spp., in both sediment and groundwater. The dominant Fe(III)-reducing species were Geothrix spp.

  2. Puget Sound Dissolved Oxygen Modeling Study: Development of an Intermediate-Scale Hydrodynamic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Labiosa, Rochelle G.; Kim, Taeyun

    2010-11-30

    The Washington State Department of Ecology contracted with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to develop an intermediate-scale hydrodynamic and water quality model to study dissolved oxygen and nutrient dynamics in Puget Sound and to help define potential Puget Sound-wide nutrient management strategies and decisions. Specifically, the project is expected to help determine 1) if current and potential future nitrogen loadings from point and non-point sources are significantly impairing water quality at a large scale and 2) what level of nutrient reductions are necessary to reduce or dominate human impacts to dissolved oxygen levels in the sensitive areas. In this study, an intermediate-scale hydrodynamic model of Puget Sound was developed to simulate the hydrodynamics of Puget Sound and the Northwest Straits for the year 2006. The model was constructed using the unstructured Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model. The overall model grid resolution within Puget Sound in its present configuration is about 880 m. The model was driven by tides, river inflows, and meteorological forcing (wind and net heat flux) and simulated tidal circulations, temperature, and salinity distributions in Puget Sound. The model was validated against observed data of water surface elevation, velocity, temperature, and salinity at various stations within the study domain. Model validation indicated that the model simulates tidal elevations and currents in Puget Sound well and reproduces the general patterns of the temperature and salinity distributions.

  3. Simulating the effects of fluctuating dissolved oxygen on growth, reproduction, and survival of fish and shrimp.

    PubMed

    Miller Neilan, Rachael; Rose, Kenneth

    2014-02-21

    Individuals are commonly exposed to fluctuating levels of stressors, while most laboratory experiments focus on constant exposures. We develop and test a mathematical model for predicting the effects of low dissolved oxygen (hypoxia) on growth, reproduction, and survival using laboratory experiments on fish and shrimp. The exposure-effects model simulates the hourly reductions in growth and survival, and the reduction in reproduction (fecundity) at times of spawning, of an individual as it is exposed to constant or hourly fluctuating dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations. The model was applied to seven experiments involving fish and shrimp that included constant and fluctuating DO exposures, with constant exposures used for parameter estimation and the model then used to simulate the growth, reproduction, and survival in the fluctuating treatments. Cumulative effects on growth, reproduction, and survival were predicted well by the model, but the model did not replay the observed episodic low survival days. Further investigation should involve the role of acclimation, possible inclusion of repair effects in reproduction and survival, and the sensitivity of model predictions to the shape of the immediate effects function. Additional testing of the model with other taxa, different patterns of fluctuating exposures, and different stressors is needed to determine the model's generality and robustness.

  4. A uniaxially oriented nanofibrous cellulose scaffold from pellicles produced by Gluconacetobacter xylinus in dissolved oxygen culture.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Aya; Tsuji, Tsubasa; Kondo, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    An aerobic, Gram-negative bacterium, Gluconacetobacter xylinus, was successfully employed to produce a stretchable cellulose nanofiber pellicle using dissolved oxygen in a conventional cultured medium. The obtained nanofibers were highly crystalline with the metastable cellulose Iα phase being apparently the dominant phase by more than 90%. The obtained pellicle could be stretched by up to 1.5 times to provide oriented crystalline nanofibrous films. Low heating of the nanofibrous film induced the transformation of the dominant cellulose Iα crystalline phase into the Iβ crystalline phase without a loss of crystallinity or the high Young's modulus. The film also exhibited unique and anisotropic viscoelastic and mechanical properties as well as superior thermal stability compared with conventional high-performance synthetic polymeric materials. In addition, when G. xylinus cells were transferred to the oriented surface after stretched, they started to synthesize cellulose ribbons that parallel the nanofiber orientation of the substrate. This function as a template was evidenced by direct video imaging of the motion of the bacteria. The application of a bacterial culture using dissolved oxygen in the medium offers the fabrication of novel anisotropic and nanofibrous scaffold of cellulose Iα.

  5. A Simple Approach to Manipulate Dissolved Oxygen for Animal Behavior Observations.

    PubMed

    Grant, Christopher J; McLimans, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    The ability to manipulate dissolved oxygen (DO) in a laboratory setting has significant application to investigate a number of ecological and organismal behavior questions. The protocol described here provides a simple, reproducible, and controlled method to manipulate DO to study behavioral response in aquatic organisms resulting from hypoxic and anoxic conditions. While performing degasification of water with nitrogen is commonly used in laboratory settings, no explicit method for ecological (aquatic) application exists in the literature, and this protocol is the first to describe a protocol to degasify water to observe organismal response. This technique and protocol were developed for direct application for aquatic macroinvertebrates; however, small fish, amphibians, and other aquatic vertebrates could be easily substituted. It allows for easy manipulation of DO levels ranging from 2 mg/L to 11 mg/L with stability for up to a 5 min animal-observation period. Beyond a 5 min observation period water temperatures began to rise, and at 10 min DO levels became too unstable to maintain. The protocol is scalable to the study organism, reproducible, and reliable, allowing for rapid implementation into introductory teaching labs and high-level research applications. The expected results of this technique should relate dissolved oxygen changes to behavioral responses of organisms. PMID:27403727

  6. Temporal scale-induced uncertainty in load duration curves for instream-dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Patil, Abhijit; Deng, Zhiqiang; Malone, Ronald F

    2013-02-01

    Load duration curves were developed using the Hydrological Simulation Program FORTRAN (HSPF) for dissolved oxygen (DO) for the Amite River in Louisiana, USA. The concept of 'dissolved oxygen reserve', defined as the total quantity of DO, is introduced. The effect of temporal resolution on duration curves of DO reserve was examined using duration curves developed based on daily, weekly, biweekly, and monthly average data. Duration curves for DO exhibited high variability in the load estimated using daily data as compared to those based on biweekly and monthly data. A seasonal analysis revealed the trend in the DO reserve. The daily DO reserve for the Amite River at Port Vincent was 44,049.31 kg when daily summer data were used and 74,255.15 kg for daily annual data. A surplus of 10,691 kg of DO reserve was shown in the monthly data during critical summer months. The coefficient of variation (CV), used to define the temporal scale-induced uncertainty, was found to be linearly and inversely correlated with the logarithm of the time scale. Regression equations were developed to extrapolate near real-time flow and water quality data, greatly simplifying flow and water quality monitoring and reducing the cost involved in flow and water quality monitoring. PMID:22623167

  7. Time Series Stream Temperature And Dissolved Oxygen Modeling In The Lower Flint River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Jackson, C. R.

    2004-12-01

    The tributaries of the Lower Flint River Basin (LFRB) are incised into the upper Floridan semi-confined limestone aquifer, and thus seepage of relatively old groundwater sustains baseflows and provides some control over temperature and dissolved oxygen fluctuations. This hydrologic and geologic setting creates aquatic habitat that is unique in the state of Georgia. Groundwater withdrawals and possible water supply reservoirs threaten to exacerbate low flow conditions during summer droughts, which may force negative impacts to stream temperature and dissolved oxygen (DO). To evaluate the possible effects of human modifications to stream habitat, summer time series (in 15 min interval) of stream temperature and DO were monitored over the last three years along these streams, and a Continuously Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) model was developed and calibrated with these data. The driving forces of the diel trends and the overall levels of stream temperature and DO were identified by this model. Simulations were conducted with assumed managed flow conditions to illustrate potential effects of various stream flow regimes on stream temperature and DO time series. The goal of this research is to provide an accurate simulation tool to guide management decisions.

  8. A uniaxially oriented nanofibrous cellulose scaffold from pellicles produced by Gluconacetobacter xylinus in dissolved oxygen culture.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Aya; Tsuji, Tsubasa; Kondo, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    An aerobic, Gram-negative bacterium, Gluconacetobacter xylinus, was successfully employed to produce a stretchable cellulose nanofiber pellicle using dissolved oxygen in a conventional cultured medium. The obtained nanofibers were highly crystalline with the metastable cellulose Iα phase being apparently the dominant phase by more than 90%. The obtained pellicle could be stretched by up to 1.5 times to provide oriented crystalline nanofibrous films. Low heating of the nanofibrous film induced the transformation of the dominant cellulose Iα crystalline phase into the Iβ crystalline phase without a loss of crystallinity or the high Young's modulus. The film also exhibited unique and anisotropic viscoelastic and mechanical properties as well as superior thermal stability compared with conventional high-performance synthetic polymeric materials. In addition, when G. xylinus cells were transferred to the oriented surface after stretched, they started to synthesize cellulose ribbons that parallel the nanofiber orientation of the substrate. This function as a template was evidenced by direct video imaging of the motion of the bacteria. The application of a bacterial culture using dissolved oxygen in the medium offers the fabrication of novel anisotropic and nanofibrous scaffold of cellulose Iα. PMID:26453871

  9. Dissolved oxygen imaging in a porous medium to investigate biodegradation in a plume with limited electron acceptor supply.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei E; Oswald, Sascha E; Lerner, David N; Smith, Colin C; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2003-05-01

    A novel combination of noninvasive imaging with an oxygen sensitive fluorescent indicator was developed to investigate the biodegradation processes occurring at the fringe of a solute plume, where the supply of oxygen was limited. A thin transparent porous matrix (156 x 120 x 3 mm) was made from quartz plates and quartz sand (212-300 microm) and enriched with acetate-degrading bacteria. A degrading plume developed from a continuous acetate source in the uniform flow field containing dissolved oxygen. Ruthenium (II)-dichlorotris(1,10-phenanthroline) (Ru(phen)3Cl2), a water-soluble fluorescent dye, was used as an indicator of dissolved oxygen. The fluorescence intensity was dependent on the concentration of oxygen because the dissolved oxygen acted as collisional quencher. The oxygen distribution was interpreted from images recorded by a CCD camera. These two-dimensional experimental results showed quantitatively how the oxygen concentrations decreased strongly at the narrow plume fringe and that oxygen was depleted at the core of the plume. Separately, dispersivity was measured in a series of nonreactive transport experiments, and biodegradation parameters were evaluated by batch experiments. Two-dimensional numerical simulations with MT3D/RT3D used these parameters, and the predicted oxygen distributions were compared with the experimental results. This measurement method provides a novel approach to investigate details of solute transport and biodegradation in porous media.

  10. Laboratory and marine study of photoluminescent sensors of oxygen dissolved in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasov, V. L.; Konovalov, B. V.; Mosharov, V. E.; Radchenko, V. N.; Khanaev, S. A.; Khlebnikov, D. V.

    2010-02-01

    The laboratory and marine study of photoluminescent sensors developed at the TsAGI has been conducted to create a highly sensitivity gauge of the oxygen dissolved in seawater. The advantages of the photoluminescent gauge over the electrochemical ones are the following: zero sensitivity to electromagnetic fields, the pH of the water, and the hydrogen sulphide and ions of heavy metals in the water; zero oxygen consumption; and no need for the water to be pumped through the device. A breadboard model of the photoluminescent gauge with LED excitation of the luminescence has been built. The laboratory tests of the model demonstrated the accuracy of the gauge to be as high as 0.05 ml/1 in air at a response time of 0.3 s for 63% relaxation. Comparative field tests of the breadboard model and the SBE 43 electrochemical oxygen gauge (Sea-Bird Electronics Corp.) have shown good agreement of the estimates of the oxygen content in the water and clarified the prospects of model’s performance improvement.

  11. Ice-Tethered Profiler Observations of Dissolved Oxygen in the Arctic Ocean Under Permanent Ice Cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmermans, M.; Toole, J.; Laney, S.; Krishfield, R.

    2008-12-01

    Two Ice-Tethered Profilers (ITP), deployed in 2006 and 2007, have provided year-round dissolved oxygen (DO) measurements from the surface mixed layer to 760 m depth under permanent ice cover in the central Canada Basin of the Arctic Ocean. A further two ITPs deployed in August 2008 are presently returning DO measurements from the northern Canada Basin and the Makarov Basin. The two ITPs that have returned year-long time series exhibit seasonal variability in DO that primarily reflects primary production and respiration; fractional oxygen saturation varies accordingly. The time evolution of DO is similar for the two ITPs, indicating a predominately temporal variability. Beginning in April, under-ice DO in the central basin increases due to photosynthetic production, reaching a maximum in July. Under-ice DO decreases between August and November and a prominent shallow oxygen maximum is observed immediately below the surface mixed layer. This DO maximum is likely the result of accumulation of oxygen in summer which is then prevented from escaping by the strong stratification. The maximum is destroyed at the onset of winter by convection and deepening of the surface layer. The ongoing DO measurements are key to understanding changes to primary production under thinning ice conditions characterized by higher under-ice light levels, and changing Arctic seasonality.

  12. Simulation of oil bioremediation in a tidally influenced beach: Spatiotemporal evolution of nutrient and dissolved oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Xiaolong; Pan, Zhong; Boufadel, Michel C.; Ozgokmen, Tamay; Lee, Kenneth; Zhao, Lin

    2016-04-01

    Numerical experiments of oil bioremediation of tidally influenced beach were simulated using the model BIOMARUN. Nutrient and dissolved oxygen were assumed present in a solution applied on the exposed beach face, and the concentration of these amendments was tracked throughout the beach for up to 6 months. It was found that, in comparison to natural attenuation, bioremediation increased the removal efficiency by 76% and 65% for alkanes and aromatics, respectively. Increasing the nutrient concentration in the applied solution did not always enhance biodegradation as oxygen became limiting even when the beach was originally oxygen-rich. Therefore, replenishment of oxygen to oil-contaminated zone was also essential. Stimulation of oil biodegradation was more evident in the upper and midintertidal zone of the beach, and less in the lower intertidal zone. This was due to reduced nutrient and oxygen replenishment, as very little of the amendment solution reached that zone. It was found that under continual application, most of the oil biodegraded within 2 months, while it persisted for 6 months under natural conditions. While the difference in duration suggests minimal long-term effects, there are situations where the beach would need to be cleaned for major ecological functions, such as temporary nesting or feeding for migratory birds. Biochemical retention time map (BRTM) showed that the duration of solution application was dependent upon the stimulated oil biodegradation rate. By contrast, the application rate of the amendment solution was dependent upon the subsurface extent of the oil-contaminated zone. Delivery of nutrient and oxygen into coastal beach involved complex interaction among amendment solution, groundwater, and seawater. Therefore, approaches that ignore the hydrodynamics due to tide are unlikely to provide the optimal solutions for shoreline bioremediation.

  13. Low temperature alkaline pH hydrolysis of oxygen-free Titan tholins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brassé, Coralie; Buch, Arnaud; Raulin, François; Coll, Patrice; Poch, Olivier; Ramirez, Sandra

    2014-05-01

    The largest moon of Saturn, Titan, is known for its dense, nitrogen-rich atmosphere. The organic aerosols which are produced in Titan's atmosphere are of great astrobiological interest, particularly because of their potential evolution when they reach the surface and may interact with putative ammonia-water cryomagma[1]. In this context we have followed the evolution of alkaline pH hydrolysis (25wt% ammonia-water) of Titan tholins (produced by an experimental setup using a plasma DC discharge named PLASMA) at low temperature. Urea has been identified as one of the main product of tholins hydrolysis along with several amino acids (alanine, glycine and aspartic acid). However, those molecules have also been detected in non-hydrolyzed tholins. One explanation is a possible oxygen leak in the PLASMA reactor during the tholins synthesis[2]. Following this preliminary study the synthesis protocol has been improved by isolating the whole device in a specially designed glove box which protect the PLASMA experiment from the laboratory atmosphere. Once we confirmed the non-presence of oxygen in tholins, we performed alkaline pH hydrolysis of oxygen-free tholins. Then we verify that the organic compounds cited above are still produced in-situ. Moreover, a recent study shows that the subsurface ocean may contain a lower fraction of ammonia (about 5wt% or less[3]), than the one used until now in this kind of experimental study[2, 4]. Thus, we have carried out new hydrolysis experiments which take this lower value into account. Additional studies have provided new highlights on the bulk composition of Titan for various gas species. Indeed, the observed Saturn's atmosphere enrichment constrains the composition of the planetesimals present in the feeding zone of Saturn. The enrichment in volatiles in Saturn's atmosphere has been reproduced by assuming the presence of specific gas species[5, 6], in particular CO2 and H2S. In the present study we assume that those gas species have

  14. Are mangroves drivers or buffers of coastal acidification? Insights from alkalinity and dissolved inorganic carbon export estimates across a latitudinal transect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sippo, James Z.; Maher, Damien T.; Tait, Douglas R.; Holloway, Ceylena; Santos, Isaac R.

    2016-05-01

    Mangrove forests are hot spots in the global carbon cycle, yet the fate for a majority of mangrove net primary production remains unaccounted for. The relative proportions of alkalinity and dissolved CO2 [CO2*] within the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) exported from mangroves is unknown, and therefore, the effect of mangrove DIC exports on coastal acidification remains unconstrained. Here we measured dissolved inorganic carbon parameters over complete tidal and diel cycles in six pristine mangrove tidal creeks covering a 26° latitudinal gradient in Australia and calculated the exchange of DIC, alkalinity, and [CO2*] between mangroves and the coastal ocean. We found a mean DIC export of 59 mmol m-2 d-1 across the six systems, ranging from import of 97 mmol m-2 d-1 to an export of 85 mmol m-2 d-1. If the Australian transect is representative of global mangroves, upscaling our estimates would result in global DIC exports of 3.6 ± 1.1 Tmol C yr-1, which accounts for approximately one third of the previously unaccounted for mangrove carbon sink. Alkalinity exchange ranged between an import of 1.2 mmol m-2 d-1 and an export of 117 mmol m-2 d-1 with an estimated global export of 4.2 ± 1.3 Tmol yr-1. A net import of free CO2 was estimated (-11.4 ± 14.8 mmol m-2 d-1) and was equivalent to approximately one third of the air-water CO2 flux (33.1 ± 6.3 mmol m-2 d-1). Overall, the effect of DIC and alkalinity exports created a measurable localized increase in coastal ocean pH. Therefore, mangroves may partially counteract coastal acidification in adjacent tropical waters.

  15. Effects of bottom water dissolved oxygen variability on copper and lead fractionation in the sediments across the oxygen minimum zone, western continental margin of India.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Parthasarathi; Chakraborty, Sucharita; Jayachandran, Saranya; Madan, Ritu; Sarkar, Arindam; Linsy, P; Nath, B Nagender

    2016-10-01

    This study describes the effect of varying bottom-water oxygen concentration on geochemical fractionation (operational speciation) of Cu and Pb in the underneath sediments across the oxygen minimum zone (Arabian Sea) in the west coast of India. Both, Cu and Pb were redistributed among the different binding phases of the sediments with changing dissolved oxygen level (from oxic to hypoxic and close to suboxic) in the bottom water. The average lability of Cu-sediment complexes gradually decreased (i.e., stability increased) with the decreasing dissolved oxygen concentrations of the bottom water. Decreasing bottom-water oxygen concentration increased Cu association with sedimentary organic matter. However, Pb association with Fe/Mn-oxyhydroxide phases in the sediments gradually decreased with the decreasing dissolved oxygen concentration of the overlying bottom water (due to dissolution of Fe/Mn oxyhydroxide phase). The lability of Pb-sediment complexes increased with the decreasing bottom-water oxygen concentration. This study suggests that bottom-water oxygen concentration is one of the key factors governing stability and lability of Cu and Pb complexes in the underneath sediment. Sedimentary organic matter and Fe/Mn oxyhydroxide binding phases were the major hosting phases for Cu and Pb respectively in the study area. Increasing lability of Pb-complexes in bottom sediments may lead to positive benthic fluxes of Pb at low oxygen environment. PMID:27267721

  16. Effects of bottom water dissolved oxygen variability on copper and lead fractionation in the sediments across the oxygen minimum zone, western continental margin of India.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Parthasarathi; Chakraborty, Sucharita; Jayachandran, Saranya; Madan, Ritu; Sarkar, Arindam; Linsy, P; Nath, B Nagender

    2016-10-01

    This study describes the effect of varying bottom-water oxygen concentration on geochemical fractionation (operational speciation) of Cu and Pb in the underneath sediments across the oxygen minimum zone (Arabian Sea) in the west coast of India. Both, Cu and Pb were redistributed among the different binding phases of the sediments with changing dissolved oxygen level (from oxic to hypoxic and close to suboxic) in the bottom water. The average lability of Cu-sediment complexes gradually decreased (i.e., stability increased) with the decreasing dissolved oxygen concentrations of the bottom water. Decreasing bottom-water oxygen concentration increased Cu association with sedimentary organic matter. However, Pb association with Fe/Mn-oxyhydroxide phases in the sediments gradually decreased with the decreasing dissolved oxygen concentration of the overlying bottom water (due to dissolution of Fe/Mn oxyhydroxide phase). The lability of Pb-sediment complexes increased with the decreasing bottom-water oxygen concentration. This study suggests that bottom-water oxygen concentration is one of the key factors governing stability and lability of Cu and Pb complexes in the underneath sediment. Sedimentary organic matter and Fe/Mn oxyhydroxide binding phases were the major hosting phases for Cu and Pb respectively in the study area. Increasing lability of Pb-complexes in bottom sediments may lead to positive benthic fluxes of Pb at low oxygen environment.

  17. Global Visualization in Water using AnodizedAluminum PressureSensitive Paint and Dissolved Oxygen as Tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, Tatsuya; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Sakaue, Hirotaka

    2009-11-01

    We have developed anodized-aluminum pressuresensitive paint (AA-PSP) for flow visualization in water using dissolved oxygen as a tracer. Developed AA-PSP is characterized using water calibration setup by controlling a dissolved oxygen concentration. It is shown that the developed AA-PSP gives 4.0 percent change in luminescence per 1 mg/l of oxygen concentration. This AA-PSP is applied to visualize flows in a water tunnel. Oxygen concentrations of the water tunnel and the dissolved oxygen are 9.5 mg/l and 20 mg/l, respectively. We can capture horseshoe vortices over the base of 10 mm cylinder by using this technique at Reynolds number of 1000 and a water speed of 100 mm/s, respectively. Unlike conventional tracers such as ink, milk, and fluorescent dyes, this visualization technique gives flow information on the AA-PSP coated surface without integrating flows between the AA-PSP and an optical detector. Because of using dissolved oxygen as a tracer, it holds the material properties of testing water except for the amount of oxygen. The tracer does not interfere with optical measurements and it does not contaminate the testing water. A conventional visualization technique using milk as a tracer is also employed for comparison.

  18. Bond-length distributions for ions bonded to oxygen: alkali and alkaline-earth metals

    PubMed Central

    Gagné, Olivier Charles; Hawthorne, Frank Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Bond-length distributions have been examined for 55 configurations of alkali-metal ions and 29 configurations of alkaline-earth-metal ions bonded to oxygen, for 4859 coordination polyhedra and 38 594 bond distances (alkali metals), and for 3038 coordination polyhedra and 24 487 bond distances (alkaline-earth metals). Bond lengths generally show a positively skewed Gaussian distribution that originates from the variation in Born repulsion and Coulomb attraction as a function of interatomic distance. The skewness and kurtosis of these distributions generally decrease with increasing coordination number of the central cation, a result of decreasing Born repulsion with increasing coordination number. We confirm the following minimum coordination numbers: [3]Li+, [3]Na+, [4]K+, [4]Rb+, [6]Cs+, [3]Be2+, [4]Mg2+, [6]Ca2+, [6]Sr2+ and [6]Ba2+, but note that some reported examples are the result of extensive dynamic and/or positional short-range disorder and are not ordered arrangements. Some distributions of bond lengths are distinctly multi-modal. This is commonly due to the occurrence of large numbers of structure refinements of a particular structure type in which a particular cation is always present, leading to an over-representation of a specific range of bond lengths. Outliers in the distributions of mean bond lengths are often associated with anomalous values of atomic displacement of the constituent cations and/or anions. For a sample of [6]Na+, the ratio U eq(Na)/U eq(bonded anions) is partially correlated with 〈[6]Na+—O2−〉 (R 2 = 0.57), suggesting that the mean bond length is correlated with vibrational/displacement characteristics of the constituent ions for a fixed coordination number. Mean bond lengths also show a weak correlation with bond-length distortion from the mean value in general, although some coordination numbers show the widest variation in mean bond length for zero distortion, e.g. Li+ in [4]- and [6]-coordination, Na+ in [4]- and [6

  19. Bond-length distributions for ions bonded to oxygen: alkali and alkaline-earth metals.

    PubMed

    Gagné, Olivier Charles; Hawthorne, Frank Christopher

    2016-08-01

    Bond-length distributions have been examined for 55 configurations of alkali-metal ions and 29 configurations of alkaline-earth-metal ions bonded to oxygen, for 4859 coordination polyhedra and 38 594 bond distances (alkali metals), and for 3038 coordination polyhedra and 24 487 bond distances (alkaline-earth metals). Bond lengths generally show a positively skewed Gaussian distribution that originates from the variation in Born repulsion and Coulomb attraction as a function of interatomic distance. The skewness and kurtosis of these distributions generally decrease with increasing coordination number of the central cation, a result of decreasing Born repulsion with increasing coordination number. We confirm the following minimum coordination numbers: ([3])Li(+), ([3])Na(+), ([4])K(+), ([4])Rb(+), ([6])Cs(+), ([3])Be(2+), ([4])Mg(2+), ([6])Ca(2+), ([6])Sr(2+) and ([6])Ba(2+), but note that some reported examples are the result of extensive dynamic and/or positional short-range disorder and are not ordered arrangements. Some distributions of bond lengths are distinctly multi-modal. This is commonly due to the occurrence of large numbers of structure refinements of a particular structure type in which a particular cation is always present, leading to an over-representation of a specific range of bond lengths. Outliers in the distributions of mean bond lengths are often associated with anomalous values of atomic displacement of the constituent cations and/or anions. For a sample of ([6])Na(+), the ratio Ueq(Na)/Ueq(bonded anions) is partially correlated with 〈([6])Na(+)-O(2-)〉 (R(2) = 0.57), suggesting that the mean bond length is correlated with vibrational/displacement characteristics of the constituent ions for a fixed coordination number. Mean bond lengths also show a weak correlation with bond-length distortion from the mean value in general, although some coordination numbers show the widest variation in mean bond length for zero distortion, e.g. Li(+) in

  20. Bond-length distributions for ions bonded to oxygen: alkali and alkaline-earth metals.

    PubMed

    Gagné, Olivier Charles; Hawthorne, Frank Christopher

    2016-08-01

    Bond-length distributions have been examined for 55 configurations of alkali-metal ions and 29 configurations of alkaline-earth-metal ions bonded to oxygen, for 4859 coordination polyhedra and 38 594 bond distances (alkali metals), and for 3038 coordination polyhedra and 24 487 bond distances (alkaline-earth metals). Bond lengths generally show a positively skewed Gaussian distribution that originates from the variation in Born repulsion and Coulomb attraction as a function of interatomic distance. The skewness and kurtosis of these distributions generally decrease with increasing coordination number of the central cation, a result of decreasing Born repulsion with increasing coordination number. We confirm the following minimum coordination numbers: ([3])Li(+), ([3])Na(+), ([4])K(+), ([4])Rb(+), ([6])Cs(+), ([3])Be(2+), ([4])Mg(2+), ([6])Ca(2+), ([6])Sr(2+) and ([6])Ba(2+), but note that some reported examples are the result of extensive dynamic and/or positional short-range disorder and are not ordered arrangements. Some distributions of bond lengths are distinctly multi-modal. This is commonly due to the occurrence of large numbers of structure refinements of a particular structure type in which a particular cation is always present, leading to an over-representation of a specific range of bond lengths. Outliers in the distributions of mean bond lengths are often associated with anomalous values of atomic displacement of the constituent cations and/or anions. For a sample of ([6])Na(+), the ratio Ueq(Na)/Ueq(bonded anions) is partially correlated with 〈([6])Na(+)-O(2-)〉 (R(2) = 0.57), suggesting that the mean bond length is correlated with vibrational/displacement characteristics of the constituent ions for a fixed coordination number. Mean bond lengths also show a weak correlation with bond-length distortion from the mean value in general, although some coordination numbers show the widest variation in mean bond length for zero distortion, e.g. Li(+) in

  1. Hypolimnetic dissolved-oxygen dynamics within selected White River reservoirs, northern Arkansas-southern Missouri, 1974-2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    De Lanois, Jeanne L.; Green, W. Reed

    2011-01-01

    Dissolved oxygen is a critical constituent in reservoirs and lakes because it is essential for metabolism by all aerobic aquatic organisms. In general, hypolimnetic temperature and dissolved-oxygen concentrations vary from summer to summer in reservoirs, more so than in natural lakes, largely in response to the magnitude of flow into and release out of the water body. Because eutrophication is often defined as the acceleration of biological productivity resulting from increased nutrient and organic loading, hypolimnetic oxygen consumption rates or deficits often provide a useful tool in analyzing temporal changes in water quality. This report updates a previous report that evaluated hypolimnetic dissolved-oxygen dynamics for a 21-year record (1974-94) in Beaver, Table Rock, Bull Shoals, and Norfork Lakes, as well as analyzed the record for Greers Ferry Lake. Beginning in 1974, vertical profiles of temperature and dissolved-oxygen concentrations generally were collected monthly from March through December at sites near the dam of each reservoir. The rate of change in the amount of dissolved oxygen present below a given depth at the beginning and end of the thermal stratification period is referred to as the areal hypolimnetic oxygen deficit. Areal hypolimnetic oxygen deficit was normalized for each reservoir based on seasonal flushing rate between April 15 and October 31 to adjust for wet year and dry year variability. Annual cycles in thermal stratification within Beaver, Table Rock, Bull Shoals, Norfork, and Greers Ferry Lakes exhibited typical monomictic (one extended turnover period per year) characteristics. Flow dynamics drive reservoir processes and need to be considered when analyzing areal hypolimnetic oxygen deficit rates. A nonparametric, locally weighted scatter plot smooth line describes the relation between areal hypolimnetic oxygen deficit and seasonal flushing rates, without assuming linearity or normality of the residuals. The results in this report

  2. Modelling of dissolved oxygen in the Danube River using artificial neural networks and Monte Carlo Simulation uncertainty analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antanasijević, Davor; Pocajt, Viktor; Perić-Grujić, Aleksandra; Ristić, Mirjana

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes the training, validation, testing and uncertainty analysis of general regression neural network (GRNN) models for the forecasting of dissolved oxygen (DO) in the Danube River. The main objectives of this work were to determine the optimum data normalization and input selection techniques, the determination of the relative importance of uncertainty in different input variables, as well as the uncertainty analysis of model results using the Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS) technique. Min-max, median, z-score, sigmoid and tanh were validated as normalization techniques, whilst the variance inflation factor, correlation analysis and genetic algorithm were tested as input selection techniques. As inputs, the GRNN models used 19 water quality variables, measured in the river water each month at 17 different sites over a period of 9 years. The best results were obtained using min-max normalized data and the input selection based on the correlation between DO and dependent variables, which provided the most accurate GRNN model, and in combination the smallest number of inputs: Temperature, pH, HCO3-, SO42-, NO3-N, Hardness, Na, Cl-, Conductivity and Alkalinity. The results show that the correlation coefficient between measured and predicted DO values is 0.85. The inputs with the greatest effect on the GRNN model (arranged in descending order) were T, pH, HCO3-, SO42- and NO3-N. Of all inputs, variability of temperature had the greatest influence on the variability of DO content in river body, with the DO decreasing at a rate similar to the theoretical DO decreasing rate relating to temperature. The uncertainty analysis of the model results demonstrate that the GRNN can effectively forecast the DO content, since the distribution of model results are very similar to the corresponding distribution of real data.

  3. Ratiometric optical fiber sensor for dual sensing of copper ion and dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Chu, Cheng-Shane; Chuang, Chih-Yung

    2015-12-20

    This paper develops a new ratiometric optical dual sensor for Cu2+ ions and dissolved oxygen (DO) incorporating a sol-gel matrix doped with palladium tetrakis pentafluorophenyl porphine as the oxygen-sensitive material, CdSe quantum dots as the Cu2+ ion-sensing material, and 7-amino-4-trifluoromethyl coumarin as the Cu2+ /DO practically independent fluorescent dye. The feasibility of coating an optical fiber with the sensing film to fabricate a ratiometric optical fiber dual sensor is investigated. Using an LED with a central wavelength of 405 nm as an excitation source, it is shown that the emission wavelengths of the Cu2+ ion-sensitive, DO-sensitive dye and the reference dye have no spectral overlap and therefore permit Cu2+ ion and DO concentration to be measured using a ratiometric-based method. The ratiometric optical fiber dual sensor has been tested with regard to monitoring different Cu2+ ion (0-10 μM) and DO concentrations (0-38 mg/L). The results show that the luminescence properties of the Cu2+ ion sensor are independent of the presence of the oxygen sensor and have a uniquely good linear response in the 0-10 μM range. The proposed ratiometric sensing approach presented in this study has the advantage of suppressing spurious fluctuations in the intensity of the excitation source. PMID:26837033

  4. Controls on aquatic carbon cycling in a carbonate dominated groundwater catchment using dissolved oxygen dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, A. P.; Parker, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon cycling in aquatic systems is increasingly seen as playing an important role in global carbon budgets and hence on potential impacts and controls on global warming. However, determining the partitioning within and transfer between different carbon stores is a major challenge, particularly where there are multiple sources and controls on carbon utilisation. Dissolved oxygen, DO, provides a proxy for investigating the dynamics of carbon utilisation in aquatic systems. High temporal resolution monitoring of DO at multiple site on the Hampshire Avon, a chalk dominated permeable catchment in southern England, UK, has been investigated using a dynamic DO model in order to investigate the biochemical cycling of carbon. Gross primary production, governed by photosynthetically active radiation, is determined through inverse modelling. Model simplification though parameter reduction is achieved through investigating controls on aeration (the transfer of oxygen across the atmosphere-river interface) and respiration. Seasonal changes in biomass affect long term oxygen dynamics, which are compounded by episodic hydrological events that control the partitioning of surface water and groundwater in the stream channel and consequently the sources of carbon and DO in the river channel. Using variations in surface geology across the catchment the impacts of varying baseflow characteristics on carbon cycling within the catchment is demonstrated.

  5. Methods and Best Practice to Intercompare Dissolved Oxygen Sensors and Fluorometers/Turbidimeters for Oceanographic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Pensieri, Sara; Bozzano, Roberto; Schiano, M. Elisabetta; Ntoumas, Manolis; Potiris, Emmanouil; Frangoulis, Constantin; Podaras, Dimitrios; Petihakis, George

    2016-01-01

    In European seas, ocean monitoring strategies in terms of key parameters, space and time scale vary widely for a range of technical and economic reasons. Nonetheless, the growing interest in the ocean interior promotes the investigation of processes such as oxygen consumption, primary productivity and ocean acidity requiring that close attention is paid to the instruments in terms of measurement setup, configuration, calibration, maintenance procedures and quality assessment. To this aim, two separate hardware and software tools were developed in order to test and simultaneously intercompare several oxygen probes and fluorometers/turbidimeters, respectively in the same environmental conditions, with a configuration as close as possible to real in-situ deployment. The chamber designed to perform chlorophyll-a and turbidity tests allowed for the simultaneous acquisition of analogue and digital signals of several sensors at the same time, so it was sufficiently compact to be used in both laboratory and onboard vessels. Methodologies and best practice committed to the intercomparison of dissolved oxygen sensors and fluorometers/turbidimeters have been used, which aid in the promotion of interoperability to access key infrastructures, such as ocean observatories and calibration facilities. Results from laboratory tests as well as field tests in the Mediterranean Sea are presented. PMID:27196908

  6. Performance of ANFIS versus MLP-NN dissolved oxygen prediction models in water quality monitoring.

    PubMed

    Najah, A; El-Shafie, A; Karim, O A; El-Shafie, Amr H

    2014-02-01

    We discuss the accuracy and performance of the adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) in training and prediction of dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations. The model was used to analyze historical data generated through continuous monitoring of water quality parameters at several stations on the Johor River to predict DO concentrations. Four water quality parameters were selected for ANFIS modeling, including temperature, pH, nitrate (NO3) concentration, and ammoniacal nitrogen concentration (NH3-NL). Sensitivity analysis was performed to evaluate the effects of the input parameters. The inputs with the greatest effect were those related to oxygen content (NO3) or oxygen demand (NH3-NL). Temperature was the parameter with the least effect, whereas pH provided the lowest contribution to the proposed model. To evaluate the performance of the model, three statistical indices were used: the coefficient of determination (R (2)), the mean absolute prediction error, and the correlation coefficient. The performance of the ANFIS model was compared with an artificial neural network model. The ANFIS model was capable of providing greater accuracy, particularly in the case of extreme events. PMID:23949111

  7. Performance of ANFIS versus MLP-NN dissolved oxygen prediction models in water quality monitoring.

    PubMed

    Najah, A; El-Shafie, A; Karim, O A; El-Shafie, Amr H

    2014-02-01

    We discuss the accuracy and performance of the adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) in training and prediction of dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations. The model was used to analyze historical data generated through continuous monitoring of water quality parameters at several stations on the Johor River to predict DO concentrations. Four water quality parameters were selected for ANFIS modeling, including temperature, pH, nitrate (NO3) concentration, and ammoniacal nitrogen concentration (NH3-NL). Sensitivity analysis was performed to evaluate the effects of the input parameters. The inputs with the greatest effect were those related to oxygen content (NO3) or oxygen demand (NH3-NL). Temperature was the parameter with the least effect, whereas pH provided the lowest contribution to the proposed model. To evaluate the performance of the model, three statistical indices were used: the coefficient of determination (R (2)), the mean absolute prediction error, and the correlation coefficient. The performance of the ANFIS model was compared with an artificial neural network model. The ANFIS model was capable of providing greater accuracy, particularly in the case of extreme events.

  8. Use of dissolved oxygen modeling results in the management of river quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rickert, D.A.

    1984-01-01

    In 1973, the U.S. Geological Survey initiated a study of the Willamette River, Oregon, to determine the major causes of dissolved oxygen (DO) depletion, and whether advanced treatment of municipal wastewaters was needed to achieve the DO standards. The study showed that rates of carbonaceous decay were low (kr = 0.03-0.06/day) and that point-source loadings of carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) accounted for less than one-third of the satisfied oxygen demand. Nitrification of industrially discharged ammonia was the dominant cause of DO depletion. The study led to the calibration and verification of a steady-state DO model which was used to examine selected scenarios of BOD loading, ammonia loading, and flow augmentation. In 1976, the modeling projections for the Willamette River were presented to resource managers. A review in 1981 indicated that the State of Oregon had instituted an effluent standard on the major discharger of ammonia, rescinded an order for all municipal wastewaters to receive advanced secondary treatment by 1980, and more fully acknowledged the need for flow augmentation during summer to attain the DO standards.

  9. In vivo noninvasive monitoring of dissolved oxygen concentration within an implanted tissue-engineered pancreatic construct.

    PubMed

    Goh, Fernie; Sambanis, Athanassios

    2011-09-01

    The function of an implanted tissue-engineered pancreatic construct is influenced by many in vivo factors; however, assessing its function is based primarily on end physiologic effects. As oxygen significantly affects cell function, we established a dual perfluorocarbon method that utilizes (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, with perfluorocarbons as oxygen concentration markers, to noninvasively monitor dissolved oxygen concentration (DO) in βTC-tet cell-containing alginate beads and at the implantation milieu. Beads were implanted in the peritoneal cavity of normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. Using this method, the feasibility of acquiring real-time in vivo DO measurements was demonstrated. Results showed that the mouse peritoneal environment is hypoxic and the DO is further reduced when βTC-tet cell constructs were implanted. The DO within cell-containing beads decreased considerably over time and could be correlated with the relative changes in the number of viable encapsulated cells. The reduction of construct DO due to the metabolic activity of the βTC-tet cells was also compatible with the implant therapeutic function, as observed in the reversal of hyperglycemia in diabetic mice. The importance of these findings in assessing implant functionality and host animal physiology is discussed.

  10. Methods and Best Practice to Intercompare Dissolved Oxygen Sensors and Fluorometers/Turbidimeters for Oceanographic Applications.

    PubMed

    Pensieri, Sara; Bozzano, Roberto; Schiano, M Elisabetta; Ntoumas, Manolis; Potiris, Emmanouil; Frangoulis, Constantin; Podaras, Dimitrios; Petihakis, George

    2016-01-01

    In European seas, ocean monitoring strategies in terms of key parameters, space and time scale vary widely for a range of technical and economic reasons. Nonetheless, the growing interest in the ocean interior promotes the investigation of processes such as oxygen consumption, primary productivity and ocean acidity requiring that close attention is paid to the instruments in terms of measurement setup, configuration, calibration, maintenance procedures and quality assessment. To this aim, two separate hardware and software tools were developed in order to test and simultaneously intercompare several oxygen probes and fluorometers/turbidimeters, respectively in the same environmental conditions, with a configuration as close as possible to real in-situ deployment. The chamber designed to perform chlorophyll-a and turbidity tests allowed for the simultaneous acquisition of analogue and digital signals of several sensors at the same time, so it was sufficiently compact to be used in both laboratory and onboard vessels. Methodologies and best practice committed to the intercomparison of dissolved oxygen sensors and fluorometers/turbidimeters have been used, which aid in the promotion of interoperability to access key infrastructures, such as ocean observatories and calibration facilities. Results from laboratory tests as well as field tests in the Mediterranean Sea are presented.

  11. Methods and Best Practice to Intercompare Dissolved Oxygen Sensors and Fluorometers/Turbidimeters for Oceanographic Applications.

    PubMed

    Pensieri, Sara; Bozzano, Roberto; Schiano, M Elisabetta; Ntoumas, Manolis; Potiris, Emmanouil; Frangoulis, Constantin; Podaras, Dimitrios; Petihakis, George

    2016-01-01

    In European seas, ocean monitoring strategies in terms of key parameters, space and time scale vary widely for a range of technical and economic reasons. Nonetheless, the growing interest in the ocean interior promotes the investigation of processes such as oxygen consumption, primary productivity and ocean acidity requiring that close attention is paid to the instruments in terms of measurement setup, configuration, calibration, maintenance procedures and quality assessment. To this aim, two separate hardware and software tools were developed in order to test and simultaneously intercompare several oxygen probes and fluorometers/turbidimeters, respectively in the same environmental conditions, with a configuration as close as possible to real in-situ deployment. The chamber designed to perform chlorophyll-a and turbidity tests allowed for the simultaneous acquisition of analogue and digital signals of several sensors at the same time, so it was sufficiently compact to be used in both laboratory and onboard vessels. Methodologies and best practice committed to the intercomparison of dissolved oxygen sensors and fluorometers/turbidimeters have been used, which aid in the promotion of interoperability to access key infrastructures, such as ocean observatories and calibration facilities. Results from laboratory tests as well as field tests in the Mediterranean Sea are presented. PMID:27196908

  12. Assessment of water quality and factors affecting dissolved oxygen in the Sangamon River, Decatur to Riverton, Illinois, summer 1982

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmidt, A.R.; Stamer, J.K.

    1987-01-01

    Water quality and processes that affect the dissolved-oxygen concentration in a 45.9 mile reach of the Sangamon River from Decatur to Riverton, Illinois, were determined from data collected during low-flow periods in the summer of 1982. Relations among dissolved oxygen, water discharge, biochemical oxygen demand, ammonia and nitrite plus nitrate concentrations, and photosynthetic-oxygen production were simulated using a one-dimensional, steady-state computer model. Average dissolved oxygen concentrations ranged from 8.0 milligrams per liter at the upstream end of the study reach at Decatur to 5.2 milligrams per liter 12.2 miles downstream. Ammonia concentrations ranged from 45 milligrams per liter at the mouth of Stevens Creek (2.6 miles downstream from Decatur) to 0.03 milligram per liter at the downstream end of the study reach. Un-ionized ammonia concentrations exceeded the maximum concentration specified in the State water quality standard (0.04 milligram per liter) throughout most of the study reach. Model simulations indicated that oxidation of ammonia to form nitrite plus nitrate was the most significant process leading to low dissolved oxygen concentrations in the river. (USGS)

  13. A mathematical model of the maximum power density attainable in an alkaline hydrogen/oxygen fuel cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, Michael C.; White, Ralph E.

    1991-01-01

    A mathematical model of a hydrogen/oxygen alkaline fuel cell is presented that can be used to predict the polarization behavior under various power loads. The major limitations to achieving high power densities are indicated and methods to increase the maximum attainable power density are suggested. The alkaline fuel cell model describes the phenomena occurring in the solid, liquid, and gaseous phases of the anode, separator, and cathode regions based on porous electrode theory applied to three phases. Fundamental equations of chemical engineering that describe conservation of mass and charge, species transport, and kinetic phenomena are used to develop the model by treating all phases as a homogeneous continuum.

  14. Closed-loop identification and control application for dissolved oxygen concentration in a full-scale coke wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Yoo, C K; Cho, J H; Kwak, H J; Choi, S K; Chun, H D; Lee, I

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to apply a closed-loop identification to actual dissolved oxygen control system in the coke wastewater treatment plant. It approximates the dissolved oxygen dynamics to a high order model using the integral transform method and reduces it to the first-order plus time delay (FOPTD) or second-order plus time delay (SOPTD) for the PID controller tuning. To experiment the process identification on the real plant, a simple set-point change of the speed of surface aerator under the closed-loop control without any mode change was used as an activation signal of the identification. The full-scale experimental results show a good identification performance and a good tracking ability for set-point change. As a result of improved control performance, the fluctuation of dissolved oxygen concentration variation has been decreased and the electric power saving has been accomplished.

