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Sample records for alkalinity major cations

  1. Alkaline earth cation extraction from acid solution

    DOEpatents

    Dietz, Mark; Horwitz, E. Philip

    2003-01-01

    An extractant medium for extracting alkaline earth cations from an aqueous acidic sample solution is described as are a method and apparatus for using the same. The separation medium is free of diluent, free-flowing and particulate, and comprises a Crown ether that is a 4,4'(5')[C.sub.4 -C.sub.8 -alkylcyclohexano]18-Crown-6 dispersed on an inert substrate material.

  2. Exploring Alkaline Stable Organic Cations for Polymer Hydroxide Exchange Membranes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-29

    Organic Cations for Polymer Hydroxide Exchange Membranes Hydroxide exchange membranes (HEMs) are important polymer electrolytes for electrochemical...Exploring Alkaline Stable Organic Cations for Polymer Hydroxide Exchange Membranes Report Title Hydroxide exchange membranes (HEMs) are important polymer ...constructing HEMs. EXPLORING ALKALINE STABLE ORGANIC CATIONS FOR POLYMER HYDROXIDE EXCHANGE MEMBRANES by Bingzi Zhang

  3. Improving the alkaline stability of imidazolium cations by substitution.

    PubMed

    Dong, Huilong; Gu, Fenglou; Li, Min; Lin, Bencai; Si, Zhihong; Hou, Tingjun; Yan, Feng; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Li, Youyong

    2014-10-06

    Imidazolium cations are promising candidates for preparing anion-exchange membranes because of their good alkaline stability. Substitution of imidazolium cations is an efficient way to improve their alkaline stability. By combining density functional theory calculations with experimental results, it is found that the LUMO energy correlates with the alkaline stability of imidazolium cations. The results indicate that alkyl groups are the most suitable substituents for the N3 position of imidazolium cations, and the LUMO energies of alkyl-substituted imidazolium cations depend on the electron-donating effect and the hyperconjugation effect. Comparing 1,2-dimethylimidazolium cations (1,2-DMIm+) and 1,3-dimethylimidazolium cations (1,3-DMIm+) with the same substituents reveals that the hyperconjugation effect is more significant in influencing the LUMO energy of 1,3-DMIms. This investigation reveals that LUMO energy is a helpful aid in predicting the alkaline stability of imidazolium cations.

  4. Cation exchange properties of zeolites in hyper alkaline aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Van Tendeloo, Leen; de Blochouse, Benny; Dom, Dirk; Vancluysen, Jacqueline; Snellings, Ruben; Martens, Johan A; Kirschhock, Christine E A; Maes, André; Breynaert, Eric

    2015-02-03

    Construction of multibarrier concrete based waste disposal sites and management of alkaline mine drainage water requires cation exchangers combining excellent sorption properties with a high stability and predictable performance in hyper alkaline media. Though highly selective organic cation exchange resins have been developed for most pollutants, they can serve as a growth medium for bacterial proliferation, impairing their long-term stability and introducing unpredictable parameters into the evolution of the system. Zeolites represent a family of inorganic cation exchangers, which naturally occur in hyper alkaline conditions and cannot serve as an electron donor or carbon source for microbial proliferation. Despite their successful application as industrial cation exchangers under near neutral conditions, their performance in hyper alkaline, saline water remains highly undocumented. Using Cs(+) as a benchmark element, this study aims to assess the long-term cation exchange performance of zeolites in concrete derived aqueous solutions. Comparison of their exchange properties in alkaline media with data obtained in near neutral solutions demonstrated that the cation exchange selectivity remains unaffected by the increased hydroxyl concentration; the cation exchange capacity did however show an unexpected increase in hyper alkaline media.

  5. Alkaline stability of quaternary ammonium cations for alkaline fuel cell membranes and ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Marino, M G; Kreuer, K D

    2015-02-01

    The alkaline stability of 26 different quaternary ammonium groups (QA) is investigated for temperatures up to 160 °C and NaOH concentrations up to 10 mol L(-1) with the aim to provide a basis for the selection of functional groups for hydroxide exchange membranes in alkaline fuel cells and of ionic-liquid cations stable in basic conditions. Most QAs exhibit unexpectedly high alkaline stability with the exception of aromatic cations. β-Protons are found to be far less susceptible to nucleophilic attack than previously suggested, whereas the presence of benzyl groups, nearby hetero-atoms, or other electron-withdrawing species promote degradation reactions significantly. Cyclic QAs proved to be exceptionally stable, with the piperidine-based 6-azonia-spiro[5.5]undecane featuring the highest half-life at the chosen conditions. Absolute and relative stabilities presented herein stand in contrast to literature data, the differences being ascribed to solvent effects on degradation.

  6. Structure and ionic diffusion of alkaline-earth ions in mixed cation glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinou, Konstantinos; Sushko, Petr; Duffy, Dorothy M.

    2015-08-15

    A series of mixed cation silicate glasses of the composition A2O – 2MO – 4SiO2, with A=Li,Na,K and M=Ca,Sr,Ba has been investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations in order to understand the effect of the nature of the cations on the mobility of the alkaline-earth ions within the glass network. The size of the alkaline-earth cation was found to affect the inter-atomic distances, the coordination number distributions and the bond angle distributions , whereas the medium-range order was almost unaffected by the type of the cation. All the alkaline-earth cations contribute to lower vibrational frequencies but it is observed that that there is a shift to smaller frequencies and the vibrational density of states distribution gets narrower as the size of the alkaline-earth increases. The results from our modeling for the ionic diffusion of the alkaline-earth cations are in a qualitative agreement with the experimental observations in that there is a distinct correlation between the activation energy for diffusion of alkaline earth-ions and the cation radii ratio. An asymmetrical linear behavior in the diffusion activation energy with increasing size difference is observed. The results can be described on the basis of a theoretical model that relates the diffusion activation energy to the electrostatic interactions of the cations with the oxygens and the elastic deformation of the silicate network.

  7. Temperature-induced collapse of alkaline Earth cation-polyacrylate anion complexes.

    PubMed

    Lages, Sebastian; Schweins, Ralf; Huber, Klaus

    2007-09-06

    Polyacrylate anions are used to inhibit CaCO3 precipitation and may be a promising additive to control formation of inorganic nanoparticles. The origin of this applicability lies in specific interactions between the alkaline earth cations and the carboxylate functions along the polyacrylate chains. In the absence of CO32- anions, these interactions eventually cause precipitation of polyelectrolytes. Extended investigation of dilute sodium polyacrylate solutions approaching this precipitation threshold revealed a dramatic shrinking of the PA coil dimensions once the threshold is reached (Eur. Phys. J. E 2001, 5, 117). Recent isothermal calorimetric titration experiments by Antonietti et al. (Macromolecules 2004, 37, 3444) indicated that the driving force of this precipitation is entropic in nature. In the present work, we investigated the impact of temperature on the structural changes of dissolved polyacrylate chains decorated with alkaline earth cations. To this end, large polyacrylate chains were brought close to the precipitation threshold by the addition of distinct amounts of Ca2+ or Sr2+ cations. The resulting structural intermediates were then subjected to temperature variations in the range of 15 degrees C major result, we could unambiguously demonstrate that the coils can reversibly be collapsed and extended by increasing and decreasing the temperature, respectively.

  8. Imidazolium Cations with Exceptional Alkaline Stability: A Systematic Study of Structure-Stability Relationships.

    PubMed

    Hugar, Kristina M; Kostalik, Henry A; Coates, Geoffrey W

    2015-07-15

    Highly base-stable cationic moieties are a critical component of anion exchange membranes (AEMs) in alkaline fuel cells (AFCs); however, the commonly employed organic cations have limited alkaline stability. To address this problem, we synthesized and characterized the stability of a series of imidazolium cations in 1, 2, or 5 M KOH/CD3OH at 80 °C, systematically evaluating the impact of substitution on chemical stability. The substituent identity at each position of the imidazolium ring has a dramatic effect on the overall cation stability. We report imidazolium cations that have the highest alkaline stabilities reported to date, >99% cation remaining after 30 days in 5 M KOH/CD3OH at 80 °C.

  9. Coordination Chemistry of Alkali and Alkaline-Earth Cations with Macrocyclic Ligands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietrich, Bernard

    1985-01-01

    Discusses: (l) alkali and alkaline-earth cations in biology (considering naturally occurring lonophores, their X-ray structures, and physiochemical studies); (2) synthetic complexing agents for groups IA and IIA; and (3) ion transport across membranes (examining neutral macrobicyclic ligands as metal cation carriers, transport by anionic carriers,…

  10. Alkaline earth metal cation exchange: effect of mobile counterion and dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Indarawis, Katrina; Boyer, Treavor H

    2012-04-17

    The goal of this research was to provide an improved understanding of the interactions between alkaline earth metals and DOM under conditions that are encountered during drinking water treatment with particular focus on cation exchange. Both magnetically enhanced and nonmagnetic cation exchange resins were converted to Na, Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba mobile counterion forms as a novel approach to investigate the exchange behavior between the cations and the interactions between the cations and DOM. The results show that cation exchange is a robust process for removal of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) considering competition with cations on the resin surface and presence of DOM. DOM was actively involved during the cation exchange process through complexation, adsorption, and coprecipitation reactions. In addition to advancing the understanding of ion exchange processes for water treatment, the results of this work are applicable to membrane pretreatment to minimize fouling, treatment of membrane concentrate, and precipitative softening.

  11. EFFECT OF CATIONS ON ALUMINUM SPECIATION UNDER ALKALINE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Hobbs, D.

    2012-07-31

    A series of experiments were performed to examine the effect of metal cations common to high level waste on the phase of aluminum formed. Experiments were performed at temperature of 150 C, 75 C, and room temperature, either without additional metal cation, or with 0.01-0.2 molar equivalents of either Ni{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 3+}, Mn{sup 2+}, or Cr{sup 3+}. Results showed that temperature has the greatest effect on the phase obtained. At 150 C, boehmite is the only phase obtained, independent of the presence of other metal cations, with only one exception where a small amount of gibbsite was also detected in the product when 0.2 equivalents of Ni{sup 2+} was present. At 75 C, a mixture of phases is obtained, most commonly including bayerite and gibbsite; however, boehmite is also formed under some conditions, including in the absence of additional metal ion. At room temperature, in the absence of additional metal ion, a mixture of bayerite and gibbsite is obtained. The addition of another metal cation suppresses the formation of gibbsite, with a couple of exceptions (0.2 equivalents of Ni{sup 2+} or 0.01 equivalents of Cr{sup 3+}) where both phases are still obtained.

  12. Cationic Polymers Developed for Alkaline Fuel Cell Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-20

    cell (AEMFC) adopts cationic group-functionalized polymers as the solid electrolyte instead of liquid potassium hydroxide or sodium hydroxide used in...hydroxide or sodium hydroxide used in the traditional AFC, avoiding leakage problems, bicarbonate and carbonate salt induced electrode degradation...the solid electrolyte instead of liquid potassium hydroxide or sodium hydroxide used in the traditional AFC, avoiding leakage problems, bicarbonate

  13. Systematic studies of the mass spectrometric properties of alkaline earth metal cationized amino acids and peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küjckelmann, Ulrich; Müller, Dietrich; Weber, Carsten

    1997-07-01

    The results of a systematic study of the gas phase interactions of α-amino acids and peptides (4-15 amino acids) with alkaline earth metals, observed with mass spectrometric techniques, are presented. Furthermore, a model for the cationization with calcium at the C-terminal amino acid arginine in rotaviral polypeptides is presented.

  14. Effect of cation exchange on major cation chemistry in the large scale redox experiment at Aespoe

    SciTech Connect

    Viani, B.E.; Bruton, C.J.

    1994-10-01

    Predicting the chemical changes that result from excavating a repository below the groundwater table in granitic terrain is a major focus of the SKB geochemistry program. The modeling study presented here demonstrates that cation exchange can play a major role in controlling the fluid chemistry that results when groundwaters of differing composition mix due to flow induced by excavation of the HRL tunnel. The major goal of this study was to assess whether an equilibrium cation exchange model could explain the composition of groundwater sampled from boreholes in the HRL tunnel. Given the consistency of the cation exchange hypothesis with observations, geochemical modeling was used to assess whether the quantity of exchanger necessary to match model results and observation was physically reasonable. The impact of mineral dissolution and precipitation on fluid chemistry was also evaluated. Finally, the compositions of exchanger phases expected to be in equilibrium with various Aespoe groundwaters were predicted.

  15. Effects of substituents and substitution positions on alkaline stability of imidazolium cations and their corresponding anion-exchange membranes.

    PubMed

    Si, Zhihong; Qiu, Lihua; Dong, Huilong; Gu, Fenglou; Li, Youyong; Yan, Feng

    2014-03-26

    Imidazolium cations with butyl groups at various substitution positions (N1-, C2-, and N3-), 1-butyl-2,3-dimethylimidazolium ([N1-BDMIm](+)), 2-butyl-1,3-dimethylimidazolium ([C2-BDMIm](+)), and 3-butyl-1,2-dimethylimidazolium ([N3-BDMIm](+)), were synthesized. Quantitative (1)H NMR spectra and density functional theory calculation were applied to investigate the chemical stability of the imidazolium cations in alkaline solutions. The results suggested that the alkaline stability of the imidazolium cations was drastically affected by the C2-substitution groups. The alkaline stability of imidazolium cations with various substitution groups at the C2-position, including 2-ethyl-1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium ([C2-EBMIm](+)), 1,2-dibutyl-3-methylimidazolium ([C2-BBMIm](+)), and 2-hydroxymethyl-1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium ([C2-HMBMIm](+)), was further studied. The butyl group substituted imidazolium cation ([C2-BBMIm](+)) exhibited the highest alkaline stability at the elevated temperatures. The synthesized anion-exchange membranes based on the [C2-BBMIm](+) cation showed promising alkaline stability. These observations should pave the way to the practical application of imidazolium-based anion exchange membrane fuel cells.

  16. Modulation of yeast alkaline cation tolerance by Ypi1 requires calcineurin.

    PubMed

    Marquina, Maribel; González, Asier; Barreto, Lina; Gelis, Samuel; Muñoz, Iván; Ruiz, Amparo; Alvarez, Mari Carmen; Ramos, José; Ariño, Joaquín

    2012-04-01

    Ypi1 was discovered as an essential protein able to act as a regulatory subunit of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae type 1 protein phosphatase Glc7 and play a key role in mitosis. We show here that partial depletion of Ypi1 causes lithium sensitivity and that high levels of this protein confer a lithium-tolerant phenotype to yeast cells. Remarkably, this phenotype was independent of the role of Ypi1 as a Glc7 regulatory subunit. Lithium tolerance in cells overexpressing Ypi1 was caused by a combination of increased efflux of lithium, mediated by augmented expression of the alkaline cation ATPase ENA1, and decreased lithium influx through the Trk1,2 high-affinity potassium transporters. Deletion of CNB1, encoding the regulatory subunit of the calcineurin phosphatase, blocked Ypi1-induced expression of ENA1, normalized Li(+) fluxes, and abolished the Li(+) hypertolerant phenotype of Ypi1-overexpressing cells. These results point to a complex role of Ypi1 on the regulation of cation homeostasis, largely mediated by the calcineurin phosphatase.

  17. Bone-specific alkaline phosphatase activity is inhibited by bisphosphonates: role of divalent cations.

    PubMed

    Vaisman, Diego N; McCarthy, Antonio D; Cortizo, Ana M

    2005-05-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are drugs widely used in the treatment of various bone diseases. BPs localize to bone mineral, and their concentration in resorption lacunae could reach almost millimolar levels. Bone alkaline phosphatase (ALP) is a membrane-bound exoenzyme that has been implicated in bone formation and mineralization. In this study, we investigated the possible direct effect of three N-containing BPs (alendronate, pamidronate, and zoledronate) on the specific activity of bone ALP obtained from an extract of UMR106 rat osteosarcoma cells. Enzymatic activity was measured by spectrophotometric detection of p-nitrophenol product and by in situ visualization of ALP bands after an electrophoresis on cellulose acetate gels. Because ALP is a metalloprotein that contains Zn2+ and Mg2+, both of which are necessary for catalytic function, we also evaluated the participation of these divalent cations in the possible effect of BPs on enzymatic activity. All BPs tested were found to dose-dependently inhibit spectrophotometrically measured ALP activity (93-42% of basal) at concentrations of BPs between 10-5 M and 10-4 M, the order of potency being zoledronate approximately equals alendronate > pamidronate. However, coincubation with excess Zn2+ or Mg2+ completely abolished this inhibitory effect. Electrophoretic analysis rendered very similar results: namely a decrease in the enzymatic activity of the bone-ALP band by BPs and a reversion of this inhibition by divalent cations. This study shows that N-containing BPs directly inhibit bone-ALP activity, in a concentration range to which this exoenzyme is probably exposed in vivo. In addition, this inhibitory effect is most possibly the result of the chelation of Zn2+ and Mg2+ ions by BPs.

  18. Selective trans-membrane transport of alkali and alkaline earth cations through graphene oxide membranes based on cation-π interactions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Pengzhan; Zheng, Feng; Zhu, Miao; Song, Zhigong; Wang, Kunlin; Zhong, Minlin; Wu, Dehai; Little, Reginald B; Xu, Zhiping; Zhu, Hongwei

    2014-01-28

    Graphene and graphene oxide (G-O) have been demonstrated to be excellent filters for various gases and liquids, showing potential applications in areas such as molecular sieving and water desalination. In this paper, the selective trans-membrane transport properties of alkali and alkaline earth cations through a membrane composed of stacked and overlapped G-O sheets ("G-O membrane") are investigated. The thermodynamics of the ion transport process reveal that the competition between the generated thermal motions and the interactions of cations with the G-O sheets results in the different penetration behaviors to temperature variations for the considered cations (K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), and Ba(2+)). The interactions between the studied metal atoms and graphene are quantified by first-principles calculations based on the plane-wave-basis-set density functional theory (DFT) approach. The mechanism of the selective ion trans-membrane transportation is discussed further and found to be consistent with the concept of cation-π interactions involved in biological systems. The balance between cation-π interactions of the cations considered with the sp(2) clusters of G-O membranes and the desolvation effect of the ions is responsible for the selectivity of G-O membranes toward the penetration of different ions. These results help us better understand the ion transport process through G-O membranes, from which the possibility of modeling the ion transport behavior of cellular membrane using G-O can be discussed further. The selectivity toward different ions also makes G-O membrane a promising candidate in areas of membrane separations.

  19. Monitoring of photoluminescence decay by alkali and alkaline earth metal cations using a photoluminescent bolaamphiphile self-assembly as an optical probe.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunhyung; Kwak, Jinyoung; Lee, Sang-Yup

    2014-05-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) decay induced by the displacement of an ionic fluorescence component, Tb(3+), with alkali and alkaline earth metal cations was investigated using photoluminescent spherical self-assemblies as optical probes. The photoluminescent spherical self-assembly was prepared by the self-organization of a tyrosine-containing bolaamphiphile molecule with a photosensitizer and Tb(3+) ion. The lanthanide ion, Tb(3+), electrically bound to the carboxyl group of the bolaamphiphile molecule, was displaced by alkali and alkaline earth metal cations that had stronger electrophilicity. The PL of the self-assembly decayed remarkably due to the substitution of lanthanide ions with alkali and alkaline earth metal cations. The PL decay showed a positive correlation with cation concentration and was sensitive to the cation valency. Generally, the PL decay was enhanced by the electrophilicity of the cations. However, Ca(2+) showed greater PL decay than Mg(2+) because Ca(2+) could create various complexes with the carboxyl groups of the bolaamphiphile molecule. Microscopic and spectroscopic investigations were conducted to study the photon energy transfer and displacement of Tb(3+) by the cation exchange. This study demonstrated that the PL decay by the displacement of the ionic fluorescent compound was applied to the detection of various cations in aqueous media and is applicable to the development of future optical sensors.

  20. Effect of three cations on the stability and microstructure of protein aggregate from duck egg white under alkaline condition.

    PubMed

    Ganasen, P; Benjakul, S

    2011-08-01

    Pidan (alkaline egg) has been consumed widely in oriental countries and lead, a toxic element, has been used traditionally to yield the desirable characteristics. For safety concerns, alternative cations can be used for the production of pidan with comparable properties to traditionally prepared pidan. Turbidity measured as absorbance at 400 nm and microstructure of duck egg white proteins at pH 12 as influenced by three cations at various levels were investigated. Turbidity and particle size of egg white protein (20 g/kg) in 10 g/kg NaCl sample with CaCl2, PbO2 or ZnCl2 added at a level of 1 g/kg increased with time up to 1 h, followed by a decrease (p<0.05). Nevertheless, the turbidity was retained more in samples added with PbO2, suggesting high stability of the aggregate formed. Zeta potential showed that the aggregates treated with PbO2 had a comparatively lower negative charge. Light microscopic studies indicated that the aggregation of egg white proteins was induced by ions but varied with the types of ions and incubation time. Therefore, PbO2 exhibited the highest stabilizing effect on egg white protein under alkaline condition. However, ZnCl2 can be used as an alternative compound even if it had lower impact on stability of aggregate of duck egg white protein.

  1. Separation of alkali, alkaline earth and rare earth cations by liquid membranes containing macrocyclic carriers. Third progress report, September 1, 1980-April 1, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, J.J.

    1981-04-15

    The overall objective of this project is to study the use of liquid membrane systems employing macrocyclic ligand carriers in making separations among metal cations. During the third year of the project, work continued in the development of a mathematical model to describe cation transport. The model was originally developed to describe the relationship between cation transport rate (J/sub M/) and the cation-macrocycle stability constant (K). The model was tested by determining the rates of transport of alkali and alkaline earth cations through chloroform membranes containing carrier ligands where the stability constants for their reaction with cations in methanol were known. From the results, it is clear that the model correctly describes the dependence of J/sub M/ on log K. The model also correctly describes the effect of cation concentration and carrier concentration on cation transport rates, as detailed in the previous progress report. During the third year of the project, the transport model was expanded so as to apply to competitive transport of cations from mixtures of two cations in the source aqueous phase. Data were collected under these conditions and the ability of the model to predict the flux of each cation was tested. Representative data of this type are presented along with corresponding data which were obtained when each cation was transported by the same carrier from a source phase containing only that cation. Comparison of transport rates determined under the two experimental conditions indicates that the relationship between the two sets of data is complex. To date, a few of these data involving transport from binary cation mixtures have been tested against the transport model. It was found that the model correctly predicts the cation fluxes from cation mixtures. These preliminary results indicate that the transport model can successfully predict separation factors when cation mixtures are used.

  2. Influence of BH3 and alkaline cation released from the reduction agent on a tandem reduction/acylation reaction-A computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkova, Nevena I.; Nikolova, Rositca D.; Bojilova, Anka G.; Vayssilov, Georgi N.

    When an alkaline boron hydride is used as reduction reagent two byproducts are released, BH3 and alkaline cation, and both of them could influence the following reaction steps if a multi-step reaction is performed in tandem one-pot fashion. We report a theoretical study on the stability of possible complexes of the Lewis acids, BH3 and alkaline cations, with reaction intermediate, solvent molecules and basic additives in a tandem hydride reduction/acylation reaction of 3-diethylphosphonocoumarin. Both chelate complexes of the intermediate anion with the alkali cations (Li+, Na+, or K+) and complexes of BH3 bound to C or O center of the ambident anionic intermediate have been investigated. Since the formation of the latter complexes blocks the intermediate for further acylation, the reaction could take place only if BH3 is bound in a complex with a strong base as DMAP. The binding energy of BH3 to DMAP was found higher than to the intermediate for Li+ and Na+ as counter cations, while for K+ BH3 is bound to the intermediate stronger than to DMAP. Formation of the intermediate is facilitated in presence of Li+ cations, but the alteration of the alkali cation does not influence the selectivity of the reaction-C-acylations is preferred in all cases.

  3. Chabazite: stable cation-exchanger in hyper alkaline concrete pore water.

    PubMed

    Van Tendeloo, Leen; Wangermez, Wauter; Kurttepeli, Mert; de Blochouse, Benny; Bals, Sara; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Martens, Johan A; Maes, André; Kirschhock, Christine E A; Breynaert, Eric

    2015-02-17

    To avoid impact on the environment, facilities for permanent disposal of hazardous waste adopt multibarrier design schemes. As the primary barrier very often consists of cement-based materials, two distinct aspects are essential for the selection of suitable complementary barriers: (1) selective sorption of the contaminants in the repository and (2) long-term chemical stability in hyperalkaline concrete-derived media. A multidisciplinary approach combining experimental strategies from environmental chemistry and materials science is therefore essential to provide a reliable assessment of potential candidate materials. Chabazite is typically synthesized in 1 M KOH solutions but also crystallizes in simulated young cement pore water, a pH 13 aqueous solution mainly containing K(+) and Na(+) cations. Its formation and stability in this medium was evaluated as a function of temperature (60 and 85 °C) over a timeframe of more than 2 years and was also asessed from a mechanistic point of view. Chabazite demonstrates excellent cation-exchange properties in simulated young cement pore water. Comparison of its Cs(+) cation exchange properties at pH 8 and pH 13 unexpectedly demonstrated an increase of the KD with increasing pH. The combined results identify chabazite as a valid candidate for inclusion in engineered barriers for concrete-based waste disposal.

  4. Rapid hydrolysis of model phosphate diesters by alkaline-earth cations in aqueous DMSO: speciation and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Taran, Olga; Medrano, Felipe; Yatsimirsky, Anatoly K

    2008-12-14

    Kinetics of the cleavage of two phosphate diesters, bis(4-nitrophenyl) phosphate and 2-hydroxypropyl 4-nitrophenyl phosphate and a triester, 4-nitrophenyl diphenyl phosphate, in the presence of Mg(II), Ca(II) and Sr(II) were studied in 90% vol. DMSO at 37 degrees C. The alkaline hydrolysis of the triester was inhibited by all cations, but with both phosphodiesters strong catalytic effects were observed. Potentiometric titrations of metal perchlorates by Bu4N(OH) revealed formation of M2(OH)3+, M(OH)+, M(OH)2 and M2(OH)5- species. Rate constants for phosphodiester cleavage by individual species were obtained from analysis of rate-concentration profiles. Observed first-order rate constants in the presence of 1-2 mM Mg(II) or Ca(II) in neutral and weakly basic solutions were 10(8)-10(11) times higher than those for background hydrolysis at the same pH while in water additions of up to 50 mM metal produced <100-fold accelerations. Possible structures of DMSO solvated catalyst-substrate complexes were modeled by DFT calculations with Mg(II). The increased catalytic activity in 90% DMSO is attributed to stronger association of hydroxide ions and anionic phosphodiesters with metal ions and to preferable solvation of cations by DMSO, which creates favorable for reaction anhydrous microenvironment in the coordination sphere of the catalyst.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of crystalline structures based on phenylboronate ligands bound to alkaline earth cations.

    PubMed

    Reinholdt, Marc; Croissant, Jonas; Di Carlo, Lidia; Granier, Dominique; Gaveau, Philippe; Bégu, Sylvie; Devoisselle, Jean-Marie; Mutin, P Hubert; Smith, Mark E; Bonhomme, Christian; Gervais, Christel; van der Lee, Arie; Laurencin, Danielle

    2011-08-15

    We describe the preparation of the first crystalline compounds based on arylboronate ligands PhB(OH)(3)(-) coordinated to metal cations: [Ca(PhB(OH)(3))(2)], [Sr(PhB(OH)(3))(2)]·H(2)O, and [Ba(PhB(OH)(3))(2)]. The calcium and strontium structures were solved using powder and single-crystal X-ray diffraction, respectively. In both cases, the structures are composed of chains of cations connected through phenylboronate ligands, which interact one with each other to form a 2D lamellar structure. The temperature and pH conditions necessary for the formation of phase-pure compounds were investigated: changes in temperature were found to mainly affect the morphology of the crystallites, whereas strong variations in pH were found to affect the formation of pure phases. All three compounds were characterized using a wide range of analytical techniques (TGA, IR, Raman, XRD, and high resolution (1)H, (11)B, and (13)C solid-state NMR), and the different coordination modes of phenylboronate ligands were analyzed. Two different kinds of hydroxyl groups were identified in the structures: those involved in hydrogen bonds, and those that are effectively "free" and not involved in hydrogen bonds of any significant strength. To position precisely the OH protons within the structures, an NMR-crystallography approach was used: the comparison of experimental and calculated NMR parameters (determined using the Gauge Including Projector Augmented Wave method, GIPAW) allowed the most accurate positions to be identified. In the case of the calcium compound, it was found that it is the (43)Ca NMR data that are critical to help identify the best model of the structure.

  6. Effect of Multiple Cation Electrolyte Mixtures on Rechargeable Zn?MnO2 Alkaline Battery

    DOE PAGES

    Hertzberg, Benjamin J.; Huang, An; Hsieh, Andrew; ...

    2016-05-23

    A Bi2O3 in β-MnO2 composite cathode material has been synthesized using a simple hydrothermal method and cycled in a mixed KOH–LiOH electrolyte with a range of concentrations. We show that, at a KOH:LiOH molar ratio of 1:3, both proton insertion and lithium insertion occur, allowing access to a higher fraction of the theoretical capacity of the MnO2 while preventing the formation of ZnMn2O4. This enables a capacity of 360 mAh/g for over 60 cycles, with cycling limited more by anode properties than traditional cathodic failure mechanisms. The structural changes occurring during cycling are characterized using electron microscopy and in situmore » synchrotron energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) techniques. This mixed electrolyte shows exceptional cyclability and capacity and can be used as a drop-in replacement for current alkaline batteries, potentially drastically improving their cycle life and creating a wide range of new applications for this energy storage technology.« less

  7. Effect of Multiple Cation Electrolyte Mixtures on Rechargeable Zn?MnO2 Alkaline Battery

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzberg, Benjamin J.; Huang, An; Hsieh, Andrew; Chamoun, Mylad; Davies, G.; Seo, Joon Kyo; Zhong, Zhong; Croft, Mark; Erdonmez, Can; Meng, Ying Shirley; Steingart, Dan

    2016-05-23

    A Bi2O3 in β-MnO2 composite cathode material has been synthesized using a simple hydrothermal method and cycled in a mixed KOH–LiOH electrolyte with a range of concentrations. We show that, at a KOH:LiOH molar ratio of 1:3, both proton insertion and lithium insertion occur, allowing access to a higher fraction of the theoretical capacity of the MnO2 while preventing the formation of ZnMn2O4. This enables a capacity of 360 mAh/g for over 60 cycles, with cycling limited more by anode properties than traditional cathodic failure mechanisms. The structural changes occurring during cycling are characterized using electron microscopy and in situ synchrotron energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) techniques. This mixed electrolyte shows exceptional cyclability and capacity and can be used as a drop-in replacement for current alkaline batteries, potentially drastically improving their cycle life and creating a wide range of new applications for this energy storage technology.

  8. Major anion and cation fluxes from the Central SiberianPlateau watersheds with underlying permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolosov, Roman R.; Prokushkin, Anatoly S.; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.

    2016-11-01

    The subarctic rivers of the Central Siberian Plateau have specific fed-characteristics due to the permafrost distribution and the active layer thawing dynamics. Two watersheds with different types of permafrost (from insular to continuous) are studied. Different data sources (Roshydromet and our own observations) are used for receiving anions’ (HCO3-, SO4 2-, Cl-) and cations’ (Ca2+, Mg2+) fluxes from the Nizhnyaya Tunguska river (1960-2011) and the Tembenchi river (1970-2011). The annual discharge of N. Tunguska for 1939-2011 is characterized by an increase of 0.3 km3/year/year, and for Tembenchi, 0.04 km3/year/year. The major part of the increase (about 60%) is due to spring flooding (May - June). The volume-weighted mean concentrations of major anions and cations in the N. Tunguska river water increased three times in the spring period (40.7 - 116.8 mg/l) and in the summer-fall period (74-212.9 mg/l). On the contrary, such concentrations decreased sharply during the winter mean water period. Due to these results, the total export of main anions and cations from the N. Tunguska river basin rose more than 4,5 times. Two possible reasons can be identified: 1) a water discharge increase of the Subarctic rivers (Peterson et al., 2002); 2) permafrost degradation induced by global climate warming (Frey and McClelland 2009).

  9. The use of laboratory-determined ion exchange parameters in the predictive modelling of field-scale major cation migration in groundwater over a 40-year period.

    PubMed

    Carlyle, Harriet F; Tellam, John H; Parker, Karen E

    2004-01-01

    An attempt has been made to estimate quantitatively cation concentration changes as estuary water invades a Triassic Sandstone aquifer in northwest England. Cation exchange capacities and selectivity coefficients for Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), and Mg(2+) were measured in the laboratory using standard techniques. Selectivity coefficients were also determined using a method involving optimized back-calculation from flushing experiments, thus permitting better representation of field conditions; in all cases, the Gaines-Thomas/constant cation exchange capacity (CEC) model was found to be a reasonable, though not perfect, first description. The exchange parameters interpreted from the laboratory experiments were used in a one-dimensional reactive transport mixing cell model, and predictions compared with field pumping well data (Cl and hardness spanning a period of around 40 years, and full major ion analyses in approximately 1980). The concentration patterns predicted using Gaines-Thomas exchange with calcite equilibrium were similar to the observed patterns, but the concentrations of the divalent ions were significantly overestimated, as were 1980 sulphate concentrations, and 1980 alkalinity concentrations were underestimated. Including representation of sulphate reduction in the estuarine alluvium failed to replicate 1980 HCO(3) and pH values. However, by including partial CO(2) degassing following sulphate reduction, a process for which there is 34S and 18O evidence from a previous study, a good match for SO(4), HCO(3), and pH was attained. Using this modified estuary water and averaged values from the laboratory ion exchange parameter determinations, good predictions for the field cation data were obtained. It is concluded that the Gaines-Thomas/constant exchange capacity model with averaged parameter values can be used successfully in ion exchange predictions in this aquifer at a regional scale and over extended time scales, despite the numerous assumptions inherent in

  10. Fullerene-C60 and crown ether doped on C60 sensors for high sensitive detection of alkali and alkaline earth cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaghmarzi, Fatemeh Alipour; Zahedi, Mansour; Mola, Adeleh; Abedini, Saboora; Arshadi, Sattar; Ahmadzadeh, Saeed; Etminan, Nazanin; Younesi, Omran; Rahmanifar, Elham; Yoosefian, Mehdi

    2017-03-01

    Fullerenes are effective acceptor components with high electron affinity for charge transfer. The significant influences of chemical adsorption of the cations on the electrical sensitivity of pristine C60 and 15-(C2H4O)5/C60 nanocages could be the basis of new generation of electronic sensor design. The density functional theory calculation for alkali and alkaline earth cations detection by pristine C60 and 15-(C2H4O)5/C60 nanocages are considered at B3LYP level of theory with 6-31 G(d) basis set. The quantum theory of atoms in molecules analysis have been performed to understand the nature of intermolecular interactions between the cations and nanocages. Also, the natural bond orbital analysis have been performed to assess the intermolecular interactions in detail. Furthermore, the frontier molecular orbital, energy gap, work function, electronegativity, number of transferred electron (∆N), dipole moment as well as the related chemical hardness and softness are investigated and calculated in this study. The results show that the adsorption of cations (M=Na+, K+, Mg2+ and Ca2+) are exothermic and the binding energy in pristine C60 nanocage and 15-(C2H4O)5/C60 increases with respect to the cations charge. The results also denote a decrease in the energy gap and an increase in the electrical conductivity upon the adsorption process. In order to validate the obtained results, the density of state calculations are employed and presented in the end as well.

  11. Effect of the alkaline cation size on the conductivity in gel polymer electrolytes and their influence on photo electrochemical solar cells.

    PubMed

    Bandara, T M W J; Fernando, H D N S; Furlani, M; Albinsson, I; Dissanayake, M A K L; Ratnasekera, J L; Mellander, B-E

    2016-04-28

    has been reported to decrease with the increasing size of the cation. However, in this work, it follows an opposite trend highlighting a major difference between liquid and quasi-solid electrolytes on the solar cell performance.

  12. Eosinophil cationic protein stimulates and major basic protein inhibits airway mucus secretion.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, J D; Davey, R T; Lundgren, B; Mullol, J; Marom, Z; Logun, C; Baraniuk, J; Kaliner, M A; Shelhamer, J H

    1991-03-01

    Possible roles of eosinophil (EO) products in modulating the release of mucus from airway explants were investigated. Cell- and membrane-free lysates from purified human EOs (1 to 20 x 10(5)) caused a dose-dependent release of respiratory glycoconjugates (RGC) from cultured feline tracheal explants. Crude extracts from isolated EO granules also stimulated RGC release, suggesting that a granular protein might be responsible. Three proteins derived from EO granules, EO-derived neurotoxin, EO cationic protein (ECP), and major basic protein (MBP) were separated by sequential sizing and affinity chromatography. ECP (0.025 to 25 micrograms/ml) caused a dose-dependent increase in RGC release from both feline and human airway explants and also stimulated the release of the serous cell-marker, lactoferrin, from human bronchial explants. EO-derived neurotoxin (0.025 to 50 micrograms/ml) failed to affect RGC release, whereas MBP (50 micrograms/ml) significantly inhibited RGC release from feline explants. Thus, ECP stimulates RGC and lactoferrin release from airway explants, whereas MBP inhibits RGC release.

  13. Cation/macromolecule interaction in alkaline cellulose solution characterized with pulsed field-gradient spin-echo NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sen; Sun, Peng; Zhang, Rongrong; Lu, Ang; Liu, Maili; Zhang, Lina

    2017-03-06

    As a breakthrough to the traditional (1)H diffusometry, the interaction of cations with cellulose is investigated via(7)Li and (23)Na PFG-SE NMR. The diffusion coefficient of Li(+) decreases more than that of Na(+) with the addition of cellulose, which indicates a stronger binding of LiOH with the macromolecule. Therefore, a new, facile, accurate and repeatable method to characterize ion/polymer interactions is established.

  14. Amino-functionalized alkaline clay with cationic star-shaped polymer as adsorbents for removal of Cr(VI) in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yuanfeng; Cai, Pingxiong; Farmahini-Farahani, Madjid; Li, Yiduo; Hou, Xiaobang; Xiao, Huining

    2016-11-01

    Pentaerythritol (PER) was esterified with 2-bromoisobutyryl bromide to synthesize a four-arm initiator 4Br-PER for atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). Star-shaped copolymers (P(AM-co-DMAEMA)4, CSP) were prepared via ATRP using dimethyl aminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) and acrylamide (AM) as comonomers, while Br-PER and CuBr/2,2‧-bipyridine (BPY) as the initiator and the catalyst, respectively. The resulting four-arm initiator and star-shaped polymer (CSP) were characterized with FT-IR, 1H NMR and Ubbelohde viscometry. Alkaline clay (AC) was immobilized with CSPs to yield amino groups, and the cationic star polymer-immobilized alkaline clay (CSP-AC) was applied to remove Cr(VI) from the aqueous solution in batch experiments. Various influencing factors, including pH, contact time and immobilization amount of CSP on adsorption capacity of CSP-AC for Cr(VI) were also investigated. The results demonstrated that Cr(VI) adsorption was highly pH dependent. The optimized pH value was 4.0. The adsorption isotherms of the adsorbent fit the Langmuir model well, with the maximum adsorption capacity of 137.9 mg/g at 30 °C. The material should be a promising adsorbent for Cr(VI) removal, with the advantages of high adsorption capacity.

  15. Partial exchange of the Li{sup +}, Na{sup +} and K{sup +} alkaline cations in the HNi(PO{sub 4}).H{sub 2}O layered compound

    SciTech Connect

    Escobal, Jaione; Mesa, Jose . E-mail: joseluis.mesa@ehu.es; Pizarro, Jose; Bazan, Begona; Arriortua, Maria; Rojo, Teofilo

    2006-12-15

    The exchange of the Li{sup +}(1), Na{sup +}(2) and K{sup +}(3) alkaline cations in the layered HNi(PO{sub 4}).H{sub 2}O was carried out starting from a methanolic solution containing the Li(OH).H{sub 2}O hydroxide for (1) and the M(OH) (M=Na and K) hydroxides together with the (C{sub 6}H{sub 13}NH{sub 2}){sub 0.75}HNiPO{sub 4}.H{sub 2}O phases for (2) and (3). The compounds are stable until, approximately, 280{sup o}C for (1) and 400 deg. C for phases (2) and (3), respectively. The IR spectra show the bands belonging to the water molecule and the (PO{sub 4}){sup 3-} oxoanion. The diffuse reflectance spectra indicate the existence of Ni(II), d{sup 8}, cations in slightly distorted octahedral geometry. The calculated Dq and Racah (B and C) parameters have a mean value of Dq=765, B=905 and C=3895cm{sup -1}, respectively, in accordance with the values obtained habitually for this octahedral Ni(II) cation. The study of the exchange process performed by X-ray powder diffraction indicates that the exchange of the Li{sup +} cation in the lamellar HNi(PO{sub 4}).H{sub 2}O phase is the minor rapid reaction, whereas the exchange of the Na{sup +} and K{sup +} cations needs the presence of the intermediate (C{sub 6}H{sub 13}NH{sub 2}){sub 0.75}HNiPO{sub 4}.H{sub 2}O intercalate in order to obtain the required producth the sodium and potassium ions. The Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) images show a mean size of particle of 5{mu}m. The Li{sup +} exchanged compound exhibits small ionic conductivity ({omega}cm{sup -1} is in the 10{sup -8}-10{sup -9} range) probably restrained by the methanol solvent. Magnetic measurements carried out from 5K to room temperature indicate antiferromagnetic coupling as the major interaction in the three phases. Notwithstanding the Li and K phases show a weak ferromagnetism at low temperatures.

  16. {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy of cationic species in CO{sub 2} selective alkaline earth metal porous silicoaluminophosphates prepared via liquid and solid state ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Arevalo-Hidalgo, Ana G.; Dugar, Sneha; Fu, Riqiang; Hernandez-Maldonado, Arturo J.

    2012-07-15

    The location of extraframework cations in Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion-exchanged SAPO-34 was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy and spectral deconvolution. Incorporation of the alkaline earth metal cations onto the SAPO framework was achieved via liquid state ion exchange, coupled partial detemplation/solid-state ion exchange, and combination of both techniques. MAS NMR revealed that the level of ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations near hexagonal prisms (site SI), which are relatively difficult to exchange with the alkaline earth metal due to steric and charge repulsion criteria. In addition, the presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange of otherwise tenacious hydrogen as corroborated by unit cell compositional data as well as enhanced CO{sub 2} adsorption at low partial pressures. The extraframework ammonium species were produced from partial detemplation of the structure-directing agent employed for the SAPO-34 synthesis, tetraethylammonium. - Graphical abstract: MAS NMR was used to elucidate the position the cationic species in alkaline earth metal exchanged silicoaluminophosphates. These species played a significant role during the ion exchange process and, therefore, the materials ultimate CO{sub 2} adsorption performance. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Location of extraframework Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} cations was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Level of Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion exchanged SAPOs are outstanding CO{sub 2} adsorbents.

  17. Cardiac ryanodine receptor: Selectivity for alkaline earth metal cations points to the EF-hand nature of luminal binding sites.

    PubMed

    Gaburjakova, Jana; Gaburjakova, Marta

    2016-06-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that the regulation of cardiac ryanodine receptor (RYR2) by luminal Ca(2+) is mediated by luminal binding sites located on the RYR2 channel itself and/or its auxiliary protein, calsequestrin. The localization and structure of RYR2-resident binding sites are not known because of the lack of a high-resolution structure of RYR2 luminal regions. To obtain the first structural insight, we probed the RYR2 luminal face stripped of calsequestrin by alkaline earth metal divalents (M(2+): Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Sr(2+) or Ba(2+)). We show that the RYR2 response to caffeine at the single-channel level is significantly modified by the nature of luminal M(2+). Moreover, we performed competition experiments by varying the concentration of luminal M(2+) (Mg(2+), Sr(2+) or Ba(2+)) from 8 mM to 53 mM and investigated its ability to compete with 1mM luminal Ca(2+). We demonstrate that all tested M(2+) bind to exactly the same RYR2 luminal binding sites. Their affinities decrease in the order: Ca(2+)>Sr(2+)>Mg(2+)~Ba(2+), showing a strong correlation with the M(2+) affinity of the EF-hand motif. This indicates that the RYR2 luminal binding regions and the EF-hand motif likely share some structural similarities because the structure ties directly to the function.

  18. Interaction between alkaline earth cations and oxo ligands: a DFT study of the affinity of Mg2+ for carbonyl ligands.

    PubMed

    Moreira da Costa, Leonardo; Stoyanov, Stanislav R; Walkimar de M Carneiro, José

    2012-09-01

    The affinities of Mg(2+) for various substituted carbonyl ligands were determined at the DFT (B3LYP/6-31+G(d)) and semi-empirical (PM6) levels of theory. Two sets of carbonyl ligands were studied: monosubstituted [aldehydes R-CHO and RPh-CHO] and homodisubstituted [ketones R(2)C=O and (RPh)(2)C=O], where R = NH(2), OCH(3), OH, CH(3), H, F, Cl, Br, CN, or NO(2)). In the (RPh)(2)CO case, the R group was bonded to the para position of a phenyl ring. The enthalpies of interaction between the ligands and a pentaaquomagnesium(II) complex were calculated to determine the affinity of each ligand for the Mg(2+) cation and to correlate with geometrical and electronic parameters. These parameters exhibited the same trends for all of the ligands studied, showing that the affinity of Mg(2+) for electron-donating ligands is higher than its affinity for electron-withdrawing ligands. In the complexes, electron-donating groups increase both the electrostatic and the covalent components of the Mg-ligand interaction. This behavior correlates with the Mg-O(carbonyl) distance and the ligand electron-donor strength.

  19. Effect of metal cation replacement on the electronic structure of metalorganic halide perovskites: Replacement of lead with alkaline-earth metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazoki, Meysam; Jacobsson, T. Jesper; Hagfeldt, Anders; Boschloo, Gerrit; Edvinsson, Tomas

    2016-04-01

    Organic and inorganic lead halogen perovskites, and in particular, C H3N H3Pb I3 , have during the last years emerged as a class of highly efficient solar cell materials. Herein we introduce metalorganic halogen perovskite materials for energy-relevant applications based on alkaline-earth metals. Based on the classical notion of Goldschmidt's rules and quantum mechanical considerations, the three alkaline-earth metals, Ca, Sr, and Ba, are shown to be able to exchange lead in the perovskite structure. The three alkaline-earth perovskites, C H3N H3Ca I3,C H3N H3Sr I3 , and C H3N H3Ba I3 , as well as the reference compound, C H3N H3Pb I3 , are in this paper investigated with density functional theory (DFT) calculations, which predict these compounds to exist as stable perovskite materials, and their electronic properties are explored. A detailed analysis of the projected molecular orbital density of states and electronic band structure from DFT calculations were used for interpretation of the band-gap variations in these materials and for estimation of the effective masses of the electrons and holes. Neglecting spin-orbit effects, the band gap of MACa I3,MASr I3 , and MABa I3 were estimated to be 2.95, 3.6, and 3.3 eV, respectively, showing the relative change expected for metal cation exchange. The shifts in the conduction band (CB) edges for the alkaline-earth perovskites were quantified using scalar relativistic DFT calculations and tight-binding analysis, and were compared to the situation in the more extensively studied lead halide perovskite, C H3N H3Pb I3 , where the change in the work function of the metal is the single most important factor in tuning the CB edge and band gap. The results show that alkaline-earth-based organometallic perovskites will not work as an efficient light absorber in photovoltaic applications but instead could be applicable as charge-selective contact materials. The rather high CB edge and the wide band gap together with the large

  20. Reach-scale cation exchange controls on major ion chemistry of an Antarctic glacial meltwater stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gooseff, Michael N.; McKnight, Diane M.; Runkel, Robert L.

    2004-01-01

    McMurdo dry valleys of Antarctica represent the largest of the ice-free areas on the Antarctic continent, containing glaciers, meltwater streams, and closed basin lakes. Previous geochemical studies of dry valley streams and lakes have addressed chemical weathering reactions of hyporheic substrate and geochemical evolution of dry valley surface waters. We examine cation transport and exchange reactions during a stream tracer experiment in a dry valley glacial meltwater stream. The injection solution was composed of dissolved Li+, Na+, K+, and Cl-. Chloride behaved conservatively in this stream, but Li+, Na+, and K+ were reactive to varying degrees. Mass balance analysis indicates that relative to Cl-, Li+ and K+ were taken up in downstream transport and Na+ was released. Simulations of conservative and reactive (first-order uptake or generation) solute transport were made with the OTIS (one-dimensional solute transport with inflow and storage) model. Among the four experimental reaches of Green Creek, solute transport simulations reveal that Li+ was removed from stream water in all four reaches, K+ was released in two reaches, taken up in one reach, and Na+ was released in all four reaches. Hyporheic sediments appear to be variable with uptake of Li+ in two reaches, uptake of K+ in one reach, release of K+ in two reaches, and uptake of Na+ in one reach. Mass balances of the conservative and reactive simulations show that from 1.05 to 2.19 moles of Li+ was adsorbed per reach, but less than 0.3 moles of K+ and less than 0.9 moles of Na+ were released per reach. This suggests that either (1) exchange of another ion which was not analyzed in this experiment or (2) that both ion exchange and sorption control inorganic solute transport. The elevated cation concentrations introduced during the experiment are typical of initial flows in each flow season, which flush accumulated dry salts from the streambed. We propose that the bed sediments (which compose the hyporheic

  1. Discrete divalent rare-earth cationic ROP catalysts: ligand-dependent redox behavior and discrepancies with alkaline-earth analogues in a ligand-assisted activated monomer mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Roisnel, Thierry; Maron, Laurent; Carpentier, Jean-François; Sarazin, Yann

    2013-03-18

    The first solvent-free cationic complexes of the divalent rare-earth metals, [{RO}RE(II) ](+) [A](-) (RE(II) =Yb(II) , 1; Eu(II) , 2) and [{LO}RE(II) ](+) [A](-) ([A](-) =[H2 N{B(C6 F5 )3 }2 ](-) ; RE(II) =Yb(II) , 3; Eu(II) , 4), have been prepared by using highly chelating monoanionic aminoether-fluoroalkoxide ({RO}(-) ) and aminoether-phenolate ({LO}(-) ) ligands. Complexes 1 and 2 are structurally related to their alkaline-earth analogues [{RO}AE](+) [A](-) (AE=Ca, 5; Sr, 6). Yet, the two families behave very differently during catalysis of the ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of L-lactide (L-LA) and trimethylene carbonate (TMC) performed under immortal conditions with excess BnOH as an exogenous chain-transfer agent. The ligand was found to strongly influence the behavior of the RE(II) complexes during ROP catalysis. The fluoroalkoxide RE(II) catalysts 1 and 2 are not oxidized under ROP conditions, and compare very favorably with their Ca and Sr congeners 5 and 6 in terms of activity (turnover frequency (TOF) in the range 200-400 molL-LA (molEu  h(-1) )) and control over the parameters during the immortal ROP of L-LA (Mn,theor ≈Mn,SEC , Mw /Mn <1.05). The Eu(II) -phenolate 4 provided one of the most effective ROP cationic systems known to date for L-LA polymerization, exhibiting high activity (TOF up to 1 880 molL-LA ⋅(molEu  h)(-1) ) and good control (Mw /Mn =1.05). By contrast, upon addition of L-LA the Yb(II) -phenolate 3 immediately oxidizes to inactive RE(III) species. Yet, the cyclic carbonate TMC was rapidly polymerized by combinations of 3 (or even 1) and BnOH, revealing excellent activities (TOF=5000-7000 molTMC ⋅(molEu  h)(-1) ) and unusually high control (Mn,theor ≈Mn,SEC , Mw /Mn <1.09); under identical conditions, the calcium derivative 5 was entirely inert toward TMC. Based on experimental and kinetic data, a new ligand-assisted activated monomer ROP mechanism is suggested, in which the so-called ancillary ligand plays a

  2. 87Sr/86Sr and major ion composition of rainwater of Ahmedabad, India: Sources of base cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Jayati; Singh, Sunil Kumar

    2012-12-01

    Rainwater samples from Ahmedabad, an urban site in India are analysed for their chemical composition and Sr isotopic ratio. Dominance of Ca in the cation budget indicates its importance in the acid neutralization whereas SO4 and NO3 dominate the anion budget. The major ion concentrations measured in this study are on the lower side of the range reported in the previous study (Rastogi and Sarin, 2007) from the same site. Na and Cl show very good correlation with ratio similar to the seawater ratio, implying their marine origin. Na concentration in these samples has been used as a proxy to calculate the non sea salt fraction of other major ions. Non sea salt Ca and Mg vary from 99.0% to 99.6% and 24.6% to 89.1% of the measured Ca and Mg respectively whereas non sea salt component of SO4 and HCO3 contribute 84.3% to 98.9% and 99.1% to 99.9% respectively. Sr concentrations in these rainwaters vary from 32 to 191 nM and 87Sr/86Sr ranges from 0.70878 to 0.71027. Sr concentration shows a very good correlation (coefficient 0.93) with the non-sea salt component of Ca and Mg indicating their continental sources and having similar provenances. Carbonates and basalts seem to contribute significantly to dissolved base cations of the rainwaters. The basalts from Deccan region, which is isotopically indistinguishable from the African basalts and the silicate and carbonates from African region along with the sediments from the Ganga plain (which is originated from the Himalayan lithologies) could be potential dust sources for this particular site. The sources of dissolved base cations deduced from Sr isotope composition of the rainwaters are consistent with wind back trajectory data obtained from NOAA HYSPLIT model.

  3. Cationized dextran nanoparticle-encapsulated CXCR4-siRNA enhanced correlation between CXCR4 expression and serum alkaline phosphatase in a mouse model of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Abedini, Fatemeh; Hosseinkhani, Hossein; Ismail, Maznah; Domb, Abraham J; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Chong, Pei Pei; Hong, Po-Da; Yu, Dah-Shyong; Farber, Ira-Yudovin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The failure of colorectal cancer treatments is partly due to overexpression of CXCR4 by tumor cells, which plays a critical role in cell metastasis. Moreover, serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels are frequently elevated in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. A polysaccharide, dextran, was chosen as the vector of siRNA. Spermine was conjugated to oxidized dextran by reductive amination process to obtain cationized dextran, so-called dextran-spermine, in order to prepare CXCR4-siRNAs/dextran-spermine nanoparticles. The fabricated nanoparticles were used in order to investigate whether downregulation of CXCR4 expression could affect serum ALP in mouse models of colorectal cancer. Methods: Colorectal cancer was established in BALB/C mice following injection of mouse colon carcinoma cells CT.26WT through the tail vein. CXCR4 siRNA for two sites of the target gene was administered following injection of naked siRNA or siRNA encapsulated into nanoparticles. Results: In vivo animal data revealed that CXCR4 silencing by dextran-spermine nanoparticles significantly downregulated CXCR4 expression compared with naked CXCR4 siRNA. Furthermore, there was correlation between CXCR4 expression and serum ALP. Conclusion: CXCR4 siRNA/dextran-spermine nanoparticles appear to be highly effective, and may be suitable for further in vivo applications. Further research evaluation will be needed to determine the effect of CXCR4 silencing on serum ALP levels, which may be a useful marker to predict liver metastasis in colorectal cancer. PMID:22888250

  4. Separation of alkali, alkaline earth and rare earth cations by liquid membranes containing macrocyclic carriers. Fourth progress report, 1 November 1981-31 July 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, J J; Izatt, R M

    1982-07-31

    The H/sub 2/O-CHCl/sub 3/-H/sub 2/O liquid membrane system was characterized with respect to the effect on cation (K/sup +/) transport rate of salt concentration and anion type. A bulk liquid membrane cell was used. A mathematical model for cation flux is being developed for several cations, several macrocycles, and mixtures of two or three cations. Eu/sup 3 +/ was not transported by 18-crown-6, but its reduced from Eu/sup 2 +/ was. Cation transport properties of calixarenes are also being investigated. Emulsion membrane systems were studied as a way of increasing the cation transport. Pb/sup 2 +/ was found to be transported by dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 through the liquid membrane. Transport rates of metal cation nitrates were measured in a water-toluene-water emulsion membrane system. 14 figures, 7 tables. (DLC)

  5. Double layer effects in electrocatalysis: the oxygen reduction reaction and ethanol oxidation reaction on Au(111), Pt(111) and Ir(111) in alkaline media containing Na and Li cations.

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, Pietro P.; Strmcnik, Dusan; Jirkovsky, Jakub S.; Connell, Justin G.; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad

    2016-03-15

    Oxygen reduction and ethanol oxidation reactions were studied on Au(111), Pt(111) and Ir(111) in alkaline solutions containing sodium and/or lithium cations. By keeping the same (111) surface orientation and exploring oxophilicity trends and non-covalent interactions between OHad and alkali metal cations (AMCn+), we were able to gain deep insights into the multiple roles that OHad plays in these important electrocatalytic reactions. Cyclic voltammetry experiments revealed that OHad formation initiates at distinct electrode potentials, governed by the oxophilicity of the specific metal surface, with further OHad adlayer stabilization by non-covalent alkali-cation interactions and affecting the formation of a “true oxide” layer at higher electrode potentials. Although OHad is a simple spectator for the ORR, it promotes the ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR) at lower potentials and act as spectator at high OHad coverages. By changing the alkali metal cation at the interface (Li+) on more oxophilic surfaces, it was possible to promote the EOR even more, relative to Na+, without changing the product distribution for the reaction. This cation effect suggests that OHad---Li+(H2O)x clusters can stabilize the ethoxide adlayer, thus improving the EOR activity. Our results indicate the importance of the entire electrochemical interface in determining the electrocatalytic activity during reaction.

  6. Gly429 is the major determinant of uncompetitive inhibition of human germ cell alkaline phosphatase by L-leucine.

    PubMed Central

    Hummer, C; Millán, J L

    1991-01-01

    The catalytic activity of human placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP) and germ cell alkaline phosphatase (GCAP) can be inhibited, through an uncompetitive mechanism, by L-Phe. GCAP is also selectively inhibited by L-Leu. Site-directed mutagenesis of five of the 12 residues which are different in PLAP and GCAP revealed that Gly429 is the primary determinant of GCAP inhibition by L-Leu, and Ser84 and Leu297 play a modulatory role in the inhibition. PMID:2001256

  7. Reaction of the coordinate complexes of inositol hexaphosphate with first row transition series cations and Cd(II) with calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Martin, C J

    1995-05-01

    The reaction of alkaline phosphatase (APase) with the complexes of myo-inositol hexakisphosphate (IHP) and various cations at pH 7.2 results in a decrease in activity. Singly, neither IHP nor metal ions induce such changes. IHP-Mn(II) complexes were the least effective. Using the ions of nickel or cadmium, activity was reduced by > 95%. A similar large decrease (> 99%) was seen previously in the reaction of APase with IHP-Cu(II) complexes. With Co(II) and IHP as reactants, the activity was reduced to 10-12% of that of the native enzyme. When the apoprotein, prepared by reaction of the enzyme with either EDTA or 1,10-phenanthroline, was titrated with Co(II), the activity was equal to that resulting from the reaction of the enzyme with IHP-Co(II) complexes. Titration with zinc restored 95% of the original activity. The products are metal-substituted derivatives in which the resident catalytic (A-site) zinc ions, at least, are replaced by the cation of the IHP complex that was used. The rates of such reactions were fastest with the complexes of Cu(II) and Cd(II) (0.12 min-1), less so with Co(II) as the ion (0.056 min-1), and slowest with complexes of nickel and manganese (0.01 min-1). In every case, the rate of reaction, but not its extent of change, was inhibited by zinc ions that reduced rate constants to 0.0014-0.0054 min-1. Magnesium ions had no effect. Likewise, Mn(II), with but one exception, did not affect the reactions. When present along with IHP-Ni(II) complexes, the rate was increased and the enzyme activity further decreased. If Zn(II) was also present, this enhancement was eliminated. All changes in enzyme activity were reversible by treatment with EDTA followed by reconstitution with zinc. Approximately 95% conversion to the original activity could be attained. Reactivation of modified APase preparation also could be attained, in some cases, by pre-incubation with Zn(II) at pH 8. For example, conversion of the Cd(II)-substituted APase to the zinc enzyme

  8. Identification of a major QTL allele from wild soybean (Glycine soja Sieb. & Zucc.) for increasing alkaline salt tolerance in soybean.

    PubMed

    Tuyen, D D; Lal, S K; Xu, D H

    2010-07-01

    Salt-affected soils are generally classified into two main categories, sodic (alkaline) and saline. Our previous studies showed that the wild soybean accession JWS156-1 (Glycine soja) from the Kinki area of Japan was tolerant to NaCl salt, and the quantitative trait locus (QTL) for NaCl salt tolerance was located on soybean linkage group N (chromosome 3). Further investigation revealed that the wild soybean accession JWS156-1 also had a higher tolerance to alkaline salt stress. In the present study, an F(6) recombinant inbred line mapping population (n = 112) and an F(2) population (n = 149) derived from crosses between a cultivated soybean cultivar Jackson and JWS156-1 were used to identify QTL for alkaline salt tolerance in soybean. Evaluation of soybean alkaline salt tolerance was carried out based on salt tolerance rating (STR) and leaf chlorophyll content (SPAD value) after treatment with 180 mM NaHCO(3) for about 3 weeks under greenhouse conditions. In both populations, a significant QTL for alkaline salt tolerance was detected on the molecular linkage group D2 (chromosome 17), which accounted for 50.2 and 13.0% of the total variation for STR in the F(6) and the F(2) populations, respectively. The wild soybean contributed to the tolerance allele in the progenies. Our results suggest that QTL for alkaline salt tolerance is different from the QTL for NaCl salt tolerance found previously in this wild soybean genotype. The DNA markers closely associated with the QTLs might be useful for marker-assisted selection to pyramid tolerance genes in soybean for both alkaline and saline stresses.

  9. Using multivariate statistical analysis of groundwater major cation and trace element concentrations to evaluate groundwater flow in a regional aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetzenbach, Klaus J.; Farnham, Irene M.; Hodge, Vernon F.; Johannesson, Kevin H.

    1999-12-01

    Groundwater samples were collected from 11 springs in Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge in southern Nevada and seven springs from Death Valley National Park in eastern California. Concentrations of the major cations (Ca, Mg, Na and K) and 45 trace elements were determined in these groundwater samples. The resultant data were subjected to evaluation via the multivariate statistical technique principal components analysis (PCA), to investigate the chemical relationships between the Ash Meadows and Death Valley spring waters, to evaluate whether the results of the PCA support those of previous hydrogeological and isotopic studies and to determine if PCA can be used to help delineate potential groundwater flow patterns based on the chemical compositions of groundwaters. The results of the PCA indicated that groundwaters from the regional Paleozoic carbonate aquifers (all of the Ash Meadows springs and four springs from the Furnace Creek region of Death Valley) exhibited strong statistical associations, whereas other Death Valley groundwaters were chemically different. The results of the PCA support earlier studies, where potentiometric head levels, 18O and D, geological relationships and rare earth element data were used to evaluate groundwater flow, which suggest groundwater flows from Ash Meadows to the Furnace Creek springs in Death Valley. The PCA suggests that Furnace Creek groundwaters are moderately concentrated Ash Meadows groundwater, reflecting longer aquifer residence times for the Furnace Creek groundwaters. Moreover, PCA indicates that groundwater may flow from springs in the region surrounding Scotty's Castle in Death Valley National Park, to a spring discharging on the valley floor. The study indicates that PCA may provide rapid and relatively cost-effective methods to assess possible groundwater flow regimes in systems that have not been previously investigated.

  10. Syntheses and characterization of energetic compounds constructed from alkaline earth metal cations (Sr and Ba) and 1,2-bis(tetrazol-5-yl)ethane

    SciTech Connect

    Xia Zhengqiang; Chen Sanping; Wei Qing; Qiao Chengfang

    2011-07-15

    Two new energetic compounds, [M(BTE)(H{sub 2}O){sub 5}]{sub n} (M=Sr(1), Ba(2)) [H{sub 2}BTE=1,2-bis(tetrazol-5-yl)ethane], have been hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses reveal that they are isomorphous and exhibit 2D (4,4) net framework, generated by 4-connected Sr{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10}/Ba{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10} SBUs linked up by two independent binding modes of H{sub 2}BTE, and the resulting 2D structure is interconnected by hydrogen-bond and strong face to face {pi}-{pi} stacking interactions between two tetrazole rings to lead to a 3D supramolecular architecture. DSC measurements show that they have significant catalytic effects on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate. Moreover, the photoluminescence properties, thermogravimetric analyses, and flame colors of the as-prepared compounds are also investigated in this paper. - Graphical abstract: Two novel 2D isomorphous alkaline earth metal complexes were assembled by 4-connected Sr{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10}/Ba{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10} SBUs and two independent binding modes of H{sub 2}BTE ligands, and the catalytic performances toward thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate and photoluminescent properties of them were investigated. Highlights: > Two novel alkaline earth energetic coordination polymers have been prepared.{yields} Both structures are layered based on 4-connected Sr{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10}/Ba{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10} SBUs and two distinct H{sub 2}BTE coordination modes.{yields} The dehydrated products of the compounds possess good thermostability and significant catalytic effects on thermal decomposition of AP.

  11. [The arsenate Na3Fe2(AsO4) 3: structural study at low temperature and simulation of conduction properties of alkaline cations].

    PubMed

    Ouerfelli, Najoua; Guesmi, Abderrahmen; Mazza, Daniele; Zid, Mohamed Faouzi; Driss, Ahmed

    2008-05-01

    The crystal structure of the low-temperature garnet-like form of trisodium diiron(III) triarsenate, Na(3)Fe(2)(AsO(4))(3), exhibits a three-dimensional framework with small tunnels running along the [111] direction, in which the Na(+) cations are located. This study demonstrates the structural origins of the different ionic conductivities of the low- and high-temperature forms. Sodium conduction properties are simulated by means of the bond-valence-sum (BVS) model; the correlations between the low- and high-temperature crystal structures are discussed. The As, Fe and Na atoms lie on special positions (Wyckoff symbols 24d, 16a and 24c, respectively).

  12. Biotic ligand modeling approach: Synthesis of the effect of major cations on the toxicity of metals to soil and aquatic organisms.

    PubMed

    Ardestani, Masoud M; van Straalen, Nico M; van Gestel, Cornelis A M

    2015-10-01

    The biotic ligand model (BLM) approach is used to assess metal toxicity, taking into account the competition of other cations with the free metal ions for binding to the biotic ligand sites of aquatic and soil organisms. The bioavailable fraction of metals, represented by the free metal ion, is a better measure than the total concentration for assessing their potential risk to the environment. Because BLMs are relating toxicity to the fraction of biotic ligands occupied by the metal, they can be useful for investigating factors affecting metal bioaccumulation and toxicity. In the present review, the effects of major cations on the toxicity of metals to soil and aquatic organisms were comprehensively studied by performing a meta-analysis of BLM literature data. Interactions at the binding sites were shown to be species- and metal-specific. The main factors affecting the relationships between toxicity and conditional binding constants for metal binding at the biotic ligand appeared to be Ca(2+) , Mg(2+) , and protons. Other important characteristics of the exposure medium, such as levels of dissolved organic carbon and concentrations of other cations, should also be considered to obtain a proper assessment of metal toxicity to soil and aquatic organisms.

  13. Purification of the two major proteins from whey concentrate using a cation-exchange selective adsorption process.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Mayyada M H; Chase, Howard A

    2010-01-01

    The packed-bed adsorption and elution of aqueous solutions of whey concentrate powders were investigated at pH 3.7 using a 5-mL SP Sepharose FF column to separate and isolate two major proteins namely, alpha-lactalbumin (ALA) and beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) from these solutions. ALA displaced and eluted BLG from the column in a pure form. Pure ALA could then be eluted with good recovery. A novel consecutive two-stage separation process was developed to separate ALA and BLG from whey concentrate mixtures. Almost all of the BLG in the feed was recovered, with 78% being recovered at 95% purity and a further 20% at 86% purity. In addition, 67% of ALA was recovered, 48% at 54% purity and 19% at 60% purity.

  14. Stable isotopes in the source waters of the Yamuna and its tributaries: seasonal and altitudinal variations and relation to major cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalai, Tarun K.; Bhattacharya, S. K.; Krishnaswami, S.

    2002-12-01

    Water samples from the Yamuna and its tributaries, one of the major river systems draining the Himalaya, have been analysed for their stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopes during three seasons (summer, monsoon and post-monsoon). The data show clear seasonal and altitudinal variations; waters from higher altitudes and those collected during monsoon season are characterized by relatively depleted isotopic composition. Regression analysis of D-18O data of samples collected during summer and monsoon seasons shows that the slope of the best-fit lines are nearly identical to those of precipitation at New Delhi for the same period. The similarity in their slopes suggests that the isotopic composition of precipitation contributing water to these rivers are reasonably well preserved in both monsoon and non-monsoon seasons, however, during the non-monsoon period both rainfall and river waters carry signatures of evaporation. The deuterium excess in river waters during the three seasons though overlap with each other, the values during October are higher. This can be understood in terms of recycled moisture contributions to precipitation. The altitude effect for 18O in these waters is determined to be 0·11 per 100 m, a factor of about two less than that reported for the Ganga source waters from similar altitudinal range. The variability in altitude effects in rivers draining the Himalaya seems to be controlled by the amount effect associated with the monsoon. The significant spatial variability in altitude effect in these river basins, which are a few hundred kilometers apart, suggests that reconstruction of palaeoelevation in the Himalaya, based on 18O-altitude gradients, would depend critically on its proper assessment in the region. This study has established a relationship between total cation abundance and 18O in waters of the Yamuna mainstream; total cations (corrected for cyclic components) double for a 1·4 km decrease in altitude as the Yamuna flows downstream.

  15. Alkaline pH Homeostasis in Bacteria: New Insights

    PubMed Central

    Padan, Etana; Bibi, Eitan; Ito, Masahiro; Krulwich, Terry A.

    2011-01-01

    The capacity of bacteria to survive and grow at alkaline pH values is of widespread importance in the epidemiology of pathogenic bacteria, in remediation and industrial settings, as well as in marine, plant-associated and extremely alkaline ecological niches. Alkali-tolerance and alkaliphily, in turn, strongly depend upon mechanisms for alkaline pH homeostasis, as shown in pH shift experiments and growth experiments in chemostats at different external pH values. Transcriptome and proteome analyses have recently complemented physiological and genetic studies, revealing numerous adaptations that contribute to alkaline pH homeostasis. These include elevated levels of transporters and enzymes that promote proton capture and retention (e.g. the ATP synthase and monovalent cation/proton antiporters), metabolic changes that lead to increased acid production, and changes in the cell surface layers that contribute to cytoplasmic proton retention. Targeted studies over the past decade have followed up the long-recognized importance of monovalent cations in active pH homeostasis. These studies show the centrality of monovalent cation/proton antiporters in this process while microbial genomics provides information about the constellation of such antiporters in individual strains. A comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of both eukaryotic and prokaryotic genome databases has identified orthologes from bacteria to humans that allow better understanding of the specific functions and physiological roles of the antiporters. Detailed information about the properties of multiple antiporters in individual strains is starting to explain how specific monovalent cation/proton antiporters play dominant roles in alkaline pH homeostasis in cells that have several additional antiporters catalyzing ostensibly similar reactions. New insights into the pH-dependent Na+/H+ antiporter NhaA that plays an important role in Escherichia coli have recently emerged from the determination of the structure

  16. Mercury analysis of acid- and alkaline-reduced biological samples: identification of meta-cinnabar as the major biotransformed compound in algae.

    PubMed

    Kelly, David; Budd, Kenneth; Lefebvre, Daniel D

    2006-01-01

    The biotransformation of Hg(II) in pH-controlled and aerated algal cultures was investigated. Previous researchers have observed losses in Hg detection in vitro with the addition of cysteine under acid reduction conditions in the presence of SnCl2. They proposed that this was the effect of Hg-thiol complexing. The present study found that cysteine-Hg, protein and nonprotein thiol chelates, and nucleoside chelates of Hg were all fully detectable under acid reduction conditions without previous digestion. Furthermore, organic (R-Hg) mercury compounds could not be detected under either the acid or alkaline reduction conditions, and only beta-HgS was detected under alkaline and not under acid SnCl2 reduction conditions. The blue-green alga Limnothrix planctonica biotransformed the bulk of Hg(II) applied as HgCl2 into a form with the analytical properties of beta-HgS. Similar results were obtained for the eukaryotic alga Selenastrum minutum. No evidence for the synthesis of organomercurials such as CH3Hg+ was obtained from analysis of either airstream or biomass samples under the aerobic conditions of the study. An analytical procedure that involved both acid and alkaline reduction was developed. It provides the first selective method for the determination of beta-HgS in biological samples. Under aerobic conditions, Hg(II) is biotransformed mainly into beta-HgS (meta-cinnabar), and this occurs in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic algae. This has important implications with respect to identification of mercury species and cycling in aquatic habitats.

  17. Alkali cation specific adsorption onto fcc(111) transition metal electrodes.

    PubMed

    Mills, J N; McCrum, I T; Janik, M J

    2014-07-21

    The presence of alkali cations in electrolyte solutions is known to impact the rate of electrocatalytic reactions, though the mechanism of such impact is not conclusively determined. We use density functional theory (DFT) to examine the specific adsorption of alkali cations to fcc(111) electrode surfaces, as specific adsorption may block catalyst sites or otherwise impact surface catalytic chemistry. Solvation of the cation-metal surface structure was investigated using explicit water models. Computed equilibrium potentials for alkali cation adsorption suggest that alkali and alkaline earth cations will specifically adsorb onto Pt(111) and Pd(111) surfaces in the potential range of hydrogen oxidation and hydrogen evolution catalysis in alkaline solutions.

