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Sample records for alkalinity major cations

  1. Alkaline earth cation extraction from acid solution

    DOEpatents

    Dietz, Mark; Horwitz, E. Philip

    2003-01-01

    An extractant medium for extracting alkaline earth cations from an aqueous acidic sample solution is described as are a method and apparatus for using the same. The separation medium is free of diluent, free-flowing and particulate, and comprises a Crown ether that is a 4,4'(5')[C.sub.4 -C.sub.8 -alkylcyclohexano]18-Crown-6 dispersed on an inert substrate material.

  2. Cation exchange properties of zeolites in hyper alkaline aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Van Tendeloo, Leen; de Blochouse, Benny; Dom, Dirk; Vancluysen, Jacqueline; Snellings, Ruben; Martens, Johan A; Kirschhock, Christine E A; Maes, André; Breynaert, Eric

    2015-02-01

    Construction of multibarrier concrete based waste disposal sites and management of alkaline mine drainage water requires cation exchangers combining excellent sorption properties with a high stability and predictable performance in hyper alkaline media. Though highly selective organic cation exchange resins have been developed for most pollutants, they can serve as a growth medium for bacterial proliferation, impairing their long-term stability and introducing unpredictable parameters into the evolution of the system. Zeolites represent a family of inorganic cation exchangers, which naturally occur in hyper alkaline conditions and cannot serve as an electron donor or carbon source for microbial proliferation. Despite their successful application as industrial cation exchangers under near neutral conditions, their performance in hyper alkaline, saline water remains highly undocumented. Using Cs(+) as a benchmark element, this study aims to assess the long-term cation exchange performance of zeolites in concrete derived aqueous solutions. Comparison of their exchange properties in alkaline media with data obtained in near neutral solutions demonstrated that the cation exchange selectivity remains unaffected by the increased hydroxyl concentration; the cation exchange capacity did however show an unexpected increase in hyper alkaline media. PMID:25569300

  3. Structure and ionic diffusion of alkaline-earth ions in mixed cation glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinou, Konstantinos; Sushko, Petr; Duffy, Dorothy M.

    2015-08-15

    A series of mixed cation silicate glasses of the composition A2O – 2MO – 4SiO2, with A=Li,Na,K and M=Ca,Sr,Ba has been investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations in order to understand the effect of the nature of the cations on the mobility of the alkaline-earth ions within the glass network. The size of the alkaline-earth cation was found to affect the inter-atomic distances, the coordination number distributions and the bond angle distributions , whereas the medium-range order was almost unaffected by the type of the cation. All the alkaline-earth cations contribute to lower vibrational frequencies but it is observed that that there is a shift to smaller frequencies and the vibrational density of states distribution gets narrower as the size of the alkaline-earth increases. The results from our modeling for the ionic diffusion of the alkaline-earth cations are in a qualitative agreement with the experimental observations in that there is a distinct correlation between the activation energy for diffusion of alkaline earth-ions and the cation radii ratio. An asymmetrical linear behavior in the diffusion activation energy with increasing size difference is observed. The results can be described on the basis of a theoretical model that relates the diffusion activation energy to the electrostatic interactions of the cations with the oxygens and the elastic deformation of the silicate network.

  4. Modulation of cardiac ryanodine receptor channels by alkaline earth cations.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Sylvester, Paula L; Porta, Maura; Copello, Julio A

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) function is modulated by Ca(2+) and Mg(2+). To better characterize Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) binding sites involved in RyR2 regulation, the effects of cytosolic and luminal earth alkaline divalent cations (M(2+): Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Sr(2+), Ba(2+)) were studied on RyR2 from pig ventricle reconstituted in bilayers. RyR2 were activated by M(2+) binding to high affinity activating sites at the cytosolic channel surface, specific for Ca(2+) or Sr(2+). This activation was interfered by Mg(2+) and Ba(2+) acting at low affinity M(2+)-unspecific binding sites. When testing the effects of luminal M(2+) as current carriers, all M(2+) increased maximal RyR2 open probability (compared to Cs(+)), suggesting the existence of low affinity activating M(2+)-unspecific sites at the luminal surface. Responses to M(2+) vary from channel to channel (heterogeneity). However, with luminal Ba(2+)or Mg(2+), RyR2 were less sensitive to cytosolic Ca(2+) and caffeine-mediated activation, openings were shorter and voltage-dependence was more marked (compared to RyR2 with luminal Ca(2+)or Sr(2+)). Kinetics of RyR2 with mixtures of luminal Ba(2+)/Ca(2+) and additive action of luminal plus cytosolic Ba(2+) or Mg(2+) suggest luminal M(2+) differentially act on luminal sites rather than accessing cytosolic sites through the pore. This suggests the presence of additional luminal activating Ca(2+)/Sr(2+)-specific sites, which stabilize high P(o) mode (less voltage-dependent) and increase RyR2 sensitivity to cytosolic Ca(2+) activation. In summary, RyR2 luminal and cytosolic surfaces have at least two sets of M(2+) binding sites (specific for Ca(2+) and unspecific for Ca(2+)/Mg(2+)) that dynamically modulate channel activity and gating status, depending on SR voltage. PMID:22039534

  5. Modulation of Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor Channels by Alkaline Earth Cations

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Sylvester, Paula L.; Porta, Maura; Copello, Julio A.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) function is modulated by Ca2+ and Mg2+. To better characterize Ca2+ and Mg2+ binding sites involved in RyR2 regulation, the effects of cytosolic and luminal earth alkaline divalent cations (M2+: Mg2+, Ca2+, Sr2+, Ba2+) were studied on RyR2 from pig ventricle reconstituted in bilayers. RyR2 were activated by M2+ binding to high affinity activating sites at the cytosolic channel surface, specific for Ca2+ or Sr2+. This activation was interfered by Mg2+ and Ba2+ acting at low affinity M2+-unspecific binding sites. When testing the effects of luminal M2+ as current carriers, all M2+ increased maximal RyR2 open probability (compared to Cs+), suggesting the existence of low affinity activating M2+-unspecific sites at the luminal surface. Responses to M2+ vary from channel to channel (heterogeneity). However, with luminal Ba2+or Mg2+, RyR2 were less sensitive to cytosolic Ca2+ and caffeine-mediated activation, openings were shorter and voltage-dependence was more marked (compared to RyR2 with luminal Ca2+or Sr2+). Kinetics of RyR2 with mixtures of luminal Ba2+/Ca2+ and additive action of luminal plus cytosolic Ba2+ or Mg2+ suggest luminal M2+ differentially act on luminal sites rather than accessing cytosolic sites through the pore. This suggests the presence of additional luminal activating Ca2+/Sr2+-specific sites, which stabilize high Po mode (less voltage-dependent) and increase RyR2 sensitivity to cytosolic Ca2+ activation. In summary, RyR2 luminal and cytosolic surfaces have at least two sets of M2+ binding sites (specific for Ca2+ and unspecific for Ca2+/Mg2+) that dynamically modulate channel activity and gating status, depending on SR voltage. PMID:22039534

  6. Coordination Chemistry of Alkali and Alkaline-Earth Cations with Macrocyclic Ligands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietrich, Bernard

    1985-01-01

    Discusses: (l) alkali and alkaline-earth cations in biology (considering naturally occurring lonophores, their X-ray structures, and physiochemical studies); (2) synthetic complexing agents for groups IA and IIA; and (3) ion transport across membranes (examining neutral macrobicyclic ligands as metal cation carriers, transport by anionic carriers,…

  7. Tryptophan fluorescence quenching by alkaline earth metal cations in deionized bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Wang, G; Wang, A J; Hu, K S

    2000-12-01

    Tryptophan quenching by the addition of alkaline earth metal cations to deionized bacteriorhodopsin suspensions was determined. The results show that the addition of cation primarily quenches fluorescence from surface tryptophan residues. The quenched intensity exhibits a 1/R dependence, where R is the ionic radius of the corresponding metal ion. This observation results from a stronger energy transfer coupling between the tryptophan and the retinal. The membrane curvature may be involved as a result of cations motion and correlated conformational changes. PMID:11332888

  8. EFFECT OF CATIONS ON ALUMINUM SPECIATION UNDER ALKALINE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Hobbs, D.

    2012-07-31

    A series of experiments were performed to examine the effect of metal cations common to high level waste on the phase of aluminum formed. Experiments were performed at temperature of 150 C, 75 C, and room temperature, either without additional metal cation, or with 0.01-0.2 molar equivalents of either Ni{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 3+}, Mn{sup 2+}, or Cr{sup 3+}. Results showed that temperature has the greatest effect on the phase obtained. At 150 C, boehmite is the only phase obtained, independent of the presence of other metal cations, with only one exception where a small amount of gibbsite was also detected in the product when 0.2 equivalents of Ni{sup 2+} was present. At 75 C, a mixture of phases is obtained, most commonly including bayerite and gibbsite; however, boehmite is also formed under some conditions, including in the absence of additional metal ion. At room temperature, in the absence of additional metal ion, a mixture of bayerite and gibbsite is obtained. The addition of another metal cation suppresses the formation of gibbsite, with a couple of exceptions (0.2 equivalents of Ni{sup 2+} or 0.01 equivalents of Cr{sup 3+}) where both phases are still obtained.

  9. Complex formation of alkaline-earth cations with crown ethers and cryptands in methanol solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Buschman, H.J.

    1986-06-01

    The complexation of alkaline-earth cations by different crown ethers, azacrown ethers, and cryptands has been studied in methanol solutions by means of calorimetric and potentiometric titrations. The smallest monocyclic ligands examined from 2:1 complexes (ratio of ligand to cation) with cations which are too large to fit into the ligand cavity. With the smallest cryptand, only Sr/sup 2 +/ and Ba/sup 2 +/ ions are able to form exclusive complexes. In the case of the reaction of cryptand (211) with Ca/sup 2 +/, a separate estimation of stability constants for the formation of exclusive and inclusive complexes was possible for the first time. Higher values for stability constants are found for the reaction of alkaline-earth cations with cryptands compared to the reaction with alkali ions. This increase is only caused by favorable entropic contributions.

  10. Capillary electrophoresis of alkali and alkaline-earth cations with imidazole or benzylamine buffers

    SciTech Connect

    Morin, P.; Francois, C.; Dreux, M. . Lab. de Chimie Bioorganique et Analytique)

    1994-01-01

    The separation of alkali, alkaline earth, and ammonium cations in several samples of water was achieved by capillary electrophoresis with indirect UV detection. A solution of imidazole (10[sup [minus]2] M, pH 4.5) was used as a buffer to resolve a mixture of six cations (K[sup +], Na[sup +], Ca[sup 2+], Ba[sup 2+], Li[sup +] and Mg[sup 2+]) by capillary electrophoresis at 214 nm in less than 10 min. The addition of potassium cation to the running buffer has an influence on the resolution of Ca[sup 2+]/Na[sup +] and Na[sup +]/Mg[sup 2+] peaks. A linear relationship between the corrected peak area and concentration was obtained in the 1--10 ppm range for these cations using a hydrodynamic injector. This electrophoretic system permitted the separation of these inorganic cations at a 50 ppb-level concentration with a hydrodynamic injection, thus making it possible to quantitatively determine their presence in mineral waters by capillary electrophoresis. At pH 4.5, potassium and ammonium unfortunately have identical ionic mobilities causing them to comigrate in an imidazole buffer. Using an alkaline solution of benzylamine as carrier electrolyte, their separation can be successfully achieved with excellent resolution at 204 nm. The analyses of tap water and several mineral waters have been achieved by capillary electrophoresis.

  11. Ultrafine Na-4-mica: uptake of alkali and alkaline earth metal cations by ion exchange.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Tatsuya; Ueda, Masahito; Nakamuro, Yumiko; Shimizu, Ken-ichi; Komarneni, Sridhar

    2004-06-01

    The cation exchange properties of alkali and alkaline earth metal cations at room temperature were investigated on an ultrafine, highly charged Na-4-mica (with the ideal mica composition Na4Mg6Al4Si4O20F4.xH2O). Ultrafine mica crystallites of 200 nm in size led to faster Sr2+ uptake kinetics in comparison to larger mica crystallites. The alkali metal ion (K+, Cs+, and Li+) exchange uptake was rapid, and complete exchange occurred within 30 min. For the alkaline earth metal ions Ba2+, Ca2+, and Mg2+, however, the exchange uptake required lengthy periods from 3 days to 4 weeks to be completed, similar to its Sr uptake, as previously reported. Kinetic models of the modified Freundlich and parabolic diffusion were examined for the experimental data on the Ba2+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ uptakes. The modified Freundlich model described well the Ba2+ ion uptake kinetics as well as that for the Sr2+ ion, while for the Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions the parabolic diffusion model showed better fitting. The alkali and alkaline earth ion exchange isotherms were also determined in comparison to the Sr2+ exchange isotherm. The thermodynamic equilibria for these cations were compared by using Kielland plots evaluated from the isotherms. PMID:15984251

  12. Monte Carlo simulation of DNA fragment hydration in the presence of alkaline cations using novel atom-atom potential functions.

    PubMed

    Teplukhin, A V; Malenkov, G G; Poltev, V I

    1998-10-01

    The set of atom-atom potential functions specially adjusted to simulation of nucleic acid fragment hydration (Poltev, Grokhlina & Malenkov, J. Biomol. Struct. Dyn. 2, 413, 1984) is extended by including alkaline cation interactions. The choice of new potential functions was realized using experimental data on crystal hydrates of nucleotides and related compounds as well as thermodynamic data on ion solutions. The extended set of potential functions allows to reproduce many features of interactions between alkaline cations and nucleic acid fragments in water solutions. The sites of preferential cation localization near bases and phosphate groups were obtained and examined. The potential functions reproduce the dissociation tendency of cation-phosphate group and cation-base complexes in aqueous medium. Pathways of cation dissociations from nucleic acid components have been studied, and metastable water-bridged positions of cations near bases and phosphate group have been revealed. PMID:9833668

  13. Arsenic and major cation hydrogeochemistry of the Central Victorian (Australia) surface waters.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Khawar; Dowling, Kim

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on the major cations (Ca, Mg, Na and K) and arsenic (As) compositions of surface waters collected from major creeks, rivers and lakes in Central Victoria (Australia). The surface waters were found to be neutral to alkaline (pH 6.7-9.4), oxidised (average redox potential (Eh) about 130 mV) and showed variable concentrations of dissolved ions (EC, about 51-4386 microS/cm). The concentrations of dissolved major cations in surface waters were found to be in the order of Na>Mg>Ca>K and in soils the contents of metals followed an order of abundance as: Ca>Mg>K>Na. While Na was the least abundant in soils, it registered the highest dissolved cation in surface waters. Of the four major cations, the average concentration of Na (98.7 mg/L) was attributed to the weathering of feldspars and atmospheric input. Relatively highly dissolved concentrations of Na and Mg compared with the world average values of rivers reflected the weathering of rock and soil minerals within the catchments. The As soil level is naturally high (linked to lithology) as reflected by high background soil values and mining operations are also considered to be a contributory factor. Under relatively alkaline-oxidative conditions low mobility of dissolved As (average about 7.9 microg/L) was observed in most of the surface waters with a few higher values (> 15 microg/L) around a sewage disposal site and mine tailings. Arsenic in soils is slowly released into water under alkaline and/or lower Eh conditions. The efficient sink of Fe, Al and Mn oxides acts as a barrier against the As release under near neutral-oxidising conditions. High As content (average about 28.3 mg/kg) in soils was found to be associated with Fe-hydroxides as revealed by XRD and SEM analysis. The dissolved As concentration was found to be below the recommended maximum levels for recreational water in all surface waters (lakes and rivers) in the study area. Catchment lithology exerted the fundamental control on surface

  14. Molecular mechanics (MM3) calculations on benzocrown ether complexes of the alkali and alkaline earth cations

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Linrong R.; Hay, B.P.

    1997-12-31

    The new metal-ligand feature of MM3 has been extended to benzocrown ether complexes of alkali and alkaline earth cations. Over 50 complexes were compared with the crystal structures retrieved from Cambridge Crystal Database. The results agree with experimental data. The averages of absolute deviations between experimental and calculated structural features are: metal-oxygen bond length, 0.03 {angstrom}; Metal-oxygen-carbon angles, 4.1{degrees}; and Metal-oxygen-carbon-carbon angles: 5.1{degrees}. Development of structure-function relationships is in progress.

  15. Selective trans-membrane transport of alkali and alkaline earth cations through graphene oxide membranes based on cation-π interactions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Pengzhan; Zheng, Feng; Zhu, Miao; Song, Zhigong; Wang, Kunlin; Zhong, Minlin; Wu, Dehai; Little, Reginald B; Xu, Zhiping; Zhu, Hongwei

    2014-01-28

    Graphene and graphene oxide (G-O) have been demonstrated to be excellent filters for various gases and liquids, showing potential applications in areas such as molecular sieving and water desalination. In this paper, the selective trans-membrane transport properties of alkali and alkaline earth cations through a membrane composed of stacked and overlapped G-O sheets ("G-O membrane") are investigated. The thermodynamics of the ion transport process reveal that the competition between the generated thermal motions and the interactions of cations with the G-O sheets results in the different penetration behaviors to temperature variations for the considered cations (K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), and Ba(2+)). The interactions between the studied metal atoms and graphene are quantified by first-principles calculations based on the plane-wave-basis-set density functional theory (DFT) approach. The mechanism of the selective ion trans-membrane transportation is discussed further and found to be consistent with the concept of cation-π interactions involved in biological systems. The balance between cation-π interactions of the cations considered with the sp(2) clusters of G-O membranes and the desolvation effect of the ions is responsible for the selectivity of G-O membranes toward the penetration of different ions. These results help us better understand the ion transport process through G-O membranes, from which the possibility of modeling the ion transport behavior of cellular membrane using G-O can be discussed further. The selectivity toward different ions also makes G-O membrane a promising candidate in areas of membrane separations. PMID:24401025

  16. Extraction of alkaline earth and actinide cations by mixtures of Di(2-ethylhexyl)alkylenediphosphonic acids and neutral synergists.

    SciTech Connect

    McAlister, D. R.; Chiarizia, R.; Dietz, M. L.; Herlinger, A. W.; Zalupski, P. R.; Chemistry; Loyola Univ.

    2002-09-18

    The synergistic extraction of alkaline earth (Ca{sup 2+}, Sr{sup 2+}, Ba{sup 2+} and Ra{sup 2+}) and actinide (Am{sup 3+}, UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and Th{sup 4+}) cations from aqueous nitric acid solutions by mixtures of P,P'-di(2-ethylhexyl) methylene-(H{sub 2}DEH[MDP]), ethylene-(H{sub 2}DEH[EDP]), and butylene-(H{sub 2}DEH[BuDP]) diphosphonic acids and neutral extractants in o-xylene has been investigated. The cis-syn-cis and cis-anti-cis stereoisomers of dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DCH18C6), the unsubstituted 21-crown-7 (21C7) and dicyclohexano-21-crown-7 (DCH21C7) were used as neutral synergists of the crown ether type. For Am(III) synergistic effects were also investigated using neutral organophosphorus esters, such as, tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP), diamyl amylphosphonate (DA[AP]) and tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) as co-extractants. In all systems investigated, no synergistic extraction enhancement was observed for actinide ions. For the alkaline earth cations, synergistic effects were only observed when mixtures of H{sub 2}DEH[EDP] or H{sub 2}DEH-[BuDP] with DCH18C6 were used to extract Sr{sup 2+}, Ba{sup 2+} and Ra{sup 2+}. No synergistic effects were observed for the extraction of alkaline earth cations by H{sub 2}DEH[MDP] or for the extraction of Ca{sup 2+} by any of the diphosphonic acids studied. The synergistic effects obtained with DCH18C6 were significantly higher for the cis-syn-cis than for the cis-anti-cis stereoisomer.

  17. Preparation of decarboxylic-functionalized weak cation exchanger and application for simultaneous separation of alkali, alkaline earth and transition metals.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yahui; Gan, Yihui; He, Chengxia; Yang, Bingcheng; Guo, Zhimou; Liang, Xinmiao

    2016-06-01

    A novel weak cation exchanger (WCX) with dicarboxyl groups functionalized has been developed by clicking mercaptosuccinic acid onto silica gel. The simple synthesis starts with modification of silica gel with triethoxyvinylsilane, followed by efficient coupling vinyl-bonded silica with mercaptosuccinic acid via a "thiol-ene" click reaction. The obtained WCX demonstrated good separation and high selectivity towards common metals. Simultaneous separation of 10 alkali, alkaline earth and transition metals was achieved within 12min. Ion exchange and complex mechanism dominates the separation process. Its utility was demonstrated for determination of metals in tap water. PMID:27130093

  18. An effective approach for alleviating cation-induced backbone degradation in aromatic ether-based alkaline polymer electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Han, Juanjuan; Liu, Qiong; Li, Xueqi; Pan, Jing; Wei, Ling; Wu, Ying; Peng, Hanqing; Wang, Ying; Li, Guangwei; Chen, Chen; Xiao, Li; Lu, Juntao; Zhuang, Lin

    2015-02-01

    Aromatic ether-based alkaline polymer electrolytes (APEs) are one of the most popular types of APEs being used in fuel cells. However, recent studies have demonstrated that upon being grafted by proximal cations some polar groups in the backbone of such APEs can be attacked by OH(-), leading to backbone degradation in an alkaline environment. To resolve this issue, we performed a systematic study on six APEs. We first replaced the polysulfone (PS) backbone with polyphenylsulfone (PPSU) and polyphenylether (PPO), whose molecular structures contain fewer polar groups. Although improved stability was seen after this change, cation-induced degradation was still obvious. Thus, our second move was to replace the ordinary quaternary ammonia (QA) cation, which had been closely attached to the polymer backbone, with a pendant-type QA (pQA), which was linked to the backbone through a long side chain. After a stability test in a 1 mol/L KOH solution at 80 °C for 30 days, all pQA-type APEs (pQAPS, pQAPPSU, and pQAPPO) exhibited as low as 8 wt % weight loss, which is close to the level of the bare backbone (5 wt %) and remarkably lower than those of the QA-type APEs (QAPS, QAPPSU, and QAPPO), whose weight losses under the same conditions were >30%. The pQA-type APEs also possessed clear microphase segregation morphology, which led to ionic conductivities that were higher, and water uptakes and degrees of membrane swelling that were lower, than those of the QA-type APEs. These observations unambiguously indicate that designing pendant-type cations is an effective approach to increasing the chemical stability of aromatic ether-based APEs. PMID:25594224

  19. Separation of alkali, alkaline earth and rare earth cations by liquid membranes containing macrocyclic carriers. Third progress report, September 1, 1980-April 1, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, J.J.

    1981-04-15

    The overall objective of this project is to study the use of liquid membrane systems employing macrocyclic ligand carriers in making separations among metal cations. During the third year of the project, work continued in the development of a mathematical model to describe cation transport. The model was originally developed to describe the relationship between cation transport rate (J/sub M/) and the cation-macrocycle stability constant (K). The model was tested by determining the rates of transport of alkali and alkaline earth cations through chloroform membranes containing carrier ligands where the stability constants for their reaction with cations in methanol were known. From the results, it is clear that the model correctly describes the dependence of J/sub M/ on log K. The model also correctly describes the effect of cation concentration and carrier concentration on cation transport rates, as detailed in the previous progress report. During the third year of the project, the transport model was expanded so as to apply to competitive transport of cations from mixtures of two cations in the source aqueous phase. Data were collected under these conditions and the ability of the model to predict the flux of each cation was tested. Representative data of this type are presented along with corresponding data which were obtained when each cation was transported by the same carrier from a source phase containing only that cation. Comparison of transport rates determined under the two experimental conditions indicates that the relationship between the two sets of data is complex. To date, a few of these data involving transport from binary cation mixtures have been tested against the transport model. It was found that the model correctly predicts the cation fluxes from cation mixtures. These preliminary results indicate that the transport model can successfully predict separation factors when cation mixtures are used.

  20. Phosphate glass electrode with good selectivity for alkaline-earth cations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Truesdell, A.H.; Pommer, A.M.

    1963-01-01

    A phosphate glass has been found to have a significant electrode specificity toward alkaline-earth ions. The order of selectivity is 2H + > Ba++ > Sr++ > Ca++ > 2K+ > 2Na+ > Mg++. Exchange properties are discussed in relation to possible structure. Its use to determine activity of Ca++ in natural systems containing Mg++ is suggested.

  1. 1H and 23Na MAS NMR spectroscopy of cationic species in CO2 selective alkaline earth metal porous silicoaluminophosphates prepared via liquid and solid state ion exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arévalo-Hidalgo, Ana G.; Dugar, Sneha; Fu, Riqiang; Hernández-Maldonado, Arturo J.

    2012-07-01

    The location of extraframework cations in Sr2+ and Ba2+ ion-exchanged SAPO-34 was estimated by means of 1H and 23Na MAS NMR spectroscopy and spectral deconvolution. Incorporation of the alkaline earth metal cations onto the SAPO framework was achieved via liquid state ion exchange, coupled partial detemplation/solid-state ion exchange, and combination of both techniques. MAS NMR revealed that the level of ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations near hexagonal prisms (site SI), which are relatively difficult to exchange with the alkaline earth metal due to steric and charge repulsion criteria. In addition, the presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange of otherwise tenacious hydrogen as corroborated by unit cell compositional data as well as enhanced CO2 adsorption at low partial pressures. The extraframework ammonium species were produced from partial detemplation of the structure-directing agent employed for the SAPO-34 synthesis, tetraethylammonium.

  2. Combined Utilization of Cation Exchanger and Neutral Receptor to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Moyer, Bruce A.

    2004-03-29

    In this report, novel approaches to the selective liquid-liquid extraction separation of sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from high-level alkaline tank waste will be discussed. Sodium hydroxide can be successfully separated from alkaline tank-waste supernatants by weakly acidic lipophilic hydroxy compounds via a cation-exchange mechanism referred to as pseudo hydroxide extraction. In a multi-cycle process, as sodium hydroxide in the aqueous phase becomes depleted, it is helpful to have a neutral sodium receptor in the extraction system to exploit the high nitrate concentration in the waste solution to promote sodium removal by an ion-pair extraction process. Simultaneous utilization of an ionizable organic hydroxy compound and a neutral extractant (crown ether) in an organic phase results in the synergistic enhancement of ion exchange and improved separation selectivity due to the receptor's strong and selective sodium binding. Moreover, combination of the hydroxy compound and the crown ether provides for mutually increased solubility, even in a non-polar organic solvent. Accordingly, application of Isopar{reg_sign} L, a kerosene-like alkane solvent, becomes feasible. This investigation involves examination of such dual-mechanism extraction phases for sodium extraction from simulated and actual salt cake waste solutions. Sodium salts can be regenerated upon the contact of the loaded extraction phases with water. Finally, conditions of potential extraction/strip cycling will be discussed.

  3. Complexation of Donor-Acceptor Substituted Aza-Crowns with Alkali and Alkaline Earth Metal Cations. Charge Transfer and Recoordination in Excited State.

    PubMed

    Volchkov, Valery V; Gostev, Fedor E; Shelaev, Ivan V; Nadtochenko, Viktor A; Dmitrieva, Svetlana N; Gromov, Sergey P; Alfimov, Mikhail V; Melnikov, Mikhail Ya

    2016-03-01

    Complexation between two aza-15-crown-5 ethers bearing electron donor and acceptor fragments and alkali and alkaline earth perchlorates has been studied using absorption, steady-state fluorescence and femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. The spectral-luminescent parameters, the stability and dissociation constants of the complexes were calculated. The intramolecular charge transfer reaction takes place both in the excited state of the crowns and their complexes 1:1; the latter is subjected to photorecoordination resulting in a weakening or a complete disruption of coordination bond between nitrogen atom and metal cation, disposed within a cavity of the crown. The compounds investigated can be viewed as novel optical molecular sensors for alkali and alkaline-earth metal cations. The photoejection of a metal cation into the bulk was not observed. PMID:26670689

  4. Major discrepancies between results obtained with two different methods for evaluating DNA damage: alkaline elution and alkaline unwinding. Possible explanations.

    PubMed

    Taningher, M; Bordone, R; Russo, P; Grilli, S; Santi, L; Parodi, S

    1987-01-01

    The fluorometric assay of DNA alkaline unwinding, developed by Birnboim and Jevcak (Cancer Res 41: 1889-1892, 1981) was applied to rat liver DNA, after treatment in vivo. N-nitrosodimethylamine, for which DNA damage in rat liver has been extensively investigated, was tested as a standard compound. The results were in complete agreement (both in terms of damage and repair) with data from the literature and with our own results obtained with other methods of detecting DNA alkaline fragmentation. Sensitivity was also of the same order of that of usual methods, with the effect of 0.3 mg/Kg of N-nitrosodimethylamine being detectable. Other DNA damaging carcinogens such as 1,2-dimethylhydrazine, 2-naphthylamine and dacarbazine were also correctly detected. Compounds like nitrofurantoin, benzoin and caprolactam, which appeared clearly positive with the alkaline elution technique, but for which genotoxicity and carcinogenicity are doubtful (nitrofurantoin) or most likely negative (benzoin and caprolactam), gave negative results with this method. This is also in agreement with previous results, observed using a different approach to measuring DNA unwinding. On the basis of these and other observations, we suggest that, under certain conditions, the alkaline elution technique is perhaps not only sensitive to DNA breaks but also to changes in chromatin conformation. Unwinding methods could be more specific in the detection of DNA fragmentations. PMID:3674758

  5. Linking trace element variations with macronutrients and major cations in marine mussels Mytilus edulis and Perna viridis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fengjie; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2015-09-01

    Marine mussels have long been used as biomonitors of contamination of trace elements, but little is known about whether variation in tissue trace elements is significantly associated with those of macronutrients and major cations. The authors examined the variability of macronutrients and major cations and their potential relationships with bioaccumulation of trace elements. The authors analyzed the concentrations of macronutrients (C, N, P, S), major cations (Na, Mg, K, Ca), and trace elements (Al, V, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Mo, Cd, Ba, Pb) in the whole soft tissues of marine mussels Mytilus edulis and Perna viridis collected globally from 21 sites. The results showed that 12% to 84% of the variances in the trace elements was associated with major cations, and the tissue concentration of major cations such as Na and Mg in mussels was a good proxy for ambient seawater concentrations of the major cations. Specifically, bioaccumulation of most of the trace elements was significantly associated with major cations, and the relationships of major cations with trace cations and trace oxyanions were totally opposite. Furthermore, 14% to 69% of the variances in the trace elements were significantly associated with macronutrients. Notably, more than half of the variance in the tissue concentrations of As, Cd, V, Ba, and Pb was explained by the variance in macronutrients in one or both species. Because the tissue macronutrient concentrations were strongly associated with animal growth and reproduction, the observed coupling relationships indicated that these biological processes strongly influenced the bioaccumulation of some trace elements. The present study indicated that simultaneous quantification of macronutrients and major cations with trace elements can improve the interpretation of biomonitoring data. PMID:25900884

  6. The use of laboratory-determined ion exchange parameters in the predictive modelling of field-scale major cation migration in groundwater over a 40-year period.

    PubMed

    Carlyle, Harriet F; Tellam, John H; Parker, Karen E

    2004-01-01

    An attempt has been made to estimate quantitatively cation concentration changes as estuary water invades a Triassic Sandstone aquifer in northwest England. Cation exchange capacities and selectivity coefficients for Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), and Mg(2+) were measured in the laboratory using standard techniques. Selectivity coefficients were also determined using a method involving optimized back-calculation from flushing experiments, thus permitting better representation of field conditions; in all cases, the Gaines-Thomas/constant cation exchange capacity (CEC) model was found to be a reasonable, though not perfect, first description. The exchange parameters interpreted from the laboratory experiments were used in a one-dimensional reactive transport mixing cell model, and predictions compared with field pumping well data (Cl and hardness spanning a period of around 40 years, and full major ion analyses in approximately 1980). The concentration patterns predicted using Gaines-Thomas exchange with calcite equilibrium were similar to the observed patterns, but the concentrations of the divalent ions were significantly overestimated, as were 1980 sulphate concentrations, and 1980 alkalinity concentrations were underestimated. Including representation of sulphate reduction in the estuarine alluvium failed to replicate 1980 HCO(3) and pH values. However, by including partial CO(2) degassing following sulphate reduction, a process for which there is 34S and 18O evidence from a previous study, a good match for SO(4), HCO(3), and pH was attained. Using this modified estuary water and averaged values from the laboratory ion exchange parameter determinations, good predictions for the field cation data were obtained. It is concluded that the Gaines-Thomas/constant exchange capacity model with averaged parameter values can be used successfully in ion exchange predictions in this aquifer at a regional scale and over extended time scales, despite the numerous assumptions inherent in

  7. Effect of the alkaline cation size on the conductivity in gel polymer electrolytes and their influence on photo electrochemical solar cells.

    PubMed

    Bandara, T M W J; Fernando, H D N S; Furlani, M; Albinsson, I; Dissanayake, M A K L; Ratnasekera, J L; Mellander, B-E

    2016-04-20

    has been reported to decrease with the increasing size of the cation. However, in this work, it follows an opposite trend highlighting a major difference between liquid and quasi-solid electrolytes on the solar cell performance. PMID:27040991

  8. Hydration thermodynamics of the SWy-1 montmorillonite saturated with alkali and alkaline-earth cations: A predictive model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieillard, Philippe; Blanc, Philippe; Fialips, Claire I.; Gailhanou, Hélène; Gaboreau, Stéphane

    2011-10-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the thermodynamic equilibria between water and a homo-ionic montmorillonite SWy-1 saturated by different cations. The choice of this smectite is justified by the large set of experimental data available from the literature for eight different interlayer cations: Na +, K +, Rb +, Cs +, Mg 2+, Ca 2+, Sr 2+, and Ba 2+. In particular, studies by Cases et al. (1992, 1997) and Bérend et al. (1995) are providing heat of adsorption data, pairs of desorption-adsorption isotherms, and information about the partition of adsorption-desorption water molecules between external surfaces and internal spaces. By calculating the effective amount of hydration water as the difference between the so-called gravimetric water and the surface covering water, a thermodynamic model was then developed, based on the concept of Ransom and Helgeson (1994) considering an asymmetric subregular binary solid solution between a fully hydrated and a anhydrous smectite. A set of six thermodynamic parameters ( ΔH∘hyd,S∘hyd and four Margules parameters) was extracted by a least square method from measurements of enthalpies of adsorption and paired adsorption-desorption isotherms for each interlayer cation. These six initial parameters were then used to determine a complete set of standard thermodynamic hydration parameters ( ΔH∘hyd,ΔG∘hyd,ΔS∘hyd, heat capacity, molar volume, and number of interlayer H 2O) and quantify, for each cation, the number of moles of hydration water molecules as a function of relative humidity and temperature. The validation of the standard state thermodynamic properties of hydration for each end member was carried out using three approaches: (1) a comparison with experimental isotherms obtained on hetero-ionic and homo-ionic SWy-1 smectite at different temperatures; (2) a comparison with the experimental integral enthalpy and entropy of hydration of the SWy-1 smectite; and (3) a comparison with experimental isotherms

  9. {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy of cationic species in CO{sub 2} selective alkaline earth metal porous silicoaluminophosphates prepared via liquid and solid state ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Arevalo-Hidalgo, Ana G.; Dugar, Sneha; Fu, Riqiang; Hernandez-Maldonado, Arturo J.

    2012-07-15

    The location of extraframework cations in Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion-exchanged SAPO-34 was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy and spectral deconvolution. Incorporation of the alkaline earth metal cations onto the SAPO framework was achieved via liquid state ion exchange, coupled partial detemplation/solid-state ion exchange, and combination of both techniques. MAS NMR revealed that the level of ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations near hexagonal prisms (site SI), which are relatively difficult to exchange with the alkaline earth metal due to steric and charge repulsion criteria. In addition, the presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange of otherwise tenacious hydrogen as corroborated by unit cell compositional data as well as enhanced CO{sub 2} adsorption at low partial pressures. The extraframework ammonium species were produced from partial detemplation of the structure-directing agent employed for the SAPO-34 synthesis, tetraethylammonium. - Graphical abstract: MAS NMR was used to elucidate the position the cationic species in alkaline earth metal exchanged silicoaluminophosphates. These species played a significant role during the ion exchange process and, therefore, the materials ultimate CO{sub 2} adsorption performance. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Location of extraframework Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} cations was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Level of Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion exchanged SAPOs are outstanding CO{sub 2} adsorbents.

  10. Cardiac ryanodine receptor: Selectivity for alkaline earth metal cations points to the EF-hand nature of luminal binding sites.

    PubMed

    Gaburjakova, Jana; Gaburjakova, Marta

    2016-06-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that the regulation of cardiac ryanodine receptor (RYR2) by luminal Ca(2+) is mediated by luminal binding sites located on the RYR2 channel itself and/or its auxiliary protein, calsequestrin. The localization and structure of RYR2-resident binding sites are not known because of the lack of a high-resolution structure of RYR2 luminal regions. To obtain the first structural insight, we probed the RYR2 luminal face stripped of calsequestrin by alkaline earth metal divalents (M(2+): Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Sr(2+) or Ba(2+)). We show that the RYR2 response to caffeine at the single-channel level is significantly modified by the nature of luminal M(2+). Moreover, we performed competition experiments by varying the concentration of luminal M(2+) (Mg(2+), Sr(2+) or Ba(2+)) from 8mM to 53mM and investigated its ability to compete with 1mM luminal Ca(2+). We demonstrate that all tested M(2+) bind to exactly the same RYR2 luminal binding sites. Their affinities decrease in the order: Ca(2+)>Sr(2+)>Mg(2+)~Ba(2+), showing a strong correlation with the M(2+) affinity of the EF-hand motif. This indicates that the RYR2 luminal binding regions and the EF-hand motif likely share some structural similarities because the structure ties directly to the function. PMID:26849106

  11. Effect of metal cation replacement on the electronic structure of metalorganic halide perovskites: Replacement of lead with alkaline-earth metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazoki, Meysam; Jacobsson, T. Jesper; Hagfeldt, Anders; Boschloo, Gerrit; Edvinsson, Tomas

    2016-04-01

    Organic and inorganic lead halogen perovskites, and in particular, C H3N H3Pb I3 , have during the last years emerged as a class of highly efficient solar cell materials. Herein we introduce metalorganic halogen perovskite materials for energy-relevant applications based on alkaline-earth metals. Based on the classical notion of Goldschmidt's rules and quantum mechanical considerations, the three alkaline-earth metals, Ca, Sr, and Ba, are shown to be able to exchange lead in the perovskite structure. The three alkaline-earth perovskites, C H3N H3Ca I3,C H3N H3Sr I3 , and C H3N H3Ba I3 , as well as the reference compound, C H3N H3Pb I3 , are in this paper investigated with density functional theory (DFT) calculations, which predict these compounds to exist as stable perovskite materials, and their electronic properties are explored. A detailed analysis of the projected molecular orbital density of states and electronic band structure from DFT calculations were used for interpretation of the band-gap variations in these materials and for estimation of the effective masses of the electrons and holes. Neglecting spin-orbit effects, the band gap of MACa I3,MASr I3 , and MABa I3 were estimated to be 2.95, 3.6, and 3.3 eV, respectively, showing the relative change expected for metal cation exchange. The shifts in the conduction band (CB) edges for the alkaline-earth perovskites were quantified using scalar relativistic DFT calculations and tight-binding analysis, and were compared to the situation in the more extensively studied lead halide perovskite, C H3N H3Pb I3 , where the change in the work function of the metal is the single most important factor in tuning the CB edge and band gap. The results show that alkaline-earth-based organometallic perovskites will not work as an efficient light absorber in photovoltaic applications but instead could be applicable as charge-selective contact materials. The rather high CB edge and the wide band gap together with the large

  12. Growth and major inorganic cation budgets of Atlantic salmon alevins at three ambient acidities

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, R.H.; Martin-Robichaud, D.J.

    1986-03-01

    Budgets of Ca/sup + +/, Mg/sup + +/, Na/sup +/, and K/sup +/ were determined for alevins of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar incubated at pH 6.8, 5.1, or 4.5. Accumulation of Ca/sup + +/, K/sup +/, and Na/sup +/ by larvae was reduced at pH 4.5 whereas Mg/sup + +/ accumulation was unaffected. The extrapolated dry weight of larvae at terminal yolk resorption was reduced from 27 mg at pH 6.8 to 5.1 to 20 mg at pH 4.5. The findings support the hypothesis that high acidity affects ion uptake from the ambient water more than yolk-to-larva transfer of cations.

  13. Cationized dextran nanoparticle-encapsulated CXCR4-siRNA enhanced correlation between CXCR4 expression and serum alkaline phosphatase in a mouse model of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Abedini, Fatemeh; Hosseinkhani, Hossein; Ismail, Maznah; Domb, Abraham J; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Chong, Pei Pei; Hong, Po-Da; Yu, Dah-Shyong; Farber, Ira-Yudovin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The failure of colorectal cancer treatments is partly due to overexpression of CXCR4 by tumor cells, which plays a critical role in cell metastasis. Moreover, serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels are frequently elevated in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. A polysaccharide, dextran, was chosen as the vector of siRNA. Spermine was conjugated to oxidized dextran by reductive amination process to obtain cationized dextran, so-called dextran-spermine, in order to prepare CXCR4-siRNAs/dextran-spermine nanoparticles. The fabricated nanoparticles were used in order to investigate whether downregulation of CXCR4 expression could affect serum ALP in mouse models of colorectal cancer. Methods: Colorectal cancer was established in BALB/C mice following injection of mouse colon carcinoma cells CT.26WT through the tail vein. CXCR4 siRNA for two sites of the target gene was administered following injection of naked siRNA or siRNA encapsulated into nanoparticles. Results: In vivo animal data revealed that CXCR4 silencing by dextran-spermine nanoparticles significantly downregulated CXCR4 expression compared with naked CXCR4 siRNA. Furthermore, there was correlation between CXCR4 expression and serum ALP. Conclusion: CXCR4 siRNA/dextran-spermine nanoparticles appear to be highly effective, and may be suitable for further in vivo applications. Further research evaluation will be needed to determine the effect of CXCR4 silencing on serum ALP levels, which may be a useful marker to predict liver metastasis in colorectal cancer. PMID:22888250

  14. Lanthanum-rich fluorbritholite-(Ce) from young alkaline volcanic rock of Eifel (Germany) and its crystal structure. Cation ordering in britholites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubkova, N. V.; Chukanov, N. V.; Pekov, I. V.; Schäfer, C.; Yapaskurt, V. O.; Pushcharovsky, D. Yu.

    2015-09-01

    Structure (R=0.0213) of lanthanum-rich fluorbritholite (Ce) [(Ce2.47La2.31Nd0.22Pr0.13Y0.07)5.20Ca4.20Th0.27Mn0.19Sr0.09]9.95(Si5.37P0.63)6O24.16F1.95 from sanidinite in Laacher See, Eifel, Germany was studied on a monocrystal. The structure [space group P63/m, a = 9.58949 (13), c = 7.0289 (11) Å, V = 559.770 (14)Å3] is identical to structures of members of apatite supergroup. Relationships of major cations in polyhedra M(1)O9 = (Ca0.6 REE 0.4), and in polyhedral M(2)O6F = ( REE 0.7Ca0.3). Substantial structural order M(1) and M(2) is defined, simplified structural formula: (Ca, LREE)2( LREE,Ca)3(SiO4)3F. Analysis of data on crystal chemistry of britholite was carried out. It was demonstrated that distribution of cations on M(1)and M(2)-positions is always characteristic of partial structural order. Clear tendency of LREE concentration in M(2) position was noted.

  15. Separation of alkali, alkaline earth and rare earth cations by liquid membranes containing macrocyclic carriers. Fourth progress report, 1 November 1981-31 July 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, J J; Izatt, R M

    1982-07-31

    The H/sub 2/O-CHCl/sub 3/-H/sub 2/O liquid membrane system was characterized with respect to the effect on cation (K/sup +/) transport rate of salt concentration and anion type. A bulk liquid membrane cell was used. A mathematical model for cation flux is being developed for several cations, several macrocycles, and mixtures of two or three cations. Eu/sup 3 +/ was not transported by 18-crown-6, but its reduced from Eu/sup 2 +/ was. Cation transport properties of calixarenes are also being investigated. Emulsion membrane systems were studied as a way of increasing the cation transport. Pb/sup 2 +/ was found to be transported by dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 through the liquid membrane. Transport rates of metal cation nitrates were measured in a water-toluene-water emulsion membrane system. 14 figures, 7 tables. (DLC)

  16. Major basic protein, but not eosinophil cationic protein or eosinophil protein X, is related to atopy in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Koller, D Y; Halmerbauer, G; Müller, J; Frischer, T; Schierl, M

    1999-10-01

    Increased eosinophil granule proteins have been described in serum and sputum samples of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). It has been assumed that eosinophil degranulation is enhanced in atopic subjects - as in asthmatics. Since in CF no differences in eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), eosinophil protein X (EPX), and eosinophil peroxidase between atopic and nonatopic subjects have been detected, we investigated whether major basic protein (MBP) is increased in serum and sputum samples derived from atopic (n = 14) compared with nonatopic CF subjects (n = 26). In CF patients, high mean serum (sputum) levels of ECP 29.7 microg/l (2.7 mg/l), EPX 53.7 microg/l (7.9 mg/l), and MBP 984.6 microg/l but low sputum MBP levels (57.4 microg/l) were measured. In addition, in serum and in sputum samples, a significant correlation between MBP and ECP (P<0.03 and P<0.0001, respectively) or EPX (P<0.05 and P<0.0004, respectively) was detected. By subdivision of the patients into allergic and nonallergic subjects, significant differences were found for serum MBP values only(mean 1382.2 microg/l vs. 770.5 microg/l; P<0.0001), but not for ECP or EPX serum levels or for eosinophil proteins in sputum. Although no differences between atopic and nonatopic CF patients in ECP and EPX were found, serum MBP levels were higher in patients sensitized to inhalant allergens than in nonsensitized subjects. These results indicate differential release of eosinophil granule proteins in peripheral blood from eosinophils, and they also indicate that MBP in serum likely is to be a better discriminator of atopy in CF. PMID:10536888

  17. Stability constants and thermodynamic data for complexes of 12-crown-4 with alkali metal and alkaline-earth cations in methanol solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Buschmann, H.

    1987-03-01

    The formation of 1:1- and 2:1-complexes of the crown ether 12C4 with mono- and bivalent cations was studied in methanol solutions by calorimetric, potentiometric and conductometric titrations. It is shown that not all donor atoms of the ligand 12C4 take part in complex formation. The accuracy of the three experimental methods are checked by comparing the results for the complexation of alkali ions with crown ether 18C6.

  18. Syntheses and characterization of energetic compounds constructed from alkaline earth metal cations (Sr and Ba) and 1,2-bis(tetrazol-5-yl)ethane

    SciTech Connect

    Xia Zhengqiang; Chen Sanping; Wei Qing; Qiao Chengfang

    2011-07-15

    Two new energetic compounds, [M(BTE)(H{sub 2}O){sub 5}]{sub n} (M=Sr(1), Ba(2)) [H{sub 2}BTE=1,2-bis(tetrazol-5-yl)ethane], have been hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses reveal that they are isomorphous and exhibit 2D (4,4) net framework, generated by 4-connected Sr{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10}/Ba{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10} SBUs linked up by two independent binding modes of H{sub 2}BTE, and the resulting 2D structure is interconnected by hydrogen-bond and strong face to face {pi}-{pi} stacking interactions between two tetrazole rings to lead to a 3D supramolecular architecture. DSC measurements show that they have significant catalytic effects on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate. Moreover, the photoluminescence properties, thermogravimetric analyses, and flame colors of the as-prepared compounds are also investigated in this paper. - Graphical abstract: Two novel 2D isomorphous alkaline earth metal complexes were assembled by 4-connected Sr{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10}/Ba{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10} SBUs and two independent binding modes of H{sub 2}BTE ligands, and the catalytic performances toward thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate and photoluminescent properties of them were investigated. Highlights: > Two novel alkaline earth energetic coordination polymers have been prepared.{yields} Both structures are layered based on 4-connected Sr{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10}/Ba{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10} SBUs and two distinct H{sub 2}BTE coordination modes.{yields} The dehydrated products of the compounds possess good thermostability and significant catalytic effects on thermal decomposition of AP.

  19. Biotic ligand modeling approach: Synthesis of the effect of major cations on the toxicity of metals to soil and aquatic organisms.

    PubMed

    Ardestani, Masoud M; van Straalen, Nico M; van Gestel, Cornelis A M

    2015-10-01

    The biotic ligand model (BLM) approach is used to assess metal toxicity, taking into account the competition of other cations with the free metal ions for binding to the biotic ligand sites of aquatic and soil organisms. The bioavailable fraction of metals, represented by the free metal ion, is a better measure than the total concentration for assessing their potential risk to the environment. Because BLMs are relating toxicity to the fraction of biotic ligands occupied by the metal, they can be useful for investigating factors affecting metal bioaccumulation and toxicity. In the present review, the effects of major cations on the toxicity of metals to soil and aquatic organisms were comprehensively studied by performing a meta-analysis of BLM literature data. Interactions at the binding sites were shown to be species- and metal-specific. The main factors affecting the relationships between toxicity and conditional binding constants for metal binding at the biotic ligand appeared to be Ca(2+) , Mg(2+) , and protons. Other important characteristics of the exposure medium, such as levels of dissolved organic carbon and concentrations of other cations, should also be considered to obtain a proper assessment of metal toxicity to soil and aquatic organisms. PMID:25953362

  20. Activation of X-H and X-D bonds (X = O, N, C) by alkaline-earth metal monoxide cations: experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Bozović, Andrea; Bohme, Diethard K

    2009-07-28

    Experimental investigations are reported for reactions of MO (+) (M = Ca, Sr, and Ba) with elemental hydrides water, ammonia and methane proceeding in the gas phase at 295 +/- 3 K in helium buffer gas at a pressure of 0.35 +/- 0.01 Torr. Measurements were taken with an inductively-coupled plasma/selected-ion flow tube (ICP/SIFT) tandem mass spectrometer and a novel electrospray ion source/ion selection quadrupole/selected-ion flow tube/triple quadrupole (ESI/qQ/SIFT/QqQ) mass spectrometer. All three alkaline-earth metal oxide ions exclusively abstract a H-atom from the three hydrides with rate coefficients > 1 x 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). Formation of metal hydroxide ion was followed by sequential addition of water or ammonia, but not methane. Density functional calculations have provided potential energy surfaces for the X-H bond activations leading to H-atom abstraction as well as those for O-atom transfer and H(2)O elimination (with ammonia and methane). A comparison of experimental and theoretical isotope effects points toward a mechanism involving the direct atom transfer from XH and XD to O in MO (+)via a three-centered transition structure. PMID:19588017

  1. Design and synthesis of redox-switched lariat ethers and their application for transport of alkali and alkaline-Earth metal cations across supported liquid membrane.

    PubMed

    Awasthy, Anubhuti; Bhatnagar, Mamta; Tomar, Jyoti; Sharma, Uma

    2006-01-01

    A new class of redox-switched anthraquinone derived lariat ethers 1-(1-anthraquinonyloxy) 3, 6, 9 trioxaundecane 11-ol (M(1)), 1-(1-anthraquinonyloxy) 3, 6 dioxaoctane 9-ol (M(2)), 1-(1-anthraquinonyloxy) 3 oxapentane 5-ol (M(3)), 1-(1-anthraquinonyloxy) 3 oxapentane 5-butane (M(4)), 1-(1-anthraquinonyloxy) 3, 6 dioxaoctane 9-methane (M(5)) and 1-(1-anthraquinonyloxy) 3 oxapentane 5-methane (M(6)) have been synthesized and characterized by spectral analysis. These ionophores were used in liquid membrane carrier facilitated transport of main group metal cations across supported liquid membrane (SLM). Cellulose nitrate membrane was used as membrane support. Effect of various parameters such as variation in concentration of metal as well as ionophore, effect of chain length and end group of ionophore have been studied. The sequence of metal ions transported by ionophore M(1) is Na(+) > Li(+) > K(+) > Ca(2+) > Mg(2+) and the order of metal ions transported by ionophores (M(2)-M(6)) is Li(+) > Na(+) > K(+) > Ca(2+) > Mg(2+). Ionophore M(1) is selective for Na(+), Li(+), and K(+) and ionophores (M(2)-M(6)) are selective for Li(+) and Na(+). PMID:17497021

  2. Major Cation, Carbon System and Trace Element Chemistry in Pore Waters from a Depth Transect of Cores on the Iberian Margin: Implications for Paleoproxies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greaves, M.; Elderfield, H.; Hodell, D. A.; Skinner, L. C.; Sevilgen, D.; Grauel, A. L.; de la Fuente, M.; Misra, S.

    2014-12-01

    A significant body of work exists on the chemistry of pore waters from DSDP and ODP drilling cores (e.g. Gieskes 1975; Sayles 1981) showing large gradients in sea salt cations and anions interpreted in terms of diagenetic reactions such as the formation of Mg-rich clays and dolomite formation (Higgins and Schrag, 2010). Another class of diagenetic reactions involves the breakdown of organic matter and trace element behaviour (Froelich et al., 1979). The translation of chemical gradients into fluxes requires estimates of pore water chemistry across the sea water - sediment surface boundary. Additionally, the use of the chemistry of benthic foraminiferal calcite for seawater paleochemistry requires estimation of the chemistry of pore waters which may differ from that of bottom seawater because of diagenetic reactions. In this work we have collected multi core samples from 10 core sites on cruise RRS James Cook JC089 on the southwest Iberian continental margin. Pore waters were extracted from the core surface and at 1 cm depth intervals down core (typically to ~40 cm depth) using Rhizon samplers and analysed for Alkalinity, DIC, ∂13C and Na, K, Mg, Ca, Li, Mn, Fe, Ba, B, Sr by atomic emission spectrophotometry as well as O2 penetration and pH by microelectrodes. This has allowed us to inspect chemical behavior at the bottom water - sediment interface. Some examples of results are a large gradient in ∂13C of DIC, the similarity of zero O2 penetration followed by an increase in Mn concentration and then decrease to zero, the similarity of Li to Mn and, in contrast to much DSDP/ODP work, Ca2+ and Mg2+both decrease with depth in pore waters near the sediment surface. References: Gieskes J.M. Annu. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci. 3, 433 (1975). Sayles F. L. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta45, 1061 (1981). Higgins J.A. and D.P. Schrag. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta.74, 5039 (2010). Froelich, P.N., et al., Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta. 43, 1075 (1979).

  3. Stable isotopes in the source waters of the Yamuna and its tributaries: seasonal and altitudinal variations and relation to major cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalai, Tarun K.; Bhattacharya, S. K.; Krishnaswami, S.

    2002-12-01

    Water samples from the Yamuna and its tributaries, one of the major river systems draining the Himalaya, have been analysed for their stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopes during three seasons (summer, monsoon and post-monsoon). The data show clear seasonal and altitudinal variations; waters from higher altitudes and those collected during monsoon season are characterized by relatively depleted isotopic composition. Regression analysis of D-18O data of samples collected during summer and monsoon seasons shows that the slope of the best-fit lines are nearly identical to those of precipitation at New Delhi for the same period. The similarity in their slopes suggests that the isotopic composition of precipitation contributing water to these rivers are reasonably well preserved in both monsoon and non-monsoon seasons, however, during the non-monsoon period both rainfall and river waters carry signatures of evaporation. The deuterium excess in river waters during the three seasons though overlap with each other, the values during October are higher. This can be understood in terms of recycled moisture contributions to precipitation. The altitude effect for 18O in these waters is determined to be 0·11 per 100 m, a factor of about two less than that reported for the Ganga source waters from similar altitudinal range. The variability in altitude effects in rivers draining the Himalaya seems to be controlled by the amount effect associated with the monsoon. The significant spatial variability in altitude effect in these river basins, which are a few hundred kilometers apart, suggests that reconstruction of palaeoelevation in the Himalaya, based on 18O-altitude gradients, would depend critically on its proper assessment in the region. This study has established a relationship between total cation abundance and 18O in waters of the Yamuna mainstream; total cations (corrected for cyclic components) double for a 1·4 km decrease in altitude as the Yamuna flows downstream.

  4. Actinide cation-cation complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Stoyer, N.J.; Seaborg, G.T.

    1994-12-01

    The +5 oxidation state of U, Np, Pu, and Am is a linear dioxo cation (AnO{sub 2}{sup +}) with a formal charge of +1. These cations form complexes with a variety of other cations, including actinide cations. Other oxidation states of actinides do not form these cation-cation complexes with any cation other than AnO{sub 2}{sup +}; therefore, cation-cation complexes indicate something unique about AnO{sub 2}{sup +} cations compared to actinide cations in general. The first cation-cation complex, NpO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, was reported by Sullivan, Hindman, and Zielen in 1961. Of the four actinides that form AnO{sub 2}{sup +} species, the cation-cation complexes of NpO{sub 2}{sup +} have been studied most extensively while the other actinides have not. The only PuO{sub 2}{sup +} cation-cation complexes that have been studied are with Fe{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 3+} and neither one has had its equilibrium constant measured. Actinides have small molar absorptivities and cation-cation complexes have small equilibrium constants; therefore, to overcome these obstacles a sensitive technique is required. Spectroscopic techniques are used most often to study cation-cation complexes. Laser-Induced Photacoustic Spectroscopy equilibrium constants for the complexes NpO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, NpO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}Th{sup 4+}, PuO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, and PuO{sub 2}{sup +}{center_dot}Th{sup 4+} at an ionic strength of 6 M using LIPAS are 2.4 {plus_minus} 0.2, 1.8 {plus_minus} 0.9, 2.2 {plus_minus} 1.5, and {approx}0.8 M{sup {minus}1}.

  5. Alkaline pH Homeostasis in Bacteria: New Insights

    PubMed Central

    Padan, Etana; Bibi, Eitan; Ito, Masahiro; Krulwich, Terry A.

    2011-01-01

    The capacity of bacteria to survive and grow at alkaline pH values is of widespread importance in the epidemiology of pathogenic bacteria, in remediation and industrial settings, as well as in marine, plant-associated and extremely alkaline ecological niches. Alkali-tolerance and alkaliphily, in turn, strongly depend upon mechanisms for alkaline pH homeostasis, as shown in pH shift experiments and growth experiments in chemostats at different external pH values. Transcriptome and proteome analyses have recently complemented physiological and genetic studies, revealing numerous adaptations that contribute to alkaline pH homeostasis. These include elevated levels of transporters and enzymes that promote proton capture and retention (e.g. the ATP synthase and monovalent cation/proton antiporters), metabolic changes that lead to increased acid production, and changes in the cell surface layers that contribute to cytoplasmic proton retention. Targeted studies over the past decade have followed up the long-recognized importance of monovalent cations in active pH homeostasis. These studies show the centrality of monovalent cation/proton antiporters in this process while microbial genomics provides information about the constellation of such antiporters in individual strains. A comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of both eukaryotic and prokaryotic genome databases has identified orthologes from bacteria to humans that allow better understanding of the specific functions and physiological roles of the antiporters. Detailed information about the properties of multiple antiporters in individual strains is starting to explain how specific monovalent cation/proton antiporters play dominant roles in alkaline pH homeostasis in cells that have several additional antiporters catalyzing ostensibly similar reactions. New insights into the pH-dependent Na+/H+ antiporter NhaA that plays an important role in Escherichia coli have recently emerged from the determination of the structure

  6. Mercury Analysis of Acid- and Alkaline-Reduced Biological Samples: Identification of meta-Cinnabar as the Major Biotransformed Compound in Algae†

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, David; Budd, Kenneth; Lefebvre, Daniel D.

    2006-01-01

    The biotransformation of HgII in pH-controlled and aerated algal cultures was investigated. Previous researchers have observed losses in Hg detection in vitro with the addition of cysteine under acid reduction conditions in the presence of SnCl2. They proposed that this was the effect of Hg-thiol complexing. The present study found that cysteine-Hg, protein and nonprotein thiol chelates, and nucleoside chelates of Hg were all fully detectable under acid reduction conditions without previous digestion. Furthermore, organic (R-Hg) mercury compounds could not be detected under either the acid or alkaline reduction conditions, and only β-HgS was detected under alkaline and not under acid SnCl2 reduction conditions. The blue-green alga Limnothrix planctonica biotransformed the bulk of HgII applied as HgCl2 into a form with the analytical properties of β-HgS. Similar results were obtained for the eukaryotic alga Selenastrum minutum. No evidence for the synthesis of organomercurials such as CH3Hg+ was obtained from analysis of either airstream or biomass samples under the aerobic conditions of the study. An analytical procedure that involved both acid and alkaline reduction was developed. It provides the first selective method for the determination of β-HgS in biological samples. Under aerobic conditions, HgII is biotransformed mainly into β-HgS (meta-cinnabar), and this occurs in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic algae. This has important implications with respect to identification of mercury species and cycling in aquatic habitats. PMID:16391065

  7. Alkaline Band Formation in Chara corallina

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, William J.

    1979-01-01

    The nature of the transport system responsible for the establishment of alkaline bands on cells of Chara corallina was investigated. The transport process was found to be insensitive to external pH, provided the value was above a certain threshold. At this threshold (pH 5.1 to 4.8) the transport process was inactivated. Transport function could be recovered by raising the pH value of the external solution. The fastest rate of recovery was always obtained in the presence of exogenous HCO3−. Experiments in which plasmalemma integrity was modified using 10 millimolar K+ treatment were also performed. Alkaline band transport was significantly reduced in the presence of 10 millimolar K+, but the system did not recover, following return to 0.2 millimolar K+ solutions, until the transport site was reexposed to exogenous HCO3−. The influence of presence and absence of various cations on both alkaline band transport and total H14CO3− assimilation was examined. No specific cation requirement (mono- or divalent) was found for either process, except the previously established role of Ca2+ at the HCO3− transport site. The alkaline band transport process exhibited a general requirement for cations. This transport system could be partially or completely stalled in low cation solutions, or glass-distilled water, respectively. The results indicate that no cationic flux occurs across the plasmalemma in direct association with either the alkaline band or HCO3− transport systems. It is felt that the present results offer support for the hypothesis that an OH− efflux transport system (rather than a H+ influx system) is responsible for alkaline band development in C. corallina. The results support the hypothesis that OH− efflux is an electrogenic process. This OH− transport system also appears to contain two allosteric effector sites, involving an acidic group and a HCO3− ion. PMID:16660706

  8. Basalt as a solid source of calcium and alkalinity for the sequestration of carbon dioxide in building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, N. C.; Westfield, I.; Lu, P.; Bourcier, W. L.; Kendall, T.; Constantz, B. R.

    2010-12-01

    Motivated by the idea of converting waste carbon dioxide into usable building products, Calera Corporation has developed a multi-step process that sequesters CO2 as carbonate minerals in cementitious materials. Process inputs include dissolved divalent cations and alkalinity, both of which can be extracted from basalt. In one mode of the Calera process, the electrochemical production of alkalinity generates large volumes of hydrochloric acid as a by-product, which has been shown to effectively leach divalent cations from basalt while being neutralized by the basalt dissolution reaction. Using a 10:1 1M HCl solution to rock ratio, 3500 ppm Ca was extracted while the initial solution was neutralized to a pH of 2.60 in two weeks at a temperature of 80oC in an anoxic batch reactor. In this scenario, mineral carbonation occurs via three steps: electrochemical production of alkalinity, CO2 absorption by the alkaline stream, then precipitation by mixing the basalt-derived divalent cation stream and the CO2-containing alkaline stream. In a second scenario, alkalinity is extracted from basalt using an alkalinity capacitor, a weak acid. This solution may contain a proton source, such as ammonium chloride, or a hydroxyl acceptor, such as boric acid, but the main design constraint is that the pKa of the capacitor be high enough to deprontonate carbonic acid. The weak acid solution is mixed with basalt in an anoxic batch reactor and the dissolving rock consumes protons from the weak acid, generating the conjugate base. The solution rich in conjugate base then absorbs CO2 and the carbonate-rich solution is mixed with a calcium-rich stream to precipitate carbonate minerals. We have extracted up to 1100 mmol alkalinity per kg rock using an alkalinity capacitor, versus no more than 50 mmol alkalinity per kg rock using DI water as a solvent. Again, carbon sequestration occurs via three steps: alkalinity extraction from basalt, CO2 absorption, and finally carbonate precipitation

  9. Impacts of major cations (K(+), Na (+), Ca (2+), Mg (2+)) and protons on toxicity predictions of nickel and cadmium to lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) using exposure models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Vijver, Martina G; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M

    2014-04-01

    Biotic ligand models (BLM) explicitly accounting for hypothetical interactions with biotic ligands and bioavailability as dictated by water chemistry have been developed for various metals and different organisms. It is only recently that BLMs for plants have received increasing attention. Lettuce is one of the most important vegetable crops in the world. This study investigated the impacts of Ca(2+), Mg(2+), K(+), Na(+) and pH, on acute toxicity of Ni and Cd to butter-head lettuce seedlings (Lactuca sativa L.). 4-day assays with the root elongation inhibition (REI) as the endpoint were performed in hydroponic solutions. Magnesium was found to be the sole cation significantly enhancing the median inhibition concentration (IC50) of Ni(2+) with increasing concentration. By incorporating the competitive effects of Mg(2+), the Ni-toxicity prediction was improved significantly as compared to the total metal model (TMM) and the free ion activity model (FIAM). The conditional stability constants derived from the Ni-BLM were log K MgBL = 2.86, log K NiBL = 5.1, and f NiBL (50%)  = 0.57. A slight downtrend was observed in the 4-d IC50 of Cd(2+) at increasing H(+) concentrations, but this tendency was not consistent and statistically significant (p = 0.07) over the whole range. The overall variations of Cd-toxicity within the tested Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) concentration ranges were relatively small and not statistically significant. 80 % of lettuce REI by Cd could be explained using both TMM and FIAM instead of BLM in the present study. Thus, the mechanistically underpinned models for soil quality guidelines should be developed on a metal-specific basis across different exposure conditions. PMID:24510448

  10. ALP (Alkaline Phosphatase) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... known as: ALK PHOS; Alkp Formal name: Alkaline Phosphatase Related tests: AST ; ALT ; GGT ; Bilirubin ; Liver Panel ; Bone Markers ; Alkaline Phosphatase Isoenzymes; Bone Specific ALP All content on Lab ...

  11. Alkaline fuel cells applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordesch, Karl; Hacker, Viktor; Gsellmann, Josef; Cifrain, Martin; Faleschini, Gottfried; Enzinger, Peter; Fankhauser, Robert; Ortner, Markus; Muhr, Michael; Aronson, Robert R.

    On the world-wide automobile market technical developments are increasingly determined by the dramatic restriction on emissions as well as the regimentation of fuel consumption by legislation. Therefore there is an increasing chance of a completely new technology breakthrough if it offers new opportunities, meeting the requirements of resource preservation and emission restrictions. Fuel cell technology offers the possibility to excel in today's motive power techniques in terms of environmental compatibility, consumer's profit, costs of maintenance and efficiency. The key question is economy. This will be decided by the costs of fuel cell systems if they are to be used as power generators for future electric vehicles. The alkaline hydrogen-air fuel cell system with circulating KOH electrolyte and low-cost catalysed carbon electrodes could be a promising alternative. Based on the experiences of Kordesch [K. Kordesch, Brennstoffbatterien, Springer, Wien, 1984, ISBN 3-387-81819-7; K. Kordesch, City car with H 2-air fuel cell and lead-battery, SAE Paper No. 719015, 6th IECEC, 1971], who operated a city car hybrid vehicle on public roads for 3 years in the early 1970s, improved air electrodes plus new variations of the bipolar stack assembly developed in Graz are investigated. Primary fuel choice will be a major issue until such time as cost-effective, on-board hydrogen storage is developed. Ammonia is an interesting option. The whole system, ammonia dissociator plus alkaline fuel cell (AFC), is characterised by a simple design and high efficiency.

  12. The alkaline and alkaline-carbonatite magmatism from Southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruberti, E.; Gomes, C. D. B.; Comin-Chiaramonti, P.

    2015-12-01

    Early to Late Cretaceous lasting to Paleocene alkaline magmatism from southern Brazil is found associated with major extensional structural features in and around the Paraná Basin and grouped into various provinces on the basis of several data. Magmatism is variable in size, mode of occurrence and composition. The alkaline rocks are dominantly potassic, a few occurrences showing sodic affinity. The more abundant silicate rocks are evolved undersaturated to saturated in silica syenites, displaying large variation in igneous forms. Less evolved types are restricted to subvolcanic environments and outcrops of effusive suites occur rarely. Cumulatic mafic and ultramafic rock types are very common, particularly in the alkali-carbonatitic complexes. Carbonatite bodies are represented by Ca-carbonatites and Mg-carbonatites and more scarcely by Fe-carbonatites. Available radiometric ages for the alkaline rocks fit on three main chronological groups: around 130 Ma, subcoveal with the Early Cretaceous flood tholeiites of the Paraná Basin, 100-110 Ma and 80-90 Ma (Late Cretaceous). The alkaline magmatism also extends into Paleocene times, as indicated by ages from some volcanic lavas. Geochemically, alkaline potassic and sodic rock types are distinguished by their negative and positive Nb-Ta anomalies, respectively. Negative spikes in Nb-Ta are also a feature common to the associated tholeiitic rocks. Sr-Nd-Pb systematics confirm the contribution of both HIMU and EMI mantle components in the formation of the alkaline rocks. Notably, Early and Late Cretaceous carbonatites have the same isotopic Sr-Nd initial ratios of the associated alkaline rocks. C-O isotopic Sr-Nd isotopic ratios indicate typical mantle signature for some carbonatites and the influence of post-magmatic processes in others. Immiscibility of liquids of phonolitic composition, derived from mafic alkaline parental magmas, has been responsible for the origin of the carbonatites. Close association of alkaline

  13. The cation-π interaction.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Dennis A

    2013-04-16

    The chemistry community now recognizes the cation-π interaction as a major force for molecular recognition, joining the hydrophobic effect, the hydrogen bond, and the ion pair in determining macromolecular structure and drug-receptor interactions. This Account provides the author's perspective on the intellectual origins and fundamental nature of the cation-π interaction. Early studies on cyclophanes established that water-soluble, cationic molecules would forego aqueous solvation to enter a hydrophobic cavity if that cavity was lined with π systems. Important gas phase studies established the fundamental nature of the cation-π interaction. The strength of the cation-π interaction (Li(+) binds to benzene with 38 kcal/mol of binding energy; NH4(+) with 19 kcal/mol) distinguishes it from the weaker polar-π interactions observed in the benzene dimer or water-benzene complexes. In addition to the substantial intrinsic strength of the cation-π interaction in gas phase studies, the cation-π interaction remains energetically significant in aqueous media and under biological conditions. Many studies have shown that cation-π interactions can enhance binding energies by 2-5 kcal/mol, making them competitive with hydrogen bonds and ion pairs in drug-receptor and protein-protein interactions. As with other noncovalent interactions involving aromatic systems, the cation-π interaction includes a substantial electrostatic component. The six (four) C(δ-)-H(δ+) bond dipoles of a molecule like benzene (ethylene) combine to produce a region of negative electrostatic potential on the face of the π system. Simple electrostatics facilitate a natural attraction of cations to the surface. The trend for (gas phase) binding energies is Li(+) > Na(+) > K(+) > Rb(+): as the ion gets larger the charge is dispersed over a larger sphere and binding interactions weaken, a classical electrostatic effect. On other hand, polarizability does not define these interactions. Cyclohexane is

  14. The Cation-π Interaction

    PubMed Central

    DOUGHERTY, DENNIS A.

    2014-01-01

    CONSPECTUS The chemistry community now recognizes the cation-π interaction as a major force for molecular recognition, joining the hydrophobic effect, the hydrogen bond, and the ion pair in determining macromolecular structure and drug-receptor interactions. This Account provides the author’s perspective on the intellectual origins and fundamental nature of the cation-π interaction. Early studies on cyclophanes established that water-soluble, cationic molecules would forgo aqueous solvation to enter a hydrophobic cavity if that cavity was lined with π systems. Important gas phase studies established the fundamental nature of the cation-π interaction. The strength of the cation-π interaction – Li+ binds to benzene with 38 kcal/mol of binding energy; NH4+ with 19 kcal/mol– distinguishes it from the weaker polar-π interactions observed in the benzene dimer or water-benzene complexes. In addition to the substantial intrinsic strength of the cation-π interaction in gas phase studies, the cation-π interaction remains energetically significant in aqueous media and under biological conditions. Many studies have shown that cation-π interactions can enhance binding energies by 2 – 5 kcal/mol, making them competitive with hydrogen bonds and ion pairs in drug-receptor and protein-protein interactions. As with other noncovalent interactions involving aromatic systems, the cation-π interaction includes a substantial electrostatic component. The six (four) Cδ−–Hδ+ bond dipoles of a molecule like benzene (ethylene) combine to produce a region of negative electrostatic potential on the face of the π system. Simple electrostatics facilitate a natural attraction of cations to the surface. The trend for (gas phase) binding energies is Li+>Na+>K+>Rb+: as the ion gets larger the charge is dispersed over a larger sphere and binding interactions weaken, a classical electrostatic effect. On other hand, polarizability does not define these interactions. Cyclohexane

  15. Influence of alkaline suspended particles on the chemical composition of acid deposition in Kaohsiung City, Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, C.S.; Lin, Z.J.; Wu, M.Y.; Liu, J.I.; Yuan, C.

