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Sample records for alkaliphilic taxa nitrogen

  1. Alkaliphiles: Some Applications of Their Products for Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Horikoshi, Koki

    1999-01-01

    The term “alkaliphile” is used for microorganisms that grow optimally or very well at pH values above 9 but cannot grow or grow only slowly at the near-neutral pH value of 6.5. Alkaliphiles include prokaryotes, eukaryotes, and archaea. Many different taxa are represented among the alkaliphiles, and some of these have been proposed as new taxa. Alkaliphiles can be isolated from normal environments such as garden soil, although viable counts of alkaliphiles are higher in samples from alkaline environments. The cell surface may play a key role in keeping the intracellular pH value in the range between 7 and 8.5, allowing alkaliphiles to thrive in alkaline environments, although adaptation mechanisms have not yet been clarified. Alkaliphiles have made a great impact in industrial applications. Biological detergents contain alkaline enzymes, such as alkaline cellulases and/or alkaline proteases, that have been produced from alkaliphiles. The current proportion of total world enzyme production destined for the laundry detergent market exceeds 60%. Another important application is the industrial production of cyclodextrin by alkaline cyclomaltodextrin glucanotransferase. This enzyme has reduced the production cost and paved the way for cyclodextrin use in large quantities in foodstuffs, chemicals, and pharmaceuticals. It has also been reported that alkali-treated wood pulp could be biologically bleached by xylanases produced by alkaliphiles. Other applications of various aspects of alkaliphiles are also discussed. PMID:10585964

  2. Needle longevity, photosynthetic rate and nitrogen concentration of eight spruce taxa planted in northern Japan.

    PubMed

    Kayama, Masazumi; Kitaoka, Satoshi; Wang, Wenjie; Choi, Dongsu; Koike, Takayoshi

    2007-11-01

    Growth characteristics of Picea glehnii Masters, P. jezoensis (Sieb. et Zucc) Carr., P. jezoensis var. hondoensis (Mayr) Rehder and P. shirasawae Hayashi from Japan, P. abies (L.) Karst. from Europe and P. glauca Voss, P. mariana Britt., Sterns and Pogg. and P. rubens Sarg. from North America were compared. The trees were grown in similar conditions at the Tomakomai Experimental Forest of Hokkaido University in northern Japan. Tree growth, needle biomass, longevity, photosynthetic rate, nitrogen concentration and specific leaf area (SLA) were measured, and photosynthetic nitrogen-use efficiency was calculated. Picea jezoensis, P. jezoensis var. hondoensis, P. abies and P. glauca had high growth rates, high photosynthetic rates in young needles, high needle nitrogen concentrations and short needle life spans. In contrast, P. glehnii, P. shirasawae, P. mariana and P. rubens had low growth and photosynthetic rates, low needle nitrogen concentrations, long needle life spans and maintained a high photosynthetic nitrogen-use efficiency in older needles. Examination of relationships between several growth parameters of the eight taxa revealed positive correlations between SLA and mass-based photosynthetic rate and between SLA and mass-based nitrogen concentration, whereas mass-based photosynthetic rate and mass-based nitrogen concentration were negatively correlated with needle longevity. The species differed greatly in growth characteristics despite being grown in similar conditions.

  3. Ribosomal RNA gene detection and targeted culture of novel nitrogen-responsive fungal taxa from temperate pine forest soil.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Cedar Nelson; Torres-Cruz, Terry; Billingsley Tobias, Terri L; Al-Matruk, Maryam; Porras-Alfaro, Andrea; Kuske, Cheryl R

    2016-09-12

    Soil fungal communities are responsible for carbon and nitrogen (N) cycling. The high complexity of the soil fungal community and the high proportion of taxonomically unidentifiable sequences confound ecological interpretations in field studies because physiological information is lacking for many organisms known only by their rRNA sequences. This situation forces experimental comparisons to be made at broader taxonomic racks where functions become difficult to infer. The objective of this study was to determine OTU (operational taxonomic units) level responses of the soil fungal community to N enrichment in a temperate pine forest experiment and to use the sequencing data to guide culture efforts of novel N-responsive fungal taxa. Replicate samples from four soil horizons (up to 10 cm depth) were obtained from ambient, enriched CO2 and N-fertilization plots. Through a fungal large subunit rRNA gene (LSU) sequencing survey, we identified two novel fungal clades that were abundant in our soil sampling (representing up to 27% of the sequences in some samples) and responsive to changes in soil N. The two N-responsive taxa with no predicted taxonomic association were targeted for isolation and culturing from specific soil samples where their sequences were abundant. Representatives of both OTUs were successfully cultured using a filtration approach. One taxon (OTU6) was most closely related to Saccharomycotina; the second taxon (OTU69) was most closely related to Mucoromycotina. Both taxa likely represent novel species. This study shows how observation of specific OTUs level responses to altered N status in a large rRNA gene field survey provided the impetus to design targeted culture approaches for isolation of novel N-responsive fungal taxa.

  4. The Respiratory Chain of Alkaliphilic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Terry Ann Krulwich

    2008-01-29

    Alkaliphilic bacteria that grow at extremely high pH are confronted by particular bioenergetic problems in carrying out oxidative phosphorylation. This project focused on the properties and adaptations of the respiratory chain. The respiratory chain as a whole, the redox poises of its components and several individual complexes of the respiratory chain of alkaliphilic Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4 have been characterized as part of this project and, importantly, this project has helped support the development of genetic tools that make B. pseudofirmus OF4 the most genetically tractable and, hence, most bioenergetically characterized extreme alkaliphile. Evidence has been obtained for a pivotal role of the cca3-type terminal oxidase in oxidative phosphorylation, especially at high pH and motifs that may be relevant to that special role have been identified.

  5. Natural abundance (δ¹⁵N) indicates shifts in nitrogen relations of woody taxa along a savanna-woodland continental rainfall gradient.

    PubMed

    Soper, Fiona M; Richards, Anna E; Siddique, Ilyas; Aidar, Marcos P M; Cook, Garry D; Hutley, Lindsay B; Robinson, Nicole; Schmidt, Susanne

    2015-05-01

    Water and nitrogen (N) interact to influence soil N cycling and plant N acquisition. We studied indices of soil N availability and acquisition by woody plant taxa with distinct nutritional specialisations along a north Australian rainfall gradient from monsoonal savanna (1,600-1,300 mm annual rainfall) to semi-arid woodland (600-250 mm). Aridity resulted in increased 'openness' of N cycling, indicated by increasing δ(15)N(soil) and nitrate:ammonium ratios, as plant communities transitioned from N to water limitation. In this context, we tested the hypothesis that δ(15)N(root) xylem sap provides a more direct measure of plant N acquisition than δ(15)N(foliage). We found highly variable offsets between δ(15)N(foliage) and δ(15)N(root) xylem sap, both between taxa at a single site (1.3-3.4 ‰) and within taxa across sites (0.8-3.4 ‰). As a result, δ(15)N(foliage) overlapped between N-fixing Acacia and non-fixing Eucalyptus/Corymbia and could not be used to reliably identify biological N fixation (BNF). However, Acacia δ(15)N(root) xylem sap indicated a decline in BNF with aridity corroborated by absence of root nodules and increasing xylem sap nitrate concentrations and consistent with shifting resource limitation. Acacia dominance at arid sites may be attributed to flexibility in N acquisition rather than BNF capacity. δ(15)N(root) xylem sap showed no evidence of shifting N acquisition in non-mycorrhizal Hakea/Grevillea and indicated only minor shifts in Eucalyptus/Corymbia consistent with enrichment of δ(15)N(soil) and/or decreasing mycorrhizal colonisation with aridity. We propose that δ(15)N(root) xylem sap is a more direct indicator of N source than δ(15)N(foliage), with calibration required before it could be applied to quantify BNF.

  6. Controlling cyanobacterial blooms in hypertrophic Lake Taihu, China: will nitrogen reductions cause replacement of non-N2 fixing by N2 fixing taxa?

    PubMed

    Paerl, Hans W; Xu, Hai; Hall, Nathan S; Zhu, Guangwei; Qin, Boqiang; Wu, Yali; Rossignol, Karen L; Dong, Linghan; McCarthy, Mark J; Joyner, Alan R

    2014-01-01

    Excessive anthropogenic nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) inputs have caused an alarming increase in harmful cyanobacterial blooms, threatening sustainability of lakes and reservoirs worldwide. Hypertrophic Lake Taihu, China's third largest freshwater lake, typifies this predicament, with toxic blooms of the non-N2 fixing cyanobacteria Microcystis spp. dominating from spring through fall. Previous studies indicate N and P reductions are needed to reduce bloom magnitude and duration. However, N reductions may encourage replacement of non-N2 fixing with N2 fixing cyanobacteria. This potentially counterproductive scenario was evaluated using replicate, large (1000 L), in-lake mesocosms during summer bloom periods. N+P additions led to maximum phytoplankton production. Phosphorus enrichment, which promoted N limitation, resulted in increases in N2 fixing taxa (Anabaena spp.), but it did not lead to significant replacement of non-N2 fixing with N2 fixing cyanobacteria, and N2 fixation rates remained ecologically insignificant. Furthermore, P enrichment failed to increase phytoplankton production relative to controls, indicating that N was the most limiting nutrient throughout this period. We propose that Microcystis spp. and other non-N2 fixing genera can maintain dominance in this shallow, highly turbid, nutrient-enriched lake by outcompeting N2 fixing taxa for existing sources of N and P stored and cycled in the lake. To bring Taihu and other hypertrophic systems below the bloom threshold, both N and P reductions will be needed until the legacy of high N and P loading and sediment nutrient storage in these systems is depleted. At that point, a more exclusive focus on P reductions may be feasible.

  7. Controlling Cyanobacterial Blooms in Hypertrophic Lake Taihu, China: Will Nitrogen Reductions Cause Replacement of Non-N2 Fixing by N2 Fixing Taxa?

    PubMed Central

    Paerl, Hans W.; Xu, Hai; Hall, Nathan S.; Zhu, Guangwei; Qin, Boqiang; Wu, Yali; Rossignol, Karen L.; Dong, Linghan; McCarthy, Mark J.; Joyner, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Excessive anthropogenic nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) inputs have caused an alarming increase in harmful cyanobacterial blooms, threatening sustainability of lakes and reservoirs worldwide. Hypertrophic Lake Taihu, China’s third largest freshwater lake, typifies this predicament, with toxic blooms of the non-N2 fixing cyanobacteria Microcystis spp. dominating from spring through fall. Previous studies indicate N and P reductions are needed to reduce bloom magnitude and duration. However, N reductions may encourage replacement of non-N2 fixing with N2 fixing cyanobacteria. This potentially counterproductive scenario was evaluated using replicate, large (1000 L), in-lake mesocosms during summer bloom periods. N+P additions led to maximum phytoplankton production. Phosphorus enrichment, which promoted N limitation, resulted in increases in N2 fixing taxa (Anabaena spp.), but it did not lead to significant replacement of non-N2 fixing with N2 fixing cyanobacteria, and N2 fixation rates remained ecologically insignificant. Furthermore, P enrichment failed to increase phytoplankton production relative to controls, indicating that N was the most limiting nutrient throughout this period. We propose that Microcystis spp. and other non-N2 fixing genera can maintain dominance in this shallow, highly turbid, nutrient-enriched lake by outcompeting N2 fixing taxa for existing sources of N and P stored and cycled in the lake. To bring Taihu and other hypertrophic systems below the bloom threshold, both N and P reductions will be needed until the legacy of high N and P loading and sediment nutrient storage in these systems is depleted. At that point, a more exclusive focus on P reductions may be feasible. PMID:25405474

  8. Some unique features of alkaliphilic anaerobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roof, Erin; Pikuta, Elena; Otto, Christopher; Williams, George; Hoover, Richard

    2013-09-01

    This article explores two topics involving the examination of four strains of alkaliphilic anaerobes. The first topic was dedicated to detection of the ability of microorganisms to metabolize alternative chirality substrates. Two saccharolytic anaerobic bacteria were chosen for the first experiment: Anaerovirgula multivorans strain SCAT, which is gram positive and spore-forming; and Spirochaeta dissipatitropha, strain ASpC2T, which is gram negative. It was found that both checked sugarlytics were able to use L-ribose and L-arabinose, as growth substrates. The second part was concerned of study a chemolithotrophy in two halo-alkaliphilic sulfate reducing bacteria: Desulfonatornum thiodismutans strain MLF1T and Desulfonatronum lacustre strain Z-7951T. The experiments with lithotrophs had demonstrated that strain MLF1T was capable to grow without any organic source of carbon, while strain Z-7951T had required at least 2 mM sodium acetate for growth. Anaerobic technique was used for preparation of the growth media and maintenance of these bacterial cultures. Standard methods for Gram, spore, and flagella staining were applied for characterization of cytomorphology. In this article, the results of the experiments performed on cytological, physiological, and biochemical levels are presented and discussed.

  9. Decolorization of azo dyes (Direct Blue 151 and Direct Red 31) by moderately alkaliphilic bacterial consortium.

    PubMed

    Lalnunhlimi, Sylvine; Krishnaswamy, Veenagayathri

    2016-01-01

    Removal of synthetic dyes is one of the main challenges before releasing the wastes discharged by textile industries. Biodegradation of azo dyes by alkaliphilic bacterial consortium is one of the environmental-friendly methods used for the removal of dyes from textile effluents. Hence, this study presents isolation of a bacterial consortium from soil samples of saline environment and its use for the decolorization of azo dyes, Direct Blue 151 (DB 151) and Direct Red 31 (DR 31). The decolorization of azo dyes was studied at various concentrations (100-300mg/L). The bacterial consortium, when subjected to an application of 200mg/L of the dyes, decolorized DB 151 and DR 31 by 97.57% and 95.25% respectively, within 5 days. The growth of the bacterial consortium was optimized with pH, temperature, and carbon and nitrogen sources; and decolorization of azo dyes was analyzed. In this study, the decolorization efficiency of mixed dyes was improved with yeast extract and sucrose, which were used as nitrogen and carbon sources, respectively. Such an alkaliphilic bacterial consortium can be used in the removal of azo dyes from contaminated saline environment.

  10. Decolorization of azo dyes (Direct Blue 151 and Direct Red 31) by moderately alkaliphilic bacterial consortium

    PubMed Central

    Lalnunhlimi, Sylvine; Krishnaswamy, Veenagayathri

    2016-01-01

    Removal of synthetic dyes is one of the main challenges before releasing the wastes discharged by textile industries. Biodegradation of azo dyes by alkaliphilic bacterial consortium is one of the environmental-friendly methods used for the removal of dyes from textile effluents. Hence, this study presents isolation of a bacterial consortium from soil samples of saline environment and its use for the decolorization of azo dyes, Direct Blue 151 (DB 151) and Direct Red 31 (DR 31). The decolorization of azo dyes was studied at various concentrations (100–300 mg/L). The bacterial consortium, when subjected to an application of 200 mg/L of the dyes, decolorized DB 151 and DR 31 by 97.57% and 95.25% respectively, within 5 days. The growth of the bacterial consortium was optimized with pH, temperature, and carbon and nitrogen sources; and decolorization of azo dyes was analyzed. In this study, the decolorization efficiency of mixed dyes was improved with yeast extract and sucrose, which were used as nitrogen and carbon sources, respectively. Such an alkaliphilic bacterial consortium can be used in the removal of azo dyes from contaminated saline environment. PMID:26887225

  11. Contribution of intracellular negative ion capacity to Donnan effect across the membrane in alkaliphilic Bacillus spp.

    PubMed

    Goto, Toshitaka; Hirabayashi, Toshinao; Morimoto, Hajime; Yamazaki, Koji; Inoue, Norio; Matsuyama, Hidetoshi; Yumoto, Isao

    2016-02-01

    To elucidate the energy production mechanism of alkaliphiles, the relationship between the H(+) extrusion rate by the respiratory chain and the corresponding ATP synthesis rate was determined in the facultative alkaliphile Bacillus cohnii YN-2000 and compared with those in the obligate alkaliphile Bacillus clarkii DSM 8720(T) and the neutralophile Bacillus subtilis IAM 1026. Under high aeration condition, much higher ATP synthesis rates and larger Δψ in the alkaliphilic Bacillus spp. grown at pH 10 than those in the neutralophilic B. subtilis grown at pH 7 were observed. This high ATP productivity could be attributed to the larger Δψ in alkaliphiles than in B. subtilis because the H(+) extrusion rate in alkaliphiles cannot account for the high ATP productivity. However, the large Δψ in the alkaliphiles could not be explained only by the H(+) translocation rate in the respiratory chain in alkaliphiles. There is a possibility that the Donnan effect across the membrane has the potential to contribute to the large Δψ. To estimate the contribution of the Donnan effect to the large Δψ in alkaliphilic Bacillus spp. grown at pH 10, intracellular negative ion capacity was examined. The intracellular negative ion capacities in alkaliphiles grown at pH 10 under high aeration condition corresponding to their intracellular pH (pH 8.1) were much higher than those in alkaliphiles grown under low aeration condition. A proportional relationship is revealed between the negative ion capacity and Δψ in alkaliphiles grown under different aeration conditions. This relationship strongly suggests that the intracellular negative ion capacity contributes to the formation of Δψ through the Donnan effect in alkaliphilic Bacillus spp. grown at pH 10.

  12. Metabolic versatility of halotolerant and alkaliphilic strains of Halomonas isolated from alkaline black liquor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunyu; Wang, Zhe; Li, Yang; Niu, Yu; Du, Miaofen; He, Xiaofei; Ma, Cuiqing; Tang, Hongzhi; Xu, Ping

    2010-09-01

    Wheat straw black liquor is a notorious pulp mill wastewater with very high pH and pollution load. Two halotolerant and alkaliphilic bacteria, designated as Halomonas sp. 19-A and Y2, were isolated from wheat straw black liquor and shown to be able to use guaiacol, vanillin, dibenzo-p-dioxin, biphenyl and fluorene, as sole carbon and carbazole as sole carbon and nitrogen source at pH 9.5 and in the presence of 10% NaCl. The two strains produced carboxymethylcellulase (CMCase), xylanase, lipase, amylase, and pullulanase. High activities of CMCase, xylanase, and amylase were observed at pH 5.0-11.0 and NaCl concentrations of 0-15%. The metabolic versatility of these Halomonas strains even under extreme pH and salinity conditions makes them promising agents for bioremediation and industrial processes.

  13. Thermophilic and alkaliphilic Actinobacteria: biology and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Shivlata, L; Satyanarayana, Tulasi

    2015-01-01

    Microbes belonging to the phylum Actinobacteria are prolific sources of antibiotics, clinically useful bioactive compounds and industrially important enzymes. The focus of the current review is on the diversity and potential applications of thermophilic and alkaliphilic actinobacteria, which are highly diverse in their taxonomy and morphology with a variety of adaptations for surviving and thriving in hostile environments. The specific metabolic pathways in these actinobacteria are activated for elaborating pharmaceutically, agriculturally, and biotechnologically relevant biomolecules/bioactive compounds, which find multifarious applications.

  14. Industrial applications of alkaliphiles and their enzymes--past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Fujinami, Shun; Fujisawa, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    Alkaliphiles are microorganisms that can grow in alkaline environments, i.e. pH >9.0. Their enzymes, especially extracellular enzymes, are able to function in their catalytic activities under high alkaline pH values because of their stability under these conditions. Proteases, protein degrading enzymes, are one of the most produced enzymes in industry. Among proteases, alkaline proteases, which are added to some detergents, are the most produced. Other alkaline enzymes, e.g. alkaline cellulases, alkaline amylases, and alkaline lipases, are also adjuncts to detergents for improving cleaning efficiency. Alkaline enzymes often show activities in a broad pH range, thermostability, and tolerance to oxidants compared to neutral enzymes. Alkaliphilic Bacillus species are the most characterized organisms among alkaliphiles. They produce so many extracellular alkaline-adapted enzymes that they are often good sources for industrial enzymes. As a patent strain, the whole genome sequence of alkaliphilic Bacillus halodurans C-125 has been sequenced for the first time. In addition, an increasing number of whole genomic sequences and structural analyses of proteins in alkaliphiles, development of genetic engineering techniques and physiological analyses will reveal the alkaline adaptation mechanisms of alkaliphilic Bacillus species and the structural basis of their enzymatic functions. This information opens up the possibility of new applications. In this paper we describe, first, the physiologies of environmental adaptations, and then the applications of enzymes and microorganisms themselves in alkaliphilic Bacillus species.

  15. Thermophilic and alkaliphilic Actinobacteria: biology and potential applications

    PubMed Central

    Shivlata, L.; Satyanarayana, Tulasi

    2015-01-01

    Microbes belonging to the phylum Actinobacteria are prolific sources of antibiotics, clinically useful bioactive compounds and industrially important enzymes. The focus of the current review is on the diversity and potential applications of thermophilic and alkaliphilic actinobacteria, which are highly diverse in their taxonomy and morphology with a variety of adaptations for surviving and thriving in hostile environments. The specific metabolic pathways in these actinobacteria are activated for elaborating pharmaceutically, agriculturally, and biotechnologically relevant biomolecules/bioactive compounds, which find multifarious applications. PMID:26441937

  16. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, Lori E.

    2013-01-01

    The article presents an overview of the nitrogen chemical market as of July 2013, including the production of ammonia compounds. Industrial uses for ammonia include fertilizers, explosives, and plastics. Other topics include industrial capacity of U.S. ammonia producers CF Industries Holdings Inc., Koch Nitrogen Co., PCS Nitrogen, Inc., and Agrium Inc., the impact of natural gas prices on the nitrogen industry, and demand for corn crops for ethanol production.

  17. Mutational Loss of a K+ and NH4+ Transporter Affects the Growth and Endospore Formation of Alkaliphilic Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yi; Southworth, Thomas W.; Kloster, Hilde; Ito, Masahiro; Guffanti, Arthur A.; Moir, Anne; Krulwich, Terry A.

    2003-01-01

    A putative transport protein (Orf9) of alkaliphilic Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4 belongs to a transporter family (CPA-2) of diverse K+ efflux proteins and cation antiporters. Orf9 greatly increased the concentration of K+ required for growth of a K+ uptake mutant of Escherichia coli. The cytoplasmic K+ content of the cells was reduced, consistent with an efflux mechanism. Orf9-dependent translocation of K+ in E. coli is apparently bidirectional, since ammonium-sensitive uptake of K+ could be shown in K+-depleted cells. The upstream gene product Orf8 has sequence similarity to a subdomain of KTN proteins that are associated with potassium-translocating channels and transporters; Orf8 modulated the transport capacities of Orf9. No Orf9-dependent K+(Na+)/H+ antiport activity was found in membrane vesicles. Nonpolar deletion mutants in the orf9 locus of the alkaliphile chromosome exhibited no K+-related phenotype but showed profound phenotypes in medium containing high levels of amine-nitrogen. Their patterns of growth and ammonium content suggested a physiological role for the orf9 locus in bidirectional ammonium transport. Orf9-dependent ammonium uptake was observed in right-side-out membrane vesicles of the alkaliphile wild type and the mutant with an orf8 deletion. Uptake was proton motive force dependent and was inhibited by K+. Orf9 is proposed to be designated AmhT (ammonium homeostasis). Ammonium homeostasis is important in high-amine-nitrogen settings and is particularly crucial at high pH since cytosolic ammonium accumulation interferes with cytoplasmic pH regulation. Endospore formation in amino-acid-rich medium was significantly defective and germination was modestly defective in the orf9 and orf7-orf10 deletion mutants. PMID:12923086

  18. Methanohalophilus zhilinae sp. nov., an alkaliphilic, halophilic, methylotrophic methanogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathrani, I. M.; Boone, D. R.; Mah, R. A.; Fox, G. E.; Lau, P. P.

    1988-01-01

    Methanohalophilus zhilinae, a new alkaliphilic, halophilic, methylotrophic species of methanogenic bacteria, is described. Strain WeN5T (T = type strain) from Bosa Lake of the Wadi el Natrun in Egypt was designated the type strain and was further characterized. This strain was nonmotile, able to catabolize dimethylsulfide, and able to grow in medium with a methyl group-containing substrate (such as methanol or trimethylamine) as the sole organic compound added. Sulfide (21 mM) inhibited cultures growing on trimethylamine. The antibiotic susceptibility pattern of strain WeN5T was typical of the pattern for archaeobacteria, and the guanine-plus-cytosine content of the deoxyribonucleic acid was 38 mol%. Characterization of the 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid sequence indicated that strain WeN5T is phylogenetically distinct from members of previously described genera other than Methanohalophilus and supported the partition of halophilic methanogens into their own genus.

  19. Sustainable biorefining in wastewater by engineered extreme alkaliphile Bacillus marmarensis

    PubMed Central

    Wernick, David G.; Pontrelli, Sammy P.; Pollock, Alexander W.; Liao, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Contamination susceptibility, water usage, and inability to utilize 5-carbon sugars and disaccharides are among the major obstacles in industrialization of sustainable biorefining. Extremophilic thermophiles and acidophiles are being researched to combat these problems, but organisms which answer all the above problems have yet to emerge. Here, we present engineering of the unexplored, extreme alkaliphile Bacillus marmarensis as a platform for new bioprocesses which meet all these challenges. With a newly developed transformation protocol and genetic tools, along with optimized RBSs and antisense RNA, we engineered B. marmarensis to produce ethanol at titers of 38 g/l and 65% yields from glucose in unsterilized media. Furthermore, ethanol titers and yields of 12 g/l and 50%, respectively, were produced from cellobiose and xylose in unsterilized seawater and algal-contaminated wastewater. As such, B. marmarensis presents a promising approach for the contamination-resistant biorefining of a wide range of carbohydrates in unsterilized, non-potable seawater. PMID:26831574

  20. A Streamlined Strategy for Biohydrogen Production with an Alkaliphilic Bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, Dwayne A; Wall, Judy D.; Mormile, Dr. Melanie R.; Begemann, Matthew B

    2012-01-01

    Biofuels are anticipated to enable a shift from fossil fuels for renewable transportation and manufacturing fuels, with biohydrogen considered attractive since it could offer the largest reduction of global carbon budgets. Currently, biohydrogen production remains inefficient and heavily fossil fuel-dependent. However, bacteria using alkali-treated biomass could streamline biofuel production while reducing costs and fossil fuel needs. An alkaliphilic bacterium, Halanaerobium strain sapolanicus, is described that is capable of biohydrogen production at levels rivaling neutrophilic strains, but at pH 11 and hypersaline conditions. H. sapolanicus ferments a variety of 5- and 6- carbon sugars derived from hemicellulose and cellulose including cellobiose, and forms the end products hydrogen and acetate. Further, it can also produce biohydrogen from switchgrass and straw pretreated at temperatures far lower than any previously reported and in solutions compatible with growth. Hence, this bacterium can potentially increase the efficiency and efficacy of biohydrogen production from renewable biomass resources.

  1. Alkaliphilic Bacteria with Impact on Industrial Applications, Concepts of Early Life Forms, and Bioenergetics of ATP Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Preiss, Laura; Hicks, David B.; Suzuki, Shino; Meier, Thomas; Krulwich, Terry Ann

    2015-01-01

    Alkaliphilic bacteria typically grow well at pH 9, with the most extremophilic strains growing up to pH values as high as pH 12–13. Interest in extreme alkaliphiles arises because they are sources of useful, stable enzymes, and the cells themselves can be used for biotechnological and other applications at high pH. In addition, alkaline hydrothermal vents represent an early evolutionary niche for alkaliphiles and novel extreme alkaliphiles have also recently been found in alkaline serpentinizing sites. A third focus of interest in alkaliphiles is the challenge raised by the use of proton-coupled ATP synthases for oxidative phosphorylation by non-fermentative alkaliphiles. This creates a problem with respect to tenets of the chemiosmotic model that remains the core model for the bioenergetics of oxidative phosphorylation. Each of these facets of alkaliphilic bacteria will be discussed with a focus on extremely alkaliphilic Bacillus strains. These alkaliphilic bacteria have provided a cogent experimental system to probe adaptations that enable their growth and oxidative phosphorylation at high pH. Adaptations are clearly needed to enable secreted or partially exposed enzymes or protein complexes to function at the high external pH. Also, alkaliphiles must maintain a cytoplasmic pH that is significantly lower than the pH of the outside medium. This protects cytoplasmic components from an external pH that is alkaline enough to impair their stability or function. However, the pH gradient across the cytoplasmic membrane, with its orientation of more acidic inside than outside, is in the reverse of the productive orientation for bioenergetic work. The reversed gradient reduces the trans-membrane proton-motive force available to energize ATP synthesis. Multiple strategies are hypothesized to be involved in enabling alkaliphiles to circumvent the challenge of a low bulk proton-motive force energizing proton-coupled ATP synthesis at high pH. PMID:26090360

  2. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, ammonia was produced by 15 companies at 26 plants in 16 states in the United States. Of the total ammonia production capacity, 55% was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of their large reserves of natural gas. US producers operated at 66% of their rated capacity. In descending order, Koch Nitrogen, Terra Industries, CF Industries, Agrium and PCS Nitrogen accounted for 81% of the US ammonia production capacity.

  3. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, L.E.

    2012-01-01

    Ammonia was produced by 12 companies at 27 plants in 15 states in the United States during 2011. Sixty-one percent of total U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of those states' large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock. In 2011, U.S. producers operated at about 84 percent of their rated capacity (excluding plants that were idle for the entire year). Four companies — CF Industries Holdings Inc.; Koch Nitrogen Co.; PCS Nitrogen Inc. and Agrium Inc., in descending order — accounted for 77 percent of the total U.S. ammonia production capacity.

  4. F1F0-ATP synthases of alkaliphilic bacteria: lessons from their adaptations

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, David B.; Liu, Jun; Fujisawa, Makoto; Krulwich, Terry A.

    2010-01-01

    This review focuses on the ATP synthases of alkaliphilic bacteria and, in particular, those that successfully overcome the bioenergetic challenges of achieving robust H+-coupled ATP synthesis at external pH values > 10. At such pH values the protonmotive force, which is posited to provide the energetic driving force for ATP synthesis, is too low to account for the ATP synthesis observed. The protonmotive force is lowered at very high pH by the need to maintain a cytoplasmic pH well below the pH outside, which results in an energetically adverse pH gradient. Several anticipated solutions to this bioenergetic conundrum have been ruled out. Although the transmembrane sodium motive force is high under alkaline conditions, respiratory alkaliphilic bacteria do not use Na+-instead of H+-coupled ATP synthases. Nor do they offset the adverse pH gradient with a compensatory increase in the transmembrane electrical potential component of the protonmotive force. Moreover, studies of ATP synthase rotors indicate that alkaliphiles cannot fully resolve the energetic problem by using an ATP synthase with a large number of c-subunits in the synthase rotor ring. Increased attention now focuses on delocalized gradients near the membrane surface and H+ transfers to ATP synthases via membrane-associated microcircuits between the H+ pumping complexes and synthases. Microcircuits likely depend upon proximity of pumps and synthases, specific membrane properties and specific adaptations of the participating enzyme complexes. ATP synthesis in alkaliphiles depends upon alkaliphile-specific adaptations of the ATP synthase and there is also evidence for alkaliphile-specific adaptations of respiratory chain components. PMID:20193659

  5. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Ammonia was produced by 15 companies at 25 plants in 16 states in the United States during 2006. Fifty-seven percent of U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of their large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock. In 2006, U.S. producers operated at about 72 percent of their rated capacity (excluding plants that were idle for the entire year). Five companies, Koch Nitrogen, Terra Industries, CF Industries, PCS Nitro-gen, and Agrium, in descending order, accounted for 79 percent U.S. ammonia production capacity. The United States was the world's fourth-ranked ammonia producer and consumer following China, India and Russia. Urea, ammonium nitrate, ammonium phosphates, nitric acid and ammonium sulfate were the major derivatives of ammonia in the United States, in descending order of importance.

  6. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, L.E.

    2010-01-01

    Ammonia was produced by 13 companies at 23 plants in 16 states during 2009. Sixty percent of all U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana. Oklahoma and Texas because of those states' large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock. In 2009, U.S. producers operated at about 83 percent of their rated capacity (excluding plants that were idle for the entire year). Five companies — Koch Nitrogen Co.; Terra Industries Inc.; CF Industries Inc.; PCS Nitrogen Inc. and Agrium Inc., in descending order — accounted for 80 percent of the total U.S. ammonia production capacity. U.S. production was estimated to be 7.7 Mt (8.5 million st) of nitrogen (N) content in 2009 compared with 7.85 Mt (8.65 million st) of N content in 2008. Apparent consumption was estimated to have decreased to 12.1 Mt (13.3 million st) of N, a 10-percent decrease from 2008. The United States was the world's fourth-ranked ammonia producer and consumer following China, India and Russia. Urea, ammonium nitrate, ammonium phosphates, nitric acid and ammonium sulfate were the major derivatives of ammonia in the United States, in descending order of importance.

  7. Clostridium thermoalcaliphilum sp. nov., an anaerobic and thermotolerant facultative alkaliphile.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Engle, M; Weiss, N; Mandelco, L; Wiegel, J

    1994-01-01

    An anaerobic and thermophilic alkaliphile, strain JW/YL23-2T (T = type strain), was isolated from sewage sludge obtained from a sewage plant in Atlanta, Ga. At pH 10.1 and 50 degrees C, the doubling time of this strain was 19 min. Strain JW/YL23-2T, a motile rod-shaped bacterium with 2 to 12 peritrichous flagella, exhibited a negative Gram stain reaction but was gram-type positive as judged by the polymyxin B test. No heat-stable (85 degrees C, 15 min) endospores were detected. At 50 degrees C, growth occurred at pH values ranging from 7.0 to 11.0; the optimum pH was 9.6 to 10.1. The temperature range for growth ranged from 27 to 57.5 degrees C; the optimum temperature was 48 to 51 degrees C (pH 10.1). Dissimilatory sulfate reduction was not detected. The organism utilized glucose, fructose, sucrose, maltose, cellobiose, and Casamino Acids. The DNA G+C content was 32 mol% (as determined by chemical analysis). A 16S rRNA sequence analysis revealed a 2% inferred evolutionary distance to Clostridium paradoxum. However, the cell wall type of strain JW/YL23-2T was A4 beta (L-Orn-D-Asp), while that of C. paradoxum was A1 tau (m-diaminopimelic acid direct). On the basis of the alkaline pH values and high temperatures for optimal growth, the inability to form spores, and other characteristics different from C. paradoxum characteristics, strain JW/YL-23-2 was placed in a new species, Clostridium thermoalcaliphilum; JW/YL23-2 (= DSM 7309) is the type strain of this new species.

  8. Isolation and characterization of alkaliphilic, chemolithoautotrophic, sulphur-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, D Y; Robertson, L A; Kuenen, J G

    2000-04-01

    Alkaliphilic sulphur-oxidizing bacteria were isolated from samples from alkaline environments including soda soil and soda lakes. Two isolates, currently known as strains AL 2 and AL 3, were characterized. They grew over a pH range 8.0-10.4 with an optimum at 9.5-9.8. Both strains could oxidize thiosulphate, sulphide, polysulphide, elemental sulphur and tetrathionate. Strain AL 3 more actively oxidized thiosulphate and sulphide, while isolate AL 2 had higher activity with elemental sulphur and tetrathionate. Isolate AL 2 was also able to oxidize trithionate. The pH optimum for thiosulphate and sulphide oxidation was between 9-10. Some activity remained at pH 11, but was negligible at pH 7. Metabolism of tetrathionate by isolate AL 2 involved initial anaerobic hydrolysis to form sulphur, thiosulphate and sulphate in a sequence similar to that in other colourless sulphur-oxidizing bacteria. Sulphate was produced by both strains. During batch growth on thiosulphate, elemental sulphur and sulphite transiently accumulated in cultures of isolates AL 2 and AL 3, respectively. At lower pH values, both strains accumulated sulphur during sulphide and thiosulphate oxidation. Both strains contained ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase. Thiosulphate oxidation in isolate AL 3 appeared to be sodium ion-dependent. Isolate AL 2 differed from AL 3 by its high GC mol % value (65.5 and 49.5, respectively), sulphur deposition in its periplasm, the absence of carboxysomes, lower sulphur-oxidizing capacity, growth kinetics (lower growth rate and higher growth yield) and cytochrome composition.

  9. Clostridium thermoalcaliphilum sp. nov., an anaerobic and thermotolerant facultative alkaliphile

    SciTech Connect

    Youhong Li; Engle, M.; Wiegel, J.

    1994-01-01

    An anaerobic and thermophilic alkaliphile, strain JW/YL23-2{sub T} (T = type strain), was isolated from sewage sludge obtained from a sewage plant in Atlanta, Ga. at pH 10.1 and 50{degrees}C, the doubling time of this strain was 19 min. Strain JW/YL23-2{sub T}, a motile rod-shaped bacterium with 2 to 12 peritrichous flagella, exhibited a negative Gram stain reaction but was gram-type positive as judged by the polymyxin B test. No heat-stable (85{degrees}C, 15 min) endospores were detected. At 50{degrees}C, growth occurred at pH values ranging from 7.0 to 11.0; the optimum pH was 9.6 to 10.1. The temperature range for growth ranged from 27 to 57.5{degrees}C; the optimum temperature was 48 to 51{degrees}C (pH 10.1). Dissimilatory sulfate reduction was not detected. The organism utilized glucose, fructose, sucrose, maltose, cellobiose, and Casamino Acids. The DNA G+C content was 32 mol% (as determined by chemical analysis). A 16S rRNA sequence analysis revealed a 2% inferred evolutionary distance to Clostridium paradoxum. However, the cell wall type of strain JW/YL23-2{sup T} was A4{beta} (L-Orn-D-Asp), while that of C. paradoxum was Al{sub {tau}} (m-diaminopimelic acid direct). On the basis of the alkaline pH values and high temperatures for optimal growth, the inability to form spores, and other characteristics different from C. paradoxum characteristics, strain JW/YL-23-2 was placed in a new species, Clostridium thermoalcaliphilum; JW/YL23-2 (= DSM 7309) is the type strain of this new species.

  10. Draft Genome Sequences of Four Alkaliphilic Bacteria Belonging to the Anaerobacillus Genus

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The draft genomes of the alkaliphilic, anaerobic bacteria, Anaerobacillus arseniciselenatis, A. alkalidiazotrophicus, and A. alkalilacustris, and a novel closely related isolate of the Anaerobacillus genus are reported here. These assembled genomes will help identify, at the molecular level, the phenotypic differences between the species of this poorly characterized genus. PMID:28104661

  11. Purification and some properties of a keratinolytic enzyme from an alkaliphilic Nocardiopsis sp. TOA-1.

    PubMed

    Mitsuiki, Shinji; Sakai, Masashi; Moriyama, Yasushi; Goto, Masatoshi; Furukawa, Kensuke

    2002-01-01

    A novel alkaliphilic Nocardiopsis sp., strain TOA-1, was isolated from a tile-joint of a bathroom. Strain TOA-1 produced a variety of alkaline hydrolytic enzymes. An alkaline protease, designated NAPase, was purified and characterized. NAPase had a very high keratinolytic activity and high stability under acidic conditions.

  12. Novel bioflocculant produced by salt-tolerant, alkaliphilic strain Oceanobacillus polygoni HG6 and its application in tannery wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Yun, Yue-Qing; Xing, Li; Song, Lei

    2017-01-09

    The optimized production of MBF-HG6, which is a novel salt-tolerant alkaliphilic bioflocculant produced by Oceanobacillus polygoni with its application in tannery wastewater treatment was investigated in this study. It was found the optimal carbon source, nitrogen source, cation, and initial pH of the medium for bioflocculant production were starch, urea, Fe(2+), and pH 9.0, respectively. The best stability in the temperature range was from 0 to 80°C and the purified MBF-HG6 contained polysaccharides of 81.53% and proteins of 9.98%. The carboxyl, hydroxyl, and amino groups were determined in bioflocculants, while the optimized bioflocculating activity was observed as 90.25% for the dosages of 6.96mL MBF-HG6, 4.77mL CaCl2 (1%, m/v), and 19.24g/L NaCl using response surface methodology. In addition, SS and turbidity removal rates of the tannery wastewater (4g/L MBF-HG6) could, respectively, reach 46.49% and 91.08%, indicating that the great potential was emerged in enhancement of tannery wastewater treatment by MBF-HG6.

  13. Environmental distribution of prokaryotic taxa

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The increasing availability of gene sequences of prokaryotic species in samples extracted from all kind of locations allows addressing the study of the influence of environmental patterns in prokaryotic biodiversity. We present a comprehensive study to address the potential existence of environmental preferences of prokaryotic taxa and the commonness of the specialist and generalist strategies. We also assessed the most significant environmental factors shaping the environmental distribution of taxa. Results We used 16S rDNA sequences from 3,502 sampling experiments in natural and artificial sources. These sequences were taxonomically assigned, and the corresponding samples were also classified into a hierarchical classification of environments. We used several statistical methods to analyze the environmental distribution of taxa. Our results indicate that environmental specificity is not very common at the higher taxonomic levels (phylum to family), but emerges at lower taxonomic levels (genus and species). The most selective environmental characteristics are those of animal tissues and thermal locations. Salinity is another very important factor for constraining prokaryotic diversity. On the other hand, soil and freshwater habitats are the less restrictive environments, harboring the largest number of prokaryotic taxa. All information on taxa, samples and environments is provided at the envDB online database, http://metagenomics.uv.es/envDB. Conclusions This is, as far as we know, the most comprehensive assessment of the distribution and diversity of prokaryotic taxa and their associations with different environments. Our data indicate that we are still far from characterizing prokaryotic diversity in any environment, except, perhaps, for human tissues such as the oral cavity and the vagina. PMID:20307274

  14. The ontology of biological taxa

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Stefan; Stenzhorn, Holger; Boeker, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: The classification of biological entities in terms of species and taxa is an important endeavor in biology. Although a large amount of statements encoded in current biomedical ontologies is taxon-dependent there is no obvious or standard way for introducing taxon information into an integrative ontology architecture, supposedly because of ongoing controversies about the ontological nature of species and taxa. Results: In this article, we discuss different approaches on how to represent biological taxa using existing standards for biomedical ontologies such as the description logic OWL DL and the Open Biomedical Ontologies Relation Ontology. We demonstrate how hidden ambiguities of the species concept can be dealt with and existing controversies can be overcome. A novel approach is to envisage taxon information as qualities that inhere in biological organisms, organism parts and populations. Availability: The presented methodology has been implemented in the domain top-level ontology BioTop, openly accessible at http://purl.org/biotop. BioTop may help to improve the logical and ontological rigor of biomedical ontologies and further provides a clear architectural principle to deal with biological taxa information. Contact: stschulz@uni-freiburg.de PMID:18586729

  15. Bioreduction of Cr(VI) by alkaliphilic Bacillus subtilis and interaction of the membrane groups

    PubMed Central

    Mary Mangaiyarkarasi, M.S.; Vincent, S.; Janarthanan, S.; Subba Rao, T.; Tata, B.V.R.

    2010-01-01

    Detoxification of Cr(VI) under alkaline pH requires attention due to the alkaline nature of many effluents. An alkaliphilic gram-positive Bacillus subtilis isolated from tannery effluent contaminated soil was found to grow and reduce Cr(VI) up to 100% at an alkaline pH 9. Decrease in pH to acidic range with growth of the bacterium signified the role played by metabolites (organic acids) in chromium resistance and reduction mechanism. The XPS and FT-IR spectra confirmed the reduction of Cr(VI) by bacteria into +3 oxidation state. Chromate reductase assay indicated that the reduction was mediated by constitutive membrane bound enzymes. The kinetics of Cr(VI) reduction activity derived using the monod equation proved (Ks = 0.00032) high affinity of the organism to the metal. This study thus helped to localize the reduction activity at subcellular level in a chromium resistant alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. PMID:23961119

  16. Nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of a new subtilisin from an alkaliphilic Bacillus isolate.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Katsuhisa; Magallones, Marietta V; Takimura, Yasushi; Hatada, Yuji; Kobayashi, Tohru; Kawai, Shuji; Ito, Susumu

    2003-10-01

    The gene for a new subtilisin from the alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. KSM-LD1 was cloned and sequenced. The open reading frame of the gene encoded a 97 amino-acid prepro-peptide plus a 307 amino-acid mature enzyme that contained a possible catalytic triad of residues, Asp32, His66, and Ser224. The deduced amino acid sequence of the mature enzyme (LD1) showed approximately 65% identity to those of subtilisins SprC and SprD from alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. LG12. The amino acid sequence identities of LD1 to those of previously reported true subtilisins and high-alkaline proteases were below 60%. LD1 was characteristically stable during incubation with surfactants and chemical oxidants. Interestingly, an oxidizable Met residue is located next to the catalytic Ser224 of the enzyme as in the cases of the oxidation-susceptible subtilisins reported to date.

  17. Alkaline cellulases from alkaliphilic Bacillus: enzymatic properties, genetics, and application to detergents.

    PubMed

    Ito, S

    1997-05-01

    We have isolated a number of alkaliphilic Bacillus that produce alkaline exoenzymes and found a possible use for alkaline cellulase (carboxymethylcellulase) as an additive for improving the cleaning effect of detergents. Enzymatic properties of some candidate cellulases fulfilled the essential requirements for enzymes to be used practically in laundry detergents. Here I describe the properties and possible catalytic mechanism of the hydrolytic reaction and the gene for the industrial alkaline cellulase produced by one of the isolates, Bacillus sp. KSM-635.

  18. Nonconventional cation-coupled flagellar motors derived from the alkaliphilic Bacillus and Paenibacillus species.

    PubMed

    Ito, Masahiro; Takahashi, Yuka

    2017-01-01

    Prior to 2008, all previously studied conventional bacterial flagellar motors appeared to utilize either H(+) or Na(+) as coupling ions. Membrane-embedded stator complexes support conversion of energy using transmembrane electrochemical ion gradients. The main H(+)-coupled stators, known as MotAB, differ from Na(+)-coupled stators, PomAB of marine bacteria, and MotPS of alkaliphilic Bacillus. However, in 2008, a MotAB-type flagellar motor of alkaliphilic Bacillus clausii KSM-K16 was revealed as an exception with the first dual-function motor. This bacterium was identified as the first bacterium with a single stator-rotor that can utilize both H(+) and Na(+) for ion-coupling at different pH ranges. Subsequently, another exception, a MotPS-type flagellar motor of alkaliphilic Bacillus alcalophilus AV1934, was reported to utilize Na(+) plus K(+) and Rb(+) as coupling ions for flagellar rotation. In addition, the alkaline-tolerant bacterium Paenibacillus sp. TCA20, which can utilize divalent cations such as Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and Sr(2+), was recently isolated from a hot spring in Japan, which contains a high Ca(2+) concentration. These findings show that bacterial flagellar motors isolated from unique environments utilize unexpected coupling ions. This suggests that bacteria that grow in different extreme environments adapt to local conditions and evolve their motility machinery.

  19. Global Microarray Analysis of Alkaliphilic Halotolerant Bacterium Bacillus sp. N16-5 Salt Stress Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Yin, Liang; Xue, Yanfen; Ma, Yanhe

    2015-01-01

    The alkaliphilic halotolerant bacterium Bacillus sp. N16-5 is often exposed to salt stress in its natural habitats. In this study, we used one-colour microarrays to investigate adaptive responses of Bacillus sp. N16-5 transcriptome to long-term growth at different salinity levels (0%, 2%, 8%, and 15% NaCl) and to a sudden salt increase from 0% to 8% NaCl. The common strategies used by bacteria to survive and grow at high salt conditions, such as K+ uptake, Na+ efflux, and the accumulation of organic compatible solutes (glycine betaine and ectoine), were observed in Bacillus sp. N16-5. The genes of SigB regulon involved in general stress responses and chaperone-encoding genes were also induced by high salt concentration. Moreover, the genes regulating swarming ability and the composition of the cytoplasmic membrane and cell wall were also differentially expressed. The genes involved in iron uptake were down-regulated, whereas the iron homeostasis regulator Fur was up-regulated, suggesting that Fur may play a role in the salt adaption of Bacillus sp. N16-5. In summary, we present a comprehensive gene expression profiling of alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. N16-5 cells exposed to high salt stress, which would help elucidate the mechanisms underlying alkaliphilic Bacillus spp. survival in and adaptation to salt stress.

  20. Corridor use by diverse taxa.

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, Nick, M.; Browne, David, R.; Cunningham, Alan; Danielson, Brent, J.; Levey, Douglas, J.; Sargent, Sarah; Spira, Tim

    2003-01-01

    Haddad, N.M., D.R. Browne, A. Cunningham, B.J. Danielson, D.J. Levey, S. Sargent, and T. Spira. 2003. Corridor use by diverse taxa. Ecology, 84(3):609-615. One of the most popular approaches for maintaining populations and conserving biodiversity in fragmented landscapes is to retain or create corridors that connect otherwise isolated habitat patches. Working in large-scale, experimental landscapes in which open-habitat patches and corridors were created by harvesting pine forest, we showed that corridors direct movements of different types of species, including butterflies, small mammals, and bird dispersed plants, causing higher movement between connected than between unconnected patches. Corridors directed the movement of all 10 species studied, with all corridor effect sizes >68%. However, this corridor effect was significant for five species, not significant for one species, and inconclusive for four species because of small sample sizes. Although we found no evidence that corridors increase emigration from a patch, our results show that movements of disparate taxa with broadly different life histories and functional roles are directed by corridors.

  1. Alkaliphilic endoxylanase from lignocellulolytic microbial consortium metagenome for biobleaching of eucalyptus pulp.

    PubMed

    Weerachavangkul, Chawannapak; Laothanachareon, Thanaporn; Boonyapakron, Katewadee; Wongwilaiwalin, Sarunyou; Nimchua, Thidarat; Eurwilaichitr, Lily; Pootanakit, Kusol; Igarashi, Yasuo; Champreda, Verawat

    2012-12-01

    Enzymatic pre-bleaching by modification of pulp fibers with xylanases is an attractive approach to reduce the consumption of toxic bleaching chemicals in the paper industry. In this study, an alkaliphilic endoxylanase gene was isolated from metagenomic DNA of a structurally stable thermophilic lignocellulose-degrading microbial consortium using amplification with conserved glycosyl hydrolase family 10 primers and subsequent genome walking. The full-length xylanase showed 78% sequence identity to an endo-beta-1,4-xylanase of Clostridium phytofermentans and was expressed in a mature form with an N-terminal His6 tag fusion in Escherichia coli. The recombinant xylanase Xyn3F was thermotolerant and alkaliphilic, working optimally at 65-70 degrees C with an optimal pH at 9- 10 and retaining >80% activity at pH 9, 60 degrees C for 1 h. Xyn3F showed a Vmax of 2,327 IU/mg and Km of 3.5 mg/ml on birchwood xylan. Pre-bleaching of industrial eucalyptus pulp with no prior pH adjustment (pH 9) using Xyn3F at 50 IU/g dried pulp led to 4.5-5.1% increase in final pulp brightness and 90.4-102.4% increase in whiteness after a single-step hypochlorite bleaching over the untreated pulp, which allowed at least 20% decrease in hypochlorite consumption to achieve the same final bleaching indices. The alkaliphilic xylanase is promising for application in an environmentally friendly bleaching step of kraft and soda pulps with no requirement for pH adjustment, leading to improved economic feasibility of the process.

  2. Investigations of Iron Minerals Formed by Dissimilatory Alkaliphilic Bacterium with {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chistyakova, N. I.; Rusakov, V. S.; Shapkin, A. A.; Zhilina, T. N.; Zavarzina, D. G.; Kohout, J.

    2010-07-13

    Anaerobic alkaliphilic bacterium of Geoalkalibacter ferrihydriticus type (strain Z-0531), isolated from a bottom sediment sample from the weakly mineralized soda Lake Khadyn, have been analyzed. The strain uses the amorphous Fe(III)-hydroxide (AFH) as an electron acceptor and acetate CH{sub 3}COO{sup -} as an electron donor. Moessbauer investigations of solid phase samples obtained during the process of the bacterium growth were carried out at room temperature, 77.8 K, 4.2 K without and with the presence of an external magnetic field (6 T) applied perpendicular to the {gamma}-bebam.

  3. Pseudomonas yangmingensis sp. nov., an alkaliphilic denitrifying species isolated from a hot spring.

    PubMed

    Wong, Biing-Teo; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2014-01-01

    This study isolated and identified a facultative, alkaliphilic, denitrifying Pseudomonas strain designed as CRS1 from a hot spring, Yang-Ming Mountain, Taiwan. The biochemical characterization, phenotypic characteristics and phylogenetic relationship of strain CRS1 were studied. On the basis of the 16S rRNA sequence similarity, phenotypic and genotypic characteristics and chemotaxonomic data, the strain CRS1 represents a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas yangmingensis sp. nov., is proposed. The strain CRS1 is a facultative autotrophic bacterium that has capability of mixotrophic and heterotrophic denitrification.

  4. Bacillus oshimensis sp. nov., a moderately halophilic, non-motile alkaliphile.

    PubMed

    Yumoto, Isao; Hirota, Kikue; Goto, Toshitaka; Nodasaka, Yoshinobu; Nakajima, Kenji

    2005-03-01

    A halophilic and halotolerant, facultatively alkaliphilic strain, K11(T), was isolated from soil obtained from Oshyamanbe, Oshima, Hokkaido, Japan. The isolate grew at pH 7-10. It was non-motile, Gram-positive and aerobic. Cells comprised straight rods and produced ellipsoidal spores. The isolate grew in 0-20 % NaCl, with optimum growth at 7 % NaCl, and hydrolysed casein, gelatin, starch, DNA and Tweens 20, 40, 60 and 80. The major isoprenoid quinone was menaquinone-7, and the cellular fatty acid profile consisted of significant amounts of C(15) branched-chain acids, iso C(15 : 0) and anteiso C(15 : 0). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing indicated that strain K11(T) was a member of group 6 [Nielsen et al., FEMS Microbiol Lett 117 (1994), 61-66] (alkaliphiles) of the genus Bacillus. DNA-DNA hybridization revealed a low relatedness (14 %) of the isolate to its closest phylogenetic neighbour, Bacillus clausii. On the basis of phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, phylogenetic data and DNA-DNA relatedness data, it was concluded that K11(T) (=JCM 12663(T)=NCIMB 14023(T)) merits classification as the type strain of a novel species, for which the name Bacillus oshimensis sp. nov. is proposed.

  5. Properties of NAD (P) H azoreductase from alkaliphilic red bacteria Aquiflexum sp. DL6.

    PubMed

    Misal, Santosh A; Lingojwar, Devendra P; Gawai, Kachru R

    2013-12-01

    Azoreductase plays a key role in bioremediation and biotransformation of azo dyes. It initializes the reduction of azo bond in azo dye metabolism under aerobic or anaerobic conditions. In the present study, we isolated an alkaliphilic red-colored Aquiflexum sp. DL6 bacterial strain and identified by 16S rRNA method. We report nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent azoreductase purified from Aquiflexum sp. DL6 by a combination of ammonium sulfate precipitation and chromatography methods. The azoreductase was purified up to 30-fold with 37 % recovery. The molecular weight was found to be 80 kDa. The optimum activity was observed at pH 7.4 and temperature 60 °C with amaranth azo dye as a substrate. The thermal stability of azoreductase was up to 80 °C. The azoreductase has shown a wide range of substrate specificity, including azo dyes and nitro aromatic compounds. Metal ions have no significant inhibitory action on azoreductase activity. The apparent K m and V max values for amaranth azo dye were 1.11 mM and 30.77 U/mg protein respectively. This NAD (P) H azoreductase represents the first azoreductase to be characterized from alkaliphilic bacteria.

  6. Anaerobic Halo-Alkaliphilic Baterial Community of Athalassic, Hypersaline Mono Lake in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.; Marsic, Damien; Ng, Joseph D.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The microorganisms of soda Mono Lake and other similar athalassic hypersaline alkaline soda lakes are of significance to Astrobiology. The microorganisms of these regimes represent the best known terrestrial analogs for microbial life that might have inhabited the hypersaline alkaline lakes and evaporites confined within closed volcanic basins and impact craters during the late Noachian and early Hesperian epochs (3.6 - 4.2 Gya) of ancient Mars. We have investigated the anaerobic microbiota of soda Mono Lake in northern California. In this paper we discuss the astrobiological significance of these ecosystems and describe several interesting features of two novel new species of anaerobic halo-alkaliphilic bacteria (Spirochaeta americana, sp. nov. and Desulfonatronum paiuteum, sp. nov) that we have isolated from Mono Lake.

  7. The respiratory chains of four strains of the alkaliphilic Bacillus clausii.

    PubMed

    Abbrescia, A; Martino, P L; Panelli, D; Sardanelli, A M; Papa, S; Alifano, P; Palese, L L; Gaballo, A

    2014-01-01

    A comparative analysis of terminal respiratory enzymes has been performed on four strains of Bacillus clausii used for preparation of a European probiotic. These four strains originated most probably from a common ancestor through early selection of stable clones for industrial propagation. They exhibit a low level of intra-specific diversity and a high degree of genomic conservation, making them an attractive model to study the different bioenergetics behaviors of alkaliphilic bacilli. The analysis of the different bioenergetics responses has been carried out revealing striking differences among the strains. Two out of the four strains have shown a functional redundancy of the terminal part of the respiratory chain. The biochemical data correlate with the expression level of the mRNA of cytochrome c oxidase and quinol oxidase genes (heme-copper type). The consequences of these different bioenergetics behaviors are also discussed.

  8. Fermentative production of L: -(+)-lactic acid by an alkaliphilic marine microorganism.

    PubMed

    Calabia, Buenaventurada P; Tokiwa, Yutaka; Aiba, Seiichi

    2011-07-01

    Of six strains of lactic acid-producing alkaliphilic microorganisms, Halolactibacillus halophilus was most efficient. It produced the highest concentration and yield of lactic acid, with minimal amounts of acetic and formic acid when sucrose and glucose were used as substrate. Mannose and xylose were poorly utilized. In batch fermentation at 30°C, pH 9 with 4 and 8% (w/v) sucrose, lactic acid was produced at 37.7 and 65.8 g l(-1), with yields of 95 and 83%, respectively. Likewise, when 4 and 8% (w/v) glucose were used, 33.4 and 59.6 g lactic acid l(-1) were produced with 85 and 76% yields, respectively. L: -(+)-lactic acid had an optical purity of 98.8% (from sucrose) and 98.3% (from glucose).

  9. A Streamlined Strategy for Biohydrogen Production with Halanaerobium hydrogeniformans, an Alkaliphilic Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Begemann, Matthew B; Mormile, Melanie R; Sitton, Oliver C; Wall, Judy D; Elias, Dwayne A

    2012-01-01

    Biofuels are anticipated to enable a shift from fossil fuels for renewable transportation and manufacturing fuels, with biohydrogen considered attractive since it could offer the largest reduction of global carbon budgets. Currently, lignocellulosic biohydrogen production remains inefficient with pretreatments that are heavily fossil fuel-dependent. However, bacteria using alkali-treated biomass could streamline biofuel production while reducing costs and fossil fuel needs. An alkaliphilic bacterium, Halanaerobiumhydrogeniformans, is described that is capable of biohydrogen production at levels rivaling neutrophilic strains, but at pH 11 and hypersaline conditions. H. hydrogeniformans ferments a variety of 5- and 6-carbon sugars derived from hemicellulose and cellulose including cellobiose, and forms the end products hydrogen, acetate, and formate. Further, it can also produce biohydrogen from switchgrass and straw pretreated at temperatures far lower than any previously reported and in solutions compatible with growth. Hence, this bacterium can potentially increase the efficiency and efficacy of biohydrogen production from renewable biomass resources.

  10. Physiological and genomic features of highly alkaliphilic hydrogen-utilizing Betaproteobacteria from a continental serpentinizing site

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Shino; Kuenen, J. Gijs; Schipper, Kira; van der Velde, Suzanne; Ishii, Shun’ichi; Wu, Angela; Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Tenney, Aaron; Meng, XianYing; Morrill, Penny L.; Kamagata, Yoichi; Muyzer, Gerard; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    2014-01-01

    Serpentinization, or the aqueous alteration of ultramafic rocks, results in challenging environments for life in continental sites due to the combination of extremely high pH, low salinity and lack of obvious electron acceptors and carbon sources. Nevertheless, certain Betaproteobacteria have been frequently observed in such environments. Here we describe physiological and genomic features of three related Betaproteobacterial strains isolated from highly alkaline (pH 11.6) serpentinizing springs at The Cedars, California. All three strains are obligate alkaliphiles with an optimum for growth at pH 11 and are capable of autotrophic growth with hydrogen, calcium carbonate and oxygen. The three strains exhibit differences, however, regarding the utilization of organic carbon and electron acceptors. Their global distribution and physiological, genomic and transcriptomic characteristics indicate that the strains are adapted to the alkaline and calcium-rich environments represented by the terrestrial serpentinizing ecosystems. We propose placing these strains in a new genus ‘Serpentinomonas’. PMID:24845058

  11. A Lipid-Accumulating Alga Maintains Growth in Outdoor, Alkaliphilic Raceway Pond with Mixed Microbial Communities.

    PubMed

    Bell, Tisza A S; Prithiviraj, Bharath; Wahlen, Brad D; Fields, Matthew W; Peyton, Brent M

    2015-01-01

    Algal biofuels and valuable co-products are being produced in both open and closed cultivation systems. Growing algae in open pond systems may be a more economical alternative, but this approach allows environmental microorganisms to colonize the pond and potentially infect or outcompete the algal "crop." In this study, we monitored the microbial community of an outdoor, open raceway pond inoculated with a high lipid-producing alkaliphilic alga, Chlorella vulgaris BA050. The strain C. vulgaris BA050 was previously isolated from Soap Lake, Washington, a system characterized by a high pH (∼9.8). An outdoor raceway pond (200 L) was inoculated with C. vulgaris and monitored for 10 days and then the culture was transferred to a 2,000 L raceway pond and cultivated for an additional 6 days. Community DNA samples were collected over the 16-day period in conjunction with water chemistry analyses and cell counts. Universal primers for the SSU rRNA gene sequences for Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archaea were used for barcoded pyrosequence determination. The environmental parameters that most closely correlated with C. vulgaris abundance were pH and phosphate. Community analyses indicated that the pond system remained dominated by the Chlorella population (93% of eukaryotic sequences), but was also colonized by other microorganisms. Bacterial sequence diversity increased over time while archaeal sequence diversity declined over the same time period. Using SparCC co-occurrence network analysis, a positive correlation was observed between C. vulgaris and Pseudomonas sp. throughout the experiment, which may suggest a symbiotic relationship between the two organisms. The putative relationship coupled with high pH may have contributed to the success of C. vulgaris. The characterization of the microbial community dynamics of an alkaliphilic open pond system provides significant insight into open pond systems that could be used to control photoautotrophic biomass productivity in an open

  12. Desulfonatronum Thiodismutans sp. nov., a Novel Alkaliphilic, Sulfate-reducing Bacterium Capable of Lithoautotrophic Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.; Bej, Asim K.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B.; Cleland, David; Krader, Paul

    2003-01-01

    A novel alkaliphilic, sulfate-reducing bacterium, strain MLF1(sup T), was isolated from sediments of soda Mono Lake, California. Gram-negative vibrio-shaped cells were observed, which were 0.6-0.7 x 1.2-2.7 microns in size, motile by a single polar flagellum and occurred singly, in pairs or as short spirilla. Growth was observed at 15-48 C (optimum, 37 C), > 1-7 % NaCI, w/v (optimum, 3%) and pH 8.0-10.0 (optimum, 9.5). The novel isolate is strictly alkaliphilic, requires a high concentration of carbonate in the growth medium and is obligately anaerobic and catalase-negative. As electron donors, strain MLF1(sup T) uses hydrogen, formate and ethanol. Sulfate, sulfite and thiosulfate (but not sulfur or nitrate) can be used as electron acceptors. The novel isolate is a lithoheterotroph and a facultative lithoautotroph that is able to grow on hydrogen without an organic source of carbon. Strain MLF1(sup T) is resistant to kanamycin and gentamicin, but sensitive to chloramphenicol and tetracycline. The DNA G+C content is 63.0 mol% (HPLC). DNA-DNA hybridization with the most closely related species, Desulfonatronum lacustre Z-7951(sup T), exhibited 51 % homology. Also, the genome size (1.6 x 10(exp 9) Da) and T(sub m) value of the genomic DNA (71 +/- 2 C) for strain MLF1(sup T) were significantly different from the genome size (2.1 x 10(exp 9) Da) and T(sub m) value (63 +/- 2 C) for Desulfonatronum lacustre Z-7951(sup T). On the basis of physiological and molecular properties, the isolate was considered to be a novel species of the genus Desulfonatronum, for which the name Desulfonatronum thiodismutans sp. nov. is proposed (the type strain is MLF1(sup T) = ATCC BAA-395(sup T) = DSM 14708(sup T)).

  13. Anaerobic decomposition of cellulose by alkaliphilic microbial community of Owens Lake, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Itoh, Takashi; Hoover, Richard B.

    2005-09-01

    The study of alkaliphilic microbial communities from anaerobic sediments of Owens and Mono Lakes in California has established the presence of active microbial cellulolytic processes in both studied lakes. The prior study of the microbial diversity of anaerobes in Mono Lake showed that the trophic chain of organic decomposition includes secondary anaerobes that previously were found to be unknown species (Spirochaeta americana, Tindallia californiensis, and Desulfonatronum thiodismutans). As we published earlier, the secondary anaerobes of Owens Lake morphologically were found to be very similar to those of Mono Lake. However, detailed comparison of the physiology and genetics has led to the conclusion that some links of organic decomposition in the trophic chain of the Owens Lake community are represented by a different unknown species. A new isolate of a sugarlytics free-living spirochete from Owens Lake ASpC2, which morphologically was similar to S. americana AspG1T isolated from Mono Lake, was found to have a different metabolic capacity such as the lack of capability to produce hydrogen during the fermentation of sugars. Furthermore, from the same microbial community of Owens Lake, another sugarlytics spore-forming alkaliphilic strain SCA was isolated in pure culture and described. Here we discuss the universal structure of the microbial community, types of microbial communities, review some hypothesis about Earth's Primordial Ocean and relevant new discoveries about water on Mars. This paper also presents some of the characteristics of novel isolates from anaerobic sediments of Owens Lake as a unique relic ecosystem of Astrobiological significance, and describes the participation of these strains in the process of cellulose degradation.

  14. Characterization and Genome Analysis of the First Facultatively Alkaliphilic Thermodesulfovibrio Isolated from the Deep Terrestrial Subsurface

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Yulia A.; Kadnikov, Vitaly V.; Lukina, Anastasia P.; Banks, David; Beletsky, Alexey V.; Mardanov, Andrey V.; Sen’kina, Elena I.; Avakyan, Marat R.; Karnachuk, Olga V.; Ravin, Nikolai V.

    2016-01-01

    Members of the genus Thermodesulfovibrio belong to the Nitrospirae phylum and all isolates characterized to date are neutrophiles. They have been isolated from terrestrial hot springs and thermophilic methanogenic anaerobic sludges. Their molecular signatures have, however, also been detected in deep subsurface. The purpose of this study was to characterize and analyze the genome of a newly isolated, facultatively alkaliphilic Thermodesulfovibrio from a 2 km deep aquifer system in Western Siberia, Russia. The new isolate, designated N1, grows optimally at pH 8.5 and at 65°C. It is able to reduce sulfate, thiosulfate or sulfite with a limited range of electron donors, such as formate, pyruvate, and lactate. Analysis of the 1.93 Mb draft genome of strain N1 revealed that it contains a set of genes for dissimilatory sulfate reduction, including sulfate adenyltransferase, adenosine-5′-phosphosulfate reductase AprAB, membrane-bound electron transfer complex QmoABC, dissimilatory sulfite reductase DsrABC, and sulfite reductase-associated electron transfer complex DsrMKJOP. Hydrogen turnover is enabled by soluble cytoplasmic, membrane-linked, and soluble periplasmic hydrogenases. The use of thiosulfate as an electron acceptor is enabled by a membrane-linked molybdopterin oxidoreductase. The N1 requirement for organic carbon sources corresponds to the lack of the autotrophic C1-fixation pathways. Comparative analysis of the genomes of Thermodesulfovibrio (T. yellowstonii, T. islandicus, T. àggregans, T. thiophilus, and strain N1) revealed a low overall genetic diversity and several adaptive traits. Consistent with an alkaliphilic lifestyle, a multisubunit Na+/H+ antiporter of the Mnh family is encoded in the Thermodesulfovibrio strain N1 genome. Nitrogenase genes were found in T. yellowstonii, T. aggregans, and T. islandicus, nitrate reductase in T. islandicus, and cellulose synthetase in T. aggregans and strain N1. Overall, our results provide genomic insights into

  15. Decomposition of Alternative Chirality Amino Acids by Alkaliphilic Anaerobe from Owens Lake, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Alisa; Pikuta, Elena V.; Guisler, Melissa; Hoover, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    The study of alkaliphilic microbial communities from anaerobic sediments of Owens and Mono Lakes in California led to the isolation of a bacterial strain capable of metabolizing amino acids with alternative chirality. According to the phylogenetic analysis, the anaerobic strain BK1 belongs to the genus Tindallia; however, despite the characteristics of other described species of this genus, the strain BK1 was able to grow on D-arginine and Dlysine. Cell morphology of this strain showed straight, motile, non-spore-forming rods with sizes 0.45 x 1.2-3 microns. Physiological characteristics of the strain showed that it is catalase negative, obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, and obligately alkaliphilic. This isolate is unable to grow at pH 7 and requires CO3 (2-) ions for growth. The strain has chemo-heterotrophic metabolism and is able to ferment various proteolysis products and some sugars. It plays the role of a primary anaerobe within the trophic chain of an anaerobic microbial community by the degradation of complex protein molecules to smaller and less energetic molecules. The new isolate requires NaCl for growth, and can grow within the range of 0.5-13 %, with the optimum at 1 % NaCl (w/v). The temperature range for the growth of the new isolate is 12-40 C with optimum at 35 C. The pH range for the growth of strain BK1 occurs between 7.8 and 11.0 with optimum at 9.5. This paper presents detailed physiological characteristics of the novel isolate from Owens Lake, a unique relic ecosystem of Astrobiological significance, and makes an accent on the ability of this strain to utilize L-amino acids.

  16. A lipid-accumulating alga maintains growth in outdoor, alkaliphilic raceway pond with mixed microbial communities

    DOE PAGES

    Bell, Tisza A.S.; Prithiviraj, Bharath; Wahlen, Brad D.; ...

    2016-01-07

    Algal biofuels and valuable co-products are being produced in both open and closed cultivation systems. Growing algae in open pond systems may be a more economical alternative, but this approach allows environmental microorganisms to colonize the pond and potentially infect or outcompete the algal “crop.” In this study, we monitored the microbial community of an outdoor, open raceway pond inoculated with a high lipid-producing alkaliphilic alga, Chlorella vulgaris BA050. The strain C. vulgaris BA050 was previously isolated from Soap Lake, Washington, a system characterized by a high pH (~9.8). An outdoor raceway pond (200 L) was inoculated with C. vulgarismore » and monitored for 10 days and then the culture was transferred to a 2,000 L raceway pond and cultivated for an additional 6 days. Community DNA samples were collected over the 16-day period in conjunction with water chemistry analyses and cell counts. Universal primers for the SSU rRNA gene sequences for Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archaea were used for barcoded pyrosequence determination. The environmental parameters that most closely correlated with C. vulgaris abundance were pH and phosphate. Community analyses indicated that the pond system remained dominated by the Chlorella population (93% of eukaryotic sequences), but was also colonized by other microorganisms. Bacterial sequence diversity increased over time while archaeal sequence diversity declined over the same time period. Using SparCC co-occurrence network analysis, a positive correlation was observed between C. vulgaris and Pseudomonas sp. throughout the experiment, which may suggest a symbiotic relationship between the two organisms. The putative relationship coupled with high pH may have contributed to the success of C. vulgaris. As a result, the characterization of the microbial community dynamics of an alkaliphilic open pond system provides significant insight into open pond systems that could be used to control photoautotrophic biomass

  17. A Lipid-Accumulating Alga Maintains Growth in Outdoor, Alkaliphilic Raceway Pond with Mixed Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Tisza A. S.; Prithiviraj, Bharath; Wahlen, Brad D.; Fields, Matthew W.; Peyton, Brent M.

    2016-01-01

    Algal biofuels and valuable co-products are being produced in both open and closed cultivation systems. Growing algae in open pond systems may be a more economical alternative, but this approach allows environmental microorganisms to colonize the pond and potentially infect or outcompete the algal “crop.” In this study, we monitored the microbial community of an outdoor, open raceway pond inoculated with a high lipid-producing alkaliphilic alga, Chlorella vulgaris BA050. The strain C. vulgaris BA050 was previously isolated from Soap Lake, Washington, a system characterized by a high pH (∼9.8). An outdoor raceway pond (200 L) was inoculated with C. vulgaris and monitored for 10 days and then the culture was transferred to a 2,000 L raceway pond and cultivated for an additional 6 days. Community DNA samples were collected over the 16-day period in conjunction with water chemistry analyses and cell counts. Universal primers for the SSU rRNA gene sequences for Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archaea were used for barcoded pyrosequence determination. The environmental parameters that most closely correlated with C. vulgaris abundance were pH and phosphate. Community analyses indicated that the pond system remained dominated by the Chlorella population (93% of eukaryotic sequences), but was also colonized by other microorganisms. Bacterial sequence diversity increased over time while archaeal sequence diversity declined over the same time period. Using SparCC co-occurrence network analysis, a positive correlation was observed between C. vulgaris and Pseudomonas sp. throughout the experiment, which may suggest a symbiotic relationship between the two organisms. The putative relationship coupled with high pH may have contributed to the success of C. vulgaris. The characterization of the microbial community dynamics of an alkaliphilic open pond system provides significant insight into open pond systems that could be used to control photoautotrophic biomass productivity in an

  18. Desulfonatronum thiodismutans sp. nov., a novel alkaliphilic, sulfate-reducing bacterium capable of lithoautotrophic growth.

    PubMed

    Pikuta, Elena V; Hoover, Richard B; Bej, Asim K; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B; Cleland, David; Krader, Paul

    2003-09-01

    A novel alkaliphilic, sulfate-reducing bacterium, strain MLF1(T), was isolated from sediments of soda Mono Lake, California. Gram-negative vibrio-shaped cells were observed, which were 0.6-0.7x1.2-2.7 micro m in size, motile by a single polar flagellum and occurred singly, in pairs or as short spirilla. Growth was observed at 15-48 degrees C (optimum, 37 degrees C), >1-7 % NaCl, w/v (optimum, 3 %) and pH 8.0-10.0 (optimum, 9.5). The novel isolate is strictly alkaliphilic, requires a high concentration of carbonate in the growth medium and is obligately anaerobic and catalase-negative. As electron donors, strain MLF1(T) uses hydrogen, formate and ethanol. Sulfate, sulfite and thiosulfate (but not sulfur or nitrate) can be used as electron acceptors. The novel isolate is a lithoheterotroph and a facultative lithoautotroph that is able to grow on hydrogen without an organic source of carbon. Strain MLF1(T) is resistant to kanamycin and gentamicin, but sensitive to chloramphenicol and tetracycline. The DNA G+C content is 63.0 mol% (HPLC). DNA-DNA hybridization with the most closely related species, Desulfonatronum lacustre Z-7951(T), exhibited 51 % homology. Also, the genome size (1.6x10(9) Da) and T(m) value of the genomic DNA (71+/-2 degrees C) for strain MLF1(T) were significantly different from the genome size (2.1x10(9) Da) and T(m) value (63+/-2 degrees C) for Desulfonatronum lacustre Z-7951(T). On the basis of physiological and molecular properties, the isolate was considered to be a novel species of the genus Desulfonatronum, for which the name Desulfonatronum thiodismutans sp. nov. is proposed (the type strain is MLF1(T)=ATCC BAA-395(T)=DSM 14708(T)).

  19. Compatibility of alkaline xylanases from an alkaliphilic Bacillus NCL (87-6-10) with commercial detergents and proteases.

    PubMed

    Kamal Kumar, B; Balakrishnan, H; Rele, M V

    2004-02-01

    Alkaline xylanases from alkaliphilic Bacillus strains NCL (87-6-10) and Sam III were compared with the commercial xylanases Pulpzyme HC and Biopulp for their compatibility with detergents and proteases for laundry applications. Among the four xylanases evaluated, the enzyme from the alkaliphilic Bacillus strain NCL (87-6-10) was the most compatible. The enzyme retained its full activity (40 degrees C for 1 h) in the presence of detergents, whereas Pulpzyme HC and Sam III showed only 30% and 50% of their initial activity, respectively. Biopulp, though stable to detergents, had only marginal activity (5%)at pH 10. However, all four enzymes retained significant activity (80%) for 60 min in the presence of the proteases Alcalase and Conidiobolus protease. Supplementation of the enzyme enhanced the cleaning ability of the detergents.