  18. Simultaneous quantification of major cannabinoids and metabolites in human urine and plasma by HPLC-MS/MS and enzyme-alkaline hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Aizpurua-Olaizola, Oier; Zarandona, Iratxe; Ortiz, Laura; Navarro, Patricia; Etxebarria, Nestor; Usobiaga, Aresatz

    2016-06-24

    A high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) method for simultaneous quantification of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), its two metabolites 11-hydroxy-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (11-OH-THC) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH), and four additional cannabinoids (cannabidiol (CBD), cannabigerol (CBG), tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV), and cannabinol (CBN)) in 1 mL of human urine and plasma was developed and validated. The hydrolysis process was studied to ensure complete hydrolysis of glucuronide conjugates and the extraction of a total amount of analytes. Initially, urine and plasma blank samples were spiked with THC-COOH-glucuronide and THC-glucuronide, and four different pretreatment methods were compared: hydrolysis-free method, enzymatic hydrolysis with Escherichia Coli β-glucuronidase, alkaline hydrolysis with 10 M NaOH, and enzyme-alkaline tandem hydrolysis. The last approach assured the maximum efficiencies (close to 100%) for both urine and plasma matrices. Regarding the figures of merit, the limits of detection were below 1 ng/mL for all analytes, the accuracy ranged from 84% to 115%, and both within-day and between-day precision were lower than 12%. Finally, the method was successfully applied to real urine and plasma samples from cannabis users. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. The cationic liposomal adjuvants CAF01 and CAF09 formulated with the major outer membrane protein elicit robust protection in mice against a Chlamydia muridarum respiratory challenge.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sukumar; Tifrea, Delia F; Follmann, Frank; Andersen, Peter; de la Maza, Luis M

    2017-03-23

    Two cationic liposomal adjuvants CAF01 and CAF09 were formulated with the native or the recombinant Chlamydia muridarum major outer membrane protein (nMOMP and rMOMP). BALB/c mice were immunized with the four vaccine formulations using the subcutaneous followed by the intranasal (i.n.) routes. As positive controls mice were inoculated i.n. with live C. muridarum and negative controls received i.n. minimal essential medium (MEM). Four weeks after the last immunization mice were challenged i.n. with 10(4) inclusion forming units (IFU) of C. muridarum. Following the challenge the mice were weighed daily. At 10days post-challenge the mice were euthanized, their lungs weighed and the number of C. muridarum IFU determined. Serum collected the day before the challenge showed that all four groups of mice immunized with CAF01, or CAF09 and MOMP had significant C. muridarum-specific antibody titers. As determined by a T-cell lymphoproliferative assay, these four groups of mice also mounted robust cell mediated immune responses with high production of IFN-γ and IL17 and low levels of IL-4. Following the challenge the four groups of mice lost significantly less body weight than the MEM-immunized group. Lungs of mice vaccinated with CAF01, or CAF09, and nMOMP were significantly lighter than those from mice immunized using rMOMP. The number of IFU recovered from the lungs of mice vaccinated with CAF01, or CAF09, and nMOMP was similar to the number of IFU recovered from mice immunized with live EB. Mice that received rMOMP had significantly higher numbers of IFU than other groups. In conclusion, CAF01 and CAF09 elicited very robust protective humoral and cellular immune responses and were equally effective at adjuntavizing the C. muridarum MOMP. Mice vaccinated with nMOMP were significantly better protected than those immunized with rMOMP, indicative of the importance of the structural conformation of this antigen in protection.

  20. Effect of major cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, K+) and anions (SO4(2-), Cl- , NO3-) on Ni accumulation and toxicity in aquatic plant (Lemna minor L.): implications For Ni risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Gopalapillai, Yamini; Hale, Beverley; Vigneault, Bernard

    2013-04-01

    The effect of major cation activity (Ca(2+) , Mg(2+) , Na(+) , K(+) ) on Ni toxicity, with dose expressed as exposure (total dissolved Ni concentration NiTot ) or free Ni ion activity (in solution Ni(2+) ), or as tissue residue (Ni concentration in plant tissue NiTiss ) to the aquatic plant Lemna minor L. was examined. In addition, Ni accumulation kinetics was explored to provide mechanistic insight into current approaches of toxicity modeling, such as the tissue residue approach and the biotic ligand model (BLM), and the implications for plant Ni risk assessment. Major cations did not inhibit Ni accumulation via competitive inhibition as expected by the BLM framework. For example, Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) (sulfate as counter-anion) had an anticompetitive effect on Ni accumulation, suggesting that Ca or Mg forms a ternary complex with Ni-biotic ligand. The counter-anion of the added Ca (sulfate, chloride, or nitrate) affected plant response (percentage of root growth inhibition) to Ni. Generally, sulfate and chloride influenced plant response while nitrate did not, even when compared within the same range of Ca(2+) , which suggests that the anion dominated the observed plant response. Overall, although an effect of major cations on Ni toxicity to L. minor L. was observed at a physiological level, Ni(2+) or NiTot alone modeled plant response, generally within a span of twofold, over a wide range of water chemistry. Thus, consideration of major cation competition for improving Ni toxicity predictions in risk assessment for aquatic plants may not be necessary.

  1. Basalt as a solid source of calcium and alkalinity for the sequestration of carbon dioxide in building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, N. C.; Westfield, I.; Lu, P.; Bourcier, W. L.; Kendall, T.; Constantz, B. R.

    2010-12-01

    Motivated by the idea of converting waste carbon dioxide into usable building products, Calera Corporation has developed a multi-step process that sequesters CO2 as carbonate minerals in cementitious materials. Process inputs include dissolved divalent cations and alkalinity, both of which can be extracted from basalt. In one mode of the Calera process, the electrochemical production of alkalinity generates large volumes of hydrochloric acid as a by-product, which has been shown to effectively leach divalent cations from basalt while being neutralized by the basalt dissolution reaction. Using a 10:1 1M HCl solution to rock ratio, 3500 ppm Ca was extracted while the initial solution was neutralized to a pH of 2.60 in two weeks at a temperature of 80oC in an anoxic batch reactor. In this scenario, mineral carbonation occurs via three steps: electrochemical production of alkalinity, CO2 absorption by the alkaline stream, then precipitation by mixing the basalt-derived divalent cation stream and the CO2-containing alkaline stream. In a second scenario, alkalinity is extracted from basalt using an alkalinity capacitor, a weak acid. This solution may contain a proton source, such as ammonium chloride, or a hydroxyl acceptor, such as boric acid, but the main design constraint is that the pKa of the capacitor be high enough to deprontonate carbonic acid. The weak acid solution is mixed with basalt in an anoxic batch reactor and the dissolving rock consumes protons from the weak acid, generating the conjugate base. The solution rich in conjugate base then absorbs CO2 and the carbonate-rich solution is mixed with a calcium-rich stream to precipitate carbonate minerals. We have extracted up to 1100 mmol alkalinity per kg rock using an alkalinity capacitor, versus no more than 50 mmol alkalinity per kg rock using DI water as a solvent. Again, carbon sequestration occurs via three steps: alkalinity extraction from basalt, CO2 absorption, and finally carbonate precipitation

  2. Mechanisms of fragmentation of cationic peptide ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong; Adams, Jeanette

    1993-06-01

    Fragmentation mechanisms for formation of several commonly occurring product ions in high-energy collision-induced induced decomposition spectra of either (M + Cat2+ - H)+ ions of peptides cationized with alkaline earth metal ions, (M + Ca+)+ ions cationized with alkali metal ions, or (M + H)+ ions are evaluated by using deuterium-labelled peptides. The different sources of hydrogen transferred in the reactions are identified. Our study supports some previously proposed mechanisms but also provides evidence for others.

  3. Impacts of major cations (K(+), Na (+), Ca (2+), Mg (2+)) and protons on toxicity predictions of nickel and cadmium to lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) using exposure models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Vijver, Martina G; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M

    2014-04-01

    Biotic ligand models (BLM) explicitly accounting for hypothetical interactions with biotic ligands and bioavailability as dictated by water chemistry have been developed for various metals and different organisms. It is only recently that BLMs for plants have received increasing attention. Lettuce is one of the most important vegetable crops in the world. This study investigated the impacts of Ca(2+), Mg(2+), K(+), Na(+) and pH, on acute toxicity of Ni and Cd to butter-head lettuce seedlings (Lactuca sativa L.). 4-day assays with the root elongation inhibition (REI) as the endpoint were performed in hydroponic solutions. Magnesium was found to be the sole cation significantly enhancing the median inhibition concentration (IC50) of Ni(2+) with increasing concentration. By incorporating the competitive effects of Mg(2+), the Ni-toxicity prediction was improved significantly as compared to the total metal model (TMM) and the free ion activity model (FIAM). The conditional stability constants derived from the Ni-BLM were log K MgBL = 2.86, log K NiBL = 5.1, and f NiBL (50%)  = 0.57. A slight downtrend was observed in the 4-d IC50 of Cd(2+) at increasing H(+) concentrations, but this tendency was not consistent and statistically significant (p = 0.07) over the whole range. The overall variations of Cd-toxicity within the tested Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) concentration ranges were relatively small and not statistically significant. 80 % of lettuce REI by Cd could be explained using both TMM and FIAM instead of BLM in the present study. Thus, the mechanistically underpinned models for soil quality guidelines should be developed on a metal-specific basis across different exposure conditions.

  4. The alkaline and alkaline-carbonatite magmatism from Southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruberti, E.; Gomes, C. D. B.; Comin-Chiaramonti, P.

    2015-12-01

    Early to Late Cretaceous lasting to Paleocene alkaline magmatism from southern Brazil is found associated with major extensional structural features in and around the Paraná Basin and grouped into various provinces on the basis of several data. Magmatism is variable in size, mode of occurrence and composition. The alkaline rocks are dominantly potassic, a few occurrences showing sodic affinity. The more abundant silicate rocks are evolved undersaturated to saturated in silica syenites, displaying large variation in igneous forms. Less evolved types are restricted to subvolcanic environments and outcrops of effusive suites occur rarely. Cumulatic mafic and ultramafic rock types are very common, particularly in the alkali-carbonatitic complexes. Carbonatite bodies are represented by Ca-carbonatites and Mg-carbonatites and more scarcely by Fe-carbonatites. Available radiometric ages for the alkaline rocks fit on three main chronological groups: around 130 Ma, subcoveal with the Early Cretaceous flood tholeiites of the Paraná Basin, 100-110 Ma and 80-90 Ma (Late Cretaceous). The alkaline magmatism also extends into Paleocene times, as indicated by ages from some volcanic lavas. Geochemically, alkaline potassic and sodic rock types are distinguished by their negative and positive Nb-Ta anomalies, respectively. Negative spikes in Nb-Ta are also a feature common to the associated tholeiitic rocks. Sr-Nd-Pb systematics confirm the contribution of both HIMU and EMI mantle components in the formation of the alkaline rocks. Notably, Early and Late Cretaceous carbonatites have the same isotopic Sr-Nd initial ratios of the associated alkaline rocks. C-O isotopic Sr-Nd isotopic ratios indicate typical mantle signature for some carbonatites and the influence of post-magmatic processes in others. Immiscibility of liquids of phonolitic composition, derived from mafic alkaline parental magmas, has been responsible for the origin of the carbonatites. Close association of alkaline

  5. Diclofenac salts. III. Alkaline and earth alkaline salts.

    PubMed

    Fini, Adamo; Fazio, Giuseppe; Rosetti, Francesca; Angeles Holgado, M; Iruín, Ana; Alvarez-Fuentes, Josefa

    2005-11-01

    Diclofenac salts containing the alkaline and two earth alkaline cations have been prepared and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and EDAX spectroscopy; and by thermal and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA): all of them crystallize as hydrate when precipitated from water. The salts dehydrate at room temperature and more easily on heating, but recovery the hydration, when placed in a humid environment. X-ray diffraction spectra suggest that on dehydration new peaks appear on diffractograms and the lattice of the salts partially looses crystallinity. This phenomenon is readily visible in the case of the calcium and magnesium salts, whose thermograms display a crystallization exotherm, before melting or decomposing at temperatures near or above 200 degrees C; these last salts appear to form solvates, when prepared from methanol. The thermogram of each salt shows a complex endotherm of dehydration about 100 degrees C; the calcium salt displays two endotherms, well separated at about 120 and 160 degrees C, which disappear after prolonged heating. Decomposition exotherms, before or soon after the melting, appear below 300 degrees C. The ammonium salt is thermally unstable and, when heated to start dehydration, dissociates and leaves acidic diclofenac.

  6. Hydroxide Degradation Pathways for Imidazolium Cations. A DFT Study

    SciTech Connect

    Long, H.; Pivovar, B.

    2014-05-15

    Imidazolium cations are promising candidates as covalently tetherable cations for application in anion exchange membranes. They have generated specific interest in alkaline membrane fuel cell applications where ammonium-based cations have been the most commonly applied but have been found to be susceptible to hydroxide attack. In the search for high stability cations, a detailed understanding of the degradation pathways and reaction barriers is required. In this work, we investigate imidazolium and benzimidazolium cations in the presence of hydroxide using density functional theory calculations for their potential in alkaline membrane fuel cells. Moreover, the dominant degradation pathway for these cations is predicted to be the nucleophilic addition–elimination pathway at the C-2 atom position on the imidazolium ring. Steric interferences, introduced by substitutions at the C-2, C-4, and C-5 atom positions, were investigated and found to have a significant, positive impact on calculated degradation energy barriers. Benzimidazolium cations, with their larger conjugated systems, are predicted to degrade much faster than their imidazolium counterparts. Our results provide important insight into designing stable cations for anion exchange membranes. Some of the molecules studied have significantly increased degradation energy barriers suggesting that they could possess significantly improved (several orders of magnitude) durability compared to traditional cations and potentially enable new applications.

  7. The role of CpG ODN in enhancement of immune response and protection in BALB/c mice immunized with recombinant major surface glycoprotein of Leishmania (rgp63) encapsulated in cationic liposome.

    PubMed

    Jaafari, Mahmoud R; Badiee, Ali; Khamesipour, Ali; Samiei, Afshin; Soroush, Dina; Kheiri, Masoumeh Tavassoti; Barkhordari, Farzaneh; McMaster, W Robert; Mahboudi, Fereidoun

    2007-08-10

    CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODN) are known to be a potent immunoadjuvant for a wide range of antigens. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of CpG ODN co-encapsulated with rgp63 antigen in cationic liposomes (Lip-rgp63-CpG ODN) in immune response enhancement and protection in BALB/c mice against leishmaniasis. Lip-rgp63-CpG ODN prepared by using dehydration-rehydration vesicle (DRV) method significantly inhibited (P<0.001) Leishmania major infection in mice measured by footpad swelling compared to Lip-rgp63, rgp63 alone, rgp63 plus CpG ODN, PBS or control liposomes. The mice immunized with Lip-rgp63-CpG ODN also showed the lowest spleen parasite burden, highest IgG2a/IgG1 ratio and IFN-gamma production and the lowest IL-4 production compared to the other groups. The results indicate that co-encapsulation of CpG ODN in liposomes improves the immunogenicity of Leishmania antigen.

  8. Anodes for alkaline electrolysis

    DOEpatents

    Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev

    2011-02-01

    A method of making an anode for alkaline electrolysis cells includes adsorption of precursor material on a carbonaceous material, conversion of the precursor material to hydroxide form and conversion of precursor material from hydroxide form to oxy-hydroxide form within the alkaline electrolysis cell.

  9. Alkaline battery operational methodology

    DOEpatents

    Sholklapper, Tal; Gallaway, Joshua; Steingart, Daniel; Ingale, Nilesh; Nyce, Michael

    2016-08-16

    Methods of using specific operational charge and discharge parameters to extend the life of alkaline batteries are disclosed. The methods can be used with any commercial primary or secondary alkaline battery, as well as with newer alkaline battery designs, including batteries with flowing electrolyte. The methods include cycling batteries within a narrow operating voltage window, with minimum and maximum cut-off voltages that are set based on battery characteristics and environmental conditions. The narrow voltage window decreases available capacity but allows the batteries to be cycled for hundreds or thousands of times.

  10. A method for the production of weakly acidic cation exchange resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, H.; Werner, F.; Mitschker, A.; Diehl, H. V.; Schaefer, A.

    1991-12-01

    The invention relates to a nonpolluting method for the production of weakly acidic cation exchange resins by saponification of cross-linked acrylonitrile bead polymers, with an alkaline saponification agent at elevated temperature, according to which method the bead polymer and alkaline saponification agent are jointly added only at elevated temperature.

  11. Surfactant-enhanced low-pH alkaline flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Peru, D.A. and Co., Columbia, MD . Research Div.); Lorenz, P.B. )

    1990-08-01

    This paper reports sodium bicarbonate investigated as a potential alkaline agent in surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding because it has very little tendency to dissolve silicate minerals. In experiments performed with Wilmington, CA, crude oil and three types of surfactants, the bicarbonate/surfactant combination caused a marked lowering of interfacial tension (IFT). Bicarbonate protected the surfactant against divalent cations and reduced adsorption of surfactant and polymer on various minerals. Coreflood test confirm that sodium bicarbonate plus surfactant can be an effective alternative to the high-pH flooding process.

  12. The cubyl cation rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Jalife, Said; Mondal, Sukanta; Cabellos, Jose Luis; Martinez-Guajardo, Gerardo; Fernandez-Herrera, Maria A; Merino, Gabriel

    2016-02-25

    Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations and high-level ab initio computations predict that the cage-opening rearrangement of the cubyl cation to the 7H(+)-pentalenyl cation is feasible in the gas phase. The rate-determining step is the formation of the cuneyl cation with an activation barrier of 25.3 kcal mol(-1) at the CCSD(T)/def2-TZVP//MP2/def2-TZVP level. Thus, the cubyl cation is kinetically stable enough to be formed and trapped at moderate temperatures, but it may be rearranged at higher temperatures.

  13. Alkaline flooding injection strategy

    SciTech Connect

    French, T.R.; Josephson, C.B.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to improved alkali-surfactant flooding methods, and this includes determining the proper design of injection strategy. Several different injection strategies have been used or suggested for recovering heavy oils with surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding methods. Oil recovery was compared for four different injection strategies: (1) surfactant followed by polymer, (2) surfactant followed by alkaline polymer, (3) alkaline surfactant followed by polymer, and (4) alkali, surfactant, and polymer mixed in a single formulation. The effect of alkaline preflush was also studied under two different conditions. All of the oil recovery experiments were conducted under optimal conditions with a viscous, non-acidic oil from Hepler (KS) oil field. The coreflood experiments were conducted with Berea sandstone cores since field core was not available in sufficient quantity for coreflood tests. The Tucker sand of Hepler field is a Class I fluvial dominated deltaic reservoir, as classified by the Department of Energy, which has been selected as the site of a DOE-sponsored field pilot test.

  14. A two-year automated dripwater chemistry study in a remote cave in the tropical south Pacific: Using [Cl-] as a conservative tracer for seasalt contribution of major cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremaine, Darrel M.; Sinclair, Daniel J.; Stoll, Heather M.; Lagerström, Maria; Carvajal, Carlos P.; Sherrell, Robert M.

    2016-07-01

    Stalagmite Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios are commonly interpreted as proxies for past hydrologic conditions and are often used to supplement carbon and oxygen stable isotope records. While the processes that control these element ratios, including water-rock interaction, dripwater residence time, and upstream precipitation of calcite, are well understood in continental caves, there have been few investigations of dripwater Element/Ca (X/Ca) evolution in coastal marine caves where seasalt can have a strong influence on the incoming Mg/Ca ratio. We instrumented a marine cave on the remote South Pacific island of Niue to record daily cave microclimate, as well as weekly-integrated drip rates, dripwater oxygen and hydrogen isotopes, and dripwater chemistry over a period of twenty-two months. Using chloride as a conservative tracer for sea-spray, we calculate that seasalt input accounts for a large portion of dripwater Na, SO4, and Mg (89%, 93%, and 85% respectively) and a smaller portion of the Ca and Sr (19% and 17%). During the second year of this study a gradual decrease (by ∼18%) in dripwater chlorinity was observed, suggesting that an epikarst-hosted seasalt aerosol inventory was being diluted over time. Minor element to calcium ratios for B, K, Cl, SO4, Mg, Na, Sr, and Fe all strongly covary over the observation period, suggesting that although sea-spray plays a significant role in modulating incoming drip chemistry, prior calcite precipitation (PCP) dominates chemical evolution within the epikarst. During a prolonged drought episode, evaporative enrichments in dripwater δD and δ18O (+4‰ and 0.5‰, respectively) were observed to coincide with increased cation and anion concentrations, strong Ca removal via PCP, and increases in Sr/Ca and Mg/Ca ratios (28% and 34%, respectively), suggesting that concomitant enrichment in speleothem δ18O and X/Ca ratios may be interpreted as multi-proxy evidence for dry climate conditions. We use modern dripwater chemistry and

  15. Alkaline quinone flow battery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kaixiang; Chen, Qing; Gerhardt, Michael R; Tong, Liuchuan; Kim, Sang Bok; Eisenach, Louise; Valle, Alvaro W; Hardee, David; Gordon, Roy G; Aziz, Michael J; Marshak, Michael P

    2015-09-25

    Storage of photovoltaic and wind electricity in batteries could solve the mismatch problem between the intermittent supply of these renewable resources and variable demand. Flow batteries permit more economical long-duration discharge than solid-electrode batteries by using liquid electrolytes stored outside of the battery. We report an alkaline flow battery based on redox-active organic molecules that are composed entirely of Earth-abundant elements and are nontoxic, nonflammable, and safe for use in residential and commercial environments. The battery operates efficiently with high power density near room temperature. These results demonstrate the stability and performance of redox-active organic molecules in alkaline flow batteries, potentially enabling cost-effective stationary storage of renewable energy.

  16. Advanced alkaline water electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakabayashi, N.; Torikai, E.; Kawami, Y.; Takenaka, H.

    Results are presented of experimental studies of possible separators and electrodes for use in advanced, high-temperature, high-pressure alkaline water electrolyzers. Material evaluations in alkaline water electrolyzers at temperatures from 100 to 120 C have shown a new type polytetrafluoroethylene membrane impregnated with potassium titanate to be the most promising when the separator is prepared by the hydrothermal treatment of a porous PFTE membrane impregnated with hydrated titanium oxide. Measurements of cell voltages in 30% KOH at current densities from 5 to 100 A/sq dm at temperatures up to 120 C with nickel electrodes of various structures have shown the foamed nickel electrode, with an average pore size of 1-1.5 mm, to have the best performance. When the foamed nickel is coated by fine powdered nickel, carbonyl nickel or Raney nickel to increase electrode surface areas, even lower cell voltages were found, indicating better performance.

  17. Effects of Cations on Corrosion of Inconel 625 in Molten Chloride Salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ming; Ma, Hongfang; Wang, Mingjing; Wang, Zhihua; Sharif, Adel

    2016-04-01

    Hot corrosion of Inconel 625 in sodium chloride, potassium chloride, magnesium chloride, calcium chloride and their mixtures with different compositions is conducted at 900°C to investigate the effects of cations in chloride salts on corrosion behavior of the alloy. XRD, SEM/EDS were used to analyze the compositions, phases, and morphologies of the corrosion products. The results showed that Inconel 625 suffers more severe corrosion in alkaline earth metal chloride molten salts than alkaline metal chloride molten salts. For corrosion in mixture salts, the corrosion rate increased with increasing alkaline earth metal chloride salt content in the mixture. Cations in the chloride molten salts mainly affect the thermal and chemical properties of the salts such as vapor pressure and hydroscopicities, which can affect the basicity of the molten salt. Corrosion of Inconel 625 in alkaline earth metal chloride salts is accelerated with increasing basicity.

  18. Studies on the interactions between purified bovine caseins and alkaline-earth-metalions

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, I. R.; Perkins, D. J.

    1971-01-01

    1. Alkaline-earth-metal cations at low concentrations form soluble complexes with bovine caseins. The relative order of binding capacities is: Mg2+>Ca2+>Ba2+>Sr2+. 2. The cations interact with both free ionized carboxyl groups of aspartic acid and glutamic acid and with monoester phosphate groups covalently bound to serine and threonine; at low concentrations of the cations interactions are predominantly with the phosphate groups. 3. The order of binding capacities for purified components of the casein complex is: αs1-casein>β-casein>κ-casein. PMID:5166590

  19. Structure of alginate gels: interaction of diuronate units with divalent cations from density functional calculations.

    PubMed

    Agulhon, Pierre; Markova, Velina; Robitzer, Mike; Quignard, Françoise; Mineva, Tzonka

    2012-06-11

    The complexation of (1→4) linked α-L-guluronate (G) and β-D-mannuronate (M) disaccharides with Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Sr(2+), Mn(2+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+) cations have been studied with quantum chemical density functional theory (DFT)-based method. A large number of possible cation-diuronate complexes, with one and two GG or MM disaccharide units and with or without water molecules in the inner coordination shells have been considered. The computed bond distances, cation interaction energies, and molecular orbital composition analysis revealed that the complexation of the transition metal (TM) ions to the disaccharides occurs via the formation of strong coordination-covalent bonds. On the contrary, the alkaline earth cations form ionic bonds with the uronates. The unidentate binding is found to be the most favored one in the TM hydrated and water-free complexes. By removing water molecules, the bidentate chelating binding also occurs, although it is found to be energetically less favored by 1 to 1.5 eV than the unidentate one. A good correlation is obtained between the alginate affinity trend toward TM cations and the interaction energies of the TM cations in all studied complexes, which suggests that the alginate affinities are strongly related to the chemical interaction strength of TM cations-uronate complexes. The trend of the interaction energies of the alkaline earth cations in the ionic complexes is opposite to the alginate affinity order. The binding strength is thus not a limiting factor in the alginate gelation in the presence of alkaline earth cations at variance with the TM cations.

  20. Electron microscope studies of overbased sulfonates with various cations

    SciTech Connect

    Mishunina, I.I.; Fialkovskii, R.V.; Mysak, N.P.; Romanyutina, L.V.

    1983-03-01

    This article examines overbased sulfonates containing anionic detergents with magnesium, calcium, strontium, or barium cations and the corresponding metal carbonates. Uses direct transmission microscopy, in which 2 planar coordinates of the object can be evaluated, to determine the dimensions of the inorganic part of the colloidal particles of the additives and to establish their geometric shape through projection on the plane (on the basis of which conclusions can be drawn as to the crystalline or amorphous structure of the solid phase). Finds that the different cations lead to changes in the colloidal structure of the additives. This is reflected in the dimensions of the micelle cores and of the adsorbed shells (with comparable total alkalinity of the additives and similar contents of neutral detergents in the hydroxide, and sulfonate per unit volume of additive, ultimately being reflected in the service properties of additives that are identical or very similar in characteristics but different in the particular metal cation.

  1. A novel type bacterial flagellar motor that can use divalent cations as a coupling ion

    PubMed Central

    Imazawa, Riku; Takahashi, Yuka; Aoki, Wataru; Sano, Motohiko; Ito, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor is a sophisticated nanomachine embedded in the cell envelope and powered by an electrochemical gradient of H+, Na+, or K+across the cytoplasmic membrane. Here we describe a new member of the bacterial flagellar stator channel family (MotAB1 of Paenibacillus sp. TCA20 (TCA-MotAB1)) that is coupled to divalent cations (Ca2+and Mg2+). In the absence of divalent cations of alkaline earth metals, no swimming was observed in Paenibacillus sp. TCA20, which grows optimally in Ca2+-rich environments. This pattern was confirmed by swimming assays of a stator-free Bacillus subtilis mutant expressing TCA-MotAB1. Both a stator-free and major Mg2+uptake system-deleted B. subtilis mutant expressing TCA-MotAB1 complemented both growth and motility deficiency under low Mg2+conditions and exhibited [Mg2+]in identical to that of the wild-type. This is the first report of a flagellar motor that can use Ca2+and Mg2+as coupling ions. These findings will promote the understanding of the operating principles of flagellar motors and molecular mechanisms of ion selectivity. PMID:26794857

  2. Assesment of the Potential Mobility of Anionic and Cationic Pollutants in Contaminated Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasserman, M.

    2001-12-01

    The risk presented to Man and the Environment by the presence of toxic chemical elements in contaminated soils and mine wastes cannot be evaluated by their total concentrations. A more realistic way to estimate this risk implies determining the fraction of total pollutant load susceptible to be solubilizable and thus potentially dispersed in the hydrocycle and bioavailable. Chemical extraction is the most common method used to reach this objective. Here we investigate two of the classical methods of sequential extraction, one developed for cationic metallic elements and the other one for the anionic forms and we propose a single protocol capable of simultaneous providing useful information about the reactivity of both cationic and anionic pollutants. The proposed method considers five operational fractions: slightly acid, reducible, oxidizable, alkaline and residual. Even though the extraction conditions of this method are generally weaker than those used in classical methods, it was possible to solubilize a larger fraction of elements in all diferent type of solids tested and the recovery for the majority of elements was also better than the classical methods.

  3. Alkaline ionic liquids applied in supported ionic liquid catalyst for selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salminen, Eero; Virtanen, Pasi; Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka

    2014-02-01

    The challenge in preparation of ionic liquids containing a strong alkaline anion is to identify a suitable cation which can tolerate the harsh conditions induced by the anion. In this study, a commercial quaternary ammonium compound (quat) benzalkonium [ADBA] (alkyldimethylbenzylammonium) was used as a cation in the synthesis of different alkaline ionic liquids. In fact, the precursor, benzalkonium chloride, is a mixture of alkyldimethylbenzylammonium chlorides of various alkyl chain lengths and is commonly used in the formulation of various antiseptic products. The prepared ionic liquids were utilized as Supported Ionic Liquid Catalysts (SILCAs). Typically, a SILCA contains metal nanoparticles, enzymes or metal complexes in an ionic liquid layer which is immobilized on a solid carrier material such as an active carbon cloth (ACC). The catalysts were applied in the selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal which is an important perfumery chemical. Interestingly, 70 % molar yield towards citronellal was achieved over a catalyst containing the alkaline ionic liquid benzalkonium methoxide.

  4. Alkaline battery, separator therefore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, George F. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An improved battery separator for alkaline battery cells has low resistance to electrolyte ion transfer and high resistance to electrode ion transfer. The separator is formed by applying an improved coating to an electrolyte absorber. The absorber, preferably, is a flexible, fibrous, and porous substrate that is resistant to strong alkali and oxidation. The coating composition includes an admixture of a polymeric binder, a hydrolyzable polymeric ester and inert fillers. The coating composition is substantially free of reactive fillers and plasticizers commonly employed as porosity promoting agents in separator coatings. When the separator is immersed in electrolyte, the polymeric ester of the film coating reacts with the electrolyte forming a salt and an alcohol. The alcohol goes into solution with the electrolyte while the salt imbibes electrolyte into the coating composition. When the salt is formed, it expands the polymeric chains of the binder to provide a film coating substantially permeable to electrolyte ion transfer but relatively impermeable to electrode ion transfer during use.

  5. Experimental data developed to support the selection of a treatment process for West Valley alkaline supernatant

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, L.A.; Holton, L.K.; Myers, T.R.; Richardson, G.M.; Wise, B.M.

    1984-01-01

    At the request of West Valley Nuclear Services Co., Inc., the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has studied alternative treatment processes for the alkaline PUREX waste presently being stored in Tank 8D2 at West Valley, New York. Five tasks were completed during FY 1983: (1) simulation and characterization of the alkaline supernatant and sludge from the tank. The radiochemical and chemical distributions between the aqueous and solid phase were determined, and the efficiency of washing sludge with water to remove ions such as Na/sup +/ and SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ was investigated; (2) evaluation of a sodium tetraphenylboron (Na-TPB) precipitation process to recover cesium (Cs) and a sodium titanate (Na-TiA) sorption process to recover strontium (Sr) and plutonium (Pu) from the West Valley Alkaline supernatant. These processes were previously developed and tested at the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant; (3) evaluation of an organic cation-exchange resin (Duolite CS-100) to recover Cs and Pu from the alkaline supernatant followed by an organic macroreticular cation exchange resin (Amberlite IRC-718) to recover Sr; (4) evaluation of an inorganic ion exchanger (Linde Ionsiv IE-95) to recover Cs, Sr, and Pu from the alkaline supernatant; and (5) evaluation of Dowex-1,X8 organic anion exchange resin to recover technetium (Tc) from alkaline supernatant. The findings of these tasks are reported. 21 references, 36 figures, 34 tables.

  6. The catalytic properties of alkaline phosphatases under various conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atyaksheva, L. F.; Chukhrai, E. S.; Poltorak, O. M.

    2008-11-01

    A comparative study was performed to examine the catalytic properties of alkaline phosphatases from bacteria Escherichia coli and bovine and chicken intestines. The activity of enzyme dimers and tetramers was determined. The activity of the dimer was three or four times higher than that of the tetramer. The maximum activity and affinity for 4-nitrophenylphosphate was observed for the bacterial alkaline phosphatase ( K M = 1.7 × 10-5 M, V max = 1800 μmol/(min mg of protein) for dimers and V max = 420 μmol/(min mg of protein) for tetramers). The Michaelis constants were equal for two animal phosphatases in various buffer media (pH 8.5) ((3.5 ± 0.2) × 10-4 M). Five buffer systems were investigated: tris, carbonate, hepes, borate, and glycine buffers, and the lowest catalytic activity of alkaline phosphatases at equal pH was observed in the borate buffer (for enzyme from bovine intestine, V max = 80 μmol/(min mg of protein)). Cu2+ cations formed a complex with tris-(oxymethyl)-aminomethane ( tris-HCl buffer) and inhibited the intestine alkaline phosphatases by a noncompetitive mechanism.

  7. Mammalian intestinal alkaline phosphatase acts as highly active exopolyphosphatase.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, B; Schröder, H C

    2001-06-11

    Recent results revealed that inorganic polyphosphates (polyP), being energy-rich linear polymers of orthophosphate residues known from bacteria and yeast, also exist in higher eukaryotes. However, the enzymatic basis of their metabolism especially in mammalian cells is still uncertain. Here we demonstrate for the first time that alkaline phosphatase from calf intestine (CIAP) is able to cleave polyP molecules up to a chain length of about 800. The enzyme acts as an exopolyphosphatase degrading polyP in a processive manner. The pH optimum is in the alkaline range. Divalent cations are not required for catalytic activity but inhibit the degradation of polyP. The rate of hydrolysis of short-chain polyP by CIAP is comparable to that of the standard alkaline phosphatase (AP) substrate p-nitrophenyl phosphate. The specific activity of the enzyme decreases with increasing chain length of the polymer both in the alkaline and in the neutral pH range. The K(m) of the enzyme also decreases with increasing chain length. The mammalian tissue non-specific isoform of AP was not able to hydrolyze polyP under the conditions applied while the placental-type AP and the bacterial (Escherichia coli) AP displayed polyP-degrading activity.

  8. Chemical degradation mechanisms of membranes for alkaline membrane fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Choe, Yoong-Kee; Henson, Neil J.; Kim, Yu Seung

    2015-12-31

    Chemical degradation mechanisms of membranes for alkaline membrane fuel cells have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT). We have elucidated that the aryl-ether moiety of membranes is one of the weakest site against attack of hydroxide ions. The results of DFT calculations for hydroxide initiated aryl-ether cleavage indicated that the aryl-ether cleavage occurred prior to degradation of cationic functional group. Such a weak nature of the aryl-ether group arises from the electron deficiency of the aryl group as well as the low bond dissociation energy. The DFT results suggests that removal of the aryl-ether group in the membrane should enhance the stability of membranes under alkaline conditions. In fact, an ether fee poly(phenylene) membrane exhibits excellent stability against the attack from hydroxide ions.

  9. Alkaline flooding for enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Gittler, W.E.

    1983-09-01

    There are over 12 active projects of varying size using one of 3 major types of alkaline agents. These include sodium silicate, caustic soda, and soda ash. Among the largest pilots currently is the THUMS project in the Wilmington field, California. Plans called for the injection of a 4% weight concentration of sodium orthosilicate over a 60% PV. Through the first 3 yr, over 27 million bbl of chemicals have been injected. Gulf Oil is operating several alkaline floods, one of which is located off shore in the Quarantine Bay field, Louisiana. In this pilot, sodium hydroxide in a weight concentration of 5 to 12% is being injected. Belco Petroleum Corp. has reported that their pilot operating in the Isenhour Unit in Wyoming is using a .5% weight concentration of soda ash in conjunction with a polymer. Other uses for alkaline agents in chemical flooding include the use of silicate as a preflush or sacrificial agent in micellar/polymer and surfactant recovery systems. In addition, caustic has been tested in the surface-mixed caustic emulsion process while orthosilicate has been tested in a recovery method known as mobility-controlled caustic floods.

  10. Postgraduate Symposium: Positive influence of nutritional alkalinity on bone health.

    PubMed

    Wynn, E; Krieg, M A; Lanham-New, S A; Burckhardt, P

    2010-02-01

    There is growing evidence that consumption of a Western diet is a risk factor for osteoporosis through excess acid supply, while fruits and vegetables balance the excess acidity, mostly by providing K-rich bicarbonate-rich foods. Western diets consumed by adults generate approximately 50-100 mEq acid/d; therefore, healthy adults consuming such a diet are at risk of chronic low-grade metabolic acidosis, which worsens with age as a result of declining kidney function. Bone buffers the excess acid by delivering cations and it is considered that with time an overstimulation of this process will lead to the dissolution of the bone mineral content and hence to reduced bone mass. Intakes of K, Mg and fruit and vegetables have been associated with a higher alkaline status and a subsequent beneficial effect on bone health. In healthy male volunteers an acid-forming diet increases urinary Ca excretion by 74% and urinary C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (C-telopeptide) excretion by 19% when compared with an alkali (base-forming) diet. Cross-sectional studies have shown that there is a correlation between the nutritional acid load and bone health measured by bone ultrasound or dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Few studies have been undertaken in very elderly women (>75 years), whose osteoporosis risk is very pertinent. The EVAluation of Nutrients Intakes and Bone Ultra Sound Study has developed and validated (n 51) an FFQ for use in a very elderly Swiss population (mean age 80.4 (sd 2.99) years), which has shown intakes of key nutrients (energy, fat, carbohydrate, Ca, Mg, vitamin C, D and E) to be low in 401 subjects. A subsequent study to assess net endogenous acid production (NEAP) and bone ultrasound results in 256 women aged > or = 75 years has shown that lower NEAP (P=0.023) and higher K intake (P=0.033) are correlated with higher bone ultrasound results. High acid load may be an important additional risk factor that may be particularly relevant in very elderly

  11. Control of cation concentrations in stream waters by surface soil processes in an Amazonian watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markewitz, Daniel; Davidson, Eric A.; Figueiredo, Ricardo de O.; Victoria, Reynaldo L.; Krusche, Alex V.

    2001-04-01

    The chemical composition of ground waters and stream waters is thought to be determined primarily by weathering of parent rock. In relatively young soils such as those occurring in most temperate ecosystems, dissolution of primary minerals by carbonic acid is the predominant weathering pathway that liberates Ca2+, Mg2+ and K+ and generates alkalinity in the hydrosphere. But control of water chemistry in old and highly weathered soils that have lost reservoirs of primary minerals (a common feature of many tropical soils) is less well understood. Here we present soil and water chemistry data from a 10,000-hectare watershed on highly weathered soil in the Brazilian Amazon. Streamwater cation concentrations and alkalinity are positively correlated to each other and to streamwater discharge, suggesting that cations and bicarbonate are mainly flushed from surface soil layers by rainfall rather than being the products of deep soil weathering carried by groundwater flow. These patterns contrast with the seasonal patterns widely recognized in temperate ecosystems with less strongly weathered soils. In this particular watershed, partial forest clearing and burning 30years previously enriched the soils in cations and so may have increased the observed wet season leaching of cations. Nevertheless, annual inputs and outputs of cations from the watershed are low and nearly balanced, and thus soil cations from forest burning will remain available for forest regrowth over the next few decades. Our observations suggest that increased root and microbial respiration during the wet season generates CO2 that drives cation-bicarbonate leaching, resulting in a biologically mediated process of surface soil exchange controlling the streamwater inputs of cations and alkalinity from these highly weathered soils.

  12. Control of cation concentrations in stream waters by surface soil processes in an Amazonian watershed.

    PubMed

    Markewitz, D; Davidson, E A; Figueiredo Rd; Victoria, R L; Krusche, A V

    2001-04-12

    The chemical composition of ground waters and stream waters is thought to be determined primarily by weathering of parent rock. In relatively young soils such as those occurring in most temperate ecosystems, dissolution of primary minerals by carbonic acid is the predominant weathering pathway that liberates Ca2+, Mg2+ and K+ and generates alkalinity in the hydrosphere. But control of water chemistry in old and highly weathered soils that have lost reservoirs of primary minerals (a common feature of many tropical soils) is less well understood. Here we present soil and water chemistry data from a 10,000-hectare watershed on highly weathered soil in the Brazilian Amazon. Streamwater cation concentrations and alkalinity are positively correlated to each other and to streamwater discharge, suggesting that cations and bicarbonate are mainly flushed from surface soil layers by rainfall rather than being the products of deep soil weathering carried by groundwater flow. These patterns contrast with the seasonal patterns widely recognized in temperate ecosystems with less strongly weathered soils. In this particular watershed, partial forest clearing and burning 30 years previously enriched the soils in cations and so may have increased the observed wet season leaching of cations. Nevertheless, annual inputs and outputs of cations from the watershed are low and nearly balanced, and thus soil cations from forest burning will remain available for forest regrowth over the next few decades. Our observations suggest that increased root and microbial respiration during the wet season generates CO2 that drives cation-bicarbonate leaching, resulting in a biologically mediated process of surface soil exchange controlling the streamwater inputs of cations and alkalinity from these highly weathered soils.

  13. Cation diffusion in titanomagnetites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragon, R.; McCallister, R. H.; Harrison, H. R.

    1984-02-01

    Interdiffusion couple experiments were performed with titanomagnetite single crystals at 1,000°C, 1,100° C and 1,200° C in various buffered atmospheres. The dependence of the interdiffusion coefficient on oxygen fugacity, composition and temperature was interpreted in terms of point defect structure. Estimates of the cation tracer diffusivities indicate that Fe migrates via a point defect mechanism, involving mixed tetrahedral-octahedral site jumps, with an activation energy of 33 Kcal/mole; whereas Ti migration is one to two orders of magnitude slower, is restricted to octahedral sites and has an activation energy of 60 Kcal/mole.

  14. Homoleptic alkaline earth metal bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide complex compounds obtained from an ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Babai, Arash; Mudring, Anja-Verena

    2006-04-17

    The first homoleptic alkaline earth bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (Tf2N) complexes [mppyr]2[Ca(Tf2N)4], [mppyr]2[Sr(Tf2N)4], and [mppyr][Ba(Tf2N)3] were crystallized from a solution of the respective alkaline earth bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide and the ionic liquid [mppyr][Tf2N] (mppyr = 1,1-N-methyl-N-propylpyrrolidinium). In the calcium and strontium compounds, the alkaline earth metal (AE) is coordinated by four bidentately chelating Tf2N ligands to form isolated (distorted) square antiprismatic [AE(Tf2N)4]2- complexes which are separated by N-methyl-N-propylpyrrolidinium cations. In contrast, the barium compound, [mppyr][Ba(Tf2N)3], forms an extended structure. Here the alkaline earth cation is surrounded by six oxygen atoms belonging to three Tf2N- anions which coordinate in a bidentate chelating fashion. Three further oxygen atoms of the same ligands are linking the Ba2+ cations to infinite (infinity)(1)[Ba(Tf2N)3] chains.

  15. Dissecting the cation-cation interaction between two uranyl units.

    PubMed

    Tecmer, Paweł; Hong, Sung W; Boguslawski, Katharina

    2016-07-21

    We present a state-of-the-art computational study of the uranyl(vi) and uranyl(v) cation-cation interactions (dications) in aqueous solution. Reliable electronic structures of two interacting uranyl(vi) and uranyl(v) subunits as well as those of the uranyl(vi) and uranyl(v) clusters are presented for the first time. Our theoretical study elucidates the impact of cation-cation interactions on changes in the molecular structure as well as changes in vibrational and UV-Vis spectra of the bare uranyl(vi) and uranyl(v) moieties for different total spin-states and total charges of the dications.

  16. Highly Stable, Anion Conductive, Comb-Shaped Copolymers for Alkaline Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, NW; Leng, YJ; Hickner, MA; Wang, CY

    2013-07-10

    To produce an anion-conductive and durable polymer electrolyte for alkaline fuel cell applications, a series of quaternized poly(2,6-dimethyl phenylene oxide)s containing long alkyl side chains pendant to the nitrogen-centered cation were synthesized using a Menshutkin reaction to form comb-shaped structures. The pendant alkyl chains were responsible for the development of highly conductive ionic domains, as confirmed by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The comb-shaped polymers having one alkyl side chain showed higher hydroxide conductivities than those with benzyltrimethyl ammonium moieties or structures with more than one alkyl side chain per cationic site. The highest conductivity was observed for comb-shaped polymers with benzyldimethylhexadecyl ammonium cations. The chemical stabilities of the comb-shaped membranes were evaluated under severe, accelerated-aging conditions, and degradation was observed by measuring IEC and ion conductivity changes during aging. The comb-shaped membranes retained their high ion conductivity in 1 M NaOH at 80 degrees C for 2000 h. These cationic polymers were employed as ionomers in catalyst layers for alkaline fuel cells. The results indicated that the C-16 alkyl side chain ionomer had a slightly better initial performance, despite its low IEC value, but very poor durability in the fuel cell. In contrast, 90% of the initial performance was retained for the alkaline fuel cell with electrodes containing the C-6 side chain after 60 h of fuel cell operation.

  17. The biogeochemistry of grassland to forest conversion: a tale of protons, cations, and water in the Pampas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jobbagy, E. G.; Jackson, R. B.

    2001-12-01

    alkalinization. The role of capillary rise and tree cycling as pathways for Na entrance into the soil is being explored. Eucalypts in the Pampas disrupted base cation and water cycles and simultaneously triggered acidification and alkalinization processes. Common contrasts in tissue stoichieometry and rooting depth between grasses and trees are likely causes of this effect. Our results highlight the importance of shifts in plant cycling patterns as a major biogeochemical force.

  18. Cation exchange chromatographic elution and separation of rubidium

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, V.P.; Khopkar, S.M.

    1982-01-01

    The systematic cation exchange chromatographic separation of rubidium on Dowex 50W-X8 was carried out with mineral acids and their salts as eluants.A selectivity scale for various eluants in terms of the elution constant was devised. Rubidium was separated from a large number of elements in binary mixtures by the process of gradient or selective elutions or selective sorption. The noteworthy feature of the method is the sequential separation of rubidium from alkali as well as alkaline earth elements.

  19. Mechanism of alcohol-enhanced lucigenin chemiluminescence in alkaline solution.

    PubMed

    Chi, Quan; Chen, Wanying; He, Zhike

    2015-11-01

    The chemiluminescence (CL) of lucigenin (Luc(2+)) can be enhanced by different alcohols in alkaline solution. The effect of different fatty alcohols on the CL of lucigenin was related to the carbon chain length and the number of hydroxyl groups. Glycerol provides the greatest enhancement. UV/Vis absorption spectra and fluorescence spectra showed that N-methylacridone (NMA) was produced in the CL reaction in the presence of different alcohols. The peak of the CL spectrum was located at 470 nm in all cases, indicating that the luminophore was always the excited-state NMA. The quenching of lucigenin CL by superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the electron spin resonance (ESR) results with the spin trap of 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) demonstrated that superoxide anions (O2 (•-)) were generated from dissolved oxygen in the CL reaction and that glycerol and dihydroxyacetone (DHA) can promote O2 (•-) production by the reduction of dissolved oxygen in alkaline solution. It was assumed that the enhancement provided by different alcohols was related to the solvent effect and reducing capacity. Glycerol and DHA can also reduce Luc(2+) into lucigenin cation radicals (Luc(•+) ), which react with O2 (•-) to produce CL, and glycerol can slowly transform into DHA, which is oxidized quickly in alkaline solution.

  20. Effects of various salts on the steady-state enzymatic activity of E. coli alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Poe, R W; Sangadala, V S; Brewer, J M

    1993-05-15

    Seventeen salts were tested at various concentrations for their effects on E. coli alkaline phosphatase steady-state activity. Three effects were distinguished: a general ionic strength effect, and weaker cation and anion effects. 1. All salts tested, including those with "noninteracting" cations and anions, stimulate alkaline phosphatase activity usually ca. 100% at moderate (0.05-0.3 M) concentrations. 2. Cations such as Na+ and Li+ produce further increases in activity at concentrations up to 1 M. The noninteracting cations tetramethylammonium and tetrapropylammonium produce lower activities at these concentrations. These do not provide the secondary stimulatory effect of cations such as Na+ or Li+. 3. Anions associated with greater "salting in" effectiveness such as thiocyanate also reduce activity at ca. 1 M concentrations. These latter effects are not dependent on protein concentration so they probably do not involve subunit dissociation. There is little effect on the fluorescence or fluorescence-polarization spectrum of the enzyme so there is no general effect of 1 M salts on the conformation of the protein. The Michaelis constant for the substrate, p-nitrophenylphosphate, and inhibition constant for inorganic phosphate are increased to some extent by salts, but the increase in activity is due to an increase in Vmax. Our working hypothesis is that increased ionic strength weakens electrostatic interactions, enabling noncovalently bound phosphate to dissociate more rapidly.

  1. Ethylene Inhibits Root Elongation during Alkaline Stress through AUXIN1 and Associated Changes in Auxin Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Xu, Heng-Hao; Liu, Wen-Cheng; Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2015-08-01

    Soil alkalinity causes major reductions in yield and quality of crops worldwide. The plant root is the first organ sensing soil alkalinity, which results in shorter primary roots. However, the mechanism underlying alkaline stress-mediated inhibition of root elongation remains to be further elucidated. Here, we report that alkaline conditions inhibit primary root elongation of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings by reducing cell division potential in the meristem zones and that ethylene signaling affects this process. The ethylene perception antagonist silver (Ag(+)) alleviated the inhibition of root elongation by alkaline stress. Moreover, the ethylene signaling mutants ethylene response1-3 (etr1-3), ethylene insensitive2 (ein2), and ein3-1 showed less reduction in root length under alkaline conditions, indicating a reduced sensitivity to alkalinity. Ethylene biosynthesis also was found to play a role in alkaline stress-mediated root inhibition; the ethylene overproducer1-1 mutant, which overproduces ethylene because of increased stability of 1-AMINOCYCLOPROPANE-1-CARBOXYLIC ACID SYNTHASE5, was hypersensitive to alkaline stress. In addition, the ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor cobalt (Co(2+)) suppressed alkaline stress-mediated inhibition of root elongation. We further found that alkaline stress caused an increase in auxin levels by promoting expression of auxin biosynthesis-related genes, but the increase in auxin levels was reduced in the roots of the etr1-3 and ein3-1 mutants and in Ag(+)/Co(2+)-treated wild-type plants. Additional genetic and physiological data showed that AUXIN1 (AUX1) was involved in alkaline stress-mediated inhibition of root elongation. Taken together, our results reveal that ethylene modulates alkaline stress-mediated inhibition of root growth by increasing auxin accumulation by stimulating the expression of AUX1 and auxin biosynthesis-related genes.

  2. Zinc electrode in alkaline electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    McBreen, J.

    1995-12-31

    The zinc electrode in alkaline electrolyte is unusual in that supersaturated zincate solutions can form during discharge and spongy or mossy zinc deposits can form on charge at low overvoltages. The effect of additives on regular pasted ZnO electrodes and calcium zincate electrodes is discussed. The paper also reports on in situ x-ray absorption (XAS) results on mossy zinc deposits.

  3. Cationic liposomes as vaccine adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Dennis; Korsholm, Karen Smith; Andersen, Peter; Agger, Else Marie

    2011-04-01

    The application of cationic liposomes as vaccine delivery systems and adjuvants has been investigated extensively over the last few decades. However, cationic liposomes are, in general, not sufficiently immunostimulatory, which is why the combination of liposomes with immunostimulating ligands has arisen as a strategy in the development of novel adjuvant systems. Within the last 5 years, two novel adjuvant systems based on cationic liposomes incorporating Toll-like receptor or non-Toll-like receptor immunostimulating ligands have progressed from preclinical testing in smaller animal species to clinical testing in humans. The immune responses that these clinical candidates induce are primarily of the Th1 type for which there is a profound unmet need. Furthermore, a number of new cationic liposome-forming surfactants with notable immunostimulatory properties have been discovered. In this article we review the recent progress on the application of cationic liposomes as vaccine delivery systems/adjuvants.

  4. ToF-SIMS investigation of the cationization of several lubricant components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunst, Ullrich; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F.

    2008-12-01

    Cationization of molecular substances results often in the emission of characteristic peak patterns of secondary ions (SI) of these molecular species and is accompanied by matrix-enhanced SI yields. Besides the cationization of molecular overlayers on substrates of periodic table group IB elements, recent especially matrix-enhanced SIMS by physical vapor deposition (PVD) processes of Ag and Au was in the focus of investigations. In this work, selected lubricants components were investigated by ToF-SIMS, using different methods for cationization: (i) substrate cationization with periodic table group IA and IB elements (Cu, Ag, Cs, Au), (ii) cationization by dissolved salts of group IA and IB elements (Li, K, Na, Cu, Ag), and (iii) the in situ PVD by sputtering of group IB element targets (Cu, Ag, Au) by using the pulsed dual source column (DSC) of a ToF-SIMS instrument and thick lubricant layers on silicon wafers positioned in the immediate vicinity of the sputter crater. The Cu- and Ag-cationization of the investigated trimethylol-propane esters TMP(C8/C10) and poly-alpha-olefins (PAO) were possible with all specified methods, whereas only the esters were cationized also by alkaline elements (Li, Na, K, Cs). Au-cationization products were only observed for volatile PAO components that have deposited on the fresh cleaned surface of the sputter crater bottom of the Au-target.

  5. Metasomatized lithosphere and the origin of alkaline lavas.

    PubMed

    Pilet, Sébastien; Baker, Michael B; Stolper, Edward M

    2008-05-16

    Recycled oceanic crust, with or without sediment, is often invoked as a source component of continental and oceanic alkaline magmas to account for their trace-element and isotopic characteristics. Alternatively, these features have been attributed to sources containing veined, metasomatized lithosphere. In melting experiments on natural amphibole-rich veins at 1.5 gigapascals, we found that partial melts of metasomatic veins can reproduce key major- and trace-element features of oceanic and continental alkaline magmas. Moreover, experiments with hornblendite plus lherzolite showed that reaction of melts of amphibole-rich veins with surrounding lherzolite can explain observed compositional trends from nephelinites to alkali olivine basalts. We conclude that melting of metasomatized lithosphere is a viable alternative to models of alkaline basalt formation by melting of recycled oceanic crust with or without sediment.

  6. Escherichia coli YqjA, a Member of the Conserved DedA/Tvp38 Membrane Protein Family, Is a Putative Osmosensing Transporter Required for Growth at Alkaline pH

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sujeet

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ability to persist and grow under alkaline conditions is an important characteristic of many bacteria. In order to survive at alkaline pH, Escherichia coli must maintain a stable cytoplasmic pH of about 7.6. Membrane cation/proton antiporters play a major role in alkaline pH homeostasis by catalyzing active inward proton transport. The DedA/Tvp38 family is a highly conserved membrane protein family of unknown function present in most sequenced genomes. YqjA and YghB are members of the E. coli DedA family with 62% amino acid identity and partially redundant functions. We have shown that E. coli with ΔyqjA and ΔyghB mutations cannot properly maintain the proton motive force (PMF) and is compromised in PMF-dependent drug efflux and other PMF-dependent functions. Furthermore, the functions of YqjA and YghB are dependent upon membrane-embedded acidic amino acids, a hallmark of several families of proton-dependent transporters. Here, we show that the ΔyqjA mutant (but not ΔyghB) cannot grow under alkaline conditions (ranging from pH 8.5 to 9.5), unlike the parent E. coli. Overexpression of yqjA restores growth at alkaline pH, but only when more than ∼100 mM sodium or potassium is present in the growth medium. Increasing the osmotic pressure by the addition of sucrose enhances the ability of YqjA to support growth under alkaline conditions in the presence of low salt concentrations, consistent with YqjA functioning as an osmosensor. We suggest that YqjA possesses proton-dependent transport activity that is stimulated by osmolarity and that it plays a significant role in the survival of E. coli at alkaline pH. IMPORTANCE The ability to survive under alkaline conditions is important for many species of bacteria. Escherichia coli can grow at pH 5.5 to 9.5 while maintaining a constant cytoplasmic pH of about 7.6. Under alkaline conditions, bacteria rely upon proton-dependent transporters to maintain a constant cytoplasmic pH. The DedA/Tvp38 protein family

  7. A theoretical study of complexes formed between cations and curved aromatic systems: electrostatics does not always control cation-π interaction.

    PubMed

    Carrazana-García, Jorge A; Cabaleiro-Lago, Enrique M; Rodríguez-Otero, Jesús

    2017-04-10

    The present work studies the interaction of two extended curved π-systems (corannulene and sumanene) with various cations (sodium, potassium, ammonium, tetramethylammonium, guanidinium and imidazolium). Polyatomic cations are models of groups found in important biomolecules in which cation-π interaction plays a fundamental role. The results indicate an important size effect: with extended π systems and cations of the size of potassium and larger, dispersion is much more important than has been generally recognized for cation-π interactions. In most of the systems studied here, the stability of the cation-π complexes is the result of a balanced combination of electrostatic, induction and dispersion contributions. None of the systems studied here owes its stability to the electrostatic interaction more than 42%. Induction dominates stabilization in complexes with sodium, and in some of the potassium and ammonium complexes. In complexes with large cations and with flat cations dispersion is the major stabilizing contribution and can provide more than 50% of the stabilization energy. This implies that theoretical studies of the cation-π interaction involving large or even medium-size fragments require a level of calculation capable of properly modelling dispersion. The separation between the cation and the π system is another important factor to take into account, especially when the fragments of the cation-π complex are bound (for example, to a protein backbone) and cannot interact at the most favourable distance.

  8. Design of Perovskite Oxides as Anion-Intercalation-Type Electrodes for Supercapacitors: Cation Leaching Effect.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Dinh, Jim; Tade, Moses O; Shao, Zongping

    2016-09-14

    Oxygen ions can be exploited as a charge carrier to effectively realize a new type of anion-intercalation supercapacitor. In this study, to get some useful guidelines for future materials development, we comparatively studied SrCoO3-δ (SC), Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3-δ (BSCF), and Co3O4 as electrodes in supercapacitors with aqueous alkaline electrolyte. The effect of interaction between the electrode materials with the alkaline solution was focused on the structure and specific surface area of the electrode material, and ultimately the electrochemical performance was emphasized. Both BSCF and SC were found to experience cation leaching in alkaline solution, resulting in an increase in the specific surface area of the material, but overleaching caused the damage of perovskite structure of BSCF. Barium leaching was more serious than strontium, and the cation leaching was component dependent. Although high initial capacitance was achieved for BSCF, it was not a good candidate as intercalation-type electrode for supercapacitor because of poor cycling stability from serious Ba(2+) and Sr(2+) leaching. Instead, SC was a favorable electrode candidate for practical use in supercapacitors due to its high capacity and proper cation leaching capacity, which brought beneficial effect on cycling stability. It is suggested that cation leaching effect should be seriously considered in the development of new perovskite materials as electrodes for supercapacitors.

  9. Modeling the effect of membrane conductivity on the performance of alkaline fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raya, Isaac P.; Ellis, Michael W.; Hernandez-Guerrero, Abel; Elizalde-Blancas, Francisco

    2016-03-01

    The present work proposes and demonstrates a methodology to capture the effect of operating conditions on ionic conductivity of membranes immersed in alkaline media. Based on reported experimental results for an anion exchange membrane (A-201 by Tokuyama) and a cation exchange membrane (Nafion 211), two novel expressions are developed for the ionic conductivity by incorporating the effects of solution concentration and temperature. The expression for the cationic conductivity is applied in a cell-level model to predict the performance of an alkaline direct borohydride fuel cell; it is found that the membrane ionic conductivity significantly affects the cell performance and capturing its functionality is essential to accurately predict the fuel cell performance.

  10. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David B.; Lao, Guifang

    1998-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium.

  11. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, D.B.; Lao, G.

    1998-01-06

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium. 3 figs.

  12. Successfully Improving Ocular Drug Delivery Using the Cationic Nanoemulsion, Novasorb

    PubMed Central

    Lallemand, Frederic; Daull, Philippe; Benita, Simon; Buggage, Ronald; Garrigue, Jean-Sebastien

    2012-01-01

    Topical ophthalmic delivery of active ingredients can be achieved using cationic nanoemulsions. In the last decade, Novagali Pharma has successfully developed and marketed Novasorb, an advanced pharmaceutical technology for the treatment of ophthalmic diseases. This paper describes the main steps in the development of cationic nanoemulsions from formulation to evaluation in clinical trials. A major challenge of the formulation work was the selection of a cationic agent with an acceptable safety profile that would ensure a sufficient ocular surface retention time. Then, toxicity and pharmacokinetic studies were performed showing that the cationic emulsions were safe and well tolerated. Even in the absence of an active ingredient, cationic emulsions were observed in preclinical studies to have an inherent benefit on the ocular surface. Moreover, clinical trials demonstrated the efficacy and safety of cationic emulsions loaded with cyclosporine A in patients with dry eye disease. Ongoing studies evaluating latanoprost emulsion in patients with ocular surface disease and glaucoma suggest that the beneficial effects on reducing ocular surface damage may also extend to this patient population. The culmination of these efforts has been the marketing of Cationorm, a preservative-free cationic emulsion indicated for the symptomatic treatment of dry eye. PMID:22506123

  13. The secondary alkaline zinc electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLarnon, Frank R.; Cairns, Elton J.

    1991-02-01

    The worldwide studies conducted between 1975 and 1990 with the aim of improving cell lifetimes of secondary alkaline zinc electrodes are overviewed. Attention is given the design features and characteristics of various secondary alkaline zinc cells, including four types of zinc/nickel oxide cell designs (vented static-electrolyte, sealed static-electrolyte, vibrating-electrode, and flowing-electrolyte); two types of zinc/air cells (mechanically rechargeable consolidated-electrode and mechanically rechargeable particulate-electrode); zinc/silver oxide battery; zinc/manganese dioxide cell; and zinc/ferric cyanide battery. Particular consideration is given to recent research in the fields of cell thermodynamics, zinc electrodeposition, zinc electrodissolution, zinc corrosion, electrolyte properties, mathematical and phenomenological models, osmotic pumping, nonuniform current distribution, and cell cycle-life perforamnce.

  14. Development of alkaline fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbs, Michael R.; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Alam, Todd Michael; Janarthanan, Rajeswari; Horan, James L.; Caire, Benjamin R.; Ziegler, Zachary C.; Herring, Andrew M.; Yang, Yuan; Zuo, Xiaobing; Robson, Michael H.; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Patterson, Wendy; Atanassov, Plamen Borissov

    2013-09-01

    This project focuses on the development and demonstration of anion exchange membrane (AEM) fuel cells for portable power applications. Novel polymeric anion exchange membranes and ionomers with high chemical stabilities were prepared characterized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories. Durable, non-precious metal catalysts were prepared by Dr. Plamen Atanassovs research group at the University of New Mexico by utilizing an aerosol-based process to prepare templated nano-structures. Dr. Andy Herrings group at the Colorado School of Mines combined all of these materials to fabricate and test membrane electrode assemblies for single cell testing in a methanol-fueled alkaline system. The highest power density achieved in this study was 54 mW/cm2 which was 90% of the project target and the highest reported power density for a direct methanol alkaline fuel cell.

  15. Synthetic cation-selective nanotube: Permeant cations chaperoned by anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilder, Tamsyn A.; Gordon, Dan; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2011-01-01

    The ability to design ion-selective, synthetic nanotubes which mimic biological ion channels may have significant implications for the future treatment of bacteria, diseases, and as ultrasensitive biosensors. We present the design of a synthetic nanotube made from carbon atoms that selectively allows monovalent cations to move across and rejects all anions. The cation-selective nanotube mimics some of the salient properties of biological ion channels. Before practical nanodevices are successfully fabricated it is vital that proof-of-concept computational studies are performed. With this in mind we use molecular and stochastic dynamics simulations to characterize the dynamics of ion permeation across a single-walled (10, 10), 36 Å long, carbon nanotube terminated with carboxylic acid with an effective radius of 5.08 Å. Although cations encounter a high energy barrier of 7 kT, its height is drastically reduced by a chloride ion in the nanotube. The presence of a chloride ion near the pore entrance thus enables a cation to enter the pore and, once in the pore, it is chaperoned by the resident counterion across the narrow pore. The moment the chaperoned cation transits the pore, the counterion moves back to the entrance to ferry another ion. The synthetic nanotube has a high sodium conductance of 124 pS and shows linear current-voltage and current-concentration profiles. The cation-anion selectivity ratio ranges from 8 to 25, depending on the ionic concentrations in the reservoirs.

  16. Oxygen electrodes for rechargeable alkaline fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swette, Larry; Giner, Jose

    1987-09-01

    Electrocatalysts and supports for the positive electrode of moderate temperature single unit rechargeable alkaline fuel cells were investigated and developed. The electrocatalysts are defined as the material with a higher activity for the oxygen electrode reaction than the support. Advanced development will require that the materials be prepared in high surface area forms, and may also entail integration of various candidate materials. Eight candidate support materials and seven electrocatalysts were investigated. Of the 8 support, 3 materials meet the preliminary requirements in terms of electrical conductivity and stability. Emphasis is now on preparing in high surface area form and testing under more severe corrosion stress conditions. Of the 7 electrocatalysts prepared and evaluated, at least 5 materials remain as potential candidates. The major emphasis remains on preparation, physical characterization and electrochemical performance testing.

  17. Oxygen electrodes for rechargeable alkaline fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swette, Larry; Giner, Jose

    1987-01-01

    Electrocatalysts and supports for the positive electrode of moderate temperature single unit rechargeable alkaline fuel cells were investigated and developed. The electrocatalysts are defined as the material with a higher activity for the oxygen electrode reaction than the support. Advanced development will require that the materials be prepared in high surface area forms, and may also entail integration of various candidate materials. Eight candidate support materials and seven electrocatalysts were investigated. Of the 8 support, 3 materials meet the preliminary requirements in terms of electrical conductivity and stability. Emphasis is now on preparing in high surface area form and testing under more severe corrosion stress conditions. Of the 7 electrocatalysts prepared and evaluated, at least 5 materials remain as potential candidates. The major emphasis remains on preparation, physical characterization and electrochemical performance testing.

  18. [Effect of bivalent alkaline earth fluorides introduction on thermal stability and spectroscopic properties of Er3+/Tm3+ /Yb3+ co-doped oxyfluorogermanate glasses].

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue-bo; Zhang, Xin-na; Zhou, Da-li; Jiao, Qing; Wang, Rong-fei; Huang, Jin-feng; Long, Xiao-bo; Qiu, Jian-bei

    2012-01-01

    Transparent Er3+/Tm3+ /Yb3+ co-doped oxyfluorogermanate glasses alone containing MgF2, CaF2, SrF2 or BaF2 and nano-glass-ceramics only containing BaF2 were prepared. The thermal stabilities and the up-conversion emission properties of the samples were investigated. Analyses of absorbance spectra reveal that the UV cutoff band moves slightly to shortwave band with the doping bivalent cation mass increasing. The results show that the emission color can be adjusted by changing the alkaline earth cation species in the glass matrixes, especially as Mg2+ is concerned, and the emission intensity can increase notably by heating the glass containing alkaline-earth fluoride into glass ceramic containing alkaline-earth fluoride nanocrystals or increasing the content of bivalent alkaline earth fluorides.

  19. Major depression

    MedlinePlus

    Depression - major; Depression - clinical; Clinical depression; Unipolar depression; Major depressive disorder ... providers do not know the exact causes of depression. It is believed that chemical changes in the ...

  20. Identifying the presence of a disulfide linkage in peptides by the selective elimination of hydrogen disulfide from collisionally activated alkali and alkaline earth metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hugh I; Beauchamp, J L

    2008-01-30

    We report a new method for identifying disulfide linkages in peptides using mass spectrometry. This is accomplished by collisional activation of singly charged cationic alkali and alkaline earth metal complexes, which results in the highly selective elimination of hydrogen disulfide (H2S2). Complexes of peptides possessing disulfide bonds with sodium and alkaline earth metal are generated using electrospray ionization (ESI). Isolation followed by collision induced dissociation (CID) of singly charged peptide complexes results in selective elimination of H2S2 to leave newly formed dehydroalanine residues in the peptide. Further activation of the product yields sequence information in the region previously short circuited by the disulfide bond. For example, singly charged magnesium and calcium ion bound complexes of [Lys8]-vasopressin exhibit selective elimination of H2S2 via low-energy CID. Further isolation of the product followed by CID yields major b- and z-type fragments revealing the peptide sequence in the region between the newly formed dehydroalanine residues. Numerous model peptides provide mechanistic details for the selective elimination of H2S2. The process is initiated starting with a metal stabilized enolate anion at Cys, followed by cleavage of the S-C bond. An examination of the peptic digest of insulin provides an example of the application of the selective elimination of H2S2 for the identification of peptides with disulfide linkages. The energetics and mechanisms of H2S2 elimination from model compounds are investigated using density functional theory (DFT) calculations.

  1. Alkaline fuel cell performance investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. E.; Manzo, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    An exploratory experimental fuel cell test program was conducted to investigate the performance characteristics of alkaline laboratory research electrodes. The objective of this work was to establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance and evaluate candidate cathode configurations having the potential for improved performance. The performance characterization tests provided data to empirically establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance for cell temperatures up to 300 F and reactant pressures up to 200 psia. Evaluation of five gold alloy cathode catalysts revealed that three doped gold alloys had more that two times the surface areas of reference cathodes and therefore offered the best potential for improved performance.

  2. Proteolytic activation of both components of the cation stress–responsive Slt pathway in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Mellado, Laura; Arst, Herbert N.; Espeso, Eduardo A.

    2016-01-01

    Tolerance of Aspergillus nidulans to alkalinity and elevated cation concentrations requires both SltA and SltB. Transcription factor SltA and the putative pseudokinase/protease signaling protein SltB comprise a regulatory pathway specific to filamentous fungi. In vivo, SltB is proteolytically cleaved into its two principal domains. Mutational analysis defines a chymotrypsin-like serine protease domain that mediates SltB autoproteolysis and proteolytic cleavage of SltA. The pseudokinase domain might modulate the protease activity of SltB. Three forms of the SltA transcription factor coexist in cells: a full-length, 78-kDa version and a processed, 32-kDa form, which is found in phosphorylated and unphosphorylated states. The SltA32kDa version mediates transcriptional regulation of sltB and, putatively, genes required for tolerance to cation stress and alkalinity. The full-length form, SltA78kDa, apparently has no transcriptional function. In the absence of SltB, only the primary product of SltA is detectable, and its level equals that of SltA78kDa. Mutations in sltB selected as suppressors of null vps alleles and resulting in cation/alkalinity sensitivity either reduced or eliminated SltA proteolysis. There is no evidence for cation or alkalinity regulation of SltB cleavage, but activation of sltB expression requires SltA. This work identifies the molecular mechanisms governing the Slt pathway. PMID:27307585

  3. Proteolytic activation of both components of the cation stress-responsive Slt pathway in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Mellado, Laura; Arst, Herbert N; Espeso, Eduardo A

    2016-08-15

    Tolerance of Aspergillus nidulans to alkalinity and elevated cation concentrations requires both SltA and SltB. Transcription factor SltA and the putative pseudokinase/protease signaling protein SltB comprise a regulatory pathway specific to filamentous fungi. In vivo, SltB is proteolytically cleaved into its two principal domains. Mutational analysis defines a chymotrypsin-like serine protease domain that mediates SltB autoproteolysis and proteolytic cleavage of SltA. The pseudokinase domain might modulate the protease activity of SltB. Three forms of the SltA transcription factor coexist in cells: a full-length, 78-kDa version and a processed, 32-kDa form, which is found in phosphorylated and unphosphorylated states. The SltA32kDa version mediates transcriptional regulation of sltB and, putatively, genes required for tolerance to cation stress and alkalinity. The full-length form, SltA78kDa, apparently has no transcriptional function. In the absence of SltB, only the primary product of SltA is detectable, and its level equals that of SltA78kDa. Mutations in sltB selected as suppressors of null vps alleles and resulting in cation/alkalinity sensitivity either reduced or eliminated SltA proteolysis. There is no evidence for cation or alkalinity regulation of SltB cleavage, but activation of sltB expression requires SltA. This work identifies the molecular mechanisms governing the Slt pathway.

  4. Decision making in C. elegans chemotaxis to alkaline pH

    PubMed Central

    Murayama, Takashi; Maruyama, Ichi N

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring of environmental and tissue pH is critical for animal survival. The nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), is attracted to mildly alkaline pH, but avoids strongly alkaline pH. However, little is known about how the behavioral switching or decision making occurs. Genetic dissection and Ca2+ imaging have previously demonstrated that ASEL and ASH are the major sensory neurons responsible for attraction and repulsion, respectively. Here we report that unlike C. elegans wild type, mutants deficient in ASEL or ASH were repelled by mildly alkaline pH, or were attracted to strongly alkaline pH, respectively. These results suggest that signals through ASEL and ASH compete to determine the animal’s alkaline-pH chemotaxis. Furthermore, mutants with 2 ASEL neurons were more efficiently attracted to mildly alkaline pH than the wild type with a single ASEL neuron, indicating that higher activity of ASEL induces stronger attraction to mildly alkaline pH. This stronger attraction was overridden by normal activity of ASH, suggesting that ASH-mediated avoidance dominates ASEL-mediated attraction. Thus, C. elegans chemotactic behaviors to alkaline pH seems to be determined by signal strengths from the sensory neurons ASEL and ASH, and the behavior decision making seems to be the result of competition between the 2 sensory neurons. PMID:24563708

  5. Alkaline detergent recycling via ultrafiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Steffani, C.; Meltzer, M.

    1995-06-01

    The metal finishing industry uses alkaline cleaners and detergents to remove oils and dirt from manufactured parts, often before they are painted or plated. The use of these cleaners has grown because environmental regulations are phasing out ozone depleting substances and placing restrictions on the use and disposal of many hazardous solvents. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is examining ultrafiltration as a cleaning approach that reclaims the cleaning solutions and minimizes wastes. The ultrafiltration membrane is made from sheets of polymerized organic film. The sheets are rolled onto a supporting frame and installed in a tube. Spent cleaning solution is pumped into a filter chamber and filtered through the membrane that captures oils and dirt and allows water and detergent to pass. The membrane is monitored and when pressure builds from oil and dirt, an automatic system cleans the surface to maintain solution flow and filtration quality. The results show that the ultrafiltration does not disturb the detergent concentration or alkalinity but removed almost all the oils and dirt leaving the solution in condition to be reused.

