Science.gov

Sample records for alkalinity major ions

  1. Controlled charge exchange between alkaline earth metals and their ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gacesa, Marko; Côté, Robin

    2015-05-01

    We theoretically investigate the prospects of realizing controlled charge exchange via magnetic Feshbach resonances in cold and ultracold collisions of atoms and ions. In particular, we focus on near-resonant charge exchange in heteroisotopic combinations of alkaline earth metals, such as 9Be++10 Be<-->9 Be+10Be+ , which exhibit favorable electronic and hyperfine structure. The quantum scattering calculations are performed for a range of initial states and experimentally attainable magnetic fields in standard coupled-channel Feshbach projection formalism, where higher-order corrections such as the mass-polarization term are explicitely included. In addition, we predict a number of magnetic Feshbach resonances for different heteronuclear isotopic combinations of the listed and related alkaline earth elements. Our results imply that near-resonant charge-exchange could be used to realize atom-ion quantum gates, as well as controlled charge transfer in optically trapped cold quantum gases. This work is partially supported by ARO.

  2. Chemical composition of major ions in rainwater.

    PubMed

    Salve, P R; Maurya, A; Wate, S R; Devotta, Sukumar

    2008-03-01

    The present study investigated the chemical composition of rainwater at Kabir nagar, Nari, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India. The rainwater samples were collected on event basis during June-July-August-2006 and were analyzed for pH, major anions Cl, NO(3), SO(4)) and cations (Ca, Mg, Na, K, NH4). The pH value varied from 6.0 to 7.3 (avg. 6.3 +/- 0.3) indicating alkaline nature of rainwater. The pH of the rainwater was found well above the reference pH (5.6), showing alkalinity during the monsoon season. The average and standard deviation of ionic composition was found to be 98.1 +/- 10.6 micro eql(-1). The total anions contribute 45.1% and cations 54.9%, respectively to rainwater. Neutralization factors (NF) followed a sequence of NF(Ca) > NF(Mg) > NF(NH4) with factors of 1.1, 0.38 and 0.15 indicating the crustal components are responsible for neutralization of anions. The average ratio of (NO(3) + Cl)/SO(4) observed as 1.1 indicates that nitric and hydrochloric acid influences the acidity of rainwater. The ratio of NH(4)/NO(3) and NH(4)/SO(4) was observed as 0.68 and 0.34 indicate that the possible compounds which may predominate in the atmosphere are NH(4)NO(3) and (NH(4))(2)SO(4). Ionic correlation was established to identify sources of origin. A good correlation was seen between Ca and Mg (r = 0.95); suggesting the common occurrence of these ions from crustal origin. Similarly, the acidic ions SO(4) and NO(3) correlated well (r = 0.60) indicating their origin from similar sources. Other relatively significant correlations were observed between Ca and SO4 (r = 0.92), Mg and SO(4) (r = 0.83), Ca and NO(3) (r = 0.09), Ca and Cl (r = 0.34) and Mg and Cl (r = 0.31), and Mg and NO(3) (r = 0.71). The observed rainwater ratio of Cl/Na (1.1) is closer to that of seawater ratio (1.16) indicates fractionation of sea-salt and modifications by non-marine constituents as the site is 834 km away from the sea coast. The nss-Ca contribution was observed as 95.7% suggesting their

  3. Inhibitory effect of metal ions on alkaline mesentericopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Raykova, D; Dorovska-Taran, V; Blagoev, B

    1981-01-01

    The effect of AG+, Cu2+, Cd2+, Co2+ and Ni2+ on the activity of alkaline mesentericopeptidase (EC 3.4.21.-) has been studied. Ag+, Cu2+ and Cd2+ were found to be reversible non-competitive inhibitors of the enzyme. The pH-dependence of Ki for Ag+-inhibition is sigmoidal with a pKa near 6. The Kilim values, calculated for the pH-independent region of the metal-enzyme inhibition, are close to the corresponding dissociation constants of metal-imidazole complexes, thus implying that the inhibitory effect of metal ions on enzyme activity is due to complex formation with the imidazole group of the active site histidine. The method of the two-component inhibition showed that Cu2+ and Ag+ bind to the same ligand of the enzyme molecule. The addition of Cu2+ decreases the rate of deacylation of the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl valerate, catalyzed by alkaline mesentericopeptidase in contrast to alpha-chymotrypsin where the acylation step is affected.

  4. Ion exchange pretreatment of alkaline radwaste for cesium removal

    SciTech Connect

    Bibler, J.P.

    1994-08-01

    A cation exchange resin has been tested for its ability to remove the Cs ion from simulants of highly alkaline liquid nuclear wastes found at the Savannah River Site, Oak Ridge, and Hanford. The resin is a condensation polymer of the K salt of resorcinol and formaldehyde. It removes milli- and micromolar amounts of Cs{sup +} from solutions that contain as high as 11 molar Na{sup +}. Small column tests indicate that approximately 200 column volumes of SRS simulant and 205 column volumes of OR Tank 25 supernatant simulant can be processed before the resin requires regeneration. For these two wastes, a carousel arrangement of two columns in series and a third in reserve can be used effectively in a process. Hanford 101-AW simulant generates a less sharp breakthrough profile with this resin, though an operation using a maximum of three columns in series with another column off-line for regeneration would be effective if the resin beds are allowed to reach about 90% breakthrough before taking them out of service. Parameters that effect the performance of the resin with a particular feed solution are the concentrations of the two primary ions of interest, Cs{sup +} and Na{sup +}, as well as the concentrations of K{sup +} and OH{sup {minus}}. A further ramification of the hydroxide ion concentration is its role in assisting oxidation of the resin, thereby destroying its usefulness in cesium removal. Although the performance of the resin is unaffected at doses of 1 E+8 rad ionizing radiation, it shows noticeable degradation after storage for 100 hours in alkaline solutions, generating quinone and ketone groups, as determined from C-13 NMR and by an increase in total organic C content of the contacting solution. Gases detected from the radiolysis of the resin/simulant mixture are CO{sub 2} from the resin, N{sub 2}O from nitrate in the simulant, and H{sub 2} possibly from resin and simulant. Oxygen depletion in the mixture results from radiolysis and chemical degradation.

  5. Effect of common ions on nitrate removal by zero-valent iron from alkaline soil.

    PubMed

    Tang, Cilai; Zhang, Zengqiang; Sun, Xining

    2012-09-15

    Zero-valent iron (Fe(0))-based permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technology has been proved to be effective for soil and groundwater nitrate remediation under acidic or near neutral conditions. But few studies have been reported about it and the effects of coexistent ions under alkaline conditions. In this study, nitrate reduction by Fe(0) was evaluated via batch tests in the presence of alkaline soil and common cation (Fe(2+), Fe(3+) and Cu(2+)) and anion (citrate, oxalate, acetate, SO(4)(2-), PO(4)(3-), Cl(-) and HCO(3)(-)). The results showed that cation significantly enhanced nitrate reduction with an order of Fe(3+)>Fe(2+)>Cu(2+) due to providing Fe(2+) directly or indirectly. Most anions enhanced nitrate reduction, but PO(4)(3-) behaved inhibition. The promotion decreased in the order of citrate>acetate>SO(4)(2-)>Cl(-)≈HCO(3)(-)≈oxalate≫PO(4)(3-). Ammonium was the major final product from nitrate reduction by Fe(0), while a little nitrite accumulated in the beginning of reaction. The nitrogen recovery in liquid and gas phase was only 56-78% after reaction due to ammonium adsorption onto soil. The solution pH and electric conductivity (EC) varied depending on the specific ion added. The results implied that PRB based Fe(0) is a potential approach for in situ remediation of soil and groundwater nitrate contamination in the alkaline conditions.

  6. Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this research involving collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is to explore new approaches to the separation of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, and other sodium salts from high-level alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit is a major reduction in disposed waste volume, obviating the building of expensive new waste tanks and reducing the costs of low-activity waste immobilization. Principles of ion recognition are being researched toward discovery of liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from other waste components. The successful concept of pseudohydroxide extraction using fluorinated alcohols and phenols is being developed at ORNL and PNNL toward a greater understanding of the controlling equilibria, role of solvation, and of synergistic effects involving crown ethers. Studies at PNNL are directed toward new solvent formulation for the practical sodium pseudohydroxide extraction systems.

  7. Structure and ionic diffusion of alkaline-earth ions in mixed cation glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinou, Konstantinos; Sushko, Petr; Duffy, Dorothy M.

    2015-08-15

    A series of mixed cation silicate glasses of the composition A2O – 2MO – 4SiO2, with A=Li,Na,K and M=Ca,Sr,Ba has been investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations in order to understand the effect of the nature of the cations on the mobility of the alkaline-earth ions within the glass network. The size of the alkaline-earth cation was found to affect the inter-atomic distances, the coordination number distributions and the bond angle distributions , whereas the medium-range order was almost unaffected by the type of the cation. All the alkaline-earth cations contribute to lower vibrational frequencies but it is observed that that there is a shift to smaller frequencies and the vibrational density of states distribution gets narrower as the size of the alkaline-earth increases. The results from our modeling for the ionic diffusion of the alkaline-earth cations are in a qualitative agreement with the experimental observations in that there is a distinct correlation between the activation energy for diffusion of alkaline earth-ions and the cation radii ratio. An asymmetrical linear behavior in the diffusion activation energy with increasing size difference is observed. The results can be described on the basis of a theoretical model that relates the diffusion activation energy to the electrostatic interactions of the cations with the oxygens and the elastic deformation of the silicate network.

  8. Effect of various alkaline metal ions on electrochemical behavior of lead electrode in sulfuric acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Nobumitsu; Yamamoto, Yui

    2015-10-01

    The effect of various alkaline metal ions on electrochemical behavior of lead electrode in sulfuric acid solution has been investigated. It was found that "the specific anodic oxidation peak" appears at the cathodic scan in cyclic voltammogram of lead electrode in sulfuric acid solution containing Li2SO4, K2SO4, Na2SO4, Rb2SO4, or Cs2SO4. The height of the specific anodic oxidation peak varies with the alkaline sulfate in the solution; K2SO4 >> Na2SO4 > Cs2SO4 > Rb2SO4 > Li2SO4. It should be note that alkaline ions exist in lead sulfate formed on lead electrode in sulfuric acid solution containing potassium sulfate when the electrode was immersed in the solution at the rest potential for more than 1 h.

  9. MODELING AN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS FOR CESIUM REMOVAL FROM ALKALINE RADIOACTIVE WASTE SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F; Luther Hamm, L; Sebastian Aleman, S; Johnston Michael, J

    2008-08-26

    The performance of spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde ion-exchange resin for the removal of cesium from alkaline radioactive waste solutions has been investigated through computer modeling. Cesium adsorption isotherms were obtained by fitting experimental data using a thermodynamic framework. Results show that ion-exchange is an efficient method for cesium removal from highly alkaline radioactive waste solutions. On average, two 1300 liter columns operating in series are able to treat 690,000 liters of waste with an initial cesium concentration of 0.09 mM in 11 days achieving a decontamination factor of over 50,000. The study also tested the sensitivity of ion-exchange column performance to variations in flow rate, temperature and column dimensions. Modeling results can be used to optimize design of the ion exchange system.

  10. Electrogeneration of hydroperoxide ion using an alkaline fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaide, F.; Brillas, E.; Cabot, P.L.; Casado, J.

    1998-10-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is a pollution-control chemical commonly used as a bleaching agent, as a disinfectant, and as a nonselective oxidant for water purification and in different industrial processes. This paper describes a novel electrochemical method for the generation of HO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} using an alkaline fuel cell (AFC). The system is formed by an undivided cell containing a H{sub 2}-diffusion anode, an O{sub 2}-diffusion cathode, and a KOH solution as electrolyte. It can work in batch or in continuous mode, cogenerating electricity and HO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}, which is formed from the two-electron reduction of O{sub 2} at the cathode. The evolution of cell voltage, current density, HO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} production, and current efficiency with time have been determined when the electrolyte remains quiescent, recirculates through the cell, or is continuously injected to it. This last device yields the best operative parameters, allowing current densities of 130 mA/cm{sup 2} and current efficiencies close to 100% using 1 mol/dm{sup 3} KOH at 20 C. The effect of HO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} upon the anodic and cathodic reactions has been studied by linear sweep voltammetry. Adsorption of this species on the cathode can explain the loss of performance of the AFC with working time using a quiescent electrolyte or under recirculation conditions. The O{sub 2}-diffusion cathode and the AFC showed good reversibility when the cell contained a fresh KOH solution with HO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}.

  11. Ab initio calculations on the positive ions of the alkaline-earth oxides, fluorides, and hydroxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, H.; Langhoff, S. R.; Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical dissociation energies are presented for the alkaline-earth fluoride, hydroxide, and oxide positive ions that are considered to be accurate to 0.1-0.2 eV. The r(e) for the positive ions are found to be consistently shorter than the corresponding neutrals by 0.07 + or -0.02 A. The bonding in the ground states is demonstrated to be of predominantly M + 2 X - character. The a 3 Pi and A 1 Pi are found to lie considerably above the X 1 Sigma + ground states of the alkaline-earth fluoride and hydroxide positive ions. The overall agreement of the theoretical ionization potentials with the available experimental appearance potentials is satisfactory; these values should represent the most accurate and consistent set available.

  12. Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this research involving collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is to explore new approaches to the separation of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, and other sodium salts from high-level alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit is a major reduction in disposed waste volume, obviating the building of expensive new waste tanks and reducing the costs of low-activity waste immobilization. Principles of ion recognition are being researched toward discovery of liquid-liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from other waste components. The successful concept of pseudohydroxide extraction using fluorinated alcohols and phenols is being developed at ORNL and PNNL toward a greater understanding of the controlling equilibria, role of solvation, and of synergistic effects involving crown ethers. Synthesis efforts are being directed toward enhanced sodium binding by crown ethers, both neutral and proton-ionizable. Studies with real tank waste at PNNL will provide feedback toward solvent compositions that have promising properties.

  13. Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Custelcean, Radu; Delmau, Laetitia H.; Engle, Nancy L.; Kang, Hyun-Ah; Keever, Tamara J.; Marchand, Alan P.; Gadthula, Srinivas; Gore, Vinayak K.; Huang, Zilin; Sivappa, Rasapalli; Tirunahari, Pavan K.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

    2005-09-26

    The purpose of this research involving collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is to explore new approaches to the separation of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, and other sodium salts from high-level alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit is a major reduction in disposed waste volume, obviating the building of expensive new waste tanks and reducing the costs of vitrification. Principles of ion recognition are being researched toward discovery of liquid-liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from other waste components. The successful concept of pseudo hydroxide extraction using fluorinated alcohols and phenols is being developed at ORNL and PNNL toward a greater understanding of the controlling equilibria, role of solvation, and of synergistic effects involving crown ethers. Synthesis efforts are being directed toward enhanced sodium binding by crown ethers, both neutral and proton-ionizable. Studies with real tank waste at PNNL will provide feedback toward solvent compositions that have promising properties.

  14. Energetics of alkali and alkaline earth ion-exchanged zeolite A

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Hui; Wu, Di; Liu, Kefeng; Guo, Xiaofeng; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2016-06-30

    Alkali and alkaline earth ion-exchanged zeolite A samples were synthesized in aqueous exchange media. They were thoroughly studied by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microprobe (EMPA), thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC), and high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry. The hydration energetics and enthalpies of formation of these zeolite A materials from constituent oxides were determined. Specifically, the hydration level of zeolite A has a linear dependence on the average ionic potential (Z/r) of the cation, from 0.894 (Rb-A) to 1.317 per TO2 (Mg-A). The formation enthalpies from oxides (25 °C) range from –93.71 ± 1.77 (K-A) to –48.02more » ± 1.85 kJ/mol per TO2 (Li-A) for hydrated alkali ion-exchanged zeolite A, and from –47.99 ± 1.20 (Ba-A) to –26.41 ± 1.71 kJ/mol per TO2 (Mg-A) for hydrated alkaline earth ion-exchanged zeolite A. As a result, the formation enthalpy from oxides generally becomes less exothermic as Z/r increases, but a distinct difference in slope is observed between the alkali and the alkaline earth series.« less

  15. Isotope fractionation in surface ionization ion source of alkaline-earth iodides

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, T.; Kanzaki, C.; Nomura, M.; Fujii, Y.

    2012-02-15

    The relationship between the isotope fractionation of alkaline-earth elements in the surface ionization ion source and the evaporation filament current, i.e., filament temperature, was studied. It was confirmed that the isotope fractionation depends on the evaporation filament temperature; the isotope fractionation in the case of higher temperature of filament becomes larger. The ionization and evaporation process in the surface ionization ion source was discussed, and it was concluded that the isotope fractionation is suppressed by setting at the lower temperature of evaporation filament because the dissociations are inhibited on the evaporation filament.

  16. Diffusion coefficients for three major ions in the topside ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quegan, S.; Bailey, G. J.; Moffett, R. J.

    1981-08-01

    Published experimental data on ion composition in the topside ionosphere are examined. For certain features (the light ion trough, the high-latitude trough, the high-latitude hole and the mid-latitude total ion concentration trough) it is pointed out that the number of major ions present may be three or more. Transport equations derived by Schunk et al. (1975, 1977, 1979) are extended to include the case of the three major ions in the topside ionosphere. Specific calculations are made for the O(+), H(+) and He(+) ions and the behavior of the diffusion coefficients is discussed. From a model of the high-latitude ionization hole, described by Heelis et al. (1981), representative concentration and temperature profiles are obtained. These profiles are used to demonstrate further the behavior of the ion diffusion coefficients.

  17. Formation of iron oxides in a highly alkaline medium in the presence of palladium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krehula, Stjepko; Musić, Svetozar

    2009-04-01

    The effect of the presence of palladium ions in a highly alkaline precipitation system on the formation of iron oxides was investigated using X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), Mössbauer and FT-IR spectroscopies, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Acicular α-FeOOH particles precipitated in a highly alkaline medium with the addition of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) were used as reference material. The initial addition of palladium ions to that precipitation system had a significant effect on the formation of iron oxide phases and their properties. In the presence of palladium ions, the initially formed α-FeOOH has been transformed to α-Fe 2O 3 crystals in the form of hexagonal bipyramids via a dissolution-reprecipitation mechanism with a simultaneous formation of metallic palladium nanoparticles. These palladium nanoparticles acted as a catalyst for the reductive dissolution of α-Fe 2O 3 particles and the formation of Fe 3O 4 crystals in the form of octahedrons. Increase in the initial concentration of palladium ions in the precipitation system accelerated the transformation process α-FeOOH → α-Fe 2O 3 → Fe 3O 4 and influenced changes in the shape of α-Fe 2O 3 and Fe 3O 4 particles.

  18. Toxicity of major geochemical ions to freshwater species

    EPA Science Inventory

    Extensive testing regarding the toxicity of major geochemical ions to Ceriodaphnia dubia, Hyalella azteca, and Pimephales promelas will be presented. For C. dubia, tests of single salts and binary mixtures in various dilution waters demonstrated multiple mechanisms of toxicity an...

  19. Assessment of commercially available ion exchange materials for cesium removal from highly alkaline wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, K.P.; Kim, A.Y.; Kurath, D.E.

    1996-04-01

    Approximately 61 million gallons of nuclear waste generated in plutonium production, radionuclide removal campaigns, and research and development activities is stored on the Department of Energy`s Hanford Site, near Richland, Washington. Although the pretreatment process and disposal requirements are still being defined, most pretreatment scenarios include removal of cesium from the aqueous streams. In many cases, after cesium is removed, the dissolved salt cakes and supernates can be disposed of as LLW. Ion exchange has been a leading candidate for this separation. Ion exchange systems have the advantage of simplicity of equipment and operation and provide many theoretical stages in a small space. The organic ion exchange material Duolite{trademark} CS-100 has been selected as the baseline exchanger for conceptual design of the Initial Pretreatment Module (IPM). Use of CS-100 was chosen because it is considered a conservative, technologically feasible approach. During FY 96, final resin down-selection will occur for IPM Title 1 design. Alternate ion exchange materials for cesium exchange will be considered at that time. The purpose of this report is to conduct a search for commercially available ion exchange materials which could potentially replace CS-100. This report will provide where possible a comparison of these resin in their ability to remove low concentrations of cesium from highly alkaline solutions. Materials which show promise can be studied further, while less encouraging resins can be eliminated from consideration.

  20. Bond-length distributions for ions bonded to oxygen: alkali and alkaline-earth metals

    PubMed Central

    Gagné, Olivier Charles; Hawthorne, Frank Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Bond-length distributions have been examined for 55 configurations of alkali-metal ions and 29 configurations of alkaline-earth-metal ions bonded to oxygen, for 4859 coordination polyhedra and 38 594 bond distances (alkali metals), and for 3038 coordination polyhedra and 24 487 bond distances (alkaline-earth metals). Bond lengths generally show a positively skewed Gaussian distribution that originates from the variation in Born repulsion and Coulomb attraction as a function of interatomic distance. The skewness and kurtosis of these distributions generally decrease with increasing coordination number of the central cation, a result of decreasing Born repulsion with increasing coordination number. We confirm the following minimum coordination numbers: [3]Li+, [3]Na+, [4]K+, [4]Rb+, [6]Cs+, [3]Be2+, [4]Mg2+, [6]Ca2+, [6]Sr2+ and [6]Ba2+, but note that some reported examples are the result of extensive dynamic and/or positional short-range disorder and are not ordered arrangements. Some distributions of bond lengths are distinctly multi-modal. This is commonly due to the occurrence of large numbers of structure refinements of a particular structure type in which a particular cation is always present, leading to an over-representation of a specific range of bond lengths. Outliers in the distributions of mean bond lengths are often associated with anomalous values of atomic displacement of the constituent cations and/or anions. For a sample of [6]Na+, the ratio U eq(Na)/U eq(bonded anions) is partially correlated with 〈[6]Na+—O2−〉 (R 2 = 0.57), suggesting that the mean bond length is correlated with vibrational/displacement characteristics of the constituent ions for a fixed coordination number. Mean bond lengths also show a weak correlation with bond-length distortion from the mean value in general, although some coordination numbers show the widest variation in mean bond length for zero distortion, e.g. Li+ in [4]- and [6]-coordination, Na+ in [4]- and [6

  1. Bond-length distributions for ions bonded to oxygen: alkali and alkaline-earth metals.

    PubMed

    Gagné, Olivier Charles; Hawthorne, Frank Christopher

    2016-08-01

    Bond-length distributions have been examined for 55 configurations of alkali-metal ions and 29 configurations of alkaline-earth-metal ions bonded to oxygen, for 4859 coordination polyhedra and 38 594 bond distances (alkali metals), and for 3038 coordination polyhedra and 24 487 bond distances (alkaline-earth metals). Bond lengths generally show a positively skewed Gaussian distribution that originates from the variation in Born repulsion and Coulomb attraction as a function of interatomic distance. The skewness and kurtosis of these distributions generally decrease with increasing coordination number of the central cation, a result of decreasing Born repulsion with increasing coordination number. We confirm the following minimum coordination numbers: ([3])Li(+), ([3])Na(+), ([4])K(+), ([4])Rb(+), ([6])Cs(+), ([3])Be(2+), ([4])Mg(2+), ([6])Ca(2+), ([6])Sr(2+) and ([6])Ba(2+), but note that some reported examples are the result of extensive dynamic and/or positional short-range disorder and are not ordered arrangements. Some distributions of bond lengths are distinctly multi-modal. This is commonly due to the occurrence of large numbers of structure refinements of a particular structure type in which a particular cation is always present, leading to an over-representation of a specific range of bond lengths. Outliers in the distributions of mean bond lengths are often associated with anomalous values of atomic displacement of the constituent cations and/or anions. For a sample of ([6])Na(+), the ratio Ueq(Na)/Ueq(bonded anions) is partially correlated with 〈([6])Na(+)-O(2-)〉 (R(2) = 0.57), suggesting that the mean bond length is correlated with vibrational/displacement characteristics of the constituent ions for a fixed coordination number. Mean bond lengths also show a weak correlation with bond-length distortion from the mean value in general, although some coordination numbers show the widest variation in mean bond length for zero distortion, e.g. Li(+) in

  2. Bond-length distributions for ions bonded to oxygen: alkali and alkaline-earth metals.

    PubMed

    Gagné, Olivier Charles; Hawthorne, Frank Christopher

    2016-08-01

    Bond-length distributions have been examined for 55 configurations of alkali-metal ions and 29 configurations of alkaline-earth-metal ions bonded to oxygen, for 4859 coordination polyhedra and 38 594 bond distances (alkali metals), and for 3038 coordination polyhedra and 24 487 bond distances (alkaline-earth metals). Bond lengths generally show a positively skewed Gaussian distribution that originates from the variation in Born repulsion and Coulomb attraction as a function of interatomic distance. The skewness and kurtosis of these distributions generally decrease with increasing coordination number of the central cation, a result of decreasing Born repulsion with increasing coordination number. We confirm the following minimum coordination numbers: ([3])Li(+), ([3])Na(+), ([4])K(+), ([4])Rb(+), ([6])Cs(+), ([3])Be(2+), ([4])Mg(2+), ([6])Ca(2+), ([6])Sr(2+) and ([6])Ba(2+), but note that some reported examples are the result of extensive dynamic and/or positional short-range disorder and are not ordered arrangements. Some distributions of bond lengths are distinctly multi-modal. This is commonly due to the occurrence of large numbers of structure refinements of a particular structure type in which a particular cation is always present, leading to an over-representation of a specific range of bond lengths. Outliers in the distributions of mean bond lengths are often associated with anomalous values of atomic displacement of the constituent cations and/or anions. For a sample of ([6])Na(+), the ratio Ueq(Na)/Ueq(bonded anions) is partially correlated with 〈([6])Na(+)-O(2-)〉 (R(2) = 0.57), suggesting that the mean bond length is correlated with vibrational/displacement characteristics of the constituent ions for a fixed coordination number. Mean bond lengths also show a weak correlation with bond-length distortion from the mean value in general, although some coordination numbers show the widest variation in mean bond length for zero distortion, e.g. Li(+) in

  3. Quantifying phytate in dairy digesta and feces: alkaline extraction and high-performance ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ray, P P; Shang, C; Maguire, R O; Knowlton, K F

    2012-06-01

    Development of an analytical method with appropriate combination of extraction and quantification approaches for undigested phytate in ruminant feces and digesta will advance knowledge of phytate degradation in ruminants and help to reduce phosphorus excretion. Established quantification methods give satisfactory results for feedstuffs and nonruminant manure but recovery of phytate is incomplete for ruminant feces and digesta because of their complex sample matrix and low ratio of phytate to inorganic P. The objective was to develop a robust, accurate, sensitive, and inexpensive method to extract and quantify phytate in feeds, ruminant feces, and digesta. Diets varying in phytate content were fed to dairy heifers, dry cows, and lactating cows to generate digesta and fecal samples of varying composition to challenge extraction and quantification methods. Samples were extracted with 0.5 M HCl or 0.25 M NaOH + 0.05 M EDTA. Acid extracts were mixed with 20% NaCl, alkaline extracts were acidified to final pH < 2, and then both extracts were clarified with C₁₈ cartridges and 0.2-μm filters. High-performance ion chromatography (HPIC) was used to quantify phytate. In feed samples, the measured phytate was comparable in alkaline and acid extracts (2,965 vs. 3,085 μg/g of DM). In digesta and fecal samples, alkaline extraction yielded greater estimates of phytate content than did acid extraction (40.7 vs. 33.6 and 202.9 vs. 144.4 μg/g of DM for digesta and fecal samples, respectively). Analysis of alkaline extracts by HPIC is usually not possible because of sample matrix interferences; acidification and C(18)-cartridge elution of alkaline extracts prevented this interference. Pure phytate added to dry samples before extraction was almost completely recovered (88 to 105%), indicating high extraction efficiency, no adverse effect of extract clean-up procedures, and accurate quantification of phytate. The proposed method is rapid, inexpensive, robust, and combines the

  4. Modeling interactions in major ion toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia (presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Various anthropogenic activities can cause exposures of freshwater systems to greatly elevated concentrations of major ions (Na, K, Ca, Mg, Cl, SO4, HCO3) with widely-varying compositions. A data set on the acute toxicity of single salts and binary salt mixtures to Ceriodaphnia d...

  5. Modeling interactions in major ion toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia

    EPA Science Inventory

    Various anthopogenic activities can cause exposures of freshwater systems to greatly elevated concentrations of major ions (Na, K, Ca, Mg, Cl, SO4, HCO3) with widely-varying compositions. A data set on the acute toxicity of single salts and binary salt mixtures to Ceriodaphnia d...

  6. Alkaline deoxygenated graphene oxide as adsorbent for cadmium ions removal from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Du, Hongyan; Yuan, Shaowei; He, Wanxia; Yan, Pengju; Liu, Zhanhong

    2015-01-01

    Alkaline deoxygenated graphene oxide (aGO) was prepared through alkaline hydrothermal treatment and used as adsorbent to remove Cd(II) ions from aqueous solutions for the first time. The characterization results of transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra indicate that aGO was successfully synthesized. The batch adsorption experiments showed that the adsorption kinetics could be described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, and the isotherms equilibrium data were well fitted with the Langmuir model. The maximum adsorption capacity of Cd(II) on aGO was 156 mg/g at pH 5 and T=293 K. The adsorption thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption process was a spontaneous and endothermic reaction. The mainly adsorption mechanism speculated from FT-IR results may be attributed to the electrostatic attraction between Cd2+ and negatively charged groups (-CO-) of aGO and cation-π interaction between Cd2+ and the graphene planes. The findings of this study demonstrate the potential utility of the nanomaterial aGO as an effective adsorbent for Cd(II) removal from aqueous solutions. PMID:26038925

  7. Extraction of cesium from an alkaline leaching solution of spent catalysts using an ion-exchange column

    SciTech Connect

    Dumont, N.; Favre-Reguillon, A.; Dunjic, B.; Lemaire, M.

    1996-04-01

    The selective extraction of cesium from an alkaline leaching solution of spent catalysts using phenolic resins was studied. The resins were synthesized by alkaline polycondensation of formaldehyde by phenol, resorcinol, catechol, and phloroglucinol. Their ionoselectivities for five alkali metals were evaluated with a solid-liquid extraction, and their ion-exchange capacities were compared. The resin with the best selectivity for cesium was tested with a real solution at different pH values. An on-column extraction is proposed to obtain cesium with high purity.

  8. The major-ion composition of Silurian seawater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brennan, S.T.; Lowenstein, T.K.

    2002-01-01

    One-hundred fluid inclusions in Silurian marine halite were analyzed in order to determine the major-ion composition of Silurian seawater. The samples analyzed were from three formations in the Late Silurian Michigan Basin, the A-1, A-2, and B Evaporites of the Salina Group, and one formation in the Early Silurian Canning Basin (Australia), the Mallowa Salt of the Carribuddy Group. The results indicate that the major-ion composition of Silurian seawater was not the same as present-day seawater. The Silurian ocean had lower concentrations of Mg2+, Na+, and SO2-4, and much higher concentrations of Ca2+ relative to the ocean's present-day composition. Furthermore, Silurian seawater had Ca2+ in excess of SO2-4. Evaporation of Silurian seawater of the composition determined in this study produces KC1-type potash minerals that lack the MgSO4-type late stage salts formed during the evaporation of present-day seawater. The relatively low Na+ concentrations in Silurian seawater support the hypothesis that oscillations in the major-ion composition of the oceans are primarily controlled by changes in the flux of mid-ocean ridge brine and riverine inputs and not global or basin-scale, seawater-driven dolomitization. The Mg2+/Ca2+ ratio of Silurian seawater was ~1.4, and the K+/Ca2+ ratio was ~0.3, both of which differ from the present-day counterparts of 5 and 1, respectively. Seawaters with Mg2+/Ca2+ 2 (e.g., modern seawater) facilitate the precipitation of aragonite and high-magnesian calcite. Therefore, the early Paleozoic calcite seas were likely due to the low Mg2+/Ca2+ ratio of seawater, not the pCO2 of the Silurian atmosphere. Copyright ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  9. Major ion chemistry of shallow groundwater of a fast growing city of central India.

    PubMed

    Marghade, Deepali; Malpe, D B; Zade, A B

    2012-04-01

    Nagpur City located in semiarid area of central India is a fast-growing industrial centre. In recent years, rapid development has created an increased demand for drinking water, which is increasingly being fulfilled by groundwater abstraction. The present study was undertaken to assess major ion chemistry of shallow groundwater to understand geochemical evolution of groundwater and water quality for promoting sustainable development and effective management of groundwater resources. A total of 47 water samples were collected from shallow aquifer of selected parts of the city and the water chemistry of various ions viz. Ca(2 +), Mg(2 +), Na(+), K(+), CO(3)(2-), HCO(3)(-), Cl(-), SO(4)(2-) and NO(3)(-) are carried out. The chemical relationships in Piper diagram identify Ca-HCO(3)-Cl and mixed Ca-Na-HCO(3)-Cl as most prevalent water types. Alkaline earth exceeds alkalis and weak acids exceed strong acids. Ionic ratios and Gibb's diagram suggest that silicate rock weathering and anthropogenic activities are the main processes that determine the ionic composition in the study area. The nitrate appeared as a major problem of safe drinking water in this region. We recorded highest nitrate concentration, i.e., 411 mg/l in one of the dug well. A comparison of groundwater quality in relation to drinking water quality standards revealed that about half of the shallow aquifer samples are not suitable for drinking.

  10. The dissolution of carbon dioxide and the diffusion of carbonate ions in alkaline fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deruiter, B.

    If alkaline fuel cells are used, it is more economical to get the necessary oxygen from the air, instead of using pure oxygen. A problem that arises, when air is used, is the dissolution of carbon dioxide into the electrolyte solution (in the form of carbonate). After a certain period the carbonate concentration can be so high that potassium carbonate crystals are formed. This research consists of two parts. A mathematical model was made to describe the diffusion of carbon dioxide and carbonate ions in the air electrode. Second, long run tests were carried out (38 days) with two fuel cells. One cell was connected to a current source which aplied a current density of 50 mA/sq cm. The other cell was not connected to a current source. During the tests, the increase of carbonate concentration was measured. The carbonate concentration was measured by titration with HCl. The precision titration equipment made it possible to analyze very small samples (30 microns). The loss of elecrolyte was therefore negligible. The data are presented in Gran plots. The mathematical model resulted in a set of three partial differential equations which have to be solved numerically. The long run tests showed that the increase of carbonate concentration was the same in both fuel cells. The test also showed that the carbonate concentration increases linearly with respect to time.

  11. Genotoxicity evaluation of 1,2 dichlorobenzene in the Indian major carp, Catla catla L. using alkaline comet assay.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Nirmala; Arunachalam, Kantha Deivi; Sathya, T N

    2013-12-01

    The genotoxic effect of 1,2 dichlorobenzene (1,2 DCB), a volatile organic compound in the Indian Major Carp, Catla catla L. was assessed using the alkaline comet assay in the gills and blood. Fish were exposed to various sub-lethal concentrations of 1,2 DCB in vivo. At 24 h, DNA damage scores (expressed as arbitrary units) increased at 0.35 and 0.7 mg/L whereas at 28 days, there was a statistically significant increase in the DNA damage score at all the doses tested (0.175, 0.23, 0.35 and 0.7 mg/L). When the DNA damage scores were considered in the blood samples, the trend was similar to that observed in the gills - significant increase at 0.35 and 0.7 mg/L at 24 h and at all doses at 28 days. The results indicate that 1,2 DCB induces genotoxicity in the form of strand breaks in the DNA of fish as evidenced by the alkaline comet assay.

  12. A study on major inorganic ion composition of atmospheric aerosols.

    PubMed

    Salve, P R; Krupadam, R J; Wate, S R

    2007-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosol samples were collected from Akola and Buldana region covering around 40 sqkm area during October-November 2002 and were analyzed for ten major inorganic ions namely F-, Cl-, NO3-, SO4(2-), PO4(2-), Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+ and NH4+ using ion chromatographic technique. The average mass of aerosols was found to be 225.81 microg/m3 with standard deviation of 31.29 and average total water soluble load of total cations and anions was found to be 4.32 microg/m3. The concentration of ions in samples showed a general pattern as SO4(2-) > NO3- > Cl- > PO4(2-) > F- for anions and Na+ > Ca2+ > NH4+ > Mg2+ > K+ for cations. The overall composition of the aerosols was taken into account to identify the sources. The trend showed higher concentration of sodium followed by calcium, sulfate, nitrate, phosphate and ammoinum and found to be influenced by terrestrial sources. The presence of SO4(2-) and NO3- in aerosols may be due to re-suspension of soil particles. Ca2+, Mg2+ and Cl- are to be derived from soil materials. The presence of NH4+ may be attributed to the reaction of NH3 vapors with acidic gases may react or condense on an acidic particle surface of anthropogenic origin. The atmospheric aerosol is slightly acidic due to neutralization of basicity by SO2 and NO(x).

  13. [Seasonal variation in the major ion chemistry and their sources in the Hubei Danjiangkou Reservoir, China].

    PubMed

    Li, Si-yue; Tan, Xiang; Xu, Zhi-fang; Zhang, Quan-fa

    2008-12-01

    Water temperature, pH, EC, TDS, ORP, Si and major anions (Cl- , NO3- and SO4(2-)) and major cations (Na+, K+, Ca2+ and Mg2+) in the Danjiangkou Reservoir, the water source area of the Middle Route of the South to North Water Transfer Project of China were monitored during the period of 2004-2006. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and principal component analysis (PCA) were performed to explore their seasonal variations and origins. The results show that the water is slightly alkaline with an average pH ranging from 7.9 to 8.4. The water is HCO3- -Ca type with low mineralized degree, and its total dissolved solid ranges from 174.6-209.1 mg x L(-1). The major ions range are as follows: Cl-, from (4.0 +/- 0.5) mg x L(-1) to (6.9 +/- 1.8) mg x L(-1); NO3-, from (4.6 +/- 0.9) mg x L(-1) to (6.8 +/- 1.7) mg x L(-1); SO4(2-), from (24.3 +/- 2.7) mg x L(-1) to (35.4 +/- 6.9) mg x L(-1); HCO3-, from (133.0 +/- 11.7) mg x L(-1) to (153.5 +/- 29.6) mg x L(-1); Na+, from (2.0 +/- 0.3) mg x L(-1) to (5.3 +/- 1.0) mg x L(-1); K+, from (0.7 +/- 0.09) mg x L(-1) to (1.6 +/- 0.7) mg x L(-1); Ca2+, from (33.0 +/- 2.1) mg x L(-1) to (46.6 +/- 0.8) mg x L(-1); Mg2+, from (8.0 +/- 2.5) mg x L(-1) to (10.5 +/- 3.2) mg x L(-1). Statistical analyses indicate that the water quality variables display significant seasonal differences except HCO3 and Si. In general, major ion concentrations in flood season are relatively lower due to the dilution of precipitation. HCO3- accounts for 75%-88% of the total major anions, while Ca2+ and alkali-earth metals (Ca2+ + Mg2+) account for 60%-80% and 87%-96% of the total major cations respectively, reflecting that carbonic acid weathering is the main proton producer in the water. The major ions have no adverse effects on human according to water drinking quality guidelines of China and WHO. PMID:19256367

  14. Spectroscopic and electron microscopic investigation of iron oxides formed in a highly alkaline medium in the presence of rhodium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krehula, Stjepko; Musić, Svetozar

    2010-07-01

    The effect of the presence of rhodium ions on the formation of iron oxides in a highly alkaline precipitation system was investigated using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), 57Fe Mössbauer and FT-IR spectroscopies, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Acicular α-FeOOH particles precipitated in a highly alkaline medium with the addition of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) were used as reference material. Characterization of α-FeOOH samples formed in the presence of rhodium ions showed a somewhat smaller mean crystallite size, increased unit-cell dimensions, a reduced average hyperfine magnetic field and a slight shift in the position of IR absorption bands in comparison with the reference α-FeOOH sample. By additional heating of the precipitation system, α-FeOOH precipitated in the presence of rhodium ions transformed to α-Fe 2O 3 crystals in the form of hexagonal bipyramids via a dissolution-recrystallization process. Metallic rhodium nanoparticles were formed simultaneously by the reduction of Rh 3+ ions in the presence of the products of TMAH thermal decomposition (trimethylamine and methanol). These rhodium nanoparticles acted as a catalyst for the reductive dissolution of α-Fe 2O 3 particles and the formation of Fe 3O 4 crystals in the form of octahedrons.

  15. The Major-ion Composition of Permian Seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Lowenstein, T K.; Timofeeff, Michael N.; Kovalevych, Volodymyr M.; Horita, Juske

    2005-01-01

    The major-ion (Mg{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, and Cl{sup -}) composition of Permian seawater was determined from chemical analyses of fluid inclusions in marine halites. New data from the Upper Permian San Andres Formation of Texas (274--272 Ma) and Salado Formation of New Mexico (251 Ma), analyzed by the environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) X-ray energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS) method, along with published chemical compositions of fluid inclusions in Permian marine halites from North America (two formations of different ages) and the Central and Eastern European basins (eight formations of four different ages) show that Permian seawater shares chemical characteristics with modern seawater, including SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} > Ca{sup 2+} at the point of gypsum precipitation, evolution into Mg{sup 2+}-Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}-Cl{sup -} brines, and Mg{sup 2+}/K{sup +} ratios {approx} 5. Permian seawater, however, is slightly depleted in SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and enriched in Ca{sup 2+}, although modeling results do not rule out Ca{sup 2+} concentrations close to those in present-day seawater. Na{sup +} and Mg{sup 2+} in Permian seawater are close to (slightly below) their concentrations in modern seawater. Permian and modern seawater are both classified as aragonite seas, with Mg{sup 2+}/Ca{sup 2+} ratios >2, conditions favorable for precipitation of aragonite and magnesian calcite as ooids and cements. The chemistry of Permian seawater was modeled using the chemical composition of brine inclusions for three periods: Lower Permian Asselian-Sakmarian (296--283 Ma), Lower Permian Artinskian-Kungurian (283--274 Ma), and Upper Permian Tatarian (258--251 Ma). Parallel changes in the chemistry of brine inclusions from equivalent age evaporites in North America, Central Europe, and Eastern Europe show that seawater underwent secular variations in chemistry over the 50 million years of the Permian. Modeled SO{sub 4}{sup 2

  16. Major-ion chemistry of the Rocky Mountain snowpack, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turk, J.T.; Taylor, H.E.; Ingersoll, G.P.; Tonnessen, K.A.; Clow, D.W.; Mast, M.A.; Campbell, D.H.; Melack, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    During 1993-97, samples of the full depth of the Rocky Mountain snowpack were collected at 52 sites from northern New Mexico to Montana and analyzed for major-ion concentrations. Concentrations of acidity, sulfate, nitrate, and calcium increased from north to south along the mountain range. In the northern part of the study area, acidity was most correlated (negatively) with calcium. Acidity was strongly correlated (positively) with nitrate and sulfate in the southern part and for the entire network. Acidity in the south exceeded the maximum acidity measured in snowpack of the Sierra Nevada and Cascade Mountains. Principal component analysis indicates three solute associations we characterize as: (1) acid (acidity, sulfate, and nitrate), (2) soil (calcium, magnesium, and potassium), and (3) salt (sodium, chloride, and ammonium). Concentrations of acid solutes in the snowpack are similar to concentrations in nearby wetfall collectors, whereas, concentrations of soil solutes are much higher in the snowpack than in wetfall. Thus, dryfall of acid solutes during the snow season is negligible, as is gypsum from soils. Snowpack sampling offers a cost-effective complement to sampling of wetfall in areas where wetfall is difficult to sample and where the snowpack accumulates throughout the winter. Copyright ?? 2001 .

  17. Three interesting coordination compounds based on metalloligand and alkaline-earth ions: Syntheses, structures, thermal behaviors and magnetic property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiang; Qian, Jun; Zhang, Chi

    2016-09-01

    Based on metalloligand LCu ([Cu(2,4-pydca)2]2-, 2,4-pydca2- = pyridine-2,4-dicarboxylate) and alkaline-earth ions (Ca2+, Sr2+, and Ba2+), three interesting coordination compounds, [Ca(H2O)7][LCu·H2O]·H2O (1), {Sr[LCu·H2O]·4H2O}n (2), and {Ba[LCu·H2O]·8H2O}n (3), have been synthesized and well-characterized by elemental analysis, infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. X-ray crystallographic studies reveal that 1 features a discrete 0D coordination compound, while 2 and 3 exhibit the 2D network and 1D chain structures, respectively. Compound 2 is constructed from {LCu}2 dimers connected with {Sr2} units, which is fabricated by two Sr2+ ions bridged via two μ2-O bridges, while compound 3 is formed by 1D {Ba}n chain linked with metalloligands LCu and exhibits an interesting sandwich like chain structure. It is noted that the coordination numbers of alkaline-earth ions are in positive correlation with their radiuses. Moreover, the magnetic property of compound 2 has been studied.

  18. EPR and optical absorption studies of Cu{sup 2+} ions in alkaline earth alumino borate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Ramesh Kumar, V.; Rao, J.L. . E-mail: jlrao46@yahoo.co.in; Gopal, N.O.

    2005-08-11

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and optical absorption spectra of Cu{sup 2+} ions in alkaline earth alumino borate glasses doped with different concentrations of CuO have been studied. The EPR spectra of all the glasses exhibit the resonance signals, characteristic of Cu{sup 2+} ions present in axially elongated octahedral sites. The number of spins participating in the resonance has been calculated as a function of temperature for calcium alumino borate (CaAB) glass doped with 0.1 mol% of CuO. From the EPR data, the paramagnetic susceptibility ({chi}) was calculated at different temperatures (T) and from the 1/{chi}-T graph, the Curie temperature of the glass has been evaluated. The optical absorption spectra of all the glasses show a single broad band, which has been assigned to the {sup 2}B{sub 1g} {yields} {sup 2}B{sub 2g} transition of the Cu{sup 2+} ions. The variation in the intensity of optical absorption with the ionic radius of the alkaline earth ion has been explained based on the Coulombic forces. By correlating the EPR and optical absorption spectral data, the nature of the in-plane {sigma} bonding between Cu{sup 2+} ion and the ligands is estimated. From the fundamental ultraviolet absorption edges of the glasses, the optical energy gap (E {sub opt}) and the Urbach energy ({delta}E) are evaluated. The variation in E {sub opt} and {delta}E is explained based on the number of defect centers in the glass.

  19. Counter-ion specificity explored in abnormal expansion of supra-molecular aggregates in aqueous solution of alkaline metal salts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ningdong; Tao, Jiaojiao; Wei, Shenghui; Chen, Mingming; Wei, Chengsha; Li, Liangbin

    2015-09-21

    Ionic effects in aqueous solution of macro-ions showing specificity and unconventional characters, respectively, receive a lot of interests recently; however, the complexity of specific ion effects in unconventional phenomena remains ambiguous. In this study, the effects of univalent ions on aggregation of supra-molecular nano-fibrils with charged carboxylate groups on the surface as a prototype of macro-ions are investigated by Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) in aqueous solutions of alkaline metal chlorides. It is found that the columnar bundles of charged fibrils are expanded in certain salt concentration range contradicting the conventional screening effects of salts. The degree of expansion is dominated by cations as Na(+) induces drastic effects in comparison to rather gentle changes from K(+) and Cs(+). The specific cations effects observed by SAXS correlate with the pH behavior of the solutions, an indicator of surface charge, or number of carboxylate groups along the supra-molecular fibrils. It is postulated that while Na(+) with stronger affinity to carboxylates apparently reduces the surface charge, K(+) and Cs(+) only weakly interact with carboxylates and induce minor changes, accounting for the cation-sensitive aggregation behavior of fibrils observed by SAXS. By probing the bundling aggregation of charged supra-molecular nano-fibrils in salty water, we provide direct evidence of specific counter-ion effects in unusual expansion caused by univalent salts. PMID:26395732

  20. Physical and optical absorption studies of Fe3+ - ions doped lithium borate glasses containing certain alkaline earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhogi, Ashok; Kumar, R. Vijaya; Kistaiah, P.

    2016-05-01

    Iron ion doped lithium borate glasses with the composition 15RO-25Li2O-59B2O3-1Fe2O3 (where R= Ca, Sr and Ba) have been prepared by the conventional melt quenching technique and characterized to investigate the physical and optical properties using XRD, density, molar volume and UV-Visible spectroscopy. The optical absorption spectra exhibit a band at around 460 nm which is assigned to 6A1g(S) → 4Eg (G) of Fe3+ ions with distorted octahedral symmetry. From ultraviolet absorption edges, the optical band gap and Urbach energies have been evaluated. The effect of alkaline earths on these properties is discussed.

  1. The influence of platinum(IV) ions on the formation of iron oxides in a highly alkaline medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krehula, Stjepko; Musić, Svetozar

    2011-05-01

    The effect of the presence of platinum(IV) ions, in the form of Pt(OH)62- at a high pH, on the formation of iron oxides in a highly alkaline precipitation system was investigated using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), 57Fe Mössbauer and FT-IR spectroscopies, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Monodispersed lath-like α-FeOOH (goethite) particles precipitated by hydrothermal treatment in a highly alkaline medium with the addition of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) were used as reference material. In the presence of 1 or 5 mol% of platinum ions in the precipitation system the lath-like α-FeOOH particles were formed as a single phase after a short hydrothermal treatment (2 h). No significant change in the size and shape of these particles in comparison to the reference sample was observed. After 6 h of autoclaving the formation of platinum nanoparticles at the surface of α-FeOOH particles via reduction by TMAH and/or its decomposition products became visible. These nanoparticles acted as a catalyst for the reduction of Fe(III) ions into Fe(II) and gradual transformation of α-FeOOH into a mixed Fe(II)-Fe(III) oxide (Fe 3O 4, magnetite) by the dissolution-recrystallization mechanism. The presence of a higher concentration of platinum ions accelerates the process of α-FeOOH → Fe 3O 4 transformation with the appearance of α-Fe 2O 3 (hematite) particles as an intermediate product.

  2. Identification of a major QTL allele from wild soybean (Glycine soja Sieb. & Zucc.) for increasing alkaline salt tolerance in soybean.

    PubMed

    Tuyen, D D; Lal, S K; Xu, D H

    2010-07-01

    Salt-affected soils are generally classified into two main categories, sodic (alkaline) and saline. Our previous studies showed that the wild soybean accession JWS156-1 (Glycine soja) from the Kinki area of Japan was tolerant to NaCl salt, and the quantitative trait locus (QTL) for NaCl salt tolerance was located on soybean linkage group N (chromosome 3). Further investigation revealed that the wild soybean accession JWS156-1 also had a higher tolerance to alkaline salt stress. In the present study, an F(6) recombinant inbred line mapping population (n = 112) and an F(2) population (n = 149) derived from crosses between a cultivated soybean cultivar Jackson and JWS156-1 were used to identify QTL for alkaline salt tolerance in soybean. Evaluation of soybean alkaline salt tolerance was carried out based on salt tolerance rating (STR) and leaf chlorophyll content (SPAD value) after treatment with 180 mM NaHCO(3) for about 3 weeks under greenhouse conditions. In both populations, a significant QTL for alkaline salt tolerance was detected on the molecular linkage group D2 (chromosome 17), which accounted for 50.2 and 13.0% of the total variation for STR in the F(6) and the F(2) populations, respectively. The wild soybean contributed to the tolerance allele in the progenies. Our results suggest that QTL for alkaline salt tolerance is different from the QTL for NaCl salt tolerance found previously in this wild soybean genotype. The DNA markers closely associated with the QTLs might be useful for marker-assisted selection to pyramid tolerance genes in soybean for both alkaline and saline stresses.

  3. Selectivity of ion exchangers in extracting cesium and rubidium from alkaline solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelkovnikova, L. A.; Kargov, S. I.; Gavlina, O. T.; Ivanov, V. A.; Al'tshuler, G. N.

    2013-01-01

    We compare the ion exchange selectivity of phenol-type sorbents based on phenol formaldehyde resins, products of condensation of diatomic phenols with formaldehyde, and crosslinked polymer based on C-phenyl[4]resorcinarene resin, for cesium and rubidium ions. It is shown that phenol formaldehyde sorbents are the ones most selective. The interaction of alkali metal cations with the anion of calix[4]arene is investigated via quantum-chemical modeling. It is shown that the selectivity toward cesium and rubidium ions in ion exchangers of the phenolic type is not due to specific interactions of ions with phenolic groups.

  4. Major ion toxicity of six produced waters to three freshwater species: Application of ion toxicity models and TIE procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Tietge, J.E.; Hockett, J.R.; Evans, J.M.

    1997-10-01

    Previous research to characterize the acute toxicity of major ions to freshwater organisms resulted in the development of statistical toxicity models for three freshwater species (Ceriodaphnia dubia, Pimephales promelas, and Daphnia magna). These ion toxicity models estimate the toxicity of seven major ions utilizing logistic regression. In this study, the ion toxicity models were used in conjunction with Phase 1 toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) procedures to evaluate the contribution of major ion toxicity to the total toxicity of six produced water samples ranging in total salinity from 1.7 to 58.1 g/L. Initial toxicities of all six samples were compared to the model predictions. Four produced waters were found to have toxicity consistent with toxicity attributable to major ion concentrations only. Two produced waters were found to exhibit more toxicity than expected from ion concentrations alone. These samples were subjected to Phase 1 TIE procedures. Toxicities were reduced by specific Phase 1 TIE manipulations to those predicted by the ion toxicity models. Mock effluents were used to verify the results. The combination of the ion toxicity models with Phase 1 TIE procedures successfully quantified the toxicity due to major ions in six produced water samples.

  5. Spectroscopic study of Mg(II) ion influence on the autoxidation of gallic acid in weakly alkaline aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolić, G. M.; Veselinović, A. M.; Nikolić, R. S.; Mitić, S. S.

    2011-12-01

    Gallic acid autoxidation in weakly alkaline aqueous solutions was studied by UV-Vis spectrophotometry and ESR spectroscopy under various conditions. Lowering the pH value from 10 to 8.5 probably changes the mechanism of the autoxidation reaction as evidenced by the different time variations of UV-Vis spectra of solutions. The presence of Mg(II) ions greatly influences the autoxidation reaction at pH 8.5. Although the UV-Vis spectral changes with time follow the similar pattern during the gallic acid autoxidation at pH 10 and at pH 8.5 in the presence of Mg(II) ions, some small differences indicate that Mg(II) ions not only affect the electron density of absorbing species but also influence the overall mechanism of the autoxidation reaction. ESR spectra of free radials formed during the initial stage of gallic acid autoxidation at pH 8.5 in the presence of Mg(II) ions were recorded. Computer simulation of ESR spectra allows partial characterization of these free radicals.

  6. The major-ion composition of Carboniferous seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Nora M.; García-Veigas, Javier; Lowenstein, Tim K.; Giles, Peter S.; Williams-Stroud, Sherilyn

    2014-06-01

    The major-ion chemistry (Na+, Mg2+, Ca2+, K+, SO42-, and Cl-) of Carboniferous seawater was determined from chemical analyses of fluid inclusions in marine halites, using the cryo scanning electron microscopy (Cryo-SEM) X-ray energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS) technique. Fluid inclusions in halite from the Mississippian Windsor and Mabou Groups, Shubenacadie Basin, Nova Scotia, Canada (Asbian and Pendleian Substages, 335.5-330 Ma), and from the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation, Utah, USA, (Desmoinesian Stage 309-305 Ma) contain Na+-Mg2+-K+-Ca2+-Cl- brines, with no measurable SO42-, which shows that the Carboniferous ocean was a “CaCl2 sea”, relatively enriched in Ca2+ and low in SO42- with equivalents Ca2+ > SO42- + HCO3-. δ34S values from anhydrite in the Mississippian Shubenacadie Basin (13.2-14.0 ‰) and the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation (11.2-12.6 ‰) support seawater sources. Br in halite from the Shubenacadie Basin (53-111 ppm) and the Paradox Basin (68-147 ppm) also indicate seawater parentages. Carboniferous seawater, modeled from fluid inclusions, contained ∼22 mmol Ca2+/kg H2O (Mississippian) and ∼24 mmol Ca2+/kg H2O (Pennsylvanian). Estimated sulfate concentrations are ∼14 mmol SO42-/kg H2O (Mississippian), and ∼12 mmol SO42-/kg H2O (Pennsylvanian). Calculated Mg2+/Ca2+ ratios are 2.5 (Mississippian) and 2.3 (Pennsylvanian), with an estimated range of 2.0-3.2. The fluid inclusion record of seawater chemistry shows a long period of CaCl2 seas in the Paleozoic, from the Early Cambrian through the Carboniferous, when seawater was enriched in Ca2+ and relatively depleted in SO42-. During this ∼200 Myr interval, Ca2+ decreased and SO42- increased, but did not cross the Ca2+-SO42- chemical divide to become a MgSO4 sea (when SO42- in seawater became greater than Ca2+) until the latest Pennsylvanian or earliest Permian (∼309-295 Ma). Seawater remained a MgSO4 sea during the Permian and Triassic, for ∼100 Myr. Fluid inclusions also record

  7. Mass Spectrometric Observation of Doubly Charged Alkaline-Earth Argon Ions.

    PubMed

    Hattendorf, Bodo; Gusmini, Bianca; Dorta, Ladina; Houk, Robert S; Günther, Detlef

    2016-09-01

    Doubly charged diatomic ions MAr(2+) where M=Mg, Ca, Sr or Ba have been observed by mass spectrometry with an inductively coupled plasma ion source. Abundance ratios are quite high, 0.1 % for MgAr(2+) , 0.4 % for CaAr(2+) , 0.2 % for SrAr(2+) and 0.1 % for BaAr(2+) relative to the corresponding doubly charged atomic ions M(2+) . It is assumed that these molecular ions are formed through reactions of the doubly charged metal ions with neutral argon atoms within the ion source. Bond dissociation energies (D0 ) were calculated and agree well with previously published values. The abundance ratios MAr(+) /M(+) and MAr(2+) /M(2+) generally follow the predicted bond dissociation energies with the exception of MgAr(2+) . Mg(2+) should form the strongest bond with Ar [D0 (MgAr(2+) )=124 to 130 kJ mol(-1) ] but its relative abundance is similar to that of the weakest bound BaAr(2+) (D0 =34 to 42 kJ mol(-1) ). The relative abundances of the various MAr(2+) ions are higher than those expected from an argon plasma at T=6000 K, indicating that collisions during ion extraction reduce the abundance of the MAr(2+) ions relative to the composition in the source. The corresponding singly charged MAr(+) ions are also observed but occur at about three orders of magnitude lower intensity than MAr(2+) . PMID:27252087

  8. Developments in MEMS scale printable alkaline and Li-ion technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littau, K. A.; Cobb, C. L.; Spengler, N.; Solberg, S.; Weisberg, M.; Chang, N.; Rodkin, A.

    2011-06-01

    Two technologies for MEMS (Microelectromechanical Systems) scale cell formation are discussed. First, the fabrication of planar alkaline cell batteries compatible with MEMS scale power storage applications is shown. Both mm scale and sub-mm scale individual cells and batteries have been constructed. The chosen coplanar electrode geometry allows for easy fabrication of series connected cells enabling higher voltage while simplifying the cell sealing and electrode formation. The Zn/Ag alkaline system is used due to the large operating voltage, inherent charge capacity, long shelf life, and ease of fabrication. Several cells have been constructed using both plated and spun-on silver. The plated cells are shown to be limited in performance due to inadequate surface area and porosity; however, the cells made from spun-on colloidal silver show reasonable charge capacity and power performance with current densities of up to 200 uA/mm2 and charge capacities of up to 18 mA-s/mm2. Second, a new printing method for interdigitated 3-D cells is introduced. A microfluidic printhead capable of dispensing multiple materials at high resolution and aspect ratio is described and used to form fine interdigitated cell features which show >10 times improvement in energy density. Representative structures enabled by this method are modeled, and the energy and power density improvements are reported.

  9. Solubility of ion and trace metals from stabilized sewage sludge by fly ash and alkaline mine tailing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongling; Sun, Lina; Sun, Tieheng

    2008-01-01

    Stabilized sewage sludge (SS) by fly ash (FA) and alkaline mine tailing as artificial soil, to be applied on the ecological rehabilitation at mining junkyards, offers a potentially viable utilization of the industrial by-product, as well as solves the shortage of soil resource in the mine area. An incubation experiment with different ratios of SS and FA was conducted to evaluate the solubility of ions and trace elements from stabilized sewage sludge. Results showed that fly ash offset a decrease in pH value of sewage sludge. The pH of (C) treatment (FA:SS = 1:1) was stable and tended to neutrality. The SO4(2-) and Cl- concentrations of the solution in the mixture were significantly decreased in the stabilized sewage sludge by alkaline fly ash and mine tailing, compared to the single SS treatment. Stabilized sewage sludge by FA weakened the nitrification of total nitrogen from SS when the proportion of FA in the mixture was more than 50%. The Cr, Ni, and Cu concentrations in the solution were gradually decreased and achieved a stable level after 22 days, for all treatments over the duration of the incubation. Moreover stabilized sewage sludge by fly ash and/or mine tailing notably decreased the trace metal solubility. The final Cr, Cu, and Ni concentrations in the solution for all mixtures of treatments were lower than 2.5, 15, and 50 microg/L, respectively. PMID:18763566

  10. Creation of trapped electrons and holes in alkaline-earth fluoride crystals doped by rare-earth ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radzhabov, E.

    2002-06-01

    Defects in Ce 3+- and Eu 2+-doped alkaline-earth fluorides, created by vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons with energy lower than that of the band gap, were investigated by various methods: thermostimulated luminescence, photostimulated luminescence and optical absorption. The CaF 2:Eu 2+ thermoluminescence curves in the range of 60-330 K due to various types of trapped holes were the same after VUV illumination as after X-ray irradiation. Thermoluminescence curves of Ce 3+-doped alkaline-earth fluorides created by VUV illumination or X-ray irradiation were generally similar. However, Vk thermoluminescence peaks were absent in VUV-illuminated CaF 2:Ce 3+ and SrF 2:Ce 3+ crystals. Creation of Ce 2+ characteristic bands was observed in photostimulated luminescence spectra as well as in optical absorption spectra of vacuum ultraviolet-illuminated or X-ray-irradiated Ce 3+-doped crystals. The proposed mechanism of creation of trapped hole and trapped electron defects by vacuum ultraviolet illumination involves charge transfer-type transitions, in which the electron transfers from valence band to an impurity level, lying in the band gap. Comparison of all involved energies of transitions in the crystals investigated shows that the sum of all transition energies is less than that of the band gap by 1-3 eV. This energy difference can be considered as the energy of lattice relaxation around created Ce 2+ or Eu + ions.

  11. Groundwater and porewater as major sources of alkalinity to a fringing coral reef lagoon (Muri Lagoon, Cook Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyronak, T.; Santos, I. R.; Erler, D. V.; Eyre, B. D.

    2013-04-01

    To better predict how ocean acidification will affect coral reefs, it is important to understand how biogeochemical cycles on reefs alter carbonate chemistry over various temporal and spatial scales. This study quantifies the contribution of shallow porewater exchange (as quantified from advective chamber incubations) and fresh groundwater discharge (as traced by 222Rn) to total alkalinity (TA) dynamics on a fringing coral reef lagoon along the southern Pacific island of Rarotonga over a tidal and diel cycle. Benthic alkalinity fluxes were affected by the advective circulation of water through permeable sediments, with net daily flux rates of carbonate alkalinity ranging from -1.55 to 7.76 mmol m-2 d-1, depending on the advection rate. Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) was a source of TA to the lagoon, with the highest flux rates measured at low tide, and an average daily TA flux of 1080 mmol m-2 d-1 at the sampling site. Both sources of TA were important on a reef-wide basis, although SGD acted solely as a delivery mechanism of TA to the lagoon, while porewater advection was either a sink or source of TA dependent on the time of day. This study describes overlooked sources of TA to coral reef ecosystems that can potentially alter water column carbonate chemistry. We suggest that porewater and groundwater fluxes of TA should be taken into account in ocean acidification models in order to properly address changing carbonate chemistry within coral reef ecosystems.

  12. Synthesis of a new family of ionophores based on aluminum-dipyrrin complexes (ALDIPYs) and their strong recognition of alkaline earth ions.

    PubMed

    Saikawa, Makoto; Daicho, Manami; Nakamura, Takashi; Uchida, Junji; Yamamura, Masaki; Nabeshima, Tatsuya

    2016-03-14

    Mononuclear and dinuclear aluminum-dipyrrin complexes (ALDIPYs) were synthesized as a new family of ionophores. They exhibited colorimetric and fluorometric responses to alkaline earth ions in an aqueous mixed solvent. The strong recognition was achieved via multipoint interactions with the oxygen atoms appropriately incorporated into the ligand framework. PMID:26935409

  13. Electrochemical Behavior of Nano-grained Pure Copper in Dilute Alkaline Solution with Chloride Ion Trace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattah-Alhosseini, Arash; Imantalab, Omid; Attarzadeh, Farid Reza

    2016-10-01

    Effect of nano-grained structure on the interface behavior of pure copper in 0.01M KOH solution with chloride ion trace is investigated by various electrochemical techniques. Nano-grained structure was achieved by accumulative roll bonding (ARB) technique. Before any electrochemical measurements, microstructure was evaluated by means of optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM observations showed that nano-grains (with an average size of below 100 nm) appeared after eight passes of ARB. Polarization curves revealed that increasing chloride ion concentration leads to a decrease in the corrosion and pitting potentials of both annealed and nano-grained pure copper samples. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy revealed that chloride ion trace lowers passive film resistance and charge-transfer resistance in both annealed and nano-grained samples. Mott-Schottky analysis showed that the surface films formed on annealed and nano-grained samples in KOH solution with and without NaCl addition are of p-type semiconducting behavior. Moreover, this analysis showed that the acceptor density increases by increasing chloride ion concentration.

  14. Electrochemical Behavior of Nano-grained Pure Copper in Dilute Alkaline Solution with Chloride Ion Trace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattah-Alhosseini, Arash; Imantalab, Omid; Attarzadeh, Farid Reza

    2016-08-01

    Effect of nano-grained structure on the interface behavior of pure copper in 0.01M KOH solution with chloride ion trace is investigated by various electrochemical techniques. Nano-grained structure was achieved by accumulative roll bonding (ARB) technique. Before any electrochemical measurements, microstructure was evaluated by means of optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM observations showed that nano-grains (with an average size of below 100 nm) appeared after eight passes of ARB. Polarization curves revealed that increasing chloride ion concentration leads to a decrease in the corrosion and pitting potentials of both annealed and nano-grained pure copper samples. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy revealed that chloride ion trace lowers passive film resistance and charge-transfer resistance in both annealed and nano-grained samples. Mott-Schottky analysis showed that the surface films formed on annealed and nano-grained samples in KOH solution with and without NaCl addition are of p-type semiconducting behavior. Moreover, this analysis showed that the acceptor density increases by increasing chloride ion concentration.

  15. Groundwater and porewater as a major source of alkalinity to a fringing coral reef lagoon (Muri Lagoon, Cook Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyronak, T.; Santos, I. R.; Erler, D. V.; Eyre, B. D.

    2012-11-01

    To better predict how ocean acidification will affect coral reefs, it is important to understand how biogeochemical cycles on reefs alter carbonate chemistry over various temporal and spatial scales. This study quantifies the contribution of fresh groundwater discharge (as traced by radon) and shallow porewater exchange (as quantified from advective chamber incubations) to total alkalinity (TA) dynamics on a fringing coral reef lagoon along the southern Pacific island of Rarotonga over a tidal and diel cycle. Benthic alkalinity fluxes were affected by the advective circulation of water through permeable sediments, with net daily flux rates of carbonate alkalinity ranging from -1.55 to 7.76 mmol m-2 d-1, depending on the advection rate. Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) was a source of TA to the lagoon, with the highest flux rates measured at low tide, and an average daily TA flux of 1080 mmol m-2 d-1. Both sources of TA were important on a reef wide basis, although SGD acted solely as a delivery mechanism of TA to the lagoon, while porewater advection was either a sink or source of TA dependant on the time of day. On a daily basis, groundwater can contribute approximately 70% to 80% of the TA taken up by corals within the lagoon. This study describes overlooked sources of TA to coral reef ecosystems that can potentially alter water-column carbonate chemistry. We suggest that porewater and groundwater fluxes of TA should be taken into account in ocean acidification models in order to properly address changing carbonate chemistry within coral reef ecosystems.

  16. A preorganized metalloreceptor for alkaline earth ions showing calcium versus magnesium selectivity in water: biological activity of selected metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Amatori, Stefano; Ambrosi, Gianluca; Fanelli, Mirco; Formica, Mauro; Fusi, Vieri; Giorgi, Luca; Macedi, Eleonora; Micheloni, Mauro; Paoli, Paola; Rossi, Patrizia

    2014-08-25

    The N,N'-bis[(3-hydroxy-4-pyron-2-yl)methyl]-N,N'-dimethylethylendiamine (Malten = L) forms the highly stable [CuH(-2)L] species in water, in which the converging maltol oxygen atoms form an electron-rich area able to host hard metal ions. When considering the alkaline earth series (AE), the [Cu(H(-2)L)] species binds all metal ions, with the exception of Mg(2+), exhibiting the relevant property to discriminate Ca(2+) versus Mg(2+) at physiological pH 7.4; the binding of the AE metal is visible to the naked eye. The stability constant values of the trinuclear [AE{Cu(H(-2)L)}2](2+) species formed reach the maximum for Ca(2+) (log K=7.7). Ca(2+) also forms a tetranuclear [Ca{Cu(H(-2)L)}]2(4+) species at a high Ca(2+) concentration. Tri- and tetranuclear calcium complexes show blue- and pink-colored crystals, respectively. [Cu(H(-2)L)] is the most active species in inducing DNA alterations. The DNA damages are compatible with its hydrolytic cleavages.

  17. Relationship between Salivary Alkaline Phosphatase Enzyme Activity and The Concentrations of Salivary Calcium and Phosphate Ions

    PubMed Central

    Jazaeri, Mina; Malekzadeh, Hosein; Abdolsamadi, Hamidreza; Rezaei-Soufi, Loghman; Samami, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Although salivary alkaline phosphatase (ALP) can balance deand remineralization processes of enamel, there is no evidence regarding its effects on the concentrations of calcium and phosphate in saliva. The present study aims to determine the relationship between salivary ALP activity and the concentrations of calcium and phosphate in saliva. In this cross-sectional study, we evaluated salivary markers in 120 males, ages 19 to 44 years. All participants provided 5 mL of unstimulated whole saliva and the level of enzyme activity as well as calcium and phosphate concentrations were measured using a colorimetric method. Data were gathered and analyzed by statistical package for social sciences (SPSS) 13.00 using Pearson correlation test. A p value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. The mean age of participants in the present study was 32.95 ± 8.09 years. The mean pH of saliva was 6.65 ± 0.62. Salivary parameters included average ALP activity (5.04 ± 1.866 U/dL), calcium (4.77 ± 0.877 mg/dL) and phosphate (10.38 ± 2.301 mg/dL). Pearson correlation test showed no significant relationship between ALP activity and calcium and phosphate concentrations in saliva (p>0.05). According to the results of the present study, there was no significant relation between salivary ALP activity and calcium and phosphate concentrations in saliva. However, further research is highly recommended. PMID:25870846

  18. Elevated major ion concentrations inhibit larval mayfly growth and development.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Brent R; Weaver, Paul C; Nietch, Christopher T; Lazorchak, James M; Struewing, Katherine A; Funk, David H

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic disturbances, including those from developing energy resources, can alter stream chemistry significantly by elevating total dissolved solids. Field studies have indicated that mayflies (Order Ephemeroptera) are particularly sensitive to high total dissolved solids. In the present study, the authors measured 20-d growth and survivorship of larval Neocloeon triangulifer exposed to a gradient of brine salt (mixed NaCl and CaCl2 ) concentrations. Daily growth rates were reduced significantly in all salt concentrations above the control (363 µS cm(-1) ) and larvae in treatments with specific conductance >812 µS cm(-1) were in comparatively earlier developmental stages (instars) at the end of the experiment. Survivorship declined significantly when specific conductance was >1513 µS cm(-1) and the calculated 20-d 50% lethal concentration was 2866 µS cm(-1) . The present study's results provide strong experimental evidence that elevated ion concentrations similar to those observed in developing energy resources, such as oil and gas drilling or coal mining, can adversely affect sensitive aquatic insect species.

  19. Elevated major ion concentrations inhibit larval mayfly growth and development.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Brent R; Weaver, Paul C; Nietch, Christopher T; Lazorchak, James M; Struewing, Katherine A; Funk, David H

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic disturbances, including those from developing energy resources, can alter stream chemistry significantly by elevating total dissolved solids. Field studies have indicated that mayflies (Order Ephemeroptera) are particularly sensitive to high total dissolved solids. In the present study, the authors measured 20-d growth and survivorship of larval Neocloeon triangulifer exposed to a gradient of brine salt (mixed NaCl and CaCl2 ) concentrations. Daily growth rates were reduced significantly in all salt concentrations above the control (363 µS cm(-1) ) and larvae in treatments with specific conductance >812 µS cm(-1) were in comparatively earlier developmental stages (instars) at the end of the experiment. Survivorship declined significantly when specific conductance was >1513 µS cm(-1) and the calculated 20-d 50% lethal concentration was 2866 µS cm(-1) . The present study's results provide strong experimental evidence that elevated ion concentrations similar to those observed in developing energy resources, such as oil and gas drilling or coal mining, can adversely affect sensitive aquatic insect species. PMID:25307284

  20. Alkalinity regulation in soft-water Florida lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, L.A.; Pollman, C.D.; Eilers, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Major ion chemistry data collected as part of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Eastern Lake Survey was examined to evaluate the mechanisms and extent of alkalinity regulation in 37 undisturbed, soft-water lakes in Florida. Comparison of major ion-Cl ratios in atmospheric deposition and in lake water shows the reactions resulting in retention of sulfate and nitrate are the dominant sources of alkalinity; production of organic acids and ammonium retention are the major alkalinity-consuming processes. Based on average reactions, enrichment of major cations accounted for only 12% of net alkalinity generation in the study lakes. In general, calcium and potassium were depleted in low-ANC lakes, presumably by in-lake sinks, and were enriched in most higher ANC lakes by ground water inputs. Differences in alkalinity among these lakes reflect hydrologic factors and the proximity of clay and carbonate deposits to the lake bed. Overall, net-alkalinity generation nearly balanced H+ predicted from evaporative concentration of atmospheric acid inputs; the close balance suggests that the alkalinity status of these lakes is very sensitive to changes in atmospheric loadings and groundwater alkalinity inputs.

