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Sample records for alkaloid camptothecin cpt

  1. A phase I and pharmacokinetic study of MAG-CPT, a water-soluble polymer conjugate of camptothecin.

    PubMed

    Schoemaker, N E; van Kesteren, C; Rosing, H; Jansen, S; Swart, M; Lieverst, J; Fraier, D; Breda, M; Pellizzoni, C; Spinelli, R; Grazia Porro, M; Beijnen, J H; Schellens, J H M; ten Bokkel Huinink, W W

    2002-09-09

    Polymeric drug conjugates are a new and experimental class of drug delivery systems with pharmacokinetic promises. The antineoplastic drug camptothecin was linked to a water-soluble polymeric backbone (MAG-CPT) and administrated as a 30 min infusion over 3 consecutive days every 4 weeks to patients with malignant solid tumours. The objectives of our study were to determine the maximal tolerated dose, the dose-limiting toxicities, and the plasma and urine pharmacokinetics of MAG-CPT, and to document anti-tumour activity. The starting dose was 17 mg m(-2) day(-1). Sixteen patients received 39 courses at seven dose levels. Maximal tolerated dose was at 68 mg m(-2) day(-1) and dose-limiting toxicities consisted of cumulative bladder toxicity. MAG-CPT and free camptothecin were accumulated during days 1-3 and considerable amounts of MAG-CPT could still be retrieved in plasma and urine after 4-5 weeks. The half-lives of bound and free camptothecin were equal indicating that the kinetics of free camptothecin were release rate dependent. In summary, the pharmacokinetics of camptothecin were dramatically changed, showing controlled prolonged exposure of camptothecin. Haematological toxicity was relatively mild, but serious bladder toxicity was encountered which is typical for camptothecin and was found dose limiting.

  2. A Novel Preparation Method for Camptothecin (CPT) Loaded Folic Acid Conjugated Dextran Tumor-Targeted Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zu, Yuangang; Wang, Dan; Zhao, Xiuhua; Jiang, Ru; Zhang, Qi; Zhao, Dongmei; Li, Yong; Zu, Baishi; Sun, Zhiqiang

    2011-01-01

    In this study, folic-dextran-camptothecin (Fa-DEX-CPT) tumor-targeted nanoparticles were produced with a supercritical antisolvent (SAS) technique by using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as a solvent and carbon dioxide as an antisolvent. A factorial design was used to reveal the effect of various process parameters on the mean particle size (MPS) and morphology of the particles formed. Under the optimum operation conditions, Fa-DEX-CPT nanoparticles with a MPS of 182.21 nm were obtained. Drug encapsulation efficiency and loading efficiency were 62.13% and 36.12%, respectively. It was found that the concentrations of the camptothecin (CPT) and dextran solution had a major influence upon morphology and shape of the final product. In addition, the samples were characterized by Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) with the purpose of developing a suitable targeted drug delivery system for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:21845075

  3. The inhibitory effects of camptothecin (CPT) and its derivatives on the substrate uptakes mediated by human solute carrier transporters (SLCs).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jian; Chan, Ting; Zhu, Ling; Yan, Xiufeng; Cao, Zhisong; Wang, Yang; Zhou, Fanfan

    2016-09-01

    1. Camptothecin (CPT) and its derivatives are potent candidate compounds in treating cancers. However, their clinical applications are largely restricted by severe toxicities. 2. The solute carrier transporters (SLCs), particularly the organic anion transporting polypeptides and organic anion/cation transporters (OATs/OCTs) are widely expressed in human key organs and responsible for the cellular influx of many substances including endogenous substrates and many clinically important drugs. Drug-drug interactions through SLCs often result in unsatisfied therapeutic outcomes and/or unexpected toxicities. 3. This study investigated the inhibitory effects of CPT and its eight derivatives on the cellular uptake of specific substrates mediated by the essential SLCs in over-expressing Human embryonic kidney 293 cells. 4. Our data revealed that CPT, 10-hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT), 10-methoxycamptothecin (MCPT) and 9-nitrocamptothecin (9NC) significantly inhibit the uptake activity of OAT3. 9NC also inhibited the substrate transport mediated by OAT1. The substrate uptakes of OAT1, OCTN1 and OCTN2 were significantly decreased in the presence of CZ112, while CPT-11 potently down-regulated the transport activity of OCT1 and OCT3. 5. In summary, our study demonstrated that CPT and its eight derivatives selectively inhibit the substrate uptakes mediated by the essential SLCs. This information contributes to understanding the localized toxicity of CPTs and provides novel molecular targets for the therapeutic optimization of CPTs in the future.

  4. Camptothecin analog (CPT-11)-sensitive human pancreatic tumor cell line QGP-1N shows resistance to SN-38, an active metabolite of CPT-11.

    PubMed

    Takeda, S; Shimazoe, T; Kuga, H; Sato, K; Kono, A

    1992-10-15

    In the course of our study to determine the cross-sensitivity between CPT-11 and its active metabolite, SN-38, we found a SN-38-resistant human pancreatic tumor cell line, QGP-1N, which shows sensitivity to CPT-11. The IC50 of SN-38 was 152 times greater for QGP-1N than for SUIT-2, also a human pancreatic tumor cell line, whose IC50 of CPT-11 was similar to that for QGP-1N. The uptakes of CPT-11 and SN-38 and the intracellular conversion of CPT-11 to SN-38 could not explain the difference in sensitivity. DNA synthesis of QGP-1N cells was inhibited by CPT-11 which did not affect that of SUIT-2, while SN-38 inhibited the DNA synthesis of SUIT-2 at lower concentrations than that of QGP-1N. The inhibition test of topoisomerase I catalytic activity by CPT-11 or SN-38 revealed no difference in the biochemical properties of the topoisomerase I enzymes to the compounds between these two cell lines. These results indicate that CPT-11 should have its own inhibitory effect on DNA synthesis through a yet unknown mechanism in QGP-1N cells, although SN-38 plays an essential role in the antitumor activity of CPT-11 in SUIT-2 cells. In some cases, the antitumor effect of CPT-11 might be consequent not only on SN-38 but also on CPT-11 itself.

  5. Dysoxylum binectariferum bark as a new source of anticancer drug camptothecin: bioactivity-guided isolation and LCMS-based quantification.

    PubMed

    Jain, Shreyans K; Meena, Samdarshi; Gupta, Ajai P; Kushwaha, Manoj; Uma Shaanker, R; Jaglan, Sundeep; Bharate, Sandip B; Vishwakarma, Ram A

    2014-07-15

    Camptothecin (CPT, 1) is a potent anticancer natural product which led to the discovery of two clinically used anticancer drugs topotecan and irinotecan. These two drugs are semisynthetic analogs of CPT, and thus the commercial production of CPT as a raw material from various plant sources and tissue culture methods is highly demanding. In the present study, the Dysoxylum binectariferum bark, was identified as an alternative source of CPT, through bioassay-guided isolation. The barks showed presence of CPT (1) and its 9-methoxy analog 2, whereas CPT alkaloids were not present in seeds and leaves. This is the first report on isolation of CPT alkaloids from Meliaceae family. An efficient chromatography-free protocol for enrichment and isolation of CPT from D. binectariferum has been established, which was able to enrich CPT up to 21% in the crude extract. The LCMS (MRM)-based quantification method revealed the presence of 0.105% of CPT in dry barks of D. binectariferum. The discovery of CPT from D. binectariferum bark will certainly create a global interest in cultivation of this plant as a new crop for commercial production of CPT. Isolation of anticancer drug CPT from this plant, indicates that along with rohitukine, CPT and 9-methoxy CPT also contributes significantly to the cytotoxicity of D. binectariferum.

  6. Perspectives on Biologically Active Camptothecin Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying-Qian; Li, Wen-Qun; Morris-Natschke, Susan L.; Qian, Keduo; Yang, Liu; Zhu, Gao-Xiang; Wu, Xiao-Bing; Chen, An-Liang; Zhang, Shao-Yong; Song, Zi-Long; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2015-01-01

    Camptothecins (CPTs) are cytotoxic natural alkaloids that specifically target DNA topoisomerase I. Research on CPTs has undergone a significant evolution from the initial discovery of CPT in the late 1960s through the study of synthetic small molecule derivatives to investigation of macromolecular constructs and formulations. Over the past years, intensive medicinal chemistry efforts have generated numerous CPT derivatives. Three derivatives, topotecan, irinotecan, and belotecan, are currently prescribed as anticancer drugs, and several related compounds are now in clinical trials. Interest in other biological effects, besides anticancer activity, of CPTs is also growing exponentially, as indicated by the large number of publications on the subject during the last decades. Therefore, the main focus of the present review is to provide an ample but condensed overview on various biological activities of CPT derivatives, in addition to continued up-to-date coverage of anticancer effects. PMID:25808858

  7. Characterization of DNA Topoisomerase-1 in Spodoptera exigua for Toxicity Evaluation of Camptothecin and Hydoxy-Camptothecin

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanning; He, Weizhi; Yang, Jingjing; Li, Chuanren; Jiang, Hongyun

    2013-01-01

    Camptothecin (CPT), a plant alkaloid originally isolated from the native Chinese tree, Camptotheca acuminate, exerts the toxic effect by targeting eukaryotic DNA topoisomerase 1 (DNA Topo1). Besides as potent anti-cancer agents, CPT and its derivatives are now being explored as potential pesticides for insect control. In this study, we assessed their toxicity to an insect homolog, the Topo1 protein from beet armyworms (Spodoptera exigua Hübner), a worldwide pest of many important crops. The S. exigua Topo1 gene contains an ORF of 2790 base pairs that is predicted to encode a polypeptide of 930 amino acids. The deduced polypeptide exhibits polymorphism at residue sites V420, L530, A653 and T729 (numbered according to human Topo1) among insect species, which are predicted to confer sensitivity to CPT. The DNA relaxation activity of this protein was subsequently examined using a truncated form that contained the residues 337–930 and was expressed in bacteria BL21 cells. The purified protein retained the ability to relax double-stranded DNA and was susceptible to CPT and its derivative hydroxy-camptothecin (HCPT) in a dose-dependent manner. The same inhibitory effect was also found on the native Topo1 extracted from IOZCAS-Spex-II cells, a cell line established from beet armyworms. Additionally, CPT and HCPT treatment reduced the steady accumulation of Topo1 protein despite the increased mRNA expression in response to the treatment. Our studies provide information of the S. exigua Topo1 gene and its amino acid polymorphism in insects and uncover some clues about potential mechanisms of CPT toxicity against insect pests. These results also are useful for development of more effective Topo1-targeted CPT insecticides in the future. PMID:23451051

  8. Compound Specific Extraction of Camptothecin from Nothapodytes nimmoniana and Piperine from Piper nigrum Using Accelerated Solvent Extractor.

    PubMed

    Upadhya, Vinayak; Pai, Sandeep R; Sharma, Ajay K; Hegde, Harsha V; Kholkute, Sanjiva D; Joshi, Rajesh K

    2014-01-01

    Effects of varying temperatures with constant pressure of solvent on extraction efficiency of two chemically different alkaloids were studied. Camptothecin (CPT) from stem of Nothapodytes nimmoniana (Grah.) Mabb. and piperine from the fruits of Piper nigrum L. were extracted using Accelerated Solvent Extractor (ASE). Three cycles of extraction for a particular sample cell at a given temperature assured complete extraction. CPT and piperine were determined and quantified by using a simple and efficient UFLC-PDA (245 and 343 nm) method. Temperature increased efficiency of extraction to yield higher amount of CPT, whereas temperature had diminutive effect on yield of piperine. Maximum yield for CPT was achieved at 80°C and for piperine at 40°C. Thus, the study determines compound specific extraction of CPT from N. nimmoniana and piperine from P. nigrum using ASE method. The present study indicates the use of this method for simple, fast, and accurate extraction of the compound of interest.

  9. PEGylated versus non-PEGylated magnetic nanoparticles as camptothecin delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Paula M; de la Mata, Mario; Casula, Maria F; Sánchez-Alcázar, José A

    2014-01-01

    Summary Camptothecin (CPT; (S)-(+)-4-ethyl-4-hydroxy-1H-pyrano[3',4':6,7]indolizino[1,2-b]quinoline-3,14-(4H,12H)-dione) is a highly cytotoxic natural alkaloid that has not yet found use as chemotherapeutic agent due to its poor water-solubility and chemical instability and, as a consequence, no effective administration means have been designed. In this work, camptothecin has been successfully loaded into iron oxide superparamagnetic nanoparticles with an average size of 14 nm. It was found that surface modification of the nanoparticles by polyethylene glycol enables loading a large amount of camptothecin. While the unloaded nanoparticles do not induce apoptosis in the H460 lung cancer cell line, the camptothecin-loaded nanoparticle formulations exhibit remarkable pro-apoptotic activity. These results indicate that camptothecin retains its biological activity after loading onto the magnetic nanoparticles. The proposed materials represent novel materials based on naturally occurring bioactive molecules loaded onto nanoparticles to be used as chemotherapeutic formulations. The procedure seems apt to be extended to other active molecules extracted from natural products. In addition, these materials offer the potential of being further implemented for combined imaging and therapeutics, as magnetic nanoparticles are known to be multifunctional tools for biomedicine. PMID:25247114

  10. Co-overexpression of geraniol-10-hydroxylase and strictosidine synthase improves anti-cancer drug camptothecin accumulation in Ophiorrhiza pumila

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Lijie; Ni, Xiaoling; Ji, Qian; Teng, Xiaojuan; Yang, Yanru; Wu, Chao; Zekria, David; Zhang, Dasheng; Kai, Guoyin

    2015-01-01

    Camptothecin (CPT) belongs to a group of monoterpenoidindole alkaloids (TIAs) and its derivatives such as irinothecan and topothecan have been widely used worldwide for the treatment of cancer, giving rise to rapidly increasing market demands. Genes from Catharanthus roseus encoding strictosidine synthase (STR) and geraniol 10-hydroxylase (G10H), were separately and simultaneously introduced into Ophiorrhiza pumila hairy roots. Overexpression of individual G10H (G lines) significantly improved CPT production with respect to non-transgenic hairy root cultures (NC line) and single STR overexpressing lines (S lines), indicating that G10H plays a more important role in stimulating CPT accumulation than STR in O. pumila. Furthermore, co-overexpression of G10H and STR genes (SG Lines) caused a 56% increase on the yields of CPT compared to NC line and single gene transgenic lines, showed that simultaneous introduction of G10H and STR can produce a synergistic effect on CPT biosynthesis in O. pumila. The MTT assay results indicated that CPT extracted from different lines showed similar anti-tumor activity, suggesting that transgenic O. pumila hairy root lines could be an alternative approach to obtain CPT. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the enhancement of CPT production in O. pumila employing a metabolic engineering strategy. PMID:25648209

  11. Multiple shoot cultures of Ophiorrhiza rugosa var. decumbens Deb and Mondal--a viable renewable source for the continuous production of bioactive Camptotheca alkaloids apart from stems of the parent plant of Nothapodytes foetida (Wight) Sleumer.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Roja; Shankar, Bhavani

    2014-02-15

    Camptotheca alkaloids were isolated from multiple shoot cultures of O. decumbens (0.056% dry weight) and stems of N. foetida. The cytotoxicity of the extracts and products were tested in a panel of five cell lines. Crude extract from O. decumbens (Cr-Od) and N. foetida (Cr-Nf) showed more potent cytotoxic activity as compared to the isolated camptothecin from O. decumbens (CPT-Od) and N. foetida (CPT-Nf). CPT isolated from shoot cultures contained biological activity suggesting the possibility of using this system of O. decumbens as a renewable source for the production of camptotheca alkaloids. 9-Methoxy camptothecin (9-mCPT), isolated from N. foetida, was a very effective cytotoxic agent as compared to Cr-Nf or CPT-Nf. The IC50 of 9-mCPT was 0.84, 0.32, and 0.35 μg/ml for A549, MCF7 and Jurkat cell lines and >3 μg/ml for U937. Viability assays using MTT dye were further confirmed by assessing extent of apoptosis in these cells. These findings suggest that shoot cultures of O. decumbens offer a rich alternative plant source for the anticancer compound, CPT and 9-mCPT is a more potent compound in N. foetida as compared to CPT.

  12. Topoisomerase degradation, DSB repair, p53 and IAPs in cancer cell resistance to camptothecin-like topoisomerase I inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tomicic, Maja T; Kaina, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Topoisomerase I (TOP1) inhibitors applied in cancer therapy such as topotecan and irinotecan are derivatives of the natural alkaloid camptothecin (CPT). The mechanism of CPT poisoning of TOP1 rests on inhibition of the re-ligation function of the enzyme resulting in the stabilization of the TOP1-cleavable complex. In the presence of CPTs this enzyme-DNA complex impairs transcription and DNA replication, resulting in fork stalling and the formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in proliferating cells. As with most chemotherapeutics, intrinsic and acquired drug resistance represents a hurdle that limits the success of CPT therapy. Preclinical data indicate that resistance to CPT-based drugs might be caused by factors such as (a) poor drug accumulation in the tumor, (b) high rate of drug efflux, (c) mutations in TOP1 leading to failure in CPT docking, or (d) altered signaling triggered by the drug-TOP1-DNA complex, (e) expression of DNA repair proteins, and (f) failure to activate cell death pathways. This review will focus on the issues (d-f). We discuss degradation of TOP1 as part of the repair pathway in the processing of TOP1 associated DNA damage, give a summary of proteins involved in repair of CPT-induced replication mediated DSB, and highlight the role of p53 and inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs), particularly XIAP and survivin, in cancer cell resistance to CPT-like chemotherapeutics.

  13. Camptothecin binds to a synthetic peptide identified by a T7 phage display screen.

    PubMed

    Takakusagi, Yoichi; Kobayashi, Susumu; Sugawara, Fumio

    2005-11-01

    An analysis of non-biotinylated camptothecin (CPT) binding to the C-20-biotinylated CPT binding peptide NSSQSARR was carried out using two methods, quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The peptide was immobilized peptide on a sensor chip and showed a dissociation constant (KD) of approximately 0.1 microM against CPT in QCM and SPR experiments.

  14. Cell line selection combined with jasmonic acid elicitation enhance camptothecin production in cell suspension cultures of Ophiorrhiza mungos L.

    PubMed

    Deepthi, S; Satheeshkumar, K

    2017-01-01

    Ophiorrhiza mungos is a herbaceous medicinal plant which contains a quinoline alkaloid, camptothecin (CPT), an anticancer compound. A high-yielding cell line, O. mungos cell line-3 (OMC3) was selected from cell suspension cultures of O. mungos using cell aggregate cloning method and established cell suspension culture. OMC3 cell suspension produced significantly high biomass (9.25 ± 1.3 g/flask fresh weight (FW)) and CPT yield (0.095 ± 0.002 mg g(-1) dry weight (DW)) compared with the original cell suspension. Inoculum size of OMC3 cell suspension culture was optimised as 14 g L(-1). Media optimisation has shown that 5 % (w/v) sucrose and an increased ammonium/nitrate concentration of 40/20 mM favoured CPT production, whereas 3 % (w/v) sucrose, an ammonium/nitrate concentration of 20/40 mM and 1.25 mM of phosphate favoured biomass accumulation. Jasmonic acid, chitin and salicylic acid was used to elicit CPT production in the original cell suspension culture and achieved significantly high CPT production with jasmonic acid (JA) elicitation. Further, OMC3 cell suspension culture was elicited with JA (50 μM) and obtained 1.12 ± 0.08 mg g(-1) DW CPT and 9.52 ± 1.4 g/flask FW (190.4 g L(-1) FW). The combination of cell line selection and elicitation has produced 18.66-fold increases in CPT production together with significantly high biomass yield. The study is helpful in the scale-up studies of O. mungos cell suspension culture in suitable bioreactor systems for the production of CPT.

  15. Synthesis of camptothecin-loaded gold nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Zhimin; Liu, Zhiguo; Zu, Yuangang; Fu, Yujie; Zhao, Chunjian; Zhao, Xiuhua; Meng, Ronghua; Tan, Shengnan

    2010-04-01

    Camptothecin-loaded gold nanomaterials have been synthesized by the sodium borohydride reduction method under a strong basic condition. The obtained gold nanomaterials have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. The camptothecin-loaded gold colloidal solution was very stable and can be stored for more than two months at room temperature without obvious changes. The color of the colloidal solution can change from wine red to purple and blue during the acidifying process. It was revealed that the release of camptothecin and the aggregation of gold nanoparticles can be controlled by tuning the solution pH. The present study implied that the gold nanomaterials can be used as the potential carrier for CPT delivery.

  16. New molecular mechanisms of action of camptothecin-type drugs.

    PubMed

    Legarza, Kathleen; Yang, Li-Xi

    2006-01-01

    Camptothecin (CPT) derivatives have emerged as a promising group of chemotherapeutic agents. The FDA has approved the CPT derivatives topotecan and irinotecan for second line treatment of ovarian cancer and metastatic colorectal cancer, respectively. These and other CPT derivatives have become part of the multi-million dollar industry that is dedicated to finding better chemotherapeutic agents with excellent tumor kill and less normal tissue toxicity. In order to reach this goal it is imperative to understand the details of the mechanisms of action and the targets of these drugs, as well as the cellular response to the drugs. Although investigations of CPT date back to the 1960's, most of the studies that have been added to our present knowledge were done in the last 10 years. The purpose of this paper is to review the latest insights into the CPT binding site, CPT-induced gene expression and CPT-induced pathways to apoptosis.

  17. Single and combined supplementation of glutamine and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on host tolerance and tumour response to 7-ethyl-10-[4-(1-piperidino)-1-piperidino]carbonyloxy-camptothecin (CPT-11)/5-fluorouracil chemotherapy in rats bearing Ward colon tumour.

    PubMed

    Xue, Hongyu; Le Roy, Séverine; Sawyer, Michael B; Field, Catherine J; Dieleman, Levinus A; Baracos, Vickie E

    2009-08-01

    Prior reports suggest that during irinotecan (7-ethyl-10-[4-(1-piperidino)-1-piperidino]carbonyloxy-camptothecin; CPT-11) chemotherapy in laboratory rats, the anti-tumour efficacy and diarrhoea toxicity could be modulated by n-3 PUFA and glutamine, respectively. We further examined how these two dietary elements, when provided individually and in combination, would affect the efficacy of a cyclical regimen of CPT-11/5-fluorouracil (5-FU), an accepted combination regimen for colorectal cancer. Prior to initiating chemotherapy, diets enriched either with glutamine (2 %, w/w total diet) or n-3 PUFA (0.88 %, w/w total diet) alone, inhibited Ward colon tumour growth (P < 0.05). These diets also completely or partially normalized the changes in peripheral leucocyte counts associated with the tumour-bearing state (e.g. neutrophil proportion/concentration and lymphocyte proportion). During chemotherapy, either glutamine- or n-3 PUFA-enriched diet enhanced tumour chemo-sensitivity, and reduced body weight loss, anorexia and muscle wasting (v. animals fed control diet, P < 0.05). Surprisingly, providing both glutamine and n-3 PUFA together did not confer a greater benefit on tumour inhibition either in the presence or absence of chemotherapy; individual benefits associated with single treatments, particularly in respect to host nutritional status (i.e. body weight, food intake and muscle weight) and immune (peripheral leucocyte counts) features were instead partially or completely lost when these two nutrients were combined. These results draw into question the common assumption that there are additive or synergistic benefits of combinations of nutrients, which are beneficial on an individual basis, and suggest that co-supplementation with glutamine and n-3 PUFA is not indicated during chemotherapy with CPT-11 and 5-FU.

  18. Camptothecin-producing endophytic fungus Trichoderma atroviride LY357: isolation, identification, and fermentation conditions optimization for camptothecin production.

    PubMed

    Pu, Xiang; Qu, Xixing; Chen, Fei; Bao, Jinku; Zhang, Guolin; Luo, Yinggang

    2013-11-01

    Camptothecin (CPT), the third largest anticancer drug, is produced mainly by Camptotheca acuminata and Nothapodytes foetida. CPT itself is the starting material for clinical CPT-type drugs, but the plant-derived CPT cannot support the heavy demand from the global market. Research efforts have been made to identify novel sources for CPT. In this study, three CPT-producing endophytic fungi, Aspergillus sp. LY341, Aspergillus sp. LY355, and Trichoderma atroviride LY357, were isolated and identified from C. acuminata. Most CPT produced by these fungi was found in the fermentation broth, and their corresponding CPT yields were 7.93, 42.92, and 197.82 μg l(-1), respectively. The CPT-producing capability of LY341 and LY355 was completely lost after repeat subculturing. A substantial decrease of CPT production was also observed in the second generation of LY357. However, a stable and sustainable production of CPT was found from the second generation through the eighth generation of LY357. The fermentation medium, time, pH, temperature, and agitation rate were optimized for CPT production. Methyl jasmonate and XAD16 were proven to be an optimum elicitor and adsorbent resin, respectively, in view of that CPT yield was increased 3.4- and 11-fold through their use. A 50- to 75-fold increase of CPT yield was obtained when the optimized fermentation conditions, elicitor, and adsorbent resin were combined and applied to the culture of the seventh and eighth generations of LY357, and the highest CPT yield was 142.15 μg l(-1). The CPT-producing T. atroviride LY357 paves a potential to uncover the mysteries of CPT biosynthesis.

  19. A promising camptothecin derivative: Semisynthesis, antitumor activity and intestinal permeability.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Berna, Guillermo; Mangas-Sanjuán, Víctor; Gonzalez-Alvarez, Marta; Gonzalez-Alvarez, Isabel; García-Giménez, José Luis; Díaz Cabañas, María José; Bermejo, Marival; Corma, Avelino

    2014-08-18

    Oral administration of camptothecin (CPT) derivatives and other antitumoral agents is being actively developed in order to improve the quality of life of patients with cancer. Though several lipophilic derivatives of CPT have shown interesting oral bioavailability in preclinical and clinical studies, only Topotecan has been approved for this route of administration. Semisynthesis, antitumor activity, biological inhibition mechanism, and in situ intestinal permeability of 9, 10-[1,3]-Dioxinocamptothecin (CDiox), an unexplored CPT derivative, have been studied in this paper. The hexacyclic analog was as effective as Topotecan and CPT in different tumor cell lines, showing an expected similar apoptosis cell mechanism and high ability to inhibit DNA synthesis in HeLa, Caco-2, A375 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines. Furthermore, in vitro and in situ pharmacokinetics transport values obtained for CDiox displayed more favorable absorption profile than CPT and Topotecan.

  20. Antitumor Activity of Peptide Amphiphile Nanofiber-Encapsulated Camptothecin

    SciTech Connect

    Soukasene, Stephen; Toft, Daniel J.; Moyer, Tyson J.; Lu, Hsuming; Lee, Hyung-Kun; Standley, Stephany M.; Cryns, Vincent L.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2012-04-02

    Self-assembling peptide amphiphile (PA) nanofibers were used to encapsulate camptothecin (CPT), a naturally occurring hydrophobic chemotherapy agent, using a solvent evaporation technique. Encapsulation by PA nanofibers was found to improve the aqueous solubility of the CPT molecule by more than 50-fold. PAs self-assembled into nanofibers in the presence of CPT as demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy. Small-angle X-ray scattering results suggest a slight increase in diameter of the nanofiber to accommodate the hydrophobic cargo. In vitro studies using human breast cancer cells show an enhancement in antitumor activity of the CPT when encapsulated by the PA nanofibers. In addition, using a mouse orthotopic model of human breast cancer, treatment with PA nanofiber-encapsulated CPT inhibited tumor growth. These results highlight the potential of this model PA system to be adapted for delivery of hydrophobic therapies to treat a variety of diseases including cancer.