  20. Diversity and enumeration of halophilic and alkaliphilic bacteria in Spanish-style green table-olive fermentations.

    PubMed

    Lucena-Padrós, Helena; Ruiz-Barba, José Luis

    2016-02-01

    The presence and enumeration of halophilic and alkaliphilic bacteria in Spanish-style table-olive fermentations was studied. Twenty 10-tonne fermenters at two large manufacturing companies in Spain, previously studied through both culture dependent and independent (PCR-DGGE) methodologies, were selected. Virtually all this microbiota was isolated during the initial fermentation stage. A total of 203 isolates were obtained and identified based on 16S rRNA gene sequences. They belonged to 13 bacterial species, included in 11 genera. It was noticeable the abundance of halophilic and alkaliphilic lactic acid bacteria (HALAB). These HALAB belonged to the three genera of this group: Alkalibacterium, Marinilactibacillus and Halolactibacillus. Ten bacterial species were isolated for the first time from table olive fermentations, including the genera Amphibacillus, Natronobacillus, Catenococcus and Streptohalobacillus. The isolates were genotyped through RAPD and clustered in a dendrogram where 65 distinct strains were identified. Biodiversity indexes found statistically significant differences between both patios regarding genotype richness, diversity and dominance. However, Jaccard similarity index suggested that the halophilic/alkaliphilic microbiota in both patios was more similar than the overall microbiota at the initial fermentation stage. Thus, up to 7 genotypes of 6 different species were shared, suggesting adaptation of some strains to this fermentation stage. Morisita-Horn similarity index indicated a high level of codominance of the same species in both patios. Halophilic and alkaliphilic bacteria, especially HALAB, appeared to be part of the characteristic microbiota at the initial stage of this table-olive fermentation, and they could contribute to the conditioning of the fermenting brines in readiness for growth of common lactic acid bacteria.

  1. Alkaliphilus transvaalensis gen. nov., sp. nov., an extremely alkaliphilic bacterium isolated from a deep South African gold mine

    SciTech Connect

    Takai, Ken; Moser, Duane P.; Onstott, Tullis C.; Spoelstra, N; Pfiffner, Susan M.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2001-07-01

    A novel extreme alkaliphile was isolated from a mine water containment dam at 3.2 km bellow land surface in an ultra-deep gold mine near Carletonville, South Africa. The cells of this bacterium were straight to slightly curved rods, motile by flagella and formed endospores, Growth was observed over the temperature range 20-50 degreesC (optimum 40 degreesC; 45 min doubling time) and ph range 8.5-12.5 (optimum pH 10.0). The novel isolate, one of the most alkaliphilic micro-organisms yet described, was a strictly anaerobic chemo-organotroph capable of utilizing proteinaceous substrates such as yeast extract, peptone. tryptone and casein, Elemental sulfur, thiosulfate or fumarate, when included as accessory electron acceptors, improved growth. The G+C content of genomic DNA was 36.4 mol%, Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rDNA sequence indicated that the isolate is a member of cluster XI within the low G+C Cram-positive bacteria, but only distantly related to previously described members. On the basis of physiological and molecular properties, the isolate represents a novel species, for which the name Alkaliphilus transvaalensis gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed (type strain SAGM1(T)= JCM 10712(T)= ATCC 700919(T)). The mechanism of generation of the highly alkaline microbial habitat and the possible source of the alkaliphile are discussed.

  2. Alkaliphilus transvaalensis gen. nov., sp. nov., an extremely alkaliphilic bacterium isolated from a deep South African gold mine.

    PubMed

    Takai, K; Moser, D P; Onstott, T C; Spoelstra, N; Pfiffner, S M; Dohnalkova, A; Fredrickson, J K

    2001-07-01

    A novel extreme alkaliphile was isolated from a mine water containment dam at 3.2 km below land surface in an ultra-deep gold mine near Carletonville, South Africa. The cells of this bacterium were straight to slightly curved rods, motile by flagella and formed endospores. Growth was observed over the temperature range 20-50 degrees C (optimum 40 degrees C; 45 min doubling time) and pH range 8.5-12.5 (optimum pH 10.0). The novel isolate, one of the most alkaliphilic micro-organisms yet described, was a strictly anaerobic chemo-organotroph capable of utilizing proteinaceous substrates such as yeast extract, peptone, tryptone and casein. Elemental sulfur, thiosulfate or fumarate, when included as accessory electron acceptors, improved growth. The G+C content of genomic DNA was 36.4 mol %. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rDNA sequence indicated that the isolate is a member of cluster XI within the low G+C gram-positive bacteria, but only distantly related to previously described members. On the basis of physiological and molecular properties, the isolate represents a novel species, for which the name Alkaliphilus transvaalensis gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed (type strain SAGM1T = JCM 10712T = ATCC 700919T). The mechanism of generation of the highly alkaline microbial habitat and the possible source of the alkaliphile are discussed.

  3. A Novel Cyclodextrin Glycosyltransferase from Alkaliphilic Amphibacillus sp. NPST-10: Purification and Properties

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Abdelnasser S. S.; Al-Salamah, Ali A.; El-Tayeb, Mohamed A.; El-Badawi, Yahya B.; Antranikian, Garabed

    2012-01-01

    Screening for cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase (CGTase)-producing alkaliphilic bacteria from samples collected from hyper saline soda lakes (Wadi Natrun Valley, Egypt), resulted in isolation of potent CGTase producing alkaliphilic bacterium, termed NPST-10. 16S rDNA sequence analysis identified the isolate as Amphibacillus sp. CGTase was purified to homogeneity up to 22.1 fold by starch adsorption and anion exchange chromatography with a yield of 44.7%. The purified enzyme was a monomeric protein with an estimated molecular weight of 92 kDa using SDS-PAGE. Catalytic activities of the enzyme were found to be 88.8 U mg−1 protein, 20.0 U mg−1 protein and 11.0 U mg−1 protein for cyclization, coupling and hydrolytic activities, respectively. The enzyme was stable over a wide pH range from pH 5.0 to 11.0, with a maximal activity at pH 8.0. CGTase exhibited activity over a wide temperature range from 45 °C to 70 °C, with maximal activity at 50 °C and was stable at 30 °C to 55 °C for at least 1 h. Thermal stability of the purified enzyme could be significantly improved in the presence of CaCl2. Km and Vmax values were estimated using soluble starch as a substrate to be 1.7 ± 0.15 mg/mL and 100 ± 2.0 μmol/min, respectively. CGTase was significantly inhibited in the presence of Co2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, Hg2+, Ba2+, Cd2+, and 2-mercaptoethanol. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of CGTase production by Amphibacillus sp. The achieved high conversion of insoluble raw corn starch into cyclodextrins (67.2%) with production of mainly β-CD (86.4%), makes Amphibacillus sp. NPST-10 desirable for the cyclodextrin production industry. PMID:22949876

  4. [Rhodobaculum claviforme gen. nov., sp. nov., a New Alkaliphilic Nonsulfur Purple Bacterium].

    PubMed

    Bryantseva, I A; Gaisin, V A; Gorlenko, V M

    2015-01-01

    Two alkaliphilic strains of nonsulfur purple bacteria (NPB), B7-4 and B8-2, were isolated from southeast Siberia moderately saline alkaline steppe lakes with pH values above 9.0. The isolates were motile, polymorphous cells (from short rods to long spindly cells) 2.0-3.2 x 9.6-20.0 μm. Intracellular membranes of vesicular type were mostly located at the cell periphery. The microorganisms contained bacteriochlorophyll a and carotenoids of the spheroidene and spirilloxanthin series. The photosynthetic apparatus was represented by LH2 and LH1 light-harvesting complexes. In the presence of organic compounds, the strains grew aerobically in the dark or anaerobically in the light. Capacity for photo- and chemoautotrophic growth was not detected. The cbbl gene encoding RuBisCO was not revealed. Optimal growth of both strains occurred at 2% NaCl (range from 0.5 to 4%), pH 8.0-8.8 (range from 7.5 to 9.7), and 25-35 degrees C. The DNA G+C content was 67.6-69.8 mol %. Pairwise comparison of the nucleotides of the 16S rRNA genes revealed that strains B7-4 and B8-2 belonged to the same species (99.9% homology) and were most closely related to the aerobic alkaliphilic bacteriochlorophyll a-containing anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium (APB) Roseibacula alcaliphilum De (95.2%) and to NPB strains Rhodobaca barguzinensis VKM B-2406(T) (94.2%) and Rbc. bogoriensis LBB1(T) (93.9%). The isolates were closely related to the NPB Rhodobacter veldkampii DSM 11550(T) (94.8%) and to aerobic bacteriochlorophyll a-containing bacteria Roseinatronobacter monicus ROS 35(T) and Roseicitreum antarcticul ZS2-28(T) (93.5 and 93.9%, respectively). New strains were described as a new NPB genus and species of the family Rhodobacteriaceae, Rhodobaculum claviforme gen. nov., sp. nov., with B7-4(T) (VKM B-2708, LMG 28126) as the type strain.

  5. A Novel Alkaliphilic Bacillus Esterase Belongs to the 13th Bacterial Lipolytic Enzyme Family

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Lang; Xue, Yanfen; Zheng, Yingying; Lu, Jian R.; Ma, Yanhe

    2013-01-01

    Background Microbial derived lipolytic hydrolysts are an important class of biocatalysts because of their huge abundance and ability to display bioactivities under extreme conditions. In spite of recent advances, our understanding of these enzymes remains rudimentary. The aim of our research is to advance our understanding by seeking for more unusual lipid hydrolysts and revealing their molecular structure and bioactivities. Methodology/Principal Findings Bacillus. pseudofirmus OF4 is an extreme alkaliphile with tolerance of pH up to 11. In this work we successfully undertook a heterologous expression of a gene estof4 from the alkaliphilic B. pseudofirmus sp OF4. The recombinant protein called EstOF4 was purified into a homologous product by Ni-NTA affinity and gel filtration. The purified EstOF4 was active as dimer with the molecular weight of 64 KDa. It hydrolyzed a wide range of substrates including p-nitrophenyl esters (C2–C12) and triglycerides (C2–C6). Its optimal performance occurred at pH 8.5 and 50°C towards p-nitrophenyl caproate and triacetin. Sequence alignment revealed that EstOF4 shared 71% identity to esterase Est30 from Geobacillus stearothermophilus with a typical lipase pentapeptide motif G91LS93LG95. A structural model developed from homology modeling revealed that EstOF4 possessed a typical esterase 6α/7β hydrolase fold and a cap domain. Site-directed mutagenesis and inhibition studies confirmed the putative catalytic triad Ser93, Asp190 and His220. Conclusion EstOF4 is a new bacterial esterase with a preference to short chain ester substrates. With a high sequence identity towards esterase Est30 and several others, EstOF4 was classified into the same bacterial lipolytic family, Family XIII. All the members in this family originate from the same bacterial genus, bacillus and display optimal activities from neutral pH to alkaline conditions with short and middle chain length substrates. However, with roughly 70% sequence identity, these

  6. A lipid-accumulating alga maintains growth in outdoor, alkaliphilic raceway pond with mixed microbial communities

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Tisza A.S.; Prithiviraj, Bharath; Wahlen, Brad D.; Fields, Matthew W.; Peyton, Brent M.

    2016-01-07

    Algal biofuels and valuable co-products are being produced in both open and closed cultivation systems. Growing algae in open pond systems may be a more economical alternative, but this approach allows environmental microorganisms to colonize the pond and potentially infect or outcompete the algal “crop.” In this study, we monitored the microbial community of an outdoor, open raceway pond inoculated with a high lipid-producing alkaliphilic alga, Chlorella vulgaris BA050. The strain C. vulgaris BA050 was previously isolated from Soap Lake, Washington, a system characterized by a high pH (~9.8). An outdoor raceway pond (200 L) was inoculated with C. vulgaris and monitored for 10 days and then the culture was transferred to a 2,000 L raceway pond and cultivated for an additional 6 days. Community DNA samples were collected over the 16-day period in conjunction with water chemistry analyses and cell counts. Universal primers for the SSU rRNA gene sequences for Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archaea were used for barcoded pyrosequence determination. The environmental parameters that most closely correlated with C. vulgaris abundance were pH and phosphate. Community analyses indicated that the pond system remained dominated by the Chlorella population (93% of eukaryotic sequences), but was also colonized by other microorganisms. Bacterial sequence diversity increased over time while archaeal sequence diversity declined over the same time period. Using SparCC co-occurrence network analysis, a positive correlation was observed between C. vulgaris and Pseudomonas sp. throughout the experiment, which may suggest a symbiotic relationship between the two organisms. The putative relationship coupled with high pH may have contributed to the success of C. vulgaris. As a result, the characterization of the microbial community dynamics of an alkaliphilic open pond system provides significant insight into open pond systems that could be used to

  7. Extracellular Electron Transport-Mediated Fe(III) Reduction by a Community of Alkaliphilic Bacteria That Use Flavins as Electron Shuttles

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Samuel J.; McMillan, Duncan G. G.; Renz, Marc B.; Schmidt, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The biochemical and molecular mechanisms used by alkaliphilic bacterial communities to reduce metals in the environment are currently unknown. We demonstrate that an alkaliphilic (pH > 9) consortium dominated by Tissierella, Clostridium, and Alkaliphilus spp. is capable of using iron (Fe3+) as a final electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions. Iron reduction is associated with the production of a freely diffusible species that, upon rudimentary purification and subsequent spectroscopic, high-performance liquid chromatography, and electrochemical analysis, has been identified as a flavin species displaying properties indistinguishable from those of riboflavin. Due to the link between iron reduction and the onset of flavin production, it is likely that riboflavin has an import role in extracellular metal reduction by this alkaliphilic community. PMID:24141133

  8. Isolation of alkaliphilic bacteria for production of high optically pure L-(+)-lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Yokaryo, Hiroto; Tokiwa, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria that grow under alkaline conditions (pH 10) were isolated from various sources in Okinawa (Japan). These alkali-tolerant and alkaliphilic bacteria were classified as follows: Microbacterium sp. (1 strain), Enterococcus spp. (9 strains), Alkalibacterium spp. (3 strains), Exiguobacterium spp. (5 strains), Oceanobacillus spp. (3 strains) and Bacillus spp. (7 strains) by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. By fermentation, many strains were able to convert glucose into mainly L-(+)-lactic acid of high optical purity in alkaline broth. This result indicated that valuable L-(+)-lactic acid-producing bacteria could be isolated efficiently by screening under alkaline conditions. Six strains were selected and their ability to produce lactic acid at different initial pH was compared. Enterococcus casseliflavus strain 79w3 gave the highest lactic acid concentration. Lactic acid concentration and productivity were 103 g L(-1) (optical purity of 99.5% as L-isomer) and 2.2 g L(-1) h(-1), respectively when 129 g L(-1) of glucose was used by batch fermentation.

  9. Alkalispirillum mobile gen. nov., spec. nov., an alkaliphilic non-phototrophic member of the Ectothiorhodospiraceae.

    PubMed

    Rijkenberg, M J; Kort, R; Hellingwerf, K J

    2001-05-01

    From cultures of the anoxygenic phototroph Halorhodospira halophila SL-1, an aerobic, gram-negative spirillum was isolated. This moderately halophilic, alkaliphilic bacterium was motile by means of a single polar flagellum. It is described here as Alkalispirillum mobile gen. nov., spec. nov. Phylogenetic analysis of the Alkalispirillum mobile 16S rRNA gene led to its classification in the gamma-subclass of the Proteobacteria, as it appears closely related to phototrophic purple sulfur bacteria of the genera Ectothiorhodospira and Halorhodospira. Surprisingly, A. mobile is an obligate aerobe. The organism grows optimally with a number of carboxylic acids (such as sodium acetate) as carbon source, at 2% (i.e. approximately 0.34 M) sodium chloride, at pH 9-10, and at temperatures ranging from 35 to 38 degrees C. The dominant cellular fatty acids of Alkalispirillum mobile are C12:0, C16:0, C18:1cis11, and C18:0; its G+C content is 66.2+/-0.5 mol%.

  10. Methanobacterium subterraneum sp. nov., a new alkaliphilic, eurythermic and halotolerant methanogen isolated from deep granitic groundwater.

    PubMed

    Kotelnikova, S; Macario, A J; Pedersen, K

    1998-04-01

    Deep subterranean granitic aquifers have not been explored regarding methanogens until now. Three autotrophic methane-producing Archaea were isolated from deep granitic groundwater at depths of 68, 409 and 420 m. These organisms were non-motile, small, thin rods, 0.1-0.15 micron in diameter, and they could use hydrogen and carbon dioxide or formate as substrates for growth and methanogenesis. One of the isolates, denoted A8p, was studied in detail. It grew with a doubling time of 2.5 h under optimal conditions (20-40 degrees C, pH 7.8-8.8 and 0.2-1.2 M NaCl). Strain A8p is eurythermic as it grew between 3.6 and 45 degrees C. It was resistant to up to 20 mg bacitracin l-1. The G + C content was 54.5 mol%, as determined by thermal denaturation. Phylogenetic studies based upon 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons placed the isolate A8p in the genus Methanobacterium. Phenotypic and phylogenetic characters indicate that the alkaliphilic, halotolerant strain A8p represents a new species. We propose the name Methanobacterium subterraneum for this species, and strain A8p (= DSM 11074T) is the type strain.

  11. Highly thermostable and alkaline α-amylase from a halotolerant-alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. AB68

    PubMed Central

    Aygan, Ashabil; Arikan, Burhan; Korkmaz, Hatice; Dinçer, Sadik; Çolak, Ömer

    2008-01-01

    An alkaliphilic and highly thermostable α-amylase producing Bacillus sp. was isolated from Van soda lake. Enzyme synthesis occurred at temperatures between 25°C and 40°C. Analysis of the enzyme by SDS-PAGE revealed a single band which was estimated to be 66 kDa. The enzyme was active in a broad temperature range, between 20°C and 90°C, with an optimum at 50°C; and maximum activity was at pH 10.5. The enzyme was almost completely stable up to 80°C with a remaining activity over 90% after 30 min pre-incubation. Thermostability was not increased in the presence of Ca2+. An average of 75% and 60°C of remaining activity was observed when the enzyme was incubated between pH 5 and 9 for 1 h and for 2 h, respectively. The activity of the enzyme was inhibited by SDS and EDTA by 38% and 34%, respectively. PMID:24031264

  12. Isolation and characterization of a moderately thermophilic anaerobic alkaliphile, Clostridium paradoxum sp. nov.

    SciTech Connect

    Youhong Li; Wiegel, J.; Mandelco, L.

    1993-07-01

    Alkaliphilic, moderately thermophilic anaerobic bacteria able to grow above pH 10.5 and 55{degrees}C were isolated from various sewage plants in the United States. The strains were motile with two to six peritrichous flagella and formed round to slightly oval terminal spores in terminally distended and slightly enlarged cells. Sporulated cells remained motile. The pH range for growth was between 7.0 and 11.1, with an optimum of around 10.1. At pH 10.1 the temperature range for growth was between 30 and 63{degrees}C, with an optimum of 56{degrees}C. The shortest observed doubling time (glucose) was around 16 min at 56{degrees}C and pH 10.1. No dissimilatory sulfate reduction was detected. The organism utilized glucose, fructose, sucrose, maltose, and pyruvate but required yeast extract or tryptone for growth. Optimal NaCl concentrations for growth were between 50 and 200 mM. The guanine-plus-cytosine content was 30.0 {+-} 0.10 mol%. On the basis of unique properties and 16S rRNA analysis, the strains are placed in a new species, Clostridium paradoxum, referring to the unusual retainment of motility by sporulated cells. Strain JW-YL-7 (DSM 7308) is designated as the type strain.

  13. Predictors of elevational biodiversity gradients change from single taxa to the multi-taxa community level

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Marcell K.; Hemp, Andreas; Appelhans, Tim; Behler, Christina; Classen, Alice; Detsch, Florian; Ensslin, Andreas; Ferger, Stefan W.; Frederiksen, Sara B.; Gebert, Friederike; Haas, Michael; Helbig-Bonitz, Maria; Hemp, Claudia; Kindeketa, William J.; Mwangomo, Ephraim; Ngereza, Christine; Otte, Insa; Röder, Juliane; Rutten, Gemma; Schellenberger Costa, David; Tardanico, Joseph; Zancolli, Giulia; Deckert, Jürgen; Eardley, Connal D.; Peters, Ralph S.; Rödel, Mark-Oliver; Schleuning, Matthias; Ssymank, Axel; Kakengi, Victor; Zhang, Jie; Böhning-Gaese, Katrin; Brandl, Roland; Kalko, Elisabeth K.V.; Kleyer, Michael; Nauss, Thomas; Tschapka, Marco; Fischer, Markus; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf

    2016-01-01

    The factors determining gradients of biodiversity are a fundamental yet unresolved topic in ecology. While diversity gradients have been analysed for numerous single taxa, progress towards general explanatory models has been hampered by limitations in the phylogenetic coverage of past studies. By parallel sampling of 25 major plant and animal taxa along a 3.7 km elevational gradient on Mt. Kilimanjaro, we quantify cross-taxon consensus in diversity gradients and evaluate predictors of diversity from single taxa to a multi-taxa community level. While single taxa show complex distribution patterns and respond to different environmental factors, scaling up diversity to the community level leads to an unambiguous support for temperature as the main predictor of species richness in both plants and animals. Our findings illuminate the influence of taxonomic coverage for models of diversity gradients and point to the importance of temperature for diversification and species coexistence in plant and animal communities. PMID:28004657

  14. New taxa of Euglenophyta from China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhi-Xin

    1995-12-01

    Eight new taxa of Euglenophyta are described in this paper. They were collected from several provinces in China and respectively named Euglena allorgei var. exsulcata, E. pisciformis var. globosa, E. tortilis. Lepocinclis glabra var. papillata, Phacus pisiformis, Ph. strombuliformis, Ph. trimarginatus var. truncatus and Astasia angusta.

  15. Alkalibacterium olivoapovliticus gen. nov., sp. nov., a new obligately alkaliphilic bacterium isolated from edible-olive wash-waters.

    PubMed

    Ntougias, S; Russell, N J

    2001-05-01

    A novel Gram-positive, obligately alkaliphilic, non-sporulating, rod-shaped, flagellated bacterium is described. Three different strains of the bacterium were isolated from the wash-waters of edible-olive production. The strains are motile, psychrotolerant, halotolerant, facultatively anaerobic bacteria with a pH optimum of 9.0-9.4 for two strains and 9.8-10.2 for the third. They are catalase- and oxidase-negative. A range of hexoses and some disaccharides composed of hexoses, but not pentoses are metabolized by the bacterial strains: D(+)-glucose, D(+)-glucose 6-phosphate, D(+)-cellobiose, starch or sucrose are the carbohydrates best utilized. No common amino acids are utilized by the three alkaliphilic strains, but yeast extract can serve as sole carbon and energy source. The major membrane phospholipids are diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and an unknown phospholipid, all containing saturated and unsaturated, even-carbon-numbered fatty acyl chains with hexadecanoic and hexadecen(7)oic as the predominant components. The G+C content of the DNA in all three strains is 39.7+/-1.0 mol% and the DNA relatedness by hybridization is >88% for all pairings of the three strains. The results of 16S rRNA sequence comparisons revealed that the strains represent a new alkaliphilic linkage in the order Bacillales, belonging to the Carnobacterium/Aerococcus-like spectrum. It is proposed that the strains should be assigned to a new genus and species, Alkalibacterium olivoapovliticus. The three strains, designated WW2-SN4aT, WW2-SN4c and WW2-SN5, have been deposited with Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen und Zellkulturen (DSMZ) as DSM 13175T, DSM 12937 and DSM 12938 respectively, and in the National Collection of Industrial and Marine Bacteria as NCIMB 13710T, NCIMB 13711 and NCIMB 13712, respectively. The type species of this genus is Alkalibacterium olivoapovliticus and the type strain is WW2-SN4aT.

  16. Alkaline Response of a Halotolerant Alkaliphilic Halomonas Strain and Functional Diversity of Its Na+(K+)/H+ Antiporters.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Bin; Meng, Yiwei; Cui, Yanbing; Li, Chunfang; Tao, Fei; Yin, Huijia; Yang, Chunyu; Xu, Ping

    2016-12-09

    Halomonas sp. Y2 is a halotolerant alkaliphilic strain from Na(+)-rich pulp mill wastewater with high alkalinity (pH >11.0). Transcriptome analysis of this isolate revealed this strain may use various transport systems for pH homeostasis. In particular, the genes encoding four putative Na(+)/H(+) antiporters were differentially expressed upon acidic or alkaline conditions. Further evidence, from heterologous expression and mutant studies, suggested that Halomonas sp. Y2 employs its Na(+)/H(+) antiporters in a labor division way to deal with saline and alkaline environments. Ha-NhaD2 displayed robust Na(+)(Li(+)) resistance and high transport activities in Escherichia coli; a ΔHa-nhaD2 mutant exhibited growth inhibition at high Na(+)(Li(+)) concentrations at pH values of 6.2, 8.0, and 10.0, suggesting its physiological role in osmotic homeostasis. In contrast, Ha-NhaD1 showed much weaker activities in ion exporting and pH homeostasis. Ha-Mrp displayed a combination of properties similar to those of Mrp transporters from some Bacillus alkaliphiles and neutrophiles. This conferred obvious Na(+)(Li(+), K(+)) resistance in E. coli-deficient strains, as those ion transport spectra of some neutrophil Mrp antiporters. Conversely, similar to the Bacillus alkaliphiles, Ha-Mrp showed central roles in the pH homeostasis of Halomonas sp. Y2. An Ha-mrp-disrupted mutant was seriously inhibited by high concentrations of Na(+)(Li(+), K(+)) but only under alkaline conditions. Ha-NhaP was determined to be a K(+)/H(+) antiporter and shown to confer strong K(+) resistance both at acidic and alkaline stresses.

  17. [Amphibacillus fermentum sp. nov., Amphibacillus tropicus sp. nov.--new alkaliphilic, facultatively anaerobic, saccharolytic Bacilli from Lake Magadi].

    PubMed

    Zhilina, T N; Garnova, E S; Turova, T P; Kostrikina, N A; Zavarzin, G A

    2001-01-01

    New alkaliphilic, saccharolytic, rod-shaped, gram-positive bacteria resistant to heating and drying and phylogenetically affiliated to the Bacillus lineage were isolated under strictly anaerobic conditions from sediments of the alkaline and highly mineralized Lake Magadi. Strain Z-7792 forms endospores; in strain Z-7984, endospore formation was not revealed. The strains are capable of both anaerobic growth (at the expense of fermentation of glucose and certain mono- and disaccharides with the formation of formate, ethanol, and acetate) and aerobic growth. Among polysaccharides, the strains hydrolyze starch, glycogen, and xylan. Yeast extract or methionine are required for growth. The strains are strict alkaliphiles exhibiting obligate requirement for Na+ and carbonate ions but not for Cl- ion. Growth occurs at a total mineralization as high as 3.3-3.6 M Na+, with an optimum at 1-1.7 M Na+. Strain Z-7792 is an obligate alkaliphile with a pH growth range of 8.5-11.5 and an optimum of 9.5-9.7. Strain Z-7984 grows in a pH range of 7.0-10.5 with an optimum at 8.0-9.5. Both strains are mesophiles having a growth optimum at 37-38 degrees C. They belong to bacilli with a low G + C content. The G + C contents of the DNA of strains Z-7792 and Z-7984 are 39.2 and 41.5 mol%, respectively. These isolates of facultatively anaerobic, strictly alkaliphilic, Na(+)-dependent bacilli can be considered representatives of the ecological group adapted to the life at drying-up shoars of soda lakes. Because of their independence of NaCl and lack of obligate dependence on sodium carbonates, the isolates are to be assigned to athalassophilic organisms. According to their physiological and phylogenetic characteristics, they taxonomically belong to group 1 of the species of bacilli, occupying a position intermediate between the genera Amphibacillus and Gracilibacillus. The isolates are described as new species of Amphibacillus: A. fermentum (type strain, Z-7984T) and A. tropicus (type strain

  18. Phage display of xylan-binding module of xylanase J from alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. strain 41M-1.

    PubMed

    Miyakubo, H; Sugio, A; Kubo, T; Nakai, R; Wakabayashi, K; Nakamura, S

    2000-01-01

    Xylanase J from alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. strain 41M-1 has a family 11/G catalytic domain and a xylan-binding module (XBM). The XBM of xylanase J was displayed on the surface of filamentous bacteriophage. The XBM expressed on the phage surface retained binding activity to xylan. Random mutations were introduced in the XBM gene by error-prone PCR, and the repertoire was cloned for display on phage. Sequence analysis of the xylan-binding activity-deficient mutants revealed that Phe 284 and Trp317 of the XBM would contribute to the xylan-binding activity.

  19. Amphibacillus jilinensis sp. nov., a facultatively anaerobic, alkaliphilic bacillus from a soda lake.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Yue; Zheng, Gang; Zhang, Wen-Wu; Xu, Xue-Wei; Wu, Min; Zhu, Xu-Fen

    2010-11-01

    A facultatively anaerobic, alkaliphilic, spore-forming, Gram-positive-staining rod, designated Y1(T), was isolated under strictly anaerobic conditions from sediment of a soda lake in Jilin province, China. The strain was not dependent on Na(+) but was highly halotolerant and grew optimally in medium JY with 0.5 M Na(+) (0.06 M NaHCO(3) and 0.44 M NaCl). The optimum pH for growth was 9.0, with a range of pH 7.5-10.5. No growth occurred at pH 7.0 or 11.0. The strain was mesophilic, with a temperature range of 15-45 °C and optimum growth at 32 °C. Strain Y1(T) was able to use certain mono- and oligosaccharides. Soluble starch and casein were hydrolysed. The methyl red test, Voges-Proskauer test and tests for catalase and oxidase activities were negative. The predominant fatty acids were anteiso-C(15 : 0) and iso-C(15 : 0). Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed 93.4-96.8 % sequence similarity to members of the genus Amphibacillus. The DNA G+C content was 37.7 mol% (T(m) method). The DNA-DNA relatedness of strain Y1(T) with respect to Amphibacillus tropicus DSM 13870(T) and Amphibacillus sediminis DSM 21624(T) was 48 and 37 %, respectively. On the basis of its phylogenetic position and the DNA-DNA relatedness data as well as its physiological and biochemical properties, strain Y1(T) represents a novel species of the genus Amphibacillus, for which the name Amphibacillus jilinensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is Y1(T) (=CGMCC 1.5123(T) =JCM 16149(T)).

  20. Treatment of Alkaline Cr(VI)-Contaminated Leachate with an Alkaliphilic Metal-Reducing Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Mathew P.; Khijniak, Tatiana V.; Boothman, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Chromium in its toxic Cr(VI) valence state is a common contaminant particularly associated with alkaline environments. A well-publicized case of this occurred in Glasgow, United Kingdom, where poorly controlled disposal of a cementitious industrial by-product, chromite ore processing residue (COPR), has resulted in extensive contamination by Cr(VI)-contaminated alkaline leachates. In the search for viable bioremediation treatments for Cr(VI), a variety of bacteria that are capable of reduction of the toxic and highly soluble Cr(VI) to the relatively nontoxic and less mobile Cr(III) oxidation state, predominantly under circumneutral pH conditions, have been isolated. Recently, however, alkaliphilic bacteria that have the potential to reduce Cr(VI) under alkaline conditions have been identified. This study focuses on the application of a metal-reducing bacterium to the remediation of alkaline Cr(VI)-contaminated leachates from COPR. This bacterium, belonging to the Halomonas genus, was found to exhibit growth concomitant to Cr(VI) reduction under alkaline conditions (pH 10). Bacterial cells were able to rapidly remove high concentrations of aqueous Cr(VI) (2.5 mM) under anaerobic conditions, up to a starting pH of 11. Cr(VI) reduction rates were controlled by pH, with slower removal observed at pH 11, compared to pH 10, while no removal was observed at pH 12. The reduction of aqueous Cr(VI) resulted in the precipitation of Cr(III) biominerals, which were characterized using transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (TEM-EDX) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The effectiveness of this haloalkaliphilic bacterium for Cr(VI) reduction at high pH suggests potential for its use as an in situ treatment of COPR and other alkaline Cr(VI)-contaminated environments. PMID:26048926

  1. Pseudomonas toyotomiensis sp. nov., a psychrotolerant facultative alkaliphile that utilizes hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Kikue; Yamahira, Keiko; Nakajima, Kenji; Nodasaka, Yoshinobu; Okuyama, Hidetoshi; Yumoto, Isao

    2011-08-01

    A psychrotolerant, facultatively alkaliphilic strain, HT-3(T), was isolated from a sample of soil immersed in hot-spring water containing hydrocarbons in Toyotomi, Hokkaido, Japan. 16S rRNA gene sequence-based phylogeny suggested that strain HT-3(T) is a member of the genus Pseudomonas and belongs to the Pseudomonas oleovorans group. Cells of the isolate were Gram-negative, aerobic, straight rods, motile by a single polar flagellum. The strain grew at 4-42 °C, with optimum growth at 35 °C at pH 7, and at pH 6-10. It hydrolysed Tweens 20, 40, 60 and 80, but not casein, gelatin, starch or DNA. Its major isoprenoid quinone was ubiquinone-9 (Q-9) and the DNA G+C content was 65.1 mol%. The whole-cell fatty acid profile consisted mainly of C(16 : 0), C(16 : 1)ω9c and C(18 : 1)ω9c. Phylogenetic analyses based on gyrB, rpoB and rpoD sequences revealed that the isolate could be discriminated from Pseudomonas species that exhibited more than 97 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity and phylogenetic neighbours belonging to the P. oleovorans group including the closest relative of the isolate, Pseudomonas alcaliphila. DNA-DNA hybridization with P. alcaliphila AL15-21(T) revealed 51 ± 5 % relatedness. Owing to differences in phenotypic properties and phylogenetic analyses based on multilocus gene sequence analysis and DNA-DNA relatedness data, the isolate merits classification in a novel species, for which the name Pseudomonas toyotomiensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is HT-3(T) ( = JCM 15604(T)  = NCIMB 14511(T)).

  2. Treatment of Alkaline Cr(VI)-Contaminated Leachate with an Alkaliphilic Metal-Reducing Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Watts, Mathew P; Khijniak, Tatiana V; Boothman, Christopher; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2015-08-15

    Chromium in its toxic Cr(VI) valence state is a common contaminant particularly associated with alkaline environments. A well-publicized case of this occurred in Glasgow, United Kingdom, where poorly controlled disposal of a cementitious industrial by-product, chromite ore processing residue (COPR), has resulted in extensive contamination by Cr(VI)-contaminated alkaline leachates. In the search for viable bioremediation treatments for Cr(VI), a variety of bacteria that are capable of reduction of the toxic and highly soluble Cr(VI) to the relatively nontoxic and less mobile Cr(III) oxidation state, predominantly under circumneutral pH conditions, have been isolated. Recently, however, alkaliphilic bacteria that have the potential to reduce Cr(VI) under alkaline conditions have been identified. This study focuses on the application of a metal-reducing bacterium to the remediation of alkaline Cr(VI)-contaminated leachates from COPR. This bacterium, belonging to the Halomonas genus, was found to exhibit growth concomitant to Cr(VI) reduction under alkaline conditions (pH 10). Bacterial cells were able to rapidly remove high concentrations of aqueous Cr(VI) (2.5 mM) under anaerobic conditions, up to a starting pH of 11. Cr(VI) reduction rates were controlled by pH, with slower removal observed at pH 11, compared to pH 10, while no removal was observed at pH 12. The reduction of aqueous Cr(VI) resulted in the precipitation of Cr(III) biominerals, which were characterized using transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (TEM-EDX) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The effectiveness of this haloalkaliphilic bacterium for Cr(VI) reduction at high pH suggests potential for its use as an in situ treatment of COPR and other alkaline Cr(VI)-contaminated environments.

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of Alkaliphilus metalliredigens Strain QYMF, an Alkaliphilic and Metal-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from Borax-Contaminated Leachate Ponds.

    PubMed

    Hwang, C; Copeland, A; Lucas, S; Lapidus, A; Barry, K; Detter, J C; Glavina Del Rio, T; Hammon, N; Israni, S; Dalin, E; Tice, H; Pitluck, S; Chertkov, O; Brettin, T; Bruce, D; Han, C; Schmutz, J; Larimer, F; Land, M L; Hauser, L; Kyrpides, N; Mikhailova, N; Ye, Q; Zhou, J; Richardson, P; Fields, M W

    2016-11-03

    Alkaliphilus metalliredigens strain QYMF is an anaerobic, alkaliphilic, and metal-reducing bacterium associated with phylum Firmicutes QYMF was isolated from alkaline borax leachate ponds. The genome sequence will help elucidate the role of metal-reducing microorganisms under alkaline environments, a capability that is not commonly observed in metal respiring-microorganisms.

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Alkaliphilus metalliredigens Strain QYMF, an Alkaliphilic and Metal-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from Borax-Contaminated Leachate Ponds

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, A.; Lucas, S.; Lapidus, A.; Barry, K.; Detter, J. C.; Glavina del Rio, T.; Hammon, N.; Israni, S.; Dalin, E.; Tice, H.; Pitluck, S.; Chertkov, O.; Brettin, T.; Bruce, D.; Han, C.; Schmutz, J.; Larimer, F.; Land, M. L.; Hauser, L.; Kyrpides, N.; Mikhailova, N.; Ye, Q.; Zhou, J.; Richardson, P.; Fields, M. W.

    2016-01-01

    Alkaliphilus metalliredigens strain QYMF is an anaerobic, alkaliphilic, and metal-reducing bacterium associated with phylum Firmicutes. QYMF was isolated from alkaline borax leachate ponds. The genome sequence will help elucidate the role of metal-reducing microorganisms under alkaline environments, a capability that is not commonly observed in metal respiring-microorganisms. PMID:27811105

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Alkaliphilus metalliredigens QYMF, an Alkaliphilic and Metal-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from Borax-contaminated Leachate Ponds

    DOE PAGES

    Hwang, C.; Copeland, A.; Lucas, Susan; ...

    2016-11-03

    Alkaliphilus metalliredigens QYMF is an anaerobic, alkaliphilic, and metal-reducing bacterium associated with phylum Firmicutes. QYMF was isolated from alkaline borax leachate ponds. The genome sequence will help elucidate the role of metal-reducing microorganisms under alkaline environments, a capability that is not commonly observed in metal respiring-microorganisms.

  6. Bioenergetics and the Role of Soluble Cytochromes c for Alkaline Adaptation in Gram-Negative Alkaliphilic Pseudomonas

    PubMed Central

    Matsuno, T.; Yumoto, I.

    2015-01-01

    Very few studies have been conducted on alkaline adaptation of Gram-negative alkaliphiles. The reversed difference of H+ concentration across the membrane will make energy production considerably difficult for Gram-negative as well as Gram-positive bacteria. Cells of the alkaliphilic Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas alcaliphila AL15-21T grown at pH 10 under low-aeration intensity have a soluble cytochrome c content that is 3.6-fold higher than that of the cells grown at pH 7 under high-aeration intensity. Cytochrome c-552 content was higher (64% in all soluble cytochromes c) than those of cytochrome c-554 and cytochrome c-551. In the cytochrome c-552-dificient mutant grown at pH 10 under low-aeration intensity showed a marked decrease in μmax⁡ [h−1] (40%) and maximum cell turbidity (25%) relative to those of the wild type. Considering the high electron-retaining abilities of the three soluble cytochromes c, the deteriorations in the growth of the cytochrome c-552-deficient mutant could be caused by the soluble cytochromes c acting as electron storages in the periplasmic space of the bacterium. These electron-retaining cytochromes c may play a role as electron and H+ condenser, which facilitate terminal oxidation at high pH under air-limited conditions, which is difficult to respire owing to less oxygen and less H+. PMID:25705691

  7. Desulfonatronum paiuteum sp. nov.: A New Alkaliphilic, Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium, Isolated from Soda Mono Lake, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena; Hoover, Richard B.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William; Cleland, David; Krader, Paul; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A novel alkaliphilic, sulfate reducing bacterium strain MLF1(sup T) was isolated from sediments of soda Mono Lake, California. Gram-negative vibrion cells, motile by singular polar flagellum, with sizes 0.5 - 0.6x 1.2 - 2.0 micron occurred singly, in pairs or short spirilla. Growth was observed over the temperature range of +15 C to +48 C (optimum +37 C), NaCl concentration range is greater than 1 - 7 %, wt/vol (optimum 3 %, wt/vol) and pH range 7.8 - 10.5 (optimum pH 9.0 - 9.4). The novel isolate is strictly alkaliphilic, requires high carbonate concentration in medium, obligately anaerobic and catalase negative. As electron donors strain MLF1(sup T) uses hydrogen, formate, ethanol. Sulfate, sulfite, and thiosulfate (but not sulfur or nitrate) can be used as electron acceptors. The sole end product of growth on formate was H2S. Strain MLF1(sup T) is resistant to kanamycin and gentamycin, but sensitive to chloramphenicol and tetracycline. Na2MoO4 inhibits growth of strain MLF1(sup T). The sum of G+C in DNA is 63.1 mol% (by HPLC method). On the basis of physiological and molecular properties, the isolate was considered as novel species of genus Desulfonatronum; and the name Desulfonatronum paiuteum sp. nov., is proposed (type strain MLF1(sup T) = ATCC BAA-395(sup T) = DSMZ 14708(sup T).

  8. Higher thermal acclimation potential of respiration but not photosynthesis in two alpine Picea taxa in contrast to two lowland congeners.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao Wei; Wang, Jing Ru; Ji, Ming Fei; Milne, Richard Ian; Wang, Ming Hao; Liu, Jian-Quan; Shi, Sheng; Yang, Shu-Li; Zhao, Chang-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The members of the genus Picea form a dominant component in many alpine and boreal forests which are the major sink for atmospheric CO2. However, little is known about the growth response and acclimation of CO2 exchange characteristics to high temperature stress in Picea taxa from different altitudes. Gas exchange parameters and growth characteristics were recorded from four year old seedlings of two alpine (Picea likiangensis vars. rubescens and linzhiensis) and two lowland (P. koraiensis and P. meyeri) taxa. Seedlings were grown at moderate (25°C/15°C) and high (35°C/25°C) day/night temperatures, for four months. The approximated biomass increment (ΔD2H) for all taxa decreased under high temperature stress, associated with decreased photosynthesis and increased respiration. However, the two alpine taxa exhibited lower photosynthetic acclimation and higher respiratory acclimation than either lowland taxon. Moreover, higher leaf dry mass per unit area (LMA) and leaf nitrogen content per unit area (Narea), and a smaller change in the nitrogen use efficiency of photosynthesis (PNUE) for lowland taxa indicated that these maintained higher homeostasis of photosynthesis than alpine taxa. The higher respiration rates produced more energy for repair and maintenance biomass, especially for higher photosynthetic activity for lowland taxa, which causes lower respiratory acclimation. Thus, the changes of ΔD2H for alpine spruces were larger than that for lowland spruces. These results indicate that long term heat stress negatively impact on the growth of Picea seedlings, and alpine taxa are more affected than low altitude ones by high temperature stress. Hence the altitude ranges of Picea taxa should be taken into account when predicting changes to carbon fluxes in warmer conditions.

  9. Lysinibacillus alkaliphilus sp. nov., an extremely alkaliphilic bacterium, and emended description of genus Lysinibacillus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fei; Feng, Youzhi; Chen, Ruirui; Zhang, Jianwei; Lin, Xiangui

    2015-08-01

    A novel aerobic, alkaliphilic, Gram-staining-positive, endospore-forming bacterium, strain OMN17T, was isolated from a typical sandy loam soil under long-term OMN fertilization (half organic manure N plus half mineral N fertilizer) in northern China and was subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. The best growth was achieved at 30 °C and pH 8-10 in medium containing 0.5% (w/v) NaCl. The cell-wall peptidoglycan of strain OMN17T was type A4α; (l-Lys-Gly-d-Asp) and the cell-wall sugars were ribose, traces of galactose and arabinose. The only respiratory quinone found in strain OMN17T was menaquinone 7 (MK-7). The major cellular fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0 and anteiso-C15 : 0. The major polar lipids were found to be phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and diphosphatidylglycerol. Phylogenetic analysis of strain OMN17T based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that the strain was most closely related to Lysinibacillus halotolerans (97.8%), Lysinibacillus sinduriensis (97.5%), Lysinibacillus chungkukjangi (97.4%) and Lysinibacillus xylanilyticus (97.0%). The DNA-DNA hybridization results indicated that this strain was distinct from other species of the genus Lysinibacillus, the degree of relatedness being 21.8 ± 0.2% with L. halotolerans, 45.6 ± 1.8% with L. sinduriensis, 33.7 ± 1.2% with L. chungkukjangi and 23.7 ± 0.7% with L. xylanilyticus. The DNA G+C content of strain OMN17T was 38.1 mol%. The phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and genetic analyses identified strain OMN17T as a novel species of the genus Lysinibacillus, for which the name Lysinibacillus alkaliphilus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is OMN17T ( = DSM 28019T = CCTCC AB 2014073T). An emended description of the genus Lysinibacillus is also provided.

  10. Marine taxa track local climate velocities.

    PubMed

    Pinsky, Malin L; Worm, Boris; Fogarty, Michael J; Sarmiento, Jorge L; Levin, Simon A

    2013-09-13

    Organisms are expected to adapt or move in response to climate change, but observed distribution shifts span a wide range of directions and rates. Explanations often emphasize biological distinctions among species, but general mechanisms have been elusive. We tested an alternative hypothesis: that differences in climate velocity-the rate and direction that climate shifts across the landscape-can explain observed species shifts. We compiled a database of coastal surveys around North America from 1968 to 2011, sampling 128 million individuals across 360 marine taxa. Climate velocity explained the magnitude and direction of shifts in latitude and depth much more effectively than did species characteristics. Our results demonstrate that marine species shift at different rates and directions because they closely track the complex mosaic of local climate velocities.

  11. Foundational issues concerning taxa and taxon names.

    PubMed

    Ereshefsky, Marc

    2007-04-01

    In a series of articles, Rieppel (2005, Biol. Philos. 20:465-487; 2006a, Cladistics 22:186-197; 2006b, Systematist 26:5-9), Keller et al. (2003, Bot. Rev. 69:93-110), and Nixon and Carpenter (2000, Cladistics 16:298-318) criticize the philosophical foundations of the PhyloCode. They argue that species and higher taxa are not individuals, and they reject the view that taxon names are rigid designators. Furthermore, they charge supporters of the individuality thesis and rigid designator theory with assuming essentialism, committing logical inconsistencies, and offering proposals that render taxonomy untestable. These charges are unsound. Such charges turn on confusions over rigid designator theory and the distinction between kinds and individuals. In addition, Rieppel's, Keller et al.'s, and Nixon and Carpenter's proposed alternatives are no better and have their own problems. The individuality thesis and rigid designator theory should not be quickly abandoned.

  12. [Clostridium alkalicellum sp. nov., an obligately alkaliphilic cellulolytic bacterium from a soda lake in the Baikal region].

    PubMed

    Zhilina, T N; Kevbrin, V V; Turova, T P; Lysenko, A M; Kostrikina, N A; Zavarzin, G A

    2005-01-01

    The first anaerobic alkaliphilic cellulolytic microorganism has been isolated from the Verkhnee Beloe soda lake (Buryatiya, Russia) with pH 10.2 and a salt content of up to 24 g/l. Five strains were characterized. Strain Z-7026 was chosen as the type strain. The cells of the isolate are gram-positive spore-forming rods. A mucous external capsule is produced. The microorganism is obligately alkaliphilic, growing in a pH range of 8.0-10.2, with an optimum at pH 9.0. Sodium ions and, in carbonate-buffered media, sodium chloride are obligately required. The microorganism is slightly halophilic; it grows at 0.017-0.4 M Na+ with an optimum at 0.15-0.3 M Na+. The metabolism is fermentative and strictly anaerobic. Cellulose, cellobiose, and xylan can be used as growth substrates. Plant and algal debris can be fermented. Lactate, ethanol, acetate, hydrogen, and traces of formate are produced during cellulose or cellobiose fermentation. Yeast extract or vitamins are required for anabolic purposes. The microorganism fixes dinitrogen and is nitrogenase-positive. It is tolerant to up to 48 mM Na2S. Growth is not inhibited by kanamycin or neomycin. Chloramphenicol, streptomycin, penicillin, ampicillin, ampiox, bacillin, novobiocin, and bacitracin suppress growth. The DNA G+C content is 29.9 mol %. According to the nucleotide sequence of its 16S rRNA gene, strain Z-7026 is phylogenetically close to the neutrophilic cellulolytic bacteria Clostridium thermocellum (95.5%), C. aldrichii (94.9%), and Acetivibrio cellulolyticus (94.8%). It is proposed as a new species: Clostridium alkalicellum sp. nov.

  13. Replacement of amino acid sequence features of a- and c-subunits of ATP synthases of Alkaliphilic Bacillus with the Bacillus consensus sequence results in defective oxidative phosphorylation and non-fermentative growth at pH 10.5.

    PubMed

    Wang, ZhenXiong; Hicks, David B; Guffanti, Arthur A; Baldwin, Katisha; Krulwich, Terry Ann

    2004-06-18

    Mitchell's (Mitchell, P. (1961) Nature 191, 144-148) chemiosmotic model of energy coupling posits a bulk electrochemical proton gradient (Deltap) as the sole driving force for proton-coupled ATP synthesis via oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and for other bioenergetic work. Two properties of proton-coupled OXPHOS by alkaliphilic Bacillus species pose a challenge to this tenet: robust ATP synthesis at pH 10.5 that does not correlate with the magnitude of the Deltap and the failure of artificially imposed potentials to substitute for respiration-generated potentials in energizing ATP synthesis at high pH (Krulwich, T. (1995) Mol. Microbiol. 15, 403-410). Here we show that these properties, in alkaliphilic Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4, depend upon alkaliphile-specific features in the proton pathway through the a- and c-subunits of ATP synthase. Site-directed changes were made in six such features to the corresponding sequence in Bacillus megaterium, which reflects the consensus sequence for non-alkaliphilic Bacillus. Five of the six single mutants assembled an active ATPase/ATP synthase, and four of these mutants exhibited a specific defect in non-fermentative growth at high pH. Most of these mutants lost the ability to generate the high phosphorylation potentials at low bulk Deltap that are characteristic of alkaliphiles. The aLys(180) and aGly(212) residues that are predicted to be in the proton uptake pathway of the a-subunit were specifically implicated in pH-dependent restriction of proton flux through the ATP synthase to and from the bulk phase. The evidence included greatly enhanced ATP synthesis in response to an artificially imposed potential at high pH. The findings demonstrate that the ATP synthase of extreme alkaliphiles has special features that are required for non-fermentative growth and OXPHOS at high pH.

  14. Anditalea andensis ANESC-ST - An Alkaliphilic Halotolerant Bacterium Capable of Electricity Generation under Alkaline-Saline Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wei; Wang, Victor Bochuan; Zhao, Cui-E; Zhang, Qichun; Loo, Say Chye Joachim; Yang, Liang; Xu, Chenjie

    2015-01-01

    A great challenge in wastewater bioremediation is the sustained activity of viable microorganisms, which can contribute to the breakdown of waste contaminants, especially in alkaline pH conditions. Identification of extremophiles with bioremediation capability can improve the efficiency of wastewater treatment. Here, we report the discovery of an electrochemically active alkaliphilic halotolerant bacterium, Anditalea andensis ANESC-ST (=CICC10485T=NCCB 100412T), which is capable of generating bioelectricity in alkaline–saline conditions. A. andensis ANESC-ST was shown to grow in alkaline conditions between pH 7.0–11.0 and also under high salt condition (up to 4 wt% NaCl). Electrical output was further demonstrated in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) with an average current density of ~0.5 µA/cm2, even under the harsh condition of 4 wt% NaCl and pH 9.0. Subsequent introduction of secreted extracellular metabolites into MFCs inoculated with Escherichia coli or Pseudomonas aeruginosa yielded enhanced electrical output. The ability of A. andensis ANESC-ST to generate energy under alkaline–saline conditions points towards a solution for bioelectricity recovery from alkaline–saline wastewater. This is the first report of A.andensis ANESC-ST producing bioelectricity at high salt concentration and pH. PMID:26171779

  15. Presence of Na+-stimulated P-type ATPase in the membrane of a facultatively anaerobic alkaliphile, Exiguobacterium aurantiacum.

    PubMed

    Koyama, N

    1999-07-01

    It was found that a facultatively anaerobic alkaliphile, Exiguobacterium aurantiacum, possesses a membrane-bound ATPase, which was activated specifically by Na+. The Na+-stimulated ATPase activity reached a maximum value at 200 mM NaCl. In the presence of 200 mM NaCl, the activity was drastically reduced by vanadate, a potent inhibitor of P-type ATPase, with a half-maximal inhibition at 1 microM. Incubation of the membranes with [gamma-32P]ATP followed by acidic lithium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated the existence of two phosphorylated intermediates with apparent molecular masses of 60 and 100 kDa. Only phosphorylation of the 100-kDa polypeptide was inhibited by vanadate. The membrane extract containing Na+-stimulated ATPase, when reconstituted into soybean phospholipid vesicles, exhibited 22Na+ transport by the addition of ATP, which was inhibited by vanadate and gramicidin. It is likely that the Na+-stimulated ATPase belongs to P-type and is involved in Na+ transport.

  16. An alkali-tolerant xylanase produced by the newly isolated alkaliphilic Bacillus pumilus from paper mill effluent.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Zhang, Wei-wei; Liu, Jin-ni; Cao, Yao-ling; Bai, Xiao-ting; Gong, Yue-sheng; Cen, Pei-lin; Yang, Ming-ming

    2010-10-01

    An alkaline active xylanase, XynBYG, was purified from an alkaliphilic Bacillus pumilus BYG, which was newly isolated from paper mill effluent. It had an optimum pH of 8.0-9.0, and showed good stability after incubated at pH 9.0 for 120 min. The optimum temperature for the activity was 50°C, and the enzyme retained below 55% of its original activity for 30 min at 55°C. The gene coding for XynBYG consists of 687 bp and encodes 229 amino acids. Similarity analysis indicated that XynBYG belong to family 11 glycosyl hydrolases. Site-directed mutagenesis was performed to replace five sites (Tyr/Ser) to Arg/Glu and the results demonstrated that the optimum temperature of the mutant Y7 (S39R-T146E) increased 5°C and the half-life of inactivation (T1/2) at 60 and 65°C was 1 h and 25 min, respectively. Thus, it provides a potential xylanase that can meet the harsh conditions in the industrial applications.

  17. Alternative splicing by participation of the group II intron ORF in extremely halotolerant and alkaliphilic Oceanobacillus iheyensis.

    PubMed

    Chee, Gab-Joo; Takami, Hideto

    2011-01-01

    Group II introns inserted into genes often undergo splicing at unexpected sites, and participate in the transcription of host genes. We identified five copies of a group II intron, designated Oi.Int, in the genome of an extremely halotolerant and alkaliphilic bacillus, Oceanobacillus iheyensis. The Oi.Int4 differs from the Oi.Int3 at four bases. The ligated exons of the Oi.Int4 could not be detected by RT-PCR assays in vivo or in vitro although group II introns can generally self-splice in vitro without the involvement of an intron-encoded open reading frame (ORF). In the Oi.Int4 mutants with base substitutions within the ORF, ligated exons were detected by in vitro self-splicing. It was clear that the ligation of exons during splicing is affected by the sequence of the intron-encoded ORF since the splice sites corresponded to the joining sites of the intron. In addition, the mutant introns showed unexpected multiple products with alternative 5' splice sites. These findings imply that alternative 5' splicing which causes a functional change of ligated exons presumably has influenced past adaptations of O. iheyensis to various environmental changes.

  18. Thiocapsa imhoffii, sp. nov., an alkaliphilic purple sulfur bacterium of the family Chromatiaceae from Soap Lake, Washington (USA).

    PubMed

    Asao, Marie; Takaichi, Shinichi; Madigan, Michael T

    2007-12-01

    An alkaliphilic purple sulfur bacterium, strain SC5, was isolated from Soap Lake, a soda lake located in east central Washington state (USA). Cells of strain SC5 were gram-negative, non-motile, and non-gas vesiculate cocci, often observed in pairs or tetrads. In the presence of sulfide, elemental sulfur was deposited internally. Liquid cultures were pink to rose red in color. Cells contained bacteriochlorophyll a and spirilloxanthin as major photosynthetic pigments. Internal photosynthetic membranes were of the vesicular type. Optimal growth of strain SC5 occurred in the absence of NaCl (range 0-4%), pH 8.5 (range pH 7.5-9.5), and 32 degrees C. Photoheterotrophic growth occurred in the presence of sulfide or thiosulfate with only a limited number of organic carbon sources. Growth factors were not required, and cells could fix N2. Dark, microaerobic growth occurred in the presence of both an organic carbon source and thiosulfate. Sulfide and thiosulfate served as electron donors for photoautotrophy, which required elevated levels of CO2. Phylogenetic analysis placed strain SC5 basal to the clade of the genus Thiocapsa in the family Chromatiaceae with a 96.7% sequence similarity to its closest relative, Thiocapsa roseopersicina strain 1711T (DSM217T). The unique assemblage of physiological and phylogenetic properties of strain SC5 defines it as a new species of the genus Thiocapsa, and we describe strain SC5 herein as Tca. imhoffii, sp. nov.

  19. Anditalea andensis ANESC-ST--An Alkaliphilic Halotolerant Bacterium Capable of Electricity Generation under Alkaline-Saline Conditions.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei; Wang, Victor Bochuan; Zhao, Cui-E; Zhang, Qichun; Loo, Say Chye Joachim; Yang, Liang; Xu, Chenjie

    2015-01-01

    A great challenge in wastewater bioremediation is the sustained activity of viable microorganisms, which can contribute to the breakdown of waste contaminants, especially in alkaline pH conditions. Identification of extremophiles with bioremediation capability can improve the efficiency of wastewater treatment. Here, we report the discovery of an electrochemically active alkaliphilic halotolerant bacterium, Anditalea andensis ANESC-ST (=CICC10485T=NCCB 100412T), which is capable of generating bioelectricity in alkaline-saline conditions. A. andensis ANESC-ST was shown to grow in alkaline conditions between pH 7.0-11.0 and also under high salt condition (up to 4 wt% NaCl). Electrical output was further demonstrated in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) with an average current density of ~0.5 µA/cm2, even under the harsh condition of 4 wt% NaCl and pH 9.0. Subsequent introduction of secreted extracellular metabolites into MFCs inoculated with Escherichia coli or Pseudomonas aeruginosa yielded enhanced electrical output. The ability of A. andensis ANESC-ST to generate energy under alkaline-saline conditions points towards a solution for bioelectricity recovery from alkaline-saline wastewater. This is the first report of A.andensis ANESC-ST producing bioelectricity at high salt concentration and pH.

  20. Desulfonatronobacter acetoxydans sp. nov.,: a first acetate-oxidizing, extremely salt-tolerant alkaliphilic SRB from a hypersaline soda lake.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, D Y; Chernyh, N A; Poroshina, M N

    2015-09-01

    Recent intensive microbiological investigation of sulfidogenesis in soda lakes did not result in isolation of any pure cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) able to directly oxidize acetate. The sulfate-dependent acetate oxidation at haloalkaline conditions has, so far, been only shown in two syntrophic associations of novel Syntrophobacteraceae members and haloalkaliphilic hydrogenotrophic SRB. In the course of investigation of one of them, obtained from a hypersaline soda lake in South-Western Siberia, a minor component was observed showing a close relation to Desulfonatronobacter acidivorans--a "complete oxidizing" SRB from soda lakes. This organism became dominant in a secondary enrichment with propionate as e-donor and sulfate as e-acceptor. A pure culture, strain APT3, was identified as a novel member of the family Desulfobacteraceae. It is an extremely salt-tolerant alkaliphile, growing with butyrate at salinity up to 4 M total Na(+) with a pH optimum at 9.5. It can grow with sulfate as e-acceptor with C3-C9 VFA and also with some alcohols. The most interesting property of strain APT3 is its ability to grow with acetate as e-donor, although not with sulfate, but with sulfite or thiosulfate as e-acceptors. The new isolate is proposed as a new species Desulfonatronobacter acetoxydans.

  1. Enzymatic Properties of an Alkaline and Chelator Resistant alpha-amylase from the Alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. Isolate L1711

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhardsdotter, Eva C. M. J.; Pusey, Marc L.; Ng, Joseph D.; Garriott, Owen K.

    2004-01-01

    An alkaliphilic amylase producing bacterium, Bacillus sp. strain L 711, was selected among 13 soda lakes isolates. When grown at pH 10.5 and 37 C, strain L711 produced multiple forms of amylases in the culture broth. One of these, BAA, was purified from the culture supernatant by QAE column chromatography and preparative native gel electrophoresis. The molecular weight of BAA was determined to be 51 kDa by denaturing gel electrophoresis. The pH optima for activity below and above 40 C were 9.5 - 10.0 and 7.0 - 7.5 respectively. BAA was stable in the pH range 6-11 and was completely inactivated at 55 C. The thermostability was not increased in the presence of Ca(2+). The enzyme was strongly inhibited by Ca(2+), Zn(2+), Mg(2+), Mn(2+), Ba(2+) and Cu(2+), whereas the presence of Na(+), Co(2+) and EDTA (10 mM) enhanced enzymatic activity. The K(sub m), and specific activity of BAA on soluble starch were 1.9 mg/ml and 18.5 U/mg respectively. The main end products of hydrolysis were maltotetraose, maltose and glucose.

  2. Quantifying the responses of biological indices to rare macroinvertebrate taxa exclusion: Does excluding more rare taxa cause more error?

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhengda; Wang, Hui; Meng, Jiao; Miao, Mingsheng; Kong, Qiang; Wang, Renqing; Liu, Jian

    2017-03-01

    Including or excluding rare taxa in bioassessment is a controversial topic, which essentially affects the reliability and accuracy of the result. In the present paper, we hypothesize that biological indices such as Shannon-Wiener index, Simpson's index, Margalef index, evenness, BMWP (biological monitoring working party), and ASPT (Average Score Per Taxon) respond differently to rare taxa exclusion. To test this hypothesis, a benthic macroinvertebrate data set based on recent fifteen-year studies in China was built for suppositional plot analyses. A field research was conducted in the Nansi Lake to perform related analyses. The results of suppositional plot simulations showed that Simpson's index placed more weight on common taxa than any other studied indices, followed by Shannon-Wiener index which remained a high value with the exclusion of rare taxa. The results indicated that there was not much of effect on Simpson's index and Shannon-Wiener index when rare taxa were excluded. Rare taxa played an important role in Margalef index and BMWP than in other indices. Evenness showed an increase trend, while ASPT varied inconsistently with the exclusion of rare taxa. Results of the field study also indicated that rare taxa had few impacts on the Shannon-Wiener index. By examining the relationships between the rare taxa and biological indices in our study, it is suggested that including the rare taxa when using BMWP and excluding them in the proposed way (e.g., fixed-count subsampling) to calculate Shannon-Wiener index and Simpson's index could raise the efficiency and reduce the biases in the bioassessment of freshwater ecosystems.

  3. Numerical experiments with model monophyletic and paraphyletic taxa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepkoski, J. J. Jr; Kendrick, D. C.; Sepkoski JJ, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The problem of how accurately paraphyletic taxa versus monophyletic (i.e., holophyletic) groups (clades) capture underlying species patterns of diversity and extinction is explored with Monte Carlo simulations. Phylogenies are modeled as stochastic trees. Paraphyletic taxa are defined in an arbitrary manner by randomly choosing progenitors and clustering all descendants not belonging to other taxa. These taxa are then examined to determine which are clades, and the remaining paraphyletic groups are dissected to discover monophyletic subgroups. Comparisons of diversity patterns and extinction rates between modeled taxa and lineages indicate that paraphyletic groups can adequately capture lineage information under a variety of conditions of diversification and mass extinction. This suggests that these groups constitute more than mere "taxonomic noise" in this context. But, strictly monophyletic groups perform somewhat better, especially with regard to mass extinctions. However, when low levels of paleontologic sampling are simulated, the veracity of clades deteriorates, especially with respect to diversity, and modeled paraphyletic taxa often capture more information about underlying lineages. Thus, for studies of diversity and taxic evolution in the fossil record, traditional paleontologic genera and families need not be rejected in favor of cladistically-defined taxa.

  4. Insects as a Nitrogen Source for Plants.

    PubMed

    Behie, Scott W; Bidochka, Michael J

    2013-07-31

    Many plants have evolved adaptations in order to survive in low nitrogen environments. One of the best-known adaptations is that of plant symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing bacteria; this is the major route by which nitrogen is incorporated into plant biomass. A portion of this plant-associated nitrogen is then lost to insects through herbivory, and insects represent a nitrogen reservoir that is generally overlooked in nitrogen cycles. In this review we show three specialized plant adaptations that allow for the recovery of insect nitrogen; that is, plants gaining nitrogen from insects. First, we show specialized adaptations by carnivorous plants in low nitrogen habitats. Insect carnivorous plants such as pitcher plants and sundews (Nepenthaceae/Sarraceniaceae and Drosera respectively) are able to obtain substantial amounts of nitrogen from the insects that they capture. Secondly, numerous plants form associations with mycorrhizal fungi that can provide soluble nitrogen from the soil, some of which may be insect-derived nitrogen, obtained from decaying insects or insect frass. Finally, a specialized group of endophytic, insect-pathogenic fungi (EIPF) provide host plants with insect-derived nitrogen. These soil-inhabiting fungi form a remarkable symbiosis with certain plant species. They can infect a wide range of insect hosts and also form endophytic associations in which they transfer insect-derived nitrogen to the plant. Root colonizing fungi are found in disparate fungal phylogenetic lineages, indicating possible convergent evolutionary strategies between taxa, evolution potentially driven by access to carbon-containing root exudates.

  5. Insects as a Nitrogen Source for Plants

    PubMed Central

    Behie, Scott W.; Bidochka, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Many plants have evolved adaptations in order to survive in low nitrogen environments. One of the best-known adaptations is that of plant symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing bacteria; this is the major route by which nitrogen is incorporated into plant biomass. A portion of this plant-associated nitrogen is then lost to insects through herbivory, and insects represent a nitrogen reservoir that is generally overlooked in nitrogen cycles. In this review we show three specialized plant adaptations that allow for the recovery of insect nitrogen; that is, plants gaining nitrogen from insects. First, we show specialized adaptations by carnivorous plants in low nitrogen habitats. Insect carnivorous plants such as pitcher plants and sundews (Nepenthaceae/Sarraceniaceae and Drosera respectively) are able to obtain substantial amounts of nitrogen from the insects that they capture. Secondly, numerous plants form associations with mycorrhizal fungi that can provide soluble nitrogen from the soil, some of which may be insect-derived nitrogen, obtained from decaying insects or insect frass. Finally, a specialized group of endophytic, insect-pathogenic fungi (EIPF) provide host plants with insect-derived nitrogen. These soil-inhabiting fungi form a remarkable symbiosis with certain plant species. They can infect a wide range of insect hosts and also form endophytic associations in which they transfer insect-derived nitrogen to the plant. Root colonizing fungi are found in disparate fungal phylogenetic lineages, indicating possible convergent evolutionary strategies between taxa, evolution potentially driven by access to carbon-containing root exudates. PMID:26462427

  6. Symbiont acquisition as neoseme: origin of species and higher taxa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bermudes, D.; Margulis, L.

    1987-01-01

    We examine the hypothesis that, in the origin of species and higher taxa of eukaryotes, symbiont acquisition followed by partner integration has been equivalent to neoseme appearance leading to speciation. The formation of stable symbiotic associations involves partner-surface recognition, behavioral and metabolic interaction, and, in some cases, gene product (RNA, protein) and genic (RNA, DNA) integration. This analysis is applied here to examples of neosemes that define specific taxa and to neosemes in plants, fungi, and animals that involve the appearance of new types of tissue. If this hypothesis is correct--if the origin of major genetic variation leading to speciation and even higher taxa may occur through symbiont acquisition and integration--then the analysis of "origins of species and higher taxa" becomes analogous to the study of microbial community ecology.

  7. Zulma Ageitos de Castellanos: Publications and status of described taxa.

    PubMed

    Signorelli, Javier H; Urteaga, Diego; Teso, Valeria

    2015-10-28

    Zulma Ageitos de Castellanos was an Argentinian malacologist working in the "Facultad de Ciencias Naturales y Museo" at La Plata University where she taught invertebrate zoology between 1947 and 1990. Her scientific publications are listed in chronological order. Described genus-group and species-group taxa are listed. Information about the type locality and type material, and taxonomic remarks are also provided. Finally, type material of all described taxa was requested and, when located, illustrated.

  8. Alkalispirochaeta cellulosivorans gen. nov., sp. nov., a cellulose-hydrolysing, alkaliphilic, halotolerant bacterium isolated from the gut of a wood-eating cockroach (Cryptocercus punctulatus), and reclassification of four species of Spirochaeta as new combinations within Alkalispirochaeta gen. nov.

    PubMed

    Sravanthi, T; Tushar, L; Sasikala, Ch; Ramana, Ch V

    2016-04-01

    An obligately anaerobic spirochaete designated strain JC227T was isolated from the gut of a wood-eating cockroach, Cryptocercus punctulatus (Scudder), from the Rann of Kutch, Gujarat, India. Strain JC227T was Gram-stain-negative, mesophilic, halotolerant and alkaliphilic. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain JC227T belongs to the genus Spirochaeta, with Spirochaeta sphaeroplastigenens JC133T (99.51%), S. odontotermitis JC202T (99.30%), S. alkalica Z-7491T (99.10%), S. americana (98.54%) and other members of the genus Spirochaeta (<92.7%) as its closest phylogenetic neighbours. However, DNA-DNA hybridization between strain JC227T and S. sphaeroplastigenens JC133T, S. odontotermitis JC202T, S. alkalica DSM 8900T and S. americana DSM 14872T was 62±2, 63, 58±2 and 48±4 %, respectively. Strain JC227T contained phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, an unidentified glycolipid and six unidentified lipids. Summed feature C18:1ω7c/C18:1ω6c was the predominant cellular fatty acid, with significant proportions of C16:0, C14:0, C12:0, C15:1ω6c, C16:1ω5c, C16:1ω6c/C16:1ω7c and C17:0 2-OH. The DNA G+C content of strain JC227T was 55.5 mol%. On the basis of physiological, biochemical, chemotaxonomic (including metabolomic) and genomic differences from previously described taxa, strain JC227T can be differentiated from members of the genus Spirochaeta and represents a novel species of a new genus, for which the name Alkalispirochaeta cellulosivorans gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Alkalispirochaeta cellulosivorans is JC227T (=KCTC 15343T=NBRC 110105T). We also propose the reclassification of Spirochaeta sphaeroplastigenens, Spirochaeta odontotermitis, Spirochaeta alkalica and Spirochaeta americana as Alkalispirochaeta sphaeroplastigenens comb. nov. (type strain JC133T=KCTC 15220T=NBRC 109056T), Alkalispirochaeta odontotermitis comb. nov. (type strain JC202T=KCTC 15324T=NBRC 110104T), Alkalispirochaeta alkalica comb. nov. (type

  9. New and rare taxa in Agaricus section Bivelares (Duploannulati).

    PubMed

    Kerrigan, Richard W; Callac, Philippe; Parra, Luis A

    2008-01-01

    Ongoing field and laboratory studies have led to our recognition of new taxa in Agaricus section Bivelares, a recent combination and now the earliest synonym and correct name of section Duploannulati. Agaricus cupressophilus and A. tlaxcalensis, in the new Agaricus subsection Cupressorum, and A. agrinferus, A. devoniensis subsp. bridghamii, and A. subsubensis in Agaricus subsection Hortenses, are described. Agaricus subfloccosus is lectotypified. Phylogeny reconstruction methods with ITS1+2 DNA sequences were used to determine appropriate placements of the new taxa. Collectively these new taxa and phylogenetic associations represent a substantial augmentation and clarification of our knowledge of section Bivelares; described, sequenced species-level taxa in the northern hemisphere are increased from six to 10, a distinct subsectional lineage is revealed and infraspecific resolution within A. devoniensis is improved. An anomalous ITS1+2 sequence is documented in one collection of A. subsubensis. Preliminary data on another novel member of Bivelares from France also are provided. Several of these taxa are rare, highlighting opportunities and challenges for documenting biodiversity in this group. Additional comments on related taxa treated in recent publications are also provided.

  10. The effectiveness of surrogate taxa for the representation of biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Adam S; Noss, Reed F; Parsons, David R

    2010-10-01

    Biodiversity is too complex to measure directly, so conservation planning must rely on surrogates to estimate the biodiversity of sites. The species richness of selected taxa is often used as a surrogate for the richness of other taxa. Surrogacy values of taxa have been evaluated in diverse contexts, yet broad trends in their effectiveness remain unclear. We reviewed published studies testing the ability of species richness of surrogate taxa to capture the richness of other (target) taxa. We stratified studies into two groups based on whether a complementarity approach (surrogates used to select a combination of sites that together maximize total species richness for the taxon) or a richness-hotspot approach (surrogates used to select sites containing the highest species richness for the taxon) was used. For each comparison of one surrogate taxon with one target, we used the following predictor variables: biome, spatial extent of study area, surrogate taxon, and target taxon. We developed a binary response variable based on whether the surrogate taxon provided better than random representation of the target taxon. For studies that used an evaluation approach that was not based on better than random representation of target taxa, we based the response variable on the interpretation of results in the original study. We performed a categorical regression to elucidate trends in the effectiveness of surrogate taxa with regard to each of the predictor variables. A surrogate was 25% more likely to be effective with a complementarity approach than with a hotspot approach. For hotspot-based approaches, biome, extent of study, surrogate taxon, and target taxon significantly influenced effectiveness of the surrogate. For complementarity-based approaches, biome, extent, and surrogate taxon significantly influenced effectiveness of the surrogate. For all surrogate evaluations, biome explained the greatest amount of variation in surrogate effectiveness. From most to least

  11. β-Cyclodextrin Production by Cyclodextrin Glucanotransferase from an Alkaliphile Microbacterium terrae KNR 9 Using Different Starch Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Ujjval B.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclodextrin glucanotransferase (CGTase, EC 2.4.1.19) is an important member of α-amylase family which can degrade the starch and produce cyclodextrins (CDs) as a result of intramolecular transglycosylation (cyclization). β-Cyclodextrin production was carried out using the purified CGTase enzyme from an alkaliphile Microbacterium terrae KNR 9 with different starches in raw as well as gelatinized form. Cyclodextrin production was confirmed using thin layer chromatography. Six different starch substrates, namely, soluble starch, potato starch, sago starch, corn starch, corn flour, and rice flour, were tested for CD production. Raw potato starch granules were found to be the best substrate giving 13.46 gm/L of cyclodextrins after 1 h of incubation at 60°C. Raw sago starch gave 12.96 gm/L of cyclodextrins as the second best substrate. To achieve the maximum cyclodextrin production, statistical optimization using Central Composite Design (CCD) was carried out with three parameters, namely, potato starch concentration, CGTase enzyme concentration, and incubation temperature. Cyclodextrin production of 28.22 (gm/L) was achieved with the optimized parameters suggested by the model which are CGTase 4.8 U/L, starch 150 gm/L, and temperature 55.6°C. The suggested optimized conditions showed about 15% increase in β-cyclodextrin production (28.22 gm/L) at 55.6°C as compared to 24.48 gm/L at 60°C. The degradation of raw potato starch granules by purified CGTase was also confirmed by microscopic observations. PMID:27648307

  12. Chimaereicella boritolerans sp. nov., a boron-tolerant and alkaliphilic bacterium of the family Flavobacteriaceae isolated from soil.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Iftikhar; Yokota, Akira; Fujiwara, Toru

    2007-05-01

    A non-motile, Gram-negative, boron-tolerant and alkaliphilic bacterium was isolated from soil of the Hisarcik area in the Kutahya Province of Turkey that was naturally high in boron minerals. The novel isolate, designated T-22(T), formed rod-shaped cells, was catalase- and oxidase-positive and tolerated up to 300 mM boron. The strain also survived on agar medium containing up to 3 % (w/v) NaCl. The pH range for growth of this strain was 6.5-10.0 (optimum pH 8.0-9.0) and the temperature range was 16-37 degrees C (optimum 28-30 degrees C). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed a clear affiliation with the genus Chimaereicella, with 97.4 % sequence similarity to Chimaereicella alkaliphila AC-74(T), which was the highest similarity among cultivated bacteria. The DNA-DNA relatedness with C. alkaliphila AC-74(T) was 28.3 %. The major respiratory quinone system was MK-7 and the predominant cellular fatty acids were iso-C(15 : 0), iso-C(17 : 1)omega9c, iso-C(17 : 0) 3-OH and summed feature 3 (iso-C(15 : 0) 2-OH and/or iso-C(16 : 1)omega7c). The DNA G+C content was 42.5 mol%. Based on the phylogenetic analysis and physiological, chemotaxonomic and genetic data, we concluded that strain T-22(T) should be classified in the genus Chimaereicella, and we propose the name Chimaereicella boritolerans sp. nov. for this novel species. The type strain is strain T-22(T) (=DSM 17298(T)=NBRC 101277(T)=ATCC BAA-1189(T)).