  1. Enzymatically mediated bioprecipitation of heavy metals from industrial wastes and single ion solutions by mammalian alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Gouri; Shah, Gaurav A; Dey, Pritam; S, Ganesh; Venu-Babu, P; Thilagaraj, W Richard

    2013-01-01

    The study was aimed at investigating the potential use of calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase (CIAP) enzyme in the removal of heavy metals (Cd(2+), Ni(2+), Co(2+) and Cr(3+/6+)) from single ion solutions as well as tannery and electroplating effluents. CIAP mediated bioremediation (white biotechnology) is a novel technique that is eco-friendly and cost effective unlike the conventional chemical technologies. Typical reactions containing the enzyme (CIAP) and p-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP) as substrate in Tris-HCl buffer (pH 8 and 11) and either single ion metal solutions (250 ppm and 1000 ppm) or effluents from tannery or electroplating industry were incubated at 37°C for 30 min, 60 min and 120 min. The inorganic phosphate (P(i)) generated due to catalytic breakdown of pNPP complexes free metal ions as metal-phosphate and the amount of metal precipitated was derived by estimating the reduction in the free metal ion present in the supernatant of reactions employing atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS). Better precipitation of metal was obtained at pH 11 than at pH 8 and between the two concentrations of different metals tested, an initial metal concentration of 250 ppm in the reaction gave more precipitation than with 1000 ppm. Experimental data showed that at pH 11, the percentage of removal of metal ions (for an initial concentration of 250 ppm) was in the following order: Cd(2+) (80.99%) > Ni(2+) (64.78%) > Cr(3+) > (46.15%) > Co(2+) (36.47%) > Cr(6+) (32.33%). The overall removal of Cr(3+) and Cr(6+) from tannery effluent was 32.77% and 37.39% respectively in 120 min at pH 11. Likewise, the overall removal of Cd(2+), Co(2+) and Ni(2+) from electroplating effluent was 50.42%, 13.93% and 38.64% respectively in 120 min at pH 11. The study demonstrates that bioprecipitation by CIAP may be a viable and environmental friendly method for clean-up of heavy metals from tannery and electroplating effluents. PMID:23030390

  2. Enzymatically mediated bioprecipitation of heavy metals from industrial wastes and single ion solutions by mammalian alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Gouri; Shah, Gaurav A; Dey, Pritam; S, Ganesh; Venu-Babu, P; Thilagaraj, W Richard

    2013-01-01

    The study was aimed at investigating the potential use of calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase (CIAP) enzyme in the removal of heavy metals (Cd(2+), Ni(2+), Co(2+) and Cr(3+/6+)) from single ion solutions as well as tannery and electroplating effluents. CIAP mediated bioremediation (white biotechnology) is a novel technique that is eco-friendly and cost effective unlike the conventional chemical technologies. Typical reactions containing the enzyme (CIAP) and p-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP) as substrate in Tris-HCl buffer (pH 8 and 11) and either single ion metal solutions (250 ppm and 1000 ppm) or effluents from tannery or electroplating industry were incubated at 37°C for 30 min, 60 min and 120 min. The inorganic phosphate (P(i)) generated due to catalytic breakdown of pNPP complexes free metal ions as metal-phosphate and the amount of metal precipitated was derived by estimating the reduction in the free metal ion present in the supernatant of reactions employing atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS). Better precipitation of metal was obtained at pH 11 than at pH 8 and between the two concentrations of different metals tested, an initial metal concentration of 250 ppm in the reaction gave more precipitation than with 1000 ppm. Experimental data showed that at pH 11, the percentage of removal of metal ions (for an initial concentration of 250 ppm) was in the following order: Cd(2+) (80.99%) > Ni(2+) (64.78%) > Cr(3+) > (46.15%) > Co(2+) (36.47%) > Cr(6+) (32.33%). The overall removal of Cr(3+) and Cr(6+) from tannery effluent was 32.77% and 37.39% respectively in 120 min at pH 11. Likewise, the overall removal of Cd(2+), Co(2+) and Ni(2+) from electroplating effluent was 50.42%, 13.93% and 38.64% respectively in 120 min at pH 11. The study demonstrates that bioprecipitation by CIAP may be a viable and environmental friendly method for clean-up of heavy metals from tannery and electroplating effluents.

  3. Relationships determining the toxicity of major ion mixtures to Ceriodaphnia dubia

    EPA Science Inventory

    Significant impacts to aquatic systems can occur due to increases in major ions (Na, K, Ca, Mg, Cl, SO4, HCO3) from various anthropogenic activities, these impacts varying with both the specific combination of ions that are elevated and the chemistry of the background water. A s...

  4. Hyperpolarizabilities of alkaline-earth metal ions Be+, Mg+, and Ca+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Dong; Zhang, Yong-Hui; Li, Cheng-Bin; Gao, Ke-Lin; Shi, Ting-Yun

    2016-09-01

    The knowledge of the hyperpolarizabilities of atoms and ions is helpful for the analysis of the high order effects of the frequency shifts in precision spectroscopy experiments. Liu et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 223001 (2015)] proposed to establish all-optical trapped ion clocks using laser at the magic wavelength for clock transition. To evaluate the high-order frequency shifts in this new scheme of optical clocks, hyperpolarizabilities are needed, but absent. Using the finite field method based on the B-spline basis set and model potentials, we calculated the electric-field-dependent energy shifts of the ground and low-lying excited states in Be+, Mg+, and Ca+ in the field strength range of 0.0-6×10-5 a.u.. The scalar and tensor polarizabilities ( α 0, α 2) and hyperpolarizabilities ( γ 0, γ 2, γ 4) were deduced. The results of the hyperpolarizabilities for Be+ showed good agreement with the values in literature, implying that the present method can be applied for the effective estimation of the atomic hyperpolarizabilities, which are rarely reported but needed in experiments. The feasibility of optical trapping of Ca+ is discussed, and the contributions of hyperpolarizabilities to the transition frequency shift for Ca+ in the optical dipole trap are estimated using quasi-electrostatic approximation.

  5. Properties of alkali-metal atoms and alkaline-earth-metal ions for an accurate estimate of their long-range interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Jasmeet; Nandy, D. K.; Arora, Bindiya; Sahoo, B. K.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of interaction potentials among the alkali-metal atoms and alkaline-earth ions is very useful in the studies of cold atom physics. Here we carry out theoretical studies of the long-range interactions among the Li, Na, K, and Rb alkali-metal atoms with the Ca+, Ba+, Sr+, and Ra+ alkaline-earth ions systematically, which are largely motivated by their importance in a number of applications. These interactions are expressed as a power series in the inverse of the internuclear separation R . Both the dispersion and induction components of these interactions are determined accurately from the algebraic coefficients corresponding to each power combination in the series. Ultimately, these coefficients are expressed in terms of the electric multipole polarizabilities of the above-mentioned systems, which are calculated using the matrix elements obtained from a relativistic coupled-cluster method and core contributions to these quantities from the random-phase approximation. We also compare our estimated polarizabilities with the other available theoretical and experimental results to verify accuracies in our calculations. In addition, we also evaluate the lifetimes of the first two low-lying states of the ions using the above matrix elements. Graphical representations of the dispersion coefficients versus R are given among all the alkaline ions with Rb.

  6. Cloning, expression, purification and activation by Na ion of halophilic alkaline phosphatase from moderate halophile Halomonas sp. 593.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Matsujiro; Oda, Kazuki; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Tokunaga, Masao

    2011-03-01

    We have succeeded in the cloning of alkaline phosphatase gene, haalp, from moderate halophile Halomonas sp. 593. A deduced amino acid sequence showed a high ratio of acidic to basic amino acids, characteristic of halophilic proteins. The gene product was efficiently expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 Star (DE3) pLysS, but in an inactive form. The purified recombinant HaALP was separated into four fractions by gel filtration. When they were dialyzed against 50 mM Tris-HCl (pH 8.0)/2 mM MgCl₂ buffer containing 3 M NaCl, one of these four fractions was activated to almost full activity. This fraction contained a folding intermediate that was converted to the native structure by the salt. Among the additional salts tested, i.e., KCl, KBr, LiCl, MgCl₂, (NH₄)₂SO₄, and Na₂SO₄, only Na₂SO₄ was effective, suggesting the importance of Na ion.

  7. Kinetic isotope effects for alkaline phosphatase reactions: implications for the role of active-site metal ions in catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zalatan, Jesse G; Catrina, Irina; Mitchell, Rebecca; Grzyska, Piotr K; O'brien, Patrick J; Herschlag, Daniel; Hengge, Alvan C

    2007-08-01

    Enzyme-catalyzed phosphoryl transfer reactions have frequently been suggested to proceed through transition states that are altered from their solution counterparts, with the alterations presumably arising from interactions with active-site functional groups. In particular, the phosphate monoester hydrolysis reaction catalyzed by Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase (AP) has been the subject of intensive scrutiny. Recent linear free energy relationship (LFER) studies suggest that AP catalyzes phosphate monoester hydrolysis through a loose transition state, similar to that in solution. To gain further insight into the nature of the transition state and active-site interactions, we have determined kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for AP-catalyzed hydrolysis reactions with several phosphate monoester substrates. The LFER and KIE data together provide a consistent picture for the nature of the transition state for AP-catalyzed phosphate monoester hydrolysis and support previous models suggesting that the enzymatic transition state is similar to that in solution. Moreover, the KIE data provides unique information regarding specific interactions between the transition state and the active-site Zn2+ ions. These results provide strong support for a model in which electrostatic interactions between the bimetallo Zn2+ site and a nonbridging phosphate ester oxygen atom make a significant contribution to the large rate enhancement observed for AP-catalyzed phosphate monoester hydrolysis.

  8. Imidazolium-based Block Copolymers as Solid-State Separators for Alkaline Fuel Cells and Lithium Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nykaza, Jacob Richard

    In this study, polymerized ionic liquid (PIL) diblock copolymers were explored as solid-state polymer separators as an anion exchange membrane (AEM) for alkaline fuel cells AFCs and as a solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) for lithium-ion batteries. Polymerized ionic liquid (PIL) block copolymers are a distinct set of block copolymers that combine the properties of both ionic liquids (e.g., high conductivity, high electrochemical stability) and block copolymers (e.g., self-assembly into various nanostructures), which provides the opportunity to design highly conductive robust solid-state electrolytes that can be tuned for various applications including AFCs and lithium-ion batteries via simple anion exchange. A series of bromide conducting PIL diblock copolymers with an undecyl alkyl side chain between the polymer backbone and the imidazolium moiety were first synthesized at various compositions comprising of a PIL component and a non-ionic component. Synthesis was achieved by post-functionalization from its non-ionic precursor PIL diblock copolymer, which was synthesized via the reverse addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) technique. This PIL diblock copolymer with long alkyl side chains resulted in flexible, transparent films with high mechanical strength and high bromide ion conductivity. The conductivity of the PIL diblock copolymer was three times higher than its analogous PIL homopolymer and an order of magnitude higher than a similar PIL diblock copolymer with shorter alkyl side chain length, which was due to the microphase separated morphology, more specifically, water/ion clusters within the PIL microdomains in the hydrated state. Due to the high conductivity and mechanical robustness of this novel PIL block copolymer, its application as both the ionomer and AEM in an AFC was investigated via anion exchange to hydroxide (OH-), where a maximum power density of 29.3 mW cm-1 (60 °C with H2/O2 at 25 psig (172 kPa) backpressure) was achieved. Rotating disk

  9. A new method for the determination of the nitrogen content of nitrocellulose based on the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions released after alkaline hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Alinat, Elodie; Delaunay, Nathalie; Archer, Xavier; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Gareil, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    A new method was proposed to determine the nitrogen content of nitrocelluloses (NCs). It is based on the finding of a linear relationship between the nitrogen content and the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions released after alkaline hydrolysis. Capillary electrophoresis was used to monitor the concentration of nitrite and nitrate ions. The influences of hydrolysis time and molar mass of NC on the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions were investigated, and new insights into the understanding of the alkaline denitration mechanism of NCs, underlying this analytical strategy is provided. The method was then tested successfully with various explosive and non-explosive NC-containing samples such as various daily products and smokeless gunpowders. Inherently to its principle exploiting a concentration ratio, this method shows very good repeatability in the determination of nitrogen content in real samples with relative standard deviation (n = 3) inferior to 1.5%, and also provides very significant advantages with respect to sample extraction, analysis time (1h for alkaline hydrolysis, 3 min for electrophoretic separation), which was about 5 times shorter than for the classical Devarda's method, currently used in industry, and safety conditions (no need for preliminary drying NC samples, mild hydrolysis conditions with 1M sodium hydroxide for 1h at 60 °C). PMID:25562808

  10. A new method for the determination of the nitrogen content of nitrocellulose based on the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions released after alkaline hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Alinat, Elodie; Delaunay, Nathalie; Archer, Xavier; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Gareil, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    A new method was proposed to determine the nitrogen content of nitrocelluloses (NCs). It is based on the finding of a linear relationship between the nitrogen content and the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions released after alkaline hydrolysis. Capillary electrophoresis was used to monitor the concentration of nitrite and nitrate ions. The influences of hydrolysis time and molar mass of NC on the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions were investigated, and new insights into the understanding of the alkaline denitration mechanism of NCs, underlying this analytical strategy is provided. The method was then tested successfully with various explosive and non-explosive NC-containing samples such as various daily products and smokeless gunpowders. Inherently to its principle exploiting a concentration ratio, this method shows very good repeatability in the determination of nitrogen content in real samples with relative standard deviation (n = 3) inferior to 1.5%, and also provides very significant advantages with respect to sample extraction, analysis time (1h for alkaline hydrolysis, 3 min for electrophoretic separation), which was about 5 times shorter than for the classical Devarda's method, currently used in industry, and safety conditions (no need for preliminary drying NC samples, mild hydrolysis conditions with 1M sodium hydroxide for 1h at 60 °C).

  11. Use of reconstituted waters to evaluate effects of elevated major ions associated with mountaintop coal mining on freshwater invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Kunz, James L; Conley, Justin M; Buchwalter, David B; Norberg-King, Teresa J; Kemble, Nile E; Wang, Ning; Ingersoll, Christopher G

    2013-12-01

    In previous laboratory chronic 7-d toxicity tests conducted with the cladoceran Ceriodaphnia dubia, surface waters collected from Appalachian sites impacted by coal mining have shown toxic effects associated with elevated total dissolved solids (TDS). The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of elevated major ions in chronic laboratory tests with C. dubia (7-d exposure), a unionid mussel (Lampsilis siliquoidea; 28-d exposure), an amphipod (Hyalella azteca; 28-d exposure), and a mayfly (Centroptilum triangulifer; 35-d exposure) in 3 reconstituted waters designed to be representative of 3 Appalachian sites impacted by coal mining. Two of the reconstituted waters had ionic compositions representative of alkaline mine drainage associated with mountaintop removal and valley fill-impacted streams (Winding Shoals and Boardtree, with elevated Mg, Ca, K, SO₄, HCO₃), and a third reconstituted water had an ionic composition representative of neutralized mine drainage (Upper Dempsey, with elevated Na, K, SO₄, and HCO₃). The waters with similar conductivities but, with different ionic compositions had different effects on the test organisms. The Winding Shoals and Boardtree reconstituted waters were consistently toxic to the mussel, the amphipod, and the mayfly. In contrast, the Upper Dempsey reconstituted water was toxic to the mussel, the amphipod, and the cladoceran but was not toxic to the mayfly. These results indicate that, although elevated TDS can be correlated with toxicity, the specific major ion composition of the water is important. Moreover, the choice of test organism is critical, particularly if a test species is to be used as a surrogate for a range of faunal groups.

  12. Use of reconstituted waters to evaluate effects of elevated major ions associated with mountaintop coal mining on freshwater invertebrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kunz, James L.; Conley, Justin M.; Buchwalter, David B.; ,; Teresa, J.; Kemble, Nile E.; Wang, Ning; Ingersoll, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    In previous laboratory chronic 7-d toxicity tests conducted with the cladoceran Ceriodaphnia dubia, surface waters collected from Appalachian sites impacted by coal mining have shown toxic effects associated with elevated total dissolved solids (TDS). The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of elevated major ions in chronic laboratory tests with C. dubia (7-d exposure), a unionid mussel (Lampsilis siliquoidea; 28-d exposure), an amphipod (Hyalella azteca; 28-d exposure), and a mayfly (Centroptilum triangulifer; 35-d exposure) in 3 reconstituted waters designed to be representative of 3 Appalachian sites impacted by coal mining. Two of the reconstituted waters had ionic compositions representative of alkaline mine drainage associated with mountaintop removal and valley fill-impacted streams (Winding Shoals and Boardtree, with elevated Mg, Ca, K, SO4, HCO3), and a third reconstituted water had an ionic composition representative of neutralized mine drainage (Upper Dempsey, with elevated Na, K, SO4, and HCO3). The waters with similar conductivities but, with different ionic compositions had different effects on the test organisms. The Winding Shoals and Boardtree reconstituted waters were consistently toxic to the mussel, the amphipod, and the mayfly. In contrast, the Upper Dempsey reconstituted water was toxic to the mussel, the amphipod, and the cladoceran but was not toxic to the mayfly. These results indicate that, although elevated TDS can be correlated with toxicity, the specific major ion composition of the water is important. Moreover, the choice of test organism is critical, particularly if a test species is to be used as a surrogate for a range of faunal groups.

  13. Use of reconstituted waters to evaluate effects of elevated major ions associated with mountaintop coal mining on freshwater invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Kunz, James L; Conley, Justin M; Buchwalter, David B; Norberg-King, Teresa J; Kemble, Nile E; Wang, Ning; Ingersoll, Christopher G

    2013-12-01

    In previous laboratory chronic 7-d toxicity tests conducted with the cladoceran Ceriodaphnia dubia, surface waters collected from Appalachian sites impacted by coal mining have shown toxic effects associated with elevated total dissolved solids (TDS). The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of elevated major ions in chronic laboratory tests with C. dubia (7-d exposure), a unionid mussel (Lampsilis siliquoidea; 28-d exposure), an amphipod (Hyalella azteca; 28-d exposure), and a mayfly (Centroptilum triangulifer; 35-d exposure) in 3 reconstituted waters designed to be representative of 3 Appalachian sites impacted by coal mining. Two of the reconstituted waters had ionic compositions representative of alkaline mine drainage associated with mountaintop removal and valley fill-impacted streams (Winding Shoals and Boardtree, with elevated Mg, Ca, K, SO₄, HCO₃), and a third reconstituted water had an ionic composition representative of neutralized mine drainage (Upper Dempsey, with elevated Na, K, SO₄, and HCO₃). The waters with similar conductivities but, with different ionic compositions had different effects on the test organisms. The Winding Shoals and Boardtree reconstituted waters were consistently toxic to the mussel, the amphipod, and the mayfly. In contrast, the Upper Dempsey reconstituted water was toxic to the mussel, the amphipod, and the cladoceran but was not toxic to the mayfly. These results indicate that, although elevated TDS can be correlated with toxicity, the specific major ion composition of the water is important. Moreover, the choice of test organism is critical, particularly if a test species is to be used as a surrogate for a range of faunal groups. PMID:24243594

  14. Major ion chemistry of the Ganga-Brahmaputra river system: Weathering processes and fluxes to the Bay of Bengal

    SciTech Connect

    Sarin, M.M.; Krishnaswami, S.; Dilli, K.; Somayajulu, B.L.K. ); Moore, W.S. )

    1989-05-01

    The Ganga-Brahmaputra, one of the worlds's largest river systems, is first in terms of sediment transport and fourth in terms of water discharge. A detailed and systematic study of the major ion chemistry of these rivers and their tributaries, as well as the clay mineral composition of the bed sediments has been conducted. The chemistry of the highland rivers are all dominated by carbonate weathering; (Ca + Mg) and HCO{sub 3} account for about 80% of the cations and anions. In the lowland rivers, HCO{sub 3} excess over (Ca + Mg) and a relatively high contribution of (Na + K) to the total cations indicate that silicate weathering and/or contributions from alkaline/saline soils and ground waters could be important sources of major ions to these waters. The chemistry of the Ganga and the Yamuna in the lower reaches is by and large dictated by the chemistry of their tributaries and their mixing proportions. The highland rivers weather acidic rocks, whereas the others flow initially through basic effusives. The Ganga-Brahmaputra river system transports about 130 million tons of dissolved salts to the Bay of Bengal, which is nearly 3% of the global river flux to the oceans. The chemical denudation rates for the Ganga and the Brahmaputra basins are about 72 and 105 tons{center dot}km{sup {minus}2}{center dot}yr{sup {minus}1}, respectively, which are factors of 2 to 3 higher than the global average. The high denudation rate, particularly in the Brahmaputra, is attributable to high relief and heavy rainfall.

  15. Simultaneous determination of total nitrogen and total phosphorus in environmental waters using alkaline persulfate digestion and ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    De Borba, Brian M; Jack, Richard F; Rohrer, Jeffrey S; Wirt, Joan; Wang, Dongmei

    2014-11-21

    An ion chromatography (IC) method was developed for the simultaneous determination of total nitrogen and total phosphorus after alkaline persulfate digestion. This study takes advantage of advances in construction of high-resolution, high-capacity anion-exchange columns that can better tolerate the matrices typically encountered when a determination of total nitrogen and total phosphorous is required. Here, we used an electrolytically generated hydroxide eluent combined with a high-capacity, hydroxide-selective, anion-exchange column for the determination of total nitrogen (as nitrate-N) and total phosphorus (as phosphate-P) in environmental samples by IC. This method yielded LODs for nitrate-N and phosphate-P of 1.0 and 1.3 μg/L, respectively. The LOQs determined for these analytes were 3.4 and 4.2 μg/L, respectively. Due to the dilution factor required and the blank nitrate-N concentration after the persulfate digestion, the quantification limits increased for nitrate-N and phosphate-P to 171 and 63 μg/L, respectively. The suitability of the method was evaluated by determining the nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations from known concentrations of organic-containing nitrogen and phosphorus compounds. In addition, environmental samples consisting of six different wastewaters and 48 reservoir samples were evaluated for total nitrogen and phosphorus. The recoveries of nitrogen and phosphorus from the organic-containing compounds ranged from 93.1 to 100.1% and 85.2 to 97.1%, respectively. In addition, good correlation between results obtained by the colorimetric method and IC was also observed. The linearity, accuracy, and evaluation of potential interferences for determining TN and TP will be discussed.

  16. Simultaneous determination of total nitrogen and total phosphorus in environmental waters using alkaline persulfate digestion and ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    De Borba, Brian M; Jack, Richard F; Rohrer, Jeffrey S; Wirt, Joan; Wang, Dongmei

    2014-11-21

    An ion chromatography (IC) method was developed for the simultaneous determination of total nitrogen and total phosphorus after alkaline persulfate digestion. This study takes advantage of advances in construction of high-resolution, high-capacity anion-exchange columns that can better tolerate the matrices typically encountered when a determination of total nitrogen and total phosphorous is required. Here, we used an electrolytically generated hydroxide eluent combined with a high-capacity, hydroxide-selective, anion-exchange column for the determination of total nitrogen (as nitrate-N) and total phosphorus (as phosphate-P) in environmental samples by IC. This method yielded LODs for nitrate-N and phosphate-P of 1.0 and 1.3 μg/L, respectively. The LOQs determined for these analytes were 3.4 and 4.2 μg/L, respectively. Due to the dilution factor required and the blank nitrate-N concentration after the persulfate digestion, the quantification limits increased for nitrate-N and phosphate-P to 171 and 63 μg/L, respectively. The suitability of the method was evaluated by determining the nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations from known concentrations of organic-containing nitrogen and phosphorus compounds. In addition, environmental samples consisting of six different wastewaters and 48 reservoir samples were evaluated for total nitrogen and phosphorus. The recoveries of nitrogen and phosphorus from the organic-containing compounds ranged from 93.1 to 100.1% and 85.2 to 97.1%, respectively. In addition, good correlation between results obtained by the colorimetric method and IC was also observed. The linearity, accuracy, and evaluation of potential interferences for determining TN and TP will be discussed. PMID:25441080

  17. Effects of environmentally relevant mixtures of major ions on a freshwater mussel.

    PubMed

    Ciparis, Serena; Phipps, Andrew; Soucek, David J; Zipper, Carl E; Jones, Jess W

    2015-12-01

    The Clinch and Powell Rivers (Virginia, USA) support diverse mussel assemblages. Extensive coal mining occurs in both watersheds. In large reaches of both rivers, major ion concentrations are elevated and mussels have been extirpated or are declining. We conducted a laboratory study to assess major ion effects on growth and survival of juvenile Villosa iris. Mussels were exposed to pond water and diluted pond water with environmentally relevant major ion mixtures for 55 days. Two treatments were tested to mimic low-flow concentrations of Ca(2+), Mg(2+), [Formula: see text] , [Formula: see text] , K(+) and Cl(-) in the Clinch and Powell Rivers, total ion concentrations of 419 mg/L and 942 mg/L, respectively. Mussel survival (>90%) and growth in the two treatments showed little variation, and were not significantly different than in diluted pond water (control). Results suggest that major ion chronic toxicity is not the primary cause for mussel declines in the Clinch and Powell Rivers. PMID:26412268

  18. Water quality in the Tibetan Plateau: major ions and trace elements in the headwaters of four major Asian rivers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiang; Sillanpää, Mika; Gjessing, Egil T; Vogt, Rolf D

    2009-12-01

    The Tibetan Plateau covers an area of about one fourth of Europe, has an average elevation over 4000m above sea level, and is the water sources for about 40% of world's population. In order to foresee future changes in water quality, it is important to understand what pressures are governing the spatial variation in water chemistry. In this paper the chemistry including major ions and trace elements in the headwaters of four major Asian rivers (i.e. the Salween, Mekong, Yangtze River and Yarlung Tsangpo) in the Tibetan Plateau was studied. The results showed that the content of dissolved salts in these Tibetan rivers was relatively high compared to waters from other parts of the world. The chemical composition of the four rivers were rather similar, with Ca(2+) and HCO(3)(-) being the dominating ions. The exception was the Yangtze River on the Plateau, which was enriched in Na(+), Cl(-), SO(4)(2-) and Li due to silicate weathering followed by strong evaporation caused by a negative water balance, dissolution of evaporites in the catchment and some drainage from saline lakes. The concentrations of heavy metals (Cu, Co, Cr, Ni, Cd, Pb, and Hg) and As, NH(4)(+) were generally low in all the rivers. Anthropogenic impacts on the quality of the rivers were identified at a few locations in the Mekong River and Yarlung Tsangpo basins. Generally, the main spatial variation in chemical compositions of these under studied rivers was found to be governed mainly by difference in geological variation and regional climatic-environment. Climate change is, therefore, one of main determining factors on the water chemical characteristics of these headwaters of Asian major rivers in the Tibetan Plateau. PMID:19783282

  19. Water quality in the Tibetan Plateau: major ions and trace elements in the headwaters of four major Asian rivers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiang; Sillanpää, Mika; Gjessing, Egil T; Vogt, Rolf D

    2009-12-01

    The Tibetan Plateau covers an area of about one fourth of Europe, has an average elevation over 4000m above sea level, and is the water sources for about 40% of world's population. In order to foresee future changes in water quality, it is important to understand what pressures are governing the spatial variation in water chemistry. In this paper the chemistry including major ions and trace elements in the headwaters of four major Asian rivers (i.e. the Salween, Mekong, Yangtze River and Yarlung Tsangpo) in the Tibetan Plateau was studied. The results showed that the content of dissolved salts in these Tibetan rivers was relatively high compared to waters from other parts of the world. The chemical composition of the four rivers were rather similar, with Ca(2+) and HCO(3)(-) being the dominating ions. The exception was the Yangtze River on the Plateau, which was enriched in Na(+), Cl(-), SO(4)(2-) and Li due to silicate weathering followed by strong evaporation caused by a negative water balance, dissolution of evaporites in the catchment and some drainage from saline lakes. The concentrations of heavy metals (Cu, Co, Cr, Ni, Cd, Pb, and Hg) and As, NH(4)(+) were generally low in all the rivers. Anthropogenic impacts on the quality of the rivers were identified at a few locations in the Mekong River and Yarlung Tsangpo basins. Generally, the main spatial variation in chemical compositions of these under studied rivers was found to be governed mainly by difference in geological variation and regional climatic-environment. Climate change is, therefore, one of main determining factors on the water chemical characteristics of these headwaters of Asian major rivers in the Tibetan Plateau.

  20. Ultrafiltration behavior of major ions (Na, Ca, Mg, F, Cl, and SO4) in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Guo, L; Hunt, B J; Santschi, P H

    2001-04-01

    Aquatic colloids, including macromolecules and microparticles, with sizes ranging between 1 nm to 1 micron, play important roles in the mobility and bioavailability of heavy metals and other contaminants in natural waters. Cross-flow ultrafiltration has become one of the most commonly used techniques for isolating aquatic colloids. However, the ultrafiltration behavior of chemical species remains poorly understood. We report here the permeation behavior of major ions (Na, Ca, Mg, F, Cl, and SO4) in natural waters during ultrafiltration using an Amicon 1 kDa ultrafiltration membrane (S10N1). Water samples across a salinity gradient of 0-20@1000 were collected from the Trinity River and Galveston Bay. The permeation behavior of major ions was well predicted by a permeation model, resulting in a constant permeation coefficient for each ion. The value of the model-derived permeation coefficient (Pc) was 0.99 for Na, 0.97 for Cl, and 0.95 for F, respectively, in Trinity River waters. Values of Pc close to 1 indicate that retention of Na, Cl, and F by the 1 kDa membrane during ultrafiltration was indeed minimal (< 1-5%). In contrast, significant (14-36%) retention was observed for SO4, Ca, and Mg in Trinity River waters, with a Pc value of 0.64, 0.82, and 0.86 for SO4, Ca and Mg, respectively. However, these retained major ions can further permeate through the 1 kDa membrane during diafiltration with ultrapure water. The selective retention of major ions during ultrafiltration may have important implications for the measurement of chemical and physical speciation of trace elements when using cross-flow ultrafiltration membranes to separate colloidal species from natural waters. Our results also demonstrate that the percent retention of major ions during ultrafiltration decreases with increasing salinity or ionic strength. This retention is largely attributed to electrostatic repulsion by the negatively charged cartridge membrane.

  1. Ultrafiltration behavior of major ions (Na, Ca, Mg, F, Cl, and SO4) in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Guo, L; Hunt, B J; Santschi, P H

    2001-04-01

    Aquatic colloids, including macromolecules and microparticles, with sizes ranging between 1 nm to 1 micron, play important roles in the mobility and bioavailability of heavy metals and other contaminants in natural waters. Cross-flow ultrafiltration has become one of the most commonly used techniques for isolating aquatic colloids. However, the ultrafiltration behavior of chemical species remains poorly understood. We report here the permeation behavior of major ions (Na, Ca, Mg, F, Cl, and SO4) in natural waters during ultrafiltration using an Amicon 1 kDa ultrafiltration membrane (S10N1). Water samples across a salinity gradient of 0-20@1000 were collected from the Trinity River and Galveston Bay. The permeation behavior of major ions was well predicted by a permeation model, resulting in a constant permeation coefficient for each ion. The value of the model-derived permeation coefficient (Pc) was 0.99 for Na, 0.97 for Cl, and 0.95 for F, respectively, in Trinity River waters. Values of Pc close to 1 indicate that retention of Na, Cl, and F by the 1 kDa membrane during ultrafiltration was indeed minimal (< 1-5%). In contrast, significant (14-36%) retention was observed for SO4, Ca, and Mg in Trinity River waters, with a Pc value of 0.64, 0.82, and 0.86 for SO4, Ca and Mg, respectively. However, these retained major ions can further permeate through the 1 kDa membrane during diafiltration with ultrapure water. The selective retention of major ions during ultrafiltration may have important implications for the measurement of chemical and physical speciation of trace elements when using cross-flow ultrafiltration membranes to separate colloidal species from natural waters. Our results also demonstrate that the percent retention of major ions during ultrafiltration decreases with increasing salinity or ionic strength. This retention is largely attributed to electrostatic repulsion by the negatively charged cartridge membrane. PMID:11317897

  2. Interactive toxicity of major ion salts: Comparisons among species and between acute and chronic endpoints

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increased concentrations of major ions (Na, K, Ca, Mg, Cl, SO4, HCO3) in freshwater systems can result from a variety of anthropogenic activities, and can adversely affect aquatic organisms if the increase is sufficiently severe. Laboratory tests have indicated that the toxicity...

  3. Mesocosm Community Response Sensitivities to Specific Conductivity Comprised of Different Major Ions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Traditional toxicity test assays have been used to evaluate the relative sensitivity to different major ion mixtures as a proxy for understanding what the response of aquatic species growing in their natural environment would be during exposure to specific conductivity stress ema...

  4. Major-ion and selected trace-metal chemistry of the Biscayne Aquifer, Southeast Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Radell, M.J.; Katz, B.G.

    1991-01-01

    The major-ion and selected trace-metal chemistry of the Biscayne aquifer was characterized as part of the Florida Ground-Water Quality Monitoring Network Program, a multiagency cooperative effort concerned with delineating baseline water quality for major aquifer systems in the State. The Biscayne aquifer is unconfined and serves as the sole source of drinking water for more than 3 million people in southeast Florida. The Biscayne aquifer consists of highly permeable interbedded limestone and sandstone of Pleistocene and Pliocene age underlying most of Dade and Broward Counties and parts of Palm Beach and Monroe Counties. The high permeability is largely caused by extensive carbonate dissolution. Water sampled from 189 wells tapping the Biscayne aquifer was predominantly a calcium bicarbonate type with some mixed types occurring in coastal areas and near major canals. Major - ion is areally uniform throughout the aquifer. According to nonparametric statistical tests of major ions and dissolved solids, the concentrations of calcium, sodium, bicarbonate, and dissolved solids increased significantly with well depth ( 0.05 significance level ), probably a result of less circulation at depth. Potassium and nitrate concentrations decreased significantly with depth. Although the source of recharge to the aquifer varies seasonally, there was no statistical difference in the concentration of major ions in pared water samples from 27 shallow wells collected during wet and dry seasons. Median concentrations for barium, chromium, copper, lead, and manganese were below maximum or secondary maximum contaminant levels set by the US Environmental Protection Agency. The median iron concentration only slightly exceeded the secondary maximum contaminant level. The concentration of barium was significantly related (0.05 significance level) to calcium and bicarbonate concentration. No distinct areal pattern or vertical distribution of the selected trace metals was evident in water from

  5. Major Ion Content of Aerosols from Denali Base Camp during Summer 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wake, C. P.; Burakowski, E. A.; Osterberg, E. C.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol samples were collected on Teflon filters at a site up-glacier from Denali Base Camp (2380 m) in Denali National Park, Alaska during May and June of 2013 using an autonomous aerosol sampler powered by solar panels and batteries. The samples were analyzed for major ions via ion chromatography. Surface and fresh snow samples were also collected over the same time period and analyzed for major ions. Ion concentrations in the aerosol samples are completely dominated by NH4+ (mean concentration of 6.6 nmol/m3) and SO4= (mean concentration of 4.0 nmol/m3). Overall, the ion burden in aerosol samples from Denali Base Camp was much lower compared to aerosol samples collected from the Denali National Park and Trapper Creek IMPROVE sites over the same time period. In contrast to the aerosol chemistry, the snow chemistry is more balanced, with NH4+, Ca2+, and Na+ dominating the cation concentrations and NO3-, Cl-, and SO4= dominating the anion concentrations. The higher levels of Ca2+, Na+, and Cl- in the snow (relative to NH4+ and SO4=) compared to relative concentrations in the aerosol samples suggest that dry deposition of sea salt and dust are important contributors to the major ion signals preserved in the snow. This has important ramifications for improving our understanding of the reconstruction of North Pacific climate variability and change from glaciochemical records currently being developed from the 208 m ice cores recovered from the Mt. Hunter plateau (3900 m) during the summer of 2013.

  6. Origin of major ions in monthly rainfall events at the Bamenda Highlands, Northwest Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Wirmvem, Mengnjo J; Ohba, Takeshi; Fantong, Wilson Y; Ayonghe, Samuel N; Hogarh, Jonathan N; Suila, Justice Y; Asaah, Asobo Nkengmatia E; Ooki, Seigo; Tanyileke, Gregory; Hell, Joseph V

    2014-04-01

    Rainwater characteristics can reveal emissions from various anthropogenic and natural sources into the atmosphere. The physico-chemical characteristics of 44 monthly rainfall events (collected between January and December 2012) from 4 weather stations (Bamenda, Ndop plain, Ndawara and Kumbo) in the Bamenda Highlands (BH) were investigated. The purpose was to determine the sources of chemical species, their seasonal inputs and suitability of the rainwater for drinking. The mean pH of 5 indicated the slightly acidic nature of the rainwater. Average total dissolved solids (TDS) were low (6.7 mg/L), characteristic of unpolluted atmospheric moisture/air. Major ion concentrations (mg/L) were low and in the order K(+) > Ca(2+) > Mg(2+) > Na(+) for cations and NO3(-)≫HCO3(-)>SO4(2-)>Cl(-)>PO4(3-)>F(-) for anions. The average rainwater in the area was mixed Ca-Mg-SO4-Cl water type. The Cl(-)/Na(+) ratio (1.04) was comparable to that of seawater (1.16), an indication that Na(+) and Cl(-) originated mainly from marine (Atlantic Ocean) aerosols. High enrichments of Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and SO(2-)4 to Na(+) ratios relative to seawater ratios (constituting 44% of the total ions) demonstrated their terrigenous origin, mainly from Saharan and Sahelian arid dusts. The K(+)/Na(+) ratio (2.24), which was similar to tropical vegetation ash (2.38), and NO3(-) was essentially from biomass burning. Light (< 100 mm) pre-monsoon and post-monsoon convective rains were enriched in major ions than the heavy (> 100 mm) monsoon rains, indicating a high contribution of major ions during the low convective showers. Despite the acidic nature, the TDS and major ion concentrations classified the rainwater as potable based on the WHO guidelines.

  7. Assessment of DNA damage of Lewis lung carcinoma cells irradiated by carbon ions and X-rays using alkaline comet assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ping; Zhou, Li-Bin; Jin, Xiao-Dong; He, Jing; Dai, Zhong-Ying; Zhou, Guang-Ming; Gao, Qing-Xiang; Li, Sha; Li, Qiang

    2008-01-01

    DNA damage and cell reproductive death determined by alkaline comet and clonogenic survival assays were examined in Lewis lung carcinoma cells after exposure to 89.63 MeV/u carbon ion and 6 MV X-ray irradiations, respectively. Based on the survival data, Lewis lung carcinoma cells were verified to be more radiosensitive to the carbon ion beam than to the X-ray irradiation. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) value, which was up to 1.77 at 10% survival level, showed that the DNA damage induced by the high-LET carbon ion beam was more remarkable than that induced by the low-LET X-ray irradiation. The dose response curves of “Tail DNA (%)” (TD) and “Olive tail moment” (OTM) for the carbon ion irradiation showed saturation beyond about 8 Gy. This behavior was not found in the X-ray curves. Additionally, the carbon ion beam produced a lower survival fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) value and a higher initial Olive tail moment 2 Gy (OTM2) than those for the X-ray irradiation. These results suggest that carbon ion beams having high-LET values produced more severe cell reproductive death and DNA damage in Lewis lung carcinoma cells in comparison with X-rays and comet assay might be an effective predictive test even combining with clonogenic assay to assess cellular radiosensitivity.

  8. DATA QUALIFICATION REPORT: MAJOR ION AND PH DATA FOR USE ON THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    C. WILSON; D.M. JENKINS; T. STEINBORN; R. WEMHEUER

    2000-08-23

    This data qualification report uses technical assessment and corroborating data methods according to Attachment 2 of AP-SIII.2Q, Rev. 0, ICN 2, ''Qualification of Unqualified Data and the Documentation of Rationale for Accepted Data'', to qualify major ion and pH data. This report was prepared in accordance with Data Qualification Plan TDP-NBS-GS-00003 1, Revision 2. Additional reports will be prepared to address isotopic and precipitation-related data. Most of the data considered in this report were acquired and developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The data qualification team considers the sampling and analytical protocols employed by the USGS over the time period of data acquisition to be state-of-the-art. The sample collection methodologies have evolved with no significant change that could affect the quality of the data considered in this report into the currently used Hydrologic Procedures that support the Yucca Mountain Project-approved USGS Quality Assurance Program Plan. Consequently, for USGS data, the data collection methods, documentation, and results are reasonable and appropriate in view of standard practice at the time the data were collected. A small number of data sets were collected by organizations other than the USGS and were reviewed along with the other major ion and pH data using corroborating data methods. Hydrochemical studies reviewed in this qualification report indicate that the extent and quality of corroborating data are sufficient to support qualification of both USGS and non-USGS major ion and pH data for generalized hydrochemical studies. The corroborating data included other major ion and pH data, isotope data, and independent hydrological data. Additionally, the analytical adequacy of the major ion data was supported by a study of anion-cation charge balances. Charge balance errors for USGS and non-USGS data were under 10% and acceptable for all data. This qualification report addresses the specific major ion data sets

  9. Major ion chemistry of the Ganga-Brahmaputra river system: Weathering processes and fluxes to the Bay of Bengal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarin, M. M.; Krishnaswami, S.; Dilli, K.; Somayajulu, B. L. K.; Moore, W. S.

    1989-05-01

    The Ganga-Brahmaputra, one of the world's largest river systems, is first in terms of sediment transport and fourth in terms of water discharge. A detailed and systematic study of the major ion chemistry of these rivers and their tributaries, as well as the clay mineral composition of the bed sediments has been conducted. The chemistry of the highland rivers (upper reaches of the Ganga, the Yamuna, the Brahmaputra, the Gandak and the Ghaghra) are all dominated by carbonate weathering; (Ca + Mg) and HCO 3 account for about 80% of the cations and anions. In the lowland rivers (the Chambal, the Betwa and the Ken), HCO 3 excess over (Ca + Mg) and a relatively high contribution of (Na + K) to the total cations indicate that silicate weathering and/or contributions from alkaline/saline soils and groundwaters could be important sources of major ions to these waters. The chemistry of the Ganga and the Yamuna in the lower reaches is by and large dictated by the chemistry of their tributaries and their mixing proportions. Illite is the dominant clay mineral (about 80%) in the bedload sediments of the highland rivers. Kaolinite and chlorite together constitute the remaining 20% of the clays. In the Chambal, Betwa and Ken, smectite accounts for about 80% of the clays. This difference in the clay mineral composition of the bed sediments is a reflection of the differences in the geology of their drainage basins. The highland rivers weather acidic rocks, whereas the others flow initially through basic effusives. The Ganga-Brahmaputra river system transports about 130 million tons of dissolved salts to the Bay of Bengal, which is nearly 3% of the global river flux to the oceans. The chemical denudation rates for the Ganga and the Brahmaputra basins are about 72 and 105 tons· km -· yr -1, respectively, which are factors of 2 to 3 higher than the global average. The high denudation rate, particularly in the Brahmaputra, is attributable to high relief and heavy rainfall.

  10. Chemical weathering in the plain and peninsular sub-basins of the Ganga: Impact on major ion chemistry and elemental fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Santosh K.; Singh, Sunil K.; Krishnaswami, S.

    2010-04-01

    Concentrations of major ions, Sr and 87Sr/ 86Sr have been measured in the Gomti, the Son and the Yamuna, tributaries of the Ganga draining its peninsular and plain sub-basins to determine their contribution to the water chemistry of the Ganga and silicate and carbonate erosion of the Ganga basin. The results show high concentrations of Na and Sr in the Gomti, the Yamuna and the Ganga (at Varanasi) with much of the Na in excess of Cl. The use of this 'excess Na' (Na∗ = Na riv - Cl riv) a common index of silicate weathering yield values of ˜18 tons km -2 yr -1 for silicate erosion rate (SER) in the Gomti and the Yamuna basins. There are however, indications that part of this Na∗ can be from saline/alkaline soils abundant in their basins, raising questions about its use as a proxy to determine SER of the Ganga plain. Independent estimation of SER based on dissolved Si as a proxy give an average value of ˜5 tons km -2 yr -1 for the peninsular and the plain drainages, several times lower than that derived using Na∗. The major source of uncertainty in this estimate is the potential removal of Si from rivers by biological and chemical processes. The Si based SER and CER (carbonate erosion rate) are also much lower than that in the Himalayan sub-basin of the Ganga. The lower relief, runoff and physical erosion in the peninsular and the plain basins relative to the Himalayan sub-basin and calcite precipitation in them all could be contributing to their lower erosion rates. Budget calculations show that the Yamuna, the Son and Gomti together account for ˜75% Na, 41% Mg and ˜53% Sr and 87Sr of their supply to the Ganga from its major tributaries, with the Yamuna dominating the contribution. The results highlight the important role of the plain and peninsular sub-basins in determining the solute and Sr isotope budgets of the Ganga. The study also shows that the anthropogenic contribution accounts for ⩽10% of the major ion fluxes of the Ganga at Rajmahal during high

  11. Sources and cycling of major ions and nutrients in Devils Lake, North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lent, R.M.

    1994-01-01

    Devils Lake is a saline lake in a large, closed drainage basin in northeastern North Dakota. Previous studies determined that major-ion and nutrient concentrations in Devils Lake are strongly affected by microbially mediated sulfate reduction and dissolution of sulfate and carbonate minerals in the bottom sediments. These studies documented substantial spatial variability in the magnitude of calculated benthic fluxes coincident with the horizontal salinity gradient in Devils Lake. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate seasonal variability in benthic-flux rates, and to understand the effect of these fluxes on the major- chemistries in Devils Lake between May and October 1991. During the study period, the water column was well mixed, and specific conductance, pH, and temperature did not vary with depth. Dissolved oxygen was enriched near the lake surface due to photosynthesis. Major-ion concentrations and nutrient concentrations did not vary with depth. Because the water-quality data were obtained during open-water periods, the vertical profiles reflect well-mixed conditions. However, the first and last profiles for the study period did document near-bottom maxima of major cations. Secchi-disk depth varied from 0.82 meter on May 7, 1991, to 2.13 meters on June 5, 1991. The mean Secchi-disk depth during the study period was 1.24 meters. Seasonal variations in Secchi-disk depths were attributed to variations in primary productivity and phytoplankton communities. Nutrient cycles in Devils Lake were evaluated using gross primary productivity rate data, sediment trap data, and major-ion and nutrient benthic-flux rate data. Gross primary productivity rate was smallest in May (0.076 gram of carbon per square meter per day) and largest in September (1.8 grams of carbon per square meter per day). Average gross primary productivity for the study period was 0.87 gram of carbon per square meter per day. Average gross primary productivity is consistent with historic

  12. [Major ion chemistry of surface water in the Xilin River Basin and the possible controls].

    PubMed

    Tang, Xi-Wen; Wu, Jin-Kui

    2014-01-01

    Under the increasing pressure of water shortage and steppe degradation, information on the hydrological cycle in the steppe region in Inner Mongolia is urgently needed. Major ions are widely used to identify the hydrological processes in a river basin. Based on the analysis results of 239 river water samples collected in 13 sections along the Xilin River system during 2006 to 2008, combined with data from groundwater and precipitation samples collected in the same period and the meteorological and hydrological data in the Xilin River Basin, hydrochemical characteristics and the chemistry of major ions of the Xilin River water have been studied by means of Piper triangle plots and Gibbs diagrams. The results showed that: (1) the total dissolved solid (TDS) in river water mainly ranged between 136.7 mg x L(-1) and 376.5 mg x L(-1), and (2) it had an increasing trend along the river flow path. (3) The major cations and anions of river water were Ca2+ and HCO3-, respectively, and the chemical type of the river water varied from HCO3- -Ca2+ in the headwater area to HCO(3-)-Ca2+ Mg2+ in the lower part. (4) The variation in the concentration of major irons in surface water was not significant at the temporal scale. Usually, the concentration values of major irons were much higher in May than those in other months during the runoff season, while the values were a bit lower in 2007 than those in 2006 and 2008. Except for SO4(2-), the concentrations of other ions such as Ca2+, Na+, Mg2+, K+, Cl- and HCO3- showed a upward trend along the river flow path. Comparing major ion concentrations of the river water with those of local groundwater and precipitation, the concentration in river water was between those of precipitation and groundwater but was much closer to the concentration of groundwater. This indicated that the surface water was recharged by a mixture of precipitation and groundwater, and groundwater showed a larger impact. The Gibbs plot revealed that the chemical

  13. [Major ion chemistry of surface water in the Xilin River Basin and the possible controls].

    PubMed

    Tang, Xi-Wen; Wu, Jin-Kui

    2014-01-01

    Under the increasing pressure of water shortage and steppe degradation, information on the hydrological cycle in the steppe region in Inner Mongolia is urgently needed. Major ions are widely used to identify the hydrological processes in a river basin. Based on the analysis results of 239 river water samples collected in 13 sections along the Xilin River system during 2006 to 2008, combined with data from groundwater and precipitation samples collected in the same period and the meteorological and hydrological data in the Xilin River Basin, hydrochemical characteristics and the chemistry of major ions of the Xilin River water have been studied by means of Piper triangle plots and Gibbs diagrams. The results showed that: (1) the total dissolved solid (TDS) in river water mainly ranged between 136.7 mg x L(-1) and 376.5 mg x L(-1), and (2) it had an increasing trend along the river flow path. (3) The major cations and anions of river water were Ca2+ and HCO3-, respectively, and the chemical type of the river water varied from HCO3- -Ca2+ in the headwater area to HCO(3-)-Ca2+ Mg2+ in the lower part. (4) The variation in the concentration of major irons in surface water was not significant at the temporal scale. Usually, the concentration values of major irons were much higher in May than those in other months during the runoff season, while the values were a bit lower in 2007 than those in 2006 and 2008. Except for SO4(2-), the concentrations of other ions such as Ca2+, Na+, Mg2+, K+, Cl- and HCO3- showed a upward trend along the river flow path. Comparing major ion concentrations of the river water with those of local groundwater and precipitation, the concentration in river water was between those of precipitation and groundwater but was much closer to the concentration of groundwater. This indicated that the surface water was recharged by a mixture of precipitation and groundwater, and groundwater showed a larger impact. The Gibbs plot revealed that the chemical

  14. Mineral dust and major ion concentrations in snowpit samples from the NEEM site, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jung-Ho; Hwang, Heejin; Hong, Sang Bum; Hur, Soon Do; Choi, Sung-Deuk; Lee, Jeonghoon; Hong, Sungmin

    2015-11-01

    Polar ice sheets conserve atmospheric aerosols at the time of snowfall, which can be used to reconstruct past climate and environmental conditions. We investigated mineral dust and major ion records in snowpit samples obtained from the northwestern Greenland ice sheet near the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling (NEEM) camp in June 2009. We analyzed the samples for mineral dust concentrations as well as stable water isotopes (δ18O, δD, and deuterium excess) and major ions (Cl-, SO42-, methanesulfonic acid (MSA), Na+, and Ca2+). Seasonal δ18O and δD cycles indicate that the snowpit samples covered a six-year period from spring 2003 to early summer 2009. Concentrations of mineral dust, nss-Ca2+, and nss-SO42- showed seasonal deposition events with maxima in the winter-spring layers. On the other hand, the Cl-/Na+ ratio and the concentrations of MSA exhibited maxima in the summer layers, making them useful indicators for the summer season. Moreover, an anomalous atmospheric mineral dust event was recorded at a depth of 165-170 cm corresponding to late winter 2005 to spring 2006. A back trajectory analysis suggests that a major contributor to the Greenland aerosol was an air mass passing over the Canadian Arctic and North America. Several trajectories point to Asian regions as a dust source. The mineral dust deposited at NEEM was strongly influenced by long-range atmospheric transport and dust input from arid source areas in northern China and Mongolia.

  15. The use of laboratory-determined ion exchange parameters in the predictive modelling of field-scale major cation migration in groundwater over a 40-year period.

    PubMed

    Carlyle, Harriet F; Tellam, John H; Parker, Karen E

    2004-01-01

    An attempt has been made to estimate quantitatively cation concentration changes as estuary water invades a Triassic Sandstone aquifer in northwest England. Cation exchange capacities and selectivity coefficients for Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), and Mg(2+) were measured in the laboratory using standard techniques. Selectivity coefficients were also determined using a method involving optimized back-calculation from flushing experiments, thus permitting better representation of field conditions; in all cases, the Gaines-Thomas/constant cation exchange capacity (CEC) model was found to be a reasonable, though not perfect, first description. The exchange parameters interpreted from the laboratory experiments were used in a one-dimensional reactive transport mixing cell model, and predictions compared with field pumping well data (Cl and hardness spanning a period of around 40 years, and full major ion analyses in approximately 1980). The concentration patterns predicted using Gaines-Thomas exchange with calcite equilibrium were similar to the observed patterns, but the concentrations of the divalent ions were significantly overestimated, as were 1980 sulphate concentrations, and 1980 alkalinity concentrations were underestimated. Including representation of sulphate reduction in the estuarine alluvium failed to replicate 1980 HCO(3) and pH values. However, by including partial CO(2) degassing following sulphate reduction, a process for which there is 34S and 18O evidence from a previous study, a good match for SO(4), HCO(3), and pH was attained. Using this modified estuary water and averaged values from the laboratory ion exchange parameter determinations, good predictions for the field cation data were obtained. It is concluded that the Gaines-Thomas/constant exchange capacity model with averaged parameter values can be used successfully in ion exchange predictions in this aquifer at a regional scale and over extended time scales, despite the numerous assumptions inherent in

  16. The use of laboratory-determined ion exchange parameters in the predictive modelling of field-scale major cation migration in groundwater over a 40-year period.

    PubMed

    Carlyle, Harriet F; Tellam, John H; Parker, Karen E

    2004-01-01

    An attempt has been made to estimate quantitatively cation concentration changes as estuary water invades a Triassic Sandstone aquifer in northwest England. Cation exchange capacities and selectivity coefficients for Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), and Mg(2+) were measured in the laboratory using standard techniques. Selectivity coefficients were also determined using a method involving optimized back-calculation from flushing experiments, thus permitting better representation of field conditions; in all cases, the Gaines-Thomas/constant cation exchange capacity (CEC) model was found to be a reasonable, though not perfect, first description. The exchange parameters interpreted from the laboratory experiments were used in a one-dimensional reactive transport mixing cell model, and predictions compared with field pumping well data (Cl and hardness spanning a period of around 40 years, and full major ion analyses in approximately 1980). The concentration patterns predicted using Gaines-Thomas exchange with calcite equilibrium were similar to the observed patterns, but the concentrations of the divalent ions were significantly overestimated, as were 1980 sulphate concentrations, and 1980 alkalinity concentrations were underestimated. Including representation of sulphate reduction in the estuarine alluvium failed to replicate 1980 HCO(3) and pH values. However, by including partial CO(2) degassing following sulphate reduction, a process for which there is 34S and 18O evidence from a previous study, a good match for SO(4), HCO(3), and pH was attained. Using this modified estuary water and averaged values from the laboratory ion exchange parameter determinations, good predictions for the field cation data were obtained. It is concluded that the Gaines-Thomas/constant exchange capacity model with averaged parameter values can be used successfully in ion exchange predictions in this aquifer at a regional scale and over extended time scales, despite the numerous assumptions inherent in

  17. Mobilization of major inorganic ions during experimental diagenesis of characterized peats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bailey, A.M.; Cohen, A.D.; Orem, W.H.; Blackson, J.H.

    2000-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were undertaken to study changes in concentrations of major inorganic ions during simulated burial of peats to about 1.5 km. Cladium, Rhizophora, and Cyrilla peats were first analyzed to determine cation distributions among fractions of the initial materials and minerals in residues from wet oxidation. Subsamples of the peats (80 g) were then subjected to increasing temperatures and pressures in steps of 5??C and 300 psi at 2-day intervals and produced solutions collected. After six steps, starting from 30??C and 300 psi, a final temperature of 60??C and a final pressure of 2100 psi were achieved. The system was then allowed to stand for an additional 2 weeks at 60??C and 2100 psi. Treatments resulted in highly altered organic solids resembling lignite and expelled solutions of systematically varying compositions. Solutions from each step were analyzed for Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, total dissolved Si (Si(T)), Cl-, SO42-, and organic acids and anions (OAAs). Some data on total dissolved Al (Al(T)) were also collected. Mobilization of major ions from peats during these experiments is controlled by at least three processes: (1) loss of dissolved ions in original porewater expelled during compaction, (2) loss of adsorbed cations as adsorption sites are lost during modification of organic solids, and (3) increased dissolution of inorganic phases at later steps due to increased temperatures (Si(T)) and increased complexing by OAAs (Al(T)). In general, results provide insight into early post-burial inorganic changes occurring during maturation of terrestrial organic matter. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of nutrients and major ions in streams-implications of different timescale procedures.

    PubMed

    Chaussê, Thais Carvalho Cerqueira; Dos Santos Brandão, Camila; da Silva, Lenilda Pita; Salamim Fonseca Spanghero, Pedro Enrico; da Silva, Daniela Mariano Lopes

    2016-01-01

    Small watersheds are characterized by a high degree of sensitivity to changes observed in their environment, making them important sampling and management units. Due to this high sensitivity, several studies have shown that intensive collecting may be more effective in these systems compared to other timescale procedures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the concentration of organic and inorganic nutrients and major ions dissolved in two small watersheds with different land uses to determine whether there are differences between these watersheds with different levels of impact and to identify the most appropriate timescale procedure for the variables under analysis. Therefore, monthly, daily, and hourly samples were taken in the two streams in the northeast of Brazil. One of the streams is located in an undisturbed area (environmental protected area) (S1) and one in a disturbed area (S2). The results showed significant differences for conductivity, temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen (%), sodium (Na(+)), and chloride (Cl(-)) ions and higher values presented in the anthropogenic stream. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) in S2 mainly comprised ammonium (NH4 (+)), while nitrate (NO3 (-)) predominated in S1. The considerable increase in the concentration of NO3 (-) and dilution of Na(+) and Cl(-) after rain in April in S1 shows how precipitation may change the chemical composition of the water in a 1-day period. No changes were observed in the concentrations of major ions and nutrients that could be related to the cyclical variation of the hours during the day in both small watersheds. Daily collections allow better monitoring of the dynamics of streams and greater robustness of the data. PMID:26681182

  19. Evaluation of nutrients and major ions in streams-implications of different timescale procedures.

    PubMed

    Chaussê, Thais Carvalho Cerqueira; Dos Santos Brandão, Camila; da Silva, Lenilda Pita; Salamim Fonseca Spanghero, Pedro Enrico; da Silva, Daniela Mariano Lopes

    2016-01-01

    Small watersheds are characterized by a high degree of sensitivity to changes observed in their environment, making them important sampling and management units. Due to this high sensitivity, several studies have shown that intensive collecting may be more effective in these systems compared to other timescale procedures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the concentration of organic and inorganic nutrients and major ions dissolved in two small watersheds with different land uses to determine whether there are differences between these watersheds with different levels of impact and to identify the most appropriate timescale procedure for the variables under analysis. Therefore, monthly, daily, and hourly samples were taken in the two streams in the northeast of Brazil. One of the streams is located in an undisturbed area (environmental protected area) (S1) and one in a disturbed area (S2). The results showed significant differences for conductivity, temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen (%), sodium (Na(+)), and chloride (Cl(-)) ions and higher values presented in the anthropogenic stream. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) in S2 mainly comprised ammonium (NH4 (+)), while nitrate (NO3 (-)) predominated in S1. The considerable increase in the concentration of NO3 (-) and dilution of Na(+) and Cl(-) after rain in April in S1 shows how precipitation may change the chemical composition of the water in a 1-day period. No changes were observed in the concentrations of major ions and nutrients that could be related to the cyclical variation of the hours during the day in both small watersheds. Daily collections allow better monitoring of the dynamics of streams and greater robustness of the data.

  20. Reverse ion exchange as a major process controlling the groundwater chemistry in an arid environment: a case study from northwestern Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Faisal K; Nazzal, Yousef; Jafri, Muhammad Kamran; Naeem, Muhammad; Ahmed, Izrar

    2015-10-01

    Assessment of groundwater quality is of utmost significance in arid regions like Saudi Arabia where the lack of present-day recharge and high evaporation rates coupled with increasing groundwater withdrawal may restrict its usage for domestic or agricultural purposes. In the present study, groundwater samples collected from agricultural farms in Hail (15 samples), Al Jawf (15 samples), and Tabuk (30 samples) regions were analyzed for their major ion concentration. The objective of the study was to determine the groundwater facies, the main hydrochemical process governing the groundwater chemistry, the saturation index with respect to the principal mineral phases, and the suitability of the groundwater for irrigational use. The groundwater samples fall within the Ca-Cl type, mixed Ca-Mg-Cl type, and Na-Cl type. Evaporation and reverse ion exchange appear to be the major processes controlling the groundwater chemistry though reverse ion exchange process is the more dominating factor. The various ionic relationships confirmed the reverse ion exchange process where the Ca and Mg in the aquifer matrix have been replaced by Na at favorable exchange sites. This phenomenon has accounted for the dominance of Ca and Mg ions over Na ion at all the sites. The process of reverse ion exchange was further substantiated by the use of modified Piper diagram (Chadha's classification) and the chloro-alkaline indices. Evaporation as a result of extreme aridity has resulted in the groundwater being oversaturated with aragonite/calcite and dolomite as revealed by the saturation indices. The groundwater samples were classified as safe (less than 10) in terms of sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) values, good (less than 1.25) in terms of residual sodium carbonate (RSC) values, and safe to moderate (between 0 and 3) in terms of Mg hazard for irrigation purposes. Though the high salinity groundwater in the three regions coupled with low SAR values are good for the soil structure, it can have a

  1. Reverse ion exchange as a major process controlling the groundwater chemistry in an arid environment: a case study from northwestern Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Faisal K; Nazzal, Yousef; Jafri, Muhammad Kamran; Naeem, Muhammad; Ahmed, Izrar

    2015-10-01

    Assessment of groundwater quality is of utmost significance in arid regions like Saudi Arabia where the lack of present-day recharge and high evaporation rates coupled with increasing groundwater withdrawal may restrict its usage for domestic or agricultural purposes. In the present study, groundwater samples collected from agricultural farms in Hail (15 samples), Al Jawf (15 samples), and Tabuk (30 samples) regions were analyzed for their major ion concentration. The objective of the study was to determine the groundwater facies, the main hydrochemical process governing the groundwater chemistry, the saturation index with respect to the principal mineral phases, and the suitability of the groundwater for irrigational use. The groundwater samples fall within the Ca-Cl type, mixed Ca-Mg-Cl type, and Na-Cl type. Evaporation and reverse ion exchange appear to be the major processes controlling the groundwater chemistry though reverse ion exchange process is the more dominating factor. The various ionic relationships confirmed the reverse ion exchange process where the Ca and Mg in the aquifer matrix have been replaced by Na at favorable exchange sites. This phenomenon has accounted for the dominance of Ca and Mg ions over Na ion at all the sites. The process of reverse ion exchange was further substantiated by the use of modified Piper diagram (Chadha's classification) and the chloro-alkaline indices. Evaporation as a result of extreme aridity has resulted in the groundwater being oversaturated with aragonite/calcite and dolomite as revealed by the saturation indices. The groundwater samples were classified as safe (less than 10) in terms of sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) values, good (less than 1.25) in terms of residual sodium carbonate (RSC) values, and safe to moderate (between 0 and 3) in terms of Mg hazard for irrigation purposes. Though the high salinity groundwater in the three regions coupled with low SAR values are good for the soil structure, it can have a

  2. Removal of titanium dioxide nanoparticles by coagulation: effects of coagulants, typical ions, alkalinity and natural organic matters.

    PubMed

    Wang, H T; Ye, Y Y; Qi, J; Li, F T; Tang, Y L

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the possibility of removing titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) from water by coagulation, as well as to find the optimal coagulant and experimental conditions for TiO2 NP removal, four types of coagulant were adopted: polyferric sulfate (PFS), ferric chloride (FeCl3), polyaluminum chloride (PACl), and alum (Al2(SO4)3). It was found that the removal of TiO2 NPs by coagulation was affected by ionic strength, alkalinity, as well as types and dosages of coagulants. PFS and FeCl3 achieved much higher removal efficiency of TiO2 NPs than PACl and Al2(SO4)3 did. For 30 mg/L TiO2 NPs, a dosage of 0.3 mM PFS (as Fe) achieved 84% removal after coagulation followed by 30 min settlement. Optimal ionic strength (0.1 M NaCl or 0.03 M CaCl2) is of vital importance for the performance of PFS. Na2SO4 is unfavorable for the performance of PFS. Optimal alkalinity (0.01-0.03 M NaHCO3) is necessary for FeCl3 to remove TiO2 NPs. Natural organic matter, as represented by humic acid (HA) up to 11 mg/L, reduces the removal of TiO2 NPs by coagulation. These findings indicate that coagulation is a good option for the removal of TiO2 NPs from water, and more attention should be paid to the effects of water quality when using coagulation to remove TiO2 NPs from aqueous matrices. This provides a possible solution to alleviate the potential hazard caused by TiO2 NPs.

  3. Aquifer wise seasonal variations and spatial distribution of major ions with focus on fluoride contamination-Pandharkawada block, Yavatmal district, Maharashtra, India.

    PubMed

    Pandith, Madhnure; Malpe, D B; Rao, A D; Rao, P N

    2016-02-01

    Seasonal variations in groundwater reveal lesser concentrations of major ions except NO3(-) during post-monsoon seasons in shallow aquifers as compared to deeper aquifers. The F(-) concentration from deeper aquifers is high in both seasons and shows a moderate positive relationship with weathering depth and is >5 mg/L in compound lava flow. Groundwater is mainly a Ca-HCO3 type in shallow aquifers and mixed type in deeper aquifers. Fluoride shows a positive correlation with pH, Na(+), HCO3(-) in shallow aquifers and an inverse correlation with Ca(2+) and HCO3(-) from deeper aquifers in both seasons. Approximately 45% of the samples are not suitable for drinking from both aquifers but suitable for irrigation purposes. Rock-water interaction, moderate alkalinity, sluggish movement, and higher residence time are the main causes for high F(-) in deeper aquifers as compared to shallow aquifers. As recommendations, drinking water requirement may be met from shallow aquifers/surface water and fluoride rich groundwater for other purposes. Most effective defluoridation techniques like ion exchange and reverse osmosis may be adopted along with integrated fluorosis mitigation measures and rooftop rainwater harvesting. Supplementary calcium and phosphorous rich food should be provided to children and creating awareness about safe drinking water habits, side effects of high F(-), and NO3(-) rich groundwater, improving oral hygiene conditions are other measures. PMID:26728981

  4. Aquifer wise seasonal variations and spatial distribution of major ions with focus on fluoride contamination-Pandharkawada block, Yavatmal district, Maharashtra, India.

    PubMed

    Pandith, Madhnure; Malpe, D B; Rao, A D; Rao, P N

    2016-02-01

    Seasonal variations in groundwater reveal lesser concentrations of major ions except NO3(-) during post-monsoon seasons in shallow aquifers as compared to deeper aquifers. The F(-) concentration from deeper aquifers is high in both seasons and shows a moderate positive relationship with weathering depth and is >5 mg/L in compound lava flow. Groundwater is mainly a Ca-HCO3 type in shallow aquifers and mixed type in deeper aquifers. Fluoride shows a positive correlation with pH, Na(+), HCO3(-) in shallow aquifers and an inverse correlation with Ca(2+) and HCO3(-) from deeper aquifers in both seasons. Approximately 45% of the samples are not suitable for drinking from both aquifers but suitable for irrigation purposes. Rock-water interaction, moderate alkalinity, sluggish movement, and higher residence time are the main causes for high F(-) in deeper aquifers as compared to shallow aquifers. As recommendations, drinking water requirement may be met from shallow aquifers/surface water and fluoride rich groundwater for other purposes. Most effective defluoridation techniques like ion exchange and reverse osmosis may be adopted along with integrated fluorosis mitigation measures and rooftop rainwater harvesting. Supplementary calcium and phosphorous rich food should be provided to children and creating awareness about safe drinking water habits, side effects of high F(-), and NO3(-) rich groundwater, improving oral hygiene conditions are other measures.

  5. Solar Ion Processing of Major Element Surface Compositions of Mature Mare Soils: Insights from Combined XPS and Analytical TEM Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christoffersen, R.; Dukes, C.; Keller, L. P.; Baragiola, R.

    2012-01-01

    Solar wind ions are capable of altering the sur-face chemistry of the lunar regolith by a number of mechanisms including preferential sputtering, radiation-enhanced diffusion and sputter erosion of space weathered surfaces containing pre-existing compositional profiles. We have previously reported in-situ ion irradiation experiments supported by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and analytical TEM that show how solar ions potentially drive Fe and Ti reduction at the monolayer scale as well as the 10-100 nm depth scale in lunar soils [1]. Here we report experimental data on the effect of ion irradiation on the major element surface composition in a mature mare soil.

  6. Major ion chemistry and weathering processes in the Midyan Basin, northwestern Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Ghrefat, Habes A; Batayneh, Awni; Zaman, Haider; Zumlot, Taisser; Elawadi, Eslam; Nazzal, Yousef

    2013-10-01

    Chemical characteristics of 72 groundwater samples collected from Midyan Basin have been studied to evaluate major ion chemistry together with the geochemical and weathering processes controlling the water composition. Water chemistry of the study area is mainly dominated by Na, Ca, SO4, and Cl. The molar ratios of (Ca + Mg)/total cations, (Na + K)/total cations, (Ca + Mg)/(Na + K), (Ca + Mg)/(HCO3 + SO4), (Ca + Mg)/HCO3, and Na/Cl reveal that water chemistry of the Midyan Basin is controlled by evaporite dissolution (gypsum and/or anhydrite, and halite), silicate weathering, and minor contribution of carbonate weathering. The studied groundwater samples are largely undersaturated with respect to dolomite, gypsum, and anhydrite. These waters are capable of dissolving more of these minerals under suitable physicochemical conditions.

  7. Major ions, nutrients, and trace elements in the Mississippi River near Thebes, Illinois, July through September 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Howard E.; Antweiler, Ronald C.; Brinton, Terry I.; Roth, David A.; Moody, John A.

    1994-01-01

    Extensive flooding in the upper Mississippi River Basin during summer 1993 had a significant effect on the water quality of the Mississippi River. To evaluate the change in temporal distribution and transport of dissolved constituents in the Mississippi River, six water samples were collected by a discharge-weighted method from July through September 1993 near Thebes, Illinois. Sampling at this location provided water-quality information from the upper Mississippi, the Missouri, and the Illinois River Basins. Dissolved major constituents that were analyzed in each of the samples included bicarbonate, calcium (Ca), carbonate (CO3), chloride (C1), dissolved organic carbon, magnesium (Mg), potassium (K), silica (SiO2) , sodium (Na), and sulfate (SO4). Dissolved nutrients included ammonium ion (NH4), nitrate (NO3), nitrite (NO2), and orthophosphate (PO4). Dissolved trace elements included aluminum (A1), arsenic (As), barium (Ba), boron (B), beryllium (Be), bromide (Br), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), cobalt, (Co), copper (Cu), fluoride (F), iron (Fe), lead, lithium (Li), manganese (Mn), mercury (Hg), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), strontium (Sr), thallium, uranium (U), vanadium (V), and zinc (Zn). Other physical properties of water that were measured included specific conductance, pH and suspended-sediment concentration (particle size, less than 63 micrometers). Results of this study indicated that large quantifies of dissolved constituents were transported through the river system. Generally, pH, alkalinity, and specific conductance and the concentrations of B, Br, Ca, C1, Cr, K, Li, Mg, Mo, Na, SO4, Sr, U, and V increased as water discharge decreased, while concentrations of F, Hg, and suspended sediment sharply decreased as water discharge decreased after the crest of the flood. Concentrations of other constituents, such as A1, As, Ba, Be, Co, Cu, Ni, NO3, NO2, NH4, PO 4, and SiO2, varied with time as discharge decreased after the crest of the flood. For most

  8. Geochemical processes in the Onyx River, Wright Valley, Antarctica: Major ions, nutrients, trace metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, William J.; Stage, Brian R.; Preston, Adam; Wagers, Shannon; Shacat, Joseph; Newell, Silvia

    2005-02-01

    We present data on major ions, nutrients and trace metals in an Antarctic stream. The Onyx River is located in Wright Valley (77-32 S; 161-34 E), one of a group of ancient river and glacier-carved landforms that comprise the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica. The river is more than 30 km long and is the largest of the glacial meltwater streams that characterize this relatively ice-free region near the Ross Sea. The complete absence of rainfall in the region and the usually small contributions of glacially derived tributaries to the main channel make this a comparatively simple system for geochemical investigation. Moreover, the lack of human impacts, past or present, provides an increasingly rare window onto a pristine aquatic system. For all major ions and silica, we observe increasing concentrations with distance from Lake Brownworth down to the recording weir near Lake Vanda. Chemical weathering rates are unexpectedly high and may be related to the rapid dissolution of ancient carbonate deposits and to the severe physical weathering associated with the harsh Antarctic winter. Of the nutrients, nitrate and dissolved reactive phosphate appear to have quite different sources. Nitrate is enriched in waters near the Lower Wright Glacier and may ultimately be derived from stratospheric sources; while phosphate is likely to be the product of chemical weathering of valley rocks and soils. We confirm the work of earlier investigations regarding the importance of the Boulder Pavement as a nutrient sink. Dissolved Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, and Cd are present at nanomolar levels and, in all cases, the concentrations of these metals are lower than in average world river water. We hypothesize that metal uptake and exchange with particulate phases along the course of the river may serve as a buffer for the dissolved load. Concurrent study of these three solute classes points out significant differences in the mechanisms and sites of their removal from the Onyx River.

  9. Forward and reverse ion-exchange kinetics for some alkali and alkaline earth metal ions on amorphous zirconium(IV) aluminophosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Varshney, K.G.; Pandith, A.H.

    1999-10-26

    The Nernst-Planck equations are applied to study the ion-exchange kinetics on the surface of zirconium(IV) aluminophosphate for Li{sup +}/H{sup +}, Na{sup +}/H{sup +}, K{sup +}/H{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+}/H{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+}/H{sup +}, and Sr{sup 2+}/H{sup +} exchanges in the forward and reverse directions under the conditions favoring particle diffusion. On the basis of these studies, various physical parameters such as the self-diffusion coefficient (D{sub 0}), the energy of activation (E{sub a}), and the entropy of activation ({Delta}S*) have been determined and a correlation has been made of these parameters with the ion-exchange characteristics of the material. The study gives an insight into the ion-exchange processes going on in the exchanger phase and its potential use in metal ion separations.

  10. Corrosion of Sn-Co alloy in alkaline media and the effect of Cl - and Br - ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refaey, S. A. M.

    1999-05-01

    Sn-Co electrodeposits alloy of approximate composition 80% Sn-20% Co (wt%) can be obtained from a gluconate bath as single phase CoSn 2, which is similar in appearance to decorative chromium. The potentiodynamic and cyclic voltammogram techniques were used to study the corrosion behaviour of CoSn 2 in sodium borate solutions (Na 2B 4O 7) at pH=9.6. The effect of different factors such as concentration of borate ions, pH, potential scan rate, successive cyclic voltammetry, and progressive addition of halide ions (Cl - and Br -) on the electrochemical behaviour of CoSn 2 alloys are discussed. The observed corrosion resistance of electrodeposited CoSn 2 alloy is due to the formation of a thin passive film, which is examined by X-ray spectroscopy and believed to be mainly tin and cobalt oxides. The voltammograms involve four anodic peaks, the first and second of which correspond to the formation of SnO and SnO 2 and the third and fourth related to the formation of cobalt oxides. SEM examination confirms that pitting corrosion takes place in presence of borax and is increased by adding halide ions.

  11. Development and validation of models predicting the toxicity of major seawater ions to the mysid shrimp, Americamysis bahia.

    PubMed

    Pillard, David A; DuFresne, Doree L; Mickley, Mike C

    2002-10-01

    The concentration and balance of major ions that comprise total dissolved solids (TDS) can influence the toxicity of effluents discharged to freshwater and marine environments. An additional complicating factor in waters released to saltwater systems is the effluent salinity since the toxicity of major ions changes with the salinity of the test solution. A study was conducted to evaluate the toxicity of six major seawater ions (bicarbonate, borate, calcium, magnesium, potassium, and sulfate) to the mysid shrimp, Americamysis bahia, at salinities of 10 and 20/1000. Logistic regression models were developed to predict organism survival at deficient and excess concentrations of the ions. Calcium and potassium caused significant mortality to mysid shrimp in both excess and deficient (relative to artificial seawater) solutions. Bicarbonate, borate, and magnesium displayed significant toxicity only in excess concentrations, while sulfate had no adverse impacts at any of the concentrations tested. As the salinity of the test solutions decreased, mysid shrimp tolerated increasingly lower calcium and potassium concentrations. Similarly, as salinity increased, the upper tolerance levels of calcium, potassium, and magnesium also increased. The models developed during these studies, and similar models developed by other researchers, were used to evaluate 11 actual effluents with unexplained toxicity that might be associated with TDS ions. The models correctly identified calcium as the primary toxicant in 9 of the 11 effluents. These results indicate the models can be used as an important tool to identify toxicity associated with major seawater ions. PMID:12371489

  12. Evaluation of environmental factors affecting yields of major dissolved ions of streams in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Norman E.

    1984-01-01

    The seven major dissolved ions in streams-sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium, chloride, sulfate, and bicarbonate and their sum dissolved solids from 56 basins in the conterminous United States and Hawaii were correlated with bedrock type, annual precipitation, population density, and average stream temperature of their respective basins through multiple linear-regression equations to predict annual yields. The study was restricted to basins underlain by limestone, sandstone, or crystalline rock. Depending on the constituent, yields ranged from about 10 to 100,000 kilograms per square kilometer. Predicted yields were within 1 order of magnitude of measured yields. The most important factor in yield prediction was annual precipitation, which accounted for 58 to 71 percent of all yields. Rock type was second in importance. Yields of magnesium, calcium, bicarbonate, and dissolved solids from limestone basins were 4 to 10 times larger than those from sandstone or crystalline basins as a result of carbonate weathering. Population density was an ineffective indicator of all constituents except sodium and chloride; it accounted for 13 percent of the annual sodium yield and 20 percent of the annual chloride yield. Average stream temperature was significant only for calcium and bicarbonate in limestone basins. Its relationship with yields was consistently negative. Either carbonate dissolution increases at low temperatures, or weathering in northern basins, which contain glacial deposits and have the lowest stream temperatures, is greater than in southern basins. Average ion contributions from atmospheric deposition accounted for 30 percent of the sodium and chloride and 60 percent of the sulfate in annual yields. The amount of sulfate derived from atmospheric contributions was higher in sandstone and crystalline basins (65 and 80 percent, respectively) than limestone basins (38 percent). This disparity is attributed to the lack of available sulfate in crystalline rock

  13. EXPERIMENTAL EFFECTS OF CONDUCTIVITY AND MAJOR IONS ON STREAM PERIPHYTON - abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our study examined if specific conductivities comprised of different ions associated with resource extraction affected stream periphyton assemblages, which are important sources of primary production. Sixteen artificial streams were dosed with two ion recipes intended to mimic so...