    1998-12-31

    This study investigated the influence of alkaline suspended particles on the chemical composition of acid deposition both temporally and spatially in Kaohsiung metropolitan area in Taiwan. During the period of January--December, 1996, both wet and dry deposition samples were collected by automatic acid precipitation samplers at six sampling sites which covered the entire metropolitan area. Major cations (NH{sub 4}{sup +}, K{sup +}, Na{sup +}, Ca{sup +2}, and Mg{sup +2}) and anions (F{sup {minus}}, Cl{sup {minus}}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, and SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2}) of acid deposition samples were analyzed in a central laboratory, while the pH value and conductivity of rainwater samples were measured in situ. Results from chemical analysis indicated that Ca{sup +2} was the most abundant cation in acid deposition samples. Major cations were Ca{sup +2} and NH{sub 4}{sup +}, while major anions were SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2} and NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. This study also revealed that the pH value, suspended solids, Ca{sup +2}, and NH{sub 4}{sup +} of rainwater decreased with rainy time in a sequential rainwater sampling process. It was estimated that approximately 80% of suspended particles could be washed out by rain droplets in the first hour of raining process. Therefore, alkaline suspended particles in the atmosphere played an very important role on the chemical composition of acid precipitation in Kaohsiung metropolitan area in Taiwan.

  16. Alkaline injection for enhanced oil recovery: a status report

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, E.H.; Berg, R.L.; Carmichael, J.D.; Weinbrandt, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    In the past several years, there has been renewed interest in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by alkaline injection. Alkaline solutions also are being used as preflushes in micellar/polymer projects. Several major field tests of alkaline flooding are planned, are in progress, or recently have been completed. Considerable basic research on alkaline injection has been published recently, and more is in progress. This paper summarizes known field tests and, where available, the amount of alkali injected and the performance results. Recent laboratory work, much sponsored by the U.S. DOE, and the findings are described. Alkaline flood field test plans for new projects are summarized.

  17. Alkaline "Permanent" Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacey, Antony

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of paper manufacturing processes and their effects on library materials focuses on the promotion of alkaline "permanent" paper, with less acid, by Canadian library preservation specialists. Standards for paper acidity are explained; advantages of alkaline paper are described, including decreased manufacturing costs; and recyclability is…

  18. Anodes for alkaline electrolysis

    DOEpatents

    Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev

    2011-02-01

    A method of making an anode for alkaline electrolysis cells includes adsorption of precursor material on a carbonaceous material, conversion of the precursor material to hydroxide form and conversion of precursor material from hydroxide form to oxy-hydroxide form within the alkaline electrolysis cell.

  19. Alkaline igneous rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Fitton, J.G.; Upton, B.G.J.

    1987-01-01

    In this volume, an international team of scientists provides an up-to-date overview of the nature, origin, and evolution of alkaline magmas. Particular attention is paid to carbonatites, lamprophyres, and lamproites which are rock suites of current interest not recently reviewed elsewhere. Recent work on the classical alkaline provinces of East Africa, South Greenland, and the Kola Peninsula is included together with reviews of other areas of alkaline magmatism in North and South America, East Greenland, Europe, West Africa, and the ocean basins. Other papers discuss the impact of experimental isotopic and geochemical studies of the petrogenesis of alkaline rocks. This book will be of interest to petrologists and geochemists studying alkaline igneous rocks, and to other earth scientists as a reference on the rapidly expanding field of igneous petrology.

  20. Alkaline battery operational methodology

    DOEpatents

    Sholklapper, Tal; Gallaway, Joshua; Steingart, Daniel; Ingale, Nilesh; Nyce, Michael

    2016-08-16

    Methods of using specific operational charge and discharge parameters to extend the life of alkaline batteries are disclosed. The methods can be used with any commercial primary or secondary alkaline battery, as well as with newer alkaline battery designs, including batteries with flowing electrolyte. The methods include cycling batteries within a narrow operating voltage window, with minimum and maximum cut-off voltages that are set based on battery characteristics and environmental conditions. The narrow voltage window decreases available capacity but allows the batteries to be cycled for hundreds or thousands of times.

  1. A two-year automated dripwater chemistry study in a remote cave in the tropical south Pacific: Using [Cl-] as a conservative tracer for seasalt contribution of major cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremaine, Darrel M.; Sinclair, Daniel J.; Stoll, Heather M.; Lagerström, Maria; Carvajal, Carlos P.; Sherrell, Robert M.

    2016-07-01

    Stalagmite Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios are commonly interpreted as proxies for past hydrologic conditions and are often used to supplement carbon and oxygen stable isotope records. While the processes that control these element ratios, including water-rock interaction, dripwater residence time, and upstream precipitation of calcite, are well understood in continental caves, there have been few investigations of dripwater Element/Ca (X/Ca) evolution in coastal marine caves where seasalt can have a strong influence on the incoming Mg/Ca ratio. We instrumented a marine cave on the remote South Pacific island of Niue to record daily cave microclimate, as well as weekly-integrated drip rates, dripwater oxygen and hydrogen isotopes, and dripwater chemistry over a period of twenty-two months. Using chloride as a conservative tracer for sea-spray, we calculate that seasalt input accounts for a large portion of dripwater Na, SO4, and Mg (89%, 93%, and 85% respectively) and a smaller portion of the Ca and Sr (19% and 17%). During the second year of this study a gradual decrease (by ∼18%) in dripwater chlorinity was observed, suggesting that an epikarst-hosted seasalt aerosol inventory was being diluted over time. Minor element to calcium ratios for B, K, Cl, SO4, Mg, Na, Sr, and Fe all strongly covary over the observation period, suggesting that although sea-spray plays a significant role in modulating incoming drip chemistry, prior calcite precipitation (PCP) dominates chemical evolution within the epikarst. During a prolonged drought episode, evaporative enrichments in dripwater δD and δ18O (+4‰ and 0.5‰, respectively) were observed to coincide with increased cation and anion concentrations, strong Ca removal via PCP, and increases in Sr/Ca and Mg/Ca ratios (28% and 34%, respectively), suggesting that concomitant enrichment in speleothem δ18O and X/Ca ratios may be interpreted as multi-proxy evidence for dry climate conditions. We use modern dripwater chemistry and

  2. The cubyl cation rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Jalife, Said; Mondal, Sukanta; Cabellos, Jose Luis; Martinez-Guajardo, Gerardo; Fernandez-Herrera, Maria A; Merino, Gabriel

    2016-02-25

    Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations and high-level ab initio computations predict that the cage-opening rearrangement of the cubyl cation to the 7H(+)-pentalenyl cation is feasible in the gas phase. The rate-determining step is the formation of the cuneyl cation with an activation barrier of 25.3 kcal mol(-1) at the CCSD(T)/def2-TZVP//MP2/def2-TZVP level. Thus, the cubyl cation is kinetically stable enough to be formed and trapped at moderate temperatures, but it may be rearranged at higher temperatures. PMID:26880646

  3. Chemical equilibria model of strontium-90 adsorption and transport in soil in response to dynamic alkaline conditions.

    PubMed

    Spalding, B P; Spalding, I R

    2001-01-15

    Strontium-90 is a major hazardous contaminant of radioactive wastewater and its processing sludges at many Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. In the past, such contaminated wastewater and sludge have been disposed in soil seepage pits, lagoons, or cribs often under highly perturbed alkaline conditions (pH > 12) where 90Sr solubility is low and its adsorption to surrounding soil is high. As natural weathering returns these soils to near-neutral or slightly acidic conditions, the adsorbed and precipitated calcium and magnesium phases, in which 90Sr is carried, change significantly in both nature and amounts. No comprehensive computational method has been formulated previously to quantitatively simulate the dynamics of 90Sr in the soil-groundwater environment under such dynamic and wide-ranging conditions. A computational code, the Hydrologic Utility Model for Demonstrating Integrated Nuclear Geochemical Environmental Responses (HUMDINGER), was composed to describe the changing equilibria of 90Sr in soil based on its causative chemical reactions including soil buffering, pH-dependent cation-exchange capacity, cation selectivity, and the precipitation/dissolution of calcium carbonate, calcium hydroxide, and magnesium hydroxide in response to leaching groundwater characteristics including pH, acid-neutralizing capacity, dissolved cations, and inorganic carbonate species. The code includes a simulation of one-dimensional transport of 90Sr through a soil column as a series of soil mixing cells where the equilibrium soluble output from one cell is applied to the next cell. Unamended soil leaching and highly alkaline soil treatments, including potassium hydroxide, sodium silicate, and sodium aluminate, were simulated and compared with experimental findings using large (10 kg) soil columns that were leached with 90Sr-contaminated groundwater after treatment. HUMDINGER's simulations were in good agreement with dynamic experimental observations of soil exchange capacity

  4. Surfactant-enhanced low-pH alkaline flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Peru, D.A. and Co., Columbia, MD . Research Div.); Lorenz, P.B. )

    1990-08-01

    This paper reports sodium bicarbonate investigated as a potential alkaline agent in surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding because it has very little tendency to dissolve silicate minerals. In experiments performed with Wilmington, CA, crude oil and three types of surfactants, the bicarbonate/surfactant combination caused a marked lowering of interfacial tension (IFT). Bicarbonate protected the surfactant against divalent cations and reduced adsorption of surfactant and polymer on various minerals. Coreflood test confirm that sodium bicarbonate plus surfactant can be an effective alternative to the high-pH flooding process.

  5. The potential of trees to record aluminum mobilization and changes in alkaline earth availability

    SciTech Connect

    Bondietti, E.A.; Baes, C.F. III; McLaughlin, S.B.

    1988-01-01

    The mobilization of exchangeable soil cations by atmospheric depositions of mineral acid anions and the distribution of polyvalent cations in the xylem are described to provide the basis for interpreting both radial concentration and concentration ratio patterns of polyvalent cations in annual growth rings of trees. There is strong circumstantial evidence that increases in Al:Ca ratios in annual rings are related to aluminum mobilization, and that changes in the availability of alkaline earth elements and radial growth rated may also be related to cation mobilization. Suggestions for further research are presented.

  6. Alkaline flooding injection strategy

    SciTech Connect

    French, T.R.; Josephson, C.B.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to improved alkali-surfactant flooding methods, and this includes determining the proper design of injection strategy. Several different injection strategies have been used or suggested for recovering heavy oils with surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding methods. Oil recovery was compared for four different injection strategies: (1) surfactant followed by polymer, (2) surfactant followed by alkaline polymer, (3) alkaline surfactant followed by polymer, and (4) alkali, surfactant, and polymer mixed in a single formulation. The effect of alkaline preflush was also studied under two different conditions. All of the oil recovery experiments were conducted under optimal conditions with a viscous, non-acidic oil from Hepler (KS) oil field. The coreflood experiments were conducted with Berea sandstone cores since field core was not available in sufficient quantity for coreflood tests. The Tucker sand of Hepler field is a Class I fluvial dominated deltaic reservoir, as classified by the Department of Energy, which has been selected as the site of a DOE-sponsored field pilot test.

  7. Sustained Osteomalacia of Long Bones Despite Major Improvement in Other Hypophosphatasia-Related Mineral Deficits in Tissue Nonspecific Alkaline Phosphatase/Nucleotide Pyrophosphatase Phosphodiesterase 1 Double-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, H. Clarke; Harmey, Dympna; Camacho, Nancy P.; Garimella, Rama; Sipe, Joseph B.; Tague, Sarah; Bi, Xiaohong; Johnson, Kristen; Terkeltaub, Robert; Millán, José Luis

    2005-01-01

    We have shown previously that the hypomineralization defects of the calvarium and vertebrae of tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP)-deficient (Akp2−/−) hypophosphatasia mice are rescued by simultaneous deletion of the Enpp1 gene, which encodes nucleotide pyrophosphatase phosphodiesterase 1 (NPP1). Conversely, the hyperossification in the vertebral apophyses typical of Enpp1−/− mice is corrected in [Akp2−/−; Enpp1−/−] double-knockout mice. Here we have examined the appendicular skeletons of Akp2−/−, Enpp1−/−, and [Akp2−/−; Enpp1−/−] mice to ascertain the degree of rescue afforded at these skeletal sites. Alizarin red and Alcian blue whole mount analysis of the skeletons from wild-type, Akp2−/−, and [Akp2−/−; Enpp1−/−] mice revealed that although calvarium and vertebrae of double-knockout mice were normalized with respect to mineral deposition, the femur and tibia were not. Using several different methodologies, we found reduced mineralization not only in Akp2−/− but also in Enpp1−/− and [Akp2−/−; Enpp1−/−] femurs and tibias. Analysis of calvarial- and bone marrow-derived osteoblasts for mineralized nodule formation in vitro showed increased mineral deposition by Enpp1−/− calvarial osteoblasts but decreased mineral deposition by Enpp1−/− long bone marrow-derived osteoblasts in comparison to wild-type cells. Thus, the osteomalacia of Akp2−/− mice and the hypomineralized phenotype of the long bones of Enpp1−/− mice are not rescued by simultaneous deletion of TNAP and NPP1 functions. PMID:15920156

  8. Modification of potato peel waste with base hydrolysis and subsequent cationization.

    PubMed

    Lappalainen, Katja; Kärkkäinen, Johanna; Joensuu, Päivi; Lajunen, Marja

    2015-11-01

    Potato peel waste (PW) is a starch containing biomaterial produced in large amounts by food processing industry. In this work, the treatment of PW by alkaline hydrolysis and cationization in the water phase is reported. In order to improve the cationization of starch, PW was hydrolyzed by heating with alkaline (NaOH) ethanol solution (80%) in a water bath. The impact of variable molar ratios of anhydroglucose unit (AGU):NaOH, heating temperatures and times was studied on the degradation of starch and the molecular size distribution of the product. The hydrolyzed PW was cationized subsequently in water by using glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride and catalyzed by NaOH under microwave irradiation or in an oil bath. The impact of the various reaction conditions on the cationization and degree of substitution of starch was studied. The degree of substitution of the cationized starch varied in the range of 0-0.35. PMID:26256329

  9. Alkaline quinone flow battery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kaixiang; Chen, Qing; Gerhardt, Michael R; Tong, Liuchuan; Kim, Sang Bok; Eisenach, Louise; Valle, Alvaro W; Hardee, David; Gordon, Roy G; Aziz, Michael J; Marshak, Michael P

    2015-09-25

    Storage of photovoltaic and wind electricity in batteries could solve the mismatch problem between the intermittent supply of these renewable resources and variable demand. Flow batteries permit more economical long-duration discharge than solid-electrode batteries by using liquid electrolytes stored outside of the battery. We report an alkaline flow battery based on redox-active organic molecules that are composed entirely of Earth-abundant elements and are nontoxic, nonflammable, and safe for use in residential and commercial environments. The battery operates efficiently with high power density near room temperature. These results demonstrate the stability and performance of redox-active organic molecules in alkaline flow batteries, potentially enabling cost-effective stationary storage of renewable energy. PMID:26404834

  10. Effects of Cations on Corrosion of Inconel 625 in Molten Chloride Salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ming; Ma, Hongfang; Wang, Mingjing; Wang, Zhihua; Sharif, Adel

    2016-04-01

    Hot corrosion of Inconel 625 in sodium chloride, potassium chloride, magnesium chloride, calcium chloride and their mixtures with different compositions is conducted at 900°C to investigate the effects of cations in chloride salts on corrosion behavior of the alloy. XRD, SEM/EDS were used to analyze the compositions, phases, and morphologies of the corrosion products. The results showed that Inconel 625 suffers more severe corrosion in alkaline earth metal chloride molten salts than alkaline metal chloride molten salts. For corrosion in mixture salts, the corrosion rate increased with increasing alkaline earth metal chloride salt content in the mixture. Cations in the chloride molten salts mainly affect the thermal and chemical properties of the salts such as vapor pressure and hydroscopicities, which can affect the basicity of the molten salt. Corrosion of Inconel 625 in alkaline earth metal chloride salts is accelerated with increasing basicity.

  11. Alkaline Phosphatase in Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Štefková, Kateřina; Procházková, Jiřina; Pacherník, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase is an enzyme commonly expressed in almost all living organisms. In humans and other mammals, determinations of the expression and activity of alkaline phosphatase have frequently been used for cell determination in developmental studies and/or within clinical trials. Alkaline phosphatase also seems to be one of the key markers in the identification of pluripotent embryonic stem as well as related cells. However, alkaline phosphatases exist in some isoenzymes and isoforms, which have tissue specific expressions and functions. Here, the role of alkaline phosphatase as a stem cell marker is discussed in detail. First, we briefly summarize contemporary knowledge of mammalian alkaline phosphatases in general. Second, we focus on the known facts of its role in and potential significance for the identification of stem cells. PMID:25767512

  12. Membrane-associated alkaline phosphatase from Bacillus licheniformis that requires detergent for solubilization: lactoperoxidase 125I localization and molecular weight determination.

    PubMed

    Spencer, D B; Hansa, J G; Stuckmann, K V; Hulett, F M

    1982-05-01

    When membranes of Bacillus licheniformis MC14 were extracted exhaustively with 1 M magnesium, approximately 80% of the membrane-associated alkaline phosphatase (orthophosphoric-monoester phosphohydrolase [alkaline optimum], E.C. 3.1.3.1) was solubilized. The remaining activity could be extracted with a cationic detergent, hexadecylpyridinium chloride, without loss of enzymatic activity. The detergent-extractable alkaline phosphatase was immunoprecipitable with antibody to the salt-extractable alkaline phosphatase or the secreted alkaline phosphatase, had an approximate molecular weight of 60,000, and was localized 100% on the outer surface of the cytoplasmic membrane. PMID:7040342

  13. Membrane-associated alkaline phosphatase from Bacillus licheniformis that requires detergent for solubilization: lactoperoxidase 125I localization and molecular weight determination.

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, D B; Hansa, J G; Stuckmann, K V; Hulett, F M

    1982-01-01

    When membranes of Bacillus licheniformis MC14 were extracted exhaustively with 1 M magnesium, approximately 80% of the membrane-associated alkaline phosphatase (orthophosphoric-monoester phosphohydrolase [alkaline optimum], E.C. 3.1.3.1) was solubilized. The remaining activity could be extracted with a cationic detergent, hexadecylpyridinium chloride, without loss of enzymatic activity. The detergent-extractable alkaline phosphatase was immunoprecipitable with antibody to the salt-extractable alkaline phosphatase or the secreted alkaline phosphatase, had an approximate molecular weight of 60,000, and was localized 100% on the outer surface of the cytoplasmic membrane. Images PMID:7040342

  14. Silica in alkaline brines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, B.F.; Rettig, S.L.; Eugster, H.P.

    1967-01-01

    Analysis of sodium carbonate-bicarbonate brines from closed basins in volcanic terranes of Oregon and Kenya reveals silica contents of up to 2700 parts per million at pH's higher than 10. These high concentrations of SiO 2 can be attributed to reaction of waters with silicates, and subsequent evaporative concentration accompanied by a rise in pH. Supersaturation with respect to amorphous silica may occur and persist for brines that are out of contact with silicate muds and undersaturated with respect to trona; correlation of SiO2 with concentration of Na and total CO2 support this interpretation. Addition of moredilute waters to alkaline brines may lower the pH and cause inorganic precipitation of substantial amounts of silica.

  15. Bifunctional alkaline oxygen electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swette, L.; Kackley, N.; Mccatty, S. A.

    1991-01-01

    The authors describe the identification and testing of electrocatalysts and supports for the positive electrode of moderate-temperature, single-unit, rechargeable alkaline fuel cells. Recent work on Na(x)Pt3O4, a potential bifunctional catalyst, is described, as well as the application of novel approaches to the development of more efficient bifunctional electrode structures. The three dual-character electrodes considered here showed similar superior performance; the Pt/RhO2 and Rh/RhO2 electrodes showed slightly better performance than the Pt/IrO2 electrode. It is concluded that Na(x)Pt3O4 continues to be a promising bifunctional oxygen electrode catalyst but requires further investigation and development.

  16. Hydroxide Degradation Pathways for Substituted Trimethylammonium Cations: A DFT Study

    SciTech Connect

    Long, H.; Kim, K.; Pivovar, B. S.

    2012-05-03

    Substituted trimethylammonium cations serve as small molecule analogues for tetherable cations in anion exchange membranes. In turn, these membranes serve as the basis for alkaline membrane fuel cells by allowing facile conduction of hydroxide. As these cations are susceptible to hydroxide attack, they degrade over time and greatly limit the lifetime of the fuel cell. In this research, we performed density functional theory calculations to investigate the degradation pathways of substituted trimethylammonium cations to probe the relative durability of cation tethering strategies in alkyl and aromatic tethers. Our results show that significant changes in calculated energy barriers occur when substitution groups change. Specifically, we have found that, when available, the Hofmann elimination pathway is the most vulnerable pathway for degradation; however, this barrier is also found to depend on the carbon chain length and number of hydrogens susceptible to Hofmann elimination. S{sub N}2 barriers were also investigated for both methyl groups and substitution groups. The reported findings give important insight into potential tethering strategies for trimethylammonium cations in anion exchange membranes.

  17. Cationically polymerizable monomers derived from renewable sources

    SciTech Connect

    Crivello, J.V.

    1992-10-01

    The objectives of this project are to design and synthesize novel monomers which orginate from renewable biological sources and to carry out their rapid, efficient, pollution-free and energy efficient cationic polymerization to useful products under the influence of ultraviolet light or heat. A summary of the results of the past year's research on cationically polymerizable monomers derived from renewable sources is presented. Three major areas of investigation corresponding to the different classes of naturally occurring starting materials were investigated; epoxidized terpenes and natural rubber and vinyl ethers from alcohols and carbohydrates.

  18. A novel type bacterial flagellar motor that can use divalent cations as a coupling ion.

    PubMed

    Imazawa, Riku; Takahashi, Yuka; Aoki, Wataru; Sano, Motohiko; Ito, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor is a sophisticated nanomachine embedded in the cell envelope and powered by an electrochemical gradient of H(+), Na(+), or K(+)across the cytoplasmic membrane. Here we describe a new member of the bacterial flagellar stator channel family (MotAB1 of Paenibacillus sp. TCA20 (TCA-MotAB1)) that is coupled to divalent cations (Ca(2+)and Mg(2+)). In the absence of divalent cations of alkaline earth metals, no swimming was observed in Paenibacillus sp. TCA20, which grows optimally in Ca(2+)-rich environments. This pattern was confirmed by swimming assays of a stator-free Bacillus subtilis mutant expressing TCA-MotAB1. Both a stator-free and major Mg(2+)uptake system-deleted B. subtilis mutant expressing TCA-MotAB1 complemented both growth and motility deficiency under low Mg(2+)conditions and exhibited [Mg(2+)]in identical to that of the wild-type. This is the first report of a flagellar motor that can use Ca(2+)and Mg(2+)as coupling ions. These findings will promote the understanding of the operating principles of flagellar motors and molecular mechanisms of ion selectivity. PMID:26794857

  19. A novel type bacterial flagellar motor that can use divalent cations as a coupling ion

    PubMed Central

    Imazawa, Riku; Takahashi, Yuka; Aoki, Wataru; Sano, Motohiko; Ito, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor is a sophisticated nanomachine embedded in the cell envelope and powered by an electrochemical gradient of H+, Na+, or K+across the cytoplasmic membrane. Here we describe a new member of the bacterial flagellar stator channel family (MotAB1 of Paenibacillus sp. TCA20 (TCA-MotAB1)) that is coupled to divalent cations (Ca2+and Mg2+). In the absence of divalent cations of alkaline earth metals, no swimming was observed in Paenibacillus sp. TCA20, which grows optimally in Ca2+-rich environments. This pattern was confirmed by swimming assays of a stator-free Bacillus subtilis mutant expressing TCA-MotAB1. Both a stator-free and major Mg2+uptake system-deleted B. subtilis mutant expressing TCA-MotAB1 complemented both growth and motility deficiency under low Mg2+conditions and exhibited [Mg2+]in identical to that of the wild-type. This is the first report of a flagellar motor that can use Ca2+and Mg2+as coupling ions. These findings will promote the understanding of the operating principles of flagellar motors and molecular mechanisms of ion selectivity. PMID:26794857

  20. Alkaline ionic liquids applied in supported ionic liquid catalyst for selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal

    PubMed Central

    Salminen, Eero; Virtanen, Pasi; Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka

    2014-01-01

    The challenge in preparation of ionic liquids containing a strong alkaline anion is to identify a suitable cation which can tolerate the harsh conditions induced by the anion. In this study, a commercial quaternary ammonium compound (quat) benzalkonium [ADBA] (alkyldimethylbenzylammonium) was used as a cation in the synthesis of different alkaline ionic liquids. In fact, the precursor, benzalkonium chloride, is a mixture of alkyldimethylbenzylammonium chlorides of various alkyl chain lengths and is commonly used in the formulation of various antiseptic products. The prepared ionic liquids were utilized as Supported Ionic Liquid Catalysts (SILCAs). Typically, a SILCA contains metal nanoparticles, enzymes, or metal complexes in an ionic liquid layer which is immobilized on a solid carrier material such as an active carbon cloth (ACC). The catalysts were applied in the selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal which is an important perfumery chemical. Interestingly, 70% molar yield toward citronellal was achieved over a catalyst containing the alkaline ionic liquid benzalkonium methoxide. PMID:24790972

  1. Alkaline ionic liquids applied in supported ionic liquid catalyst for selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salminen, Eero; Virtanen, Pasi; Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka

    2014-02-01

    The challenge in preparation of ionic liquids containing a strong alkaline anion is to identify a suitable cation which can tolerate the harsh conditions induced by the anion. In this study, a commercial quaternary ammonium compound (quat) benzalkonium [ADBA] (alkyldimethylbenzylammonium) was used as a cation in the synthesis of different alkaline ionic liquids. In fact, the precursor, benzalkonium chloride, is a mixture of alkyldimethylbenzylammonium chlorides of various alkyl chain lengths and is commonly used in the formulation of various antiseptic products. The prepared ionic liquids were utilized as Supported Ionic Liquid Catalysts (SILCAs). Typically, a SILCA contains metal nanoparticles, enzymes or metal complexes in an ionic liquid layer which is immobilized on a solid carrier material such as an active carbon cloth (ACC). The catalysts were applied in the selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal which is an important perfumery chemical. Interestingly, 70 % molar yield towards citronellal was achieved over a catalyst containing the alkaline ionic liquid benzalkonium methoxide.

  2. Alkaline ionic liquids applied in supported ionic liquid catalyst for selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Eero; Virtanen, Pasi; Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka

    2014-01-01

    The challenge in preparation of ionic liquids containing a strong alkaline anion is to identify a suitable cation which can tolerate the harsh conditions induced by the anion. In this study, a commercial quaternary ammonium compound (quat) benzalkonium [ADBA] (alkyldimethylbenzylammonium) was used as a cation in the synthesis of different alkaline ionic liquids. In fact, the precursor, benzalkonium chloride, is a mixture of alkyldimethylbenzylammonium chlorides of various alkyl chain lengths and is commonly used in the formulation of various antiseptic products. The prepared ionic liquids were utilized as Supported Ionic Liquid Catalysts (SILCAs). Typically, a SILCA contains metal nanoparticles, enzymes, or metal complexes in an ionic liquid layer which is immobilized on a solid carrier material such as an active carbon cloth (ACC). The catalysts were applied in the selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal which is an important perfumery chemical. Interestingly, 70% molar yield toward citronellal was achieved over a catalyst containing the alkaline ionic liquid benzalkonium methoxide. PMID:24790972

  3. Modulators of intestinal alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Bobkova, Ekaterina V; Kiffer-Moreira, Tina; Sergienko, Eduard A

    2013-01-01

    Small molecule modulators of phosphatases can lead to clinically useful drugs and serve as invaluable tools to study functional roles of various phosphatases in vivo. Here, we describe lead discovery strategies for identification of inhibitors and activators of intestinal alkaline phosphatases. To identify isozyme-selective inhibitors and activators of the human and mouse intestinal alkaline phosphatases, ultrahigh throughput chemiluminescent assays, utilizing CDP-Star as a substrate, were developed for murine intestinal alkaline phosphatase (mIAP), human intestinal alkaline phosphatase (hIAP), human placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP), and human tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) isozymes. Using these 1,536-well assays, concurrent HTS screens of the MLSMR library of 323,000 compounds were conducted for human and mouse IAP isozymes monitoring both inhibition and activation. This parallel screening approach led to identification of a novel inhibitory scaffold selective for murine intestinal alkaline phosphatase. SAR efforts based on parallel testing of analogs against different AP isozymes generated a potent inhibitor of the murine IAP with IC50 of 540 nM, at least 65-fold selectivity against human TNAP, and >185 selectivity against human PLAP. PMID:23860652

  4. Experimental data developed to support the selection of a treatment process for West Valley alkaline supernatant

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, L.A.; Holton, L.K.; Myers, T.R.; Richardson, G.M.; Wise, B.M.

    1984-01-01

    At the request of West Valley Nuclear Services Co., Inc., the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has studied alternative treatment processes for the alkaline PUREX waste presently being stored in Tank 8D2 at West Valley, New York. Five tasks were completed during FY 1983: (1) simulation and characterization of the alkaline supernatant and sludge from the tank. The radiochemical and chemical distributions between the aqueous and solid phase were determined, and the efficiency of washing sludge with water to remove ions such as Na/sup +/ and SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ was investigated; (2) evaluation of a sodium tetraphenylboron (Na-TPB) precipitation process to recover cesium (Cs) and a sodium titanate (Na-TiA) sorption process to recover strontium (Sr) and plutonium (Pu) from the West Valley Alkaline supernatant. These processes were previously developed and tested at the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant; (3) evaluation of an organic cation-exchange resin (Duolite CS-100) to recover Cs and Pu from the alkaline supernatant followed by an organic macroreticular cation exchange resin (Amberlite IRC-718) to recover Sr; (4) evaluation of an inorganic ion exchanger (Linde Ionsiv IE-95) to recover Cs, Sr, and Pu from the alkaline supernatant; and (5) evaluation of Dowex-1,X8 organic anion exchange resin to recover technetium (Tc) from alkaline supernatant. The findings of these tasks are reported. 21 references, 36 figures, 34 tables.

  5. Alkaline battery, separator therefore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, George F. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An improved battery separator for alkaline battery cells has low resistance to electrolyte ion transfer and high resistance to electrode ion transfer. The separator is formed by applying an improved coating to an electrolyte absorber. The absorber, preferably, is a flexible, fibrous, and porous substrate that is resistant to strong alkali and oxidation. The coating composition includes an admixture of a polymeric binder, a hydrolyzable polymeric ester and inert fillers. The coating composition is substantially free of reactive fillers and plasticizers commonly employed as porosity promoting agents in separator coatings. When the separator is immersed in electrolyte, the polymeric ester of the film coating reacts with the electrolyte forming a salt and an alcohol. The alcohol goes into solution with the electrolyte while the salt imbibes electrolyte into the coating composition. When the salt is formed, it expands the polymeric chains of the binder to provide a film coating substantially permeable to electrolyte ion transfer but relatively impermeable to electrode ion transfer during use.

  6. Evaluation of Alkaline Cleaner Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partz, Earl

    1998-01-01

    Alkaline cleaners used to process aluminum substrates have contained chromium as the corrosion inhibitor. Chromium is a hazardous substance whose use and control are described by environmental laws. Replacement materials that have the characteristics of chromated alkaline cleaners need to be found that address both the cleaning requirements and environmental impacts. This report will review environmentally friendly candidates evaluated as non-chromium alkaline cleaner replacements and methods used to compare those candidates one versus another. The report will also list characteristics used to select candidates based on their declared contents. It will also describe and evaluate methods used to discriminate among the large number of prospective candidates.

  7. Maleic acid-styrene encapsulated silica cation exchanger in high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yang, R; Jiang, S; Chen, L

    2001-12-24

    The use of poly(maleic acid-styrene)-encapsulated silica for the determination of monovalent and divalent cations is well accepted in ion chromatography. The separation of Mn(2+), alkali and alkaline earth metal cations is obtained under the same chromatographic conditions. The influences of pH and the concentration of eluent on the retention of cations have been studied. The preparation conditions of packings were studied. The metal ions in the boiler water samples from a thermal power plant were quantitatively determined using this column. The results are in agreement with those determined by ICP and Volumetric analysis methods. PMID:18968461

  8. Chemical degradation mechanisms of membranes for alkaline membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Yoong-Kee; Henson, Neil J.; Kim, Yu Seung

    2015-12-01

    Chemical degradation mechanisms of membranes for alkaline membrane fuel cells have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT). We have elucidated that the aryl-ether moiety of membranes is one of the weakest site against attack of hydroxide ions. The results of DFT calculations for hydroxide initiated aryl-ether cleavage indicated that the aryl-ether cleavage occurred prior to degradation of cationic functional group. Such a weak nature of the aryl-ether group arises from the electron deficiency of the aryl group as well as the low bond dissociation energy. The DFT results suggests that removal of the aryl-ether group in the membrane should enhance the stability of membranes under alkaline conditions. In fact, an ether fee poly(phenylene) membrane exhibits excellent stability against the attack from hydroxide ions.

  9. Chemical degradation mechanisms of membranes for alkaline membrane fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Choe, Yoong-Kee; Henson, Neil J.; Kim, Yu Seung

    2015-12-31

    Chemical degradation mechanisms of membranes for alkaline membrane fuel cells have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT). We have elucidated that the aryl-ether moiety of membranes is one of the weakest site against attack of hydroxide ions. The results of DFT calculations for hydroxide initiated aryl-ether cleavage indicated that the aryl-ether cleavage occurred prior to degradation of cationic functional group. Such a weak nature of the aryl-ether group arises from the electron deficiency of the aryl group as well as the low bond dissociation energy. The DFT results suggests that removal of the aryl-ether group in the membrane should enhance the stability of membranes under alkaline conditions. In fact, an ether fee poly(phenylene) membrane exhibits excellent stability against the attack from hydroxide ions.

  10. Gas phase salt clusters from electrosprayed alkaline earth colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, R. Marshall; Shen, Nanzhu; Nicoll, Jeremy; Tarnawiecki, Boris; Dejsupa, Chadin; Dearden, David V.

    1997-03-01

    Several distributions of small polynuclear ions of general form [nM + mA + pS]q+ (where M represents an alkaline earth cation (Mg, Ca, Sr or Ba), n = 2-10, A represents a halide, acetate or nitrate counterion originating in the divalent salt, and S represents an acetic acid or methanol adduct) are detected by FTICR when water/methanol solutions of alkaline earth salts are electrosprayed. For example, the largest cluster ion derived from 6.3 mM solutions of calcium acetate acidified with 2%x acetic acid have n= 10, m = 18, p = 5 and q = 2. Characteristics of these solutions suggest the presence of colloidal dispersions. These characteristics include stability upon aging, light scattering response and the requisite pre-etching of the glass containers. Aqueous mixtures of two group II salts produce mixed-salt cluster ions. For instance, from a mixture of calcium and magnesium acetate we trap mixed-cation clusters characterized by a complete set of binary partitions of n, for n = 2-6. Specifically, the manifold of clusters with four cations contains 4:0, 3:1, 2:2, 1:3 and 0:4 ratios of magnesium to calcium. Isolated alkaline earth clusters react with a low-pressure background of 18-crown-6 (C6) by salt abstraction exclusively. In general, the more facile abstraction from a mixed cluster produces a pair of products in which the neutral conforms to the hard-soft acid-base principle. The reactions of C6 with [MgSr(OAc)3]+ provide evidence for the existence of isomeric clusters at m/z 289. This is supported by bimodal kinetics and preliminary results of ab initio calculations.

  11. Alkaline flooding for enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Gittler, W.E.

    1983-09-01

    There are over 12 active projects of varying size using one of 3 major types of alkaline agents. These include sodium silicate, caustic soda, and soda ash. Among the largest pilots currently is the THUMS project in the Wilmington field, California. Plans called for the injection of a 4% weight concentration of sodium orthosilicate over a 60% PV. Through the first 3 yr, over 27 million bbl of chemicals have been injected. Gulf Oil is operating several alkaline floods, one of which is located off shore in the Quarantine Bay field, Louisiana. In this pilot, sodium hydroxide in a weight concentration of 5 to 12% is being injected. Belco Petroleum Corp. has reported that their pilot operating in the Isenhour Unit in Wyoming is using a .5% weight concentration of soda ash in conjunction with a polymer. Other uses for alkaline agents in chemical flooding include the use of silicate as a preflush or sacrificial agent in micellar/polymer and surfactant recovery systems. In addition, caustic has been tested in the surface-mixed caustic emulsion process while orthosilicate has been tested in a recovery method known as mobility-controlled caustic floods.

  12. Preparation and characterization of cationic and amphoteric mannans from Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Čížová, Alžbeta; Neščáková, Zuzana; Malovíková, Anna; Bystrický, Slavomír

    2016-09-20

    Cationic and amphoteric mannans from Candida albicans were prepared by chemical modification with (3-chloro-2-hydroxypropyl)trimethylammonium chloride (CHPTAC) and sodium chloroacetate under aqueous alkaline conditions. The optimal reaction conditions for mannan cationization were found to be 6h, 60°C, and NaOH/CHPTAC ratio of 1.0. Adjusting the molar ratio of cationization agent to anhydromannose unit, cationic and amphoteric mannans with degree of substitution ranging from 0.07 to 0.57 were obtained. Their structure was confirmed by elemental analysis as well as FTIR and NMR spectroscopies. Moderate decrease of molecular weight of both cationic and amphoteric mannans was recorded by size exclusion chromatography. With increasing level of modification, reduction of the antibody-binding capacity was observed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. PMID:27261724

  13. Control of cation concentrations in stream waters by surface soil processes in an Amazonian watershed.

    PubMed

    Markewitz, D; Davidson, E A; Figueiredo Rd; Victoria, R L; Krusche, A V

    2001-04-12

    The chemical composition of ground waters and stream waters is thought to be determined primarily by weathering of parent rock. In relatively young soils such as those occurring in most temperate ecosystems, dissolution of primary minerals by carbonic acid is the predominant weathering pathway that liberates Ca2+, Mg2+ and K+ and generates alkalinity in the hydrosphere. But control of water chemistry in old and highly weathered soils that have lost reservoirs of primary minerals (a common feature of many tropical soils) is less well understood. Here we present soil and water chemistry data from a 10,000-hectare watershed on highly weathered soil in the Brazilian Amazon. Streamwater cation concentrations and alkalinity are positively correlated to each other and to streamwater discharge, suggesting that cations and bicarbonate are mainly flushed from surface soil layers by rainfall rather than being the products of deep soil weathering carried by groundwater flow. These patterns contrast with the seasonal patterns widely recognized in temperate ecosystems with less strongly weathered soils. In this particular watershed, partial forest clearing and burning 30 years previously enriched the soils in cations and so may have increased the observed wet season leaching of cations. Nevertheless, annual inputs and outputs of cations from the watershed are low and nearly balanced, and thus soil cations from forest burning will remain available for forest regrowth over the next few decades. Our observations suggest that increased root and microbial respiration during the wet season generates CO2 that drives cation-bicarbonate leaching, resulting in a biologically mediated process of surface soil exchange controlling the streamwater inputs of cations and alkalinity from these highly weathered soils. PMID:11298445

  14. MLKL forms cation channels

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Bingqing; Fang, Sui; Chen, Xueqin; Hu, Hong; Chen, Peiyuan; Wang, Huayi; Gao, Zhaobing

    2016-01-01

    The mixed lineage kinase domain-like (MLKL) protein is a key factor in tumor necrosis factor-induced necroptosis. Recent studies on necroptosis execution revealed a commitment role of MLKL in membrane disruption. However, our knowledge of how MLKL functions on membrane remains very limited. Here we demonstrate that MLKL forms cation channels that are permeable preferentially to Mg2+ rather than Ca2+ in the presence of Na+ and K+. Moreover, the N-terminal domain containing six helices (H1-H6) is sufficient to form channels. Using the substituted cysteine accessibility method, we further determine that helix H1, H2, H3, H5 and H6 are transmembrane segments, while H4 is located in the cytoplasm. Finally, MLKL-induced membrane depolarization and cell death exhibit a positive correlation to its channel activity. The Mg2+-preferred permeability and five transmembrane segment topology distinguish MLKL from previously identified Mg2+-permeable channels and thus establish MLKL as a novel class of cation channels. PMID:27033670

  15. The biogeochemistry of grassland to forest conversion: a tale of protons, cations, and water in the Pampas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jobbagy, E. G.; Jackson, R. B.

    2001-12-01

    alkalinization. The role of capillary rise and tree cycling as pathways for Na entrance into the soil is being explored. Eucalypts in the Pampas disrupted base cation and water cycles and simultaneously triggered acidification and alkalinization processes. Common contrasts in tissue stoichieometry and rooting depth between grasses and trees are likely causes of this effect. Our results highlight the importance of shifts in plant cycling patterns as a major biogeochemical force.

  16. Highly Stable, Anion Conductive, Comb-Shaped Copolymers for Alkaline Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, NW; Leng, YJ; Hickner, MA; Wang, CY

    2013-07-10

    To produce an anion-conductive and durable polymer electrolyte for alkaline fuel cell applications, a series of quaternized poly(2,6-dimethyl phenylene oxide)s containing long alkyl side chains pendant to the nitrogen-centered cation were synthesized using a Menshutkin reaction to form comb-shaped structures. The pendant alkyl chains were responsible for the development of highly conductive ionic domains, as confirmed by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The comb-shaped polymers having one alkyl side chain showed higher hydroxide conductivities than those with benzyltrimethyl ammonium moieties or structures with more than one alkyl side chain per cationic site. The highest conductivity was observed for comb-shaped polymers with benzyldimethylhexadecyl ammonium cations. The chemical stabilities of the comb-shaped membranes were evaluated under severe, accelerated-aging conditions, and degradation was observed by measuring IEC and ion conductivity changes during aging. The comb-shaped membranes retained their high ion conductivity in 1 M NaOH at 80 degrees C for 2000 h. These cationic polymers were employed as ionomers in catalyst layers for alkaline fuel cells. The results indicated that the C-16 alkyl side chain ionomer had a slightly better initial performance, despite its low IEC value, but very poor durability in the fuel cell. In contrast, 90% of the initial performance was retained for the alkaline fuel cell with electrodes containing the C-6 side chain after 60 h of fuel cell operation.

  17. Reductive dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride using buffered alkaline ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ya-Ting; Liang, Chenju

    2015-10-01

    Alkaline ascorbic acid (AA) was recently discovered as a novel in-situ chemical reduction (ISCR) reagent for remediating chlorinated solvents in the subsurface. For this ISCR process, the maintenance of an alkaline pH is essential. This study investigated the possibility of the reduction of carbon tetrachloride (CT) using alkaline AA solution buffered by phosphate and by NaOH. The results indicated that CT was reduced by AA, and chloroform (CF) was a major byproduct at a phosphate buffered pH of 12. However, CT was completely reduced by AA in 2M NaOH without CF formation. In the presence of iron/soil minerals, iron could be reduced by AA and Fe(2+) tends to precipitate on the mineral surface to accelerate CT degradation. A simultaneous transfer of hydrogenolysis and dichloroelimination would occur under phosphate buffered pH 12. This implies that a high alkaline environment is a crucial factor for maintaining the dominant pathway of two electron transfer from dianionic AA to dehydroascorbic acid, and to undergo dichloroelimination of CT. Moreover, threonic acid and oxalic acid were identified to be the major AA decomposition products in alkaline solutions. PMID:25912910

  18. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy reveals cation-triggered backbone degradation in polysulfone-based anion exchange membranes.

    PubMed

    Arges, Christopher G; Ramani, Vijay

    2013-02-12

    Anion exchange membranes (AEMs) find widespread applications as an electrolyte and/or electrode binder in fuel cells, electrodialysis stacks, flow and metal-air batteries, and electrolyzers. AEMs exhibit poor stability in alkaline media; their degradation is induced by the hydroxide ion, a potent nucleophile. We have used 2D NMR techniques to investigate polymer backbone stability (as opposed to cation stability) of the AEM in alkaline media. We report the mechanism behind a peculiar, often-observed phenomenon, wherein a demonstrably stable polysulfone backbone degrades rapidly in alkaline solutions upon derivatization with alkaline stable fixed cation groups. Using COSY and heteronuclear multiple quantum correlation spectroscopy (2D NMR), we unequivocally demonstrate that the added cation group triggers degradation of the polymer backbone in alkaline via quaternary carbon hydrolysis and ether hydrolysis, leading to rapid failure. This finding challenges the existing perception that having a stable cation moiety is sufficient to yield a stable AEM and emphasizes the importance of the often ignored issue of backbone stability. PMID:23335629

  19. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy reveals cation-triggered backbone degradation in polysulfone-based anion exchange membranes

    PubMed Central

    Arges, Christopher G.; Ramani, Vijay

    2013-01-01

    Anion exchange membranes (AEMs) find widespread applications as an electrolyte and/or electrode binder in fuel cells, electrodialysis stacks, flow and metal-air batteries, and electrolyzers. AEMs exhibit poor stability in alkaline media; their degradation is induced by the hydroxide ion, a potent nucleophile. We have used 2D NMR techniques to investigate polymer backbone stability (as opposed to cation stability) of the AEM in alkaline media. We report the mechanism behind a peculiar, often-observed phenomenon, wherein a demonstrably stable polysulfone backbone degrades rapidly in alkaline solutions upon derivatization with alkaline stable fixed cation groups. Using COSY and heteronuclear multiple quantum correlation spectroscopy (2D NMR), we unequivocally demonstrate that the added cation group triggers degradation of the polymer backbone in alkaline via quaternary carbon hydrolysis and ether hydrolysis, leading to rapid failure. This finding challenges the existing perception that having a stable cation moiety is sufficient to yield a stable AEM and emphasizes the importance of the often ignored issue of backbone stability. PMID:23335629

  20. Alkaline degradation studies of anion exchange polymers to enable new membrane designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunez, Sean Andrew

    Current performance targets for anion-exchange membrane (AEM) fuel cells call for greater than 95% alkaline stability for 5000 hours at temperatures up to 120 °C. Using this target temperature of 120 °C, an incisive 1H NMR-based alkaline degradation method to identify the degradation products of n-alkyl spacer tetraalkylammonium cations in various AEM polymers and small molecule analogs. Herein, the degradation mechanisms and rates of benzyltrimethylammonium-, n-alkyl interstitial spacer- and n-alkyl terminal pendant-cations are studied on several architectures. These findings demonstrate that benzyltrimethylammonium- and n-alkyl terminal pendant cations are more labile than an n-alkyl interstitial spacer cation and conclude that Hofmann elimination is not the predominant mechanism of alkaline degradation. Additionally, the alkaline stability of an n-alkyl interstitial spacer cation is enhanced when combined with an n-alkyl terminal pendant. Interestingly, at 120 °C, an inverse trend was found in the overall alkaline stability of AEM poly(styrene) and AEM poly(phenylene oxide) samples than was previously shown at 80 °C. Successive small molecule studies suggest that at 120 °C, an anion-induced 1,4-elimination degradation mechanism may be activated on styrenic AEM polymers bearing an acidic alpha-hydrogen. In addition, an ATR-FTIR based method was developed to assess the alkaline stability of solid membranes and any added resistance to degradation that may be due to differential solubilities and phase separation. To increase the stability of anion exchange membranes, Oshima magnesate--halogen exchange was demonstrated as a method for the synthesis of new anion exchange membranes that typically fail in the presence of organolithium or Grignard reagents alone. This new chemistry, applied to non-resinous polymers for the first time, proved effective for the n-akyl interstitial spacer functionalization of poly(phenylene oxide) and poly(styrene- co

  1. Qualitative aspects of the degradation of mitomycins in alkaline solution.

    PubMed

    Beijnen, J H; den Hartigh, J; Underberg, W J

    1985-01-01

    The major degradation product in alkaline solution of mitomycin A, mitomycin C and porfiromycin is the corresponding 7-hydroxymitosane. The isolation and the physico-chemical and analytical properties of these compounds and their derivatized analogues are discussed. Data are presented on the degradation of mitomycin C at extremely high pH values. PMID:16867711

  2. Coordination of trivalent metal cations to peptides: results from IRMPD spectroscopy and theory.

    PubMed

    Prell, James S; Flick, Tawnya G; Oomens, Jos; Berden, Giel; Williams, Evan R

    2010-01-21

    Structures of trivalent lanthanide metal cations La(3+), Ho(3+), and Eu(3+) with deprotonated Ala(n) (n = 2-5) or Leu-enk (Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Leu) are investigated with infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy between 900 and 1850 cm(-1) and theory. In all of these complexes, a salt bridge is formed in which the metal cation coordinates to the carboxylate group of the peptide, resulting in a limited conformational space and many sharp IRMPD spectral bands. The IRMPD spectra clearly indicate that all carbonyl groups solvate the metal cation in each of the Ala(n) complexes. Due to strong vibrational coupling between the carbonyl groups, a sharp, high-energy amide I band due to in-phase stretching of all of the amide carbonyl groups bound to the metal cation is observed that is separated by approximately 50 cm(-1) from a strong, lower-energy amide I band. This extent of carbonyl coupling, which is sometimes observed in condensed-phase peptide and protein IR spectroscopy, has not been reported in IRMPD spectroscopy studies of other cationized peptide complexes. Intense bands due to carbonyl groups not associated with the metal cation are observed for Leu-enk complexes, indicating that a side chain group, such as the Tyr or Phe aromatic ring, prevents complete carbonyl coordination of the metal cation. Substitution of smaller lanthanide cations for La(3+) in these peptide complexes results only in minor structural changes consistent with the change in metal cation size. These are the first IRMPD spectra reported for lanthanide metal cationized peptides, and comparison to previously reported protonated and alkali metal or alkaline earth metal cationized peptide complexes reveals many trends consistent with the higher charge state of the lanthanide cations. PMID:19950916

  3. Development of Natural Alkalinity in Appalachian Deep Coal Mine Discharges, Irwin Syncline, Pennsylvania, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, E. M.; Winters, W. R.; Winters, W. R.; Capo, R. C.

    2001-12-01

    Geochemical processes in flooded underground coal mine complexes are controlled by the relationship between overburden mineralogy and the hydrogeologic system, which is influenced by mining methodology and discharge location. Numerous large flow (over 2,000 L/min), historically acidic, deep mine discharges in Appalachian bituminous coal basins are now net alkaline, with circumneutral pH and high concentrations of dissolved iron (20-80 ppm) and sodium (100-500 ppm) [1]. Understanding natural alkalinity production offers alternative approaches for neutralizing acid mine drainage (AMD) and has implications for predictive models, mining regulations, mine discharge remediation, and resource recovery. To determine the subsurface processes involved in the generation of natural alkalinity, we focused on the Irwin syncline, a 240 sq.-km bituminous coal basin in southwestern Pennsylvania. All major streams that arise within or cross the syncline are affected by polluted mine drainage. The pollution ranges from highly acidic iron- and aluminum-contaminated discharges in the northern portion of the basin to highly alkaline, iron and sulfate-contaminated discharges in the southern portion. Underground mine barrier data were used to divide the basin into six hydraulically related sub-basins; mine waters were collected from nine discharges across the basin [2]. Sub-basin hydrology was integrated with infiltration, discharge, and overburden geochemistry and mineralogy. Modeling of Irwin syncline flows using a solute modeling program (PHREEQC 2.4.2; [3]) indicates that the spatial and temporal change in mine water chemistry involves processes other than simple carbonate dissolution or dilution with uncontaminated water. Results indicate that the acidic discharges in the northeastern end of the basin are the product of surface water modified by pyrite oxidation and dissolution of aluminosilicate minerals. Sodium concentrations in those flows are likely the result of minor halite

  4. Ethylene Inhibits Root Elongation during Alkaline Stress through AUXIN1 and Associated Changes in Auxin Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Xu, Heng-Hao; Liu, Wen-Cheng; Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2015-08-01

    Soil alkalinity causes major reductions in yield and quality of crops worldwide. The plant root is the first organ sensing soil alkalinity, which results in shorter primary roots. However, the mechanism underlying alkaline stress-mediated inhibition of root elongation remains to be further elucidated. Here, we report that alkaline conditions inhibit primary root elongation of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings by reducing cell division potential in the meristem zones and that ethylene signaling affects this process. The ethylene perception antagonist silver (Ag(+)) alleviated the inhibition of root elongation by alkaline stress. Moreover, the ethylene signaling mutants ethylene response1-3 (etr1-3), ethylene insensitive2 (ein2), and ein3-1 showed less reduction in root length under alkaline conditions, indicating a reduced sensitivity to alkalinity. Ethylene biosynthesis also was found to play a role in alkaline stress-mediated root inhibition; the ethylene overproducer1-1 mutant, which overproduces ethylene because of increased stability of 1-AMINOCYCLOPROPANE-1-CARBOXYLIC ACID SYNTHASE5, was hypersensitive to alkaline stress. In addition, the ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor cobalt (Co(2+)) suppressed alkaline stress-mediated inhibition of root elongation. We further found that alkaline stress caused an increase in auxin levels by promoting expression of auxin biosynthesis-related genes, but the increase in auxin levels was reduced in the roots of the etr1-3 and ein3-1 mutants and in Ag(+)/Co(2+)-treated wild-type plants. Additional genetic and physiological data showed that AUXIN1 (AUX1) was involved in alkaline stress-mediated inhibition of root elongation. Taken together, our results reveal that ethylene modulates alkaline stress-mediated inhibition of root growth by increasing auxin accumulation by stimulating the expression of AUX1 and auxin biosynthesis-related genes. PMID:26109425

  5. Reactive oxygen species accelerate degradation of anion exchange membranes based on polyphenylene oxide in alkaline environments.

    PubMed

    Parrondo, Javier; Wang, Zhongyang; Jung, Min-Suk J; Ramani, Vijay

    2016-07-20

    Anion exchange membranes (AEM) based on polyphenylene oxide (PPO) suffered quaternary-ammonium-cation-site degradation in alkaline environments. Surprisingly, the degradation rate was considerably faster in the presence of molecular oxygen. We postulated that the AEM cation-site catalyzes the reduction of dioxygen by hydroxide ions to yield the superoxide anion radical and the highly reactive hydroxyl free radical. We substantiated our hypothesis by using a phosphorous-containing spin trap (5-diisopropoxy-phosphoryl-5-methyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide) to detect the adducts for both free radicals in situ using (31)P-NMR spectroscopy. PMID:27381009

  6. RECLAMATION OF ALKALINE ASH PILES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the study was to develop methods for reclaiming ash disposal piles for the ultimate use as agricultural or forest lands. The ashes studied were strongly alkaline and contained considerable amounts of salts and toxic boron. The ashes were produced from burning bit...

  7. Design of Perovskite Oxides as Anion-Intercalation-Type Electrodes for Supercapacitors: Cation Leaching Effect.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Dinh, Jim; Tade, Moses O; Shao, Zongping

    2016-09-14

    Oxygen ions can be exploited as a charge carrier to effectively realize a new type of anion-intercalation supercapacitor. In this study, to get some useful guidelines for future materials development, we comparatively studied SrCoO3-δ (SC), Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3-δ (BSCF), and Co3O4 as electrodes in supercapacitors with aqueous alkaline electrolyte. The effect of interaction between the electrode materials with the alkaline solution was focused on the structure and specific surface area of the electrode material, and ultimately the electrochemical performance was emphasized. Both BSCF and SC were found to experience cation leaching in alkaline solution, resulting in an increase in the specific surface area of the material, but overleaching caused the damage of perovskite structure of BSCF. Barium leaching was more serious than strontium, and the cation leaching was component dependent. Although high initial capacitance was achieved for BSCF, it was not a good candidate as intercalation-type electrode for supercapacitor because of poor cycling stability from serious Ba(2+) and Sr(2+) leaching. Instead, SC was a favorable electrode candidate for practical use in supercapacitors due to its high capacity and proper cation leaching capacity, which brought beneficial effect on cycling stability. It is suggested that cation leaching effect should be seriously considered in the development of new perovskite materials as electrodes for supercapacitors. PMID:27559826

  8. Isolation of alkaline mutagens from complex mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C.H.; Guerin, M.R.; Clark, B.R.; Rao, T.K.; Epler, J.L.

    1981-05-01

    A method for the preparative-scale enrichment of alkaline mutagens from complex natural and anthropogenic mixtures is described. Mutagenic alkaline fractions were isolated from cigarette smoke, crude petroleum, and petroleum substitutes derived from coal and shale.

  9. Solubility of uranium in alkaline salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.T.; Edwards, T.B.

    1994-03-29

    The solubility of uranium in alkaline salt solutions was investigated to screen for significant factors and interactions among the major salt components and temperature. The components included in the study were the sodium salts of hydroxide, nitrate, nitrite, aluminate, sulfate, and carbonate. General findings from the study included: (1) uranium solubilities are very low (1-20 mg/L) for all solution compositions at hydroxide concentrations from 0.1 to 17 molar (2) carbonate, sulfate, and aluminate are not effective complexants for uranium at high hydroxide concentration, (3) uranium solubility decreases with increasing temperature for most alkaline salt solutions, and (4) uranium solubility increases with changes in solution chemistry that reflect aging of high level waste (increase in nitrite and carbonate concentrations, decrease in nitrate and hydroxide concentrations). A predictive model for the concentration of uranium as a function of component concentrations and temperature was fitted to the data. All of the solution components and temperature were found to be significant. There is a significant lack of fit for the model, which suggests that the dependence on the uranium solubility over the wide range of solution compositions is non-linear and/or that there are other uncontrolled parameters which are important to the uranium solubility.

  10. Major depression

    MedlinePlus

    Depression - major; Depression - clinical; Clinical depression; Unipolar depression; Major depressive disorder ... Doctors do not know the exact causes of depression. It is believed that chemical changes in the ...

  11. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David B.; Lao, Guifang

    1998-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium.

  12. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, D.B.; Lao, G.

    1998-01-06

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium. 3 figs.

  13. Dissecting the cation-cation interaction between two uranyl units.

    PubMed

    Tecmer, Paweł; Hong, Sung W; Boguslawski, Katharina

    2016-07-21

    We present a state-of-the-art computational study of the uranyl(vi) and uranyl(v) cation-cation interactions (dications) in aqueous solution. Reliable electronic structures of two interacting uranyl(vi) and uranyl(v) subunits as well as those of the uranyl(vi) and uranyl(v) clusters are presented for the first time. Our theoretical study elucidates the impact of cation-cation interactions on changes in the molecular structure as well as changes in vibrational and UV-Vis spectra of the bare uranyl(vi) and uranyl(v) moieties for different total spin-states and total charges of the dications. PMID:27335229

  14. Multidrug resistance protein MdtM adds to the repertoire of antiporters involved in alkaline pH homeostasis in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In neutralophilic bacteria, monovalent metal cation/H+ antiporters play a key role in pH homeostasis. In Escherichia coli, only four antiporters (NhaA, NhaB, MdfA and ChaA) are identified to function in maintenance of a stable cytoplasmic pH under conditions of alkaline stress. We hypothesised that the multidrug resistance protein MdtM, a recently characterised homologue of MdfA and a member of the major facilitator superfamily, also functions in alkaline pH homeostasis. Results Assays that compared the growth of an E. coli ΔmdtM deletion mutant transformed with a plasmid encoding wild-type MdtM or the dysfunctional MdtM D22A mutant at different external alkaline pH values (ranging from pH 8.5 to 10) revealed a potential contribution by MdtM to alkaline pH tolerance, but only when millimolar concentrations of sodium or potassium was present in the growth medium. Fluorescence-based activity assays using inverted vesicles generated from transformants of antiporter-deficient (ΔnhaA, ΔnhaB, ΔchaA) E. coli TO114 cells defined MdtM as a low-affinity antiporter that catalysed electrogenic exchange of Na+, K+, Rb+ or Li+ for H+. The K+/H+ antiport reaction had a pH optimum at 9.0, whereas the Na+/H+ exchange activity was optimum at pH 9.25. Measurement of internal cellular pH confirmed MdtM as contributing to maintenance of a stable cytoplasmic pH, acid relative to the external pH, under conditions of alkaline stress. Conclusions Taken together, the results support a role for MdtM in alkaline pH tolerance. MdtM can therefore be added to the currently limited list of antiporters known to function in pH homeostasis in the model organism E. coli. PMID:23701827

  15. Cationic lipid-mediated nucleic acid delivery: beyond being cationic.

    PubMed

    Rao, N Madhusudhana

    2010-03-01

    Realization of the potential of nucleic acids as drugs is intricately linked to their in vivo delivery. Cationic lipids demonstrated tremendous potential as safe, efficient and scalable in vitro carriers of nucleic acids. For in vivo delivery of nucleic acids, the extant two component liposomal preparations consisting of cationic lipids and nucleic acids have been largely found to be insufficient. Being a soft matter, liposomes readily respond to many physiological variables leading to complex component and morphological changes, thus confounding the efforts in a priori identification of a "competent" formulation. In the recent past many chemical moieties that provide advantage in facing the challenges of barriers in vivo, were incorporated into cationic lipids to improve the transfection efficiency. The cationic lipids, essential for DNA condensation and protection, definitely require additional components to be efficient in vivo. In addition, formulations of cationic lipid carriers with non-lipidic components, mainly peptides, have demonstrated success in in vivo transfection. The present review describes some recent successes of in vivo nucleic acid delivery by cationic lipids. PMID:20060819

  16. Development of alkaline fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbs, Michael R.; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Alam, Todd Michael; Janarthanan, Rajeswari; Horan, James L.; Caire, Benjamin R.; Ziegler, Zachary C.; Herring, Andrew M.; Yang, Yuan; Zuo, Xiaobing; Robson, Michael H.; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Patterson, Wendy; Atanassov, Plamen Borissov

    2013-09-01

    This project focuses on the development and demonstration of anion exchange membrane (AEM) fuel cells for portable power applications. Novel polymeric anion exchange membranes and ionomers with high chemical stabilities were prepared characterized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories. Durable, non-precious metal catalysts were prepared by Dr. Plamen Atanassov's research group at the University of New Mexico by utilizing an aerosol-based process to prepare templated nano-structures. Dr. Andy Herring's group at the Colorado School of Mines combined all of these materials to fabricate and test membrane electrode assemblies for single cell testing in a methanol-fueled alkaline system. The highest power density achieved in this study was 54 mW/cm2 which was 90% of the project target and the highest reported power density for a direct methanol alkaline fuel cell.

  17. Alkaline dechlorination of chlorinated volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, B.; Siegrist, R.L.

    1996-06-01

    The vast majority of contaminated sites in the United States and abroad are contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as trichloroethylene (TCE), trichloroethane (TCA), and chloroform. These VOCs are mobile and persistent in the subsurface and present serious health risks at trace concentrations. The goal of this project was to develop a new chemical treatment system that can rapidly and effectively degrade chlorinated VOCs. The system is based on our preliminary findings that strong alkalis such as sodium hydroxide (NaOH) can absorb and degrade TCE. The main objectives of this study were to determine the reaction rates between chlorinated VOCs, particularly TCE, and strong alkalis, to elucidate the reaction mechanisms and by-products, to optimize the chemical reactions under various experimental conditions, and to develop a laboratory bench- scale alkaline destruction column that can be used to destroy vapor- phase TCE.

  18. Oxygen electrodes for rechargeable alkaline fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swette, Larry; Giner, Jose

    1987-01-01

    Electrocatalysts and supports for the positive electrode of moderate temperature single unit rechargeable alkaline fuel cells were investigated and developed. The electrocatalysts are defined as the material with a higher activity for the oxygen electrode reaction than the support. Advanced development will require that the materials be prepared in high surface area forms, and may also entail integration of various candidate materials. Eight candidate support materials and seven electrocatalysts were investigated. Of the 8 support, 3 materials meet the preliminary requirements in terms of electrical conductivity and stability. Emphasis is now on preparing in high surface area form and testing under more severe corrosion stress conditions. Of the 7 electrocatalysts prepared and evaluated, at least 5 materials remain as potential candidates. The major emphasis remains on preparation, physical characterization and electrochemical performance testing.

  19. Osteoblast response to hydroxyapatite doped with divalent and trivalent cations.

    PubMed

    Webster, Thomas J; Massa-Schlueter, Elizabeth A; Smith, Jennifer L; Slamovich, Elliot B

    2004-05-01

    The present in vitro study doped hydroxyapatite (HA) with various metal cations (Mg(2+), Zn(2+), La(3+), Y(3+), In(3+), and Bi(3+)) in an attempt to enhance properties of HA pertinent to orthopedic and dental applications. X-ray diffraction material characterization indicated that the metal cations may have substituted for calcium in the HA crystal structure and that all of the doped HA formulations were single-phase and crystalline. Scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed a variety of grain sizes, depending on the dopant utilized. Energy-dispersive spectroscopy confirmed that the dopants added during synthesis were present and that all of the HA formulations synthesized were within the defined range of HA phase in the CaO-P(2)O(5)-H(2)O system. Lastly, Bi-doped HA had a slower dissolution rate than either undoped HA or HA doped with other cations when exposed to simulated physiological conditions for 21 days. In terms of cell function, results provided the first evidence that osteoblasts, bone-forming cells, adhered and differentiated (as measured by alkaline phosphatase synthesis) in response to HA doped with trivalent cations (specifically, La(3+), Y(3+), In(3+), Bi(3+)) at earlier time points than either HA doped with divalent cations (Mg(2+), Zn(2+)) or undoped HA. Of the dopants examined, Bi(3+) most enhanced osteoblast long-term calcium-containing mineral deposition. For these reasons, this study revealed for the first time the potential benefits of doping HA with Bi(3+) according to criteria critical for bone prosthetic clinical success. PMID:14741626

  20. The use of some ion-exchange sorbing tracer cations in in-situ experiments in high saline groundwaters

    SciTech Connect

    Byegaard, J.; Skarnemark, G.; Skaalberg, M.

    1995-12-31

    The possibility to use alkali metals and alkaline earth metals as slightly sorbing tracers in in-situ sorption experiments in high saline groundwaters has been investigated. The cation exchange characteristics of granite and some fracture minerals (chlorite and calcite) have been studied using the proposed cations as tracers. The results show low Kd`s for Na, Ca and Sr ({approximately}0.1 ml/g), while the sorption is higher for the more electropositive cations (Rb, Cs and Ba). A higher contribution of irreversible sorption can also be observed for the latter group of cations. For calcite the sorption of all the tracers, except Ca, is lower compared to the corresponding sorption to granite and chlorite. Differences in selectivity coefficients and cation exchange capacity are obtained when using different size fractions of crushed granite. The difference is even more pronounced when comparing crushed granite to intact granite.

  1. Aryl sulfoxide radical cations. Generation, spectral properties, and theoretical calculations.

    PubMed

    Baciocchi, Enrico; Del Giacco, Tiziana; Gerini, Maria Francesca; Lanzalunga, Osvaldo

    2006-08-17

    Aromatic sulfoxide radical cations have been generated by pulse radiolysis and laser flash photolysis techniques. In water (pulse radiolysis) the radical cations showed an intense absorption band in the UV region (ca. 300 nm) and a broad less intense band in the visible region (from 500 to 1000 nm) whose position depends on the nature of the ring substituent. At very low pulse energy, the radical cations decayed by first-order kinetics, the decay rate increasing as the pH increases. It is suggested that the decay involves a nucleophilic attack of H(2)O or OH(-) (in basic solutions) to the positively charged sulfur atom to give the radical ArSO(OH)CH(3)(*). By sensitized [N-methylquinolinium tetrafluoborate (NMQ(+))] laser flash photolysis (LFP) the aromatic sulfoxide radical cations were generated in acetonitrile. In these experiments, however, only the band of the radical cation in the visible region could be observed, the UV band being covered by the UV absorption of NMQ(+). The lambda(max) values of the bands in the visible region resulted almost identical to those observed in water for the same radical cations. In the LFP experiments the sulfoxide radical cations decayed by second-order kinetics at a diffusion-controlled rate, and the decay is attributed to the back electron transfer between the radical cation and NMQ(*). DFT calculations were also carried out for a number of 4-X ring substituted (X = H, Me, Br, OMe, CN) aromatic sulfoxide radical cations (and their neutral parents). In all radical cations, the conformation with the S-O bond almost coplanar with the aromatic ring is the only one corresponding to the energy minimum. The maximum of energy corresponds to the conformation where the S-O bond is perpendicular to the aromatic ring. The rotational energy barriers are not very high, ranging from 3.9 to 6.9 kcal/mol. In all radical cations, the major fraction of charge and spin density is localized on the SOMe group. However, a substantial delocalization

  2. General features in the stoichiometry and stability of ionophore A23187-cation complexes in homogeneous solution.

    PubMed

    Chapman, C J; Puri, A K; Taylor, R W; Pfeiffer, D R

    1990-08-15

    Existing literature describing the stoichiometry and stability of complexes between A23187 and divalent cations in solution has been extended to include additional transition series cations, the heavy-metal cations Cd2+ and Pb2+, plus seven lanthanide series trivalent cations. Stability constants of 1:1 complexes between the ionophore and the divalent cations vary by 6.2 orders of magnitude between Cu2+ and Ba2+ which are the strongest and weakest complexes, respectively. Considering alkaline-earth and first-series transition cations together, the pattern of stability constants obeys the extended Irving-Williams series as is seen with many nonionophorous liganding agents. Cd2+ and Pb2+ are bound with an affinity similar to those of Mn2+ and Zn2+, whereas the lanthanides are bound with little selectivity and slightly higher stability. Titration of the ionophore in the 10(-5) M concentration range with di- and trivalent cations gives rise first to complexes of stoichiometry MA2 and subsequently to MA as the metal concentration is increased. The second stepwise stability constants for formation of the MA2 species exceeds the first constant by approximately 10-fold. With lanthanides, heavy metals, and transition-metal cations, OH-, at near physiological concentrations, competes significantly with free ionophore for binding to the 1:1 complexes. This competition is not apparent when Ca2+ or Mg2+ are the central cations. Possible implications of the 1:1 complex selectivity pattern, the ionophore-hydroxide competitive binding equilibria, and potential ternary complexes involving 1:1 ionophore:cation complexes and other anions present in biological systems are discussed with respect to the ionophore's transport selectivity and biological actions. PMID:2116770

  3. Stream acidification and base cation losses with grassland afforestation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, Kathleen A.; PiñEiro, Gervasio; Palmer, Sheila M.; JobbáGy, Esteban G.; Jackson, Robert B.

    2008-07-01

    Afforestation of natural grasslands with fast-growing pine and eucalyptus species is increasing globally, but little is known about its effect on ecosystems and watersheds and, ultimately, the quality of water resources. To investigate the biogeochemical and hydrological consequences of this land use change, we sampled stream water in paired watersheds in Uruguay and Argentina. In watersheds planted with pine, we found no change in stream pH following afforestation, while in watersheds planted with eucalyptus, pH was 0.7 units lower on average than in streams draining grasslands. To further investigate the mechanism behind the decrease in pH, we sampled soils and streams of eucalypt catchments in Uruguay and analyzed exchangeable base cation concentrations, alkalinity, and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). At these sites, Ca, Mg, and Na concentrations were >30% lower in afforested soils than in grassland soils, and pH was significantly lower below 10 cm depth. Stream measurements taken over three years illustrate that these soil changes were also manifested in stream water chemistry. In the eucalypt watersheds, base cation concentrations were >40% lower, and alkalinity and DIC were halved in stream water. A test with data from additional sites where both pines and eucalypts were planted nearby showed that eucalyptus has a stronger acidifying effect than pine. Overall, our data suggest that repeated harvesting cycles at some locations could negatively impact the soil store of base cations and reduce downstream water quality. Our results can be used to help minimize negative impacts of this land use and to inform policy in this and other regions targeted for plantation forestry.