  15. Closed-loop identification and control application for dissolved oxygen concentration in a full-scale coke wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Yoo, C K; Cho, J H; Kwak, H J; Choi, S K; Chun, H D; Lee, I

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to apply a closed-loop identification to actual dissolved oxygen control system in the coke wastewater treatment plant. It approximates the dissolved oxygen dynamics to a high order model using the integral transform method and reduces it to the first-order plus time delay (FOPTD) or second-order plus time delay (SOPTD) for the PID controller tuning. To experiment the process identification on the real plant, a simple set-point change of the speed of surface aerator under the closed-loop control without any mode change was used as an activation signal of the identification. The full-scale experimental results show a good identification performance and a good tracking ability for set-point change. As a result of improved control performance, the fluctuation of dissolved oxygen concentration variation has been decreased and the electric power saving has been accomplished. PMID:11385849

  16. Luminescent sensing of dissolved oxygen based on Ru(II) complex embedded in sol-gel matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Yubing; Tao, Wei; Hu, Yanli; Mao, Yimei; Zhao, Hui

    2015-11-01

    In biological cells and tissues environment, real-time monitoring and controlling dissolved oxygen (DO) provides critical information for studying cellular metabolism process, health status and pathological features. This paper developed an optical DO sensor based on fluorescence quenching principle, prepared tris(4,7-diphenyl-1,10- phenanthroline)ruthenium(II) dichloride complex sol-gel sensing film, and studied its sensing performance. The principle of this sensor is that dissolved oxygen has quenching effect towards the fluorescence emitted by ruthenium complex. So the fluorescence intensity is reduced due to the existence of DO. The measurement limit of DO was 10- 100%, the response time was 20s, and the resolution was 0.02. Compared to traditional dissolved oxygen electrode probe, this luminescent fiber had many advantages, such as smaller size, shorter response time and higher stability.

  17. Effect of dissolved oxygen on nitrogen and phosphorus removal and electricity production in microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Tao, Qinqin; Luo, Jingjing; Zhou, Juan; Zhou, Shaoqi; Liu, Guangli; Zhang, Renduo

    2014-07-01

    Performance of a two-chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC) was evaluated with the influence of cathodic dissolved oxygen (DO). The maximum voltage, coulombic efficiency and maximum power density outputs of MFC decreased from 521 to 303 mV, 52.48% to 23.09% and 530 to 178 mW/m(2) with cathodic DO declining. Furthermore, a great deal of total phosphorus (TP) was removed owing to chemical precipitation (about 80%) and microbial absorption (around 4-17%). COD was first removed in anode chamber (>70%) then in cathode chamber (<5%). Most of nitrogen was removed when the cathodic DO was at low levels. Chemical precipitates formed in cathode chamber were verified as phosphate, carbonate and hydroxyl compound with the aid of scanning electron microscope capable of energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR).

  18. Iodine-mediated etching of gold nanorods for plasmonic sensing of dissolved oxygen and salt iodine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiyang; Chen, Zhaopeng; Cheng, Fangbin; Zhang, Yaowen; Chen, Lingxin

    2016-05-10

    Here, we have carefully investigated iodine-mediated etching of gold nanorods (AuNRs) in the presence of iodate and applied this phenomenon to on-site detection of dissolved oxygen (DO). Under given conditions, the quantitative conversion of target analytes DO to iodine leads to the etching of AuNRs along the longitudinal direction with the aid of cetyltrimethylammonium. As a result, the longitudinal localized surface plasmon resonance shifts to a short wavelength. The peak-shift can be used for quantitative determination of DO and iodate by a spectrophotometer. The satisfactory results from DO detection in different water samples and iodate detection in table salt indicate the feasibility of the proposed methods. Moreover, the as-prepared colorimetric test paper would make the detection more economical and simpler. PMID:27049138

  19. Modification of Graphene on Ultramicroelectrode Array and Its Application in Detection of Dissolved Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinfen; Bian, Chao; Tong, Jianhua; Sun, Jizhou; Li, Yang; Hong, Wen; Xia, Shanhong

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigated two different modification methods of graphene (GN) on ultramicroelectrode array (UMEA) and applied the GN modified UMEA for the determination of dissolved oxygen (DO). The UMEAs were fabricated by Micro Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) technique and the radius of each ultramicroelectrode is 10 μm. GN-NH2 and GN-COOH were modified on UMEA by using self-assembling method. Compared with GN-NH2 modified UMEA, the GN-COOH modified UMEA showed better electrochemical reduction to DO, owing to better dispersing and more active sites. The GN-COOH on UMEA was electroreduced to reduced GN-COOH (rGN-COOH) to increase the conductivity and the catalysis performance. Finally, the palladium nanoparticles/rGN-COOH composite was incorporated into DO microsensor for the detection of DO. PMID:25549176

  20. Tilapia cage culture and the dissolved oxygen trends in Sampaloc Lake, the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Santiago, A E; Arcilla, R P

    1993-02-01

    The 28-hectare tilapia cage culture that occupied the 104-hectare Sampaloc Lake, a crater lake, shifted to intensive method in 1986 when tilapia growth slowed done at the beginning of 1982. Thus, commercial feeds became the main source of allochthonous organic matter in the lake. Total feeds given annually for the 28-hectare cage culture at 3 croppings per year amounted to 5250 tons. At feed conversion ratio of 1 : 2 a significant portion of the feeds given ended as organic wastes in the lake. In 1988, tilapia cage operators began experiencing their worst occurrences of fishkill, worth millions of pesos. An assessment of the dissolved oxygen condition of Sampaloc lake in late 1989, 1990 and mid-1991 showed ominous trends which might adversely affect the use of Sampaloc lake for fishery.

  1. Influence of solid corrosion by-products on the consumption of dissolved oxygen in copper pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Ignacio T.; Alsina, Marco A.; Pastén, Pablo A.; Pizarro, Gonzalo E.

    2009-06-12

    Research on corrosion of copper pipes has given little consideration to the influence of solid corrosion by-products on the processes occurring at the metal-liquid interface. Consequently, the effect of such solid phases on the rate of dissolved oxygen (DO) consumption remains poorly understood. In-situ experiments were performed in copper pipes under different carbonate concentrations and ageing times. Our results show that the amount of solid corrosion by-products and concentration of hydrogen ions affect the rate of DO consumption during stagnation. Furthermore, our findings support the existing hypothesis that the available concentration of hydrogen ions, rather than DO, is the limiting factor for copper release into drinking water.

  2. Frequency-duration analysis of dissolved-oxygen concentrations in two southwestern Wisconsin streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greb, Steven R.; Graczyk, David J.

    2007-01-01

    Historically, dissolved-oxygen (DO) data have been collected in the same manner as other water-quality constituents, typically at infrequent intervals as a grab sample or an instantaneous meter reading. Recent years have seen an increase in continuous water-quality monitoring with electronic dataloggers. This new technique requires new approaches in the statistical analysis of the continuous record. This paper presents an application of frequency-duration analysis to the continuous DO records of a cold and a warm water stream in rural southwestern Wisconsin. This method offers a quick, concise way to summarize large time-series data bases in an easily interpretable manner. Even though the two streams had similar mean DO concentrations, frequency-duration analyses showed distinct differences in their DO-concentration regime. This type of analysis also may be useful in relating DO concentrations to biological effects and in predicting low DO occurrences.

  3. Determination of Trophic State Changes with Diel Dissolved Oxygen: A Case Study in a Shallow Lake.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen; Xu, Y Jun

    2015-11-01

    Current trophic state indices (TSI) have been reported to have limitations in assessing changes in eutrophication status of shallow waters. This study aimed to use intensive measurements on dissolved oxygen (DO) to improve the determination of tropic state changes. The authors deployed an environment monitoring buoy in a eutrophic shallow lake and recorded water temperature, DO, and chlorophyll-a concentrations at 15-minute intervals for two 1-year periods: from August 2008 to July 2009 and from August 2013 to July 2014. In addition, they recorded water levels over the same periods and collected water samples for nutrient analysis. The authors analyzed the high-time resolution DO records, compared the diel DO trends between the two 1-year periods, and proposed a new TSI using DO. They found that analyzing the change in diel DO ranges can improve commonly used methods for classifying trophic states and assessing the change of eutrophication status of waterbodies. PMID:26564585

  4. Dissolved-oxygen and algal conditions in selected locations of the Willamette River basin, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rinella, F.A.; McKenzie, S.W.; Wille, S.A.

    1981-01-01

    During July and August 1978, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Oregon Department of Enviromental Quality, made three intensive river-quality dissolved-oxygen studies in the upper Willamette River basin. Two studies were made on the upper Willamette River and one was made on the Santiam River, a Willamette River tributary. Nitrification, occurring in both the upper Willamette and South Santiam Rivers, accounted for about 62% and 92% of the DO sag in the rivers, respectively. Rates of nitrification were found to be dependent on ammonia concentrations in the rivers. Periphyton and phytoplankton algal samples were collected on the main stem Willamette River and selected tributaries during August 1978. Diatoms were the dominant group in both the periphyton and phytoplankton samples. The most common diatom genera were Melosira, Stephanodiscus, Cymbella, Achnanthes, and Nitzschia. Comparisons with historical data indicate no significant difference from previous years in the total abundance or diversity of the algae. (USGS)

  5. Dissolved oxygen prediction using a possibility theory based fuzzy neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Usman T.; Valeo, Caterina

    2016-06-01

    A new fuzzy neural network method to predict minimum dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in a highly urbanised riverine environment (in Calgary, Canada) is proposed. The method uses abiotic factors (non-living, physical and chemical attributes) as inputs to the model, since the physical mechanisms governing DO in the river are largely unknown. A new two-step method to construct fuzzy numbers using observations is proposed. Then an existing fuzzy neural network is modified to account for fuzzy number inputs and also uses possibility theory based intervals to train the network. Results demonstrate that the method is particularly well suited to predicting low DO events in the Bow River. Model performance is compared with a fuzzy neural network with crisp inputs, as well as with a traditional neural network. Model output and a defuzzification technique are used to estimate the risk of low DO so that water resource managers can implement strategies to prevent the occurrence of low DO.

  6. Dissolved oxygen prediction using a possibility-theory based fuzzy neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, U. T.; Valeo, C.

    2015-11-01

    A new fuzzy neural network method to predict minimum dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in a highly urbanised riverine environment (in Calgary, Canada) is proposed. The method uses abiotic (non-living, physical and chemical attributes) as inputs to the model, since the physical mechanisms governing DO in the river are largely unknown. A new two-step method to construct fuzzy numbers using observations is proposed. Then an existing fuzzy neural network is modified to account for fuzzy number inputs and also uses possibility-theory based intervals to train the network. Results demonstrate that the method is particularly well suited to predict low DO events in the Bow River. Model output and a defuzzification technique is used to estimate the risk of low DO so that water resource managers can implement strategies to prevent the occurrence of low DO.

  7. Enhanced removal of carbon dioxide and alleviation of dissolved oxygen accumulation in photobioreactor with bubble tank.

    PubMed

    Chai, Xiaoli; Zhao, Xin

    2012-07-01

    Reduction of carbon loss from the effluent is one of the most important aspects of photobioreactors design. In this study, a novel gas sparger of bubble tank was adopted in a photobioreactor to enhance carbon dioxide (CO(2)) mass transfer rate as well as alleviate dissolved oxygen (DO) accumulation. The results showed that low DO level in the culture can be obtained due to the turbulent hydrodynamic condition provided by the bubble tank. The effects of CO(2) concentration, flow rate of influent, and light intensity on CO(2) removal efficiency were investigated. The maximum CO(2) removal efficiency was 94% at flow rate of 30 mL min(-1), light intensity of 179 μmol m(-2) s(-1) and CO(2) concentration of 10%, implying that the novel gas sparger is a promising alternative for CO(2) removal from CO(2)-enriched air by cultivating microalgae in the photobioreactor.

  8. Nanoplankton population dynamics and dissolved oxygen change across the Bay of Izmir by neural networks.

    PubMed

    Sunlu, F S; Demir, I; Onkal Engin, G; Buyukisik, B; Sunlu, U; Koray, T; Kukrer, S

    2009-06-01

    The bay of Izmir, which is the biggest harbor on the Aegean Sea, is of upmost economical importance for Izmir, the third largest city in Turkey. Most of the studies carried out focused on the effects of intensive industrial activity and agricultural production on the bay pollution within the region. These studies, most of the time, are limited to monitoring the level of pollution. However, it is believed that these studies should be supported with models and statistical analysis techniques, as the models, especially the prediction ones, provide an important approach to assessing risk and assessment. In this study, neural network analysis was used to construct prediction models for nanoplankton population change with nutrients and other environmentally important parameters. The results indicated that, using data over a 52 week period, it is possible to predict nanoplankton population dynamics and dissolved oxygen change for the future.

  9. Performance of temperature and dissolved oxygen criteria to predict habitat use by lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plumb, J.M.; Blanchfield, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    We compared theoretical habitat volumes, determined from traditional combinations of temperature and dissolved oxygen concentration (DO) boundaries, with in situ habitat use by acoustically tagged lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush). The widely used criteria of 8-12 ??C underestimated lake trout habitat use by 68%-80%. Instead, combined temperature (<12 or 15 ??C) and DO (>4 or 6 mg??L-1) criteria most closely matched lake trout habitat use, had a similar seasonal trend as the tagged fish, suggested modest reductions (5% of total lake volume) in habitat during a warmer year, and performed best when the constraints of temperature and DO were most limiting. All data were collected in a small boreal shield lake (27 ha, zmax = 21 m) at the Experimental Lakes Area in northwestern Ontario, Canada, during two contrasting periods of thermal stratification (2003: warmer and longer; 2004: cooler and shorter), providing an assessment of observed and theoretical habitat volumes over current environmental extremes.

  10. Benthic Primary Production in a Saltmarsh Pond: Insights from Fluxes of Dissolved Inorganic Carbon and Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karolewski, J. S.; Stanley, R. H.; Howard, E. M.; Spivak, A. C.

    2014-12-01

    Salt marshes are important carbon sinks that exist at continental margins and act as mediators in the exchange of nutrients and carbon between terrestrial and marine environments. Within salt marshes, 10-20% of total surface area is covered by marshtop ponds. The fractional area of marshtop ponds is predicted to increase as sea level rises. Despite their potential importance, the balance between autotrophic and heterotrophic processes within such ponds remain poorly understood. To quantify the balance of metabolic fluxes within salt marsh ponds, chemical fluxes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and dissolved oxygen (DO) were measured in July, 2014 in benthic flux chambers inserted into a salt marsh pond in the Plum Island Estuary Long-Term Ecosystem Research (PIE-LTER) site. Light and dark chambers were used to enable separation of rates of photosynthesis and respiration. Separate chambers were used to enclose sediment covered by primarily benthic microalgae and primarily benthic macroalgae. Net ecosystem metabolism in the microalgae was ~10 and in the macroalgae ~15 mmol C/m2/hour. Respiration rates were ~10 mmol C/m2/ hour for both microalgae and macroalgae. The resulting fluxes of net ecosystem production in the ponds will be compared with overall marsh net ecosystem flux as measured by an eddy flux tower that was located 100 meters from the pond. Additionally, concurrent measurements of DIC and DO allow quantification of the C:O ratio during respiration (i.e. respiratory quotient) in this system.

  11. Mechanism of the cathodic process coupled to the oxidation of iron monosulfide by dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Duinea, Mădălina I; Costas, Andreea; Baibarac, Mihaela; Chiriță, Paul

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the mechanism of iron monosulfide (FeS) oxidation by dissolved oxygen (O2(aq)). Synthetic FeS was reacted with O2(aq) for 6days and at 25°C. We have characterized the initial and reacted FeS surface using Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with Energy Dispersive X-ray (SEM/EDX) analysis, Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). It was found that during the aqueous oxidation of FeS new solid phases (disulfide, polysulfide, elemental sulfur, ferric oxyhydroxides and Fe3O4) develop on the mineral surface. The results of potentiodynamic polarization experiments show that after 2days of FeS electrode immersion in oxygen bearing solution (OBS) at initial pH 5.1 and 25°C the modulus of cathodic Tafel slopes dramatically decreases, from 393mV/dec to 86mV/dec. This decrease is ascribed to the change of the mechanism of electron transfer from cathodic sites to O2 (mechanism of cathodic process). The oxidation current densities (jox) indicate that mineral oxidative dissolution is not inhibited by pH increase up to 6.7. Another conclusion, which emerges from the analysis of jox, is that the dissolved Fe(3+) does not intermediate the aqueous oxidation of FeS. The results of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) show that after 2days of contact between electrode and OBS the properties of FeS/water interface change. From the analysis of the EIS, FTIR spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and SEM/EDX data we can conclude that the change of FeS/water interface properties accompanies the formation of new solid phases on the mineral surface. The new characteristics of the surface layer and FeS/water interface do not cause the inhibition of mineral oxidation.

  12. Relationship between ecosystem respiration and aeration constant in open channel dissolved oxygen analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, S. J.; Butler, A. P.; Heppell, C. M.

    2015-12-01

    Using the open channel diel method of Odum (1956) and the night-time regression method (Hornberger and Kelly, 1985), we analysed a time series of dissolved oxygen (DO) in two slow flowing streams for a two month period in summer 2014 and obtained values for ecosystem respiration and the aeration constant for each day in the period. We then used the standard dissolved oxygen lumped model to generate a DO time series behaviour for one of those rivers selecting respiration and aeration parameters by randomly sampling from the values obtained from the data. Two synthetic time series were created, one where respiration and aeration were independent of temperature and a second where respiration and aeration were affected by temperature according to the modified Arrhenius relationship. With these two synthetic time series, we again recovered the respiration and aeration input parameters using the night- time regression method and compared those recovered parameters with the input parameters. Because the simulations were conducted with parameters that were known, the values recovered using the night-time regression method (i.e post-simulation) could be compared with parameters driving the simulation (i.e. pre-simulation input values). For values based on data, we found a strong correlation between the aeration constant and respiration for both rivers. For the synthetic time series, no such correlation was found, either with the temperature independent or temperature dependent time series. The night-time regression method also recovered perfectly the input parameters, so the correlation was not brought about as a result of implementing the method itself. We are currently investigating the cause of the correlation.

  13. Identification of key parameters controlling dissolved oxygen migration and attenuation in fractured crystalline rocks.

    PubMed

    Spiessl, S M; MacQuarrie, K T B; Mayer, K U

    2008-01-28

    In the crystalline rocks of the Canadian Shield, geochemical conditions are currently reducing at depths of 500-1000 m. However, during future glacial periods, altered hydrologic conditions could potentially result in enhanced recharge of glacial melt water containing a relatively high concentration of dissolved oxygen (O2). It is therefore of interest to investigate the physical and geochemical processes, including naturally-occurring redox reactions, that may control O2 ingress. In this study, the reactive transport code MIN3P is used in combination with 2k factorial analyses to identify the most important parameters controlling oxygen migration and attenuation in fractured crystalline rocks. Scenarios considered are based on simplified conceptual models that include a single vertical fracture, or a fracture zone, contained within a rock matrix that extends from the ground surface to a depth of 500 m. Consistent with field observations, Fe(II)-bearing minerals are present in the fractures (i.e. chlorite) and the rock matrix (biotite and small quantities of pyrite). For the parameter ranges investigated, results indicate that for the single fracture case, the most influential factors controlling dissolved O2 ingress are flow velocity in the fracture, fracture aperture, and the biotite reaction rate in the rock matrix. The most important parameters for the fracture zone simulations are flow velocity in the individual fractures, pO2 in the recharge water, biotite reaction rate, and to a lesser degree the abundance and reactivity of chlorite in the fracture zone, and the fracture zone width. These parameters should therefore receive increased consideration during site characterization, and in the formulation of site-specific models intended to predict O2 behavior in crystalline rocks. PMID:17935829

  14. How do changes in dissolved oxygen concentration influence microbially-controlled phosphorus cycling in stream biofilms?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saia, S. M.; Locke, N. A.; Regan, J. M.; Carrick, H. J.; Buda, A. R.; Walter, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    Advances in molecular microbiology techniques (e.g. epi-fluorescent microscopy and PCR) are making it easier to study the influence of specific microorganisms on nutrient transport. Polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) are commonly used in wastewater treatment plants to remove excess phosphorus (P) from effluent water. PAOs have also been identified in natural settings but their ecological function is not well known. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that PAOs in natural environments would release and accumulate P during anaerobic and aerobic conditions, respectively. We placed stream biofilms in sealed, covered tubs and subjected them to alternating air (aerobic conditions) and N2 gas (anaerobic condition) bubbling for 12 hours each. Four treatments investigated the influence of changing dissolved oxygen on micribially-controlled P cycling: (1) biofilms bubbled continuously with air, (2) biofilms bubbled alternatively with air and N2, (3) biocide treated biofilms bubbled continuously with air, and (4) biocide treated biofilms bubbled alternatively with air and N2. Treatments 3 and 4 serve as abiotic controls to treatments 1 and 2. We analyzed samples every 12 hours for soluble reactive P (SRP), temperature, dissolved oxygen, and pH. We also used fluorescent microscopy (i.e. DAPI staining) and PCR to verify the presence of PAOs in the stream biofilms. SRP results over the course of the experiment support our hypothesis that anaerobic and aerobic stream conditions may impact PAO mediated P release and uptake, respectively in natural environments. The results of these experiments draw attention to the importance of microbiological controls on P mobility in freshwater ecosystems.

  15. Thermal and dissolved oxygen characteristics of a South Carolina cooling reservoir

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oliver, James L.; Hudson, Patrick L.

    1987-01-01

    Temperature and dissolved oxygen concentrations were measured monthly from January 1971 to December 1982 at 1-m depth intervals at 13 stations in Keowee Reservoir in order to characterize spatial and temporal changes associated with operation of the Oconee Nuclear Station. The reservoir water column was i to 4°C warmer in operational than in non-operational years. The thermo-dine was at depths of 5 to 15 m before the operation of Oconee Nuclear Station, but was always below the upper level of the intake (20 m) after the station was in full operation; this suggests that pumping by the Oconee Nuclear Station had depleted all available cool hypolimnetic water to this depth. As a result summer water temperatures at depths greater than 10 m were usually 10°C higher after plant operation began than before. By fall the reservoir was nearly homothemious to a depth of 27 m, where a thermocine developed. Seasonal temperature profiles varied with distance from the plant; a cool water plume was evident in spring and a warm water plume was present in the summer, fall, and winter. A cold water plume also developed in the northern section of the reservoir due to the operation of Jocassee Pumped Storage Station. Increases in the mean water temperature of the reservoir during operational periods were correlated with the generating output of the power plant. The annual heat load to the reservoir increased by one-third after plant operations began. The alteration of the thermal stratification of the receiving water during the summer also caused the dissolved oxygen to mix to greater depths.

  16. Identification of key parameters controlling dissolved oxygen migration and attenuation in fractured crystalline rocks.

    PubMed

    Spiessl, S M; MacQuarrie, K T B; Mayer, K U

    2008-01-28

    In the crystalline rocks of the Canadian Shield, geochemical conditions are currently reducing at depths of 500-1000 m. However, during future glacial periods, altered hydrologic conditions could potentially result in enhanced recharge of glacial melt water containing a relatively high concentration of dissolved oxygen (O2). It is therefore of interest to investigate the physical and geochemical processes, including naturally-occurring redox reactions, that may control O2 ingress. In this study, the reactive transport code MIN3P is used in combination with 2k factorial analyses to identify the most important parameters controlling oxygen migration and attenuation in fractured crystalline rocks. Scenarios considered are based on simplified conceptual models that include a single vertical fracture, or a fracture zone, contained within a rock matrix that extends from the ground surface to a depth of 500 m. Consistent with field observations, Fe(II)-bearing minerals are present in the fractures (i.e. chlorite) and the rock matrix (biotite and small quantities of pyrite). For the parameter ranges investigated, results indicate that for the single fracture case, the most influential factors controlling dissolved O2 ingress are flow velocity in the fracture, fracture aperture, and the biotite reaction rate in the rock matrix. The most important parameters for the fracture zone simulations are flow velocity in the individual fractures, pO2 in the recharge water, biotite reaction rate, and to a lesser degree the abundance and reactivity of chlorite in the fracture zone, and the fracture zone width. These parameters should therefore receive increased consideration during site characterization, and in the formulation of site-specific models intended to predict O2 behavior in crystalline rocks.

  17. Segregated Pt on Pd nanotubes for enhanced oxygen reduction activity in alkaline electrolyte.

    PubMed

    St John, Samuel; Atkinson, Robert W; Dyck, Ondrej; Sun, Cheng-Jun; Zawodzinski, Thomas A; Papandrew, Alexander B

    2015-12-01

    Nanoscaled Pt domains were integrated with Pd nanotubes via vapor deposition to yield a highly active electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media. The surface-area-normalized ORR activity of these bi-metallic Pt-on-Pd nanotubes (PtPdNTs) was nearly 6× the corresponding carbon-supported Pt nanoparticle (Pt/C) activity at 0.9 V vs. RHE (1.5 vs. 0.24 mA cmmetal(-2), respectively). Furthermore, the high specific activity of the PtPdNTs was achieved without sacrificing mass-normalized activity, which is more than twice that of Pt/C (0.333 A mgPtPdNT(-1)vs. 0.141 A mgPt/C(-1)) and also greater than that of Pd/C (0.221 A mgPd/C(-1)). We attribute the enhancements in specific and mass activity to modifications of the segregated Pt electronic structure and to nanoscale porosity, respectively. PMID:26553367

  18. Effect of Dissolved Oxygen on the Filterability of Jet Fuels for Temperatures Between 300 Degrees and 400 Degrees F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckeown, Anderson B; Hibbard, Robert R

    1955-01-01

    The effect of dissolved oxygen in the filter-clogging characteristics of three JP-4 and two JP-5 fuels was studied at 300 degrees to 400 degrees F in a bench- scale rig, employing filter paper as the filter medium. The residence time of the fuel at the high temperature was approximately 6 seconds. For these conditions, the clogging characteristics of the fuels increased with both increasing temperature and increasing concentration of dissolved oxygen. The amount of insoluble material formed at high temperatures necessary to produce clogging of filters was very small, of the order of 1 milligram per gallon of fuel.

  19. Factors initiating phytoplankton blooms and resulting effects on dissolved oxygen in Duwamish River estuary, Seattle, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welch, Eugene Brummer

    1969-01-01

    Phytoplankton productivity, standing stock, and related environmental factors were studied during 1964-66 in the Duwamish River estuary, at Seattle, Wash., to ascertain the factors that affect phytoplankton growth in the estuary; a knowledge of these factors in turn permits the detection and evaluation of the influence that effluent nutrients have on phytoplankton production. The factors that control the concentration of dissolved oxygen were also evaluated because of the importance of dissolved oxygen to the salmonid populations that migrate through the estuary. Phytoplankton blooms, primarily of diatoms, occurred in the lower estuary during August 1965 and 1966. No bloom occurred during 1964, but the presence of oxygen-supersaturated surface water in August 1963 indicates that a bloom did occur then. Nutrients probably were not the primary factor controlling the timing of phytoplankton blooms. Ammonia ,and phosphate concentrations increased significantly downstream from the Municipality of Metropolitan Seattle's Renton Treatment Plant outfall after the plant began operation in June 1965, and concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus were relatively high before operation of the Renton Treatment Plant and during nonbloom periods. The consistent coincidence of blooms with minimum fresh-water discharge and tidal exchange during August throughout the study period indicates that bloom timing probably was controlled mostly by hydrographic factors that determine retention time and stability of the surface-water layer. This control was demonstrated in part by a highly significant correlation of gross productivity with retention time (as indicated by fresh-water discharge) and vertical stability (as indicated by the difference between mean surface and mean bottom temperatures). The failure of a bloom to develop in 1964 is related to a minimum fresh-water discharge that was much greater than normal during that summer. Hydrographic factors are apparently important because

  20. Survival, development, and growth of fall Chinook salmon embryos, alevin, and fry exposed to variable thermal and dissolved oxygen regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, David R.; Abernethy, Cary S.; Hand, Kristine D.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Chandler, James A.; Groves, Philip

    2006-11-15

    Some fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) initiate spawning in the Snake River downstream of Hells Canyon Dam at temperatures that exceed 13?C and at intergravel dissolved oxygen concentrations that are less than 8 mg O2/L. Although water temperature declines and dissolved oxygen increases soon after spawning, these temperature and dissolved oxygen levels do not meet the water quality standards established by the states of Oregon and Idaho for salmonid spawning. Our objective was to determine if temperatures from 13 to 17 C and dissolved oxygen levels from 4 to greater than 8 mg O2/L during the first 40 days of incubation followed by declining temperature and rising dissolved oxygen affected survival, development, and growth of Snake River fall Chinook salmon embryos, alevins, and fry. During the first 40 days of incubation, temperatures were adjusted downward approximately 0.2 C/day and oxygen was increased in increments of 2 mg O2/L to mimic the thermal and oxygen regime of the Snake River where these fish spawn. At 40 days post-fertilization, embryos were moved to a common exposure regime that followed the thermal and dissolved oxygen profile of the Snake River through emergence. Mortality of fall Chinook salmon embryos increased markedly at initial incubation temperatures equal to or greater than 17?C, and a rapid decline in survival occurred between 16.5 C and 17 C, with no significant difference in survival at temperatures less than or equal to 16.5 C. Initial dissolved oxygen levels as low as 4 mg O2/L over a range of initial temperatures from 15 to 16.5 C did not affect embryo survival to emergence. There were no significant differences across the range of initial temperature exposures for alevin and fry size at hatch and emergence. The number of days from fertilization to eyed egg, hatch, and emergence was highly related to temperature and dissolved oxygen; it took from 6 to 10 days longer to reach hatch at 4 mg O2/L than at saturation and up to

  1. Variation in oxygen isotope ratio of dissolved orthophosphate induced by uptake process in natural coral holobionts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrera, Charissa M.; Miyajima, Toshihiro; Watanabe, Atsushi; Umezawa, Yu; Morimoto, Naoko; San Diego-McGlone, Maria Lourdes; Nadaoka, Kazuo

    2016-06-01

    A model incubation experiment using natural zooxanthellate corals was conducted to evaluate the influence of phosphate uptake by coral holobionts on oxygen isotope ratio of dissolved PO4 3- (δ18Op). Live coral samples of Acropora digitifera, Porites cylindrica, and Heliopora coerulea were collected from coral reefs around Ishigaki Island (Okinawa, Japan) and Bolinao (northern Luzon, Philippines) and incubated for 3-5 d after acclimatization under natural light conditions with elevated concentrations of PO4 3-. Phosphate uptake by corals behaved linearly with incubation time, with uptake rate depending on temperature. δ18Op usually increased with time toward the equilibrium value with respect to oxygen isotope exchange with ambient seawater, but sometimes became higher than equilibrium value at the end of incubation. The magnitude of the isotope effect associated with uptake depended on coral species; the greatest effect was in A. digitifera and the smallest in H. coerulea. However, it varied even within samples of a single coral species, which suggests multiple uptake processes with different isotope effects operating simultaneously with varying relative contributions in the coral holobionts used. In natural environments where concentrations of PO4 3- are much lower than those used during incubation, PO4 3- is presumably turned over much faster and the δ18Op easily altered by corals and other major primary producers. This should be taken into consideration when using δ18Op as an indicator of external PO4 3- sources in coastal ecosystems.

  2. Oxygen Isotopic Composition of Dissolved Inorganic Phosphate in the Monterey Bay and California Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, K.; Paytan, A.; Kendall, C.

    2001-12-01

    The marine biogeochemical cycle of phosphorus (P) is intricately linked to the atmospheric abundance of CO2 through its role as an important major nutrient. Phosphorus is considered to be a limiting nutrient in some oceanic systems (Cotner et al., 1997; Karl et al., 1995; Michaels et al., 1996; Wu et al., 2000) and is possibly the ultimate limiting macronutrient for marine productivity (Broecker and Peng, 1982; Delaney, 1998; Toggweiler, 1999; Tyrrell, 1999). Despite the recognition of the important role P plays in regulating marine productivity and thus the "biological pump" relatively little is known about P cycling within the ocean. We have mapped spatial and temporal variations in the oxygen isotopic composition of phosphate within the Monterey Bay and along a transect in the California Current. The P-O bond is resistant to inorganic hydrolysis and, in the temperature range of the ocean, is only broken by enzyme mediated reactions. Therefore, the d18O of inorganic phosphate should reflect the degree of recycling of phosphate within the ecosystem where greater recycling corresponds to increased equilibration with d18O of seawater. We have applied a method for extraction of dissolved inorganic phosphate from seawater and purification to silver phosphate for oxygen isotopic analysis (McLaughlin et al., 2000). These results are the first step in determining how phosphate recycling varies spatially and throughout the water column.

  3. Multi-pollutant treatment of crystalline cellulosic effluent: Function of dissolved oxygen on process control.

    PubMed

    Shanthi Sravan, J; Naresh Kumar, A; Venkata Mohan, S

    2016-10-01

    Treatment of crystalline cellulose based wastewater was carried out in periodic discontinuous batch reactor (PDBR). Specific influence of dissolved oxygen on treatment of crystalline cellulosic (CC) wastewater was evaluated in three different microenvironments such as aerobic, anoxic and anaerobic. PDBR-aerobic biosystem documented relatively higher substrate degradation [2.63kgCOD/m(3)-day (92%)] in comparison to PDBR-anoxic [2.12kgCOD/m(3)-day (71%)] and PDBR-anaerobic [1.81kgCOD/m(3)-day (63%)], which is in accordance with the observed DO levels. Similarly, multipollutants viz., phosphates and nitrates removal was observed to be higher in aerobic followed by anoxic and anaerobic operations. Higher nitrate removal in aerobic operation might be attributed to the efficient denitrification carried out by the biocatalyst, which utilizes both nitrates and oxygen as oxidizing agents. Multiscan spectral profiles depicted reduction in color intensity in all three microenvironments that correlated with the substrate degradation observed. Despite the high organic load, PDBR functioned well without exhibiting process inhibition. PMID:27005787

  4. A recent occurrence of thermal stratification and low dissolved oxygen in western Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, John F.; Applegate, Vernon C.; Keller, Myrl

    1965-01-01

    Instances of thermal stratification have been detected only occasionally in western Lake Erie during the past 40 years, but when it does occur it is of considerable importance because of associated dissolved oxygen (DO) depletion in the hypolimnion. Data collected in June of 1963 give an indication of the meteorological conditions necessary to produce this thermal stratification. These conditions are: daily wind speed of less than 3.1 m/sec (7 mph); highest wind speed of less than 6.7 m/sec (15 mph); and an average daily temperature of more than 18.5 C for approximately 5 consecutive days. Weather records for Sandusky, Ohio, show these conditions to have occurred on 33 separate occasions between 1953 and 1963. These data suggest stable thermal stratification occurs more frequently than heretofore suspected. The 1963 data also show that in only 5 days of stratification DO in the hypolimnion was reduced to less than 3 ppm, whereas 28 days were required in 1953. This increased rate of DO depletion is probably due to an increase in the oxygen demand of the bottom sediment in recent years.

  5. Synergistic photogeneration of reactive oxygen species by dissolved organic matter and C60 in aqueous phase.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Niu, Junfeng; Shang, Enxiang; Crittenden, John Charles

    2015-01-20

    We investigated the photogeneration of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by C60 under UV irradiation, when humic acid (HA) or fulvic acid (FA) is present. When C60 and dissolved organic matter (DOM) were present as a mixture, singlet oxygen ((1)O2) generation concentrations were 1.2–1.5 times higher than the sum of (1)O2 concentrations that were produced when C60 and DOM were present in water by themselves. When C60 and HA were present as a mixture, superoxide radicals (O2(•–)) were 2.2–2.6 times more than when C60 and HA were present in water by themselves. A synergistic ROS photogeneration mechanism involved in energy and electron transfer between DOM and C60 was proposed. Enhanced (1)O2 generation in the mixtures was partly due to (3)DOM* energy transfer to O2. However, it was mostly due to (3)DOM* energy transfer to C60 producing (3)C60*. (3)C60* has a prolonged lifetime (>4 μs) in the mixture and provides sufficient time for energy transfer to O2, which produces (1)O2. The enhanced O2(•–) generation for HA/C60 mixture was because (3)C60* mediated electron transfer from photoionized HA to O2. This study demonstrates the importance of considering DOM when investigating ROS production by C60.

  6. Multi-pollutant treatment of crystalline cellulosic effluent: Function of dissolved oxygen on process control.

    PubMed

    Shanthi Sravan, J; Naresh Kumar, A; Venkata Mohan, S

    2016-10-01

    Treatment of crystalline cellulose based wastewater was carried out in periodic discontinuous batch reactor (PDBR). Specific influence of dissolved oxygen on treatment of crystalline cellulosic (CC) wastewater was evaluated in three different microenvironments such as aerobic, anoxic and anaerobic. PDBR-aerobic biosystem documented relatively higher substrate degradation [2.63kgCOD/m(3)-day (92%)] in comparison to PDBR-anoxic [2.12kgCOD/m(3)-day (71%)] and PDBR-anaerobic [1.81kgCOD/m(3)-day (63%)], which is in accordance with the observed DO levels. Similarly, multipollutants viz., phosphates and nitrates removal was observed to be higher in aerobic followed by anoxic and anaerobic operations. Higher nitrate removal in aerobic operation might be attributed to the efficient denitrification carried out by the biocatalyst, which utilizes both nitrates and oxygen as oxidizing agents. Multiscan spectral profiles depicted reduction in color intensity in all three microenvironments that correlated with the substrate degradation observed. Despite the high organic load, PDBR functioned well without exhibiting process inhibition.

  7. Assessment of the uncertainty budget for the amperometric measurement of dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Fisicaro, Paola; Adriaens, Annemie; Ferrara, Enzo; Prenesti, Enrico

    2007-07-30

    This work aimed at identifying the main sources of uncertainty for the measurement of dissolved oxygen concentration in aqueous solutions. The experimental apparatus consists of an amperometric cell based on the Clark-type sensor. The corresponding uncertainty budget was assessed, this being a fundamental step for the validation of a measurement method. The principle of the measurement, as well as the procedure for the set-up and the characterisation of the cell, are described. The measurement equation was defined as a combination of Faraday's and Fick's laws, and a method was worked out for the empirical determination of the diffusivity parameter. In this connection, the solutions of oxygen were standardised by way of the Winkler's titration, as suggested by the ISO Guide 5813 and 5814. With this approach we aimed at contributing to the development of a potential primary method of measurement. A discussion of all the contributions to the overall uncertainty is reported, allowing operators to locate the largest ones and plan specific improvements.

  8. Tidal fluxes of dissolved oxygen at the North Inlet-Winyah Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, L. R.; Kjerfve, B.; Petrecca, D. M.

    2006-04-01

    Advective, dispersive and total dissolved oxygen (DO) fluxes from 1297 complete tidal cycles were analyzed to test the "outwelling" hypothesis as it pertains to DO. A 910 day time series of meteorological and water quality data (approximately 35,000 half-hourly observations) was used to assess DO fluxes and dynamics at Crab Haul Creek, a small (1.1 km 2) tidal salt marsh basin at North Inlet, South Carolina, within the North Inlet-Winyah Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve. A basin storage curve, derived from water velocity measurements made across a permanent transect in the tidal creek every half hour for eight semidiurnal tidal cycles, enabled water discharges to be estimated from tide height readings in the 910 day time series. The discharges along with DO concentration measurements were used to calculate DO fluxes for each tidal cycle in the series. The long-term mean dispersive and advective DO fluxes were -0.281 g O 2 s -1 and -0.375 g O 2 s -1, respectively. Based on " t" tests both means are significantly less than zero ( p < 0.02), indicating exports. Furthermore a significant correlation was found between the dispersive DO export and the tidal mean solar radiation, indicating that photosynthesis is the principal process driving the dispersive export of DO. On the other hand no significant correlations were found between the advective export of DO and solar radiation or between the dispersive fluxes of DO and salt. The absence of such correlations indicates that the advective export of DO is simply an artifact of a slight ebb sampling bias in our computation of the tidal mean discharge. On a unit area basis the average annual dispersive export of DO is 8.9 g m -2 yr -1 or 0.28 mol DO m -2 yr -1. This is a small fraction of the oxygen produced in the basin by phytoplankton (18 mol DO m -2 yr -1) and its contribution to the DO resources of the receiving waters is far exceeded by the oxygen demand associated with the concurrent export of dissolved

  9. Characterization of a dissolved oxygen sensor made of plastic optical fiber coated with ruthenium-incorporated solgel

    SciTech Connect

    Chu Fenghong; Yang Junjie; Cai Haiwen; Qu Ronghui; Fang Zujie

    2009-01-10

    A dissolved oxygen sensor made of plastic optical fiber as the substrate and dichlorotris (1, 10-phenanthroline) ruthenium as a fluorescence indicator is studied. Oxygen quenching characteristics of both intensity and phase were measured; the obtained characteristics showed deviation from the linear relation described by the Stern-Volmer equation. A two-layer model is proposed to explain the deviation, and main parameters can be deduced with the model.

  10. Oxygen and Sulfur Isotope Composition of Dissolved Sulfate in Interstitial Waters of the Great Australian Bight, ODP Leg 182.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernasconi, S. M.; Böttcher, M. E.; Wormann, U. G.

    2005-12-01

    We measured the sulfur and oxygen isotope composition of dissolved sulfides and sulfate at ODP Sites 1129, 1130, 1131 and 1132 in the Great Australian Bight (GAB). At all Sites, a saline brine is present in the subsurface as indicated by increasing chloride concentrations with depth to reach contents up to 3 times seawater. Sulfate also increases with depth but the concentrations are reduced by intense microbial sulfate reduction. The sulfur isotope fractionation between coexisting dissolved sulfate and sulfide is very large and reaches up to 70 ‰ at all studied Sites. Due to the high sulfide concentrations and the lack of a significant source of oxidants we consider that the large sulfur isotope fractionations are induced by sulfate reducing bacteria alone without a significant contribution of elemental sulfur disproportionation and sulfide oxidation processes. The oxygen isotope composition of dissolved sulfate reaches maximum values of approximately +27 ‰ vs. VSMOW at all sites, close to the equilibrium isotope fractionation between sulfate and water. The oxygen isotope composition of dissolved sulfate positively correlates with the sulfur isotope fractionation between sulfate and sulfide. These oxygen isotope data thus support the hypothesis that that the high sulfur isotope fractionation are related to a single step fractionation by sulfate reducing bacteria and do not involve significant sulfide oxidation reactions and/or elemental sulfur disproportionation. Sulfide oxidation processes would lead to a lowering of the oxygen isotope composition of residual sulfate. Elemental sulfur disproportionation has been shown to increase the oxygen isotope composition of sulfate but to a smaller extent than that that observed in the GAB. The patterns of the oxygen isotope increase with progressive sulfate reduction indicate a predominant influence of isotope exchange rather than a kinetic isotope fractionation controlling the oxygen isotope composition of sulfate

  11. Historical trends in Chesapeake Bay dissolved oxygen based on benthic foraminifera from sediment cores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karlsen, A.W.; Cronin, T. M.; Ishmans, S.E.; Willard, D.A.; Kerhin, R.; Holmes, C.W.; Marot, M.

    2000-01-01

    Environmentally sensitive benthic foraminifera (protists) from Chesapeake Bay were used as bioindicators to estimate the timing and degree of changes in dissolved oxygen (DO) over the past five centuries. Living foraminifers from 19 surface samples and fossil assemblages from 11 sediment cores dated by 210Pb, 137Cs, 14C, and pollen stratigraphy were analyzed from the tidal portions of the Patuxent, Potomac, and Choptank Rivers and the main channel of the Chesapeake Bay. Ammonia parkinsoniana, a facultative anaerobe tolerant of periodic anoxic conditions, comprises an average of 74% of modern Chesapeake foraminiferal assemblages (DO = 0.47 and 1.72 ml l-1) compared to 0% to 15% of assemblages collected in the 1960s. Paleoecological analyses show that A. parkinsoniana was absent prior to the late 17th century, increased to 10-25% relative frequency between approximately 1670-1720 and 1810-1900, and became the dominant (60-90%) benthic foraminiferal species in channel environments beginning in the early 1970s. Since the 1970s, deformed tests of A. parkinsoniana occur in all cores (10-20% of Ammonia), suggesting unprecedented stressful benthic conditions. These cores indicate that prior to the late 17th century, there was limited oxygen depletion. During the past 200 years, decadal scale variability in oxygen depletion has occurred, as dysoxic (DO = 0.1-1.0 ml l-1), perhaps short-term anoxic (DO < 0.1 ml l-1) conditions developed. The most extensive (spatially and temporally) anoxlc conditions were reached during the 1970s. Over decadal timescales, DO variability seems to be linked closely to climatological factors influencing river discharge; the unprecedented anoxia since the early 1970s is attributed mainly to high freshwater flow and to an increase in nutrient concentrations from the watershed.

  12. Dissolved inorganic carbon and alkalinity fluxes from coastal marine sediments: model estimates for different shelf environments and sensitivity to global change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumins, V.; Gehlen, M.; Arndt, S.; van Cappellen, P.; Regnier, P.

    2012-07-01

    We present a one-dimensional reactive transport model to estimate benthic fluxes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and alkalinity (AT) from coastal marine sediments. The model incorporates the transport processes of sediment accumulation, molecular diffusion, bioturbation and bioirrigation, while the reactions included are the redox pathways of organic carbon oxidation, re-oxidation of reduced nitrogen, iron and sulfur compounds, pore water acid-base equilibria, and dissolution of particulate inorganic carbon (calcite, aragonite, and Mg-calcite). The coastal zone is divided into four environmental units with different particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) fluxes: reefs, banks and bays, carbonate shelves and non-carbonate shelves. Model results are analyzed separately for each environment and then scaled up to the whole coastal ocean. The model-derived estimate for the present-day global coastal benthic DIC efflux is 126 Tmol yr-1, based on a global coastal reactive POC depositional flux of 117 Tmol yr-1. The POC decomposition leads to a~carbonate dissolution from shallow marine sediments of 7 Tmol yr-1 (on the order of 0.1 Pg C yr-1). Assuming complete re-oxidation of aqueous sulfide released from sediments, the effective net flux of alkalinity to the water column is 29 Teq yr-1, primarily from PIC dissolution (46%) and ammonification (33%). Because our POC depositional flux falls in the high range of global values given in the literature, the reported DIC and alkalinity fluxes should be viewed as upper-bound estimates. Increasing coastal seawater DIC to what might be expected in year 2100 due to the uptake of anthropogenic CO2 increases PIC dissolution by 2.3 Tmol yr-1 and alkalinity efflux by 4.8 Teq yr-1. Our reactive transport modeling approach not only yields global estimates of benthic DIC, alkalinity and nutrient fluxes under variable scenarios of ocean productivity and chemistry, but also provides insights into the

  13. Dissolved inorganic carbon and alkalinity fluxes from coastal marine sediments: model estimates for different shelf environments and sensitivity to global change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumins, V.; Gehlen, M.; Arndt, S.; Van Cappellen, P.; Regnier, P.