  14. Wet precipitation of major ions, polonium-210, and organic carbon in a metropolitan city, Seoul, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, G.; Kim, G.

    2011-12-01

    An extensive survey of chemical constituents in precipitation including dissolved organic carbon, dissolved nitrogen, major ions, trace elements, and radionuclides was conducted in a representative urban environment of Seoul over one-year period from 2009 to 2010. The sources for these chemical species were apportioned by applying principal component analysis (PCA) in association with commonly acknowledged key tracers, such as Na, K, Ca, and V. The fossil fuel combustion (especially coal) was shown to be the dominant source for most constituents being investigated, with biomass burning being recognized as another significant source. With the aid of air mass backward trajectory analyses, we concluded that the primary fraction of the chemical species in our precipitation samples originated locally in Korea, albeit the frequent long-range transport from the eastern and northeastern China might contribute substantially. Overall, our study suggests the significant role of human activities in altering the atmospheric environment of Seoul and presumably most urban areas around the world, highlighting its profound environmental implications, such as health risks posed by excessive polonium-210, enhanced rainwater acidity from organic acids, and radiative forcing by organic aerosols.

  15. A study on lithium/air secondary batteries-Stability of the NASICON-type lithium ion conducting solid electrolyte in alkaline aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimonishi, Yuta; Zhang, Tao; Imanishi, Nobuyuki; Im, Dongmin; Lee, Dong Joon; Hirano, Atsushi; Takeda, Yasuo; Yamamoto, Osamu; Sammes, Nigel

    The stability of the high lithium ion conducting glass ceramics, Li 1+ x+ yTi 2- xAl xSi yP 3- yO 12 (LTAP) in alkaline aqueous solutions with and without LiCl has been examined. A significant conductivity decrease of the LTAP plate immersed in 0.057 M LiOH aqueous solution at 50 °C for 3 weeks was observed. However, no conductivity change of the LTAP plate immersed in LiCl saturated LiOH aqueous solutions at 50 °C for 3 weeks was observed. The pH value of the LiCl-LiOH-H 2O solution with saturated LiCl was in a range of 7-9. The molarity of LiOH and LiCl in the LiOH and LiCl saturated aqueous solution were estimated to be 5.12 and 11.57 M, respectively, by analysis of Li + and OH -. The high concentration of LiOH and the low pH value of 8.14 in this solution suggested that the dissociation of LiOH into Li + and OH - is too low in the solution with a high concentration of Li +. These results suggest that the water stable LTAP could be used as a protect layer of the lithium metal anode in the lithium/air cell with LiCl saturated aqueous solution as the electrolyte, because the content of OH - ions in the LiCl saturated aqueous solution does not increase via the cell reaction of Li + 1/2O 2 + H 2O → 2LiOH, and LTAP is stable under a deep discharge state.

  16. A new N-hydroxyethyliminodiacetic acid modified core-shell silica phase for chelation ion chromatography of alkaline earth, transition and rare earth elements.

    PubMed

    McGillicuddy, Nicola; Nesterenko, Ekaterina P; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Stack, Elaine M; Omamogho, Jesse O; Glennon, Jeremy D; Paull, Brett

    2013-12-20

    Bare core-shell silica (1.7μm) has been modified with iminodiacetic acid functional groups via standard silane chemistry, forming a new N-hydroxyethyliminodiacetic acid (HEIDA) functionalised core-shell stationary phase. The column was applied in high-performance chelation ion chromatography and evaluated for the retention of alkaline earth, transition and heavy metal cations. The influence of nitric acid eluent concentration, addition of complexing agent dipicolinic acid, eluent pH and column temperature on the column performance was investigated. The efficiencies obtained for transition and heavy metal cations (and resultant separations) were comparable or better than those previously obtained for alternative fully porous silica based chelation stationary phases, and a similarly modified monolithic silica column, ranging from ∼15 to 56μm HETP. Increasing the ionic strength of the eluent with the addition of KNO3 (0.75M) and increasing the column temperature (70°C) facilitated the isocratic separation of a mixture of 14 lanthanides and yttrium in under 12min, with HETP averaging 18μm (7μm for Ce(III)).

  17. Carbon quantum dots directly generated from electrochemical oxidation of graphite electrodes in alkaline alcohols and the applications for specific ferric ion detection and cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mengli; Xu, Yuanhong; Niu, Fushuang; Gooding, J Justin; Liu, Jingquan

    2016-04-25

    Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) are attracting tremendous interest owing to their low toxicity, water dispersibility, biocompatibility, optical properties and wide applicability. Herein, CQDs with an average diameter of (4.0 ± 0.2) nm and high crystallinity were produced simply from the electrochemical oxidation of a graphite electrode in alkaline alcohols. The as-formed CQDs dispersion was colourless but the dispersion gradually changed to bright yellow when stored in ambient conditions. Based on UV-Vis absorption, fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), this colour change appeared to be due to oxygenation of surface species over time. Furthermore, the CQDs were used in specific and sensitive detection of ferric ion (Fe(3+)) with broad linear ranges of 10-200 μM with a low limit of detection of 1.8 μM (S/N = 3). The application of the CQDs for Fe(3+) detection in tap water was demonstrated and the possible mechanism was also discussed. Finally, based on their good characteristics of low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility, the CQDs were successfully applied to cell imaging. PMID:26878217

  18. Strontium isotope and major ion chemistry of the rainwaters from Guiyang, Guizhou Province, China.

    PubMed

    Han, Guilin; Liu, Cong-Qiang

    2006-07-01

    Twenty-two rainwater samples from Guiyang city, southwestern China, have been analyzed for their chemical compositions and 87Sr/86Sr ratios, with a main purpose to get a better understanding of the general features of rainwater in Guiyang city and their correspondences to human activities. The rainwaters studied are almost acidic (pH=4.53) and show big changes in major ion composition. Ca2+ and Mg2+ are the principal cations in the rainwaters and their mean values are 56.6 micromol/L (12.5-163.8 micromol/L) and 12.8 micromol/L (4.5-47.3 micromol/L ), respectively. The sum of Ca2+ and Mg2+ accounts for 78%-96% of the total cations in the studied rainwaters. Na+ was the least abundant of the major cations with a mean content of 4 micromol/L (0.9-7.8 micromol/L). SO4(2-) is the predominant anion, with a mean content of 94 micromol/L (33.5-279.4 micromol/L), coming next is NO(3-) with a mean content of 48 micromol/L (2.1-251.8 micromol/L). SO4(2-) and NO(3-) together account for 77%-99% of the total anions. Ca2+ and Mg2+ in the rainwater are most likely from dissolution of carbonate minerals in dust or aerosol, unlike K+ that shows more contribution of anthropogenic sources to the rainwater. Na+ does not vary in concentration with Cl-. Significant enrichment of Cl- relative to Na+ as compared with sea water indicates negligible contribution of marine source, which is supported by the evidence that the total rainwater samples show lower 87Sr/86Sr ratios (ranging from 0.707934 to 0.709080) than sea water. The rainwater samples are characterized by high contents of NO(3-), SO4(2-), and Cl- relative to Na+, as compared to the rainwater from other areas in the world, suggesting that the anions (NO(3-), SO4(2-), and Cl-) have mainly of anthropogenic sources. Sr isotope shows potential to trace sources of contaminants when combined with other chemical factors: covariation of 87Sr/86Sr ratio with Cl-/Na+ in the rainwater suggest presence of at least two anthropogenic sources

  19. Characteristics of major secondary ions in typical polluted atmospheric aerosols during autumn in central Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Fang, Guor-Cheng; Lin, Shih-Chieh; Chang, Shih-Yu; Lin, Chuan-Yao; Chou, Charles-C K; Wu, Yun-Jui; Chen, Yu-Chieh; Chen, Wei-Tzu; Wu, Tsai-Lin

    2011-06-01

    In autumn of 2008, the chemical characteristics of major secondary ionic aerosols at a suburban site in central Taiwan were measured during an annually occurring season of high pollution. The semicontinuous measurement system measured major soluble inorganic species, including NH(4)(+), NO(3)(-), and SO(4)(2-), in PM(10) with a 15 min resolution time. The atmospheric conditions, except for the influences of typhoons, were dominated by the local sea-land breeze with clear diurnal variations of meteorological parameters and air pollutant concentrations. To evaluate secondary aerosol formation at different ozone levels, daily ozone maximum concentration (O(3,daily max)) was used as an index of photochemical activity for dividing between the heavily polluted period (O(3,daily max) ≧80 ppb) and the lightly polluted period (O(3,daily max)<80 ppb). The concentrations of PM(10), NO(3)(-), SO(4)(2-), NH(4)(+) and total major ions during the heavily polluted period were 1.6, 1.9, 2.4, 2.7 and 2.3 times the concentrations during the lightly polluted period, respectively. Results showed that the daily maximum concentrations of PM(10) occurred around midnight and the daily maximum ozone concentration occurred during daytime. The average concentration of SO(2) was higher during daytime, which could be explained by the transportation of coastal industry emissions to the sampling site. In contrast, the high concentration of NO(2) at night was due to the land breeze flow that transport inland urban air masses toward this site. The simulations of breeze circulations and transitions were reflected in transports and distributions of these pollutants. During heavily polluted periods, NO(3)(-) and NH(4)(+) showed a clear diurnal variations with lower concentrations after midday, possibly due to the thermal volatilization of NH(4)NO(3) during daytime and transport of inland urban plume at night. The diurnal variation of PM(10) showed the similar pattern to that of NO(3)(-) and NH(4

  20. Isolation and characterization of a metal ion-dependent alkaline protease from a halotolerant Bacillus aquimaris VITP4.

    PubMed

    Shivanand, Pooja; Jayaraman, Gurunathan

    2011-04-01

    A halotolerant bacterium Bacillus acquimaris VITP4 was used for the production of extracellular protease. Fractional precipitation using ammonium chloride was used to obtain the enzyme. The protease exhibited optimum activity at pH 8.0 and 40 degrees C and retained 50% of its optimal proteolytic activity even in the presence of 4 M NaCl, suggesting that it is halotolerant. The molecular mass of protease, as revealed by SDS-PAGE was found to be 34 kDa and the homogeneity of the enzyme was confirmed by gelatin zymography and reverse-phase HPLC. Upon purification, the specific activity of th enzyme increased from 533 U/mg to 1719 U/mg. Protease inhibitors like phenyl methane sulphonyl fluoride and 2-mercaptoethanol did not affect the activity of the enzyme, but EDTA inhibited the activity, indicating the requirement of metal ions for activity. Cu2, Ni2+ and Mn2+ enhanced the enzyme activity, but Zn2+, Hg2+ and Fe2+ decreased the activity, while Mg2+, Ca2+ and K+ had no effect on the enzyme activity. The protease was quite stable in the presence of cationic (CTAB), anionic (SDS) and neutral detergents (Triton X-100 and Tween-20) and exhibited antimicrobial activity against selected bacterial and fungal strains. The stability characteristics and broad spectrum antimicrobial activity indicated the potential use of this protease in industrial applications.

  1. {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy of cationic species in CO{sub 2} selective alkaline earth metal porous silicoaluminophosphates prepared via liquid and solid state ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Arevalo-Hidalgo, Ana G.; Dugar, Sneha; Fu, Riqiang; Hernandez-Maldonado, Arturo J.

    2012-07-15

    The location of extraframework cations in Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion-exchanged SAPO-34 was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectroscopy and spectral deconvolution. Incorporation of the alkaline earth metal cations onto the SAPO framework was achieved via liquid state ion exchange, coupled partial detemplation/solid-state ion exchange, and combination of both techniques. MAS NMR revealed that the level of ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations near hexagonal prisms (site SI), which are relatively difficult to exchange with the alkaline earth metal due to steric and charge repulsion criteria. In addition, the presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange of otherwise tenacious hydrogen as corroborated by unit cell compositional data as well as enhanced CO{sub 2} adsorption at low partial pressures. The extraframework ammonium species were produced from partial detemplation of the structure-directing agent employed for the SAPO-34 synthesis, tetraethylammonium. - Graphical abstract: MAS NMR was used to elucidate the position the cationic species in alkaline earth metal exchanged silicoaluminophosphates. These species played a significant role during the ion exchange process and, therefore, the materials ultimate CO{sub 2} adsorption performance. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Location of extraframework Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} cations was estimated by means of {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MAS NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Level of Sr{sup 2+} or Ba{sup 2+} ion exchange was limited by the presence of protons and sodium cations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of ammonium cations in the supercages facilitated the exchange. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sr{sup 2+} and Ba{sup 2+} ion exchanged SAPOs are outstanding CO{sub 2} adsorbents.

  2. Cometary coma ions. [which occur when water is the major constituent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, A. C.

    1974-01-01

    For comets whose nuclei are composed of water ice conglomerates it is shown that the ion H3O(+) can predominate to distances of 5000 km in the subsolar direction. Beyond this distance H2O(+) is the most important ion. The crossover point is a sensitive function of the rate of evaporation from the nucleus. The presence of ammonia or metals such as sodium, in concentrations greater than 0.1% H2O, can lead to NH4(+) and Na(+) ions.

  3. The general description of major ion concentrations in groundwater of Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalvāns, A.; Delina, A.

    2012-04-01

    Latvia is situated at the North central part of the Baltic sedimentary basin where the crystalline basement is found in depth between 0.6 to 2 km. Three large aquifer complexes with distinct chemical composition of groundwater are identified: the stagnant water exchange zone where Na-Ca-Cl brine is found; the slow water exchange zone where Na-Ca-Cl-SO4 brackish water is found and active water exchange zone where the freshwater resides. These are separated by distinct regional aquicludes. The composition of the Cl- dominated brines at the base of sedimentary basin is characterised by shift from Na+ towards Ca++ as dominant cation, partially associated with depth of the aquifer and the strength of the brine. The concentration of SO4-- here is inversely linked to the concentration of Ca++ and, according to geochemical modelling, often is close to the solubility limit of the gypsum. The major ion concentrations in the E and W part of the territory are rather different. Therefore two different initial sources of the formation brine were suggested. Alternatively the observations can be explained by different thermal histories of different parts of the basin, affecting the rate of albitization - exchange of the Na for Ca in the solution due to water-rock interaction. The groundwater composition in the slow exchange zone can be nicely explained by the mixing of freshwater and brine residing deeper in the presence of gypsum during some but no all stages of mixing. In some shallow parts of the zone still bound by the Narva regional aquiclude freshwater is found. The question is posted - could this be a paleogroundwater originating from the extensive continental glaciations that override the territory several times during the Pleistocene? Initial isotope studies presented elsewhere seems to give negative answer to this question. The active water exchange zone is characterised by fresh Ca-Mg-HCO3 water with exceptions in cases where gypsum are abundant in sedimentary rocks and

  4. Major ions and radionuclides in aerosol particles from the South Pole during ISCAT-2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimoto, R.; Hogan, A.; Grube, P.; Davis, D.; Webb, J.; Schloesslin, C.; Sage, S.; Raccah, F.

    2004-10-01

    As part of ISCAT 2000, bulk, high-volume, aerosol samples were collected at the South Pole (SP) nominally over 24-h intervals, and they were analyzed for major ions, several trace elements, and three naturally occurring radionuclides. The mean concentrations of Na (<17 ng m-3), sulfate (98 ng m-3), and methanesulfonate (MSA, 4.4 ng m-3) all were lower in ISCAT 2000 compared with ISCAT 1998, suggesting weaker marine influences during the latter study. In contrast, the 210Pb activity (0.20 mBq m-3) was more than two-times higher in ISCAT 2000 than in 1998, and nitrate concentrations (150 ng m-3) were approximately four-times higher, suggesting stronger continental influences in the second study. These differences between experiments are consistent with an analysis of meteorological transport and exchange. 7Be activities were generally comparable for ISCAT-1998 and 2000, suggesting that there were, on average, similar upper tropospheric/lower stratospheric influences on surface air during the two experiments: long-term records of 7Be, however, show pronounced annual and lower-frequency cycles. The concentration ratios of MSA to nss-sulfate (R) were similar in the two campaigns, and a regression analysis suggests that a non-biogenic source or sources account for up to ∼30% of the nonsea-salt sulfate. Various possible explanations for the low values of R (=0.08) relative to other Antarctic sites are discussed, including differences in R due to where the oxidation of DMS takes place (that is, in the marine boundary layer or in the buffer layer/free troposphere), chemical fractionation during transport, and the transport of sulfur compounds from lower latitudes and possibly from Mt. Erebus.

  5. Resection is a major repair pathway of heavy ion-induced DNA lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, Marco; Averbeck, Nicole; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela

    Space radiation include densely ionizing heavy ions, which can produce clustered DNA damage with high frequency in human cells. Repair of these complex lesions is generally assumed to be more difficult than for simple double-strand breaks. We show here that human cells use break resection with increasing frequency after exposure to heavy ions. Resection can lead to misrepair of the DNA lesion, via microhomology mediated end-joining. Resection can therefore be responsible for the increased effectiveness of heavy ions in the induction of mutations and genetic late effects.

  6. Determination of major sodium iodide symporter (NIS) inhibitors in drinking waters using ion chromatography with conductivity detector.

    PubMed

    Cengiz, Mehmet Fatih; Bilgin, Ayse Kevser

    2016-02-20

    Goiter is an important health problem all over the world and iodine deficiency is its most common cause. Perchlorate, thiocyanate and nitrate (called as major NIS inhibitors) are known to competitively inhibit iodide uptake by the thyroid gland and thus, human exposure to major NIS inhibitors is a public health concern. In this study, an ion chromatographic method for the determination of most common NIS inhibitor ions in drinking waters was developed and validated. This is the first study where an analytical method is used for the determination of major NIS inhibitors in drinking water by an ion chromatography system in a single run. Chromatographic separations were achieved with an anion-exchange column and separated ions were identified by a conductivity detector. The method was found to be selective, linear, precise accurate and true for all of interested ions. The limits of the detections (LOD) were estimated at 0.003, 0.004 and 0.025mgL(-1) for perchlorate, thiocyanate and nitrate, respectively. Possible interference ions in drinking waters were examined for the best separation of NIS inhibitors. The excellent method validation data and proficiency test result (Z-score for nitrate: -0.1) of the FAPAS(®) suggested that the developed method could be applied for determination of NIS inhibitor residues in drinking waters. To evaluate the usefulness of the method, 75 drinking water samples from Antalya/Turkey were analyzed for NIS inhibitors. Perchlorate concentrations in the samples ranged from not detected (less than LOD) to 0.07±0.02mgL(-1) and the range of nitrate concentrations were found to be 3.60±0.01mgL(-1) and 47.42±0.40mgL(-1). No thiocyanate residues were detected in tested drinking water samples.

  7. Major ion chemistry in the headwaters of the Yamuna river system:. Chemical weathering, its temperature dependence and CO 2 consumption in the Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalai, T. K.; Krishnaswami, S.; Sarin, M. M.

    2002-10-01

    The Yamuna river and its tributaries in the Himalaya constitute the Yamuna River System (YRS). The YRS basin has a drainage area and discharge comparable in magnitude to those of the Bhagirathi and the Alaknanda rivers, which merge to form the Ganga at the foothills of the Himalaya. A detailed geochemical study of the YRS was carried out to determine: (i) the relative significance of silicate, carbonate and evaporite weathering in contributing to its major ion composition; (ii) CO 2 consumption via silicate weathering; and (iii) the factors regulating chemical weathering of silicates in the basin. The results show that the YRS waters are mildly alkaline, with a wide range of TDS, ˜32 to ˜620 mg l-1. In these waters, the abundances of Ca, Mg and alkalinity, which account for most of TDS, are derived mainly from carbonates. Many of the tributaries in the lower reaches of the Yamuna basin are supersaturated with calcite. In addition to carbonic acid, sulphuric acid generated by oxidation of pyrites also seems to be supplying protons for chemical weathering. Silicate weathering in YRS basin contributes, on average, ˜25% (molar basis) of total cations on a basin wide scale. Silicate weathering, however, does not seem to be intense in the basin as evident from low Si/(Na*+K) in the waters, ˜1.2 and low values of chemical index of alteration (CIA) in bed sediments, ˜60. CO 2 drawdown resulting from silicate weathering in the YRS basin in the Himalaya during monsoon ranges between (4 to 7) × 10 5 moles km -2 y -1. This is higher than that estimated for the Ganga at Rishikesh for the same season. The CO 2 consumption rates in the Yamuna and the Ganga basins in the Himalaya are higher than the global average value, suggesting enhanced CO 2 drawdown in the southern slopes of the Himalaya. The impact of this enhanced drawdown on the global CO 2 budget may not be pronounced, as the drainage area of the YRS and the Ganga in the Himalaya is small. The CO 2 drawdown by

  8. Statistical models to predict the toxicity of major ions to Ceriodaphnia dubia, Daphnia magna and Pimephales promelas (fathead minnows)

    SciTech Connect

    Mount, D.R.; Gulley, D.D.; Hockett, J.R.; Garrison, T.D.; Evans, J.M.

    1997-10-01

    Toxicity of fresh waters with high total dissolved solids has been shown to be dependent on the specific ionic composition of the water. To provide a predictive tool to assess toxicity attributable to major ions, the authors tested the toxicity of over 2,900 ion solutions using the daphnids, Ceriodaphnia dubia and Daphnia magna, and fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Multiple logistic regression was used to relate ion composition to survival for each of the three test species. In general, relative ion toxicity was K{sup +} > HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} {approx} Mg{sup 2+} > Cl{sup {minus}} > SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}; Na{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+} were not significant variables in the regressions, suggesting that the toxicity of Na{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+} salts was primarily attributable to the corresponding anion. For C. dubia and D. magna, toxicity of Cl{sup {minus}}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, and K{sup +} was reduced in solutions enriched with more than one cation. Final regression models showed a good quality of fit to the data (R{sup 2} = 0.767--0.861). Preliminary applications of these models to field-collected samples indicated a high degree of accuracy for the C. dubia model, while the D. magna and fathead minnow models tended to overpredict ion toxicity. Studies of oil and gas produced waters, irrigation drain waters, shale oil leachates, sediment pore waters, and industrial process waters have shown toxicity caused by elevated concentrations of common ions.

  9. Environmental isotopes and major ions for tracing leachate contamination from a municipal landfill in Metro Manila, Philippines.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, S S; Sucgang, R J; Almoneda, R V; Mendoza, N D S; David, C P C

    2012-08-01

    The surface water and groundwater sources in the vicinity of a major municipal landfill in Metro Manila, Philippines were investigated to determine contamination by landfill leachate. Tritium, stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen, and major ions in the leachate and freshwater within the landfill environment were determined. The leachate contained elevated tritium activities and high concentrations of sodium, chloride, potassium, and calcium. The concentrations of tritium and the leachate related ions in the affected surface water were significantly higher than the non-impacted water and correlated strongly with distance from the leachate source, following a negative exponential relationship, providing evidence of leachate transport along the affected surface water. Enrichment in deuterium was exhibited by leachate in the holding pond but not by the effluent leachate. The stable isotope signature of leachate is masked in the surface water due to dilution by stream water. Dilution similarly masked the effect of leachate in the shallow groundwater which was strongly influenced by precipitation. Evidence of leachate contamination in the deep groundwater was sporadic. In isolated cases, elevated tritium concentrations coincided with enrichment in deuterium. In the same case, leachate related ions, Na, Ca, Mg, and Cl, varied with rainfall but generally increased from 2003 to 2009. The effect on the groundwater of methane produced within the landfill was seen in the depletion in deuterium in groundwater in the drier months.

  10. Alkaline battery, separator therefore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, George F. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An improved battery separator for alkaline battery cells has low resistance to electrolyte ion transfer and high resistance to electrode ion transfer. The separator is formed by applying an improved coating to an electrolyte absorber. The absorber, preferably, is a flexible, fibrous, and porous substrate that is resistant to strong alkali and oxidation. The coating composition includes an admixture of a polymeric binder, a hydrolyzable polymeric ester and inert fillers. The coating composition is substantially free of reactive fillers and plasticizers commonly employed as porosity promoting agents in separator coatings. When the separator is immersed in electrolyte, the polymeric ester of the film coating reacts with the electrolyte forming a salt and an alcohol. The alcohol goes into solution with the electrolyte while the salt imbibes electrolyte into the coating composition. When the salt is formed, it expands the polymeric chains of the binder to provide a film coating substantially permeable to electrolyte ion transfer but relatively impermeable to electrode ion transfer during use.

  11. Highly treated mine waters may require major ion addition before environmental release.

    PubMed

    Harford, Andrew J; Jones, David R; van Dam, Rick A

    2013-01-15

    Mining operations often use passive and/or active water treatments to improve water quality prior to environmental release. Key considerations in choosing a treatment process include the extent to which the water quality is actually improved, and the potential residual environmental risks of the release of such water. However, there are few published studies concerning the environmental impacts of treated waste waters. This study used toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) methods to quantify and identify the "toxic" constituents of a highly-treated water (distillate) produced by brine concentration of a mining process water. Exposure of five freshwater species (Chlorella sp., Lemna aequinoctialis, Hydra viridissima, Moinodaphnia macleayi and Mogurnda mogurnda) to a concentration range of the distillate (0, 25, 50 and 100%) found that it was toxic to H. viridissima (50-100% effect when exposed to 100% distillate). TIE tests demonstrated that the effect wasn't due to residual ammonia (~1 mg L(-1)N) or trace organics, and unlikely to be due to manganese (Mn; 130-230 μg L(-1)). Conversely, addition of 0.2 and 0.5 mg L(-1) calcium improved the growth rate of H. viridissima by 61 and 66%, respectively, while addition of calcium, sodium and potassium (0.5, 1.0 and 0.4 mg L(-1), respectively) to levels comparable to that in the local aquatic environment resulted in 100% recovery. Further assessment on the likelihood of residual metal toxicity indicated that Mn concentrations in the distillate were at levels that could inhibit the growth of H. viridissima. Ultimately, the results demonstrated that ion deficiency should be considered as a potential stressor in risk/impact assessments of the discharge of treated wastewaters, and these may need to be supplemented with the deficient ions to reduce environmental impacts. The findings have highlighted the need for water managers to consider the possibility of unintended environmental risks from the discharge of highly

  12. Highly treated mine waters may require major ion addition before environmental release.

    PubMed

    Harford, Andrew J; Jones, David R; van Dam, Rick A

    2013-01-15

    Mining operations often use passive and/or active water treatments to improve water quality prior to environmental release. Key considerations in choosing a treatment process include the extent to which the water quality is actually improved, and the potential residual environmental risks of the release of such water. However, there are few published studies concerning the environmental impacts of treated waste waters. This study used toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) methods to quantify and identify the "toxic" constituents of a highly-treated water (distillate) produced by brine concentration of a mining process water. Exposure of five freshwater species (Chlorella sp., Lemna aequinoctialis, Hydra viridissima, Moinodaphnia macleayi and Mogurnda mogurnda) to a concentration range of the distillate (0, 25, 50 and 100%) found that it was toxic to H. viridissima (50-100% effect when exposed to 100% distillate). TIE tests demonstrated that the effect wasn't due to residual ammonia (~1 mg L(-1)N) or trace organics, and unlikely to be due to manganese (Mn; 130-230 μg L(-1)). Conversely, addition of 0.2 and 0.5 mg L(-1) calcium improved the growth rate of H. viridissima by 61 and 66%, respectively, while addition of calcium, sodium and potassium (0.5, 1.0 and 0.4 mg L(-1), respectively) to levels comparable to that in the local aquatic environment resulted in 100% recovery. Further assessment on the likelihood of residual metal toxicity indicated that Mn concentrations in the distillate were at levels that could inhibit the growth of H. viridissima. Ultimately, the results demonstrated that ion deficiency should be considered as a potential stressor in risk/impact assessments of the discharge of treated wastewaters, and these may need to be supplemented with the deficient ions to reduce environmental impacts. The findings have highlighted the need for water managers to consider the possibility of unintended environmental risks from the discharge of highly

  13. The design of alkaline fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strasser, K.

    1990-01-01

    Alkaline fuel cells recently developed have yielded satisfactory operation even in the cases of their use of mobile and matrix-type electrolytes; the advantages of realistic operation have been demonstrated by a major West German manufacturer's 100 kW alkaline fuel cell apparatus, which was operated in the role of an air-independent propulsion system. Development has begun for a spacecraft alkaline fuel cell of the matrix-electrolyte configuration.

  14. Wet deposition of major ions in a rural area impacted by biomass burning emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, Cidelmara H.; Allen, Andrew G.; Fornaro, Adalgiza; Orlando, Eduardo A.; Grigoletto, Tahuana L. B.; Campos, M. Lucia A. M.

    2011-09-01

    This work concerns the influence of industrialized agriculture in the tropics on precipitation chemistry. A total of 264 rain events were sampled using a wet-only collector in central São Paulo State, Brazil, between January 2003 and July 2007. Electroneutrality balance calculations (considering H +, K +, Na +, NH4+, Ca 2+, Mg 2+, Cl -, NO3-, SO42-, F -, PO43-, H 3CCOO -, HCOO -, CO42- and HCO3-) showed that there was an excess of cations (˜15%), which was attributed to the presence of unmeasured organic anion species originating from biomass burning and biogenic emissions. On average, the three ions NH4+, NO 3- and H + were responsible for >55% of the total ion concentrations in the rainwater samples. Concentrations (except of H +) were significantly higher ( t-test; P = 0.05), by between two to six-fold depending on species, during the winter sugar cane harvest period, due to the practice of pre-harvest burning of the crop. Principal component analysis showed that three components could explain 88% of the variance for measurements made throughout the year: PC1 (52%, biomass burning and soil dust resuspension); PC2 (26%, secondary aerosols); PC3 (10%, road transport emissions). Differences between harvest and non-harvest periods appeared to be mainly due to an increased relative importance of road transport/industrial emissions during the summer (non-harvest) period. The volume-weighted mean (VWM) concentrations of ammonium (23.4 μmol L -1) and nitrate (17.5 μmol L -1) in rainwater samples collected during the harvest period were similar to those found in rainwater from São Paulo city, which emphasizes the importance of including rural agro-industrial emissions in regional-scale atmospheric chemistry and transport models. Since there was evidence of a biomass burning source throughout the year, it appears that rainwater composition will continue to be affected by vegetation fires, even after sugar cane burning is phased out as envisaged by recent São Paulo

  15. Groundwater quality in Scotland: major ion chemistry of the key groundwater bodies.

    PubMed

    Robins, N S

    2002-07-22

    Groundwater in Scotland is, for the most part, weakly to moderately mineralised and dominated by the Ca and HCO3 ions. The aquifer systems are almost entirely unconfined and most groundwater remains in contact with oxygen; some reducing groundwaters occur in deeper isolated cracks and joints within the many fractured bedrock aquifers such as Devonian sandstones. Groundwater depleted in oxygen is also common in the Coal Measures in the Midland Valley as a direct result of past coal and oil shale mining, when iron and other metals are taken into solution as the abandoned mine workings are allowed to flood. Low pH groundwaters are rare but do occur where calcite is absent in some basement rocks. Marine intrusion of coastal aquifers occurs locally in East Lothian and parts of Morayshire. Deeper circulating groundwaters are responsible for some of the more exotic spa waters, notably at Bridge of Earn near Perth. Nitrate contamination of groundwater is increasing in some areas, and is most prevalent in the south of Scotland. The Devonian aquifer in Fife and parts of the Permian sandstone aquifers of south-west Scotland are the worst affected.

  16. Use of major ion chemistry and environmental isotopes to delineate groundwater flow in Eagle Valley, Nevada. [Abstract only

    SciTech Connect

    Szecsody, J.E.

    1983-03-01

    Certain aquifer parameters can be estimated by various chemistry techniques as seen in this analysis of the Eagle Valley groundwater system. Major ions of wells do increase in concentration along the groundwater flow path. However, contour maps of sulfate, chloride, and sodium ion concentrations of 60 wells show that there is no trend in areas of non-thermal water. The ion concentrations increase only near thermal wells, indicating mixing of thermal/non-thermal waters. Carbon-13 analyses of one thermal area confirms considerable mixing with non-thermal water. Stable isotopes of water (oxygen-18 and deuterium) show aquifer water is isotopically depleted near mountain front stream channels, suggesting summer recharge. The basin center is more isotopically depleted, which suggests year-round recharge via deep percolation. Tritium and carbon-14 age dating of water demonstrate that the youngest water is along the recharge mountain front with wells containing modern tritium activity. The oldest non-thermal water is in the basin center, possibly up to 1000 years old. Age dating also suggests leakage from the Carson River into the groundwater system whereas previous investigations suggest groundwater discharge to the river. Two thermal springs previously defined as similar water are shown to have greatly differing ages. Carson Hot Springs is found to be the oldest water in the basin, containing water about 12,000 years old.

  17. Statistical generation of training sets for measuring NO3(-), NH4(+) and major ions in natural waters using an ion selective electrode array.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Amy V; Hemond, Harold F

    2016-05-18

    Knowledge of ionic concentrations in natural waters is essential to understand watershed processes. Inorganic nitrogen, in the form of nitrate and ammonium ions, is a key nutrient as well as a participant in redox, acid-base, and photochemical processes of natural waters, leading to spatiotemporal patterns of ion concentrations at scales as small as meters or hours. Current options for measurement in situ are costly, relying primarily on instruments adapted from laboratory methods (e.g., colorimetric, UV absorption); free-standing and inexpensive ISE sensors for NO3(-) and NH4(+) could be attractive alternatives if interferences from other constituents were overcome. Multi-sensor arrays, coupled with appropriate non-linear signal processing, offer promise in this capacity but have not yet successfully achieved signal separation for NO3(-) and NH4(+)in situ at naturally occurring levels in unprocessed water samples. A novel signal processor, underpinned by an appropriate sensor array, is proposed that overcomes previous limitations by explicitly integrating basic chemical constraints (e.g., charge balance). This work further presents a rationalized process for the development of such in situ instrumentation for NO3(-) and NH4(+), including a statistical-modeling strategy for instrument design, training/calibration, and validation. Statistical analysis reveals that historical concentrations of major ionic constituents in natural waters across New England strongly covary and are multi-modal. This informs the design of a statistically appropriate training set, suggesting that the strong covariance of constituents across environmental samples can be exploited through appropriate signal processing mechanisms to further improve estimates of minor constituents. Two artificial neural network architectures, one expanded to incorporate knowledge of basic chemical constraints, were tested to process outputs of a multi-sensor array, trained using datasets of varying degrees of

  18. ALT1, a Snf2 family chromatin remodeling ATPase, negatively regulates alkaline tolerance through enhanced defense against oxidative stress in rice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mingxin; Wang, Ruci; Wang, Juan; Hua, Kai; Wang, Yueming; Liu, Xiaoqiang; Yao, Shanguo

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline salt stress adversely affects rice growth, productivity and grain quality. However, the mechanism underlying this process remains elusive. We characterized here an alkaline tolerant mutant, alt1 in rice. Map-based cloning revealed that alt1 harbors a mutation in a chromatin remodeling ATPase gene. ALT1-RNAi transgenic plants under different genetic background mimicked the alt1 phenotype, exhibiting tolerance to alkaline stress in a transcript dosage-dependent manner. The predicted ALT1 protein belonged to the Ris1 subgroup of the Snf2 family and was localized in the nucleus, and transcription of ALT1 was transiently suppressed after alkaline treatment. Although the absorption of several metal ions maintained well in the mutant under alkaline stress, expression level of the genes involved in metal ions homeostasis was not altered in the alt1 mutant. Classification of differentially expressed abiotic stress related genes, as revealed by microarray analysis, found that the majority (50/78) were involved in ROS production, ROS scavenging, and DNA repair. This finding was further confirmed by that alt1 exhibited lower levels of H2O2 under alkaline stress and tolerance to methyl viologen treatment. Taken together, these results suggest that ALT1 negatively functions in alkaline tolerance mainly through the defense against oxidative damage, and provide a potential two-step strategy for improving the tolerance of rice plants to alkaline stress. PMID:25473841

  19. Relationships between groundwater contamination and major-ion chemistry in a karst aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, B. R.

    1990-11-01

    Groundwater contamination was examined within a rural setting of the Inner Bluegrass Karst Region of central Kentucky where potential contaminant sources include soil-organic matter, organic and inorganic fertilizer, and septic-tank effluent. To evaluate controls on groundwater contamination, data on nitrate concentrations and indicator bacteria in water from wells and springs were compared with physical and chemical attributes of the groundwater system. Bacterial densities greater than the recommended limit were found in all springs and approximately half of the wells, whereas nitrate concentrations >45 mg l -1 were restricted to 20% of the springs and 10% of the wells. Nitrate concentrations varied markedly in closely spaced wells and springs, which indicates that land use is not the primary control on groundwater contamination. Groundwater contamination is related to the distribution of chemical water types in the study area. All Ca subtype water was contaminated with nitrate and bacteria. Ca subtype water occurs in the shallow, rapidly circulating groundwater zone, which is most susceptible to contamination. The similarity in nitrate concentrations between local springs, major springs, and wells that contain Ca subtype water indicates that the occurrence of large conduits is not the main control on nitrate and bacterial contamination of groundwater. Temporal fluctuations in nitrate concentrations of Ca subtype water are attributed to seasonal fluctuations in recharge and in plant growth. Ca-Mg water subtype was generally not contaminated, and Na-HCO 3 and Na-Cl water types were not contaminated. Ca-Mg water subtype, and Na-HCO 3 and Na-Cl water types are associated with longer residence times and reducing conditions, which allow bacterial die-off and denitrification, respectively. Differences in residence time and reducing conditions among the chemical water types and subtypes are attributed to variations in rock permeability and to the occurrence of horizontal

  20. Landscape controls on dissolved nutrients, organic matter and major ions in a suburbanizing watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daley, M. L.; McDowell, W. H.

    2010-12-01

    Understanding the relative importance of anthropogenic and natural landscape features that drive spatial variability in water quality is a central challenge in studying the biogeochemistry of heterogeneous landscapes. We quantified the average annual flux and concentration of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), phosphate-P (PO4-P), sodium (Na+) and chloride (Cl-) at ~40 stream sites in three major (51 to 903 km2) NH basins. We used GIS to quantify anthropogenic (e.g. human population density, % impervious surface cover and % agriculture) and natural (e.g. % forest, % wetlands and soil C:N) landscape features for each sub-basin and then employed multiple-regression analysis to relate water quality parameters to landscape characteristics. Anthropogenic features were strong predictors of DIN flux and Na+ and Cl- concentrations, whereas wetland cover (a natural feature) was a significant, but weak predictor of DOC (r2=0.26, p<0.01) and DON (r2 = 0.14, p<0.05) flux. Anthropogenic features could not explain a significant amount of variance in DON or DOC flux. Mean PO4-P concentrations were surprisingly low (<0.015 mg P/L) when compared to the larger range in mean DIN concentrations (0.03 to 0.96 mg/L) and consequently no landscape characteristics could explain a significant amount of spatial variability in PO4-P flux or concentration. Human population density was the single best predictor of DIN flux (r2=0.76, p<0.01), and together with % impervious surface and % agriculture explained 86% (p<0.01) of the total variance. Among all sites, % road pavement was a strong predictor of stream Na+ and Cl- concentrations (r2 = 0.75 to 0.78, p<0.01) and % impervious surface was a stronger predictor (r2 = 0.86 to 0.92, p<0.01) among a subset of sites. Our results suggest that DIN and DON result from different sources in the landscape and although sources of DON and DOC are similar, DON and DOC concentrations respond

  1. The Calcium Goes Meow: Effects of Ions and Glycosylation on Fel d 1, the Major Cat Allergen

    PubMed Central

    Pol-Fachin, Laércio; Verli, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    The major cat allergen, Fel d 1, is a structurally complex protein with two N-glycosylation sites that may be filled by different glycoforms. In addition, the protein contains three putative Ca2+ binding sites. Since the impact of these Fel d 1 structure modifications on the protein dynamics, physiology and pathology are not well established, the present work employed computational biology techniques to tackle these issues. While conformational effects brought upon by glycosylation were identified, potentially involved in cavity volume regulation, our results indicate that only the central Ca2+ ion remains coordinated to Fel d 1 in biological solutions, impairing its proposed role in modulating phospholipase A2 activity. As these results increase our understanding of Fel d 1 structural biology, they may offer new support for understanding its physiological role and impact into cat-promoted allergy. PMID:26134118

  2. ALP (Alkaline Phosphatase) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... known as: ALK PHOS; Alkp Formal name: Alkaline Phosphatase Related tests: AST ; ALT ; GGT ; Bilirubin ; Liver Panel ; Bone Markers ; Alkaline Phosphatase Isoenzymes; Bone Specific ALP All content on Lab ...

  3. Alkaline fuel cells applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordesch, Karl; Hacker, Viktor; Gsellmann, Josef; Cifrain, Martin; Faleschini, Gottfried; Enzinger, Peter; Fankhauser, Robert; Ortner, Markus; Muhr, Michael; Aronson, Robert R.

    On the world-wide automobile market technical developments are increasingly determined by the dramatic restriction on emissions as well as the regimentation of fuel consumption by legislation. Therefore there is an increasing chance of a completely new technology breakthrough if it offers new opportunities, meeting the requirements of resource preservation and emission restrictions. Fuel cell technology offers the possibility to excel in today's motive power techniques in terms of environmental compatibility, consumer's profit, costs of maintenance and efficiency. The key question is economy. This will be decided by the costs of fuel cell systems if they are to be used as power generators for future electric vehicles. The alkaline hydrogen-air fuel cell system with circulating KOH electrolyte and low-cost catalysed carbon electrodes could be a promising alternative. Based on the experiences of Kordesch [K. Kordesch, Brennstoffbatterien, Springer, Wien, 1984, ISBN 3-387-81819-7; K. Kordesch, City car with H 2-air fuel cell and lead-battery, SAE Paper No. 719015, 6th IECEC, 1971], who operated a city car hybrid vehicle on public roads for 3 years in the early 1970s, improved air electrodes plus new variations of the bipolar stack assembly developed in Graz are investigated. Primary fuel choice will be a major issue until such time as cost-effective, on-board hydrogen storage is developed. Ammonia is an interesting option. The whole system, ammonia dissociator plus alkaline fuel cell (AFC), is characterised by a simple design and high efficiency.

  4. The alkaline and alkaline-carbonatite magmatism from Southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruberti, E.; Gomes, C. D. B.; Comin-Chiaramonti, P.

    2015-12-01

    Early to Late Cretaceous lasting to Paleocene alkaline magmatism from southern Brazil is found associated with major extensional structural features in and around the Paraná Basin and grouped into various provinces on the basis of several data. Magmatism is variable in size, mode of occurrence and composition. The alkaline rocks are dominantly potassic, a few occurrences showing sodic affinity. The more abundant silicate rocks are evolved undersaturated to saturated in silica syenites, displaying large variation in igneous forms. Less evolved types are restricted to subvolcanic environments and outcrops of effusive suites occur rarely. Cumulatic mafic and ultramafic rock types are very common, particularly in the alkali-carbonatitic complexes. Carbonatite bodies are represented by Ca-carbonatites and Mg-carbonatites and more scarcely by Fe-carbonatites. Available radiometric ages for the alkaline rocks fit on three main chronological groups: around 130 Ma, subcoveal with the Early Cretaceous flood tholeiites of the Paraná Basin, 100-110 Ma and 80-90 Ma (Late Cretaceous). The alkaline magmatism also extends into Paleocene times, as indicated by ages from some volcanic lavas. Geochemically, alkaline potassic and sodic rock types are distinguished by their negative and positive Nb-Ta anomalies, respectively. Negative spikes in Nb-Ta are also a feature common to the associated tholeiitic rocks. Sr-Nd-Pb systematics confirm the contribution of both HIMU and EMI mantle components in the formation of the alkaline rocks. Notably, Early and Late Cretaceous carbonatites have the same isotopic Sr-Nd initial ratios of the associated alkaline rocks. C-O isotopic Sr-Nd isotopic ratios indicate typical mantle signature for some carbonatites and the influence of post-magmatic processes in others. Immiscibility of liquids of phonolitic composition, derived from mafic alkaline parental magmas, has been responsible for the origin of the carbonatites. Close association of alkaline

  5. Integrating biotinylated polyalkylthiophene thin films with biological macromolecules: biosensing organophosphorus pesticides and metal ions with surface immobilized alkaline phosphatase utilizing chemiluminescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, Rajiv; Kamtekar, S.; Ayyagari, Madhu S. R.; Marx, Kenneth A.; Kumar, Jayant; Tripathy, Sukant K.; Kaplan, David L.

    1995-05-01

    We describe a methodology for immobilizing the enzyme alkaline phosphatase onto a glass surface using a novel biotinylated copolymer poly (3-undecylthiophene-co-3- thiophenecarboxaldehyde) 6-biotinamido hexanohydrazide attached hydrophobically to silanized glass. The biotin-streptavidin protein interaction is used to carry out this immobilization. Alkaline phosphatase catalyzes the dephosphorylation of a class of macrocyclic compounds: including CSPD {chloro 3-[4-methoxy spiro(1,2 dioxetane-3-2-trichloro-(3.3.1.1)-decan]-4 yl}phenyl phosphate to a product species which emits energy by chemiluminescence. We can detect this chemiluminescence signal with a photomultiplier tube for both enzymatic catalysis in solution and the surface immobilized enzyme (streptavidin conjugate). This enzyme is inhibited by the organophosphorus class of pesticides as well as nerve agents. The enzyme is also inhibited by Be(II), Bi(III) as well as excess Zn(II), while the apoenzyme is reactivated by Zn(II). We demonstrate in this study that two representative organophosphorus pesticides inhibit the enzymatic production of chemiluminescent products. This is true for the enzyme conjugate both free in solution and immobilized. We can detect pesticides down to about 50 ppb for the enzyme in solution and 500 ppb for surface immobilized enzyme in a 100 (mu) l capillary. Detection of Zn(II) by apoenzyme reactivation occurs down to 3 ppb. Be(II) and Bi(III) are detected by inhibition down to 1 ppm.

  6. Fabrication of free-standing NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoarrays via a facile modified hydrothermal synthesis method and their applications for lithium ion batteries and high-rate alkaline batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Qingyun Zhang, Xiangyang; Shen, Youming

    2015-03-15

    Graphical abstract: Hydrothermal-synthesized NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoflake arrays exhibit porous structure and high capacity as well as good cycling life for lithium ion batteries and alkaline batteries. - Highlights: • Self-supported NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoflake arrays are prepared by a hydrothermal method. • NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoflake arrays show high capacity and good cycling life. • Porous nanoflake arrays structure is favorable for fast ion/electron transfer. - Abstract: Self-supported NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoflake arrays on nickel foam are prepared by a facile hydrothermal method. The obtained NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoflakes with thicknesses of ∼25 nm grow vertically to the nickel foam substrate and form an interconnected porous network with pore diameters of 50–500 nm. As anode material of LIBs, the NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoflake arrays show a high initial coulombic efficiency of 76%, as well as good cycling stability with a capacity of 880 mAh g{sup −1} at 0.5 A g{sup −1}, and 523 mAh g{sup −1} at 1.5 A g{sup −1} after 50 cycles. As the cathode of alkaline batteries, a high capacity of 95 mAh g{sup −1} is achieved at 2 A g{sup −1} and 94% retention is maintained after 10,000 cycles. The superior electrochemical performance is mainly due to the unique nanoflake arrays structure with large surface area and shorter diffusion length for mass and charge transport.

  7. Hexahydrated magnesium ions bind in the deep major groove and at the outer mouth of A-form nucleic acid duplexes.

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, H.; Gao, Y.-G.; Sanishvili, R.; Joachimiak, A.; Wang, A. H.-J.; Univ. of Illinois; Northwestern Univ.

    2000-01-01

    Magnesium ions play important roles in the structure and function of nucleic acids. Whereas the tertiary folding of RNA often requires magnesium ions binding to tight places where phosphates are clustered, the molecular basis of the interactions of magnesium ions with RNA helical regions is less well understood. We have refined the crystal structures of four decamer oligonucleotides, d(ACCGGCCGGT), r(GCG)d(TATACGC), r(GC)d(GTATACGC) and r(G)d(GCGTATACGC) with bound hexahydrated magnesium ions at high resolution. The structures reveal that A-form nucleic acid has characteristic [Mg(H2O)6]2+ binding modes. One mode has the ion binding in the deep major groove of a GpN step at the O6/N7 sites of guanine bases via hydrogen bonds. Our crystallographic observations are consistent with the recent NMR observations that in solution [Co(NH3)6]3+, a model ion of [Mg(H2O)6]2+, binds in an identical manner. The other mode involves the binding of the ion to phosphates, bridging across the outer mouth of the narrow major groove. These [Mg(H2O)6]2+ ions are found at the most negative electrostatic potential regions of A-form duplexes. We propose that these two binding modes are important in the global charge neutralization, and therefore stability, of A-form duplexes.

  8. Trophic dynamics of shrinking Subarctic lakes: naturally eutrophic waters impart resilience to rising nutrient and major ion concentrations.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Tyler L; Heglund, Patricia J; Lindberg, Mark S; Schmutz, Joel A; Schmidt, Joshua H; Dubour, Adam J; Rover, Jennifer; Bertram, Mark R

    2016-06-01

    Shrinking lakes were recently observed for several Arctic and Subarctic regions due to increased evaporation and permafrost degradation. Along with lake drawdown, these processes often boost aquatic chemical concentrations, potentially impacting trophic dynamics. In particular, elevated chemical levels may impact primary productivity, which may in turn influence populations of primary and secondary consumers. We examined trophic dynamics of 18 shrinking lakes of the Yukon Flats, Alaska, that had experienced pronounced increases in nutrient (>200 % total nitrogen, >100 % total phosphorus) and ion concentrations (>100 % for four major ions combined) from 1985-1989 to 2010-2012, versus 37 stable lakes with relatively little chemical change over the same period. We found that phytoplankton stocks, as indexed by chlorophyll concentrations, remained unchanged in both shrinking and stable lakes from the 1980s to 2010s. Moving up the trophic ladder, we found significant changes in invertebrate abundance across decades, including decreased abundance of five of six groups examined. However, these decadal losses in invertebrate abundance were not limited to shrinking lakes, occurring in lakes with stable surface areas as well. At the top of the food web, we observed that probabilities of lake occupancy for ten waterbird species, including adults and chicks, remained unchanged from the period 1985-1989 to 2010-2012. Overall, our study lakes displayed a high degree of resilience to multi-trophic cascades caused by rising chemical concentrations. This resilience was likely due to their naturally high fertility, such that further nutrient inputs had little impact on waters already near peak production. PMID:26857253

  9. [Effect of sand dust weather on major water-soluble ions in PM10 in Lanzhou, China].

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Chen, Qiang; Zhang, Wen-Yu; Guo, Yong-Tao; Zhao, Lian-Biao

    2014-07-01

    The major water-soluble ions (Ca(2+), NH(4+), Mg(2+), K(+), Na(+), SO4(2-), NO3(-) and Cl-(-) in PM10 at 1-h interval were measured by an online analyzer for monitoring of Aerosols and Gases (MARGA) at the campus of Lanzhou University, from April 1 to June 30, 2011. There were 15 days of dust weather during the monitoring period. The main water-soluble ions in PM10 were Ca(2+), SO4(2-) and NO3(-). The concentration of NO3(-) and NH4(+) decreased during blowing sand weather comparing with non-dust, this phenomenon showed that the dust weather had the function of eliminating the local anthropogenic emissions. As the soil pollution marker, the concentration of Mg(2+), Na(+) and Ca(2+) increased during dust weather comparing with non-dust. The correlation coefficients between Na(+) and Mg(2+), Na(+) and Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) during dust weather were 0.520, 0.659 and 0.671, respectively. The similar correlation coefficients indicated that some fraction of these species was derived from the same sources, such as soil dust. The correlation coefficients between Na(+) and Mg(2+), Na(+) and Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) during non-dust weather were not strong, only 0.065, 0.131 and 0.163, respectively. The low correlation coefficients indicated that these species were derived from different sources. The mass concentration of Cl(-) in the dust weather was significantly higher than that of floating dust and non dust, indicating that soil dust was the main source of Cl(-).

  10. The major-ion composition of Cenozoic seawater: the past 36 million years from fluid inclusions in marine halite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brennan, Sean T.; Lowenstein, Tim K.; Cendon, Dioni I.

    2013-01-01

    Fluid inclusions from ten Cenozoic (Eocene-Miocene) marine halites are used to quantify the major-ion composition (Mg2+, Ca2+, K+, Na+, SO42−, and Cl−) of seawater over the past 36 My. Criteria used to determine a seawater origin of the halites include: (1) stratigraphic, sedimentologic, and paleontologic observations; (2) Br− in halite; (3) δ34S of sulfate minerals; (4) 87Sr/86Sr of carbonates and sulfates; and (5) fluid inclusion brine compositions and evaporation paths, which must overlap from geographically separated basins of the same age to confirm a “global” seawater chemical signal. Changes in the major-ion chemistry of Cenozoic seawater record the end of a systematic, long term (>150 My) shift from the Ca2+-rich, Mg2+- and SO42−-poor seawater of the Mesozoic (“CaCl2 seas”) to the “MgSO4 seas” (with higher Mg2+ and SO42−>Ca2+) of the Cenozoic. The major ion composition of Cenozoic seawater is calculated for the Eocene-Oligocene (36-34 Ma), Serravallian-Tortonian (13.5-11.8 Ma) and the Messinian (6-5 Ma), assuming chlorinity (565 mmolal), salinity, and the K+ concentration (11 mmolal) are constant and the same as in modern seawater. Fluid inclusions from Cenozoic marine halites show that the concentrations of Mg2+and SO42− have increased in seawater over the past 36 My and the concentration of Ca2+ has decreased. Mg2+ concentrations increased from 36 mmolal in Eocene-Oligocene seawater (36-34 Ma) to 55 mmolal in modern seawater. The Mg2+/Ca2+ ratio of seawater has risen from ∼2.3 at the end of the Eocene, to 3.4 and 4.0, respectively, at 13.5 to 11.8 Ma and 6 to 5 Ma, and to 5 in modern seawater. Eocene-Oligocene seawater (36-34 Ma) has estimated ranges of SO42− = 14–23 mmolal and Ca2+ = 11–20 mmolal. If the (Ca2+)(SO42−) product is assumed to be the same as in modern seawater (∼300 mmolal2), Eocene-Oligocene seawater had Ca2+ ∼16 mmolal and SO42− ∼19 mmolal. The same estimates of Ca2+ and SO42− for Serravallian

  11. Predicting the toxicity of major ions in seawater to mysid shrimp (Mysidopsis bahia), sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus), and inland silverside minnow (Menidia beryllina)

    SciTech Connect

    Pillard, D.A.; DuFresne, D.L.; Caudle, D.D.; Tietge, J.E.; Evans, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    Although marine organisms are naturally adapted to salinities well above those of freshwater, elevated concentrations of specific ions have been shown to cause adverse effects on some saltwater species. Because some ions are also physiologically essential, a deficiency of these ions can also cause significant effects. To provide a predictive tool to assess toxicity associated with major ions, mysid shrimp (Mysidopsis bahia), sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus), and inland silverside minnows (Menidia beryllina) were exposed to saline solutions containing calcium, magnesium, potassium, strontium, bicarbonate, borate, bromide, and sulfate at concentrations above and below what would be found in seawater. Solution salinity was maintained at approximately 31% by increasing or decreasing sodium and chloride concentrations. Logistic regression models were developed with both the ion molar concentrations and ion activity. Toxicity to all three species was observed when either a deficiency or an excess of potassium and calcium occurred. Significant mortality occurred in all species when exposed to excess concentrations of magnesium, bicarbonate, and borate. The response to the remaining ions varied with species. Sheepshead minnows were the most tolerant of both deficient and elevated levels of the different ions. Mysid shrimp and inland silverside minnows demonstrated similar sensitivities to several ions, but silverside minnow response was more variable. As a result, the logistic models that predict inland silverside minnow survival generally were less robust than for the other two species.

  12. Major Ion Geochemistry of Horseshoe Lake, Mammoth Lakes, California: Water Quality in a Region with Elevated CO2 from Sub-Surface Leakage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santilena, R.; Szutu, D.; Ellis, A. S.; Khachikian, C. S.

    2010-12-01

    Tree-kill areas around Horseshoe Lake indicate how naturally high levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted from a cooling magma chamber are affecting the ecosystem. CO2 leakage from geologically sequestered CO2 sites may have similar effects. Weathering processes and water quality changes are two other environmental impacts of high levels of CO2 leaking from subsurface CO2 reservoirs. This study’s focus was to conduct a geochemical study of Horseshoe Lake with emphasis on water chemistry to determine any quantifiable effects from the high release of volcanic CO2. We collected 22 water samples, including 5 samples from streams that drained into the lake. Two interior locations were sampled at the surface and at depths of 2-meter intervals. The interior lake samples showed increasing Mg and Ca concentrations from the surface to 12 m in depth, and increasing Sr and Si from the surface to 4 m in depth. Water samples were measured for temperature, conductivity, pH, alkalinity, and analyzed for major ions Ca2+, K+, Na+, Mg2+, Cl-, SO42-, and HCO3- (from alkalinity). Amounts of Al, Ca, K, Mg, Na, and high levels of Si from elemental data are consistent with waters in granitic environments. Temperature in the lakes and streams ranged from 3.5 to 16 °C, pH ranged from 5.9-7.2, conductivity ranged from 8.66 to 21.93 μS/cm, and alkalinity ranged from 0.137- 0.408 meq/L. A TSI Q-Trak™ measured soil and ambient CO2 concentrations in July and a Vernier LabQuest was used in August. A bottomless bottle was placed in the soil in a10cm deep hole with the probe inserted in the top. A probe about 1 m above ground measured the ambient CO2 concentrations. To determine the flux of soil CO2, concentrations were read over a 5-minute time period. CO2 gas concentrations in the tree kill area ranged from 600 to 1,700 ppm in ambient air, and over 99,000 ppm in the soil. Maximum readings were exceeded so actual values of CO2 in the soil are not known. The stream samples had a different

  13. Simultaneous determinations by theophylline and its major metabolites in urine by reversed-phase ion-pair high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Muir, K T; Jonkman, J H; Tang, D S; Kunitani, M; Riegelman, S

    1980-11-14

    A new, highly slective high-performance liquid-chromatographic (HPLC) assay for theophylline and its major metabolites in urine is described. The method utilizes an ion-pair extraction followed by separation and quantitation by reversed-phase ion-pair gradient-elution HPLC. Comparison with several other methods showed that interferences were present in too many blank urine samples to allow for the accurate quantitation of the metabolites of theophylline by direct injection--isocratic HPLC assays. Sample processing involving ion-pair complexing and extraction together with gradient-elution systems is recommended for accurate pharmacokinetic studies.

  14. Evaluating the role of metal ions in the bathochromic and hyperchromic responses of cyanidin derivatives in acidic and alkaline pH.

    PubMed

    Sigurdson, G T; Robbins, R J; Collins, T M; Giusti, M M

    2016-10-01

    In many food products, colorants derived from natural sources are increasingly popular due to consumer demand. Anthocyanins are one class of versatile and abundant naturally occurring chromophores that produce different hues in nature, especially with metal ions and other copigments assisting. The effects of chelation of metal ions (Mg(2+), Al(3+), Cr(3+), Fe(3+), and Ga(3+)) in factorial excesses to anthocyanin concentration (0-500×) on the spectral characteristics (380-700nm) of cyanidin and acylated cyanidin derivatives were evaluated to better understand the color evolution of anthocyanin-metal chelates in pH 3-8. In all pH, anthocyanins exhibited bathochromic and hyperchromic shifts. Largest bathochromic shifts most often occurred in pH 6; while largest hyperchromic shifts occurred in pH 5. Divalent Mg(2+) showed no observable effect on anthocyanin color while trivalent metal ions caused bathochromic shifts and hue changes. Generally, bathochromic shifts on anthocyanins were greatest with more electron rich metal ions (Fe(3+)≈Ga(3+)>Al(3+)>Cr(3+)).

  15. Evaluating the role of metal ions in the bathochromic and hyperchromic responses of cyanidin derivatives in acidic and alkaline pH.

    PubMed

    Sigurdson, G T; Robbins, R J; Collins, T M; Giusti, M M

    2016-10-01

    In many food products, colorants derived from natural sources are increasingly popular due to consumer demand. Anthocyanins are one class of versatile and abundant naturally occurring chromophores that produce different hues in nature, especially with metal ions and other copigments assisting. The effects of chelation of metal ions (Mg(2+), Al(3+), Cr(3+), Fe(3+), and Ga(3+)) in factorial excesses to anthocyanin concentration (0-500×) on the spectral characteristics (380-700nm) of cyanidin and acylated cyanidin derivatives were evaluated to better understand the color evolution of anthocyanin-metal chelates in pH 3-8. In all pH, anthocyanins exhibited bathochromic and hyperchromic shifts. Largest bathochromic shifts most often occurred in pH 6; while largest hyperchromic shifts occurred in pH 5. Divalent Mg(2+) showed no observable effect on anthocyanin color while trivalent metal ions caused bathochromic shifts and hue changes. Generally, bathochromic shifts on anthocyanins were greatest with more electron rich metal ions (Fe(3+)≈Ga(3+)>Al(3+)>Cr(3+)). PMID:27132820

  16. The influence of the major ions of seawater on the adsorption of simple organic acids by goethite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balistrieri, Laurie S.; Murray, James W.

    1987-05-01

    The adsorption of oxalic, phthalic, salicylic, and lactic acids on goethite from 0.53 M NaCl and from synthetic major ion seawater is examined to determine the effect of Mg, Ca, and SO 4 on the adsorption behavior of the organic compounds. The comparison shows that organic acid adsorption is suppressed in seawater relative to the NaCl system. Successive additions of SO 4, Mg, and Ca in their natural ionic proportions found in seawater to 0.53 M NaCl indicate that sulfate suppresses the adsorption of all the organic acids, especially in the low pH range. The addition of Mg also suppresses the adsorption of oxalic and phthalic acids while the addition of Ca suppresses lactic acid adsorption. The effect of SO 4, Mg, and Ca on the adsorption of the organic acids is due to competition for available binding sites and the formation of solution complexes which either do not adsorb or weakly adsorb.

  17. Process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Chia-lin W.

    1994-01-01

    According to its major aspects and broadly stated, the present invention is a process for treating alkaline waste materials, including high level radioactive wastes, for vitrification. The process involves adjusting the pH of the wastes with nitric acid, adding formic acid (or a process stream containing formic acid) to reduce mercury compounds to elemental mercury and MnO{sub 2} to the Mn(II) ion, and mixing with class formers to produce a melter feed. The process minimizes production of hydrogen due to noble metal-catalyzed formic acid decomposition during, treatment, while producing a redox-balanced feed for effective melter operation and a quality glass product. An important feature of the present invention is the use of different acidifying and reducing, agents to treat the wastes. The nitric acid acidifies the wastes to improve yield stress and supplies acid for various reactions; then the formic acid reduces mercury compounds to elemental mercury and MnO{sub 2}) to the Mn(II) ion. When the pH of the waste is lower, reduction of mercury compounds and MnO{sub 2}) is faster and less formic acid is needed, and the production of hydrogen caused by catalytically-active noble metals is decreased.

  18. Preparation and Electrochemical Performance of LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 Cathode Materials for Lithium-ion Batteries from Spent Mixed Alkaline Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li; Xi, Guoxi

    2016-01-01

    LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 cathode materials of lithium-ion batteries were successfully re-synthesized using mixed spent alkaline zinc-manganese batteries and spent lithium-ion batteries as the raw materials. These materials were synthesized by using a combination of dissolution, co-precipitation, calcination, battery preparation, and battery charge-discharge processes. The phase composition, morphology, and electrochemical performance of the products were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, infrared spectra, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy, and charge-discharge measurements. The results showed that LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 cathode materials could be successfully re-synthesized at optimal preparation conditions of: co-precipitation, pH value of 8, calcination temperature of 850°C, and calcination time of 10 h. Furthermore, the electrochemical results showed that the re-synthesized sample could deliver an initial discharge capacity of up to 160.2 mAh g-1 and Coulomb efficiency of 99.8%.

  19. Supramolecular recognition control of polyethylene glycol modified N-doped graphene quantum dots: tunable selectivity for alkali and alkaline-earth metal ions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Siwei; Sun, Jing; Zhu, Chong; He, Peng; Peng, Zheng; Ding, Guqiao

    2016-02-01

    The graphene quantum dot based fluorescent probe community needs unambiguous evidence about the control on the ion selectivity. In this paper, polyethylene glycol modified N-doped graphene quantum dots (PN-GQDs) were synthesized by alkylation reaction between graphene quantum dots and organic halides. We demonstrate the tunable selectivity and sensitivity by controlling the supramolecular recognition through the length and the end group size of the polyether chain on PN-GQDs. The relationship formulae between the selectivity/detection limit and polyether chains are experimentally deduced. The polyether chain length determines the interaction between the PN-GQDs and ions with different ratios of charge to radius, which in turn leads to a good selectivity control. Meanwhile the detection limit shows an exponential growth with the size of end groups of the polyether chain. The PN-GQDs can be used as ultrasensitive and selective fluorescent probes for Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+) and Sr(2+), respectively. PMID:26730814

  20. A set of alkali and alkaline-earth coordination polymers based on the ligand 2-(1H-benzotriazol-1-yl) acetic acid: Effects the radius of metal ions on structures and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jin-Hua; Tang, Gui-Mei; Qin, Ting-Xiao; Yan, Shi-Chen; Wang, Yong-Tao; Cui, Yue-Zhi; Weng Ng, Seik

    2014-11-15

    Four new metal coordination complexes, namely, [Na(BTA)]{sub n} (1), [K{sub 2}(BTA){sub 2}(μ{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O)]{sub n} (2), and [M(BTA){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub n} (M=Ca(II) and Sr(II) for 3 and 4, respectively) [BTA=2-(1H-benzotriazol-1-yl) acetic anion], have been obtained under hydrothermal condition, by reacting the different alkali and alkaline-earth metal hydroxides with HBTA. Complexes 1–4 were structurally characterized by X-ray single-crystal diffraction, EA, IR, PXRD, and thermogravimetry analysis (TGA). These complexes display low-dimensional features displaying various two-dimensional (2D) and one-dimensional (1D) coordination motifs. Complex 1 displays a 2D layer with the thickness of 1.5 nm and possesses a topologic structure of a 11 nodal net with Schläfli symbol of (3{sup 18}). Complex 2 also shows a thick 2D sheet and its topologic structure is a 9 nodes with Schläfli symbol of (3{sup 11}×4{sup 2}). Complexes 3 and 4 possess a 1D linear chain and further stack via hydrogen bonding interactions to generate a three-dimensional supramolecular architecture. These results suggest that both the coordination preferences of the metal ions and the versatile nature of this flexible ligand play a critical role in the final structures. The luminescent spectra show strong emission intensities in complexes 1–4, which display violet photoluminescence. Additionally, ferroelectric, dielectric and nonlinear optic (NLO) second-harmonic generation (SHG) properties of 2 are discussed in detail. - Graphical abstract: A set of alkali and alkaline-earth metal coordination polymers were hydrothermally synthesized by 2-(1H-benzotriazol-1-yl)acetic acid, displaying interesting topologic motifs from two-dimension to one-dimension and specific physical properties. - Highlights: • Alkali and alkaline-earth metal coordination polymers have been obtained. • The ligand 2-(1H-benzotriazol-1-yl)acetic acid has been adopted. • The two-dimensional and one

  1. Alkaline Earth Metal Zirconate Perovskites MZrO3 (M=Ba(2+), Sr(2+), Ca(2+)) Derived from Molecular Precursors and Doped with Eu(3+) Ions.

    PubMed

    Drąg-Jarząbek, Anna; John, Łukasz; Petrus, Rafał; Kosińska-Klähn, Magdalena; Sobota, Piotr

    2016-03-24

    The effect of alkaline earth metal alkoxides on the protonation of zirconocene dichloride was investigated. This approach enabled the design of compounds with preset molecular structures for generating high-purity binary metal oxide perovskites MZrO3 (M=Ba(2+), Sr(2+), Ca(2+)). Single-source molecular precursors [Ba4 Zr2 (μ6 -O)(μ3 ,η(2)-OR)8 (OR)2(η(2) -HOR)2 (HOR)2 Cl4], [Sr4 Zr2 (μ6 -O)(μ3 ,η(2)-OR)8 (OR)2 (HOR)4 Cl4], [Ca4 Zr2 (μ6-O)(μ3 ,η(2)-OR)8 (OR)2 Cl4], and [Ca6 Zr2 (μ2 ,η(2)-OR)12 (μ-Cl)2 (η(2) -HOR)4 Cl6 ]⋅8 CH2 Cl2 were prepared via elimination of the cyclopentadienyl ring from Cp2 ZrCl2 as CpH in the presence of M(OR)2 and alcohol ROH (ROH=CH3OCH2 CH2OH) as a source of protons. The resulting complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, IR and NMR spectroscopy, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The compounds were then thermally decomposed to MCl2 /MZrO3 mixtures. Leaching of MCl2 from the raw powder with deionized water produced highly pure perovskite-like oxide particles of 40-80 nm in size. Luminescence studies on Eu(3+)-doped MZrO3 revealed that the perovskites are attractive host lattices for potential applications in display technology. PMID:26891039

  2. Direct injection ion chromatography for the control of chlorinated drinking water: simultaneous estimation of nine haloacetic acids and quantitation of bromate, chlorite and chlorate along with the major inorganic anions.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Villanova, Rafael J; Raposo Funcia, César; Oliveira Dantas Leite, M Vilani; Toruño Fonseca, Ivania M; Espinosa Nieto, Miguel; Espuelas India, Javier

    2014-09-01

    Most methods for the analysis of haloacetic acids published in recent years are based on ion chromatography with direct injection, employing a gradient elution with potassium hydroxide (KOH). This work reports the exploration of an alternative eluent, a buffer of sodium carbonate/sodium hydrogen carbonate, aimed at the simultaneous analysis of nine haloacetic acids along with bromate, chlorite and chlorate. The alternative of both a less alkaline eluent and a lower temperature of operation may prevent the partial decomposition of some of the haloacetic acids during the analytical process, especially the more vulnerable brominated ones. Gradient elution at temperature of 7 °C yielded the best results, with an acceptable separation of 17 analytes (which includes the major natural inorganic anions) and a good linearity. Precision ranges from 0.3 to 23.4 (% V.C.), and detection limits are within units of μg L⁻¹, except for tribromoacetic acid - somewhat high in comparison with those of the official methods. Nonetheless, with the basic instrumentation setup herein described, this method may be suitable for monitoring when the drinking water treatments are to be optimized. This is especially interesting for small communities or for developing/developed countries in which regulations on disinfection by-products others than trihalomethanes are being addressed. PMID:25252348

  3. Direct injection ion chromatography for the control of chlorinated drinking water: simultaneous estimation of nine haloacetic acids and quantitation of bromate, chlorite and chlorate along with the major inorganic anions.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Villanova, Rafael J; Raposo Funcia, César; Oliveira Dantas Leite, M Vilani; Toruño Fonseca, Ivania M; Espinosa Nieto, Miguel; Espuelas India, Javier

    2014-09-01

    Most methods for the analysis of haloacetic acids published in recent years are based on ion chromatography with direct injection, employing a gradient elution with potassium hydroxide (KOH). This work reports the exploration of an alternative eluent, a buffer of sodium carbonate/sodium hydrogen carbonate, aimed at the simultaneous analysis of nine haloacetic acids along with bromate, chlorite and chlorate. The alternative of both a less alkaline eluent and a lower temperature of operation may prevent the partial decomposition of some of the haloacetic acids during the analytical process, especially the more vulnerable brominated ones. Gradient elution at temperature of 7 °C yielded the best results, with an acceptable separation of 17 analytes (which includes the major natural inorganic anions) and a good linearity. Precision ranges from 0.3 to 23.4 (% V.C.), and detection limits are within units of μg L⁻¹, except for tribromoacetic acid - somewhat high in comparison with those of the official methods. Nonetheless, with the basic instrumentation setup herein described, this method may be suitable for monitoring when the drinking water treatments are to be optimized. This is especially interesting for small communities or for developing/developed countries in which regulations on disinfection by-products others than trihalomethanes are being addressed.

  4. Identification of differentially expressed genes in flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) under saline-alkaline stress by digital gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ying; Huang, Wengong; Chen, Hongyu; Wu, Guangwen; Yuan, Hongmei; Song, Xixia; Kang, Qinghua; Zhao, Dongsheng; Jiang, Weidong; Liu, Yan; Wu, Jianzhong; Cheng, Lili; Yao, Yubo; Guan, Fengzhi

    2014-10-01

    The salinization and alkalization of soil are widespread environmental problems, and alkaline salt stress is more destructive than neutral salt stress. Therefore, understanding the mechanism of plant tolerance to saline-alkaline stress has become a major challenge. However, little attention has been paid to the mechanism of plant alkaline salt tolerance. In this study, gene expression profiling of flax was analyzed under alkaline-salt stress (AS2), neutral salt stress (NSS) and alkaline stress (AS) by digital gene expression. Three-week-old flax seedlings were placed in 25 mM Na2CO3 (pH11.6) (AS2), 50mM NaCl (NSS) and NaOH (pH11.6) (AS) for 18 h. There were 7736, 1566 and 454 differentially expressed genes in AS2, NSS and AS compared to CK, respectively. The GO category gene enrichment analysis revealed that photosynthesis was particularly affected in AS2, carbohydrate metabolism was particularly affected in NSS, and the response to biotic stimulus was particularly affected in AS. We also analyzed the expression pattern of five categories of genes including transcription factors, signaling transduction proteins, phytohormones, reactive oxygen species proteins and transporters under these three stresses. Some key regulatory gene families involved in abiotic stress, such as WRKY, MAPKKK, ABA, PrxR and ion channels, were differentially expressed. Compared with NSS and AS, AS2 triggered more differentially expressed genes and special pathways, indicating that the mechanism of AS2 was more complex than NSS and AS. To the best of our knowledge, this was the first transcriptome analysis of flax in response to saline-alkaline stress. These data indicate that common and diverse features of saline-alkaline stress provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms of plant saline-alkaline tolerance and offer a number of candidate genes as potential markers of tolerance to saline-alkaline stress. PMID:25058012

  5. Identification of differentially expressed genes in flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) under saline-alkaline stress by digital gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ying; Huang, Wengong; Chen, Hongyu; Wu, Guangwen; Yuan, Hongmei; Song, Xixia; Kang, Qinghua; Zhao, Dongsheng; Jiang, Weidong; Liu, Yan; Wu, Jianzhong; Cheng, Lili; Yao, Yubo; Guan, Fengzhi

    2014-10-01

    The salinization and alkalization of soil are widespread environmental problems, and alkaline salt stress is more destructive than neutral salt stress. Therefore, understanding the mechanism of plant tolerance to saline-alkaline stress has become a major challenge. However, little attention has been paid to the mechanism of plant alkaline salt tolerance. In this study, gene expression profiling of flax was analyzed under alkaline-salt stress (AS2), neutral salt stress (NSS) and alkaline stress (AS) by digital gene expression. Three-week-old flax seedlings were placed in 25 mM Na2CO3 (pH11.6) (AS2), 50mM NaCl (NSS) and NaOH (pH11.6) (AS) for 18 h. There were 7736, 1566 and 454 differentially expressed genes in AS2, NSS and AS compared to CK, respectively. The GO category gene enrichment analysis revealed that photosynthesis was particularly affected in AS2, carbohydrate metabolism was particularly affected in NSS, and the response to biotic stimulus was particularly affected in AS. We also analyzed the expression pattern of five categories of genes including transcription factors, signaling transduction proteins, phytohormones, reactive oxygen species proteins and transporters under these three stresses. Some key regulatory gene families involved in abiotic stress, such as WRKY, MAPKKK, ABA, PrxR and ion channels, were differentially expressed. Compared with NSS and AS, AS2 triggered more differentially expressed genes and special pathways, indicating that the mechanism of AS2 was more complex than NSS and AS. To the best of our knowledge, this was the first transcriptome analysis of flax in response to saline-alkaline stress. These data indicate that common and diverse features of saline-alkaline stress provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms of plant saline-alkaline tolerance and offer a number of candidate genes as potential markers of tolerance to saline-alkaline stress.