  6. Cation Uptake and Allocation by Red Pine Seedlings under Cation-Nutrient Stress in a Column Growth Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Zhenqing; Balogh-Brunstad, Zsuzsanna; Grant, Michael R.; Harsh, James B.; Gill, Richard; Thomashow, Linda; Dohnalkova, Alice; Stacks, Daryl; Letourneau, Melissa; Keller, Chester K.

    2014-01-10

    Background and Aims Plant nutrient uptake is affected by environmental stress, but how plants respond to cation-nutrient stress is poorly understood. We assessed the impact of varying degrees of cation-nutrient limitation on cation uptake in an experimental plant-mineral system. Methods Column experiments, with red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.) seedlings growing in sand/mineral mixtures, were conducted for up to nine months under a range of Ca- and K-limited conditions. The Ca and K were supplied from both minerals and nutrient solutions with varying Ca and K concentrations. Results Cation nutrient stress had little impact on carbon allocation after nine months of plant growth and K was the limiting nutrient for biomass production. The Ca/Sr and K/Rb ratio results allowed independent estimation of dissolution incongruency and discrimination against Sr and Rb during cation uptake processes. The fraction of K in biomass from biotite increased with decreasing K supply from nutrient solutions. The mineral anorthite was consistently the major source of Ca, regardless of nutrient treatment. Conclusions Red pine seedlings exploited more mineral K in response to more severe K deficiency. This did not occur for Ca. Plant discrimination factors must be carefully considered to accurately identify nutrient sources using cation tracers.

  7. Alkaline and alkaline earth metal phosphate halides and phosphors

    DOEpatents

    Lyons, Robert Joseph; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Cleaver, Robert John

    2012-11-13

    Compounds, phosphor materials and apparatus related to nacaphite family of materials are presented. Potassium and rubidium based nacaphite family compounds and phosphors designed by doping divalent rare earth elements in the sites of alkaline earth metals in the nacaphite material families are descried. An apparatus comprising the phosphors based on the nacaphite family materials are presented herein. The compounds presented is of formula A.sub.2B.sub.1-yR.sub.yPO.sub.4X where the elements A, B, R, X and suffix y are defined such that A is potassium, rubidium, or a combination of potassium and rubidium and B is calcium, strontium, barium, or a combination of any of calcium, strontium and barium. X is fluorine, chlorine, or a combination of fluorine and chlorine, R is europium, samarium, ytterbium, or a combination of any of europium, samarium, and ytterbium, and y ranges from 0 to about 0.1.

  8. Molecular and isotopic signatures in sediments and gas hydrate of the central/southwestern Ulleung Basin: high alkalinity escape fuelled by biogenically sourced methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ji-Hoon; Park, Myong-Ho; Chun, Jong-Hwa; Lee, Joo Yong

    2011-02-01

    Natural marine gas hydrate was discovered in Korean territorial waters during a 2007 KIGAM cruise to the central/southwestern Ulleung Basin, East Sea. The first data on the geochemical characterization of hydrate-bound water and gas are presented here for cold seep site 07GHP-10 in the central basin sector, together with analogous data for four sites (07GHP-01, 07GHP-02, 07GHP-03, and 07GHP-14) where no hydrates were detected in other cores from the central/southwestern sectors. Hydrate-bound water displayed very low concentrations of major ions (Cl-, SO{4/2-}, Na+, Mg2+, K+, and Ca2+), and more positive δD (15.5‰) and δ18O (2.3‰) signatures compared to seawater. Cl- freshening and more positive isotopic values were also observed in the pore water at gas hydrate site 07GHP-10. The inferred sulfate-methane interface (SMI) was very shallow (<5 mbsf) at least at four sites, suggesting the widespread occurrence of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) at shallow sediment depths, and possibly high methane flux. Around the SMI, pore water alkalinity was very high (>40 mM), but the carbon isotopic ratios of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC) did not show minimum values typical of AOM. Moreover, macroscopic authigenic carbonates were not observed at any of the core sites. This can plausibly be explained by carbon with high δ13C values diffusing upward from below the SMI, increasing alkalinity via deep methanogenesis and eventually escaping as alkalinity into the water column, with minor precipitation as solid phase. This contrasts, but is not inconsistent with recent reports of methane-fuelled carbonate formation at other sites in the southwestern basin sector. Methane was the main hydrocarbon component (>99.85%) of headspace, void, and hydrate-bound gases, C1/C2+ ratios were at least 1,000, and δ13CCH4 and δDCH4 values were in the typical range of methane generated by microbial reduction of CO2. This is supported by the δ13CC2H6 signatures of void and hydrate

  9. Alkaline cations directing the transformation of FAU zeolites into five different framework types.

    PubMed

    Van Tendeloo, Leen; Gobechiya, Elena; Breynaert, Eric; Martens, Johan A; Kirschhock, Christine E A

    2013-12-28

    Exposure of faujasite zeolites to different alkali hydroxide solutions readily yields zeolites with ABW, CHA, MER and ANA topologies. In NaOH faujasite persisted. Aside from new opportunities for zeolite synthesis, this reveals that a suitable aluminosilicate connectivity in the source material significantly facilitates zeolite crystallization.

  10. Block copolymers for alkaline fuel cell membrane materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yifan

    Alkaline fuel cells (AFCs) using anion exchange membranes (AEMs) as electrolyte have recently received considerable attention. AFCs offer some advantages over proton exchange membrane fuel cells, including the potential of non-noble metal (e.g. nickel, silver) catalyst on the cathode, which can dramatically lower the fuel cell cost. The main drawback of traditional AFCs is the use of liquid electrolyte (e.g. aqueous potassium hydroxide), which can result in the formation of carbonate precipitates by reaction with carbon dioxide. AEMs with tethered cations can overcome the precipitates formed in traditional AFCs. Our current research focuses on developing different polymer systems (blend, block, grafted, and crosslinked polymers) in order to understand alkaline fuel cell membrane in many aspects and design optimized anion exchange membranes with better alkaline stability, mechanical integrity and ionic conductivity. A number of distinct materials have been produced and characterized. A polymer blend system comprised of poly(vinylbenzyl chloride)-b-polystyrene (PVBC-b-PS) diblock copolymer, prepared by nitroxide mediated polymerization (NMP), with poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene oxide) (PPO) or brominated PPO was studied for conversion into a blend membrane for AEM. The formation of a miscible blend matrix improved mechanical properties while maintaining high ionic conductivity through formation of phase separated ionic domains. Using anionic polymerization, a polyethylene based block copolymer was designed where the polyethylene-based block copolymer formed bicontinuous morphological structures to enhance the hydroxide conductivity (up to 94 mS/cm at 80 °C) while excellent mechanical properties (strain up to 205%) of the polyethylene block copolymer membrane was observed. A polymer system was designed and characterized with monomethoxy polyethylene glycol (mPEG) as a hydrophilic polymer grafted through substitution of pendent benzyl chloride groups of a PVBC

  11. Long-term trends in alkalinity in large rivers of the conterminous US in relation to acidification, agriculture, and hydrologic modification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stets, Edward G.; Kelly, Valerie J.; Crawford, Charles G.

    2014-01-01

    Alkalinity increases in large rivers of the conterminous US are well known, but less is understood about the processes leading to these trends as compared with headwater systems more intensively examined in conjunction with acid deposition studies. Nevertheless, large rivers are important conduits of inorganic carbon and other solutes to coastal areas and may have substantial influence on coastal calcium carbonate saturation dynamics. We examined long-term (mid-20th to early 21st century) trends in alkalinity and other weathering products in 23 rivers of the conterminous US. We used a rigorous flow-weighting technique which allowed greater focus on solute trends occurring independently of changes in flow. Increasing alkalinity concentrations and yield were widespread, occurring at 14 and 13 stations, respectively. Analysis of trends in other weathering products suggested that the causes of alkalinity trends were diverse, but at many stations alkalinity increases coincided with decreasing nitrate + sulfate and decreasing cation:alkalinity ratios, which is consistent with recovery from acidification. A positive correlation between the Sen–Thiel slopes of alkalinity increases and agricultural lime usage indicated that agricultural lime contributed to increasing solute concentration in some areas. However, several stations including the Altamaha, Upper Mississippi, and San Joaquin Rivers exhibited solute trends, such as increasing cation:alkalinity ratios and increasing nitrate + sulfate, more consistent with increasing acidity, emphasizing that multiple processes affect alkalinity trends in large rivers. This study was unique in its examination of alkalinity trends in large rivers covering a wide range of climate and land use types, but more detailed analyses will help to better elucidate temporal changes to river solutes and especially the effects they may have on coastal calcium carbonate saturation state.

  12. Long-term trends in alkalinity in large rivers of the conterminous US in relation to acidification, agriculture, and hydrologic modification.

    PubMed

    Stets, E G; Kelly, V J; Crawford, C G

    2014-08-01

    Alkalinity increases in large rivers of the conterminous US are well known, but less is understood about the processes leading to these trends as compared with headwater systems more intensively examined in conjunction with acid deposition studies. Nevertheless, large rivers are important conduits of inorganic carbon and other solutes to coastal areas and may have substantial influence on coastal calcium carbonate saturation dynamics. We examined long-term (mid-20th to early 21st century) trends in alkalinity and other weathering products in 23 rivers of the conterminous US. We used a rigorous flow-weighting technique which allowed greater focus on solute trends occurring independently of changes in flow. Increasing alkalinity concentrations and yield were widespread, occurring at 14 and 13 stations, respectively. Analysis of trends in other weathering products suggested that the causes of alkalinity trends were diverse, but at many stations alkalinity increases coincided with decreasing nitrate+sulfate and decreasing cation:alkalinity ratios, which is consistent with recovery from acidification. A positive correlation between the Sen-Thiel slopes of alkalinity increases and agricultural lime usage indicated that agricultural lime contributed to increasing solute concentration in some areas. However, several stations including the Altamaha, Upper Mississippi, and San Joaquin Rivers exhibited solute trends, such as increasing cation:alkalinity ratios and increasing nitrate+sulfate, more consistent with increasing acidity, emphasizing that multiple processes affect alkalinity trends in large rivers. This study was unique in its examination of alkalinity trends in large rivers covering a wide range of climate and land use types, but more detailed analyses will help to better elucidate temporal changes to river solutes and especially the effects they may have on coastal calcium carbonate saturation state.

  13. Alkaline volcanisms in the Proto-Kuril forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yutani, T.; Hirano, N.

    2015-12-01

    The Nemuro Group in the northeasternmost part of Japan represents forearc basin deposits of the Proto-Kuril arc that consist of Upper Cretaceous-Paleocene sedimentary rocks with andesitic volcaniclastics and alkaline lavas. Their occurrence in this setting is unusual because such alkaline lavas and intrusions are not commonly found in forearc environments. Here, we report new petrological and geological data to discuss the nature of magmatic process involved in their petrogenesis. Pillow and massive lava flows represent subaqueous volcanic activity, and the occurrence of inter-pillow sedimentary units indicates their eruption on unconsolidated sediments of the lower Nemuro Group. Sill intrusions with layered structures and thicknesses ranging from 10 to 130 m are also common widely distributed in the Nemuro Group. Major and trace element chemistry and mineralogical data distinguish the analyzed samples as K-rich alkaline rocks with low TiO2 or Nb contents, analogous to island arc-like tholeiites. These K-rich alkaline rocks can be classified into two groups of shoshonites: shoshonites containing olivine phenocrysts and intruding into the lower Nemuro Group (Group 1), and shoshonites with no olivine and making up the middle part of the Nemuro Group (Group 2). Group 1 shoshonites have higher MgO, Cr and Ni contents than those of Group 2. The bulk-rock composition of Group 2, which has lower MgO contents, shows higher SiO2 than that of Group 1. Such compositional differences possibly represent fractional crystallization of magmas between Groups 1 and 2. Based on the limited available data, we conclude that these alkaline rocks intruding into the Nemuro Group represent arc-shoshonites, and that the Group 1 magmas underwent fractional crystallization to produce the Group 2 magmas.

  14. Effect of Organic Cations on Hydrogen Oxidation Reaction of Carbon Supported Platinum

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Hoon Taek; Choe, Yong-Kee; Martinez, Ulises; Dumont, Joseph Henry; Monahty, Angela; Bae, Chulsung; Matanovic, Ivana; Kim, Yu Seung

    2016-11-02

    Effect of organic cations on hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) of carbon supported platinum (Pt/C) is investigated using three 0.1 M alkaline electrolytes, tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAOH), tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (TBAOH) and tetrabutylphosphonium hydroxide (TBPOH). Rotating disk electrode experiments indicate that the HOR of Pt/C is adversely impacted by time-dependent and potential-driven chemisorption of organic cations. In-situ infrared reflection adsorption spectroscopy experiments indicated that the specific chemisorption of organic cations drives the hydroxide co-adsorption on Pt surface. The co-adsorption of TMA+ and hydroxide at 0.1 V vs. reversible hydrogen electrode is the strongest; consequently, complete removal of the co-adsorbed layer from Pt surface is difficult even after exposure the Pt surface to 1.2 V. Conversely, the chemisorption of TBP+ is the weakest, yet notable decrease of HOR current density is still observed. The adsorption energies, ΔE, for TMA+, TBA+, and TBP+ on Pt (111) surface from density functional theory are computed to be -2.79, -2.42 and -2.00 eV, respectively. The relatively low adsorption energy of TBP+ is explained by the steric hindrance and electronic effect. This study emphasizes the importance of cationic group on HOR activity of alkaline anion exchange membrane fuel cells.

  15. Effect of Organic Cations on Hydrogen Oxidation Reaction of Carbon Supported Platinum

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Hoon Taek; Choe, Yong-Kee; Martinez, Ulises; ...

    2016-11-02

    Effect of organic cations on hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) of carbon supported platinum (Pt/C) is investigated using three 0.1 M alkaline electrolytes, tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAOH), tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (TBAOH) and tetrabutylphosphonium hydroxide (TBPOH). Rotating disk electrode experiments indicate that the HOR of Pt/C is adversely impacted by time-dependent and potential-driven chemisorption of organic cations. In-situ infrared reflection adsorption spectroscopy experiments indicated that the specific chemisorption of organic cations drives the hydroxide co-adsorption on Pt surface. The co-adsorption of TMA+ and hydroxide at 0.1 V vs. reversible hydrogen electrode is the strongest; consequently, complete removal of the co-adsorbed layer from Pt surfacemore » is difficult even after exposure the Pt surface to 1.2 V. Conversely, the chemisorption of TBP+ is the weakest, yet notable decrease of HOR current density is still observed. The adsorption energies, ΔE, for TMA+, TBA+, and TBP+ on Pt (111) surface from density functional theory are computed to be -2.79, -2.42 and -2.00 eV, respectively. The relatively low adsorption energy of TBP+ is explained by the steric hindrance and electronic effect. This study emphasizes the importance of cationic group on HOR activity of alkaline anion exchange membrane fuel cells.« less

  16. Closed type alkaline storage battery

    SciTech Connect

    Hayama, H.

    1980-06-10

    The alkaline storage battery employs a metallic hat shaped terminal closure which has a piercing needle as well as a puncturable metallic diaphragm positioned below the piercing needle. The needle is fixed by caulking at its peripheral edge portion to a edge of the closure. A comparatively thick and hard metal plate is placed on the inner surface of the diaphragm and is applied to an open portion of a tubular metallic container which has a battery element. A peripheral edge portion of the closure, the diaphragm and the metallic plate are clamped in airtight relationship through a packing between the caulked end portion and an inner annular step portion of the metallic container of the battery. A lead wire extends from one polarity electrode of the battery element and is connected to a central portion of the metallic plate.

  17. Cation affinity numbers of Lewis bases.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Christoph; Tandon, Raman; Maryasin, Boris; Larionov, Evgeny; Zipse, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Using selected theoretical methods the affinity of a large range of Lewis bases towards model cations has been quantified. The range of model cations includes the methyl cation as the smallest carbon-centered electrophile, the benzhydryl and trityl cations as models for electrophilic substrates encountered in Lewis base-catalyzed synthetic procedures, and the acetyl cation as a substrate model for acyl-transfer reactions. Affinities towards these cationic electrophiles are complemented by data for Lewis-base addition to Michael acceptors as prototypical neutral electrophiles.

  18. Ethylene Inhibits Root Elongation during Alkaline Stress through AUXIN1 and Associated Changes in Auxin Accumulation1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Xu, Heng-Hao; Liu, Wen-Cheng; Zhang, Xiao-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Soil alkalinity causes major reductions in yield and quality of crops worldwide. The plant root is the first organ sensing soil alkalinity, which results in shorter primary roots. However, the mechanism underlying alkaline stress-mediated inhibition of root elongation remains to be further elucidated. Here, we report that alkaline conditions inhibit primary root elongation of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings by reducing cell division potential in the meristem zones and that ethylene signaling affects this process. The ethylene perception antagonist silver (Ag+) alleviated the inhibition of root elongation by alkaline stress. Moreover, the ethylene signaling mutants ethylene response1-3 (etr1-3), ethylene insensitive2 (ein2), and ein3-1 showed less reduction in root length under alkaline conditions, indicating a reduced sensitivity to alkalinity. Ethylene biosynthesis also was found to play a role in alkaline stress-mediated root inhibition; the ethylene overproducer1-1 mutant, which overproduces ethylene because of increased stability of 1-AMINOCYCLOPROPANE-1-CARBOXYLIC ACID SYNTHASE5, was hypersensitive to alkaline stress. In addition, the ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor cobalt (Co2+) suppressed alkaline stress-mediated inhibition of root elongation. We further found that alkaline stress caused an increase in auxin levels by promoting expression of auxin biosynthesis-related genes, but the increase in auxin levels was reduced in the roots of the etr1-3 and ein3-1 mutants and in Ag+/Co2+-treated wild-type plants. Additional genetic and physiological data showed that AUXIN1 (AUX1) was involved in alkaline stress-mediated inhibition of root elongation. Taken together, our results reveal that ethylene modulates alkaline stress-mediated inhibition of root growth by increasing auxin accumulation by stimulating the expression of AUX1 and auxin biosynthesis-related genes. PMID:26109425

  19. Evolution of alkaline phosphatases in primates.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, D J; Rogers, C; Harris, H

    1982-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase [orthophosphoric-monoester phosphohydrolase (alkaline optimum), EC 3.1.3.1] in placenta, intestine, liver, kidney, bone, and lung from a variety of primate species has been characterized by quantitative inhibition, thermostability, and immunological studies. Characteristic human placental-type alkaline phosphatase occurs in placentas of great apes (chimpanzee and orangutan) but not in placentas of other primates, including gibbon. It is also present in trace amounts in human lung but not in lung or other tissues of various Old and New World monkeys. However, a distinctive alkaline phosphatase resembling it occurs in substantial amounts in lungs from Old World monkeys but not New World monkeys. It appears that duplication of alkaline phosphatase genes and mutations of genetic elements controlling their tissue expression have occurred relatively recently in mammalian evolution. Images PMID:6950431

  20. Alkaline pH sensor molecules.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Takashi; Maruyama, Ichiro N

    2015-11-01

    Animals can survive only within a narrow pH range. This requires continual monitoring of environmental and body-fluid pH. Although a variety of acidic pH sensor molecules have been reported, alkaline pH sensor function is not well understood. This Review describes neuronal alkaline pH sensors, grouped according to whether they monitor extracellular or intracellular alkaline pH. Extracellular sensors include the receptor-type guanylyl cyclase, the insulin receptor-related receptor, ligand-gated Cl- channels, connexin hemichannels, two-pore-domain K+ channels, and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Intracellular sensors include TRP channels and gap junction channels. Identification of molecular mechanisms underlying alkaline pH sensing is crucial for understanding how animals respond to environmental alkaline pH and how body-fluid pH is maintained within a narrow range.

  1. Formation of electroactive colloids via in situ coprecipitation under electric field: erbium chloride alkaline aqueous pseudocapacitor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kunfeng; Xue, Dongfeng

    2014-09-15

    For the first time, a new ErCl3 alkaline aqueous pseudocapacitor system was demonstrated by designing commercial ErCl3 salt electrode in alkaline aqueous electrolyte, where the materials synthesis and subsequently integrating into practical electrode structures occur at the same spatial and temporal scale. Highly electroactive ErOOH colloids were in-situ crystallized via electric field assisted chemical coprecipitation of ErCl3 in KOH aqueous electrolyte. These electroactive ErOOH colloids absorbed by carbon black and PVDF matrix were highly redox-reactive with higher cation utilization ratio of 86 % and specific capacitance values of 1811F/g, exceeding the one-electron redox theoretical capacitance (Er(3+)↔Er(2+)). We believe that additional two-electron (Er(2+)↔Er) or three-electron (Er(3+)↔Er) reactions can occur in our designed ErCl3 alkaline aqueous pseudocapacitor system. The specific electrode configuration with ErOOH colloids grown among the carbon black/PVDF matrix can create short ion diffusion and electron transfer length to enable the fast and reversible Faradaic reactions. This work shows promising for finding high-performance electrical energy storage systems via designing the colloidal state of electroactive cations with the utilization of in-situ crystallization route.

  2. Alkali Metal Cation Transport and Homeostasis in Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Ariño, Joaquín; Ramos, José; Sychrová, Hana

    2010-01-01

    Summary: The maintenance of appropriate intracellular concentrations of alkali metal cations, principally K+ and Na+, is of utmost importance for living cells, since they determine cell volume, intracellular pH, and potential across the plasma membrane, among other important cellular parameters. Yeasts have developed a number of strategies to adapt to large variations in the concentrations of these cations in the environment, basically by controlling transport processes. Plasma membrane high-affinity K+ transporters allow intracellular accumulation of this cation even when it is scarce in the environment. Exposure to high concentrations of Na+ can be tolerated due to the existence of an Na+, K+-ATPase and an Na+, K+/H+-antiporter, which contribute to the potassium balance as well. Cations can also be sequestered through various antiporters into intracellular organelles, such as the vacuole. Although some uncertainties still persist, the nature of the major structural components responsible for alkali metal cation fluxes across yeast membranes has been defined within the last 20 years. In contrast, the regulatory components and their interactions are, in many cases, still unclear. Conserved signaling pathways (e.g., calcineurin and HOG) are known to participate in the regulation of influx and efflux processes at the plasma membrane level, even though the molecular details are obscure. Similarly, very little is known about the regulation of organellar transport and homeostasis of alkali metal cations. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive and up-to-date vision of the mechanisms responsible for alkali metal cation transport and their regulation in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and to establish, when possible, comparisons with other yeasts and higher plants. PMID:20197501

  3. Cationic Antimicrobial Polymers and Their Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana Maria; de Melo Carrasco, Letícia Dias

    2013-01-01

    Cationic compounds are promising candidates for development of antimicrobial agents. Positive charges attached to surfaces, particles, polymers, peptides or bilayers have been used as antimicrobial agents by themselves or in sophisticated formulations. The main positively charged moieties in these natural or synthetic structures are quaternary ammonium groups, resulting in quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs). The advantage of amphiphilic cationic polymers when compared to small amphiphilic molecules is their enhanced microbicidal activity. Besides, many of these polymeric structures also show low toxicity to human cells; a major requirement for biomedical applications. Determination of the specific elements in polymers, which affect their antimicrobial activity, has been previously difficult due to broad molecular weight distributions and random sequences characteristic of radical polymerization. With the advances in polymerization control, selection of well defined polymers and structures are allowing greater insight into their structure-antimicrobial activity relationship. On the other hand, antimicrobial polymers grafted or self-assembled to inert or non inert vehicles can yield hybrid antimicrobial nanostructures or films, which can act as antimicrobials by themselves or deliver bioactive molecules for a variety of applications, such as wound dressing, photodynamic antimicrobial therapy, food packing and preservation and antifouling applications. PMID:23665898

  4. Heavy metal cations permeate the TRPV6 epithelial cation channel.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Gergely; Danko, Tamas; Bergeron, Marc J; Balazs, Bernadett; Suzuki, Yoshiro; Zsembery, Akos; Hediger, Matthias A

    2011-01-01

    TRPV6 belongs to the vanilloid family of the transient receptor potential channel (TRP) superfamily. This calcium-selective channel is highly expressed in the duodenum and the placenta, being responsible for calcium absorption in the body and fetus. Previous observations have suggested that TRPV6 is not only permeable to calcium but also to other divalent cations in epithelial tissues. In this study, we tested whether TRPV6 is indeed also permeable to cations such as zinc and cadmium. We found that the basal intracellular calcium concentration was higher in HEK293 cells transfected with hTRPV6 than in non-transfected cells, and that this difference almost disappeared in nominally calcium-free solution. Live cell imaging experiments with Fura-2 and NewPort Green DCF showed that overexpression of human TRPV6 increased the permeability for Ca(2+), Ba(2+), Sr(2+), Mn(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), and interestingly also for La(3+) and Gd(3+). These results were confirmed using the patch clamp technique. (45)Ca uptake experiments showed that cadmium, lanthanum and gadolinium were also highly efficient inhibitors of TRPV6-mediated calcium influx at higher micromolar concentrations. Our results suggest that TRPV6 is not only involved in calcium transport but also in the transport of other divalent cations, including heavy metal ions, which may have toxicological implications.

  5. Long-term alkalinity decrease and acidification of estuaries in northwestern Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xinping; Pollack, Jennifer Beseres; McCutcheon, Melissa R; Montagna, Paul A; Ouyang, Zhangxian

    2015-03-17

    More than four decades of alkalinity and pH data (late 1960s to 2010) from coastal bays along the northwestern Gulf of Mexico were analyzed for temporal changes across a climatic gradient of decreasing rainfall and freshwater inflow, from northeast to southwest. The majority (16 out of 27) of these bays (including coastal waters) showed a long-term reduction in alkalinity at a rate of 3.0-21.6 μM yr(-1). Twenty-two bays exhibited pH decreases at a rate of 0.0014-0.0180 yr(-1). In contrast, a northernmost coastal bay exhibited increases in both alkalinity and pH. Overall, the two rates showed a significant positive correlation, indicating that most of these bays, especially those at lower latitudes, have been experiencing long-term acidification. The observed alkalinity decrease may be caused by reduced riverine alkalinity export, a result of precipitation decline under drought conditions, and freshwater diversion for human consumption, as well as calcification in these bays. A decrease in alkalinity inventory and accompanying acidification may have negative impacts on shellfish production in these waters. In addition, subsequent reduction in alkalinity export from these bays to the adjacent coastal ocean may also decrease the buffer capacity of the latter against future acidification.

  6. Halogenated silanes, radicals, and cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liming; He, Yi-Liang

    2008-09-01

    Quantum chemistry study has been carried out on the structure and energetics of halogenated silanes, radicals, and cations (SiHxXy0,+1, X = F, Cl, Br; x + y = 1-4). The geometries are optimized at B3LYP/6-31+G(2df,p) level. The adiabatic ionization energiess (IEas), relative energetics of cations, proton affinities (PAs) of silanes, and the enthalpies of formation are predicted using G3(CC) model chemistry. Non-classical ion complex structures are found for hydrogenated cations and transition states connecting classical and non-classical structures are also located. The most stable cations for silylene and silyl radicals have their classical divalent and trivalent structures, and those for silanes have non-classical structures except for SiH3Br+ and SiH2Br2+. The non-classical structures for halosilane cations imply difficulty in experimentally measurement of the adiabatic ionization energies using photoionization or photoelectron studies. For SiH3X, SiH2X2, and SiHX3, the G3(CC) adiabatic IEas to classical ionic structures closest to their neutrals agree better with the photoelectron spectroscopic measurements. The transition states between classical and non-classical structures also hamper the photoionization determination of the appearance energies for silylene cations from silanes. The G3(CC) results for SiHx0,+1 agree excellently with the photoionization mass spectrometric study, and the results for fluorinated and chlorinated species also agree with the previous theoretical predictions at correlation levels from BAC-MP4 to CCSD(T)/CBS. The predicted enthalpy differences between SiH2Cl+, SiHCl2+, and SiCl3+ are also in accordance with previous kinetics study. The G3(CC) results show large discrepancies to the collision-induced charge transfer and/or dissociation reactions involving SiFx+ and SiClx+ ions, for which the G3(CC) enthalpies of formation are also significantly differed from the previous theoretical predictions, especially on SiFx+ (x = 2-4). The G3

  7. Process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Chia-lin W.

    1994-01-01

    According to its major aspects and broadly stated, the present invention is a process for treating alkaline waste materials, including high level radioactive wastes, for vitrification. The process involves adjusting the pH of the wastes with nitric acid, adding formic acid (or a process stream containing formic acid) to reduce mercury compounds to elemental mercury and MnO{sub 2} to the Mn(II) ion, and mixing with class formers to produce a melter feed. The process minimizes production of hydrogen due to noble metal-catalyzed formic acid decomposition during, treatment, while producing a redox-balanced feed for effective melter operation and a quality glass product. An important feature of the present invention is the use of different acidifying and reducing, agents to treat the wastes. The nitric acid acidifies the wastes to improve yield stress and supplies acid for various reactions; then the formic acid reduces mercury compounds to elemental mercury and MnO{sub 2}) to the Mn(II) ion. When the pH of the waste is lower, reduction of mercury compounds and MnO{sub 2}) is faster and less formic acid is needed, and the production of hydrogen caused by catalytically-active noble metals is decreased.

  8. Contraction/elongation behavior of cation-modified polyacrylonitrile fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwang J.; Caligiuri, Jerusha; Choe, Kiyoug; Shahinpoor, Mohsen

    2003-07-01

    In this paper, the authors present the contraction/elongation behavior of cation-modified Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fibers, which identifies the fibers to be effectively used as biomimetic actuators and artifical muscles. The research was intiated by realizing that the contraction/elongation behavior of PAN is governed by the diffusional processes of ions/solvents interaction. The PAN fibers were suitably annealed, cross-linked and hydrolyzed to become "active". The cation-modified process was performed using KOH, NaOH, and LiOH, respectively, for the boiling and alkaline-soaking mediums. It was found that the PAN fibers, regardless of whether being activated in KOH, NaOH, or LiOH, increased from their initial length after being activated and soaked in distilled water. Lengths then decreased after the fibers were soaked in the bases. Fibers treated with LiOH had the largest increase in length following immersion in distilled water. Fibers soaked in any of the three mediums generally had the same decrease in length following immersion in the alkaline solutions, as also occurred following immersion in HCl. Especially noticeable with the fibers treated with LiOH was that greater displacement in the lengths occurred using the 2 N solutions. It is our general notion that the Osmotic pressure of free ions plays an import role on the properties of PAN. However, the observation that Li+ treated PAN fibers exhibit the largest contraction/expansion capability compared to Na+ or K+ treated PANs, can raise another important issue, i.e. "hydration". Realizing that the Osmotic pressure of electrolyte systems in weakly dependent upon the types of ions, it is highly likely that the "hydration" phenomena of free ions within the PAN network plays a key role on its deformation properties. It should be noted that PAN fibers have the capability of changing their effective longitudinal strain more than 100% and have comparable strength to human muscle.

  9. pH and monovalent cations regulate cytosolic free Ca(2+) in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Naseem, Riffat; Holland, I Barry; Jacq, Annick; Wann, Kenneth T; Campbell, Anthony K

    2008-06-01

    The results here show for the first time that pH and monovalent cations can regulate cytosolic free Ca(2+) in E. coli through Ca(2+) influx and efflux, monitored using aequorin. At pH 7.5 the resting cytosolic free Ca(2+) was 0.2-0.5 microM. In the presence of external Ca(2+) (1 mM) at alkaline pH this rose to 4 microM, being reduced to 0.9 microM at acid pH. Removal of external Ca(2+) caused an immediate decrease in cytosolic free Ca(2+) at 50-100 nM s(-1). Efflux rates were the same at pH 5.5, 7.5 and 9.5. Thus, ChaA, a putative Ca(2+)/H(+)exchanger, appeared not to be a major Ca(2+)-efflux pathway. In the absence of added Na(+), but with 1 mM external Ca(2+), cytosolic free Ca(2+) rose to approximately 10 microM. The addition of Na(+)(half maximum 60 mM) largely blocked this increase and immediately stimulated Ca(2+) efflux. However, this effect was not specific, since K(+) also stimulated efflux. In contrast, an increase in osmotic pressure by addition of sucrose did not significantly stimulate Ca(2+) efflux. The results were consistent with H(+) and monovalent cations competing with Ca(2+) for a non-selective ion influx channel. Ca(2+) entry and efflux in chaA and yrbG knockouts were not significantly different from wild type, confirming that neither ChaA nor YrbG appear to play a major role in regulating cytosolic Ca(2+) in Escherichia coli. The number of Ca(2+) ions calculated to move per cell per second ranged from <1 to 100, depending on conditions. Yet a single eukaryote Ca(2+) channel, conductance 100 pS, should conduct >6 million ions per second. This raises fundamental questions about the nature and regulation of Ca(2+) transport in bacteria, and other small living systems such as mitochondria, requiring a new mathematical approach to describe such ion movements. The results have important significance in the adaptation of E. coli to different ionic environments such as the gut, fresh water and in sea water near sewage effluents.

  10. Cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising lignin

    DOEpatents

    Fenn, David; Bowman, Mark P; Zawacky, Steven R; Van Buskirk, Ellor J; Kamarchik, Peter

    2013-07-30

    A cationic electrodepositable coating composition is disclosed. The present invention in directed to a cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising a lignin-containing cationic salt resin, that comprises (A) the reaction product of: lignin, an amine, and a carbonyl compound; (B) the reaction product of lignin, epichlorohydrin, and an amine; or (C) combinations thereof.

  11. Use of natural mordenite to remove chromium (III) and to neutralize pH of alkaline waste waters.

    PubMed

    Córdova-Rodríguez, Valduvina; Rodríguez-Iznaga, Inocente; Acosta-Chávez, Raquel María; Chávez-Rivas, Fernando; Petranovskii, Vitalii; Pestryakov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    The natural mordenite from Palmarito de Cauto deposit (PZ), Cuba, was studied in this work as an ion exchanger to remove Cr(3+) cations from alkaline aqueous solutions at different pH and chromium concentrations. The mordenite stability under cyclic treatment processes with alkaline solutions and its capacity to decrease the pH of the solutions was also analyzed. It was shown that PZ removes Cr(3+) ions from alkaline solutions, and it happens independently of the starting chromium concentration and the pH of the exchange solution used. This material has an important neutralizing effect on alkaline solutions, expressed in a significant pH decrease from the early stages of the treatments. For solutions with initial pH equal to 11, it decreases to a value of around seven. The stability of this material is not affected significantly after continuous cyclic treatment with NaOH solution, which shows that mordenite, in particular from Palmarito de Cauto deposit, has high stability in alkaline solutions. The results are important as they suggest that natural zeolites may be of interest in treatments of alkaline industrial waste effluents.

  12. Process for extracting technetium from alkaline solutions

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Sachleben, Richard A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

    1995-01-01

    A process for extracting technetium values from an aqueous alkaline solution containing at least one alkali metal hydroxide and at least one alkali metal nitrate, the at least one alkali metal nitrate having a concentration of from about 0.1 to 6 molar. The solution is contacted with a solvent consisting of a crown ether in a diluent for a period of time sufficient to selectively extract the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution. The solvent containing the technetium values is separated from the aqueous alkaline solution and the technetium values are stripped from the solvent.

  13. Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Deborah A.; Holmes, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

  14. Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Deborah A.; Holmes, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

  15. Major Links.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Tona

    1995-01-01

    Provides electronic mail addresses for resources and discussion groups related to the following academic majors: art, biology, business, chemistry, computer science, economics, health sciences, history, literature, math, music, philosophy, political science, psychology, sociology, and theater. (AEF)

  16. Simulation of future stream alkalinity under changing deposition and climate scenarios.

    PubMed

    Welsch, Daniel L; Cosby, B Jack; Hornberger, George M

    2006-08-31

    Models of soil and stream water acidification have typically been applied under scenarios of changing acidic deposition, however, climate change is usually ignored. Soil air CO2 concentrations have potential to increase as climate warms and becomes wetter, thus affecting soil and stream water chemistry by initially increasing stream alkalinity at the expense of reducing base saturation levels on soil exchange sites. We simulate this change by applying a series of physically based coupled models capable of predicting soil air CO2 and stream water chemistry. We predict daily stream water alkalinity for a small catchment in the Virginia Blue Ridge for 60 years into the future given stochastically generated daily climate values. This is done for nine different combinations of climate and deposition. The scenarios for both climate and deposition include a static scenario, a scenario of gradual change, and a scenario of abrupt change. We find that stream water alkalinity continues to decline for all scenarios (average decrease of 14.4 microeq L-1) except where climate is gradually warming and becoming more moist (average increase of 13 microeq L-1). In all other scenarios, base cation removal from catchment soils is responsible for limited alkalinity increase resulting from climate change. This has implications given the extent that acidification models are used to establish policy and legislation concerning deposition and emissions.

  17. The significance of inhibitor-resistant alkaline phosphatase in the cytochemical demonstration of transport adenosine triphosphatase.

    PubMed

    Firth, J A; Marland, B Y

    1975-08-01

    The hydrolysis of disodium p-nitrophenyl phosphate at pH 9.0 by slices of formaldehydee-fixed rat renal cortex was investigated by colorimetric estimation of the nitrophenol liberated. It was found that three types of activity could be identified on the basis of their responses to inhibitors and cations: (a) alkaline phosphatase sensitive to inhibition by L-tetramisole; (b) potassium-dependent phosphatase, probably identifiable with the phosphatase component of sodium-potassium-dependent transport adenosine triphosphatase (?Na-K-ATPase); and (c) alkaline phosphatase insensitive to L-tetramisole. It was found that in the presence of strontium ions, as used in Na-K-ATPase cytochemistry, the activities of the second and third types of enzyme were approximately equal. The implications of these findings for the cytochemical demonstration of Na-K-ATPase are discussed.

  18. Effects of pyrolysis conditions and ion-exchangeable cations on the thermal decomposition of a Victorian low-rank coal

    SciTech Connect

    Sathe, C.; Pang, Y.; Li, C.Z.

    1998-12-31

    A Loy Yang brown coal sample was acid-washed and ion-exchanged with Na and Ca to prepare the H-form, Na-form and Ca-form coal samples. These coal samples were pyrolyzed in a wire-mesh reactor where the extraparticle secondary reactions of the evolved volatiles were minimized. The ion-exchanged coal samples were found to give very different tar yields from those of the raw coal samples. The tar yields from the pyrolysis of the raw and H-form coal samples were observed to be very sensitive to changes in heating rate and the tar yields at 600 C were found to increase much more than the corresponding increases in the total volatile yields as the heating rate was increased from 1 to 1,000 K/s. In contrast, the tar yields from the Ca-form and Na-form coal samples showed little heating rate sensitivity. The heating rate sensitivity of pyrolysis yields is believed to be at least partly related to the presence of carboxyl/carboxylate groups and other bulky substitution groups in the coal as well as the rapid pressure buildup within the particles. Re-exchanging Na in the Na-form coal sample and Ca in the Ca-form coal sample with H confirmed the effects of Na and Ca, but also suggested that the irreversible structural changes taking place during ion-exchange should also be considered to evaluate the effects of ion-exchangeable cations during pyrolysis. The major roles of ion-exchangeable cations during pyrolysis are thought to be associated with the transformation of the alkali and alkaline earth metallic species. Some Ca was volatilized during pyrolysis, even at temperatures as low as 600 C.

  19. Alkaline static feed electrolyzer based oxygen generation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, L. D.; Kovach, A. J.; Fortunato, F. A.; Schubert, F. H.; Grigger, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    In preparation for the future deployment of the Space Station, an R and D program was established to demonstrate integrated operation of an alkaline Water Electrolysis System and a fuel cell as an energy storage device. The program's scope was revised when the Space Station Control Board changed the energy storage baseline for the Space Station. The new scope was aimed at the development of an alkaline Static Feed Electrolyzer for use in an Environmental Control/Life Support System as an oxygen generation system. As a result, the program was divided into two phases. The phase 1 effort was directed at the development of the Static Feed Electrolyzer for application in a Regenerative Fuel Cell System. During this phase, the program emphasized incorporation of the Regenerative Fuel Cell System design requirements into the Static Feed Electrolyzer electrochemical module design and the mechanical components design. The mechanical components included a Pressure Control Assembly, a Water Supply Assembly and a Thermal Control Assembly. These designs were completed through manufacturing drawing during Phase 1. The Phase 2 effort was directed at advancing the Alkaline Static Feed Electrolyzer database for an oxygen generation system. This development was aimed at extending the Static Feed Electrolyzer database in areas which may be encountered from initial fabrication through transportation, storage, launch and eventual Space Station startup. During this Phase, the Program emphasized three major areas: materials evaluation, electrochemical module scaling and performance repeatability and Static Feed Electrolyzer operational definition and characterization.

  20. Difference between Chitosan Hydrogels via Alkaline and Acidic Solvent Systems

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Jingyi; Wang, Zhengke; Hu, Qiaoling

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan (CS) has generated considerable interest for its desirable properties and wide applications. Hydrogel has been proven to be a major and vital form in the applications of CS materials. Among various types of CS hydrogels, physical cross-linked CS hydrogels are popular, because they avoided the potential toxicity and sacrifice of intrinsic properties caused by cross-linking or reinforcements. Alkaline solvent system and acidic solvent system are two important solvent systems for the preparation of physical cross-linked CS hydrogels, and also lay the foundations of CS hydrogel-based materials in many aspects. As members of physical cross-linked CS hydrogels, gel material via alkaline solvent system showed significant differences from that via acidic solvent system, but the reasons behind are still unexplored. In the present work, we studied the difference between CS hydrogel via alkaline system and acidic system, in terms of gelation process, hydrogel structure and mechanical property. In-situ/pseudo in-situ studies were carried out, including fluorescent imaging of gelation process, which provided dynamic visualization. Finally, the reasons behind the differences were explained, accompanied by the discussion about design strategy based on gelation behavior of the two systems. PMID:27786262

  1. Difference between Chitosan Hydrogels via Alkaline and Acidic Solvent Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Jingyi; Wang, Zhengke; Hu, Qiaoling

    2016-10-01

    Chitosan (CS) has generated considerable interest for its desirable properties and wide applications. Hydrogel has been proven to be a major and vital form in the applications of CS materials. Among various types of CS hydrogels, physical cross-linked CS hydrogels are popular, because they avoided the potential toxicity and sacrifice of intrinsic properties caused by cross-linking or reinforcements. Alkaline solvent system and acidic solvent system are two important solvent systems for the preparation of physical cross-linked CS hydrogels, and also lay the foundations of CS hydrogel-based materials in many aspects. As members of physical cross-linked CS hydrogels, gel material via alkaline solvent system showed significant differences from that via acidic solvent system, but the reasons behind are still unexplored. In the present work, we studied the difference between CS hydrogel via alkaline system and acidic system, in terms of gelation process, hydrogel structure and mechanical property. In-situ/pseudo in-situ studies were carried out, including fluorescent imaging of gelation process, which provided dynamic visualization. Finally, the reasons behind the differences were explained, accompanied by the discussion about design strategy based on gelation behavior of the two systems.

  2. Inverse optimization of hydraulic, solute transport, and cation exchange parameters using HP1 and UCODE to simulate cation exchange.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Diederik; Smith, Chris; Šimůnek, Jiří; Smiles, David

    2012-11-01

    Reactive transport modeling is a powerful tool to evaluate systems with complex geochemical relations. However, parameters are not always directly measurable. This study represents one of the first attempts to obtain hydrologic, transport and geochemical parameters from an experimental dataset involving transient unsaturated water flow and solute transport, using an automatic inverse optimization (or calibration) algorithm. The data come from previously published, controlled laboratory experiments on the transport of major cations (Na, K, Mg, Ca) during water absorption into horizontal soil columns that were terminated at different times. Experimental data consisted of the depth profiles of water contents (θ), Cl concentrations, and total aqueous and sorbed concentrations of major cations. The dataset was used to optimize several parameters using the reactive transport model, HP1 and the generic optimization code, UCODE. Although the soil hydraulic and solute transport parameters were also optimized, the study focused mainly on the geochemical parameters because the soil columns were constructed from disturbed soil. The cation exchange capacity and the cation exchange coefficients for two exchange models (Gapon and Rothmund-Kornfeld) were optimized. The results suggest that both calibrated models satisfactorily described the experimental data, although the Rothmund-Kornfeld model fit was slightly better. However, information content and surface response analyses indicated that parameters of the Gapon model are well identifiable, whereas those of the Rothmund-Kornfeld model were strongly correlated. The calibrated geochemical parameters were validated using an independent dataset. In agreement with the identifiability analysis, the Gapon approach was better than the Rothmund-Kornfeld model at calculating the observed concentrations of major cations in the soil solution and on the exchange sites.

  3. Effect of magnesium cations on the activity and stability of β-galactosidases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atyaksheva, L. F.; Pilipenko, O. S.; Poltorak, O. M.; Chukhrai, E. S.

    2007-07-01

    It was shown that the presence of magnesium cations in the reaction mixture increases, approximately twofold, the activity of bacterial Escherichia coli and yeast Kluyveromyces lactis β-galactosidases but does not affect the activity of bovine liver and fungous Penicillium canescens β-galactosidases. The catalytic constants for E. coli and yeast K. lactis β-galactosidases in the presence of 0.01 M and in the absence of Mg2+ cations were determined (490 and 220 s-1 and 59.8 and 37.4 s-1, respectively). It was shown that the Michaelis constants for these two enzymes are higher in the presence of Mg2+ cations, that the thermal stability of E. coli and K. Lactis β-galactosidases is higher in the presence of 0.01 M Mg2+, and that the effective rate constants of thermal inactivation of the enzymes are two-to eightfold lower, depending on conditions, in the presence of Mg2+ cations. The maximum stabilizing effect of magnesium cations was observed at weak alkaline pH values (7.5-8.5).

  4. Removal of K+, Na+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ from saline-alkaline water using the microalga Scenedesmus obliquus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zongli; Ying, Chengqi; Lu, Jianxue; Lai, Qifang; Zhou, Kai; Wang, Hui; Chen, Ling

    2013-11-01

    The capability of Scenedesmus obliquus to remove cations (K+, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+) from saline-alkaline water was investigated at different salinities (0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25) and carbonate alkalinities (0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 mmol/L). K+, Na+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ in saline-alkaline water were efficiently removed by S. obliquus. The maximum removal of the cations (29.37 mg for K+, 185.85 mg for Na+, 23.07 mg for Ca2+, 66.14 mg for Mg2+) occurred at salinity 25. The maximum removal of K+ (2.28 mg), Na+ (6.62 mg), Ca2+ (1.01 mg), and Mg2+ (0.62 mg) occurred at carbonate alkalinities of 25 mmol/L for K+, 35 mmol/L for Na+, 20 mmol/L for Ca2+, and 25 mmol/L for Mg2+, respectively. Under a salinity stress, the concentration of Na+ in S. obliquus increased significantly, while that of K+ decreased significantly. The concentrations of Ca2+ and Mg2+ decreased as well. The ratios of K+/Na+, Ca2+/Na+, and Mg2+/Na+ were significantly lower in all salinity treatments than those of the control. Under alkaline stress, the concentrations of Na+ and K+ in S. obliquus decreased significantly and the ratios of K+/Na+, Ca2+/Na+, and Mg2+/Na+ were significantly higher in all treatments than in the control. Moreover, the concentrations of Ca2+ and Mg2+ in S. obliquus at alkalinities of 5-10 mmol/L were significantly higher than those of the other treatments. The removal of Na+ by S. obliquus mainly occurs through biosorption, and Mg2+ and Ca2+ were removed through both biosorption and bioaccumulation.

  5. Alkaline tolerant dextranase from streptomyces anulatus

    DOEpatents

    Decker, Stephen R.; Adney, William S.; Vinzant, Todd B.; Himmel, Michael E.

    2003-01-01

    A process for production of an alkaline tolerant dextranase enzyme comprises culturing a dextran-producing microorganism Streptomyces anulatus having accession no. ATCC PTA-3866 to produce an alkaline tolerant dextranase, Dex 1 wherein the protein in said enzyme is characterized by a MW of 63.3 kDa and Dex 2 wherein its protein is characterized by a MW of 81.8 kDa.

  6. Technetium recovery from high alkaline solution

    DOEpatents

    Nash, Charles A.

    2016-07-12

    Disclosed are methods for recovering technetium from a highly alkaline solution. The highly alkaline solution can be a liquid waste solution from a nuclear waste processing system. Methods can include combining the solution with a reductant capable of reducing technetium at the high pH of the solution and adding to or forming in the solution an adsorbent capable of adsorbing the precipitated technetium at the high pH of the solution.

  7. Toxicity of alkalinity to Hyalella azteca

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lasier, P.J.; Winger, P.V.; Reinert, R.E.

    1997-01-01

    Toxicity testing and chemical analyses of sediment pore water have been suggested for use in sediment quality assessments and sediment toxicity identification evaluations. However, caution should be exercised in interpreting pore-water chemistry and toxicity due to inherent chemical characteristics and confounding relationships. High concentrations of alkalinity, which are typical of sediment pore waters from many regions, have been shown to be toxic to test animals. A series of tests were conducted to assess the significance of elevated alkalinity concentrations to Hyalella azteca, an amphipod commonly used for sediment and pore-water toxicity testing. Toxicity tests with 14-d old and 7-d old animals were conducted in serial dilutions of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) solutions producing alkalinities ranging between 250 to 2000 mg/L as CaCO3. A sodium chloride (NaCl) toxicity test was also conducted to verify that toxicity was due to bicarbonate and not sodium. Alkalinity was toxic at concentrations frequently encountered in sediment pore water. There was also a significant difference in the toxicity of alkalinity between 14-d old and 7-d old animals. The average 96-h LC50 for alkalinity was 1212 mg/L (as CaCO3) for 14-d old animals and 662 mg/L for the younger animals. Sodium was not toxic at levels present in the NaHCO3 toxicity tests. Alkalinity should be routinely measured in pore-water toxicity tests, and interpretation of toxicity should consider alkalinity concentration and test-organism tolerance.

  8. Alkaline Water and Longevity: A Murine Study

    PubMed Central

    Magro, Massimiliano; Corain, Livio; Ferro, Silvia; Baratella, Davide; Bonaiuto, Emanuela; Terzo, Milo; Corraducci, Vittorino; Salmaso, Luigi; Vianello, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The biological effect of alkaline water consumption is object of controversy. The present paper presents a 3-year survival study on a population of 150 mice, and the data were analyzed with accelerated failure time (AFT) model. Starting from the second year of life, nonparametric survival plots suggest that mice watered with alkaline water showed a better survival than control mice. Interestingly, statistical analysis revealed that alkaline water provides higher longevity in terms of “deceleration aging factor” as it increases the survival functions when compared with control group; namely, animals belonging to the population treated with alkaline water resulted in a longer lifespan. Histological examination of mice kidneys, intestine, heart, liver, and brain revealed that no significant differences emerged among the three groups indicating that no specific pathology resulted correlated with the consumption of alkaline water. These results provide an informative and quantitative summary of survival data as a function of watering with alkaline water of long-lived mouse models. PMID:27340414

  9. Performed surfactant-optimized aqueous alkaline flood

    SciTech Connect

    Thigpen, D.R.; Lawson, J.B.; Nelson, R.C.

    1991-11-26

    This paper describes improvement in a process for recovering oil from an acidic oil reservoir by injecting an aqueous alkaline solution comprising water, sodium chloride, and alkaline material for reacting with the reservoir oil forming a petroleum acid soap to form an in-situ surfactant system. The improvement comprises: selecting a preformed cosurfactant which is soluble in both the aqueous solution and the reservoir oil and has a solubility ratio which is grater than the solubility ratio of the petroleum acid soap where the solubility ratio is the ratio of solubility in the aqueous alkaline solution to the solubility in the reservoir oil; combining with the alkaline solution an amount of the preformed cosurfactant which will result in the in-situ surfacant system having a salinity about equal to a salinity which results in minimal interfacial tension between the oil in the reservoir and the in-situ surfactant system at reservoir temperature, wherein the amount of the preformed cosurfactant is about 0.3 percent by weight in the aqueous alkaline solution; and injecting the cosurfactant-aqueous alkaline solution mixture into the reservoir to displace oil toward a fluid production location.

  10. Major depression.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Susan M; Pagalilauan, Genevieve L; Simpson, Scott A

    2014-09-01

    Major depression is a common, disabling condition seen frequently in primary care practices. Non-psychiatrist ambulatory providers are increasingly responsible for diagnosing, and primarily managing patients suffering from major depressive disorder (MDD). The goal of this review is to help primary care providers to understand the natural history of MDD, identify practical tools for screening, and a thoughtful approach to management. Clinically challenging topics like co-morbid conditions, treatment resistant depression and pharmacotherapy selection with consideration to side effects and medication interactions, are also covered.

  11. Hydrogeochemistry of Lake Turkana, Kenya: Mass balance and mineral reactions in an alkaline lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuretich, Richard F.; Cerling, Thure E.

    1983-06-01

    Lake Turkana, in northwestern Kenya, is a closed-basin, alkaline ( pH = 9.2) lake of moderate salinity ( TDS = 2500 ppm). Principal ions are Na +, HCO -3 and CI -. The lake is essentially polymictic in the northern basin and little compositional variation occurs in surface waters. The Omo River is the principal influent, providing some 80-90% of water input to the lake. Chloride has an apparent accumulation time of about 2500 years after accounting for burial of interstitial water. The bottom sediments are predominantly detrital and fine-grained, yet mineral-water reactions are very important for the geochcmical budget. Ca 2+ is precipitated as calcite; Na + is removed as an exchangeable cation on smectite; Mg 2+ is probably incorporated into a Mg-silicate phase, most likely poorlycrystalline smectite, as it enters the lake water; K + may be used in illite regradation. Cation exchange is a very important process in the mass balance of this lake. Over 40% of incoming Na is removed as an exchangeable cation. After cation exchange and interstitial water burial, Na has a response time of 2650 years, which compares favorably with that of chloride. These processes seem to occur rapidly within the water mass of the lake: other reactions may be important in regulating interstitial water compositions. Several changes occur in the upper 3m of sediment: interstitial-water pH drops to 8.3 and alkalinity increases slightly with depth, SO 2-4 decreases slightly, and amorphous silica saturation is approached. These changes are a response to organic matter oxidation and the dissolution of unstable silicates rather than a reversal of reactions occurring in the lake water. High rates of sedimentation (up to 1 cm per year) may minimize the effects of diffusion between the interstitial waters and the lake water, although burial of interstitial water assumes considerable importance.

  12. Bond-length distributions for ions bonded to oxygen: alkali and alkaline-earth metals

    PubMed Central

    Gagné, Olivier Charles; Hawthorne, Frank Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Bond-length distributions have been examined for 55 configurations of alkali-metal ions and 29 configurations of alkaline-earth-metal ions bonded to oxygen, for 4859 coordination polyhedra and 38 594 bond distances (alkali metals), and for 3038 coordination polyhedra and 24 487 bond distances (alkaline-earth metals). Bond lengths generally show a positively skewed Gaussian distribution that originates from the variation in Born repulsion and Coulomb attraction as a function of interatomic distance. The skewness and kurtosis of these distributions generally decrease with increasing coordination number of the central cation, a result of decreasing Born repulsion with increasing coordination number. We confirm the following minimum coordination numbers: [3]Li+, [3]Na+, [4]K+, [4]Rb+, [6]Cs+, [3]Be2+, [4]Mg2+, [6]Ca2+, [6]Sr2+ and [6]Ba2+, but note that some reported examples are the result of extensive dynamic and/or positional short-range disorder and are not ordered arrangements. Some distributions of bond lengths are distinctly multi-modal. This is commonly due to the occurrence of large numbers of structure refinements of a particular structure type in which a particular cation is always present, leading to an over-representation of a specific range of bond lengths. Outliers in the distributions of mean bond lengths are often associated with anomalous values of atomic displacement of the constituent cations and/or anions. For a sample of [6]Na+, the ratio U eq(Na)/U eq(bonded anions) is partially correlated with 〈[6]Na+—O2−〉 (R 2 = 0.57), suggesting that the mean bond length is correlated with vibrational/displacement characteristics of the constituent ions for a fixed coordination number. Mean bond lengths also show a weak correlation with bond-length distortion from the mean value in general, although some coordination numbers show the widest variation in mean bond length for zero distortion, e.g. Li+ in [4]- and [6]-coordination, Na+ in [4]- and [6

  13. Major and trace element geochemistry of Lake Bogoria and Lake Nakuru, Kenya, during extreme draught

    PubMed Central

    Jirsa, Franz; Gruber, Martin; Stojanovic, Anja; Omondi, Steve Odour; Mader, Dieter; Körner, Wilfried; Schagerl, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The physico-chemical properties of water samples from the two athalassic endorheic lakes Bogoria and Nakuru in Kenya were analysed. Surface water samples were taken between July 2008 and October 2009 in weekly intervals from each lake. The following parameters were determined: pH, salinity, electric conductivity, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), the major cations (FAAS and ICP-OES) and the major anions (IC), as well as certain trace elements (ICP-OES). Samples of superficial sediments were taken in October 2009 and examined using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) for their major and trace element content including rare earth elements (REE). Both lakes are highly alkaline with a dominance of Na > K > Si > Ca in cations and HCO3 > CO3 > Cl > F > SO4 in anions. Both lakes also exhibited high concentrations of Mo, As and fluoride. Due to an extreme draught from March to October 2009, the water level of Lake Nakuru dropped significantly. This created drastic evapoconcentration, with the total salinity rising from about 20‰ up to 63‰. Most parameters (DOC, Na, K, Ca, F, Mo and As) increased with falling water levels. A clear change in the quality of DOC was observed, followed by an almost complete depletion of dissolved Fe from the water phase. In Lake Bogoria the evapoconcentration effects were less pronounced (total salinity changed from about 40‰ to 48‰). The distributions of REE in the superficial sediments of Lake Nakuru and Lake Bogoria are presented here for the first time. The results show a high abundance of the REE and a very distinct Eu depletion of Eu/Eu* = 0.33–0.45. PMID:25843965

  14. Recent developments on IME-alkaline water electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenborre, H.; Baetsle, L. H.; Hebel, W.; Leysen, R.; Nackaerts, H.; Spaepen, G.

    Demonstration on a laboratory scale is reported for the substitution of the conventional asbestos diaphragm in alkaline water electrolysis processes by thin sheets of polyantimonic acid and polysulfone. The membranes investigated withstand concentrated KOH solutions at up to 120 C, and have the necessary ion-conducting and gas-separating properties. It was also found that, by increasing the amount of polyantimonic acid in the membrane, electrolyte concentration can be lowered from 30 percent to 5 percent (by weight) without major effect on the cell voltage.

  15. A binary A(x)B(1-x) ionic alkaline pseudocapacitor system involving manganese, iron, cobalt, and nickel: formation of electroactive colloids via in situ electric field assisted coprecipitation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kunfeng; Yin, Shu; Xue, Dongfeng

    2015-01-21

    A new "combinatorial transition-metal cation pseudocapacitor" was demonstrated by designing combinatorial transition-metal cation pseudocapacitors with binary AxB1-x salt electrodes involving manganese, iron, cobalt, and nickel cations in an alkaline aqueous electrolyte. Binary multi-valence cations were crystallized in the colloidal state through an in situ coprecipitation under an electric field. These electroactive colloids absorbed by carbon black and the PVDF matrix are highly redox-reactive with high specific capacitance values, where the specific electrode configuration can create short ion diffusion paths to enable fast and reversible Faradaic reactions. This work shows huge promise for developing high-performance electrical energy storage systems via designing the colloidal state of electroactive cations. Multiple redox cations in the colloidal state can show high redox activities, making them more suitable for potential application in pseudocapacitor systems.

  16. Major Andre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henisch, B. A.; Henisch, H. K.

    1976-01-01

    If most Revolutionary era people seem two-dimensional their lives simpler to understand than ours, it may be only that history, with the benefit of hindsight, clarifies. Examines a profile of Major John Andre, the British liaison officer in Benedict Arnold's plan to surrender West Point, as both hero and villain to show the complexity of early…

  17. Coupling alkaline pre-extraction with alkaline-oxidative post-treatment of corn stover to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentability

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A two-stage chemical pretreatment of corn stover is investigated comprising an NaOH pre-extraction followed by an alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP) post-treatment. We propose that conventional one-stage AHP pretreatment can be improved using alkaline pre-extraction, which requires significantly less H2O2 and NaOH. To better understand the potential of this approach, this study investigates several components of this process including alkaline pre-extraction, alkaline and alkaline-oxidative post-treatment, fermentation, and the composition of alkali extracts. Results Mild NaOH pre-extraction of corn stover uses less than 0.1 g NaOH per g corn stover at 80°C. The resulting substrates were highly digestible by cellulolytic enzymes at relatively low enzyme loadings and had a strong susceptibility to drying-induced hydrolysis yield losses. Alkaline pre-extraction was highly selective for lignin removal over xylan removal; xylan removal was relatively minimal (~20%). During alkaline pre-extraction, up to 0.10 g of alkali was consumed per g of corn stover. AHP post-treatment at low oxidant loading (25 mg H2O2 per g pre-extracted biomass) increased glucose hydrolysis yields by 5%, which approached near-theoretical yields. ELISA screening of alkali pre-extraction liquors and the AHP post-treatment liquors demonstrated that xyloglucan and β-glucans likely remained tightly bound in the biomass whereas the majority of the soluble polymeric xylans were glucurono (arabino) xylans and potentially homoxylans. Pectic polysaccharides were depleted in the AHP post-treatment liquor relative to the alkaline pre-extraction liquor. Because the already-low inhibitor content was further decreased in the alkaline pre-extraction, the hydrolysates generated by this two-stage pretreatment were highly fermentable by Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that were metabolically engineered and evolved for xylose fermentation. Conclusions This work demonstrates that this two

  18. Natural vermiculite as an exchanger support for heavy cations in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    da Fonseca, Maria G; de Oliveira, Michelle M; Arakaki, Luiza N H; Espinola, José G P; Airoldi, Claudio

    2005-05-01

    The natural highly charged lamellar silicate vermiculite was investigated as an exchanger matrix in doubly distilled water solution to exchange magnesium inside the lamella with the heavy cations copper, nickel, cobalt, and lead at the solid/liquid interface. The extension of each exchange reaction was dependent on time of reaction, pH, and cation concentration. The maximum time presented the following order Pb2+ < Ni2+ < Cu2+ < Co2+, which corresponds to 12, 24, 48, and 72 h, respectively. The best performance was observed for nickel, as represented by the exchange capacity Nf, which gave values 0.59, 0.76, 0.84, and 0.93 mmol g(-1) for Pb2+ < Co2+ < Cu2+ < Ni2+, respectively. This capacity is dependent on pH interval variation from 1 to 9, being significantly increased in alkaline condition. The isotherm data were adjusted to a modified Langmuir equation and from the data the spontaneous Gibbs free energy was calculated. Linear correlations were obtained through Gibbs free energy or the maximum capacity against the cationic radius plot, with the lowest values for the largest cation lead. An exponential correlation was also observed for the maximum capacity versus enthalpy of hydration plot, indicating a difficulty of the less hydrated cation, lead, in exchanging with magnesium inside the lamellar space, as suggested by the proposed mechanism. The saturated matrices with cations presented a decrease in interlayer distance in comparison with the original vermiculite, which can be related to the hydrated phases, characteristic for each cation, with a lowest value for lead.

  19. [Alkaline phosphatase in Amoeba proteus].

    PubMed

    Sopina, V A

    2005-01-01

    In free-living Amoeba proteus (strain B), 3 phosphatase were found after disc-electrophoresis of 10 microg of protein in PAGE and using 1-naphthyl phosphate as a substrate a pH 9.0. These phosphatases differed in their electrophoretic mobilities - "slow" (1-3 bands), "middle" (one band) and "fast" (one band). In addition to 1-naphthyl phosphate, "slow" phosphatases were able to hydrolyse 2-naphthyl phosphate and p-nitrophenyl phosphate. They were slightly activated by Mg2+, completely inhibited by 3 chelators (EDTA, EGTA and 1,10-phenanthroline), L-cysteine, sodium dodecyl sulfate and Fe2+, Zn2+ and Mn2+ (50 mM), considerably inactivated by orthovanadate, molybdate, phosphatase inhibitor cocktail 1, p-nitrophenyl phosphate, Na2HPO4, DL-dithiothreitol and urea and partly inhibited by H2O2, DL-phenylalanine, 2-mercaptoethanol, phosphatase inhibitor cocktail 2 and Ca2+. Imidazole, L-(+)-tartrate, okadaic acid, NaF and sulfhydryl reagents -p-(hydroxy-mercuri)benzoate and N-ethylmaleimide - had no influence on the activity of "slow" phosphatases. "Middle" and "fast" phosphatases, in contrast to "slow" ones, were not inactivated by 3 chelators. The "middle" phosphatase differed from the "fast" one by smaller resistance to urea, Ca2+, Mn2+, phosphates and H2O2 and greater resistance to dithiothreitol and L-(+)-tartrate. In addition, the "fast" phosphatase was inhibited by L-cysteine but the "middle" one was activated by it. Of 5 tested ions (Mg2+, Cu2+, Mn2+, Ca2+ and Zn2+), only Zn2+ reactivated "slow" phosphatases after their inactivation by EDTA treatment. The reactivation of apoenzyme was only partial (about 35 %). Thus, among phosphatases found in amoebae at pH 9.0, only "slow" ones are Zn-metalloenzymes and may be considered as alkaline phosphatases (EC 3.1.3.1). It still remains uncertain, to which particular phosphatase class "middle" and "fast" phosphatases (pH 9.0) may belong.

  20. The Potential of Soft Soil Improvement Through a Coupled Technique Between Electro Kinetic and Alkaline Activation of Soft Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, G. E.; Ismail, H. B.; Huat, B. K.; Afshin, A.; Azhar, A. T. S.

    2016-07-01

    Soil stabilization techniques have been in development for decades with different rates of success. Alkaline activation of soft soil is one of those techniques that has proved to deliver some of the best shear strength values with minor drawbacks in comparison with conventional soil stabilization methods. However, environmental considerations have not been taken into account, as major mineral glassy phase activators are poisoning alkaline solutions, such as sodium-, potassium-hydroxide, and sodium-, potassium-silicate, which poses serious hazards to man and environment. This paper addresses the ways of discarding the involvement of the aforementioned alkaline solutions in soft soil stabilization by investigating the potential of a coupled electro kinetic alkaline activation technique for soft soil strengthening, through which the provision of alkaline pH is governed by electro kinetic potential. Uncertainties in regard to the dissolution of aluminosilicate as well as the dominance of acidic front are challenges that need to be overcome.

  1. Late Proterozoic and Silurian alkaline plutons within the southeastern New England Avalon zone

    SciTech Connect

    Hermes, O.D. ); Zartman, R.E. )

    1992-07-01

    Distinct pulses of quartz-bearing, alkaline plutonism and volcanism are known to have occurred in the Avalon zone of southeastern New England during the Late Ordovician, Early Silurian, Devonian, and Carboniferous. Zircon separates from the Franklin and Dartmouth plutons demonstrate that two additional, previously unrecognized periods of alkaline magmatism occurred. The Franklin pluton yields an age of 417 {plus minus} 6 Ma (Late Silurian), whereas the Dartmouth pluton is Late Proterozoic (595 {plus minus} 5 Ma) and markedly older than the other plutons of alkaline affinity. The new ages further emphasize the episodic nature and long-term duration of such alkaline igneous events within the southeastern New England Avalon zone. The Dartmouth pluton may represent a post-collisional alkaline granite emplaced in the Late Proterozoic, almost immediately after a major period of calcalkaline igneous activity that accompanied plate convergence and continental accretion. The abrupt change from orogenic calcalkaline igneous activity to post-collisional alkaline granite, followed by younger episodes of anorogenic emplacement, is remarkably similar to igneous events reported from pan-African mobile belts widespread throughout Africa. In addition, parts of the Dartmouth pluton exhibit features indicative of mixing and commingling of felsic and mafic melts that are associated with coevally formed mylonitic fabrics. Because these fabrics are conformable to those in adjacent gneisses, but discordant with Alleghanian fabrics in the nearby Carboniferous Narragansett basin, they represent some of the best candidates for pre-Alleghanian structures thus far identified in the southeastern New England Avalon zone.

  2. Simultaneous determination of 24 or more acidic and alkaline phytohormones in femtomole quantities of plant tissues by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shichang; Chen, Weiqi; Qu, Long; Gai, Ying; Jiang, Xiangning

    2013-02-01

    Phytohormones act at relatively low concentrations as major regulatory factors of plant growth and development, and cross talk of phytohormones is currently of great interest throughout the plant science community. To meet this demand, a method that is capable of simultaneously analyzing diverse plant hormones is essential. This paper introduces a high-performance liquid chromatographic separation technique coupled with sensitive and selective ion trap mass spectrometry to simultaneously determine 24 or more acidic and alkaline phytohormones, including auxin, cis- and trans-abscisic acid, 11 cytokinins, and 10 gibberellins, in a single injection of sample. A binary solid-phase extraction using Oasis MCX cartridges for cations and Oasis MAX cartridges for anions was used to prepurify more than 24 acidic and alkaline phytohormones from a single plant extract. The method showed good linearity for all 24 phytohormones with R(2) values ranging from 0.9903 to 0.9997. Limits of detection for most of the phytohormones were in the femtomole range with some extending into the sub-femtomole range. This method was applied to hundreds of plant samples comprising different tissues from various plants, including herbaceous, woody climbing, and woody plants to demonstrate feasibility and to validate the methodology.

  3. Cu Vacancies Boost Cation Exchange Reactions in Copper Selenide Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated cation exchange reactions in copper selenide nanocrystals using two different divalent ions as guest cations (Zn2+ and Cd2+) and comparing the reactivity of close to stoichiometric (that is, Cu2Se) nanocrystals with that of nonstoichiometric (Cu2–xSe) nanocrystals, to gain insights into the mechanism of cation exchange at the nanoscale. We have found that the presence of a large density of copper vacancies significantly accelerated the exchange process at room temperature and corroborated vacancy diffusion as one of the main drivers in these reactions. Partially exchanged samples exhibited Janus-like heterostructures made of immiscible domains sharing epitaxial interfaces. No alloy or core–shell structures were observed. The role of phosphines, like tri-n-octylphosphine, in these reactions, is multifaceted: besides acting as selective solvating ligands for Cu+ ions exiting the nanoparticles during exchange, they also enable anion diffusion, by extracting an appreciable amount of selenium to the solution phase, which may further promote the exchange process. In reactions run at a higher temperature (150 °C), copper vacancies were quickly eliminated from the nanocrystals and major differences in Cu stoichiometries, as well as in reactivities, between the initial Cu2Se and Cu2–xSe samples were rapidly smoothed out. These experiments indicate that cation exchange, under the specific conditions of this work, is more efficient at room temperature than at higher temperature. PMID:26140622

  4. Cu Vacancies Boost Cation Exchange Reactions in Copper Selenide Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Lesnyak, Vladimir; Brescia, Rosaria; Messina, Gabriele C; Manna, Liberato

    2015-07-29

    We have investigated cation exchange reactions in copper selenide nanocrystals using two different divalent ions as guest cations (Zn(2+) and Cd(2+)) and comparing the reactivity of close to stoichiometric (that is, Cu2Se) nanocrystals with that of nonstoichiometric (Cu(2-x)Se) nanocrystals, to gain insights into the mechanism of cation exchange at the nanoscale. We have found that the presence of a large density of copper vacancies significantly accelerated the exchange process at room temperature and corroborated vacancy diffusion as one of the main drivers in these reactions. Partially exchanged samples exhibited Janus-like heterostructures made of immiscible domains sharing epitaxial interfaces. No alloy or core-shell structures were observed. The role of phosphines, like tri-n-octylphosphine, in these reactions, is multifaceted: besides acting as selective solvating ligands for Cu(+) ions exiting the nanoparticles during exchange, they also enable anion diffusion, by extracting an appreciable amount of selenium to the solution phase, which may further promote the exchange process. In reactions run at a higher temperature (150 °C), copper vacancies were quickly eliminated from the nanocrystals and major differences in Cu stoichiometries, as well as in reactivities, between the initial Cu2Se and Cu(2-x)Se samples were rapidly smoothed out. These experiments indicate that cation exchange, under the specific conditions of this work, is more efficient at room temperature than at higher temperature.

  5. ADSORPTION METHOD FOR SEPARATING METAL CATIONS

    DOEpatents

    Khym, J.X.

    1959-03-10

    The chromatographic separation of fission product cations is discussed. By use of this method a mixture of metal cations containing Zr, Cb, Ce, Y, Ba, and Sr may be separated from one another. Mentioned as preferred exchange adsorbents are resins containing free sulfonic acid groups. Various eluants, such as tartaric acid, HCl, and citric acid, used at various acidities, are employed to effect the selective elution and separation of the various fission product cations.

  6. Liquid Crystalline Polymers by Cationic Polymerization,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    cation mechanism of Scholl reaction the Lewis acid and by the benzylic carbocations . Hydride transfer to benzylic carbenium ions leads to methyl groups...reviewed. Examples from ring-opening, carbocationic , and radical-cation poly- merizations and oligomerizations are discussed. Accesion For DrIC TAB3...Examples from ring- opening, carbocationic , and radical-cation polymeri- zations and oligomerizations are discussed. INTRODUCTION This paper will

  7. Phenolic cation exchange resin material for recovery of cesium and strontium

    DOEpatents

    Ebra, Martha A.; Wallace, Richard M.

    1983-01-01

    A phenolic cation exchange resin with a chelating group has been prepared by reacting resorcinol with iminodiacetic acid in the presence of formaldehyde at a molar ratio of about 1:1:6. The material is highly selective for the simultaneous recovery of both cesium and strontium from aqueous alkaline solutions, such as, aqueous alkaline nuclear waste solutions. The organic resins are condensation polymers of resorcinol and formaldehyde with attached chelating groups. The column performance of the resins compares favorably with that of commercially available resins for either cesium or strontium removal. By combining Cs.sup.+ and Sr.sup.2+ removal in the same bed, the resins allow significant reduction of the size and complexity of facilities for processing nuclear waste.