  4. Flocculation performance of a cationic biopolymer derived from a cellulosic source in mild aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Liimatainen, Henrikki; Sirviö, Juho; Sundman, Ola; Visanko, Miikka; Hormi, Osmo; Niinimäki, Jouko

    2011-10-01

    The flocculation behavior of cationic, quaternary ammonium groups containing cellulosic biopolymers, CDACs, synthesized by cationizing dialdehyde cellulose in mild aqueous solution was studied in a kaolin suspension. In particular, the role of CDAC dosage and solution pH, NaCl concentration, and temperature were clarified. In addition, the initial apparent charge densities (CDs), particle sizes, ζ-potential, and stability of CDs were determined. CDACs possessed a high flocculation activity in neutral and acidic solutions, but a significant decrease was observed in alkaline solutions (pH >9). This was also seen as a decline in the apparent CD and particle size of the CDACs in alkaline conditions. The measurements also indicated that the apparent CD decreased to a constant level of 3 mmol/g in aqueous solutions. However, no notable decrease in flocculation performance was obtained after several days of storage. Moreover, the variation of NaCl concentration and temperature did not affect the flocculation activity. PMID:21862324

  5. Cation Diffusion in Xenotime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, D. J.

    2004-05-01

    Xenotime is an important mineral in metamorphic paragenesis, and useful in isotopic dating, garnet-xenotime thermometry, and monazite-xenotime thermometry, so diffusion data for xenotime of cations of geochronological and geochemical importance are of some interest. We report here on diffusion of the rare earth elements Sm, Dy and Yb in synthetic xenotime under dry conditions. The synthetic xenotime was grown via a Na2}CO{3}-MoO_{3 flux method. The source of diffusant for the experiments were REE phosphate powders, with experiments run with sources containing a single REE. Experiments were performed by placing source and xenotime in Pt capsules, and annealing capsules in 1 atm furnaces for times ranging from thirty minutes to a month, at temperatures from 1000 to 1400C. The REE distributions in the xenotime were profiled by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). The following Arrhenius relations are obtained for diffusion in xenotime, normal to (101): DSm = 1.7x10-4 exp(-442 kJ mol-1/RT) m2}sec{-1 DDy = 3.5x10-7 exp(-365 kJ mol-1/RT) m2}sec{-1 DYb = 7.4x10-7 exp(-371 kJ mol-1/RT) m2}sec{-1. Diffusivities of these REE do not differ greatly in xenotime, in contrast to the findings noted for the REE in zircon (Cherniak et al., 1997), where the LREE diffuse more slowly, and with higher activation energies for diffusion, than the heavier rare earths. In zircon, these differences among diffusion of the rare earths are attributed to the relatively large size of the REE with respect to Zr, for which they substitute in the zircon lattice. With the systematic increase in ionic radius from the heavy to lighter REE, this size mismatch becomes more pronounced and diffusivities of the LREE are as consequence slower. Although xenotime is isostructural with zircon, the REE are more closely matched in size to Y, so in xenotime this effect appears much smaller and the REE diffuse at similar rates. In addition, the process of diffusion in xenotime likely involves simple REE+3

  6. Proteolytic activation of both components of the cation stress-responsive Slt pathway in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Mellado, Laura; Arst, Herbert N; Espeso, Eduardo A

    2016-08-15

    Tolerance of Aspergillus nidulans to alkalinity and elevated cation concentrations requires both SltA and SltB. Transcription factor SltA and the putative pseudokinase/protease signaling protein SltB comprise a regulatory pathway specific to filamentous fungi. In vivo, SltB is proteolytically cleaved into its two principal domains. Mutational analysis defines a chymotrypsin-like serine protease domain that mediates SltB autoproteolysis and proteolytic cleavage of SltA. The pseudokinase domain might modulate the protease activity of SltB. Three forms of the SltA transcription factor coexist in cells: a full-length, 78-kDa version and a processed, 32-kDa form, which is found in phosphorylated and unphosphorylated states. The SltA32kDa version mediates transcriptional regulation of sltB and, putatively, genes required for tolerance to cation stress and alkalinity. The full-length form, SltA78kDa, apparently has no transcriptional function. In the absence of SltB, only the primary product of SltA is detectable, and its level equals that of SltA78kDa. Mutations in sltB selected as suppressors of null vps alleles and resulting in cation/alkalinity sensitivity either reduced or eliminated SltA proteolysis. There is no evidence for cation or alkalinity regulation of SltB cleavage, but activation of sltB expression requires SltA. This work identifies the molecular mechanisms governing the Slt pathway. PMID:27307585

  7. A binary AxB1-x ionic alkaline pseudocapacitor system involving manganese, iron, cobalt, and nickel: formation of electroactive colloids via in situ electric field assisted coprecipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kunfeng; Yin, Shu; Xue, Dongfeng

    2014-12-01

    A new ``combinatorial transition-metal cation pseudocapacitor'' was demonstrated by designing combinatorial transition-metal cation pseudocapacitors with binary AxB1-x salt electrodes involving manganese, iron, cobalt, and nickel cations in an alkaline aqueous electrolyte. Binary multi-valence cations were crystallized in the colloidal state through an in situ coprecipitation under an electric field. These electroactive colloids absorbed by carbon black and the PVDF matrix are highly redox-reactive with high specific capacitance values, where the specific electrode configuration can create short ion diffusion paths to enable fast and reversible Faradaic reactions. This work shows huge promise for developing high-performance electrical energy storage systems via designing the colloidal state of electroactive cations. Multiple redox cations in the colloidal state can show high redox activities, making them more suitable for potential application in pseudocapacitor systems.A new ``combinatorial transition-metal cation pseudocapacitor'' was demonstrated by designing combinatorial transition-metal cation pseudocapacitors with binary AxB1-x salt electrodes involving manganese, iron, cobalt, and nickel cations in an alkaline aqueous electrolyte. Binary multi-valence cations were crystallized in the colloidal state through an in situ coprecipitation under an electric field. These electroactive colloids absorbed by carbon black and the PVDF matrix are highly redox-reactive with high specific capacitance values, where the specific electrode configuration can create short ion diffusion paths to enable fast and reversible Faradaic reactions. This work shows huge promise for developing high-performance electrical energy storage systems via designing the colloidal state of electroactive cations. Multiple redox cations in the colloidal state can show high redox activities, making them more suitable for potential application in pseudocapacitor systems. Electronic supplementary

  8. Anode conductor for alkaline cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schrenk, D.J.; Murphy, P.E.

    1988-12-13

    This patent describes an electrochemical cell comprised of an anode comprised of zinc; a cathode; and alkaline electrolyte; and a current collector comprised of a silicon bronze alloy that is comprised of 85-98% by weight copper and 1-5% by weight silicon with the remainder being comprised of at least one of manganese, iron, zinc, aluminum, tin, lead, or mixtures thereof; and a strip of metal tab stock welded to the current collector, the tab stock being a metal other than silicon bronze alloy.

  9. Alkaline fuel cell performance investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. E.; Manzo, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    An exploratory experimental fuel cell test program was conducted to investigate the performance characteristics of alkaline laboratory research electrodes. The objective of this work was to establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance and evaluate candidate cathode configurations having the potential for improved performance. The performance characterization tests provided data to empirically establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance for cell temperatures up to 300 F and reactant pressures up to 200 psia. Evaluation of five gold alloy cathode catalysts revealed that three doped gold alloys had more than two times the surface areas of reference cathodes and therefore offered the best potential for improved performance.

  10. Alkaline fuel cell performance investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. E.; Manzo, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    An exploratory experimental fuel cell test program was conducted to investigate the performance characteristics of alkaline laboratory research electrodes. The objective of this work was to establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance and evaluate candidate cathode configurations having the potential for improved performance. The performance characterization tests provided data to empirically establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance for cell temperatures up to 300 F and reactant pressures up to 200 psia. Evaluation of five gold alloy cathode catalysts revealed that three doped gold alloys had more that two times the surface areas of reference cathodes and therefore offered the best potential for improved performance.

  11. Decision making in C. elegans chemotaxis to alkaline pH

    PubMed Central

    Murayama, Takashi; Maruyama, Ichi N

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring of environmental and tissue pH is critical for animal survival. The nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), is attracted to mildly alkaline pH, but avoids strongly alkaline pH. However, little is known about how the behavioral switching or decision making occurs. Genetic dissection and Ca2+ imaging have previously demonstrated that ASEL and ASH are the major sensory neurons responsible for attraction and repulsion, respectively. Here we report that unlike C. elegans wild type, mutants deficient in ASEL or ASH were repelled by mildly alkaline pH, or were attracted to strongly alkaline pH, respectively. These results suggest that signals through ASEL and ASH compete to determine the animal’s alkaline-pH chemotaxis. Furthermore, mutants with 2 ASEL neurons were more efficiently attracted to mildly alkaline pH than the wild type with a single ASEL neuron, indicating that higher activity of ASEL induces stronger attraction to mildly alkaline pH. This stronger attraction was overridden by normal activity of ASH, suggesting that ASH-mediated avoidance dominates ASEL-mediated attraction. Thus, C. elegans chemotactic behaviors to alkaline pH seems to be determined by signal strengths from the sensory neurons ASEL and ASH, and the behavior decision making seems to be the result of competition between the 2 sensory neurons. PMID:24563708

  12. Cation Uptake and Allocation by Red Pine Seedlings under Cation-Nutrient Stress in a Column Growth Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Zhenqing; Balogh-Brunstad, Zsuzsanna; Grant, Michael R.; Harsh, James B.; Gill, Richard; Thomashow, Linda; Dohnalkova, Alice; Stacks, Daryl; Letourneau, Melissa; Keller, Chester K.

    2014-01-10

    Background and Aims Plant nutrient uptake is affected by environmental stress, but how plants respond to cation-nutrient stress is poorly understood. We assessed the impact of varying degrees of cation-nutrient limitation on cation uptake in an experimental plant-mineral system. Methods Column experiments, with red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.) seedlings growing in sand/mineral mixtures, were conducted for up to nine months under a range of Ca- and K-limited conditions. The Ca and K were supplied from both minerals and nutrient solutions with varying Ca and K concentrations. Results Cation nutrient stress had little impact on carbon allocation after nine months of plant growth and K was the limiting nutrient for biomass production. The Ca/Sr and K/Rb ratio results allowed independent estimation of dissolution incongruency and discrimination against Sr and Rb during cation uptake processes. The fraction of K in biomass from biotite increased with decreasing K supply from nutrient solutions. The mineral anorthite was consistently the major source of Ca, regardless of nutrient treatment. Conclusions Red pine seedlings exploited more mineral K in response to more severe K deficiency. This did not occur for Ca. Plant discrimination factors must be carefully considered to accurately identify nutrient sources using cation tracers.

  13. Cation Ordering in Layered Nickelates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson-Cheeseman, Brittany; Zhou, Hua; Cammarata, Antonio; Hoffman, Jason; Balachandran, Prasanna; Rondinelli, James; Bhattacharya, Anand

    2013-03-01

    The single layer Ruddlesden-Popper nickelates present a model system to understand how the effects of digital dopant cation ordering may affect the properties of 2-dimensional conducting sheets. We investigate the effects of aliovalent A-site cation order on LaSrNiO4 films. Using molecular beam epitaxy, we interleave full layers of SrO and LaO in a series of chemically equivalent films, varying the pattern of SrO and LaO layers relative to the NiO2 layers. Through synchrotron surface x-ray diffraction and Coherant Bragg Rod Analysis (COBRA), we directly investigate the A-site cation order and the resulting atomic displacements for each ordering pattern. We correlate these results with theoretical calculations and transport measurements of the layered nickelate films.

  14. Alkaline earths as main group reagents in molecular catalysis.

    PubMed

    Hill, Michael S; Liptrot, David J; Weetman, Catherine

    2016-02-21

    The past decade has witnessed some remarkable advances in our appreciation of the structural and reaction chemistry of the heavier alkaline earth (Ae = Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba) elements. Derived from complexes of these metals in their immutable +2 oxidation state, a broad and widely applicable catalytic chemistry has also emerged, driven by considerations of cost and inherent low toxicity. The considerable adjustments incurred to ionic radius and resultant cation charge density also provide reactivity with significant mechanistic and kinetic variability as group 2 is descended. In an attempt to place these advances in the broader context of contemporary main group element chemistry, this review focusses on the developing state of the art in both multiple bond heterofunctionalisation and cross coupling catalysis. We review specific advances in alkene and alkyne hydroamination and hydrophosphination catalysis and related extensions of this reactivity that allow the synthesis of a wide variety of acyclic and heterocyclic small molecules. The use of heavier alkaline earth hydride derivatives as pre-catalysts and intermediates in multiple bond hydrogenation, hydrosilylation and hydroboration is also described along with the emergence of these and related reagents in a variety of dehydrocoupling processes that allow that facile catalytic construction of Si-C, Si-N and B-N bonds. PMID:26797470

  15. Alkaline detergent recycling via ultrafiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Steffani, C.; Meltzer, M.

    1995-06-01

    The metal finishing industry uses alkaline cleaners and detergents to remove oils and dirt from manufactured parts, often before they are painted or plated. The use of these cleaners has grown because environmental regulations are phasing out ozone depleting substances and placing restrictions on the use and disposal of many hazardous solvents. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is examining ultrafiltration as a cleaning approach that reclaims the cleaning solutions and minimizes wastes. The ultrafiltration membrane is made from sheets of polymerized organic film. The sheets are rolled onto a supporting frame and installed in a tube. Spent cleaning solution is pumped into a filter chamber and filtered through the membrane that captures oils and dirt and allows water and detergent to pass. The membrane is monitored and when pressure builds from oil and dirt, an automatic system cleans the surface to maintain solution flow and filtration quality. The results show that the ultrafiltration does not disturb the detergent concentration or alkalinity but removed almost all the oils and dirt leaving the solution in condition to be reused.

  16. Grace DAKASEP alkaline battery separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovannoni, R. T.; Lundquist, J. T.; Choi, W. M.

    1987-01-01

    The Grace DAKASEP separator was originally developed as a wicking layer for nickel-zinc alkaline batteries. The DAKASEP is a filled non-woven separator which is flexible and heat sealable. Through modification of formulation and processing variables, products with a variety of properties can be produced. Variations of DAKASEP were tested in Ni-H2, Ni-Zn, Ni-Cd, and primary alkaline batteries with good results. The properties of DAKASEP which are optimized for Hg-Zn primary batteries are shown in tabular form. This separator has high tensile strength, 12 micron average pore size, relatively low porosity at 46-48 percent, and consequently moderately high resistivity. Versions were produced with greater than 70 percent porosity and resistivities in 33 wt percent KOH as low as 3 ohm cm. Performance data for Hg-Zn E-1 size cells containing DAKASEP with the properties shown in tabular form, are more reproducible than data obtained with a competitive polypropylene non-woven separator. In addition, utilization of active material is in general considerably improved.

  17. Alkaline and alkaline earth metal phosphate halides and phosphors

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, Robert Joseph; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Cleaver, Robert John

    2012-11-13

    Compounds, phosphor materials and apparatus related to nacaphite family of materials are presented. Potassium and rubidium based nacaphite family compounds and phosphors designed by doping divalent rare earth elements in the sites of alkaline earth metals in the nacaphite material families are descried. An apparatus comprising the phosphors based on the nacaphite family materials are presented herein. The compounds presented is of formula A.sub.2B.sub.1-yR.sub.yPO.sub.4X where the elements A, B, R, X and suffix y are defined such that A is potassium, rubidium, or a combination of potassium and rubidium and B is calcium, strontium, barium, or a combination of any of calcium, strontium and barium. X is fluorine, chlorine, or a combination of fluorine and chlorine, R is europium, samarium, ytterbium, or a combination of any of europium, samarium, and ytterbium, and y ranges from 0 to about 0.1.

  18. Optical probes for the detection of protons, and alkali and alkaline earth metal cations.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Graham R C; Sahoo, Suban K; Kamila, Sukanta; Singh, Narinder; Kaur, Navneet; Hyland, Barry W; Callan, John F

    2015-07-01

    Luminescent sensors and switches continue to play a key role in shaping our understanding of key biochemical processes, assist in the diagnosis of disease and contribute to the design of new drugs and therapies. Similarly, their contribution to the environment cannot be understated as they offer a portable means to undertake field testing for hazardous chemicals and pollutants such as heavy metals. From a physiological perspective, the Group I and II metal ions are among the most important in the periodic table with blood plasma levels of H(+), Na(+) and Ca(2+) being indicators of several possible disease states. In this review, we examine the progress that has been made in the development of luminescent probes for Group I and Group II ions as well as protons. The potential applications of these probes and the mechanism involved in controlling their luminescent response upon analyte binding will also be discussed. PMID:25742963

  19. Long-term trends in alkalinity in large rivers of the conterminous US in relation to acidification, agriculture, and hydrologic modification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stets, Edward G.; Kelly, Valerie J.; Crawford, Charles G.

    2014-01-01

    Alkalinity increases in large rivers of the conterminous US are well known, but less is understood about the processes leading to these trends as compared with headwater systems more intensively examined in conjunction with acid deposition studies. Nevertheless, large rivers are important conduits of inorganic carbon and other solutes to coastal areas and may have substantial influence on coastal calcium carbonate saturation dynamics. We examined long-term (mid-20th to early 21st century) trends in alkalinity and other weathering products in 23 rivers of the conterminous US. We used a rigorous flow-weighting technique which allowed greater focus on solute trends occurring independently of changes in flow. Increasing alkalinity concentrations and yield were widespread, occurring at 14 and 13 stations, respectively. Analysis of trends in other weathering products suggested that the causes of alkalinity trends were diverse, but at many stations alkalinity increases coincided with decreasing nitrate + sulfate and decreasing cation:alkalinity ratios, which is consistent with recovery from acidification. A positive correlation between the Sen–Thiel slopes of alkalinity increases and agricultural lime usage indicated that agricultural lime contributed to increasing solute concentration in some areas. However, several stations including the Altamaha, Upper Mississippi, and San Joaquin Rivers exhibited solute trends, such as increasing cation:alkalinity ratios and increasing nitrate + sulfate, more consistent with increasing acidity, emphasizing that multiple processes affect alkalinity trends in large rivers. This study was unique in its examination of alkalinity trends in large rivers covering a wide range of climate and land use types, but more detailed analyses will help to better elucidate temporal changes to river solutes and especially the effects they may have on coastal calcium carbonate saturation state.

  20. Cation-cation interactions and cation exchange in a series of isostructural framework uranyl tungstates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balboni, Enrica; Burns, Peter C.

    2014-05-01

    The isotypical compounds (UO2)3(WO6)(H2O)5 (1), Ag(UO2)3(WO6)(OH)(H2O)3 (2), K(UO2)3(WO6)OH(H2O)4 (3), Rb(UO2)3(WO6)(OH)(H2O)3.5 (4), and Cs(UO2)3(WO6)OH(H2O)3 (5) were synthesized, characterized, and their structures determined. Each crystallizes in space group Cc. (1): a=12.979 (3), b=10.238 (2), c=11.302 (2), β=102.044 (2); (2): a=13.148 (2), b=9.520 (1), c=11.083 (2), β=101.568 (2); (3): a=13.111 (8), b=9.930 (6), c=11.242 (7), β=101.024 (7); (4): a=12.940 (2), b=10.231 (2), c=11.259(2), β=102.205 (2); (5): a=12.983 (3), b=10.191 (3), c=11.263 (4), β=101.661 (4). Compounds 1-5 are a framework of uranyl and tungsten polyhedra containing cation-cation interactions. The framework has three symmetrically distinct U(VI) cations, one tungsten, sixteen to eighteen oxygen atoms, and in 2-5, one monovalent cation. Each atom occupies a general position. Each U(VI) cation is present as a typical (UO2)2+ uranyl ion in an overall pentagonal bipyramidal coordination environment. Each pentagonal bipyramid shares two equatorial edges with two other pentagonal bipyramids, forming a trimer. Trimers are connected into chains by edge-sharing with WO6 octahedra. Chains are linked through cation-cation interactions between two symmetrically independent uranyl ions. This yields a remarkably complex system of intersecting channels that extend along [0 0 1] and [-1 1 0]. The cation exchange properties of 2 and 3 were characterized at room temperature and at 140 °C.

  1. Cationically polymerizable monomers derived from renewable sources. Annual performance report

    SciTech Connect

    Crivello, J.V.

    1992-10-01

    The objectives of this project are to design and synthesize novel monomers which orginate from renewable biological sources and to carry out their rapid, efficient, pollution-free and energy efficient cationic polymerization to useful products under the influence of ultraviolet light or heat. A summary of the results of the past year`s research on cationically polymerizable monomers derived from renewable sources is presented. Three major areas of investigation corresponding to the different classes of naturally occurring starting materials were investigated; epoxidized terpenes and natural rubber and vinyl ethers from alcohols and carbohydrates.

  2. Block copolymers for alkaline fuel cell membrane materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yifan

    Alkaline fuel cells (AFCs) using anion exchange membranes (AEMs) as electrolyte have recently received considerable attention. AFCs offer some advantages over proton exchange membrane fuel cells, including the potential of non-noble metal (e.g. nickel, silver) catalyst on the cathode, which can dramatically lower the fuel cell cost. The main drawback of traditional AFCs is the use of liquid electrolyte (e.g. aqueous potassium hydroxide), which can result in the formation of carbonate precipitates by reaction with carbon dioxide. AEMs with tethered cations can overcome the precipitates formed in traditional AFCs. Our current research focuses on developing different polymer systems (blend, block, grafted, and crosslinked polymers) in order to understand alkaline fuel cell membrane in many aspects and design optimized anion exchange membranes with better alkaline stability, mechanical integrity and ionic conductivity. A number of distinct materials have been produced and characterized. A polymer blend system comprised of poly(vinylbenzyl chloride)-b-polystyrene (PVBC-b-PS) diblock copolymer, prepared by nitroxide mediated polymerization (NMP), with poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene oxide) (PPO) or brominated PPO was studied for conversion into a blend membrane for AEM. The formation of a miscible blend matrix improved mechanical properties while maintaining high ionic conductivity through formation of phase separated ionic domains. Using anionic polymerization, a polyethylene based block copolymer was designed where the polyethylene-based block copolymer formed bicontinuous morphological structures to enhance the hydroxide conductivity (up to 94 mS/cm at 80 °C) while excellent mechanical properties (strain up to 205%) of the polyethylene block copolymer membrane was observed. A polymer system was designed and characterized with monomethoxy polyethylene glycol (mPEG) as a hydrophilic polymer grafted through substitution of pendent benzyl chloride groups of a PVBC

  3. Major Links.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Tona

    1995-01-01

    Provides electronic mail addresses for resources and discussion groups related to the following academic majors: art, biology, business, chemistry, computer science, economics, health sciences, history, literature, math, music, philosophy, political science, psychology, sociology, and theater. (AEF)

  4. Alkaline volcanisms in the Proto-Kuril forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yutani, T.; Hirano, N.

    2015-12-01

    The Nemuro Group in the northeasternmost part of Japan represents forearc basin deposits of the Proto-Kuril arc that consist of Upper Cretaceous-Paleocene sedimentary rocks with andesitic volcaniclastics and alkaline lavas. Their occurrence in this setting is unusual because such alkaline lavas and intrusions are not commonly found in forearc environments. Here, we report new petrological and geological data to discuss the nature of magmatic process involved in their petrogenesis. Pillow and massive lava flows represent subaqueous volcanic activity, and the occurrence of inter-pillow sedimentary units indicates their eruption on unconsolidated sediments of the lower Nemuro Group. Sill intrusions with layered structures and thicknesses ranging from 10 to 130 m are also common widely distributed in the Nemuro Group. Major and trace element chemistry and mineralogical data distinguish the analyzed samples as K-rich alkaline rocks with low TiO2 or Nb contents, analogous to island arc-like tholeiites. These K-rich alkaline rocks can be classified into two groups of shoshonites: shoshonites containing olivine phenocrysts and intruding into the lower Nemuro Group (Group 1), and shoshonites with no olivine and making up the middle part of the Nemuro Group (Group 2). Group 1 shoshonites have higher MgO, Cr and Ni contents than those of Group 2. The bulk-rock composition of Group 2, which has lower MgO contents, shows higher SiO2 than that of Group 1. Such compositional differences possibly represent fractional crystallization of magmas between Groups 1 and 2. Based on the limited available data, we conclude that these alkaline rocks intruding into the Nemuro Group represent arc-shoshonites, and that the Group 1 magmas underwent fractional crystallization to produce the Group 2 magmas.

  5. Ethylene Inhibits Root Elongation during Alkaline Stress through AUXIN1 and Associated Changes in Auxin Accumulation1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Xu, Heng-Hao; Liu, Wen-Cheng; Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2015-01-01

    Soil alkalinity causes major reductions in yield and quality of crops worldwide. The plant root is the first organ sensing soil alkalinity, which results in shorter primary roots. However, the mechanism underlying alkaline stress-mediated inhibition of root elongation remains to be further elucidated. Here, we report that alkaline conditions inhibit primary root elongation of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings by reducing cell division potential in the meristem zones and that ethylene signaling affects this process. The ethylene perception antagonist silver (Ag+) alleviated the inhibition of root elongation by alkaline stress. Moreover, the ethylene signaling mutants ethylene response1-3 (etr1-3), ethylene insensitive2 (ein2), and ein3-1 showed less reduction in root length under alkaline conditions, indicating a reduced sensitivity to alkalinity. Ethylene biosynthesis also was found to play a role in alkaline stress-mediated root inhibition; the ethylene overproducer1-1 mutant, which overproduces ethylene because of increased stability of 1-AMINOCYCLOPROPANE-1-CARBOXYLIC ACID SYNTHASE5, was hypersensitive to alkaline stress. In addition, the ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor cobalt (Co2+) suppressed alkaline stress-mediated inhibition of root elongation. We further found that alkaline stress caused an increase in auxin levels by promoting expression of auxin biosynthesis-related genes, but the increase in auxin levels was reduced in the roots of the etr1-3 and ein3-1 mutants and in Ag+/Co2+-treated wild-type plants. Additional genetic and physiological data showed that AUXIN1 (AUX1) was involved in alkaline stress-mediated inhibition of root elongation. Taken together, our results reveal that ethylene modulates alkaline stress-mediated inhibition of root growth by increasing auxin accumulation by stimulating the expression of AUX1 and auxin biosynthesis-related genes. PMID:26109425

  6. The interaction of humic substances with cationic polyelectrolytes.

    PubMed

    Kam, S K; Gregory, J

    2001-10-01

    The anionic charge carried by aquatic humic substances plays a major part in their interaction with metal ions and other cationic species. Removal of such substances by coagulation and flocculation can be, at least partly, determined by charge neutralisation. In this work, the charge densities of a commercial humic acid and an aquatic humic extract have been investigated by studying their interactions with a series of synthetic cationic polyelectrolytes. These covered a range of charge densities and molecular weights. The techniques used were colloid titration by spectrophotometry and streaming current detection, and flocculation determined by colour removal and by an optical monitoring method. For a given cationic polyelectrolyte, all four methods gave charge densities for humic substances which were in good agreement. However, systematic differences in the apparent humic charge density were found, depending on the charge density of the cationic polyelectrolyte used. With low charge density polyelectrolytes, the apparent anionic charge of the humic substances was found to be low. With higher polyelectrolyte charge densities, the apparent humic substance charge density increases and reaches a limiting value when the polyelectrolyte charge is greater than about 3 meq/g. This indicates a non-stoichiometric interaction between the anionic sites of the humic substances and the cationic charges of the low-charge polyelectrolytes. Optimum flocculation of humics occurred with less cationic charge in the case of low-charge polyelectrolytes than those with higher charge density. However, the degree of removal was considerably better in the latter case. In all cases, the molecular weight of the cationic polyelectrolytes (over a range from about 50,000 to 15 million) appeared to have no effect on the results. PMID:11561615

  7. Cationic Antimicrobial Polymers and Their Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana Maria; de Melo Carrasco, Letícia Dias

    2013-01-01

    Cationic compounds are promising candidates for development of antimicrobial agents. Positive charges attached to surfaces, particles, polymers, peptides or bilayers have been used as antimicrobial agents by themselves or in sophisticated formulations. The main positively charged moieties in these natural or synthetic structures are quaternary ammonium groups, resulting in quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs). The advantage of amphiphilic cationic polymers when compared to small amphiphilic molecules is their enhanced microbicidal activity. Besides, many of these polymeric structures also show low toxicity to human cells; a major requirement for biomedical applications. Determination of the specific elements in polymers, which affect their antimicrobial activity, has been previously difficult due to broad molecular weight distributions and random sequences characteristic of radical polymerization. With the advances in polymerization control, selection of well defined polymers and structures are allowing greater insight into their structure-antimicrobial activity relationship. On the other hand, antimicrobial polymers grafted or self-assembled to inert or non inert vehicles can yield hybrid antimicrobial nanostructures or films, which can act as antimicrobials by themselves or deliver bioactive molecules for a variety of applications, such as wound dressing, photodynamic antimicrobial therapy, food packing and preservation and antifouling applications. PMID:23665898

  8. Diffusion of highly charged cations in olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, D. J.; Watson, E. B.; Liang, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Diffusion of tungsten, titanium and phosphorus have been measured in natural iron-bearing olivine (~Fo90) and synthetic forsterite. Experiments were run under buffered conditions (with iron-wustite or Ni-NiO buffers) in 1-atm furnaces. The sources of diffusant for experiments were MgWO4 for tungsten diffusion, Mg2TiO4 for Ti diffusion, and AlPO4 for P diffusion; in all cases these compounds were pre-reacted at high temperature with Mg2SiO4 or Fe-bearing olivine prior to diffusion anneals. Samples were placed with the source materials in noble metal or silica capsules, which were sealed under vacuum in silica glass ampoules with solid buffers. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) was used to measure depth profiles for all sets of experiments; measurements of P were also made with Nuclear Reaction Analysis using the 31P(α,p)34S reaction. These new data suggest marked differences among diffusivities of these cations, with titanium diffusion faster than diffusion of tungsten, but slower than diffusion of phosphorus over the conditions investigated. Diffusivities of all of these elements appear significantly slower than those of divalent cations in olivine. These results will be discussed in context with extant diffusion data for major, trace and minor elements in olivine. The effects of oxygen fugacity and olivine composition on diffusion, and potential implications for diffusion mechanisms will also be considered.

  9. Formation of electroactive colloids via in situ coprecipitation under electric field: erbium chloride alkaline aqueous pseudocapacitor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kunfeng; Xue, Dongfeng

    2014-09-15

    For the first time, a new ErCl3 alkaline aqueous pseudocapacitor system was demonstrated by designing commercial ErCl3 salt electrode in alkaline aqueous electrolyte, where the materials synthesis and subsequently integrating into practical electrode structures occur at the same spatial and temporal scale. Highly electroactive ErOOH colloids were in-situ crystallized via electric field assisted chemical coprecipitation of ErCl3 in KOH aqueous electrolyte. These electroactive ErOOH colloids absorbed by carbon black and PVDF matrix were highly redox-reactive with higher cation utilization ratio of 86 % and specific capacitance values of 1811F/g, exceeding the one-electron redox theoretical capacitance (Er(3+)↔Er(2+)). We believe that additional two-electron (Er(2+)↔Er) or three-electron (Er(3+)↔Er) reactions can occur in our designed ErCl3 alkaline aqueous pseudocapacitor system. The specific electrode configuration with ErOOH colloids grown among the carbon black/PVDF matrix can create short ion diffusion and electron transfer length to enable the fast and reversible Faradaic reactions. This work shows promising for finding high-performance electrical energy storage systems via designing the colloidal state of electroactive cations with the utilization of in-situ crystallization route. PMID:24973700

  10. Process for extracting technetium from alkaline solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, B.A.; Sachleben, R.A.; Bonnesen, P.V.

    1994-12-31

    This invention relates generally to a process for extracting technetium from nuclear wastes and more particularly to a process for extracting technetium from alkaline waste solutions containing technetium and high concentrations of alkali metal nitrates. A process for extracting technetium values from an aqueous alkaline solution containing at least one alkali metal hydroxide and at least one alkali metal nitrate comprises the steps of: contacting the aqueous alkaline solution with a solvent consisting of a crown ether in a diluent, the diluent being a water-immiscible organic liquid in which the crown ether is soluble, for a period of time sufficient to selectively extract the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution into the solvent; separating the solvent containing the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution; and stripping the technetium values from the solvent by contacting the solvent with water.

  11. Halogenated silanes, radicals, and cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liming; He, Yi-Liang

    2008-09-01

    Quantum chemistry study has been carried out on the structure and energetics of halogenated silanes, radicals, and cations (SiHxXy0,+1, X = F, Cl, Br; x + y = 1-4). The geometries are optimized at B3LYP/6-31+G(2df,p) level. The adiabatic ionization energiess (IEas), relative energetics of cations, proton affinities (PAs) of silanes, and the enthalpies of formation are predicted using G3(CC) model chemistry. Non-classical ion complex structures are found for hydrogenated cations and transition states connecting classical and non-classical structures are also located. The most stable cations for silylene and silyl radicals have their classical divalent and trivalent structures, and those for silanes have non-classical structures except for SiH3Br+ and SiH2Br2+. The non-classical structures for halosilane cations imply difficulty in experimentally measurement of the adiabatic ionization energies using photoionization or photoelectron studies. For SiH3X, SiH2X2, and SiHX3, the G3(CC) adiabatic IEas to classical ionic structures closest to their neutrals agree better with the photoelectron spectroscopic measurements. The transition states between classical and non-classical structures also hamper the photoionization determination of the appearance energies for silylene cations from silanes. The G3(CC) results for SiHx0,+1 agree excellently with the photoionization mass spectrometric study, and the results for fluorinated and chlorinated species also agree with the previous theoretical predictions at correlation levels from BAC-MP4 to CCSD(T)/CBS. The predicted enthalpy differences between SiH2Cl+, SiHCl2+, and SiCl3+ are also in accordance with previous kinetics study. The G3(CC) results show large discrepancies to the collision-induced charge transfer and/or dissociation reactions involving SiFx+ and SiClx+ ions, for which the G3(CC) enthalpies of formation are also significantly differed from the previous theoretical predictions, especially on SiFx+ (x = 2-4). The G3

  12. Major depression.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Susan M; Pagalilauan, Genevieve L; Simpson, Scott A

    2014-09-01

    Major depression is a common, disabling condition seen frequently in primary care practices. Non-psychiatrist ambulatory providers are increasingly responsible for diagnosing, and primarily managing patients suffering from major depressive disorder (MDD). The goal of this review is to help primary care providers to understand the natural history of MDD, identify practical tools for screening, and a thoughtful approach to management. Clinically challenging topics like co-morbid conditions, treatment resistant depression and pharmacotherapy selection with consideration to side effects and medication interactions, are also covered. PMID:25134869

  13. Alkaline-resistance model of subtilisin ALP I, a novel alkaline subtilisin.

    PubMed

    Maeda, H; Mizutani, O; Yamagata, Y; Ichishima, E; Nakajima, T

    2001-05-01

    The alkaline-resistance mechanism of the alkaline-stable enzymes is not yet known. To clarify the mechanism of alkaline-resistance of alkaline subtilisin, structural changes of two typical subtilisins, subtilisin ALP I (ALP I) and subtilisin Sendai (Sendai), were studied by means of physicochemical methods. Subtilisin NAT (NAT), which exhibits no alkaline resistance, was examined as a control. ALP I gradually lost its activity, accompanied by protein degradation, but, on the contrary, Sendai was stable under alkaline conditions. CD spectral measurements at neutral and alkaline pH indicated no apparent differences between ALP I and Sendai. A significant difference was observed on measurement of fluorescence emission spectra of the tryptophan residues of ALP I that were exposed on the enzyme surface. The fluorescence intensity of ALP I was greatly reduced under alkaline conditions; moreover, the reduction was reversed when alkaline-treated ALP I was neutralized. The fluorescence spectrum of Sendai remained unchanged. The enzymatic and optical activities of NAT were lost at high pH, indicating a lack of functional and structural stability in an alkaline environment. Judging from these results, the alkaline resistance is closely related to the surface structure of the enzyme molecule. PMID:11328588

  14. The dynamics of alkaline phosphatase activity during operculum regeneration in the polychaete Pomatoceros lamarckii.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Réka; Ferrier, David E K

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase enzymes are found throughout the living world and fulfil a variety of functions. They have been linked to regeneration, stem cells and biomineralisation in a range of animals. Here we describe the pattern of alkaline phosphatase activity in a spiralian appendage, the operculum of the serpulid polychaete Pomatoceros lamarckii. The P. lamarckii operculum is reinforced by a calcified opercular plate and is capable of rapid regeneration, making it an ideal model system to study these key processes in annelids. Alkaline phosphatase activity is present in mesodermal tissues of both intact and regenerating opercular filaments, in a strongly regionalised pattern correlated with major morphological features. Based on the lack of epidermal activity and the broad distribution of staining in mesodermal tissues, calcification- or stem cell-specific roles are unlikely. Transcriptomic data reveal that at least four distinct genes contribute to the detected activity. Opercular alkaline phosphatase activity is sensitive to levamisole. Phylogenetic analysis of metazoan alkaline phosphatases indicates homology of the P. lamarckii sequences to other annelid alkaline phosphatases, and shows that metazoan alkaline phosphatase evolution was characterised by extensive lineage-specific duplications. PMID:25690977

  15. Major Andre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henisch, B. A.; Henisch, H. K.

    1976-01-01

    If most Revolutionary era people seem two-dimensional their lives simpler to understand than ours, it may be only that history, with the benefit of hindsight, clarifies. Examines a profile of Major John Andre, the British liaison officer in Benedict Arnold's plan to surrender West Point, as both hero and villain to show the complexity of early…

  16. Cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising lignin

    DOEpatents

    Fenn, David; Bowman, Mark P; Zawacky, Steven R; Van Buskirk, Ellor J; Kamarchik, Peter

    2013-07-30

    A cationic electrodepositable coating composition is disclosed. The present invention in directed to a cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising a lignin-containing cationic salt resin, that comprises (A) the reaction product of: lignin, an amine, and a carbonyl compound; (B) the reaction product of lignin, epichlorohydrin, and an amine; or (C) combinations thereof.

  17. Process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Chia-lin W.

    1994-01-01

    According to its major aspects and broadly stated, the present invention is a process for treating alkaline waste materials, including high level radioactive wastes, for vitrification. The process involves adjusting the pH of the wastes with nitric acid, adding formic acid (or a process stream containing formic acid) to reduce mercury compounds to elemental mercury and MnO{sub 2} to the Mn(II) ion, and mixing with class formers to produce a melter feed. The process minimizes production of hydrogen due to noble metal-catalyzed formic acid decomposition during, treatment, while producing a redox-balanced feed for effective melter operation and a quality glass product. An important feature of the present invention is the use of different acidifying and reducing, agents to treat the wastes. The nitric acid acidifies the wastes to improve yield stress and supplies acid for various reactions; then the formic acid reduces mercury compounds to elemental mercury and MnO{sub 2}) to the Mn(II) ion. When the pH of the waste is lower, reduction of mercury compounds and MnO{sub 2}) is faster and less formic acid is needed, and the production of hydrogen caused by catalytically-active noble metals is decreased.

  18. Gaseous protein cations are amphoteric

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, J.L. Jr.; McLuckey, S.A.

    1997-02-19

    Singly- and multiply-protonated ubiquitin molecules are found to react with iodide anions, and certain other anions, by attachment of the anion, in competition with proton transfer to the anion. The resulting adduct ions are relatively weakly bound and dissociate upon collisional activation by loss of the neutral acid derived from the anion. Adduct ions that behave similarly can also be formed via ion/molecule reactions involving the neutral acid. The ion/molecule reaction phenomenology, however, stands in contrast with that expected based on the reaction site(s) being charged. Reaction rates increase inversely with charge state and the total number of neutral molecules that add to the protein cations increases inversely with cation charge. These observations are inconsistent with the formation of proton-bound clusters but are fully consistent with the formation of ion pairs or dipole/dipole bonding involving the neutral acid and neutral basic sites in the protein. The ion/ion reactions can be interpreted on the basis of conjugate acid/base chemistry in which the anion, which is a strong gaseous base, reacts with a protonated site, which is a strong gaseous acid. Adduct ions can also be formed via ion/molecule reaction which, on the basis of microscopic reversibility, implies that the neutral acid interacts with neutral basic sites on the protein cation. 26 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Use of natural mordenite to remove chromium (III) and to neutralize pH of alkaline waste waters.

    PubMed

    Córdova-Rodríguez, Valduvina; Rodríguez-Iznaga, Inocente; Acosta-Chávez, Raquel María; Chávez-Rivas, Fernando; Petranovskii, Vitalii; Pestryakov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    The natural mordenite from Palmarito de Cauto deposit (PZ), Cuba, was studied in this work as an ion exchanger to remove Cr(3+) cations from alkaline aqueous solutions at different pH and chromium concentrations. The mordenite stability under cyclic treatment processes with alkaline solutions and its capacity to decrease the pH of the solutions was also analyzed. It was shown that PZ removes Cr(3+) ions from alkaline solutions, and it happens independently of the starting chromium concentration and the pH of the exchange solution used. This material has an important neutralizing effect on alkaline solutions, expressed in a significant pH decrease from the early stages of the treatments. For solutions with initial pH equal to 11, it decreases to a value of around seven. The stability of this material is not affected significantly after continuous cyclic treatment with NaOH solution, which shows that mordenite, in particular from Palmarito de Cauto deposit, has high stability in alkaline solutions. The results are important as they suggest that natural zeolites may be of interest in treatments of alkaline industrial waste effluents. PMID:26818904

  20. A baculovirus alkaline nuclease knockout construct produces fragmented DNA and aberrant capsids

    SciTech Connect

    Okano, Kazuhiro; Vanarsdall, Adam L.; Rohrmann, George F. . E-mail: rohrmanng@orst.edu

    2007-03-01

    DNA replication of bacmid-derived constructs of the Autographa californica multiple nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) was analyzed by field inversion gel electrophoresis (FIGE) in combination with digestion at a unique Eco81I restriction enzyme site. Three constructs were characterized: a parental bacmid, a bacmid deleted for the alkaline nuclease gene, and a bacmid from which the gp64 gene had been deleted. The latter was employed as a control for comparison with the alkaline nuclease knockout because neither yields infectious virus and their replication is limited to the initially transfected cells. The major difference between DNA replicated by the different constructs was the presence in the alkaline nuclease knockout of high concentrations of relatively small, subgenome length DNA in preparations not treated with Eco81I. Furthermore, upon Eco81I digestion, the alkaline nuclease knockout bacmid also yielded substantially more subgenome size DNA than the other constructs. Electron microscopic examination of cells transfected with the alkaline nuclease knockout indicated that, in addition to a limited number of normal-appearing electron-dense nucleocapsids, numerous aberrant capsid-like structures were observed indicating a defect in nucleocapsid maturation or in a DNA processing step that is necessary for encapsidation. Because of the documented role of the baculovirus alkaline nuclease and its homologs from other viruses in homologous recombination, these data suggest that DNA recombination may play a major role in the production of baculovirus genomes.

  1. Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Deborah A.; Holmes, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

  2. Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Deborah A.; Holmes, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

  3. Inorganic-organic separators for alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A flexible separator is reported for use between the electrodes of Ni-Cd and Ni-Zn batteries using alkaline electrolytes. The separator was made by coating a porous substrate with a battery separator composition. The coating material included a rubber-based resin copolymer, a plasticizer and inorganic and organic fillers which comprised 55% by volume or less of the coating as finally dried. One or more of the filler materials, whether organic or inorganic, is preferably active with the alkaline electrolyte to produce pores in the separator coating. The plasticizer was an organic material which is hydrolyzed by the alkaline electrolyte to improve conductivity of the separator coating.

  4. Process for extracting technetium from alkaline solutions

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Sachleben, Richard A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

    1995-01-01

    A process for extracting technetium values from an aqueous alkaline solution containing at least one alkali metal hydroxide and at least one alkali metal nitrate, the at least one alkali metal nitrate having a concentration of from about 0.1 to 6 molar. The solution is contacted with a solvent consisting of a crown ether in a diluent for a period of time sufficient to selectively extract the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution. The solvent containing the technetium values is separated from the aqueous alkaline solution and the technetium values are stripped from the solvent.

  5. Hyperconjugation in diethyl ether cation versus diethyl sulfide cation.

    PubMed

    Morita, Masato; Matsuda, Yoshiyuki; Endo, Tomoya; Mikami, Naohiko; Fujii, Asuka; Takahashi, Kaito

    2015-09-28

    Ionization of a molecule can greatly alter its electronic structure as well as its geometric structure. In this collaborative experimental and theoretical study, we examined variance in hyperconjugation upon ionization of diethyl ether (DEE) and diethyl sulfide (DES). We obtained the experimental gas phase vibrational spectra of DEE, DES, DEE(+), DES(+), DEE(+)-Ar, and DES(+)-Ar in the wavenumber region of 2500 to 3600 cm(-1). For DEE(+) and DEE(+)-Ar, we observed a greatly red shifted CH stretching peak at 2700 cm(-1), while the lowest CH stretching peaks for DEE, DES, DES(+) and DES(+)-Ar were observed around 2850 cm(-1). For DEE(+), we calculated a drastic red shifted CH stretching peak at 2760 cm(-1), but for DEE, DES, and DES(+) the lowest CH stretching peaks were calculated to be at 2860, 2945, and 2908 cm(-1), respectively. In addition, for DEE, the minima (maxima) geometry in the neutral state becomes a maxima (minima) geometry in the cationic state, while similar minima geometries are seen in neutral and cationic states of DES. These experimental and theoretical findings were rationalized through the natural bond orbital analysis by quantifying the hyperconjugation between the σCH orbital and the ionized singly occupied p orbital of the oxygen (sulfur) in DEE(+) (DES(+)). This study showed how orientation with the ionized orbital can greatly affect the neighboring CH bond strength and its polarity, as well as the geometry of the system. Furthermore, this change in the CH bond strength between DEE(+) and DES(+) is quantified from the energies for intramolecular proton transfer in the two cations. PMID:26300267

  6. Major and trace element geochemistry of Lake Bogoria and Lake Nakuru, Kenya, during extreme draught

    PubMed Central

    Jirsa, Franz; Gruber, Martin; Stojanovic, Anja; Omondi, Steve Odour; Mader, Dieter; Körner, Wilfried; Schagerl, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The physico-chemical properties of water samples from the two athalassic endorheic lakes Bogoria and Nakuru in Kenya were analysed. Surface water samples were taken between July 2008 and October 2009 in weekly intervals from each lake. The following parameters were determined: pH, salinity, electric conductivity, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), the major cations (FAAS and ICP-OES) and the major anions (IC), as well as certain trace elements (ICP-OES). Samples of superficial sediments were taken in October 2009 and examined using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) for their major and trace element content including rare earth elements (REE). Both lakes are highly alkaline with a dominance of Na > K > Si > Ca in cations and HCO3 > CO3 > Cl > F > SO4 in anions. Both lakes also exhibited high concentrations of Mo, As and fluoride. Due to an extreme draught from March to October 2009, the water level of Lake Nakuru dropped significantly. This created drastic evapoconcentration, with the total salinity rising from about 20‰ up to 63‰. Most parameters (DOC, Na, K, Ca, F, Mo and As) increased with falling water levels. A clear change in the quality of DOC was observed, followed by an almost complete depletion of dissolved Fe from the water phase. In Lake Bogoria the evapoconcentration effects were less pronounced (total salinity changed from about 40‰ to 48‰). The distributions of REE in the superficial sediments of Lake Nakuru and Lake Bogoria are presented here for the first time. The results show a high abundance of the REE and a very distinct Eu depletion of Eu/Eu* = 0.33–0.45. PMID:25843965

  7. Enzymatic activation of autotaxin by divalent cations without EF-hand loop region involvement.

    PubMed

    Lee, J; Jung, I D; Nam, S W; Clair, T; Jeong, E M; Hong, S Y; Han, J W; Lee, H W; Stracke, M L; Lee, H Y

    2001-07-15

    Autotaxin (ATX) is a recently described member of the nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase (NPP) family of proteins with potent tumor cell motility-stimulating activity. Like other NPPs, ATX is a glycoprotein with peptide sequences homologous to the catalytic site of bovine intestinal alkaline phosphodiesterase (PDE) and the loop region of an EF-hand motif. The PDE active site of ATX has been associated with the motility-stimulating activity of ATX. In this study, we examined the roles of the EF-hand loop region and of divalent cations on the enzymatic activities of ATX. Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) was each demonstrated to increase the PDE activity of ATX in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas incubation of ATX with chelating agents abolished this activity, indicating a requirement for divalent cations. Non-linear regression analysis of enzyme kinetic data indicated that addition of these divalent cations increases reaction velocity predominantly through an effect on V(max.) Three mutant proteins, Ala(740)-, Ala(742)-, and Ala(751)-ATX, in the EF-hand loop region of ATX had enzymatic activity comparable to that of the wild-type protein. A deletion mutation of the entire loop region resulted in slightly reduced PDE activity but normal motility-stimulating activity. However, the PDE activity of this same deletion mutant remained sensitive to augmentation by cations, strongly implying that cations exert their effect by interactions outside of the EF-hand loop region. PMID:11389881

  8. Alkaline static feed electrolyzer based oxygen generation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, L. D.; Kovach, A. J.; Fortunato, F. A.; Schubert, F. H.; Grigger, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    In preparation for the future deployment of the Space Station, an R and D program was established to demonstrate integrated operation of an alkaline Water Electrolysis System and a fuel cell as an energy storage device. The program's scope was revised when the Space Station Control Board changed the energy storage baseline for the Space Station. The new scope was aimed at the development of an alkaline Static Feed Electrolyzer for use in an Environmental Control/Life Support System as an oxygen generation system. As a result, the program was divided into two phases. The phase 1 effort was directed at the development of the Static Feed Electrolyzer for application in a Regenerative Fuel Cell System. During this phase, the program emphasized incorporation of the Regenerative Fuel Cell System design requirements into the Static Feed Electrolyzer electrochemical module design and the mechanical components design. The mechanical components included a Pressure Control Assembly, a Water Supply Assembly and a Thermal Control Assembly. These designs were completed through manufacturing drawing during Phase 1. The Phase 2 effort was directed at advancing the Alkaline Static Feed Electrolyzer database for an oxygen generation system. This development was aimed at extending the Static Feed Electrolyzer database in areas which may be encountered from initial fabrication through transportation, storage, launch and eventual Space Station startup. During this Phase, the Program emphasized three major areas: materials evaluation, electrochemical module scaling and performance repeatability and Static Feed Electrolyzer operational definition and characterization.

  9. Physicochemical and transfection properties of cationic Hydroxyethylcellulose/DNA nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fayazpour, Farzaneh; Lucas, Bart; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen; Sanders, Niek N; Demeester, Jo; De Smedt, Stefaan C

    2006-10-01

    In this study the physicochemical and transfection properties of cationic hydroxyethylcellulose/plasmid DNA (pDNA) nanoparticles were investigated and compared with the properties of DNA nanoparticles based on polyethylene imine (PEI), which is widely investigated as a gene carrier. The two types of cationic hydroxyethylcelluloses studied, polyquaternium-4 (PQ-4) and polyquaternium-10 (PQ-10), are already commonly used in cosmetic and topical drug delivery devices. Both PQ-4 and PQ-10 spontaneously interact with pDNA with the formation of nanoparticles approximately 200 nm in size. Gel electrophoresis and fluorescence dequenching experiments indicated that the interactions between pDNA and the cationic celluloses were stronger than those between pDNA and PEI. The cationic cellulose/pDNA nanoparticles transfected cells to a much lesser extent than the PEI-based pDNA nanoparticles. The low transfection property of the PQ-4/pDNA nanoparticles was attributed to their neutrally charged surface, which does not allow an optimal binding of PQ-4/pDNA nanoparticles to cellular membranes. Although the PQ-10/pDNA nanoparticles were positively charged and thus expected to be taken up by cells, they were also much less efficient in transfecting cells than were PEI/pDNA nanoparticles. Agents known to enhance the endosomal escape were not able to improve the transfection properties of PQ-10/pDNA nanoparticles, indicating that a poor endosomal escape is, most likely, not the major reason for the low transfection activity of PQ-10/pDNA nanoparticles. We hypothesized that the strong binding of pDNA to PQ-10 prohibits the release of pDNA from PQ-10 once the PQ-10/pDNA nanoparticles arrive in the cytosol of the cells. Tailoring the nature and extent of the cationic side chains on this type of cationic hydroxyethylcellulose may be promising to further enhance their DNA delivery properties. PMID:17025362

  10. Sulfate Separation from Aqueous Alkaline Solutions by Selective Crystallization of Alkali Metal Coordination Capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Rajbanshi, Arbin; Moyer, Bruce A; Custelcean, Radu

    2011-01-01

    Self-assembly of a tris(urea) anion receptor with Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} or K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} yields crystalline capsules held together by coordinating Na{sup +} or K{sup +} cations and hydrogen-bonding water bridges, with the sulfate anions encapsulated inside urea-lined cavities. The sodium-based capsules can be selectively crystallized in excellent yield from highly competitive aqueous alkaline solutions ({approx}6 M Na{sup +}, pH 14), thereby providing for the first time a viable approach to sulfate separation from nuclear wastes.

  11. Removal of K+, Na+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ from saline-alkaline water using the microalga Scenedesmus obliquus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zongli; Ying, Chengqi; Lu, Jianxue; Lai, Qifang; Zhou, Kai; Wang, Hui; Chen, Ling

    2013-11-01

    The capability of Scenedesmus obliquus to remove cations (K+, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+) from saline-alkaline water was investigated at different salinities (0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25) and carbonate alkalinities (0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 mmol/L). K+, Na+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ in saline-alkaline water were efficiently removed by S. obliquus. The maximum removal of the cations (29.37 mg for K+, 185.85 mg for Na+, 23.07 mg for Ca2+, 66.14 mg for Mg2+) occurred at salinity 25. The maximum removal of K+ (2.28 mg), Na+ (6.62 mg), Ca2+ (1.01 mg), and Mg2+ (0.62 mg) occurred at carbonate alkalinities of 25 mmol/L for K+, 35 mmol/L for Na+, 20 mmol/L for Ca2+, and 25 mmol/L for Mg2+, respectively. Under a salinity stress, the concentration of Na+ in S. obliquus increased significantly, while that of K+ decreased significantly. The concentrations of Ca2+ and Mg2+ decreased as well. The ratios of K+/Na+, Ca2+/Na+, and Mg2+/Na+ were significantly lower in all salinity treatments than those of the control. Under alkaline stress, the concentrations of Na+ and K+ in S. obliquus decreased significantly and the ratios of K+/Na+, Ca2+/Na+, and Mg2+/Na+ were significantly higher in all treatments than in the control. Moreover, the concentrations of Ca2+ and Mg2+ in S. obliquus at alkalinities of 5-10 mmol/L were significantly higher than those of the other treatments. The removal of Na+ by S. obliquus mainly occurs through biosorption, and Mg2+ and Ca2+ were removed through both biosorption and bioaccumulation.

  12. Composite seal reduces alkaline battery leakage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clatterbuck, C. H.; Plitt, K. F.

    1965-01-01

    Composite seal consisting of rubber or plastic washers and a metal washer reduces alkaline battery leakage. Adhesive is applied to each washer interface, and the washers are held together mechanically.

  13. Technetium recovery from high alkaline solution

    DOEpatents

    Nash, Charles A.

    2016-07-12

    Disclosed are methods for recovering technetium from a highly alkaline solution. The highly alkaline solution can be a liquid waste solution from a nuclear waste processing system. Methods can include combining the solution with a reductant capable of reducing technetium at the high pH of the solution and adding to or forming in the solution an adsorbent capable of adsorbing the precipitated technetium at the high pH of the solution.

  14. Alkaline tolerant dextranase from streptomyces anulatus

    DOEpatents

    Decker, Stephen R.; Adney, William S.; Vinzant, Todd B.; Himmel, Michael E.

    2003-01-01

    A process for production of an alkaline tolerant dextranase enzyme comprises culturing a dextran-producing microorganism Streptomyces anulatus having accession no. ATCC PTA-3866 to produce an alkaline tolerant dextranase, Dex 1 wherein the protein in said enzyme is characterized by a MW of 63.3 kDa and Dex 2 wherein its protein is characterized by a MW of 81.8 kDa.

  15. Evaluation of the alkaline electrolysis of zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Meisenhelder, J.H.; Brown, A.P.; Loutfy, R.O.; Yao, N.P.

    1981-05-01

    The alkaline leach and electrolysis process for zinc production is compared to the conventional acid-sulfate process in terms of both energy saving and technical merit. In addition, the potential for industrial application of the alkaline process is discussed on the basis of present market conditions, possible future zinc market scenarios, and the probability of increased secondary zinc recovery. In primary zinc production, the energy-saving potential for the alkaline process was estimated to be greater than 10%, even when significantly larger electrolysis current densities than those required for the sulfate process are used. The principal technical advantages of the alkaline process are that it can handle low-grade, high-iron-content or oxidized ores (like most of those found in the US) in a more cost- and energy-efficient manner than can the sulfate process. Additionally, in the electrowinning operation, the alkaline process should be technically superior because a dendritic or sponge deposit is formed that is amenable to automated collection without interruption of the electrolysis. Also, use of the higher current densities would result in significant capital cost reductions. Alkaline-based electrolytic recovery processes were considered for the recycling of zinc from smelter baghouse dusts and from the potential source of nickel/zinc electric-vehicle batteries. In all comparisons, an alkaline process was shown to be technically superior and, particularly for the baghouse dusts, energetically and economically superior to alternatively proposed recovery methods based on sulfate electrolysis. It is concluded that the alkaline zinc method is an important alternative technology to the conventional acid zinc process. (WHK)

  16. Syrtis Major

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 1 May 2002) The Science This image is from the region of Syrtis Major, which is dominated by a low-relief shield volcano. This area is believed to be an area of vigorous aeolian activity with strong winds in the east-west direction. The effects of these winds are observed as relatively bright streaks across the image, extending from topographic features such as craters. The brighter surface material probably indicates a smaller relative particle size in these areas, as finer particles have a higher albedo. The bright streaks seen off of craters are believed to have formed during dust storms. A raised crater rim can cause a reduction in the wind velocity directly behind it, which results in finer particles being preferentially deposited in this location. In the top half of the image, there is a large bright streak that crosses the entire image. There is no obvious topographic obstacle, therefore it is unclear whether it was formed in the same manner as described above. This image is located northwest of Nili Patera, a large caldera in Syrtis Major. Different flows from the caldera eruptions can be recognized as raised ridges, representing the edge of a flow lobe. The Story In the 17th century, Holland was in its Golden Age, a time of cultural greatness and immense political and economic influence in the world. In that time, lived a inquisitive person named Christian Huygens. As a boy, he loved to draw and to figure out problems in mathematics. As a man, he used these talents to make the first detailed drawings of the Martian surface - - only 50 years or so after Galileo first turned his telescope on Mars. Mars suddenly became something other than a small red dot in the sky. One of the drawings Huygens made was of a dark marking on the red planet's surface named Syrtis Major. Almost 350 years later, here we are with an orbiter that can show us this place in detail. Exploration lives! It's great we can study this area up close. In earlier periods of history

  17. Cation coordination in oxychloride glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. A.; Holland, D.; Bland, J.; Johnson, C. E.; Thomas, M. F.

    2003-02-01

    Glasses containing mixtures of cations and anions of nominal compositions [Sb2O3]x - [ZnCl2]1-x where x = 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, and 1.00, have been studied by means of neutron diffraction and Raman and Mössbauer spectroscopy. There is preferential bonding within the system with the absence of Sb-Cl bonds. Antimony is found to be threefold coordinated to oxygen, and zinc fourfold coordinated. The main contributing species are of the form [Sb(OSb)2(OZn)] and [Zn(ClZn)2(OSb)2].

  18. Use of laser induced photoacoustic spectroscopy (LIPAS) to determine equilibrium constants of cation-cation complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Hannink, N.J.; Hoffman, D.C.; Silva, R.J.; Russo, R.E.

    1993-12-31

    Laser Induced PhotoAcoustic Spectroscopy (LIPAS) is a relatively new, photothermal technique to examine solutions. Studies in the past have shown it to be more sensitive than conventional absorption spectroscopy, while, yielding the same information thus allowing lower concentrations to be used. This study is using LIPAS to examine solutions to determine the equilibrium constants of cation-cation complexes. It has been found that actinyl(V) cations form cation-cation complexes with a variety of cations, including actinyl(VI) cations. The radioactive nature of the actinide elements requires special handling techniques and also require limits be placed on the amount of material that can be used. The sensitivity of some oxidation states of the actinides to oxygen also presents a problem. Preliminary results will be presented for actinyl(V)-actinyl(VI) cation-cation complexes that were studied using a remote LIPAS system incorporating fiber optics for transmission of laser signals.

  19. Alkaline Water and Longevity: A Murine Study

    PubMed Central

    Magro, Massimiliano; Corain, Livio; Ferro, Silvia; Baratella, Davide; Bonaiuto, Emanuela; Terzo, Milo; Corraducci, Vittorino; Salmaso, Luigi; Vianello, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The biological effect of alkaline water consumption is object of controversy. The present paper presents a 3-year survival study on a population of 150 mice, and the data were analyzed with accelerated failure time (AFT) model. Starting from the second year of life, nonparametric survival plots suggest that mice watered with alkaline water showed a better survival than control mice. Interestingly, statistical analysis revealed that alkaline water provides higher longevity in terms of “deceleration aging factor” as it increases the survival functions when compared with control group; namely, animals belonging to the population treated with alkaline water resulted in a longer lifespan. Histological examination of mice kidneys, intestine, heart, liver, and brain revealed that no significant differences emerged among the three groups indicating that no specific pathology resulted correlated with the consumption of alkaline water. These results provide an informative and quantitative summary of survival data as a function of watering with alkaline water of long-lived mouse models. PMID:27340414

  20. Performed surfactant-optimized aqueous alkaline flood

    SciTech Connect

    Thigpen, D.R.; Lawson, J.B.; Nelson, R.C.

    1991-11-26

    This paper describes improvement in a process for recovering oil from an acidic oil reservoir by injecting an aqueous alkaline solution comprising water, sodium chloride, and alkaline material for reacting with the reservoir oil forming a petroleum acid soap to form an in-situ surfactant system. The improvement comprises: selecting a preformed cosurfactant which is soluble in both the aqueous solution and the reservoir oil and has a solubility ratio which is grater than the solubility ratio of the petroleum acid soap where the solubility ratio is the ratio of solubility in the aqueous alkaline solution to the solubility in the reservoir oil; combining with the alkaline solution an amount of the preformed cosurfactant which will result in the in-situ surfacant system having a salinity about equal to a salinity which results in minimal interfacial tension between the oil in the reservoir and the in-situ surfactant system at reservoir temperature, wherein the amount of the preformed cosurfactant is about 0.3 percent by weight in the aqueous alkaline solution; and injecting the cosurfactant-aqueous alkaline solution mixture into the reservoir to displace oil toward a fluid production location.

  1. Origin of observed acidic-alkaline rains in a wet-only precipitation study in a Mediterranean coastal site, Patras, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavas, Sotirios; Moschonas, Nektarios

    Major anions and cations were analyzed in a wet-only precipitation study for 16 months. The pH exhibited large variation, from 4.07 to 8.51 pH units. Twenty-eight percent of the observed rain volume had pH <5, whereas 42% of the rains had pH >6, as is usually observed in the Mediterranean. Comparison with our work of 15 years ago indicates a free acidity reduction by ˜18%, non-sea-salt sulfate ions reduction of ˜40% and nitrate ions reduction of 66%. Chloride and all cation concentrations were similar in the present work and that carried out in 1985-86 indicating similar sources, namely aerosol and crustal material as in MS. Calcium ions were the dominating neutralization ions. The annual wet-only deposition rates were calculated for the major species and were found to be comparable to those reported in past studies. Deposition of calcium ions dominates all deposited species, except sea salt, and indicates its significance in the neutralizing mechanisms of soils of the region, if neutralization is needed. Air mass back trajectories calculated for all analyzed samples, revealed four sectors of origin of air masses: NW to NE Europe, northern Africa, local and western Mediterranean, each with a specific chemistry. Cluster analysis and factor analysis also discriminated the samples by their sources. The main sources derived from the statistical analysis were: marine aerosols, alkalinity-acidity as inferred by the calcium ion concentrations from crustal sources and hydronium ions mainly from anthropogenic activities and ammonium salts of sulfate and nitrate also mainly from anthropogenic activities. These sources were closely correlated with the geographic sectors obtained from the air mass back trajectories.

  2. First-principles Study on the Vibration Modes and Electronic Structure of Alkali and Alkaline-earth Amides and Alanates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsumuraya, Takao; Shishidou, Tatsuya; Oguchi, Tamio

    2009-03-01

    Light alkaline and alkaline-earth metal hydrides such as amides M(NH2)n and alanates M(AlH4)n (M=K, Na, Li, Ca, and Mg) have attracted a growing interest as reversible hydrogen storage materials recently because of their innately high hydrogen contents. [1, 2] We study the electronic structure of the amides and alanates with different cations, focusing on the role of cation states from first-principles calculations based on the all-electron FLAPW method. Calculated breathing stretch vibration modes for these compounds are compared with measured infrared and Raman spectra. In the amides, we find a significant tendency such that the breathing stretch vibration frequencies and the structural parameters of NH2 vary in accordance with the ionization energy of cation, which may be explained by the strength in hybridization between cation orbitals and molecular orbitals of (NH2)^-. We elucidate the microscopic mechanism of correlations between the breathing stretch vibration frequencies of N-H and structural parameters by analyzing the calculated electronic structure from a view point of the molecular-orbitals. A similar tendency in the alanates is also discussed. [1] P. Chen, Z. Xiong, J. Luo, J. Lin and K.L. Tan, Nature 420, 302 (2002). [2] B. Bogdanovi and M. Schwickardi, J. Alloys Compd. 253-254, 1 (1997).

  3. Surface charge density on silica in alkali and alkaline earth chloride electrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dove, Patricia M.; Craven, Colin M.

    2005-11-01

    The surface charge density of colloidal SiO 2 (Aerosil 380) was measured in alkali chloride (0.067 and 0.20 M LiCl, NaCl, and KCl) and alkaline earth chloride (0.067 M MgCl 2, CaCl 2, SrCl 2, BaCl 2) solutions. Measurements were conducted at 25°C by potentiometric titrations using the constant ionic medium method in a CO 2-free system. The experimental design measured surface charge for solutions with constant ionic strength as well as constant cation concentration. Alkali chloride solutions promote negative surface charge density in the order LiCl < NaCl < KCl to give the "regular" lyotropic behavior previously reported. In contrast, the alkaline earth chloride solutions exhibit a reversed lyotropic trend with increasing crystallographic radius where increasing negative charge is promoted in the order BaCl 2 < SrCl 2 < CaCl 2 < MgCl 2. The origin of the opposing affinity trends is probed by testing the hypothesis that this reversal is rooted in the differing solvent structuring characteristics of the IA and IIA cations at the silica-water interface. This idea arises from earlier postulations that solvent structuring effects increase entropy through solvent disordering and these gains must be much greater than the small, positive enthalpy associated with electrostatic interactions. By correlating measured charge density with a proxy for the solvent-structuring ability of cations, this study shows that silica surface charge density is maximized by those electrolytes that have the strongest effects on solvent structuring. We suggest that for a given solid material, solvation entropy has a role in determining the ionic specificity of electrostatic interactions and reiterate the idea that the concept of lyotropy is rooted in the solvent-structuring ability of cations at the interface.

  4. Bond-length distributions for ions bonded to oxygen: alkali and alkaline-earth metals

    PubMed Central

    Gagné, Olivier Charles; Hawthorne, Frank Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Bond-length distributions have been examined for 55 configurations of alkali-metal ions and 29 configurations of alkaline-earth-metal ions bonded to oxygen, for 4859 coordination polyhedra and 38 594 bond distances (alkali metals), and for 3038 coordination polyhedra and 24 487 bond distances (alkaline-earth metals). Bond lengths generally show a positively skewed Gaussian distribution that originates from the variation in Born repulsion and Coulomb attraction as a function of interatomic distance. The skewness and kurtosis of these distributions generally decrease with increasing coordination number of the central cation, a result of decreasing Born repulsion with increasing coordination number. We confirm the following minimum coordination numbers: [3]Li+, [3]Na+, [4]K+, [4]Rb+, [6]Cs+, [3]Be2+, [4]Mg2+, [6]Ca2+, [6]Sr2+ and [6]Ba2+, but note that some reported examples are the result of extensive dynamic and/or positional short-range disorder and are not ordered arrangements. Some distributions of bond lengths are distinctly multi-modal. This is commonly due to the occurrence of large numbers of structure refinements of a particular structure type in which a particular cation is always present, leading to an over-representation of a specific range of bond lengths. Outliers in the distributions of mean bond lengths are often associated with anomalous values of atomic displacement of the constituent cations and/or anions. For a sample of [6]Na+, the ratio U eq(Na)/U eq(bonded anions) is partially correlated with 〈[6]Na+—O2−〉 (R 2 = 0.57), suggesting that the mean bond length is correlated with vibrational/displacement characteristics of the constituent ions for a fixed coordination number. Mean bond lengths also show a weak correlation with bond-length distortion from the mean value in general, although some coordination numbers show the widest variation in mean bond length for zero distortion, e.g. Li+ in [4]- and [6]-coordination, Na+ in [4]- and [6

  5. Bond-length distributions for ions bonded to oxygen: alkali and alkaline-earth metals.

    PubMed

    Gagné, Olivier Charles; Hawthorne, Frank Christopher

    2016-08-01

    Bond-length distributions have been examined for 55 configurations of alkali-metal ions and 29 configurations of alkaline-earth-metal ions bonded to oxygen, for 4859 coordination polyhedra and 38 594 bond distances (alkali metals), and for 3038 coordination polyhedra and 24 487 bond distances (alkaline-earth metals). Bond lengths generally show a positively skewed Gaussian distribution that originates from the variation in Born repulsion and Coulomb attraction as a function of interatomic distance. The skewness and kurtosis of these distributions generally decrease with increasing coordination number of the central cation, a result of decreasing Born repulsion with increasing coordination number. We confirm the following minimum coordination numbers: ([3])Li(+), ([3])Na(+), ([4])K(+), ([4])Rb(+), ([6])Cs(+), ([3])Be(2+), ([4])Mg(2+), ([6])Ca(2+), ([6])Sr(2+) and ([6])Ba(2+), but note that some reported examples are the result of extensive dynamic and/or positional short-range disorder and are not ordered arrangements. Some distributions of bond lengths are distinctly multi-modal. This is commonly due to the occurrence of large numbers of structure refinements of a particular structure type in which a particular cation is always present, leading to an over-representation of a specific range of bond lengths. Outliers in the distributions of mean bond lengths are often associated with anomalous values of atomic displacement of the constituent cations and/or anions. For a sample of ([6])Na(+), the ratio Ueq(Na)/Ueq(bonded anions) is partially correlated with 〈([6])Na(+)-O(2-)〉 (R(2) = 0.57), suggesting that the mean bond length is correlated with vibrational/displacement characteristics of the constituent ions for a fixed coordination number. Mean bond lengths also show a weak correlation with bond-length distortion from the mean value in general, although some coordination numbers show the widest variation in mean bond length for zero distortion, e.g. Li(+) in

  6. Coupling alkaline pre-extraction with alkaline-oxidative post-treatment of corn stover to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentability

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A two-stage chemical pretreatment of corn stover is investigated comprising an NaOH pre-extraction followed by an alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP) post-treatment. We propose that conventional one-stage AHP pretreatment can be improved using alkaline pre-extraction, which requires significantly less H2O2 and NaOH. To better understand the potential of this approach, this study investigates several components of this process including alkaline pre-extraction, alkaline and alkaline-oxidative post-treatment, fermentation, and the composition of alkali extracts. Results Mild NaOH pre-extraction of corn stover uses less than 0.1 g NaOH per g corn stover at 80°C. The resulting substrates were highly digestible by cellulolytic enzymes at relatively low enzyme loadings and had a strong susceptibility to drying-induced hydrolysis yield losses. Alkaline pre-extraction was highly selective for lignin removal over xylan removal; xylan removal was relatively minimal (~20%). During alkaline pre-extraction, up to 0.10 g of alkali was consumed per g of corn stover. AHP post-treatment at low oxidant loading (25 mg H2O2 per g pre-extracted biomass) increased glucose hydrolysis yields by 5%, which approached near-theoretical yields. ELISA screening of alkali pre-extraction liquors and the AHP post-treatment liquors demonstrated that xyloglucan and β-glucans likely remained tightly bound in the biomass whereas the majority of the soluble polymeric xylans were glucurono (arabino) xylans and potentially homoxylans. Pectic polysaccharides were depleted in the AHP post-treatment liquor relative to the alkaline pre-extraction liquor. Because the already-low inhibitor content was further decreased in the alkaline pre-extraction, the hydrolysates generated by this two-stage pretreatment were highly fermentable by Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that were metabolically engineered and evolved for xylose fermentation. Conclusions This work demonstrates that this two

  7. Syrtis Major

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 6 June 2002) The Science This image, located near the equator and 288W (72E), is near the southern edge of a low, broad volcanic feature called Syrtis Major. A close look at this image reveals a wrinkly texture that indicates a very rough surface that is associated with the lava flows that cover this region. On a larger scale, there are numerous bright streaks that trail topographic features such as craters. These bright streaks are in the wind shadows of the craters where dust that settles onto the surface is not as easily scoured away. It is important to note that these streaks are only bright in a relative sense to the surrounding image. Syrtis Major is one of the darkest regions on Mars and it is as dark as fresh basalt flows or dunes are on Earth. The Story Cool! It almost looks as if nature has 'painted' comets on the surface of Mars, using craters as comet cores and dust as streaky tails. Of course, that's just an illusion. As in many areas of Mars, the wind is behind the creation of such fantastic landforms. The natural phenomenon seen here gives this particular surface of Mars a very dynamic, fast-moving, almost luminous 'cosmic personality.' The bright, powdery-looking streaks of dust are in the 'wind shadows' of craters, where dust that settles onto the surface is not as easily scoured away. That's because the wind moves across the land in a particular direction, and a raised surface like the rim of a crater 'protects' dust from being completely blown away on the other side. The raised landforms basically act as a buffer. From the streaks seen above, you can tell the wind was blowing in a northeast to southwest direction. Why are the streaks so bright? Because they contrast with the really dark underlying terrain in this volcanic area of Mars. Syrtis Major is one of the darkest regions on Mars because it is made of basalt. Basalt is typically dark gray or black, and forms when a certain type of molten lava cools. The meaning of the word basalt

  8. A new approach for preparation of magnetite-graphite composite: Intercalation of polyhydroxy iron cation into graphite oxide in L-arginine medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuqiong; Chen, Zhen; Jin, Yongdong; Chen, Shuihua; Wang, Hang; Geng, Junxia; Song, Qiang; Yang, Xiaodan; Ma, Lijian; Li, Shoujian; Qin, Zhi; Zheng, Chong

    2011-05-01

    A new approach to prepare magnetite nanoparticle pillared graphite has been put forward. The magnetic composite was normally obtained by calcining iron-intercalated graphite oxide, but the latter was prepared via intercalation reaction using polyhydroxy iron cation as iron precursor and pillaring agent, and a strong organic guanidine base, L-arginine, as alkaline agent and also intercalating agent. L-arginine, used herein instead of inorganic alkali, which would lead to the deoxygenation and reduction of graphite oxide into graphite, not only provided the alkaline condition for the formation of polyhydroxy iron cations, but also increased the interlayer spacing of graphite oxide to facilitate the intercalation of polyhydroxy iron cations into graphite oxide. The characterization by powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer and nitrogen absorption indicated that the composite was nanoscale Fe 3O 4 pillared graphite with superparamagnetic property.