    2013-01-01

    We present a one-dimensional reactive transport model to estimate benthic fluxes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and alkalinity (AT) from coastal marine sediments. The model incorporates the transport processes of sediment accumulation, molecular diffusion, bioturbation and bioirrigation, while the reactions included are the redox pathways of organic carbon oxidation, re-oxidation of reduced nitrogen, iron and sulfur compounds, pore water acid-base equilibria, and dissolution of particulate inorganic carbon (calcite, aragonite, and Mg-calcite). The coastal zone is divided into four environmental units with different particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) fluxes: reefs, banks and bays, carbonate shelves and non-carbonate shelves. Model results are analyzed separately for each environment and then scaled up to the whole coastal ocean. The model-derived estimate for the present-day global coastal benthic DIC efflux is 126 Tmol yr-1, based on a global coastal reactive POC depositional flux of 117 Tmol yr-1. The POC decomposition leads to a carbonate dissolution from shallow marine sediments of 7 Tmol yr-1 (on the order of 0.1 Pg C yr-1. Assuming complete re-oxidation of aqueous sulfide released from sediments, the effective net flux of alkalinity to the water column is 29 Teq. yr-1, primarily from PIC dissolution (46%) and ammonification (33%). Because our POC depositional flux falls in the high range of global values given in the literature, the reported DIC and alkalinity fluxes should be viewed as upper-bound estimates. Increasing coastal seawater DIC to what might be expected in year 2100 due to the uptake of anthropogenic CO2 increases PIC dissolution by 2.3 Tmol yr-1and alkalinity efflux by 4.8 Teq. yr-1. Our reactive transport modeling approach not only yields global estimates of benthic DIC, alkalinity and nutrient fluxes under variable scenarios of ocean productivity and chemistry, but also provides insights into the

  14. Enhancement of oxygen surface exchange kinetics of SrTiO(3) by alkaline earth metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Argirusis, Christos; Wagner, Stefan; Menesklou, Wolfgang; Warnke, Carsten; Damjanovic, Tanja; Borchardt, Günter; Ivers-Tiffée, Ellen

    2005-10-21

    The oxygen incorporation reaction in undoped SrTiO(3) was investigated by electrical measurements (pressure modulation technique) in the temperature range from 650-920 degrees C and by means of tracer exchange experiments in the temperature range from 458-600 degrees C. The surface of the undoped SrTiO(3) single crystals was modified by alkaline earth metal compounds leading to a tremendous enhancement of the effective surface exchange rate for oxygen incorporation as compared to the uncoated surface.

  15. Dissolved oxygen in two Oregon estuaries: The importance of the ocean-estuary connection - May 16, 2011

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the role of the ocean –estuary connection in influencing periodic reductions in dissolved oxygen (DO) levels in Yaquina and Yachats estuaries, Oregon, USA. In the Yaquina Estuary, there is close coupling between the coastal ocean and the estuary. As a result, low DO ...

  16. Signal amplification by adsorption-induced catalytic reduction of dissolved oxygen on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes for electrochemiluminescent immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shengyuan; Hou, Zhentao; Lei, Jianping; Lin, Dajie; Hu, Zheng; Yan, Feng; Ju, Huangxian

    2011-11-28

    A signal amplification strategy was proposed for quantum dot-based electrochemiluminescence by an adsorption-induced catalytic reduction of dissolved oxygen at the sidewall of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes, which led to a 'signal-on' sandwich immunoassay with a linear range of 6 orders of magnitude.

  17. Impact of minimum daily dissolved oxygen concentration on production performance of hybrid female channel catfish x male blue catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hybrid Catfish (female Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus X male Blue Catfish I. furcatus) were reared during two years as single-batch crops under two different dissolved oxygen (DO) regimes each year; a high-DO (control) treatment in which the minimum daily DO was maintained above 3.8 ppm during ...

  18. Modeling dissolved oxygen dynamics in blackwater rivers: The importance of site-specific data and carbon flux parameter complexity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The validity of models predicting parameters of ecosystem health may be limited by the resolution of data available for target river reaches. Here we test the ability of the Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC) model to accurately predict dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations in two reaches of s...

  19. Historic and recent patterns in dissolved oxygen within the Yaquina Estuary (Oregon, USA): Importance of anthropogenic activities and oceanic conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Spatial and temporal patterns of dissolved oxygen (DO) in Yaquina Estuary, Oregon (USA) are examined using historic and recent data. There was a significant increasing trend in DO in the upstream portion of the estuary during the years 1960–1985. Historically, minimum dry season ...

  20. The Effect of Increased Temperatures and Ultraviolet Radiation on Dissolved Oxygen in Ecosystems Primarily Comprised of "Euglena"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Matt

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether increased levels of UV radiation and temperatures from global warming have a significant impact on dissolved oxygen (DO) output from the alga, "Euglena," which affects other organisms in the ecosystem. The original hypothesis stated that if temperature was increased along with exposure time to…

  1. Periodical bubble formation and the oscillatory change in dissolved oxygen concentration in a catalase-hydrogen peroxide system.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Satoshi

    2006-06-01

    The relationship between the periodical bubble forming and the oscillatory change in the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in a catalase-hydrogen peroxide system was studied. Photographs of the bubbles and the responses from the DO electrode indicated that large bubbles were generated periodically, and that the DO profile depended on the geometrical relationship between the electrode and the bubbles. PMID:16772694

  2. A multisyringe flow injection Winkler-based spectrophotometric analyzer for in-line monitoring of dissolved oxygen in seawater.

    PubMed

    Horstkotte, Burkhard; Alonso, Juan Carlos; Miró, Manuel; Cerdà, Víctor

    2010-01-15

    An integrated analyzer based on the multisyringe flow injection analysis approach is proposed for the automated determination of dissolved oxygen in seawater. The entire Winkler method including precipitation of manganese(II) hydroxide, fixation of dissolved oxygen, dissolution of the oxidized manganese hydroxide precipitate, and generation of iodine and tri-iodide ion are in-line effected within the flow network. Spectrophotometric quantification of iodine and tri-iodide at the isosbestic wavelength of 466nm renders enhanced method reliability. The calibration function is linear up to 19mgL(-1) dissolved oxygen and an injection frequency of 17 per hour is achieved. The multisyringe system features a highly satisfying signal stability with repeatabilities of 2.2% RSD that make it suitable for continuous determination of dissolved oxygen in seawater. Compared to the manual starch-end-point titrimetric Winkler method and early reported automated systems, concentrations and consumption of reagents and sample are reduced up to hundredfold. The versatility of the multisyringe assembly was exploited in the implementation of an ancillary automatic batch-wise Winkler titrator using a single syringe of the module for accurate titration of the released iodine/tri-iodide with thiosulfate. PMID:20006097

  3. Improving estimates of ecosystem metabolism by reducing effects of tidal advection on dissolved oxygen time series-Abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    Continuous time series of dissolved oxygen (DO) have been used to compute estimates of metabolism in aquatic ecosystems. Central to this open water or "Odum" method is the assumption that the DO time is not strongly affected by advection and that effects due to advection or mixin...

  4. Manipulation of Microenvironment with a Built-in Electrochemical Actuator in Proximity of a Dissolved Oxygen Microsensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Chang-Soo; Lee, Cae-Hyang; Fiering, Jason O.; Ufer, Stefan; Scarantino, Charles W.; Nagle, H. Troy; Fiering, Jason O.; Ufer, Stefan; Nagle, H. Troy; Scarantino, Charles W.

    2004-01-01

    Abstract - Biochemical sensors for continuous monitoring require dependable periodic self- diagnosis with acceptable simplicity to check its functionality during operation. An in situ self- diagnostic technique for a dissolved oxygen microsensor is proposed in an effort to devise an intelligent microsensor system with an integrated electrochemical actuation electrode. With a built- in platinum microelectrode that surrounds the microsensor, two kinds of microenvironments, called the oxygen-saturated or oxygen-depleted phases, can be created by water electrolysis depending on the polarity. The functionality of the microsensor can be checked during these microenvironment phases. The polarographic oxygen microsensor is fabricated on a flexible polyimide substrate (Kapton) and the feasibility of the proposed concept is demonstrated in a physiological solution. The sensor responds properly during the oxygen-generating and oxygen- depleting phases. The use of these microenvironments for in situ self-calibration is discussed to achieve functional integration as well as structural integration of the microsensor system.

  5. Model development for prediction and mitigation of dissolved oxygen sags in the Athabasca River, Canada.

    PubMed

    Martin, Nancy; McEachern, Preston; Yu, Tong; Zhu, David Z

    2013-01-15

    Northern rivers exposed to high biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) loads are prone to dissolved oxygen (DO) sags in winter due to re-aeration occurring within limited open water leads. Additionally, photosynthesis is reduced by decreased daylight hours, inability of solar radiation to pass through ice, and slower algal growth in winter. The low volumetric flow decreases point-source dilution while their travel time increases. The Athabasca River in Alberta, Canada, has experienced these sags which may affect the aquatic ecosystem. A water quality model for an 800 km reach of this river was customized, calibrated, and validated specifically for DO and the factors that determine its concentration. After validation, the model was used to assess the assimilative capacity of the river and mitigation measures that could be deployed. The model reproduced the surface elevation and water temperature for the seven years simulated with mean absolute errors of <15 cm and <0.9 °C respectively. The ice cover was adequately predicted for all seven winters, and the simulation of nutrients and phytoplankton primary productivity were satisfactory. The DO concentration was very sensitive to the sediment oxygen demand (SOD), which represented about 50% of the DO sink in winter. The DO calibration was improved by implementing an annual SOD based on the BOD load. The model was used to estimate the capacity of the river to assimilate BOD loads in order to maintain a DO concentration of 7 mg/L, which represents the chronic provincial guideline plus a buffer of 0.5 mg/L. The results revealed the maximum assimilative BOD load of 8.9 ton/day at average flow conditions, which is lower than the maximum permitted load. In addition, the model predicted a minimum assimilative flow of about 52 m(3)/s at average BOD load. Climate change scenarios could increase the frequency of this low flow. A three-level warning-system is proposed to manage the BOD load proactively at different river discharges

  6. Analysis of environmental issues related to small-scale hydroelectric development. VI. Dissolved oxygen concentrations below operating dams

    SciTech Connect

    Cada, G.F.; Kumar, K.D.; Solomon, J.A.; Hildebrand, S.G.

    1982-01-01

    Results are presented of an effort aimed at determining whether or not water quality degradation, as exemplified by dissolved oxygen concentrations, is a potentially significant issue affecting small-scale hydropower development in the US. The approach was to pair operating hydroelectric sites of all sizes with dissolved oxygen measurements from nearby downstream US Geological Survey water quality stations (acquired from the WATSTORE data base). The USGS data were used to calculate probabilities of non-compliance (PNCs), i.e., the probabilities that dissolved oxygen concentrations in the discharge waters of operating hydroelectric dams will drop below 5 mg/l. PNCs were estimated for each site, season (summer vs remaining months), and capacity category (less than or equal to 30 MW vs >30 MW). Because of the low numbers of usable sites in many states, much of the subsequent analysis was conducted on a regional basis. During the winter months (November through June) all regions had low mean PNCs regardless of capacity. Most regions had higher mean PNCs in summer than in winter, and summer PNCs were greater for large-scale than for small-scale sites. Among regions, the highest mean summer PNCs were found in the Great Basin, the Southeast, and the Ohio Valley. To obtain a more comprehensive picture of the effects of season and capacity on potential dissolved oxygen problems, cumulative probability distributions of PNC were developed for selected regions. This analysis indicates that low dissolved oxygen concentrations in the tailwaters below operating hydroelectric projects are a problem largely confined to large-scale facilities.

  7. Photo-electrochemical sensor for dissolved oxygen, based on a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/iron oxalate hybrid electrode.

    PubMed

    Bencsik, Gábor; Lukács, Zsófia; Visy, Csaba

    2010-02-01

    In this work a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT)/iron oxalate composite was synthesized by electrochemical polymerization. The layer was deposited potentiostatically from the monomer-containing solution in the presence of iron(II) oxalate. Similarly to the polypyrrole/iron oxalate electrode--presented in a recent paper--the layer gave a negative photocurrent, which depended on the oxygen concentration of the electrolyte. This cathodic photocurrent--taken as the differences between the values registered under illumination and in the dark at -750 mV potential on the cathodic part of the voltammetric cycles--confirmed the sensitivity of the PEDOT/iron oxalate electrode for dissolved oxygen. Stationary photocurrents were determined also from chronoamperometric measurements, and they exhibited a linear behaviour with the dissolved oxygen concentration to below 1 ppm. The photo-effect of the PEDOT/iron oxalate layer can be attributed to the excitation of the neutral form of the film. PMID:20098773

  8. Development, calibration, and sensitivity analyses of a high-resolution dissolved oxygen mass balance model for the northern Gulf of Mexico

    EPA Science Inventory

    A high-resolution dissolved oxygen mass balance model was developed for the Louisiana coastal shelf in the northern Gulf of Mexico. GoMDOM (Gulf of Mexico Dissolved Oxygen Model) was developed to assist in evaluating the impacts of nutrient loading on hypoxia development and exte...

  9. Photochemical Production of Singlet Oxygen from Dissolved Organic Matter in Ice.

    PubMed

    Fede, Alexis; Grannas, Amanda M

    2015-11-01

    Dissolved natural organic matter (DOM) is a ubiquitous component of natural waters and an important photosensitizer. A variety of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to be produced from DOM photochemistry, including singlet oxygen, 1O2. Recently, it has been determined that humic-like substances and unknown organic chromophores are significant contributors to sunlight absorption in snowpack; however, DOM photochemistry in snow/ice has received little attention in the literature. We recently showed that DOM plays an important role in indirect photolysis processes in ice, producing ROS and leading to the efficient photodegradation of a probe hydrophobic organic pollutant, aldrin.1 ROS scavenger experiments indicated that 1O2 played a significant role in the indirect photodegradation of aldrin. Here we quantitatively examine 1O2 photochemically produced from DOM in frozen and liquid aqueous solutions. Steady-state 1O2 production is enhanced up to nearly 1000 times in frozen DOM samples compared to liquid samples. 1O2 production is dependent on the concentration of DOM, but the nature of the DOM source (terrestrial vs microbial) does not have a significant effect on 1O2 production in liquid or frozen samples, with different source types producing similar steady-state concentrations of 1O2. The temperature of frozen samples also has a significant effect on steady-state 1O2 production in the range of 228-262 K, with colder samples producing more steady-state 1O2. The large enhancement in 1O2 in frozen samples suggests that it may play a significant role in the photochemical processes that occur in snow and ice, and DOM could be a significant, but to date poorly understood, oxidant source in snow and ice.

  10. Preferential flow characterization in fractured aquifer by injecting dissolved oxygen in boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vurro, Michele; Donnaloia, Mietta; Masciopinto, Costantino; Pennetta, Luigi; Robbins, Gary; Vitale, Sarah

    2016-04-01

    A new approach to identify contributing fractures and wellbore flow in fractured and karst aquifers is presented. It is time efficient, low cost and based on a benign tracer: the dissolved oxygen (DO). The method was already applied by other scientists to test fractured crystalline rock wells. The DO method consists in elevating water DO concentration in a borehole by bubbling air at assigned water depths using a porous polypropylene tube (bubbler) connected to a compressed air tank with tubing. After the aeration, the resulting profile should be a linear increase in DO with depth due to the effects of water pressure on oxygen solubility. Any changes in the DO profile will be then observed when water flows into and through the well. DO dilution can be used to locate inflowing fractures and to define active flow zones in wells. If there is no change in the DO profile, a "dead zones" in the well is present, that is to say no flow is taking place or can be identified. The DO tests in this work have been carried out in the industrial area of Bari, at the experimental station, constituted by five wells drilled at the CNR-IRSA. The wells penetrate karstic limestone. Results show enhanced flow through at depths between 32 and 37 meters below the water level: DO concentrations decrease until they reach values close to 0 mg/l. DO curves show also the presence of inflowing fractures, as testified by the decrease in the DO concentrations due to the effects of water dilution, at depths of 4 and 9 meters (below the water table) in the north well, at 4 and 10 meters in the central well, and at 30 meters in the south well. The benefits of utilizing DO as a tracer include ease of accessibility, low cost and time-efficiency as well as non-toxic nature of the tracer and no impact on flow conditions.

  11. Short-term covariation of dissolved oxygen and phytoplankton photosynthesis in a coastal fish aquaculture site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Takashi; Murata, Osamu; Furuya, Ken; Eguchi, Mitsuru

    2007-09-01

    The influence of phytoplankton photosynthesis (PP) on dissolved oxygen (DO) dynamics was evaluated in a red sea bream ( Pagrus major) aquaculture site. The surface PP was monitored continuously by a natural fluorescence sensor for 2-3 weeks during all seasons, except spring. In summer, when the daily PP was low during cloudy weather, DO at the surface markedly decreased below the critical level (5.7 mg O 2 L -1), which is needed for normal fish growth. However, on the subsequent clear day, active PP restored the DO back to above the critical level. In fall, under cloudy skies, the surface DO also decreased below the critical level and remained there, even when the subsequent days were clear. In winter, DO remained at high levels throughout the water column due to an active supply from the air and vertical mixing. Besides seasonal changes, surface DO showed a diel cycle with a minimum early in the morning and maximum in the evening. This diel cycle was also regulated by planktonic photosynthesis. This was most obvious and its amplitude was largest in summer, as PP was very high and thermal stratification prevented diffusion of DO from the surface to deeper water. The present study is the first detailed report on the close coupling of DO with PP in coastal waters, even under non-bloom conditions. Cloudy weather and early mornings were found to be the most critical periods in oxygen supply to cultured fish and other pelagic organisms in a fish culture site and other eutrophic coastal area.

  12. Decoupling the influence of biological and physical processes on the dissolved oxygen in the Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jiabi; Shen, Jian

    2015-01-01

    is instructive and essential to decouple the effects of biological and physical processes on the dissolved oxygen condition, in order to understand their contribution to the interannual variability of hypoxia in Chesapeake Bay since the 1980s. A conceptual bottom DO budget model is applied, using the vertical exchange time scale (VET) to quantify the physical condition and net oxygen consumption rate to quantify biological activities. By combining observed DO data and modeled VET values along the main stem of the Chesapeake Bay, the monthly net bottom DO consumption rate was estimated for 1985-2012. The DO budget model results show that the interannual variations of physical conditions accounts for 88.8% of the interannual variations of observed DO. The high similarity between the VET spatial pattern and the observed DO suggests that physical processes play a key role in regulating the DO condition. Model results also show that long-term VET has a slight increase in summer, but no statistically significant trend is found. Correlations among southerly wind strength, North Atlantic Oscillation index, and VET demonstrate that the physical condition in the Chesapeake Bay is highly controlled by the large-scale climate variation. The relationship is most significant during the summer, when the southerly wind dominates throughout the Chesapeake Bay. The seasonal pattern of the averaged net bottom DO consumption rate (B'20) along the main stem coincides with that of the chlorophyll-a concentration. A significant correlation between nutrient loading and B'20 suggests that the biological processes in April-May are most sensitive to the nutrient loading.

  13. An Intelligent Optical Dissolved Oxygen Measurement Method Based on a Fluorescent Quenching Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Li, Fengmei; Wei, Yaoguang; Chen, Yingyi; Li, Daoliang; Zhang, Xu

    2015-12-09

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) is a key factor that influences the healthy growth of fishes in aquaculture. The DO content changes with the aquatic environment and should therefore be monitored online. However, traditional measurement methods, such as iodometry and other chemical analysis methods, are not suitable for online monitoring. The Clark method is not stable enough for extended periods of monitoring. To solve these problems, this paper proposes an intelligent DO measurement method based on the fluorescence quenching mechanism. The measurement system is composed of fluorescent quenching detection, signal conditioning, intelligent processing, and power supply modules. The optical probe adopts the fluorescent quenching mechanism to detect the DO content and solves the problem, whereas traditional chemical methods are easily influenced by the environment. The optical probe contains a thermistor and dual excitation sources to isolate visible parasitic light and execute a compensation strategy. The intelligent processing module adopts the IEEE 1451.2 standard and realizes intelligent compensation. Experimental results show that the optical measurement method is stable, accurate, and suitable for online DO monitoring in aquaculture applications.

  14. Lake number, a quantitative indicator of mixing used to estimate changes in dissolved oxygen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, Dale M.; Imberger, Jorg

    1994-01-01

    Lake Number, LN, values are shown to be quantitative indicators of deep mixing in lakes and reservoirs that can be used to estimate changes in deep water dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations. LN is a dimensionless parameter defined as the ratio of the moments about the center of volume of the water body, of the stabilizing force of gravity associated with density stratification to the destabilizing forces supplied by wind, cooling, inflow, outflow, and other artificial mixing devices. To demonstrate the universality of this parameter, LN values are used to describe the extent of deep mixing and are compared with changes in DO concentrations in three reservoirs in Australia and four lakes in the U.S.A., which vary in productivity and mixing regimes. A simple model is developed which relates changes in LN values, i.e., the extent of mixing, to changes in near bottom DO concentrations. After calibrating the model for a specific system, it is possible to use real-time LN values, calculated using water temperature profiles and surface wind velocities, to estimate changes in DO concentrations (assuming unchanged trophic conditions).

  15. The nitritation performance of biofilm reactor for treating domestic wastewater under high dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhaoming; Li, Zebing; Ma, Jing; Du, Jia; Chen, Guanghui; Bian, Wei; Li, Jun; Zhao, Baihang

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the nitritation performance in a biofilm reactor for treating domestic wastewater. The reactor was operated in continuous feed mode from phases 1 to 3. The dissolved oxygen (DO) was controlled at 3.5-7 mg/L throughout the experiment. The biofilm reactor showed excellent nitritation performance after the inoculation of nitrifying sludge, with the hydraulic retention time being reduced from 24 to 7 hr. Above 90% nitrite accumulation ratio (NAR) was maintained in phase 1. Afterwards, nitratation occurred with the low NH4(+)-N concentration in the reactor. The improvement of NH4(+)-N concentration to 20-35 mg/L had a limited effect on the recovery of nitritation. However, nitritation recovered rapidly when sequencing batch feed mode was adopted in phase 4, with the effluent NH4(+)-N concentration above 7 mg/L. The improvement of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) activity and the combined inhibition effect of free ammonia (FA) and free nitrous acid (FNA) on the nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) were two key factors for the rapid recovery of nitritation. Sludge activity was obtained in batch tests. The results of batch tests had a good relationship with the long term operation performance of the biofilm reactor. PMID:27090719

  16. Incorporating both physical and kinetic limitations in quantifying dissolved oxygen flux to aquatic sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Connor, B.L.; Hondzo, Miki; Harvey, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, dissolved oxygen (DO) fluxes have been calculated using the thin-film theory with DO microstructure data in systems characterized by fine sediments and low velocities. However, recent experimental evidence of fluctuating DO concentrations near the sediment-water interface suggests that turbulence and coherent motions control the mass transfer, and the surface renewal theory gives a more mechanistic model for quantifying fluxes. Both models involve quantifying the mass transfer coefficient (k) and the relevant concentration difference (??C). This study compared several empirical models for quantifying k based on both thin-film and surface renewal theories, as well as presents a new method for quantifying ??C (dynamic approach) that is consistent with the observed DO concentration fluctuations near the interface. Data were used from a series of flume experiments that includes both physical and kinetic uptake limitations of the flux. Results indicated that methods for quantifying k and ??C using the surface renewal theory better estimated the DO flux across a range of fluid-flow conditions. ?? 2009 ASCE.

  17. Ammonia-oxidizing microbial communities in reactors with efficient nitrification at low-dissolved oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Colin M.; Camejo, Pamela; Oshlag, J. Zachary; Noguera, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing microbial communities involved in ammonia oxidation under low dissolved oxygen (DO) conditions (<0.3 mg/L) were investigated using chemostat reactors. One lab-scale reactor (NS_LowDO) was seeded with sludge from a full-scale wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) not adapted to low-DO nitrification, while a second reactor (JP_LowDO) was seeded with sludge from a full-scale WWTP already achieving low-DO nitrifiaction. The experimental evidence from quantitative PCR, rDNA tag pyrosequencing, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) suggested that ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in the Nitrosomonas genus were responsible for low-DO nitrification in the NS_LowDO reactor, whereas in the JP_LowDO reactor nitrification was not associated with any known ammonia-oxidizing prokaryote. Neither reactor had a significant population of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) or anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) organisms. Organisms isolated from JP_LowDO were capable of autotrophic and heterotrophic ammonia utilization, albeit without stoichiometric accumulation of nitrite or nitrate. Based on the experimental evidence we propose that Pseudomonas, Xanthomonadaceae, Rhodococcus, and Sphingomonas are involved in nitrification under low-DO conditions. PMID:25506762

  18. An Intelligent Optical Dissolved Oxygen Measurement Method Based on a Fluorescent Quenching Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fengmei; Wei, Yaoguang; Chen, Yingyi; Li, Daoliang; Zhang, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) is a key factor that influences the healthy growth of fishes in aquaculture. The DO content changes with the aquatic environment and should therefore be monitored online. However, traditional measurement methods, such as iodometry and other chemical analysis methods, are not suitable for online monitoring. The Clark method is not stable enough for extended periods of monitoring. To solve these problems, this paper proposes an intelligent DO measurement method based on the fluorescence quenching mechanism. The measurement system is composed of fluorescent quenching detection, signal conditioning, intelligent processing, and power supply modules. The optical probe adopts the fluorescent quenching mechanism to detect the DO content and solves the problem, whereas traditional chemical methods are easily influenced by the environment. The optical probe contains a thermistor and dual excitation sources to isolate visible parasitic light and execute a compensation strategy. The intelligent processing module adopts the IEEE 1451.2 standard and realizes intelligent compensation. Experimental results show that the optical measurement method is stable, accurate, and suitable for online DO monitoring in aquaculture applications. PMID:26690176

  19. Enhanced nitrogen removal in constructed wetlands: effects of dissolved oxygen and step-feeding.

    PubMed

    Li, Fengmin; Lu, Lun; Zheng, Xiang; Ngo, Huu Hao; Liang, Shuang; Guo, Wenshan; Zhang, Xiuwen

    2014-10-01

    Four horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands (HSFCWs), named HSFCW1 (three-stage, without step-feeding), HSFCW2 (three-stage, with step-feeding), HSFCW3 (five-stage, without step-feeding) and HSFCW4 (five-stage, with step-feeding) were designed to investigate the effects of dissolved oxygen (DO) and step-feeding on nitrogen removal. High removal of 90.9% COD, 99.1% ammonium nitrogen and 88.1% total nitrogen (TN) were obtained simultaneously in HSFCW4 compared with HSFCW1-3. The excellent TN removal of HSFCW4 was due to artificial aeration provided sufficient DO for nitrification and the favorable anoxic environment created for denitrification. Step-feeding was a crucial factor because it provided sufficient carbon source (high COD: nitrate ratio of 14.3) for the denitrification process. Microbial activities and microbial abundance in HSFCW4 was found to be influenced by DO distribution and step-feeding, and thus improve TN removal. These results suggest that artificial aeration combined with step-feeding could achieve high nitrogen removal in HSFCWs.

  20. Ammonia-oxidizing microbial communities in reactors with efficient nitrification at low-dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Colin M; Camejo, Pamela; Oshlag, J Zachary; Noguera, Daniel R

    2015-03-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing microbial communities involved in ammonia oxidation under low dissolved oxygen (DO) conditions (<0.3 mg/L) were investigated using chemostat reactors. One lab-scale reactor (NS_LowDO) was seeded with sludge from a full-scale wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) not adapted to low-DO nitrification, while a second reactor (JP_LowDO) was seeded with sludge from a full-scale WWTP already achieving low-DO nitrifiaction. The experimental evidence from quantitative PCR, rDNA tag pyrosequencing, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) suggested that ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in the Nitrosomonas genus were responsible for low-DO nitrification in the NS_LowDO reactor, whereas in the JP_LowDO reactor nitrification was not associated with any known ammonia-oxidizing prokaryote. Neither reactor had a significant population of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) or anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) organisms. Organisms isolated from JP_LowDO were capable of autotrophic and heterotrophic ammonia utilization, albeit without stoichiometric accumulation of nitrite or nitrate. Based on the experimental evidence we propose that Pseudomonas, Xanthomonadaceae, Rhodococcus, and Sphingomonas are involved in nitrification under low-DO conditions.

  1. The effect of Sequoyah Nuclear Plant on dissolved oxygen in Chickamauga Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Butkus, S.R.; Shiao, M.C.; Yeager, B.L.

    1990-09-01

    During the summer of 1985, the Tennessee Division of Water Pollution Control and the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency measured dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations downstream from the Sequoyah Nuclear Plant (SQN) discharge mixing zone that were below the state criterion for DO. The Tennessee General Water Quality Criteria'' specifies that DO should be a minimum of 5.0 mg/l measured at a depth of 5 feet for the protection of fish and aquatic life. The Tennessee Valley Authority developed the present study to answer general concerns about reservoir conditions and potential for adverse effects on aquatic biota. Four objectives were defined for this study: (1) to better define the extent and duration of the redistribution of DO in the reservoir, (2) to better understand DO dynamics within the mixing zone, (3) to determine whether DO is being lost (or added) as the condenser cooling water passes through the plant, and (4) to evaluate the potential for impact on aquatic life in the reservoir.

  2. Versatile common instrumentation for optical detection of pH and dissolved oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardesai, Neha; Rao, Govind; Kostov, Yordan

    2015-07-01

    The recent trend toward use of disposable and miniature bioreactors requires the use of appropriate sensors. pH and dissolved oxygen (DO) are often measured using optical chemical sensors due to their small form factor and convenience in use. These sensors are often interrogated using a specialized opto-electronic transducer that is designed around the optical sensor. In this contribution, we are presenting a new class of opto-electronic transducers that are usable with several different chemical sensors without the need to switch the optics or hardware when changing the type of the chemical sensor. This allows flexibility closer to the lab-grade devices while the size is closer to a dedicated sensor. This versatile instrumentation is capable of seamlessly switching between the pH and DO measurement modes and is capable of auto recognition of the sensor type. The principle of ratiometric fluorescence is used for pH measurements, and that of fluorescence lifetime for DO measurements. An approach to obtain identical calibrations between several devices is also presented. The described hardware constitutes common instrumentation for measuring either pH or DO and has been tested in actual bioprocesses. It has been found adequate for continuous bioprocess monitoring.

  3. The structural features of hemicelluloses dissolved out at different cooking stages of active oxygen cooking process.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jianbin; Yang, Qiulin; Lin, Lu

    2014-04-15

    This work described the morphologic changes of corn stalk and the structural characterization of its hemicelluloses dissolved in yellow liquor at different cooking stages. The results showed that active oxygen cooking process was an efficient method to depolymerize the corn stalk into cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin as a pretreatment of biomass conversion. This cooking process can also be divided into three phases: bulk delignification, extended delignification, and residual delignification. During the heating-up period 57.67% of hemicelluloses and 62.31% of lignin were removed from the raw material. However, only 15% of hemicelluloses and 23.21% of lignin were removed during at temperature' period. The hemicelluloses from the corn stalk and yellow liquor were composed of (1→4)-β-D-xylopyranose backbones substituted with α-l-arabinofuranosyl, 4-O-methyl-α-D-glucuronic acid, and some methoxyl residues. The backbones of hemicelluloses were gradually cleaved during the cooking process. The acetyl groups substituted with xylopyranosyl residues were completely cleaved during the cooking process.

  4. Dissolved oxygen transfer to sediments by sweep and eject motions in aquatic environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Connor, B.L.; Hondzo, Miki

    2008-01-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations were quantified near the sediment-water interface to evaluate DO transfer to sediments in a laboratory recirculating flume and open channel under varying fluid-flow conditions. DO concentration fluctuations were observed within the diffusive sublayer, as defined by the time-averaged DO concentration gradient near the sediment-water interface. Evaluation of the DO concentration fluctuations along with detailed fluid-flow characterizations were used to quantify quasi-periodic sweep and eject motions (bursting events) near the sediments. Bursting events dominated the Reynolds shear stresses responsible for momentum and mass fluctuations near the sediment bed. Two independent methods for detecting bursting events using DO concentration and velocity data produced consistent results. The average time between bursting events was scaled with wall variables and was incorporated into a similarity model to describe the dimensionless mass transfer coefficient (Sherwood number, Sh) in terms of the Reynolds number, Re, and Schmidt number, Sc, which described transport in the flow. The scaling of bursting events was employed with the similarity model to quantify DO transfer to sediments and results showed a high degree of agreement with experimental data. ?? 2008, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

  5. Predicting dissolved oxygen concentration using kernel regression modeling approaches with nonlinear hydro-chemical data.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kunwar P; Gupta, Shikha; Rai, Premanjali

    2014-05-01

    Kernel function-based regression models were constructed and applied to a nonlinear hydro-chemical dataset pertaining to surface water for predicting the dissolved oxygen levels. Initial features were selected using nonlinear approach. Nonlinearity in the data was tested using BDS statistics, which revealed the data with nonlinear structure. Kernel ridge regression, kernel principal component regression, kernel partial least squares regression, and support vector regression models were developed using the Gaussian kernel function and their generalization and predictive abilities were compared in terms of several statistical parameters. Model parameters were optimized using the cross-validation procedure. The proposed kernel regression methods successfully captured the nonlinear features of the original data by transforming it to a high dimensional feature space using the kernel function. Performance of all the kernel-based modeling methods used here were comparable both in terms of predictive and generalization abilities. Values of the performance criteria parameters suggested for the adequacy of the constructed models to fit the nonlinear data and their good predictive capabilities. PMID:24338099

  6. Raising and controlling study of dissolved oxygen concentration in closed-type aeration tank.

    PubMed

    Chen, C K; Lo, S L

    2005-07-01

    This study investigated the promotion and control of dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration of the closed-type aeration tank via practical experiments in the wastewater treatment system of a 5-star hotel in Taipei. As with limited and treasured space in Taiwan, before the completion of the sewer system construction in cities, to utilize the mat foundation under large buildings as the space of sewage treatment plant still has been one of the alternatives of those sewage treatments. However, aeration tanks constructed in the mat foundation of buildings have smaller effective water depth, which will cause a lower total transfer amount of DO. Controlling the total exhaust gas flow rate can increase the pressure on such closed-type aeration tanks. The DO concentration thus may increase according to Henry's Law. Furthermore, it may enable operators to adjust the DO concentration of the aeration tank more precisely and thus sustain optimal operating conditions in these treatment facilities. Practical experiments indicated that the DO concentration of aeration tank maintains an average of 3.8 mg l(-1), obtaining the optimum operating conditions. The efficiency of the biological treatment facilities in the mat foundation could be markedly improved. PMID:16080335

  7. An economic analysis of selected strategies for dissolved-oxygen management; Chattahoochee River, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schefter, John E.; Hirsch, Robert M.

    1980-01-01

    A method for evaluating the cost-effectiveness of alternative strategies for dissolved-oxygen (DO) management is demonstrated, using the Chattahoochee River, GA., as an example. The conceptual framework for the analysis is suggested by the economic theory of production. The minimum flow of the river and the percentage of the total waste inflow receiving nitrification are considered to be two variable inputs to be used in the production of given minimum concentration of DO in the river. Each of the inputs has a cost: the loss of dependable peak hydroelectric generating capacity at Buford Dam associated with flow augmentation and the cost associated with nitrification of wastes. The least-cost combination of minimum flow and waste treatment necessary to achieve a prescribed minimum DO concentration is identified. Results of the study indicate that, in some instances, the waste-assimilation capacity of the Chattahoochee River can be substituted for increased waste treatment; the associated savings in waste-treatment costs more than offset the benefits foregone because of the loss of peak generating capacity at Buford Dam. The sensitivity of the results to the estimates of the cost of replacing peak generating capacity is examined. It is also demonstrated that a flexible approach to the management of DO in the Chattahoochee River may be much more cost effective than a more rigid, institutional approach wherein constraints are placed on the flow of the river and(or) on waste-treatment practices. (USGS)

  8. Application of Scaling for Robust Modeling of Dissolved Oxygen in Streams and Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishtiaq, K. S.; Abdul-Aziz, O.

    2012-12-01

    We present a scaling concept for developing a data driven, empirical, and robust model of dissolved Oxygen (DO) in streams and rivers using an extended stochastic harmonic (ESHA) algorithm. A single reference observation from the diurnal cycle was chosen as the scaling parameter to normalize and collapse hourly DO data of different days into a single diurnal curve. The spatio-temporal robustness of the scaling model was verified for four streams of comparable watershed sizes representing four distinct Level III Ecoregions of Minnesota. Estimated model parameters exhibited notable spatio-temporal robustness and collapsed into narrow bands. Predicted hourly DO using temporal (May-August) mean of the site specific model parameters showed superior performance in terms of root mean square error (0.48 - 0.80 mg/L), correlation coefficient (0.87-0.96) and Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency (0.58-0.74). Model results using monthly mean of estimated parameters reemphasized the temporal robustness, slightly improving the prediction accuracies. A satisfactory validation of the model robustness was achieved by using parameters of independent sites and a regional set of parameters obtained by averaging the model parameters in time and space. The scaling-based data driven empirical model can be applied to simulate continuous DO time-series from a single observation for streams and rivers of comparable watershed sizes. Availability of DO at fine spatio-temporal resolutions would support a dynamic assessment of aquatic ecosystem health and facilitate the achievement of improved watershed and ecosystem services.

  9. Identifying dissolved oxygen variability and stress in tidal freshwater streams of northern New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Wilding, Thomas K; Brown, Edmund; Collier, Kevin J

    2012-10-01

    Tidal streams are ecologically important components of lotic network, and we identify dissolved oxygen (DO) depletion as a potentially important stressor in freshwater tidal streams of northern New Zealand. Other studies have examined temporal DO variability within rivers and we build on this by examining variability between streams as a basis for regional-scale predictors of risk for DO stress. Diel DO variability in these streams was driven by: (1) photosynthesis by aquatic plants and community respiration which produced DO maxima in the afternoon and minima early morning (range, 0.6-4.7 g/m(3)) as a product of the solar cycle and (2) tidal variability as a product of the lunar cycle, including saline intrusions with variable DO concentrations plus a small residual effect on freshwater DO for low-velocity streams. The lowest DO concentrations were observed during March (early autumn) when water temperatures and macrophyte biomass were high. Spatial comparisons indicated that low-gradient tidal streams were at greater risk of DO depletions harmful to aquatic life. Tidal influence was stronger in low-gradient streams, which typically drain more developed catchments, have lower reaeration potential and offer conditions more suitable for aquatic plant proliferation. Combined, these characteristics supported a simple method based on the extent of low-gradient channel for identifying coastal streams at risk of DO depletion. High-risk streams can then be targeted for riparian planting, nutrient limits and water allocation controls to reduce potential ecological stress.

  10. Versatile common instrumentation for optical detection of pH and dissolved oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Sardesai, Neha; Rao, Govind; Kostov, Yordan

    2015-07-15

    The recent trend toward use of disposable and miniature bioreactors requires the use of appropriate sensors. pH and dissolved oxygen (DO) are often measured using optical chemical sensors due to their small form factor and convenience in use. These sensors are often interrogated using a specialized opto-electronic transducer that is designed around the optical sensor. In this contribution, we are presenting a new class of opto-electronic transducers that are usable with several different chemical sensors without the need to switch the optics or hardware when changing the type of the chemical sensor. This allows flexibility closer to the lab-grade devices while the size is closer to a dedicated sensor. This versatile instrumentation is capable of seamlessly switching between the pH and DO measurement modes and is capable of auto recognition of the sensor type. The principle of ratiometric fluorescence is used for pH measurements, and that of fluorescence lifetime for DO measurements. An approach to obtain identical calibrations between several devices is also presented. The described hardware constitutes common instrumentation for measuring either pH or DO and has been tested in actual bioprocesses. It has been found adequate for continuous bioprocess monitoring.

  11. MEMS needle-type sensor array for in situ measurements of dissolved oxygen and redox potential.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Hwan; Seo, Youngwoo; Lim, Tae-Sun; Bishop, Paul L; Papautsky, Ian

    2007-11-15

    Microelectrodes are among the most accurate and reliable monitoring devices for measuring the dynamics of biofilm processes. This paper describes a novel needle-type microelectrode array (MEA) for simultaneous in situ measurements of dissolved oxygen (DO) and oxidation reduction potential (ORP) fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies. The MEA exhibits fast response times for both DO and ORP measurements and shows a substantial increase in DO sensitivity. To demonstrate the versatility of the new sensor, it was applied to the measurement of DO and ORP microprofiles in a multispecies biofilm. This work demonstrates that the MEA is able to monitor local concentration changes with a high spatial resolution and provide the versatility of the microelectrode technique needed for biofilm studies as well as the capability for repetitive measurements. In addition, the use of MEMS technologies and batch fabrication approaches enables integration, high consistency, high yields, and mass production. With further development, it may be possible to add additional sensors to the MEA (e.g., pH, phosphate) and integrate them with a reference electrode. PMID:18075099

  12. Transcriptome analysis of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis during milk acidification as affected by dissolved oxygen and the redox potential.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Nadja; Moslehi-Jenabian, Saloomeh; Werner, Birgit Brøsted; Jensen, Maiken Lund; Garrigues, Christel; Vogensen, Finn Kvist; Jespersen, Lene

    2016-06-01

    Performance of Lactococcus lactis as a starter culture in dairy fermentations depends on the levels of dissolved oxygen and the redox state of milk. In this study the microarray analysis was used to investigate the global gene expression of L. lactis subsp. lactis DSM20481(T) during milk acidification as affected by oxygen depletion and the decrease of redox potential. Fermentations were carried out at different initial levels of dissolved oxygen (dO2) obtained by milk sparging with oxygen (high dO2, 63%) or nitrogen (low dO2, 6%). Bacterial exposure to high initial oxygen resulted in overexpression of genes involved in detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS), oxidation-reduction processes, biosynthesis of trehalose and down-regulation of genes involved in purine nucleotide biosynthesis, indicating that several factors, among them trehalose and GTP, were implicated in bacterial adaptation to oxidative stress. Generally, transcriptional changes were more pronounced during fermentation of oxygen sparged milk. Genes up-regulated in response to oxygen depletion were implicated in biosynthesis and transport of pyrimidine nucleotides, branched chain amino acids and in arginine catabolic pathways; whereas genes involved in salvage of nucleotides and cysteine pathways were repressed. Expression pattern of genes involved in pyruvate metabolism indicated shifts towards mixed acid fermentation after oxygen depletion with production of specific end-products, depending on milk treatment. Differential expression of genes, involved in amino acid and pyruvate pathways, suggested that initial oxygen might influence the release of flavor compounds and, thereby, flavor development in dairy fermentations. The knowledge of molecular responses involved in adaptation of L. lactis to the shifts of redox state and pH during milk fermentations is important for the dairy industry to ensure better control of cheese production. PMID:27015296

  13. Transcriptome analysis of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis during milk acidification as affected by dissolved oxygen and the redox potential.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Nadja; Moslehi-Jenabian, Saloomeh; Werner, Birgit Brøsted; Jensen, Maiken Lund; Garrigues, Christel; Vogensen, Finn Kvist; Jespersen, Lene

    2016-06-01

    Performance of Lactococcus lactis as a starter culture in dairy fermentations depends on the levels of dissolved oxygen and the redox state of milk. In this study the microarray analysis was used to investigate the global gene expression of L. lactis subsp. lactis DSM20481(T) during milk acidification as affected by oxygen depletion and the decrease of redox potential. Fermentations were carried out at different initial levels of dissolved oxygen (dO2) obtained by milk sparging with oxygen (high dO2, 63%) or nitrogen (low dO2, 6%). Bacterial exposure to high initial oxygen resulted in overexpression of genes involved in detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS), oxidation-reduction processes, biosynthesis of trehalose and down-regulation of genes involved in purine nucleotide biosynthesis, indicating that several factors, among them trehalose and GTP, were implicated in bacterial adaptation to oxidative stress. Generally, transcriptional changes were more pronounced during fermentation of oxygen sparged milk. Genes up-regulated in response to oxygen depletion were implicated in biosynthesis and transport of pyrimidine nucleotides, branched chain amino acids and in arginine catabolic pathways; whereas genes involved in salvage of nucleotides and cysteine pathways were repressed. Expression pattern of genes involved in pyruvate metabolism indicated shifts towards mixed acid fermentation after oxygen depletion with production of specific end-products, depending on milk treatment. Differential expression of genes, involved in amino acid and pyruvate pathways, suggested that initial oxygen might influence the release of flavor compounds and, thereby, flavor development in dairy fermentations. The knowledge of molecular responses involved in adaptation of L. lactis to the shifts of redox state and pH during milk fermentations is important for the dairy industry to ensure better control of cheese production.

  14. Heterogeneity in a Suburban River Network: Understanding the Impact of Fluvial Wetlands on Dissolved Oxygen and Metabolism in Headwater Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, J. S.; Wollheim, W. M.; Sheehan, K.; Lightbody, A.

    2014-12-01

    Low dissolved oxygen content in rivers threatens fish populations, aquatic organisms, and the health of entire ecosystems. River systems with high fluvial wetland abundance and organic matter, may result in high metabolism that in conjunction with low re-aeration rates, lead to low oxygen conditions. Increasing abundance of beaver ponds in many areas may exacerbate this phenomenon. This research aims to understand the impact of fluvial wetlands, including beaver ponds, on dissolved oxygen (D.O.) and metabolism throughout the headwaters of the Ipswich R. watershed, MA, USA. In several fluvial wetland dominated systems, we measured diel D.O. and metabolism in the upstream inflow, the surface water transient storage zones of fluvial wetland sidepools, and at the outflow to understand how the wetlands modify dissolved oxygen. D.O. was also measured longitudinally along entire surface water flow paths (x-y km long) to determine how low levels of D.O. propagate downstream. Nutrient samples were also collected to understand how their behavior was related to D.O. behavior. Results show that D.O. in fluvial wetlands has large swings with periods of very low D.O. at night. D.O. swings were also seen in downstream outflow, though lagged and somewhat attenuated. Flow conditions affect the level of inundation and the subsequent effects of fluvial wetlands on main channel D.O.. Understanding the D.O. behavior throughout river systems has important implications for the ability of river systems to remove anthropogenic nitrogen.