  6. Variability of Near-stream, Sub-surface Major-ion and Tracer Concentrations in an Acid Mine Drainage Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bencala, K. E.; Kimball, B. A.; Runkel, R. L.

    2006-12-01

    In acid mine drainage environments, tracer-injection and synoptic sampling approaches provide tools for making operational estimates of solute loading within a stream segment. Identifying sub-surface contaminant sources remains a challenge both for characterization of in-stream metal loading and hydrological process research. There is a need to quantitatively define the character and source of contaminants entering streams from ground-water pathways, as well as the potential for changes in water chemistry and contaminant concentrations along these flow paths crossing the sediment-water interface. Complicating the identification of inflows is the mixing of solute sources which may occur in the `near-stream' subsurface areas and specifically along hyporheic exchange flows (HEFs). In Mineral Creek (Silverton, Colorado), major-ion (SO42-, Cl-, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+) meter-scale sampling shows that subsurface inflows and likely HEFs occur in a hydro- geochemical setting of significant, one order-of-magnitude, spatial variation in the solute concentrations. Transient Storage Models (TSMs) are a tool for interpreting the in-stream responses of solute transport in streams influenced by hyporheic exchange flows. Simulations using the USGS TSM code OTIS are interpreted as suggesting that in Mineral Creek the strong concentration `tailing' of bromide following the tracer injection occurred, at least in part, from HEFs in a hydro - solute transport setting of likely multiple, dispersed and mixed sources of water along a 64 m sub-reach of the nominally gaining stream. In acid mine drainage environments, the ability to distinguish between local and deep solute sources is critical in modeling reactive transport along the stream, as well as in identifying the geochemical evolution of dispersed, subsurface inflows thorough the catchment.

  7. Tracing groundwater input into Lake Vanda, Wright Valley, Antarctica using major ions, stable isotopes and noble gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, C. B.; Poreda, R. J.; Snyder, G. T.

    2008-12-01

    The McMurdo Dry Valleys (MDV), Antarctica, is the largest ice-free region on Antarctica. Lake Vanda, located in central Wright Valley, is the deepest lake among the MDV lakes. It has a relatively fresh water layer above 50 m with a hypersaline calcium-chloride brine below (50-72 m). The Onyx River is the only stream input into Lake Vanda. It flows westward from the coastal Lower Wright Glacier and discharges into Lake Vanda. Suggested by the published literature and this study, there has been and may still be groundwater input into Lake Vanda. Stable isotopes, major ions, and noble gas data from this study coupled with previously published data indicate that the bottom waters of Lake Vanda have had significant contributions from a deep groundwater system. The dissolved gas of the bottom waters of Lake Vanda display solubility concentrations rather than the Ar-enriched dissolved gas seen in the Taylor Valley lakes (such as Lake Bonney). The isotopic data indicate that the bottom calcium-chloride-brine of Lake Vanda has undergone very little evaporation. The calcium-chloride chemistry of the groundwater that discharges into Lake Vanda most likely results from the chemical weathering and dissolution of cryogenic evaporites (antarcticite and gypsum) within the glacial sediments of Wright Valley. The high calcium concentrations of the brine have caused gypsum to precipitate on the lake bottom. Our work also supports previous physical and chemical observations suggesting that the upper portion actively circulates and the hypersaline bottom layer does not. The helium and calcium chloride values are concentrated at the bottom, with a very narrow transition layer between it and the above fresh water. If the freshwater layer did not actively circulate, then diffusion over time would have caused the helium and calcium chloride to slowly permeate upwards through the water column.

  8. Alkaline injection for enhanced oil recovery: a status report

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, E.H.; Berg, R.L.; Carmichael, J.D.; Weinbrandt, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    In the past several years, there has been renewed interest in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by alkaline injection. Alkaline solutions also are being used as preflushes in micellar/polymer projects. Several major field tests of alkaline flooding are planned, are in progress, or recently have been completed. Considerable basic research on alkaline injection has been published recently, and more is in progress. This paper summarizes known field tests and, where available, the amount of alkali injected and the performance results. Recent laboratory work, much sponsored by the U.S. DOE, and the findings are described. Alkaline flood field test plans for new projects are summarized.

  9. Rapid changes in water hardness and alkalinity: Calcite formation is lethal to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Bogart, Sarah J; Woodman, Samuel; Steinkey, Dylan; Meays, Cindy; Pyle, Greg G

    2016-07-15

    There is growing concern that freshwater ecosystems may be negatively affected by ever-increasing anthropogenic inputs of extremely hard, highly alkaline effluent containing large quantities of Ca(2+), Mg(2+), CO3(2-), and HCO3(-) ions. In this study, the toxicity of rapid and extreme shifts in water hardness (38-600mg/L as CaCO3) and alkalinity (30-420mg/L as CaCO3) to Daphnia magna was tested, both independently and in combination. Within these ranges, where no precipitation event occurred, shifts in water hardness and/or alkalinity were not toxic to D. magna. In contrast, 98-100% of D. magna died within 96h after exposure to 600mg/L as CaCO3 water hardness and 420mg/L as CaCO3 alkalinity (LT50 of 60h with a 95% CI of 54.2-66.0h). In this treatment, a CaCO3 (calcite) precipitate formed in the water column which was ingested by and thoroughly coated the D. magna. Calcite collected from a mining impacted stream contained embedded organisms, suggesting field streams may also experience similar conditions and possibly increased mortality as observed in the lab tests. Although further investigation is required to determine the exact fate of aquatic organisms exposed to rapid calcite precipitation in the field, we caution that negative effects may occur more quickly or at lower concentrations of water hardness and alkalinity in which we observed effects in D. magna, because some species, such as aquatic insects, are more sensitive than cladocerans to changes in ionic strength. Our results provide evidence that both calcite precipitation and the major ion balance of waters should be managed in industrially affected ecosystems and we support the development of a hardness+alkalinity guideline for the protection of aquatic life.

  10. Rapid changes in water hardness and alkalinity: Calcite formation is lethal to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Bogart, Sarah J; Woodman, Samuel; Steinkey, Dylan; Meays, Cindy; Pyle, Greg G

    2016-07-15

    There is growing concern that freshwater ecosystems may be negatively affected by ever-increasing anthropogenic inputs of extremely hard, highly alkaline effluent containing large quantities of Ca(2+), Mg(2+), CO3(2-), and HCO3(-) ions. In this study, the toxicity of rapid and extreme shifts in water hardness (38-600mg/L as CaCO3) and alkalinity (30-420mg/L as CaCO3) to Daphnia magna was tested, both independently and in combination. Within these ranges, where no precipitation event occurred, shifts in water hardness and/or alkalinity were not toxic to D. magna. In contrast, 98-100% of D. magna died within 96h after exposure to 600mg/L as CaCO3 water hardness and 420mg/L as CaCO3 alkalinity (LT50 of 60h with a 95% CI of 54.2-66.0h). In this treatment, a CaCO3 (calcite) precipitate formed in the water column which was ingested by and thoroughly coated the D. magna. Calcite collected from a mining impacted stream contained embedded organisms, suggesting field streams may also experience similar conditions and possibly increased mortality as observed in the lab tests. Although further investigation is required to determine the exact fate of aquatic organisms exposed to rapid calcite precipitation in the field, we caution that negative effects may occur more quickly or at lower concentrations of water hardness and alkalinity in which we observed effects in D. magna, because some species, such as aquatic insects, are more sensitive than cladocerans to changes in ionic strength. Our results provide evidence that both calcite precipitation and the major ion balance of waters should be managed in industrially affected ecosystems and we support the development of a hardness+alkalinity guideline for the protection of aquatic life. PMID:27060657

  11. Kinetic approach to evaluate the energy and entropy of activation for the exchange of alkaline earth metal ions on tin(IV) tungstate cation exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Varshney, K.G.; Khan, A.A.; Varshney, K.; Agrawal, S.

    1984-01-01

    A new approach based on the Nernst-Planck equations has been applied to study the reaction kinetics on the surface of tin(IV) tungstate for the Mg(II)-H(I), Ca(II)-H(I), Sr(II)-H(I) and Ba(II)-H(I) exchanges under the conditions favouring a particle diffusion phenomenon. On the basis of these studies the various physical parameters such as the effective diffusion coefficients, activation energies and entropies of activation have been evaluated which give some informations regarding the mechanism of ion-exchange on the surface of inorganic materials. 25 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  12. Anodes for alkaline electrolysis

    DOEpatents

    Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev

    2011-02-01

    A method of making an anode for alkaline electrolysis cells includes adsorption of precursor material on a carbonaceous material, conversion of the precursor material to hydroxide form and conversion of precursor material from hydroxide form to oxy-hydroxide form within the alkaline electrolysis cell.

  13. Alkaline "Permanent" Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacey, Antony

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of paper manufacturing processes and their effects on library materials focuses on the promotion of alkaline "permanent" paper, with less acid, by Canadian library preservation specialists. Standards for paper acidity are explained; advantages of alkaline paper are described, including decreased manufacturing costs; and recyclability is…

  14. Redox reactions of actinides in carbonate and alkaline solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shilov, Vladimir P.; Yusov, Aleksander B.

    2002-06-01

    Data on redox reactions involving uranium, neptunium, plutonium and americium ions in carbonate and alkaline solutions are generalised. The results of kinetic studies of these reactions are analysed and their mechanisms are discussed. The bibliography includes 169 references.

  15. Sequential injection system with higher dimensional electrochemical sensor signals Part 2. Potentiometric e-tongue for the determination of alkaline ions.

    PubMed

    Cortina, M; Gutés, A; Alegret, S; Del Valle, Manuel

    2005-06-15

    An intelligent, automatic system based on an array of non-specific-response chemical sensors was developed. As a great amount of information is required for its correct modelling, we propose a system generating it itself. The sequential injection analysis (SIA) technique was chosen as it enables the processes of training, calibration, validation and operation to be automated simply. Detection was carried out using an array of potentiometric sensors based on PVC membranes of different selectivity. The diluted standard solutions needed for system learning and response modelling are automatically prepared from more concentrated standards. The electrodes used were characterised with respect to one and two analytes, by means of high-dimensionality calibrations, and the response surface of each was represented; this characterisation enabled an interference study of great practical utility. The combined response was modelled by means of artificial neural networks (ANNs), and thus it was possible to obtain an automated electronic tongue based on SIA. In order to identify the ANN which provided the best model of the electrode responses, some of the network's parameters were optimised and its usefulness in determining NH(4)(+), K(+) and Na(+) ions in synthetic samples was then tested. Finally, it was used to determine these ions in commercial fertilisers, the obtained results being compared with reference methods. PMID:18970109

  16. Hydrogen ion secretion by the collecting duct as a determinant of the urine to blood PCO2 gradient in alkaline urine

    SciTech Connect

    DuBose, T.D. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Several theories have been advanced to explain the elevation in urinary PCO/sub 2/ during bicarbonate loading and include: (a) H+ secretion, (b) countercurrent system for CO/sub 2/, (c) the ampholyte properties of bicarbonate, and (d) mixing of urine of disparate bicarbonate and butter concentrations. In this study microelectrodes were used to measure in situ and equilibrium pH (pHis and pHeq) and PCO/sub 2/ in control and bicarbonate loaded rats before and after infusion of carbonic anhydrase. The disequilibrium pH method (pHdq . pHis - pHeq) was used to demonstrate H+ secretion. Control rats excreting an acid urine (pH . 6.04 +/- 0.06) failed to display a significant disequilibrium pH at the base (BCD), or tip (TCD) of the papillary collecting duct. Urine pH (7.54 +/- 0.12), and urine to blood (U-B) PCO/sub 2/ increased significantly during NaHCO/sub 3/ loading while PCO/sub 2/ at the BCD and TCD also increased (95 +/- 4 and 122 +/- 4). Furthermore, an acid disequilibrium pH was present at both the BCD and TCD (-0.42 +/- 0.04 and -0.36 +/- 0.03) and was obliterated by carbonic anhydrase. Comparison of the PCO/sub 2/ in the BCD or TCD with the adjacent vasa recta revealed similar values (r . 0.97). It is concluded that H+ secretion by the collecting duct into bicarbonate containing fluid with delayed dehydration of H/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, is the most likely determinant of the U-B PCO/sub 2/ in alkaline urine. Similar values for PCO/sub 2/ in the collecting duct and the adjacent vasa recta suggests trapping of CO/sub 2/ in the medullary countercurrent system. The rise in PCO/sub 2/ occurs both along the collecting duct and after exit from the papilla.

  17. SEPARATION OF PLUTONYL IONS

    DOEpatents

    Connick, R.E.; McVey, Wm.H.

    1958-07-15

    A process is described for separating plutonyl ions from the acetate ions with which they are associated in certaln carrier precipitation methods of concentrating plutonium. The method consists in adding alkaline earth metal ions and subsequently alkalizing the solution, causing formation of an alkaltne earth plutonate precipitate. Barium hydroxide is used in a preferred embodiment since it provides alkaline earth metal ion and alkalizes the solution in one step forming insoluble barium platonate.

  18. Differential expression of genes encoding neuronal ion-channel subunits in major depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia: implications for pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Smolin, Bella; Karry, Rachel; Gal-Ben-Ari, Shunit; Ben-Shachar, Dorit

    2012-08-01

    Evidence concerning ion-channel abnormalities in the pathophysiology of common psychiatric disorders is still limited. Given the significance of ion channels in neuronal activity, neurotransmission and neuronal plasticity we hypothesized that the expression patterns of genes encoding different ion channels may be altered in schizophrenia, bipolar and unipolar disorders. Frozen samples of striatum including the nucleus accumbens (Str-NAc) and the lateral cerebellar hemisphere of 60 brains from depressed (MDD), bipolar (BD), schizophrenic and normal subjects, obtained from the Stanley Foundation Brain Collection, were assayed. mRNA of 72 different ion-channel subunits were determined by qRT-PCR and alteration in four genes were verified by immunoblotting. In the Str-NAc the prominent change was observed in the MDD group, in which there was a significant up-regulation in genes encoding voltage-gated potassium-channel subunits. However, in the lateral cerebellar hemisphere (cerebellum), the main change was observed in schizophrenia specimens, as multiple genes encoding various ion-channel subunits were significantly down-regulated. The impaired expression of genes encoding ion channels demonstrates a disease-related neuroanatomical pattern. The alterations observed in Str-NAc of MDD may imply electrical hypo-activity of this region that could be of relevance to MDD symptoms and treatment. The robust unidirectional alteration of both excitatory and inhibitory ion channels in the cerebellum may suggests cerebellar general hypo-transcriptional activity in schizophrenia.

  19. Kinetic studies of the [NpO₂ (CO₃)₃]⁴⁻ ion at alkaline conditions using ¹³C NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Panasci, Adele F.; Harley, Stephen J.; Zavarin, Mavrik; Casey, William H.

    2014-04-21

    Carbonate ligand-exchange rates on the [NpO₂ (CO₃)₃]⁴⁻ ion were determined using a saturation-transfer ¹³C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) pulse sequence in the pH range of 8.1 ≤ pH ≤ 10.5. Over the pH range 9.3 ≤ pH ≤ 10.5, which compares most directly with previous work of Stout et al.,1 we find an average rate, activation energy, enthalpy, and entropy of k298ex = 40.6(±4.3) s⁻¹, Ea =45.1(±3.8) kJ mol⁻¹, ΔH = 42.6(±3.8) kJ mol⁻¹, and ΔS = -72(±13) J mol⁻¹ K⁻¹, respectively. These activation parameters are similar to the Stout et al. results at pH 9.4. However, their room-temperature rate at pH 9.4, k298ex = 143(±1.0) s⁻¹, is ~3 times faster than what we experimentally determined at pH 9.3: k298ex = 45.4(±5.3) s⁻¹. Our rates for [NpO₂ (CO₃)₃]⁴⁻ are also faster by a factor of ~3 relative to the isoelectronic [UO₂(CO₃)₃]⁴⁻ as reported by Brucher et al.2 of k298ex = 13(±3) s⁻¹. Consistent with results for the [UO₂(CO₃)₃]⁴⁻ ion, we find evidence for a proton-enhanced pathway for carbonate exchange for the [NpO₂(CO₃)₃]⁴⁻ ion at pH < 9.0.

  20. Estimates of average major ion concentrations in bulk precipitation at two high-altitude sites near the continental divide in Southwestern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, M.M.; Claassen, H.C.

    1985-01-01

    The composition of bulk precipitation from two high-altitude sites, established in 1971 near the Continental Divide in southwestern Colorado, has been monitored by season during the past decade. Calcium ions are the predominant cationic species; sulfate is the major anionic constituent. Bulk precipitation major ion concentrations exhibit log-normal distributions. Representative mean and standard deviation values for the major inorganic ionic species present in bulk precipitation have been calculated for three years of consecutive seasons. Standard deviations for all species, except nitrate, are similar. For two years of data grouped into quarters, deviations from mean values fall well within the plus or minus two standard deviation limit. There does not seem to be a systematic deviation from the mean concentration values, with respect to either ionic component or season.

  1. The major DNA repair pathway after both proton and carbon-ion radiation is NHEJ, but the HR pathway is more relevant in carbon ions.

    PubMed

    Gerelchuluun, Ariungerel; Manabe, Eri; Ishikawa, Takaaki; Sun, Lue; Itoh, Kazuya; Sakae, Takeji; Suzuki, Kenshi; Hirayama, Ryoichi; Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Chen, David J; Tsuboi, Koji

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the roles of non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR) pathways in repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by exposure to high-energy protons and carbon ions (C ions) versus gamma rays in Chinese hamster cells. Two Chinese hamster cell lines, ovary AA8 and lung fibroblast V79, as well as various mutant sublines lacking DNA-PKcs (V3), X-ray repair cross-complementing protein-4 [XRCC4 (XR1), XRCC3 (irs1SF) and XRCC2 (irs1)] were exposed to gamma rays ((137)Cs), protons (200 MeV; 2.2 keV/μm) and C ions (290 MeV; 50 keV/μm). V3 and XR1 cells lack the NHEJ pathway, whereas irs1 and irs1SF cells lack the HR pathway. After each exposure, survival was measured using a clonogenic survival assay, in situ DSB induction was evaluated by immunocytochemical analysis of histone H2AX phosphorylation at serine 139 (γ-H2AX foci) and chromosome aberrations were examined using solid staining. The findings from this study showed that clonogenic survival clearly depended on the NHEJ and HR pathway statuses, and that the DNA-PKcs(-/-) cells (V3) were the most sensitive to all radiation types. While protons and γ rays yielded almost the same biological effects, C-ion exposure greatly enhanced the sensitivity of wild-type and HR-deficient cells. However, no significant enhancement of sensitivity in cell killing was seen after C-ion irradiation of NHEJ deficient cells. Decreases in the number of γ-H2AX foci after irradiation occurred more slowly in the NHEJ deficient cells. In particular, V3 cells had the highest number of residual γ-H2AX foci at 24 h after C-ion irradiation. Chromosomal aberrations were significantly higher in both the NHEJ- and HR-deficient cell lines than in wild-type cell lines in response to all radiation types. Protons and gamma rays induced the same aberration levels in each cell line, whereas C ions introduced higher but not significantly different aberration levels. Our results

  2. Principal Locations of Major-Ion, Trace-Element, Nitrate, and Escherichia coli Loading to Emigration Creek, Salt Lake County, Utah, October 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimball, Briant A.; Runkel, Robert L.; Walton-Day, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    Housing development and recreational activity in Emigration Canyon have increased substantially since 1980, perhaps causing an observed decrease in water quality of this northern Utah stream located near Salt Lake City. To identify reaches of the stream that contribute to water-quality degradation, a tracer-injection and synoptic-sampling study was done to quantify mass loading of major ions, trace elements, nitrate, and Escherichia coli (E. coli) to the stream. The resulting mass-loading profiles for major ions and trace elements indicate both geologic and anthropogenic inputs to the stream, principally from tributary and spring inflows to the stream at Brigham Fork, Burr Fork, Wagner Spring, Emigration Tunnel Spring, Blacksmith Hollow, and Killyon Canyon. The pattern of nitrate loading does not correspond to the major-ion and trace-element loading patterns. Nitrate levels in the stream did not exceed water-quality standards at the time of synoptic sampling. The majority of nitrate mass loading can be considered related to anthropogenic input, based on the field settings and trends in stable isotope ratios of nitrogen. The pattern of E. coli loading does not correspond to the major-ion, trace-element, or nitrate loading patterns. The majority of E. coli loading was related to anthropogenic sources based on field setting, but a considerable part of the loading also comes from possible animal sources in Killyon Canyon, in Perkins Flat, and in Rotary Park. In this late summer sampling, E. coli concentrations only exceeded water-quality standards in limited sections of the study reach. The mass-loading approach used in this study provides a means to design future studies and to evaluate the loading on a catchment scale.

  3. Interaction of adenylic acid with alkaline earth metal ions in the crystalline solid and aqueous solution. Evidence for the sugar C'2-endo/anti, C'3-endo/anti and C'4-exon/anti conformational changes.

    PubMed

    Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    1990-09-10

    The reaction of adenosine 5'-monophosphoric acid (H2-AMP) with the alkaline earth metal ions has been investigated in aqueous solution at neutral pH. The solid salts of Mg-AMP.5H2O, Ca-AMP.6H2O, Sr-AMP.7H2O and Ba-AMP.7H2O were isolated and characterized by Fourier transform infrared, 1H-NMR spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction measurements. Spectroscopic and other evidence showed that the Sr-AMP.7H2O and Ba-AMP.7H2O are isomorphous, whereas the Mg-AMP.5H2O and Ca-AMP.6H2O are not similar. The Mg2+ binding is through the N-7 (inner-sphere) and the phosphate group (outer-sphere via H2O), while the Ca2+ binds to the phosphate group (inner-sphere) and to the base N-7 site (outer-sphere through H2O). The Sr2+ and Ba2+ bind to H2O molecules, H-bonding to the N-7, N-1 and the phosphate group (outer-sphere). In aqueous solution, an equilibrium between the inner- and outer-sphere metal ion bindings can be established. The sugar moiety exhibited C'2-endo/anti conformation, in the free H2-AMP acid and the magnesium salt, C'3-endo/anti in the calcium salt and unusual C'4-exo/anti, in the strontium and barium salts.

  4. De Novo Transcriptional Analysis of Alfalfa in Response to Saline-Alkaline Stress

    PubMed Central

    An, Yi-Min; Song, Li-Li; Liu, Ying-Rui; Shu, Yong-Jun; Guo, Chang-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Saline-alkaline stress, caused by high levels of harmful carbonate salts and high soil pH, is a major abiotic stress that affects crop productivity. Alfalfa is a widely cultivated perennial forage legume with some tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses, especially to saline-alkaline stress. To elucidate the mechanism underlying plant saline-alkaline tolerance, we conducted transcriptome analysis of whole alfalfa seedlings treated with saline-alkaline solutions for 0 day (control), 1 day (short-term treatment), and 7 days (long-term treatment) using ion torrent sequencing technology. A transcriptome database dataset of 53,853 unigenes was generated, and 2,286 and 2,233 genes were differentially expressed in the short-term and long-term treatment, respectively. Gene ontology analysis revealed 14 highly enriched pathways and demonstrated the differential response of metabolic pathways between the short-term and long-term treatment. The expression levels of 109 and 96 transcription factors were significantly altered significantly after 1 day and 7 days of treatment, respectively. Specific responses of peroxidase, flavonoids, and the light pathway component indicated that the antioxidant capacity was one of the central mechanisms of saline-alkaline stress tolerance response in alfalfa. Among the 18 differentially expressed genes examined by real time PCR, the expression levels of eight genes, including inositol transporter, DNA binding protein, raffinose synthase, ferritin, aldo/keto reductase, glutathione S-transferase, xyloglucan endotrans glucosylase, and a NAC transcription factor, exhibited different patterns in response to saline and alkaline stress. The expression levels of the NAC transcription factor and glutathione S-transferase were altered significantly under saline stress and saline-alkaline stress; they were upregulated under saline-alkaline stress and downregulated under salt stress. Physiology assays showed an increased concentration of reactive oxygen

  5. De Novo Transcriptional Analysis of Alfalfa in Response to Saline-Alkaline Stress.

    PubMed

    An, Yi-Min; Song, Li-Li; Liu, Ying-Rui; Shu, Yong-Jun; Guo, Chang-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Saline-alkaline stress, caused by high levels of harmful carbonate salts and high soil pH, is a major abiotic stress that affects crop productivity. Alfalfa is a widely cultivated perennial forage legume with some tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses, especially to saline-alkaline stress. To elucidate the mechanism underlying plant saline-alkaline tolerance, we conducted transcriptome analysis of whole alfalfa seedlings treated with saline-alkaline solutions for 0 day (control), 1 day (short-term treatment), and 7 days (long-term treatment) using ion torrent sequencing technology. A transcriptome database dataset of 53,853 unigenes was generated, and 2,286 and 2,233 genes were differentially expressed in the short-term and long-term treatment, respectively. Gene ontology analysis revealed 14 highly enriched pathways and demonstrated the differential response of metabolic pathways between the short-term and long-term treatment. The expression levels of 109 and 96 transcription factors were significantly altered significantly after 1 day and 7 days of treatment, respectively. Specific responses of peroxidase, flavonoids, and the light pathway component indicated that the antioxidant capacity was one of the central mechanisms of saline-alkaline stress tolerance response in alfalfa. Among the 18 differentially expressed genes examined by real time PCR, the expression levels of eight genes, including inositol transporter, DNA binding protein, raffinose synthase, ferritin, aldo/keto reductase, glutathione S-transferase, xyloglucan endotrans glucosylase, and a NAC transcription factor, exhibited different patterns in response to saline and alkaline stress. The expression levels of the NAC transcription factor and glutathione S-transferase were altered significantly under saline stress and saline-alkaline stress; they were upregulated under saline-alkaline stress and downregulated under salt stress. Physiology assays showed an increased concentration of reactive oxygen

  6. Alkaline battery operational methodology

    DOEpatents

    Sholklapper, Tal; Gallaway, Joshua; Steingart, Daniel; Ingale, Nilesh; Nyce, Michael

    2016-08-16

    Methods of using specific operational charge and discharge parameters to extend the life of alkaline batteries are disclosed. The methods can be used with any commercial primary or secondary alkaline battery, as well as with newer alkaline battery designs, including batteries with flowing electrolyte. The methods include cycling batteries within a narrow operating voltage window, with minimum and maximum cut-off voltages that are set based on battery characteristics and environmental conditions. The narrow voltage window decreases available capacity but allows the batteries to be cycled for hundreds or thousands of times.

  7. Synthesis and phase transitions of oxide-ion conducting compound La{sub 2}Mo{sub 2}O{sub 9} doped with alkaline metals

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesnikova, D. S.; Kharitonova, E. P.; Voronkova, V. I.

    2011-03-15

    The specific features of synthesis, polymorthism, and electric conductivity of oxide-ion conducting compounds La{sub 2-x}Me{sub x}Mo{sub 2}O{sub 9-y}, where Me = Na, K, Rb, or Cs, have been studied. Ceramic samples were obtained by solid-state synthesis in the temperature range of 960-1100 Degree-Sign C. The regions where solid solutions exist have been found to depend on the temperature of the sample firing. According to the calorimetric and electrophysical data, the phase transition from the monoclinic phase ({alpha}) to the cubic phase ({beta}) in samples doped with potassium and rubidium disappears at x = 0.02 and 0.04, respectively. In these cases the only transition from the cubic {beta}{sub ms} phase to the high-temperature cubic {beta} phase is observed near 450 Degree-Sign C. Doping with sodium and cesium does not suppress the {alpha} {yields} {beta} phase transition.

  8. Evaluation and comparison of SuperLig{reg_sign} 644, resorcinol-formaldehyde and CS-100 ion exchange materials for the removal of cesium from simulated alkaline supernate

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.N.; Bray, L.A.; Eloviche, R.J.; Bruening, R.L.; Decker, R.M.; Kafka, T.M.; White, L.R.

    1995-03-01

    PNL evaluated three polymeric materials for Cs removal efficiency from a simulated Hanford Neutralized Current Acid Waste (NCAW) supernatant liquid using 200 mL ion exchange columns. Cs loadings (mmole Cs/g resin) were 0.20, 0.18, and 0.039 for Super Lig 644, R-F, and CS-100 (0.045, 0.070, 0.011 mmole Cs/mL resin). Elution of each resin material with 0.5 M HNO{sub 3} required 3.5, 7.0, and 3.2 cv to reach 0.1 C/C{sub 0} for the respective materials, resulting in volume compressions of 27, 20, and 6.9. Peak Cs concentrations during elution was 185, 38.5, and 27.8 C/C{sub 0}. SuperLig 644 had the highest Cs loading per gram in NCAW and the greatest volume compression on aci elution. Because of high density and poor elution, R-F had the highest Cs loading per unit volume and lower volume compression. CS-100, the baseline material for Cs removal at Hanford, was inferior to both SuperLig 644 and R-F in terms of Cs loading and selectivity over sodium.

  9. Comparing Single species Toxicity Tests to Mesocosm Community-Level Responses to Total Dissolved Solids Comprised of Different Major Ions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) dosing studies representing different sources of ions were conducted from 2011-2015. Emergence responses in stream mesocosms were compared to single-species exposures using a whole effluent testing (WET) format and an ex-situ method (single species te...

  10. Trends in major-ion constituents and properties for selected sampling sites in the Tongue and Powder River watersheds, Montana and Wyoming, based on data collected during water years 1980-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sando, Steven K.; Vecchia, Aldo V.; Barnhart, Elliott P.; Sando, Thomas R.; Clark, Melanie L.; Lorenz, David L.

    2014-01-01

    The primary purpose of this report is to present information relating to flow-adjusted temporal trends in major-ion constituents and properties for 16 sampling sites in the Tongue and Powder River watersheds based on data collected during 1980–2010. In association with this primary purpose, the report presents background information on major-ion characteristics (including specific conductance, calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium adsorption ratio, sodium, alkalinity, chloride, fluoride, dissolved sulfate, and dissolved solids) of the sampling sites and coal-bed methane (CBM) produced water (groundwater pumped from coal seams) in the site watersheds, trend analysis methods, streamflow conditions, and factors that affect trend results. The Tongue and Powder River watersheds overlie the Powder River structural basin (PRB) in northeastern Wyoming and southeastern Montana. Limited extraction of coal-bed methane (CBM) from the PRB began in the early 1990’s, and increased dramatically during the late 1990’s and early 2000’s. CBM-extraction activities produce discharges of water with high concentrations of dissolved solids (particularly sodium and bicarbonate ions) relative to most stream water in the Tongue and Powder River watersheds. Water-quality of CBM produced water is of concern because of potential effects of sodium on agricultural soils and potential effects of bicarbonate on aquatic biota. Two parametric trend-analysis methods were used in this study: the time-series model (TSM) and ordinary least squares regression (OLS) on time, streamflow, and season. The TSM was used to analyze trends for 11 of the 16 study sites. For five sites, data requirements of the TSM were not met and OLS was used to analyze trends. Two primary 10-year trend-analysis periods were selected. Trend-analysis period 1 (water years 1986–95; hereinafter referred to as period 1) was selected to represent variability in major-ion concentrations in the Tongue and Powder River

  11. Quantify the loss of major ions induced by CO2 enrichment and nitrogen addition in subtropical model forest ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Juxiu; Zhang, Deqiang; Huang, Wenjuan; Zhou, Guoyi; Li, Yuelin; Liu, Shizhong

    2014-04-01

    Previous studies have reported that atmospheric CO2 enrichment would increase the ion concentrations in the soil water. However, none of these studies could exactly quantify the amount of ion changes in the soil water induced by elevated CO2 and all of these experiments were carried out only in the temperate areas. Using an open-top chamber design, we studied the effects of CO2 enrichment alone and together with nitrogen (N) addition on soil water chemistry in the subtropics. Three years of exposure to an atmospheric CO2 concentration of 700 ppm resulted in accelerated base cation loss via leaching water below the 70 cm soil profile. The total of base cation (K+ + Na+ + Ca2+ + Mg2+) loss in the elevated CO2 treatment was higher than that of the control by 220%, 115%, and 106% in 2006, 2007, and 2008, respectively. The N treatment decreased the effect of high CO2 treatment on the base cation loss in the leachates. Compared to the control, N addition induced greater metal cation (Al3+ and Mn2+) leaching loss in 2008 and net Al3+ and Mn2+ loss in the high N treatment increased by 100% and 67%, respectively. However, the CO2 treatment decreased the effect of high N treatment on the metal cation loss. Changes of ion export followed by the exposure to the elevated CO2, and N treatments were related to both ion concentrations and leached water amount. We hypothesize that forests in subtropical China might suffer from nutrient limitation and some poisonous metal activation in plant biomass under future global change.

  12. A Test of a Major-ion Toxicity Model to Predict the Toxicity of Coal Bed Methane Product Waters to Aquatic Biota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, M. B.; Meyer, J. S.

    2003-12-01

    Coal bed methane (CBM) accounts for about 7.5% of the total natural gas production in the United States, and the Powder River Basin (PRB) in Montana and Wyoming has recently become a major production area. During CBM extraction, a coal seam is partially de-watered to relieve hydraulic pressure, thus causing methane gas to desorb. Some of this water (called product water) is discharged on the land surface and allowed to run into local drainages in the PRB. Due to the massive amounts of product water being discharged (rates up to 64,000 L/day per well), studies are needed to examine the potential effects on aquatic organisms. Additionally, models to predict such effects would be useful regulatory screening tools. To that end, we tested the ability of a multivariate logistic regression model of the toxicity of major inorganic ions (i.e., Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Cl-, HCO3-, SO42-) to predict the acute toxicity of CBM-related waters to two aquatic invertebrates (Ceriodaphnia dubia and Daphnia magna) and fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). First, we entered water chemistry data for several CBM product and receiving waters from the PRB into the major-ion model. Then we compared the model's predicted survival to the survival of the three species in toxicity tests we had previously conducted with those waters. For the majority of CBM product water and stream water samples in which CBM product water constituted the entire flow of the stream, the major-ion model consistently under-predicted survival by >50%. Therefore, from a regulatory standpoint, this model is conservative for detecting toxicity of CBM product waters (i.e., it over-predicts toxicity). Although the model appeared to be an excellent predictor of survival for receiving waters that contained no inputs from CBM processing (i.e., the difference between predicted and observed survival was <=10%), the majority of those cases were inconclusive tests of the model because the predicted and observed survival were

  13. Characterization and Oxidation of Chromium(III) by Sodium Hypochlorite in Alkaline Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Huijian; Rao, Linfeng; Zhang, Zhicheng; Rai, Dhanpat

    2006-07-01

    Chromium exists in nuclear waste sludges and is a problematic element in the vitrification process of high-level nuclear wastes. It is therefore necessary to treat the waste sludges to remove chromium prior to vitrification, by caustic leaching or oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI). The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of oligomerization of Cr(III) on its oxidation by hypochlorite in alkaline solutions. Monomeric, dimeric and trimeric Cr(III) species in solution were separated by ion exchange. The kinetics of the oxidation of the separated species by hypochlorite in alkaline solutions was studied by UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy, and compared with the oxidation by hydrogen peroxide previously studied. Results indicate that hypochlorite can oxidize Cr(III) to Cr(VI) in alkaline solutions, but the rate of oxidation by hypochlorite is slower than that by hydrogen peroxide at the same alkalinity and concentrations of oxidants. The rate of oxidation of Cr(III) by both oxidants decreases as the concentration of sodium hydroxide is increased, but the oxidation by hypochlorite seems less affected by the degree of oligomerization of Cr(III) than that by peroxide. Compared with the oxidation by hydrogen peroxide where the major reaction pathway has an inverse order with respect to CNaOH, the oxidation by hypochlorite has a significant reaction pathway independent of [OH?].

  14. The Pmr1 protein, the major yeast Ca2+-ATPase in the Golgi, regulates intracellular levels of the cadmium ion.

    PubMed

    Lauer Júnior, Cláudio Marcos; Bonatto, Diego; Mielniczki-Pereira, Albanin Aparecida; Schuch, Ana Zilles; Dias, Johnny Ferraz; Yoneama, Maria-Lúcia; Pêgas Henriques, João Antonio

    2008-08-01

    Cadmium is a nonessential, highly toxic heavy metal that shows ionic properties similar to calcium. These ionic similarities imply that the cadmium ion, Cd2+, is a calcium ion, Ca2+, receptor-agonist, affecting the same biochemical pathways involved in Ca2+ homeostasis. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the PMC1 and PMR1 genes encode vacuolar and Golgi Ca2+-ATPases, respectively. The PMR1 protein product Pmr1p is involved in both Ca2+ and Mn2+ homeostasis. This study investigated the importance of Pmc1p and Pmr1p for Cd2+ cellular detoxification. Using the standard techniques of yeast molecular research and a multielemental procedure named particle-induced X-ray emission, Pmr1p was identified as a protein that directly participates in the detoxification of Cd2+, possibly through the secretory pathway. The results allow us to posit a model of Cd2+ detoxification where Pmr1p has a central role in cell survival in a Cd2+-rich environment.

  15. The major ion, 87Sr/86Sr, and δ11B geochemistry of groundwater in the Wyodak-Anderson coal bed aquifer (Powder River Basin, Wyoming, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemarchand, Damien; Jacobson, Andrew D.; Cividini, Damien; Chabaux, François

    2015-11-01

    We developed a multicomponent, 1D advective transport model that describes the downgradient evolution of solute concentrations, 87Sr/86Sr ratios, and δ11B values in the Wyodak-Anderson Coal Bed (WACB) aquifer located in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, USA. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the chemical vulnerability of groundwater to potential environmental change stemming from the extraction of coal bed methane and shale gas. Model calculations demonstrate that coupling between microbial activity and the dissolved carbonate system controls major ion transport in the WACB aquifer. The analysis of 87Sr/86Sr ratios further reveals the importance of ion-exchange reactions. Similarly, δ11B data emphasize the significance of pH-dependent surface reactions and demonstrate the vulnerability of the aquifer to the long-term acidification of recharge water.

  16. Disposition of preformed mineral in matrix vesicles. Internal localization and association with alkaline phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, F.M.; Keller, P.J.; Genge, B.R.; Walters, S.A.; Wuthier, R.E.

    1987-08-05

    Studies were made on the disposition of mineral ions in matrix vesicles (MV) and their relationship to alkaline phosphatase by treatment of MV-enriched microsomes (MVEM) with graded levels of Ca2+-chelating agents to complex accessible ions, fractionation of MVEM on hypertonic sucrose gradients at two different pH values (7.5 and 8.0) to evaluate for the presence of calcium phosphate mineral, and passage of MVEM through cation-exchange columns to determine the accessibility of the Ca2+. The effect of removal of Ca2+ and Pi on subsequent ability of MVEM to induce mineral formation from synthetic cartilage lymph was also determined. Passage through cation-exchange columns revealed that MV Ca2+ was not freely exchangeable, but coeluted in the void volume with alkaline phosphatase. However, upon incubation in synthetic cartilage lymph, progressively more Ca2+ was retained by the column. These findings indicate that, initially, the majority of Ca2+ in MVEM is internal and not readily exchangeable, but as Ca2+ accumulates, progressively more becomes external. The mineral in MV is labile and readily susceptible to loss; treatment with graded levels of EGTA removed major portions of the original Ca2+ and Pi. 45Ca uptake by these mineral-depleted MV was markedly reduced, even in the presence of alkaline phosphatase substrates. Sucrose gradient fractionation of MVEM caused extensive loss of Pi, but not Ca2+, from the low-density alkaline phosphatase-rich fractions. This reveals that Ca2+ and Pi are not initially coupled together: Pi is largely soluble, whereas Ca2+ must be tightly bound. In the high-density vesicles, large amounts of both Ca2+ and Pi are present.

  17. Parallel single-species and stream mesocosm exposures for grading major ion effects in doses mimicking energy extraction produced waters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excess TDS/Major Ionic Stress/Elevated Conductivities appeared increasing in streams in Central and Eastern Appalachia. Direct discharges from permitted point sources and regional interest in setting eco-based effluent guidelines/aquatic life criteria, as well as potential differ...

  18. Titanium corrosion in alkaline hydrogen peroxide environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Been, Jantje

    1998-12-01

    The corrosion of Grade 2 titanium in alkaline hydrogen peroxide environments has been studied by weight loss corrosion tests, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), linear polarization resistance (LPR) measurements and potentiodynamic polarography. Calcium ions and wood pulp were investigated as corrosion inhibitors. In alkaline peroxide, the titanium corrosion rate increased with increasing pH, temperature, and hydrogen peroxide concentration. The corrosion controlling mechanism is thought to be the reaction of the oxide with the perhydroxyl ion. No evidence of thermodynamically stable calcium titanate was found in the surface film of test coupons exposed to calcium-inhibited alkaline peroxide solutions. Calcium inhibition is probably the result of low local alkali and peroxide concentrations at the metal surface produced by reaction of adsorbed calcium with hydrogen peroxide. It has been shown that the inhibiting effect of calcium is temporary, possibly through an effect of calcium on the chemical and/or physical stability of the surface oxide. Pulp is an effective and stable corrosion inhibitor. Raising the pulp concentration decreased the corrosion rate. The inhibiting effect of pulp may be related to the adsorption and interaction of the pulp fibers with H 2O2, thereby decreasing the peroxide concentration and rendering the solution less corrosive. The presence of both pulp and calcium led to higher corrosion rates than obtained by either one inhibitor alone. Replacement of hydrofluoric acid with alkaline peroxide for pickling of titanium was investigated. Titanium corrosion rates in alkaline peroxide exceeded those obtained in the conventional hydrofluoric acid bath. General corrosion was observed with extensive roughening of the surface giving a dull gray appearance. Preferred dissolution of certain crystallographic planes was investigated through the corrosion of a titanium single crystal. Whereas the overall effect on the corrosion rate was small

  19. Biogeochemical processes controlling the mobility of major ions and trace metals in aquitard sediments beneath an oil sand tailing pond: Laboratory studies and reactive transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, A. A.; Haque, S. E.; Mayer, K. U.; Ulrich, A. C.

    2013-08-01

    Increased production and expansion of the oil sand industry in Alberta are of great benefit to the economy, but they carry major environmental challenges. The volume of fluid fine tailings requiring storage is 840 × 106 m3 and growing, making it imperative that we better understand the fate and transport of oil sand process-affected water (OSPW) seepage from these facilities. Accordingly, the current study seeks to characterize both a) the potential for major ion and trace element release, and b) the principal biogeochemical processes involved, as tailing pond OSPW infiltrates into, and interacts with, underlying glacial till sediments prior to reaching down gradient aquifers or surface waters. Objectives were addressed through a series of aqueous and solid phase experiments, including radial diffusion cells, an isotope analysis, X-ray diffraction, and sequential extractions. The diffusion cells were also simulated in a reactive transport framework to elucidate key reaction processes. The experiments indicate that the ingress and interaction of OSPW with the glacial till sediment-pore water system will result in: a mitigation of ingressing Na (retardation), displacement and then limited precipitation of exchangeable Ca and Mg (as carbonates), sulfate reduction and subsequent precipitation of the produced sulfides, as well as biodegradation of organic carbon. High concentrations of ingressing Cl (~ 375 mg L- 1) and Na (~ 575 mg L- 1) (even though the latter is delayed, or retarded) are expected to migrate through the till and into the underlying sand channel. Trace element mobility was influenced by ion exchange, oxidation-reduction, and mineral phase reactions including reductive dissolution of metal oxyhydroxides — in accordance with previous observations within sandy aquifer settings. Furthermore, although several trace elements showed the potential for release (Al, B, Ba, Cd, Mn, Pb, Si, Sr), large-scale mobilization is not supported. Thus, the present

  20. Biogeochemical processes controlling the mobility of major ions and trace metals in aquitard sediments beneath an oil sand tailing pond: laboratory studies and reactive transport modeling.

    PubMed

    Holden, A A; Haque, S E; Mayer, K U; Ulrich, A C

    2013-08-01

    Increased production and expansion of the oil sand industry in Alberta are of great benefit to the economy, but they carry major environmental challenges. The volume of fluid fine tailings requiring storage is 840×10(6) m(3) and growing, making it imperative that we better understand the fate and transport of oil sand process-affected water (OSPW) seepage from these facilities. Accordingly, the current study seeks to characterize both a) the potential for major ion and trace element release, and b) the principal biogeochemical processes involved, as tailing pond OSPW infiltrates into, and interacts with, underlying glacial till sediments prior to reaching down gradient aquifers or surface waters. Objectives were addressed through a series of aqueous and solid phase experiments, including radial diffusion cells, an isotope analysis, X-ray diffraction, and sequential extractions. The diffusion cells were also simulated in a reactive transport framework to elucidate key reaction processes. The experiments indicate that the ingress and interaction of OSPW with the glacial till sediment-pore water system will result in: a mitigation of ingressing Na (retardation), displacement and then limited precipitation of exchangeable Ca and Mg (as carbonates), sulfate reduction and subsequent precipitation of the produced sulfides, as well as biodegradation of organic carbon. High concentrations of ingressing Cl (~375 mg L(-1)) and Na (~575 mg L(-1)) (even though the latter is delayed, or retarded) are expected to migrate through the till and into the underlying sand channel. Trace element mobility was influenced by ion exchange, oxidation-reduction, and mineral phase reactions including reductive dissolution of metal oxyhydroxides - in accordance with previous observations within sandy aquifer settings. Furthermore, although several trace elements showed the potential for release (Al, B, Ba, Cd, Mn, Pb, Si, Sr), large-scale mobilization is not supported. Thus, the present

  1. Dynamic model of in-lake alkalinity generation

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, L.A.; Brezonik, P.L.

    1988-01-01

    In-lake alkalinity generation (IAG) is important in regulation of alkalinity in lakes with long residence times, particularly seepage lakes. An IAG model based on input/output modeling concepts is presented that describes budgets for each ion involved in alkalinity regulation by a single differential equation that includes inputs, outputs, and a first-order sink term. These equations are linked to an alkalinity balance equation that includes inputs, outputs, IAG (by sulfate and nitrate reduction), and internal alkalinity consumption (by ammonium assimilation). Calibration using published lake budgets shows that rate constants are generally similar among soft water lakes (k/sub SO/sub 4// approx. 0.5 m/yr; k/sub NO/sub 3// approx. = 1.3 yr/sup -1/; k/sub NH/sub 4// approx. 1.5 yr/sup -1/). Sensitivity analysis shows that predicted alkalinity is sensitive to water residence time, but less sensitive to modest changes in rate constants. The model reflects the homeostatic nature of internal alkalinity generation, in which internal alkalinity production increases with increasing acid input and decreases with decreasing acid inputs of HNO/sub 3/ or H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/.

  2. [Composition characteristics and source analysis of major ions in four small lake-watersheds on the Tibetan Plateau, China].

    PubMed

    Li, He; Li, Jun; Liu, Xiao-Long; Yang, Xi; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Jie; Niu, Ying-Quan

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the ionic compositions of small lake-watersheds on the Tibetan Plateau, water samples from the brackish lakes (Pung Co (lake), Angrenjin Co and Dajia Co), the freshwater lake (Daggyaima Co), their inflowing rivers and the hot spring (Dagejia Geothermal Field), were collected during July-August 2013. The results showed that the major anions and cations of the brackish lakes were HCO3-, SO4(2-) and Na+, respectively, and the hydrochemical types were HCO3-SO4-Na and HCO3-Na. The major anions and cations of the inflowing rivers and the freshwater lake were HCO3-, SO4(2-) and Ca2+, Mg2+, respectively, and the hydrochemical types were HCO3-Ca, HCO3-Ca-Mg, HCO3-Mg-Ca, HCO3-SO4-Ca and SO4-HCO3- Ca. The major anions and cations of the hot spring were HCO3- and Na+, respectively, and the hydrochemical type was HCO3-Na. Water chemistry in the brackish lakes was primarily dominated by evaporation-crystallization processes, while the inflowing rivers and the freshwater lake were mainly influenced by carbonate weathering, and the hot spring was mainly controlled by hot water-granite interaction. Ca2+ was preferentially removed over Mg2+ from the water when carbonate minerals precipitation occured, which resulted in the high Mg2+/Ca2+ molar ratios of the brackish lakes. In the contribution of cation compositions, the largest contribution was carbonate weathering (54% - 79%), followed by silicate weathering (13% -29%) and evaperite dissolution (4% -23%), and the smallest was atmospheric input (3% - 7%). PMID:26031067

  3. [Composition characteristics and source analysis of major ions in four small lake-watersheds on the Tibetan Plateau, China].

    PubMed

    Li, He; Li, Jun; Liu, Xiao-Long; Yang, Xi; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Jie; Niu, Ying-Quan

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the ionic compositions of small lake-watersheds on the Tibetan Plateau, water samples from the brackish lakes (Pung Co (lake), Angrenjin Co and Dajia Co), the freshwater lake (Daggyaima Co), their inflowing rivers and the hot spring (Dagejia Geothermal Field), were collected during July-August 2013. The results showed that the major anions and cations of the brackish lakes were HCO3-, SO4(2-) and Na+, respectively, and the hydrochemical types were HCO3-SO4-Na and HCO3-Na. The major anions and cations of the inflowing rivers and the freshwater lake were HCO3-, SO4(2-) and Ca2+, Mg2+, respectively, and the hydrochemical types were HCO3-Ca, HCO3-Ca-Mg, HCO3-Mg-Ca, HCO3-SO4-Ca and SO4-HCO3- Ca. The major anions and cations of the hot spring were HCO3- and Na+, respectively, and the hydrochemical type was HCO3-Na. Water chemistry in the brackish lakes was primarily dominated by evaporation-crystallization processes, while the inflowing rivers and the freshwater lake were mainly influenced by carbonate weathering, and the hot spring was mainly controlled by hot water-granite interaction. Ca2+ was preferentially removed over Mg2+ from the water when carbonate minerals precipitation occured, which resulted in the high Mg2+/Ca2+ molar ratios of the brackish lakes. In the contribution of cation compositions, the largest contribution was carbonate weathering (54% - 79%), followed by silicate weathering (13% -29%) and evaperite dissolution (4% -23%), and the smallest was atmospheric input (3% - 7%).

  4. Air concentrations and wet deposition of major inorganic ions at five non-urban sites in China, 2001-2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aas, Wenche; Shao, Min; Jin, Lei; Larssen, Thorjørn; Zhao, Dawei; Xiang, Renjun; Zhang, Jinhong; Xiao, Jinsong; Duan, Lei

    Air and precipitation measurements at five sites were undertaken from 2001 to 2003 in four different provinces in China, as part of the acid rain monitoring program IMPACTS. The sites were located in Tie Shan Ping (TSP) in Chongqing, Cai Jia Tang (CJT) in Hunan, Lei Gong Shan (LGS) and Liu Chong Guan (LCG) in Guizhou and Li Xi He (LXH) in Guangdong. The site characteristics are quite varied with TSP and LCG located relatively near big cites while the three others are situated in more regionally representative areas. The distances to urban centres are reflected in the air pollution concentrations, with annual average concentrations of SO 2 ranging from 0.5 to above 40 μg S m -3. The main components in the airborne particles are (NH 4) 2SO 4 and CaSO 4. Reduced nitrogen has a considerably higher concentration level than oxidised nitrogen, reflecting the high ammonia emissions from agriculture. The gas/particle ratio for the nitrogen compounds is about 1:1 at all the three intensive measurement sites, while for sulphur it varies from 2.5 to 0.5 depending on the distance to the emission sources. As in air, the predominant ions in precipitation are sulphate, calcium and ammonium. The volume weighted annual concentration of sulphate ranges from about 70 μeq l -1 at the most rural site (LGS) to about 200 μeq l -1 at TSP and LCG. The calcium concentration ranges from 25 to 250 μeq l -1, while the total nitrogen concentration is between 30 and 150 μeq l -1; ammonium is generally twice as high as nitrate. China's acid rain research has traditionally been focused on urban sites, but these measurements show a significant influence of long range transported air pollutants to rural areas in China. The concentration levels are significantly higher than seen in most other parts of the world.

  5. Application of δ(18)O, δ(13)CDIC, and major ions to evaluate micropollutant sources in the Bay of Vidy, Lake Geneva.

    PubMed

    Halder, Janine; Pralong, Charles; Bonvin, Florence; Lambiel, Frederic; Vennemann, Torsten W

    2016-01-01

    Waters were sampled monthly from a profile at the wastewater outlet and a reference point in the Bay of Vidy (Lake Geneva) for a year. The samples were analyzed for (18)O/(16)O of water, (13)C/(12)C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), major ions, and selected micropollutant concentrations. δ(18)O values, combined with the major ion concentrations, allowed discharged waste and storm-drainage water to be traced within the water column. On the basis of δ(18)O values, mole fractions of wastewater (up to 45 %), storm-drainage (up to 16 %), and interflowing Rhône River water (up to 34 %) could be determined. The results suggest that the stormwater fractions do not influence micropollutant concentrations in a measurable way. In contrast, the Rhône River interflow coincides with elevated concentrations of Rhône River-derived micropollutants in some profiles. δ(13)C values of DIC suggest that an increase in micropollutant concentrations at the sediment-water interface could be related to remineralization processes or resuspension. PMID:25358053

  6. Alkaline quinone flow battery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kaixiang; Chen, Qing; Gerhardt, Michael R; Tong, Liuchuan; Kim, Sang Bok; Eisenach, Louise; Valle, Alvaro W; Hardee, David; Gordon, Roy G; Aziz, Michael J; Marshak, Michael P

    2015-09-25

    Storage of photovoltaic and wind electricity in batteries could solve the mismatch problem between the intermittent supply of these renewable resources and variable demand. Flow batteries permit more economical long-duration discharge than solid-electrode batteries by using liquid electrolytes stored outside of the battery. We report an alkaline flow battery based on redox-active organic molecules that are composed entirely of Earth-abundant elements and are nontoxic, nonflammable, and safe for use in residential and commercial environments. The battery operates efficiently with high power density near room temperature. These results demonstrate the stability and performance of redox-active organic molecules in alkaline flow batteries, potentially enabling cost-effective stationary storage of renewable energy. PMID:26404834

  7. Alkaline quinone flow battery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kaixiang; Chen, Qing; Gerhardt, Michael R; Tong, Liuchuan; Kim, Sang Bok; Eisenach, Louise; Valle, Alvaro W; Hardee, David; Gordon, Roy G; Aziz, Michael J; Marshak, Michael P

    2015-09-25

    Storage of photovoltaic and wind electricity in batteries could solve the mismatch problem between the intermittent supply of these renewable resources and variable demand. Flow batteries permit more economical long-duration discharge than solid-electrode batteries by using liquid electrolytes stored outside of the battery. We report an alkaline flow battery based on redox-active organic molecules that are composed entirely of Earth-abundant elements and are nontoxic, nonflammable, and safe for use in residential and commercial environments. The battery operates efficiently with high power density near room temperature. These results demonstrate the stability and performance of redox-active organic molecules in alkaline flow batteries, potentially enabling cost-effective stationary storage of renewable energy.

  8. Characterization of major-ion chemistry and nutrients in headwater streams along the Appalachian National Scenic Trail and within adjacent watersheds, Maine to Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Argue, Denise M.; Pope, Jason P.; Dieffenbach, Fred

    2012-01-01

    An inventory of water-quality data on field parameters, major ions, and nutrients provided a summary of water quality in headwater (first- and second-order) streams within watersheds along the Appalachian National Scenic Trail (Appalachian Trail). Data from 1,817 sampling sites in 831 catchments were used for the water-quality summary. Catchment delineations from NHDPlus were used as the fundamental geographic units for this project. Criteria used to evaluate sampling sites for inclusion were based on selected physical attributes of the catchments adjacent to the Appalachian Trail, including stream elevation, percentage of developed land cover, and percentage of agricultural land cover. The headwater streams of the Appalachian Trail are generally dilute waters, with low pH, low acid neutralizing capacity (ANC), and low concentrations of nutrients. The median pH value was slightly acidic at 6.7; the median specific conductance value was 23.6 microsiemens per centimeter, and the median ANC value was 98.7 milliequivalents per liter (μeq/L). Median concentrations of cations (calcium, magnesium, sodium, and potassium) were each less than 1.5 milligrams per liter (mg/L), and median concentrations of anions (bicarbonate, chloride, fluoride, sulfate, and nitrate) were less than 10 mg/L. Differences in water-quality constituent levels along the Appalachian Trail may be related to elevation, atmospheric deposition, geology, and land cover. Spatial variations were summarized by ecological sections (ecosections) developed by the U.S. Forest Service. Specific conductance, pH, ANC, and concentrations of major ions (calcium, chloride, magnesium, sodium, and sulfate) were all negatively correlated with elevation. The highest elevation ecosections (White Mountains, Blue Ridge Mountains, and Allegheny Mountains) had the lowest pH, ANC, and concentrations of major ions. The lowest elevation ecosections (Lower New England and Hudson Valley) generally had the highest pH, ANC, and

  9. Alkaline assisted thermal oil recovery: Kinetic and displacement studies

    SciTech Connect

    Saneie, S.; Yortsos, Y.C.

    1993-06-01

    This report deals with two major issues of chemical assisted flooding - the interaction of caustic, one of the proposed additives to steam flood, with the reservoir rock, and the displacement of oil by a chemical flood at elevated temperatures. A mathematical model simulating the kinetics of silica dissolution and hydroxyl ion consumption in a typical alkaline flooding environment is first developed. The model is based on the premise that dissolution occurs via hydrolysis of active sites through the formation of an intermediate complex, which is in equilibrium with the silicic acid in solution. Both static (batch) and dynamic (core flood) processes are simulated to examine the sensitivity of caustic consumption and silica dissolution to process parameters, and to determine rates of propagation of pH values. The model presented provides a quantitative description of the quartz-alkali interaction in terms of pH, salinity, ion exchange properties, temperature and contact time, which are of significant importance in the design of soluble silicate flooding processes. The modeling of an adiabatic hot waterflood assisted by the simultaneous injection of a chemical additive is next presented. The model is also applicable to the hot alkaline flooding under conditions of negligible adsorption of the generated anionic surfactant and of hydroxide adsorption being Langmuirian. The theory of generalized simple waves (coherence ) is used to develop solutions for the temperature, concentration, and oil saturation profiles, as well as the oil recovery curves. It is shown that, for Langmuir adsorption kinetics, the chemical resides in the heated region of the reservoir if its injection concentration is below a critical value, and in the unheated region if its concentration exceeds this critical value. Results for a chemical slug injection in a tertiary recovery process indicate recovery performance is maximized when chemical resides in the heated region of the reservior.

  10. Identification of the hydrogeochemical processes in groundwater using major ion chemistry: a case study of Penna-Chitravathi river basins in Southern India.

    PubMed

    Reddy, A G S; Kumar, K Niranjan

    2010-11-01

    Hydrogeochemical studies were carried out in the Penna-Chitravathi river basins to identify and delineate the important geochemical processes which were responsible for the evolution of chemical composition of groundwater. The area is underlain by peninsular gneissic complex of Archaean age, Proterozoic meta-sediments, and strip of river alluvium. Groundwater samples were collected covering all the major hydrogeological environs in pre- and post-monsoon seasons. The samples were analyzed for major constituents such as Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, K+, CO3-, HCO3-, Cl-, SO2(-4), NO3-, and F-. The groundwater in general is of Na+-Cl-, Na+-HCO3-, Ca2+-Mg2+-HCO3-, and Ca2+-Mg2+-Cl- types. Na+ among cations and Cl- and/or HCO3- among anions dominate the water; Na+ and Ca2+ are in the transitional state with Na+ replacing Ca2+ and HCO3- Cl- due to physiochemical changes in the aquifer and water-rock interactions. The Ca2+-Mg2+-Cl- HCO3- type water in one third samples suggest that ion exchange and dissolution processes are responsible for its origin. Change in storage of aquifer in a season does not influence the major geochemical makeup of groundwater. Gibbs plots indicate that the evolution of water chemistry is influenced by water-rock interaction followed by evapotranspiration process. The aquifer material mineralogy together with semiarid climate, poor drainage system, and low precipitation factors played major role in controlling groundwater quality of the area.

  11. Atmospheric deposition of mercury and major ions to the Pensacola Bay (Florida) watershed: spatial, seasonal, and inter-annual variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffrey, J. M.; Landing, W. M.; Nolek, S. D.; Gosnell, K.; Bagui, S. S.; Bagui, S. C.

    2010-02-01

    Atmospheric deposition was measured at three sites in the Pensacola Bay watershed, Florida, between November 2004 and December 2007. Mercury deposition in the Pensacola Bay watershed was similar to that from nearby Mercury Deposition Network sites along the Northern Gulf of Mexico coast. Mercury deposition during the summer months is higher than other months due to higher concentrations in rainfall throughout the region. Deposition of constituents like H+, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, chloride and sodium, were much higher in Pensacola Bay that at National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) sites. Chloride and sodium fluxes are higher because Pensacola Bay sites are closer to the Gulf of Mexico which is a source of sea salt aerosols. Acid rain constituents, H+, sulfate, nitrate and ammonium are most likely higher at Pensacola Bay sites because these sites are much closer to emission sources of these constituents than NADP sites, particularly two Florida NADP sites, FL14 and FL23, which are located in rural counties far from major industrial activities.

  12. Atmospheric deposition of mercury and major ions to the Pensacola (Florida) watershed: spatial, seasonal, and inter-annual variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffrey, J. M.; Landing, W. M.; Nolek, S. D.; Gosnell, K. J.; Bagui, S. S.; Bagui, S. C.

    2010-06-01

    Atmospheric deposition was measured at three sites in the Pensacola Bay watershed, Florida, between November 2004 and December 2007. Mercury deposition in the Pensacola Bay watershed was similar to that from nearby Mercury Deposition Network sites along the Northern Gulf of Mexico coast. Mercury deposition during the summer months is higher than other months due to higher concentrations in rainfall throughout the region. Deposition of constituents like H+, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, chloride and sodium, were much higher in Pensacola Bay that at National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) sites. Chloride and sodium deposition are higher because Pensacola Bay sites are closer to the Gulf of Mexico which is a source of sea salt aerosols. Acid rain constituents, H+, sulfate, nitrate and ammonium are most likely higher at Pensacola Bay sites because these sites are much closer to emission sources of these constituents than NADP sites, particularly two Florida NADP sites, FL14 and FL23, which are located in rural counties far from major industrial activities.

  13. A one-year record of carbonaceous components and major ions in aerosols from an urban kerbside location in Oporto, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Custódio, Danilo; Cerqueira, Mário; Alves, Célia; Nunes, Teresa; Pio, Casimiro; Esteves, Valdemar; Frosini, Daniele; Lucarelli, Franco; Querol, Xavier

    2016-08-15

    PM2.5 aerosol samples were collected from January 2013 to January 2014 on the kerbside of a major arterial route in the city of Oporto, Portugal, and later analyzed for carbonaceous fractions and water soluble ions. The average concentrations of organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC) and water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in the aerosol were 6.2μg/m(3), 5.0μg/m(3) and 3.8μg/m(3), respectively, and fit within the range of values that have been observed close to major roads in Europe, Asia and North America. On average, carbonaceous matter accounted for 56% of the gravimetrically measured PM2.5 mass. The three carbon fractions exhibited a similar seasonal variation, with high concentrations in late autumn and in winter, and low concentrations in spring. SO4(2-) was the dominant water soluble ion, followed by NO3(-), NH4(+), Cl(-), Na(+), K(+), oxalate, Ca(2+), Mg(2+), formate, methanesulfonate and acetate. Some of these ions exhibited a clear seasonal trend during the study period. The average OC/EC ratio for the entire set of samples was 1.28±0.61, which was consistent with a significant influence of vehicle exhaust emissions on aerosol composition. On the other hand, the average WSOC/OC ratio was 0.67±0.23, reflecting the influence of other emitting sources. WSOC was highly correlated with nssK(+), a tracer of biomass combustion, and was not correlated with nssSO4(2-), a species associated with secondary processes, suggesting that the main source of WSOC was biomass burning. Most of the SO4(2-) was anthropogenic in origin and was closely associated with NH4(+), pointing to the formation of secondary aerosols. Na(+), Cl(-) and methanesulfonate were clearly associated with marine sources while NO3(-) was related with combustion of both fossil and non-fossil fuels. Mixed sources explained the occurrence of the other water soluble ions. PMID:27110993

  14. Biogeochemical processes controlling the mobility of major ions and trace metals in aquitard sediments beneath an oil sand tailing pond: laboratory studies and reactive transport modeling.

    PubMed

    Holden, A A; Haque, S E; Mayer, K U; Ulrich, A C

    2013-08-01

    Increased production and expansion of the oil sand industry in Alberta are of great benefit to the economy, but they carry major environmental challenges. The volume of fluid fine tailings requiring storage is 840×10(6) m(3) and growing, making it imperative that we better understand the fate and transport of oil sand process-affected water (OSPW) seepage from these facilities. Accordingly, the current study seeks to characterize both a) the potential for major ion and trace element release, and b) the principal biogeochemical processes involved, as tailing pond OSPW infiltrates into, and interacts with, underlying glacial till sediments prior to reaching down gradient aquifers or surface waters. Objectives were addressed through a series of aqueous and solid phase experiments, including radial diffusion cells, an isotope analysis, X-ray diffraction, and sequential extractions. The diffusion cells were also simulated in a reactive transport framework to elucidate key reaction processes. The experiments indicate that the ingress and interaction of OSPW with the glacial till sediment-pore water system will result in: a mitigation of ingressing Na (retardation), displacement and then limited precipitation of exchangeable Ca and Mg (as carbonates), sulfate reduction and subsequent precipitation of the produced sulfides, as well as biodegradation of organic carbon. High concentrations of ingressing Cl (~375 mg L(-1)) and Na (~575 mg L(-1)) (even though the latter is delayed, or retarded) are expected to migrate through the till and into the underlying sand channel. Trace element mobility was influenced by ion exchange, oxidation-reduction, and mineral phase reactions including reductive dissolution of metal oxyhydroxides - in accordance with previous observations within sandy aquifer settings. Furthermore, although several trace elements showed the potential for release (Al, B, Ba, Cd, Mn, Pb, Si, Sr), large-scale mobilization is not supported. Thus, the present

  15. A field measurement based scaling approach for quantification of major ions, organic carbon, and elemental carbon using a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yang; Huang, X. H. Hilda; Griffith, Stephen M.; Li, Mei; Li, Lei; Zhou, Zhen; Wu, Cheng; Meng, Junwang; Chan, Chak K.; Louie, Peter K. K.; Yu, Jian Zhen

    2016-10-01

    Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (SPAMS) have been increasingly deployed for aerosol studies in Asia. To date, SPAMS is most often used to provide unscaled information for both the size and chemical composition of individual particles. The instrument's lack of accuracy is primarily due to only a fraction of particles being detected after collection, and the instrumental sensitivity is un-calibrated for various chemical species in mixed ambient aerosols. During a campaign from January to April 2013 at a coastal site in Hong Kong, the particle number information and ion intensity of major PM2.5 components collected by SPAMS were scaled by comparing with collocated bulk PM2.5 measurements of hourly or higher resolution. The bulk measurements include PM2.5 mass by a SHARP 5030 Monitor, major ions by a Monitor for Aerosols & Gases in ambient Air (MARGA), and organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) by a Sunset OCEC analyzer. During the data processing, both transmission efficiency (scaled with the Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer) and hit efficiency conversion were considered, and component ion intensities quantified as peak area (PA) and relative peak area (RPA) were analyzed to track the performance. The comparison between the scaled particle mass assuming a particle density of 1.9 g cm-3 from SPAMS and PM2.5 concentration showed good correlation (R2 = 0.81) with a slope of 0.814 ± 0.004. Regression analysis results suggest an improved scaling performance using RPA compared with PA for most of the major PM2.5 components, including sulfate, nitrate, potassium, ammonium, OC and EC. Thus, we recommend preferentially scaling these species using the RPA. For periods of high K+ concentrations (>1.5 μg m-3), under-estimation of K+ by SPAMS was observed due to exceeding the dynamic range of the acquisition board. When only applying the hit efficiency correction, data for sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, potassium and OC were in reasonably good correlation (R2 = 0

  16. Multi-Decadal Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosol Loading Based on Major Ion and Stable Isotope Geochemistry of Glacial Ice From the Siberian Altai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joswiak, D.; Aizen, E.; Aizen, V.

    2006-12-01

    Analysis of a deep alpine ice core from the mid-latitude Siberian Altai is presented. The 170m core in storage and processing at the University of Idaho is examined to 50m on the basis of annual layer identification and dating, visual stratigraphy, major ion concentration, stable (δ18O,δ2H) and radiogenic (δ3H) isotope variability using multivariate and time series statistical methods. The core depth has recorded atmospheric precipitation since the recent industrial (post-1940) time period and into the intermediate transition of the early 20^{th}Century based on multi-parameter dating techniques. The time series is evaluated as a proxy for high-resolution examination of aerosol loading through the ion chemistry and mineral dust records preserved in the glacial ice. Aerosol loading estimations are achieved through major element analysis (to 20m depth) for dust particles ranging in size from 0.52-5.04μm. Average ion concentrations corroborate well with another ice core from the Altai Mts. for the industrialized (post-1940) time in this geographic region, with slightly elevated concentrations of all species analyzed and localized differences in peak variability. The ion chemistry is characterized by a significant increase in sulfate concentrations (0-33m mean SO4=10.54μEq/L, 33-50m mean SO4=2.91μEq/L) and a slight increase in nitrate concentrations in the upper portion of core corresponding to the recent (<50yrs) past. This level of increased aerosol loading is typically associated with anthropogenic activities, including industrialization, biomass burning, and agricultural activity that may accompany increasing temperature trends. However, oxygen isotopes ratios do not show a statistically significant difference in mean oxygen isotope ratios expected for the associated (0-33m, 33-50m) time periods of increased sulfate and nitrate concentrations. Other central Asian aeolian dust species (magnesium, calcium, chloride and sodium) do not show significant increasing

  17. Major-ion chemistry, δ13C and 87Sr/86Sr as indicators of hydrochemical evolution and sources of salinity in groundwater in the Yuncheng Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currell, Matthew J.; Cartwright, Ian

    2011-06-01

    Processes controlling hydrogeochemistry in the Yuncheng Basin, China, were characterised using major-ion chemistry, 87Sr/86Sr ratios and δ13C values. Evapotranspiration during recharge increased solute concentrations by factors of ˜5-50 in deep palaeowaters, while higher degrees of evapotranspiration have occurred in shallow, modern groundwater. Aquifer sediments (loess) contain approximately 15 weight% calcite; trends in groundwater HCO3 concentrations and δ13C values (ranging from -16.4 to -8.2‰) indicate that carbonate weathering is a significant source of DIC. Groundwater 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.7110-0.7162, median of 0.7116) are similar to those in both loess carbonate (0.7109-0.7116) and local rainfall (0.7112), and are significantly lower than Sr in aquifer silicates (0.7184-0.7251). Despite evidence for substantial carbonate dissolution, groundwater is generally Ca-poor (< 10% of total cations) and Na-rich, due to cation exchange. Saturation with respect to carbonate minerals occurs during or soon after recharge (all calcite and dolomite saturation indices are positive). Subsequent carbonate dissolution in the deep aquifer must occur as a second-stage process, in response to Ca loss (by ion exchange) and/or via incongruent dissolution of dolomite and impure calcite. The latter is consistent with positive correlations between δ13C values and Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios ( r 2 = 0.32 and 0.34).

  18. Alkaline galvanic cell

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, T.; Maeda, Y.; Momose, K.; Wakahata, T.

    1983-10-04

    An alkaline galvanic cell is disclosed including a container serving for a cathode terminal, a sealing plate in the form of a layered clad plate serving for an anode terminal to be fitted into the container, and an insulating packing provided between the sealing plate and container for sealing the cell upon assembly. The cell is provided with a layer of epoxy adduct polyamide amine having amine valence in the range of 50 to 400 and disposed between the innermost copper layer of the sealing plate arranged to be readily amalgamated and the insulating packing so as to serve as a sealing agent or liquid leakage suppression agent.

  19. Assessment of major ions and heavy metals in groundwater: a case study from Guangzhou and Zhuhai of the Pearl River Delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yintao; Tang, Changyuan; Chen, Jianyao; Yao, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Anthropogenic activities in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) have caused a deterioration of groundwater quality over the past twenty years as a result of rapid urbanization and industrial development. In this study, the hydrochemical characteristics, quality, and sources of heavy metals in the groundwater of the PRD were investigated. Twenty-five groundwater samples were collected and analyzed for pH, electrical conductivity (EC), total dissolved solids (TDS), δ18O, δ2H, major ions, and heavy metals. The groundwater was slightly acidic and presented TDS values that ranged from 35.5 to 8,779.3 mg·L-1. The concentrations of the major ions followed the order Cl->HCO 3 - >Na+>SO 4 2- >NO 3 - >NH 4 + >Ca2+>K+>Mg2+>Fe2+/3+>Al3+. Ca-Mg-HCO3 and Na-K-HCO3 were the predominant types of facies, and the chemical composition of the groundwater was primarily controlled by chemical weathering of the basement rocks, by mixing of freshwater and seawater and by anthropogenic activities. The heavy metal pollution index (HPI) indicated that 64% of the samples were in the low category, 16% were in the medium category and 20% were in the high category, providing further evidence that this groundwater is unsuitable for drinking. Lead, arsenic, and manganese were mainly sourced from landfill leachate; cadmium from landfill leachate and agricultural wastes; mercury from the discharge of leachate associated with mining activities and agricultural wastes; and chromium primarily from industrial wastes. According to the irrigation water quality indicators, the groundwater in the PRD can be used for irrigation in most farmland without strong negative impacts. However, approximately 9 million people in the Guangdong Province are at risk due to the consumption of untreated water. Therefore, we suggest that treating the groundwater to achieve safer levels is necessary.

  20. Major ion chemistry and dissolved inorganic carbon cycling in a human-disturbed mountainous river (the Luodingjiang River) of the Zhujiang (Pearl River), China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shurong; Lu, X X; Sun, Huiguo; Han, Jingtai; Higgitt, David Laurence

    2009-04-01

    Major ion chemistry and dissolved inorganic carbon system (DIC, mainly HCO3(-) and gaseous CO2) in the Luodingjiang River, a mountainous tributary of the Zhujiang (Pearl River), China, were examined based on a seasonal and spatial sampling scheme in 2005. The diverse distribution of lithology and anthropogenic impacts in the river basin provided the basic idea to assess the effects of lithology vs. human activities on water chemistry and carbon biogeochemistry in river systems. Major ions showed great spatial variations, with higher concentrations of total dissolved solids (TDS) and DIC in the regions with carbonate rocks and clastic sedimentary rocks, while lower in the regions with metamorphic sandstones and schists as well as granites. pCO2 at all sampling sites was oversaturated in June, ranging with a factor from 1.6 to 18.8 of the atmospheric concentration, reflecting the enhanced contribution from baseflow and interflow influx as well as in situ oxidation of organic matter. However, in April and December, undersaturated pCO2 was found in some shallow, clean rivers in the upstream regions. delta13C of DIC has a narrow range from -9.07 to -13.59 per thousand, which was more depleted in the regions with metamorphic rocks and granites than in the carbonate regions. Seasonally, it was slightly more depleted in the dry season (December) than in the wet season (June). The results suggested that lithological variability had a dominant control on spatial variations of water chemistry and carbon geochemistry in river systems. Besides, anthropogenic activities, such as agricultural and urban activities and in-stream damming, as well as river physical properties, such as water depth and transparency, also indicated their impacts. The seasonal variations likely reflected the changes of hydrological regime, as well as metabolic processes in the river.