  9. The Potential of Soft Soil Improvement Through a Coupled Technique Between Electro Kinetic and Alkaline Activation of Soft Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, G. E.; Ismail, H. B.; Huat, B. K.; Afshin, A.; Azhar, A. T. S.

    2016-07-01

    Soil stabilization techniques have been in development for decades with different rates of success. Alkaline activation of soft soil is one of those techniques that has proved to deliver some of the best shear strength values with minor drawbacks in comparison with conventional soil stabilization methods. However, environmental considerations have not been taken into account, as major mineral glassy phase activators are poisoning alkaline solutions, such as sodium-, potassium-hydroxide, and sodium-, potassium-silicate, which poses serious hazards to man and environment. This paper addresses the ways of discarding the involvement of the aforementioned alkaline solutions in soft soil stabilization by investigating the potential of a coupled electro kinetic alkaline activation technique for soft soil strengthening, through which the provision of alkaline pH is governed by electro kinetic potential. Uncertainties in regard to the dissolution of aluminosilicate as well as the dominance of acidic front are challenges that need to be overcome.

  10. 21 CFR 864.7660 - Leukocyte alkaline phosphatase test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Leukocyte alkaline phosphatase test. 864.7660... Leukocyte alkaline phosphatase test. (a) Identification. A leukocyte alkaline phosphatase test is a device used to identify the enzyme leukocyte alkaline phosphatase in neutrophilic granulocytes...

  11. 21 CFR 864.7660 - Leukocyte alkaline phosphatase test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Leukocyte alkaline phosphatase test. 864.7660... Leukocyte alkaline phosphatase test. (a) Identification. A leukocyte alkaline phosphatase test is a device used to identify the enzyme leukocyte alkaline phosphatase in neutrophilic granulocytes...

  12. Cu Vacancies Boost Cation Exchange Reactions in Copper Selenide Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated cation exchange reactions in copper selenide nanocrystals using two different divalent ions as guest cations (Zn2+ and Cd2+) and comparing the reactivity of close to stoichiometric (that is, Cu2Se) nanocrystals with that of nonstoichiometric (Cu2–xSe) nanocrystals, to gain insights into the mechanism of cation exchange at the nanoscale. We have found that the presence of a large density of copper vacancies significantly accelerated the exchange process at room temperature and corroborated vacancy diffusion as one of the main drivers in these reactions. Partially exchanged samples exhibited Janus-like heterostructures made of immiscible domains sharing epitaxial interfaces. No alloy or core–shell structures were observed. The role of phosphines, like tri-n-octylphosphine, in these reactions, is multifaceted: besides acting as selective solvating ligands for Cu+ ions exiting the nanoparticles during exchange, they also enable anion diffusion, by extracting an appreciable amount of selenium to the solution phase, which may further promote the exchange process. In reactions run at a higher temperature (150 °C), copper vacancies were quickly eliminated from the nanocrystals and major differences in Cu stoichiometries, as well as in reactivities, between the initial Cu2Se and Cu2–xSe samples were rapidly smoothed out. These experiments indicate that cation exchange, under the specific conditions of this work, is more efficient at room temperature than at higher temperature. PMID:26140622

  13. Cu Vacancies Boost Cation Exchange Reactions in Copper Selenide Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Lesnyak, Vladimir; Brescia, Rosaria; Messina, Gabriele C; Manna, Liberato

    2015-07-29

    We have investigated cation exchange reactions in copper selenide nanocrystals using two different divalent ions as guest cations (Zn(2+) and Cd(2+)) and comparing the reactivity of close to stoichiometric (that is, Cu2Se) nanocrystals with that of nonstoichiometric (Cu(2-x)Se) nanocrystals, to gain insights into the mechanism of cation exchange at the nanoscale. We have found that the presence of a large density of copper vacancies significantly accelerated the exchange process at room temperature and corroborated vacancy diffusion as one of the main drivers in these reactions. Partially exchanged samples exhibited Janus-like heterostructures made of immiscible domains sharing epitaxial interfaces. No alloy or core-shell structures were observed. The role of phosphines, like tri-n-octylphosphine, in these reactions, is multifaceted: besides acting as selective solvating ligands for Cu(+) ions exiting the nanoparticles during exchange, they also enable anion diffusion, by extracting an appreciable amount of selenium to the solution phase, which may further promote the exchange process. In reactions run at a higher temperature (150 °C), copper vacancies were quickly eliminated from the nanocrystals and major differences in Cu stoichiometries, as well as in reactivities, between the initial Cu2Se and Cu(2-x)Se samples were rapidly smoothed out. These experiments indicate that cation exchange, under the specific conditions of this work, is more efficient at room temperature than at higher temperature. PMID:26140622

  14. Late Proterozoic and Silurian alkaline plutons within the southeastern New England Avalon zone

    SciTech Connect

    Hermes, O.D. ); Zartman, R.E. )

    1992-07-01

    Distinct pulses of quartz-bearing, alkaline plutonism and volcanism are known to have occurred in the Avalon zone of southeastern New England during the Late Ordovician, Early Silurian, Devonian, and Carboniferous. Zircon separates from the Franklin and Dartmouth plutons demonstrate that two additional, previously unrecognized periods of alkaline magmatism occurred. The Franklin pluton yields an age of 417 {plus minus} 6 Ma (Late Silurian), whereas the Dartmouth pluton is Late Proterozoic (595 {plus minus} 5 Ma) and markedly older than the other plutons of alkaline affinity. The new ages further emphasize the episodic nature and long-term duration of such alkaline igneous events within the southeastern New England Avalon zone. The Dartmouth pluton may represent a post-collisional alkaline granite emplaced in the Late Proterozoic, almost immediately after a major period of calcalkaline igneous activity that accompanied plate convergence and continental accretion. The abrupt change from orogenic calcalkaline igneous activity to post-collisional alkaline granite, followed by younger episodes of anorogenic emplacement, is remarkably similar to igneous events reported from pan-African mobile belts widespread throughout Africa. In addition, parts of the Dartmouth pluton exhibit features indicative of mixing and commingling of felsic and mafic melts that are associated with coevally formed mylonitic fabrics. Because these fabrics are conformable to those in adjacent gneisses, but discordant with Alleghanian fabrics in the nearby Carboniferous Narragansett basin, they represent some of the best candidates for pre-Alleghanian structures thus far identified in the southeastern New England Avalon zone.

  15. Flexible separator for alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.

    1977-01-01

    Device is fabricated from low-cost readily-available commercial-materials by automated methods utilizing conventional paper coating processes. Flexibility of unit prevents cracking and disintegration caused by electrode warpage and dendrite growth, major causes of early battery failure with present separators.

  16. Syrtis Major

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 18 May 2004 This image of Syrtis Major was acquired August 20, 2002, during northern spring.

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the martian surface using its five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from the use of multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 12.8, Longitude 79.5 East (280.5 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The

  17. Anti-inflammatory activity of cationic lipids.

    PubMed

    Filion, M C; Phillips, N C

    1997-10-01

    1. The effect of liposome phospholipid composition has been assumed to be relatively unimportant because of the presumed inert nature of phospholipids. 2. We have previously shown that cationic liposome formulations used for gene therapy inhibit, through their cationic component, the synthesis by activated macrophages of the pro-inflammatory mediators nitric oxide (NO) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). 3. In this study, we have evaluated the ability of different cationic lipids to reduce footpad inflammation induced by carrageenan and by sheep red blood cell challenge. 4. Parenteral (i.p. or s.c) or local injection of the positively charged lipids dimethyldioctadecylammomium bromide (DDAB), dioleyoltrimethylammonium propane (DOTAP), dimyristoyltrimethylammonium propane (DMTAP) or dimethylaminoethanecarbamoyl cholesterol (DC-Chol) significantly reduced the inflammation observed in both models in a dose-dependent manner (maximum inhibition: 70-95%). 5. Cationic lipids associated with dioleyol- or dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine retained their anti-inflammatory activity while cationic lipids associated with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) or dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) showed no anti-inflammatory activity, indicating that the release of cationic lipids into the macrophage cytoplasm is a necessary step for anti-inflammatory activity. The anti-inflammatory activity of cationic lipids was abrogated by the addition of dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine-poly(ethylene)glycol-2000 (DPPE-PEG2000) which blocks the interaction of cationic lipids with macrophages. 6. Because of the significant role of protein kinase C (PKC) in the inflammatory process we have determined whether the cationic lipids used in this study inhibit PKC activity. The cationic lipids significantly inhibited the activity of PKC but not the activity of a non-related protein kinase, PKA. The synthesis of interleukin-6 (IL-6), which is not dependent on PKC activity for its

  18. Selone-stabilized aryltellurenyl cations.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Sangeeta; Raju, Saravanan; Singh, Harkesh B; Butcher, Ray J

    2016-05-28

    Controlled bromination of a diarylditelluride, R2Te2 (R = 2,6-dimethylphenyl) (6) in dichloromethane led to the formation of a Te(II)-Te(IV) mixed-valent tellurenyl bromide, RBr2TeTeR (7). A further reaction of 7 with 1,3-dibutylbenzimidazolin-2-selone, C15H22N2Se (L) (9), produced the first selone adduct of the 2,6-dimethylphenyltellurenyl cation with the 2,6-dimethylphenyltellurium dibromide anion, [(2,6-Me2C6H3)Te(L)](+)[(2,6-Me2C6H3)TeBr2](-) (10). The red colored cationic adduct 10 is not stable in acetonitrile and disproportionated to give the selone adduct of 2,6-dimethylphenyltellurenyl bromide, [(2,6-Me2C6H3)Te(L)Br] (11b) and bis(2,6-dimethylphenyl)tellurium dibromide, [(2,6-Me2C6H3)2TeBr2], (13). The metathesis reaction of 11b with AgBF4 produced a stable dark red colored selone adduct of the 2,6-dimethylphenyltellurenyl cation with the BF4(-) anion, [(2,6-Me2C6H3)Te(L)](+)BF4(-) (15). The selone adducts of aryltellurenyl halides, i.e. [(2,6-Me2C6H3)Te(L)X] (X = Cl, Br, I) (11a-11c), have been synthesized by a one-pot reaction of 6 with an equimolar mixture of 9 and 1,3-dibutylbenzimidazolin-2-dihaloselones, C15H22N2SeX2 (14a-14c). Triphenylphosphine (PPh3), when treated with [(2,6-Me2C6H3)Te(L)X] (11a-11c), substitutes selone from the adduct to afford the triphenylphosphine adducts of aryltellurenyl halides, [(2,6-Me2C6H3)Te(PPh3)X] (16a-16c). PMID:27111528

  19. Phenolic cation exchange resin material for recovery of cesium and strontium

    DOEpatents

    Ebra, Martha A.; Wallace, Richard M.

    1983-01-01

    A phenolic cation exchange resin with a chelating group has been prepared by reacting resorcinol with iminodiacetic acid in the presence of formaldehyde at a molar ratio of about 1:1:6. The material is highly selective for the simultaneous recovery of both cesium and strontium from aqueous alkaline solutions, such as, aqueous alkaline nuclear waste solutions. The organic resins are condensation polymers of resorcinol and formaldehyde with attached chelating groups. The column performance of the resins compares favorably with that of commercially available resins for either cesium or strontium removal. By combining Cs.sup.+ and Sr.sup.2+ removal in the same bed, the resins allow significant reduction of the size and complexity of facilities for processing nuclear waste.

  20. Phenolic cation-exchange resin material for recovery of cesium and strontium. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Ebra, M.A.; Wallace, R.M.

    1982-05-05

    A phenolic cation exchange resin with a chelating group has been prepared by reacting resorcinol with iminodiacetic acid in the presence of formaldehyde at a molar ratio of about 1:1:6. The material is highly selective for the simultaneous recovery of both cesium and strontium from aqueous alkaline solutions, such as, aqueous alkaline nuclear wate solutions. The organic resins are condensation polymers of resorcinol and formaldehyde with attached chelating groups. The column performance of the resins compares favorably with that of commercially available resins for either cesium or strontium removal. By combining Cs/sup +/ and Sr/sup 2 +/ removal in the same bed, the resins allow significant reduction of the size and complexity of facilities for processing nuclear waste.

  1. Cation-coupled bicarbonate transporters.

    PubMed

    Aalkjaer, Christian; Boedtkjer, Ebbe; Choi, Inyeong; Lee, Soojung

    2014-10-01

    Cation-coupled HCO3(-) transport was initially identified in the mid-1970s when pioneering studies showed that acid extrusion from cells is stimulated by CO2/HCO3(-) and associated with Na(+) and Cl(-) movement. The first Na(+)-coupled bicarbonate transporter (NCBT) was expression-cloned in the late 1990s. There are currently five mammalian NCBTs in the SLC4-family: the electrogenic Na,HCO3-cotransporters NBCe1 and NBCe2 (SLC4A4 and SLC4A5 gene products); the electroneutral Na,HCO3-cotransporter NBCn1 (SLC4A7 gene product); the Na(+)-driven Cl,HCO3-exchanger NDCBE (SLC4A8 gene product); and NBCn2/NCBE (SLC4A10 gene product), which has been characterized as an electroneutral Na,HCO3-cotransporter or a Na(+)-driven Cl,HCO3-exchanger. Despite the similarity in amino acid sequence and predicted structure among the NCBTs of the SLC4-family, they exhibit distinct differences in ion dependency, transport function, pharmacological properties, and interactions with other proteins. In epithelia, NCBTs are involved in transcellular movement of acid-base equivalents and intracellular pH control. In nonepithelial tissues, NCBTs contribute to intracellular pH regulation; and hence, they are crucial for diverse tissue functions including neuronal discharge, sensory neuron development, performance of the heart, and vascular tone regulation. The function and expression levels of the NCBTs are generally sensitive to intracellular and systemic pH. Animal models have revealed pathophysiological roles of the transporters in disease states including metabolic acidosis, hypertension, visual defects, and epileptic seizures. Studies are being conducted to understand the physiological consequences of genetic polymorphisms in the SLC4-members, which are associated with cancer, hypertension, and drug addiction. Here, we describe the current knowledge regarding the function, structure, and regulation of the mammalian cation-coupled HCO3(-) transporters of the SLC4-family. PMID:25428855

  2. Cation-Coupled Bicarbonate Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Aalkjaer, Christian; Boedtkjer, Ebbe; Choi, Inyeong; Lee, Soojung

    2016-01-01

    Cation-coupled HCO3− transport was initially identified in the mid-1970s when pioneering studies showed that acid extrusion from cells is stimulated by CO2/HCO3− and associated with Na+ and Cl− movement. The first Na+-coupled bicarbonate transporter (NCBT) was expression-cloned in the late 1990s. There are currently five mammalian NCBTs in the SLC4-family: the electrogenic Na,HCO3-cotransporters NBCe1 and NBCe2 (SLC4A4 and SLC4A5 gene products); the electroneutral Na,HCO3-cotransporter NBCn1 (SLC4A7 gene product); the Na+-driven Cl,HCO3-exchanger NDCBE (SLC4A8 gene product); and NBCn2/NCBE (SLC4A10 gene product), which has been characterized as an electroneutral Na,HCO3-cotransporter or a Na+-driven Cl,HCO3-exchanger. Despite the similarity in amino acid sequence and predicted structure among the NCBTs of the SLC4-family, they exhibit distinct differences in ion dependency, transport function, pharmacological properties, and interactions with other proteins. In epithelia, NCBTs are involved in transcellular movement of acid-base equivalents and intracellular pH control. In nonepithelial tissues, NCBTs contribute to intracellular pH regulation; and hence, they are crucial for diverse tissue functions including neuronal discharge, sensory neuron development, performance of the heart, and vascular tone regulation. The function and expression levels of the NCBTs are generally sensitive to intracellular and systemic pH. Animal models have revealed pathophysiological roles of the transporters in disease states including metabolic acidosis, hypertension, visual defects, and epileptic seizures. Studies are being conducted to understand the physiological consequences of genetic polymorphisms in the SLC4-members, which are associated with cancer, hypertension, and drug addiction. Here, we describe the current knowledge regarding the function, structure, and regulation of the mammalian cation-coupled HCO3− transporters of the SLC4-family. PMID:25428855

  3. Alkaline phosphatase from venom of the endoparasitoid wasp, Pteromalus puparum.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jia-Ying; Yin Ye, Gong; Fang, Qi; Hu, Cui

    2010-01-01

    Using chromogenic substrates 5-bromo-4-chloro-3'-indolyl phosphate and nitro blue tetrazolium, alkaline phosphatase (ALPase) was histochemically detected in the venom apparatus of an endoparasitoid wasp, Pteromalus puparum L. (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae). Ultrastructural observations demonstrated its presence in the secretory vesicles and nuclei of the venom gland secretory cells. Using p-nitrophenyl phosphate as substrate to measure enzyme activity, the venom ALPase was found to be temperature dependent with bivalent cation effects. The full-length cDNA sequence of ALPase was amplified from the cDNA library of the venom apparatus of P. puparum, providing the first molecular characterization of ALPase in the venom of a parasitoid wasp. The cDNA consisted of 2645 bp with a 1623 bp open reading frame coding for 541 deduced amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 59.83 kDa and pI of 6.98. Using multiple sequence alignment, the deduced amino acid sequence shared high identity to its counterparts from other insects. A signal peptide and a long conserved ALPase gene family signature sequence were observed. The amino acid sequence of this venom protein was characterized with different potential glycosylation, myristoylation, phosphorylation sites and metal ligand sites. The transcript of the ALPase gene was detected by RT-PCR in the venom apparatus with development related expression after adult wasp emergence, suggesting a possible correlation with the oviposition process. PMID:20575745

  4. Thermoelectric Properties of Barium Plumbate Doped by Alkaline Earth Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eufrasio, Andreza; Bhatta, Rudra; Pegg, Ian; Dutta, Biprodas

    Ceramic oxides are now being considered as a new class of thermoelectric materials because of their high stability at elevated temperatures. Such materials are especially suitable for use as prospective thermoelectric power generators because high temperatures are encountered in such operations. The present investigation uses barium plumbate (BaPbO3) as the starting material, the thermoelectric properties of which have been altered by judicious cation substitutions. BaPbO3 is known to exhibit metallic properties which may turn semiconducting as a result of compositional changes without precipitating a separate phase and/or altering the basic perovskite crystal structure. Perovskite structures are noted for their large interstitial spaces which can accommodate a large variety of ``impurity'' ions. As BaPbO3 has high electrical conductivity, σ = 2.43x105Ω-1 m-1 at room temperature, its thermopower, S, is relatively low, 23 μV/K, as expected. With a thermal conductivity, k, of 4.83Wm-1K-1, the figure of merit (ZT =S2 σ Tk-1) of BaPbO3 is only 0.01 at T = 300K. The objective of this investigation is to study the variation of thermoelectric properties of BaPbO3 as Ba and Pb ions are systematically substituted by alkaline earth ions.

  5. Cation-tuned stimuli-responsive and optical properties of supramolecular hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Masamichi; Yanai, Kazushige; Zama, Yusuke; Tsuchiyagaito, Junko; Yoshida, Masaru; Ishii, Ayumi; Hasegawa, Miki

    2015-06-01

    Hierarchical self-assembly of an amphiphilic tris-urea in aqueous media is shown. A mixture of the amphiphilic tris-urea and an alkaline solution gave a viscous solution composed of fibrous aggregates. This viscous solution transformed into supramolecular hydrogels, which are capable of hierarchically organizing into higher-order aggregates in response to several cationic triggers. The resulting supramolecular hydrogels were relatively stiff and their storage moduli attained over 10(3)  Pa. The stimuli-responsive and optical properties of the resulting hydrogels were influenced by the cationic trigger. Proton and calcium ion triggers gave pH- and chemical stimuli-responsive hydrogels, respectively. A terbium ion trigger also provided a highly luminescent hydrogel through energy transfer from the tris-urea to terbium. PMID:25900015

  6. Structure and Properties of a Semi-crystalline Cationic Polymer for Anion Exchange Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, Frederick; Price, Samuel; Savage, Alice; Ren, Xiaoming; Insane Membranes Collaboration

    Nafion has long been studied in order to understand its combination of good mechanical properties, chemical resistance, and excellent charge transport characteristics. In the past decade, uncertainty regarding the morphological behavior of Nafion has largely been resolved, allowing researchers to mimic and improve on the structure of this material. In this presentation, work to incorporate key characteristics of Nafion into a model cation-containing polymer will be described. In these new materials, semi-crystalline atactic poly(norbornene) is used to introduce good mechanical properties to anion-exchange membranes, analogous to the PTFE crystallites in Nafion. The ether linkages between the charged species and backbone are also utilized to place the cationic species (trimethylamine) in our materials into a mechanically soft environment. The resulting polymer shows some characteristics that are similar to those of Nafion. In this presentation, the synthesis, alkaline stability, mechanical properties, morphological behavior and charge transport properties will all be described.

  7. Method for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations, medium for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations

    DOEpatents

    Wasserman, Stephen R.; Anderson, Kenneth B.; Song, Kang; Yuchs, Steven E.; Marshall, Christopher L.

    1998-01-01

    A method for encapsulating hazardous cations is provided comprising supplying a pretreated substrate containing the cations; contacting the substrate with an organo-silane compound to form a coating on the substrate; and allowing the coating to cure. A medium for containing hazardous cations is also provided, comprising a substrate having ion-exchange capacity and a silane-containing coating on the substrate.

  8. Intermediate range order in alkaline borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crupi, C.; Carini, G.; Ruello, G.; D'Angelo, G.

    2016-03-01

    We describe the neutron diffraction patterns of a series of alkaline borate glasses at different metal oxide content. Strong differences are observed in the intermediate range order as a function of the specific alkaline ion and of its concentration. On these results, we propose that the first sharp diffraction peak arises from correlations of atoms of voids and show that the compositional variation of this peak intensity in alkaline borate glasses is due to changes in the distribution of void sizes within the three-dimensional network. We argue that our interpretation in terms of interstitial (empty and/or filled) voids, having different sizes, provides a general explanation for all anomalous behaviours revealed for the first sharp diffraction peak.

  9. Characterization of an Aspergillus flavus alkaline protease and its role in the infection of maize kernels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A 33 kDa protein present in Aspergillus flavus infected maize embryo tissue was identified as a fungal alkaline protease (ALP). This protein became one of the major extracellular proteins of A. flavus in potato dextrose broth medium cultural filtrate after 3 days, but was expressed at low levels or ...

  10. Advancements in Anion Exchange Membrane Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Sturgeon, Matthew R.; Long, Hai; Park, Andrew M.; Pivovar, Bryan S.

    2015-10-15

    Anion-exchange membrane fuel cells (AME-FCs) are of increasingly popular interest as they enable the use of non-Pt fuel cell catalysts, the primary cost limitation of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Benzyltrimethyl ammonium (BTMA) is the standard cation that has historically been utilized as the hydroxide conductor in AEMs. Herein we approach AEMs from two directions. First and foremost we study the stability of several different cations in a hydroxide solution at elevated temperatures. We specifically targeted BTMA and methoxy and nitro substituted BTMA. We've also studied the effects of adding an akyl spacer units between the ammonium cation and the phenyl group. In the second approach we use computational studies to predict stable ammonium cations, which are then synthesized and tested for stability. Our unique method to study cation stability in caustic conditions at elevated temperatures utilizes Teflon Parr reactors suitable for use under various temperatures and cation concentrations. NMR analysis was used to determine remaining cation concentrations at specific time points with GCMS analysis verifying product distribution. We then compare the experimental results with calculated modeling stabilities. Our studies show that the electron donating methoxy groups slightly increase stability (compared to that of BTMA), while the electron withdrawing nitro groups greatly decrease stability in base. These results give insight into possible linking strategies to be employed when tethering a BTMA like ammonium cation to a polymeric backbone; thus synthesizing an anion exchange membrane.

  11. Tripodal Receptors for Cation and Anion Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Kuswandi, Bambang; Nuriman; Verboom, Willem; Reinhoudt, David N.

    2006-01-01

    This review discusses different types of artificial tripodal receptors for the selective recognition and sensing of cations and anions. Examples on the relationship between structure and selectivity towards cations and anions are described. Furthermore, their applications as potentiometric ion sensing are emphasised, along with their potential applications in optical sensors or optodes.

  12. Degradation of halogenated carbons in alkaline alcohol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Seiko; Shimokawa, Toshinari

    2002-02-01

    1,1,2-Trichloro-trifluoroethane, 1,2-dibromo-tetrafluoroethane, 2,3,4,6-tetrachlorophenol, 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene, and 2,4,6-trichloroanisole were dissolved in alkaline isopropyl alcohol and irradiated with 60Co gamma rays after purged with pure nitrogen gas. The concentration of the hydroxide ions and the parent molecules decreased with the dose, while that of the halide ions and the organic products, with less halogen atoms than the parent, increased. Chain degradation will occur in alkaline isopropyl alcohol.

  13. Alkaline earth filled nickel skutterudite antimonide thermoelectrics

    DOEpatents

    Singh, David Joseph

    2013-07-16

    A thermoelectric material including a body centered cubic filled skutterudite having the formula A.sub.xFe.sub.yNi.sub.zSb.sub.12, where A is an alkaline earth element, x is no more than approximately 1.0, and the sum of y and z is approximately equal to 4.0. The alkaline earth element includes guest atoms selected from the group consisting of Be, Mb, Ca, Sr, Ba, Ra and combinations thereof. The filled skutterudite is shown to have properties suitable for a wide variety of thermoelectric applications.

  14. Laser direct write of planar alkaline microbatteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, C. B.; Kim, H.; Piqué, A.

    We are developing a laser engineering approach to fabricate and optimize alkaline microbatteries in planar geometries. The laser direct-write technique enables multicapability for adding, removing and processing material and provides the ability to pattern complicated structures needed for fabricating complete microbattery assemblies. In this paper, we demonstrate the production of planar zinc-silver oxide alkaline cells under ambient conditions. The microbattery cells exhibit 1.55-V open-circuit potentials, as expected for the battery chemistry, and show a flat discharge behavior under constant-current loads. High capacities of over 450 μAhcm-2 are obtained for 5-mm2 microbatteries.

  15. Alkaline Capacitors Based on Nitride Nanoparticles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldissi, Matt

    2003-01-01

    High-energy-density alkaline electrochemical capacitors based on electrodes made of transition-metal nitride nanoparticles are undergoing development. Transition- metal nitrides (in particular, Fe3N and TiN) offer a desirable combination of high electrical conductivity and electrochemical stability in aqueous alkaline electrolytes like KOH. The high energy densities of these capacitors are attributable mainly to their high capacitance densities, which, in turn, are attributable mainly to the large specific surface areas of the electrode nanoparticles. Capacitors of this type could be useful as energy-storage components in such diverse equipment as digital communication systems, implanted medical devices, computers, portable consumer electronic devices, and electric vehicles.

  16. The Alkaline Diet: Is There Evidence That an Alkaline pH Diet Benefits Health?

    PubMed Central

    Schwalfenberg, Gerry K.

    2012-01-01

    This review looks at the role of an alkaline diet in health. Pubmed was searched looking for articles on pH, potential renal acid loads, bone health, muscle, growth hormone, back pain, vitamin D and chemotherapy. Many books written in the lay literature on the alkaline diet were also reviewed and evaluated in light of the published medical literature. There may be some value in considering an alkaline diet in reducing morbidity and mortality from chronic diseases and further studies are warranted in this area of medicine. PMID:22013455

  17. De Novo Transcriptional Analysis of Alfalfa in Response to Saline-Alkaline Stress

    PubMed Central

    An, Yi-Min; Song, Li-Li; Liu, Ying-Rui; Shu, Yong-Jun; Guo, Chang-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Saline-alkaline stress, caused by high levels of harmful carbonate salts and high soil pH, is a major abiotic stress that affects crop productivity. Alfalfa is a widely cultivated perennial forage legume with some tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses, especially to saline-alkaline stress. To elucidate the mechanism underlying plant saline-alkaline tolerance, we conducted transcriptome analysis of whole alfalfa seedlings treated with saline-alkaline solutions for 0 day (control), 1 day (short-term treatment), and 7 days (long-term treatment) using ion torrent sequencing technology. A transcriptome database dataset of 53,853 unigenes was generated, and 2,286 and 2,233 genes were differentially expressed in the short-term and long-term treatment, respectively. Gene ontology analysis revealed 14 highly enriched pathways and demonstrated the differential response of metabolic pathways between the short-term and long-term treatment. The expression levels of 109 and 96 transcription factors were significantly altered significantly after 1 day and 7 days of treatment, respectively. Specific responses of peroxidase, flavonoids, and the light pathway component indicated that the antioxidant capacity was one of the central mechanisms of saline-alkaline stress tolerance response in alfalfa. Among the 18 differentially expressed genes examined by real time PCR, the expression levels of eight genes, including inositol transporter, DNA binding protein, raffinose synthase, ferritin, aldo/keto reductase, glutathione S-transferase, xyloglucan endotrans glucosylase, and a NAC transcription factor, exhibited different patterns in response to saline and alkaline stress. The expression levels of the NAC transcription factor and glutathione S-transferase were altered significantly under saline stress and saline-alkaline stress; they were upregulated under saline-alkaline stress and downregulated under salt stress. Physiology assays showed an increased concentration of reactive oxygen

  18. De Novo Transcriptional Analysis of Alfalfa in Response to Saline-Alkaline Stress.

    PubMed

    An, Yi-Min; Song, Li-Li; Liu, Ying-Rui; Shu, Yong-Jun; Guo, Chang-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Saline-alkaline stress, caused by high levels of harmful carbonate salts and high soil pH, is a major abiotic stress that affects crop productivity. Alfalfa is a widely cultivated perennial forage legume with some tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses, especially to saline-alkaline stress. To elucidate the mechanism underlying plant saline-alkaline tolerance, we conducted transcriptome analysis of whole alfalfa seedlings treated with saline-alkaline solutions for 0 day (control), 1 day (short-term treatment), and 7 days (long-term treatment) using ion torrent sequencing technology. A transcriptome database dataset of 53,853 unigenes was generated, and 2,286 and 2,233 genes were differentially expressed in the short-term and long-term treatment, respectively. Gene ontology analysis revealed 14 highly enriched pathways and demonstrated the differential response of metabolic pathways between the short-term and long-term treatment. The expression levels of 109 and 96 transcription factors were significantly altered significantly after 1 day and 7 days of treatment, respectively. Specific responses of peroxidase, flavonoids, and the light pathway component indicated that the antioxidant capacity was one of the central mechanisms of saline-alkaline stress tolerance response in alfalfa. Among the 18 differentially expressed genes examined by real time PCR, the expression levels of eight genes, including inositol transporter, DNA binding protein, raffinose synthase, ferritin, aldo/keto reductase, glutathione S-transferase, xyloglucan endotrans glucosylase, and a NAC transcription factor, exhibited different patterns in response to saline and alkaline stress. The expression levels of the NAC transcription factor and glutathione S-transferase were altered significantly under saline stress and saline-alkaline stress; they were upregulated under saline-alkaline stress and downregulated under salt stress. Physiology assays showed an increased concentration of reactive oxygen

  19. phoD Alkaline Phosphatase Gene Diversity in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Kertesz, Michael A.; Bünemann, Else K.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatase enzymes are responsible for much of the recycling of organic phosphorus in soils. The PhoD alkaline phosphatase takes part in this process by hydrolyzing a range of organic phosphoesters. We analyzed the taxonomic and environmental distribution of phoD genes using whole-genome and metagenome databases. phoD alkaline phosphatase was found to be spread across 20 bacterial phyla and was ubiquitous in the environment, with the greatest abundance in soil. To study the great diversity of phoD, we developed a new set of primers which targets phoD genes in soil. The primer set was validated by 454 sequencing of six soils collected from two continents with different climates and soil properties and was compared to previously published primers. Up to 685 different phoD operational taxonomic units were found in each soil, which was 7 times higher than with previously published primers. The new primers amplified sequences belonging to 13 phyla, including 71 families. The most prevalent phoD genes identified in these soils were affiliated with the orders Actinomycetales (13 to 35%), Bacillales (1 to 29%), Gloeobacterales (1 to 18%), Rhizobiales (18 to 27%), and Pseudomonadales (0 to 22%). The primers also amplified phoD genes from additional orders, including Burkholderiales, Caulobacterales, Deinococcales, Planctomycetales, and Xanthomonadales, which represented the major differences in phoD composition between samples, highlighting the singularity of each community. Additionally, the phoD bacterial community structure was strongly related to soil pH, which varied between 4.2 and 6.8. These primers reveal the diversity of phoD in soil and represent a valuable tool for the study of phoD alkaline phosphatase in environmental samples. PMID:26253682

  20. Cationic Bolaamphiphiles for Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Amelia Li Min; Lim, Alisa Xue Ling; Zhu, Yiting; Yang, Yi Yan; Khan, Majad

    2014-05-01

    Advances in medical research have shed light on the genetic cause of many human diseases. Gene therapy is a promising approach which can be used to deliver therapeutic genes to treat genetic diseases at its most fundamental level. In general, nonviral vectors are preferred due to reduced risk of immune response, but they are also commonly associated with low transfection efficiency and high cytotoxicity. In contrast to viral vectors, nonviral vectors do not have a natural mechanism to overcome extra- and intracellular barriers when delivering the therapeutic gene into cell. Hence, its design has been increasingly complex to meet challenges faced in targeting of, penetration of and expression in a specific host cell in achieving more satisfactory transfection efficiency. Flexibility in design of the vector is desirable, to enable a careful and controlled manipulation of its properties and functions. This can be met by the use of bolaamphiphile, a special class of lipid. Unlike conventional lipids, bolaamphiphiles can form asymmetric complexes with the therapeutic gene. The advantage of having an asymmetric complex lies in the different purposes served by the interior and exterior of the complex. More effective gene encapsulation within the interior of the complex can be achieved without triggering greater aggregation of serum proteins with the exterior, potentially overcoming one of the great hurdles faced by conventional single-head cationic lipids. In this review, we will look into the physiochemical considerations as well as the biological aspects of a bolaamphiphile-based gene delivery system.

  1. MERCURIC CHLORIDE CAPTURE BY ALKALINE SORBENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of bench-scale mechanistic studies of mercury/sorbent reactions that showed that mercuric chloride (HgC12) is readily adsorbed by alkaline sorbents, which may offers a less expensive alternative to the use of activated carbons. A laboratory-scale, fixed-b...

  2. Negative Electrode For An Alkaline Cell

    DOEpatents

    Coco, Isabelle; Cocciantelli, Jean-Michel; Villenave, Jean-Jacques

    1998-07-14

    The present invention concerns a negative electrode for an alkaline cell, comprising a current collector supporting a paste containing an electrochemically active material and a binder, characterized in that said binder is a polymer containing hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups, said polymer being selected from an acrylic homopolymer, copolymer and terpolymer, an unsaturated organic acid copolymer and an unsaturated acid anhydride copolymer.

  3. Kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of nitrocellulose.

    PubMed

    Christodoulatos, C; Su, T L; Koutsospyros, A

    2001-01-01

    Cellulose nitrate (nitrocellulose) is an explosive solid substance used in large quantities in various formulations of rocket and gun propellants. Safe destruction of nitrocellulose can be achieved by alkaline hydrolysis, which converts it to biodegradable products that can then be treated by conventional biological processes. The kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of munitions-grade nitrocellulose in sodium hydroxide solutions were investigated in completely mixed batch reactors. Experiments were conducted using solutions of alkaline strength ranging from 0.1 to 15% by mass and temperatures in the range of 30 to 90 degrees C. Regression analysis of the kinetic data revealed that alkaline hydrolysis of nitrocellulose is of the order 1.0 and 1.5 with respect to nitrocellulose and hydroxide concentration, respectively. The activation energy of the hydrolysis reaction was found to be 100.9 kJ/mol with a preexponential Arrhenius constant of 4.73 x 10(13). Nitrite and nitrate, in a 3:1 ratio, were the primary nitrogen species present in the posthydrolysis solution. The kinetic information is pertinent to the development and optimization of nitrocellulose chemical-biological treatment systems. PMID:11563378

  4. Use Alkalinity Monitoring to Optimize Bioreactor Performance.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher S; Kult, Keegan J

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, the agricultural community has reduced flow of nitrogen from farmed landscapes to stream networks through the use of woodchip denitrification bioreactors. Although deployment of this practice is becoming more common to treat high-nitrate water from agricultural drainage pipes, information about bioreactor management strategies is sparse. This study focuses on the use of water monitoring, and especially the use of alkalinity monitoring, in five Iowa woodchip bioreactors to provide insights into and to help manage bioreactor chemistry in ways that will produce desirable outcomes. Results reported here for the five bioreactors show average annual nitrate load reductions between 50 and 80%, which is acceptable according to established practice standards. Alkalinity data, however, imply that nitrous oxide formation may have regularly occurred in at least three of the bioreactors that are considered to be closed systems. Nitrous oxide measurements of influent and effluent water provide evidence that alkalinity may be an important indicator of bioreactor performance. Bioreactor chemistry can be managed by manipulation of water throughput in ways that produce adequate nitrate removal while preventing undesirable side effects. We conclude that (i) water should be retained for longer periods of time in bioreactors where nitrous oxide formation is indicated, (ii) measuring only nitrate and sulfate concentrations is insufficient for proper bioreactor operation, and (iii) alkalinity monitoring should be implemented into protocols for bioreactor management. PMID:27136151

  5. ISSUES WITH ALKALINE TREATMENT OF SLUDGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation begins with a discussion of the use of lime and other alkaline materials from the very earliest times to the present for killing bacteria, viruses and parasites and for controlling odors in wastewaters and sludge. It answers the question "How did EPA arrive at i...

  6. Alkaline electrochemical cells and method of making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyt, H. E.; Pfluger, H. L. (Inventor)

    1970-01-01

    Equilibrated cellulose ether membranes of increased electrolytic conductivity for use as separators in concentrated alkaline electrochemical cells are investigated. The method of making such membranes by equilibration to the degree desired in an aqueous alkali solution mantained at a temperature below about 10 C is described.

  7. Ionized alkaline water: new strategy for management of metabolic acidosis in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Abol-Enein, Hassan; Gheith, Osama A; Barakat, Nashwa; Nour, Eman; Sharaf, Abd-Elhameed

    2009-06-01

    Metabolic acidosis can occur as a result of either the accumulation of endogenous acids or loss of bicarbonate from the gastrointestinal tract or the kidney, which represent common causes of metabolic acidosis. The appropriate treatment of acute metabolic acidosis has been very controversial. Ionized alkaline water was not evaluated in such groups of patients in spite of its safety and reported benefits. So, we aimed to assess its efficacy in the management of metabolic acidosis in animal models. Two models of metabolic acidosis were created in dogs and rats. The first model of renal failure was induced by ligation of both ureters; and the second model was induced by urinary diversion to gut (gastrointestinal bicarbonate loss model). Both models were subjected to ionized alkaline water (orally and by hemodialysis). Dogs with renal failure were assigned to two groups according to the type of dialysate utilized during hemodialysis sessions, the first was utilizing alkaline water and the second was utilizing conventional water. Another two groups of animals with urinary diversion were arranged to receive oral alkaline water and tap water. In renal failure animal models, acid-base parameters improved significantly after hemodialysis with ionized alkaline water compared with the conventional water treated with reverse osmosis (RO). Similar results were observed in urinary diversion models as there was significant improvement of both the partial pressure of carbon dioxide and serum bicarbonate (P = 0.007 and 0.001 respectively) after utilizing alkaline water orally. Alkaline ionized water can be considered as a major safe strategy in the management of metabolic acidosis secondary to renal failure or dialysis or urinary diversion. Human studies are indicated in the near future to confirm this issue in humans. PMID:19527469

  8. [Adsorption of chromium (VI) from aqueous solution on bentonite modified by cationic polymers].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Yue, Qin-Yan; Li, Qian; Lu, Guang-Jiang; Gao, Bao-Yu; Yuan, Ai-Juan

    2009-06-15

    Two cationic polymer-epicholorohydrin dimethylamine (EPI-DMA) and poly dimethyldlammonium (PDMDAAC) as the intercalary reagents were used to prepare a series of bentonites (EPI-DMA/Bt and PDMDAAC/Bt) modified by the cationic polymers, respectively. The adsorption of Cr(VI) on cationic polymer/bentonite and major influencing factors were studied. The results show that the sorption capacity of Cr (VI) is increased more than five times compared with the original one. The load of cationic polymers in bentonites, the dosing quantity of EPI-DMA/Bt and PDMDAAC/Bt, the solution pH, temperature (T), time of reaction (t) affect the adsorption. When T = 20 degrees C, pH = 4.0, t = 120 min, EPI-DMA/Bt (the load of cationic polymer is 99.6 mg/g) and PDMDAAC/Bt (the load of cationic polymer is 55.1 mg/g) adsorb 0.71 mg/g and 0.56 mg/g Cr(VI), respectively. The adsorption kinetics are fitted well by pseudo second-order equation. The adsorption isotherms of cationic polymer/bentonites to Cr( VI) are fitted well by the Langmuir equation. PMID:19662861

  9. Preparation of poly(glycidylmethacrylate-divinylbenzene) weak acid cation exchange stationary phases with succinic anhydride, phthalic anhydride, and maleic anhydride for ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junwei; Wang, Yong; Wu, Shuchao; Zhang, Peimin; Zhu, Yan

    2016-08-01

    In this work, poly(glycidylmethacrylate-divinylbenzene) microspheres were prepared and applied for the preparation of weak acid cation exchange stationary phases. Succinic anhydride, phthalic anhydride, and maleic anhydride were selected as carboxylation reagents to prepare three weak acid cation exchangers by direct chemical derivatization reaction without solvent or catalyst. The diameters and dispersity of the microspheres were characterized by scanning electron microscopy; the amount of accessible epoxy groups and mechanical stability were also measured. The weak acid cation exchangers were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy; the content of carboxyl groups was measured by traditional acid base titration method. The chromatographic properties were characterized and compared by separating alkali, alkaline earth metal ions and ammonium and polar amines. The separation properties enhanced in the order of succinic anhydride, phthalic anhydride, and maleic anhydride modified poly(glycidylmethacrylate-divinylbenzene) cation exchangers. PMID:27288092

  10. Titanium corrosion in alkaline hydrogen peroxide environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Been, Jantje

    1998-12-01

    The corrosion of Grade 2 titanium in alkaline hydrogen peroxide environments has been studied by weight loss corrosion tests, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), linear polarization resistance (LPR) measurements and potentiodynamic polarography. Calcium ions and wood pulp were investigated as corrosion inhibitors. In alkaline peroxide, the titanium corrosion rate increased with increasing pH, temperature, and hydrogen peroxide concentration. The corrosion controlling mechanism is thought to be the reaction of the oxide with the perhydroxyl ion. No evidence of thermodynamically stable calcium titanate was found in the surface film of test coupons exposed to calcium-inhibited alkaline peroxide solutions. Calcium inhibition is probably the result of low local alkali and peroxide concentrations at the metal surface produced by reaction of adsorbed calcium with hydrogen peroxide. It has been shown that the inhibiting effect of calcium is temporary, possibly through an effect of calcium on the chemical and/or physical stability of the surface oxide. Pulp is an effective and stable corrosion inhibitor. Raising the pulp concentration decreased the corrosion rate. The inhibiting effect of pulp may be related to the adsorption and interaction of the pulp fibers with H 2O2, thereby decreasing the peroxide concentration and rendering the solution less corrosive. The presence of both pulp and calcium led to higher corrosion rates than obtained by either one inhibitor alone. Replacement of hydrofluoric acid with alkaline peroxide for pickling of titanium was investigated. Titanium corrosion rates in alkaline peroxide exceeded those obtained in the conventional hydrofluoric acid bath. General corrosion was observed with extensive roughening of the surface giving a dull gray appearance. Preferred dissolution of certain crystallographic planes was investigated through the corrosion of a titanium single crystal. Whereas the overall effect on the corrosion rate was small

  11. Improved Performance of the Alkaline-Side CSEX Process for Cesium Extraction from Alkaline High-Level Waste Obtained by Characterization of the Effect of Surfactant Impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Delmau, L.H.

    1999-11-04

    identify the harmful impurities as undecyl- and dodecylsulfonate. Subsequent tests with purchased sodium dodecylsulfonate confirmed that this surfactant could produce decreased stripping performance of the magnitude equivalent to that observed when using the simulant associated with the worse performance. With the identification of the impurity now settled, it is clear that poor stripping arises from ion-pair species in the solvent comprised of the cesium-extractant complex cation and the alkylsulfonate anion. Because the Gibbs energy of transfer of this anion and the complexation of the cesium cation by the extractant are both so favorable, the stripping of the cesium, nitrate from the solvent is correspondingly unfavorable. Thus, once the cesium associated with nitrate ion in the solvent has been stripped, further stripping of the remaining cesium in the solvent becomes inefficient. A simple remedy is the addition of a lipophilic amine such as trioctylamine to the solvent. This well-known amine extractant, once proposed for reprocessing, remains neutral and essentially inert during extraction of the alkaline waste but converts to the trioctylammonium nitrate salt on scrubbing and stripping. This lipophilic salt remains in the organic phase and allows the final traces of cesium in the solvent to be stripped by supplying the alkylsulfonate impurity in the solvent with equivalent cationic charges. Further results regarding this and other improvements to the solvent system will be described elsewhere.

  12. Reactive transport modeling of column experiments on the evolution of saline alkaline waste solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zuoping; Zhang, Guoxiang; Wan, Jiamin

    2008-04-01

    Leakage of saline-alkaline tank waste solutions often creates a serious environmental contamination problem. To better understand the mechanisms controlling the fate of such waste solutions in the Hanford vadose zone, we simulated reactive transport in columns designed to represent local site conditions. The Pitzer ion interaction module was used, with principal geochemical processes considered in the simulation including quartz dissolution, precipitation of brucite, calcite, and portlandite, multi-component cation exchange, and aqueous complexation reactions. Good matches were observed between the simulated and measured column data at ambient temperature (˜ 21 °C). Relatively good agreement was also obtained at high temperature (˜ 70 °C). The decrease of pH at the plume front is examined through formation of secondary mineral phases and/or quartz dissolution. Substantial formation of secondary mineral phases resulting from multi-component cation exchange suggests that these phases are responsible for a decrease in pH within the plume front. In addition, a sensitivity analysis was conducted with respect to cation exchange capacity, selectivity coefficient, mineral assemblage, temperature, and ionic strength. This study could serve as a useful guide to subsequent experimental work, to thermodynamic models developed for the concentrated solutions at high ionic strength and to other types of waste plume studies.

  13. Reactive transport modeling of column experiments on the evolution of saline-alkaline waste solutions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zuoping; Zhang, Guoxiang; Wan, Jiamin

    2008-04-01

    Leakage of saline-alkaline tank waste solutions often creates a serious environmental contamination problem. To better understand the mechanisms controlling the fate of such waste solutions in the Hanford vadose zone, we simulated reactive transport in columns designed to represent local site conditions. The Pitzer ion interaction module was used, with principal geochemical processes considered in the simulation including quartz dissolution, precipitation of brucite, calcite, and portlandite, multi-component cation exchange, and aqueous complexation reactions. Good matches were observed between the simulated and measured column data at ambient temperature ( approximately 21 degrees C). Relatively good agreement was also obtained at high temperature ( approximately 70 degrees C). The decrease of pH at the plume front is examined through formation of secondary mineral phases and/or quartz dissolution. Substantial formation of secondary mineral phases resulting from multi-component cation exchange suggests that these phases are responsible for a decrease in pH within the plume front. In addition, a sensitivity analysis was conducted with respect to cation exchange capacity, selectivity coefficient, mineral assemblage, temperature, and ionic strength. This study could serve as a useful guide to subsequent experimental work, to thermodynamic models developed for the concentrated solutions at high ionic strength and to other types of waste plume studies. PMID:18313795

  14. Cation distributions on rapidly solidified cobalt ferrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Guire, Mark R.; Kalonji, Gretchen; O'Handley, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    The cation distributions in two rapidly solidified cobalt ferrites have been determined using Moessbauer spectroscopy at 4.2 K in an 8-T magnetic field. The samples were obtained by gas atomization of a Co0-Fe2O3-P2O5 melt. The degree of cation disorder in both cases was greater than is obtainable by cooling unmelted cobalt ferrite. The more rapidly cooled sample exhibited a smaller departure from the equilibrium cation distribution than did the more slowly cooled sample. This result is explained on the basis of two competing effects of rapid solidification: high cooling rate of the solid, and large undercooling.

  15. Antibacterial properties of cationic steroid antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Savage, Paul B; Li, Chunhong; Taotafa, Uale; Ding, Bangwei; Guan, Qunying

    2002-11-19

    Cationic steroid antibiotics have been developed that display broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. These compounds are comprised of steroids appended with amine groups arranged to yield facially amphiphilic morphology. Examples of these antibiotics are highly bactericidal, while related compounds effectively permeabilize the outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria sensitizing these organisms to hydrophobic antibiotics. Cationic steroid antibiotics exhibit various levels of eukaryote vs. prokaryote cell selectivity, and cell selectivity can be increased via charge recognition of prokaryotic cells. Studies of the mechanism of action of these antibiotics suggest that they share mechanistic aspects with cationic peptide antibiotics. PMID:12445638

  16. Delineating the role of polyphenol oxidase in the darkening of alkaline wheat noodles.

    PubMed

    Fuerst, E Patrick; Anderson, James V; Morris, Craig F

    2006-03-22

    This study evaluated the effects of inhibitors on polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity, the effect of the PPO inhibitor tropolone on noodle darkening, and the correlation of PPO activity with darkening of alkaline noodles. The PPO inhibitors tropolone and salicylhydroxamic acid (each at 1 microM) reduced kernel PPO activity by approximately 50% in three hexaploid wheat cultivars but did not inhibit PPO activity in the two very low PPO cultivars, durum Langdon, and the synthetic hexaploid-derived ID580. Tropolone (100 microg/g flour) inhibited alkaline noodle darkening (deltaL*) by 13-25% in the low PPO wheat cultivar, ID377s, and by 39-54% in the high PPO wheat cultivar, Klasic. Alkaline noodle darkening among 502 wheat samples was correlated with kernel PPO activity (r = 0.64). Results substantiate the hypothesis that PPO plays a major role in darkening of alkaline noodles. However, results also indicate that substantial darkening would occur even at zero PPO activity, as measured in the kernel PPO assay. Therefore, darkening of alkaline noodles is probably due to the cultivar-specific level of PPO activity and the presence of at least one additional darkening mechanism. Further investigation is required to identify the phenolic discoloration agent(s) and to determine the potential roles of non-PPO discoloration mechanisms, both enzymatic and nonenzymatic, in wheat products. PMID:16536622

  17. Metal bioavailability and toxicity to fish in low-alkalinity lakes - a critical-review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spry, D.J.; Wiener, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    Fish in low-alkalinity lakes having ph of 6.0-6.5 Or less often have higher body or tissue burdens of mercury, cadmium, and lead than do fish in nearby lakes with higher ph. The greater bioaccumulation of these metals in such waters seems to result partly from the greater aqueous abundances of biologically available forms (ch3hg+, cd2+, and pb2+) at low ph. In addition, the low concentrations of aqueous calcium in low-alkalinity lakes increase the permeability of biological membranes to these metals, which in fish may cause greater uptake from both water and food. Fish exposed to aqueous inorganic aluminum in the laboratory and field accumulate the metal in and on the epithelial cells of the gills; however, there is little accumulation of aluminum in the blood or internal organs. In low-ph water, both sublethal and lethal toxicity of aluminum has been clearly demonstrated in both laboratory and field studies at environmental concentrations. In contrast, recently measured aqueous concentrations of total mercury, methylmercury, cadmium, and lead in low-alkalinity lakes are much lower than the aqueous concentrations known to cause acute or chronic toxicity in fish, although the vast majority of toxicological research has involved waters with much higher ionic strength than that in low-alkalinity lakes. Additional work with fish is needed to better assess (1) the toxicity of aqueous metals in low-alkalinity waters, and (2) the toxicological significance of dietary methylmercury and cadmium.

  18. Effect of cobalt on synthesis and activation of Bacillus licheniformis alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, D B; Chen, C P; Hulett, F M

    1981-01-01

    The effect of CO2+ on the synthesis and activation of Bacillus licheniformis MC14 alkaline phosphatase has been shown by the development of a defined minimal salts medium in which this organism produces 35 times more (assayable) alkaline phosphatase than when grown in a low-phosphate complex medium or in the defined medium without cobalt. Stimulation of enzyme activity with cobalt is dependent on a low phosphate concentration in the medium (below 0.075 mM) and continued protein synthesis. Cobalt stimulation resulted in alkaline phosphate production being a major portion of total protein synthesized during late-logarithmic and early-stationary-phase culture growth. Cells cultured in the defined medium minus cobalt, or purified enzyme partially inactivated with a chelating agent, showed a 2.5-fold increase in activity when assayed in the presence of cobalt. Atomic spectral analysis indicated the presence of 3.65 +/- 0.45 g-atoms of cobalt associated with each mole of purified active alkaline phosphatase. A biochemical localization as a function of culture age in this medium showed that alkaline phosphatase was associated with the cytoplasmic membrane and was also found as a soluble enzyme in the periplasmic region and secreted into the growth medium. PMID:7462163

  19. Effect of cobalt on synthesis and activation of Bacillus licheniformis alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Spencer, D B; Chen, C P; Hulett, F M

    1981-02-01

    The effect of CO2+ on the synthesis and activation of Bacillus licheniformis MC14 alkaline phosphatase has been shown by the development of a defined minimal salts medium in which this organism produces 35 times more (assayable) alkaline phosphatase than when grown in a low-phosphate complex medium or in the defined medium without cobalt. Stimulation of enzyme activity with cobalt is dependent on a low phosphate concentration in the medium (below 0.075 mM) and continued protein synthesis. Cobalt stimulation resulted in alkaline phosphate production being a major portion of total protein synthesized during late-logarithmic and early-stationary-phase culture growth. Cells cultured in the defined medium minus cobalt, or purified enzyme partially inactivated with a chelating agent, showed a 2.5-fold increase in activity when assayed in the presence of cobalt. Atomic spectral analysis indicated the presence of 3.65 +/- 0.45 g-atoms of cobalt associated with each mole of purified active alkaline phosphatase. A biochemical localization as a function of culture age in this medium showed that alkaline phosphatase was associated with the cytoplasmic membrane and was also found as a soluble enzyme in the periplasmic region and secreted into the growth medium. PMID:7462163

  20. Growing season net ecosystem CO2 exchange of two desert ecosystems with alkaline soils in Kazakhstan

    PubMed Central

    Li, Longhui; Chen, Xi; van der Tol, Christiaan; Luo, Geping; Su, Zhongbo

    2014-01-01

    Central Asia is covered by vast desert ecosystems, and the majority of these ecosystems have alkaline soils. Their contribution to global net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) is of significance simply because of their immense spatial extent. Some of the latest research reported considerable abiotic CO2 absorption by alkaline soil, but the rate of CO2 absorption has been questioned by peer communities. To investigate the issue of carbon cycle in Central Asian desert ecosystems with alkaline soils, we have measured the NEE using eddy covariance (EC) method at two alkaline sites during growing season in Kazakhstan. The diurnal course of mean monthly NEE followed a clear sinusoidal pattern during growing season at both sites. Both sites showed significant net carbon uptake during daytime on sunny days with high photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) but net carbon loss at nighttime and on cloudy and rainy days. NEE has strong dependency on PAR and the response of NEE to precipitation resulted in an initial and significant carbon release to the atmosphere, similar to other ecosystems. These findings indicate that biotic processes dominated the carbon processes, and the contribution of abiotic carbon process to net ecosystem CO2 exchange may be trivial in alkaline soil desert ecosystems over Central Asia. PMID:24455157

  1. ACTINIDE-ALUMINATE SPECIATION IN ALKALINE RADIOACTIVE WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Highly alkaline radioactive waste tanks contain a number of transuranic species, in particular U, Np, Pu, and Am - the exact forms of which are currently unknown. Knowledge of actinide speciation under highly alkaline conditions is essential towards understanding and predicting ...

  2. A method for making an alkaline battery electrode plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chida, K.; Ezaki, T.

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for making an alkaline battery electrode plate where the desired active substances are filled into a nickel foam substrate. In this substrate an electrolytic oxidation reduction occurs in an alkaline solution containing lithium hydroxide.

  3. Eosinophil granule cationic proteins regulate the classical pathway of complement.

    PubMed Central

    Weiler, J M; Edens, R E; Bell, C S; Gleich, G J

    1995-01-01

    Major basic protein, the primary constituent of eosinophil granules, regulates the alternative and classical pathways of complement. Major basic protein and other eosinophil granule cationic proteins, which are important in mediating tissue damage in allergic disease, regulate the alternative pathway by interfering with C3b interaction with factor B to assemble an alternative pathway C3 convertase. In the present study, eosinophil peroxidase, eosinophil cationic protein and eosinophil-derived neurotoxin, as well as major basic protein, were examined for capacity to regulate the classical pathway. Eosinophil peroxidase, eosinophil cationic protein and major basic protein inhibited formation of cell-bound classical pathway C3 convertase (EAC1,4b,2a), causing 50% inhibition of complement-mediated lysis at about 0.19, 0.75 and 0.5 micrograms/10(7) cellular intermediates, respectively. Eosinophil-derived neurotoxin had no activity on this pathway of complement. The eosinophil granule proteins were examined for activity on the formation of the membrane attack complex. Major basic protein and eosinophil cationic protein had no activity on terminal lysis. In contrast, eosinophil peroxidase inhibited lysis of EAC1,4b,2a,3b,5b, but had only minimal activity on later events in complement lysis. These polycations were then examined to determine the site(s) at which they regulated the early classical pathway. Eosinophil granule polycationic proteins: (1) reduced the Zmax at all time points but had only minimal effect on the Tmax during the formation of the classical pathway C3 convertase (EAC1,4b,2a); (2) inhibited formation of EAC1,4b,2a proportional to C4 but independent of C2 concentration; (3) inhibited fluid phase formation of C1,4b,2a, as reflected by a decrease in C1-induced consumption of C2 over time; and (4) inhibited C1 activity over time without a direct effect on either C4 or C2. These observations suggest that polycations regulate the early classical pathway by

  4. Electron exchange involving a sulfur-stabilized ruthenium radical cation.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Anthony P; Ryland, Bradford L; Norton, Jack R; Buccella, Daniela; Moscatelli, Alberto

    2007-07-01

    Half-sandwich Ru(II) amine, thiol, and thiolate complexes were prepared and characterized by X-ray crystallography. The thiol and amine complexes react slowly with acetonitrile to give free thiol or amine and the acetonitrile complex. With the thiol complex, the reaction is dissociative. The thiolate complex has been oxidized to its Ru(III) radical cation and the solution EPR spectrum of that radical cation recorded. Cobaltocene reduces the thiol complex to the thiolate complex. The 1H and 31P NMR signals of the thiolate complex in acetonitrile become very broad whenever the thiolate and thiol complexes are present simultaneously. The line broadening is primarily due to electron exchange between the thiolate complex and its radical cation; the latter is generated by an unfavorable redox equilibrium between the thiol and thiolate complexes. Pyramidal inversion of sulfur in the thiol complex is fast at room temperature but slow at lower temperatures; major and minor conformers of the thiol complex were observed by 31P NMR at -98 degrees C in CD2Cl2. PMID:17569530

  5. Degradation of cellulose under alkaline conditions: new insights from a 12 years degradation study.

    PubMed

    Glaus, Martin A; Van Loon, Luc R

    2008-04-15

    Cellulose degradation under alkaline conditions is of relevance to the mobility of many cations of the transition metal, lanthanide, and actinide series in the geosphere because strong complexants such as isosaccharinic acids, 3-deoxy-2-C-hydroxymethyl-D-erythro-pentonic acid (alpha-ISA) and 3-deoxy-2-C-hydroxymethyl-D-threo-pentonic acid (beta-ISA) may be formed. In the context of the long-term safety of cementitious repositories for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste, where large amounts of cellulose may be present, the question of the time scales needed for the complete degradation of cellulose is important. The present paper reports the results of a 12 year study of the degradation of four different cellulosic materials (pure cellulose, tissue, cotton, paper) in an artificial cement pore water under anaerobic conditions at approximately 25 degrees C. The observed reaction characteristics can be divided into a fast reaction phase (2-3 years), dominated by the stepwise conversion of terminal glucose monomeric units to alpha-ISA and beta-ISA, and a very slow reaction phase during which the same products were found. The slow rate of the alkaline degradation of cellulose during this second reaction phase shows that previous kinetic models of cellulose degradation did not adequately describe the long-term behavior under alkaline conditions and need to be reassessed. It is postulated that a previously unknown mechanism by which crystalline or inaccessible reducing end groups of the polysaccharide chain become temporarily susceptible to alkaline attack is responsible for the slow rate of cellulose degradation. PMID:18497142

  6. FINAL REPORT. ACTINIDE-ALUMINATE SPECIATION IN ALKALINE RADIOACTIVE WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Investigation of behavior of actinides in alkaline media containing Al(III) showed that no aluminate complexes of actinides in oxidation states (III-VII) were formed in alkaline solutions. At alkaline precipitation (pH 10-14) of actinides in presence of Al(III) formation of alumi...

  7. Removal of Microcystis aeruginosa using cationic starch modified soils.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wenqing; Tan, Wanqiao; Wang, Lijing; Pan, Gang

    2016-06-15

    A cheap and biodegradable modifier, cationic starch (CS), was used to turn local soils into effective flocculants for Microcystis aeruginosa (M. aeruginosa) removal. The isoelectric point of soil particles was remarkably increased from pH 0.5 to 11.8 after modification with CS, which made CS modified soil particles positively charged and obtain algal flocculation ability. At the soil concentration of 100 mg/L, when the CS modifier was 10 mg/L, 86% of M. aeruginosa cells were removed within 30 min. Lower or higher CS dosage led to limited algal removal. About 71% and 45% of M. aeruginosa cells were removed within 30 min when CS was 5 mg/L and 80 mg/L, respectively. This is because only part of algal cells combined with CS modified soil particles through charge neutralization at low dosage, while flocs formed at high CS dosage were positively charged which prevents further aggregation among the flocs. The floc stability was quantified by a floc breakage index under applied shear force. Algal flocs formed at acid and alkaline conditions were more prone to be broken than those at the neutral condition. The cost and biodegradability concerns may be largely reduced through the use of CS modified local soils. For field applications, other practical issues (e.g., re-suspension) should be further studied by jointly using other methods. PMID:26143587

  8. Cation locations and dislocations in zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Luis James

    The focus of this dissertation is the extra-framework cation sites in a particular structural family of zeolites, chabazite. Cation sites play a particularly important role in the application of these sieves for ion exchange, gas separation, catalysis, and, when the cation is a proton, acid catalysis. Structural characterization is commonly performed through the use of powder diffraction and Rietveld analysis of powder diffraction data. Use of high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance, in the study of the local order of the various constituent nuclei of zeolites, complements well the long-range order information produced by diffraction. Recent developments in solid state NMR techniques allow for increased study of disorder in zeolites particularly when such phenomena test the detection limits of diffraction. These two powerful characterization techniques, powder diffraction and NMR, offer many insights into the complex interaction of cations with the zeolite framework. The acids site locations in SSZ-13, a high silica chabazite, and SAPO-34, a silicoaluminophosphate with the chabazite structure, were determined. The structure of SAPO-34 upon selective hydration was also determined. The insensitivity of X-rays to hydrogen was avoided through deuteration of the acid zeolites and neutron powder diffraction methods. Protons at inequivalent positions were found to have different acid strengths in both SSZ-13 and SAPO-34. Other light elements are incorporated into zeolites in the form of extra-framework cations, among these are lithium, sodium, and calcium. Not amenable by X-ray powder diffraction methods, the positions of such light cations in fully ion-exchanged versions of synthetic chabazite were determined through neutron powder diffraction methods. The study of more complex binary cation systems were conducted. Powder diffraction and solid state NMR methods (MAS, MQMAS) were used to examine cation site preferences and dislocations in these mixed-akali chabazites

  9. Cation-cation clusters in ionic liquids: Cooperative hydrogen bonding overcomes like-charge repulsion

    PubMed Central

    Knorr, Anne; Ludwig, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Direct spectroscopic evidence for H-bonding between like-charged ions is reported for the ionic liquid, 1-(2-hydroxyethyl)-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate. New infrared bands in the OH frequency range appear at low temperatures indicating the formation of H-bonded cation-cation clusters similar to those known for water and alcohols. Supported by DFT calculations, these vibrational bands can be assigned to attractive interaction between the hydroxyl groups of the cations. The repulsive Coulomb interaction is overcome by cooperative hydrogen bonding between ions of like charge. The transition energy from purely cation-anion interacting configurations to those including cation-cation H-bonds is determined to be 3–4 kJmol−1. The experimental findings and DFT calculations strongly support the concept of anti-electrostatic hydrogen bonds (AEHBs) as recently suggested by Weinhold and Klein. The like-charge configurations are kinetically stabilized with decreasing temperatures. PMID:26626928

  10. Test procedure for cation exchange chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, T.D.

    1994-08-24

    The purpose of this test plan is to demonstrate the synthesis of inorganic antimonate ion exchangers and compare their performance against the standard organic cation exchangers. Of particular interest is the degradation rate of both inorganic and organic cation exchangers. This degradation rate will be tracked by determining the ion exchange capacity and thermal stability as a function of time, radiation dose, and chemical reaction.

  11. Identification of differentially expressed genes in flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) under saline-alkaline stress by digital gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ying; Huang, Wengong; Chen, Hongyu; Wu, Guangwen; Yuan, Hongmei; Song, Xixia; Kang, Qinghua; Zhao, Dongsheng; Jiang, Weidong; Liu, Yan; Wu, Jianzhong; Cheng, Lili; Yao, Yubo; Guan, Fengzhi

    2014-10-01

    The salinization and alkalization of soil are widespread environmental problems, and alkaline salt stress is more destructive than neutral salt stress. Therefore, understanding the mechanism of plant tolerance to saline-alkaline stress has become a major challenge. However, little attention has been paid to the mechanism of plant alkaline salt tolerance. In this study, gene expression profiling of flax was analyzed under alkaline-salt stress (AS2), neutral salt stress (NSS) and alkaline stress (AS) by digital gene expression. Three-week-old flax seedlings were placed in 25 mM Na2CO3 (pH11.6) (AS2), 50mM NaCl (NSS) and NaOH (pH11.6) (AS) for 18 h. There were 7736, 1566 and 454 differentially expressed genes in AS2, NSS and AS compared to CK, respectively. The GO category gene enrichment analysis revealed that photosynthesis was particularly affected in AS2, carbohydrate metabolism was particularly affected in NSS, and the response to biotic stimulus was particularly affected in AS. We also analyzed the expression pattern of five categories of genes including transcription factors, signaling transduction proteins, phytohormones, reactive oxygen species proteins and transporters under these three stresses. Some key regulatory gene families involved in abiotic stress, such as WRKY, MAPKKK, ABA, PrxR and ion channels, were differentially expressed. Compared with NSS and AS, AS2 triggered more differentially expressed genes and special pathways, indicating that the mechanism of AS2 was more complex than NSS and AS. To the best of our knowledge, this was the first transcriptome analysis of flax in response to saline-alkaline stress. These data indicate that common and diverse features of saline-alkaline stress provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms of plant saline-alkaline tolerance and offer a number of candidate genes as potential markers of tolerance to saline-alkaline stress. PMID:25058012

  12. Eruption of Alkaline Basalts Prior to the Calc-alkaline Lavas of Mt. Cleveland Volcano, Aleutian Arc, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, D. L.; Nicolaysen, K. P.

    2005-12-01

    Mt. Cleveland is a 1,730 m stratovolcano, located on Chuginadak Island, that has erupted at least 23 times historically, with the latest occurring in August 2005. Major, trace, and REE analyses of 63 samples from Mt. Cleveland, including 8 from proximal cinder cones and 4 from andesitic domes on the lower flanks, identify two distinct lava suites. Modern Cleveland (MC) basalts to dacites (50.5-66.7 wt.% SiO2) exhibit a calc-alkaline differentiation trend. Major element trends suggest crystal fractionation of plagioclase +/- ortho- and clinopyroxene in MC lavas and olivine in cinder cone deposits. Resorption textures on plagioclase and olivine phenocrysts and multiple populations of plagioclase predominate throughout the MC suite suggesting magma mixing is a major process at Cleveland. Frothy white xenoliths of plagioclase + quartz + biotite are encased in glass and erupted as small pumiceous fragments in 2001. The partial resorption of the xenocrysts indicates assimilation is also an active crustal process at Cleveland. MC trace element spider diagrams exhibit a typical arc pattern in which HFS elements including Nb are depleted, and Pb and LIL elements are enriched. Th/La, Sm/La, and Sr, Nd, Pb, and Hf isotopic ratios indicate both a North Pacific MORB and a sediment component in the source of modern Cleveland lavas, consistent with sediment flux estimates of 90 to 95 m3/m/yr and an updip sediment thickness of 1300 to 1400 meters. Average 206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, 87Sr/86Sr, and 143Nd/144Nd values for the calc-alkaline suite are 18.93, 15.58, 0.70345, and 0.51303 respectively. The second suite consists of 3 olivine-rich, mildly alkaline basalts (48.5-49.4 wt.% SiO2), of older stratigraphic position than MC lavas representing deposits from an older phase of activity (ancestral Cleveland, AC). La/Yb, Sr/Y, and Th/Nb ratios indicate lower degrees of partial melting, relative to MC lavas, and suggests presence of garnet in the source region. The AC lavas, however, are

  13. Method for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations, medium for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations

    DOEpatents

    Wasserman, S.R.; Anderson, K.B.; Song, K.; Yuchs, S.E.; Marshall, C.L.

    1998-04-28

    A method for encapsulating hazardous cations is provided comprising supplying a pretreated substrate containing the cations; contacting the substrate with an organo-silane compound to form a coating on the substrate; and allowing the coating to cure. A medium for containing hazardous cations is also provided, comprising a substrate having ion-exchange capacity and a silane-containing coating on the substrate. 3 figs.