  15. Nitrogen doped carbon nanotubes with encapsulated ferric carbide as excellent electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction in acid and alkaline media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Guoyu; Wang, Hongjuan; Yu, Hao; Peng, Feng

    2015-07-01

    Nitrogen doped carbon nanotubes (NCNTs) with encapsulated Fe3C nanoparticles (Fe3C@NCNTs) are synthesized by a simple direct pyrolysis of melamine and ferric chloride. The characterization results reveal that Fe3C is mainly encapsulated in the interior of NCNTs and N species is mainly distributed on the outside surface of NCNTs. Iron and iron carbide catalyze the growth of NCNTs and are wrapped by carbon to form Fe3C@NCNTs. The as-prepared Fe3C@NCNTs catalyst exhibits superior oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity, excellent methanol tolerance and long-term stability in both acid and alkaline media. It is proven that the doped N is the main active site for ORR and the inner Fe3C with outside carbon form the synergetic active site to enhance ORR activity. The ORR mechanism of direct four electron transfer pathway is proved in acid and alkaline media.

  16. Effect of dissolved oxygen manipulation on diffusive emissions from NAPL-impacted low permeability soil layers.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Lisa M; Dahlen, Paul R; Johnson, Paul C

    2014-05-01

    Aquifer physical model experiments were performed to investigate if diffusive emissions from nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL)-impacted low-permeability layers into groundwater moving through adjacent NAPL-free high-permeability layers can be reduced by creating an aerobic biotreatment zone at the interface between the two, and if over time that leads to reduced emissions after treatment ceases. Experiments were performed in two 1.2-m long × 1.2-m high × 5.4 cm wide stainless steel tanks; each with a high-permeability sand layer overlying a low-permeability crushed granite layer containing a NAPL mixture of indane and benzene. Each tank was water-saturated with horizontal flow primarily through the sand layer. The influent water was initially deoxygenated and the emissions and concentration distributions were allowed to reach near-steady conditions. The influent dissolved oxygen (DO) level was increased stepwise to 6.5-8.5 mg/L and 17-20 mg/L, and then decreased back to deoxygenated conditions. Each condition was maintained for at least 45 days. Relative to the near-steady benzene emission at the initial deoxygenated condition, the emission was reduced by about 70% when the DO was 6.5-8.5 mg/L, 90% when the DO was 17-20 mg/L, and ultimately 60% when returning to low DO conditions. While the reductions were substantial during treatment, longer-term reductions after 120 d of elevated DO treatment, relative to an untreated condition predicted by theory, were low: 29% and 6% in Tank 1 and Tank 2, respectively. Results show a 1-2 month lag between the end of DO delivery and rebound to the final near-steady emissions level. This observation has implications for post-treatment performance monitoring sampling at field sites. PMID:24716993

  17. Puget Sound Dissolved Oxygen Modeling Study: Development of an Intermediate Scale Water Quality Model

    SciTech Connect

    Khangaonkar, Tarang; Sackmann, Brandon S.; Long, Wen; Mohamedali, Teizeen; Roberts, Mindy

    2012-10-01

    The Salish Sea, including Puget Sound, is a large estuarine system bounded by over seven thousand miles of complex shorelines, consists of several subbasins and many large inlets with distinct properties of their own. Pacific Ocean water enters Puget Sound through the Strait of Juan de Fuca at depth over the Admiralty Inlet sill. Ocean water mixed with freshwater discharges from runoff, rivers, and wastewater outfalls exits Puget Sound through the brackish surface outflow layer. Nutrient pollution is considered one of the largest threats to Puget Sound. There is considerable interest in understanding the effect of nutrient loads on the water quality and ecological health of Puget Sound in particular and the Salish Sea as a whole. The Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) contracted with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop a coupled hydrodynamic and water quality model. The water quality model simulates algae growth, dissolved oxygen, (DO) and nutrient dynamics in Puget Sound to inform potential Puget Sound-wide nutrient management strategies. Specifically, the project is expected to help determine 1) if current and potential future nitrogen loadings from point and non-point sources are significantly impairing water quality at a large scale and 2) what level of nutrient reductions are necessary to reduce or control human impacts to DO levels in the sensitive areas. The project did not include any additional data collection but instead relied on currently available information. This report describes model development effort conducted during the period 2009 to 2012 under a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) cooperative agreement with PNNL, Ecology, and the University of Washington awarded under the National Estuary Program

  18. Predicting Late Winter Dissolved Oxygen Levels in Arctic Lakes Using Morphology and Landscape Metrics.

    PubMed

    Leppi, Jason C; Arp, Christopher D; Whitman, Matthew S

    2016-02-01

    Overwintering habitat for Arctic freshwater fish is essential, such that understanding the distribution of winter habitat quality at the landscape-scale is warranted. Adequate dissolved oxygen (DO) is a major factor limiting habitat quality in the Arctic region where ice cover can persist for 8 months each year. Here we use a mixed-effect model developed from 20 lakes across northern Alaska to assess which morphology and landscape attributes can be used to predict regional overwintering habitat quality. Across all lakes, we found that the majority of the variations in late winter DO can be explained by lake depth and littoral area. In shallow lakes (<4 m), we found evidence that additional variables such as elevation, lake area, ice cover duration, and snow depth were associated with DO regimes. Low DO regimes were most typical of shallow lakes with large littoral areas and lakes that had high DO regimes often were lakes with limited littoral areas and deeper water. Our analysis identifies metrics that relate to late winter DO regimes in Arctic lakes that can aid managers in understanding which lakes will likely provide optimum DO for overwintering habitat. Conversely, lakes which predicted to have marginal winter DO levels may be vulnerable to disturbances that could lower DO below critical thresholds to support sensitive fish. In regions where lakes are also used by humans for industrial winter water supply, such as ice-road construction for oil and gas development, these findings will be vital for the management of resources and protection of Arctic fish.

  19. Effect of dissolved oxygen manipulation on diffusive emissions from NAPL-impacted low permeability soil layers.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Lisa M; Dahlen, Paul R; Johnson, Paul C

    2014-05-01

    Aquifer physical model experiments were performed to investigate if diffusive emissions from nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL)-impacted low-permeability layers into groundwater moving through adjacent NAPL-free high-permeability layers can be reduced by creating an aerobic biotreatment zone at the interface between the two, and if over time that leads to reduced emissions after treatment ceases. Experiments were performed in two 1.2-m long × 1.2-m high × 5.4 cm wide stainless steel tanks; each with a high-permeability sand layer overlying a low-permeability crushed granite layer containing a NAPL mixture of indane and benzene. Each tank was water-saturated with horizontal flow primarily through the sand layer. The influent water was initially deoxygenated and the emissions and concentration distributions were allowed to reach near-steady conditions. The influent dissolved oxygen (DO) level was increased stepwise to 6.5-8.5 mg/L and 17-20 mg/L, and then decreased back to deoxygenated conditions. Each condition was maintained for at least 45 days. Relative to the near-steady benzene emission at the initial deoxygenated condition, the emission was reduced by about 70% when the DO was 6.5-8.5 mg/L, 90% when the DO was 17-20 mg/L, and ultimately 60% when returning to low DO conditions. While the reductions were substantial during treatment, longer-term reductions after 120 d of elevated DO treatment, relative to an untreated condition predicted by theory, were low: 29% and 6% in Tank 1 and Tank 2, respectively. Results show a 1-2 month lag between the end of DO delivery and rebound to the final near-steady emissions level. This observation has implications for post-treatment performance monitoring sampling at field sites.

  20. Effect of dissolved oxygen and temperature on macromolecular composition and PHB storage of activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Paula; Urtubia, Alejandra; Schiappacasse, María C; Chamy, Rolando; Montalvo, Silvio; Borja, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    The macromolecular composition of activated sludge (lipids, intracellular proteins and intracellular polysaccharides) was studied together with its capacity to store macromolecules such as polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) in a conventional activated sludge system fed with synthetic sewage water at an organic load rate of 1.0 kg COD/(m(3)·d), varying the dissolved oxygen (DO) and temperature. Six DO concentrations (0.8, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 8 mg/L) were studied at 20°C with a sludge retention time (SRT) of 6 days. In addition, four temperatures (10ºC, 15ºC, 20ºC and 30ºC) were assessed at constant DO (2 mg/L) with 2 days SRT in a second experimental run. The highest lipid content in the activated sludge was 95.6 mg/g VSS, obtained at 30°C, 2 mg/L of DO and a SRT of 2 days. The highest content of intracellular proteins in the activated sludge was 87.8 mg/g VSS, obtained at 20°C, 8 mg/L of DO and a SRT of 6 days. The highest content of intracellular polysaccharides in the activated sludge was 76.6 mg/g VSS, which was achieved at 20°C, a SRT of 6 days and a wide range of DO. The activated sludge PHB storage was very low for all the conditions studied.

  1. Invertebrate and fish assemblage relations to dissolved Oxygen minima in lowland streams of southwestern Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Justus, B.G.; Mize, Scott V.; Kroes, Daniel; Wallace, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations in lowland streams are naturally lower than those in upland streams; however, in some regions where monitoring data are lacking, DO criteria originally established for upland streams have been applied to lowland streams. This study investigated the DO concentrations at which fish and invertebrate assemblages at 35 sites located on lowland streams in southwestern Louisiana began to demonstrate biological thresholds.Average threshold values for taxa richness, diversity and abundance metrics were 2.6 and 2.3 mg/L for the invertebrate and fish assemblages, respectively. These thresholds are approximately twice the DO concentration that some native fish species are capable of tolerating and are comparable with DO criteria that have been recently applied to some coastal streams in Louisiana and Texas. DO minima >2.5 mg/L were favoured for all but extremely tolerant taxa. Extremely tolerant taxa had respiratory adaptations that gave them a competitive advantage, and their success when DO minima were <2 mg/L could be related more to reductions in competition or predation than to DO concentration directly.DO generally had an inverse relation to the amount of agriculture in the buffer area; however, DO concentrations at sites with both low and high amounts of agriculture (including three least-disturbed sites) declined to <2.5 mg/L. Thus, although DO fell below a concentration that was identified as an approximate biological threshold, sources of this condition were sometimes natural (allochthonous material) and had little relation to anthropogenic activity.

  2. Electrochemical dissolved oxygen removal from microfluidic streams for LOC sample pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Marei, Mohamed M; Roussel, Thomas J; Keynton, Robert S; Baldwin, Richard P

    2014-09-01

    Current water quality monitoring for heavy metal contaminants largely results in analytical snapshots at a particular time and place. Therefore, we have been interested in miniaturized and inexpensive sensors suitable for long-term, real-time monitoring of the drinking water distribution grid, industrial wastewater effluents, and even rivers and lakes. Among the biggest challenges for such sensors are the issues of in-field device calibration and sample pretreatment. Previously, we have demonstrated use of coulometric stripping analysis for calibration-free determination of copper and mercury. For more negatively reduced metals, O2 reduction interferes with stripping analysis; hence, most electroanalysis techniques rely on pretreatments to remove dissolved oxygen (DO). Current strategies for portable DO removal offer limited practicality, because of their complexity, and often cause inadvertent sample alterations. Therefore, we have designed an indirect in-line electrochemical DO removal device (EDOR), utilizing a silver cathode to reduce DO in a chamber that is fluidically isolated from the sample stream by an O2-permeable membrane. The resulting concentration gradient supports passive DO diffusion from the sample stream into the deoxygenation chamber. The DO levels in the sample stream were determined by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and amperometry at a custom thin-layer cell (TLC) detector. Results show removal of 98% of the DO in a test sample at flow rates approaching 50 μL/min and power consumption as low as 165 mW h L(-1) at steady state. Besides our specific stripping application, this device is well-suited for LOC applications where miniaturized DO removal and/or regulation are desirable.

  3. Electrochemical dissolved oxygen removal from microfluidic streams for LOC sample pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Marei, Mohamed M; Roussel, Thomas J; Keynton, Robert S; Baldwin, Richard P

    2014-09-01

    Current water quality monitoring for heavy metal contaminants largely results in analytical snapshots at a particular time and place. Therefore, we have been interested in miniaturized and inexpensive sensors suitable for long-term, real-time monitoring of the drinking water distribution grid, industrial wastewater effluents, and even rivers and lakes. Among the biggest challenges for such sensors are the issues of in-field device calibration and sample pretreatment. Previously, we have demonstrated use of coulometric stripping analysis for calibration-free determination of copper and mercury. For more negatively reduced metals, O2 reduction interferes with stripping analysis; hence, most electroanalysis techniques rely on pretreatments to remove dissolved oxygen (DO). Current strategies for portable DO removal offer limited practicality, because of their complexity, and often cause inadvertent sample alterations. Therefore, we have designed an indirect in-line electrochemical DO removal device (EDOR), utilizing a silver cathode to reduce DO in a chamber that is fluidically isolated from the sample stream by an O2-permeable membrane. The resulting concentration gradient supports passive DO diffusion from the sample stream into the deoxygenation chamber. The DO levels in the sample stream were determined by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and amperometry at a custom thin-layer cell (TLC) detector. Results show removal of 98% of the DO in a test sample at flow rates approaching 50 μL/min and power consumption as low as 165 mW h L(-1) at steady state. Besides our specific stripping application, this device is well-suited for LOC applications where miniaturized DO removal and/or regulation are desirable. PMID:25082792

  4. Predicting Late Winter Dissolved Oxygen Levels in Arctic Lakes Using Morphology and Landscape Metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leppi, Jason C.; Arp, Christopher D.; Whitman, Matthew S.

    2016-02-01

    Overwintering habitat for Arctic freshwater fish is essential, such that understanding the distribution of winter habitat quality at the landscape-scale is warranted. Adequate dissolved oxygen (DO) is a major factor limiting habitat quality in the Arctic region where ice cover can persist for 8 months each year. Here we use a mixed-effect model developed from 20 lakes across northern Alaska to assess which morphology and landscape attributes can be used to predict regional overwintering habitat quality. Across all lakes, we found that the majority of the variations in late winter DO can be explained by lake depth and littoral area. In shallow lakes (<4 m), we found evidence that additional variables such as elevation, lake area, ice cover duration, and snow depth were associated with DO regimes. Low DO regimes were most typical of shallow lakes with large littoral areas and lakes that had high DO regimes often were lakes with limited littoral areas and deeper water. Our analysis identifies metrics that relate to late winter DO regimes in Arctic lakes that can aid managers in understanding which lakes will likely provide optimum DO for overwintering habitat. Conversely, lakes which predicted to have marginal winter DO levels may be vulnerable to disturbances that could lower DO below critical thresholds to support sensitive fish. In regions where lakes are also used by humans for industrial winter water supply, such as ice-road construction for oil and gas development, these findings will be vital for the management of resources and protection of Arctic fish.

  5. Predicting Late Winter Dissolved Oxygen Levels in Arctic Lakes Using Morphology and Landscape Metrics.

    PubMed

    Leppi, Jason C; Arp, Christopher D; Whitman, Matthew S

    2016-02-01

    Overwintering habitat for Arctic freshwater fish is essential, such that understanding the distribution of winter habitat quality at the landscape-scale is warranted. Adequate dissolved oxygen (DO) is a major factor limiting habitat quality in the Arctic region where ice cover can persist for 8 months each year. Here we use a mixed-effect model developed from 20 lakes across northern Alaska to assess which morphology and landscape attributes can be used to predict regional overwintering habitat quality. Across all lakes, we found that the majority of the variations in late winter DO can be explained by lake depth and littoral area. In shallow lakes (<4 m), we found evidence that additional variables such as elevation, lake area, ice cover duration, and snow depth were associated with DO regimes. Low DO regimes were most typical of shallow lakes with large littoral areas and lakes that had high DO regimes often were lakes with limited littoral areas and deeper water. Our analysis identifies metrics that relate to late winter DO regimes in Arctic lakes that can aid managers in understanding which lakes will likely provide optimum DO for overwintering habitat. Conversely, lakes which predicted to have marginal winter DO levels may be vulnerable to disturbances that could lower DO below critical thresholds to support sensitive fish. In regions where lakes are also used by humans for industrial winter water supply, such as ice-road construction for oil and gas development, these findings will be vital for the management of resources and protection of Arctic fish. PMID:26467673

  6. Distributions of 14 elements on 60 selected absorbers from two simulant solutions (acid-dissolved sludge and alkaline supernate) for Hanford HLW Tank 102-SY

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, S.F.; Svitra, Z.V.; Bowen, S.M.

    1993-10-01

    Sixty commercially available or experimental absorber materials were evaluated for partitioning high-level radioactive waste. These absorbers included cation and anion exchange resins, inorganic exchangers, composite absorbers, and a series of liquid extractants sorbed on porous support-beads. The distributions of 14 elements onto each absorber were measured from simulated solutions that represent acid-dissolved sludge and alkaline supernate solutions from Hanford high-level waste (HLW) Tank 102-SY. The selected elements, which represent fission products (Ce, Cs, Sr, Tc, and Y); actinides (U, Pu, and Am); and matrix elements (Cr, Co, Fe, Mn, Zn, and Zr), were traced by radionuclides and assayed by gamma spectrometry. Distribution coefficients for each of the 1680 element/absorber/solution combinations were measured for dynamic contact periods of 30 min, 2 h, and 6 h to provide sorption kinetics information for the specified elements from these complex media. More than 5000 measured distribution coefficients are tabulated.

  7. The use of dissolved oxygen-controlled, fed-batch aerobic cultivation for recombinant protein subunit vaccine manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Patrick; Sun, Jacob; Champagne, Paul-Philippe; Lau, Heron; Gao, Meg; Sun, Hong; Zeiser, Arno; D'Amore, Tony

    2015-11-27

    A simple "off-the-shelf" fed-batch approach to aerobic bacterial cultivation for recombinant protein subunit vaccine manufacturing is presented. In this approach, changes in the dissolved oxygen levels are used to adjust the nutrient feed rate (DO-stat), so that the desired dissolved oxygen level is maintained throughout cultivation. This enables high Escherichia coli cell densities and recombinant protein titers. When coupled to a kLa-matched scale-down model, process performance is shown to be consistent at the 2L, 20L, and 200L scales for two recombinant E. coli strains expressing different protein subunit vaccine candidates. Additionally, by mining historical DO-stat nutrient feeding data, a method to transition from DO-stat to a pre-determined feeding profile suitable for larger manufacturing scales without using feedback control is demonstrated at the 2L, 20L, and 200L scales.

  8. Maximizing biomass concentration in baker's yeast process by using a decoupled geometric controller for substrate and dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Chopda, Viki R; Rathore, Anurag S; Gomes, James

    2015-11-01

    Biomass production by baker's yeast in a fed-batch reactor depends on the metabolic regime determined by the concentration of glucose and dissolved oxygen in the reactor. Achieving high biomass concentration in turn is dependent on the dynamic interaction between the glucose and dissolved oxygen concentration. Taking this into account, we present in this paper the implementation of a decoupled input-output linearizing controller (DIOLC) for maximizing biomass in a fed-batch yeast process. The decoupling is based on the inversion of 2×2 input-output matrix resulting from global linearization. The DIOLC was implemented online using a platform created in LabVIEW employing a TCP/IP protocol via the reactor's built-in electronic system. An improvement in biomass yield by 23% was obtained compared to that using a PID controller. The results demonstrate superior capability of the DIOLC and that the cumulative effect of smoother control action contributes to biomass maximization. PMID:26233328

  9. Investigation and correction of the interference of ethanol, sugar and phenols on dissolved oxygen measurement in wine.

    PubMed

    del Alamo-Sanza, María; Pando, Valentín; Nevares, Ignacio

    2014-01-27

    The dissolved oxygen in wine is routinely measured to control and monitor various oenological processes. The availability of devices based on different technologies and features allows a user to select a device that best meets their needs. However, grape must and wine samples each exhibit a complex composition that varies with time, which, along with atmospheric conditions, makes it necessary to evaluate the effects of these factors on dissolved oxygen measurements. This work evaluates the effects that ethanol, sugar, and phenols have on dissolved oxygen measurements in a model and real wine. The results suggest that significant errors are made in all studied systems and that the response of each device is different. Therefore, a compensation value was developed to take into account the sample composition. A compensation value was proposed to minimise the error made by each device based on the ethanol and sugar contents of the measured liquid. The best results are those obtained after using the compensation value to correct the data from the Pyro-Mini device. In all cases, errors made in DO measurements by optical systems were reduced by 50-82% by applying the compensation value for synthetic wines and 45-100% for real wines.

  10. Modelling the migration opportunities of diadromous fish species along a gradient of dissolved oxygen concentration in a European tidal watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, J.; Stevens, M.; Breine, J.

    2007-10-01

    The relationship between poor water quality and migration opportunities for fish remains poorly documented, although it is an essential research step in implementing EU water legislation. In this paper, we model the environmental constraints that control the movements of anadromous and catadromous fish populations that migrate through the tidal watershed of River Scheldt, a heavily impacted river basin in Western Europe. Local populations of sturgeon, sea lamprey, sea trout, Atlantic salmon, houting and allis shad were essentially extirpated around 1900. For remaining populations (flounder, three-spined stickleback, twaite shad, thinlip mullet, European eel and European smelt), a data driven logistic model was parameterized. The presence or absence of fish species in samples taken between 1995 and 2004 was modelled as a function of temperature, dissolved oxygen concentration, river flow and season. Probabilities to catch individuals from all diadromous species but three-spined stickleback increased as a function of the interaction between temperature and dissolved oxygen. The hypoxic zone situated in the freshwater tidal part of the estuary was an effective barrier for upstream migrating anadromous spawners since it blocked the entrance to historical spawning sites upstream. Similarly, habitat availability for catadromous fish was greatly reduced and restricted to lower brackish water parts of the estuary. The model was applied to infer preliminary dissolved oxygen criteria for diadromous fish, to make qualitative predictions about future changes in fish distribution given anticipated changes in water quality and to suggest necessary measures with respect to watershed management.

  11. Comparison of Hydrograph Deconvolutions using Residual Alkalinity, Chloride, and Oxygen 18 as Hydrochemical Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribolzi, O.; VallèS, V.; Bariac, T.

    1996-04-01

    Hydrograph deconvolution using geochemical tracers is currently widely used for determining the hydrologic mechanisms occurring in watersheds. However, few chemical parameters can be used as tracers because their involvement in biogeochemical processes prevents them from behaving in a conservative way. The aim of this study was to combine several geochemically controlled parameters into a single tracer. Residual alkalinity is a combination of several controlled parameters and is conservative in a wide range of natural environments. It was used in this study for quantifying the contributions of surface runoff and of groundwater flow during a flood in a Mediterranean watershed underlain by sedimentary rock. A preliminary geochemical study revealed that interactions with calcite, dolomite, and the clay-humus complex controlled calcium and magnesium concentrations as well as carbonate alkalinity (Alkc), which prevented using them as tracers. Nevertheless, although residual alkalinity (Alkresidual) is a combination of these three parameters (Alkresidual = Alkc - 2[Ca2+]T-2[Mg2+]T), it provided results that were highly comparable to those obtained using chloride and δ18O. Contrary to the most cases in the literature, the contribution of direct runoff was dominant (about 80% at peak discharge). Accuracy estimates, which took into account analytical errors, temporal variations in the isotopic signature of rainfall, and the spatial variability of chemical elements, supported this result and confirmed that residual alkalinity is a useful concept in hydrology.

  12. Processes controlling dissolved oxygen and pH in the upper Willamette River basin, Oregon, 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pogue, Ted R.; Anderson, Chauncey W.

    1995-01-01

    In July and August of 1994, the U. S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ) collected data to document the spatial extent and diel variability of dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations and pH levels in selected reaches of streams in the upper Willamette River Basin. These data were also collected to identify primary factors that control DO concentrations downstream from major point sources as well as to provide ODEQ with data to refine calibration of their steady-state DO and nutrient models for the upper Willamette River Basin. All of the reaches studied had diel variations in DO and pH. The magnitude of the diel variations in DO ranged from 0.2 to 3.9 milligrams per liter (7 to 50 percent-saturation units based on ambient water temperature and barometric pressure) and in pH from 0.3 to 1.4 units. However, of the reaches studied, only the Coast Fork Willamette River from river mile (RM) 21.7 to 12.5 and the Willamette River from RM 151 to 141.6 had field measured violations of State standards for DO and pH. DO concentration and pH in water depend on many factors. Data were collected to examine several major factors, including BOD (biochemical oxygen demand), carbonaceous BOD, nitrogenous BOD, and measures of photosynthetic activity. Of the four study reaches, only a short stretch of the Coast Fork Willamette River has potential for important levels of oxygen consumption from BOD or nitrification. Additionally, water-column primary-productivity measurements indicated that respiration and photosynthesis by free-floating algae did not explain the observed diel variations in DO in the study reaches. Results from a simple mathematical model incorporating measures of community respiration and net primary productivities indicated that periphyton are capable of producing a diel variation of the order of magnitude observed during the August study period. In the Willamette River near Peoria, the combined periphyton DO

  13. Mechanism of oxygen reduction reaction on Pt(111) in alkaline solution: Importance of chemisorbed water on surface

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Shizhong; White, Michael G.; Liu, Ping

    2016-06-30

    Here, we report a detailed mechanistic study of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on Pt(111) in alkaline solution, combining density functional theory and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. A complex reaction network including four possible pathways via either 2e– or 4e– transfer is established and is able to reproduce the experimental measured polarization curve at both low- and high-potential regions. Our results show that it is essential to account for solvation by water and the dynamic coverage of *OH to describe the reaction kinetics well. In addition, a chemisorbed water (*H2O)-mediated mechanism including 4e– transfers is identified, where the reduction stepsmore » via *H2O on the surface are potential-independent and only the final removal of *OH from the surface in the form of OH–(aq) contributes to the current. For the ORR in alkaline solutions, such a mechanism is more competitive than the associative and dissociative mechanisms typically used to describe the ORR in acid solution. Finally, *OH and **O2 intermediates are found to be critically important for tuning the ORR activity of Pt in alkaline solution. To enhance the activity, the binding of Pt should be tuned in such a way that *OH binding is weak enough to release more surface sites under working conditions, while **O2 binding is strong enough to enable the ORR via the 4e– transfer mechanism.« less

  14. Short-term dissolved oxygen patterns in sub-tropical mangroves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Jon M.; Griffin, Lachlan; Dale, Pat E. R.; Sheaves, Marcus

    2013-10-01

    Mangrove forests in subtropical areas are highly heterogeneous environments, influenced by diverse physical structures and tidal flushing regimes. An important component of tidal water is the concentration of dissolved oxygen (DO), as it affects aquatic organisms such as fish (directly: respiration and behaviour) and immature mosquitoes (directly: trigger for egg-hatch; indirectly: fish predation of larvae). Changes in DO may be important over relatively small time scales such as minutes and days, but, at such scales it has received little investigation. The aim of this study was to address this knowledge gap, monitoring DO at small time intervals (1 min) over tidal flooding events (hours - days) in two contrasting subtropical mangrove systems. These represented a range of mangrove tidal hydrology: a well-connected fringing mangrove forest in south-east Queensland and a more complex mangrove basin forest in northern New South Wales with impeded tidal connections. The results indicated that patterns of DO varied diurnally and by mangrove system. In the fringing forest, where the substrate was exposed before and after flooding, the highest mean DO concentration was during the day, followed by evening, with pre-dawn the lowest (6.8, 6.5 and 6.1 mg/l, respectively). DO patterns differed by tide stage and time of day with falling DO especially during late evening and pre-dawn as tides ebbed. In the mangrove basin forest the pattern was reversed, but also depended on the distance the tide had travelled across the basin. Before tidal incursion, standing water in the basin was anoxic (DO 0 mg/l). As tidal water flooded into the systems there was a greater increase in DO closer to the tide source than further away, with a DO concentration of 7.6 mg/l compared to 5.4 mg/l. The observations were interpreted in the light of processes and potential impacts on aquatic organisms (fish and immature mosquitoes). The most significant observation was that in the mangrove basin DO

  15. Urothelial injury to the rabbit bladder from various alkaline and acidic solutions used to dissolve kidney stones.

    PubMed

    Reckler, J; Rodman, J S; Jacobs, D; Rotterdam, H; Marion, D; Vaughan, E D

    1986-07-01

    Different irrigating solutions are used clinically to dissolve uric acid, cystine and struvite stones. These studies were undertaken to assess the toxicity to the rabbit bladder epithelium of several commonly used formulations. Test solutions were infused antegrade through a left ureterotomy overnight. Bladders were removed and routine histological sections made. A pH 7.6 solution of NaHCO3 appeared harmless. The same solution with two per cent acetylcysteine produced slight injury. All pH 4 solutions caused significant damage to the urothelium. Hemiacidrin, which contains magnesium, produced less damage than did other pH 4 solutions without that cation. Our data tend to support Suby's conclusions that addition of magnesium reduces urothelial injury even though the presence of magnesium will slow dissolution of struvite.

  16. Electrocatalytic Activity of Transition Metal Oxide-Carbon Composites for Oxygen Reduction in Alkaline Batteries and Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Malkhandi, S; Trinh, P; Manohar, AK; Jayachandrababu, KC; Kindler, A; Prakash, GKS; Narayanan, SR

    2013-06-07

    Conductive transition metal oxides (perovskites, spinels and pyrochlores) are attractive as catalysts for the air electrode in alkaline rechargeable metal-air batteries and fuel cells. We have found that conductive carbon materials when added to transition metal oxides such as calcium-doped lanthanum cobalt oxide, nickel cobalt oxide and calcium-doped lanthanum manganese cobalt oxide increase the electrocatalytic activity of the oxide for oxygen reduction by a factor of five to ten. We have studied rotating ring-disk electrodes coated with (a) various mass ratios of carbon and transition metal oxide, (b) different types of carbon additives and (c) different types of transition metal oxides. Our experiments and analysis establish that in such composite catalysts, carbon is the primary electro- catalyst for the two-electron electro-reduction of oxygen to hydroperoxide while the transition metal oxide decomposes the hydroperoxide to generate additional oxygen that enhances the observed current resulting in an apparent four-electron process. These findings are significant in that they change the way we interpret previous reports in the scientific literature on the electrocatalytic activity of various transition metal oxide- carbon composites for oxygen reduction, especially where carbon is assumed to be an additive that just enhances the electronic conductivity of the oxide catalyst. (C) 2013 The Electrochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  17. Dissolved-oxygen depletion and other effects of storing water in Flaming Gorge Reservoir, Wyoming and Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bolke, E.L.

    1979-01-01

    The circulation of water in Flaming Gorge Reservoir is caused chiefly by insolation, inflow-outflow relationships, and wind, which is significant due to the geographical location of the reservoir. During 1970-75, there was little annual variation in the thickness, dissolved oxygen, and specific conductance of the hypolimnion near Flaming Gorge Dam. Depletion of dissolved oxygen occurred simultaneously in the bottom waters of both tributary arms in the upstream part of the reservoir and was due to reservoir stratification. Anaerobic conditions in the bottom water during summer stratification eventually results in a metalimnetie oxygen minimum in the reservoir. The depletion of flow in the river below Flaming Gorge Dam due to evaporation and bank storage in the reservoir for the 1983-75 period was 1,320 cubic hectometers, and the increase of dissolved-solids load in the river was 1,947,000 metric tens. The largest annual variations in dissolved-solids concentration in the river was about 800 milligrams per liter before closure of the dam and about 200 milligrams per liter after closure. The discharge weighted-average dissolved-solids concentration for the 5 years prior to closure was 888 milligrams per liter and 512 milligrams per liter after closure. The most significant changes in the individual dissolved-ion loads in the river during 1973-75 were the increase in sulfate (0.48 million metric tons), which was probably derived from the solution of gypsum, and the decrease in bicarbonate (0.39 million metric tons), which can be attributed to chemical precipitation. The maximum range in temperature in the Green River below the reservoir prior to closure of the dam in 1982 was from 0?C in winter to 21?C in summer. After closure until 1970 the temperature ranged from 2 ? to 12?C, but since 1970 the range has been from 4 ? to 9?C. During September 1975, a massive algal bloom was observed in the upstream part of the reservoir. The bloom covered approximately 16 kilometers

  18. Partial nitrification and denitrification of mature landfill leachate using a pilot-scale continuous activated sludge process at low dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenguo; Wang, Xiaojun; Yang, YongYuan; Mirino, Markus W; Yuan, Yanlei

    2016-10-01

    Controlling of low dissolved oxygen (DO) levels (0.1-0.5mg/L), a cost-effective strategy, was applied to a pilot-scale anoxic-oxic-oxic-anoxic process for partial nitrification and denitrification of mature landfill leachate. High ammonium removal efficiency, stable nitrite accumulation rate and total nitrogen removal efficiency was higher than 95.0%, 90.0% and 66.4%, respectively, implying potential application of this process for nitrogen removal of mature landfill leachate. Efficient nitrite accumulation in the first oxic reactor depended on low DO conditions and sufficient alkalinity. However, operational limit was mainly decided by actual hydraulic retention time (AHRT) of the first oxic reactor and appeared with AHRT less than 13.9h under DO of 0.3-0.5mg/L. High-throughput sequencing analysis demonstrated significant change of bacterial diversity in the first oxic reactor after a long-term operation and dominant bacteria genus Nitrosomonas was shown to be responsible for NH4(+)-N removal and nitrite accumulation under low DO levels. PMID:27403860

  19. Modelling dissolved oxygen and benthic algae dynamics in a coastal ecosystem by exploiting real-time monitoring data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovato, T.; Ciavatta, S.; Brigolin, D.; Rubino, A.; Pastres, R.

    2013-03-01

    In this work we propose a methodological approach for the detection and simulation of relevant changes in coastal ecosystems, i.e. oxygen depletion and proliferation of benthic algae. This approach is based on the integration of the data provided by real-time monitoring systems with the output of complex ecosystem models. We tested the method in a case study, where real-time Dissolved Oxygen (DO) data and a 2D Reaction-Transport model were used to simulate the growth of macroalgae and the daily dynamics of DO in the Lagoon of Venice (Italy). The spatiotemporal relationships among the macroalgae distribution and the DO observations were quantified by analysing and comparing the Dissolved Oxygen time series and model outputs. The outcomes were used for the inverse estimation of the initial, i.e. late winter, biomass of macroalgae. The model was then applied to simulate the growth of macroalgae and the daily dynamic of DO during the productive (i.e., spring and summer) seasons. The comparison between the model output and the real-time data indicates that the model had skill in simulating the short term (daily) DO dynamic at several lagoon sites impacted by macroalgae proliferation. The simulated intra-daily variability of Dissolved Oxygen is significantly correlated with the observations in half of the monitoring sites, as well the simulated algal growth, which resulted comparable with the field measurements. The estimated average value of macroalgae biomass was ˜1 kgfw m-2 in 2007, which is consistent with a good to moderate quality status of the Lagoon of Venice. The proposed methodology can be useful in the assessment of the environmental status of coastal ecosystems as required by recent national and international legislation.

  20. An Analysis of Dissolved Oxygen Concentrations in Tail Waters of Hydroelectric Dams and the Implications for Small-Scale Hydropower Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cada, Glenn F.; Kumar, K. D.; Solomon, Jean A.; Hildebrand, Stephen G.

    1983-08-01

    One of the environmental issues affecting small-scale hydropower development in the United States is water quality degradation. The extent of this potential problem, as exemplified by low dissolved oxygen concentrations in reservoir tail waters, was analyzed by pairing operating hydroelectric sites with dissolved oxygen measurements from nearby downstream U.S. Geological Survey water quality stations. These data were used to calculate probabilities of noncompliance (PNC's), that is, the probabilities that dissolved oxygen concentrations in the discharge waters of operating hydroelectric dams will drop below 5 mg/l. The continental states were grouped into eight regions based on geographic and climatic similarities. Most regions had higher mean PNC's in summer than in winter, and summer PNC's were greater for large-scale than for small-scale hydropower facilities. Cumulative probability distributions of PNC also indicated that low dissolved oxygen concentrations in the tail waters of operating hydroelectric dams are phenomena largely confined to sites with large-scale facilities.

  1. Effect of dissolved oxygen content on stress corrosion cracking of a cold worked 316L stainless steel in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Litao; Wang, Jianqiu

    2014-03-01

    Stress corrosion crack growth tests of a cold worked nuclear grade 316L stainless steel were conducted in simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary water environment containing various dissolved oxygen (DO) contents but no dissolved hydrogen. The crack growth rate (CGR) increased with increasing DO content in the simulated PWR primary water. The fracture surface exhibited typical intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) characteristics.

  2. Oxidation of naturally reduced uranium in aquifer sediments by dissolved oxygen and its potential significance to uranium plume persistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J. A.; Smith, R. L.; Bohlke, J. K.; Jemison, N.; Xiang, H.; Repert, D. A.; Yuan, X.; Williams, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    The occurrence of naturally reduced zones is common in alluvial aquifers in the western U.S.A. due to the burial of woody debris in flood plains. Such reduced zones are usually heterogeneously dispersed in these aquifers and characterized by high concentrations of organic carbon, reduced mineral phases, and reduced forms of metals, including uranium(IV). The persistence of high concentrations of dissolved uranium(VI) at uranium-contaminated aquifers on the Colorado Plateau has been attributed to slow oxidation of insoluble uranium(IV) mineral phases found in association with these reducing zones, although there is little understanding of the relative importance of various potential oxidants. Four field experiments were conducted within an alluvial aquifer adjacent to the Colorado River near Rifle, CO, wherein groundwater associated with the naturally reduced zones was pumped into a gas-impermeable tank, mixed with a conservative tracer (Br-), bubbled with a gas phase composed of 97% O2 and 3% CO2, and then returned to the subsurface in the same well from which it was withdrawn. Within minutes of re-injection of the oxygenated groundwater, dissolved uranium(VI) concentrations increased from less than 1 μM to greater than 2.5 μM, demonstrating that oxygen can be an important oxidant for uranium in such field systems if supplied to the naturally reduced zones. Dissolved Fe(II) concentrations decreased to the detection limit, but increases in sulfate could not be detected due to high background concentrations. Changes in nitrogen species concentrations were variable. The results contrast with other laboratory and field results in which oxygen was introduced to systems containing high concentrations of mackinawite (FeS), rather than the more crystalline iron sulfides found in aged, naturally reduced zones. The flux of oxygen to the naturally reduced zones in the alluvial aquifers occurs mainly through interactions between groundwater and gas phases at the water table

  3. Influence of alkalinity, hardness and dissolved solids on drinking water taste: A case study of consumer satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Lou, Jie-Chung; Lee, Wei-Li; Han, Jia-Yun

    2007-01-01

    Two surveys of consumer satisfaction with drinking water conducted by Taiwan Water Supply Corp. are presented in this study. The study results show that although a lot of money was invested to modify traditional treatment processes, over 60% of local residents still avoided drinking tap water. Over half of the respondents felt that sample TT (from the traditional treatment process) was not a good drinking water, whether in the first or second survey, whereas almost 60% of respondents felt that samples PA, PB, CCL and CT (from advanced treatment processes) were good to drink. For all drinking water samples, respondent satisfaction with a sample primarily depended on it having no unpleasant flavors. Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration plans to revise the drinking water quality standards for TH and TDS in the near future. The new standards require a lower TH concentration (from currently 400mg/L (as CaCO(3)) to 150mg/L (as CaCO(3))), and a lower TDS maximum admissible concentration from the current guideline of 600 to 250mg/L. Therefore, this study also evaluated the impacts on drinking water tastes caused by variations in TH and TDS concentrations, and assessed the need to issue more strict drinking water quality standards for TH and TDS. The research results showed that most respondents could not tell the difference in water taste among water samples with different TDS, TH and alkalinity. Furthermore, hardness was found to be inversely associated with cardiovascular diseases and cancers, and complying with more strict standards would lead most water facilities to invest billions of dollars to upgrade their treatment processes. Consequently, in terms of drinking water tastes alone, this study suggested that Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration should conduct more thorough reviews of the scientific literature that provides the rationale for setting standards and reconsider if it is necessary to revise drinking water quality standards for TH and

  4. Geothermal reservoir temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenzie, W.F.; Truesdell, A.H.

    1977-01-01

    The oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes have been tested as a geothermometer in three areas of the western United States. Limited analyses of spring and borehole fluids and existing experimental rate studies suggest that dissolved sulfate and water are probably in isotopic equilibrium in all reservoirs of significant size with temperatures above ca. 140??C and that little re-equilibration occurs during ascent to the surface. The geothermometer is, however, affected by changes in ??18O of water due to subsurface boiling and dilution and by addition of sulfate of nearsurface origin. Methods are described to calculate the effects of boiling and dilution. The geothermometer, is applied to thermal systems of Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, Long Valley, California, and Raft River, Idaho to estimate deep reservoir temperatures of 360, 240, and 142??C, respectively. ?? 1976.

  5. Changes in controlling factors of dissolved oxygen in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific from the past to the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigemitsu, M.; Yamamoto, A.; Oka, A.; Yamanaka, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Variability of the volume of oceanic oxygen-deficient waters is critical for aerobic organisms. Several climate models consistently predict the decreasing oceanic oxygen inventory from the second half of the 20th to the 21st centuries. However, the projections about how the volume of oxygen-deficient waters in the future are not consistent with each other. In this study, we investigated the factors controlling the variability of volumes of oxygen-deficient waters in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific (EEP) where the largest oxygen-deficient zone exists in the ocean. Hindcast (from years 1850 to 2005) and forecast (from years 2006 to 2100) experiments with an offline global ocean biogeochemical model were performed by using outputs of physical field by the Earth System Model, MIROC-ESM, under the RCP4.5 and 8.5 scenarios. The model results illustrated that the volume of oxygen-deficient waters in EEP remains relatively constant from years 1850 to 1950, rapidly increases from years 1950 to 2000, and gradually declines from years 2000 to 2100. Available observations are consistent with the change of oxygen concentration from years 1950 to 2000. The budget analysis in EEP shows the following: (1) During 1850 to 1950, the horizontal advection via the Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC) is the major source of dissolved oxygen to the oxygen-deficient waters in EEP and that is almost consumed by the regeneration of organic matter. (2) During 1950 to 2000, the horizontal advection decreases and the declilne is not compensated by the reduction of regeneration of organic matter, which results in the expanding volume of oxygen-deficient waters. (3) In the 21st century, the horizontal advection declines further but the decrease in the regeneration of organic matter and increase in vertical advective supply are in excess of the decrease, leading to the shrink of oxygen-deficient water volume. Our model suggests that the key mechanisms controlling the oxygen-deficient water volume in EEP

  6. The role of orthophosphate and dissolved oxygen in the performance of arsenic-iron removal plants in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Ryan T; McBean, Edward A

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic iron removal plants (AIRPs) are used in some locations in Bangladesh to remove arsenic from groundwater to provide access to safer drinking water. In this study, the influence of orthophosphate in influent water on the performance of 21 (of 105) AIRPs installed in the Manikganj District was evaluated. The degree of aeration was also estimated, and the role of dissolved oxygen in AIRP performance is discussed. AIRP installations were done by a local non-governmental organization (The Society for People's Action in Change and Equity) with financial assistance from the Australian High Commission, Dhaka under the Direct Aid Program of the Australian Government. The presence of orthophosphate in the influent did not influence arsenic removal efficiency in the tested AIRPs, likely due to the high iron concentrations at all sites. The high iron provides adequate surface area for both orthophosphate and arsenic to be removed. Orthophosphate co-precipitated with iron oxides much more quickly than arsenic, in one cleaning cycle study, and is expected to play a more significant role in interfering with arsenic removal at sites with much lower iron concentrations. The aeration trays studied are estimated to introduce at least 2.4-3.7 mg/L of dissolved oxygen. In normal operation, sufficient oxygen is introduced through the aeration tray to fully oxidize all influent iron. The AIRPs studied show promise for use in areas of Bangladesh with high natural iron, where users are concerned with arsenic, iron, or both, in their drinking water.

  7. Assessment of robustness against dissolved oxygen/substrate oscillations for C. glutamicum DM1933 in two-compartment bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Käß, Friedrich; Hariskos, Ioanna; Michel, Andrea; Brandt, Hans-Jürgen; Spann, Robert; Junne, Stefan; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Neubauer, Peter; Oldiges, Marco

    2014-06-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is an important organism for industrial biotechnology; particularly, in amino acid production (e.g. L-lysine). Production scales often reach reactor working volumes of several hundred cubic meters, which triggers inhomogeneous distribution of substrates and dissolved gasses due to increasing mixing times. Individual cells which follow the flow profile through the reactor are experiencing oscillating microenvironments. Oscillations can have an influence on the process performance, which is a subject of scale-down experiments. In this work, L-lysine-producing C. glutamicum DM1933 was assessed for its robustness against continuous dissolved oxygen and substrate supply oscillation in two-compartment scale-down bioreactors. Aerobic, substrate-limited stirred tank and non-aerated, substrate-excess plug flow compartments were applied for oscillation. Inhomogeneity of substrate and oxygen supply was observed to cause rapid side product turnover, redistribution of oxygen uptake from oxygen limited into fully aerobic zones, and intermediate medium acidification. However, process inhomogeneity did not impair productivity or growth at plug flow residence times of several minutes. In a focused analysis of proteome, metabolome, transcriptome, and other physiological parameters, no changes were identified in response to process inhomogeneity. In conclusion, fed-batch processes with C. glutamicum DM1933 possess remarkable robustness against oxygen and substrate supply oscillation, which is a unique property in the field of published scale-down studies. Microbial physiology of C. glutamicum appears to be ideally adapted to both homogeneous and inhomogeneous conditions. This ensures exceptional suitability for cultivation at increased mixing times, which is suggested to constitute an important basis for the long-lasting success in large scale bioprocess application. PMID:24218302

  8. Effects of pH and dissolved oxygen on the photodegradation of 17α-ethynylestradiol in dissolved humic acid solution.

    PubMed

    Ren, Dong; Huang, Bin; Bi, Tingting; Xiong, Dan; Pan, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    To probe the mechanisms responsible for pH and dissolved oxygen (DO) affecting the photodegradation of 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) in dissolved humic acid (HA) solution, EE2 aqueous solutions with pH values ranging from 3.0 to 11.0 and different DO conditions were irradiated by using a 300 W mercury lamp equipped with 290 nm light cutoff filters. In 5.0 mg L(-1) HA solutions (pH 8.0), EE2 was degraded at a rate of 0.0739 h(-1) which was about 4-fold faster than that in Milli-Q water. The degradation of EE2 was mainly caused by the oxidation of photogenerated reactive species (RS), and the contribution of direct photodegradation to EE2 degradation was always lower than 27%. Both the direct and indirect photodegradation of EE2 were closely dependent on the EE2 initial concentration, pH value and DO concentration. The photodegradation rate of EE2 decreased with increased initial concentration of EE2 due to the limitation of photon flux. With pH and DO increasing, the degradation rate of EE2 increased significantly due to the increase in the yields of excited EE2 and RS. Among the photogenerated RS, HO˙ and (3)HA* were determined to be the key contributors, and their global contribution to EE2 photodegradation was about 50%. Although HA could generate more (1)O2 than HO˙, the contribution of (1)O2 to EE2 degradation was lower than 13% due to its low reactivity towards EE2. This study could enlarge our knowledge on the photochemical behaviors of steroid estrogens in natural sunlit waters. PMID:26611276

  9. First-principles study of MnNiO3 as an alkaline oxygen-evolution photocatalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jie; Yan, Qimin; Chen, Wei; Jain, Anubhav; Neaton, Jeffrey; Persson, Kristin

    2015-03-01

    We present a first-principles study of MnNiO3, a promising oxygen-evolution photocatalyst. Using density functional theory with the screened hybrid functional of Heyd, Scuseria, and Ernzerhof (HSE), we compute and analyze the ground-state geometry and electronic structure. We find that MnNiO3 is a ferrimagnetic semiconductor with an indirect band gap, consistent with experimental observations. We also predict that MnNiO3 has promising band edge positions relative to the vacuum, with potential to straddle the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) redox potentials in aqueous solution. A detailed analysis of the band structure and density of states provides a clear explanation why MnNiO3 is promising for OER. Pourbaix diagram calculations suggest that MnNiO3 is stable in alkaline solution at potentials relevant for oxygen evolution. This work was supported by the Department of Energy through the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis.