  13. Characterization of thermostable serine alkaline protease from an alkaliphilic strain Bacillus pumilus MCAS8 and its applications.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, Renganathan; Jayashree, Shanmugam; Annapurna, Balumuri; Seshadri, Sundaram

    2012-12-01

    This study describes the characterization and optimization of medium components for an extracellular detergent, surfactant, organic solvent and thermostable serine alkaline protease produced by alkaliphilic Bacillus pumilus MCAS8 strain isolated from Pulicat lake sediments, Tamil Nadu, India. The strain yielded maximum protease (2,214 U/ml) under optimized conditions: carbon source, citric acid-1.5 % (w/w); inducer, soyabean meal-2 % (w/w); pH 11.0; shaking condition 37 °C for 48 h. The enzyme had pH and temperature optima of 9.0 and 60 °C, respectively. The enzyme displayed the molecular mass of 36 kDa in sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis study and exhibited activity at a wide range of pH (6.0-11.0) and thermostability (20-70 °C). More than 70 % residual activity was observed when the enzyme was incubated with dithiothreitol, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid and H(2)O(2) for 30 min. The protease activity was also enhanced by divalent cations such as Ba(2+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) and was strongly inhibited by Fe(2+), Zn(2+), Sr(2+), Hg(2+) and urea. The enzyme retained more than 50 % of its initial activity after pre-incubation for 1 h in the presence of 5 % (v/v) organic solvents such as dimethyl sulphoxide and acetone. The protease could hydrolyse various native proteinaceous substrates (1 % w/v) such as bovine serum albumin, casein, skim milk, gelatine, azocasein and haemoglobin. Wash performance analysis of enzyme revealed that it could effectively remove blood stains from the cotton fabric, thus making it suitable to use as an effective detergent additive. The protease enzyme also exhibited promising result in the dehairing of goat skin. The potency of the eco-friendly enzyme without using any chemicals against washing and dehairing showed that the enzyme could be used for various industrial applications.

  14. The enrichment of an alkaliphilic biofilm consortia capable of the anaerobic degradation of isosaccharinic acid from cellulosic materials incubated within an anthropogenic, hyperalkaline environment.

    PubMed

    Charles, C J; Rout, S P; Garratt, E J; Patel, K; Laws, A P; Humphreys, P N

    2015-08-01

    Anthropogenic hyperalkaline sites provide an environment that is analogous to proposed cementitious geological disposal facilities (GDF) for radioactive waste. Under anoxic, alkaline conditions cellulosic wastes will hydrolyze to a range of cellulose degradation products (CDP) dominated by isosaccharinic acids (ISA). In order to investigate the potential for microbial activity in a cementitious GDF, cellulose samples were incubated in the alkaline (∼pH 12), anaerobic zone of a lime kiln waste site. Following retrieval, these samples had undergone partial alkaline hydrolysis and were colonized by a Clostridia-dominated biofilm community, where hydrogenotrophic, alkaliphilic methanogens were also present. When these samples were used to establish an alkaline CDP fed microcosm, the community shifted away from Clostridia, methanogens became undetectable and a flocculate community dominated by Alishewanella sp. established. These flocs were composed of bacteria embedded in polysaccharides and proteins stabilized by extracellular DNA. This community was able to degrade all forms of ISA with >60% of the carbon flow being channelled into extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) production. This study demonstrated that alkaliphilic microbial communities can degrade the CDP associated with some radioactive waste disposal concepts at pH 11. These communities divert significant amounts of degradable carbon to EPS formation, suggesting that EPS has a central role in the protection of these communities from hyperalkaline conditions.

  15. The enrichment of an alkaliphilic biofilm consortia capable of the anaerobic degradation of isosaccharinic acid from cellulosic materials incubated within an anthropogenic, hyperalkaline environment

    PubMed Central

    Charles, C. J.; Rout, S. P.; Garratt, E. J.; Patel, K.; Laws, A. P.; Humphreys, P. N.

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic hyperalkaline sites provide an environment that is analogous to proposed cementitious geological disposal facilities (GDF) for radioactive waste. Under anoxic, alkaline conditions cellulosic wastes will hydrolyze to a range of cellulose degradation products (CDP) dominated by isosaccharinic acids (ISA). In order to investigate the potential for microbial activity in a cementitious GDF, cellulose samples were incubated in the alkaline (∼pH 12), anaerobic zone of a lime kiln waste site. Following retrieval, these samples had undergone partial alkaline hydrolysis and were colonized by a Clostridia-dominated biofilm community, where hydrogenotrophic, alkaliphilic methanogens were also present. When these samples were used to establish an alkaline CDP fed microcosm, the community shifted away from Clostridia, methanogens became undetectable and a flocculate community dominated by Alishewanella sp. established. These flocs were composed of bacteria embedded in polysaccharides and proteins stabilized by extracellular DNA. This community was able to degrade all forms of ISA with >60% of the carbon flow being channelled into extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) production. This study demonstrated that alkaliphilic microbial communities can degrade the CDP associated with some radioactive waste disposal concepts at pH 11. These communities divert significant amounts of degradable carbon to EPS formation, suggesting that EPS has a central role in the protection of these communities from hyperalkaline conditions. PMID:26195600

  16. Bacillus trypoxylicola sp. nov., xylanase-producing alkaliphilic bacteria isolated from the guts of Japanese horned beetle larvae (Trypoxylus dichotomus septentrionalis).

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Tomoko; Urai, Makoto; Iwabuchi, Noriyuki; Nakajima, Mutsuyasu; Sunairi, Michio

    2010-01-01

    Three xylanase-producing alkaliphilic strains, SU1(T), 36AC4 and 36AC6, were isolated from the guts of larvae of the Japanese horned beetle (Trypoxylus dichotomus septentrionalis). The isolates stained Gram-positive and were aerobic, spore-forming, non-motile and rod-shaped and grew optimally at 30 degrees C and pH 9. They contained MK-7 as the major isoprenoid quinone and iso-C(15 : 0), anteiso-C(15 : 0), anteiso-C(17 : 0) and iso-C(17 : 0) as the major fatty acids. The DNA G+C contents of the strains were 37.4-37.7 mol%. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, these strains were shown to belong to the genus Bacillus. Although their 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to the type strains of the alkaliphilic species Bacillus pseudalcaliphilus and B. alcalophilus was 97 %, the novel isolates formed a distinct group in the phylogenetic trees and DNA-DNA relatedness values to the type strains of these species were less than 30 %. Results of physiological and biochemical tests, including salt preference, enabled these strains to be differentiated phenotypically from described Bacillus species. Therefore, strains SU1(T), 36AC4 and 36AC6 represent a novel species for which the name Bacillus trypoxylicola sp. nov. is proposed; the type strain is SU1(T) (=NBRC 102646(T) =KCTC 13244(T)).

  17. Classification and quantification of bacteriophage taxa in human gut metagenomes

    PubMed Central

    Waller, Alison S; Yamada, Takuji; Kristensen, David M; Kultima, Jens Roat; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Koonin, Eugene V; Bork, Peer

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophages have key roles in microbial communities, to a large extent shaping the taxonomic and functional composition of the microbiome, but data on the connections between phage diversity and the composition of communities are scarce. Using taxon-specific marker genes, we identified and monitored 20 viral taxa in 252 human gut metagenomic samples, mostly at the level of genera. On average, five phage taxa were identified in each sample, with up to three of these being highly abundant. The abundances of most phage taxa vary by up to four orders of magnitude between the samples, and several taxa that are highly abundant in some samples are absent in others. Significant correlations exist between the abundances of some phage taxa and human host metadata: for example, ‘Group 936 lactococcal phages' are more prevalent and abundant in Danish samples than in samples from Spain or the United States of America. Quantification of phages that exist as integrated prophages revealed that the abundance profiles of prophages are highly individual-specific and remain unique to an individual over a 1-year time period, and prediction of prophage lysis across the samples identified hundreds of prophages that are apparently active in the gut and vary across the samples, in terms of presence and lytic state. Finally, a prophage–host network of the human gut was established and includes numerous novel host–phage associations. PMID:24621522

  18. Benefits of organic farming to biodiversity vary among taxa

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, R.J; Norton, L.R; Feber, R.E; Johnson, P.J; Chamberlain, D.E; Joys, A.C; Mathews, F; Stuart, R.C; Townsend, M.C; Manley, W.J; Wolfe, M.S; Macdonald, D.W; Firbank, L.G

    2005-01-01

    Habitat and biodiversity differences between matched pairs of organic and non-organic farms containing cereal crops in lowland England were assessed by a large-scale study of plants, invertebrates, birds and bats. Habitat extent, composition and management on organic farms was likely to favour higher levels of biodiversity and indeed organic farms tended to support higher numbers of species and overall abundance across most taxa. However, the magnitude of the response varied; plants showed larger and more consistent responses than other taxa. Variation in response across taxa may be partly a consequence of the small size and isolated context of many organic farms. Extension of organic farming could contribute to the restoration of biodiversity in agricultural landscapes. PMID:17148225

  19. Benefits of organic farming to biodiversity vary among taxa.

    PubMed

    Fuller, R J; Norton, L R; Feber, R E; Johnson, P J; Chamberlain, D E; Joys, A C; Mathews, F; Stuart, R C; Townsend, M C; Manley, W J; Wolfe, M S; Macdonald, D W; Firbank, L G

    2005-12-22

    Habitat and biodiversity differences between matched pairs of organic and non-organic farms containing cereal crops in lowland England were assessed by a large-scale study of plants, invertebrates, birds and bats. Habitat extent, composition and management on organic farms was likely to favour higher levels of biodiversity and indeed organic farms tended to support higher numbers of species and overall abundance across most taxa. However, the magnitude of the response varied; plants showed larger and more consistent responses than other taxa. Variation in response across taxa may be partly a consequence of the small size and isolated context of many organic farms. Extension of organic farming could contribute to the restoration of biodiversity in agricultural landscapes.

  20. Indicators: Nitrogen

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Nitrogen, like phosphorus, is a critical nutrient required for all life. Nitrogen can occur in rivers and streams, lakes, and coastal waters in several forms including ammonia (NH3), nitrates (NO3), and nitrites (NO2).

  1. Bacillus lindianensis sp. nov., a novel alkaliphilic and moderately halotolerant bacterium isolated from saline and alkaline soils.

    PubMed

    Dou, Guiming; Liu, Hongcan; He, Wei; Ma, Yuchao

    2016-01-01

    Two alkaliphilic and halotolerant Gram-stain positive, rod-shaped and endospore-forming bacteria, designated strains 12-3(T) and 12-4, were isolated from saline and alkaline soils collected in Lindian county, Heilongjiang province, China. Both strains were observed to grow well at a wide range of temperature and pH values, 10-45 °C and pH 8-12, with optimal growth at 37 °C and pH 9.0, respectively. Growth of the two strains was found to occur at total salt concentrations of 0-12 % (w/v), with an optimum at 4 % (w/v). The G+C contents of the genomic DNA of strains 12-3(T) and 12-4 were determined to be 42.7 and 42.4 mol%, respectively, and the major cellular fatty acids were identified as anteiso-C15:0 and anteiso-C17:0. In isolate 12-3(T), meso-diaminopimelic acid was found to be the diagnostic diamino acid of the cell wall peptidoglycan; diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol were identified as the major cellular polar lipids; and menaquinone-7 was identified as the predominant isoprenoid quinone. Strains 12-3(T) and 12-4 share very close 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity (99.74 %) and their DNA-DNA relatedness was 95.3 ± 0.63 %, meaning that the two strains can be considered to belong to the same species. 16S rRNA gene sequence-based phylogenetic analysis revealed strains 12-3(T) and 12-4 exhibit high similarities to Bacillus pseudofirmus DSM 8715(T) (98.7 %), Bacillus marmarensis DSM 21297(T) (97.2 %) and Bacillus nanhaiisediminis CGMCC 1.10116(T) (97.1 and 97.0 %, respectively). DNA-DNA hybridization values between isolate 12-3(T) and the type strains of closely related Bacillus species were below 30 %. On the basis of the polyphasic evidence presented, strains 12-3(T) and 12-4 are considered to represent a novel species of the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus lindianensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 12-3(T) (DSM 26864(T) = CGMCC 1.12717(T)).

  2. Anaerovirgula multivorans gen. nov., sp. nov., a Novel Spore-Forming, Alkaliphilic Anaerobe Isolated from Owens Lake, California, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Itoh, Takashi; Krader, Paul; Whitman, William B.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2006-01-01

    A novel, alkaliphilic, obligately anaerobic bacterium, strain SCAT, was isolated from mud sediments of a soda lake in California, USA. The rod-shaped cells were motile, Gram-positive, formed spores and were 0.4-0.5x2.5-5.0 micrometers in size. Growth occurred within the pH range 6.7-10.0 and was optimal at pH 8.5. The temperature range for growth was 10-45 degrees C, with optimal growth at 35 degrees C. NaCl was required for growth. Growth occurred at 0.5-9.0% (w/v) NaCl and was optimal at 1-2% (w/v). The novel isolate was a catalase-negative chemo-organoheterotroph that fermented sugars, proteolysis products, some organic and amino acids, glycerol, d-cellobiose and cellulose. It was also capable of growth by the Stickland reaction. Strain SCAT was sensitive to tetracycline, chloramphenicol, rifampicin and gentamicin, but it was resistant to ampicillin and kanamycin. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 34.2 mol%. Major fatty acid components were C14:0, iso-C15:0, C16:1omega9c and C16:0. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of strain SCAT showed a similarity of approximately 97% with the type strains of Clostridium formicaceticum and Clostridium aceticum in clostridial cluster XI and a similarity of less than 94.2% to any other recognized Clostridium species and those of related genera in this cluster. Strain SCAT was clearly differentiated from C. formicaceticum and C. aceticum based on comparison of their phenotypic properties and fatty acid profiles, as well as low levels of DNA-DNA relatedness between strain SCAT and the type strains of these two species. Therefore, strain SCAT is considered to represent a novel species of a new genus, Anaerovirgula multivorans gen. nov., sp. nov., in clostridial cluster XI. The type strain is SCAT (=ATCC BAA-1084T=JCM 12857T=DSM 17722T=CIP 107910T).

  3. STORAGE BEHAVIOR OF SEEDS FROM NATIVE HAWAIIAN TAXA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ex situ conservation is required to preserve genetic diversity of the 956 species native to Hawai’i (89% endemism, 30% federally-listed as endangered or threatened). Optimizing storage procedures to maximize seed longevity is critical to the effort. Storage behavior of seeds from about 280 taxa was ...

  4. Eliciting the Functional Taxonomy from protein annotations and taxa

    PubMed Central

    Falda, Marco; Lavezzo, Enrico; Fontana, Paolo; Bianco, Luca; Berselli, Michele; Formentin, Elide; Toppo, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The advances of omics technologies have triggered the production of an enormous volume of data coming from thousands of species. Meanwhile, joint international efforts like the Gene Ontology (GO) consortium have worked to provide functional information for a vast amount of proteins. With these data available, we have developed FunTaxIS, a tool that is the first attempt to infer functional taxonomy (i.e. how functions are distributed over taxa) combining functional and taxonomic information. FunTaxIS is able to define a taxon specific functional space by exploiting annotation frequencies in order to establish if a function can or cannot be used to annotate a certain species. The tool generates constraints between GO terms and taxa and then propagates these relations over the taxonomic tree and the GO graph. Since these constraints nearly cover the whole taxonomy, it is possible to obtain the mapping of a function over the taxonomy. FunTaxIS can be used to make functional comparative analyses among taxa, to detect improper associations between taxa and functions, and to discover how functional knowledge is either distributed or missing. A benchmark test set based on six different model species has been devised to get useful insights on the generated taxonomic rules. PMID:27534507

  5. The hominin fossil record: taxa, grades and clades

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Bernard; Lonergan, Nicholas

    2008-01-01

    This paper begins by reviewing the fossil evidence for human evolution. It presents summaries of each of the taxa recognized in a relatively speciose hominin taxonomy. These taxa are grouped in grades, namely possible and probable hominins, archaic hominins, megadont archaic hominins, transitional hominins, pre-modern Homo and anatomically modern Homo. The second part of this contribution considers some of the controversies that surround hominin taxonomy and systematics. The first is the vexed question of how you tell an early hominin from an early panin, or from taxa belonging to an extinct clade closely related to the Pan-Homo clade. Secondly, we consider how many species should be recognized within the hominin fossil record, and review the philosophies and methods used to identify taxa within the hominin fossil record. Thirdly, we examine how relationships within the hominin clade are investigated, including descriptions of the methods used to break down an integrated structure into tractable analytical units, and then how cladograms are generated and compared. We then review the internal structure of the hominin clade, including the problem of how many subclades should be recognized within the hominin clade, and we examine the reliability of hominin cladistic hypotheses. The last part of the paper reviews the concepts of a genus, including the criteria that should be used for recognizing genera within the hominin clade. PMID:18380861

  6. Eliciting the Functional Taxonomy from protein annotations and taxa.

    PubMed

    Falda, Marco; Lavezzo, Enrico; Fontana, Paolo; Bianco, Luca; Berselli, Michele; Formentin, Elide; Toppo, Stefano

    2016-08-18

    The advances of omics technologies have triggered the production of an enormous volume of data coming from thousands of species. Meanwhile, joint international efforts like the Gene Ontology (GO) consortium have worked to provide functional information for a vast amount of proteins. With these data available, we have developed FunTaxIS, a tool that is the first attempt to infer functional taxonomy (i.e. how functions are distributed over taxa) combining functional and taxonomic information. FunTaxIS is able to define a taxon specific functional space by exploiting annotation frequencies in order to establish if a function can or cannot be used to annotate a certain species. The tool generates constraints between GO terms and taxa and then propagates these relations over the taxonomic tree and the GO graph. Since these constraints nearly cover the whole taxonomy, it is possible to obtain the mapping of a function over the taxonomy. FunTaxIS can be used to make functional comparative analyses among taxa, to detect improper associations between taxa and functions, and to discover how functional knowledge is either distributed or missing. A benchmark test set based on six different model species has been devised to get useful insights on the generated taxonomic rules.

  7. Alkalimonas amylolytica gen. nov., sp. nov., and Alkalimonas delamerensis gen. nov., sp. nov., novel alkaliphilic bacteria from soda lakes in China and East Africa.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yanhe; Xue, Yanfen; Grant, William D; Collins, Nadine C; Duckworth, Andrew W; Van Steenbergen, Robert P; Jones, Brian E

    2004-06-01

    Two related novel alkaliphilic and slightly halophilic bacteria are described. They are strain N10 from Lake Chahannor in China and strain 1E1 from Lake Elmenteita in East Africa. Both strains are strictly aerobic, heterotrophic, alkaliphilic, mesophilic, and require NaCl for growth. The optimal conditions for growth were at pH 10-10.5 and 2-3% (w/v) NaCl. Cells of both strains were Gram-negative, rod-shaped, non-spore-forming, and motile with a single polar flagellum. Cellular fatty acids in both strains were predominantly saturated and mono-unsaturated straight-chain fatty acids (16:0, 16:1omega7c and 18:1omega7c). The major isoprenoid quinone of both strains was Q8. The major polar lipids are phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol phosphate and phosphatidylethanolamine. The guanine plus cytosine (G + C) content of the DNA was 52.5 mol% and 55.4 mol%, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the two strains formed a distinct lineage within the gamma-3 subclass of the Proteobacteria. The strains shared a 16S rDNA sequence similarity of 96.1% and showed less than 93.7% of sequence similarity to any other known species. Based on polyphasic data, the two strains were differentiated from currently recognized genera and represent a new genus, Alkalimonas gen. nov., with two species, Alkalimonas amylolytica sp. nov. (type strain is N10T = AS 1.3430) and Alkalimonas delamerensis sp. nov. ( type strain is 1E1(P, T) = CBS 391.94). The GenBank accession numbers for the 16S rRNA gene sequence of strains N10 and 1E1 are AF250323 and X92130, respectively.

  8. Tindallia Californiensis sp. nov.: A New Halo-Alkaliphilic Primary Anaerobe, Isolated from Meromictic soda Mono Lake in California and the Correction of Diagnosis for Genus Tindallia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena; Marsic, Damien; Hoover, Richard B.; Kevbrin, Vadim; Whitman, William B.; Krader, Paul; Cleland, Dave; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A novel extremely halo-alkaliphilic, bacterium strain APO (sup T) was isolated from sediments of the athalassic, meromictic, soda Mono Lake in California. Gram positive, spore-forming, slightly curved rods with sizes 0.6-0.7x 2.5-4.0 micrometers which occur singly, in pairs or short curved chains. Cells, are motile by singular subcentral flagellum. Strain APO (sup T) is mesophilic: growth was observed over the temperature range of +10 C to +48 C (optimum +37 C), NaCl concentration range 1-20 %, wt/vol (optimum 3-5%, wt/vol) and pH range 8.0-11.0 (optimum pH 9.5). The novel isolate is strictly halo-alkaliphilic, requires sodium chloride in medium, obligately anaerobic and catalase-negative. Strain APO (sup T) is organo-heterotroph with fermentative type of metabolism, and uses as substrates: peptone, badotryptone, casamino acids, yeast extract, L-serine, L-lysine, L-histidine, L-arginine, and pyruvate. The main end products of growth on peptone medium were: lactate, acetate, propionate, and ethanol. Strain APO (sup T) is resistant to kanamycin, but sensitive to chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and gentamycin. The sum of G+C in DNA is 44.4 mol% (by HPLC method). On the bait of physiological and molecular properties, the isolate was considered as novel species of genus Tindallia; and the name Tindallia californiensis sp. nov., is proposed for new isolate (type strain APO (sup T) - ATCC BAA_393(sup T) = DSMZ 14871 (sup T)).

  9. Agaricus section Xanthodermatei: a phylogenetic reconstruction with commentary on taxa.

    PubMed

    Kerrigan, Richard W; Callac, Philippe; Guinberteau, Jacques; Challen, Michael P; Parra, Luis A

    2005-01-01

    Agaricus section Xanthodermatei comprises a group of species allied to A. xanthodermus and generally characterized by basidiomata having phenolic odors, transiently yellowing discolorations in some parts of the basidiome, Schaeffer's reaction negative, and mild to substantial toxicity. The section has a global distribution, while most included species have distributions restricted to regions of single continents. Using specimens and cultures from Europe, North America, and Hawaii, we analyzed DNA sequences from the ITS1+2 region of the nuclear rDNA to identify and characterize phylogenetically distinct entities and to construct a hypothesis of relationships, both among members of the section and with representative taxa from other sections of the genus. 61 sequences from affiliated taxa, plus 20 from six (or seven) other sections of Agaricus, and one Micropsalliota sequence, were evaluated under distance, maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood methods. We recognized 21 discrete entities in Xanthodermatei, including 14 established species and 7 new ones, three of which are described elsewhere. Four species from California, New Mexico, and France deserve further study before they are described. Type studies of American taxa are particularly emphasized, and a lectotype is designated for A. californicus. Section Xanthodermatei formed a single clade in most analyses, indicating that the traditional sectional characters noted above are good unifying characters that appear to have arisen only once within Agaricus. Deep divisions within the sequence-derived structure of the section could be interpreted as subsections in Xanthodermatei; however, various considerations led us to refrain from proposing new supraspecific taxa. The nearest neighbors of section Xanthodermatei are putatively in section Duploannulati.

  10. Deciphering The Role of Plankton Taxa in Particle Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuer, Susanne; Amacher, Jessica; DeMartini, Francesca; Wilson, Stephanie

    2015-04-01

    The sinking of phytoplankton derived particulate organic matter to the deep ocean constitutes an important removal process of atmospheric CO2 and is termed the biological carbon pump. Understanding the taxon specific connection between phytoplankton communities in the euphotic zone and their contribution to particle flux is a high priority in current oceanographic research and provides a basis to evaluate how carbon export might change in a future ocean. Here we present results from DNA-based molecular studies that investigate the taxonomic composition of cyanobacterial and protist communities retrieved from shallow particle traps in comparison to those living in the euphotic zone. This research has been mainly carried out in the Sargasso Sea at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study site (BATS). Trap material collected at this oligotrophic ocean site reveals a surprisingly high diversity of small, non-mineral ballasted taxa, some of which are over-represented compared to the euphotic zone communities. But the majority of clones in the traps belong to mostly heterotrophic protist taxa. By analyzing the fingerprints of prey DNA in guts and fecal pellets of dominant zooplankton grazers we find that there is a close link between prey utilization and the recovery of those taxa in the traps, showing the importance of fecal pellets in packaging and mediating their flux out of the euphotic zone.

  11. Nitrogen Index

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a need to improve the management of nitrogen inputs to agricultural systems because they increase the potential for losses of reactive nitrogen to the environment, resulting in negative impacts to water and air resources. There is a need to reduce nitrate leaching, emissions of N2O from agr...

  12. The genome of alkaliphilic Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4 reveals adaptations that support the ability to grow in an external pH range from 7.5 to 11.4

    PubMed Central

    Janto, Benjamin; Ahmed, Azad; Ito, Masahiro; Liu, Jun; Hicks, David B.; Pagni, Sarah; Fackelmayer, Oliver J.; Smith, Terry-Ann; Earl, Joshua; Elbourne, Liam D.H.; Hassan, Karl; Paulsen, Ian T.; Kolstø, Anne-Brit; Tourasse, Nicolas J.; Ehrlich, Garth D.; Boissy, Robert; Ivey, D. Mack; Li, Gang; Xue, Yanfen; Ma, Yanhe; Hu, Fen Z.; Krulwich, Terry A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4 is an extreme but facultative alkaliphile that grows non-fermentatively in a pH range from 7.5 to above 11.4 and can withstand large sudden increases in external pH. It is a model organism for studies of bioenergetics at high pH, at which energy demands are higher than at neutral pH because both cytoplasmic pH homeostasis and ATP synthesis require more energy. The alkaliphile also tolerates a cytoplasmic pH > 9.0 at external pH values at which the pH homeostasis capacity is exceeded, and manages other stresses that are exacerbated at alkaline pH, e.g. sodium, oxidative and cell wall stresses. The genome of B. pseudofirmus OF4 includes two plasmids that are lost from some mutants without viability loss. The plasmids may provide a reservoir of mobile elements that promote adaptive chromosomal rearrangements under particular environmental conditions. The genome also reveals a more acidic pI profile for proteins exposed on the outer surface than found in neutralophiles. A large array of transporters and regulatory genes are predicted to protect the alkaliphile from its overlapping stresses. In addition, unanticipated metabolic versatility was observed, which could ensure requisite energy for alkaliphily under diverse conditions. PMID:21951522

  13. Genome of alkaliphilic Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4 reveals adaptations that support the ability to grow in an external pH range from 7.5 to 11.4.

    PubMed

    Janto, Benjamin; Ahmed, Azad; Ito, Masahiro; Liu, Jun; Hicks, David B; Pagni, Sarah; Fackelmayer, Oliver J; Smith, Terry-Ann; Earl, Joshua; Elbourne, Liam D H; Hassan, Karl; Paulsen, Ian T; Kolstø, Anne-Brit; Tourasse, Nicolas J; Ehrlich, Garth D; Boissy, Robert; Ivey, D Mack; Li, Gang; Xue, Yanfen; Ma, Yanhe; Hu, Fen Z; Krulwich, Terry A

    2011-12-01

    Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4 is an extreme but facultative alkaliphile that grows non-fermentatively in a pH range from 7.5 to above 11.4 and can withstand large sudden increases in external pH. It is a model organism for studies of bioenergetics at high pH, at which energy demands are higher than at neutral pH because both cytoplasmic pH homeostasis and ATP synthesis require more energy. The alkaliphile also tolerates a cytoplasmic pH > 9.0 at external pH values at which the pH homeostasis capacity is exceeded, and manages other stresses that are exacerbated at alkaline pH, e.g. sodium, oxidative and cell wall stresses. The genome of B. pseudofirmus OF4 includes two plasmids that are lost from some mutants without viability loss. The plasmids may provide a reservoir of mobile elements that promote adaptive chromosomal rearrangements under particular environmental conditions. The genome also reveals a more acidic pI profile for proteins exposed on the outer surface than found in neutralophiles. A large array of transporters and regulatory genes are predicted to protect the alkaliphile from its overlapping stresses. In addition, unanticipated metabolic versatility was observed, which could ensure requisite energy for alkaliphily under diverse conditions.

  14. Bacterial Community Structure after Long-term Organic and Inorganic Fertilization Reveals Important Associations between Soil Nutrients and Specific Taxa Involved in Nutrient Transformations

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fang; Chen, Lin; Zhang, Jiabao; Yin, Jun; Huang, Shaomin

    2017-01-01

    Fertilization has a large impact on the soil microbial communities, which play pivotal roles in soil biogeochemical cycling and ecological processes. While the effects of changes in nutrient availability due to fertilization on the soil microbial communities have received considerable attention, specific microbial taxa strongly influenced by long-term organic and inorganic fertilization, their potential effects and associations with soil nutrients remain unclear. Here, we use deep 16S amplicon sequencing to investigate bacterial community characteristics in a fluvo-aquic soil treated for 24 years with inorganic fertilizers and organics (manure and straw)-inorganic fertilizers, and uncover potential links between soil nutrient parameters and specific bacterial taxa. Our results showed that combined organic-inorganic fertilization increased soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) contents and altered bacterial community composition, while inorganic fertilization had little impact on soil nutrients and bacterial community composition. SOC and TN emerged as the major determinants of community composition. The abundances of specific taxa, especially Arenimonas, Gemmatimonas, and an unclassified member of Xanthomonadaceae, were substantially increased by organic-inorganic amendments rather than inorganic amendments only. A co-occurrence based network analysis demonstrated that SOC and TN had strong positive associations with some taxa (Gemmatimonas and the members of Acidobacteria subgroup 6, Myxococcales, Betaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes), and Gemmatimonas, Flavobacterium, and an unclassified member of Verrucomicrobia were identified as the keystone taxa. These specific taxa identified above are implicated in the decomposition of complex organic matters and soil carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus transformations. The present work strengthens our current understanding of the soil microbial community structure and functions under long-term fertilization

  15. Measuring Stratigraphic Congruence Across Trees, Higher Taxa, and Time

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Anne; Wills, Matthew A.

    2016-01-01

    The congruence between the order of cladistic branching and the first appearance dates of fossil lineages can be quantified using a variety of indices. Good matching is a prerequisite for the accurate time calibration of trees, while the distribution of congruence indices across large samples of cladograms has underpinned claims about temporal and taxonomic patterns of completeness in the fossil record. The most widely used stratigraphic congruence indices are the stratigraphic consistency index (SCI), the modified Manhattan stratigraphic measure (MSM*), and the gap excess ratio (GER) (plus its derivatives; the topological GER and the modified GER). Many factors are believed to variously bias these indices, with several empirical and simulation studies addressing some subset of the putative interactions. This study combines both approaches to quantify the effects (on all five indices) of eight variables reasoned to constrain the distribution of possible values (the number of taxa, tree balance, tree resolution, range of first occurrence (FO) dates, center of gravity of FO dates, the variability of FO dates, percentage of extant taxa, and percentage of taxa with no fossil record). Our empirical data set comprised 647 published animal and plant cladograms spanning the entire Phanerozoic, and for these data we also modeled the effects of mean age of FOs (as a proxy for clade age), the taxonomic rank of the clade, and the higher taxonomic group to which it belonged. The center of gravity of FO dates had not been investigated hitherto, and this was found to correlate most strongly with some measures of stratigraphic congruence in our empirical study (top-heavy clades had better congruence). The modified GER was the index least susceptible to bias. We found significant differences across higher taxa for all indices; arthropods had lower congruence and tetrapods higher congruence. Stratigraphic congruence—however measured—also varied throughout the Phanerozoic

  16. Measuring Stratigraphic Congruence Across Trees, Higher Taxa, and Time.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Anne; Wills, Matthew A

    2016-09-01

    The congruence between the order of cladistic branching and the first appearance dates of fossil lineages can be quantified using a variety of indices. Good matching is a prerequisite for the accurate time calibration of trees, while the distribution of congruence indices across large samples of cladograms has underpinned claims about temporal and taxonomic patterns of completeness in the fossil record. The most widely used stratigraphic congruence indices are the stratigraphic consistency index (SCI), the modified Manhattan stratigraphic measure (MSM*), and the gap excess ratio (GER) (plus its derivatives; the topological GER and the modified GER). Many factors are believed to variously bias these indices, with several empirical and simulation studies addressing some subset of the putative interactions. This study combines both approaches to quantify the effects (on all five indices) of eight variables reasoned to constrain the distribution of possible values (the number of taxa, tree balance, tree resolution, range of first occurrence (FO) dates, center of gravity of FO dates, the variability of FO dates, percentage of extant taxa, and percentage of taxa with no fossil record). Our empirical data set comprised 647 published animal and plant cladograms spanning the entire Phanerozoic, and for these data we also modeled the effects of mean age of FOs (as a proxy for clade age), the taxonomic rank of the clade, and the higher taxonomic group to which it belonged. The center of gravity of FO dates had not been investigated hitherto, and this was found to correlate most strongly with some measures of stratigraphic congruence in our empirical study (top-heavy clades had better congruence). The modified GER was the index least susceptible to bias. We found significant differences across higher taxa for all indices; arthropods had lower congruence and tetrapods higher congruence. Stratigraphic congruence-however measured-also varied throughout the Phanerozoic, reflecting

  17. The evolutionary reality of higher taxa in mammals.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Aelys M; Barraclough, Timothy G

    2014-05-22

    Species are generally regarded as a fundamental unit of biodiversity. By contrast, higher taxa such as genera and families, while widely used as biodiversity metrics and for classification and communication, are generally not believed to be shaped by shared evolutionary processes in the same way as species. We use simulations to show that processes which are important for emergence of evolutionarily significant units (ESUs) at the species level, namely geographical isolation and ecological divergence, can generate evolutionary independence above the species level and thereby lead to emergence of discrete phylogenetic clusters (higher ESUs). Extending phylogenetic approaches for delimiting evolutionarily significant species to broader phylogenetic scales, we find evidence for the existence of higher ESUs in mammals. In carnivores, euungulates and lagomorphs the hierarchical level of units detected correspond, on average, to the level of family or genus in traditional taxonomy. The units in euungulates are associated with divergent patterns of body mass, consistent with occupation of distinct ecological zones. Our findings demonstrate a new framework for studying biodiversity that unifies approaches at species and higher levels, thus potentially restoring higher taxa to their historical status as natural entities.

  18. A microarray for assessing transcription from pelagic marine microbial taxa

    PubMed Central

    Shilova, Irina N; Robidart, Julie C; James Tripp, H; Turk-Kubo, Kendra; Wawrik, Boris; Post, Anton F; Thompson, Anne W; Ward, Bess; Hollibaugh, James T; Millard, Andy; Ostrowski, Martin; J Scanlan, David; Paerl, Ryan W; Stuart, Rhona; Zehr, Jonathan P

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomic approaches have revealed unprecedented genetic diversity within microbial communities across vast expanses of the world's oceans. Linking this genetic diversity with key metabolic and cellular activities of microbial assemblages is a fundamental challenge. Here we report on a collaborative effort to design MicroTOOLs (Microbiological Targets for Ocean Observing Laboratories), a high-density oligonucleotide microarray that targets functional genes of diverse taxa in pelagic and coastal marine microbial communities. MicroTOOLs integrates nucleotide sequence information from disparate data types: genomes, PCR-amplicons, metagenomes, and metatranscriptomes. It targets 19 400 unique sequences over 145 different genes that are relevant to stress responses and microbial metabolism across the three domains of life and viruses. MicroTOOLs was used in a proof-of-concept experiment that compared the functional responses of microbial communities following Fe and P enrichments of surface water samples from the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre. We detected transcription of 68% of the gene targets across major taxonomic groups, and the pattern of transcription indicated relief from Fe limitation and transition to N limitation in some taxa. Prochlorococcus (eHLI), Synechococcus (sub-cluster 5.3) and Alphaproteobacteria SAR11 clade (HIMB59) showed the strongest responses to the Fe enrichment. In addition, members of uncharacterized lineages also responded. The MicroTOOLs microarray provides a robust tool for comprehensive characterization of major functional groups of microbes in the open ocean, and the design can be easily amended for specific environments and research questions. PMID:24477198

  19. Sensitivities of extant animal taxa to ocean acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, Astrid C.; Pörtner, Hans-O.

    2013-11-01

    Anthropogenic CO2 emitted to the atmosphere is absorbed by the oceans, causing a progressive increase in ocean inorganic carbon concentrations and resulting in decreased water pH and calcium carbonate saturation. This phenomenon, called ocean acidification, is in addition to the warming effects of CO2 emissions. Ocean acidification has been reported to affect ocean biota, but the severity of this threat to ocean ecosystems (and humans depending on these ecosystems) is poorly understood. Here we evaluate the scale of this threat in the context of widely used representative concentration pathways (RCPs) by analysing the sensitivities of five animal taxa (corals, echinoderms, molluscs, crustaceans and fishes) to a wide range of CO2 concentrations. Corals, echinoderms and molluscs are more sensitive to RCP8.5 (936 ppm in 2100) than are crustaceans. Larval fishes may be even more sensitive than the lower invertebrates, but taxon sensitivity on evolutionary timescales remains obscure. The variety of responses within and between taxa, together with observations in mesocosms and palaeo-analogues, suggest that ocean acidification is a driver for substantial change in ocean ecosystems this century, potentially leading to long-term shifts in species composition.

  20. The impact of rare taxa on a fish index of biotic integrity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wan, H.; Chizinski, C.J.; Dolph, C.L.; Vondracek, B.; Wilson, B.N.

    2010-01-01

    The index of biotic integrity (IBI) is a commonly used bioassessment tool that integrates abundance and richness measures to assess water quality. In developing IBIs that are both responsive to human disturbance and resistant to natural variability and sampling error, water managers must decide how to weigh information about rare and abundant taxa, which in turn requires an understanding of the sensitivity of indices to rare taxa. Herein, we investigated the influence of rare fish taxa (within the lower 5% of rank abundance curves) on IBI metric and total scores for stream sites in two of Minnesota's major river basins, the St. Croix (n = 293 site visits) and Upper Mississippi (n = 210 site visits). We artificially removed rare taxa from biological samples by (1) separately excluding each individual taxon that fell within the lower 5% of rank abundance curves; (2) simultaneously excluding all taxa that had an abundance of one (singletons) or two (doubletons); and (3) simultaneously excluding all taxa that fell within the lower 5% of rank abundance curves. We then compared IBI metric and total scores before and after removal of rare taxa using the normalized root mean square error (nRMSE) and regression analysis. The difference in IBI metric and total scores increased as more taxa were removed. Moreover, when multiple rare taxa were removed, the nRMSE was related to sample abundance and to total taxa richness, with greater nRMSE observed in samples with a larger number of taxa or sample abundance. Metrics based on relative abundance of fish taxa were less sensitive to the loss of rare taxa, whereas those based on taxa richness were more sensitive, because taxa richness metrics give more weight to rare taxa compared to the relative abundance metrics. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Fungal Taxa Target Different Carbon Substrates in Harvard Forest Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, C. A.; Allison, S. D.; Wallenstein, M. D.; Mellilo, J. M.; Treseder, K. K.

    2006-12-01

    The mineralization of soil organic carbon is a major component of the global carbon cycle and is largely controlled by soil microbial communities. However, little is known about the functional roles of soil microbes or whether different microbial taxa target different carbon substrates under natural conditions. To examine this possibility, we assessed the community composition of active fungi by using a novel nucleotide analog technique in soils from the Harvard Forest. We hypothesized that fungal community composition would shift in response to the addition of different substrates and that specific fungal taxa would respond differentially to particular carbon sources. To test this hypothesis, we added a nucleotide analog probe directly to soils in conjunction with one of five carbon compounds of increasing recalcitrance: glycine, sucrose, cellulose, tannin-protein complex, and lignin. During 48 hour incubations, the nucleotide analog was incorporated into newly replicated DNA of soil organisms that proliferated following the addition of the substrates. In this way, we labeled the DNA of microbes that respond to a particular carbon source. Labeled DNA was isolated and fungal Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) regions of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) were sequenced and analyzed to identify active fungi to near-species resolution. Diversity analyses at the ≥97% sequence similarity level indicated that taxonomic richness was greater under cellulose (Shannon Index: 3.23 ± 0.11 with ± 95% CI) and lignin (2.87 ± 0.15) additions than the other treatments (2.34 ± 0.16 to 2.64 ± 0.13). In addition, community composition of active fungi shifted under glycine, sucrose, and cellulose additions. Specifically, the community under glycine was significantly different from communities under control, cellulose, and tannin-protein (P<0.05). Additionally, the sucrose and cellulose communities were marginally different from the control community (P = 0.059 and 0.054, respectively) and

  2. Fossil preservation and the stratigraphic ranges of taxa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foote, M.; Raup, D. M.

    1996-01-01

    The incompleteness of the fossil record hinders the inference of evolutionary rates and patterns. Here, we derive relationships among true taxonomic durations, preservation probability, and observed taxonomic ranges. We use these relationships to estimate original distributions of taxonomic durations, preservation probability, and completeness (proportion of taxa preserved), given only the observed ranges. No data on occurrences within the ranges of taxa are required. When preservation is random and the original distribution of durations is exponential, the inference of durations, preservability, and completeness is exact. However, reasonable approximations are possible given non-exponential duration distributions and temporal and taxonomic variation in preservability. Thus, the approaches we describe have great potential in studies of taphonomy, evolutionary rates and patterns, and genealogy. Analyses of Upper Cambrian-Lower Ordovician trilobite species, Paleozoic crinoid genera, Jurassic bivalve species, and Cenozoic mammal species yield the following results: (1) The preservation probability inferred from stratigraphic ranges alone agrees with that inferred from the analysis of stratigraphic gaps when data on the latter are available. (2) Whereas median durations based on simple tabulations of observed ranges are biased by stratigraphic resolution, our estimates of median duration, extinction rate, and completeness are not biased.(3) The shorter geologic ranges of mammalian species relative to those of bivalves cannot be attributed to a difference in preservation potential. However, we cannot rule out the contribution of taxonomic practice to this difference. (4) In the groups studied, completeness (proportion of species [trilobites, bivalves, mammals] or genera [crinoids] preserved) ranges from 60% to 90%. The higher estimates of completeness at smaller geographic scales support previous suggestions that the incompleteness of the fossil record reflects loss of

  3. Parallel phylogeographic structure in ecologically similar sympatric sister taxa.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Michael N

    2012-02-01

    Present-day phylogeographic patterns have been shaped by the dual histories of lineages and places, producing a diversity of relationships that may challenge discovery of general rules. For example, the predicted positive correlation between dispersal ability and gene flow has been supported inconsistently, suggesting unaccounted complexity in theory or the comparative framework. Here, I extend the sympatric sister-species approach, in which variance between lineages and places is minimized, to sister clades and test a fundamental assumption of comparative genetic studies of dispersal: that taxa which evolved at the same time and in the same place will, if they have similar life histories and ecologies, have essentially the same phylogeographic structure. Phylogenetic analyses of 197 Stigmatopora pipefishes using two nuclear (creatine kinase intron 6, α-tropomyosin) and two mitochondrial (16S, noncoding region) loci revealed largely synchronous parallel diversification of sister clades that are codistributed from Western Australia to New Zealand, supporting the null hypothesis. Only one comparison, however, yielded a sympatric sister-species pair (the two stem species), so I also explored the potential for extant species sharing a substantial proportion of their evolutionary histories in sympatry to substitute for sister taxon comparisons. In eastern Australia, where strong environmental structure is lacking, phylogeographic differences between species that have been codistributed for ~85% of their evolutionary histories were consistent with tendencies favoured by their modest life-history differences, that is the larger, rarer species had lower genetic diversity. In contrast, in New Zealand, two species codistributed for ~70% of their evolutionary histories were both structured similarly by a strong biogeographic filter despite differences in life history. Rigorously quantifying the influence of intrinsic and extrinsic factors on phylogeographic structure may

  4. Identifying sighting clusters of endangered taxa with historical records.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Karl J

    2011-04-01

    The probability and time of extinction of taxa is often inferred from statistical analyses of historical records. Many of these analyses require the exclusion of multiple records within a unit of time (i.e., a month or a year). Nevertheless, spatially explicit, temporally aggregated data may be useful for identifying clusters of sightings (i.e., sighting clusters) in space and time. Identification of sighting clusters highlights changes in the historical recording of endangered taxa. I used two methods to identify sighting clusters in historical records: the Ederer-Myers-Mantel (EMM) test and the space-time permutation scan (STPS). I applied these methods to the spatially explicit sighting records of three species of orchids that are listed as endangered in the Republic of Ireland under the Wildlife Act (1976): Cephalanthera longifolia, Hammarbya paludosa, and Pseudorchis albida. Results with the EMM test were strongly affected by the choice of the time interval, and thus the number of temporal samples, used to examine the records. For example, sightings of P. albida clustered when the records were partitioned into 20-year temporal samples, but not when they were partitioned into 22-year temporal samples. Because the statistical power of EMM was low, it will not be useful when data are sparse. Nevertheless, the STPS identified regions that contained sighting clusters because it uses a flexible scanning window (defined by cylinders of varying size that move over the study area and evaluate the likelihood of clustering) to detect them, and it identified regions with high and regions with low rates of orchid sightings. The STPS analyses can be used to detect sighting clusters of endangered species that may be related to regions of extirpation and may assist in the categorization of threat status.

  5. Taxa-area Relationship (TAR) of Microbial Functional Genes with Long-TGerm Fertilization

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Yuting; Wu, Liyou; Clark, Ian; Xue, Kai; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Hirsch, Penny; Mcgrath, Steve; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    Diversity and spatial patterns in plant and animal communities are well documented as a positive-power law of a taxa-area relationship (TAR). At present little is known whether this also applies to soil microbial communities and whether long-term fertilization has an influence on the underlying microbial diversity. To test the effects of long-term fertilization on above-ground botanical diversity and below-ground microbial diversity, a nested sampling approach on Park Grass plots (12d& 11/2c) of Rothamsted Reseach in United Kingdom, both at ~;; pH 5 but with plant diversities of between 42 and 13 respectively were used. GeoChip 3.0, covering approximately 57, 000 gene sequences of 292 gene families involved in nitrogen, carbon, sulfur and phosphorus cycling, metal reduction and resistance, and organic contaminant degradation, was used to determine the gene area relationships for both functional and phylogenetic groups and the relationship to plant diversity. Our analysis indicated that the microbial communities were separated by different plant diversity based on DCA. The soil microbial diversity was in accord with plant diversity. Soil microbial community exhibited different z value with different plant diversity, z = 0.0449 with higher plant diversity and z = 0.0583 with lower plant diversity (P< 0.0001). These results suggest that the turnover in space of microorganisms may be higher with long-term fertilization.

  6. Optimization and purification of mannanase produced by an alkaliphilic-thermotolerant Bacillus cereus N1 isolated from Bani Salama Lake in Wadi El-Natron

    PubMed Central

    El-Sharouny, Ebaa Ebrahim; El-Toukhy, Nabil M.K.; El-Sersy, Nermeen Ahmed; El-Gayar, Abeer Abd El-Aal

    2015-01-01

    An alkaliphilic-thermotolerant Bacillus cereus N1 isolated from Bani Salama Lake, Wadi El-Natron, Egypt, was proved to produce mannanase enzyme. Optimization of the fermentation medium components using Plackett–Burman design was applied. Glucose and inoculum size were found to be the most significant factors enhancing the production of the enzyme. On applying optimized medium in the fermentation process, an enzyme productivity of 42.2 UmL−1 was achieved with 6.4 fold increase compared to the basal one. Mannanase was also extracted and purified using chromatography such as ion-exchange chromatographic and gel filtration methods. It was indicated that, the mannanase activity extracted and purified from the isolate B. cereus N1 was reduced to 321.6 U (about 36% of the whole mannanase in the culture filtrate) in comparison with the initial mannanase activity (900 U) and the total protein content reduced to 52 mg (the initial total protein content was 220 mg). However, the specific activity for the mannanase from B. cereus N1 at the end of the purification steps was found to be about 628 Umg−1 compared to 4.2 Umg−1 at the initial culture filtrate. It was also indicated that the mannanase enzyme was purified almost 149-fold. PMID:26019646

  7. Production of Alkaline Protease by Solvent-Tolerant Alkaliphilic Bacillus circulans MTCC 7942 Isolated from Hydrocarbon Contaminated Habitat: Process Parameters Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Ulhas; Chaudhari, Ambalal

    2013-01-01

    In the present investigation, a newly isolated organic solvent-tolerant and alkaliphilic bacterial strain was reported from a hydrocarbon (gasoline and diesel) contaminated soil collected from the petrol station, Shirpur (India). The strain was identified as Bacillus circulans MTCC 7942, based on phenotype, biochemical, and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence. The capability of Bacillus circulans to secrete an extracellular, thermostable, alkaline protease and grow in the presence of organic solvents was explored. Bacillus circulans produced maximum alkaline protease (412 U/mL) in optimized medium (g/L): soybean meal, 15; starch, 10; KH2PO4, 1; MgSO4·7H2O, 0.05; CaCl2, 1; Na2CO3, 8; pH 10.0 at 37°C and 100 rpm. The competence of strain to grow in various organic solvents—n-octane, dodecane, n-decane, N,N-dimethylformamide, n-hexane, and dimethyl sulfoxide, establishes its potential as solvent-stable protease source for the possible applications in nonaqueous reactions and fine chemical synthesis. PMID:25937965

  8. A new alkaliphilic cold-active esterase from the psychrophilic marine bacterium Rhodococcus sp.: functional and structural studies and biotechnological potential.

    PubMed

    De Santi, Concetta; Tedesco, Pietro; Ambrosino, Luca; Altermark, Bjørn; Willassen, Nils-Peder; de Pascale, Donatella

    2014-03-01

    The special features of cold-adapted lipolytic biocatalysts have made their use possible in several industrial applications. In fact, cold-active enzymes are known to be able to catalyze reactions at low temperatures, avoiding side reactions taking place at higher temperatures and preserving the integrity of products. A lipolytic gene was isolated from the Arctic marine bacterium Rhodococcus sp. AW25M09 and expressed in Escherichia coli as inclusion bodies. The recombinant enzyme (hereafter called RhLip) showed interesting cold-active esterase activity. The refolded purified enzyme displayed optimal activity at 30 °C and was cold-active with retention of 50% activity at 10 °C. It is worth noting that the optimal pH was 11, and the low relative activity below pH 10 revealed that RhLip was an alkaliphilic esterase. The enzyme was active toward short-chain p-nitrophenyl esters (C2-C6), displaying optimal activity with the butyrate (C4) ester. In addition, the enzyme revealed a good organic solvent and salt tolerance. These features make this an interesting enzyme for exploitation in some industrial applications.

  9. Production of Alkaline Protease by Solvent-Tolerant Alkaliphilic Bacillus circulans MTCC 7942 Isolated from Hydrocarbon Contaminated Habitat: Process Parameters Optimization.

    PubMed

    Patil, Ulhas; Chaudhari, Ambalal

    2013-01-01

    In the present investigation, a newly isolated organic solvent-tolerant and alkaliphilic bacterial strain was reported from a hydrocarbon (gasoline and diesel) contaminated soil collected from the petrol station, Shirpur (India). The strain was identified as Bacillus circulans MTCC 7942, based on phenotype, biochemical, and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence. The capability of Bacillus circulans to secrete an extracellular, thermostable, alkaline protease and grow in the presence of organic solvents was explored. Bacillus circulans produced maximum alkaline protease (412 U/mL) in optimized medium (g/L): soybean meal, 15; starch, 10; KH2PO4, 1; MgSO4·7H2O, 0.05; CaCl2, 1; Na2CO3, 8; pH 10.0 at 37°C and 100 rpm. The competence of strain to grow in various organic solvents-n-octane, dodecane, n-decane, N,N-dimethylformamide, n-hexane, and dimethyl sulfoxide, establishes its potential as solvent-stable protease source for the possible applications in nonaqueous reactions and fine chemical synthesis.

  10. Enzymatic Properties of an Alkaline and Chelator Resistant Proportional to alpha-Amylase from the Alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. Isolate L1711

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhardsdotter, Eva C. M. J.; Pusey, Marc L.; Ng, Joseph D.; Garriott, Owen K.

    2004-01-01

    An alkaliphilic amylase producing bacterium, Bacillus sp. strain L1711, was selected among 13 soda lakes isolates. When grown at pH 10.5 and 370 C, strain L1711 produced multiple forms of amylases in the culture broth. One of these, BAA, was purified from the culture supernatant by QAE column chromatography and preparative native gel electrophoresis. The molecular weight of BAA was determined to be 51 kDa by denaturing gel electrophoresis. The pH optima for activity below and above 40 C were 9.5-10.0 and 7.0-7.5 respectively. BAA was stable in the pH range 6-11 and was completely inactivated at 55?C. The thermostability was not increased in the presence of Ca(2+). The enzyme was strongly inhibited by Ca(2+), Zn(2+), Mg(2+), Mn(2+), Ba(2+) and Cu(2+), whereas the presence of Na(+), Co2+ and EDTA (10 mM) enhanced enzymatic activity. The K(sub m) and specific activity of BAA on soluble starch were 1.9 mg/ml and 18.5 U/mg respectively. The main end products of hydrolysis were maltotetraose, maltose and glucose .

  11. Pollinator sharing and gene flow among closely related sympatric dioecious fig taxa.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Cannon, Charles H; Chen, Jin

    2016-04-13

    Hybridization and insect pollination are widely believed to increase rates of plant diversification. The extreme diversity of figs (Ficus) and their obligate pollinators, fig wasps (Agaonidae), provides an opportunity to examine the possible role of pollinator-mediated hybridization in plant diversification. Increasing evidence suggests that pollinator sharing and hybridization occurs among fig taxa, despite relatively strict coevolution with the pollinating wasp. Using five sympatric dioecious fig taxa and their pollinators, we examine the degree of pollinator sharing and inter-taxa gene flow. We experimentally test pollinator preference for floral volatiles, the main host recognition signal, from different figs. All five fig taxa shared pollinators with other taxa, and gene flow occurred between fig taxa within and between sections. Floral volatiles of each taxon attracted more than one pollinator species. Floral volatiles were more similar between closely related figs, which experienced higher levels of pollinator sharing and inter-taxa gene flow. This study demonstrates that pollinator sharing and inter-taxa gene flow occurs among closely related sympatric dioecious fig taxa and that pollinators choose the floral volatiles of multiple fig taxa. The implications of pollinator sharing and inter-taxa gene flow on diversification, occurring even in this highly specialized obligate pollination system, require further study.

  12. Nitrogen dioxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nitrogen dioxide ; CASRN 10102 - 44 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  13. Nested taxa-area curves for eastern United States floras

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    The slopes of log-log species-area curves have been studied extensively and found to be influenced by the range of areas under study. Two such studies of eastern United States floras have yielded species-area curve slopes which differ by more than 100%: 0.251 and 0.113. The first slope may be too steep because the flora of the world was included, and both may be too steep because noncontiguous areas were used. These two hypotheses were tested using a set of nested floras centered in Ohio and continuing up to the flora of the world. The results suggest that this set of eastern United States floras produces a log-log species-area curve with a slope of approximately 0.20 with the flora of the world excluded, and regardless of whether or not the floras are from nested areas. Genera- and family-area curves are less steep than species-area curves and show similar patterns. Taxa ratio curves also increase with area, with the species/family ratio showing the steepest slope.

  14. Comparing mechanisms of host manipulation across host and parasite taxa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lafferty, Kevin D.; Shaw, Jenny C.

    2013-01-01

    Parasites affect host behavior in several ways. They can alter activity, microhabitats or both. For trophically transmitted parasites (the focus of our study), decreased activity might impair the ability of hosts to respond to final-host predators, and increased activity and altered microhabitat choice might increase contact rates between hosts and final-host predators. In an analysis of trophically transmitted parasites, more parasite groups altered activity than altered microhabitat choice. Parasites that infected vertebrates were more likely to impair the host’s reaction to predators, whereas parasites that infected invertebrates were more likely to increase the host’s contact with predators. The site of infection might affect how parasites manipulate their hosts. For instance, parasites in the central nervous system seem particularly suited to manipulating host behavior. Manipulative parasites commonly occupy the body cavity, muscles and central nervous systems of their hosts. Acanthocephalans in the data set differed from other taxa in that they occurred exclusively in the body cavity of invertebrates. In addition, they were more likely to alter microhabitat choice than activity. Parasites in the body cavity (across parasite types) were more likely to be associated with increased host contact with predators. Parasites can manipulate the host through energetic drain, but most parasites use more sophisticated means. For instance, parasites target four physiological systems that shape behavior in both invertebrates and vertebrates: neural, endocrine, neuromodulatory and immunomodulatory. The interconnections between these systems make it difficult to isolate specific mechanisms of host behavioral manipulation.

  15. DNA barcoding and taxonomy: dark taxa and dark texts.

    PubMed

    Page, Roderic D M

    2016-09-05

    Both classical taxonomy and DNA barcoding are engaged in the task of digitizing the living world. Much of the taxonomic literature remains undigitized. The rise of open access publishing this century and the freeing of older literature from the shackles of copyright have greatly increased the online availability of taxonomic descriptions, but much of the literature of the mid- to late-twentieth century remains offline ('dark texts'). DNA barcoding is generating a wealth of computable data that in many ways are much easier to work with than classical taxonomic descriptions, but many of the sequences are not identified to species level. These 'dark taxa' hamper the classical method of integrating biodiversity data, using shared taxonomic names. Voucher specimens are a potential common currency of both the taxonomic literature and sequence databases, and could be used to help link names, literature and sequences. An obstacle to this approach is the lack of stable, resolvable specimen identifiers. The paper concludes with an appeal for a global 'digital dashboard' to assess the extent to which biodiversity data are available online.This article is part of the themed issue 'From DNA barcodes to biomes'.

  16. Sustaining salmonid populations: A caring understanding of naturalness of taxa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nielsen, Jennifer L.; Regier, Henry A.; Knudsen, E. Eric

    2004-01-01

    Species of the family of Salmonidae occur naturally in Northern Hemisphere waters that remain clear and cool to cold in summer. For purposes of reproduction, salmonids generally behaviorally respond to the currents of streams and lakes in recently glaciated areas. For feeding and maturation, many larger species migrate into existing systems of large lakes, seas, and oceans. The subfamilies include Salmoninae, Coregoninae, and Thymallinae. In many locales and regions of the hemisphere, numerous species of these subfamilies evolved and self-organized into species flocks or taxocenes of bewildering complexity. For example, any individual species may play different or unique ecological roles in different taxocenes. The northern Pacific and Atlantic Ocean ecosystems, with their seas and tributaries, each contained a metacomplex of such taxocenes that, in their natural state some centuries ago, resembled each other but differed in many ways. Humans have valued all species of this family for subsistence, ceremonial, naturalist, gustatory, angling, and commercial reasons for centuries. Modern progressive humans (MPHs), whose industrial and commercial enterprises have gradually spread over this hemisphere in recent time, now affect aquatic ecosystems at all scales from local to global. These human effects mingle in complex ways that together induce uniquely natural salmonid taxocenes to disintegrate with the loss of species, including those groups least tolerant to human manipulations, but extending more recently to those taxa more adapted to anthropogenic change. As we leave the modern era, dominated by MPHs, will we find ways to live sustainably with salmonid taxocenes that still exhibit self-organizational integrity, or will only individual, isolated populations of salmonid species, derived from those most tolerant of MPHs, survive? To achieve future sustainability of salmonids, we suggest implementation of a search for intuitive knowledge based on faith in the wisdom of

  17. Cloning, evaluation, and high-level expression of a thermo-alkaline pectate lyase from alkaliphilic Bacillus clausii with potential in ramie degumming.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Cheng; Xue, Yanfen; Ma, Yanhe

    2017-02-09

    Alkaline pectate lyases (Pels) have potential application in bioscouring of the textile industry. In this study, a thermo-alkaline Pel (BacPelA) gene from an alkaliphilic Bacillus clausii strain was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The mature BacPelA exhibited maximum activity at pH 10.5 and 70 °C and showed high cleavage capability on methylated pectins. BacPelA showed the highest specific activity of 936.2 U mg(-1) on ≥85% methylated pectin and 675.5 U mg(-1) on standard substrate polygalacturonic acid (PGA) upon evaluation of the absorbance at 235 nm (A235). The K m and k cat values for PGA were 0.54 g l(-1) and 346.5 s(-1), respectively. Moreover, the 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid (DNS) assay, which detects the released reducing oligogalacturonic acids, was confirmed to be inaccurate and unsuitable for endo-acting pectinase activity assay because of the difference in the reducibility by DNS reagent between the standard galacturonic acid and the catalytic oligomer products. Significant ramie fiber weight loss was observed following treatment with BacPelA (24.8%) and combined enzyme-chemical method (30.9%), which indicated that the degumming efficiency of BacPelA was the highest of all alkaline and thermostable Pels reported to date. The total activity of the recombinant mature BacPelA reached 8378.2 U ml(-1) (A235) by high-cell-density cultivation in fed-batch fermentation with productivity of 239.4 U ml(-1) h(-1) using E. coli as host, which represents the highest Pel yield reported to date. Therefore, BacPelA, with promising properties for bioscouring, shows potential applications for ramie degumming in the textile industry.

  18. Detergent-, solvent- and salt-compatible thermoactive alkaline serine protease from halotolerant alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. NPST-AK15: purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Abdelnasser S S; Al-Salamah, Ali A; El-Badawi, Yahya B; El-Tayeb, Mohamed A; Antranikian, Garabed

    2015-09-01

    Alkaline protease produced by the halotolerant alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. strain NPST-AK15 was purified to homogeneity by the combination of ammonium sulfate precipitation, anion-exchange and gel permeation chromatography. The purified enzyme was a monomeric protein with an estimated molecular weight of 32 kDa. NPST-AK15 protease was highly active and stable over a wide pH range, with a maximal activity at pH 10.5. The enzyme showed optimum activity at 60 °C and was stable at 30-50 °C for at least 1 h. Thermal stability of the purified protease was substantially improved by CaCl2 (1.1- to 6.6-fold). The K m, V max and k cat values for the enzyme were 2.5 mg ml(-1), 42.5 µM min(-1) mg(-1), and 392.46 × 10(3) min(-1), respectively. NPST-AK15 protease activity was strongly inhibited by PMSF, suggesting that the enzyme is a serine protease. The enzyme was highly stable in NaCl up to 20 % (w/v). Moreover, the purified enzyme was stable in several organic solvents such as diethyl ether, benzene, toluene, and chloroform. In addition, it showed high stability and compatibility with a wide range of surfactants and commercial detergents and was slightly activated by hydrogen peroxide. These features of NPST-AK15 protease make this enzyme a promising candidate for application in the laundry and pharmaceutical industries.

  19. Degradation of azo dye methyl red by alkaliphilic, halotolerant Nesterenkonia lacusekhoensis EMLA3: application in alkaline and salt-rich dyeing effluent treatment.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Amrik; Goyal, Nidhi; Gupta, Anshu

    2017-03-02

    Effluents from textile industries are highly colored due to vast use of various azo dyes and color is the first visual indicator of pollution. Biological treatment of textile effluent is often hampered due to the alkaline pH and high salinity; a common characteristic of many textile industrial wastewaters. Considering this, the present study explores the potential of a newly isolated halotolerant and alkaliphilic bacterium Nesterenkonia lacusekhoensis EMLA3 for degradation of methyl red (MR) dye under alkaline condition. Strain EMLA3 showed 97% degradation of 50 mg L(-1) MR after 16 h at initial pH of 11.5 in nutrient medium. Dye degradation by the isolate is supported by the formation of low-molecular weight metabolites as divulge through GC-MS & FTIR studies Optimum dye degradation was observed in the pH range of 8.0-11.5 and temperature range of 30-35 °C. Significant MR degrading activity of the strain could be achieved in the presence of very high salt level (100-120 g L(-1) NaCl) and in co-presence of different heavy metals. Application of strain to alkaline pH, salt, and heavy metals laden-textile effluent resulted in overall 83% dye removal from the effluent after 120 h of treatment under static condition. Furthermore, the property of microbe to drop-down the pH of wastewater from 11.5 to 8.60 after treatment also lowers the need of additional neutralization treatment. The entire study thus comes out with novel application of N. lacusekhoensis-a less explored extremophilic bacterium-for treatment of alkaline and salt-rich azo dye-containing wastewaters.

  20. Purification strategies, characteristics and thermodynamic analysis of a highly thermostable alkaline protease from a salt-tolerant alkaliphilic actinomycete, Nocardiopsis alba OK-5.

    PubMed

    Gohel, Sangeeta D; Singh, Satya P

    2012-03-15

    An alkaline protease from salt tolerant alkaliphilic actinomycetes, Nocardiopsis alba strain OK-5 was purified to homogeneity by 27 and 13 fold with a yield of 35 and 13% using two-steps and one-step method, respectively. The purification methods involved hydrophobic interaction on phenyl sapharose matrix. The apparent molecular mass was 20 kDa. The temperature optimum shifted from 70 to 80°C in 4M NaCl and 30% Na-glutamate, with significant stability at 60-80°C in Na-glutamate. Deactivation rate constant (K(d)) increased and half life (t(1/2)) decreased with the increasing temperatures from 37 to 80°C. The order of stability was: 30% Na-glutamate>4M NaCl>2M NaCl>0M NaCl. The enzyme was stable even at 80°C in 30% Na-glutamate with K(d) 4.11 and t(1/2) 168.64 min. The activation energies (E), enthalpy (ΔH*) and entropy (ΔS*) for protease deactivation in with Na-glutamate were 31.97 kJ/mole, 29.23 kJ/mole and -211.83 J/mole, respectively. The change in free energy (ΔG*) for protease deactivation at 60°C in 30% Na-glutamate was 101.70 kJ/mole. Protease had the highest activity and stability at pH 10-11. While the enzyme was highly resistant against chemical denaturation, it had varied responses to metal ions. Complete inhibition by PMSF confirmed serine nature of the protease. Na-glutamate, H(2)O(2), β-mercaptoethanol and different surfactants enhanced the activity.

  1. DNA barcode data accurately assign higher spider taxa.

    PubMed

    Coddington, Jonathan A; Agnarsson, Ingi; Cheng, Ren-Chung; Čandek, Klemen; Driskell, Amy; Frick, Holger; Gregorič, Matjaž; Kostanjšek, Rok; Kropf, Christian; Kweskin, Matthew; Lokovšek, Tjaša; Pipan, Miha; Vidergar, Nina; Kuntner, Matjaž

    2016-01-01

    The use of unique DNA sequences as a method for taxonomic identification is no longer fundamentally controversial, even though debate continues on the best markers, methods, and technology to use. Although both existing databanks such as GenBank and BOLD, as well as reference taxonomies, are imperfect, in best case scenarios "barcodes" (whether single or multiple, organelle or nuclear, loci) clearly are an increasingly fast and inexpensive method of identification, especially as compared to manual identification of unknowns by increasingly rare expert taxonomists. Because most species on Earth are undescribed, a complete reference database at the species level is impractical in the near term. The question therefore arises whether unidentified species can, using DNA barcodes, be accurately assigned to more inclusive groups such as genera and families-taxonomic ranks of putatively monophyletic groups for which the global inventory is more complete and stable. We used a carefully chosen test library of CO1 sequences from 49 families, 313 genera, and 816 species of spiders to assess the accuracy of genus and family-level assignment. We used BLAST queries of each sequence against the entire library and got the top ten hits. The percent sequence identity was reported from these hits (PIdent, range 75-100%). Accurate assignment of higher taxa (PIdent above which errors totaled less than 5%) occurred for genera at PIdent values >95 and families at PIdent values ≥ 91, suggesting these as heuristic thresholds for accurate generic and familial identifications in spiders. Accuracy of identification increases with numbers of species/genus and genera/family in the library; above five genera per family and fifteen species per genus all higher taxon assignments were correct. We propose that using percent sequence identity between conventional barcode sequences may be a feasible and reasonably accurate method to identify animals to family/genus. However, the quality of the

  2. DNA barcode data accurately assign higher spider taxa

    PubMed Central

    Coddington, Jonathan A.; Agnarsson, Ingi; Cheng, Ren-Chung; Čandek, Klemen; Driskell, Amy; Frick, Holger; Gregorič, Matjaž; Kostanjšek, Rok; Kropf, Christian; Kweskin, Matthew; Lokovšek, Tjaša; Pipan, Miha; Vidergar, Nina

    2016-01-01

    The use of unique DNA sequences as a method for taxonomic identification is no longer fundamentally controversial, even though debate continues on the best markers, methods, and technology to use. Although both existing databanks such as GenBank and BOLD, as well as reference taxonomies, are imperfect, in best case scenarios “barcodes” (whether single or multiple, organelle or nuclear, loci) clearly are an increasingly fast and inexpensive method of identification, especially as compared to manual identification of unknowns by increasingly rare expert taxonomists. Because most species on Earth are undescribed, a complete reference database at the species level is impractical in the near term. The question therefore arises whether unidentified species can, using DNA barcodes, be accurately assigned to more inclusive groups such as genera and families—taxonomic ranks of putatively monophyletic groups for which the global inventory is more complete and stable. We used a carefully chosen test library of CO1 sequences from 49 families, 313 genera, and 816 species of spiders to assess the accuracy of genus and family-level assignment. We used BLAST queries of each sequence against the entire library and got the top ten hits. The percent sequence identity was reported from these hits (PIdent, range 75–100%). Accurate assignment of higher taxa (PIdent above which errors totaled less than 5%) occurred for genera at PIdent values >95 and families at PIdent values ≥ 91, suggesting these as heuristic thresholds for accurate generic and familial identifications in spiders. Accuracy of identification increases with numbers of species/genus and genera/family in the library; above five genera per family and fifteen species per genus all higher taxon assignments were correct. We propose that using percent sequence identity between conventional barcode sequences may be a feasible and reasonably accurate method to identify animals to family/genus. However, the quality of

  3. DNA microarray analysis of the cyanotroph Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344 in response to nitrogen starvation, cyanide and a jewelry wastewater.

    PubMed

    Luque-Almagro, V M; Escribano, M P; Manso, I; Sáez, L P; Cabello, P; Moreno-Vivián, C; Roldán, M D

    2015-11-20

    Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344 is an alkaliphilic bacterium that can use cyanide as nitrogen source for growth, becoming a suitable candidate to be applied in biological treatment of cyanide-containing wastewaters. The assessment of the whole genome sequence of the strain CECT5344 has allowed the generation of DNA microarrays to analyze the response to different nitrogen sources. The mRNA of P. pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344 cells grown under nitrogen limiting conditions showed considerable changes when compared against the transcripts from cells grown with ammonium; up-regulated genes were, among others, the glnK gene encoding the nitrogen regulatory protein PII, the two-component ntrBC system involved in global nitrogen regulation, and the ammonium transporter-encoding amtB gene. The protein coding transcripts of P. pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344 cells grown with sodium cyanide or an industrial jewelry wastewater that contains high concentration of cyanide and metals like iron, copper and zinc, were also compared against the transcripts of cells grown with ammonium as nitrogen source. This analysis revealed the induction by cyanide and the cyanide-rich wastewater of four nitrilase-encoding genes, including the nitC gene that is essential for cyanide assimilation, the cyanase cynS gene involved in cyanate assimilation, the cioAB genes required for the cyanide-insensitive respiration, and the ahpC gene coding for an alkyl-hydroperoxide reductase that could be related with iron homeostasis and oxidative stress. The nitC and cynS genes were also induced in cells grown under nitrogen starvation conditions. In cells grown with the jewelry wastewater, a malate quinone:oxidoreductase mqoB gene and several genes coding for metal extrusion systems were specifically induced.

  4. Triterpenes of toxic and non-toxic taxa of Lantana camara.

    PubMed

    Hart, N K; Lamberton, J A; Sioumis, A A; Suares, H; Seawright, A A

    1976-04-15

    The taxa of Lantana camara toxic to animals contain lantadene A lantadene B, whereas in two non-toxic taxa other triterpenes predominate. Several new triterpenes have been characterized. Contrary to earlier claims, lantadene A and to a lesser extent lantadene B are toxic when administered intraruminally to sheep.

  5. Divergence time estimation using fossils as terminal taxa and the origins of Lissamphibia.

    PubMed

    Pyron, R Alexander

    2011-07-01

    Were molecular data available for extinct taxa, questions regarding the origins of many groups could be settled in short order. As this is not the case, various strategies have been proposed to combine paleontological and neontological data sets. The use of fossil dates as node age calibrations for divergence time estimation from molecular phylogenies is commonplace. In addition, simulations suggest that the addition of morphological data from extinct taxa may improve phylogenetic estimation when combined with molecular data for extant species, and some studies have merged morphological and molecular data to estimate combined evidence phylogenies containing both extinct and extant taxa. However, few, if any, studies have attempted to estimate divergence times using phylogenies containing both fossil and living taxa sampled for both molecular and morphological data. Here, I infer both the phylogeny and the time of origin for Lissamphibia and a number of stem tetrapods using Bayesian methods based on a data set containing morphological data for extinct taxa, molecular data for extant taxa, and molecular and morphological data for a subset of extant taxa. The results suggest that Lissamphibia is monophyletic, nested within Lepospondyli, and originated in the late Carboniferous at the earliest. This research illustrates potential pitfalls for the use of fossils as post hoc age constraints on internal nodes and highlights the importance of explicit phylogenetic analysis of extinct taxa. These results suggest that the application of fossils as minima or maxima on molecular phylogenies should be supplemented or supplanted by combined evidence analyses whenever possible.

  6. State-of-Science Approaches to Determine Sensitive Taxa for Water Quality Criteria Derivation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current Ambient Water Quality Criteria (AWQC) guidelines specify pre-defined taxa diversity requirements, which has limited chemical-specific criteria development in the U.S. to less than 100 chemicals. A priori knowledge of sensitive taxa to toxicologically similar groups of che...

  7. EXCLUSION OF RARE TAXA AFFECTS PERFORMANCE OF THE O/E INDEX IN BIOASSESSMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The contribution of rare taxa to bioassessments based on multispecies assemblages is the subject of continued debate. As a result, users of predictive models such as River InVertebrate Prediction and Classification System (RIVPACS) disagree on whether to exclude locally rare taxa...

  8. Screening Prosopis (mesquite) germplasm for biomass production and nitrogen fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, P.; Cannell, G.H.; Clark, P.R.; Osborn, J.F.

    1980-01-01

    The nitrogen-fixing trees of the genus Prosopis (mesquite or algaroba) are well adapted to the semi-arid and often saline regions of the world. These trees may produce firewood or pods for livestock food, they may stabilize sand dunes and they may enrich the soil by production of leaf litter supported by nitrogen fixation. A collection of nearly 500 Prosopis accessions representing North and South American and African germplasm has been established. Seventy of these accessions representing 14 taxa are being grown under field conditions where a 30-fold range in biomass productivity among accessions has been estimated. In a greehouse experiment, 13 Prosopis taxa grew on nitrogen-free medium nodulated, and had a 10-fold difference in nitrogen fixation (acetylene reduction). When Prosopis is propagated by seed the resulting trees are extremely variable in growth rate and presence or absence of thorns. Propagation of 6 Prosopis taxa by stem cuttings has been achieved with low success (1 to 10%) in field-grown plants and with higher success (50 to 100%) with young actively growing greenhouse plants.

  9. Keratinolytic activities of alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. MBRL 575 from a novel habitat, limestone deposit site in Manipur, India.

    PubMed

    Kshetri, Pintubala; Ningthoujam, Debananda S

    2016-01-01

    Microbial degradation of keratinous wastes is preferred over physicochemical methods as the latter is costlier and not eco-friendly. Novel habitats are promising for discovery of new microbial strains. Towards discovery of novel keratinolytic bacteria, screening of bacterial strains from a novel limestone habitat in Hundung, Manipur, India was done and a promising isolate, MBRL 575, was found to degrade native chicken feather efficiently. It could grow over a broad pH range (Langeveld et al. in J Infect Dis 188:1782-1789, 2003; Park and Son in Microbiol Res 164:478-485, 2009; Zaghloul et al. in Biodegradation 22:111-128, 2011; Takami et al. in Biosci Biotechnol Biochem 56:1667-1669, 1992; Riffel et al. in J Biotechnol 128:693-703, 2007; Wang et al. in Bioresour Technol 99:5679-5686, 2008) and in presence of 0-15 % NaCl. Based on phenotypic characterization and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the new keratinolytic limestone isolate was identified as Bacillus sp. MBRL 575. It produced 305 ± 12 U/ml keratinase and liberated 120 ± 5.5 mg of soluble peptides and 158 ± 4 mg of amino acids per gram of feather after 48 h of incubation at 30 °C in chicken feather medium. The strain could also degrade feathers of other species besides chicken. The cell-free enzyme was also able to degrade feather. Citrate and soybean meal were found to be the best carbon and nitrogen supplements for enhanced enzyme, soluble peptide and amino acid production. In addition to keratinolytic activity, MBRL 575 also exhibited antagonistic activity against two major rice fungal pathogens, Rhizoctonia oryzae-sativae (65 %) and Rhizoctonia solani (58 %).

  10. Aerobic biodegradation of Azo dye by Bacillus cohnii MTCC 3616; an obligately alkaliphilic bacterium and toxicity evaluation of metabolites by different bioassay systems.

    PubMed

    Prasad, A S Arun; Rao, K V Bhaskara

    2013-08-01

    An obligate alkaliphilic bacterium Bacillus cohnii MTCC 3616 aerobically decolorized a textile azo dye Direct Red-22 (5,000 mg l⁻¹) with 95 % efficiency at 37 °C and pH 9 in 4 h under static conditions. The decolorization of Direct Red-22 (DR-22) was possible through a broad pH (7-11), temperature (10-45 °C), salinity (1-7 %), and dye concentration (5-10 g l⁻¹) range. Decolorization of dye was assessed by UV-vis spectrophotometer with reduction of peak intensity at 549 nm (λ(max)). Biodegradation of dye was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The FTIR spectrum revealed that B. cohnii specifically targeted azo bond (N=N) at 1,614.42 cm⁻¹ to break down Direct Red-22. Formation of metabolites with different retention times in HPLC analysis further confirmed the degradation of dye. The phytotoxicity test with 5,000 mg l⁻¹ of untreated dye showed 80 % germination inhibition in Vigna mungo, 70 % in Sorghum bicolor and 80 % in Vigna radiata. No germination inhibition was noticed in all three plants by DR-22 metabolites at 5,000 mg l⁻¹. Biotoxicity test with Artemia salina proved the lethality of the azo dye at LC₅₀ of 4 and 8 % for degraded metabolites by causing death of its nauplii compared to its less toxic-degraded metabolites. Bioaccumulation of dye was observed in the mid-gut of A. salina. The cytogenotoxicity assay on the meristematic root tip cells of Allium cepa further confirmed the cytotoxic nature of azo dye (DR-22) with decrease in mitotic index (0.5 % at 500 ppm) and increase in aberrant index (4.56 %) over 4-h exposure period. Genotoxic damages (lagging chromosome, metaphase cluster, chromosome bridges, and dye accumulation in cytoplasm) were noticed at different stages of cell cycle. The degraded metabolites had negligible cytotoxic and genotoxic effects.