  14. Cation-chloride cotransporters in neuronal development, plasticity and disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaila, Kai; Price, Theodore J.; Payne, John A.; Puskarjov, Martin; Voipio, Juha

    2015-01-01

    Electrical activity in neurons requires a seamless functional coupling between plasmalemmal ion channels and ion transporters. Although ion channels have been studied intensively for several decades, research on ion transporters is in its infancy. In recent years, it has become evident that one family of ion transporters, cation-chloride cotransporters (CCCs), and in particular K+–Cl− cotransporter 2 (KCC2), have seminal roles in shaping GABAergic signalling and neuronal connectivity. Studying the functions of these transporters may lead to major paradigm shifts in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying brain development and plasticity in health and disease. PMID:25234263

  15. Photolysis of alkaline-earth nitrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriger, L. D.; Miklin, M. B.; Dyagileva, E. P.; Anan'ev, V. A.

    2013-02-01

    Peroxynitrite and nitrite ions are the diamagnetic products of photolysis (with light at a wavelength of 253.7 nm) of alkaline-earth nitrates; the paramagnetic products and hydrogen peroxide were not found. The structural water in alkaline-earth nitrate crystals did not affect the qualitative composition of the photodecomposition products. The quantum yield of nitrite ions was 0.0012, 0.0038, 0.0078, and 0.0091 quanta-1 and that of peroxynitrite ions was 0.0070, 0.0107, 0.0286, and 0.0407 quanta-1 for Sr(NO3)2, Ba(NO3)2, Ca(NO3)2 · 4H2O, and Mg(NO3)2 · 6H2O, respectively.

  16. Divalent cation shrinks DNA but inhibits its compaction with trivalent cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tongu, Chika; Kenmotsu, Takahiro; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Zinchenko, Anatoly; Chen, Ning; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2016-05-01

    Our observation reveals the effects of divalent and trivalent cations on the higher-order structure of giant DNA (T4 DNA 166 kbp) by fluorescence microscopy. It was found that divalent cations, Mg(2+) and Ca(2+), inhibit DNA compaction induced by a trivalent cation, spermidine (SPD(3+)). On the other hand, in the absence of SPD(3+), divalent cations cause the shrinkage of DNA. As the control experiment, we have confirmed the minimum effect of monovalent cation, Na(+) on the DNA higher-order structure. We interpret the competition between 2+ and 3+ cations in terms of the change in the translational entropy of the counterions. For the compaction with SPD(3+), we consider the increase in translational entropy due to the ion-exchange of the intrinsic monovalent cations condensing on a highly charged polyelectrolyte, double-stranded DNA, by the 3+ cations. In contrast, the presence of 2+ cation decreases the gain of entropy contribution by the ion-exchange between monovalent and 3+ ions.

  17. Recognition of metal cations by biological systems.

    PubMed

    Truter, M R

    1975-11-01

    Recognition of metal cations by biological systems can be compared with the geochemical criteria for isomorphous replacement. Biological systems are more highly selective and much more rapid. Methods of maintaining an optimum concentration, including storage and transfer for the essential trace elements, copper and iron, used in some organisms are in part reproducible by coordination chemists while other features have not been reporduced in models. Poisoning can result from a foreign metal taking part in a reaction irreversibly so that the recognition site or molecule is not released. For major nutrients, sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium, there are similarities to the trace metals in selective uptake but differences qualitatively and quantitatively in biological activity. Compounds selective for potassium replace all the solvation sphere with a symmetrical arrangement of oxygen atoms; those selective for sodium give an asymmetrical environment with retention of a solvent molecule. Experiments with naturally occurring antibiotics and synthetic model compounds have shown that flexibility is an important feature of selectivity and that for transfer or carrier properties there is an optimum (as opposed to a maximum) metal-ligand stability constant. Thallium is taken up instead of potassium and will activate some enzymes; it is suggested that the poisonous characteristics arise because the thallium ion may bind more strongly than potassium to part of a site and then fail to bind additional atoms as required for the biological activity. Criteria for the design of selective complexing agents are given with indications of those which might transfer more than one metal at once. PMID:1815

  18. The alkaline earth intercalates of molybdenum disulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somoano, R. B.; Hadek, V.; Rembaum, A.; Samson, S.; Woollam, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Molybdenum disulfide has been intercalated with calcium and strontium by means of the liquid ammonia technique. Chemical, X-ray, and superconductivity data are presented. The X-ray data reveal a lowering of crystal symmetry and increase of complexity of the structure upon intercalation with the alkaline earth metals. The Ca and Sr intercalates start to superconduct at 4 and 5.6 K, respectively, and show considerable anisotropy regarding the critical magnetic field.

  19. Surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding field project

    SciTech Connect

    French, T.R.

    1991-10-01

    The Tucker sand of Helper (KS) field is a candidate for surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding. The geology of the Helper site is typical of many DOE Class I reservoirs. The Tucker sand of Helper field was deposited in a fluvial dominated deltaic environment. Helper oil can be mobilized with either chemical system 2 or chemical system 3, as described in this report. Oil fields in the Gulf Coast region are also good candidates for surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding. The results from laboratory tests conducted in Berea sandstone cores with oil brine from Helper (KS) field are encouraging. The crude oil is viscous and non-acidic and, yet, was mobilized by the chemical formulations described in this report. Significant amounts of the oil were mobilized under simulated reservoir conditions. The results in Berea sandstone cores were encouraging and should be verified by tests with field core. Consumption of alkali, measured with field core, was very low. Surfactant loss appeared to be acceptable. Despite the good potential for mobilization of Helper oil, certain reservoir characteristics such as low permeability, compartmentalization, and shallow depth place constraints on applications of any chemical system in the Tucker sand. These constraints are typical of many DOE Class I reservoirs. Although Hepler field is not a perfect reservoir in which to apply surfactant- enhanced alkaline flooding, Hepler oil is particularly amenable to mobilization by surfactant-enhanced alkaline systems. A field test is recommended, dependent upon final evaluation of well logs and cores from the proposed pilot area. 14 refs., 21 figs., 10 tabs.

  20. RNA Oligomerization in Laboratory Analogues of Alkaline Hydrothermal Vent Systems.

    PubMed

    Burcar, Bradley T; Barge, Laura M; Trail, Dustin; Watson, E Bruce; Russell, Michael J; McGown, Linda B

    2015-07-01

    Discovering pathways leading to long-chain RNA formation under feasible prebiotic conditions is an essential step toward demonstrating the viability of the RNA World hypothesis. Intensive research efforts have provided evidence of RNA oligomerization by using circular ribonucleotides, imidazole-activated ribonucleotides with montmorillonite catalyst, and ribonucleotides in the presence of lipids. Additionally, mineral surfaces such as borates, apatite, and calcite have been shown to catalyze the formation of small organic compounds from inorganic precursors (Cleaves, 2008 ), pointing to possible geological sites for the origins of life. Indeed, the catalytic properties of these particular minerals provide compelling evidence for alkaline hydrothermal vents as a potential site for the origins of life since, at these vents, large metal-rich chimney structures can form that have been shown to be energetically favorable to diverse forms of life. Here, we test the ability of iron- and sulfur-rich chimneys to support RNA oligomerization reactions using imidazole-activated and non-activated ribonucleotides. The chimneys were synthesized in the laboratory in aqueous "ocean" solutions under conditions consistent with current understanding of early Earth. Effects of elemental composition, pH, inclusion of catalytic montmorillonite clay, doping of chimneys with small organic compounds, and in situ ribonucleotide activation on RNA polymerization were investigated. These experiments, under certain conditions, showed successful dimerization by using unmodified ribonucleotides, with the generation of RNA oligomers up to 4 units in length when imidazole-activated ribonucleotides were used instead. Elemental analysis of the chimney precipitates and the reaction solutions showed that most of the metal cations that were determined were preferentially partitioned into the chimneys. PMID:26154881

  1. Major ion chemistry of the Ganga-Brahmaputra river system: Weathering processes and fluxes to the Bay of Bengal

    SciTech Connect

    Sarin, M.M.; Krishnaswami, S.; Dilli, K.; Somayajulu, B.L.K. ); Moore, W.S. )

    1989-05-01

    The Ganga-Brahmaputra, one of the worlds's largest river systems, is first in terms of sediment transport and fourth in terms of water discharge. A detailed and systematic study of the major ion chemistry of these rivers and their tributaries, as well as the clay mineral composition of the bed sediments has been conducted. The chemistry of the highland rivers are all dominated by carbonate weathering; (Ca + Mg) and HCO{sub 3} account for about 80% of the cations and anions. In the lowland rivers, HCO{sub 3} excess over (Ca + Mg) and a relatively high contribution of (Na + K) to the total cations indicate that silicate weathering and/or contributions from alkaline/saline soils and ground waters could be important sources of major ions to these waters. The chemistry of the Ganga and the Yamuna in the lower reaches is by and large dictated by the chemistry of their tributaries and their mixing proportions. The highland rivers weather acidic rocks, whereas the others flow initially through basic effusives. The Ganga-Brahmaputra river system transports about 130 million tons of dissolved salts to the Bay of Bengal, which is nearly 3% of the global river flux to the oceans. The chemical denudation rates for the Ganga and the Brahmaputra basins are about 72 and 105 tons{center dot}km{sup {minus}2}{center dot}yr{sup {minus}1}, respectively, which are factors of 2 to 3 higher than the global average. The high denudation rate, particularly in the Brahmaputra, is attributable to high relief and heavy rainfall.

  2. The fate of added alkalinity in model scenarios of ocean alkalinization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer González, Miriam; Ilyina, Tatiana

    2014-05-01

    The deliberate large-scale manipulation of the Earth's climate (geo-engineering) has been proposed to mitigate climate change and ocean acidification. Whilst the mitigation potential of these technologies could sound promising, they may also pose many environmental risks. Our research aims at exploring the ocean-based carbon dioxide removal method of alkalinity enhancement. Its mitigation potential to reduce atmospheric CO2 and counteract the consequences of ocean acidification, risks and unintended consequences are studied. In order to tackle these questions, different scenarios are implemented in the state-of-the-art Earth system model of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology. The model configuration is based on the 5th phase of the coupled model intercomparison project following a high CO2 future climate change scenario RCP8.5 (in which radiative forcing rises to 8.5 W/m² in 2100). Two different scenarios are performed where the alkalinity is artificially added globally uniformly in the upper ocean. In the first scenario, alkalinity is increased as a pulse by doubling natural values of the first 12 meters. In the second scenario we add alkalinity into the same ocean layer such that the atmospheric CO2 concentration is reduced from RCP8.5 to RCP4.5 levels (with the radiative forcing of 4.5 W/m² in 2100). We investigate the fate of the added alkalinity in these two scenarios and compare the differences in alkalinity budgets. In order to increase oceanic CO2 uptake from the atmosphere, enhanced alkalinity has to stay in the upper ocean. Once the alkalinity is added, it will become part of the biogeochemical cycles and it will be distributed with the ocean currents. Therefore, we are particularly interested in the residence time of the added alkalinity at the surface. Variations in CO2 partial pressure, seawater pH and saturation state of carbonate minerals produced in the implemented scenarios will be presented. Collateral changes in ocean biogeochemistry and

  3. Mechanism of oligonucleotide release from cationic liposomes.

    PubMed Central

    Zelphati, O; Szoka, F C

    1996-01-01

    We propose a mechanism for oligonucleotide (ODN) release from cationic lipid complexes in cells that accounts for various observations on cationic lipid-nucleic acid-cell interactions. Fluorescent confocal microscopy of cells treated with rhodamine-labeled cationic liposome/ fluorescein-labeled ODN (F-ODN) complexes show the F-ODN separates from the lipid after internalization and enters the nucleus leaving the fluorescent lipid in cytoplasmic structures. ODN displacement from the complex was studied by fluorescent resonance energy transfer. Anionic liposome compositions (e.g., phosphatidylserine) that mimic the cytoplasmic facing monolayer of the cell membrane released ODN from the complex at about a 1:1 (-/+) charge ratio. Release was independent of ionic strength and pH. Physical separation of the F-ODN from monovalent and multivalent cationic lipids was confirmed by gel electrophoresis. Fluid but not solid phase anionic liposomes are required, whereas the physical state of the cationic lipids does not effect the release. Water soluble molecules with a high negative linear charge density, dextran sulfate, or heparin also release ODN. However, ATP, spermidine, spermine, tRNA, DNA, polyglutamic acid, polylysine, bovine serum albumin, or histone did not release ODN, even at 100-fold charge excess (-/+). Based upon these results, we propose that the complex, after internalization by endocytosis, induces flip-flop of anionic lipids from the cytoplasmic facing monolayer. Anionic lipids laterally diffuse into the complex and form a charged neutralized ion-pair with the cationic lipids. This leads to displacement of the ODN from the cationic lipid and its release into the cytoplasm. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8876163

  4. Rapid changes in water hardness and alkalinity: Calcite formation is lethal to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Bogart, Sarah J; Woodman, Samuel; Steinkey, Dylan; Meays, Cindy; Pyle, Greg G

    2016-07-15

    There is growing concern that freshwater ecosystems may be negatively affected by ever-increasing anthropogenic inputs of extremely hard, highly alkaline effluent containing large quantities of Ca(2+), Mg(2+), CO3(2-), and HCO3(-) ions. In this study, the toxicity of rapid and extreme shifts in water hardness (38-600mg/L as CaCO3) and alkalinity (30-420mg/L as CaCO3) to Daphnia magna was tested, both independently and in combination. Within these ranges, where no precipitation event occurred, shifts in water hardness and/or alkalinity were not toxic to D. magna. In contrast, 98-100% of D. magna died within 96h after exposure to 600mg/L as CaCO3 water hardness and 420mg/L as CaCO3 alkalinity (LT50 of 60h with a 95% CI of 54.2-66.0h). In this treatment, a CaCO3 (calcite) precipitate formed in the water column which was ingested by and thoroughly coated the D. magna. Calcite collected from a mining impacted stream contained embedded organisms, suggesting field streams may also experience similar conditions and possibly increased mortality as observed in the lab tests. Although further investigation is required to determine the exact fate of aquatic organisms exposed to rapid calcite precipitation in the field, we caution that negative effects may occur more quickly or at lower concentrations of water hardness and alkalinity in which we observed effects in D. magna, because some species, such as aquatic insects, are more sensitive than cladocerans to changes in ionic strength. Our results provide evidence that both calcite precipitation and the major ion balance of waters should be managed in industrially affected ecosystems and we support the development of a hardness+alkalinity guideline for the protection of aquatic life. PMID:27060657

  5. Studying the Chemistry of Cationized Triacylglycerols Using Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Density Functional Theory Computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossert, J. Stuart; Herrera, Lisandra Cubero; Ramaley, Louis; Melanson, Jeremy E.

    2014-08-01

    Analysis of triacylglycerols (TAGs), found as complex mixtures in living organisms, is typically accomplished using liquid chromatography, often coupled to mass spectrometry. TAGs, weak bases not protonated using electrospray ionization, are usually ionized by adduct formation with a cation, including those present in the solvent (e.g., Na+). There are relatively few reports on the binding of TAGs with cations or on the mechanisms by which cationized TAGs fragment. This work examines binding efficiencies, determined by mass spectrometry and computations, for the complexation of TAGs to a range of cations (Na+, Li+, K+, Ag+, NH4 +). While most cations bind to oxygen, Ag+ binding to unsaturation in the acid side chains is significant. The importance of dimer formation, [2TAG + M]+ was demonstrated using several different types of mass spectrometers. From breakdown curves, it became apparent that two or three acid side chains must be attached to glycerol for strong cationization. Possible mechanisms for fragmentation of lithiated TAGs were modeled by computations on tripropionylglycerol. Viable pathways were found for losses of neutral acids and lithium salts of acids from different positions on the glycerol moiety. Novel lactone structures were proposed for the loss of a neutral acid from one position of the glycerol moiety. These were studied further using triple-stage mass spectrometry (MS3). These lactones can account for all the major product ions in the MS3 spectra in both this work and the literature, which should allow for new insights into the challenging analytical methods needed for naturally occurring TAGs.

  6. Cationic curdlan: Synthesis, characterization and application of quaternary ammonium salts of curdlan.

    PubMed

    Suflet, Dana M; Popescu, Irina; Pelin, Irina M; Nicolescu, Alina; Hitruc, Gabriela

    2015-06-01

    Water-soluble curdlan derivatives containing quaternary ammonium groups with a degree of substitution up to 0.15 were synthesized using different cationic agents in alkaline medium. The chemical structure of curdlan derivatives was confirmed by FTIR, (13)C and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. The influence of some reaction conditions (temperature, time, and molar ratio) on the degree of substitution and the viscosimetic behaviour were studied. The degree of substitution increased with the amount of the cationization agent per anhydroglucose unit and was higher when the glycidyl reagents were used, compared with the case when the reagents contained chloro-hydroxypropyl groups. The viscosity behaviour of these new derivatives of curdlan in aqueous solutions and the values of intrinsic viscosities calculated using different semi-empirical equations denote a high hydrodynamic dimension of the macromolecular coils. The interaction of these cationic curdlan derivatives with an anionic curdlan (monobasic curdlan phosphate) was studied in situ by turbidimetric measurements and after 24h by optical density and dynamic light scattering. The formation of polyelectrolyte complexes was influenced by the degree of substitution, the nature of the quaternary substituent, and by the ionic strength of the aqueous solution. The morphology of the polyelectrolyte complexes particles in dry state was examined by atomic force microscopy. PMID:25843873

  7. Innate cation sensitivity in a semiconducting polymer.

    PubMed

    Althagafi, Talal M; Algarni, Saud A; Grell, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Water-gated organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) using the hole transporting semiconducting polymer, poly(2,5-bis(3-hexadecylthiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene) (PBTTT), show an innate response of their threshold voltage to the addition of divalent metal cations to the gating water, without deliberately introducing an ion-sensitive component. A similar threshold response is shown for several divalent cations, but is absent for monovalent cations. Response is absent for transistors using the inorganic semiconductor ZnO, or the similar organic semiconductor poly(3-hexylthiophene) (rrP3HT), instead of PBTTT. We assign innate cation sensitivity to residues of the organometallic Pd(0) complex used as catalyst in PBTTT synthesis which bears strong resemblance to typical metal chelating agents. Organometallic Pd(0) residues are absent from ZnO, and also from rrP3HT which is polymerised with a different type of catalyst. However, when Pd(0) complex is deliberately added to rrP3HT casting solutions, resulting OTFTs also display threshold response to a divalent cation. PMID:27343580

  8. Cation control of energetics on dye-sensitized nanocrystalline TiO2 for solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stux, Arnold M.

    Regenerative solar cells based on nanocrystalline TiO2 (anatase) and the dye Ru(deeb)(bpy)2(PF6)2, where deeb is 4,4'-(CO2CH2CH3)2-2,2 '-bipyridine and bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine, have increased efficiency when in the presence of a high concentration of cations with a large charge-to-radius ratio. Concentration-dependent photoluminescence (PL) quenching and increased quantum yield for interfacial charge separation have been explored for mono- and divalent cations by absorbance, time-resolved and steady-state PL. Cation adsorption stabilizes TiO2 acceptor states resulting in energetically favorable electron transfer from the dye into the semiconductor conduction band. Quenching of the PL of excited states is reversible. A new luminescence approach for sensing alkali and alkaline earth metal cations utilizes the surface-adsorption/desorption induced energetic shifts of a semiconductor conduction band to alter the electron transfer quenching efficiency of a photoluminescent dye such as Ru(deeb)(bpy)2(PF 6)2 anchored to TiO2 nanoparticles. This approach yields intensity, lifetime, and wavelength-ratiometric calcium ion sensors that are sensitive to 5 x 10-4 M concentrations. In situ photoluminescence of a regenerative solar cell has been demonstrated as a probe of injection and efficiencies. The smaller the alkali cation, the higher the photocurrent and the more quenched the photoluminescence. The extent of quenching in 0.1 M iodide/0.01 M iodine electrolytes was 10-fold with LiI and 3-fold with NaI. A millimolar threshold concentration is observed for Li+ at which point a red shift in absorbance and photoluminescence spectra concomitant with significant static and dynamic quenching occurs. For Na+, the threshold concentration for observable red shift is more than an order of magnitude higher than for Li+. Cation adsorption was also observed on planar TiO2 surfaces in the absence of dye. The flat band potentials of single crystal TiO 2 (rutile) with cations in propylene

  9. Cation-pi interactions as a mechanism in technical lignin adsorption to cationic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Karthik V; Renneckar, Scott

    2009-04-13

    The assembly of dissolved technical lignins in aqueous and organic medium has been studied at the solid-liquid interface. Adsorption of alkali lignin onto gold coated crystals treated with a cationic polymer was determined using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. Complete coverage of the cationic surface with alkali lignin occurred at low solution concentration, revealing a high affinity coefficient under both alkali and neutral conditions. With additional adsorption studies from organosolv lignin in organic solvent and spectroscopic analysis of mixtures of cationic polymer and alkali lignin, a noncovalent interaction between lignin's aromatic rings and the cation of the quaternary ammonium group was shown to exist. The work underscores how polyphenolic biopolymers can strongly interact with cations through noncovalent interactions to control molecular architecture. PMID:19226174

  10. Tree species affect cation exchange capacity (CEC) and cation binding properties of organic matter in acid forest soils.

    PubMed

    Gruba, Piotr; Mulder, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) in forest soil is of major importance for cation binding and acid buffering, but its characteristics may differ among soils under different tree species. We investigated acidity, cation exchange properties and Al bonding to SOM in stands of Scots pine, pedunculate oak, Norway spruce, European beech and common hornbeam in southern Poland. The content of total carbon (Ct) was by far the major contributor to total cation exchange capacity (CECt) even in loamy soils and a strong relationship between Ct and CECt was found. The slope of the regression of CECt to Ct increased in the order hornbeam≈oak

  11. Examination of the effect of the annealing cation on higher order structures containing guanine or isoguanine repeats

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Sarah E.; Wang, Junmei; Jayawickramarajah, Janarthanan; Hamilton, Andrew D.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2010-01-01

    Isoguanine (2-oxo-6-amino-guanine), a natural but non-standard base, exhibits unique self-association properties compared to its isomer, guanine, and results in formation of different higher order DNA structures. In this work, the higher order structures formed by oligonucleotides containing guanine repeats or isoguanine repeats after annealing in solutions containing various cations are evaluated by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The guanine-containing strand (G9) consistently formed quadruplexes upon annealing, whereas the isoguanine strand (Ig9) formed both pentaplexes and quadruplexes depending on the annealing cation. Quadruplex formation with G9 showed some dependence on the identity of the cation present during annealing with high relative quadruplex formation detected with six of ten cations. Analogous annealing experiments with Ig9 resulted in complex formation with all ten cations, and the majority of the resulting complexes were pentaplexes. CD results indicated most of the original complexes survived the desalting process necessary for ESI-MS analysis. In addition, several complexes, especially the pentaplexes, were found to be capable of cation exchange with ammonium ions. Ab initio calculations were conducted for isoguanine tetrads and pentads coordinated with all ten cations to predict the most energetically stable structures of the complexes in the gas phase. The observed preference of forming quadruplexes versus pentaplexes as a function of the coordinated cation can be interpreted by the calculated reaction energies of both the tetrads and pentads in combination with the distortion energies of tetrads. PMID:19746468

  12. Crystal structure of hydrogen-bearing vuonnemite from the Lovozero alkaline massif

    SciTech Connect

    Rastsvetaeva, R. K. Aksenov, S. M.; Verin, I. A.; Lykova, I. S.

    2011-05-15

    Hydrogen-bearing vuonnemite from the Shkatulka hyperagpaitic pegmatite (the Lovozero alkaline massif, Kola Peninsula) was studied by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The triclinic unit-cell parameters are as follows: a = 5.4712(1) Angstrom-Sign , b = 7.1626(1) Angstrom-Sign , c = 14.3702(3) Angstrom-Sign , {alpha} = 92.623(2) Degree-Sign , {beta} = 95.135(1) Degree-Sign , {gamma} = 90.440(1) Degree-Sign , sp. gr. P1, R = 3.4%. The Na{sup +} cations and H{sub 2}O molecules are ordered in sites between the packets. The water molecules are hydrogen bonded to the PO{sub 4} tetrahedra.

  13. Fluorescent probes and bioimaging: alkali metals, alkaline earth metals and pH.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Hu, Ying; Yoon, Juyoung

    2015-07-21

    All living species and life forms have an absolute requirement for bio-functional metals and acid-base equilibrium chemistry owing to the critical roles they play in biological processes. Hence, a great need exists for efficient methods to detect and monitor biometals and acids. In the last few years, great attention has been paid to the development of organic molecule based fluorescent chemosensors. The availability of new synthetic fluorescent probes has made fluorescence microscopy an indispensable tool for tracing biologically important molecules and in the area of clinical diagnostics. This review highlights the recent advances that have been made in the design and bioimaging applications of fluorescent probes for alkali metals and alkaline earth metal cations, including lithium, sodium and potassium, magnesium and calcium, and for pH determination within biological systems. PMID:25317749

  14. Comparison of alkaline industrial wastes for aqueous mineral carbon sequestration through a parallel reactivity study.

    PubMed

    Noack, Clinton W; Dzombak, David A; Nakles, David V; Hawthorne, Steven B; Heebink, Loreal V; Dando, Neal; Gershenzon, Michael; Ghosh, Rajat S

    2014-10-01

    Thirty-one alkaline industrial wastes from a wide range of industrial processes were acquired and screened for application in an aqueous carbon sequestration process. The wastes were evaluated for their potential to leach polyvalent cations and base species. Following mixing with a simple sodium bicarbonate solution, chemistries of the aqueous and solid phases were analyzed. Experimental results indicated that the most reactive materials were capable of sequestering between 77% and 93% of the available carbon under experimental conditions in four hours. These materials - cement kiln dust, spray dryer absorber ash, and circulating dry scrubber ash - are thus good candidates for detailed, process-oriented studies. Chemical equilibrium modeling indicated that amorphous calcium carbonate is likely responsible for the observed sequestration. High variability and low reactive fractions render many other materials less attractive for further pursuit without considering preprocessing or activation techniques. PMID:24735991

  15. Determination of the zincate diffusion coefficient and its application to alkaline battery problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, C. E.; Kautz, Harold E.

    1978-01-01

    The diffusion coefficient for the zincate ion at 24 C was found to be 9.9 X 10 to the minus 7th power squared cm per sec + or - 30 percent in 45 percent potassium hydroxide and 1.4 x 10 to the minus 7 squared cm per sec + or - 25 percent in 40 percent sodium hydroxide. Comparison of these values with literature values at different potassium hydroxide concentrations show that the Stokes-Einstein equation is obeyed. The diffusion coefficient is characteristic of the zincate ion (not the cation) and independent of its concentration. Calculations with the measured value of the diffusion coefficient show that the zinc concentration in an alkaline zincate half cell becomes uniform throughout in tens of hours by diffusion alone. Diffusion equations are derived which are applicable to finite size chambers. Details and discussion of the experimental method are also given.

  16. Determination of the zincate diffusion coefficient and its application to alkaline battery problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, C. E.; Kautz, H. E.

    1978-01-01

    The diffusion coefficient for the zincate ion at 24 C was found to be 9.9 x 10 to the -7th power sq cm/sec + or - 30% in 45% potassium hydroxide and 1.4 x 10 to the -7th power sq cm/sec + or - 25% in 40% sodium hydroxide. Comparison of these values with literature values at different potassium hydroxide concentrations show that the Stokes-Einstein equation is obeyed. The diffusion coefficient is characteristic of the zincate ion (not the cation) and independent of its concentration. Calculations with the measured value of the diffusion coefficient show that the zinc concentration in an alkaline zincate half-cell becomes uniform throughout in tens of hours by diffusion alone. Diffusion equations are derived which are applicable to finite-size chambers. Details and discussion of the experimental method are also given.

  17. Cationically polymerizable monomers derived from renewable sources

    SciTech Connect

    Crivello, J.V.

    1991-10-01

    The objective of this project is to make use of products obtained from renewable plant sources as monomers for the direct production of polymers which can be used for a wide range of plastic applications. In this report is described progress in the synthesis and polymerization of cationically polymerizable monomers and oligomers derived from botanical oils, terpenes, natural rubber, and lignin. Nine different botanical oils were obtained from various sources, characterized and then epoxidized. Their photopolymerization was carried out using cationic photoinitiators and the mechanical properties of the resulting polymers characterized. Preliminary biodegradation studies are being conducted on the photopolymerized films from several of these oils. Limonene was cationically polymerized to give dimers and the dimers epoxidized to yield highly reactive monomers suitable for coatings, inks and adhesives. The direct phase transfer epoxidation of squalene and natural rubber was carried out. The modified rubbers undergo facile photocrosslinking in the presence of onium salts to give crosslinked elastomers. 12 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  18. Solution of trivalent cations into uranium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleburgh, S. C.; Parfitt, D. C.; Grimes, R. W.; Dorado, B.; Bertolus, M.; Blair, P. R.; Hallstadius, L.; Backman, K.

    2012-01-01

    The accommodation of trivalent oxides (M 2O 3) in uranium dioxide has been investigated using atomic scale simulation. Calculations suggest that all trivalent oxides studied preferentially enter UO 2 by associating the substitutional ion with an oxygen vacancy, larger cations forming the cluster {2MU':VOrad rad }×. Solution into hyper-stoichiometric UO 2+ x was accompanied by the formation of the {MU':UUrad }× cluster and smaller solution energies than into stoichiometric UO 2. Solubility is a particularly strong function of hyper-stoichiometry for smaller cations such as Cr 3+, which has implications for the use of Cr 2O 3 as a grain enlarger but not so for larger cations such s Gd 3+.

  19. Cationic Lipid-Based Nucleic Acid Vectors.

    PubMed

    Jubeli, Emile; Goldring, William P D; Pungente, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    The delivery of nucleic acids into cells remains an important laboratory cell culture technique and potential clinical therapy, based upon the initial cellular uptake, then translation into protein (in the case of DNA), or gene deletion by RNA interference (RNAi). Although viral delivery vectors are more efficient, the high production costs, limited cargo capacity, and the potential for clinical adverse events make nonviral strategies attractive. Cationic lipids are the most widely applied and studied nonviral vectors; however, much remains to be solved to overcome limitations of these systems. Advances in the field of cationic lipid-based nucleic acid (lipoplex) delivery rely upon the development of robust and reproducible lipoplex formulations, together with the use of cell culture assays. This chapter provides detailed protocols towards the formulation, delivery, and assessment of in vitro cationic lipid-based delivery of DNA. PMID:27436310

  20. Toxicity and immunomodulatory activity of liposomal vectors formulated with cationic lipids toward immune effector cells.

    PubMed

    Filion, M C; Phillips, N C

    1997-10-23

    their DNA content, downregulated NO and TNF-alpha synthesis by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)-activated macrophages. The replacement of DOPE by DPPC, or the addition of DPPE-PEG2000, restored NO and TNF-alpha synthesis by activated macrophages. Since macrophages constitute the major site of liposome localization after parenteral administration and play an important role in the control of the immune system, cationic liposomes should be used with caution to deliver gene or antisense oligonucleotide to mammalian cells. Cationic lipids show in vitro toxicity toward phagocytic cells and inhibit in vitro and in situ NO and TNF-alpha production by activated macrophages. PMID:9371426

  1. Mobilization of Roadside Soil Cation Pools by Exchange with Road Deicers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, R.; Bain, D.

    2014-12-01

    Over the past sixty years, road deicers (i.e., road salt) have been applied to roadways in high latitudes to improve traffic conditions in winter weather. However, the dissolution of road deicers in highway runoff create waters with high total dissolved solids (TDS), specifically high concentrations of sodium, which can mobilize soil metals via soil cation exchange reactions. While several studies have detailed the interactions of high TDS solutions and surface and ground waters, limited attention is paid to the impacts of high TDS solutions on near-road soils. Between 2013 and 2014, soil water samples were collected from a roadside transect of lysimeter nests in Pittsburgh, PA. Soil water samples were analyzed for metal concentrations and resulting data used to examine cation dynamics. Patterns in soil water calcium and magnesium concentrations follow patterns in soil water sodium concentrations. In our samples, the highest major cation concentrations are found at the deepest lysimeters, suggesting major cations are mobilized to, and potentially accumulate in, deeper soil horizons. Concentration peaks in the downslope soil waters lag concentration peaks at the near-road nest by two months, indicating that road salt plumes persist and migrate following the road salting season. Characterizing the interactions of high TDS solutions and roadside soil cation pools clarifies our understanding of metal dynamics in the roadside environment. A deeper understanding of these processes is necessary to effectively restore and manage watersheds as high TDS solutions (i.e., road deicing, hydraulic fracturing, and marginal irrigation water) increasingly influence ecosystem function.

  2. Treatment of drinking water residuals: comparing sedimentation and dissolved air flotation performance with optimal cation ratios.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, J C; Walsh, M E; Gagnon, G A

    2004-03-01

    Spent filter backwash water (SFBW) and clarifier sludge generally comprise the majority of the waste residual volume generated and in relative terms, these can be collectively referred to as combined filter backwash water (CFBW). CFBW is essentially a low-solids wastewater with metal hydroxide flocs that are typically light and slow to settle. This study evaluates the impact of adding calcium and magnesium carbonates to CFBW in terms of assessing the impacts on the sedimentation and DAF separation processes. Representative CFBW samples were collected from two surface water treatment plants (WTP): Lake Major WTP (Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada) and Victoria Park WTP (Truro, Nova Scotia, Canada). Bench-scale results indicated that improvements in the CFBW settled water quality could be achieved through the addition of the divalent cations, thereby adjusting the monovalent to divalent (M:D) ratios of the wastewater. In general, the DAF process required slightly higher M:D ratios than the sedimentation process. The optimum M:D ratios for DAF and sedimentation were determined to be 1:1 and 0.33:1, respectively. It was concluded that the optimisation of the cation balance between monovalent cations (e.g., Na(+), K(+)) and added divalent cations (i.e., Ca(2+), Mg(2+)) aided in the settling mechanism through charge neutralisation-precipitation. The increase in divalent cation concentrations within the waste residual stream promoted destabilisation of the negatively charged colour molecules within the CFBW, thereby causing the colloidal content to become more hydrophobic. PMID:14975650

  3. MULTISPECIES CATION LEACHING DURING CONTINUOUS DISPLACEMENT OF ELECTROLYTE SOLUTIONS THROUGH SOIL COLUMNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A model based upon concepts of multispecies ion chromatography and mobile-immobile water was developed to simulate the leaching of major soil cations during steady, continuous infiltration of electrolyte solutions into soil columns. The model assumes that a fraction of exchange s...

  4. Enhanced Cd[2+]-selective root-tonoplast-transport in tobaccos expressing Arabidopsis cation exchangers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several "Arabidopsis" CAtion eXchangers (CAXs) encode tonoplast-localized transporters that appear to be major contributors to vacuolar accumulation/sequestration of cadmium (Cd[2+]), an undesirable pollutant ion that occurs in man largely as a result of dietary consumption of aerial tissues of food...

  5. Amelioration of an Ultisol profile acidity using crop straws combined with alkaline slag.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiu-yu; Masud, M M; Li, Zhong-yi; Xu, Ren-kou

    2015-07-01

    The acidity of Ultisols (pH <5) is detrimental to crop production. Technologies should be explored to promote base saturation and liming effect for amelioration of Ultisol pH. Column leaching experiments were conducted to investigate the amelioration effects of canola straw (CS) and peanut straw (PS) in single treatment and in combination whether with alkaline slag (AS) or with lime on Ultisol profile acidity. The treatment without liming materials was set as control, and the AS and lime in single treatment are set for comparison. Results indicated that all the liming materials increase soil profile pH and soil exchangeable base cations at the 0-40-cm depth, except that the lime had amelioration effect just on 0 to 15-cm profile. The amelioration effect of the liming materials on surface soil acidity was mainly dependent on the ash alkalinity in organic materials or acid neutralization capacity of inorganic materials. Specific adsorption of sulfate (SO4(2-)) or organic anions, decarboxylation of organic acids/anions, and the association of H(+) with organic anions induced a "liming effect" of crop residues and AS on subsoil acidity. Moreover, SO4(2-) and chloride (Cl(-)) in PS, CS, and AS primarily induced base cations to move downward to subsoil and exchange with exchangeable aluminum (Al(3+)) and protons (H(+)). These anions also promoted the exchangeable Al to leach out of the soil profile. The CS was more effective than PS in decreasing soil acidity in the subsoil, which mainly resulted from higher sulfur (S) and Cl content in CS compared to PS. The CS combined with AS was the better amendment choice in practical agricultural systems. PMID:25666472

  6. ABSORPTION METHOD FOR SEPARATING METAL CATIONS

    DOEpatents

    Tompkins, E.R.; Parker, G.W.

    1959-03-10

    An improved method is presented for the chromatographic separation of fission products wherein a substantial reduction in liquid volume is obtained. The process consists in contacting a solution containing fission products with a body of ion-exchange adsorbent to effect adsorption of fission product cations. The loaded exchange resin is then contacted with a small volume of a carboxylic acid eluant, thereby recovering the fission products. The fission product carrying eluate is acidified without increasing its volume to the volume of the original solution, and the acidified eluate is then used as a feed solution for a smaller body of ion-exchange resin effecting readsorption of the fission product cations.

  7. ALT1, a Snf2 Family Chromatin Remodeling ATPase, Negatively Regulates Alkaline Tolerance through Enhanced Defense against Oxidative Stress in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Mingxin; Wang, Ruci; Wang, Juan; Hua, Kai; Wang, Yueming; Liu, Xiaoqiang; Yao, Shanguo

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline salt stress adversely affects rice growth, productivity and grain quality. However, the mechanism underlying this process remains elusive. We characterized here an alkaline tolerant mutant, alt1 in rice. Map-based cloning revealed that alt1 harbors a mutation in a chromatin remodeling ATPase gene. ALT1-RNAi transgenic plants under different genetic background mimicked the alt1 phenotype, exhibiting tolerance to alkaline stress in a transcript dosage-dependent manner. The predicted ALT1 protein belonged to the Ris1 subgroup of the Snf2 family and was localized in the nucleus, and transcription of ALT1 was transiently suppressed after alkaline treatment. Although the absorption of several metal ions maintained well in the mutant under alkaline stress, expression level of the genes involved in metal ions homeostasis was not altered in the alt1 mutant. Classification of differentially expressed abiotic stress related genes, as revealed by microarray analysis, found that the majority (50/78) were involved in ROS production, ROS scavenging, and DNA repair. This finding was further confirmed by that alt1 exhibited lower levels of H2O2 under alkaline stress and tolerance to methyl viologen treatment. Taken together, these results suggest that ALT1 negatively functions in alkaline tolerance mainly through the defense against oxidative damage, and provide a potential two-step strategy for improving the tolerance of rice plants to alkaline stress. PMID:25473841

  8. Alkaline assisted thermal oil recovery: Kinetic and displacement studies

    SciTech Connect

    Saneie, S.; Yortsos, Y.C.

    1993-06-01

    This report deals with two major issues of chemical assisted flooding - the interaction of caustic, one of the proposed additives to steam flood, with the reservoir rock, and the displacement of oil by a chemical flood at elevated temperatures. A mathematical model simulating the kinetics of silica dissolution and hydroxyl ion consumption in a typical alkaline flooding environment is first developed. The model is based on the premise that dissolution occurs via hydrolysis of active sites through the formation of an intermediate complex, which is in equilibrium with the silicic acid in solution. Both static (batch) and dynamic (core flood) processes are simulated to examine the sensitivity of caustic consumption and silica dissolution to process parameters, and to determine rates of propagation of pH values. The model presented provides a quantitative description of the quartz-alkali interaction in terms of pH, salinity, ion exchange properties, temperature and contact time, which are of significant importance in the design of soluble silicate flooding processes. The modeling of an adiabatic hot waterflood assisted by the simultaneous injection of a chemical additive is next presented. The model is also applicable to the hot alkaline flooding under conditions of negligible adsorption of the generated anionic surfactant and of hydroxide adsorption being Langmuirian. The theory of generalized simple waves (coherence ) is used to develop solutions for the temperature, concentration, and oil saturation profiles, as well as the oil recovery curves. It is shown that, for Langmuir adsorption kinetics, the chemical resides in the heated region of the reservoir if its injection concentration is below a critical value, and in the unheated region if its concentration exceeds this critical value. Results for a chemical slug injection in a tertiary recovery process indicate recovery performance is maximized when chemical resides in the heated region of the reservior.

  9. Characterization and Oxidation of Chromium(III) by Sodium Hypochlorite in Alkaline Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Huijian; Rao, Linfeng; Zhang, Zhicheng; Rai, Dhanpat

    2006-07-01

    Chromium exists in nuclear waste sludges and is a problematic element in the vitrification process of high-level nuclear wastes. It is therefore necessary to treat the waste sludges to remove chromium prior to vitrification, by caustic leaching or oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI). The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of oligomerization of Cr(III) on its oxidation by hypochlorite in alkaline solutions. Monomeric, dimeric and trimeric Cr(III) species in solution were separated by ion exchange. The kinetics of the oxidation of the separated species by hypochlorite in alkaline solutions was studied by UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy, and compared with the oxidation by hydrogen peroxide previously studied. Results indicate that hypochlorite can oxidize Cr(III) to Cr(VI) in alkaline solutions, but the rate of oxidation by hypochlorite is slower than that by hydrogen peroxide at the same alkalinity and concentrations of oxidants. The rate of oxidation of Cr(III) by both oxidants decreases as the concentration of sodium hydroxide is increased, but the oxidation by hypochlorite seems less affected by the degree of oligomerization of Cr(III) than that by peroxide. Compared with the oxidation by hydrogen peroxide where the major reaction pathway has an inverse order with respect to CNaOH, the oxidation by hypochlorite has a significant reaction pathway independent of [OH?].

  10. Proposal for management and alkalinity transformation of bauxite residue in China.

    PubMed

    Xue, Shengguo; Kong, Xiangfeng; Zhu, Feng; Hartley, William; Li, Xiaofei; Li, Yiwei

    2016-07-01

    Bauxite residue is a hazardous solid waste produced during the production of alumina. Its high alkalinity is a potential threat to the environment which may disrupt the surrounding ecological balance of its disposal areas. China is one of the major global producers of alumina and bauxite residue, but differences in alkalinity and associated chemistry exist between residues from China and those from other countries. A detailed understanding of the chemistry of bauxite residue remains the key to improving its management, both in terms of minimizing environmental impacts and reducing its alkaline properties. The nature of bauxite residue and the chemistry required for its transformation are still poorly understood. This review focuses on various transformation processes generated from the Bayer process, sintering process, and combined Bayer-sintering process in China. Problems associated with transformation mechanisms, technical methods, and relative merits of these technologies are reviewed, while current knowledge gaps and research priorities are recommended. Future research should focus on transformation chemistry and its associated mechanisms and for the development of a clear and economic process to reduce alkalinity and soda in bauxite residue. PMID:27023808

  11. Alkaline chemistry of transuranium elements and technetium and the treatment of alkaline radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, C.H.; Peretrukhin, V.F.; Shilov, V.P.; Pikaev, A.K.

    1995-05-01

    Goal of this survey is to generalize the known data on fundamental physical-chemical properties of TRUs and Tc, methods for their isolation, and to provide recommendations that will be useful for partitioning them from alkaline high-level wastes.

  12. Suppressing the dendritic growth of zinc in an ionic liquid containing cationic and anionic zinc complexes for battery applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Pulletikurthi, Giridhar; Lahiri, Abhishek; Cui, Tong; Endres, Frank

    2016-05-10

    Metallic zinc is a promising negative electrode for high energy rechargeable batteries due to its abundance, low-cost and non-toxic nature. However, the formation of dendritic zinc and low Columbic efficiency in aqueous alkaline solutions during charge/discharge processes remain a great challenge. Here we demonstrate that the dendritic growth of zinc can be effectively suppressed in an ionic liquid electrolyte containing highly concentrated cationic and anionic zinc complexes obtained by dissolving zinc oxide and zinc trifluoromethylsulfonate in a protic ionic liquid, 1-ethylimidazolium trifluoromethylsulfonate. The presence of both cationic and anionic zinc complexes alters the interfacial structure at the electrode/electrolyte interface and influences the nucleation and growth of zinc, leading to compact, homogeneous and dendrite-free zinc coatings. This study also provides insights into the development of highly concentrated metal salts in ionic liquids as electrolytes to deposit dendrite-free zinc as an anode material for energy storage applications. PMID:27080261

  13. Alkaline deoxygenated graphene oxide as adsorbent for cadmium ions removal from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Du, Hongyan; Yuan, Shaowei; He, Wanxia; Yan, Pengju; Liu, Zhanhong

    2015-01-01

    Alkaline deoxygenated graphene oxide (aGO) was prepared through alkaline hydrothermal treatment and used as adsorbent to remove Cd(II) ions from aqueous solutions for the first time. The characterization results of transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra indicate that aGO was successfully synthesized. The batch adsorption experiments showed that the adsorption kinetics could be described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, and the isotherms equilibrium data were well fitted with the Langmuir model. The maximum adsorption capacity of Cd(II) on aGO was 156 mg/g at pH 5 and T=293 K. The adsorption thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption process was a spontaneous and endothermic reaction. The mainly adsorption mechanism speculated from FT-IR results may be attributed to the electrostatic attraction between Cd2+ and negatively charged groups (-CO-) of aGO and cation-π interaction between Cd2+ and the graphene planes. The findings of this study demonstrate the potential utility of the nanomaterial aGO as an effective adsorbent for Cd(II) removal from aqueous solutions. PMID:26038925

  14. Purification and characterization of a novel extracellular alkaline protease from Cellulomonas bogoriensis.

    PubMed

    Li, Fan; Yang, Liyuan; Lv, Xue; Liu, Dongbo; Xia, Hongmei; Chen, Shan

    2016-05-01

    An extracellular alkaline protease produced by the alkali-tolerant Cellulomonas bogoriensis was purified by a combination of ammonium sulfate precipitation and cation exchange chromatography. The purity of the protease was detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and its molecular weight was confirmed to be 18.3 kDa. The enzyme showed optimum activity at 60 °C and pH 11. The stability of the protease was maintained at a wide temperature range of 4-60 °C and pH range of 3-12. Irreversible inhibition of the enzyme activity by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and tosyl-l-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone demonstrated that the purified enzyme is a chymotrypsin of the serine protease family. The Km and Vmax of the protease activity on casein were 19.2 mg/mL and 25000 μg/min/mg, respectively. The broad substrate specificity and remarkable stability in the presence of organic solvents, salt, and commercial detergents, as well as its excellent stain removal and dehairing capability, make the purified alkaline protease a promising candidate for industrial applications. PMID:26849962

  15. XANES Demonstrates the Release of Calcium Phosphates from Alkaline Vertisols to Moderately Acidified Solution.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Karl O; Tighe, Matthew K; Guppy, Christopher N; Milham, Paul J; McLaren, Timothy I; Schefe, Cassandra R; Lombi, Enzo

    2016-04-19

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) minerals may comprise the main phosphorus (P) reserve in alkaline soils, with solubility dependent on pH and the concentration of Ca and/or P in solution. Combining several techniques in a novel way, we studied these phenomena by progressively depleting P from suspensions of two soils (low P) using an anion-exchange membrane (AEM) and from a third soil (high P) with AEM together with a cation-exchange membrane. Depletions commenced on untreated soil, then continued as pH was manipulated and maintained at three constant pH levels: the initial pH (pHi) and pH 6.5 and 5.5. Bulk P K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy revealed that the main forms of inorganic P in each soil were apatite, a second more soluble CaP mineral, and smectite-sorbed P. With moderate depletion of P at pHi or pH 6.5, CaP minerals became more prominent in the spectra compared to sorbed species. The more soluble CaP minerals were depleted at pH 6.5, and all CaP minerals were exhausted at pH 5.5, showing that the CaP species present in these alkaline soils are soluble with decreases of pH in the range achievable by rhizosphere acidification. PMID:26974327

  16. Stability in alkaline aqueous electrolyte of air electrode protected with fluorinated interpenetrating polymer network membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolotti, Bruno; Messaoudi, Houssam; Chikh, Linda; Vancaeyzeele, Cédric; Alfonsi, Séverine; Fichet, Odile

    2015-01-01

    We developed original anion exchange membranes to protect air electrodes operating in aqueous lithium-air battery configuration, i.e. supplied with atmospheric air and in concentrated aqueous lithium hydroxide. These protective membranes have an interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) architecture combining a hydrogenated cationic polyelectrolyte network based on poly(epichlorohydrin) (PECH) and a fluorinated neutral network based on perfluoropolyether (Fluorolink® MD700). Two phases, each one rich in one of the polymer, are co-continuous in the materials. This morphology allows combining their properties according to the weight proportions of each polymer. Thus, PECH/Fluorolink IPNs show ionic conductivity varying from 1 to 2 mS cm-1, water uptake from 30 to 90 wt.% and anionic transport number from 0.65 to 0.80 when the PECH proportion varies from 40 to 90 wt.%. These membranes have been systematically assembled on air electrodes. Air electrode protected with PECH/Fluorolink 70/30 IPN shows outstanding stability higher than 1000 h, i.e. a 20-fold increase in the lifetime of the non-modified electrode. This efficient membrane/air electrode assembly is promising for development of alkaline electrolyte based storage or production energy systems, such as metal air batteries or alkaline fuel cells.

  17. DNA DAMAGE QUANTITATION BY ALKALINE GEL ELECTROPHORESIS.

    SciTech Connect

    SUTHERLAND,B.M.; BENNETT,P.V.; SUTHERLAND, J.C.

    2004-03-24

    Physical and chemical agents in the environment, those used in clinical applications, or encountered during recreational exposures to sunlight, induce damages in DNA. Understanding the biological impact of these agents requires quantitation of the levels of such damages in laboratory test systems as well as in field or clinical samples. Alkaline gel electrophoresis provides a sensitive (down to {approx} a few lesions/5Mb), rapid method of direct quantitation of a wide variety of DNA damages in nanogram quantities of non-radioactive DNAs from laboratory, field, or clinical specimens, including higher plants and animals. This method stems from velocity sedimentation studies of DNA populations, and from the simple methods of agarose gel electrophoresis. Our laboratories have developed quantitative agarose gel methods, analytical descriptions of DNA migration during electrophoresis on agarose gels (1-6), and electronic imaging for accurate determinations of DNA mass (7-9). Although all these components improve sensitivity and throughput of large numbers of samples (7,8,10), a simple version using only standard molecular biology equipment allows routine analysis of DNA damages at moderate frequencies. We present here a description of the methods, as well as a brief description of the underlying principles, required for a simplified approach to quantitation of DNA damages by alkaline gel electrophoresis.

  18. Autonomous in situ measurements of seawater alkalinity.

    PubMed

    Spaulding, Reggie S; DeGrandpre, Michael D; Beck, James C; Hart, Robert D; Peterson, Brittany; De Carlo, Eric H; Drupp, Patrick S; Hammar, Terry R

    2014-08-19

    Total alkalinity (AT) is an important parameter for describing the marine inorganic carbon system and understanding the effects of atmospheric CO2 on the oceans. Measurements of AT are limited, however, because of the laborious process of collecting and analyzing samples. In this work we evaluate the performance of an autonomous instrument for high temporal resolution measurements of seawater AT. The Submersible Autonomous Moored Instrument for alkalinity (SAMI-alk) uses a novel tracer monitored titration method where a colorimetric pH indicator quantifies both pH and relative volumes of sample and titrant, circumventing the need for gravimetric or volumetric measurements. The SAMI-alk performance was validated in the laboratory and in situ during two field studies. Overall in situ accuracy was -2.2 ± 13.1 μmol kg(-1) (n = 86), on the basis of comparison to discrete samples. Precision on duplicate analyses of a carbonate standard was ±4.7 μmol kg(-1) (n = 22). This prototype instrument can measure in situ AT hourly for one month, limited by consumption of reagent and standard solutions. PMID:25051401

  19. Molecular modeling of human alkaline sphingomyelinase.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Panneer Selvam; Olubiyi, Olujide; Thirunavukkarasu, Chinnasamy; Strodel, Birgit; Kumar, Muthuvel Suresh

    2011-01-01

    Alkaline sphingomyelinase, which is expressed in the human intestine and hydrolyses sphingomyelin, is a component of the plasma and the lysosomal membranes. Hydrolase of sphingomyelin generates ceramide, sphingosine, and sphingosine 1-phosphate that have regulatory effects on vital cellular functions such as proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. The enzyme belongs to the Nucleotide Pyrophosphatase/Phosphodiesterase family and it differs in structural similarity with acidic and neutral sphingomyelinase. In the present study we modeled alkaline sphingomyelinase using homology modeling based on the structure of Nucleotide Pyrophosphatase/Phosphodiesterase from Xanthomonas axonopodis with which it shares 34% identity. Homology modeling was performed using Modeller9v7. We found that Cys78 and Cys394 form a disulphide bond. Further analysis shows that Ser76 may be important for the function of this enzyme, which is supported by the findings of Wu et al. (2005), that S76F abolishes the activity completely. We found that the residues bound to Zn(2+) are conserved and geometrically similar with the template. Molecular Dynamics simulations were carried out for the modeled protein to observe the effect of Zinc metal ions. It was observed that the metal ion has little effect with regard to the stability but induces increased fluctuations in the protein. These analyses showed that Zinc ions play an important role in stabilizing the secondary structure and in maintaining the compactness of the active site. PMID:21544170

  20. Bone alkaline phosphatase in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Beyeler, C; Banks, R E; Thompson, D; Forbes, M A; Cooper, E H; Bird, H

    1995-07-01

    A double monoclonal immunoradiometric assay specific for bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP) was used to determine whether the raised total alkaline phosphatase (TAP) often found in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is derived from bone or liver. Fifty-eight patients with RA were compared to 14 with AS and 14 with non-inflammatory rheumatic diseases (NI). None had clinical liver disease and only one had a slightly elevated aspartate transaminase activity. Elevated BAP concentrations were found in seven patients (5 RA, 1 AS, 1 NI), only two of whom also had abnormal TAP. Abnormal TAP activities were found in only three patients (all RA). BAP did not correlate with disease activity in RA or AS. In contrast, TAP correlated with disease activity (assessed by plasma viscosity) in RA (P < 0.002) and gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) also correlated with plasma viscosity in RA (P < 0.01). Both TAP and BAP were significantly correlated with GGT in RA (P < 0.001 and P < 0.02, respectively). These findings are discussed, together with possible reasons for the conflicting nature of some of the observations. PMID:7486797

  1. Advanced inorganic separators for alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A flexible, porous battery separator comprising a coating applied to a porous, flexible substrate is described. The coating comprises: (1) a thermoplastic rubber-based resin which is insoluble and unreactive in the alkaline electrolyte; (2) a polar organic plasticizer which is reactive with the alkaline electrolyte to produce a reaction product which contains a hydroxyl group and/or a carboxylic acid group; and (3) a mixture of polar particulate filler materials which are unreactive with the electrolyte, the mixture comprising at least one first filler material having a surface area of greater than 25 meters sq/gram, at least one second filler material having a surface area of 10 to 25 sq meters/gram, wherein the volume of the mixture of filler materials is less than 45% of the total volume of the fillers and the binder, the filler surface area per gram of binder is about 20 to 60 sq meters/gram, and the amount of plasticizer is sufficient to coat each filler particle. A method of forming the battery separator is also described.

  2. Electrochemical generation of oxygen. 1: The effects of anions and cations on hydrogen chemisorption and anodic oxide film formation on platinum electrode. 2: The effects of anions and cations on oxygen generation on platinum electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, C. J.; Yeager, E.; Ogrady, W. E.

    1975-01-01

    The effects were studied of anions and cations on hydrogen chemisorption and anodic oxide film formation on Pt by linear sweep voltammetry, and on oxygen generation on Pt by potentiostatic overpotential measurement. The hydrogen chemisorption and anodic oxide film formation regions are greatly influenced by anion adsorption. In acids, the strongly bound hydrogen occurs at more cathodic potential when chloride and sulfate are present. Sulfate affects the initial phase of oxide film formation by produced fine structure while chloride retards the oxide-film formation. In alkaline solutions, both strongly and weakly bound hydrogen are influenced by iodide, cyanide, and barium and calcium cations. These ions also influence the oxide film formation. Factors considered to explain these effects are discussed. The Tafel slope for oxygen generation was found to be independent on the oxide thickness and the presence of cations or anions. The catalytic activity indicated by the exchange current density was observed decreasing with increasing oxide layer thickness, only a minor dependence on the addition of certain cations and anions was found.

  3. Cation Selectivity in Biological Cation Channels Using Experimental Structural Information and Statistical Mechanical Simulation.

    PubMed

    Finnerty, Justin John; Peyser, Alexander; Carloni, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Cation selective channels constitute the gate for ion currents through the cell membrane. Here we present an improved statistical mechanical model based on atomistic structural information, cation hydration state and without tuned parameters that reproduces the selectivity of biological Na+ and Ca2+ ion channels. The importance of the inclusion of step-wise cation hydration in these results confirms the essential role partial dehydration plays in the bacterial Na+ channels. The model, proven reliable against experimental data, could be straightforwardly used for designing Na+ and Ca2+ selective nanopores. PMID:26460827

  4. Method for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations, medium for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, S.R.; Anderson, K.B.; Song, K.; Yuchs, S.E.; Marshall, C.L.

    1996-12-31

    The problems associated with the disposal of toxic metals in an environmentally acceptable manner continues to plague industry. Such metals as nickel, vanadium, molybdenum, cobalt, iron, and antimony present physiological and ecological challenges that are best addressed through minimization of exposure and dispersion. A method for encapsulating hazardous cations is provided comprising supplying a pretreated substrate containing the cations; contacting the substrate with an organo-silane compound to form a coating on the substrate; and allowing the coating to cure. A medium for containing hazardous cations is also provided, comprising a substrate having ion-exchange capacity and a silane-containing coating on the substrate.

  5. Cation Selectivity in Biological Cation Channels Using Experimental Structural Information and Statistical Mechanical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Finnerty, Justin John

    2015-01-01

    Cation selective channels constitute the gate for ion currents through the cell membrane. Here we present an improved statistical mechanical model based on atomistic structural information, cation hydration state and without tuned parameters that reproduces the selectivity of biological Na+ and Ca2+ ion channels. The importance of the inclusion of step-wise cation hydration in these results confirms the essential role partial dehydration plays in the bacterial Na+ channels. The model, proven reliable against experimental data, could be straightforwardly used for designing Na+ and Ca2+ selective nanopores. PMID:26460827

  6. Restructuring of a Peat in Interaction with Multivalent Cations: Effect of Cation Type and Aging Time

    PubMed Central

    Kunhi Mouvenchery, Yamuna; Jaeger, Alexander; Aquino, Adelia J. A.; Tunega, Daniel; Diehl, Dörte; Bertmer, Marko; Schaumann, Gabriele Ellen

    2013-01-01

    It is assumed to be common knowledge that multivalent cations cross-link soil organic matter (SOM) molecules via cation bridges (CaB). The concept has not been explicitly demonstrated in solid SOM by targeted experiments, yet. Therefore, the requirements for and characteristics of CaB remain unidentified. In this study, a combined experimental and molecular modeling approach was adopted to investigate the interaction of cations on a peat OM from physicochemical perspective. Before treatment with salt solutions of Al3+, Ca2+ or Na+, respectively, the original exchangeable cations were removed using cation exchange resin. Cation treatment was conducted at two different values of pH prior to adjusting pH to 4.1. Cation sorption is slower (>>2 h) than deprotonation of functional groups (<2 h) and was described by a Langmuir model. The maximum uptake increased with pH of cation addition and decreased with increasing cation valency. Sorption coefficients were similar for all cations and at both pH. This contradicts the general expectations for electrostatic interactions, suggesting that not only the interaction chemistry but also spatial distribution of functional groups in OM determines binding of cations in this peat. The reaction of contact angle, matrix rigidity due to water molecule bridges (WaMB) and molecular mobility of water (NMR analysis) suggested that cross-linking via CaB has low relevance in this peat. This unexpected finding is probably due to the low cation exchange capacity, resulting in low abundance of charged functionalities. Molecular modeling demonstrates that large average distances between functionalities (∼3 nm in this peat) cannot be bridged by CaB-WaMB associations. However, aging strongly increased matrix rigidity, suggesting successive increase of WaMB size to connect functionalities and thus increasing degree of cross-linking by CaB-WaMB associations. Results thus demonstrated that the physicochemical structure of OM is decisive for Ca

  7. Summary technical report on the electrochemical treatment of alkaline nuclear wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1994-07-30

    This report summarizes the laboratory studies investigating the electrolytic treatment of alkaline solutions carried out under the direction of the Savannah River Technology Center from 1985-1992. Electrolytic treatment has been demonstrated at the laboratory scale to be feasible for the destruction of nitrate and nitrite and the removal of radioactive species such as {sup 99}Tc and {sup 106}Ru from Savannah River Site (SRS) decontaminated salt solution and other alkaline wastes. The reaction rate and current efficiency for the removal of these species are dependent on cell configuration, electrode material, nature of electrode surface, waste composition, current density, and temperature. Nitrogen, ammonia, and nitrous oxide have been identified as the nitrogen-containing reaction products from the electrochemical reduction of nitrate and nitrite under alkaline conditions. The reaction mechanism for the reduction is very complex. Voltammetric studies indicated that the electrode reactions involve surface phenomena and are not necessarily mass transfer controlled. In an undivided cell, results suggest an electrocatalytic role for oxygen via the generation of the superoxide anion. In general, more efficient reduction of nitrite and nitrate occurs at cathode materials with higher overpotentials for hydrogen evolution. Nitrate and nitrite destruction has also been demonstrated in engineering-scale flow reactors. In flow reactors, the nitrate/nitrite destruction efficiency is improved with an increase in the current density, temperature, and when the cell is operated in a divided cell configuration. Nafion{reg_sign} cation exchange membranes have exhibited good stability and consistent performance as separators in the divided-cell tests. The membranes were also shown to be unaffected by radiation at doses approximating four years of cell operation in treating decontaminated salt solution.

  8. Viscoelastic cationic polymers containing the urethane linkage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A. (Inventor)

    1972-01-01

    A method for the synthesis and manufacturing of elastomeric compositions and articles containing quaternary nitrogen centers and condensation residues along the polymeric backbone of the centers is presented. Linear and cross-linked straight chain and block polymers having a wide damping temperature range were synthesized. Formulae for the viscoelastic cationic polymers are presented.

  9. NMR studies of cation transport across membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Shochet, N.R.

    1985-01-01

    /sup 23/Na NMR Studies of cation transport across membranes were conducted both on model and biological membranes. Two ionophores, the carrier monensin and the channel-former gramicidin, were chosen to induce cation transport in large unilamellar phosphatidylcholine vesicles. The distinction between the NMR signals arising from the two sides of the membrane was achieved by the addition of an anionic paramagnetic shift reagent to the outer solution. The kinetics of the cation transport across the membrane was observed simultaneously monitoring the changes in the /sup 23/Na NMR signals of both compartments. Two mathematical models were developed for the estimation of the transport parameters of the monensin- and gramicidin-induced cation transport. The models were able to fit the experimental data very well. A new method for the estimation of the volume trapped inside the vesicles was developed. The method uses the relative areas of the intra- and extravesicular NMR signals arising from a suspension of vesicles bathed in the same medium they contain, as a measure for the relative volumes of these compartments. Sodium transport across biological membranes was studied by /sup 23/ NMR, using suspensions of cultured nerve cells. The sodium influx through voltage-gated channels was studied using the channel modifier batrachotoxin in combination with scorpion toxin.

  10. ADSORPTION OF ORGANIC CATIONS TO NATURAL MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The factors that control the extent of adsorption of amphiphilic organic cations on environmental and pristine surfaces have been studied. he sorbents were kaolinite, montmorillonite, two aquifer materials, and a soil; solutions contained various concentrations of NaCl and CaC12,...

  11. Dynamics of poly(4-hydroxystyrene) radical cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Kazumasa; Kozawa, Takahiro; Tagawa, Seiichi

    2008-03-01

    Poly(4-hydroxystyrene) (PHS) has been used in KrF excimer laser (248 nm) lithography as a backbone polymer, and is also a promising material for EUV or electron beam lithography. Analysis of the intermediate species is important for the control of reactions in resist materials. Since the size of integrated circuits fabricated for mass production will decrease below 30 nm and the size error must also be decreased to the molecular level, the elucidation of proton dynamics at the molecular level is also important for reducing the deviation of the resist pattern size. In this study, the dynamics of PHS radical cations were studied, because PHS radical cation is main source of proton. The transient absorption of PHS was observed in the near-infrared region (NIR) in p-dioxane solutions by pulse radiolysis. The intramolecular PHS dimer radical cation (M2 +.) were observed, whereas p-cresol shows no distinct CR band. Although the radical cations of phenol derivatives are known to be easily deprotonated, it was found that M2 +. formation prevents deprotonation by its charge resonance stabilization.

  12. ADSORPTION OF ORGANIC CATIONS TO NATURAL MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The factors that control the extent of adsorption of amphiphilic organic cations on environmental and pristine surfaces have been studied. The sorbents were kaolinite, montmorillonite, two aquifer materials, and a soil; solutions contained various concentrations of NaCl and CaCl,...

  13. The corrosion resistance of thermoset composites in alkaline environments

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, D.H.; Thompson, M.J.

    1998-12-31

    Corrosion engineers need guidelines for selecting thermoset resins for aggressive applications such as hot alkali and alkaline peroxide. The suitability of fiberglass-reinforced plastic (FRP) for alkaline service depends on factors such as the ester content of the resin, the unsaturated monomer composition, and the cure system. The purpose of the present paper is to show the effect of these factors on the alkaline corrosion resistance of FRP and provide corrosion engineers with the guidance needed for selecting the best epoxy vinyl ester resins for alkaline environments.

  14. Rechargeable Zn-MnO sub 2 alkaline batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wruck, W.J.; Reichman, B.; Bullock, K.R.; Kao, W.H. )

    1991-12-01

    In this paper progress in the development of rechargeable alkaline zinc-manganese dioxide cells is described. The advantages and limitations of the system are evaluated. Laboratory tests run on commercial primary alkaline cells as well as model simulations of a bipolar MnO{sub 2} electrode show that the rechargeable alkaline battery may be able to compete with lead-acid, nickel-cadmium, and secondary lithium cells for low- to moderate-rate applications. However, because of this poor performance at high rates and low temperatures, the alkaline MnO{sub 2} battery is not suitable for present automotive starting applications.

  15. Process and apparatus for the production of Bi-213 cations

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Hines, J.J.; Chiarizia, R.; Dietz, M.

    1998-12-29

    A process for producing substantially impurity-free Bi-213 cations is disclosed. An aqueous acid feed solution containing Ac-225 cations is contacted with an ion exchange medium to bind the Ac-225 cations and form an Ac-225-laden ion exchange medium. The bound Ac-225 incubates on the ion exchange medium to form Bi-213 cations by radioactive decay. The Bi-213 cations are then recovered from the Ac-225-laden ion exchange medium to form a substantially impurity-free aqueous Bi-213 cation acid solution. An apparatus for carrying out this process is also disclosed. 7 figs.

  16. Process and apparatus for the production of BI-213 cations

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Hines, John J.; Chiarizia, Renato; Dietz, Mark

    1998-01-01

    A process for producing substantially impurity-free Bi-213 cations is disclosed. An aqueous acid feed solution containing Ac-225 cations is contacted with an ion exchange medium to bind the Ac-225 cations and form an Ac-225-laden ion exchange medium. The bound Ac-225 incubates on the ion exchange medium to form Bi-213 cations by radioactive decay. The Bi-213 cations are then recovered from the Ac-225-laden ion exchange medium to form a substantially impurity-free aqueous Bi-213 cation acid solution. An apparatus for carrying out this process is also disclosed.

  17. Alkaline earth metal ions mediated self-assembly in the presence of 1,10-phenanthroline, nitrate and tetrafluoroborate anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrov, Georgi D.; Neykov, Mihail V.

    2007-10-01

    1,10-Phenanthroline (phen) was reacted with various combinations of two and in one of the cases with three alkaline earth metal cations taken in equimolar ratio. In all the competitive reactions it was obtained only one product free of any impurities, which is in accordance with the theory of self-assembly processes. The compound [Ca(phen) 2(H 2O) 2(NO 3)]NO 3 was synthesized in all the reactions where Ca 2+ was involved. In contrast, none of the reactions led to the preparation of a strontium complex. Two of the reactions, in which participated Be 2+, resulted in the compound (phen) 3(H +) 2(NO -3) 2. The second group of competitive reactions was carried out with 1,10-phenanthroline and a given alkaline earth metal cation in the presence of the anions NO 3- and BF 4-. These led to the compounds Mg(phen) 4(BF 4) 2(H 2O) 3, [Ca(phen) 2(H 2O) 2(NO 3)]BF 4, Sr(phen) 4(OH)(BF 4)(H 2O) and Ba(phen) 3.5(BF 4) 2(H 2O). All the newly synthesized substances were characterized by elemental analysis, IR- and FAB-mass-spectra.

  18. Synthesis of magnetite-porphyrin nanocomposite and its application as a novel magnetic adsorbent for removing heavy cations

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhshayesh, Sara Dehghani, Hossein

    2013-07-15

    Graphical abstract: Magnetite-porphyrin nanocomposite (MPNC) as a novel magnetic adsorbent for removing heavy cations was synthesized. - Highlights: • Nanosized Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} was prepared by hydrothermal reaction of iron salt in alkaline media. • The synthesized magnetite and nanocomposite had soft ferromagnetic property. • Magnetic nanocomposite as a novel magnetic adsorbent for heavy cations was prepared. • Satisfactory separation from solutions in the order of Pb{sup 2+} > Cd{sup 2+} > Hg{sup 2+} was obtained. - Abstract: Magnetite-porphyrin nanocomposite (MPNC) was synthesized as a novel magnetic adsorbent for removing heavy cations. Firstly, we prepared nano-sized magnetite using a simple hydrothermal route. The synthesis of nanoscaled magnetite was carried out through reaction between iron source and various amines. In this paper, we studied effective parameters in controlling shape and size of nanoscaled magnetite. These parameters were presence of alkaline, reaction time, kind of amine and iron salt. Morphology, particle size and magnetic properties of the nanoscaled magnetite were obtained by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Our study showed that the synthesized magnetite from reaction between FeSO{sub 4} and hydrazinum hydrate has spherical shape. The synthesized magnetite was a nanosized compound and used for preparation of magnetite-porphyrin nanocomposite. The synthesized magnetite-porphyrin hybrid material had magnetic property and was used as magnetic adsorbent for removing heavy cations of water. Satisfactory separation from solutions in the order of Pb{sup 2+} > Cd{sup 2+} > Hg{sup 2+} was obtained.

  19. Ground and Excited-Electronic-State Dissociations of Hydrogen-Rich and Hydrogen-Deficient Tyrosine Peptide Cation Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viglino, Emilie; Lai, Cheuk Kuen; Mu, Xiaoyan; Chu, Ivan K.; Tureček, František

    2016-09-01

    We report a comprehensive study of collision-induced dissociation (CID) and near-UV photodissociation (UVPD) of a series of tyrosine-containing peptide cation radicals of the hydrogen-rich and hydrogen-deficient types. Stable, long-lived, hydrogen-rich peptide cation radicals, such as [AAAYR + 2H]+● and several of its sequence and homology variants, were generated by electron transfer dissociation (ETD) of peptide-crown-ether complexes, and their CID-MS3 dissociations were found to be dramatically different from those upon ETD of the respective peptide dications. All of the hydrogen-rich peptide cation radicals contained major (77%-94%) fractions of species having radical chromophores created by ETD that underwent photodissociation at 355 nm. Analysis of the CID and UVPD spectra pointed to arginine guanidinium radicals as the major components of the hydrogen-rich peptide cation radical population. Hydrogen-deficient peptide cation radicals were generated by intramolecular electron transfer in CuII(2,2 ':6 ',2 ″-terpyridine) complexes and shown to contain chromophores absorbing at 355 nm and undergoing photodissociation. The CID and UVPD spectra showed major differences in fragmentation for [AAAYR]+● that diminished as the Tyr residue was moved along the peptide chain. UVPD was found to be superior to CID in localizing Cα-radical positions in peptide cation radical intermediates.

  20. Ground and Excited-Electronic-State Dissociations of Hydrogen-Rich and Hydrogen-Deficient Tyrosine Peptide Cation Radicals.