  1. Click synthesis of a polyamidoamine dendrimer-based camptothecin prodrug

    PubMed Central

    Zolotarskaya, Olga Yu.; Xu, Leyuan; Valerie, Kristoffer; Yang, Hu

    2015-01-01

    In the present work we report on the click synthesis of a new camptothecin (CPT) prodrug based on anionic polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer intended for cancer therapy. We applied ‘click’ chemistry to improve polymer-drug coupling reaction efficiency. Specifically, CPT was functionalized with a spacer, 1-azido-3,6,9,12,15-pentaoxaoctadecan-18-oic acid (APO), via EDC/DMAP coupling reaction. In parallel, propargylamine (PPA) and methoxypoly(ethylene glycol) amine were conjugated to PAMAM dendrimer G4.5 in sequence using an effective coupling agent 4-(4,6-dimethoxy-(1,3,5)triazin-2-yl)-4-methyl-morpholinium chloride (DMTMM). CPT-APO was then coupled to PEGylated PAMAM dendrimer G4.5-PPA via a click reaction using copper bromide/2,2’-bipyridine/ dimethyl sulfoxide (catalyst/ligand/solvent). Human glioma cells were exposed to the CPT-conjugate to determine toxicity and cell cycle effects using WST-1 assay and flow cytometry. The CPT-conjugate displayed a dose-dependent toxicity with an IC50 of 5 μM, a 185-fold increase relative to free CPT, presumably as a result of slow release. As expected, conjugated CPT resulted in G2/M arrest and cell death while the dendrimer itself had little to no toxicity. Altogether, highly efficient click chemistry allows for the synthesis of multifunctional dendrimers for sustained drug delivery. PMID:26640689

  2. E-ring conformation has a key role in cleavable complex formation: homocamptothecin versus camptothecins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvier, D.; Chourpa, I.; Maizieres, M.; Riou, J.-F.; Dauchez, M.; Alix, A. J. P.; Manfait, M.

    2003-06-01

    Homocamptothecin (hCPT) is a new camptothecin (CPT) derivative with a seven-membered β-hydroxylactone E-ring. This modification provides higher lactone stability and did not impair its activity against topoisomerase I (top1), but rather appears to improve it compared to CPT. Such lactone modification was unexpected regarding the previous structure-activity relationship data inside the CPT series, and may have crucial mechanistic implications in the ternary cleavable complex formation. In this study, the detailed characterization of the E-ring homologation and lactone/carboxylate conversion, self-aggregation, influence of pH and polarity of the molecular environment have been performed for hCPT by frequency-domain fluorescence. The real-time spectrofluorometry confirmed the enhanced stability of hCPT. We have also investigated the E-ring status of hCPT within the top1 ternary complex with DNA, and with top1 or DNA binary complexes. Unlike CPT, no modification of the (β-hydroxy-) lactone-carboxylate conversion rates was observed, suggesting that E-ring opening is not required for cleavable complex stabilization in presence of hCPT. Comparison of the two structures by molecular modeling revealed similar conformation and steric volumes between the β-hydroxylactone ring conformation of hCPT and the opened ring of CPT. The lack of hCPT E-ring opening was discussed in the light of these molecular modeling results.

  3. Design and synthesis of novel camptothecin/5-fluorouracil conjugates as cytotoxic agents.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying-Qian; Dai, Wei; Yang, Liu; Li, Hong-Yu

    2011-11-01

    In an effort to overcome several limitations associated with the synthesis of camptothecin (CPT), seven conjugates (10a-10g) composed of CPT and a 5-fluorouracil derivative joined by suitable dipeptide linkages were synthesised, and their cytotoxic activity against four human tumour cell lines as well as an in vitro pharmacokinetic determination of their lactone stability were studied. Among these compounds, most tested conjugates showed cytotoxic activities comparable or superior to CPT-11 (2), but they were less potent when compared with CPT (1). Interestingly, all of the compounds showed selective inhibitory activities against BGC-823, with IC₅₀ values lower than 0.1 µmol, which is more potent than CPT-11 (2). Also, the in vitro pharmacokinetic determination of the lactone levels of the representative compound 10b showed that the biological life span of their lactone forms in human and mouse plasma were significantly increased when compared with their mother compound CPT (1).

  4. Improved tumor targeting and antitumor activity of camptothecin loaded solid lipid nanoparticles by preinjection of blank solid lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jang, Dong-Jin; Moon, Cheol; Oh, Euichaul

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to enhance the in vivo antitumor effects of camptothecin (CPT), a strong antitumor agent whose delivery is limited by poor aqueous solubility and instability of the active lactone form. CPT was loaded into sterically stabilized, solid lipid nanoparticles (CPT-SLNs) formulated for intravenous administration. The influence of preinjected blank SLNs on the tumor targeting, pharmacokinetics and antitumor activity of CPT-SLNs was investigated. The CPT-SLNs composed of trilaurin-based lipid matrix containing poloxamer188 and pegylated phospholipid as stabilizers were prepared by hot homogenization method and evaluated for in vitro characteristics and in vivo performance. The CPT-SLNs showed an in vitro long-term sustained release pattern and effectively protected the CPT lactone form from hydrolysis under physiological conditions. Notable tumor targeting and tumor growth inhibition were observed after intravenous administration of CPT-SLNs to mice with subcutaneous transplants of CT26 carcinoma cells. In pharmacokinetic studies in rats, CPT-SLNs markedly elevated plasma CPT level and prolonged blood circulation compared to free CPT. Nonetheless, high uptake of CPT-SLNs by reticuloendothelial system (RES)-rich tissues resulted in limited tumor targeting of CPT-SLNs and plasma CPT levels. Preinjection of blank SLNs before administration of CPT-SLNs to tumor-bearing mice substantially reduced the accumulation of CPT-SLNs in RES organs. This led to significantly enhanced tumor targeting, improved pharmacokinetic parameters and increased antitumor efficacy of CPT-SLNs. These results suggested that the in vivo antitumor effects of CPT-SLNs could be further enhanced by preinjection of blank SLNs. Therefore, CPT-SLNs with preinjected blank SLNs could be a potential approach for stable and effective CPT-based cancer therapy.

  5. Study of the Binding between Camptothecin Analogs and FTO by Spectroscopy and Molecular Docking.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ting; Wang, Zechun; Zhang, Lijiao; Wang, Ning; Han, Xinxin; Wang, Ruiyong; Chang, Junbiao

    2017-04-11

    In this work, the interaction between camptothecin (CPT) analogs and fat mass and obesity associated (FTO) was investigated using spectroscopy and molecular docking. From the experimental results, it was found that the CPT analogs caused the fluorescence quenching of FTO through a static quenching procedure. The binding constants and thermodynamic parameters at three different temperatures, the number of binding sites were obtained, which suggested that the hydrophobic interaction and electrostatic force played major role in the reaction between CPT analogs and FTO. Results revealed that 10-hydroxycamptothecin was the strongest quencher.

  6. Macromolecular and nanotechnological modification of camptothecin and its analogs to improve the efficacy.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Hiraku; Machida, Yoshiharu

    2005-09-01

    Camptothecin (CPT) and its analogs are some of the most potent antitumor agents known. However, their poor water-solubility and high toxicity require changes of their physicochemical and biological characteristics. Active lactone forms have provoked interest in the utility of CPT and its analogs again. Macromolecular chemical modifications and nanotechnological formulations have been used to obtain improved systems of CPT-related compounds. In these systems, one of the most important concepts is the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. The outcomes obtained by these approaches are displayed by introducing concrete examples.

  7. Transcriptomic and proteomic profiling of maize embryos exposed to camptothecin

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Camptothecin is a plant alkaloid that specifically binds topoisomerase I, inhibiting its activity and inducing double stranded breaks in DNA, activating the cell responses to DNA damage and, in response to severe treatments, triggering cell death. Results Comparative transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of maize embryos that had been exposed to camptothecin were conducted. Under the conditions used in this study, camptothecin did not induce extensive degradation in the genomic DNA but induced the transcription of genes involved in DNA repair and repressed genes involved in cell division. Camptothecin also affected the accumulation of several proteins involved in the stress response and induced the activity of certain calcium-dependent nucleases. We also detected changes in the expression and accumulation of different genes and proteins involved in post-translational regulatory processes. Conclusions This study identified several genes and proteins that participate in DNA damage responses in plants. Some of them may be involved in general responses to stress, but others are candidate genes for specific involvement in DNA repair. Our results open a number of new avenues for researching and improving plant resistance to DNA injury. PMID:21595924

  8. Amorphous solid dispersion studies of camptothecin-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes in PEG 6000.

    PubMed

    Fatmi, Sofiane; Bournine, Lamine; Iguer-Ouada, Mokrane; Lahiani-Skiba, Malika; Bouchal, Fatiha; Skiba, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: The present work focused on the solubility enhancement of the poorly water-soluble anti-cancer agent camptothecin which, in its natural state, presents poor solubility inducing lack of activity with a marked toxicity. A new approach is adopted by using a ternary system including camptothecin (CPT) and cyclodextrins (CDs) dispersed in polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000. Camptothecin solubility variations in the presence of α-CD, β-CD, γ-CD, hydroxypropyl-α-CD (HPα-CD), hydroxypropyl-β-CD (HPβ-CD), permethyl-β-CD (PMβ-CD) and sulfobutyl ether-β-CD (SBEβ-CD), were evaluated by Higuchi solubility experiments. In the second part, the most efficient camptothecin/P-CDs binary systems, mainly HPβ-CD and PMβ-CD, were dispersed in PEG 6000. In addition to a drug release and modeling evaluation, the CPT interactions with CDs and PEG 6000 to prepared the amorphous solid dispersion in the binary and ternary systems were investigated by Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). The results showed that HPβ-CD and PMβ-CD were the most efficient for camptothecin solubilization with highest apparent equilibrium constants. Dissolution studies showed that percentage of CPT alone after two hour in 0.1 M HCI medium, did not exceed 16%, whereas under the same conditions, CPT/PMβ-CD complex reached 76%. When dispersing the binary systems CPT/β-CDs in PEG 6000, the velocity and the percentage of CPT release were considerably improved whatever the CD used, reaching the same value of 85%. The binary and ternary systems characterization demonstrated that CPT inclused into the CDs cavity, replacing the water molecules. Furthermore, a drug transition from crystalline to amorphous form was obtained when solid dispersion is realized. The present work demonstrated that ternary complexes are promising systems for CPT encapsulation, and offer opportunities to

  9. Camptothecins guanine interactions: mechanism of charge transfer reaction upon photoactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenkeste, K.; Guiot, E.; Tfibel, F.; Pernot, P.; Mérola, F.; Georges, P.; Fontaine-Aupart, M. P.

    2002-01-01

    The potent activity exhibited by the antitumoral camptothecin (CPT) and its analog irinotecan (CPT-11) is known to be related to a close contact between the drug and the nucleic acid base guanine. This specificity of interaction between these two chromophores was examined by following changes in the photophysical properties of the drug using steady-state as well as time-resolved absorption and fluorescence methods. The observed effects on absorption, fluorescence emission and singlet excited state lifetimes give evidence for the occurrence of a stacking complex formation restricted to the quinoline part of CPT or CPT-11 and the guanine base but also with the adenine base. The triplet excited state properties of the drugs have been also characterized in absence and in presence of guanosine monophosphate and reveal the occurrence of an electron transfer from the guanine base to the drug. Support for this conclusion was obtained from the studies of a set of biological targets of various oxido-reduction potentials, adenosine monophosphate, cytidine, cytosine, tryptophan, tyrosine and phenylalanine. This finding gives an interpretation of the CPT-induced guanine photolesions previously reported in the literature. These data taken together are discussed in connection with the drug activity. The stacking complex CPT/guanine is necessary but not sufficient to explain the role of the chirality and of the lactone structure in the function of the drug. A stereospecific interaction with the enzyme topoisomerase I seems necessary to stabilize the stacking complex. The first experiments using time-resolved fluorescence by two-photon excitation confirms that CPT does not bind to the isolated enzyme.

  10. Synthesis of water-soluble camptothecin-polyoxetane conjugates via click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zolotarskaya, Olga Yu; Wagner, Alison F; Beckta, Jason M; Valerie, Kristoffer; Wynne, Kenneth J; Yang, Hu

    2012-11-05

    Water-soluble camptothecin (CPT)-polyoxetane conjugates were synthesized using a clickable polymeric platform P(EAMO) that was made by polymerization of acetylene-functionalized 3-ethyl-3-(hydroxymethyl)oxetane (i.e., EAMO). CPT was first modified with a linker 6-azidohexanoic acid via an ester linkage to yield CPT-azide. CPT-azide was then click coupled to P(EAMO) in dichloromethane using bromotris(triphenylphosphine)copper(I)/N,N-diisopropylethylamine. For water solubility and cytocompatibility improvement, methoxypolyethylene glycol azide (mPEG-azide) was synthesized from mPEG 750 g mol(-1) and click grafted using copper(II) sulfate and sodium ascorbate to P(EAMO)-g-CPT. (1)H NMR spectroscopy confirmed synthesis of all intermediates and the final product P(EAMO)-g-CPT/PEG. CPT was found to retain its therapeutically active lactone form. The resulting P(EAMO)-g-CPT/PEG conjugates were water-soluble and produced dose-dependent cytotoxicity to human glioma cells and increased γ-H2AX foci formation, indicating extensive cell cycle-dependent DNA damage. Altogether, we have synthesized CPT-polymer conjugates able to induce controlled toxicity to human cancer cells.

  11. MWNT-hybrided supramolecular hydrogel for hydrophobic camptothecin delivery.

    PubMed

    Mu, Shansong; Liang, Yuanyuan; Chen, Shuaijun; Zhang, Liming; Liu, Tao

    2015-05-01

    To encapsulate the hydrophobic camptothecin (CPT) into hydrogel matrix with a high loading amount, a supramolecular hydrogel hybrided with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) was developed by the host-guest interactions and used for loading and delivering CPT. Firstly, carboxylated MWNTs were modified by polyethylene glycol monomethyl ether (MPEG), which resulted in the water-dispersed MPEG-MWNTs. Then α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) was mixed with MPEG-MWNTs and the hybrid supramolecular hydrogel was fabricated by the inclusion interactions between α-CD and MPEG. The used MPEG not only dispersed MWNTs in aqueous solution, but also functioned as hydrogel matrix by interacting with α-CD. The gelation time for the sol-gel transition and rheological properties of the resultant hydrogels were studied. Due to the excellent application of MWNTs in drug delivery, hydrophobic CPT could be loaded into the hydrogel matrix by a higher amount compared with micelles. By in vitro release and cell viability tests, it was found that the encapsulated CPT could exhibit a controlled and sustained release behavior as well as sustained antitumor efficacy.

  12. Camptothecin-binding site in human serum albumin and protein transformations induced by drug binding.

    PubMed

    Fleury, F; Ianoul, A; Berjot, M; Feofanov, A; Alix, A J; Nabiev, I

    1997-07-14

    Circular dichroism (CD) and Raman spectroscopy were employed in order to locate a camptothecin (CPT)-binding site within human serum albumin (HSA) and to identify protein structural transformations induced by CPT binding. A competitive binding of CPT and 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (a ligand occupying IIIA structural sub-domain of the protein) to HSA does not show any competition and demonstrates that the ligands are located in the different binding sites, whereas a HSA-bound CPT may be replaced by warfarin, occupying IIA structural sub-domain of the protein. Raman and CD spectra of HSA and HSA/CPT complexes show that the CPT-binding does not induce changes of the global protein secondary structure. On the other hand, Raman spectra reveal pronounced CPT-induced local structural modifications of the HSA molecule, involving changes in configuration of the two disulfide bonds and transfer of a single Trp-residue to hydrophilic environment. These data suggest that CPT is bound in the region of interdomain connections within the IIA structural domain of HSA and it induces relative movement of the protein structural domains.

  13. Induction of oncogene addiction shift to NF-{kappa}B by camptothecin in solid tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Togano, Tomiteru; Sasaki, Masataka; Watanabe, Mariko; Nakashima, Makoto; Tsuruo, Takashi; Umezawa, Kazuo; Higashihara, Masaaki; Watanabe, Toshiki; Horie, Ryouichi

    2009-12-04

    The biological basis of the resistance of solid tumor cells to chemotherapy is not well understood. While addressing this problem, we found that gastric cancer cell line St-4/CPT, lung cancer cell line A549/CPT, and colon cancer cell line HT-29/CPT, all of which are resistant to camptothecin (CPT), showed strong and constitutive nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B activity driven by I{kappa}B kinase compared with their parental cell lines St-4, A549, and HT-29. A new NF-{kappa}B inhibitor, dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin (DHMEQ), reduced viability and induced apoptosis in St-4/CPT, A549/CPT, and HT-29/CPT cell lines, while their parental cell lines were resistant to DHMEQ. The results in this study present an example of the shift in signals that support the survival of solid tumor cells to NF-{kappa}B during the acquisition of resistance to CPT. The results also indicate that solid tumor cells that become resistant to chemotherapy may be more easily treated by NF-{kappa}B inhibitors.

  14. Low Doses of Camptothecin Induced Hormetic and Neuroprotective Effects in PC12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Chen, Shenghui; Bao, Jiaolin; Zhang, Yulin; Huang, Borong; Jia, Xuejing; Chen, Meiwan; Wan, Jian-Bo; Su, Huanxing; Wang, Yitao

    2015-01-01

    Hormetic response is an adaptive mechanism for a cell or organism surviving in an unfavorable environment. It has been an intriguing subject of researches covering a broad range of biological and medical disciplines, in which the underlying significance and molecular mechanisms are under intensive investigation. In the present study, we demonstrated that topoisomerase I inhibitor camptothecin (CPT), a potent anticancer agent, induced an obvious hormetic response in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells. Camptothecin inhibited PC12 cell growth at relative high doses as generally acknowledged while stimulated the cell growth by as much as 39% at low doses. Moreover, low doses of CPT protected the cells from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced cell death. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) pathways were reported playing pivotal roles in protecting cells from oxidative stress. We observed that these 2 pathways were upregulated by low doses of CPT, as evidenced by increased levels of phosphorylated PI3K, phosphorylated Akt, phosphorylated mammalian target of rapamycin, Nrf2, and HO-1; and abolishment of the growth-promoting and neuroprotective effects of CPT by LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor. These results suggest that the hormetic and neuroprotective effects of CPT at low doses on PC12 cells were attributable, at least partially, to upregulated PI3K/Akt and Nrf2/HO-1 pathways. PMID:26674066

  15. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 inhibition and sustained extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation in camptothecin-induced human colon cancer cell death

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Minyoung; Young Kim, Sun; Kim, JongGuk; Kim, Hak-Su; Kim, Sang-Man; Kim, Eun Ju

    2013-01-01

    Camptothecins are commonly used chemotherapeutics; in some models, they enhance signaling via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway through effects on upstream kinases. To evaluate the impact of camptothecin (CPT) on MAPKs in human colon cancer, we studied HCT116 and CaCo2 colon cancer cells. We found that HCT116 cells highly express mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP1), which selectively inactivates extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), whereas MKP1 levels were undetectable in CaCo2 cells. CPT did not affect ERK activity in CaCo2 cells, but did induce a striking increase in ERK activity in HCT116 cells in association with a corresponding decrease in MKP1. The reduction in MKP1 expression occurred at a posttranscriptional level and was blocked by the proteasome inhibitor MG132, whereas that CPT-induced downregulation of MKP1 was not due to proteasome-mediated degradation. Treatment of HCT116 cells with CPT induced a sustained activation of nuclear ERK, which was required for CPT-induced apoptosis. P38 and JNK activity were unaffected by CPT, suggesting that the effects of CPT are mediated specifically by ERK. These results suggest that targeting dual-specificity MAPK phosphatases in colon cancer cells may be a viable strategy for optimizing camptothecin-based therapeutic protocols. PMID:24005240

  16. Anti-tumor activity of N-trimethyl chitosan-encapsulated camptothecin in a mouse melanoma model

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Camptothecin (CPT) has recently attracted increasing attention as a promising anticancer agent for a variety of tumors. But the clinical application is largely hampered by its extreme water insolubility and unpredictable side effect. It is essential to establish an efficient and safe protocol for the administration of CPT versus melanoma. Methods Camptothecin was encapsulated with N-trimethyl chitosan (CPT-TMC) through microprecipitation and sonication. Its inhibition effect on B16-F10 cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis was evaluated by MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis in vitro. The anti-tumor activity of CPT-TMC was evaluated in C57BL/6 mice bearing B16-F10 melanoma. Tumor volume, tumor weight and survival time were recorded. Assessment of apoptotic cells within tumor tissue was performed by TUNEL assay. Antiangiogenesis and antiproliferation effects of CPT-TMC in vivo were conducted via CD31 and PCNA immunohistochemistry, respectively. Results CPT-TMC efficiently inhibited B16-F10 cells proliferation and increased apoptosis in vitro. Experiment group showed significant inhibition compared with free CPT-treated group (81.3% vs. 56.9%) in the growth of B16-F10 melanoma xenografts and prolonged the survival time of the treated mice (P < 0.05). Decreased cell proliferation, increased tumor apoptosis as well as a reduction in angiogenesis were observed. Conclusions Our data suggest that N-trimethyl chitosan-encapsulated camptothecin is superior to free CPT by overcoming its insolubility and finally raises the potential of its application in melanoma therapy. PMID:20565783

  17. Synergistic antitumor activity of a self-assembling camptothecin and capecitabine hybrid prodrug for improved efficacy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wang; Su, Hao; Cheetham, Andrew G; Zhang, Weifang; Wang, Yuzhu; Kan, QuanCheng; Cui, Honggang

    2017-01-10

    The direct use of anticancer drugs to create their own nanostructures is an emerging concept in the field of drug delivery to obtain nanomedicines of high drug loading and high reproducibility, and the combination use of two or more drugs has been a proven clinical strategy to enhance therapeutic outcomes. We report here the synthesis, assembly and cytotoxicity evaluation of self-assembling hybrid prodrugs containing both camptothecin (CPT) and a capecitabine (Cap) analogue. CPT and Cap molecules were conjugated onto a short β-sheet-forming peptide (Sup35) to yield three different self-assembling prodrugs (dCPT-Sup35, CPT-Cap-Sup35 and dCap-Sup35). We found that the chemical structure of conjugated drugs could strongly influence their assembled morphology as well as their structural stability in aqueous solution. With a decrease in number of CPT units, the resulting nanostructures exhibited a morphological transformation from nanofibers (dCPT-Sup35) to filaments (CPT-Cap-Sup35) then to spherical particles (dCap-Sup35). Notably, the hybrid CPT-Cap prodrug showed a synergistic effect and significantly enhanced potency against three esophageal adenocarcinoma cell lines compared with the two homo-prodrugs (dCPT-Sup35 and dCap-Sup35) as well as free parent drugs (CPT, 5-Fu and CPT/5-FU mixture (1:1)). We believe this work represents a conceptual advancement in integrating two structurally distinct drugs of different action mechanisms into a single self-assembling hybrid prodrug to construct self-deliverable nanomedicines for more effective combination chemotherapy.

  18. Phenylbutyrate inhibits homologous recombination induced by camptothecin and methyl methanesulfonate.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Gitte S; Germann, Susanne M; Westergaard, Tine; Lisby, Michael

    2011-08-01

    Homologous recombination is accompanied by extensive changes to chromatin organization at the site of DNA damage. Some of these changes are mediated through acetylation/deacetylation of histones. Here, we show that recombinational repair of DNA damage induced by the anti-cancer drug camptothecin (CPT) and the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) is blocked by sodium phenylbutyrate (PBA) in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In particular, PBA suppresses CPT- and MMS-induced genetic recombination as well as DNA double-strand break repair during mating-type interconversion. Treatment with PBA is accompanied by a dramatic reduction in histone H4 lysine 8 acetylation. Live cell imaging of homologous recombination proteins indicates that repair of CPT-induced DNA damage is redirected to a non-recombinogenic pathway in the presence of PBA without loss in cell viability. In contrast, the suppression of MMS-induced recombination by PBA is accompanied by a dramatic loss in cell viability. Taken together, our results demonstrate that PBA inhibits DNA damage-induced homologous recombination likely by mediating changes in chromatin acetylation. Moreover, the combination of PBA with genotoxic agents can lead to different cell fates depending on the type of DNA damage inflicted.

  19. Supramolecular Crafting of Self-Assembling Camptothecin Prodrugs with Enhanced Efficacy against Primary Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hao; Zhang, Pengcheng; Cheetham, Andrew G; Koo, Jin Mo; Lin, Ran; Masood, Asad; Schiapparelli, Paula; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Cui, Honggang

    2016-01-01

    Chemical modification of small molecule hydrophobic drugs is a clinically proven strategy to devise prodrugs with enhanced treatment efficacy. While this prodrug strategy improves the parent drug's water solubility and pharmacokinetic profile, it typically compromises the drug's potency against cancer cells due to the retarded drug release rate and reduced cellular uptake efficiency. Here we report on the supramolecular design of self-assembling prodrugs (SAPD) with much improved water solubility while maintaining high potency against cancer cells. We found that camptothecin (CPT) prodrugs created by conjugating two CPT molecules onto a hydrophilic segment can associate into filamentous nanostructures in water. Our results suggest that these SAPD exhibit much greater efficacy against primary brain cancer cells relative to that of irinotecan, a clinically used CPT prodrug. We believe these findings open a new avenue for rational design of supramolecular prodrugs for cancer treatment. PMID:27217839

  20. CPT-hole closure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noce, T.E.; Holzer, T.L.

    2003-01-01

    The long-term stability of deep holes 1.75 inches. (4.4 cm) in diameter by 98.4 feet (30 m) created by cone penetration testing (CPT) was monitored at a site in California underlain by Holocene and Pleistocene age alluvial fan deposits. Portions of the holes remained open both below and above the 28.6-foot (8.7 m)-deep water table for approximately three years, when the experiment was terminated. Hole closure appears to be a very slow process that may take decades in the stiff soils studied here. Other experience suggests holes in softer soils may also remain open. Thus, despite their small diameter, CPT holes may remain open for years and provide paths for rapid migration of contaminants. The observations confirm the need to grout holes created by CPT soundings as well as other direct-push techniques in areas where protection of shallow ground water is important.

  1. Ab initio study on the noncovalent adsorption of camptothecin anticancer drug onto graphene, defect modified graphene and graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, Nabanita; Deka, Ramesh C.

    2013-09-01

    The application of graphene and related nanomaterials like boron nitride (BN) nanosheets, BN-graphene hybrid nanomaterials, and graphene oxide (GO) for adsorption of anticancer chemotherapeutic camptothecin (CPT) along with the effect on electronic properties prior to functionalization and after functionalization has been reported using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The inclusion of dispersion correction to DFT is instrumental in accounting for van der Waals π-π stacking between CPT and the nanomaterial. The adsorption of CPT exhibits significant strain within the nanosheets and noncovalent adsorption of CPT is thermodynamically favoured onto the nanosheets. In case of GO, surface incorporation of functional groups result in significant crumpling along the basal plane and the interaction is basically mediated by H-bonding rather than π- π stacking. Docking studies predict the plausible binding of CPT, CPT functionalized graphene and GO with topoisomerase I (top 1) signifying that CPT interacts through π stacking with AT and GC base pairs of DNA and in presence of nano support, DNA bases preferentially gets bound to the basal plane of graphene and GO rather than the edges. At a theoretical level of understanding, our studies point out the noncovalent interaction of CPT with graphene based nanomaterials and GO for loading and delivery of anticancer chemotherapeutic along with active binding to Top1 protein.

  2. Molecular characterisation of camptothecin-induced mutations at the hprt locus in Chinese hamster cells.

    PubMed

    Balestrieri, E; Zanier, R; Degrassi, F

    2001-05-09

    The capacity of the topoisomerase I inhibitor camptothecin (CPT) to induce single locus mutations at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) gene and the DNA changes underlying induced mutations were analysed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Camptothecin treatments increased hprt mutations up to 50-fold over the spontaneous levels at highly cytotoxic doses. Genomic DNA was isolated from 6-thioguanine resistant clones and subjected to multiplex PCR to screen for gross alterations in the gene structure. The molecular analysis revealed that deletion mutants represented 80% of the analysed clones, including total hprt deletion, multiple and single exon deletions. Furthermore, a fraction of the analysed clones showed deletions of more than one exon that were characterised by the absence of non-contiguous exons. These data show that single locus mutations induced by camptothecin are characterised by large deletions or complex rearrangements rather than single base substitutions and suggest that the recombinational repair of camptothecin-induced strand breaks at replication fork may be involved in the generations of these alterations at the chromatin structure level.

  3. CPT Results from Ktev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hogan

    2002-02-01

    We present several preliminary measurements from KTeV of the fundamental neutral K parameters, and their implications for CPT violation. A new limit is given on the sidereal time dependence of φ+-. The results are based on data collected in 1996-97.