  11. Structural analysis of alkaline β-mannanase from alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. N16-5: implications for adaptation to alkaline conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yueju; Zhang, Yunhua; Cao, Yang; Qi, Jianxun; Mao, Liangwei; Xue, Yanfen; Gao, Feng; Peng, Hao; Wang, Xiaowei; Gao, George F; Ma, Yanhe

    2011-01-28

    Significant progress has been made in isolating novel alkaline β-mannanases, however, there is a paucity of information concerning the structural basis for alkaline tolerance displayed by these β-mannanases. We report the catalytic domain structure of an industrially important β-mannanase from the alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. N16-5 (BSP165 MAN) at a resolution of 1.6 Å. This enzyme, classified into subfamily 8 in glycosyl hydrolase family 5 (GH5), has a pH optimum of enzymatic activity at pH 9.5 and folds into a classic (β/α)(8)-barrel. In order to gain insight into molecular features for alkaline adaptation, we compared BSP165 MAN with previously reported GH5 β-mannanases. It was revealed that BSP165 MAN and other subfamily 8 β-mannanases have significantly increased hydrophobic and Arg residues content and decreased polar residues, comparing to β-mannanases of subfamily 7 or 10 in GH5 which display optimum activities at lower pH. Further, extensive structural comparisons show alkaline β-mannanases possess a set of distinctive features. Position and length of some helices, strands and loops of the TIM barrel structures are changed, which contributes, to a certain degree, to the distinctly different shaped (β/α)(8)-barrels, thus affecting the catalytic environment of these enzymes. The number of negatively charged residues is increased on the molecular surface, and fewer polar residues are exposed to the solvent. Two amino acid substitutions in the vicinity of the acid/base catalyst were proposed to be possibly responsible for the variation in pH optimum of these homologous enzymes in subfamily 8 of GH5, identified by sequence homology analysis and pK(a) calculations of the active site residues. Mutational analysis has proved that Gln91 and Glu226 are important for BSP165 MAN to function at high pH. These findings are proposed to be possible factors implicated in the alkaline adaptation of GH5 β-mannanases and will help to further understanding of

  12. Assessment of available anatomical characters for linking living mammals to fossil taxa in phylogenetic analyses

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Analyses of living and fossil taxa are crucial for understanding biodiversity through time. The total evidence method allows living and fossil taxa to be combined in phylogenies, using molecular data for living taxa and morphological data for living and fossil taxa. With this method, substantial overlap of coded anatomical characters among living and fossil taxa is vital for accurately inferring topology. However, although molecular data for living species are widely available, scientists generating morphological data mainly focus on fossils. Therefore, there are fewer coded anatomical characters in living taxa, even in well-studied groups such as mammals. We investigated the number of coded anatomical characters available in phylogenetic matrices for living mammals and how these were phylogenetically distributed across orders. Eleven of 28 mammalian orders have less than 25% species with available characters; this has implications for the accurate placement of fossils, although the issue is less pronounced at higher taxonomic levels. In most orders, species with available characters are randomly distributed across the phylogeny, which may reduce the impact of the problem. We suggest that increased morphological data collection efforts for living taxa are needed to produce accurate total evidence phylogenies. PMID:27146442

  13. High level of bacterial diversity and novel taxa in continental shelf sediment.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jin-Kyung; Cho, Jae-Chang

    2012-06-01

    The bacterial diversity of the continental shelf sediment in the Yellow Sea was investigated by the cloning and sequencing of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes. The majority of the cloned sequences were distinct phylotypes that were novel at the species level. The richness estimator indicated that the sediment sample might harbor up to 32 phylum-level taxa. A large number of low-abundance, phylum-level taxa accounted for most of the observed phylogenetic diversity at our study site, suggesting that these low-abundance taxa might play crucial roles in the shelf sediment ecosystem.

  14. Do foliar endophytic bacteria fix nitrogen?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kueppers, L. M.; Moyes, A. B.; Frank, C.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Carper, D.; Vandehey, N.; O'Neil, J.; Dekas, A.

    2015-12-01

    Endophytic microorganisms - bacteria and fungi that live inside healthy plant tissue - are a relatively unexplored source of functional diversity in natural ecosystems. Prior to modern sequencing technology, detecting uncultured endophytic bacteria and assessing their putative functions was challenging. However, recent work has revealed a remarkable diversity of as yet non-culturable endophytic taxa and is beginning to identify functional roles within plant microbiomes. We recently examined bacterial communities in the foliage of a long-lived, high-elevation conifer species, limber pine (Pinus flexilis), and discovered a community strongly dominated by acetic acid bacteria (Acetobacteraceae), with several taxa closely related to known nitrogen fixers. Given limber pine's status as a pioneer species that is able to grow in low fertility soils, we hypothesized that this bacterial community has a potential functional role in fixing atmospheric nitrogen, providing a source of this limiting nutrient to the host tree. We used the radioisotope 13N2 to confirm that N2 rapidly diffuses into pine needles, where it could potentially be fixed. With an acetylene reduction assay we confirmed nitrogenase enzyme activity inside excised twigs 4 times over a growing season, and estimate potential rates of N2 fixation at 0.1 nmol N2 g needle-1 hr-1. Scaled to the stand level, this N input could be on the order of ~20 mg N m-2 d-1 over a growing season. While these rates are low, the long lifespan of individual trees (~1000 years) makes them biologically meaningful. Still, measured rates of acetylene reduction and bulk 15N2 incorporation are quite variable in space and time. Much work remains to better characterize the plant-microbial interactions in this system, including the rates of nitrogen fixation and their variability over the growing season, across edaphic conditions, among host species, and through plant development; and to determine which community members are responsible

  15. [The role of heterochrony in the establishment of archetype in higher Echinoderm taxa].

    PubMed

    Rozhnov, S V

    2009-01-01

    The analysis based on paleontological data shows that the body plans of higher echinoderm taxa were established through the combination of previously developed characters. These combinations appeared due to various heterochronies and resulted in more or less complete filling of the morphological space of logical capabilities. The maximum rank of new taxa decreased with time. New body plans of higher taxa did not replace the old plans but rather overlay them, extending the hierarchy of body plans and the respective hierarchy of taxa. The macroevolution of echinoderms and other metazoans progressed from the formation of an archetype (a general body plan) to individual details, the development of structural plans of lower levels. Heterochrony resulted in mosaic evolution and obscurity of intermediate forms.

  16. Microbial Community Diversities and Taxa Abundances in Soils along a Seven-Year Gradient of Potato Monoculture Using High Throughput Pyrosequencing Approach

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xing; Zhang, Junlian; Gu, Tianyu; Zhang, Wenming; Shen, Qirong; Yin, Shixue; Qiu, Huizhen

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies have focused on linking soil community structure, diversity, or specific taxa to disturbances. Relatively little attention has been directed to crop monoculture soils, particularly potato monoculture. Information about microbial community changes over time between monoculture and non-monoculture treatments is lacking. Furthermore, few studies have examined microbial communities in potato monoculture soils using a high throughput pyrosequencing approach. Methodology/Principal Findings Soils along a seven-year gradient of potato monoculture were collected and microbial communities were characterized using high throughput pyrosequencing approach. Principal findings are as follows. First, diversity (HShannon) and richness (SChao1) indices of bacterial community, but not of fungal community, were linearly decreased over time and corresponded to a decline of soil sustainability represented by yield decline and disease incidence increase. Second, Fusarium, the only soilborne pathogen-associated fungal genus substantially detected, was linearly increased over time in abundance and was closely associated with yield decline. Third, Fusarium abundance was negatively correlated with soil organic matter (OM) and total nitrogen (TN) but positively with electrical conductivity (EC). Fourth, Fusarium was correlated in abundances with 6 bacterial taxa over time. Conclusions Soil bacterial and fungal communities exhibited differential responses to the potato monoculture. The overall soil bacterial communities were shaped by potato monoculture. Fusarium was the only soilborne pathogen-associated genus associated with disease incidence increase and yield decline. The changes of soil OM, TN and EC were responsible for Fusarium enrichment, in addition to selections by the monoculture crop. Acidobacteria and Nitrospirae were linearly decreased over time in abundance, corresponding to the decrease of OM, suggesting their similar ecophysiologial trait

  17. Determining indicator taxa across spatial and seasonal gradients in the Columbia River coastal margin

    PubMed Central

    Fortunato, Caroline S; Eiler, Alexander; Herfort, Lydie; Needoba, Joseph A; Peterson, Tawnya D; Crump, Byron C

    2013-01-01

    Bacterioplankton communities are deeply diverse and highly variable across space and time, but several recent studies demonstrate repeatable and predictable patterns in this diversity. We expanded on previous studies by determining patterns of variability in both individual taxa and bacterial communities across coastal environmental gradients. We surveyed bacterioplankton diversity across the Columbia River coastal margin, USA, using amplicon pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes from 596 water samples collected from 2007 to 2010. Our results showed seasonal shifts and annual reassembly of bacterioplankton communities in the freshwater-influenced Columbia River, estuary, and plume, and identified indicator taxa, including species from freshwater SAR11, Oceanospirillales, and Flavobacteria groups, that characterize the changing seasonal conditions in these environments. In the river and estuary, Actinobacteria and Betaproteobacteria indicator taxa correlated strongly with seasonal fluctuations in particulate organic carbon (ρ=−0.664) and residence time (ρ=0.512), respectively. In contrast, seasonal change in communities was not detected in the coastal ocean and varied more with the spatial variability of environmental factors including temperature and dissolved oxygen. Indicator taxa of coastal ocean environments included SAR406 and SUP05 taxa from the deep ocean, and Prochlorococcus and SAR11 taxa from the upper water column. We found that in the Columbia River coastal margin, freshwater-influenced environments were consistent and predictable, whereas coastal ocean community variability was difficult to interpret due to complex physical conditions. This study moves beyond beta-diversity patterns to focus on the occurrence of specific taxa and lends insight into the potential ecological roles these taxa have in coastal ocean environments. PMID:23719153

  18. A nomenclator of extant and fossil taxa of the Valvatidae (Gastropoda, Ectobranchia)

    PubMed Central

    Haszprunar, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A compilation of all supra- and (infra-) specific taxa of extant and fossil Valvatidae, a group of freshwater operculate snails, is provided, including taxa initially described in this family and subsequently classified in other families, as well as names containing errors or misspellings. The extensive reference list is directly linked to the available electronic source (digital view or pdf-download) of the respective papers. PMID:24578604

  19. How oxymonads lost their groove: an ultrastructural comparison of Monocercomonoides and excavate taxa.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Alastair G B; Radek, Renate; Dacks, Joel B; O'Kelly, Charles J

    2002-01-01

    Despite being amongst the more familiar groups of heterotrophic flagellates, the evolutionary affinities of oxymonads remain poorly understood. A re-interpretation of the cytoskeleton of the oxymonad Monocercomonoides hausmanni suggests that this organism has a similar ultrastructural organisation to members of the informal assemblage 'excavate taxa'. The preaxostyle, 'R1' root, and 'R2' root of M. hausmanni are proposed to be homologous to the right, left, and anterior roots respectively of excavate taxa. The 'paracrystalline' portion of the preaxostyle, previously treated as unique to oxymonads, is proposed to be homologous to the I fibre of excavate taxa. Other non-microtubular fibres are identified that have both positional and substructural similarity to the distinctive B and C fibres of excavate taxa. A homologue to the 'singlet root', otherwise distinctive for excavate taxa, is also proposed. The preaxostyle and C fibre homologue in Monocercomonoides are most similar to the homologous structures in Trimastix. suggesting a particularly close relationship. This supports and extends recent molecular phylogenetic findings that Trimastix and oxymonads form a clade. We conclude that oxymonads have an excavate ancestry, and that the 'excavate taxa' sensu stricto form a paraphyletic assemblage.

  20. Fossils impact as hard as living taxa in parsimony analyses of morphology.

    PubMed

    Cobbett, Andrea; Wilkinson, Mark; Wills, Matthew A

    2007-10-01

    Systematists disagree whether data from fossils should be included in parsimony analyses. In a handful of well-documented cases, the addition of fossil data radically overturns a hypothesis of relationships based on extant taxa alone. Fossils can break up long branches and preserve character combinations closer in time to deep splitting events. However, fossils usually require more interpretation than extant taxa, introducing greater potential for spurious codings. Moreover, because fossils often have more "missing" codings, they are frequently accused of increasing numbers of MPTs, frustrating resolution and reducing support. Despite the controversy, remarkably little is known about the effects of fossils more generally. Here we provide the first systematic study, investigating empirically the behavior of fossil and extant taxa in 45 published morphological data sets. First-order jackknifing is used to determine the effects that each terminal has on inferred relationships, on the number of MPTs, and on CI' and RI as measures of homoplasy. Bootstrap leaf stabilities provide a proxy for the contribution of individual taxa to the branch support in the rest of the tree. There is no significant difference in the impact of fossil versus extant taxa on relationships, numbers of MPTs, and CI' or RI. However, adding individual fossil taxa is more likely to reduce the total branch support of the tree than adding extant taxa. This must be weighed against the superior taxon sampling afforded by including judiciously coded fossils, providing data from otherwise unsampled regions of the tree. We therefore recommend that investigators should include fossils, in the absence of compelling and case specific reasons for their exclusion.

  1. Reconstructing the genomic content of microbiome taxa through shotgun metagenomic deconvolution.

    PubMed

    Carr, Rogan; Shen-Orr, Shai S; Borenstein, Elhanan

    2013-01-01

    Metagenomics has transformed our understanding of the microbial world, allowing researchers to bypass the need to isolate and culture individual taxa and to directly characterize both the taxonomic and gene compositions of environmental samples. However, associating the genes found in a metagenomic sample with the specific taxa of origin remains a critical challenge. Existing binning methods, based on nucleotide composition or alignment to reference genomes allow only a coarse-grained classification and rely heavily on the availability of sequenced genomes from closely related taxa. Here, we introduce a novel computational framework, integrating variation in gene abundances across multiple samples with taxonomic abundance data to deconvolve metagenomic samples into taxa-specific gene profiles and to reconstruct the genomic content of community members. This assembly-free method is not bounded by various factors limiting previously described methods of metagenomic binning or metagenomic assembly and represents a fundamentally different approach to metagenomic-based genome reconstruction. An implementation of this framework is available at http://elbo.gs.washington.edu/software.html. We first describe the mathematical foundations of our framework and discuss considerations for implementing its various components. We demonstrate the ability of this framework to accurately deconvolve a set of metagenomic samples and to recover the gene content of individual taxa using synthetic metagenomic samples. We specifically characterize determinants of prediction accuracy and examine the impact of annotation errors on the reconstructed genomes. We finally apply metagenomic deconvolution to samples from the Human Microbiome Project, successfully reconstructing genus-level genomic content of various microbial genera, based solely on variation in gene count. These reconstructed genera are shown to correctly capture genus-specific properties. With the accumulation of metagenomic

  2. Conditionally rare taxa disproportionately contribute to temporal changes in microbial diversity.

    PubMed

    Shade, Ashley; Jones, Stuart E; Caporaso, J Gregory; Handelsman, Jo; Knight, Rob; Fierer, Noah; Gilbert, Jack A

    2014-07-15

    Microbial communities typically contain many rare taxa that make up the majority of the observed membership, yet the contribution of this microbial "rare biosphere" to community dynamics is unclear. Using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing of 3,237 samples from 42 time series of microbial communities from nine different ecosystems (air; marine; lake; stream; adult human skin, tongue, and gut; infant gut; and brewery wastewater treatment), we introduce a new method to detect typically rare microbial taxa that occasionally become very abundant (conditionally rare taxa [CRT]) and then quantify their contributions to temporal shifts in community structure. We discovered that CRT made up 1.5 to 28% of the community membership, represented a broad diversity of bacterial and archaeal lineages, and explained large amounts of temporal community dissimilarity (i.e., up to 97% of Bray-Curtis dissimilarity). Most of the CRT were detected at multiple time points, though we also identified "one-hit wonder" CRT that were observed at only one time point. Using a case study from a temperate lake, we gained additional insights into the ecology of CRT by comparing routine community time series to large disturbance events. Our results reveal that many rare taxa contribute a greater amount to microbial community dynamics than is apparent from their low proportional abundances. This observation was true across a wide range of ecosystems, indicating that these rare taxa are essential for understanding community changes over time. Importance: Microbial communities and their processes are the foundations of ecosystems. The ecological roles of rare microorganisms are largely unknown, but it is thought that they contribute to community stability by acting as a reservoir that can rapidly respond to environmental changes. We investigated the occurrence of typically rare taxa that very occasionally become more prominent in their communities ("conditionally rare"). We quantified conditionally rare

  3. Signals of speciation: volatile organic compounds resolve closely related sagebrush taxa, suggesting their importance in evolution.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Deidre M; Runyon, Justin B; Richardson, Bryce A

    2016-09-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play important roles in the environmental adaptation and fitness of plants. Comparison of the qualitative and quantitative differences in VOCs among closely related taxa and assessing the effects of environment on their emissions are important steps to deducing VOC function and evolutionary importance. Headspace VOCs from five taxa of sagebrush (Artemisia, subgenus Tridentatae) growing in two common gardens were collected and analyzed using GC-MS. Of the 74 total VOCs emitted, only 15 were needed to segregate sagebrush taxa using Random Forest analysis with a low error of 4%. All but one of these 15 VOCs showed qualitative differences among taxa. Ordination of results showed strong clustering that reflects taxonomic classification. Random Forest identified five VOCs that classify based on environment (2% error), which do not overlap with the 15 VOCs that segregated taxa. We show that VOCs can discriminate closely related species and subspecies of Artemisia, which are difficult to define using molecular markers or morphology. Thus, it appears that changes in VOCs either lead the way or follow closely behind speciation in this group. Future research should explore the functions of VOCs, which could provide further insights into the evolution of sagebrushes.

  4. Differences among Major Taxa in the Extent of Ecological Knowledge across Four Major Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Rebecca; Knowlton, Nancy; Brainard, Russell E.; Caley, M. Julian

    2011-01-01

    Existing knowledge shapes our understanding of ecosystems and is critical for ecosystem-based management of the world's natural resources. Typically this knowledge is biased among taxa, with some taxa far better studied than others, but the extent of this bias is poorly known. In conjunction with the publically available World Registry of Marine Species database (WoRMS) and one of the world's premier electronic scientific literature databases (Web of Science®), a text mining approach is used to examine the distribution of existing ecological knowledge among taxa in coral reef, mangrove, seagrass and kelp bed ecosystems. We found that for each of these ecosystems, most research has been limited to a few groups of organisms. While this bias clearly reflects the perceived importance of some taxa as commercially or ecologically valuable, the relative lack of research of other taxonomic groups highlights the problem that some key taxa and associated ecosystem processes they affect may be poorly understood or completely ignored. The approach outlined here could be applied to any type of ecosystem for analyzing previous research effort and identifying knowledge gaps in order to improve ecosystem-based conservation and management. PMID:22073172

  5. The core root microbiome of sugarcanes cultivated under varying nitrogen fertilizer application.

    PubMed

    Yeoh, Yun Kit; Paungfoo-Lonhienne, Chanyarat; Dennis, Paul G; Robinson, Nicole; Ragan, Mark A; Schmidt, Susanne; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2016-05-01

    Diazotrophic bacteria potentially supply substantial amounts of biologically fixed nitrogen to crops, but their occurrence may be suppressed by high nitrogen fertilizer application. Here, we explored the impact of high nitrogen fertilizer rates on the presence of diazotrophs in field-grown sugarcane with industry-standard or reduced nitrogen fertilizer application. Despite large differences in soil microbial communities between test sites, a core sugarcane root microbiome was identified. The sugarcane root-enriched core taxa overlap with those of Arabidopsis thaliana raising the possibility that certain bacterial families have had long association with plants. Reduced nitrogen fertilizer application had remarkably little effect on the core root microbiome and did not increase the relative abundance of root-associated diazotrophs or nif gene counts. Correspondingly, low nitrogen fertilizer crops had lower biomass and nitrogen content, reflecting a lack of major input of biologically fixed nitrogen, indicating that manipulating nitrogen fertilizer rates does not improve sugarcane yields by enriching diazotrophic populations under the test conditions. Standard nitrogen fertilizer crops had improved biomass and nitrogen content, and corresponding soils had higher abundances of nitrification and denitrification genes. These findings highlight that achieving a balance in maximizing crop yields and minimizing nutrient pollution associated with nitrogen fertilizer application requires understanding of how microbial communities respond to fertilizer use.

  6. New records for Albania based on taxa from the Prespa National Park

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Twelve taxa are enumerated as new and three taxa confirmed for the flora of Albania. They were collected between 2007 and 2012 in the Prespa National Park of Albania which is part of the Prespa International Park, a biological protected area at the borders with F.Y.R. Macedonia and Greece. Four taxa, viz., Centaurea galicicae, Festuca galicicae, Laserpitium ochridanum and Micromeria cristata subsp. kosaninii are restricted to Dry and Galičica Mountains. Centaurea decora, a recently described species, is treated as a synonym of Centaurea soskae thus extending the known localities of the latter to the southeast. Detailed information on distribution, occurrence and habitats in Albania are provided for each taxon. PMID:24723753

  7. Nitrogen dioxide detection

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N.; Agnew, Stephen F.; Christensen, William H.

    1993-01-01

    Method and apparatus for detecting the presence of gaseous nitrogen dioxide and determining the amount of gas which is present. Though polystyrene is normally an insulator, it becomes electrically conductive in the presence of nitrogen dioxide. Conductance or resistance of a polystyrene sensing element is related to the concentration of nitrogen dioxide at the sensing element.

  8. Contrasting spatial patterns and ecological attributes of soil bacterial and archaeal taxa across a landscape

    PubMed Central

    Constancias, Florentin; Saby, Nicolas P A; Terrat, Sébastien; Dequiedt, Samuel; Horrigue, Wallid; Nowak, Virginie; Guillemin, Jean-Philippe; Biju-Duval, Luc; Chemidlin Prévost-Bouré, Nicolas; Ranjard, Lionel

    2015-01-01

    Even though recent studies have clarified the influence and hierarchy of environmental filters on bacterial community structure, those constraining bacterial populations variations remain unclear. In consequence, our ability to understand to ecological attributes of soil bacteria and to predict microbial community response to environmental stress is therefore limited. Here, we characterized the bacterial community composition and the various bacterial taxonomic groups constituting the community across an agricultural landscape of 12 km2, by using a 215 × 215 m systematic grid representing 278 sites to precisely decipher their spatial distribution and drivers at this scale. The bacterial and Archaeal community composition was characterized by applying 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing directly to soil DNA from samples. Geostatistics tools were used to reveal the heterogeneous distribution of bacterial composition at this scale. Soil physical parameters and land management explained a significant amount of variation, suggesting that environmental selection is the major process shaping bacterial composition. All taxa systematically displayed also a heterogeneous and particular distribution patterns. Different relative influences of soil characteristics, land use and space were observed, depending on the taxa, implying that selection and spatial processes might be differentially but not exclusively involved for each bacterial phylum. Soil pH was a major factor determining the distribution of most of the bacterial taxa and especially the most important factor explaining the spatial patterns of α-Proteobacteria and Planctomycetes. Soil texture, organic carbon content and quality were more specific to a few number of taxa (e.g., β-Proteobacteria and Chlorobi). Land management also influenced the distribution of bacterial taxa across the landscape and revealed different type of response to cropping intensity (positive, negative, neutral or hump-backed relationships

  9. Partitioning core and satellite taxa from within cystic fibrosis lung bacterial communities.

    PubMed

    van der Gast, Christopher J; Walker, Alan W; Stressmann, Franziska A; Rogers, Geraint B; Scott, Paul; Daniels, Thomas W; Carroll, Mary P; Parkhill, Julian; Bruce, Kenneth D

    2011-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients suffer from chronic bacterial lung infections that lead to death in the majority of cases. The need to maintain lung function in these patients means that characterising these infections is vital. Increasingly, culture-independent analyses are expanding the number of bacterial species associated with CF respiratory samples; however, the potential significance of these species is not known. Here, we applied ecological statistical tools to such culture-independent data, in a novel manner, to partition taxa within the metacommunity into core and satellite species. Sputa and clinical data were obtained from 14 clinically stable adult CF patients. Fourteen rRNA gene libraries were constructed with 35 genera and 82 taxa, identified in 2139 bacterial clones. Shannon-Wiener and taxa-richness analyses confirmed no undersampling of bacterial diversity. By decomposing the distribution using the ratio of variance to the mean taxon abundance, we partitioned objectively the species abundance distribution into core and satellite species. The satellite group comprised 67 bacterial taxa from 33 genera and the core group, 15 taxa from 7 genera (including Pseudomonas (1 taxon), Streptococcus (2), Neisseria (2), Catonella (1), Porphyromonas (1), Prevotella (5) and Veillonella (3)], the last four being anaerobes). The core group was dominated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Other recognised CF pathogens were rare. Mantel and partial Mantel tests assessed which clinical factors influenced the composition observed. CF transmembrane conductance regulator genotype and antibiotic treatment correlated with all core taxa. Lung function correlated with richness. The clinical significance of these core and satellite species findings in the CF lung is discussed. GenBank accession numbers: FM995625–FM997761

  10. Benefits to poorly studied taxa of conservation of bird and mammal diversity on islands.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Clare; Holmes, Nick; Tershy, Bernie; Spatz, Dena; Croll, Donald A

    2015-02-01

    Protected area delineation and conservation action are urgently needed on marine islands, but the potential biodiversity benefits of these activities can be difficult to assess due to lack of species diversity information for lesser known taxa. We used linear mixed effects modeling and simple spatial analyses to investigate whether conservation activities based on the diversity of well-known insular taxa (birds and mammals) are likely to also capture the diversity of lesser known taxa (reptiles, amphibians, vascular land plants, ants, land snails, butterflies, and tenebrionid beetles). We assembled total, threatened, and endemic diversity data for both well-known and lesser known taxa and combined these with physical island biogeography characteristics for 1190 islands from 109 archipelagos. Among physical island biogeography factors, island area was the best indicator of diversity of both well-known and little-known taxa. Among taxonomic factors, total mammal species richness was the best indicator of total diversity of lesser known taxa, and the combination of threatened mammal and threatened bird diversity was the best indicator of lesser known endemic richness. The results of other intertaxon diversity comparisons were highly variable, however. Based on our results, we suggest that protecting islands above a certain minimum threshold area may be the most efficient use of conservation resources. For example, using our island database, if the threshold were set at 10 km(2) and the smallest 10% of islands greater than this threshold were protected, 119 islands would be protected. The islands would range in size from 10 to 29 km(2) and would include 268 lesser known species endemic to a single island, along with 11 bird and mammal species endemic to a single island. Our results suggest that for islands of equivalent size, prioritization based on total or threatened bird and mammal diversity may also capture opportunities to protect lesser known species endemic to

  11. Partitioning core and satellite taxa from within cystic fibrosis lung bacterial communities

    PubMed Central

    van der Gast, Christopher J; Walker, Alan W; Stressmann, Franziska A; Rogers, Geraint B; Scott, Paul; Daniels, Thomas W; Carroll, Mary P; Parkhill, Julian; Bruce, Kenneth D

    2011-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients suffer from chronic bacterial lung infections that lead to death in the majority of cases. The need to maintain lung function in these patients means that characterising these infections is vital. Increasingly, culture-independent analyses are expanding the number of bacterial species associated with CF respiratory samples; however, the potential significance of these species is not known. Here, we applied ecological statistical tools to such culture-independent data, in a novel manner, to partition taxa within the metacommunity into core and satellite species. Sputa and clinical data were obtained from 14 clinically stable adult CF patients. Fourteen rRNA gene libraries were constructed with 35 genera and 82 taxa, identified in 2139 bacterial clones. Shannon–Wiener and taxa-richness analyses confirmed no undersampling of bacterial diversity. By decomposing the distribution using the ratio of variance to the mean taxon abundance, we partitioned objectively the species abundance distribution into core and satellite species. The satellite group comprised 67 bacterial taxa from 33 genera and the core group, 15 taxa from 7 genera (including Pseudomonas (1 taxon), Streptococcus (2), Neisseria (2), Catonella (1), Porphyromonas (1), Prevotella (5) and Veillonella (3)], the last four being anaerobes). The core group was dominated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Other recognised CF pathogens were rare. Mantel and partial Mantel tests assessed which clinical factors influenced the composition observed. CF transmembrane conductance regulator genotype and antibiotic treatment correlated with all core taxa. Lung function correlated with richness. The clinical significance of these core and satellite species findings in the CF lung is discussed. PMID:21151003

  12. Contrasting spatial patterns and ecological attributes of soil bacterial and archaeal taxa across a landscape.

    PubMed

    Constancias, Florentin; Saby, Nicolas P A; Terrat, Sébastien; Dequiedt, Samuel; Horrigue, Wallid; Nowak, Virginie; Guillemin, Jean-Philippe; Biju-Duval, Luc; Chemidlin Prévost-Bouré, Nicolas; Ranjard, Lionel

    2015-06-01

    Even though recent studies have clarified the influence and hierarchy of environmental filters on bacterial community structure, those constraining bacterial populations variations remain unclear. In consequence, our ability to understand to ecological attributes of soil bacteria and to predict microbial community response to environmental stress is therefore limited. Here, we characterized the bacterial community composition and the various bacterial taxonomic groups constituting the community across an agricultural landscape of 12 km(2) , by using a 215 × 215 m systematic grid representing 278 sites to precisely decipher their spatial distribution and drivers at this scale. The bacterial and Archaeal community composition was characterized by applying 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing directly to soil DNA from samples. Geostatistics tools were used to reveal the heterogeneous distribution of bacterial composition at this scale. Soil physical parameters and land management explained a significant amount of variation, suggesting that environmental selection is the major process shaping bacterial composition. All taxa systematically displayed also a heterogeneous and particular distribution patterns. Different relative influences of soil characteristics, land use and space were observed, depending on the taxa, implying that selection and spatial processes might be differentially but not exclusively involved for each bacterial phylum. Soil pH was a major factor determining the distribution of most of the bacterial taxa and especially the most important factor explaining the spatial patterns of α-Proteobacteria and Planctomycetes. Soil texture, organic carbon content and quality were more specific to a few number of taxa (e.g., β-Proteobacteria and Chlorobi). Land management also influenced the distribution of bacterial taxa across the landscape and revealed different type of response to cropping intensity (positive, negative, neutral or hump-backed relationships

  13. Morpho-colorimetric characterisation of Malva alliance taxa by seed image analysis.

    PubMed

    Lo Bianco, M; Grillo, O; Escobar Garcia, P; Mascia, F; Venora, G; Bacchetta, G

    2017-01-01

    Seed morphometric and -colorimetric features describing shape, size and textural seed traits of 28 taxa belonging to the genera Lavatera L. and Malva L., were recorded by means of computer vision techniques. The data were statistically analysed to contribute to the taxonomical treatment of the Malva alliance and to assess some doubtful systematic positions. A clear differentiation between taxa traditionally attributed to Lavatera or Malva was highlighted. Furthermore, the identification system proposed here was able to discriminate among the Lavatera sections, confirming the taxonomic organization of this genus. The results obtained for Malva, both at the species level and among sections, supported this analytical tool as diagnostic for systematic purposes.

  14. Short-Term Protein Stable Isotope Probing of Microbial Communities to Associate Functions with Taxa (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipton, M. S.; Slysz, G. W.; Steinke, L. A.; Ward, D. M.; Klatt, C. G.; Clauss, T. R.; Purvine, S. O.; Anderson, G. A.; Payne, S. H.; Bryant, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    Determining which taxa in a community perform which functions is essential for understanding metabolite fluxes and metabolic interactions among community members. Specific taxa will alter their metabolism in order to acclimate to changing environmental factors such as light through the diel cycle, changing temperature and other factors. Monitoring which proteins are being expressed, and the quantitative protein expression patterns in the individual taxa as a response to external stimuli is key to understanding these mechanisms. Protein stable isotope probing (Pro-SIP) has strong potential for revealing key metabolizing taxa in complex microbial communities. In Pro-SIP studies, label incorporation is determined by the extent of the change in the isotopic profile of peptides when measured by mass spectrometry. While most Pro-SIP work to date has been performed under controlled laboratory conditions to allow extensive isotope labeling of the target organism(s), these techniques have not been applied to short term in situ studies due to the small degree of partial labeling of the proteins. We have applied Pro-SIP to study the assimilation of a labeled substrate into proteins to determine which taxa are responsible for sequestration of dissolved inorganic carbon in microbial mats associated with the alkaline siliceous hot springs of Yellowstone National Park. This community is fueled by sunlight as it transitions from dark to light; the aim was to understand the light-dependent pathway of inorganic carbon incorporation into different taxa during the early morning hours when the mat was in low light and anoxic. Each mat sample was incubated with 13C-bicarbonate for 3 h. Substrate assimilation was determined through standard proteomic techniques along with the use of SIPPER, a collection of algorithms that sensitively measure small changes in peptide isotopic patterns, allowing the determination of which taxa assimilated the substrate during this period. For the

  15. Rare but active taxa contribute to community dynamics of benthic biofilms in glacier-fed streams.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Linda; Besemer, Katharina; Fasching, Christina; Urich, Tim; Singer, Gabriel A; Quince, Christopher; Battin, Tom J

    2014-08-01

    Glaciers harbour diverse microorganisms, which upon ice melt can be released downstream. In glacier-fed streams microorganisms can attach to stones or sediments to form benthic biofilms. We used 454-pyrosequencing to explore the bulk (16S rDNA) and putatively active (16S rRNA) microbial communities of stone and sediment biofilms across 26 glacier-fed streams. We found differences in community composition between bulk and active communities among streams and a stronger congruence between biofilm types. Relative abundances of rRNA and rDNA were positively correlated across different taxa and taxonomic levels, but at lower taxonomic levels, the higher abundance in either the active or the bulk communities became more apparent. Here, environmental variables played a minor role in structuring active communities. However, we found a large number of rare taxa with higher relative abundances in rRNA compared with rDNA. This suggests that rare taxa contribute disproportionately to microbial community dynamics in glacier-fed streams. Our findings propose that high community turnover, where taxa repeatedly enter and leave the 'seed bank', contributes to the maintenance of microbial biodiversity in harsh ecosystems with continuous environmental perturbations, such as glacier-fed streams.

  16. Dominant plant taxa predict plant productivity responses to CO2 enrichment across precipitation and soil gradients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The responses of water-limited ecosystems to rising atmospheric CO2 concentration (eCO2) depend on the supply and availability of soil moisture and on change in abundance of dominant plant taxa. Soil moisture supply and availability depends primarily on precipitation amount and soil texture. Respo...

  17. [Conditionally neutral phylogenetic markers of major taxa: a new aspect of the evolution of macromolecules].

    PubMed

    Petrov, N B; Aleshin, V V

    2002-08-01

    The current phase of molecular phylogenetics can be named the 18S rRNA gene era, which is now approaching the end. To date, almost all phyla of metazoans and many taxa of protists are represented in databases of 18S rRNA gene sequences. The elements of the phylogenetic tree of Metazoa inferred from 18S rRNA genes are characterized by unequal validity: some of them seem to be well grounded; others are not adequately supported, and probably will be revised later. The validity of phylogenetic reconstruction is influenced by two main factors: (1) erroneous grouping of long branches that occur because of abnormally high evolution rate; (2) deficit of phylogenetically informative characters. A method for overcoming these difficulties is suggested in addition to known tools: using phylogenetic markers that are stable within individual taxa and evolve by punctuated equilibrium. These markers are least influenced by the convergence caused by a high evolution rate of the entire gene. The nature of these markers of ancient taxa, paradoxical from the perspective of neutral evolution, is discussed, as well as their importance for establishing monophyly of both new large-scale taxonomic groups of invertebrates (Bilateria + Rhombozoa + Orthonectida + Myxozoa + Cnidaria + Placozoa and Echinodermata + Hemichordata) and some major taxa of Nematoda.

  18. Bacterial taxa-area and distance-decay relationships in marine environments.

    PubMed

    Zinger, L; Boetius, A; Ramette, A

    2014-02-01

    The taxa-area relationship (TAR) and the distance-decay relationship (DDR) both describe spatial turnover of taxa and are central patterns of biodiversity. Here, we compared TAR and DDR of bacterial communities across different marine realms and ecosystems at the global scale. To obtain reliable global estimates for both relationships, we quantified the poorly assessed effects of sequencing depth, rare taxa removal and number of sampling sites. Slope coefficients of bacterial TARs were within the range of those of plants and animals, whereas slope coefficients of bacterial DDR were much lower. Slope coefficients were mostly affected by removing rare taxa and by the number of sampling sites considered in the calculations. TAR and DDR slope coefficients were overestimated at sequencing depth <4000 sequences per sample. Noticeably, bacterial TAR and DDR patterns did not correlate with each other both within and across ecosystem types, suggesting that (i) TAR cannot be directly derived from DDR and (ii) TAR and DDR may be influenced by different ecological factors. Nevertheless, we found marine bacterial TAR and DDR to be steeper in ecosystems associated with high environmental heterogeneity or spatial isolation, namely marine sediments and coastal environments compared with pelagic ecosystems. Hence, our study provides information on macroecological patterns of marine bacteria, as well as methodological and conceptual insights, at a time when biodiversity surveys increasingly make use of high-throughput sequencing technologies.

  19. Covariance in species diversity and facilitation among non-interactive parasite taxa: all against the host.

    PubMed

    Krasnov, B R; Mouillot, D; Khokhlova, I S; Shenbrot, G I; Poulin, R

    2005-10-01

    Different parasite taxa exploit different host resources and are often unlikely to interact directly. It is unclear, however, whether the diversity of any given parasite taxon is indirectly influenced by that of other parasite taxa on the same host. Some components of host immune defences may operate simultaneously against all kinds of parasites, whereas investment by the host in specific defences against one type of parasite may come at the expense of defence against other parasites. We investigated the relationships between the species diversity of 4 higher taxa of ectoparasites (fleas, sucking lice, mesostigmatid mites, and ixodid ticks), and between the species richness of ectoparasites and endoparasitic helminths, across different species of rodent hosts. Our analyses used 2 measures of species diversity, species richness and taxonomic distinctness, and controlled for the potentially confounding effects of sampling effort and phylogenetic relationships among host species. We found positive pairwise correlations between the species richness of fleas, mites and ticks; however, there was no association between species richness of any of these 3 groups and that of lice. We also found a strong positive relationship between the taxonomic distinctness of ecto- and endoparasite assemblages across host species. These results suggest the existence of a process of apparent facilitation among unrelated taxa in the organization of parasite communities. We propose explanations based on host immune responses, involving acquired cross-resistance to infection and interspecific variation in immunocompetence among hosts, to account for these patterns.

  20. Twelve invasive plant taxa in U.S. western riparian ecosystems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessments of stream ecosystems often include an evaluation of riparian condition; a key stressor in riparian ecosystems is the presence of invasive plants. We analyzed the distribution of 12 invasive taxa (common burdock [Arctium minus], giant reed [Arundo donax], cheatgrass [B...

  1. Gene Flow Among Different Teosinte Taxa and Into the Domesticated Maize Gene Pool

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize (Zea mays ssp. mays) was domesticated from one wild species ancestor, the Balsas teosinte (Zea mays ssp. parviglumis) about 9000 years ago. Higher levels of gene diversity are found in teosinte taxa compared to maize following domestication and selection bottlenecks. Diversity in maize can b...

  2. Anaerobic trophic interactions of contrasting methane-emitting mire soils: processes versus taxa.

    PubMed

    Hunger, Sindy; Gößner, Anita S; Drake, Harold L

    2015-05-01

    Natural wetlands such as mires contribute up to 33% to the global emission of methane. The emission of methane is driven by trophic interactions of anaerobes that collectively degrade biopolymers. The hypothesis of this study was that these interactions in contrasting methane-emitting mire soils are functionally similar but linked to dissimilar taxa. This hypothesis was addressed by evaluating anaerobic processes and microbial taxa of eutrophic, mesotrophic and oligotrophic mire soils. Glucose was fermented to various products (e.g. H2, CO2, butyrate, acetate). Acetoclastic methanogenesis occurred, and acetogenesis and methanogenesis transformed H2-CO2 to acetate and methane, respectively. Although product profiles, cultivable cell numbers and gene copy numbers [mcrA (encodes alpha-subunit of methyl-CoM reductase) and 16S rRNA genes] were similar for all mire soils, only approximately 15% of detected family-level bacteria and species-level methanogens were shared by all mire soils. Approximately, 40% of the detected family-level taxa of each mire soil have no cultured isolates. Acidic conditions appeared to restrict the number of dominant phylotypes. The results indicated (a) that microbial processes which drive methanogenesis are similar but facilitated by dissimilar microbial communities in contrasting mire soils and (b) that mire soils harbor a large number of taxa with no cultured isolates.

  3. Comparative ITS and AFLP Analysis of Diploid Cardamine (Brassicaceae) Taxa from Closely Related Polyploid Complexes

    PubMed Central

    MARHOLD, KAROL; LIHOVÁ, JUDITA; PERNÝ, MARIÁN; BLEEKER, WALTER

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Aims Diploid representatives from the related polyploid complexes of Cardamine amara, C. pratensis and C. raphanifolia (Brassicaceae), were studied to elucidate phylogenetic relationships among the complexes and among the individual taxa included. • Methods Two independent molecular data sets were used: nucleotide sequences from the internal transcribed spacers (ITS) of nrDNA, and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. Seventeen diploid taxa from the studied groups were sampled. • Key Results Both ITS and AFLP analyses provided congruent results in inferred relationships, and revealed two main lineages. While the C. amara group, consisting of C. wiedemanniana and four subspecies of C. amara, was resolved as a well‐supported monophyletic group, taxa from the C. pratensis and C. tenera groups (the latter representing diploid taxa of the complex of C. raphanifolia) all appeared together in a single clade/cluster with no support for the recognition of either of the groups. Intra‐individual polymorphisms and patterns of nucleotide variation in the ITS region in C. uliginosa and C. tenera, together with the distribution of AFLP bands, indicate ancient hybridization and introgression among these Caucasian diploids. • Conclusions The lack of supported hierarchical structure suggests that extensive reticulate evolution between these groups, even at the diploid level, has occurred (although an alternative explanation, namely ancestral polymorphism in ITS data, cannot be completely excluded). Several implications for the investigation of the polyploid complexes of concern are drawn. When tracing origins of polyploid taxa, a much more complex scenario should be expected, taking into account all relatives as potential parents, irrespective of the group in which they are classified. PMID:15037449

  4. Trait-based diversification shifts reflect differential extinction among fossil taxa.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Peter J; Estabrook, George F

    2014-11-18

    Evolution provides many cases of apparent shifts in diversification associated with particular anatomical traits. Three general models connect these patterns to anatomical evolution: (i) elevated net extinction of taxa bearing particular traits, (ii) elevated net speciation of taxa bearing particular traits, and (iii) elevated evolvability expanding the range of anatomies available to some species. Trait-based diversification shifts predict elevated hierarchical stratigraphic compatibility (i.e., primitive→derived→highly derived sequences) among pairs of anatomical characters. The three specific models further predict (i) early loss of diversity for taxa retaining primitive conditions (elevated net extinction), (ii) increased diversification among later members of a clade (elevated net speciation), and (iii) increased disparity among later members in a clade (elevated evolvability). Analyses of 319 anatomical and stratigraphic datasets for fossil species and genera show that hierarchical stratigraphic compatibility exceeds the expectations of trait-independent diversification in the vast majority of cases, which was expected if trait-dependent diversification shifts are common. Excess hierarchical stratigraphic compatibility correlates with early loss of diversity for groups retaining primitive conditions rather than delayed bursts of diversity or disparity across entire clades. Cambrian clades (predominantly trilobites) alone fit null expectations well. However, it is not clear whether evolution was unusual among Cambrian taxa or only early trilobites. At least among post-Cambrian taxa, these results implicate models, such as competition and extinction selectivity/resistance, as major drivers of trait-based diversification shifts at the species and genus levels while contradicting the predictions of elevated net speciation and elevated evolvability models.

  5. Differential growth responses of soil bacterial taxa to carbon substrates of varying chemical recalcitrance

    SciTech Connect

    Goldfarb, K.C.; Karaoz, U.; Hanson, C.A.; Santee, C.A.; Bradford, M.A.; Treseder, K.K.; Wallenstein, M.D.; Brodie, E.L.

    2011-04-18

    Soils are immensely diverse microbial habitats with thousands of co-existing bacterial, archaeal, and fungal species. Across broad spatial scales, factors such as pH and soil moisture appear to determine the diversity and structure of soil bacterial communities. Within any one site however, bacterial taxon diversity is high and factors maintaining this diversity are poorly resolved. Candidate factors include organic substrate availability and chemical recalcitrance, and given that they appear to structure bacterial communities at the phylum level, we examine whether these factors might structure bacterial communities at finer levels of taxonomic resolution. Analyzing 16S rRNA gene composition of nucleotide analog-labeled DNA by PhyloChip microarrays, we compare relative growth rates on organic substrates of increasing chemical recalcitrance of >2,200 bacterial taxa across 43 divisions/phyla. Taxa that increase in relative abundance with labile organic substrates (i.e., glycine, sucrose) are numerous (>500), phylogenetically clustered, and occur predominantly in two phyla (Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria) including orders Actinomycetales, Enterobacteriales, Burkholderiales, Rhodocyclales, Alteromonadales, and Pseudomonadales. Taxa increasing in relative abundance with more chemically recalcitrant substrates (i.e., cellulose, lignin, or tannin-protein) are fewer (168) but more phylogenetically dispersed, occurring across eight phyla and including Clostridiales, Sphingomonadalaes, Desulfovibrionales. Just over 6% of detected taxa, including many Burkholderiales increase in relative abundance with both labile and chemically recalcitrant substrates. Estimates of median rRNA copy number per genome of responding taxa demonstrate that these patterns are broadly consistent with bacterial growth strategies. Taken together, these data suggest that changes in availability of intrinsically labile substrates may result in predictable shifts in soil bacterial composition.

  6. Climate sensitivity of allergenic taxa in Central Europe associated with new climate change related forces.

    PubMed

    Deák, Aron József; Makra, László; Matyasovszky, István; Csépe, Zoltán; Muladi, Beáta

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse trends of the pollen season with its duration, start and end dates, as well as trends of the annual total pollen count and annual peak pollen concentration for the Szeged agglomeration in Southern Hungary. The data set covered an 11-year period (1997-2007) that included eight taxa and seven daily climate variables. Trend analysis was performed on both annual and daily bases. Trend analysis on a daily basis is a new approach that provides information on the annual cycles of the trends. To quantify the strength of the relationship between the annual cycle of the slope of a pollen concentration trend and the annual cycles of the slopes of the climate variable trends, an association measure and a multiple association measure are introduced. Individual taxa were sorted into three categories according to their climate sensitivities. These were compared with two novel climate change-related forces, namely risk potential and expansion potential due to the climate change. The total annual pollen counts indicated significant trends for 4 taxa and 3 of these 4 trends increased on a daily basis. At the same time, significant changes were detected for the pollen season characteristics of three taxa. The association measures performed well when compared to the climate change-related forces. Significant changes in pollen season characteristics were also in accordance with the risk potential and expansion potential due to the climate change. A novel procedure was applied to separate the effects of the past and current weather conditions that influence the current Ambrosia pollen concentrations. The potential effect of land use changes on pollen release of the given taxa was also discussed using the CORINE Land Cover Database.

  7. Floral traits driving reproductive isolation of two co-flowering taxa that share vertebrate pollinators

    PubMed Central

    Queiroz, Joel A.; Quirino, Zelma G. M.; Machado, Isabel C.

    2015-01-01

    Floral attributes evolve in response to frequent and efficient pollinators, which are potentially important drivers of floral diversification and reproductive isolation. In this context, we asked, how do flowers evolve in a bat–hummingbird pollination system? Hence, we investigated the pollination ecology of two co-flowering Ipomoea taxa (I. marcellia and I. aff. marcellia) pollinated by bats and hummingbirds, and factors favouring reproductive isolation and pollinator sharing in these plants. To identify the most important drivers of reproductive isolation, we compared the flowers of the two Ipomoea taxa in terms of morphometry, anthesis and nectar production. Pollinator services were assessed using frequency of visits, fruit set and the number of seeds per fruit after visits. The studied Ipomoea taxa differed in corolla size and width, beginning and duration of anthesis, and nectar attributes. However, they shared the same diurnal and nocturnal visitors. The hummingbird Heliomaster squamosus was more frequent in I. marcellia (1.90 visits h−1) than in I. aff. marcellia (0.57 visits h−1), whereas glossophagine bats showed similar visit rates in both taxa (I. marcellia: 0.57 visits h−1 and I. aff. marcellia: 0.64 visits h−1). Bat pollination was more efficient in I. aff. marcellia, whereas pollination by hummingbirds was more efficient in I. marcellia. Differences in floral attributes between Ipomoea taxa, especially related to the anthesis period, length of floral parts and floral arrangement in the inflorescence, favour reproductive isolation from congeners through differential pollen placement on pollinators. This bat–hummingbird pollination system seems to be advantageous in the study area, where the availability of pollinators and floral resources changes considerably throughout the year, mainly as a result of rainfall seasonality. This interaction is beneficial for both sides, as it maximizes the number of potential pollen vectors for plants and

  8. Trait-based diversification shifts reflect differential extinction among fossil taxa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Peter J.; Estabrook, George F.

    2014-11-01

    Evolution provides many cases of apparent shifts in diversification associated with particular anatomical traits. Three general models connect these patterns to anatomical evolution: (i) elevated net extinction of taxa bearing particular traits, (ii) elevated net speciation of taxa bearing particular traits, and (iii) elevated evolvability expanding the range of anatomies available to some species. Trait-based diversification shifts predict elevated hierarchical stratigraphic compatibility (i.e., primitive→derived→highly derived sequences) among pairs of anatomical characters. The three specific models further predict (i) early loss of diversity for taxa retaining primitive conditions (elevated net extinction), (ii) increased diversification among later members of a clade (elevated net speciation), and (iii) increased disparity among later members in a clade (elevated evolvability). Analyses of 319 anatomical and stratigraphic datasets for fossil species and genera show that hierarchical stratigraphic compatibility exceeds the expectations of trait-independent diversification in the vast majority of cases, which was expected if trait-dependent diversification shifts are common. Excess hierarchical stratigraphic compatibility correlates with early loss of diversity for groups retaining primitive conditions rather than delayed bursts of diversity or disparity across entire clades. Cambrian clades (predominantly trilobites) alone fit null expectations well. However, it is not clear whether evolution was unusual among Cambrian taxa or only early trilobites. At least among post-Cambrian taxa, these results implicate models, such as competition and extinction selectivity/resistance, as major drivers of trait-based diversification shifts at the species and genus levels while contradicting the predictions of elevated net speciation and elevated evolvability models.

  9. Nitrogen spark denoxer

    DOEpatents

    Ng, Henry K.; Novick, Vincent J.; Sekar, Ramanujam R.

    1997-01-01

    A NO.sub.X control system for an internal combustion engine includes an oxygen enrichment device that produces oxygen and nitrogen enriched air. The nitrogen enriched air contains molecular nitrogen that is provided to a spark plug that is mounted in an exhaust outlet of an internal combustion engine. As the nitrogen enriched air is expelled at the spark gap of the spark plug, the nitrogen enriched air is exposed to a pulsating spark that is generated across the spark gap of the spark plug. The spark gap is elongated so that a sufficient amount of atomic nitrogen is produced and is injected into the exhaust of the internal combustion engine. The injection of the atomic nitrogen into the exhaust of the internal combustion engine causes the oxides of nitrogen to be reduced into nitrogen and oxygen such that the emissions from the engine will have acceptable levels of NO.sub.X. The oxygen enrichment device that produces both the oxygen and nitrogen enriched air can include a selectively permeable membrane.

  10. Flameless nitrogen skid unit

    SciTech Connect

    Loesch, S.B.; John, J.C.; Mints, D.K.

    1984-03-27

    A flameless nitrogen vaporizing unit includes a first internal combustion engine driving a nitrogen pump through a transmission. A second internal combustion engine drives three hydraulic oil pumps against a variable back pressure so that a variable load may be imposed upon the second engine. Liquid nitrogen is pumped from the nitrogen pump driven by the first engine into a first heat exchanger where heat is transferred from exhaust gases from the first and second internal combustion engines to the liquid nitrogen to cause the nitrogen to be transformed into a gaseous state. The gaseous nitrogen then flows into a second heat exchanger where it is superheated by an engine coolant fluid to heat the gaseous nitrogen to essentially an ambient temperature. The superheated nitrogen is then injected into the well. The engine coolant fluid flows in a coolant circulation system. Heat is transferred to the coolant fluid directly from the internal combustion engine. Heat is also provided to the coolant fluid from lubrication oil pumped by the three pumps attached to the second internal combustion engine. The coolant fluid circulating system includes a comingling chamber for comingling warmer coolant fluid flowing from the internal combustion engines to the second heat exchanger with cooler coolant fluids flowing from the second heat exchanger to the internal combustion engines. Methods of vaporizing nitrogen are also disclosed.

  11. Two-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis Analyses of pH-Dependent Protein Expression in Facultatively Alkaliphilic Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4 Lead to Characterization of an S-Layer Protein with a Role in Alkaliphily

    PubMed Central

    Gilmour, Raymond; Messner, Paul; Guffanti, Arthur A.; Kent, Rebecca; Scheberl, Andrea; Kendrick, Nancy; Krulwich, Terry Ann

    2000-01-01

    The large majority of proteins of alkaliphilic Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4 grown at pH 7.5 and 10.5, as studied by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analyses, did not exhibit significant pH-dependent variation. A new surface layer protein (SlpA) was identified in these studies. Although the prominence of some apparent breakdown products of SlpA in gels from pH 10.5-grown cells led to discovery of the alkaliphile S-layer, the largest and major SlpA forms were present in large amounts in gels from pH 7.5-grown cells as well. slpA RNA abundance was, moreover, unchanged by growth pH. SlpA was similar in size to homologues from nonalkaliphiles but contained fewer Arg and Lys residues. An slpA mutant strain (RG21) lacked an exterior S-layer that was identified in the wild type by electron microscopy. Electrophoretic analysis of whole-cell extracts further indicated the absence of a 90-kDa band in the mutant. This band was prominent in wild-type extracts from both pH 7.5- and 10.5-grown cells. The wild type grew with a shorter lag phase than RG21 at either pH 10.5 or 11 and under either Na+-replete or suboptimal Na+ concentrations. The extent of the adaptation deficit increased with pH elevation and suboptimal Na+. By contrast, the mutant grew with a shorter lag and faster growth rate than the wild type at pH 7.5 under Na+-replete and suboptimal Na+ conditions, respectively. Logarithmically growing cells of the two strains exhibited no significant differences in growth rate, cytoplasmic pH regulation, starch utilization, motility, Na+-dependent transport of α-aminoisobutyric acid, or H+-dependent synthesis of ATP. However, the capacity for Na+-dependent pH homeostasis was diminished in RG21 upon a sudden upward shift of external pH from 8.5 to 10.5. The energy cost of retaining the SlpA layer at near-neutral pH is apparently adverse, but the constitutive presence of SlpA enhances the capacity of the extremophile to adjust to high pH. PMID:11029415

  12. Albert Behnke: nitrogen narcosis.

    PubMed

    Grover, Casey A; Grover, David H

    2014-02-01

    As early as 1826, divers diving to great depths noted that descent often resulted in a phenomenon of intoxication and euphoria. In 1935, Albert Behnke discovered nitrogen as the cause of this clinical syndrome, a condition now known as nitrogen narcosis. Nitrogen narcosis consists of the development of euphoria, a false sense of security, and impaired judgment upon underwater descent using compressed air below 3-4 atmospheres (99 to 132 feet). At greater depths, symptoms can progress to loss of consciousness. The syndrome remains relatively unchanged in modern diving when compressed air is used. Behnke's use of non-nitrogen-containing gas mixtures subsequent to his discovery during the 1939 rescue of the wrecked submarine USS Squalus pioneered the use of non-nitrogen-containing gas mixtures, which are used by modern divers when working at great depth to avoid the effects of nitrogen narcosis.

  13. Nitrogen In Saturn's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, H. T.; Sittler, E. C.; Johnson, R. E.; McComas, D. J.; Reisenfeld, D.; Shappirio, M. D.; Baragiola, R.; Michael, M.; Shematovich, V. I.; Crary, F.; Young, D. T.

    2004-12-01

    We are analyzing CAPS instrument data on Cassini to look for nitrogen ions in Saturn's magnetosphere. Because Voyager could not separate oxygen and nitrogen, there has been considerable controversy on nitrogen's presence and relative importance. Two principal sources have been suggested: Titan's atmosphere and nitrogen species trapped in Saturn's icy satellite surfaces (Sittler et al 2004). The latter may be primordial nitrogen, likely as NH3 in ice (Stevenson 1982; Squyers et al. 1983) or nitrogen ions that have been implanted in the surface (Delitsky and Lane 2002). We will present the results of Saturnian nitrogen cloud modeling and relevant CAPS observations. We recently described the Titan source (Michael, et al. 2004; Shematovich et al. 2003; Smith et al. 2004; Sittler et al. 2004) in preparation for Cassini's Saturnian plasma measurements. Two components were identified: energetic nitrogen ions formed near Titan and energized as they diffused inward (Sittler et al. 2004) and neutrals in orbits with small perigee that became ionized in the inner magnetosphere (Smith et al 2004). The latter component would be a source of lower energy, co-rotating nitrogen ions in the inner magnetosphere. Such a component would have an energy spectrum similar to nitrogen species sputtered from the icy satellite surfaces (Johnson and Sittler 1990). However, the mass spectrum would differ, likely containing NHx and NOx species also, and, hence, may be separated from the Titan source. Our preliminary analysis for nitrogen species in the CAPS data will be compared to our models. Of interest will be the energy spectra, which can indicate whether any nitrogen present is formed locally or near Titan's orbit and diffused inward. This work is supported by the NASA Planetary Atmospheres, NASA Graduate Student Research, Virginia Space Grant Consortium Graduate Research Fellowship and CAPS Cassini instrument team programs.

  14. Ambiguous taxa: Effects on the characterization and interpretation of invertebrate assemblages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cuffney, T.F.; Bilger, M.D.; Haigler, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Damaged and immature specimens often result in macroinvertebrate data that contain ambiguous parent-child pairs (i.e., abundances associated with multiple related levels of the taxonomic hierarchy such as Baetis pluto and the associated ambiguous parent Baetis sp.). The choice of method used to resolve ambiguous parent-child pairs may have a very large effect on the characterization of invertebrate assemblages and the interpretation of responses to environmental change because very large proportions of taxa richness (73-78%) and abundance (79-91%) can be associated with ambiguous parents. To address this issue, we examined 16 variations of 4 basic methods for resolving ambiguous taxa: RPKC (remove parent, keep child), MCWP (merge child with parent), RPMC (remove parent or merge child with parent depending on their abundances), and DPAC (distribute parents among children). The choice of method strongly affected assemblage structure, assemblage characteristics (e.g., metrics), and the ability to detect responses along environmental (urbanization) gradients. All methods except MCWP produced acceptable results when used consistently within a study. However, the assemblage characteristics (e.g., values of assemblage metrics) differed widely depending on the method used, and data should not be combined unless the methods used to resolve ambiguous taxa are well documented and are known to be comparable. The suitability of the methods was evaluated and compared on the basis of 13 criteria that considered conservation of taxa richness and abundance, consistency among samples, methods, and studies, and effects on the interpretation of the data. Methods RPMC and DPAC had the highest suitability scores regardless of whether ambiguous taxa were resolved for each sample separately or for a group of samples. Method MCWP gave consistently poor results. Methods MCWP and DPAC approximate the use of family-level identifications and operational taxonomic units (OTU), respectively. Our

  15. Metagenomic and PCR-Based Diversity Surveys of [FeFe]-Hydrogenases Combined with Isolation of Alkaliphilic Hydrogen-Producing Bacteria from the Serpentinite-Hosted Prony Hydrothermal Field, New Caledonia

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Nan; Postec, Anne; Monnin, Christophe; Pelletier, Bernard; Payri, Claude E.; Ménez, Bénédicte; Frouin, Eléonore; Ollivier, Bernard; Erauso, Gaël; Quéméneur, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    High amounts of hydrogen are emitted in the serpentinite-hosted hydrothermal field of the Prony Bay (PHF, New Caledonia), where high-pH (~11), low-temperature (< 40°C), and low-salinity fluids are discharged in both intertidal and shallow submarine environments. In this study, we investigated the diversity and distribution of potentially hydrogen-producing bacteria in Prony hyperalkaline springs by using metagenomic analyses and different PCR-amplified DNA sequencing methods. The retrieved sequences of hydA genes, encoding the catalytic subunit of [FeFe]-hydrogenases and, used as a molecular marker of hydrogen-producing bacteria, were mainly related to those of Firmicutes and clustered into two distinct groups depending on sampling locations. Intertidal samples were dominated by new hydA sequences related to uncultured Firmicutes retrieved from paddy soils, while submarine samples were dominated by diverse hydA sequences affiliated with anaerobic and/or thermophilic submarine Firmicutes pertaining to the orders Thermoanaerobacterales or Clostridiales. The novelty and diversity of these [FeFe]-hydrogenases may reflect the unique environmental conditions prevailing in the PHF (i.e., high-pH, low-salt, mesothermic fluids). In addition, novel alkaliphilic hydrogen-producing Firmicutes (Clostridiales and Bacillales) were successfully isolated from both intertidal and submarine PHF chimney samples. Both molecular and cultivation-based data demonstrated the ability of Firmicutes originating from serpentinite-hosted environments to produce hydrogen by fermentation, potentially contributing to the molecular hydrogen balance in situ. PMID:27625634

  16. Synopsis of valid species-group taxa for freshwater Gastropoda recorded from the European Neogene

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Thomas A.; Kroh, Andreas; Harzhauser, Mathias; Georgopoulou, Elisavet; Mandic, Oleg

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Here we present a complete list of all valid species-group taxa of freshwater gastropods reported from Miocene and Pliocene deposits in Europe. The last comparable work dates back to the 1920s and covered about 1,600 names. The extensive literature research underlying the present work revealed considerable changes in the taxonomic and systematic frameworks of Neogene freshwater gastropods and yielded a total number of 2,156 accepted taxa. Each taxon is accompanied by a full citation of its first description; where the information is available, page number and illustration reference are provided. First descriptions available as open-access full-text sources on the web were linked via hyperlink to the first page of the publication. PMID:25152683

  17. A nomenclator of extant and fossil taxa of the Melanopsidae (Gastropoda, Cerithioidea)

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This nomenclator provides details on all published names in the family-, genus-, and species-group, as well as for a few infrasubspecific names introduced for, or attributed to, the family Melanopsidae. It includes nomenclaturally valid names, as well as junior homonyms, junior objective synonyms, nomina nuda, common incorrect subsequent spellings, and as far as possible discussion on the current status in taxonomy. The catalogue encompasses three family-group names, 79 genus-group names, and 1381 species-group names. All of them are given in their original combination and spelling (except mandatory corrections requested by the Code), along with their original source. For each family- and genus-group name, the original classification and the type genus and type species, respectively, are given. Data provided for species-group taxa are type locality, type horizon (for fossil taxa), and type specimens, as far as available. PMID:27551193

  18. A nomenclator of extant and fossil taxa of the Melanopsidae (Gastropoda, Cerithioidea).

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Thomas A

    2016-01-01

    This nomenclator provides details on all published names in the family-, genus-, and species-group, as well as for a few infrasubspecific names introduced for, or attributed to, the family Melanopsidae. It includes nomenclaturally valid names, as well as junior homonyms, junior objective synonyms, nomina nuda, common incorrect subsequent spellings, and as far as possible discussion on the current status in taxonomy. The catalogue encompasses three family-group names, 79 genus-group names, and 1381 species-group names. All of them are given in their original combination and spelling (except mandatory corrections requested by the Code), along with their original source. For each family- and genus-group name, the original classification and the type genus and type species, respectively, are given. Data provided for species-group taxa are type locality, type horizon (for fossil taxa), and type specimens, as far as available.

  19. Nicotiana Roots Recruit Rare Rhizosphere Taxa as Major Root-Inhabiting Microbes.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Muhammad; Law, Audrey D; Moe, Luke A

    2016-02-01

    Root-associated microbes have a profound impact on plant health, yet little is known about the distribution of root-associated microbes among different root morphologies or between rhizosphere and root environments. We explore these issues here with two commercial varieties of burley tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) using 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing from rhizosphere soil, as well as from primary, secondary, and fine roots. While rhizosphere soils exhibited a fairly rich and even distribution, root samples were dominated by Proteobacteria. A comparison of abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) between rhizosphere and root samples indicated that Nicotiana roots select for rare taxa (predominantly Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Acidobacteria) from their corresponding rhizosphere environments. The majority of root-inhabiting OTUs (~80 %) exhibited habitat generalism across the different root morphological habitats, although habitat specialists were noted. These results suggest a specific process whereby roots select rare taxa from a larger community.

  20. Bias and Sensitivity in the Placement of Fossil Taxa Resulting from Interpretations of Missing Data

    PubMed Central

    Sansom, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    The utility of fossils in evolutionary contexts is dependent on their accurate placement in phylogenetic frameworks, yet intrinsic and widespread missing data make this problematic. The complex taphonomic processes occurring during fossilization can make it difficult to distinguish absence from non-preservation, especially in the case of exceptionally preserved soft-tissue fossils: is a particular morphological character (e.g., appendage, tentacle, or nerve) missing from a fossil because it was never there (phylogenetic absence), or just happened to not be preserved (taphonomic loss)? Missing data have not been tested in the context of interpretation of non-present anatomy nor in the context of directional shifts and biases in affinity. Here, complete taxa, both simulated and empirical, are subjected to data loss through the replacement of present entries (1s) with either missing (?s) or absent (0s) entries. Both cause taxa to drift down trees, from their original position, toward the root. Absolute thresholds at which downshift is significant are extremely low for introduced absences (two entries replaced, 6% of present characters). The opposite threshold in empirical fossil taxa is also found to be low; two absent entries replaced with presences causes fossil taxa to drift up trees. As such, only a few instances of non-preserved characters interpreted as absences will cause fossil organisms to be erroneously interpreted as more primitive than they were in life. This observed sensitivity to coding non-present morphology presents a problem for all evolutionary studies that attempt to use fossils to reconstruct rates of evolution or unlock sequences of morphological change. Stem-ward slippage, whereby fossilization processes cause organisms to appear artificially primitive, appears to be a ubiquitous and problematic phenomenon inherent to missing data, even when no decay biases exist. Absent characters therefore require explicit justification and taphonomic

  1. Crisis of Japanese vascular flora shown by quantifying extinction risks for 1618 taxa.

    PubMed

    Kadoya, Taku; Takenaka, Akio; Ishihama, Fumiko; Fujita, Taku; Ogawa, Makoto; Katsuyama, Teruo; Kadono, Yasuro; Kawakubo, Nobumitsu; Serizawa, Shunsuke; Takahashi, Hideki; Takamiya, Masayuki; Fujii, Shinji; Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Muneda, Kazuo; Yokota, Masatsugu; Yonekura, Koji; Yahara, Tetsukazu

    2014-01-01

    Although many people have expressed alarm that we are witnessing a mass extinction, few projections have been quantified, owing to limited availability of time-series data on threatened organisms, especially plants. To quantify the risk of extinction, we need to monitor changes in population size over time for as many species as possible. Here, we present the world's first quantitative projection of plant species loss at a national level, with stochastic simulations based on the results of population censuses of 1618 threatened plant taxa in 3574 map cells of ca. 100 km2. More than 500 lay botanists helped monitor those taxa in 1994-1995 and in 2003-2004. We projected that between 370 and 561 vascular plant taxa will go extinct in Japan during the next century if past trends of population decline continue. This extinction rate is approximately two to three times the global rate. Using time-series data, we show that existing national protected areas (PAs) covering ca. 7% of Japan will not adequately prevent population declines: even core PAs can protect at best <60% of local populations from decline. Thus, the Aichi Biodiversity Target to expand PAs to 17% of land (and inland water) areas, as committed to by many national governments, is not enough: only 29.2% of currently threatened species will become non-threatened under the assumption that probability of protection success by PAs is 0.5, which our assessment shows is realistic. In countries where volunteers can be organized to monitor threatened taxa, censuses using our method should be able to quantify how fast we are losing species and to assess how effective current conservation measures such as PAs are in preventing species extinction.

  2. Lectotypification of names of Himalayan Brassicaceae taxa currently placed in the genus Cardamine

    PubMed Central

    Marhold, Karol; Kempa, Matúš; Al-Shehbaz, Ihsan A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Lectotypes of twenty-eight names of taxa currently recognized or synonymized in Cardamine are designated as part of the work on the account of the genus for the Pan-Himalayan Flora. Among them, the previous first-step lectotypification of the name Cardamine calthifolia is finalized. In cases when specimen images are available online, stable identifiers for specimens, other permanent links, or links via JSTOR Global Plants are provided. PMID:26140016

  3. Nine endangered taxa, one recovering ecosystem: Identifying common ground for recovery on Santa Cruz Island, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McEachern, A. Kathryn; Wilken, Dieter H.

    2011-01-01

    It is not uncommon to have several rare and listed taxa occupying habitats in one landscape or management area where conservation amounts to defense against the possibility of further loss. It is uncommon and extremely exciting, however, to have several listed taxa occupying one island that is managed cooperatively for conservation and recovery. On Santa Cruz Island, the largest of the northern California island group in the Santa Barbara Channel, we have a golden opportunity to marry ecological knowledge and institutional "good will" in a field test of holistic rare plant conservation. Here, the last feral livestock have been removed, active weed control is underway, and management is focused on understanding and demonstrating system response to conservation management. Yet funding limitations still exist and we need to plan the most fiscally conservative and marketable approach to rare plant restoration. We still experience the tension between desirable quick results and the ecological pace of system recovery. Therefore, our research has focused on identifying fundamental constraints on species recovery at individual, demographic, habitat, and ecosystem levels, and then developing suites of actions that might be taken across taxa and landscapes. At the same time, we seek a performance middle ground that balances an institutional need for quick demonstration of hands-on positive results with a contrasting approach that allows ecosystem recovery to facilitate species recovery in the long term. We find that constraints vary across breeding systems, life-histories, and island locations. We take a hybrid approach in which we identify several actions that we can take now to enhance population size or habitat occupancy for some taxa by active restoration, while allowing others to recover at the pace of ecosystem change. We make our recommendations on the basis of data we have collected over the last decade, so that management is firmly grounded in ecological observation.

  4. Bias and sensitivity in the placement of fossil taxa resulting from interpretations of missing data.

    PubMed

    Sansom, Robert S

    2015-03-01

    The utility of fossils in evolutionary contexts is dependent on their accurate placement in phylogenetic frameworks, yet intrinsic and widespread missing data make this problematic. The complex taphonomic processes occurring during fossilization can make it difficult to distinguish absence from non-preservation, especially in the case of exceptionally preserved soft-tissue fossils: is a particular morphological character (e.g., appendage, tentacle, or nerve) missing from a fossil because it was never there (phylogenetic absence), or just happened to not be preserved (taphonomic loss)? Missing data have not been tested in the context of interpretation of non-present anatomy nor in the context of directional shifts and biases in affinity. Here, complete taxa, both simulated and empirical, are subjected to data loss through the replacement of present entries (1s) with either missing (?s) or absent (0s) entries. Both cause taxa to drift down trees, from their original position, toward the root. Absolute thresholds at which downshift is significant are extremely low for introduced absences (two entries replaced, 6% of present characters). The opposite threshold in empirical fossil taxa is also found to be low; two absent entries replaced with presences causes fossil taxa to drift up trees. As such, only a few instances of non-preserved characters interpreted as absences will cause fossil organisms to be erroneously interpreted as more primitive than they were in life. This observed sensitivity to coding non-present morphology presents a problem for all evolutionary studies that attempt to use fossils to reconstruct rates of evolution or unlock sequences of morphological change. Stem-ward slippage, whereby fossilization processes cause organisms to appear artificially primitive, appears to be a ubiquitous and problematic phenomenon inherent to missing data, even when no decay biases exist. Absent characters therefore require explicit justification and taphonomic

  5. Immunological change in a parasite-impoverished environment: divergent signals from four island taxa.

    PubMed

    Beadell, Jon S; Atkins, Colm; Cashion, Erin; Jonker, Michelle; Fleischer, Robert C

    2007-09-19

    Dramatic declines of native Hawaiian avifauna due to the human-mediated emergence of avian malaria and pox prompted an examination of whether island taxa share a common altered immunological signature, potentially driven by reduced genetic diversity and reduced exposure to parasites. We tested this hypothesis by characterizing parasite prevalence, genetic diversity and three measures of immune response in two recently-introduced species (Neochmia temporalis and Zosterops lateralis) and two island endemics (Acrocephalus aequinoctialis and A. rimitarae) and then comparing the results to those observed in closely-related mainland counterparts. The prevalence of blood parasites was significantly lower in 3 of 4 island taxa, due in part to the absence of certain parasite lineages represented in mainland populations. Indices of genetic diversity were unchanged in the island population of N. temporalis; however, allelic richness was significantly lower in the island population of Z. lateralis while both allelic richness and heterozygosity were significantly reduced in the two island-endemic species examined. Although parasite prevalence and genetic diversity generally conformed to expectations for an island system, we did not find evidence for a pattern of uniformly altered immune responses in island taxa, even amongst endemic taxa with the longest residence times. The island population of Z. lateralis exhibited a significantly reduced inflammatory cell-mediated response while levels of natural antibodies remained unchanged for this and the other recently introduced island taxon. In contrast, the island endemic A. rimitarae exhibited a significantly increased inflammatory response as well as higher levels of natural antibodies and complement. These measures were unchanged or lower in A. aequinoctialis. We suggest that small differences in the pathogenic landscape and the stochastic history of mutation and genetic drift are likely to be important in shaping the unique

  6. Lectotypification of names of Himalayan Brassicaceae taxa currently placed in the genus Cardamine.

    PubMed

    Marhold, Karol; Kempa, Matúš; Al-Shehbaz, Ihsan A

    2015-01-01

    Lectotypes of twenty-eight names of taxa currently recognized or synonymized in Cardamine are designated as part of the work on the account of the genus for the Pan-Himalayan Flora. Among them, the previous first-step lectotypification of the name Cardaminecalthifolia is finalized. In cases when specimen images are available online, stable identifiers for specimens, other permanent links, or links via JSTOR Global Plants are provided.

  7. Dominant plant taxa predict plant productivity responses to CO2 enrichment across precipitation and soil gradients

    PubMed Central

    Fay, Philip A.; Newingham, Beth A.; Polley, H. Wayne; Morgan, Jack A.; LeCain, Daniel R.; Nowak, Robert S.; Smith, Stanley D.

    2015-01-01

    The Earth's atmosphere will continue to be enriched with carbon dioxide (CO2) over the coming century. Carbon dioxide enrichment often reduces leaf transpiration, which in water-limited ecosystems may increase soil water content, change species abundances and increase the productivity of plant communities. The effect of increased soil water on community productivity and community change may be greater in ecosystems with lower precipitation, or on coarser-textured soils, but responses are likely absent in deserts. We tested correlations among yearly increases in soil water content, community change and community plant productivity responses to CO2 enrichment in experiments in a mesic grassland with fine- to coarse-textured soils, a semi-arid grassland and a xeric shrubland. We found no correlation between CO2-caused changes in soil water content and changes in biomass of dominant plant taxa or total community aboveground biomass in either grassland type or on any soil in the mesic grassland (P > 0.60). Instead, increases in dominant taxa biomass explained up to 85 % of the increases in total community biomass under CO2 enrichment. The effect of community change on community productivity was stronger in the semi-arid grassland than in the mesic grassland, where community biomass change on one soil was not correlated with the change in either the soil water content or the dominant taxa. No sustained increases in soil water content or community productivity and no change in dominant plant taxa occurred in the xeric shrubland. Thus, community change was a crucial driver of community productivity responses to CO2 enrichment in the grasslands, but effects of soil water change on productivity were not evident in yearly responses to CO2 enrichment. Future research is necessary to isolate and clarify the mechanisms controlling the temporal and spatial variations in the linkages among soil water, community change and plant productivity responses to CO2 enrichment. PMID

  8. Crisis of Japanese Vascular Flora Shown By Quantifying Extinction Risks for 1618 Taxa

    PubMed Central

    Kadoya, Taku; Takenaka, Akio; Ishihama, Fumiko; Fujita, Taku; Ogawa, Makoto; Katsuyama, Teruo; Kadono, Yasuro; Kawakubo, Nobumitsu; Serizawa, Shunsuke; Takahashi, Hideki; Takamiya, Masayuki; Fujii, Shinji; Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Muneda, Kazuo; Yokota, Masatsugu; Yonekura, Koji; Yahara, Tetsukazu

    2014-01-01

    Although many people have expressed alarm that we are witnessing a mass extinction, few projections have been quantified, owing to limited availability of time-series data on threatened organisms, especially plants. To quantify the risk of extinction, we need to monitor changes in population size over time for as many species as possible. Here, we present the world's first quantitative projection of plant species loss at a national level, with stochastic simulations based on the results of population censuses of 1618 threatened plant taxa in 3574 map cells of ca. 100 km2. More than 500 lay botanists helped monitor those taxa in 1994–1995 and in 2003–2004. We projected that between 370 and 561 vascular plant taxa will go extinct in Japan during the next century if past trends of population decline continue. This extinction rate is approximately two to three times the global rate. Using time-series data, we show that existing national protected areas (PAs) covering ca. 7% of Japan will not adequately prevent population declines: even core PAs can protect at best <60% of local populations from decline. Thus, the Aichi Biodiversity Target to expand PAs to 17% of land (and inland water) areas, as committed to by many national governments, is not enough: only 29.2% of currently threatened species will become non-threatened under the assumption that probability of protection success by PAs is 0.5, which our assessment shows is realistic. In countries where volunteers can be organized to monitor threatened taxa, censuses using our method should be able to quantify how fast we are losing species and to assess how effective current conservation measures such as PAs are in preventing species extinction. PMID:24922311

  9. Immunological Change in a Parasite-Impoverished Environment: Divergent Signals from Four Island Taxa

    PubMed Central

    Beadell, Jon S.; Atkins, Colm; Cashion, Erin; Jonker, Michelle; Fleischer, Robert C.