  1. First Identification of 5,11-Dideoxytetrodotoxin in Marine Animals, and Characterization of Major Fragment Ions of Tetrodotoxin and Its Analogs by High Resolution ESI-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Yotsu-Yamashita, Mari; Abe, Yuka; Kudo, Yuta; Ritson-Williams, Raphael; Paul, Valerie J.; Konoki, Keiichi; Cho, Yuko; Adachi, Masaatsu; Imazu, Takuya; Nishikawa, Toshio; Isobe, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    Even though tetrodotoxin (TTX) is a widespread toxin in marine and terrestrial organisms, very little is known about the biosynthetic pathway used to produce it. By describing chemical structures of natural analogs of TTX, we can start to identify some of the precursors that might be important for TTX biosynthesis. In the present study, an analog of TTX, 5,11-dideoxyTTX, was identified for the first time in natural sources, the ovary of the pufferfish and the pharynx of a flatworm (planocerid sp. 1), by comparison with totally synthesized (−)-5,11-dideoxyTTX, using high resolution ESI-LC-MS. Based on the presence of 5,11-dideoxyTTX together with a series of known deoxy analogs, 5,6,11-trideoxyTTX, 6,11-dideoxyTTX, 11-deoxyTTX, and 5-deoxyTTX, in these animals, we predicted two routes of stepwise oxidation pathways in the late stages of biosynthesis of TTX. Furthermore, high resolution masses of the major fragment ions of TTX, 6,11-dideoxyTTX, and 5,6,11-trideoxyTTX were also measured, and their molecular formulas and structures were predicted to compare them with each other. Although both TTX and 5,6,11-trideoxyTTX give major fragment ions that are very close, m/z 162.0660 and 162.1020, respectively, they are distinguishable and predicted to be different molecular formulas. These data will be useful for identification of TTXs using high resolution LC-MS/MS. PMID:23924959

  2. Major ion chemistry and dissolved inorganic carbon cycling in a human-disturbed mountainous river (the Luodingjiang River) of the Zhujiang (Pearl River), China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shurong; Lu, X X; Sun, Huiguo; Han, Jingtai; Higgitt, David Laurence

    2009-04-01

    Major ion chemistry and dissolved inorganic carbon system (DIC, mainly HCO3(-) and gaseous CO2) in the Luodingjiang River, a mountainous tributary of the Zhujiang (Pearl River), China, were examined based on a seasonal and spatial sampling scheme in 2005. The diverse distribution of lithology and anthropogenic impacts in the river basin provided the basic idea to assess the effects of lithology vs. human activities on water chemistry and carbon biogeochemistry in river systems. Major ions showed great spatial variations, with higher concentrations of total dissolved solids (TDS) and DIC in the regions with carbonate rocks and clastic sedimentary rocks, while lower in the regions with metamorphic sandstones and schists as well as granites. pCO2 at all sampling sites was oversaturated in June, ranging with a factor from 1.6 to 18.8 of the atmospheric concentration, reflecting the enhanced contribution from baseflow and interflow influx as well as in situ oxidation of organic matter. However, in April and December, undersaturated pCO2 was found in some shallow, clean rivers in the upstream regions. delta13C of DIC has a narrow range from -9.07 to -13.59 per thousand, which was more depleted in the regions with metamorphic rocks and granites than in the carbonate regions. Seasonally, it was slightly more depleted in the dry season (December) than in the wet season (June). The results suggested that lithological variability had a dominant control on spatial variations of water chemistry and carbon geochemistry in river systems. Besides, anthropogenic activities, such as agricultural and urban activities and in-stream damming, as well as river physical properties, such as water depth and transparency, also indicated their impacts. The seasonal variations likely reflected the changes of hydrological regime, as well as metabolic processes in the river. PMID:19185905

  3. Increased river alkalinization in the Eastern U.S.

    PubMed

    Kaushal, Sujay S; Likens, Gene E; Utz, Ryan M; Pace, Michael L; Grese, Melissa; Yepsen, Metthea

    2013-09-17

    The interaction between human activities and watershed geology is accelerating long-term changes in the carbon cycle of rivers. We evaluated changes in bicarbonate alkalinity, a product of chemical weathering, and tested for long-term trends at 97 sites in the eastern United States draining over 260,000 km(2). We observed statistically significant increasing trends in alkalinity at 62 of the 97 sites, while remaining sites exhibited no significant decreasing trends. Over 50% of study sites also had statistically significant increasing trends in concentrations of calcium (another product of chemical weathering) where data were available. River alkalinization rates were significantly related to watershed carbonate lithology, acid deposition, and topography. These three variables explained ~40% of variation in river alkalinization rates. The strongest predictor of river alkalinization rates was carbonate lithology. The most rapid rates of river alkalinization occurred at sites with highest inputs of acid deposition and highest elevation. The rise of alkalinity in many rivers throughout the Eastern U.S. suggests human-accelerated chemical weathering, in addition to previously documented impacts of mining and land use. Increased river alkalinization has major environmental implications including impacts on water hardness and salinization of drinking water, alterations of air-water exchange of CO2, coastal ocean acidification, and the influence of bicarbonate availability on primary production.

  4. Increased river alkalinization in the Eastern U.S.

    PubMed

    Kaushal, Sujay S; Likens, Gene E; Utz, Ryan M; Pace, Michael L; Grese, Melissa; Yepsen, Metthea

    2013-09-17

    The interaction between human activities and watershed geology is accelerating long-term changes in the carbon cycle of rivers. We evaluated changes in bicarbonate alkalinity, a product of chemical weathering, and tested for long-term trends at 97 sites in the eastern United States draining over 260,000 km(2). We observed statistically significant increasing trends in alkalinity at 62 of the 97 sites, while remaining sites exhibited no significant decreasing trends. Over 50% of study sites also had statistically significant increasing trends in concentrations of calcium (another product of chemical weathering) where data were available. River alkalinization rates were significantly related to watershed carbonate lithology, acid deposition, and topography. These three variables explained ~40% of variation in river alkalinization rates. The strongest predictor of river alkalinization rates was carbonate lithology. The most rapid rates of river alkalinization occurred at sites with highest inputs of acid deposition and highest elevation. The rise of alkalinity in many rivers throughout the Eastern U.S. suggests human-accelerated chemical weathering, in addition to previously documented impacts of mining and land use. Increased river alkalinization has major environmental implications including impacts on water hardness and salinization of drinking water, alterations of air-water exchange of CO2, coastal ocean acidification, and the influence of bicarbonate availability on primary production. PMID:23883395

  5. Increased river alkalinization in the Eastern U.S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushal, S.; Likens, G. E.; Utz, R.; Pace, M.; Grese, M.; Yepsen, M.

    2013-12-01

    The interaction between human activities and watershed geology is accelerating long-term changes in the carbon cycle of rivers. We evaluated changes in bicarbonate alkalinity, a product of chemical weathering, and tested for long-term trends at 97 sites in the eastern United States draining over 260,000 km2. We observed statistically significant increasing trends in alkalinity at 62 of the 97 sites, while remaining sites exhibited no significant decreasing trends. Over 50% of study sites also had statistically significant increasing trends in concentrations of calcium (another product of chemical weathering) where data were available. River alkalinization rates were significantly related to watershed carbonate lithology, acid deposition, and topography. These 3 variables explained ~40% of variation in river alkalinization rates. The strongest predictor of river alkalinization rates was carbonate lithology. The most rapid rates of river alkalinization occurred at sites with highest inputs of acid deposition and highest elevation. The rise of alkalinity in many rivers throughout the eastern U.S. suggests human-accelerated chemical weathering, in addition to previously documented impacts of mining and land use. Increased river alkalinization has major environmental implications including impacts on water hardness and salinization of drinking water, alterations of air-water exchange of CO2, coastal ocean acidification, and the influence of bicarbonate availability on primary production.

  6. Molecular modeling of human alkaline sphingomyelinase.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Panneer Selvam; Olubiyi, Olujide; Thirunavukkarasu, Chinnasamy; Strodel, Birgit; Kumar, Muthuvel Suresh

    2011-01-01

    Alkaline sphingomyelinase, which is expressed in the human intestine and hydrolyses sphingomyelin, is a component of the plasma and the lysosomal membranes. Hydrolase of sphingomyelin generates ceramide, sphingosine, and sphingosine 1-phosphate that have regulatory effects on vital cellular functions such as proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. The enzyme belongs to the Nucleotide Pyrophosphatase/Phosphodiesterase family and it differs in structural similarity with acidic and neutral sphingomyelinase. In the present study we modeled alkaline sphingomyelinase using homology modeling based on the structure of Nucleotide Pyrophosphatase/Phosphodiesterase from Xanthomonas axonopodis with which it shares 34% identity. Homology modeling was performed using Modeller9v7. We found that Cys78 and Cys394 form a disulphide bond. Further analysis shows that Ser76 may be important for the function of this enzyme, which is supported by the findings of Wu et al. (2005), that S76F abolishes the activity completely. We found that the residues bound to Zn(2+) are conserved and geometrically similar with the template. Molecular Dynamics simulations were carried out for the modeled protein to observe the effect of Zinc metal ions. It was observed that the metal ion has little effect with regard to the stability but induces increased fluctuations in the protein. These analyses showed that Zinc ions play an important role in stabilizing the secondary structure and in maintaining the compactness of the active site. PMID:21544170

  7. [Development of metal ions analysis by ion chromatography].

    PubMed

    Yu, Hong; Wang, Yuxin

    2007-05-01

    Analysis of metal ions by ion chromatography, including cation-exchange ion chromatography, anion-exchange ion chromatography and chelation ion chromatography, is reviewed. The cation-exchange ion chromatography is a main method for the determination of metal ions. Stationary phases in cation-exchange ion chromatography are strong acid cation exchanger (sulfonic) and weak acid cation exchanger (carboxylic). Alkali metal ions, alkaline earth metal ions, transition metal ions, rare earth metal ions, ammonium ions and amines can be analyzed by cation-exchange ion chromatography with a suitable detector. The anion-exchange ion chromatography is suitable for the separation and analysis of alkaline earth metal ions, transition metal ions and rare earth metal ions. The selectivity for analysis of metal ions with anion-exchange ion chromatography is good. Simultaneous determination of metal ions and inorganic anions can be achieved using anion-exchange ion chromatography. Chelation ion chromatography is suitable for the determination of trace metal ions in complex matrices. A total of 125 references are cited.

  8. Enzymatic method of determining lead using alkaline phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Shekhovtsova, T.N.; Kucheryaeva, V.V.; Dolmanova, I.F.

    1986-03-20

    The purpose of this work was to determine the possibility of using alkaline phosphatase to determine trace amounts of ions of a number of metals - Mg, Ba, Ca, Sr, Cd, Pb - for which there are virtually no sensitive and simple methods of determination.

  9. Characterization of major-ion chemistry and nutrients in headwater streams along the Appalachian National Scenic Trail and within adjacent watersheds, Maine to Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Argue, Denise M.; Pope, Jason P.; Dieffenbach, Fred

    2012-01-01

    An inventory of water-quality data on field parameters, major ions, and nutrients provided a summary of water quality in headwater (first- and second-order) streams within watersheds along the Appalachian National Scenic Trail (Appalachian Trail). Data from 1,817 sampling sites in 831 catchments were used for the water-quality summary. Catchment delineations from NHDPlus were used as the fundamental geographic units for this project. Criteria used to evaluate sampling sites for inclusion were based on selected physical attributes of the catchments adjacent to the Appalachian Trail, including stream elevation, percentage of developed land cover, and percentage of agricultural land cover. The headwater streams of the Appalachian Trail are generally dilute waters, with low pH, low acid neutralizing capacity (ANC), and low concentrations of nutrients. The median pH value was slightly acidic at 6.7; the median specific conductance value was 23.6 microsiemens per centimeter, and the median ANC value was 98.7 milliequivalents per liter (μeq/L). Median concentrations of cations (calcium, magnesium, sodium, and potassium) were each less than 1.5 milligrams per liter (mg/L), and median concentrations of anions (bicarbonate, chloride, fluoride, sulfate, and nitrate) were less than 10 mg/L. Differences in water-quality constituent levels along the Appalachian Trail may be related to elevation, atmospheric deposition, geology, and land cover. Spatial variations were summarized by ecological sections (ecosections) developed by the U.S. Forest Service. Specific conductance, pH, ANC, and concentrations of major ions (calcium, chloride, magnesium, sodium, and sulfate) were all negatively correlated with elevation. The highest elevation ecosections (White Mountains, Blue Ridge Mountains, and Allegheny Mountains) had the lowest pH, ANC, and concentrations of major ions. The lowest elevation ecosections (Lower New England and Hudson Valley) generally had the highest pH, ANC, and

  10. Trends in major-ion constituents and properties for selected sampling sites in the Tongue and Powder River watersheds, Montana and Wyoming, based on data collected during water years 1980-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sando, Steven K.; Vecchia, Aldo V.; Barnhart, Elliott P.; Sando, Thomas R.; Clark, Melanie L.; Lorenz, David L.

    2014-01-01

    The primary purpose of this report is to present information relating to flow-adjusted temporal trends in major-ion constituents and properties for 16 sampling sites in the Tongue and Powder River watersheds based on data collected during 1980–2010. In association with this primary purpose, the report presents background information on major-ion characteristics (including specific conductance, calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium adsorption ratio, sodium, alkalinity, chloride, fluoride, dissolved sulfate, and dissolved solids) of the sampling sites and coal-bed methane (CBM) produced water (groundwater pumped from coal seams) in the site watersheds, trend analysis methods, streamflow conditions, and factors that affect trend results. The Tongue and Powder River watersheds overlie the Powder River structural basin (PRB) in northeastern Wyoming and southeastern Montana. Limited extraction of coal-bed methane (CBM) from the PRB began in the early 1990’s, and increased dramatically during the late 1990’s and early 2000’s. CBM-extraction activities produce discharges of water with high concentrations of dissolved solids (particularly sodium and bicarbonate ions) relative to most stream water in the Tongue and Powder River watersheds. Water-quality of CBM produced water is of concern because of potential effects of sodium on agricultural soils and potential effects of bicarbonate on aquatic biota. Two parametric trend-analysis methods were used in this study: the time-series model (TSM) and ordinary least squares regression (OLS) on time, streamflow, and season. The TSM was used to analyze trends for 11 of the 16 study sites. For five sites, data requirements of the TSM were not met and OLS was used to analyze trends. Two primary 10-year trend-analysis periods were selected. Trend-analysis period 1 (water years 1986–95; hereinafter referred to as period 1) was selected to represent variability in major-ion concentrations in the Tongue and Powder River

  11. Silica in alkaline brines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, B.F.; Rettig, S.L.; Eugster, H.P.

    1967-01-01

    Analysis of sodium carbonate-bicarbonate brines from closed basins in volcanic terranes of Oregon and Kenya reveals silica contents of up to 2700 parts per million at pH's higher than 10. These high concentrations of SiO 2 can be attributed to reaction of waters with silicates, and subsequent evaporative concentration accompanied by a rise in pH. Supersaturation with respect to amorphous silica may occur and persist for brines that are out of contact with silicate muds and undersaturated with respect to trona; correlation of SiO2 with concentration of Na and total CO2 support this interpretation. Addition of moredilute waters to alkaline brines may lower the pH and cause inorganic precipitation of substantial amounts of silica.

  12. Bifunctional alkaline oxygen electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swette, L.; Kackley, N.; Mccatty, S. A.

    1991-01-01

    The authors describe the identification and testing of electrocatalysts and supports for the positive electrode of moderate-temperature, single-unit, rechargeable alkaline fuel cells. Recent work on Na(x)Pt3O4, a potential bifunctional catalyst, is described, as well as the application of novel approaches to the development of more efficient bifunctional electrode structures. The three dual-character electrodes considered here showed similar superior performance; the Pt/RhO2 and Rh/RhO2 electrodes showed slightly better performance than the Pt/IrO2 electrode. It is concluded that Na(x)Pt3O4 continues to be a promising bifunctional oxygen electrode catalyst but requires further investigation and development.

  13. Equilibrium data for cesium ion exchange of Hanford CC and NCAW tank waste

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, L.A.; Carson, K.J.; Elovich, R.J.; Kurath, D.E.

    1996-04-01

    Hanford alkaline waste storage-tank contents will be processed to remove the soluble salts. A major fraction of these solutions will require cesium recovery to produce a low-level waste (LLW). The technology for decontamination of high-level alkaline waste and sludge wash waters is being developed. At the request of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has studied several ion exchange materials for the recovery of cesium from Hanford waste tanks. The WHC program was divided into tow main tasks, (1) to obtain equilibrium data for cesium ion exchange, and (2) to evaluate ion exchange column performance. The subject of this letter report is the measurement of batch distribution coefficients for several ion exchange media for a range of operating conditions for two types of waste; complexant concentrate (CC) and neutralized current acid waste (NCAW).

  14. Major anthocyanins from purple asparagus (Asparagus officinalis).

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Yumi; Ozaki, Yukio; Miyajima, Ikuo; Yamaguchi, Masaatsu; Fukui, Yuko; Iwasa, Keiko; Motoki, Satoru; Suzuki, Takashi; Okubo, Hiroshi

    2008-05-01

    Two major anthocyanins (A1 and A2) were isolated from peels of the spears of Asparagus officinalis cv. Purple Passion. They were purified by column, paper and high-performance liquid chromatographic separations, and their structures were elucidated by high-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (HR-FT-ICR MS), 1H, 13C and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopic analyses and either acid or alkaline hydrolysis, respectively. A1 was identified as cyanidin 3-[3''-(O-beta-d-glucopyranosyl)-6''-(O-alpha-l-rhamnopyranosyl)-O-beta-d-glucopyranoside], whereas A2 was cyanidin 3-rutinoside, which is widely distributed in higher plants. Oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assays proved their high antioxidant activities. PMID:18406435

  15. Ion association in natural brines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Truesdell, A.H.; Jones, B.F.

    1969-01-01

    Natural brines, both surface and subsurface, are highly associated aqueous solutions. Ion complexes in brines may be ion pairs in which the cation remains fully hydrated and the bond between the ions is essentially electrostatic, or coordination complexes in which one or more of the hydration water molecules are replaced by covalent bonds to the anion. Except for Cl-, the major simple ions in natural brines form ion pairs; trace and minor metals in brines form mainly coordination complexes. Limitations of the Debye-Hu??ckel relations for activity coefficients and lack of data on definition and stability of all associated species in concentrated solutions tend to produce underestimates of the degree of ion association, except where the brines contain a very high proportion of Cl-. Data and calculations on closed basin brines of highly varied composition have been coupled with electrode measurements of single-ion activities in an attempt to quantify the degree of ion association. Such data emphasize the role of magnesium complexes. Trace metal contents of closed basin brines are related to complexes formed with major anions. Alkaline sulfo- or chlorocarbonate brines (western Great Basin) carry significant trace metal contents apparently as hydroxides or hydroxy polyions. Neutral high chloride brines (Bonneville Basin) are generally deficient in trace metals. With a knowledge of the thermodynamic properties of a natural water, many possible reactions with other phases (solids, gases, other liquids) may be predicted. A knowledge of these reactions is particularly important in the study of natural brines which may be saturated with many solid phases (silicates, carbonates, sulfates, etc.), which may have a high pH and bring about dissolution of other phases (silica, amphoteric hydroxides, CO2, etc.), and which because of their high density may form relatively stable interfaces with dilute waters. ?? 1969.

  16. Assessment of spatial variability of major-ion concentrations and del oxygen-18 values in surface snow, Upper Fremont Glacier, Wyoming, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naftz, D.L.; Schuster, P.F.; Reddy, M.M.

    1994-01-01

    One hundred samples were collected from the surface of the Upper Fremont Glacier at equally spaced intervals defined by an 8100m2 snow grid to asesss the significance of lateral variability in major-ion concentrations and del oxygen-18 values. Comparison of the observed variability of each chemical constituent to the variability expected by measurement error indicated substantial lateral variability with the surface-snow layer. Results of the nested ANOVA indicate most of the variance for every constituent is in the values grouped at the two smaller geographic scales (between 506m2 and within 506m2 sections). The variance data from the snow grid were used to develop equations to evaluate the significance of both positive and negative concentration/value peaks of nitrate and del oxygen-18 with depth, in a 160m ice core. Values of del oxygen-18 in the section from 110-150m below the surface consistently vary outside the expected limits and possibly represents cooler temperatures during the Little Ice Age from about 1810 to 1725 A.D. -from Authors

  17. Quality of major ion and total dissolved solids data from groundwater sampled by the National Water-Quality Assessment Program, 1992–2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gross, Eliza L.; Lindsey, Bruce D.; Rupert, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    Field blank samples help determine the frequency and magnitude of contamination bias, and replicate samples help determine the sampling variability (error) of measured analyte concentrations. Quality control data were evaluated for calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, chloride, sulfate, fluoride, silica, and total dissolved solids. A 99-percent upper confidence limit is calculated from field blanks to assess the potential for contamination bias. For magnesium, potassium, chloride, sulfate, and fluoride, potential contamination in more than 95 percent of environmental samples is less than or equal to the common maximum reporting level. Contamination bias has little effect on measured concentrations greater than 4.74 mg/L (milligrams per liter) for calcium, 14.98 mg/L for silica, 4.9 mg/L for sodium, and 120 mg/L for total dissolved solids. Estimates of sampling variability are calculated for high and low ranges of concentration for major ions and total dissolved solids. Examples showing the calculation of confidence intervals and how to determine whether measured differences between two water samples are significant are presented.

  18. Evaluation of Alkaline Cleaner Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partz, Earl

    1998-01-01

    Alkaline cleaners used to process aluminum substrates have contained chromium as the corrosion inhibitor. Chromium is a hazardous substance whose use and control are described by environmental laws. Replacement materials that have the characteristics of chromated alkaline cleaners need to be found that address both the cleaning requirements and environmental impacts. This report will review environmentally friendly candidates evaluated as non-chromium alkaline cleaner replacements and methods used to compare those candidates one versus another. The report will also list characteristics used to select candidates based on their declared contents. It will also describe and evaluate methods used to discriminate among the large number of prospective candidates.

  19. Dynamical simulations of superionicity in alkaline-earth halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L. X.; Hardy, J. R.; Cao, H. Z.

    1996-04-01

    Superionicity in alkaline-earth halides CaF 2, SrF 2 and BaF 2 has been studied by molecular dynamical simulations using Gordon-Kim potentials. These dynamical simulations employ a novel technique to monitor the motion of ions which clearly demonstrates the nature of the superionic phases in these crystals. While in the superionic phase, the Ca 2+, Ba 2+, and Sr 2+ ions maintain ideal lattice positions, the F - ions flow between them in a correlated linear manner closely related to that proposed previously by Boyer.

  20. Alkaline flooding for enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Gittler, W.E.

    1983-09-01

    There are over 12 active projects of varying size using one of 3 major types of alkaline agents. These include sodium silicate, caustic soda, and soda ash. Among the largest pilots currently is the THUMS project in the Wilmington field, California. Plans called for the injection of a 4% weight concentration of sodium orthosilicate over a 60% PV. Through the first 3 yr, over 27 million bbl of chemicals have been injected. Gulf Oil is operating several alkaline floods, one of which is located off shore in the Quarantine Bay field, Louisiana. In this pilot, sodium hydroxide in a weight concentration of 5 to 12% is being injected. Belco Petroleum Corp. has reported that their pilot operating in the Isenhour Unit in Wyoming is using a .5% weight concentration of soda ash in conjunction with a polymer. Other uses for alkaline agents in chemical flooding include the use of silicate as a preflush or sacrificial agent in micellar/polymer and surfactant recovery systems. In addition, caustic has been tested in the surface-mixed caustic emulsion process while orthosilicate has been tested in a recovery method known as mobility-controlled caustic floods.

  1. Diurnal variations of carbonaceous components, major ions, and stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios in suburban aerosols from northern vicinity of Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Nannan; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Kanaya, Yugo; Wang, Zifa

    2015-12-01

    We report diurnal variations of organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and major ions as well as stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios (δ13C and δ15N) in ambient aerosols at a suburban site (Mangshan), 40 km north of Beijing, China. We found that aerosol chemical compositions were largely controlled by the air mass transport from Beijing in daytime with southerly winds and by relatively fresh air mass in nighttime from the northern forest areas with northerly winds. Higher concentrations of aerosol mass and total carbon were obtained in daytime. Further, higher OC/EC ratios were recorded in daytime (4.0 ± 1.7) than nighttime (3.2 ± 0.7), suggesting that OC is formed by photochemical oxidation of gaseous precursors in daytime. Contributions of WSOC to OC were slightly higher in daytime (38%) than nighttime (34%), possibly due to secondary formation of WSOC in daytime. We also found higher concentrations of Ca2+ in daytime, which was originated from the construction dust in Beijing area and transported to the sampling site. δ13C ranged from -25.3 to -21.2‰ (ave. -23.5 ± 0.9‰) in daytime and -29.0 to -21.4‰ (-24.0 ± 1.5‰) in nighttime, suggesting that Mangshan aerosols were more influenced by fossil fuel combustion products in daytime and by terrestrial C3 plants in nighttime. This study suggests that daytime air mass delivery from megacity Beijing largely influence the air quality at the receptor site in the north together with photochemical processing of organic aerosols during the atmospheric transport, whereas the Mangshan site is covered with relatively clean air masses at night.

  2. Impacts of permafrost degradation on the riverine delivery of organic matter, inorganic nutrients, and major ions to the Arctic Ocean (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, K. E.

    2009-12-01

    Over the next century, near-surface permafrost across the circumpolar Arctic is expected to degrade significantly, particularly for land areas south of 70°N. This is likely to cause widespread impacts on the riverine delivery of organic matter, inorganic nutrients, and major ions to the Arctic Ocean. These interacting processes can be highly complex and undoubtedly exhibit spatial and temporal variability associated with current permafrost conditions, sensitivity to permafrost thaw, mode of permafrost degradation, and/or environmental characteristics of watersheds. Here, we present measurements of biogeochemical constituents from nearly 100 streams and rivers across West Siberia, a region that contains the world's largest stores of peat carbon, exports massive volumes of freshwater to the Arctic Ocean, and is warming faster than the Arctic as a whole. These measurements show that cold, permafrost-influenced watersheds release little dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), or total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) to streams, regardless of the extent of peatland cover. However, considerably higher concentrations are found in warm, permafrost-free watersheds, rising sharply as a function of peatland cover. This suggests that by the year 2100, impacts of warming and permafrost degradation may cause ~29-53% increases in DOC, DON, and TDP fluxes to the Arctic Ocean. Additionally, measurements of total inorganic solutes (TIS) in permafrost-free watersheds currently exhibit six times higher concentrations than in permafrost-influenced watersheds, suggesting that should permafrost in the region completely disappear, TIS export from the West Siberian region to the Arctic Ocean would increase by ~59%. Such increases in the export of biogeochemical constituents could have important implications for future biological productivity in arctic Eurasian shelf waters and the Arctic Ocean basin interior.

  3. Seasonal hydrology drives rapid shifts in the flux and composition of dissolved and particulate organic carbon and major and trace ions in the Fraser River, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, B. M.; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, B.; Eglinton, T. I.; Spencer, R. G. M.; Bulygina, E.; Galy, V.; Lamborg, C. H.; Ganguli, P. M.; Montluçon, D. B.; Marsh, S.; Gillies, S. L.; Fanslau, J.; Epp, A.; Luymes, R.

    2015-10-01

    Rapid changes in the volume and sources of discharge during the spring freshet lead to pronounced variations in biogeochemical properties in snowmelt-dominated river basins. We used daily sampling during the onset of the freshet in the Fraser River (southwestern Canada) in 2013 to identify rapid changes in the flux and composition of dissolved material, with a focus on dissolved organic matter (DOM). Previous time series sampling (at twice monthly frequency) of dissolved inorganic species in the Fraser River has revealed smooth seasonal transitions in concentrations of major ions and tracers of water and dissolved load sources between freshet and base flow periods. In contrast, daily sampling reveals a significant increase in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration (200 to 550 μmol L-1) occurring over a matter of days, accompanied by a shift in DOM optical properties, indicating a transition towards higher molecular weight, more aromatic DOM composition. Comparable changes in DOM composition, but not concentration, occur at other times of year, underscoring the role of seasonal climatology in DOM cycling. A smaller data set of total and dissolved Hg concentrations also showed variability during the spring freshet period, although dissolved Hg dynamics appear to be driven by factors beyond DOM as characterized here. The time series records of DOC and particulate organic carbon (POC) concentrations indicate that the Fraser River exports 0.25-0.35 % of its annual basin net primary productivity. The snowmelt-dominated hydrology, forested land cover, and minimal reservoir impoundment of the Fraser River may influence the DOC yield of the basin, which is high relative to the nearby Columbia River and of similar magnitude to that of the Yukon River to the north. Anticipated warming and decreased snowfall due to climate changes in the region may cause an overall decrease in DOM flux from the Fraser River to the coastal ocean in coming decades

  4. One-year observations of size distribution characteristics of major aerosol constituents at a coastal receptor site in Hong Kong - Part 1: Inorganic ions and oxalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Q.; Huang, X. H. H.; Yu, J. Z.

    2014-09-01

    Size distribution data of major aerosol constituents are essential in source apportioning of visibility degradation, testing and verification of air quality models incorporating aerosols. We report here 1-year observations of mass size distributions of major inorganic ions (sulfate, nitrate, chloride, ammonium, sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium) and oxalate at a coastal suburban receptor site in Hong Kong, China. A total of 43 sets of size-segregated samples in the size range of 0.056-18 μm were collected from March 2011 to February 2012. The size distributions of sulfate, ammonium, potassium and oxalate were characterized by a dominant droplet mode with a mass mean aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) in the range of ~ 0.7-0.9 μm. Oxalate had a slightly larger MMAD than sulfate on days with temperatures above 22 °C as a result of the process of volatilization and repartitioning. Nitrate was mostly dominated by the coarse mode but enhanced presence in fine mode was detected on winter days with lower temperature and lower concentrations of sea salt and soil particles. This data set reveals an inversely proportional relationship between the fraction of nitrate in the fine mode and product of the sum of sodium and calcium in equivalent concentrations and the dissociation constant of ammonium nitrate (i.e., (1/([Na+] + 2[Ca2+]) × (1/Ke')) when Pn_fine is significant (> 10%). The seasonal variation observed for sea salt aerosol abundance, with lower values in summer and winter, is possibly linked with the lower marine salinities in these two seasons. Positive matrix factorization was applied to estimate the relative contributions of local formation and transport to the observed ambient sulfate level through the use of the combined data sets of size-segregated sulfate and select gaseous air pollutants. On average, the regional/super-regional transport of air pollutants was the dominant source at this receptor site, especially on high-sulfate days while local formation

  5. One-year observations of size distribution characteristics of major aerosol constituents at a coastal receptor site in Hong Kong - Part 1: Inorganic ions and oxalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Q.; Huang, X. H. H.; Yu, J. Z.

    2014-01-01

    Size distribution data of major aerosol constituents are essential in source apportioning of visibility degradation, testing and verification of air quality models incorporating aerosols. We report here one-year observations of mass size distributions of major inorganic ions (sulfate, nitrate, chloride, ammonium, sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium) and oxalate at a coastal suburban receptor site in Hong Kong, China. A total of 43 sets of size segregated samples in the size range of 0.056-18 μm were collected from March 2011 to February 2012. The size distributions of sulfate, ammonium, potassium and oxalate were characterized by a dominant droplet mode with a mass mean aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) in the range of ~0.7-0.9 μm. Oxalate had a slightly larger MMAD than sulfate on days with temperatures above 22 °C as a result of the process of volatilization and repartitioning. Nitrate was mostly dominated by the coarse mode but enhanced presence in fine mode was detected on winter days with lower temperature and lower concentrations of sea salt and soil particles. This data set reveals an inversely proportional relationship between the fraction of nitrate in the fine mode and product of the sum of sodium and calcium in equivalent concentrations and the dissociation constant of ammonium nitrate (i.e., (1/[Na+] + 2[Ca2+]) × (1/Ke')). The seasonal variation observed for sea salt aerosol abundance, with lower values in summer and winter, is possibly linked with the lower marine salinities in these two seasons. Positive matrix factorization was applied to estimate the relative contributions of local formation and transport to the observed ambient sulfate level through the use of the combined datasets of size-segregated sulfate and select gaseous air pollutants. On average, the regional/super-regional transport of air pollutants was the dominant source at this receptor site, especially on high sulfate days, while local formation processes contributed approximately

  6. Declining Temporal Variability of Major Ions Concentrations but not Arsenic Concentration as Function of Groundwater age in the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna Delta of Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhar, R. K.; Zheng, Y.; Stute, M.; Cheng, Z.; Vangeen, A.; Shamsudduha, M.; Hoque, M. A.; Shanewaz, M.; Ahmed, K.

    2004-12-01

    groundwater >21 years old: 6-7 percent and 10-14 percent, major cations and anions, respectively. This suggests that despite the apparent influence of recharge on major ion concentrations, dissolved As concentrations in most shallow aquifers are relatively well buffered. No notable variability (<2 percent) in As concentrations was observed in groundwaters from the Pleistocene aquifer.

  7. PREDICTING THE TOXICITY OF MAJOR IONS IN SEAWATER TO MYSID SHRIMP (MYSIDOPSIS BAHIA), SHEEPSHEAD MINNOW (CYPRINODON VARIEGATUS), AND INLAND SILVERSIDE MINNOW (MENIDIA BERYLLINA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although marine organisms are naturally adapted to salinities well above those of freshwater, elevated concentrations of specific ions have been shown to cause adverse effects on some saltwater species. Because some ions are also physiologically essential, a deficiency of these i...

  8. Statistical analysis of major ion and trace element geochemistry of water, 1986-2006, at seven wells transecting the freshwater/saline-water interface of the Edwards Aquifer, San Antonio, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahler, Barbara J.

    2008-01-01

    The statistical analyses taken together indicate that the geochemistry at the freshwater-zone wells is more variable than that at the transition-zone wells. The geochemical variability at the freshwater-zone wells might result from dilution of ground water by meteoric water. This is indicated by relatively constant major ion molar ratios; a preponderance of positive correlations between SC, major ions, and trace elements; and a principal components analysis in which the major ions are strongly loaded on the first principal component. Much of the variability at three of the four transition-zone wells might result from the use of different laboratory analytical methods or reporting procedures during the period of sampling. This is reflected by a lack of correlation between SC and major ion concentrations at the transition-zone wells and by a principal components analysis in which the variability is fairly evenly distributed across several principal components. The statistical analyses further indicate that, although the transition-zone wells are less well connected to surficial hydrologic conditions than the freshwater-zone wells, there is some connection but the response time is longer. 

  9. Alkalinity Enrichment Enhances Net Calcification of a Coral Reef Flat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albright, R.; Caldeira, K.

    2015-12-01

    Ocean acidification is projected to shift reefs from a state of net accretion to one of net dissolution sometime this century. While retrospective studies show large-scale changes in coral calcification over the last several decades, it is not possible to unequivocally link these results to ocean acidification due to confounding factors of temperature and other environmental parameters. Here, we quantified the calcification response of a coral reef flat to alkalinity enrichment to test whether reef calcification increases when ocean chemistry is restored to near pre-industrial conditions. We used sodium hydroxide (NaOH) to increase the total alkalinity of seawater flowing over a reef flat, with the aim of increasing carbonate ion concentrations [CO32-] and the aragonite saturation state (Ωarag) to values that would have been attained under pre-industrial atmospheric pCO2 levels. We developed a dual tracer regression method to estimate alkalinity uptake (i.e., calcification) in response to alkalinity enrichment. This approach uses the change in ratios between a non-conservative tracer (alkalinity) and a conservative tracer (a non-reactive dye, Rhodamine WT) to assess the fraction of added alkalinity that is taken up by the reef as a result of an induced increase in calcification rate. Using this method, we estimate that an average of 17.3% ± 2.3% of the added alkalinity was taken up by the reef community. In providing results from the first seawater chemistry manipulation experiment performed on a natural coral reef community (without artificial confinement), we demonstrate that, upon increase of [CO32-] and Ωarag to near pre-industrial values, reef calcification increases. Thus, we conclude that, the impacts of ocean acidification are already being felt by coral reefs. This work is the culmination of years of work in the Caldeira lab at the Carnegie Institution for Science, involving many people including Jack Silverman, Kenny Schneider, and Jana Maclaren.

  10. Characterization of Human Bone Alkaline Phosphatase in Pichia Pastoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, Christine C.; Ciszak, Eva; Karr, Laurel J.

    1999-01-01

    A soluble form of human bone alkaline phosphatase has been expressed in a recombinant strain of the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. We constructed a plasmid containing cDNA encoding for human bone alkaline phosphatase, with the hydrophobic carboxyl terminal portion deleted. Alkaline phosphatase was secreted into the medium to a level of 32mg/L when cultured in shake flasks, and enzyme activity was 12U/mg, as measured by a spectrophotometric assay. By conversion to a fermentation system, a yield of 880mg/L has been achieved with an enzyme activity of 968U/mg. By gel electrophoresis analysis, it appears that greater than 50% of the total protein in the fermentation media is alkaline phosphatase. Although purification procedures are not yet completely optimized, they are expected to include filtration, ion exchange and affinity chromatography. Our presentation will focus on the purification and crystallization results up to the time of the conference. Structural data should provide additional information on the role of alkaline phosphatase in normal bone mineralization and in certain bone mineralization anomalies.

  11. COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qui; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling

    2004-05-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding in the swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to the naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of the injected solution bypasses the target pore space containing oil. The objective of this work is to investigate whether combining these two technologies could broaden the applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium--polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 9.2 to 12.9.

  12. Occurrence and Origin of Methane in Relation to Major Ion Concentrations in Groundwater Wells of the Denver-Julesburg and Piceance Basins of Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, J. D.; Sherwood, O.; Lackey, G.; Burke, T. L.; Osborn, S. G.; Ryan, J. N.

    2014-12-01

    The rapid expansion of unconventional oil and gas development in North America has generated intense public concerns about potential impacts to groundwater quality. To address these concerns, we examined geochemical data from a publicly available Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) database. The data consist of over 17,000 samples from 4,756 unique surface and groundwater locations collected since 1990, representing one of the most extensive databases of groundwater quality in relation to oil and gas development anywhere. Following rigorous data QA/QC, we classified groundwater samples with respect to major ion composition and compared the assigned water "types" along with other geochemical parameters to methane concentrations and carbon isotopes in the Denver-Julesburg (DJ) and Piceance Basins in Colorado. 88% of samples with elevated methane (defined as > 1 mg L-1) were classified as Na-HCO3 type in the DJ basin and 78% were classified as either Na-HCO3 or Na-Cl type in the Piceance basin. Of the elevated methane samples, 96% and 69% in the DJ and Piceance basins respectively had microbial gas signatures, as determined by d13C values < - 60 ‰. Samples with elevated methane concentrations had higher pH, higher concentrations of chloride and sodium and lower concentrations of calcium in both the DJ and Piceance Basin. Elevated methane concentrations were predominately microbial in origin and correlated to indicators of increased water-rock interactions and anaerobic groundwater conditions, indicating that methane observed in these groundwater samples are largely a result of natural processes. Rare occurrences of stray thermogenic gas (d13C > 55 ‰, gas wetness > 5 % C2+ hydrocarbons) were most frequently associated with the Na-HCO3 water type in the DJ basin (67% of occurrences) and were randomly distributed across water types in the Piceance Basin. Investigation of natural and anthropogenic causes for the presence of methane is ongoing, using

  13. Solvation structures and dynamics of alkaline earth metal halides in supercritical water: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshri, Sonanki; Mandal, Ratnamala; Tembe, B. L.

    2016-09-01

    Constrained molecular dynamics simulations of alkaline earth metal halides have been carried out to investigate their structural and dynamical properties in supercritical water. Potentials of mean force (PMFs) for all the alkaline earth metal halides in supercritical water have been computed. Contact ion pairs (CIPs) are found to be more stable than all other configurations of the ion pairs except for MgI2 where solvent shared ion pair (SShIP) is more stable than the CIP. There is hardly any difference in the PMFs between the M2+ (M = Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba) and the X- (X = F, Cl, Br, I) ions whether the second X- ion is present in the first coordination shell of the M2+ ion or not. The solvent molecules in the solvation shells diffuse at a much slower rate compared to the bulk. Orientational distribution functions of solvent molecules are sharper for smaller ions.

  14. Reductive dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride using buffered alkaline ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ya-Ting; Liang, Chenju

    2015-10-01

    Alkaline ascorbic acid (AA) was recently discovered as a novel in-situ chemical reduction (ISCR) reagent for remediating chlorinated solvents in the subsurface. For this ISCR process, the maintenance of an alkaline pH is essential. This study investigated the possibility of the reduction of carbon tetrachloride (CT) using alkaline AA solution buffered by phosphate and by NaOH. The results indicated that CT was reduced by AA, and chloroform (CF) was a major byproduct at a phosphate buffered pH of 12. However, CT was completely reduced by AA in 2M NaOH without CF formation. In the presence of iron/soil minerals, iron could be reduced by AA and Fe(2+) tends to precipitate on the mineral surface to accelerate CT degradation. A simultaneous transfer of hydrogenolysis and dichloroelimination would occur under phosphate buffered pH 12. This implies that a high alkaline environment is a crucial factor for maintaining the dominant pathway of two electron transfer from dianionic AA to dehydroascorbic acid, and to undergo dichloroelimination of CT. Moreover, threonic acid and oxalic acid were identified to be the major AA decomposition products in alkaline solutions.

  15. Chemical degradation mechanisms of membranes for alkaline membrane fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Choe, Yoong-Kee; Henson, Neil J.; Kim, Yu Seung

    2015-12-31

    Chemical degradation mechanisms of membranes for alkaline membrane fuel cells have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT). We have elucidated that the aryl-ether moiety of membranes is one of the weakest site against attack of hydroxide ions. The results of DFT calculations for hydroxide initiated aryl-ether cleavage indicated that the aryl-ether cleavage occurred prior to degradation of cationic functional group. Such a weak nature of the aryl-ether group arises from the electron deficiency of the aryl group as well as the low bond dissociation energy. The DFT results suggests that removal of the aryl-ether group in the membrane should enhance the stability of membranes under alkaline conditions. In fact, an ether fee poly(phenylene) membrane exhibits excellent stability against the attack from hydroxide ions.

  16. Occlusion and ion exchange in the molten (lithium chloride + potassium chloride + alkaline earth chloride) salt + zeolite 4A system with alkaline earth chlorides of calcium and strontium, and in the molten (lithium chloride + potassium chloride + actinide chloride) salt + zeolite 4A system with the actinide chloride of uranium.

    SciTech Connect

    Lexa, D.; Chemical Engineering

    2003-04-01

    The interaction between molten salts of the type LiCl-KCl-MeCl n (Me=Ca, Sr, U; x{sub MeCLn} $$ = to 0.45; and x {sub KCl}/x LiCl=0.69) and zeolite 4A have been studied at 823 K. The main interactions between these salts and zeolite are molten salt occlusion to form salt-loaded zeolite and ion exchange between the molten salt and salt-loaded zeolite. An irreversible chemical reaction has been observed in the LiCl-KCl-UCl{sup 3+}zeolite system. The extent of occlusion is a function of the concentration of MeCl n in the zeolite and is equal to 10{+-}1 Cl- per zeolite unit cell, (AlSiO{sub 4}){sub 12}, at infinite MeCl n dilution. The ion-exchange mole-fraction equilibrium constants (separation factors) with respect to Li are decreasing functions of the concentration of SrCl{sub 2} and UCl{sub 3}, but an increasing function of the concentration of CaCl{sub 2} in the zeolite. At infinite MeCl n dilution, they are equal to 0.9, 11.9, and 13 for CaCl{sub 2}, SrCl{sub 2}, and UCl{sub 3}, respectively. The standard ion-exchange chemical potentials are equal to -50.0, -84, and -101.1 kJ x mol-1 for Ca{sup 2+}, Sr{sup 2+}, and U{sup 3+}, respectively.

  17. Coordination of alkaline earth metal ions in the inverted cucurbit[7]uril supramolecular assemblies formed in the presence of [ZnCl4]2- and [CdCl4]2-.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Zhang, Yun-Qian; Zhu, Qian-Jiang; Xue, Sai-Feng; Tao, Zhu; Xiao, Xin

    2015-05-01

    A convenient method to isolate inverted cucurbit[7]uril (iQ[7]) from a mixture of water-soluble Q[n]s was established by eluting the soluble mixture of Q[n]s on a Dowex (H(+) form) column so that iQ[7] could be selected as a ligand for coordination and supramolecular assembly with alkaline earth cations (AE(2+)) in aqueous HCl solutions in the presence of [ZnCl(4)](2-) and [CdCl(4)](2-) anions as structure-directing agents. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that both iQ[7]-AE(2+) -[ZnCl(4)](2-) -HCl and iQ[7]-AE(2+) -[CdCl(4)](2-) -HCl interaction systems yielded supramolecular assemblies, in which the [ZnCl(4)](2-) and [CdCl(4)](2-) anions presented a honeycomb effect, and this resulted in the formation of linear iQ[7]/AE(2+) coordination polymers through outer-surface interactions of Q[n]s.

  18. Mechanism of Formation of the Major Estradiol Product Ions Following Collisional Activation of the Molecular Anion in a Tandem Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooding, Kerry M.; Barkley, Robert M.; Hankin, Joseph A.; Johnson, Christopher A.; Bradford, Andrew P.; Santoro, Nanette; Murphy, Robert C.

    2013-10-01

    The importance of the mass spectral product ion structure is highlighted in quantitative assays, which typically use multiple reaction monitoring (MRM), and in the discovery of novel metabolites. Estradiol is an important sex steroid whose quantitation and metabolite identification using tandem mass spectrometry has been widely employed in numerous clinical studies. Negative electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry of estradiol (E2) results in several product ions, including the abundant m/z 183 and 169. Although m/z 183 is one of the most abundant product ions used in many quantitative assays, the structure of m/z 183 has not been rigorously examined. We suggest a structure for m/z 183 and a mechanism of formation consistent with collision induced dissociation (CID) of E2 and several stable isotopes ([D4]-E2, [13C6]-E2, and [D1]-E2). An additional product ion from E2, namely m/z 169, has also been examined. MS3 experiments indicated that both m/z 183 and m/z 169 originate from only E2 [M - H]- m/z 271. These ions, m/z 183 and m/z 169, were also present in the collision induced decomposition mass spectra of other prominent estrogens, estrone (E1) and estriol (E3), indicating that these two product ions could be used to elucidate the estrogenic origin of novel metabolites. We propose two fragmentation schemes to explain the CID data and suggest a structure of m/z 183 and m/z 169 consistent with several isotopic variants and high resolution mass spectrometric measurements.

  19. Ethylene Inhibits Root Elongation during Alkaline Stress through AUXIN1 and Associated Changes in Auxin Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Xu, Heng-Hao; Liu, Wen-Cheng; Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2015-08-01

    Soil alkalinity causes major reductions in yield and quality of crops worldwide. The plant root is the first organ sensing soil alkalinity, which results in shorter primary roots. However, the mechanism underlying alkaline stress-mediated inhibition of root elongation remains to be further elucidated. Here, we report that alkaline conditions inhibit primary root elongation of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings by reducing cell division potential in the meristem zones and that ethylene signaling affects this process. The ethylene perception antagonist silver (Ag(+)) alleviated the inhibition of root elongation by alkaline stress. Moreover, the ethylene signaling mutants ethylene response1-3 (etr1-3), ethylene insensitive2 (ein2), and ein3-1 showed less reduction in root length under alkaline conditions, indicating a reduced sensitivity to alkalinity. Ethylene biosynthesis also was found to play a role in alkaline stress-mediated root inhibition; the ethylene overproducer1-1 mutant, which overproduces ethylene because of increased stability of 1-AMINOCYCLOPROPANE-1-CARBOXYLIC ACID SYNTHASE5, was hypersensitive to alkaline stress. In addition, the ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor cobalt (Co(2+)) suppressed alkaline stress-mediated inhibition of root elongation. We further found that alkaline stress caused an increase in auxin levels by promoting expression of auxin biosynthesis-related genes, but the increase in auxin levels was reduced in the roots of the etr1-3 and ein3-1 mutants and in Ag(+)/Co(2+)-treated wild-type plants. Additional genetic and physiological data showed that AUXIN1 (AUX1) was involved in alkaline stress-mediated inhibition of root elongation. Taken together, our results reveal that ethylene modulates alkaline stress-mediated inhibition of root growth by increasing auxin accumulation by stimulating the expression of AUX1 and auxin biosynthesis-related genes.

  20. Ethylene Inhibits Root Elongation during Alkaline Stress through AUXIN1 and Associated Changes in Auxin Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Xu, Heng-Hao; Liu, Wen-Cheng; Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2015-08-01

    Soil alkalinity causes major reductions in yield and quality of crops worldwide. The plant root is the first organ sensing soil alkalinity, which results in shorter primary roots. However, the mechanism underlying alkaline stress-mediated inhibition of root elongation remains to be further elucidated. Here, we report that alkaline conditions inhibit primary root elongation of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings by reducing cell division potential in the meristem zones and that ethylene signaling affects this process. The ethylene perception antagonist silver (Ag(+)) alleviated the inhibition of root elongation by alkaline stress. Moreover, the ethylene signaling mutants ethylene response1-3 (etr1-3), ethylene insensitive2 (ein2), and ein3-1 showed less reduction in root length under alkaline conditions, indicating a reduced sensitivity to alkalinity. Ethylene biosynthesis also was found to play a role in alkaline stress-mediated root inhibition; the ethylene overproducer1-1 mutant, which overproduces ethylene because of increased stability of 1-AMINOCYCLOPROPANE-1-CARBOXYLIC ACID SYNTHASE5, was hypersensitive to alkaline stress. In addition, the ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor cobalt (Co(2+)) suppressed alkaline stress-mediated inhibition of root elongation. We further found that alkaline stress caused an increase in auxin levels by promoting expression of auxin biosynthesis-related genes, but the increase in auxin levels was reduced in the roots of the etr1-3 and ein3-1 mutants and in Ag(+)/Co(2+)-treated wild-type plants. Additional genetic and physiological data showed that AUXIN1 (AUX1) was involved in alkaline stress-mediated inhibition of root elongation. Taken together, our results reveal that ethylene modulates alkaline stress-mediated inhibition of root growth by increasing auxin accumulation by stimulating the expression of AUX1 and auxin biosynthesis-related genes. PMID:26109425

  1. Metasomatized lithosphere and the origin of alkaline lavas.

    PubMed

    Pilet, Sébastien; Baker, Michael B; Stolper, Edward M

    2008-05-16

    Recycled oceanic crust, with or without sediment, is often invoked as a source component of continental and oceanic alkaline magmas to account for their trace-element and isotopic characteristics. Alternatively, these features have been attributed to sources containing veined, metasomatized lithosphere. In melting experiments on natural amphibole-rich veins at 1.5 gigapascals, we found that partial melts of metasomatic veins can reproduce key major- and trace-element features of oceanic and continental alkaline magmas. Moreover, experiments with hornblendite plus lherzolite showed that reaction of melts of amphibole-rich veins with surrounding lherzolite can explain observed compositional trends from nephelinites to alkali olivine basalts. We conclude that melting of metasomatized lithosphere is a viable alternative to models of alkaline basalt formation by melting of recycled oceanic crust with or without sediment.

  2. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David B.; Lao, Guifang

    1998-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium.

  3. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, D.B.; Lao, G.

    1998-01-06

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium. 3 figs.

  4. Ocean alkalinity and the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldeira, K. G.; Rampino, Michael R.

    1988-01-01

    A biogeochemical cycle model resolving ocean carbon and alkalinity content is applied to the Maestrichtian and Danian. The model computes oceanic concentrations and distributions of Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and Sigma-CO2. From these values an atmospheric pCO2 value is calculated, which is used to estimate rates of terrestrial weathering of calcite, dolomite, and calcium and magnesium silicates. Metamorphism of carbonate rocks and the subsequent outgassing of CO2 to the atmosphere are parameterized in terms of carbonate rock reservoir sizes, total land area, and a measure of overall tectonic activity, the sea-floor generation rate. The ocean carbon reservoir computed by the model is used with Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) C-13 data to estimate organic detrital fluxes under a variety of ocean mixing rate assumptions. Using Redfield ratios, the biogenic detrital flux estimate is used to partition the ocean carbon and alkalinity reservoirs between the mixed layer and deep ocean. The calcite flux estimate and carbonate ion concentrations are used to determine the rate of biologically mediated CaCO3 titration. Oceanic productivity was severely limited for approximately 500 kyr following the K/T boundary resulting in significant increases in total ocean alkalinity. As productivity returned to the ocean, excess carbon and alkalinity was removed from the ocean as CaCO3. Model runs indicate that this resulted in a transient imbalance in the other direction. Ocean chemistry returned to near-equilibrium by about 64 mybp.

  5. Petrogenesis of coeval silica-saturated and silica-undersaturated alkaline rocks: Mineralogical and geochemical evidence from the Saima alkaline complex, NE China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yu-Sheng; Yang, Jin-Hui; Sun, Jin-Feng; Zhang, Ji-Heng; Wu, Fu-Yuan

    2016-03-01

    A combined study of zircon U-Pb ages, mineral chemistry, whole-rock elements and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopes was carried out for the Saima alkaline complex in the northeastern China, in order to investigate the source and petrogenesis of coeval silica-saturated and silica-undersaturated alkaline rocks. The Saima alkaline complex consists of nepheline syenites, quartz-bearing syenites and alkaline volcanic rocks (i.e., phonolite and trachyte), with minor mafic dikes and carbonatitic veins. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) zircon U-Pb dating gives consistent ages of 230-224 Ma for these rocks, suggesting that they are coeval. All alkaline rocks in the Saima complex are enriched in large ion lithophile elements (LILEs) and light rare earth elements (LREEs), and depleted in high field strength elements (HFSEs) with significant negative Nb, Ta and Ti anomalies. Geochemical data and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic compositions indicate that the various alkaline rocks were all derived from partial melting of an ancient, re-enriched lithospheric mantle in the garnet stability field, but experienced variable siliceous- or carbonate-rich crustal contamination. Based on petrographic evidence, mineral compositions, and whole-rock geochemical data, two distinct magmatic evolutionary trends are proposed to explain the coeval emplacement of the various rock types within the Saima alkaline complex. The silica-undersaturated rocks (nepheline syenites and phonolites) result from alkali feldspar + apatite + titanite crystal fractionation of an alkaline mafic parental melt combined with assimilation of marine carbonate host rocks. In contrast, the generation of silica-saturated rocks (quartz-bearing syenites and trachytes) may be attributed to subsequent and continued clinopyroxene + apatite + biotite crystal fractionation coupled with assimilation of siliceous sediments.

  6. Development of alkaline fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbs, Michael R.; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Alam, Todd Michael; Janarthanan, Rajeswari; Horan, James L.; Caire, Benjamin R.; Ziegler, Zachary C.; Herring, Andrew M.; Yang, Yuan; Zuo, Xiaobing; Robson, Michael H.; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Patterson, Wendy; Atanassov, Plamen Borissov

    2013-09-01

    This project focuses on the development and demonstration of anion exchange membrane (AEM) fuel cells for portable power applications. Novel polymeric anion exchange membranes and ionomers with high chemical stabilities were prepared characterized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories. Durable, non-precious metal catalysts were prepared by Dr. Plamen Atanassovs research group at the University of New Mexico by utilizing an aerosol-based process to prepare templated nano-structures. Dr. Andy Herrings group at the Colorado School of Mines combined all of these materials to fabricate and test membrane electrode assemblies for single cell testing in a methanol-fueled alkaline system. The highest power density achieved in this study was 54 mW/cm2 which was 90% of the project target and the highest reported power density for a direct methanol alkaline fuel cell.

  7. The pressure induced B1-B2 phase transition of alkaline halides and alkaline earth chalcogenides. A first principles investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Potzel, Oliver; Taubmann, Gerhard

    2011-05-15

    In this work, we considered the pressure induced B1-B2 phase transition of AB compounds. The DFT calculations were carried out for 11 alkaline halides, 11 alkaline earth chalcogenides and the lanthanide pnictide CeP. For both the B1 and the B2 structures of each compound, the energy was calculated as a function of the cell volume. The transition pressure, the bulk moduli and their pressure derivatives were obtained from the corresponding equations of state. The transition path of the Buerger mechanism was described using roots of the transition matrix. We correlated the computed enthalpies of activation to some structure defining properties of the compounds. A fair correlation to Pearsons hardness of the ions was observed. -- Graphical abstract: Pressure induced transition from the B1 structure (left) via the transition state (middle) to the B2 structure (right). Display Omitted highlights: > Pressure induced phase transitions in AB compounds were considered. > Alkaline halides and alkaline earth chalcogenides were treated. > DFT calculations with periodic boundary conditions were applied. > The transition path was described by roots of the transition matrix. > The enthalpy of activation was calculated for numerous compounds.

  8. Oxygen electrodes for rechargeable alkaline fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swette, Larry; Giner, Jose

    1987-01-01

    Electrocatalysts and supports for the positive electrode of moderate temperature single unit rechargeable alkaline fuel cells were investigated and developed. The electrocatalysts are defined as the material with a higher activity for the oxygen electrode reaction than the support. Advanced development will require that the materials be prepared in high surface area forms, and may also entail integration of various candidate materials. Eight candidate support materials and seven electrocatalysts were investigated. Of the 8 support, 3 materials meet the preliminary requirements in terms of electrical conductivity and stability. Emphasis is now on preparing in high surface area form and testing under more severe corrosion stress conditions. Of the 7 electrocatalysts prepared and evaluated, at least 5 materials remain as potential candidates. The major emphasis remains on preparation, physical characterization and electrochemical performance testing.

  9. Design factors and performance efficiencies of successive alkalinity producing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jage, C.R.; Zipper, C.E.

    1999-07-01

    Successive Alkalinity Producing Systems (SAPS) are passive treatment wetlands that have been used successfully in renovating acidic mine drainage (AMD) for several years. Unfortunately, design parameters and treatment efficiency of these systems vary widely due to a lack of clear, consistent design and construction guidelines. This study is investigating ten operating SAPS systems in Virginia and West Virginia for the purpose of identifying the relationship of design and construction factors to system performance. Influent and effluent water samples were collected for a period of two years or longer by the operators of each system. Each sample was analyzed for pH, alkalinity, acidity, sulfate, total iron, total manganese, and aluminum. The individual systems were also characterized according to system age, size, and construction materials. Residence times for the ten systems ranged from 4.5 hours to 13.31 days. On average, they were able to raise the pH 0.65 units and generate a net alkalinity of 84.84 mg/l as CaCO{sub 3}. Iron and manganese removal did occur in the SAPS cells, but the majority of the removal took place in post-SAPS settling ponds. Net alkalinity generation was positively correlated with residence time and iron removal rates suggesting a synergistic effect. Seasonal variation in alkalinity production was also noted, possibly indicating changes in alkalinity generation rates by dissimilatory sulfate reduction. These data provide the foundation for the development of a user-oriented SAPS design model based solely on influent AMD chemistry and final treatment goals as input parameters.

  10. Actinide solubility and spectroscopic speciation in alkaline Hanford waste solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, L.; Felmy, A.R.; Rai, D.

    1996-10-01

    Information on the solubility and the speciation of actinide elements, especially plutonium and neptunium, in alkaline solutions is of importance in the development of separation techniques for the Hanford tank HLW supernatant. In the present study, experimental data on the solubilities of plutonium in simulated Hanford tank solutions were analyzed with Pitzer`s specific ion-interaction approach, which is applicable in dilute to highly concentrated electrolyte solutions. In order to investigate the formation of actinide species in alkaline solutions with ligands (e.g., hydroxide, aluminate and carbonate), spectroscopic measurements of neptunium (V), as a chemical analog of plutonium (V), were conducted. Based on the solubility data and available information on both solid and aqueous species, a thermodynamic model was proposed. The applicability and limitations of this model are discussed.

  11. Purification and characterization of an alkaline protease from Acetes chinensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiachao; Liu, Xin; Li, Zhaojie; Xu, Jie; Xue, Changhu; Gao, Xin

    2005-07-01

    An alkaline protease from Acetes chinensis was purified and characterized in this study. The steps of purification include ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion-exchange chromatography with Q-sepharose Fast Flow, gel filtration chromatography with S300 and the second ion-exchange chromatography with Q-sepharose Fast Flow. The protease was isolated and purified, which was present and active on protein substrates (azocasein and casein). The specific protease activity was 17.15 folds and the recovery was 4.67. The molecular weight of the protease was estimated at 23.2 kD by SDS-PAGE. With azocasein as the susbstrate, the optimal temperature was 55°C and the optimal pH value was 5.5. Ion Ca2+ could enhance the proteolytic activity of the protease, while Cu2+, EDTA and PMSF could inhibit its activity.

  12. Experimental data developed to support the selection of a treatment process for West Valley alkaline supernatant

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, L.A.; Holton, L.K.; Myers, T.R.; Richardson, G.M.; Wise, B.M.

    1984-01-01

    At the request of West Valley Nuclear Services Co., Inc., the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has studied alternative treatment processes for the alkaline PUREX waste presently being stored in Tank 8D2 at West Valley, New York. Five tasks were completed during FY 1983: (1) simulation and characterization of the alkaline supernatant and sludge from the tank. The radiochemical and chemical distributions between the aqueous and solid phase were determined, and the efficiency of washing sludge with water to remove ions such as Na/sup +/ and SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ was investigated; (2) evaluation of a sodium tetraphenylboron (Na-TPB) precipitation process to recover cesium (Cs) and a sodium titanate (Na-TiA) sorption process to recover strontium (Sr) and plutonium (Pu) from the West Valley Alkaline supernatant. These processes were previously developed and tested at the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant; (3) evaluation of an organic cation-exchange resin (Duolite CS-100) to recover Cs and Pu from the alkaline supernatant followed by an organic macroreticular cation exchange resin (Amberlite IRC-718) to recover Sr; (4) evaluation of an inorganic ion exchanger (Linde Ionsiv IE-95) to recover Cs, Sr, and Pu from the alkaline supernatant; and (5) evaluation of Dowex-1,X8 organic anion exchange resin to recover technetium (Tc) from alkaline supernatant. The findings of these tasks are reported. 21 references, 36 figures, 34 tables.

  13. Wet deposition and related atmospheric chemistry in the São Paulo metropolis, Brazil: Part 1. Major inorganic ions in rainwater as evaluated by capillary electrophoresis with contactless conductivity detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Flávio R.; Fracassi da Silva, José A.; Lago, Claudimir L.; Fornaro, Adalgiza; Gutz, Ivano G. R.

    The metropolitan region of São Paulo (17.8 million inhabitants) presents serious air quality problems. An official network monitors key air pollutants, however, there is no regular program of evaluation of the wet deposition and data about rainwater composition is scarce. Opening a series of articles on this subject, capillary zone electrophoresis with contactless conductivity detection (CZE-CCD) is proposed and applied as a quick and inexpensive alternative to ion chromatography for the determination of the ionic composition of rainwater. Excellent resolution of the peaks and sufficient sensitivity were obtained for major ions. Switching from anion to cation determination is fast (30 min) and as simple as inverting the polarity of the voltage supply and changing the modifier added to the buffer solution. CZE-CCD was applied to the study of wet-only deposition collected in São Paulo during the period from May l997 to March 1998. The volume weighted means of the anions, sulfate, nitrate and chloride, were, respectively, 17, 22 and 29 μmol l -1. Among the cations, ammonium was the dominating one, with 28 μmol l -1, followed by calcium, 23 μmol l -1, sodium, 12 μmol l -1, and potassium, 5.8 μmol l -1. The wet flux of these anions and cations were, respectively, 2.5, 2.2, 1.6, 0.78, 1.4, 0.43 and 0.35 g m -2 yr -1. By attributing all sodium to marine origin, half of the chloride and more than 90% of all other ions are ascribable to continental/anthropogenic sources. Literature data for rainwater from inland regions (˜200 km apart from São Paulo) reveals lower deposition of all ions but H +. Absorption of NH 3 and incorporation of calcium carbonate, mainly in the metropolitan region itself, accounts for decreased acidity. The enrichment in all other ions during the studied period indicates the prevalence of the anthropogenic emissions from the metropolis over continental sources and explains the high correlation between the ions NO 3-, SO 42-, and NH 4+; the

  14. Alkalinization by chloride/bicarbonate pathway in larval mosquito midgut

    PubMed Central

    Boudko, Dmitri Y.; Moroz, Leonid L.; Harvey, William R.; Linser, Paul J.

    2001-01-01

    The midgut of mosquito larvae maintains a specific lumen alkalinization profile with large longitudinal gradients (pH ≈ 3 units⋅mm−1) in which an extremely alkaline (pH ≈ 11) anterior midgut lies between near-neutral posterior midgut and gastric cecum (pH 7–8). A plasma membrane H+ V-ATPase energizes this alkalinization but the ion carriers involved are unknown. Capillary zone electrophoresis of body samples with outlet conductivity detection showed a specific transepithelial distribution of chloride and bicarbonate/carbonate ions, with high concentrations of both anions in the midgut tissue: 68.3 ± 5.64 and 50.8 ± 4.21 mM, respectively. Chloride was higher in the hemolymph, 57.6 ± 7.84, than in the lumen, 3.51 ± 2.58, whereas bicarbonate was higher in the lumen, 58.1 ± 7.34, than the hemolymph, 3.96 ± 2.89. Time-lapse video assays of pH profiles in vivo revealed that ingestion of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor acetazolamide and the ion exchange inhibitor DIDS (4,4′-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2′-disulfonic acid), at 10−4 M eliminates lumen alkalinization. Basal application of these inhibitors in situ also reduced gradients recorded with self-referencing pH-sensitive microelectrodes near the basal membrane by ≈65% and 85% respectively. Self-referencing chloride-selective microelectrodes revealed a specific spatial profile of transepithelial chloride transport with an efflux maximum in anterior midgut. Both acetazolamide and DIDS reduced chloride effluxes. These data suggest that an H+ V-ATPase-energized anion exchange occurs across the apical membrane of the epithelial cells and implicate an electrophoretic Cl−/HCO\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{_{3}^{-}}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} exchanger and carbonic anhydrase as

  15. Alkaline fuel cell performance investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. E.; Manzo, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    An exploratory experimental fuel cell test program was conducted to investigate the performance characteristics of alkaline laboratory research electrodes. The objective of this work was to establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance and evaluate candidate cathode configurations having the potential for improved performance. The performance characterization tests provided data to empirically establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance for cell temperatures up to 300 F and reactant pressures up to 200 psia. Evaluation of five gold alloy cathode catalysts revealed that three doped gold alloys had more that two times the surface areas of reference cathodes and therefore offered the best potential for improved performance.

  16. Alkaline fuel cell performance investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. E.; Manzo, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    An exploratory experimental fuel cell test program was conducted to investigate the performance characteristics of alkaline laboratory research electrodes. The objective of this work was to establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance and evaluate candidate cathode configurations having the potential for improved performance. The performance characterization tests provided data to empirically establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance for cell temperatures up to 300 F and reactant pressures up to 200 psia. Evaluation of five gold alloy cathode catalysts revealed that three doped gold alloys had more than two times the surface areas of reference cathodes and therefore offered the best potential for improved performance.

  17. Physiological and molecular features of Puccinellia tenuiflora tolerating salt and alkaline-salt stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xia; Wei, Liqin; Wang, Zizhang; Wang, Tai

    2013-03-01

    Saline-alkali soil seriously threatens agriculture productivity; therefore, understanding the mechanism of plant tolerance to alkaline-salt stress has become a major challenge. Halophytic Puccinellia tenuiflora can tolerate salt and alkaline-salt stress, and is thus an ideal plant for studying this tolerance mechanism. In this study, we examined the salt and alkaline-salt stress tolerance of P. tenuiflora, and analyzed gene expression profiles under these stresses. Physiological experiments revealed that P. tenuiflora can grow normally with maximum stress under 600 mmol/L NaCl and 150 mmol/L Na2 CO3 (pH 11.0) for 6 d. We identified 4,982 unigenes closely homologous to rice and barley. Furthermore, 1,105 genes showed differentially expressed profiles under salt and alkaline-salt treatments. Differentially expressed genes were overrepresented in functions of photosynthesis, oxidation reduction, signal transduction, and transcription regulation. Almost all genes downregulated under salt and alkaline-salt stress were related to cell structure, photosynthesis, and protein synthesis. Comparing with salt stress, alkaline-salt stress triggered more differentially expressed genes and significantly upregulated genes related to H(+) transport and citric acid synthesis. These data indicate common and diverse features of salt and alkaline-salt stress tolerance, and give novel insights into the molecular and physiological mechanisms of plant salt and alkaline-salt tolerance.

  18. Process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, C.L.W.

    1995-07-25

    A process is described for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification. The process involves acidifying the wastes with an oxidizing agent such as nitric acid, then adding formic acid as a reducing agent, and then mixing with glass formers to produce a melter feed. The nitric acid contributes nitrates that act as an oxidant to balance the redox of the melter feed, prevent reduction of certain species to produce conducting metals, and lower the pH of the wastes to a suitable level for melter operation. The formic acid reduces mercury compounds to elemental mercury for removal by steam stripping, and MnO{sub 2} to the Mn(II) ion to prevent foaming of the glass melt. The optimum amounts of nitric acid and formic acid are determined in relation to the composition of the wastes, including the concentrations of mercury (II) and MnO{sub 2}, noble metal compounds, nitrates, formates and so forth. The process minimizes the amount of hydrogen generated during treatment, while producing a redox-balanced feed for effective melter operation and a quality glass product. 4 figs.

  19. Process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Chia-lin W.

    1995-01-01

    A process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification. The process involves acidifying the wastes with an oxidizing agent such as nitric acid, then adding formic acid as a reducing agent, and then mixing with glass formers to produce a melter feed. The nitric acid contributes nitrates that act as an oxidant to balance the redox of the melter feed, prevent reduction of certain species to produce conducting metals, and lower the pH of the wastes to a suitable level for melter operation. The formic acid reduces mercury compounds to elemental mercury for removal by steam stripping, and MnO.sub.2 to the Mn(II) ion to prevent foaming of the glass melt. The optimum amounts of nitric acid and formic acid are determined in relation to the composition of the wastes, including the concentrations of mercury (II) and MnO.sub.2, noble metal compounds, nitrates, formates and so forth. The process minimizes the amount of hydrogen generated during treatment, while producing a redox-balanced feed for effective melter operation and a quality glass product.

  20. Alkaline Water and Longevity: A Murine Study.

    PubMed

    Magro, Massimiliano; Corain, Livio; Ferro, Silvia; Baratella, Davide; Bonaiuto, Emanuela; Terzo, Milo; Corraducci, Vittorino; Salmaso, Luigi; Vianello, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The biological effect of alkaline water consumption is object of controversy. The present paper presents a 3-year survival study on a population of 150 mice, and the data were analyzed with accelerated failure time (AFT) model. Starting from the second year of life, nonparametric survival plots suggest that mice watered with alkaline water showed a better survival than control mice. Interestingly, statistical analysis revealed that alkaline water provides higher longevity in terms of "deceleration aging factor" as it increases the survival functions when compared with control group; namely, animals belonging to the population treated with alkaline water resulted in a longer lifespan. Histological examination of mice kidneys, intestine, heart, liver, and brain revealed that no significant differences emerged among the three groups indicating that no specific pathology resulted correlated with the consumption of alkaline water. These results provide an informative and quantitative summary of survival data as a function of watering with alkaline water of long-lived mouse models.

  1. Alkaline detergent recycling via ultrafiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Steffani, C.; Meltzer, M.

    1995-06-01

    The metal finishing industry uses alkaline cleaners and detergents to remove oils and dirt from manufactured parts, often before they are painted or plated. The use of these cleaners has grown because environmental regulations are phasing out ozone depleting substances and placing restrictions on the use and disposal of many hazardous solvents. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is examining ultrafiltration as a cleaning approach that reclaims the cleaning solutions and minimizes wastes. The ultrafiltration membrane is made from sheets of polymerized organic film. The sheets are rolled onto a supporting frame and installed in a tube. Spent cleaning solution is pumped into a filter chamber and filtered through the membrane that captures oils and dirt and allows water and detergent to pass. The membrane is monitored and when pressure builds from oil and dirt, an automatic system cleans the surface to maintain solution flow and filtration quality. The results show that the ultrafiltration does not disturb the detergent concentration or alkalinity but removed almost all the oils and dirt leaving the solution in condition to be reused.

  2. Grace DAKASEP alkaline battery separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovannoni, R. T.; Lundquist, J. T.; Choi, W. M.

    1987-01-01

    The Grace DAKASEP separator was originally developed as a wicking layer for nickel-zinc alkaline batteries. The DAKASEP is a filled non-woven separator which is flexible and heat sealable. Through modification of formulation and processing variables, products with a variety of properties can be produced. Variations of DAKASEP were tested in Ni-H2, Ni-Zn, Ni-Cd, and primary alkaline batteries with good results. The properties of DAKASEP which are optimized for Hg-Zn primary batteries are shown in tabular form. This separator has high tensile strength, 12 micron average pore size, relatively low porosity at 46-48 percent, and consequently moderately high resistivity. Versions were produced with greater than 70 percent porosity and resistivities in 33 wt percent KOH as low as 3 ohm cm. Performance data for Hg-Zn E-1 size cells containing DAKASEP with the properties shown in tabular form, are more reproducible than data obtained with a competitive polypropylene non-woven separator. In addition, utilization of active material is in general considerably improved.

  3. Arsenic(III, V) adsorption on a goethite-based adsorbent in the presence of major co-existing ions: Modeling competitive adsorption consistent with spectroscopic and molecular evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanematsu, Masakazu; Young, Thomas M.; Fukushi, Keisuke; Green, Peter G.; Darby, Jeannie L.

    2013-04-01

    Adsorption of the two oxyanions, arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(III)), on a common goethite-based granular porous adsorbent is studied in the presence of major co-existing ions in groundwater (i.e., phosphate, silicic acid, sulfate, carbonate, magnesium, and calcium) and predicted using the extended triple layer model (ETLM), a dipole modified single-site triple layer surface complexation model consistent with spectroscopic and molecular evidence. Surface species of all ions were selected according to the previous ETLM studies and published experimental spectroscopic/theoretical molecular information. The adsorption equilibrium constants for all ions were determined using adsorption data obtained in single-solute systems. The adsorption equilibrium constants referenced to the site-occupancy standard state (indicated by Kθ) were compared with those for goethite in the literature if available. The values of these constants for the goethite-based adsorbent are found to be close to the values for goethite previously studied. These "constrained" adsorption equilibrium constants determined in single-solute systems were used in the ETLM to predict the competitive interactions of As(III, V) with the co-existing ions in binary-solute systems. The ETLM is capable of predicting As(III, V) adsorption in the presence of oxyanions (phosphate, silicic acid, sulfate, and carbonate). This study presents the first successful and systematic prediction of the competitive interactions of As(III, V) with these oxyanions using the ETLM. The ETLM prediction of surface (and aqueous) speciation also provides insights into the distinct adsorption behavior of As(III, V) in the presence of the oxyanions. Magnesium and calcium significantly enhanced As(V) adsorption at higher pH values, while they had little effect on As(III) adsorption. The enhanced adsorption of As(V), however, could not be predicted by the ETLM using the surface species proposed in previous ETLM studies. Further studies

  4. Alkaline and alkaline earth metal phosphate halides and phosphors

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, Robert Joseph; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Cleaver, Robert John

    2012-11-13

    Compounds, phosphor materials and apparatus related to nacaphite family of materials are presented. Potassium and rubidium based nacaphite family compounds and phosphors designed by doping divalent rare earth elements in the sites of alkaline earth metals in the nacaphite material families are descried. An apparatus comprising the phosphors based on the nacaphite family materials are presented herein. The compounds presented is of formula A.sub.2B.sub.1-yR.sub.yPO.sub.4X where the elements A, B, R, X and suffix y are defined such that A is potassium, rubidium, or a combination of potassium and rubidium and B is calcium, strontium, barium, or a combination of any of calcium, strontium and barium. X is fluorine, chlorine, or a combination of fluorine and chlorine, R is europium, samarium, ytterbium, or a combination of any of europium, samarium, and ytterbium, and y ranges from 0 to about 0.1.