  8. Phenolic cation-exchange resin material for recovery of cesium and strontium. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Ebra, M.A.; Wallace, R.M.

    1982-05-05

    A phenolic cation exchange resin with a chelating group has been prepared by reacting resorcinol with iminodiacetic acid in the presence of formaldehyde at a molar ratio of about 1:1:6. The material is highly selective for the simultaneous recovery of both cesium and strontium from aqueous alkaline solutions, such as, aqueous alkaline nuclear wate solutions. The organic resins are condensation polymers of resorcinol and formaldehyde with attached chelating groups. The column performance of the resins compares favorably with that of commercially available resins for either cesium or strontium removal. By combining Cs/sup +/ and Sr/sup 2 +/ removal in the same bed, the resins allow significant reduction of the size and complexity of facilities for processing nuclear waste.

  9. Poorly selective cation channels in the apical membrane of A6 cells.

    PubMed

    Van Driessche, W; De Smet, P; de Smedt, H

    1994-03-01

    This paper describes a Ca(2+)-blockable, poorly selective cation pathway in the apical membrane of A6 epithelia. This pathway has properties that resemble the cation-selective channels in the toad urinary bladder and frog skin. Transepithelial short circuit currents (Isc) and power density spectra (PDS) of the fluctuations in current were recorded. The basolateral surface of the tissues was exposed to Cl- or SO4(2-) solutions with Na+ as the major cation. Ca(2+)-blockable inward oriented currents and Lorentzian noise were recorded with isotonic (215 mosmol/kg) mucosal Cl- and hypotonic (144 mos-mol/kg serosal SO4(2-) solution with Na+, K+, Rb+ or Cs+ as the major mucosal cation. Experiments with mucosal K+ demonstrated that the cation-selective channel was markedly activated by serosal hypotonicity. Effects of an increased electrical driving force were excluded on the basis of the results obtained with microelectrode experiments and transepithelial voltage clamping. Cell volume expansion induced by isotonic replacements of serosal sucrose by glycerol or urea also activated the cation-selective pathway. Furthermore, the presence of Cl- in the mucosal solution was a prerequisite for a sustained response to hypotonicity or replacements of the organic compounds. Moreover, we found that the cation-selective channels are mainly expressed in the cells during the early period of epithelial growth.

  10. Correlation between pH dependence of O2 evolution and sensitivity of Mn cations in the oxygen-evolving complex to exogenous reductants.

    PubMed

    Semin, Boris K; Davletshina, Lira N; Rubin, Andrei B

    2015-08-01

    Effects of pH, Ca(2+), and Cl(-) ions on the extraction of Mn cations from oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) in Ca-depleted photosystem II (PSII(-Ca)) by exogenous reductants hydroquinone (H2Q) and H2O2 were studied. Two of 4 Mn cations are released by H2Q and H2O2 at pHs 5.7, 6.5, and 7.5, and their extraction does not depend on the presence of Ca(2+) and Cl(-) ions. One of Mn cations ("resistant" Mn cation) cannot be extracted by H2Q and H2O2 at any pH. Extraction of 4th Mn ion ("flexible" Mn cation) is sensitive to pH, Ca(2+), and Cl(-). This Mn cation is released by reductants at pH 6.5 but not at pHs 5.7 and 7.5. A pH dependence curve of the oxygen-evolving activity in PSII(-Ca) membranes (in the presence of exogenous Ca(2+)) has a bell-shaped form with the maximum at pH 6.5. Thus, the increase in the resistance of flexible Mn cation in OEC to the action of reductants at acidic and alkaline pHs coincides with the decrease in oxygen evolution activity at these pHs. Exogenous Ca(2+) protects the extraction of flexible Mn cation at pH 6.5. High concentration of Cl(-) anions (100 mM) shifts the pH optimum of oxygen evolution to alkaline region (around pH 7.5), while the pH of flexible Mn extraction is also shifted to alkaline pH. This result suggests that flexible Mn cation plays a key role in the water-splitting reaction. The obtained results also demonstrate that only one Mn cation in Mn4 cluster is under strong control of calcium. The change in the flexible Mn cation resistance to exogenous reductants in the presence of Ca(2+) suggests that Ca(2+) can control the redox potential of this cation.

  11. Purification and characterization of alkaline phosphatase from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Mori, S; Okamoto, M; Nishibori, M; Ichimura, M; Sakiyama, J; Endo, H

    1999-06-01

    Soluble alkaline phosphatase from the thermophilic bacterium Bacillus stearothermophilus was purified by a combination of chromatographic methods, and its properties were examined. The purified enzyme had specific activity of 4.43 micromol p-nitrophenol/min per mg of protein and seemed to be a single band on SDS/PAGE with a molecular mass of 32 kDa. Its apparent Km for p-nitrophenyl phosphate was 1.114 mM. The enzyme exhibited an optimal pH of approx. 9.0 and exhibited its highest activity at 60-70 degrees C. It also showed a bivalent cation requirement for activity, with maximal enhancement in the presence of Mg2+. In addition, significant thermal stability was observed in comparison with counterparts from mesophiles. Its partial N-terminal sequence was T1FSIVAFDPATGELGIAVQ19 as estimated by automated Edman degradation method. A search on the SwissProt database did not reveal any similar protein sequences from other sources.

  12. Critical factors in the design of cost-effective alkaline flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, P.B.; Peru, D.A.

    1991-02-01

    A review of major alkaline flooding projects highlights the recognized fact that alkali consumption and scale formation are serious deterrents when strong alkalis are used. The review also confirms that there are several mechanisms of oil mobilization besides reducing interfacial tension. Even oils of low acid number may be amenable to alkaline flooding. Moreover, alkalis in a lower pH range - which have minimal reaction with reservoir minerals - can often mobilize oil, especially when enhanced with a low concentration of surfactant. However, the future of alkaline flooding depends critically on improved reservoir analysis, which includes factors that have often been neglected: (1) thorough mineralogical analysis; (2) evaluation of ion-exchange properties; and (3) assessment of carbon dioxide content. An evaluation of high-pH alkaline flooding field tests over the past 60 years shows that the majority of tests did not produce encouraging results. Laboratory and limited field experience with lower pH alkalis suggests that they may be more feasible in selected cases. Alkaline flooding should be rejected if there is as much as 1% gypsum in the rock or as much as 1 mol % CO{sub 2} in the fluid. Otherwise, a flood at moderate pH (around 10) can be considered for low-kaolinite reservoirs. For low-montmorillonite reservoirs with less than 5 meq divalent exchange ions per kg of rock, a very low pH (around 8.5) may be effective when enhanced with surfactant. 55 refs., 3 tabs.

  13. Intermediate range order in alkaline borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crupi, C.; Carini, G.; Ruello, G.; D'Angelo, G.

    2016-03-01

    We describe the neutron diffraction patterns of a series of alkaline borate glasses at different metal oxide content. Strong differences are observed in the intermediate range order as a function of the specific alkaline ion and of its concentration. On these results, we propose that the first sharp diffraction peak arises from correlations of atoms of voids and show that the compositional variation of this peak intensity in alkaline borate glasses is due to changes in the distribution of void sizes within the three-dimensional network. We argue that our interpretation in terms of interstitial (empty and/or filled) voids, having different sizes, provides a general explanation for all anomalous behaviours revealed for the first sharp diffraction peak.

  14. Cation-Coupled Bicarbonate Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Aalkjaer, Christian; Boedtkjer, Ebbe; Choi, Inyeong; Lee, Soojung

    2016-01-01

    Cation-coupled HCO3− transport was initially identified in the mid-1970s when pioneering studies showed that acid extrusion from cells is stimulated by CO2/HCO3− and associated with Na+ and Cl− movement. The first Na+-coupled bicarbonate transporter (NCBT) was expression-cloned in the late 1990s. There are currently five mammalian NCBTs in the SLC4-family: the electrogenic Na,HCO3-cotransporters NBCe1 and NBCe2 (SLC4A4 and SLC4A5 gene products); the electroneutral Na,HCO3-cotransporter NBCn1 (SLC4A7 gene product); the Na+-driven Cl,HCO3-exchanger NDCBE (SLC4A8 gene product); and NBCn2/NCBE (SLC4A10 gene product), which has been characterized as an electroneutral Na,HCO3-cotransporter or a Na+-driven Cl,HCO3-exchanger. Despite the similarity in amino acid sequence and predicted structure among the NCBTs of the SLC4-family, they exhibit distinct differences in ion dependency, transport function, pharmacological properties, and interactions with other proteins. In epithelia, NCBTs are involved in transcellular movement of acid-base equivalents and intracellular pH control. In nonepithelial tissues, NCBTs contribute to intracellular pH regulation; and hence, they are crucial for diverse tissue functions including neuronal discharge, sensory neuron development, performance of the heart, and vascular tone regulation. The function and expression levels of the NCBTs are generally sensitive to intracellular and systemic pH. Animal models have revealed pathophysiological roles of the transporters in disease states including metabolic acidosis, hypertension, visual defects, and epileptic seizures. Studies are being conducted to understand the physiological consequences of genetic polymorphisms in the SLC4-members, which are associated with cancer, hypertension, and drug addiction. Here, we describe the current knowledge regarding the function, structure, and regulation of the mammalian cation-coupled HCO3− transporters of the SLC4-family. PMID:25428855

  15. Cation-coupled bicarbonate transporters.

    PubMed

    Aalkjaer, Christian; Boedtkjer, Ebbe; Choi, Inyeong; Lee, Soojung

    2014-10-01

    Cation-coupled HCO3(-) transport was initially identified in the mid-1970s when pioneering studies showed that acid extrusion from cells is stimulated by CO2/HCO3(-) and associated with Na(+) and Cl(-) movement. The first Na(+)-coupled bicarbonate transporter (NCBT) was expression-cloned in the late 1990s. There are currently five mammalian NCBTs in the SLC4-family: the electrogenic Na,HCO3-cotransporters NBCe1 and NBCe2 (SLC4A4 and SLC4A5 gene products); the electroneutral Na,HCO3-cotransporter NBCn1 (SLC4A7 gene product); the Na(+)-driven Cl,HCO3-exchanger NDCBE (SLC4A8 gene product); and NBCn2/NCBE (SLC4A10 gene product), which has been characterized as an electroneutral Na,HCO3-cotransporter or a Na(+)-driven Cl,HCO3-exchanger. Despite the similarity in amino acid sequence and predicted structure among the NCBTs of the SLC4-family, they exhibit distinct differences in ion dependency, transport function, pharmacological properties, and interactions with other proteins. In epithelia, NCBTs are involved in transcellular movement of acid-base equivalents and intracellular pH control. In nonepithelial tissues, NCBTs contribute to intracellular pH regulation; and hence, they are crucial for diverse tissue functions including neuronal discharge, sensory neuron development, performance of the heart, and vascular tone regulation. The function and expression levels of the NCBTs are generally sensitive to intracellular and systemic pH. Animal models have revealed pathophysiological roles of the transporters in disease states including metabolic acidosis, hypertension, visual defects, and epileptic seizures. Studies are being conducted to understand the physiological consequences of genetic polymorphisms in the SLC4-members, which are associated with cancer, hypertension, and drug addiction. Here, we describe the current knowledge regarding the function, structure, and regulation of the mammalian cation-coupled HCO3(-) transporters of the SLC4-family.

  16. Atomic hydrogen in. gamma. -irradiated hydroxides of alkaline-earth elements

    SciTech Connect

    Spitsyn, V.I.; Yurik, T.K.; Barsova, L.I.

    1982-04-01

    Atomic hydrogen is an important intermediate product formed in the radiolysis of compounds containing X-H bonds. H atoms have been detected in irradiated matrices of H/sub 2/ and inert gases at 4/sup 0/K, in irradiated ice and frozen solutions of acids in irradiated salts and in other systems. Here results are presented from a study of the ESR spectra of H atoms generated in polycrystalline hydroxides of alkaline-earth elements that have been ..gamma..-irradiated at 77/sup 0/K, after preliminary treatment at various temperatures. For the first time stabilization of atomic hydrogen in ..gamma..-irradiated polycrystalline alkaline-earth element hydroxides has been detected. Depending on the degree of dehydroxylation, several types of hydrogen atoms may be stabilized in the hydroxides, these hydrogen atoms having different radiospectroscopic parameters. In the magnesium-calcium-strontium-barium hydroxide series, a regular decrease has been found in the hfi constants for H atoms with the cations in the immediate surroundings. A direct proportionality has been found between the parameters ..delta..A/A/sub 0/ and the polarizability of the cation.

  17. Tungstate-ferrates of some alkali and alkaline-earth metals

    SciTech Connect

    Gruba, A.I.; Danileiko, L.A.; Moroz, Ya.A.; Zyats, M.N.

    1988-02-01

    Tungstate-ferrates of some alkali and alkaline-earth metals with the ratio Fe:W = 2:11, the iron ions in which are found in two types of coordination, tetrahedral and octahedral, were synthesized. The similarity of the IR spectra of the compounds obtained and known compounds with the anion structure of the Keggin type with the composition M/sub X/(XZW/sub 11/O/sub 40/H/sub m/) x nH/sub 2/O indicates that their heteropolyanions are isostructural. The thermal stability of the compounds studied and the structure of the products of thermolysis depend on the charge and radius of the extrasphere cation. When the ratio of the radii of the extrasphere cation of the alkali or alkaline-earth metal to the radius of the ion of the central 3d element, appearing in the coordination sphere of the heteropolytungstates, exceeds 1.6, the most likely products of thermolysis of heteropolycompounds are the compounds of the pyrochlore family and tungsten bronzes.

  18. Syrtis Major

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 1 May 2002) The Science This image is from the region of Syrtis Major, which is dominated by a low-relief shield volcano. This area is believed to be an area of vigorous aeolian activity with strong winds in the east-west direction. The effects of these winds are observed as relatively bright streaks across the image, extending from topographic features such as craters. The brighter surface material probably indicates a smaller relative particle size in these areas, as finer particles have a higher albedo. The bright streaks seen off of craters are believed to have formed during dust storms. A raised crater rim can cause a reduction in the wind velocity directly behind it, which results in finer particles being preferentially deposited in this location. In the top half of the image, there is a large bright streak that crosses the entire image. There is no obvious topographic obstacle, therefore it is unclear whether it was formed in the same manner as described above. This image is located northwest of Nili Patera, a large caldera in Syrtis Major. Different flows from the caldera eruptions can be recognized as raised ridges, representing the edge of a flow lobe. The Story In the 17th century, Holland was in its Golden Age, a time of cultural greatness and immense political and economic influence in the world. In that time, lived a inquisitive person named Christian Huygens. As a boy, he loved to draw and to figure out problems in mathematics. As a man, he used these talents to make the first detailed drawings of the Martian surface - - only 50 years or so after Galileo first turned his telescope on Mars. Mars suddenly became something other than a small red dot in the sky. One of the drawings Huygens made was of a dark marking on the red planet's surface named Syrtis Major. Almost 350 years later, here we are with an orbiter that can show us this place in detail. Exploration lives! It's great we can study this area up close. In earlier periods of history

  19. Synthesis and characterization of a novel potato starch derivative with cationic acetylcholine groups.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bing; Ni, Boli; Lü, Shaoyu; Cui, Dapeng; Liu, Mingzhu; Gong, Honghong; Han, Fei

    2012-04-01

    A novel substance, cationic acetylcholine potato starch (CAPS), was developed for the first time. The synthesis process had three steps: first, carboxymethyl potato starch (CMPS) was synthesized under sodium hydroxide alkaline condition and in isopropyl alcohol organic media; second, bromocholine chloride (BCC) was synthesized with sulphuric acid as a catalytic agent; finally, CAPS was synthesized by the reaction of CMPS with BCC in N,N'-dimethylformamide (DMF). The degree of substitution (DS) of CAPS was determined by ammonia gas-sensing electrode and elemental analysis. CAPS was characterized by Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) and near infrared (FTNIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC).

  20. Preparation and flocculation properties of cationic starch/chitosan crosslinking-copolymer.

    PubMed

    You, Lijun; Lu, Feifei; Li, Dan; Qiao, Zhongming; Yin, Yeping

    2009-12-15

    A novel flocculant (CATCS) based on corn starch and chitosan was prepared and its flocculation behaviors were studied. The synthesis conditions of CATCS were discussed and the production obtained was characterized using Fourier infrared spectra and scanning electron microscopy. Flocculation properties of the products were evaluated in terms of transmittance, removal of organic contaminant and solid suspending substances. Influences of temperature, pH and flocculant dosage on flocculation efficiency of CATCS were examined. CATCS had better flocculation performance at lower temperature for the wastewater investigated. CATCS showed better flocculation performance than cationic starch and chitosan in 5 g/L kaolin suspension trended to performance well in acidic and alkaline solution. The comparison of the flocculation performance between CATCS, Fe2(SO4)3 and polyacrylamide showed CATCS had much efficient flocculation performance. In addition, cationic starch was prepared from corn starch using microwave-assisted method.

  1. Method for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations, medium for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations

    DOEpatents

    Wasserman, Stephen R.; Anderson, Kenneth B.; Song, Kang; Yuchs, Steven E.; Marshall, Christopher L.

    1998-01-01

    A method for encapsulating hazardous cations is provided comprising supplying a pretreated substrate containing the cations; contacting the substrate with an organo-silane compound to form a coating on the substrate; and allowing the coating to cure. A medium for containing hazardous cations is also provided, comprising a substrate having ion-exchange capacity and a silane-containing coating on the substrate.

  2. Laser direct write of planar alkaline microbatteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, C. B.; Kim, H.; Piqué, A.

    We are developing a laser engineering approach to fabricate and optimize alkaline microbatteries in planar geometries. The laser direct-write technique enables multicapability for adding, removing and processing material and provides the ability to pattern complicated structures needed for fabricating complete microbattery assemblies. In this paper, we demonstrate the production of planar zinc-silver oxide alkaline cells under ambient conditions. The microbattery cells exhibit 1.55-V open-circuit potentials, as expected for the battery chemistry, and show a flat discharge behavior under constant-current loads. High capacities of over 450 μAhcm-2 are obtained for 5-mm2 microbatteries.

  3. Alkaline earth filled nickel skutterudite antimonide thermoelectrics

    DOEpatents

    Singh, David Joseph

    2013-07-16

    A thermoelectric material including a body centered cubic filled skutterudite having the formula A.sub.xFe.sub.yNi.sub.zSb.sub.12, where A is an alkaline earth element, x is no more than approximately 1.0, and the sum of y and z is approximately equal to 4.0. The alkaline earth element includes guest atoms selected from the group consisting of Be, Mb, Ca, Sr, Ba, Ra and combinations thereof. The filled skutterudite is shown to have properties suitable for a wide variety of thermoelectric applications.

  4. Alkaline Capacitors Based on Nitride Nanoparticles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldissi, Matt

    2003-01-01

    High-energy-density alkaline electrochemical capacitors based on electrodes made of transition-metal nitride nanoparticles are undergoing development. Transition- metal nitrides (in particular, Fe3N and TiN) offer a desirable combination of high electrical conductivity and electrochemical stability in aqueous alkaline electrolytes like KOH. The high energy densities of these capacitors are attributable mainly to their high capacitance densities, which, in turn, are attributable mainly to the large specific surface areas of the electrode nanoparticles. Capacitors of this type could be useful as energy-storage components in such diverse equipment as digital communication systems, implanted medical devices, computers, portable consumer electronic devices, and electric vehicles.

  5. Syrtis Major

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 6 June 2002) The Science This image, located near the equator and 288W (72E), is near the southern edge of a low, broad volcanic feature called Syrtis Major. A close look at this image reveals a wrinkly texture that indicates a very rough surface that is associated with the lava flows that cover this region. On a larger scale, there are numerous bright streaks that trail topographic features such as craters. These bright streaks are in the wind shadows of the craters where dust that settles onto the surface is not as easily scoured away. It is important to note that these streaks are only bright in a relative sense to the surrounding image. Syrtis Major is one of the darkest regions on Mars and it is as dark as fresh basalt flows or dunes are on Earth. The Story Cool! It almost looks as if nature has 'painted' comets on the surface of Mars, using craters as comet cores and dust as streaky tails. Of course, that's just an illusion. As in many areas of Mars, the wind is behind the creation of such fantastic landforms. The natural phenomenon seen here gives this particular surface of Mars a very dynamic, fast-moving, almost luminous 'cosmic personality.' The bright, powdery-looking streaks of dust are in the 'wind shadows' of craters, where dust that settles onto the surface is not as easily scoured away. That's because the wind moves across the land in a particular direction, and a raised surface like the rim of a crater 'protects' dust from being completely blown away on the other side. The raised landforms basically act as a buffer. From the streaks seen above, you can tell the wind was blowing in a northeast to southwest direction. Why are the streaks so bright? Because they contrast with the really dark underlying terrain in this volcanic area of Mars. Syrtis Major is one of the darkest regions on Mars because it is made of basalt. Basalt is typically dark gray or black, and forms when a certain type of molten lava cools. The meaning of the word basalt

  6. Advancements in Anion Exchange Membrane Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Sturgeon, Matthew R.; Long, Hai; Park, Andrew M.; Pivovar, Bryan S.

    2015-10-15

    Anion-exchange membrane fuel cells (AME-FCs) are of increasingly popular interest as they enable the use of non-Pt fuel cell catalysts, the primary cost limitation of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Benzyltrimethyl ammonium (BTMA) is the standard cation that has historically been utilized as the hydroxide conductor in AEMs. Herein we approach AEMs from two directions. First and foremost we study the stability of several different cations in a hydroxide solution at elevated temperatures. We specifically targeted BTMA and methoxy and nitro substituted BTMA. We've also studied the effects of adding an akyl spacer units between the ammonium cation and the phenyl group. In the second approach we use computational studies to predict stable ammonium cations, which are then synthesized and tested for stability. Our unique method to study cation stability in caustic conditions at elevated temperatures utilizes Teflon Parr reactors suitable for use under various temperatures and cation concentrations. NMR analysis was used to determine remaining cation concentrations at specific time points with GCMS analysis verifying product distribution. We then compare the experimental results with calculated modeling stabilities. Our studies show that the electron donating methoxy groups slightly increase stability (compared to that of BTMA), while the electron withdrawing nitro groups greatly decrease stability in base. These results give insight into possible linking strategies to be employed when tethering a BTMA like ammonium cation to a polymeric backbone; thus synthesizing an anion exchange membrane.

  7. Cation exchange capacity of pine bark substrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cation exchange capacity (CEC) is an important soil and substrate chemical property. It describes a substrate's ability to retain cation nutrients. Higher CEC values for a substrate generally result in greater amounts of nutrients retained in the substrate and available for plant uptake, and great...

  8. Tripodal Receptors for Cation and Anion Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Kuswandi, Bambang; Nuriman; Verboom, Willem; Reinhoudt, David N.

    2006-01-01

    This review discusses different types of artificial tripodal receptors for the selective recognition and sensing of cations and anions. Examples on the relationship between structure and selectivity towards cations and anions are described. Furthermore, their applications as potentiometric ion sensing are emphasised, along with their potential applications in optical sensors or optodes.

  9. Similar cation exchange capacities among bryophyte species refute a presumed mechanism of peatland acidification.

    PubMed

    Soudzilovskaia, N A; Cornelissen, J H C; During, H J; van Logtestijn, R S P; Lang, S I; Aerts, R

    2010-09-01

    Fen-bog succession is accompanied by strong increases of carbon accumulation rates. We tested the prevailing hypothesis that living Sphagna have extraordinarily high cation exchange capacity (CEC) and therefore acidify their environment by exchanging tissue-bound protons for basic cations in soil water. As Sphagnum invasion in a peatland usually coincides with succession from a brown moss-dominated alkaline fen to an acidic bog, the CEC of Sphagna is widely believed to play an important role in this acidification process. However, Sphagnum CEC has never been compared explicitly to that of a wide range of other bryophyte taxa. Whether high CEC directly leads to the ability to acidify the environment in situ also remains to be tested. We screened 20 predominant subarctic bryophyte species, including fen brown mosses and bog Sphagna for CEC, in situ soil water acidification capacity (AC), and peat acid neutralizing capacity (ANC). All these bryophyte species possessed substantial CEC, which was remarkably similar for brown mosses and Sphagna. This refutes the commonly accepted idea of living Sphagnum CEC being responsible for peatland acidification, as Sphagnum's ecological predecessors, brown mosses, can do the same job. Sphagnum AC was several times higher than that of other bryophytes, suggesting that CE (cation exchange) sites of Sphagna in situ are not saturated with basic cations, probably due to the virtual absence of these cations in the bog water. Together, these results suggest that Sphagna can not realize their CEC in bogs, while fen mosses can do so in fens. The fen peat ANC was 65% higher than bog ANC, indicating that acidity released by brown mosses in the CE process was neutralized, maintaining an alkaline environment. We propose two successional pathways indicating boundaries for a fen-bog shift with respect to bryophyte CEC. In neither of them is Sphagnum CE an important factor. We conclude that living Sphagnum CEC does not play any considerable role

  10. Structural and energetic study of cation-π-cation interactions in proteins.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Silvana; Soteras, Ignacio; Gelpí, Josep Lluis; Dehez, François; Chipot, Christophe; Luque, F Javier; Curutchet, Carles

    2017-04-12

    Cation-π interactions of aromatic rings and positively charged groups are among the most important interactions in structural biology. The role and energetic characteristics of these interactions are well established. However, the occurrence of cation-π-cation interactions is an unexpected motif, which raises intriguing questions about its functional role in proteins. We present a statistical analysis of the occurrence, composition and geometrical preferences of cation-π-cation interactions identified in a set of non-redundant protein structures taken from the Protein Data Bank. Our results demonstrate that this structural motif is observed at a small, albeit non-negligible frequency in proteins, and suggest a preference to establish cation-π-cation motifs with Trp, followed by Tyr and Phe. Furthermore, we have found that cation-π-cation interactions tend to be highly conserved, which supports their structural or functional role. Finally, we have performed an energetic analysis of a representative subset of cation-π-cation complexes combining quantum-chemical and continuum solvation calculations. Our results point out that the protein environment can strongly screen the cation-cation repulsion, leading to an attractive interaction in 64% of the complexes analyzed. Together with the high degree of conservation observed, these results suggest a potential stabilizing role in the protein fold, as demonstrated recently for a miniature protein (Craven et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2016, 138, 1543). From a computational point of view, the significant contribution of non-additive three-body terms challenges the suitability of standard additive force fields for describing cation-π-cation motifs in molecular simulations.

  11. The Alkaline Diet: Is There Evidence That an Alkaline pH Diet Benefits Health?

    PubMed Central

    Schwalfenberg, Gerry K.

    2012-01-01

    This review looks at the role of an alkaline diet in health. Pubmed was searched looking for articles on pH, potential renal acid loads, bone health, muscle, growth hormone, back pain, vitamin D and chemotherapy. Many books written in the lay literature on the alkaline diet were also reviewed and evaluated in light of the published medical literature. There may be some value in considering an alkaline diet in reducing morbidity and mortality from chronic diseases and further studies are warranted in this area of medicine. PMID:22013455

  12. The alkaline diet: is there evidence that an alkaline pH diet benefits health?

    PubMed

    Schwalfenberg, Gerry K

    2012-01-01

    This review looks at the role of an alkaline diet in health. Pubmed was searched looking for articles on pH, potential renal acid loads, bone health, muscle, growth hormone, back pain, vitamin D and chemotherapy. Many books written in the lay literature on the alkaline diet were also reviewed and evaluated in light of the published medical literature. There may be some value in considering an alkaline diet in reducing morbidity and mortality from chronic diseases and further studies are warranted in this area of medicine.

  13. S. Typhimurium strategies to resist killing by cationic antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Matamouros, Susana; Miller, Samuel I

    2015-11-01

    S. Typhimurium is a broad host range Gram-negative pathogen that must evade killing by host innate immune systems to colonize, replicate, cause disease, and be transmitted to other hosts. A major pathogenic strategy of Salmonellae is entrance, survival, and replication within eukaryotic cell phagocytic vacuoles. These phagocytic vacuoles and gastrointestinal mucosal surfaces contain multiple cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) which control invading bacteria. S. Typhimurium possesses several key mechanisms to resist killing by CAMPs which involve sensing CAMPs and membrane damage to activate signaling cascades that result in remodeling of the bacterial envelope to reduce its overall negative charge with an increase in hydrophobicity to decrease binding and effectiveness of CAMPs. Moreover Salmonellae have additional mechanisms to resist killing by CAMPs including an outer membrane protease which targets cationic peptides at the surface, and specific efflux pumps which protect the inner membrane from damage. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Bacterial Resistance to Antimicrobial Peptides.

  14. Simulation of Stream Water Alkalinity Under Scenarios of Changing Acidic Deposition and Changing Climate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsch, D. L.; Cosby, B.; Hornberger, G. M.

    2003-12-01

    Models of soil and stream water and catchment acidification have typically been applied without consideration of climate change. Soil air CO2 concentrations have potential to increase as climate warms and becomes wetter. We simulate this increase by applying a coupled series of models which simulate soil temperature, soil tension, catchment hydrology, soil air CO2 concentrations, and soil and stream water chemistry to predict daily stream water alkalinity values for a small catchment in the Blue Ridge of Virginia for 60 years into the future given stochastically generated daily climate values. This is done for four different scenarios of climate change and atmospheric deposition change. We find that stream water alkalinity continues to decline for all scenarios except when climate is gradually warming and becoming more moist, indicating the influence of increasing soil air CO2 concentrations on stream water chemistry. In all other scenarios, base cation removal from catchment soils is responsible for limited alkalinity change resulting from climate change. This has strong implications given the extent that models such as MAGIC are used to establish policy and legislation concerning deposition and emissions.

  15. Rapid alkaline methylene blue supravital staining for assessment of anterior segment infections

    PubMed Central

    Kiuchi, Katsuji

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To present the Löffler’s alkaline methylene blue technique of staining eye discharges in eyes with anterior segment infections. Method The Löffler’s alkaline methylene blue staining method is a simple staining technique that can be used to differentiate bacterial, viral, and fungal infections. It is a cationic dye that stains cells blue because the positively charged dye is attracted to negatively charged particles such as polyphosphates, DNAs, and RNAs. Specimens collected from patients by swabbing are smeared onto microscope slides and the methylene blue solution is dropped on the slide. The slide is covered with a glass cover slip and examined under a microscope. The entire time from the collection to the viewing is about 30 seconds. Results Histopathological images of the conjunctival epithelial cells and neutrophils in eye discharges were dyed blue and the nuclei were stained more intensely blue. Bacterial infections consisted mainly of neutrophils, and viral infections consisted mainly of lymphocytes. Conclusions Löffler’s alkaline methylene blue staining can be done in about 30 seconds for diagnosis. Even though this is a one color stain, it is possible to infer the cause of the infection by detection of the absence of bacteria and/or fungi in context of the differential distribution of neutrophils and lymphocytes. PMID:27784986

  16. Deposition of 18-MEA onto alkaline-color-treated weathered hair to form a persistent hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Tanamachi, Hiroto; Inoue, Shigeto; Tanji, Noriyuki; Tsujimura, Hisashi; Oguri, Masashi; Ishita, Mio; Tokunaga, Shinichi; Sazanami, Fumiko

    2009-01-01

    A technology for the deposition of a persistent hydrophobicity to alkaline-color-treated weathered hair surfaces using 18-MEA (18-methyleicosanoic acid) is presented. Two approaches were examined in order to make 18-MEA bind tightly to the alkaline-color-treated weathered hair surface. One was to apply 18-MEA as an acid form and the other was to apply 18-MEA as a salt or complex. It was found that the combination of 18-MEA with specific cationic surfactants [stearoxypropyldimethylamine (SPDA) and docosyldimethylamine (DSDA)] makes the alkaline-color-treated weathered hair surface hydrophobic and that its hydrophobicity is maintained even after shampooing. Characterization of adsorbed layers of 18-MEA/SPDA on a mica surface, as a possible hydrophilic surface model, was performed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AR-XPS). The results revealed that 18-MEA/SPDA formed a layer with high wear resistance, with an alkyl chain, the hydrophobic moiety, oriented at an angle of around 25 degrees to the air interface.

  17. Energetics of alkali and alkaline earth ion-exchanged zeolite A

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Hui; Wu, Di; Liu, Kefeng; ...

    2016-06-30

    Alkali and alkaline earth ion-exchanged zeolite A samples were synthesized in aqueous exchange media. They were thoroughly studied by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microprobe (EMPA), thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC), and high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry. The hydration energetics and enthalpies of formation of these zeolite A materials from constituent oxides were determined. Specifically, the hydration level of zeolite A has a linear dependence on the average ionic potential (Z/r) of the cation, from 0.894 (Rb-A) to 1.317 per TO2 (Mg-A). The formation enthalpies from oxides (25 °C) range from –93.71 ± 1.77 (K-A) to –48.02more » ± 1.85 kJ/mol per TO2 (Li-A) for hydrated alkali ion-exchanged zeolite A, and from –47.99 ± 1.20 (Ba-A) to –26.41 ± 1.71 kJ/mol per TO2 (Mg-A) for hydrated alkaline earth ion-exchanged zeolite A. As a result, the formation enthalpy from oxides generally becomes less exothermic as Z/r increases, but a distinct difference in slope is observed between the alkali and the alkaline earth series.« less

  18. Change of pH during excess sludge fermentation under alkaline, acidic and neutral conditions.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yue; Peng, Yongzhen; Liu, Ye; Jin, Baodan; Wang, Bo; Wang, Shuying

    2014-12-01

    The change in pH during excess sludge (ES) fermentation of varying sludge concentrations was investigated in a series of reactors at alkaline, acidic, and neutral pHs. The results showed that the changes were significantly affected by fermentative conditions. Under different conditions, pH exhibited changing profiles. When ES was fermented under alkaline conditions, pH decreased in a range of (10±1). At the beginning of alkaline fermentation, pH dropped significantly, at intervals of 4h, 4h, and 5h with sludge concentrations of 8665.6mg/L, 6498.8mg/L, and 4332.5mg/L, then it would become moderate. However, under acidic conditions, pH increased from 4 to 5. Finally, under neutral conditions pH exhibited a decrease then an increase throughout entire fermentation process. Further study showed short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), ammonia nitrogen and cations contributed to pH change under various fermentation conditions. This study presents a novel strategy based on pH change to predict whether SCFAs reach their stable stage.

  19. Energetics of alkali and alkaline earth ion-exchanged zeolite A

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Hui; Wu, Di; Liu, Kefeng; Guo, Xiaofeng; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2016-06-30

    Alkali and alkaline earth ion-exchanged zeolite A samples were synthesized in aqueous exchange media. They were thoroughly studied by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microprobe (EMPA), thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC), and high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry. The hydration energetics and enthalpies of formation of these zeolite A materials from constituent oxides were determined. Specifically, the hydration level of zeolite A has a linear dependence on the average ionic potential (Z/r) of the cation, from 0.894 (Rb-A) to 1.317 per TO2 (Mg-A). The formation enthalpies from oxides (25 °C) range from –93.71 ± 1.77 (K-A) to –48.02 ± 1.85 kJ/mol per TO2 (Li-A) for hydrated alkali ion-exchanged zeolite A, and from –47.99 ± 1.20 (Ba-A) to –26.41 ± 1.71 kJ/mol per TO2 (Mg-A) for hydrated alkaline earth ion-exchanged zeolite A. As a result, the formation enthalpy from oxides generally becomes less exothermic as Z/r increases, but a distinct difference in slope is observed between the alkali and the alkaline earth series.

  20. Ref2, a regulatory subunit of the yeast protein phosphatase 1, is a novel component of cation homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ferrer-Dalmau, Jofre; González, Asier; Platara, Maria; Navarrete, Clara; Martínez, José L; Barreto, Lina; Ramos, José; Ariño, Joaquín; Casamayor, Antonio

    2010-02-24

    Maintenance of cation homoeostasis is a key process for any living organism. Specific mutations in Glc7, the essential catalytic subunit of yeast protein phosphatase 1, result in salt and alkaline pH sensitivity, suggesting a role for this protein in cation homoeostasis. We screened a collection of Glc7 regulatory subunit mutants for altered tolerance to diverse cations (sodium, lithium and calcium) and alkaline pH. Among 18 candidates, only deletion of REF2 (RNA end formation 2) yielded increased sensitivity to these conditions, as well as to diverse organic toxic cations. The Ref2F374A mutation, which renders it unable to bind Glc7, did not rescue the salt-related phenotypes of the ref2 strain, suggesting that Ref2 function in cation homoeostasis is mediated by Glc7. The ref2 deletion mutant displays a marked decrease in lithium efflux, which can be explained by the inability of these cells to fully induce the Na+-ATPase ENA1 gene. The effect of lack of Ref2 is additive to that of blockage of the calcineurin pathway and might disrupt multiple mechanisms controlling ENA1 expression. ref2 cells display a striking defect in vacuolar morphogenesis, which probably accounts for the increased calcium levels observed under standard growth conditions and the strong calcium sensitivity of this mutant. Remarkably, the evidence collected indicates that the role of Ref2 in cation homoeostasis may be unrelated to its previously identified function in the formation of mRNA via the APT (for associated with Pta1) complex.

  1. Alkaline phosphatase revisited: hydrolysis of alkyl phosphates.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Patrick J; Herschlag, Daniel

    2002-03-05

    Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase (AP) is the prototypical two metal ion catalyst with two divalent zinc ions bound approximately 4 A apart in the active site. Studies spanning half a century have elucidated many structural and mechanistic features of this enzyme, rendering it an attractive model for investigating the potent catalytic power of bimetallic centers. Unfortunately, fundamental mechanistic features have been obscured by limitations with the standard assays. These assays generate concentrations of inorganic phosphate (P(i)) in excess of its inhibition constant (K(i) approximately 1 muM). This tight binding by P(i) has affected the majority of published kinetic constants. Furthermore, binding limits k(cat)/K(m) for reaction of p-nitrophenyl phosphate, the most commonly employed substrate. We describe a sensitive (32)P-based assay for hydrolysis of alkyl phosphates that avoids the complication of product inhibition. We have revisited basic mechanistic features of AP with these alkyl phosphate substrates. The results suggest that the chemical step for phosphorylation of the enzyme limits k(cat)/K(m). The pH-rate profile and additional results suggest that the serine nucleophile is active in its anionic form and has a pK(a) of < or = 5.5 in the free enzyme. An inactivating pK(a) of 8.0 is observed for binding of both substrates and inhibitors, and we suggest that this corresponds to ionization of a zinc-coordinated water molecule. Counter to previous suggestions, inorganic phosphate dianion appears to bind to the highly charged AP active site at least as strongly as the trianion. The dependence of k(cat)/K(m) on the pK(a) of the leaving group follows a Brønsted correlation with a slope of beta(lg) = -0.85 +/- 0.1, differing substantially from the previously reported value of -0.2 obtained from data with a less sensitive assay. This steep leaving group dependence is consistent with a largely dissociative transition state for AP-catalyzed hydrolysis of

  2. Constructing and Screening a Metagenomic Library of a Cold and Alkaline Extreme Environment.

    PubMed

    Glaring, Mikkel A; Vester, Jan K; Stougaard, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Natural cold or alkaline environments are common on Earth. A rare combination of these two extremes is found in the permanently cold (less than 6 °C) and alkaline (pH above 10) ikaite columns in the Ikka Fjord in Southern Greenland. Bioprospecting efforts have established the ikaite columns as a source of bacteria and enzymes adapted to these conditions. They have also highlighted the limitations of cultivation-based methods in this extreme environment and metagenomic approaches may provide access to novel extremophilic enzymes from the uncultured majority of bacteria. Here, we describe the construction and screening of a metagenomic library of the prokaryotic community inhabiting the ikaite columns.

  3. Sequestration of organic cations by acidified hepatic endocytic vesicles and implications for biliary excretion.

    PubMed

    Van Dyke, R W; Faber, E D; Meijer, D K

    1992-04-01

    A number of cationic amine drugs that are taken up by liver and excreted into bile may accumulate in acidified intracellular organelles such as lysosomes and endosomes. These studies were undertaken to assess directly the uptake and accumulation of three types of model organic cationic amines by endocytic vesicles, and the role of vesicle acidification in this process. Uptake of tubocurarine (TC), vecuronium and tributylmethylammonium (TBuMA) by purified rat liver multivesicular bodies (MVB) (prelysosomal endocytic vesicles) was dependent upon MgATP, time and drug concentration. After 60 min, 52 to 81% of MVB cation content was dependent upon vesicle acidification (due to an electrogenic proton pump), but not upon an interior positive vesicle membrane potential. Nineteen to 42% of MVB cation content appeared due to binding to MVB membranes or to internal lipoproteins. Vesicle-to-medium ATP-dependent apparent concentration ratios for these three cations were 3.3 to 51. MVB uptake of these cations resembled uptake of methylamine, a tertiary amine known to distribute across organellar membranes according to pH gradients. By contrast, MVB uptake of the lipophilic quaternary amine methyldeptropine was not dependent upon MgATP or on development of MVB pH or membrane potential gradients. In further studies, TC, vecuronium and TBuMA were rapidly taken up by the isolated perfused rat liver and excreted in bile. Exposure to 250 mciroM primaquin (which partially alkalinized acidic endosomes and lysosomes) reduced accumulation of [3H]vecuronium in a lysosomal fraction by 23%, decreased perfusate disappearance of TC and TBuMA, but not of vecuronium, and decreased biliary appearance of all three cations. These studies suggest that acidified intracellular organelles sequester certain organic cationic drugs, possibly via a drug/proton antiporter, and/or diffusion followed by intravesicular protonation and trapping of tertiary amines. However, attempts at partial displacement of

  4. phoD Alkaline Phosphatase Gene Diversity in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Kertesz, Michael A.; Bünemann, Else K.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatase enzymes are responsible for much of the recycling of organic phosphorus in soils. The PhoD alkaline phosphatase takes part in this process by hydrolyzing a range of organic phosphoesters. We analyzed the taxonomic and environmental distribution of phoD genes using whole-genome and metagenome databases. phoD alkaline phosphatase was found to be spread across 20 bacterial phyla and was ubiquitous in the environment, with the greatest abundance in soil. To study the great diversity of phoD, we developed a new set of primers which targets phoD genes in soil. The primer set was validated by 454 sequencing of six soils collected from two continents with different climates and soil properties and was compared to previously published primers. Up to 685 different phoD operational taxonomic units were found in each soil, which was 7 times higher than with previously published primers. The new primers amplified sequences belonging to 13 phyla, including 71 families. The most prevalent phoD genes identified in these soils were affiliated with the orders Actinomycetales (13 to 35%), Bacillales (1 to 29%), Gloeobacterales (1 to 18%), Rhizobiales (18 to 27%), and Pseudomonadales (0 to 22%). The primers also amplified phoD genes from additional orders, including Burkholderiales, Caulobacterales, Deinococcales, Planctomycetales, and Xanthomonadales, which represented the major differences in phoD composition between samples, highlighting the singularity of each community. Additionally, the phoD bacterial community structure was strongly related to soil pH, which varied between 4.2 and 6.8. These primers reveal the diversity of phoD in soil and represent a valuable tool for the study of phoD alkaline phosphatase in environmental samples. PMID:26253682

  5. Negative Electrode For An Alkaline Cell

    DOEpatents

    Coco, Isabelle; Cocciantelli, Jean-Michel; Villenave, Jean-Jacques

    1998-07-14

    The present invention concerns a negative electrode for an alkaline cell, comprising a current collector supporting a paste containing an electrochemically active material and a binder, characterized in that said binder is a polymer containing hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups, said polymer being selected from an acrylic homopolymer, copolymer and terpolymer, an unsaturated organic acid copolymer and an unsaturated acid anhydride copolymer.

  6. Alkaline electrochemical cells and method of making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyt, H. E.; Pfluger, H. L. (Inventor)

    1970-01-01

    Equilibrated cellulose ether membranes of increased electrolytic conductivity for use as separators in concentrated alkaline electrochemical cells are investigated. The method of making such membranes by equilibration to the degree desired in an aqueous alkali solution mantained at a temperature below about 10 C is described.

  7. Kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of nitrocellulose.

    PubMed

    Christodoulatos, C; Su, T L; Koutsospyros, A

    2001-01-01

    Cellulose nitrate (nitrocellulose) is an explosive solid substance used in large quantities in various formulations of rocket and gun propellants. Safe destruction of nitrocellulose can be achieved by alkaline hydrolysis, which converts it to biodegradable products that can then be treated by conventional biological processes. The kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of munitions-grade nitrocellulose in sodium hydroxide solutions were investigated in completely mixed batch reactors. Experiments were conducted using solutions of alkaline strength ranging from 0.1 to 15% by mass and temperatures in the range of 30 to 90 degrees C. Regression analysis of the kinetic data revealed that alkaline hydrolysis of nitrocellulose is of the order 1.0 and 1.5 with respect to nitrocellulose and hydroxide concentration, respectively. The activation energy of the hydrolysis reaction was found to be 100.9 kJ/mol with a preexponential Arrhenius constant of 4.73 x 10(13). Nitrite and nitrate, in a 3:1 ratio, were the primary nitrogen species present in the posthydrolysis solution. The kinetic information is pertinent to the development and optimization of nitrocellulose chemical-biological treatment systems.

  8. MERCURIC CHLORIDE CAPTURE BY ALKALINE SORBENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of bench-scale mechanistic studies of mercury/sorbent reactions that showed that mercuric chloride (HgC12) is readily adsorbed by alkaline sorbents, which may offers a less expensive alternative to the use of activated carbons. A laboratory-scale, fixed-b...

  9. ISSUES WITH ALKALINE TREATMENT OF SLUDGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation begins with a discussion of the use of lime and other alkaline materials from the very earliest times to the present for killing bacteria, viruses and parasites and for controlling odors in wastewaters and sludge. It answers the question "How did EPA arrive at i...

  10. De Novo Transcriptional Analysis of Alfalfa in Response to Saline-Alkaline Stress

    PubMed Central

    An, Yi-Min; Song, Li-Li; Liu, Ying-Rui; Shu, Yong-Jun; Guo, Chang-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Saline-alkaline stress, caused by high levels of harmful carbonate salts and high soil pH, is a major abiotic stress that affects crop productivity. Alfalfa is a widely cultivated perennial forage legume with some tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses, especially to saline-alkaline stress. To elucidate the mechanism underlying plant saline-alkaline tolerance, we conducted transcriptome analysis of whole alfalfa seedlings treated with saline-alkaline solutions for 0 day (control), 1 day (short-term treatment), and 7 days (long-term treatment) using ion torrent sequencing technology. A transcriptome database dataset of 53,853 unigenes was generated, and 2,286 and 2,233 genes were differentially expressed in the short-term and long-term treatment, respectively. Gene ontology analysis revealed 14 highly enriched pathways and demonstrated the differential response of metabolic pathways between the short-term and long-term treatment. The expression levels of 109 and 96 transcription factors were significantly altered significantly after 1 day and 7 days of treatment, respectively. Specific responses of peroxidase, flavonoids, and the light pathway component indicated that the antioxidant capacity was one of the central mechanisms of saline-alkaline stress tolerance response in alfalfa. Among the 18 differentially expressed genes examined by real time PCR, the expression levels of eight genes, including inositol transporter, DNA binding protein, raffinose synthase, ferritin, aldo/keto reductase, glutathione S-transferase, xyloglucan endotrans glucosylase, and a NAC transcription factor, exhibited different patterns in response to saline and alkaline stress. The expression levels of the NAC transcription factor and glutathione S-transferase were altered significantly under saline stress and saline-alkaline stress; they were upregulated under saline-alkaline stress and downregulated under salt stress. Physiology assays showed an increased concentration of reactive oxygen

  11. Alkaline earth metal catalysts for asymmetric reactions.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shū; Yamashita, Yasuhiro

    2011-01-18

    The group 2 alkaline earth metals calcium (Ca), strontium (Sr), and barium (Ba) are among the most common elements on Earth, abundant in both the sea and the Earth's crust. Although they are familiar in our daily lives, their application to organic synthesis has, so far, been limited. Some particularly useful properties of these elements include (i) low electronegativity, (ii) a stable oxidation state of +2, meaning that they can potentially form two covalent bonds with anions, and (iii) the ability to occupy a variety of coordination sites due to their large ionic radius. Furthermore, the alkaline earth metals, found between the group 1 and group 3 elements, show mild but significant Lewis acidity, which can be harnessed to control coordinative molecules via a Lewis acid-base interaction. Taken together, these characteristics make the metals Ca, Sr, and Ba very promising components of highly functionalized acid-base catalysts. In this Account, we describe the development of chiral alkaline earth metal catalysts for asymmetric carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions. Recently prepared chiral alkaline earth metal complexes have shown high diastereo- and enantioselectivities in fundamental and important chemical transformations. We chose chiral bisoxazoline (Box) derivatives bearing a methylene tether as a ligand for chiral modification. These molecules are very useful because they can covalently coordinate to alkaline earth metals in a bidentate fashion through deprotonation of the tether portion. It was found that chiral calcium-Box complexes could successfully promote catalytic asymmetric 1,4-addition and [3 + 2] cycloaddition reactions with high diastereo- and enantioselectivities. Both the calcium-Box complexes and chiral strontium-bis-sulfonamide and chiral barium-BINOLate complexes could catalyze asymmetric 1,4-addition reactions with high enantioselectivities. Furthermore, we designed a calcium-neutral coordinative ligand complex as a new type of chiral alkaline

  12. Ionized alkaline water: new strategy for management of metabolic acidosis in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Abol-Enein, Hassan; Gheith, Osama A; Barakat, Nashwa; Nour, Eman; Sharaf, Abd-Elhameed

    2009-06-01

    Metabolic acidosis can occur as a result of either the accumulation of endogenous acids or loss of bicarbonate from the gastrointestinal tract or the kidney, which represent common causes of metabolic acidosis. The appropriate treatment of acute metabolic acidosis has been very controversial. Ionized alkaline water was not evaluated in such groups of patients in spite of its safety and reported benefits. So, we aimed to assess its efficacy in the management of metabolic acidosis in animal models. Two models of metabolic acidosis were created in dogs and rats. The first model of renal failure was induced by ligation of both ureters; and the second model was induced by urinary diversion to gut (gastrointestinal bicarbonate loss model). Both models were subjected to ionized alkaline water (orally and by hemodialysis). Dogs with renal failure were assigned to two groups according to the type of dialysate utilized during hemodialysis sessions, the first was utilizing alkaline water and the second was utilizing conventional water. Another two groups of animals with urinary diversion were arranged to receive oral alkaline water and tap water. In renal failure animal models, acid-base parameters improved significantly after hemodialysis with ionized alkaline water compared with the conventional water treated with reverse osmosis (RO). Similar results were observed in urinary diversion models as there was significant improvement of both the partial pressure of carbon dioxide and serum bicarbonate (P = 0.007 and 0.001 respectively) after utilizing alkaline water orally. Alkaline ionized water can be considered as a major safe strategy in the management of metabolic acidosis secondary to renal failure or dialysis or urinary diversion. Human studies are indicated in the near future to confirm this issue in humans.

  13. Selective disulfide bond cleavage in gold(I) cationized polypeptide ions formed via gas-phase ion/ion cation switching.

    PubMed

    Gunawardena, Harsha P; O'Hair, Richard A J; McLuckey, Scott A

    2006-09-01

    Gaseous multiply protonated disulfide-linked peptides have been subjected to reactions with AuCl2(-) ions to explore the possibility of effecting cation switching of Au+ for two protons and to determine whether cationization by Au+ ions affords selective dissociation of disulfide linkages. The incorporation of Au+ into several model disulfide-linked peptides proved to be straightforward. The primary ion/ion reaction channels were proton transfer, which does not lead to Au+ incorporation, and attachment of AuCl2(-) ions to the polypeptide cation, which does incorporate Au+. Fragmentation of the attachment product, the extent of which varied with peptide and charge state, led to losses of one or more molecules of HCl and, to some extent, cleavage of polypeptides at the disulfide linkage into its two constituent chains. Collisional activation of the intact metal-ion-incorporated peptides showed cleavage of the disulfide linkage to be a major, and in some cases exclusive, process. Cations with protons as the only cationizing agents showed only small contributions from cleavage of the disulfide linkage. These results indicate that Au+ incorporation into a disulfide-linked polypeptide ion is a promising way to effect selective dissociation of disulfide bonds. Cation switching via ion/ion reactions is a convenient means for incorporating gold and is attractive because it avoids the requirement of adding metal salts to the analyte solution.

  14. INORGANIC CATIONS IN RAT KIDNEY

    PubMed Central

    Tandler, C. J.; Kierszenbaum, A. L.

    1971-01-01

    For localization of pyroantimonate-precipitable cations, rat kidney was fixed by perfusion with a saturated aqueous solution of potassium pyroantimonate (pH about 9.2, without addition of any conventional fixative). A remarkably good preservation of the tissue and cell morphology was obtained as well as a consistent and reproducible localization of the insoluble antimonate salts of magnesium, calcium, and sodium. All proximal and distal tubules and glomeruli were delimited by massive electron-opaque precipitates localized in the basement membrane and, to a lesser extent, in adjacent connective tissue. In the intraglomerular capillaries the antimonate precipitate was encountered in the basement membranes and also between the foot processes. In addition to a more or less uniform distribution in the cytoplasm and between the microvilli of the brush border, antimonate precipitates were found in all cell nuclei, mainly between the masses of condensed chromatin. The mitochondria usually contained a few large antimonate deposits which probably correspond to the so-called "dense granules" observed after conventional fixations. PMID:4106544

  15. Cationic Bolaamphiphiles for Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Amelia Li Min; Lim, Alisa Xue Ling; Zhu, Yiting; Yang, Yi Yan; Khan, Majad

    2014-05-01

    Advances in medical research have shed light on the genetic cause of many human diseases. Gene therapy is a promising approach which can be used to deliver therapeutic genes to treat genetic diseases at its most fundamental level. In general, nonviral vectors are preferred due to reduced risk of immune response, but they are also commonly associated with low transfection efficiency and high cytotoxicity. In contrast to viral vectors, nonviral vectors do not have a natural mechanism to overcome extra- and intracellular barriers when delivering the therapeutic gene into cell. Hence, its design has been increasingly complex to meet challenges faced in targeting of, penetration of and expression in a specific host cell in achieving more satisfactory transfection efficiency. Flexibility in design of the vector is desirable, to enable a careful and controlled manipulation of its properties and functions. This can be met by the use of bolaamphiphile, a special class of lipid. Unlike conventional lipids, bolaamphiphiles can form asymmetric complexes with the therapeutic gene. The advantage of having an asymmetric complex lies in the different purposes served by the interior and exterior of the complex. More effective gene encapsulation within the interior of the complex can be achieved without triggering greater aggregation of serum proteins with the exterior, potentially overcoming one of the great hurdles faced by conventional single-head cationic lipids. In this review, we will look into the physiochemical considerations as well as the biological aspects of a bolaamphiphile-based gene delivery system.

  16. Crystal structure of alkaline cellulase K: insight into the alkaline adaptation of an industrial enzyme.

    PubMed

    Shirai, T; Ishida, H; Noda, J; Yamane, T; Ozaki, K; Hakamada, Y; Ito, S

    2001-07-27

    The crystal structure of the catalytic domain of alkaline cellulase K was determined at 1.9 A resolution. Because of the most alkaliphilic nature and it's highest activity at pH 9.5, it is used commercially in laundry detergents. An analysis of the structural bases of the alkaliphilic character of the enzyme suggested a mechanism similar to that previously proposed for alkaline proteases, that is, an increase in the number of Arg, His, and Gln residues, and a decrease in Asp and Lys residues. Some ion pairs were formed by the gained Arg residues, which is similar to what has been found in the alkaline proteases. Lys-Asp ion pairs are disfavored and partly replaced with Arg-Asp ion pairs. The alkaline adaptation appeared to be a remodeling of ion pairs so that the charge balance is kept in the high pH range.

  17. Preparation of poly(glycidylmethacrylate-divinylbenzene) weak acid cation exchange stationary phases with succinic anhydride, phthalic anhydride, and maleic anhydride for ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junwei; Wang, Yong; Wu, Shuchao; Zhang, Peimin; Zhu, Yan

    2016-08-01

    In this work, poly(glycidylmethacrylate-divinylbenzene) microspheres were prepared and applied for the preparation of weak acid cation exchange stationary phases. Succinic anhydride, phthalic anhydride, and maleic anhydride were selected as carboxylation reagents to prepare three weak acid cation exchangers by direct chemical derivatization reaction without solvent or catalyst. The diameters and dispersity of the microspheres were characterized by scanning electron microscopy; the amount of accessible epoxy groups and mechanical stability were also measured. The weak acid cation exchangers were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy; the content of carboxyl groups was measured by traditional acid base titration method. The chromatographic properties were characterized and compared by separating alkali, alkaline earth metal ions and ammonium and polar amines. The separation properties enhanced in the order of succinic anhydride, phthalic anhydride, and maleic anhydride modified poly(glycidylmethacrylate-divinylbenzene) cation exchangers.

  18. Sulfate ion (SO4(2-)) release from old and new cation exchange resins used in condensate polishing systems for power plants.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhi-Ping; Tang, Xue-Ying; Yin, Zhao-Hui; Yu, Wei-Wei

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a dynamic cycle test, a static immersion method and a pyrolysis experiment were combined to examine the characteristics of SO4(2-) released from several new and old cation exchange resins used in condensate polishing systems for power plants. The results show that the quantity and velocity of SO4(2-) released from new and old resins tend to balance in a short time during the dynamic cycle experiment. SO4(2-) is released by 1500H (monosphere super gel type cation exchange resins) and 001 × 7 (gel type cation exchange resins) new and old cation exchange resins, the quantity of which increases according to immersion time. In the pyrolysis experiment, the quantity of SO4(2-) released from resins increases and the pH of the pyrolysis solution transforms from alkaline to acidic with an increase in temperature.

  19. Improved Performance of the Alkaline-Side CSEX Process for Cesium Extraction from Alkaline High-Level Waste Obtained by Characterization of the Effect of Surfactant Impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Delmau, L.H.

    1999-11-04

    identify the harmful impurities as undecyl- and dodecylsulfonate. Subsequent tests with purchased sodium dodecylsulfonate confirmed that this surfactant could produce decreased stripping performance of the magnitude equivalent to that observed when using the simulant associated with the worse performance. With the identification of the impurity now settled, it is clear that poor stripping arises from ion-pair species in the solvent comprised of the cesium-extractant complex cation and the alkylsulfonate anion. Because the Gibbs energy of transfer of this anion and the complexation of the cesium cation by the extractant are both so favorable, the stripping of the cesium, nitrate from the solvent is correspondingly unfavorable. Thus, once the cesium associated with nitrate ion in the solvent has been stripped, further stripping of the remaining cesium in the solvent becomes inefficient. A simple remedy is the addition of a lipophilic amine such as trioctylamine to the solvent. This well-known amine extractant, once proposed for reprocessing, remains neutral and essentially inert during extraction of the alkaline waste but converts to the trioctylammonium nitrate salt on scrubbing and stripping. This lipophilic salt remains in the organic phase and allows the final traces of cesium in the solvent to be stripped by supplying the alkylsulfonate impurity in the solvent with equivalent cationic charges. Further results regarding this and other improvements to the solvent system will be described elsewhere.

  20. Aggregation of nucleosomes by divalent cations.

    PubMed Central

    de Frutos, M; Raspaud, E; Leforestier, A; Livolant, F

    2001-01-01

    Conditions of precipitation of nucleosome core particles (NCP) by divalent cations (Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)) have been explored over a large range of nucleosome and cation concentrations. Precipitation of NCP occurs for a threshold of divalent cation concentration, and redissolution is observed for further addition of salt. The phase diagram looks similar to those obtained with DNA and synthetic polyelectrolytes in the presence of multivalent cations, which supports the idea that NCP/NCP interactions are driven by cation condensation. In the phase separation domain the effective charge of the aggregates was determined by measurements of their electrophoretic mobility. Aggregates formed in the presence of divalent cations (Mg(2+)) remain negatively charged over the whole concentration range. They turn positively charged when aggregation is induced by trivalent (spermidine) or tetravalent (spermine) cations. The higher the valency of the counterions, the more significant is the reversal of the effective charge of the aggregates. The sign of the effective charge has no influence on the aspect of the phase diagram. We discuss the possible reasons for this charge reversal in the light of actual theoretical approaches. PMID:11463653

  1. Metal bioavailability and toxicity to fish in low-alkalinity lakes - a critical-review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spry, D.J.; Wiener, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    Fish in low-alkalinity lakes having ph of 6.0-6.5 Or less often have higher body or tissue burdens of mercury, cadmium, and lead than do fish in nearby lakes with higher ph. The greater bioaccumulation of these metals in such waters seems to result partly from the greater aqueous abundances of biologically available forms (ch3hg+, cd2+, and pb2+) at low ph. In addition, the low concentrations of aqueous calcium in low-alkalinity lakes increase the permeability of biological membranes to these metals, which in fish may cause greater uptake from both water and food. Fish exposed to aqueous inorganic aluminum in the laboratory and field accumulate the metal in and on the epithelial cells of the gills; however, there is little accumulation of aluminum in the blood or internal organs. In low-ph water, both sublethal and lethal toxicity of aluminum has been clearly demonstrated in both laboratory and field studies at environmental concentrations. In contrast, recently measured aqueous concentrations of total mercury, methylmercury, cadmium, and lead in low-alkalinity lakes are much lower than the aqueous concentrations known to cause acute or chronic toxicity in fish, although the vast majority of toxicological research has involved waters with much higher ionic strength than that in low-alkalinity lakes. Additional work with fish is needed to better assess (1) the toxicity of aqueous metals in low-alkalinity waters, and (2) the toxicological significance of dietary methylmercury and cadmium.

  2. Growing season net ecosystem CO2 exchange of two desert ecosystems with alkaline soils in Kazakhstan.

    PubMed

    Li, Longhui; Chen, Xi; van der Tol, Christiaan; Luo, Geping; Su, Zhongbo

    2014-01-01

    Central Asia is covered by vast desert ecosystems, and the majority of these ecosystems have alkaline soils. Their contribution to global net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) is of significance simply because of their immense spatial extent. Some of the latest research reported considerable abiotic CO2 absorption by alkaline soil, but the rate of CO2 absorption has been questioned by peer communities. To investigate the issue of carbon cycle in Central Asian desert ecosystems with alkaline soils, we have measured the NEE using eddy covariance (EC) method at two alkaline sites during growing season in Kazakhstan. The diurnal course of mean monthly NEE followed a clear sinusoidal pattern during growing season at both sites. Both sites showed significant net carbon uptake during daytime on sunny days with high photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) but net carbon loss at nighttime and on cloudy and rainy days. NEE has strong dependency on PAR and the response of NEE to precipitation resulted in an initial and significant carbon release to the atmosphere, similar to other ecosystems. These findings indicate that biotic processes dominated the carbon processes, and the contribution of abiotic carbon process to net ecosystem CO2 exchange may be trivial in alkaline soil desert ecosystems over Central Asia.

  3. Cloning and identification of Group 1 mrp operon encoding a novel monovalent cation/proton antiporter system from the moderate halophile Halomonas zhaodongensis.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lin; Hong, Shan; Liu, Henan; Huang, Haipeng; Sun, Hao; Xu, Tong; Jiang, Juquan

    2014-11-01

    The novel species Halomonas zhaodongensis NEAU-ST10-25(T) recently identified by our group is a moderate halophile which can grow at the range of 0-2.5 M NaCl (optimum 0.5 M) and pH 6-12 (optimum pH 9). To explore its halo-alkaline tolerant mechanism, genomic DNA was screened from NEAU-ST10-25(T) in this study for Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiporter genes by selection in Escherichia coli KNabc lacking three major Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiporters. One mrp operon could confer tolerance of E. coli KNabc to 0.8 M NaCl and 100 mM LiCl, and an alkaline pH. This operon was previously mainly designated mrp (also mnh, pha or sha) due to its multiple resistance and pH-related activity. Here, we will also use mrp to designate the homolog from H. zhaodongensis (Hz_mrp). Sequence analysis and protein alignment showed that Hz_mrp should belong to Group 1 mrp operons. Further phylogenetic analysis reveals that Hz_Mrp system should represent a novel sub-class of Group 1 Mrp systems. This was confirmed by a significant difference in pH-dependent activity profile or the specificity and affinity for the transported monovalent cations between Hz_Mrp system and all the known Mrp systems. Therefore, we propose that Hz_Mrp should be categorized as a novel Group 1 Mrp system.

  4. Cation distributions on rapidly solidified cobalt ferrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Guire, Mark R.; Kalonji, Gretchen; O'Handley, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    The cation distributions in two rapidly solidified cobalt ferrites have been determined using Moessbauer spectroscopy at 4.2 K in an 8-T magnetic field. The samples were obtained by gas atomization of a Co0-Fe2O3-P2O5 melt. The degree of cation disorder in both cases was greater than is obtainable by cooling unmelted cobalt ferrite. The more rapidly cooled sample exhibited a smaller departure from the equilibrium cation distribution than did the more slowly cooled sample. This result is explained on the basis of two competing effects of rapid solidification: high cooling rate of the solid, and large undercooling.

  5. Eosinophil granule cationic proteins regulate the classical pathway of complement.

    PubMed Central

    Weiler, J M; Edens, R E; Bell, C S; Gleich, G J

    1995-01-01

    Major basic protein, the primary constituent of eosinophil granules, regulates the alternative and classical pathways of complement. Major basic protein and other eosinophil granule cationic proteins, which are important in mediating tissue damage in allergic disease, regulate the alternative pathway by interfering with C3b interaction with factor B to assemble an alternative pathway C3 convertase. In the present study, eosinophil peroxidase, eosinophil cationic protein and eosinophil-derived neurotoxin, as well as major basic protein, were examined for capacity to regulate the classical pathway. Eosinophil peroxidase, eosinophil cationic protein and major basic protein inhibited formation of cell-bound classical pathway C3 convertase (EAC1,4b,2a), causing 50% inhibition of complement-mediated lysis at about 0.19, 0.75 and 0.5 micrograms/10(7) cellular intermediates, respectively. Eosinophil-derived neurotoxin had no activity on this pathway of complement. The eosinophil granule proteins were examined for activity on the formation of the membrane attack complex. Major basic protein and eosinophil cationic protein had no activity on terminal lysis. In contrast, eosinophil peroxidase inhibited lysis of EAC1,4b,2a,3b,5b, but had only minimal activity on later events in complement lysis. These polycations were then examined to determine the site(s) at which they regulated the early classical pathway. Eosinophil granule polycationic proteins: (1) reduced the Zmax at all time points but had only minimal effect on the Tmax during the formation of the classical pathway C3 convertase (EAC1,4b,2a); (2) inhibited formation of EAC1,4b,2a proportional to C4 but independent of C2 concentration; (3) inhibited fluid phase formation of C1,4b,2a, as reflected by a decrease in C1-induced consumption of C2 over time; and (4) inhibited C1 activity over time without a direct effect on either C4 or C2. These observations suggest that polycations regulate the early classical pathway by

  6. The sulphate-reduction alkalinity pump tested

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, Patrick; Petrishcheva, Elena

    2016-04-01

    Carbonate precipitation has been suggested to be induced by alkalinity increase during sulphate reduction under anoxic conditions. This mechanism may explain the formation of carbonate deposits in shallow marine environments, either within a redox stratified sediment inhabited by phototrophic microbial mats or in shallow water within the photic zone where sulphidic water is upwelling onto the shelf. The alkalinity pump may work as long as the sulphide is not reoxidized to sulphate, a process that would acidify the surrounding. The alkalinity effect of sulphate reduction was recently tested by Aloisi (2008) for microbial mats using a model approach. He found that sulphate reduction does not significantly increase or even decrease carbonate saturation and is unlikely to have played a significant role through Earth history. The model considers many environmental factors, including the effect of carbonate precipitation itself on the carbonate equilbrium and on the alkalinity. We used a modified version of Aloisi's (2008) model to simulate the saturation states of aragonite, calcite and dolomite without the effects of carbonate precipitation. This is necessary to evaluate the effect of microbial metabolisms exclusively on carbonate saturation, since carbonate precipitation is only the consequence, but not the cause of oversaturation. First results show that the saturation state is increased in the zone of phototrophic CO2 uptake. In contrast, the saturation state is strongly decreased in the zone where dissolved oxygen overlaps with dissolved sulphide. Aerobic sulphide oxidation consumes most of the HS- and dissipates most of the alkalinity produced in the sulphate reduction zone below. Hence, our results are consistent with the findings of Aloisi (2008), and they even more clearly show that sulphate reduction does not induce carbonate precipitation nor contributes to carbonate precipitation in combination with phototrophic CO2 uptake. The alkalinity effect of sulphate

  7. [Leucocyte alkaline phosphatase in normal and pathological pregnancy (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Stark, K H; Zaki, I; Sobolewski, K

    1981-01-01

    The activities of leucocyte alkaline phosphatase were determined in 511 patients with normal and pathological pregnancy. Mean values were compared and the enzyme followed up, and the conclusion was drawn that leucocyte alkaline phosphatase was no safe indicator of foetal condition. No direct relationship were found to exist between leucocyte alkaline phosphatase, total oestrogens, HSAP, HLAP, HPL, and oxytocinase.

  8. Identification of differentially expressed genes in flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) under saline-alkaline stress by digital gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ying; Huang, Wengong; Chen, Hongyu; Wu, Guangwen; Yuan, Hongmei; Song, Xixia; Kang, Qinghua; Zhao, Dongsheng; Jiang, Weidong; Liu, Yan; Wu, Jianzhong; Cheng, Lili; Yao, Yubo; Guan, Fengzhi

    2014-10-01

    The salinization and alkalization of soil are widespread environmental problems, and alkaline salt stress is more destructive than neutral salt stress. Therefore, understanding the mechanism of plant tolerance to saline-alkaline stress has become a major challenge. However, little attention has been paid to the mechanism of plant alkaline salt tolerance. In this study, gene expression profiling of flax was analyzed under alkaline-salt stress (AS2), neutral salt stress (NSS) and alkaline stress (AS) by digital gene expression. Three-week-old flax seedlings were placed in 25 mM Na2CO3 (pH11.6) (AS2), 50mM NaCl (NSS) and NaOH (pH11.6) (AS) for 18 h. There were 7736, 1566 and 454 differentially expressed genes in AS2, NSS and AS compared to CK, respectively. The GO category gene enrichment analysis revealed that photosynthesis was particularly affected in AS2, carbohydrate metabolism was particularly affected in NSS, and the response to biotic stimulus was particularly affected in AS. We also analyzed the expression pattern of five categories of genes including transcription factors, signaling transduction proteins, phytohormones, reactive oxygen species proteins and transporters under these three stresses. Some key regulatory gene families involved in abiotic stress, such as WRKY, MAPKKK, ABA, PrxR and ion channels, were differentially expressed. Compared with NSS and AS, AS2 triggered more differentially expressed genes and special pathways, indicating that the mechanism of AS2 was more complex than NSS and AS. To the best of our knowledge, this was the first transcriptome analysis of flax in response to saline-alkaline stress. These data indicate that common and diverse features of saline-alkaline stress provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms of plant saline-alkaline tolerance and offer a number of candidate genes as potential markers of tolerance to saline-alkaline stress.

  9. Cationic ruthenium alkylidene catalysts bearing phosphine ligands.

    PubMed

    Endo, Koji; Grubbs, Robert H

    2016-02-28

    The discovery of highly active catalysts and the success of ionic liquid immobilized systems have accelerated attention to a new class of cationic metathesis catalysts. We herein report the facile syntheses of cationic ruthenium catalysts bearing bulky phosphine ligands. Simple ligand exchange using silver(i) salts of non-coordinating or weakly coordinating anions provided either PPh3 or chelating Ph2P(CH2)nPPh2 (n = 2 or 3) ligated cationic catalysts. The structures of these newly reported catalysts feature unique geometries caused by ligation of the bulky phosphine ligands. Their activities and selectivities in standard metathesis reactions were also investigated. These cationic ruthenium alkylidene catalysts reported here showed moderate activity and very similar stereoselectivity when compared to the second generation ruthenium dichloride catalyst in ring-closing metathesis, cross metathesis, and ring-opening metathesis polymerization assays.

  10. Removal of Microcystis aeruginosa using cationic starch modified soils.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wenqing; Tan, Wanqiao; Wang, Lijing; Pan, Gang

    2016-06-15

    A cheap and biodegradable modifier, cationic starch (CS), was used to turn local soils into effective flocculants for Microcystis aeruginosa (M. aeruginosa) removal. The isoelectric point of soil particles was remarkably increased from pH 0.5 to 11.8 after modification with CS, which made CS modified soil particles positively charged and obtain algal flocculation ability. At the soil concentration of 100 mg/L, when the CS modifier was 10 mg/L, 86% of M. aeruginosa cells were removed within 30 min. Lower or higher CS dosage led to limited algal removal. About 71% and 45% of M. aeruginosa cells were removed within 30 min when CS was 5 mg/L and 80 mg/L, respectively. This is because only part of algal cells combined with CS modified soil particles through charge neutralization at low dosage, while flocs formed at high CS dosage were positively charged which prevents further aggregation among the flocs. The floc stability was quantified by a floc breakage index under applied shear force. Algal flocs formed at acid and alkaline conditions were more prone to be broken than those at the neutral condition. The cost and biodegradability concerns may be largely reduced through the use of CS modified local soils. For field applications, other practical issues (e.g., re-suspension) should be further studied by jointly using other methods.