    2007-01-01

    Dramatic declines of native Hawaiian avifauna due to the human-mediated emergence of avian malaria and pox prompted an examination of whether island taxa share a common altered immunological signature, potentially driven by reduced genetic diversity and reduced exposure to parasites. We tested this hypothesis by characterizing parasite prevalence, genetic diversity and three measures of immune response in two recently-introduced species (Neochmia temporalis and Zosterops lateralis) and two island endemics (Acrocephalus aequinoctialis and A. rimitarae) and then comparing the results to those observed in closely-related mainland counterparts. The prevalence of blood parasites was significantly lower in 3 of 4 island taxa, due in part to the absence of certain parasite lineages represented in mainland populations. Indices of genetic diversity were unchanged in the island population of N. temporalis; however, allelic richness was significantly lower in the island population of Z. lateralis while both allelic richness and heterozygosity were significantly reduced in the two island-endemic species examined. Although parasite prevalence and genetic diversity generally conformed to expectations for an island system, we did not find evidence for a pattern of uniformly altered immune responses in island taxa, even amongst endemic taxa with the longest residence times. The island population of Z. lateralis exhibited a significantly reduced inflammatory cell-mediated response while levels of natural antibodies remained unchanged for this and the other recently introduced island taxon. In contrast, the island endemic A. rimitarae exhibited a significantly increased inflammatory response as well as higher levels of natural antibodies and complement. These measures were unchanged or lower in A. aequinoctialis. We suggest that small differences in the pathogenic landscape and the stochastic history of mutation and genetic drift are likely to be important in shaping the unique

  10. Dominant plant taxa predict plant productivity responses to CO2 enrichment across precipitation and soil gradients

    DOE PAGES

    Fay, Philip A.; Newingham, Beth A.; Polley, H. Wayne; ...

    2015-03-30

    The Earth’s atmosphere will continue to be enriched with carbon dioxide (CO2) over the coming century. Carbon dioxide enrichment often reduces leaf transpiration, which in water-limited ecosystems may increase soil water content, change species abundances and increase the productivity of plant communities. The effect of increased soil water on community productivity and community change may be greater in ecosystems with lower precipitation, or on coarser-textured soils, but responses are likely absent in deserts. We tested correlations among yearly increases in soil water content, community change and community plant productivity responses to CO2 enrichment in experiments in a mesic grassland withmore » fine- to coarse-textured soils, a semi-arid grassland and a xeric shrubland. We found no correlation between CO2-caused changes in soil water content and changes in biomass of dominant plant taxa or total community aboveground biomass in either grassland type or on any soil in the mesic grassland (P > 0.60). Instead, increases in dominant taxa biomass explained up to 85% of the increases in total community biomass under CO2 enrichment. The effect of community change on community productivity was stronger in the semi-arid grassland than in the mesic grassland,where community biomass change on one soil was not correlated with the change in either the soil water content or the dominant taxa. No sustained increases in soil water content or community productivity and no change in dominant plant taxa occurred in the xeric shrubland. Thus, community change was a crucial driver of community productivity responses to CO2 enrichment in the grasslands, but effects of soil water change on productivity were not evident in yearly responses to CO2 enrichment. In conclusion, future research is necessary to isolate and clarify the mechanisms controlling the temporal and spatial variations in the linkages among soil water, community change and plant productivity responses to CO2

  11. Temporal consistency in background mortality of four dominant coral taxa along Australia's Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisapia, C.; Anderson, K. D.; Pratchett, M. S.

    2016-09-01

    Studies on the population and community dynamics of scleractinian corals typically focus on catastrophic mortality associated with acute disturbances (e.g., coral bleaching and outbreaks of crown-of-thorns starfish), though corals are subject to high levels of background mortality and injuries caused by routine and chronic processes. This study quantified prevalence (proportion of colonies with injuries) and severity (areal extent of injuries on individual colonies) of background mortality and injuries for four common coral taxa (massive Porites, encrusting Montipora, Acropora hyacinthus and branching Pocillopora) on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Sampling was conducted over three consecutive years during which there were no major acute disturbances. A total of 2276 adult colonies were surveyed across 27 sites, within nine reefs and three distinct latitudinal sectors. The prevalence of injuries was very high (>83%) across all four taxa, but highest for Porites (91%) and Montipora (85%). For these taxa ( Montipora and Pocillopora), there was also significant temporal and spatial variation in prevalence of partial mortality. The severity of injuries ranged from 3% to more than 80% and varied among coral taxa, but was fairly constant spatially and temporally. This shows that some injuries have considerable longevity and that corals may invest relatively little in regenerating tissue over sites of previous injuries. Inter-colony variation in the severity of injury also had no apparent effect on the realized growth of individual colonies, suggesting that energy diverted to regeneration has a limited bearing on overall energetic allocation, or impacts on other life-history processes (e.g., reproduction) rather than growth. Establishing background levels of injury and regeneration is important for understanding energy investment and life-history consequences for reef-building corals as well as for predicting susceptibility to, and capacity to recover from, acute

  12. Combining phylogenomics and fossils in higher-level squamate reptile phylogeny: molecular data change the placement of fossil taxa.

    PubMed

    Wiens, John J; Kuczynski, Caitlin A; Townsend, Ted; Reeder, Tod W; Mulcahy, Daniel G; Sites, Jack W

    2010-12-01

    Molecular data offer great potential to resolve the phylogeny of living taxa but can molecular data improve our understanding of relationships of fossil taxa? Simulations suggest that this is possible, but few empirical examples have demonstrated the ability of molecular data to change the placement of fossil taxa. We offer such an example here. We analyze the placement of snakes among squamate reptiles, combining published morphological data (363 characters) and new DNA sequence data (15,794 characters, 22 nuclear loci) for 45 living and 19 fossil taxa. We find several intriguing results. First, some fossil taxa undergo major changes in their phylogenetic position when molecular data are added. Second, most fossil taxa are placed with strong support in the expected clades by the combined data Bayesian analyses, despite each having >98% missing cells and despite recent suggestions that extensive missing data are problematic for Bayesian phylogenetics. Third, morphological data can change the placement of living taxa in combined analyses, even when there is an overwhelming majority of molecular characters. Finally, we find strong but apparently misleading signal in the morphological data, seemingly associated with a burrowing lifestyle in snakes, amphisbaenians, and dibamids. Overall, our results suggest promise for an integrated and comprehensive Tree of Life by combining molecular and morphological data for living and fossil taxa.

  13. Biomechanical modeling and sensitivity analysis of bipedal running ability. II. Extinct taxa.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, John R

    2004-10-01

    Using an inverse dynamics biomechanical analysis that was previously validated for extant bipeds, I calculated the minimum amount of actively contracting hindlimb extensor muscle that would have been needed for rapid bipedal running in several extinct dinosaur taxa. I analyzed models of nine theropod dinosaurs (including birds) covering over five orders of magnitude in size. My results uphold previous findings that large theropods such as Tyrannosaurus could not run very quickly, whereas smaller theropods (including some extinct birds) were adept runners. Furthermore, my results strengthen the contention that many nonavian theropods, especially larger individuals, used fairly upright limb orientations, which would have reduced required muscular force, and hence muscle mass. Additional sensitivity analysis of muscle fascicle lengths, moment arms, and limb orientation supports these conclusions and points out directions for future research on the musculoskeletal limits on running ability. Although ankle extensor muscle support is shown to have been important for all taxa, the ability of hip extensor muscles to support the body appears to be a crucial limit for running capacity in larger taxa. I discuss what speeds were possible for different theropod dinosaurs, and how running ability evolved in an inverse relationship to body size in archosaurs.

  14. Evidence of Taxa-, Clone-, and Kin-discrimination in Protists: Ecological and Evolutionary Implications.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Avelina; Paz-Y-Miño-C, Guillermo

    2014-11-01

    Unicellular eukaryotes, or protists, are among the most ancient organisms on Earth. Protists belong to multiple taxonomic groups; they are widely distributed geographically and in all environments. Their ability to discriminate among con- and heterospecifics has been documented during the past decade. Here we discuss exemplar cases of taxa-, clone-, and possible kin-discrimination in five major lineages: Mycetozoa (Dictyostelium, Polysphondylium), Dikarya (Saccharomyces), Ciliophora (Tetrahymena), Apicomplexa (Plasmodium) and Archamoebae (Entamoeba). We summarize the proposed genetic mechanisms involved in discrimination-mediated aggregation (self versus different), including the csA, FLO and trg (formerly lag) genes, and the Proliferation Activation Factors (PAFs), which facilitate clustering in some protistan taxa. We caution about the experimental challenges intrinsic to studying recognition in protists, and highlight the opportunities for exploring the ecology and evolution of complex forms of cell-cell communication, including social behavior, in a polyphyletic, still superficially understood group of organisms. Because unicellular eukaryotes are the evolutionary precursors of multicellular life, we infer that their mechanisms of taxa-, clone-, and possible kin-discrimination gave origin to the complex diversification and sophistication of traits associated with species and kin recognition in plants, fungi, invertebrates and vertebrates.

  15. Surrogate taxa and fossils as reliable proxies of spatial biodiversity patterns in marine benthic communities.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Carrie L; Kowalewski, Michał

    2017-03-15

    Rigorous documentation of spatial heterogeneity (β-diversity) in present-day and preindustrial ecosystems is required to assess how marine communities respond to environmental and anthropogenic drivers. However, the overwhelming majority of contemporary and palaeontological assessments have centred on single higher taxa. To evaluate the validity of single taxa as community surrogates and palaeontological proxies, we compared macrobenthic communities and sympatric death assemblages at 52 localities in Onslow Bay (NC, USA). Compositional heterogeneity did not differ significantly across datasets based on live molluscs, live non-molluscs, and all live organisms. Death assemblages were less heterogeneous spatially, likely reflecting homogenization by time-averaging. Nevertheless, live and dead datasets were greater than 80% congruent in pairwise comparisons to the literature estimates of β-diversity in other marine ecosystems, yielded concordant bathymetric gradients, and produced nearly identical ordinations consistently delineating habitats. Congruent estimates from molluscs and non-molluscs suggest that single groups can serve as reliable community proxies. High spatial fidelity of death assemblages supports the emerging paradigm of Conservation Palaeobiology. Integrated analyses of ecological and palaeontological data based on surrogate taxa can quantify anthropogenic changes in marine ecosystems and advance our understanding of spatial and temporal aspects of biodiversity.

  16. Spatial Scaling of Microbial Diversity across Various Functional and Phylogenetic Taxa

    SciTech Connect

    Schadt, Christopher Warren; Garten Jr, Charles T; Kang, S.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the spatial patterns of organisms and the underlying mechanisms shaping biotic communities is a central goal in community ecology. One of the most well documented spatial patterns in plant and animal communities is the positive-power law relationship between species (or taxa) richness and area. Such a taxa-area relationships (TARs) are one of the principal generalizations in ecology, and are fundamental to our understanding of the distribution of global biodiversity. However, TARs remain elusive and controversial in microbial communities, especially in soil habitats, due to inadequate sampling methodologies. Here, we describe TARs, at a whole-community level, across various microbial functional and phylogenetic groups in a forest soil using a comprehensive functional gene array (FGA) with > 24,000 probes. Our analysis indicated that the forest soil microbial community exhibited a relatively flat taxa-area relationship (slope z = 0.0624), but the z values varied considerably across different functional and phylogenetic groups (z = 0.0475-0.0959), which are several times lower than those commonly observed in higher plants and animals. These results suggest that the turnover in space of microorganisms may be, in general, lower than that of plants and animals.

  17. Using computational fluid dynamics to test functional and ecological hypotheses in fossil taxa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Imran

    2016-04-01

    Reconstructing how ancient organisms moved and fed is a major focus of study in palaeontology. Traditionally, this has been hampered by a lack of objective data on the functional morphology of extinct species, especially those without a clear modern analogue. However, cutting-edge techniques for characterizing specimens digitally and in three dimensions, coupled with state-of-the-art computer models, now provide a robust framework for testing functional and ecological hypotheses even in problematic fossil taxa. One such approach is computational fluid dynamics (CFD), a method for simulating fluid flows around objects that has primarily been applied to complex engineering-design problems. Here, I will present three case studies of CFD applied to fossil taxa, spanning a range of specimen sizes, taxonomic groups and geological ages. First, I will show how CFD enabled a rigorous test of hypothesized feeding modes in an enigmatic Ediacaran organism with three-fold symmetry, revealing previously unappreciated complexity of pre-Cambrian ecosystems. Second, I will show how CFD was used to evaluate hydrodynamic performance and feeding in Cambrian stem-group echinoderms, shedding light on the probable feeding strategy of the latest common ancestor of all deuterostomes. Third, I will show how CFD allowed us to explore the link between form and function in Mesozoic ichthyosaurs. These case studies serve to demonstrate the enormous potential of CFD for addressing long-standing hypotheses for a variety of fossil taxa, opening up an exciting new avenue in palaeontological studies of functional morphology.

  18. Darwin's diagram of divergence of taxa as a causal model for the origin of species.

    PubMed

    Bouzat, Juan L

    2014-03-01

    On the basis that Darwin's theory of evolution encompasses two logically independent processes (common descent and natural selection), the only figure in On the Origin of Species (the Diagram of Divergence of Taxa) is often interpreted as illustrative of only one of these processes: the branching patterns representing common ancestry. Here, I argue that Darwin's Diagram of Divergence of Taxa represents a broad conceptual model of Darwin's theory, illustrating the causal efficacy of natural selection in producing well-defined varieties and ultimately species. The Tree Diagram encompasses the idea that natural selection explains common descent and the origin of organic diversity, thus representing a comprehensive model of Darwin's theory on the origin of species. I describe Darwin's Tree Diagram in relation to his argumentative strategy under the vera causa principle, and suggest that the testing of his theory based on the evidence from the geological record, the geographical distribution of organisms, and the mutual affinities of organic beings can be framed under the hypothetico-deductive method. Darwin's Diagram of Divergence of Taxa therefore represents a broad conceptual model that helps understanding the causal construction of Darwin's theory of evolution, the structure of his argumentative strategy, and the nature of his scientific methodology.

  19. Evidence of Taxa-, Clone-, and Kin-discrimination in Protists: Ecological and Evolutionary Implications

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, Avelina; Paz-y-Miño-C, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Unicellular eukaryotes, or protists, are among the most ancient organisms on Earth. Protists belong to multiple taxonomic groups; they are widely distributed geographically and in all environments. Their ability to discriminate among con- and heterospecifics has been documented during the past decade. Here we discuss exemplar cases of taxa-, clone-, and possible kin-discrimination in five major lineages: Mycetozoa (Dictyostelium, Polysphondylium), Dikarya (Saccharomyces), Ciliophora (Tetrahymena), Apicomplexa (Plasmodium) and Archamoebae (Entamoeba). We summarize the proposed genetic mechanisms involved in discrimination-mediated aggregation (self versus different), including the csA, FLO and trg (formerly lag) genes, and the Proliferation Activation Factors (PAFs), which facilitate clustering in some protistan taxa. We caution about the experimental challenges intrinsic to studying recognition in protists, and highlight the opportunities for exploring the ecology and evolution of complex forms of cell-cell communication, including social behavior, in a polyphyletic, still superficially understood group of organisms. Because unicellular eukaryotes are the evolutionary precursors of multicellular life, we infer that their mechanisms of taxa-, clone-, and possible kin-discrimination gave origin to the complex diversification and sophistication of traits associated with species and kin recognition in plants, fungi, invertebrates and vertebrates. PMID:25400313

  20. Diatoms from Brazil: the taxa recorded by Christian Gottfried Ehrenberg

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Weliton José; Jahn, Regine; Menezes, Mariângela

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The flora of diatoms from Brazil has been studied by several authors from the beginning of the 19th up to now. Some of the old lists and descriptions are unknown or have been ignored by Brazilian researchers and the situation of the names cited was not assessed. Here we compiled a list of 101 taxa of diatoms from Brazil registered by Christian Gottfried Ehrenberg during the 19th century. We checked the current nomenclatural status of those taxa and lectotypified species from Brazil described by this author. For this, we accessed the Ehrenberg collection in the Museum für Naturkunde, Berlin, Germany, where 11 samples from Brazil studied by Ehrenberg are housed and published in different papers. Using these samples, we found 101 taxa (specific and infraspecific) published by Ehrenberg from Brazil. Five species (Eunotia bidens Ehrenb., Eunotia depressa Ehrenb., Eunotia elephas Ehrenb., Pinnularia microstauron Ehrenb., and Terpsinoe brasiliensis Ehrenb.) were new descriptions and were lectotypified here. The other species cited for Brazil were described initially from other places. However, 23 names were invalid and one illegitimate. PMID:23730191

  1. Functional gains of including non-commercial epibenthic taxa in coastal beam trawl surveys: A note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brind'Amour, Anik; Rouyer, Armelle; Martin, Jocelyne

    2009-05-01

    The development of ecosystem-based indicators requires the broadening of a view of the community, from fish species to all the species (macrobenthic and fish) correctly captured by a given sampling gear. Many scientific surveys already have such integrated databases. The present note aims to demonstrate that existing databases, herein from dedicated coastal nursery surveys, are actually underexploited. Such databases contain information on non-commercial taxa, which could greatly improve our knowledge on the organisation and functioning of coastal ecosystems. Using two datasets, a "complete" dataset composed of commercial and not-commercial epibenthic trawled species (fish and invertebrate) and a "subset" dataset characterized by commercial and routinely surveyed species (mainly fish and cephalopods), different measures of functional diversity are compared to identify the functional gains of including epibenthic species. The results show that, when included in the analyses, epibenthic taxa provide gains of functional information, associated mainly with the community feeding traits, i.e. organisms composing the primary and secondary consumer levels of the coastal nursery food web. Failure to include some of the primary (zooplanktivores and suspension feeders) and secondary consumers (detritivores-scavengers) in coastal survey analyses may, for instance, hamper our understanding of energy flux between the benthic and water column compartments of these ecosystems. The results also suggest that the exclusion of some taxa associated with these two food web compartments, may lead to the underestimation of the functional redundancy in coastal ecosystems.

  2. The Fixation of Nitrogen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrew, S. P. S.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen in the form of ammonia as one of the foundations of modern chemical industry. The article describes ammonia production and synthesis, purifying the hydrogen-nitrogen mix, nitric acid production, and its commericial plant. (HM)

  3. Nitrogen trading tool

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nitrogen cycle is impacted by human activities, including those that increase the use of nitrogen in agricultural systems, and this impact can be seen in effects such as increased nitrate (NO3) levels in groundwater or surface water resources, increased concentration of nitrous oxide (N2O) in th...

  4. Modeling Atmospheric Reactive Nitrogen

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen is an essential building block of all proteins and thus an essential nutrient for all life. Reactive nitrogen, which is naturally produced via enzymatic reactions, forest fires and lightning, is continually recycled and cascades through air, water, and soil media. Human ...

  5. Nitrogen in Chinese coals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, D.; Lei, J.; Zheng, B.; Tang, X.; Wang, M.; Hu, Jiawen; Li, S.; Wang, B.; Finkelman, R.B.

    2011-01-01

    Three hundred and six coal samples were taken from main coal mines of twenty-six provinces, autonomous regions, and municipalities in China, according to the resource distribution and coal-forming periods as well as the coal ranks and coal yields. Nitrogen was determined by using the Kjeldahl method at U. S. Geological Survey (USGS), which exhibit a normal frequency distribution. The nitrogen contents of over 90% Chinese coal vary from 0.52% to 1.41% and the average nitrogen content is recommended to be 0.98%. Nitrogen in coal exists primarily in organic form. There is a slight positive relationship between nitrogen content and coal ranking. ?? 2011 Science Press, Institute of Geochemistry, CAS and Springer Berlin Heidelberg.

  6. The microbial nitrogen cycle.

    PubMed

    Jetten, Mike S M

    2008-11-01

    This special issue highlights several recent discoveries in the microbial nitrogen cycle including the diversity of nitrogen-fixing bacteria in special habitats, distribution and contribution of aerobic ammonium oxidation by bacteria and crenarchaea in various aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, regulation of metabolism in nitrifying bacteria, the molecular diversity of denitrifying microorganisms and their enzymes, the functional diversity of freshwater and marine anammox bacteria, the physiology of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation and the degradation of recalcitrant organic nitrogen compounds. Simultaneously the articles in this issue show that many questions still need to be addressed, and that the microbes involved in catalyzing the nitrogen conversions still harbour many secrets that need to be disclosed to fully understand the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle, and make future predictions and global modelling possible.

  7. Distinguishing terminal monophyletic groups from reticulate taxa: performance of phenetic, tree-based, and network procedures.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Patrick A; Richards, Christopher M

    2007-04-01

    Hybridization is a well-documented, natural phenomenon that is common at low taxonomic levels in the higher plants and other groups. In spite of the obvious potential for gene flow via hybridization to cause reticulation in an evolutionary tree, analytical methods based on a strictly bifurcating model of evolution have frequently been applied to data sets containing taxa known to hybridize in nature. Using simulated data, we evaluated the relative performance of phenetic, tree-based, and network approaches for distinguishing between taxa with known reticulate history and taxa that were true terminal monophyletic groups. In all methods examined, type I error (the erroneous rejection of the null hypothesis that a taxon of interest is not monophyletic) was likely during the early stages of introgressive hybridization. We used the gradual erosion of type I error with continued gene flow as a metric for assessing relative performance. Bifurcating tree-based methods performed poorly, with highly supported, incorrect topologies appearing during some phases of the simulation. Based on our model, we estimate that many thousands of gene flow events may be required in natural systems before reticulate taxa will be reliably detected using tree-based methods of phylogeny reconstruction. We conclude that the use of standard bifurcating tree-based methods to identify terminal monophyletic groups for the purposes of defining or delimiting phylogenetic species, or for prioritizing populations for conservation purposes, is difficult to justify when gene flow between sampled taxa is possible. As an alternative, we explored the use of two network methods. Minimum spanning networks performed worse than most tree-based methods and did not yield topologies that were easily interpretable as phylogenies. The performance of NeighborNet was comparable to parsimony bootstrap analysis. NeighborNet and reverse successive weighting were capable of identifying an ephemeral signature of reticulate

  8. Demonstrating Paramagnetism Using Liquid Nitrogen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmonds, Ray; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes how liquid nitrogen is attracted to the poles of neodymium magnets. Nitrogen is not paramagnetic, so the attraction suggests that the liquid nitrogen contains a small amount of oxygen, which causes the paramagnetism. (MVL)

  9. Molecular Biology of Nitrogen Fixation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanmugam, K. T.; Valentine, Raymond C.

    1975-01-01

    Reports that as a result of our increasing knowledge of the molecular biology of nitrogen fixation it might eventually be possible to increase the biological production of nitrogenous fertilizer from atmospheric nitrogen. (GS)

  10. Fertilizer nitrogen isotope signatures.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Alison S; Kelly, Simon D

    2007-09-01

    There has been considerable recent interest in the potential application of nitrogen isotope analysis in discriminating between organically and conventionally grown crops. A prerequisite of this approach is that there is a difference in the nitrogen isotope compositions of the fertilizers used in organic and conventional agriculture. We report new measurements of delta15N values for synthetic nitrogen fertilizers and present a compilation of the new data with existing literature nitrogen isotope data. Nitrogen isotope values for fertilizers that may be permitted in organic cultivation systems are also reported (manures, composts, bloodmeal, bonemeal, hoof and horn, fishmeal and seaweed based fertilizers). The delta15N values of the synthetic fertilizers in the compiled dataset fall within a narrow range close to 0 per thousand with 80% of samples lying between-2 and 2 per thousand and 98.5% of the data having delta15N values of less than 4 per thousand (mean=0.2 per thousand n=153). The fertilizers that may be permitted in organic systems have a higher mean delta15N value of 8.5 per thousand and exhibit a broader range in delta15N values from 0.6 to 36.7 per thousand (n=83). The possible application of the nitrogen isotope approach in discriminating between organically and conventionally grown crops is discussed in light of the fertilizer data presented here and with regard to other factors that are also important in determining crop nitrogen isotope values.

  11. The nitrogen cycle.

    PubMed

    Stein, Lisa Y; Klotz, Martin G

    2016-02-08

    Nitrogen is the fourth most abundant element in cellular biomass, and it comprises the majority of Earth's atmosphere. The interchange between inert dinitrogen gas (N2) in the extant atmosphere and 'reactive nitrogen' (those nitrogen compounds that support, or are products of, cellular metabolism and growth) is entirely controlled by microbial activities. This was not the case, however, in the primordial atmosphere, when abiotic reactions likely played a significant role in the inter-transformation of nitrogen oxides. Although such abiotic reactions are still important, the extant nitrogen cycle is driven by reductive fixation of dinitrogen and an enzyme inventory that facilitates dinitrogen-producing reactions. Prior to the advent of the Haber-Bosch process (the industrial fixation of N2 into ammonia, NH3) in 1909, nearly all of the reactive nitrogen in the biosphere was generated and recycled by microorganisms. Although the Haber-Bosch process more than quadrupled the productivity of agricultural crops, chemical fertilizers and other anthropogenic sources of fixed nitrogen now far exceed natural contributions, leading to unprecedented environmental degradation.

  12. Nitrogen Backbone Oligomers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongbo; Eremets, Mikhail I; Troyan, Ivan; Liu, Hanyu; Ma, Yanming; Vereecken, Luc

    2015-08-19

    We found that nitrogen and hydrogen directly react at room temperature and pressures of ~35 GPa forming chains of single-bonded nitrogen atom with the rest of the bonds terminated with hydrogen atoms - as identified by IR absorption, Raman, X-ray diffraction experiments and theoretical calculations. At releasing pressures below ~10 GPa, the product transforms into hydrazine. Our findings might open a way for the practical synthesis of these extremely high energetic materials as the formation of nitrogen-hydrogen compounds is favorable already at pressures above 2 GPa according to the calculations.

  13. Nitrogen Backbone Oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongbo; Eremets, Mikhail I.; Troyan, Ivan; Liu, Hanyu; Ma, Yanming; Vereecken, Luc

    2015-01-01

    We found that nitrogen and hydrogen directly react at room temperature and pressures of ~35 GPa forming chains of single-bonded nitrogen atom with the rest of the bonds terminated with hydrogen atoms - as identified by IR absorption, Raman, X-ray diffraction experiments and theoretical calculations. At releasing pressures below ~10 GPa, the product transforms into hydrazine. Our findings might open a way for the practical synthesis of these extremely high energetic materials as the formation of nitrogen-hydrogen compounds is favorable already at pressures above 2 GPa according to the calculations. PMID:26286836

  14. Brachyceran Diptera (Insecta) in Cretaceous ambers, Part IV, Significant New Orthorrhaphous Taxa.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, David A; Arillo, Antonio; Cumming, Jeffrey M; Hauser, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Thirteen species of basal Brachycera (11 described as new) are reported, belonging to nine families and three infraorders. They are preserved in amber from the Early Cretaceous (Neocomian) of Lebanon, Albian of northern Spain, upper Albian to lower Cenomanian of northern Myanmar, and Late Cretaceous of New Jersey USA (Turonian) and Alberta, Canada (Campanian). Taxa are as follows, with significance as noted: In Stratiomyomorpha: Stratiomyidae (Cretaceogaster pygmaeus Teskey [2 new specimens in Canadian amber], Lysistrata emerita Grimaldi & Arillo, gen. et sp. n. [stem-group species of the family in Spanish amber]), and Xylomyidae (Cretoxyla azari Grimaldi & Cumming, gen. et sp. n. [in Lebanese amber], and an undescribed species from Spain). In Tabanomorpha: Tabanidae (Cratotabanus newjerseyensis Grimaldi, sp. n., in New Jersey amber). In Muscomorpha: Acroceridae (Schlingeromyia minuta Grimaldi & Hauser, gen. et sp. n. and Burmacyrtus rusmithi Grimaldi & Hauser gen. etsp. n., in Burmese amber, the only definitive species of the family from the Cretaceous); Mythicomyiidae (Microburmyia analvena Grimaldi & Cumming gen. et sp. n. and Microburmyia veanalvena Grimaldi & Cumming, sp. n., stem-group species of the family, both in Burmese amber); Apsilocephalidae or near (therevoid family-group) (Kumaromyia burmitica Grimaldi & Hauser, gen. et sp. n. [in Burmese amber]); Apystomyiidae (Hilarimorphites burmanica Grimaldi & Cumming, sp. n. [in Burmese amber], whose closest relatives are from the Late Jurassic of Kazachstan, the Late Cretaceous of New Jersey, and Recent of California). Lastly, two species belonging to families incertae sedis, both in Burmese amber: Tethepomyiidae (Tethepomyia zigrasi Grimaldi & Arillo sp. n., the aculeate oviscapt of which indicates this family was probably parasitoidal and related to Eremochaetidae); and unplaced to family is Myanmyia asteiformia Grimaldi, gen. et sp. n., a minute fly with highly reduced venation. These new taxa significantly

  15. Enrichment of lung microbiome with supraglottic taxa is associated with increased pulmonary inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The lung microbiome of healthy individuals frequently harbors oral organisms. Despite evidence that microaspiration is commonly associated with smoking-related lung diseases, the effects of lung microbiome enrichment with upper airway taxa on inflammation has not been studied. We hypothesize that the presence of oral microorganisms in the lung microbiome is associated with enhanced pulmonary inflammation. To test this, we sampled bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) from the lower airways of 29 asymptomatic subjects (nine never-smokers, 14 former-smokers, and six current-smokers). We quantified, amplified, and sequenced 16S rRNA genes from BAL samples by qPCR and 454 sequencing. Pulmonary inflammation was assessed by exhaled nitric oxide (eNO), BAL lymphocytes, and neutrophils. Results BAL had lower total 16S than supraglottic samples and higher than saline background. Bacterial communities in the lower airway clustered in two distinct groups that we designated as pneumotypes. The rRNA gene concentration and microbial community of the first pneumotype was similar to that of the saline background. The second pneumotype had higher rRNA gene concentration and higher relative abundance of supraglottic-characteristic taxa (SCT), such as Veillonella and Prevotella, and we called it pneumotypeSCT. Smoking had no effect on pneumotype allocation, α, or β diversity. PneumotypeSCT was associated with higher BAL lymphocyte-count (P= 0.007), BAL neutrophil-count (P= 0.034), and eNO (P= 0.022). Conclusion A pneumotype with high relative abundance of supraglottic-characteristic taxa is associated with enhanced subclinical lung inflammation. PMID:24450871

  16. The structure of cystoliths in selected taxa of the genus Ficus L. (Moraceae) in Peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ummu-Hani, B.; Noraini, T.

    2013-11-01

    A study was undertaken on mature leaves of 15 taxa of the genus Ficus in Peninsular Malaysia. The main objectives of this study are to determine the morphology and distribution of cystoliths in the epidermal layers of the leaf lamina in selected taxa of Ficus. The morphology of cystoliths is classified based on its size, shape, colour, and the presence of stalk cystolith. There are seven types of cystolith morphology observed in this study. Most of the cystoliths are either solitary, elongated, narrow or broad, and pointed or blunt at one or both ends. However, double- and rarely triple-cystoliths are also present in some species. The size of the cystoliths varies even within the same species. Based on the position of cystoliths, all the 15 taxa studied can be generally classified into three groups: Group 1 - with cystoliths adjacent to the adaxial epidermis layer (F. annulata, F. benghalensis and F. superba), Group 2 - with cystoliths adjacent to the abaxial epidermis layer (F. aurantiacea, F. lepicarpa, F. hispida, F. obscura var. borneensis, F. religiosa, F. schwarzii, F. ucinata and F. vasculosa), and Group 3 - with cystoliths present in both adaxial and abaxial epidermis layers (F. benjamina, F. depressa, F. microcarpa and F. tinctoria). Based on the occurrence of cystoliths, the types of lithocysts were related to the number of epidermal layers, i.e. hair-like lithocysts in uniseriate epidermis is present in all species studied. However, the characteristics of the cystoliths may not suitably be used as a taxonomic marker but it can be useful as additional character for group identification in Ficusper.

  17. Brachyceran Diptera (Insecta) in Cretaceous ambers, Part IV, Significant New Orthorrhaphous Taxa

    PubMed Central

    Grimaldi, David A.; Arillo, Antonio; Cumming, Jeffrey M.; Hauser, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Thirteen species of basal Brachycera (11 described as new) are reported, belonging to nine families and three infraorders. They are preserved in amber from the Early Cretaceous (Neocomian) of Lebanon, Albian of northern Spain, upper Albian to lower Cenomanian of northern Myanmar, and Late Cretaceous of New Jersey USA (Turonian) and Alberta, Canada (Campanian). Taxa are as follows, with significance as noted: In Stratiomyomorpha: Stratiomyidae (Cretaceogaster pygmaeus Teskey [2 new specimens in Canadian amber], Lysistrata emerita Grimaldi & Arillo, gen. et sp. n. [stem-group species of the family in Spanish amber]), and Xylomyidae (Cretoxyla azari Grimaldi & Cumming, gen. et sp. n. [in Lebanese amber], and an undescribed species from Spain). In Tabanomorpha: Tabanidae (Cratotabanus newjerseyensis Grimaldi, sp. n., in New Jersey amber). In Muscomorpha: Acroceridae (Schlingeromyia minuta Grimaldi & Hauser, gen. et sp. n. and Burmacyrtus rusmithi Grimaldi & Hauser gen. et sp. n., in Burmese amber, the only definitive species of the family from the Cretaceous); Mythicomyiidae (Microburmyia analvena Grimaldi & Cumming gen. et sp. n. and Microburmyia veanalvena Grimaldi & Cumming, sp. n., stem-group species of the family, both in Burmese amber); Apsilocephalidae or near (therevoid family-group) (Kumaromyia burmitica Grimaldi & Hauser, gen. et sp. n. [in Burmese amber]); Apystomyiidae (Hilarimorphites burmanica Grimaldi & Cumming, sp. n. [in Burmese amber], whose closest relatives are from the Late Jurassic of Kazachstan, the Late Cretaceous of New Jersey, and Recent of California). Lastly, two species belonging to families incertae sedis, both in Burmese amber: Tethepomyiidae (Tethepomyia zigrasi Grimaldi & Arillo sp. n., the aculeate oviscapt of which indicates this family was probably parasitoidal and related to Eremochaetidae); and unplaced to family is Myanmyia asteiformia Grimaldi, gen. et sp. n., a minute fly with highly reduced venation. These new taxa

  18. Post-zygotic Reproductive Isolation Between Sympatric Taxa in the Chamaecrista desvauxii Complex (Leguminosae–Caesalpinioideae)

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Cristiana Barros Nascimento; Lambert, Sabrina Mota; Borba, Eduardo Leite; de Queiroz, Luciano Paganucci

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Differences in the mating systems and the mechanisms of reproductive isolation between Chamaecrista desvauxii var. graminea and C. desvauxii var. latistipula were examined in the Chapada Diamantina, Brazil. These taxa occur sympatrically, and their populations demonstrate marked morphological differences. The objective of the present work was to determine if reproductive isolation mechanisms exist between these two populations of C. desvauxii, and to determine the influence of these putative mechanisms on their genetic differentiation. Methods Field observations were made of floral biology, phenology and floral visitation, and experiments on intra- and interpopulation pollination and germination rates of the resultant seeds were performed. A genetic examination of the populations was undertaken using four allozyme loci. Key Results The varieties examined demonstrated overlapping of flowering periods during the months of June to September. The main pollinator for both varieties was the bee Bombus brevivillus. Both varieties are self-compatible, and a large number of fruits are formed in cross-pollinations with high seed germination rates. Inter-taxa pollinations result in high levels of fruit production, but no seeds are formed. Two of the four loci examined were diagnostic for the varieties, and exclusive high-frequency alleles were encountered at the other loci, leading to a high genetic distance between the two populations (0·495). Conclusions Pre-zygotic barriers were not found between the two varieties, and these remain isolated due to post-zygotic events. The two varieties demonstrate marked differences in their morphology, floral biology, phenology and genetic make-up, all of which indicate that they should be treated as two distinct species. A complete revision involving the other varieties of the C. desvauxii complex will be necessary in order to define these two taxa formally. PMID:17331960

  19. The Liquid Nitrogen Fountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McRae, Robin; Rahn, Jeffrey A.; Beamer, Timothy W.; Lebret, Norm

    2002-10-01

    Details of a demonstration using liquid nitrogen are presented. The demonstration is based on a 500-mL transparent polyethylene soft-drink bottle with a screw-on pop-up drink top. Prior to the demonstration, a balloon is placed over the popped-up spout of the bottle top. The bottle is filled with liquid nitrogen and the top, with the balloon affixed, is quickly put in place and screwed on tightly. As the liquid nitrogen in the bottle boils, the balloon inflates. When the balloon bursts the noise produced is far greater than would ordinarily be expected, and a fountain of liquid nitrogen and condensing water vapor shoots into the air above the bottle.

  20. Mineral commodity profiles: nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, Deborah A.

    2004-01-01

    Overview -- Nitrogen (N) is an essential element of life and a part of all animal and plant proteins. As a part of the DNA and RNA molecules, nitrogen is an essential constituent of each individual's genetic blueprint. As an essential element in the chlorophyll molecule, nitrogen is vital to a plant's ability to photosynthesize. Some crop plants, such as alfalfa, peas, peanuts, and soybeans, can convert atmospheric nitrogen into a usable form by a process referred to as 'fixation.' Most of the nitrogen that is available for crop production, however, comes from decomposing animal and plant waste or from commercially produced fertilizers. Commercial fertilizers contain nitrogen in the form of ammonium and/or nitrate or in a form that is quickly converted to the ammonium or nitrate form once the fertilizer is applied to the soil. Ammonia is generally the source of nitrogen in fertilizers. Anhydrous ammonia is commercially produced by reacting nitrogen with hydrogen under high temperatures and pressures. The source of nitrogen is the atmosphere, which is almost 80 percent nitrogen. Hydrogen is derived from a variety of raw materials, which include water, and crude oil, coal, and natural gas hydrocarbons. Nitrogen-based fertilizers are produced from ammonia feedstocks through a variety of chemical processes. Small quantities of nitrates are produced from mineral resources principally in Chile. In 2002, anhydrous ammonia and other nitrogen materials were produced in more than 70 countries. Global ammonia production was 108 million metric tons (Mt) of contained nitrogen. With 28 percent of this total, China was the largest producer of ammonia. Asia contributed 46 percent of total world ammonia production, and countries of the former U.S.S.R. represented 13 percent. North America also produced 13 percent of the total; Western Europe, 9 percent; the Middle East, 7 percent; Central America and South America, 5 percent; Eastern Europe, 3 percent; and Africa and Oceania

  1. Typification of names of South American taxa related to Woodsia montevidensis (Woodsiaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Arana, Marcelo D.; Mynssen, Claudine M.; Zimmer, Brigitte; Ponce, M. Monica

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A revision of the nomenclature of six South American taxa related to Woodsia is presented, as a part of a taxonomic revision of the genus in South America. Lectotypes are selected for Cheilanthes crenata, Woodsia crenata var. pallidipes, Woodsia incisa, Woodsia montevidensis var. fuscipes and the second step lectotypification for Dicksonia montevidensis and Woodsia peruviana, based on the analysis of their protologues and original herbarium material. All names are currently synonyms of Woodsia montevidensis. Physematium incisum (Gillies ex Hook. & Grev.) Kunze constitutes an illegitimate name and Physematium cumingianum is considered as nomen inquirendum. PMID:27489474

  2. New taxa of the family Syringophilidae (Acari: Prostigmata) from African barbets and woodpeckers (Piciformes: Lybiidae, Picidae).

    PubMed

    Skorack, Maciej; Klimovičová, Miroslava; Muchai, Muchane; Hromada, Martin

    2014-02-25

    New taxa of quill mites (Acari: Syringophilidae) are described from African barbets and woodpeckers in the Ethiopian region. A new monotypic genus Picineoaulonastus gen. nov. is established for a new species Picineoaulonastus pogoniulus sp. nov., parasitising 2 lybiid species, Pogoniulus bilineatus (Sundevall) (type host) in Kenya and Tanzania and P. pusillus (Dumont) (Piciformes: Lybiidae) in Ethiopia. Additionally, 2 more new syringophilid species are described: Neosyringophilopsis lybidus sp. nov. from P. bilineatus in Kenya, and Syringophiloidus picidus sp. nov. from Dendropicos fuscescens (Vieillot) (Piciformes: Picidae) in Kenya, Uganda, and Tanzania.

  3. Atmospheric Nitrogen Fluorescence Yield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. H., Jr.; Christl, M. J.; Fountain, W. F.; Gregory, J. C.; Martens, K. U.; Sokolsky, Pierre; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Several existing and planned experiments estimate the energies of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from air showers using the atmospheric nitrogen fluorescence. The nitrogen fluorescence yield from air shower electrons depends on the atmospheric composition. We will discuss the uncertainties in the fluorescence yield form electrons in the real atmosphere and describe a concept for a small balloon payload to measure the atmospheric fluorescence yield as a function of attitude.

  4. Protein Nitrogen Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, S. Suzanne

    The protein content of foods can be determined by numerous methods. The Kjeldahl method and the nitrogen combustion (Dumas) method for protein analysis are based on nitrogen determination. Both methods are official for the purposes of nutrition labeling of foods. While the Kjeldahl method has been used widely for over a hundred years, the recent availability of automated instrumentation for the Dumas method in many cases is replacing use of the Kjeldahl method.

  5. Nitrogen loss from Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shematovich, V. I.; Johnson, R. E.; Michael, M.; Luhmann, J. G.

    2003-08-01

    Dissociation and dissociative ionization of molecular nitrogen by solar UV radiation and by photoelectrons and sputtering by the magnetospheric ions and pickup ions are the main sources of translationally excited (hot) nitrogen atoms and molecules in the upper atmosphere of Titan. As Titan does not posses an intrinsic magnetic field, Saturn's magnetospheric ions can penetrate Titan's exobase and sputter atoms and molecules from it. The sputtering of nitrogen from Titan's upper atmosphere by the corotating nitrogen ions and by photodissociation was addressed earlier [Lammer and Bauer, 1993; Shematovich et al., 2001]. Here penetration of slowed and deflected magnetospheric N+ and carbon-containing pickup ions is described using a Monte Carlo model. The interaction of these ions with the atmospheric neutrals leads to the production of fast neutrals that collide with other atmospheric neutrals producing heating and ejection of atoms and molecules. Results from Brecht et al. [2000] are used to estimate the net flux and energy spectra of the magnetospheric and pickup ions onto the exobase. Sputtering is primarily responsible for any ejected molecular nitrogen, and, for the ion fluxes used, we show that the total sputtering contribution is comparable to or larger than the dissociation contribution giving a total loss rate of ~3.6 × 1025 nitrogen neutrals per second.

  6. Brucella, nitrogen and virulence.

    PubMed

    Ronneau, Severin; Moussa, Simon; Barbier, Thibault; Conde-Álvarez, Raquel; Zuniga-Ripa, Amaia; Moriyon, Ignacio; Letesson, Jean-Jacques

    2016-08-01

    The brucellae are α-Proteobacteria causing brucellosis, an important zoonosis. Although multiplying in endoplasmic reticulum-derived vacuoles, they cause no cell death, suggesting subtle but efficient use of host resources. Brucellae are amino-acid prototrophs able to grow with ammonium or use glutamate as the sole carbon-nitrogen source in vitro. They contain more than twice amino acid/peptide/polyamine uptake genes than the amino-acid auxotroph Legionella pneumophila, which multiplies in a similar vacuole, suggesting a different nutritional strategy. During these two last decades, many mutants of key actors in nitrogen metabolism (transporters, enzymes, regulators, etc.) have been described to be essential for full virulence of brucellae. Here, we review the genomic and experimental data on Brucella nitrogen metabolism and its connection with virulence. An analysis of various aspects of this metabolism (transport, assimilation, biosynthesis, catabolism, respiration and regulation) has highlighted differences and similarities in nitrogen metabolism with other α-Proteobacteria. Together, these data suggest that, during their intracellular life cycle, the brucellae use various nitrogen sources for biosynthesis, catabolism and respiration following a strategy that requires prototrophy and a tight regulation of nitrogen use.

  7. Nitrogen Uptake in Spinach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, J.; VanBenthem, P.

    2013-12-01

    A plant's absorption of nitrogen can be encouraged by a variety of environmental factors, especially the application of fertilizers. As a common limiting factor in plant growth, not up taking enough nitrogen can be a result of an unhealthy plant. Moreover, as farmers seek out methods to increase growth of plants, fertilizers are used as a solution to the issue of nitrogen deficiency to incorporate additional nitrogen from chemical or organic sources, by not using the right fertilizer can greatly affect the plats. The point of this research project is to determine the effect of various fertilizers on the plant growth, and to correlate the measured nitrogen, water and chlorophyll content in spinach leaves. Spinach leaves were used because they are known to quickly uptake chemicals in the environment. The spinach plants were exposed to four different growing parameters, which are referred to as control, ammonium nitrate, MiracleGro , and organic. The spinach was originally placed in nitrogen deficient soil with only 2.2x10 4 weight percent (wt. %) nitrogen. The leaves in the control group were grown in this nitrogen deficient soil without any fertilizer added. Ammomium nitrate and MiracleGro were added to the spinach in the A and MG groups, respectively, and organic chicken stool was used for the O group. By using a spectral imaging system and flame combustion techniques, the chlorophyll content can be related to the nitrogen content in the spinach leaves. In these spinach leaves, nitrogen and chlorophyll content were measured, chlorophyll is a green pigment that plays a crucial role in producing nutrients for green plants. The lack of chlorophyll will allow the plant to become susceptible to diseases, so it is extremely important that the plants have a high content of chlorophyll. The role of nitrogen in chlorophyll is very important and helps in the creation of chlorophyll; therefore it is necessary that an appropriate amount of nitrogen is added for optimal growth

  8. Single site mutations in the hetero-oligomeric Mrp antiporter from alkaliphilic Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4 that affect Na+/H+ antiport activity, sodium exclusion, individual Mrp protein levels, or Mrp complex formation.

    PubMed

    Morino, Masato; Natsui, Shinsuke; Ono, Tomohiro; Swartz, Talia H; Krulwich, Terry A; Ito, Masahiro

    2010-10-01

    Mrp systems are widely distributed and structurally complex cation/proton antiporters. Antiport activity requires hetero-oligomeric complexes of all six or seven hydrophobic Mrp proteins (MrpA-MrpG). Here, a panel of site-directed mutants in conserved or proposed motif residues was made in the Mrp Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiporter from an alkaliphilic Bacillus. The mutant operons were expressed in antiporter-deficient Escherichia coli KNabc and assessed for antiport properties, support of sodium resistance, membrane levels of each Mrp protein, and presence of monomeric and dimeric Mrp complexes. Antiport did not depend on a VFF motif or a conserved tyrosine pair, but a role for a conserved histidine in a potential quinone binding site of MrpA was supported. The importance of several acidic residues for antiport was confirmed, and the importance of additional residues was demonstrated (e.g. three lysine residues conserved across MrpA, MrpD, and membrane-bound respiratory Complex I subunits (NuoL/M/N)). The results extended indications that MrpE is required for normal membrane levels of other Mrp proteins and for complex formation. Moreover, mutations in several other Mrp proteins lead to greatly reduced membrane levels of MrpE. Thus, changes in either of the two Mrp modules, MrpA-MrpD and MrpE-MrpG, influence the other. Two mutants, MrpB-P37G and MrpC-Q70A, showed a normal phenotype but lacked the MrpA-MrpG monomeric complex while retaining the dimeric hetero-oligomeric complex. Finally, MrpG-P81A and MrpG-P81G mutants exhibited no antiport activity but supported sodium resistance and a low [Na(+)](in). Such mutants could be used to screen hypothesized but uncharacterized sodium efflux functions of Mrp apart from Na(+) (Li(+))/H(+) antiport.

  9. Quantitative analysis of total flavonoids and total phenolic acids in thirty Hypericum taxa.

    PubMed

    Pilepić, Kroata Hazler; Males, Zeljan; Crkvencić, Maja

    2013-03-01

    The content of total flavonoids and total phenolic acids in the aerial parts of thirty Hypericum taxa collected over two consecutive seasons was investigated by spectrophotometric methods. All taxa examined contained flavonoids and phenolic acids in different quantities, although the differences between species and year's harvest were not found to be significant. The quantity of total flavonoids ranged from 0.1 to 1.6%. The highest content of flavonoids was found in the samples of H. japonicum (1.6%) and H. perforatum (1.5%), while the samples of H. androsaemum and H. balearicum comprised the lowest flavonoid amount (0.13%). The content of total phenolic acids in the investigated samples was found to be between 1.1-10.4%. The samples of H. perforatum were found to contain the highest quantity of phenolic acids (10.4% and 10.2%), whereas the sample ofH. linarifolium showed the lowest amount of phenolic acids (1.1%).

  10. Invasion dynamics of two alien Carpobrotus (Aizoaceae) taxa on a Mediterranean island: II. Reproductive strategies.

    PubMed

    Suehs, C M; Affre, L; Médail, F

    2004-06-01

    This study compares sexually and asexually produced fruit set, seed production, biomass, germination, and seedling size in Carpobrotus acinaciformis and C. edulis following controlled pollination experiments in order to evaluate the potential role of reproductive traits with respect to the invasive potential of these taxa. C. edulis is slightly agamospermic, completely self-fertile, slightly preferentially self-compatible, experiences no inbreeding depression, and has low hybrid vigour. In contrast, C. acinaciformis does not have reliable agamospermy, is only slightly self-fertile and self-compatible, experiences a slight inbreeding depression, and has a strong hybrid vigour. Both taxa have relatively low, although significantly different germination frequencies, and insignificantly different seedling sizes. Owing to the high performance in hybridisation as compared to all other controlled pollinations in C. acinaciformis, as well as a large amount of previously demonstrated introgression, we refer to the population studied on the island of Bagaud (France) as C. affine acinaciformis. We conclude that both C. edulis and C. affine acinaciformis should be considered as harmful invasive plants in the Mediterranean Basin, the former because of the flexibility of its mating system and high seed production, and the latter because of its strong clonality, high hybrid vigour, and potential for continued introgression from C. edulis genes. These differences require different control strategies, while the avoidance of sympatry is a distinct priority.

  11. Taxonomic and nomenclatural aspects of Hypoxylon taxa from southern South America proposed by Spegazzini.

    PubMed

    Hladki, Adriana I; Romero, Andrea I

    2009-01-01

    The holotypes and isotypes of 20 Hypoxylon taxa described by Spegazzini have been examined and their taxonomic positions and nomenclatural problems are discussed. Two new combinations, Annulohypoxylon apiahynum comb. nov. and A. subeffusum comb. nov., are proposed. H. goliath is considered a synonym of Rosellinia bunodes. H. albostigmatosum and H. guarapiense are synonyms of H. anthochroum, H. anthracoderma of H. monticulosum, H. mbaiense of H. notatum, H. paulistanum of H. diatrypeoides, H. plumbeum and H. rubiginosum var. microcarpum of H. perforatum. H. porteri and H. intermedium belong in Biscogniauxia capnodes, H. puiggarii in Annulophypoxylon subeffusum, H. subvinosum. in H. lenormandii, H. turbinatum var. guaraniticum in Phylacia turbinata and H. valsarioides in Creosphaeria sassafras. H. leptascum is transferred to A. leptascum, H. circostomum to Nemania circostoma and H. latissimum to N. latissima. The holotype of H. albostigmatosum has been recovered, thus the lectotypification by Shear no longer is needed. H. subnigricans and H. umbilicatum are confirmed as good taxa. H. anthochroum and H. lenormandii are reported as first records from Argentina (Tucumán).

  12. Possible effects of global environmental changes on Antarctic benthos: a synthesis across five major taxa

    PubMed Central

    Ingels, Jeroen; Vanreusel, Ann; Brandt, Angelika; Catarino, Ana I; David, Bruno; De Ridder, Chantal; Dubois, Philippe; Gooday, Andrew J; Martin, Patrick; Pasotti, Francesca; Robert, Henri

    2012-01-01

    Because of the unique conditions that exist around the Antarctic continent, Southern Ocean (SO) ecosystems are very susceptible to the growing impact of global climate change and other anthropogenic influences. Consequently, there is an urgent need to understand how SO marine life will cope with expected future changes in the environment. Studies of Antarctic organisms have shown that individual species and higher taxa display different degrees of sensitivity to environmental shifts, making it difficult to predict overall community or ecosystem responses. This emphasizes the need for an improved understanding of the Antarctic benthic ecosystem response to global climate change using a multitaxon approach with consideration of different levels of biological organization. Here, we provide a synthesis of the ability of five important Antarctic benthic taxa (Foraminifera, Nematoda, Amphipoda, Isopoda, and Echinoidea) to cope with changes in the environment (temperature, pH, ice cover, ice scouring, food quantity, and quality) that are linked to climatic changes. Responses from individual to the taxon-specific community level to these drivers will vary with taxon but will include local species extinctions, invasions of warmer-water species, shifts in diversity, dominance, and trophic group composition, all with likely consequences for ecosystem functioning. Limitations in our current knowledge and understanding of climate change effects on the different levels are discussed. PMID:22423336

  13. Iteration expansion and regional evolution: phylogeography of Dendrobium officinale and four related taxa in southern China.

    PubMed

    Hou, Beiwei; Luo, Jing; Zhang, Yusi; Niu, Zhitao; Xue, Qingyun; Ding, Xiaoyu

    2017-03-06

    The genus Dendrobium was used as a case study to elucidate the evolutionary history of Orchidaceae in the Sino-Japanese Floristic Region (SJFR) and Southeast Asia region. These evolutionary histories remain largely unknown, including the temporal and spatial distribution of the evolutionary events. The present study used nuclear and plastid DNA to determine the phylogeography of Dendrobium officinale and four closely related taxa. Plastid DNA haplotype and nuclear data were shown to be discordant, suggesting reticulate evolution drove the species' diversification. Rapid radiation and genetic drift appeared to drive the evolution of D. tosaense and D. flexicaule, whereas introgression or hybridization might have been involved in the evolution of D. scoriarum and D. shixingense. The phylogeographical structure of D. officinale revealed that core natural distribution regions might have served as its glacial refuges. In recent years, human disturbances caused its artificial migration and population extinction. The five taxa may have originated from the Nanling Mountains and the Yungui Plateau and then migrated northward or eastward. After the initial iteration expansion, D. officinale populations appeared to experience the regional evolutionary patterns in different regions and follow the sequential or rapid decline in gene exchange.

  14. Taxonomic significance of leaf micromorphology in some selected taxa of Acanthaceae (Peninsular Malaysia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurul-Aini, C. A. C.; Noraini, T.; Latiff, A.; Amirul-Aiman, A. J.; Ruzi, A. R.; Idris, S.

    2014-09-01

    Comparative leaf micromorphology study was conducted in eight taxa of Acanthaceae from Peninsular Malaysia. Eight chosen taxa were Acanthus ebracteatus Vahl, A. ilicifolius L., A. volubilis Wall, A. montanus T. Anderson, Andrographis paniculata (Burm.f.) Wall. ex Nees, Asystasia gangetica subsp. micrantha (Nees) Ensermu, Chroesthes longifolia (Wight) B. Hansen and Peristrophe roxburghiana (Schult.) Bremek. The objective of this study was to identify the leaf micromorphological characteristics that can be used in species identification and also as supportive data in classification. The procedures involved such as dehydration, critical point drying, gold coated and examination under scanning electron microscope. Findings in this study have demonstrated the similarities and variations in leaf micromorphological characteristics such as in type of epicuticular waxes, cuticular ornamentations, stomata characteristics and in the presence of trichomes. Six types of epicuticular waxes and five types of trichomes were observed. Variations in cuticular ornamentations and stomata structure can be used to differentiate species. One diagnostic character was found and proven to be very useful to identify Acanthus via the presence of simple trichomes (short-conicle like). In conclusion, the results of this study have shown that leaf micromorphological characteristics have taxonomic significance that can be useful in classifications and identification especially at species level.

  15. Integrated Analyses Resolve Conflicts over Squamate Reptile Phylogeny and Reveal Unexpected Placements for Fossil Taxa

    PubMed Central

    Reeder, Tod W.; Townsend, Ted M.; Mulcahy, Daniel G.; Noonan, Brice P.; Wood, Perry L.; Sites, Jack W.; Wiens, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Squamate reptiles (lizards and snakes) are a pivotal group whose relationships have become increasingly controversial. Squamates include >9000 species, making them the second largest group of terrestrial vertebrates. They are important medicinally and as model systems for ecological and evolutionary research. However, studies of squamate biology are hindered by uncertainty over their relationships, and some consider squamate phylogeny unresolved, given recent conflicts between molecular and morphological results. To resolve these conflicts, we expand existing morphological and molecular datasets for squamates (691 morphological characters and 46 genes, for 161 living and 49 fossil taxa, including a new set of 81 morphological characters and adding two genes from published studies) and perform integrated analyses. Our results resolve higher-level relationships as indicated by molecular analyses, and reveal hidden morphological support for the molecular hypothesis (but not vice-versa). Furthermore, we find that integrating molecular, morphological, and paleontological data leads to surprising placements for two major fossil clades (Mosasauria and Polyglyphanodontia). These results further demonstrate the importance of combining fossil and molecular information, and the potential problems of estimating the placement of fossil taxa from morphological data alone. Thus, our results caution against estimating fossil relationships without considering relevant molecular data, and against placing fossils into molecular trees (e.g. for dating analyses) without considering the possible impact of molecular data on their placement. PMID:25803280

  16. Development, characterisation, and across-taxa utility of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Billotte, N; Risterucci, A M; Barcelos, E; Noyer, J L; Amblard, P; Baurens, F C

    2001-06-01

    The results of the development of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) microsatellite markers are given step by step, from the screening of libraries enriched in (GA)n, (GT)n, and (CCG)n simple-sequence repeats (SSRs) to the final characterisation of 21 SSR loci. Also published are primer sequences, estimates of allele size range, and expected heterozygosity in E. guineensis and in the closely related species E. oleifera, in which an optimal utility of the SSR markers was observed. Multivariate data analyses showed the ability of SSR markers to efficiently reveal the genetic-diversity structure of the genus Elaeis in accordance with known geographical origins and with measured genetic relationships based on previous molecular studies. High levels of allelic variability indicated that E. guineensis SSRs will be a powerful tool for genetic studies of the genus Elaeis, including variety identification and intra- or inter-specific genetic mapping. PCR amplification tests on a subset of 16 other palm species and allele-sequence data showed that E. guineensis SSRs are putative transferable markers across palm taxa. In addition, phenetic information based on SSR flanking region sequences makes E. guineensis SSR markers a potentially useful molecular resource for any researcher studying the phylogeny of palm taxa.

  17. Molecular phylogenetic evidence for ancient divergence of lizard taxa on either side of Wallace's Line.

    PubMed Central

    Schulte, James A; Melville, Jane; Larson, Allan

    2003-01-01

    Wallace's Line, separating the terrestrial faunas of South East Asia from the Australia-New Guinea region, is the most prominent and well-studied biogeographical division in the world. Phylogenetically distinct subgroups of major animal and plant groups have been documented on either side of Wallace's Line since it was first proposed in 1859. Despite its importance, the temporal history of fragmentation across this line is virtually unknown and the geological foundation has rarely been discussed. Using molecular phylogenetics and dating techniques, we show that the split between taxa in the South East Asian and the Australian-New Guinean geological regions occurred during the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous in two independent lizard clades. This estimate is compatible with the hypothesis of rifting Gondwanan continental fragments during the Mesozoic and strongly rejects the hypothetical origin of various members of the Australian-New Guinean herpetofauna as relatively recent invasions from South East Asia. Our finding suggests an ancient fragmentation of lizard taxa on either side of Wallace's Line and provides further evidence that the composition of modern global communities has been significantly affected by rifting and accretion of Gondwanan continental plates during the Middle to Late Mesozoic. PMID:12769459

  18. Essential oils of three taxa of the Nepeta argolica aggregate from Greece.

    PubMed

    Hanlidou, Effie; Karousou, Regina; Lazari, Diamanto

    2012-08-01

    The essential-oil composition of three not previously studied taxa belonging to the Nepeta argolica aggregate was examined. The oils of N. argolica ssp. malacotrichos and N. argolica ssp. vourinensis (both Greek endemics) are rich in 1,8-cineole (30.9-55.6% of the total oil composition), while those of the Balkan endemic N. spruneri are rich in either sesquiterpenes (mainly caryophyllene oxide, 14.6-19.8%) or in 4aα,7α,7aβ- and 4aα,7α,7aα-nepetalactones (total content 17.5-40.5%), accompanied by caryophyllene oxide (11.5-11.7%) and 1,8-cineole (up to 16.5%). The comparison of our results with published information concerning the related taxa of the N. argolica aggregate showed that while oils with as main components nepetalactones or 1,8-cineole are common, sesquiterpene-rich oils are reported for the first time within the aggregate.

  19. Climate-driven C4 plant distributions in China: divergence in C4 taxa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Renzhong; Ma, Linna

    2016-06-01

    There have been debates on the driving factors of C4 plant expansion, such as PCO2 decline in the late Micocene and warmer climate and precipitation at large-scale modern ecosystems. These disputes are mainly due to the lack of direct evidence and extensive data analysis. Here we use mass flora data to explore the driving factors of C4 distribution and divergent patterns for different C4 taxa at continental scale in China. The results display that it is mean annual climate variables driving C4 distribution at present-day vegetation. Mean annual temperature is the critical restriction of total C4 plants and the precipitation gradients seem to have much less impact. Grass and sedge C4 plants are largely restricted to mean annual temperature and precipitation respectively, while Chenopod C4 plants are strongly restricted by aridity in China. Separate regression analysis can succeed to detect divergences of climate distribution patterns of C4 taxa at global scale.

  20. Nuclear DNA content and base composition in 28 taxa of Musa.

    PubMed

    Kamaté, K; Brown, S; Durand, P; Bureau, J M; De Nay, D; Trinh, T H

    2001-08-01

    The nuclear DNA content of 28 taxa of Musa was assessed by flow cytometry, using line PxPC6 of Petunia hybrida as an internal standard. The 2C DNA value of Musa balbisiana (BB genome) was 1.16 pg, whereas Musa acuminata (AA genome) had an average 2C DNA value of 1.27 pg, with a difference of 11% between its subspecies. The two haploid (IC) genomes, A and B, comprising most of the edible bananas, are therefore of similar size, 0.63 pg (610 million bp) and 0.58 pg (560 million bp), respectively. The genome of diploid Musa is thus threefold that of Arabidopsis thaliana. The genome sizes in a set of triploid Musa cultivars or clones were quite different, with 2C DNA values ranging from 1.61 to 2.23 pg. Likewise, the genome sizes of tetraploid cultivars ranged from 1.94 to 2.37 pg (2C). Apparently, tetraploids (for instance, accession I.C.2) can have a genome size that falls within the range of triploid genome sizes, and vice versa (as in the case of accession Simili Radjah). The 2C values estimated for organs such as leaf, leaf sheath, rhizome, and flower were consistent, whereas root material gave atypical results, owing to browning. The genomic base composition of these Musa taxa had a median value of 40.8% GC (SD = 0.43%).

  1. Integrated analyses resolve conflicts over squamate reptile phylogeny and reveal unexpected placements for fossil taxa.

    PubMed

    Reeder, Tod W; Townsend, Ted M; Mulcahy, Daniel G; Noonan, Brice P; Wood, Perry L; Sites, Jack W; Wiens, John J

    2015-01-01

    Squamate reptiles (lizards and snakes) are a pivotal group whose relationships have become increasingly controversial. Squamates include >9000 species, making them the second largest group of terrestrial vertebrates. They are important medicinally and as model systems for ecological and evolutionary research. However, studies of squamate biology are hindered by uncertainty over their relationships, and some consider squamate phylogeny unresolved, given recent conflicts between molecular and morphological results. To resolve these conflicts, we expand existing morphological and molecular datasets for squamates (691 morphological characters and 46 genes, for 161 living and 49 fossil taxa, including a new set of 81 morphological characters and adding two genes from published studies) and perform integrated analyses. Our results resolve higher-level relationships as indicated by molecular analyses, and reveal hidden morphological support for the molecular hypothesis (but not vice-versa). Furthermore, we find that integrating molecular, morphological, and paleontological data leads to surprising placements for two major fossil clades (Mosasauria and Polyglyphanodontia). These results further demonstrate the importance of combining fossil and molecular information, and the potential problems of estimating the placement of fossil taxa from morphological data alone. Thus, our results caution against estimating fossil relationships without considering relevant molecular data, and against placing fossils into molecular trees (e.g. for dating analyses) without considering the possible impact of molecular data on their placement.

  2. Temporal scaling of bacterial taxa is influenced by both stochastic and deterministic ecological factors.

    PubMed

    van der Gast, Christopher J; Ager, Duane; Lilley, Andrew K

    2008-06-01

    Microorganisms operate at a range of spatial and temporal scales acting as key drivers of ecosystem properties. Therefore, many key questions in microbial ecology require the consideration of both spatial and temporal scales. Spatial scaling, in particular the species-area relationship (SAR), has a long history in ecology and has recently been addressed in microbial ecology. However, the temporal analogue of the SAR, the species-time relationship, has received far less attention even in the science of general ecology. Here we focus upon the role of temporal scaling in microbial ecological patterns by coupling molecular characterization of bacterial communities in discrete island (bioreactor) systems with a macroecological approach. Our findings showed that the temporal scaling exponent (slope), and therefore taxa turnover of the bacterial taxa-time relationship decreased as selective pressure (industrial wastewater concentration) increased. Also, as the concentration of industrial wastewater increased across the bioreactors, we observed a gradual switch from stochastic community assembly to more deterministic (niche)-based considerations. The identification of broad-scale statistical patterns is particularly relevant to microbial ecology, as it is frequently difficult to identify individual species or their functions. In this study, we identify wide-reaching statistical patterns of diversity and show that they are shaped by the prevalent underlying ecological factors.

  3. Iteration expansion and regional evolution: phylogeography of Dendrobium officinale and four related taxa in southern China

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Beiwei; Luo, Jing; Zhang, Yusi; Niu, Zhitao; Xue, Qingyun; Ding, Xiaoyu

    2017-01-01

    The genus Dendrobium was used as a case study to elucidate the evolutionary history of Orchidaceae in the Sino-Japanese Floristic Region (SJFR) and Southeast Asia region. These evolutionary histories remain largely unknown, including the temporal and spatial distribution of the evolutionary events. The present study used nuclear and plastid DNA to determine the phylogeography of Dendrobium officinale and four closely related taxa. Plastid DNA haplotype and nuclear data were shown to be discordant, suggesting reticulate evolution drove the species’ diversification. Rapid radiation and genetic drift appeared to drive the evolution of D. tosaense and D. flexicaule, whereas introgression or hybridization might have been involved in the evolution of D. scoriarum and D. shixingense. The phylogeographical structure of D. officinale revealed that core natural distribution regions might have served as its glacial refuges. In recent years, human disturbances caused its artificial migration and population extinction. The five taxa may have originated from the Nanling Mountains and the Yungui Plateau and then migrated northward or eastward. After the initial iteration expansion, D. officinale populations appeared to experience the regional evolutionary patterns in different regions and follow the sequential or rapid decline in gene exchange. PMID:28262789

  4. Possible effects of global environmental changes on Antarctic benthos: a synthesis across five major taxa.

    PubMed

    Ingels, Jeroen; Vanreusel, Ann; Brandt, Angelika; Catarino, Ana I; David, Bruno; De Ridder, Chantal; Dubois, Philippe; Gooday, Andrew J; Martin, Patrick; Pasotti, Francesca; Robert, Henri

    2012-02-01

    Because of the unique conditions that exist around the Antarctic continent, Southern Ocean (SO) ecosystems are very susceptible to the growing impact of global climate change and other anthropogenic influences. Consequently, there is an urgent need to understand how SO marine life will cope with expected future changes in the environment. Studies of Antarctic organisms have shown that individual species and higher taxa display different degrees of sensitivity to environmental shifts, making it difficult to predict overall community or ecosystem responses. This emphasizes the need for an improved understanding of the Antarctic benthic ecosystem response to global climate change using a multitaxon approach with consideration of different levels of biological organization. Here, we provide a synthesis of the ability of five important Antarctic benthic taxa (Foraminifera, Nematoda, Amphipoda, Isopoda, and Echinoidea) to cope with changes in the environment (temperature, pH, ice cover, ice scouring, food quantity, and quality) that are linked to climatic changes. Responses from individual to the taxon-specific community level to these drivers will vary with taxon but will include local species extinctions, invasions of warmer-water species, shifts in diversity, dominance, and trophic group composition, all with likely consequences for ecosystem functioning. Limitations in our current knowledge and understanding of climate change effects on the different levels are discussed.

  5. Climate-driven C4 plant distributions in China: divergence in C4 taxa

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Renzhong; Ma, Linna

    2016-01-01

    There have been debates on the driving factors of C4 plant expansion, such as PCO2 decline in the late Micocene and warmer climate and precipitation at large-scale modern ecosystems. These disputes are mainly due to the lack of direct evidence and extensive data analysis. Here we use mass flora data to explore the driving factors of C4 distribution and divergent patterns for different C4 taxa at continental scale in China. The results display that it is mean annual climate variables driving C4 distribution at present-day vegetation. Mean annual temperature is the critical restriction of total C4 plants and the precipitation gradients seem to have much less impact. Grass and sedge C4 plants are largely restricted to mean annual temperature and precipitation respectively, while Chenopod C4 plants are strongly restricted by aridity in China. Separate regression analysis can succeed to detect divergences of climate distribution patterns of C4 taxa at global scale. PMID:27302686

  6. Fission and fusion in island taxa--serendipity, or something to be expected?

    PubMed

    Emerson, Brent C; Faria, Christiana M A

    2014-11-01

    A well-used metaphor for oceanic islands is that they act as 'natural laboratories' for the study of evolution. But how can islands or archipelagos be considered analogues of laboratories for understanding the evolutionary process itself? It is not necessarily the case that just because two or more related species occur on an island or archipelago, somehow, this can help us understand more about their evolutionary history. But in some cases, it can. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Garrick et al. () use population-level sampling within closely related taxa of Galapagos giant tortoises to reveal a complex demographic history of the species Chelonoidis becki - a species endemic to Isabela Island, and geographically restricted to Wolf Volcano. Using microsatellite genotyping and mitochondrial DNA sequencing, they provide a strong case for C. becki being derived from C. darwini from the neighbouring island of Santiago. But the interest here is that colonization did not happen only once. Garrick et al. () reveal C. becki to be the product of a double colonization event, and their data reveal these two founding lineages to be now fusing back into one. Their results are compelling and add to a limited literature describing the evolutionary consequences of double colonization events. Here, we look at the broader implications of the findings of Garrick et al. () and suggest genomic admixture among multiple founding populations may be a characteristic feature within insular taxa.

  7. Unraveling Trichoderma species in the attine ant environment: description of three new taxa.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Quimi Vidaurre; Meirelles, Lucas Andrade; Chaverri, Priscila; Rodrigues, Andre

    2016-05-01

    Fungus-growing "attine" ants forage diverse substrates to grow fungi for food. In addition to the mutualistic fungal partner, the colonies of these insects harbor a rich microbiome composed of bacteria, filamentous fungi and yeasts. Previous work reported some Trichoderma species in the fungus gardens of leafcutter ants. However, no studies systematically addressed the putative association of Trichoderma with attine ants, especially in non-leafcutter ants. Here, a total of 62 strains of Trichoderma were analyzed using three molecular markers (ITS, tef1 and rpb2). In addition, 30 out of 62 strains were also morphologically examined. The strains studied correspond to the largest sampling carried out so far for Trichoderma in the attine ant environment. Our results revealed the richness of Trichoderma in this environment, since we found 20 Trichoderma species, including three new taxa described in the present work (Trichoderma attinorum, Trichoderma texanum and Trichoderma longifialidicum spp. nov.) as well as a new phylogenetic taxon (LESF 545). Moreover, we show that all 62 strains grouped within different clades across the Trichoderma phylogeny, which are identical or closely related to strains derived from several other environments. This evidence supports the transient nature of the genus Trichoderma in the attine ant colonies. The discovery of three new species suggests that the dynamic foraging behavior of these insects might be responsible for accumulation of transient fungi into their colonies, which might hold additional fungal taxa still unknown to science.

  8. Effects of Nitrogen Availability and Form on Phytoplankton Growth in a Eutrophied Estuary (Neuse River Estuary, NC, USA)

    PubMed Central

    Paerl, Hans W.; Wetz, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen availability and form are important controls on estuarine phytoplankton growth. This study experimentally determined the influence of urea and nitrate additions on phytoplankton growth throughout the growing season (March 2012, June 2011, August 2011) in a temperate, eutrophied estuary (Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina, USA). Photopigments (chlorophyll a and diagnostic photopigments: peridinin, fucoxanthin, alloxanthin, zeaxanthin, chlorophyll b) and microscopy-based cell counts were used as indicators of phytoplankton growth. In March, the phytoplankton community was dominated by Gyrodinium instriatum and only fucoxanthin-based growth rates were stimulated by nitrogen addition. The limited response to nitrogen suggests other factors may control phytoplankton growth and community composition in early spring. In June, inorganic nitrogen concentrations were low and stimulatory effects of both nitrogen forms were observed for chlorophyll a- and diagnostic photopigment-based growth rates. In contrast, cell counts showed that only cryptophyte and dinoflagellate (Heterocapsa rotundata) growth were stimulated. Responses of other photopigments may have been due to an increase in pigment per cell or growth of plankton too small to be counted with the microscopic methods used. Despite high nitrate concentrations in August, growth rates were elevated in response to urea and/or nitrate addition for all photopigments except peridinin. However, this response was not observed in cell counts, again suggesting that pigment-based growth responses may not always be indicative of a true community and/or taxa-specific growth response. This highlights the need to employ targeted microscopy-based cell enumeration concurrent with pigment-based technology to facilitate a more complete understanding of phytoplankton dynamics in estuarine systems. These results are consistent with previous studies showing the seasonal importance of nitrogen availability in estuaries, and also

  9. Analyzing trophic transfer of metals in stream food webs using nitrogen isotopes.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Margaret R; Feng, Xiahong; Folt, Carol L; Chamberlain, C Page

    2003-12-30

    This study examines detrimental effects of acid mine drainage (AMD) on stream invertebrate communities and tests for a direct relationship between trophic position and accumulation of three metals (Fe, Cu, Zn) by stream invertebrates in situ. On two dates in each of seven stream sites, we measured food chain length, mean trophic level, taxa richness, and trophic position of stream macroinvertebrates comprising the food webs using stable nitrogen isotope ratios. Metals in tissue of representatives of 35 taxa were measured by ICP-OES. Our results are the first direct comparison of uptake of these metals in stream invertebrate taxa according to trophic position as identified by delta15N. As predicted, metal concentrations were generally greater in water and insects from sites adjacent to mining activity and invertebrate taxa richness was significantly lower. Taxa richness increased with distance away from contaminated headwaters. Despite reductions in diversity at sites nearest AMD, food chain length and mean trophic level did not differ between streams. The relationship between trophic position and metal accumulation differed considerably among metals. Specifically, Fe declined (biodilution) and Zn increased (biomagnification) with trophic level, but trophic position had no effect on Cu levels in these insects. Our results highlight fundamental differences in trophic transfer of specific metals through aquatic food webs and identify ecologically important impacts of AMD on stream invertebrates.

  10. Selection of nontarget arthropod taxa for field research on transgenic insecticidal crops: using empirical data and statistical power.