  4. Kinetics of lactone hydrolysis in antitumor drugs of camptothecin series as studied by fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chourpa, I; Millot, J M; Sockalingum, G D; Riou, J F; Manfait, M

    1998-03-02

    Potent antitumor activity exhibited by 20-S-camptothecin (CPT) and numerous derivatives is known to be lost upon opening of the alpha-hydroxy-lactone ring of these drugs, hydrolyzable at neutral and basic pH. To quantify in 'real time' the lactone hydrolysis reaction in CPTs under physiological conditions, we have applied a non-perturbing approach by fluorescence spectroscopy. CPT and a set of its derivatives (21-lactam-S-CPT, 10,11-(methylenedioxy)-CPT, CPT-11, SN-38, topotecan, tricyclic ketone-CPT) with antitumor activity varying from negligible to 10 times that of CPT have been studied. Prior to the kinetic measurements, the effects of substitutions, pH, polarity of molecular environment, lactone ring opening (lactone-carboxylate transition) have been investigated in terms of the UV-visible absorption and fluorescence emission spectra of CPTs. Then the determined parameters of the fluorescence emission spectra corresponding to the respective lactone and carboxylate forms have been used to estimate the residual lactone percentage as a function of time. The reproducibility of the obtained data demonstrates that the spectroscopic approach provides a satisfactory precision for this kind of measurements. For CPT at pH 7.3, the lactone half-life was 29.4 +/- 1.7 min and the lactone percentage at equilibrium was 20.9 +/- 0.3%. Within a series of derivatives with substitutions at quinoline rings, the lactone half-life varied from 29 to 32 min and the equilibrium lactone content varied from 15% to 23%. For each compound, even slight increase of pH from 7.1 to 7.3 or from 7.3 to 7.6 logically leads to a remarkable decrease of both lactone half-life and equilibrium lactone percentage.

  5. NF-kappaB activation by camptothecin. A linkage between nuclear DNA damage and cytoplasmic signaling events.

    PubMed

    Huang, T T; Wuerzberger-Davis, S M; Seufzer, B J; Shumway, S D; Kurama, T; Boothman, D A; Miyamoto, S

    2000-03-31

    Activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB by extracellular signals involves its release from the inhibitor protein IkappaBalpha in the cytoplasm and subsequent nuclear translocation. NF-kappaB can also be activated by the anticancer agent camptothecin (CPT), which inhibits DNA topoisomerase (Topo) I activity and causes DNA double-strand breaks during DNA replication to induce S phase-dependent cytotoxicity. Here we show that CPT activates NF-kappaB by a mechanism that is dependent on initial nuclear DNA damage followed by cytoplasmic signaling events. NF-kappaB activation by CPT is dramatically diminished in cytoplasts and in CEM/C2 cells expressing a mutant Topo I protein that fails to bind CPT. This response is intensified in S phase cell populations and is prevented by the DNA polymerase inhibitor aphidicolin. In addition, CPT activation of NF-kappaB involves degradation of cytoplasmic IkappaBalpha by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in a manner that depends on the IkappaB kinase complex. Finally, inhibition of NF-kappaB activation augments CPT-induced apoptosis. These findings elucidate the progression of signaling events that initiates in the nucleus with CPT-Topo I interaction and continues in the cytoplasm resulting in degradation of IkappaBalpha and nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB to attenuate the apoptotic response.

  6. Co-delivery of camptothecin and curcumin by cationic polymeric nanoparticles for synergistic colon cancer combination chemotherapy†

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Bo; Si, Xiaoying; Han, Moon Kwon; Viennois, Emilie; Zhang, Mingzhen; Merlin, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticle (NP)-based combination chemotherapy has been proposed as a potent strategy for enhancing intracellular drug concentrations and achieving synergistic effects in colon cancer therapy. Here, we fabricated a series of chitosan-functionalized camptothecin (CPT)/curcumin (CUR)-loaded polymeric NPs with various weight ratios of CPT to CUR. The resultant cationic spherical CPT/CUR-NPs had a desirable particle size (193–224 nm), relatively narrow size distribution, and slightly positive zeta-potential. These NPs exhibited a simultaneous sustained release profile for both drugs throughout the study period with a slight, initial burst release. Subsequent cellular uptake experiments demonstrated that the introduction of chitosan to the NP surface markedly increased cellular-uptake efficiency compared with other drug formulations, and thus increased the intracellular drug concentrations. Importantly, the combined delivery of CPT and CUR in a single NP enhanced synergistic effects of the two drugs. Among the five cationic CPT/CUR-NPs tested, NPs with a CPT/CUR weight ratio of 4:1 showed the highest anticancer activity, resulting in a combination index of approximately 0.46. In summary, our study represents the first report of combinational application of CPT and CUR with a one-step–fabricated co-delivery system for effective colon cancer combination chemotherapy. PMID:26617985

  7. Autophagy inhibition switches low-dose camptothecin-induced premature senescence to apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-wei; Zhang, Shan-shan; Song, Jian-rui; Sun, Kai; Zong, Chen; Zhao, Qiu-dong; Liu, Wen-ting; Li, Rong; Wu, Meng-chao; Wei, Li-xin

    2014-08-01

    Recently, several studies indicated that senescent tumor cells are resistant to apoptosis in chemotherapy. They may return to cell cycle, thus act as stumbling blocks in anticancer treatments. In the present study, we found that, in human colorectal cancer cells, low-dose camptothecin (CPT) simultaneously induced autophagy and premature senescence through AMPK-TSC2-mTOR pathway and ATM-Chk2-p53-p21 pathway respectively. What's important is the suppression of autophagy substantially increased apoptosis and greatly attenuated senescence possibly by blocking p53/p21 pathway, which suggests that autophagy plays an indispensable role in sustaining cell senescence caused by low-dose CPT. The combination of low-dose CPT and autophagy inhibitor, a way to lead senescent cells to die, would be potentially valuable in cancer therapy.

  8. Membrane transport of camptothecin: facilitation by human P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) and multidrug resistance protein 2 (ABCC2)

    PubMed Central

    Lalloo, Anita K; Luo, Feng R; Guo, Ailan; Paranjpe, Pankaj V; Lee, Sung-Hack; Vyas, Viral; Rubin, Eric; Sinko, Patrick J

    2004-01-01

    Background The purpose of the present study was to continue the investigation of the membrane transport mechanisms of 20-(S)-camptothecin (CPT) in order to understand the possible role of membrane transporters on its oral bioavailability and disposition. Methods The intestinal transport kinetics of CPT were characterized using Caco-2 cells, MDCKII wild-type cells and MDCKII cells transfected with human P-glycoprotein (PGP) (ABCB1) or human multidrug resistance protein 2 (MRP2) (ABCC2). The effects of drug concentration, inhibitors and temperature on CPT directional permeability were determined. Results The absorptive (apical to basolateral) and secretory (basolateral to apical) permeabilities of CPT were found to be saturable. Reduced secretory CPT permeabilities with decreasing temperatures suggests the involvement of an active, transporter-mediated secretory pathway. In the presence of etoposide, the CPT secretory permeability decreased 25.6%. However, inhibition was greater in the presence of PGP and of the breast cancer resistant protein inhibitor, GF120918 (52.5%). The involvement of additional secretory transporters was suggested since the basolateral to apical permeability of CPT was not further reduced in the presence of increasing concentrations of GF120918. To investigate the involvement of specific apically-located secretory membrane transporters, CPT transport studies were conducted using MDCKII/PGP cells and MDCKII/MRP2 cells. CPT carrier-mediated permeability was approximately twofold greater in MDCKII/PGP cells and MDCKII/MRP2 cells than in MDCKII/wild-type cells, while the apparent Km values were comparable in all three cell lines. The efflux ratio of CPT in MDCKII/PGP in the presence of 0.2 μM GF120918 was not completely reversed (3.36 to 1.49). However, the decrease in the efflux ratio of CPT in MDCKII/MRP2 cells (2.31 to 1.03) suggests that CPT efflux was completely inhibited by MK571, a potent inhibitor of the Multidrug Resistance Protein

  9. Combined treatment of photodynamic therapy and the topoisomerase I inhibitor camptothecin in growing V79 and NHIK 3025 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaullier, Jean-Michel; Rodal, Siv K.; Moan, Johan; Berg, Kristian

    1996-12-01

    The topoisomerase I (Topo I) inhibitor camptothecin (CPT) has been combined with photodynamic treatment (PDT) in V79 and NHIK 3025 cells. Meso-tetra (N-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphine (TMPyPH2) was used as a photosensitizer. The dye has been shown to localize in granules in the cytoplasm of both cell lines. Some of the granularly located TMPyPH2 is relocated to the cytosol after exposure to a light dose inactivation 70% of the cells. The human NHIK 3025 carcinoma from cervix were more resistant to PDT (D50 approximately equals 0.33 J/cm2) and CPT (D50 approximately equals 320 nM) than Chinese hamster V79 lung fibroblasts (PDT, D20 approximately equals 0.3 J/cm2 and CPT, D20 approximately equals 55 nM). When the cells were treated with CPT for 18 hours before PDT, the combination of treatments led to slight synergistic effects for low CPT concentrations (up to 100 nM in NHIK 3025 cells) and high PDT doses (above 0.15 J/cm2). For higher CPT concentrations and lower PDT doses, the combination of treatment became additive.

  10. Targeting of Topoisomerase I for Prognoses and Therapeutics of Camptothecin-Resistant Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Hsiang-Ping; An, Herng-Wei; Lee, Chi-Ming; Wu, Jen-Chine; Chen, Chien-Shu; Huang, Shih-Hao; Hwang, Jaulang; Cheng, Kur-Ta; Leiw, Phui-Ly; Chen, Chi-Long; Lin, Chun-Mao

    2015-01-01

    DNA topoisomerase I (TOP1) levels of several human neoplasms are higher than those of normal tissues. TOP1 inhibitors are widely used in treating conventional therapy-resistant ovarian cancers. However, patients may develop resistance to TOP1 inhibitors, hampering chemotherapy success. In this study, we examined the mechanisms associated with the development of camptothecin (CPT) resistance in ovarian cancers and identified evodiamine (EVO), a natural product with TOP1 inhibiting activity that overcomes the resistance. The correlations among TOP1 levels, cancer staging, and overall survival (OS) were analyzed. The effect of EVO on CPT-resistant ovarian cancer was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. TOP1 was associated with poor prognosis in ovarian cancers (p = 0.024). EVO induced apoptosis that was detected using flow cytometry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. The tumor size decreased significantly in the EVO treatment group compared with the control group (p < 0.01) in a xenograft mouse model. Effects of drugs targeting TOP1 for prognosis and therapy in CPT-resistant ovarian cancer are anticipated. EVO with TOP1 can be developed as an antiproliferative agent for overcoming CPT resistance in ovarian cancers. PMID:26207989

  11. Mixed Micelles made of Poly(ethylene glycol)-Phosphatidylethanolamine Conjugate and D-α-tocopheryl Polyethylene Glycol 1000 Succinate as Pharmaceutical Nanocarriers for Camptothecin

    PubMed Central

    Mu, L.; Elbayoumi, T.A.; Torchilin, V.P.

    2006-01-01

    Micelles from the mixture of poly(ethylene glycol)-phosphatidyl ethanolamine conjugate (PEG-PE) and D-α-tocopheryl polyetheyene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS) were prepared loaded with the poorly soluble anticancer drug camptothecin (CPT). The solubilization of CPT by the mixed micelles was more efficient than with earlier described micelles made of PEG-PE alone. CPT-loaded mixed micelles were stable upon storage and dilution and firmly retained the incorporated drug. The cytotoxicity of the CPT-loaded mixed micelles against various cancer cells in vitro was remarkably higher than that of the free drug. PEG-PE/TPGS mixed micelles may serve as pharmaceutical nanocarriers with improved solubilization capacity for poorly soluble drugs. PMID:16242875

  12. A phase I study with MAG-camptothecin intravenously administered weekly for 3 weeks in a 4-week cycle in adult patients with solid tumours.

    PubMed

    Wachters, F M; Groen, H J M; Maring, J G; Gietema, J A; Porro, M; Dumez, H; de Vries, E G E; van Oosterom, A T

    2004-06-14

    In MAG-camptothecin (MAG-CPT), the topoisomerase inhibitor camptothecin is linked to a water-soluble polymer. Preclinical experiments showed enhanced antitumour efficacy and limited toxicity compared to camptothecin alone. Prior phase I trials guided the regimen used in this study. The objectives were to determine the maximum tolerated dose, dose-limiting toxicities, safety profile, and pharmacokinetics of weekly MAG-CPT. Patients with solid tumours received MAG-CPT intravenously administered weekly for 3 weeks in 4-week cycles. At the starting dose level (80 mg x m(-2) week(-1)), no dose-limiting toxicities occurred during the first cycle (n=3). Subsequently, three patients were enrolled at the second dose level (120 mg x m(-2) week(-1)). Two of three patients at the 80 mg x m(-2) week(-1) cohort developed haemorrhagic cystitis (grade 1/3 dysuria and grade 2/3 haematuria) during the second and third cycles. Next, the 80 mg x m(-2) week(-1) cohort was enlarged to a total of six patients. One other patient at this dose level experienced grade 1 haematuria. At 120 mg x m(-2) week(-1), grade 1 bladder toxicity occurred in two of three patients. Dose escalation was stopped at 120 mg x m(-2) week(-1). Cumulative bladder toxicity was dose-limiting toxicity at 80 mg x m(-2) week(-1). Pharmacokinetics revealed highly variable urinary camptothecin excretion, associated with bladder toxicity. Due to cumulative bladder toxicity, weekly MAG-CPT is not a suitable regimen for treatment of patients with solid tumours.

  13. Alkaloids Isolated from Natural Herbs as the Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jin-Jian; Bao, Jiao-Lin; Chen, Xiu-Ping; Huang, Min; Wang, Yi-Tao

    2012-01-01

    Alkaloids are important chemical compounds that serve as a rich reservoir for drug discovery. Several alkaloids isolated from natural herbs exhibit antiproliferation and antimetastasis effects on various types of cancers both in vitro and in vivo. Alkaloids, such as camptothecin and vinblastine, have already been successfully developed into anticancer drugs. This paper focuses on the naturally derived alkaloids with prospective anticancer properties, such as berberine, evodiamine, matrine, piperine, sanguinarine, and tetrandrine, and summarizes the mechanisms of action of these compounds. Based on the information in the literature that is summarized in this paper, the use of alkaloids as anticancer agents is very promising, but more research and clinical trials are necessary before final recommendations on specific alkaloids can be made. PMID:22988474

  14. Core-shell hybrid nanocapsules for oral delivery of camptothecin: formulation development, in vitro and in vivo evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ünal, Hale; d'Angelo, Ivana; Pagano, Ester; Borrelli, Francesca; Izzo, Angelo; Ungaro, Francesca; Quaglia, Fabiana; Bilensoy, Erem

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to design and in vitro-in vivo evaluate oral nanocapsules prepared from amphiphilic cyclodextrins (CDs) or poly-ɛ-caprolactone (PCL) for the effective oral delivery of an anticancer agent, camptothecin (CPT). CPT-loaded anionic and Chitosan (CS)-coated cationic nanocapsules were prepared and characterized in vitro. Morphological analysis was performed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). CPT release profile was evaluated using dialysis method under sink conditions. To determine the protective effect and drug stability provided by nanocapsules, all the formulations were incubated in simulated gastrointestinal media. Measurement of mucoadhesive tendency of CPT-loaded nanocapsules was realized by turbidimetric method. Penetration of nanocapsules was performed through an artificial mucus model. The permeability of CPT in solution form and bound to nanocapsule formulations were demonstrated across Caco-2 cell line. Finally, the intestinal uptake of nanocapsules was evaluated in vivo, in a mouse model. Both anionic and cationic formulations were in the range of 180-220 nm with a narrow size distribution and desired zeta potential values. CPT-loaded nanocapsules were found to be stable in simulated gastrointestinal media. Turbidimetric measurements confirmed the interaction between nanoparticles and mucin. Penetration of CPT through an artificial mucus gel layer was higher with CS-coated nanocapsules in accordance with the results obtained from permeability studies across Caco-2 cell line. In vivo animal studies confirmed that the intestinal uptake of nanocapsules was significantly higher with cationic nanocapsules. CPT-loaded positively charged CD nanocapsules might be an attractive and promising treatment for oral chemotherapy.

  15. CPT Faces Changing Education Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1986

    1986-01-01

    The American Chemical Society's Committee on Professional Training (CPT) held a 50th anniversary symposium that focused on changing needs in the field of education. Highlights of the symposium are presented. (JN)

  16. Topoisomerase I inhibitor, camptothecin, induces apoptogenic signaling in human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    García, Carolina Paola; Videla Richardson, Guillermo Agustín; Romorini, Leonardo; Miriuka, Santiago Gabriel; Sevlever, Gustavo Emilio; Scassa, María Elida

    2014-03-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) need to maintain their genomic integrity in response to DNA damage to safeguard the integrity of the organism. DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the most lethal forms of DNA damage and, if not repaired correctly, they can lead to cell death, genomic instability and cancer. How human ESCs (hESCs) maintain genomic integrity in response to agents that cause DSBs is relatively unclear. In the present study we aim to determine the hESC response to the DSB inducing agent camptothecin (CPT). We find that hESCs are hypersensitive to CPT, as evidenced by high levels of apoptosis. CPT treatment leads to DNA-damage sensor kinase (ATM and DNA-PKcs) phosphorylation on serine 1981 and serine 2056, respectively. Activation of ATM and DNA-PKcs was followed by histone H2AX phosphorylation on Ser 139, a sensitive reporter of DNA damage. Nuclear accumulation and ATM-dependent phosphorylation of p53 on serine 15 were also observed. Remarkably, hESC viability was further decreased when ATM or DNA-PKcs kinase activity was impaired by the use of specific inhibitors. The hypersensitivity to CPT treatment was markedly reduced by blocking p53 translocation to mitochondria with pifithrin-μ. Importantly, programmed cell death was achieved in the absence of the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor, p21(Waf1), a bona fide p53 target gene. Conversely, differentiated hESCs were no longer highly sensitive to CPT. This attenuated apoptotic response was accompanied by changes in cell cycle profile and by the presence of p21(Waf1). The results presented here suggest that p53 has a key involvement in preventing the propagation of damaged hESCs when genome is threatened. As a whole, our findings support the concept that the phenomenon of apoptosis is a prominent player in normal embryonic development.

  17. Intestinal alkalization as a possible preventive mechanism in irinotecan (CPT-11)-induced diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Tadashi; Ha, Linan; Arimori, Kazuhiko; Latham, Patricia; Kobayashi, Kunihiko; Ceryak, Susan; Matsuzaki, Yasushi; Bouscarel, Bernard

    2002-01-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of irinotecan (CPT-11), a DNA topoisomerase inhibitor, is often limited by the induction of severe late-onset diarrhea. This prodrug and its active metabolite, 7-ethyl-10-hydroxy-camptothecin (SN-38), have a labile alpha-hydroxy-lactone ring that undergoes pH-dependent reversible hydrolysis. At physiological pH and higher, equilibrium favors the less toxic carboxylate form, whereas at acidic pH, the more potent lactone form is favored. We have reported previously that the initial uptake rate of CPT-11 and SN-38 by intestinal cells was significantly different between the respective lactone and carboxylate form. Results from the present study in HT-29 cells further demonstrate the correlation between the CPT-11/SN-38 initial uptake rate and the induced toxicity, cell cycle alteration, apoptosis, and colony-forming efficiency. The exposure of HT-29 cells to SN-38 for a limited period of time (<2 h) was sufficient to induce these events. Because the decreased initial uptake of SN-38 carboxylate resulted in a reduced cellular toxicity, we postulated that the CPT-11-induced diarrhea was preventable by influencing the equilibrium toward the carboxylate form and, thus, reducing its intestinal uptake. In the golden Syrian hamster model, p.o. sodium bicarbonate supplementation (5 mg/ml in drinking water) led to alkalization of the intestinal contents. In addition, this alkalization resulted in the reduction of the histopathological damage to the mucosa of the small and large intestine, as well as a 20% reduction of the intestinal SN-38 lactone concentration of animals receiving CPT-11 (20-50 mg/kg x 7 days). Taken together, these results from in vitro and in vivo studies support intestinal alkalization by sodium bicarbonate supplementation as a preventive mechanism against CPT-11-induced diarrhea. In addition, this provides a strong rationale for the usage of this measure as an adjunct to CPT-11 treatment.

  18. Disulfide cross-linked phosphorylcholine micelles for triggered release of camptothecin

    PubMed Central

    McRae Page, Samantha; Martorella, Molly; Parelkar, Sangram; Kosif, Irem

    2013-01-01

    A series of block copolymers based on 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) were synthesized by reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. Incorporation of dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA) into the hydrophobic block led to formation of block copolymer micelles in water. The micelles were between 15 and 30 nm in diameter, as characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS), with some size control achieved by adjusting the hydrophobic/hydrophilic balance. Cross-linked micelles were prepared by disulfide formation, and observed to be stable in solution for weeks. The micelles proved amenable to disassembly when treated with a reducing agent, such as dithiothreitol (DTT), and represent a potential delivery platform for chemotherapeutic agents. As a proof-of-concept, camptothecin (CPT) was conjugated to the polymer scaffold through a disulfide linkage, and release of the drug from the micelle was monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy. These CPT-loaded prodrug micelles showed a reduction in release rate compared to physically encapsulated CPT. The use of disulfide conjugation facilitated drug release under reducing conditions, with a half-life (t1/2) of 5.5 hours in the presence of 3 mM DTT, compared to 28 hours in PBS. The toxicity of the micellar prodrugs was evaluated in cell culture against human breast (MCF7) and colorectal (COLO205) cancer cell lines. PMID:23742055

  19. Camptothecin Enhances Cell Death Induced by (177)Lu-EDTMP in Osteosarcoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Chandan; Vats, Kusum; Lohar, Sharad P; Korde, Aruna; Samuel, Grace

    2014-10-01

    Lutetium-177 is an assured therapeutic radionuclide with favorable half-life and suitable β(-) energy. Radiolabeled (177)Lu-EDTMP (Ethylenediamine tetramethylene phosphonic acid) is by and large used for bone pain palliation in cancer patients. In vitro cell studies are carried out in osteosarcoma cells MG-63 to evaluate the combined effect of anticancer drug camptothecin (CPT) and (177)Lu-EDTMP. Two concentrations of (177)Lu-EDTMP (3.7 and 37 MBq) were incubated with MG63 cell line for 48 hours with and without pretreatment of CPT (10 nM) for 1 hour. After completion of incubation, the cells were harvested and cellular toxicity was estimated by LDH, MTT, and trypan blue dye. Apoptotic DNA fragmentation was estimated by ELISA kit. The expression of proteins such as bcl2, PARP, and MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) that were related to apoptotic signaling pathways was assessed by western blotting. The results indicated that cellular toxicity and apoptosis were relatively higher in MG63 cells that were treated with CPT prior to treating with (177)Lu-EDTMP in comparison with the corresponding individual controls.

  20. Differential induction of Leishmania donovani bi-subunit topoisomerase I-DNA cleavage complex by selected flavones and camptothecin: activity of flavones against camptothecin-resistant topoisomerase I.

    PubMed

    Das, Benu Brata; Sen, Nilkantha; Roy, Amit; Dasgupta, Somdeb Bose; Ganguly, Agneyo; Mohanta, Bikash Chandra; Dinda, Biswanath; Majumder, Hemanta K

    2006-01-01

    Emergence of the bi-subunit topoisomerase I in the kinetoplastid family (Trypanosoma and Leishmania) has brought a new twist in topoisomerase research related to evolution, functional conservation and preferential sensitivities to the specific inhibitors of type IB topoisomerase family. In the present study, we describe that naturally occurring flavones baicalein, luteolin and quercetin are potent inhibitors of the recombinant Leishmania donovani topoisomerase I. These compounds bind to the free enzyme and also intercalate into the DNA at a very high concentration (300 microM) without binding to the minor grove. Here, we show that inhibition of topoisomerase I by these flavones is due to stabilization of topoisomerase I-DNA cleavage complexes, which subsequently inhibit the religation step. Their ability to stabilize the covalent topoisomerase I-DNA complex in vitro and in living cells is similar to that of the known topoisomerase I inhibitor camptothecin (CPT). However, in contrast to CPT, baicalein and luteolin failed to inhibit the religation step when the drugs were added to pre-formed enzyme substrate binary complex. This differential mechanism to induce the stabilization of cleavable complex with topoisomerase I and DNA by these selected flavones and CPT led us to investigate the effect of baicalein and luteolin on CPT-resistant mutant enzyme LdTOP1Delta39LS lacking 1-39 amino acids of the large subunit [B. B. Das, N. Sen, S. B. Dasgupta, A. Ganguly and H. K. Majumder (2005) J. Biol. Chem. 280, 16335-16344]. Baicalein and luteolin stabilize duplex oligonucleotide cleavage with LdTOP1Delta39LS. This observation was further supported by the stabilization of in vivo cleavable complex by baicalein and luteolin with highly CPT-resistant L.donovani strain. Taken together, our data suggest that the interacting amino acid residues of topoisomerase I may be partially overlapping or different for flavones and CPT. This study illuminates new properties of the flavones

  1. Differential induction of Leishmania donovani bi-subunit topoisomerase I–DNA cleavage complex by selected flavones and camptothecin: activity of flavones against camptothecin-resistant topoisomerase I

    PubMed Central

    Das, Benu Brata; Sen, Nilkantha; Roy, Amit; Dasgupta, Somdeb Bose; Ganguly, Agneyo; Mohanta, Bikash Chandra; Dinda, Biswanath; Majumder, Hemanta K.

    2006-01-01

    Emergence of the bi-subunit topoisomerase I in the kinetoplastid family (Trypanosoma and Leishmania) has brought a new twist in topoisomerase research related to evolution, functional conservation and preferential sensitivities to the specific inhibitors of type IB topoisomerase family. In the present study, we describe that naturally occurring flavones baicalein, luteolin and quercetin are potent inhibitors of the recombinant Leishmania donovani topoisomerase I. These compounds bind to the free enzyme and also intercalate into the DNA at a very high concentration (300 µM) without binding to the minor grove. Here, we show that inhibition of topoisomerase I by these flavones is due to stabilization of topoisomerase I–DNA cleavage complexes, which subsequently inhibit the religation step. Their ability to stabilize the covalent topoisomerase I–DNA complex in vitro and in living cells is similar to that of the known topoisomerase I inhibitor camptothecin (CPT). However, in contrast to CPT, baicalein and luteolin failed to inhibit the religation step when the drugs were added to pre-formed enzyme substrate binary complex. This differential mechanism to induce the stabilization of cleavable complex with topoisomerase I and DNA by these selected flavones and CPT led us to investigate the effect of baicalein and luteolin on CPT-resistant mutant enzyme LdTOP1Δ39LS lacking 1–39 amino acids of the large subunit [B. B. Das, N. Sen, S. B. Dasgupta, A. Ganguly and H. K. Majumder (2005) J. Biol. Chem. 280, 16335–16344]. Baicalein and luteolin stabilize duplex oligonucleotide cleavage with LdTOP1Δ39LS. This observation was further supported by the stabilization of in vivo cleavable complex by baicalein and luteolin with highly CPT-resistant L.donovani strain. Taken together, our data suggest that the interacting amino acid residues of topoisomerase I may be partially overlapping or different for flavones and CPT. This study illuminates new properties of the flavones

  2. Camptothecin inhibits platelet-derived growth factor-BB-induced proliferation of rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells through inhibition of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Eun-Seok; Kang, Shin-il; Yoo, Kyu-dong; Lee, Mi-Yea; Yoo, Hwan-Soo; Hong, Jin-Tae; Shin, Hwa-Sup; Kim, Bokyung; Yun, Yeo-Pyo

    2013-04-15

    The abnormal proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in arterial wall is a major cause of vascular disorders such as atherosclerosis and restenosis after angioplasty. In this study, we investigated not only the inhibitory effects of camptothecin (CPT) on PDGF-BB-induced VSMC proliferation, but also its molecular mechanism of this inhibition. CPT significantly inhibited proliferation with IC50 value of 0.58 μM and the DNA synthesis of PDGF-BB-stimulated VSMCs in a dose-dependent manner (0.5–2 μM ) without any cytotoxicity. CPT induced the cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase. Also, CPT decreased the expressions of G0/G1-specific regulatory proteins including cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)2, cyclin D1 and PCNA in PDGF-BB-stimulated VSMCs. Pre-incubation of VSMCs with CPT significantly inhibited PDGF-BB-induced Akt activation, whereas CPT did not affect PDGF-receptor beta phosphorylation, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 phosphorylation and phospholipase C (PLC)-γ1 phosphorylation in PDGF-BB signaling pathway. Our data showed that CPT pre-treatment inhibited VSMC proliferation, and that the inhibitory effect of CPT was enhanced by LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor, on PDGF-BB-induced VSMC proliferation. In addition, inhibiting the PI3K/Akt pathway by LY294002 significantly enhanced the suppression of PCNA expression and Akt activation by CPT. These results suggest that the anti-proliferative activity of CPT is mediated in part by downregulating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. - Highlights: ► CPT inhibits proliferation of PDGF-BB-induced VSMC without cytotoxicity. ► CPT arrests the cell cycle in G0/G1 phase by downregulation of cyclin D1 and CDK2. ► CPT significantly attenuates Akt phosphorylation in PDGF-BB signaling pathway. ► LY294002 enhanced the inhibitory effect of CPT on VSMC proliferation. ► Thus, CPT is mediated by downregulating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  3. CPT Tests: Kaon vs neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    2003-07-09

    CPT violation has an impressive limit in the neutral kaon system |m(K{sup 0})-m({bar K}{sup 0})| < 10{sup -18} m{sub K} = 0.50 x 10{sup -18} GeV. However, if viewed as a constraint on the mass-squared, the bound appears weak, |m{sup 2}(K{sup 0})-m{sup 2}({bar K}{sup 0})| < 0.25 eV{sup 2}. the authors point out that neutrino oscillation offers better limits on CPT violation in this case. The comparison of solar and rector neutrino results puts the best limit on CPT violation by far, |{Delta}m{sub {nu}}{sup 2}-{Delta}m{sub {rho}}{sup 2}| < 1.3 x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} (90% CL).