  11. Cation locations and dislocations in zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Luis James

    The focus of this dissertation is the extra-framework cation sites in a particular structural family of zeolites, chabazite. Cation sites play a particularly important role in the application of these sieves for ion exchange, gas separation, catalysis, and, when the cation is a proton, acid catalysis. Structural characterization is commonly performed through the use of powder diffraction and Rietveld analysis of powder diffraction data. Use of high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance, in the study of the local order of the various constituent nuclei of zeolites, complements well the long-range order information produced by diffraction. Recent developments in solid state NMR techniques allow for increased study of disorder in zeolites particularly when such phenomena test the detection limits of diffraction. These two powerful characterization techniques, powder diffraction and NMR, offer many insights into the complex interaction of cations with the zeolite framework. The acids site locations in SSZ-13, a high silica chabazite, and SAPO-34, a silicoaluminophosphate with the chabazite structure, were determined. The structure of SAPO-34 upon selective hydration was also determined. The insensitivity of X-rays to hydrogen was avoided through deuteration of the acid zeolites and neutron powder diffraction methods. Protons at inequivalent positions were found to have different acid strengths in both SSZ-13 and SAPO-34. Other light elements are incorporated into zeolites in the form of extra-framework cations, among these are lithium, sodium, and calcium. Not amenable by X-ray powder diffraction methods, the positions of such light cations in fully ion-exchanged versions of synthetic chabazite were determined through neutron powder diffraction methods. The study of more complex binary cation systems were conducted. Powder diffraction and solid state NMR methods (MAS, MQMAS) were used to examine cation site preferences and dislocations in these mixed-akali chabazites

  12. Cation-cation clusters in ionic liquids: Cooperative hydrogen bonding overcomes like-charge repulsion.

    PubMed

    Knorr, Anne; Ludwig, Ralf

    2015-12-02

    Direct spectroscopic evidence for H-bonding between like-charged ions is reported for the ionic liquid, 1-(2-hydroxyethyl)-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate. New infrared bands in the OH frequency range appear at low temperatures indicating the formation of H-bonded cation-cation clusters similar to those known for water and alcohols. Supported by DFT calculations, these vibrational bands can be assigned to attractive interaction between the hydroxyl groups of the cations. The repulsive Coulomb interaction is overcome by cooperative hydrogen bonding between ions of like charge. The transition energy from purely cation-anion interacting configurations to those including cation-cation H-bonds is determined to be 3-4 kJmol(-1). The experimental findings and DFT calculations strongly support the concept of anti-electrostatic hydrogen bonds (AEHBs) as recently suggested by Weinhold and Klein. The like-charge configurations are kinetically stabilized with decreasing temperatures.

  13. Surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding field project

    SciTech Connect

    French, T.R.

    1991-10-01

    The Tucker sand of Helper (KS) field is a candidate for surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding. The geology of the Helper site is typical of many DOE Class I reservoirs. The Tucker sand of Helper field was deposited in a fluvial dominated deltaic environment. Helper oil can be mobilized with either chemical system 2 or chemical system 3, as described in this report. Oil fields in the Gulf Coast region are also good candidates for surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding. The results from laboratory tests conducted in Berea sandstone cores with oil brine from Helper (KS) field are encouraging. The crude oil is viscous and non-acidic and, yet, was mobilized by the chemical formulations described in this report. Significant amounts of the oil were mobilized under simulated reservoir conditions. The results in Berea sandstone cores were encouraging and should be verified by tests with field core. Consumption of alkali, measured with field core, was very low. Surfactant loss appeared to be acceptable. Despite the good potential for mobilization of Helper oil, certain reservoir characteristics such as low permeability, compartmentalization, and shallow depth place constraints on applications of any chemical system in the Tucker sand. These constraints are typical of many DOE Class I reservoirs. Although Hepler field is not a perfect reservoir in which to apply surfactant- enhanced alkaline flooding, Hepler oil is particularly amenable to mobilization by surfactant-enhanced alkaline systems. A field test is recommended, dependent upon final evaluation of well logs and cores from the proposed pilot area. 14 refs., 21 figs., 10 tabs.

  14. The alkaline earth intercalates of molybdenum disulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somoano, R. B.; Hadek, V.; Rembaum, A.; Samson, S.; Woollam, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Molybdenum disulfide has been intercalated with calcium and strontium by means of the liquid ammonia technique. Chemical, X-ray, and superconductivity data are presented. The X-ray data reveal a lowering of crystal symmetry and increase of complexity of the structure upon intercalation with the alkaline earth metals. The Ca and Sr intercalates start to superconduct at 4 and 5.6 K, respectively, and show considerable anisotropy regarding the critical magnetic field.

  15. Oxidation catalysts on alkaline earth supports

    DOEpatents

    Mohajeri, Nahid

    2017-03-21

    An oxidation catalyst includes a support including particles of an alkaline earth salt, and first particles including a palladium compound on the support. The oxidation catalyst can also include precious metal group (PMG) metal particles in addition to the first particles intermixed together on the support. A gas permeable polymer that provides a continuous phase can completely encapsulate the particles and the support. The oxidation catalyst may be used as a gas sensor, where the first particles are chemochromic particles.

  16. Inhibition of Alkaline Phosphatase by Several Diuretics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    August 20th, 1979) . . Summary , . Acetazolamide, furosemide, ethacrynic acid and chlorothiazide, diuretics of considerable structural diversity, inhibit...Ki is calculated to be 8.4, 7.0, 2.8 and 0.1 mmol/l for acetazolamide, furosemide, ethacrynic acid and chlorothiazide, respectively. Chlorothiazide...is a much more potent inhibitor of alkaline phos- phatase than the other three diuretics. The combination of ethacrynic acid and cysteine, itself an

  17. Test procedure for cation exchange chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, T.D.

    1994-08-24

    The purpose of this test plan is to demonstrate the synthesis of inorganic antimonate ion exchangers and compare their performance against the standard organic cation exchangers. Of particular interest is the degradation rate of both inorganic and organic cation exchangers. This degradation rate will be tracked by determining the ion exchange capacity and thermal stability as a function of time, radiation dose, and chemical reaction.

  18. Alkaline phosphatase of Physarum polycephalum is insoluble.

    PubMed

    Furuhashi, Kiyoshi

    2008-02-01

    The plasmodia of Physarum polycephalum grow as multinucleated cells in the presence of sufficient humidity and nutriment. Under non-illuminating conditions, stresses such as low temperature or high concentrations of salts transform the plasmodia into spherules whereas dehydration induces sclerotization. Some phosphatases including protein phosphatase and acid phosphatase have been purified from the plasmodia, but alkaline phosphatase remains to be elucidated. Phosphatase of the plasmodia, spherules and sclerotia was visualized by electrophoresis gel-staining assay using 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl phosphate. Insoluble fractions of the sclerotia were abundant in phosphatase activity. The phosphatase which was extracted by nonionic detergent was subjected to column chromatography and preparative electrophoresis. Purified phosphatase showed the highest activity at pH 8.8, indicating that this enzyme belongs to alkaline phosphatase. The apparent molecular mass from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under non-reducing condition was estimated to be 100 kDa whereas that under reducing was 105 kDa. An amount of 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate or 0.5 M NaCl had no effects on the activity although the phosphatase showed heat instability, Mg(2+)-dependency and sensitivity to 2-glycerophosphate or NaF. The extracting conditions and enzymatic properties suggest that this alkaline phosphatase which is in a membrane-bound form plays important roles in phosphate metabolism.

  19. Method for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations, medium for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations

    DOEpatents

    Wasserman, S.R.; Anderson, K.B.; Song, K.; Yuchs, S.E.; Marshall, C.L.

    1998-04-28

    A method for encapsulating hazardous cations is provided comprising supplying a pretreated substrate containing the cations; contacting the substrate with an organo-silane compound to form a coating on the substrate; and allowing the coating to cure. A medium for containing hazardous cations is also provided, comprising a substrate having ion-exchange capacity and a silane-containing coating on the substrate. 3 figs.

  20. Cationized Carbohydrate Gas-Phase Fragmentation Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Bythell, Benjamin J; Abutokaikah, Maha T; Wagoner, Ashley R; Guan, Shanshan; Rabus, Jordan M

    2016-11-28

    We investigate the fragmentation chemistry of cationized carbohydrates using a combination of tandem mass spectrometry, regioselective labeling, and computational methods. Our model system is D-lactose. Barriers to the fundamental glyosidic bond cleavage reactions, neutral loss pathways, and structurally informative cross-ring cleavages are investigated. The most energetically favorable conformations of cationized D-lactose were found to be similar. In agreement with the literature, larger group I cations result in structures with increased cation coordination number which require greater collision energy to dissociate. In contrast with earlier proposals, the B n -Y m fragmentation pathways of both protonated and sodium-cationized analytes proceed via protonation of the glycosidic oxygen with concerted glycosidic bond cleavage. Additionally, for the sodiated congeners our calculations support sodiated 1,6-anhydrogalactose B n ion structures, unlike the preceding literature. This affects the subsequent propensity of formation and prediction of B n /Y m branching ratio. The nature of the anomeric center (α/β) affects the relative energies of these processes, but not the overall ranking. Low-energy cross-ring cleavages are observed for the metal-cationized analytes with a retro-aldol mechanism producing the (0,2) A 2 ion from the sodiated forms. Theory and experiment support the importance of consecutive fragmentation processes, particularly for the protonated congeners at higher collision energies. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  1. Cation-dependent stability of subtilisin.

    PubMed

    Alexander, P A; Ruan, B; Bryan, P N

    2001-09-04

    Subtilisin BPN' contains two cation binding sites. One specifically binds calcium (site A), and the other can bind both divalent and monovalvent metals (site B). By binding at specific sites in the tertiary structure of subtilisin, cations contribute their binding energy to the stability of the native state and increase the activation energy of unfolding. Deconvoluting the influence of binding sites A and B on the inactivation rate of subtilisin is complicated, however. This paper examines the stabilizing effects of cation binding at site B by using a mutant of subtilisin BPN' which lacks calcium site A. Using this mutant, we show that calcium binding at site B has relatively little effect on stability in the presence of moderate concentrations of monovalent cations. At [NaCl] =100 mM, site B is >or=98% occupied with sodium, and therefore its net occupancy with a cation varies little as subtilisin is titrated with calcium. Exchanging sodium for calcium results in a 5-fold decrease in the rate of inactivation. In contrast, because of the high selectivity of site A for calcium, its occupancy changes dramatically as calcium concentration is varied, and consequently the inactivation rate of subtilisin decreases approximately 200-fold as site A becomes saturated with calcium, irrespective of the concentration of monovalent cations.

  2. Cationized Carbohydrate Gas-Phase Fragmentation Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bythell, Benjamin J.; Abutokaikah, Maha T.; Wagoner, Ashley R.; Guan, Shanshan; Rabus, Jordan M.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the fragmentation chemistry of cationized carbohydrates using a combination of tandem mass spectrometry, regioselective labeling, and computational methods. Our model system is D-lactose. Barriers to the fundamental glyosidic bond cleavage reactions, neutral loss pathways, and structurally informative cross-ring cleavages are investigated. The most energetically favorable conformations of cationized D-lactose were found to be similar. In agreement with the literature, larger group I cations result in structures with increased cation coordination number which require greater collision energy to dissociate. In contrast with earlier proposals, the B n -Y m fragmentation pathways of both protonated and sodium-cationized analytes proceed via protonation of the glycosidic oxygen with concerted glycosidic bond cleavage. Additionally, for the sodiated congeners our calculations support sodiated 1,6-anhydrogalactose B n ion structures, unlike the preceding literature. This affects the subsequent propensity of formation and prediction of B n /Y m branching ratio. The nature of the anomeric center (α/β) affects the relative energies of these processes, but not the overall ranking. Low-energy cross-ring cleavages are observed for the metal-cationized analytes with a retro-aldol mechanism producing the 0,2 A 2 ion from the sodiated forms. Theory and experiment support the importance of consecutive fragmentation processes, particularly for the protonated congeners at higher collision energies.

  3. RNA Oligomerization in Laboratory Analogues of Alkaline Hydrothermal Vent Systems.

    PubMed

    Burcar, Bradley T; Barge, Laura M; Trail, Dustin; Watson, E Bruce; Russell, Michael J; McGown, Linda B

    2015-07-01

    Discovering pathways leading to long-chain RNA formation under feasible prebiotic conditions is an essential step toward demonstrating the viability of the RNA World hypothesis. Intensive research efforts have provided evidence of RNA oligomerization by using circular ribonucleotides, imidazole-activated ribonucleotides with montmorillonite catalyst, and ribonucleotides in the presence of lipids. Additionally, mineral surfaces such as borates, apatite, and calcite have been shown to catalyze the formation of small organic compounds from inorganic precursors (Cleaves, 2008 ), pointing to possible geological sites for the origins of life. Indeed, the catalytic properties of these particular minerals provide compelling evidence for alkaline hydrothermal vents as a potential site for the origins of life since, at these vents, large metal-rich chimney structures can form that have been shown to be energetically favorable to diverse forms of life. Here, we test the ability of iron- and sulfur-rich chimneys to support RNA oligomerization reactions using imidazole-activated and non-activated ribonucleotides. The chimneys were synthesized in the laboratory in aqueous "ocean" solutions under conditions consistent with current understanding of early Earth. Effects of elemental composition, pH, inclusion of catalytic montmorillonite clay, doping of chimneys with small organic compounds, and in situ ribonucleotide activation on RNA polymerization were investigated. These experiments, under certain conditions, showed successful dimerization by using unmodified ribonucleotides, with the generation of RNA oligomers up to 4 units in length when imidazole-activated ribonucleotides were used instead. Elemental analysis of the chimney precipitates and the reaction solutions showed that most of the metal cations that were determined were preferentially partitioned into the chimneys.

  4. Cation-chloride cotransporters in neuronal development, plasticity and disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaila, Kai; Price, Theodore J.; Payne, John A.; Puskarjov, Martin; Voipio, Juha

    2015-01-01

    Electrical activity in neurons requires a seamless functional coupling between plasmalemmal ion channels and ion transporters. Although ion channels have been studied intensively for several decades, research on ion transporters is in its infancy. In recent years, it has become evident that one family of ion transporters, cation-chloride cotransporters (CCCs), and in particular K+–Cl− cotransporter 2 (KCC2), have seminal roles in shaping GABAergic signalling and neuronal connectivity. Studying the functions of these transporters may lead to major paradigm shifts in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying brain development and plasticity in health and disease. PMID:25234263

  5. Ion-chromatographic behavior of alkali metal cations and ammonium ion on zirconium-adsorbing silica gel.

    PubMed

    Ohta, K; Morikawa, H; Tanaka, K; Uwamino, Y; Furukawa, M; Sando, M

    2000-07-07

    The preparation and evaluation of zirconium-adsorbing silica gel (Zr-Silica) as an ion-exchange stationary phase in ion chromatography for inorganic anions and cations was carried out. The Zr-Silica was prepared by the reaction of silanol groups on the surface of the silica gel with zirconium butoxide (Zr(OCH2CH2CH2CH3)4) in ethanol. The ion-exchange characteristics of the Zr-Silica were evaluated using 10 mM tartaric acid at pH 2.5 as eluent. The Zr-Silica was found to act as a cation-exchanger under the eluent conditions. The retention behavior of alkali and alkaline earth metal cations was then investigated. The Zr-Silica column was proved to be suitable for the simultaneous separation of alkali metal cations and ammonium ion. Excellent separation of the cations on a 15 cm Zr-Silica column was achieved in 25 min using 10 mM tartaric acid as eluent.

  6. Divalent cation shrinks DNA but inhibits its compaction with trivalent cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tongu, Chika; Kenmotsu, Takahiro; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Zinchenko, Anatoly; Chen, Ning; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2016-05-01

    Our observation reveals the effects of divalent and trivalent cations on the higher-order structure of giant DNA (T4 DNA 166 kbp) by fluorescence microscopy. It was found that divalent cations, Mg(2+) and Ca(2+), inhibit DNA compaction induced by a trivalent cation, spermidine (SPD(3+)). On the other hand, in the absence of SPD(3+), divalent cations cause the shrinkage of DNA. As the control experiment, we have confirmed the minimum effect of monovalent cation, Na(+) on the DNA higher-order structure. We interpret the competition between 2+ and 3+ cations in terms of the change in the translational entropy of the counterions. For the compaction with SPD(3+), we consider the increase in translational entropy due to the ion-exchange of the intrinsic monovalent cations condensing on a highly charged polyelectrolyte, double-stranded DNA, by the 3+ cations. In contrast, the presence of 2+ cation decreases the gain of entropy contribution by the ion-exchange between monovalent and 3+ ions.

  7. [Chemical structure of bioethanol lignin by low-temperature alkaline catalytic hydrothermal treatment].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Huan; Zhang, Ming-Ming; Wang, Ji-Fu; Xu, Yu-Zhi; Wang, Chun-Peng; Chu, Fu-Xiang

    2013-11-01

    In order to improve the reaction activity of bioethanol lignin, we investigated the activation of bioethanol lignin by a hydrothermal treatment method. Catalytic hydrothermal treatment of bioethanol lignin was performed at 180 degrees C for 3 h in the presence of alkaline solutions (NaOH, Na2 CO3, KOH and K2 CO3), the change in bioethanol lignin structures was studied comparatively by FTIR, 1H NMR,GPC and elemental analysis. FTIR spectra showed that after alkali hydrothermal treatment, the band at 1 375 cm(-1) attributed to the phenolic hydroxyl groups increased, and the band intensity at 1 116 cm(-1) attributed to the ether bond decreased. On the other hand, the band at 1 597 and 1 511 cm(-1) attributed to aromatic skeletal vibration remained almost unchanged. 1H NMR spectra showed that after alkali hydrothermal treatment, the number of aromatic methoxyl is increased, and based on the increment of the content of phenolic hydroxyl, the catalytic activity can be ranked as follows: KOH > NaOH > K2 CO3 > Na2 CO3. Especially for KOH, the increment of the content of phenolic hydroxyl was 170%, because the ion radius of potassium cation is bigger than sodium cation, so the potassium cations more easily formed cation adducts with lignin. GPC results showed that the molecular weight of alkali hydrothermal treatment lignin decreased and the molecular distribution got wider. Elemental analysis showed that hydrothermal treatment could break the interlinkage between lignin and protein, which can reduce the protein content and increase the purity of lignin, meanwhile, the content of O and H both decreased,while C fell, indicating that the bioethanol lignin had suffered a decarbonylation reaction. This is the most benefit of the lignin as a substitute for phenol.

  8. Mesozoic mafic alkaline magmatism of southern Scandinavia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tappe, Sebastian

    2004-11-01

    More than 100 volcanic necks in central Scania (southern Sweden) are the product of Jurassic continental rift-related mafic alkaline magmatism at the southwest margin of the Baltic Shield. They are mainly basanites, with rarer melanephelinites. Both rock groups display overlapping primitive Mg-numbers, Cr and Ni contents, steep chondrite-normalized rare earth element patterns (LaN /YbN = 17 27) and an overall enrichment in incompatible elements. However, the melanephelinites are more alkaline and have stronger high field strength element enrichment than the basanites. The existence of distinct primary magmas is also indicated by heterogeneity in highly incompatible element ratios (e.g. Zr/Nb, La/Nb). Trace element modelling indicates that the magmas were generated by comparably low degrees of melting of a heterogeneous mantle source. Such a source can best be explained by a metasomatic overprint of the mantle lithosphere by percolating evolved melts. The former existence of such alkaline trace element-enriched melts can be demonstrated by inversion of the trace element content of green-core clinopyroxenes and anorthoclase which occur as xenocrysts in the melanephelinites and are interpreted as being derived from crystallization of evolved mantle melts. Jurassic magmatic activity in Scania was coeval with the generation of nephelinites in the nearby Egersund Basin (Norwegian North Sea). Both Scanian and North Sea alkaline magmas share similar trace element characteristics. Mantle enrichment processes at the southwest margin of the Baltic Shield and the North Sea Basin generated trace element signatures similar to those of ocean island basalts (e.g. low Zr/Nb and La/Nb) but there are no indications of plume activity during the Mesozoic in this area. On the contrary, the short duration of rifting, absence of extensive lithospheric thinning, and low magma volumes argue against a Mesozoic mantle plume. It seems likely that the metasomatic imprint resulted from the

  9. Alkaline and ultrasound assisted alkaline pretreatment for intensification of delignification process from sustainable raw-material.

    PubMed

    Subhedar, Preeti B; Gogate, Parag R

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline and ultrasound-assisted alkaline pretreatment under mild operating conditions have been investigated for intensification of delignification. The effect of NaOH concentration, biomass loading, temperature, ultrasonic power and duty cycle on the delignification has been studied. Most favorable conditions for only alkaline pretreatment were alkali concentration of 1.75 N, solid loading of 0.8% (w/v), temperature of 353 K and pretreatment time of 6 h and under these conditions, 40.2% delignification was obtained. In case of ultrasound-assisted alkaline approach, most favorable conditions obtained were alkali concentration of 1N, paper loading of 0.5% (w/v), sonication power of 100 W, duty cycle of 80% and pretreatment time of 70 min and the delignification obtained in ultrasound-assisted alkaline approach under these conditions was 80%. The material samples were characterized by FTIR, SEM, XRD and TGA technique. The lignin was recovered from solution by precipitation method and was characterized by FTIR, GPC and TGA technique.

  10. Alkaline solution/binder ratio as a determining factor in the alkaline activation of aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz-Santaquiteria, C.; Fernandez-Jimenez, A.; Palomo, A.

    2012-09-15

    This study investigates the effect of the alkaline solution/binder (S/B) ratio on the composition and nanostructure of the reaction products generated in the alkaline activation of aluminosilicates. The experiments used two mixtures of fly ash and dehydroxylated white clay and for each of these, varying proportions of the solution components. The alkali activator was an 8 M NaOH solution (with and without sodium silicate) used at three S/B ratios: 0.50, 0.75 and 1.25. The {sup 29}Si, {sup 27}Al MAS NMR and XRD characterisation of the reaction products reveal that for ratios nearest the value delivering suitable paste workability, the reaction-product composition and structure depend primarily on the nature and composition of the starting materials and the alkaline activator used. However, when an excess alkaline activator is present in the system, the reaction products tend to exhibit SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratios of approximately 1, irrespective of the composition of the starting binder or the alkaline activator.

  11. Rapid changes in water hardness and alkalinity: Calcite formation is lethal to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Bogart, Sarah J; Woodman, Samuel; Steinkey, Dylan; Meays, Cindy; Pyle, Greg G

    2016-07-15

    There is growing concern that freshwater ecosystems may be negatively affected by ever-increasing anthropogenic inputs of extremely hard, highly alkaline effluent containing large quantities of Ca(2+), Mg(2+), CO3(2-), and HCO3(-) ions. In this study, the toxicity of rapid and extreme shifts in water hardness (38-600mg/L as CaCO3) and alkalinity (30-420mg/L as CaCO3) to Daphnia magna was tested, both independently and in combination. Within these ranges, where no precipitation event occurred, shifts in water hardness and/or alkalinity were not toxic to D. magna. In contrast, 98-100% of D. magna died within 96h after exposure to 600mg/L as CaCO3 water hardness and 420mg/L as CaCO3 alkalinity (LT50 of 60h with a 95% CI of 54.2-66.0h). In this treatment, a CaCO3 (calcite) precipitate formed in the water column which was ingested by and thoroughly coated the D. magna. Calcite collected from a mining impacted stream contained embedded organisms, suggesting field streams may also experience similar conditions and possibly increased mortality as observed in the lab tests. Although further investigation is required to determine the exact fate of aquatic organisms exposed to rapid calcite precipitation in the field, we caution that negative effects may occur more quickly or at lower concentrations of water hardness and alkalinity in which we observed effects in D. magna, because some species, such as aquatic insects, are more sensitive than cladocerans to changes in ionic strength. Our results provide evidence that both calcite precipitation and the major ion balance of waters should be managed in industrially affected ecosystems and we support the development of a hardness+alkalinity guideline for the protection of aquatic life.

  12. l-Glutamate-Dependent Medium Alkalinization by Asparagus Mesophyll Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    McCutcheon, Steve L.; Ciccarelli, Bruce W.; Chung, Induk; Shelp, Barry; Bown, Alan W.

    1988-01-01

    Mechanically isolated Asparagus sprengeri Regel mesophyll cells cause alkalinization of the suspension medium on the addition of l-glutamate or its analog l-methionine-d,l-sulfoximine. Using a radiolabeled pH probe, it was found that both compounds caused internal acidification whereas l-aspartate did not. Fusicoccin stimulated H+ efflux from the cells by 111% and the uptake of l-[U-14C]glutamate by 55%. Manometric experiments demonstrated that, unlike l-methionine-d,l-sulfoximine, l-glutamate stimulated CO2 evolution from nonilluminated cells. Simultaneous measurements of medium alkalinization and 14CO2 evolution upon the addition of labeled l-glutamate showed that alkalinization was immediate and reached a maximum value after 45 minutes whereas 14CO2 evolution exhibited a lag before its appearance and continued in a linear manner for at least 100 minutes. Rates of alkalinization and uptake of l-[U-14C]glutamate were higher in the light while rates of 14CO2 evolution were higher in the dark. The major labeled product of glutamate decarboxylation, γ-aminobutyric acid, was found in the cells and the suspension medium. Its addition to the cell suspension did not result in medium alkalinization and evidence indicates that it is lost from the cell to the medium. The data suggest that the origin of medium alkalinization is co-transport not metabolism, and that the loss of labeled CO2 and γ-aminobutyric acid from the cell result in an overestimation of the stoichiometry of the H+/l-glutamate uptake process. Images Fig. 5 PMID:16666418

  13. Cationic amphiphiles with fatty acyl chain asymmetry of coconut oil deliver genes selectively to mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Chandrashekhar, Voshavar; Srujan, Marepally; Prabhakar, Rairala; Reddy, Rakesh C; Sreedhar, Bojja; Rentam, Kiran K R; Kanjilal, Sanjit; Chaudhuri, Arabinda

    2011-03-16

    Recent structure-activity studies have revealed a dramatic influence of hydrophobic chain asymmetry in enhancing gene delivery efficacies of synthetic cationic amphiphiles (Nantz, M. H. et al. Mol. Pharmaceutics2010, 7, 786-794; Koynova, R. et al. Mol. Pharmaceutics2009, 6, 951-958). The present findings demonstrate for the first time that such a transfection enhancing influence of asymmetric hydrocarbon chains observed in pure synthetic cationic amphiphiles also works for cationic amphiphiles designed with natural, asymmetric fatty acyl chains of a food-grade oil. Herein, we demonstrate that cationic amphiphiles designed with the natural fatty acyl chain asymmetry of food-grade coconut oil are less cytotoxic and deliver genes selectively to mouse lung. Despite lauroyl chains being the major fatty acyl chains of coconut oil, both the in vitro and In vivo gene transfer efficiencies of such cationic amphiphiles were found to be remarkably superior (>4-fold) to those of their pure dilauroyl analogue. Mechanistic studies involving the technique of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) revealed higher biomembrane fusibility of the cationic liposomes of the coconut amphiphiles than that of the symmetric dilauroyl analogue. AFM study revealed pronounced fusogenic nonlamellar structures of the liposomes of coconut amphiphiles. Findings in the FRET and cellular uptake study, taken together, support the notion that the higher cellular uptake resulting from the more fusogenic nature of the liposomes of coconut amphiphiles 1 are likely to play a dominant role in making the coconut amphiphiles transfection competent.

  14. Studying the chemistry of cationized triacylglycerols using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and density functional theory computations.

    PubMed

    Grossert, J Stuart; Cubero Herrera, Lisandra; Ramaley, Louis; Melanson, Jeremy E

    2014-08-01

    Analysis of triacylglycerols (TAGs), found as complex mixtures in living organisms, is typically accomplished using liquid chromatography, often coupled to mass spectrometry. TAGs, weak bases not protonated using electrospray ionization, are usually ionized by adduct formation with a cation, including those present in the solvent (e.g., Na(+)). There are relatively few reports on the binding of TAGs with cations or on the mechanisms by which cationized TAGs fragment. This work examines binding efficiencies, determined by mass spectrometry and computations, for the complexation of TAGs to a range of cations (Na(+), Li(+), K(+), Ag(+), NH4(+)). While most cations bind to oxygen, Ag(+) binding to unsaturation in the acid side chains is significant. The importance of dimer formation, [2TAG + M](+) was demonstrated using several different types of mass spectrometers. From breakdown curves, it became apparent that two or three acid side chains must be attached to glycerol for strong cationization. Possible mechanisms for fragmentation of lithiated TAGs were modeled by computations on tripropionylglycerol. Viable pathways were found for losses of neutral acids and lithium salts of acids from different positions on the glycerol moiety. Novel lactone structures were proposed for the loss of a neutral acid from one position of the glycerol moiety. These were studied further using triple-stage mass spectrometry (MS(3)). These lactones can account for all the major product ions in the MS(3) spectra in both this work and the literature, which should allow for new insights into the challenging analytical methods needed for naturally occurring TAGs.

  15. Studying the Chemistry of Cationized Triacylglycerols Using Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Density Functional Theory Computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossert, J. Stuart; Herrera, Lisandra Cubero; Ramaley, Louis; Melanson, Jeremy E.

    2014-08-01

    Analysis of triacylglycerols (TAGs), found as complex mixtures in living organisms, is typically accomplished using liquid chromatography, often coupled to mass spectrometry. TAGs, weak bases not protonated using electrospray ionization, are usually ionized by adduct formation with a cation, including those present in the solvent (e.g., Na+). There are relatively few reports on the binding of TAGs with cations or on the mechanisms by which cationized TAGs fragment. This work examines binding efficiencies, determined by mass spectrometry and computations, for the complexation of TAGs to a range of cations (Na+, Li+, K+, Ag+, NH4 +). While most cations bind to oxygen, Ag+ binding to unsaturation in the acid side chains is significant. The importance of dimer formation, [2TAG + M]+ was demonstrated using several different types of mass spectrometers. From breakdown curves, it became apparent that two or three acid side chains must be attached to glycerol for strong cationization. Possible mechanisms for fragmentation of lithiated TAGs were modeled by computations on tripropionylglycerol. Viable pathways were found for losses of neutral acids and lithium salts of acids from different positions on the glycerol moiety. Novel lactone structures were proposed for the loss of a neutral acid from one position of the glycerol moiety. These were studied further using triple-stage mass spectrometry (MS3). These lactones can account for all the major product ions in the MS3 spectra in both this work and the literature, which should allow for new insights into the challenging analytical methods needed for naturally occurring TAGs.

  16. Sulfonated and sulfoacylated poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) copolymers as packing materials for cation chromatography.

    PubMed

    Pirogov, Andrey V; Chernova, Marina V; Nemtseva, Dar'ya S; Shpigun, Oleg A

    2003-07-01

    Three different types of cation exchangers were produced from four basic poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) substrates with different properties. Porous PS-DVB resin beads were functionalized by sulfonation and sulfoacylation under various conditions to produce sulfonated resins with exchange capacities of 0.03-1.80 mM g(-1). The matrix with 50% of cross-linking is most suitable for updating by the proposed technique. Sulfuric and chlorosulfonic acids were used as the reagents for sulfonation. The sulfonating conditions, capacities, and the technique of the synthesis are given. The effects of parameters of the sulfonation reaction and the composition of the reactionary mixture on ion-exchange capacity of the sorbents were investigated. Selectivity and efficiency of the separation of some inorganic cations and derivatives of amines and hydrazines on the resins obtained are compared by ion chromatography with conductometric detection. As a result, the sulfoacylated resin was proved more efficient for the separation of these analytes. The resolution of the analytes strongly depends on the degree of functionalization. The best performance about 19,000 plates m(-1) was obtained using the sulfopropionylated beads with an ion-exchange capacity of 0.3 mM g(-1). The prepared sulfoacylated cation exchanger was compared with the commercially available Dionex CS-12 packing material. It was found that the separation of alkaline ions and 1,1-dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) were much better that those for the commercial material.

  17. Cationized pullulan 3D matrices as new materials for gene transfer.

    PubMed

    San Juan, Aurélie; Hlawaty, Hanna; Chaubet, Frédéric; Letourneur, Didier; Feldman, Laurent J

    2007-08-01

    This study deals with the development of a novel biocompatible cationized pullulan three-dimensional matrix for gene delivery. A water-soluble cationic polysaccharide, diethylaminoethyl-pullulan (DEAE-pullulan), was first synthesized and characterized. Fluorescence quenching and gel retardation assays evidenced the complexation in solution of DNA with DEAE-pullulan, but not with neutral pullulan. On cultured smooth muscle cells (SMCs) incubated with DEAE-pullulan and a plasmid vector expressing a secreted form of alkaline phosphatase (pSEAP), SEAP activity was 150-fold higher than with pSEAP alone or pSEAP with neutral pullulan. DEAE-pullulan was then chemically crosslinked using phosphorus oxychloride. The resulting matrices were obtained in less than a minute and molded as discs of 12 mm diameter and 2 mm thickness. Such DEAE-pullulan 3D matrices were loaded with up to 50 microg of plasmid DNA, with a homogeneous plasmid loading observed with YOYO-1 fluorescence staining. Moreover, the DEAE-pullulan matrix was shown to protect pSEAP from DNase I degradation. Incubation of cultured SMCs with pSEAP-loaded DEAE-pullulan matrices resulted in significant gene transfer without cell toxicity. This study suggests that these cationized pullulan 3D matrices could be useful biomaterials for local gene transfer.

  18. Chiroptical properties of cation complexes of chiral phenazino-18-crown-6 ether-type hosts.

    PubMed

    Szarvas, Szilvia; Szalay, Luca; Vass, Elemér; Hollósi, Miklós; Samu, Erika; Huszthy, Péter

    2005-06-01

    Herein we report CD spectroscopic studies on complexes of (R,R)-dimethyl-, (R,R)-diisobutyl-, and (S,S)-di-sec-butyl-phenazino-18-crown-6 ligands (Scheme 1) with selected alkali (Na+, K+), alkaline earth (Mg2+, Ca2+), and transition-metal (Ag+, Zn2+, Ni2+, Cd2+, Pb2+) cations. The complexation was monitored in the 300- to 240-nm region of the CD spectra comprising mainly the 1Bb band of the heteroaromatic subunit. The CD spectra of the complexes showed an unexpected diversity. In the most characteristic 1Bb spectral region, the number, position, and intensity of band(s) depend not only on the heteroaromatic subunit and the size of the substituents but also on the diameter, ion strength, and coordination geometry of the cation. The appearance of two weak 1Bb CD bands (type-I spectra) with the sign pattern of the host is an indication of two complexes of comparable stability. The "type-II" spectra differ from that of the host in the number, sign pattern, and intensity of the bands. Complexes of transition-metal cations generally show CD spectra with more intense bands. The CD spectra of complexes of (S,S)-di-sec-butyl-phenazino-18-crown-6 ligand with Na+, K+, and Pb2+ (type III) strongly suggest exciton coupling caused by the closeness of the heteroaromatic rings of two 1:1 complex molecules.

  19. Major ion chemistry of the Ganga-Brahmaputra river system: Weathering processes and fluxes to the Bay of Bengal

    SciTech Connect

    Sarin, M.M.; Krishnaswami, S.; Dilli, K.; Somayajulu, B.L.K. ); Moore, W.S. )

    1989-05-01

    The Ganga-Brahmaputra, one of the worlds's largest river systems, is first in terms of sediment transport and fourth in terms of water discharge. A detailed and systematic study of the major ion chemistry of these rivers and their tributaries, as well as the clay mineral composition of the bed sediments has been conducted. The chemistry of the highland rivers are all dominated by carbonate weathering; (Ca + Mg) and HCO{sub 3} account for about 80% of the cations and anions. In the lowland rivers, HCO{sub 3} excess over (Ca + Mg) and a relatively high contribution of (Na + K) to the total cations indicate that silicate weathering and/or contributions from alkaline/saline soils and ground waters could be important sources of major ions to these waters. The chemistry of the Ganga and the Yamuna in the lower reaches is by and large dictated by the chemistry of their tributaries and their mixing proportions. The highland rivers weather acidic rocks, whereas the others flow initially through basic effusives. The Ganga-Brahmaputra river system transports about 130 million tons of dissolved salts to the Bay of Bengal, which is nearly 3% of the global river flux to the oceans. The chemical denudation rates for the Ganga and the Brahmaputra basins are about 72 and 105 tons{center dot}km{sup {minus}2}{center dot}yr{sup {minus}1}, respectively, which are factors of 2 to 3 higher than the global average. The high denudation rate, particularly in the Brahmaputra, is attributable to high relief and heavy rainfall.

  20. Using Ylide Functionalization to Stabilize Boron Cations

    PubMed Central

    Scherpf, Thorsten; Feichtner, Kai‐Stephan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The metalated ylide YNa [Y=(Ph3PCSO2Tol)−] was employed as X,L‐donor ligand for the preparation of a series of boron cations. Treatment of the bis‐ylide functionalized borane Y2BH with different trityl salts or B(C6F5)3 for hydride abstraction readily results in the formation of the bis‐ylide functionalized boron cation [Y−B−Y]+ (2). The high donor capacity of the ylide ligands allowed the isolation of the cationic species and its characterization in solution as well as in solid state. DFT calculations demonstrate that the cation is efficiently stabilized through electrostatic effects as well as π‐donation from the ylide ligands, which results in its high stability. Despite the high stability of 2 [Y−B−Y]+ serves as viable source for the preparation of further borenium cations of type Y2B+←LB by addition of Lewis bases such as amines and amides. Primary and secondary amines react to tris(amino)boranes via N−H activation across the B−C bond. PMID:28185370

  1. Comparison of alkaline industrial wastes for aqueous mineral carbon sequestration through a parallel reactivity study.

    PubMed

    Noack, Clinton W; Dzombak, David A; Nakles, David V; Hawthorne, Steven B; Heebink, Loreal V; Dando, Neal; Gershenzon, Michael; Ghosh, Rajat S

    2014-10-01

    Thirty-one alkaline industrial wastes from a wide range of industrial processes were acquired and screened for application in an aqueous carbon sequestration process. The wastes were evaluated for their potential to leach polyvalent cations and base species. Following mixing with a simple sodium bicarbonate solution, chemistries of the aqueous and solid phases were analyzed. Experimental results indicated that the most reactive materials were capable of sequestering between 77% and 93% of the available carbon under experimental conditions in four hours. These materials - cement kiln dust, spray dryer absorber ash, and circulating dry scrubber ash - are thus good candidates for detailed, process-oriented studies. Chemical equilibrium modeling indicated that amorphous calcium carbonate is likely responsible for the observed sequestration. High variability and low reactive fractions render many other materials less attractive for further pursuit without considering preprocessing or activation techniques.

  2. Crystal structure of hydrogen-bearing vuonnemite from the Lovozero alkaline massif

    SciTech Connect

    Rastsvetaeva, R. K. Aksenov, S. M.; Verin, I. A.; Lykova, I. S.

    2011-05-15

    Hydrogen-bearing vuonnemite from the Shkatulka hyperagpaitic pegmatite (the Lovozero alkaline massif, Kola Peninsula) was studied by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The triclinic unit-cell parameters are as follows: a = 5.4712(1) Angstrom-Sign , b = 7.1626(1) Angstrom-Sign , c = 14.3702(3) Angstrom-Sign , {alpha} = 92.623(2) Degree-Sign , {beta} = 95.135(1) Degree-Sign , {gamma} = 90.440(1) Degree-Sign , sp. gr. P1, R = 3.4%. The Na{sup +} cations and H{sub 2}O molecules are ordered in sites between the packets. The water molecules are hydrogen bonded to the PO{sub 4} tetrahedra.

  3. Determination of the zincate diffusion coefficient and its application to alkaline battery problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, C. E.; Kautz, Harold E.

    1978-01-01

    The diffusion coefficient for the zincate ion at 24 C was found to be 9.9 X 10 to the minus 7th power squared cm per sec + or - 30 percent in 45 percent potassium hydroxide and 1.4 x 10 to the minus 7 squared cm per sec + or - 25 percent in 40 percent sodium hydroxide. Comparison of these values with literature values at different potassium hydroxide concentrations show that the Stokes-Einstein equation is obeyed. The diffusion coefficient is characteristic of the zincate ion (not the cation) and independent of its concentration. Calculations with the measured value of the diffusion coefficient show that the zinc concentration in an alkaline zincate half cell becomes uniform throughout in tens of hours by diffusion alone. Diffusion equations are derived which are applicable to finite size chambers. Details and discussion of the experimental method are also given.

  4. Source of Lake Vostok Cations Constrained with Strontium Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, William; Welch, Kathleen; Priscu, John; Tranter, Martyn; Royston-Bishop, George

    2016-08-01

    Lake Vostok is the largest sub-glacial lake in Antarctica. The primary source of our current knowledge regarding the geochemistry and biology of the lake comes from the analysis of refrozen lake water associated with ice core drilling. Several sources of dissolved ions and particulate matter to the lake have been proposed, including materials from the melted glacier ice, the weathering of underlying geological materials, hydrothermal activity and underlying, ancient evaporitic deposits. A sample of Lake Vostok Type 1 accretion ice has been analyzed for its 87Sr/86Sr signature as well as its major cation and anion and Sr concentrations. The strontium isotope ratio of 0.71655 and the Ca/Sr ratio in the sample strongly indicate that the major source of the Sr is from aluminosilicate minerals from the continental crust. These data imply that at least a portion of the other cations in the Type 1 ice also are derived from continental crustal materials and not hydrothermal activity, the melted glacier ice, or evaporitic sources.

  5. Desialylated alkaline phosphatase: activation by 4-nitrophenol.

    PubMed

    Nayudu, P R

    1984-01-01

    Mouse ileal alkaline phosphatase is a sialyl enzyme (12-14 moles per mole of enzyme). When partially desialylated by treatment with neuraminidase, the enzyme loses most of its activity, associated with reduced apparent Vmax and Km. Part of that loss, however, is recovered as the product 4-nitrophenol's concentration builds up in the cuvette. Experimental results are presented to demonstrate that the activation is due to the binding of 4-nitrophenol as a ligand by the partially desialylated enzyme and that both the loss of activity by sialic acid removal and activation by ligand-binding are correlated with changes in protein conformation.

  6. Tree species affect cation exchange capacity (CEC) and cation binding properties of organic matter in acid forest soils.

    PubMed

    Gruba, Piotr; Mulder, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) in forest soil is of major importance for cation binding and acid buffering, but its characteristics may differ among soils under different tree species. We investigated acidity, cation exchange properties and Al bonding to SOM in stands of Scots pine, pedunculate oak, Norway spruce, European beech and common hornbeam in southern Poland. The content of total carbon (Ct) was by far the major contributor to total cation exchange capacity (CECt) even in loamy soils and a strong relationship between Ct and CECt was found. The slope of the regression of CECt to Ct increased in the order hornbeam≈oak

  7. Permeability of alkaline magmas: a study from Campi Flegrei, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polacci, M.; Bouvet de Maissoneuve, C.; Giordano, D.; Piochi, M.; Degruyter, W.; Bachmann, O.; Mancini, L.

    2012-04-01

    Knowledge of permeability is of paramount importance for understanding the evolution of magma degassing during pre-, syn- and post-eruptive volcanic processes. Most permeability estimates existing to date refer to magmas of calc-alkaline compositions. We report here the preliminary results of permeability measurements performed on alkali-trachyte products erupted from the Campanian Ignimbrite (CI) and Monte Nuovo (MTN), two explosive eruptions from Campi Flegrei (CF), an active, hazardous caldera west of Naples, Southern Italy. Darcian (viscous) permeability spans a wide range between 10^-11 and 10^-14 m^2. We observe that the most permeable samples are the scoria clasts from the upper units of MTN; pumice samples from the Breccia Museo facies of CI are instead the least permeable. Non-Darcian (inertial) permeability follows the same trend as Darcian permeability. The first implication of this study is that porosity in alkaline as well as calc-alkaline magmas does not exert a first order control on permeability (e.g. the MTN samples are the most permeable but not the most porous). Second, sample geometry exhibits permeability anisotropy (higher permeability in the direction of vesicle elongation), suggesting stronger degassing in the vertical direction in the conduit. In addition, inertial effects are higher across the sample. As inertial effects are potentially generated by tortuosity (or tortuous vesicle paths), tortuosity is likely higher horizontally than vertically in the conduit. Finally, the measured CF permeability values overlap with those of rhyolitic pumice clasts from the Kos Plateau Tuff (Bouvet de Maisonneuve et al., 2009), together with CI one of the major Quaternary explosive eruptions of the Mediterranean region. This indicates that gas flow is strongly controlled by the geometry of the porous media, which is generated by the bubble dynamics during magma ascent. Therefore, permeability will depend on composition through the rheological properties

  8. Amelioration of an Ultisol profile acidity using crop straws combined with alkaline slag.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiu-yu; Masud, M M; Li, Zhong-yi; Xu, Ren-kou

    2015-07-01

    The acidity of Ultisols (pH <5) is detrimental to crop production. Technologies should be explored to promote base saturation and liming effect for amelioration of Ultisol pH. Column leaching experiments were conducted to investigate the amelioration effects of canola straw (CS) and peanut straw (PS) in single treatment and in combination whether with alkaline slag (AS) or with lime on Ultisol profile acidity. The treatment without liming materials was set as control, and the AS and lime in single treatment are set for comparison. Results indicated that all the liming materials increase soil profile pH and soil exchangeable base cations at the 0-40-cm depth, except that the lime had amelioration effect just on 0 to 15-cm profile. The amelioration effect of the liming materials on surface soil acidity was mainly dependent on the ash alkalinity in organic materials or acid neutralization capacity of inorganic materials. Specific adsorption of sulfate (SO4(2-)) or organic anions, decarboxylation of organic acids/anions, and the association of H(+) with organic anions induced a "liming effect" of crop residues and AS on subsoil acidity. Moreover, SO4(2-) and chloride (Cl(-)) in PS, CS, and AS primarily induced base cations to move downward to subsoil and exchange with exchangeable aluminum (Al(3+)) and protons (H(+)). These anions also promoted the exchangeable Al to leach out of the soil profile. The CS was more effective than PS in decreasing soil acidity in the subsoil, which mainly resulted from higher sulfur (S) and Cl content in CS compared to PS. The CS combined with AS was the better amendment choice in practical agricultural systems.

  9. Mobilization of Roadside Soil Cation Pools by Exchange with Road Deicers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, R.; Bain, D.

    2014-12-01

    Over the past sixty years, road deicers (i.e., road salt) have been applied to roadways in high latitudes to improve traffic conditions in winter weather. However, the dissolution of road deicers in highway runoff create waters with high total dissolved solids (TDS), specifically high concentrations of sodium, which can mobilize soil metals via soil cation exchange reactions. While several studies have detailed the interactions of high TDS solutions and surface and ground waters, limited attention is paid to the impacts of high TDS solutions on near-road soils. Between 2013 and 2014, soil water samples were collected from a roadside transect of lysimeter nests in Pittsburgh, PA. Soil water samples were analyzed for metal concentrations and resulting data used to examine cation dynamics. Patterns in soil water calcium and magnesium concentrations follow patterns in soil water sodium concentrations. In our samples, the highest major cation concentrations are found at the deepest lysimeters, suggesting major cations are mobilized to, and potentially accumulate in, deeper soil horizons. Concentration peaks in the downslope soil waters lag concentration peaks at the near-road nest by two months, indicating that road salt plumes persist and migrate following the road salting season. Characterizing the interactions of high TDS solutions and roadside soil cation pools clarifies our understanding of metal dynamics in the roadside environment. A deeper understanding of these processes is necessary to effectively restore and manage watersheds as high TDS solutions (i.e., road deicing, hydraulic fracturing, and marginal irrigation water) increasingly influence ecosystem function.

  10. Treatment of drinking water residuals: comparing sedimentation and dissolved air flotation performance with optimal cation ratios.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, J C; Walsh, M E; Gagnon, G A

    2004-03-01

    Spent filter backwash water (SFBW) and clarifier sludge generally comprise the majority of the waste residual volume generated and in relative terms, these can be collectively referred to as combined filter backwash water (CFBW). CFBW is essentially a low-solids wastewater with metal hydroxide flocs that are typically light and slow to settle. This study evaluates the impact of adding calcium and magnesium carbonates to CFBW in terms of assessing the impacts on the sedimentation and DAF separation processes. Representative CFBW samples were collected from two surface water treatment plants (WTP): Lake Major WTP (Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada) and Victoria Park WTP (Truro, Nova Scotia, Canada). Bench-scale results indicated that improvements in the CFBW settled water quality could be achieved through the addition of the divalent cations, thereby adjusting the monovalent to divalent (M:D) ratios of the wastewater. In general, the DAF process required slightly higher M:D ratios than the sedimentation process. The optimum M:D ratios for DAF and sedimentation were determined to be 1:1 and 0.33:1, respectively. It was concluded that the optimisation of the cation balance between monovalent cations (e.g., Na(+), K(+)) and added divalent cations (i.e., Ca(2+), Mg(2+)) aided in the settling mechanism through charge neutralisation-precipitation. The increase in divalent cation concentrations within the waste residual stream promoted destabilisation of the negatively charged colour molecules within the CFBW, thereby causing the colloidal content to become more hydrophobic.

  11. Cationically polymerizable monomers derived from renewable sources

    SciTech Connect

    Crivello, J.V.

    1991-10-01

    The objective of this project is to make use of products obtained from renewable plant sources as monomers for the direct production of polymers which can be used for a wide range of plastic applications. In this report is described progress in the synthesis and polymerization of cationically polymerizable monomers and oligomers derived from botanical oils, terpenes, natural rubber, and lignin. Nine different botanical oils were obtained from various sources, characterized and then epoxidized. Their photopolymerization was carried out using cationic photoinitiators and the mechanical properties of the resulting polymers characterized. Preliminary biodegradation studies are being conducted on the photopolymerized films from several of these oils. Limonene was cationically polymerized to give dimers and the dimers epoxidized to yield highly reactive monomers suitable for coatings, inks and adhesives. The direct phase transfer epoxidation of squalene and natural rubber was carried out. The modified rubbers undergo facile photocrosslinking in the presence of onium salts to give crosslinked elastomers. 12 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  12. Cationic acrylamide emulsion polymer brine thickeners

    SciTech Connect

    Gleason, P.A.; Piccoline, M.A.

    1986-12-02

    This patent describes a thickened, solids free, aqueous drilling and servicing brine having a density of at least 14.4 ppg. comprising (a) an aqueous solution of at least one water-soluble salt of a multivalent metal, and (b) a cationic water-in-oil emulsion polymer of acrylamide or methacrylamide and a cationic monomer selected from the group consisting of a dialkylaminoalkyl acrylamide or methacrylamide, a trialkylaminoalkyl acrylamide or methacrylamide, a trialkylaminoalkyl acrylate or methacrylate, and a dialkyldialkyl ammonium halide. The acrylamide or methacrylamide to cationic monomer molar ratio of the polymer is about 70:30 to 95:5, the polymer having an I.V. in 1.0N KCl of about 1.0 to 7.0 dl/g and being present in a compatible and viscosifying amount; the thickened brine characterized by being substantially non-dilatent.

  13. Forging Colloidal Nanostructures via Cation Exchange Reactions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Among the various postsynthesis treatments of colloidal nanocrystals that have been developed to date, transformations by cation exchange have recently emerged as an extremely versatile tool that has given access to a wide variety of materials and nanostructures. One notable example in this direction is represented by partial cation exchange, by which preformed nanocrystals can be either transformed to alloy nanocrystals or to various types of nanoheterostructures possessing core/shell, segmented, or striped architectures. In this review, we provide an up to date overview of the complex colloidal nanostructures that could be prepared so far by cation exchange. At the same time, the review gives an account of the fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic parameters governing these types of reactions, as they are currently understood, and outlines the main open issues and possible future developments in the field. PMID:26891471

  14. Extrinsic Cation Selectivity of 2D Membranes

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    From a systematic study of the concentration driven diffusion of positive and negative ions across porous 2D membranes of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), we prove their cation selectivity. Using the current–voltage characteristics of graphene and h-BN monolayers separating reservoirs of different salt concentrations, we calculate the reversal potential as a measure of selectivity. We tune the Debye screening length by exchanging the salt concentrations and demonstrate that negative surface charge gives rise to cation selectivity. Surprisingly, h-BN and graphene membranes show similar characteristics, strongly suggesting a common origin of selectivity in aqueous solvents. For the first time, we demonstrate that the cation flux can be increased by using ozone to create additional pores in graphene while maintaining excellent selectivity. We discuss opportunities to exploit our scalable method to use 2D membranes for applications including osmotic power conversion. PMID:28157333

  15. Mercury(II) Penicillamine Complex Formation in Alkaline Aqueous Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, B.O.; Jalilehvand, F.; Mah, V.

    2009-06-01

    The complex formation between mercury(II) and penicillamine (H{sub 2}Pen = 3,3'-dimethyl cysteine) in alkaline aqueous solutions (pH {approx}2) has been investigated with extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and {sup 199}Hg NMR spectroscopy. By varying the penicillamine concentration (C{sub H{sub 2}Pen} = 0.2--1.25 M) in {approx}0.1 M Hg(II) solutions, two coexisting major species [Hg(Pen){sub 2}]{sup 2-} and [Hg(Pen){sub 3}]{sub 4-} were characterized with mean Hg-S bond distances 2.34(2) and 2.44(2) {angstrom}, respectively. The [Hg(Pen){sub 2}]{sup 2-} complex with two deprotonated penicillamine ligands forms an almost linear S-Hg-S entity with two weak chelating Hg-N interactions at the mean Hg-N distance 2.52(2) {angstrom}. The same type of coordination is also found for the corresponding [Hg(Cys){sub 2}]{sup 2-} complex in alkaline aqueous solution with the mean bond distances Hg-S 2.34(2) {angstrom} and Hg-N 2.56(2) {angstrom}. The relative amounts of the [Hg(Pen){sub 2}]{sup 2-} and [Hg(Pen){sub 3}]{sup 4-} complexes were estimated by fitting linear combinations of the EXAFS oscillations to the experimental spectra. Also their {sup 199}Hg NMR chemical shifts were used to evaluate the complex formation, showing that the [Hg(Pen){sub 3}]{sup 4-} complex dominates already at moderate excess of the free ligand ([Pen{sup 2-}] > {approx} 0.1 M).

  16. Alkaline assisted thermal oil recovery: Kinetic and displacement studies

    SciTech Connect

    Saneie, S.; Yortsos, Y.C.

    1993-06-01

    This report deals with two major issues of chemical assisted flooding - the interaction of caustic, one of the proposed additives to steam flood, with the reservoir rock, and the displacement of oil by a chemical flood at elevated temperatures. A mathematical model simulating the kinetics of silica dissolution and hydroxyl ion consumption in a typical alkaline flooding environment is first developed. The model is based on the premise that dissolution occurs via hydrolysis of active sites through the formation of an intermediate complex, which is in equilibrium with the silicic acid in solution. Both static (batch) and dynamic (core flood) processes are simulated to examine the sensitivity of caustic consumption and silica dissolution to process parameters, and to determine rates of propagation of pH values. The model presented provides a quantitative description of the quartz-alkali interaction in terms of pH, salinity, ion exchange properties, temperature and contact time, which are of significant importance in the design of soluble silicate flooding processes. The modeling of an adiabatic hot waterflood assisted by the simultaneous injection of a chemical additive is next presented. The model is also applicable to the hot alkaline flooding under conditions of negligible adsorption of the generated anionic surfactant and of hydroxide adsorption being Langmuirian. The theory of generalized simple waves (coherence ) is used to develop solutions for the temperature, concentration, and oil saturation profiles, as well as the oil recovery curves. It is shown that, for Langmuir adsorption kinetics, the chemical resides in the heated region of the reservoir if its injection concentration is below a critical value, and in the unheated region if its concentration exceeds this critical value. Results for a chemical slug injection in a tertiary recovery process indicate recovery performance is maximized when chemical resides in the heated region of the reservior.

  17. Alkaline chemistry of transuranium elements and technetium and the treatment of alkaline radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, C.H.; Peretrukhin, V.F.; Shilov, V.P.; Pikaev, A.K.

    1995-05-01

    Goal of this survey is to generalize the known data on fundamental physical-chemical properties of TRUs and Tc, methods for their isolation, and to provide recommendations that will be useful for partitioning them from alkaline high-level wastes.

  18. [Contrastive analysis on soil alkalinization predicting models based on measured reflectance and TM image reflectance].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Xiong, Hei-Gang; Long, Tao; Lu, Wen-Juan

    2011-01-01

    Based on the monitored data of soil pH and measured Vis-NIR reflectance on spot in Qitai oasis alkalinized area in Xinjiang, as well as comparison of the relationship between measured reflectance and soil pH and the relationship between TM reflectance and soil pH, both of the reflectance multivariate linear regression models were built to evaluate soil alkalinization level, and the model accuracy of pH fitting was discussed with error inspection of post-sample. The results showed that there is a significant positive correlation between soil pH and reflectance. With pH rising the reflectance increased concurrently. So the alkalinization soil characterized by hardening had good spectral response characteristics. Both measured reflectance and TM image reflectance had good potential ability for change detection of the alkalinization soil. The pH predicting model of measured reflectance had higher accuracy and the major error was from different hardening state. If building model by TM reflectance directly, the accuracy of fitting was lower because of the vegetation information in image spectrum. With the vegetation factor removed with NDVI, the accuracy of TM predicting model was near the accuracy of measured reflectance predicting model, and both of the model levels were good.

  19. ABSORPTION METHOD FOR SEPARATING METAL CATIONS

    DOEpatents

    Tompkins, E.R.; Parker, G.W.

    1959-03-10

    An improved method is presented for the chromatographic separation of fission products wherein a substantial reduction in liquid volume is obtained. The process consists in contacting a solution containing fission products with a body of ion-exchange adsorbent to effect adsorption of fission product cations. The loaded exchange resin is then contacted with a small volume of a carboxylic acid eluant, thereby recovering the fission products. The fission product carrying eluate is acidified without increasing its volume to the volume of the original solution, and the acidified eluate is then used as a feed solution for a smaller body of ion-exchange resin effecting readsorption of the fission product cations.

  20. Response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris to alkaline stress.

    PubMed

    Stolyar, Sergey; He, Qiang; Joachimiak, Marcin P; He, Zhili; Yang, Zamin Koo; Borglin, Sharon E; Joyner, Dominique C; Huang, Katherine; Alm, Eric; Hazen, Terry C; Zhou, Jizhong; Wall, Judy D; Arkin, Adam P; Stahl, David A

    2007-12-01

    The response of exponentially growing Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to pH 10 stress was studied using oligonucleotide microarrays and a study set of mutants with genes suggested by microarray data to be involved in the alkaline stress response deleted. The data showed that the response of D. vulgaris to increased pH is generally similar to that of Escherichia coli but is apparently controlled by unique regulatory circuits since the alternative sigma factors (sigma S and sigma E) contributing to this stress response in E. coli appear to be absent in D. vulgaris. Genes previously reported to be up-regulated in E. coli were up-regulated in D. vulgaris; these genes included three ATPase genes and a tryptophan synthase gene. Transcription of chaperone and protease genes (encoding ATP-dependent Clp and La proteases and DnaK) was also elevated in D. vulgaris. As in E. coli, genes involved in flagellum synthesis were down-regulated. The transcriptional data also identified regulators, distinct from sigma S and sigma E, that are likely part of a D. vulgaris Hildenborough-specific stress response system. Characterization of a study set of mutants with genes implicated in alkaline stress response deleted confirmed that there was protective involvement of the sodium/proton antiporter NhaC-2, tryptophanase A, and two putative regulators/histidine kinases (DVU0331 and DVU2580).

  1. Autonomous in situ measurements of seawater alkalinity.

    PubMed

    Spaulding, Reggie S; DeGrandpre, Michael D; Beck, James C; Hart, Robert D; Peterson, Brittany; De Carlo, Eric H; Drupp, Patrick S; Hammar, Terry R

    2014-08-19

    Total alkalinity (AT) is an important parameter for describing the marine inorganic carbon system and understanding the effects of atmospheric CO2 on the oceans. Measurements of AT are limited, however, because of the laborious process of collecting and analyzing samples. In this work we evaluate the performance of an autonomous instrument for high temporal resolution measurements of seawater AT. The Submersible Autonomous Moored Instrument for alkalinity (SAMI-alk) uses a novel tracer monitored titration method where a colorimetric pH indicator quantifies both pH and relative volumes of sample and titrant, circumventing the need for gravimetric or volumetric measurements. The SAMI-alk performance was validated in the laboratory and in situ during two field studies. Overall in situ accuracy was -2.2 ± 13.1 μmol kg(-1) (n = 86), on the basis of comparison to discrete samples. Precision on duplicate analyses of a carbonate standard was ±4.7 μmol kg(-1) (n = 22). This prototype instrument can measure in situ AT hourly for one month, limited by consumption of reagent and standard solutions.

  2. Advanced inorganic separators for alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A flexible, porous battery separator comprising a coating applied to a porous, flexible substrate is described. The coating comprises: (1) a thermoplastic rubber-based resin which is insoluble and unreactive in the alkaline electrolyte; (2) a polar organic plasticizer which is reactive with the alkaline electrolyte to produce a reaction product which contains a hydroxyl group and/or a carboxylic acid group; and (3) a mixture of polar particulate filler materials which are unreactive with the electrolyte, the mixture comprising at least one first filler material having a surface area of greater than 25 meters sq/gram, at least one second filler material having a surface area of 10 to 25 sq meters/gram, wherein the volume of the mixture of filler materials is less than 45% of the total volume of the fillers and the binder, the filler surface area per gram of binder is about 20 to 60 sq meters/gram, and the amount of plasticizer is sufficient to coat each filler particle. A method of forming the battery separator is also described.

  3. DNA DAMAGE QUANTITATION BY ALKALINE GEL ELECTROPHORESIS.

    SciTech Connect

    SUTHERLAND,B.M.; BENNETT,P.V.; SUTHERLAND, J.C.

    2004-03-24

    Physical and chemical agents in the environment, those used in clinical applications, or encountered during recreational exposures to sunlight, induce damages in DNA. Understanding the biological impact of these agents requires quantitation of the levels of such damages in laboratory test systems as well as in field or clinical samples. Alkaline gel electrophoresis provides a sensitive (down to {approx} a few lesions/5Mb), rapid method of direct quantitation of a wide variety of DNA damages in nanogram quantities of non-radioactive DNAs from laboratory, field, or clinical specimens, including higher plants and animals. This method stems from velocity sedimentation studies of DNA populations, and from the simple methods of agarose gel electrophoresis. Our laboratories have developed quantitative agarose gel methods, analytical descriptions of DNA migration during electrophoresis on agarose gels (1-6), and electronic imaging for accurate determinations of DNA mass (7-9). Although all these components improve sensitivity and throughput of large numbers of samples (7,8,10), a simple version using only standard molecular biology equipment allows routine analysis of DNA damages at moderate frequencies. We present here a description of the methods, as well as a brief description of the underlying principles, required for a simplified approach to quantitation of DNA damages by alkaline gel electrophoresis.

  4. Thermodynamic model for an alkaline fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhaert, Ivan; De Paepe, Michel; Mulder, Grietus

    Alkaline fuel cells are low temperature fuel cells for which stationary applications, e.g. cogeneration in buildings, are a promising market. In order to guarantee a long life, water and thermal management has to be done in a careful way. In order to better understand the water, alkali and thermal flows, a two-dimensional model for an Alkaline Fuel Cell is developed using a control volume approach. In each volume the electrochemical reactions together with the mass and energy balance are solved. The model is created in Aspen Custom Modeller, the development environment of Aspen Plus, where special attention is given to the physical flow of hydrogen, water and air in the system. In this way the developed component, the AFC-cell, can be built into stack configurations to understand its effect on the overall performance. The model is validated by experimental data from measured performance by VITO with their Cell Voltage Monitor at a test case, where the AFC-unit is used as a cogeneration unit.

  5. The effect of alkaline agents on retention of EOR chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, P.B.

    1991-07-01

    This report summarizes a literature survey on how alkaline agents reduce losses of surfactants and polymers in oil recovery by chemical injection. Data are reviewed for crude sulfonates, clean anionic surfactants, nonionic surfactants, and anionic and nonionic polymers. The role of mineral chemistry is briefly described. Specific effects of various alkaline anions are discussed. Investigations needed to improve the design of alkaline-surfactant-polymer floods are suggested. 62 refs., 28 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Stability in alkaline aqueous electrolyte of air electrode protected with fluorinated interpenetrating polymer network membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolotti, Bruno; Messaoudi, Houssam; Chikh, Linda; Vancaeyzeele, Cédric; Alfonsi, Séverine; Fichet, Odile

    2015-01-01

    We developed original anion exchange membranes to protect air electrodes operating in aqueous lithium-air battery configuration, i.e. supplied with atmospheric air and in concentrated aqueous lithium hydroxide. These protective membranes have an interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) architecture combining a hydrogenated cationic polyelectrolyte network based on poly(epichlorohydrin) (PECH) and a fluorinated neutral network based on perfluoropolyether (Fluorolink® MD700). Two phases, each one rich in one of the polymer, are co-continuous in the materials. This morphology allows combining their properties according to the weight proportions of each polymer. Thus, PECH/Fluorolink IPNs show ionic conductivity varying from 1 to 2 mS cm-1, water uptake from 30 to 90 wt.% and anionic transport number from 0.65 to 0.80 when the PECH proportion varies from 40 to 90 wt.%. These membranes have been systematically assembled on air electrodes. Air electrode protected with PECH/Fluorolink 70/30 IPN shows outstanding stability higher than 1000 h, i.e. a 20-fold increase in the lifetime of the non-modified electrode. This efficient membrane/air electrode assembly is promising for development of alkaline electrolyte based storage or production energy systems, such as metal air batteries or alkaline fuel cells.

  7. Purification and characterization of a novel extracellular alkaline protease from Cellulomonas bogoriensis.

    PubMed

    Li, Fan; Yang, Liyuan; Lv, Xue; Liu, Dongbo; Xia, Hongmei; Chen, Shan

    2016-05-01

    An extracellular alkaline protease produced by the alkali-tolerant Cellulomonas bogoriensis was purified by a combination of ammonium sulfate precipitation and cation exchange chromatography. The purity of the protease was detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and its molecular weight was confirmed to be 18.3 kDa. The enzyme showed optimum activity at 60 °C and pH 11. The stability of the protease was maintained at a wide temperature range of 4-60 °C and pH range of 3-12. Irreversible inhibition of the enzyme activity by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and tosyl-l-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone demonstrated that the purified enzyme is a chymotrypsin of the serine protease family. The Km and Vmax of the protease activity on casein were 19.2 mg/mL and 25000 μg/min/mg, respectively. The broad substrate specificity and remarkable stability in the presence of organic solvents, salt, and commercial detergents, as well as its excellent stain removal and dehairing capability, make the purified alkaline protease a promising candidate for industrial applications.

  8. Alkaline deoxygenated graphene oxide as adsorbent for cadmium ions removal from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Du, Hongyan; Yuan, Shaowei; He, Wanxia; Yan, Pengju; Liu, Zhanhong

    2015-01-01

    Alkaline deoxygenated graphene oxide (aGO) was prepared through alkaline hydrothermal treatment and used as adsorbent to remove Cd(II) ions from aqueous solutions for the first time. The characterization results of transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra indicate that aGO was successfully synthesized. The batch adsorption experiments showed that the adsorption kinetics could be described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, and the isotherms equilibrium data were well fitted with the Langmuir model. The maximum adsorption capacity of Cd(II) on aGO was 156 mg/g at pH 5 and T=293 K. The adsorption thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption process was a spontaneous and endothermic reaction. The mainly adsorption mechanism speculated from FT-IR results may be attributed to the electrostatic attraction between Cd2+ and negatively charged groups (-CO-) of aGO and cation-π interaction between Cd2+ and the graphene planes. The findings of this study demonstrate the potential utility of the nanomaterial aGO as an effective adsorbent for Cd(II) removal from aqueous solutions.

  9. Cationic dialkylarylphosphates: a new family of bio-inspired cationic lipids for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Le Corre, Stéphanie S; Belmadi, Nawal; Berchel, Mathieu; Le Gall, Tony; Haelters, Jean-Pierre; Lehn, Pierre; Montier, Tristan; Jaffrès, Paul-Alain

    2015-01-28

    In this work that aims to synthesize and evaluate new cationic lipids as vectors for gene delivery, we report the synthesis of a series of cationic lipids in which a phosphate functional group acts as a linker to assemble on a molecular scale, two lipid chains and one cationic polar head. The mono or dicationic moiety is connected to the phosphate group by an aryl spacer. In this work, two synthesis strategies were evaluated. The first used the Atherton-Todd coupling reaction to introduce a phenolic derivative to dioleylphosphite. The second strategy used a sequential addition of lipid alcohol and a phenolic derivative on POCl3. The two methods are efficient, but the latter allows larger yields. Different polar head groups were introduced, thus producing amphiphilic compounds possessing either one permanent (N-methyl-imidazolium, pyridinium, trimethylammonium) or two permanent cationic charges. All these cationic lipids were formulated as liposomal solutions and characterized (size and zeta potential). They formed stable liposomal solutions both in water (at pH 7.0) and in a weakly acidic medium (at pH 5.5). Finally, this new generation of cationic lipids was used to deliver DNA into various human-derived epithelial cells cultured in vitro. Compared with Lipofectamine used as a reference commercial lipofection reagent, some cationic dialkylarylphosphates were able to demonstrate potent gene transfer abilities, and noteworthily, monocationic derivatives were much more efficient than dicationic analogues.

  10. Purification and characterization of a novel alkaline α-L-rhamnosidase produced by Acrostalagmus luteo albus.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Natalia Lorena; Voget, Claudio Enrique; Hours, Roque Alberto; Cavalitto, Sebastián Fernando

    2011-09-01

    Rhamnosidases are enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of terminal nonreducing L-rhamnose for the bioconversion of natural or synthetic rhamnosides. They are of great significance in the current biotechnological area, with applications in food and pharmaceutical industrial processes. In this study we isolated and characterized a novel alkaline rhamnosidase from Acrostalagmus luteo albus, an alkali-tolerant soil fungus from Argentina. We also present an efficient, simple, and inexpensive method for purifying the A. luteo albus rhamnosidase and describe the characteristics of the purified enzyme. In the presence of rhamnose as the sole carbon source, this fungus produces a rhamnosidase with a molecular weight of 109 kDa and a pI value of 4.6, as determined by SDS-PAGE and analytical isoelectric focusing, respectively. This enzyme was purified to homogeneity by chromatographic and electrophoretic techniques. Using p-nitrofenil-α-L-rhamnopiranoside as substrate, the enzyme activity showed pH and temperature optima of 8.0 and 55°C, respectively. The enzyme exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with K (M) and V (max) values of 3.38 mmol l(-1) and 68.5 mmol l(-1) min(-1), respectively. Neither divalent cations such as Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Mn(2+), and Co(2+) nor reducing agents such as β-mercaptoethanol and dithiothreitol showed any effect on enzyme activity, whereas this activity was completely inhibited by Zn(2+) at a concentration of 0.2 mM. This enzyme showed the capacity to hydrolyze some natural rhamnoglucosides such as hesperidin, naringin and quercitrin under alkaline conditions. Based on these results, and mainly due to the high activity of the A. luteo albus rhamnosidase under alkaline conditions, this enzyme should be considered a potential new biocatalyst for industrial applications.

  11. Summary technical report on the electrochemical treatment of alkaline nuclear wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1994-07-30

    This report summarizes the laboratory studies investigating the electrolytic treatment of alkaline solutions carried out under the direction of the Savannah River Technology Center from 1985-1992. Electrolytic treatment has been demonstrated at the laboratory scale to be feasible for the destruction of nitrate and nitrite and the removal of radioactive species such as {sup 99}Tc and {sup 106}Ru from Savannah River Site (SRS) decontaminated salt solution and other alkaline wastes. The reaction rate and current efficiency for the removal of these species are dependent on cell configuration, electrode material, nature of electrode surface, waste composition, current density, and temperature. Nitrogen, ammonia, and nitrous oxide have been identified as the nitrogen-containing reaction products from the electrochemical reduction of nitrate and nitrite under alkaline conditions. The reaction mechanism for the reduction is very complex. Voltammetric studies indicated that the electrode reactions involve surface phenomena and are not necessarily mass transfer controlled. In an undivided cell, results suggest an electrocatalytic role for oxygen via the generation of the superoxide anion. In general, more efficient reduction of nitrite and nitrate occurs at cathode materials with higher overpotentials for hydrogen evolution. Nitrate and nitrite destruction has also been demonstrated in engineering-scale flow reactors. In flow reactors, the nitrate/nitrite destruction efficiency is improved with an increase in the current density, temperature, and when the cell is operated in a divided cell configuration. Nafion{reg_sign} cation exchange membranes have exhibited good stability and consistent performance as separators in the divided-cell tests. The membranes were also shown to be unaffected by radiation at doses approximating four years of cell operation in treating decontaminated salt solution.

  12. Capillary electrochromatography with contactless conductivity detection for the determination of some inorganic and organic cations using monolithic octadecylsilica columns.

    PubMed

    Mai, Thanh Duc; Pham, Hung Viet; Hauser, Peter C

    2009-10-27

    A fast separation of alkali and alkaline earth metal cations and ammonium was carried out by capillary electrochromatography on monolithic octadecylsilica columns of 15 cm length and 100 microm inner diameter using water/methanol mixtures containing acetic acid as mobile phase. On-column contactless conductivity detection was used for quantification of these non-UV-absorbing species. The method was also extended successfully to the determination of small amines as well as of amino acids, and the separation selectivity was optimized by varying the composition of the mobile phase. Detection limits of about 1 microM were possible for the inorganic cations as well as for the small amines, while the amino acids could be quantified down to about 10 microM. The separation of 12 amino acids was achieved in the relatively short time of 10 min.

  13. Binding and selectivity of phenazino-18-crown-6-ether with alkali, alkaline earth and toxic metal species: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Nasarul; Chimni, Swapandeep Singh

    2017-02-01

    The interactions of phenazino-crown ether ligands with alkali, alkaline earth and selected toxic species were investigated using density functional theory modelling by employing B3PW91/6-311G ++ (d, p) level of theory. The complex stability was analysed in terms of binding energies, perturbation energies, position of highest molecular orbital and energy gap values. In general, the complexes formed by P18C6-1a ligand with metal cations were found to be more stable than those with P18C6-1b. Among alkali and alkaline earth metals complexes having highest stability was observed for the complex formed by P18C6-1a with Be2+. Computational calculations of P18C6 ligand with toxic metal ions reveals that the P18C6-Cr6+ metal complexes acquire envelop like geometry, leading to higher binding energy values. Comparing the binding energies of neutral and monocations of Ag and Hg, the former had higher value both in neutral as well as monocation state. Thus, the stability of metal complexes is determined not only by the ligand but also by the type of metal ion. In solvent systems the stability constants of metal complexes were found increasing with decreasing permittivity of the solvent. This reflects the inherited polar character of the protic solvents stabilises the cation, resulting in decrease of effective interaction of ligand with the metal ion.