  10. A one-dimensional, steady-state, dissolved-oxygen model and waste-load assimilation study for East Fork White River, Bartholomew County, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilber, William G.; Peters, James G.; Crawford, Charles G.

    1979-01-01

    A digital model calibrated to conditions in East Fork White River, Bartholomew County, IN, was used to develop alternatives for future waste loadings that would be compatible with Indiana stream water-quality standards defined for two critical hydrologic conditions, summer and winter low flows. The model indicates that benthic-oxygen demand and the headwater concentrations of carbonaceous biochemical-oxygen demand, nitrogenous biochemical-oxygen demand, and dissolved oxygen are the most significant factors affecting the dissolved-oxygen concentration of East Fork White River downstream from the Columbus wastewater-treatment facility. The effect of effluent from the facility on the water quality of East Fork White River was minimal. The model also indicates that, with a benthic-oxygen demand of approximately 0.65 gram per square meter per day, the stream has no additional waste-load assimilative capacity during summer low flows. Regardless of the quality of the Columbus wastewater effluent, the minimum 24-hour average dissolved-oxygen concentration of at least 5 milligrams per liter, the State 's water-quality standard for streams, would not be met. Ammonia toxicity is not a limiting water-quality criterion during summer and winter low flows. During winter low flows, the current carbonaceous biochemical-oxygen demand limits for the Columbus wastewater-treatment facility will not result in violations of the in-stream dissolved-oxygen standard. (USGS)

  11. Effect of Pattern Layout and Dissolved Oxygen in CO2 Rinse Water on Cu Corrosion during Post-Etch Cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kentaro Tokuri,; Yukinari Yamashita,; Morio Shiohara,; Noriaki Oda,; Seiichi Kondo,; Shuichi Saito,

    2010-05-01

    When post-etch cleaning was carried out in Cu dual-damascene process, Cu at the bottom of isolated via was etched out especially in the wafer edge, and this would become a critical issue as device scale is shrunk. The corrosion was caused in the rinse step rather than chemical cleaning step because dissolved oxygen in rinse water from the air increased oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) and CO2 included in the rinse water for preventing wafer electrification decreased pH. The corrosion was found to be suppressed by increasing dummy pattern density and by controlling atmosphere and pH of the rinse water.

  12. Improvement in production and quality of gellan gum by Sphingomonas paucimobilis under high dissolved oxygen tension levels.

    PubMed

    Banik, R M; Santhiagu, A

    2006-09-01

    The effect of agitation rate and dissolved oxygen tension (DOT) on growth and gellan production by Sphingomonas paucimobilis was studied. Higher cell growth of 5.4 g l(-1) was obtained at 700 rpm but maximum gellan (15 g l(-1)) was produced at 500 rpm. DOT levels above 20% had no effect on cell growth but gellan yield was increased to 23 g l(-1 )with increase in DOT level to 100%. Higher DOT levels improved the viscosity and molecular weight of the polymer with change in acetate and glycerate content of the polymer.

  13. One year of Seaglider dissolved oxygen concentration profiles at the PAP site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binetti, Umberto; Kaiser, Jan; Heywood, Karen; Damerell, Gillian; Rumyantseva, Anna

    2015-04-01

    Oxygen is one of the most important variables measured in oceanography, influenced both by physical and biological factors. During the OSMOSIS project, 7 Seagliders were used in 3 subsequent missions to measure a multidisciplinary suite of parameters at high frequency in the top 1000 m of the water column for one year, from September 2012 to September 2013. The gliders were deployed at the PAP time series station (nominally at 49° N 16.5° W) and surveyed the area following a butterfly-shaped path. Oxygen concentration was measured by Aanderaa optodes and calibrated using ship CTD O2 profiles during 5 deployment and recovery cruises, which were in turn calibrated by Winkler titration of discrete samples. The oxygen-rich mixed layer deepens in fall and winter and gets richer in oxygen when the temperature decreases. The spring bloom did not happen as expected, but instead the presence of a series of small blooms was measured throughout spring and early summer. During the summer the mixed layer become very shallow and oxygen concentrations decreased. A Deep Oxygen Maximum (DOM) developed along with a deep chlorophyll maximum during the summer and was located just below the mixed layer . At this depth, phytoplankton had favourable light and nutrient conditions to grow and produce oxygen, which was not subject to immediate outgassing. The oxygen concentration in the DOM was not constant, but decreased, then increased again until the end of the mission. Intrusions of oxygen rich water are also visible throughout the mission. These are probably due to mesoscale events through the horizontal transport of oxygen and/or nutrients that can enhance productivity, particularly at the edge of the fronts. We calculate net community production (NCP) by analysing the variation in oxygen with time. Two methods have been proposed. The classical oxygen budget method assumes that changes in oxygen are due to the sum of air-sea flux, isopycnal advection, diapycnal mixing and NCP. ERA

  14. Ordered mesoporous boron-doped carbons as metal-free electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline solution.

    PubMed

    Bo, Xiangjie; Guo, Liping

    2013-02-21

    Ordered mesoporous boron-doped carbons (BOMCs) were prepared by co-impregnation and carbonization of sucrose and 4-hydroxyphenylboronic acid into SBA-15 silica template. Nitrogen sorption, small angle X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals that BOMCs possess highly ordered mesoporous structure, uniform pore size distribution, and high surface area. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis demonstrates that B atoms can be successfully doped into the framework of OMCs. Due to the desirable characteristics of BOMCs, BOMCs are highly active, cheap, and selective metal-free electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline solution. Although B content is a key factor in determining ORR activity, the ORR activity of BOMCs is also dependent on the surface area. The high surface area of BOMCs facilitates the exposure of the active sites for ORR. BOMCs may be further exploited as potentially efficient and inexpensive metal-free ORR catalysts with good long-term stability in alkaline solution. PMID:23318553

  15. Order of Activity of Nitrogen, Iron Oxide, and FeNx Complexes towards Oxygen Reduction in Alkaline Medium.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yansong; Zhang, Bingsen; Wang, Da-Wei; Su, Dang Sheng

    2015-12-01

    In alkaline medium, it seems that both metal-free and iron-containing carbon-based catalysts, such as nitrogen-doped nanocarbon materials, FeOx -doped carbon, and Fe/N/C catalysts, are active for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). However, the order of activity of these different active compositions has not been clearly determined. Herein, we synthesized nitrogen-doped carbon black (NCB), Fe3 O4 /CB, Fe3 O4 /NCB, and FeN4 /CB. Through the systematic study of the ORR catalytic activity of these four catalysts in alkaline solution, we confirmed the difference in the catalytic activity and catalytic mechanism for nitrogen, iron oxides, and Fe-N complexes, respectively. In metal-free NCB, nitrogen can improve the ORR catalytic activity with a four-electron pathway. Fe3 O4 /CB catalyst did not exhibit improved activity over that of NCB owing to the poor conductivity and spinel structure of Fe3 O4 . However, FeN4 coordination compounds as the active sites showed excellent ORR catalytic activity.

  16. Dissolved oxygen analysis, TMDL model comparison, and particulate matter shunting—Preliminary results from three model scenarios for the Klamath River upstream of Keno Dam, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, Annett B.; Rounds, Stewart A.; Deas, Michael L.; Sogutlugil, I. Ertugrul

    2012-01-01

    Efforts are underway to identify actions that would improve water quality in the Link River to Keno Dam reach of the Upper Klamath River in south-central Oregon. To provide further insight into water-quality improvement options, three scenarios were developed, run, and analyzed using previously calibrated CE-QUAL-W2 hydrodynamic and water-quality models. Additional scenarios are under development as part of this ongoing study. Most of these scenarios evaluate changes relative to a "current conditions" model, but in some cases a "natural conditions" model was used that simulated the reach without the effect of point and nonpoint sources and set Upper Klamath Lake at its Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) targets. These scenarios were simulated using a model developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Watercourse Engineering, Inc. for the years 2006–09, referred to here as the "USGS model." Another model of the reach was developed by Tetra Tech, Inc. for years 2000 and 2002 to support the Klamath River TMDL process; that model is referred to here as the "TMDL model." The three scenarios described in this report included (1) an analysis of whether this reach of the Upper Klamath River would be in compliance with dissolved oxygen standards if sources met TMDL allocations, (2) an application of more recent datasets to the TMDL model with comparison to results from the USGS model, and (3) an examination of the effect on dissolved oxygen in the Klamath River if particulate material were stopped from entering Klamath Project diversion canals. Updates and modifications to the USGS model are in progress, so in the future these scenarios will be reanalyzed with the updated model and the interim results presented here will be superseded. Significant findings from this phase of the investigation include: * The TMDL analysis used depth-averaged dissolved oxygen concentrations from model output for comparison with dissolved oxygen standards. The Oregon dissolved oxygen

  17. In situ generated highly active copper oxide catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction at low overpotential in alkaline solutions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang; Cui, Shengsheng; Qian, Manman; Sun, Zijun; Du, Pingwu

    2016-04-25

    Developing efficient water oxidation catalysts made up of earth-abundant elements has attracted much attention as a step toward for future clean energy production. Herein we report a simple one-step method to generate a low cost copper oxide catalyst film in situ from a copper(ii) ethylenediamine complex. The resulting catalyst has excellent activity toward the oxygen evolution reaction in alkaline solutions. A catalytic current density of 1.0 mA cm(-2) and 10 mA cm(-2) for the catalyst film requires the overpotentials of only ∼370 mV and ∼475 mV in 1.0 M KOH, respectively. This catalytic performance shows that the new catalyst is one of the best Cu-based heterogeneous OER catalysts to date. PMID:27020763

  18. Stream diurnal dissolved oxygen profiles as indicators of in-stream metabolism and disturbance effects: Fort Benning as a case study

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, Patrick J

    2005-01-01

    We investigated whether two characteristics of stream diurnal dissolved oxygen profiles, the daily amplitude and maximum value of the dissolved oxygen saturation deficit, are useful indicators of stream metabolism and the effects of catchment-scale disturbances. The study was conducted at the U.S. Army's Fort Benning installation where vegetation loss and high rates of erosion from intensely used training areas and unpaved roads have resulted in extensive sedimentation in some streams. Diurnal profiles of dissolved oxygen were measured in 10 second-order streams draining catchments which exhibited a range of disturbance levels. Rates of gross primary production (GPP) and total ecosystem respiration (R) per unit surface area were determined for each stream using the single-station diurnal dissolved oxygen change method with direct measurement of air-water oxygen exchange rates. The daily amplitude of the diurnal dissolved oxygen deficit profile was highly correlated with daily rates of GPP, and multiplying the daily amplitude by average stream depth to account for differences in water volume did not improve the correlation. The daily maximum dissolved oxygen deficit was highly correlated with daily rates of R, and multiplying by average stream depth improved the correlation. In general, these indicators of stream metabolism declined sharply with increasing catchment disturbance level, although the indicators of R showed a more consistent relationship with disturbance level than those of GPP. Our results show that the daily amplitude and maximum value of diurnal dissolved oxygen deficit profiles are good indicators of reach-scale rates of metabolism and the effects of catchment-scale disturbance on these metabolism rates. At Fort Benning, and presumably at other military installations, they are useful tools for evaluating trends in impacts from military training or rates of recovery following restoration activities.

  19. Influence of under pressure dissolved oxygen on trichloroethylene degradation by the H2O2/TiO2 process

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The widespread use of trichloroethylene (TCE) and its frequent release into the environment has caused many environmental and health problems. In this study the degradation of TCE at different micromolar concentrations was investigated in a stainless steel reactor with various concentrations of H2O2 and TiO2 at different oxygen pressures and three different pHs. Methods To examine the synergistic effect of under pressure oxygen on TCE degradation, the concentrations of H2O2 and TiO2 as well as pH were first optimized, and then the experiments were performed under optimal conditions. Gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector (FID) was used to measure TCE concentrations. Results Results showed that the percentage of TCE degradation without pressurized oxygen was low and it increased with increasing pressure of oxygen at all initial concentrations of TCE. The degradation percentages without oxygen pressure were 48.27%, 51.22%, 58.13% and 64.33% for TCE concentrations of 3000, 1500, 300 and 150 μg/L respectively. At an oxygen pressure of 2.5 atmospheres (atm) the percent degradation of TCE reached 84.85%, 89.14%, 93.13% and 94.99% respectively for the aforementioned TCE concentrations. Conclusions The results of this study show that the application of dissolved oxygen under pressure increases the efficiency of the H2O2/TiO2 process on the degradation of TCE and can be used along with other oxidants as an effective method for the removal of this compound from aqueous solutions. PMID:24359702

  20. A novel spin-label method for monitoring dissolved oxygen in the perfluorochemical blood substitute, FC-43 emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Ching-San; Froncisz, Wojciech; Hyde, James S.

    TEMPO-laurate, a lipid spin probe, was found to partition favorably into perfluorotributylamine (PFT), either in pure form or in the emulsified preparation, FC-43 emulsion. The signal amplitude of the ESR spectrum of TEMPO-laurate was shown to be sensitive to the levels of oxygen in perfluorochemical preparations. The spin probe dissolved into pure PFT gave rise to a single-component ESR spectrum. Partition of the probe into the micelles of FC-43 emulsion, however, revealed a two-component ESR spectrum: a major component attributed to the probe inside the micelles and a minor component probably due to the probe associated with the surface of the micelles. The results suggest that the ESR signal of TEMPO-laurate may be a useful parameter for determining the uptake and release of oxygen in perfluorochemical blood substitutes.

  1. Net Subterranean Estuarine Export Fluxes of Dissolved Inorganic C, N, P, Si, and Total Alkalinity into the Jiulong River Estuary, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G.; Wang, Z.; Zhai, W. D.; Moore, W. S.; Li, Q.; Yan, X.; Qi, D.; Jiang, Y.

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate geochemical impacts of the subterranean estuary (STE) on the Jiulong River estuary, China, we estimated seasonal fluxes of subterranean water discharge into the estuary based on the mass balance of radium isotopes and net subterranean export fluxes of dissolved inorganic C (DIC), N (DIN), Si (DSi), soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP), and total alkalinity (TA). Based on 226Ra data, the subterranean discharge (in 107 m3 d-1) was estimated to be 0.24~0.51 in the spring, 0.56~1.16 in the summer, 0.38~0.79 in the fall, and 0.22~0.45 in the winter. This was equivalent to 6-16% of the concomitant river discharge. The net spatially integrated material fluxes from the STE into the estuary were equivalent up to 51-89% of the concomitant riverine fluxes for DIC and TA, around 10-25% for DSi and DIN, and negligible for SRP. Paradoxically, the mixing lines along the salinity gradient revealed no apparent additions of these species. These additions are not revealed because the STE is a relatively small spatially-averaged source that spreads throughout the estuary in contrast to the major point sources of the river and the ocean for the estuary. Thus, despite apparent conservative mixing of DIC, DIN, and DSi, subterranean exports of these species into estuaries must be taken into account in evaluating geochemical impacts of estuarine exports on shelf waters.

  2. The oxygen isotope composition of dissolved chromate: a new tool for determining sources of chromium contamination in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullen, T.; Widory, D.

    2009-05-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is a widespread carcinogen in groundwater, derived from both anthropogenic and natural sources. A large range of chromium isotope composition has been demonstrated for dissolved Cr(VI) in groundwater, resulting from the large isotope fractionation accompanying reduction of Cr(VI) to trivalent chromium (Cr(III)). As a result, the isotopic composition of chromium in dissolved chromate is beginning to prove useful for determining the sources of chromium in contaminated groundwater, but considered alone can likewise be non-diagnostic due to overlapping compositional ranges of potential anthropogenic and natural sources. Based on the strong Cr-O bond in the chromate molecule implied by the large chromium isotope fractionation accompanying Cr(VI) reduction, we have proposed that oxygen will remain closely linked to chromium in the chromate molecule and thus can be used to better constrain chromate sources through a Cr-O "multi-tracer" approach. In a series of laboratory experiments using isotopically "enriched" water and "normal" chromate, we have demonstrated that there is insignificant isotopic exchange between oxygen in chromate and water for residence times as long as one year, and thus chromate will retain the oxygen isotope composition of its source during extended transport in groundwater. We have likewise demonstrated that sufficient chromate for oxygen isotope analysis can be successfully isolated from a chemically complex groundwater sample through a series of precipitation, ion exchange and heating procedures. Although our current approach of measuring 100 micromolar samples of chromate using TCEA- gas mass spectrometry is straightforward and robust, we are also developing a negative-ion thermal ionization mass spectrometry technique in order to greatly reduce the sample size requirement. We are currently applying this novel technique at an electric power facility in California and a metal plating facility in France in order to

  3. Effect of arsenic on the activity of oxygen dissolved in dilute liquid copper solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walqui, H.; Seetharaman, S.; Staffansson, L. I.

    1985-06-01

    The influence of arsenic additions on the activity of oxygen in liquid copper was studied by the solid-electrolyte galvanic cell (-) Pt, W/Cu-O-As ∥ ZrO2-CaO ∥ NiO-Ni/Pt (+) in the temperature range 1373 to 1473 K. The activity coefficient of oxygen in liquid copper was found to be unaffected by the addition of arsenic. The interaction parameter values for group V B elements in the periodic table with respect to oxygen are discussed in the light of the solute interactions in copper.

  4. Simulation of dissolved oxygen and biochemical oxygen demand, Plantation Canal, Broward County, Florida with an evaluation of the QUAL-I model for use in south Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Russo, Thomas N.; McQuivey, Raul S.

    1975-01-01

    A mathematical model; QUAL-I, developed by the Texas Water Development Board, was evaluated as a management tool in predicting the spatial and temporal distribution of dissolved oxygen and biochemical oxygen demand in Plantation Canal. Predictions based on the QUAL-I model, which was verified only against midday summer-flow conditions, showed that improvement of quality of inflows from sewage treatment plants and use of at least 130 cubic feet per second of dilution water would improve water quality in the canal significantly. The model was not fully amenable to use on Plantation Canal because: (1) it did not consider photosynthetic production, nitrification, and benthic oxygen demand as sources and sinks of oxygen; (2) the model assumptions of complete mixing, transport, and steady state were not met; and (3) the data base was inadequate because it consisted of only one set of data for each case. However, it was felt that meaningful results could be obtained for some sets of conditions. (Woodard-USGS)

  5. Relationships among nutrients, chlorophyll-a, and dissolved oxygen in agricultural streams in Illinois.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Allyson M; Royer, Todd V; David, Mark B; Gentry, Lowell E

    2006-01-01

    A better understanding of the controls on algae and dissolved O2 in agricultural streams of Illinois is needed to aid in development of nutrient standards. We investigated the relationships between dissolved nutrients, algal abundance, and dissolved O2 in five streams in east-central Illinois from March through November 2004. The streams drained watersheds from 25 to 777 km2 that were dominated by row crop agriculture. Three sites had open canopies and two were bordered by a narrow forest of deciduous trees. Algal abundance was measured as chlorophyll-a (chl-a) concentration in the water column (sestonic) and on the streambed (periphytic). Mean NO3-N concentrations ranged from 5.5 to 8.8 mg N L(-1) and did not relate to algal abundance. Sestonic chl-a values ranged from nearly zero to >15 mg m(-3) with no differences between open and shaded streams and only a weak correlation with dissolved reactive P (mean concentrations were 44-479 microg L(-1)). The results suggest that sestonic chl-a is a poor criterion for assessing nutrient-related problems in these streams. Greatest periphytic chl-a occurred during low flow from August through October, but periphyton occurred consistently in only two of the five streams. The abundance of filamentous algae explained 64% of the variation in diel O2 saturation, but was not correlated with nutrients. Currently it appears that hydrology and light, rather than nutrients, control algal abundance in these streams, and in the agricultural landscape of east-central Illinois, it may not be possible to reduce nutrient concentrations sufficiently to limit filamentous algal blooms.

  6. Modelling algae growth and dissolved oxygen in the Seine River downstream the Paris urban area: contribution of high frequency measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilmin, Lauriane; Escoffier, Nicolas; Groleau, Alexis; Poulin, Michel; Flipo, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    Dissolved oxygen is a key variable in the hydro-ecological functioning of river systems. The accurate representation of the different biogeochemical processes affecting algal blooms and dissolved oxygen in the water column in hydro-ecological models is crucial for the use of these models as reliable management tools. This study focuses on the water quality of the Seine River along a 225 km stretch, from Paris to the Seine estuary. The study area is highly urbanized and located downstream France's largest agricultural area, and therefore receives large amounts of nutrients. During the last decades, nutrient inputs have been significantly reduced, especially with the implementation of new sewage water treatment technologies. Even though the frequency and the intensity of observed algal blooms have decreased, blooms were observed in 2011 and 2012. These blooms are generally followed by a period of high organic matter accumulation, leading to high mineralization fluxes and potential oxygen depletion. The hydrodynamics and the water quality of the Seine River are simulated for the 2011-2012 period with the distributed process-based hydro-ecological model ProSe (Even et al., 1998). The simulated chlorophyll a and dissolved oxygen concentrations are compared to high frequency measurements at the Bougival monitoring station (50 km downstream from Paris), which is part of the CarboSeine monitoring network. The high frequency continuous dataset allows calibrating of primary producers' physiological parameters. New growth parameters are defined for the diatom community. The blooms occur at the end of the winter period (march 2011 and march 2012) and the optimal temperature for diatom growth is calibrated at 10°C, based on an analysis of the physiological response of the diatom community. One of the main outcomes of the modelling exercise is that the precise identification of the constituting communities of algal blooms must be achieved prior to the modelling itself. With the

  7. Survival of Campylobacter jejuni in co-culture with Acanthamoeba castellanii: role of amoeba-mediated depletion of dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Bui, Xuan Thanh; Winding, Anne; Qvortrup, Klaus; Wolff, Anders; Bang, Dang Duong; Creuzenet, Carole

    2012-08-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a major cause of infectious diarrhoea worldwide but relatively little is known about its ecology. In this study, we examined its interactions with Acanthamoeba castellanii, a protozoan suspected to serve as a reservoir for bacterial pathogens. We observed rapid degradation of intracellular C.jejuni in A.castellanii 5 h post gentamicin treatment at 25°C. Conversely, we found that A.castellanii promoted the extracellular growth of C.jejuni in co-cultures at 37°C in aerobic conditions. This growth-promoting effect did not require amoebae - bacteria contact. The growth rates observed with or without contact with amoeba were similar to those observed when C.jejuni was grown in microaerophilic conditions. Preconditioned media prepared with live or dead amoebae cultivated with or without C.jejuni did not promote the growth of C.jejuni in aerobic conditions. Interestingly, the dissolved oxygen levels of co-cultures with or without amoebae - bacteria contact were much lower than those observed with culture media or with C.jejuni alone incubated in aerobic conditions, and were comparable with levels obtained after 24 h of growth of C.jejuni under microaerophilic conditions. Our studies identified the depletion of dissolved oxygen by A.castellanii as the major contributor for the observed amoeba-mediated growth enhancement. PMID:22176643

  8. Distribution and mass transfer of dissolved oxygen in a multi-habitat membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bing; Qiu, Bing; Huang, Shaosong; Yang, Kanghua; Bin, Liying; Fu, Fenglian; Yang, Huiwen

    2015-04-01

    This work investigated the DO distribution and the factors influencing the mass transfer of DO in a multi-habitat membrane bioreactor. Through the continuous measurements of an on-line automatic system, the timely DO values at different zones in the bioreactor were obtained, which gave a detailed description to the distribution of oxygen within the bioreactor. The results indicated that the growth of biomass had an important influence on the distribution of oxygen. As the extension of operational time, the volumetric oxygen mass transfer coefficient (kLa) was generally decreased. With the difference in DO values, a complex environment combining anoxic and oxic state was produced within a single bioreactor, which provided a fundamental guarantee for the total removal of TN. Aeration rate, the concentration and apparent viscosity of MLSS have different influences on kLa, but adjusting the viscosity is a feasible method to improve the mass transfer of oxygen in the bioreactor.

  9. Influence of dissolved oxygen concentration on the start-up of the anammox-based process: ELAN®.

    PubMed

    Morales, N; Val del Río, A; Vázquez-Padín, J R; Gutiérrez, R; Fernández-González, R; Icaran, P; Rogalla, F; Campos, J L; Méndez, R; Mosquera-Corral, A

    2015-01-01

    The anammox-based process ELAN® was started-up in two different sequencing batch reactor (SBR) pilot plant reactors treating municipal anaerobic digester supernatant. The main difference in the operation of both reactors was the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in the bulk liquid. SBR-1 was started at a DO value of 0.4 mg O2/L whereas SBR-2 was started at DO values of 3.0 mg O2/L. Despite both reactors working at a nitrogen removal rate of around 0.6 g N/(L d), in SBR-1, granules represented only a small fraction of the total biomass and reached a diameter of 1.1 mm after 7 months of operation, while in SBR-2 the biomass was mainly composed of granules with an average diameter of 3.2 mm after the same operational period. Oxygen microelectrode profiling revealed that granules from SBR-2 where only fully penetrated by oxygen with DO concentrations of 8 mg O2/L while granules from SBR-1 were already oxygen penetrated at DO concentrations of 1 mg O2/L. In this way granules from SBR-2 performed better due to the thick layer of ammonia oxidizing bacteria, which accounted for up to 20% of all the microbial populations, which protected the anammox bacteria from non-suitable liquid media conditions. PMID:26247749

  10. Effect of dissolved oxygen on heterotrophic denitrification using poly(butylene succinate) as the carbon source and biofilm carrier.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guozhi; Li, Li; Liu, Qian; Xu, Guimei; Tan, Hongxin

    2014-11-01

    The effect of dissolved oxygen (DO) on heterotrophic denitrification using poly(butylene succinate) as the carbon source and biofilm carrier was evaluated in a lab-scale experiment. Aerated, low-oxygen, and anoxic treatment groups were set up, which had average DO concentrations of 5.2±1.0, 1.4±1.2, and 0.5±0.3 mg L(-1), respectively. The NO3(-)-N and total nitrogen (TN) removal rates in the aerated group (37.44±0.24 and 36.24±0.48 g m(-3) d(-1), respectively) were higher than those in the other two groups. There was no significant difference between the low-oxygen and anoxic groups for the NO3(-)-N or TN removal rate. Accumulation of NO2(-)-N reached 5.0 mg L(-1) in the aerated group; no nitrite accumulation was found in the other two treatment groups. Bacterial communities of the low-oxygen and anoxic groups showed high similarity and were significantly different from those of the aerated group.

  11. The Role of Oxygen in the Copper-Catalyzed Decomposition of Phenylborates in Aqueous Alkaline Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Hyder, M.L.

    1997-03-17

    The effect of oxygen on the copper-catalyzed hydrolysis of phenyl borates containing from one to four phenyl groups was studied in 1 M aqueous sodium hydroxide solution at 59 degrees C. The results are tentatively explained if the effective catalyst for each of the reactions is either cupric or cuprous ion, with the latter being present in significant concentration only in the absence of air.

  12. Improved dissolved oxygen status following removal of exotic weed mats in important fish habitat lagoons of the tropical Burdekin River floodplain, Australia.

    PubMed

    Perna, Colton; Burrows, Damien

    2005-01-01

    The Burdekin delta floodplain, north Queensland, is highly modified for agricultural purposes. Riparian condition is very poor and exotic aquatic weeds dominate waterways. Historically, most streams and lagoons were highly seasonal, but those now used for the delivery of irrigation water maintain elevated flows and increased turbidity and nutrient loading. These factors have aided exotic weed growth and many major lagoons are covered by dense water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) mats which greatly reduce dissolved oxygen levels, one of the most important water quality variables for aquatic fauna. Mechanical harvesting of water hyacinth from several of these lagoons resulted in rapid and substantial increases in dissolved oxygen saturation, and improved suitability of the habitat to support fish species. Decrease in dissolved oxygen as water passes sequentially through weed-infested lagoons, justified the approach of harvesting upstream lagoons first, however, the channels that connect these lagoons remain weed-infested and are still impacting upon downstream oxygen levels. PMID:15757716

  13. Substrate and Transition State Binding in Alkaline Phosphatase Analyzed by Computation of Oxygen Isotope Effects.

    PubMed

    Roston, Daniel; Cui, Qiang

    2016-09-14

    Enzymes are powerful catalysts, and a thorough understanding of the sources of their catalytic power will facilitate many medical and industrial applications. Here we have studied the catalytic mechanism of alkaline phosphatase (AP), which is one of the most catalytically proficient enzymes known. We have used quantum mechanics calculations and hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations to model a variety of isotope effects relevant to the reaction of AP. We have calculated equilibrium isotope effects (EIEs), binding isotope effects (BIEs), and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for a range of phosphate mono- and diester substrates. The results agree well with experimental values, but the model for the reaction's transition state (TS) differs from the original interpretation of those experiments. Our model indicates that isotope effects on binding make important contributions to measured KIEs on V/K, which complicated interpretation of the measured values. Our results provide a detailed interpretation of the measured isotope effects and make predictions that can test the proposed model. The model indicates that the substrate is deformed in the ground state (GS) of the reaction and partially resembles the TS. The highly preorganized active site preferentially binds conformations that resemble the TS and not the GS, which induces the substrate to adapt to the enzyme, rather than the other way around-as with classic "induced fit" models. The preferential stabilization of the TS over the GS is what lowers the barrier to the chemical step.

  14. Substrate and Transition State Binding in Alkaline Phosphatase Analyzed by Computation of Oxygen Isotope Effects.

    PubMed

    Roston, Daniel; Cui, Qiang

    2016-09-14

    Enzymes are powerful catalysts, and a thorough understanding of the sources of their catalytic power will facilitate many medical and industrial applications. Here we have studied the catalytic mechanism of alkaline phosphatase (AP), which is one of the most catalytically proficient enzymes known. We have used quantum mechanics calculations and hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations to model a variety of isotope effects relevant to the reaction of AP. We have calculated equilibrium isotope effects (EIEs), binding isotope effects (BIEs), and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for a range of phosphate mono- and diester substrates. The results agree well with experimental values, but the model for the reaction's transition state (TS) differs from the original interpretation of those experiments. Our model indicates that isotope effects on binding make important contributions to measured KIEs on V/K, which complicated interpretation of the measured values. Our results provide a detailed interpretation of the measured isotope effects and make predictions that can test the proposed model. The model indicates that the substrate is deformed in the ground state (GS) of the reaction and partially resembles the TS. The highly preorganized active site preferentially binds conformations that resemble the TS and not the GS, which induces the substrate to adapt to the enzyme, rather than the other way around-as with classic "induced fit" models. The preferential stabilization of the TS over the GS is what lowers the barrier to the chemical step. PMID:27541005

  15. Global optimization and oxygen dissociation on polyicosahedral Ag32Cu6 core-shell cluster for alkaline fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, N.; Chen, F. Y.; Wu, X.Q.

    2015-01-01

    The structure of 38 atoms Ag-Cu cluster is studied by using a combination of a genetic algorithm global optimization technique and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. It is demonstrated that the truncated octahedral (TO) Ag32Cu6 core-shell cluster is less stable than the polyicosahedral (pIh) Ag32Cu6 core-shell cluster from the atomistic models and the DFT calculation shows an agreeable result, so the newfound pIh Ag32Cu6 core-shell cluster is further investigated for potential application for O2 dissociation in oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The activation energy barrier for the O2 dissociation on pIh Ag32Cu6 core-shell cluster is 0.715 eV, where the d-band center is −3.395 eV and the density of states at the Fermi energy level is maximal for the favorable absorption site, indicating that the catalytic activity is attributed to a maximal charge transfer between an oxygen molecule and the pIh Ag32Cu6 core-shell cluster. This work revises the earlier idea that Ag32Cu6 core-shell nanoparticles are not suitable as ORR catalysts and confirms that Ag-Cu nanoalloy is a potential candidate to substitute noble Pt-based catalyst in alkaline fuel cells. PMID:26148904

  16. High performance and bifunctional cobalt-embedded nitrogen doped carbon/nanodiamond electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction and oxygen evolution reactions in alkaline media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yanzhuo; Zang, Jianbing; Dong, Liang; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Yanhui

    2016-02-01

    A bifunctional noble metal-free catalyst with a cobalt-embedded nitrogen doped graphitized carbon shell covering a nanodiamond (ND) core (Co-N-C/ND) is synthesized. The resulting Co-N-C/ND exhibits excellent catalytic activities for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in alkaline media. The average electron transfer number of ORR on the Co-N-C/ND is 3.82 between -0.4 and -0.7 V (vs. Hg/HgO), indicating a near four-electron transfer mechanism for ORR. Moreover, the catalytic activity of the Co-N-C/ND for ORR is comparable to the 20 wt% Pt reference catalyst supported on carbon black. The OER onset potential on the Co-N-C/ND is 0.43 V (vs. Hg/HgO) and the current density at 0.7 V is 3.19 mA cm-2, demonstrating excellent catalytic activity for OER. In comparison to the Co-N-C derived from carbon black, the Co-N-C/ND exhibits better durability. The superior electrocatalytic performance of the Co-N-C/ND could be attributed to the synergistic effect of the Co-N moieties in the carbon shell and the high stability could be ascribed to the ND core.

  17. LUMOS - A Sensitive and Reliable Optode System for Measuring Dissolved Oxygen in the Nanomolar Range

    PubMed Central

    Lehner, Philipp; Larndorfer, Christoph; Garcia-Robledo, Emilio; Larsen, Morten; Borisov, Sergey M.; Revsbech, Niels-Peter; Glud, Ronnie N.; Canfield, Donald E.; Klimant, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Most commercially available optical oxygen sensors target the measuring range of 300 to 2 μmol L-1. However these are not suitable for investigating the nanomolar range which is relevant for many important environmental situations. We therefore developed a miniaturized phase fluorimeter based measurement system called the LUMOS (Luminescence Measuring Oxygen Sensor). It consists of a readout device and specialized “sensing chemistry” that relies on commercially available components. The sensor material is based on palladium(II)-5,10,15,20-tetrakis-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorphenyl)-porphyrin embedded in a Hyflon AD 60 polymer matrix and has a KSV of 6.25 x 10-3 ppmv-1. The applicable measurement range is from 1000 nM down to a detection limit of 0.5 nM. A second sensor material based on the platinum(II) analogue of the porphyrin is spectrally compatible with the readout device and has a measurement range of 20 μM down to 10 nM. The LUMOS device is a dedicated system optimized for a high signal to noise ratio, but in principle any phase flourimeter can be adapted to act as a readout device for the highly sensitive and robust sensing chemistry. Vise versa, the LUMOS fluorimeter can be used for read out of less sensitive optical oxygen sensors based on the same or similar indicator dyes, for example for monitoring oxygen at physiological conditions. The presented sensor system exhibits lower noise, higher resolution and higher sensitivity than the electrochemical STOX sensor previously used to measure nanomolar oxygen concentrations. Oxygen contamination in common sample containers has been investigated and microbial or enzymatic oxygen consumption at nanomolar concentrations is presented. PMID:26029920

  18. Effects of pH and dissolved oxygen on the reduction of hexavalent chromium by dissolved ferrous iron in poorly buffered aqueous systems.

    PubMed

    Schlautman, M A; Han, I

    2001-04-01

    The effects of pH and dissolved oxygen (DO) on the reduction of Cr(VI) by dissolved Fe(II) were investigated for aqueous solutions having relatively low buffering capacities. All solutions were maintained at a constant ionic strength (generally 0.05 M) and temperature (23 +/- 2 degrees C). For the majority of the experiments conducted, initial concentrations of Fe(II) and Cr(VI) were 50 and 20 microM, respectively, representing a deficient amount of Fe(II) (i.e. nonstoichiometric conditions). Experiments conducted in the absence and presence of DO were performed in an anaerobic chamber and in vessels open to the atmosphere, respectively. Specific initial pH values were obtained by adjusting the pH of Cr(VI) and Fe(II) stock solutions prior to their mixing or by spiking Cr(VI)-Fe(II) systems with strong base to rapidly increase the pH in situ. Consistent with previous reports, Cr(VI) reduction rates for our systems increased with increasing pH (pH ranges of 3.5-6 and 3.5-7.2 for oxic and anoxic experiments, respectively). Because of our poorly buffered experimental systems, pH values decreased over the course of the reactions which, in turn, caused decreases in the reduction rates with time. Spiking some experimental systems with NaOH to rapidly raise the pH resulted in faster rates of Cr(VI) reduction than when the pH was adjusted prior to mixing the stock solutions together; this observation is likely due to the presence of microenvironments in the reactors for which local, short-term pH values greatly exceed the equilibrium value (i.e. mixing is slower than the reduction reaction in these high pH microenvironments). The molar ratios of Fe(II) oxidized to Cr(VI) reduced were close to the expected stoichiometric value of 3 for the majority of our experimental systems, which shows that DO will not cause a serious interference in most applications using Fe(II) to reduce Cr(VI).

  19. Modelling the seasonal cycle of dissolved oxygen in the upper ocean at ocean weather station P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, F.; Garcon, V.; Minster, J.-F.

    1990-03-01

    Three main processes regulate the variations of dissolved O 2 concentrations in the surface waters: gas exchange at the air-sea interface, vertical mixing and biological activity of marine organisms. A one-dimensional integral mixed layer model ( GASPAR, 1988) is used to study the temporal evolution of monthly averaged dissolved O 2 content of surface waters at Ocean Weather Station P, and to assess the relative importance of the various contributing mechanisms during 1969-1972. Production and consumption due to biological activity are taken into account as an input function of the model. A large part of the seasonal signal of dissolved O 2 in surface waters can be reproduced by the physical model without biological activity. However, kinetics of gas exchange, biological production and entrainment of sub-mixed layer water all contribute by the same order of magnitude to supersaturation during warming periods and undersaturation during cooling periods. Various shapes (over depth and time) of production-consumption function have been tested for the year 1970. Most of the evolution of monthly average dissolved O 2 in the surface waters can be obtained (1) with a total annual production rate of the order of 5 mol O 2 m -2 y -1, (2) with a constant production throughout the year and in the 0-50 m layer, and (3) with logarithmic decrease in consumption between 50 and 300 m. The relative influence of various parameters on the three processes supplying O 2 to the surface waters is investigated. Total annual production P seems to be the most influential. Vertical mixing and depth of photic zone, z 0, affect the gas exchange flux during the cooling season. Episodic events, like storms, modify the supersaturation of the mixed layer O 2 content by up to 4 mmol m -3, but gas exchange later draws back this content towards a smooth evolution curve. Finally, the sensitivity of the net annual gas exchange to various parameters is too large for the model to provide a reliable value.

  20. Dissolved Oxygen Dynamics in Coastal Pacific Northwest Rivers: Biological Controls and Management Options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobota, D. J.; Foster, E.; Michie, R.; Waltz, D.

    2014-12-01

    In Oregon's Central Coast Range (OCR), dissolved O2 concentrations in at least 10% of stream length frequently dip below state standards set to ensure survival and reproduction of native salmonids. We examined O2 dynamics on 12 OCR rivers during times of the year when standards had been violated. Continuous dissolved O2 data were collected 15 minutes apart over a 24-hour period during spring (May - June) or fall (September - November) 2008 on each river. We modeled O2 dynamics for each river with parameters describing O2 exchange with the atmosphere, production of O2 from gross primary production (GPP), and consumption of O2 by ecosystem respiration (ER) fit to observed data. Average nighttime atmospheric O2 exchange and ER were estimated by regressing interval changes in dissolved O2 concentrations between measurements with corresponding O2 saturation deficits. GPP for each daytime sampling interval was calculated as the difference between O2 saturation deficit and the sum of temperature-corrected reaeration and ecosystem respiration. All regression models developed for estimating night-time reaeration and ER were highly significant (p<0.03; adjusted r2=0.17 - 0.77). GPP ranged from 0.62 to 14.95 mg O2 L-1 d-1, ER ranged from -1.21 mg O2 L-1 d-1, and net daily metabolism (NDM; net O2 flux controlled by biological processes) ranged from -11.64 to 3.75 mg O2 L-1 d-1 across all rivers and seasons. Increased aquatic productivity resulting from adjacent and upstream human activities likely altered dissolved O2 dynamics in these rivers. Through scenario analysis, we found that at one river (Alsea), GPP and ER would need to be reduced by 85 and 73%, respectively, to meet the state standard (95% saturation). Our modeling approach can be connected with management actions across a variety of spatial and temporal scales, ranging from local, riparian-scale manipulations of shading and organic matter input to watershed and regional nutrient and temperature management.

  1. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory : evaluation of alkaline persulfate digestion as an alternative to Kjeldahl digestion for determination of total and dissolved nitrogen and phosphorus in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patton, Charles J.; Kryskalla, Jennifer R.

    2003-01-01

    Alkaline persulfate digestion was evaluated and validated as a more sensitive, accurate, and less toxic alternative to Kjeldahl digestion for routine determination of nitrogen and phosphorus in surface- and ground-water samples in a large-scale and geographically diverse study conducted by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) between October 1, 2001, and September 30, 2002. Data for this study were obtained from about 2,100 surface- and ground-water samples that were analyzed for Kjeldahl nitrogen and Kjeldahl phosphorus in the course of routine operations at the USGS National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL). These samples were analyzed independently for total nitrogen and total phosphorus using an alkaline persulfate digestion method developed by the NWQL Methods Research and Development Program. About half of these samples were collected during nominally high-flow (April-June) conditions and the other half were collected during nominally low-flow (August-September) conditions. The number of filtered and whole-water samples analyzed from each flow regime was about equal.By operational definition, Kjeldahl nitrogen (ammonium + organic nitrogen) and alkaline persulfate digestion total nitrogen (ammonium + nitrite + nitrate + organic nitrogen) are not equivalent. It was necessary, therefore, to reconcile this operational difference by subtracting nitrate + nitrite concentra-tions from alkaline persulfate dissolved and total nitrogen concentrations prior to graphical and statistical comparisons with dissolved and total Kjeldahl nitrogen concentrations. On the basis of two-population paired t-test statistics, the means of all nitrate-corrected alkaline persulfate nitrogen and Kjeldahl nitrogen concentrations (2,066 paired results) were significantly different from zero at the p = 0.05 level. Statistically, the means of Kjeldahl nitrogen concentrations were greater than those of nitrate-corrected alkaline persulfate nitrogen concentrations. Experimental evidence strongly

  2. The Influence of Fe Substitution in Lanthanum Calcium Cobalt Oxide on the Oxygen Evolution Reaction in Alkaline Media

    DOE PAGES

    Abreu-Sepulveda, Maria A.; Dhital, Chetan; Huq, Ashfia; Li, Ling; Bridges, Craig A.; Paranthaman, M. Parans; Narayanan, S. R.; Quesnel, David J.; Tryk, Donald A.; Manivannan, A.

    2016-07-30

    The effect due to systematic substitution of cobalt by iron in La0.6Ca0.4Co1-xFexO3 towards the oxygen evolution reaction(OER) in alkaline media has been investigated. We synthesized these compounds by a facile glycine-nitrate synthesis and the phase formation was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and Neutron Diffraction elemental analysis. The apparent OER activity was evaluated by quasi steady state current measurements in alkaline media using a traditional three-electrode cell. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows iron substitution causes an increase in the surface concentration of various cobalt oxidation states. Tafel slope in the vicinity of 60 mV/decade and electrochemical reaction order towards OH- near unitymore » were achieved for the unsubstituted La0.6Ca0.4CoO3. Moreover, a decrease in the Tafel slope to 49 mV/decade was observed when iron is substituted in high amounts in the perovskite structure. The area specific current density showed dependence on the Fe fraction, however the relationship of specific current density with Fe fraction is not linear. High Fe substitutions, La0.6Ca0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3 and La0.6Ca0.4Co0.1Fe0.9O3 showed higher area specific activity towards OER than La0.6Ca0.4CoO3 or La0.6Ca0.4FeO3. Finally, we believe iron inclusion in the cobalt sites of the perovskite helps decrease the electron transfer barrier and facilitates the formation of cobalt-hydroxide at the surface. Possible OER mechanisms based on the observed kinetic parameters will be discussed.« less

  3. Aircraft and runway deicers at General Mitchell International Airport, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA. 1. Biochemical oxygen demand and dissolved oxygen in receiving streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corsi, S.R.; Booth, N.L.; Hall, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    Aircraft and runway deicers are used during cold weather at many of the world's airports to facilitate safe air travel. Propylene glycol-, ethylene glycol-, and urea-based deicers are known to have very high biochemical oxygen demand. At General Mitchell International Airport (GMIA) in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA, deicer application, water chemistry, and dissolved oxygen (DO) data were collected for two deicing seasons in order to evaluate and define premanagement water quality parameters prior to the implementation of a glycol management program. Calculations using stream-monitoring data during a controlled release of deicer provided an estimate of 0.8/d for the first-order decay rate constant, substantially higher than published laboratory test results. For eight precipitation events with deicing activities, between 2.4 and 99% of propylene and ethylene glycol applied to aircraft was delivered directly to receiving streams. The percentage of glycol runoff during an event increased with increasing storm-flow volume. Elevated concentrations of glycol and biochemical oxygen demand were measured downstream from the airport. However, the frequency of low DO concentrations in the receiving streams is comparable with that at an upstream reference site. This is possibly due to slowed bacteria metabolism at low water temperatures, short travel times, and dilution from downstream tributaries.