  4. Fluorescence detection of the anticancer drug topotecan and related camptothecins in plasma and whole blood by two-photon excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Thomas G.; Malak, Henryk M.; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    1997-05-01

    Recent FDA-approval of topotecan (9-dimethylaminomethyl-10- hydroxycamptothecin) and camptosar (CPT-11) along with the accelerated clinical development of related camptothecin drugs provides new hope for the successful treatment of human cancer, including neoplasms for which no effective treatments currently exist. Current clinical efforts worldwide are aimed at optimizing the therapeutic efficacies of the camptothecins, with the major focus on the determination of the most effective dosing schedules. To this end, technological advances which provide a direct and rapid means of measuring plasma drug levels (i.e. such that correlations between plasma drug levels and clinical responses can be sought) would be of great utility. Here we report on the direct fluorescence detection of topotecan and SN-38 in human plasma and topotecan in whole blood at micro molar levels using two-photon excitation at 730 or 820 nm. Topotecan was detected at concentrations as low as 0.05 and 1 (mu) M in plasma and whole blood, respectively. Since skin, blood and other tissues are translucent at long wavelengths, our results suggest the attractive possibility of homogeneous or noninvasive clinical sensing of camptothecins in situ using two-photon excitation.

  5. Quantitation of camptothecin and related compounds.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, M; Sissi, C; Gatto, B; Moro, S; Zagotto, G

    2001-11-25

    Camptothecin and congeners represent a clinically very useful class of anticancer agents. Proper identification and quantitation of the original compounds and their metabolites in biological fluids is fundamental to assess drug metabolism and distribution in animals and in man. In this paper we will review the recent literature available on the methods used for separation and quantitative determination of the camptothecin family of drugs. Complications arise from the fact that they are chemically labile, and the pharmacologically active lactone structure can undergo ring opening at physiological conditions. In addition, a number of metabolic changes usually occur, producing a variety of active or inactive metabolites. Hence, the conditions of extraction, pre-treatment and quantitative analysis are to be carefully calibrated in order to provide meaningful results.

  6. Olesoxime protects embryonic cortical neurons from camptothecin intoxication by a mechanism distinct from BDNF

    PubMed Central

    Gouarné, Caroline; Giraudon-Paoli, Marc; Seimandi, Mathieu; Biscarrat, Clotilde; Tardif, Gwenaëlle; Pruss, Rebecca M; Bordet, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Olesoxime is a small cholesterol–oxime promoting rat embryonic motor neurons survival in the absence of trophic factors. Because olesoxime can substitute for neurotrophic factors in many situations, and to gain further understanding of its mechanism of action, we wondered if it could prevent neuronal death induced by camptothecin (CPT) and compared its effects with those of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Experimental Approach E17 rat embryonic cortical neurons were treated with olesoxime, BDNF or vehicle and intoxicated with CPT. Caspase-dependent and caspase-independent death pathways along with pro-survival pathways activation were explored. Key Results As previously reported for BDNF, olesoxime dose-dependently delayed CPT-induced cell death. Both compounds acted downstream of p53 activation preventing cytochrome c release and caspases activation. When caspase activation was blocked, both olesoxime and BDNF provided additional neuroprotective effect, potentially through the prevention of apoptosis-inducing factor release from mitochondria. While BDNF activates both the PI3K/Akt and the ERK pathway, olesoxime induced only a late activation of the ERK pathways, which did not seem to play a major role in its neuroprotection against CPT. Rather, our results favour preserved mitochondrial membrane integrity by olesoxime. Conclusions and Implications Albeit different, olesoxime and BDNF mechanisms for neuroprotection converge to preserve mitochondrial function. These findings emphasize the importance of targeting the mitochondria in the process of neurodegeneration. Importantly olesoxime, by mimicking neurotrophin pro-survival activities without impacting PI3K/Akt and ERK signalling, may have greater therapeutic potential in many diseases where neurotrophins were considered as a therapeutic solution. PMID:23278424

  7. CPT Word Processing Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slaymaker, Josephine; Eakman, Donna

    A project to develop a student word processing manual was developed by using input from: (1) information specialists, employees, and educators; and (2) students using the manual. These instructional materials provide workbook assignments and reading for an individualized unit on CPT word processing to be used by 30 to 40 high school students per…

  8. Camptothecin Attenuates Cytochrome P450 3A4 Induction by Blocking the Activation of Human Pregnane X ReceptorS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yakun; Tang, Yong; Robbins, Gregory T.

    2010-01-01

    Differential regulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) is a common cause of adverse drug effects in cancer therapy. Due to the extremely important role of cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) in drug metabolism and the dominant regulation of human pregnane X receptor (hPXR) on CYP3A4, finding inhibitors for hPXR could provide a unique tool to control drug efficacies in cancer therapy. Camptothecin (CPT) was demonstrated as a novel and potent inhibitor (IC50 = 0.58 μM) of an hPXR-mediated transcriptional regulation on CYP3A4 in this study. In contrast, one of its analogs, irinotecan (CPT-11), was found to be an hPXR agonist in the same tests. CPT disrupted the interaction of hPXR with steroid receptor coactivator-1 but had effects on neither the competition of ligand binding nor the formation of the hPXR and retinoid X receptor α heterodimer, nor the interaction between the regulatory complex and DNA-responsive elements. CPT treatment resulted in delayed metabolism of nifedipine in human hepatocytes treated with rifampicin, suggesting a potential prevention of drug-drug interactions between CYP3A4 inducers and CYP3A4-metabolized drugs. Because CPT is the leading compound of topoisomerase I inhibitors, which comprise a quickly developing class of anticancer agents, the findings indicate the potential of a new class of compounds to modify hPXR activity as agonists/inhibitors and are important in the development of CPT analogs. PMID:20504912

  9. CPT violation implies violation of Lorentz invariance.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, O W

    2002-12-02

    A interacting theory that violates CPT invariance necessarily violates Lorentz invariance. On the other hand, CPT invariance is not sufficient for out-of-cone Lorentz invariance. Theories that violate CPT by having different particle and antiparticle masses must be nonlocal.

  10. Isoeugenol is a selective potentiator of camptothecin cytotoxicity in vertebrate cells lacking TDP1

    PubMed Central

    Elsayed, Waheba; El-Shafie, Lamia; Hassan, Mohamed K.; Farag, Mohamed A.; El-Khamisy, Sherif F.

    2016-01-01

    Camptothecin (CPT), a topoisomerase I (TOP1) inhibitor, exhibits anti-tumor activity against a wide range of tumors. Redundancy of TOP1-mediated repair mechanisms is a major challenge facing the efficiency of TOP1-targetting therapies. This study aims to uncover new TOP1 targeting approaches utilising a selection of natural compounds in the presence or absence of tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase I (TDP1); a key TOP1-mediated protein-linked DNA break (PDB) repair enzyme. We identify, isoeugenol, a phenolic ether found in plant essential oils, as a potentiator of CPT cytotoxicity in Tdp1 deficient but not proficient cells. Consistent with our cellular data, isoeugenol did not inhibit Tdp1 enzymatic activity in vitro nor it sensitized cells to the PARP1 inhibitor olaparib. However, biochemical analyses suggest that isoeugenol inhibits TDP2 catalytic activity; a pathway that can compensate for the absence of TDP1. Consistent with this, isoeugenol exacerbated etoposide-induced cytotoxicity, which generates TOP2-mediated PDBs for which TDP2 is required for processing. Together, these findings identify isoeugenol as a potential lead compound for developing TDP2 inhibitors and encourage structure-activity relationship studies to shed more light on its utility in drug discovery programs. PMID:27220325

  11. Isoeugenol is a selective potentiator of camptothecin cytotoxicity in vertebrate cells lacking TDP1.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, Waheba; El-Shafie, Lamia; Hassan, Mohamed K; Farag, Mohamed A; El-Khamisy, Sherif F

    2016-05-25

    Camptothecin (CPT), a topoisomerase I (TOP1) inhibitor, exhibits anti-tumor activity against a wide range of tumors. Redundancy of TOP1-mediated repair mechanisms is a major challenge facing the efficiency of TOP1-targetting therapies. This study aims to uncover new TOP1 targeting approaches utilising a selection of natural compounds in the presence or absence of tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase I (TDP1); a key TOP1-mediated protein-linked DNA break (PDB) repair enzyme. We identify, isoeugenol, a phenolic ether found in plant essential oils, as a potentiator of CPT cytotoxicity in Tdp1 deficient but not proficient cells. Consistent with our cellular data, isoeugenol did not inhibit Tdp1 enzymatic activity in vitro nor it sensitized cells to the PARP1 inhibitor olaparib. However, biochemical analyses suggest that isoeugenol inhibits TDP2 catalytic activity; a pathway that can compensate for the absence of TDP1. Consistent with this, isoeugenol exacerbated etoposide-induced cytotoxicity, which generates TOP2-mediated PDBs for which TDP2 is required for processing. Together, these findings identify isoeugenol as a potential lead compound for developing TDP2 inhibitors and encourage structure-activity relationship studies to shed more light on its utility in drug discovery programs.

  12. N+CPT clock resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Crescimanno, M.; Hohensee, M.

    2008-12-15

    In a typical compact atomic time standard a current modulated semiconductor laser is used to create the optical fields that interrogate the atomic hyperfine transition. A pair of optical sidebands created by modulating the diode laser become the coherent population trapping (CPT) fields. At the same time, other pairs of optical sidebands may contribute to other multiphoton resonances, such as three-photon N-resonance [Phys. Rev. A 65, 043817 (2002)]. We analyze the resulting joint CPT and N-resonance (hereafter N+CPT) analytically and numerically. Analytically we solve a four-level quantum optics model for this joint resonance and perturbatively include the leading ac Stark effects from the five largest optical fields in the laser's modulation comb. Numerically we use a truncated Floquet solving routine that first symbolically develops the optical Bloch equations to a prescribed order of perturbation theory before evaluating. This numerical approach has, as input, the complete physical details of the first two excited-state manifolds of {sup 87}Rb. We test these theoretical approaches with experiments by characterizing the optimal clock operating regimes.

  13. Near-Infrared Light Triggered ROS-activated Theranostic Platform based on Ce6-CPT-UCNPs for Simultaneous Fluorescence Imaging and Chemo-Photodynamic Combined Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Caixia; Zhang, Chunlei; Alfranca, Gabriel; Yang, Yao; Jiang, Xinquan; Yang, Yuming; Pan, Fei; de la Fuente, Jesús M.; Cui, Daxiang

    2016-01-01

    Many drug controlled release methods have been integrated in multifunctional nanoparticles, such as pH-, redox-, temperature-, enzyme-, and light-responsive release. However, few report is associated with the ROS responsive drug controlled release. Herein, a thioketal linker-based ROS responsive drug (camptothecin conjugated with thioketal linker, abbreviated as TL-CPT) was prepared and the thioketal linker could be cleaved by ROS(reactive oxygen species). To achieve cancer simultaneous optical imaging, photodynamic therapy and chemotherapy, the photosensitizer Chlorin e6(Ce6), TL-CPT and carboxyl-mPEG were loaded on the upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs), which were named as Ce6-CPT-UCNPs. Under 980 nm laser irradiation, Ce6-CPT-UCNPs emitted a narrow emission band at 645-675 nm which was overlapped with Ce6 absorption peak. Ce6 absorbed the light to produce ROS, which was used for photodynamic therapy and to cleave the thioketal linker in Ce6-CPT-UCNPs to release camptothecin for chemotherapy. Meanwhile, Ce6 absorbed the light, was used for near-infrared fluorescence imaging. The in vivo biodistribution studies showed that the prepared nanoparticles had high orthotopic lung cancer targeting efficiency. The in vivo therapeutic results demonstrated that NCI-H460 lung cancers could be completely eliminated by combining chemo- and photodynamic therapy under 980 nm laser irradiation. The prepared multifunctional Ce6-CPT-UCNPs have great potential in applications such as cancer targeted fluorescent imaging, simultaneous ROS activated chemo- and photodynamic therapy in near future. PMID:26941840

  14. Near-Infrared Light Triggered ROS-activated Theranostic Platform based on Ce6-CPT-UCNPs for Simultaneous Fluorescence Imaging and Chemo-Photodynamic Combined Therapy.

    PubMed

    Yue, Caixia; Zhang, Chunlei; Alfranca, Gabriel; Yang, Yao; Jiang, Xinquan; Yang, Yuming; Pan, Fei; de la Fuente, Jesús M; Cui, Daxiang

    2016-01-01

    Many drug controlled release methods have been integrated in multifunctional nanoparticles, such as pH-, redox-, temperature-, enzyme-, and light-responsive release. However, few report is associated with the ROS responsive drug controlled release. Herein, a thioketal linker-based ROS responsive drug (camptothecin conjugated with thioketal linker, abbreviated as TL-CPT) was prepared and the thioketal linker could be cleaved by ROS(reactive oxygen species). To achieve cancer simultaneous optical imaging, photodynamic therapy and chemotherapy, the photosensitizer Chlorin e6(Ce6), TL-CPT and carboxyl-mPEG were loaded on the upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs), which were named as Ce6-CPT-UCNPs. Under 980 nm laser irradiation, Ce6-CPT-UCNPs emitted a narrow emission band at 645-675 nm which was overlapped with Ce6 absorption peak. Ce6 absorbed the light to produce ROS, which was used for photodynamic therapy and to cleave the thioketal linker in Ce6-CPT-UCNPs to release camptothecin for chemotherapy. Meanwhile, Ce6 absorbed the light, was used for near-infrared fluorescence imaging. The in vivo biodistribution studies showed that the prepared nanoparticles had high orthotopic lung cancer targeting efficiency. The in vivo therapeutic results demonstrated that NCI-H460 lung cancers could be completely eliminated by combining chemo- and photodynamic therapy under 980 nm laser irradiation. The prepared multifunctional Ce6-CPT-UCNPs have great potential in applications such as cancer targeted fluorescent imaging, simultaneous ROS activated chemo- and photodynamic therapy in near future.

  15. Decreased cyclin B1 expression contributes to G2 delay in human brain tumor cells after treatment with camptothecin.

    PubMed Central

    Janss, A. J.; Maity, A.; Tang, C. B.; Muschel, R. J.; McKenna, W. G.; Sutton, L.; Phillips, P. C.

    2001-01-01

    DNA damage produces delayed mitosis (G2/M delay) in proliferating cells, and shortening the delay sensitizes human malignant glioma and medulloblastoma cells to cytotoxic chemotherapy. Although activation of the cyclin-dependent kinase CDC2 mediates G2/M transition in all tumor cells studied to date, regulation of CDC2 varies between tumor types. Persistent hyperphosphorylation of kinase and reduced cyclin expression have been implicated as mediators of treatment-induced G2 delay in different tumor models. To evaluate regulation of G2/M transition in human brain tumors, we studied the expression and/or activity of CDC2 kinase and cyclins A and B1 in U-251 MG and DAOY medulloblastoma cells after their treatment with camptothecin (CPT). Synchronized cells were treated during S phase, then harvested at predetermined intervals for evaluation of cell cycle kinetics, kinase activity mRNA, and protein expression. CPT produced G2 delay associated with decreased CDC2 kinase activity and cyclin B1 expression. Kinase activity was associated with CDC2 bound to cyclin B1, not cyclin A, in both cell lines. Cyclin A mRNA and protein expression were reduced after CPT treatment; however, decreased protein expression was short lived and moderate in the glioma and primitive neuroectodermal tumor/medulloblastoma cells, respectively. We conclude that G2 delay is a common response of brain tumor cells to chemotherapy with topoisomerase I inhibitors and that a mechanism of this delay may be reduced expression of cyclin B1. PMID:11305412

  16. Synthesis and Self-Assembly of a Mikto-Arm Star Dual Drug Amphiphile Containing both Paclitaxel and Camptothecin

    PubMed Central

    Cheetham, A.G.; Zhang, P.; Lin, Y.-A.; Lin, R.; Cui, H.

    2014-01-01

    Self-assembly of anticancer therapeutics into discrete nanostructures provides an innovative way to develop a self-delivering nanomedicine with a high, quantitative drug loading. We report here the synthesis and assembly of a mikto-arm star dual drug amphiphile (DA) containing both a bulky paclitaxel (PTX) and a planar camptothecin (CPT). The two anti-cancer drugs of interest were stochastically conjugated to a β-sheet forming peptide (Sup35) and under physiologically-relevant conditions the dual DA could spontaneously associate into supramolecular filaments with a fixed 41% total drug loading (29% PTX and 12% CPT). Transmission electron microscopy imaging and circular dichroism spectroscopy studies reveal that the bulkiness of the PTX, as well as the π-π interaction preference between the CPT units, has a significant impact on the assembly kinetics, molecular level packing, and nanostructure morphology and stability. We found that the DA containing two PTX units assembled into non-filamentous micelle-like structures, in contrast to the filamentous structures formed by the hetero dual DA and the DA containing two CPTs. The hetero dual DA was found to effectively release the two anticancer agents, exhibiting superior cytotoxicity against PTX-resistant cervical cancer cells. The presented work offers a potential method to generate well-defined entwined filamentous nanostructures and provides the basis for a future combination therapy platform. PMID:25667746

  17. Neutrino Experiments: Hierarchy, CP, CPT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Manmohan; Randhawa, Monika; Singh, Mandip

    We present an overview of our recent investigations regarding the prospects of ongoing neutrino experiments as well as future experiments in determining few of the most important unknowns in the field of neutrino physics, specifically the neutrino mass ordering and leptonic CP-violation phase. The effect of matter oscillations on the neutrino oscillation probabilities has been exploited in resolving the degeneracy between the neutrino mass ordering and the CP violation phase in the leptonic sector. Further, we estimate the extent of extrinsic CP and CPT violation in the experiments with superbeams as well as neutrino factories.

  18. Correlation between the sensitivity of tumors to treatment with CZ48 and local concentrations of the active metabolite CPT within the tumors

    PubMed Central

    LIU, XING; CAO, ZHISONG; MENDOZA, JOHN; VARDEMAN, DANA; GIOVANELLA, BEPPINO

    2013-01-01

    Crystalline camptothecin-20-O-propionate hydrate (CZ48) is an esterification product from the reaction of natural camptothecin with propionic anhydride. CZ48 has been tested against 29 human tumor lines grown in nude mice as xenografts. Of the tested tumor lines, 28 were found to be responsive to CZ48, by regression or significant inhibition. The total response rate was 97%. However, the effective dose required to achieve the positive response varied from 100 to 2000 mg/kg/day depending on the tumor type. Thus, the sensitivity of tumors to CZ48 treatment varied from tumor to tumor. The most sensitive CLO-breast carcinoma achieved regression when treated with 100 mg/kg/day, while PC3-prostate carcinoma required as high as 1000 mg/kg/day to achieve a definitive response. To determine the reason for these differences in sensitivities among the tumors, we treated 9 human xenografts grown in nude mice with 1000 mg/kg/day CZ48 until saturation and measured the local concentrations of the parental CZ48 as well as the corresponding metabolite camptothecin (CPT) in the tumors with the established high-performance liquid chromatography procedure. Results showed that the sensitivities of these tumors to CZ48 treatment were not affected by local concentrations of the active metabolite CPT in the tumors, but instead by the types of tumors. PMID:24648919

  19. Effects of antidepressants on DSP4/CPT-induced DNA damage response in neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Hilton, Benjamin A.; Cui, Kui; Zhu, Meng-Yang

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage is a form of cell stress and injury. Increased systemic DNA damage is related to the pathogenic development of neurodegenerative diseases. Depression occurs in a relatively high percentage of patients suffering from degenerative diseases, for whom antidepressants are often used to relieve depressive symptoms. However, few studies have attempted to elucidate why different groups of antidepressants have similar effects on relieving symptoms of depression. Previously, we demonstrated that neurotoxins N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP4)- and camptothecin (CPT)-induced the DNA damage response in SH-SY5Y cells, and DSP4 caused cell cycle arrest which was predominately in the S-phase. The present study shows that CPT treatment also resulted in similar cell cycle arrest. Some classic antidepressants could reduce the DNA damage response induced by DSP4 or CPT in SH-SY5Y cells. Cell viability examination demonstrated that both DSP4 and CPT caused cell death, which was prevented by spontaneous administration of some tested antidepressants. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that a majority of the tested antidepressants protect cells from being arrested in S-phase. These results suggest that blocking the DNA damage response may be an important pharmacologic characteristic of antidepressants. Exploring the underlying mechanisms may allow for advances in the effort to improve therapeutic strategies for depression appearing in degenerative and psychiatric diseases. PMID:26038195

  20. Camptothecin-7-yl-methanthiole: semisynthesis and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Christodoulou, Michael S; Zunino, Franco; Zuco, Valentina; Borrelli, Stella; Comi, Daniela; Fontana, Gabriele; Martinelli, Marisa; Lorens, James B; Evensen, Lasse; Sironi, Maurizio; Pieraccini, Stefano; Dalla Via, Lisa; Gia, Ornella Maria; Passarella, Daniele

    2012-12-01

    The introduction of a methylenthiol group at position 7 of camptothecin was carried out in four steps. This preparation also yielded the corresponding disulfide, which behaves as a prodrug due to its reactivity with glutathione. Assessment of their antiproliferative activities, investigations of their mechanism of action, and molecular modeling analysis indicated that the 7-modified camptothecin derivatives described herein maintain the biological activity and drug-target interactions of the parent compound.

  1. Camptothecin enhances the frequency of oligonucleotide-directed gene repair in mammalian cells by inducing DNA damage and activating homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Luciana; Kmiec, Eric B

    2004-01-01

    Camptothecin (CPT) is an anticancer drug that promotes DNA breakage at replication forks and the formation of lesions that activate the processes of homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous end joining. We have taken advantage of the CPT-induced damage response by coupling it to gene repair directed by synthetic oligonucleotides, a process in which a mutant base pair is converted into a wild-type one. Here, we show that pretreating DLD-1 cells with CPT leads to a significant stimulation in the frequency of correction of an integrated mutant enhanced green fluorescent protein gene. The stimulation is dose-dependent and coincident with the formation of double-strand DNA breaks. Caffeine, but not vanillin, blocks the enhancement of gene repair suggesting that, in this system, HR is the pathway most responsible for elevating the frequency of correction. The involvement of HR is further proven by studies in which wortmannin was seen to inhibit gene repair at high concentrations but not at lower levels that are known to inhibit DNA-PK activity. Taken together, our results suggest that DNA damage induced by CPT activates a cellular response that stimulates gene repair in mammalian cells.

  2. Comparative molecular field analysis and molecular modeling studies of 20-(S)- camptothecin analogs as inhibitors of DNA topoisomerase I and anticancer/antitumor agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrigan, Sean W.; Fox, Peter C.; Wall, Monroe E.; Wani, Mansukh C.; Bowen, J. Phillip

    1997-01-01

    Conformational studies and comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) were undertakenfor a series of camptothecin (CPT) analogs to correlate topoisomerase I inhibition with thesteric and electrostatic properties of 32 known compounds. The resulting CoMFA modelshave been used to make predictions on novel CPT derivatives. Using the newly derived MM3parameters, a molecular database of the 32 CPT analogs was created. Various point atomiccharges were generated and assigned to the MM3 minimized structures, which were used inpartial least-squares analyses. Overall, CoMFA models with the greatest predictive validitywere obtained when both the R- and S-isomers were included in the data set, andsemiempirical charges were calculated for MM3 minimized low-energy lactone structures. Across-validated R2 of 0.758 and a non-cross-validated R2 of 0.916 were obtained for MM3minimized structures with PM3 ESP charges for the 32 CPT analogs. The derived QSARequations were used to assign topoisomerase I inhibition values for compounds in this studyand compounds not included in the original data set. Prior to its appearance in the literature,an IC50 of 103 nM was predicted for the 10,11-oxazole derivative. This CoMFA predictedvalue compared favorably with the recently reported value of 150 nM. The CoMFA modelwas also evaluated by predicting the activities of recently reported 11-aza CPT and trionederivatives. The predicted activity (IC50 = 249 nM) for 11-aza CPT compared well with thereported value of 383 nM.

  3. Testing CPT Invariance with Antiprotonic Helium Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, Dezso

    2008-08-08

    The structure of matter is related to symmetries at every level of study. CPT symmetry is one of the most important laws of field theory: it states the invariance of physical properties when one simultaneously changes the signs of the charge and of the spatial and time coordinates of free elementary particles. Although in general opinion CPT symmetry is not violated in Nature, there are theoretical attempts to develop CPT-violating models. The Antiproton Decelerator at CERN has been built to test CPT invariance. The ASACUSA experiment compares the properties of particles and antiparticles by studying the antiprotonic helium atom via laser spectroscopy and measuring the mass, charge and magnetic moment of the antiproton as compared to those of the proton.

  4. MINOS and CPT-violating neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Barenboim, Gabriela; Lykken, Joseph D.

    2009-12-01

    We review the status of CPT violation in the neutrino sector. Apart from LSND, current data favors three flavors of light stable neutrinos and antineutrinos, with both halves of the spectrum having one smaller mass splitting and one larger mass splitting. Oscillation data for the smaller splitting are consistent with CPT. For the larger splitting, current data favor an antineutrino mass-squared splitting that is an order of magnitude larger than the corresponding neutrino splitting, with the corresponding mixing angle less than maximal. This CPT-violating spectrum is driven by recent results from MINOS, but is consistent with other experiments if we ignore LSND. We describe an analysis technique which, together with MINOS running optimized for muon antineutrinos, should be able to conclusively confirm the CPT-violating spectrum proposed here, with as little as 3 times the current data set. If confirmed, the CPT-violating neutrino mass-squared difference would be an order of magnitude less than the current most-stringent upper bound on CPT violation for quarks and charged leptons.