    PubMed

    Prasifka, J R; Hellmich, R L; Dively, G P; Higgins, L S; Dixon, P M; Duan, J J

    2008-02-01

    One of the possible adverse effects of transgenic insecticidal crops is the unintended decline in the abundance of nontarget arthropods. Field trials designed to evaluate potential nontarget effects can be more complex than expected because decisions to conduct field trials and the selection of taxa to include are not always guided by the results of laboratory tests. Also, recent studies emphasize the potential for indirect effects (adverse impacts to nontarget arthropods without feeding directly on plant tissues), which are difficult to predict because of interactions among nontarget arthropods, target pests, and transgenic crops. As a consequence, field studies may attempt to monitor expansive lists of arthropod taxa, making the design of such broad studies more difficult and reducing the likelihood of detecting any negative effects that might be present. To improve the taxonomic focus and statistical rigor of future studies, existing field data and corresponding power analysis may provide useful guidance. Analysis of control data from several nontarget field trials using repeated-measures designs suggests that while detection of small effects may require considerable increases in replication, there are taxa from different ecological roles that are sampled effectively using standard methods. The use of statistical power to guide selection of taxa for nontarget trials reflects scientists' inability to predict the complex interactions among arthropod taxa, particularly when laboratory trials fail to provide guidance on which groups are more likely to be affected. However, scientists still may exercise judgment, including taxa that are not included in or supported by power analyses.

  11. Nitrogen Inputs via Nitrogen Fixation in Northern Plants and Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorp, N. R.; Wieder, R. K.; Vile, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Dominated by cold and often acidic water logged environments, mineralization of organic matter is slow in the majority of northern ecosystems. Measures of extractable ammonium and nitrate are generally low and can be undetectable in peat pore waters. Despite this apparent nitrogen limitation, many of these environments produce deep deposits of soil organic matter. Biological nitrogen fixation carried out by autotrophic and heterotrophic diazotrophs associated with cryptograms provides the majority of known nitrogen inputs in these northern ecosystems. Nitrogen fixation was assessed in a variety of northern soils within rhizospheres of dominant plant communities. We investigated the availability of this newly fixed nitrogen to the vascular plant community in nitrogen limited northern plant communities. We tracked nitrogen flow from 15N2 gas fixed in Sphagnum mosses into tissues of two native vascular plant species, boreal cranberry (Vaccinium oxycoccus) and black spruce (Picea mariana). 15N-labeled Sphagnum microcosms were grown within variable mesh size exclusion/inclusion fabrics in a nitrogen addition experiment in situ in order to investigate the role of mycorrhizal fungi in the uptake of newly fixed nitrogen. Up to 24% of daily fixed 15N label was transferred to vascular plant tissues during 2 months. Nitrogen addition resulted in decreased N2 fixation rates; however, with higher nitrogen availability there was a higher rate of 15N label uptake into the vascular plants, likely the result of increased production of dissolved organic nitrogen. Reliance on mycorrhizal networks for nitrogen acquisition was indicated by nitrogen isotope fractionation patterns. Moreover, N2 fixation activities in mosses were stimulated when vascular plants were grown in moss microcosms versus "moss only" treatments. Results indicate that bog vascular plants may derive considerable nitrogen from atmospheric N2 biologically fixed within Sphagnum mosses. This work demonstrates that

  12. Complex interactions between regional dispersal of native taxa and an invasive species.

    PubMed

    Strecker, Angela L; Arnott, Shelley E

    2010-04-01

    In the event of an environmental disturbance, dispersal of native taxa may provide species and genetic diversity to ecosystems, increasing the likelihood that there will be species and genotypes present that are less vulnerable to the disturbance. This may allow communities to maintain functioning during a disturbance and may be particularly important when the perturbation is novel to the system, such as the establishment of an invasive species. We examined how dispersal of native species may influence crustacean zooplankton communities in freshwater lakes invaded by the invertebrate predator, Bythotrephes longimanus. Using large enclosures, we experimentally tested the effect of dispersal on zooplankton community abundance, richness, and composition in (1) a community invaded by Bythotrephes, (2) the same community with the invader removed, and (3) a community that was never invaded. Dispersal increased zooplankton community abundance and richness; however, these effects were usually only significant in the invader-removed treatment. Dispersal tended to make the invader-removed communities more similar to never-invaded communities in abundance, richness, and composition. Dispersal had little effect on zooplankton abundance in the invaded community; however, richness significantly increased, and the community composition changed to resemble a never-invaded community by the end of the experiment. Our results have implications for understanding the role of dispersal during transitory states in communities. Dispersal of native taxa may be particularly important during the period between the arrival and broad-scale establishment of Bythotrephes, as dispersal through space or time (i.e., from resting eggs) may rapidly increase zooplankton abundance when the invader is absent or in low abundances. Overall, our results suggest that communities with strong local predatory and competitive interactions may be closed to immigration from colonists, but that invasive species

  13. The nitrogen cycle: Atmosphere interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Atmospheric interactions involving the nitrogen species are varied and complex. These interactions include photochemical reactions, initiated by the absorption of solar photons and chemical kinetic reactions, which involve both homogeneous (gas-to-gas reactions) and heterogeneous (gas-to-particle) reactions. Another important atmospheric interaction is the production of nitrogen oxides by atmospheric lightning. The nitrogen cycle strongly couples the biosphere and atmosphere. Many nitrogen species are produced by biogenic processes. Once in the atmosphere nitrogen oxides are photochemically and chemically transformed to nitrates, which are returned to the biosphere via precipitation, dry deposition and aerosols to close the biosphere-atmosphere nitrogen cycle. The sources, sinks and photochemistry/chemistry of the nitrogen species; atmospheric nitrogen species; souces and sinks of nitrous oxide; sources; sinks and photochemistry/chemistry of ammonia; seasonal variation of the vertical distribution of ammonia in the troposphere; surface and atmospheric sources of the nitrogen species, and seasonal variation of ground level ammonia are summarized.

  14. Characterization of Two New Records of Zygomycete Species Belonging to Undiscovered Taxa in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi Thuong Thuong; Lee, Seo Hee; Bae, Sarah; Jeon, Sun Jeong; Mun, Hye Yeon

    2016-01-01

    During a biodiversity survey of undiscovered taxa in Korea, two zygomycetous fungal strains were isolated. The first strain, EML-FSDY6-1 was isolated from a soil sample collected at Dokdo Island in the East Sea of Korea in 2013, and the second strain, EML-DG-NH3-1 was isolated from a rat dung sample collected at Chonnam National University garden, Gwangju, Korea in 2014. Based on the morphological characteristics and phylogenetic analysis of the internal transcribed spacer, 18S and 28S rDNA, actin and translation elongation factor-1α genes. EML-FSDY6-1 and EML-DG-NH3-1 isolates were confirmed as zygomycete species, Absidia pseudocylindrospora and Absidia glauca, respectively. Neither species has previously been described in Korea. PMID:27103852

  15. Allometry and growth of eight tree taxa in United Kingdom woodlands

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Matthew R; Moustakas, Aristides; Carey, Gregory; Malhi, Yadvinder; Butt, Nathalie; Benham, Sue; Pallett, Denise; Schäfer, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    As part of a project to develop predictive ecosystem models of United Kingdom woodlands we have collated data from two United Kingdom woodlands - Wytham Woods and Alice Holt. Here we present data from 582 individual trees of eight taxa in the form of summary variables relating to the allometric relationships between trunk diameter, height, crown height, crown radius and trunk radial growth rate to the tree’s light environment and diameter at breast height. In addition the raw data files containing the variables from which the summary data were obtained. Large sample sizes with longitudinal data spanning 22 years make these datasets useful for future studies concerned with the way trees change in size and shape over their life-span. PMID:25977813

  16. Ecological patterns, diversity and core taxa of microbial communities in groundwater-fed rapid gravity filters

    PubMed Central

    Gülay, Arda; Musovic, Sanin; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Al-Soud, Waleed Abu; Sørensen, Søren J; Smets, Barth F

    2016-01-01

    Here, we document microbial communities in rapid gravity filtration units, specifically serial rapid sand filters (RSFs), termed prefilters (PFs) and after- filters (AFs), fed with anoxic groundwaters low in organic carbon to prepare potable waters. A comprehensive 16S rRNA-based amplicon sequencing survey revealed a core RSF microbiome comprising few bacterial taxa (29–30 genera) dominated by Nitrospirae, Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria, with a strikingly high abundance (75–87±18%) across five examined waterworks in Denmark. Lineages within the Nitrospira genus consistently comprised the second most and most abundant fraction in PFs (27±23%) and AFs (45.2±23%), respectively, and were far more abundant than typical proteobacterial ammonium-oxidizing bacteria, suggesting a physiology beyond nitrite oxidation for Nitrospira. Within the core taxa, sequences closely related to types with ability to oxidize ammonium, nitrite, iron, manganese and methane as primary growth substrate were identified and dominated in both PFs (73.6±6%) and AFs (61.4±21%), suggesting their functional importance. Surprisingly, operational taxonomic unit richness correlated strongly and positively with sampling location in the drinking water treatment plant (from PFs to AFs), and a weaker negative correlation held for evenness. Significant spatial heterogeneity in microbial community composition was detected in both PFs and AFs, and was higher in the AFs. This is the first comprehensive documentation of microbial community diversity in RSFs treating oligotrophic groundwaters. We have identified patterns of local spatial heterogeneity and dispersal, documented surprising energy–diversity relationships, observed a large and diverse Nitrospira fraction and established a core RSF microbiome. PMID:26953601

  17. Cellular differentiation and individuality in the “minor” multicellular taxa

    PubMed Central

    Herron, Matthew D.; Rashidi, Armin; Shelton, Deborah E.; Driscoll, William W.

    2014-01-01

    Biology needs a concept of individuality in order to distinguish organisms from parts of organisms and from groups of organisms, to count individuals and compare traits across taxa, and to distinguish growth from reproduction. Most of the proposed criteria for individuality were designed for ‘unitary’ or ‘paradigm’ organisms: contiguous, functionally and physiologically integrated, obligately sexually reproducing multicellular organisms with a germ line sequestered early in development. However, the vast majority of the diversity of life on Earth does not conform to all of these criteria. We consider the issue of individuality in the ‘minor’ multicellular taxa, which collectively span a large portion of the eukaryotic tree of life, reviewing their general features and focusing on a model species for each group. When the criteria designed for unitary organisms are applied to other groups, they often give conflicting answers or no answer at all to the question of whether or not a given unit is an individual. Complex life cycles, intimate bacterial symbioses, aggregative development, and strange genetic features complicate the picture. The great age of some of the groups considered shows that ‘intermediate’ forms, those with some but not all of the traits traditionally associated with individuality, cannot reasonably be considered ephemeral or assumed transitional. We discuss a handful of recent attempts to reconcile the many proposed criteria for individuality and to provide criteria that can be applied across all the domains of life. Finally, we argue that individuality should be defined without reference to any particular taxon and that understanding the emergence of new kinds of individuals requires recognizing individuality as a matter of degree. PMID:23448295

  18. Physiological and ecological performance differs in four coral taxa at a volcanic carbon dioxide seep.

    PubMed

    Strahl, J; Stolz, I; Uthicke, S; Vogel, N; Noonan, S H C; Fabricius, K E

    2015-06-01

    Around volcanic carbon dioxide (CO2) seeps in Papua New Guinea, partial pressures of CO2 (pCO2) approximate those as predicted for the end of this century, and coral communities have low diversity and low structural complexity. To assess the mechanisms for such community shifts in response to ocean acidification, we examined the physiological performance of two hard corals that occur with increased or unaltered abundance at a seep site (mean pHTotal=7.8, pCO2=862 μatm) compared to a control site (mean pHTotal=8.1, pCO2=323 μatm), namely massive Porites spp. and Pocillopora damicornis, and two species with reduced abundance, Acropora millepora and Seriatopora hystrix. Oxygen fluxes, calcification, and skeletal densities were analyzed in corals originating from the seep and control site. Net photosynthesis rates increased considerably in Porites spp. and A. millepora and slightly in P. damicornis at increased pCO2, but remained unaltered in S. hystrix. Dark respiration rates remained constant in all corals investigated from both sites. Rates of light calcification declined in S. hystrix at high pCO2, but were unaffected by pCO2 in the other three coral taxa. Dark and net calcification rates remained unchanged in massive Porites and P. damicornis, but were drastically reduced at high pCO2 in A. millepora and S. hystrix. However, skeletal densities were similar at both seep and control sites in all coral taxa investigated. Our data suggest that the pCO2-tolerant corals were characterized by an increased ability to acclimatize to ocean acidification, e.g. by maintaining net calcification. Thus, robust corals, such as Porites spp. and P. damicornis, are more likely to persist for longer in a future high pCO2 world than those unable to acclimatize.

  19. Explaining Spatial Variation in the Recording Effort of Citizen Science Data across Multiple Taxa.

    PubMed

    Mair, Louise; Ruete, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    The collation of citizen science data in open-access biodiversity databases makes temporally and spatially extensive species' observation data available to a wide range of users. Such data are an invaluable resource but contain inherent limitations, such as sampling bias in favour of recorder distribution, lack of survey effort assessment, and lack of coverage of the distribution of all organisms. Any technical assessment, monitoring program or scientific research applying citizen science data should therefore include an evaluation of the uncertainty of its results. We use 'ignorance' scores, i.e. spatially explicit indices of sampling bias across a study region, to further understand spatial patterns of observation behaviour for 13 reference taxonomic groups. The data is based on voluntary observations made in Sweden between 2000 and 2014. We compared the effect of six geographical variables (elevation, steepness, population density, log population density, road density and footpath density) on the ignorance scores of each group. We found substantial variation among taxonomic groups in the relative importance of different geographic variables for explaining ignorance scores. In general, road access and logged population density were consistently important variables explaining bias in sampling effort, indicating that access at a landscape-scale facilitates voluntary reporting by citizen scientists. Also, small increases in population density can produce a substantial reduction in ignorance score. However the between-taxa variation in the importance of geographic variables for explaining ignorance scores demonstrated that different taxa suffer from different spatial biases. We suggest that conservationists and researchers should use ignorance scores to acknowledge uncertainty in their analyses and conclusions, because they may simultaneously include many correlated variables that are difficult to disentangle.

  20. Ecological patterns, diversity and core taxa of microbial communities in groundwater-fed rapid gravity filters.

    PubMed

    Gülay, Arda; Musovic, Sanin; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Al-Soud, Waleed Abu; Sørensen, Søren J; Smets, Barth F

    2016-09-01

    Here, we document microbial communities in rapid gravity filtration units, specifically serial rapid sand filters (RSFs), termed prefilters (PFs) and after- filters (AFs), fed with anoxic groundwaters low in organic carbon to prepare potable waters. A comprehensive 16S rRNA-based amplicon sequencing survey revealed a core RSF microbiome comprising few bacterial taxa (29-30 genera) dominated by Nitrospirae, Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria, with a strikingly high abundance (75-87±18%) across five examined waterworks in Denmark. Lineages within the Nitrospira genus consistently comprised the second most and most abundant fraction in PFs (27±23%) and AFs (45.2±23%), respectively, and were far more abundant than typical proteobacterial ammonium-oxidizing bacteria, suggesting a physiology beyond nitrite oxidation for Nitrospira. Within the core taxa, sequences closely related to types with ability to oxidize ammonium, nitrite, iron, manganese and methane as primary growth substrate were identified and dominated in both PFs (73.6±6%) and AFs (61.4±21%), suggesting their functional importance. Surprisingly, operational taxonomic unit richness correlated strongly and positively with sampling location in the drinking water treatment plant (from PFs to AFs), and a weaker negative correlation held for evenness. Significant spatial heterogeneity in microbial community composition was detected in both PFs and AFs, and was higher in the AFs. This is the first comprehensive documentation of microbial community diversity in RSFs treating oligotrophic groundwaters. We have identified patterns of local spatial heterogeneity and dispersal, documented surprising energy-diversity relationships, observed a large and diverse Nitrospira fraction and established a core RSF microbiome.

  1. Host-specificity among abundant and rare taxa in the sponge microbiome.

    PubMed

    Reveillaud, Julie; Maignien, Loïs; Murat Eren, A; Huber, Julie A; Apprill, Amy; Sogin, Mitchell L; Vanreusel, Ann

    2014-06-01

    Microbial communities have a key role in the physiology of the sponge host, and it is therefore essential to understand the stability and specificity of sponge-symbiont associations. Host-specific bacterial associations spanning large geographic distance are widely acknowledged in sponges. However, the full spectrum of specificity remains unclear. In particular, it is not known whether closely related sponges host similar or very different microbiota over wide bathymetric and geographic gradients, and whether specific associations extend to the rare members of the sponge microbiome. Using the ultra-deep Illumina sequencing technology, we conducted a comparison of sponge bacterial communities in seven closely related Hexadella species with a well-resolved host phylogeny, as well as of a distantly related sponge Mycale. These samples spanned unprecedentedly large bathymetric (15-960 m) gradients and varying European locations. In addition, this study included a bacterial community analysis of the local background seawater for both Mycale and the widespread deep-sea taxa Hexadella cf. dedritifera. We observed a striking diversity of microbes associated with the sponges, spanning 47 bacterial phyla. The data did not reveal any Hexadella microbiota co-speciation pattern, but confirmed sponge-specific and species-specific host-bacteria associations, even within extremely low abundant taxa. Oligotyping analysis also revealed differential enrichment preferences of closely related Nitrospira members in closely related sponges species. Overall, these results demonstrate highly diverse, remarkably specific and stable sponge-bacteria associations that extend to members of the rare biosphere at a very fine phylogenetic scale, over significant geographic and bathymetric gradients.

  2. Spatial patterns of parrotfish corallivory in the Caribbean: the importance of coral taxa, density and size.

    PubMed

    Roff, George; Ledlie, Mary H; Ortiz, Juan C; Mumby, Peter J

    2011-01-01

    The past few decades have seen an increase in the frequency and intensity of disturbance on coral reefs, resulting in shifts in size and composition of coral populations. These changes have lead to a renewed focus on processes that influence demographic rates in corals, such as corallivory. While previous research indicates selective corallivory among coral taxa, the importance of coral size and the density of coral colonies in influencing corallivory are unknown. We surveyed the size, taxonomy and number of bites by parrotfish per colony of corals and the abundance of three main corallivorous parrotfish (Sparisoma viride, Sparisoma aurofrenatum, Scarus vetula) at multiple spatial scales (reefs within islands: 1-100 km, and between islands: >100 km) within the Bahamas Archipelago. We used a linear mixed model to determine the influence of coral taxa, colony size, colony density, and parrotfish abundance on the intensity of corallivory (bites per m(2) of coral tissue). While the effect of colony density was significant in determining the intensity of corallivory, we found no significant influence of colony size or parrotfish abundance (density, biomass or community structure). Parrotfish bites were most frequently observed on the dominant species of reef building corals (Montastraea annularis, Montastraea faveolata and Porites astreoides), yet our results indicate that when the confounding effects of colony density and size were removed, selective corallivory existed only for the less dominant Porites porites. As changes in disturbance regimes result in the decline of dominant frame-work building corals such as Montastraea spp., the projected success of P. porites on Caribbean reefs through high reproductive output, resistance to disease and rapid growth rates may be attenuated through selective corallivory by parrotfish.

  3. Regional Differences in Seasonal Timing of Rainfall Discriminate between Genetically Distinct East African Giraffe Taxa

    PubMed Central

    Thomassen, Henri A.; Freedman, Adam H.; Brown, David M.; Buermann, Wolfgang; Jacobs, David K.

    2013-01-01

    Masai (Giraffa tippelskirchi), Reticulated (G. reticulata) and Rothschild's (G. camelopardalis) giraffe lineages in East Africa are morphologically and genetically distinct, yet in Kenya their ranges abut. This raises the question of how divergence is maintained among populations of a large mammal capable of long-distance travel, and which readily hybridize in zoos. Here we test four hypotheses concerning the maintenance of the phylogeographic boundaries among the three taxa: 1) isolation-by-distance; 2) physical barriers to dispersal; 3) general habitat differences resulting in habitat segregation; or 4) regional differences in the seasonal timing of rainfall, and resultant timing of browse availability. We used satellite remotely sensed and climate data to characterize the environment at the locations of genotyped giraffes. Canonical variate analysis, random forest algorithms, and generalized dissimilarity modelling were employed in a landscape genetics framework to identify the predictor variables that best explained giraffes' genetic divergence. We found that regional differences in the timing of precipitation, and resulting green-up associated with the abundance of browse, effectively discriminate between taxa. Local habitat conditions, topographic and human-induced barriers, and geographic distance did not aid in discriminating among lineages. Our results suggest that selection associated with regional timing of events in the annual climatic cycle may help maintain genetic and phenotypic divergence in giraffes. We discuss potential mechanisms of maintaining divergence, and suggest that synchronization of reproduction with seasonal rainfall cycles that are geographically distinct may contribute to reproductive isolation. Coordination of weaning with green-up cycles could minimize the costs of lactation and predation on the young. Our findings are consistent with theory and empirical results demonstrating the efficacy of seasonal or phenologically dictated

  4. New reports of nuclear DNA content for 407 vascular plant taxa from the United States

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Chengke; Alverson, William S.; Follansbee, Aaron; Waller, Donald M.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims The amount of DNA in an unreplicated haploid nuclear genome (C-value) ranges over several orders of magnitude among plant species and represents a key metric for comparing plant genomes. To extend previously published datasets on plant nuclear content and to characterize the DNA content of many species present in one region of North America, flow cytometry was used to estimate C-values of woody and herbaceous species collected in Wisconsin and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, USA. Methods A total of 674 samples and vouchers were collected from locations across Wisconsin and Michigan, USA. From these, C-value estimates were obtained for 514 species, subspecies and varieties of vascular plants. Nuclei were extracted from samples of these species in one of two buffers, stained with the fluorochrome propidium iodide, and an Accuri C-6 flow cytometer was used to measure fluorescence peaks relative to those of an internal standard. Replicate extractions, coefficients of variation and comparisons to published C-values in the same and related species were used to confirm the accuracy and reliability of our results. Key Results and Conclusions Prime C-values for 407 taxa are provided for which no published data exist, including 390 angiosperms, two gymnosperms, ten monilophytes and five lycophytes. Non-prime reports for 107 additional taxa are also provided. The prime values represent new reports for 129 genera and five families (of 303 genera and 97 families sampled). New family C-value maxima or minima are reported for Betulaceae, Ericaceae, Ranunculaceae and Sapindaceae. These data provide the basis for phylogenetic analyses of C-value variation and future analyses of how C-values covary with other functional traits. PMID:23100602

  5. Influence of aeration implements, phosphorus fertilizers, and soil taxa on phosphorus losses from grasslands.

    PubMed

    Franklin, D H; Butler, D M; Cabrera, M L; Calvert, V H; West, L T; Rema, J A

    2011-01-01

    Attenuation of rainfall within the solum may help to move contaminants and nutrients into the soil to be better sequestered or utilized by crops. Surface application of phosphorus (P) amendments to grasslands may lead to elevated concentrations of P in surface runoff and eutrophication of surface waters. Aeration of grasslands has been proposed as a treatment to reduce losses of applied P. Here, results from two small-plot aeration studies and two field-scale, paired-watershed studies are supplemented with previously unpublished soil P data and synthesized. The overall objective of these studies was to determine the impact of aeration on soil P, runoff volume, and runoff P losses from mixed tall fescue [Lolium arundinaceum (Schreb.) Darbysh.]-bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon L.) grasslands fertilized with P. Small-scale rainfall simulations were conducted on two soil taxa using three types of aeration implements: spikes, disks, and cores. The-field scale study was conducted on four soil taxa with slit and knife aeration. Small-plot studies showed that core aeration reduced loads of total P and dissolved reactive P (DRP) in runoff from plots fertilized with broiler litter and that aeration was effective in reducing P export when it increased soil P in the upper 5 cm. In the field-scale study, slit aeration reduced DRP losses by 35% in fields with well-drained soils but not in poorly drained soils. Flow-weighted concentrations of DRP in aerated fields were related to water-soluble P applied in amendments and soil test P in the upper 5 cm. These studies show that the overall effectiveness of mechanical soil aeration on runoff volume and P losses is controlled by the interaction of soil characteristics such as internal drainage and compaction, soil P, type of surface-applied manure, and type of aeration implement.

  6. Biodiversity conservation across taxa and landscapes requires many small as well as single large habitat fragments.

    PubMed

    Rösch, Verena; Tscharntke, Teja; Scherber, Christoph; Batáry, Péter

    2015-09-01

    Agricultural intensification has been shown to reduce biodiversity through processes such as habitat degradation and fragmentation. We tested whether several small or single large habitat fragments (re-visiting the 'single large or several small' debate) support more species across a wide range of taxonomic groups (plants, leafhoppers, true bugs, snails). Our study comprised 14 small (<1 ha) and 14 large (1.5-8 ha) fragments of calcareous grassland in Central Germany along orthogonal gradients of landscape complexity and habitat connectivity. Each taxon was sampled on six plots per fragment. Across taxa, species richness did not differ between large and small fragments, whereas species-area accumulation curves showed that both overall and specialist species richness was much higher on several small fragments of calcareous grassland than on few large fragments. On average, 85% of the overall species richness was recorded on all small fragments taken together (4.6 ha), whereas the two largest ones (15.1 ha) only accounted for 37% of the species. This could be due to the greater geographic extent covered by many small fragments. However, community composition differed strongly between large and small fragments, and some of the rarest specialist species appeared to be confined to large fragments. The surrounding landscape did not show any consistent effects on species richness and community composition. Our results show that both single large and many small fragments are needed to promote landscape-wide biodiversity across taxa. We therefore question the focus on large fragments only and call for a new diversified habitat fragmentation strategy for biodiversity conservation.

  7. Regional differences in seasonal timing of rainfall discriminate between genetically distinct East African giraffe taxa.

    PubMed

    Thomassen, Henri A; Freedman, Adam H; Brown, David M; Buermann, Wolfgang; Jacobs, David K

    2013-01-01

    Masai (Giraffa tippelskirchi), Reticulated (G. reticulata) and Rothschild's (G. camelopardalis) giraffe lineages in East Africa are morphologically and genetically distinct, yet in Kenya their ranges abut. This raises the question of how divergence is maintained among populations of a large mammal capable of long-distance travel, and which readily hybridize in zoos. Here we test four hypotheses concerning the maintenance of the phylogeographic boundaries among the three taxa: 1) isolation-by-distance; 2) physical barriers to dispersal; 3) general habitat differences resulting in habitat segregation; or 4) regional differences in the seasonal timing of rainfall, and resultant timing of browse availability. We used satellite remotely sensed and climate data to characterize the environment at the locations of genotyped giraffes. Canonical variate analysis, random forest algorithms, and generalized dissimilarity modelling were employed in a landscape genetics framework to identify the predictor variables that best explained giraffes' genetic divergence. We found that regional differences in the timing of precipitation, and resulting green-up associated with the abundance of browse, effectively discriminate between taxa. Local habitat conditions, topographic and human-induced barriers, and geographic distance did not aid in discriminating among lineages. Our results suggest that selection associated with regional timing of events in the annual climatic cycle may help maintain genetic and phenotypic divergence in giraffes. We discuss potential mechanisms of maintaining divergence, and suggest that synchronization of reproduction with seasonal rainfall cycles that are geographically distinct may contribute to reproductive isolation. Coordination of weaning with green-up cycles could minimize the costs of lactation and predation on the young. Our findings are consistent with theory and empirical results demonstrating the efficacy of seasonal or phenologically dictated

  8. Taxas de eventos para as fontes astrofísicas do detector Mario Schenberg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, C. S.; Araujo, J. C. N.; Miranda, O. D.; Aguiar, O. D.

    2003-08-01

    O detector de ondas gravitacionais Mario Schenberg será sensível a sinais que cheguem à Terra com amplitude h~10-21 e dentro da faixa em frequências que varia de 3,0 a 3,4 kHz. As principais fontes astrofísicas em condições de gerar um sinal detectável pela antena Schenberg são: colapsos estelares que produzam eventos do tipo supernova; instabilidades hidrodinâmicas em estrelas de nêutrons; excitação dos modos fluído (modos f) de estrelas de nêutrons; excitação dos primeiros modos quadrupolares de buracos negros com massa ~ 3,8 M¤; coalescências de estrelas de nêutrons e buracos negros em sistemas binários e, ainda, espiralações de mini-buracos negros. Neste trabalho nós determinamos as taxas de eventos para o Schenberg associadas a dois tipos de fontes: através da de-excitação dos modos f de estrelas de nêutrons e através da coalescência de mini-buracos negros de 0,5 M¤ (que atualmente têm sido colocados como possíveis candidatos a objetos massivos do halo Galáctico). Nós mostramos que esses tipos de fontes poderão produzir sinais em ondas gravitacionais com uma taxa em torno de um evento por ano dentro da banda do Schenberg.

  9. Diverse, rare microbial taxa responded to the Deepwater Horizon deep-sea hydrocarbon plume

    PubMed Central

    Kleindienst, Sara; Grim, Sharon; Sogin, Mitchell; Bracco, Annalisa; Crespo-Medina, Melitza; Joye, Samantha B

    2016-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil well blowout generated an enormous plume of dispersed hydrocarbons that substantially altered the Gulf of Mexico's deep-sea microbial community. A significant enrichment of distinct microbial populations was observed, yet, little is known about the abundance and richness of specific microbial ecotypes involved in gas, oil and dispersant biodegradation in the wake of oil spills. Here, we document a previously unrecognized diversity of closely related taxa affiliating with Cycloclasticus, Colwellia and Oceanospirillaceae and describe their spatio-temporal distribution in the Gulf's deepwater, in close proximity to the discharge site and at increasing distance from it, before, during and after the discharge. A highly sensitive, computational method (oligotyping) applied to a data set generated from 454-tag pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA gene V4–V6 regions, enabled the detection of population dynamics at the sub-operational taxonomic unit level (0.2% sequence similarity). The biogeochemical signature of the deep-sea samples was assessed via total cell counts, concentrations of short-chain alkanes (C1–C5), nutrients, (colored) dissolved organic and inorganic carbon, as well as methane oxidation rates. Statistical analysis elucidated environmental factors that shaped ecologically relevant dynamics of oligotypes, which likely represent distinct ecotypes. Major hydrocarbon degraders, adapted to the slow-diffusive natural hydrocarbon seepage in the Gulf of Mexico, appeared unable to cope with the conditions encountered during the DWH spill or were outcompeted. In contrast, diverse, rare taxa increased rapidly in abundance, underscoring the importance of specialized sub-populations and potential ecotypes during massive deep-sea oil discharges and perhaps other large-scale perturbations. PMID:26230048

  10. Systematics of the family Plectopylidae in Vietnam with additional information on Chinese taxa (Gastropoda, Pulmonata, Stylommatophora)

    PubMed Central

    Páll-Gergely, Barna; Hunyadi, András; Ablett, Jonathan; Lương, Hào Văn; Fred Naggs; Asami, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Vietnamese species from the family Plectopylidae are revised based on the type specimens of all known taxa, more than 600 historical non-type museum lots, and almost 200 newly-collected samples. Altogether more than 7000 specimens were investigated. The revision has revealed that species diversity of the Vietnamese Plectopylidae was previously overestimated. Overall, thirteen species names (anterides Gude, 1909, bavayi Gude, 1901, congesta Gude, 1898, fallax Gude, 1909, gouldingi Gude, 1909, hirsuta Möllendorff, 1901, jovia Mabille, 1887, moellendorffi Gude, 1901, persimilis Gude, 1901, pilsbryana Gude, 1901, soror Gude, 1908, tenuis Gude, 1901, verecunda Gude, 1909) were synonymised with other species. In addition to these, Gudeodiscus hemmeni sp. n. and Gudeodiscus messageri raheemi ssp. n. are described from north-western Vietnam. Sixteen species and two subspecies are recognized from Vietnam. The reproductive anatomy of eight taxa is described. Based on anatomical information, Halongella gen. n. is erected to include Plectopylis schlumbergeri and Plectopylis fruhstorferi. Additionally, the genus Gudeodiscus is subdivided into two subgenera (Gudeodiscus and Veludiscus subgen. n.) on the basis of the morphology of the reproductive anatomy and the radula. The Chinese Gudeodiscus phlyarius werneri Páll-Gergely, 2013 is moved to synonymy of Gudeodiscus phlyarius. A spermatophore was found in the organ situated next to the gametolytic sac in one specimen. This suggests that this organ in the Plectopylidae is a diverticulum. Statistically significant evidence is presented for the presence of calcareous hook-like granules inside the penis being associated with the absence of embryos in the uterus in four genera. This suggests that these probably play a role in mating periods before disappearing when embryos develop. Sicradiscus mansuyi is reported from China for the first time. PMID:25632253

  11. The Implications of Stratigraphic Compatibility for Character Integration among Fossil Taxa.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Peter J; Estabrook, George F

    2015-09-01

    Two characters are stratigraphically compatible if some phylogenies indicate that their combinations (state-pairs) evolved without homoplasy and in an order consistent with the fossil record. Simulations assuming independent character change indicate that we expect approximately 95% of compatible character pairs to also be stratigraphically compatible over a wide range of sampling regimes and general evolutionary models. However, two general models of rate heterogeneity elevate expected stratigraphic incompatibility: "early burst" models, where rates of change are higher among early members of a clade than among later members of that clade, and "integration" models, where the evolution of characters is correlated in some manner. Both models have important theoretical and methodological implications. Therefore, we examine 259 metazoan clades for deviations from expected stratigraphic compatibility. We do so first assuming independent change with equal rates of character change through time. We then repeat the analysis assuming independent change with separate "early" and "late" rates (with "early" = the first third of taxa in a clade), with the early and late rates chosen to maximize the probability of the observed compatibility among the early taxa and then the whole clade. We single out Cambrian trilobites as a possible "control" group because morphometric studies suggest that integration patterns are not conserved among closely related species. Even allowing for early bursts, we see excess stratigraphic incompatibility (i.e., negative deviations) in significantly more clades than expected at 0.50, 0.25, and 0.05 [Formula: see text] values. This pattern is particularly strong in chordates, echinoderms, and arthropods. However, stratigraphic compatibility among Cambrian trilobites matches the expectations of integration studies, as they (unlike post-Cambrian trilobites) do not deviate from the expectations of independent change with no early bursts. Thus, these

  12. Molecular evidence indicates that subarctic willow communities in Scotland support a diversity of host-associated Melampsora rust taxa.

    PubMed

    Milne, Jeremy M; Helfer, Stephan; Kirk, Calum; Hollingsworth, Peter M; Ennos, Richard A

    2012-05-01

    Rare and threatened subarctic willow scrub communities in the UK are the subject of ongoing conservation programmes, yet little is known about the diversity of fungal taxa that they support. Isolates of the rust genus Melampsora were sampled from 112 leaves of eight subarctic willow (Salix) taxa and their hybrids from twelve sites in the UK. In order to determine the number of Melampsora taxa present in the samples, isolates were sequenced for the Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) region of rDNA and data were subject to phylogenetic analysis. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian analysis indicated that the isolates fell into three strongly supported host-associated clades. Clade I contained only isolates from Salix herbacea and was distinguished morphologically by dense urediniospore echinulation and thin cell walls. Clade II contained isolates from Salix arbuscula and Salix reticulata only. These could not be distinguished morphologically from isolates in Clade III which were found on Salix lapponum, Salix myrsinites, Salix myrsinifolia, Salix aurita, Salix lanata, and their hybrids. Clade II was most distinct in ITS sequence, differing by 50 bases from Clades I and III, while the latter clades differed in sequence by only 24 bases on average. Clades I and III are likely to represent the previously recognised taxa Melampsora alpina Juel 1894 and Melampsora epitea Thüm. 1879 respectively, but Clade II has not apparently been described before. Significant differences in the intensity of infection by isolates of Clade III were found among different Salix species at a single site, suggesting either differences in resistance among Salix taxa, or the presence of further cryptic taxa within Clade III. The study illustrates the power of molecular phylogenetic analysis to reveal cryptic biodiversity within Melampsora, and suggests that conserving Salix host diversity within subarctic willow communities will ensure that a diversity of associated Melampsora taxa is maintained.

  13. The nitrogen cascade

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway J.N.; Aber J.D.; Erisman J.W.; Seitzinger S.P.; Howarth R.W.; Cowling E.B.; Cosby B.J.

    2003-04-01

    Human production of food and energy is the dominant continental process that breaks the triple bond in molecular nitrogen (N{sub 2}) and creates reactive nitrogen (Nr) species. Circulation of anthropogenic Nr in Earth's atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere has a wide variety of consequences, which are magnified with time as Nr moves along its biogeochemical pathway. The same atom of Nr can cause multiple effects in the atmosphere, in terrestrial ecosystems, in freshwater and marine systems, and on human health. We call this sequence of effects the nitrogen cascade. As the cascade progresses, the origin of Nr becomes unimportant. Reactive nitrogen does not cascade at the same rate through all environmental systems; some systems have the ability to accumulate Nr, which leads to lag times in the continuation of the cascade. These lags slow the cascade and result in Nr accumulation in certain reservoirs, which in turn can enhance the effects of Nr on that environment. The only way to eliminate Nr accumulation and stop the cascade is to convert Nr back to nonreactive N{sub 2}.

  14. ODD NITROGEN PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Harold S.

    1980-01-01

    This chapter is in three parts. The first concerns interpretations that can be made from atmospheric observations regarding nitrogen compounds and ozone, the second reviews some predictions made by atmospheric models, and the third compares between certain model results and atmospheric measurements with an emphasis on detecting evidence of significant disagreements.

  15. Nitrogen in aquatic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Rabalais, Nancy N

    2002-03-01

    Aquatic ecosystems respond variably to nutrient enrichment and altered nutrient ratios, along a continuum from fresh water through estuarine, coastal, and marine systems. Although phosphorus is considered the limiting nutrient for phytoplankton production in freshwater systems, the effects of atmospheric nitrogen and its contribution to acidification of fresh waters can be detrimental. Within the estuarine to coastal continuum, multiple nutrient limitations occur among nitrogen, phosphorus, and silicon along the salinity gradient and by season, but nitrogen is generally considered the primary limiting nutrient for phytoplankton biomass accumulation. There are well-established, but nonlinear, positive relationships among nitrogen and phosphorus flux, phytoplankton primary production, and fisheries yield. There are thresholds, however, where the load of nutrients to estuarine, coastal and marine systems exceeds the capacity for assimilation of nutrient-enhanced production, and water-quality degradation occurs. Impacts can include noxious and toxic algal blooms, increased turbidity with a subsequent loss of submerged aquatic vegetation, oxygen deficiency, disruption of ecosystem functioning, loss of habitat, loss of biodiversity, shifts in food webs, and loss of harvestable fisheries.

  16. Nitrogen recommendation systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen fertilization for corn production is complicated by soil and weather variability, yet has far-reaching economic and environmental implications. To address this challenge, alternative N management strategies have been explored extensively in recent years by both public and private groups for...

  17. Nitrogen use efficiency revisited.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Tadaki

    2011-08-01

    Nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) was originally defined as the dry mass productivity per unit N taken up from soil. The term was subsequently redefined as the product of nitrogen productivity (NP) and mean residence time of nitrogen (MRT). However, this redefinition was found to contradict the original definition under certain conditions, and confusion arose when the MRT defined for a steady-state system was applied to a system that was actually not at steady state. As MRT is the expected length of time that a unit of N newly taken up from soil is retained before being lost, it can be translated into the plant nitrogen duration (PND) divided by the total N uptake. This MRT is determined equally well for a steady state- and a non-steady state system and is in accordance with the original definition of NUE. It can be applied to a herbaceous perennial stand (that was at a steady state) and to an annual stand (that was not at a steady state) to determine NUE. NUE is also applicable when plant growth and reproduction are analyzed in relation to N use.

  18. Ruminant nitrogen usage

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This book brings together the latest research on protein absorption by ruminants and takes a look at the calculation of optimum nutrient requirements, including bacterial digestion, in the calculations. It also describes the parameters of nitrogen conversion in the ruminant and examines the different kinds of protein found in animal feedstuffs.

  19. Nitrogen catch crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High costs of nitrogen (N) fertilizer and the potential for N losses to ground and surface water have resulted in increased interest in using catch crops to recover this N. Research on potatoes has shown that the amount of N lost to leaching can be as much as the amount of N removed from the field ...

  20. The Global Nitrogen Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, J. N.

    2003-12-01

    Once upon a time nitrogen did not exist. Today it does. In the intervening time the universe was formed, nitrogen was created, the Earth came into existence, and its atmosphere and oceans were formed! In this analysis of the Earth's nitrogen cycle, I start with an overview of these important events relative to nitrogen and then move on to the more traditional analysis of the nitrogen cycle itself and the role of humans in its alteration.The universe is ˜15 Gyr old. Even after its formation, there was still a period when nitrogen did not exist. It took ˜300 thousand years after the big bang for the Universe to cool enough to create atoms; hydrogen and helium formed first. Nitrogen was formed in the stars through the process of nucleosynthesis. When a star's helium mass becomes great enough to reach the necessary pressure and temperature, helium begins to fuse into still heavier elements, including nitrogen.Approximately 10 Gyr elapsed before Earth was formed (˜4.5 Ga (billion years ago)) by the accumulation of pre-assembled materials in a multistage process. Assuming that N2 was the predominate nitrogen species in these materials and given that the temperature of space is -270 °C, N2 was probably a solid when the Earth was formed since its boiling point (b.p.) and melting point (m.p.) are -196 °C and -210 °C, respectively. Towards the end of the accumulation period, temperatures were probably high enough for significant melting of some of the accumulated material. The volcanic gases emitted by the resulting volcanism strongly influenced the surface environment. Nitrogen was converted from a solid to a gas and emitted as N2. Carbon and sulfur were probably emitted as CO and H2S (Holland, 1984). N2 is still the most common nitrogen volcanic gas emitted today at a rate of ˜2 TgN yr-1 (Jaffee, 1992).Once emitted, the gases either remained in the atmosphere or were deposited to the Earth's surface, thus continuing the process of biogeochemical cycling. The rate of

  1. Single gene deletions of mrpA to mrpG and mrpE point mutations affect activity of the Mrp Na+/H+ antiporter of alkaliphilic Bacillus and formation of hetero-oligomeric Mrp complexes.

    PubMed

    Morino, Masato; Natsui, Shinsuke; Swartz, Talia H; Krulwich, Terry A; Ito, Masahiro

    2008-06-01

    Mrp antiporters catalyze secondary Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiport and/or K(+)/H(+) antiport that is physiologically important in diverse bacteria. An additional capacity for anion flux has been observed for a few systems. Mrp is unique among antiporters in that it requires all six or seven hydrophobic gene products (MrpA to MrpG) of the mrp operon for full antiporter activity, but MrpE has been reported to be dispensable. Here, the membrane complexes formed by Mrp proteins were examined using a cloned mrp operon from alkaliphilic Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4. The operon was engineered so that the seven Mrp proteins could be detected in single samples. Membrane extracts of an antiporter-deficient Escherichia coli strain expressing this construct were analyzed by blue native-sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Mrp complexes of two sizes were identified containing all seven Mrp proteins. Studies of the single nonpolar mrp gene deletions in the construct showed that a subcomplex of MrpA, MrpB, MrpC, and MrpD was formed in the absence of MrpE, MrpF, or MrpG. By contrast, MrpE, MrpF, and MrpG were not observed in membranes lacking MrpA, MrpB, MrpC, or MrpD. Although MrpA and MrpD have been hypothesized to be the antiporter proteins, the MrpA-to-D complex was inactive. Every Mrp protein was required for an activity level near that of the wild-type Na(+)/H(+) antiporter, but a very low activity level was observed in the absence of MrpE. The introduction of an MrpE(P114G) mutation into the full Mrp complex led to antiport activity with a greatly increased apparent K(m) value for Na(+). The results suggested that interactions among the proteins of heterooligomeric Mrp complexes strongly impact antiporter properties.

  2. Aqueous phase removal of nitrogen from nitrogen compounds

    DOEpatents

    Fassbender, Alex G.

    1993-01-01

    A method is disclosed for denitrification of compounds containing nitrogen present in aqueous waste streams. The method comprises the steps of (1) identifying the types of nitrogen compounds present in a waste stream, (2) determining the concentrations of nitrogen compounds, (3) balancing oxidized and reduced form of nitrogen by adding a reactant, and (4) heating the mixture to a predetermined reaction temperature from about 300.degree. C. to about 600.degree. C., thereby resulting in less harmful nitrogen and oxygen gas, hydroxides, alcohols, and hydrocarbons.

  3. Inferring hominoid and early hominid phylogeny using craniodental characters: the role of fossil taxa.

    PubMed

    Strait, David S; Grine, Frederick E

    2004-12-01

    Recent discoveries of new fossil hominid species have been accompanied by several phylogenetic hypotheses. All of these hypotheses are based on a consideration of hominid craniodental morphology. However, Collard and Wood (2000) suggested that cladograms derived from craniodental data are inconsistent with the prevailing hypothesis of ape phylogeny based on molecular data. The implication of their study is that craniodental characters are unreliable indicators of phylogeny in hominoids and fossil hominids but, notably, their analysis did not include extinct species. We report here on a cladistic analysis designed to test whether the inclusion of fossil taxa affects the ability of morphological characters to recover the molecular ape phylogeny. In the process of doing so, the study tests both Collard and Wood's (2000) hypothesis of character reliability, and the several recently proposed hypotheses of early hominid phylogeny. One hundred and ninety-eight craniodental characters were examined, including 109 traits that traditionally have been of interest in prior studies of hominoid and early hominid phylogeny, and 89 craniometric traits that represent size-corrected linear dimensions measured between standard cranial landmarks. The characters were partitioned into two data sets. One set contained all of the characters, and the other omitted the craniometric characters. Six parsimony analyses were performed; each data set was analyzed three times, once using an ingroup that consisted only of extant hominoids, a second time using an ingroup of extant hominoids and extinct early hominids, and a third time excluding Kenyanthropus platyops. Results suggest that the inclusion of fossil taxa can play a significant role in phylogenetic analysis. Analyses that examined only extant taxa produced most parsimonious cladograms that were inconsistent with the ape molecular tree. In contrast, analyses that included fossil hominids were consistent with that tree. This consistency

  4. Bacteria and the Nitrogen Economy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayanaba, A.

    1982-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation accounts for almost 70 percent of nitrogen for plant growth. If food is to keep abreast of population growth, even more nitrogen must be fixed. For this international research institutes continue the search for natural variants in the bacterial population while also pursuing novel genetic engineering methods. (Author)

  5. A cross-taxa phenological dataset from Mohonk Lake, NY and its relationship to climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, B. I.; Cook, E. R.; Huth, P. C.; Thompson, J. E.; Forster, A.; Smiley, D.

    2007-12-01

    We present a detailed analysis of a rare cross-taxa native species phenology dataset (plant flowering, insect first sighting, and amphibian first sighting) from Mohonk Lake, NY. This dataset is highly unusual in North America for its longevity of record, consistency of methodology and location, diversity of species available, and availability of local daily meteorological data. For each phenology series, we examined the flowering and first sighting Julian calendar dates for the existence of temporal trends. Only one of the five animal species (katydid) showed any evidence for a significant trend in first sighting. In contrast, the plant species showed a rich mixture of temporal trends in flowering that could be divided into four classes: woody plant (no trend), woody plant (negative trend), herbaceous plant (negative trend), and herbaceous plant (positive trend). Many of the trends were found to be statistically significant and robust to the method of trend estimation. The data within each of the four plant classes were also pooled as anomalies to provide more complete temporal coverage for tests of trend robustness. The results were strongly consistent with the individual species trends within each class and highly significant statistically. We next correlated the flowering and first sighting dates against growing degree-day (GDD) summations for each day of the year to measure the sensitivity of each species to this common form of climatic forcing on phenology. All species showed a significant sensitivity to GDD summations, with peak correlations falling on or near the varying median flowering or first sighting dates. These results were robust whether the GDD analyses were conducted over the complete set of observations for each species (beginning on or after 1928) or over a latter period with a more serially complete set of cross-taxa observations (1970-2002). The GDD correlations indicate significant climate sensitivity in all species, but the different

  6. S1 satellite DNA repetitive units display identical structure and overall variability in all Anatolian brown frog taxa.

    PubMed

    Picariello, Orfeo; Feliciello, Isidoro; Chinali, Gianni

    2016-02-01

    S1 satellite DNA from Palearctic brown frogs has a species-specific structure in all European species. We characterized S1 satellite DNA from the Anatolian brown frogs Rana macrocnemis, R. camerani, and R. holtzi in order to define their taxonomic rank and the structure of this satellite in this frog lineage. Southern blots of genomic DNA digested with KpnI, EcoRV, NdeI, NheI, or StuI produced the same pattern of satellite DNA bands. Moreover, quantitative dot blots showed that this satellite DNA accounts for 0.1 % of the genome in all taxa. Analysis of the overall genomic variability of the S1a repeat sequence in specimens from various populations demonstrated that this repetitive unit also has the same size (476 bp), the same most common sequence (MCS) and the same overall variability in all three taxa, and also in R. macrocnemis tavasensis. The S1a repetitive unit presents three deletions of 9, 8 and 1 bp compared to the 494-bp S1a repeat from European frogs. The S1a MCS has three variable positions (sequence WWTK in positions 183-186), due to the presence of two repeat subpopulations with motifs AATG and WWTT in all taxa. Unlike previously analyzed mitochondrial and nuclear sequences that show considerable variations among these taxa, no difference could be detected in the structure and variability of the S1 satellite repetitive units. This suggests that these taxa should belong to a single species. Our results indicate that this satellite DNA variety probably formed when the Anatolian lineage radiated from common ancestor about 4 mya, and since then has maintained its structure in all four taxa examined.

  7. [Evolutional relationships of endemic green algae Draparnaldioides simplex from Lake Baikal with nonbaicalian taxa of family Chaetoforaceae (Chlorophyta)].

    PubMed

    Mincheva, E V; Peretolchina, T E; Izhboldina, L A; Kravtsova, L S; Shcherbakov, D Iu

    2013-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships between the endemic baicalian green algae Draparnaldioides simplex C. meyer et Skabitsch, 1976 and holarctic taxa of green algae were studied using the fragment of 18S rDNA and internal transcribed spacers ITS1 and ITS2 of nuclear DNA. We showed that the baicalian genus Draparnaldioides is a separate taxon. The genetic difference between Draparnaldioides and nonbaicalian taxa of the sister groups of the green algae are small enough to indicate relative youth of the genus Draparnaldioides and its recent radiation from a common ancestor with Draparnaldia and Chaetophora.

  8. A taxa summary for the Simulium damnosum complex, with special reference to distribution outside the control areas of West Africa.

    PubMed

    Crosskey, R W

    1987-04-01

    A synoptic list is provided of currently recognized taxa in the Simulium damnosum complex, with an indication of their geographical distributions. Outline maps are given for the distribution of S. damnosum sensu lato, and for the West African cytospecies of the complex. Short reports on the identities and distributions of member taxa are given for countries other than those of the Onchocerciasis Control Programme in the Volta River Basin (OCP) and its Senegambia Extension; these are mainly based on collation of published and unpublished data for the post-1976 period (since the last WHO Expert Committee Report on Onchocerciasis).

  9. Methane/nitrogen separation process

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Richard W.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; Pinnau, Ingo; Segelke, Scott

    1997-01-01

    A membrane separation process for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. We have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen.

  10. Methane/nitrogen separation process

    DOEpatents

    Baker, R.W.; Lokhandwala, K.A.; Pinnau, I.; Segelke, S.

    1997-09-23

    A membrane separation process is described for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. The authors have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen. 11 figs.

  11. The Effects of Increasing the Number of Taxa on Inferences of Molecular Convergence

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Matthew W.; Hahn, Yoonsoo

    2017-01-01

    Convergent evolution provides insight into the link between phenotype and genotype. Recently, large-scale comparative studies of convergent evolution have become possible, but researchers are still trying to determine the best way to design these types of analyses. One aspect of molecular convergence studies that has not yet been investigated is how taxonomic sample size affects inferences of molecular convergence. Here we show that increased sample size decreases the amount of inferred molecular convergence associated with the three convergent transitions to a marine environment in mammals. The sampling of more taxa—both with and without the convergent phenotype—reveals that alleles associated only with marine mammals in small datasets are actually more widespread, or are not shared by all marine species. The sampling of more taxa also allows finer resolution of ancestral substitutions, revealing that they are not in fact on lineages leading to solely marine species. We revisit a previous study on marine mammals and find that only 7 of the reported 43 genes with convergent substitutions still show signs of convergence with a larger number of background species. However, four of those seven genes also showed signs of positive selection in the original analysis and may still be good candidates for adaptive convergence. Though our study is framed around the convergence of marine mammals, we expect our conclusions on taxonomic sampling are generalizable to any study of molecular convergence. PMID:28057728

  12. Metagenomic identification of bacterioplankton taxa and pathways involved in microcystin degradation in lake erie.

    PubMed

    Mou, Xiaozhen; Lu, Xinxin; Jacob, Jisha; Sun, Shulei; Heath, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacterial harmful blooms (CyanoHABs) that produce microcystins are appearing in an increasing number of freshwater ecosystems worldwide, damaging quality of water for use by human and aquatic life. Heterotrophic bacteria assemblages are thought to be important in transforming and detoxifying microcystins in natural environments. However, little is known about their taxonomic composition or pathways involved in the process. To address this knowledge gap, we compared the metagenomes of Lake Erie free-living bacterioplankton assemblages in laboratory microcosms amended with microcystins relative to unamended controls. A diverse array of bacterial phyla were responsive to elevated supply of microcystins, including Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes, Proteobacteria of the alpha, beta, gamma, delta and epsilon subdivisions and Verrucomicrobia. At more detailed taxonomic levels, Methylophilales (mainly in genus Methylotenera) and Burkholderiales (mainly in genera Bordetella, Burkholderia, Cupriavidus, Polaromonas, Ralstonia, Polynucleobacter and Variovorax) of Betaproteobacteria were suggested to be more important in microcystin degradation than Sphingomonadales of Alphaproteobacteria. The latter taxa were previously thought to be major microcystin degraders. Homologs to known microcystin-degrading genes (mlr) were not overrepresented in microcystin-amended metagenomes, indicating that Lake Erie bacterioplankton might employ alternative genes and/or pathways in microcystin degradation. Genes for xenobiotic metabolism were overrepresented in microcystin-amended microcosms, suggesting they are important in bacterial degradation of microcystin, a phenomenon that has been identified previously only in eukaryotic systems.

  13. Impacts of invasive plants on resident animals across ecosystems, taxa, and feeding types: a global assessment.

    PubMed

    Schirmel, Jens; Bundschuh, Mirco; Entling, Martin H; Kowarik, Ingo; Buchholz, Sascha

    2016-02-01

    As drivers of global change, biological invasions have fundamental ecological consequences. However, it remains unclear how invasive plant effects on resident animals vary across ecosystems, animal classes, and functional groups. We performed a comprehensive meta-analysis covering 198 field and laboratory studies reporting a total of 3624 observations of invasive plant effects on animals. Invasive plants had reducing (56%) or neutral (44%) effects on animal abundance, diversity, fitness, and ecosystem function across different ecosystems, animal classes, and feeding types while we could not find any increasing effect. Most importantly, we found that invasive plants reduced overall animal abundance, diversity and fitness. However, this significant overall effect was contingent on ecosystems, taxa, and feeding types of animals. Decreasing effects of invasive plants were most evident in riparian ecosystems, possibly because frequent disturbance facilitates more intense plant invasions compared to other ecosystem types. In accordance with their immediate reliance on plants for food, invasive plant effects were strongest on herbivores. Regarding taxonomic groups, birds and insects were most strongly affected. In insects, this may be explained by their high frequency of herbivory, while birds demonstrate that invasive plant effects can also cascade up to secondary consumers. Since data on impacts of invasive plants are rather limited for many animal groups in most ecosystems, we argue for overcoming gaps in knowledge and for a more differentiated discussion on effects of invasive plant on native fauna.

  14. Wolbachia distribution in selected beetle taxa characterized by PCR screens and MLST data.

    PubMed

    Sontowski, Rebekka; Bernhard, Detlef; Bleidorn, Christoph; Schlegel, Martin; Gerth, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Wolbachia (Alphaproteobacteria) is an inherited endosymbiont of arthropods and filarial nematodes and was reported to be widespread across insect taxa. While Wolbachia's effects on host biology are not understood from most of these hosts, known Wolbachia-induced phenotypes cover a spectrum from obligate beneficial mutualism to reproductive manipulations and pathogenicity. Interestingly, data on Wolbachia within the most species-rich order of arthropods, the Coleoptera (beetles), are scarce. Therefore, we screened 128 species from seven beetle families (Buprestidae, Hydraenidae, Dytiscidae, Hydrophilidae, Gyrinidae, Haliplidae, and Noteridae) for the presence of Wolbachia. Our data show that, contrary to previous estimations, Wolbachia frequencies in beetles (31% overall) are comparable to the ones in other insects. In addition, we used Wolbachia MLST data and host phylogeny to explore the evolutionary history of Wolbachia strains from Hydraenidae, an aquatic lineage of beetles. Our data suggest that Wolbachia from Hydraenidae might be largely host genus specific and that Wolbachia strain phylogeny is not independent to that of its hosts. As this contrasts with most terrestrial Wolbachia-arthropod systems, one potential conclusion is that aquatic lifestyle of hosts may result in Wolbachia distribution patterns distinct from those of terrestrial hosts. Our data thus provide both insights into Wolbachia distribution among beetles in general and a first glimpse of Wolbachia distribution patterns among aquatic host lineages.

  15. The evolution of peafowl and other taxa with ocelli (eyespots): a phylogenomic approach.

    PubMed

    Sun, Keping; Meiklejohn, Kelly A; Faircloth, Brant C; Glenn, Travis C; Braun, Edward L; Kimball, Rebecca T

    2014-09-07

    The most striking feature of peafowl (Pavo) is the males' elaborate train, which exhibits ocelli (ornamental eyespots) that are under sexual selection. Two additional genera within the Phasianidae (Polyplectron and Argusianus) exhibit ocelli, but the appearance and location of these ornamental eyespots exhibit substantial variation among these genera, raising the question of whether ocelli are homologous. Within Polyplectron, ocelli are ancestral, suggesting ocelli may have evolved even earlier, prior to the divergence among genera. However, it remains unclear whether Pavo, Polyplectron and Argusianus form a monophyletic clade in which ocelli evolved once. We estimated the phylogeny of the ocellated species using sequences from 1966 ultraconserved elements (UCEs) and three mitochondrial regions. The three ocellated genera did form a strongly supported clade, but each ocellated genus was sister to at least one genus without ocelli. Indeed, Polyplectron and Galloperdix, a genus not previously suggested to be related to any ocellated taxon, were sister genera. The close relationship between taxa with and without ocelli suggests multiple gains or losses. Independent gains, possibly reflecting a pre-existing bias for eye-like structures among females and/or the existence of a simple mutational pathway for the origin of ocelli, appears to be the most likely explanation.

  16. The evolution of peafowl and other taxa with ocelli (eyespots): a phylogenomic approach

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Keping; Meiklejohn, Kelly A.; Faircloth, Brant C.; Glenn, Travis C.; Braun, Edward L.; Kimball, Rebecca T.

    2014-01-01

    The most striking feature of peafowl (Pavo) is the males' elaborate train, which exhibits ocelli (ornamental eyespots) that are under sexual selection. Two additional genera within the Phasianidae (Polyplectron and Argusianus) exhibit ocelli, but the appearance and location of these ornamental eyespots exhibit substantial variation among these genera, raising the question of whether ocelli are homologous. Within Polyplectron, ocelli are ancestral, suggesting ocelli may have evolved even earlier, prior to the divergence among genera. However, it remains unclear whether Pavo, Polyplectron and Argusianus form a monophyletic clade in which ocelli evolved once. We estimated the phylogeny of the ocellated species using sequences from 1966 ultraconserved elements (UCEs) and three mitochondrial regions. The three ocellated genera did form a strongly supported clade, but each ocellated genus was sister to at least one genus without ocelli. Indeed, Polyplectron and Galloperdix, a genus not previously suggested to be related to any ocellated taxon, were sister genera. The close relationship between taxa with and without ocelli suggests multiple gains or losses. Independent gains, possibly reflecting a pre-existing bias for eye-like structures among females and/or the existence of a simple mutational pathway for the origin of ocelli, appears to be the most likely explanation. PMID:25030982

  17. Comparative Phylogeography in Fijian Coral Reef Fishes: A Multi-Taxa Approach towards Marine Reserve Design

    PubMed Central

    Drew, Joshua A.; Barber, Paul H.

    2012-01-01

    Delineating barriers to connectivity is important in marine reserve design as they describe the strength and number of connections among a reserve's constituent parts, and ultimately help characterize the resilience of the system to perturbations at each node. Here we demonstrate the utility of multi-taxa phylogeography in the design of a system of marine protected areas within Fiji. Gathering mtDNA control region data from five species of coral reef fish in five genera and two families, we find a range of population structure patterns, from those experiencing little (Chrysiptera talboti, Halichoeres hortulanus, and Pomacentrus maafu), to moderate (Amphiprion barberi, Φst = 0.14 and Amblyglyphidodon orbicularis Φst = 0.05) barriers to dispersal. Furthermore estimates of gene flow over ecological time scales suggest species-specific, asymmetric migration among the regions within Fiji. The diversity among species-specific results underscores the limitations of generalizing from single-taxon studies, including the inability to differentiate between a species-specific result and a replication of concordant phylogeographic patterns, and suggests that greater taxonomic coverage results in greater resolution of community dynamics within Fiji. Our results indicate that the Fijian reefs should not be managed as a single unit, and that closely related species can express dramatically different levels of population connectivity. PMID:23118892

  18. Firmicutes dominate the bacterial taxa within sugar-cane processing plants

    PubMed Central

    Sharmin, Farhana; Wakelin, Steve; Huygens, Flavia; Hargreaves, Megan

    2013-01-01

    Sugar cane processing sites are characterised by high sugar/hemicellulose levels, available moisture and warm conditions, and are relatively unexplored unique microbial environments. The PhyloChip microarray was used to investigate bacterial diversity and community composition in three Australian sugar cane processing plants. These ecosystems were highly complex and dominated by four main Phyla, Firmicutes (the most dominant), followed by Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Chloroflexi. Significant variation (p < 0.05) in community structure occurred between samples collected from ‘floor dump sediment’, ‘cooling tower water’, and ‘bagasse leachate’. Many bacterial Classes contributed to these differences, however most were of low numerical abundance. Separation in community composition was also linked to Classes of Firmicutes, particularly Bacillales, Lactobacillales and Clostridiales, whose dominance is likely to be linked to their physiology as ‘lactic acid bacteria’, capable of fermenting the sugars present. This process may help displace other bacterial taxa, providing a competitive advantage for Firmicutes bacteria. PMID:24177592

  19. Comments on Triassic pterosaurs with discussion about ontogeny and description of new taxa.

    PubMed

    Kellner, Alexander W A

    2015-01-01

    Eudimorphodon ranzii was the first Triassic pterosaur to be described and several specimens have been referred to this taxon mainly based on the presence of multicuspid teeth. Since this dental feature has been observed in several other pterosaurs, the revision of some specimens assigned to Eudimorphodon shows that they represent new taxa as follows: Arcticodactylus cromptonellus (comb. nov.), Austriadraco dallavecchiai (gen. et sp. nov.) and Bergamodactylus wildi (gen. et sp. nov.). A preliminary analysis of pterosaur ontogeny resulted in the recognition of six distinct ontogenetic stages (OS1-6). According to this classification, the holotype of Arcticodactylus cromptonellus has reached OS2, and although being ontogenetically much younger than others, the conspicuous anatomical differences lead to its exclusion from Eudimorphodon. The holotypes of Austriadraco dallavecchiai, Bergamodactylus wildi and Carniadactylus rosenfeldi have reached at least OS5, which demonstrates that the anatomical differences among them cannot be explained by ontogeny. Moreover, Bergamodactylus wildi reaches about 60% of the maximized wingspan of Carniadactylus rosenfeldi and further concurs that these specimens collected in distinct Triassic Islands of Europe are not conspecific. The present study increases the diversity of Triassic flying reptiles and further pushes the origins of this clade back to at least the Middle Triassic.

  20. Comparative lophotrochozoan neurogenesis and larval neuroanatomy: recent advances from previously neglected taxa.

    PubMed

    Wanninger, A

    2008-01-01

    Recently, a number of neurodevelopmental studies of hitherto neglected taxa have become available, contributing to questions relating to the evolution of the nervous system of Lophotrochozoa (Spiralia + Lophophorata). As an example, neurogenesis of echiurans showed that these worm-shaped spiralians, which as adults do not exhibit any signs of segmentation, do show such traits during ontogeny, e.g. by segmentally arranged perikarya and commissures. Similarly, sipunculan worms, which have a single ventral nerve cord in the adult stage, develop this nerve cord by gradual fusion of a paired larval nerve during metamorphosis, and show transitional stages of segmentation. These findings indicate that echiurans, annelids and sipunculans stem from a segmented ancestor. By contrast, no traces of body segmentation are present during neurogenesis of basal molluscs. However, a tetraneurous condition (i.e. one pair of ventral and one pair of lateral nerve cords), as is typical for Mollusca, and a serotonergic larval apical organ that matches the complexity of polyplacophoran apical organs, were found in larval entoprocts, thus strongly supporting a mollusc-entoproct clade. Within the Lophophorata (Ectoprocta + Phoronida + Brachiopoda), data on nervous system development for any of the 3 lophophorate phyla are as of yet too scarce for profound phylogenetic inferences. Taking into account the most recent advances in molecular phylogenetics and developmental neurobiology, a scenario emerges that proposes a clade comprising Sipuncula + Annelida (including Echiura) on the one hand and a monophyletic assemblage of Entoprocta + Mollusca on the other.

  1. Brachiopod taxa and shell portions reliably recording past ocean environments: Toward establishing a robust paleoceanographic proxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuyuki; Asami, Ryuji; Iryu, Yasufumi

    2011-07-01

    Fossils of rhynchonelliform brachiopods (marine invertebrates) constitute ˜70% of the samples used for delineating a well-known Phanerozoic trend in oxygen isotope composition (δ18O) of low-Mg calcite shells. The trend represents secular variations in temperature and/or δ18O of ancient seawater. However, the use of brachiopods as a paleoceanographic proxy is based on the presupposition that the shell calcite is precipitated in isotopic equilibrium with ambient seawater. Here, we show that high-resolution time series of the shell δ18O values along the maximum growth axes of two long-lived cool-water brachiopods are identical to, greater than, or less than those of calcite precipitated in isotopic equilibrium with ambient seawater, depending on the difference in shell growth rates. Coupled with δ18O data from subtropical and warm-temperate brachiopod species examined in our previous studies, we provide a sound framework illustrating which taxa and shell portions reliably recorded past ocean environments.

  2. Selective feeding by shredders on leaf-colonizing stream fungi: comparison of macroinvertebrate taxa.

    PubMed

    Arsuffi, T L; Suberkropp, K

    1989-04-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to examine the effects of fungal species composition of leaf detritus on the feeding of distantly related macroinvertebrate shredders. Preferences of shredders representing three orders of insects (Diptera: Tipulidae; Plecoptera: Pteronarcidae; Trichoptera: Limnephilidae and Calamatoceridae) and one each of gastropods (Basommatophora: Planorbidae) and crustaceans (Amphipoda: Gammaridae) were compared. Shredder preferences were based on consumption of leaves separately colonized by one of eight species of aquatic hyphomycetes. The feeding patterns of the invertebrates ranged from lack of feeding to heavy consumption of fungal-colonized leaves. Where consumption occurred, rank orders of preference and degree of selectivity differed among invertebrate shredders. Differences in preferences together with relationships between degree of selectivity and the relative mobility and digestive specializations exhibited by shredders suggest that the exploitation of fungal-colonized leaf detritus by different taxa is affected by phylogenetic constraints. Our results suggest that fungal species composition affects the feeding of a variety of shredders and that fungal species composition may be as important as degree of conditioning in determining food selection by shredders.

  3. On core jakobids and excavate taxa: the ultrastructure of Jakoba incarcerata.

    PubMed

    Simpson, A G; Patterson, D J

    2001-01-01

    The cellular organisation of the 'excavate' flagellate Jakoba incarcerata Bernard, Simpson and Patterson 2000 is described. Cells have one nucleus and dictyosome. The putative mitochondria lack cristae. Two flagella (anterior and posterior) insert anterior to the feeding groove. The posterior flagellum bears a dorsal vane. An 'anterior' microtubular root arises against the anterior basal body. Two main microtubular roots, left and right, and a singlet 'root' arise around the posterior basal body and support the groove. Non-microtubular fibres termed 'A', 'B', 'I', and 'composite' associate with the right root. A multilaminar 'C' fibre associates with the left root. The cytoskeleton of J. incarcerata indicates a common ancestry with other excavate taxa (i.e. diplomonads, retortamonads, heteroloboseids, 'core jakobids', Malawimonas, Carpediemonas, and Trimastix). Overall, J. incarcerata is most similar to (other) core jakobids, namely Jakoba libera, Reclinomonas, and Histiona. We regard J. incarcerata as a core jakobid and identify the group by the synapomorphy 'vanes restricted to dorsal side of the posterior flagellum'. The anterior root and position of the B fibre (and presence of dense inclusions in the cartwheels and a conscpicuous singlet root-associated fibre) in J. incarcerata are novel for core jakobids and argue for close relationships with Trimastix and/or Heterolobosea. The C fibre is similar in substructure to the costal fibre of parabasalids and it is possible that the structures are homologous.

  4. Multi-taxa integrated landscape genetics for zoonotic infectious diseases: deciphering variables influencing disease emergence.

    PubMed

    Leo, Sarah S T; Gonzalez, Andrew; Millien, Virginie

    2016-05-01

    Zoonotic disease transmission systems involve sets of species interacting with each other and their environment. This complexity impedes development of disease monitoring and control programs that require reliable identification of spatial and biotic variables and mechanisms facilitating disease emergence. To overcome this difficulty, we propose a framework that simultaneously examines all species involved in disease emergence by integrating concepts and methods from population genetics, landscape ecology, and spatial statistics. Multi-taxa integrated landscape genetics (MTILG) can reveal how interspecific interactions and landscape variables influence disease emergence patterns. We test the potential of our MTILG-based framework by modelling the emergence of a disease system across multiple species dispersal, interspecific interaction, and landscape scenarios. Our simulations showed that both interspecific-dependent dispersal patterns and landscape characteristics significantly influenced disease spread. Using our framework, we were able to detect statistically similar inter-population genetic differences and highly correlated spatial genetic patterns that imply species-dependent dispersal. Additionally, species that were assigned coupled-dispersal patterns were affected to the same degree by similar landscape variables. This study underlines the importance of an integrated approach to investigating emergence of disease systems. MTILG is a robust approach for such studies and can identify potential avenues for targeted disease management strategies.

  5. Understanding lichenicolous heterobasidiomycetes: new taxa and reproductive innovations in Tremella s.l.

    PubMed

    Zamora, Juan Carlos; Millanes, Ana María; Wedin, Mats; Rico, Víctor J; Pérez-Ortega, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Four new lichenicolous Tremella species are described and characterized morphologically and molecularly. Tremella celata grows on Ramalina fraxinea, inducing the formation of inconspicuous galls, and having hyphae with incomplete clamps. Tremella endosporogena develops intrahymenially in the apothecia of Lecanora carpinea, having single-celled basidia and clampless hyphae. Tremella diederichiana is the name proposed for a species micromorphologically close to T. christiansenii but inducing the formation of small, pale galls on the thallus and apothecia of Lecidea aff. erythrophaea Tremella variae grows on Lecanora varia thallus, instead of on the apothecia, as do the other known Tremella species parasitizing Lecanora s.l. Phylogenetic relationships and host specificity of these species are investigated and compared with other taxa that show morphological resemblances, phylogenetic affinities or similar hosts. The formation of mitotic conidia inside old basidia (endospores), which is a poorly known reproductive strategy in the Basidiomycota, is also a distinctive character of Tremella endosporogena A discussion on the reproductive role and systematic implications of endospores is included.

  6. When decisions on homologous structures cause ambiguous taxa relationships: the Neomorphinae (Aves, Cuculidae) example.

    PubMed

    Posso, S R; Donatelli, R J

    2010-02-01

    The anatomy of Neomorphinae is poorly understood and the systematics of this sub-family is also the most controversial of the cuckoo taxa, mainly with regard to the systematic position of Tapera and Dromococcyx. In this study, morphological similarities of the Neomorphinae are discussed after a comprehensive description of the cranial osteology was conducted in seven species, embracing all the Neomorphinae genera. This description is followed by comparisons with other cuckoos in order to contribute to the anatomy and systematics of this sub-family. In this way, we provide illustrations that enable the osteological descriptions and the proposed primary homologies to be visualised and compared. Even though Neomorphinae species share many cranial osteological characteristics, there are some anatomical divergences that allowed us to divide them into two distinct groups: (Dromococcyx/Tapera) and (Morococcyx(Neomorphus/Geococcyx)). After comparisons among all cuckoos this study suggests that Neomorphinae are more similar to Crotophaginae and Couinae than to other sub-families of cuckoos. Our results contrast with a recent phylogenetic study based on morphological features, mainly because alternative interpretations to the primary osteological homologies in this study grouped Tapera and Dromococcyx with Cuculinae. Although morphological studies can be used in phylogenetic analysis, we demonstrated here that decisions in the interpretation of the homologies can provide ambiguous results.

  7. Comparative phylogeography in Fijian coral reef fishes: a multi-taxa approach towards marine reserve design.

    PubMed

    Drew, Joshua A; Barber, Paul H

    2012-01-01

    Delineating barriers to connectivity is important in marine reserve design as they describe the strength and number of connections among a reserve's constituent parts, and ultimately help characterize the resilience of the system to perturbations at each node. Here we demonstrate the utility of multi-taxa phylogeography in the design of a system of marine protected areas within Fiji. Gathering mtDNA control region data from five species of coral reef fish in five genera and two families, we find a range of population structure patterns, from those experiencing little (Chrysiptera talboti, Halichoeres hortulanus, and Pomacentrus maafu), to moderate (Amphiprion barberi, Φ(st) = 0.14 and Amblyglyphidodon orbicularis Φ(st) = 0.05) barriers to dispersal. Furthermore estimates of gene flow over ecological time scales suggest species-specific, asymmetric migration among the regions within Fiji. The diversity among species-specific results underscores the limitations of generalizing from single-taxon studies, including the inability to differentiate between a species-specific result and a replication of concordant phylogeographic patterns, and suggests that greater taxonomic coverage results in greater resolution of community dynamics within Fiji. Our results indicate that the Fijian reefs should not be managed as a single unit, and that closely related species can express dramatically different levels of population connectivity.

  8. Studies on Leaf Venation in Selected Taxa of the Genus Ficus L. (Moraceae) in Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Badron, Ummu Hani; Talip, Noraini; Mohamad, Abdul Latiff; Affenddi, Affina Eliya Aznal; Juhari, Amirul Aiman Ahmad

    2014-12-01

    A study on the variation of leaf venation patterns was conducted on 21 taxa of the genus Ficus in Peninsular Malaysia. The results showed the existence of eight leaf venation patterns based on veinlets, the ultimate marginal and areolar venation. The majority of species, such as F. annulata, F. benghalensis, F. benjamina, F. deltoidea var. angustifolia, F. deltoidea var. kunstleri, F. depressa, F. elastica, F. hispida, F. microcarpa, F. religiosa, F. tinctoria, F. ucinata and F. vasculosa, show tri-veinlets. The others exhibit the following: bi-veinlets in F. aurata and F. heteropleura; uni-veinlets in F. lepicarpa, F. schwarzii and F. superba; and simple veinlets in F. aurantiacea and F. fulva. F. sagittata presents no veinlets for areolar venation. The presence of tracheid or swollen veins at the centre of the lamina and the presence of cystolith cells and trichomes are common anatomical characteristics that could assist in group classification of the studied species. Variations in leaf venation patterns are not only valuable in identifying a taxon group, but can also be used to differentiate between species in the genus Ficus.

  9. Studies on Leaf Venation in Selected Taxa of the Genus Ficus L. (Moraceae) in Peninsular Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Badron, Ummu Hani; Talip, Noraini; Mohamad, Abdul Latiff; Affenddi, Affina Eliya Aznal; Juhari, Amirul Aiman Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    A study on the variation of leaf venation patterns was conducted on 21 taxa of the genus Ficus in Peninsular Malaysia. The results showed the existence of eight leaf venation patterns based on veinlets, the ultimate marginal and areolar venation. The majority of species, such as F. annulata, F. benghalensis, F. benjamina, F. deltoidea var. angustifolia, F. deltoidea var. kunstleri, F. depressa, F. elastica, F. hispida, F. microcarpa, F. religiosa, F. tinctoria, F. ucinata and F. vasculosa, show tri-veinlets. The others exhibit the following: bi-veinlets in F. aurata and F. heteropleura; uni-veinlets in F. lepicarpa, F. schwarzii and F. superba; and simple veinlets in F. aurantiacea and F. fulva. F. sagittata presents no veinlets for areolar venation. The presence of tracheid or swollen veins at the centre of the lamina and the presence of cystolith cells and trichomes are common anatomical characteristics that could assist in group classification of the studied species. Variations in leaf venation patterns are not only valuable in identifying a taxon group, but can also be used to differentiate between species in the genus Ficus. PMID:27073603

  10. Distribution of Mytilus taxa in European coastal areas as inferred from molecular markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kijewski, T.; Śmietanka, B.; Zbawicka, M.; Gosling, E.; Hummel, H.; Wenne, R.