  4. Aircraft and runway deicers at General Mitchell International Airport, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA. 1. Biochemical oxygen demand and dissolved oxygen in receiving streams.

    PubMed

    Corsi, S R; Booth, N L; Hall, D W

    2001-07-01

    Aircraft and runway deicers are used during cold weather at many of the world's airports to facilitate safe air travel. Propylene glycol-, ethylene glycol-, and urea-based deicers are known to have very high biochemical oxygen demand. At General Mitchell International Airport (GMIA) in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA, deicer application, water chemistry, and dissolved oxygen (DO) data were collected for two deicing seasons in order to evaluate and define premanagement water quality parameters prior to the implementation of a glycol management program. Calculations using stream-monitoring data during a controlled release of deicer provided an estimate of 0.8/d for the first-order decay rate constant, substantially higher than published laboratory test results. For eight precipitation events with deicing activities, between 2.4 and 99% of propylene and ethylene glycol applied to aircraft was delivered directly to receiving streams. The percentage of glycol runoff during an event increased with increasing storm-flow volume. Elevated concentrations of glycol and biochemical oxygen demand were measured downstream from the airport. However, the frequency of low DO concentrations in the receiving streams is comparable with that at an upstream reference site. This is possibly due to slowed bacteria metabolism at low water temperatures, short travel times, and dilution from downstream tributaries.

  5. Salinity, alkalinity, and dissolved and particulate organic carbon in the Sacramento River water at Rio Vista, California, and at other locations in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schemel, L.E.

    1984-01-01

    Salinity, alkalinity, and dissolved and particulate organic carbon (DOC and POC respectively) concentrations in the Sacramento River water at Rio Vista were measured every three to five days during 1980 as part of an effort to identify time-dependent variations in the composition of the freshwater flow from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta to San Francisco Bay. Concentration ranges were generally small compared to the seasonal range of river flow rate; transport rates to the Delta and to the Bay varied primarily as a function of flow rate. Surface runoff from winter storms diluted salinity and alkalinity concentrations. DOC and POC were generally more concentrated during winter than during other times of the year. Variations in tributary flows resulted in sometimes-large salinity and alkalinity variations during spring through fall. Late summer concentrations were high because of large inflows of agricultural waste waters. POC and DOC concentrations were lowest during summer. (USGS)

  6. A one-dimensional, steady-state, dissolved-oxygen model and waste-load assimilation study for Cedar Creek, Dekalb and Allen counties, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilber, William G.; Peters, J.G.; Ayers, M.A.; Crawford, Charles G.

    1979-01-01

    A digital model calibrated to conditions in Cedar Creek was used to develop alternatives for future waste loadings that would be compatible with Indiana stream water-quality standards defined for two critical hydrologic conditions, summer and winter low flows. The model indicates that the dissolved-oxygen concentration of the Auburn wastewater effluent and nitrification are the most significant factors affecting the dissolved-oxygen concentration in Cedar Creek during summer low flows. The observed dissolved-oxygen concentration of the Auburn wastewater effluent was low and averaged 30 percent of saturation. Projected nitrogenous biochemical-oxygen demand loads, from the Indiana State Board of Health, for the Auburn and Waterloo wastewater-treatment facilities will result in violations of the current instream dissolved-oxygen standard (5 mg/l), even with an effluent dissolved-oxygen concentration of 80 percent saturation. Natural streamflow for Cedar Creek upstream from the confluence of Willow and Little Cedar Creeks is small compared with the waste discharge, so benefits of dilution for Waterloo and Auburn are minimal. The model also indicates that, during winter low flows, ammonia toxicity, rather than dissolved oxygen, is the limiting water-quality criterion in the reach of Cedar Creek downstream from the wastewater-treatment facility at Auburn and the confluence of Garrett ditch. Ammonia-nitrogen concentrations predicted for 1978 through 2000 downstream from the Waterloo wastewater-treatment facility do not exceed Indiana water-quality standards for streams. Calculations of the stream 's assimilative capacity indicate that future waste discharge in the Cedar Creek basin will be limited to the reaches between the Auburn wastewater-treatment facility and County Road 68. (Kosco-USGS)

  7. Monitoring Dissolved Oxygen in New Jersey Coastal Waters Using Autonomous Gliders

    EPA Science Inventory

    The coastal ocean is a highly variable system with processes that have significant implications on the hydrographic and oxygen characteristics of the water column. The spatial and temporal variability of these fields can cause dramatic changes to water quality and in turn the h...

  8. Spatial and Temporal Monitoring of Dissolved Oxygen (DO) in New Jersey Coastal Waters Using Autonomous Gliders

    EPA Science Inventory

    The coastal ocean is a highly variable system with processes that have significant implications on the hydrographic and oxygen characteristics of the water column. The spatial and temporal variability of these fields can cause dramatic changes to water quality and in turn the h...

  9. Spatial and Temporal Monitoring of Dissolved Oxygen in NJ Coastal Waters using AUVs (Presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The coastal ocean is a highly variable system with processes that have significant implications on the hydrographic and oxygen characteristics of the water column. The spatial and temporal variability of these fields can cause dramatic changes to water quality and in turn the h...

  10. Removal of cationic dye methylene blue by zero-valent iron: Effects of pH and dissolved oxygen on removal mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuan; Kurokawa, Tomoyo; Suzuki, Moe; Takagi, Minoru; Kawase, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Effects of pH and dissolved oxygen on mechanisms for decolorization and total organic carbon (TOC) removal of cationic dye methylene blue (MB) by zero-valent iron (ZVI) were systematically examined. Decolorization and TOC removal of MB by ZVI are attributed to the four potential mechanisms, i.e. reduction, degradation, precipitation and adsorption. The contributions of four mechanisms were quantified at pH 3.0, 6.0 and 10.0 in the oxic and anoxic systems. The maximum efficiencies of decolorization and TOC removal of MB were found at pH 6.0. The TOC removal efficiencies at pH 3.0 and 10.0 were 11.0 and 17.0%, respectively which were considerably lower as compared with 68.1% at pH 6.0. The adsorption, which was favorable at higher pH but was depressed by the passive layer formed on the ZVI surface at alkaline conditions, characterized the effects of pH on decolorization and TOC removal of MB. The efficiencies of decolorization and TOC removal at pH 6.0 under the anoxic condition were 73.0 and 59.0%, respectively, which were comparable to 79.9 and 55.5% obtained under the oxic condition. In the oxic and anoxic conditions, however, the contributions of removal mechanisms were quite different. Although the adsorption dominated the decolorization and TOC removal under the oxic condition, the contribution of precipitation was largely superior to that of adsorption under the anoxic condition.

  11. Dissolved inorganic carbon and total alkalinity of a Hawaiian fringing reef: chemical techniques for monitoring the effects of ocean acidification on coral reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantz, C. A.; Atkinson, M. J.; Winn, C. W.; Kahng, S. E.

    2014-03-01

    There is an interest in developing approaches to "ecosystem-based" management for coral reefs. One aspect of ecosystem performance is to monitor carbon metabolism of whole communities. In an effort to explore robust techniques to monitor the metabolism of fringing reefs, especially considering the possible effects of ocean acidification, a yearlong study of the carbonate chemistry of a nearshore fringing reef in Hawaii was conducted. Diurnal changes in seawater carbonate chemistry were measured once a week in an algal-dominated and a coral-dominated reef flat on the Waimanalo fringing reef, Hawaii, from April of 2010 until May of 2011. Calculated rates of gross primary production (GPP) and net community calcification ( G) were similar to previous estimates of community metabolism for other coral reefs (GPP 971 mmol C m-2 d-1; G 186 mmol CaCO3 m-2 d-1) and indicated that this reef was balanced in terms of organic metabolism, exhibited net calcification, and was a net source of CO2 to the atmosphere. Average slopes of total alkalinity versus dissolved inorganic carbon (TA-DIC slope) for the coral-dominated reef flat exhibited a greater calcification-to-net photosynthesis ratio than for the algal-dominated reef flat (coral slope vs. algal slope). Over the course of the time series, TA-DIC slopes remained significantly different between sites and were not correlated with diurnal averages in reef-water residence time or solar irradiance. These characteristic slopes for each reef flat reflect the relationship between carbon and carbonate community metabolism and can be used as a tool to monitor ecosystem function in response to ocean acidification.

  12. Quantitative Aspects of the Interfacial Catalytic Oxidation of Dithiothreitol by Dissolved Oxygen in the Presence of Carbon Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sauvain, Jean-Jacques; Rossi, Michel J

    2016-01-19

    The catalytic nature of particulate matter is often advocated to explain its ability to generate reactive oxygen species, but quantitative data are lacking. We have performed molecular characterization of three different carbonaceous nanoparticles (NP) by 1. identifying and quantifying their surface functional groups based on probe gas-particle titration; 2. studying the kinetics of dissolved oxygen consumption in the presence of suspended NP's and dithiothreitol (DTT). We show that these NP's can reversibly change their oxidation state between oxidized and reduced functional groups present on the NP surface. By comparing the amount of O2 consumed and the number of strongly reducing sites on the NP, its average turnover ranged from 35 to 600 depending on the type of NP. The observed quadratic rate law for O2 disappearance points to a Langmuir-Hinshelwood surface-based reaction mechanism possibly involving semiquinone radical. In the proposed model, the strongly reducing surface site is assumed to be a polycyclic aromatic hydroquinone whose oxidation to the corresponding conjugated quinone is rate-limiting in the catalytic chain reaction. The presence and strength of the reducing surface functional groups are important for explaining the catalytic activity of NP in the presence of oxygen and a reducing agent like DTT. PMID:26683500

  13. Pairing high-frequency data with a link-node model to manage dissolved oxygen impairment in a dredged estuary.

    PubMed

    Camarillo, Mary Kay; Weissmann, Gregory A; Gulati, Shelly; Herr, Joel; Sheeder, Scott; Stringfellow, William T

    2016-08-01

    High-frequency data and a link-node model were used to investigate the relative importance of mass loads of oxygen-demanding substances and channel geometry on recurrent low dissolved oxygen (DO) in the San Joaquin River Estuary in California. The model was calibrated using 6 years of data. The calibrated model was then used to determine the significance of the following factors on low DO: excavation of the river to allow navigation of large vessels, non-point source pollution from the agricultural watershed, effluent from a wastewater treatment plant, and non-point source pollution from an urban area. An alternative metric for low DO, excess net oxygen demand (ENOD), was applied to better characterize DO impairment. Model results indicate that the dredged ship channel had the most significant effect on DO (62 % fewer predicted hourly DO violations), followed by mass load inputs from the watershed (52 % fewer predicted hourly DO violations). Model results suggest that elimination of any one factor will not completely resolve DO impairment and that continued use of supplemental aeration is warranted. Calculation of ENOD proved more informative than the sole use of DO. Application of the simple model allowed for interpretation of the extensive data collected. The current monitoring program could be enhanced by additional monitoring stations that would provide better volumetric estimates of low DO. PMID:27393195

  14. Simultaneous phosphorus uptake and denitrification by EBPR-r biofilm under aerobic conditions: effect of dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Wong, Pan Yu; Ginige, Maneesha P; Kaksonen, Anna H; Cord-Ruwisch, Ralf; Sutton, David C; Cheng, Ka Yu

    2015-01-01

    A biofilm process, termed enhanced biological phosphorus removal and recovery (EBPR-r), was recently developed as a post-denitrification approach to facilitate phosphorus (P) recovery from wastewater. Although simultaneous P uptake and denitrification was achieved despite substantial intrusion of dissolved oxygen (DO >6 mg/L), to what extent DO affects the process was unclear. Hence, in this study a series of batch experiments was conducted to assess the activity of the biofilm under various DO concentrations. The biofilm was first allowed to store acetate (as internal storage) under anaerobic conditions, and was then subjected to various conditions for P uptake (DO: 0-8 mg/L; nitrate: 10 mg-N/L; phosphate: 8 mg-P/L). The results suggest that even at a saturating DO concentration (8 mg/L), the biofilm could take up P and denitrify efficiently (0.70 mmol e(-)/g total solids*h). However, such aerobic denitrification activity was reduced when the biofilm structure was physically disturbed, suggesting that this phenomenon was a consequence of the presence of oxygen gradient across the biofilm. We conclude that when a biofilm system is used, EBPR-r can be effectively operated as a post-denitrification process, even when oxygen intrusion occurs. PMID:26398030

  15. Pairing high-frequency data with a link-node model to manage dissolved oxygen impairment in a dredged estuary.

    PubMed

    Camarillo, Mary Kay; Weissmann, Gregory A; Gulati, Shelly; Herr, Joel; Sheeder, Scott; Stringfellow, William T

    2016-08-01

    High-frequency data and a link-node model were used to investigate the relative importance of mass loads of oxygen-demanding substances and channel geometry on recurrent low dissolved oxygen (DO) in the San Joaquin River Estuary in California. The model was calibrated using 6 years of data. The calibrated model was then used to determine the significance of the following factors on low DO: excavation of the river to allow navigation of large vessels, non-point source pollution from the agricultural watershed, effluent from a wastewater treatment plant, and non-point source pollution from an urban area. An alternative metric for low DO, excess net oxygen demand (ENOD), was applied to better characterize DO impairment. Model results indicate that the dredged ship channel had the most significant effect on DO (62 % fewer predicted hourly DO violations), followed by mass load inputs from the watershed (52 % fewer predicted hourly DO violations). Model results suggest that elimination of any one factor will not completely resolve DO impairment and that continued use of supplemental aeration is warranted. Calculation of ENOD proved more informative than the sole use of DO. Application of the simple model allowed for interpretation of the extensive data collected. The current monitoring program could be enhanced by additional monitoring stations that would provide better volumetric estimates of low DO.

  16. A one-dimensional, steady-state, dissolved-oxygen model and waste-load assimilation study for West Fork Blue River, Washington County, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, James G.; Wilber, W.G.; Crawford, Charles G.; Girardi, F.P.

    1979-01-01

    A digital computer model calibrated to observe stream conditions was used to evaluate water quality in West Fork Blue River, Washington County, IN. Instream dissolved-oxygen concentration averaged 96.5% of saturation at selected sites on West Fork Blue River during two 24-hour summer surveys. This high dissolved-oxygen concentration reflects small carbonaceous and nitrogenous waste loads; adequate dilution of waste by the stream; and natural reaeration. Nonpoint source waste loads accounted for an average of 53.2% of the total carbonaceous biochemical-oxygen demand and 90.2% of the nitrogenous biochemical-oxygen demand. Waste-load assimilation was studiedfor critical summer and winter low flows. Natural streamflow for these conditions was zero, so no benefit from dilution was provided. The projected stream reaeration capacity was not sufficient to maintain the minimum daily dissolved-oxygen concentration (5 milligrams per liter) in the stream with current waste-discharge restrictions. During winter low flow, ammonia toxicity, rather than dissolved-oxygen concentration, was the limiting water-quality criterion downstream from the Salem wastewater-treatment facility. (USGS)

  17. Tailored gold nanostructure arrays as catalysts for oxygen reduction in alkaline media and a single molecule SERS platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogala, Wojciech; Kannan, Palanisamy; Gawinkowski, Sylwester; Jönsson-Niedziolka, Martin; Kominiak, Magdalena; Waluk, Jacek; Opallo, Marcin

    2015-06-01

    Although plenty of functional nanomaterials are widely applied in science and technology, cost-efficient, controlled and reproducible fabrication of metallic nanostructures is a considerable challenge. Automated electrorefining by scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) provides an effective approach to circumvent some drawbacks of traditional homogeneous syntheses of nanoparticles, providing precise control over the amount, time and place of reactant delivery. The precursor is just a raw metal, which is the most economically viable source. This approach ensures reproducibility and the opportunity for fabrication of micropatterns, which can be rapidly analyzed by scanning probe techniques. Here, a cost-effective methodology for the preparation of naked (ligand-free) metallic nanostructures, from polycrystalline gold using a moving microelectrode, is presented. Automated micropatterning of bare gold on indium tin oxide (ITO) demonstrates the versatility of this method to tune the size and shape of the nanostructures. The morphology of the obtained materials and thus their catalytic and plasmonic properties can be tuned using the electrorefining parameters. Programmable fabrication of sample microarrays by microprinting followed by comparative SECM studies or spectroscopic analysis allows quick optimization and characterization for specific purposes. Electrocatalytic oxygen reduction in alkaline media and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) of single porphycene molecules are presented as model examples.Although plenty of functional nanomaterials are widely applied in science and technology, cost-efficient, controlled and reproducible fabrication of metallic nanostructures is a considerable challenge. Automated electrorefining by scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) provides an effective approach to circumvent some drawbacks of traditional homogeneous syntheses of nanoparticles, providing precise control over the amount, time and place of reactant

  18. Controls on in situ oxygen and dissolved inorganic carbon dynamics in peats of a temperate fen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estop-AragonéS, Cristian; Knorr, Klaus-Holger; Blodau, Christian

    2012-06-01

    Changes in hydrological conditions are expected and may alter carbon cycling in peatlands. Peat aeration with water table change has not commonly been investigated, and the water table is often assumed to constitute the oxic-anoxic boundary in peat. We analyzed temperature, moisture, oxygen (O2), and carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations in profiles of a temperate fen during two seasons. A drying-rewetting cycle and flooding were induced and compared to controls. The response of moisture and water table position varied greatly and was related to gradients of peat compaction and ash content. Background drought raised air-filled porosity (AFP) to a maximum of 15%-38% in shallow peat and experimental drought up to 50%. Decline in water table and soil moisture broadly led to O2 penetration and CO2 degassing, and rewetting and flooding led to anoxic conditions and CO2 accumulation in peat pore water. In dense peat with ≥20% ash content the unsaturated zone remained partly low in oxygen, however, and up to 5% AFP and 20 cm above water table O2 concentrations frequently remained below 50 μmol L-1. Moderately intense and short drying did not induce substantial oxygen penetration in the compacted soil profiles. The likelihood of the presence of oxygen in the peat was predicted by logistic regression using water table and ash content or bulk density as predictors (p < 0.0005). The model is potentially useful for predicting the position of the redoxcline in peat deposits and may assist in improving statistical models of trace gas emission from peatlands.

  19. Effects of simulated natural and massive resuspension on benthic oxygen, nutrient and dissolved inorganic carbon fluxes in Loch Creran, Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almroth-Rosell, Elin; Tengberg, Anders; Andersson, Sara; Apler, Anna; Hall, Per O. J.

    2012-08-01

    The effect of repeated natural resuspension on benthic oxygen consumption and the effect of natural and massive resuspension on oxygen consumption and fluxes of phosphate, silicate, ammonium and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were studied at two stations (S1 and S2) in a Scottish sea loch. Station S11 had organically enriched sediment and station S1 had lower organic content in the sediment. The fluxes were measured in situ using the Göteborg benthic lander. Natural resuspension, simulating resuspension events due to strong wind, waves or currents, and massive resuspension, simulating resuspension due to e.g. trawling or dredging, were created inside the incubation chambers by regulating the stirring of the incubated overlying water or by retracting and shaking the incubated sediment. Natural resuspension showed clear effects on the oxygen consumption at station S11, where it increased with an average of 12.8 (standard error (s.e.) 0.17) and 7.7 (s.e. 0.12) mmol m- 2 d- 1 during the first and second incubations, respectively. At station S1 there was no clear effect of natural resuspension on the oxygen consumption. Massive resuspension increased the oxygen consumption on S1 with an average of 608 (standard deviation (sd) 366) mmol m- 2 d- 1 and on S11 with an average of 2396 (sd 2265) mmol m- 2 d- 1. The fluxes of ammonium, phosphate and silicate were affected by the massive resuspension in 50, 14 and 33% of the chambers, respectively, on station S11. However, in the majority of the cases there were no effects on the nutrient and DIC fluxes of massive resuspension. The absolute concentrations of DIC, ammonium and silicate did however instantly increase with an average of 419 (sd 297), 48 (sd 27) and 6.9 (sd 3.7) μM, respectively, at S11 upon massive resuspension. The concentrations of phosphate decreased instantly with an average of 0.2 (sd 0.1) μM. On station S1 there were effects only on the ammonium and silicate concentrations, which increased with 0.8 (sd

  20. Generalized regression neural network-based approach for modelling hourly dissolved oxygen concentration in the Upper Klamath River, Oregon, USA.

    PubMed

    Heddam, Salim

    2014-08-01

    In this study, a comparison between generalized regression neural network (GRNN) and multiple linear regression (MLR) models is given on the effectiveness of modelling dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in a river. The two models are developed using hourly experimental data collected from the United States Geological Survey (USGS Station No: 421209121463000 [top]) station at the Klamath River at Railroad Bridge at Lake Ewauna. The input variables used for the two models are water, pH, temperature, electrical conductivity, and sensor depth. The performances of the models are evaluated using root mean square errors (RMSE), the mean absolute error (MAE), Willmott's index of agreement (d), and correlation coefficient (CC) statistics. Of the two approaches employed, the best fit was obtained using the GRNN model with the four input variables used.

  1. Effects of dissolved oxygen on microbial community of single-stage autotrophic nitrogen removal system treating simulating mature landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xin; Zhou, Jian; Wang, Jiale; Qing, Xiaoxia; He, Qiang

    2016-10-01

    The performance of four identical sequencing biofilm batch reactors (SBBR) for autotrophic nitrogen removal was investigated with 2000mg/L ammonia-containing mature landfill leachate at 30°C. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of dissolved oxygen (DO) on the performance and microbial community of single-stage nitrogen removal using anammox and partial nitritation (SNAP) system. At an applied load of 0.5kgNm(-3)d(-1), average total nitrogen removal efficiency (TNRE) above 90% was long-term achieved with an optimal DO concentration of 2.7mg/L. The microelectrode-measured profiles showed the microenvironments inside the biofilms. 16S ribosomal Ribonucleic Acid (rRNA) amplicon pyrosequencing and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) were used to analyze the microbial variations of different DO concentrations and different positions inside one reactor. PMID:27450126

  2. Regulation of dissolved oxygen from accumulated nitrite during the heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification of Pseudomonas stutzeri T13.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yilu; Li, Ang; Zhang, Xuening; Ma, Fang

    2015-04-01

    The nitrogen-removing characteristics of Pseudomonas stutzeri T13, a heterotrophic nitrifying-aerobic denitrifying bacterium, were investigated. The ammonium and nitrate removal of the bacterium was found to reach nearly 100 % at 15 h. However, the total nitrogen (TN) removal rate reached only about 23.47 % because of the dramatic accumulation of nitrite at a high dissolved oxygen (DO) level (160 rpm). The process of nitrite reduction was found to be the bottleneck for the efficiency of aerobic denitrification. Decreasing the shaking speed from 160 to 50 rpm to lower the DO concentration during cultivation was an effective method of improving nitrite utilization because nitrite removal increased from 62.37 to 100 %. The 99.21 % capability of simultaneous heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification with TN removal was achieved at a relatively low DO level (50 rpm). PMID:25417744

  3. Dissolved oxygen and dietary phosphorus modulate utilization and effluent partitioning of phosphorus in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) aquaculture.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Nichole K; Sugiura, Shozo H; Kehler, Thomas; Fletcher, John W; Coloso, Relicardo M; Weis, Peddrick; Ferraris, Ronaldo P

    2005-11-01

    Phosphorus (P) is the limiting nutrient in freshwater primary production, and excessive levels cause premature eutrophication. P levels in aquaculture effluents are now tightly regulated. Increasing our understanding of waste P partitioning into soluble, particulate, and settleable fractions is important in the management of effluent P. When water supply is limited, dissolved oxygen concentration (DO) decreases below the optimum levels. Therefore, we studied effects of DO (6 and 10mg/L) and dietary P (0.7 and 1.0% P) on rainbow trout growth, P utilization, and effluent P partitioning. Biomass increased by 40% after 3 weeks. DO at 10mg/L significantly increased fish growth and feed efficiency, and increased the amount of P in the soluble fraction of the effluent. Soluble effluent P was greater in fish fed 1.0% P. DO increases fish growth and modulates P partitioning in aquaculture effluent.

  4. Using River Distances in the Space/Time Estimation of Dissolved Oxygen Along Two Impaired River Networks in New Jersey

    PubMed Central

    Money, Eric; Carter, Gail P.; Serre, Marc L.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding surface water quality is a critical step towards protecting human health and ecological stability. Because of resource deficiencies and the large number of river miles needing assessment, there is a need for a methodology that can accurately depict river water quality where data do not exist. The objective of this research is to implement a methodology that incorporates a river metric into the space/time analysis of dissolved oxygen data for two impaired river basins. An efficient algorithm is developed to calculate river distances within the BMElib statistical package for space/time geostatistics. We find that using a river distance in a space/time context leads to an appreciable 10% reduction in the overall estimation error, and results in maps of DO that are more realistic than those obtained using a Euclidean distance. As a result river distance is used in the subsequent non-attainment assessment of DO for two impaired river basins in New Jersey. PMID:19285333

  5. Dissolved oxygen fluctuations in karst spring flow and implications for endemic species: Barton Springs, Edwards aquifer, Texas, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahler, Barbara J.; Bourgeais, Renan

    2013-01-01

    Karst aquifers and springs provide the dissolved oxygen critical for survival of endemic stygophiles worldwide, but little is known about fluctuations of dissolved oxygen concentrations (DO) and factors that control those concentrations. We investigated temporal variation in DO at Barton Springs, Austin, Texas, USA. During 2006–2012, DO fluctuated by as much as a factor of 2, and at some periods decreased to concentrations that adversely affect the Barton Springs salamander (Eurycea sorosum) (≤4.4 mg/L), a federally listed endangered species endemic to Barton Springs. DO was lowest (≤4.4 mg/L) when discharge was low (≤1 m3/s) and spring water temperature was >21 °C, although not at a maximum; the minimum DO recorded was 4.0 mg/L. Relatively low DO (3/s) and maximum T (22.2 °C). A four-segment linear regression model with daily data for discharge and spring water temperature as explanatory variables provided an excellent fit for mean daily DO (Nash–Sutcliffe coefficient for the validation period of 0.90). DO also fluctuated at short-term timescales in response to storms, and DO measured at 15-min intervals could be simulated with a combination of discharge, spring temperature, and specific conductance as explanatory variables. On the basis of the daily-data regression model, we hypothesize that more frequent low DO corresponding to salamander mortality could result from (i) lower discharge from Barton Springs resulting from increased groundwater withdrawals or decreased recharge as a result of climate change, and (or) (ii) higher groundwater temperature as a result of climate change.

  6. Water quality characterization and mathematical modeling of dissolved oxygen in the East and West Ponds, Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge.

    PubMed

    Maillacheruvu, Krishnanand; Roy, D; Tanacredi, J

    2003-09-01

    The current study was undertaken to characterize the East and West Ponds and develop a mathematical model of the effects of nutrient and BOD loading on dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations in these ponds. The model predicted that both ponds will recover adequately given the average expected range of nutrient and BOD loading due to waste from surface runoff and migratory birds. The predicted dissolved oxygen levels in both ponds were greater than 5.0 mg/L, and were supported by DO levels in the field which were typically above 5.0 mg/L during the period of this study. The model predicted a steady-state NBOD concentration of 12.0-14.0 mg/L in the East Pond, compared to an average measured value of 3.73 mg/L in 1994 and an average measured value of 12.51 mg/L in a 1996-97 study. The model predicted that the NBOD concentration in the West Pond would be under 3.0 mg/L compared to the average measured values of 7.50 mg/L in 1997, and 8.51 mg/L in 1994. The model predicted that phosphorus (as PO4(3-)) concentration in the East Pond will approach 4.2 mg/L in 4 months, compared to measured average value of 2.01 mg/L in a 1994 study. The model predicted that phosphorus concentration in the West Pond will approach 1.00 mg/L, compared to a measured average phosphorus (as PO4(3-)) concentration of 1.57 mg/L in a 1994 study. PMID:12940494

  7. Enhanced Catalytic Activities of NiPt Truncated Octahedral Nanoparticles toward Ethylene Glycol Oxidation and Oxygen Reduction in Alkaline Electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Xia, Tianyu; Liu, Jialong; Wang, Shouguo; Wang, Chao; Sun, Young; Gu, Lin; Wang, Rongming

    2016-05-01

    The high cost and poor durability of Pt nanoparticles (NPs) are great limits for the proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) from being scaled-up for commercial applications. Pt-based bimetallic NPs together with a uniform distribution can effectively reduce the usage of expensive Pt while increasing poison resistance of intermediates. In this work, a simple one-pot method was used to successfully synthesize ultrafine (about 7.5 nm) uniform NiPt truncated octahedral nanoparticles (TONPs) in dimethylformamid (DMF) without any seeds or templates. The as-prepared NiPt TONPs with Pt-rich surfaces exhibit greatly improved catalytic activities together with good tolerance and better stability for ethylene glycol oxidation reaction (EGOR) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in comparison with NiPt NPs and commercial Pt/C catalysts in alkaline electrolyte. For example, the value of mass and specific activities for EGOR are 23.2 and 17.6 times higher comparing with those of commercial Pt/C, respectively. Our results demonstrate that the dramatic enhancement is mainly attributed to Pt-rich surface, larger specific surface area, together with coupling between Ni and Pt atoms. This developed method provides a promising pathway for simple preparation of highly efficient electrocatalysts for PEMFCs in the near future. PMID:27093304

  8. Emerging methanol-tolerant AlN nanowire oxygen reduction electrocatalyst for alkaline direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, M.; Wang, J.; Li, J. R.; Wang, Y. G.; Tang, H. L.; Wang, W. J.

    2014-08-01

    Replacing precious and nondurable Pt catalysts with cheap materials is a key issue for commercialization of fuel cells. In the case of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts for direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), the methanol tolerance is also an important concern. Here, we develop AlN nanowires with diameters of about 100-150 nm and the length up to 1 mm through crystal growth method. We find it is electrochemically stable in methanol-contained alkaline electrolyte. This novel material exhibits pronounced electrocatalytic activity with exchange current density of about 6.52 × 10-8 A/cm2. The single cell assembled with AlN nanowire cathodic electrode achieves a power density of 18.9 mW cm-2. After being maintained at 100 mA cm-2 for 48 h, the AlN nanowire-based single cell keeps 92.1% of the initial performance, which is in comparison with 54.5% for that assembled with Pt/C cathode. This discovery reveals a new type of metal nitride ORR catalyst that can be cheaply produced from crystal growth method.

  9. N-doped graphene coupled with Co nanoparticles as an efficient electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction in alkaline media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Geng; Lu, Wangting; Cao, Feifei; Xiao, Zhidong; Zheng, Xinsheng

    2016-01-01

    Development of low-cost and highly efficient electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is still a great challenge for the large-scale application of fuel cells and metal-air batteries. Herein, a noble metal-free ORR electrocatalyst in the form of N-doped graphene coupled with part of Co nanoparticles encased in N-doped graphitic shells (named as SUCo-0.03-800) is prepared by facile one-step pyrolysis of the mixture of sucrose, urea and cobalt nitrate. The novel structure is confirmed by High Resolution-TEM, XRD, XPS and Raman spectroscopy. SUCo-0.03-800 presents comparable ORR catalytic activity to commercial Pt/C catalyst with a dominating four-electron pathway under alkaline conditions, and both of its mass activity and volume activity also outperform Co-free N-doped graphene and other Co/N-C hybrids with higher Co content, which may probably be ascribed to the high specific surface area, novel structure and synergistic effect between encased Co nanoparticles and N-doped graphitic shell. Additionally, SUCo-0.03-800 also shows outstanding stability and improved selectivity towards ORR, making it a promising alternative to Pt with potential application in fuel cells and metal-air batteries.

  10. Oxygen evolution reaction characteristics of synthetic nickel-cobalt-oxide electrodes for alkaline anion-exchange membrane water electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Tae Woo; Park, ChanSu; Kim, Yang Do; Lee, Dooyong; Park, Sungkyun; Lee, Jae Ho; Choi, Sung Mook; Choi, Chul Young

    2015-11-01

    A polymer electrolyte membrane water electrolysis system can produce high-purity hydrogen gases in a highly efficient manner. However, the level of hydrogen gas production is still small. In addition, noble-metal catalysts for the reaction in acidic environments, as well as an additional drying step to remove water contained in the hydrogen, are required. Therefore, water electrolysis system with high efficiency and lower cost, an alkaline anion-exchange membrane system that can produce high-purity hydrogen without a noble-metal catalyst, is needed. Nano-size NiCo2O4 powders were prepared by using a sol-gel method to achieve an efficient and economical water electrolysis system. When the powder was calcined at 450 °C, the crystallinity and the cyclic voltammogram measurement showed the best values. In addition, the 15-wt.% polytetrafluoroethylene mixed NiCo2O4 powders exhibited the largest cyclic voltammetry active area and the highest oxygen evolution reaction activity with the appropriate stability.

  11. Advanced oxygen reduction reaction catalyst based on nitrogen and sulfur co-doped graphene in alkaline medium.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongfeng; Li, Meng; Jiang, Liqing; Lin, Lin; Cui, Lili; He, Xingquan

    2014-11-14

    A novel nitrogen and sulfur co-doped graphene (N-S-G) catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) has been prepared by pyrolysing graphite oxide and poly[3-amino-5-mercapto-1,2,4-triazole] composite (PAMTa). The atomic percentage of nitrogen and sulfur for the prepared N-S-G can be adjusted by controlling the pyrolysis temperature. Furthermore, the catalyst pyrolysed at 1000 °C, denoted N-S-G 1000, exhibits the highest catalytic activity for ORR, which displays the highest content of graphitic-N and thiophene-S among all the pyrolysed samples. The electrocatalytic performance of N-S-G 1000 is significantly better than that of PAMTa and reduced graphite oxide composite. Remarkably, the N-S-G 1000 catalyst is comparable with Pt/C in terms of the onset and half-wave potentials, and displays larger kinetic limiting current density and better methanol tolerance and stability than Pt/C for ORR in an alkaline medium. PMID:25255312

  12. Electrochemical and spectroscopic study of novel Cu and Fe-based catalysts for oxygen reduction in alkaline media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qinggang; Yang, Xiaofang; He, Ruihua; Bueno-López, Agustín; Miller, Hamish; Ren, Xiaoming; Yang, Wanli; Koel, Bruce E.

    2012-09-01

    We synthesized two “single-core” Fe-Nx/C and Cu-Nx/C electrocatalysts and a bi-core CuFe-Nx/C composite electrocatalyst using iron and copper phthalocyanine-based precursors and a high-temperature pyrolysis method. The morphology, structure, and activity toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media were evaluated for each electrocatalyst by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), and the rotating ring-disk electrode (RRDE) method. Although the Cu-Nx/C catalyst showed lower catalytic activity than Fe-Nx/C, the presence of Cu enhanced the ORR performance of bi-core CuFe-Nx/C, as compared to single-core Fe-Nx/C. To fully understand the synergistic effect between Cu and Fe on this enhancement, high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HR-XPS) and soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was employed to study the electronic structure of as-synthesized electrocatalysts. The HR-XPS analysis showed that metal-nitrogen bonding was maintained and that the oxidation states of Fe and Cu were influenced by the presence of the second metal in the bi-core catalyst. The XAS data revealed that a fraction of an electron was transferred from Fe to Cu, which may help to lower the kinetic barrier during the ORR process. Based on our experimental results and four different models, we briefly discuss ORR mechanisms on these metallic catalysts.

  13. Electrocatalytical study of carbon supported Pt, Ru and bimetallic Pt-Ru nanoparticles for oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, M. G.; Zardari, P.

    2015-08-01

    Carbon supported Pt, Ru and bimetallic Pt-Ru nanoparticles (Pt/C, Ru/C and Pt.Ru/C) have been prepared by the chemical reduction method. Particle morphology, composition and structure of nanoparticles have been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. SEM results showed a uniform dispersion of nanoparticles with rough and porous structure into carbon supports with the average particle size of 30-64 nm. EDX analysis demonstrated the presence of both Pt and Ru nanoparticles in each gas diffusion electrode. The Pt/C, Ru/C and Pt.Ru/C composites were used as electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media. The ORR activities of cathodes were characterized using cyclic voltammetry (CV), polarization technique, AC impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and chronoamperometry. CV and polarization curves showed significantly higher activity on Pt.Ru/C electrocatalyst than observed on Pt/C and Ru/C catalysts, which can be related to synergistic effect, which is playing a critical role in ORR activity. The Tafel slope values of 120 mV/dec showed that the first electron transfer is the rate determining step. The EIS results of cathodes under different polarization potentials indicated two different behaviours which depend on the applied dc potentials and reveal different electrochemical processes occurring on the electrodes.

  14. Bio-desulfurization of biogas using acidic biotrickling filter with dissolved oxygen in step feed recirculation.

    PubMed

    Chaiprapat, Sumate; Charnnok, Boonya; Kantachote, Duangporn; Sung, Shihwu

    2015-03-01

    Triple stage and single stage biotrickling filters (T-BTF and S-BTF) were operated with oxygenated liquid recirculation to enhance bio-desulfurization of biogas. Empty bed retention time (EBRT 100-180 s) and liquid recirculation velocity (q 2.4-7.1 m/h) were applied. H2S removal and sulfuric acid recovery increased with higher EBRT and q. But the highest q at 7.1 m/h induced large amount of liquid through the media, causing a reduction in bed porosity in S-BTF and H2S removal. Equivalent performance of S-BTF and T-BTF was obtained under the lowest loading of 165 gH2S/m(3)/h. In the subsequent continuous operation test, it was found that T-BTF could maintain higher H2S elimination capacity and removal efficiency at 175.6±41.6 gH2S/m(3)/h and 89.0±6.8% versus S-BTF at 159.9±42.8 gH2S/m(3)/h and 80.1±10.2%, respectively. Finally, the relationship between outlet concentration and bed height was modeled. Step feeding of oxygenated liquid recirculation in multiple stages clearly demonstrated an advantage for sulfide oxidation. PMID:25569031

  15. [Characteristics of dissolved oxygen and its affecting factors in the Yangtze Estuary].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying-Ying; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Ying; Zhu, Zhuo-Yi

    2007-08-01

    The cruises on hypoxia research were carried out in the Yangtze Estuary and adjacent area of the East China Sea on June, August and October, 2006. DO, stability and the concentration of nitrate and phosphate in the section B were analyzed. The result indicates that there is distinct difference among the concentration of DO in the section B of the three cruises. The DO distribution is higher in surface water but lower in bottom. The oxygen minimum value (1.1 mg x L(-1)) is found at the bottom in August, and the apparent oxygen utilization (AOU) is higher than 2.79 mg x L(-1) in the section B. The strong halocline above the hypoxic zone, as a result of affluent water from the coastwise, Taiwan Warm Current, and the high concentration of organic substance are major factors causing the formation of the hypoxia. The stability of the seawater goes down, the vertical mixing affect the DO through its effect on stratification, in October. deltaDO is primarily affected by the stability and the concentration of deltaNO3-, deltaDIP.

  16. [Characteristics of dissolved oxygen and its affecting factors in the Yangtze Estuary].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying-Ying; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Ying; Zhu, Zhuo-Yi

    2007-08-01

    The cruises on hypoxia research were carried out in the Yangtze Estuary and adjacent area of the East China Sea on June, August and October, 2006. DO, stability and the concentration of nitrate and phosphate in the section B were analyzed. The result indicates that there is distinct difference among the concentration of DO in the section B of the three cruises. The DO distribution is higher in surface water but lower in bottom. The oxygen minimum value (1.1 mg x L(-1)) is found at the bottom in August, and the apparent oxygen utilization (AOU) is higher than 2.79 mg x L(-1) in the section B. The strong halocline above the hypoxic zone, as a result of affluent water from the coastwise, Taiwan Warm Current, and the high concentration of organic substance are major factors causing the formation of the hypoxia. The stability of the seawater goes down, the vertical mixing affect the DO through its effect on stratification, in October. deltaDO is primarily affected by the stability and the concentration of deltaNO3-, deltaDIP. PMID:17926388

  17. Oxygen isotope effects of enzyme-catalyzed organophosphorus hydrolysis reactions: implications for interpretation of dissolved PO4 δ18O values in natural waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Y.; Blake, R. E.

    2002-12-01

    The geochemical cycling of P in Earth surface environments is controlled largely by biota. It has been recently demonstrated that intracellular cycling of P in microbial cultures and biological turnover of P in natural waters leads to temperature-dependent O isotope equilibrium between dissolved inorganic PO4 (Pi) and ambient water, and that the δ18O of Pi can be a useful tracer of biological reactions and P cycling in aquatic systems/sediments. Oxygen isotope exchange between Pi and water during biological turnover of P is catalyzed by enzymes at low-temperature. Phosphoenzymes play a crucial role in the intracellular functions of all living organisms and also have important extracellular functions in aquatic ecosystems such as regeneration of Pi from organophosphorus compounds (e.g., phosphoesters). Laboratory experiments indicate that extracellular enzyme reactions may result in incomplete Pi turnover and non-equilibrium Pi-water O isotope exchange. Determination of the O isotope effects of phosphoenzyme-catalyzed reactions is fundamental to the understanding of mechanisms of PO4-water O isotope exchange, pathways of biogeochemical P cycling, and interpretation of PO4 δ18O values from natural systems. Here we report on the O isotope fractionation between enzymatically-released Pi and water, in cell-free abiotic systems. Alkaline phosphatase (Apase) is a non-specific phosphohydrolase commonly found in fresh and marine coastal waters that catalyzes the hydrolysis of Pi from phosphomonoesters. We examined the O isotope effects of Apase derived from both microbial and eukaryotic sources and acting on different phosphomonoester substrates (e.g., α-D-Glucose 1-Phosphate, β-Glycerophosphate, AMP) in 18O-labeled waters. Oxygen isotope ratios of Pi released by Apase indicate that only 1 of the 4 O atoms in PO4 is incorporated from water with little or no apparent O isotopic fractionation at the site of incorporation. This observation is consistent with

  18. Relation between flows and dissolved oxygen in the Roanoke River between Roanoke Rapids Dam and Jamesville, North Carolina, 2005-2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wehmeyer, Loren L.; Wagner, Chad R.

    2011-01-01

    The relation between dam releases and dissolved-oxygen concentration, saturation and deficit, downstream from Roanoke Rapids Dam in North Carolina was evaluated from 2005 to 2009. Dissolved-oxygen data collected at four water-quality monitoring stations downstream from Roanoke Rapids Dam were used to determine if any statistical relations or discernible quantitative or qualitative patterns linked Roanoke River in-stream dissolved-oxygen levels to hydropower peaking at Roanoke Rapids Dam. Unregulated tributaries that inundate and drain portions of the Roanoke River flood plain are crucial in relation to in-stream dissolved oxygen. Hydropower peaking from 2005 to 2009 both inundated and drained portions of the flood plain independently of large storms. The effects of these changes in flow on dissolved-oxygen dynamics are difficult to isolate, however, because of (1) the variable travel time for water to move down the 112-mile reach of the Roanoke River from Roanoke Rapids Dam to Jamesville, North Carolina, and (2) the range of in-situ conditions, particularly inundation history and water temperature, in the flood plain. Statistical testing was conducted on the travel-time-adjusted hourly data measured at each of the four water-quality stations between May and November 2005-2009 when the weekly mean flow was 5,000-12,000 cubic feet per second (a range when Roanoke Rapids Dam operations likely affect tributary and flood-plain water levels). Results of this statistical testing indicate that at the 99-percent confidence interval dissolved-oxygen levels downstream from Roanoke Rapids Dam were lower during peaking weeks than during non-peaking weeks in three of the five years and higher in one of the five years; no data were available for weeks with peaking in 2007. For the four years of statistically significant differences in dissolved oxygen between peaking and non-peaking weeks, three of the years had statistically signficant differences in water temperature. Years

  19. Biological phosphorus and nitrogen removal in sequencing batch reactors: effects of cycle length, dissolved oxygen concentration and influent particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Ginige, Maneesha P; Kayaalp, Ahmet S; Cheng, Ka Yu; Wylie, Jason; Kaksonen, Anna H

    2013-01-01

    Removal of phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) from municipal wastewaters is required to mitigate eutrophication of receiving water bodies. While most treatment plants achieve good N removal using influent carbon (C), the use of influent C to facilitate enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is poorly explored. A number of operational parameters can facilitate optimum use of influent C and this study investigated the effects of cycle length, dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration during aerobic period and influent solids on biological P and N removal in sequencing batch reactors (SRBs) using municipal wastewaters. Increasing cycle length from 3 to 6 h increased P removal efficiency, which was attributed to larger portion of N being removed via nitrite pathway and more biodegradable organic C becoming available for EBPR. Further increasing cycle length from 6 to 8 h decreased P removal efficiencies as the demand for biodegradable organic C for denitrification increased as a result of complete nitrification. Decreasing DO concentration in the aerobic period from 2 to 0.8 mg L(-1) increased P removal efficiency but decreased nitrification rates possibly due to oxygen limitation. Further, sedimented wastewater was proved to be a better influent stream than non-sedimented wastewater possibility due to the detrimental effect of particulate matter on biological nutrient removal.

  20. The kinetics of the oxidation of pyrite by ferric ions and dissolved oxygen: An electrochemical study

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, P.R.; Crundwell, F.K.