  5. Neutrinos as the messengers of CPT violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borissov, Liubomir Anguelov

    CPT violation has the potential to explain all three existing neutrino oscillation signals without enlarging the neutrino sector. CPT violation in the Dirac mass terms of the three neutrino flavors preserves Lorentz invariance, but generates in dependent masses for neutrinos and antineutrinos. This specific signature can be motivated by braneworld scenarios with extra dimensions, where neutrinos are the natural messengers for Standard Model physics of CPT violation in the bulk. A simple model of maximal CPT violation is sufficient to explain the exisiting neutrino data, while accommodating the recent results from the KamLAND experiment and making dramatic predictions for the ongoing MiniBooNE experiment. In addition, the model fits the existing SuperKamiokande data, at least as well as the standard atmospheric neutrino oscillation models. Another attractive feature of the presented model is that it provides a new promising mechanism for baryogenesis, which obviates two of the three Sakharov conditions necessary to generate the baryon asymmetry of the universe. CPT-violating scenarios can give new insights about the possible nature of neutrinos. Majorana neutrino masses are still allowed, but in general, there are no longer Majorana neutrinos in the conventional sense. However, CPT-violating models still have interesting consequences for neutrinoless double beta decay. Compared to the usual case, while the larger mass scale (from LSND) may appear, a greater degree of suppression can also occur.

  6. Fabrication and optimization of camptothecin loaded Eudragit S 100 nanoparticles by Taguchi L4 orthogonal array design

    PubMed Central

    Mahalingam, Manikandan; Krishnamoorthy, Kannan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The objective of this investigation was to design and optimize the experimental conditions for the fabrication of camptothecin (CPT) loaded Eudragit S 100. Nanoparticles, and to understand the effect of various process parameters on the average particles size, particle size uniformity and surface area of the prepared polymeric nanoparticles using Taguchi design. Materials and Methods: CPT loaded Eudragit S 100 nanoparticles were prepared by nanoprecipitation method and characterized by particles size analyzer. Taguchi orthogonal array design was implemented to study the influence of seven independent variables on three dependent variables. Eight experimental trials involving seven independent variables at higher and lower levels were generated by design expert. Results: Factorial design result has shown that (a) except, β-cyclodextrin concentration all other parameters do not significantly influenced the average particle size (R1); (b) except, sonication duration and aqueous phase volume, all other process parameters significantly influence the particle size uniformity; (c) all the process parameters does not significantly influence the surface area. Conclusion: The R1, particle size uniformity and surface area of the prepared drug-loaded polymeric nanoparticles were found to be 120 nm, 0.237 and 55.7 m2 /g and the results were good correlated with the data generated by the Taguchi design method. PMID:26258056

  7. Anticancer Alkaloids from Trees: Development into Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Isah, Tasiu

    2016-01-01

    Trees have made an enormous phytochemical contribution in anticancer drugs' development more than any other life form. The contributions include alkaloids that are biosynthesized in various ways and yield. Lead alkaloids isolated from the trees are taxol and camptothecins that currently have annual sales in billion dollars. Other important alkaloids isolated from these life forms include rohitukine, harringtonine, acronycine, thalicarpine, usambarensine, ellipticine, and matrines. Studies on their mechanism of action and target on the DNA and protein of cancerous cells aided the development of potent hemisynthesized congeners. The molecules and their congeners passed/are passing a long period of historical development before approved as antineoplastic drugs for cancer chemotherapy. Some of them did not find the application as anticancer drugs due to ineffectiveness in clinical trials; others are generating research interest in the antineoplastic activity at the present and have reached clinical trial stages. Potentials in antineoplastic molecules from trees are high and are hoped to be commensurate with cancer types afflicting human society in the future. PMID:28082790

  8. CPT violation and particle-antiparticle asymmetry in cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgov, A. D.

    2010-04-15

    General features of generation of the cosmological charge asymmetry in CPT noninvariant world are discussed. If the effects of CPT violationmanifest themselves only inmass differences of particles and antiparticles, the baryon asymmetry of the Universe hardly can be explained solely by breaking of CPT invariance. However, CPT noninvariant theories may lead to a new effect of distorting the usual equilibrium distributions. If this takes place, CPT violation may explain the baryon asymmetry of the Universe.

  9. Distinct CPT-induced deaths in lung cancer cells caused by clathrin-mediated internalization of CP micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu-Sheng; Cheng, Ru-You; Lo, Yu-Lun; Hsu, Chin; Chen, Su-Hwei; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Wang, Li-Fang

    2016-02-01

    We previously synthesized a chondroitin sulfate-graft-poly(ε-caprolactone) copolymer (H-CP) with a high content of poly(ε-caprolactone) (18.7 mol%), which self-assembled in water into a rod-like micelle to encapsulate hydrophobic camptothecin (CPT) in the core (micelle/CPT) for tumor-targeted drug delivery. As a result of the recognition of the micelle by CD44, the micelle/CPT entered CRL-5802 cells efficiently and released CPT efficaciously, resulting in higher tumor suppression than commercial CPT-11. In this study, H1299 cells were found to have a higher CD44 expression than CRL-5802 cells. However, the lower CD44-expressing CRL-5802 cells had a higher percentage of cell death and higher cellular uptake of the micelle/CPT than the higher CD44-expressing H1299 cells. Examination of the internalization pathway of the micelle/CPT in the presence of different endocytic chemical inhibitors showed that the CRL-5802 cells involved clathrin-mediated endocytosis, which was not found in the H1299 cells. Analysis of the cell cycle of the two cell lines exposed to the micelle/CPT revealed that the CRL-5802 cells arrested mainly in the S phase and the H1299 cells arrested mainly in the G2-M phase. A consistent result was also found in the evaluation of γ-H2AX expression, which was about three-fold higher in the CRL-5802 cells than in the H1299 cells. A near-infrared dye, IR780, was encapsulated into the micelle to observe the in vivo biodistribution of the micelle/IR780 in tumor-bearing mice. The CRL-5802 tumor showed a higher fluorescence intensity than the H1299 tumor at any tracing time after 1 h. Thus we tentatively concluded that CRL-5802 cells utilized the clathrin-mediated internalization pathway and arrested in the S phase on exposure to the micelle/CPT; all are possible reasons for the better therapeutic outcome in CRL-5802 cells than in H1299 cells.We previously synthesized a chondroitin sulfate-graft-poly(ε-caprolactone) copolymer (H-CP) with a high content of

  10. 15-Deoxy-{Delta}{sup 12,14}-prostaglandin J{sub 2} enhanced the anti-tumor activity of camptothecin against renal cell carcinoma independently of topoisomerase-II and PPAR{gamma} pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Yasuhiro; Fujita, Megumi; Koma, Hiromi; Yamamori, Motohiro; Nakamura, Tsutomu; Okamura, Noboru; Yagami, Tatsurou

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} A topoisomerase-I inhibitor, camptothecin, exhibited synergistically toxicity with 15d-PGJ{sub 2}. {yields} The combination of 15d-PGJ{sub 2} and a topoisomerase-II inhibitor, doxorubicine, did not cause synergistic cell growth inhibition. {yields} A PPAR{gamma} antagonist did not prevent Caki-2 from undergoing 15d-PGJ{sub 2}-induced cytotoxicity. {yields} The treatment of camptothecin combined with 15d-PGJ{sub 2} activated caspase-3 more than the separate treatment. -- Abstract: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is chemoresistant cancer. Although several clinical trials were conducted to explore effective medications, the chemoresistance of RCC has not yet been conquered. An endogenous ligand for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}), 15-deoxy-{Delta}{sup 12,14}-prostaglandin J{sub 2} (15d-PGJ{sub 2}), induces apoptosis in RCC. Here, we examined synergistic effects of several carcinostatics on the anti-tumor activity of 15d-PGJ{sub 2} in Caki-2 cell line by MTT assay. A topoisomerase-I inhibitor, camptothecin (CPT), exhibited synergistically toxicity with 15d-PGJ{sub 2}, but neither 5-fluorouracil nor cisplatin did. The combination of 15d-PGJ{sub 2} and a topoisomerase-II inhibitor, doxorubicine, did not cause synergistic cell growth inhibition. The synergistic effect of topoisomerase-I and II inhibitors was not also detected. A PPAR{gamma} antagonist, GW9662, did not prevent Caki-2 from undergoing 15d-PGJ{sub 2}-induced cytotoxicity. The treatment of CPT combined with 15d-PGJ{sub 2} activated caspase-3 more than the separate treatment. These results suggest that 15d-PGJ{sub 2} exhibited the anti-tumor activity synergistically with CPT independent of topoisomerase-II and PPAR{gamma}.

  11. Controlled release camptothecin tablets based on pluronic and poly(acrylic acid) copolymer. Effect of fabrication technique on drug stability, tablet structure, and release mode.

    PubMed

    Bromberg, Lev; Hatton, T Alan; Barreiro-Iglesias, Rafael; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen; Concheiro, Angel

    2007-06-01

    Poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(propylene oxide)-b-(polyethylene oxide)-g-poly(acrylic acid), a graft-comb copolymer of Pluronic 127 and poly(acrylic acid) (Pluronic-PAA), was explored as an excipient for tablet dosage form of camptothecin (CPT). The tablets were prepared by either direct compression of the drug-polymer physical blend, suspension in ethanol followed by evaporation, or compression after kneading and characterized with respect to their physical structures, drug stability, and release behavior. Porosity and water uptake rate were strongly dependent on the fabrication procedure, ranking in the order: direct compression of physical blend > compression after suspension/evaporation in ethanol > compression after kneading. Tablets prepared by compression of physical blends swelled in water with a rapid surface gel layer formation that impeded swelling and disintegration of the tablets core. These tablets were able to sustain the CPT release for a period of time longer than those observed with the tablets made by either suspension/evaporation or kneading, which disintegrated within a few minutes. Despite the tablet disintegration, the CPT release was impeded for at least 6 hr, which was attributed to the ability of the Pluronic-PAA copolymers to form micellar aggregates at the hydrated surface of the particles. Physical mixing did not alter the fraction of CPT being in the pharmaceutically active lactone form, whilst the preparation of the tablets by the other two methods caused a significant reduction in the lactone form content. Tablets prepared from the physical blends demonstrated CPT release rates increasing with the pH due to the PAA ionization leading to the increase in the rate and extent of the tablet swelling. The results obtained demonstrate the potential of the Pluronic-PAA copolymers for the oral administration of chemotherapeutic agents.

  12. Alkaloids in Marine Algae

    PubMed Central

    Güven, Kasım Cemal; Percot, Aline; Sezik, Ekrem

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the alkaloids found in green, brown and red marine algae. Algal chemistry has interested many researchers in order to develop new drugs, as algae include compounds with functional groups which are characteristic from this particular source. Among these compounds, alkaloids present special interest because of their pharmacological activities. Alkaloid chemistry has been widely studied in terrestrial plants, but the number of studies in algae is insignificant. In this review, a detailed account of macro algae alkaloids with their structure and pharmacological activities is presented. The alkaloids found in marine algae may be divided into three groups: 1. Phenylethylamine alkaloids, 2. Indole and halogenated indole alkaloids, 3. Other alkaloids. PMID:20390105

  13. Theoretical Studies of Lorentz and CPT Symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostelecky, V. Alan

    2005-01-01

    The fundamental symmetries studied here are Lorentz and CPT invariance, which form a cornerstone of the relativistic quantum theories used in modern descriptions of nature. The results obtained during the reporting period focus on the idea, originally suggested by the P.I. and his group in the late 1980s, that observable CPT and Lorentz violation in nature might emerge from the qualitatively new physics expected to hold at the Planck scale. What follows is a summary of results obtained during the period of this grant.

  14. Maturational delay in ADHD: evidence from CPT

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Itai; Slobodin, Ortal; Aboud, Merav; Melamed, Julia; Cassuto, Hanoch

    2013-01-01

    While data from behavioral, neuropsychological, and brain studies suggested that Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is related to a developmental lag that reduces with age, other studies have proposed that ADHD represents a deviant brain function. The present study used a cross-sectional approach to examine whether ADHD children show a developmental delay in cognitive performance measured by continuous performance test (CPT). We thus, compared six age groups of ADHD children (N = 559) and their unaffected peers (N = 365), aged 6–11, in four parameters of MOXO-CPT performance: Attention, Timing, Hyperactivity and Impulsivity. Results have shown that despite improvement in CPT performance with age, ADHD children continued to demonstrate impaired performance as compared to controls. In most parameters, CPT performance of ADHD children matched that of 1–3 years younger normal controls, with a delay most prominent in older children. However, in the Hyperactivity parameter, ADHD children's performance resembled that of much younger healthy children, with almost no evidence for a developmental catch up. This study suggests that while some cognitive functions develop slower but normally, other functions (e.g., inhibitory control) show a different trajectory. PMID:24298243

  15. Effect of HM910, a novel camptothecin derivative, on the inhibition of multiple myeloma cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Ouyang, Yudan; Zhang, Xu; Zhou, Wenqiang; Wang, Fang; Huang, Zhencong; Wang, Xiaokun; Chen, Yifan; Zhang, Hui; Fu, Liwu

    2015-01-01

    Despite a variety of novel therapeutic agents, such as bortezomib, thalidomide and topotecan, multiple myeloma (MM) remains an incurable disease, thus the development of new chemotherapeutical agents is of high priority. We found HM910, a novel camptothecin (CPT) derivative, exhibited potent inhibition of MM cell growth in vitro and in xenografts of nude mice. Mechanistically, HM910 reduced the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) via an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), which eventually resulting in the release of cytochrome c and the activation of mitochondrial-dependent apoptotic pathway. On the other hand, HM910 significantly triggered cell cycle arrest in G1 phase via downregulating the expressions of cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) 4 and 6, resulting in down-regulation of cyclin D1. Therefore, HM910 maybe a promising candidate for treating MM patients and is currently in phase I clinical trial in China. PMID:26045982

  16. High expression of sphingosine kinase 1 and S1P receptors in chemotherapy-resistant prostate cancer PC3 cells and their camptothecin-induced up-regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Akao, Yukihiro . E-mail: yakao@giib.or.jp; Banno, Yoshiko; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Hasegawa, Nobuko; Kim, Tack-Joong; Murate, Takashi; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Nozawa, Yoshinori

    2006-04-21

    Although most of pharmacological therapies for cancer utilize the apoptotic machinery of the cells, the available anti-cancer drugs are limited due to the ability of prostate cancer cells to escape from the anti-cancer drug-induced apoptosis. A human prostate cancer cell line PC3 is resistant to camptothecin (CPT). To elucidate the mechanism of this resistance, we have examined the involvement of sphingosine kinase (SPHK) and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor in CPT-resistant PC3 and -sensitive LNCaP cells. PC3 cells exhibited higher activity accompanied with higher expression levels of protein and mRNA of SPHK1, and also elevated expression of S1P receptors, S1P{sub 1} and S1P{sub 3}, as compared with those of LNCaP cells. The knockdown of SPHK1 by small interfering RNA and inhibition of S1P receptor signaling by pertussis toxin in PC3 cells induced significant inhibition of cell growth, suggesting implication of SPHK1 and S1P receptors in cell proliferation in PC3 cells. Furthermore, the treatment of PC3 cells with CPT was found to induce up-regulation of the SPHK1/S1P signaling by induction of both SPHK1 enzyme and S1P{sub 1}/S1P{sub 3} receptors. These findings strongly suggest that high expression and up-regulation of SPHK1 and S1P receptors protect PC3 cells from the apoptosis induced by CPT.

  17. Novel E-ring camptothecin keto analogues (S38809 and S39625) are stable, potent, and selective topoisomerase I inhibitors without being substrates of drug efflux transporters.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Kazutaka; Dexheimer, Thomas S; Redon, Christophe; Sordet, Olivier; Agama, Keli; Lavielle, Gilbert; Pierré, Alain; Bates, Susan E; Pommier, Yves

    2007-12-01

    Camptothecin (CPT) analogues are powerful anticancer agents but are chemically unstable due to their alpha-hydroxylactone six-membered E-ring structure, which is essential for trapping topoisomerase I (Top1)-DNA cleavage complexes. To stabilize the E-ring, CPT keto analogues with a five-membered E-ring lacking the oxygen of the lactone ring (S38809 and S39625) have been synthesized. S39625 has been selected for advanced preclinical development based on its promising activity in tumor models. Here, we show that both keto analogues are active against purified Top1 and selective against Top1 in yeast and human cancer cells. The keto analogues show improved cytotoxicity toward colon, breast, and prostate cancer cells and leukemia cells compared with CPT. The drug-induced Top1-DNA cleavage complexes induced by the keto analogues show remarkable persistence both with purified Top1 and in cells following 1-h drug treatments. Moreover, we find that S39625 is not a substrate for either the ABCB1 (multidrug resistance-1/P-glycoprotein) or ABCG2 (mitoxantrone resistance/breast cancer resistance protein) drug efflux transporters, which sets S39625 apart from the clinically used CPT analogues topotecan or SN-38 (active metabolite of irinotecan). Finally, we show that nanomolar concentrations of S38809 or S39625 induce intense and persistent histone gamma-H2AX. The chemical stability of the keto analogues and the ability of S39625 to produce high levels of persistent Top1-DNA cleavage complex and its potent antiproliferative activity against human cancer cell lines make S39625 a promising new anticancer drug candidate. Histone gamma-H2AX could be used as a biomarker for the upcoming clinical trials of S39625.

  18. Relationship between DNA damage response, initiated by camptothecin or oxidative stress, and DNA replication, analyzed by quantitative 3D image analysis.

    PubMed

    Berniak, K; Rybak, P; Bernas, T; Zarębski, M; Biela, E; Zhao, H; Darzynkiewicz, Z; Dobrucki, J W

    2013-10-01

    A method of quantitative analysis of spatial (3D) relationship between discrete nuclear events detected by confocal microscopy is described and applied in analysis of a dependence between sites of DNA damage signaling (γH2AX foci) and DNA replication (EdU incorporation) in cells subjected to treatments with camptothecin (Cpt) or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Cpt induces γH2AX foci, likely reporting formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), almost exclusively at sites of DNA replication. This finding is consistent with the known mechanism of induction of DSBs by DNA topoisomerase I (topo1) inhibitors at the sites of collisions of the moving replication forks with topo1-DNA "cleavable complexes" stabilized by Cpt. Whereas an increased level of H2AX histone phosphorylation is seen in S-phase of cells subjected to H2O2, only a minor proportion of γH2AX foci coincide with DNA replication sites. Thus, the increased level of H2AX phosphorylation induced by H2O2 is not a direct consequence of formation of DNA lesions at the sites of moving DNA replication forks. These data suggest that oxidative stress induced by H2O2 and formation of the primary H2O2-induced lesions (8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine) inhibits replication globally and triggers formation of γH2AX at various distances from replication forks. Quantitative analysis of a frequency of DNA replication sites and γH2AX foci suggests also that stalling of replicating forks by Cpt leads to activation of new DNA replication origins. © 2013 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  19. Brain targeting effect of camptothecin-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles in rat after intravenous administration.

    PubMed

    Martins, Susana M; Sarmento, Bruno; Nunes, Cláudia; Lúcio, Marlene; Reis, Salette; Ferreira, Domingos C

    2013-11-01

    This study intended to investigate the ability of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) to deliver camptothecin into the brain parenchyma after crossing the blood-brain barrier. For that purpose, camptothecin-loaded SLN with mean size below 200 nm, low polydispersity index (<0.25), negative surface charge (-20 mV), and high camptothecin association efficiency (>94%) were produced. Synchrotron small and wide angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) analysis indicates that SLN maintain their physical stability in contact with DMPC membrane, whereas SLN change the lamellar structure of DMPC into a cubic phase, which is associated with efficient release of the incorporated drugs. Cytotoxicity studies against glioma and macrophage human cell lines revealed that camptothecin-loaded SLN induced cell death with the lowest maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values, revealing higher antitumour activity of camptothecin-loaded SLN against gliomas. Furthermore, in vivo biodistribution studies of intravenous camptothecin-loaded SLN performed in rats proved the positive role of SLN on the brain targeting since significant higher brain accumulation of camptothecin was observed, compared to non-encapsulated drug. Pharmacokinetic studies further demonstrated lower deposition of camptothecin in peripheral organs, when encapsulated into SLN, with consequent decrease in potential side toxicological effects. These results confirmed the potential of camptothecin-loaded SLN for antitumour brain treatments.

  20. [Alkaloids of Pausinystalia macroceras].

    PubMed

    Leboef, M; Cavé, A; Mangeney, P; Bouquet, A

    1981-04-01

    A study of the alkaloidal content of trunk-barks of Pausinystalia macroceras (K. Schum.) Pierre, Rubiaceae, resulted in the isolation of six alkaloids, five of which are indole alkaloids that belong to the yohimbane and heteroyohimbane groups; among them, yohimbine was found in major amount. Moreover, the levorotatory isomer of calycanthine, a quinoline dimeric tryptophane derived base, has been isolated for the first time. The phytochemical significance of calycanthine and related alkaloids is discussed.

  1. Exploiting plant alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Schläger, Sabrina; Dräger, Birgit

    2016-02-01

    Alkaloid-containing plants have been used for medicine since ancient times. Modern pharmaceuticals still rely on alkaloid extraction from plants, some of which grow slowly, are difficult to cultivate and produce low alkaloid yields. Microbial cells as alternative alkaloid production systems are emerging. Before industrial application of genetically engineered bacteria and yeasts, several steps have to be taken. Original alkaloid-forming enzymes have to be elucidated from plants. Their activity in the heterologous host cells, however, may be low. The exchange of individual plant enzymes for alternative catalysts with better performance and optimal fermentation parameters appear promising. The overall aim is enhancement and stabilization of alkaloid yields from microbes in order to replace the tedious extraction of low alkaloid concentrations from intact plants.

  2. Investigating CPT Conservation in Sterile Neutrino Fits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignarra, Christina

    2010-02-01

    We investigate compatibility between neutrino and antineutrino short-baseline oscillation experiments under a two-neutrino oscillation hypothesis due to a sterile neutrino at δm^2˜1 eV^2. We explore the preliminary MINOS antineutrino disappearance results as well as antineutrino oscillation results from LSND, MiniBooNE, KARMEN, Bugey, and Chooz, and neutrino oscillation results from NOMAD, MiniBooNE, CCFR84, and CDHS. We find that a combined fit of the antineutrino data yields a high chi-squared probability, while the global fit including neutrino and antineutrino data yields high incompatibility. CPT-violating fits within this scenario are also explored. )

  3. Quantum gravity, CPT symmetry and entangled states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavromatos, Nick E.

    2012-03-01

    In this talk I discuss the potential rôle of quantumgravity space-time foam on an induced intrinsic violation of CPT symmetry, resulting in (perturbatively weak) modifications of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) correlations in entangled particle states of neutral mesons. For specific models of foam, inspired from String theory, the modifications may be falsifiable at the current upgrade of the DAΦNE detector in Frascati NL. Advantages of neutral Kaons over other neutral mesons (e.g. B-mesons) for the possible detection of the phenomenon, are outlined.

  4. LSND, SN1987A, and CPT violation

    SciTech Connect

    Murayama, Hitoshi; Yanagida, T.

    2000-10-17

    We point out that neutrino events observed at Kamiokande andIMB from SN1987A disfavor the neutrino oscillation parameters preferredby the LSND experiment. For Delta m2>0 (the light side), theelectron neutrinos from the neutronization burst would be lost, while thefirst event at Kamiokande is quite likely to be due to an electronneutrino. For Delta m2<0 (the dark side), the average energy of thedominantly bar nu e events is already lower than the theoreticalexpectations, which would get aggravated by a complete conversion frombar nu mu to bar nu e. If taken seriously, the LSND data are disfavoredindependent of the existence of a sterile neutrino. A possible remedy isCPT violation, which allows different mass spectra for neutrinos andanti-neutrinos and hence can accommodate atmospheric, solar and LSND datawithout a sterile neutrino. If this is the case, Mini-BooNE must run inbar nu rather than the planned nu mode to test the LSND signal. Wespeculate on a possible origin of CPT violation.

  5. Camptothecin resistance in cancer: insights into the molecular mechanisms of a DNA-damaging drug.

    PubMed

    Beretta, G L; Gatti, L; Perego, P; Zaffaroni, N

    2013-01-01

    Poisoning of DNA topoisomerase I is the mechanism by which camptothecins interfere with tumor growth. Although the clinical use of camptothecins has had a significant impact on cancer therapy, de novo or acquired clinical resistance to these drugs is common. Clinical resistance to camptothecins is still a poorly understood phenomenon, likely involving pharmacological and tumor-related factors. Experimental models including yeast and mammalian cell cultures suggest three general mechanisms of camptothecin resistance: i) reduced cellular accumulation of drugs, ii) alteration in the structure/expression of topoisomerase I, and iii) alterations in the cellular response to camptothecin-DNA-ternary complex formation. Some lines of evidence have also suggested links between cellular camptothecin resistance, the existence of a subset of tumor-initiating cells and miRNA deregulation. In this regard, a better definition of the molecular events clarifying the regulation of tumorigenesis and gene expression might contribute to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms on the basis of camptothecin resistance of tumors and to identify new molecular tools for targeting cancer cells. The relevance of these mechanisms to clinical drug resistance has not yet been completely defined, but their evaluation in clinical specimens should help to define personalized treatments including camptothecins as single agents or in combination with other cytotoxic and target-specific anticancer agents. The present review focuses on the cellular/ molecular aspects involved in resistance of tumor cells to camptothecins, including the potential role of cancer stem cells and deregulated miRNAs, and on the approaches proposed for overcoming resistance.

  6. Amaryllidaceae and Sceletium alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhong

    2009-03-01

    Alkaloids from the plants of Amaryllidaceae family consists of an unique class of nitrogen-containing compounds showing diverse and significant biological activities, including anticancer and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activities. This review summarizes the research into the isolation, structure elucidation, biological activity, and chemical aspects of the Amaryllidaceae alkaloids over the last two years. In addition, structurally closely related Sceletium alkaloids are also discussed.

  7. McGee Ranch CPT investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Cassem, B.R.

    1993-06-15

    Applied Research Associated, Inc. (ARA), under contract to Argonne National Laboratory to perform work for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), conducted Peizo Cone Penetration (P-CPT) Tests as part of an investigation of the fine-textured soils at the McGee Ranch Site. The purpose of the investigation was to characterize a potential borrow area for fine-textured soil materials that would be used to construct multi-layer closure covers on the Hanford Site. As part of the investigation, WHC conducted non auger-drill borings on the site during September 1992. ARA`s objective was to characterize the soils at the McGee Ranch site using the cone penetrometer and compare the findings with the lithologic characterization obtained from geologic boring logs. This report documents ARA`s site investigation efforts, test techniques, and analysis of the data for field work conducted April 14 and 15, 1993.

  8. CPT Violation: What and where to look for

    SciTech Connect

    Mavromatos, Nick E.

    2005-10-26

    In this review I classify the possible ways of CPT violation, and I describe briefly their phenomenology, in both terrestrial and astrophysical experiments, including antimatter factories, neutral mesons and neutrinos, and discuss the various sensitivities. I also pay attention to disentangling genuine quantum-gravity induced CPT violation from 'fake' violation due to ordinary matter effects. A particularly interesting situation arises when the breaking of CPT invariance is through unitarity violations, in the sense of the matter theory being viewed as an effective field theory, entangled with decoherening quantum gravity 'environments'. In such a case the quantum mechanical CPT operator is ill defined due to another mathematical theorem, and one has novel effects associated with CPT Violating modifications of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen type correlations of entangled meson states in B and {phi} meson factories.

  9. Medicinally important secondary metabolites in recombinant microorganisms or plants: progress in alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Holger; Wink, Michael

    2009-12-01

    Plants produce a high diversity of natural products or secondary metabolites which are important for the communication of plants with other organisms. A prominent function is the protection against herbivores and/or microbial pathogens. Some natural products are also involved in defence against abiotic stress, e.g. UV-B exposure. Many of the secondary metabolites have interesting biological properties and quite a number are of medicinal importance. Because the production of the valuable natural products, such as the anticancer drugs paclitaxel, vinblastine or camptothecin in plants is a costly process, biotechnological alternatives to produce these alkaloids more economically become increasingly important. This review provides an overview of the state of art to produce alkaloids in recombinant microorganisms, such as bacteria or yeast. Some progress has been made in metabolic engineering usually employing a single recombinant alkaloid gene. More importantly, for benzylisoquinoline, monoterpene indole and diterpene alkaloids (taxanes) as well as some terpenoids and phenolics the proof of concept for production of complex alkaloids in recombinant Escherichia coli and yeast has already been achieved. In a long-term perspective, it will probably be possible to generate gene cassettes for complete pathways, which could then be used for production of valuable natural products in bioreactors or for metabolic engineering of crop plants. This will improve their resistance against herbivores and/or microbial pathogens.