    PubMed

    Viglino, Emilie; Lai, Cheuk Kuen; Mu, Xiaoyan; Chu, Ivan K; Tureček, František

    2016-09-01

    We report a comprehensive study of collision-induced dissociation (CID) and near-UV photodissociation (UVPD) of a series of tyrosine-containing peptide cation radicals of the hydrogen-rich and hydrogen-deficient types. Stable, long-lived, hydrogen-rich peptide cation radicals, such as [AAAYR + 2H](+●) and several of its sequence and homology variants, were generated by electron transfer dissociation (ETD) of peptide-crown-ether complexes, and their CID-MS(3) dissociations were found to be dramatically different from those upon ETD of the respective peptide dications. All of the hydrogen-rich peptide cation radicals contained major (77%-94%) fractions of species having radical chromophores created by ETD that underwent photodissociation at 355 nm. Analysis of the CID and UVPD spectra pointed to arginine guanidinium radicals as the major components of the hydrogen-rich peptide cation radical population. Hydrogen-deficient peptide cation radicals were generated by intramolecular electron transfer in Cu(II)(2,2':6',2″-terpyridine) complexes and shown to contain chromophores absorbing at 355 nm and undergoing photodissociation. The CID and UVPD spectra showed major differences in fragmentation for [AAAYR](+●) that diminished as the Tyr residue was moved along the peptide chain. UVPD was found to be superior to CID in localizing Cα-radical positions in peptide cation radical intermediates. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27278824

  1. Ground and Excited-Electronic-State Dissociations of Hydrogen-Rich and Hydrogen-Deficient Tyrosine Peptide Cation Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viglino, Emilie; Lai, Cheuk Kuen; Mu, Xiaoyan; Chu, Ivan K.; Tureček, František

    2016-06-01

    We report a comprehensive study of collision-induced dissociation (CID) and near-UV photodissociation (UVPD) of a series of tyrosine-containing peptide cation radicals of the hydrogen-rich and hydrogen-deficient types. Stable, long-lived, hydrogen-rich peptide cation radicals, such as [AAAYR + 2H]+● and several of its sequence and homology variants, were generated by electron transfer dissociation (ETD) of peptide-crown-ether complexes, and their CID-MS3 dissociations were found to be dramatically different from those upon ETD of the respective peptide dications. All of the hydrogen-rich peptide cation radicals contained major (77%-94%) fractions of species having radical chromophores created by ETD that underwent photodissociation at 355 nm. Analysis of the CID and UVPD spectra pointed to arginine guanidinium radicals as the major components of the hydrogen-rich peptide cation radical population. Hydrogen-deficient peptide cation radicals were generated by intramolecular electron transfer in CuII(2,2':6',2″-terpyridine) complexes and shown to contain chromophores absorbing at 355 nm and undergoing photodissociation. The CID and UVPD spectra showed major differences in fragmentation for [AAAYR]+● that diminished as the Tyr residue was moved along the peptide chain. UVPD was found to be superior to CID in localizing Cα-radical positions in peptide cation radical intermediates.

  2. Effect of alkaline addition on anaerobic sludge digestion with combined pretreatment of alkaline and high pressure homogenization.

    PubMed

    Fang, Wei; Zhang, Panyue; Zhang, Guangming; Jin, Shuguang; Li, Dongyi; Zhang, Meixia; Xu, Xiangzhe

    2014-09-01

    To improve anaerobic digestion efficiency, combination pretreatment of alkaline and high pressure homogenization was applied to pretreat sewage sludge. Effect of alkaline dosage on anaerobic sludge digestion was investigated in detail. SCOD of sludge supernatant significantly increased with the alkaline dosage increase after the combined pretreatment because of sludge disintegration. Organics were significantly degraded after the anaerobic digestion, and the maximal SCOD, TCOD and VS removal was 73.5%, 61.3% and 43.5%, respectively. Cumulative biogas production, methane content in biogas and biogas production rate obviously increased with the alkaline dosage increase. Considering both the biogas production and alkaline dosage, the optimal alkaline dosage was selected as 0.04 mol/L. Relationships between biogas production and sludge disintegration showed that the accumulative biogas was mainly enhanced by the sludge disintegration. The methane yield linearly increased with the DDCOD increase as Methane yield (ml/gVS)=4.66 DDCOD-9.69. PMID:24703958

  3. Charge Compensation in RE3+ (RE = Eu, Gd) and M+ (M = Li, Na, K) Co-Doped Alkaline Earth Nanofluorides Obtained by Microwave Reaction with Reactive Ionic Liquids Leading to Improved Optical Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lorbeer, C; Behrends, F; Cybinska, J; Eckert, H; Mudring, Anja -V

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline earth fluorides are extraordinarily promising host matrices for phosphor materials with regard to rare earth doping. In particular, quantum cutting materials, which might considerably enhance the efficiency of mercury-free fluorescent lamps or SC solar cells, are often based on rare earth containing crystalline fluorides such as NaGdF4, GdF3 or LaF3. Substituting most of the precious rare earth ions and simultaneously retaining the efficiency of the phosphor is a major goal. Alkaline earth fluoride nanoparticles doped with trivalent lanthanide ions (which are required for the quantum cutting phenomenon) were prepared via a microwave assisted method in ionic liquids. As doping trivalent ions into a host with divalent cations requires charge compensation, this effect was thoroughly studied by powder X-ray and electron diffraction, luminescence spectroscopy and 23Na, 139La and 19F solid state NMR spectroscopy. Monovalent alkali ions were codoped with the trivalent lanthanide ions to relieve stress and achieve a better crystallinity and higher quantum cutting abilities of the prepared material. 19F-magic angle spinning (MAS)-NMR-spectra, assisted by 19F{23Na} rotational echo double resonance (REDOR) studies, reveal distinct local fluoride environments, the populations of which are discussed in relation to spatial distribution and clustering models. In the co-doped samples, fluoride species having both Na+ and La3+ ions within their coordination sphere can be identified and quantified. This interplay of mono- and trivalent ions in the CaF2 lattice appears to be an efficient charge compensation mechanism that allows for improved performance characteristics of such co-doped phosphor materials.

  4. Dendritic Cells Stimulated by Cationic Liposomes.

    PubMed

    Vitor, Micaela Tamara; Bergami-Santos, Patrícia Cruz; Cruz, Karen Steponavicius Piedade; Pinho, Mariana Pereira; Barbuto, José Alexandre Marzagão; De La Torre, Lucimara Gaziola

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy of cancer aims to harness the immune system to detect and destroy cancer cells. To induce an immune response against cancer, activated dendritic cells (DCs) must present tumor antigens to T lymphocytes of patients. However, cancer patients' DCs are frequently defective, therefore, they are prone to induce rather tolerance than immune responses. In this context, loading tumor antigens into DCs and, at the same time, activating these cells, is a tempting goal within the field. Thus, we investigated the effects of cationic liposomes on the DCs differentiation/maturation, evaluating their surface phenotype and ability to stimulate T lymphocytes proliferation in vitro. The cationic liposomes composed by egg phosphatidylcholine, 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium propane and 1,2-dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (50/25/25% molar) were prepared by the thin film method followed by extrusion (65 nm, polydispersity of 0.13) and by the dehydration-rehydration method (95% of the population 107 nm, polydispersity of 0.52). The phenotypic analysis of dendritic cells and the analysis of T lymphocyte proliferation were performed by flow cytometry and showed that both cationic liposomes were incorporated and activated dendritic cells. Extruded liposomes were better incorporated and induced higher CD86 expression for dendritic cells than dehydrated-rehydrated vesicles. Furthermore, dendritic cells which internalized extruded liposomes also provided stronger T lymphocyte stimulation. Thus, cationic liposomes with a smaller size and polydispersity seem to be better incorporated by dendritic cells. Hence, these cationic liposomes could be used as a potential tool in further cancer immunotherapy strategies and contribute to new strategies in immunotherapy. PMID:27398454

  5. Silica-based cationic bilayers as immunoadjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Lincopan, Nilton; Santana, Mariana RA; Faquim-Mauro, Eliana; da Costa, Maria Helena B; Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana M

    2009-01-01

    Background Silica particles cationized by dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB) bilayer were previously described. This work shows the efficiency of these particulates for antigen adsorption and presentation to the immune system and proves the concept that silica-based cationic bilayers exhibit better performance than alum regarding colloid stability and cellular immune responses for vaccine design. Results Firstly, the silica/DODAB assembly was characterized at 1 mM NaCl, pH 6.3 or 5 mM Tris.HCl, pH 7.4 and 0.1 mg/ml silica over a range of DODAB concentrations (0.001–1 mM) by means of dynamic light scattering for particle sizing and zeta-potential analysis. 0.05 mM DODAB is enough to produce cationic bilayer-covered particles with good colloid stability. Secondly, conditions for maximal adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) or a recombinant, heat-shock protein from Mycobacterium leprae (18 kDa-hsp) onto DODAB-covered or onto bare silica were determined. At maximal antigen adsorption, cellular immune responses in vivo from delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions determined by foot-pad swelling tests (DTH) and cytokines analysis evidenced the superior performance of the silica/DODAB adjuvant as compared to alum or antigens alone whereas humoral response from IgG in serum was equal to the one elicited by alum as adjuvant. Conclusion Cationized silica is a biocompatible, inexpensive, easily prepared and possibly general immunoadjuvant for antigen presentation which displays higher colloid stability than alum, better performance regarding cellular immune responses and employs very low, micromolar doses of cationic and toxic synthetic lipid. PMID:19152701

  6. A second component of the SltA-dependent cation tolerance pathway in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Mellado, Laura; Calcagno-Pizarelli, Ana Maria; Lockington, Robin A; Cortese, Marc S; Kelly, Joan M; Arst, Herbert N; Espeso, Eduardo A

    2015-09-01

    The transcriptional response to alkali metal cation stress is mediated by the zinc finger transcription factor SltA in Aspergillus nidulans and probably in other fungi of the pezizomycotina subphylum. A second component of this pathway has been identified and characterized. SltB is a 1272 amino acid protein with at least two putative functional domains, a pseudo-kinase and a serine-endoprotease, involved in signaling to the transcription factor SltA. Absence of SltB activity results in nearly identical phenotypes to those observed for a null sltA mutant. Hypersensitivity to a variety of monovalent and divalent cations, and to medium alkalinization are among the phenotypes exhibited by a null sltB mutant. Calcium homeostasis is an exception and this cation improves growth of sltΔ mutants. Moreover, loss of kinase HalA in conjunction with loss-of-function sltA or sltB mutations leads to pronounced calcium auxotrophy. sltA sltB double null mutants display a cation stress sensitive phenotype indistinguishable from that of single slt mutants showing the close functional relationship between these two proteins. This functional relationship is reinforced by the fact that numerous mutations in both slt loci can be isolated as suppressors of poor colonial growth resulting from certain null vps (vacuolar protein sorting) mutations. In addition to allowing identification of sltB, our sltB missense mutations enabled prediction of functional regions in the SltB protein. Although the relationship between the Slt and Vps pathways remains enigmatic, absence of SltB, like that of SltA, leads to vacuolar hypertrophy. Importantly, the phenotypes of selected sltA and sltB mutations demonstrate that suppression of null vps mutations is not dependent on the inability to tolerate cation stress. Thus a specific role for both SltA and SltB in the VPS pathway seems likely. Finally, it is noteworthy that SltA and SltB have a similar, limited phylogenetic distribution, being restricted to

  7. Unexpected Actinyl Cation-Directed Structural Variation in Neptunyl(VI) A-Type Tri-lacunary Heteropolyoxotungstate Complexes.

    PubMed

    Berg, John M; Gaunt, Andrew J; May, Iain; Pugmire, Alison L; Reilly, Sean D; Scott, Brian L; Wilkerson, Marianne P

    2015-05-01

    A-type tri-lacunary heteropolyoxotungstate anions (e.g., [PW9O34](9-), [AsW9O34](9-), [SiW9O34](10-), and [GeW9O34](10-)) are multidentate oxygen donor ligands that readily form sandwich complexes with actinyl cations ({UO2}(2+), {NpO2}(+), {NpO2}(2+), and {PuO2}(2+)) in near-neutral/slightly alkaline aqueous solutions. Two or three actinyl cations are sandwiched between two tri-lacunary anions, with additional cations (Na(+), K(+), or NH4(+)) also often held within the cluster. Studies thus far have indicated that it is these additional +1 cations, rather than the specific actinyl cation, that direct the structural variation in the complexes formed. We now report the structural characterization of the neptunyl(VI) cluster complex (NH4)13[Na(NpO2)2(A-α-PW9O34)2]·12H2O. The anion in this complex, [Na(NpO2)2(PW9O34)2](13-), contains one Na(+) cation and two {NpO2}(2+) cations held between two [PW9O34](9-) anions, with an additional partial occupancy NH4(+) or {NpO2}(2+) cation also present. In the analogous uranium(VI) system, under similar reaction conditions that include an excess of NH4Cl in the parent solution, it was previously shown that [(NH4)2(U(VI)O2)2(A-PW9O34)2](12-) is the dominant species in both solution and the crystallized salt. Spectroscopic studies provide further proof of differences in the observed chemistry for the {NpO2}(2+)/[PW9O34](9-) and {UO2}(2+)/[PW9O34](9-) systems, both in solution and in solid state complexes crystallized from comparable salt solutions. This work reveals that varying the actinide element (Np vs U) can indeed measurably impact structure and complex stability in the cluster chemistry of actinyl(VI) cations with A-type tri-lacunary heteropolyoxotungstate anions. PMID:25901900

  8. Unexpected Actinyl Cation-Directed Structural Variation in Neptunyl(VI) A-Type Tri-lacunary Heteropolyoxotungstate Complexes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Berg, John M.; Gaunt, Andrew J.; May, Iain; Pugmire, Alison L.; Reilly, Sean D.; Scott, Brian L.; Wilkerson, Marianne P.

    2015-04-22

    A-type tri-lacunary heteropolyoxotungstate anions (e.g., [PW9O34]9-, [AsW9O34]9-, [SiW9O34]10- and [GeW9O34]10-) are multi-dentate oxygen donor ligands that readily form sandwich complexes with actinyl cations ({UO2}2+, {NpO2}+, {NpO2}2+ & {PuO2}2+) in near neutral/slightly alkaline aqueous solutions. Two or three actinyl cations are sandwiched between two trilacunary anions, with additional cations (Na+, K+ or NH4 +) also often held within the cluster. Studies thus far have indicated that it is these additional +I cations, rather than the specific actinyl cation, that direct the structural variation in the complexes formed. We now report the structural characterization of the neptunyl (VI) cluster complex (NH4)13 [Na(NpO2)2(A-α-more » PW9O34)2]·12H2O. The anion in this complex, [Na(NpO2)2(PW9O34)2]13-, contains one Na+ cation and two {NpO2}2+ cations held between two [PW9O34]9- anions – with an additional partial occupancy NH4 + or {NpO2}2+ cation also present. In the analogous uranium (VI) system, under similar reaction conditions that includes an excess of NH4Cl in the parent solution, it was previously shown that [(NH4)2(UVIO2)2(A-PW9O34)2]12- is the dominant species in both solution and the crystallized salt. Spectroscopic studies provide further proof of differences in the observed chemistry for the {NpO2}2+/[PW9O34]9- and {UO2}2+/[PW9O34]9- systems, both in solution and in solid state complexes crystallized from comparable salt solutions. The work revealed that varying the actinide element (Np vs. U) can indeed measurably impact structure and complex stability in the cluster chemistry of actinyl (VI) cations with A-type tri-lacunary heteropolyoxotungstate anions.« less

  9. Dolomite Dissolution in Alkaline Cementious Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittermayr, Florian; Klammer, Dietmar; Köhler, Stephan; Dietzel, Martin

    2010-05-01

    Chemical alteration of concrete has gained much attention over the past years as many cases of deterioration due to sulphate attack, thaumasite formation (TSA) or alkali silica reactions (ASR) have been reported in various constructions (Schmidt et al, 2009). Much less is known about the so called alkali carbonate reaction (ACR). It is believed that dolomite aggregates can react with the alkalis from the cement, dissolve and form calcite and brucite (Katayama, 2004). Due to very low solubility of dolomite in alkaline solutions this reaction seems doubtful. In this study we are trying to gain new insides about the conditions that can lead to the dissolution of dolomite in concrete. Therefore we investigated concrete samples from Austrian tunnels that show partially dissolved dolomite aggregates. Petrological analysis such as microprobe, SEM and Raman spectroscopy as well as a hydrochemical analysis of interstitial solutions and ground water and modelling with PhreeqC (Parkhurst and Appelo, 1999) are carried out. In addition a series of batch experiments is set up. Modelling approaches by PhreeqC show a thermodynamically possibility in the alkaline range when additional Ca2+ in solution causes dolomite to become more and more undersaturated as calcite gets supersaturated. Interacting ground water is enriched in Ca2+and saturated with respect to gypsum as marine evaporites are found in situ rocks. Furthermore it is more likely that Portlandite (Ca(OH)2) plays a more important role than Na and K in the cement. Portlandite acts as an additional Ca2+ source and is much more abundant than the alkalies. Some interstitial solutions are dominated mainly by Na+ and SO42- and reach concentrations up to 30 g/l TDS. It is believed that solutions can even reach thenardite saturation as efflorescences are found on the tunnel walls. In consequence dolomite solubility increases with increasing ionic strength. pH > 11 further accelerate the process of dedolomitization by the removal

  10. Interrelationship between anionic and cationic forms of glutathione S-transferases of human liver.

    PubMed Central

    Awasthi, Y C; Dao, D D; Saneto, R P

    1980-01-01

    Human liver glutathione S-transferases (GSH S-transferases) were fractionated into cationic and anionic proteins. During fractionation with (NH4)2SO4 the anionic GSH S-transferases are concentrated in the 65%-saturated-(NH4)2SO4 fraction, whereas the cationic GSH S-transferases separate in the 80%-saturated-(NH4)2SO4 fraction. From the 65%-saturated-(NH4)2SO4 fraction two new anionic GSH S-transferases, omega and psi, were purified to homogeneity by using ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, Sephadex G-200 gel filtration, affinity chromatography on GSH bound to epoxy-activated Sepharose and isoelectric focusing. By a similar procedure, cationic GSH S-transferases were purified from the 80%-saturated-(NH4)2SO4 fraction. Isoelectric points of GSH S-transferases omega and psi are 4.6 and 5.4 respectively. GSH S-transferase omega is the major anionic GSH S-transferase of human liver, whereas GSH S-transferase psi is present only in traces. The subunit mol.wt. of GSH S-transferase omega is about 22500, whereas that of cationic GSH S-transferases is about 24500. Kinetic and structural properties as well as the amino acid composition of GSH S-transferase omega are described. The antibodies raised against cationic GSH S-transferases cross-react with GSH S-transferase omega. There are significant differences between the catalytic properties of GSH S-transferase omega and the cationic GSH S-transferases. GSH peroxidase II activity is displayed by all five cationic GSH S-transferases, whereas both anionic GSH S-transferases do not display this activity. Images Fig. 3. PMID:7470087

  11. Mixed-valent neptunium(IV/V) compound with cation-cation-bound six-membered neptunyl rings.

    PubMed

    Jin, Geng Bang

    2013-11-01

    A new mixed-valent neptunium(IV/V) compound has been synthesized by evaporation of a neptunium(V) acidic solution. The structure of the compound features cation-cation-bound six-membered neptunyl(V) rings. These rings are further connected by Np(IV) ions through cation-cation interactions (CCIs) into a three-dimensional neptunium cationic open framework. This example illustrates the possibility of isolating neptunyl(V) CCI oligomers in inorganic systems using other cations to compete with Np(V) in bonding with the neptunyl oxygen. PMID:24187926

  12. Cation-cation interactions, magnetic communication and reactivity of the pentavalent uraniumion [U(NR)2]+

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Liam P; Schelter, Eric J; Boncella, James M; Yang, Ping; Gsula, Robyn L; Scott, Brian L; Thompson, Joe D; Kiplinger, Jacqueline L; Batista, Enrique R

    2009-01-01

    The dimeric bis(imido) uranium complex [{l_brace}U(NtBu)2(I)(tBu2bpy){r_brace}2] (see picture; U green, N blue, I red) has cation-cation interactions between [U(NR)2]+ ions. This f1-f1 system also displays f orbital communication between uranium(V) centers at low temperatures, and can be oxidized to generate uranium(VI) bis(imido) complexes.

  13. Cationic Pillararenes Potently Inhibit Biofilm Formation without Affecting Bacterial Growth and Viability.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Roymon; Naugolny, Alissa; Feldman, Mark; Herzog, Ido M; Fridman, Micha; Cohen, Yoram

    2016-01-27

    It is estimated that up to 80% of bacterial infections are accompanied by biofilm formation. Since bacteria in biofilms are less susceptible to antibiotics than are bacteria in the planktonic state, biofilm-associated infections pose a major health threat, and there is a pressing need for antibiofilm agents. Here we report that water-soluble cationic pillararenes differing in the quaternary ammonium groups efficiently inhibited the formation of biofilms by clinically important Gram-positive pathogens. Biofilm inhibition did not result from antimicrobial activity; thus, the compounds should not inhibit growth of natural bacterial flora. Moreover, none of the cationic pillararenes caused detectable membrane damage to red blood cells or toxicity to human cells in culture. The results indicate that cationic pillararenes have potential for use in medical applications in which biofilm formation is a problem. PMID:26745311

  14. Release of colloidal particles in natural porous media by monovalent and divalent cations.

    PubMed

    Grolimund, Daniel; Borkovec, Michal

    2006-10-10

    We study mobilization of colloidal particles from natural porous media, such as soils and groundwater aquifers. Extensive laboratory scale column experiments of particle release from four different subsurface materials are presented. The important characteristics of the release process are (i) its non-exponential kinetics, (ii) the finite supply of colloidal particles and (iii) the strong dependence of the release kinetic on the nature of the adsorbed cations. Particle release depends most sensitively on the relative saturation of the medium with divalent cations. We propose a mathematic model, which captures all these aspects quantitatively, and can be used to describe the coupling between transport of major cations and the release of colloidal particles. The present experimental investigations as well as the developed modeling framework represent an important step towards the understanding of colloid-facilitated transport phenomena in natural porous media. PMID:16844263

  15. THE CATION CONTENT OF PHOSPHOLIPIDES FROM SWINE ERYTHROCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Kirschner, Leonard B.

    1958-01-01

    Phospholipides from swine erythrocytes were isolated and separated into four reproducible fractions. One of the fractions seems to be pure phosphatidylserine. The others are almost certainly not single compounds, although the analytical data indicate that they represent mixtures considerably simpler than the parent mixture extracted from the cells. All four fractions contained Na+ and K+, but very little Ca2+. Sodium was the predominant cation in two of the fractions under all conditions although the major intracellular cation was potassium. In the other two fractions the ratio Na/K varied with the extraction procedure largely because the quantity of K+ seemed to depend on the solvent system used. There appear to be reasons to believe that the entire system of phospholipides binds Na+ preferentially. In addition, it was observed that the quantity of Na+ found in the lipide extracts varied when the extrusion of Na+ from the cells was made to vary. Both of these observations are consistent with the possibility that the phospholipides play some part in the extrusion of Na+ from these cells. PMID:13587908

  16. PEGylated Cationic Serum Albumin for Boosting Retroviral Gene Transfer.

    PubMed

    Palesch, David; Boldt, Felix; Müller, Janis A; Eisele, Klaus; Stürzel, Christina M; Wu, Yuzhou; Münch, Jan; Weil, Tanja

    2016-08-17

    Retroviral vectors are common tools for introducing genes into the genome of a cell. However, low transduction rates are a major limitation in retroviral gene transfer, especially in clinical applications. We generated cationic human serum albumin (cHSA) protected by a shell of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG); this significantly enhanced retroviral gene transduction with potentially attractive pharmacokinetics and low immunogenicity. By screening a panel of chemically optimized HSA compounds, we identified a very potent enhancer that boosted the transduction rates of viral vectors. Confocal microscopy revealed a drastically increased number of viral particles attached to the surfaces of target cells. In accordance with the positive net charge of cationic and PEGylated HSA, this suggests a mechanism of action in which the repulsion of the negatively charged cellular and viral vector membranes is neutralized, thereby promoting attachment and ultimately transduction. Importantly, the transduction-enhancing PEGylated HSA derivative evaded recognition by HSA-specific antibodies and macrophage activation. Our findings hold great promise for facilitating improved retroviral gene transfer. PMID:27239020

  17. Excited state dynamics of the astaxanthin radical cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amarie, Sergiu; Förster, Ute; Gildenhoff, Nina; Dreuw, Andreas; Wachtveitl, Josef

    2010-07-01

    Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy in the visible and NIR and ultrafast fluorescence spectroscopy were used to examine the excited state dynamics of astaxanthin and its radical cation. For neutral astaxanthin, two kinetic components corresponding to time constants of 130 fs (decay of the S 2 excited state) and 5.2 ps (nonradiative decay of the S 1 excited state) were sufficient to describe the data. The dynamics of the radical cation proved to be more complex. The main absorption band was shifted to 880 nm (D 0 → D 3 transition), showing a weak additional band at 1320 nm (D 0 → D 1 transition). We found, that D 3 decays to the lower-lying D 2 within 100 fs, followed by a decay to D 1 with a time constant of 0.9 ps. The D 1 state itself exhibited a dual behavior, the majority of the population is transferred to the ground state in 4.9 ps, while a small population decays on a longer timescale of 40 ps. Both transitions from D 1 were found to be fluorescent.

  18. Seychelles alkaline suite records the culmination of Deccan Traps continental flood volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen-Smith, T. M.; Ashwal, L. D.; Torsvik, T. H.; Ganerød, M.; Nebel, O.; Webb, S. J.; Werner, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Silhouette and North Islands in the Seychelles represent an alkaline plutonic-volcanic complex, dated at 63 to 63.5 Ma by U-Pb zircon and 40Ar/39Ar methods. This magmatism coincides with the final stages of the cataclysmic Deccan Traps continental flood volcanism in India (67 to 63 Ma), and thus a causal link has been suggested. Recent reconstructions have placed the Seychelles islands adjacent to the Laxmi Ridge and at the western margin of the Réunion mantle plume at the time of formation of the complex. Here we present geochemical evidence in support of the notion that the Seychelles alkaline magmatism was initiated by the peripheral activity of the Réunion mantle plume and is thus part of the Deccan magmatic event. Positive εNd (0.59 to 3.76) and εHf (0.82 to 6.79) and initial Sr of 0.703507 to 0.705643 at 65 Ma indicate derivation of the Seychelles alkaline magmas from a Réunion-like mantle source with an additional minor enriched component, suggesting entrainment of sub-continental lithospheric mantle. The similarity in trace element composition between the Seychelles suite and Deccan alkaline felsic and mafic rocks provides additional evidence for a common mantle source for the Seychelles and Deccan magmatism. Furthermore, we demonstrate the role of fractional crystallisation in the evolution of the alkaline suite. Modelling using major elements suggests that fractional crystallisation and varying degrees of accumulation of olivine, plagioclase, ilmenite, clinopyroxene, alkali feldspar and apatite can describe the spectrum of rock types, from gabbro, through syenite, to granite.

  19. External total alkalinity loads versus internal generation: The influence of nonriverine alkalinity sources in the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, Erik; Wällstedt, Teresia; Humborg, Christoph; Mörth, Carl-Magnus; Gustafsson, Bo G.

    2014-11-01

    In this study we first present updated riverine total alkalinity (TA) loads to the various Baltic Sea sub-basins, based on monthly measurements in 82 of the major rivers that represent 85% of the total runoff. Simulations in the coupled physical-biogeochemical BALTSEM (BAltic sea Long-Term large Scale Eutrophication Model) model show that these river loads together with North Sea water inflows are not sufficient to reproduce observed TA concentrations in the system, demonstrating the large influence from internal sources. Budget calculations indicate that the required internal TA generation must be similar to river loads in magnitude. The nonriverine source in the system amounts to about 2.4 mmol m-2 d-1 on average. We argue here that the majority of this source is related to denitrification together with unresolved sediment processes such as burial of reduced sulfur and/or silicate weathering. This hypothesis is supported by studies on sediment processes on a global scale and also by data from sediment cores in the Baltic Sea. In a model simulation with all internal TA sources and sinks switched on, the net absorption of atmospheric CO2 increased by 0.78 mol C m-2 yr-1 compared to a simulation where TA was treated as a passive tracer. Our results clearly illustrate how pelagic TA sources together with anaerobic mineralization in coastal sediments generate a significant carbon sink along the aquatic continuum, mitigating CO2 evasions from coastal and estuarine systems.

  20. Uranium(VI) Diffusion in Sodium-Montmorillonite at Alkaline pH Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinnacher, R. M.; Davis, J. A.; Tournassat, C.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Diffusive transport of uranium(VI) in montmorillonite clay and bentonite has important implications for uranium(VI) mobility in engineered barrier systems or host rocks in high level radioactive waste repositories, and clay-rich soils and sediments in the environment. The prediction of uranium(VI) adsorption and diffusion in clay-rich media, however, is complicated by (1) the complexity of the mineralogical structure of montmorillonite, in terms of its pore-size distributions and available surface site types, and (2) the complex uranium(VI) solution speciation, which can include cationic, uncharged, and anionic complexes, depending on solution conditions. For instance, a partial or full exclusion of anions from negatively charged clay interlayer spaces could change the effective 'anion-accessible' porosity and decrease the diffusive flux of these solutes under steady state conditions. In contrast, weak cation exchange reactions can result in 'surface diffusion' of adsorbed cations, such as UO2OH+, in addition to diffusion in the liquid phase, resulting in greater diffusive fluxes at steady state. In order to investigate these complex interactions, we performed two, lab-scale uranium(VI) through-diffusion experiments in lightly compacted Na-montmorillonite at slightly different, alkaline pH conditions (average pH values of 8.69 and 8.87). Observed uranium(VI) diffusive fluxes were decreased by approximately an order of magnitude in comparison to a tritium tracer. This indicates a relevance of 'anion exclusion' effects, the full or partial exclusion of anionic U(VI)-carbonato species from clay interlayer spaces. In addition, uranium(VI) sorption reactions were shown to be relevant in the diffusion experiments, even at alkaline pH values of around 8.7 and 8.9, where uranium(VI) sorption is low compared to other pH conditions. Despite the similarity of pH conditions, different degrees of uranium(VI) retardation were determined for the two systems. Additionally, we

  1. Alkaline pulping of some eucalypts from Sudan.

    PubMed

    Khristova, P; Kordsachia, O; Patt, R; Dafaalla, S

    2006-03-01

    Four eucalypts (Eucalyptus camaldulensis, Eucalyptus microtheca, Eucalyptus tereticornis and Eucalyptus citriodora) grown in Sudan were examined for their suitability for pulping and papermaking with different alkaline methods. Their physical, morphological and chemical characteristics are reported. The pulping trials with E. citriodora and E. tereticornis were carried out using the kraft-AQ, soda-AQ, modified AS/AQ (ASA), ASAM and kraft methods. For the other two species, only the ASAM and the kraft process were applied. ASAM pulping gave the best results in terms of yield, degree of delignification, mechanical and optical pulp properties. The best pulps, obtained in kraft and ASAM cooking of E. citriodora, were bleached to 88% ISO brightness in a totally chlorine free bleaching sequence (OQ1O/PQ2P). The bleached pulps, especially the ASAM pulp, showed good papermaking properties and would be suitable for manufacture of writing and printing grades of paper. PMID:15935655

  2. Alkaline oxide conversion coatings for aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Buchheit, R.G.

    1996-02-01

    Three related conversion coating methods are described that are based on film formation which occurs when aluminum alloys are exposed to alkaline Li salt solutions. Representative examples of the processing methods, resulting coating structure, composition and morphology are presented. The corrosion resistance of these coatings to aerated 0.5 M NaCl solution has been evaluated as a function of total processing time using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). This evaluation shows that excellent corrosion resistance can be uniformly achieved using no more than 20 minutes of process time for 6061-T6. Using current methods a minimum of 80 minutes of process time is required to get marginally acceptable corrosion resistance for 2024-T3. Longer processing times are required to achieve uniformly good corrosion resistance.

  3. The Alkaline Dissolution Rate of Calcite.

    PubMed

    Colombani, Jean

    2016-07-01

    Due to the widespread presence of calcium carbonate on Earth, several geochemical systems, among which is the global CO2 cycle, are controlled to a large extent by the dissolution and precipitation of this mineral. For this reason, the dissolution of calcite has been thoroughly investigated for decades. Despite this intense activity, a consensual value of the dissolution rate of calcite has not been found yet. We show here that the inconsistency between the reported values stems mainly from the variability of the chemical and hydrodynamic conditions of measurement. The spreading of the values, when compared in identical conditions, is much less than expected and is interpreted in terms of sample surface topography. This analysis leads us to propose benchmark values of the alkaline dissolution rate of calcite compatible with all the published values, and a method to use them in various chemical and hydrodynamic contexts. PMID:27282839

  4. Properties of cathode materials in alkaline cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salkind, A. J.; McBreen, J.; Freeman, R.; Parkhurst, W. A.

    1984-04-01

    Conventional and new cathode materials in primary and secondary alkaline cells were investigated for stability, structure, electrochemical reversibility and efficiency. Included were various forms of AgO for reserve type silver zinc batteries, a new material - AgNiO2 and several nickel electrodes for nickel cadmium and nickel hydrogen cells for aerospace applications. A comparative study was made of the stability of electroformed and chemically prepared AgO. Stability was correlated with impurities. After the first discharge AgNiO2 can be recharged to the monovalent level. The discharge product is predominantly silver. Plastic bonded nickel electrodes display a second plateau on discharge. Additions of Co(OH)2 largely eliminate this.

  5. Polyvinyl alcohol membranes as alkaline battery separators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Gonzalez-Sanabria, O.; Manzo, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    Polyvinly alcohol (PVA) cross-linked with aldehyde reagents yields membranes that demonstrate properties that make them suitable for use as alkaline battery separators. Film properties can be controlled by the choice of cross-linker, cross-link density and the method of cross-linking. Three methods of cross-linking and their effects on film properties are discussed. Film properties can also be modified by using a copolymer of vinyl alcohol and acrylic acid as the base for the separator and cross-linking it similarly to the PVA. Fillers can be incorporated into the films to further modify film properties. Results of separator screening tests and cell tests for several variations of PBA films are discussed.

  6. Development of an alkaline fuel cell subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    A two task program was initiated to develop advanced fuel cell components which could be assembled into an alkaline power section for the Space Station Prototype (SSP) fuel cell subsystem. The first task was to establish a preliminary SSP power section design to be representative of the 200 cell Space Station power section. The second task was to conduct tooling and fabrication trials and fabrication of selected cell stack components. A lightweight, reliable cell stack design suitable for the SSP regenerative fuel cell power plant was completed. The design meets NASA's preliminary requirements for future multikilowatt Space Station missions. Cell stack component fabrication and tooling trials demonstrated cell components of the SSP stack design of the 1.0 sq ft area can be manufactured using techniques and methods previously evaluated and developed.

  7. Microbially-Mediated Subsurface Calcite Precipitation for Removal of Hazardous Divalent Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Colwell, Frederick S.; Smith, R.W.; Ferris, F. Gratn; Ingram, Jani C.; Reysenbach, A.-L.; Fujita, Yoshiko; Tyler, T.L.; Taylor, J.L.; Banta, A.; Delwiche, M.E.; McLing, T.; Cortez, Marnie, M.; Watwood, M.E.

    2003-03-27

    We are investigating microbially-mediated acceleration of calcite precipitation and co-precipitation of hazardous divalent cations (e.g., 90Sr) in calcite saturated subsurface systems. In theory, the addition of urea to an aquifer or vadose zone and its subsequent hydrolysis by indigenous microbes will cause an increase in alkalinity, pH and calcite precipitation. Lab studies indicated the ability of various bacteria to precipitate calcite through urea hydrolysis and that incorporation of strontium in biogenically-formed calcite is greater than in abiotically formed calcite. Results from a field experiment in a pristine location in the Snake River Plain aquifer involving the phased addition of molasses and then urea showed increases in total cell numbers, rate of urea hydrolysis and calcite formation during the study. The combined diagnostic approaches of microbiology, molecular ecology and analytical chemistry demonstrate the feasibility of this biogeochemical manipulation for subsurface remediation at arid Western DOE sites such as Hanford and INEEL.

  8. Novolacs With Alternating P-Cresol & Polyhydroxyphenyl Monomer Units: Developer Cationic Effects And Thermal Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakeney, Andrew J.; Jeffries, Alfred T.; Wehrle, John J.; Gardner, Wesley M.

    1988-01-01

    Novolacs which alternate p-cresol monomer units with polyhydroxyphenyl monomer units have been synthesized by acid catalyzed condensation of 2,6-bis(hydroxymethyl)-p-cresol with polyhydroxybenzenes such as resorcinol or 4-chlororesorcinol. These novolacs are highly alkaline soluble and exhibit improved glass transition temperatures relative to conventional novolacs. Unexpected developer cation effects have been observed on the dissolution times of some of these novolacs. The effect of molecular weight on these effects will be discussed for one system. The dissolution discrimination and inhibition of a 4- chlororesorcinol containing novolac was examined relative to a standard m-,p-cresol novolac and polyvinyl phenol. Images produced from a resist using a p-cresol/ 4-chlororesorcinol novolac showed no significant image degradation at 200 degrees C.

  9. Synthetic Ultrashort Cationic Lipopeptides Induce Systemic Plant Defense Responses against Bacterial and Fungal Pathogens ▿

    PubMed Central

    Brotman, Yariv; Makovitzki, Arik; Shai, Yechiel; Chet, Ilan; Viterbo, Ada

    2009-01-01

    A new family of synthetic, membrane-active, ultrashort lipopeptides composed of only four amino acids linked to fatty acids was tested for the ability to induce systemic resistance and defense responses in plants. We found that two peptides wherein the third residue is a d-enantiomer (italic), C16-KKKK and C16-KLLK, can induce medium alkalinization of tobacco suspension-cultured cells and expression of defense-related genes in cucumber and Arabidopsis seedlings. Moreover, these compounds can prime systemic induction of antimicrobial compounds in cucumber leaves similarly to the plant-beneficial fungus Trichoderma asperellum T203 and provide systemic protection against the phytopathogens Botrytis cinerea B05, Pseudomonas syringae pv. lachrimans, and P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000. Thus, short cationic lipopeptides are a new category of compounds with potentially high utility in the induction of systemic resistance in plants. PMID:19542326

  10. Geochemical Modeling of pH Neutralization of High Alkaline-Saline Waste Fluids in Unsaturated Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G.; Zheng, Z.

    2004-12-01

    Leakage of high alkaline-saline fluids, such as those stored in Hanford, a site of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in Washington State, has raised attention of scientific community. These fluids have unique thermodynamic and physical properties. Chemical components in the fluids are incompletely dissociated, especially those containing divalent or polyvalent ions. A number of laboratory experiments through injecting synthetic high alkaline-saline fluids (up to 10M of sodium nitrate, pH >12) into the sediments sampled from the DOE Hanford site were conducted to study the reactive transport processes of the fluids in subsurface environments. The experimental results observed show that the composition of the high alkaline sodium nitrate fluids can be drastically changed due to fluid-rock interactions, and eventually lead to pH neutralization of the fluid in the plume front. The dominant fluid-rock interactions are cation exchanges (Na+-K+-Ca+2-Mg+2-H+), precipitation of calcium and magnesium minerals, and dissolution of silica. In order to precisely model the reactive transport of these processes, a coupling of the Pitzer's ion-interaction geochemical model and a flow and transport model would be highly needed. The extended existing reactive geochemical transport code, BIO-CORE2Dc, incorporating a comprehensive Pitzer ion-interaction model, is capable of predicting the experimental observations. In addition, the developed model was tested against two reported cases. In both cases, the measured mean ionic activity coefficients were well reproduced by our model, while the Debye-Hückel model, usually used to calculate aqueous species activities in dilute solutions, was unable to predict the experimental data. Finally, modeling study based on our laboratory column experiment was performed. Our simulation is able to capture the observed pH trends, changes in exchangeable cations such as Ca+2, Mg+2, and formation of secondary precipitation phases in the plume front.

  11. Selective separation of hydroxide from alkaline nuclear tank waste by liquid-liquid extraction with weak hydroxy acids.

    PubMed

    Chambliss, C Kevin; Haverlock, Tamara I; Bonnesen, Peter V; Engle, Nancy L; Moyer, Bruce A

    2002-04-15

    Recovery and recycle of caustic reagents in industrial processes offer potential means of pollution prevention, as investigated herein for particular needs related to the cleanup of alkaline nuclear waste. Specifically, the recovery of hydroxide from alkaline media by liquid-liquid extraction can be effected utilizing weak hydroxy acids, as demonstrated for NaOH utilizing a series of lipophilic fluorinated alcohols and alkylated phenols dissolved in 1-octanol. Extraction efficiency follows the expected order of acidity of the hydroxy acids, the phenols being the most efficient extractants among the compounds tested. After extraction, NaOH is effectively recoverable from the organic phase upon contact with water. The weakest hydroxy acids are the most efficiently stripped, NaOH recovery being nearly quantitative in a single contact. In competitive extraction experiments, good selectivity for hydroxide recovery over other anions such as nitrate and chloride was demonstrated. Since the order of extraction favors larger anions, the exceptional preference for hydroxide implies that the extraction occurs by deprotonation of the hydroxy acids in a cation-exchange process. Stripping therefore occurs by hydrolysis to regenerate the neutral hydroxy acid, liberating NaOH to the aqueous phase. Since hydroxide equivalents rather than actual hydroxide ions are transferred to the solvent, the process is termed "pseudohydroxide extraction." Hydroxide recovery from a simulant of alkaline nuclear tank waste (Hanford DSSF simulant) was also demonstrated in repeated extraction and stripping cycles. PMID:11993889

  12. The Nickel(111)/Alkaline Electrolyte Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Kuilong; Chottiner, G. S.; Scherson, D. A.; Reid, Margaret A.

    1991-01-01

    The electrochemical properties of Ni (111) prepared and characterized in ultra high vacuum, UHV, by surface analytical techniques have been examined in alkaline media by cyclic voltammetry using an UHV-electrochemical cell transfer system designed and built in this laboratory. Prior to the transfer, the Ni(111) surfaces were exposed to saturation coverages of CO in UHV in an attempt to protect the surface from possible contamination with other gases during the transfer. Temperature Programmed Desorption, TPD, of CO-dosed Ni (111) surfaces displaying sharp c(4x2), LEED patterns, subsequently exposed to water-saturated Ar at atmospheric pressure in an auxiliary UHV compatible chamber and finally transferred back to the main UHV chamber, yielded CO2 and water as the only detectable products. This indicates that the CO-dosed surfaces react with water and/or bicarbonate and hydroxide as the most likely products. Based on the integration of the TPD peaks, the combined amounts of H2O and CO2 were found to be on the order of a single monolayer. The reacted c(4x2)CO/Ni(111) layer seems to protect the surface from undergoing spontaneous oxidation in strongly alkaline solutions. This was evidenced by the fact that the open circuit potential observed immediately after contact with deaerated 0.1 M KOH was about 0.38 V vs. DHE, drifting slightly towards more negative values prior to initiating the voltametric scans. The average ratio of the integrated charge obtained in the first positive linear scan in the range of 0.35 to 1.5 V vs. DHE (initiated at the open circuit potential) and the first (and subsequent) linear negative scans in the same solution yielded for various independent runs a value of 3.5 +/- 0.3. Coulometric analysis of the cyclic voltammetry curves indicate that the electrochemically formed oxyhydroxide layer involves a charge equivalent to 3.2 +/- 0.4 layers of Ni metal.

  13. It's Major! College Major Selection & Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byers, Jenny; Mattern, Krista D.; Shaw, Emily J.; Springall, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Presented at the College Board National Forum, October 26, 2011. Choosing a college major is challenging enough, without stopping to consider the impact it has on a student's college experience and career choice. To provide support during this major decision, participants in this session will develop strategies to facilitate students in making an…

  14. A mathematical model of the maximum power density attainable in an alkaline hydrogen/oxygen fuel cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, Michael C.; White, Ralph E.

    1991-01-01

    A mathematical model of a hydrogen/oxygen alkaline fuel cell is presented that can be used to predict the polarization behavior under various power loads. The major limitations to achieving high power densities are indicated and methods to increase the maximum attainable power density are suggested. The alkaline fuel cell model describes the phenomena occurring in the solid, liquid, and gaseous phases of the anode, separator, and cathode regions based on porous electrode theory applied to three phases. Fundamental equations of chemical engineering that describe conservation of mass and charge, species transport, and kinetic phenomena are used to develop the model by treating all phases as a homogeneous continuum.

  15. Alkaline cleaner replacement for printed wiring board fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Goldammer, S.E.; Pemberton, S.E.; Tucker, D.R.

    1997-04-01

    A replacement alkaline cleaning chemistry was qualified for the copper cleaning process used to support printed wiring board fabrication. The copper cleaning process was used to prepare copper surfaces for enhancing the adhesion of dry film photopolymers (photoresists and solder masks) and acrylic adhesives. The alkaline chemistry was used to remove organic contaminates such as fingerprints.

  16. TOTAL ALKALINITY OF SURFACE WATERS OF THE US

    EPA Science Inventory

    This map provides a synoptic illustration of the national patterns of surface water alkalinity in the conterminous United States. Alkalinity is the most readily available measure of the acid-neutralizing capacity of surface waters and provides a reasonable estimate o...

  17. Removal of plutonium and americium from alkaline waste solutions

    DOEpatents

    Schulz, Wallace W.

    1979-01-01

    High salt content, alkaline waste solutions containing plutonium and americium are contacted with a sodium titanate compound to effect removal of the plutonium and americium from the alkaline waste solution onto the sodium titanate and provide an effluent having a radiation level of less than 10 nCi per gram alpha emitters.

  18. The Chemistry of Paper Preservation Part 4. Alkaline Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Henry A.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the problem of the inherent instability of paper due to the presence of acids that catalyze the hydrolytic degradation of cellulose. Focuses on the chemistry involved in the sizing of both acid and alkaline papers and the types of fillers used. Discusses advantages and problems of alkaline papermaking. Contains 48 references. (JRH)

  19. ANNUAL REPORT. ACTINIDE-ALUMINATE SPECIATION IN ALKALINE RADIOACTIVE WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Highly alkaline radioactive waste tanks contain a number of transuranic species, in particular U, Np, Pu, and Am-the exact forms of which are currently unknown. Knowledge of actinide speciation under highly alkaline conditions is essential towards understanding and predicting the...

  20. A theoretical study of dihydrogen bonds in small protonated rings: Aziridine and azetidine cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, B. G.; Araújo, R. C. M. U.; Carvalho, A. B.; Ramos, M. N.

    2010-02-01

    B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) calculations were used to predict some molecular properties of the C 2H 6N +⋯BeH 2, C 2H 6N +⋯MgH 2, C 3H 8N +⋯BeH 2 and C 3H 8N +⋯MgH 2 dihydrogen-bonded complexes. In these systems, it was demonstrated that the C 2H 6N + and C 3H 8N + protonated rings are potential candidates to bind with protonic hydrogens derived from alkaline earth metal compounds, BeH 2 and MgH 2. In terms of structural parameters and quantification of the dihydrogen bond energies, we should mention that the C 2H 6N + three-membered ring provides the formation of stronger bound systems, which are 4.0 kJ mol -1 more stables than C 3H 8N + four-membered ones. As complement, the analysis of the infrared spectrum indicated that red-shifts and blue-shifts are occurring in the N-H bonds of both C 2H 6N + and C 3H 8N + cationic rings. However, these two vibrational shifts were also verified on BeH 2 and MgH 2, what lead us to affirm that cationic compounds derived from small nitrogen rings and earth alkaline molecules are able to form unusual dihydrogen-bonded complexes by means of distinct spectroscopic phenomena, the red-shits and blue-shifts.

  1. In vitro effects of fat, FA, and cholesterol on sphingomyelin hydrolysis induced by rat intestinal alkaline sphingomyelinase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Jun; Nilsson, Ake; Duan, Rui-Dong

    2002-05-01

    Dietary sphingomyelin (SM) may have regulatory effects on cell proliferation and tumorigenesis in the colon. Alkaline sphingomyelinase (SMase) is the major enzyme responsible for hydrolysis of SM in the gut. Previously we purified the enzyme and showed that the presence of glycerophospholipids inhibited SM hydrolysis induced by alkaline SMase in vitro. In the present work, we studied the effects of TG, DG, FA, ceramide, and cholesterol on SM hydrolysis catalyzed by purified alkaline SMase. The results showed that both TG (triolein and tristearin) and DG (1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycerol and 1,2-distearoyl-rac-glycerol) inhibited the activity of alkaline SMase. 1-Monooleoyl-rac-glycerol, 1-monostearoyl-rac-glycerol, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid, linolenic acid, and arachidonic acid stimulated the activity of alkaline SMase at 0.4-0.8 mM concentrations but inhibited the enzyme at higher concentrations. There was no difference between the effects induced by saturated and unsaturated FA. A short-chain FA such as lauric acid had a stronger stimulatory effect at low concentrations and weaker inhibitory effect at high concentrations than long-chain FA. Choosing linoleic acid as an example, we found that FA had similar effects on both alkaline SMase and neutral SMase. Cholesterol and ceramide when mixed with FA to increase its solubility in bile salt micelles inhibited SMase activity. In conclusion, glycerides, FA, ceramide, and cholesterol influence SM hydrolysis catalyzed by intestinal alkaline SMase. The presence of lipids in the diet may thus influence the course of SM digestion in the gut and thereby the exposure of colon to SM metabolites. PMID:12056588

  2. Salt- and alkaline-tolerance are linked in Acacia.

    PubMed

    Bui, Elisabeth N; Thornhill, Andrew; Miller, Joseph T

    2014-07-01

    Saline or alkaline soils present a strong stress on plants that together may be even more deleterious than alone. Australia's soils are old and contain large, sometimes overlapping, areas of high salt and alkalinity. Acacia and other Australian plant lineages have evolved in this stressful soil environment and present an opportunity to understand the evolution of salt and alkalinity tolerance. We investigate this evolution by predicting the average soil salinity and pH for 503 Acacia species and mapping the response onto a maximum-likelihood phylogeny. We find that salinity and alkalinity tolerance have evolved repeatedly and often together over 25 Ma of the Acacia radiation in Australia. Geographically restricted species are often tolerant of extreme conditions. Distantly related species are sympatric in the most extreme soil environments, suggesting lack of niche saturation. There is strong evidence that many Acacia have distributions affected by salinity and alkalinity and that preference is lineage specific. PMID:25079493

  3. Monovalent cation transport in irreversibly sickled cells.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, M R; Morrison, C E; Shohet, S B

    1978-01-01

    Using discontinuous density gradients of Stractan II, we have separated sickle cell blood into discrete subpopulations of reticulocytes, mature discoid cells, and irreversibly sickled cells (ISCs). We have measured active and passive fluxes of monovalent cations in mature discoid cells, ISCs, and normal control cells, also separated upon density gradients. These measurements revealed a decreased active cation transport in ISC-rich populations. However, parallel measurements of Na, K-ATPase activity showed normal ouabain-sensitive ATPase activity in ISCs. Passive permeability to external Rb was also normal in ISCs. The observation of depressed pump activity in intact ISCs, contrasted with normal ATPase activity in ISC membranes, suggests the presence of factors in the intact cell which inhibit the active transport of Na and K in ISCs. PMID:149799

  4. Structurally Distinct Cation Channelrhodopsins from Cryptophyte Algae.

    PubMed

    Govorunova, Elena G; Sineshchekov, Oleg A; Spudich, John L

    2016-06-01

    Microbial rhodopsins are remarkable for the diversity of their functional mechanisms based on the same protein scaffold. A class of rhodopsins from cryptophyte algae show close sequence homology with haloarchaeal rhodopsin proton pumps rather than with previously known channelrhodopsins from chlorophyte (green) algae. In particular, both aspartate residues that occupy the positions of the chromophore Schiff base proton acceptor and donor, a hallmark of rhodopsin proton pumps, are conserved in these cryptophyte proteins. We expressed the corresponding polynucleotides in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells and studied electrogenic properties of the encoded proteins with whole-cell patch-clamp recording. Despite their lack of residues characteristic of the chlorophyte cation channels, these proteins are cation-conducting channelrhodopsins that carry out light-gated passive transport of Na(+) and H(+). These findings show that channel function in rhodopsins has evolved via multiple routes. PMID:27233115

  5. Cation specific binding with protein surface charges.

    PubMed

    Hess, Berk; van der Vegt, Nico F A

    2009-08-11

    Biological organization depends on a sensitive balance of noncovalent interactions, in particular also those involving interactions between ions. Ion-pairing is qualitatively described by the law of "matching water affinities." This law predicts that cations and anions (with equal valence) form stable contact ion pairs if their sizes match. We show that this simple physical model fails to describe the interaction of cations with (molecular) anions of weak carboxylic acids, which are present on the surfaces of many intra- and extracellular proteins. We performed molecular simulations with quantitatively accurate models and observed that the order K(+) < Na(+) < Li(+) of increasing binding affinity with carboxylate ions is caused by a stronger preference for forming weak solvent-shared ion pairs. The relative insignificance of contact pair interactions with protein surfaces indicates that thermodynamic stability and interactions between proteins in alkali salt solutions is governed by interactions mediated through hydration water molecules. PMID:19666545

  6. Electronic spectrum of 9-methylanthracenium radical cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Gerard D.; Sanelli, Julian A.; Dryza, Vik; Bieske, Evan J.; Schmidt, Timothy W.

    2016-04-01

    The predissociation spectrum of the cold, argon-tagged, 9-methylanthracenium radical cation is reported from 8000 cm-1 to 44 500 cm-1. The reported spectrum contains bands corresponding to at least eight electronic transitions ranging from the near infrared to the ultraviolet. These electronic transitions are assigned through comparison with ab initio energies and intensities. The infrared D1←D0 transitions exhibit significant vibronic activity, which is assigned through comparison with TD-B3LYP excited state frequencies and intensities, as well as modelled vibronic interactions. Dissociation of 9-methylanthracenium is also observed at high visible-photon energies, resulting in the loss of either CH2 or CH3. The relevance of these spectra, and the spectra of other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon radical cations, to the largely unassigned diffuse interstellar bands, is discussed.

  7. [PAH Cations as Viable Carriers of DIBs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, Ted

    1998-01-01

    This report is intended to fill in the blanks in NASA's file system for our lab astro study of molecular ions of astrophysical interest. In order to give NASA what it needs for its files, I attach below the text of the section from our recent proposal to continue this work, in which we describe progress to date, including a large number of publications. Our initial studies were focused on PAH cations, which appear to be viable candidates as the carriers of the DIBs, an idea that has been supported by laboratory spectroscopy of PAH cations in inert matrices. Beginning with the simplest aromatic (benzene; C6H6) and moving progressively to larger species (naphthalene, C10OH8; pyrene, C16H10; and most recently chrysene, C18H12), we have been able to derive rate coefficients for reactions with neutral spices that are abundant in the diffuse interstellar medium.

  8. Ultrafast dynamics of water in cationic micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokter, Adriaan M.; Woutersen, Sander; Bakker, Huib J.

    2007-03-01

    The effect of confinement on the dynamical properties of liquid water is investigated for water enclosed in cationic reverse micelles. The authors performed mid-infrared ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy on the OH-stretch vibration of isotopically diluted HDO in D2O in cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) reverse micelles of various sizes. The authors observe that the surfactant counterions are inhomogeneously distributed throughout the reverse micelle, and that regions of extreme salinity occur near the interfacial Stern layer. The authors find that the water molecules in the core of the micelles show similar orientational dynamics as bulk water, and that water molecules in the counterion-rich interfacial region are much less mobile. An explicit comparison is made with the dynamics of water confined in anionic sodium bis(2-ethythexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) reverse micelles. The authors find that interfacial water in cationic CTAB reverse micelles has a higher orientational mobility than water in anionic AOT reverse micelles.

  9. Plant NHX cation/proton antiporters

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Rosales, M Pilar; Gálvez, Francisco J; Huertas, Raúl; Aranda, M Nieves; Baghour, Mourad; Cagnac, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    Although physiological and biochemical data since long suggested that Na+/H+ and K+/H+ antiporters are involved in intracellular ion and pH regulation in plants, it has taken a long time to identify genes encoding antiporters that could fulfil these roles. Genome sequencing projects have now shown that plants contain a very large number of putative Cation/Proton antiporters, the function of which is only beginning to be studied. The intracellular NHX transporters constitute the first Cation/Proton exchanger family studied in plants. The founding member, AtNHX1, was identified as an important salt tolerance determinant and suggested to catalyze Na+ accumulation in vacuoles. It is, however, becoming increasingly clear, that this gene and other members of the family also play crucial roles in pH regulation and K+ homeostasis, regulating processes from vesicle trafficking and cell expansion to plant development. PMID:19794841

  10. Cation-ratio dating of petroglyphs using PIXE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitley, David S.; Dorn, Ronald I.

    1988-12-01

    A central problem in archaeological research has been the Chronometrie dating of petroglyphs (rock engravings). Recent improvements in the understanding of the chemistry of rock varnish (or patina) that develops on rock surfaces in arid regions has resulted in the development of a calibrated dating technique, cation-ratio (CR) dating. This is based on calibrating chemical changes in minor and major trace elements in the varnish over time. PIXE is used to determine the bulk chemical constituents of small samples of varnish mechanically removed from within petroglyphs. Recent applications in western North America have yielded petroglyph dates of great importance in understanding the origins of art and the antiquity of human settlement in the western hemisphere. In particular the CR dates on petroglyphs suggest that humans moved into the New World about 10 K yrs earlier than previously believed, and that the making of petroglyphs was one of the most ancient and long-lived cultural traditions in aboriginal North America.

  11. Novel penetrating cations for targeting mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Chernyak, Boris V; Antonenko, Yuri N; Domnina, Lidia V; Ivanova, Olga Yu; Lyamzaev, Konstantin G; Pustovidko, Antonina V; Rokitskaya, Tatiana I; Severina, Inna I; Simonyan, Ruben A; Trendeleva, Tatiana A; Zvyagilskaya, Renata A

    2013-01-01

    Novel penetrating cations were used for the design of mitochondria-targeted compounds and tested in model lipid membranes, in isolated mitochondria and in living human cells in culture. Rhodamine-19, berberine and palmatine were conjugated by aliphatic linkers with plastoquinone possessing antioxidant activity. These conjugates (SkQR1,SkQBerb, SkQPalm) and their analogs lacking plastoquinol moiety (C12R1,C10Berb and C10Palm) penetrated bilayer phospholipid membrane in their cationic forms and accumulated in isolated mitochondria or in mitochondria of living cells due to membrane potential negative inside. Reduced forms of SkQR1, SkQBerb and SkQPalm inhibited lipid peroxidation in isolated mitochondria at nanomolar concentrations. In human fibroblasts SkQR1, SkQBerb and SkQPalm prevented fragmentation of mitochondria and apoptosis induced by hydrogen peroxide. SkQR1 was effective at subnanomolar concentrations while SkQberb, SkQPalm and SkQ1 (prototypic conjugate of plastoquinone with dodecyltriphenylphosphonium) were effective at 10-times higher concentrations. The aliphatic conjugates of berberine and palmatine (as well as the conjugates of triphenylphosphonium) induced proton transport mediated by free fatty acids (FA) both in the model and mitochondrial membrane. In mitochondria this process was facilitated by the adenine nucleotide carrier. In contrast to the other cationic conjugates, SkQR1 and C12R1 induced FA-independent proton conductivity due to protonation/deprotonation of the rhodamine residue. This property in combination with the antioxidant activity probably makes rhodamine conjugates highly effective in protection against oxidative stress. The novel cationic conjugates described here are promising candidates for drugs against various pathologies and aging as mitochondria-targeted antioxidants and selective mild uncouplers. PMID:23092317

  12. Regulation of Cation Balance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Cyert, Martha S.; Philpott, Caroline C.

    2013-01-01

    All living organisms require nutrient minerals for growth and have developed mechanisms to acquire, utilize, and store nutrient minerals effectively. In the aqueous cellular environment, these elements exist as charged ions that, together with protons and hydroxide ions, facilitate biochemical reactions and establish the electrochemical gradients across membranes that drive cellular processes such as transport and ATP synthesis. Metal ions serve as essential enzyme cofactors and perform both structural and signaling roles within cells. However, because these ions can also be toxic, cells have developed sophisticated homeostatic mechanisms to regulate their levels and avoid toxicity. Studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have characterized many of the gene products and processes responsible for acquiring, utilizing, storing, and regulating levels of these ions. Findings in this model organism have often allowed the corresponding machinery in humans to be identified and have provided insights into diseases that result from defects in ion homeostasis. This review summarizes our current understanding of how cation balance is achieved and modulated in baker’s yeast. Control of intracellular pH is discussed, as well as uptake, storage, and efflux mechanisms for the alkali metal cations, Na+ and K+, the divalent cations, Ca2+ and Mg2+, and the trace metal ions, Fe2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, and Mn2+. Signal transduction pathways that are regulated by pH and Ca2+ are reviewed, as well as the mechanisms that allow cells to maintain appropriate intracellular cation concentrations when challenged by extreme conditions, i.e., either limited availability or toxic levels in the environment. PMID:23463800

  13. Phosphatidylinositol anchor of HeLa cell alkaline phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Jemmerson, R.; Low, M.G.

    1987-09-08

    Alkaline phosphatase from cancer cells, HeLa TCRC-1, was biosynthetically labeled with either /sup 3/H-fatty acids or (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine as analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography of immunoprecipitated material. Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) released a substantial proportion of the /sup 3/H-fatty acid label from immunoaffinity-purified alkaline phosphatase but had no effect on the radioactivity of (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine-labeled material. PI-PLC also liberated catalytically active alkaline phosphatase from viable cells, and this could be selectively blocked by monoclonal antibodies to alkaline phosphatase. However, the alkaline phosphatase released from /sup 3/H-fatty acid labeled cells by PI-PLC was not radioactive. By contrast, treatment with bromelain removed both the /sup 3/H-fatty acid and the (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine label from purified alkaline phosphatase. Subtilisin was also able to remove the (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine label from the purified alkaline phosphatase. The /sup 3/H radioactivity in alkaline phosphatase purified from (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine-labeled cells comigrated with authentic (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine by anion-exchange chromatography after acid hydrolysis. The data suggest that the /sup 3/H-fatty acid and (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine are covalently attached to the carboxyl-terminal segment since bromelain and subtilisin both release alkaline phosphatase from the membrane by cleavage at that end of the polypeptide chain. The data are consistent with findings for other proteins recently shown to be anchored in the membrane through a glycosylphosphatidylinositol structure and indicate that a similar structure contributes to the membrane anchoring of alkaline phosphatase.

  14. Chemical and biotic characteristics of two low-alkalinity lakes in northern Wisconsin: relation to atmospheric deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webster, K.E.; Eilers, J.M.; Wiener, J.G.; Glass, G.E.; Garrison, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    Synoptic surveys of water chemistry in north-central Wisconsin documented the presence of many low alkalinity lakes potentially sensitive to acid deposition. Furthermore, lake hydrologic type proved to be a key factor in determining lake sensitivity: the low alkalinity systems were predominately seepage lakes. To test this hypothesis and identify the controls on the chemistry of these low alkalinity systems, the authors initiated hydrologic, chemical, biological and limnological studies at Lakes Clara and Vandercook in 1980. The report summarizes the results of those studies (including previously published hydrologic results) conducted between 1981 and 1983. The major goals are to assess the sensitivity of the study lakes to acid deposition and to identify key processes controlling the acid-base chemistry of these software seepage lakes.

  15. Sn Cation Valency Dependence in Cation Exchange Reactions Involving Cu2-xSe Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We studied cation exchange reactions in colloidal Cu2-xSe nanocrystals (NCs) involving the replacement of Cu+ cations with either Sn2+ or Sn4+ cations. This is a model system in several aspects: first, the +2 and +4 oxidation states for tin are relatively stable; in addition, the phase of the Cu2-xSe NCs remains cubic regardless of the degree of copper deficiency (that is, “x”) in the NC lattice. Also, Sn4+ ions are comparable in size to the Cu+ ions, while Sn2+ ones are much larger. We show here that the valency of the entering Sn ions dictates the structure and composition not only of the final products but also of the intermediate steps of the exchange. When Sn4+ cations are used, alloyed Cu2–4ySnySe NCs (with y ≤ 0.33) are formed as intermediates, with almost no distortion of the anion framework, apart from a small contraction. In this exchange reaction the final stoichiometry of the NCs cannot go beyond Cu0.66Sn0.33Se (that is Cu2SnSe3), as any further replacement of Cu+ cations with Sn4+ cations would require a drastic reorganization of the anion framework, which is not possible at the reaction conditions of the experiments. When instead Sn2+ cations are employed, SnSe NCs are formed, mostly in the orthorhombic phase, with significant, albeit not drastic, distortion of the anion framework. Intermediate steps in this exchange reaction are represented by Janus-type Cu2-xSe/SnSe heterostructures, with no Cu–Sn–Se alloys. PMID:25340627

  16. Formation of M2+(O2)(C3H8) species in alkaline-earth-exchanged Y zeolite during propane selective oxidation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiang; Mojet, Barbara L; van Ommen, Jan G; Lefferts, Leon

    2005-10-01

    The adsorption of oxygen and d2-propane (CH3CD2CH3) on a series of alkaline-earth-exchanged Y zeolite at room temperature was studied with in situ infrared spectroscopy. Surprisingly at room temperature, oxygen adsorption led to the formation of supercage M2+(O2) species. Further, at low propane coverage, propane was found to adsorb linearly on Mg2+ cations, but a ring-adsorption structure was observed for propane adsorbing on Ca2+, Sr2+, and Ba2+ cations. It is demonstrated that O2 and propane can simultaneously attach to one active center (M2+) to form a M2+(O2)(C3H8) species, which is proposed to be the precursor in thermal propane selective oxidation. Selectivity to acetone in the propane oxidation reaction decreases with increasing temperature and cation size due to the formation of 2-propanol and carboxylate ions. An extended reaction scheme for the selective oxidation of propane over alkaline earth exchanged Y zeolites is proposed. PMID:16853364

  17. Low cation coordination in oxide melts

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, Lawrie; Benmore, Chris J; Du, Jincheng; Weber, Richard; Neuefeind, Joerg C; Tumber, Sonia; Parise, John B

    2014-01-01

    The complete set of Faber-Ziman partial pair distribution functions for a rare earth oxide liquid were measured for the first time by combining aerodynamic levitation, neutron diffraction, high energy x-ray diffraction and isomorphic substitution using Y2 O3 and Ho2 O3 melts. The average Y- O coordination is measured to be 5.5(2), which is significantly less than the octahedral coordination of crystalline Y2 O3 (or Ho2 O3 ). Investigation of high temperature La2 O3 , ZrO2 , SiO2 , and Al2 O3 melts by x-ray diffraction and molecular dynamics simulations also show lower-than-crystal cation- oxygen coordination. These measurements suggest a general trend towards lower M-O coordination compared to their crystalline counterparts. It is found that this coordination number drop is larger for lower field strength, larger radius cations and is negligible for high field strength (network forming) cations. These findings have broad implications for predicting the local structure and related physical properties of metal-oxide melts and oxide glasses.

  18. Reducible cationic lipids for gene transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Wetzer, B; Byk, G; Frederic, M; Airiau, M; Blanche, F; Pitard, B; Scherman, D

    2001-01-01

    One of the main challenges of gene therapy remains the increase of gene delivery into eukaryotic cells. We tested whether intracellular DNA release, an essential step for gene transfer, could be facilitated by using reducible cationic DNA-delivery vectors. For this purpose, plasmid DNA was complexed with cationic lipids bearing a disulphide bond. This reduction-sensitive linker is expected to be reduced and cleaved in the reducing milieu of the cytoplasm, thus potentially improving DNA release and consequently transfection. The DNA--disulphide-lipid complexation was monitored by ethidium bromide exclusion, and the size of complexes was determined by dynamic light scattering. It was found that the reduction kinetics of disulphide groups in DNA--lipid complexes depended on the position of the disulphide linker within the lipid molecule. Furthermore, the internal structure of DNA--lipid particles was examined by small-angle X-ray scattering before and after lipid reduction. DNA release from lipid complexes was observed after the reduction of disulphide bonds of several lipids. Cell-transfection experiments suggested that complexes formed with selected reducible lipids resulted in up to 1000-fold higher reporter-gene activity, when compared with their analogues without disulphide bonds. In conclusion, reduction-sensitive groups introduced into cationic lipid backbones potentially allow enhanced DNA release from DNA--lipid complexes after intracellular reduction and represent a tool for improved vectorization. PMID:11389682

  19. Study of the fluoro- and chlorodimethylbutyl cations

    PubMed Central

    Olah, George A.; Prakash, G. K. Surya; Rasul, Golam

    2013-01-01

    A comparative study of the 2,3-dimethyl-3-fluoro-2-butyl cation and its chloro analog was carried out by the ab initio/GIAO-CCSD(T) (gauge invariant atomic orbital-coupled cluster with single, double, and perturbative triple excitation) method. The structures and 13C NMR chemical shifts of the cations were calculated at the GIAO-CCSD(T)/tzp/dz//MP2/cc-pVTZ level. Bridged fluoronium ion 1, carbenium ion 2, and fluorocarbenium ion 3 were found to be minima on the potential energy surface. Bridged fluoronium ion 1, although a minimum on the potential energy surface, is 12.8 kcal/mol less stable than the open chain fluorobutyl cation 3. In contrast to the fluorinated ion, bridged chloronium ion 5 was found to be the lowest energy minimum being 10.6 kcal/mol more stable than ion 6 and 7.4 kcal/mol more stable than ion 7. PMID:23650369

  20. Fe(III), Cr(VI), and Fe(III) mediated Cr(VI) reduction in alkaline media using a Halomonas isolate from Soap Lake, Washington.

    PubMed

    VanEngelen, Michael R; Peyton, Brent M; Mormile, Melanie R; Pinkart, Holly C

    2008-11-01

    Hexavalent chromium is one of the most widely distributed environmental contaminants. Given the carcinogenic and mutagenic consequences of Cr(VI) exposure, the release of Cr(VI) into the environment has long been a major concern. While many reports of microbial Cr(VI) reduction are in circulation, very few have demonstrated Cr(VI) reduction under alkaline conditions. Since Cr(VI) exhibits higher mobility in alkaline soils relative to pH neutral soils, and since Cr contamination of alkaline soils is associated with a number of industrial activities, microbial Cr(VI) reduction under alkaline conditions requires attention.Soda lakes are the most stable alkaline environments on earth, and contain a wide diversity of alkaliphilic organisms. In this study, a bacterial isolate belonging to the Halomonas genus was obtained from Soap Lake, a chemically stratified alkaline lake located in central Washington State. The ability of this isolate to reduce Cr(VI) and Fe(III) was assessed under alkaline (pH = 9), anoxic, non-growth conditions with acetate as an electron donor. Metal reduction rates were quantified using Monod kinetics. In addition, Cr(VI) reduction experiments were carried out in the presence of Fe(III) to evaluate the possible enhancement of Cr(VI) reduction rates through electron shuttling mechanisms. While Fe(III) reduction rates were slow compared to previously reported rates, Cr(VI) reduction rates fell within range of previously reported rates. PMID:18401687

  1. Counter-ion specificity explored in abnormal expansion of supra-molecular aggregates in aqueous solution of alkaline metal salts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ningdong; Tao, Jiaojiao; Wei, Shenghui; Chen, Mingming; Wei, Chengsha; Li, Liangbin

    2015-09-21

    Ionic effects in aqueous solution of macro-ions showing specificity and unconventional characters, respectively, receive a lot of interests recently; however, the complexity of specific ion effects in unconventional phenomena remains ambiguous. In this study, the effects of univalent ions on aggregation of supra-molecular nano-fibrils with charged carboxylate groups on the surface as a prototype of macro-ions are investigated by Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) in aqueous solutions of alkaline metal chlorides. It is found that the columnar bundles of charged fibrils are expanded in certain salt concentration range contradicting the conventional screening effects of salts. The degree of expansion is dominated by cations as Na(+) induces drastic effects in comparison to rather gentle changes from K(+) and Cs(+). The specific cations effects observed by SAXS correlate with the pH behavior of the solutions, an indicator of surface charge, or number of carboxylate groups along the supra-molecular fibrils. It is postulated that while Na(+) with stronger affinity to carboxylates apparently reduces the surface charge, K(+) and Cs(+) only weakly interact with carboxylates and induce minor changes, accounting for the cation-sensitive aggregation behavior of fibrils observed by SAXS. By probing the bundling aggregation of charged supra-molecular nano-fibrils in salty water, we provide direct evidence of specific counter-ion effects in unusual expansion caused by univalent salts. PMID:26395732

  2. Cation uptake and allocation by red pine seedlings under cation-nutrient stress in a column growth experiment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background and aims: Plant nutrient uptake is affected by environmental stress, but how plants respond to cation nutrient stress is poorly understood. We assessed the impact of varying degrees of cation-nutrient stress on cation uptake in an experimental plant-mineral system. Methods: Column experim...