    2000-01-01

    The dissolution of pyrite is important in the geochemical cycling of iron and sulphur, in the formation of acid mine drainage, and in the extraction of metals by bacterial leaching. Many researchers have studied the kinetics of dissolution, and the rate of dissolution has often been found to be half-order in ferric ions or oxygen. Previous work has not adequately explained the kinetics of dissolution of pyrite. The dissolution of pyrite is an oxidation-reduction reaction. The kinetics of the oxidation and reduction half-reactions was studied independently using electrochemical techniques of voltammetry. The kinetics of the overall reaction was studied by the electrochemical technique of potentiometry, which consisted of measuring the mixed potential of a sample of corroding pyrite in solutions of different compositions. The kinetics of the half reactions are related to the kinetics of the overall dissolution reaction by the condition that there is no accumulation of charge. This principle is used to derive expressions for the mixed potential and the rate of dissolution, which successfully describe the mixed potential measurements and the kinetics of dissolution reported in the literature. It is shown that the observations of half-order kinetics and that the oxygen in the sulphate product arises from water are both a direct consequence of the electrochemical mechanism. Thus it is concluded that the electrochemical reaction steps occurring at the mineral-solution interface control the rate of dissolution. Raman spectroscopy was used to analyze reaction products formed on the pyrite surface. The results indicated that small amounts of polysulphides form on the surface of the pyrite. However, it was also found that the mixed (corrosion) potential does not change over a 14-day leaching period. This indicates that even though polysulphide material is present on the surface, it does not influence the rate of the reactions occurring at the surface. Measurement of the

  1. Development of a Self-calibrating Dissolved Oxygen Microsensor Array for the Monitoring and Control of Plant Growth in a Space Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Chang-Soo; Brown, Christopher S.; Nagle, H. Troy

    2004-01-01

    Plant experiments in space will require active nutrient delivery concepts in which water and nutrients are replenished on a continuous basis for long-term growth. The goal of this study is to develop a novel microsensor array to provide information on the dissolved oxygen environment in the plant root zone for the optimum control of plant cultivation systems in the space environment. Control of water and oxygen is limited by the current state-of-the-art in sensor technology. Two capabilities of the new microsensor array were tested. First, a novel in situ self-diagnosis/self-calibration capability for the microsensor was explored by dynamically controlling the oxygen microenvironment in close proximity to an amperometric dissolved oxygen microsensors. A pair of integrated electrochemical actuator electrodes provided the microenvironments based on water electrolysis. Miniaturized thin film dissolved oxygen microsensors on a flexible polyimide (Kapton(Registered Trademark)? substrate were fabricated and their performances were tested. Secondly, measurements of dissolved oxygen in two representative plant growth systems were made, which had not been performed previously due to lack of proper sensing technology. The responses of the oxygen microsensor array on a flexible polymer substrate properly reflected the oxygen contents on the surface of a porous tube nutrient delivery system and within a particulate substrate system. Additionally, we demonstrated the feasibility of using a 4-point thin film microprobe for water contents measurements for both plant growth systems. mechanical flexibility, and self-diagnosis. The proposed technology is anticipated to provide a reliable sensor feedback plant growth nutrient delivery systems in both terrestrial environment and the microgravity environment during long term space missions. The unique features of the sensor include small size and volume, multiple-point sensing,

  2. Mesoporous TiN as a noncarbon support of Ag-rich PtAg nanoalloy catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline media.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhiming; Yang, Minghui; Chen, Hao; Zhao, Mengtian; DiSalvo, Francis J

    2014-12-01

    There has been growing interest in noncarbon supports for fuel cell reactions, especially for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media. Herein, we report a robust mesoporous titanium nitride (TiN) which is not only kinetically stable in alkaline media, but also electrochemically stable in the potential range of fuel cell operation. This binary nitride exhibits an order of magnitude higher electronic conductivity than carbon black. Bimetallic Ag-rich PtAg nanoalloy is selected as the catalyst for the ORR in alkaline media due to their superior activity and relatively low cost. TiN-supported Pt1 Ag9 nanoalloy catalysts are synthesized by a new and efficient approach with KEt3 BH as reducing agent and THF as solvent. Pt1 Ag9 /TiN exhibits much higher mass activity and durability for the ORR in alkaline media than Pt1 Ag9 /C, Pt/C and Ag/C catalysts, suggesting that mesoporous TiN is a very promising support in alkaline media. PMID:25320003

  3. What can Dissolved Oxygen Isotopes Tell us About the Metabolism of Impacted Rivers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkiteswaran, J. J.; Wassenaar, L. I.; Schiff, S. L.; Koehler, G.

    2009-05-01

    The cumulative effect of multiple agricultural and urban impacts on river ecology is examined using two Canadian prairie rivers with various upstream nutrient loadings and metabolic histories. While diel changes in O2 concentrations have traditionally been used to estimate biological rates, this approach suffers from a lack of information on re-aeration rates. By combining diel variation in O2 with δ18O-- O2 both metabolic and gas exchange rates can be better quantified than by O2 alone. Diel changes in O2 are driven by photosynthetic O2 production, respiratory O2 consumption, and gas exchange with the atmosphere. Each process imposes different δ18O--O2 values on the aquatic ecosystem. During photosynthesis, the photochemical oxidation of H2O produces O2 with the same δ18O value as the original H2O. This is typically <0 ‰ vs SMOW. Respiratory consumption of O2 is isotopically fractionating and the remaining δ18O-- O2 values increase as O2 is consumed. Gas exchange with the atmosphere causes the dissolved O2 pool to become progressively closer to the δ18O--O2 of the atmosphere, +23.5 ‰. Since photosynthetically produced O2 is isotopically distinct from O2 in the atmosphere, this leads to large diel changes in δ18O--O2 values. The net result is that by combining diel O2 and δ18O--O2 curves, rates of photosynthesis, respiration, and gas exchange can be determined without making the common assumptions required my night-time regression or O2-sag methods. The impact of nutrients on sewage treatment plant outfalls on the Bow River at Calgary and South Saskatchewan River at Saskatoon was assessed by 50 km longitudinal transects on both rivers in four seasons. The new dynamic PoRGy (photosynthesis--respiration--gas exchange) model was used to examine how metabolic and gas exchange rates are changed by nutrient impacts. Briefly, photosynthesis and respiration rates increased in some seasons downstream of the sewage treatment plants but the longitudinal pattern was

  4. Dissolved oxygen analysis, TMDL model comparison, and particulate matter shunting—Preliminary results from three model scenarios for the Klamath River upstream of Keno Dam, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, Annett B.; Rounds, Stewart A.; Deas, Michael L.; Sogutlugil, I. Ertugrul

    2012-01-01

    Efforts are underway to identify actions that would improve water quality in the Link River to Keno Dam reach of the Upper Klamath River in south-central Oregon. To provide further insight into water-quality improvement options, three scenarios were developed, run, and analyzed using previously calibrated CE-QUAL-W2 hydrodynamic and water-quality models. Additional scenarios are under development as part of this ongoing study. Most of these scenarios evaluate changes relative to a "current conditions" model, but in some cases a "natural conditions" model was used that simulated the reach without the effect of point and nonpoint sources and set Upper Klamath Lake at its Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) targets. These scenarios were simulated using a model developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Watercourse Engineering, Inc. for the years 2006–09, referred to here as the "USGS model." Another model of the reach was developed by Tetra Tech, Inc. for years 2000 and 2002 to support the Klamath River TMDL process; that model is referred to here as the "TMDL model." The three scenarios described in this report included (1) an analysis of whether this reach of the Upper Klamath River would be in compliance with dissolved oxygen standards if sources met TMDL allocations, (2) an application of more recent datasets to the TMDL model with comparison to results from the USGS model, and (3) an examination of the effect on dissolved oxygen in the Klamath River if particulate material were stopped from entering Klamath Project diversion canals. Updates and modifications to the USGS model are in progress, so in the future these scenarios will be reanalyzed with the updated model and the interim results presented here will be superseded. Significant findings from this phase of the investigation include: * The TMDL analysis used depth-averaged dissolved oxygen concentrations from model output for comparison with dissolved oxygen standards. The Oregon dissolved oxygen

  5. Investigation of the Alkaline Electrochemical Interface and Development of Composite Metal/Metal-Oxides for Hydrogen and Oxygen Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Michael

    Understanding the fundamentals of electrochemical interfaces will undoubtedly reveal a path forward towards a society based on clean and renewable energy. In particular, it has been proposed that hydrogen can play a major role as an energy carrier of the future. To fully utilize the clean energy potential of a hydrogen economy, it is vital to produce hydrogen via water electrolysis, thus avoiding co-production of CO2 inherent to reformate hydrogen. While significant research efforts elsewhere are focused on photo-chemical hydrogen production from water, the inherent low efficiency of this method would require a massive land-use footprint to achieve sufficient hydrogen production rates to integrate hydrogen into energy markets. Thus, this research has primarily focused on the water splitting reactions on base-metal catalysts in the alkaline environment. Development of high-performance base-metal catalysts will help move alkaline water electrolysis to the forefront of hydrogen production methods, and when paired with solar and wind energy production, represents a clean and renewable energy economy. In addition to the water electrolysis reactions, research was conducted to understand the de-activation of reversible hydrogen electrodes in the corrosive environment of the hydrogen-bromine redox flow battery. Redox flow batteries represent a promising energy storage option to overcome the intermittency challenge of wind and solar energy production methods. Optimization of modular and scalable energy storage technology will allow higher penetration of renewable wind and solar energy into the grid. In Chapter 1, an overview of renewable energy production methods and energy storage options is presented. In addition, the fundamentals of electrochemical analysis and physical characterization of the catalysts are discussed. Chapter 2 reports the development of a Ni-Cr/C electrocatalyst with unprecedented mass-activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in alkaline

  6. Assessment of suspended-sediment transport, bedload, and dissolved oxygen during a short-term drawdown of Fall Creek Lake, Oregon, winter 2012-13

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schenk, Liam N.; Bragg, Heather M.

    2014-01-01

    The drawdown of Fall Creek Lake resulted in the net transport of approximately 50,300 tons of sediment from the lake during a 6-day drawdown operation, based on computed daily values of suspended-sediment load downstream of Fall Creek Dam and the two main tributaries to Fall Creek Lake. A suspended-sediment budget calculated for 72 days of the study period indicates that as a result of drawdown operations, there was approximately 16,300 tons of sediment deposition within the reaches of Fall Creek and the Middle Fork Willamette River between Fall Creek Dam and the streamgage on the Middle Fork Willamette River at Jasper, Oregon. Bedload samples collected at the station downstream of Fall Creek Dam during the drawdown were primarily composed of medium to fine sands and accounted for an average of 11 percent of the total instantaneous sediment load (also termed sediment discharge) during sample collection. Monitoring of dissolved oxygen at the station downstream of Fall Creek Dam showed an initial decrease in dissolved oxygen concurrent with the sediment release over the span of 5 hours, though the extent of dissolved oxygen depletion is unknown because of extreme and rapid fouling of the probe by the large amount of sediment in transport. Dissolved oxygen returned to background levels downstream of Fall Creek Dam on December 18, 2012, approximately 1 day after the end of the drawdown operation.

  7. Titanium Dioxide-Grafted Copper Complexes: High-Performance Electrocatalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction in Alkaline Media.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei-Fei; Wei, Ping-Jie; Yu, Guo-Qiang; Liu, Jin-Gang

    2016-01-01

    The sluggish kinetics of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at the cathodes of fuel cells significantly hampers fuel cell performance. Therefore, the development of high-performance, non-precious-metal catalysts as alternatives to noble metal Pt-based ORR electrocatalysts is highly desirable for the large-scale commercialization of fuel cells. TiO2 -grafted copper complexes deposited on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) form stable and efficient electrocatalysts for the ORR. The optimized catalyst composite CNTs@TiO2 -ZA-[Cu(phen${{^{{\\rm NO}{_{2}}}}}$)(BTC)] shows surprisingly high selectivity for the 4 e(-) reduction of O2 to water (approximately 97 %) in alkaline solution with an onset potential of 0.988 V vs. RHE, and demonstrates superior stability and excellent tolerance for the methanol crossover effect in comparison to a commercial Pt/C catalyst. The copper complexes were grafted onto the surface of TiO2 through coordination of an imidazole-containing ligand, zoledronic acid (ZA), which binds to TiO2 through its bis-phosphoric acid anchoring group. Rational optimization of the copper catalyst's ORR performance was achieved by using an electron-deficient ligand, 5-nitro-1,10-phenanthroline (phen${{^{{\\rm NO}{_{2}}}}}$), and bridging benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylate (BTC). This facile approach to the assembly of copper catalysts on TiO2 with rationally tuned ORR activity will have significant implications for the development of high-performance, non-precious-metal ORR catalysts. PMID:26602327

  8. Relation Between Flow and Dissolved Oxygen in the Roanoke River Between Roanoke Rapids and Jamesville, North Carolina, 1998-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wehmeyer, Loren L.; Bales, Jerad D.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the relation between dam release characteristics and downstream water quality in the lower Roanoke River, North Carolina, is important for natural-resource management and ecosystem protection. Data from four raingages, four water-quality monitoring sites, and one streamflow-measurement site were used to identify statistical relations and discernible quantitative or qualitative patterns linking Roanoke River instream dissolved-oxygen (DO) levels to releases at Roanoke Rapids Dam for the period 1998-2005. The time-series DO data, complicated by the occurrence of major hurricanes in the short period of hourly DO data collection at the dam, present a mixed picture of the effects of hydropower peaking (a technique used by hydropower dam operators to produce electricity when consumption is high by passing a large volume of water through the dam turbines, which dramatically increases the volume of flow below the dam) on downstream DO. Other than in 2003 when dissolved-oxygen concentrations in the Roanoke River were likely affected by runoff from Hurricane Isabel rains, there were not consistent, statistically significant differences detected in the annual medians of hourly and(or) daily DO values during peaking versus nonpeaking periods. Along the Roanoke River, downstream of Roanoke Rapids Dam at Oak City, North Carolina, using a 95-percent confidence interval, the median value of the May-November daily mean DO concentrations for each year was lower during peaking periods for 2 years, higher for 2 years, and not significantly different for 4 years. Downstream at Jamesville, North Carolina, also using a 95-percent confidence interval, the median value of the annual May-November daily mean DO concentrations during hydropower peaking was lower for 4 years, higher for 2 years, and not significantly different for 2 years. In summary, the effect of hydropower peaking on downstream DO was inconsistent. Conversely, large precipitation events downstream from the dam

  9. Effect of the spatiotemporal variability of rainfall inputs in water quality integrated catchment modelling for dissolved oxygen concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno Ródenas, Antonio Manuel; Cecinati, Francesca; ten Veldhuis, Marie-Claire; Langeveld, Jeroen; Clemens, Francois

    2016-04-01

    Maintaining water quality standards in highly urbanised hydrological catchments is a worldwide challenge. Water management authorities struggle to cope with changing climate and an increase in pollution pressures. Water quality modelling has been used as a decision support tool for investment and regulatory developments. This approach led to the development of integrated catchment models (ICM), which account for the link between the urban/rural hydrology and the in-river pollutant dynamics. In the modelled system, rainfall triggers the drainage systems of urban areas scattered along a river. When flow exceeds the sewer infrastructure capacity, untreated wastewater enters the natural system by combined sewer overflows. This results in a degradation of the river water quality, depending on the magnitude of the emission and river conditions. Thus, being capable of representing these dynamics in the modelling process is key for a correct assessment of the water quality. In many urbanised hydrological systems the distances between draining sewer infrastructures go beyond the de-correlation length of rainfall processes, especially, for convective summer storms. Hence, spatial and temporal scales of selected rainfall inputs are expected to affect water quality dynamics. The objective of this work is to evaluate how the use of rainfall data from different sources and with different space-time characteristics affects modelled output concentrations of dissolved oxygen in a simplified ICM. The study area is located at the Dommel, a relatively small and sensitive river flowing through the city of Eindhoven (The Netherlands). This river stretch receives the discharge of the 750,000 p.e. WWTP of Eindhoven and from over 200 combined sewer overflows scattered along its length. A pseudo-distributed water quality model has been developed in WEST (mikedhi.com); this is a lumped-physically based model that accounts for urban drainage processes, WWTP and river dynamics for several

  10. Response of phytoplankton and dissolved oxygen and related marine ecological parameters to typhoon tropical cyclone in the oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, DanLing

    Typhoons (tropical cyclones, or hurricanes) are strong wind events in the weather system, which influence the upper ocean dynamics and the ecosystem, in particular upwelling, water temperature, salinity, chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) concentration and primary production and fish abundances. But little is known about the response of dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration to a typhoon in the open ocean. This paper investigates the impact of a typhoon on DO concentration and related ecological parameters using in-situ and remote sensing data. The in-situ data were collected one week after the passage of the super-typhoon Nanmadol in the northern South China Sea in 2011. An increase in DO concentration, accompanied by a decrease in water temperature and an increase in salinity and Chl-a concentration, was measured at sampling stations close to the typhoon track. At these stations, maximum DO concentration was found at a depth of around 5 m and maximum Chl-a concentration at depths between 50 m and 75 m. The layer of high DO concentration extends from the surface to a depth of 35 m and the concentrations stay almost constant down to this depth. Due to the passage of the typhoon, also a large sea level anomaly (21.6 cm) and a high value of Ekman pumping velocity (4.0×10-4 m s-1) are observed, indicating upwelling phenomenon. At the same time, also intrusion of Kuroshio waters in the form of a loop current into the South China Sea (SCS) was observed. We attribute the increase of DO concentration after the passage of the typhoon to three effects:1) entrainment of oxygen from the air into the upper water layer and strong vertical mixing of the water body due to the typhoon winds, 2) upwelling of cold nutrient-rich water which stimulates photosynthesis of phytoplankton and thus the generation of oxygen, which also increases the DO concentration due to cold water since the solubility of oxygen increase with decreasing water temperature, and, possibly, 3) transport of DO enriched waters

  11. Response of dissolved oxygen and related marine ecological parameters to a tropical cyclone in the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jingrou; Tang, Danling; Alpers, Werner; Wang, Sufen

    2014-04-01

    It is well known that tropical cyclones can cause upwelling, decrease of sea surface temperature, increase of chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) concentration and enhancement of primary production. But little is known about the response of dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration to a typhoon in the open ocean. This paper investigates the impact of a typhoon on DO concentration and related ecological parameters using in situ and remote sensing data. The in situ data were collected 1 week after the passage of the super-typhoon Nanmadol in the northern South China Sea in 2011. An increase in DO concentration, accompanied by a decrease in water temperature and an increase in salinity and Chl-a concentration, was measured at sampling stations close to the typhoon track. At these stations, maximum DO concentration was found at a depth of around 5 m and maximum Chl-a concentration at depths between 50 and 75 m. The layer of high DO concentration extends from the surface to a depth of 35 m and the concentrations stay almost constant down to this depth. Due to the passage of the typhoon, also a large sea level anomaly (21.6 cm) and a high value of Ekman pumping velocity (4.0 × 10-4 m s-1) are observed, indicating upwelling phenomenon. At the same time, also intrusion of Kuroshio waters in the form of a loop current into the South China Sea (SCS) was observed. We attribute the increase of DO concentration after the passage of the typhoon to three effects: (1) entrainment of oxygen from the air into the upper water layer and strong vertical mixing of the water body due to the typhoon winds, (2) upwelling of cold nutrient-rich water which stimulates photosynthesis of phytoplankton and thus the generation of oxygen, which also increases the DO concentration due to cold water since the solubility of oxygen increase with decreasing water temperature, and, possibly, (3) transport of DO enriched waters from the Western Pacific to the SCS via the intrusion of Kuroshio waters.

  12. Impact of variability in coastal fog on photosynthesis and dissolved oxygen levels in shallow water habitats: Salmon Creek estuary case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Largier, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    Coastal fog reduces available light levels that in turn reduce rates of photosynthesis and oxygen production. This effect can be seen in perturbations of the day-night production-respiration cycle that leads to increase and decrease in dissolved oxygen in shallow-water habitats. In well stratified coastal lagoons, a lower layer may be isolated from the atmosphere so that small changes in photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) are evident in perturbations of the typical day-night cycle of oxygen concentration. This effect is observed in the summertime, mouth-closed Salmon Creek Estuary, located in Sonoma County (California). Sub-diurnal fluctuations in dissolved oxygen in Salmon Creek Estuary correlate with deviations from the clear-sky diurnal cycle in PAR. Similar effects are observed in other estuaries and the process by which fog controls photosynthesis can be expected to occur throughout coastal California, although the effect may not be easily observable in data collected from open waters where mixing and bloom dynamics are likely to dominate temporal variability in biogenic properties like dissolved oxygen.

  13. Limiting factors to encapsulation: the combined effects of dissolved protein and oxygen availability on embryonic growth and survival of species with contrasting feeding strategies.

    PubMed

    Brante, Antonio; Fernández, Miriam; Viard, Frédérique

    2009-07-01

    Encapsulation is a common strategy among marine invertebrate species. It has been shown that oxygen and food availability independently constrain embryo development during intracapsular development. However, it is unclear how embryos of species with different feeding strategies perceive these two constraints when operating jointly. In the present study, we examined the relative importance of dissolved albumen, as a food source, oxygen condition and their interaction on embryonic growth and the survival of two calyptraeid species, Crepidula coquimbensis and Crepidula fornicata, exhibiting different embryo feeding behaviours (i.e. presence vs absence of intracapsular cannibalism). Two oxygen condition treatments (normoxia and hypoxia) and three albumen concentrations (0, 1 and 2 mg l(-1)) were studied. In addition, albumen intake by embryos was observed using fluorescence microscopy. Our study shows that embryos of both species incorporated dissolved albumen but used a different set of embryonic organs. We observed that embryo growth rates in C. coquimbensis were negatively affected only by hypoxic conditions. Conversely, a combination of low albumen concentration and oxygen availability slowed embryo growth in C. fornicata. These findings suggest that oxygen availability is a limiting factor for the normal embryo development of encapsulated gastropod species, regardless of feeding behaviour or developmental mode. By contrast, the effect of dissolved albumen as an alternative food source on embryo performance may depend on the feeding strategy of the embryos.

  14. A one-dimensional, steady-state, dissolved-oxygen model and waste-load assimilation study for Little Laughery Creek, Ripley and Franklin counties, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crawford, Charles G.; Wilber, William G.; Peters, James G.

    1980-01-01

    A digital model calibrated to conditions in Little Laughery Creek triutary and Little Laughery Creek, Ripley and Franklin Counties, Ind., was used to predict alternatives for future waste loadings that would be compatible with Indiana stream water-quality standards defined for two critical hydrologic conditions, summer and winter low flows. Natural streamflow during the summer and annual 7-day, 10-year low flow is zero. Headwater flow upstream from the wastewater-treatment facilities consists solely of process cooling water from an industrial discharger. This flow is usually less than 0.5 cubic foot per second. Consequently, benefits from dilution are minimal. As a result, current and projected ammonia-nitrogen concentrations from the municipal discharges will result in in-stream ammonia-nitrogen concentrations that exceed the Indiana ammonia-nitrogen toxicity standards (maximum stream ammonia-nitrogen concentrations of 2.5 and 4.0 milligrams per liter during summer and winter low flows, respectively). Benthic-oxygen demand is probably the most significant factor affecting Little Laughery Creek and is probably responsible for the in-stream dissolved-oxygen concentration being less than the Indiana stream dissolved-oxygen standard (5.0 milligrams per liter) during two water-quality surveys. After municipal dischargers complete advanced waste-treatment facilities, benthic-oxygen demand should be less significant in the stream dissolved-oxygen dynamics. (USGS)

  15. Response coefficient analysis of a fed-batch bioreactor to dissolved oxygen perturbation in complementary cultures during PHB production

    PubMed Central

    Patnaik, Pratap R

    2008-01-01

    Background Although the production of poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) has many biological, energetic and environmental advantages over chemically synthesized polymers, synthetic polymers continue to be produced industrially since the productivities of fermentation processes fr PHB are not yet economically competitive. Improvement of a PHB fermentation requires good understanding and optimization under the realistic conditions of large bioreactors. Laboratory-scale studies have shown that co-cultures of Ralstonia eutropha and Lactobacillus delbrueckii generate better fermentation efficiencies than R. eutropha alone. In large bioreactors, incomplete dispersioin and perturbations in the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration, both of which affect the fermentation, have to be considered. This study analyzes the effect of DO fluctuations on bioreactor performance for both ideal and optimally dispersed broths. Results Response coefficient analysis was employed to obtain quantitative information on the effect of DO perturbations on different variables. Three values of the Peclet number (Pe) cheracterized three levels of dispersion: Pe = 0.01 for nearly complete dispersion, Pe = 20 for optimum dispersion and Pe = 60 for insufficient dispersion. The response coefficients (RCs) of the pairs of bacterial concentrations and the main substrates, glucose and ammonium chloride, showed contrasting variations with time. Lactate, a critical intermediate, and PHB had similar RC profiles but those of lactate were one to two orders of magnitude larger than other RCs. Significantly, the optimum Pe also resulted in the largest RCs, suggesting a balance between productivity and reactor stability. Conclusion Since R. eutropha requires oxygen for its growth whereas L. delbrueckii does not, fluctuations in the DO concentartion have a strong influence on the fermentation. Apart from this, the mechanism of PHB biosynthesis indicates that control of lactate is a critical determinant of fermentation

  16. Kinetic studies of lipid oxidation induced by hemoglobin measured by consumption of dissolved oxygen in a liposome model system.

    PubMed

    Carvajal, Ana Karina; Rustad, Turid; Mozuraityte, Revilija; Storrø, Ivar

    2009-09-01

    The effect of hemoglobin (Hb) and lipid concentration, pH, temperature, and different antioxidants on heme-mediated lipid oxidation of liposomes from marine phospholipids was studied. The rate of lipid oxidation was measured by consumption of dissolved oxygen. Heme-mediated lipid oxidation at different Hb and lipid concentrations was modeled by Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The maximum rate (V(max)) for the reaction with cod and bovine Hb as a pro-oxidant was 66.2 +/- 3.4 and 56.6 +/- 3.4 microM/min, respectively. The Michaelis-Menten constant (K(m)) for the reaction with cod and bovine Hb was 0.67 +/- 0.09 and 1.2 +/- 0.2 microM, respectively. V(max) for the relationship between the oxygen uptake rate and lipid concentration was 43.2 +/- 1.5 microM/min, while the K(m) was 0.93 +/- 0.14 mg/mL. The effect of the temperature followed Arrhenius kinetics, and there was no significant difference in activation energy between cod and bovine Hb. The rate of lipid oxidation induced by bovine Hb was highest around pH 6. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) had no significant effect on heme-mediated lipid oxidation, but alpha-tocopherol and astaxanthin worked well as antioxidants. Kinetic differences were found between iron and Hb as pro-oxidants, and the efficacy of the antioxidants depended upon the pro-oxidant in the system. PMID:19691337

  17. Heterogeneous conditions in dissolved oxygen affect N-glycosylation but not productivity of a monoclonal antibody in hybridoma cultures.

    PubMed

    Serrato, J Antonio; Palomares, Laura A; Meneses-Acosta, Angélica; Ramírez, Octavio T

    2004-10-20

    It is known that heterogeneous conditions exist in large-scale animal cell cultures. However, little is known about how heterogeneities affect cells, productivities, and product quality. To study the effect of non-constant dissolved oxygen tension (DOT), hybridomas were subjected to sinusoidal DOT oscillations in a one-compartment scale-down simulator. Oscillations were forced by manipulating the inlet oxygen partial pressure through a feedback control algorithm in a 220-mL bioreactor maintained at a constant agitation. Such temporal DOT oscillations simulate spatial DOT gradients that can occur in large scales. Different oscillation periods, in the range of 800 to 12,800 s (axis of 7% (air saturation) and amplitude of 7%), were tested and compared to constant DOT (10%) control cultures. Oscillating DOT decreased maximum cell concentrations, cell growth rates, and viability indexes. Cultures at oscillating DOT had an increased glycolytic metabolism that was evidenced by a decrease in yield of cells on glucose and an increase in lactate yield. DOT gradients, even several orders of magnitude higher than those expected under practical large-scale conditions, did not significantly affect the maximum concentration of an IgG(1) monoclonal antibody (MAb). The glycosylation profile of the MAb produced at a constant DOT of 10% was similar to that reported in the literature. However, MAb produced under oscillating culture conditions had a higher amount of triantennary and sialylated glycans, which can interfere with effector functions of the antibody. It was shown that transient excursions of hybridomas to limiting DOT, as occurs in deficiently mixed large-scale bioreactors, is important to culture performance as the oscillation period, and thus the time cells spent at low DOT, affected cell growth, metabolism, and the glycosylation pattern of MAb. Such results underline the importance of monitoring protein characteristics for the development of large-scale processes.

  18. Impact of oxygen dissolved at bottling and transmitted through closures on the composition and sensory properties of a Sauvignon Blanc wine during bottle storage.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Paulo; Silva, Maria A; Pons, Alexandre; Tominaga, Takatoshi; Lavigne, Valérie; Saucier, Cédric; Darriet, Philippe; Teissedre, Pierre-Louis; Dubourdieu, Denis

    2009-11-11

    This work outlines the results from an investigation to determine the effect of the oxygen dissolved at bottling and the specific oxygen barrier properties of commercially available closures on the composition, color and sensory properties of a Bordeaux Sauvignon Blanc wine during two years of storage. The importance of oxygen for wine development after bottling was also assessed using an airtight bottle ampule. Wines were assessed for the antioxidants (SO(2) and ascorbic acid), varietal thiols (4-mercapto-4-methylpentan-2-one, 3-mercaptohexan-1-ol), hydrogen sulfide and sotolon content, and color throughout 24 months of storage. In addition, the aroma and palate properties of wines were also assessed. The combination of oxygen dissolved at bottling and the oxygen transferred through closures has a significant effect on Sauvignon Blanc development after bottling. Wines highly exposed to oxygen at bottling and those sealed with a synthetic, Nomacorc classic closure, highly permeable to oxygen, were relatively oxidized in aroma, brown in color, and low in antioxidants and volatile compounds compared to wines sealed with other closures. Conversely, wines sealed under more airtight conditions, bottle ampule and screw cap Saran-tin, have the slowest rate of browning, and displayed the greatest contents of antioxidants and varietal thiols, but also high levels of H(2)S, which were responsible for the reduced dominating character found in these wines, while wines sealed with cork stoppers and screw cap Saranex presented negligible reduced and oxidized characters.

  19. Modeling hourly dissolved oxygen concentration (DO) using two different adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS): a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Heddam, Salim

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a comparison of two adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS)-based neuro-fuzzy models applied for modeling dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration. The two models are developed using experimental data collected from the bottom (USGS station no: 420615121533601) and top (USGS station no: 420615121533600) stations at Klamath River at site KRS12a nr Rock Quarry, Oregon, USA. The input variables used for the ANFIS models are water pH, temperature, specific conductance, and sensor depth. Two ANFIS-based neuro-fuzzy systems are presented. The two neuro-fuzzy systems are: (1) grid partition-based fuzzy inference system, named ANFIS_GRID, and (2) subtractive-clustering-based fuzzy inference system, named ANFIS_SUB. In both models, 60 % of the data set was randomly assigned to the training set, 20 % to the validation set, and 20 % to the test set. The ANFIS results are compared with multiple linear regression models. The system proposed in this paper shows a novelty approach with regard to the usage of ANFIS models for DO concentration modeling.

  20. Long-term in situ oxidation of biogenic uraninite in an alluvial aquifer: impact of dissolved oxygen and calcium.

    PubMed

    Lezama-Pacheco, Juan S; Cerrato, José M; Veeramani, Harish; Alessi, Daniel S; Suvorova, Elena; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan; Giammar, Daniel E; Long, Philip E; Williams, Kenneth H; Bargar, John R

    2015-06-16

    Oxidative dissolution controls uranium release to (sub)oxic pore waters from biogenic uraninite produced by natural or engineered processes, such as bioremediation. Laboratory studies show that uraninite dissolution is profoundly influenced by dissolved oxygen (DO), carbonate, and solutes such as Ca(2+). In complex and heterogeneous subsurface environments, the concentrations of these solutes vary in time and space. Knowledge of dissolution processes and kinetics occurring over the long-term under such conditions is needed to predict subsurface uranium behavior and optimize the selection and performance of uraninite-based remediation technologies over multiyear periods. We have assessed dissolution of biogenic uraninite deployed in wells at the Rifle, CO, DOE research site over a 22 month period. Uraninite loss rates were highly sensitive to DO, with near-complete loss at >0.6 mg/L over this period but no measurable loss at lower DO. We conclude that uraninite can be stable over decadal time scales in aquifers under low DO conditions. U(VI) solid products were absent over a wide range of DO values, suggesting that dissolution proceeded through complexation and removal of oxidized surface uranium atoms by carbonate. Moreover, under the groundwater conditions present, Ca(2+) binds strongly to uraninite surfaces at structural uranium sites, impacting uranium fate. PMID:26001126

  1. Analysis and numerical simulation of natural and human-caused low dissolved oxygen in the Minjiang River Estuary.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Pang, Yong; Shi, Chengchun; Wang, Yishu; Xu, Lei; Pan, Hongche; Xie, Rongrong

    2016-01-01

    The Minjiang River, a typical tidal channel in Southeast China, plays an important role in the supply of drinking water, flood control and drought relief, farming and navigation, as well as shipping and other functions. Dissolved oxygen (DO), as a basic living condition for aquatic biota, has been deteriorating in the Minjiang River in recent years. In order to understand how the spatial distribution of DO responds to river discharge, nutrient loading and water temperature, a three-dimensional Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code model was used to simulate water age and the distribution of DO in the Minjiang River. The model presented in this paper was used for water resource and water quality simulations under various physical, chemical, and biological scenarios. Sensitivity simulation results indicated that the three factors had a significant impact on the spatial distribution variation of DO in the Minjiang River. Increased river discharge or split ratio of the North Channel resulted in decreased water age and increased DO. Increased nutrient loading and water temperature caused lower DO. In order to protect coastal environments in the Minjiang River, river discharge should be increased and pollutants of local cities should be reduced during the high temperature and drought period.

  2. A simple and rapid method for monitoring dissolved oxygen in water with a submersible microbial fuel cell (SBMFC).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2012-01-01

    A submersible microbial fuel cell (SBMFC) was developed as a biosensor for in situ and real time monitoring of dissolved oxygen (DO) in environmental waters. Domestic wastewater was utilized as a sole fuel for powering the sensor. The sensor performance was firstly examined with tap water at varying DO levels. With an external resistance of 1000Ω, the current density produced by the sensor (5.6 ± 0.5-462.2 ± 0.5 mA/m(2)) increased linearly with DO level up to 8.8 ± 0.3mg/L (regression coefficient, R(2)=0.9912), while the maximum response time for each measurement was less than 4 min. The current density showed different response to DO levels when different external resistances were applied, but a linear relationship was always observed. Investigation of the sensor performance at different substrate concentrations indicates that the organic matter contained in the domestic wastewater was sufficient to power the sensing activities. The sensor ability was further explored under different environmental conditions (e.g. pH, temperature, conductivity, and alternative electron acceptor), and the results indicated that a calibration would be required before field application. Lastly, the sensor was tested with different environmental waters and the results showed no significant difference (p>0.05) with that measured by DO meter. The simple, compact SBMFC sensor showed promising potential for direct, inexpensive and rapid DO monitoring in various environmental waters.

  3. Removal of chemical oxygen demand and dissolved nutrients by a sunken lawn infiltration system during intermittent storm events.

    PubMed

    Hou, Lizhu; Yang, Huan; Li, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Urban surface water runoff typically contains high but varying amounts of organic matter and nutrients that require removal before reuse. Infiltration systems such as sunken lawns can improve water quality. However, there is currently insufficient information describing the treatment efficiency of lawn-based infiltration systems. In this study, novel sunken lawn infiltration systems (SLISs) were designed and their pollutant removal effectiveness was assessed. The results revealed that SLISs with Poa pratensis and Lolium perenne effectively removed most chemical oxygen demand (CODCr) and dissolved nutrients. Average CODCr, total nitrogen (TN), ammonium-nitrogen (NH4(+)-N) and total phosphorus (TP) concentrations were reduced by 78.93, 66.64, 71.86 and 75.83%, respectively, and the corresponding effluent concentrations met the standard for urban miscellaneous water consumption in China. The NH4(+)-N in the synthetic runoff was shown to be removed by adsorption during the stormwater dosing and nitrification during subsequent dry days, as well as through uptake by plants. Phosphorus was mainly removed by adsorption and chemical precipitation. The NH4(+)-N and phosphorus Langmuir isotherm model fitted the clay loam soil adsorption process better than the Freundlich model. Overall, these results indicate that an SLIS provides an alternative means of removing runoff pollutants owing to its efficiency, easy operation and maintenance. PMID:24473312

  4. Modeling hourly dissolved oxygen concentration (DO) using two different adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS): a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Heddam, Salim

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a comparison of two adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS)-based neuro-fuzzy models applied for modeling dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration. The two models are developed using experimental data collected from the bottom (USGS station no: 420615121533601) and top (USGS station no: 420615121533600) stations at Klamath River at site KRS12a nr Rock Quarry, Oregon, USA. The input variables used for the ANFIS models are water pH, temperature, specific conductance, and sensor depth. Two ANFIS-based neuro-fuzzy systems are presented. The two neuro-fuzzy systems are: (1) grid partition-based fuzzy inference system, named ANFIS_GRID, and (2) subtractive-clustering-based fuzzy inference system, named ANFIS_SUB. In both models, 60 % of the data set was randomly assigned to the training set, 20 % to the validation set, and 20 % to the test set. The ANFIS results are compared with multiple linear regression models. The system proposed in this paper shows a novelty approach with regard to the usage of ANFIS models for DO concentration modeling. PMID:24057665

  5. [Effect of the change in sulphate and dissolved oxygen mass concentration on metal release in old cast iron distribution pipes].

    PubMed

    Wu, Yong-li; Shi, Bao-you; Sun, Hui-fang; Zhang, Zhi-huan; Gu, Jun-nong; Wang, Dong-sheng

    2013-09-01

    To understand the processes of corrosion by-product release and the consequent "red water" problems caused by the variation of water chemical composition in drinking water distribution system, the effect of sulphate and dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration on total iron release in corroded old iron pipe sections historically transporting groundwater was investigated in laboratory using small-scale pipe section reactors. The release behaviors of some low-level metals, such as Mn, As, Cr, Cu, Zn and Ni, in the process of iron release were also monitored. The results showed that the total iron and Mn release increased significantly with the increase of sulphate concentration, and apparent red water occurred when sulphate concentration was above 400 mg x L(-1). With the increase of sulfate concentration, the effluent concentrations of As, Cr, Cu, Zn and Ni also increased obviously, however, the effluent concentrations of these metals were lower than the influent concentrations under most circumstances, which indicated that adsorption of these metals by pipe corrosion scales occurred. Increasing DO within a certain range could significantly inhibit the iron release.

  6. Novel probes for pH and dissolved oxygen measurements in cultivations from millilitre to benchtop scale.

    PubMed

    Demuth, Caspar; Varonier, Joel; Jossen, Valentin; Eibl, Regine; Eibl, Dieter

    2016-05-01

    pH value and the concentration of dissolved oxygen (DO) are key parameters to monitor and control cell growth in cultivation studies. Reliable, robust and accurate methods to measure these parameters in cultivation systems in real time guarantee high product yield and quality. This mini-review summarises the current state of the art of pH and DO sensors that are applied to bioprocesses from millilitre to benchtop scale by means of a short introduction on measuring principles and selected applications. Special emphasis is placed on single-use bioreactors, which have been increasingly employed in bioprocess development and production in recent years. Working principles, applications and the particular requirements of sensors in these cultivation systems are given. In such processes, optical sensors for pH and DO are often preferred to electrochemical probes, as they allow semi-invasive measurements and can be miniaturised to micrometre scale or lower. In addition, selected measuring principles of novel sensing technologies for pH and DO are discussed. These include solid-state sensors and miniaturised devices that are not yet commercially available, but show promising characteristics for possible use in bioprocesses in the near future.

  7. Analysis and numerical simulation of natural and human-caused low dissolved oxygen in the Minjiang River Estuary.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Pang, Yong; Shi, Chengchun; Wang, Yishu; Xu, Lei; Pan, Hongche; Xie, Rongrong

    2016-01-01

    The Minjiang River, a typical tidal channel in Southeast China, plays an important role in the supply of drinking water, flood control and drought relief, farming and navigation, as well as shipping and other functions. Dissolved oxygen (DO), as a basic living condition for aquatic biota, has been deteriorating in the Minjiang River in recent years. In order to understand how the spatial distribution of DO responds to river discharge, nutrient loading and water temperature, a three-dimensional Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code model was used to simulate water age and the distribution of DO in the Minjiang River. The model presented in this paper was used for water resource and water quality simulations under various physical, chemical, and biological scenarios. Sensitivity simulation results indicated that the three factors had a significant impact on the spatial distribution variation of DO in the Minjiang River. Increased river discharge or split ratio of the North Channel resulted in decreased water age and increased DO. Increased nutrient loading and water temperature caused lower DO. In order to protect coastal environments in the Minjiang River, river discharge should be increased and pollutants of local cities should be reduced during the high temperature and drought period. PMID:27191570

  8. A simple and rapid method for monitoring dissolved oxygen in water with a submersible microbial fuel cell (SBMFC).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2012-01-01

    A submersible microbial fuel cell (SBMFC) was developed as a biosensor for in situ and real time monitoring of dissolved oxygen (DO) in environmental waters. Domestic wastewater was utilized as a sole fuel for powering the sensor. The sensor performance was firstly examined with tap water at varying DO levels. With an external resistance of 1000Ω, the current density produced by the sensor (5.6 ± 0.5-462.2 ± 0.5 mA/m(2)) increased linearly with DO level up to 8.8 ± 0.3mg/L (regression coefficient, R(2)=0.9912), while the maximum response time for each measurement was less than 4 min. The current density showed different response to DO levels when different external resistances were applied, but a linear relationship was always observed. Investigation of the sensor performance at different substrate concentrations indicates that the organic matter contained in the domestic wastewater was sufficient to power the sensing activities. The sensor ability was further explored under different environmental conditions (e.g. pH, temperature, conductivity, and alternative electron acceptor), and the results indicated that a calibration would be required before field application. Lastly, the sensor was tested with different environmental waters and the results showed no significant difference (p>0.05) with that measured by DO meter. The simple, compact SBMFC sensor showed promising potential for direct, inexpensive and rapid DO monitoring in various environmental waters. PMID:22726635

  9. Aqueous stability of leuprolide acetate: effect of temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH and complexation with β-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Mehdi; Mobedi, Hamid; Behnamghader, Aliasghar

    2016-01-01

    In the present research, the aqueous stability of leuprolide acetate (LA) in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) medium was studied (pH = 2.0-7.4). For this purpose, the effect of temperature, dissolved oxygen and pH on the stability of LA during 35 days was investigated. Results showed that the aqueous stability of LA was higher at low temperatures. Degassing of the PBS medium partially increased the stability of LA at 4 °C, while did not change at 37 °C. The degradation of LA was accelerated at lower pH values. In addition, complexes of LA with different portions of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) were prepared through freeze-drying procedure and characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analyses. Studying their aqueous stability at various pH values (2.0-7.4) showed LA/β-CD complexes exhibited higher stability when compared with LA at all pH values. The stability of complexes was also improved by increasing the portion of LA/β-CD up to 1/10.

  10. Dissolved oxygen in the rehabilitation phase of an estuary: influence of sewage pollution abatement and hydro-climatic factors.

    PubMed

    Villate, Fernando; Iriarte, Arantza; Uriarte, Ibon; Intxausti, Lander; de la Sota, Alejandro

    2013-05-15

    Seasonal and inter-annual variations of dissolved oxygen (DO) along the estuary of Bilbao were investigated from 1998 to 2008, during its rehabilitation phase from pollution, to determine whether anthropogenic or natural forcings or both govern DO dynamics and hypoxia. Both seasonal and inter-annual variations of DO were best explained by hydro-climatic factors, sewage pollution and phytoplankton dynamics in the inner, intermediate and outer estuary respectively. The most remarkable intra-decadal improvement in DO occurred in the halocline layer of the intermediate estuary, where the factor that best explained these changes was sewage pollution abatement. However, in the estuarine hotspot for hypoxia, i.e. inner estuary bottom waters, no parallel response to sewage pollution abatement was observed and hydro-climatic factors were the main drivers of inter-annual DO variations. Differences in the degree of stratification and flushing accounted for this differential response of DO to anthropogenic and climate-related forcings at both axial and vertical scales. PMID:23601887

  11. Time-resolved chemiluminescence of firefly luciferin generated by dissolving oxygen in deoxygenated dimethyl sulfoxide containing potassium tert-butoxide

    PubMed Central

    Yanagisawa, Yuki; Hasegawa, Kosuke; Wada, Naohisa; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Sekiya, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Chemiluminescence (CL) of firefly luciferin (Ln) consisting of red and green emission peaks can be generated by dissolving oxygen (O2) gas in deoxygenated dimethyl sulfoxide containing potassium tert-butoxide (t-BuOK) even without the enzyme luciferase. In this study, the characteristics of CL of Ln are examined by varying the concentrations of both Ln ([Ln]) and t-BuOK ([t-BuOK]). The time courses of the green and the red luminescence signals are also measured using a 32-channel photo sensor module. Interestingly, addition of 18-crown-6 ether (18-crown-6), a good clathrate for K+, to the reaction solution before exposure to O2 changes the luminescence from green to red when [t-BuOK] = 20 mM and [18-crown-6] = 80 mM. Based on our experimental results, we propose a two-pathway model where K+ plays an important role in the regulation of Ln CL to explain the two-color luminescence observed from electronically excited oxyluciferin via dioxetanone. PMID:27493856

  12. Long-term in situ oxidation of biogenic uraninite in an alluvial aquifer: impact of dissolved oxygen and calcium.

    PubMed

    Lezama-Pacheco, Juan S; Cerrato, José M; Veeramani, Harish; Alessi, Daniel S; Suvorova, Elena; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan; Giammar, Daniel E; Long, Philip E; Williams, Kenneth H; Bargar, John R

    2015-06-16

    Oxidative dissolution controls uranium release to (sub)oxic pore waters from biogenic uraninite produced by natural or engineered processes, such as bioremediation. Laboratory studies show that uraninite dissolution is profoundly influenced by dissolved oxygen (DO), carbonate, and solutes such as Ca(2+). In complex and heterogeneous subsurface environments, the concentrations of these solutes vary in time and space. Knowledge of dissolution processes and kinetics occurring over the long-term under such conditions is needed to predict subsurface uranium behavior and optimize the selection and performance of uraninite-based remediation technologies over multiyear periods. We have assessed dissolution of biogenic uraninite deployed in wells at the Rifle, CO, DOE research site over a 22 month period. Uraninite loss rates were highly sensitive to DO, with near-complete loss at >0.6 mg/L over this period but no measurable loss at lower DO. We conclude that uraninite can be stable over decadal time scales in aquifers under low DO conditions. U(VI) solid products were absent over a wide range of DO values, suggesting that dissolution proceeded through complexation and removal of oxidized surface uranium atoms by carbonate. Moreover, under the groundwater conditions present, Ca(2+) binds strongly to uraninite surfaces at structural uranium sites, impacting uranium fate.