  10. Alkaloids from Menispermum dauricum.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bing-Wu; Chen, Jian-Yong; Wang, Yan-Ping; Cheng, Kin-Fin; Li, Xiao-Yu; Qin, Guo-Wei

    2002-10-01

    The alkaloids, dechloroacutumidine and 1-epidechloroacutumine, together with three known alkaloids, acutumidine, acutumine, and dechloroacutumine, were isolated from the rhizomes of Menispermum dauricum and their structures established by spectral and chemical methods. The cytotoxicity of each compound against the growth of human cell lines was studied, and acutumine selectively inhibited T-cell growth.

  11. Two Faces of Alkaloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostál, Jirí

    2000-08-01

    Alkaloids can occur in two forms, denoted as ammonium salts and free bases. These forms differ substantially in their properties and in some cases in their structures. The article discusses and compares the salts and free bases of six well-known alkaloids: nicotine, morphine, cocaine, sanguinarine, allocryptopine, and magnoflorine. Relevance for the biological and medical uses of these compounds is emphasized.

  12. Sequence dependent modulating effect of camptothecin on the DNA-cleaving activity of the calf thymus type I topoisomerase.

    PubMed Central

    Gromova, I I; Buchman, V L; Abagyan, R A; Ulyanov, A V; Bronstein, I B

    1990-01-01

    High-resolution mapping of topol cleavages in the regions of human DNA including the oncogene c-Ha-ras and p53, has revealed three kinds of topol cleavage sites: cleavage sites not affected by camptothecin; cleavage sites reinforced only in the presence of camptothecin, and cleavage sites which weaken in the presence of camptothecin. Statistical analysis of sequences revealed certain nucleotide or dinucleotide preferences for three groups studied. The preferences in camptothecin-reduced sites predominate upstream from the cleavage point, whereas in camptothecin-induced sites the situation is reversed. The influence of camptothecin on cleavage sites induced by two molecular forms of topol has been also studied. Images PMID:2155407

  13. Brain Delivery of Drug and MRI Contrast Agent: Detection and Quantitative Determination of Brain Deposition of CPT-Glu Using LC-MS/MS and Gd-DTPA Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tabanor, Kayann; Lee, Phil; Kiptoo, Paul; Choi, In-Young; Sherry, Erica B.; Eagle, Cheyenne Sun; Williams, Todd D.; Siahaan, Teruna J.

    2015-01-01

    Successful treatment and diagnosis of neurological diseases depend on reliable delivery of molecules across the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which restricts penetration of pharmaceutical drugs and diagnostic agents into the brain. Thus, developing new non-invasive strategies to improve drug delivery across the BBB is critically needed. This study was aimed at evaluating the activity of HAV6 peptide (Ac-SHAVSS-NH2) in improving brain delivery of camptothecin-glutamate (CPT-Glu) conjugate and gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (Gd-DTPA) contrast agent in Sprague-Dawley rats. Brain delivery of both CPT-Glu and Gd-DTPA was evaluated in an in situ rat brain perfusion model in the presence and absence of HAV6 peptide (1.0 mM). Gd-DTPA (0.6 mmol/kg) was intravenously (i.v.) administered with and without HAV6 peptide (0.019 mmol/kg) in rats. The detection and quantification of CPT-Glu and Gd-DTPA in the brain were carried out by LC-MS/MS and quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), respectively. Rats perfused with CPT-Glu in combination with HAV6 had significantly higher deposition of drug in the brain compared to CPT-Glu alone. MRI results also showed that administration of Gd-DTPA in the presence of HAV6 peptide led to significant accumulation of Gd-DTPA in various regions of the brain in both the in situ rat brain perfusion and in vivo studies. All observations taken together indicate that HAV6 peptide can disrupt the BBB and enhance delivery of small molecules into the brain. PMID:26705088

  14. Expression of HSP27, HSP72 and MRP proteins in in vitro co-culture of colon tumour cell spheroids with normal cells after incubation with rhTGF- beta1 and/or CPT-11.

    PubMed

    Paduch, Roman; Jakubowicz-Gil, Joanna; Kandefer-Szerszen, Martyna

    2009-12-01

    We studied the expression of inducible heat shock protein (HSP27, HSP72) and multidrug-resistance protein (MRP) in co-cultures of human colon carcinoma cell spheroids obtained from different grades of tumour with normal human colon epithelium, myofibroblast and endothelial cell monolayers. We also measured the influence of recombinant human transforming growth factor beta1 (rhTGF-beta1) and camptothecin (CPT-11), added as single agents or in combination, on the levels of the HSPs, MRP, interleukin (IL)-6 and nitric oxide (NO). An immunoblotting analysis with densitometry showed that rhTGF-beta1 and/or CPT-11 increased HSP27, HSP72 and MRP expression in tumour cells and myofibroblasts, as well as in co-cultures compared with appropriate controls. By contrast, in colonic epithelium, inhibition of HSPs and MRP was comparable with that of the control. In endothelial cells, HSP72 was undetectable. Direct interaction of colon tumour spheroids with normal myofibroblasts caused a significant, tumour-grade dependent increase in IL-6 production. Production of IL-6 was significantly lowered by rhTGF-beta1 and/or CPT-11. Tumour cell spheroids cultivated alone produced larger amounts of NO than normal cells. In co-culture, the level of the radical decreased compared with the sum of NO produced by the monocultures of the two types of cells. rhTGF-beta1 and/or CPT-11 decreased NO production both in tumour and normal cell monocultures and their co-cultures. In conclusion, direct interactions between tumour and normal cells influence the expression of HSP27, HSP72 and MRP, and alter IL-6 and NO production. rhTGF-beta1 and/or CPT-11 may potentate resistance to chemotherapy by increasing HSP and MRP expression but, on the other hand, they may limit tumour cell spread by decreasing the level of some soluble mediators of inflammation (IL-6 and NO).

  15. Brain Delivery of Drug and MRI Contrast Agent: Detection and Quantitative Determination of Brain Deposition of CPT-Glu Using LC-MS/MS and Gd-DTPA Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Tabanor, Kayann; Lee, Phil; Kiptoo, Paul; Choi, In-Young; Sherry, Erica B; Eagle, Cheyenne Sun; Williams, Todd D; Siahaan, Teruna J

    2016-02-01

    Successful treatment and diagnosis of neurological diseases depend on reliable delivery of molecules across the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which restricts penetration of pharmaceutical drugs and diagnostic agents into the brain. Thus, developing new noninvasive strategies to improve drug delivery across the BBB is critically needed. This study was aimed at evaluating the activity of HAV6 peptide (Ac-SHAVSS-NH2) in improving brain delivery of camptothecin-glutamate (CPT-Glu) conjugate and gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (Gd-DTPA) contrast agent in Sprague-Dawley rats. Brain delivery of both CPT-Glu and Gd-DTPA was evaluated in an in situ rat brain perfusion model in the presence and absence of HAV6 peptide (1.0 mM). Gd-DTPA (0.6 mmol/kg) was intravenously (iv) administered with and without HAV6 peptide (0.019 mmol/kg) in rats. The detection and quantification of CPT-Glu and Gd-DTPA in the brain were carried out by LC-MS/MS and quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), respectively. Rats perfused with CPT-Glu in combination with HAV6 had significantly higher deposition of drug in the brain compared to CPT-Glu alone. MRI results also showed that administration of Gd-DTPA in the presence of HAV6 peptide led to significant accumulation of Gd-DTPA in various regions of the brain in both the in situ rat brain perfusion and in vivo studies. All observations taken together indicate that HAV6 peptide can disrupt the BBB and enhance delivery of small molecules into the brain.

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF A WIRELINE CPT SYSTEM FOR MULTIPLE TOOL USAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen P. Farrington; Martin L. Gildea; J. Christopher Bianchi

    1999-08-01

    The first phase of development of a wireline cone penetrometer system for multiple tool usage was completed under DOE award number DE-AR26-98FT40366. Cone penetrometer technology (CPT) has received widespread interest and is becoming more commonplace as a tool for environmental site characterization activities at several Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Although CPT already offers many benefits for site characterization, the wireline system can improve CPT technology by offering greater utility and increased cost savings. Currently the use of multiple CPT tools during a site characterization (i.e. piezometric cone, chemical sensors, core sampler, grouting tool) must be accomplished by withdrawing the entire penetrometer rod string to change tools. This results in multiple penetrations being required to collect the data and samples that may be required during characterization of a site, and to subsequently seal the resulting holes with grout. The wireline CPT system allows multiple CPT tools to be interchanged during a single penetration, without withdrawing the CPT rod string from the ground. The goal of the project is to develop and demonstrate a system by which various tools can be placed at the tip of the rod string depending on the type of information or sample desired. Under the base contract, an interchangeable piezocone and grouting tool was designed, fabricated, and evaluated. The results of the evaluation indicate that success criteria for the base contract were achieved. In addition, the wireline piezocone tool was validated against ASTM standard cones, the depth capability of the system was found to compare favorably with that of conventional CPT, and the reliability and survivability of the system were demonstrated.

  17. Crystal Structure of Rat Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase II (CPT-II)

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao,Y.; Jogl, G.; Esser, V.; Tong, L.

    2006-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT-II) has a crucial role in the {beta}-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids in mitochondria. We report here the crystal structure of rat CPT-II at 1.9 Angstroms resolution. The overall structure shares strong similarity to those of short- and medium-chain carnitine acyltransferases, although detailed structural differences in the active site region have a significant impact on the substrate selectivity of CPT-II. Three aliphatic chains, possibly from a detergent that is used for the crystallization, were found in the structure. Two of them are located in the carnitine and CoA binding sites, respectively. The third aliphatic chain may mimic the long-chain acyl group in the substrate of CPT-II. The binding site for this aliphatic chain does not exist in the short- and medium-chain carnitine acyltransferases, due to conformational differences among the enzymes. A unique insert in CPT-II is positioned on the surface of the enzyme, with a highly hydrophobic surface. It is likely that this surface patch mediates the association of CPT-II with the inner membrane of the mitochondria.

  18. Occurrence of halogenated alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Gribble, Gordon W

    2012-01-01

    Once considered to be isolation artifacts or chemical "mistakes" of nature, the number of naturally occurring organohalogen compounds has grown from a dozen in 1954 to >5000 today. Of these, at least 25% are halogenated alkaloids. This is not surprising since nitrogen-containing pyrroles, indoles, carbolines, tryptamines, tyrosines, and tyramines are excellent platforms for biohalogenation, particularly in the marine environment where both chloride and bromide are plentiful for biooxidation and subsequent incorporation into these electron-rich substrates. This review presents the occurrence of all halogenated alkaloids, with the exception of marine bromotyrosines where coverage begins where it left off in volume 61 of The Alkaloids. Whereas the biological activity of these extraordinary compounds is briefly cited for some examples, a future volume of The Alkaloids will present full coverage of this topic and will also include selected syntheses of halogenated alkaloids. Natural organohalogens of all types, especially marine and terrestrial halogenated alkaloids, comprise a rapidly expanding class of natural products, in many cases expressing powerful biological activity. This enormous proliferation has several origins: (1) a revitalization of natural product research in a search for new drugs, (2) improved compound characterization methods (multidimensional NMR, high-resolution mass spectrometry), (3) specific enzyme-based and other biological assays, (4) sophisticated collection methods (SCUBA and remote submersibles for deep ocean marine collections), (5) new separation and purification techniques (HPLC and countercurrent separation), (6) a greater appreciation of traditional folk medicine and ethobotany, and (7) marine bacteria and fungi as novel sources of natural products. Halogenated alkaloids are truly omnipresent in the environment. Indeed, one compound, Q1 (234), is ubiquitous in the marine food web and is found in the Inuit from their diet of whale

  19. Alkaloids from Esenbeckia pilocarpoides.

    PubMed

    Bevalot, F; Fournet, A; Moretti, C; Vaquette, J

    1984-12-01

    A preliminary screening showed the occurrence of alkaloids only in root bark and roots of ESENBECKIA PILOCARPOIDES H. B. K., (Rutaceae). Six alkaloids have been isolated and identified from root bark: one acridone, 1-hydroxy-3-methoxy- N-methyl-acridone; four furoquinolines, maculine, flindersiamine, kokusaginine, kokusagine; the sixth, isomaculine, a furo-4-quinolone, known as a synthetic product, has been isolated for the first time from a natural source.

  20. Marine Indole Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Netz, Natalie; Opatz, Till

    2015-01-01

    Marine indole alkaloids comprise a large and steadily growing group of secondary metabolites. Their diverse biological activities make many compounds of this class attractive starting points for pharmaceutical development. Several marine-derived indoles were found to possess cytotoxic, antineoplastic, antibacterial and antimicrobial activities, in addition to the action on human enzymes and receptors. The newly isolated indole alkaloids of marine origin since the last comprehensive review in 2003 are reported, and biological aspects will be discussed. PMID:26287214

  1. 10-Boronic acid substituted camptothecin as prodrug of SN-38.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Xie, Shao; Ma, Longjun; Chen, Yi; Lu, Wei

    2016-06-30

    Malignant tumor cells have been found to have high levels of reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), supporting the hypothesis that a prodrug could be activated by intracellular H2O2 and lead to a potential antitumor therapy. In this study, the 7-ethyl-10-boronic acid camptothecin (B1) was synthesized for the first time as prodrug of SN-38, by linking a cleavable aryl carbon-boron bond to the SN-38. Prodrug B1 selectively activated by H2O2, converted rapidly to the active form SN-38 under favorable oxidative conditions in cancer cells with elevated levels of H2O2. The cell survival assay showed that prodrug B1 was equally or more effective in inhibiting the growth of six different cancer cells, as compared to SN-38. Unexpectedly, prodrug B1 displayed even more potent Topo I inhibitory activity than SN-38, suggesting that it was not only a prodrug of SN-38 but also a typical Topo I inhibitor. Prodrug B1 also demonstrated a significant antitumor activity at 2.0 mg/kg in a xenograft model using human brain star glioblastoma cell lines U87MG.

  2. Anticancer Drug Camptothecin Test in 3D Hydrogel Networks with HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jun; Susan Sun, Xiuzhi; Yang, Zhilong; Cao, Shuai

    2017-01-01

    Development of a biomimetic 3D culture system for drug screening is necessary to fully understand the in vivo environment. Previously, a self-assembling peptide hydrogel has been reported; the hydrogel exhibited physiological properties superior to a 3D cell culture matrix. In this work, further research using H9e hydrogel with HeLa cells was carried out considering H9e hydrogel’s interaction with camptothecin, a hydrophobic drug. According to AFM images, a PGworks solution triggered H9e hydrogel fiber aggregation and forms a 3D matrix suitable for cell culture. Dynamic rheological studies showed that camptothecin was encapsulated within the hydrogel network concurrently with peptide self-assembly without permanently destroying the hydrogel’s architecture and remodeling ability. Fluorescence measurement indicated negligible interaction between the fluorophore part of camptothecin and the hydrogel, especially at concentration 0.25 and 0.5 wt%. Using a dialysis method, we found that H9e hydrogel could not significantly inhibit the diffusion of camptothecin encapsulated inside the hydrogel matrix. In the cell culture experiment, HeLa cells were simultaneously embedded in the H9e hydrogel with the initialization of hydrogelation. Most importantly, cell viability data after camptothecin treatment showed responses that were drug-dose dependent but unaffected by the H9e hydrogel concentration, indicating that the hydrogel did not inhibit the drug. PMID:28145436

  3. Design and optimization of 20-O-linked camptothecin glycoconjugates as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Lerchen, H G; Baumgarten, J; von dem Bruch, K; Lehmann, T E; Sperzel, M; Kempka, G; Fiebig, H H

    2001-11-22

    To improve the biological profile of 20(S)-camptothecin, a novel class of 20-O-linked camptothecin glycoconjugates has been designed for preferential cellular uptake into tumor cells by an active transport mechanism. Such conjugates have been optimized for enhanced solubility, stabilization of the camptothecin lactone ring, sufficient hydrolytic and proteolytic stability, and for an overall improvement in tumor selectivity. The constitution of the peptide spacer has a major impact on stability and biological activity of the conjugates both in vitro and in vivo. Glycoconjugates 17-22 with valine residues at the linkage position to camptothecin are sufficiently stable and show good antitumor activity in vitro against HT29 and other tumor cell lines. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry experiments indicate that glycoconjugates such as 19 are taken up into lysosomal compartments of the tumor cell line HT29 by an active transport mechanism. The steric configuration of the particular amino acid residues linked to the camptothecin moiety has a major impact on the in vivo activity of the corresponding glycoconjugates in the breast cancer xenograft MX-1 model. Inhibiting tumor growth by >96%, the glycoconjugates 19 and 21 show the best activity in this particular model and have been investigated more extensively. The glycoconjugate 19 compares favorably to topotecan 4 and glycoconjugate 21 with respect to toxicity against hematopoietic stem cells and hepatocytes. Based on its profile, 19 has been selected for clinical trials.

  4. Synthesis and Antitumor Properties of BQC-Glucuronide, a Camptothecin Prodrug for Selective Tumor Activation.

    PubMed

    Prijovich, Zeljko M; Burnouf, Pierre-Alain; Chou, Hua-Cheng; Huang, Ping-Ting; Chen, Kai-Chuan; Cheng, Tian-Lu; Leu, Yu-Lin; Roffler, Steve R

    2016-04-04

    Major limitations of camptothecin anticancer drugs (toxicity, nonselectivity, water insolubility, inactivation by human serum albumin) may be improved by creating glucuronide prodrugs that rely on beta-glucuronidase for their activation. We found that the camptothecin derivative 5,6-dihydro-4H-benzo[de]quinoline-camptothecin (BQC) displays greater cytotoxicity against cancer cells than the clinically used camptothecin derivatives SN-38 and topotecan even in the presence of human serum albumin. We synthesized the prodrug BQC-glucuronide (BQC-G), which was 4000 times more water soluble and 20-40 times less cytotoxic than BQC. Importantly, even in the presence of human serum albumin, BQC-G was efficiently hydrolyzed by beta-glucuronidase and produced greater cytotoxicity (IC50 = 13 nM) than camptothecin, 9-aminocamptothecin, SN-38, or topotecan (IC50 > 3000, 1370, 48, and 28 nM, respectively). BQC-G treatment of mice bearing human colon cancer xenografts with naturally or artificially elevated beta-glucuronidase activity produced significant antitumor activity, showing that BQC-G is a potent prodrug suitable for selective intratumoral drug activation.

  5. Enhanced camptothecin production by ethanol addition in the suspension culture of the endophyte, Fusarium solani.

    PubMed

    Venugopalan, Aarthi; Srivastava, Smita

    2015-01-01

    Ethanolic extract of a non-camptothecin producing plant, Catharanthus roseus when added in the suspension culture of the endophyte Fusarium solani known to produce camptothecin, resulted in enhanced production of camptothecin by 10.6-fold in comparison to that in control (2.8 μg/L). Interestingly, addition of pure ethanol (up to 5% v/v) in the suspension culture of F. solani resulted in maximum enhancement in camptothecin production (up to 15.5-fold) from that obtained in control. In the presence of ethanol, a reduced glucose uptake (by ∼ 40%) and simultaneous ethanol consumption (up to 9.43 g/L) was observed during the cultivation period (14 days). Also, the total NAD level and the protein content in the biomass increased by 3.7- and 1.9-fold, respectively, in comparison to that in control. The study indicates a dual role of ethanol, presumably as an elicitor and also as a carbon/energy source, leading to enhanced biomass and camptothecin production.

  6. Genomic profiling in CEPH cell lines distinguishes between the camptothecins and indenoisoquinolines.

    PubMed

    Watson, Venita Gresham; Hardison, Nicholas E; Harris, Tyndall; Motsinger-Reif, Alison; McLeod, Howard L

    2011-10-01

    We have attempted to use a familial genetics strategy to study mechanisms of topoisomerase 1 (Top1) inhibition. Investigations have steadily been chipping away at the pathways involved in cellular response following Top1 inhibition for more than 20 years. Our system-wide approach, which phenotypes a collection of genotyped human cell lines for sensitivity to compounds and interrogates all genes and molecular pathways simultaneously. Previously, we characterized the in vitro sensitivity of 15 families of Centre d'Etude Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) cell lines (n = 142) to 9 camptothecin analogues. Linkage analysis revealed a pattern of 7 quantitative trait loci (QTL) shared by all of the camptothecins. To identify which, if any, QTLs are related to the general mechanism of Top1 inhibition or should be considered camptothecin specific, we characterized the in vitro sensitivity of the same panel of CEPH cell lines to the indenisoquinolones, a structurally distinct class of Top1 inhibitors. Four QTLs on chromosomes 1, 5, 11, and 16 were shared by both the camptothecins and the indenoisoquinolines and are considered associated with the general mechanism of Top1 inhibition. The remaining 3 QTLs (chromosomes 6 and 20) are considered specific to camptothecin-induced cytotoxicity. Finally, 8 QTLs were identified, which were unique to the indenoisoquinolines.

  7. Brain delivery of camptothecin by means of solid lipid nanoparticles: formulation design, in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Martins, Susana; Tho, Ingunn; Reimold, Isolde; Fricker, Gert; Souto, Eliana; Ferreira, Domingos; Brandl, Martin

    2012-12-15

    For the purpose of brain delivery upon intravenous injection, formulations of camptothecin-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN), prepared by hot high pressure homogenisation, were designed. Incorporation of camptothecin in the hydrophobic and acidic environment of SLN matrix was chosen to stabilise the lactone ring, which is essential for its antitumour activity, and for avoiding premature loss of drug on the way to target camptothecin to the brain. A multivariate approach was used to assess the influence of the qualitative and quantitative composition on the physicochemical properties of camptothecin-loaded SLN in comparison to plain SLN. Mean particle sizes of ≤200 nm, homogenous size distributions and high encapsulation efficiencies (>90%) were achieved for the most suitable formulations. In vitro release studies in plasma, showed a prolonged release profile of camptothecin from SLN, confirming the physical stability of the particles under physiological pH. A higher affinity of the SLN to the porcine brain capillary endothelial cells (BCEC) was shown in comparison to macrophages. MTT studies in BCEC revealed a moderate decrease in the cell viability of camptothecin, when incorporated in SLN compared to free camptothecin in solution. In vivo studies in rats showed that fluorescently labelled SLN were detected in the brain after i.v. administration. This study indicates that the camptothecin-loaded SLN are a promising drug brain delivery system worth to explore further for brain tumour therapy.

  8. Sensitive determination of four camptothecins by solid-phase microextraction-HPLC based on a boronic acid contained polymer monolithic layer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jishun; Min, Xinwen; Li, Peng; Chen, Wu; Tian, Dawei; Chen, Qinhua

    2015-06-16

    Camptothecin (CPT) and its derivative have been revealed to possess special anti-cancer activity, extraction methods are necessary for trace determination of CPTs in complex samples. In this work, we prepared a high efficient boronic acid-based polymer monolithic layer for microextraction of CPTs. A disposable membrane filter-based extraction device was developed, and boronic acid groups were co-polymerized into a polyporous polymer skeleton and served as the monolithic sorbent. The prepared poly(4-VB-MA-TRIM) showed good stability and great extraction efficiency toward four CPTs. After optimization of extraction conditions, poly(4-VB-MA-TRIM)-based solid-phase microextraction was coupled HPLC for determination of CPTs in biological samples. The method exhibited low limits of detection of 0.05-0.2 ng mL(-1), which is significantly more sensitive than reported HPLC methods. The method also showed wide linear range (0.1-100 and 0.5-200 ng mL(-1)), good linearity (R(2)≥0.9981) and good reproducibility (RSD ≤3.76%). The method has been applied in plasma samples, with good selectivity and good recoveries ranging from 85.1 to 104.7%.

  9. Cytotoxicity of Hymenocallis expansa alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Antoun, M D; Mendoza, N T; Ríos, Y R; Proctor, G R; Wickramaratne, D B; Pezzuto, J M; Kinghorn, A D

    1993-08-01

    From the bulbs and leaves of Hymenocallis expansa (Amaryllidaceae), three alkaloid constituents were identified: (+)-tazettine, (+)-hippeastrine, and (-)-haemanthidine. These alkaloids demonstrated significant cytotoxicity when tested against a panel of human and murine tumor cell lines.

  10. Metabolic Pathways of the Camptothecin Analog AR-67

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Jamie; Milewska, Marta; Arnold, Susanne M.

    2011-01-01

    7-tert-Butyldimethylsilyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin (AR-67; also known as DB-67) is a novel lipophilic camptothecin analog in early-phase anticancer clinical trials. In support of these studies, we evaluated the metabolism of AR-67 in vitro and identified potential metabolites in patient samples. The lactone form of AR-67 was found to be preferentially metabolized over AR-67 carboxylate in human microsomes. Subsequently, the lactone form was tested as a substrate in a panel of CYP450 and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes known to metabolize the majority of clinically approved molecules. AR-67 was metabolized by CYP3A5, CYP3A4, CYP1A1, and CYP1A2, in order of activity. Extrahepatic UGT1A8 and UGT1A7 possessed at least 6-fold higher metabolizing activity than UGT1A1 and other UGT enzymes tested. CYP1A1 and UGT1A7 displayed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, whereas CYP3A4, CYP3A5, and UGT1A8 displayed kinetics consistent with substrate inhibition. Chromatographic analysis of representative patient plasma and urine samples demonstrated the presence of AR-67 glucuronides and oxidized products in the urine but only in very minimal amounts. We conclude that limited in vivo metabolism of AR-67 by UGT1A1 may partly explain the absence of AR-67 glucuronides in plasma and hypothesize that UGT1A8- and CYP3A-mediated biotransformation within the gastrointestinal epithelium may provide protective mechanisms against AR-67 gastrointestinal toxicity. PMID:21189330

  11. Design and one-pot synthesis of new 7-acyl camptothecin derivatives as potent cytotoxic agents.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying-Qian; Dai, Wei; Wang, Chih-Ya; Morris-Natschke, Susan L; Zhou, Xing-Wen; Yang, Liu; Yang, Xiao-Ming; Li, Wen-Qun; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2012-12-15

    New 7-acyl camptothecin derivatives were designed and synthesized from camptothecin in a one-pot reaction through a Minisci type-reaction and were evaluated for cytotoxicity against four tumor cell lines, A-549, DU-145, KB, and KB-vin. All of the new compounds showed significant inhibition of human tumor cell growth, with IC(50) values ranging from 0.01538 to 13.342 μM. Most of the derivatives were more cytotoxic than irinotecan, and the (7a) and 7-propionyl (7b) analogs exhibited the highest cytotoxic activity against the tumor cell lines tested. This compound class merits further development as anticancer clinical trial candidates.

  12. Alkaloids from Hippeastrum papilio.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, Jean Paulo; Berkov, Strahil; Viladomat, Francesc; Codina, Carles; Zuanazzi, José Angelo S; Bastida, Jaume

    2011-08-18

    Galanthamine, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor marketed as a hydrobromide salt (Razadyne®, Reminyl®) for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD), is obtained from Amaryllidaceae plants, especially those belonging to the genera Leucojum, Narcissus, Lycoris and Ungernia. The growing demand for galanthamine has prompted searches for new sources of this compound, as well as other bioactive alkaloids for the treatment of AD. In this paper we report the isolation of the new alkaloid 11β-hydroxygalanthamine, an epimer of the previously isolated alkaloid habranthine, which was identified using NMR techniques. It has been shown that 11β-hydroxygalanthamine has an important in vitro acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity. Additionally, Hippeastrum papilio yielded substantial quantities of galanthamine.

  13. Search for CPT-odd decays of positronium

    SciTech Connect

    Vetter, Paul A.; Freedman, Stuart J.

    2003-07-11

    We have limited a CPT-violating correlation in annihilationsof polarized ortho-positronium. We searched for an asymmetry in thetriple correlations dot k1 cross k2, where k1 and k2 are the two largestphoton momenta, and s is the spin of the positronium. Using theGammasphere array of Compton-suppressed high-purity germanium detectors,we detected 2.65e7 events of ortho-Ps annihila tion. The amplitude of aCPT-violating asymmetry in the data set is found to be 0.0026 plus orminus 0.0031, a factor of 6 smaller than previousexperiments.