  3. p53 Mutagenesis by benzo[a]pyrene derived radical cations.

    PubMed

    Sen, Sushmita; Bhojnagarwala, Pratik; Francey, Lauren; Lu, Ding; Penning, Trevor M; Field, Jeffrey

    2012-10-15

    Benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), a major human carcinogen in combustion products such as cigarette smoke and diesel exhaust, is metabolically activated into DNA-reactive metabolites via three different enzymatic pathways. The pathways are the anti-(+)-benzo[a]pyrene 7,8-diol 9,10-epoxide pathway (P450/epoxide hydrolase catalyzed) (B[a]PDE), the benzo[a]pyrene o-quinone pathway (aldo ketose reductase (AKR) catalyzed) and the B[a]P radical cation pathway (P450 peroxidase catalyzed). We used a yeast p53 mutagenesis system to assess mutagenesis by B[a]P radical cations. Because radical cations are short-lived, they were generated in situ by reacting B[a]P with cumene hydroperoxide (CuOOH) and horse radish peroxidase (HRP) and then monitoring the generation of the more stable downstream products, B[a]P-1,6-dione and B[a]P-3,6-dione. On the basis of B[a]P-1,6 and 3,6-dione formation, approximately 4 μM of radical cation was generated. In the mutagenesis assays, the radical cations produced in situ showed a dose-dependent increase in mutagenicity from 0.25 μM to 10 μM B[a]P with no significant increase seen with further escalation to 50 μM B[a]P. However, mutagenesis was 200-fold less than with the AKR pathway derived B[a]P, 7-8-dione. Mutant p53 plasmids, which yield red colonies, were recovered from the yeast to study the pattern and spectrum of mutations. The mutation pattern observed was G to T (31%) > G to C (29%) > G to A (14%). The frequency of codons mutated by the B[a]P radical cations was essentially random and not enriched at known cancer hotspots. The quinone products of radical cations, B[a]P-1,6-dione and B[a]P-3,6-dione were more mutagenic than the radical cation reactions, but still less mutagenic than AKR derived B[a]P-7,8-dione. We conclude that B[a]P radical cations and their quinone products are weakly mutagenic in this yeast-based system compared to redox cycling PAH o-quinones. PMID:22768918

  4. Batteries: from alkaline to zinc-air.

    PubMed

    Dondelinger, Robert M

    2004-01-01

    There is no perfect disposable battery--one that will sit on the shelf for 20 years, then continually provide unlimited current, at a completely constant voltage until exhausted, without producing heat. There is no perfect rechargeable battery--one with all of the above characteristics and will also withstand an infinite overcharge while providing an equally infinite cycle life. There are only compromises. Every battery selection is a compromise between the ideally required characteristics, the advantages, and the limitations of each battery type. General selection of a battery type to power a medical device is largely outside the purview of the biomed. Initially, these are engineering decisions made at the time of medical equipment design and are intended to be followed in perpetuity. However, since newer cell types evolve and the manufacturer's literature is fixed at the time of printing, some intelligent substitutions may be made as long as the biomed understands the characteristics of both the recommended cell and the replacement cell. For example, when the manufacturer recommends alkaline, it is usually because of the almost constant voltage it produces under the devices' design load. Over time, other battery types may be developed that will meet the intent of the manufacturer, at a lower cost, providing longer operational life, at a lower environmental cost, or with a combination of these advantages. In the Obstetrical Doppler cited at the beginning of this article, the user had put in carbon-zinc cells, and the biomed had unknowingly replaced them with carbonzinc cells. If the alkaline cells recommended by the manufacturer had been used, there would have been the proper output voltage at the battery terminals when the [table: see text] cells were at their half-life. Instead, the device refused to operate since the battery voltage was below presumed design voltage. While battery-type substitutions may be easily and relatively successfully made in disposable

  5. Archaeal Communities in a Heterogeneous Hypersaline-Alkaline Soil.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Noya, Yendi E; Valenzuela-Encinas, César; Sandoval-Yuriar, Alonso; Jiménez-Bueno, Norma G; Marsch, Rodolfo; Dendooven, Luc

    2015-01-01

    In this study the archaeal communities in extreme saline-alkaline soils of the former lake Texcoco, Mexico, with electrolytic conductivities (EC) ranging from 0.7 to 157.2 dS/m and pH from 8.5 to 10.5 were explored. Archaeal communities in the 0.7 dS/m pH 8.5 soil had the lowest alpha diversity values and were dominated by a limited number of phylotypes belonging to the mesophilic Candidatus Nitrososphaera. Diversity and species richness were higher in the soils with EC between 9.0 and 157.2 dS/m. The majority of OTUs detected in the hypersaline soil were members of the Halobacteriaceae family. Novel phylogenetic branches in the Halobacteriales class were detected in the soil, and more abundantly in soil with the higher pH (10.5), indicating that unknown and uncharacterized Archaea can be found in this soil. Thirteen different genera of the Halobacteriaceae family were identified and were distributed differently between the soils. Halobiforma, Halostagnicola, Haloterrigena, and Natronomonas were found in all soil samples. Methanogenic archaea were found only in soil with pH between 10.0 and 10.3. Retrieved methanogenic archaea belonged to the Methanosarcinales and Methanomicrobiales orders. The comparison of the archaeal community structures considering phylogenetic information (UniFrac distances) clearly clustered the communities by pH. PMID:26074731

  6. Archaeal Communities in a Heterogeneous Hypersaline-Alkaline Soil

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Noya, Yendi E.; Valenzuela-Encinas, César; Sandoval-Yuriar, Alonso; Jiménez-Bueno, Norma G.; Marsch, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    In this study the archaeal communities in extreme saline-alkaline soils of the former lake Texcoco, Mexico, with electrolytic conductivities (EC) ranging from 0.7 to 157.2 dS/m and pH from 8.5 to 10.5 were explored. Archaeal communities in the 0.7 dS/m pH 8.5 soil had the lowest alpha diversity values and were dominated by a limited number of phylotypes belonging to the mesophilic Candidatus Nitrososphaera. Diversity and species richness were higher in the soils with EC between 9.0 and 157.2 dS/m. The majority of OTUs detected in the hypersaline soil were members of the Halobacteriaceae family. Novel phylogenetic branches in the Halobacteriales class were detected in the soil, and more abundantly in soil with the higher pH (10.5), indicating that unknown and uncharacterized Archaea can be found in this soil. Thirteen different genera of the Halobacteriaceae family were identified and were distributed differently between the soils. Halobiforma, Halostagnicola, Haloterrigena, and Natronomonas were found in all soil samples. Methanogenic archaea were found only in soil with pH between 10.0 and 10.3. Retrieved methanogenic archaea belonged to the Methanosarcinales and Methanomicrobiales orders. The comparison of the archaeal community structures considering phylogenetic information (UniFrac distances) clearly clustered the communities by pH. PMID:26074731

  7. Belliella buryatensis sp. nov., isolated from alkaline lake water.

    PubMed

    Kozyreva, Lyudmila; Egorova, Darya; Anan'ina, Lyudmila; Plotnikova, Elena; Ariskina, Elena; Prisyazhnaya, Natalya; Radnaeva, Larisa; Namsaraev, Bair

    2016-01-01

    Two bacterial isolates from water of the alkaline brackish Lake Solenoe (Buryatia, Russia), 2C and 5CT, were characterized by using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. The strains were small, non-motile, Gram-stain-negative rods that formed small orange-red colonies on the surface of marine agar. Studies based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the strains were related closely to Belliella pelovolcani CC-SAL-25T (98.7 % sequence similarity). The G+C content of the DNA was 38-40 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization values between strains 2C and 5CT and B. pelovolcani CC-SAL-25T were 56-58 mol%. A menaquinone with seven isoprene units (MK-7) was the major respiratory quinone. The fatty acid profiles were slightly different from that of B. pelovolcani CC-SAL-25T. The novel strains could be distinguished from the phylogenetically closest species B. pelovolcani CC-SAL-25T based on matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectra of whole cells and a range of physiological and biochemical characteristics. The data obtained suggest that strains 2C and 5CT represent a novel species of the genus Belliella, for which the name Belliella buryatensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 5CT ( = VKM B-2724T = KCTC 32194T). PMID:26474559

  8. Microbial thiocyanate utilization under highly alkaline conditions.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, D Y; Tourova, T P; Lysenko, A M; Kuenen, J G

    2001-02-01

    Three kinds of alkaliphilic bacteria able to utilize thiocyanate (CNS-) at pH 10 were found in highly alkaline soda lake sediments and soda soils. The first group included obligate heterotrophs that utilized thiocyanate as a nitrogen source while growing at pH 10 with acetate as carbon and energy sources. Most of the heterotrophic strains were able to oxidize sulfide and thiosulfate to tetrathionate. The second group included obligately autotrophic sulfur-oxidizing alkaliphiles which utilized thiocyanate nitrogen during growth with thiosulfate as the energy source. Genetic analysis demonstrated that both the heterotrophic and autotrophic alkaliphiles that utilized thiocyanate as a nitrogen source were related to the previously described sulfur-oxidizing alkaliphiles belonging to the gamma subdivision of the division Proteobacteria (the Halomonas group for the heterotrophs and the genus Thioalkalivibrio for autotrophs). The third group included obligately autotrophic sulfur-oxidizing alkaliphilic bacteria able to utilize thiocyanate as a sole source of energy. These bacteria could be enriched on mineral medium with thiocyanate at pH 10. Growth with thiocyanate was usually much slower than growth with thiosulfate, although the biomass yield on thiocyanate was higher. Of the four strains isolated, the three vibrio-shaped strains were genetically closely related to the previously described sulfur-oxidizing alkaliphiles belonging to the genus Thioalkalivibrio. The rod-shaped isolate differed from the other isolates by its ability to accumulate large amounts of elemental sulfur inside its cells and by its ability to oxidize carbon disulfide. Despite its low DNA homology with and substantial phenotypic differences from the vibrio-shaped strains, this isolate also belonged to the genus Thioalkalivibrio according to a phylogenetic analysis. The heterotrophic and autotrophic alkaliphiles that grew with thiocyanate as an N source possessed a relatively high level of cyanase

  9. Microbial Thiocyanate Utilization under Highly Alkaline Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Tourova, Tatyana P.; Lysenko, Anatoly M.; Kuenen, J. Gijs

    2001-01-01

    Three kinds of alkaliphilic bacteria able to utilize thiocyanate (CNS−) at pH 10 were found in highly alkaline soda lake sediments and soda soils. The first group included obligate heterotrophs that utilized thiocyanate as a nitrogen source while growing at pH 10 with acetate as carbon and energy sources. Most of the heterotrophic strains were able to oxidize sulfide and thiosulfate to tetrathionate. The second group included obligately autotrophic sulfur-oxidizing alkaliphiles which utilized thiocyanate nitrogen during growth with thiosulfate as the energy source. Genetic analysis demonstrated that both the heterotrophic and autotrophic alkaliphiles that utilized thiocyanate as a nitrogen source were related to the previously described sulfur-oxidizing alkaliphiles belonging to the gamma subdivision of the division Proteobacteria (the Halomonas group for the heterotrophs and the genus Thioalkalivibrio for autotrophs). The third group included obligately autotrophic sulfur-oxidizing alkaliphilic bacteria able to utilize thiocyanate as a sole source of energy. These bacteria could be enriched on mineral medium with thiocyanate at pH 10. Growth with thiocyanate was usually much slower than growth with thiosulfate, although the biomass yield on thiocyanate was higher. Of the four strains isolated, the three vibrio-shaped strains were genetically closely related to the previously described sulfur-oxidizing alkaliphiles belonging to the genus Thioalkalivibrio. The rod-shaped isolate differed from the other isolates by its ability to accumulate large amounts of elemental sulfur inside its cells and by its ability to oxidize carbon disulfide. Despite its low DNA homology with and substantial phenotypic differences from the vibrio-shaped strains, this isolate also belonged to the genus Thioalkalivibrio according to a phylogenetic analysis. The heterotrophic and autotrophic alkaliphiles that grew with thiocyanate as an N source possessed a relatively high level of cyanase

  10. Modifier cation effects on 29Si nuclear shielding anisotropies in silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltisberger, Jay H.; Florian, Pierre; Keeler, Eric G.; Phyo, Pyae A.; Sanders, Kevin J.; Grandinetti, Philip J.

    2016-07-01

    We have examined variations in the 29Si nuclear shielding tensor parameters of SiO4 tetrahedra in a series of seven alkali and alkaline earth silicate glass compositions, Cs2O · 4.81 SiO2, Rb2O · 3.96 SiO2, Rb2O · 2.25 SiO2, K2O · 4.48 SiO2, Na2O · 4.74 SiO2, BaO · 2.64 SiO2, and SrO · 2.36 SiO2, using natural abundance 29Si two-dimensional magic-angle flipping (MAF) experiments. Our analyses of these 2D spectra reveal a linear dependence of the 29Si nuclear shielding anisotropy of Q(3) sites on the Si-non-bridging oxygen bond length, which in turn depends on the cation potential and coordination of modifier cations to the non-bridging oxygen. We also demonstrate how a combination of Cu2+ as a paramagnetic dopant combined with echo train acquisition can reduce the total experiment time of 29Si 2D NMR measurements by two orders of magnitude, enabling higher throughput 2D NMR studies of glass structure.

  11. [Oat growth and cation absorption characteristics under salt and alkali stress].

    PubMed

    Fan, Yuan; Ren, Chang-Zhong; Li, Pin-Fang; Ren, Tu-Sheng

    2011-11-01

    This paper monitored the oat growth and cation absorption characteristics on a saline-alkali soil in the Baicheng region of Jilin Province under low, medium, and high levels of salt stress. No significant differences were observed in the shoot growth and yield components under the three levels of salt stress, but the root biomass and root/shoot ratio decreased significantly with increasing salt stress level. At maturing stage, the root/shoot ratio under medium and high salt stresses was 77.2% and 64.5% of that under low salt stress, respectively. Under the three levels of salt stress, the K+/Na+ and Ca2+/Na+ ratios in oat plant had significant differences at trefoil stage, but no significant differences at heading stage. With the increase of salt stress level, the cation absorption selectivity coefficient of oat at filling stage decreased significantly, but the transportation selectivity coefficient had no significant difference under the three levels of stress. It was concluded that oat could adapt to the salt and alkali stress of soda-alkaline soil to some extent, and the adaptation capability decreased with the increasing level of stress. The decrease of oat root biomass and the stronger ion selective absorption capacity at heading stage under salt and alkali stress could benefit the shoot growth and yield components of oat. PMID:22303664

  12. Modifier cation effects on (29)Si nuclear shielding anisotropies in silicate glasses.

    PubMed

    Baltisberger, Jay H; Florian, Pierre; Keeler, Eric G; Phyo, Pyae A; Sanders, Kevin J; Grandinetti, Philip J

    2016-07-01

    We have examined variations in the (29)Si nuclear shielding tensor parameters of SiO4 tetrahedra in a series of seven alkali and alkaline earth silicate glass compositions, Cs2O·4.81 SiO2, Rb2O·3.96 SiO2, Rb2O·2.25 SiO2, K2O·4.48 SiO2, Na2O·4.74 SiO2, BaO·2.64 SiO2, and SrO·2.36 SiO2, using natural abundance (29)Si two-dimensional magic-angle flipping (MAF) experiments. Our analyses of these 2D spectra reveal a linear dependence of the (29)Si nuclear shielding anisotropy of Q((3)) sites on the Si-non-bridging oxygen bond length, which in turn depends on the cation potential and coordination of modifier cations to the non-bridging oxygen. We also demonstrate how a combination of Cu(2+) as a paramagnetic dopant combined with echo train acquisition can reduce the total experiment time of (29)Si 2D NMR measurements by two orders of magnitude, enabling higher throughput 2D NMR studies of glass structure. PMID:27187210

  13. Cation-containing Polymers with Co-continuous Microphase-Separated Morphologies for Rapid Transport Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, Frederick; Price, Samuel; Savage, Alice; Ren, Xiaoming; Pomerantz, Natalie; Zukas, Walter

    2015-03-01

    Cation-containing polymer membranes are the subject of renewed research for their potential to enable the use of alkaline fuel cells, and are also of interest for their water vapor transport properties. Charge and water vapor transport are both heavily dependent on membrane morphology and the development of hydrophilic channels throughout the material. Reaction induced phase separation has been shown to create such morphologies when used with uncharged copolymers and crosslinking monomers. Here we have applied this same technique but used ion-containing block copolymers of 4-vinylbenzyltrimethylammonium chloride and styrene to create a cation-containing polymer membrane having a microphase-separated, co-continuous morphology, as characterized by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF STEM). These materials show excellent charge transport behavior and water vapor transport properties, surpassing commercially available materials. These results and efforts to improve other important physical characteristics for membrane applications will be presented.

  14. Separation of silver from other metal cations using pyridone and triazole macrocycles in liquid membrane systems

    SciTech Connect

    Izatt, R.M.; LindH, G.C.; Bruening, R.L.; Huszthy, P.; McDaniel, C.W.; Bradshaw, J.S.; Christensen, J.J.

    1988-09-01

    Selective transport of Ag/sup +/ over other metal ions in competitive experiments in bulk and emulsion liquid membrane systems has been accomplished by using macrocycles of the proton-ionizable pyridone and triazole types. The transport of Ag/sup +/ by the pyridone macrocycles involves the cotransport of an anion, while transport by the triazole macrocycles can involve either co-anion transport or the counter transport of H/sup +/. In particular, the affinity of Ag/sup +/ for the triazole moiety, the excellent fit of Ag/sup +/ into an 18-crown-6 sized cavity, and the presence of only one proton-ionizable site per macrocycle molecule combine to produce highly selective transport of Ag/sup +/ over Pb/sup 2 +/ and Tl/sup +/ with triazolo-18-crown-6 derivatives in membrane systems containing acid receiving phases. Transport of alkali-, alkaline-earth-, and several transition-metal cations is minimal in similar membrane systems and, hence, selective transport of Ag/sup +/ over these cations is also expected.

  15. Comparative analysis of cation/proton antiporter superfamily in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Chuyu; Yang, Xiaohan; Xia, Xinli; Yin, Weilun

    2013-01-01

    The cation/proton antiporter superfamily is associated with the transport of monovalent cations across membranes. This superfamily was annotated in the Arabidopsis genome and some members were functionally characterized. In the present study, a systematic analysis of the cation/proton antiporter genes in diverse plant specieswas reported.We identified 240 cation/proton antiporters in alga, moss, and angiosperm. A phylogenetic tree was constructed showing these 240members are separated into three families, i.e., Na+/H+ exchangers, K+ efflux antiporters, and cation/H+ exchangers. Our analysis revealed that tandem and/or segmental duplications contribute to the expansion of cation/H+ exchangers in the examined angiospermspecies. Sliding windowanalysis of the nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution ratios showed some differences in the evolutionary fate of cation/proton antiporter paralogs. Furthermore, we identified over-represented motifs among these 240 proteins and foundmostmotifs are family specific, demonstrating diverse evolution of the cation/proton antiporters among three families. In addition, we investigated the co-expressed genes of the cation/proton antiporters in Arabidopsis thaliana. The results showed some biological processes are enriched in the co-expressed genes, suggesting the cation/proton antiporters may be involved in these biological processes. Taken together, this study furthers our knowledge on cation/proton antiporters in plants.

  16. Net alkalinity and net acidity 2: Practical considerations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirby, C.S.; Cravotta, C.A., III

    2005-01-01

    The pH, alkalinity, and acidity of mine drainage and associated waters can be misinterpreted because of the chemical instability of samples and possible misunderstandings of standard analytical method results. Synthetic and field samples of mine drainage having various initial pH values and concentrations of dissolved metals and alkalinity were titrated by several methods, and the results were compared to alkalinity and acidity calculated based on dissolved solutes. The pH, alkalinity, and acidity were compared between fresh, unoxidized and aged, oxidized samples. Data for Pennsylvania coal mine drainage indicates that the pH of fresh samples was predominantly acidic (pH 2.5-4) or near neutral (pH 6-7); ??? 25% of the samples had pH values between 5 and 6. Following oxidation, no samples had pH values between 5 and 6. The Standard Method Alkalinity titration is constrained to yield values >0. Most calculated and measured alkalinities for samples with positive alkalinities were in close agreement. However, for low-pH samples, the calculated alkalinity can be negative due to negative contributions by dissolved metals that may oxidize and hydrolyze. The Standard Method hot peroxide treatment titration for acidity determination (Hot Acidity) accurately indicates the potential for pH to decrease to acidic values after complete degassing of CO2 and oxidation of Fe and Mn, and it indicates either the excess alkalinity or that required for neutralization of the sample. The Hot Acidity directly measures net acidity (= -net alkalinity). Samples that had near-neutral pH after oxidation had negative Hot Acidity; samples that had pH < 6.3 after oxidation had positive Hot Acidity. Samples with similar pH values before oxidation had dissimilar Hot Acidities due to variations in their alkalinities and dissolved Fe, Mn, and Al concentrations. Hot Acidity was approximately equal to net acidity calculated based on initial pH and dissolved concentrations of Fe, Mn, and Al minus the

  17. Francisella DnaK Inhibits Tissue-nonspecific Alkaline Phosphatase*

    PubMed Central

    Arulanandam, Bernard P.; Chetty, Senthilnath Lakshmana; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Leonard, Sean; Klose, Karl; Seshu, Janakiram; Cap, Andrew; Valdes, James J.; Chambers, James P.

    2012-01-01

    Following pulmonary infection with Francisella tularensis, we observed an unexpected but significant reduction of alkaline phosphatase, an enzyme normally up-regulated following inflammation. However, no reduction was observed in mice infected with a closely related Gram-negative pneumonic organism (Klebsiella pneumoniae) suggesting the inhibition may be Francisella-specific. In similar fashion to in vivo observations, addition of Francisella lysate to exogenous alkaline phosphatase (tissue-nonspecific isozyme) was inhibitory. Partial purification and subsequent proteomic analysis indicated the inhibitory factor to be the heat shock protein DnaK. Incubation with increasing amounts of anti-DnaK antibody reduced the inhibitory effect in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, DnaK contains an adenosine triphosphate binding domain at its N terminus, and addition of adenosine triphosphate enhances dissociation of DnaK with its target protein, e.g. alkaline phosphatase. Addition of adenosine triphosphate resulted in decreased DnaK co-immunoprecipitated with alkaline phosphatase as well as reduction of Francisella-mediated alkaline phosphatase inhibition further supporting the binding of Francisella DnaK to alkaline phosphatase. Release of DnaK via secretion and/or bacterial cell lysis into the extracellular milieu and inhibition of plasma alkaline phosphatase could promote an orchestrated, inflammatory response advantageous to Francisella. PMID:22923614

  18. Oxidation of ammonia and methane in an alkaline, saline lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Joye, S.B.; Connell, T.L.; Miller, L.G.; Oremland, R.S.; Jellison, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    The oxidation of ammonia (NH3) and methane (CH4) was investigated in an alkaline saline lake, Mono Lake, California (U.S.A.). Ammonia oxidation was examined in April and July 1995 by comparing dark 14CO2 fixation rates in the presence or absence of methyl fluoride (MeF), an inhibitor of NH3 oxidation. Ammonia oxidizer-mediated dark 14CO2 fixation rates were similar in surface (5-7 m) and oxycline (11-15 m) waters, ranging between 70-340 and 89-186 nM d-1, respectively, or 1-7% of primary production by phytoplankton. Ammonia oxidation rates ranged between 580-2,830 nM d-1 in surface waters and 732-1,548 nM d-1 in oxycline waters. Methane oxidation was examined using a 14CH4 tracer technique in July 1994, April 1995, and July 1995. Methane oxidation rates were consistently higher in July, and rates in oxycline and anaerobic bottom waters (0.5-37 and 7-48 nM d-1, respectively) were 10-fold higher than those in aerobic surface waters (0.04-3.8 nM d-1). The majority of CH4 oxidation, in terms of integrated activity, occurred within anoxic bottom waters. Water column oxidation reduced the potential lake-atmosphere CH4 flux by a factor of two to three. Measured oxidation rates and water column concentrations were used to estimate the biological turnover times of NH3 and CH4. The NH3 pool turns over rapidly, on time scales of 0.8 d in surface waters and 10 d within the oxycline, while CH4 is cycled on 103-d time scales in surface waters and 102-d time scales within oxycline and bottom waters. Our data suggest an important role for NH3 oxidation in alkaline, saline lakes since the process converts volatile NH3 to soluble NO2-, thereby reducing loss via lake-atmosphere exchange and maintaining nitrogen in a form that is readily available to phytoplankton.

  19. High stability of electro-transport and magnetism against the A-site cation disorder in SrRuO3

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y. L.; Liu, M. F.; Liu, R.; Xie, Y. L.; Li, X.; Yan, Z. B.; Liu, J.-M.

    2016-01-01

    It is known that the electro-transport and magnetism of perovskite alkaline-earth ruthenate oxides are sensitive to the lattice distortion associated with the A-site cation size. Orthorhombic CaRuO3 and cubic BaRuO3 exhibit distinctly different electro-transport and magnetic properties from orthorhombic SrRuO3. It has been suggested that SrRuO3 can be robust against some intrinsic/external perturbations but fragile against some others in terms of electro-transport and magnetism, and it is our motivation to explore such stability against the local site cation disorder. In this work, we prepare a set of SrRuO3-based samples with identical averaged A-site size but different A-site cation disorder (size mismatch) by Ca and Ba co-substitution of Sr. It is revealed that the electro-transport and magnetism of SrRuO3 demonstrate relatively high stability against this A-site cation disorder, characterized by the relatively invariable electrical and magnetic properties in comparison with those of SrRuO3 itself. A simple electro-transport network model is proposed to explain quantitatively the measured behaviors. The present work suggests that SrRuO3 as an itinerant electron ferromagnetic metal possesses relatively high robustness against local lattice distortion and cation occupation disorder. PMID:27297396

  20. High stability of electro-transport and magnetism against the A-site cation disorder in SrRuO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. L.; Liu, M. F.; Liu, R.; Xie, Y. L.; Li, X.; Yan, Z. B.; Liu, J.-M.

    2016-06-01

    It is known that the electro-transport and magnetism of perovskite alkaline-earth ruthenate oxides are sensitive to the lattice distortion associated with the A-site cation size. Orthorhombic CaRuO3 and cubic BaRuO3 exhibit distinctly different electro-transport and magnetic properties from orthorhombic SrRuO3. It has been suggested that SrRuO3 can be robust against some intrinsic/external perturbations but fragile against some others in terms of electro-transport and magnetism, and it is our motivation to explore such stability against the local site cation disorder. In this work, we prepare a set of SrRuO3-based samples with identical averaged A-site size but different A-site cation disorder (size mismatch) by Ca and Ba co-substitution of Sr. It is revealed that the electro-transport and magnetism of SrRuO3 demonstrate relatively high stability against this A-site cation disorder, characterized by the relatively invariable electrical and magnetic properties in comparison with those of SrRuO3 itself. A simple electro-transport network model is proposed to explain quantitatively the measured behaviors. The present work suggests that SrRuO3 as an itinerant electron ferromagnetic metal possesses relatively high robustness against local lattice distortion and cation occupation disorder.

  1. High stability of electro-transport and magnetism against the A-site cation disorder in SrRuO3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y L; Liu, M F; Liu, R; Xie, Y L; Li, X; Yan, Z B; Liu, J-M

    2016-01-01

    It is known that the electro-transport and magnetism of perovskite alkaline-earth ruthenate oxides are sensitive to the lattice distortion associated with the A-site cation size. Orthorhombic CaRuO3 and cubic BaRuO3 exhibit distinctly different electro-transport and magnetic properties from orthorhombic SrRuO3. It has been suggested that SrRuO3 can be robust against some intrinsic/external perturbations but fragile against some others in terms of electro-transport and magnetism, and it is our motivation to explore such stability against the local site cation disorder. In this work, we prepare a set of SrRuO3-based samples with identical averaged A-site size but different A-site cation disorder (size mismatch) by Ca and Ba co-substitution of Sr. It is revealed that the electro-transport and magnetism of SrRuO3 demonstrate relatively high stability against this A-site cation disorder, characterized by the relatively invariable electrical and magnetic properties in comparison with those of SrRuO3 itself. A simple electro-transport network model is proposed to explain quantitatively the measured behaviors. The present work suggests that SrRuO3 as an itinerant electron ferromagnetic metal possesses relatively high robustness against local lattice distortion and cation occupation disorder. PMID:27297396

  2. Radiolytic generation of radical cations in xenon matrices. Tetramethylcyclopropane radical cation and its transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, X.Z.; Trifunac, A.D. )

    1990-04-05

    Radiolytic generation of radical cations in xenon matrices containing electron scavengers is illustrated by studying the 1,1,2,2-tetramethylcyclopropane radical cation. Dilute and concentrated solutions of tetramethylcyclopropane in xenon without electron scavengers and neat tetramethylcyclopropane yielded neutral radicals upon {gamma}-irradiation. Speculation on the mechanisms of radical formation is presented. The radical species observed in the {gamma}-irradiation of neat tetramethylcyclopropane appears to be identical with the paramagnetic species observed in CF{sub 2}ClCFCl{sub 2} above 120 K, suggesting that a neutral radical rather than the ring-opened distonic radical cation is observed in the CF{sub 2}ClCFCl{sub 2} matrix.

  3. Cation–cation interactions and cation exchange in a series of isostructural framework uranyl tungstates

    SciTech Connect

    Balboni, Enrica; Burns, Peter C.

    2014-05-01

    The isotypical compounds (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(WO{sub 6})(H{sub 2}O){sub 5} (1), Ag(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(WO{sub 6})(OH)(H{sub 2}O){sub 3} (2), K(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(WO{sub 6})OH(H{sub 2}O){sub 4} (3), Rb(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(WO{sub 6})(OH)(H{sub 2}O){sub 3.5} (4), and Cs(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(WO{sub 6})OH(H{sub 2}O){sub 3} (5) were synthesized, characterized, and their structures determined. Each crystallizes in space group Cc. (1): a=12.979 (3), b=10.238 (2), c=11.302 (2), β=102.044 (2); (2): a=13.148 (2), b=9.520 (1), c=11.083 (2), β=101.568 (2); (3): a=13.111 (8), b=9.930 (6), c=11.242 (7), β=101.024 (7); (4): a=12.940 (2), b=10.231 (2), c=11.259(2), β=102.205 (2); (5): a=12.983 (3), b=10.191 (3), c=11.263 (4), β=101.661 (4). Compounds 1–5 are a framework of uranyl and tungsten polyhedra containing cation–cation interactions. The framework has three symmetrically distinct U(VI) cations, one tungsten, sixteen to eighteen oxygen atoms, and in 2–5, one monovalent cation. Each atom occupies a general position. Each U(VI) cation is present as a typical (UO{sub 2}){sup 2+} uranyl ion in an overall pentagonal bipyramidal coordination environment. Each pentagonal bipyramid shares two equatorial edges with two other pentagonal bipyramids, forming a trimer. Trimers are connected into chains by edge-sharing with WO{sub 6} octahedra. Chains are linked through cation–cation interactions between two symmetrically independent uranyl ions. This yields a remarkably complex system of intersecting channels that extend along [0 0 1] and [−1 1 0]. The cation exchange properties of 2 and 3 were characterized at room temperature and at 140 °C. - Graphical abstract: Chains of uranium and tungsten polyhedra are connected into a three dimensional framework by cation–cation interactions occurring between two symmetrically independent uranyl pentagonal bipyramids. Monovalent cations present in channels within the structure can be exchanged by room temperature or mild hydrothermal

  4. Solubility of pllutonium in alkaline salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.T.; Edwards, T.B.

    1993-02-26

    Plutonium solubility data from several studies have been evaluated. For each data set, a predictive model has been developed where appropriate. In addition, a statistical model and corresponding prediction intervals for plutonium solubility as a quadratic function of the hydroxide concentration have been developed. Because of the wide range of solution compositions, the solubility of plutonium can vary by as much as three orders of magnitude for any given hydroxide concentration and still remain within the prediction interval. Any nuclear safety assessments that depend on the maximum amount of plutonium dissolved in alkaline salt solutions should use concentrations at least as great as the upper prediction limits developed in this study. To increase the confidence in the prediction model, it is recommended that additional solubility tests be conducted at low hydroxide concentrations and with all of the other solution components involved. To validate the model for application to actual waste solutions, it is recommended that the plutonium solubilities in actual waste solutions be determined and compared to the values predicted by the quadratic model.

  5. Hydrocarbon potential of an alkaline lake basin

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Jian Yu; Wang Gijun ); Ma Wanyi )

    1991-03-01

    The Biyan basin is an oil-rich intermountain basin in the central part of China. It is a half graben with a marginal normal fault in the south and a slope in the north. The thickest Eogene reaches 7 km in the center of the depression. This basin became a typical alkaline lake with specific sedimentary sequences composed of oil shale, trona, dolomite, and dark mudstone during Early Tertiary because of dry climate and peripheral source areas rich in Na-containing minerals. The source rock is characterized by abundant organic matter with a mean TOC of 2.5% and kerogen of good quality with H/C 1.4-1.7, and IH up to 800 mg/g. The study of biomarkers reveals a low Pr/Ph ratio and an abundant gammacerane and {minus}carotane, thus indicating an environment of high salinity and reduction. All geochemical data demonstrate multiple provinces of primary organic matter, of which halophilous prokaryotic organisms are likely contributors. Crude oil in the Biyan oil field contains high wax and low sulfur. The low-mature oil is discovered in dolomite beds. The high hydrocarbon potential of this basin is due to particularly favorable conditions for preservation and transformation of organic matter and high subsidence rates.

  6. Response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris to Alkaline Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Stolyar, S.; He, Q.; He, Z.; Yang, Z.; Borglin, S.E.; Joyner, D.; Huang, K.; Alm, E.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.; Wall, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.; Stahl, D.A.

    2007-11-30

    The response of exponentially growing Desulfovibrio vulgarisHildenborough to pH 10 stress was studied using oligonucleotidemicroarrays and a study set of mutants with genes suggested by microarraydata to be involved in the alkaline stress response deleted. The datashowed that the response of D. vulgaris to increased pH is generallysimilar to that of Escherichia coli but is apparently controlled byunique regulatory circuits since the alternative sigma factors (sigma Sand sigma E) contributing to this stress response in E. coli appear to beabsent in D. vulgaris. Genes previously reported to be up-regulated in E.coli were up-regulated in D. vulgaris; these genes included three ATPasegenes and a tryptophan synthase gene. Transcription of chaperone andprotease genes (encoding ATP-dependent Clp and La proteases and DnaK) wasalso elevated in D. vulgaris. As in E. coli, genes involved in flagellumsynthesis were down-regulated. The transcriptional data also identifiedregulators, distinct from sigma S and sigma E, that are likely part of aD. vulgaris Hildenborough-specific stress response system.Characterization of a study set of mutants with genes implicated inalkaline stress response deleted confirmed that there was protectiveinvolvement of the sodium/proton antiporter NhaC-2, tryptophanase A, andtwo putative regulators/histidine kinases (DVU0331 andDVU2580).

  7. Engineering challenges of ocean alkalinity enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruger, T.; Renforth, P.

    2012-04-01

    The addition of calcium oxide (CaO) to the ocean as a means of enhancing the capacity of the ocean as a carbon sink was first proposed by Haroon Kheshgi in 1995. Calcium oxide is created by heating high purity limestone in a kiln to temperatures of approximately 1000°C. Addition of this material to the ocean draws carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere (approximately 1 tonne of CaO could sequester 1.3 tonnes of CO2). Abiotic carbonate precipitation is inhibited in the surface ocean. This is a carbon and energy expensive process, where approximately 0.8 tonnes of CO2 are produced at a point source for every tonne sequestered. The feasibility of ocean alkalinity enhancement requires capture and storage of the point source of CO2. We present details of a feasibility study of the engineering challenges of Kheshgi's method focusing on the potential scalability and costs of the proposed process. To draw down a PgC per year would require the extraction and processing of ~6Pg of limestone per year, which is similar in scale to the current coal industry. Costs are estimated at ~USD30-40 per tonne of CO2 sequestered through the process, which is favourable to comparative processes. Kheshgi, H. (1995) Energy 20 (9) 915-922

  8. Process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Chia-lin W.

    1995-01-01

    A process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification. The process involves acidifying the wastes with an oxidizing agent such as nitric acid, then adding formic acid as a reducing agent, and then mixing with glass formers to produce a melter feed. The nitric acid contributes nitrates that act as an oxidant to balance the redox of the melter feed, prevent reduction of certain species to produce conducting metals, and lower the pH of the wastes to a suitable level for melter operation. The formic acid reduces mercury compounds to elemental mercury for removal by steam stripping, and MnO.sub.2 to the Mn(II) ion to prevent foaming of the glass melt. The optimum amounts of nitric acid and formic acid are determined in relation to the composition of the wastes, including the concentrations of mercury (II) and MnO.sub.2, noble metal compounds, nitrates, formates and so forth. The process minimizes the amount of hydrogen generated during treatment, while producing a redox-balanced feed for effective melter operation and a quality glass product.

  9. Process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, C.L.W.

    1995-07-25

    A process is described for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification. The process involves acidifying the wastes with an oxidizing agent such as nitric acid, then adding formic acid as a reducing agent, and then mixing with glass formers to produce a melter feed. The nitric acid contributes nitrates that act as an oxidant to balance the redox of the melter feed, prevent reduction of certain species to produce conducting metals, and lower the pH of the wastes to a suitable level for melter operation. The formic acid reduces mercury compounds to elemental mercury for removal by steam stripping, and MnO{sub 2} to the Mn(II) ion to prevent foaming of the glass melt. The optimum amounts of nitric acid and formic acid are determined in relation to the composition of the wastes, including the concentrations of mercury (II) and MnO{sub 2}, noble metal compounds, nitrates, formates and so forth. The process minimizes the amount of hydrogen generated during treatment, while producing a redox-balanced feed for effective melter operation and a quality glass product. 4 figs.

  10. Production of alkaline protease from Cellulosimicrobium cellulans

    PubMed Central

    Ferracini-Santos, Luciana; Sato, Hélia H

    2009-01-01

    Cellulosimicrobium cellulans is one of the microorganisms that produces a wide variety of yeast cell wall-degrading enzymes, β-1,3-glucanase, protease and chitinase. Dried cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were used as carbon and nitrogen source for cell growth and protease production. The medium components KH2PO4, KOH and dried yeast cells showed a significant effect (p<0.05) on the factorial fractional design. A second design was prepared using two factors: pH and percentage of dried yeast cells. The results showed that the culture medium for the maximum production of protease was 0.2 g/l of MgSO4.7H2O, 2.0 g/l of (NH4)2SO4 and 8% of dried yeast cells in 0.15M phosphate buffer at pH 8.0. The maximum alkaline protease production was 7.0 ± 0.27 U/ml over the center point. Crude protease showed best activity at 50ºC and pH 7.0-8.0, and was stable at 50ºC. PMID:24031317

  11. Bacterial Diversity in a Nonsaline Alkaline Environment: Heterotrophic Aerobic Populations

    PubMed Central

    Tiago, Igor; Chung, Ana Paula; Veríssimo, António

    2004-01-01

    Heterotrophic populations were isolated and characterized from an alkaline groundwater environment generated by active serpentinization, which results in a Ca(OH)2-enriched, extremely diluted groundwater with pH 11.4. One hundred eighty-five strains were isolated in different media at different pH values during two sampling periods. To assess the degree of diversity present in the environment and to select representative strains for further characterization of the populations, we screened the isolates by using random amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR profiles and grouped them based on similarities determined by fatty acid methyl ester analysis. Phenotypic characterization, determinations of G+C content, phylogenetic analyses by direct sequencing of 16S rRNA genes, and determinations of pH tolerance were performed with the selected isolates. Although 38 different populations were identified and characterized, the vast majority of the isolates were gram positive with high G+C contents and were affiliated with three distinct groups, namely, strains closely related to the species Dietzia natrolimnae (32% of the isolates), to Frigoribacterium/Clavibacter lineages (29% of the isolates), and to the type strain of Microbacterium kitamiense (20% of the isolates). Other isolates were phylogenetically related to strains of the genera Agrococcus, Leifsonia, Kytococcus, Janibacter, Kocuria, Rothia, Nesterenkonia, Citrococcus, Micrococcus, Actinomyces, Rhodococcus, Bacillus, and Staphylococcus. Only five isolates were gram negative: one was related to the Sphingobacteria lineage and the other four were related to the α-Proteobacteria lineage. Despite the pH of the environment, the vast majority of the populations were alkali tolerant, and only two strains were able to grow at pH 11. PMID:15574939

  12. Sedimentary lipid biogeochemistry of an hypereutrophic alkaline lagoon

    SciTech Connect

    Grimalt, J.O.; Albaiges, J. ); Yruela, I.; Saizjimenez, C. ); Toja, J. ); Leeuw, J.W. De. )

    1991-09-01

    A detailed study of the lipid composition of sedimentary and water particulate samples of a dilute alkaline lake (Santa Olalla Lagoon, Guadalquivir Delta, southwestern Spain) has allowed the identification and quantitation of about 300 compounds reflecting predominant inputs of organic matter and very early diagenetic processes. These lipids, dominated by fatty acids (80-86%), account for up to 0.25% wt. of dry sediment which is consistent with the high eutrophic conditions of the lagoon and suggests a good preservation of the originally produced organic matter. However, the primary lipid compounds, mainly from cyanobacterial origin, are strongly modified. The C{sub 30}-C{sub 32}, 1,13- and 1,15-diols constitute the only major group that can be attributed directly to these organisms. The predominant lipids, including the fatty acids, are indicative of intense microbial reworking, namely contributions from gram-positive and gram-negative eubacteria and methanogens. Conversely, the higher plant lipids are better preserved and dominate the aliphatic hydrocarbon fraction. Hydrogenation and dehydration are two major transformation processes in the sedimentary system being reflected in the transformation of sterols into 5{alpha}(H)- and 5{beta}(H)-stanols and sterenes, and 17{beta}(H), 21{beta}(H)-hopan-22-ol into diploptene. Oxidation in the water column seems to involve the partial transformation of sterols into steroid ketones, phytol into 5,9,13-trimethyltetradecanoic acid and two isomeric 3,7,11,15-tetramethyl-17-hexadecanolides, and, possibly, tetrahymanol into gammacer-3-one. Adiantone and bishomohopanoic acid probably result from the partial oxydation of extended polyhydroxyhopanes or the C{sub 30}-C{sub 33} hydroxyhopanes found in the lagoon waters.

  13. Sedimentary lipid biogeochemistry of an hypereutrophic alkaline lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimalt, J. O.; Yruela, I.; Saiz-Jimenez, C.; Toja, J.; de Leeuw, J. W.; Albaigés, J.

    1991-09-01

    A detailed study of the lipid composition of sedimentary and water particulate samples of a dilute alkaline lake (Santa Olalla Lagoon, Guadalquivir Delta, southwestern Spain) has allowed the identification and quantitation of about 300 compounds reflecting predominant inputs of organic matter and very early diagenetic processes. These lipids, dominated by fatty acids (80-86%), account for up to 0.25% wt. of dry sediment which is consistent with the high eutrophic conditions of the lagoon and suggests a good preservation of the originally produced organic matter. However, the primary lipid compounds, mainly from cyanobacterial origin, are strongly modified. The C30-C32, 1,13- and 1,15-diols constitute the only major group that can be attributed directly to these organisms. The predominant lipids, including the fatty acids, are indicative of intense microbial reworking, namely contributions from gram-positive and gram-negative eubacteria and methanogens. Conversely, the higher plant lipids are better preserved and dominate the aliphatic hydrocarbon fraction. Hydrogenation and dehydration are two major transformation processes in the sedimentary system being reflected in the transformation of sterols into 5α(H)- and 5β(H)-stanols and sterenes, and 17β(H),21β(H)-hopan-22-ol into diploptene. Oxidation in the water column seems to involve the partial transformation of sterols into steroid ketones, phytol into 5,9,13-trimethyltetradecanoic acid and two isomeric 3,7,11,15-tetramethyl-17-hexadecanolides, and, possibly, tetrahymanol into gammacer-3-one. Adiantone and bishomohopanoic acid probably result from the partial oxydation of extended polyhydroxyhopanes or the C30-C33 hydroxyhopanes found in the lagoon waters.

  14. Downscaling Alkaline Phosphatase Activity in a Subtropical Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Y.

    2011-12-01

    This research was conducted by downscaling study to understand phosphorus (P)-deficient status of different plankton and the role of alkaline phosphatase activity (APA) in subtropical Feitsui Reservoir. Results from field survey showed that bulk APA (1.6~95.2 nM h-1) was widely observed in the epilimnion (0~20 m) with an apparent seasonal variations, suggesting that plankton in the system were subjected to P-deficient seasonally. Mixed layer depth (an index of phosphate availability) is the major factor influencing the variation of bulk APA and specific APA (124~1,253 nmol mg C-1 h-1), based on multiple linear regression analysis. Size-fractionated APA assays showed that picoplankton (size 0.2~3 um) contributed most of the bulk APA in the system. In addition, single-cell APA detected by enzyme-labeled fluorescence (ELF) assay indicated that heterotrophic bacteria are the major contributors of APA. Thus, we can infer that bacteria play an important role in accelerating P-cycle within P-deficient systems. Light/nutrient manipulation bioassays showed that bacterial growth was directly controlled by phosphate, while picocyanobacterial growth is controlled by light and can out-compete bacteria under P-limited condition with the aid of light. Further analysis revealed that the strength of summer typhoon is a factor responsible for the inter-annual variability of bulk and specific APA. APA study demonstrated the episodic events (e.g. strong typhoon and extreme precipitation) had significant influence on APA variability in sub-tropical to tropical aquatic ecosystems. Hence, the results herein will allow future studies on monitoring typhoon disturbance (intensity and frequency) as well as the APA of plankton during summer-to-autumn in subtropical systems.

  15. Electrokinetic properties of wavellite and its floatability with cationic and anionic collectors.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Aline Pereira Leite; Peres, Antônio Eduardo Clark; de Araujo, Armando Corrêa; Valadão, George Eduardo Sales

    2011-09-15

    The reverse apatite flotation with fatty acids has been widely used for the reduction of phosphorus content of magmatic origin iron ores. However, the occurrence of phosphorus intensely disseminated as secondary minerals such as wavellite renders the anionic reverse flotation a challenge. Zeta potential measurements and microflotation tests of wavellite with the use of anionic and cationic collectors were carried out in this work. The wavellite's IEP value was achieved at pH 4.5. Below the IEP value, the surface positively charged sites are made up of aluminum ions. The species H(+), Al(OH)(2)(+), Al(OH)(2+), Al(3+), OH(-), H(2)PO(4)(-), HPO(4)(2-), and PO(4)(3-) play a role in the protonation and deprotonation reactions that will determine the wavellite-solution interface properties. The highest values of wavellite's floatability under basic pH conditions were achieved in the presence of cationic collectors (1 × 10(-4) mol L(-1)). The formation of surface complexes and the precipitation of insoluble salt of aluminum onto wavellite surface seems to be the most likely hypothesis for the chemical nature interactions between amines and wavellite. The surface formation of aluminum oleate on the wavellite's surface seems to be the most probable hypothesis for the adsorption mechanism and the resultant high floatability of wavellite between pH 7.5 and pH 10.0 in the presence of sodium oleate (1 × 10(-4) mol L(-1)). The results showed that the cationic reverse flotation of secondary phosphates is a promising route to reduce the phosphorus content of iron ores from deposits that underwent a supergene enrichment process, since wavellite floatability in the alkaline pH range, using amine as collector, was not significantly affected by the presence of corn starch. PMID:21719026

  16. Method of increasing the sulfation capacity of alkaline earth sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Shearer, John A.; Turner, Clarence B.; Johnson, Irving

    1982-01-01

    A system and method for increasing the sulfation capacity of alkaline earth carbonates to scrub sulfur dioxide produced during the fluidized bed combustion of coal in which partially sulfated alkaline earth carbonates are hydrated in a fluidized bed to crack the sulfate coating and convert the alkaline earth oxide to the hydroxide. Subsequent dehydration of the sulfate-hydroxide to a sulfate-oxide particle produces particles having larger pore size, increased porosity, decreased grain size and additional sulfation capacity. A continuous process is disclosed.

  17. Polyvinyl alcohol battery separator containing inert filler. [alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Hsu, L. C.; Manzo, M. A. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A cross-linked polyvinyl alcohol battery separator is disclosed. A particulate filler, inert to alkaline electrolyte of an alkaline battery, is incorporated in the separator in an amount of 1-20% by weight, based on the weight of the polyvinyl alcohol, and is dispersed throughout the product. Incorporation of the filler enhances performance and increases cycle life of alkaline batteries when compared with batteries containing a similar separator not containing filler. Suitable fillers include titanates, silicates, zirconates, aluminates, wood floor, lignin, and titania. Particle size is not greater than about 50 microns.

  18. Method of increasing the sulfation capacity of alkaline earth sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Shearer, J.A.; Turner, C.B.; Johnson, I.

    1980-03-13

    A system and method for increasing the sulfation capacity of alkaline earth carbonates to scrub sulfur dioxide produced during the fluidized bed combustion of coal in which partially sulfated alkaline earth carbonates are hydrated in a fluidized bed to crack the sulfate coating and convert the alkaline earth oxide to the hydroxide. Subsequent dehydration of the sulfate-hydroxide to a sulfate-oxide particle produces particles having larger pore size, increased porosity, decreased grain size and additional sulfation capacity. A continuous process is disclosed.

  19. Prediction of the speciation of alkaline earths adsorbed on mineral surfaces in salt solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sverjensky, Dimitri A.

    2006-05-01

    Despite the fact that the bulk compositions of most low temperature natural surface waters, groundwaters, and porewaters are heavily influenced by alkaline earths, an understanding of the development of proton surface charge in the presence of alkaline earth adsorption on the surfaces of minerals is lacking. In particular, models of speciation at the mineral-water interface in systems involving alkaline earths need to be established for a range of different minerals. In the present study, X-ray standing wave results for Sr 2+ adsorption on rutile as a tetranuclear complex [Fenter, P., Cheng, L., Rihs, S., Machesky, M., Bedyzk, M.D., Sturchio, N.C., 2000. Electrical double-layer structure at the rutile-water interface as observed in situ with small-period X-ray standing waves. J. Colloid Interface Sci.225, 154-165] are used as constraints for all the alkaline earths in surface complexation simulations of proton surface charge, metal adsorption, and electrokinetic experiments referring to wide ranges of pH, ionic strength, surface coverage, and type of oxide. The tetranuclear reaction 4>SOH+M+H2O=(>SOH)2(>SO-)2_M(OH)++3H+ predominates for the large cations Sr 2+ and Ba 2+ (and presumably Ra 2+), consistent with X-ray results. In contrast, the mononuclear reaction >SOH+M+H2O=>SO-_M(OH)++2H+ predominates for the much smaller Mg 2+ (and presumably Be 2+), with minor amounts of the tetranuclear reaction. Both reaction types appear to be important for the intermediate size Ca 2+. For all the alkaline earths on all oxides, the proportions of the different reaction types vary systematically as a function of pH, ionic strength, and surface coverage. The application of Born solvation and crystal-chemical theory enables estimation of the equilibrium constants of adsorption of all the alkaline earths on all oxides. On high dielectric constant solids (rutile, magnetite, manganese dioxide), where the solvation contribution is negligable, ion adsorption correlates with crystal

  20. Alkali or alkaline earth metal promoted catalyst and a process for methanol synthesis using alkali or alkaline earth metals as promoters

    DOEpatents

    Tierney, John W.; Wender, Irving; Palekar, Vishwesh M.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a heterogeneous catalyst comprising reduced copper chromite impregnated with an alkali or alkaline earth metal. There is thus no need to add a separate alkali or alkaline earth compound. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100.degree.-160.degree. C. and the pressure range of 40-65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H.sub.2 /CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

  1. Alkali or alkaline earth metal promoted catalyst and a process for methanol synthesis using alkali or alkaline earth metals as promoters

    DOEpatents

    Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.; Palekar, V.M.

    1995-01-31

    The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a heterogeneous catalyst comprising reduced copper chromite impregnated with an alkali or alkaline earth metal. There is thus no need to add a separate alkali or alkaline earth compound. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100--160 C and the pressure range of 40--65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H[sub 2]/CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

  2. Ultrafast dynamics of pyrrolidinium cation ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Shirota, Hideaki; Funston, Alison M; Wishart, James F; Castner, Edward W

    2005-05-01

    We have investigated the ultrafast molecular dynamics of five pyrrolidinium cation room temperature ionic liquids using femtosecond optical heterodyne-detected Raman-induced Kerr effect spectroscopy. The ionic liquids studied are N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide P14+/NTf2-), N-methoxyethyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide P1EOE+/NTf2-), N-ethoxyethyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide P1EOE+/NTf2-), N-ethoxyethyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bromide P1EOE+, and N-ethoxyethyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium dicyanoamide P1EOE+/DCA-). For comparing dynamics among the five ionic liquids, we categorize the ionic liquids into two groups. One group of liquids comprises the three pyrrolidinium cations P14+, P1EOM+, and P1EOE+ paired with the NTf2- anion. The other group of liquids consists of the P1EOE+ cation paired with each of the three anions NTf2-, Br-, and DCA-. The overdamped relaxation for time scales longer than 2 ps has been fit by a triexponential function for each of the five pyrrolidinium ionic liquids. The fast ( approximately 2 ps) and intermediate (approximately 20 ps) relaxation time constants vary little among these five ionic liquids. However, the slow relaxation time constant correlates with the viscosity. Thus, the Kerr spectra in the range from 0 to 750 cm(-1) are quite similar for the group of three pyrrolidinium ionic liquids paired with the NTf2- anion. The intermolecular vibrational line shapes between 0 and 150 cm(-1) are fit to a multimode Brownian oscillator model; adequate fits required at least three modes to be included in the line shape. PMID:15918734

  3. Ultrafast dynamics of pyrrolidinium cation ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirota, Hideaki; Funston, Alison M.; Wishart, James F.; Castner, Edward W.

    2005-05-01

    We have investigated the ultrafast molecular dynamics of five pyrrolidinium cation room temperature ionic liquids using femtosecond optical heterodyne-detected Raman-induced Kerr effect spectroscopy. The ionic liquids studied are N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide P14+/NTf2-), N-methoxyethyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide P1EOE+/NTf2-), N-ethoxyethyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide P1EOE+/NTf2-), N-ethoxyethyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bromideP1EOE+, and N-ethoxyethyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium dicyanoamide P1EOE+/DCA-). For comparing dynamics among the five ionic liquids, we categorize the ionic liquids into two groups. One group of liquids comprises the three pyrrolidinium cations P14+, P1EOM+, and P1EOE+ paired with the NTf2- anion. The other group of liquids consists of the P1EOE+ cation paired with each of the three anions NTf2-,Br-, and DCA-. The overdamped relaxation for time scales longer than 2 ps has been fit by a triexponential function for each of the five pyrrolidinium ionic liquids. The fast (˜2ps) and intermediate (˜20ps) relaxation time constants vary little among these five ionic liquids. However, the slow relaxation time constant correlates with the viscosity. Thus, the Kerr spectra in the range from 0 to 750cm-1 are quite similar for the group of three pyrrolidinium ionic liquids paired with the NTf2- anion. The intermolecular vibrational line shapes between 0 and 150cm-1 are fit to a multimode Brownian oscillator model; adequate fits required at least three modes to be included in the line shape.

  4. Cationic bituminous emulsions and emulsion aggregate slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, P.

    1986-07-01

    A cationic bituminous emulsion is described which consists of from about 30% to about 80% by weight of bitumen, from about 0.1% to about 10% by weight of an emulsifier selected from the group consisting of reaction products of a polyamine reacted with a member of the group consisting of epoxidized unsaturated fatty acids of chain lengths between C/sub 8/ and C/sub 22/ and the esters thereof and adding water to make up 100% by weight, the emulsion having a pH in the range of from 2-7.

  5. Nonclassical 21-Homododecahedryl Cation Rearrangement Revisited.

    PubMed

    Jalife, Said; Mondal, Sukanta; Osorio, Edison; Cabellos, José Luis; Martínez-Guajardo, Gerardo; Fernández-Herrera, María A; Merino, Gabriel

    2016-03-01

    The degenerate rearrangement in the 21-homododecahedryl cation (1) has been studied via density functional theory computations and Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics simulations. Compound 1 can be described as a highly fluxional hyperconjugated carbocation. Complete scrambling of 1 can be achieved by the combination of two unveiled barrierless processes. The first one is a "rotation" of one of the six-membered rings via a 0.8 kcal·mol(-1) barrier, and the second one is a slower interconvertion between two hyperconjomers via an out-of-plane methine bending (ΔG(⧧) = 4.0 kcal·mol(-1)). PMID:26862680

  6. Mobility of cations in magnesium aluminate spinel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinelli, J. R.; Sonder, E.; Weeks, R. A.; Zuhr, R. A.

    1986-04-01

    Transport of cations in magnesium aluminate spinel due to an applied electric field at approximately 1000 °C has been measured by observing changes in elemental concentrations near the cathode and anode surfaces using ion backscattering techniques. The results indicate that magnesium ions are the mobile species at 1000 °C and that these ions combine with ambient oxygen at the cathode surface to form a MgO layer. Quantitative interpretation of the data leads to the conclusion that the ionic transference number of spinel becomes approximately 0.5 after treatment in an electric field.

  7. Fragmentation Pathways in the Uracil Radical Cation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Congyi; Matsika, Spiridoula; Kotur, Marija; Weinacht, Thomas C.

    2012-08-24

    We investigate pathways for fragmentation in the uracil radical cation using ab initio electronic structure calculations. We focus on the main fragments produced in pump–probe dissociative ionization experiments. These are fragments with mass to charge ratios (m/z) of 69, 28, 41, and 42. Barriers to dissociation along the ground ionic surface are reported, which provide an estimate of the energetic requirements for the production of the main fragments. Finally, direct and sequential fragmentation mechanisms have been analyzed, and it is concluded that sequential fragmentation after production of fragment with m/z 69 is the dominant mechanism for the production of the smaller fragments.

  8. Evaluation of planarization performance for a novel alkaline copper slurry under a low abrasive concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengting, Jiang; Yuling, Liu; Haobo, Yuan; Guodong, Chen; Weijuan, Liu

    2014-11-01

    A novel alkaline copper slurry that possesses a relatively high planarization performance is investigated under a low abrasive concentration. Based on the action mechanism of CMP, the feasibility of using one type of slurry in copper bulk elimination process and residual copper elimination process, with different process parameters, was analyzed. In addition, we investigated the regular change of abrasive concentration effect on copper and tantalum removal rate and within wafer non-uniformity (WIWNU) in CMP process. When the abrasive concentration is 3 wt%, in bulk elimination process, the copper removal rate achieves 6125 Å/min, while WIWNU is 3.5%, simultaneously. In residual copper elimination process, the copper removal rate is approximately 2700 Å/min, while WIWNU is 2.8%. Nevertheless, the tantalum removal rate is 0 Å/min, which indicates that barrier layer isn't eliminated in residual copper elimination process. The planarization experimental results show that an excellent planarization performance is obtained with a relatively high copper removal rate in bulk elimination process. Meanwhile, after residual copper elimination process, the dishing value increased inconspicuously, in a controllable range, and the wafer surface roughness is only 0.326 nm (sq < 1 nm) after polishing. By comparison, the planarization performance and surface quality of alkaline slurry show almost no major differences with two kinds of commercial acid slurries after polishing. All experimental results are conducive to research and improvement of alkaline slurry in the future.

  9. Cyanide Degradation under Alkaline Conditions by a Strain of Fusarium solani Isolated from Contaminated Soils

    PubMed Central

    Dumestre, A.; Chone, T.; Portal, J.; Gerard, M.; Berthelin, J.

    1997-01-01

    Several cyanide-tolerant microorganisms have been selected from alkaline wastes and soils contaminated with cyanide. Among them, a fungus identified as Fusarium solani IHEM 8026 shows a good potential for cyanide biodegradation under alkaline conditions (pH 9.2 to 10.7). Results of K(sup14)CN biodegradation studies show that fungal metabolism seems to proceed by a two-step hydrolytic mechanism: (i) the first reaction involves the conversion of cyanide to formamide by a cyanide-hydrolyzing enzyme, cyanide hydratase (EC 4.2.1.66); and (ii) the second reaction consists of the conversion of formamide to formate, which is associated with fungal growth. No growth occurred during the first step of cyanide degradation, suggesting that cyanide is toxic to some degree even in cyanide-degrading microorganisms, such as F. solani. The presence of organic nutrients in the medium has a major influence on the occurrence of the second step. Addition of small amounts of yeast extract led to fungal growth, whereas no growth was observed in media containing cyanide as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen. The simple hydrolytic detoxification pathway identified in the present study could be used for the treatment of many industrial alkaline effluents and wastes containing free cyanide without a prior acidification step, thus limiting the risk of cyanhydric acid volatilization; this should be of great interest from an environmental and health point of view. PMID:16535647

  10. Clinopyroxene-liquid thermometers and barometers specific to alkaline differentiated magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masotta, M.; Mollo, S.; Freda, C.; Gaeta, M.; Moore, G.

    2013-12-01

    We present new thermometers and barometers based on clinopyroxene-liquid equilibria specific to alkaline differentiated magmas. The new models were calibrated through the regression analyses of experimental datasets obtained by merging phase equilibria experiments from the literature with new experiments performed by using trachytic and phonolitic starting compositions. The regression strategy was twofold: (1) we have tested previous thermometric and barometric equations and recalibrated these models using the new datasets; (2) we have calibrated a new thermometer and a new barometer including only regression parameters that closely describe the compositional variability of the datasets. The new models yield more precise estimates than previous thermometers and barometers when used to predict temperatures and pressures of alkaline differentiated magmas. We have tested the reliability of the new equations by using clinopyroxene-liquid pairs from trachytes and phonolites erupted during major explosive eruptions at the Phlegrean Fields and Mt. Vesuvius (central Italy). The test yielded crystallization conditions comparable to those determined by means of melt and fluid inclusion analyses and phase equilibria studies; this validates the use of the proposed models for precise estimates of crystallization temperatures and pressures in differentiated alkaline magmas. Because these magmas feed some of the most voluminous, explosive, and threatening volcanic eruptions in the world, a better understanding of the environmental conditions of their reservoirs is mandatory and this is now possible with the new models provided here.

  11. Mapping of export signals of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pilin with alkaline phosphatase fusions.

    PubMed Central

    Strom, M S; Lory, S

    1987-01-01

    Pili of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are assembled from monomers of the structural subunit, pilin, after secretion of this protein across the bacterial membrane. These subunits are initally synthesized as precursors (prepilin) with a six-amino-acid leader peptide that is cleaved off during or after membrane traversal, followed by methylation of the amino-terminal phenylalanine residue. This report demonstrates that additional sequences from the N terminus of the mature protein are necessary for membrane translocation. Gene fusions were made between amino-terminal coding sequences of the cloned pilin gene (pilA) and the structural gene for Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase (phoA) devoid of a signal sequence. Fusions between at least 45 amino acid residues of the mature pilin and alkaline phosphatase resulted in translocation of the fusion proteins across the cytoplasmic membranes of both P. aeruginosa and E. coli strains carrying recombinant plasmids, as measured by alkaline phosphatase activity and Western blotting. Fusion proteins constructed with the first 10 amino acids of prepilin (including the 6-amino-acid leader peptide) were not secreted, although they were detected in the cytoplasm. Therefore, unlike that of the majority of secreted proteins that are synthesized with transient signal sequences, the membrane traversal of pilin across the bacterial membrane requires the transient six-amino-acid leader peptide as well as sequences contained in the N-terminal region of the mature pilin protein. Images PMID:2885309

  12. Soil Cation Status in Southern California: Interactions of Vehicular Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, R.; Bain, D. J.; Jenerette, D.; Clarke, L. W.

    2012-12-01

    Roadside soils are often enriched in trace metals due to vehicular deposition. However, less attention is given to base cation pools in roadside soils. Relatively high loadings of nitrate from vehicular exhaust should acidify roadside soils, potentially mobilizing cationic species by displacing them from soil exchange sites. In contrast, weathering of road materials can contribute substantial amounts of these cations to the same soils, potentially replenishing cation pools. Base cations are essential nutrients and these dynamics may alter ecosystem processes in near-road environments. Metal concentrations in park and garden soils collected from Southern California (Los Angeles and Riverside Counties) were examined across gradients of road network intensity, climate and geology. In these samples, base cation concentrations decrease in areas of denser road networks. Base cation concentrations also decrease with distance from the road, with near-road samples relatively depleted in base cation concentrations. In addition, base cation concentrations are associated with traffic flux density, with exchange pools decreasing near heavily trafficked areas. These relationships suggest road activity is mobilizing cations, depleting near-road soils of essential nutrient pools, despite road material weathering. This depletion of soil nutrients from exchange pools in roadside soils likely influences local ecological function in unpredictable ways. This observation lays the groundwork for continued characterization of soil metal processes in the increasingly common roadside environment.

  13. Evaluation of cation-anion interaction strength in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Ana M; Rocha, Marisa A A; Freire, Mara G; Marrucho, Isabel M; Coutinho, João A P; Santos, Luís M N B F

    2011-04-14

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with variable collision induced dissociation of the isolated [(cation)(2)anion](+) and/or [(anion)(2)cation](-) ions of imidazolium-, pyridinium-, pyrrolidinium-, and piperidinium-based ionic liquids (ILs) combined with a large set of anions, such as chloride, tetrafluoroborate, hexafluorophosphate, trifluoromethanesulfonate, and bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide, was used to carry out a systematic and comprehensive study on the ionic liquids relative interaction energies. The results are interpreted in terms of main influences derived from the structural characteristics of both anion and cation. On the basis of quantum chemical calculations, the effect of the anion upon the dissociation energies of the ionic liquid pair, and isolated [(cation)(2)anion](+) and/or [(anion)(2)cation](-) aggregates, were estimated and are in good agreement with the experimental data. Both experimental and computational results indicate an energetic differentiation between the cation and the anion to the ionic pair. Moreover, it was found that the quantum chemical calculations can describe the trend obtained for the electrostatic cation-anion attraction potential. The impact of the cation-anion interaction strengths in the surface tension of ionic liquids is further discussed. The surface tensions dependence on the cation alkyl chain length, and on the anion nature, follows an analogous pattern to that of the relative cation-anion interaction energies determined by mass spectrometry. PMID:21425809

  14. The Age of Majority.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of State Governments, Lexington, KY.

    During the past 2 years state laws lowering the age of majority to 18 and other statutes that confer some majority rights on minors have considerably altered the status of young people in our society. In 7 states, the age of majority has been lowered in an effort to relieve young people of the minority disabilities originally intended to protect…

  15. Processes affecting the oceanic distributions of dissolved calcium and alkalinity

    SciTech Connect

    Shiller, A.M.; Gieskes, J.M.

    1980-05-20

    Recent studies of the CO/sub 2/ system have suggested that chemical processes in addition to the dissolution and precipitation of calcium carbonate affect the oceanic calcium and alkalinity distributions. Calcium and alkalinity data from the North Pacific have been examined both by using the simple physical-chemical model of previous workers and by a study involving the broader oceanographic context of these data. The simple model is shown to be an inadequate basis for these studies. Although a proton flux associated with organic decomposition may affect the alkalinity, previously reported deviations of calcium-alkalinity correlations from expected trends appear to be related to boundary processes that have been neglected rather than to this proton flux. The distribution of calcium in the surface waters of the Pacific Ocean is examined.

  16. Alkaline flood prediction studies, Ranger VII pilot, Wilmington Field, California

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, E.H.; Breit, V.S.

    1982-01-01

    The paper discusses: (1) The design of a simulator to model alkaline displacement mechanisms and the current state-of-the-art understanding of in-situ caustic consumption. (2) Assimilation of laboratory core flood and rock consumption data. Use of this data in 1-D and 2-D limited area simulations, and a 3-D model of the entire pilot project. (3) Simulation studies of alkaline flood behavior in a small 2-D area of the field for various concentrations, slug sizes, long term consumption functions and two relative permeability adjustment mechanisms. (4) Scale up of 2-D simulation results, and their use in a 271 acre 1.097 x 10/sup 6/m/sup 2/), 7 layered 3-D model of the pilot. (5) Comparison of 3-D simulator results with initial field alkaline flood performance. (6) Recommended additional application of the simulator methods developed in this pilot and in other alkaline floods. 10 refs.

  17. ESTIMATION OF PHOSPHATE ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS. I. ALKALINE HYDROLYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) chemical reactivity models were extended to allow the calculation of alkaline hydrolysis rate constants of phosphate esters in water. The rate is calculated from the energy difference between the initial and transition state...

  18. ESTIMATION OF PHOSPHATE ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS - ALKALINE HYDROLYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) chemical reactivity models were extended to allow the calculation of alkaline hydrolysis rate constants of phosphate esters in water. The rate is calculated from the energy difference between the initial and transition state...

  19. Kinetics of the Fading of Phenolphthalein in Alkaline Solution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, Lois

    1989-01-01

    Described is an experiment which illustrates pseudo-first-order kinetics in the fading of a common indicator in an alkaline solution. Included are background information, details of materials used, laboratory procedures, and sample results. (CW)

  20. Oxygen electrodes for rechargeable alkaline fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swette, L.; Kackley, N.

    1989-01-01

    Electrocatalysts and supports for the positive electrode of moderate temperature single-unit rechargeable alkaline fuel cells are being investigated and developed. Candidate support materials were drawn from transition metal carbides, borides, nitrides and oxides which have high conductivity (greater than 1 ohm/cm). Candidate catalyst materials were selected largely from metal oxides of the form ABO sub x (where A = Pb, Cd, Mn, Ti, Zr, La, Sr, Na, and B = Pt, Pd, Ir, Ru, Ni (Co) which were investigated and/or developed for one function only, O2 reduction or O2 evolution. The electrical conductivity requirement for catalysts may be lower, especially if integrated with a higher conductivity support. All candidate materials of acceptable conductivity are subjected to corrosion testing. Materials that survive chemical testing are examined for electrochemical corrosion activity. For more stringent corrosion testing, and for further evaluation of electrocatalysts (which generally show significant O2 evolution at at 1.4 V), samples are held at 1.6 V or 0.6 V for about 100 hours. The surviving materials are then physically and chemically analyzed for signs of degradation. To evaluate the bifunctional oxygen activity of candidate catalysts, Teflon-bonded electrodes are fabricated and tested in a floating electrode configuration. Many of the experimental materials being studied have required development of a customized electrode fabrication procedure. In advanced development, the goal is to reduce the polarization to about 300 to 350 mV. Approximately six support materials and five catalyst materials were identified to date for further development. The test results will be described.

  1. The Martian ocean: First acid, then alkaline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, M. W.

    1992-01-01

    In Mars' distant past, carbon dioxide and water may have been plentiful. Values of total outgassed CO2 from several to about 10 bar are consistent with present knowledge, and this amount of CO2 implies an amount of water outgassed equal to an equivalent depth of 500 to 1000 m. It is quite reasonable, therefore, to envision an early Mars in which there was a body or bodies of liquid water, perhaps in the northern plains, and a dense carbon dioxide atmosphere. Under such conditions, the pH of the water will be low, due to the dissolution of carbon dioxide in the water to form carbonic acid. This acidic water is capable of weathering the available rock quite intensely, particularly because this rock is likely to be heavily fractured (from meteorite bombardment) or even consist of fine particles (such as pyroclastic deposits). As time goes on, however, the carbon dioxide atmosphere will rapidly pass through the ocean to form carbonate deposits. As the density of the atmosphere decreases, so will the flux of carbonic acid into the ocean. Without this input of carbonic acid, the effect of the dissolved weathering products will be to increase the pH of the water. The ocean will then become alkaline. To study this process, I have developed a geochemical cycle model for the atmosphere-hydrosphere-regolith system of Mars. The treatment of geochemical cycles as complex kinetic chemical reactions has been undertaken for terrestrial systems in recent years with much success. This method is capable of elegantly handling the interactions between the simultaneous chemical reactions needed to understand such a system.