  14. Electrochemical generation of oxygen. 1: The effects of anions and cations on hydrogen chemisorption and anodic oxide film formation on platinum electrode. 2: The effects of anions and cations on oxygen generation on platinum electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, C. J.; Yeager, E.; Ogrady, W. E.

    1975-01-01

    The effects were studied of anions and cations on hydrogen chemisorption and anodic oxide film formation on Pt by linear sweep voltammetry, and on oxygen generation on Pt by potentiostatic overpotential measurement. The hydrogen chemisorption and anodic oxide film formation regions are greatly influenced by anion adsorption. In acids, the strongly bound hydrogen occurs at more cathodic potential when chloride and sulfate are present. Sulfate affects the initial phase of oxide film formation by produced fine structure while chloride retards the oxide-film formation. In alkaline solutions, both strongly and weakly bound hydrogen are influenced by iodide, cyanide, and barium and calcium cations. These ions also influence the oxide film formation. Factors considered to explain these effects are discussed. The Tafel slope for oxygen generation was found to be independent on the oxide thickness and the presence of cations or anions. The catalytic activity indicated by the exchange current density was observed decreasing with increasing oxide layer thickness, only a minor dependence on the addition of certain cations and anions was found.

  15. Restructuring of a Peat in Interaction with Multivalent Cations: Effect of Cation Type and Aging Time

    PubMed Central

    Kunhi Mouvenchery, Yamuna; Jaeger, Alexander; Aquino, Adelia J. A.; Tunega, Daniel; Diehl, Dörte; Bertmer, Marko; Schaumann, Gabriele Ellen

    2013-01-01

    It is assumed to be common knowledge that multivalent cations cross-link soil organic matter (SOM) molecules via cation bridges (CaB). The concept has not been explicitly demonstrated in solid SOM by targeted experiments, yet. Therefore, the requirements for and characteristics of CaB remain unidentified. In this study, a combined experimental and molecular modeling approach was adopted to investigate the interaction of cations on a peat OM from physicochemical perspective. Before treatment with salt solutions of Al3+, Ca2+ or Na+, respectively, the original exchangeable cations were removed using cation exchange resin. Cation treatment was conducted at two different values of pH prior to adjusting pH to 4.1. Cation sorption is slower (>>2 h) than deprotonation of functional groups (<2 h) and was described by a Langmuir model. The maximum uptake increased with pH of cation addition and decreased with increasing cation valency. Sorption coefficients were similar for all cations and at both pH. This contradicts the general expectations for electrostatic interactions, suggesting that not only the interaction chemistry but also spatial distribution of functional groups in OM determines binding of cations in this peat. The reaction of contact angle, matrix rigidity due to water molecule bridges (WaMB) and molecular mobility of water (NMR analysis) suggested that cross-linking via CaB has low relevance in this peat. This unexpected finding is probably due to the low cation exchange capacity, resulting in low abundance of charged functionalities. Molecular modeling demonstrates that large average distances between functionalities (∼3 nm in this peat) cannot be bridged by CaB-WaMB associations. However, aging strongly increased matrix rigidity, suggesting successive increase of WaMB size to connect functionalities and thus increasing degree of cross-linking by CaB-WaMB associations. Results thus demonstrated that the physicochemical structure of OM is decisive for Ca

  16. Restructuring of a peat in interaction with multivalent cations: effect of cation type and aging time.

    PubMed

    Kunhi Mouvenchery, Yamuna; Jaeger, Alexander; Aquino, Adelia J A; Tunega, Daniel; Diehl, Dörte; Bertmer, Marko; Schaumann, Gabriele Ellen

    2013-01-01

    It is assumed to be common knowledge that multivalent cations cross-link soil organic matter (SOM) molecules via cation bridges (CaB). The concept has not been explicitly demonstrated in solid SOM by targeted experiments, yet. Therefore, the requirements for and characteristics of CaB remain unidentified. In this study, a combined experimental and molecular modeling approach was adopted to investigate the interaction of cations on a peat OM from physicochemical perspective. Before treatment with salt solutions of Al(3+), Ca(2+) or Na(+), respectively, the original exchangeable cations were removed using cation exchange resin. Cation treatment was conducted at two different values of pH prior to adjusting pH to 4.1. Cation sorption is slower (>2 h) than deprotonation of functional groups (<2 h) and was described by a Langmuir model. The maximum uptake increased with pH of cation addition and decreased with increasing cation valency. Sorption coefficients were similar for all cations and at both pH. This contradicts the general expectations for electrostatic interactions, suggesting that not only the interaction chemistry but also spatial distribution of functional groups in OM determines binding of cations in this peat. The reaction of contact angle, matrix rigidity due to water molecule bridges (WaMB) and molecular mobility of water (NMR analysis) suggested that cross-linking via CaB has low relevance in this peat. This unexpected finding is probably due to the low cation exchange capacity, resulting in low abundance of charged functionalities. Molecular modeling demonstrates that large average distances between functionalities (∼3 nm in this peat) cannot be bridged by CaB-WaMB associations. However, aging strongly increased matrix rigidity, suggesting successive increase of WaMB size to connect functionalities and thus increasing degree of cross-linking by CaB-WaMB associations. Results thus demonstrated that the physicochemical structure of OM is decisive for

  17. Method for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations, medium for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, S.R.; Anderson, K.B.; Song, K.; Yuchs, S.E.; Marshall, C.L.

    1996-12-31

    The problems associated with the disposal of toxic metals in an environmentally acceptable manner continues to plague industry. Such metals as nickel, vanadium, molybdenum, cobalt, iron, and antimony present physiological and ecological challenges that are best addressed through minimization of exposure and dispersion. A method for encapsulating hazardous cations is provided comprising supplying a pretreated substrate containing the cations; contacting the substrate with an organo-silane compound to form a coating on the substrate; and allowing the coating to cure. A medium for containing hazardous cations is also provided, comprising a substrate having ion-exchange capacity and a silane-containing coating on the substrate.

  18. Influence of calcium and silica on hydraulic properties of sodium montmorillonite assemblages under alkaline conditions.

    PubMed

    Kinsela, Andrew S; Tjitradjaja, Alice; Collins, Richard N; Waite, T David; Payne, Timothy E; Macdonald, Bennett C T; White, Ian

    2010-03-01

    A sodium-washed montmorillonite was exposed to calcium and silica under alkaline conditions in order to gain insight into possible interactions of engineered clay barriers and cementitious leachates found in many waste storage facilities. The changes in physico-chemical properties of the material were investigated using a combination of dead-end filtration, electrophoresis and scanning electron microscopy. The results show minimal differentiation between unaltered Na-montmorillonite samples at the two pH values tested (9 and 12), with the structure of the resulting assemblages arising from repulsive tactoid interactions. The addition of calcium (50 mM) greatly decreases the size of the structural network, and in doing so, increases the hydraulic conductivity approximately 65-fold, with the effect being greatest at pH 12. Whilst the addition of silica alone (10 mM) produced little change in the hydraulic properties of montmorillonite, its combined effect with calcium produced alterations to the structural assemblages that could not be accounted for by the presence of calcium alone. The likely binding of calcium with multiple silanol groups appears to enhance the retention of water within the Na-montmorillonite assemblage, whilst still allowing the fluent passage of water. The results confirm that polyvalent cations such as Ca(2+) may have a dramatic effect on the structural and hydraulic properties of montmorillonite assemblages while the effects of solutions containing both silicate and calcium are complex and influenced by silica-cation interactions.

  19. Conditions for the formation of pure birnessite during the oxidation of Mn(II) cations in aqueous alkaline medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boumaiza, Hella; Coustel, Romain; Medjahdi, Ghouti; Ruby, Christian; Bergaoui, Latifa

    2017-04-01

    Birnessite was synthetized through redox reaction by mixing MnO4-, Mn2+ and OH- solutions. The Mn(VII): Mn(II) ratio of 0.33 was chosen and three methods were used consisting in a quick mixing under vigorous stirring of two of the three reagents and then on the dropwise addition of the third one. The obtained solids were characterized by XRD, FTIR and XPS spectroscopies. Their average oxidation states were determined from ICP and CEC measurements while their surface properties were investigated by XPS. This study provides an increased understanding of the importance of dissolved oxygen in the formation of birnessite and hausmannite and shows the ways to obtain pure birnessite. The role of counter-ion ie. Na+ or K+ was also examined.

  20. Charge Compensation in RE3+ (RE = Eu, Gd) and M+ (M = Li, Na, K) Co-Doped Alkaline Earth Nanofluorides Obtained by Microwave Reaction with Reactive Ionic Liquids Leading to Improved Optical Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lorbeer, C; Behrends, F; Cybinska, J; Eckert, H; Mudring, Anja -V

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline earth fluorides are extraordinarily promising host matrices for phosphor materials with regard to rare earth doping. In particular, quantum cutting materials, which might considerably enhance the efficiency of mercury-free fluorescent lamps or SC solar cells, are often based on rare earth containing crystalline fluorides such as NaGdF4, GdF3 or LaF3. Substituting most of the precious rare earth ions and simultaneously retaining the efficiency of the phosphor is a major goal. Alkaline earth fluoride nanoparticles doped with trivalent lanthanide ions (which are required for the quantum cutting phenomenon) were prepared via a microwave assisted method in ionic liquids. As doping trivalent ions into a host with divalent cations requires charge compensation, this effect was thoroughly studied by powder X-ray and electron diffraction, luminescence spectroscopy and 23Na, 139La and 19F solid state NMR spectroscopy. Monovalent alkali ions were codoped with the trivalent lanthanide ions to relieve stress and achieve a better crystallinity and higher quantum cutting abilities of the prepared material. 19F-magic angle spinning (MAS)-NMR-spectra, assisted by 19F{23Na} rotational echo double resonance (REDOR) studies, reveal distinct local fluoride environments, the populations of which are discussed in relation to spatial distribution and clustering models. In the co-doped samples, fluoride species having both Na+ and La3+ ions within their coordination sphere can be identified and quantified. This interplay of mono- and trivalent ions in the CaF2 lattice appears to be an efficient charge compensation mechanism that allows for improved performance characteristics of such co-doped phosphor materials.

  1. NMR studies of cation transport across membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Shochet, N.R.

    1985-01-01

    /sup 23/Na NMR Studies of cation transport across membranes were conducted both on model and biological membranes. Two ionophores, the carrier monensin and the channel-former gramicidin, were chosen to induce cation transport in large unilamellar phosphatidylcholine vesicles. The distinction between the NMR signals arising from the two sides of the membrane was achieved by the addition of an anionic paramagnetic shift reagent to the outer solution. The kinetics of the cation transport across the membrane was observed simultaneously monitoring the changes in the /sup 23/Na NMR signals of both compartments. Two mathematical models were developed for the estimation of the transport parameters of the monensin- and gramicidin-induced cation transport. The models were able to fit the experimental data very well. A new method for the estimation of the volume trapped inside the vesicles was developed. The method uses the relative areas of the intra- and extravesicular NMR signals arising from a suspension of vesicles bathed in the same medium they contain, as a measure for the relative volumes of these compartments. Sodium transport across biological membranes was studied by /sup 23/ NMR, using suspensions of cultured nerve cells. The sodium influx through voltage-gated channels was studied using the channel modifier batrachotoxin in combination with scorpion toxin.

  2. Viscoelastic cationic polymers containing the urethane linkage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A. (Inventor)

    1972-01-01

    A method for the synthesis and manufacturing of elastomeric compositions and articles containing quaternary nitrogen centers and condensation residues along the polymeric backbone of the centers is presented. Linear and cross-linked straight chain and block polymers having a wide damping temperature range were synthesized. Formulae for the viscoelastic cationic polymers are presented.

  3. ADSORPTION OF ORGANIC CATIONS TO NATURAL MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The factors that control the extent of adsorption of amphiphilic organic cations on environmental and pristine surfaces have been studied. The sorbents were kaolinite, montmorillonite, two aquifer materials, and a soil; solutions contained various concentrations of NaCl and CaCl,...

  4. Process and apparatus for the production of BI-213 cations

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Hines, John J.; Chiarizia, Renato; Dietz, Mark

    1998-01-01

    A process for producing substantially impurity-free Bi-213 cations is disclosed. An aqueous acid feed solution containing Ac-225 cations is contacted with an ion exchange medium to bind the Ac-225 cations and form an Ac-225-laden ion exchange medium. The bound Ac-225 incubates on the ion exchange medium to form Bi-213 cations by radioactive decay. The Bi-213 cations are then recovered from the Ac-225-laden ion exchange medium to form a substantially impurity-free aqueous Bi-213 cation acid solution. An apparatus for carrying out this process is also disclosed.

  5. Process and apparatus for the production of Bi-213 cations

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, E.P.; Hines, J.J.; Chiarizia, R.; Dietz, M.

    1998-12-29

    A process for producing substantially impurity-free Bi-213 cations is disclosed. An aqueous acid feed solution containing Ac-225 cations is contacted with an ion exchange medium to bind the Ac-225 cations and form an Ac-225-laden ion exchange medium. The bound Ac-225 incubates on the ion exchange medium to form Bi-213 cations by radioactive decay. The Bi-213 cations are then recovered from the Ac-225-laden ion exchange medium to form a substantially impurity-free aqueous Bi-213 cation acid solution. An apparatus for carrying out this process is also disclosed. 7 figs.

  6. Dolomite Dissolution in Alkaline Cementious Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittermayr, Florian; Klammer, Dietmar; Köhler, Stephan; Dietzel, Martin

    2010-05-01

    Chemical alteration of concrete has gained much attention over the past years as many cases of deterioration due to sulphate attack, thaumasite formation (TSA) or alkali silica reactions (ASR) have been reported in various constructions (Schmidt et al, 2009). Much less is known about the so called alkali carbonate reaction (ACR). It is believed that dolomite aggregates can react with the alkalis from the cement, dissolve and form calcite and brucite (Katayama, 2004). Due to very low solubility of dolomite in alkaline solutions this reaction seems doubtful. In this study we are trying to gain new insides about the conditions that can lead to the dissolution of dolomite in concrete. Therefore we investigated concrete samples from Austrian tunnels that show partially dissolved dolomite aggregates. Petrological analysis such as microprobe, SEM and Raman spectroscopy as well as a hydrochemical analysis of interstitial solutions and ground water and modelling with PhreeqC (Parkhurst and Appelo, 1999) are carried out. In addition a series of batch experiments is set up. Modelling approaches by PhreeqC show a thermodynamically possibility in the alkaline range when additional Ca2+ in solution causes dolomite to become more and more undersaturated as calcite gets supersaturated. Interacting ground water is enriched in Ca2+and saturated with respect to gypsum as marine evaporites are found in situ rocks. Furthermore it is more likely that Portlandite (Ca(OH)2) plays a more important role than Na and K in the cement. Portlandite acts as an additional Ca2+ source and is much more abundant than the alkalies. Some interstitial solutions are dominated mainly by Na+ and SO42- and reach concentrations up to 30 g/l TDS. It is believed that solutions can even reach thenardite saturation as efflorescences are found on the tunnel walls. In consequence dolomite solubility increases with increasing ionic strength. pH > 11 further accelerate the process of dedolomitization by the removal

  7. Extraction and separation of cationic surfactants from river sediments: application to a spectrophotometric determination of cationic surfactant in an aquatic environment using membrane filters.

    PubMed

    Sun, H F; Hase, T; Hata, N; Kasahara, I; Taguchi, S

    2001-11-01

    The quantitative extraction of cationic surfactant (CS+) in river sediments was studied. Further, the developed method was applied to the spectrophotometric determination of CS+ in urban river sediment samples by solid-phase extraction with membranes. A mixture of methanol and hydrochloric acid was proposed as an eluent. Dried sediment was digested in the eluent under ultrasonic irradiation. After elution, the eluent was evaporated to almost dryness. The residue was dissolved in a small volume of methanol and diluted to a certain volume with water. The pH of the solution was adjusted to 4-5 to separate iron and some other metals as precipitates of hydroxides. The solution was passed through two-piled membranes: first glass-fiber and then polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membranes. A small volume of methanol was passed through the membranes to elute any CS+ retaining on the membranes. After passing the methanol solution through a cationic exchange resin column, the retained CS+ was eluted with methanol containing a high concentration of sodium chloride. Water, Bromophenol Blue (BPB) and hydrochloric acid were added to the solution. The solution was passed through a mixed cellulose ester membrane filter to retain an ion associate of CS+.BPB-. The retained ion associate was dissolved in a small volume of N,N-dimethylformamide together with the membrane filter, followed by the addition of triethanolamine to make the solution alkaline. The absorbance due to BPB2- was measured at 603 nm against a reagent blank. This method was applied to the determination of CS+ in river water and sediment. A cationic surfactant in sediments at 10(-5) mol kg-1 levels was detected with satisfactory precision. It was found that CS+ was about 500-fold enriched in the sediment from water at the place where domestic wastewater was discharged.

  8. Involvement of a proton-coupled organic cation antiporter in the blood-brain barrier transport of amantadine.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toyofumi; Aoyama, Takahiko; Suzuki, Naoto; Kobayashi, Masaru; Fukami, Toshiro; Matsumoto, Yoshiaki; Tomono, Kazuo

    2016-09-01

    The blood-to-brain transport of amantadine, a weak N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist, has been shown previously to participate in the cationic drug-sensitive transport system across the mouse blood-brain barrier (BBB). The purpose of the present study was to characterize the influx transport system by means of both an in situ mouse brain perfusion technique and in vitro studies using rat immortalized brain capillary endothelial cells (GPNT). The observed concentration-dependent initial uptake rate of [(3) H]amantadine suggested the involvement of a carrier-mediated transport mechanism. The normal uptake at physiological pH 7.4 was decreased by 72.9% in acidic perfusate, while it was increased by 35.3% in alkaline perfusate. These results suggest that pH-dependent transport is regulated by utilizing an oppositely directed proton gradient as a driving force. In addition, the [(3) H]amantadine uptake was moderately inhibited by the adamantane structural analogs (rimantadine and memantine) and other cationic drugs (pyrilamine, clonidine, nicotine, etc.), but not by substrates or inhibitors of the well-characterized organic cation transporters (tetraethylammonium, l-carnitine and choline). A similar inhibition pattern was observed between the in vivo studies and the in vitro experiments. These results indicate that the influx transport for amantadine across the BBB involves a proton-coupled organic cation antiporter. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Silica-based cationic bilayers as immunoadjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Lincopan, Nilton; Santana, Mariana RA; Faquim-Mauro, Eliana; da Costa, Maria Helena B; Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana M

    2009-01-01

    Background Silica particles cationized by dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB) bilayer were previously described. This work shows the efficiency of these particulates for antigen adsorption and presentation to the immune system and proves the concept that silica-based cationic bilayers exhibit better performance than alum regarding colloid stability and cellular immune responses for vaccine design. Results Firstly, the silica/DODAB assembly was characterized at 1 mM NaCl, pH 6.3 or 5 mM Tris.HCl, pH 7.4 and 0.1 mg/ml silica over a range of DODAB concentrations (0.001–1 mM) by means of dynamic light scattering for particle sizing and zeta-potential analysis. 0.05 mM DODAB is enough to produce cationic bilayer-covered particles with good colloid stability. Secondly, conditions for maximal adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) or a recombinant, heat-shock protein from Mycobacterium leprae (18 kDa-hsp) onto DODAB-covered or onto bare silica were determined. At maximal antigen adsorption, cellular immune responses in vivo from delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions determined by foot-pad swelling tests (DTH) and cytokines analysis evidenced the superior performance of the silica/DODAB adjuvant as compared to alum or antigens alone whereas humoral response from IgG in serum was equal to the one elicited by alum as adjuvant. Conclusion Cationized silica is a biocompatible, inexpensive, easily prepared and possibly general immunoadjuvant for antigen presentation which displays higher colloid stability than alum, better performance regarding cellular immune responses and employs very low, micromolar doses of cationic and toxic synthetic lipid. PMID:19152701

  10. A second component of the SltA-dependent cation tolerance pathway in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Mellado, Laura; Calcagno-Pizarelli, Ana Maria; Lockington, Robin A.; Cortese, Marc S.; Kelly, Joan M.; Arst, Herbert N.; Espeso, Eduardo A.

    2015-01-01

    The transcriptional response to alkali metal cation stress is mediated by the zinc finger transcription factor SltA in Aspergillus nidulans and probably in other fungi of the pezizomycotina subphylum. A second component of this pathway has been identified and characterized. SltB is a 1272 amino acid protein with at least two putative functional domains, a pseudo-kinase and a serine-endoprotease, involved in signaling to the transcription factor SltA. Absence of SltB activity results in nearly identical phenotypes to those observed for a null sltA mutant. Hypersensitivity to a variety of monovalent and divalent cations, and to medium alkalinization are among the phenotypes exhibited by a null sltB mutant. Calcium homeostasis is an exception and this cation improves growth of sltΔ mutants. Moreover, loss of kinase HalA in conjunction with loss-of-function sltA or sltB mutations leads to pronounced calcium auxotrophy. sltA sltB double null mutants display a cation stress sensitive phenotype indistinguishable from that of single slt mutants showing the close functional relationship between these two proteins. This functional relationship is reinforced by the fact that numerous mutations in both slt loci can be isolated as suppressors of poor colonial growth resulting from certain null vps (vacuolar protein sorting) mutations. In addition to allowing identification of sltB, our sltB missense mutations enabled prediction of functional regions in the SltB protein. Although the relationship between the Slt and Vps pathways remains enigmatic, absence of SltB, like that of SltA, leads to vacuolar hypertrophy. Importantly, the phenotypes of selected sltA and sltB mutations demonstrate that suppression of null vps mutations is not dependent on the inability to tolerate cation stress. Thus a specific role for both SltA and SltB in the VPS pathway seems likely. Finally, it is noteworthy that SltA and SltB have a similar, limited phylogenetic distribution, being restricted to

  11. A second component of the SltA-dependent cation tolerance pathway in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Mellado, Laura; Calcagno-Pizarelli, Ana Maria; Lockington, Robin A; Cortese, Marc S; Kelly, Joan M; Arst, Herbert N; Espeso, Eduardo A

    2015-09-01

    The transcriptional response to alkali metal cation stress is mediated by the zinc finger transcription factor SltA in Aspergillus nidulans and probably in other fungi of the pezizomycotina subphylum. A second component of this pathway has been identified and characterized. SltB is a 1272 amino acid protein with at least two putative functional domains, a pseudo-kinase and a serine-endoprotease, involved in signaling to the transcription factor SltA. Absence of SltB activity results in nearly identical phenotypes to those observed for a null sltA mutant. Hypersensitivity to a variety of monovalent and divalent cations, and to medium alkalinization are among the phenotypes exhibited by a null sltB mutant. Calcium homeostasis is an exception and this cation improves growth of sltΔ mutants. Moreover, loss of kinase HalA in conjunction with loss-of-function sltA or sltB mutations leads to pronounced calcium auxotrophy. sltA sltB double null mutants display a cation stress sensitive phenotype indistinguishable from that of single slt mutants showing the close functional relationship between these two proteins. This functional relationship is reinforced by the fact that numerous mutations in both slt loci can be isolated as suppressors of poor colonial growth resulting from certain null vps (vacuolar protein sorting) mutations. In addition to allowing identification of sltB, our sltB missense mutations enabled prediction of functional regions in the SltB protein. Although the relationship between the Slt and Vps pathways remains enigmatic, absence of SltB, like that of SltA, leads to vacuolar hypertrophy. Importantly, the phenotypes of selected sltA and sltB mutations demonstrate that suppression of null vps mutations is not dependent on the inability to tolerate cation stress. Thus a specific role for both SltA and SltB in the VPS pathway seems likely. Finally, it is noteworthy that SltA and SltB have a similar, limited phylogenetic distribution, being restricted to

  12. Development of an alkaline fuel cell subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    A two task program was initiated to develop advanced fuel cell components which could be assembled into an alkaline power section for the Space Station Prototype (SSP) fuel cell subsystem. The first task was to establish a preliminary SSP power section design to be representative of the 200 cell Space Station power section. The second task was to conduct tooling and fabrication trials and fabrication of selected cell stack components. A lightweight, reliable cell stack design suitable for the SSP regenerative fuel cell power plant was completed. The design meets NASA's preliminary requirements for future multikilowatt Space Station missions. Cell stack component fabrication and tooling trials demonstrated cell components of the SSP stack design of the 1.0 sq ft area can be manufactured using techniques and methods previously evaluated and developed.

  13. Properties of cathode materials in alkaline cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salkind, A. J.; McBreen, J.; Freeman, R.; Parkhurst, W. A.

    1984-04-01

    Conventional and new cathode materials in primary and secondary alkaline cells were investigated for stability, structure, electrochemical reversibility and efficiency. Included were various forms of AgO for reserve type silver zinc batteries, a new material - AgNiO2 and several nickel electrodes for nickel cadmium and nickel hydrogen cells for aerospace applications. A comparative study was made of the stability of electroformed and chemically prepared AgO. Stability was correlated with impurities. After the first discharge AgNiO2 can be recharged to the monovalent level. The discharge product is predominantly silver. Plastic bonded nickel electrodes display a second plateau on discharge. Additions of Co(OH)2 largely eliminate this.

  14. Advanced-capability alkaline fuel cell powerplant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deronck, Henry J.

    The alkaline fuel cell powerplant utilized in the Space Shuttle Orbiter has established an excellent performance and reliability record over the past decade. Recent AFC technology programs have demonstrated significant advances in cell durability and power density. These capabilities provide the basis for substantial improvement of the Orbiter powerplant, enabling new mission applications as well as enhancing performance in the Orbiter. Improved durability would extend the powerplant's time between overhaul fivefold, and permit longer-duration missions. The powerplant would also be a strong candidate for lunar/planetary surface power systems. Higher power capability would enable replacement of the Orbiter's auxiliary power units with electric motors, and benefits mass-critical applications such as the National AeroSpace Plane.

  15. Polyvinyl alcohol membranes as alkaline battery separators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Gonzalez-Sanabria, O.; Manzo, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    Polyvinly alcohol (PVA) cross-linked with aldehyde reagents yields membranes that demonstrate properties that make them suitable for use as alkaline battery separators. Film properties can be controlled by the choice of cross-linker, cross-link density and the method of cross-linking. Three methods of cross-linking and their effects on film properties are discussed. Film properties can also be modified by using a copolymer of vinyl alcohol and acrylic acid as the base for the separator and cross-linking it similarly to the PVA. Fillers can be incorporated into the films to further modify film properties. Results of separator screening tests and cell tests for several variations of PBA films are discussed.

  16. Rechargeable alkaline manganese dioxide/zinc batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordesh, K.; Weissenbacher, M.

    The rechargeable alkaline manganese dioxide/zinc MnO 2/Zn) system, long established commercial as a primay battery, has reached a high level of performance as a secondary battery system. The operating principles are presented and the technological achievements are surveyed by referencing the recent publications and patent literature. A review is also given of the improvements obtained with newly formulated cathodes and anodes and specially designed batteries. Supported by modelling of the cathode and anode processes and by statistical evidence during cycling of parallel/series-connected modules, the envisioned performance of the next generation of these batteries is described. The possibility of extending the practical use of the improved rechargeable MnO 2/Zn system beyond the field of small electronics into the area of power tools, and even to kW-sized power sources, is demonstrated. Finally, the commercial development in comparison with other rechargeable battery systems is examined.

  17. Inhibition of renal alkaline phosphatase by cimetidine.

    PubMed

    Minai-Tehrani, Dariush; Khodai, Somayeh; Aminnaseri, Somayeh; Minoui, Saeed; Sobhani-Damavadifar, Zahra; Alavi, Sana; Osmani, Raheleh; Ahmadi, Shiva

    2011-08-01

    Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) belongs to hydrolase group of enzymes. It is responsible for removing phosphate groups from many types of molecules, including nucleotides and proteins. Cimetidine (trade name Tagamet) is an antagonist of histamine H2-receptor that inhibits the production of gastric acid. Cimetidine is used for the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases. In this study the inhibitory effect of cimetidine on mouse renal ALP activity was investigated. Our results showed that cimetidine can inhibit ALP by uncompetitive inhibition. In the absence of inhibitor the V(max) and K(m) of the enzyme were found to be 13.7 mmol/mg prot.min and 0.25 mM, respectively. Both the Vmax and Km of the enzyme decreased with increasing cimetidine concentrations (0- 1.2 mM). The Ki and IC(50) of cimetidine were determined to be about 0.5 mM and 0.52 mM, respectively.

  18. Development of an alkaline fuel cell subsystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1987-03-01

    A two task program was initiated to develop advanced fuel cell components which could be assembled into an alkaline power section for the Space Station Prototype (SSP) fuel cell subsystem. The first task was to establish a preliminary SSP power section design to be representative of the 200 cell Space Station power section. The second task was to conduct tooling and fabrication trials and fabrication of selected cell stack components. A lightweight, reliable cell stack design suitable for the SSP regenerative fuel cell power plant was completed. The design meets NASA's preliminary requirements for future multikilowatt Space Station missions. Cell stack component fabrication and tooling trials demonstrated cell components of the SSP stack design of the 1.0 sq ft area can be manufactured using techniques and methods previously evaluated and developed.

  19. Acylglucuronide in alkaline conditions: migration vs. hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Di Meo, Florent; Steel, Michele; Nicolas, Picard; Marquet, Pierre; Duroux, Jean-Luc; Trouillas, Patrick

    2013-06-01

    This work rationalizes the glucuronidation process (one of the reactions of the phase II metabolism) for drugs having a carboxylic acid moiety. At this stage, acylglucuronides (AG) metabolites are produced, that have largely been reported in the literature for various drugs (e.g., mycophenolic acid (MPA), diclofenac, ibuprofen, phenylacetic acids). The competition between migration and hydrolysis is rationalized by adequate quantum calculations, combing MP2 and density functional theory (DFT) methods. At the molecular scale, the former process is a real rotation of the drug around the glucuconic acid. This chemical-engine provides four different metabolites with various toxicities. Migration definitely appears feasible under alkaline conditions, making proton release from the OH groups. The latter reaction (hydrolysis) releases the free drug, so the competition is of crucial importance to tackle drug action and elimination. From the theoretical data, both migration and hydrolysis appear kinetically and thermodynamically favored, respectively.

  20. The Alkaline Dissolution Rate of Calcite.

    PubMed

    Colombani, Jean

    2016-07-07

    Due to the widespread presence of calcium carbonate on Earth, several geochemical systems, among which is the global CO2 cycle, are controlled to a large extent by the dissolution and precipitation of this mineral. For this reason, the dissolution of calcite has been thoroughly investigated for decades. Despite this intense activity, a consensual value of the dissolution rate of calcite has not been found yet. We show here that the inconsistency between the reported values stems mainly from the variability of the chemical and hydrodynamic conditions of measurement. The spreading of the values, when compared in identical conditions, is much less than expected and is interpreted in terms of sample surface topography. This analysis leads us to propose benchmark values of the alkaline dissolution rate of calcite compatible with all the published values, and a method to use them in various chemical and hydrodynamic contexts.

  1. Alkaline oxide conversion coatings for aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Buchheit, R.G.

    1996-02-01

    Three related conversion coating methods are described that are based on film formation which occurs when aluminum alloys are exposed to alkaline Li salt solutions. Representative examples of the processing methods, resulting coating structure, composition and morphology are presented. The corrosion resistance of these coatings to aerated 0.5 M NaCl solution has been evaluated as a function of total processing time using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). This evaluation shows that excellent corrosion resistance can be uniformly achieved using no more than 20 minutes of process time for 6061-T6. Using current methods a minimum of 80 minutes of process time is required to get marginally acceptable corrosion resistance for 2024-T3. Longer processing times are required to achieve uniformly good corrosion resistance.

  2. Alkaline pulping of some eucalypts from Sudan.

    PubMed

    Khristova, P; Kordsachia, O; Patt, R; Dafaalla, S

    2006-03-01

    Four eucalypts (Eucalyptus camaldulensis, Eucalyptus microtheca, Eucalyptus tereticornis and Eucalyptus citriodora) grown in Sudan were examined for their suitability for pulping and papermaking with different alkaline methods. Their physical, morphological and chemical characteristics are reported. The pulping trials with E. citriodora and E. tereticornis were carried out using the kraft-AQ, soda-AQ, modified AS/AQ (ASA), ASAM and kraft methods. For the other two species, only the ASAM and the kraft process were applied. ASAM pulping gave the best results in terms of yield, degree of delignification, mechanical and optical pulp properties. The best pulps, obtained in kraft and ASAM cooking of E. citriodora, were bleached to 88% ISO brightness in a totally chlorine free bleaching sequence (OQ1O/PQ2P). The bleached pulps, especially the ASAM pulp, showed good papermaking properties and would be suitable for manufacture of writing and printing grades of paper.

  3. Unexpected Actinyl Cation-Directed Structural Variation in Neptunyl(VI) A-Type Tri-lacunary Heteropolyoxotungstate Complexes

    DOE PAGES

    Berg, John M.; Gaunt, Andrew J.; May, Iain; ...

    2015-04-22

    A-type tri-lacunary heteropolyoxotungstate anions (e.g., [PW9O34]9-, [AsW9O34]9-, [SiW9O34]10- and [GeW9O34]10-) are multi-dentate oxygen donor ligands that readily form sandwich complexes with actinyl cations ({UO2}2+, {NpO2}+, {NpO2}2+ & {PuO2}2+) in near neutral/slightly alkaline aqueous solutions. Two or three actinyl cations are sandwiched between two trilacunary anions, with additional cations (Na+, K+ or NH4 +) also often held within the cluster. Studies thus far have indicated that it is these additional +I cations, rather than the specific actinyl cation, that direct the structural variation in the complexes formed. We now report the structural characterization of the neptunyl (VI) cluster complex (NH4)13 [Na(NpO2)2(A-α-more » PW9O34)2]·12H2O. The anion in this complex, [Na(NpO2)2(PW9O34)2]13-, contains one Na+ cation and two {NpO2}2+ cations held between two [PW9O34]9- anions – with an additional partial occupancy NH4 + or {NpO2}2+ cation also present. In the analogous uranium (VI) system, under similar reaction conditions that includes an excess of NH4Cl in the parent solution, it was previously shown that [(NH4)2(UVIO2)2(A-PW9O34)2]12- is the dominant species in both solution and the crystallized salt. Spectroscopic studies provide further proof of differences in the observed chemistry for the {NpO2}2+/[PW9O34]9- and {UO2}2+/[PW9O34]9- systems, both in solution and in solid state complexes crystallized from comparable salt solutions. The work revealed that varying the actinide element (Np vs. U) can indeed measurably impact structure and complex stability in the cluster chemistry of actinyl (VI) cations with A-type tri-lacunary heteropolyoxotungstate anions.« less

  4. Pressure-induced cation-cation bonding in V2O3

    DOE PAGES

    Bai, Ligang; Li, Quan; Corr, Serena A.; ...

    2015-10-09

    A pressure-induced phase transition, associated with the formation of cation-cation bonding, occurs in V2O3 by combining synchroton x-ray diffraction in a diamond anvil cell and ab initio evolutionary calculations. The high-pressure phase has a monoclinic structure with a C2/c space group, and it is both energetically and dynamically stable at pressures above 47 GPa to at least 105 GPa. this phase transition can be viewed as a two-dimensional Peierls-like distortion, where the cation-cation dimer chains are connected along the c axis of the monoclinic cell. In conclusion, this finding provides insights into the interplay of electron correlation and lattice distortionmore » in V2O3, and it may also help to understand novel properties of other early transition-metal oxides.« less

  5. Uranium(VI) Diffusion in Sodium-Montmorillonite at Alkaline pH Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinnacher, R. M.; Davis, J. A.; Tournassat, C.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Diffusive transport of uranium(VI) in montmorillonite clay and bentonite has important implications for uranium(VI) mobility in engineered barrier systems or host rocks in high level radioactive waste repositories, and clay-rich soils and sediments in the environment. The prediction of uranium(VI) adsorption and diffusion in clay-rich media, however, is complicated by (1) the complexity of the mineralogical structure of montmorillonite, in terms of its pore-size distributions and available surface site types, and (2) the complex uranium(VI) solution speciation, which can include cationic, uncharged, and anionic complexes, depending on solution conditions. For instance, a partial or full exclusion of anions from negatively charged clay interlayer spaces could change the effective 'anion-accessible' porosity and decrease the diffusive flux of these solutes under steady state conditions. In contrast, weak cation exchange reactions can result in 'surface diffusion' of adsorbed cations, such as UO2OH+, in addition to diffusion in the liquid phase, resulting in greater diffusive fluxes at steady state. In order to investigate these complex interactions, we performed two, lab-scale uranium(VI) through-diffusion experiments in lightly compacted Na-montmorillonite at slightly different, alkaline pH conditions (average pH values of 8.69 and 8.87). Observed uranium(VI) diffusive fluxes were decreased by approximately an order of magnitude in comparison to a tritium tracer. This indicates a relevance of 'anion exclusion' effects, the full or partial exclusion of anionic U(VI)-carbonato species from clay interlayer spaces. In addition, uranium(VI) sorption reactions were shown to be relevant in the diffusion experiments, even at alkaline pH values of around 8.7 and 8.9, where uranium(VI) sorption is low compared to other pH conditions. Despite the similarity of pH conditions, different degrees of uranium(VI) retardation were determined for the two systems. Additionally, we

  6. The Nickel(111)/Alkaline Electrolyte Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Kuilong; Chottiner, G. S.; Scherson, D. A.; Reid, Margaret A.

    1991-01-01

    The electrochemical properties of Ni (111) prepared and characterized in ultra high vacuum, UHV, by surface analytical techniques have been examined in alkaline media by cyclic voltammetry using an UHV-electrochemical cell transfer system designed and built in this laboratory. Prior to the transfer, the Ni(111) surfaces were exposed to saturation coverages of CO in UHV in an attempt to protect the surface from possible contamination with other gases during the transfer. Temperature Programmed Desorption, TPD, of CO-dosed Ni (111) surfaces displaying sharp c(4x2), LEED patterns, subsequently exposed to water-saturated Ar at atmospheric pressure in an auxiliary UHV compatible chamber and finally transferred back to the main UHV chamber, yielded CO2 and water as the only detectable products. This indicates that the CO-dosed surfaces react with water and/or bicarbonate and hydroxide as the most likely products. Based on the integration of the TPD peaks, the combined amounts of H2O and CO2 were found to be on the order of a single monolayer. The reacted c(4x2)CO/Ni(111) layer seems to protect the surface from undergoing spontaneous oxidation in strongly alkaline solutions. This was evidenced by the fact that the open circuit potential observed immediately after contact with deaerated 0.1 M KOH was about 0.38 V vs. DHE, drifting slightly towards more negative values prior to initiating the voltametric scans. The average ratio of the integrated charge obtained in the first positive linear scan in the range of 0.35 to 1.5 V vs. DHE (initiated at the open circuit potential) and the first (and subsequent) linear negative scans in the same solution yielded for various independent runs a value of 3.5 +/- 0.3. Coulometric analysis of the cyclic voltammetry curves indicate that the electrochemically formed oxyhydroxide layer involves a charge equivalent to 3.2 +/- 0.4 layers of Ni metal.

  7. Mixed-valent neptunium(IV/V) compound with cation-cation-bound six-membered neptunyl rings.

    PubMed

    Jin, Geng Bang

    2013-11-04

    A new mixed-valent neptunium(IV/V) compound has been synthesized by evaporation of a neptunium(V) acidic solution. The structure of the compound features cation-cation-bound six-membered neptunyl(V) rings. These rings are further connected by Np(IV) ions through cation-cation interactions (CCIs) into a three-dimensional neptunium cationic open framework. This example illustrates the possibility of isolating neptunyl(V) CCI oligomers in inorganic systems using other cations to compete with Np(V) in bonding with the neptunyl oxygen.

  8. Microscopic approach for the identification of cationic membrane fouling during cheddar cheese whey electroacidification.

    PubMed

    Lin Teng Shee, F; Angers, P; Bazinet, L

    2008-06-15

    This is the first time that fouling of cation-exchange membranes during cheddar cheese whey electroacidification with bipolar membranes is reported. A mineral fouling was observed only on the cationic membrane side in contact with the base. The deposit was identified as magnesium hydroxide and this fouling was more important on the cation-exchange membrane situated close to the cathode. Little deposit was formed after six electroacidification runs, but on long time, the buildup of fouling film would lead after many electroacidifications to an important decrease of the system efficiency. Since, fouling of permselective membranes represents one of the major issues in electrodialytic processes, this result will be the basis for the determination of cleaning conditions allowing the prevention of such a fouling.

  9. Analysis of chromite by cation-exchange using ethylenediaminetetra-acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Jawaid, M; Ingman, F

    1975-12-01

    A method for the separation and determination of five major elements in chromite ore (and chrome-bearing refractories), based on complexation of the metals with EDTA is described. After removal of silica, the cations are separated into two groups by passing the solution through a cation-exchange resin (Dowex 50W-X8, in Na-form) in the presence of an excess of the complexing agent. The optimum conditions for the separation are discussed on the basis of exchange constants that were either known or determined. The first group contains Cr and Fe, which emerge in the filtrate at pH between 1.5 and 2.1, whereas A1, Mg and Ca, which are adsorbed on the resin, form another group. Complexometric titrations are used for the subsequent determination of the cations in each group. The method is simpler and more rapid and accurate for routine analysis than the current methods.

  10. Sorption mechanism and predictive models for removal of cationic organic contaminants by cation exchange resins.

    PubMed

    Jadbabaei, Nastaran; Zhang, Huichun

    2014-12-16

    Understanding the sorption mechanism of organic contaminants on cation exchange resins (CXRs) will enable application of these resins for the removal of cationic organic compounds from contaminated water. In this study, sorption of a diverse set of 12 organic cations and 8 neutral aromatic solutes on two polystyrene CXRs, MN500 and Amberlite 200, was examined. MN500 showed higher sorbed concentrations due to its microporous structure. The sorbed concentrations followed the same trend of aromatic cations > aliphatic cations > neutral solutes for both resins. Generally, solute-solvent interactions, nonpolar moiety of the solutes, and resin matrix can affect selectivity of the cations. Sorbed concentrations of the neutral compounds were significantly less than those of the cations, indicating a combined effect of electrostatic and nonelectrostatic interactions. By conducting multiple linear regression between Gibbs free energy of sorption and Abraham descriptors for all 20 compounds, polarity/polarizability (S), H-bond acidity (A), induced dipole (E), and electrostatic (J(+)) interactions were found to be involved in the sorption of the cations by the resins. After converting the aqueous sorption isotherms to sorption from the ideal gas-phase by water-wet resins, a more significant effect of J(+) was observed. Predictive models were then developed based on the linear regressions and validated by accurately estimating the sorption of different test set compounds with a root-mean-square error range of 0.91-1.1 and 0.76-0.85 for MN500 and Amberlite 200, respectively. The models also accurately predicted sorption behavior of aniline and imidazole between pH 3 and 10.

  11. Roles of alkaline phosphatase and labile internal mineral in matrix vesicle-mediated calcification. Effect of selective release of membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase and treatment with isosmotic pH 6 buffer.

    PubMed

    Register, T C; McLean, F M; Low, M G; Wuthier, R E

    1986-07-15

    The roles of alkaline phosphatase and labile internal mineral in matrix vesicle-mediated mineralization have been studied by selectively releasing the enzyme from a wide variety of matrix vesicle preparations using treatment with a bacterial phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C and by demineralization of the vesicles using isosmotic pH 6 buffer. Following depletion of 50-90% of the alkaline phosphatase activity or treatment with citrate buffer, the vesicles were tested for their ability to accumulate 45Ca2+ and 32Pi from a synthetic cartilage lymph. Removal of alkaline phosphatase by phospholipase C treatment caused two principal effects, depending on the matrix vesicle preparation. In rapidly mineralizing vesicle fractions which did not require organic phosphate esters (Po) to accumulate mineral ions, release of alkaline phosphatase had only a minor effect. In slowly mineralizing vesicles preparations or those dependent on Po substrates for mineral ion uptake, release of alkaline phosphatase caused significant loss of mineralizing activity. The activity of rapidly calcifying vesicles was shown to be dependent on the presence of labile internal mineral, as demonstrated by major loss in activity when the vesicles were decalcified by various treatments. Ion uptake by demineralized vesicles or those fractionated on sucrose step gradients required Po and was significantly decreased by alkaline phosphatase depletion. Uptake of Pi, however, was not coupled with hydrolysis of the Po substrate. These findings argue against a direct role for alkaline phosphatase as a porter in matrix vesicle Pi uptake, contrary to previous postulates. The results emphasize the importance of internal labile mineral in rapid uptake of mineral ions by matrix vesicles.

  12. A mathematical model of the maximum power density attainable in an alkaline hydrogen/oxygen fuel cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, Michael C.; White, Ralph E.

    1991-01-01

    A mathematical model of a hydrogen/oxygen alkaline fuel cell is presented that can be used to predict the polarization behavior under various power loads. The major limitations to achieving high power densities are indicated and methods to increase the maximum attainable power density are suggested. The alkaline fuel cell model describes the phenomena occurring in the solid, liquid, and gaseous phases of the anode, separator, and cathode regions based on porous electrode theory applied to three phases. Fundamental equations of chemical engineering that describe conservation of mass and charge, species transport, and kinetic phenomena are used to develop the model by treating all phases as a homogeneous continuum.

  13. Alkaline cleaner replacement for printed wiring board fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Goldammer, S.E.; Pemberton, S.E.; Tucker, D.R.

    1997-04-01

    A replacement alkaline cleaning chemistry was qualified for the copper cleaning process used to support printed wiring board fabrication. The copper cleaning process was used to prepare copper surfaces for enhancing the adhesion of dry film photopolymers (photoresists and solder masks) and acrylic adhesives. The alkaline chemistry was used to remove organic contaminates such as fingerprints.

  14. The Chemistry of Paper Preservation Part 4. Alkaline Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Henry A.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the problem of the inherent instability of paper due to the presence of acids that catalyze the hydrolytic degradation of cellulose. Focuses on the chemistry involved in the sizing of both acid and alkaline papers and the types of fillers used. Discusses advantages and problems of alkaline papermaking. Contains 48 references. (JRH)

  15. Removal of plutonium and americium from alkaline waste solutions

    DOEpatents

    Schulz, Wallace W.

    1979-01-01

    High salt content, alkaline waste solutions containing plutonium and americium are contacted with a sodium titanate compound to effect removal of the plutonium and americium from the alkaline waste solution onto the sodium titanate and provide an effluent having a radiation level of less than 10 nCi per gram alpha emitters.

  16. Independent adsorption of monovalent cations and cationic polymers at PE/PG lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomich, Daria A.; Nesterenko, Alexey M.; Kostritskii, Andrei Yu; Kondinskaia, Diana A.; Ermakov, Yuri A.; Gurtovenko, Andrey A.

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic cationic polymers constitute a wide class of polymeric biocides. Commonly their antimicrobial effect is associated to their interaction with bacterial membranes. In the present study we analyze the interaction of various cationic polymers with model bacterial membranes comprised of a mixture of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG). We describe a polymer-membrane interaction as a process of modification of the surface charge. It is well known that small monovalent inorganic cations (Na+, K+) cannot overcharge the surface of a bilayer containing anionic lipids. In contrast, polycations are able to overcharge anionic membranes and demonstrate a very large input to the electric field distribution at the membrane-water interface. We aimed here to study the electrostatic effects associated with the interaction of polycations of different types with a model lipid membrane whose composition closely resembles that of bacterial membranes (PE:PG = 1:4). Four different cationic polymers (polyvinylamine, polyallylamine, poly-L-lysine and polyethylenimine) were adsorbed at a model PE/PG bilayer in MD simulations. Adsorption of sodium cations was inspected separately for PE/PG bilayers of different composition and cation’s binding parameters were determined. From computational experiments and consequent theoretical analysis we concluded that sodium adsorption at anionic binding sites does not depend on the presence of polycations. Therefore, we hypothesize that antimicrobial activity of the studied cationic polymers should depend on the ionic composition of the medium.

  17. Synthetic ultrashort cationic lipopeptides induce systemic plant defense responses against bacterial and fungal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Brotman, Yariv; Makovitzki, Arik; Shai, Yechiel; Chet, Ilan; Viterbo, Ada

    2009-08-01

    A new family of synthetic, membrane-active, ultrashort lipopeptides composed of only four amino acids linked to fatty acids was tested for the ability to induce systemic resistance and defense responses in plants. We found that two peptides wherein the third residue is a d-enantiomer (italic), C16-KKKK and C16-KLLK, can induce medium alkalinization of tobacco suspension-cultured cells and expression of defense-related genes in cucumber and Arabidopsis seedlings. Moreover, these compounds can prime systemic induction of antimicrobial compounds in cucumber leaves similarly to the plant-beneficial fungus Trichoderma asperellum T203 and provide systemic protection against the phytopathogens Botrytis cinerea B05, Pseudomonas syringae pv. lachrimans, and P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000. Thus, short cationic lipopeptides are a new category of compounds with potentially high utility in the induction of systemic resistance in plants.

  18. ZP3-dependent activation of sperm cation channels regulates acrosomal secretion during mammalian fertilization

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The sperm acrosome reaction is a Ca(2+)-dependent secretory event required for fertilization. Adhesion to the egg's zona pellucida promotes Ca2+ influx through voltage-sensitive channels, thereby initiating secretion. We used potentiometric fluorescent probes to determine the role of sperm membrane potential in regulating Ca2+ entry. ZP3, the glycoprotein agonist of the zona pellucida, depolarizes sperm membranes by activating a pertussis toxin-insensitive mechanism with the characteristics of a poorly selective cation channel. ZP3 also activates a pertussis toxin-sensitive pathway that produces a transient rise in internal pH. The concerted effects of depolarization and alkalinization open voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels. These observations suggest that mammalian sperm utilize membrane potential-dependent signal transduction mechanisms and that a depolarization pathway is an upstream transducing element coupling adhesion to secretion during fertilization. PMID:8707844

  19. Microbially-Mediated Subsurface Calcite Precipitation for Removal of Hazardous Divalent Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Colwell, Frederick S.; Smith, R.W.; Ferris, F. Gratn; Ingram, Jani C.; Reysenbach, A.-L.; Fujita, Yoshiko; Tyler, T.L.; Taylor, J.L.; Banta, A.; Delwiche, M.E.; McLing, T.; Cortez, Marnie, M.; Watwood, M.E.

    2003-03-27

    We are investigating microbially-mediated acceleration of calcite precipitation and co-precipitation of hazardous divalent cations (e.g., 90Sr) in calcite saturated subsurface systems. In theory, the addition of urea to an aquifer or vadose zone and its subsequent hydrolysis by indigenous microbes will cause an increase in alkalinity, pH and calcite precipitation. Lab studies indicated the ability of various bacteria to precipitate calcite through urea hydrolysis and that incorporation of strontium in biogenically-formed calcite is greater than in abiotically formed calcite. Results from a field experiment in a pristine location in the Snake River Plain aquifer involving the phased addition of molasses and then urea showed increases in total cell numbers, rate of urea hydrolysis and calcite formation during the study. The combined diagnostic approaches of microbiology, molecular ecology and analytical chemistry demonstrate the feasibility of this biogeochemical manipulation for subsurface remediation at arid Western DOE sites such as Hanford and INEEL.

  20. Salt- and alkaline-tolerance are linked in Acacia.

    PubMed

    Bui, Elisabeth N; Thornhill, Andrew; Miller, Joseph T

    2014-07-01

    Saline or alkaline soils present a strong stress on plants that together may be even more deleterious than alone. Australia's soils are old and contain large, sometimes overlapping, areas of high salt and alkalinity. Acacia and other Australian plant lineages have evolved in this stressful soil environment and present an opportunity to understand the evolution of salt and alkalinity tolerance. We investigate this evolution by predicting the average soil salinity and pH for 503 Acacia species and mapping the response onto a maximum-likelihood phylogeny. We find that salinity and alkalinity tolerance have evolved repeatedly and often together over 25 Ma of the Acacia radiation in Australia. Geographically restricted species are often tolerant of extreme conditions. Distantly related species are sympatric in the most extreme soil environments, suggesting lack of niche saturation. There is strong evidence that many Acacia have distributions affected by salinity and alkalinity and that preference is lineage specific.

  1. Salt- and alkaline-tolerance are linked in Acacia

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Elisabeth N.; Thornhill, Andrew; Miller, Joseph T.

    2014-01-01

    Saline or alkaline soils present a strong stress on plants that together may be even more deleterious than alone. Australia's soils are old and contain large, sometimes overlapping, areas of high salt and alkalinity. Acacia and other Australian plant lineages have evolved in this stressful soil environment and present an opportunity to understand the evolution of salt and alkalinity tolerance. We investigate this evolution by predicting the average soil salinity and pH for 503 Acacia species and mapping the response onto a maximum-likelihood phylogeny. We find that salinity and alkalinity tolerance have evolved repeatedly and often together over 25 Ma of the Acacia radiation in Australia. Geographically restricted species are often tolerant of extreme conditions. Distantly related species are sympatric in the most extreme soil environments, suggesting lack of niche saturation. There is strong evidence that many Acacia have distributions affected by salinity and alkalinity and that preference is lineage specific. PMID:25079493

  2. Novel quaternary ammonium microblock poly (p-phenylene-co-aryl ether ketone)s as anion exchange membranes for alkaline fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xue; Xue, Boxin; Qian, Huidong; Zheng, Jifu; Li, Shenghai; Zhang, Suobo

    2017-02-01

    Using cation compounds as raw materials, three quaternized microblock poly(p-phenylene-co-aryl ether ketone)s (s-, m-, and l-QPP-co-PAEK) were synthesized using a nickel (0)-catalyzed coupling reaction. Hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties were affixed using cationic quaternary ammonium (QA) groups attached to poly(p-phenylene) by a three-carbon interstitial spacer and nonionic dichloride monomers of various lengths, respectively. The morphology, water uptake, swelling ratio, mechanical properties, thermal stability, hydroxide conductivity and alkaline stability of these new membranes were investigated. Experimental results indicated that the membrane with the longest hydrophobic microblock exhibited high hydroxide conductivity (37.6 mS cm-1 at 80 °C) resulting from the aggregation of ionic clusters observed using TEM. The copolymers with longer hydrophobic nonionic segments exhibited improved alkaline stability, suggesting that the hydrophobic chain shields the QA groups and that the polymer chains pack in a manner that restricts rotation. Controlling the distribution of QA groups in poly(p-phenylene) moieties and tuning the block length of nonionic segments are demonstrated to be effective methods for improving the hydroxide conductivity and alkaline stability of anion exchange membranes.

  3. The relationship between potassic, calc-alkaline and Na-alkaline magmatism in South Italy volcanoes: A melt inclusion approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiano, Pierre; Clocchiatti, Robert; Ottolini, Luisa; Sbrana, Alessandro

    2004-03-01

    The present-day tectonic setting of the Tyrrhenian Sea is dominated by the eastward migration of the Tyrrhenian-Appenines subduction system and the existence of a contemporaneous and parallel extensional-compressional regime. This complex setting leads to the occurrence of a wide spectrum of magma-types in the South Italy volcanoes. Here, major and trace-element data for primitive melt inclusions preserved in olivine phenocrysts have been obtained in order to add constraints on the origin of the calc-alkaline magmas from the Aeolian arc (Stromboli and Vulcano islands), the potassic magmas from the Campania Province (Vesuvius and Phlegraean Fields) and the Na-alkaline magmas from Ustica Island. The approach used to determine the possible mantle sources of the trapped melts for each population of melt inclusions is based on the determination of the trace-element incompatibility sequence taken as the relative order of increasing bulk partition coefficients, which depends on the mineralogy of the source and gives direct information about minerals residual at the time of melting. Compositional similarities between the melt inclusions and their host lavas suggest that shallow-level magma contamination did not contribute significantly to the geochemical characteristics of the magma-types encountered in the region. Results of the trace-element modelling indicate that the melt inclusions from the Aeolian Islands and Campania Province volcanoes originate from mantle sources strongly affected by subduction-related metasomatic processes. Trace-element relationships of melt inclusions from Vulcano and Stromboli reflect melting of peridotitic sources that have been enriched by a slab-derived, aqueous fluid formed during dehydratation of K-free phases at shallow to intermediate depths. The negative high-field strength elements (HFSE) anomalies of these inclusions were generated in the absence of any residual phase in which HFSE might be compatible. In addition, their major

  4. The choice of low-temperature hydrogen fuel cells: Acidic - or alkaline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordesch, K.

    A comparison of the major types of hydrogen-oxygen (air) fuel cells is given. The criteria for the selection is the fuel availability, system performance, optimal cost and life expectancy in most suitable application areas. Special recommendations are given for designs of bipolar alkaline batteries for intermittent use in electric vehicles on the road, combining high conversion efficiency with long stand-by periods. Such batteries with liquid alkaline electrolytes will have to compete with matrix-type cells using improved acidic- or membrane-type cells. Hybrid systems will be discussed and their advantages from the economic point of view will be considered. In electric vehicles the combination with an advanced rechargeable battery system, like zinc-bromine, could be decisive for success. Unfortunately, there are not enough cost data available to compare the systems now.

  5. Acid esterification-alkaline transesterification process for methyl ester production from crude rubber seed oil.

    PubMed

    Thaiyasuit, Prachasanti; Pianthong, Kulachate; Worapun, Ittipon

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to examine methods and the most suitable conditions for producing methyl ester from crude rubber seed oil. An acid esterification-alkaline transesterification process is proposed. In the experiment, the 20% FFA of crude rubber seed oil could be reduced to 3% FFA by acid esterification. The product after esterified was then tranesterified by alkaline transesterification process. By this method, the maximum yield of methyl ester was 90% by mass. The overall consumption of methanol was 10.5:1 by molar ratio. The yielded methyl ester was tested for its fuel properties and met required standards. The major fatty acid methyl ester compositions were analyzed and constituted of methyl linoleate 41.57%, methyl oleate 24.87%, and methyl lonolenate 15.16%. Therefore, the cetane number of methyl ester could be estimated as 47.85, while the tested result of motor cetane number was 51.20.

  6. Biochemical properties and substrate specificities of alkaline and histidine acid phytases.

    PubMed

    Oh, B-C; Choi, W-C; Park, S; Kim, Y-o; Oh, T-K

    2004-01-01

    Phytases are a special class of phosphatase that catalyze the sequential hydrolysis of phytate to less-phosphorylated myo-inositol derivatives and inorganic phosphate. Phytases are added to animal feedstuff to reduce phosphate pollution in the environment, since monogastric animals such as pigs, poultry, and fish are unable to metabolize phytate. Based on biochemical properties and amino acid sequence alignment, phytases can be categorized into two major classes, the histidine acid phytases and the alkaline phytases. The histidine acid phosphatase class shows broad substrate specificity and hydrolyzes metal-free phytate at the acidic pH range and produces myo-inositol monophosphate as the final product. In contrast, the alkaline phytase class exhibits strict substrate specificity for the calcium-phytate complex and produces myo-inositol trisphosphate as the final product. This review describes recent findings that present novel viewpoints concerning the molecular basis of phytase classification.

  7. Phosphatidylinositol anchor of HeLa cell alkaline phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Jemmerson, R.; Low, M.G.

    1987-09-08

    Alkaline phosphatase from cancer cells, HeLa TCRC-1, was biosynthetically labeled with either /sup 3/H-fatty acids or (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine as analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography of immunoprecipitated material. Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) released a substantial proportion of the /sup 3/H-fatty acid label from immunoaffinity-purified alkaline phosphatase but had no effect on the radioactivity of (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine-labeled material. PI-PLC also liberated catalytically active alkaline phosphatase from viable cells, and this could be selectively blocked by monoclonal antibodies to alkaline phosphatase. However, the alkaline phosphatase released from /sup 3/H-fatty acid labeled cells by PI-PLC was not radioactive. By contrast, treatment with bromelain removed both the /sup 3/H-fatty acid and the (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine label from purified alkaline phosphatase. Subtilisin was also able to remove the (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine label from the purified alkaline phosphatase. The /sup 3/H radioactivity in alkaline phosphatase purified from (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine-labeled cells comigrated with authentic (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine by anion-exchange chromatography after acid hydrolysis. The data suggest that the /sup 3/H-fatty acid and (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine are covalently attached to the carboxyl-terminal segment since bromelain and subtilisin both release alkaline phosphatase from the membrane by cleavage at that end of the polypeptide chain. The data are consistent with findings for other proteins recently shown to be anchored in the membrane through a glycosylphosphatidylinositol structure and indicate that a similar structure contributes to the membrane anchoring of alkaline phosphatase.

  8. Polycation-DNA complexes for gene delivery: a comparison of the biopharmaceutical properties of cationic polypeptides and cationic lipids.

    PubMed

    Pouton, C W; Lucas, P; Thomas, B J; Uduehi, A N; Milroy, D A; Moss, S H

    1998-04-30

    DNA plasmids formed particulate complexes with a variety of cationic polyamino acids and cationic lipids, which were used to transfect mammalian cells in culture. Complexation was studied by assaying for exclusion of ethidium using a fluorometric assay, which indicated that complexation with cationic polyamino acids took place with utilisation of the majority of charged functional groups. The particle sizes and zeta potentials of a range of complexes were determined. Generally polyamino acids formed uniform particles 80-120 nm in diameter in water, but their particle size increased on dilution of the particles in electrolytes or cell culture media. The efficiency of transfection was compared using complexes of pRSVlacZ, a reporter construct which expressed beta-galactosidase under the control of the Rous sarcoma virus promoter. Positively charged DNA/polyamino acid complexes were taken up by cells but required an endosomolytic agent, such as chloroquine, to facilitate transfection. Polyornithine complexes resulted in the highest levels of expression, in comparison with other homopolyamino acids (polyornithine>poly-L-lysine=poly-D-lysine>polyarginine). Copolyamino acids of lysine and alanine condensed DNA but were less active in transfection experiments. Copoly(L-Lys, L-Ala 1:1) was inactive even in the presence of chloroquine. In contrast DNA/cationic lipid complexes transfected cells spontaneously, and chloroquine did not improve the extent of expression, rather it usually reduced efficiency. There was little correlation between comparative efficiencies of lipid complexes between cell lines suggesting that the nature of the cell membrane and differences in mechanisms of internalisation were determinants of efficiency. In an effort to explore better cell culture models for gene delivery, monolayers of Caco-2 cells were transfected in filter culture. As the cells differentiated and formed a polarized monolayer, expression of beta-galactosidase was reduced until at

  9. The acute toxicity of major ion salts to Ceriodaphnia dubia: I. ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The ions Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Cl-, SO42-, and HCO3-/CO32- (referred to as “major ions”) are present in all fresh waters and are physiologically required by aquatic organisms, but can be increased to harmful levels by a variety of anthropogenic activities that speed geochemical weathering or otherwise introduce or concentrate ions. While toxicity of these ions to aquatic organisms has been previously shown, it is also known that their toxicity can vary depending on the concentrations of other co-occurring anions, and understanding these relationships is key to predicting toxicity and establishing appropriate environmental limits. In this paper we conduct a series of experiments with Ceriodaphnia dubia to evaluate the acute toxicity of all twelve major ionsalts (pairing one of the cations with one of the anions) and to determine how toxicity of these salts varies as a function of background water chemistry. All salts except CaSO4 and CaCO3 were acutely toxic to C. dubia below saturation, with the lowest LC50s found for K salts. Of the remaining salts, all but CaCl2 showed some degree of decreased toxicity as the ionic content of the background water increased. Experiments that independently varied Ca:Mg ratio, Na:K ratio, Cl:SO4 ratio, and alkalinity/pH were used to show that Ca concentration was the primary factor influencing the toxicities of Na and Mg salts. In contrast, the toxicities of K salts were primarily influenced by the concentration of Na. Th

  10. Chemical and biotic characteristics of two low-alkalinity lakes in northern Wisconsin: relation to atmospheric deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webster, K.E.; Eilers, J.M.; Wiener, J.G.; Glass, G.E.; Garrison, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    Synoptic surveys of water chemistry in north-central Wisconsin documented the presence of many low alkalinity lakes potentially sensitive to acid deposition. Furthermore, lake hydrologic type proved to be a key factor in determining lake sensitivity: the low alkalinity systems were predominately seepage lakes. To test this hypothesis and identify the controls on the chemistry of these low alkalinity systems, the authors initiated hydrologic, chemical, biological and limnological studies at Lakes Clara and Vandercook in 1980. The report summarizes the results of those studies (including previously published hydrologic results) conducted between 1981 and 1983. The major goals are to assess the sensitivity of the study lakes to acid deposition and to identify key processes controlling the acid-base chemistry of these software seepage lakes.

  11. Expanding the Palette of Phenanthridinium Cations

    PubMed Central

    Cairns, Andrew G; Senn, Hans Martin; Murphy, Michael P; Hartley, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    5,6-Disubstituted phenanthridinium cations have a range of redox, fluorescence and biological properties. Some properties rely on phenanthridiniums intercalating into DNA, but the use of these cations as exomarkers for the reactive oxygen species (ROS), superoxide, and as inhibitors of acetylcholine esterase (AChE) do not require intercalation. A versatile modular synthesis of 5,6-disubstituted phenanthridiniums that introduces diversity by Suzuki–Miyaura coupling, imine formation and microwave-assisted cyclisation is presented. Computational modelling at the density functional theory (DFT) level reveals that the novel displacement of the aryl halide by an acyclic N-alkylimine proceeds by an SNAr mechanism rather than electrocyclisation. It is found that the displacement of halide is concerted and there is no stable Meisenheimer intermediate, provided the calculations consistently use a polarisable solvent model and a diffuse basis set. PMID:24677631

  12. Cation channels in the Arabidopsis plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Véry, Anne Aliénor; Sentenac, Hervé

    2002-04-01

    In vivo analyses have identified different functional types of ion channels in various plant tissues and cells. The Arabidopsis genome contains approximately 70 genes for ion channels, of which 57 might be cation-selective channels (K(+), Ca(2+) or poorly discriminating channels). Here, we describe the different families of (putative) cation channels: the Shakers, the two-P-domain and Kir K(+) channels (encoded by the KCO genes), the cyclic-nucleotide-gated channels, the glutamate receptors, and the Ca(2+) channel TPC1. We also compare molecular data with the data obtained in planta, which should lead to a better understanding of the identity of these channels and provide clues about their roles in plant nutrition and cell signalling.

  13. Mechanism of metal cationization in organic SIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojciechowski, I.; Delcorte, A.; Gonze, X.; Bertrand, P.

    2001-09-01

    A mechanism for metal cationization of phenyl group containing hydrocarbons is discussed. Intact molecules and their fragments are emitted from a thin organic layer covering a metal surface bombarded by fast ions. It is shown that the process of associative ionization of a neutral hydrocarbon molecule and a neutral excited metal atom, occurring above the surface, may contribute to the yield of cationized molecules. To demonstrate this we have calculated the potential energy curves for the model system C 6H 6+Me (Me=Ag, Cu, Au) making use of the density functional theory. The initial states of the metal atoms approaching the benzene ring along the C 6 symmetry axis were set as the ground, ionic, and excited in ( n-1)d 9ns 2 electronic configuration.

  14. Nanoheterostructure cation exchange: anionic framework conservation.

    PubMed

    Jain, Prashant K; Amirav, Lilac; Aloni, Shaul; Alivisatos, A Paul

    2010-07-28

    In ionic nanocrystals the cationic sublattice can be replaced with a different metal ion via a fast, simple, and reversible place exchange, allowing postsynthetic modification of the composition of the nanocrystal, while preserving its size and shape. Here, we demonstrate that, during such an exchange, the anionic framework of the crystal is preserved. When applied to nanoheterostructures, this phenomenon ensures that compositional interfaces within the heterostructure are conserved throughout the transformation. For instance, a morphology composed of a CdSe nanocrystal embedded in a CdS rod (CdSe/CdS) was exchanged to a PbSe/PbS nanorod via a Cu(2)Se/Cu(2)S structure. During every exchange cycle, the seed size and position within the nanorod were preserved, as evident by excitonic features, Z-contrast imaging, and elemental line scans. Anionic framework conservation extends the domain of cation exchange to the design of more complex and unique nanostructures.

  15. [PAH Cations as Viable Carriers of DIBs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, Ted

    1998-01-01

    This report is intended to fill in the blanks in NASA's file system for our lab astro study of molecular ions of astrophysical interest. In order to give NASA what it needs for its files, I attach below the text of the section from our recent proposal to continue this work, in which we describe progress to date, including a large number of publications. Our initial studies were focused on PAH cations, which appear to be viable candidates as the carriers of the DIBs, an idea that has been supported by laboratory spectroscopy of PAH cations in inert matrices. Beginning with the simplest aromatic (benzene; C6H6) and moving progressively to larger species (naphthalene, C10OH8; pyrene, C16H10; and most recently chrysene, C18H12), we have been able to derive rate coefficients for reactions with neutral spices that are abundant in the diffuse interstellar medium.

  16. Planar Chiral, Ferrocene-Stabilized Silicon Cations.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Ruth K; Klare, Hendrik F T; Fröhlich, Roland; Oestreich, Martin

    2016-04-04

    The preparation of a series of planar chiral, ferrocenyl-substituted hydrosilanes as precursors of ferrocene-stabilized silicon cations is described. These molecules also feature stereogenicity at the silicon atom. The generation and (29)Si NMR spectroscopic characterization of the corresponding silicon cations is reported, and problems arising from interactions of the electron-deficient silicon atom and adjacent C(sp(3))-H bonds or aromatic π donors are discussed. These issues are overcome by tethering another substituent at the silicon atom to the ferrocene backbone. The resulting annulation also imparts conformational rigidity and steric hindrance in such a way that the central chirality at the silicon atom is set with complete diastereocontrol. These chiral Lewis acid catalysts were then tested in difficult Diels-Alder reactions, but no enantioinduction was seen.

  17. Electronic spectrum of 9-methylanthracenium radical cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Gerard D.; Sanelli, Julian A.; Dryza, Vik; Bieske, Evan J.; Schmidt, Timothy W.

    2016-04-01

    The predissociation spectrum of the cold, argon-tagged, 9-methylanthracenium radical cation is reported from 8000 cm-1 to 44 500 cm-1. The reported spectrum contains bands corresponding to at least eight electronic transitions ranging from the near infrared to the ultraviolet. These electronic transitions are assigned through comparison with ab initio energies and intensities. The infrared D1←D0 transitions exhibit significant vibronic activity, which is assigned through comparison with TD-B3LYP excited state frequencies and intensities, as well as modelled vibronic interactions. Dissociation of 9-methylanthracenium is also observed at high visible-photon energies, resulting in the loss of either CH2 or CH3. The relevance of these spectra, and the spectra of other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon radical cations, to the largely unassigned diffuse interstellar bands, is discussed.

  18. Influence of hydration and cation binding on parvalbumin dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanotti, J.-M.; Parello, J.; Bellissent-Funel, M.-C.

    Due to structural characteristics, parvalbumin exerts a major role in intracellular Mg2+ and Ca2+ concentration regulation during the muscular contraction-relieving cycle. This structure-function relationship being established, we are investigating the structure-dynamics-function relationship to take into account the protein dynamics. Because of the strong incoherent neutron scattering cross section of hydrogen and of the abundance of this element in proteins, incoherent inelastic neutron scattering is a unique probe to study vibrations and localised motions in biological macromolecules. We take advantage of the complementarities in energy or time resolution of various neutron spectrometers (time of flight, backscattering, spin-echo) to probe the parvalbumin dynamics from a fraction of a picosecond to a few nanoseconds. Influences of hydration and of the nature of the cation on parvalbumin dynamics are discussed.

  19. Regulation of Cation Balance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Cyert, Martha S.; Philpott, Caroline C.