  14. Analysis of Ergot Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Crews, Colin

    2015-01-01

    The principles and application of established and newer methods for the quantitative and semi-quantitative determination of ergot alkaloids in food, feed, plant materials and animal tissues are reviewed. The techniques of sampling, extraction, clean-up, detection, quantification and validation are described. The major procedures for ergot alkaloid analysis comprise liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (LC-FLD). Other methods based on immunoassays are under development and variations of these and minor techniques are available for specific purposes. PMID:26046699

  15. Analysis of Ergot Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Crews, Colin

    2015-06-03

    The principles and application of established and newer methods for the quantitative and semi-quantitative determination of ergot alkaloids in food, feed, plant materials and animal tissues are reviewed. The techniques of sampling, extraction, clean-up, detection, quantification and validation are described. The major procedures for ergot alkaloid analysis comprise liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (LC-FLD). Other methods based on immunoassays are under development and variations of these and minor techniques are available for specific purposes.

  16. The Origin and Diversity of Cpt1 Genes in Vertebrate Species

    PubMed Central

    Lopes-Marques, Mónica; Delgado, Inês L. S.; Ruivo, Raquel; Torres, Yan; Sainath, Sri Bhashyam; Rocha, Eduardo; Cunha, Isabel; Santos, Miguel M.; Castro, L. Filipe C.

    2015-01-01

    The Carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (Cpt1) gene family plays a crucial role in energy homeostasis since it is required for the occurrence of fatty acid β-oxidation in the mitochondria. The exact gene repertoire in different vertebrate lineages is variable. Presently, four genes are documented: Cpt1a, also known as Cpt1a1, Cpt1a2; Cpt1b and Cpt1c. The later is considered a mammalian innovation resulting from a gene duplication event in the ancestor of mammals, after the divergence of sauropsids. In contrast, Cpt1a2 has been found exclusively in teleosts. Here, we reassess the overall evolutionary relationships of Cpt1 genes using a combination of approaches, including the survey of the gene repertoire in basal gnathostome lineages. Through molecular phylogenetics and synteny studies, we find that Cpt1c is most likely a rapidly evolving orthologue of Cpt1a2. Thus, Cpt1c is present in other lineages such as cartilaginous fish, reptiles, amphibians and the coelacanth. We show that genome duplications (2R) and variable rates of sequence evolution contribute to the history of Cpt1 genes in vertebrates. Finally, we propose that loss of Cpt1b is the likely cause for the unusual energy metabolism of elasmobranch. PMID:26421611

  17. Simple Indolizidine and Quinolizidine Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Michael, Joseph P

    2016-01-01

    This review of simple indolizidine and quinolizidine alkaloids (i.e., those in which the parent bicyclic systems are in general not embedded in polycyclic arrays) is an update of the previous coverage in Volume 55 of this series (2001). The present survey covers the literature from mid-1999 to the end of 2013; and in addition to aspects of the isolation, characterization, and biological activity of the alkaloids, much emphasis is placed on their total synthesis. A brief introduction to the topic is followed by an overview of relevant alkaloids from fungal and microbial sources, among them slaframine, cyclizidine, Steptomyces metabolites, and the pantocins. The important iminosugar alkaloids lentiginosine, steviamine, swainsonine, castanospermine, and related hydroxyindolizidines are dealt with in the subsequent section. The fourth and fifth sections cover metabolites from terrestrial plants. Pertinent plant alkaloids bearing alkyl, functionalized alkyl or alkenyl substituents include dendroprimine, anibamine, simple alkaloids belonging to the genera Prosopis, Elaeocarpus, Lycopodium, and Poranthera, and bicyclic alkaloids of the lupin family. Plant alkaloids bearing aryl or heteroaryl substituents include ipalbidine and analogs, secophenanthroindolizidine and secophenanthroquinolizidine alkaloids (among them septicine, julandine, and analogs), ficuseptine, lasubines, and other simple quinolizidines of the Lythraceae, the simple furyl-substituted Nuphar alkaloids, and a mixed quinolizidine-quinazoline alkaloid. The penultimate section of the review deals with the sizable group of simple indolizidine and quinolizidine alkaloids isolated from, or detected in, ants, mites, and terrestrial amphibians, and includes an overview of the "dietary hypothesis" for the origin of the amphibian metabolites. The final section surveys relevant alkaloids from marine sources, and includes clathryimines and analogs, stellettamides, the clavepictines and pictamine, and bis

  18. Effect of fermentation parameters, elicitors and precursors on camptothecin production from the endophyte Fusarium solani.

    PubMed

    Venugopalan, Aarthi; Potunuru, Uma Rani; Dixit, Madhulika; Srivastava, Smita

    2016-04-01

    Volumetric productivity of camptothecin from the suspension culture of the endophyte Fusarium solani was enhanced up to ∼152 fold (from 0.19 μg l(-1) d(-1) to 28.9 μg l(-1) d(-1)) under optimized fermentation conditions including initial pH (6.0), temperature (32 °C) and agitation speed (80 rpm) with (5% (v/v)) ethanol as medium component. Among various elicitors and precursors studied, tryptamine (0.5 mM) as precursor and bovine serum albumin (BSA) (0.075 mM) as an elicitor added on day 6 of the cultivation period resulted in maximum enhancement of camptothecin concentration (up to 4.5 and 3.4-fold, respectively). These leads provide immense scope for further enhancement in camptothecin productivity at bioreactor level. The cytotoxicity analysis of the crude camptothecin extract from the fungal biomass revealed its high effectiveness against colon and mammary gland cancer cell lines.

  19. Use of hydrodynamic flow focusing for the generation of biodegradable camptothecin-loaded polymer microspheres.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Thomas; Zhao, Hong; Jackson, John K; Chapman, Glenn H; Dykes, James; Häfeli, Urs O

    2008-11-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the use of hydrodynamic flow focusing for the generation of biodegradable polymer microspheres encapsulating the anticancer drug camptothecin. Poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and poly(L-lactide) (PLA) were used as the matrix materials. Camptothecin was dissolved in the disperse phase and microspheres with a mean size between 2 and 3 microm generated using hydrodynamic flow focusing. When up to 1 wt.% of the drug was added to PLA, the drug encapsulation efficiency was 64%. For PLGA, the drug encapsulation efficiency was between 39 and 46%. Drug release from PLA particles was rapid and complete within 6 h, while drug release from PLGA particles showed no burst effect and followed a first order release profile. The encapsulated camptothecin stayed in its active lactone form, as shown by HPLC, and was able to exert cell toxic effects as shown by a cell viability assay. Hydrodynamic flow focusing is a promising tool for the preparation of drug-releasing biodegradable microspheres typically made by solvent evaporation and/or solvent extraction, as indicated by the successful encapsulation of the anticancer drug camptothecin.

  20. The Securinega alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Chirkin, Eqor; Atkatlian, William; Porée, François-Hugues

    2015-01-01

    Securinega alkaloids represent a family of plant secondary metabolites known for 50 years. Securinine (1), the most abundant and studied alkaloid of this series was isolated by Russian researchers in 1956. In the following years, French and Japanese scientists reported other Securinega compounds and extensive work was done to elucidate their intriguing structures. The homogeneity of this family relies mainly on its tetracyclic chemical backbone, which features a butenolide moiety (cycle D) and an azabicyclo[3.2.1]octane ring system (rings B and C). Interestingly, after a period of latency of 20 years, the Securinega topic reemerged as a prolific source of new natural structures and to date more than 50 compounds have been identified and characterized. The oligomeric subgroup gathering dimeric, trimeric, and tetrameric units is of particular interest. The unprecedented structure of the Securinega alkaloids was the subject of extensive synthetic efforts culminating in several efficient and elegant total syntheses. The botanical distribution of these alkaloids seems limited to the Securinega, Flueggea, Margaritaria, and Breynia genera (Phyllanthaceae). However, only a limited number of plant species have been considered for their alkaloid contents, and additional phytochemical as well as genetic studies are needed. Concerning the biosynthesis, experiments carried out with radiolabelled aminoacids allowed to identify lysine and tyrosine as the precursors of the piperidine ring A and the CD rings of securinine (1), respectively. Besides, plausible biosynthetic pathways were proposed for virosaine A (38) and B (39), flueggine A (46), and also the different oligomers flueggenine A-D (48-51), fluevirosinine A (56), and flueggedine (20). The case of nirurine (45) and secu'amamine (37) remains elusive and additional studies seem necessary to understand their mode of production. The scope of biological of activities of the Securinega alkaloids was mainly centered on the CNS

  1. Lorentz- and CPT-symmetry studies in subatomic physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, Ralf

    2016-12-01

    Subatomic systems provide an exquisite test bench for spacetime symmetries. This work motivates such measurements, reviews the effective field theory test framework for the description of Lorentz and CPT violation, and employs this framework to study the phenomenology of spacetime-symmetry breaking in various subatomic systems.

  2. Atmospheric neutrinos as a probe of CPT violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Poonam

    2005-06-01

    We show that atmospheric neutrinos, in conjunction with a (currently planned) large mass magnetized iron calorimeter can allow us to both detect the presence of CPT violation(CPTV) and putting bounds on them which compare very favourably with those possible from a future neutrino factory [Based on A. Datta, R. Gandhi, P. Mehta, S.U. Sankar, Phys. Lett. B 597 (2004) 356].

  3. Lorentz and CPT Tests with Spin-Polarized Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Bluhm, Robert; Kostelecky, V. Alan

    2000-02-14

    Experiments using macroscopic samples of spin-polarized matter offer exceptional sensitivity to Lorentz and CPT violation in the electron sector. Data from existing experiments with a spin-polarized torsion pendulum provide sensitivity in this sector rivaling that of all other existing experiments and could reveal spontaneous violation of Lorentz symmetry at the Planck scale. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  4. Assignment of the human carnitine palmitoyltransferase II gene (CPT1) to chromosome 1p32

    SciTech Connect

    Gellera, C.; Verderio, E.; Taroni, F.

    1994-11-01

    In the study reported here, a new set of FISH experiments was carried out with the two positively identified CPT1-specific probes. The inserts of phage clones {lambda}CPT142 and {lambda}CPT1B1 were labeled by nick-translation with biotin-16-dUTP. FISH was performed on lymphocyte metaphases from two 46,XY males.

  5. Indole alkaloids from Geissospermum reticulatum.

    PubMed

    Reina, M; Ruiz-Mesia, W; López-Rodríguez, M; Ruiz-Mesia, L; González-Coloma, A; Martínez-Díaz, R

    2012-05-25

    Ten indole alkaloids were isolated from Geissospermum reticulatum, seven (1-7) from the leaves and three (8-10) from the bark. Seven were aspidospermatan-type alkaloids (1-3, 5-9), including four (5-8) with a 1-oxa-3-cyclopentene group in their molecule, which we named geissospermidine subtype. Compounds 1-3, 5-8, and 10 had not been reported previously as natural products, while 4 and 9 were the known alkaloids O-demethylaspidospermine and flavopereirine. Their structures were determined by spectroscopic techniques including 1D and 2D NMR experiments (COSY, NOESY, HSQC, HMBC). Additionally, X-ray crystallographic analyses of 1, 2, and 6 were performed. Antiparasitic activities of the ethanolic and alkaloidal extracts and of the pure alkaloids were tested against Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania infantum. In general, the extracts exhibited selective action and were more active against Leishmania than against Trypanosoma. Alkaloid 4 was also very active against L. infantum.

  6. Quinoline alkaloids from Acronychia laurifolia.

    PubMed

    Cui, B; Chai, H; Dong, Y; Horgen, F D; Hansen, B; Madulid, D A; Soejarto, D D; Farnsworth, N R; Cordell, G A; Pezzuto, J M; Kinghorn, A D

    1999-09-01

    Bioassay-directed fractionation of a root extract of Acronychia laurifolia (Rutaceae) using the KB-V1+ human tumor cell line led to the isolation of six quinoline alkaloids. One of these alkaloids is novel, namely, 2,3-methylenedioxy-4,7-dimethoxyquinoline and the other five were identified as the known compounds, evolitrine, gamma-fagarine, skimmianine, kokusaginine and maculosidine. Two known bis-tetrahydrofuran lignans, sesamolin and yangambin, were also identified. The structure of the new alkaloid was determined by spectroscopic methods. All of the isolates were evaluated against a panel of human cancer cell lines; four of the alkaloids showed weak cytotoxic activity.

  7. Quinolizidine alkaloids from Lupinus lanatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neto, Alexandre T.; Oliveira, Carolina Q.; Ilha, Vinicius; Pedroso, Marcelo; Burrow, Robert A.; Dalcol, Ionara I.; Morel, Ademir F.

    2011-10-01

    In this study, one new quinolizidine alkaloid, lanatine A ( 1), together with three other known alkaloids, 13-α- trans-cinnamoyloxylupanine ( 2), 13-α-hydroxylupanine ( 3), and (-)-multiflorine ( 4) were isolated from the aerial parts of Lupinus lanatus (Fabaceae). The structures of alkaloids 1- 4 were elucidated by spectroscopic data analysis. The stereochemistry of 1 was determined by single crystal X-ray analysis. Bayesian statistical analysis of the Bijvoet differences suggests the absolute stereochemistry of 1. In addition, the antimicrobial potential of alkaloids 1- 4 is also reported.

  8. Induction of neuronal apoptosis by camptothecin, an inhibitor of DNA topoisomerase-I: evidence for cell cycle-independent toxicity

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Camptothecin is an S-phase-specific anticancer agent that inhibits the activity of the enzyme DNA topoisomerase-I (topo-I). Irreversible DNA double-strand breaks are produced during DNA synthesis in the presence of camptothecin, suggesting that this agent should not be toxic to nondividing cells, such as neurons. Unexpectedly, camptothecin induced significant, dose-dependent cell death of postmitotic rat cortical neurons in vitro; astrocytes were more resistant. Aphidicolin, an inhibitor of DNA polymerase alpha, did not prevent camptothecin-induced neuronal death, while death was prevented by actinomycin D and 5,6- dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosyl benzimidazole as well as cycloheximide and anisomycin, inhibitors of RNA and protein synthesis, respectively. Camptothecin-induced neuronal death was apoptotic, as characterized by chromatin condensation, cytoplasmic shrinking, plasma membrane blebbing, and fragmentation of neurites. DNA fragmentation was also confirmed by the use of the in situ DNA end labeling assay. In addition, aurintricarboxylic acid, an inhibitor of the apoptotic endonuclease, partially protected against camptothecin-induced neuronal death. The toxicity of stereoisomers of a camptothecin analogue was stereospecific, demonstrating that toxicity was a result of inhibition of topo-I. The difference in sensitivity to camptothecin between neurons and astrocytes correlated with their transcriptional activity and level of topo-I protein expression. These data indicate important roles for topo-I in postmitotic neurons and suggest that topo-I inhibitors can induce apoptosis independent of DNA synthesis. We suggest a model based on transcriptionally mediated DNA damage, a novel mechanism of action of topo-I poisons. PMID:8707853

  9. Omnibus experiment: CPT and CP violation with sterile neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loo, K. K.; Novikov, N. Yu; Smirnov, M. V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Wurm, M.

    2016-05-01

    We propose to probe both the CPT and CP violation together with the search for sterile neutrinos in one do-it-all experiment. This omnibus experiment would utilize neutrino oscillometry with large scintillator detectors like LENA, JUNO or RENO-50 and manmade radioactive sources similar to the ones used by the GALLEX experiment. Our calculations indicate that such an experiment is realistic and could be performed in parallel to the main research plan for JUNO, LENA, or RENO-50. Assuming as the starting point the values of the oscillation parameters indicated by the current global fit (in 3 active + 1 sterile scenario) and requiring at least 5 sigma confidence level, we estimate that with the proposed experiment we would be able to detect CPT mass anomalies of the order of 1% or larger.

  10. CPT symmetry and antimatter gravity in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villata, M.

    2011-04-01

    The gravitational behavior of antimatter is still unknown. While we may be confident that antimatter is self-attractive, the interaction between matter and antimatter might be either attractive or repulsive. We investigate this issue on theoretical grounds. Starting from the CPT invariance of physical laws, we transform matter into antimatter in the equations of both electrodynamics and gravitation. In the former case, the result is the well-known change of sign of the electric charge. In the latter, we find that the gravitational interaction between matter and antimatter is a mutual repulsion, i.e. antigravity appears as a prediction of general relativity when CPT is applied. This result supports cosmological models attempting to explain the Universe accelerated expansion in terms of a matter-antimatter repulsive interaction.

  11. Effect of precursors feeding and media manipulation on production of novel anticancer pro-drug camptothecin from endophytic fungus.

    PubMed

    Amna, Touseef; Amina, Musarat; Sharma, P R; Puri, S C; Al-Youssef, Hanan M; Al-Taweel, Areej M; Qazi, G N

    2012-10-01

    We have established methodology for the isolation and characterization of a novel endophytic fungus from the inner bark of medicinal plant Nothapodytes foetida, which produced camptothecin in Sabouraud broth (SB) under shake flask conditions. Camptothecin and its related compounds are at present obtained by extraction from intact plants, but fungal endopytes may be an alternative source of production. In present study we have observed the effect of different nutrient combinations and precursors (tryptophan, tryptamine, geraniol, citral, mevalonic acid and leucine) on the accumulation of camptothecin by endophytic fungus Entrophospora infrequens. The precursors were fed either alone or in combinations (tryptophan and geraniol, tryptophan and citral, tryptophan and mevalonic acid, tryptophan and leucine). The highest camptothecin content was observed in the range of 503 ± 25µg/100g dry cell mass in Sabouraud medium. Camptothecin content in the medium was increased by 2.5 folds by the presence of tryptophan and leucine whereas the production with trytophan was also significantly different from other treatments. Furthermore, the effect of fungal camptothecin on the morphology of human cancer cell lines was also studied. The treated cells showed reduction in size, condensation of nucleus and the protoplasmic extensions were reduced. All these characteristics are found in apoptotic cells.

  12. Capsaicin synergizes with camptothecin to induce increased apoptosis in human small cell lung cancers via the calpain pathway.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Jamie R; Perry, Haley E; Brown, Kathleen C; Gao, Ying; Lin, Ju; Stevenson, Cathyrn D; Hurley, John D; Nolan, Nicholas A; Akers, Austin T; Chen, Yi Charlie; Denning, Krista L; Brown, Linda G; Dasgupta, Piyali

    2017-04-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is characterized by excellent initial response to chemotherapy and radiation therapy with a majority of the patients showing tumor shrinkage and even remission. However, the challenge with SCLC therapy is that patients inevitably relapse and subsequently do not respond to the first line treatment. Recent clinical studies have investigated the possibility of camptothecin-based combination therapy as first line treatment for SCLC patients. Conventionally, camptothecin is used for recurrent SCLC and has poor survival outcomes. Therefore, drugs which can improve the therapeutic index of camptothecin should be valuable for SCLC therapy. Extensive evidence shows that nutritional compounds like capsaicin (the spicy compound of chili peppers) can improve the anti-cancer activity of chemotherapeutic drugs in both cell lines and animal models. Statistical analysis shows that capsaicin synergizes with camptothecin to enhance apoptosis of human SCLC cells. The synergistic activity of camptothecin and capsaicin is observed in both classical and variant SCLC cell lines and, in vivo, in human SCLC tumors xenotransplanted on chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) models. The synergistic activity of capsaicin and camptothecin are mediated by elevation of intracellular calcium and the calpain pathway. Our data foster hope for novel nutrition based combination therapies in SCLC.

  13. Tomographic Site Characterization Using CPT, ERT, and GPR

    SciTech Connect

    Rexford M. Morey

    1997-05-23

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the cleanup of inactive DOE sites and for bringing DOE sites and facilities into compliance with federal, state and local laws and regulations. The DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM) needs advanced technologies that can make environmental restoration and waste management operations more efficient and less costly. These techniques are required to better characterize the physical, hydrogeological, and chemical properties of the subsurface while minimizing and optimizing the use of boreholes and monitoring wells. Today the cone penetrometer technique (CPT) is demonstrating the value of a minimally invasive deployment system fix site characterization. Applied Research Associates is developing two new sensor packages for site characterization and monitoring. The two new methods are: . Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) and . Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) Tomography. These sensor systems are now integrated with the Cone Penetrometer Technique (CPT). The results of this program now make it possible to install ERT and GPR units by CPT methods and thereby reduce installation costs and total costs for ERT and GPR surveys. These two techniques can complement each other in regions of low resistivity where ERT is more effective and regions of high resistivity where GPR is more effective. The results show that CPT-installed GeoWells can be used in both ERT and GPR borehole tomographic subsurface imaging. These two imaging techniques can be used for environmental site characterization and environmental remediation monitoring. Technologies used for site characterization and monitoring have numerous and diverse applications within site clean-up and waste management operations.

  14. Coherent population trapping (CPT) versus electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Sumanta; Kumar, Molahalli Panidhara; Bharti, Vineet; Natarajan, Vasant

    2017-02-01

    We discuss the differences between two well-studied and related phenomena - coherent population trapping (CPT) and electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). Many differences between the two - such as the effect of power in the beams, detuning of the beams from resonance, and the use of vapor cells filled with buffer gas - are demonstrated experimentally. The experiments are done using magnetic sublevels of the 1 → 1 transition in the D2 line of 87Rb.

  15. Dualities, CPT symmetry and dimensional reduction in string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolami, O.

    1997-08-01

    In this lecture we address the following issues in the context of string theories: i) The role played by S and T dualities in obtaining topological inflation in N=1 supergravity models, ii) A mechanism for generating the baryon asymmetry of the universe based on the string interactions that violate CPT symmetry and iii) The quantum cosmology of the dimensionally reduced multidimensional Einstein-Yang-Mills system.

  16. Sonic CPT Probing in Support of DNAPL Characterization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-22

    Cesium and cobalt spectra collected with the sonic gamma probe before and after field testing...the sonic CPT system. The gamma radiation detector consists of a sodium iodide crystal attached to a photomultiplier tube. The manufacturer rates the...gamma detector was a sodium iodide (Nal) crystal/photo-multiplier t ube unit rated to withstand up to a 25 g acceleration. Since previous testing

  17. CPT tests with antihydrogen and antiprotonic helium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayano, Ryugo

    2014-09-01

    Recent progress of the CPT tests with antihydrogen and antiprotonic helium atoms by the ASACUSA collaboration at CERN's antiproton decelerator will be presented. The antiprotonic helium atom (antiproton+electron+helium nucleus) is a serendipitously discovered metastable three-body system, whose energy levels can now be studied by laser spectroscopy techniques to a relative precision of ~10-9. By comparing these precise experimental results with the result of three-body QED calculation, the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio was determined to a relative precision of 1 . 2 ×10-9 . While this can be used as a precise test of the CPT symmetry, CODATA instead assumed the CPT, and combined our results with the proton-to-electron mass ratio measured by the Penning trap method in their adjustment of the fundamental physical constants. In addition to the laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium, ASACUSA collaboration also aims at measuring the ground-state hyperfine splitting of antihydrogen using the (anti)-atomic beam method. Extraction of antihydrogen atoms from a ``cusp'' trap has so far been demonstrated. Both of these experiments will benefit from the completing of a new antiproton decelerator-cooler ring called ELENA, which is under construction at CERN.

  18. Design and synthesis of new 7-(N-substituted-methyl)-camptothecin derivatives as potent cytotoxic agents.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiao-Bo; Goto, Masuo; Song, Zi-Long; Morris-Natschke, Susan L; Zhao, Yu; Wu, Dan; Yang, Liu; Li, Shu-Gang; Liu, Ying-Qian; Zhu, Gao-Xiang; Wu, Xiao-Bing; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2014-08-15

    A series of novel 7-(N-substituted-methyl)-camptothecin derivatives was designed, synthesized, and evaluated for in vitro cytotoxicity against four human tumor cell lines, A-549, MDA-MB-231, KB, and KBvin. All of the derivatives showed promising in vitro cytotoxic activity against the tested tumor cell lines, with IC50 values ranging from 0.0023 to 1.11 μM, and were as or more potent than topotecan. Compounds 9d, 9e, and 9r exhibited the highest antiproliferative activity among all prepared derivatives. Furthermore, all of the compounds were more potent than paclitaxel against the multidrug-resistant (MDR) KBvin subline. With a concise efficient synthesis and potent cytotoxic profiles, especially significant activity towards KBvin, compounds 9d, 9e, and 9r merit further development as a new generation of camptothecin-derived anticancer clinical trial candidates.

  19. Smart AS1411-aptamer conjugated pegylated PAMAM dendrimer for the superior delivery of camptothecin to colon adenocarcinoma in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Alibolandi, Mona; Taghdisi, Seyed Mohammad; Ramezani, Pouria; Hosseini Shamili, Fazileh; Farzad, Sara Amel; Abnous, Khalil; Ramezani, Mohammad

    2017-03-15

    In the current study camptothecin-loaded pegylated PAMAM dendrimer were synthesized and were functionalized with AS1411 anti-nucleolin aptamers for site-specific targeting against colorectal cancer cells which over expresses nucleolin receptors. The morphological properties and size dispersity of the prepared nanoparticles were evaluated using transmission electron microscope (TEM) and DLS. The drug-loading content and encapsulation efficiency were obtained 8.1% and 93.67% respectively. The in vitro release of camptothecin from the formulation was provided the sustained release of encapsulated camptothecin during 4days. Comparative in vitro cytotoxicity experiments demonstrated that the targeted camptothecin loaded-pegylated dendrimers had higher antiproliferation activity, towards nucleolin-positive HT29 and C26 colorectal cancer cells than nucleolin-negative CHO cell line. Fluorscence microscopy and flow cytometry also confirmed the enhanced cellular uptake of AS1411 targeted pegylated-dendrimer. In vivo study in C26 tumor-bearing BALB/C mice revealed that the AS1411-functionalized camptothecin loaded pegylated dendrimers improved antitumor activity and survival rate of the encapsulated camptothecin. Conjugation of AS1411 aptamer to the camptothecin loaded-pegylated dendrimer surface provides site-specific delivery of camptothecin, inhibit C26 tumor growth in vivo and significantly decrease systemic toxicity. These results suggested that the new nucleolin-targeted pegylated PAMAM dendrimer as a delivery system for camptothecin have the potential for the treatment of nucleolin-overexpressed colorectal cancer.

  20. Irinotecan (CPT-11) chemotherapy alters intestinal microbiota in tumour bearing rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaoxi B; Dieleman, Levinus A; Ketabi, Ali; Bibova, Ilona; Sawyer, Michael B; Xue, Hongyu; Field, Catherine J; Baracos, Vickie E; Gänzle, Michael G

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal microbiota mediate toxicity of irinotecan (CPT-11) cancer therapies and cause systemic infection after CPT-11-induced loss of barrier function. The intestinal microbiota and their functions are thus potential targets for treatment to mitigate CPT-11 toxicity. However, microbiota changes during CPT-11 therapy remain poorly described. This study analysed changes in intestinal microbiota induced by CPT-11 chemotherapy. Qualitative and quantitative taxonomic analyses, and functional analyses were combined to characterize intestinal microbiota during CPT-11-based chemotherapy, and in presence or absence of oral glutamine, a treatment known to reduce CPT-11 toxicity. In the first set of experiments tumour-bearing rats received a dose-intensive CPT-11 regimen (125 mg kg(-1)×3 days), with or without oral glutamine bolus (0.75 g kg(-1)). In a subsequent more clinically-oriented chemotherapy regimen, rats received two cycles of CPT-11 (50 mg kg(-1)) followed by 5-flurouracil (50 mg kg(-1)). The analysis of fecal samples over time demonstrated that tumours changed the composition of intestinal microbiota, increasing the abundance of clostrridial clusters I, XI, and Enterobacteriaceae. CPT-11 chemotherapy increased cecal Clostridium cluster XI and Enterobacteriaceae, particularly after the dose-intensive therapy. Glutamine treatment prevented the reduced abundance of major bacterial groups after CPT-11 administration; i.e. total bacteria, Clostridium cluster VI, and the Bacteroides-group. Virulence factor/toxin genes of pathogenic Escherichia coli and Clostridium difficile were not detected in the cecal microbiota. In conclusion, both colon cancer implantation and CPT-11-based chemotherapies disrupted the intestinal microbiota. Oral glutamine partially mitigated CPT-11 toxicity and induced temporary changes of the intestinal microbiota.