  5. Using stable isotopes and major ions to identify hydrological processes and geochemical characteristics in a typical karstic basin, Guizhou, Southwest China.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhiwei; Tang, Changyuan; Wu, Pan; Zhang, Ruixue; Zhang, Chipeng

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of hydrological processes is very important for water resource development in karst basins. In order to understand these processes associated with complex hydrogeochemical evolution, a typical basin was chosen in Houzai, southwest China. The basin was hydrogeologically classified into three zones based on hydrogen and oxygen isotopes as well as the field surveys. Isotopic values were found to be enriched in zone 2 where paddy fields were prevailing with well-developed underground flow systems, and heavier than those in zone 1. Zone 3 was considered as the mixture of zones 1 and 2 with isotopic values falling in the range between the two zones. A conceptual hydrological model was thus proposed to reveal the probable hydrological cycle in the basin. In addition, major processes of long-term chemical weathering in the karstic basin were discussed, and reactions between water and carbonate rocks proved to be the main geochemical processes in karst aquifers.

  6. Major ions anomalies and contamination status by trace metals in sediments from two hot spots along the Mediterranean Coast of Egypt.

    PubMed

    Shreadah, Mohamed A; Shobier, Aida H; Ghani, Safaa A Abdel; El Zokm, Gehan M; Said, Tarek O

    2015-05-01

    The major constituents and trace metals in the surface sediments collected from the Western Harbor and El-Mex Bay along the Egyptian Mediterranean Coast were studied. The concentrations of major constituents decreased in the following order: Ca > Si > Mg > Na > K for the Western Harbor and El-Mex Bay. Additionally, the ranking order of trace metals was Fe > Al > Pb > Zn > Mn > Cu > Sn > V > As > Cd > Se for the Western Harbor. For El-Mex Bay, the decreasing order was Fe > Al > Mn > Sn > Pb > Zn > Cu > V > As > Cd > Se. Fe, Al, Zn, Pb, Cu, V, Cd and Sn in the Western Harbor occurred in higher concentrations than in El-Mex Bay. A higher concentration of Mn was observed in El-Mex Bay. Two pollution indicators, enrichment factor (EF) and metal pollution index (MPI), and several sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) were used to evaluate the status of metal pollution. Based on the mean EF values of the studied metals, surface sediments of the Western Harbor and El-Mex Bay revealed that they are enriched with metals from anthropogenic sources. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) test showed that the mean measurements for all metals across the Western Harbor and El-Mex Bay are significantly different at a 0.05 significance level. Principal components analysis (PCA) was applied in result interpretation. The spatial distribution of the different parameters was illustrated.

  7. Surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding with weak alkalis

    SciTech Connect

    French, T.R.; Josephson, C.B.

    1991-02-01

    The objective of Project BE4B in FY90 was to develop cost-effective and efficient chemical flooding formulations using surfactant-enhanced, lower pH (weak) alkaline chemical systems. Chemical systems were studied that mitigate the deleterious effects of divalent ions. The experiments were conducted with carbonate mixtures and carbonate/phosphate mixtures of pH 10.5, where most of the phosphate ions exist as the monohydrogen phosphate species. Orthophosphate did not further reduce the deleterious effect of divalent ions on interfacial tension behavior in carbonate solutions, where the deleterious effect of the divalent ions is already very low. When added to a carbonate mixture, orthophosphate did substantially reduce the adsorption of an atomic surfactant, which was an expected result; however, there was no correlation between the amount of reduction and the divalent ion levels. For acidic oils, a variety of surfactants are available commercially that have potential for use between pH 8.3 and pH 9.5. Several of these surfactants were tested with oil from Wilmington (CA) field and found to be suitable for use in that field. Two low-acid crude oils, with acid numbers of 0.01 and 0.27 mg KOH/g of oil, were studied. It was shown that surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding does have merit for use with these low-acid crude oils. However, each low-acid oil tested was found to behave differently, and it was concluded that the applicability of the method must be experimentally determined for any given low-acid crude oil. 19 refs., 10 figs. 4 tabs.

  8. Major Advisor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chatwin, Marshall

    This paper describes a computer program, Major Advisor (MA), which helps students identify college majors. Used in conjunction with career counseling and advising, MA provides information to students who are developing their educational plans. The program matches students' personal preferences and the requirements/characteristics of 130 common…

  9. Determination of hydroxide and carbonate contents of alkaline electrolytes containing zinc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otterson, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    A method to prevent zinc interference with the titration of OH- and CO3-2 ions in alkaline electrolytes with standard acid is presented. The Ba-EDTA complex was tested and shown to prevent zinc interference with acid-base titrations without introducing other types of interference. Theoretical considerations indicate that this method can be used to prevent interference by other metals.

  10. Coordination Chemistry of Alkali and Alkaline-Earth Cations with Macrocyclic Ligands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietrich, Bernard

    1985-01-01

    Discusses: (l) alkali and alkaline-earth cations in biology (considering naturally occurring lonophores, their X-ray structures, and physiochemical studies); (2) synthetic complexing agents for groups IA and IIA; and (3) ion transport across membranes (examining neutral macrobicyclic ligands as metal cation carriers, transport by anionic carriers,…

  11. Phosphate glass electrode with good selectivity for alkaline-earth cations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Truesdell, A.H.; Pommer, A.M.

    1963-01-01

    A phosphate glass has been found to have a significant electrode specificity toward alkaline-earth ions. The order of selectivity is 2H + > Ba++ > Sr++ > Ca++ > 2K+ > 2Na+ > Mg++. Exchange properties are discussed in relation to possible structure. Its use to determine activity of Ca++ in natural systems containing Mg++ is suggested.

  12. Areal distribution of selected trace elements, salinity, and major ions in shallow ground water, Tulare Basin, Southern San Joaquin Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fujii, Roger; Swain, W.C.

    1995-01-01

    The distribution of salinity and selected trace elements in shallow ground water in the Tulare Basin, California, was assessed to evaluate potential problems related to disposal in evaporation ponds of irrigation drain water containing elevated concentrations of selenium and other trace elements. The constituents of primary concern were selenium, arsenic, and salinity; uranium, boron, and molybdenum also were evaluated. Samples from 117 shallow wells were analyzed, and the results for samples from 110 of the wells were interpreted in relation to surficial geology, sediment depositional environment, soil characteristics, and hydrologic processes to determine the geochemical and hydrologic factors affecting the distribution of these constituents in ground water. In general, shallow ground water in areas where concentrations of salinity and most trace elements are elevated is influenced primarily by sediments derived from marine sedimentary rocks originating in the Coast Range, San Emigdio Mountains, and Tehachapi Mountains, and probably by unusual exposures of similar marine formations in the Sierra Nevada. Ground water in areas where concentrations of salinity and trace elements are significantly lower generally is influenced by igneous and metamorphic rocks exposed in the Sierra Nevada. In addition to sources of sediments, evaporation of shallow ground water, as indicated by isotopic enrichment of oxygen-18 and deuterium, increases salinity and concentrations of conservative trace elements such as selenium (under oxidizing conditions) and boron. Redox conditions affect the oxidation state of all trace elements of concern, except boron, and were found to be a major influence on trace-element solubility. Under oxidized conditions, selenate predominates and behaves conservatively, and arsenate predominates and is affected by sorption reactions that can limit arsenic solubility. Under reduced conditions, selenium is reduced to insoluble elemental selenium and arsenite

  13. Auger decay mechanism in photon-stimulated desorption of ions from surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, C.C.

    1983-11-01

    Photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) of positive ions was studied with synchrotron radiation using an angle-integrating time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Ion yields as functions of photon energy near core levels were measured from condensed gases, alkali fluorides, and other alkali and alkaline earth halides. These results are compared to bulk photoabsorption measurements with emphasis on understanding fundamental desorption mechanisms. The applicability of the Auger decay mechanism, in which ion desorption is strictly proportional to surface absorption, is discussed in detail. The Auger decay model is developed in detail to describe Na/sup +/ and F/sup +/ desorption from NaF following Na(1s) excitation. The major decay pathways of the Na(1s) hole leading to desorption are described and equations for the energetics of ion desorption are developed. Ion desorption spectra of H/sup +/, Li/sup +/, and F/sup +/ are compared to bulk photoabsorption near the F(2s) and Li(1s) edges of LiF. A strong photon beam exposure dependence of ion yields from alkali fluorides is revealed, which may indicate the predominance of metal ion desorption from defect sites. The large role of indirect mechanisms in ion desorption condensed N/sub 2/-O/sub 2/ multilayers is demonstrated and discussed. Ion desorption spectra from several alkali halides and alkaline earth halides are compared to bulk photoabsorption spectra. Relative ion yields from BaF/sub 2/ and a series of alkali halides are discussed in terms of desorption mechanisms.

  14. Ethylene Inhibits Root Elongation during Alkaline Stress through AUXIN1 and Associated Changes in Auxin Accumulation1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Xu, Heng-Hao; Liu, Wen-Cheng; Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2015-01-01

    Soil alkalinity causes major reductions in yield and quality of crops worldwide. The plant root is the first organ sensing soil alkalinity, which results in shorter primary roots. However, the mechanism underlying alkaline stress-mediated inhibition of root elongation remains to be further elucidated. Here, we report that alkaline conditions inhibit primary root elongation of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings by reducing cell division potential in the meristem zones and that ethylene signaling affects this process. The ethylene perception antagonist silver (Ag+) alleviated the inhibition of root elongation by alkaline stress. Moreover, the ethylene signaling mutants ethylene response1-3 (etr1-3), ethylene insensitive2 (ein2), and ein3-1 showed less reduction in root length under alkaline conditions, indicating a reduced sensitivity to alkalinity. Ethylene biosynthesis also was found to play a role in alkaline stress-mediated root inhibition; the ethylene overproducer1-1 mutant, which overproduces ethylene because of increased stability of 1-AMINOCYCLOPROPANE-1-CARBOXYLIC ACID SYNTHASE5, was hypersensitive to alkaline stress. In addition, the ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor cobalt (Co2+) suppressed alkaline stress-mediated inhibition of root elongation. We further found that alkaline stress caused an increase in auxin levels by promoting expression of auxin biosynthesis-related genes, but the increase in auxin levels was reduced in the roots of the etr1-3 and ein3-1 mutants and in Ag+/Co2+-treated wild-type plants. Additional genetic and physiological data showed that AUXIN1 (AUX1) was involved in alkaline stress-mediated inhibition of root elongation. Taken together, our results reveal that ethylene modulates alkaline stress-mediated inhibition of root growth by increasing auxin accumulation by stimulating the expression of AUX1 and auxin biosynthesis-related genes. PMID:26109425

  15. Batteries: from alkaline to zinc-air.

    PubMed

    Dondelinger, Robert M

    2004-01-01

    applications (for example, zinc-air for alkaline--if it is cost-effective), this is absolutely forbidden for secondary cells. Because of the differing cell voltages, charge characteristics and overcharge tolerance between different types of secondary cells, substituting a nickel-cadmium battery pack for the more expensive lithium-ion pack (if it is physically able to fit into the battery compartment), might appear to save money (e.g. $50 vs. $100) but it would be very ill advised. Since the cell characteristics are very different, it would be downright fatal to anyone within the 'kill radius' when the pack explodes. Those outside the kill radius would receive chemical burns from the electrolyte. Substitutions of secondary cell battery packs are generally not a good idea for biomeds to engage in. These are engineering decisions best left to either aftermarket battery pack manufacturers or the medical device manufacturer as a design engineering change.

  16. Batteries: from alkaline to zinc-air.

    PubMed

    Dondelinger, Robert M

    2004-01-01

    applications (for example, zinc-air for alkaline--if it is cost-effective), this is absolutely forbidden for secondary cells. Because of the differing cell voltages, charge characteristics and overcharge tolerance between different types of secondary cells, substituting a nickel-cadmium battery pack for the more expensive lithium-ion pack (if it is physically able to fit into the battery compartment), might appear to save money (e.g. $50 vs. $100) but it would be very ill advised. Since the cell characteristics are very different, it would be downright fatal to anyone within the 'kill radius' when the pack explodes. Those outside the kill radius would receive chemical burns from the electrolyte. Substitutions of secondary cell battery packs are generally not a good idea for biomeds to engage in. These are engineering decisions best left to either aftermarket battery pack manufacturers or the medical device manufacturer as a design engineering change. PMID:15106428

  17. The Origin of Life in Alkaline Hydrothermal Vents.

    PubMed

    Sojo, Victor; Herschy, Barry; Whicher, Alexandra; Camprubí, Eloi; Lane, Nick

    2016-02-01

    Over the last 70 years, prebiotic chemists have been very successful in synthesizing the molecules of life, from amino acids to nucleotides. Yet there is strikingly little resemblance between much of this chemistry and the metabolic pathways of cells, in terms of substrates, catalysts, and synthetic pathways. In contrast, alkaline hydrothermal vents offer conditions similar to those harnessed by modern autotrophs, but there has been limited experimental evidence that such conditions could drive prebiotic chemistry. In the Hadean, in the absence of oxygen, alkaline vents are proposed to have acted as electrochemical flow reactors, in which alkaline fluids saturated in H2 mixed with relatively acidic ocean waters rich in CO2, through a labyrinth of interconnected micropores with thin inorganic walls containing catalytic Fe(Ni)S minerals. The difference in pH across these thin barriers produced natural proton gradients with equivalent magnitude and polarity to the proton-motive force required for carbon fixation in extant bacteria and archaea. How such gradients could have powered carbon reduction or energy flux before the advent of organic protocells with genes and proteins is unknown. Work over the last decade suggests several possible hypotheses that are currently being tested in laboratory experiments, field observations, and phylogenetic reconstructions of ancestral metabolism. We analyze the perplexing differences in carbon and energy metabolism in methanogenic archaea and acetogenic bacteria to propose a possible ancestral mechanism of CO2 reduction in alkaline hydrothermal vents. Based on this mechanism, we show that the evolution of active ion pumping could have driven the deep divergence of bacteria and archaea.

  18. Ocean Acidification: Coccolithophore's Light Controlled Effect on Alkalinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobbins, W.

    2015-12-01

    Coccolithophorids, which play a significant role in the flux of calcite and organic carbon from the photic region to deeper pelagic and benthic zones, are potentially far more useful than siliceous phytoplankton for ocean fertilization projects designed to sequester CO2. However, the production of H+ ions during calcification (HCO3 + Ca+ —> CaCO3 + H+) has resulted in localized acidification around coccolithophore blooms. It has been hypothesized that under the correct light conditions photosynthesis could proceed at a rate such that CO2 is removed in amounts equimolar or greater than the H+ produced by calcification, allowing stable or increasing alkalinity despite ongoing calcification. Previously, this effect had not been demonstrated under laboratory conditions. Fifteen Emiliania huxleyi cultures were separated into equal groups with each receiving: 0, 6, 12, 18, or 24 hours of light each day for 24 days. Daily pH, cell density, and temperature measurements revealed a strong positive correlation between light exposure and pH, and no significant decline in pH in any of the cultures. Alkalinity increases were temperature independent and not strongly correlated with cell density, implying photosynthetic removal of carbon dioxide as the root cause. The average pH across living cultures increased from 7.9 to 8.3 over the first week and changed little for the reminder of the 24-day period. The results demonstrate coccolithophorids can increase alkalinity across a broad range of cell densities, despite the acidification inherent to the calcification process. If the light-alkalinity effect reported here proves scalable to larger cultures, Emiliania huxleyi are a strong candidate for carbon sequestration via targeted ocean fertilization.

  19. The Origin of Life in Alkaline Hydrothermal Vents.

    PubMed

    Sojo, Victor; Herschy, Barry; Whicher, Alexandra; Camprubí, Eloi; Lane, Nick

    2016-02-01

    Over the last 70 years, prebiotic chemists have been very successful in synthesizing the molecules of life, from amino acids to nucleotides. Yet there is strikingly little resemblance between much of this chemistry and the metabolic pathways of cells, in terms of substrates, catalysts, and synthetic pathways. In contrast, alkaline hydrothermal vents offer conditions similar to those harnessed by modern autotrophs, but there has been limited experimental evidence that such conditions could drive prebiotic chemistry. In the Hadean, in the absence of oxygen, alkaline vents are proposed to have acted as electrochemical flow reactors, in which alkaline fluids saturated in H2 mixed with relatively acidic ocean waters rich in CO2, through a labyrinth of interconnected micropores with thin inorganic walls containing catalytic Fe(Ni)S minerals. The difference in pH across these thin barriers produced natural proton gradients with equivalent magnitude and polarity to the proton-motive force required for carbon fixation in extant bacteria and archaea. How such gradients could have powered carbon reduction or energy flux before the advent of organic protocells with genes and proteins is unknown. Work over the last decade suggests several possible hypotheses that are currently being tested in laboratory experiments, field observations, and phylogenetic reconstructions of ancestral metabolism. We analyze the perplexing differences in carbon and energy metabolism in methanogenic archaea and acetogenic bacteria to propose a possible ancestral mechanism of CO2 reduction in alkaline hydrothermal vents. Based on this mechanism, we show that the evolution of active ion pumping could have driven the deep divergence of bacteria and archaea. PMID:26841066

  20. Major Links.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Tona

    1995-01-01

    Provides electronic mail addresses for resources and discussion groups related to the following academic majors: art, biology, business, chemistry, computer science, economics, health sciences, history, literature, math, music, philosophy, political science, psychology, sociology, and theater. (AEF)

  1. Alkaline pH sensor molecules.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Takashi; Maruyama, Ichiro N

    2015-11-01

    Animals can survive only within a narrow pH range. This requires continual monitoring of environmental and body-fluid pH. Although a variety of acidic pH sensor molecules have been reported, alkaline pH sensor function is not well understood. This Review describes neuronal alkaline pH sensors, grouped according to whether they monitor extracellular or intracellular alkaline pH. Extracellular sensors include the receptor-type guanylyl cyclase, the insulin receptor-related receptor, ligand-gated Cl- channels, connexin hemichannels, two-pore-domain K+ channels, and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Intracellular sensors include TRP channels and gap junction channels. Identification of molecular mechanisms underlying alkaline pH sensing is crucial for understanding how animals respond to environmental alkaline pH and how body-fluid pH is maintained within a narrow range.

  2. Cesium removal from liquid acidic wastes with the primary focus on ammonium molybdophosphate as an ion exchanger: A literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.J.

    1995-03-01

    Many articles have been written concerning the selective removal of cesium from both acidic and alkaline defense wastes. The majority of the work performed for cesium removal from defense wastes involves alkaline feed solutions. Several different techniques for cesium removal from acidic solutions have been evaluated such as precipitation, solvent extraction, and ion exchange. The purpose of this paper is to briefly review various techniques for cesium removal from acidic solutions. The main focus of the review will be on ion exchange techniques, particularly those involving ammonium molybdophosphate as the exchanger. The pertinent literature sources are condensed into a single document for quick reference. The information contained in this document was used as an aid in determining techniques to evaluate cesium removal from the acidic Idaho Chemical Processing Plant waste matrices. 47 refs., 2 tabs.

  3. Optical Properties of Alkaline Earth Ions Doped Bismuth Borate Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Kundu, Virender; Dhiman, R. L.; Maan, A. S.; Goyal, D. R.

    2011-07-15

    The optical properties of glasses with composition xLi{sub 2}O(30-x)Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}-70B{sub 2}O{sub 3}; x = 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 mol %, prepared by normal melt quench technique were investigated by means of UV-VIS measurement. It was observed that the optical band gap of the present glass system decreases with increasing Li{sub 2}O content up to 15 mol%, and with further increase in lithium oxide content i.e. x>15 mol% the optical band gap increases. It was also observed that the present glass system behaves as an indirect band gap semiconductor.

  4. Alkaline-resistance model of subtilisin ALP I, a novel alkaline subtilisin.

    PubMed

    Maeda, H; Mizutani, O; Yamagata, Y; Ichishima, E; Nakajima, T

    2001-05-01

    The alkaline-resistance mechanism of the alkaline-stable enzymes is not yet known. To clarify the mechanism of alkaline-resistance of alkaline subtilisin, structural changes of two typical subtilisins, subtilisin ALP I (ALP I) and subtilisin Sendai (Sendai), were studied by means of physicochemical methods. Subtilisin NAT (NAT), which exhibits no alkaline resistance, was examined as a control. ALP I gradually lost its activity, accompanied by protein degradation, but, on the contrary, Sendai was stable under alkaline conditions. CD spectral measurements at neutral and alkaline pH indicated no apparent differences between ALP I and Sendai. A significant difference was observed on measurement of fluorescence emission spectra of the tryptophan residues of ALP I that were exposed on the enzyme surface. The fluorescence intensity of ALP I was greatly reduced under alkaline conditions; moreover, the reduction was reversed when alkaline-treated ALP I was neutralized. The fluorescence spectrum of Sendai remained unchanged. The enzymatic and optical activities of NAT were lost at high pH, indicating a lack of functional and structural stability in an alkaline environment. Judging from these results, the alkaline resistance is closely related to the surface structure of the enzyme molecule.

  5. [Inhibition of alkaline phosphatase I of Pichia guilliermondii yeast in vitro and in vivo].

    PubMed

    Sibirnyi, A A; Shavlovskii, G M

    1978-01-01

    The rate of p-nitrophenyl phosphate and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) hydrolysis by the partially purified preparation of alkaline phosphatase I of Pichia guilliermondii flavinogenic yeast was studied as affected by different substrates and inorganic ions. Their Km was established to be 2.0 X 10(-4) m and 2.5 X 10(-4) M, respectively. Dephosphorylation of p-nitrophenylphosphate and FMN was inhibited competitively by beta-glycerophosphate (Ki = 3.1 X 10(-3) M, respectively). The presence of inorganic phosphate ions in the reaction mixture decreases or removes inhibition of these compounds hydrolysis by other substrates of alkaline phosphatase I. The activity of alkaline phosphatase I increases in the presence of Mg2+ and was strongly inhibited in the presence of Be2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+ and inorganic phosphate, the mixture of Be2+ and F- being the most effective. This mixture inhibited the phosphatase activity of the partially purified preparation of alkaline phosphatase I of the cell-free extract as well as of intact cells in both the alkaline and acid zones of pH (8.6 and 5.5, respectively). Incubation of the washed iron-deficient P. guilliermondii cells in the presence of Be2+ and F- did not result in accumulation of FMN in the yeast culture. A possible role of nonspecific phosphomonoesterases in hydrolysis of FMN in vivo is discussed. PMID:208203

  6. Seasonal patterns of alkalinity in the San Francisco Bay estuarine system, California, during 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schemel, L.E.

    1984-01-01

    Salinity and alkalinity were measured in the near-surface waters of San Francisco Bay estuarine system at two-week intervals during 1980. Results are presented in figures and as numerical values, and the analytical methods are detailed. The transport of alkalinity to the Bay from the delta during 1980 was 3.8 x 10 to Ohe 10th power equivalents; this estimate is based on the freshwater alkalinity concentrations predicted by the north San Francisco Bay salinity-alkalinity distributions. North San Francisco Bay distributions are primarily the result of conservative mixing of freshwater from the Delta with Pacific Ocean water. Nonlinear distributions are the consequence of alkalinity variations in the freshwater rather than the effects of in-estuary processes or sources. Seasonal inflow of agricultural waste water is a major cause of freshwater alkalinity variations. South San Francisco Bay salinity-alkalinity distributions show the effects of variations in Delta outflow rate, local streams, and municipal waste-water inflows. (USGS)

  7. The dynamics of alkaline phosphatase activity during operculum regeneration in the polychaete Pomatoceros lamarckii.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Réka; Ferrier, David E K

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase enzymes are found throughout the living world and fulfil a variety of functions. They have been linked to regeneration, stem cells and biomineralisation in a range of animals. Here we describe the pattern of alkaline phosphatase activity in a spiralian appendage, the operculum of the serpulid polychaete Pomatoceros lamarckii. The P. lamarckii operculum is reinforced by a calcified opercular plate and is capable of rapid regeneration, making it an ideal model system to study these key processes in annelids. Alkaline phosphatase activity is present in mesodermal tissues of both intact and regenerating opercular filaments, in a strongly regionalised pattern correlated with major morphological features. Based on the lack of epidermal activity and the broad distribution of staining in mesodermal tissues, calcification- or stem cell-specific roles are unlikely. Transcriptomic data reveal that at least four distinct genes contribute to the detected activity. Opercular alkaline phosphatase activity is sensitive to levamisole. Phylogenetic analysis of metazoan alkaline phosphatases indicates homology of the P. lamarckii sequences to other annelid alkaline phosphatases, and shows that metazoan alkaline phosphatase evolution was characterised by extensive lineage-specific duplications. PMID:25690977

  8. Long-term alkalinity decrease and acidification of estuaries in northwestern Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xinping; Pollack, Jennifer Beseres; McCutcheon, Melissa R; Montagna, Paul A; Ouyang, Zhangxian

    2015-03-17

    More than four decades of alkalinity and pH data (late 1960s to 2010) from coastal bays along the northwestern Gulf of Mexico were analyzed for temporal changes across a climatic gradient of decreasing rainfall and freshwater inflow, from northeast to southwest. The majority (16 out of 27) of these bays (including coastal waters) showed a long-term reduction in alkalinity at a rate of 3.0-21.6 μM yr(-1). Twenty-two bays exhibited pH decreases at a rate of 0.0014-0.0180 yr(-1). In contrast, a northernmost coastal bay exhibited increases in both alkalinity and pH. Overall, the two rates showed a significant positive correlation, indicating that most of these bays, especially those at lower latitudes, have been experiencing long-term acidification. The observed alkalinity decrease may be caused by reduced riverine alkalinity export, a result of precipitation decline under drought conditions, and freshwater diversion for human consumption, as well as calcification in these bays. A decrease in alkalinity inventory and accompanying acidification may have negative impacts on shellfish production in these waters. In addition, subsequent reduction in alkalinity export from these bays to the adjacent coastal ocean may also decrease the buffer capacity of the latter against future acidification.

  9. An assessment of continental shelf anaerobic processes on oceanic alkalinity budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, X.; Cai, W.

    2010-12-01

    Recent interest in the ocean’s capacity to absorb atmospheric CO2 and buffer the accompanying “ocean acidification” has prompted discussion on the magnitude of continental shelf alkalinity production via anaerobic processes (denitrification, sulfate and redox metal reduction). Recent studies have suggested that atmospheric CO2 could be sequestered along with these reactions. Unfortunately, available estimates are largely based on gross reaction rates or misconceptions regarding reaction stoichiometry. In fact, net alkalinity gain does not result from the internal cycling of nitrogen and sulfur species, or from the reduction of metal oxides. Instead, only the processes that involve permanent loss of anaerobic remineralization products, i.e., nitrogen gas from net denitrification and reduced sulfur (i.e., pyrite burial) from net sulfate reduction, could contribute to this anaerobic alkalinity production. Our revised estimate of net alkalinity production from anaerobic processes is on the order of 4-5 Tmol yr-1 in global continental shelf areas, significantly smaller than the previously estimated rates. In addition, pyrite burial in coastal habitats (salt marshes, mangroves, and seagrass meadows) may contribute another 0.1-1.1 Tmol yr-1 alkalinity although their long-term effect is not yet clear under current changing climate conditions and rising sea levels. Finally, we propose that these alkalinity production reactions can be viewed as “charge transfer” processes, in which negative charges of nitrate and sulfate ions are converted to those of bicarbonate along with a net loss of these oxidative anions.

  10. Ion sources for use in ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Nicholas R.

    1989-02-01

    This paper reviews high current ion sources suitable for commercial use. Although the production of high currents of a variety of ions is a vital consideration, this paper focuses on other aspects of ion source performance. The modern ion implanter is a major item of expensive capital equipment, with the ion source being its least reliable component. So, the most critical issues today are reliability and lifetime, as well as safety, flexibility, and ease of service. The Freeman ion source has clearly dominated the field, yet a number of alternative sources have found commercial acceptance, including microwave sources. Factors affecting the ultimate usefulness of various sources in different implantation applications are discussed.

  11. Characterization by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry of the major photoproducts of temoporfin (m-THPC) and bacteriochlorin (m-THPBC).

    PubMed

    Angotti, M; Maunit, B; Muller, J F; Bezdetnaya, L; Guillemin, F

    2001-07-01

    The photobleaching of 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(m-hydroxyphenyl)chlorin (temoporfin, m-THPC) and 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(m-hydroxyphenyl)bacteriochlorin (bacteriochlorin, m-THPBC) was studied in ethanol-water (1 : 99, v/v) and in physiological medium (phosphate-buffered saline, PBS) with or without fetal calf serum (FCS). m-THPC solution was irradiated with the laser radiation of 650 nm, whereas m-THPBC solution underwent two consecutive irradiations at 532 and 650 nm. The photoproducts were characterized by UV-visible absorption spectrophotometry and by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) coupled with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICRMS). Independent of the solvent used, the phototransformation of either photosensitizer yielded the formation of 5,10,15,20-tetrakis (m-hydroxyphenyl)porphyrin (m-THPP) through a major dehydrogenation process. PMID:11473406

  12. Alkaline decomposition of synthetic jarosite with arsenic

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The widespread use of jarosite-type compounds to eliminate impurities in the hydrometallurgical industry is due to their capability to incorporate several elements into their structures. Some of these elements are of environmental importance (Pb2+, Cr6+, As5+, Cd2+, Hg2+). For the present paper, AsO43- was incorporated into the lattice of synthetic jarosite in order to carry out a reactivity study. Alkaline decomposition is characterized by removal of sulfate and potassium ions from the lattice and formation of a gel consisting of iron hydroxides with absorbed arsenate. Decomposition curves show an induction period followed by a conversion period. The induction period is independent of particle size and exponentially decreases with temperature. The conversion period is characterized by formation of a hydroxide halo that surrounds an unreacted jarosite core. During the conversion period in NaOH media for [OH-] > 8 × 10-3 mol L-1, the process showed a reaction order of 1.86, and an apparent activation energy of 60.3 kJ mol-1 was obtained. On the other hand, during the conversion period in Ca(OH)2 media for [OH-] > 1.90 × 10-2 mol L-1, the reaction order was 1.15, and an apparent activation energy of 74.4 kJ mol-1 was obtained. The results are consistent with the spherical particle model with decreasing core and chemical control. PMID:23566061

  13. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-12-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in

  14. Charge Compensation in RE3+ (RE = Eu, Gd) and M+ (M = Li, Na, K) Co-Doped Alkaline Earth Nanofluorides Obtained by Microwave Reaction with Reactive Ionic Liquids Leading to Improved Optical Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lorbeer, C; Behrends, F; Cybinska, J; Eckert, H; Mudring, Anja -V

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline earth fluorides are extraordinarily promising host matrices for phosphor materials with regard to rare earth doping. In particular, quantum cutting materials, which might considerably enhance the efficiency of mercury-free fluorescent lamps or SC solar cells, are often based on rare earth containing crystalline fluorides such as NaGdF4, GdF3 or LaF3. Substituting most of the precious rare earth ions and simultaneously retaining the efficiency of the phosphor is a major goal. Alkaline earth fluoride nanoparticles doped with trivalent lanthanide ions (which are required for the quantum cutting phenomenon) were prepared via a microwave assisted method in ionic liquids. As doping trivalent ions into a host with divalent cations requires charge compensation, this effect was thoroughly studied by powder X-ray and electron diffraction, luminescence spectroscopy and 23Na, 139La and 19F solid state NMR spectroscopy. Monovalent alkali ions were codoped with the trivalent lanthanide ions to relieve stress and achieve a better crystallinity and higher quantum cutting abilities of the prepared material. 19F-magic angle spinning (MAS)-NMR-spectra, assisted by 19F{23Na} rotational echo double resonance (REDOR) studies, reveal distinct local fluoride environments, the populations of which are discussed in relation to spatial distribution and clustering models. In the co-doped samples, fluoride species having both Na+ and La3+ ions within their coordination sphere can be identified and quantified. This interplay of mono- and trivalent ions in the CaF2 lattice appears to be an efficient charge compensation mechanism that allows for improved performance characteristics of such co-doped phosphor materials.

  15. Major depression.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Susan M; Pagalilauan, Genevieve L; Simpson, Scott A

    2014-09-01

    Major depression is a common, disabling condition seen frequently in primary care practices. Non-psychiatrist ambulatory providers are increasingly responsible for diagnosing, and primarily managing patients suffering from major depressive disorder (MDD). The goal of this review is to help primary care providers to understand the natural history of MDD, identify practical tools for screening, and a thoughtful approach to management. Clinically challenging topics like co-morbid conditions, treatment resistant depression and pharmacotherapy selection with consideration to side effects and medication interactions, are also covered.

  16. A baculovirus alkaline nuclease knockout construct produces fragmented DNA and aberrant capsids

    SciTech Connect

    Okano, Kazuhiro; Vanarsdall, Adam L.; Rohrmann, George F. . E-mail: rohrmanng@orst.edu

    2007-03-01

    DNA replication of bacmid-derived constructs of the Autographa californica multiple nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) was analyzed by field inversion gel electrophoresis (FIGE) in combination with digestion at a unique Eco81I restriction enzyme site. Three constructs were characterized: a parental bacmid, a bacmid deleted for the alkaline nuclease gene, and a bacmid from which the gp64 gene had been deleted. The latter was employed as a control for comparison with the alkaline nuclease knockout because neither yields infectious virus and their replication is limited to the initially transfected cells. The major difference between DNA replicated by the different constructs was the presence in the alkaline nuclease knockout of high concentrations of relatively small, subgenome length DNA in preparations not treated with Eco81I. Furthermore, upon Eco81I digestion, the alkaline nuclease knockout bacmid also yielded substantially more subgenome size DNA than the other constructs. Electron microscopic examination of cells transfected with the alkaline nuclease knockout indicated that, in addition to a limited number of normal-appearing electron-dense nucleocapsids, numerous aberrant capsid-like structures were observed indicating a defect in nucleocapsid maturation or in a DNA processing step that is necessary for encapsidation. Because of the documented role of the baculovirus alkaline nuclease and its homologs from other viruses in homologous recombination, these data suggest that DNA recombination may play a major role in the production of baculovirus genomes.

  17. Redox reactions of neptunium and plutonium in alkaline aqueous solutions upon gamma radiolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikaev, A. K.; Gogolev, A. V.; Shilov, V. P.

    1999-10-01

    The paper is a brief review of data obtained by the authors from the study on redox reactions of neptunium and plutonium ions upon γ-radiolysis of their aerated alkaline aqueous solutions. It includes the information on radiolytic reduction of Np(V), Np(VI), and Pu(VI) ions under various experimental conditions. It was found that the values of Np(VI) and Pu(VI) reduction yields do not depend on alkali concentration. The values considerably increase in the presence of some organic compounds (EDTA and formate were investigated). The formation of the Np(V) peroxo complex was observed in the γ-radiolysis of alkaline aqueous solutions of Np(VI) and Np(V) in the presence of nitrate. The mechanism of radiolytic redox reactions of the ions is discussed in some detail.

  18. A novel alkaline oxidation pretreatment for spruce, birch and sugar cane bagasse.

    PubMed

    Kallioinen, Anne; Hakola, Maija; Riekkola, Tiina; Repo, Timo; Leskelä, Markku; von Weymarn, Niklas; Siika-aho, Matti

    2013-07-01

    Alkaline oxidation pretreatment was developed for spruce, birch and sugar cane bagasse. The reaction was carried out in alkaline water solution under 10 bar oxygen pressure and at mild reaction temperature of 120-140°C. Most of the lignin was solubilised by the alkaline oxidation pretreatment and an easily hydrolysable carbohydrate fraction was obtained. After 72 h hydrolysis with a 10 FPU/g enzyme dosage, glucose yields of 80%, 91%, and 97%, for spruce, birch and bagasse, respectively, were achieved. The enzyme dosage could be decreased to 4 FPU/g without a major effect in terms of the hydrolysis performance. Compared to steam explosion alkaline oxidation was found to be significantly better in the conditions tested, especially for the pretreatment of spruce. In hydrolysis and fermentation at 12% d.m. consistency an ethanol yield of 80% could be obtained with both bagasse and spruce in 1-3 days.

  19. A novel alkaline oxidation pretreatment for spruce, birch and sugar cane bagasse.

    PubMed

    Kallioinen, Anne; Hakola, Maija; Riekkola, Tiina; Repo, Timo; Leskelä, Markku; von Weymarn, Niklas; Siika-aho, Matti

    2013-07-01

    Alkaline oxidation pretreatment was developed for spruce, birch and sugar cane bagasse. The reaction was carried out in alkaline water solution under 10 bar oxygen pressure and at mild reaction temperature of 120-140°C. Most of the lignin was solubilised by the alkaline oxidation pretreatment and an easily hydrolysable carbohydrate fraction was obtained. After 72 h hydrolysis with a 10 FPU/g enzyme dosage, glucose yields of 80%, 91%, and 97%, for spruce, birch and bagasse, respectively, were achieved. The enzyme dosage could be decreased to 4 FPU/g without a major effect in terms of the hydrolysis performance. Compared to steam explosion alkaline oxidation was found to be significantly better in the conditions tested, especially for the pretreatment of spruce. In hydrolysis and fermentation at 12% d.m. consistency an ethanol yield of 80% could be obtained with both bagasse and spruce in 1-3 days. PMID:23711947

  20. Process for extracting technetium from alkaline solutions

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Sachleben, Richard A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

    1995-01-01

    A process for extracting technetium values from an aqueous alkaline solution containing at least one alkali metal hydroxide and at least one alkali metal nitrate, the at least one alkali metal nitrate having a concentration of from about 0.1 to 6 molar. The solution is contacted with a solvent consisting of a crown ether in a diluent for a period of time sufficient to selectively extract the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution. The solvent containing the technetium values is separated from the aqueous alkaline solution and the technetium values are stripped from the solvent.

  1. Inorganic-organic separators for alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A flexible separator is reported for use between the electrodes of Ni-Cd and Ni-Zn batteries using alkaline electrolytes. The separator was made by coating a porous substrate with a battery separator composition. The coating material included a rubber-based resin copolymer, a plasticizer and inorganic and organic fillers which comprised 55% by volume or less of the coating as finally dried. One or more of the filler materials, whether organic or inorganic, is preferably active with the alkaline electrolyte to produce pores in the separator coating. The plasticizer was an organic material which is hydrolyzed by the alkaline electrolyte to improve conductivity of the separator coating.

  2. Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Deborah A.; Holmes, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

  3. Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Deborah A.; Holmes, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

  4. Alkaline static feed electrolyzer based oxygen generation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, L. D.; Kovach, A. J.; Fortunato, F. A.; Schubert, F. H.; Grigger, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    In preparation for the future deployment of the Space Station, an R and D program was established to demonstrate integrated operation of an alkaline Water Electrolysis System and a fuel cell as an energy storage device. The program's scope was revised when the Space Station Control Board changed the energy storage baseline for the Space Station. The new scope was aimed at the development of an alkaline Static Feed Electrolyzer for use in an Environmental Control/Life Support System as an oxygen generation system. As a result, the program was divided into two phases. The phase 1 effort was directed at the development of the Static Feed Electrolyzer for application in a Regenerative Fuel Cell System. During this phase, the program emphasized incorporation of the Regenerative Fuel Cell System design requirements into the Static Feed Electrolyzer electrochemical module design and the mechanical components design. The mechanical components included a Pressure Control Assembly, a Water Supply Assembly and a Thermal Control Assembly. These designs were completed through manufacturing drawing during Phase 1. The Phase 2 effort was directed at advancing the Alkaline Static Feed Electrolyzer database for an oxygen generation system. This development was aimed at extending the Static Feed Electrolyzer database in areas which may be encountered from initial fabrication through transportation, storage, launch and eventual Space Station startup. During this Phase, the Program emphasized three major areas: materials evaluation, electrochemical module scaling and performance repeatability and Static Feed Electrolyzer operational definition and characterization.

  5. Difference between Chitosan Hydrogels via Alkaline and Acidic Solvent Systems

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Jingyi; Wang, Zhengke; Hu, Qiaoling

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan (CS) has generated considerable interest for its desirable properties and wide applications. Hydrogel has been proven to be a major and vital form in the applications of CS materials. Among various types of CS hydrogels, physical cross-linked CS hydrogels are popular, because they avoided the potential toxicity and sacrifice of intrinsic properties caused by cross-linking or reinforcements. Alkaline solvent system and acidic solvent system are two important solvent systems for the preparation of physical cross-linked CS hydrogels, and also lay the foundations of CS hydrogel-based materials in many aspects. As members of physical cross-linked CS hydrogels, gel material via alkaline solvent system showed significant differences from that via acidic solvent system, but the reasons behind are still unexplored. In the present work, we studied the difference between CS hydrogel via alkaline system and acidic system, in terms of gelation process, hydrogel structure and mechanical property. In-situ/pseudo in-situ studies were carried out, including fluorescent imaging of gelation process, which provided dynamic visualization. Finally, the reasons behind the differences were explained, accompanied by the discussion about design strategy based on gelation behavior of the two systems. PMID:27786262

  6. Composite seal reduces alkaline battery leakage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clatterbuck, C. H.; Plitt, K. F.

    1965-01-01

    Composite seal consisting of rubber or plastic washers and a metal washer reduces alkaline battery leakage. Adhesive is applied to each washer interface, and the washers are held together mechanically.

  7. Ratiometric electrochemical detection of alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Goggins, Sean; Naz, Christophe; Marsh, Barrie J; Frost, Christopher G

    2015-01-11

    A novel ferrocene-derived substrate for the ratiometric electrochemical detection of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was designed and synthesised. It was demonstrated to be an excellent electrochemical substrate for the ALP-labelled enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).

  8. Changes in streamflow and summary of major-ion chemistry and loads in the North Fork Red River basin upstream from Lake Altus, northwestern Texas and western Oklahoma, 1945-1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, S. Jerrod; Wahl, Kenneth L.

    2003-01-01

    Upstream from Lake Altus, the North Fork Red River drains an area of 2,515 square miles. The quantity and quality of surface water are major concerns at Lake Altus, and water-resource managers and consumers need historical information to make informed decisions about future development. The Lugert-Altus Irrigation District relies on withdrawals from the lake to sustain nearly 46,000 acres of agricultural land. Kendall's tau tests of precipitation data indicated no statistically significant trend over the entire 100 years of available record. However, a significant increase in precipitation occurred in the last 51 years. Four streamflow-gaging stations with more than 10 years of record were maintained in the basin. These stations recorded no significant trends in annual streamflow volume. Two stations, however, had significant increasing trends in the base-flow index, and three had significant decreasing trends in annual peak flows. Major-ion chemistry in the North Fork Red River is closely related to the chemical composition of the underlying bedrock. Two main lithologies are represented in the basin upstream from Lake Altus. In the upper reaches, young and poorly consolidated sediments include a range of sizes from coarse gravel to silt and clay. Nearsurface horizons commonly are cemented as calcium carbonate caliche. Finer-grained gypsiferous sandstones and shales dominate the lower reaches of the basin. A distinct increase in dissolved solids, specifically sodium, chloride, calcium, and sulfate, occurs as the river flows over rocks that contain substantial quantities of gypsum, anhydrite, and dolomite. These natural salts are the major dissolved constituents in the North Fork Red River.

  9. Evaluation of the alkaline electrolysis of zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Meisenhelder, J.H.; Brown, A.P.; Loutfy, R.O.; Yao, N.P.

    1981-05-01

    The alkaline leach and electrolysis process for zinc production is compared to the conventional acid-sulfate process in terms of both energy saving and technical merit. In addition, the potential for industrial application of the alkaline process is discussed on the basis of present market conditions, possible future zinc market scenarios, and the probability of increased secondary zinc recovery. In primary zinc production, the energy-saving potential for the alkaline process was estimated to be greater than 10%, even when significantly larger electrolysis current densities than those required for the sulfate process are used. The principal technical advantages of the alkaline process are that it can handle low-grade, high-iron-content or oxidized ores (like most of those found in the US) in a more cost- and energy-efficient manner than can the sulfate process. Additionally, in the electrowinning operation, the alkaline process should be technically superior because a dendritic or sponge deposit is formed that is amenable to automated collection without interruption of the electrolysis. Also, use of the higher current densities would result in significant capital cost reductions. Alkaline-based electrolytic recovery processes were considered for the recycling of zinc from smelter baghouse dusts and from the potential source of nickel/zinc electric-vehicle batteries. In all comparisons, an alkaline process was shown to be technically superior and, particularly for the baghouse dusts, energetically and economically superior to alternatively proposed recovery methods based on sulfate electrolysis. It is concluded that the alkaline zinc method is an important alternative technology to the conventional acid zinc process. (WHK)

  10. Toxicity of alkalinity to Hyalella azteca

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lasier, P.J.; Winger, P.V.; Reinert, R.E.

    1997-01-01

    Toxicity testing and chemical analyses of sediment pore water have been suggested for use in sediment quality assessments and sediment toxicity identification evaluations. However, caution should be exercised in interpreting pore-water chemistry and toxicity due to inherent chemical characteristics and confounding relationships. High concentrations of alkalinity, which are typical of sediment pore waters from many regions, have been shown to be toxic to test animals. A series of tests were conducted to assess the significance of elevated alkalinity concentrations to Hyalella azteca, an amphipod commonly used for sediment and pore-water toxicity testing. Toxicity tests with 14-d old and 7-d old animals were conducted in serial dilutions of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) solutions producing alkalinities ranging between 250 to 2000 mg/L as CaCO3. A sodium chloride (NaCl) toxicity test was also conducted to verify that toxicity was due to bicarbonate and not sodium. Alkalinity was toxic at concentrations frequently encountered in sediment pore water. There was also a significant difference in the toxicity of alkalinity between 14-d old and 7-d old animals. The average 96-h LC50 for alkalinity was 1212 mg/L (as CaCO3) for 14-d old animals and 662 mg/L for the younger animals. Sodium was not toxic at levels present in the NaHCO3 toxicity tests. Alkalinity should be routinely measured in pore-water toxicity tests, and interpretation of toxicity should consider alkalinity concentration and test-organism tolerance.

  11. Technetium recovery from high alkaline solution

    DOEpatents

    Nash, Charles A.

    2016-07-12

    Disclosed are methods for recovering technetium from a highly alkaline solution. The highly alkaline solution can be a liquid waste solution from a nuclear waste processing system. Methods can include combining the solution with a reductant capable of reducing technetium at the high pH of the solution and adding to or forming in the solution an adsorbent capable of adsorbing the precipitated technetium at the high pH of the solution.

  12. Alkaline tolerant dextranase from streptomyces anulatus

    DOEpatents

    Decker, Stephen R.; Adney, William S.; Vinzant, Todd B.; Himmel, Michael E.

    2003-01-01

    A process for production of an alkaline tolerant dextranase enzyme comprises culturing a dextran-producing microorganism Streptomyces anulatus having accession no. ATCC PTA-3866 to produce an alkaline tolerant dextranase, Dex 1 wherein the protein in said enzyme is characterized by a MW of 63.3 kDa and Dex 2 wherein its protein is characterized by a MW of 81.8 kDa.

  13. Geochemical fingerprints of Late Triassic calc-alkaline lamprophyres from the Eastern Pontides, NE Turkey: A key to understanding lamprophyre formation in a subduction-related environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karsli, Orhan; Dokuz, Abdurrahman; Kaliwoda, Melanie; Uysal, Ibrahim; Aydin, Faruk; Kandemir, Raif; Fehr, Karl-Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The Eastern Pontides in NE Turkey is one of the major orogenic belts in Anatolia. In this paper, we report our new 40Ar/39Ar dating, mineral chemistry, major and trace elements and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic analyses of the lamprophyre intrusions in this region. The lamprophyres are widely scattered and intrude Late Carboniferous granitoid rocks. The lamprophyres exhibit fine-grained textures and are mineralogically uniform. Hornblende 40Ar/39Ar dating yielded a plateau age of 216.01 ± 10.64 Ma. Based on their geochemistry, mineral compositions and paragenesis, the lamprophyres are classified as calc-alkaline lamprophyres in general and spessartites in particular, which are rich in large ion lithophile elements (e.g., Rb, Ba, K) but depleted in Nb and Ti. Our samples exhibit moderate fractionation in LREE patterns approximately 100 times that of chondrite but HREE abundances less than 10 times that of chondrite. These calc-alkaline lamprophyres display a range of ISr (216 Ma) values from 0.70619 to 0.71291 and ɛNd (216 Ma) values from - 1.4 to 4.1, with TDM = 1.11 to 2.20 Ga. Their Pb isotopic ratios indicate an enriched mantle source. The enrichment process is related to metasomatism of a subcontinental lithospheric mantle source, which is caused by a large quantity of H2O-rich fluids, rather than sediments released from oceanic crust at depth during the closure of the Paleotethys Ocean in Triassic times. All of the geochemical data and the trace element modeling suggest that the primary magma of the calc-alkaline to high-K calc-alkaline spessartites was generated at depth by a low degree of partial melting (~ 1-10%) of a previously enriched lithospheric mantle wedge consisting of phlogopite-bearing spinel peridotite. The ascendance of a hot asthenosphere triggered by extensional events caused partial melting of mantle material. The rising melts were accompanied by fractional crystallization and crustal contamination en route to the surface. All of the geochemical

  14. Alkaline Water and Longevity: A Murine Study

    PubMed Central

    Magro, Massimiliano; Corain, Livio; Ferro, Silvia; Baratella, Davide; Bonaiuto, Emanuela; Terzo, Milo; Corraducci, Vittorino; Salmaso, Luigi; Vianello, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The biological effect of alkaline water consumption is object of controversy. The present paper presents a 3-year survival study on a population of 150 mice, and the data were analyzed with accelerated failure time (AFT) model. Starting from the second year of life, nonparametric survival plots suggest that mice watered with alkaline water showed a better survival than control mice. Interestingly, statistical analysis revealed that alkaline water provides higher longevity in terms of “deceleration aging factor” as it increases the survival functions when compared with control group; namely, animals belonging to the population treated with alkaline water resulted in a longer lifespan. Histological examination of mice kidneys, intestine, heart, liver, and brain revealed that no significant differences emerged among the three groups indicating that no specific pathology resulted correlated with the consumption of alkaline water. These results provide an informative and quantitative summary of survival data as a function of watering with alkaline water of long-lived mouse models. PMID:27340414

  15. Performed surfactant-optimized aqueous alkaline flood

    SciTech Connect

    Thigpen, D.R.; Lawson, J.B.; Nelson, R.C.

    1991-11-26

    This paper describes improvement in a process for recovering oil from an acidic oil reservoir by injecting an aqueous alkaline solution comprising water, sodium chloride, and alkaline material for reacting with the reservoir oil forming a petroleum acid soap to form an in-situ surfactant system. The improvement comprises: selecting a preformed cosurfactant which is soluble in both the aqueous solution and the reservoir oil and has a solubility ratio which is grater than the solubility ratio of the petroleum acid soap where the solubility ratio is the ratio of solubility in the aqueous alkaline solution to the solubility in the reservoir oil; combining with the alkaline solution an amount of the preformed cosurfactant which will result in the in-situ surfacant system having a salinity about equal to a salinity which results in minimal interfacial tension between the oil in the reservoir and the in-situ surfactant system at reservoir temperature, wherein the amount of the preformed cosurfactant is about 0.3 percent by weight in the aqueous alkaline solution; and injecting the cosurfactant-aqueous alkaline solution mixture into the reservoir to displace oil toward a fluid production location.

  16. Removal of dissolved actinides from alkaline solutions by the method of appearing reagents

    DOEpatents

    Krot, Nikolai N.; Charushnikova, Iraida A.

    1997-01-01

    A method of reducing the concentration of neptunium and plutonium from alkaline radwastes containing plutonium and neptunium values along with other transuranic values produced during the course of plutonium production. The OH.sup.- concentration of the alkaline radwaste is adjusted to between about 0.1M and about 4M. [UO.sub.2 (O.sub.2).sub.3 ].sup.4- ion is added to the radwastes in the presence of catalytic amounts of Cu.sup.+2, Co.sup.+2 or Fe.sup.+2 with heating to a temperature in excess of about 60.degree. C. or 85.degree. C., depending on the catalyst, to coprecipitate plutonium and neptunium from the radwaste. Thereafter, the coprecipitate is separated from the alkaline radwaste.

  17. Coupling alkaline pre-extraction with alkaline-oxidative post-treatment of corn stover to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentability

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A two-stage chemical pretreatment of corn stover is investigated comprising an NaOH pre-extraction followed by an alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP) post-treatment. We propose that conventional one-stage AHP pretreatment can be improved using alkaline pre-extraction, which requires significantly less H2O2 and NaOH. To better understand the potential of this approach, this study investigates several components of this process including alkaline pre-extraction, alkaline and alkaline-oxidative post-treatment, fermentation, and the composition of alkali extracts. Results Mild NaOH pre-extraction of corn stover uses less than 0.1 g NaOH per g corn stover at 80°C. The resulting substrates were highly digestible by cellulolytic enzymes at relatively low enzyme loadings and had a strong susceptibility to drying-induced hydrolysis yield losses. Alkaline pre-extraction was highly selective for lignin removal over xylan removal; xylan removal was relatively minimal (~20%). During alkaline pre-extraction, up to 0.10 g of alkali was consumed per g of corn stover. AHP post-treatment at low oxidant loading (25 mg H2O2 per g pre-extracted biomass) increased glucose hydrolysis yields by 5%, which approached near-theoretical yields. ELISA screening of alkali pre-extraction liquors and the AHP post-treatment liquors demonstrated that xyloglucan and β-glucans likely remained tightly bound in the biomass whereas the majority of the soluble polymeric xylans were glucurono (arabino) xylans and potentially homoxylans. Pectic polysaccharides were depleted in the AHP post-treatment liquor relative to the alkaline pre-extraction liquor. Because the already-low inhibitor content was further decreased in the alkaline pre-extraction, the hydrolysates generated by this two-stage pretreatment were highly fermentable by Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that were metabolically engineered and evolved for xylose fermentation. Conclusions This work demonstrates that this two

  18. Preliminary Ion Exchange Modeling for Removal of Cesium from Hanford Waste Using Hydrous Crystalline Silicotitanate Material

    SciTech Connect

    HAMM, LUTHER L.

    2004-07-27

    For the current pretreatment facility design of the River Protection Project (RPP) Waste Treatment Plant (WTP), the removal of cesium from low activity waste (LAW) is achieved by ion-exchange technology based on SuperLig(R) 644 resin. Due to recent concerns over potential radiological and chemical degradation of SuperLig(R) 644 resin and increased pressure drops observed during pilot-scale column studies, an increased interest in developing a potential backup ion-exchanger material has resulted. Ideally, a backup ion-exchanger material would replace the SuperLig(R) 644 resin and have no other major impacts on the pretreatment facility flowsheet. Such an ideal exchanger has not been identified to date. However, Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) ion-exchanger materials have been studied for the removal of cesium from a variety of DOE wastes over the last decade. CST ion-exchanger materials demonstrate a high affinity for cesium under high alkalinity conditions and have been under investigation for cesium removal specifically at Hanford and SRS during the last six years. Since CST is an inorganic based material (with excellent properties in regard to chemical, radiological, and thermal stability) that is considered to be practically non-elutable (while SuperLig(R) 644 is an organic based elutable resin), the overall pretreatment facility flowsheet would be impacted in various ways. However, the CST material is still being considered as a potential backup ion-exchanger material. The performance of a proposed backup ion-exchange column using IONSIV IE-911 (CST in its engineered-form) material for the removal of cesium from Hanford high level radioactive alkaline waste is discussed. This report focuses attention on the ion-exchange aspects and addresses the loading phase of the process cycle.

  19. The Potential of Soft Soil Improvement Through a Coupled Technique Between Electro Kinetic and Alkaline Activation of Soft Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, G. E.; Ismail, H. B.; Huat, B. K.; Afshin, A.; Azhar, A. T. S.

    2016-07-01

    Soil stabilization techniques have been in development for decades with different rates of success. Alkaline activation of soft soil is one of those techniques that has proved to deliver some of the best shear strength values with minor drawbacks in comparison with conventional soil stabilization methods. However, environmental considerations have not been taken into account, as major mineral glassy phase activators are poisoning alkaline solutions, such as sodium-, potassium-hydroxide, and sodium-, potassium-silicate, which poses serious hazards to man and environment. This paper addresses the ways of discarding the involvement of the aforementioned alkaline solutions in soft soil stabilization by investigating the potential of a coupled electro kinetic alkaline activation technique for soft soil strengthening, through which the provision of alkaline pH is governed by electro kinetic potential. Uncertainties in regard to the dissolution of aluminosilicate as well as the dominance of acidic front are challenges that need to be overcome.

  20. Impacts of Priming with Silicon on the Growth and Tolerance of Maize Plants to Alkaline Stress.

    PubMed

    Abdel Latef, Arafat A; Tran, Lam-Son P

    2016-01-01

    Silicon (Si) has been known to augment plant defense against biotic and abiotic pressures. Maize (Zea maize L.) is classified as a Si accumulator and is relatively susceptible to alkaline stress. In this study, seeds of maize were grown in pots and exposed to various concentrations of Na2CO3 (0, 25, 50, and 75 mM) with or without 1.5 mM Si in the form of sodium metasilicate Na2O3Si.5H2O for 25 days. Alkaline-stressed plants showed a decrease in growth parameters, leaf relative water content (LRWC), and the contents of photosynthetic pigments, soluble sugars, total phenols and potassium ion (K(+)), as well as potassium/sodium ion (K(+)/Na(+)) ratio. By contrast, alkaline stress increased the contents of soluble proteins, total free amino acids, proline, Na(+) and malondialdehyde (MDA), as well as the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and peroxidase (POD) in stressed plants. On the other hand, application of Si by seed-priming improved growth of stressed plants, which was accompanied by the enhancement in LRWC, and levels of photosynthetic pigments, soluble sugars, soluble proteins, total free amino acids and K(+), as well as activities of SOD, CAT, and POD enzymes. Furthermore, Si supplement resulted in a decrease in the contents of proline, MDA and Na(+), which together with enhanced K(+) level led to a favorable adjustment of K(+)/Na(+) ratio, in stressed plants relative to plants treated with alkaline stress alone. Taken together, these results indicate that Si plays a pivotal role in alleviating the negative effects of alkaline stress on maize growth by improving water status, enhancing photosynthetic pigments, accumulating osmoprotectants rather than proline, activating the antioxidant machinery, and maintaining the balance of K(+)/Na(+) ratio. Thus, our findings demonstrate that seed-priming with Si is an efficient strategy that can be used to boost tolerance of maize plants to alkaline stress. PMID:27014283

  1. Impacts of Priming with Silicon on the Growth and Tolerance of Maize Plants to Alkaline Stress

    PubMed Central

    Abdel Latef, Arafat A.; Tran, Lam-Son P.

    2016-01-01

    Silicon (Si) has been known to augment plant defense against biotic and abiotic pressures. Maize (Zea maize L.) is classified as a Si accumulator and is relatively susceptible to alkaline stress. In this study, seeds of maize were grown in pots and exposed to various concentrations of Na2CO3 (0, 25, 50, and 75 mM) with or without 1.5 mM Si in the form of sodium metasilicate Na2O3Si.5H2O for 25 days. Alkaline-stressed plants showed a decrease in growth parameters, leaf relative water content (LRWC), and the contents of photosynthetic pigments, soluble sugars, total phenols and potassium ion (K+), as well as potassium/sodium ion (K+/Na+) ratio. By contrast, alkaline stress increased the contents of soluble proteins, total free amino acids, proline, Na+ and malondialdehyde (MDA), as well as the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and peroxidase (POD) in stressed plants. On the other hand, application of Si by seed-priming improved growth of stressed plants, which was accompanied by the enhancement in LRWC, and levels of photosynthetic pigments, soluble sugars, soluble proteins, total free amino acids and K+, as well as activities of SOD, CAT, and POD enzymes. Furthermore, Si supplement resulted in a decrease in the contents of proline, MDA and Na+, which together with enhanced K+ level led to a favorable adjustment of K+/Na+ ratio, in stressed plants relative to plants treated with alkaline stress alone. Taken together, these results indicate that Si plays a pivotal role in alleviating the negative effects of alkaline stress on maize growth by improving water status, enhancing photosynthetic pigments, accumulating osmoprotectants rather than proline, activating the antioxidant machinery, and maintaining the balance of K+/Na+ ratio. Thus, our findings demonstrate that seed-priming with Si is an efficient strategy that can be used to boost tolerance of maize plants to alkaline stress. PMID:27014283

  2. Impacts of Priming with Silicon on the Growth and Tolerance of Maize Plants to Alkaline Stress.

    PubMed

    Abdel Latef, Arafat A; Tran, Lam-Son P

    2016-01-01

    Silicon (Si) has been known to augment plant defense against biotic and abiotic pressures. Maize (Zea maize L.) is classified as a Si accumulator and is relatively susceptible to alkaline stress. In this study, seeds of maize were grown in pots and exposed to various concentrations of Na2CO3 (0, 25, 50, and 75 mM) with or without 1.5 mM Si in the form of sodium metasilicate Na2O3Si.5H2O for 25 days. Alkaline-stressed plants showed a decrease in growth parameters, leaf relative water content (LRWC), and the contents of photosynthetic pigments, soluble sugars, total phenols and potassium ion (K(+)), as well as potassium/sodium ion (K(+)/Na(+)) ratio. By contrast, alkaline stress increased the contents of soluble proteins, total free amino acids, proline, Na(+) and malondialdehyde (MDA), as well as the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and peroxidase (POD) in stressed plants. On the other hand, application of Si by seed-priming improved growth of stressed plants, which was accompanied by the enhancement in LRWC, and levels of photosynthetic pigments, soluble sugars, soluble proteins, total free amino acids and K(+), as well as activities of SOD, CAT, and POD enzymes. Furthermore, Si supplement resulted in a decrease in the contents of proline, MDA and Na(+), which together with enhanced K(+) level led to a favorable adjustment of K(+)/Na(+) ratio, in stressed plants relative to plants treated with alkaline stress alone. Taken together, these results indicate that Si plays a pivotal role in alleviating the negative effects of alkaline stress on maize growth by improving water status, enhancing photosynthetic pigments, accumulating osmoprotectants rather than proline, activating the antioxidant machinery, and maintaining the balance of K(+)/Na(+) ratio. Thus, our findings demonstrate that seed-priming with Si is an efficient strategy that can be used to boost tolerance of maize plants to alkaline stress.

  3. Syrtis Major

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 1 May 2002) The Science This image is from the region of Syrtis Major, which is dominated by a low-relief shield volcano. This area is believed to be an area of vigorous aeolian activity with strong winds in the east-west direction. The effects of these winds are observed as relatively bright streaks across the image, extending from topographic features such as craters. The brighter surface material probably indicates a smaller relative particle size in these areas, as finer particles have a higher albedo. The bright streaks seen off of craters are believed to have formed during dust storms. A raised crater rim can cause a reduction in the wind velocity directly behind it, which results in finer particles being preferentially deposited in this location. In the top half of the image, there is a large bright streak that crosses the entire image. There is no obvious topographic obstacle, therefore it is unclear whether it was formed in the same manner as described above. This image is located northwest of Nili Patera, a large caldera in Syrtis Major. Different flows from the caldera eruptions can be recognized as raised ridges, representing the edge of a flow lobe. The Story In the 17th century, Holland was in its Golden Age, a time of cultural greatness and immense political and economic influence in the world. In that time, lived a inquisitive person named Christian Huygens. As a boy, he loved to draw and to figure out problems in mathematics. As a man, he used these talents to make the first detailed drawings of the Martian surface - - only 50 years or so after Galileo first turned his telescope on Mars. Mars suddenly became something other than a small red dot in the sky. One of the drawings Huygens made was of a dark marking on the red planet's surface named Syrtis Major. Almost 350 years later, here we are with an orbiter that can show us this place in detail. Exploration lives! It's great we can study this area up close. In earlier periods of history

  4. Use of natural mordenite to remove chromium (III) and to neutralize pH of alkaline waste waters.

    PubMed

    Córdova-Rodríguez, Valduvina; Rodríguez-Iznaga, Inocente; Acosta-Chávez, Raquel María; Chávez-Rivas, Fernando; Petranovskii, Vitalii; Pestryakov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    The natural mordenite from Palmarito de Cauto deposit (PZ), Cuba, was studied in this work as an ion exchanger to remove Cr(3+) cations from alkaline aqueous solutions at different pH and chromium concentrations. The mordenite stability under cyclic treatment processes with alkaline solutions and its capacity to decrease the pH of the solutions was also analyzed. It was shown that PZ removes Cr(3+) ions from alkaline solutions, and it happens independently of the starting chromium concentration and the pH of the exchange solution used. This material has an important neutralizing effect on alkaline solutions, expressed in a significant pH decrease from the early stages of the treatments. For solutions with initial pH equal to 11, it decreases to a value of around seven. The stability of this material is not affected significantly after continuous cyclic treatment with NaOH solution, which shows that mordenite, in particular from Palmarito de Cauto deposit, has high stability in alkaline solutions. The results are important as they suggest that natural zeolites may be of interest in treatments of alkaline industrial waste effluents.

  5. Use of natural mordenite to remove chromium (III) and to neutralize pH of alkaline waste waters.

    PubMed

    Córdova-Rodríguez, Valduvina; Rodríguez-Iznaga, Inocente; Acosta-Chávez, Raquel María; Chávez-Rivas, Fernando; Petranovskii, Vitalii; Pestryakov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    The natural mordenite from Palmarito de Cauto deposit (PZ), Cuba, was studied in this work as an ion exchanger to remove Cr(3+) cations from alkaline aqueous solutions at different pH and chromium concentrations. The mordenite stability under cyclic treatment processes with alkaline solutions and its capacity to decrease the pH of the solutions was also analyzed. It was shown that PZ removes Cr(3+) ions from alkaline solutions, and it happens independently of the starting chromium concentration and the pH of the exchange solution used. This material has an important neutralizing effect on alkaline solutions, expressed in a significant pH decrease from the early stages of the treatments. For solutions with initial pH equal to 11, it decreases to a value of around seven. The stability of this material is not affected significantly after continuous cyclic treatment with NaOH solution, which shows that mordenite, in particular from Palmarito de Cauto deposit, has high stability in alkaline solutions. The results are important as they suggest that natural zeolites may be of interest in treatments of alkaline industrial waste effluents. PMID:26818904

  6. Prevention of cathode damage from positive ion bombardment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, W. H.

    1972-01-01

    Mixed alkaline earth oxide compounds deposited into hole at cathode surface center prevent ion back bombardment damage to cathode by reducing oxide layer and by creating metallic diffusion along sides of hole for enhanced electron emission.

  7. Late Proterozoic and Silurian alkaline plutons within the southeastern New England Avalon zone

    SciTech Connect

    Hermes, O.D. ); Zartman, R.E. )

    1992-07-01

    Distinct pulses of quartz-bearing, alkaline plutonism and volcanism are known to have occurred in the Avalon zone of southeastern New England during the Late Ordovician, Early Silurian, Devonian, and Carboniferous. Zircon separates from the Franklin and Dartmouth plutons demonstrate that two additional, previously unrecognized periods of alkaline magmatism occurred. The Franklin pluton yields an age of 417 {plus minus} 6 Ma (Late Silurian), whereas the Dartmouth pluton is Late Proterozoic (595 {plus minus} 5 Ma) and markedly older than the other plutons of alkaline affinity. The new ages further emphasize the episodic nature and long-term duration of such alkaline igneous events within the southeastern New England Avalon zone. The Dartmouth pluton may represent a post-collisional alkaline granite emplaced in the Late Proterozoic, almost immediately after a major period of calcalkaline igneous activity that accompanied plate convergence and continental accretion. The abrupt change from orogenic calcalkaline igneous activity to post-collisional alkaline granite, followed by younger episodes of anorogenic emplacement, is remarkably similar to igneous events reported from pan-African mobile belts widespread throughout Africa. In addition, parts of the Dartmouth pluton exhibit features indicative of mixing and commingling of felsic and mafic melts that are associated with coevally formed mylonitic fabrics. Because these fabrics are conformable to those in adjacent gneisses, but discordant with Alleghanian fabrics in the nearby Carboniferous Narragansett basin, they represent some of the best candidates for pre-Alleghanian structures thus far identified in the southeastern New England Avalon zone.

  8. Flexible separator for alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.

    1977-01-01

    Device is fabricated from low-cost readily-available commercial-materials by automated methods utilizing conventional paper coating processes. Flexibility of unit prevents cracking and disintegration caused by electrode warpage and dendrite growth, major causes of early battery failure with present separators.

  9. Syrtis Major

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 6 June 2002) The Science This image, located near the equator and 288W (72E), is near the southern edge of a low, broad volcanic feature called Syrtis Major. A close look at this image reveals a wrinkly texture that indicates a very rough surface that is associated with the lava flows that cover this region. On a larger scale, there are numerous bright streaks that trail topographic features such as craters. These bright streaks are in the wind shadows of the craters where dust that settles onto the surface is not as easily scoured away. It is important to note that these streaks are only bright in a relative sense to the surrounding image. Syrtis Major is one of the darkest regions on Mars and it is as dark as fresh basalt flows or dunes are on Earth. The Story Cool! It almost looks as if nature has 'painted' comets on the surface of Mars, using craters as comet cores and dust as streaky tails. Of course, that's just an illusion. As in many areas of Mars, the wind is behind the creation of such fantastic landforms. The natural phenomenon seen here gives this particular surface of Mars a very dynamic, fast-moving, almost luminous 'cosmic personality.' The bright, powdery-looking streaks of dust are in the 'wind shadows' of craters, where dust that settles onto the surface is not as easily scoured away. That's because the wind moves across the land in a particular direction, and a raised surface like the rim of a crater 'protects' dust from being completely blown away on the other side. The raised landforms basically act as a buffer. From the streaks seen above, you can tell the wind was blowing in a northeast to southwest direction. Why are the streaks so bright? Because they contrast with the really dark underlying terrain in this volcanic area of Mars. Syrtis Major is one of the darkest regions on Mars because it is made of basalt. Basalt is typically dark gray or black, and forms when a certain type of molten lava cools. The meaning of the word basalt

  10. An assessment of ocean margin anaerobic processes on oceanic alkalinity budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xinping; Cai, Wei-Jun

    2011-09-01

    Recent interest in the ocean's capacity to absorb atmospheric CO2 and buffer the accompanying "ocean acidification" has prompted discussions on the magnitude of ocean margin alkalinity production via anaerobic processes. However, available estimates are largely based on gross reaction rates or misconceptions regarding reaction stoichiometry. In this paper, we argue that net alkalinity gain does not result from the internal cycling of nitrogen and sulfur species or from the reduction of metal oxides. Instead, only the processes that involve permanent loss of anaerobic remineralization products, i.e., nitrogen gas from net denitrification and reduced sulfur (i.e., pyrite burial) from net sulfate reduction, could contribute to this anaerobic alkalinity production. Our revised estimate of net alkalinity production from anaerobic processes is on the order of 4-5 Tmol yr-1 in global ocean margins that include both continental shelves and oxygen minimum zones, significantly smaller than the previously estimated rate of 16-31 Tmol yr-1. In addition, pyrite burial in coastal habitats (salt marshes, mangroves, and seagrass meadows) may contribute another 0.1-1.1 Tmol yr-1, although their long-term effect is not yet clear under current changing climate conditions and rising sea levels. Finally, we propose that these alkalinity production reactions can be viewed as "charge transfer" processes, in which negative charges of nitrate and sulfate ions are converted to those of bicarbonate along with a net loss of these oxidative anions.

  11. Recent advances in Rydberg physics using alkaline-earth atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunning, F. B.; Killian, T. C.; Yoshida, S.; Burgdörfer, J.

    2016-06-01

    In this brief review, the opportunities that the alkaline-earth elements offer for studying new aspects of Rydberg physics are discussed. For example, the bosonic alkaline-earth isotopes have zero nuclear spin which eliminates many of the complexities present in alkali Rydberg atoms, permitting simpler and more direct comparison between theory and experiment. The presence of two valence electrons allows the production of singlet and triplet Rydberg states that can exhibit a variety of attractive or repulsive interactions. The availability of weak intercombination lines is advantageous for laser cooling and for applications such as Rydberg dressing. Excitation of one electron to a Rydberg state leaves behind an optically active core ion allowing, for high-L states, the optical imaging of Rydberg atoms and their (spatial) manipulation using light scattering. The second valence electron offers the possibility of engineering long-lived doubly excited states such as planetary atoms. Recent advances in both theory and experiment are highlighted together with a number of possible directions for the future.

  12. Buffering of alkaline steel slag leachate across a natural wetland.

    PubMed

    Mayes, William M; Younger, Paul L; Aumônier, Jonathan

    2006-02-15

    Buffering of high-pH (>12) steel slag leachate is documented across a small, natural calcareous wetland. The alkaline leachate is supersaturated with respect to calcite upstream of the wetland (Sl(calcite) values +2.3) and becomes less saturated with progress across the wetland, to Sl(calcite) values of +0.27 at the wetland outlet. Reduction in pH across the wetland (to around pH 8 at the wetland outlet) was observed to be more pronounced over summer months, possibly due to increased microbial activity, possibly further assisted by greater flow baffling by emergent vegetation. Calculated calcite precipitation rates downstream of the leachate source, estimated from hydrochemical data, flow, and surface area, were on the order of 0.4-15 g m(-2) day(-1), while direct measurements (using immersed limestone blocks) showed calcite precipitation values in the range 3-10 g m(-2) day(-1). Precipitation rate was highest in the pH range where the carbonate ion is a dominant constituent of sample alkalinity (pH 9.5-11) and at the locations where wetland biota became established downstream of the leachate emergence. These data provide valuable insights into the potential for using constructed wetlands for the passive treatment of high pH steel slag leachates.

  13. Interfacial activity in alkaline flooding enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, M.K.

    1981-01-01

    The ionization of long-chained organic acids in the crude oil to form soaps was shown to be primarily responsible for the lowering of oil-water interfacial tension at alkaline pH. These active acids can be concentrated by silica gel chromatography into a minor polar fraction. An equilibrium chemical model was proposed based on 2 competing reactions: the ionization of acids to form active anions, and the formation of undissociated soap between acid anions and sodium ions. It correlates the interfacial activity with the interfacial concentration of active acid anions which is expressed in terms of the concentrations of the chemical species in the system. The model successfully predicts the observed oil-alkaline solution interfacial phenomenon, including its dependence on pH, alkali and salt concentrations, type of acid present and type of soap formed. Flooding at different alkali concentrations to activate different acid species present in the crude was shown to give better recovery than flooding at a single high alkali concentration. Treating the crude oil with a dilute solution of mineral acids liberates additional free active acids and yields better interfacial activity during subsequent alkali contact.

  14. Uptake of arsenic by alkaline soils near alkaline coal fly ash disposal facilities.

    PubMed

    Khodadoust, Amid P; Theis, Thomas L; Murarka, Ishwar P; Naithani, Pratibha; Babaeivelni, Kamel

    2013-12-01

    The attenuation of arsenic in groundwater near alkaline coal fly ash disposal facilities was evaluated by determining the uptake of arsenic from ash leachates by surrounding alkaline soils. Ten different alkaline soils near a retired coal fly ash impoundment were used in this study with pH ranging from 7.6 to 9.0, while representative coal fly ash samples from two different locations in the coal fly ash impoundment were used to produce two alkaline ash leachates with pH 7.4 and 8.2. The arsenic found in the ash leachates was present as arsenate [As(V)]. Adsorption isotherm experiments were carried out to determine the adsorption parameters required for predicting the uptake of arsenic from the ash leachates. For all soils and leachates, the adsorption of arsenic followed the Langmuir and Freundlich equations, indicative of the favorable adsorption of arsenic from leachates onto all soils. The uptake of arsenic was evaluated as a function of ash leachate characteristics and the soil components. The uptake of arsenic from alkaline ash leachates, which occurred mainly as calcium hydrogen arsenate, increased with increasing clay fraction of soil and with increasing soil organic matter of the alkaline soils. Appreciable uptake of arsenic from alkaline ash leachates with different pH and arsenic concentration was observed for the alkaline soils, thus attenuating the contamination of groundwater downstream of the retired coal fly ash impoundment.

  15. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and the Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-12-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding froin swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in

  16. Thermoelectric Properties of Barium Plumbate Doped by Alkaline Earth Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eufrasio, Andreza; Bhatta, Rudra; Pegg, Ian; Dutta, Biprodas

    Ceramic oxides are now being considered as a new class of thermoelectric materials because of their high stability at elevated temperatures. Such materials are especially suitable for use as prospective thermoelectric power generators because high temperatures are encountered in such operations. The present investigation uses barium plumbate (BaPbO3) as the starting material, the thermoelectric properties of which have been altered by judicious cation substitutions. BaPbO3 is known to exhibit metallic properties which may turn semiconducting as a result of compositional changes without precipitating a separate phase and/or altering the basic perovskite crystal structure. Perovskite structures are noted for their large interstitial spaces which can accommodate a large variety of ``impurity'' ions. As BaPbO3 has high electrical conductivity, σ = 2.43x105Ω-1 m-1 at room temperature, its thermopower, S, is relatively low, 23 μV/K, as expected. With a thermal conductivity, k, of 4.83Wm-1K-1, the figure of merit (ZT =S2 σ Tk-1) of BaPbO3 is only 0.01 at T = 300K. The objective of this investigation is to study the variation of thermoelectric properties of BaPbO3 as Ba and Pb ions are systematically substituted by alkaline earth ions.