    2013-01-01

    All living organisms require nutrient minerals for growth and have developed mechanisms to acquire, utilize, and store nutrient minerals effectively. In the aqueous cellular environment, these elements exist as charged ions that, together with protons and hydroxide ions, facilitate biochemical reactions and establish the electrochemical gradients across membranes that drive cellular processes such as transport and ATP synthesis. Metal ions serve as essential enzyme cofactors and perform both structural and signaling roles within cells. However, because these ions can also be toxic, cells have developed sophisticated homeostatic mechanisms to regulate their levels and avoid toxicity. Studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have characterized many of the gene products and processes responsible for acquiring, utilizing, storing, and regulating levels of these ions. Findings in this model organism have often allowed the corresponding machinery in humans to be identified and have provided insights into diseases that result from defects in ion homeostasis. This review summarizes our current understanding of how cation balance is achieved and modulated in baker’s yeast. Control of intracellular pH is discussed, as well as uptake, storage, and efflux mechanisms for the alkali metal cations, Na+ and K+, the divalent cations, Ca2+ and Mg2+, and the trace metal ions, Fe2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, and Mn2+. Signal transduction pathways that are regulated by pH and Ca2+ are reviewed, as well as the mechanisms that allow cells to maintain appropriate intracellular cation concentrations when challenged by extreme conditions, i.e., either limited availability or toxic levels in the environment. PMID:23463800

  20. Interaction between silica and hydrophobic cations.

    PubMed Central

    Depasse, J

    1978-01-01

    The interactions between silica and some molecules which have a high affinity for its surface have been studied. The hydrophobic properties and the positive charge of these molecules are likely to be responsible for their strong adsorption on to silica. These observations should be useful in research into new inhibitors of the effects of silica. One of the cations tested, chloroquine, has been shown to be an effective inhibitor of the haemolytic activity of quartz. PMID:204326

  1. Batteries: from alkaline to zinc-air.

    PubMed

    Dondelinger, Robert M

    2004-01-01

    There is no perfect disposable battery--one that will sit on the shelf for 20 years, then continually provide unlimited current, at a completely constant voltage until exhausted, without producing heat. There is no perfect rechargeable battery--one with all of the above characteristics and will also withstand an infinite overcharge while providing an equally infinite cycle life. There are only compromises. Every battery selection is a compromise between the ideally required characteristics, the advantages, and the limitations of each battery type. General selection of a battery type to power a medical device is largely outside the purview of the biomed. Initially, these are engineering decisions made at the time of medical equipment design and are intended to be followed in perpetuity. However, since newer cell types evolve and the manufacturer's literature is fixed at the time of printing, some intelligent substitutions may be made as long as the biomed understands the characteristics of both the recommended cell and the replacement cell. For example, when the manufacturer recommends alkaline, it is usually because of the almost constant voltage it produces under the devices' design load. Over time, other battery types may be developed that will meet the intent of the manufacturer, at a lower cost, providing longer operational life, at a lower environmental cost, or with a combination of these advantages. In the Obstetrical Doppler cited at the beginning of this article, the user had put in carbon-zinc cells, and the biomed had unknowingly replaced them with carbonzinc cells. If the alkaline cells recommended by the manufacturer had been used, there would have been the proper output voltage at the battery terminals when the [table: see text] cells were at their half-life. Instead, the device refused to operate since the battery voltage was below presumed design voltage. While battery-type substitutions may be easily and relatively successfully made in disposable

  2. Sn cation valency dependence in cation exchange reactions involving Cu(2-x)Se nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    De Trizio, Luca; Li, Hongbo; Casu, Alberto; Genovese, Alessandro; Sathya, Ayyappan; Messina, Gabriele C; Manna, Liberato

    2014-11-19

    We studied cation exchange reactions in colloidal Cu(2-x)Se nanocrystals (NCs) involving the replacement of Cu(+) cations with either Sn(2+) or Sn(4+) cations. This is a model system in several aspects: first, the +2 and +4 oxidation states for tin are relatively stable; in addition, the phase of the Cu(2-x)Se NCs remains cubic regardless of the degree of copper deficiency (that is, "x") in the NC lattice. Also, Sn(4+) ions are comparable in size to the Cu(+) ions, while Sn(2+) ones are much larger. We show here that the valency of the entering Sn ions dictates the structure and composition not only of the final products but also of the intermediate steps of the exchange. When Sn(4+) cations are used, alloyed Cu(2-4y)Sn(y)Se NCs (with y ≤ 0.33) are formed as intermediates, with almost no distortion of the anion framework, apart from a small contraction. In this exchange reaction the final stoichiometry of the NCs cannot go beyond Cu0.66Sn0.33Se (that is Cu2SnSe3), as any further replacement of Cu(+) cations with Sn(4+) cations would require a drastic reorganization of the anion framework, which is not possible at the reaction conditions of the experiments. When instead Sn(2+) cations are employed, SnSe NCs are formed, mostly in the orthorhombic phase, with significant, albeit not drastic, distortion of the anion framework. Intermediate steps in this exchange reaction are represented by Janus-type Cu(2-x)Se/SnSe heterostructures, with no Cu-Sn-Se alloys.

  3. Sn Cation Valency Dependence in Cation Exchange Reactions Involving Cu2-xSe Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We studied cation exchange reactions in colloidal Cu2-xSe nanocrystals (NCs) involving the replacement of Cu+ cations with either Sn2+ or Sn4+ cations. This is a model system in several aspects: first, the +2 and +4 oxidation states for tin are relatively stable; in addition, the phase of the Cu2-xSe NCs remains cubic regardless of the degree of copper deficiency (that is, “x”) in the NC lattice. Also, Sn4+ ions are comparable in size to the Cu+ ions, while Sn2+ ones are much larger. We show here that the valency of the entering Sn ions dictates the structure and composition not only of the final products but also of the intermediate steps of the exchange. When Sn4+ cations are used, alloyed Cu2–4ySnySe NCs (with y ≤ 0.33) are formed as intermediates, with almost no distortion of the anion framework, apart from a small contraction. In this exchange reaction the final stoichiometry of the NCs cannot go beyond Cu0.66Sn0.33Se (that is Cu2SnSe3), as any further replacement of Cu+ cations with Sn4+ cations would require a drastic reorganization of the anion framework, which is not possible at the reaction conditions of the experiments. When instead Sn2+ cations are employed, SnSe NCs are formed, mostly in the orthorhombic phase, with significant, albeit not drastic, distortion of the anion framework. Intermediate steps in this exchange reaction are represented by Janus-type Cu2-xSe/SnSe heterostructures, with no Cu–Sn–Se alloys. PMID:25340627

  4. Reducible cationic lipids for gene transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Wetzer, B; Byk, G; Frederic, M; Airiau, M; Blanche, F; Pitard, B; Scherman, D

    2001-01-01

    One of the main challenges of gene therapy remains the increase of gene delivery into eukaryotic cells. We tested whether intracellular DNA release, an essential step for gene transfer, could be facilitated by using reducible cationic DNA-delivery vectors. For this purpose, plasmid DNA was complexed with cationic lipids bearing a disulphide bond. This reduction-sensitive linker is expected to be reduced and cleaved in the reducing milieu of the cytoplasm, thus potentially improving DNA release and consequently transfection. The DNA--disulphide-lipid complexation was monitored by ethidium bromide exclusion, and the size of complexes was determined by dynamic light scattering. It was found that the reduction kinetics of disulphide groups in DNA--lipid complexes depended on the position of the disulphide linker within the lipid molecule. Furthermore, the internal structure of DNA--lipid particles was examined by small-angle X-ray scattering before and after lipid reduction. DNA release from lipid complexes was observed after the reduction of disulphide bonds of several lipids. Cell-transfection experiments suggested that complexes formed with selected reducible lipids resulted in up to 1000-fold higher reporter-gene activity, when compared with their analogues without disulphide bonds. In conclusion, reduction-sensitive groups introduced into cationic lipid backbones potentially allow enhanced DNA release from DNA--lipid complexes after intracellular reduction and represent a tool for improved vectorization. PMID:11389682

  5. Reducible cationic lipids for gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Wetzer, B; Byk, G; Frederic, M; Airiau, M; Blanche, F; Pitard, B; Scherman, D

    2001-06-15

    One of the main challenges of gene therapy remains the increase of gene delivery into eukaryotic cells. We tested whether intracellular DNA release, an essential step for gene transfer, could be facilitated by using reducible cationic DNA-delivery vectors. For this purpose, plasmid DNA was complexed with cationic lipids bearing a disulphide bond. This reduction-sensitive linker is expected to be reduced and cleaved in the reducing milieu of the cytoplasm, thus potentially improving DNA release and consequently transfection. The DNA--disulphide-lipid complexation was monitored by ethidium bromide exclusion, and the size of complexes was determined by dynamic light scattering. It was found that the reduction kinetics of disulphide groups in DNA--lipid complexes depended on the position of the disulphide linker within the lipid molecule. Furthermore, the internal structure of DNA--lipid particles was examined by small-angle X-ray scattering before and after lipid reduction. DNA release from lipid complexes was observed after the reduction of disulphide bonds of several lipids. Cell-transfection experiments suggested that complexes formed with selected reducible lipids resulted in up to 1000-fold higher reporter-gene activity, when compared with their analogues without disulphide bonds. In conclusion, reduction-sensitive groups introduced into cationic lipid backbones potentially allow enhanced DNA release from DNA--lipid complexes after intracellular reduction and represent a tool for improved vectorization.

  6. Controlling chemistry with cations: photochemistry within zeolites.

    PubMed

    Ramamurthy, V; Shailaja, J; Kaanumalle, Lakshmi S; Sunoj, R B; Chandrasekhar, J

    2003-08-21

    The alkali ions present in the supercages of zeolites X and Y interact with included guest molecules through quadrupolar (cation-pi), and dipolar (cation-carbonyl) interactions. The presence of such interactions can be inferred through solid-state NMR spectra of the guest molecules. Alkali ions, as illustrated in this article, can be exploited to control the photochemical and photophysical behaviors of the guest molecules. For example, molecules that rarely phosphoresce can be induced to do so within heavy cation-exchanged zeolites. The nature (electronic configuration) of the lowest triplet state of carbonyl compounds can be altered with the help of light alkali metal ions. This state switch (n pi*-pi pi*) helps to bring out reactivity that normally remains dormant. Selectivity obtained during the singlet oxygen oxidation of olefins within zeolites illustrates the remarkable control that can be exerted on photoreactions with the help of a confined medium that also has active sites. The reaction cavities of zeolites, like enzymes, are not only well-defined and confined, but also have active sites that closely guide the reactant molecule from start to finish. The examples provided here illustrate that zeolites are far more useful than simple shape-selective catalysts.

  7. Low cation coordination in oxide melts

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, Lawrie; Benmore, Chris J; Du, Jincheng; Weber, Richard; Neuefeind, Joerg C; Tumber, Sonia; Parise, John B

    2014-01-01

    The complete set of Faber-Ziman partial pair distribution functions for a rare earth oxide liquid were measured for the first time by combining aerodynamic levitation, neutron diffraction, high energy x-ray diffraction and isomorphic substitution using Y2 O3 and Ho2 O3 melts. The average Y- O coordination is measured to be 5.5(2), which is significantly less than the octahedral coordination of crystalline Y2 O3 (or Ho2 O3 ). Investigation of high temperature La2 O3 , ZrO2 , SiO2 , and Al2 O3 melts by x-ray diffraction and molecular dynamics simulations also show lower-than-crystal cation- oxygen coordination. These measurements suggest a general trend towards lower M-O coordination compared to their crystalline counterparts. It is found that this coordination number drop is larger for lower field strength, larger radius cations and is negligible for high field strength (network forming) cations. These findings have broad implications for predicting the local structure and related physical properties of metal-oxide melts and oxide glasses.

  8. Microbial Thiocyanate Utilization under Highly Alkaline Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Tourova, Tatyana P.; Lysenko, Anatoly M.; Kuenen, J. Gijs

    2001-01-01

    Three kinds of alkaliphilic bacteria able to utilize thiocyanate (CNS−) at pH 10 were found in highly alkaline soda lake sediments and soda soils. The first group included obligate heterotrophs that utilized thiocyanate as a nitrogen source while growing at pH 10 with acetate as carbon and energy sources. Most of the heterotrophic strains were able to oxidize sulfide and thiosulfate to tetrathionate. The second group included obligately autotrophic sulfur-oxidizing alkaliphiles which utilized thiocyanate nitrogen during growth with thiosulfate as the energy source. Genetic analysis demonstrated that both the heterotrophic and autotrophic alkaliphiles that utilized thiocyanate as a nitrogen source were related to the previously described sulfur-oxidizing alkaliphiles belonging to the gamma subdivision of the division Proteobacteria (the Halomonas group for the heterotrophs and the genus Thioalkalivibrio for autotrophs). The third group included obligately autotrophic sulfur-oxidizing alkaliphilic bacteria able to utilize thiocyanate as a sole source of energy. These bacteria could be enriched on mineral medium with thiocyanate at pH 10. Growth with thiocyanate was usually much slower than growth with thiosulfate, although the biomass yield on thiocyanate was higher. Of the four strains isolated, the three vibrio-shaped strains were genetically closely related to the previously described sulfur-oxidizing alkaliphiles belonging to the genus Thioalkalivibrio. The rod-shaped isolate differed from the other isolates by its ability to accumulate large amounts of elemental sulfur inside its cells and by its ability to oxidize carbon disulfide. Despite its low DNA homology with and substantial phenotypic differences from the vibrio-shaped strains, this isolate also belonged to the genus Thioalkalivibrio according to a phylogenetic analysis. The heterotrophic and autotrophic alkaliphiles that grew with thiocyanate as an N source possessed a relatively high level of cyanase

  9. Archaeal Communities in a Heterogeneous Hypersaline-Alkaline Soil.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Noya, Yendi E; Valenzuela-Encinas, César; Sandoval-Yuriar, Alonso; Jiménez-Bueno, Norma G; Marsch, Rodolfo; Dendooven, Luc

    2015-01-01

    In this study the archaeal communities in extreme saline-alkaline soils of the former lake Texcoco, Mexico, with electrolytic conductivities (EC) ranging from 0.7 to 157.2 dS/m and pH from 8.5 to 10.5 were explored. Archaeal communities in the 0.7 dS/m pH 8.5 soil had the lowest alpha diversity values and were dominated by a limited number of phylotypes belonging to the mesophilic Candidatus Nitrososphaera. Diversity and species richness were higher in the soils with EC between 9.0 and 157.2 dS/m. The majority of OTUs detected in the hypersaline soil were members of the Halobacteriaceae family. Novel phylogenetic branches in the Halobacteriales class were detected in the soil, and more abundantly in soil with the higher pH (10.5), indicating that unknown and uncharacterized Archaea can be found in this soil. Thirteen different genera of the Halobacteriaceae family were identified and were distributed differently between the soils. Halobiforma, Halostagnicola, Haloterrigena, and Natronomonas were found in all soil samples. Methanogenic archaea were found only in soil with pH between 10.0 and 10.3. Retrieved methanogenic archaea belonged to the Methanosarcinales and Methanomicrobiales orders. The comparison of the archaeal community structures considering phylogenetic information (UniFrac distances) clearly clustered the communities by pH.

  10. Alkaline phosphatase in stallion semen: characterization and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Turner, R M O; McDonnell, S M

    2003-06-01

    Significant amounts of alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity have been found in semen plasma from numerous species. In species in which the majority of semen plasma AP (SPAP) activity originates from the epididymis and testicle, SPAP activity can be used clinically as a marker to differentiate testicular origin azoospermia or oligospermia from ejaculatory failure. Information on SPAP activity in stallions to date has been limited. In this study, a standard clinical chemistry analyzer was used to determine AP activity in pre-ejaculatory fluid and ejaculates from groups of normal stallions. Additionally, accessory glands, epididymides, testicles and other components of the urogenital tract of normal stallions were assayed to determine which tissues contain SPAP activity. The results indicated that levels of AP activity are low in pre-ejaculatory fluid, but significantly higher in ejaculatory fluid from normal stallions. Spermatozoa were not a significant source of SPAP activity. High levels of SPAP activity were found in the testes and epididymides. These findings suggest that SPAP activity is a candidate for a sperm-independent marker for ejaculation in the stallion. Finally, AP activity was determined in ejaculatory fluid from a stallion with bilaterally blocked ampullae, both before and after relief of the blockage. While the blockage was present, AP activity in ejaculatory fluid was low. However, following relief of the blockage, AP activity in ejaculatory fluid rose dramatically, thus suggesting that AP activity will be useful as an inexpensive, simple clinical assay for differentiating ejaculatory failure or excurrent duct blockages from testicular origin azoospermia and oligospermia.

  11. Archaeal Communities in a Heterogeneous Hypersaline-Alkaline Soil

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Noya, Yendi E.; Valenzuela-Encinas, César; Sandoval-Yuriar, Alonso; Jiménez-Bueno, Norma G.; Marsch, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    In this study the archaeal communities in extreme saline-alkaline soils of the former lake Texcoco, Mexico, with electrolytic conductivities (EC) ranging from 0.7 to 157.2 dS/m and pH from 8.5 to 10.5 were explored. Archaeal communities in the 0.7 dS/m pH 8.5 soil had the lowest alpha diversity values and were dominated by a limited number of phylotypes belonging to the mesophilic Candidatus Nitrososphaera. Diversity and species richness were higher in the soils with EC between 9.0 and 157.2 dS/m. The majority of OTUs detected in the hypersaline soil were members of the Halobacteriaceae family. Novel phylogenetic branches in the Halobacteriales class were detected in the soil, and more abundantly in soil with the higher pH (10.5), indicating that unknown and uncharacterized Archaea can be found in this soil. Thirteen different genera of the Halobacteriaceae family were identified and were distributed differently between the soils. Halobiforma, Halostagnicola, Haloterrigena, and Natronomonas were found in all soil samples. Methanogenic archaea were found only in soil with pH between 10.0 and 10.3. Retrieved methanogenic archaea belonged to the Methanosarcinales and Methanomicrobiales orders. The comparison of the archaeal community structures considering phylogenetic information (UniFrac distances) clearly clustered the communities by pH. PMID:26074731

  12. Belliella buryatensis sp. nov., isolated from alkaline lake water.

    PubMed

    Kozyreva, Lyudmila; Egorova, Darya; Anan'ina, Lyudmila; Plotnikova, Elena; Ariskina, Elena; Prisyazhnaya, Natalya; Radnaeva, Larisa; Namsaraev, Bair

    2016-01-01

    Two bacterial isolates from water of the alkaline brackish Lake Solenoe (Buryatia, Russia), 2C and 5CT, were characterized by using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. The strains were small, non-motile, Gram-stain-negative rods that formed small orange-red colonies on the surface of marine agar. Studies based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the strains were related closely to Belliella pelovolcani CC-SAL-25T (98.7 % sequence similarity). The G+C content of the DNA was 38-40 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization values between strains 2C and 5CT and B. pelovolcani CC-SAL-25T were 56-58 mol%. A menaquinone with seven isoprene units (MK-7) was the major respiratory quinone. The fatty acid profiles were slightly different from that of B. pelovolcani CC-SAL-25T. The novel strains could be distinguished from the phylogenetically closest species B. pelovolcani CC-SAL-25T based on matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectra of whole cells and a range of physiological and biochemical characteristics. The data obtained suggest that strains 2C and 5CT represent a novel species of the genus Belliella, for which the name Belliella buryatensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 5CT ( = VKM B-2724T = KCTC 32194T).

  13. Tracing the geochemical evolution of alkaline Lake Van, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiecien, Ola; Viehberg, Finn; Plessen, Birgit; Litt, Thomas; Tillman Meyer, Felix

    2015-04-01

    Terminal Lake Van, the world's largest soda basin, is characterised by Na-CO3-Cl water chemistry (Reimer et al., 2008), salinity of ~22 ‰ and high pH of ~9.7. The sedimentary record of the lake goes ca. 600 ka back and documents major climatic events over that period (Stockhecke et al., 2014). Alas, the longevity of the basin does not mean that it persisted unchanged over such a long time. Information collected within the ICDP PALEOVAN project clearly suggests that upon its birth the chemistry of early Lake Van was very different from its modern alkaline equivalent. Here we document, by means of proxy data, the changes in water chemistry in a transforming basin. Results of lithological (Stockhecke et al., 2014) and micropaleontological (ostracod, gastropod and diatom assemblages) analysis, combined with geochemical data (δ18O, δ13C, Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca) obtained from the biogenic and authigenic carbonate fraction imply, that early Lake Van was a relatively shallow, fresh-to-brackish and, most probably, open basin. Sedimentological information points to tectonic factors rather than climatic changes responsible for closing the lake ca. 430 ka ago. Reimer, A., Landmann, G., Kempe, S., 2008. Lake Van, Eastern Anatolia, Hydrochemistry and History. Aquat. Geochemistry 15, 195-222. Stockhecke, M., Sturm, M., Brunner, I., Schmincke, H.-U., Sumita, M., Kipfer, R., Cukur, D., Kwiecien, O., Anselmetti, F.S., 2014. Sedimentary evolution and environmental history of Lake Van (Turkey) over the past 600 000 years. Sedimentology.

  14. Anionic-cationic bi-cell design for direct methanol fuel cell stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyea; Ünlü, Murat; Zhou, Junfeng; Anestis-Richard, Irene; Kohl, Paul A.

    A new fuel cell stack design is described using an anion exchange membrane (AEM) fuel cell and a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell in series with a single fuel tank servicing both anodes in a passive direct methanol fuel cell configuration. The anionic-cationic bi-cell stack has alkaline and acid fuel cells in series (twice the voltage), one fuel tank, and simplified water management. The series connection between the two cells involves shorting the cathode of the anionic cell to the anode of the acidic cell. It is shown that these two electrodes are at essentially the same potential which avoids an undesired potential difference and resulting loss in current between the two electrodes. Further, the complimentary direction of water transport in the two kinds of fuel cells simplifies water management at both the anodes and cathodes. The effect of ionomer content on the AEM electrode potential and the activity of methanol oxidation were investigated. The individual performance of AEM and PEM fuel cells were evaluated. The effect of ion-exchange capacity in the alkaline electrodes was studied. A fuel wicking material in the methanol fuel tank was used to provide orientation-independent operation. The open circuit potential of the bi-cell was 1.36 V with 2.0 M methanol fuel and air at room temperature.

  15. Insight into the stability of poly(diallydimethylammoniumchloride) and polybrene poly cationic coatings in capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Pei, Lei; Lucy, Charles A

    2014-10-24

    Polycationic polymers are widely used in capillary electrophoresis (CE) as surface coatings to prevent protein adsorption and control electroosmotic flow (EOF). Such semi-permanent coatings are formed by flushing the capillary with a quaternary amine-based polymer such as poly(diallydimethylammonium chloride) (PDADMAC) or polybrene. Compared to covalent capillary coatings, the claimed advantages of adsorptive polycation coatings are their simple preparation and that they are not limited to the pH 2-8 range as are covalent coatings. However, while the latter is commonly claimed, few studies have demonstrated the stability of polycationic coatings at extreme pH. Herein PDADMAC and polybrene are studied as model cationic coatings. PDADMAC with higher molecular weight (M.W.) demonstrated higher EOF stability at pH 9.5, with PDADMAC of M.W. less than 200,000 being unstable at pH 9.5. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) shows that the quaternary amines of PDADMAC and polybrene were slowly converted to tertiary amines in alkaline solution and more rapidly when adsorbed on a silica surface. The degraded polycation deprotonated at pH >7, resulting in loss of polymer from the surface and diminishing EOF. Successive multiple ionic layer (SMIL) coatings show greater alkaline stability by distancing the polycation from the surface. Separations of inorganic anions at pH 9.5 illustrate the degradation behavior and enhanced stability of higher M.W. polycationic coatings.

  16. Interaction of polyamines with proteins of photosystem II: Cation binding and photosynthetic oxygen evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauchemin, R.; Harnois, J.; Rouillon, R.; Tajmir-Riahi, H. A.; Carpentier, R.

    2007-05-01

    Polyamines are organic cations that function in diverse physiological processes that share as a common thread a close relationship to cell proliferation and growth. Polyamines also affect photosynthetic oxygen evolution and therefore, this study was designed to investigate the interaction of 1,3-diaminopropane, 1,4-diaminobutane (putrescine), and 1,5-diaminopentane (cadaverine) cations with proteins of photosystem II (PSII) using PSII-enriched submembrane fractions with diamine concentrations between 0.01 and 20 mM. Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) difference spectroscopy with its self-deconvolution and second derivative resolution enhancement, as well as curve-fitting procedures were applied in order to determine the diamine binding mode, the protein conformational changes, and the structural properties of diamine-protein complexes. Spectroscopic evidence showed that diamines interact with proteins (H-bonding) through polypeptide C dbnd O groups with no major perturbations of protein secondary structure. At very low diamine concentration (0.01 mM), no inhibition of oxygen-evolution occurred, while at higher diamine content (5-10 mM), 100% inhibition was observed. Chorophyll fluorescence measurements demonstrated that the inhibition mainly affects the oxygen evolving complex of PSII. Comparisons of the effects of these dipositive organic cations with divalent metal cations on one hand and with polyvalent spermine and spermidine on the other hand, show major alterations of the protein secondary structure as positive charge increases.

  17. Biodistribution of rhodamine B fluorescence-labeled cationic nanoparticles in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, Kristina Bram; Northeved, Helle; Gjetting, Torben; Permin, Anders; Andresen, Thomas L.; Wegener, Karen Malene; Lam, Henrik Rye; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2014-02-01

    We investigated the biodistribution following the administration of nanosized (about 50 and 90 nm) cationic ( ζ: +30 and +50 mV) micelles and liposomes intended for drug delivery. The particles were stable and well characterized with respect to size and ζ potential. Ten 5- to 6-week-old male rats were used. The animals were randomly allocated to five groups receiving either cationic micelles or cationic liposomes by single intravenous (IV) administration at a dose of 100 mg/kg bodyweight by single intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection at a dose of 50 μg or no treatment. ICV administration was used to study local distribution in the brain and IV administration to study the systemic distribution of the particles. For both types of particles, ICV administration showed distribution in all ventricles in the brain while IV delivery displayed distribution to the major organs liver, spleen, kidney and lung, but not to the brain. Our data suggest that cationic micelles and liposomes are widely distributed in the body, indicating that these could potentially be used as drug delivery carriers to the major organs, but they do not cross the blood-brain barrier to a significant extent, without a targeting ligand attached. However, they are able to persist in the ventricles of the brain up to 24 h after ICV administration, demonstrating a new ability.

  18. Cation uptake and allocation by red pine seedlings under cation-nutrient stress in a column growth experiment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background and aims: Plant nutrient uptake is affected by environmental stress, but how plants respond to cation nutrient stress is poorly understood. We assessed the impact of varying degrees of cation-nutrient stress on cation uptake in an experimental plant-mineral system. Methods: Column experim...

  19. The preparation of monoclonal antibodies to human bone and liver alkaline phosphatase and their use in immunoaffinity purification and in studying these enzymes when present in serum.

    PubMed Central

    Bailyes, E M; Seabrook, R N; Calvin, J; Maguire, G A; Price, C P; Siddle, K; Luzio, J P

    1987-01-01

    1. Liver and bone alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes were solubilized with the zwitterionic detergent sulphobetaine 14, and purified to homogeneity by using a monoclonal antibody previously raised against a partially-purified preparation of the liver isoenzyme. Both purified isoenzymes had a specific activity in the range 1100-1400 mumol/min per mg of protein with a subunit Mr of 80,000 determined by SDS/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Butanol extraction instead of detergent solubilization, before immunoaffinity purification of the liver enzyme, resulted in the same specific activity and subunit Mr. The native Mr of the sulphobetaine 14-solubilized enzyme was consistent with the enzyme being a dimer of two identical subunits and was higher than that of the butanol-extracted enzyme, presumably due to the binding of the detergent micelle. 2. Pure bone and liver alkaline phosphatase were used to raise further antibodies to the two isoenzymes. Altogether, 27 antibody-producing cell lines were cloned from 12 mice. Several of these antibodies showed a greater than 2-fold preference for bone alkaline phosphatase in the binding assay used for screening. No antibodies showing a preference for liver alkaline phosphatase were successfully cloned. None of the antibodies showed significant cross-reaction with placental or intestinal alkaline phosphatase. Epitope analysis of the 27 antibodies using liver alkaline phosphatase as antigen gave rise to six groupings, with four antibodies unclassified. The six major epitope groups were also observed using bone alkaline phosphatase as antigen. 3. Serum from patients with cholestasis contains soluble and particulate forms of alkaline phosphatase. The soluble serum enzyme had the same size and charge as butanol-extracted liver enzyme on native polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. Cellulose acetate electrophoresis separated the soluble and particulate serum alkaline phosphatases as slow- and fast-moving forms respectively. In the

  20. Electromembrane recycling of highly mineralized alkaline blowdown water from evaporative water treatment plants at thermal power stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chichirova, N. D.; Chichirov, A. A.; Lyapin, A. I.; Minibaev, A. I.; Silov, I. Yu.; Tolmachev, L. I.

    2016-12-01

    Thermal power stations (TPS) are the main source of highly mineralized effluents affecting the environment. An analysis of their water systems demonstrates that alkaline effluents prevail at TPSs. Extraction of an alkali from highly mineralized effluents can make the recycling of effluents economically feasible. A method is proposed of electromembrane recycling of liquid alkaline highly mineralized wastes from TPSs. The process includes electromembrane apparatuses of two types, namely, a diffusion dialysis extractor (DDE) intended for extraction of the alkali from a highly mineralized solution having a complex composition and an electrodialysis concentrator for increasing the concentration of the extracted solution to a value suitable for use in water treatment plants at TPSs. For implementation of the first process (i.e. the extraction of alkali from alkaline-salt solution) various membranes from various manufacturers were studied: CM-PAD and AM-PAD (Ralex, Czechia), MK-40, MA-40, MA-41, MA-414, and MB-2 (OOO OKhK "Shchekinoazot", Russia), AR103-QDF and CR61-CMP (Ionies Inc., USA). The experiments demonstrate that the acceptable degree of separation of the alkali and the salt is achieved in a pair of cation-exchange membranes with the efficiency of separation being higher without an electric field. The highest efficiency was attained with Russian-made membranes (MK-40, OOO OKhK "Shchekinoazot"). A full scale experiment on recycling of highly-mineralized blowdown water from the evaporating water treatment system at the Kazan cogeneration power station No. 3 (TETs-3) was performed in a pilot unit consisting of two electromembrane apparatuses made by UAB "Membraninės Technologijos LT". In the experiments every ton of blowdown water yielded 0.1 t of concentrated alkaline solution with an alkali content of up to 4 wt % and 0.9 t of the softened salt solution suitable for the reuse in the TPS cycle. The power rate is 6 kWh / ton of blowdown water.

  1. Net alkalinity and net acidity 2: Practical considerations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirby, C.S.; Cravotta, C.A.

    2005-01-01

    The pH, alkalinity, and acidity of mine drainage and associated waters can be misinterpreted because of the chemical instability of samples and possible misunderstandings of standard analytical method results. Synthetic and field samples of mine drainage having various initial pH values and concentrations of dissolved metals and alkalinity were titrated by several methods, and the results were compared to alkalinity and acidity calculated based on dissolved solutes. The pH, alkalinity, and acidity were compared between fresh, unoxidized and aged, oxidized samples. Data for Pennsylvania coal mine drainage indicates that the pH of fresh samples was predominantly acidic (pH 2.5-4) or near neutral (pH 6-7); ??? 25% of the samples had pH values between 5 and 6. Following oxidation, no samples had pH values between 5 and 6. The Standard Method Alkalinity titration is constrained to yield values >0. Most calculated and measured alkalinities for samples with positive alkalinities were in close agreement. However, for low-pH samples, the calculated alkalinity can be negative due to negative contributions by dissolved metals that may oxidize and hydrolyze. The Standard Method hot peroxide treatment titration for acidity determination (Hot Acidity) accurately indicates the potential for pH to decrease to acidic values after complete degassing of CO2 and oxidation of Fe and Mn, and it indicates either the excess alkalinity or that required for neutralization of the sample. The Hot Acidity directly measures net acidity (= -net alkalinity). Samples that had near-neutral pH after oxidation had negative Hot Acidity; samples that had pH < 6.3 after oxidation had positive Hot Acidity. Samples with similar pH values before oxidation had dissimilar Hot Acidities due to variations in their alkalinities and dissolved Fe, Mn, and Al concentrations. Hot Acidity was approximately equal to net acidity calculated based on initial pH and dissolved concentrations of Fe, Mn, and Al minus the

  2. Cell volume-regulated cation channels.

    PubMed

    Wehner, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Considering the enormous turnover rates of ion channels when compared to carriers it is quite obvious that channel-mediated ion transport may serve as a rapid and efficient mechanism of cell volume regulation. Whenever studied in a quantitative fashion the hypertonic activation of non-selective cation channels is found to be the main mechanism of regulatory volume increase (RVI). Some channels are inhibited by amiloride (and may be related to the ENaC), others are blocked by Gd(3) and flufenamate (and possibly linked to the group of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels). Nevertheless, the actual architecture of hypertonicity-induced cation channels remains to be defined. In some preparations, hypertonic stress decreases K(+) channel activity so reducing the continuous K(+) leak out of the cell; this is equivalent to a net gain of cell osmolytes facilitating RVI. The hypotonic activation of K(+) selective channels appears to be one of the most common principles of regulatory volume decrease (RVD) and, in most instances, the actual channels involved could be identified on the molecular level. These are BKCa (or maxi K(+)) channels, IK(Ca) and SK(Ca) channels (of intermediate and small conductance, respectively), the group of voltage-gated (Kv) channels including their Beta (or Kv ancilliary) subunits, two-pore K(2P) channels, as well as inwardly rectifying K(+) (Kir) channels (also contributing to K(ATP) channels). In some cells, hypotonicity activates non-selective cation channels. This is surprising, at first sight, because of the inside negative membrane voltage and the sum of driving forces for Na(+) and K(+) diffusion across the cell membrane rather favouring net cation uptake. Some of these channels, however, exhibit a P(K)/P(Na) significantly higher than 1, whereas others are Ca(++) permeable linking hypotonic stress to the activation of Ca(++) dependent ion channels. In particular, the latter holds for the group of TRPs which are specialised in the

  3. Oxidation of ammonia and methane in an alkaline, saline lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Joye, S.B.; Connell, T.L.; Miller, L.G.; Oremland, R.S.; Jellison, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    The oxidation of ammonia (NH3) and methane (CH4) was investigated in an alkaline saline lake, Mono Lake, California (U.S.A.). Ammonia oxidation was examined in April and July 1995 by comparing dark 14CO2 fixation rates in the presence or absence of methyl fluoride (MeF), an inhibitor of NH3 oxidation. Ammonia oxidizer-mediated dark 14CO2 fixation rates were similar in surface (5-7 m) and oxycline (11-15 m) waters, ranging between 70-340 and 89-186 nM d-1, respectively, or 1-7% of primary production by phytoplankton. Ammonia oxidation rates ranged between 580-2,830 nM d-1 in surface waters and 732-1,548 nM d-1 in oxycline waters. Methane oxidation was examined using a 14CH4 tracer technique in July 1994, April 1995, and July 1995. Methane oxidation rates were consistently higher in July, and rates in oxycline and anaerobic bottom waters (0.5-37 and 7-48 nM d-1, respectively) were 10-fold higher than those in aerobic surface waters (0.04-3.8 nM d-1). The majority of CH4 oxidation, in terms of integrated activity, occurred within anoxic bottom waters. Water column oxidation reduced the potential lake-atmosphere CH4 flux by a factor of two to three. Measured oxidation rates and water column concentrations were used to estimate the biological turnover times of NH3 and CH4. The NH3 pool turns over rapidly, on time scales of 0.8 d in surface waters and 10 d within the oxycline, while CH4 is cycled on 103-d time scales in surface waters and 102-d time scales within oxycline and bottom waters. Our data suggest an important role for NH3 oxidation in alkaline, saline lakes since the process converts volatile NH3 to soluble NO2-, thereby reducing loss via lake-atmosphere exchange and maintaining nitrogen in a form that is readily available to phytoplankton.

  4. Low pH alkaline chemical formulations

    SciTech Connect

    French, T.R.; Peru, D.A.; Thornton, S.D.

    1989-01-01

    This report describes the development of a surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding system that is applicable to specific reservoir conditions in Wilmington (California) field. The cost of the chemicals for an ASP (alkali/surfactant/polymer) flood is calculated to be $3.90/bbl of oil produced, with 78% of that cost attributable to polymer. This research included phase behavior tests, oil displacement tests, mineral dissolution tests, and adsorption measurements. It was discovered that consumption of low pH alkalis is low enough in the Wilmington field to be acceptable. In addition, alkali dramatically reduced surfactant adsorption and precipitation. A mixture of NaHCO3 and Na2CO3 was recommended for use as a preflush and in the ASP formulation. Research was also conducted on the synergistic effect that occurs when a mixture of alkali and synthetic surfactant contacts crude oil. It appears that very low IFT is predominantly a result of the activation of the natural surfactants present in the Wilmington oil, and the sustained low IFT is primarily the result of the synthetic surfactant. It also appears that removal of acids from the crude oil by the alkali renders the oil more interfacially reactive to synthetic surfactant. These phenomena help to explain the synergism that results from combining alkali and synthetic surfactant into a single oil recovery formulation. 19 refs., 24 figs., 10 tabs.

  5. Identification of human pulmonary alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Capelli, A; Cerutti, C G; Lusuardi, M; Donner, C F

    1997-04-01

    An increase of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity has been observed in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of patients affected by pulmonary fibrosis in chronic interstitial lung disorders. To characterize the ALP isoenzymes in such cases, we used gel filtration, agarose gel electrophoresis, heat and amino acid inhibition assays, wheat-germ agglutinin (WGA) precipitation, and an immunoassay specific for the bone-isoform of ALP. Only one anodic band representing a high-molecular-weight isoform of ALP (Mr approximately 2,000 kDa) was observed on electrophoresis of BALF. The inhibition assay results were consistent for a tissue-nonspecific isoenzyme sensitive to a temperature of 56 degrees C (71.9 +/- 2.5% inhibition) and to homoarginine (65.7 +/- 1.9%), and resistant to L-phenylalanine and L-leucine. Less than 13% of ALP activity was heat-stable. After incubation of BALF specimens with glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase D plus Nonidet P-40, or with phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase C alone, an electrophoretic cathodic band (Mr approximately 220 kDa) appeared near the bone band of a standard serum. With the WGA assay, 84.4 +/- 3.3% of ALP precipitated and the band disappeared. After immunoassay for the bone isoform, a mean of less than 5% enzyme activity was measured. We conclude that the ALP found in BALF is a pulmonary isoform of a tissue nonspecific isoenzyme.

  6. Extracellular alkaline proteinase of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides.

    PubMed

    Dunaevsky, Ya E; Matveeva, A R; Beliakova, G A; Domash, V I; Belozersky, M A

    2007-03-01

    The main proteinase of the filamentous fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides causing anthracnoses and serious problems for production and storage of agricultural products has molecular mass of 57 kD and was purified more than 200-fold to homogeneity with the yield of 5%. Maximal activity of the proteinase is at pH 9.0-10.0, and the enzyme is stable at pH 6.0-11.5 (residual activity not less than 70%). The studied enzyme completely kept its activity to 55 degrees C, with a temperature optimum of 45 degrees C. The purified C. gloeosporioides proteinase is stable at alkaline pH values, but rapidly loses its activity at pH values lower than 5.0. Addition of bovine serum albumin stabilizes the enzyme under acidic conditions. Data on inhibitor analysis and substrate specificity of the enzyme allow its classification as a serine proteinase of subtilisin family. It is demonstrated that the extracellular proteinase of C. gloeosporioides specifically effects plant cell wall proteins. It is proposed that the studied proteinase--via hydrolysis of cell wall--provides for penetration of the fungus into the tissues of the host plant.

  7. Production of alkaline protease from Cellulosimicrobium cellulans

    PubMed Central

    Ferracini-Santos, Luciana; Sato, Hélia H

    2009-01-01

    Cellulosimicrobium cellulans is one of the microorganisms that produces a wide variety of yeast cell wall-degrading enzymes, β-1,3-glucanase, protease and chitinase. Dried cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were used as carbon and nitrogen source for cell growth and protease production. The medium components KH2PO4, KOH and dried yeast cells showed a significant effect (p<0.05) on the factorial fractional design. A second design was prepared using two factors: pH and percentage of dried yeast cells. The results showed that the culture medium for the maximum production of protease was 0.2 g/l of MgSO4.7H2O, 2.0 g/l of (NH4)2SO4 and 8% of dried yeast cells in 0.15M phosphate buffer at pH 8.0. The maximum alkaline protease production was 7.0 ± 0.27 U/ml over the center point. Crude protease showed best activity at 50ºC and pH 7.0-8.0, and was stable at 50ºC. PMID:24031317

  8. Solubility of pllutonium in alkaline salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.T.; Edwards, T.B.

    1993-02-26

    Plutonium solubility data from several studies have been evaluated. For each data set, a predictive model has been developed where appropriate. In addition, a statistical model and corresponding prediction intervals for plutonium solubility as a quadratic function of the hydroxide concentration have been developed. Because of the wide range of solution compositions, the solubility of plutonium can vary by as much as three orders of magnitude for any given hydroxide concentration and still remain within the prediction interval. Any nuclear safety assessments that depend on the maximum amount of plutonium dissolved in alkaline salt solutions should use concentrations at least as great as the upper prediction limits developed in this study. To increase the confidence in the prediction model, it is recommended that additional solubility tests be conducted at low hydroxide concentrations and with all of the other solution components involved. To validate the model for application to actual waste solutions, it is recommended that the plutonium solubilities in actual waste solutions be determined and compared to the values predicted by the quadratic model.

  9. Process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Chia-lin W.

    1995-01-01

    A process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification. The process involves acidifying the wastes with an oxidizing agent such as nitric acid, then adding formic acid as a reducing agent, and then mixing with glass formers to produce a melter feed. The nitric acid contributes nitrates that act as an oxidant to balance the redox of the melter feed, prevent reduction of certain species to produce conducting metals, and lower the pH of the wastes to a suitable level for melter operation. The formic acid reduces mercury compounds to elemental mercury for removal by steam stripping, and MnO.sub.2 to the Mn(II) ion to prevent foaming of the glass melt. The optimum amounts of nitric acid and formic acid are determined in relation to the composition of the wastes, including the concentrations of mercury (II) and MnO.sub.2, noble metal compounds, nitrates, formates and so forth. The process minimizes the amount of hydrogen generated during treatment, while producing a redox-balanced feed for effective melter operation and a quality glass product.

  10. Process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, C.L.W.

    1995-07-25

    A process is described for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification. The process involves acidifying the wastes with an oxidizing agent such as nitric acid, then adding formic acid as a reducing agent, and then mixing with glass formers to produce a melter feed. The nitric acid contributes nitrates that act as an oxidant to balance the redox of the melter feed, prevent reduction of certain species to produce conducting metals, and lower the pH of the wastes to a suitable level for melter operation. The formic acid reduces mercury compounds to elemental mercury for removal by steam stripping, and MnO{sub 2} to the Mn(II) ion to prevent foaming of the glass melt. The optimum amounts of nitric acid and formic acid are determined in relation to the composition of the wastes, including the concentrations of mercury (II) and MnO{sub 2}, noble metal compounds, nitrates, formates and so forth. The process minimizes the amount of hydrogen generated during treatment, while producing a redox-balanced feed for effective melter operation and a quality glass product. 4 figs.

  11. Engineering challenges of ocean alkalinity enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruger, T.; Renforth, P.

    2012-04-01

    The addition of calcium oxide (CaO) to the ocean as a means of enhancing the capacity of the ocean as a carbon sink was first proposed by Haroon Kheshgi in 1995. Calcium oxide is created by heating high purity limestone in a kiln to temperatures of approximately 1000°C. Addition of this material to the ocean draws carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere (approximately 1 tonne of CaO could sequester 1.3 tonnes of CO2). Abiotic carbonate precipitation is inhibited in the surface ocean. This is a carbon and energy expensive process, where approximately 0.8 tonnes of CO2 are produced at a point source for every tonne sequestered. The feasibility of ocean alkalinity enhancement requires capture and storage of the point source of CO2. We present details of a feasibility study of the engineering challenges of Kheshgi's method focusing on the potential scalability and costs of the proposed process. To draw down a PgC per year would require the extraction and processing of ~6Pg of limestone per year, which is similar in scale to the current coal industry. Costs are estimated at ~USD30-40 per tonne of CO2 sequestered through the process, which is favourable to comparative processes. Kheshgi, H. (1995) Energy 20 (9) 915-922

  12. Response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris to Alkaline Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Stolyar, S.; He, Q.; He, Z.; Yang, Z.; Borglin, S.E.; Joyner, D.; Huang, K.; Alm, E.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.; Wall, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.; Stahl, D.A.

    2007-11-30

    The response of exponentially growing Desulfovibrio vulgarisHildenborough to pH 10 stress was studied using oligonucleotidemicroarrays and a study set of mutants with genes suggested by microarraydata to be involved in the alkaline stress response deleted. The datashowed that the response of D. vulgaris to increased pH is generallysimilar to that of Escherichia coli but is apparently controlled byunique regulatory circuits since the alternative sigma factors (sigma Sand sigma E) contributing to this stress response in E. coli appear to beabsent in D. vulgaris. Genes previously reported to be up-regulated in E.coli were up-regulated in D. vulgaris; these genes included three ATPasegenes and a tryptophan synthase gene. Transcription of chaperone andprotease genes (encoding ATP-dependent Clp and La proteases and DnaK) wasalso elevated in D. vulgaris. As in E. coli, genes involved in flagellumsynthesis were down-regulated. The transcriptional data also identifiedregulators, distinct from sigma S and sigma E, that are likely part of aD. vulgaris Hildenborough-specific stress response system.Characterization of a study set of mutants with genes implicated inalkaline stress response deleted confirmed that there was protectiveinvolvement of the sodium/proton antiporter NhaC-2, tryptophanase A, andtwo putative regulators/histidine kinases (DVU0331 andDVU2580).

  13. Collective water dynamics in the first solvation shell drive the NMR relaxation of aqueous quadrupolar cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carof, Antoine; Salanne, Mathieu; Charpentier, Thibault; Rotenberg, Benjamin

    2016-09-01

    Using molecular simulations, we analyze the microscopic processes driving the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) relaxation of quadrupolar cations in water. The fluctuations of the Electric Field Gradient (EFG) experienced by alkaline and magnesium cations, which determine the NMR relaxation time, are mainly due to the dynamics of water molecules in their solvation shell. The dynamics of the ion plays a less important role, with the exception of the short-time dynamics in the lighter Li+ case, for which rattling in the solvent cage results in oscillations of the EFG autocorrelation function (ACF). Several microscopic mechanisms that may a priori contribute to the decay of the EFG-ACF occur in fact over too long time scales: entrance/exit of individual water molecules into/from the solvation shell, rotation of a molecule around the ion, or reorientation of the molecule. In contrast, the fluctuations of the ion-water distance are clearly correlated to that of the EFG. Nevertheless, it is not sufficient to consider a single molecule due to the cancellations arising from the symmetry of the solvation shell. The decay of the EFG-ACF, hence NMR relaxation, is in fact governed by the collective symmetry-breaking fluctuations of water in the first solvation shell.

  14. Modifier cation effects on (29)Si nuclear shielding anisotropies in silicate glasses.

    PubMed

    Baltisberger, Jay H; Florian, Pierre; Keeler, Eric G; Phyo, Pyae A; Sanders, Kevin J; Grandinetti, Philip J

    2016-07-01

    We have examined variations in the (29)Si nuclear shielding tensor parameters of SiO4 tetrahedra in a series of seven alkali and alkaline earth silicate glass compositions, Cs2O·4.81 SiO2, Rb2O·3.96 SiO2, Rb2O·2.25 SiO2, K2O·4.48 SiO2, Na2O·4.74 SiO2, BaO·2.64 SiO2, and SrO·2.36 SiO2, using natural abundance (29)Si two-dimensional magic-angle flipping (MAF) experiments. Our analyses of these 2D spectra reveal a linear dependence of the (29)Si nuclear shielding anisotropy of Q((3)) sites on the Si-non-bridging oxygen bond length, which in turn depends on the cation potential and coordination of modifier cations to the non-bridging oxygen. We also demonstrate how a combination of Cu(2+) as a paramagnetic dopant combined with echo train acquisition can reduce the total experiment time of (29)Si 2D NMR measurements by two orders of magnitude, enabling higher throughput 2D NMR studies of glass structure.

  15. Synthesis and distribution of cations in substituted lead phosphate lacunar apatites

    SciTech Connect

    Hamdi, Besma; Feki, Hafed El; Savariault, Jean-Michel . E-mail: savariau@cemes.fr; Salah, Abdelhamid Ben

    2007-02-15

    Synthesis of apatites, Pb{sub 7.4}Bi{sub 0.3}Na{sub 2.3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6} (I), Pb{sub 7.36}Bi{sub 0.32}Na{sub 2.08}Li{sub 0.24}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6} (II) and Pb{sub 5.78}Bi{sub 0.81}Ca{sub 0.60}Na{sub 2.81}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6} (III), with anion vacancy were carried out during solid state reactions. The three compounds of apatite-type structure crystallize in the hexagonal system, space group P6{sub 3}/m. In every compound, a preferential occupation of the (6h) site by Pb and Bi cations is shown revealing the influence of their lone electronic pair. The introduction of calcium increases the quantity of bismuth in these apatites. Alkaline metals occupy mainly the (4f) site. Infrared spectroscopy is correlated to the bonding scheme. A connection between the cations occupying (4f) sites and the c cell parameters is presented.

  16. Cation-containing Polymers with Co-continuous Microphase-Separated Morphologies for Rapid Transport Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, Frederick; Price, Samuel; Savage, Alice; Ren, Xiaoming; Pomerantz, Natalie; Zukas, Walter

    2015-03-01

    Cation-containing polymer membranes are the subject of renewed research for their potential to enable the use of alkaline fuel cells, and are also of interest for their water vapor transport properties. Charge and water vapor transport are both heavily dependent on membrane morphology and the development of hydrophilic channels throughout the material. Reaction induced phase separation has been shown to create such morphologies when used with uncharged copolymers and crosslinking monomers. Here we have applied this same technique but used ion-containing block copolymers of 4-vinylbenzyltrimethylammonium chloride and styrene to create a cation-containing polymer membrane having a microphase-separated, co-continuous morphology, as characterized by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF STEM). These materials show excellent charge transport behavior and water vapor transport properties, surpassing commercially available materials. These results and efforts to improve other important physical characteristics for membrane applications will be presented.

  17. Lower the electron affinity by halogenation: an unusual strategy to design superalkali cations.

    PubMed

    Hou, Na; Wu, Di; Li, Ying; Li, Zhi-Ru

    2014-02-19

    A new kind of cationic superatom compounds (M-F)(+) (M = OLi4, NLi5, CLi6, BLi7, and Al14) with low vertical electron affinities (VEA) has been designed based on the distinctive electronic structure of superalkaline-earth atom. The stability of the studied superatom architectures is guaranteed by strong M-fluorine interactions, considerable HOMO-LUMO gaps, as well as large dissociation energies. What is extraordinary is that fluorination plays an important role in lowering the VEA value of M(+) and enables the resulting (M-F)(+) fluorides to join the superalkali family. However, the same strategy does not work as well for the alkaline-earth atoms whose valence electrons are more tightly bound. The comparative study on (OLi4-X)(+) (X = F, Cl, Br) reveals that fluorination is more effective than chlorination and bromination to reduce the VEA value of the OLi4(+) cation. As for the (Al14-X)(+) species, there is no obvious dependence of VEA values on halogen atomic number.

  18. Modifier cation effects on 29Si nuclear shielding anisotropies in silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltisberger, Jay H.; Florian, Pierre; Keeler, Eric G.; Phyo, Pyae A.; Sanders, Kevin J.; Grandinetti, Philip J.

    2016-07-01

    We have examined variations in the 29Si nuclear shielding tensor parameters of SiO4 tetrahedra in a series of seven alkali and alkaline earth silicate glass compositions, Cs2O · 4.81 SiO2, Rb2O · 3.96 SiO2, Rb2O · 2.25 SiO2, K2O · 4.48 SiO2, Na2O · 4.74 SiO2, BaO · 2.64 SiO2, and SrO · 2.36 SiO2, using natural abundance 29Si two-dimensional magic-angle flipping (MAF) experiments. Our analyses of these 2D spectra reveal a linear dependence of the 29Si nuclear shielding anisotropy of Q(3) sites on the Si-non-bridging oxygen bond length, which in turn depends on the cation potential and coordination of modifier cations to the non-bridging oxygen. We also demonstrate how a combination of Cu2+ as a paramagnetic dopant combined with echo train acquisition can reduce the total experiment time of 29Si 2D NMR measurements by two orders of magnitude, enabling higher throughput 2D NMR studies of glass structure.

  19. B-site Cation Ordered Double Perovskites as Efficient and Stable Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hainan; Chen, Gao; Zhu, Yinlong; Liu, Bo; Zhou, Wei; Shao, Zongping

    2017-03-02

    Simple disordered perovskite oxides have been intensively exploited as promising electrocatalysts for catalysing the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) towards its application in water splitting, reversible fuel cells, and rechargeable metal-air batteries. Here, we demonstrated that B-site cation-ordered double perovskite Ba2BixSc0.2Co1.8-xO6-δ with two types of cobalt local environments are superior electrocatalysts for OER in alkaline solutions, demonstrating ultrahigh catalytic activity. In addition, no obvious performance degradation was observed for the Ba2Bi0.1Sc0.2Co1.7O6-δ sample after a continuous chronopotentiometry test. The critical role of the ordered [Co2+] and [Sc3+, Bi5+, Co3+] dual environments in improving OER activity was exhibited. The aforementioned results indicate that B-site cation-ordered double perovskite oxides may represent a new class of promising electrocatalysts for the OER in sustainable energy storage and conversion systems.

  20. Comparative analysis of cation/proton antiporter superfamily in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Chuyu; Yang, Xiaohan; Xia, Xinli; Yin, Weilun

    2013-01-01

    The cation/proton antiporter superfamily is associated with the transport of monovalent cations across membranes. This superfamily was annotated in the Arabidopsis genome and some members were functionally characterized. In the present study, a systematic analysis of the cation/proton antiporter genes in diverse plant specieswas reported.We identified 240 cation/proton antiporters in alga, moss, and angiosperm. A phylogenetic tree was constructed showing these 240members are separated into three families, i.e., Na+/H+ exchangers, K+ efflux antiporters, and cation/H+ exchangers. Our analysis revealed that tandem and/or segmental duplications contribute to the expansion of cation/H+ exchangers in the examined angiospermspecies. Sliding windowanalysis of the nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution ratios showed some differences in the evolutionary fate of cation/proton antiporter paralogs. Furthermore, we identified over-represented motifs among these 240 proteins and foundmostmotifs are family specific, demonstrating diverse evolution of the cation/proton antiporters among three families. In addition, we investigated the co-expressed genes of the cation/proton antiporters in Arabidopsis thaliana. The results showed some biological processes are enriched in the co-expressed genes, suggesting the cation/proton antiporters may be involved in these biological processes. Taken together, this study furthers our knowledge on cation/proton antiporters in plants.

  1. Downscaling Alkaline Phosphatase Activity in a Subtropical Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Y.

    2011-12-01

    This research was conducted by downscaling study to understand phosphorus (P)-deficient status of different plankton and the role of alkaline phosphatase activity (APA) in subtropical Feitsui Reservoir. Results from field survey showed that bulk APA (1.6~95.2 nM h-1) was widely observed in the epilimnion (0~20 m) with an apparent seasonal variations, suggesting that plankton in the system were subjected to P-deficient seasonally. Mixed layer depth (an index of phosphate availability) is the major factor influencing the variation of bulk APA and specific APA (124~1,253 nmol mg C-1 h-1), based on multiple linear regression analysis. Size-fractionated APA assays showed that picoplankton (size 0.2~3 um) contributed most of the bulk APA in the system. In addition, single-cell APA detected by enzyme-labeled fluorescence (ELF) assay indicated that heterotrophic bacteria are the major contributors of APA. Thus, we can infer that bacteria play an important role in accelerating P-cycle within P-deficient systems. Light/nutrient manipulation bioassays showed that bacterial growth was directly controlled by phosphate, while picocyanobacterial growth is controlled by light and can out-compete bacteria under P-limited condition with the aid of light. Further analysis revealed that the strength of summer typhoon is a factor responsible for the inter-annual variability of bulk and specific APA. APA study demonstrated the episodic events (e.g. strong typhoon and extreme precipitation) had significant influence on APA variability in sub-tropical to tropical aquatic ecosystems. Hence, the results herein will allow future studies on monitoring typhoon disturbance (intensity and frequency) as well as the APA of plankton during summer-to-autumn in subtropical systems.

  2. Sedimentary lipid biogeochemistry of an hypereutrophic alkaline lagoon

    SciTech Connect

    Grimalt, J.O.; Albaiges, J. ); Yruela, I.; Saizjimenez, C. ); Toja, J. ); Leeuw, J.W. De. )

    1991-09-01

    A detailed study of the lipid composition of sedimentary and water particulate samples of a dilute alkaline lake (Santa Olalla Lagoon, Guadalquivir Delta, southwestern Spain) has allowed the identification and quantitation of about 300 compounds reflecting predominant inputs of organic matter and very early diagenetic processes. These lipids, dominated by fatty acids (80-86%), account for up to 0.25% wt. of dry sediment which is consistent with the high eutrophic conditions of the lagoon and suggests a good preservation of the originally produced organic matter. However, the primary lipid compounds, mainly from cyanobacterial origin, are strongly modified. The C{sub 30}-C{sub 32}, 1,13- and 1,15-diols constitute the only major group that can be attributed directly to these organisms. The predominant lipids, including the fatty acids, are indicative of intense microbial reworking, namely contributions from gram-positive and gram-negative eubacteria and methanogens. Conversely, the higher plant lipids are better preserved and dominate the aliphatic hydrocarbon fraction. Hydrogenation and dehydration are two major transformation processes in the sedimentary system being reflected in the transformation of sterols into 5{alpha}(H)- and 5{beta}(H)-stanols and sterenes, and 17{beta}(H), 21{beta}(H)-hopan-22-ol into diploptene. Oxidation in the water column seems to involve the partial transformation of sterols into steroid ketones, phytol into 5,9,13-trimethyltetradecanoic acid and two isomeric 3,7,11,15-tetramethyl-17-hexadecanolides, and, possibly, tetrahymanol into gammacer-3-one. Adiantone and bishomohopanoic acid probably result from the partial oxydation of extended polyhydroxyhopanes or the C{sub 30}-C{sub 33} hydroxyhopanes found in the lagoon waters.

  3. Sedimentary lipid biogeochemistry of an hypereutrophic alkaline lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimalt, J. O.; Yruela, I.; Saiz-Jimenez, C.; Toja, J.; de Leeuw, J. W.; Albaigés, J.

    1991-09-01

    A detailed study of the lipid composition of sedimentary and water particulate samples of a dilute alkaline lake (Santa Olalla Lagoon, Guadalquivir Delta, southwestern Spain) has allowed the identification and quantitation of about 300 compounds reflecting predominant inputs of organic matter and very early diagenetic processes. These lipids, dominated by fatty acids (80-86%), account for up to 0.25% wt. of dry sediment which is consistent with the high eutrophic conditions of the lagoon and suggests a good preservation of the originally produced organic matter. However, the primary lipid compounds, mainly from cyanobacterial origin, are strongly modified. The C30-C32, 1,13- and 1,15-diols constitute the only major group that can be attributed directly to these organisms. The predominant lipids, including the fatty acids, are indicative of intense microbial reworking, namely contributions from gram-positive and gram-negative eubacteria and methanogens. Conversely, the higher plant lipids are better preserved and dominate the aliphatic hydrocarbon fraction. Hydrogenation and dehydration are two major transformation processes in the sedimentary system being reflected in the transformation of sterols into 5α(H)- and 5β(H)-stanols and sterenes, and 17β(H),21β(H)-hopan-22-ol into diploptene. Oxidation in the water column seems to involve the partial transformation of sterols into steroid ketones, phytol into 5,9,13-trimethyltetradecanoic acid and two isomeric 3,7,11,15-tetramethyl-17-hexadecanolides, and, possibly, tetrahymanol into gammacer-3-one. Adiantone and bishomohopanoic acid probably result from the partial oxydation of extended polyhydroxyhopanes or the C30-C33 hydroxyhopanes found in the lagoon waters.

  4. Bacterial Diversity in a Nonsaline Alkaline Environment: Heterotrophic Aerobic Populations

    PubMed Central

    Tiago, Igor; Chung, Ana Paula; Veríssimo, António

    2004-01-01

    Heterotrophic populations were isolated and characterized from an alkaline groundwater environment generated by active serpentinization, which results in a Ca(OH)2-enriched, extremely diluted groundwater with pH 11.4. One hundred eighty-five strains were isolated in different media at different pH values during two sampling periods. To assess the degree of diversity present in the environment and to select representative strains for further characterization of the populations, we screened the isolates by using random amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR profiles and grouped them based on similarities determined by fatty acid methyl ester analysis. Phenotypic characterization, determinations of G+C content, phylogenetic analyses by direct sequencing of 16S rRNA genes, and determinations of pH tolerance were performed with the selected isolates. Although 38 different populations were identified and characterized, the vast majority of the isolates were gram positive with high G+C contents and were affiliated with three distinct groups, namely, strains closely related to the species Dietzia natrolimnae (32% of the isolates), to Frigoribacterium/Clavibacter lineages (29% of the isolates), and to the type strain of Microbacterium kitamiense (20% of the isolates). Other isolates were phylogenetically related to strains of the genera Agrococcus, Leifsonia, Kytococcus, Janibacter, Kocuria, Rothia, Nesterenkonia, Citrococcus, Micrococcus, Actinomyces, Rhodococcus, Bacillus, and Staphylococcus. Only five isolates were gram negative: one was related to the Sphingobacteria lineage and the other four were related to the α-Proteobacteria lineage. Despite the pH of the environment, the vast majority of the populations were alkali tolerant, and only two strains were able to grow at pH 11. PMID:15574939

  5. Copper release in low and high alkaline water.

    PubMed

    D'Antonio, L; Fabbricino, M; Nasso, M; Trifuoggi, M

    2008-04-01

    Copper release in drinking water, caused by electrochemical corrosion of household distribution systems, was investigated. Experiments were developed testing both low and high alkaline water in stagnant conditions. The effect of varying stagnation time was investigated also. Both soluble and insoluble copper compounds, produced by corrosion processes are quantified, using appropriate experimental procedures. On the basis of obtained results, copper concentration in stagnant water is defined as a function of water alkalinity, while total metal release is defined as a function of stagnation length, and is not dependent on water alkalinity.

  6. Method of increasing the sulfation capacity of alkaline earth sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Shearer, J.A.; Turner, C.B.; Johnson, I.

    1980-03-13

    A system and method for increasing the sulfation capacity of alkaline earth carbonates to scrub sulfur dioxide produced during the fluidized bed combustion of coal in which partially sulfated alkaline earth carbonates are hydrated in a fluidized bed to crack the sulfate coating and convert the alkaline earth oxide to the hydroxide. Subsequent dehydration of the sulfate-hydroxide to a sulfate-oxide particle produces particles having larger pore size, increased porosity, decreased grain size and additional sulfation capacity. A continuous process is disclosed.

  7. Method of increasing the sulfation capacity of alkaline earth sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Shearer, John A.; Turner, Clarence B.; Johnson, Irving

    1982-01-01

    A system and method for increasing the sulfation capacity of alkaline earth carbonates to scrub sulfur dioxide produced during the fluidized bed combustion of coal in which partially sulfated alkaline earth carbonates are hydrated in a fluidized bed to crack the sulfate coating and convert the alkaline earth oxide to the hydroxide. Subsequent dehydration of the sulfate-hydroxide to a sulfate-oxide particle produces particles having larger pore size, increased porosity, decreased grain size and additional sulfation capacity. A continuous process is disclosed.

  8. Polyvinyl alcohol battery separator containing inert filler. [alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Hsu, L. C.; Manzo, M. A. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A cross-linked polyvinyl alcohol battery separator is disclosed. A particulate filler, inert to alkaline electrolyte of an alkaline battery, is incorporated in the separator in an amount of 1-20% by weight, based on the weight of the polyvinyl alcohol, and is dispersed throughout the product. Incorporation of the filler enhances performance and increases cycle life of alkaline batteries when compared with batteries containing a similar separator not containing filler. Suitable fillers include titanates, silicates, zirconates, aluminates, wood floor, lignin, and titania. Particle size is not greater than about 50 microns.

  9. Carbonic anhydrase 2-like and Na⁺-K⁺-ATPase α gene expression in medaka (Oryzias latipes) under carbonate alkalinity stress.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zongli; Lai, Qifang; Hao, Zhuoran; Chen, Ling; Lin, Tingting; Zhou, Kai; Wang, Hui

    2015-12-01

    High carbonate alkalinity is one of the major stress factors for living organisms in saline-alkaline water areas. Acute and chronic effects of carbonate alkalinity on expression of two genes, carbonic anhydrase 2-like (CA2-like) and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase α subunit (NKA-α) mRNA in medaka (Oryzias latipes) were evaluated to better understand the responses important for coping with a carbonate alkalinity stress. In the acute exposure experiment, the expression of CA2-like and NKA-α mRNA in the gill and kidney of medaka were examined from 0 h to 7 days exposed to 30.4 mM carbonate alkalinity water. Exposure to high carbonate alkalinity resulted in a transitory alkalosis, followed by a transient increase in gill and kidney CA2-like and NKA-α mRNA expression. In the chronic exposure experiment, the expression of these two genes was examined in the gill and kidney at 50 days post-exposure to six different carbonate alkalinity concentrations ranging from 1.5 to 30.4 mM. Gill and kidney CA2-like mRNA levels in 30.4 mM were approximately 10 and 30 times higher than that of the control (1.5 mM), respectively. Less differences were found in NKA-α expression in the 50-days exposure. The results indicate that when transferred to high carbonate alkalinity water, a transitory alkalosis may occur in medaka, followed by compensatory acid-base and ion regulatory responses. Thus, CA2-like and NKA-α are at least two of the important factors that contribute to the regulation of alkalinity stress.

  10. Sorption of chlorophenols on microporous minerals: mechanism and influence of metal cations, solution pH, and humic acid.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Hu, Yuanan; Cheng, Hefa

    2016-10-01

    Sorption of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP), 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP), and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP) on a range of dealuminated zeolites were investigated to understand the mechanism of their sorption on microporous minerals, while the influence of common metal cations, solution pH, and humic acid was also studied. Sorption of chlorophenols was found to increase with the hydrophobicity of the sorbates and that of the microporous minerals, indicating the important role of hydrophobic interactions, while sorption was also stronger in the micropores of narrower sizes because of greater enhancement of the dispersion interactions. The presence of metal cations could enhance chlorophenol sorption due to the additional electrostatic attraction between metal cations exchanged into the mineral micropores and the chlorophenolates, and this effect was apparent on the mineral sorbent with a high density of surface cations (2.62 sites/nm(2)) in its micropores. Under circum-neutral or acidic conditions, neutral chlorophenol molecules adsorbed into the hydrophobic micropores through displacing the "loosely bound" water molecules, while their sorption was negligible under moderately alkaline conditions due to electrostatic repulsion between the negatively charged zeolite framework and anionic chlorophenolates. The influence of humic acid on sorption of chlorophenols on dealuminated Y zeolites suggests that its molecules did not block the micropores but created a secondary sorption sites by forming a "coating layer" on the external surface of the zeolites. These mechanistic insights could help better understand the interactions of ionizable chlorophenols and metal cations in mineral micropores and guide the selection and design of reusable microporous mineral sorbents for sorptive removal of chlorophenols from aqueous stream.

  11. It's Major! College Major Selection & Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byers, Jenny; Mattern, Krista D.; Shaw, Emily J.; Springall, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Presented at the College Board National Forum, October 26, 2011. Choosing a college major is challenging enough, without stopping to consider the impact it has on a student's college experience and career choice. To provide support during this major decision, participants in this session will develop strategies to facilitate students in making an…

  12. High stability of electro-transport and magnetism against the A-site cation disorder in SrRuO3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y L; Liu, M F; Liu, R; Xie, Y L; Li, X; Yan, Z B; Liu, J-M

    2016-06-14

    It is known that the electro-transport and magnetism of perovskite alkaline-earth ruthenate oxides are sensitive to the lattice distortion associated with the A-site cation size. Orthorhombic CaRuO3 and cubic BaRuO3 exhibit distinctly different electro-transport and magnetic properties from orthorhombic SrRuO3. It has been suggested that SrRuO3 can be robust against some intrinsic/external perturbations but fragile against some others in terms of electro-transport and magnetism, and it is our motivation to explore such stability against the local site cation disorder. In this work, we prepare a set of SrRuO3-based samples with identical averaged A-site size but different A-site cation disorder (size mismatch) by Ca and Ba co-substitution of Sr. It is revealed that the electro-transport and magnetism of SrRuO3 demonstrate relatively high stability against this A-site cation disorder, characterized by the relatively invariable electrical and magnetic properties in comparison with those of SrRuO3 itself. A simple electro-transport network model is proposed to explain quantitatively the measured behaviors. The present work suggests that SrRuO3 as an itinerant electron ferromagnetic metal possesses relatively high robustness against local lattice distortion and cation occupation disorder.

  13. High stability of electro-transport and magnetism against the A-site cation disorder in SrRuO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. L.; Liu, M. F.; Liu, R.; Xie, Y. L.; Li, X.; Yan, Z. B.; Liu, J.-M.

    2016-06-01

    It is known that the electro-transport and magnetism of perovskite alkaline-earth ruthenate oxides are sensitive to the lattice distortion associated with the A-site cation size. Orthorhombic CaRuO3 and cubic BaRuO3 exhibit distinctly different electro-transport and magnetic properties from orthorhombic SrRuO3. It has been suggested that SrRuO3 can be robust against some intrinsic/external perturbations but fragile against some others in terms of electro-transport and magnetism, and it is our motivation to explore such stability against the local site cation disorder. In this work, we prepare a set of SrRuO3-based samples with identical averaged A-site size but different A-site cation disorder (size mismatch) by Ca and Ba co-substitution of Sr. It is revealed that the electro-transport and magnetism of SrRuO3 demonstrate relatively high stability against this A-site cation disorder, characterized by the relatively invariable electrical and magnetic properties in comparison with those of SrRuO3 itself. A simple electro-transport network model is proposed to explain quantitatively the measured behaviors. The present work suggests that SrRuO3 as an itinerant electron ferromagnetic metal possesses relatively high robustness against local lattice distortion and cation occupation disorder.

  14. High stability of electro-transport and magnetism against the A-site cation disorder in SrRuO3

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y. L.; Liu, M. F.; Liu, R.; Xie, Y. L.; Li, X.; Yan, Z. B.; Liu, J.-M.

    2016-01-01

    It is known that the electro-transport and magnetism of perovskite alkaline-earth ruthenate oxides are sensitive to the lattice distortion associated with the A-site cation size. Orthorhombic CaRuO3 and cubic BaRuO3 exhibit distinctly different electro-transport and magnetic properties from orthorhombic SrRuO3. It has been suggested that SrRuO3 can be robust against some intrinsic/external perturbations but fragile against some others in terms of electro-transport and magnetism, and it is our motivation to explore such stability against the local site cation disorder. In this work, we prepare a set of SrRuO3-based samples with identical averaged A-site size but different A-site cation disorder (size mismatch) by Ca and Ba co-substitution of Sr. It is revealed that the electro-transport and magnetism of SrRuO3 demonstrate relatively high stability against this A-site cation disorder, characterized by the relatively invariable electrical and magnetic properties in comparison with those of SrRuO3 itself. A simple electro-transport network model is proposed to explain quantitatively the measured behaviors. The present work suggests that SrRuO3 as an itinerant electron ferromagnetic metal possesses relatively high robustness against local lattice distortion and cation occupation disorder. PMID:27297396

  15. Alkali or alkaline earth metal promoted catalyst and a process for methanol synthesis using alkali or alkaline earth metals as promoters

    DOEpatents

    Tierney, John W.; Wender, Irving; Palekar, Vishwesh M.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a heterogeneous catalyst comprising reduced copper chromite impregnated with an alkali or alkaline earth metal. There is thus no need to add a separate alkali or alkaline earth compound. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100.degree.-160.degree. C. and the pressure range of 40-65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H.sub.2 /CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

  16. Alkali or alkaline earth metal promoted catalyst and a process for methanol synthesis using alkali or alkaline earth metals as promoters

    DOEpatents

    Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.; Palekar, V.M.

    1995-01-31

    The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a heterogeneous catalyst comprising reduced copper chromite impregnated with an alkali or alkaline earth metal. There is thus no need to add a separate alkali or alkaline earth compound. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100--160 C and the pressure range of 40--65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H[sub 2]/CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

  17. Cation–cation interactions and cation exchange in a series of isostructural framework uranyl tungstates

    SciTech Connect

    Balboni, Enrica; Burns, Peter C.

    2014-05-01

    The isotypical compounds (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(WO{sub 6})(H{sub 2}O){sub 5} (1), Ag(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(WO{sub 6})(OH)(H{sub 2}O){sub 3} (2), K(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(WO{sub 6})OH(H{sub 2}O){sub 4} (3), Rb(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(WO{sub 6})(OH)(H{sub 2}O){sub 3.5} (4), and Cs(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(WO{sub 6})OH(H{sub 2}O){sub 3} (5) were synthesized, characterized, and their structures determined. Each crystallizes in space group Cc. (1): a=12.979 (3), b=10.238 (2), c=11.302 (2), β=102.044 (2); (2): a=13.148 (2), b=9.520 (1), c=11.083 (2), β=101.568 (2); (3): a=13.111 (8), b=9.930 (6), c=11.242 (7), β=101.024 (7); (4): a=12.940 (2), b=10.231 (2), c=11.259(2), β=102.205 (2); (5): a=12.983 (3), b=10.191 (3), c=11.263 (4), β=101.661 (4). Compounds 1–5 are a framework of uranyl and tungsten polyhedra containing cation–cation interactions. The framework has three symmetrically distinct U(VI) cations, one tungsten, sixteen to eighteen oxygen atoms, and in 2–5, one monovalent cation. Each atom occupies a general position. Each U(VI) cation is present as a typical (UO{sub 2}){sup 2+} uranyl ion in an overall pentagonal bipyramidal coordination environment. Each pentagonal bipyramid shares two equatorial edges with two other pentagonal bipyramids, forming a trimer. Trimers are connected into chains by edge-sharing with WO{sub 6} octahedra. Chains are linked through cation–cation interactions between two symmetrically independent uranyl ions. This yields a remarkably complex system of intersecting channels that extend along [0 0 1] and [−1 1 0]. The cation exchange properties of 2 and 3 were characterized at room temperature and at 140 °C. - Graphical abstract: Chains of uranium and tungsten polyhedra are connected into a three dimensional framework by cation–cation interactions occurring between two symmetrically independent uranyl pentagonal bipyramids. Monovalent cations present in channels within the structure can be exchanged by room temperature or mild hydrothermal

  18. Involvement of the H+/organic cation antiporter in nicotine transport in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Tega, Yuma; Akanuma, Shin-Ichi; Kubo, Yoshiyuki; Hosoya, Ken-Ichi

    2015-01-01

    Nicotine is an addictive alkaloid in cigarette smoke and is responsible for tobacco dependence. It is important to consider the blood-to-liver transport of nicotine to understand the nicotine elimination from the body because most of the nicotine is converted to inactive metabolites by cytochrome P450 localized in the endoplasmic reticulum of the hepatocytes. In this study, the blood-to-liver transport of nicotine was investigated by means of an in vivo portal vein injection technique in rats, and the in vitro uptake by freshly isolated rat hepatocytes was used to clarify its mechanism. The results obtained showed that the in vivo blood-to-liver transport of [(3)H]nicotine was significantly inhibited by 50 mM nicotine and pyrilamine, suggesting involvement of a carrier-mediated transport process in the blood-to-liver transport of nicotine. The in vitro uptake study using freshly isolated rat hepatocytes showed a time- and concentration-dependent uptake of [(3)H]nicotine with a Km value of 141 µM, and the uptake was increased under alkaline extracellular conditions. In addition, intracellular acidification caused an increase in [(3)H]nicotine uptake, suggesting that the influx transport of nicotine is driven by an oppositely directed H(+) gradient in hepatocytes. Moreover, [(3)H]nicotine uptake was strongly inhibited in the presence of cationic drugs, such as pyrilamine, whereas only weak inhibitory effects were shown by substrates of typical organic cation transporters, such as tetraethylammonium, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium, choline, and l-carnitine. In conclusion, a carrier-mediated system controlling the blood-to-liver transport of nicotine appears to be present on the sinusoidal membrane of hepatocytes. The pattern of inhibition and ion dependence is suggestive of an H(+)/organic cation antiporter-mediated nicotine transport system.