    2011-02-01

    The genetic constitution of mussels ( Mytilus spp.) was studied by means of three nuclear (Me 15/16, EF-bis, ITS) and one mtDNA (ND2-COIII) marker on a large European scale. In addition to a sharp cline between Atlantic and Mediterranean M. galloprovincialis, we observed a clear genetic distinction between the Black Sea and Mediterranean populations and a higher incidence of M. trossulus than reported so far in northern European populations. The frequency of M. galloprovincialis nuclear alleles was high along the Iberian Peninsula and decreased abruptly along the French coasts with a high frequency of M. edulis alleles in the Bay of Biscay, The Netherlands, Germany, Iceland, Barents and White Seas, and with little evidence of introgression between the two taxa. M. trossulus alleles were observed in the Baltic Sea and Danish Straits as expected. In addition, occurrence of M. trossulus alleles in cold waters of Iceland, Barents Sea and White Sea is reported for the first time.

  11. I-HEDGE: determining the optimum complementary sets of taxa for conservation using evolutionary isolation

    PubMed Central

    Mooers, Arne Ø.; Caccone, Adalgisa; Russello, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    In the midst of the current biodiversity crisis, conservation efforts might profitably be directed towards ensuring that extinctions do not result in inordinate losses of evolutionary history. Numerous methods have been developed to evaluate the importance of species based on their contribution to total phylogenetic diversity on trees and networks, but existing methods fail to take complementarity into account, and thus cannot identify the best order or subset of taxa to protect. Here, we develop a novel iterative calculation of the heightened evolutionary distinctiveness and globally endangered metric (I-HEDGE) that produces the optimal ranked list for conservation prioritization, taking into account complementarity and based on both phylogenetic diversity and extinction probability. We applied this metric to a phylogenetic network based on mitochondrial control region data from extant and recently extinct giant Galápagos tortoises, a highly endangered group of closely related species. We found that the restoration of two extinct species (a project currently underway) will contribute the greatest gain in phylogenetic diversity, and present an ordered list of rankings that is the optimum complementarity set for conservation prioritization. PMID:27635324

  12. Phylogenetic overview of the genus Genea (Pezizales, Ascomycota) with an emphasis on European taxa.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Pablo; Cabero, Julio; Moreno, Gabriel; Bratek, Zoltán; van Vooren, Nicolas; Kaounas, Vasileios; Konstantinidis, Giorgos; Agnello, Carlo; Merényi, Zsolt; Smith, Matthew E; Vizzini, Alfredo; Trappe, James M

    2016-01-01

    We constructed a comprehensive phylogeny of the genus Genea, with new molecular data from samples collected in several countries in temperate and Mediterranean Europe, as well as North America. Type specimens and authentic material of most species were examined to support identifications. The molecular identity of the most common species in Genea was compared with nuc rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS), D1-D2 domains of 28S nuc rDNA (28S rDNA) and translation elongation factor 1-α ene (TEF1) profiles of 10 recently proposed taxa, G. brunneocarpa, G. compressa, G. dentata, G. fageticola, G. lobulata, G. oxygala, G. pinicola, G. pseudobalsleyi, G. pseudoverrucosa and G. tuberculata, supporting their status as distinct species. Genea mexicana and G. thaxteri on the one hand and G. sphaerica and G. lespiaultii on the other are closely related. Multiple lineages were recorded for G. verrucosa and G. fragrans, but we found no morphological traits to discriminate among them, so we tentatively interpreted them as cryptic species. A key to species of the genus Genea is provided to facilitate identification. We provide macroscopic images of fresh specimens and of representative spores of most species. Finally, we conducted a molecular analysis of the divergence time for Genea and discuss the implications of our results.

  13. TaxaGloss - A Glossary and Translation Tool for Biodiversity Studies

    PubMed Central

    Fredericq, Suzanne; Freshwater, D. Wilson; Gilbert, Edward; Madrid, Maycol; Maslakova, Svetlana; Miglietta, Maria Pia; Rocha, Rosana M.; Rodríguez, Estefanía; Thacker, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Correctly identifying organisms is key to most biological research, and is especially critical in areas of biodiversity and conservation. Yet it remains one of the greatest challenges when studying all but the few well-established model systems. The challenge is in part due to the fact that most species have yet to be described, vanishing taxonomic expertise and the relative inaccessibility of taxonomic information. Furthermore, identification keys and other taxonomic resources are based on complex, taxon-specific vocabularies used to describe important morphological characters. Using these resources is made difficult by the fact that taxonomic documentation of the world's biodiversity is an international endeavour, and keys and field guides are not always available in the practitioner's native language. New information To address this challenge, we have developed a publicly available on-line illustrated multilingual glossary and translation tool for technical taxonomic terms using the Symbiota Software Project biodiversity platform. Illustrations, photographs and translations have been sourced from the global community of taxonomists working with marine invertebrates and seaweeds. These can be used as single-language illustrated glossaries or to make customized translation tables. The glossary has been launched with terms and illustrations of seaweeds, tunicates, sponges, hydrozoans, sea anemones, and nemerteans, and already includes translations into seven languages for some groups. Additional translations and development of terms for more taxa are underway, but the ultimate utility of this tool depends on active participation of the international taxonomic community. PMID:28174506

  14. Environmental heterogeneity as a universal driver of species richness across taxa, biomes and spatial scales.

    PubMed

    Stein, Anke; Gerstner, Katharina; Kreft, Holger

    2014-07-01

    Environmental heterogeneity is regarded as one of the most important factors governing species richness gradients. An increase in available niche space, provision of refuges and opportunities for isolation and divergent adaptation are thought to enhance species coexistence, persistence and diversification. However, the extent and generality of positive heterogeneity-richness relationships are still debated. Apart from widespread evidence supporting positive relationships, negative and hump-shaped relationships have also been reported. In a meta-analysis of 1148 data points from 192 studies worldwide, we examine the strength and direction of the relationship between spatial environmental heterogeneity and species richness of terrestrial plants and animals. We find that separate effects of heterogeneity in land cover, vegetation, climate, soil and topography are significantly positive, with vegetation and topographic heterogeneity showing particularly strong associations with species richness. The use of equal-area study units, spatial grain and spatial extent emerge as key factors influencing the strength of heterogeneity-richness relationships, highlighting the pervasive influence of spatial scale in heterogeneity-richness studies. We provide the first quantitative support for the generality of positive heterogeneity-richness relationships across heterogeneity components, habitat types, taxa and spatial scales from landscape to global extents, and identify specific needs for future comparative heterogeneity-richness research.

  15. Sealing Nitrogen Tetroxide Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, George G.; Houston, Donald W.; Scott, Frank D.

    1990-01-01

    Use of Furmanite FSC-N-6B sealant in clam-shell sealing device makes it possible to stop leaks of nitrogen tetroxide through defective or improperly-seated plumbing fittings. Devised to stop leaks in vent line of small rocket motor on Space Shuttle. Also used on plumbing containing hydrazine and other hazardous fluids, and repair withstands severe temperature, vibration, and shock. Leaks stopped in place, without draining or replacement of leaking parts.

  16. Ice sheets and nitrogen

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Eric W.

    2013-01-01

    Snow and ice play their most important role in the nitrogen cycle as a barrier to land–atmosphere and ocean–atmosphere exchanges that would otherwise occur. The inventory of nitrogen compounds in the polar ice sheets is approximately 260 Tg N, dominated by nitrate in the much larger Antarctic ice sheet. Ice cores help to inform us about the natural variability of the nitrogen cycle at global and regional scale, and about the extent of disturbance in recent decades. Nitrous oxide concentrations have risen about 20 per cent in the last 200 years and are now almost certainly higher than at any time in the last 800 000 years. Nitrate concentrations recorded in Greenland ice rose by a factor of 2–3, particularly between the 1950s and 1980s, reflecting a major change in NOx emissions reaching the background atmosphere. Increases in ice cores drilled at lower latitudes can be used to validate or constrain regional emission inventories. Background ammonium concentrations in Greenland ice show no significant recent trend, although the record is very noisy, being dominated by spikes of input from biomass burning events. Neither nitrate nor ammonium shows significant recent trends in Antarctica, although their natural variations are of biogeochemical and atmospheric chemical interest. Finally, it has been found that photolysis of nitrate in the snowpack leads to significant re-emissions of NOx that can strongly impact the regional atmosphere in snow-covered areas. PMID:23713125

  17. Ice sheets and nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Eric W

    2013-07-05

    Snow and ice play their most important role in the nitrogen cycle as a barrier to land-atmosphere and ocean-atmosphere exchanges that would otherwise occur. The inventory of nitrogen compounds in the polar ice sheets is approximately 260 Tg N, dominated by nitrate in the much larger Antarctic ice sheet. Ice cores help to inform us about the natural variability of the nitrogen cycle at global and regional scale, and about the extent of disturbance in recent decades. Nitrous oxide concentrations have risen about 20 per cent in the last 200 years and are now almost certainly higher than at any time in the last 800 000 years. Nitrate concentrations recorded in Greenland ice rose by a factor of 2-3, particularly between the 1950s and 1980s, reflecting a major change in NOx emissions reaching the background atmosphere. Increases in ice cores drilled at lower latitudes can be used to validate or constrain regional emission inventories. Background ammonium concentrations in Greenland ice show no significant recent trend, although the record is very noisy, being dominated by spikes of input from biomass burning events. Neither nitrate nor ammonium shows significant recent trends in Antarctica, although their natural variations are of biogeochemical and atmospheric chemical interest. Finally, it has been found that photolysis of nitrate in the snowpack leads to significant re-emissions of NOx that can strongly impact the regional atmosphere in snow-covered areas.

  18. Nitrogen metabolism in haloarchaea

    PubMed Central

    Bonete, María José; Martínez-Espinosa, Rosa María; Pire, Carmen; Zafrilla, Basilio; Richardson, David J

    2008-01-01

    The nitrogen cycle (N-cycle), principally supported by prokaryotes, involves different redox reactions mainly focused on assimilatory purposes or respiratory processes for energy conservation. As the N-cycle has important environmental implications, this biogeochemical cycle has become a major research topic during the last few years. However, although N-cycle metabolic pathways have been studied extensively in Bacteria or Eukarya, relatively little is known in the Archaea. Halophilic Archaea are the predominant microorganisms in hot and hypersaline environments such as salted lakes, hot springs or salted ponds. Consequently, the denitrifying haloarchaea that sustain the nitrogen cycle under these conditions have emerged as an important target for research aimed at understanding microbial life in these extreme environments. The haloarchaeon Haloferax mediterranei was isolated 20 years ago from Santa Pola salted ponds (Alicante, Spain). It was described as a denitrifier and it is also able to grow using NO3-, NO2- or NH4+ as inorganic nitrogen sources. This review summarizes the advances that have been made in understanding the N-cycle in halophilic archaea using Hfx mediterranei as a haloarchaeal model. The results obtained show that this microorganism could be very attractive for bioremediation applications in those areas where high salt, nitrate and nitrite concentrations are found in ground waters and soils. PMID:18593475

  19. Application of RAD-based phylogenetics to complex relationships among variously related taxa in a species flock.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tetsumi; Nagata, Nobuaki; Sota, Teiji

    2014-11-01

    Restriction site-associated DNA (RAD) sequences from entire genomes can be used to resolve complex phylogenetic problems. However, the processed data matrix varies depending on the strategies used to determine orthologous loci and to filter loci according to the number of taxa with sequence data for the loci, and often contains plenty of missing data. To explore the utility of RAD sequences for elucidating the phylogenetics of variously related species, we conducted RAD sequencing for the Ohomopterus ground beetles and attempted maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analyses using 42 data matrices ranging from 1.6×10(4) to 8.1×10(6) base pairs, with 11-72% missing data. We demonstrate that robust phylogenetic trees, in terms of bootstrap values, do not necessarily result from larger data matrices, as previously suggested. Robust trees for distantly related and closely related taxa resulted from different data matrices, and topologically different robust trees for distantly related taxa resulted from various data matrices. For closely related taxa, moderately large data matrices strongly supported a topology that is incompatible with morphological evidence, possibly due to the effect of introgressive hybridization. Practically, exploring variously prepared data matrices is an effective way to propose important alternative phylogenetic hypotheses for this study group.

  20. Leonard A. Kelton, 1923-2011: Biographical sketch, list of publications, described taxa, and patronyms names in his honor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A biographical sketch of the late heteropterist, Leonard Alexander Kelton (1923-2011), a former systematist at the Canadian National Collection in Ottawa, Canada, is presented. Also provided are lists of his 71 scientific publications, the new taxa he described, and the patronyms named in his honor....

  1. Do the rich get richer? Varying effects of tree species identity and diversity on the richness of understory taxa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Champagne, Juilette; Paine, C. E. Timothy; Schoolmaster, Donald; Stejskal, Robert; Volařík, Daniel; Šebesta, Jan; Trnka, Filip; Koutecký, Tomáš; Švarc, Petr; Svátek, Martin; Hector, Andy; Matula, Radim

    2016-01-01

    Understory herbs and soil invertebrates play key roles in soil formation and nutrient cycling in forests. Studies suggest that diversity in the canopy and in the understory are positively associated, but these studies often confound the effects of tree species diversity with those of tree species identity and abiotic conditions. We combined extensive field sampling with structural equation modeling to evaluate the simultaneous effects of tree diversity on the species diversity of understory herbs, beetles, and earthworms. The diversity of earthworms and saproxylic beetles was directly and positively associated with tree diversity, presumably because species of both these taxa specialize on certain species of trees. Tree identity also strongly affected diversity in the understory, especially for herbs, likely as a result of interspecific differences in canopy light transmittance or litter decomposition rates. Our results suggest that changes in forest management will disproportionately affect certain understory taxa. For instance, changes in canopy diversity will affect the diversity of earthworms and saproxylic beetles more than changes in tree species composition, whereas the converse would be expected for understory herbs and detritivorous beetles. We conclude that the effects of tree diversity on understory taxa can vary from positive to negative and may affect biogeochemical cycling in temperate forests. Thus, maintaining high diversity in temperate forests can promote the diversity of multiple taxa in the understory.

  2. The roles of Lazarus taxa and refugia through the Ordovician-Silurian transition: data from the Brachiopoda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, J.-Y.; Boucot, A. J.; Harper, D. A.; Zhan, R.-B.; Neuman, R. B.

    2003-04-01

    Global analyses of nearly 90 families and 275 genera of brachiopods from the middle Ashgill through the Hirnantian (Ordovician) to the lower-middle Rhuddanian (Silurian) suggest that about 60% and 40% of the total number of genera were eliminated at the first and second phases of the end Ordovician extinction event, respectively. Among the 85 surviving genera, about 50 with declining and 10 with proliferating abundances are known from the Hirnantian together with about 20 provisional Lazarus taxa. The Lazarus taxa are essentially survivors and form the extremity of the declining genera. The distributions of declining genera and relicts during the crisis interval shows a random and sporadic pattern, suggesting there was no single, common refugium for end Ordovician brachiopods. In addition to their biological attributes, a markedly decreased population size together with taphonomic failure and poor preservation, and collecting bias have contributed towards the distributional trends apparent during the event. The development of declining genera during the extinction may be linked to their palaeogeographical setting, the phylogenetic history of the taxa, and the ambient environmental conditions. This new global database has significantly reduced the number of Lazarus taxa and minimizes the number of possible locations for collective refugia during the end Ordovician crisis. Nevertheless, the atrypids, athyridids, pentamerids, and spiriferids had more limited distributions during the crisis interval but formed the locus for a Silurian diversification of the phylum into carbonate environments possibly around the Rhuddanian-Aeronian boundary.

  3. prepare_taxa_charts.py: A Python program to automate generation of publication ready taxonomic pie chart images from QIIME.

    PubMed

    Lakhujani, Vijay; Badapanda, Chandan

    2017-06-01

    QIIME (Quantitative Insights Into Microbial Ecology) is one of the most popular open-source bioinformatics suite for performing metagenome, 16S rRNA amplicon and Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) data analysis. Although, it is very comprehensive and powerful tool, it lacks a method to provide publication ready taxonomic pie charts. The script plot_taxa_summary.py bundled with QIIME generate a html file and a folder containing taxonomic pie chart and legend as separate images. The images have randomly generated alphanumeric names. Therefore, it is difficult to associate the pie chart with the legend and the corresponding sample identifier. Even if the option to have the legend within the html file is selected while executing plot_taxa_summary.py, it is very tedious to crop a complete image (having both the pie chart and the legend) due to unequal image sizes. It requires a lot of time to manually prepare the pie charts for multiple samples for publication purpose. Moreover, there are chances of error while identifying the pie chart and legend pair due to random alphanumeric names of the images. To bypass all these bottlenecks and make this process efficient, we have developed a python based program, prepare_taxa_charts.py, to automate the renaming, cropping and merging of taxonomic pie chart and corresponding legend image into a single, good quality publication ready image. This program not only augments the functionality of plot_taxa_summary.py but is also very fast in terms of CPU time and user friendly.

  4. Chemical and principal-component analyses of the essential oils of Apioideae taxa (Apiaceae) from central Balkan.

    PubMed

    Kapetanos, Chrysostomos; Karioti, Anastasia; Bojović, Srdjan; Marin, Petar; Veljić, Milan; Skaltsa, Helen

    2008-01-01

    The volatile constituents of the essential oils of 23 taxa belonging to the Apioideae subfamily were studied in detail. The investigated taxa were Pimpinella serbica (Vis.) Bentham & Hooker, Libanotis montana Cr., Cnidium silaifolium (Jacq.) Simk. ssp. orientale (Boiss.) Tutin, Bupleurum praealtum L., B. sibthorpianum S. S. var. diversifolium (Roch.) Hay, Aegopodium podagraria L., Torilis anthriscus (L.) Gmel., Orlaya grandiflora (L.) Hoffm., Laserpitium siler L., Laser trilobum (L.) Brokh., Chaerophyllum aureum L., C. hirsutum L., C. temulum L., Pastinaca sativa L., P. hirsuta Pancic., Tordylium maximum L., Physospermum cornubiense (L.) DC., Peucedanum alsaticum L., P. oreoselinum (L.) Moench, P. cervaria (L.) Cuss., P. austriacum (Jacq.) Koch, P. longifolium W. et K., and P. officinale L. All of these species grow wild in the central part of the Balkan Peninsula. The essential oils were found to be complex mixtures of various compounds, more than 100 constituents being in each taxon, with contributions of main products never exceeding 25% of the total content. Sesquiterpene hydrocarbons were found to be the main group of constituents of all taxa, except for Peucedanum species, where monoterpene hydrocarbons were identified as the main components. The chemotaxonomic value of the essential-oil composition is discussed according to results of principal-component analysis (PCA). The essential-oil composition mainly reflects current taxonomic relationships between the investigated taxa.

  5. On the generic placement and taxonomic status of some Miltochrista taxa described by Franz Daniel (Lepidoptera, Erebidae, Arctiinae).

    PubMed

    Volynkin, Anton V

    2016-10-31

    Three Miltochrista Hübner, [1819] taxa described by Daniel, Miltochrista tibeta Daniel, 1951, M. tibeta clara Daniel, 1951 and M. gilva Daniel, 1951 are transferred to the genus Lyclene Moore, [1860]. M. tibeta clara is upgraded to the species level. Adults, male and female genitalia are illustrated.

  6. A multigene phylogenetic synthesis for the class Lecanoromycetes (Ascomycota): 1307 fungi representing 1139 infrageneric taxa, 317 genera and 66 families

    PubMed Central

    Miadlikowska, Jolanta; Kauff, Frank; Högnabba, Filip; Oliver, Jeffrey C.; Molnár, Katalin; Fraker, Emily; Gaya, Ester; Hafellner, Josef; Hofstetter, Valérie; Gueidan, Cécile; Otálora, Mónica A.G.; Hodkinson, Brendan; Kukwa, Martin; Lücking, Robert; Björk, Curtis; Sipman, Harrie J.M.; Burgaz, Ana Rosa; Thell, Arne; Passo, Alfredo; Myllys, Leena; Goward, Trevor; Fernández-Brime, Samantha; Hestmark, Geir; Lendemer, James; Lumbsch, H. Thorsten; Schmull, Michaela; Schoch, Conrad; Sérusiaux, Emmanuël; Maddison, David R.; Arnold, A. Elizabeth; Lutzoni, François; Stenroos, Soili

    2014-01-01

    The Lecanoromycetes is the largest class of lichenized Fungi, and one of the most species-rich classes in the kingdom. Here we provide a multigene phylogenetic synthesis (using three ribosomal RNA-coding and two protein-coding genes) of the Lecanoromycetes based on 642 newly generated and 3329 publicly available sequences representing 1139 taxa, 317 genera, 66 families, 17 orders and five subclasses (four currently recognized: Acarosporomycetidae, Lecanoromycetidae, Ostropomycetidae, Umbilicariomycetidae; and one provisionarily recognized, ‘Candelariomycetidae’). Maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses on four multigene datasets assembled using a cumulative supermatrix approach with a progressively higher number of species and missing data (5-gene, 5+4-gene, 5+4+3-gene and 5+4+3+2-gene datasets) show that the current classification includes non-monophyletic taxa at various ranks, which need to be recircumscribed and require revisionary treatments based on denser taxon sampling and more loci. Two newly circumscribed orders (Arctomiales and Hymeneliales in the Ostropomycetidae) and three families (Ramboldiaceae and Psilolechiaceae in the Lecanorales, and Strangosporaceae in the Lecanoromycetes inc. sed.) are introduced. The potential resurrection of the families Eigleraceae and Lopadiaceae is considered here to alleviate phylogenetic and classification disparities. An overview of the photobionts associated with the main fungal lineages in the Lecanoromycetes based on available published records is provided. A revised schematic classification at the family level in the phylogenetic context of widely accepted and newly revealed relationships across Lecanoromycetes is included. The cumulative addition of taxa with an increasing amount of missing data (i.e., a cumulative supermatrix approach, starting with taxa for which sequences were available for all five targeted genes and ending with the addition of taxa for which only two genes have been sequenced) revealed

  7. A multigene phylogenetic synthesis for the class Lecanoromycetes (Ascomycota): 1307 fungi representing 1139 infrageneric taxa, 317 genera and 66 families.

    PubMed

    Miadlikowska, Jolanta; Kauff, Frank; Högnabba, Filip; Oliver, Jeffrey C; Molnár, Katalin; Fraker, Emily; Gaya, Ester; Hafellner, Josef; Hofstetter, Valérie; Gueidan, Cécile; Otálora, Mónica A G; Hodkinson, Brendan; Kukwa, Martin; Lücking, Robert; Björk, Curtis; Sipman, Harrie J M; Burgaz, Ana Rosa; Thell, Arne; Passo, Alfredo; Myllys, Leena; Goward, Trevor; Fernández-Brime, Samantha; Hestmark, Geir; Lendemer, James; Lumbsch, H Thorsten; Schmull, Michaela; Schoch, Conrad L; Sérusiaux, Emmanuël; Maddison, David R; Arnold, A Elizabeth; Lutzoni, François; Stenroos, Soili

    2014-10-01

    The Lecanoromycetes is the largest class of lichenized Fungi, and one of the most species-rich classes in the kingdom. Here we provide a multigene phylogenetic synthesis (using three ribosomal RNA-coding and two protein-coding genes) of the Lecanoromycetes based on 642 newly generated and 3329 publicly available sequences representing 1139 taxa, 317 genera, 66 families, 17 orders and five subclasses (four currently recognized: Acarosporomycetidae, Lecanoromycetidae, Ostropomycetidae, Umbilicariomycetidae; and one provisionarily recognized, 'Candelariomycetidae'). Maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses on four multigene datasets assembled using a cumulative supermatrix approach with a progressively higher number of species and missing data (5-gene, 5+4-gene, 5+4+3-gene and 5+4+3+2-gene datasets) show that the current classification includes non-monophyletic taxa at various ranks, which need to be recircumscribed and require revisionary treatments based on denser taxon sampling and more loci. Two newly circumscribed orders (Arctomiales and Hymeneliales in the Ostropomycetidae) and three families (Ramboldiaceae and Psilolechiaceae in the Lecanorales, and Strangosporaceae in the Lecanoromycetes inc. sed.) are introduced. The potential resurrection of the families Eigleraceae and Lopadiaceae is considered here to alleviate phylogenetic and classification disparities. An overview of the photobionts associated with the main fungal lineages in the Lecanoromycetes based on available published records is provided. A revised schematic classification at the family level in the phylogenetic context of widely accepted and newly revealed relationships across Lecanoromycetes is included. The cumulative addition of taxa with an increasing amount of missing data (i.e., a cumulative supermatrix approach, starting with taxa for which sequences were available for all five targeted genes and ending with the addition of taxa for which only two genes have been sequenced) revealed

  8. Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Studies of the Marine Nitrogen Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casciotti, Karen L.

    2016-01-01

    The marine nitrogen cycle is a complex web of microbially mediated reactions that control the inventory, distribution, and speciation of nitrogen in the marine environment. Because nitrogen is a major nutrient that is required by all life, its availability can control biological productivity and ecosystem structure in both surface and deep-ocean communities. Stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate and nitrite have provided new insights into the rates and distributions of marine nitrogen cycle processes, especially when analyzed in combination with numerical simulations of ocean circulation and biogeochemistry. This review highlights the insights gained from dual-isotope studies applied at regional to global scales and their incorporation into oceanic biogeochemical models. These studies represent significant new advances in the use of isotopic measurements to understand the modern nitrogen cycle, with implications for the study of past ocean productivity, oxygenation, and nutrient status.

  9. Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Studies of the Marine Nitrogen Cycle.

    PubMed

    Casciotti, Karen L

    2016-01-01

    The marine nitrogen cycle is a complex web of microbially mediated reactions that control the inventory, distribution, and speciation of nitrogen in the marine environment. Because nitrogen is a major nutrient that is required by all life, its availability can control biological productivity and ecosystem structure in both surface and deep-ocean communities. Stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate and nitrite have provided new insights into the rates and distributions of marine nitrogen cycle processes, especially when analyzed in combination with numerical simulations of ocean circulation and biogeochemistry. This review highlights the insights gained from dual-isotope studies applied at regional to global scales and their incorporation into oceanic biogeochemical models. These studies represent significant new advances in the use of isotopic measurements to understand the modern nitrogen cycle, with implications for the study of past ocean productivity, oxygenation, and nutrient status.

  10. The Ophiostoma clavatum species complex: a newly defined group in the Ophiostomatales including three novel taxa.

    PubMed

    Linnakoski, Riikka; Jankowiak, Robert; Villari, Caterina; Kirisits, Thomas; Solheim, Halvor; de Beer, Z Wilhelm; Wingfield, Michael J

    2016-07-01

    Two species of blue-stain fungi with similar morphologies, Ophiostoma brunneo-ciliatum and Ophiostoma clavatum, are associates of bark beetles infesting Pinus spp. in Europe. This has raised questions whether they represent distinct taxa. Absence of herbarium specimens and contaminated or mistakenly identified cultures of O. brunneo-ciliatum and O. clavatum have accentuated the uncertainty regarding their correct identification. The aim of this study was to reconsider the identity of European isolates reported as O. brunneo-ciliatum and O. clavatum by applying DNA-based identification methods, and to provide appropriate type specimens for them. Phylogenetic analyses of the ITS, βT, TEF-1α and CAL gene sequences revealed that the investigated isolates represent a complex of seven cryptic species. The study confirmed that ITS data is insufficient to delineate species in some Ophiostoma species clusters. Lectotypes and epitypes were designated for O. clavatum and O. brunneo-ciliatum, and three new species, Ophiostoma brunneolum, Ophiostoma macroclavatum and Ophiostoma pseudocatenulatum, are described in the newly defined O. clavatum-complex. The other two species included in the complex are Ophiostoma ainoae and Ophiostoma tapionis. The results suggest co-evolution of these fungi in association with specific bark beetles. The results also confirm the identity of the fungus associated with the pine bark beetle Ips acuminatus as O. clavatum, while O. brunneo-ciliatum appears to be mainly associated with another pine bark beetle, Ips sexdentatus.

  11. Supporting biodiversity by prescribed burning in grasslands - A multi-taxa approach.

    PubMed

    Valkó, Orsolya; Deák, Balázs; Magura, Tibor; Török, Péter; Kelemen, András; Tóth, Katalin; Horváth, Roland; Nagy, Dávid D; Debnár, Zsuzsanna; Zsigrai, György; Kapocsi, István; Tóthmérész, Béla

    2016-12-01

    There are contrasting opinions on the use of prescribed burning management in European grasslands. On the one hand, prescribed burning can be effectively used for the management of open landscapes, controlling dominant species, reducing accumulated litter or decreasing wildfire risk. On the other hand burning can have a detrimental impact on grassland biodiversity by supporting competitor grasses and by threatening several rare and endangered species, especially arthropods. We studied the effects of prescribed burning in alkaline grasslands of high conservation interest. Our aim was to test whether dormant-season prescribed burning can be an alternative conservation measure in these grasslands. We selected six sites in East-Hungary: in three sites, a prescribed fire was applied in November 2011, while three sites remained unburnt. We studied the effects of burning on soil characteristics, plant biomass and on the composition of vegetation and arthropod assemblages (isopods, spiders, ground beetles and rove beetles). Soil pH, organic matter, potassium and phosphorous did not change, but soluble salt content increased significantly in the burnt sites. Prescribed burning had several positive effects from the nature conservation viewpoint. Shannon diversity and the number of flowering shoots were higher, and the cover of the dominant grass Festuca pseudovina was lower in the burnt sites. Graminoid biomass was lower, while total, green and forb biomass were higher in the burnt plots compared to the control. The key finding of our study was that prescribed burning did not decrease the abundance and diversity of arthropod taxa. Species-level analyses showed that out of the most abundant invertebrate species, 10 were not affected, 1 was negatively and 1 was positively affected by burning. Moreover, our results suggest that prescribed burning leaving unburnt patches can be a viable management tool in open landscapes, because it supports plant diversity and does not threaten

  12. Genetic and phenotypic differentiation between invasive and native Rhododendron (Ericaceae) taxa and the role of hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Erfmeier, Alexandra; Tsaliki, Marina; Roß, Christel A; Bruelheide, Helge

    2011-01-01

    Hybridization has been repeatedly put forward to explain the invasiveness of Rhododendron ponticum L. in the British Isles. The present study investigates the pattern of ecotypic differentiation and hybridization among native North American R. catawbiense and R. maximum, native R. ponticum from Georgia and Spain, and invasive R. ponticum from Ireland and aims to assess the contribution of hybridization for Rhododendron invasion in the British Isles. Six populations per taxon were analyzed with AFLP markers for genetic dissimilarity, subjected to germination and growth experiments, and tested for frost hardiness. We assessed variation in morphological and ecological characteristics to identify traits displaying evidence of hybridization, thus, promoting invasiveness. Molecular marker analyses revealed a clear distinction between North American R. catawbiense and R. maximum on the one hand, and all R. ponticum populations on the other hand, displaying a complete intermixture of native Spanish and invasive Irish populations. Multivariate analyses of traits revealed leaf length–width ratio, relative growth rates (RGRs) in leaf length, root biomass, and shoot–root ratio to significantly discriminate between the different taxa and unequivocally assigned invasive Irish R. ponticum to the Spanish phenotypes. While the Irish R. ponticum had similar growth traits as conspecific native R. ponticum provenances, germination and biomass allocation were more similar to North American R. catawbiense and R. maximum. Hybridization did not contribute to explaining invasiveness of R. ponticum in Ireland. The similarity in germination and biomass allocation of invasive Irish R. ponticum and North American species has evolved independently and can more probably be attributed to an independent shift within the Ponticum cluster in Ireland. PMID:22393509

  13. Impacts of major predators on tropical agroforest arthropods: comparisons within and across taxa.

    PubMed

    Philpott, Stacy M; Greenberg, Russell; Bichier, Peter; Perfecto, Ivette

    2004-06-01

    In food web studies, taxonomically unrelated predators are often grouped into trophic levels regardless of their relative importance on prey assemblages, multiple predator effects, or interactions such as omnivory. Ants and birds are important predators likely to differentially shape arthropod assemblages, but no studies have compared their effects on a shared prey base. In two separate studies, we excluded birds and ants from branches of a canopy tree ( Inga micheliana) in a coffee farm in Mexico for 2 months in the dry and wet seasons of 2002. We investigated changes in arthropod densities with and without predation pressure from (1) birds and (2) ant assemblages dominated by one of two ant species ( Azteca instabilis and Camponotus senex). We first analyzed individual effects of each predator (birds, Azteca instabilis, and C. senex) then used a per day effect metric to compare differences in effects across (birds vs ants) and within predator taxa (the two ant species). Individually, birds reduced densities of total and large arthropods and some arthropod orders (e.g., spiders, beetles, roaches) in both seasons. Azteca instabilis did not significantly affect arthropods (total, small, large or specific orders). Camponotus senex, however, tended to remove arthropods (total, small), especially in the dry season, and affected arthropod densities of some orders both positively and negatively. Predators greatly differed in their effects on Inga arthropods (for all, small, large, and individual orders of arthropods) both in sign (+/-) and magnitudes of effects. Birds had stronger negative effects on arthropods than ants and the two dominant ant species had stronger effects on arthropods in different seasons. Our results show that aggregating taxonomically related and unrelated predators into trophic levels without prior experimental data quantifying the sign and strengths of effects may lead to a misrepresentation of food web interactions.

  14. Evaluating green infrastructure in urban environments using a multi-taxa and functional diversity approach.

    PubMed

    Pinho, Pedro; Correia, Otília; Lecoq, Miguel; Munzi, Silvana; Vasconcelos, Sasha; Gonçalves, Paula; Rebelo, Rui; Antunes, Cristina; Silva, Patrícia; Freitas, Catarina; Lopes, Nuno; Santos-Reis, Margarida; Branquinho, Cristina

    2016-05-01

    Forested areas within cities host a large number of species, responsible for many ecosystem services in urban areas. The biodiversity in these areas is influenced by human disturbances such as atmospheric pollution and urban heat island effect. To ameliorate the effects of these factors, an increase in urban green areas is often considered sufficient. However, this approach assumes that all types of green cover have the same importance for species. Our aim was to show that not all forested green areas are equal in importance for species, but that based on a multi-taxa and functional diversity approach it is possible to value green infrastructure in urban environments. After evaluating the diversity of lichens, butterflies and other-arthropods, birds and mammals in 31 Mediterranean urban forests in south-west Europe (Almada, Portugal), bird and lichen functional groups responsive to urbanization were found. A community shift (tolerant species replacing sensitive ones) along the urbanization gradient was found, and this must be considered when using these groups as indicators of the effect of urbanization. Bird and lichen functional groups were then analyzed together with the characteristics of the forests and their surroundings. Our results showed that, contrary to previous assumptions, vegetation density and more importantly the amount of urban areas around the forest (matrix), are more important for biodiversity than forest quantity alone. This indicated that not all types of forested green areas have the same importance for biodiversity. An index of forest functional diversity was then calculated for all sampled forests of the area. This could help decision-makers to improve the management of urban green infrastructures with the goal of increasing functionality and ultimately ecosystem services in urban areas.

  15. A review of the leafhopper tribe Hyalojassini (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae: Iassinae) with description of new taxa.

    PubMed

    Dai, Wu; Dietrich, Christopher H; Zhang, Yalin

    2015-01-16

    The morphologically diverse leafhopper tribe Hyalojassini is reinstated from synonymy under Iassini based on distinctive features of the male genitalia and a key to the Oriental genera is given. The previously monotypic genera Hyalojassus Evans and Coriojassus Evans are revised and redescribed based on study of the type species. The following new genera and species are described from Thailand and China and placed in Hyalojassini: Kanchanaburiassus maculatus gen. nov. & sp. nov. from Kanchanaburi, Thailand; Lamelliassus chaingmaiensis gen. & sp. nov. from Chaingmai, Thailand; Siamiassus constanti gen. & sp. nov. from Loei, Thailand ; Decliviassus gen nov. with D. bipunctatus sp. nov., D. maculatus sp. nov., and D. nudus sp. nov., from Thailand; Trocniassus gen. nov. with T. shaanxiensis and T. henanensis sp. nov.; Hyalojassus elongatus sp. nov. and H. punctulatus sp. nov. from Thailand and H. yunnanensis sp. nov. from China; Coriojassus loeiensis sp. nov. from Thailand, C. yunnanensis sp. nov. and C. zhejiangensis sp. nov. from Yunnan and Zhejiang, China, respectively, the latter representing the first records of the genus from China. Sinojassus Dai et al. 2010 (nec Zhang 1985) is a junior homonym, thus a new replacement name, Siniassus nom. nov., is proposed, the genus is transferred to Hyalojassini, and the following new combinations are made: Siniassus loberus (Dai, Zhang & Zhang, 2010), Siniassus aspinus (Dai, Zhang & Zhang, 2010), Siniassus compressus (Dai, Zhang & Zhang, 2010) and Siniassus webbi (Dai & Dietrich, 2010). Detailed morphological descriptions and illustrations for all new taxa are provided. The following New World genera share the diagnostic morphological features of Hyalojassini and are newly placed in this tribe: Absheta Blocker, Aztrania Blocker, Baldriga Blocker, Bertawolia Blocker, Betawala Blocker, Comanopa Blocker, Daveyoungana Blocker & Webb, Derakandra Blocker, Donleva Blocker, Gargaropsis Fowler, Garlica Blocker, Gehundra Blocker

  16. DNA taxonomy in morphologically plastic taxa: algorithmic species delimitation in the Boodlea complex (Chlorophyta: Cladophorales).

    PubMed

    Leliaert, Frederik; Verbruggen, Heroen; Wysor, Brian; De Clerck, Olivier

    2009-10-01

    DNA-based taxonomy provides a convenient and reliable tool for species delimitation, especially in organisms in which morphological discrimination is difficult or impossible, such as many algal taxa. A group with a long history of confusing species circumscriptions is the morphologically plastic Boodlea complex, comprising the marine green algal genera Boodlea, Cladophoropsis, Phyllodictyon and Struveopsis. In this study, we elucidate species boundaries in the Boodlea complex by analysing nrDNA internal transcribed spacer sequences from 175 specimens collected from a wide geographical range. Algorithmic methods of sequence-based species delineation were applied, including statistical parsimony network analysis, and a maximum likelihood approach that uses a mixed Yule-coalescent model and detects species boundaries based on differences in branching rates at the level of species and populations. Sequence analyses resulted in the recognition of 13 phylogenetic species, although we failed to detect sharp species boundaries, possibly as a result of incomplete reproductive isolation. We found considerable conflict between traditional and phylogenetic species definitions. Identical morphological forms were distributed in different clades (cryptic diversity), and at the same time most of the phylogenetic species contained a mixture of different morphologies (indicating intraspecific morphological variation). Sampling outside the morphological range of the Boodlea complex revealed that the enigmatic, sponge-associated Cladophoropsis (Spongocladia) vaucheriiformis, also falls within the Boodlea complex. Given the observed evolutionary complexity and nomenclatural problems associated with establishing a Linnaean taxonomy for this group, we propose to discard provisionally the misleading morphospecies and genus names, and refer to clade numbers within a single genus, Boodlea.

  17. Two Distinct Triatoma dimidiata (Latreille, 1811) Taxa Are Found in Sympatry in Guatemala and Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Moguel, Barbara; Solorzano, Elizabeth; Dumonteil, Eric; Rodas, Antonieta; de la Rua, Nick; Garnica, Roberto; Monroy, Carlota

    2009-01-01

    Approximately 10 million people are infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, which remains the most serious parasitic disease in the Americas. Most people are infected via triatomine vectors. Transmission has been largely halted in South America in areas with predominantly domestic vectors. However, one of the main Chagas vectors in Mesoamerica, Triatoma dimidiata, poses special challenges to control due to its diversity across its large geographic range (from Mexico into northern South America), and peridomestic and sylvatic populations that repopulate houses following pesticide treatment. Recent evidence suggests T. dimidiata may be a complex of species, perhaps including cryptic species; taxonomic ambiguity which confounds control. The nuclear sequence of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) of the ribosomal DNA and the mitochondrial cytochrome b (mt cyt b) gene were used to analyze the taxonomy of T. dimidiata from southern Mexico throughout Central America. ITS2 sequence divides T. dimidiata into four taxa. The first three are found mostly localized to specific geographic regions with some overlap: (1) southern Mexico and Guatemala (Group 2); (2) Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, and Costa Rica (Group 1A); (3) and Panama (Group 1B). We extend ITS2 Group 1A south into Costa Rica, Group 2 into southern Guatemala and show the first information on isolates in Belize, identifying Groups 2 and 3 in that country. The fourth group (Group 3), a potential cryptic species, is dispersed across parts of Mexico, Guatemala, and Belize. We show it exists in sympatry with other groups in Peten, Guatemala, and Yucatan, Mexico. Mitochondrial cyt b data supports this putative cryptic species in sympatry with others. However, unlike the clear distinction of the remaining groups by ITS2, the remaining groups are not separated by mt cyt b. This work contributes to an understanding of the taxonomy and population subdivision of T

  18. Biological diversity of Salix taxa in Cu, Pb and Zn phytoextraction from soil.

    PubMed

    Mleczek, Mirosław; Rutkowski, Paweł; Goliński, Piotr; Kaczmarek, Zygmunt; Szentner, Kinga; Waliszewska, Bogusława; Stolarski, Mariusz; Szczukowski, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the efficiency of copper (Cu), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) phytoextraction by 145 Salix taxa cultivated in an area affected by industrial activity. Survivability and biomass of plants were also analyzed. The highest Cu, Pb and Zn content in shoots was 33.38 ± 2.91 (S. purpurea × viminalis 8), 24.64 ± 1.97 (S. fragilis 1) and 58.99 ± 4.30 (S. eriocephala 7) mg kg(-1) dry weight, respectively. In the case of unwashed leaves, the highest content of these metals was 135.06 ± 8.14 (S. purpurea 26), 67.98 ± 5.27 (S. purpurea 45) and 142.56 ± 12.69 (S. alba × triandra 2) mg kg(-1) dw, while in washed leaves it was 106.02 ± 11.12 (S. purpurea 45), 55.06 ± 5.75 (S. purpurea 45) and 122.87 ± 12.33 (S. alba × triandra 2) mg kg(-1) dw, respectively. The differences between the highest and lowest values for Cu, Pb and Zn were 545%, 20500% and 535% in shoots; 2692%, 2560% and 7500% in unwashed leaves; and 3286%, 2221% and 6950% in washed leaves, respectively. S. acutifolia was able to effectively accumulate all three metals jointly, producing shoots that were well developed in both length and diameter when compared with the other tested willows-an ability that would suggest its high suitability for practical application.

  19. Reproductive biology and species geographical distribution in the Melastomataceae: a survey based on New World taxa

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Ana Paula Milla; Fracasso, Carla Magioni; Luciene dos Santos, Mirley; Romero, Rosana; Sazima, Marlies; Oliveira, Paulo Eugênio

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Apomictic plants are less dependent on pollinator services and able to occupy more diverse habitats than sexual species. However, such assumptions are based on temperate species, and comparable evaluation for species-rich Neotropical taxa is lacking. In this context, the Melastomataceae is a predominantly Neotropical angiosperm family with many apomictic species, which is common in the Campos Rupestres, endemism-rich vegetation on rocky outcrops in central Brazil. In this study, the breeding system of some Campo Rupestre Melastomataceae was evaluated, and breeding system studies for New World species were surveyed to test the hypothesis that apomixis is associated with wide distributions, whilst sexual species have more restricted areas. Methods The breeding systems of 20 Campo Rupestre Melastomataceae were studied using hand pollinations and pollen-tube growth analysis. In addition, breeding system information was compiled for 124 New World species of Melastomataceae with either wide (>1000 km) or restricted distributions. Key Results Most (80 %) of the Campo Rupestre species studied were self-compatible. Self-incompatibility in Microlicia viminalis was associated with pollen-tube arrest in the style, as described for other Melastomataceae, but most self-incompatible species analysed showed pollen-tube growth to the ovary irrespective of pollination treatment. Apomictic species showed lower pollen viability and were less frequent among the Campo Rupestre plants. Among the New World species compiled, 43 were apomictic and 77 sexual (24 self-incompatible and 53 self-compatible). Most apomictic (86 %) and self-incompatible species (71 %) presented wide distributions, whilst restricted distributions predominate only among the self-compatible ones (53 %). Conclusions Self-compatibility and dependence on biotic pollination were characteristic of Campo Rupestre and narrowly distributed New World Melastomataceae species, whilst apomictics are widely

  20. Near-future ocean acidification causes differences in microbial associations within diverse coral reef taxa.

    PubMed

    Webster, N S; Negri, A P; Flores, F; Humphrey, C; Soo, R; Botté, E S; Vogel, N; Uthicke, S

    2013-04-01

    Microorganisms form symbiotic partnerships with a diverse range of marine organisms and can be critical to the health and survival of their hosts. Despite the importance of these relationships, the sensitivity of symbiotic microbes to ocean acidification (OA) is largely unknown and this needs to be redressed to adequately predict marine ecosystem resilience in a changing climate. We adopted a profiling approach to explore the sensitivity of microbes associated with coral reef biofilms and representatives of three ecologically important calcifying invertebrate phyla [corals, foraminifera and crustose coralline algae (CCA)] to OA. The experimental design for this study comprised four pHs consistent with current IPCC predictions for the next few centuries (pHNIST 8.1, 7.9, 7.7, 7.5); these pH/pCO₂ conditions were produced in flow-through aquaria using CO₂ bubbling. All reduced pH/increased pCO₂ treatments caused clear differences in the microbial communities associated with coral, foraminifera, CCA and reef biofilms over 6 weeks, while no visible signs of host stress were detected over this period. The microbial communities of coral, foraminifera, CCA and biofilms were significantly different between pH 8.1 (pCO₂ = 464 μatm) and pH 7.9 (pCO₂ = 822 μatm), a concentration likely to be exceeded by the end of the present century. This trend continued at lower pHs/higher pCO₂. 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed variable and species-specific changes in the microbial communities with no microbial taxa consistently present or absent from specific pH treatments. The high sensitivity of coral, foraminifera, CCA and biofilm microbes to OA conditions projected to occur by 2100 is a concern for reef ecosystems and highlights the need for urgent research to assess the implications of microbial shifts for host health and coral reef processes.

  1. 21 CFR 862.1515 - Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Systems § 862.1515 Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system. (a) Identification. A nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system is a device intended to measure amino acid nitrogen levels in serum, plasma, and urine... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system....

  2. 21 CFR 862.1515 - Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Systems § 862.1515 Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system. (a) Identification. A nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system is a device intended to measure amino acid nitrogen levels in serum, plasma, and urine... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system....

  3. 21 CFR 862.1515 - Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Systems § 862.1515 Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system. (a) Identification. A nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system is a device intended to measure amino acid nitrogen levels in serum, plasma, and urine... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system....

  4. 21 CFR 862.1515 - Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Systems § 862.1515 Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system. (a) Identification. A nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system is a device intended to measure amino acid nitrogen levels in serum, plasma, and urine... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system....

  5. Detecting reticulate relationships among diploid Leucanthemum Mill. (Compositae, Anthemideae) taxa using multilocus species tree reconstruction methods and AFLP fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Konowalik, Kamil; Wagner, Florian; Tomasello, Salvatore; Vogt, Robert; Oberprieler, Christoph

    2015-11-01

    We examined the evolutionary history of the diploid representatives of the genus Leucanthemum Mill. (Compositae, Anthemideae), which constitutes an extensive polyploid complex comprising around 41 species with ploidy levels ranging from 2x to 22x. The inference of phylogenetic relationships even on the diploid level is complicated in this genus due to the overlay of hybridisation and incomplete lineage sorting processes leading to incongruence among gene trees based on nuclear and plastid sequence information. Species tree and network reconstructions were based on gene trees from nine low-copy nuclear markers and the concatenated sequence information for five intergenic spacer regions of the chloroplast genome, either sequenced by Roche 454 pyrosequencing techniques or traditional Sanger sequencing techniques. Additional phylogenetic information came from multi-locus AFLP-fingerprinting of representative individuals of all diploid taxa under study and the subsequent analysis of AFLP patterns with Bayesian clustering and network reconstruction methods. To distinguish between hybridisation and incomplete lineage sorting, we developed and utilized a new 'hybrid index' calculation for individual taxa of the data set, which was compared to a simulated null-distribution assuming the occurrence of incomplete lineage sorting alone for pinpointing taxa with a significant hybrid signal. As a result, two species groups with contrasting patterns of gene flow and/or hybrid speciation signals could be identified in the diploids of Leucanthemum: (a) an early-diverging stock of allopatrically distributed diploid species with a lack of evidence for recent hybridisation events among its members and (b) a more recently radiated taxon assemblage with morphologically less clearly circumscribed taxa and a pronounced signal of gene flow among lineages and several candidate taxa, for which a homoploid hybrid origin may be considered.

  6. Nitrogen fixation apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Hao-Lin

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for achieving nitrogen fixation includes a volumetric electric discharge chamber. The volumetric discharge chamber provides an even distribution of an electron beam, and enables the chamber to be maintained at a controlled energy to pressure (E/p) ratio. An E/p ratio of from 5 to 15 kV/atm of O.sub.2 /cm promotes the formation of vibrationally excited N.sub.2. Atomic oxygen interacts with vibrationally excited N.sub.2 at a much quicker rate than unexcited N.sub.2, greatly improving the rate at which NO is formed.

  7. Understanding Nitrogen Fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Paul J. Chirik

    2012-05-25

    The purpose of our program is to explore fundamental chemistry relevant to the discovery of energy efficient methods for the conversion of atmospheric nitrogen (N{sub 2}) into more value-added nitrogen-containing organic molecules. Such transformations are key for domestic energy security and the reduction of fossil fuel dependencies. With DOE support, we have synthesized families of zirconium and hafnium dinitrogen complexes with elongated and activated N-N bonds that exhibit rich N{sub 2} functionalization chemistry. Having elucidated new methods for N-H bond formation from dihydrogen, C-H bonds and Broensted acids, we have since turned our attention to N-C bond construction. These reactions are particularly important for the synthesis of amines, heterocycles and hydrazines with a range of applications in the fine and commodity chemicals industries and as fuels. One recent highlight was the discovery of a new N{sub 2} cleavage reaction upon addition of carbon monoxide which resulted in the synthesis of an important fertilizer, oxamide, from the diatomics with the two strongest bonds in chemistry. Nitrogen-carbon bonds form the backbone of many important organic molecules, especially those used in the fertilizer and pharamaceutical industries. During the past year, we have continued our work in the synthesis of hydrazines of various substitution patterns, many of which are important precursors for heterocycles. In most instances, the direct functionalization of N{sub 2} offers a more efficient synthetic route than traditional organic methods. In addition, we have also discovered a unique CO-induced N{sub 2} bond cleavage reaction that simultaneously cleaves the N-N bond of the metal dinitrogen compound and assembles new C-C bond and two new N-C bonds. Treatment of the CO-functionalized core with weak Broensted acids liberated oxamide, H{sub 2}NC(O)C(O)NH{sub 2}, an important slow release fertilizer that is of interest to replace urea in many applications. The

  8. Preprototype nitrogen supply subsystem development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, D. B.; Hallick, T. M.; Schubert, F. H.

    1981-01-01

    A nitrogen supply subsystem based on the dissociation of hydrazine into a mixture of hydrogen and nitrogen is developed. The latter is separated to provide makeup nitrogen to control the composition of spacecraft atmospheres. Specific hardware developments resulted in the design and fabrication of a nominal 3.6 kg/d nitrogen generation module. The design integrates a hydrazine catalytic dissociator, three ammonia dissociation stages and four hydrogen separation stages into a 33 kg, 14 cu dm module. A technique was devised to alternate the ammonia dissociation and hydrogen separation stages to give high nitrogen purity in the end product stream. Tests show the product stream to contain less than 0.5 percent hydrogen and 10 parts per million ammonia. The design and development of a test stand for the nitrogen generation module and a series of tests which verified its operation and performance capability are described.

  9. Nitrogen In Saturn's Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, H. T.; Sittler, E. C.; Johnson, R. E.; McComas, D.; Reisenfeld, D.; Shappirio, M.; Michael, M.; Shematovich, V. I.; Baragiola, R. A.; Crary, F.; Young, D.

    2004-11-01

    We are analyzing CAPS instrument data on Cassini to look for nitrogen ions in Saturn's magnetosphere. Because Voyager could not separate oxygen and nitrogen, there has been considerable controversy on nitrogen's presence and relative importance. Two principal sources have been suggested: Titan's atmosphere and nitrogen species trapped in Saturn's icy satellite surfaces (Sittler et al 2004). The latter may be primordial nitrogen, likely as NH3 in ice (Stevenson 1982; Squyers et al. 1983) or nitrogen ions that have been implanted in the surface (Delitsky and Lane 2002). We will present the results of Saturnian nitrogen cloud modeling and relevant CAPS observations. We recently described the Titan source (Michael, et al. 2004; Shematovich et al. 2003; Smith et al. 2004; Sittler et al. 2004) in preparation for Cassini's Saturnian plasma measurements. Two components were identified: energetic nitrogen ions formed near Titan and energized as they diffused inward (Sittler et al. 2004) and neutrals in orbits with small perigee that became ionized in the inner magnetosphere (Smith et al 2004). The latter component would be a source of lower energy, co-rotating nitrogen ions to the inner magnetosphere. Such a component would have an energy spectrum similar to nitrogen species sputtered from the icy satellite surfaces (Johnson and Sittler 1990). However, the mass spectrum would differ, likely containing NHx and NOx species also, and, hence, may be separated from the Titan source. Our preliminary analysis for nitrogen species in the CAPS data will be compared to the models. Of interest will be the energy spectra, which can indicate whether any nitrogen present is formed locally or near Titan's orbit and diffused inward. This work is supported by the NASA Planetary Atmospheres, NASA Graduate Student Research, Virginia Space Grant Consortium Graduate Research Fellowship and the CAPS Cassini instrument team programs.

  10. New fossil taxa and notes on the Mesozoic evolution of Liadytidae and Dytiscidae (Coleoptera).

    PubMed

    Prokin, Alexander A; Petrov, Pyotr N; Wang, Bo; Ponomarenko, Alexander G

    2013-01-01

    The diagnoses of Liadytidae Ponomarenko, 1977, Liadytiscinae Prokin & Ren, 2010, Liadytiscus Prokin & Ren, 2010 and Mesoderus Prokin & Ren, 2010 (Dytiscidae) are modified, and the following new taxa are described from Mesozoic fossils: Liadytes aspidytoides sp. n. (Liadytidae); Mesoderini trib. n., Liadyxianus kirejtshuki gen. n. et sp. n., Mesoderus punctatus sp. n., Mesoderus ovatus sp. n., Mesodytes rhantoides gen. n. et sp. n., Palaeodytes baissiensis sp. n. and Cretodytes incertus sp. n. (Dytiscidae). A summarized checklist of all Mesozoic Liadytidae and Dytiscidae known from adults is given, and an identification key to the genera of Mesozoic Dytiscidae known from adults is provided for the first time. Palaeodytes incompletus Ponomarenko, Coram & Jarzembowski, 2005 (the suffix of the specific epithet is emended from the original incomnpleta) is found to belong not to this genus, but to another one, which remains to be described. The fossil larva Angaragabus jurassicus Ponomarenko, 1963 from the Lower Jurassic of Irkutsk Oblast, Russia, probably belonging to Liadytidae, is re-examined. If this larva actually belongs to Liadytidae, then its morphological characters provide additional confirmation of the conclusion, based on the characters of adult liadytids, that the family is quite separate from the recent family Aspidytidae, and the similarity between the adults of both families results from parallel processes in the evolution of the superfamily Dytiscoidea. We show that the principal trends of morphological changes of Liadytidae and Dytiscidae during the Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous included a consistent increase in the area of the metacoxal plates at the expense of decreasing area of the lateral lobes of the metaventrite ("wings"), flattening and loss of the lateral border of the elevated median area of the metaventrite, and shortening and dilation of the metafemur and metatibia. These changes were probably associated with an increased load of

  11. Microbial Hub Taxa Link Host and Abiotic Factors to Plant Microbiome Variation

    PubMed Central

    Agler, Matthew T.; Ruhe, Jonas; Kroll, Samuel; Morhenn, Constanze; Kim, Sang-Tae; Weigel, Detlef; Kemen, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    Plant-associated microorganisms have been shown to critically affect host physiology and performance, suggesting that evolution and ecology of plants and animals can only be understood in a holobiont (host and its associated organisms) context. Host-associated microbial community structures are affected by abiotic and host factors, and increased attention is given to the role of the microbiome in interactions such as pathogen inhibition. However, little is known about how these factors act on the microbial community, and especially what role microbe–microbe interaction dynamics play. We have begun to address this knowledge gap for phyllosphere microbiomes of plants by simultaneously studying three major groups of Arabidopsis thaliana symbionts (bacteria, fungi and oomycetes) using a systems biology approach. We evaluated multiple potential factors of microbial community control: we sampled various wild A. thaliana populations at different times, performed field plantings with different host genotypes, and implemented successive host colonization experiments under lab conditions where abiotic factors, host genotype, and pathogen colonization was manipulated. Our results indicate that both abiotic factors and host genotype interact to affect plant colonization by all three groups of microbes. Considering microbe–microbe interactions, however, uncovered a network of interkingdom interactions with significant contributions to community structure. As in other scale-free networks, a small number of taxa, which we call microbial “hubs,” are strongly interconnected and have a severe effect on communities. By documenting these microbe–microbe interactions, we uncover an important mechanism explaining how abiotic factors and host genotypic signatures control microbial communities. In short, they act directly on “hub” microbes, which, via microbe–microbe interactions, transmit the effects to the microbial community. We analyzed two “hub” microbes (the

  12. Environmentally cued hatching across taxa: embryos respond to risk and opportunity.

    PubMed

    Warkentin, Karen M

    2011-07-01

    Most animals begin life in eggs, protected and constrained by a capsule, shell, or other barrier. As embryos develop, their needs and abilities change, altering the costs and benefits of encapsulation, and the risks and opportunities of the outside world. When the cost/benefit ratio is better outside the egg, animals should hatch. Adaptive timing of hatching evolves in this context. However, many environmental variables affect the optimal timing of hatching so there is often no consistent best time. Across a broad range of animals, from flatworms and snails to frogs and birds, embryos hatch at different times or at different developmental stages in response to changing risks or opportunities. Embryos respond to many types of cues, assessed via different sensory modalities. Some responses appear simple. Others are surprisingly complex and sophisticated. Parents also manipulate the timing of hatching. The number and breadth of examples of cued hatching suggest that, in the absence of specific information, we should not assume that hatching timing is fixed. Our challenge now is to integrate information on the timing of hatching across taxa to better understand the diversity of patterns and how they are structured in relation to different types of environmental and developmental variation. As starting points for comparative studies, I: (1) suggest a framework based on heterokairy-individual, plastic variation in the rate, timing, or sequence of developmental events and processes-to describe patterns and mechanisms of variation in the timing of hatching; (2) briefly review the distribution of environmentally cued hatching across the three major clades of Bilateria, highlighting the diverse environmental factors and mechanisms involved; and (3) discuss factors that shape the diversity of plastic and fixed timing of hatching, drawing on evolutionary theory on phenotypic plasticity which directs our attention to fitness trade-offs, environmental heterogeneity, and

  13. The Evolution of Diapsid Reproductive Strategy with Inferences about Extinct Taxa

    PubMed Central

    Varricchio, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Diapsids show an extremely wide range of reproductive strategies. Offspring may receive no parental care, care from only one sex, care from both parents, or care under more complex regimes. Young may vary from independent, super-precocial hatchlings to altricial neonates needing much care before leaving the nest. Parents can invest heavily in a few young, or less so in a larger number. Here we examine the evolution of these traits across a composite phylogeny spanning the extant diapsids and including the limited number of extinct taxa for which reproductive strategies can be well constrained. Generalized estimating equation(GEE)-based phylogenetic comparative methods demonstrate the influences of body mass, parental care strategy and hatchling maturity on clutch volume across the diapsids. The influence of polygamous reproduction is not important despite a large sample size. Applying the results of these models to the dinosaurs supports the hypothesis of paternal care (male only) in derived non-avian theropods, previously suggested based on simpler analyses. These data also suggest that sauropodomorphs did not care for their young. The evolution of parental-care occurs in an almost linear series of transitions. Paternal care rarely gives rise to other care strategies. Where hatchling condition changes, diapsids show an almost unidirectional tendency of evolution towards increased altriciality. Transitions to social monogamy from the ancestral state in diapsids, where both sexes are polygamous, are common. In contrast, once evolved, polygyny and polyandry are very evolutionarily stable. Polygyny and maternal care correlate, as do polyandry and paternal care. Ancestral-character estimation (ACE) of these care strategies with the character transition likelihoods estimated from the original data gives good confidence at most important nodes. These analyses suggest that the basalmost diapsids had no parental care. Crocodilians independently evolved maternal care

  14. Biomechanical modeling and sensitivity analysis of bipedal running ability. I. Extant taxa.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, John R

    2004-10-01

    I used a simple mathematical model of the inverse dynamics of locomotion to estimate the minimum muscle masses required to maintain quasi-static equilibrium about the four main limb joints at mid-stance of fast running. Models of 10 extant taxa (a human, a kangaroo, two lizards, an alligator, and five birds) were analyzed in various bipedal poses to examine how anatomy, size, limb orientation, and other model parameters influence running ability. I examined how the muscle masses required for fast running compare to the muscle masses that are actually able to exert moments about the hip, knee, ankle, and toe joints, to see how support ability varies across the limb. I discuss the assumptions and limitations of the models, using sensitivity analysis to see how widely the results differed with feasible parameter input values. Even with a wide range of input values, the models validated the analysis procedure. Animals that are known to run bipedally were calculated as able to preserve quasi-static equilibrium about their hindlimb joints at mid-stance, whereas non-bipedal runners (iguanas and alligators) were recognized as having too little muscle mass to run quickly in bipedal poses. Thus, this modeling approach should be reliable for reconstructing running ability in extinct bipeds such as nonavian dinosaurs. The models also elucidated how key features are important for bipedal running capacity, such as limb orientation, muscle moment arms, muscle fascicle lengths, and body size. None of the animals modeled had extensor muscle masses acting about any one joint that were 7% or more of their body mass, which provides a reasonable limit for how much muscle mass is normally apportioned within a limb to act about a particular joint. The models consistently showed that a key biomechanical limit on running ability is the capacity of ankle extensors to generate sufficiently large joint moments. Additionally, the analysis reveals how large ratite birds remain excellent runners

  15. Diversity of Polychaeta (Annelida) and other worm taxa in mangrove habitats of Darwin Harbour, northern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, K. N.; Glasby, C. J.

    2008-02-01

    In this paper data on the diversity, distribution and abundance of polychaetes and other worm taxa in the mangroves of Darwin Harbour, northern Australia, are presented and compared with those of other tropical mangrove areas. Aspects of the feeding guild ecology and the effects of disturbance on mangrove worms are also examined. Data were collected over a period of four years, across four mangrove assemblages. Samples were obtained using three sampling techniques: 1 m × 1 m quadrat searches, epifauna searches and a new infaunal sampling technique, the anoxic mat. A total of 76 species (68 polychaetes, 1 oligochaete, 1 echiuran, 3 sipunculans, 2 nemerteans, 1 turbellarian) were recorded from the four main mangrove assemblages. Of these, 30 species are widespread, occurring in mangrove and non-mangrove habitats throughout the Indo-west Pacific. Only seven species (all polychaetes) appear to be restricted to the mangroves of Darwin Harbour and northern Australia. Polychaetes are predominant, comprising 80-96% of all worms sampled, with three families—Nereididae, Capitellidae and Spionidae—accounting for 46% of all species. The highest diversity and abundance was recorded in the soft, unconsolidated substrates of the seaward assemblage, with diversity and abundance decreasing progressively in the landward assemblages. Most of the worm fauna was infaunal (70%), but the intensive sampling regime revealed a hitherto unknown significant percentage of epifaunal species (18%) and species occurring as both infauna and epifauna (12%). Univariate analyses showed annual and seasonal differences in worm species richness and abundance—presumably associated with the intensity of the monsoon and recruitment success. The worm fauna differed between mangrove assemblages but the proportion of species in each feeding guild was relatively consistent across the four assemblages studied. Herbivores were the most species-rich and abundant, followed by carnivores and sub

  16. How Should Genes and Taxa be Sampled for Phylogenomic Analyses with Missing Data? An Empirical Study in Iguanian Lizards.

    PubMed

    Streicher, Jeffrey W; Schulte, James A; Wiens, John J

    2016-01-01

    Targeted sequence capture is becoming a widespread tool for generating large phylogenomic data sets to address difficult phylogenetic problems. However, this methodology often generates data sets in which increasing the number of taxa and loci increases amounts of missing data. Thus, a fundamental (but still unresolved) question is whether sampling should be designed to maximize sampling of taxa or genes, or to minimize the inclusion of missing data cells. Here, we explore this question for an ancient, rapid radiation of lizards, the pleurodont iguanians. Pleurodonts include many well-known clades (e.g., anoles, basilisks, iguanas, and spiny lizards) but relationships among families have proven difficult to resolve strongly and consistently using traditional sequencing approaches. We generated up to 4921 ultraconserved elements with sampling strategies including 16, 29, and 44 taxa, from 1179 to approximately 2.4 million characters per matrix and approximately 30% to 60% total missing data. We then compared mean branch support for interfamilial relationships under these 15 different sampling strategies for both concatenated (maximum likelihood) and species tree (NJst) approaches (after showing that mean branch support appears to be related to accuracy). We found that both approaches had the highest support when including loci with up to 50% missing taxa (matrices with ~40-55% missing data overall). Thus, our results show that simply excluding all missing data may be highly problematic as the primary guiding principle for the inclusion or exclusion of taxa and genes. The optimal strategy was somewhat different for each approach, a pattern that has not been shown previously. For concatenated analyses, branch support was maximized when including many taxa (44) but fewer characters (1.1 million). For species-tree analyses, branch support was maximized with minimal taxon sampling (16) but many loci (4789 of 4921). We also show that the choice of these sampling

  17. Orchard nitrogen management: Which nitrogen source is best?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Suboptimal management of nitrogen fertility in pecan orchards leads to a loss of nutmeat yield and quality, but also a waste of natural resources and money. This article reviews several basic guiding principles useful to orchard managers when developing nitrogen management strategies, and determini...

  18. Nitrogen release during coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, L.L.; Mitchell, R.E.; Fletcher, T.H.; Hurt, R.H.

    1995-02-01

    Experiments in entrained flow reactors at combustion temperatures are performed to resolve the rank dependence of nitrogen release on an elemental basis for a suite of 15 U.S. coals ranging from lignite to low-volatile bituminous. Data were obtained as a function of particle conversion, with overall mass loss up to 99% on a dry, ash-free basis. Nitrogen release rates are presented relative to both carbon loss and overall mass loss. During devolatilization, fractional nitrogen release from low-rank coals is much slower than fractional mass release and noticeably slower than fractional carbon release. As coal rank increases, fractional nitrogen release rate relative to that of carbon and mass increases, with fractional nitrogen release rates exceeding fractional mass and fractional carbon release rates during devolatilization for high-rank (low-volatile bituminous) coals. At the onset of combustion, nitrogen release rates increase significantly. For all coals investigated, cumulative fractional nitrogen loss rates relative to those of mass and carbon passes through a maximum during the earliest stages of oxidation. The mechanism for generating this maximum is postulated to involve nascent thermal rupture of nitrogen-containing compounds and possible preferential oxidation of nitrogen sites. During later stages of oxidation, the cumulative fractional loss of nitrogen approaches that of carbon for all coals. Changes in the relative release rates of nitrogen compared to those of both overall mass and carbon during all stages of combustion are attributed to a combination of the chemical structure of coals, temperature histories during combustion, and char chemistry.

  19. Investigating Nitrogen Pollution: Activities and Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green Teacher, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Introduces activities on nitrogen, nitrogen pollution from school commuters, nitrogen response in native and introduced species, and nutrient loading models. These activities help students determine the nitrogen contribution from their parents' cars, test native plant responses to nitrogen, and experiment with the results of removing water from…

  20. The frequency of eubacterium-to-eukaryote lateral gene transfers shows significant cross-taxa variation within amoebozoa.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Russell F; Gray, Michael W

    2006-12-01

    Single-celled bacterivorous eukaryotes offer excellent test cases for evaluation of the frequency of prey-to-predator lateral gene transfer (LGT). Here we use analysis of expressed sequence tag (EST) data sets to quantify the extent of LGT from eubacteria to two amoebae, Acanthamoeba castellanii and Hartmannella vermiformis. Stringent screening for LGT proceeded in several steps intended to enrich for authentic events while at the same time minimizing the incidence of false positives due to factors such as limitations in database coverage and ancient paralogy. The results were compared with data obtained when the same methodology was applied to EST libraries from a number of other eukaryotic taxa. Significant differences in the extent of apparent eubacterium-to-eukaryote LGT were found between taxa. Our results indicate that there may be substantial inter-taxon variation in the number of LGT events that become fixed even between amoebozoan species that have similar feeding modalities.

  1. Multi-taxa approach shows consistent shifts in arthropod functional traits along grassland land-use intensity gradient.

    PubMed

    Simons, Nadja K; Weisser, Wolfgang W; Gossner, Martin M

    2016-03-01

    Intensification of land use reduces biodiversity but may also shift the trait composition of communities. Understanding how land use affects single traits and community trait composition, helps to understand why some species are more affected by land use than others. Trait-based analyses are common for plants, but rare for arthropods. We collected literature-based traits for nearly 1000 insect and spider species to test how land- use intensity (including mowing, fertilization, and grazing) across 124 grasslands in three regions of Germany affects community-weighted mean traits across taxa and in single taxa. We additionally measured morphometric traits for more than 150 Heteroptera species and tested whether the weighted mean morphometric traits change with increasing land-use intensity. Community average body size decreased and community average dispersal ability increased from low to high land-use intensity. Furthermore, the relative abundance of herbivores and of specialists among herbivores decreased and the relative abundance of species using the herb layer increased with increasing land-use intensity. Community-weighted means of the morphometric traits in Heteroptera also changed from low to high land-use intensity toward longer and thinner shapes as well as longer appendices (legs, wings, and antenna). While changes in traits with increasing mowing and fertilization intensity were consistent with the combined land-use intensity, community average traits did often not change or with opposite direction under increasing grazing intensity. We conclude that high land-use intensity acts as an environmental filter selecting for on average smaller, more mobile, and less specialized species across taxa. Although trait collection across multiple arthropod taxa is laborious and needs clear trait definitions, it is essential for understanding the functional consequences of biodiversity loss due to land-use intensification.

  2. DIATOMS (BACILLARIOPHYTA) OF ISOLATED ISLANDS: NEW TAXA IN THE GENUS NAVICULA SENSU STRICTO FROM THE GALáPAGOS ISLANDS(1).

    PubMed

    Seddon, Alistair W R; Froyd, Cynthia A; Witkowski, Andrzej

    2011-08-01

    The diatoms (Bacillariophyta) from a coastal lagoon from the Diablas wetlands (Isla Isabela, the Galápagos Islands) were studied in material from surface samples and a sediment core spanning the past 2,700 years in order to examine evidence of diatom evolution under geographic isolation. The total number of taxa found was ∼100. Ultrastructural variation in valve morphology between members of Galápagos taxa was used to describe 10 species from the genus Navicula sensu stricto, which are new to science. Four taxa: N. isabelensis, N. isabelensoides, N. isabelensiformis, and N. isabelensiminor, shared several key characteristics that may be indicative of a common evolutionary heritage; these species therefore provide possible evidence for the in situ evolution of diatoms in the Galápagos coastal lagoons. Shared morphological characteristics include: (i) stria patterning in the central area, (ii) an elevated and thickened external raphe-sternum, (iii) external central raphe endings that are slightly deflected toward the valve primary side, and (iv) an arched valve surface. To explain these findings, two models were proposed. The first suggested limited lateral diatomaceous transport of Navicula species between the Galápagos and continental South America. Alternatively, these new species may be ecological specialists arising from the unique environmental conditions of the Galápagos coastal lagoons, which restrict the colonization of common diatom taxa and enable the establishment of novel, rare species. The Diablas wetlands are an important site for diatom research, where local-scale environmental changes have combined with global-scale biogeographic processes resulting in unique diatom assemblages.

  3. Consistency of effects of tropical forest disturbance on species composition and richness relative to use of indicator taxa.

    PubMed

    Stork, N E; Srivastava, D S; Eggleton, P; Hodda, M; Lawson, G; Leakey, R R B; Watt, A D

    2016-12-16

    A citation-classic study published almost twenty years ago found that the species richness of eight taxa each responded differently to anthropogenic disturbance in Cameroon forests. Recent developments in conservation biology suggest that net number of species is an insensitive measure of change and that understanding which species are affected by disturbance is more important. In addition, it is recognized that all disturbance types are not equal in their effect on species and that grouping species according to function rather than taxonomy is more informative of responses of biodiversity to change. In a reanalysis of most of the original Cameroon dataset (canopy/ground ants, termites, canopy beetles, nematodes and butterflies) using more a inclusive measure of forest disturbance, which recognised four component drivers of change, we found disturbance effects are always stronger on species composition than on species richness and are mostly concordant between taxa. Further, the magnitude of compositional change relative to reference site was correlated across several taxa. In contrast to findings in the original study, species richness for most groups did not decline with disturbance level, providing additional support to the view that trends in species richness at local scales do not reflect the resilience of ecosystems to disturbance. Although disturbance generally caused changes in composition, the strength of this relationship depended on the disturbance driver and the functional group of organisms considered. This re-analysis suggests consideration of the impact of different forms of disturbance on species composition rather than net numbers of species, and the functional similarity of different taxa are important for conservation management when assessing the impacts of disturbance on biodiversity. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Alternative nitrogen sources for cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several alternative nitrogen (N) sources, rates of N, and amendments were evaluated at Prattville, Alabama, on cotton in 2008. Nitrogen rates reported are for sidedress application only. Dry urea produced the highest yield, averaging 1100 pounds lint per acre. Ammonia volatilization was measured fr...

  5. Seasonal Nitrogen Cycles on Pluto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. J.; Paige, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    A thermal model, developed to predict seasonal nitrogen cycles on Triton, has been modified and applied to Pluto. The model is used to calculate the partitioning of nitrogen between surface frost deposits and the atmosphere, as a function of time for various sets of input parameters.

  6. Overview of the transcriptome profiles identified in hagfish, shark, and bichir: current issues arising from some nonmodel vertebrate taxa.

    PubMed

    Takechi, Masaki; Takeuchi, Masaki; Ota, Kinya G; Nishimura, Osamu; Mochii, Makoto; Itomi, Kazu; Adachi, Noritaka; Takahashi, Maiko; Fujimoto, Satoko; Tarui, Hiroshi; Okabe, Masataka; Aizawa, Shinichi; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2011-11-15

    Because of their crucial phylogenetic positions, hagfishes, sharks, and bichirs are recognized as key taxa in our understanding of vertebrate evolution. The expression patterns of the regulatory genes involved in developmental patterning have been analyzed in the context of evolutionary developmental studies. However, in a survey of public sequence databases, we found that the large-scale sequence data for these taxa are still limited. To address this deficit, we used conventional Sanger DNA sequencing and a next-generation sequencing technology based on 454 GS FLX sequencing to obtain expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of the Japanese inshore hagfish (Eptatretus burgeri; 161,482 ESTs), cloudy catshark (Scyliorhinus torazame; 165,819 ESTs), and gray bichir (Polypterus senegalus; 34,336 ESTs). We deposited the ESTs in a newly constructed database, designated the "Vertebrate TimeCapsule." The ESTs include sequences from genes that can be effectively used in evolutionary developmental studies; for instance, several encode cartilaginous extracellular matrix proteins, which are central to an understanding of the ways in which evolutionary processes affected the skeletal elements, whereas others encode regulatory genes involved in craniofacial development and early embryogenesis. Here, we discuss how hagfishes, sharks, and bichirs contribute to our understanding of vertebrate evolution, we review the current status of the publicly available sequence data for these three taxa, and we introduce our EST projects and newly developed database.

  7. Biogeography of heterotrophic flagellate populations indicates the presence of generalist and specialist taxa in the Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Thaler, Mary; Lovejoy, Connie

    2015-03-01

    Heterotrophic marine flagellates (HF) are ubiquitous in the world's oceans and represented in nearly all branches of the domain Eukaryota. However, the factors determining distributions of major taxonomic groups are poorly known. The Arctic Ocean is a good model environment for examining the distribution of functionally similar but phylogenetically diverse HF because the physical oceanography and annual ice cycles result in distinct environments that could select for microbial communities or favor specific taxa. We reanalyzed new and previously published high-throughput sequencing data from multiple studies in the Arctic Ocean to identify broad patterns in the distribution of individual taxa. HF accounted for fewer than 2% to over one-half of the reads from the water column and for up to 60% of reads from ice, which was dominated by Cryothecomonas. In the water column, many HF phylotypes belonging to Telonemia and Picozoa, uncultured marine stramenopiles (MAST), and choanoflagellates were geographically widely distributed. However, for two groups in particular, Telonemia and Cryothecomonas, some species level taxa showed more restricted distributions. For example, several phylotypes of Telonemia favored open waters with lower nutrients such as the Canada Basin and offshore of the Mackenzie Shelf. In summary, we found that while some Arctic HF were successful over a range of conditions, others could be specialists that occur under particular conditions. We conclude that tracking species level diversity in HF not only is feasible but also provides a potential tool for understanding the responses of marine microbial ecosystems to rapidly changing ice regimes.

  8. Molecular phylogenetic analysis supports a Gondwanan origin of the Hyriidae (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Unionida) and the paraphyly of Australasian taxa.