  17. Solid-State Water Electrolysis with an Alkaline Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Leng, YJ; Chen, G; Mendoza, AJ; Tighe, TB; Hickner, MA; Wang, CY

    2012-06-06

    We report high-performance, durable alkaline membrane water electrolysis in a solid-state cell. An anion exchange membrane (AEM) and catalyst layer ionomer for hydroxide ion conduction were used without the addition of liquid electrolyte. At 50 degrees C, an AEM electrolysis cell using iridium oxide as the anode catalyst and Pt black as the cathode catalyst exhibited a current density of 399 mA/cm(2) at 1.80 V. We found that the durability of the AEM-based electrolysis cell could be improved by incorporating a highly durable ionomer in the catalyst layer and optimizing the water feed configuration. We demonstrated an AEM-based electrolysis cell with a lifetime of > 535 h. These first-time results of water electrolysis in a solid-state membrane cell are promising for low-cost, scalable hydrogen production.

  18. Singlet-Oxygen Generation in Alkaline Periodate Solution.

    PubMed

    Bokare, Alok D; Choi, Wonyong

    2015-12-15

    A nonphotochemical generation of singlet oxygen ((1)O2) using potassium periodate (KIO4) in alkaline condition (pH > 8) was investigated for selective oxidation of aqueous organic pollutants. The generation of (1)O2 was initiated by the spontaneous reaction between IO4(-) and hydroxyl ions, along with a stoichiometric conversion of IO4(-) to iodate (IO3(-)). The reactivity of in-situ-generated (1)O2 was monitored by using furfuryl alcohol (FFA) as a model substrate. The formation of (1)O2 in the KIO4/KOH system was experimentally confirmed using electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements in corroboration with quenching studies using azide as a selective (1)O2 scavenger. The reaction in the KIO4/KOH solution in both oxic and anoxic conditions initiated the generation of superoxide ion as a precursor of the singlet oxygen (confirmed by using superoxide scavengers), and the presence of molecular oxygen was not required as a precursor of (1)O2. Although hydrogen peroxide had no direct influence on the FFA oxidation process, the presence of natural organic matter, such as humic and fulvic acids, enhanced the oxidation efficiency. Using the oxidation of simple organic diols as model compounds, the enhanced (1)O2 formation is attributed to periodate-mediated oxidation of vicinal hydroxyl groups present in humic and fulvic constituent moieties. The efficient and simple generation of (1)O2 using the KIO4/KOH system without any light irradiation can be employed for the selective oxidation of aqueous organic compounds under neutral and near-alkaline conditions.

  19. Photoelastic response of alkaline earth aluminosilicate glasses.

    PubMed

    Smedskjaer, Morten M; Saxton, Scott A; Ellison, Adam J; Mauro, John C

    2012-02-01

    Understanding the structural origins of the photoelastic response in oxide glasses is important for discovering new families of zero-stress optic glasses and for developing a predictive physical model. In this Letter, we have investigated the composition dependence of the stress optic coefficient C of 32 sodium aluminosilicate glasses with different types of alkaline earth oxides (MgO, CaO, SrO, and BaO). We find that most of the composition dependence of the stress optic response can be captured by a linear regression model and that the individual contributions from the alkaline earths to C depend on the alkaline earth-oxygen bond metallicity. High bond metallicity is required to allow bonds to be distorted along both the bonding direction and perpendicular to it. These findings are valuable for understanding the photoelastic response of oxide glasses.

  20. Molecular and isotopic signatures in sediments and gas hydrate of the central/southwestern Ulleung Basin: high alkalinity escape fuelled by biogenically sourced methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ji-Hoon; Park, Myong-Ho; Chun, Jong-Hwa; Lee, Joo Yong

    2011-02-01

    Natural marine gas hydrate was discovered in Korean territorial waters during a 2007 KIGAM cruise to the central/southwestern Ulleung Basin, East Sea. The first data on the geochemical characterization of hydrate-bound water and gas are presented here for cold seep site 07GHP-10 in the central basin sector, together with analogous data for four sites (07GHP-01, 07GHP-02, 07GHP-03, and 07GHP-14) where no hydrates were detected in other cores from the central/southwestern sectors. Hydrate-bound water displayed very low concentrations of major ions (Cl-, SO{4/2-}, Na+, Mg2+, K+, and Ca2+), and more positive δD (15.5‰) and δ18O (2.3‰) signatures compared to seawater. Cl- freshening and more positive isotopic values were also observed in the pore water at gas hydrate site 07GHP-10. The inferred sulfate-methane interface (SMI) was very shallow (<5 mbsf) at least at four sites, suggesting the widespread occurrence of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) at shallow sediment depths, and possibly high methane flux. Around the SMI, pore water alkalinity was very high (>40 mM), but the carbon isotopic ratios of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC) did not show minimum values typical of AOM. Moreover, macroscopic authigenic carbonates were not observed at any of the core sites. This can plausibly be explained by carbon with high δ13C values diffusing upward from below the SMI, increasing alkalinity via deep methanogenesis and eventually escaping as alkalinity into the water column, with minor precipitation as solid phase. This contrasts, but is not inconsistent with recent reports of methane-fuelled carbonate formation at other sites in the southwestern basin sector. Methane was the main hydrocarbon component (>99.85%) of headspace, void, and hydrate-bound gases, C1/C2+ ratios were at least 1,000, and δ13CCH4 and δDCH4 values were in the typical range of methane generated by microbial reduction of CO2. This is supported by the δ13CC2H6 signatures of void and hydrate

  1. The Nature of Surface Oxides on Corrosion-Resistant Nickel Alloy Covered by Alkaline Water

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A nickel alloy with high chrome and molybdenum content was found to form a highly resistive and passive oxide layer. The donor density and mobility of ions in the oxide layer has been determined as a function of the electrical potential when alkaline water layers are on the alloy surface in order to account for the relative inertness of the nickel alloy in corrosive environments. PMID:20672134

  2. Alkaline Capacitors Based on Nitride Nanoparticles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldissi, Matt

    2003-01-01

    High-energy-density alkaline electrochemical capacitors based on electrodes made of transition-metal nitride nanoparticles are undergoing development. Transition- metal nitrides (in particular, Fe3N and TiN) offer a desirable combination of high electrical conductivity and electrochemical stability in aqueous alkaline electrolytes like KOH. The high energy densities of these capacitors are attributable mainly to their high capacitance densities, which, in turn, are attributable mainly to the large specific surface areas of the electrode nanoparticles. Capacitors of this type could be useful as energy-storage components in such diverse equipment as digital communication systems, implanted medical devices, computers, portable consumer electronic devices, and electric vehicles.

  3. Alkaline earth filled nickel skutterudite antimonide thermoelectrics

    DOEpatents

    Singh, David Joseph

    2013-07-16

    A thermoelectric material including a body centered cubic filled skutterudite having the formula A.sub.xFe.sub.yNi.sub.zSb.sub.12, where A is an alkaline earth element, x is no more than approximately 1.0, and the sum of y and z is approximately equal to 4.0. The alkaline earth element includes guest atoms selected from the group consisting of Be, Mb, Ca, Sr, Ba, Ra and combinations thereof. The filled skutterudite is shown to have properties suitable for a wide variety of thermoelectric applications.

  4. Inhibition of Brass Corrosion by 2-Mercapto-1-methylimidazole in Weakly Alkaline Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radovanovic, Milan B.; Antonijevic, Milan M.

    2016-03-01

    The electrochemical behavior of brass and anticorrosion effect of 2-mercapto-1-methylimidazole (2-MMI) in weakly alkaline solution with and without presence of chloride ions was investigated using electrochemical techniques in addition to SEM-EDS analysis. Results show that inhibition efficiency depended on inhibitor concentration and immersion time of brass electrode in inhibitor solution. Inhibition mechanism of 2-mercapto-1-methylimidazole includes adsorption of inhibitor on active sites on electrode surface which was confirmed by SEM-EDS analysis of the brass. Adsorption of the 2-MMI in sodium tetraborate solution obeys Flory-Huggins adsorption isotherm, while in the presence of chloride, ions adsorption of inhibitor obeys Langmuir adsorption isotherm.

  5. The Alkaline Diet: Is There Evidence That an Alkaline pH Diet Benefits Health?

    PubMed Central

    Schwalfenberg, Gerry K.

    2012-01-01

    This review looks at the role of an alkaline diet in health. Pubmed was searched looking for articles on pH, potential renal acid loads, bone health, muscle, growth hormone, back pain, vitamin D and chemotherapy. Many books written in the lay literature on the alkaline diet were also reviewed and evaluated in light of the published medical literature. There may be some value in considering an alkaline diet in reducing morbidity and mortality from chronic diseases and further studies are warranted in this area of medicine. PMID:22013455

  6. Identification of anthropogenic and natural inputs of sulfate into a karstic coastal groundwater system in northeast China: evidence from major ions, δ13CDIC and δ34SSO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, D.; Song, X.; Currell, M. J.

    2015-11-01

    The hydrogeochemical processes controlling groundwater evolution in the Daweijia area of Dalian, northeast China, were characterized using hydrochemistry and isotopes of carbon and sulfur (δ13CDIC and δ34SSO4). The aim was to distinguish anthropogenic impacts as distinct from natural processes, with a particular focus on sulfate, which is found at elevated levels (range: 54.4 to 368.8 mg L-1; mean: 174.4 mg L-1) in fresh and brackish groundwater. The current investigation reveals minor seawater intrusion impact (not exceeding 5 % of overall solute load), in contrast with extensive impacts observed in 1982 during the height of intensive abstraction. This indicates that measures to restrict groundwater abstraction have been effective. However, hydrochemical facies analysis shows that the groundwater remains in a state of ongoing hydrochemical evolution (towards Ca-Cl type water) and quality degradation (increasing nitrate and sulphate concentrations). The wide range of NO3 concentrations (74.7-579 mg L-1) in the Quaternary aquifer indicates considerable input of fertilizers and/or leakage from septic systems. Both δ13C (-14.5 to -5.9 ‰) and δ34SSO4 (+5.4-+13.1 ‰) values in groundwater show increasing trends along groundwater flow paths. While carbonate minerals may contribute to increasing δ13CDIC and δ34SSO4 values in deep karstic groundwater, high loads of agricultural fertilizers reaching the aquifer via irrigation return flow are likely the main source of the dissolved sulfate in Quaternary groundwater, as shown by distinctive isotopic ratios and a lack of evidence for other sources in the major ion chemistry. According to isotope mass balance calculations, the fertilizer contribution to overall sulfate has reached an average of 62.1 % in the Quaternary aquifer, which has a strong hydraulic connection to the underlying carbonate aquifer. The results point to an alarming level of impact from the local intensive agriculture on the groundwater system, a

  7. Sorption of water alkalinity and hardness from high-strength wastewater on bifunctional activated carbon: process optimization, kinetics and equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Amosa, Mutiu K

    2016-08-01

    Sorption optimization and mechanism of hardness and alkalinity on bifunctional empty fruit bunch-based powdered activation carbon (PAC) were studied. The PAC possessed both high surface area and ion-exchange properties, and it was utilized in the treatment of biotreated palm oil mill effluent. Batch adsorption experiments designed with Design Expert(®) were conducted in correlating the singular and interactive effects of the three adsorption parameters: PAC dosage, agitation speed and contact time. The sorption trends of the two contaminants were sequentially assessed through a full factorial design with three factor interaction models and a central composite design with polynomial models of quadratic order. Analysis of variance revealed the significant factors on each design response with very high R(2) values indicating good agreement between model and experimental values. The optimum operating conditions of the two contaminants differed due to their different regions of operating interests, thus necessitating the utility of desirability factor to get consolidated optimum operation conditions. The equilibrium data for alkalinity and hardness sorption were better represented by the Langmuir isotherm, while the pseudo-second-order kinetic model described the adsorption rates and behavior better. It was concluded that chemisorption contributed majorly to the adsorption process.

  8. Sorption of water alkalinity and hardness from high-strength wastewater on bifunctional activated carbon: process optimization, kinetics and equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Amosa, Mutiu K

    2016-08-01

    Sorption optimization and mechanism of hardness and alkalinity on bifunctional empty fruit bunch-based powdered activation carbon (PAC) were studied. The PAC possessed both high surface area and ion-exchange properties, and it was utilized in the treatment of biotreated palm oil mill effluent. Batch adsorption experiments designed with Design Expert(®) were conducted in correlating the singular and interactive effects of the three adsorption parameters: PAC dosage, agitation speed and contact time. The sorption trends of the two contaminants were sequentially assessed through a full factorial design with three factor interaction models and a central composite design with polynomial models of quadratic order. Analysis of variance revealed the significant factors on each design response with very high R(2) values indicating good agreement between model and experimental values. The optimum operating conditions of the two contaminants differed due to their different regions of operating interests, thus necessitating the utility of desirability factor to get consolidated optimum operation conditions. The equilibrium data for alkalinity and hardness sorption were better represented by the Langmuir isotherm, while the pseudo-second-order kinetic model described the adsorption rates and behavior better. It was concluded that chemisorption contributed majorly to the adsorption process. PMID:26752149

  9. phoD Alkaline Phosphatase Gene Diversity in Soil.

    PubMed

    Ragot, Sabine A; Kertesz, Michael A; Bünemann, Else K

    2015-10-01

    Phosphatase enzymes are responsible for much of the recycling of organic phosphorus in soils. The PhoD alkaline phosphatase takes part in this process by hydrolyzing a range of organic phosphoesters. We analyzed the taxonomic and environmental distribution of phoD genes using whole-genome and metagenome databases. phoD alkaline phosphatase was found to be spread across 20 bacterial phyla and was ubiquitous in the environment, with the greatest abundance in soil. To study the great diversity of phoD, we developed a new set of primers which targets phoD genes in soil. The primer set was validated by 454 sequencing of six soils collected from two continents with different climates and soil properties and was compared to previously published primers. Up to 685 different phoD operational taxonomic units were found in each soil, which was 7 times higher than with previously published primers. The new primers amplified sequences belonging to 13 phyla, including 71 families. The most prevalent phoD genes identified in these soils were affiliated with the orders Actinomycetales (13 to 35%), Bacillales (1 to 29%), Gloeobacterales (1 to 18%), Rhizobiales (18 to 27%), and Pseudomonadales (0 to 22%). The primers also amplified phoD genes from additional orders, including Burkholderiales, Caulobacterales, Deinococcales, Planctomycetales, and Xanthomonadales, which represented the major differences in phoD composition between samples, highlighting the singularity of each community. Additionally, the phoD bacterial community structure was strongly related to soil pH, which varied between 4.2 and 6.8. These primers reveal the diversity of phoD in soil and represent a valuable tool for the study of phoD alkaline phosphatase in environmental samples.

  10. phoD Alkaline Phosphatase Gene Diversity in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Kertesz, Michael A.; Bünemann, Else K.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatase enzymes are responsible for much of the recycling of organic phosphorus in soils. The PhoD alkaline phosphatase takes part in this process by hydrolyzing a range of organic phosphoesters. We analyzed the taxonomic and environmental distribution of phoD genes using whole-genome and metagenome databases. phoD alkaline phosphatase was found to be spread across 20 bacterial phyla and was ubiquitous in the environment, with the greatest abundance in soil. To study the great diversity of phoD, we developed a new set of primers which targets phoD genes in soil. The primer set was validated by 454 sequencing of six soils collected from two continents with different climates and soil properties and was compared to previously published primers. Up to 685 different phoD operational taxonomic units were found in each soil, which was 7 times higher than with previously published primers. The new primers amplified sequences belonging to 13 phyla, including 71 families. The most prevalent phoD genes identified in these soils were affiliated with the orders Actinomycetales (13 to 35%), Bacillales (1 to 29%), Gloeobacterales (1 to 18%), Rhizobiales (18 to 27%), and Pseudomonadales (0 to 22%). The primers also amplified phoD genes from additional orders, including Burkholderiales, Caulobacterales, Deinococcales, Planctomycetales, and Xanthomonadales, which represented the major differences in phoD composition between samples, highlighting the singularity of each community. Additionally, the phoD bacterial community structure was strongly related to soil pH, which varied between 4.2 and 6.8. These primers reveal the diversity of phoD in soil and represent a valuable tool for the study of phoD alkaline phosphatase in environmental samples. PMID:26253682

  11. ISSUES WITH ALKALINE TREATMENT OF SLUDGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation begins with a discussion of the use of lime and other alkaline materials from the very earliest times to the present for killing bacteria, viruses and parasites and for controlling odors in wastewaters and sludge. It answers the question "How did EPA arrive at i...

  12. Alkaline electrochemical cells and method of making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyt, H. E.; Pfluger, H. L. (Inventor)

    1970-01-01

    Equilibrated cellulose ether membranes of increased electrolytic conductivity for use as separators in concentrated alkaline electrochemical cells are investigated. The method of making such membranes by equilibration to the degree desired in an aqueous alkali solution mantained at a temperature below about 10 C is described.

  13. Kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of nitrocellulose.

    PubMed

    Christodoulatos, C; Su, T L; Koutsospyros, A

    2001-01-01

    Cellulose nitrate (nitrocellulose) is an explosive solid substance used in large quantities in various formulations of rocket and gun propellants. Safe destruction of nitrocellulose can be achieved by alkaline hydrolysis, which converts it to biodegradable products that can then be treated by conventional biological processes. The kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of munitions-grade nitrocellulose in sodium hydroxide solutions were investigated in completely mixed batch reactors. Experiments were conducted using solutions of alkaline strength ranging from 0.1 to 15% by mass and temperatures in the range of 30 to 90 degrees C. Regression analysis of the kinetic data revealed that alkaline hydrolysis of nitrocellulose is of the order 1.0 and 1.5 with respect to nitrocellulose and hydroxide concentration, respectively. The activation energy of the hydrolysis reaction was found to be 100.9 kJ/mol with a preexponential Arrhenius constant of 4.73 x 10(13). Nitrite and nitrate, in a 3:1 ratio, were the primary nitrogen species present in the posthydrolysis solution. The kinetic information is pertinent to the development and optimization of nitrocellulose chemical-biological treatment systems.

  14. Alkaline Bohr effect of human hemoglobin Ao.

    PubMed

    Di Cera, E; Doyle, M L; Gill, S J

    1988-04-01

    Differential oxygen binding measurements obtained over the pH range 6.95 to 9.10 at 25 degrees C have allowed a detailed description of the alkaline Bohr effect of human hemoglobin Ao. Phenomenological analysis of the data in terms of the Adair equation shows that: (1) the oxygen binding curves are asymmetrical with the population of the triply oxygenated species being negligible throughout the pH range studied: (2) the shape of the oxygen binding curve is affected by pH, especially at low saturation; and (3) the maximum O2-proton linkage is -0.52 mole of proton per mole of oxygen at pH 7.4. A possible molecular mechanism of the Bohr effect is proposed within the framework of an allosteric model which accounts for the low population of triply oxygenated hemoglobin species. At least three Bohr groups are necessary for a quantitative description of the alkaline Bohr effect. Two of these groups titrate in the range of the His146 beta and Vall alpha residues, which have long been identified as the main alkaline Bohr groups, and altogether contribute 84% of the alkaline Bohr effect at physiological pH. A third ionizable group, linked to oxygenation presumably at the beta chains, is implicated and is titrated in a pH range characteristic of a surface histidyl residue.

  15. MERCURIC CHLORIDE CAPTURE BY ALKALINE SORBENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of bench-scale mechanistic studies of mercury/sorbent reactions that showed that mercuric chloride (HgC12) is readily adsorbed by alkaline sorbents, which may offers a less expensive alternative to the use of activated carbons. A laboratory-scale, fixed-b...

  16. Use Alkalinity Monitoring to Optimize Bioreactor Performance.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher S; Kult, Keegan J

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, the agricultural community has reduced flow of nitrogen from farmed landscapes to stream networks through the use of woodchip denitrification bioreactors. Although deployment of this practice is becoming more common to treat high-nitrate water from agricultural drainage pipes, information about bioreactor management strategies is sparse. This study focuses on the use of water monitoring, and especially the use of alkalinity monitoring, in five Iowa woodchip bioreactors to provide insights into and to help manage bioreactor chemistry in ways that will produce desirable outcomes. Results reported here for the five bioreactors show average annual nitrate load reductions between 50 and 80%, which is acceptable according to established practice standards. Alkalinity data, however, imply that nitrous oxide formation may have regularly occurred in at least three of the bioreactors that are considered to be closed systems. Nitrous oxide measurements of influent and effluent water provide evidence that alkalinity may be an important indicator of bioreactor performance. Bioreactor chemistry can be managed by manipulation of water throughput in ways that produce adequate nitrate removal while preventing undesirable side effects. We conclude that (i) water should be retained for longer periods of time in bioreactors where nitrous oxide formation is indicated, (ii) measuring only nitrate and sulfate concentrations is insufficient for proper bioreactor operation, and (iii) alkalinity monitoring should be implemented into protocols for bioreactor management. PMID:27136151

  17. Use Alkalinity Monitoring to Optimize Bioreactor Performance.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher S; Kult, Keegan J

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, the agricultural community has reduced flow of nitrogen from farmed landscapes to stream networks through the use of woodchip denitrification bioreactors. Although deployment of this practice is becoming more common to treat high-nitrate water from agricultural drainage pipes, information about bioreactor management strategies is sparse. This study focuses on the use of water monitoring, and especially the use of alkalinity monitoring, in five Iowa woodchip bioreactors to provide insights into and to help manage bioreactor chemistry in ways that will produce desirable outcomes. Results reported here for the five bioreactors show average annual nitrate load reductions between 50 and 80%, which is acceptable according to established practice standards. Alkalinity data, however, imply that nitrous oxide formation may have regularly occurred in at least three of the bioreactors that are considered to be closed systems. Nitrous oxide measurements of influent and effluent water provide evidence that alkalinity may be an important indicator of bioreactor performance. Bioreactor chemistry can be managed by manipulation of water throughput in ways that produce adequate nitrate removal while preventing undesirable side effects. We conclude that (i) water should be retained for longer periods of time in bioreactors where nitrous oxide formation is indicated, (ii) measuring only nitrate and sulfate concentrations is insufficient for proper bioreactor operation, and (iii) alkalinity monitoring should be implemented into protocols for bioreactor management.

  18. Negative Electrode For An Alkaline Cell

    DOEpatents

    Coco, Isabelle; Cocciantelli, Jean-Michel; Villenave, Jean-Jacques

    1998-07-14

    The present invention concerns a negative electrode for an alkaline cell, comprising a current collector supporting a paste containing an electrochemically active material and a binder, characterized in that said binder is a polymer containing hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups, said polymer being selected from an acrylic homopolymer, copolymer and terpolymer, an unsaturated organic acid copolymer and an unsaturated acid anhydride copolymer.

  19. Impact of mineral deposition on shrimp, Penaeus monodon in a high alkaline water.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, A; Rajkumar, M; Sun, Jun; Martin, Gary G; Parida, A

    2011-05-01

    This study compares water quality parameters, shrimp growth and mortality rates, and biomass at harvest in two ponds of equal size, seeded with the same density (7 m2) of White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) and Monodon Baculo Virus (MBV) negative post-larvae (PL)-20 of shrimp, Penaeus monodon in the Vellar estuary of South India. The primary difference between the ponds was the water source; one was filled from the estuary and the second with water from bore wells with high alkalinity. Temperature in both ponds was similar and reached 320C after 185 days of culture. Dissolved oxygen (DO) levels were within the acceptable range although levels in the alkaline pond were near the lower limit for the last 90 days before harvest. Salinity levels were similar in both ponds, above optimal levels, and increased over the 185 days. Alkalinity in the estuarine water was typically <50 ppm and again 200-320 ppm in the alkaline pond. In the alkaline pond, beginning on the 75th day mineral deposits was observed covering all parts of the shrimp including the eye and the inner gill chambers, and by harvest, 42% of the shrimp showed this coating. Elemental analysis identified the major constituents as calcium, phosphorus and manganese. Survival rates in the estuarine-water-fed pond was 92% with a total pond biomass at harvest of 1.65 tons ha-1 compared to survival of 79% in the alkaline pond and a biomass at harvest of 1.020 tons ha-1. When well water must be used, its alkalinity should be monitored and diluted with water from other sources.

  20. Recent Alkaline Lakes: Clues to Understanding the Evolution of Early Planetary Alkaline Oceans and Biogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempe, S.; Hartmann, J.; Kazmierczak, J.

    2008-09-01

    Abstract New models suggest that terrestrial weathering consumes 0.26GtC/a (72% silicate-, 28% carbonateweathering), equivalent to a loss of one atmospheric C content every 3700a. Rapid weathering leads in volcanic areas to alkaline conditions, illustrated by the crater lake of Niuafo`ou/Tonga and Lake Van/Turkey, the largest soda lake on Earth. Alkaline conditions cause high CaCO3 supersaturation, permineralization of algal mats and growth of stromatolites. Alkaline conditions can nearly depress free [Ca2+] to levels necessary for proteins to function. Therefore early oceans on Earth (and possibly on Mars) should have been alkaline (i.e. "Soda Oceans"). Recent findings of MgSO4 in top soils on Mars may be misleading about the early history of martian oceans.

  1. Effect of cobalt on synthesis and activation of Bacillus licheniformis alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, D B; Chen, C P; Hulett, F M

    1981-01-01

    The effect of CO2+ on the synthesis and activation of Bacillus licheniformis MC14 alkaline phosphatase has been shown by the development of a defined minimal salts medium in which this organism produces 35 times more (assayable) alkaline phosphatase than when grown in a low-phosphate complex medium or in the defined medium without cobalt. Stimulation of enzyme activity with cobalt is dependent on a low phosphate concentration in the medium (below 0.075 mM) and continued protein synthesis. Cobalt stimulation resulted in alkaline phosphate production being a major portion of total protein synthesized during late-logarithmic and early-stationary-phase culture growth. Cells cultured in the defined medium minus cobalt, or purified enzyme partially inactivated with a chelating agent, showed a 2.5-fold increase in activity when assayed in the presence of cobalt. Atomic spectral analysis indicated the presence of 3.65 +/- 0.45 g-atoms of cobalt associated with each mole of purified active alkaline phosphatase. A biochemical localization as a function of culture age in this medium showed that alkaline phosphatase was associated with the cytoplasmic membrane and was also found as a soluble enzyme in the periplasmic region and secreted into the growth medium. PMID:7462163

  2. Delineating the role of polyphenol oxidase in the darkening of alkaline wheat noodles.

    PubMed

    Fuerst, E Patrick; Anderson, James V; Morris, Craig F

    2006-03-22

    This study evaluated the effects of inhibitors on polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity, the effect of the PPO inhibitor tropolone on noodle darkening, and the correlation of PPO activity with darkening of alkaline noodles. The PPO inhibitors tropolone and salicylhydroxamic acid (each at 1 microM) reduced kernel PPO activity by approximately 50% in three hexaploid wheat cultivars but did not inhibit PPO activity in the two very low PPO cultivars, durum Langdon, and the synthetic hexaploid-derived ID580. Tropolone (100 microg/g flour) inhibited alkaline noodle darkening (deltaL*) by 13-25% in the low PPO wheat cultivar, ID377s, and by 39-54% in the high PPO wheat cultivar, Klasic. Alkaline noodle darkening among 502 wheat samples was correlated with kernel PPO activity (r = 0.64). Results substantiate the hypothesis that PPO plays a major role in darkening of alkaline noodles. However, results also indicate that substantial darkening would occur even at zero PPO activity, as measured in the kernel PPO assay. Therefore, darkening of alkaline noodles is probably due to the cultivar-specific level of PPO activity and the presence of at least one additional darkening mechanism. Further investigation is required to identify the phenolic discoloration agent(s) and to determine the potential roles of non-PPO discoloration mechanisms, both enzymatic and nonenzymatic, in wheat products.

  3. Metal bioavailability and toxicity to fish in low-alkalinity lakes - a critical-review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spry, D.J.; Wiener, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    Fish in low-alkalinity lakes having ph of 6.0-6.5 Or less often have higher body or tissue burdens of mercury, cadmium, and lead than do fish in nearby lakes with higher ph. The greater bioaccumulation of these metals in such waters seems to result partly from the greater aqueous abundances of biologically available forms (ch3hg+, cd2+, and pb2+) at low ph. In addition, the low concentrations of aqueous calcium in low-alkalinity lakes increase the permeability of biological membranes to these metals, which in fish may cause greater uptake from both water and food. Fish exposed to aqueous inorganic aluminum in the laboratory and field accumulate the metal in and on the epithelial cells of the gills; however, there is little accumulation of aluminum in the blood or internal organs. In low-ph water, both sublethal and lethal toxicity of aluminum has been clearly demonstrated in both laboratory and field studies at environmental concentrations. In contrast, recently measured aqueous concentrations of total mercury, methylmercury, cadmium, and lead in low-alkalinity lakes are much lower than the aqueous concentrations known to cause acute or chronic toxicity in fish, although the vast majority of toxicological research has involved waters with much higher ionic strength than that in low-alkalinity lakes. Additional work with fish is needed to better assess (1) the toxicity of aqueous metals in low-alkalinity waters, and (2) the toxicological significance of dietary methylmercury and cadmium.

  4. The role of remediation, natural alkalinity sources and physical stream parameters in stream recovery.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Natalie A; DeRose, Lisa; Korenowsky, Rebekah; Bowman, Jennifer R; Lopez, Dina; Johnson, Kelly; Rankin, Edward

    2013-10-15

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) negatively impacts not only stream chemistry, but also aquatic biology. The ultimate goal of AMD treatment is restoration of the biological community, but that goal is rarely explicit in treatment system design. Hewett Fork in Raccoon Creek Watershed, Ohio, has been impacted by historic coal mining and has been treated with a calcium oxide doser in the headwaters of the watershed since 2004. All of the acidic inputs are isolated to a 1.5 km stretch of stream in the headwaters of the Hewett Fork watershed. The macroinvertebrate and fish communities have begun to recover and it is possible to distinguish three zones downstream of the doser: an impaired zone, a transition zone and a recovered zone. Alkalinity from both the doser and natural sources and physical stream parameters play a role in stream restoration. In Hewett Fork, natural alkaline additions downstream are higher than those from the doser. Both, alkaline additions and stream velocity drive sediment and metal deposition. Metal deposition occurs in several patterns; aluminum tends to deposit in regions of low stream velocity, while iron tends to deposit once sufficient alkalinity is added to the system downstream of mining inputs. The majority of metal deposition occurs upstream of the recovered zone. Both the physical stream parameters and natural alkalinity sources influence biological recovery in treated AMD streams and should be considered in remediation plans.

  5. Growing season net ecosystem CO2 exchange of two desert ecosystems with alkaline soils in Kazakhstan

    PubMed Central

    Li, Longhui; Chen, Xi; van der Tol, Christiaan; Luo, Geping; Su, Zhongbo

    2014-01-01

    Central Asia is covered by vast desert ecosystems, and the majority of these ecosystems have alkaline soils. Their contribution to global net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) is of significance simply because of their immense spatial extent. Some of the latest research reported considerable abiotic CO2 absorption by alkaline soil, but the rate of CO2 absorption has been questioned by peer communities. To investigate the issue of carbon cycle in Central Asian desert ecosystems with alkaline soils, we have measured the NEE using eddy covariance (EC) method at two alkaline sites during growing season in Kazakhstan. The diurnal course of mean monthly NEE followed a clear sinusoidal pattern during growing season at both sites. Both sites showed significant net carbon uptake during daytime on sunny days with high photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) but net carbon loss at nighttime and on cloudy and rainy days. NEE has strong dependency on PAR and the response of NEE to precipitation resulted in an initial and significant carbon release to the atmosphere, similar to other ecosystems. These findings indicate that biotic processes dominated the carbon processes, and the contribution of abiotic carbon process to net ecosystem CO2 exchange may be trivial in alkaline soil desert ecosystems over Central Asia. PMID:24455157

  6. Relation of specific conductance in ground water to intersection of flow paths by wells, and associated major ion and nitrate geochemistry, Barton Springs Segment of the Edwards Aquifer, Austin, Texas, 1978-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garner, Bradley D.; Mahler, Barbara J.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding of karst flow systems can be complicated by the presence of solution-enlarged conduits, which can transmit large volumes of water through the aquifer rapidly. If the geochemistry at a well can be related to streamflow or spring discharge (springflow), or both, the relations can indicate the presence of recent recharge in water at the well, which in turn might indicate that the well intersects a conduit (and thus a major flow path). Increasing knowledge of the occurrence and distribution of conduits in the aquifer can contribute to better understanding of aquifer framework and function. To that end, 26 wells in the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards aquifer, Austin, Texas, were investigated for potential intersection with conduits; 26 years of arbitrarily timed specific conductance measurements in the wells were compared to streamflow in five creeks that provide recharge to the aquifer and were compared to aquifer flow conditions as indicated by Barton Springs discharge. A nonparametric statistical test (Spearman's rho) was used to divide the 26 wells into four groups on the basis of correlation of specific conductance of well water to streamflow or spring discharge, or both. Potential relations between conduit intersection by wells and ground-water geochemistry were investigated through analysis of historical major ion and nitrate geochemistry for wells in each of the four groups. Specific conductance at nine wells was negatively correlated with both streamflow and spring discharge, or streamflow only. These correlations were interpreted as evidence of an influx of surface-water recharge during periods of high streamflow and the influence at the wells of water from a large, upgradient part of the aquifer; and further interpreted as indicating that four wells intersect major aquifer flow paths and five wells intersect minor aquifer flow paths (short, tributary conduits). Specific conductance at six wells was positively correlated with spring

  7. A method for making an alkaline battery electrode plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chida, K.; Ezaki, T.

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for making an alkaline battery electrode plate where the desired active substances are filled into a nickel foam substrate. In this substrate an electrolytic oxidation reduction occurs in an alkaline solution containing lithium hydroxide.

  8. Contamination and purification of alkaline gas treating solutions

    SciTech Connect

    McCullough, J.G.; Nielsen, R.B.

    1996-08-01

    Alkanolamine and potassium carbonate solutions in gas treating units removing carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, or both are contaminated by impurities in the feed gases and makeup water and by the products of the degradation and oxidation of amines occurring in the units themselves. Feed gas impurities include oxygen, carbonyl sulfide, carbon monoxide, hydrogen cyanide, ammonia, brine, solid particles, heavy hydrocarbons, sulfur dioxide, hydrochloric acid, organic acids, and pipeline corrosion inhibitors. Impure makeup water contains sulfate, chloride, alkali metal, and alkaline earth ions (hardness). Reactions causing contamination in the units include oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfate and thiosulfate, oxidation of amines to formic acid and other products, and degradation of amines by carbon dioxide. The resulting heat-stable salts and polymers reduce the gas absorbing capacity of alkanolamine solutions and increase their corrosiveness. Similar problems occur in potassium carbonate solutions, except that degradation products of amine activators are too dilute to be harmful. Contaminants are removed by inlet gas separation, charcoal and mechanical filtration, neutralization of heat-stable salts, reclaiming at both atmospheric and reduced pressure, upstream washing of the feed gas, electrodialysis, use of antioxidants, ion exchange, and blowdown and dumping of the solution.

  9. Factors affecting alkalinity generation by successive alkalinity-producing systems: regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Jage, C R; Zipper, C E; Noble, R

    2001-01-01

    Use of successive alkalinity-producing systems (SAPS) for treatment of acidic mine drainage (AMD) has grown in recent years. However, inconsistent performance has hampered widespread acceptance of this technology. This research was conducted to determine the influence of system design and influent AMD chemistry on net alkalinity generation by SAPS. Monthly observations were obtained from eight SAPS cells in southern West Virginia and southwestern Virginia. Analysis of these data revealed strong, positive correlations between net alkalinity generation and three variables: the natural log of limestone residence time, influent dissolved Fe concentration, and influent non-Mn acidity. A statistical model was constructed to describe SAPS performance. Subsequent analysis of data obtained from five systems in western Pennsylvania (calibration data set) was used to reevaluate the model form, and the statistical model was adjusted using the combined data sets. Limestone residence time exhibited a strong, positive logarithmic correlation with net alkalinity generation, indicating net alkalinity generation occurs most rapidly within the first few hours of AMD-limestone contact and additional residence time yields diminishing gains in treatment. Influent Fe and non-Mn acidity concentrations both show strong positive linear relationships with net alkalinity generation, reflecting the increased solubility of limestone under acidic conditions. These relationships were present in the original and the calibration data sets, separately, and in the statistical model derived from the combined data set. In the combined data set, these three factors accounted for 68% of the variability in SAPS systems performance. PMID:11401248

  10. Alkaline polymer electrolyte membranes for fuel cell applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Jie; Qiao, Jinli; Baker, Ryan; Zhang, Jiujun

    2013-07-01

    In this review, we examine the most recent progress and research trends in the area of alkaline polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) development in terms of material selection, synthesis, characterization, and theoretical approach, as well as their fabrication into alkaline PEM-based membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) and the corresponding performance/durability in alkaline polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Respective advantages and challenges are also reviewed. To overcome challenges hindering alkaline PEM technology advancement and commercialization, several research directions are then proposed.

  11. The sulphate-reduction alkalinity pump tested

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, Patrick; Petrishcheva, Elena

    2016-04-01

    Carbonate precipitation has been suggested to be induced by alkalinity increase during sulphate reduction under anoxic conditions. This mechanism may explain the formation of carbonate deposits in shallow marine environments, either within a redox stratified sediment inhabited by phototrophic microbial mats or in shallow water within the photic zone where sulphidic water is upwelling onto the shelf. The alkalinity pump may work as long as the sulphide is not reoxidized to sulphate, a process that would acidify the surrounding. The alkalinity effect of sulphate reduction was recently tested by Aloisi (2008) for microbial mats using a model approach. He found that sulphate reduction does not significantly increase or even decrease carbonate saturation and is unlikely to have played a significant role through Earth history. The model considers many environmental factors, including the effect of carbonate precipitation itself on the carbonate equilbrium and on the alkalinity. We used a modified version of Aloisi's (2008) model to simulate the saturation states of aragonite, calcite and dolomite without the effects of carbonate precipitation. This is necessary to evaluate the effect of microbial metabolisms exclusively on carbonate saturation, since carbonate precipitation is only the consequence, but not the cause of oversaturation. First results show that the saturation state is increased in the zone of phototrophic CO2 uptake. In contrast, the saturation state is strongly decreased in the zone where dissolved oxygen overlaps with dissolved sulphide. Aerobic sulphide oxidation consumes most of the HS- and dissipates most of the alkalinity produced in the sulphate reduction zone below. Hence, our results are consistent with the findings of Aloisi (2008), and they even more clearly show that sulphate reduction does not induce carbonate precipitation nor contributes to carbonate precipitation in combination with phototrophic CO2 uptake. The alkalinity effect of sulphate

  12. Pyramidal texturing of silicon surface via inorganic-organic hybrid alkaline liquor for heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fengyou; Zhang, Xiaodan; Wang, Liguo; Jiang, Yuanjian; Wei, Changchun; Zhao, Ying

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate a new class of silicon texturing approach based on inorganic (sodium hydroxide, NaOH) and organic (tetramethylammonium hydroxide, TMAH) alkaline liquor etching processes for photovoltaic applications. The first stage of inorganic alkaline etching textures the silicon surface rapidly with large pyramids and reduces the cost. The subsequent organic alkaline second-etching improves the coverage of small pyramids on the silicon surface and strip off the metallic contaminants produced by the first etching step. In addition, it could smoothen the surface of the pyramids to yield good morphology. In this study, the texturing duration of both etching steps was controlled to optimize the optical and electrical properties as well as the surface morphology and passivation characteristics of the silicon substrates. Compared with traditional inorganic NaOH texturing, this hybrid process yields smoother (111) facets of the pyramids, fewer residual Na+ ions on the silicon surface, and a shorter processing period. It also offers the advantage of lower cost compared with the organic texturing method based on the use of only TMAH. We applied this hybrid texturing process to fabricate silicon heterojunction solar cells, which showed a remarkable improvement compared with the cells based on traditional alkaline texturing processes.

  13. Probing the origins of catalytic discrimination between phosphate and sulfate monoester hydrolysis: comparative analysis of alkaline phosphatase and protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Logan D; Zalatan, Jesse G; Herschlag, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    Catalytic promiscuity, the ability of enzymes to catalyze multiple reactions, provides an opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of the origins of catalysis and substrate specificity. Alkaline phosphatase (AP) catalyzes both phosphate and sulfate monoester hydrolysis reactions with a ∼10(10)-fold preference for phosphate monoester hydrolysis, despite the similarity between these reactions. The preponderance of formal positive charge in the AP active site, particularly from three divalent metal ions, was proposed to be responsible for this preference by providing stronger electrostatic interactions with the more negatively charged phosphoryl group versus the sulfuryl group. To test whether positively charged metal ions are required to achieve a high preference for the phosphate monoester hydrolysis reaction, the catalytic preference of three protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), which do not contain metal ions, were measured. Their preferences ranged from 5 × 10(6) to 7 × 10(7), lower than that for AP but still substantial, indicating that metal ions and a high preponderance of formal positive charge within the active site are not required to achieve a strong catalytic preference for phosphate monoester over sulfate monoester hydrolysis. The observed ionic strength dependences of kcat/KM values for phosphate and sulfate monoester hydrolysis are steeper for the more highly charged phosphate ester with both AP and the PTP Stp1, following the dependence expected based on the charge difference of these two substrates. However, the dependences for AP were not greater than those of Stp1 and were rather shallow for both enzymes. These results suggest that overall electrostatics from formal positive charge within the active site is not the major driving force in distinguishing between these reactions and that substantial discrimination can be attained without metal ions. Thus, local properties of the active site, presumably including multiple positioned dipolar

  14. Identification of anthropogenic and natural inputs of sulfate into a karstic coastal groundwater system in northeast China: evidence from major ions, δ13CDIC and δ34SSO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Dongmei; Song, Xianfang; Currell, Matthew J.

    2016-05-01

    The hydrogeochemical processes controlling groundwater evolution in the Daweijia area of Dalian, northeast China, were characterised using hydrochemistry and isotopes of carbon and sulfur (δ13CDIC and δ34SSO4). The aim was to distinguish anthropogenic impacts as distinct from natural processes, with a particular focus on sulfate, which is found at elevated levels (range: 54.4 to 368.8 mg L-1; mean: 174.4 mg L-1) in fresh and brackish groundwater. The current investigation reveals minor seawater intrusion impact (not exceeding 5 % of the overall solute load), in contrast with extensive impacts observed in 1982 during the height of intensive abstraction. This indicates that measures to restrict groundwater abstraction have been effective. However, hydrochemical facies analysis shows that the groundwater remains in a state of ongoing hydrochemical evolution (towards Ca-Cl type water) and quality degradation (increasing nitrate and sulfate concentrations). The wide range of NO3 concentrations (74.7-579 mg L-1) in the Quaternary aquifer indicates considerable input of fertilisers and/or leakage from septic systems. Both δ13C (-14.5 to -5.9 permil) and δ34SSO4 (+5.4 to +13.1 permil) values in groundwater show increasing trends along groundwater flow paths. While carbonate minerals may contribute to increasing δ13CDIC and δ34SSO4 values in deep karstic groundwater, high loads of agricultural fertilisers reaching the aquifer via irrigation return flow are likely the main source of the dissolved sulfate in Quaternary groundwater, as shown by distinctive isotopic ratios and a lack of evidence for other sources in the major ion chemistry. According to isotope mass balance calculations, the fertiliser contribution to overall sulfate has reached an average of 62.1 % in the Quaternary aquifer, which has a strong hydraulic connection to the underlying carbonate aquifer. The results point to an alarming level of impact from the local intensive agriculture on the groundwater

  15. Mechanisms of hydrogen ion neutralization in an experimentally acidified lake

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, R.B.; Kelly, C.A.; Schindler, D.W.; Turner, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    The experimental acidification of Lake 223 (Experimental Lakes Area, northwestern Ontario) with sulfuric acid in 1976-1983 allowed a detailed examination of the capacity of the lake to neutralize hydrogen ion. A whole-lake alkalinity and ion budget for Lake 223 showed that 66-81% of the added sulfuric acid was neutralized by alkalinity production in the lake. Nearly 85% of in situ alkalinity production was accounted for by net loss of sulfate through bacterial sulfate reduction, coupled with iron reduction and iron sulfide formation, in littoral sediments (60%) and in the hypolimnion (25%). Exchange of hydrogen ion for calcium and manganese in the sediments accounted for 19% of the alkalinity generated, while other cations were net sinks for alkalinity. The seasonal production of 1000 ..mu..eq liter/sup -1/ alkalinity in the anoxic hypolimnion of this soft-water lake could be attributed to bacterial sulfate reduction coupled with iron sulfide formation, ammonium production, and iron (II) production. Only the alkalinity produced from bacterial sulfate reduction coupled with iron sulfide formation remained throughout the annual cycle.

  16. Eruption of Alkaline Basalts Prior to the Calc-alkaline Lavas of Mt. Cleveland Volcano, Aleutian Arc, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, D. L.; Nicolaysen, K. P.

    2005-12-01

    Mt. Cleveland is a 1,730 m stratovolcano, located on Chuginadak Island, that has erupted at least 23 times historically, with the latest occurring in August 2005. Major, trace, and REE analyses of 63 samples from Mt. Cleveland, including 8 from proximal cinder cones and 4 from andesitic domes on the lower flanks, identify two distinct lava suites. Modern Cleveland (MC) basalts to dacites (50.5-66.7 wt.% SiO2) exhibit a calc-alkaline differentiation trend. Major element trends suggest crystal fractionation of plagioclase +/- ortho- and clinopyroxene in MC lavas and olivine in cinder cone deposits. Resorption textures on plagioclase and olivine phenocrysts and multiple populations of plagioclase predominate throughout the MC suite suggesting magma mixing is a major process at Cleveland. Frothy white xenoliths of plagioclase + quartz + biotite are encased in glass and erupted as small pumiceous fragments in 2001. The partial resorption of the xenocrysts indicates assimilation is also an active crustal process at Cleveland. MC trace element spider diagrams exhibit a typical arc pattern in which HFS elements including Nb are depleted, and Pb and LIL elements are enriched. Th/La, Sm/La, and Sr, Nd, Pb, and Hf isotopic ratios indicate both a North Pacific MORB and a sediment component in the source of modern Cleveland lavas, consistent with sediment flux estimates of 90 to 95 m3/m/yr and an updip sediment thickness of 1300 to 1400 meters. Average 206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, 87Sr/86Sr, and 143Nd/144Nd values for the calc-alkaline suite are 18.93, 15.58, 0.70345, and 0.51303 respectively. The second suite consists of 3 olivine-rich, mildly alkaline basalts (48.5-49.4 wt.% SiO2), of older stratigraphic position than MC lavas representing deposits from an older phase of activity (ancestral Cleveland, AC). La/Yb, Sr/Y, and Th/Nb ratios indicate lower degrees of partial melting, relative to MC lavas, and suggests presence of garnet in the source region. The AC lavas, however, are

  17. The alkaline earth intercalates of molybdenum disulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somoano, R. B.; Hadek, V.; Rembaum, A.; Samson, S.; Woollam, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Molybdenum disulfide has been intercalated with calcium and strontium by means of the liquid ammonia technique. Chemical, X-ray, and superconductivity data are presented. The X-ray data reveal a lowering of crystal symmetry and increase of complexity of the structure upon intercalation with the alkaline earth metals. The Ca and Sr intercalates start to superconduct at 4 and 5.6 K, respectively, and show considerable anisotropy regarding the critical magnetic field.

  18. Alkaline earth cation extraction from acid solution

    DOEpatents

    Dietz, Mark; Horwitz, E. Philip

    2003-01-01

    An extractant medium for extracting alkaline earth cations from an aqueous acidic sample solution is described as are a method and apparatus for using the same. The separation medium is free of diluent, free-flowing and particulate, and comprises a Crown ether that is a 4,4'(5')[C.sub.4 -C.sub.8 -alkylcyclohexano]18-Crown-6 dispersed on an inert substrate material.

  19. Surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding field project

    SciTech Connect

    French, T.R.

    1991-10-01

    The Tucker sand of Helper (KS) field is a candidate for surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding. The geology of the Helper site is typical of many DOE Class I reservoirs. The Tucker sand of Helper field was deposited in a fluvial dominated deltaic environment. Helper oil can be mobilized with either chemical system 2 or chemical system 3, as described in this report. Oil fields in the Gulf Coast region are also good candidates for surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding. The results from laboratory tests conducted in Berea sandstone cores with oil brine from Helper (KS) field are encouraging. The crude oil is viscous and non-acidic and, yet, was mobilized by the chemical formulations described in this report. Significant amounts of the oil were mobilized under simulated reservoir conditions. The results in Berea sandstone cores were encouraging and should be verified by tests with field core. Consumption of alkali, measured with field core, was very low. Surfactant loss appeared to be acceptable. Despite the good potential for mobilization of Helper oil, certain reservoir characteristics such as low permeability, compartmentalization, and shallow depth place constraints on applications of any chemical system in the Tucker sand. These constraints are typical of many DOE Class I reservoirs. Although Hepler field is not a perfect reservoir in which to apply surfactant- enhanced alkaline flooding, Hepler oil is particularly amenable to mobilization by surfactant-enhanced alkaline systems. A field test is recommended, dependent upon final evaluation of well logs and cores from the proposed pilot area. 14 refs., 21 figs., 10 tabs.

  20. Highly Stable, Anion Conductive, Comb-Shaped Copolymers for Alkaline Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, NW; Leng, YJ; Hickner, MA; Wang, CY

    2013-07-10

    To produce an anion-conductive and durable polymer electrolyte for alkaline fuel cell applications, a series of quaternized poly(2,6-dimethyl phenylene oxide)s containing long alkyl side chains pendant to the nitrogen-centered cation were synthesized using a Menshutkin reaction to form comb-shaped structures. The pendant alkyl chains were responsible for the development of highly conductive ionic domains, as confirmed by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The comb-shaped polymers having one alkyl side chain showed higher hydroxide conductivities than those with benzyltrimethyl ammonium moieties or structures with more than one alkyl side chain per cationic site. The highest conductivity was observed for comb-shaped polymers with benzyldimethylhexadecyl ammonium cations. The chemical stabilities of the comb-shaped membranes were evaluated under severe, accelerated-aging conditions, and degradation was observed by measuring IEC and ion conductivity changes during aging. The comb-shaped membranes retained their high ion conductivity in 1 M NaOH at 80 degrees C for 2000 h. These cationic polymers were employed as ionomers in catalyst layers for alkaline fuel cells. The results indicated that the C-16 alkyl side chain ionomer had a slightly better initial performance, despite its low IEC value, but very poor durability in the fuel cell. In contrast, 90% of the initial performance was retained for the alkaline fuel cell with electrodes containing the C-6 side chain after 60 h of fuel cell operation.

  1. Sucrolytic Enzyme Activities in Cotyledons of the Faba Bean (Developmental Changes and Purification of Alkaline Invertase).

    PubMed Central

    Ross, H. A.; McRae, D.; Davies, H. V.

    1996-01-01

    In terms of maximum extractable catalytic activity, sucrose synthase is the predominant sucrolytic enzyme in developing cotyledons of faba bean (Vicia faba L.). Although acid invertase activity is extremely low, there is significant activity of alkaline invertase, the majority of which is extractable only with high concentrations of NaCl. Calculations of potential activity in vivo indicate that alkaline invertase is the predominant sucrolytic enzyme from 50 days after anthesis onward. However, at almost all stages of cotyledon development analyzed, the maximum extractable catalytic activities of both enzymes is in excess of the actual rate of starch deposition. Two forms of alkaline invertase were identified in developing cotyledons. The major form has been purified to homogeneity, and antibodies have been raised against it. The native protein has a molecular mass of about 238 [plus or minus] 4.5 kD. It is apparently a homotetramer (subunit molecular mass 53.4 [plus or minus] 0.9 kD). The enzyme has a pH optimum of 7.4, an isoelectric point of 5.2, and a Km[sucrose] of 10 mM and is inhibited by Tris (50% inhibition at 5 mM) and fructose (30% inhibition at 10 mM). Bean alkaline invertase is a [beta]-fructofuranosidase with no significant activity against raffinose, stachyose, trehalose, maltose, or lactose. PMID:12226291

  2. The fate of added alkalinity in model scenarios of ocean alkalinization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer González, Miriam; Ilyina, Tatiana

    2014-05-01

    The deliberate large-scale manipulation of the Earth's climate (geo-engineering) has been proposed to mitigate climate change and ocean acidification. Whilst the mitigation potential of these technologies could sound promising, they may also pose many environmental risks. Our research aims at exploring the ocean-based carbon dioxide removal method of alkalinity enhancement. Its mitigation potential to reduce atmospheric CO2 and counteract the consequences of ocean acidification, risks and unintended consequences are studied. In order to tackle these questions, different scenarios are implemented in the state-of-the-art Earth system model of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology. The model configuration is based on the 5th phase of the coupled model intercomparison project following a high CO2 future climate change scenario RCP8.5 (in which radiative forcing rises to 8.5 W/m² in 2100). Two different scenarios are performed where the alkalinity is artificially added globally uniformly in the upper ocean. In the first scenario, alkalinity is increased as a pulse by doubling natural values of the first 12 meters. In the second scenario we add alkalinity into the same ocean layer such that the atmospheric CO2 concentration is reduced from RCP8.5 to RCP4.5 levels (with the radiative forcing of 4.5 W/m² in 2100). We investigate the fate of the added alkalinity in these two scenarios and compare the differences in alkalinity budgets. In order to increase oceanic CO2 uptake from the atmosphere, enhanced alkalinity has to stay in the upper ocean. Once the alkalinity is added, it will become part of the biogeochemical cycles and it will be distributed with the ocean currents. Therefore, we are particularly interested in the residence time of the added alkalinity at the surface. Variations in CO2 partial pressure, seawater pH and saturation state of carbonate minerals produced in the implemented scenarios will be presented. Collateral changes in ocean biogeochemistry and

  3. Alkaline and ultrasound assisted alkaline pretreatment for intensification of delignification process from sustainable raw-material.

    PubMed

    Subhedar, Preeti B; Gogate, Parag R

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline and ultrasound-assisted alkaline pretreatment under mild operating conditions have been investigated for intensification of delignification. The effect of NaOH concentration, biomass loading, temperature, ultrasonic power and duty cycle on the delignification has been studied. Most favorable conditions for only alkaline pretreatment were alkali concentration of 1.75 N, solid loading of 0.8% (w/v), temperature of 353 K and pretreatment time of 6 h and under these conditions, 40.2% delignification was obtained. In case of ultrasound-assisted alkaline approach, most favorable conditions obtained were alkali concentration of 1N, paper loading of 0.5% (w/v), sonication power of 100 W, duty cycle of 80% and pretreatment time of 70 min and the delignification obtained in ultrasound-assisted alkaline approach under these conditions was 80%. The material samples were characterized by FTIR, SEM, XRD and TGA technique. The lignin was recovered from solution by precipitation method and was characterized by FTIR, GPC and TGA technique.

  4. Alkaline solution/binder ratio as a determining factor in the alkaline activation of aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz-Santaquiteria, C.; Fernandez-Jimenez, A.; Palomo, A.

    2012-09-15

    This study investigates the effect of the alkaline solution/binder (S/B) ratio on the composition and nanostructure of the reaction products generated in the alkaline activation of aluminosilicates. The experiments used two mixtures of fly ash and dehydroxylated white clay and for each of these, varying proportions of the solution components. The alkali activator was an 8 M NaOH solution (with and without sodium silicate) used at three S/B ratios: 0.50, 0.75 and 1.25. The {sup 29}Si, {sup 27}Al MAS NMR and XRD characterisation of the reaction products reveal that for ratios nearest the value delivering suitable paste workability, the reaction-product composition and structure depend primarily on the nature and composition of the starting materials and the alkaline activator used. However, when an excess alkaline activator is present in the system, the reaction products tend to exhibit SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratios of approximately 1, irrespective of the composition of the starting binder or the alkaline activator.

  5. A Novel Alkaline α-Galactosidase from Melon Fruit with a Substrate Preference for Raffinose1

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhifang; Schaffer, Arthur A.

    1999-01-01

    The cucurbits translocate the galactosyl-sucrose oligosaccharides raffinose and stachyose, therefore, α-galactosidase (α-d-galactoside galactohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.22) is expected to function as the initial enzyme of photoassimilate catabolism. However, the previously described alkaline α-galactosidase is specific for the tetrasaccharide stachyose, leaving raffinose catabolism in these tissues as an enigma. In this paper we report the partial purification and characterization of three α-galactosidases, including a novel alkaline α-galactosidase (form I) from melon (Cucumis melo) fruit tissue. The form I enzyme showed preferred activity with raffinose and significant activity with stachyose. Other unique characteristics of this enzyme, such as weak product inhibition by galactose (in contrast to the other α-galactosidases, which show stronger product inhibition), also impart physiological significance. Using raffinose and stachyose as substrates in the assays, the activities of the three α-galactosidases (alkaline form I, alkaline form II, and the acid form) were measured at different stages of fruit development. The form I enzyme activity increased during the early stages of ovary development and fruit set, in contrast to the other α-galactosidase enzymes, both of which declined in activity during this period. In the mature, sucrose-accumulating mesocarp, the alkaline form I enzyme was the major α-galactosidase present. We also observed hydrolysis of raffinose at alkaline conditions in enzyme extracts from other cucurbit sink tissues, as well as from young Coleus blumei leaves. Our results suggest different physiological roles for the α-galactosidase forms in the developing cucurbit fruit, and show that the newly discovered enzyme plays a physiologically significant role in photoassimilate partitioning in cucurbit sink tissue. PMID:10069835

  6. A novel alkaline alpha-galactosidase from melon fruit with a substrate preference for raffinose

    PubMed

    Gao; Schaffer

    1999-03-01

    The cucurbits translocate the galactosyl-sucrose oligosaccharides raffinose and stachyose, therefore, alpha-galactosidase (alpha-D-galactoside galactohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.22) is expected to function as the initial enzyme of photoassimilate catabolism. However, the previously described alkaline alpha-galactosidase is specific for the tetrasaccharide stachyose, leaving raffinose catabolism in these tissues as an enigma. In this paper we report the partial purification and characterization of three alpha-galactosidases, including a novel alkaline alpha-galactosidase (form I) from melon (Cucumis melo) fruit tissue. The form I enzyme showed preferred activity with raffinose and significant activity with stachyose. Other unique characteristics of this enzyme, such as weak product inhibition by galactose (in contrast to the other alpha-galactosidases, which show stronger product inhibition), also impart physiological significance. Using raffinose and stachyose as substrates in the assays, the activities of the three alpha-galactosidases (alkaline form I, alkaline form II, and the acid form) were measured at different stages of fruit development. The form I enzyme activity increased during the early stages of ovary development and fruit set, in contrast to the other alpha-galactosidase enzymes, both of which declined in activity during this period. In the mature, sucrose-accumulating mesocarp, the alkaline form I enzyme was the major alpha-galactosidase present. We also observed hydrolysis of raffinose at alkaline conditions in enzyme extracts from other cucurbit sink tissues, as well as from young Coleus blumei leaves. Our results suggest different physiological roles for the alpha-galactosidase forms in the developing cucurbit fruit, and show that the newly discovered enzyme plays a physiologically significant role in photoassimilate partitioning in cucurbit sink tissue.

  7. A Database of Alkaline-Earth-Coordinated Peptide Cross Sections: Insight into General Aspects of Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilger, Jonathan M.; Valentine, Stephen J.; Glover, Matthew S.; Clemmer, David E.

    2013-05-01

    A database of 1470 collision cross sections (666 doubly- and 804 triply-charged) of alkaline-earth-coordinated tryptic peptide ions [where the cation (M2+) correspond to Mg2+, Ca2+, or Ba2+] is presented. The utility of such an extensive set of measurements is illustrated by extraction of general properties of M2+-coordinated peptide structures. Specifically, we derive sets of intrinsic size parameters (ISPs) for individual amino acid residues for M2+-coordinated peptides. Comparison of these parameters with existing ISPs for protonated peptides suggests that M2+ binding occurs primarily through interactions with specific polar aliphatic residues (Asp, Ser, and Thr) and the peptide backbone. A comparison of binding interactions for these alkaline-earth metals with interactions reported previously for alkali metals is provided. Finally, we describe a new analysis in which ISPs are used as probes for assessing peptide structure based on amino acid composition.

  8. Facile synthesis of water-soluble carbon nano-onions under alkaline conditions.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Gaber Hashem Gaber; Laíño, Rosana Badía; Calzón, Josefa Angela García; García, Marta Elena Díaz

    2016-01-01

    Carbonization of tomatoes at 240 °C using 30% (w/v) NaOH as catalyst produced carbon onions (C-onions), while solely carbon dots (C-dots) were obtained at the same temperature in the absence of the catalyst. Other natural materials, such as carrots and tree leaves (acer saccharum), under the same temperature and alkaline conditions did not produce carbon onions. XRD, FTIR, HRTEM, UV-vis spectroscopy, and photoluminescence analyses were performed to characterize the as-synthesized carbon nanomaterials. Preliminary tests demonstrate a capability of the versatile materials for chemical sensing of metal ions. The high content of lycopene in tomatoes may explain the formation of C-onions in alkaline media and a possible formation mechanism for such structures was outlined. PMID:27335764

  9. Facile synthesis of water-soluble carbon nano-onions under alkaline conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Gaber Hashem Gaber; Laíño, Rosana Badía; Calzón, Josefa Angela García

    2016-01-01

    Summary Carbonization of tomatoes at 240 °C using 30% (w/v) NaOH as catalyst produced carbon onions (C-onions), while solely carbon dots (C-dots) were obtained at the same temperature in the absence of the catalyst. Other natural materials, such as carrots and tree leaves (acer saccharum), under the same temperature and alkaline conditions did not produce carbon onions. XRD, FTIR, HRTEM, UV–vis spectroscopy, and photoluminescence analyses were performed to characterize the as-synthesized carbon nanomaterials. Preliminary tests demonstrate a capability of the versatile materials for chemical sensing of metal ions. The high content of lycopene in tomatoes may explain the formation of C-onions in alkaline media and a possible formation mechanism for such structures was outlined. PMID:27335764

  10. Catalytic actions of alkaline salts in reactions between 1,2,3,4-butanetetracarboxylic acid and cellulose: II. Esterification.

    PubMed

    Ji, Bolin; Tang, Peixin; Yan, Kelu; Sun, Gang

    2015-11-01

    1,2,3,4-Butanetetracarboxylic acid (BTCA) reacts with cellulose in two steps with catalysis of alkaline salts such as sodium hypophosphite: anhydride formation and esterification of anhydride with cellulose. The alkali metal ions were found effective in catalyzing formation of BTCA anhydride in a previous report. In this work, catalytic functions of the alkaline salts in the esterification reaction between BTCA anhydride and cellulose were investigated. Results revealed that acid anions play an important role in the esterification reaction by assisting removal of protons on intermediates and completion of the esterification between cellulose and BTCA. Besides, alkaline salts with lower pKa1 values of the corresponding acids are more effective ones for the reaction since addition of these salts could lead to lower pH values and higher acid anion concentrations in finishing baths. The mechanism explains the results of FTIR and wrinkle recovery angles of the fabrics cured under different temperatures and times.

  11. Structural Features of Alkaline Extracted Polysaccharide from the Seeds of Plantago asiatica L. and Its Rheological Properties.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun-Yi; Chen, Hai-Hong; Lin, Hui-Xia; Xie, Ming-Yong; Nie, Shao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Polysaccharide from the seeds of Plantago asiatica L. has many bioactivities, but few papers report on the structural and rheological characteristics of the alkaline extract. The alkaline extracted polysaccharide was prepared from seeds of P. asiatica L. and named herein as alkaline extracted polysaccharide from seeds of P. asiatica L. (PLAP). Its structural and rheological properties were characterized by monosaccharide composition, methylation, GC-MS and rheometry. PLAP, as an acidic arabinoxylan, was mainly composed of 1,2,4-linked Xylp and 1,3,4-linked Xylp residues. PLAP solution showed pseudoplastic behavior, and weak gelling properties at high concentration. Sodium and especially calcium ions played a significant role in increasing the apparent viscosity and gel strength. PMID:27608001

  12. Ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ehlers, Kenneth W.

    1984-01-01

    A magnetic filter for an ion source reduces the production of undesired ion species and improves the ion beam quality. High-energy ionizing electrons are confined by the magnetic filter to an ion source region, where the high-energy electrons ionize gas molecules. One embodiment of the magnetic filter uses permanent magnets oriented to establish a magnetic field transverse to the direction of travel of ions from the ion source region to the ion extraction region. In another embodiment, low energy 16 eV electrons are injected into the ion source to dissociate gas molecules and undesired ion species into desired ion species.

  13. Synergetic effect of alkaline earth metal oxides and iron oxides on the degradation of hexachlorobenzene and its degradation pathway.

    PubMed

    Su, Guijin; Liu, Yexuan; Huang, Linyan; Shi, Yali; Zhang, Aiqian; Zhang, Lixia; Liu, Wenbin; Gao, Lirong; Zheng, Minghui

    2013-01-01

    The degradation of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) was carried out over physical mixtures of a series of alkaline earth metal oxides (MO: M=Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba) and iron oxides with different crystal types (Fe(x)O(y):Fe(2)O(3) or Fe(3)O(4)) at 300°C. These physical mixtures all showed a synergetic effect toward the degradation of HCB. A range of degradation products were identified by various methods, including tri- to penta-chlorobenzenes by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS), tri- to penta-chlorophenols, tetrachlorocatechol (TCC) and tetrachlorohydroquinone (TCHQ) by GC-MS after derivatization, and formic and acetic acids by ion chromatography. Two degradation pathways, hydrodechlorination and oxidative degradation, appear to occur competitively. However, more sequential chlorinated benzene and phenol congeners were formed over mixed MO/Fe(3)O(4) than over mixed MO/Fe(2)O(3) under the same conditions. The oxidative reaction dominated over mixed MO/Fe(2)O(3) and was promoted as the major reaction by the synergetic effect, while both the oxidative and hydrodechlorination reactions were important over mixed MO/Fe(3)O(4), and both pathways are remarkably promoted by the synergetic effect. The enhanced hydrodechlorination may be attributed to free electrons generated by the transformation of Fe(3)O(4) into Fe(2)O(3), and hydrogen provided by water adsorbed on the MO.

  14. Reduction and structural modification of zirconolite on He+ ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Merry; Kulriya, P. K.; Shukla, Rishabh; Dhaka, R. S.; Kumar, Raj; Ghumman, S. S.

    2016-07-01

    The immobilization of minor actinides and alkaline-earth metal is a major concern in nuclear industry due to their long-term radioactive contribution to the high level waste (HLW). Materials having zirconolite, pyrochlore, and perovskite structure are promising candidates for immobilization of HLW. The zirconolite which exhibits high radiation stability and corrosion resistance behavior is investigated for its radiation stability against alpha particles in the present study. CaZrTi2O7 pellets prepared using solid state reaction techniques, were irradiated with 30 keV He+ ions for the ion fluence varying from 1 × 1017 to 1 × 1021 ions/m2. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the un-irradiated sample exhibited well separated grains with average size of about 6.8 μm. On the ion irradiation, value of the average grains size was about 7.1 μm, and change in the microstructure was insignificant. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies showed a shift in the core level peak position (of Ca 2p, Ti 2p and Zr 3d) towards lower binding energy with respect to pristine sample as well as loss of oxygen was also observed for sample irradiated with the ion fluence of 1 × 1020 ions/m2. These indicate a decrease in co-ordination number and the ionic character of Msbnd O bond. Moreover, core level XPS signal was not detected for sample irradiated with ion fluence of 1 × 1021 ions/m2, suggesting surface damage of the sample at this ion fluence. However, X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies showed that zirconolite was not amorphized even on irradiation up to a fluence order of 1 × 1021 ion/m2. But, significant decrease in peak intensity due to creation of defects and a marginal positive peak shift due to tensile strain induced by irradiation, were observed. Thus, XRD along with XPS investigation suggests that reduction, decrease in co-ordination number, and increase in covalency are responsible for the radiation damage in zirconolite.

  15. Alkaline biofiltration of H2S odors.

    PubMed

    González-Sánchez, Armando; Revah, Sergio; Deshusses, Marc A

    2008-10-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a very common odor nuisance which is best controlled by chemical or biological scrubbing. Under alkaline pH, the amount of H2S that can be solubilized in a scrubbing liquid increases significantly, and therefore, gas-liquid mass transfer limitations can be reduced. To date, biological scrubbing of H2S has been limited to neutral or acidic pH, despite the potential benefit of reduced mass transfer limitations at alkaline pH. In the present paper, an alkaliphilic sulfoxidizing bacterial consortium was deployed in a laboratory-scale biotrickling filter treating H2S at pH 10. The gas contact time ranged from 1 to 6 s, and H2S inlet concentrations, from 2.5 to 18 ppm(v). The results showed that under most conditions, H2S removal exceeded 98% and the degradation end-product was sulfate. At the highest H2S concentrations and shortest gas contacttimes, when the loading exceeded 30 g m(-3) h(-1), the H2S removal efficiency decreased significantly due to biological reaction limitation, and incompletely oxidized sulfides were measured in the trickling liquid. An analysis of the process demonstrated that operating the biotrickling filter at high pH results in an enhancement of the mass transfer by a factor of 1700-11 000. Overall, alkaline biotrickling filtration was shown to be very effective at low concentration of H2S and very short gas contact time. This is the first demonstration of a biotrickling filter for air pollution control operated at high pH.

  16. Evidence for alkaline igneous activity and associated metasomatism in the Reelfoot rift, south-central Midcontinent, U. S. A

    SciTech Connect

    Goldhaber, M.B.; Diehl, S.F.; Sutley, S.J. ); Flohr, M.J.K. )

    1993-03-01

    Alkaline igneous magmatism is commonly associated with intracontinental rifts such as the Reelfoot rift (RR). Direct evidence for alkaline magmatism in the area of the RR occurs as lamprophyre and syenite encountered in deep wells. The authors' new studies of lamprophyres and sedimentary rocks from wells in the region provide additional examples of alkaline magmatism and emphasize the effects of related metasomatism. Sedimentary rocks in the Dow Chemical No. 1 Garrigan well, which is not known to contain lamprophyre dikes, probably also were metasomatically altered, as they contain authigenic fluorapatite, Ce-phosphates, and other REE-rich minerals. Enrichments of incompatible and large ion lithophile elements commonly associated with alkaline magmatism occur in the New Madrid test well, near the crest of the Pascola Arch. The carbonate-free fraction of Paleozoic rocks in this well is highly enriched in Nb (500 ppm), Ba (> 5,000 ppm), La (500 ppm), Th (1,000 ppm), and F (2,400 ppm). Abundant inclusion-rich potassium-feldspar cement in a nearby well may also be the result of alkaline metasomatism. Fluorite and elevated F concentrations are found in several wells in the RR, and contrast with stratigraphically correlative platform carbonates of the Ozark uplift, which lack F enrichment. Well and spring water samples above the RR are enriched in fluorine (as much as 5,000 ppb) compared to samples away from the rift which typically have concentrations two orders of magnitude smaller. The data and observations are consistent with relatively widespread alkaline metasomatism, which was associated with the intrusion of alkaline magmas in the RR.

  17. Status of ELENCO's alkaline fuel cell technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Broeck, H.; van Bogaert, G.; Vennekens, G.; Vermeeren, L.; Vlasselaer, F.

    Low-temperature alkaline fuel cells which can be operated with air, oxygen-enriched air, and pure oxygen are discussed. Aspects of the electrochemical stack development, including manufacturing techniques, performance levels, and reactant purity, are first reviewed. Design, engineering, and operating aspects of the 1.5 kW, 15 kW, and 50 kW prototype fuel cell systems are considered. An ejector device based on the venturi principle is used to improve the H2 gas circulation and to reduce the H2 losses. Various industrial and aerospace applications of the modules are discussed.

  18. Permeability of alkaline magmas: a study from Campi Flegrei, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polacci, M.; Bouvet de Maissoneuve, C.; Giordano, D.; Piochi, M.; Degruyter, W.; Bachmann, O.; Mancini, L.

    2012-04-01

    Knowledge of permeability is of paramount importance for understanding the evolution of magma degassing during pre-, syn- and post-eruptive volcanic processes. Most permeability estimates existing to date refer to magmas of calc-alkaline compositions. We report here the preliminary results of permeability measurements performed on alkali-trachyte products erupted from the Campanian Ignimbrite (CI) and Monte Nuovo (MTN), two explosive eruptions from Campi Flegrei (CF), an active, hazardous caldera west of Naples, Southern Italy. Darcian (viscous) permeability spans a wide range between 10^-11 and 10^-14 m^2. We observe that the most permeable samples are the scoria clasts from the upper units of MTN; pumice samples from the Breccia Museo facies of CI are instead the least permeable. Non-Darcian (inertial) permeability follows the same trend as Darcian permeability. The first implication of this study is that porosity in alkaline as well as calc-alkaline magmas does not exert a first order control on permeability (e.g. the MTN samples are the most permeable but not the most porous). Second, sample geometry exhibits permeability anisotropy (higher permeability in the direction of vesicle elongation), suggesting stronger degassing in the vertical direction in the conduit. In addition, inertial effects are higher across the sample. As inertial effects are potentially generated by tortuosity (or tortuous vesicle paths), tortuosity is likely higher horizontally than vertically in the conduit. Finally, the measured CF permeability values overlap with those of rhyolitic pumice clasts from the Kos Plateau Tuff (Bouvet de Maisonneuve et al., 2009), together with CI one of the major Quaternary explosive eruptions of the Mediterranean region. This indicates that gas flow is strongly controlled by the geometry of the porous media, which is generated by the bubble dynamics during magma ascent. Therefore, permeability will depend on composition through the rheological properties

  19. Gelatin hydrolysates from farmed Giant catfish skin using alkaline proteases and its antioxidative function of simulated gastro-intestinal digestion.

    PubMed

    Ketnawa, Sunantha; Martínez-Alvarez, Oscar; Benjakul, Soottawat; Rawdkuen, Saroat

    2016-02-01

    This work aims to evaluate the ability of different alkaline proteases to prepare active gelatin hydrolysates. Fish skin gelatin was hydrolysed by visceral alkaline-proteases from Giant catfish, commercial trypsin, and Izyme AL®. All antioxidant activity indices of the hydrolysates increased with increasing degree of hydrolysis (P<0.05). The hydrolysates obtained with Izyme AL® and visceral alkaline-proteases showed the highest and lowest radical scavenging capacity, while prepared with commercial trypsin was the most effective in reducing ferric ions and showed the best metal chelating properties. The hydrolysate obtained with Izyme AL® showed the lowest iron reducing ability, but provided the highest average molecular weight (⩾ 7 kDa), followed by commercial trypsin (2.2 kDa) and visceral alkaline-proteases (1.75 kDa). After in vitro gastrointestinal digestion, the hydrolysates showed significant higher radical scavenging, reducing ferric ions and chelating activities. Gelatin hydrolysates, from fish skin, could serve as a potential source of functional food ingredients for health promotion.

  20. Gelatin hydrolysates from farmed Giant catfish skin using alkaline proteases and its antioxidative function of simulated gastro-intestinal digestion.