  19. Electrokinetic properties of wavellite and its floatability with cationic and anionic collectors.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Aline Pereira Leite; Peres, Antônio Eduardo Clark; de Araujo, Armando Corrêa; Valadão, George Eduardo Sales

    2011-09-15

    The reverse apatite flotation with fatty acids has been widely used for the reduction of phosphorus content of magmatic origin iron ores. However, the occurrence of phosphorus intensely disseminated as secondary minerals such as wavellite renders the anionic reverse flotation a challenge. Zeta potential measurements and microflotation tests of wavellite with the use of anionic and cationic collectors were carried out in this work. The wavellite's IEP value was achieved at pH 4.5. Below the IEP value, the surface positively charged sites are made up of aluminum ions. The species H(+), Al(OH)(2)(+), Al(OH)(2+), Al(3+), OH(-), H(2)PO(4)(-), HPO(4)(2-), and PO(4)(3-) play a role in the protonation and deprotonation reactions that will determine the wavellite-solution interface properties. The highest values of wavellite's floatability under basic pH conditions were achieved in the presence of cationic collectors (1 × 10(-4) mol L(-1)). The formation of surface complexes and the precipitation of insoluble salt of aluminum onto wavellite surface seems to be the most likely hypothesis for the chemical nature interactions between amines and wavellite. The surface formation of aluminum oleate on the wavellite's surface seems to be the most probable hypothesis for the adsorption mechanism and the resultant high floatability of wavellite between pH 7.5 and pH 10.0 in the presence of sodium oleate (1 × 10(-4) mol L(-1)). The results showed that the cationic reverse flotation of secondary phosphates is a promising route to reduce the phosphorus content of iron ores from deposits that underwent a supergene enrichment process, since wavellite floatability in the alkaline pH range, using amine as collector, was not significantly affected by the presence of corn starch.

  20. A monovalent cationic conductance that is blocked by extracellular divalent cations in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Arellano, R O; Woodward, R M; Miledi, R

    1995-01-01

    1. Native Xenopus oocytes were voltage clamped and exposed to Ringer solutions containing low concentrations of divalent cations. Oocytes, held at -60 mV, developed a reversible non-inactivating smooth inward current (Ic) associated with an increase in membrane conductance. 2. Ic was selectively carried by cations (Na+, K+), indicating that the current was not the result of a non-specific membrane breakdown, but was due instead to removal of a blocking effect of divalent cations on a specific population of endogenous ionic channels located in the oocyte membrane. 3. The blocking effects of Ca2+ and Mg2+ were voltage dependent, implying action at a binding site within the pore of the cationic channel. For example, the half-maximal inhibition (IC50) of Ic by Ca2+ was 61 microM in oocytes held at -60 mV and 212 microM in oocytes held at 0 mV. 4. The Ic channels could be unblocked by depolarization of the membrane even in the presence of physiological concentrations of Ca2+ or Mg2+. The unblocking of the channels was observed as a slowly developing outward current. 5. The novel cationic current was substantially reduced following in vitro maturation of oocytes by treatment with progesterone (10 microM, 4-5 h). 6. The physiological role of Ic channels remains to be elucidated. Nonetheless, their characteristics explain the ionic basis of the sensitivity of oocytes to reductions in extracellular divalent cations and raise the possibility that the channels play a role in calcium homeostasis. PMID:7542710

  1. Nonlinearity of cationic aromatic amine sorption to aluminosilicates and soils: role of intermolecular cation-π interactions.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Dharni; Arey, Teresa A; Dickstein, Daniel R; Newman, Mark H; Zhang, Tina Y; Kinnear, Heather M; Bader, Mohammad M

    2013-12-17

    Through the study of substituted anilines and benzylamines, we demonstrated that cooperative cation-π, π-π, and van der Waals interactions can increase aromatic cationic amine sorption to Na/Ca-montmorillonite well beyond the extent expected by cation exchange alone. Cationic amines exhibiting cooperative interactions displayed nonlinear S-shaped isotherms and increased affinity for the sorbent at low surface coverage; parallel cation exchange and cooperative interactions were noted above a sorption threshold of 0.3-2.3% of exchange sites occupied. Our experiments revealed the predominance of intermolecular cation-π interactions, which occurred between the π system of a compound retained on the surface via cation exchange and the cationic amine group of an adjacent molecule. Compounds with greater amine charge/area and electron-donating substituents that allowed for greater electron density at the center of the aromatic ring showed a greater potential for cation-π interactions on montmorillonite surfaces. However, benzylamine sorption to nine soils, at charge loadings comparable to the experiments with montmorillonite, revealed no significant cooperative interactions. It appears that cation-π interactions may be likely in soils with exceptionally high cation exchange capacities (>0.7 mol charge/kg) and low organic matter contents, abundant in montmorillonite and other expanding clay minerals.

  2. Clinopyroxene-liquid thermometers and barometers specific to alkaline differentiated magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masotta, M.; Mollo, S.; Freda, C.; Gaeta, M.; Moore, G.

    2013-12-01

    We present new thermometers and barometers based on clinopyroxene-liquid equilibria specific to alkaline differentiated magmas. The new models were calibrated through the regression analyses of experimental datasets obtained by merging phase equilibria experiments from the literature with new experiments performed by using trachytic and phonolitic starting compositions. The regression strategy was twofold: (1) we have tested previous thermometric and barometric equations and recalibrated these models using the new datasets; (2) we have calibrated a new thermometer and a new barometer including only regression parameters that closely describe the compositional variability of the datasets. The new models yield more precise estimates than previous thermometers and barometers when used to predict temperatures and pressures of alkaline differentiated magmas. We have tested the reliability of the new equations by using clinopyroxene-liquid pairs from trachytes and phonolites erupted during major explosive eruptions at the Phlegrean Fields and Mt. Vesuvius (central Italy). The test yielded crystallization conditions comparable to those determined by means of melt and fluid inclusion analyses and phase equilibria studies; this validates the use of the proposed models for precise estimates of crystallization temperatures and pressures in differentiated alkaline magmas. Because these magmas feed some of the most voluminous, explosive, and threatening volcanic eruptions in the world, a better understanding of the environmental conditions of their reservoirs is mandatory and this is now possible with the new models provided here.

  3. The Martian ocean: First acid, then alkaline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, M. W.

    1992-01-01

    In Mars' distant past, carbon dioxide and water may have been plentiful. Values of total outgassed CO2 from several to about 10 bar are consistent with present knowledge, and this amount of CO2 implies an amount of water outgassed equal to an equivalent depth of 500 to 1000 m. It is quite reasonable, therefore, to envision an early Mars in which there was a body or bodies of liquid water, perhaps in the northern plains, and a dense carbon dioxide atmosphere. Under such conditions, the pH of the water will be low, due to the dissolution of carbon dioxide in the water to form carbonic acid. This acidic water is capable of weathering the available rock quite intensely, particularly because this rock is likely to be heavily fractured (from meteorite bombardment) or even consist of fine particles (such as pyroclastic deposits). As time goes on, however, the carbon dioxide atmosphere will rapidly pass through the ocean to form carbonate deposits. As the density of the atmosphere decreases, so will the flux of carbonic acid into the ocean. Without this input of carbonic acid, the effect of the dissolved weathering products will be to increase the pH of the water. The ocean will then become alkaline. To study this process, I have developed a geochemical cycle model for the atmosphere-hydrosphere-regolith system of Mars. The treatment of geochemical cycles as complex kinetic chemical reactions has been undertaken for terrestrial systems in recent years with much success. This method is capable of elegantly handling the interactions between the simultaneous chemical reactions needed to understand such a system.

  4. Spectroscopic studies of alkaline activated slag geopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozgawa, W.; Deja, J.

    2009-04-01

    In the work, results of structural studies of different geopolymers, obtained using a granulated blast furnace slag, are presented. The slag was subjected to an alkaline activation process. As activators, NaOH, Na 2CO 3 and liquid glass were applied. IR and NMR spectroscopy were the main experimental methods used, the results obtained were compared with XRD phase analysis and SEM observations. In the IR spectra of raw slag as well as in the spectra of products of paste hydration, the bands due to the characteristic vibrations of bonds observed in both types of oxygen bridges: Si-O-Si and Si-O-Al, were assigned. These bridges constitute basic structural units, forming tetrahedral geopolymer chains. It was found that the slag composition, mainly SiO 2/Al 2O 3 ratio and modification in oxides concentration, influences the presence of the bands connected with the phases (mainly C-S-H) formed during the hydration in the IR spectra. Additionally, significant effect of amorphous phases share on the spectra shape was established. 29Si and 27Al MAS-NMR spectra of initial slag geopolymers and pastes provided information concerning coordination of both atoms in the structures. It was revealed that the kind of slag geopolymers and the conditions of paste hydration influence connectedness of silicooxygen tetrahedra and coordination number of aluminium atoms. Based on IR spectra, it was also possible to determine the influence of the activator type, activation time and hydration conditions on the products formed. Significant changes were observed for the bands assigned to vibrations of carbonate and hydroxide groups. The changes were also noticed in the case of bands due to vibrations of silicate and aluminosilicate bonds.

  5. Alkaline decomposition of synthetic jarosite with arsenic

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The widespread use of jarosite-type compounds to eliminate impurities in the hydrometallurgical industry is due to their capability to incorporate several elements into their structures. Some of these elements are of environmental importance (Pb2+, Cr6+, As5+, Cd2+, Hg2+). For the present paper, AsO43- was incorporated into the lattice of synthetic jarosite in order to carry out a reactivity study. Alkaline decomposition is characterized by removal of sulfate and potassium ions from the lattice and formation of a gel consisting of iron hydroxides with absorbed arsenate. Decomposition curves show an induction period followed by a conversion period. The induction period is independent of particle size and exponentially decreases with temperature. The conversion period is characterized by formation of a hydroxide halo that surrounds an unreacted jarosite core. During the conversion period in NaOH media for [OH-] > 8 × 10-3 mol L-1, the process showed a reaction order of 1.86, and an apparent activation energy of 60.3 kJ mol-1 was obtained. On the other hand, during the conversion period in Ca(OH)2 media for [OH-] > 1.90 × 10-2 mol L-1, the reaction order was 1.15, and an apparent activation energy of 74.4 kJ mol-1 was obtained. The results are consistent with the spherical particle model with decreasing core and chemical control. PMID:23566061

  6. Alkaline decomposition of synthetic jarosite with arsenic.

    PubMed

    Patiño, Francisco; Flores, Mizraim U; Reyes, Iván A; Reyes, Martín; Hernández, Juan; Rivera, Isauro; Juárez, Julio C

    2013-01-01

    The widespread use of jarosite-type compounds to eliminate impurities in the hydrometallurgical industry is due to their capability to incorporate several elements into their structures. Some of these elements are of environmental importance (Pb(2+), Cr(6+), As(5+), Cd(2+), Hg(2+)). For the present paper, AsO4 (3-) was incorporated into the lattice of synthetic jarosite in order to carry out a reactivity study. Alkaline decomposition is characterized by removal of sulfate and potassium ions from the lattice and formation of a gel consisting of iron hydroxides with absorbed arsenate. Decomposition curves show an induction period followed by a conversion period. The induction period is independent of particle size and exponentially decreases with temperature. The conversion period is characterized by formation of a hydroxide halo that surrounds an unreacted jarosite core. During the conversion period in NaOH media for [OH(-)] > 8 × 10(-3) mol L(-1), the process showed a reaction order of 1.86, and an apparent activation energy of 60.3 kJ mol(-1) was obtained. On the other hand, during the conversion period in Ca(OH)2 media for [OH(-)] > 1.90 × 10(-2) mol L(-1), the reaction order was 1.15, and an apparent activation energy of 74.4 kJ mol(-1) was obtained. The results are consistent with the spherical particle model with decreasing core and chemical control.

  7. Processes affecting the oceanic distributions of dissolved calcium and alkalinity

    SciTech Connect

    Shiller, A.M.; Gieskes, J.M.

    1980-05-20

    Recent studies of the CO/sub 2/ system have suggested that chemical processes in addition to the dissolution and precipitation of calcium carbonate affect the oceanic calcium and alkalinity distributions. Calcium and alkalinity data from the North Pacific have been examined both by using the simple physical-chemical model of previous workers and by a study involving the broader oceanographic context of these data. The simple model is shown to be an inadequate basis for these studies. Although a proton flux associated with organic decomposition may affect the alkalinity, previously reported deviations of calcium-alkalinity correlations from expected trends appear to be related to boundary processes that have been neglected rather than to this proton flux. The distribution of calcium in the surface waters of the Pacific Ocean is examined.

  8. ESTIMATION OF PHOSPHATE ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS - ALKALINE HYDROLYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) chemical reactivity models were extended to allow the calculation of alkaline hydrolysis rate constants of phosphate esters in water. The rate is calculated from the energy difference between the initial and transition state...

  9. ESTIMATION OF PHOSPHATE ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS. I. ALKALINE HYDROLYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) chemical reactivity models were extended to allow the calculation of alkaline hydrolysis rate constants of phosphate esters in water. The rate is calculated from the energy difference between the initial and transition state...

  10. Regulation of alkaline phosphatase expression in human choriocarcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, T A; Tin, A W; Sussman, H H

    1979-01-01

    The coincident expression of two structurally distinct isoenzymes of human alkaline phosphatase was demonstrated in two independently derived gestational choriocarcinoma cell lines. These proteins were shown to have enzymatic, antigenic, and physical-chemical properties resembling those of isoenzymes from term placenta and adult liver. The regulation of these isoenzymes has been studied during the exposure of both cell lines to 5-bromodeoxyuridine and dibutyryl cyclic AMP. The responses of the alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes to these agents have also been compared with the response of another protein phenotypic to placenta, the alpha subunit of chorionic gonadotropin. The results show that (i) the separate structural genes coding for placental and liver alkaline phosphatases are regulated in a noncoordinate fashion; (ii) both alkaline phosphatase genes respond independently of the alpha subunit; and (iii) the induction of the placental type isoenzyme occurs via at least two independent pathways. Images PMID:218197

  11. Net alkalinity and net acidity 1: Theoretical considerations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirby, C.S.; Cravotta, C.A.

    2005-01-01

    Net acidity and net alkalinity are widely used, poorly defined, and commonly misunderstood parameters for the characterization of mine drainage. The authors explain theoretical expressions of 3 types of alkalinity (caustic, phenolphthalein, and total) and acidity (mineral, CO2, and total). Except for rarely-invoked negative alkalinity, theoretically defined total alkalinity is closely analogous to measured alkalinity and presents few practical interpretation problems. Theoretically defined "CO 2-acidity" is closely related to most standard titration methods with an endpoint pH of 8.3 used for determining acidity in mine drainage, but it is unfortunately named because CO2 is intentionally driven off during titration of mine-drainage samples. Using the proton condition/mass- action approach and employing graphs to illustrate speciation with changes in pH, the authors explore the concept of principal components and how to assign acidity contributions to aqueous species commonly present in mine drainage. Acidity is defined in mine drainage based on aqueous speciation at the sample pH and on the capacity of these species to undergo hydrolysis to pH 8.3. Application of this definition shows that the computed acidity in mg L -1 as CaCO3 (based on pH and analytical concentrations of dissolved FeII, FeIII, Mn, and Al in mg L -1):aciditycalculated=50{1000(10-pH)+[2(FeII)+3(FeIII)]/56+2(Mn)/ 55+3(Al)/27}underestimates contributions from HSO4- and H+, but overestimates the acidity due to Fe3+ and Al3+. However, these errors tend to approximately cancel each other. It is demonstrated that "net alkalinity" is a valid mathematical construction based on theoretical definitions of alkalinity and acidity. Further, it is shown that, for most mine-drainage solutions, a useful net alkalinity value can be derived from: (1) alkalinity and acidity values based on aqueous speciation, (2) measured alkalinity minus calculated acidity, or (3) taking the negative of the value obtained in a

  12. Fragmentation Pathways in the Uracil Radical Cation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Congyi; Matsika, Spiridoula; Kotur, Marija; Weinacht, Thomas C.

    2012-08-24

    We investigate pathways for fragmentation in the uracil radical cation using ab initio electronic structure calculations. We focus on the main fragments produced in pump–probe dissociative ionization experiments. These are fragments with mass to charge ratios (m/z) of 69, 28, 41, and 42. Barriers to dissociation along the ground ionic surface are reported, which provide an estimate of the energetic requirements for the production of the main fragments. Finally, direct and sequential fragmentation mechanisms have been analyzed, and it is concluded that sequential fragmentation after production of fragment with m/z 69 is the dominant mechanism for the production of the smaller fragments.

  13. Development of cationic nanocrystals for ocular delivery.

    PubMed

    Romero, Gregori B; Keck, Cornelia M; Müller, Rainer H; Bou-Chacra, Nadia A

    2016-10-01

    A cationic nanocrystal formulation containing dexamethasone acetate nanocrystals (0.05%) and polymyxin B (0.10%) for ophthalmic application was produced using a self-developed small scale method for wet bead milling. The formulation developed offers the advantage of increased saturation solubility of the drug (due to the nano-size of the crystals) and increased residence time in the eye (due to small size and increased mucoadhesion by the cationic charge) resulting ultimately in potential increased bioavailability. Characterization of the nanosuspensions by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) and transmission electron microscopy showed that the production method was successful in achieving dexamethasone crystals in the range of about 200-250nm. The physical stabilization of the nanocrystals and generation of the positive charge were realized by using cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) and benzalkonium chloride (BAC) at the concentration of 0.01%. In contrast to other cationic excipients, they are regulatorily accepted due to their use as preservatives. The drug polymyxin B also contributed to the positive charge. Positive zeta potentials in the range +20 to +30mV were achieved. Isotonicity was adjusted using NaCl and non-ionic excipients (glycerol, sorbitol, dextrose). Physical and chemical stabilities were monitored for a period of 6months at room temperature, 5°C and 40°C. Particle size of the bulk population assessed by PCS remained practically unchanged over 6months of storage for the various formulations without isotonicity agents, and for the CPC-containing formulations with non-ionic isotonicity excipients. The chemical content also proved stable after 6months for all 3 temperatures evaluated. In vitro investigation of mucoadhesion was tested using mucin solutions at different concentrations, and the generated negative zeta potential was used as a measure of the interaction. The zeta potential reversed to about -15mV, indicating distinct interaction. The

  14. Nonclassical 21-Homododecahedryl Cation Rearrangement Revisited.

    PubMed

    Jalife, Said; Mondal, Sukanta; Osorio, Edison; Cabellos, José Luis; Martínez-Guajardo, Gerardo; Fernández-Herrera, María A; Merino, Gabriel

    2016-03-04

    The degenerate rearrangement in the 21-homododecahedryl cation (1) has been studied via density functional theory computations and Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics simulations. Compound 1 can be described as a highly fluxional hyperconjugated carbocation. Complete scrambling of 1 can be achieved by the combination of two unveiled barrierless processes. The first one is a "rotation" of one of the six-membered rings via a 0.8 kcal·mol(-1) barrier, and the second one is a slower interconvertion between two hyperconjomers via an out-of-plane methine bending (ΔG(⧧) = 4.0 kcal·mol(-1)).

  15. Synthesis and Characterization of Alkaline-Earth Metal (Ca, Sr, and Ba) Doped Nanodimensional LaMnO3 Rare-Earth Manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asma, Khalid; Saadat, Anwar Siddiqi; Affia, Aslam

    2013-07-01

    The substitution of divalent cations of alkaline-earth elements in nanodimensional structures of rare-earth manganites produces advanced materials with potential electrical and magnetic functionalities. A systematic investigation of La0.65A0.35MnO3 (A = Ca, Sr, Ba) materials synthesized with a modified citrate route adopting ethanol dehydration has been undertaken. The structural and morphological analyses are carried out by using x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. Resistivity measurements are performed in variation with temperature to study the electrical transport properties which are found to vary with the size of the A-site cationic radius. Room temperature magnetic measurements are carried out to investigate the type of magnetic phase present in materials. The stability of the magnetic phase and coercivity are found to be dependent on the size of nanocrystallites.

  16. Soil Cation Status in Southern California: Interactions of Vehicular Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, R.; Bain, D. J.; Jenerette, D.; Clarke, L. W.

    2012-12-01

    Roadside soils are often enriched in trace metals due to vehicular deposition. However, less attention is given to base cation pools in roadside soils. Relatively high loadings of nitrate from vehicular exhaust should acidify roadside soils, potentially mobilizing cationic species by displacing them from soil exchange sites. In contrast, weathering of road materials can contribute substantial amounts of these cations to the same soils, potentially replenishing cation pools. Base cations are essential nutrients and these dynamics may alter ecosystem processes in near-road environments. Metal concentrations in park and garden soils collected from Southern California (Los Angeles and Riverside Counties) were examined across gradients of road network intensity, climate and geology. In these samples, base cation concentrations decrease in areas of denser road networks. Base cation concentrations also decrease with distance from the road, with near-road samples relatively depleted in base cation concentrations. In addition, base cation concentrations are associated with traffic flux density, with exchange pools decreasing near heavily trafficked areas. These relationships suggest road activity is mobilizing cations, depleting near-road soils of essential nutrient pools, despite road material weathering. This depletion of soil nutrients from exchange pools in roadside soils likely influences local ecological function in unpredictable ways. This observation lays the groundwork for continued characterization of soil metal processes in the increasingly common roadside environment.

  17. Acid transformation of bauxite residue: Conversion of its alkaline characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiangfeng; Li, Meng; Xue, Shengguo; Hartley, William; Chen, Chengrong; Wu, Chuan; Li, Xiaofei; Li, Yiwei

    2017-02-15

    Bauxite residue (BR) is a highly alkaline solid hazardous waste produced from bauxite processing for alumina production. Alkaline transformation appears to reduce the environmental risk of bauxite residue disposal areas (BRDAs) whilst potentially providing opportunities for the sustainable reuse and on-going management of BR. Mineral acids, a novel citric acid and a hybrid combination of acid-gypsum treatments were investigated for their potential to reduce residue pH and total alkalinity and transform the alkaline mineral phase. XRD results revealed that with the exception of andradite, the primary alkaline solid phases of cancrinite, grossular and calcite were transformed into discriminative products based on the transformation used. Supernatants separated from BR and transformed bauxite residue (TBR) displayed distinct changes in soluble Na, Ca and Al, and a reduction in pH and total alkalinity. SEM images suggest that mineral acid transformations promote macro-aggregate formation, and the positive promotion of citric acid, confirming the removal or reduction in soluble and exchangeable Na. NEXAFS analysis of Na K-edge revealed that the chemical speciation of Na in TBRs was consistent with BR. Three acid treatments and gypsum combination had no effect on Na speciation, which affects the distribution of Na revealed by sodium STXM imaging.

  18. The alkalinizing effects of metabolizable bases in the healthy calf.

    PubMed Central

    Naylor, J M; Forsyth, G W

    1986-01-01

    The alkalinizing effect of citrate, acetate, propionate, gluconate, L and DL-lactate were compared in healthy neonatal calves. The calves were infused for a 3.5 hour period with 150 mmol/L solutions of the sodium salts of the various bases. Blood pH, base excess, and metabolite concentrations were measured and the responses compared with sodium bicarbonate and sodium chloride infusion. D-gluconate and D-lactate had poor alkalinizing abilities and accumulated in blood during infusion suggesting that they are poorly metabolized by the calf. Acetate, L-lactate and propionate had alkalinizing effects similar to bicarbonate, although those of acetate had a slightly better alkalinizing effect than L-lactate. Acetate was more effectively metabolized because blood acetate concentrations were lower than L-lactate concentrations. There was a tendency for a small improvement in metabolism of acetate and lactate with age. Sodium citrate infusion produced signs of hypocalcemia, presumably because it removed ionized calcium from the circulation. D-gluconate, D-lactate and citrate are unsuitable for use as alkalinizing agents in intravenous fluids. Propionate, acetate and L-lactate are all good alkalinizing agents in healthy calves but will not be as effective in situations where tissue metabolism is impaired. PMID:3024796

  19. Nitrogen isotope evidence for alkaline lakes on late Archean continents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stüeken, E. E.; Buick, R.; Schauer, A. J.

    2015-02-01

    Nitrogen isotope ratios in ancient sedimentary rocks are generally interpreted as a proxy for metabolic nitrogen pathways and the redox state of the water column. Fractionation processes occurring under anoxic, alkaline conditions during the dissociation of NH4+ to H+ and volatile NH3 are frequently overlooked, although this mechanism imparts large isotopic fractionations. Here we propose that NH3 volatilization is largely responsible for δ15N values of up to + 50 ‰ at high C/N ratios in the late Archean Tumbiana Formation. This sequence of sedimentary rocks represents a system of lakes that formed on subaerial flood basalts and were partly filled by basaltic volcanic ash. Aqueous alteration of volcanic glass followed by evaporative concentration of ions should have led to the development of high alkalinity with a pH of 9 or higher, as in modern analogues. In this sedimentologically unusual setting, nitrogen isotope ratios thus provide indirect evidence for the oldest alkaline lake system in the rock record. These very heavy lacustrine δ15N values contrast markedly with those of Archean marine sedimentary rocks, making a Precambrian "soda ocean" unlikely. Today, alkaline lakes are among the most productive ecosystems on Earth. Some nutrients, in particular molybdenum, are more soluble at high pH, and certain prebiotic reactions would likely have been favored under alkaline conditions in similar settings earlier in Earth's history. Hence alkaline lakes in the Archean could have been significant for the origin and early evolution of life.

  20. Characteristics of plasmalemma alkaline phosphatase of rat mesenteric artery.

    PubMed

    Kwan, C Y

    1983-01-01

    General characteristics of alkaline phosphatase activity of the plasma membrane-enriched fraction isolated from rat mesenteric arteries were investigated. The vascular smooth muscle plasmalemma alkaline phosphatase is a metalloenzyme which is strongly inhibited by chelating agents and this inhibition can be completely overcome by addition of Mg2+ or Ca2+. Zn2+ only partially reactivates the enzyme in the presence of low concentrations of EDTA. The enzymatic hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate, beta-glycerophosphate, alpha-glycerophosphate, or 3'-adenosine monophosphate showed an optimal activity in the alkaline region between pH 9 and 11. The alkaline phosphatase activity is distinctly different from the plasmalemma ATPase and 5'-nucleotidase activities with respect to their pH dependence, influence by added divalent metal ions and stability against heat inactivation. Vanadate ion, being structurally similar to the transition state analog of the phosphoryl group, potently inhibits alkaline phosphatase with an apparent Ki of 1.5 microM. The altered alkaline phosphatase activity of vascular smooth muscle in relation to its possible physiological function and pathophysiological manifestation associated with hypertensive disease are discussed.

  1. Overexpression of Human Bone Alkaline Phosphatase in Pichia Pastoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Laurel; Malone, Christine, C.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Pichiapastoris expression system was utilized to produce functionally active human bone alkaline phosphatase in gram quantities. Bone alkaline phosphatase is a key enzyme in bone formation and biomineralization, yet important questions about its structural chemistry and interactions with other cellular enzymes in mineralizing tissues remain unanswered. A soluble form of human bone alkaline phosphatase was constructed by deletion of the 25 amino acid hydrophobic C-terminal region of the encoding cDNA and inserted into the X-33 Pichiapastoris strain. An overexpression system was developed in shake flasks and converted to large-scale fermentation. Alkaline phosphatase was secreted into the medium to a level of 32mgAL when cultured in shake flasks. Enzyme activity was 12U/mg measured by a spectrophotometric assay. Fermentation yielded 880mgAL with enzymatic activity of 968U/mg. Gel electrophoresis analysis indicates that greater than 50% of the total protein in the fermentation is alkaline phosphatase. A purification scheme has been developed using ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by hydrophobic interaction chromatography. We are currently screening crystallization conditions of the purified recombinant protein for subsequent X-ray diffraction analyses. Structural data should provide additional information on the role of alkaline phosphatase in normal bone mineralization and in certain bone mineralization anomalies.

  2. A laundry detergent-stable alkaline trypsin from striped seabream (Lithognathus mormyrus) viscera: purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    El Hadj Ali, Nedra; Hmidet, Noomen; Bougatef, Ali; Nasri, Rim; Nasri, Moncef

    2009-11-25

    An alkaline trypsin from the intestine of striped seabream (Lithognathus mormyrus) was purified and characterized. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity by precipitation with ammonium sulfate, Sephadex G-100 gel filtration and CM-Sephadex cation-exchange chromatography, with a 24.9-fold increase in specific activity and 13% recovery. The molecular weight of the purified alkaline trypsin was estimated to be 27.5 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and size exclusion chromatography. The purified trypsin appeared as a single band on native PAGE. Interestingly, the enzyme was highly active over a wide range of pH from 8.0 to 11.0, with an optimum at pH 10.0 using Nalpha-benzoyl-dl-arginine-p-nitroanilide (BAPNA) as a substrate. The relative activities at pH 8.0, 11.0, and 12.0 were 73%, 67% and 50.4%, respectively. The enzyme was extremely stable over a broad pH range (5.0-12.0). The optimum temperature for enzyme activity was 50 degrees C. The purified enzyme was strongly inhibited by soybean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI). In addition, the enzyme showed excellent stability toward various surfactants and bleache agents and compatibility with some commercial solid and liquid detergents. The trypsin kinetic constants, Km and kcat of the enzyme for BAPNA, were 0.29 mM and 1.36 s(-1), respectively, while the catalytic efficiency kcat/Km was 4.68 s(-1) mM(-1).

  3. Predicting species’ tolerance to salinity and alkalinity using distribution data and geochemical modelling: a case study using Australian grasses

    PubMed Central

    Saslis-Lagoudakis, C. Haris; Hua, Xia; Bui, Elisabeth; Moray, Camile; Bromham, Lindell

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Salt tolerance has evolved many times independently in different plant groups. One possible explanation for this pattern is that it builds upon a general suite of stress-tolerance traits. If this is the case, then we might expect a correlation between salt tolerance and other tolerances to different environmental stresses. This association has been hypothesized for salt and alkalinity tolerance. However, a major limitation in investigating large-scale patterns of these tolerances is that lists of known tolerant species are incomplete. This study explores whether species’ salt and alkalinity tolerance can be predicted using geochemical modelling for Australian grasses. The correlation between taxa found in conditions of high predicted salinity and alkalinity is then assessed. Methods Extensive occurrence data for Australian grasses is used together with geochemical modelling to predict values of pH and electrical conductivity to which species are exposed in their natural distributions. Using parametric and phylogeny-corrected tests, the geochemical predictions are evaluated using a list of known halophytes as a control, and it is determined whether taxa that occur in conditions of high predicted salinity are also found in conditions of high predicted alkalinity. Key Results It is shown that genera containing known halophytes have higher predicted salinity conditions than those not containing known halophytes. Additionally, taxa occurring in high predicted salinity tend to also occur in high predicted alkalinity. Conclusions Geochemical modelling using species’ occurrence data is a potentially useful approach to predict species’ relative natural tolerance to challenging environmental conditions. The findings also demonstrate a correlation between salinity tolerance and alkalinity tolerance. Further investigations can consider the phylogenetic distribution of specific traits involved in these ecophysiological strategies, ideally by

  4. Density Functional Theory and Mass Spectrometry of Phthalate Fragmentations Mechanisms: Modeling Hyperconjugated Carbocation and Radical Cation Complexes with Neutral Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeilani, Yassin A.; Cardelino, Beatriz H.; Ibeanusi, Victor M.

    2011-11-01

    This is the first ab initio study of the energetics of the fragmentation mechanisms of phthalate, by mass spectrometry, leading to protonated phthalic anhydride ( m/z 149). Phthalates fragment by two major pathways; namely, the McLafferty + 1 rearrangement and the loss of alkoxy. Both pathways involve a carbonyl oxygen attack to the ortho-carbonyl carbon leading to structures with tetrahedral carbon intermediates that eventually give m/z 149. These pathways were studied by collision induced dissociation (CID) using triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. The proposed McLafferty + 1 pathway proceeds through a distonic M•+, leading to the loss of an allylic-stabilized alkene radical. The McLafferty rearrangement step proceeds through a six-membered ring transition state with a small activation energy ranging 0.4-6.2 kcal/mol; the transfer of a second H from the distonic ion of the rearrangement step proceeds through a radical cation molecule complex. Based on quantum chemical modeling of the cation molecule complexes, two kinds of cation molecule complexes were identified as radical cation molecule complex and hyperconjugated cation molecule complex. This distinction is based on the cation and simplifies future modeling of similar complexes. Optimization of important fragments in these pathways showed cyclized and hydrogen-bonded structures to be favored. An exception was the optimized structure of the protonated phthalic anhydride ( m/z 149) that showed a structure with an open anhydride ring.

  5. The Infrared Spectra of BF_3 Cation and BF_2OH Cation Trapped in Solid Neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacox, Marilyn E.; Thompson, Warren E.

    2010-06-01

    New, more detailed studies of the photoionization and Penning ionization of BF_3 trapped in solid neon have confirmed the earlier infrared spectroscopic identification of BF_2 and BF_2 cation and have yielded a revised assignment for the infrared absorptions of BF3 cation. The position of the absorption attributed to ν_3 of that molecule is consistent with the distortion of the ground-state cation from D3h symmetry because of strong vibronic interaction between levels of the Btilde ^2E^' state and E^' levels of the ~X ^2A_2^' ground state, as predicted by Haller and co-workers. The facile reaction of BF_3 with traces of H_2O desorbed from the walls of the vacuum system leads to the stabilization of sufficient BF_2OH for the identification of two vibrational fundamentals of BF_2OH cation. M. E. Jacox and W. E. Thompson, J. Chem. Phys. 102, 4747 (1995). E. Haller, H. Koppel, L. S. Cederbaum, W. von Niessen, and G. Bieri, J. Chem. Phys. 78, 1359 (1983).

  6. Irrigant divalent cation concentrations influence bacterial adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Dass, Clarissa L.; Walsh, Mary F.; Seo, Sue; Shiratsuchi, Hiroe; Craig, David H.; Basson, Marc D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Surgical wounds are frequently contaminated by microbes, but rarely become infected if the bacterial burden is low, and irrigation is used to reduce contamination. Wound fluids are low in calcium and high in magnesium. We hypothesized that manipulating irrigant divalent cation concentrations might influence bacterial adhesion. Methods Staphylococcus aureus, E. coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were stained with fluorescent Calcein AM before plating onto fibroblast monolayers, collagen I, or uncoated bacteriologic plastic. After one hour, wells were washed with HEPES-buffered pH-balanced sterile water without or with 5mM CaCl2, 5mM MgCl2 or 1mM EDTA+EGTA, and the remaining adherent bacteria were assayed fluorometrically. Results Supplementing the irrigation with magnesium or chelators increased but calcium-supplemented irrigation reduced bacterial adhesion to collagen or fibroblasts. Non-specific electrostatic bacterial adhesion to uncoated plastic was unaffected by calcium. Conclusion Bacterial adhesion to mammalian cells and matrix proteins is influenced by divalent cations, and pathogenic bacteria may be adapted to adhere under the low calcium high magnesium conditions in wounds. Although these results await confirmation for other bacteria, and in vivo validation and safety-testing, they suggest that supplementing wound irrigation with 5mM CaCl2 may reduce bacterial adhesion and subsequent wound infection. PMID:19577252

  7. Interaction of Hyaluronan with Cationic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bano, Fouzia; Carril, Mónica; Di Gianvincenzo, Paolo; Richter, Ralf P

    2015-08-04

    The polysaccharide hyaluronan (HA) is a main component of peri- and extracellular matrix, and an attractive molecule for materials design in tissue engineering and nanomedicine. Here, we study the morphology of complexes that form upon interaction of nanometer-sized amine-coated gold particles with this anionic, linear, and regular biopolymer in solution and grafted to a surface. We find that cationic nanoparticles (NPs) have profound effects on HA morphology on the molecular and supramolecular scale. Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM-D) shows that depending on their relative abundance, cationic NPs promote either strong compaction or swelling of films of surface-grafted HA polymers (HA brushes). Transmission electron and atomic force microscopy reveal that the NPs do also give rise to complexes of distinct morphologies-compact nanoscopic spheres and extended microscopic fibers-upon interaction with HA polymers in solution. In particular, stable and hydrated spherical complexes of single HA polymers with NPs can be prepared when balancing the ionizable groups on HA and NPs. The observed self-assembly phenomena could be useful for the design of drug delivery vehicles and a better understanding of the reorganization of HA-rich synthetic or biological matrices.

  8. Antibacterial Activity of Geminized Amphiphilic Cationic Homopolymers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Shi, Xuefeng; Yu, Danfeng; Zhang, Jian; Yang, Guang; Cui, Yingxian; Sun, Keji; Wang, Jinben; Yan, Haike

    2015-12-22

    The current study is aimed at investigating the effect of cationic charge density and hydrophobicity on the antibacterial and hemolytic activities. Two kinds of cationic surfmers, containing single or double hydrophobic tails (octyl chains or benzyl groups), and the corresponding homopolymers were synthesized. The antimicrobial activity of these candidate antibacterials was studied by microbial growth inhibition assays against Escherichia coli, and hemolysis activity was carried out using human red blood cells. It was interestingly found that the homopolymers were much more effective in antibacterial property than their corresponding monomers. Furthermore, the geminized homopolymers had significantly higher antibacterial activity than that of their counterparts but with single amphiphilic side chains in each repeated unit. Geminized homopolymers, with high positive charge density and moderate hydrophobicity (such as benzyl groups), combine both advantages of efficient antibacterial property and prominently high selectivity. To further explain the antibacterial performance of the novel polymer series, the molecular interaction mechanism is proposed according to experimental data which shows that these specimens are likely to kill microbes by disrupting bacterial membranes, leading them unlikely to induce resistance.

  9. Ceramic Spheres From Cation Exchange Beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, F. W.

    2003-01-01

    Porous ZrO2 and hollow TiO2 spheres were synthesized from a strong acid cation exchange resin. Spherical cation exchange beads, polystyrene based polymer, were used as a morphological-directing template. Aqueous ion exchange reaction was used to chemically bind (ZrO)(2+) ions to the polystyrene structure. The pyrolysis of the polystyrene at 600 C produces porous ZrO2 spheres with a surface area of 24 sq m/g with a mean sphere size of 42 microns. Hollow TiO2 spheres were synthesized by using the beads as a micro-reactor. A direct surface reaction - between titanium isopropoxide and the resin beads forms a hydrous TiO2 shell around the polystyrene core. The pyrolysis of the polystyrene core at 600 C produces hollow anatase spheres with a surface area of 42 sq m/g with a mean sphere size of 38 microns. The formation of ceramic spheres was studied by XRD, SEM and B.E.T. nitrogen adsorption measurements.

  10. Electronic absorptions of the benzylium cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dryza, Viktoras; Chalyavi, Nahid; Sanelli, Julian A.; Bieske, Evan J.

    2012-11-01

    The electronic transitions of the benzylium cation (Bz+) are investigated over the 250-550 nm range by monitoring the photodissociation of mass-selected C7H7+-Arn (n = 1, 2) complexes in a tandem mass spectrometer. The Bz+-Ar spectrum displays two distinct band systems, the S1←S0 band system extending from 370 to 530 nm with an origin at 19 067 ± 15 cm-1, and a much stronger S3←S0 band system extending from 270 to 320 nm with an origin at 32 035 ± 15 cm-1. Whereas the S1←S0 absorption exhibits well resolved vibrational progressions, the S3←S0 absorption is broad and relatively structureless. Vibronic structure of the S1←S0 system, which is interpreted with the aid of time-dependent density functional theory and Franck-Condon simulations, reflects the activity of four totally symmetric ring deformation modes (ν5, ν6, ν9, ν13). We find no evidence for the ultraviolet absorption of the tropylium cation, which according to the neon matrix spectrum should occur over the 260 - 275 nm range [A. Nagy, J. Fulara, I. Garkusha, and J. Maier, Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 50, 3022 (2011)], 10.1002/anie.201008036.

  11. Nanoheterostructure Cation Exchange: Anionic Framework Conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Prashant K.; Amirav, Lilac; Aloni, Shaul; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2010-05-11

    In ionic nanocrystals the cationic sub-lattice can be replaced with a different metal ion via a fast, simple, and reversible place-exchange, allowing post-synthetic modification of the composition of the nanocrystal, while preserving its size and shape. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that during such an exchange, the anionic framework of the crystal is preserved. When applied to nanoheterostructures, this phenomenon ensures that compositional interfaces within the heterostructure are conserved throughout the transformation. For instance, a morphology composed of a CdSe nanocrystal embedded in a CdS rod (CdSe/CdS) was exchanged to a PbSe/PbS nanorod via a Cu2Se/Cu2S structure. During every exchange cycle, the seed size and position within the nanorod were preserved, as evident by excitonic features, Z-contrast imaging, and elemental line-scans. Anionic framework conservation extends the domain of cation exchange to the design of more complex and unique nanostructures.

  12. Transition-Metal Hydride Radical Cations.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue; Shaw, Anthony P; Estes, Deven P; Norton, Jack R

    2016-08-10

    Transition-metal hydride radical cations (TMHRCs) are involved in a variety of chemical and biochemical reactions, making a more thorough understanding of their properties essential for explaining observed reactivity and for the eventual development of new applications. Generally, these species may be treated as the ones formed by one-electron oxidation of diamagnetic analogues that are neutral or cationic. Despite the importance of TMHRCs, the generally sensitive nature of these complexes has hindered their development. However, over the last four decades, many more TMHRCs have been synthesized, characterized, isolated, or hypothesized as reaction intermediates. This comprehensive review focuses on experimental studies of TMHRCs reported through the year 2014, with an emphasis on isolated and observed species. The methods used for the generation or synthesis of TMHRCs are surveyed, followed by a discussion about the stability of these complexes. The fundamental properties of TMHRCs, especially those pertaining to the M-H bond, are described, followed by a detailed treatment of decomposition pathways. Finally, reactions involving TMHRCs as intermediates are described.

  13. Photodissociation of Cerium Oxide Nanocluster Cations.

    PubMed

    Akin, S T; Ard, S G; Dye, B E; Schaefer, H F; Duncan, M A

    2016-04-21

    Cerium oxide cluster cations, CexOy(+), are produced via laser vaporization in a pulsed nozzle source and detected with time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The mass spectrum displays a strongly preferred oxide stoichiometry for each cluster with a specific number of metal atoms x, with x ≤ y. Specifically, the most prominent clusters correspond to the formula CeO(CeO2)n(+). The cluster cations are mass selected and photodissociated with a Nd:YAG laser at either 532 or 355 nm. The prominent clusters dissociate to produce smaller species also having a similar CeO(CeO2)n(+) formula, always with apparent leaving groups of (CeO2). The production of CeO(CeO2)n(+) from the dissociation of many cluster sizes establishes the relative stability of these clusters. Furthermore, the consistent loss of neutral CeO2 shows that the smallest neutral clusters adopt the same oxidation state (IV) as the most common form of bulk cerium oxide. Clusters with higher oxygen content than the CeO(CeO2)n(+) masses are present with much lower abundance. These species dissociate by the loss of O2, leaving surviving clusters with the CeO(CeO2)n(+) formula. Density functional theory calculations on these clusters suggest structures composed of stable CeO(CeO2)n(+) cores with excess oxygen bound to the surface as a superoxide unit (O2(-)).

  14. Cationic antimicrobial peptides in penaeid shrimp.

    PubMed

    Tassanakajon, Anchalee; Amparyup, Piti; Somboonwiwat, Kunlaya; Supungul, Premruethai

    2011-08-01

    Penaeid shrimp aquaculture has been consistently affected worldwide by devastating diseases that cause a severe loss in production. To fight a variety of harmful microbes in the surrounding environment, particularly at high densities (of which intensive farming represents an extreme example), shrimps have evolved and use a diverse array of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as part of an important first-line response of the host defense system. Cationic AMPs in penaeid shrimps composed of penaeidins, crustins, and anti-lipopolysaccharide factors are comprised of multiple classes or isoforms and possess antibacterial and antifungal activities against different strains of bacteria and fungi. Shrimp AMPs are primarily expressed in circulating hemocytes, which is the main site of the immune response, and hemocytes expressing AMPs probably migrate to infection sites to fight against pathogen invasion. Indeed, most AMPs are produced as early as the nauplii developmental stage to protect shrimp larvae from infections. In this review, we discuss the sequence diversity, expression, gene structure, and antimicrobial activities of cationic AMPs in penaeid shrimps. The information available on antimicrobial activities indicates that these shrimp AMPs have potential therapeutic applications in the control of disease problems in aquaculture.

  15. Ferrocenylbenzobisimidazoles for recognition of anions and cations.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, María; Tárraga, Alberto; Molina, Pedro

    2013-07-01

    The preparation of 2,7-disubstituted benzobisimidazoles decorated with substituents displaying different electrooptical properties is described. The presence of redox, chromogenic, and fluorescent groups at the heteroaromatic core, which acts as ditopic binding site, made these receptors potential candidates as multichannel probes for ions. The triad 4 behaves as a selective redox and fluorescent chemosensor for HSO4(-) and Hg(2+) ions, whereas receptor 5 acts as a redox and chromogenic chemosensor molecule for AcO(-) and SO4(2-) anions. The change in the absorption spectra is accompanied by a color change from yellow to orange, while sensing of Zn(2+), Hg(2+), and Pb(2+) cations is carried out only by electrochemical techniques. Receptor 6 exhibits a remarkable cathodic shift of the oxidation wave only in the presence of AcO(-), H2PO4(-), and HP2O7(3-) anions, whereas addition of Pb(2+) induces an anodic shift. A new low energy band in the absorption spectra, which is responsible for the color change from colorless to pale yellow, and an important increase of the monomer emission band is observed only in the presence of H2PO4(-), and HP2O7(3-) anions. The most salient feature of the receptor 6 is its ability to act as a multichannel (redox, chromogenic, and fluorescent) chemodosimeter for Cu(2+), and Hg(2+) metal cations.

  16. Designing advanced alkaline polymer electrolytes for fuel cell applications.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jing; Chen, Chen; Zhuang, Lin; Lu, Juntao

    2012-03-20

    Although the polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) is a superior power source for electric vehicles, the high cost of this technology has served as the primary barrier to the large-scale commercialization. Over the last decade, researchers have pursued lower-cost next-generation materials for fuel cells, and alkaline polymer electrolytes (APEs) have emerged as an enabling material for platinum-free fuel cells. To fulfill the requirements of fuel cell applications, the APE must be as conductive and stable as its acidic counterpart, such as Nafion. This benchmark has proved challenging for APEs because the conductivity of OH(-) is intrinsically lower than that of H(+), and the stability of the cationic functional group in APEs, typically quaternary ammonia (-NR(3)(+)), is usually lower than that of the sulfonic functional group (-SO(3)(-)) in acidic polymer electrolytes. To improve the ionic conductivity, APEs are often designed to be of high ion-exchange capacity (IEC). This modification has caused unfavorable changes in the materials: these high IEC APEs absorb excessive amounts of water, leading to significant swelling and a decline in mechanical strength of the membrane. Cross-linking the polymer chains does not completely solve the problem because stable ionomer solutions would not be available for PEFC assembly. In this Account, we report our recent progress in the development of advanced APEs, which are highly resistant to swelling and show conductivities comparable with Nafion at typical temperatures for fuel-cell operation. We have proposed two strategies for improving the performance of APEs: self-cross-linking and self-aggregating designs. The self-cross-linking design builds on conventional cross-linking methods and works for APEs with high IEC. The self-aggregating design improves the effective mobility of OH(-) and boosts the ionic conductivity of APEs with low IEC. For APEs with high IEC, cross-linking is necessary to restrict the swelling of the

  17. Alkali-cation affinities of polyoxyethylene dodecylethers and helical conformations of their cationized molecules studied by electrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Yukio; Hirajima, Rui; Morigaki, Ken; Yamaguchi, Yoshitaka; Ueda, Kazuyoshi

    2007-11-01

    Relative alkali-cation affinity of polyoxyethylene (POE) dodecylethers in gas phase was studied by electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry using dodecylether-poly-ethoxylate (C(12)EO:n, "n" denotes ethyleneoxide unit number) nonionic surfactants, and possible helical conformations of the cationized molecules were demonstrated. The alkali-cation affinity highly depended on the cation diameters. The mass spectra of C(12)EO:8 cationized by alkali-metal ions were dominated by potassiated molecules. The results indicated that the POE moiety could have specific affinity to K(+) ions based on a host-guest interaction between POE helix and potassium ions. This is very similar to the relationships between 18-crown-6 and K(+). The ESI mass spectra exhibited the multiply cationized C(12)EO:n in addition to the singly cationized molecules. The critical EO unit numbers necessary for producing the multiply-charged cationized molecules also depended on the cation diameters. In addition, the POE surfactants highly preferred alkali cations to proton. The results were strongly supported by molecular mechanics/dynamics calculations. A helical conformation of the POE moiety of C(12)EO:15 including two K(+) ions gave a potential minimum, while a lowest energy structure of the protonated molecule took irregular conformations due to the formation of local hydrogen bonds.

  18. Fresh water leaching of alkaline bauxite residue after sea water neutralization.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Neal W; Fulton, Ian M; Kopittke, Rosemary A; Kopittke, Peter M

    2009-01-01

    Processing of bauxite to extract alumina produces a strongly alkaline waste, bauxite refining residue, which is commonly stored in engineered structures. Once full, these waste dumps must be revegetated. In many alumina refineries, the waste is separated into fine-textured red mud and coarse-textured residue sand (RS). The sand component has physical characteristics that make it a suitable plant growth medium, provided the adverse chemical characteristics can be addressed. Neutralization of the highly saline-sodic RS with sea water lowers pH, reduces Na saturation, and adds plant nutrients. However, sea water-neutralized RS remains saline sodic and needs fresh water leaching before use as a plant growth medium. Columns containing sea water-neutralized RS were leached with 30 m depth-equivalent of fresh water to evaluate the effects of rainfall on the RS and its leachate. Entrained cations were rapidly displaced by the fresh water, lowering salinity to non-plant-limiting levels (< or =0.3 dS m(-1)). The percentage of the effective cation exchange capacity (ECEC) saturated by Na decreased from 71 to 62% due to a reduction in soil solution ionic strength (causing a decrease in the ECEC) and the preferential displacement of Na(+) (and K(+)) from the exchange. Fresh water leaching increased pH (leachate pH increased from 8.0 to 10.1). This pH increase is attributed to the slow dissolution of the Na-containing mineral sodalite. Under the current experimental conditions, the application of 30 m depth-equivalent of leaching reduced the total RS sodalite content by <10%.

  19. Thermodynamics of a Ca(2+)-dependent highly thermostable alkaline protease from a haloalkliphilic actinomycete.

    PubMed

    Gohel, S D; Singh, S P

    2015-01-01

    An alkaline protease from salt-tolerant alkaliphilic actinomycetes, Nocardiopsis alba OK-5 was purified by a single-step hydrophobic interaction chromatography and characterized. The purified protease with an estimated molecular mass of 20 kDa was optimally active at 70 °C in 0-3 M NaCl and 0-100 mM Ca(2+) displaying significant stability at 50-80 °C. The enzyme was stable at 80 °C in 100 mM Ca(2+) with Kd of 17 × 10(-3) and t1/2 of 32 min. The activation energy (Ea), enthalpy (ΔH*), and entropy (ΔS*) for the protease deactivation calculated in the presence of 200 mM Ca(2+) were 38.15 kJ/mol, 35.49 kJ/mol and 183.48 J/mol, respectively. The change in free energy (ΔG*) for protease deactivation at 60 °C in 200 mM Ca(2+) was 95.88 kJ/mol. Decrease in ΔH* reflected reduced cooperativity of deactivation and unfolding. The enzyme was intrinsically stable that counteracted heat denaturation by a weak cooperativity during the unfolding. Further, the enzyme was highly stable in the presence of various cations, surfactants, H2O2, β-mercaptoethanol, and commercial detergents. The compatibility of the enzyme with various cations, surfactants, and detergent matrices suggests its suitability as an additive in the detergents and peptide synthesis.

  20. Comparative analysis of the five major Erwinia chrysanthemi pectate lyases: enzyme characteristics and potential inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Tardy, F; Nasser, W; Robert-Baudouy, J; Hugouvieux-Cotte-Pattat, N

    1997-01-01

    In Erwinia chrysanthemi 3937, pectate lyase activity mainly results from the cumulative action of five major isoenzymes, PelA to PelE. Comparison of their amino acid sequences revealed two families, PelB-C and PelA-D-E. Molecular cloning permitted expression of the different pel genes in Escherichia coli and the isolation of each Pel independently from the other isoenzymes. We used similar experimental conditions to overproduce and purify the five Pels in a one-step chromatography method. We analyzed some of the basic enzymatic properties of these five isoenzymes. PelA has a low specific activity compared to the other four enzymes. PelB and PelC have a high affinity for their substrate: about 10-fold higher than the enzymes of the PelA-D-E group. The optimum pH is more alkaline for PelB and PelC (about 9.2) than for PelA, PelD, and PelE (from 8 to 8.8). Below pH 7, activity was negligible for PelB and PelC, while PelA, PelD, and PelE retained 25 to 30% of their activities. The temperature optima were determined to be 50 degrees C for PelD and PelE, 55 degrees C for PelA, and 60 degrees C for PelB and PelC. Enzymes of the PelB-C group are more stable than those of the PelA-D-E group. Use of substrates presenting various degrees of methylation revealed that PelA, PelD, and PelE are active only for very low levels of methylation, while PelB and PelC are more active on partially methylated pectins (up to 22% for PelC and up to 45% for PelB). Pectate lyases have an absolute requirement for Ca2+ ions. For the five isoenzymes, maximal activity was obtained at a Ca2+ concentration of 0.1 mM. None of the tested cations (Ba2+, Co2+, Cu2+, Mg2+, Mn2+, Sr2+, Zn2+) can substitute for Ca2+. At a high concentration (1 mM), most of the divalent cations inhibited pectate lyase activity. In addition, we demonstrated that two compounds present in plant tissues, epicatechin and salicylic acid, inhibit the pectate lyases at a concentration of 0.2 mM. PMID:9098045

  1. Anion stripping as a general method to create cationic porous framework with mobile anions.

    PubMed

    Mao, Chengyu; Kudla, Ryan A; Zuo, Fan; Zhao, Xiang; Mueller, Leonard J; Bu, Xianhui; Feng, Pingyun

    2014-05-28

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with cationic frameworks and mobile anions have many applications from sensing, anion exchange and separation, to fast ion conductivity. Despite recent progress, the vast majority of MOFs have neutral frameworks. A common mechanism for the formation of neutral frameworks is the attachment of anionic species such as F(-) or OH(-) to the framework metal sites, neutralizing an otherwise cationic scaffolding. Here, we report a general method capable of converting such neutral frameworks directly into cationic ones with concurrent generation of mobile anions. Our method is based on the differential affinity between distinct metal ions with framework anionic species. Specifically, Al(3+) is used to strip F(-) anions away from framework Cr(3+) sites, leading to cationic frameworks with mobile Cl(-) anions. The subsequent anion exchange with OH(-) further leads to a porous network with mobile OH(-) anions. New materials prepared by anion stripping can undergo ion exchange with anionic organic dyes and also exhibit much improved ionic conductivity compared to the original unmodified MOFs.

  2. The Mrp system: a giant among monovalent cation/proton antiporters?

    PubMed

    Swartz, Talia H; Ikewada, Sayuri; Ishikawa, Osamu; Ito, Masahiro; Krulwich, Terry Ann

    2005-10-01

    Mrp systems are a novel and broadly distributed type of monovalent cation/proton antiporter of bacteria and archaea. Monovalent cation/proton antiporters are membrane transport proteins that catalyze efflux of cytoplasmic sodium, potassium or lithium ions in exchange for external hydrogen ions (protons). Other known monovalent cation antiporters are single gene products, whereas Mrp systems have been proposed to function as hetero-oligomers. A mrp operon typically has six or seven genes encoding hydrophobic proteins all of which are required for optimal Mrp-dependent sodium-resistance. There is little sequence similarity of Mrp proteins to other antiporters but three of these proteins have significant sequence similarity to membrane embedded subunits of ion-translocating electron transport complexes. Mrp antiporters have essential roles in the physiology of alkaliphilic and neutralophilic Bacillus species, nitrogen-fixing Sinorhizobium meliloti and in the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, although these bacteria contain multiple monovalent cation/proton antiporters. The wide distribution of Mrp systems leads to the anticipation of important roles in an even wider variety of pathogens, extremophiles and environmentally important organisms. Here, the distribution, established physiological roles and catalytic activities of Mrp systems are reviewed, hypotheses regarding their complexity are discussed and major open questions about their function are highlighted.

  3. Photodynamic inactivation of Gram (-) and Gram (+) microorganisms by cationic porphyrins and metalloporphyrins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyulkhandanyan, Grigor V.; Paronyan, Marina H.; Hovsepyan, Anichka S.; Ghazaryan, Robert K.; Tovmasyan, Artak G.; Gyulkhandanyan, Aram G.; Gyulkhandanyan, Anna G.; Amelyan, Gayane V.

    2009-06-01

    Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) of microorganisms is successfully applied against Gram (+) microorganisms. However the majority of photosensitizers poorly affect on Gram (-) microorganisms. At present number of works have shown that cationic photosensitizers are able to induce photoinactivation both Gram (+) and Gram (-) microorganisms. The purpose of this work was definition of more effective new cationic pyridylporphyrins with various coordinated metals and functional groups for destruction of Gram (-) microorganisms. The efficiency of new cationic porphyrins and metalloporphyrins (9 compounds) was tested against Gram (-) microorganism E. coli (strain Κ-12). The testing results show high efficiency of metalloporphyrins, especially silver complexes, against E. coli microorganism under dark conditions. 50 % and 100 % cell growth inhibitory concentrations (IC50 and IC100 values, accordingly) of studied metallocomplexes are considerably lower in comparison with metal-free porphyrins. At the same time the Zncomplexes of porphyrins are more phototoxic than their metal-free analogues. Zn-metalloporphyrins with allyl and butyl functional groups were shown the highest efficiency against E. coli. The photodynamic action of cationic Zn -TBut4PyP metalloporphyrin against Gram(+) (St. aureus and St. epidermis) and Gram(-) (E.coli, strain K-12 and Salmonella sp.) microorganisms was investigated. It is revealed, that Gram (+) microorganisms were 3-5 times more susceptible to the compounds' phototoxic influence than Gram (-) microorganisms.

  4. Effect of Extra-Framework Cations of LTL Nanozeolites to Inhibit Oil Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Kok-Hou; Cham, Hooi-Ying; Awala, Hussein; Ling, Tau Chuan; Mukti, Rino R.; Wong, Ka-Lun; Mintova, Svetlana; Ng, Eng-Poh

    2015-06-01

    Lubricant oils take significant part in current health and environmental considerations since they are an integral and indispensable component of modern technology. Antioxidants are probably the most important additives used in oils because oxidative deterioration plays a major role in oil degradation. Zeolite nanoparticles (NPs) have been proven as another option as green antioxidants in oil formulation. The anti-oxidative behavior of zeolite NPs is obvious; however, the phenomenon is still under investigation. Herein, a study of the effect of extra-framework cations stabilized on Linde Type L (LTL) zeolite NPs (ca. 20 nm) on inhibition of oxidation in palm oil-based lubricant oil is reported. Hydrophilic LTL zeolites with a Si/Al ratio of 3.2 containing four different inorganic cations (Li+, Na+, K+, Ca2+) were applied. The oxidation of the lubricant oil was followed by visual observation, colorimetry, fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, 1H NMR spectroscopy, total acid number (TAN), and rheology analyses. The effect of extra-framework cations to slow down the rate of oil oxidation and to control the viscosity of oil is demonstrated. The degradation rate of the lubricant oil samples is decreased considerably as the polarizability of cation is increased with the presence of zeolite NPs. More importantly, the microporous zeolite NPs have a great influence in halting the steps that lead to the polymerization of the oils and thus increasing the lifetime of oils.

  5. Cation exchange in a temporally fluctuating thin freshwater lens on top of saline groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eeman, S.; De Louw, P. G. B.; Van der Zee, S. E. A. T. M.

    2016-10-01

    In coastal-zone fields with a high groundwater level and sufficient rainfall, freshwater lenses are formed on top of saline or brackish groundwater. The fresh and the saline water meet at shallow depth, where a transition zone is found. This study investigates the mixing zone that is characterized by this salinity change, as well as by cation exchange processes, and which is forced by seepage and by rainfall which varies as a function of time. The processes are first investigated for a one-dimensional (1D) stream tube perpendicular to the interface concerning salt and major cation composition changes. The complex sequence of changes is explained with basic cation exchange theory. It is also possible to show that the sequence of changes is maintained when a two-dimensional field is considered where the upward saline seepage flows to drains. This illustrates that for cation exchange, the horizontal component (dominant for flow of water) has a small impact on the chemical changes in the vertical direction. The flow's horizontal orientation, parallel to the interface, leads to changes in concentration that are insignificant compared with those that are found perpendicular to the interface, and are accounted for in the 1D flow tube. Near the drains, differences with the 1D considerations are visible, especially in the longer term, exceeding 100 years. The simulations are compared with field data from the Netherlands which reveal similar patterns.

  6. Controlling Cesium Cation Recognition via Cation Metathesis within and Ion Pair Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sung Kuk; Vargas-Zuniga, Gabriela; Hay, Benjamin; Young, Neil J; Delmau, Laetitia Helene; Lee, Prof. Chang-Hee; Kim, Jong Seung; Lynch, Vincent M.; Sessler, Jonathan L.

    2012-01-01

    Ion pair receptor 3 bearing an anion binding site and multiple cation binding sites has been synthesized and shown to function in a novel binding-release cycle that does not necessarily require displacement to effect release. The receptor forms stable complexes with the test cesium salts, CsCl and CsNO{sub 3}, in solution (10% methanol-d{sub 4} in chloroform-d) as inferred from {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopic analyses. The addition of KClO{sub 4} to these cesium salt complexes leads to a novel type of cation metathesis in which the 'exchanged' cations occupy different binding sites. Specifically, K{sup +} becomes bound at the expense of the Cs{sup +} cation initially present in the complex. Under liquid-liquid conditions, receptor 3 is able to extract CsNO{sub 3} and CsCl from an aqueous D{sub 2}O layer into nitrobenzene-d{sub 5} as inferred from {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopic analyses and radiotracer measurements. The Cs{sup +} cation of the CsNO{sub 3} extracted into the nitrobenzene phase by receptor 3 may be released into the aqueous phase by contacting the loaded nitrobenzene phase with an aqueous KClO{sub 4} solution. Additional exposure of the nitrobenzene layer to chloroform and water gives 3 in its uncomplexed, ion-free form. This allows receptor 3 to be recovered for subsequent use. Support for the underlying complexation chemistry came from single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses and gas-phase energy-minimization studies.

  7. Plant rhamnogalacturonan II complexation of heavy metal cations

    DOEpatents

    O`Neill, M.A.; Pellerin, P.J.M.; Warrenfeltz, D.; Vidal, S.; Darvill, A.G.; Albersheim, P.

    1999-03-02

    The present invention provides rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) and relates to its ability to complex specific multivalent heavy metal cations. In the presence of boric acid, RG-II monomers form dimers that are cross-linked by a borate ester. The yield of such borate ester cross-linked dimers of RG-II is enhanced in the presence of specific heavy metal cations. The present invention further relates to the utility of RG-II in assays for the detection of specific heavy metal contamination; as a reagent useful in the removal of specific heavy metal cations contaminating foods and liquids, for example, fish, wines, etc.; as a pharmaceutical composition useful as an antidote in specific heavy metal cation poisoning; as a treatment for the detoxification of specific heavy metal cations from blood and/or tissues; and in a method of remediation of waters and soils contaminated with specific heavy metal cations. 15 figs.

  8. Plant rhamnogalacturonan II complexation of heavy metal cations

    DOEpatents

    O'Neill, Malcolm A.; Pellerin, Patrice J. M.; Warrenfeltz, Dennis; Vidal, Stephane; Darvill, Alan G.; Albersheim, Peter

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) and relates to its ability to complex specific multivalent heavy metal cations. In the presence of boric acid, RG-II monomers form dimers that are cross-linked by a borate ester. The yield of such borate ester cross-linked dimers of RG-II is enhanced in the presence of specific heavy metal cations. The present invention further relates to the utility of RG-II in assays for the detection of specific heavy metal contamination; as a reagent useful in the removal of specific heavy metal cations contaminating foods and liquids, for example, fish, wines, etc.; as a pharmaceutical composition useful as an antidote in specific heavy metal cation poisoning; as a treatment for the detoxification of specific heavy metal cations from blood and/or tissues; and in a method of remediation of waters and soils contaminated with specific heavy metal cations.

  9. Quantitation of Alkaline Phosphatase Isoenzymes Using Agarose Containing Wheat Germ Lectin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-01

    SIl Quantitation of Alkaline Phosphatase Isoenzymes Using Agarose Containing Wheat Germ Lectin A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the...16 Wheat Germ Lectin Electrophoresis to Quantitate Alkaline Phosphatase Isoenzymes ................ 16 Alkaline Phosphatase Isoenzyme...vs Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis ......................... 40 Clinical Correlation Using Wheat Germ Lectin 45 Placental Alkaline Phosphatase

  10. Structure-activity relationship in cationic lipid mediated gene transfection.

    PubMed

    Niculescu-Duvaz, Dan; Heyes, James; Springer, Caroline J

    2003-07-01

    Non-viral synthetic vectors for gene delivery represent a safer alternative to viral vectors. Their main drawback is the low transfection efficiency, especially in vivo. Among the non-viral vectors currently in use, the cationic liposomes composed of cationic lipids are the most common. This review discusses the physicochemical properties of cationic lipids, the formation, macrostructure and specific parameters of the corresponding formulated liposomes, and the effect of all these parameters on transfection efficiency. The optimisation of liposomal vectors requires both the understanding of the biological variables involved in the transfection process, and the effect of the structural elements of the cationic lipids on these biological variables. The biological barriers relevant for in vitro and in vivo transfection are identified, and solutions to overcome them based on rational design of the cationic lipids are discussed. The review focuses on the relationship between the structure of the cationic lipid and the transfection activity. The structure is analysed in a modular manner. The hydrophobic domain, the cationic head group, the backbone that acts as a scaffold for the other domains, the linkers between backbone, hydrophobic domain and cationic head group, the polyethyleneglycol chains and the targeting moiety are identified as distinct elements of the cationic lipids used in gene therapy. The main chemical functionalities used to built these domains, as well as overall molecular features such as architecture and geometry, are presented. Studies of structure-activity relationships of each cationic lipid domain, including the authors', and the trends identified by these studies, help furthering the understanding of the mechanism governing the formation and behaviour of cationic liposomes in gene delivery, and therefore the rational design of new improved cationic lipids vectors capable of achieving clinical significance.

  11. Fully Cationized Gold Clusters: Synthesis of Au25(SR(+))18.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yohei; Narita, Kunihiro; Yonezawa, Tetsu; Whetten, Robert L

    2016-10-06

    Although many thiolate-protected Au clusters with different numbers of Au atoms and a variety of thiolate ligands have been synthesized, to date there has been no report of a fully cationized Au cluster protected with cationic thiolates. Herein, we report the synthesis of the first member of a new series of thiolate-protected Au cluster molecules: a fully cationized Au25(SR(+))18 cluster.

  12. Investigation of alkaline mine drainage impacted streamside soil composition for select metals using extraction and acid digestion techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Styer, J.C.; Fish, C.

    1996-10-01

    The concentrations of Fe, Mg, Mn, Na, Ca, Zn and P were determined in soils that are adjacent to alkaline mine drainage impacted Four Mile Run in Latrobe, PA. The hypothesis stated: soils closer to the mine drainage win have higher extractable and total metal concentrations in an eroded zone closer to the stream than soils in an uneroded zone farther from the stream. Since the area will sustain enhanced and man-made wetlands, it is necessary to determine the bioavailability of nutrients to plants. A comparison was made of extractions, which mimic plant roots, and digestions which give total metals. The extraction technique is the Mehlich Method, and the digestion technique is EPA SW-846 method No.3050A. The samples were analyzed on the Inductively Coupled Plasma Spectrophotometer. The results show no difference between extractable metals in erosion and uneroded zones. This study will also provide valuable information as to the fertility and cation exchange capacity of these soils.

  13. Cation exchange on the nanoscale: an emerging technique for new material synthesis, device fabrication, and chemical sensing.

    PubMed

    Rivest, Jessy B; Jain, Prashant K

    2013-01-07

    Cation exchange is an age-old technique for the chemical conversion of liquids or extended solids by place-exchanging the cations in an ionic material with a different set of cations. The technique is undergoing a major revival with the advent of high-quality nanocrystals: researchers are now able to overcome the limitations in bulk systems and fully exploit cation exchange for materials synthesis and discovery via rapid, low-temperature transformations in the solid state. In this tutorial review, we discuss cation exchange as a promising materials synthesis and discovery tool. Exchange on the nanoscale exhibits some unique attributes: rapid kinetics at room temperature (orders of magnitude faster than in the bulk) and the tuning of reactivity via control of nanocrystal size, shape, and surface faceting. These features make cation exchange a convenient tool for accessing nanocrystal compositions and morphologies for which conventional synthesis may not be established. A simple exchange reaction allows extension of nanochemistry to a larger part of the periodic table, beyond the typical gamut of II-VI, IV-VI, and III-V materials. Cation exchange transformations in nanocrystals can be topotactic and size- and shape-conserving, allowing nanocrystals synthesized by conventional methods to be used as templates for production of compositionally novel, multicomponent, or doped nanocrystals. Since phases and compositions resulting from an exchange reaction can be kinetically controlled, rather than governed by the phase diagram, nanocrystals of metastable and hitherto inaccessible compositions are attainable. Outside of materials synthesis, applications for cation exchange exist in water purification, chemical staining, and sensing. Since nanoscale cation exchange occurs rapidly at room temperature, it can be integrated with sensitive environments such as those in biological systems. Cation exchange is already allowing access to a variety of new materials and processes

  14. Advanced alkaline water electrolysis. Task 2 summary report. Model for alkaline water electrolysis systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yaffe, M.R.; Murray, J.N.

    1980-04-01

    Task 2 involved the establishment of an engineering and economic model for the evaluation of various options in water electrolysis. The mode, verification of the specific coding and four case studies are described. The model was tested by evaluation of a nearly commercial technology, i.e., an 80-kW alkaline electrolyte system, operating at 60/sup 0/C, which delivers approximately 255 SLM, hydrogen for applications such as electrical generation cooling or semiconductor manufacturing. The calculated cost of hydrogen from this installed non-optimized case system with an initial cost to the customer of $87,000 was $6.99/Kg H/sub 2/ ($1.67/100 SCF) on a 20-yr levelized basis using 2.5 cents/kWh power costs. This compares favorably to a levelized average merchant hydrogen cost value of $9.11/Kg H/sub 2/ ($2.17/100 SCF) calculated using the same program.

  15. Uniformly cationized protein efficiently reaches the cytosol of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Futami, Midori; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Asama, Takashi; Murata, Hitoshi; Tada, Hiroko; Kosaka, Megumi; Yamada, Hidenori; Futami, Junichiro

    2012-10-17

    Protein cationization techniques are powerful protein transduction methods for mammalian cells. As we demonstrated previously, cationized proteins with limited conjugation to polyethylenimine have excellent ability to enter into cells by adsorption-mediated endocytosis [Futami, J., et al. (2005) J. Biosci. Bioeng. 99, 95-103]. In this study, we show that proteins with extensive and uniform cationization covering the protein surface reach the cytoplasm and nucleus more effectively than proteins with limited cationic polymers or proteins that are fused to cationic peptides. Although extensive modification of carboxylates results in loss of protein function, chicken avidin retains biotin-binding ability even after extensive amidation of carboxylates. Using this cationized avidin carrier system, the protein transduction ability of variously cationized avidins was investigated using biotinylated protein as a probe. The results revealed that cationized avidins bind rapidly to the cell surface followed by endocytotic uptake. Small amounts of uniformly cationized avidin showed direct penetration into the cytoplasm within a 15 min incubation. This penetration route seemed to be energy dependent and functioned under cellular physiological conditions. A biotinylated exogenous transcription factor protein that penetrated cells was demonstrated to induce target gene expression in living cells.

  16. The formation of singly and doubly cationized oligomers in SIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delcorte, A.; Wojciechowski, I.; Gonze, X.; Garrison, B. J.; Bertrand, P.

    2003-01-01

    The cationization of sputtered organic species via metal particle adduction is investigated using poly-4-methylstyrene molecules in combination with Cu, Pd, Ag and Au substrates. Metal-cationization occurs for these four substrates. The cationized molecule yields vary with the considered substrate and they are not correlated with the metal ion yields. In addition, double cationization with two metal particles is observed with a very significant intensity for Cu, Ag and Au supports. We interpret the results with an emission scheme in which excited molecules and metal atoms recombine above the surface and decay via electron emission, thereby locking the complex in the ionic state.

  17. Infrared spectroscopic investigations of cationic ethanol, propanol, and butanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Yoshiyuki; Harigaya, Hiroyuki; Xie, Min; Takahashi, Kaito; Fujii, Asuka

    2015-11-01

    Infrared spectroscopy of the alcohol cations of ethanol, propanol, and butanol was performed to investigate their structures and hyperconjugation mechanisms. In the ethanol cation, the Csbnd C bond hyperconjugates with the singly occupied molecular orbital (SOMO) at the oxygen atom, so that the Csbnd C bond weakens and the bond length elongates. Multiple hyperconjugations among SOMO, the Csbnd C bond, and the end Csbnd H bond occur in the propanol cation and enhance the acidity of the Csbnd H bond through the delocalization of its bonding σ electron. The butanol cation forms the oxonium-type structure through the proton transfer from the terminal CH bond.

  18. Spectral response of magnetic nanofluid to toxic cations