  2. Net alkalinity and net acidity 1: Theoretical considerations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirby, C.S.; Cravotta, C.A., III

    2005-01-01

    Net acidity and net alkalinity are widely used, poorly defined, and commonly misunderstood parameters for the characterization of mine drainage. The authors explain theoretical expressions of 3 types of alkalinity (caustic, phenolphthalein, and total) and acidity (mineral, CO2, and total). Except for rarely-invoked negative alkalinity, theoretically defined total alkalinity is closely analogous to measured alkalinity and presents few practical interpretation problems. Theoretically defined "CO 2-acidity" is closely related to most standard titration methods with an endpoint pH of 8.3 used for determining acidity in mine drainage, but it is unfortunately named because CO2 is intentionally driven off during titration of mine-drainage samples. Using the proton condition/mass- action approach and employing graphs to illustrate speciation with changes in pH, the authors explore the concept of principal components and how to assign acidity contributions to aqueous species commonly present in mine drainage. Acidity is defined in mine drainage based on aqueous speciation at the sample pH and on the capacity of these species to undergo hydrolysis to pH 8.3. Application of this definition shows that the computed acidity in mg L -1 as CaCO3 (based on pH and analytical concentrations of dissolved FeII, FeIII, Mn, and Al in mg L -1):aciditycalculated=50{1000(10-pH)+[2(FeII)+3(FeIII)]/56+2(Mn)/ 55+3(Al)/27}underestimates contributions from HSO4- and H+, but overestimates the acidity due to Fe3+ and Al3+. However, these errors tend to approximately cancel each other. It is demonstrated that "net alkalinity" is a valid mathematical construction based on theoretical definitions of alkalinity and acidity. Further, it is shown that, for most mine-drainage solutions, a useful net alkalinity value can be derived from: (1) alkalinity and acidity values based on aqueous speciation, (2) measured alkalinity minus calculated acidity, or (3) taking the negative of the value obtained in a

  3. Solvent processible, high-performance partially fluorinated copoly(arylene ether) alkaline ionomers for alkaline electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Junfeng; Ünlü, Murat; Anestis-Richard, Irene; Kim, Hyea; Kohl, Paul A.

    2011-10-01

    A solvent processable, low water uptake, partially fluorinated copoly(arylene ether) functionalized with pendant quaternary ammonium groups (QAPAE) was synthesized and uses as the ionomer in alkaline electrodes on fuel cells. The quaternized polymers containing fluorinated biphenyl groups were synthesized via chloromethylation of copoly(arylene ether) followed by amination with trimethylamine. The resulting ionomers were very soluble in polar, aprotic solvents. Highly aminated ionomers had conductivities approaching 10 mS cm-1 at room temperature. Compared to previous ionomers based on quaternized poly(arylene ether sulfone) (QAPSF) with similar ion exchange capacity (IEC), the water uptake of QAPAE was significantly less due to the hydrophobic octafluoro-biphenyl groups in the backbone. The performance of the fuel cell electrodes made with the QAPAE ionomers was evaluated as the cathode on a hybrid AEM/PEM fuel cell. The QAPAE alkaline ionomer electrode with IEC = 1.22 meq g-1 had superior performance to the electrodes prepared with QAPSF, IEC = 1.21 meq g-1 at 25 and 60 °C in a H2/O2 fuel cell. The peak power densities at 60 °C were 315 mW cm-2 for QAPAE electrodes and 215 mW cm-2 for QAPSF electrodes.

  4. Alkali Metal Cation versus Proton and Methyl Cation Affinities: Structure and Bonding Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Boughlala, Zakaria; Fonseca Guerra, Célia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We have analyzed the structure and bonding of gas‐phase Cl−X and [HCl−X]+ complexes for X+= H+, CH3 +, Li+, and Na+, using relativistic density functional theory (DFT). We wish to establish a quantitative trend in affinities of the anionic and neutral Lewis bases Cl− and HCl for the various cations. The Cl−X bond becomes longer and weaker along X+ = H+, CH3 +, Li+, and Na+. Our main purpose is to understand the heterolytic bonding mechanism behind the intrinsic (i.e., in the absence of solvent) alkali metal cation affinities (AMCA) and how this compares with and differs from those of the proton affinity (PA) and methyl cation affinity (MCA). Our analyses are based on Kohn–Sham molecular orbital (KS‐MO) theory in combination with a quantitative energy decomposition analysis (EDA) that pinpoints the importance of the different features in the bonding mechanism. Orbital overlap appears to play an important role in determining the trend in cation affinities. PMID:27551660

  5. Alkali Metal Cation versus Proton and Methyl Cation Affinities: Structure and Bonding Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Boughlala, Zakaria; Fonseca Guerra, Célia; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2016-06-01

    We have analyzed the structure and bonding of gas-phase Cl-X and [HCl-X](+) complexes for X(+)= H(+), CH3 (+), Li(+), and Na(+), using relativistic density functional theory (DFT). We wish to establish a quantitative trend in affinities of the anionic and neutral Lewis bases Cl(-) and HCl for the various cations. The Cl-X bond becomes longer and weaker along X(+) = H(+), CH3 (+), Li(+), and Na(+). Our main purpose is to understand the heterolytic bonding mechanism behind the intrinsic (i.e., in the absence of solvent) alkali metal cation affinities (AMCA) and how this compares with and differs from those of the proton affinity (PA) and methyl cation affinity (MCA). Our analyses are based on Kohn-Sham molecular orbital (KS-MO) theory in combination with a quantitative energy decomposition analysis (EDA) that pinpoints the importance of the different features in the bonding mechanism. Orbital overlap appears to play an important role in determining the trend in cation affinities. PMID:27551660

  6. Photodissociation of Cerium Oxide Nanocluster Cations.

    PubMed

    Akin, S T; Ard, S G; Dye, B E; Schaefer, H F; Duncan, M A

    2016-04-21

    Cerium oxide cluster cations, CexOy(+), are produced via laser vaporization in a pulsed nozzle source and detected with time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The mass spectrum displays a strongly preferred oxide stoichiometry for each cluster with a specific number of metal atoms x, with x ≤ y. Specifically, the most prominent clusters correspond to the formula CeO(CeO2)n(+). The cluster cations are mass selected and photodissociated with a Nd:YAG laser at either 532 or 355 nm. The prominent clusters dissociate to produce smaller species also having a similar CeO(CeO2)n(+) formula, always with apparent leaving groups of (CeO2). The production of CeO(CeO2)n(+) from the dissociation of many cluster sizes establishes the relative stability of these clusters. Furthermore, the consistent loss of neutral CeO2 shows that the smallest neutral clusters adopt the same oxidation state (IV) as the most common form of bulk cerium oxide. Clusters with higher oxygen content than the CeO(CeO2)n(+) masses are present with much lower abundance. These species dissociate by the loss of O2, leaving surviving clusters with the CeO(CeO2)n(+) formula. Density functional theory calculations on these clusters suggest structures composed of stable CeO(CeO2)n(+) cores with excess oxygen bound to the surface as a superoxide unit (O2(-)). PMID:27035210

  7. Nanoheterostructure Cation Exchange: Anionic Framework Conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Prashant K.; Amirav, Lilac; Aloni, Shaul; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2010-05-11

    In ionic nanocrystals the cationic sub-lattice can be replaced with a different metal ion via a fast, simple, and reversible place-exchange, allowing post-synthetic modification of the composition of the nanocrystal, while preserving its size and shape. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that during such an exchange, the anionic framework of the crystal is preserved. When applied to nanoheterostructures, this phenomenon ensures that compositional interfaces within the heterostructure are conserved throughout the transformation. For instance, a morphology composed of a CdSe nanocrystal embedded in a CdS rod (CdSe/CdS) was exchanged to a PbSe/PbS nanorod via a Cu2Se/Cu2S structure. During every exchange cycle, the seed size and position within the nanorod were preserved, as evident by excitonic features, Z-contrast imaging, and elemental line-scans. Anionic framework conservation extends the domain of cation exchange to the design of more complex and unique nanostructures.

  8. Antibacterial Activity of Geminized Amphiphilic Cationic Homopolymers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Shi, Xuefeng; Yu, Danfeng; Zhang, Jian; Yang, Guang; Cui, Yingxian; Sun, Keji; Wang, Jinben; Yan, Haike

    2015-12-22

    The current study is aimed at investigating the effect of cationic charge density and hydrophobicity on the antibacterial and hemolytic activities. Two kinds of cationic surfmers, containing single or double hydrophobic tails (octyl chains or benzyl groups), and the corresponding homopolymers were synthesized. The antimicrobial activity of these candidate antibacterials was studied by microbial growth inhibition assays against Escherichia coli, and hemolysis activity was carried out using human red blood cells. It was interestingly found that the homopolymers were much more effective in antibacterial property than their corresponding monomers. Furthermore, the geminized homopolymers had significantly higher antibacterial activity than that of their counterparts but with single amphiphilic side chains in each repeated unit. Geminized homopolymers, with high positive charge density and moderate hydrophobicity (such as benzyl groups), combine both advantages of efficient antibacterial property and prominently high selectivity. To further explain the antibacterial performance of the novel polymer series, the molecular interaction mechanism is proposed according to experimental data which shows that these specimens are likely to kill microbes by disrupting bacterial membranes, leading them unlikely to induce resistance. PMID:26606647

  9. Divalent cation affinity sites in Paramecium aurelia.

    PubMed

    Fisher, G; Kaneshiro, E S; Peters, P D

    1976-05-01

    Sites with high calcium affinity in Paramecium aurelia were identified by high calcium (5 mM) fixation and electron microscope methods. Electron-opaque deposits were observed on the cytoplasmic side of surface membranes, particularly at the basal regions of cilia and trichocyst-pellicle fusion sites. Deposits were also observed on some smooth cytomembranes, within the axoneme of cilia, and on basal bodies. The divalent cations, Mg2+, Mn2+, Sr2+, Ni2+, Ba2+, and Zn2+, could be substituted for Ca2+ in the procedure. Deposits were larger with 5 mM Sr2+. Ba2+, and Mn2+ at ciliary transverse plates and the terminal plate of basal bodies. Microprobe analysis showed that Ca and C1 were concentrated within deposits. In some analyses, S and P were detected in deposits. Also, microprobe analysis of 5 mM Mn2+-fixed P. aurelia showed that those deposits were enriched in Mn and C1 and sometimes enriched in P. Deposits were seen only when the ciliates were actively swimming at the time of fixation. Locomotory mutants having defective membrane Ca-gating mechanisms and ciliates fixed while exhibiting ciliary reversal showed no obvious differences in deposition pattern and intensity. Possible correlations between electron-opaque deposits and the locations of intramembranous particles seen by freeze-fracture studied, as well as sites where fibrillar material associate with membranes are considered. The possibility that the action sites of calcium and other divalent cations were identified is discussed. PMID:1262398

  10. Ceramic Spheres From Cation Exchange Beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, F. W.

    2003-01-01

    Porous ZrO2 and hollow TiO2 spheres were synthesized from a strong acid cation exchange resin. Spherical cation exchange beads, polystyrene based polymer, were used as a morphological-directing template. Aqueous ion exchange reaction was used to chemically bind (ZrO)(2+) ions to the polystyrene structure. The pyrolysis of the polystyrene at 600 C produces porous ZrO2 spheres with a surface area of 24 sq m/g with a mean sphere size of 42 microns. Hollow TiO2 spheres were synthesized by using the beads as a micro-reactor. A direct surface reaction - between titanium isopropoxide and the resin beads forms a hydrous TiO2 shell around the polystyrene core. The pyrolysis of the polystyrene core at 600 C produces hollow anatase spheres with a surface area of 42 sq m/g with a mean sphere size of 38 microns. The formation of ceramic spheres was studied by XRD, SEM and B.E.T. nitrogen adsorption measurements.

  11. Interaction of Hyaluronan with Cationic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bano, Fouzia; Carril, Mónica; Di Gianvincenzo, Paolo; Richter, Ralf P

    2015-08-01

    The polysaccharide hyaluronan (HA) is a main component of peri- and extracellular matrix, and an attractive molecule for materials design in tissue engineering and nanomedicine. Here, we study the morphology of complexes that form upon interaction of nanometer-sized amine-coated gold particles with this anionic, linear, and regular biopolymer in solution and grafted to a surface. We find that cationic nanoparticles (NPs) have profound effects on HA morphology on the molecular and supramolecular scale. Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM-D) shows that depending on their relative abundance, cationic NPs promote either strong compaction or swelling of films of surface-grafted HA polymers (HA brushes). Transmission electron and atomic force microscopy reveal that the NPs do also give rise to complexes of distinct morphologies-compact nanoscopic spheres and extended microscopic fibers-upon interaction with HA polymers in solution. In particular, stable and hydrated spherical complexes of single HA polymers with NPs can be prepared when balancing the ionizable groups on HA and NPs. The observed self-assembly phenomena could be useful for the design of drug delivery vehicles and a better understanding of the reorganization of HA-rich synthetic or biological matrices. PMID:26146006

  12. A cation counterflux supports lysosomal acidification

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Benjamin E.; Huynh, Kassidy K.; Brodovitch, Alexandre; Jabs, Sabrina; Stauber, Tobias; Jentsch, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    The profound luminal acidification essential for the degradative function of lysosomes requires a counter-ion flux to dissipate an opposing voltage that would prohibit proton accumulation. It has generally been assumed that a parallel anion influx is the main or only counter-ion transport that enables acidification. Indeed, defective anion conductance has been suggested as the mechanism underlying attenuated lysosome acidification in cells deficient in CFTR or ClC-7. To assess the individual contribution of counter-ions to acidification, we devised means of reversibly and separately permeabilizing the plasma and lysosomal membranes to dialyze the cytosol and lysosome lumen in intact cells, while ratiometrically monitoring lysosomal pH. Replacement of cytosolic Cl− with impermeant anions did not significantly alter proton pumping, while the presence of permeant cations in the lysosomal lumen supported acidification. Accordingly, the lysosomes were found to acidify to the same pH in both CFTR- and ClC-7–deficient cells. We conclude that cations, in addition to chloride, can support lysosomal acidification and defects in lysosomal anion conductance cannot explain the impaired microbicidal capacity of CF phagocytes. PMID:20566682

  13. Pt- and Ru-doped SnO₂-Sb anodes with high stability in alkaline medium.

    PubMed

    Berenguer, Raúl; Sieben, Juan Manuel; Quijada, César; Morallón, Emilia

    2014-12-24

    Different Pt- and Ru-doped Ti/SnO2-Sb electrodes were synthesized by thermal decomposition. The effect of the gradual substitution of Sb by Ru in the nominal composition on the physicochemical and electrochemical properties were evaluated. The electrochemical stability of the electrodes was estimated from accelerated tests at 0.5 A cm(-2) in 1 M NaOH. Both as-synthesized and deactivated electrodes were thoroughly characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). The incorporation of a small amount (about 3 at. %) of both Pt and Ru into the SnO2-Sb electrodes produced a 400-times increase in their service life in alkaline medium, with no remarkable change in the electrocatalysis of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). It is concluded that the deactivation of the electrodes is promoted by alkaline dissolution of metal species and coating detachment at high potentials. The introduction of Pt has a coating compacting effect, and Ru(IV), at low amounts until 9.75 at. %, replaces the Sn(IV) cations in the rutile-like SnO2 structure to form a solid solution that strongly increases the stability of the electrodes. The observed Ru segregation and decreased stability for larger Ru contents (x > 9.75 at. %), together with the selective dissolution of Ru after deactivation, suggest that the formation of a homogeneous (RuδSn1-δ)O2 single-phase is crucial for the stabilization of these electrodes. PMID:25453898

  14. Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopic Studies of Radical Cation Reactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Sheng

    1990-01-01

    A spin Hamiltonian suitable for theoretical analyses of ESR spectra in this work is derived by using the general effective Hamiltonian theory in the usual Schrodinger representation. The Permutation Indices method is extended to obtain the dynamic exchange equations used in ESR lineshape simulation. The correlation between beta-hydrogen coupling constants and their geometric orientations is derived through the use of a perturbation method. The three electron bond model is extended to rationalize unimolecular rearrangements of radical cations. The ring-closed radical cations of 9,10-octalin oxide and syn-sesquinorbornene oxide have been characterized by ESR spectroscopy in the CFCl_3 matrix at low temperature. The ESR spectra of the former radical cation exhibit a novel alternating linewidth effect arising from an internal relation between the coupling constants for the four equivalent pairs of hydrogens. The self-electron-transfer rate constants between the methyl viologen dication and cation have been determined by dynamic ESR lineshape simulations at room temperature in allyl alcohol, water, methanol and propargyl alcohol solvents. The radical cation formed by the radiolytic oxidation of allylamine in Freon matrices at 77 K is shown to be the 3-iminiopropyl distonic species(3-iminium-1-propyl radical) resulting from a symmetry-allowed 1,2-hydrogen shift in the parent radical cation. The nucleophilic endocyclization of the but-3-en-1-ol radical cation to the protonated tetrahydrofuran -3-yl radical was observed in the radiolytic oxidation of but-3-en-1-ol in Freon matrices. ESR studies of the radiolytic oxidation of 1,5-hexadiyne have resulted in the first spectroscopic characterization of the radical cation Cope rearrangement, the 1,5-hexadiyne radical cation isomerizing to the 1,2,4,5 -hexatetraene radical cation. ESR studies show that the symmetric(C_{rm 2v}) bicyclo (3.3.0) -octa-2,6-diene-4,8-diyl(a bridged 1,4 -bishomobenzene species) radical cation is

  15. Overexpression of Human Bone Alkaline Phosphatase in Pichia Pastoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Laurel; Malone, Christine, C.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Pichiapastoris expression system was utilized to produce functionally active human bone alkaline phosphatase in gram quantities. Bone alkaline phosphatase is a key enzyme in bone formation and biomineralization, yet important questions about its structural chemistry and interactions with other cellular enzymes in mineralizing tissues remain unanswered. A soluble form of human bone alkaline phosphatase was constructed by deletion of the 25 amino acid hydrophobic C-terminal region of the encoding cDNA and inserted into the X-33 Pichiapastoris strain. An overexpression system was developed in shake flasks and converted to large-scale fermentation. Alkaline phosphatase was secreted into the medium to a level of 32mgAL when cultured in shake flasks. Enzyme activity was 12U/mg measured by a spectrophotometric assay. Fermentation yielded 880mgAL with enzymatic activity of 968U/mg. Gel electrophoresis analysis indicates that greater than 50% of the total protein in the fermentation is alkaline phosphatase. A purification scheme has been developed using ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by hydrophobic interaction chromatography. We are currently screening crystallization conditions of the purified recombinant protein for subsequent X-ray diffraction analyses. Structural data should provide additional information on the role of alkaline phosphatase in normal bone mineralization and in certain bone mineralization anomalies.

  16. A fungal pathogen secretes plant alkalinizing peptides to increase infection.

    PubMed

    Masachis, Sara; Segorbe, David; Turrà, David; Leon-Ruiz, Mercedes; Fürst, Ursula; El Ghalid, Mennat; Leonard, Guy; López-Berges, Manuel S; Richards, Thomas A; Felix, Georg; Di Pietro, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Plant infections caused by fungi are often associated with an increase in the pH of the surrounding host tissue(1). Extracellular alkalinization is thought to contribute to fungal pathogenesis, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we show that the root-infecting fungus Fusarium oxysporum uses a functional homologue of the plant regulatory peptide RALF (rapid alkalinization factor)(2,3) to induce alkalinization and cause disease in plants. An upshift in extracellular pH promotes infectious growth of Fusarium by stimulating phosphorylation of a conserved mitogen-activated protein kinase essential for pathogenicity(4,5). Fungal mutants lacking a functional Fusarium (F)-RALF peptide failed to induce host alkalinization and showed markedly reduced virulence in tomato plants, while eliciting a strong host immune response. Arabidopsis plants lacking the receptor-like kinase FERONIA, which mediates the RALF-triggered alkalinization response(6), displayed enhanced resistance against Fusarium. RALF homologues are found across a number of phylogenetically distant groups of fungi, many of which infect plants. We propose that fungal pathogens use functional homologues of alkalinizing peptides found in their host plants to increase their infectious potential and suppress host immunity. PMID:27572834

  17. Quantification of unsaturated-zone alteration and cation exchange in zeolitized tuffs at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaniman, David T.; Chipera, Steve J.; Bish, David L.; Carey, J. William; Levy, Schön S.

    2001-10-01

    Zeolitized horizons in the unsaturated zone (UZ) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA, are an important component in concepts for a high-level nuclear waste repository at this site. The use of combined quantitative X-ray diffraction and geochemical analysis allows measurement of the chemical changes that accompanied open-system zeolitization at Yucca Mountain. This approach also provides measures of the extent of chemical migration that has occurred in these horizons as a result of subsequent cation exchange. Mass-balance analysis of zeolitized horizons with extensive cation exchange (drill hole UZ-16) and with only minimal cation exchange (drill hole SD-9) shows that Al is essentially immobile. Although zeolitization occurred in an open system, the mass transfer of constituents other than water is relatively small in initial zeolitization, in contrast to the larger scales of cation exchange that can occur after zeolites have formed. Cation exchange in the clinoptilolite ± mordenite zeolitized horizons is seen in downward-diminishing concentration gradients of Ca, Mg, and Sr exchanged for Na and (to lesser extent) K. Comparison with data from drill hole SD-7, which has multiple zeolitized horizons above the water table, shows that the upper horizons accumulate Ca, Mg, and Sr to such an extent that transport of these elements to the deepest UZ zeolitized horizon can be blocked. Quantitative analysis of zeolite formation yields insight into processes that are implied from laboratory studies and modeling efforts but are otherwise unverified at the site. Such analysis also yields information not provided by or contradicted by some models of flow and transport. The results include the following: (1) evidence of effective downward flow through zeolitic horizons despite the low permeability of these horizons, (2) evidence that alkaline-earth elements accumulated by zeolites are mostly derived from eolian materials in surface soils, (3) validation of the very effective

  18. Controlling Cesium Cation Recognition via Cation Metathesis within and Ion Pair Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sung Kuk; Vargas-Zuniga, Gabriela; Hay, Benjamin; Young, Neil J; Delmau, Laetitia Helene; Lee, Prof. Chang-Hee; Kim, Jong Seung; Lynch, Vincent M.; Sessler, Jonathan L.

    2012-01-01

    Ion pair receptor 3 bearing an anion binding site and multiple cation binding sites has been synthesized and shown to function in a novel binding-release cycle that does not necessarily require displacement to effect release. The receptor forms stable complexes with the test cesium salts, CsCl and CsNO{sub 3}, in solution (10% methanol-d{sub 4} in chloroform-d) as inferred from {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopic analyses. The addition of KClO{sub 4} to these cesium salt complexes leads to a novel type of cation metathesis in which the 'exchanged' cations occupy different binding sites. Specifically, K{sup +} becomes bound at the expense of the Cs{sup +} cation initially present in the complex. Under liquid-liquid conditions, receptor 3 is able to extract CsNO{sub 3} and CsCl from an aqueous D{sub 2}O layer into nitrobenzene-d{sub 5} as inferred from {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopic analyses and radiotracer measurements. The Cs{sup +} cation of the CsNO{sub 3} extracted into the nitrobenzene phase by receptor 3 may be released into the aqueous phase by contacting the loaded nitrobenzene phase with an aqueous KClO{sub 4} solution. Additional exposure of the nitrobenzene layer to chloroform and water gives 3 in its uncomplexed, ion-free form. This allows receptor 3 to be recovered for subsequent use. Support for the underlying complexation chemistry came from single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses and gas-phase energy-minimization studies.

  19. Formation of Stable Cationic Lipid/DNA Complexes for Gene Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofland, Hans E. J.; Shephard, Lee; Sullivan, Sean M.

    1996-07-01

    Stable cationic lipid/DNA complexes were formed by solubilizing cationic liposomes with 1% octylglucoside and complexing a DNA plasmid with the lipid in the presence of detergent. Removal of the detergent by dialysis yielded a lipid/DNA suspension that was able to transfect tissue culture cells up to 90 days after formation with no loss in activity. Similar levels of gene transfer were obtained by mixing the cationic lipid in a liposome form with DNA just prior to cell addition. However, expression was completely lost 24 hr after mixing. The transfection efficiency of the stable complex in 15% fetal calf serum was 30% of that obtained in the absence of serum, whereas the transient complex was completely inactivated with 2% fetal calf serum. A 90-day stability study comparing various storage conditions showed that the stable complex could be stored frozen or as a suspension at 4 degrees C with no loss in transfection efficiency. Centrifugation of the stable complex produced a pellet that contained approximately 90% of the DNA and 10% of the lipid. Transfection of cells with the resuspended pellet and the supernatant showed that the majority of the transfection activity was in the pellet and all the toxicity was in the supernatant. Formation of a stable cationic lipid/DNA complex has produced a transfection vehicle that can be stored indefinitely, can be concentrated with no loss in transfection efficiency, and the toxicity levels can be greatly reduced when the active complex is isolated from the uncomplexed lipid.

  20. Gas-phase structure and reactivity of the keto tautomer of the deoxyguanosine radical cation.

    PubMed

    Feketeová, Linda; Chan, Bun; Khairallah, George N; Steinmetz, Vincent; Maître, Philippe; Radom, Leo; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2015-10-21

    Guanine radical cations are formed upon oxidation of DNA. Deoxyguanosine (dG) is used as a model, and the gas-phase infrared (IR) spectroscopic signature and gas-phase unimolecular and bimolecular chemistry of its radical cation, dG˙(+), A, which is formed via direct electrospray ionisation (ESI/MS) of a methanolic solution of Cu(NO3)2 and dG, are examined. Quantum chemistry calculations have been carried out on 28 isomers and comparisons between their calculated IR spectra and the experimentally-measured spectra suggest that A exists as the ground-state keto tautomer. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) of A proceeds via cleavage of the glycosidic bond, while its ion–molecule reactions with amine bases occur via a number of pathways including hydrogen-atom abstraction, proton transfer and adduct formation. A hidden channel, involving isomerisation of the radical cation via adduct formation, is revealed through the use of two stages of CID, with the final stage of CID showing the loss of CH2O as a major fragmentation pathway from the reformed radical cation, dG˙(+). Quantum chemistry calculations on the unimolecular and bimolecular reactivity are also consistent with A being present as a ground-state keto tautomer. PMID:25942055

  1. Photodynamic inactivation of Gram (-) and Gram (+) microorganisms by cationic porphyrins and metalloporphyrins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyulkhandanyan, Grigor V.; Paronyan, Marina H.; Hovsepyan, Anichka S.; Ghazaryan, Robert K.; Tovmasyan, Artak G.; Gyulkhandanyan, Aram G.; Gyulkhandanyan, Anna G.; Amelyan, Gayane V.

    2009-06-01

    Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) of microorganisms is successfully applied against Gram (+) microorganisms. However the majority of photosensitizers poorly affect on Gram (-) microorganisms. At present number of works have shown that cationic photosensitizers are able to induce photoinactivation both Gram (+) and Gram (-) microorganisms. The purpose of this work was definition of more effective new cationic pyridylporphyrins with various coordinated metals and functional groups for destruction of Gram (-) microorganisms. The efficiency of new cationic porphyrins and metalloporphyrins (9 compounds) was tested against Gram (-) microorganism E. coli (strain Κ-12). The testing results show high efficiency of metalloporphyrins, especially silver complexes, against E. coli microorganism under dark conditions. 50 % and 100 % cell growth inhibitory concentrations (IC50 and IC100 values, accordingly) of studied metallocomplexes are considerably lower in comparison with metal-free porphyrins. At the same time the Zncomplexes of porphyrins are more phototoxic than their metal-free analogues. Zn-metalloporphyrins with allyl and butyl functional groups were shown the highest efficiency against E. coli. The photodynamic action of cationic Zn -TBut4PyP metalloporphyrin against Gram(+) (St. aureus and St. epidermis) and Gram(-) (E.coli, strain K-12 and Salmonella sp.) microorganisms was investigated. It is revealed, that Gram (+) microorganisms were 3-5 times more susceptible to the compounds' phototoxic influence than Gram (-) microorganisms.

  2. Effect of Extra-Framework Cations of LTL Nanozeolites to Inhibit Oil Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kok-Hou; Cham, Hooi-Ying; Awala, Hussein; Ling, Tau Chuan; Mukti, Rino R; Wong, Ka-Lun; Mintova, Svetlana; Ng, Eng-Poh

    2015-12-01

    Lubricant oils take significant part in current health and environmental considerations since they are an integral and indispensable component of modern technology. Antioxidants are probably the most important additives used in oils because oxidative deterioration plays a major role in oil degradation. Zeolite nanoparticles (NPs) have been proven as another option as green antioxidants in oil formulation. The anti-oxidative behavior of zeolite NPs is obvious; however, the phenomenon is still under investigation. Herein, a study of the effect of extra-framework cations stabilized on Linde Type L (LTL) zeolite NPs (ca. 20 nm) on inhibition of oxidation in palm oil-based lubricant oil is reported. Hydrophilic LTL zeolites with a Si/Al ratio of 3.2 containing four different inorganic cations (Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+)) were applied. The oxidation of the lubricant oil was followed by visual observation, colorimetry, fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, (1)H NMR spectroscopy, total acid number (TAN), and rheology analyses. The effect of extra-framework cations to slow down the rate of oil oxidation and to control the viscosity of oil is demonstrated. The degradation rate of the lubricant oil samples is decreased considerably as the polarizability of cation is increased with the presence of zeolite NPs. More importantly, the microporous zeolite NPs have a great influence in halting the steps that lead to the polymerization of the oils and thus increasing the lifetime of oils. PMID:26058517

  3. Effect of Extra-Framework Cations of LTL Nanozeolites to Inhibit Oil Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Kok-Hou; Cham, Hooi-Ying; Awala, Hussein; Ling, Tau Chuan; Mukti, Rino R.; Wong, Ka-Lun; Mintova, Svetlana; Ng, Eng-Poh

    2015-06-01

    Lubricant oils take significant part in current health and environmental considerations since they are an integral and indispensable component of modern technology. Antioxidants are probably the most important additives used in oils because oxidative deterioration plays a major role in oil degradation. Zeolite nanoparticles (NPs) have been proven as another option as green antioxidants in oil formulation. The anti-oxidative behavior of zeolite NPs is obvious; however, the phenomenon is still under investigation. Herein, a study of the effect of extra-framework cations stabilized on Linde Type L (LTL) zeolite NPs (ca. 20 nm) on inhibition of oxidation in palm oil-based lubricant oil is reported. Hydrophilic LTL zeolites with a Si/Al ratio of 3.2 containing four different inorganic cations (Li+, Na+, K+, Ca2+) were applied. The oxidation of the lubricant oil was followed by visual observation, colorimetry, fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, 1H NMR spectroscopy, total acid number (TAN), and rheology analyses. The effect of extra-framework cations to slow down the rate of oil oxidation and to control the viscosity of oil is demonstrated. The degradation rate of the lubricant oil samples is decreased considerably as the polarizability of cation is increased with the presence of zeolite NPs. More importantly, the microporous zeolite NPs have a great influence in halting the steps that lead to the polymerization of the oils and thus increasing the lifetime of oils.

  4. Overcoming tumor resistance to cisplatin by cationic lipid-assisted prodrug nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhi-Ting; Chen, Zhi-Yao; Sun, Chun-Yang; Li, Hong-Jun; Wang, Hong-Xia; Cheng, Qin-Qin; Zuo, Zu-Qi; Wang, Ji-Long; Liu, Yang-Zhong; Wang, Yu-Cai; Wang, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Chemotherapy resistance has become a major challenge in the clinical treatment of lung cancer which is the leading cancer type for the estimated deaths. Recent studies have shown that nanoparticles as drug carriers can raise intracellular drug concentration by achieving effectively cellular uptake and rapid drug release, and therefore reverse the acquired chemoresistance of tumors. In this context, nanoparticles-based chemotherapy represents a promising strategy for treating malignancies with chemoresistance. In the present study, we developed cationic lipid assisted nanoparticles (CLAN) to deliver polylactide-cisplatin prodrugs to drug resistant lung cancer cells. The nanoparticles were formulated through self-assembly of a biodegradable poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(lactide) (PEG-PLA), a hydrophobic polylactide-cisplatin prodrug, and a cationic lipid. The cationic nanoparticles were proven to significantly improve cell uptake of cisplatin, leading to an increased DNA-Pt adduct and significantly promoted DNA damage in vitro. Moreover, our study reveals that cationic nanoparticles, although are slightly inferior in blood circulation and tumor accumulation, are more effective in blood vessel extravasation. The CLANs ultimately enhances the cellular drug availability and leads to the reversal of cisplatin resistance. PMID:27088406

  5. Ground state of naphthyl cation: Singlet or triplet?

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Achintya Kumar; Vaval, Nayana Pal, Sourav; Manohar, Prashant U.

    2014-03-21

    We present a benchmark theoretical investigation on the electronic structure and singlet-triplet(S-T) gap of 1- and 2-naphthyl cations using the CCSD(T) method. Our calculations reveal that the ground states of both the naphthyl cations are singlet, contrary to the results obtained by DFT/B3LYP calculations reported in previous theoretical studies. However, the triplet states obtained in the two structural isomers of naphthyl cation are completely different. The triplet state in 1-naphthyl cation is (π,σ) type, whereas in 2-naphthyl cation it is (σ,σ{sup ′}) type. The S-T gaps in naphthyl cations and the relative stability ordering of the singlet and the triplet states are highly sensitive to the basis-set quality as well as level of correlation, and demand for inclusion of perturbative triples in the coupled-cluster ansatz.

  6. Plant rhamnogalacturonan II complexation of heavy metal cations

    DOEpatents

    O`Neill, M.A.; Pellerin, P.J.M.; Warrenfeltz, D.; Vidal, S.; Darvill, A.G.; Albersheim, P.

    1999-03-02

    The present invention provides rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) and relates to its ability to complex specific multivalent heavy metal cations. In the presence of boric acid, RG-II monomers form dimers that are cross-linked by a borate ester. The yield of such borate ester cross-linked dimers of RG-II is enhanced in the presence of specific heavy metal cations. The present invention further relates to the utility of RG-II in assays for the detection of specific heavy metal contamination; as a reagent useful in the removal of specific heavy metal cations contaminating foods and liquids, for example, fish, wines, etc.; as a pharmaceutical composition useful as an antidote in specific heavy metal cation poisoning; as a treatment for the detoxification of specific heavy metal cations from blood and/or tissues; and in a method of remediation of waters and soils contaminated with specific heavy metal cations. 15 figs.

  7. Plant rhamnogalacturonan II complexation of heavy metal cations

    DOEpatents

    O'Neill, Malcolm A.; Pellerin, Patrice J. M.; Warrenfeltz, Dennis; Vidal, Stephane; Darvill, Alan G.; Albersheim, Peter

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) and relates to its ability to complex specific multivalent heavy metal cations. In the presence of boric acid, RG-II monomers form dimers that are cross-linked by a borate ester. The yield of such borate ester cross-linked dimers of RG-II is enhanced in the presence of specific heavy metal cations. The present invention further relates to the utility of RG-II in assays for the detection of specific heavy metal contamination; as a reagent useful in the removal of specific heavy metal cations contaminating foods and liquids, for example, fish, wines, etc.; as a pharmaceutical composition useful as an antidote in specific heavy metal cation poisoning; as a treatment for the detoxification of specific heavy metal cations from blood and/or tissues; and in a method of remediation of waters and soils contaminated with specific heavy metal cations.

  8. Solvent effect on cation-π interactions with Al3+.

    PubMed

    Larrucea, Julen

    2012-09-01

    Cation-π interactions are known to be one of the strongest noncovalent forces in the gas phase, but they rarely occur in a fully solvated environment. The present work used two different ab initio molecular dynamics-based approaches to describe the correlation between the strength of the cation-π interactions and the number of water molecules surrounding the cation. Five different complexes between an aluminum cation and different molecules containing aromatic rings were studied, and the degree of hydration of each complex was varied. Results indicated that cation-π interactions vanish when the aluminum cation is surrounded by more than three water molecules. The results also highlighted the influence of -OH ligands on the interaction strength. PMID:22581060

  9. Thermodynamics of a Ca(2+)-dependent highly thermostable alkaline protease from a haloalkliphilic actinomycete.

    PubMed

    Gohel, S D; Singh, S P

    2015-01-01

    An alkaline protease from salt-tolerant alkaliphilic actinomycetes, Nocardiopsis alba OK-5 was purified by a single-step hydrophobic interaction chromatography and characterized. The purified protease with an estimated molecular mass of 20 kDa was optimally active at 70 °C in 0-3 M NaCl and 0-100 mM Ca(2+) displaying significant stability at 50-80 °C. The enzyme was stable at 80 °C in 100 mM Ca(2+) with Kd of 17 × 10(-3) and t1/2 of 32 min. The activation energy (Ea), enthalpy (ΔH*), and entropy (ΔS*) for the protease deactivation calculated in the presence of 200 mM Ca(2+) were 38.15 kJ/mol, 35.49 kJ/mol and 183.48 J/mol, respectively. The change in free energy (ΔG*) for protease deactivation at 60 °C in 200 mM Ca(2+) was 95.88 kJ/mol. Decrease in ΔH* reflected reduced cooperativity of deactivation and unfolding. The enzyme was intrinsically stable that counteracted heat denaturation by a weak cooperativity during the unfolding. Further, the enzyme was highly stable in the presence of various cations, surfactants, H2O2, β-mercaptoethanol, and commercial detergents. The compatibility of the enzyme with various cations, surfactants, and detergent matrices suggests its suitability as an additive in the detergents and peptide synthesis. PMID:25150113

  10. 21 CFR 862.1050 - Alkaline phosphatase or isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alkaline phosphatase or isoenzymes test system... Test Systems § 862.1050 Alkaline phosphatase or isoenzymes test system. (a) Identification. An alkaline phosphatase or isoenzymes test system is a device intended to measure alkaline phosphatase or its...

  11. 21 CFR 862.1050 - Alkaline phosphatase or isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alkaline phosphatase or isoenzymes test system... Test Systems § 862.1050 Alkaline phosphatase or isoenzymes test system. (a) Identification. An alkaline phosphatase or isoenzymes test system is a device intended to measure alkaline phosphatase or its...

  12. 40 CFR 420.110 - Applicability; description of the alkaline cleaning subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... alkaline cleaning subcategory. 420.110 Section 420.110 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Alkaline Cleaning Subcategory § 420.110 Applicability; description of the alkaline cleaning subcategory... alkaline cleaning baths to remove mineral and animal fats or oils from the steel, and those...

  13. Infrared spectroscopic investigations of cationic ethanol, propanol, and butanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Yoshiyuki; Harigaya, Hiroyuki; Xie, Min; Takahashi, Kaito; Fujii, Asuka

    2015-11-01

    Infrared spectroscopy of the alcohol cations of ethanol, propanol, and butanol was performed to investigate their structures and hyperconjugation mechanisms. In the ethanol cation, the Csbnd C bond hyperconjugates with the singly occupied molecular orbital (SOMO) at the oxygen atom, so that the Csbnd C bond weakens and the bond length elongates. Multiple hyperconjugations among SOMO, the Csbnd C bond, and the end Csbnd H bond occur in the propanol cation and enhance the acidity of the Csbnd H bond through the delocalization of its bonding σ electron. The butanol cation forms the oxonium-type structure through the proton transfer from the terminal CH bond.

  14. Acidic minespoil reclamation with alkaline biosolids

    SciTech Connect

    Drill, C.; Lindsay, B.J.; Logan, T.L.

    1998-12-31

    The effectiveness of an alkaline stabilized biosolids product, N-Viro Soil (NVS), was studied at a wild animal preserve in Cumberland, OH. The preserve occupies land that was strip mined for high-sulfur coal. While most of the land has been conventionally reclaimed, several highly acidic hot spots remain. Two of these hot spots were studied through concurrent field, greenhouse, and laboratory projects. In April 1995, NVS was applied at rates ranging from 0--960 mt/ha (wet wt.) to plots at the two sites. The plots were seeded using a standard reclamation mix and soil samples were analyzed for chemical characteristics before and after application and also in 1996 and 1997. Soil pH increased from 3.5 to about 11 in the amended plots and soil EC values increased from 21.0 mmho/cm to a maximum of 6.0 mmho/cm in the amended plots immediately after application. Soil Cu and Zn concentrations also increased in the NVS amended plots, but this did not affect plant germination or growth. By the summer of 1996, soil pH values had decreased to 7.3--8.7 and EC values decreased to 0.34--1.36 mmho/cm to the amended plots. Soil samples were collected in September 1995 for physical analyses. N-Viro Soil improved the moisture retention and water conductivity properties of the spoil. The plots were monitored for growth during the summer of 1995 and plant biomass and soil samples were taken in 1996 and 1997 for trace element and nutrient analysis. NVS did not significantly increase trace element concentrations in the biomass. The addition of NVS to acid mine spoil improves the chemical and physical properties of the spoil material thus aiding vegetative establishment and growth. NVS improves the chemical nature of the spoil by increasing pH and providing micro and macronutrients and improves the physical properties of the spoil with the addition of organic matter.

  15. TOXIC CATIONS AND MARINE BIOTA: ANALYSIS OF RESEARCH EFFORT DURING THE THREE YEAR PERIOD 1974-1976

    EPA Science Inventory

    Available technical articles published during 1974, 1975, and 1976 on effects of heavy metals and toxic cations upon estuarine and marine flora and fauna were reviewed. For all articles, research effort generated by toxicant, by response parameter, and by major indicator organism...

  16. Hydropower major rehabilitation projects

    SciTech Connect

    Norlin, J.A.

    1995-12-31

    The Corps of Engineers has developed an active Major Rehabilitation Program to handle large, long duration restoration projects. These projects are funded by specific appropriations and subsequently are required to have detailed rehabilitation plans to justify the work. The emphasis of the Major Rehabilitation Program is correcting reliability problems. Papers that were presented at Waterpower `93 discussed the basic concepts that are required in preparing a Major Rehabilitation Evaluation Report. This paper will cover the current status of each of the current major rehabilitation projects that the Corps of Engineers has in progress.

  17. Late Triassic alkaline complex in Sulu UHP terrane: Implications for post-collisional magmatism along the continental subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Song, Y.; Liu, Q.

    2014-12-01

    In order to insight into crust-mantle interaction triggered by partial melting of the subudcted continental crust during its exhumation, we carried out a combined study on Shidao alkaline complex in the Sulu ultrahigh pressure (UHP) terrane. The alkaline complex is composed of shoshonitic to ultrapotassic gabbro, pyroxene syenite, amphibole syenite, quartz syenite, and granite. Field researches suggest that the mafic rocks are earlier than the felsic ones in sequence. LA-ICPMS zircon U-Pb dating on them gives Late Triassic ages of 214 ± 2 to 200 ± 3 Ma from mafic to felsic rocks. These ages are a bit younger than Late Triassic ages for partial melting of the Sulu UHP terrane during exhumation, indicating syn-exhumation magmatism during continental collision. The alkaline rocks have wide ranges of SiO2 (49.7 - 76.7 wt.%), MgO (8.25 - 0.03 wt.%),total Fe2O3 (9.23 - 0.47 wt.%), CaO (8.39 - 0.39 wt.%), Ni (126.0 - 0.07 ppm), and Cr (182.0 - 0.45 ppm) contents. Other major oxides are regularly changed with SiO2. The alkaline rocks have characteristics of arc-like patterns in the trace element distribution, e.g., enrichment of LREE and LILE (Rb, Ba, Th and U), depletion of HFSE (Nb, Ta, P and Ti), and positive Pb anomalies. From the mafic to felsic rocks, (La/Yb)N ratios and contents of the total REE, Sr and Ba are decreased but Rb contents are increased. The alkaline rocks also display features of A2-type granitoids, suggesting a post-collisional magmatism. They have high initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.70575 and 0.70927) and negative ɛNd(t) values (-18.6 to -15.0) for whole-rock. The homogeneous initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios and ɛNd(t) values of the alkaline rocks are almost unchanged with SiO2 and MgO contents, suggesting a fractional crystallization (FC) process from a same parental magma. Our studies suggest a series of crust-mantle interaction processes along the continental subduction interface as follows: (1) melts from partial melting of the subducted continental

  18. Major anthocyanins from purple asparagus (Asparagus officinalis).

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Yumi; Ozaki, Yukio; Miyajima, Ikuo; Yamaguchi, Masaatsu; Fukui, Yuko; Iwasa, Keiko; Motoki, Satoru; Suzuki, Takashi; Okubo, Hiroshi

    2008-05-01

    Two major anthocyanins (A1 and A2) were isolated from peels of the spears of Asparagus officinalis cv. Purple Passion. They were purified by column, paper and high-performance liquid chromatographic separations, and their structures were elucidated by high-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (HR-FT-ICR MS), 1H, 13C and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopic analyses and either acid or alkaline hydrolysis, respectively. A1 was identified as cyanidin 3-[3''-(O-beta-d-glucopyranosyl)-6''-(O-alpha-l-rhamnopyranosyl)-O-beta-d-glucopyranoside], whereas A2 was cyanidin 3-rutinoside, which is widely distributed in higher plants. Oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assays proved their high antioxidant activities. PMID:18406435

  19. Alkalinity Enrichment Enhances Net Calcification of a Coral Reef Flat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albright, R.; Caldeira, K.

    2015-12-01

    Ocean acidification is projected to shift reefs from a state of net accretion to one of net dissolution sometime this century. While retrospective studies show large-scale changes in coral calcification over the last several decades, it is not possible to unequivocally link these results to ocean acidification due to confounding factors of temperature and other environmental parameters. Here, we quantified the calcification response of a coral reef flat to alkalinity enrichment to test whether reef calcification increases when ocean chemistry is restored to near pre-industrial conditions. We used sodium hydroxide (NaOH) to increase the total alkalinity of seawater flowing over a reef flat, with the aim of increasing carbonate ion concentrations [CO32-] and the aragonite saturation state (Ωarag) to values that would have been attained under pre-industrial atmospheric pCO2 levels. We developed a dual tracer regression method to estimate alkalinity uptake (i.e., calcification) in response to alkalinity enrichment. This approach uses the change in ratios between a non-conservative tracer (alkalinity) and a conservative tracer (a non-reactive dye, Rhodamine WT) to assess the fraction of added alkalinity that is taken up by the reef as a result of an induced increase in calcification rate. Using this method, we estimate that an average of 17.3% ± 2.3% of the added alkalinity was taken up by the reef community. In providing results from the first seawater chemistry manipulation experiment performed on a natural coral reef community (without artificial confinement), we demonstrate that, upon increase of [CO32-] and Ωarag to near pre-industrial values, reef calcification increases. Thus, we conclude that, the impacts of ocean acidification are already being felt by coral reefs. This work is the culmination of years of work in the Caldeira lab at the Carnegie Institution for Science, involving many people including Jack Silverman, Kenny Schneider, and Jana Maclaren.

  20. Permeation of Water through Cation Exchange Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Lakshminarayanaiah, N.

    1967-01-01

    Water permeabilities as well as other membrane parameters, such as exchange capacity, water content, and specific conductance, have been measured for two cation exchange membranes in the H form. The conductance of membrane with low water content was less than that of the membrane with high water content. These data have been discussed in the light of an existing theory and found inadequate to explain the results in a quantitative way. Water permeability of the membranes subject to mechanical pressure was found to be higher than their isotopic water permeability, according to expectation. These data have been examined from the standpoint of thermodynamic and kinetic theories of water flow in membranes and used to estimate the average size of membrane pores. PMID:6048874

  1. Univalent-cation-elicited acidification by yeasts.

    PubMed

    Kotyk, A; Georghiou, G

    1994-08-01

    Addition of univalent cations to sugar-metabolizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Lodderomyces elongisporus brought about a powerful acidification of the external medium with rates up to nearly 20 nmol H+ per min per mg dry wt. in S. cerevisiae, over 15 nmol in S. pombe, and 4.7 nmol in L. elongisporus. These rates were as much as 20 times, 5.5 times and 10.3 times, respectively. higher than in the absence of K+. Use of galactose-induced cells, of H(+)-ATPase-deficient mutants and observations over the entire growth curve indicated that the K+ effect on H+ extrusion is not connected with the H(+)-ATPase function as such but rather depends on metabolic reactions producing ATP. The effect has apparently nothing to do with the electrical potential across the plasma membrane. PMID:7804140

  2. Cation Diffusion Facilitator family: Structure and function.

    PubMed

    Kolaj-Robin, Olga; Russell, David; Hayes, Kevin A; Pembroke, J Tony; Soulimane, Tewfik

    2015-05-22

    The Cation Diffusion Facilitators (CDFs) form a family of membrane-bound proteins capable of transporting zinc and other heavy metal ions. Involved in metal tolerance/resistance by efflux of ions, CDF proteins share a two-modular architecture consisting of a transmembrane domain (TMD) and C-terminal domain (CTD) that protrudes into the cytoplasm. Discovery of a Zn²⁺ and Cd²⁺ CDF transporter from a marine bacterium Maricaulis maris that does not possess the CTD questions current perceptions regarding this family of proteins. This article describes a new, CTD-lacking subfamily of CDFs and our current knowledge about this family of proteins in the view of these findings. PMID:25896018

  3. Cell Penetrating Peptides and Cationic Antibacterial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez Plaza, Jonathan G.; Morales-Nava, Rosmarbel; Diener, Christian; Schreiber, Gabriele; Gonzalez, Zyanya D.; Lara Ortiz, Maria Teresa; Ortega Blake, Ivan; Pantoja, Omar; Volkmer, Rudolf; Klipp, Edda; Herrmann, Andreas; Del Rio, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPP) and cationic antibacterial peptides (CAP) have similar physicochemical properties and yet it is not understood how such similar peptides display different activities. To address this question, we used Iztli peptide 1 (IP-1) because it has both CPP and CAP activities. Combining experimental and computational modeling of the internalization of IP-1, we show it is not internalized by receptor-mediated endocytosis, yet it permeates into many different cell types, including fungi and human cells. We also show that IP-1 makes pores in the presence of high electrical potential at the membrane, such as those found in bacteria and mitochondria. These results provide the basis to understand the functional redundancy of CPPs and CAPs. PMID:24706763

  4. Cationic nanofibrillar cellulose with high antibacterial properties.

    PubMed

    Chaker, Achraf; Boufi, Sami

    2015-10-20

    Cationic nanofibrillar cellulose (C-NFC) has been prepared via a high pressure homogenization using quaternized cellulose fibers with glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride. It has been shown that the quaternization of dried softwood pulp facilitated the defibrillation processes and prevented clogging of the homogenizer. The effects of the trimethylammonium chloride content on the fibrillation yield, the transparency degree of the gel, the rheological behavior of the NFC suspension and their electrokinetic properties were investigated. AFM observation showed that the NFC suspension consisted of individualized cellulose I nanofibrils 4-5nm in width and length in the micronic scale. In addition to their strong reinforcing potential, the inclusion of C-NFC into a polymer matrix was shown to efficiently enhance the antibacterial activity. The reinforcing potential of C-NFC, studied by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), was compared to anionic NFC and the difference was explained in terms of the nanofibrils capacities to build up a strong networks held by hydrogen bonding. PMID:26256179

  5. Antiviral effect of cationic compounds on bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Ly-Chatain, Mai H.; Moussaoui, Saliha; Vera, Annabelle; Rigobello, Véronique; Demarigny, Yann

    2013-01-01

    The antiviral activity of several cationic compounds – cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), chitosan, nisin, and lysozyme – was investigated on the bacteriophage c2 (DNA head and non-contractile tail) infecting Lactococcus strains and the bacteriophage MS2 (F-specific RNA) infecting E. coli. Firstly, these activities were evaluated in a phosphate buffer pH 7 – 10 mM. The CTAB had a virucidal effect on the Lactococcus bacteriophages, but not on the MS2. After 1 min of contact with 0.125 mM CTAB, the c2 population was reduced from 6 to 1.5 log(pfu)/mL and completely deactivated at 1 mM. On the contrary, chitosan inhibited the MS2 more than it did the bacteriophages c2. No antiviral effect was observed for the nisin or the lysozyme on bacteriophages after 1 min of treatment. A 1 and 2.5 log reduction was respectively observed for nisin and lysozyme when the treatment time increased (5 or 10 min). These results showed that the antiviral effect depended both on the virus and structure of the antimicrobial compounds. The antiviral activity of these compounds was also evaluated in different physico-chemical conditions and in complex matrices. The antiviral activity of CTAB was impaired in acid pH and with an increase of the ionic strength. These results might be explained by the electrostatic interactions between cationic compounds and negatively charged particles such as bacteriophages or other compounds in a matrix. Milk proved to be protective suggesting the components of food could interfere with antimicrobial compounds. PMID:23487495

  6. Molecular and biochemical characterization of a new alkaline active multidomain xylanase from alkaline wastewater sludge.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanyu; Meng, Kun; Luo, Huiying; Huang, Huoqing; Yuan, Tiezheng; Yang, Peilong; Yao, Bin

    2013-02-01

    A xylanase gene, xyn-b39, coding for a multidomain glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 10 protein was cloned from the genomic DNA of the alkaline wastewater sludge of a paper mill. Its deduced amino acid sequence of 1,481 residues included two carbohydrate-binding modules (CBM) of family CBM_4_9, one catalytic domain of GH 10, one family 9 CBM and three S-layer homology (SLH) domains. xyn-b39 was expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant enzyme was purified and characterized. Xyn-b39 exhibited maximum activity at pH 7.0 and 60 °C, and remained highly active under alkaline conditions (more than 80 % activity at pH 9.0 and 40 % activity at pH 10.0). The enzyme was thermostable at 55 °C, retaining more than 90 % of the initial activity after 2 h pre-incubation. Xyn-b39 had wide substrate specificity and hydrolyzed soluble substrates (birchwood xylan, beechwood xylan, oat spelt xylan, wheat arabinoxylan) and insoluble substrates (oat spelt xylan and wheat arabinoxylan). Hydrolysis product analysis indicated that Xyn-b39 was an endo-type xylanase. The K (m) and V (max) values of Xyn-b39 for birchwood xylan were 1.01 mg/mL and 73.53 U/min/mg, respectively. At the charge of 10 U/g reed pulp for 1 h, Xyn-b39 significantly reduced the Kappa number (P < 0.05) with low consumption of chlorine dioxide alone. PMID:23117673

  7. Cu and Zn adsorption to a heterogeneous natural sediment: Influence of leached cations and natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Fisher-Power, Leanne M; Cheng, Tao; Rastghalam, Zahra Sadat

    2016-02-01

    Adsorption of heavy metals by natural sediments has important implications to the fate and transport of contaminants in subsurface environments. Although the importance of major multivalent cations and dissolved organic matter (DOM) in heavy metal adsorption had been previously demonstrated, the leaching of major cations and DOM from sediments and its influence on heavy metal adsorption have not been fully examined. In this study, the concentrations of Ca, Mg, Al, Fe, and natural organic matter that leached from a natural sediment in Cu and Zn adsorption experiments were measured and used in surface complexation models to elucidate their effects on Cu and Zn adsorption. Experimental results showed that the leaching of cations and DOM was substantial and pH-dependent. The leached concentrations of Ca and Mg were reasonably simulated based on BaCl2 extractable Ca and Mg at pH < 5, and Al and Fe activities were accurately predicted for specific pH ranges by assuming solubility control by Al(OH)3 and Fe(OH)3. Visual MINTEQ simulations showed that the leached cations markedly decreased Cu adsorption at pH < 6 and Zn adsorption at pH 3-8. Due to varying affinity for DOM between Cu and Zn, DOM was found to decrease Cu adsorption at pH > 6 due to formation of Cu-DOM aqueous complexes, but increase Zn adsorption at pH 4-7 due to formation of aqueous complexes between DOM and major cations, which reduced competition from these cations against Zn for binding sites on the sediment. PMID:26547878

  8. Ionic conductivity of alkaline (Li 2O, Na 2O) and alkaline-earth (BaO) borates in crystallization (vitrification) region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solntsev, V. P.; Davydov, A. V.

    2011-11-01

    In this paper we report the existence of abnormal behavior of electric properties of alkaline (Li 2O,Na 2O) and alkaline-earth (BaO) borate in the melt—a crystal (glass) transition region. Results of measurement of conductivity in the mentioned interval evidence the existence of a strong variation of electric properties depending on the concentration of alkaline and alkaline-earth ions. The reasons of such behavior are discussed.

  9. Major ion chemistry of the Ganga-Brahmaputra river system: Weathering processes and fluxes to the Bay of Bengal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarin, M. M.; Krishnaswami, S.; Dilli, K.; Somayajulu, B. L. K.; Moore, W. S.

    1989-05-01

    The Ganga-Brahmaputra, one of the world's largest river systems, is first in terms of sediment transport and fourth in terms of water discharge. A detailed and systematic study of the major ion chemistry of these rivers and their tributaries, as well as the clay mineral composition of the bed sediments has been conducted. The chemistry of the highland rivers (upper reaches of the Ganga, the Yamuna, the Brahmaputra, the Gandak and the Ghaghra) are all dominated by carbonate weathering; (Ca + Mg) and HCO 3 account for about 80% of the cations and anions. In the lowland rivers (the Chambal, the Betwa and the Ken), HCO 3 excess over (Ca + Mg) and a relatively high contribution of (Na + K) to the total cations indicate that silicate weathering and/or contributions from alkaline/saline soils and groundwaters could be important sources of major ions to these waters. The chemistry of the Ganga and the Yamuna in the lower reaches is by and large dictated by the chemistry of their tributaries and their mixing proportions. Illite is the dominant clay mineral (about 80%) in the bedload sediments of the highland rivers. Kaolinite and chlorite together constitute the remaining 20% of the clays. In the Chambal, Betwa and Ken, smectite accounts for about 80% of the clays. This difference in the clay mineral composition of the bed sediments is a reflection of the differences in the geology of their drainage basins. The highland rivers weather acidic rocks, whereas the others flow initially through basic effusives. The Ganga-Brahmaputra river system transports about 130 million tons of dissolved salts to the Bay of Bengal, which is nearly 3% of the global river flux to the oceans. The chemical denudation rates for the Ganga and the Brahmaputra basins are about 72 and 105 tons· km -· yr -1, respectively, which are factors of 2 to 3 higher than the global average. The high denudation rate, particularly in the Brahmaputra, is attributable to high relief and heavy rainfall.

  10. Absorption of artificial piggery effluent by soils: Inverse optimisation of hydraulic, solute transport, and cation exchange parameters using HP1 and UCODE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, Diederik; Smith, Chris; Simunek, Jirka; Smiles, David

    2010-05-01

    Smiles and Smith (2004) performed controlled laboratory experiments on the transport of major cations (Na, K, Mg, Ca) during water absorption in horizontal soil columns for three different times. Experimental data consists of profiles of water contents, Cl concentrations, total aqueous and sorbed concentrations of the major cations. Numerical simulation of the experimental dataset requires a coupled code that can consider variably-saturated water flow, multi-component solute transport, and geochemical reactions (aqueous complexation and cation exchange). The HP1 code, based on coupled HYDRUS-1D and PHREEQC, is used to simulate this data set. The sorption of the major cations is described as a competitive cation exchange process. The objective of the study is to calibrate hydraulic, transport, and geochemical parameters using HP1, the universal optimization code UCODE_2005 (Poeter et al., 2005), and the experimental dataset of Smiles and Smith (2004). The dataset was used to calibrate three types of parameters: soil hydraulic parameters (the parameters of the van Genuchten-Mualem model for the soil hydraulic functions), solute transport parameters (dispersivity), and geochemical parameters (exchange coefficients for the major cations and the cation exchange capacity). Different calibration runs were performed with different sets of input data, different sets of optimized parameters, and different formulations of the cation exchange process (i.e., Gapon, Rothmund-Kornfeld). Overall, the description of the dataset with the coupled code is satisfactory. Estimated parameters are within expected ranges for the type of material used. References Poeter, E.P., M.C. Hill, E.R. Banta, S. Mehl, and C. Steen, 2005. UCODE_2005 and six other computer codes for universal sensitivity analysis, calibration and uncertainty evaluation. U.S. Geological Survey Techniques and Methods 6-A11. Smiles, D.E., and C.J. Smith, 2004. Absorption of artificial piggery effluent by soil: A

  11. Microbial community succession in alkaline, saline bauxite residue: a cross-refinery study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santini, T.; Malcolm, L. I.; Tyson, G. W.; Warren, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    Bauxite residue, a byproduct of the Bayer process for alumina refining, is an alkaline, saline tailings material that is generally considered to be inhospitable to microbial life. In situ remediation strategies promote soil formation in bauxite residue by enhancing leaching of saline, alkaline pore water, and through incorporation of amendments to boost organic matter content, decrease pH, and improve physical structure. The amelioration of chemical and physical conditions in bauxite residue is assumed to support diversification of microbial communities from narrow, poorly functioning microbial communities towards diverse, well-functioning communities. This study aimed to characterise microbial communities in fresh and remediated bauxite residues from refineries worldwide, to identify (a) whether initial microbial communities differed between refineries; (b) major environmental controls on microbial community composition; and (c) whether remediation successfully shifts the composition of microbial communities in bauxite residue towards those found in reference (desired endpoint) soils. Samples were collected from 16 refineries and characterised using 16S amplicon sequencing to examine microbial community composition and structure, in conjunction with physicochemical analyses. Initial microbial community composition was similar across refineries but partitioned into two major groups. Microbial community composition changes slowly over time and indicates that alkalinity and salinity inhibit diversification. Microbially-based strategies for in situ remediation should consider the initial microbial community composition and whether the pre-treatment of chemical properties would optimise subsequent bioremediation outcomes. During in situ remediation, microbial communities become more diverse and develop wider functional capacity, indicating progression towards communities more commonly observed in natural grassland and forest soils.

  12. Effects of acid/alkaline pretreatment and gamma-ray irradiation on extracellular polymeric substances from sewage sludge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Shuibo; Wu, Yuqi; Wang, Wentao; Wang, Jingsong; Luo, Zhiping; Li, Shiyou

    2014-04-01

    In order to investigate the mechanism of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) influencing sludge characteristics, variations of extractable EPS from municipal sewage sludge by acid/alkaline pretreatment and gamma-ray irradiation were studied. The changes in constituents of EPS were analyzed by UV-vis spectra and SEM images. The effects of alkaline pretreatment and gamma-ray irradiation on the functional groups in EPS were investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. Results showed that the extractable EPS increased clearly with increasing irradiation dose from 0 to 15 kGy. UV-vis spectra indicated that a new absorption band from 240 nm to 300 nm existed in all irradiated samples, apart from acid condition. The results of FTIR spectroscopic analysis indicated that, irradiation influenced major functional groups in EPS, such as protein and polysaccharide, and these effects were clearer under alkaline condition. SEM images provided that after alkaline hydrolysis, gamma-ray irradiation was more effective in resulting in the sludge flocs and cells broken, compared with acid pretreatment (pH 2.50).

  13. Enhanced aggregation of alginate-coated iron oxide (hematite) nanoparticles in the presence of calcium, strontium, and barium cations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai Loon; Mylon, Steven E; Elimelech, Menachem

    2007-05-22

    Early-stage aggregation kinetics studies of alginate-coated hematite nanoparticles in solutions containing alkaline-earth metal cations revealed enhanced aggregation rates in the presence of Ca2+, Sr2+, and Ba2+, but not with Mg2+. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging of the aggregates provided evidence that alginate gel formation was essential for enhanced aggregation to occur. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) aggregation results clearly indicated that a much lower concentration of Ba2+ compared to Ca2+ and Sr2+ was required to achieve a similar degree of enhanced aggregation in each system. To elucidate the relationship between the alginate's affinities for divalent cations and the enhanced aggregation of the alginate-coated hematite nanoparticles, atomic force microscopy (AFM) was employed to probe the interaction forces between alginate-coated hematite surfaces under the solution chemistries used for the aggregation study. Maximum adhesion forces, maximum pull-off distances, and the work of adhesion were used as indicators to gauge the alginate's affinity for the divalent cations and the resulting attractive interactions between alginate-coated hematite nanoparticles. The results showed that alginate had higher affinity for Ba2+ than either Sr2+ or Ca2+. This same trend was consistent with the cation concentrations required for comparable enhanced aggregation kinetics, suggesting that the rate of alginate gel formation controls the enhanced aggregation kinetics. An aggregation mechanism incorporating the gelation of alginate is proposed to explain the accelerated aggregate growth in the presence of Ca2+, Sr2+, and Ba2+. PMID:17469860

  14. Adsorption of a water soluble cationic dye into a cationic Langmuir monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shil, Ashis; Hussain, S. A.; Bhattacharjee, D.

    2015-05-01

    This communication reports the successful adsorption of a water soluble cationic fluorescent dye Rhodamine B (RhB) into a cationic Langmuir monolayer of Octadecylamine (ODA). Anionic nano clay platelets Hectorite played an important role in the process of adsorption. Surface pressure vs. area per molecule (π-A) isotherms were studied to monitor the adsorption process. In-situ fluorescence Imaging Microscopic (FIM) technique was employed to visualize the domain structures formed at the air-water interface. Atomic Force Microscopic (AFM) image of the monolayer Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films were taken to study the morphology and ultrastructure of the film. Detailed spectroscopic investigations were carried out on the mono- and multilayer Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films.

  15. Field measurement of alkalinity and pH

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, Ivan

    1964-01-01

    The behavior of electrometric pH equipment under field conditions departs from the behavior predicted from Nernst's law. The response is a linear function of pH, and hence measured pH values may be corrected to true pH if the instrument is calibrated with two reference solutions for each measurement. Alkalinity titrations may also be made in terms of true pH. Standard methods, such as colorimetric titrations, were rejected as unreliable or too cumbersome for rapid field use. The true pH of the end point of the alkalinity titration as a function of temperature, ionic strength, and total alkalinity has been calculated. Total alkalinity in potable waters is the most important factor influencing the end point pH, which varies from 5.38 (0 ? C, 5 ppm (parts per million) HC0a-) to 4.32 (300 ppm HC0a-,35 ? C), for the ranges of variables considered. With proper precautions, the pH may be determined to =i:0.02 pH and the alkalinity to =i:0.6 ppm HCO3- for many naturally occurring bodies of fresh water.

  16. Characterization of Human Bone Alkaline Phosphatase in Pichia Pastoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, Christine C.; Ciszak, Eva; Karr, Laurel J.

    1999-01-01

    A soluble form of human bone alkaline phosphatase has been expressed in a recombinant strain of the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. We constructed a plasmid containing cDNA encoding for human bone alkaline phosphatase, with the hydrophobic carboxyl terminal portion deleted. Alkaline phosphatase was secreted into the medium to a level of 32mg/L when cultured in shake flasks, and enzyme activity was 12U/mg, as measured by a spectrophotometric assay. By conversion to a fermentation system, a yield of 880mg/L has been achieved with an enzyme activity of 968U/mg. By gel electrophoresis analysis, it appears that greater than 50% of the total protein in the fermentation media is alkaline phosphatase. Although purification procedures are not yet completely optimized, they are expected to include filtration, ion exchange and affinity chromatography. Our presentation will focus on the purification and crystallization results up to the time of the conference. Structural data should provide additional information on the role of alkaline phosphatase in normal bone mineralization and in certain bone mineralization anomalies.

  17. Investigating mechanisms of alkalinization for reducing primary breast tumor invasion.

    PubMed

    Robey, Ian F; Nesbit, Lance A

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular pH (pHe) of many solid tumors is acidic as a result of glycolytic metabolism and poor perfusion. Acidity promotes invasion and enhances metastatic potential. Tumor acidity can be buffered by systemic administration of an alkaline agent such as sodium bicarbonate. Tumor-bearing mice maintained on sodium bicarbonate drinking water exhibit fewer metastases and survive longer than untreated controls. We predict this effect is due to inhibition of tumor invasion. Reducing tumor invasion should result in fewer circulating tumor cells (CTCs). We report that bicarbonate-treated MDA-MB-231 tumor-bearing mice exhibited significantly lower numbers of CTCs than untreated mice (P < 0.01). Tumor pHe buffering may reduce optimal conditions for enzymes involved in tumor invasion such as cathepsins and matrix metalloproteases (MMPs). To address this, we tested the effect of transient alkalinization on cathepsin and MMP activity using enzyme activatable fluorescence agents in mice bearing MDA-MB-231 mammary xenografts. Transient alkalinization significantly reduced the fluorescent signal of protease-specific activatable agents in vivo (P ≤ 0.003). Alkalinization, however, did not affect expression of carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX). The findings suggest a possible mechanism in a live model system for breast cancer where systemic alkalinization slows the rate of invasion. PMID:23936808

  18. Ultrasensitive detection of amifostine and alkaline phosphatase based on the growth of CdS quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Na, Weidan; Liu, Siyu; Liu, Xiaotong; Su, Xingguang

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we reported a simple and sensitive fluorescence nanosensor for rapid detection of amifostine and alkaline phosphatase (ALP). The novel nanosensor was based on the fluorescence "turn on-off" of CdS quantum dots (QDs). Firstly, Cd(2+) cation could react with S(2-) anion to generate fluorescent CdS QDs in the presence of amifostine. The fluorescence (FL) intensity of amifostine-capped CdS QDs (Amifostine-CdS QDs) was increased with the increasing amounts of amifostine, and could be used for amifostine detection. However, amifostine could be converted to 2-(3-aminopropylamino) ethanethiol (WR1065) in the presence of ALP based on the dephosphorylation of ALP. Under the optimum conditions, the affinity of WR1065 to CdS QDs was weaker than that of amifostine. Therefore the new generation of WR1065-CdS QDs would reduce the FL intensity with the increase of ALP concentration, and the fluorescence of CdS QDs was turn off. The metabolic process of amifostine in the presence of alkaline phosphatase could be also studied via the change of FL intensity of CdS QDs. The present method was cost-effective, convenient, and does not require any complicated synthetic procedures. PMID:26452927

  19. Recovery of manganese oxides from spent alkaline and zinc-carbon batteries. An application as catalysts for VOCs elimination.

    PubMed

    Gallegos, María V; Falco, Lorena R; Peluso, Miguel A; Sambeth, Jorge E; Thomas, Horacio J

    2013-06-01

    Manganese, in the form of oxide, was recovered from spent alkaline and zinc-carbon batteries employing a biohydrometallurgy process, using a pilot plant consisting in: an air-lift bioreactor (containing an acid-reducing medium produced by an Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans bacteria immobilized on elemental sulfur); a leaching reactor (were battery powder is mixed with the acid-reducing medium) and a recovery reactor. Two different manganese oxides were recovered from the leachate liquor: one of them by electrolysis (EMO) and the other by a chemical precipitation with KMnO4 solution (CMO). The non-leached solid residue was also studied (RMO). The solids were compared with a MnOx synthesized in our laboratory. The characterization by XRD, FTIR and XPS reveal the presence of Mn2O3 in the EMO and the CMO samples, together with some Mn(4+) cations. In the solid not extracted by acidic leaching (RMO) the main phase detected was Mn3O4. The catalytic performance of the oxides was studied in the complete oxidation of ethanol and heptane. Complete conversion of ethanol occurs at 200°C, while heptane requires more than 400°C. The CMO has the highest oxide selectivity to CO2. The results show that manganese oxides obtained using spent alkaline and zinc-carbon batteries as raw materials, have an interesting performance as catalysts for elimination of VOCs. PMID:23562448

  20. Base Cations In Northern Red Oak Trees, Soils and Surface Waters of Shenandoah National Park, VA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosby, B. J.; Blankinship, J. C.; Webb, J. R.; Welsch, D. L.; Deviney, F. A.

    2002-05-01

    Depletion of exchangeable base cations (especially calcium and magnesium) in soils is recognized as a problem for the health of forest ecosystems as well as for the acid-base balance of drainage streams. Factors that may reduce base-cation supplies in forest soils include uptake associated with forest regeneration and leaching associated with acidic deposition. We examine here the linkages between the base status of forest soils, base content of wood in trees, and streamwater acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) in the watersheds of western Virginia's Shenandoah National Park. Prior to establishment of the park in the late 1920s, the forest in the park area was intensively harvested and much of the land was cleared for agriculture. At present, most of the park is protected from direct human disturbance and occupied by a regenerating mixed hardwood forest of about 70-years age. The park does, however, receive an indirect anthropogenic impact in the form of acidic deposition. We analyzed quarterly streamwater samples taken from 14 catchments in SNP over the period 1988-1999, data from seventy-nine soil pits sampled throughout SNP in 2000, cores of bole wood from northern red oak trees at 28 sites (also sampled in 2000), and the species - water quality relationships derived from a previous study of fish populations in the SNP (1998). Contemporary ecosystem attributes in the park, including forest-cover type and fish species distributions, are closely associated with the distribution of the park's three major bedrock types: siliciclastic rocks (sandstones and shales), granitic rocks, and basaltic rocks. Areas underlain by basaltic bedrock have a greater capacity for export of base cations in streamwater (higher stream ANC and greater fish species richness), have higher soil base saturations, and have trees with higher bole wood content of the important nutrient cations Ca and Mg. Granitic areas are intermediate, and siliciclastic areas have the lowest base cation