    PubMed

    Ketnawa, Sunantha; Martínez-Alvarez, Oscar; Benjakul, Soottawat; Rawdkuen, Saroat

    2016-02-01

    This work aims to evaluate the ability of different alkaline proteases to prepare active gelatin hydrolysates. Fish skin gelatin was hydrolysed by visceral alkaline-proteases from Giant catfish, commercial trypsin, and Izyme AL®. All antioxidant activity indices of the hydrolysates increased with increasing degree of hydrolysis (P<0.05). The hydrolysates obtained with Izyme AL® and visceral alkaline-proteases showed the highest and lowest radical scavenging capacity, while prepared with commercial trypsin was the most effective in reducing ferric ions and showed the best metal chelating properties. The hydrolysate obtained with Izyme AL® showed the lowest iron reducing ability, but provided the highest average molecular weight (⩾ 7 kDa), followed by commercial trypsin (2.2 kDa) and visceral alkaline-proteases (1.75 kDa). After in vitro gastrointestinal digestion, the hydrolysates showed significant higher radical scavenging, reducing ferric ions and chelating activities. Gelatin hydrolysates, from fish skin, could serve as a potential source of functional food ingredients for health promotion. PMID:26304317

  1. Reversible Hydrolysis Reaction with the Spore Photoproduct under Alkaline Conditions.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Surya; Lin, Gengjie; Li, Lei

    2016-09-16

    DNA lesions may reduce the electron density at the nucleobases, making them prone to further modifications upon the alkaline treatment. The dominant DNA photolesion found in UV-irradiated bacterial endospores is a thymine dimer, 5-thyminyl-5,6-dihydrothymine, i.e., the spore photoproduct (SP). Here we report a stepwise addition/elimination reaction in the SP hydrolysis product under strong basic conditions where a ureido group is added to the carboxyl moiety to form a cyclic amide, regenerating SP after eliminating a hydroxide ion. Direct amidation of carboxylic acids by reaction with amines in the presence of a catalyst is well documented; however, it is very rare for an amidation reaction to occur without activation. This uncatalyzed SP reverse reaction in aqueous solution is even more surprising because the carboxyl moiety is not a good electrophile due to the negative charge it carries. Examination of the base-catalyzed hydrolyses of two other saturated pyrimidine lesions, 5,6-dihydro-2'-deoxyuridine and pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone photoproduct, reveals that neither reaction is reversible even though all three hydrolysis reactions may share the same gem-diol intermediate. Therefore, the SP structure where the two thymine residues maintain a stacked conformation likely provides the needed framework enabling this highly unusual carboxyl addition/elimination reaction. PMID:27537985

  2. Tunable high performance cross-linked alkaline anion exchange membranes for fuel cell applications.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Nicholas J; Kostalik, Henry A; Clark, Timothy J; Mutolo, Paul F; Abruña, Héctor D; Coates, Geoffrey W

    2010-03-17

    Fuel cells are energy conversion devices that show great potential in numerous applications ranging from automobiles to portable electronics. However, further development of fuel cell components is necessary for them to become commercially viable. One component critical to their performance is the polymer electrolyte membrane, which is an ion conductive medium separating the two electrodes. While proton conducting membranes are well established (e.g., Nafion), hydroxide conducting membranes (alkaline anion exchange membranes, AAEMs) have been relatively unexplored by comparison. Operating under alkaline conditions offers significant efficiency benefits, especially for the oxygen reduction reaction; therefore, effective AAEMs could significantly advance fuel cell technologies. Here we demonstrate the use of ring-opening metathesis polymerization to generate new cross-linked membrane materials exhibiting high hydroxide ion conductivity and good mechanical properties. Cross-linking allows for increased ion incorporation, which, in turn supports high conductivities. This facile synthetic approach enables the preparation of cross-linked materials with the potential to meet the demands of hydrogen-powered fuel cells as well as direct methanol fuel cells. PMID:20178312

  3. Decay of the zincate concentration gradient at an alkaline zinc cathode after charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, H. E.; May, C. E.

    1979-01-01

    The transport of the zincate ion to the alkaline zinc cathode was studied by observing the decay of the zincate concentration gradient at a horizontal zinc cathode after charging. This decay was found to approximate first order kinetics as expected from a proposed boundary layer model. The concentrations were calculated from polarization voltages. The decay half life was shown to be a linear function of the thickness of porous zinc deposit on the cathode indicating a very rapid transport of zincate through porous zinc metal. The rapid transport is attributed to an electrochemical mechanism. From the linear dependence of the half life on the thickness the boundary layer thickness was found to be about 0.010 cm when the cathode was at the bottom of the cell. No significant dependence of the boundary layer thickness on the viscosity of electrolyte was observed. The data also indicated a relatively sharp transition between the diffusion and convection transport regions. When the cathode was at the top of the cell, the boundary layer thickness was found to be roughly 0.080 cm. The diffusion of zincate ion through asbestos submerged in alkaline electrolyte was shown to be comparable with that predicted from the bulk diffusion coefficient of the zincate ion in alkali.

  4. Tunable High Performance Cross-Linked Alkaline Anion Exchange Membranes for Fuel Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Nicholas J.; Kostalik, IV, Henry A.; Clark, Timothy J.; Mutolo, Paul F.; Abruña, Héctor D.; Coates, Geoffrey W.

    2010-02-23

    Fuel cells are energy conversion devices that show great potential in numerous applications ranging from automobiles to portable electronics. However, further development of fuel cell components is necessary for them to become commercially viable. One component critical to their performance is the polymer electrolyte membrane, which is an ion conductive medium separating the two electrodes. While proton conducting membranes are well established (e.g., Nafion), hydroxide conducting membranes (alkaline anion exchange membranes, AAEMs) have been relatively unexplored by comparison. Operating under alkaline conditions offers significant efficiency benefits, especially for the oxygen reduction reaction; therefore, effective AAEMs could significantly advance fuel cell technologies. Here we demonstrate the use of ring-opening metathesis polymerization to generate new cross-linked membrane materials exhibiting high hydroxide ion conductivity and good mechanical properties. Cross-linking allows for increased ion incorporation, which, in turn supports high conductivities. This facile synthetic approach enables the preparation of cross-linked materials with the potential to meet the demands of hydrogen-powered fuel cells as well as direct methanol fuel cells.

  5. Alkaline chemistry of transuranium elements and technetium and the treatment of alkaline radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, C.H.; Peretrukhin, V.F.; Shilov, V.P.; Pikaev, A.K.

    1995-05-01

    Goal of this survey is to generalize the known data on fundamental physical-chemical properties of TRUs and Tc, methods for their isolation, and to provide recommendations that will be useful for partitioning them from alkaline high-level wastes.

  6. Proposal for management and alkalinity transformation of bauxite residue in China.

    PubMed

    Xue, Shengguo; Kong, Xiangfeng; Zhu, Feng; Hartley, William; Li, Xiaofei; Li, Yiwei

    2016-07-01

    Bauxite residue is a hazardous solid waste produced during the production of alumina. Its high alkalinity is a potential threat to the environment which may disrupt the surrounding ecological balance of its disposal areas. China is one of the major global producers of alumina and bauxite residue, but differences in alkalinity and associated chemistry exist between residues from China and those from other countries. A detailed understanding of the chemistry of bauxite residue remains the key to improving its management, both in terms of minimizing environmental impacts and reducing its alkaline properties. The nature of bauxite residue and the chemistry required for its transformation are still poorly understood. This review focuses on various transformation processes generated from the Bayer process, sintering process, and combined Bayer-sintering process in China. Problems associated with transformation mechanisms, technical methods, and relative merits of these technologies are reviewed, while current knowledge gaps and research priorities are recommended. Future research should focus on transformation chemistry and its associated mechanisms and for the development of a clear and economic process to reduce alkalinity and soda in bauxite residue.

  7. [Contrastive analysis on soil alkalinization predicting models based on measured reflectance and TM image reflectance].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Xiong, Hei-Gang; Long, Tao; Lu, Wen-Juan

    2011-01-01

    Based on the monitored data of soil pH and measured Vis-NIR reflectance on spot in Qitai oasis alkalinized area in Xinjiang, as well as comparison of the relationship between measured reflectance and soil pH and the relationship between TM reflectance and soil pH, both of the reflectance multivariate linear regression models were built to evaluate soil alkalinization level, and the model accuracy of pH fitting was discussed with error inspection of post-sample. The results showed that there is a significant positive correlation between soil pH and reflectance. With pH rising the reflectance increased concurrently. So the alkalinization soil characterized by hardening had good spectral response characteristics. Both measured reflectance and TM image reflectance had good potential ability for change detection of the alkalinization soil. The pH predicting model of measured reflectance had higher accuracy and the major error was from different hardening state. If building model by TM reflectance directly, the accuracy of fitting was lower because of the vegetation information in image spectrum. With the vegetation factor removed with NDVI, the accuracy of TM predicting model was near the accuracy of measured reflectance predicting model, and both of the model levels were good. PMID:21428094

  8. Proposal for management and alkalinity transformation of bauxite residue in China.

    PubMed

    Xue, Shengguo; Kong, Xiangfeng; Zhu, Feng; Hartley, William; Li, Xiaofei; Li, Yiwei

    2016-07-01

    Bauxite residue is a hazardous solid waste produced during the production of alumina. Its high alkalinity is a potential threat to the environment which may disrupt the surrounding ecological balance of its disposal areas. China is one of the major global producers of alumina and bauxite residue, but differences in alkalinity and associated chemistry exist between residues from China and those from other countries. A detailed understanding of the chemistry of bauxite residue remains the key to improving its management, both in terms of minimizing environmental impacts and reducing its alkaline properties. The nature of bauxite residue and the chemistry required for its transformation are still poorly understood. This review focuses on various transformation processes generated from the Bayer process, sintering process, and combined Bayer-sintering process in China. Problems associated with transformation mechanisms, technical methods, and relative merits of these technologies are reviewed, while current knowledge gaps and research priorities are recommended. Future research should focus on transformation chemistry and its associated mechanisms and for the development of a clear and economic process to reduce alkalinity and soda in bauxite residue. PMID:27023808

  9. [Contrastive analysis on soil alkalinization predicting models based on measured reflectance and TM image reflectance].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Xiong, Hei-Gang; Long, Tao; Lu, Wen-Juan

    2011-01-01

    Based on the monitored data of soil pH and measured Vis-NIR reflectance on spot in Qitai oasis alkalinized area in Xinjiang, as well as comparison of the relationship between measured reflectance and soil pH and the relationship between TM reflectance and soil pH, both of the reflectance multivariate linear regression models were built to evaluate soil alkalinization level, and the model accuracy of pH fitting was discussed with error inspection of post-sample. The results showed that there is a significant positive correlation between soil pH and reflectance. With pH rising the reflectance increased concurrently. So the alkalinization soil characterized by hardening had good spectral response characteristics. Both measured reflectance and TM image reflectance had good potential ability for change detection of the alkalinization soil. The pH predicting model of measured reflectance had higher accuracy and the major error was from different hardening state. If building model by TM reflectance directly, the accuracy of fitting was lower because of the vegetation information in image spectrum. With the vegetation factor removed with NDVI, the accuracy of TM predicting model was near the accuracy of measured reflectance predicting model, and both of the model levels were good.

  10. Low serum alkaline phosphatase activity in Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Shaver, W A; Bhatt, H; Combes, B

    1986-01-01

    Low values for serum alkaline phosphatase activity were observed early in the course of two patients with Wilson's disease presenting with the combination of severe liver disease and Coombs' negative acute hemolytic anemia. A review of other cases of Wilson's disease revealed that 11 of 12 patients presenting with hemolytic anemia had values for serum alkaline phosphatase less than their respective sex- and age-adjusted mean values; in eight, serum alkaline phosphatase activity was less than the lower value for the normal range of the test. Low values for serum alkaline phosphatase were much less common in Wilson's disease patients with more chronic forms of presentation. Copper added in high concentration to serum in vitro did not have an important effect on serum alkaline phosphatase activity. The mechanism responsible for the decrease in serum alkaline phosphatase activity in patients is uncertain.

  11. Fluoride ion contamination in the groundwater of Mithi sub-district, the Thar Desert, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafique, Tahir; Naseem, Shahid; Bhanger, Muhammad I.; Usmani, Tanzil H.

    2008-11-01

    Groundwater samples were collected from various localities of Mithi sub-district of the Thar Desert of Pakistan and analysed for fluoride ion along with other chemical parameters. The area is mainly covered by sand dunes and kaolin/granite at variable depths. Results showed that collected water samples were severely contaminated by the presence of fluoride ion and most of the samples have higher concentration than prescribed WHO standards (1.5 mg/l) for drinking water. Fluoride ion concentrations ranged between 0.09 and 11.63 mg/l with mean and median values of 3.64 and 3.44 mg/l, respectively, in this area whereas, distribution pattern showed high concentrations in the vicinity of Islamkot and Mithi towns. The content of F- has also been correlated with other major ions found in the groundwater of the study area. The positive correlation of F- with Na+ and HCO3 - showed that the water with high Na+ and HCO3 - stabilizes F- ions in the groundwater of the Thar Desert. The pH versus F- plots signifies high fluoride concentration at higher pH values, implying that alkaline environment favours the replacement of exchangeable OH- with F- in the groundwater of Mithi area. The saturation indices (SI) of fluorite (CaF2) and calcite (CaCO3) in the groundwater samples showed that most of the samples are oversaturated with respect to calcite whereas majority of samples have been found under saturated with respect to fluorite. The log TDS and Na/Na+Ca ratio reflected supremacy of weathering of rocks, which promotes the availability of fluoride ions in the groundwater. Piper diagram has been used to classify the hydrofacies. In the cation triangle, all samples are Na-type, while the anion triangle reflects major dominance of Cl-type with a minor influence of HCO3 - and SO4 -.

  12. DNA DAMAGE QUANTITATION BY ALKALINE GEL ELECTROPHORESIS.

    SciTech Connect

    SUTHERLAND,B.M.; BENNETT,P.V.; SUTHERLAND, J.C.

    2004-03-24

    Physical and chemical agents in the environment, those used in clinical applications, or encountered during recreational exposures to sunlight, induce damages in DNA. Understanding the biological impact of these agents requires quantitation of the levels of such damages in laboratory test systems as well as in field or clinical samples. Alkaline gel electrophoresis provides a sensitive (down to {approx} a few lesions/5Mb), rapid method of direct quantitation of a wide variety of DNA damages in nanogram quantities of non-radioactive DNAs from laboratory, field, or clinical specimens, including higher plants and animals. This method stems from velocity sedimentation studies of DNA populations, and from the simple methods of agarose gel electrophoresis. Our laboratories have developed quantitative agarose gel methods, analytical descriptions of DNA migration during electrophoresis on agarose gels (1-6), and electronic imaging for accurate determinations of DNA mass (7-9). Although all these components improve sensitivity and throughput of large numbers of samples (7,8,10), a simple version using only standard molecular biology equipment allows routine analysis of DNA damages at moderate frequencies. We present here a description of the methods, as well as a brief description of the underlying principles, required for a simplified approach to quantitation of DNA damages by alkaline gel electrophoresis.

  13. Autonomous in situ measurements of seawater alkalinity.

    PubMed

    Spaulding, Reggie S; DeGrandpre, Michael D; Beck, James C; Hart, Robert D; Peterson, Brittany; De Carlo, Eric H; Drupp, Patrick S; Hammar, Terry R

    2014-08-19

    Total alkalinity (AT) is an important parameter for describing the marine inorganic carbon system and understanding the effects of atmospheric CO2 on the oceans. Measurements of AT are limited, however, because of the laborious process of collecting and analyzing samples. In this work we evaluate the performance of an autonomous instrument for high temporal resolution measurements of seawater AT. The Submersible Autonomous Moored Instrument for alkalinity (SAMI-alk) uses a novel tracer monitored titration method where a colorimetric pH indicator quantifies both pH and relative volumes of sample and titrant, circumventing the need for gravimetric or volumetric measurements. The SAMI-alk performance was validated in the laboratory and in situ during two field studies. Overall in situ accuracy was -2.2 ± 13.1 μmol kg(-1) (n = 86), on the basis of comparison to discrete samples. Precision on duplicate analyses of a carbonate standard was ±4.7 μmol kg(-1) (n = 22). This prototype instrument can measure in situ AT hourly for one month, limited by consumption of reagent and standard solutions.

  14. Discovery of Alkaline Volcanic Rocks on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McSween, H. Y.; Team, A. S.

    2006-05-01

    Based on remote sensing measurements and the compositions of martian meteorites, the surface of Mars is inferred to be dominated by subalkaline mafic volcanic rocks. However, the Spirit rover has recently discovered lavas of alkalic composition. Picritic (Adirondack class) basalts with high alkali and low silica contents were previously analyzed on the plains of Gusev Crater, and two new classes of dark, fine-grained, relatively unaltered volcanic rocks with distinctive thermal emission spectra have now been found as float and in a possible dike at high elevations in the Columbia Hills. Chemical analyses indicate that these rocks are mildly alkaline basalt and trachybasalt, respectively. Their mineralogy consists of Na- and K-rich feldspar(s), low- and high-Ca pyroxenes, ferroan olivine, Fe-Ti (and possibly Cr) oxides, phosphate, and possibly glass. Chemical compositions of these rocks lie along a MELTS-calculated liquid line of descent for Adirondack class basalt. Systematic changes in normative mineralogy are consistent with the calculated magmatic fractionation. We infer that Backstay- and Irvine-class magmas may have formed by low-pressure fractionation of primitive, oxidized Adirondack-class magmas and were possibly emplaced coevally with the plains basalts. The compositions of these rocks reveal that the Gusev magmatic province is alkaline, distinct from the subalkaline volcanic rocks thought to dominate most of the planet's surface. This discovery may have implications for the composition of the martian mantle source region and the conditions under which it melted.

  15. Advanced inorganic separators for alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A flexible, porous battery separator comprising a coating applied to a porous, flexible substrate is described. The coating comprises: (1) a thermoplastic rubber-based resin which is insoluble and unreactive in the alkaline electrolyte; (2) a polar organic plasticizer which is reactive with the alkaline electrolyte to produce a reaction product which contains a hydroxyl group and/or a carboxylic acid group; and (3) a mixture of polar particulate filler materials which are unreactive with the electrolyte, the mixture comprising at least one first filler material having a surface area of greater than 25 meters sq/gram, at least one second filler material having a surface area of 10 to 25 sq meters/gram, wherein the volume of the mixture of filler materials is less than 45% of the total volume of the fillers and the binder, the filler surface area per gram of binder is about 20 to 60 sq meters/gram, and the amount of plasticizer is sufficient to coat each filler particle. A method of forming the battery separator is also described.

  16. Autonomous in situ measurements of seawater alkalinity.

    PubMed

    Spaulding, Reggie S; DeGrandpre, Michael D; Beck, James C; Hart, Robert D; Peterson, Brittany; De Carlo, Eric H; Drupp, Patrick S; Hammar, Terry R

    2014-08-19

    Total alkalinity (AT) is an important parameter for describing the marine inorganic carbon system and understanding the effects of atmospheric CO2 on the oceans. Measurements of AT are limited, however, because of the laborious process of collecting and analyzing samples. In this work we evaluate the performance of an autonomous instrument for high temporal resolution measurements of seawater AT. The Submersible Autonomous Moored Instrument for alkalinity (SAMI-alk) uses a novel tracer monitored titration method where a colorimetric pH indicator quantifies both pH and relative volumes of sample and titrant, circumventing the need for gravimetric or volumetric measurements. The SAMI-alk performance was validated in the laboratory and in situ during two field studies. Overall in situ accuracy was -2.2 ± 13.1 μmol kg(-1) (n = 86), on the basis of comparison to discrete samples. Precision on duplicate analyses of a carbonate standard was ±4.7 μmol kg(-1) (n = 22). This prototype instrument can measure in situ AT hourly for one month, limited by consumption of reagent and standard solutions. PMID:25051401

  17. The effect of alkaline agents on retention of EOR chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, P.B.

    1991-07-01

    This report summarizes a literature survey on how alkaline agents reduce losses of surfactants and polymers in oil recovery by chemical injection. Data are reviewed for crude sulfonates, clean anionic surfactants, nonionic surfactants, and anionic and nonionic polymers. The role of mineral chemistry is briefly described. Specific effects of various alkaline anions are discussed. Investigations needed to improve the design of alkaline-surfactant-polymer floods are suggested. 62 refs., 28 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. Alkalinity and carbon budgets in the Mediterranean Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Copin-Montegut, C. )

    1993-12-01

    The carbon budget of the Mediterranean Sea has never been assessed. This paper reports the results of numerous measurements of pH and alkalinity in the spring of 1991. This concentration in inorganic carbon was deduced from the measurements. The existence of simple relationships between alkalinity and salinity or inorganic carbon and salinity made it possible to assess the budget of alkalinity and carbon in the Mediterranean Sea. 55 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Ion and neutral mass spectrometry of the isotopic composition of Titan's upper atmosphere: Implications for the atmospheric dynamics and photochemistry, and the evolution of the major species over geological time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandt, Kathleen E.

    The atmosphere of Titan, Saturn's largest moon, is an analog for the Earth's atmosphere in the distant past when life first emerged, and may also be used to study the distant future when the abundance of water in the atmosphere may be reduced by photochemical loss processes associated with climate change. This Dissertation investigates the evolution of Titan's atmosphere utilizing measurements of the stable isotope ratios in molecular nitrogen and methane. The Cassini Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) measures the composition of the ionosphere and neutral atmosphere as it flies through the atmosphere, approaching altitudes as low as 950 km above the surface. INMS measurements of the 14N/15N in N2 as a function of altitude for 30 Titan flybys are compared, using a basic diffusion model, to the Huygens Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) measurement of the 14N/15N in N2 on the surface. This comparison provides the input parameters needed to extrapolate the INMS measurements of 12C/13C in CH4 from the upper atmosphere to the surface where the ratio is within the range of expected primordial values. Although the 12C/13C at Titan is close to the primordial value, escape and photochemistry fractionate the isotope ratio over time. This suggests that methane has been present in Titan's atmosphere for no more than one billion years. A cross-calibration of INMS ion densities with the electron densities measured by the Cassini Radio Plasma Wave Spectrometer (RPWS) constrains the energy response of INMS and provides a new approach for determining the densities of ions in Titan's ionosphere. These ion densities validate an updated coupled Ion-Neutral-Thermal model that constrains the fractionation of the nitrogen isotopes due to photochemistry. Modeling the evolution of the nitrogen isotopes over geological times scales based on chemistry and escape limits the initial 14N/15N to a heavier ratio than the 14N/ 15N observed in the Earth's atmosphere. The methodologies

  20. Ion exchange polymers and method for making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, Warren H. (Inventor); Street, Kenneth W., Jr. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An ion exchange polymer comprised of an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal salt of a poly(carboxylic acid) in a poly(vinyl acetal) matrix is described. The polymer is made by treating a mixture made of poly(vinyl alcohol) and poly(acrylic acid) with a suitable aldehyde and an acid catalyst to cause acetalization with some cross-linking. The material is then subjected to an alkaline aqueous solution of an alkali metal salt or an alkali earth metal salt. All of the film forming and cross-linking steps can be carried out simultaneously, if desired.

  1. Performance of AA5052 alloy anode in alkaline ethylene glycol electrolyte with dicarboxylic acids additives for aluminium-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, DaPeng; Zhang, DaQuan; Lee, KangYong; Gao, LiXin

    2015-11-01

    Dicarboxylic acid compounds, i.e. succinic acid (SUA), adipic acid (ADA) and sebacic acid (SEA), are used as electrolyte additives in the alkaline ethylene glycol solution for AA5052 aluminium-air batteries. It shows that the addition of dicarboxylic acids lowers the hydrogen gas evolution rate of commercial AA5052 aluminium alloy anode. AA5052 aluminium alloy has wide potential window for electrochemical activity and better discharge performance in alkaline ethylene glycol solution containing dicarboxylic acid additives. ADA has the best inhibition effect for the self-corrosion of AA5052 anode among the three dicarboxylic acid additives. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) reveals that dicarboxylic acids and aluminium ions can form coordination complexes. Quantum chemical calculations shows that ADA has a smaller energy gap (ΔE, the energy difference between the lowest unoccupied orbital and the highest occupied orbital), indicating that ADA has the strongest interaction with aluminium ions.

  2. Alkaline stable C2-substituted imidazolium-based cross-linked anion exchange membranes for alkaline fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Bencai; Chu, Fuqiang; Ren, Yurong; Jia, Baoping; Yuan, Ningyi; Shang, Hui; Feng, Tianying; Zhu, Yuanyuan; Ding, Jianning

    2014-11-01

    Novel C2-substituted imidazolium-based cross-linked anion exchange membranes (AEMs) are prepared via irradiation with ultraviolet light cross-linking of styrene, acrylonitrile and 1,3-diallyl-2-methyl imidazolium bromine ([DAMIm][Br]), and followed by anion exchange with hydroxide ions. [DAMIm][Br] is synthesized and used both as crosslinker and hydrophilic phase. The ionic conductivity of the AEMs increases with increasing [DAMIm][Br] content due to the hydrophilic regions and the continuous hydrophilic polymeric networks formed in the membranes. The imidazolium-based cross-linked AEMs show excellent thermal stabilities, and the membrane which containing 30% mass fraction of [DAMIm][Br] shows ionic conductivity up to 2.0 × 10-2 S cm-1 and good long-term chemical stability in 1 M KOH solution. The results of this study suggest that the C2-substituted imidazolium-based cross-linked AEMs have good perspectives for alkaline fuel cell applications.

  3. Reactive oxygen species accelerate degradation of anion exchange membranes based on polyphenylene oxide in alkaline environments.

    PubMed

    Parrondo, Javier; Wang, Zhongyang; Jung, Min-Suk J; Ramani, Vijay

    2016-07-20

    Anion exchange membranes (AEM) based on polyphenylene oxide (PPO) suffered quaternary-ammonium-cation-site degradation in alkaline environments. Surprisingly, the degradation rate was considerably faster in the presence of molecular oxygen. We postulated that the AEM cation-site catalyzes the reduction of dioxygen by hydroxide ions to yield the superoxide anion radical and the highly reactive hydroxyl free radical. We substantiated our hypothesis by using a phosphorous-containing spin trap (5-diisopropoxy-phosphoryl-5-methyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide) to detect the adducts for both free radicals in situ using (31)P-NMR spectroscopy. PMID:27381009

  4. Theoretical dissociation energies for the alkali and alkaline-earth monofluorides and monochlorides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langhoff, S. R.; Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Partridge, H.

    1986-01-01

    Spectroscopic parameters are accurately determined for the alkali and alkaline-earth monofluorides and monochlorides by means of ab initio self-consistent field and correlated wave function calculations. Numerical Hartree-Fock calculations are performed on selected systems to ensure that the extended Slater basis sets employed are near the Hartree-Fock limit. Since the bonding is predominantly electrostatic in origin, a strong correlation exists between the dissociation energy (to ions) and the spectroscopic parameter r(e). By dissociating to the ionic limits, most of the differential correlation effects can be embedded in the accurate experimental electron affinities and ionization potentials.

  5. Magnetite solubility and phase stability in alkaline media at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemniak, S.E.; Jones, M.E.; Combs, K.E.S.

    1994-05-01

    Magnetite, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, is the dominant oxide constituent of the indigenous corrosion layers that form on iron base alloys in high purity, high temperature water. The apparent simultaneous stability of two distinct oxidation states of iron in this metal oxide is responsible for its unique solubility behavior. The present work was undertaken to extend the experimental and theoretical bases for estimating solubilities of an iron corrosion product (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Fe(OH){sub 2}) over a broader temperature range and in the presence of complexing, pH-controlling reagents. These results indicate that a surface layer of ferrous hydroxide controls magnetite solubility behavior at low temperatures in much the same manner as a surface layer of nickel(II) hydroxide was previously reported to control the low temperature solubility behavior of NiO. The importance of Fe(III) ion complexes implies not only that most previously-derived thermodynamic properties of the Fe(OH){sub 3}{sup {minus}} ion are incorrect, but that magnetite phase stability probably shifts to favor a sodium ferric hydroxyphosphate compound in alkaline sodium phosphate solutions at elevated temperatures. The test methodology involved pumping alkaline solutions of known composition through a bed of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} granules and analyzing the emerging solution for Fe. Two pH-controlling reagents were tested: sodium phosphate and ammonia. Equilibria for the following reactions were described in thermodynamic terms: (a) Fe(OH){sub 2}/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} dissolution and transformation, (b) Fe(II) and Fe(III) ion hydroxocomplex formation (hydrolysis), (c) Fe(II) ion amminocomplex formation, and (d) Fe(II) and Fe(III) ion phosphatocomplex formation. 36 refs.

  6. Dolomite Dissolution in Alkaline Cementious Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittermayr, Florian; Klammer, Dietmar; Köhler, Stephan; Dietzel, Martin

    2010-05-01

    Chemical alteration of concrete has gained much attention over the past years as many cases of deterioration due to sulphate attack, thaumasite formation (TSA) or alkali silica reactions (ASR) have been reported in various constructions (Schmidt et al, 2009). Much less is known about the so called alkali carbonate reaction (ACR). It is believed that dolomite aggregates can react with the alkalis from the cement, dissolve and form calcite and brucite (Katayama, 2004). Due to very low solubility of dolomite in alkaline solutions this reaction seems doubtful. In this study we are trying to gain new insides about the conditions that can lead to the dissolution of dolomite in concrete. Therefore we investigated concrete samples from Austrian tunnels that show partially dissolved dolomite aggregates. Petrological analysis such as microprobe, SEM and Raman spectroscopy as well as a hydrochemical analysis of interstitial solutions and ground water and modelling with PhreeqC (Parkhurst and Appelo, 1999) are carried out. In addition a series of batch experiments is set up. Modelling approaches by PhreeqC show a thermodynamically possibility in the alkaline range when additional Ca2+ in solution causes dolomite to become more and more undersaturated as calcite gets supersaturated. Interacting ground water is enriched in Ca2+and saturated with respect to gypsum as marine evaporites are found in situ rocks. Furthermore it is more likely that Portlandite (Ca(OH)2) plays a more important role than Na and K in the cement. Portlandite acts as an additional Ca2+ source and is much more abundant than the alkalies. Some interstitial solutions are dominated mainly by Na+ and SO42- and reach concentrations up to 30 g/l TDS. It is believed that solutions can even reach thenardite saturation as efflorescences are found on the tunnel walls. In consequence dolomite solubility increases with increasing ionic strength. pH > 11 further accelerate the process of dedolomitization by the removal

  7. Alkaline earth metal doped tin oxide as a novel oxygen storage material

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Qiang; Yin, Shu; Yoshida, Mizuki; Wu, Xiaoyong; Liu, Bin; Miura, Akira; Takei, Takahiro; Kumada, Nobuhiro; Sato, Tsugio

    2015-09-15

    Alkaline earth metal doped tin oxide (SnO{sub 2}) hollow nanospheres with a diameter of 50 nm have been synthesized successfully via a facial solvothermal route in a very simple system composed of only ethanol, acetic acid, SnCl{sub 4}·5H{sub 2}O and A(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·xH{sub 2}O (A = Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba). The synthesized undoped SnO{sub 2} and A-doped SnO{sub 2} hollow nanospheres were characterized by the oxygen storage capacity (OSC), X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and the Brunauer–Emmet–Teller (BET) technique. The OSC values of all samples were measured using thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis. The incorporation of alkaline earth metal ion into tin oxide greatly enhanced the thermal stability and OSC. Especially, Ba-doped SnO{sub 2} hollow nanospheres calcined at 1000 °C for 20 h with a BET surface area of 61 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} exhibited the considerably high OSC of 457 μmol-O g{sup −1} and good thermal stability. Alkaline earth metal doped tin oxide has the potential to be a novel oxygen storage material.

  8. Calixarene crown ether solvent composition and use thereof for extraction of cesium from alkaline waste solutions

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Sachleben, Richard A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Presley, Derek J.

    2001-01-01

    A solvent composition and corresponding method for extracting cesium (Cs) from aqueous neutral and alkaline solutions containing Cs and perhaps other competing metal ions is described. The method entails contacting an aqueous Cs-containing solution with a solvent consisting of a specific class of lipophilic calix[4]arene-crown ether extractants dissolved in a hydrocarbon-based diluent containing a specific class of alkyl-aromatic ether alcohols as modifiers. The cesium values are subsequently recovered from the extractant, and the solvent subsequently recycled, by contacting the Cs-containing organic solution with an aqueous stripping solution. This combined extraction and stripping method is especially useful as a process for removal of the radionuclide cesium-137 from highly alkaline waste solutions which are also very concentrated in sodium and potassium. No pre-treatment of the waste solution is necessary, and the cesium can be recovered using a safe and inexpensive stripping process using water, dilute (millimolar) acid solutions, or dilute (millimolar) salt solutions. An important application for this invention would be treatment of alkaline nuclear tank wastes. Alternatively, the invention could be applied to decontamination of acidic reprocessing wastes containing cesium-137.

  9. Spectroscopic studies of copper doped alkaline earth lead zinc phosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sastry, S. Sreehari; Rao, B. Rupa Venkateswara

    2014-02-01

    In this paper spectroscopic investigation of Cu2+ doped alkaline earth lead zinc phosphate glasses was done through the spectroscopic techniques like X-ray diffraction, Ultra Violet (UV) absorption Spectroscopy, Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR - X band), Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) and Raman Spectroscopy. Alkaline earth lead zinc phosphate glasses containing 0.1% copper oxide (CuO) were prepared by the melt quenching technique. Spectroscopic studies indicated that there is a greater possibility for the copper ions to exist in Cu2+ state in these glasses. The optical absorption spectra indicated that the absorption peak of Cu2+ is a function of composition. The maxima absorption peak was reported at 862 nm for strontium lead zinc phosphate glass. Bonding parameters were calculated for the optical and EPR data. All these spectral results indicated clearly that there are certain structural changes in the present glass system with different alkaline earth contents. The IR and Raman spectra noticed the breaking of the P-O-P bonds and creating more number of new P-O-Cu bonds.

  10. Membrane treatment of alkaline bleaching effluents from elementary chlorine free kraft softwood cellulose production.

    PubMed

    Oñate, Elizabeth; Rodríguez, Edgard; Bórquez, Rodrigo; Zaror, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports experimental results on the sequential use of ultrafiltration (UF), nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) to fractionate alkaline extraction bleaching effluents from kraft cellulose production. The aim was to unveil the way key pollutants are distributed when subjected to sequential UF/NF/RO membrane separation processes. Alkaline bleaching effluents were obtained from a local pinewood-based mill, featuring elementary chlorine free bleaching to produce high-brightness cellulose. The experimental system was based on a laboratory-scale membrane system, DSS LabStak® M20 Alfa Laval, using Alfa Laval UF and NF/RO membranes, operated at a constant transmembrane pressure (6 bar for UF membranes and 32 bar for NF/RO membranes), at 25°C. Results show that 78% chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total phenols, 82% adsorbable organic halogens (AOX) and 98% colour were retained by UF membranes which have molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) above 10 kDa. In all, 16% of original COD, total phenols and AOX, and the remaining 2% colour were retained by UF membranes within the 1 to 10 kDa MWCO range. Chloride ions were significantly present in all UF permeates, and RO was required to obtain a high-quality permeate with a view to water reuse. It is concluded that UF/NF/RO membranes offer a feasible option for water and chemicals recovery from alkaline bleaching effluents in kraft pulp production. PMID:25253193

  11. Formation of electroactive colloids via in situ coprecipitation under electric field: erbium chloride alkaline aqueous pseudocapacitor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kunfeng; Xue, Dongfeng

    2014-09-15

    For the first time, a new ErCl3 alkaline aqueous pseudocapacitor system was demonstrated by designing commercial ErCl3 salt electrode in alkaline aqueous electrolyte, where the materials synthesis and subsequently integrating into practical electrode structures occur at the same spatial and temporal scale. Highly electroactive ErOOH colloids were in-situ crystallized via electric field assisted chemical coprecipitation of ErCl3 in KOH aqueous electrolyte. These electroactive ErOOH colloids absorbed by carbon black and PVDF matrix were highly redox-reactive with higher cation utilization ratio of 86 % and specific capacitance values of 1811F/g, exceeding the one-electron redox theoretical capacitance (Er(3+)↔Er(2+)). We believe that additional two-electron (Er(2+)↔Er) or three-electron (Er(3+)↔Er) reactions can occur in our designed ErCl3 alkaline aqueous pseudocapacitor system. The specific electrode configuration with ErOOH colloids grown among the carbon black/PVDF matrix can create short ion diffusion and electron transfer length to enable the fast and reversible Faradaic reactions. This work shows promising for finding high-performance electrical energy storage systems via designing the colloidal state of electroactive cations with the utilization of in-situ crystallization route.

  12. Light Weight Design Nickel-Alkaline Cells Using Fiber Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickett, David F.; Willis, Bob; Britton, Doris; Saelens, Johan

    2005-01-01

    Using fiber electrode technology, currently produced by Bekaert Corporation (Bekaert), Electro Energy, Inc., (EEI) Mobile Energy Products Group (formerly, Eagle-Picher Technologies, LLC., Power Systems Department) in Colorado Springs, CO has demonstrated that it is feasible to manufacture flight weight nickel-hydrogen cells having about twice the specific energy (80 vs. 40 watt-hr/kg) as state-of-the-art nickel-hydrogen cells that are flown on geosynchronous communications satellites. Although lithium-ion battery technology has made large in-roads to replace the nickel-alkaline technology (nickel-cadmium, nickel-metal hydride), the technology offered here competes with lithium-ion weight and offers alternatives not present in the lithium-ion chemistry such as ability to undergo continuous overcharge, reversal on discharge and sustain rate capability sufficient to start automotive and aircraft engines at subzero temperatures. In development to date seven 50 ampere-hour nickel-hydrogen have been constructed, acceptance tested and briefly tested in a low earth orbit (LEO) cycle regime. The effort was jointly funded by Electro Energy, Inc. and NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH. Five of the seven cells have been shipped to NASA GRC for further cycle testing. Two of the cells experienced failure due to internal short circuits during initial cycle testing at EEL Destructive Physical Analysis (DPA) of one of the cells has shown the failure mode to be due to inadequate hydrogen catalyst electrodes that were not capacity balanced with the higher energy density nickel oxide electrodes. In the investigators opinion, rebuild of the cells using proper electrode balance would result in cells that could sustain over 30,000 cycles at moderate depths-of-discharge in a LEO regime or endure over 20 years of geosynchronous orbit (GEO) cycling while realizing a two-fold increase in specific energy for the battery or a 1.1 kg weight savings per 50 ampere-hour cell. Additional

  13. A TEST FOR DIFFUSIBLE IONS

    PubMed Central

    Northrop, John H.

    1924-01-01

    1. The Donnan equilibrium furnishes a test for the ionic nature of any diffusible substance, since the ratio of the concentration of any ion on the two sides of a membrane must be equal to the ratio of the concentrations of any other ion of the same sign and valence, whereas a non-ionic substance would be equally distributed on both sides. 2. The distribution of trypsin inside and outside of gelatin particles has been compared to the distribution of hydrogen and chloride ions under the same conditions. 3. The ratio of the trypsin concentration in the gelatin to the concentration in the outside liquid is equal to the ratio of the hydrogen ion under the same conditions and to the reciprocal of the chloride ion ratio. 4. This result was obtained between pH 2.0 and 10.2. At pH 10.2 the trypsin is equally distributed and on the akaline side of 10.2 the ratio is directly equal to the chloride ratio. 5. Trypsin is therefore a positive monovalent ion in solutions of pH 10 to 2. It is probably isoelectric at 10.2 and a monovalent negative ion on the alkaline side of 10.2 6. Trypsin must also be a strong base since there is no evidence of any undissociated form on the acid side of pH 10.2. PMID:19872075

  14. Polyvinyl alcohol membranes as alkaline battery separators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Gonzalez-Sanabria, O.; Manzo, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    Polyvinly alcohol (PVA) cross-linked with aldehyde reagents yields membranes that demonstrate properties that make them suitable for use as alkaline battery separators. Film properties can be controlled by the choice of cross-linker, cross-link density and the method of cross-linking. Three methods of cross-linking and their effects on film properties are discussed. Film properties can also be modified by using a copolymer of vinyl alcohol and acrylic acid as the base for the separator and cross-linking it similarly to the PVA. Fillers can be incorporated into the films to further modify film properties. Results of separator screening tests and cell tests for several variations of PBA films are discussed.

  15. Development of an alkaline fuel cell subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    A two task program was initiated to develop advanced fuel cell components which could be assembled into an alkaline power section for the Space Station Prototype (SSP) fuel cell subsystem. The first task was to establish a preliminary SSP power section design to be representative of the 200 cell Space Station power section. The second task was to conduct tooling and fabrication trials and fabrication of selected cell stack components. A lightweight, reliable cell stack design suitable for the SSP regenerative fuel cell power plant was completed. The design meets NASA's preliminary requirements for future multikilowatt Space Station missions. Cell stack component fabrication and tooling trials demonstrated cell components of the SSP stack design of the 1.0 sq ft area can be manufactured using techniques and methods previously evaluated and developed.

  16. Alkaline oxide conversion coatings for aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Buchheit, R.G.

    1996-02-01

    Three related conversion coating methods are described that are based on film formation which occurs when aluminum alloys are exposed to alkaline Li salt solutions. Representative examples of the processing methods, resulting coating structure, composition and morphology are presented. The corrosion resistance of these coatings to aerated 0.5 M NaCl solution has been evaluated as a function of total processing time using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). This evaluation shows that excellent corrosion resistance can be uniformly achieved using no more than 20 minutes of process time for 6061-T6. Using current methods a minimum of 80 minutes of process time is required to get marginally acceptable corrosion resistance for 2024-T3. Longer processing times are required to achieve uniformly good corrosion resistance.

  17. Intestinal alkaline phosphatase to treat necrotizing enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Biesterveld, Ben E.; Koehler, Shannon M.; Heinzerling, Nathan P.; Rentea, Rebecca M.; Fredrich, Katherine; Welak, Scott R.; Gourlay, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) activity is decreased in necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), and IAP supplementation prevents NEC development. It is not known if IAP given after NEC onset can reverse the course of the disease. We hypothesized that enteral IAP given after NEC induction would not reverse intestinal injury. Materials and methods NEC was induced in Sprague–Dawley pups by delivery preterm followed by formula feedings with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and hypoxia exposure and continued up to 4 d. IAP was added to feeds on day 2 until being sacrificed on day 4. NEC severity was scored based on hematoxylin and eosin-stained terminal ileum sections, and AP activity was measured using a colorimetric assay. IAP and interleukin-6 expression were measured using real time polymerase chain reaction. Results NEC pups' alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity was decreased to 0.18 U/mg compared with controls of 0.57 U/mg (P < 0.01). Discontinuation of LPS and hypoxia after 2 d increased AP activity to 0.36 U/mg (P < 0.01). IAP supplementation in matched groups did not impact total AP activity or expression. Discontinuing LPS and hypoxia after NEC onset improved intestinal injury scores to 1.14 compared with continued stressors, score 2.25 (P < 0.01). IAP supplementation decreased interleukin-6 expression two-fold (P < 0.05), though did not reverse NEC intestinal damage (P = 0.5). Conclusions This is the first work to demonstrate that removing the source of NEC improves intestinal damage and increases AP activity. When used as a rescue treatment, IAP decreased intestinal inflammation though did not impact injury making it likely that IAP is best used preventatively to those neonates at risk. PMID:25840489

  18. The Nickel(111)/Alkaline Electrolyte Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Kuilong; Chottiner, G. S.; Scherson, D. A.; Reid, Margaret A.

    1991-01-01

    The electrochemical properties of Ni (111) prepared and characterized in ultra high vacuum, UHV, by surface analytical techniques have been examined in alkaline media by cyclic voltammetry using an UHV-electrochemical cell transfer system designed and built in this laboratory. Prior to the transfer, the Ni(111) surfaces were exposed to saturation coverages of CO in UHV in an attempt to protect the surface from possible contamination with other gases during the transfer. Temperature Programmed Desorption, TPD, of CO-dosed Ni (111) surfaces displaying sharp c(4x2), LEED patterns, subsequently exposed to water-saturated Ar at atmospheric pressure in an auxiliary UHV compatible chamber and finally transferred back to the main UHV chamber, yielded CO2 and water as the only detectable products. This indicates that the CO-dosed surfaces react with water and/or bicarbonate and hydroxide as the most likely products. Based on the integration of the TPD peaks, the combined amounts of H2O and CO2 were found to be on the order of a single monolayer. The reacted c(4x2)CO/Ni(111) layer seems to protect the surface from undergoing spontaneous oxidation in strongly alkaline solutions. This was evidenced by the fact that the open circuit potential observed immediately after contact with deaerated 0.1 M KOH was about 0.38 V vs. DHE, drifting slightly towards more negative values prior to initiating the voltametric scans. The average ratio of the integrated charge obtained in the first positive linear scan in the range of 0.35 to 1.5 V vs. DHE (initiated at the open circuit potential) and the first (and subsequent) linear negative scans in the same solution yielded for various independent runs a value of 3.5 +/- 0.3. Coulometric analysis of the cyclic voltammetry curves indicate that the electrochemically formed oxyhydroxide layer involves a charge equivalent to 3.2 +/- 0.4 layers of Ni metal.

  19. Bipolar concept for alkaline fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gülzow, E.; Schulze, M.; Gerke, U.

    Alkaline fuel cell stacks are mostly build in monopolar configuration of the cells. At the German Aerospace Center a bipolar plate for alkaline fuel cells has been developed and characterized in a short stack. As a consequence of the sealing concept of the stack two different bipolar plate types are needed. Therefore, the number of cells can only vary by 2 if the end plates are not changed. The single cell as well as the short stack is characterized by various methods, e.g. V- i characteristics, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). As a result of the specific electrodes used the differential pressure between electrolyte and gas phase is limited to a few 10 mbar. At higher differential pressures gas crossover through the electrodes and electrolyte takes place with the result that the electrolyte may flood the flow fields. In contrast to PEFC, electrode supported by a metal net as conductor and mechanical support can be used in the AFC. Therefore, the structure of the flow field can be quite simple, this means flow fields with channels with large width and depth are possible. Consequently, the pressure loss over the flow field is very low. The single cell as well as the short stack was operated at overpressures of a few 10 mbar. The AFC can be operated without a compression but with a simple fan. The developed cell design is also used for the characterization of the fuel cell components like electrodes and diaphragms. The test facility for the single cell and for the stack is fully computer controlled and allows the variation of the operation conditions, e.g. flow of the electrolyte, hydrogen flow, oxygen or air flow and cell temperature.

  20. Formation of Nanocrystalline Surface of Cu-Sn Alloy Foam Electrochemically Produced for Li-Ion Battery Electrode.

    PubMed

    Ye, Bora; Kim, Sunjung

    2015-10-01

    Cu-Sn alloy foam is a promising electrode material for Li-ion batteries. In this study, Cu-Sn alloy foam was produced by diffusion-limited electrodeposition in alkaline electrolyte using polyurethane (PU) foam template. Our major concern is to form Cu-Sn alloy foam with nanocrystalline surface morphology by adjusting electrodeposition conditions such as deposition potential and metal ion concentration. Cu-Sn alloy layers comprising of nanoclusters such as nanospheres, nanoellipsoids, and nanoflakes were created depending on electrodeposition conditions. Larger surface area of nanocluster-interconnected Cu-Sn alloy layer was created when both Sn concentration and negative deposition potential were higher. After decomposing PU template thermally, Cu-Sn alloy foam of Cu, Cu6Sn5, and Cu3Sn phases was finally produced. PMID:26726491

  1. A mathematical model of the maximum power density attainable in an alkaline hydrogen/oxygen fuel cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, Michael C.; White, Ralph E.

    1991-01-01

    A mathematical model of a hydrogen/oxygen alkaline fuel cell is presented that can be used to predict the polarization behavior under various power loads. The major limitations to achieving high power densities are indicated and methods to increase the maximum attainable power density are suggested. The alkaline fuel cell model describes the phenomena occurring in the solid, liquid, and gaseous phases of the anode, separator, and cathode regions based on porous electrode theory applied to three phases. Fundamental equations of chemical engineering that describe conservation of mass and charge, species transport, and kinetic phenomena are used to develop the model by treating all phases as a homogeneous continuum.

  2. Nucleotide and amino acid sequences of human intestinal alkaline phosphatase: close homology to placental alkaline phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Henthorn, P.S.; Raducha, M.; Edwards, Y.H.; Weiss, M.J.; Slaughter, C.; Lafferty, M.A.; Harris, H.

    1987-03-01

    A cDNA clone for human adult intestinal alkaline phosphatase (ALP) (orthophosphoric-monoester phosphohydrolase (alkaline optimum); EC 3.1.3.1) was isolated from a lambdagt11 expression library. The cDNA insert of this clone is 2513 base pairs in length and contains an open reading frame that encodes a 528-amino acid polypeptide. This deduced polypeptide contains the first 40 amino acids of human intestinal ALP, as determined by direct protein sequencing. Intestinal ALP shows 86.5% amino acid identity to placental (type 1) ALP and 56.6% amino acid identity to liver/bone/kidney ALP. In the 3'-untranslated regions, intestinal and placental ALP cDNAs are 73.5% identical (excluding gaps). The evolution of this multigene enzyme family is discussed.

  3. Alkaline cleaner replacement for printed wiring board fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Goldammer, S.E.; Pemberton, S.E.; Tucker, D.R.

    1997-04-01

    A replacement alkaline cleaning chemistry was qualified for the copper cleaning process used to support printed wiring board fabrication. The copper cleaning process was used to prepare copper surfaces for enhancing the adhesion of dry film photopolymers (photoresists and solder masks) and acrylic adhesives. The alkaline chemistry was used to remove organic contaminates such as fingerprints.

  4. [Salt-alkaline tolerance of sorghum germplasm at seedling stage].

    PubMed

    Gao, Jian-Ming; Xia, Bu-Xian; Yuan, Qing-Hua; Luo, Feng; Han, Yun; Gui, Zhi; Pei, Zhong-You; Sun, Shou-Jun

    2012-05-01

    A sand culture experiment with Hoagland solution plus NaCl and Na2CO3 was conducted to study the responses of sorghum seedlings to salt-alkaline stress. An assessment method for identifying the salt-alkaline tolerance of sorghum at seedling stage was established, and the salt-alkaline tolerance of 66 sorghum genotypes was evaluated. At the salt concentrations 8.0-12.5 g x L(-1), there was a great difference in the salt-alkaline tolerance between tolerant genotype 'TS-185' and susceptive 'Tx-622B', suggesting that this range of salt concentrations was an appropriate one to evaluate the salt-alkaline tolerance of sorghum at seedling stage. At the salt concentrations 10.0 and 12.5 g x L(-1), there existed significant differences in the relative livability, relative fresh mass, and relative height among the 66 genotypes, indicating a great difference in the salt-alkaline tolerance among these genotypes. The genotype 'Sanchisan' was highly tolerant, 16 genotypes such as 'MN-2735' were tolerant, 32 genotypes such as 'EARLY HONEY' were mild tolerant, 16 genotypes such as 'Tx-622B' were susceptive, and genotype 'MN-4588' was highly susceptive to salt-alkaline stress. Most of the sorghum genotypes belonging to Sudangrasses possessed a high salt-alkaline tolerance, while the sorghum genotypes belonging to maintainer lines were in adverse. PMID:22919841

  5. Removal of plutonium and americium from alkaline waste solutions

    DOEpatents

    Schulz, Wallace W.

    1979-01-01

    High salt content, alkaline waste solutions containing plutonium and americium are contacted with a sodium titanate compound to effect removal of the plutonium and americium from the alkaline waste solution onto the sodium titanate and provide an effluent having a radiation level of less than 10 nCi per gram alpha emitters.

  6. The Chemistry of Paper Preservation Part 4. Alkaline Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Henry A.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the problem of the inherent instability of paper due to the presence of acids that catalyze the hydrolytic degradation of cellulose. Focuses on the chemistry involved in the sizing of both acid and alkaline papers and the types of fillers used. Discusses advantages and problems of alkaline papermaking. Contains 48 references. (JRH)

  7. Effect of microsolvation on hydrogen trapping potential of metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Ranjita; Bandaru, Sateesh; D'mello, Viola Caroline; Chattaraj, Pratim Kumar

    2013-03-01

    A thorough analysis is carried out to understand how the microsolvation affects the hydrogen adsorbing capacity of metal ions in the presence as well as absence of the counter ions. Calculations are done at different levels of theory by using different functionals and basis sets and also by using the BSSE correction. The Be2+ ion doped systems exhibit stronger interaction with the hydrogen molecule than the other metal doped systems. The extent of interaction is less affected by the method of computation. The reaction free energy values imply that adsorption on alkaline earth metal doped systems is spontaneous at room temperature. Interaction energies are favorable for hydrogen adsorption on the systems containing alkaline earth metal ions and the gravimetric density of adsorbed hydrogen molecule is more in those containing the alkali metal ions.

  8. Characterization of Actinides in Simulated Alkaline Tank Waste Sludges and Leachates

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, Kenneth L.

    2005-06-01

    Removal of waste-limiting components of sludge (Al, Cr, S, P) in underground tanks at Hanford by treatment with concentrated alkali has proven less efficacious for Al and Cr removal than had been hoped. More aggressive treatments of sludges, for example, contact with oxidants targeting Cr(III), have been tested in a limited number of samples and found to improve leaching efficiency for Cr. Oxidative alkaline leaching can be expected to have at best a secondary influence on the mobilization of Al. Our earlier explorations of Al leaching from sludge simulants indicated acidic and complexometric leaching can improve Al dissolution. Unfortunately, treatments of sludge samples with oxidative alkaline, acidic or complexing leachates produce conditions under which normally insoluble actinide ions (e.g., Am3+, Pu4+, Np4+) can be mobilized to the solution phase. Few experimental or meaningful theoretical studies of actinide chemistry in strongly alkaline, strongly oxidizing solutions have been completed. Unfortunately, extrapolation of the more abundant acid phase thermodynamic data to these radically different conditions provides limited reliable guidance for predicting actinide speciation in highly salted alkaline solutions. In this project, we are investigating the fundamental chemistry of actinides and important sludge components in sludge simulants and supernatants under representative oxidative leaching conditions. We are examining the potential impact of acidic or complexometric leaching with concurrent secondary separations on Al removal from sludges. Finally, a portion of our research is directed at the control of polyvalent anions (SO4=, CrO4=, PO43-) in waste streams destined for vitrification. Our primary objective is to provide adequate insight into actinide behavior under these conditions to enable prudent decision making as tank waste treatment protocols develop. We expect to identify those components of sludges that are likely to be problematic in the

  9. Salt- and alkaline-tolerance are linked in Acacia.

    PubMed

    Bui, Elisabeth N; Thornhill, Andrew; Miller, Joseph T

    2014-07-01

    Saline or alkaline soils present a strong stress on plants that together may be even more deleterious than alone. Australia's soils are old and contain large, sometimes overlapping, areas of high salt and alkalinity. Acacia and other Australian plant lineages have evolved in this stressful soil environment and present an opportunity to understand the evolution of salt and alkalinity tolerance. We investigate this evolution by predicting the average soil salinity and pH for 503 Acacia species and mapping the response onto a maximum-likelihood phylogeny. We find that salinity and alkalinity tolerance have evolved repeatedly and often together over 25 Ma of the Acacia radiation in Australia. Geographically restricted species are often tolerant of extreme conditions. Distantly related species are sympatric in the most extreme soil environments, suggesting lack of niche saturation. There is strong evidence that many Acacia have distributions affected by salinity and alkalinity and that preference is lineage specific.

  10. Transgenic petunia with the iron(III)-phytosiderophore transporter gene acquires tolerance to iron deficiency in alkaline environments.

    PubMed

    Murata, Yoshiko; Itoh, Yoshiyuki; Iwashita, Takashi; Namba, Kosuke

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for all plants. However, terrestrial plants often suffer from iron deficiency in alkaline soil due to its extremely low solubility. Alkaline soil accounts for about 30% of all cultivated ground in the world. Plants have evolved two distinct strategies, I and II, for iron uptake from the soil. Dicots and non-graminaceous monocots use Strategy I, which is primarily based on the reduction of iron(III) to iron(II) and the uptake of iron(II) by the iron-regulated transporter, IRT1. In contrast, graminaceous plants use Strategy II to efficiently acquire insoluble iron(III). Strategy II comprises the synthesis and secretion of iron-chelating phytosiderophores, such as mugineic acids and the Yellow Stripe 1 transporter proteins of the iron(III)-phytosiderophore complex. Barley, which exhibits the highest tolerance to iron deficiency in alkaline soil among graminaceous plants, utilizes mugineic acids and the specific iron(III)-mugineic acids transporter, HvYS1. In this study, we established the transgenic plant Petunia hybrida, which originally had only Strategy I, by introducing the HvYS1 transporter gene derived from barley. When the transgenic plants were grown hydroponically in media containing the iron(III)-2'-deoxymugineic acid complex, free 2'-deoxymugineic acid and its iron(III) complex were detected in the root extract of the transgenic plant by electrospray ionization-Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The growth of the transgenic petunia was significantly better than that of the control host in alkaline conditions. Consequently, the transgenic plant acquired a significantly enhanced tolerance to alkaline hydroponic media in the presence of the iron(III)-2'-deoxymugineic acid complex. Furthermore, the flower color of the transgenic plant deepened. The results showed that iron-phytosiderophore complexes and their transporters can potentially be utilized to overcome the worldwide iron uptake problems to diverse

  11. The Characterization of Eu2+-Doped Mixed Alkaline-Earth Iodide Scintillator Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, John S; Boatner, Lynn A; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Wisniewski, D.; Kolopus, James A; Cherepy, Nerine; Payne, Stephen A.

    2011-01-01

    The high-performance inorganic scintillator, SrI2:Eu2+, when activated with divalent europium in the concentration range of 3 to 6%, has shown great promise for use in applications that require high-energy-resolution gamma-ray detection. We have recently grown and tested crystals in which other alkaline-earth ions have been partially substituted for Sr ions. Specifically, europium-doped single crystals have been grown in which up to 30 at % of the strontium ions have been substituted for either by barium, magnesium, or calcium ions. In the case of the strontium iodide scintillator host, a material that is characterized by an orthorhombic crystal structure, there are three other column IIA elements that are obvious choices for investigations whose purpose is to realize potential improvements in the performance of SrI2:Eu2+-based scintillators via the replacement of strontium ions with either Mg2+, Ca2+, or Ba2+. Light yields of up to 81,400 photons/MeV with an associated energy resolution of 3.7% (fwhm for 662 keV gamma-rays) have been observed in the case of a partial substitution of Ba2+ for Sr2+. The measured decay times ranged from 1.1 to 2.0 s, while the peak emission wavelengths ranged from 432 to 438 nm.

  12. Determination of the zincate diffusion coefficient and its application to alkaline battery problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, C. E.; Kautz, Harold E.

    1978-01-01

    The diffusion coefficient for the zincate ion at 24 C was found to be 9.9 X 10 to the minus 7th power squared cm per sec + or - 30 percent in 45 percent potassium hydroxide and 1.4 x 10 to the minus 7 squared cm per sec + or - 25 percent in 40 percent sodium hydroxide. Comparison of these values with literature values at different potassium hydroxide concentrations show that the Stokes-Einstein equation is obeyed. The diffusion coefficient is characteristic of the zincate ion (not the cation) and independent of its concentration. Calculations with the measured value of the diffusion coefficient show that the zinc concentration in an alkaline zincate half cell becomes uniform throughout in tens of hours by diffusion alone. Diffusion equations are derived which are applicable to finite size chambers. Details and discussion of the experimental method are also given.

  13. Evolution of plasmonic and hybrid photoionization properties of alkaline earth metallofullerenes with the increasing fullerene size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Aakash; Chakraborty, Himadri

    2013-05-01

    A theoretical study of the photoionization of endohedral fullerenes with a selection of fullerene molecules of increasing size and with confined alkaline earth atoms like Be and Mg is carried out. The fullerene ion cores, comprised of C4+ ions, are smudged into a continuous jellium charge distribution, while the delocalized cloud of carbon valence electrons plus the electrons of the encaged atom are treated in the Kohn-Sham local density approximation (LDA). Only the spherical geometry is considered. The photoionization spectra are calculated by the time-dependent LDA that includes essential electron correlations. A systematic evolution of the mixing of valence atomic levels with states of fullerene single-electron bands is found along the sequence. This hybridization as a function of the fullerene size is seen to primarily define the properties of the subshell-differential ionization spectra both in the low energy plasmonic as well as the high energy oscillatory regions. Supported by NSF and DOE.

  14. A disposable alkaline phosphatase-based biosensor for vanadium chronoamperometric determination.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Gámez, Ana Lorena; Alonso-Lomillo, María Asunción; Domínguez-Renedo, Olga; Arcos-Martínez, María Julia

    2014-02-24

    A chronoamperometric method for vanadium ion determination, based on the inhibition of the enzyme alkaline phosphatase, is reported. Screen-printed carbon electrodes modified with gold nanoparticles were used as transducers for the immobilization of the enzyme. The enzymatic activity over 4-nitrophenyl phosphate sodium salt is affected by vanadium ions, which results in a decrease in the chronoamperometric current registered. The developed method has a detection limit of 0.39 ± 0.06 µM, a repeatability of 7.7% (n = 4) and a reproducibility of 8% (n = 3). A study of the possible interferences shows that the presence of Mo(VI), Cr(III), Ca(II) and W(VI), may affect vanadium determination at concentration higher than 1.0 mM. The method was successfully applied to the determination of vanadium in spiked tap water.

  15. Decay of the zincate concentration gradient at an alkaline zinc cathode after charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, H. E.; May, C. E.

    1979-01-01

    The study was carried out by observing the decay of the zincate concentration gradient at a horizontal zinc cathode after charging. This decay was found to approximate first order kinetics as expected from a proposed boundary layer model. The decay half life was shown to be a linear function of the thickness of porous zinc deposit on the cathode indicating a very rapid transport of zincate through porous zinc metal. The rapid transport is attributed to an electrochemical mechanism. The data also indicated a relatively sharp transition between the diffusion and convection transport regions. The diffusion of zincate ion through asbestos submerged in alkaline electrolyte was shown to be comparable with that predicted from the bulk diffusion coefficient of the zincate ion in alkali.

  16. Determination of the zincate diffusion coefficient and its application to alkaline battery problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, C. E.; Kautz, H. E.

    1978-01-01

    The diffusion coefficient for the zincate ion at 24 C was found to be 9.9 x 10 to the -7th power sq cm/sec + or - 30% in 45% potassium hydroxide and 1.4 x 10 to the -7th power sq cm/sec + or - 25% in 40% sodium hydroxide. Comparison of these values with literature values at different potassium hydroxide concentrations show that the Stokes-Einstein equation is obeyed. The diffusion coefficient is characteristic of the zincate ion (not the cation) and independent of its concentration. Calculations with the measured value of the diffusion coefficient show that the zinc concentration in an alkaline zincate half-cell becomes uniform throughout in tens of hours by diffusion alone. Diffusion equations are derived which are applicable to finite-size chambers. Details and discussion of the experimental method are also given.

  17. Reaction of montmorillonite in alkaline solution at 60 C, 90 C, 120 C and 180 C

    SciTech Connect

    Amaya, Takayuki; Shimojo, Mikio; Fujihara, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Katsuhiko

    1999-07-01

    The reaction of montmorillonite was investigated. Three kinds of bentonites with different montmorillonite composition were mixed with 0.3M NaOH solution and 0.3M Ca(OH){sub 2} slurry. They were immersed at 60 C, 90 C, 120 C, and 180 C for one month, three months and six months. The concentrations of the soluble ions were measured and the bentonites were analyzed quantitatively after the immersion. 50% of the montmorillonite was reacted within two weeks at greater than 90 C. Montmorillonite reacts less when mixed with Si-minerals. It extensively reacted in 0.3M Ca(OH){sub 2} slurry. These results suggest that the reaction mechanism of the montmorillonite in alkaline solution was dominantly Si dissolution, and would decrease by controlling the concentration of Si ion. The cement/bentonite system under Si saturated conditions is discussed.

  18. A Disposable Alkaline Phosphatase-Based Biosensor for Vanadium Chronoamperometric Determination

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Gámez, Ana Lorena; Alonso-Lomillo, María Asunción; Domínguez-Renedo, Olga; Arcos-Martínez, María Julia

    2014-01-01

    A chronoamperometric method for vanadium ion determination, based on the inhibition of the enzyme alkaline phosphatase, is reported. Screen-printed carbon electrodes modified with gold nanoparticles were used as transducers for the immobilization of the enzyme. The enzymatic activity over 4-nitrophenyl phosphate sodium salt is affected by vanadium ions, which results in a decrease in the chronoamperometric current registered. The developed method has a detection limit of 0.39 ± 0.06 μM, a repeatability of 7.7% (n = 4) and a reproducibility of 8% (n = 3). A study of the possible interferences shows that the presence of Mo(VI), Cr(III), Ca(II) and W(VI), may affect vanadium determination at concentration higher than 1.0 mM. The method was successfully applied to the determination of vanadium in spiked tap water. PMID:24569772

  19. Recycling of Ni(II)-citrate complexes using precipitation in alkaline solutions.

    PubMed

    Gyliene, O; Aikaite, J; Nivinskiene, O

    2004-06-18

    When the excess of Ni(II) ions as compared to citrate concentration is used both Ni(II) ions and citrate can be precipitated in alkaline solutions. The ratio between Ni(II) and citrate in the precipitate and completeness of citrate precipitation depends on the ratio between the Ni(II) and citrate concentrations in the initial solution and its pH. The data of chemical analysis, potentiometric titration, FT-IR as well as visible spectrophotometric investigations suggest that Ni(II) in the insoluble compound is bound with three -COO- groups and -OH group of the citrate. The insoluble compound also contains SO4(2-) and hydroxides. The treatment of this precipitate with H2SO4 enables to recover a soluble Ni(II)-citrate complex, which can be reused in practice, and to remove the excess of Ni(II) in the form of insoluble Ni(OH)2. PMID:15177751

  20. ALKALINE CARBONATE LEACHING PROCESS FOR URANIUM EXTRACTION

    DOEpatents

    Thunaes, A.; Brown, E.A.; Rabbitts, A.T.

    1957-11-12

    A process for the leaching of uranium from high carbonate ores is presented. According to the process, the ore is leached at a temperature of about 200 deg C and a pressure of about 200 p.s.i.g. with a solution containing alkali carbonate, alkali permanganate, and bicarbonate ion, the bicarbonate ion functionlng to prevent premature formation of alkali hydroxide and consequent precipitation of a diuranate. After the leaching is complete, the uranium present is recovered by precipitation with NaOH.

  1. Phosphatidylinositol anchor of HeLa cell alkaline phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Jemmerson, R.; Low, M.G.

    1987-09-08

    Alkaline phosphatase from cancer cells, HeLa TCRC-1, was biosynthetically labeled with either /sup 3/H-fatty acids or (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine as analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography of immunoprecipitated material. Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) released a substantial proportion of the /sup 3/H-fatty acid label from immunoaffinity-purified alkaline phosphatase but had no effect on the radioactivity of (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine-labeled material. PI-PLC also liberated catalytically active alkaline phosphatase from viable cells, and this could be selectively blocked by monoclonal antibodies to alkaline phosphatase. However, the alkaline phosphatase released from /sup 3/H-fatty acid labeled cells by PI-PLC was not radioactive. By contrast, treatment with bromelain removed both the /sup 3/H-fatty acid and the (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine label from purified alkaline phosphatase. Subtilisin was also able to remove the (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine label from the purified alkaline phosphatase. The /sup 3/H radioactivity in alkaline phosphatase purified from (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine-labeled cells comigrated with authentic (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine by anion-exchange chromatography after acid hydrolysis. The data suggest that the /sup 3/H-fatty acid and (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine are covalently attached to the carboxyl-terminal segment since bromelain and subtilisin both release alkaline phosphatase from the membrane by cleavage at that end of the polypeptide chain. The data are consistent with findings for other proteins recently shown to be anchored in the membrane through a glycosylphosphatidylinositol structure and indicate that a similar structure contributes to the membrane anchoring of alkaline phosphatase.

  2. It's Major! College Major Selection & Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byers, Jenny; Mattern, Krista D.; Shaw, Emily J.; Springall, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Presented at the College Board National Forum, October 26, 2011. Choosing a college major is challenging enough, without stopping to consider the impact it has on a student's college experience and career choice. To provide support during this major decision, participants in this session will develop strategies to facilitate students in making an…

  3. Chemical and biotic characteristics of two low-alkalinity lakes in northern Wisconsin: relation to atmospheric deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webster, K.E.; Eilers, J.M.; Wiener, J.G.; Glass, G.E.; Garrison, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    Synoptic surveys of water chemistry in north-central Wisconsin documented the presence of many low alkalinity lakes potentially sensitive to acid deposition. Furthermore, lake hydrologic type proved to be a key factor in determining lake sensitivity: the low alkalinity systems were predominately seepage lakes. To test this hypothesis and identify the controls on the chemistry of these low alkalinity systems, the authors initiated hydrologic, chemical, biological and limnological studies at Lakes Clara and Vandercook in 1980. The report summarizes the results of those studies (including previously published hydrologic results) conducted between 1981 and 1983. The major goals are to assess the sensitivity of the study lakes to acid deposition and to identify key processes controlling the acid-base chemistry of these software seepage lakes.

  4. X-Ray Structure Reveals a New Class and Provides Insight into Evolution of Alkaline Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Bihani, Subhash C.; Das, Amit; Nilgiriwala, Kayzad S.; Prashar, Vishal; Pirocchi, Michel; Apte, Shree Kumar; Ferrer, Jean-Luc; Hosur, Madhusoodan V.

    2011-01-01

    The alkaline phosphatase (AP) is a bi-metalloenzyme of potential applications in biotechnology and bioremediation, in which phosphate monoesters are nonspecifically hydrolysed under alkaline conditions to yield inorganic phosphate. The hydrolysis occurs through an enzyme intermediate in which the catalytic residue is phosphorylated. The reaction, which also requires a third metal ion, is proposed to proceed through a mechanism of in-line displacement involving a trigonal bipyramidal transition state. Stabilizing the transition state by bidentate hydrogen bonding has been suggested to be the reason for conservation of an arginine residue in the active site. We report here the first crystal structure of alkaline phosphatase purified from the bacterium Sphingomonas. sp. Strain BSAR-1 (SPAP). The crystal structure reveals many differences from other APs: 1) the catalytic residue is a threonine instead of serine, 2) there is no third metal ion binding pocket, and 3) the arginine residue forming bidentate hydrogen bonding is deleted in SPAP. A lysine and an aspargine residue, recruited together for the first time into the active site, bind the substrate phosphoryl group in a manner not observed before in any other AP. These and other structural features suggest that SPAP represents a new class of APs. Because of its direct contact with the substrate phosphoryl group, the lysine residue is proposed to play a significant role in catalysis. The structure is consistent with a mechanism of in-line displacement via a trigonal bipyramidal transition state. The structure provides important insights into evolutionary relationships between members of AP superfamily. PMID:21829507

  5. Determination of the nitrogen content of nitrocellulose by capillary electrophoresis after alkaline denitration.

    PubMed

    Alinat, Elodie; Delaunay, Nathalie; Costanza, Christine; Archer, Xavier; Gareil, Pierre

    2014-07-01

    Nitrocellulose (NC) is a nitrate cellulose ester polymer whose nitrogen content determines its physical and chemical properties and its industrial applications. For the first time, capillary electrophoresis (CE) was used to quantify nitrite and nitrate ions released after the alkaline hydrolysis of NC to determine its nitrogen content. This article focuses on the development and validation of the CE method adapted to the determination of these anions in basic matrices in 3 min total runtime. Molybdate anion was used as internal standard. The matrix effect in sodium hydroxide solution was statistically studied, demonstrating that no significant effect occurred in 0.5M sodium hydroxide solution. RSDs on normalized migration times (n=20) were 0.05% for both anions, while RSDs on normalized corrected areas (n=20) were 0.8% and 0.7% for nitrite and nitrate ions, respectively. The selectivity of the CE method was checked in the presence of 10 other anionic species potentially present in post-blast residues. Excellent linearities for normalized corrected areas (R(2)>0.999, residual standard deviations of ca 0.05) were obtained for both anions in the range 5-100 mg L(-1). Finally, the optimized CE method was successfully applied to calculate the denitration yields of two NC standards belonging to the non-explosive and explosive classes, and to determine the nitrogen content of a NC contained in a single-base gunpowder. CE, with its speed, low running costs, and simplicity of use, appears as a valuable alternative to ion chromatography for the nitrogen content determination of pure NCs and NC-based explosives, and more generally, for the determination of nitrite and nitrate ions in other highly alkaline matrices.

  6. Improved Performance of the Alkaline-Side CSEX Process for Cesium Extraction from Alkaline High-Level Waste Obtained by Characterization of the Effect of Surfactant Impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Delmau, L.H.

    1999-11-04

    Improved understanding and performance of the alkaline-side CSEX process has been obtained through the characterization of impurity effects that hinder complete stripping of cesium from the solvent. It is shown in this report that tests of the alkaline-side CSEX process conducted in the summer and fall of 1998 were complicated by the presence of common surfactant anions, undecyl- and dodecylsulfonate, as trace impurities in the two simulants tested. This conclusion was drawn from the results of a series of systematic extraction tests followed by a definitive identification by electrospray mass spectrometry (ES-MS). Based on this understanding, a straightforward preventative measure involving the addition of a lipophilic tertiary amine extractant at a small concentration to the solvent is proposed and demonstrated. As part of the task ''Fission Product Solvent Extraction'' supported by the Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program within the USDOE Office of Environmental Management, the alkaline-side CSEX process has been developed for removal of radio-cesium ({sup 137}Cs) from alkaline high-level wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site and Savannah River Site (SRS). As described in a previous report, tests conducted in Fiscal Year 1998 generally demonstrated performance meeting the requirements for cesium removal from the waste to be treated at the SRS. However, discrepancies in stripping behavior were shown to arise from unidentified differences ''in the batches of waste simulant employed for testing. Various effects such as solvent impurities, kinetics, contacting method, and counting method were eliminated as possible causes of the observed discrepancies. Tests in Fiscal Year 1999 reported herein confirmed the earlier suspicion that the simulants contained lipophilic anionic impurities. Extraction tests demonstrated that the impurities could be concentrated in the solvent, and by ES-MS in the negative-ion mode it was possible to

  7. Sporosarcina pasteurii use in extreme alkaline conditions for recycling solid industrial wastes.

    PubMed

    Cuzman, Oana A; Rescic, Silvia; Richter, Katharina; Wittig, Linda; Tiano, Piero

    2015-11-20

    The ureolytic bacteria are one of the most efficient organisms able to produce high amounts of carbonate that easily react with the free calcium ions from the environment. Sporosarcina pasteurii, a robust microbe in alkaline environments, was tested in this work for its potential use in an eco-cementation process that involves the biomediated calcite precipitation (BCP). Bacterial behavior in extreme alkaline environment (pH values of 9-13) was tested in controlled laboratory conditions and in the presence of solid industry wastes, such as Cement Kiln Dust (CKD) and Lime Kiln Dust (LKD), by evaluating the enzymatic activity and the calcite precipitation capacity. Grain consolidation potential of S. pasteurii was tested for one type of CKD mixed with ground granulated blast-furnace slag (GGBS), with possible bioclogging and biocementation applications. The results revealed the formation of stable biocalcite in the presence of CKD, with a performance depending on the pH-value and free calcium ion content. The BCP induced by S. pasteurii and the recycling of solid wastes, such as CKD with high lime content, is a promising way for different bioclogging and biocementation applications, with benefits in construction costs and reduction of environmental pollution. PMID:26376469

  8. Zn2Mg alkaline phosphatase in an early ptolemeic mummy.

    PubMed

    Kaup, Y; Baumer, U; Koller, J; Hedges, R E; Werner, H; Hartmann, H J; Etspüler, H; Weser, U

    1994-01-01

    Bone samples of a ptolemeic mummy have been employed to study the mode of conservation on the intactness of Zn2Mg alkaline phosphatase in both structure and catalytic activity. A protein of M(r) = 190 +/- 10 kDa being identical to the 200 kDa enzyme of fresh human bones was successfully isolated. Regardless of age 200 kDa protein bands and a distinct subunit at 60 kDa were seen in SDS-PAGE electrophoresis. The 200 kDa band was also monitored by activity staining. The specific activity was 120 mU/mg and 65% of the respective activity obtained in the identical preparation using fresh human tibia or rib. The enzymic activity was inhibited in the presence of 1,10-phenanthroline and L-homoarginine. Radiocarbon dating supported the assignment of the mummy to the early ptolemeic period. Among the many bactericidal and fungicidal components employed for mummification were aromatic alcohols, mono- and sesquiterpenes. Pistachio resin was the major balm resin used. The microbiological sterility of the bone surface was ascertained by independent bacterial and fungal examinations.

  9. Archaeal Communities in a Heterogeneous Hypersaline-Alkaline Soil

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Noya, Yendi E.; Valenzuela-Encinas, César; Sandoval-Yuriar, Alonso; Jiménez-Bueno, Norma G.; Marsch, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    In this study the archaeal communities in extreme saline-alkaline soils of the former lake Texcoco, Mexico, with electrolytic conductivities (