  13. [Response of reactive oxygen metabolism in melon chloroplasts to short-term salinity-alkalinity stress regulated by exogenous γ-aminobutyric acid].

    PubMed

    Xiang, Li-xia; Hu, Li-pan; Hu, Xiao-hui; Pan, Xiong-bo; Ren, Wen-qi

    2015-12-01

    The regulatory effect of exogenous γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on metabolism of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in melon chloroplasts under short-term salinity-alkalinity stress were investigated in melon variety 'Jinhui No. 1', which was cultured with deep flow hydroponics. The result showed that under salinity-alkalinity stress, the photosynthetic pigment content, MDA content, superoxide anion (O₂·) production rate and hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) content in chloroplast increased significantly, the contents of antioxidants ascorbic acid (AsA) and glutathione (GSH) increased, and the activities of H⁺-ATPase and H⁺-PPiase were inhibited obviously. With exogenous GABA application, the accumulations of O₂·, MDA and H₂O₂ induced by salinity-alkalinity stress were inhibited. Exogenous GABA alleviated the increase of photosynthetic pigment content, improved the activity of SOD, enzymes of AsA-GSH cycle, total AsA and total GSH while decreased the AsA/DHA ratio and GSH/GSSH ratio. Foliar GABA could enhance the H⁺-ATPase and H⁺-PPiase activities. Our results suggested that the exogenous GABA could accelerate the ROS metabolism in chloroplast, promote the recycle of AsA-GSH, and maintain the permeability of cell membrane to improve the ability of melon chloroplast against salinity-alkalinity stress.

  14. [Response of reactive oxygen metabolism in melon chloroplasts to short-term salinity-alkalinity stress regulated by exogenous γ-aminobutyric acid].

    PubMed

    Xiang, Li-xia; Hu, Li-pan; Hu, Xiao-hui; Pan, Xiong-bo; Ren, Wen-qi

    2015-12-01

    The regulatory effect of exogenous γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on metabolism of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in melon chloroplasts under short-term salinity-alkalinity stress were investigated in melon variety 'Jinhui No. 1', which was cultured with deep flow hydroponics. The result showed that under salinity-alkalinity stress, the photosynthetic pigment content, MDA content, superoxide anion (O₂·) production rate and hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) content in chloroplast increased significantly, the contents of antioxidants ascorbic acid (AsA) and glutathione (GSH) increased, and the activities of H⁺-ATPase and H⁺-PPiase were inhibited obviously. With exogenous GABA application, the accumulations of O₂·, MDA and H₂O₂ induced by salinity-alkalinity stress were inhibited. Exogenous GABA alleviated the increase of photosynthetic pigment content, improved the activity of SOD, enzymes of AsA-GSH cycle, total AsA and total GSH while decreased the AsA/DHA ratio and GSH/GSSH ratio. Foliar GABA could enhance the H⁺-ATPase and H⁺-PPiase activities. Our results suggested that the exogenous GABA could accelerate the ROS metabolism in chloroplast, promote the recycle of AsA-GSH, and maintain the permeability of cell membrane to improve the ability of melon chloroplast against salinity-alkalinity stress. PMID:27112014

  15. Bifunctional enhancement of oxygen reduction reaction activity on Ag catalysts due to water activation on LaMnO3 supports in alkaline media.

    PubMed

    Park, Shin-Ae; Lee, Eun-Kyung; Song, Hannah; Kim, Yong-Tae

    2015-08-27

    Ag is considered to be one of the best candidates for oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalysts in alkaline media for application in various electrochemical energy devices. In this study, we demonstrate that water activation is a key factor in enhancing the ORR activity in alkaline media, unlike in acid environments. Ag supported on LaMnO3 having a high oxophilicity showed a markedly higher ORR activity than that on carbon with inert surfaces. Through various electrochemical tests, it was revealed that the origin of the enhanced ORR activity of Ag/LaMnO3 is the bifunctional effect mainly due to the water activation at the interface between Ag and LaMnO3. Furthermore, the ligand effect due to the charge transfer from Mn to Ag leads to the enhancement of both oxygen activation on Ag and water activation on Mn sites, and hence, an improvement in the ORR activity of Ag/LaMnO3. On the other hand, the strain effect based on the fine structure variation in the lattice was negligible. We therefore suggest that the employment of a co-catalyst or support with highly oxophilic nature and the maximization of the interface between catalyst and support should be considered in the design of electrocatalysts for the ORR in alkaline media.

  16. Effect of heme modification on oxygen affinity of myoglobin and equilibrium of the acid-alkaline transition in metmyoglobin.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Tomokazu; Nagao, Satoshi; Fukaya, Masashi; Tai, Hulin; Nagatomo, Shigenori; Morihashi, Kenji; Matsuo, Takashi; Hirota, Shun; Suzuki, Akihiro; Imai, Kiyohiro; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko

    2010-05-01

    Functional regulation of myoglobin (Mb) is thought to be achieved through the heme environment furnished by nearby amino acid residues, and subtle tuning of the intrinsic heme Fe reactivity. We have performed substitution of strongly electron-withdrawing perfluoromethyl (CF(3)) group(s) as heme side chain(s) of Mb to obtain large alterations of the heme electronic structure in order to elucidate the relationship between the O(2) affinity of Mb and the electronic properties of heme peripheral side chains. We have utilized the equilibrium constant (pK(a)) of the "acid-alkaline transition" in metmyoglobin in order to quantitatively assess the effects of the CF(3) substitutions for the electron density of heme Fe atom (rho(Fe)) of the protein. The pK(a) value of the protein was found to decrease by approximately 1 pH unit upon the introduction of one CF(3) group, and the decrease in the pK(a) value with decreasing the rho(Fe) value was confirmed by density functional theory calculations on some model compounds. The O(2) affinity of Mb was found to correlate well with the pK(a) value in such a manner that the P(50) value, which is the partial pressure of O(2) required to achieve 50% oxygenation, increases by a factor of 2.7 with a decrease of 1 pK(a) unit. Kinetic studies on the proteins revealed that the decrease in O(2) affinity upon the introduction of an electron-withdrawing CF(3) group is due to an increase in the O(2) dissociation rate. Since the introduction of a CF(3) group substitution is thought to prevent further Fe(2+)-O(2) bond polarization and hence formation of a putative Fe(3+)-O(2)(-)-like species of the oxy form of the protein [Maxwell, J. C.; Volpe, J. A.; Barlow, C. H.; Caughey, W. S. Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 1974, 58, 166-171], the O(2) dissociation is expected to be enhanced by the substitution of electron-withdrawing groups as heme side chains. We also found that, in sharp contrast to the case of the O(2) binding to the protein, the CO

  17. The role of iron and reactive oxygen in the degradation of dissolved organic matter draining permafrost soils (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cory, R. M.; Page, S. E.; Kling, G. W.; Sander, M.; Harrold, K. H.; McNeill, K.

    2013-12-01

    As the permafrost boundary deepens from climate warming it will create conditions for redox reactions between soil-derived dissolved organic matter (DOM) and iron where those conditions did not previously exist. These new conditions will facilitate the transformation of DOM, and the overarching question is whether the pathway to CO2 released to the atmosphere or the export of DOM to coastal oceans will be favored. Our findings suggest that in either dark soils or sunlit surface waters, the presence of iron promotes the degradation of DOM to CO2. Evidence in support of iron-mediated oxidation of DOM to CO2 includes (1) strong positive correlations between iron and formation of hydroxyl radical (●OH), a highly reactive oxygen species implicated in DOM mineralization, (2) complete oxidation of DOM in the presence of high iron concentrations, and (3) loss of permafrost-derived DOM and iron from a thermokarst-impacted lake over time. For example, iron and DOM-rich soils or surface waters had the highest dark or photochemical ●OH formation respectively, both consistent with a dark or light Fenton source of ●OH and subsequent oxidation of DOM by ●OH. Photo-oxidation of DOM to CO2 was favored over partial photo-oxidation in surface waters characterized by high DOM and dissolved iron concentrations, consistent with photochemical reactions mediated by iron. Changes in DOM quality and quantity over time in a lake receiving permafrost carbon via a landslide (thermokarst slump) were also consistent with iron-mediated photodegradation of DOM. Given differences in DOM degradation across tundra ecosystems varying in iron, along with the abundance of water-logged soils supplying reduced iron to soil water or shallow streams, preliminary calculations at the landscape scale indicate that iron-mediated mineralization of DOM in soils and surface waters may be at least as important to carbon cycling as is bacterial respiration of DOM in the water column of streams and lakes

  18. A one-dimensional, steady-state, dissolved-oxygen model and waste-load assimilation study for Wildcat Creek, Howard County, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crawford, Charles G.; Wilber, William G.; Peters, James G.

    1979-01-01

    The Indiana State Board of Health is developing a water-quality management plan that includes establishing limits for wastewater effluents discharged into Indiana streams. A digital model calibrated to conditions in Wildcat Creek was used to predict alternatives for future waste loadings that would be compatible with Indiana stream water-quality standards defined for two critical hydrologic conditions, summer and winter low flows. The model indicates that benthic-oxygen demand is the most significant factor affecting the dissolved-oxygen concentrations in Wildcat Creek during summer low flows. The Indiana stream dissolved-oxygen standard should not be violated if the Kokomo wastewater-treatment facility meets its current National Pollution Discharge Elimination System permit restrictions (average monthly 5-day biochemical-oxygen demand of 5 milligrams per liter and maximum weekly 5-day biochemical-oxygen demand of 7.5 milligrams per liter) and benthic-oxygen demand becomes negligible. Ammonia-nitrogen toxicity may also be a water-quality limitation in Wildcat Creek. Ammonia-nitrogen waste loads for the Kokomo wastewater-treatment facility, projected by the Indiana State Board of Health, will result in stream ammonia-nitrogen concentrations that exceed the State standard (2.5 milligrams per liter during summer months and 4.0 milligrams per liter during winter months). (Kosco-USGS)

  19. Dissolved Oxygen Sensor in Animal-Borne Instruments: An Innovation for Monitoring the Health of Oceans and Investigating the Functioning of Marine Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Bailleul, Frederic; Vacquie-Garcia, Jade; Guinet, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The current decline in dissolved oxygen concentration within the oceans is a sensitive indicator of the effect of climate change on marine environment. However the impact of its declining on marine life and ecosystems’ health is still quite unclear because of the difficulty in obtaining in situ data, especially in remote areas, like the Southern Ocean (SO). Southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) proved to be a relevant alternative to the traditional oceanographic platforms to measure physical and biogeochemical structure of oceanic regions rarely observed. In this study, we use a new stage of development in biologging technology to draw a picture of dissolved oxygen concentration in the SO. We present the first results obtained from a dissolved oxygen sensor added to Argos CTD-SRDL tags and deployed on 5 female elephant seals at Kerguelen. From October 2010 and October 2011, 742 oxygen profiles associated with temperature and salinity measurements were recorded. Whether a part of the data must be considered cautiously, especially because of offsets and temporal drifts of the sensors, the range of values recorded was consistent with a concomitant survey conducted from a research vessel (Keops-2 project). Once again, elephant seals reinforced the relationship between marine ecology and oceanography, delivering essential information about the water masses properties and the biological status of the Southern Ocean. But more than the presentation of a new stage of development in animal-borne instrumentation, this pilot study opens a new field of investigation in marine ecology and could be enlarged in a near future to other key marine predators, especially large fish species like swordfish, tuna or sharks, for which dissolved oxygen is expected to play a crucial role in distribution and behaviour. PMID:26200780

  20. Dissolved Oxygen Sensor in Animal-Borne Instruments: An Innovation for Monitoring the Health of Oceans and Investigating the Functioning of Marine Ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Bailleul, Frederic; Vacquie-Garcia, Jade; Guinet, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The current decline in dissolved oxygen concentration within the oceans is a sensitive indicator of the effect of climate change on marine environment. However the impact of its declining on marine life and ecosystems' health is still quite unclear because of the difficulty in obtaining in situ data, especially in remote areas, like the Southern Ocean (SO). Southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) proved to be a relevant alternative to the traditional oceanographic platforms to measure physical and biogeochemical structure of oceanic regions rarely observed. In this study, we use a new stage of development in biologging technology to draw a picture of dissolved oxygen concentration in the SO. We present the first results obtained from a dissolved oxygen sensor added to Argos CTD-SRDL tags and deployed on 5 female elephant seals at Kerguelen. From October 2010 and October 2011, 742 oxygen profiles associated with temperature and salinity measurements were recorded. Whether a part of the data must be considered cautiously, especially because of offsets and temporal drifts of the sensors, the range of values recorded was consistent with a concomitant survey conducted from a research vessel (Keops-2 project). Once again, elephant seals reinforced the relationship between marine ecology and oceanography, delivering essential information about the water masses properties and the biological status of the Southern Ocean. But more than the presentation of a new stage of development in animal-borne instrumentation, this pilot study opens a new field of investigation in marine ecology and could be enlarged in a near future to other key marine predators, especially large fish species like swordfish, tuna or sharks, for which dissolved oxygen is expected to play a crucial role in distribution and behaviour.

  1. A one-dimensional, steady-state, dissolved-oxygen model and waste-load assimilation study for Silver Creek, Clark and Floyd counties, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilber, William G.; Crawford, Charles G.; Peters, James G.

    1979-01-01

    The Indiana State Board of Health is developing a State water-quality management plan that includes establishing limits for wastewater effluents discharged into Indiana streams. A digital model calibrated to conditions in Silver Creek was used to develop alternatives for future waste loadings that would be compatible with Indiana stream water-quality standards defined for two critical hydrologic conditions, summer and winter low flows. Effluents from the Sellersburg and Clarksville-North wastewater-treatment facilities are the only point-source waste loads that significantly affect the water quality in the modeled segment of Silver Creek. Model simulations indicate that nitrification is the most significant factor affecting the dissolved-oxygen concentration in Silver Creek during summer and winter low flows. Natural streamflow in Silver Creek during the summer and annual 7-day, 10-year low flow is zero, so no benefit from dilution is provided. Present ammonia-nitrogen and dissolved-oxygen concentrations of effluent from the Sellersburg and Clarksville-North wastewater-treatment facilities will violate current Indiana water-quality standards for ammonia toxicity and dissolved oxygen during summer and winter low flows. The current biochemical-oxygen demand limits for the Sellersburg and Clarksville-North wastewater-treatment facilities are not sufficient to maintain an average dissolved-oxygen concentration of at least 5 milligrams per liter, the State 's water-quality standard for streams. Calculations of the stream 's assimilative capacity indicate that Silver Creek cannot assimilate additional waste loadings and meet current Indiana water-quality standards. (Kosco-USGS)

  2. A one-dimensional, steady-state, dissolved-oxygen model and waste-load assimilation study for the Mississinewa River, Grant County, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilber, William G.; Crawford, Charles G.; Peters, James G.

    1979-01-01

    A digital model calibrated to conditions in the Mississinewa River, Grant County, IN was used to develop alternatives for future waste loadings that would be compatible with Indiana stream water-quality standards defined for two critical hydrologic conditions, summer and winter low flows. The hydrology of the Mississinewa River downstream from Gas City is controlled primarily by two factors; low slopes, typical of the Tipton Till Plain, and a 10-foot dam at river mile 35.9, in Marion. All point-source waste loads affecting the modeled segment of the Mississinewa River are in the four incorporated municipalities of Fairmount, Jonesboro, Gas City, and Marion, in a primarily agricultural area. Model simulations indicate that algal photosynthesis and nitrification are the most significant factors affecting the dissolved-oxygen concentration in the Mississinewa River during summer low flows. Natural reaeration without photosynthesis, is not sufficient to maintain an average dissolved-oxygen concentration of at least 5 milligrams per liter in the stream, the State 's water-quality standard. Projected carbonaceous and nitrogenous biochemical-oxygen demand loads, from the Indiana State Board of Health, for Owens, Illinois, Inc., and the Gas City and Marion wastewater-treatment facility will result in violations of the instream dissolved-oxygen standard. Fairmount and Jonesboro, because of their distance from the Mississinewa, do not significantly affect the water quality of the modeled segment. The model also indicates that, during winter low flows, ammonia toxicity, rather than dissolved oxygen is the limiting water-quality criterion in the Mississinewa River downstream from the Gas City wastewater-treatment facility. (USGS)

  3. Dissolved Oxygen Sensor in Animal-Borne Instruments: An Innovation for Monitoring the Health of Oceans and Investigating the Functioning of Marine Ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Bailleul, Frederic; Vacquie-Garcia, Jade; Guinet, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The current decline in dissolved oxygen concentration within the oceans is a sensitive indicator of the effect of climate change on marine environment. However the impact of its declining on marine life and ecosystems' health is still quite unclear because of the difficulty in obtaining in situ data, especially in remote areas, like the Southern Ocean (SO). Southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) proved to be a relevant alternative to the traditional oceanographic platforms to measure physical and biogeochemical structure of oceanic regions rarely observed. In this study, we use a new stage of development in biologging technology to draw a picture of dissolved oxygen concentration in the SO. We present the first results obtained from a dissolved oxygen sensor added to Argos CTD-SRDL tags and deployed on 5 female elephant seals at Kerguelen. From October 2010 and October 2011, 742 oxygen profiles associated with temperature and salinity measurements were recorded. Whether a part of the data must be considered cautiously, especially because of offsets and temporal drifts of the sensors, the range of values recorded was consistent with a concomitant survey conducted from a research vessel (Keops-2 project). Once again, elephant seals reinforced the relationship between marine ecology and oceanography, delivering essential information about the water masses properties and the biological status of the Southern Ocean. But more than the presentation of a new stage of development in animal-borne instrumentation, this pilot study opens a new field of investigation in marine ecology and could be enlarged in a near future to other key marine predators, especially large fish species like swordfish, tuna or sharks, for which dissolved oxygen is expected to play a crucial role in distribution and behaviour. PMID:26200780

  4. Porous Mn2 O3 : A Low-Cost Electrocatalyst for Oxygen Reduction Reaction in Alkaline Media with Comparable Activity to Pt/C.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenhai; Geng, Jing; Kuai, Long; Li, Min; Geng, Baoyou

    2016-07-11

    Preparing nonprecious metal catalysts with high activity in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) can promote the development of energy conversion devices. Support-free porous Mn2 O3 was synthesized by a facile aerosol-spray-assisted approach (ASAA) and subsequent thermal treatment, and exhibited ORR activity that is comparable to commercial Pt/C The catalyst also exhibits notably higher activity than other Mn-based oxides, such as Mn3 O4 and MnO2 . The rotating ring disk electrode (RRDE) study indicates a typical 4-electron ORR pathway on Mn2 O3 . Furthermore, the porous Mn2 O3 demonstrates considerable stability and a good methanol tolerance in alkaline media. In light of the low cost and high earth abundance of Mn, the highly active Mn2 O3 is a promising candidate to be used as a cathode material in metal-air batteries and alkaline fuel cells. PMID:27258474

  5. Porous Mn2 O3 : A Low-Cost Electrocatalyst for Oxygen Reduction Reaction in Alkaline Media with Comparable Activity to Pt/C.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenhai; Geng, Jing; Kuai, Long; Li, Min; Geng, Baoyou

    2016-07-11

    Preparing nonprecious metal catalysts with high activity in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) can promote the development of energy conversion devices. Support-free porous Mn2 O3 was synthesized by a facile aerosol-spray-assisted approach (ASAA) and subsequent thermal treatment, and exhibited ORR activity that is comparable to commercial Pt/C The catalyst also exhibits notably higher activity than other Mn-based oxides, such as Mn3 O4 and MnO2 . The rotating ring disk electrode (RRDE) study indicates a typical 4-electron ORR pathway on Mn2 O3 . Furthermore, the porous Mn2 O3 demonstrates considerable stability and a good methanol tolerance in alkaline media. In light of the low cost and high earth abundance of Mn, the highly active Mn2 O3 is a promising candidate to be used as a cathode material in metal-air batteries and alkaline fuel cells.

  6. Determining Dissolved Oxygen Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boucher, Randy

    2010-01-01

    This project was used in a mathematical modeling and introduction to differential equations course for first-year college students. The students worked in two-person groups and were given three weeks to complete the project. Students were given this project three weeks into the course, after basic first order linear differential equation and…

  7. Microprofiles of oxygen, redox potential, and pH, and microbial fermentation products in the highly alkaline gut of the saprophagous larva of Penthetria holosericea (Diptera: Bibionidae).

    PubMed

    Šustr, Vladimír; Stingl, Ulrich; Brune, Andreas

    2014-08-01

    The saprophagous larvae of bibionid flies harbor bacteria in their alkaline intestinal tracts, but little is known about the contribution of the gut microbiota to the digestion of their recalcitrant diet. In this study, we measured oxygen and hydrogen partial pressure, redox potential and pH in the midgut, gastric caeca and hindgut of larvae of the bibionid fly Penthetria holosericea with Clark-type O2 and H2 microsensors, platinum redox microelectrodes, and LIX-type pH microelectrodes. The center of the midgut lumen was anoxic, whereas gastric caeca and hindgut were hypoxic. However, redox potential profiles indicated oxidizing conditions throughout the gut, with lowest values in the midgut (+20 to +60mV). Hydrogen production was not detected. The midgut was extremely alkaline (pH around 11), whereas hindgut and gastric caeca were neutral to slightly alkaline. While HPLC analysis showed high concentrations of glucose in the midgut (15mM) and gastric caeca (27mM), the concentrations of microbial fermentation products such as lactate (2-4mM), acetate (<1mM) and succinate (<0.5mM) were low in all gut regions, suggesting that the contribution of microorganisms to the digestive process, particularly in the alkaline midgut, is only of minor importance. We conclude that the digestive strategy of the saprophytic larva of P. holosericea, which feeds selectively on decomposed leaves and its own microbe-rich faeces, differs fundamentally from those of detritivorous and humivorous insects, which host a highly active, fermentative microbiota in their alkaline midgut or hindgut compartments. PMID:24971929

  8. The effect of dissolved oxygen on N2O production by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in an enriched nitrifying sludge.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lai; Ni, Bing-Jie; Erler, Dirk; Ye, Liu; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2014-12-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) is commonly recognized as an important factor influencing nitrous oxide (N2O) production by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). However, it has been difficult to separate the true effect of DO from that of nitrite, as DO variation often affects nitrite accumulation. The effect of DO on N2O production by an enriched nitrifying sludge, consisting of both AOB and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB), was investigated in this study. Nitrite accumulation was minimised by augmenting nitrite oxidation through the addition of an enriched NOB sludge. It was demonstrated that the specific N2O production rate increased from 0 to 1.9 ± 0.09 (n = 3) mg N2O-N/hr/g VSS with an increase of DO concentration from 0 to 3.0 mg O2/L, whereas N2O emission factor (the ratio between N2O nitrogen emitted and the ammonium nitrogen converted) decreased from 10.6 ± 1.7% (n = 3) at DO = 0.2 mg O2/L to 2.4 ± 0.1% (n = 3) at DO = 3.0 mg O2/L. The site preference measurements indicated that both the AOB denitrification and hydroxylamine (NH2OH) oxidation pathways contributed to N2O production, and DO had an important effect on the relative contributions of the two pathways. This finding is supported by analysis of the process data using an N2O model describing both pathways. As DO increased from 0.2 to 3.0 mg O2/L, the contribution of AOB denitrification decreased from 92% - 95%-66% - 73%, accompanied by a corresponding increase in the contribution by the NH2OH oxidation pathway. PMID:25179869

  9. Dissolved Oxygen Concentration Profiles in the Hyporheic Zone Through the Use of a High-Density Fiber Optic Measurement Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeder, William Jeffrey; Quick, Annika; Farrell, Tiffany B.; Benner, Shawn G.; Feris, Kevin P.; Tonina, Daniele

    2015-04-01

    The majority of chemical reactions in riverine systems occur within the hyporheic zone (HZ). Hyporheic exchange, flow into and out of the hyporheic zone, represents a primary control over those reactions because the flow rate will determine the residence time and amount of chemical constituents in the HZ. Hyporheic flow can be conceptualized as discreet streamlines that collectively represent a broad distribution of residence times. Within this context, dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration becomes a primary indicator of the redox and biochemical state of the HZ including, for example, the fate of carbon, contaminant behavior, nutrient cycling, stream DO levels and nitrous oxide (N2O) production. River systems have been identified as a significant source of N2O emissions, contributing an estimated 10% of anthropogenically generated N2O. The primary biochemical transformations that lead to N2O production are nitrification (NH4+ to NO3-) and denitrification (NO3- to N2) reactions that are mediated by microbes living in the HZ. Current theory describes a process in which DO enters the stoss side of the HZ and is consumed by respiration and nitrification in the upstream, oxic portion of the streamlines leading to a progressive partitioning of the HZ from oxic to anoxic. This conceptualization, however, has not been well validated in a physical sense, due to inherent difficulties associated with measuring chemical concentrations in the HZ. To test current theory, we measured HZ DO concentrations, in a large-scale flume experiment, almost continuously for five months using a multiplexed optical network and a precision robotic surface probe system. We were able to measure DO at higher spatial and temporal resolution than has been previously demonstrated. These measurements, coupled with detailed numerical modeling of HZ flowlines, allowed us to map HZ DO concentrations spatially and over time. Our findings validate the models that describe the consumption of DO through

  10. Hydrodynamic features of the South Aegean Sea as derived from Argo T/ S and dissolved oxygen profiles in the area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassis, Dimitris; Krasakopoulou, Evangelia; Korres, Gerasimos; Petihakis, George; Triantafyllou, George S.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, the hydrodynamic picture of the South Aegean Sea is examined through an analysis of recent measurements in its sub-basins, the Myrtoan and Cretan Sea. Both sub-basins play an important role in the water circulation, exchange, and formation processes that affect the dynamics of the whole Eastern Mediterranean. For the first time, Bio-Argo floats were deployed in the area under the Greek Argo Research Infrastructure coordination. The acquired profiles cover an almost 2-year period (November 2013-July 2015) and are compared with previous Argo profiles and the re-processed time-series data recorded from the E1-M3A POSEIDON observatory operating in the area since 2007. The spatio-temporal distribution of the physical and chemical properties in each sub-basin is examined. Dense water formation events are revealed in the northern part (Myrtoan), while the wider area can be characterized as pre-conditioned. In the Cretan basin, a strong inter-annual variability of the salinity field at intermediate and deep layers is observed that is associated with water exchange from its open boundaries. Furthermore, comparison of the dissolved oxygen (DO) distribution with physical water properties within both the mixed layer, and at greater depths, indicated that relatively high but still under-saturated DO values are more likely to be associated with convection events. Finally, an updated picture of the physical properties and the DO distribution is presented based on the last 5 years of measurements and the recent introduction of Bio-Argo floats with DO sensors in the area.

  11. The impact of wind mixing on the variation of bottom dissolved oxygen off the Changjiang Estuary during summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Xiaobo; Huang, Daji; Zeng, Dingyong; Zhang, Tao; Li, Hongliang; Chen, Jianfang

    2016-02-01

    Hypoxia off the Changjiang Estuary has been frequently reported using short time duration field data. However, its evolution was unknown because of a lack of long-term data and its associated dominant factor. A 104-day long dataset was collected with a bottom mounted system off the Changjiang Estuary in summer 2009. The monitored parameters were bottom dissolved oxygen (DO), temperature, pressure and current. Two hypoxia events were identified, showing that hypoxia was severe and lasted for more than a half month. The first event appeared on July 18 and lasted 17 days. During this hypoxia period, the minimum DO was down to 0.17 mg/L, which broke the historical record. The second hypoxia event appeared on August 30 and lasted 18 days with a minimum DO of 1.29 mg/L. The variation of bottom DO was closely related to that of stratification. The monitored data showed that almost every increase/decrease of DO was associated with a weakening/enhancing of stratification, which were recorded as many as 12 times during the monitoring period. Wind mixing modulated or broke the stratification, which affected the variation of bottom DO and hypoxia events. Using a lagged correlation analysis, the stratification and wind mixing were significantly correlated with a coefficient of determination r2 = 0.72, and stratification lagged wind by 35 h. The bottom DO and wind mixing were significantly correlated with a coefficient of determination r2 = 0.65, and DO lagged wind by 33 h. The formation periods of two hypoxia events estimated from monitored data were 20 and 15 days, which were much shorter than that from on-board experiments. Strong wind mixing played a dual role on hypoxia. It could relieve hypoxia conditions by supplying DO through mixing. It accelerated the formation of hypoxia afterward as a result of the enhanced phytoplankton bloom induced by wind mixing and high organic decomposition rates consuming more DO.

  12. Effects of climate change on stream temperature, dissolved oxygen, and sediment concentration in the Sierra Nevada in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ficklin, Darren L.; Stewart, Iris T.; Maurer, Edwin P.

    2013-05-01

    Warmer temperatures are expected to raise mountain stream temperatures, affecting water quality and ecosystem health. We demonstrate the importance of climate-driven changes in hydrology as fundamental to understanding changes in the local water quality. In particular, we focus on changes in stream temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations, and sediment transport in mountainous, snowmelt-dominated, and water-limited systems, using the Sierra Nevada as our case study. Downscaled output from an ensemble of general circulation model projections for the A2 (higher greenhouse gas) emission scenario was used to drive the Soil and Water Assessment Tool with a new integrated stream temperature model on the subbasin scale. Spring and summer stream temperature increase by 1°C-5.5°C, with varying increases among subbasins. The highest projected stream temperatures are in the low-elevation subbasins of the southern Sierra Nevada, while the northern Sierra Nevada, with distinct impacts on snowmelt and subsurface flow contributions to streamflow, shows moderated increases. The spatial pattern of stream temperature changes was the result of differences in surface and subsurface hydrologic, snowmelt, and air temperature changes. Concurrent with stream temperature increases and decreases in spring and summer flows, simulations indicated decreases in DO (10%) and sediment (50%) concentrations by 2100. Stream temperature and DO concentrations for several major streams decline below survival thresholds for several native indicator species. These results highlight that climatic changes in water-limited mountain systems may drive changes in water quality that have to be understood on the reach scale for developing adaptive management options.

  13. [Startup, stable operation and process failure of EBPR system under the low temperature and low dissolved oxygen condition].

    PubMed

    Ma, Juan; Li, Lu; Yu, Xiao-Jun; Wei, Xue-Fen; Liu, Juan-Li

    2015-02-01

    A sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was started up and operated with alternating anaerobic/oxic (An/O) to perform enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) under the condition of 13-16 degrees C. The results showed that under the condition of low temperature, the EBPR system was successfully started up in a short time (<6 d). The reactor achieved a high and stable phosphorus removal performance with an influent phosphate concentration of 20 mg x L(-1) and the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration of 2 mg x L(-1). The effluent phosphate concentration was lower than 0.5 mg x L(-1). It was found that decreasing DO had an influence on the steady operation of EBPR system. As DO concentration of aerobic phase decreased from 2 mg x L(-1) to 1 mg x L(-1), the system could still perform EBPR and the phosphorus removal efficiency was greater than 97.4%. However, the amount of phosphate released during anaerobic phase was observed to decrease slightly compared with that of 2 mg x L(-1) DO condition. Moreover, the phosphorus removal performance of the system deteriorated immediately and the effluent phosphate concentration couldn't meet the national integrated wastewater discharge standard when DO concentration was further lowered to 0.5 mg x L(-1). The experiments of increasing DO to recover phosphorus removal performance of the EBPR suggested the process failure resulted from low DO was not reversible in the short-term. It was also found that the batch tests of anoxic phosphorus uptake using nitrite and nitrate as electron acceptors had an impact on the stable operation of EBPR system, whereas the resulting negative influence could be recovered within 6 cycles. In addition, the mixed liquid suspended solids (MLSS) of the EBPR system remained stable and the sludge volume index (SVI) decreased to a certain extend in a long run, implying long-term low temperature and low DO condition favored the sludge sedimentation. PMID:26031088

  14. Influence of mixed liquor recycle ratio and dissolved oxygen on performance of pre-denitrification submerged membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Tan, Teck Wee; Ng, How Yong

    2008-02-01

    The conflicting influence of mixed liquor recycle ratio and dissolved oxygen on nitrogen removal and membrane fouling of a pre-denitrification submerged MBR was investigated in this study. It was found that a high aeration rate of 10 L air/min was able to minimize membrane fouling as compared with lower aeration rates of 5 and 2.5L air/min in this study. Faster fouling at lower aeration rate was due to the decrease in cross-flow velocity across the membrane surface. However, high DO concentration (average of 5.1+/-0.5mg O2/L) present in the recycle mixed liquor at an aeration rate of 10 L air/min deteriorated the TN removal efficiency when operating at a recycle ratio of more than 3. A lower aeration rate of 5L air/min, resulting in an average DO concentration of 3.4+/-0.7 mg O2/L in the recycle mixed liquor, led to an improvement in TN removal efficiency: 63%, 80%, 84% and 89% for mixed liquor recycle ratio of 1, 3, 5 and 10, respectively. Further decrease in aeration rate to 2.5L air/min, resulting in an average DO concentration of 1.9+/-0.8 mg O2/L, did not improve the TN removal efficiency. Using a newly developed simplified nitrification-denitrification model, it was calculated that the COD/NO3(-)-N required for denitrification at 10 L air/min aeration rate was higher than those associated with 5 and 2.5L air/min aeration rates. The model also revealed that denitrification at an aeration rate of 10 L air/min was limited by COD concentration present in the wastewater when operating at a mixed liquor recycle ratio of 3 and higher. PMID:17905406

  15. Comparisons of optical pH and dissolved oxygen sensors with traditional electrochemical probes during mammalian cell culture.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Michael A; Ge, Xudong; Kostov, Yordan; Brorson, Kurt A; Moreira, Antonio R; Rao, Govind

    2007-07-01

    Small-scale upstream bioprocess development often occurs in flasks and multi-well plates. These culturing platforms are often not equipped to accurately monitor and control critical process parameters; thus they may not yield conditions representative of manufacturing. In response, we and others have developed optical sensors that enable small-scale process monitoring. Here we have compared two parameters critical to control in industrial cell culture, pH and dissolved oxygen (DO), measured with our optical sensors versus industrially accepted electrochemical probes. For both optical sensors, agreement with the corresponding electrochemical probe was excellent. The Pearson Correlations between the optical sensors and electrochemical probes were 98.7% and 99.7%, for DO and pH, respectively. Also, we have compared optical pH sensor performance in regular (320 mOsm/kg) and high-osmolality (450 mOsm/kg) cell culture media to simulate the increase in osmolality in pH-controlled cultures. Over a pH range of 6.38-7.98 the average difference in pH readings in the two media was 0.04 pH units. In summary, we have demonstrated that these optical sensors agree well with standard electrochemical probes. The accuracy of the optical probes demonstrates their ability to detect potential parameter drift that could have significant impact on growth, production kinetics, and protein product quality. We have also shown that an increase in osmolality that could result from controlling pH or operating the reactor in fed-batch mode has an insignificant impact on the functionality of the pH patches.

  16. Dissolved Oxygen in Guadalupe Slough and Pond A3W, South San Francisco Bay, California, August and September 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shellenbarger, Gregory; Schoellhamer, David H.; Morgan, Tara L.; Takekawa, John Y.; Athearn, Nicole D.; Henderson, Kathleen D.

    2008-01-01

    Initial restoration of former salt evaporation ponds under the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project in San Francisco Bay included the changing of water-flow patterns and the monitoring of water quality of discharge waters from the ponds. Low dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations became evident in discharge waters when the ponds first were opened in 2004. This was a concern, because of the potential for low-DO pond discharge to decrease the DO concentrations in the sloughs that receive water from the ponds. However, as of summer 2007, only limited point-measurements of DO concentrations had been made in the receiving sloughs adjacent to the discharge ponds. In this report, we describe two short studies aimed at understanding the natural variability of slough DO and the effect of pond discharge on the DO concentrations in the sloughs. Pond A3W (a discharge pond) and the adjacent Guadalupe Slough were instrumented in August and September 2007 to measure DO, temperature, conductivity, and pH. In addition, Mowry and Newark Sloughs were instrumented during the August study to document DO variability in nearby sloughs that were unaffected by pond discharge. The results showed that natural tidal variability in the slough appeared to dominate and control the slough DO concentrations. Water-quality parameters between Guadalupe Slough and Mowry and Newark Sloughs could not be directly compared because deployment locations were different distances from the bay. Pond-discharge water was identified in Guadalupe Slough using the deployed instruments, but, counter to the previous assumption, the pond discharge, at times, increased DO concentrations in the slough. The effects of altering the volume of pond discharge were overwhelmed by natural spring-neap tidal variability in the slough. This work represents a preliminary investigation by the U.S. Geological Survey of the effects of pond discharge on adjacent sloughs, and the results will be used in designing a comprehensive DO

  17. Effects of Elevated CO2 and Decreased Dissolved Oxygen on Phototactic Behaviors of Juvenile Dungeness Crab (Cancer magister)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imm, J.

    2015-12-01

    Anthropogenic CO2 emissions are increasing the concentration of CO2 in the oceans, and contributing to ocean acidification (OA), while increasing ocean temperatures and eutrophication are causing decreased levels of dissolved oxygen (DO). Due to coastal upwelling and limited water flow, the Puget Sound ecosystem is naturally high in CO2 and seasonally low in DO, making it particularly susceptible to increased acidification and hypoxia. Dungeness crabs (Cancer magister) are both ecologically and economically important to the Puget Sound region. To investigate the threat of low pH and DO to C. magister behavior, megalopae and juveniles were exposed to current and predicted future levels of pH and DO. Juveniles were then placed in a dark container with a single bright light, and movement and phototaxis were studied during three-minute trials. We hypothesized that low pH and low DO conditions would alter phototactic behaviors of juvenile C. magister, through changes in neurotransmission and metabolism. C. magister reared in control (High pH-High DO) conditions spent a greater proportion of their time near the light, and were significantly more likely to touch the light during the three-minute trial, as compared to juveniles in the other treatment conditions. These results suggest that future predicted CO2 and DO conditions in Puget Sound could disrupt the behavioral and cognitive abilities of juvenile crabs, leading to decreased survival and recruitment in the C. magister population. Given the importance of C. magister to the Puget Sound, these population changes could have significant ecological and economic implications for the region.

  18. Different hydrodynamic processes regulated on water quality (nutrients, dissolved oxygen, and phytoplankton biomass) in three contrasting waters of Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weihua; Yuan, Xiangcheng; Long, Aimin; Huang, Hui; Yue, Weizhong

    2014-03-01

    The subtropical Hong Kong (HK) waters are located at the eastern side of the Pearl River Estuary. Monthly changes of water quality, including nutrients, dissolved oxygen (DO), and phytoplankton biomass (Chl-a) were routinely investigated in 2003 by the Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department in three contrasting waters of HK with different prevailing hydrodynamic processes. The western, eastern, and southern waters were mainly dominated by nutrient-replete Pearl River discharge, the nutrient-poor coastal/shelf oceanic waters, and mixtures of estuarine and coastal seawater and sewage effluent of Hong Kong, respectively. Acting in response, the water quality in these three contrasting areas showed apparently spatial–temporal variation pattern. Nutrients usually decreased along western waters to eastern waters. In the dry season, the water column was strongly mixed by monsoon winds and tidal currents, which resulted in relatively low Chl-a (<5 μg l(−1)) and high bottom DO (>4 mg l(−1)), suggesting that mixing enhanced the buffering capacity of eutrophication in HK waters. However, in the wet season, surface Chl-a was generally >10 μg l(−1) in southern waters in summer due to halocline and thermohaline stratification, adequate nutrients, and light availability. Although summer hypoxia (DO <2 mg l(−1)) was episodically observed near sewage effluent site and in southern waters induced by vertical stratification, the eutrophication impacts in HK waters were not as severe as expected owing to P limitation and short water residence time in the wet season. PMID:24122158

  19. Influence of mixed liquor recycle ratio and dissolved oxygen on performance of pre-denitrification submerged membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Tan, Teck Wee; Ng, How Yong

    2008-02-01

    The conflicting influence of mixed liquor recycle ratio and dissolved oxygen on nitrogen removal and membrane fouling of a pre-denitrification submerged MBR was investigated in this study. It was found that a high aeration rate of 10 L air/min was able to minimize membrane fouling as compared with lower aeration rates of 5 and 2.5L air/min in this study. Faster fouling at lower aeration rate was due to the decrease in cross-flow velocity across the membrane surface. However, high DO concentration (average of 5.1+/-0.5mg O2/L) present in the recycle mixed liquor at an aeration rate of 10 L air/min deteriorated the TN removal efficiency when operating at a recycle ratio of more than 3. A lower aeration rate of 5L air/min, resulting in an average DO concentration of 3.4+/-0.7 mg O2/L in the recycle mixed liquor, led to an improvement in TN removal efficiency: 63%, 80%, 84% and 89% for mixed liquor recycle ratio of 1, 3, 5 and 10, respectively. Further decrease in aeration rate to 2.5L air/min, resulting in an average DO concentration of 1.9+/-0.8 mg O2/L, did not improve the TN removal efficiency. Using a newly developed simplified nitrification-denitrification model, it was calculated that the COD/NO3(-)-N required for denitrification at 10 L air/min aeration rate was higher than those associated with 5 and 2.5L air/min aeration rates. The model also revealed that denitrification at an aeration rate of 10 L air/min was limited by COD concentration present in the wastewater when operating at a mixed liquor recycle ratio of 3 and higher.

  20. Enhancement of 5-keto-d-gluconate production by a recombinant Gluconobacter oxydans using a dissolved oxygen control strategy.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jianfeng; Wu, Mianbin; Lin, Jianping; Yang, Lirong

    2016-07-01

    The rapid and incomplete oxidation of sugars, alcohols, and polyols by the gram-negative bacterium Gluconobacter oxydans facilitates a wide variety of biological applications. For the conversion of glucose to 5-keto-d-gluconate (5-KGA), a promising precursor of the industrial substance L-(+)-tartaric acid, G. oxydans DSM2343 was genetically engineered to strain ZJU2, in which the GOX1231 and GOX1081 genes were knocked out in a markerless fashion. Then, a secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (GCD) from Xanthomonas campestris DSM3586 was heterologously expressed in G. oxydans ZJU2. The 5-KGA production and cell yield were increased by 10% and 24.5%, respectively. The specific activity of GCD towards gluconate was 1.75±0.02 U/mg protein, which was 7-fold higher than that of the sldAB in G. oxydans. Based on the analysis of kinetic parameters including specific cell growth rate (μ), specific glucose consumption rate (qs) and specific 5-KGA production rate (qp), a dissolved oxygen (DO) control strategy was proposed. Finally, batch fermentation was carried out in a 15-L bioreactor using an initial agitation speed of 600 rpm to obtain a high μ for cell growth. Subsequently, DO was continuously maintained above 20% to achieve a high qp to ensure a high accumulation of 5-KGA. Under these conditions, the maximum concentration of 5-KGA reached 117.75 g/L with a productivity of 2.10 g/(L·h).

  1. Effect of phytoremediation on concentrations of benzene, toluene, naphthalene, and dissolved oxygen in groundwater at a former manufactured gas plant site, Charleston, South Carolina, USA, 1998–2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landmeyer, James E.; Effinger, Thomas N.

    2016-01-01

    Concentrations of benzene, toluene, naphthalene, and dissolved oxygen in groundwater at a former manufactured gas plant site near Charleston, South Carolina, USA, have been monitored since the installation of a phytoremediation system of hybrid poplar trees in 1998. Between 2000 and 2014, the concentrations of benzene, toluene, and naphthalene (BT&N) in groundwater in the planted area have decreased. For example, in the monitoring well containing the highest concentrations of BT&N, benzene concentrations decreased from 10,200 µg/L to less than 4000 µg/L, toluene concentrations decreased from 2420 µg/L to less than 20 µg/L, and naphthalene concentrations decreased from 6840 µg/L to less than 3000 µg/L. Concentrations of BT&N in groundwater in all wells were observed to be lower during the summer months relative to the winter months of a particular year during the first few years after installing the phytoremediation system, most likely due to increased transpiration and contaminant uptake by the hybrid poplar trees during the warm summer months; this pathway of uptake by trees was confirmed by the detection of benzene, toluene, and naphthalene in trees during sampling events in 2002, and later in the study in 2012. These data suggest that the phytoremediation system affects the groundwater contaminants on a seasonal basis and, over multiple years, has resulted in a cumulative decrease in dissolved-phase contaminant concentrations in groundwater. The removal of dissolved organic contaminants from the aquifer has resulted in a lower demand on dissolved oxygen supplied by recharge and, as a result, the redox status of the groundwater has changed from anoxic to oxic conditions. This study provides much needed information for water managers and other scientists on the viability of the long-term effectiveness of phytoremediation in decreasing groundwater contaminants and increasing dissolved oxygen at sites contaminated by benzene, toluene, and naphthalene.

  2. A one-dimensional, steady-state, dissolved-oxygen model and waste-load assimilation study for Sand Creek, Decatur County, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilber, William G.; Crawford, Charles G.; Peters, James G.

    1979-01-01

    A digital model calibrated to conditions in Sand Creek near Greensburg, Ind., was used to develop alternatives for future waste loadings that would be compatible with Indiana stream water-quality standards defined for two critical hydrologic conditions, summer and winter low flows. The only point-source waste load affecting Sand Creek in the vicinity of Greensburg is the Greensburg wastewater-treatment facility. Non-point, unrecorded waste loads seemed to be significant during three water-quality surveys done by the Indiana State Board of Health. Natural streamflow in Sand Creek during the summer and annual 7-day, 10-year low flow is zero so no benefit from dilution is provided. Effluent ammonia-nitrogen concentrations from the Greensburg wastewater-treatment facility will not meet Indiana water-quality standards during summer and winter low flows. To meet the water-quality standard the wastewater-effluent would be limited to a maximum total ammonia-nitrogen concentration of 2.5 mg/l for summer months (June through August) and 4.0 mg/l for winter months (November through March). Model simulations indicate that benthic-oxygen demand, nitrification, and the dissolved-oxygen concentration of the wastewater effluent are the most significant factors affecting the in-stream dissolved-oxygen concentration during summer low flows. The model predicts that with a benthic-oxygen demand of 1.5 grams per square meter per day at 20C the stream has no additional waste-load assimilative capacity. Present carbonaceous biochemical-oxygen demand loads from the Greensburg wastewater-treatment facility will not result in violations of the in-stream dissolved-oxygen standard (5 mg/l) during winter low flows. (Kosco-USGS)