    PubMed

    Graf, Daniel L; Jones, Hugh; Geneva, Anthony J; Pfeiffer, John M; Klunzinger, Michael W

    2015-04-01

    The freshwater mussel family Hyriidae (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Unionida) has a disjunct trans-Pacific distribution in Australasia and South America. Previous phylogenetic analyses have estimated the evolutionary relationships of the family and the major infra-familial taxa (Velesunioninae and Hyriinae: Hyridellini in Australia; Hyriinae: Hyriini, Castaliini, and Rhipidodontini in South America), but taxon and character sampling have been too incomplete to support a predictive classification or allow testing of biogeographical hypotheses. We sampled 30 freshwater mussel individuals representing the aforementioned hyriid taxa, as well as outgroup species representing the five other freshwater mussel families and their marine sister group (order Trigoniida). Our ingroup included representatives of all Australian genera. Phylogenetic relationships were estimated from three gene fragments (nuclear 28S, COI and 16S mtDNA) using maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian inference, and we applied a Bayesian relaxed clock model calibrated with fossil dates to estimate node ages. Our analyses found good support for monophyly of the Hyriidae and the subfamilies and tribes, as well as the paraphyly of the Australasian taxa (Velesunioninae, (Hyridellini, (Rhipidodontini, (Castaliini, Hyriini)))). The Hyriidae was recovered as sister to a clade comprised of all other Recent freshwater mussel families. Our molecular date estimation supported Cretaceous origins of the major hyriid clades, pre-dating the Tertiary isolation of South America from Antarctica/Australia. We hypothesize that early diversification of the Hyriidae was driven by terrestrial barriers on Gondwana rather than marine barriers following disintegration of the super-continent.

  9. Pollen Performance in Clarkia Taxa with Contrasting Mating Systems: Implications for Male Gametophytic Evolution in Selfers and Outcrossers

    PubMed Central

    Hove, Alisa A.; Mazer, Susan J.

    2013-01-01

    We tested three predictions regarding the joint evolution of pollen performance and mating system. First, due to the potential for intense intrasexual competition in outcrossing populations, we predicted that outcrossers would produce faster-growing pollen than their selfing relatives. Second, if elevated competition promotes stronger selection on traits that improve pollen performance, then, among-plant variation in pollen performance would be lower in outcrossers than in selfers. Third, given successive generations of adaptation to the same maternal genotype in selfers, we predicted that, in selfing populations (but not in outcrossing ones), pollen would perform better following self- than cross-pollinations. We tested these predictions in field populations of two pairs of Clarkia (Onagraceae) sister taxa. Consistent with our predictions, one outcrosser (C. unguiculata) exhibited faster pollen germination and less variation in pollen tube growth rate (PTGR) among pollen donors than its selfing sister species, C. exilis. Contrary to our predictions, the selfing C. xantiana ssp. parviflora exhibited faster PTGR than the outcrossing ssp. xantiana, and these taxa showed similar levels of variation in this trait. Pollen performance following self- vs. cross-pollinations did not differ within either selfing or outcrossing taxa. While these findings suggest that mating system and pollen performance may jointly evolve in Clarkia, other factors clearly contribute to pollen performance in natural populations. PMID:27137375

  10. Cambro-ordovician sea-level fluctuations and sequence boundaries: The missing record and the evolution of new taxa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lehnert, O.; Miller, J.F.; Leslie, Stephen A.; Repetski, J.E.; Ethington, Raymond L.

    2005-01-01

    The evolution of early Palaeozoic conodont faunas shows a clear connection to sea-level changes. One way that this connection manifests itself is that thick successions of carbonates are missing beneath major sequence boundaries due to karstification and erosion. From this observation arises the question of how many taxa have been lost from different conodont lineages in these incomplete successions. Although many taxa suffered extinction due to the environmental stresses associated with falling sea-levels, some must have survived in these extreme conditions. The number of taxa missing in the early Palaeozoic tropics always will be unclear, but it will be even more difficult to evaluate the missing record in detrital successions of higher latitudes. A common pattern in the evolution of Cambrian-Ordovician conodont lineages is appearances of new species at sea-level rises and disappearances at sea-level drops. This simple picture can be complicated by intervals that consistently have no representatives of a particular lineage, even after extensive sampling of the most complete sections. Presumably the lineages survived in undocumented refugia. In this paper, we give examples of evolution in Cambrian-Ordovician shallowmarine conodont faunas and highlight problems of undiscovered or truly missing segments of lineages. ?? The Palaeontological Association.

  11. DNA content and distribution in ancient feathers and potential to reconstruct the plumage of extinct avian taxa

    PubMed Central

    Rawlence, Nicolas J.; Wood, Jamie R.; Armstrong, Kyle N.; Cooper, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Feathers are known to contain amplifiable DNA at their base (calamus) and have provided an important genetic source from museum specimens. However, feathers in subfossil deposits generally only preserve the upper shaft and feather ‘vane’ which are thought to be unsuitable for DNA analysis. We analyse subfossil moa feathers from Holocene New Zealand rockshelter sites and demonstrate that both ancient DNA and plumage information can be recovered from their upper portion, allowing species identification and a means to reconstruct the appearance of extinct taxa. These ancient DNA sequences indicate that the distal portions of feathers are an untapped resource for studies of museum, palaeontological and modern specimens. We investigate the potential to reconstruct the plumage of pre-historically extinct avian taxa using subfossil remains, rather than assuming morphological uniformity with closely related extant taxa. To test the notion of colour persistence in subfossil feathers, we perform digital comparisons of feathers of the red-crowned parakeet (Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae novaezelandiae) excavated from the same horizons as the moa feathers, with modern samples. The results suggest that the coloration of the moa feathers is authentic, and computer software is used to perform plumage reconstructions of moa based on subfossil remains. PMID:19570784

  12. Abundance of broad bacterial taxa in the sargasso sea explained by environmental conditions but not water mass.

    PubMed

    Sjöstedt, Johanna; Martiny, Jennifer B H; Munk, Peter; Riemann, Lasse

    2014-05-01

    To explore the potential linkage between distribution of marine bacterioplankton groups, environmental conditions, and water mass, we investigated the factors determining the abundance of bacterial taxa across the hydrographically complex Subtropical Convergence Zone in the Sargasso Sea. Based on information from 16S rRNA gene clone libraries from various locations and two depths, abundances of the predominant taxa (eubacteria, Archaea, Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and the Roseobacter, SAR11, and SAR86 clades) were quantified by real-time PCR. In addition, the abundances of Synechococcus, Prochlorococcus, and picoalgae were determined by flow cytometry. Linear multiple-regression models determining the relative effects of eight environmental variables and of water mass explained 35 to 86% of the variation in abundance of the quantified taxa, even though only one to three variables were significantly related to any particular taxon's abundance. Most of the variation in abundance was explained by depth and chlorophyll a. The predominant phototrophs, Prochlorococcus and picoalgae, were negatively correlated with phosphate, whereas eubacteria, heterotrophic bacteria, and SAR86 were negatively correlated with nitrite. Water mass showed limited importance for explaining the abundance of the taxonomical groups (significant only for Roseobacter, explaining 14% of the variation). The results suggest the potential for predicting the abundance of broad bacterioplankton groups throughout the Sargasso Sea using only a few environmental parameters.

  13. Phalangopsidae crickets from Tropical Africa (Orthoptera, Grylloidea), with descriptions of new taxa and an identification key for African genera.

    PubMed

    Desutter-Grandcolas, Laure

    2015-04-22

    New Phalangopsidae crickets are described from tropical Africa, including three new genera and ten new species: Afrophaloria Desutter-Grandcolas, n.gen., Afrophaloria amani Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., type species, Afrophaloria apiariensis Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., Afrophaloria hempae Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., Kameruloria gabonensis Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., Kameruloria nigricornis Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., Kameruloria trimaculata Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., Paragryllodes amani Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., Phasmagryllus Desutter-Grandcolas, n.gen., Phasmagryllus elegans Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., type species, Upupagryllus Desutter-Grandcolas, n.gen., Upupagryllus subalatus Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., type species, and Upupagryllus alatus Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp. All these taxa, except Paragryllodes amani Desutter-Grandcolas, n. sp., belong to the subfamily Phaloriinae. The subfamily is redefined, to take into account their morphological (apterous taxa) and ecological (straminicolous taxa) diversity. A key for phalangopsid African genera is proposed, and the status of Larandeicus Chopard, 1937 briefly discussed.

  14. Deciphering the Ecology of Key Diatom Taxa to Understand Climate-Induced Changes in West Greenland Lakes over the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saros, J. E.; Northington, R.; Malik, H.; Anderson, N. J.

    2014-12-01

    Paleolimnological records from southwest Greenland reveal that diatom communities have not changed in a similar way to other regions of the Arctic, and in general, do not show synchronous change across this area. There are a number of cases in which lakes in close proximity to each other show opposite community changes over the Holocene. These changes in diatom fossil profiles have been difficult to interpret due to a lack of explicit ecological information for key species. The objective of this project is to decipher the ecology of key diatom species that are abundant across these paleolimnological records. We hypothesize that climate-driven changes in nutrients and water column stability (via its effects on light availability) are key factors shaping diatom community structure in these lakes. We assessed the requirements of particular taxa for nutrients and light through comparative lake sampling and resource bioassays. A whole-lake manipulation in which water column stability was reduced through enhanced water circulation was also conducted to assess the response of key taxa to this change. We found that the relative abundances of key diatom taxa are under complex control by the interactive effects of nutrients and light. We discuss how these results will enhance interpretation of climate-induced changes in Arctic lakes in this region.

  15. Phylogeny and nomenclature of the genus Talaromyces and taxa accommodated in Penicillium subgenus Biverticillium

    PubMed Central

    Samson, R.A.; Yilmaz, N.; Houbraken, J.; Spierenburg, H.; Seifert, K.A.; Peterson, S.W.; Varga, J.; Frisvad, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    The taxonomic history of anamorphic species attributed to Penicillium subgenus Biverticillium is reviewed, along with evidence supporting their relationship with teleomorphic species classified in Talaromyces. To supplement previous conclusions based on ITS, SSU and/or LSU sequencing that Talaromyces and subgenus Biverticillium comprise a monophyletic group that is distinct from Penicillium at the generic level, the phylogenetic relationships of these two groups with other genera of Trichocomaceae was further studied by sequencing a part of the RPB1 (RNA polymerase II largest subunit) gene. Talaromyces species and most species of Penicillium subgenus Biverticillium sensu Pitt reside in a monophyletic clade distant from species of other subgenera of Penicillium. For detailed phylogenetic analysis of species relationships, the ITS region (incl. 5.8S nrDNA) was sequenced for the available type strains and/or representative isolates of Talaromyces and related biverticillate anamorphic species. Extrolite profiles were compiled for all type strains and many supplementary cultures. All evidence supports our conclusions that Penicillium subgenus Biverticillium is distinct from other subgenera in Penicillium and should be taxonomically unified with the Talaromyces species that reside in the same clade. Following the concepts of nomenclatural priority and single name nomenclature, we transfer all accepted species of Penicillium subgenus Biverticillium to Talaromyces. A holomorphic generic diagnosis for the expanded concept of Talaromyces, including teleomorph and anamorph characters, is provided. A list of accepted Talaromyces names and newly combined Penicillium names is given. Species of biotechnological and medical importance, such as P. funiculosum and P. marneffei, are now combined in Talaromyces. Excluded species and taxa that need further taxonomic study are discussed. An appendix lists other generic names, usually considered synonyms of Penicillium sensu lato that

  16. Eighth international congress on nitrogen fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the Eighth International Congress on Nitrogen Fixation held May 20--26, 1990 in Knoxville, Tennessee. The volume contains abstracts of individual presentations. Sessions were entitled Recent Advances in the Chemistry of Nitrogen Fixation, Plant-microbe Interactions, Limiting Factors of Nitrogen Fixation, Nitrogen Fixation and the Environment, Bacterial Systems, Nitrogen Fixation in Agriculture and Industry, Plant Function, and Nitrogen Fixation and Evolution.

  17. Vegetation community change points suggest that critical loads of nutrient nitrogen may be too high

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, Kayla; Aherne, Julian; Bleasdale, Andy

    2016-12-01

    It is widely accepted that elevated nitrogen deposition can have detrimental effects on semi-natural ecosystems, including changes to plant diversity. Empirical critical loads of nutrient nitrogen have been recommended to protect many sensitive European habitats from significant harmful effects. In this study, we used Threshold Indicator Taxa Analysis (TITAN) to investigate shifts in vegetation communities along an atmospheric nitrogen deposition gradient for twenty-two semi-natural habitat types (as described under Annex I of the European Union Habitats Directive) in Ireland. Significant changes in vegetation community, i.e., change points, were determined for twelve habitats, with seven habitats showing a decrease in the number of positive indicator species. Community-level change points indicated a decrease in species abundance along a nitrogen deposition gradient ranging from 3.9 to 15.3 kg N ha-1 yr-1, which were significantly lower than recommended critical loads (Wilcoxon signed-rank test; V = 6, p < 0.05). These results suggest that lower critical loads of empirical nutrient nitrogen deposition may be required to protect many European habitats. Changes to vegetation communities may mean a loss of sensitive indicator species and potentially rare species in these habitats, highlighting how emission reductions policies set under the National Emissions Ceilings Directive may be directly linked to meeting the goal set out under the European Union's Biodiversity Strategy of "halting the loss of biodiversity" across Europe by 2020.

  18. Effect of nitrogen, phosphorous, and their interaction on coral reef algal succession in Glover's Reef, Belize.

    PubMed

    McClanahan, T R; Carreiro-Silva, M; DiLorenzo, M

    2007-12-01

    Nitrogen and phosphorous fertilizers were used to determine their short-term summer effects on algal colonization, abundance, and species composition in moderate herbivory treatments. Secondary succession of algae on coral skeletons was examined in four treatments: an untreated control, a pure phosphate fertilizer, a pure nitrogen fertilizer, and an equal mix of the two fertilizers. Turf algae cover was the only measure of algae abundance to respond significantly to fertilization. Turf cover was three times higher in treatments with added nitrogen when compared with the pure phosphorus treatment. These turfs were dominated by green and cyanobacteria taxa, namely Enteromorpha prolifera, Lyngbya confervoides, and two species of Cladophora. The phosphate treatment was dominated by encrusting corallines and the cyanobacteria L. confervoides, while the controls had the highest cover of frondose brown algae, namely Padina sanctae-crucis and two species of Dictyota. Results indicate that turf algae were co-limited by nitrogen and phosphorus but enrichment appeared to inhibit brown frondose algae that currently dominate these reefs. Number of species was lowest on the pure phosphorus and nitrogen treatments, highest in the controls and intermediate in the mixed treatments, which suggests that diversity is reduced most by an imbalanced nutrient ratio.

  19. High-nitrogen explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Naud, D.; Hiskey, M. A.; Kramer, J. F.; Bishop, R. L.; Harry, H. H.; Son, S. F.; Sullivan, G. K.

    2002-01-01

    The syntheses and characterization of various tetrazine and furazan compounds offer a different approach to explosives development. Traditional explosives - such as TNT or RDX - rely on the oxidation of the carbon and hydrogen atoms by the oxygen carrying nitro group to produce the explosive energy. High-nitrogen compounds rely instead on large positive heats of formation for that energy. Some of these high-nitrogen compounds have been shown to be less sensitive to initiation (e.g. by impact) when compared to traditional nitro-containing explosives of similar performances. Using the precursor, 3,6-bis-(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)-s-tetrazine (BDT), several useful energetic compounds based on the s-tetrazine system have been synthesized and studied. The compound, 3,3{prime}-azobis(6-amino-s-tetrazine) or DAAT, detonates as a half inch rate stick despite having no oxygen in the molecule. Using perfluoroacetic acid, DAAT can be oxidized to give mixtures of N-oxide isomers (DAAT03.5) with an average oxygen content of about 3.5. This energetic mixture burns at extremely high rates and with low dependency on pressure. Another tetrazine compound of interest is 3,6-diguanidino-s-tetrazine(DGT) and its dinitrate and diperchlorate salts. DGT is easily synthesized by reacting BDT with guanidine in methanol. Using Caro's acid, DGT can be further oxidized to give 3,6-diguanidino-s-tetrazine-1,4-di-N-oxide (DGT-DO). Like DGT, the di-N-oxide can react with nitric acid or perchloric acid to give the dinitrate and the diperchlorate salts. The compounds, 4,4{prime}-diamino-3,3{prime}-azoxyfurazan (DAAF) and 4,4{prime}-diamino-3,3{prime}-azofurazan (DAAzF), may have important future roles in insensitive explosive applications. Neither DAAF nor DAAzF can be initiated by laboratory impact drop tests, yet both have in some aspects better explosive performances than 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene TATB - the standard of insensitive high explosives. The thermal stability of DAAzF is

  20. Melting line of polymeric nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakub, L. N.

    2013-05-01

    We made an attempt to predict location of the melting line of polymeric nitrogen using two equations for Helmholtz free energy: proposed earlier for cubic gauche-structure and developed recently for liquid polymerized nitrogen. The P-T relation, orthobaric densities and latent heat of melting were determined using a standard double tangent construction. The estimated melting temperature decreases with increasing pressure, alike the temperature of molecular-nonmolecular transition in solid. We discuss the possibility of a triple point (solid-molecular fluid-polymeric fluid) at ˜80 GPa and observed maximum of melting temperature of nitrogen.

  1. Environmental friendly nitrogen fertilization.

    PubMed

    Shaviv, Avi

    2005-09-01

    With the huge intensification of agriculture and the increasing awareness to human health and natural resources sustainability, there was a shift towards the development of environmental friendly N application approaches that support sustainable use of land and sustain food production. The effectiveness of such approaches depends on their ability to synchronize plant nitrogen demand with its supply and the ability to apply favored compositions and dosages of N-species. They are also influenced by farming scale and its sophistication, and include the following key concepts: (i) Improved application modes such as split or localized ("depot") application; (ii) use of bio-amendments like nitrification and urease inhibitors and combinations of (i) and (ii); (iii) use of controlled and slow release fertilizers; (iv) Fertigation-fertilization via irrigation systems including fully automated and controlled systems; and (v) precision fertilization in large scale farming systems. The paper describes the approaches and their action mechanisms and examines their agronomic and environmental significance. The relevance of the approaches for different farming scales, levels of agronomic intensification and agro-technical sophistication is examined as well.

  2. Energy, industry and nitrogen: strategies for decreasing reactive nitrogen emissions.

    PubMed

    Moomaw, William R

    2002-03-01

    Nitrogen oxides are released during atmospheric combustion of fossil fuels and biomass, and during the production of certain chemicals and products. They can react with natural or man-made volatile organic compounds to produce smog, or else can be further oxidized to produce particulate haze, or acid rain that can eutrophy land and water. The reactive nitrogen that begins in the energy sector thus cascades through the atmosphere, the hydrosphere and soils before being eventually partially denitrifed to the global warming and stratospheric ozone-depleting gas nitrous oxide or molecular nitrogen. This paper will suggest how an economic analysis of the nitrogen cycle can identify the most cost-effective places to intervene. Nitrogen oxides released during fossil-fuel combustion in vehicles, power plants and heating boilers can either be controlled by add-on emission control technology, or can be eliminated by many of the same technical options that lead to carbon dioxide reduction. These integrated strategies also address sustainability, economic development and national security issues. Similarly in industrial production, it is more effective to focus on redesigning industrial processes rather than on nitrogen oxide pollution elimination from the current system. This paper will suggest which strategies might be utilized to address multiple benefits rather than focusing on single pollutants.

  3. Belowground carabid beetle diversity in the western Palaearctic - effects of history and climate on range-restricted taxa (Coleoptera, Carabidae).

    PubMed

    Schuldt, Andreas; Assmann, Thorsten

    2011-01-01

    Broad-scale patterns of subterranean diversity are a fascinating but neglected part of biodiversity research. Carabid beetles adapted to belowground habitats form a particularly species-rich part of the subterranean fauna. We studied large-scale diversity patterns of these belowground carabids across the western Palaearctic and evaluated potential impacts of historical and contemporary environmental conditions on the distribution of these taxa, using available species richness and environmental data at country level. Regression modelling and variation partitioning showed a strong relationship between species richness and range in elevation. Potential effects of climatic variables, mainly those related to ambient energy input, were much weaker. We discuss the implications of this combination of effects, which suggests, concordant with the absence of subterranean carabids in northern and highest richness in southern Europe, a strong prevailing influence of historical processes on current richness distributions of these taxa. Previous studies did not provide clear indications for such an influence. In contrast to more mobile and widespread carabid beetles, dispersal limitation due to high adaptation of belowground carabids to subterranean habitats has probably hindered their re-colonization of former permafrost and glaciated regions. Hotspots of highest belowground diversity are located in regions with an assumed long-term stability of environmental conditions, correlating with patterns of other dispersal-limited taxa such as many endemic plants. Our study provides important new information in the discussion of potential determinants of the distinct geographic patterns of belowground diversity. Moreover, it contributes to a better understanding of range size related differences previously found in the distribution of diversity and environmental dependencies of widespread and range-restricted species within the highly diverse carabid beetles.

  4. Three-dimensional geometric morphometric analysis of talar morphology in extant gorilla taxa from highland and lowland habitats.

    PubMed

    Knigge, Ryan P; Tocheri, Matthew W; Orr, Caley M; Mcnulty, Kieran P

    2015-01-01

    Western gorillas (Gorilla gorilla) are known to climb significantly more often than eastern gorillas (Gorilla beringei), a behavioral distinction attributable to major differences in their respective habitats (i.e., highland vs. lowland). Genetic evidence suggests that the lineages leading to these taxa began diverging from one another between approximately 1 and 3 million years ago. Thus, gorillas offer a special opportunity to examine the degree to which morphology of recently diverged taxa may be "fine-tuned" to differing ecological requirements. Using three-dimensional (3D) geometric morphometrics, we compared talar morphology in a sample of 87 specimens including western (lowland), mountain (highland), and grauer gorillas (lowland and highland populations). Talar shape was captured with a series of landmarks and semilandmarks superimposed by generalized Procrustes analysis. A between-group principal components analysis of overall talar shape separates gorillas by ecological habitat and by taxon. An analysis of only the trochlea and lateral malleolar facet identifies subtle variations in trochlear shape between western lowland and lowland grauer gorillas, potentially indicative of convergent evolution of arboreal adaptations in the talus. Lastly, talar shape scales differently with centroid size for highland and lowland gorillas, suggesting that ankle morphology may track body-size mediated variation in arboreal behaviors differently depending on ecological setting. Several of the observed shape differences are linked biomechanically to the facilitation of climbing in lowland gorillas and to stability and load-bearing on terrestrial substrates in the highland taxa, providing an important comparative model for studying morphological variation in groups known only from fossils (e.g., early hominins).

  5. Leaf-Associated Bacterial and Fungal Taxa Shifts in Response to Larvae of the Tree Hole Mosquito, Ochlerotatus triseriatus

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Michael G.; Chen, Shicheng; Walker, Edward D.

    2014-01-01

    Larvae of the eastern tree hole mosquito, Ochlerotatus triseriatus (Say), and related container-breeding species are known to feed upon substrate-associated microorganisms. Although the importance of these microbial resources to larval growth has been established, almost nothing is known about the taxonomic composition and dynamics of these critical microbial food sources. We examined bacterial and fungal community compositional changes on oak leaves tethered in natural tree hole habitats of O. triseriatus. We eliminated larvae experimentally in a subset of the tree holes and examined 16S rDNA gene sequences for bacteria and ergosterol concentrations and 18S rRNA gene sequences for fungi collected from leaf material subsamples. Leaf ergosterol content varied significantly with time, but not treatment. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to compare microbial taxonomic patterns found in leaves incubated with or without larvae present, and we found that larval presence affected both bacterial and fungal groups, either from loosely attached or strongly adherent categories. Bacterial communities generally grouped more tightly when larvae were present, and class level taxa proportions changed when larvae were present, suggesting selection by larval feeding or activities for particular taxa such as members of the Bacteroidetes, Alphaproteobacteria, and Betaproteobacteria classes. Fungal taxa composite scores also separated along PC axes related to the presence of larvae and indicated larval feeding effects on several higher taxonomic groups, including Saccharomycetes, Dothideomycetes, and Chytridiomycota. These results support the hypothesis that larval mosquito feeding and activities altered microbial communities associated with substrate surfaces, potentially leading to decreased food value of the resource and affecting decomposition of particulate matter in the system. PMID:17899246

  6. Hybrid Origins of Carex rostrata var. borealis and C. stenolepis, Two Problematic Taxa in Carex Section Vesicariae (Cyperaceae)

    PubMed Central

    M. Pedersen, A. Tiril; Nowak, Michael D.; Brysting, Anne K.; Elven, Reidar; Bjorå, Charlotte S.

    2016-01-01

    Hybridization is frequent in the large and ecologically significant genus Carex (Cyperaceae). In four important sections of the northern regions (Ceratocystis, Glareosae, Phacocystis and Vesicariae), the frequent occurrence of hybrids often renders the identification of “pure” species and hybrids difficult. In this study we address the origins and taxonomic rank of two taxa of section Vesicariae: Carex rostrata var. borealis and C. stenolepis. The origin and taxonomic status of C. stenolepis has been the subject of substantial debate over the years, whereas C. rostrata var. borealis has received very little attention in the years since its first description in the 19th century. By performing an extensive sampling of relevant taxa from a broad distribution range, and analyzing data from fifteen microsatellite loci developed specifically for our study together with pollen stainability measures, we resolve the hybrid origins of C. rostrata var. borealis and C. stenolepis and provide new insights into this taxonomically challenging group of sedges. Our results are in accordance with previous findings suggesting that C. stenolepis is a hybrid between C. vesicaria and C. saxatilis. They are also in accordance with a previous proposition that C. rostrata var. borealis is a hybrid between C. rostrata and C. rotundata, and furthermore suggest that both hybrids are the result of multiple, recent (i.e., postglacial) hybridization events. We found little evidence for successful sexual reproduction within C. rostrata var. borealis and C. stenolepis, but conclude that the common and recurrent, largely predictable occurrence of these taxa justifies accepting both hybrids as hybrid species with binomial names. There are, however, complications as to types and priority names, and we therefore choose to address these problems in a separate paper. PMID:27780239

  7. The ontogeny of talo-crural appositional articular morphology among catarrhine taxa: adult shape reflects substrate use.

    PubMed

    Turley, Kevin; Frost, Stephen R

    2014-07-01

    The upper ankle joint forms a single articular plane between organism and the foot and substrate. Singular warp analysis shows that its shape reflects substrate use. This study explores whether the differences in shape are genetic with a developmental trajectory evident during ontogeny or epigenetic and the result of substrate use by the individual. A total of 418 matched distal tibial and proximal talar landmarked surfaces from adult and subadult specimens from 12 diverse catarrhine taxa were studied. Specimens were grouped by molar eruption (M1, M2, and M3) for comparative analysis. Generalized Procrustes analysis, multivariate regression, relative warp analysis, singular warp analysis, and permutation tests were used. Singular warp analysis for the entire cohort was highly significant in the first singular warp, with the adult taxa sorting by substrate use. All 173 subadults clustered with an adult "arboreal" shape profile. Among Hominoidea, adults (M3) sorted by substrate use with Pan paniscus and Hylobatidae assuming an "arboreal" shape separate from Pan troglodytes and the remaining taxa with "terrestrial" shape. Cercopithecoid adults sorted by substrate use as well, with the M3 specimens of Papio hamadryas and Macaca thibetana demonstrating a "terrestrial" shape. Differences in mode of locomotion did not affect the findings in the first singular warp. Results confirmed the convergence of talo-crural shape among superfamilies based on substrate use and divergence in shape within Pan and Macaca, based on substrate use. The shape differences among adults (M3) are consistent with a plastic response to the behavioral stimulus of substrate use.

  8. Nitrogen removal from natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    According to a 1991 Energy Information Administration estimate, U.S. reserves of natural gas are about 165 trillion cubic feet (TCF). To meet the long-term demand for natural gas, new gas fields from these reserves will have to be developed. Gas Research Institute studies reveal that 14% (or about 19 TCF) of known reserves in the United States are subquality due to high nitrogen content. Nitrogen-contaminated natural gas has a low Btu value and must be upgraded by removing the nitrogen. In response to the problem, the Department of Energy is seeking innovative, efficient nitrogen-removal methods. Membrane processes have been considered for natural gas denitrogenation. The challenge, not yet overcome, is to develop membranes with the required nitrogen/methane separation characteristics. Our calculations show that a methane-permeable membrane with a methane/nitrogen selectivity of 4 to 6 would make denitrogenation by a membrane process viable. The objective of Phase I of this project was to show that membranes with this target selectivity can be developed, and that the economics of the process based on these membranes would be competitive. Gas permeation measurements with membranes prepared from two rubbery polymers and a superglassy polymer showed that two of these materials had the target selectivity of 4 to 6 when operated at temperatures below - 20{degrees}C. An economic analysis showed that a process based on these membranes is competitive with other technologies for small streams containing less than 10% nitrogen. Hybrid designs combining membranes with other technologies are suitable for high-flow, higher-nitrogen-content streams.

  9. The nitrogen cycle on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mancinelli, Rocco L.

    1989-01-01

    Nirtogen is an essential element for the evolution of life, because it is found in a variety of biologically important molecules. Therefore, N is an important element to study from a exobiological perspective. In particular, fixed nitrogen is the biologically useful form of nitrogen. Fixed nitrogen is generally defines as NH3, NH4(+), NO(x), or N that is chemically bound to either inorganic or organic molecules, and releasable by hydrolysis to NH3 or NH4(+). On Earth, the vast majority of nitrogen exists as N2 in the atmosphere, and not in the fixes form. On early Mars the same situations probably existed. The partial pressure of N2 on early Mars was thought to be 18 mb, significantly less than that of Earth. Dinitrogen can be fixed abiotically by several mechanisms. These mechanisms include thernal shock from meteoritic infall and lightning, as well as the interaction of light and sand containing TiO2 which produces NH3 that would be rapidly destroyed by photolysis and reaction with OH radicals. These mechanisms could have been operative on primitive Mars.The chemical processes effecting these compounds and possible ways of fixing or burying N in the Martian environment are described. Data gathered in this laboratory suggest that the low abundance of nitrogen along (compared to primitive Earth) may not significantly deter the origin and early evolution of a nitrogen utilizing organisms. However, the conditions on current Mars with respect to nitrogen are quite different, and organisms may not be able to utilize all of the available nitrogen.

  10. The International Code of Virus Classification and Nomenclature (ICVCN): proposal for text changes for improved differentiation of viral taxa and viruses.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Jens H; Radoshitzky, Sheli R; Bavari, Sina; Jahrling, Peter B

    2013-07-01

    The International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) is responsible for the classification of viruses into taxa. Importantly, the ICTV is currently not responsible for the nomenclature of viruses or their subclassification into strains, lineages, or genotypes. ICTV rules for classification of viruses and nomenclature of taxa are laid out in a code, the International Code of Virus Classification and Nomenclature (ICVCN). The most recent version of the Code makes it difficult for the unfamiliar reader to distinguish between viruses and taxa, thereby often giving the impression that certain Rules apply to viruses. Here, Code text changes are proposed to address this problem.

  11. New Guinean Issidae: description of new taxa in a poorly known island fauna (Hemiptera, Fulgoroidea).

    PubMed

    Gnezdilov, V M; Le Cesne, M; Soulier-Perkins, A; Bourgoin, T

    2015-01-05

    In the framework of the recent expedition results of "Our Planet Reviewed Papua-New-Guinea 2012-2013" we provide here the first Issidae (Hemiptera, Fulgoroidea) fauna review of New Guinea with the description of three new taxa: one new genus Papunega Gnezdilov et Bourgoin gen. nov. with two new species: Papunega magnifacies Gnezdilov et Le Cesne, sp. nov. (type species), Papunega armocula Gnezdilov et Soulier-Perkins, sp. nov. Tetrica fasciatifrons Melichar, 1906 is transferred to the genus Papugena gen. nov. to become Papugena fasciatifrons (Melichar, 1906) comb. nov. New Guinean Issidae fauna now includes 7 genera and 16 species. 

  12. New taxa and revisionary systematics of alcyonacean octocorals from the Pacific coast of North America (Cnidaria, Anthozoa)

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Gary C.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A taxonomic assessment of four species of octocorals from the northeastern Pacific Ocean (British Columbia to California) is provided. Included here are a new species of clavulariid stolonifieran Cryptophyton, a new species of the nephtheid soft coral Gersemia, an undetermined species of soft coral in the genus Alcyonium that has been referred in the literature by several other names, and a new genus is named for a plexaurid sea fan originally described in the Indo-Pacific genus Euplexaura. Discussions are included that compare the species to related taxa, or provide revisionary assessments. PMID:23794840

  13. Controlling Harmful Cyanobacteria: Taxa-Specific Responses of Cyanobacteria to Grazing by Large-Bodied Daphnia in a Biomanipulation Scenario.

    PubMed

    Urrutia-Cordero, Pablo; Ekvall, Mattias K; Hansson, Lars-Anders

    2016-01-01

    Lake restoration practices based on reducing fish predation and promoting the dominance of large-bodied Daphnia grazers (i.e., biomanipulation) have been the focus of much debate due to inconsistent success in suppressing harmful cyanobacterial blooms. While most studies have explored effects of large-bodied Daphnia on cyanobacterial growth at the community level and/or on few dominant species, predictions of such restoration practices demand further understanding on taxa-specific responses in diverse cyanobacterial communities. In order to address these questions, we conducted three grazing experiments during summer in a eutrophic lake where the natural phytoplankton community was exposed to an increasing gradient in biomass of the large-bodied Daphnia magna. This allowed evaluating taxa-specific responses of cyanobacteria to Daphnia grazing throughout the growing season in a desired biomanipulation scenario with limited fish predation. Total cyanobacterial and phytoplankton biomasses responded negatively to Daphnia grazing both in early and late summer, regardless of different cyanobacterial densities. Large-bodied Daphnia were capable of suppressing the abundance of Aphanizomenon, Dolichospermum, Microcystis and Planktothrix bloom-forming cyanobacteria. However, the growth of the filamentous Dolichospermum crassum was positively affected by grazing during a period when this cyanobacterium dominated the community. The eutrophic lake was subjected to biomanipulation since 2005 and nineteen years of lake monitoring data (1996-2014) revealed that reducing fish predation increased the mean abundance (50%) and body-size (20%) of Daphnia, as well as suppressed the total amount of nutrients and the growth of the dominant cyanobacterial taxa, Microcystis and Planktothrix. Altogether our results suggest that lake restoration practices solely based on grazer control by large-bodied Daphnia can be effective, but may not be sufficient to control the overgrowth of all

  14. Controlling Harmful Cyanobacteria: Taxa-Specific Responses of Cyanobacteria to Grazing by Large-Bodied Daphnia in a Biomanipulation Scenario

    PubMed Central

    Urrutia-Cordero, Pablo; Ekvall, Mattias K.; Hansson, Lars-Anders

    2016-01-01

    Lake restoration practices based on reducing fish predation and promoting the dominance of large-bodied Daphnia grazers (i.e., biomanipulation) have been the focus of much debate due to inconsistent success in suppressing harmful cyanobacterial blooms. While most studies have explored effects of large-bodied Daphnia on cyanobacterial growth at the community level and/or on few dominant species, predictions of such restoration practices demand further understanding on taxa-specific responses in diverse cyanobacterial communities. In order to address these questions, we conducted three grazing experiments during summer in a eutrophic lake where the natural phytoplankton community was exposed to an increasing gradient in biomass of the large-bodied Daphnia magna. This allowed evaluating taxa-specific responses of cyanobacteria to Daphnia grazing throughout the growing season in a desired biomanipulation scenario with limited fish predation. Total cyanobacterial and phytoplankton biomasses responded negatively to Daphnia grazing both in early and late summer, regardless of different cyanobacterial densities. Large-bodied Daphnia were capable of suppressing the abundance of Aphanizomenon, Dolichospermum, Microcystis and Planktothrix bloom-forming cyanobacteria. However, the growth of the filamentous Dolichospermum crassum was positively affected by grazing during a period when this cyanobacterium dominated the community. The eutrophic lake was subjected to biomanipulation since 2005 and nineteen years of lake monitoring data (1996–2014) revealed that reducing fish predation increased the mean abundance (50%) and body-size (20%) of Daphnia, as well as suppressed the total amount of nutrients and the growth of the dominant cyanobacterial taxa, Microcystis and Planktothrix. Altogether our results suggest that lake restoration practices solely based on grazer control by large-bodied Daphnia can be effective, but may not be sufficient to control the overgrowth of all

  15. Dominant plant taxa predict plant productivity responses to CO2 enrichment across precipitation and soil gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Fay, Philip A.; Newingham, Beth A.; Polley, H. Wayne; Morgan, Jack A.; LeCain, Daniel R.; Nowak, Robert S.; Smith, Stanley D.

    2015-03-30

    The Earth’s atmosphere will continue to be enriched with carbon dioxide (CO2) over the coming century. Carbon dioxide enrichment often reduces leaf transpiration, which in water-limited ecosystems may increase soil water content, change species abundances and increase the productivity of plant communities. The effect of increased soil water on community productivity and community change may be greater in ecosystems with lower precipitation, or on coarser-textured soils, but responses are likely absent in deserts. We tested correlations among yearly increases in soil water content, community change and community plant productivity responses to CO2 enrichment in experiments in a mesic grassland with fine- to coarse-textured soils, a semi-arid grassland and a xeric shrubland. We found no correlation between CO2-caused changes in soil water content and changes in biomass of dominant plant taxa or total community aboveground biomass in either grassland type or on any soil in the mesic grassland (P > 0.60). Instead, increases in dominant taxa biomass explained up to 85% of the increases in total community biomass under CO2 enrichment. The effect of community change on community productivity was stronger in the semi-arid grassland than in the mesic grassland,where community biomass change on one soil was not correlated with the change in either the soil water content or the dominant taxa. No sustained increases in soil water content or community productivity and no change in dominant plant taxa occurred in the xeric shrubland. Thus, community change was a crucial driver of community productivity responses to CO2 enrichment in the grasslands, but effects of soil water change on productivity were not evident in yearly responses to CO2 enrichment. In conclusion, future research is necessary to isolate and clarify the mechanisms controlling the temporal and spatial variations in the linkages among soil water

  16. Anaerobic Nitrogen Fixers on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, B. G.

    2000-07-01

    The conversion of atmospheric nitrogen gas to the protein of living systems is an amazing process of nature. The first step in the process is biological nitrogen fixation, the transformation of N2 to NH3. The phenomenon is crucial for feeding the billions of our species on Earth. On Mars, the same process may allow us to discover how life can adapt to a hostile environment, and render it habitable. Hostile environments also exist on Earth. For example, nothing grows in coal refuse piles due to the oxidation of pyrite and marcasite to sulfuric acid. Yet, when the acidity is neutralized, alfalfa and soybean plants develop root nodules typical of symbiotic nitrogen fixation with Rhizobium species possibly living in the pyritic material. When split open, these nodules exhibited the pinkish color of leghemoglobin, a protein in the nodule protecting the active nitrogen-fixing enzyme nitrogenase against the toxic effects of oxygen. Although we have not yet obtained direct evidence of nitrogenase activity in these nodules (reduction of acetylene to ethylene, for example), these findings suggested the possibility that nitrogen fixation was taking place in this hostile, non-soil material. This immediately raises the possibility that freeliving anaerobic bacteria which fix atmospheric nitrogen on Earth, could do the same on Mars.

  17. Evaluation of a spacecraft nitrogen generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, R. D.; Powell, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    A method is discussed of generating nitrogen for cabin leakage makeup aboard space vehicles having longer duration missions. The nitrogen generation concept is based on using liquid hydrazine as the stored form of nitrogen to reduce the higher tankage and expendables weight associated with high pressure gaseous or cryogenic liquid nitrogen storage. The hydrazine is catalytically dissociated to yield a mixture of nitrogen and hydrogen. The nitrogen/hydrogen mixture is then separated to yield the makeup nitrogen. The excess supply of hydrogen would be available for use in the reduction of metabolic carbon dioxide. A detailed comparison was completed of Palladium/Silver and Polymer Electrochemical-based Nitrogen Generation Systems. The palladium/silver-based system was judged better than the Polymer Electrochemical Nitrogen Generation System because of lower expendable weight and palladium/silver nitrogen/hydrogen separation represents 'off-the-shelf' technology.

  18. Hydrocarbon degraders establish at the costs of microbial richness, abundance and keystone taxa after crude oil contamination in permafrost environments

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sizhong; Wen, Xi; Shi, Yulan; Liebner, Susanne; Jin, Huijun; Perfumo, Amedea

    2016-01-01

    Oil spills from pipeline ruptures are a major source of terrestrial petroleum pollution in cold regions. However, our knowledge of the bacterial response to crude oil contamination in cold regions remains to be further expanded, especially in terms of community shifts and potential development of hydrocarbon degraders. In this study we investigated changes of microbial diversity, population size and keystone taxa in permafrost soils at four different sites along the China-Russia crude oil pipeline prior to and after perturbation with crude oil. We found that crude oil caused a decrease of cell numbers together with a reduction of the species richness and shifts in the dominant phylotypes, while bacterial community diversity was highly site-specific after exposure to crude oil, reflecting different environmental conditions. Keystone taxa that strongly co-occurred were found to form networks based on trophic interactions, that is co-metabolism regarding degradation of hydrocarbons (in contaminated samples) or syntrophic carbon cycling (in uncontaminated samples). With this study we demonstrate that after severe crude oil contamination a rapid establishment of endemic hydrocarbon degrading communities takes place under favorable temperature conditions. Therefore, both endemism and trophic correlations of bacterial degraders need to be considered in order to develop effective cleanup strategies. PMID:27886221

  19. Invasion dynamics of two alien Carpobrotus (Aizoaceae) taxa on a Mediterranean island: I. Genetic diversity and introgression.

    PubMed

    Suehs, C M; Affre, L; Médail, F

    2004-01-01

    This study, based on morphological and isozyme analysis, clearly discriminates two invasive Carpobrotus taxa, C. edulis and C. acinaciformis, in the Hyères archipelago off the southeastern coast of France. However, three different allelic combinations demonstrate the presence of intermediate individuals resulting from an introgression of part of the C. edulis genome into that of C. acinaciformis. Both taxa have higher than average genetic (C. edulis: P(0.95)=62.5%, A=2.25+/-0.70, H(o)=0.329+/-0.324; C. acinaciformis: P(0.95)=75%, A=2.38+/-0.42, H(o)=0.645+/-0.109) and clonal diversities (C. edulis: IP=0.37; C. acinaciformis: IP=0.48). Furthermore, C. acinaciformis has an excess of heterozygotes (F=-0.585+/-0.217), probably due to introgression. The relationship between the probability of clonal identity for two individuals and distance indicates that C. acinaciformis relies more on clonal reproduction than on sexual recruitment (seed recruitment/vegetative propagation=u/v=0.027), in contrast to C. edulis, whose probability of clonal identity did not vary with distance. The overwhelming clonal growth and high genetic diversities of C. acinaciformis and the previously recorded invasion potential for C. edulis raises concern for intensified invasion via hybridisation.

  20. Quantitation of Crocins and picrocrocin in saffron by HPLC: application to quality control and phytochemical differentiation from other crocus taxa.

    PubMed

    Koulakiotis, Nikolaos Stavros; Gikas, Evangelos; Iatrou, Gregoris; Lamari, Fotini N; Tsarbopoulos, Anthony

    2015-05-01

    A chromatographic method was developed and fully validated for the determination of the major saffron constituents, i.e., picrocrocin and five major crocins. Dried samples (styles of Crocus sativus and other Crocus taxa) were extracted with MeOH : water (1 : 1, v/v), and chromatographic separation of the analytes was achieved by reversed-phase chromatography using a gradient elution. Full validation was performed using spiked samples with analytes, which were isolated, purified, and characterized by MS due to a lack of commercial standards. The method showed a good fit (r2 > 0.999) for all analytes with limit of quantitation values in the range of 1-15 µg/mL, and demonstrated adequate intra- and inter-precision (< 15 % RSD) and accuracy (< 7 % RE). The method was applied to the analysis of various commercial saffron samples and of indigenous Crocus taxa and allowed for the first time the absolute quantitation of several Crocus components.

  1. Gene fishing: the use of a simple protocol to isolate multiple homeodomain classes from diverse invertebrate taxa.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shannon E; Gates, Ruth D; Jacobs, David K

    2003-04-01

    Comparison of relevant gene sequence and functional data is central to understanding the evolution of metazoan development. The conservation of portions of regulatory genes, such as homeoboxes, allows for the design of PCR-based sequence isolation and amplification strategies. Here we describe a simple protocol that uses a degenerate primer pair to isolate a variety of homeobox-containing genes from diverse metazoan taxa. In a nonexhaustive survey, we have isolated 28 gene sequence fragments from 15 taxa, representing eight invertebrate phyla (Mollusca, Echiura, Annelida, Platyhelminth, Acoela, Ctenophora, Cnidaria, and Porifera). Based on BLAST and parsimony analyses, these gene fragments affiliate with several gene groups (PAIRED-like, HOX, and ParaHOX) and several single genes, including pancreas/duodenum homeoboxes (Pdx), empty spiracles (ems/Emx), gastrulation brain homeoboxes (Gbx), hematopoietically expressed homeoboxes (HEX), brain specific homeobox (bsh/BarH1/BarH2), NK-1 (NK-1/s59/slouch), and ladybird (Lbl/Lbe/Lbx). In several cases, these fragments represent the first reported orthologue for the phylum or superphyletic group (i.e., Lophotrochozoa).

  2. Integrating Taxonomic, Functional and Phylogenetic Beta Diversities: Interactive Effects with the Biome and Land Use across Taxa

    PubMed Central

    Corbelli, Julian Martin; Zurita, Gustavo Andres; Filloy, Julieta; Galvis, Juan Pablo; Vespa, Natalia Isabel; Bellocq, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    The spatial distribution of species, functional traits and phylogenetic relationships at both the regional and local scales provide complementary approaches to study patterns of biodiversity and help to untangle the mechanisms driving community assembly. Few studies have simultaneously considered the taxonomic (TBD), functional (FBD) and phylogenetic (PBD) facets of beta diversity. Here we analyze the associations between TBD, FBD, and PBD with the biome (representing different regional species pools) and land use, and investigate whether TBD, FBD and PBD were correlated. In the study design we considered two widely used indicator taxa (birds and ants) from two contrasting biomes (subtropical forest and grassland) and land uses (tree plantations and cropfields) in the southern Neotropics. Non-metric multidimensional scaling showed that taxonomic, functional and phylogenetic distances were associated to biome and land use; study sites grouped into four groups on the bi-dimensional space (cropfields in forest and grassland, and tree plantations in forest and grassland), and that was consistent across beta diversity facets and taxa. Mantel and PERMANOVA tests showed that TBD, FBD and PBD were positively correlated for both bird and ant assemblages; in general, partial correlations were also significant. Some of the functional traits considered here were conserved along phylogeny. Our results will contribute to the development of sound land use planning and beta diversity conservation. PMID:25978319

  3. Integrating Taxonomic, Functional and Phylogenetic Beta Diversities: Interactive Effects with the Biome and Land Use across Taxa.

    PubMed

    Corbelli, Julian Martin; Zurita, Gustavo Andres; Filloy, Julieta; Galvis, Juan Pablo; Vespa, Natalia Isabel; Bellocq, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    The spatial distribution of species, functional traits and phylogenetic relationships at both the regional and local scales provide complementary approaches to study patterns of biodiversity and help to untangle the mechanisms driving community assembly. Few studies have simultaneously considered the taxonomic (TBD), functional (FBD) and phylogenetic (PBD) facets of beta diversity. Here we analyze the associations between TBD, FBD, and PBD with the biome (representing different regional species pools) and land use, and investigate whether TBD, FBD and PBD were correlated. In the study design we considered two widely used indicator taxa (birds and ants) from two contrasting biomes (subtropical forest and grassland) and land uses (tree plantations and cropfields) in the southern Neotropics. Non-metric multidimensional scaling showed that taxonomic, functional and phylogenetic distances were associated to biome and land use; study sites grouped into four groups on the bi-dimensional space (cropfields in forest and grassland, and tree plantations in forest and grassland), and that was consistent across beta diversity facets and taxa. Mantel and PERMANOVA tests showed that TBD, FBD and PBD were positively correlated for both bird and ant assemblages; in general, partial correlations were also significant. Some of the functional traits considered here were conserved along phylogeny. Our results will contribute to the development of sound land use planning and beta diversity conservation.

  4. Life history profiles for 27 strepsirrhine primate taxa generated using captive data from the Duke Lemur Center

    PubMed Central

    Zehr, Sarah M; Roach, Richard G; Haring, David; Taylor, Julie; Cameron, Freda H; Yoder, Anne D

    2014-01-01

    Since its establishment in 1966, the Duke Lemur Center (DLC) has accumulated detailed records for nearly 4,200 individuals from over 40 strepsirrhine primate taxa—the lemurs, lorises, and galagos. Here we present verified data for 3,627 individuals of 27 taxa in the form of a life history table containing summarized species values for variables relating to ancestry, reproduction, longevity, and body mass, as well as the two raw data files containing direct and calculated variables from which this summary table is built. Large sample sizes, longitudinal data that in many cases span an animal’s entire life, exact dates of events, and large numbers of individuals from closely related yet biologically diverse primate taxa make these datasets unique. This single source for verified raw data and systematically compiled species values, particularly in combination with the availability of associated biological samples and the current live colony for research, will support future studies from an enormous spectrum of disciplines. PMID:25977776

  5. The concept of correlated progression as the basis of a model for the evolutionary origin of major new taxa

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, T.S

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the evolutionary processes responsible for the long treks through morphospace associated with the origin of new higher taxa is hampered by the lack of a realistic and usable model that accounts for long-term phenotypic evolvability. The systems-related concept of correlated progression, in which all the traits are functionally linked and so constrained to evolve by small increments at a time in parallel with each other, provides the basis for such a model. Implications for the process of evolution at high taxonomic level are that: the evolving traits must be considered together as a system, and the exact sequence of incremental changes in characters is indeterminable; there are no identifiable key innovations; selection acts on the phenotype as a whole rather than on individual traits; and the selection force is therefore multidimensional. Application of the model to the pattern of evolution of traits and trait states as revealed by the fossil record of the stem groups of such taxa as mammals, turtles and tetrapods generates realistic testable hypotheses about how such groups evolved. PMID:17472914

  6. Adaptations and Predispositions of Different Middle European Arthropod Taxa (Collembola, Araneae, Chilopoda, Diplopoda) to Flooding and Drought Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Michael Thomas; Guhmann, Patrick; Decker, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Simple Summary This review summarizes adaptations and predispositions of different arthropod taxa (springtails, web spiders, millipedes and centipedes) to flood and drought conditions. The main focus sis directed to arthropod species, which are living in Middle European floodplain forests and wetlands, because of the fast change of flood and drought conditions in these habitats. Furthermore the effects of the predicted regional climate change like increasing aperiodic summer flooding and decreasing winter and spring floods are also discussed. Abstract Floodplain forests and wetlands are amongst the most diverse and species rich habitats on earth. Arthropods are a key group for the high diversity pattern of these landscapes, due to the fact that the change between flooding and drought causes in different life cycles and in a variety of adaptations in the different taxa. The floodplain forests and wetlands of Central Amazonia are well investigated and over the last 50 years many adaptations of several hexapod, myriapod and arachnid orders were described. In contrast to Amazonia the Middle European floodplains were less investigated concerning the adaptations of arthropods to flood and drought conditions. This review summarizes the adaptations and predispositions of springtails, web spiders, millipedes and centipedes to the changeable flood and drought conditions of Middle European floodplain forests and wetlands. Furthermore the impact of regional climate change predictions like increasing aperiodic summer floods and the decrease of typical winter and spring floods are discussed in this article. PMID:26487164

  7. Closely-related taxa influence woody species discrimination via DNA barcoding: evidence from global forest dynamics plots.

    PubMed

    Pei, Nancai; Erickson, David L; Chen, Bufeng; Ge, Xuejun; Mi, Xiangcheng; Swenson, Nathan G; Zhang, Jin-Long; Jones, Frank A; Huang, Chun-Lin; Ye, Wanhui; Hao, Zhanqing; Hsieh, Chang-Fu; Lum, Shawn; Bourg, Norman A; Parker, John D; Zimmerman, Jess K; McShea, William J; Lopez, Ida C; Sun, I-Fang; Davies, Stuart J; Ma, Keping; Kress, W John

    2015-10-12

    To determine how well DNA barcodes from the chloroplast region perform in forest dynamics plots (FDPs) from global CTFS-ForestGEO network, we analyzed DNA barcoding sequences of 1277 plant species from a wide phylogenetic range (3 FDPs in tropics, 5 in subtropics and 5 in temperate zone) and compared the rates of species discrimination (RSD). We quantified RSD by two DNA barcode combinations (rbcL + matK and rbcL + matK + trnH-psbA) using a monophyly-based method (GARLI). We defined two indexes of closely-related taxa (Gm/Gt and S/G ratios) and correlated these ratios with RSD. The combination of rbcL + matK averagely discriminated 88.65%, 83.84% and 72.51% at the local, regional and global scales, respectively. An additional locus trnH-psbA increased RSD by 2.87%, 1.49% and 3.58% correspondingly. RSD varied along a latitudinal gradient and were negatively correlated with ratios of closely-related taxa. Successes of species discrimination generally depend on scales in global FDPs. We suggested that the combination of rbcL + matK + trnH-psbA is currently applicable for DNA barcoding-based phylogenetic studies on forest communities.

  8. Distinct interacting core taxa in co-occurrence networks enable discrimination of polymicrobial oral diseases with similar symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Shiba, Takahiko; Watanabe, Takayasu; Kachi, Hirokazu; Koyanagi, Tatsuro; Maruyama, Noriko; Murase, Kazunori; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Maruyama, Fumito; Izumi, Yuichi; Nakagawa, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Polymicrobial diseases, which can be life threatening, are caused by the presence and interactions of multiple microbes. Peri-implantitis and periodontitis are representative polymicrobial diseases that show similar clinical symptoms. To establish a means of differentiating between them, we compared microbial species and functional genes in situ by performing metatranscriptomic analyses of peri-implantitis and periodontitis samples obtained from the same subjects (n = 12 each). Although the two diseases differed in terms of 16S rRNA-based taxonomic profiles, they showed similarities with respect to functional genes and taxonomic and virulence factor mRNA profiles. The latter—defined as microbial virulence types—differed from those of healthy periodontal sites. We also showed that networks based on co-occurrence relationships of taxonomic mRNA abundance (co-occurrence networks) were dissimilar between the two diseases. Remarkably, these networks consisted mainly of taxa with a high relative mRNA-to-rRNA ratio, with some showing significant co-occurrence defined as interacting core taxa, highlighting differences between the two groups. Thus, peri-implantitis and periodontitis have shared as well as distinct microbiological characteristics. Our findings provide insight into microbial interactions in polymicrobial diseases with unknown etiologies. PMID:27499042

  9. From Problem Taxa to Problem Solver: A New Miocene Family, Tranatocetidae, Brings Perspective on Baleen Whale Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Gol’din, Pavel; Steeman, Mette Elstrup

    2015-01-01

    Miocene baleen whales were highly diverse and included tens of genera. However, their taxonomy and phylogeny, as well as relationships with living whales, are still a subject of controversy. Here, “Mesocetus” argillarius, a poorly known specimen from Denmark, is redescribed with a focus on the cranial anatomy. It was found to represent not only a new genus, Tranatocetus gen. nov., but also a new family; Tranatocetidae. The whales of this family have the rostral bones either overriding or dividing the frontals; the rostral bones are contacting the parietals and nasals dividing the maxillae on the vertex; the occipital shield is dorsoventrally bent. The tympanic bulla is particularly characteristic of this family featuring a short, narrow anterior portion with a rounded or squared anterior end and a wider and higher posterior portion that is swollen in the posteroventral area. A phylogenetic analysis including 51 taxa supports a monophyletic group comprising most Neogene and modern whales, with Tranatocetidae being possibly closer related to Balaenopteridae (rorquals) than to Cetotheriidae. Tranatocetidae exhibit a charahteristic bulla shape. In fact, all Neogene and modern mysticete families examined have a unique shape of the tympanic bulla that is diagnostic at family-level. Inclusion of problematic taxa like Tranatocetus argillarius in phylogenies brings new understanding of the distribution and diagnostic value of character traits. This underlines the need for re-examination of earlier described specimens in the light of the wealth of new information published in later years. PMID:26331471

  10. Distance-Decay and Taxa-Area Relationships for Bacteria, Archaea and Methanogenic Archaea in a Tropical Lake Sediment

    PubMed Central

    Barreto, Davi Pedroni; Conrad, Ralf; Klose, Melanie; Claus, Peter; Enrich-Prast, Alex

    2014-01-01

    The study of of the distribution of microorganisms through space (and time) allows evaluation of biogeographic patterns, like the species-area index (z). Due to their high dispersal ability, high reproduction rates and low rates of extinction microorganisms tend to be widely distributed, and they are thought to be virtually cosmopolitan and selected primarily by environmental factors. Recent studies have shown that, despite these characteristics, microorganisms may behave like larger organisms and exhibit geographical distribution. In this study, we searched patterns of spatial diversity distribution of bacteria and archaea in a contiguous environment. We collected 26 samples of a lake sediment, distributed in a nested grid, with distances between samples ranging from 0.01 m to 1000 m. The samples were analyzed using T-RFLP (Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism) targeting mcrA (coding for a subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase) and the genes of Archaeal and Bacterial 16S rRNA. From the qualitative and quantitative results (relative abundance of operational taxonomic units) we calculated the similarity index for each pair to evaluate the taxa-area and distance decay relationship slopes by linear regression. All results were significant, with mcrA genes showing the highest slope, followed by Archaeal and Bacterial 16S rRNA genes. We showed that the microorganisms of a methanogenic community, that is active in a contiguous environment, display spatial distribution and a taxa-area relationship. PMID:25330320

  11. Temperature dependence of evolutionary diversification: differences between two contrasting model taxa support the metabolic theory of ecology.

    PubMed

    Machac, A; Zrzavý, J; Smrckova, J; Storch, D

    2012-12-01

    Biodiversity patterns are largely determined by variation of diversification rates across clades and geographic regions. Although there are multiple reasons for this variation, it has been hypothesized that metabolic rate is the crucial driver of diversification of evolutionary lineages. According to the metabolic theory of ecology (MTE), metabolic rate - and consequently speciation - is driven mainly by body size and environmental temperature. As environmental temperature affects metabolic rate in ecto- and endotherms differently, its impact on diversification rate should also differ between the two types of organisms. Employing two independent approaches, we analysed correlates of speciation rates and, ultimately, net diversification rates for two contrasting taxa: plethodontid salamanders and carnivoran mammals. Whereas in the ectothermic plethodontids speciation rates positively correlated with environmental temperature, in the endothermic carnivorans a reverse, negative correlation was detected. These findings comply with predictions of the MTE and suggest that similar geographic patterns of biodiversity across taxa (e.g. ecto- and endotherms) might have been generated by different ecological and evolutionary processes.

  12. From Problem Taxa to Problem Solver: A New Miocene Family, Tranatocetidae, Brings Perspective on Baleen Whale Evolution.

    PubMed

    Gol'din, Pavel; Steeman, Mette Elstrup

    2015-01-01

    Miocene baleen whales were highly diverse and included tens of genera. However, their taxonomy and phylogeny, as well as relationships with living whales, are still a subject of controversy. Here, "Mesocetus" argillarius, a poorly known specimen from Denmark, is redescribed with a focus on the cranial anatomy. It was found to represent not only a new genus, Tranatocetus gen. nov., but also a new family; Tranatocetidae. The whales of this family have the rostral bones either overriding or dividing the frontals; the rostral bones are contacting the parietals and nasals dividing the maxillae on the vertex; the occipital shield is dorsoventrally bent. The tympanic bulla is particularly characteristic of this family featuring a short, narrow anterior portion with a rounded or squared anterior end and a wider and higher posterior portion that is swollen in the posteroventral area. A phylogenetic analysis including 51 taxa supports a monophyletic group comprising most Neogene and modern whales, with Tranatocetidae being possibly closer related to Balaenopteridae (rorquals) than to Cetotheriidae. Tranatocetidae exhibit a charahteristic bulla shape. In fact, all Neogene and modern mysticete families examined have a unique shape of the tympanic bulla that is diagnostic at family-level. Inclusion of problematic taxa like Tranatocetus argillarius in phylogenies brings new understanding of the distribution and diagnostic value of character traits. This underlines the need for re-examination of earlier described specimens in the light of the wealth of new information published in later years.

  13. Size, age and composition: characteristics of plant taxa as diversity predictors of gall-midges (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae).

    PubMed

    Araújo, Walter S

    2011-12-01

    Many hypotheses have been proposed to explain the diversity of gall-midge insects (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), some of them taking into account plant diversity. This study aims to test the importance of size, age and composition of host plant taxa in the diversity of Cecidomyiidae. For this we used inventories data on the diversity of galling and host plants in Brazil. We found that Asterales, Myrtales and Malpighiales, were the most important orders, with 34, 33 and 25, gall morphotypes, respectively. The most representative host families were Asteraceae (34 morphotypes), Myrtaceae (23) and Fabaceae (22). In general, the order size and the plant family were good predictors of the galling diversity, but not the taxon age. The most diverse host genera for gall-midges were Mikania, Eugenia and Styrax, with 15, 13 and nine galler species, respectively. The size of plant genera showed no significant relationship with the richness of Cecidomyiidae, contrary to the prediction of the plant taxon size hypothesis. The plant genera with the greatest diversity of galling insects are not necessarily those with the greatest number of species. These results indicate that some plant taxa have a high intrinsic richness of galling insects, suggesting that the plant species composition may be equally or more important for the diversity of gall-midges than the size or age of the host taxon.

  14. A DNA barcode library for ground beetles (Insecta, Coleoptera, Carabidae) of Germany: The genus Bembidion Latreille, 1802 and allied taxa

    PubMed Central

    Raupach, Michael J.; Hannig, Karsten; Morinière, Jérome; Hendrich, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Abstract As molecular identification method, DNA barcoding based on partial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI) sequences has been proven to be a useful tool for species determination in many insect taxa including ground beetles. In this study we tested the effectiveness of DNA barcodes to discriminate species of the ground beetle genus Bembidion and some closely related taxa of Germany. DNA barcodes were obtained from 819 individuals and 78 species, including sequences from previous studies as well as more than 300 new generated DNA barcodes. We found a 1:1 correspondence between BIN and traditionally recognized species for 69 species (89%). Low interspecific distances with maximum pairwise K2P values below 2.2% were found for three species pairs, including two species pairs with haplotype sharing (Bembidion atrocaeruleum/Bembidion varicolor and Bembidion guttula/Bembidion mannerheimii). In contrast to this, deep intraspecific sequence divergences with distinct lineages were revealed for two species (Bembidion geniculatum/Ocys harpaloides). Our study emphasizes the use of DNA barcodes for the identification of the analyzed ground beetles species and represents an important step in building-up a comprehensive barcode library for the Carabidae in Germany and Central Europe as well. PMID:27408547

  15. Unique method of tooth replacement in durophagous placodont marine reptiles, with new data on the dentition of Chinese taxa.

    PubMed

    Neenan, James M; Li, Chun; Rieppel, Olivier; Bernardini, Federico; Tuniz, Claudio; Muscio, Giuseppe; Scheyer, Torsten M

    2014-05-01

    The placodonts of the Triassic period (~252-201 mya) represent one of the earliest and most extreme specialisations to a durophagous diet of any known reptile group. Exceptionally enlarged crushing tooth plates on the maxilla, dentary and palatine cooperated to form functional crushing areas in the buccal cavity. However, the extreme size of these teeth, combined with the unusual way they occluded, constrained how replacement occurred. Using an extensive micro-computed tomographic dataset of 11 specimens that span all geographic regions and placodont morphotypes, tooth replacement patterns were investigated. In addition, the previously undescribed dental morphologies and formulae of Chinese taxa are described for the first time and incorporated into the analysis. Placodonts have a unique tooth replacement pattern and results follow a phylogenetic trend. The plesiomorphic Placodus species show many replacement teeth at various stages of growth, with little or no discernible pattern. On the other hand, the more derived cyamodontoids tend to have fewer replacement teeth growing at any one time, replacing teeth unilaterally and/or in functional units, thus maintaining at least one functional crushing area at all times. The highly derived placochelyids have fewer teeth and, as a result, only have one or two replacement teeth in the upper jaw. This supports previous suggestions that these taxa had an alternative diet to other placodonts. Importantly, all specimens show at least one replacement tooth growing at the most posterior palatine tooth plates, indicating increased wear at this point and thus the most efficient functional crushing area.

  16. Closely-related taxa influence woody species discrimination via DNA barcoding: evidence from global forest dynamics plots

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Nancai; Erickson, David L.; Chen, Bufeng; Ge, Xuejun; Mi, Xiangcheng; Swenson, Nathan G.; Zhang, Jin-Long; Jones, Frank A.; Huang, Chun-Lin; Ye, Wanhui; Hao, Zhanqing; Hsieh, Chang-Fu; Lum, Shawn; Bourg, Norman A.; Parker, John D.; Zimmerman, Jess K.; McShea, William J.; Lopez, Ida C.; Sun, I-Fang; Davies, Stuart J.; Ma, Keping; Kress, W. John

    2015-01-01

    To determine how well DNA barcodes from the chloroplast region perform in forest dynamics plots (FDPs) from global CTFS-ForestGEO network, we analyzed DNA barcoding sequences of 1277 plant species from a wide phylogenetic range (3 FDPs in tropics, 5 in subtropics and 5 in temperate zone) and compared the rates of species discrimination (RSD). We quantified RSD by two DNA barcode combinations (rbcL + matK and rbcL + matK + trnH-psbA) using a monophyly-based method (GARLI). We defined two indexes of closely-related taxa (Gm/Gt and S/G ratios) and correlated these ratios with RSD. The combination of rbcL + matK averagely discriminated 88.65%, 83.84% and 72.51% at the local, regional and global scales, respectively. An additional locus trnH-psbA increased RSD by 2.87%, 1.49% and 3.58% correspondingly. RSD varied along a latitudinal gradient and were negatively correlated with ratios of closely-related taxa. Successes of species discrimination generally depend on scales in global FDPs. We suggested that the combination of rbcL + matK + trnH-psbA is currently applicable for DNA barcoding-based phylogenetic studies on forest communities. PMID:26456472

  17. Distance-decay and taxa-area relationships for bacteria, archaea and methanogenic archaea in a tropical lake sediment.

    PubMed

    Barreto, Davi Pedroni; Conrad, Ralf; Klose, Melanie; Claus, Peter; Enrich-Prast, Alex

    2014-01-01

    The study of of the distribution of microorganisms through space (and time) allows evaluation of biogeographic patterns, like the species-area index (z). Due to their high dispersal ability, high reproduction rates and low rates of extinction microorganisms tend to be widely distributed, and they are thought to be virtually cosmopolitan and selected primarily by environmental factors. Recent studies have shown that, despite these characteristics, microorganisms may behave like larger organisms and exhibit geographical distribution. In this study, we searched patterns of spatial diversity distribution of bacteria and archaea in a contiguous environment. We collected 26 samples of a lake sediment, distributed in a nested grid, with distances between samples ranging from 0.01 m to 1000 m. The samples were analyzed using T-RFLP (Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism) targeting mcrA (coding for a subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase) and the genes of Archaeal and Bacterial 16S rRNA. From the qualitative and quantitative results (relative abundance of operational taxonomic units) we calculated the similarity index for each pair to evaluate the taxa-area and distance decay relationship slopes by linear regression. All results were significant, with mcrA genes showing the highest slope, followed by Archaeal and Bacterial 16S rRNA genes. We showed that the microorganisms of a methanogenic community, that is active in a contiguous environment, display spatial distribution and a taxa-area relationship.

  18. Hydrocarbon degraders establish at the costs of microbial richness, abundance and keystone taxa after crude oil contamination in permafrost environments.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sizhong; Wen, Xi; Shi, Yulan; Liebner, Susanne; Jin, Huijun; Perfumo, Amedea

    2016-11-25

    Oil spills from pipeline ruptures are a major source of terrestrial petroleum pollution in cold regions. However, our knowledge of the bacterial response to crude oil contamination in cold regions remains to be further expanded, especially in terms of community shifts and potential development of hydrocarbon degraders. In this study we investigated changes of microbial diversity, population size and keystone taxa in permafrost soils at four different sites along the China-Russia crude oil pipeline prior to and after perturbation with crude oil. We found that crude oil caused a decrease of cell numbers together with a reduction of the species richness and shifts in the dominant phylotypes, while bacterial community diversity was highly site-specific after exposure to crude oil, reflecting different environmental conditions. Keystone taxa that strongly co-occurred were found to form networks based on trophic interactions, that is co-metabolism regarding degradation of hydrocarbons (in contaminated samples) or syntrophic carbon cycling (in uncontaminated samples). With this study we demonstrate that after severe crude oil contamination a rapid establishment of endemic hydrocarbon degrading communities takes place under favorable temperature conditions. Therefore, both endemism and trophic correlations of bacterial degraders need to be considered in order to develop effective cleanup strategies.

  19. Divergence of brain and retinal anatomy and histology in pelagic antarctic notothenioid fishes of the sister taxa Dissostichus and Pleuragramma.

    PubMed

    Eastman, Joseph T; Lannoo, Michael J

    2011-04-01

    The neutrally buoyant Antarctic fishes of the sister taxa Dissostichus (D. eleginoides and D. mawsoni) and Pleuragramma antarcticum diverged early in the notothenioid radiation and filled different niches in the pelagic realm of the developing Southern Ocean. To assess the influence of phylogenetic and ecological factors in shaping neural morphology in these taxa, we studied the anatomy and histology of the brains and retinae, and determined the proportional weights of brain regions. With the brain of the non-Antarctic sister taxon Eleginops maclovinus as plesiomorphic, statistically significant departures in the brains of the two Antarctic taxa include reduction of the corpus cerebelli and expansion of the mesencephalon and medulla. Compared to Eleginops, both species also have a relatively smaller telencephalon, although this is significant only in Dissostichus. There are a number of apomorphic features in the brain of Pleuragramma including reduced olfactory nerves and bulbs, an extremely small corpus cerebelli and an expanded mesencephalon. Although there is not a significant difference in the relative weights of the medulla in the two taxa, the prominence of the eminentia granularis and bulging cap-like appearance of the crista cerebellaris are distinctive in Pleuragramma. Brain histology of Dissostichus and Pleuragramma reflects typical perciform patterns and the two species of Dissostichus are histologically identical. Lateral compression in Pleuragramma and notable lobation in Dissostichus also contribute to differences between the taxa. Compression in Pleuragramma is attributable to convergence on an anchovy/herring body shape and to the relatively large brain in this small fish. The less prominent pattern of lobation of the telencephalon, inferior lobes and corpus cerebelli in Pleuragramma probably reflects underlying histology, specifically a reduction in cellularity of the neuropil in the nuclei and lobes. The retinal histology of Dissostichus and

  20. Bacterial Diversity and Community Structure in Two Bornean Nepenthes Species with Differences in Nitrogen Acquisition Strategies.

    PubMed

    Sickel, Wiebke; Grafe, T Ulmar; Meuche, Ivonne; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf; Keller, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Carnivorous plants of the genus Nepenthes have been studied for over a century, but surprisingly little is known about associations with microorganisms. The two species Nepenthes rafflesiana and Nepenthes hemsleyana differ in their pitcher-mediated nutrient sources, sequestering nitrogen from arthropod prey and arthropods as well as bat faeces, respectively. We expected bacterial communities living in the pitchers to resemble this diet difference. Samples were taken from different parts of the pitchers (leaf, peristome, inside, outside, digestive fluid) of both species. Bacterial communities were determined using culture-independent high-throughput amplicon sequencing. Bacterial richness and community structure were similar in leaves, peristomes, inside and outside walls of both plant species. Regarding digestive fluids, bacterial richness was higher in N. hemsleyana than in N. rafflesiana. Additionally, digestive fluid communities were highly variable in structure, with strain-specific differences in community composition between replicates. Acidophilic taxa were mostly of low abundance, except the genus Acidocella, which strikingly reached extremely high levels in two N. rafflesiana fluids. In N. hemsleyana fluid, some taxa classified as vertebrate gut symbionts as well as saprophytes were enriched compared to N. rafflesiana, with saprophytes constituting potential competitors for nutrients. The high variation in community structure might be caused by a number of biotic and abiotic factors. Nitrogen-fixing bacteria were present in both study species, which might provide essential nutrients to the plant at times of low prey capture and/or rare encounters with bats.

  1. Metazoan meiofauna in deep-sea canyons and adjacent open slopes: A large-scale comparison with focus on the rare taxa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchelli, S.; Gambi, C.; Zeppilli, D.; Danovaro, R.

    2010-03-01

    Metazoan meiofaunal abundance, total biomass, nematode size and the richness of taxa were investigated along bathymetric gradients (from the shelf break down to ca. 5000-m depth) in six submarine canyons and on five adjacent open slopes of three deep-sea regions. The investigated areas were distributed along >2500 km, on the Portuguese to the Catalan and South Adriatic margins. The Portuguese and Catalan margins displayed the highest abundances, biomass and richness of taxa, while the lowest values were observed in the Central Mediterranean Sea. The comparison between canyons and the nearby open slopes showed the lack of significant differences in terms of meiofaunal abundance and biomass at any sampling depth. In most canyons and on most slopes, meiofaunal variables did not display consistent bathymetric patterns. Conversely, we found that the different topographic features were apparently responsible for significant differences in the abundance and distribution of the rare meiofaunal taxa (i.e. taxa accounting for <1% of total meiofaunal abundance). Several taxa belonging to the temporary meiofauna, such as larvae/juveniles of Priapulida, Holothuroidea, Ascidiacea and Cnidaria, were encountered exclusively on open slopes, while others (including the Tanaidacea and Echinodea larvae) were found exclusively in canyons sediments. Results reported here indicate that, at large spatial scales, differences in deep-sea meiofaunal abundance and biomass are not only controlled by the available food sources, but also by the region or habitat specific topographic features, which apparently play a key role in the distribution of rare benthic taxa.

  2. Membrane rejection of nitrogen compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S.; Lueptow, R. M.

    2001-01-01

    Rejection characteristics of nitrogen compounds were examined for reverse osmosis, nanofiltration, and low-pressure reverse osmosis membranes. The rejection of nitrogen compounds is explained by integrating experimental results with calculations using the extended Nernst-Planck model coupled with a steric hindrance model. The molecular weight and chemical structure of nitrogen compounds appear to be less important in determining rejection than electrostatic properties. The rejection is greatest when the Donnan potential exceeds 0.05 V or when the ratio of the solute radius to the pore radius is greater than 0.8. The transport of solute in the pore is dominated by diffusion, although convective transport is significant for organic nitrogen compounds. Electromigration contributes negligibly to the overall solute transport in the membrane. Urea, a small organic compound, has lower rejection than ionic compounds such as ammonium, nitrate, and nitrite, indicating the critical role of electrostatic interaction in rejection. This suggests that better treatment efficiency for organic nitrogen compounds can be obtained after ammonification of urea.

  3. Sources and fate of bioavailable dissolved organic nitrogen in the Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paerl, H. W.; Peierls, B. L.; Hounshell, A.; Osburn, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    Eutrophication is a widespread problem affecting the structure and function of estuaries and is often linked to anthropogenic nitrogen (N) enrichment, since N is the primary nutrient limiting algal production. Watershed management actions typically have ignored dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) loading because of its perceived refractory nature and instead focused on inorganic N as targets for loading reductions. A fluorescence-based model indicated that anthropogenic sources of DON near the head of the microtidal Neuse River Estuary (NRE), NC were dominated by septic systems and poultry waste. A series of bioassays were used to determine the bioavailability of river DON and DON-rich sources to primary producers and whether those additions promoted the growth of certain phytoplankton taxa, particularly harmful species. Overall, at time scales up to two to three weeks, estuarine phytoplankton and bacteria only showed limited responses to additions of high molecular weight (HMW, >1 kDa) river DON. When increases in productivity and biomass did occur, they were quite small compared with the response to inorganic N. Low molecular weight (LMW) river DON, waste water treatment plant effluent, and poultry litter extract did have a positive effect on phytoplankton and bacterial production, indicating a bioavailable fraction. High variability of bulk DON concentration suggested that bioavailable compounds added in the experimental treatments were low in concentration and turned over quite rapidly. Some phytoplankton taxa, as measured by diagnostic photopigments, appeared to be selectively enhanced by the HMW and specific source DON additions, although the taxa could not be positively identified as harmful species. Preliminary tests show that labile autochthonous organic matter may act as a primer for the mineralization of the HMW DON. These and other, longer-term bioavailability studies will be needed to adequately address the fate of watershed DON in estuarine ecosystems.

  4. Atlas of relations between climatic parameters and distributions of important trees and shrubs in North America: Revisions for all taxa from the United States and Canada and new taxa from the western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, Robert S.; Anderson, Katherine H.; Pelltier, Richard T.; Strickland, Laura E.; Shafer, Sarah L.; Bartlein, Patrick J.; McFadden, Andrew K.

    2015-01-01

    This volume of the atlas provides numerous changes, updates, and enhancements from previous volumes. Its geographic coverage is now restricted to Canada and the continental United States, and the source and time period of the climatic data have changed. New variables were added, including monthly values for temperature and precipitation, and measures of interannual variability. The distribution maps for all previously published species were redigitized, some distribution maps were revised, and 148 new species were added from the arid and semiarid western United States. The graphical displays were expanded to illustrate the new climatic variables, and the data tables were modified to provide more detail on the population distributions of plant taxa relative to climatic variables.