  1. Transcription factors in alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Sato, Fumihiko

    2013-01-01

    Higher plants produce a large variety of low-molecular weight secondary compounds. Among them, nitrogen-containing alkaloids are the most biologically active and are often used pharmaceutically. Whereas alkaloid chemistry has been intensively investigated, alkaloid biosynthesis, including the relevant biosynthetic enzymes, genes and their regulation, and especially transcription factors, is largely unknown, as only a limited number of plant species produce certain types of alkaloids and they are difficult to study. Recently, however, several groups have succeeded in isolating the transcription factors that are involved in the biosynthesis of several types of alkaloids, including bHLH, ERF, and WRKY. Most of them show Jasmonate (JA) responsiveness, which suggests that the JA signaling cascade plays an important role in alkaloid biosynthesis. Here, we summarize the types and functions of transcription factors that have been isolated in alkaloid biosynthesis, and characterize their similarities and differences compared to those in other secondary metabolite pathways, such as phenylpropanoid and terpenoid biosyntheses. The evolution of this biosynthetic pathway and regulatory network, as well as the application of these transcription factors to metabolic engineering, is discussed.

  2. Decoherence induced CPT violation and entangled neutral mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Bernabeu, J.; Mavromatos, Nick E.; Sarkar, Sarben

    2006-08-15

    We discuss two classes of semimicroscopic theoretical models of stochastic spacetime foam in quantum gravity and the associated effects on entangled states of neutral mesons, signalling an intrinsic breakdown of CPT invariance. One class of models deals with a specific model of foam, initially constructed in the context of noncritical (Liouville) string theory, but viewed here in the more general context of effective quantum-gravity models. The relevant Hamiltonian perturbation, describing the interaction of the meson with the foam medium, consists of off-diagonal stochastic metric fluctuations, connecting distinct mass eigenstates (or the appropriate generalization thereof in the case of K-mesons), and it is proportional to the relevant momentum transfer (along the direction of motion of the meson pair). There are two kinds of CPT-violating effects in this case, which can be experimentally disentangled: one (termed '{omega}-effect') is associated with the failure of the indistinguishability between the neutral meson and its antiparticle, and affects certain symmetry properties of the initial state of the two-meson system; the second effect is generated by the time evolution of the system in the medium of the spacetime foam, and can result in time-dependent contributions of the {omega}-effect type in the time profile of the two-meson state. Estimates of both effects are given, which show that, at least in certain models, such effects are not far from the sensitivity of experimental facilities available currently or in the near future. The other class of quantum-gravity models involves a medium of gravitational fluctuations which behaves like a 'thermal bath'. In this model both of the above-mentioned intrinsic CPT violation effects are not valid.

  3. An efficient probe of the cosmological CPT violation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Gong-Bo; Wang, Yuting; Xia, Jun-Qing; Li, Mingzhe; Zhang, Xinmin E-mail: ytwang@nao.cas.cn E-mail: limz@ustc.edu.cn

    2015-07-01

    We develop an efficient method based on the linear regression algorithm to probe the cosmological CPT violation using the CMB polarisation data. We validate this method using simulated CMB data and apply it to recent CMB observations. We find that a combined data sample of BICEP1 and BOOMERanG 2003 favours a nonzero isotropic rotation angle at 2.3σ confidence level, i.e., α-bar =−3.3{sup o}±1.4{sup o} (68% CL) with systematics included.

  4. Rubitecan: 9-NC, 9-Nitro-20(S)-camptothecin, 9-nitro-camptothecin, 9-nitrocamptothecin, RFS 2000, RFS2000.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    Rubitecan [Orathecin, 9-nitrocamptothecin, 9NC, RFS 2000] is a topoisomerase I inhibitor extracted from the bark and leaves of the Camptotheca acuminata tree, which is native to China. Rubitecan is an oral compound being developed for the treatment of pancreatic cancer and other solid tumours by SuperGen. One of the major benefits of rubitecan is that it can be administered in an outpatient setting, so patients can be treated in their homes. Rubitecan was isolated by the Stehlin Foundation in the US. SuperGen is currently awaiting regulatory approval in the US and the EU for rubitecan in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. At the BIO-2004 conference, SuperGen announced it is seeking a partner for rubitecan for territories outside the US. SuperGen acquired exclusive worldwide rights to rubitecan from the Stehlin Foundation in 1997 except in Mexico, Canada, Spain, Japan, the UK, France, Italy and Germany. SuperGen has also received approval from the US FDA to use its own manufactured rubitecan in clinical trials. SuperGen and the Stehlin Foundation have an 8-year research agreement that secures global rights to other camptothecins and additional anticancer compounds for the former. In December 1999, SuperGen and Abbott signed a worldwide sales and marketing agreement for rubitecan. Under the terms of the agreement, Abbott had exclusive distribution and promotion rights for rubitecan outside the US, and co-promotion rights with SuperGen within the US. In return, Abbott made an initial equity investment in SuperGen. SuperGen and Abbott Laboratories ended their collaboration agreement in February 2002 by mutual consent with SuperGen stating that the dissolution of the agreement was based on commercial motivation rather than anything to do with rubitecan's safety or efficacy. Abbott no longer has rights or obligations to purchase shares of SuperGen stock or an option to purchase up to 49% of the company. For its part, SuperGen will no longer receive milestone payments

  5. CPT conservation and atmospheric neutrinos in the MINOS far detector

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Bernard Raymond

    2006-02-01

    The MINOS Far Detector is a 5400 ton iron calorimeter located at the Soudan state park in Soudan Minnesota. The MINOS far detector can observe atmospheric neutrinos and separate charge current νμ and $\\bar{v}$μ interactions by using a 1.4 T magnetic field to identify the charge of the produced muon. The CPT theorem requires that neutrinos and anti-neutrinos oscillate in the same way. In a fiducial exposure of 5.0 kilo-ton years a total of 41 candidate neutrino events are observed with an expectation of 53.1 ± 7.6(system.) ± 7.2(stat.) unoscillated events or 31.6 ± 4.7(system.) ± 5.6(stat.) events with Δm2 = 2.4 x 10-3 eV2, sin2(2θ) = 1.0 as oscillation parameters. These include 28 events which can have there charge identified with high confidence. These 28 events consist of 18 events consistent with being produced by νμ and 10 events being consistent with being produced by $\\bar{v}$μ. No evidence of CPT violation is observed.

  6. Biosynthetic Pathways of Ergot Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Gerhards, Nina; Neubauer, Lisa; Tudzynski, Paul; Li, Shu-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Ergot alkaloids are nitrogen-containing natural products belonging to indole alkaloids. The best known producers are fungi of the phylum Ascomycota, e.g., Claviceps, Epichloë, Penicillium and Aspergillus species. According to their structures, ergot alkaloids can be divided into three groups: clavines, lysergic acid amides and peptides (ergopeptines). All of them share the first biosynthetic steps, which lead to the formation of the tetracyclic ergoline ring system (except the simplest, tricyclic compound: chanoclavine). Different modifications on the ergoline ring by specific enzymes result in an abundance of bioactive natural products, which are used as pharmaceutical drugs or precursors thereof. From the 1950s through to recent years, most of the biosynthetic pathways have been elucidated. Gene clusters from several ergot alkaloid producers have been identified by genome mining and the functions of many of those genes have been demonstrated by knock-out experiments or biochemical investigations of the overproduced enzymes. PMID:25513893

  7. Purine alkaloids in Paullinia.

    PubMed

    Weckerle, Caroline S; Stutz, Michael A; Baumann, Thomas W

    2003-10-01

    Among the few purine alkaloid-containing genera consumed as stimulants, Paullinia is the least investigated with respect to both chemotaxonomy and within-the-plant allocation of caffeine and its allies. Since purine alkaloids (PuA) have been proved to be valuable marker compounds in chemotaxonomy, 34 species of Paullinia and related genera were screened for them, but only one, P. pachycarpa, was positive in addition to the already known P. cupana and P. yoco. The PuA allocation in P. pachycarpa was examined and found to be restricted to theobromine in the stem, leaves and flowers. Moreover, the theobromine concentration in the stem cortex increased significantly towards the base of the plant. Since the stem cortex of P. yoco is traditionally used by the natives of Colombia and Ecuador to prepare a caffeine-rich beverage, we suspected that within the genus Paullinia the PuA are preferentially allocated to the older parts of the stem and not to young shoots like e.g., in the coffee plant (Coffea spp.). Indeed, the axis (greenhouse) of P. cupana (guaraná), known for its caffeine-rich seeds, exhibited a basipetal PuA gradient (0.005-0.145%). Moreover, the analysis of young cortex samples (herbarium) and of one piece of old stem (museum collection) revealed the same for P. yoco, even though we found much less (0.5 vs 2.5%) caffeine in the old cortex as compared to the only two analyses in 1926 of similar material. However, this discrepancy may be explained by the high variability of the PuA pattern we detected among yoco, the diversity of which the Indians take advantage.

  8. Antiproliferative activities of Amaryllidaceae alkaloids from Lycoris radiata targeting DNA topoisomerase I.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gui-Lin; Tian, Yong-Qiang; Wu, Jian-Lin; Li, Na; Guo, Ming-Quan

    2016-12-06

    Crude Amaryllidaceae alkaloids (AAs) extracted from Lycoris radiata are reported to exhibit significant anti-cancer activity. However, the specific alkaloids responsible for the pharmacodynamic activity and their targets still remain elusive. In this context, we strived to combine affinity ultrafiltration with topoisomerase I (Top I) as a target enzyme aiming to fish out specific bioactive AAs from Lycoris radiata. 11 AAs from Lycoris radiata were thus screened out, among which hippeastrine (peak 5) with the highest Enrichment factor (EF) against Top I exhibited good dose-dependent inhibition with IC50 at 7.25 ± 0.20 μg/mL comparable to camptothecin (positive control) at 6.72 ± 0.23 μg/mL. The molecular docking simulation further indicated the inhibitory mechanism between Top I and hippeastrine. The in vitro antiproliferation assays finally revealed that hippeastrine strongly inhibited the proliferation of HT-29 and Hep G2 cells in an intuitive dose-dependent manner with the IC50 values at 3.98 ± 0.29 μg/mL and 11.85 ± 0.20 μg/mL, respectively, and also induced significant cellular morphological changes, which further validated our screening method and the potent antineoplastic effects. Collectively, these results suggested that hippeastrine could be a very promising anticancer candidate for the therapy of cancer in the near future.

  9. Antiproliferative activities of Amaryllidaceae alkaloids from Lycoris radiata targeting DNA topoisomerase I

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gui-Lin; Tian, Yong-Qiang; Wu, Jian-Lin; Li, Na; Guo, Ming-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Crude Amaryllidaceae alkaloids (AAs) extracted from Lycoris radiata are reported to exhibit significant anti-cancer activity. However, the specific alkaloids responsible for the pharmacodynamic activity and their targets still remain elusive. In this context, we strived to combine affinity ultrafiltration with topoisomerase I (Top I) as a target enzyme aiming to fish out specific bioactive AAs from Lycoris radiata. 11 AAs from Lycoris radiata were thus screened out, among which hippeastrine (peak 5) with the highest Enrichment factor (EF) against Top I exhibited good dose-dependent inhibition with IC50 at 7.25 ± 0.20 μg/mL comparable to camptothecin (positive control) at 6.72 ± 0.23 μg/mL. The molecular docking simulation further indicated the inhibitory mechanism between Top I and hippeastrine. The in vitro antiproliferation assays finally revealed that hippeastrine strongly inhibited the proliferation of HT-29 and Hep G2 cells in an intuitive dose-dependent manner with the IC50 values at 3.98 ± 0.29 μg/mL and 11.85 ± 0.20 μg/mL, respectively, and also induced significant cellular morphological changes, which further validated our screening method and the potent antineoplastic effects. Collectively, these results suggested that hippeastrine could be a very promising anticancer candidate for the therapy of cancer in the near future. PMID:27922057

  10. Synthesis and biological evaluation of new camptothecin derivatives obtained by modification of position 20.

    PubMed

    Riva, Elena; Comi, Daniela; Borrelli, Stella; Colombo, Francesco; Danieli, Bruno; Borlak, Jurgen; Evensen, Lasse; Lorens, James B; Fontana, Gabriele; Gia, Ornella Maria; Via, Lisa Dalla; Passarella, Daniele

    2010-12-15

    The preparation and biological evaluation of a novel series of dimeric camptothecin derivatives are described. All the new compounds showed a significant ability to inhibit human tumor cell growth with IC(50) values ranging from 0.03 to 12.2 μM. The interference with the activity of the nuclear enzymes topoisomerases has been demonstrated, highlighting the poison effect of one of the obtained byproducts toward topoisomerase I. A moderate antiangiogenic activity has been demonstrated for one of the obtained compounds. Moreover, the effects of four new compounds on caspases activity and ROS generation have been studied on transgenic mouse cell.

  11. Clinical developments of chemotherapeutic nanomedicines: polymers and liposomes for delivery of camptothecins and platinum (II) drugs.

    PubMed

    Kieler-Ferguson, Heidi M; Fréchet, Jean M J; Szoka, Francis C

    2013-01-01

    For the past 40 years, liposomal and polymeric delivery vehicles have been studied as systems capable of modulating the cytotoxicity of small molecule chemotherapeutics, increasing tumor bearing animal survival times, and improving drug targeting. Although a number of macromolecular-drug conjugates have progressed to clinical trials, tuning drug release to maintain efficacy in conjunction with controlling drug toxicity has prevented the clinical adoption of many vehicles. In this article, we review the motivations for and approaches to polymer and liposomal delivery with regard to camptothecin and cisplatin delivery.

  12. The invariance of classical electromagnetism under Charge-conjugation, Parity and Time-reversal (CPT) transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    1989-01-01

    The invariance of classical electromagnetism under charge-conjugation, parity, and time-reversal (CPT) is studied by considering the motion of a charged particle in electric and magnetic fields. Upon applying CPT transformations to various physical quantities and noting that the motion still behaves physically demonstrates invariance.

  13. Inducing Proactive Control Shifts in the AX-CPT

    PubMed Central

    Gonthier, Corentin; Macnamara, Brooke N.; Chow, Michael; Conway, Andrew R. A.; Braver, Todd S.

    2016-01-01

    The Dual Mechanisms of Control (DMC) account (Braver, 2012) proposes two distinct mechanisms of cognitive control, proactive and reactive. This account has been supported by a large number of studies using the AX-CPT paradigm that have demonstrated not only between-group differences, but also within-subjects variability in the use of the two control mechanisms. Yet there has been little investigation of task manipulations that can experimentally modulate the use of proactive control in healthy young adults; such manipulations could be useful to better understand the workings of cognitive control mechanisms. In the current study, a series of three experiments demonstrate how individuals can be systematically biased toward and away from the utilization of proactive control, via strategy training and no-go manipulations, respectively. These results provide increased support for the DMC framework, and provide a new basis from which to examine group-based differences and neural mechanisms underlying the two control modes. PMID:27920741

  14. Traveling solitons in Lorentz and CPT breaking systems

    SciTech Connect

    Souza Dutra, A. de; Correa, R. A. C.

    2011-05-15

    In this work we present a class of traveling solitons in Lorentz and CPT breaking systems. In the case of Lorentz violating scenarios, as far as we know, only static solitonic configurations were analyzed up to now in the literature. Here it is shown that it is possible to construct some traveling solitons which cannot be mapped into static configurations by means of Lorentz boosts due to explicit breaking. In fact, the traveling solutions cannot be reached from the static ones by using something similar to a Lorentz boost in those cases. Furthermore, in the model studied, a complete set of exact solutions is obtained. The solutions present a critical behavior controlled by the choice of an arbitrary integration constant.

  15. Simultaneously improving the sensitivity and absolute accuracy of CPT magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shang-Qing; Yang, Guo-Qing; Xu, Yun-Fei; Lin, Qiang; Liu, Zhi-Heng; Chen, Zheng-Xiang

    2014-03-24

    A new method to improve the sensitivity and absolute accuracy simultaneously for coherent population trapping (CPT) magnetometer based on the differential detection method is presented. Two modulated optical beams with orthogonal circular polarizations are applied, in one of which two magnetic resonances are excited simultaneously by modulating a 3.4GHz microwave with Larmor frequency. When a microwave frequency shift is introduced, the difference in the power transmitted through the cell in each beam shows a low noise resonance. The sensitivity of 2pT/Hz @ 10Hz is achieved. Meanwhile, the absolute accuracy of ± 0.5nT within the magnetic field ranging from 20000nT to 100000nT is realized.

  16. Nonlinear modes of the tensor Dirac equation and CPT violation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reifler, Frank J.; Morris, Randall D.

    1993-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that Dirac's bispinor equation can be expressed, in an equivalent tensor form, as a constrained Yang-Mills equation in the limit of an infinitely large coupling constant. It was also shown that the free tensor Dirac equation is a completely integrable Hamiltonian system with Lie algebra type Poisson brackets, from which Fermi quantization can be derived directly without using bispinors. The Yang-Mills equation for a finite coupling constant is investigated. It is shown that the nonlinear Yang-Mills equation has exact plane wave solutions in one-to-one correspondence with the plane wave solutions of Dirac's bispinor equation. The theory of nonlinear dispersive waves is applied to establish the existence of wave packets. The CPT violation of these nonlinear wave packets, which could lead to new observable effects consistent with current experimental bounds, is investigated.

  17. Lethal carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) II deficiency in newborns: A molecular-genetic study

    SciTech Connect

    Taroni, F.; Gellera, C.; Cavadini, P.

    1994-09-01

    Classically, CPT II deficiency presents in young adults with recurrent episodes of paroxysmal myoglobinuria triggered by prolonged exercise, cold, or fever. More severe forms of CPT II deficiency have recently been observed in children and newborns. Here, were present biochemical and molecular studies of lethal neonatal CPT II deficiency in a premature Haitian infant of nonconsanguineous parents. He presented at birth with severe respiratory distress, cardiac arrhythmia and heart failure. His condition worsened and he died on the 4th day of life. Postmortem examination showed hypertrophied, dilated heart, and lipid storage in liver, heart and kidney. An older sibling had died unexpectantly at 4 days of age with postmortem evidence of fatty infiltration of liver, kidney, heart and muscle. Biochemical study of cultured fibroblasts demonstrated dramatic reduction of palmitate oxidation (to < 3%) and very low residual CPT II activity ({le}15%). No CPT II protein was detected by Western blot analysis of fibroblasts. However, immunoprecitation of cells pulse-labeled with L-[{sup 35}S] methionine demonstrated normal amounts of newly synthesized CPT II, thus suggesting altered stability of the enzyme. To identify the molecular defect in his patient, individual CPT II exons were amplified by genomic PCR and directly sequenced. A missense mutation was found in exon 4, resulting in the nonconservative amino acid substitution at codon 227 (Pro227Leu). SSCP analysis of a genomic PCR fragment encompassing the mutation demonstrated that the patient was homozygous and the parents were heterozygous for this mutation. The mutation was detected neither in a large number of controls nor in other CPT II deficient patients. Finally, CPT II activity in COS-1 cells transfected with mutated CPT II cDNA was <8% than that in cells transfected with wild-type cDNA, thus demonstrating the pathogenic role of this mutation.

  18. Chemotherapeutic agent CPT-11 eliminates peritoneal resident macrophages by inducing apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mei-Yun; Pan, Hao; Liang, Yi-Dan; Wei, Hong-Xia; Xu, Li-Hui; Zha, Qing-Bing; He, Xian-Hui; Ouyang, Dong-Yun

    2016-02-01

    CPT-11 (Irinotecan) is a first-line chemotherapeutic agent in clinic, but it may induce side effects including diarrhea and enteritis in patients. The underlying mechanism of CPT-11's intestinal toxicity is unclear. Peritoneal resident macrophages have been reported to be important for the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis. In this study, we evaluated the cytotoxic effects of CPT-11 on mouse peritoneal resident macrophages. CPT-11 was administered intraperitoneally to mice and their peritoneal exudate cells were isolated for evaluation. CPT-11 treatment strikingly decreased the ratio of F4/80(hi)MHCII(low) large peritoneal macrophages (LPMs), which are regarded as prenatally-originated peritoneal resident macrophages. Consistent with this, the transcription factor GATA6 specifically expressed in LPMs was barely detectable in the macrophages from CPT-11-treated mice, indicative of elimination of LPMs. Such elimination of LPMs was at least partly due to CPT-induced apoptosis in macrophages, because inhibition of apoptosis by caspase-3 inhibitor z-DEVD-fmk significantly diminished the loss of GATA6(+) LPMs. As GATA6 is a transcription factor that controls expression of multiple genes regulating peritoneal B-1 cell development and translocation, elimination of GATA6(+) LPMs led to a great reduction in B-1 cells in the peritoneal cavity after CPT-11 treatment. These results indicated that CPT-11-induced apoptosis contributed to the elimination of peritoneal resident macrophages, which might in turn impair the function of peritoneal B-1 cells in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. Our findings may at least partly explain why CPT-11 treatment in cancer patients induces diarrhea and enteritis, which may provide a novel avenue to prevent such side effects.

  19. Mouse white adipocytes and 3T3-L1 cells display an anomalous pattern of carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) I isoform expression during differentiation. Inter-tissue and inter-species expression of CPT I and CPT II enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, N F; Hill, J K; Esser, V; Kirkland, J L; Corkey, B E; Foster, D W; McGarry, J D

    1997-01-01

    The outer mitochondrial membrane enzyme carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I) represents the initial and regulated step in the beta-oxidation of fatty acids. It exists in at least two isoforms, denoted L (liver) and M (muscle) types, with very different kinetic properties and sensitivities to malonyl-CoA. Here we have examined the relative expression of the CPT I isoforms in two different models of adipocyte differentiation and in a number of rat tissues. Adipocytes from mice, hamsters and humans were also evaluated. Primary monolayer cultures of undifferentiated rat preadipocytes expressed solely L-CPT I, but significant levels of M-CPT I emerged after only 3 days of differentiation in vitro; in the mature cell M-CPT I predominated. In sharp contrast, the murine 3T3-L1 preadipocyte expressed essentially exclusively L-CPT I, both in the undifferentiated state and throughout the differentiation process in vitro. This was also true of the mature mouse white fat cell. Fully developed adipocytes from the hamster and human behaved similarly to those of the rat. Thus the mouse white fat cell differs fundamentally from those of the other species examined in terms of tis choice of a key regulatory enzyme in fatty acid metabolism. In contrast, brown adipose tissue from all three rodents displayed the same isoform profiles, each expressing overwhelmingly M-CPT I. Northern blot analysis of other rat tissues established L-CPT I as the dominant isoform not only in liver but also in kidney, lung, ovary, spleen, brain, intestine and pancreatic islets. In addition to its primacy in skeletal muscle, heart and fat, M-CPT I was also found to dominate the testis. The same inter-tissue isoform pattern (with the exception of white fat) was found in the mouse. Taken together, the data bring to light an intriguing divergence between white adipocytes of the mouse and other mammalian species. They also raise a cautionary note that should be considered in the choice of animal model used

  20. Camptothecin sensitivity in Werner syndrome fibroblasts as assessed by the COMET technique.

    PubMed

    Lowe, J; Sheerin, A; Jennert-Burston, K; Burton, D; Ostler, E L; Bird, J; Green, M H L; Faragher, R G A

    2004-06-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an inherited genetic disease in which individuals display the premature aging of a selected subset of tissues. The disorder results from the loss of function mutations in the wrn gene. Wrn codes for a member of the RecQ helicase family with a unique nuclease domain. There is significant evidence that the role of wrn is to assist in the repair and reinitiation of DNA replication forks that have stalled. Loss of the wrn helicase imposes a distinct set of phenotypes at the cellular level. These include premature replicative senescence (in a subset of cell types), chromosomal instability, a distinct mutator phenotype, and hypersensitivity to a limited number of DNA damaging agents. Unfortunately, most of these phenotypes are not suitable for the rapid assessment of loss of function of the wrn gene product. However, WS cells have been reported to show abnormal sensitivity to the drug camptothecin (an inhibitor of topoisomerase type I). A rapid assay for this sensitivity would be a useful marker of loss of wrn function. The COMET (single-cell gel electrophoresis) assay is a rapid, sensitive, versatile, and robust technique for the quantitative assessment of DNA damage in eukaryotic cells. Using this assay, we have found that a significantly increased level of strand breaks can be demonstrated in WS cells treated with camptothecin compared with normal controls.

  1. How Trypanosoma cruzi handles cell cycle arrest promoted by camptothecin, a topoisomerase I inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Zuma, Aline Araujo; Mendes, Isabela Cecília; Reignault, Lissa Catherine; Elias, Maria Carolina; de Souza, Wanderley; Machado, Carlos Renato; Motta, Maria Cristina M

    2014-02-01

    The protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease, which affects approximately 8 million people in Latin America. This parasite contains a single nucleus and a kinetoplast, which harbors the mitochondrial DNA (kDNA). DNA topoisomerases act during replication, transcription and repair and modulate DNA topology by reverting supercoiling in the DNA double-strand. In this work, we evaluated the effects promoted by camptothecin, a topoisomerase I inhibitor that promotes protozoan proliferation impairment, cell cycle arrest, ultrastructure alterations and DNA lesions in epimastigotes of T. cruzi. The results showed that inhibition of cell proliferation was reversible only at the lowest drug concentration (1μM) used. The unpacking of nuclear heterochromatin and mitochondrion swelling were the main ultrastructural modifications observed. Inhibition of parasite proliferation also led to cell cycle arrest, which was most likely caused by nuclear DNA lesions. Following camptothecin treatment, some of the cells restored their DNA, whereas others entered early apoptosis but did not progress to late apoptosis, indicating that the protozoa stay alive in a "senescence-like" state. This programmed cell death may be associated with a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species. Taken together, these results indicate that the inhibition of T. cruzi proliferation is related to events capable of affecting cell cycle, DNA organization and mitochondrial activity.

  2. Design, modeling, synthesis and biological activity evaluation of camptothecin-linked platinum anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Cincinelli, Raffaella; Musso, Loana; Dallavalle, Sabrina; Artali, Roberto; Tinelli, Stella; Colangelo, Donato; Zunino, Franco; De Cesare, Michelandrea; Beretta, Giovanni Luca; Zaffaroni, Nadia

    2013-05-01

    The design, modeling, synthesis and biological activity evaluation of two hybrid agents formed by 7-oxyiminomethylcamptothecin derivatives and diaminedichloro-platinum (II) complex are reported. The compounds showed growth inhibitory activity against a panel of human tumor cell lines, including sublines resistant to topotecan and platinum compounds. The derivatives were active in all the tested cell lines, and compound 1b, the most active one, was able to overcome cisplatin resistance in the osteosarcoma U2OS/Pt cell line. Platinum-containing camptothecins produced platinum-DNA adducts and topoisomerase I-mediated DNA damage with cleavage pattern and persistence similar to SN38, the active principle of irinotecan. Compound 1b exhibited an appreciable antitumor activity in vivo against human H460 tumor xenograft, comparable to that of irinotecan at lower well-tolerated dose levels and superior to cisplatin. The results support the interpretation that the diaminedichloro-platinum (II) complex conjugated via an oxyiminomethyl linker at the 7-position of the camptothecin resulted in a new class of effective antitumor compounds.

  3. The Chemistry of the Akuammiline Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Adams, Gregory L; Smith, Amos B

    2016-01-01

    An update on the literature covering the akuammiline family of alkaloids is presented. This chapter begins with a summary of new akuammiline alkaloids reported since 2000 and is followed by an overview of new reported bioactivities of akuammiline alkaloids since 2000. The remainder of the chapter comprises a comprehensive review of the synthetic chemistry that has been reported in the last 50 years concerning akuammiline alkaloids and their structural motifs.

  4. 27 CFR 21.99 - Brucine alkaloid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Brucine alkaloid. 21.99... Brucine alkaloid. (a) Identification test. Add a few drops of concentrated nitric acid to about 10 mg of brucine alkaloid. A vivid red color is produced. Dilute the red solution with a few drops of water and...

  5. 27 CFR 21.99 - Brucine alkaloid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Brucine alkaloid. 21.99... Brucine alkaloid. (a) Identification test. Add a few drops of concentrated nitric acid to about 10 mg of brucine alkaloid. A vivid red color is produced. Dilute the red solution with a few drops of water and...

  6. 27 CFR 21.99 - Brucine alkaloid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Brucine alkaloid. 21.99... Brucine alkaloid. (a) Identification test. Add a few drops of concentrated nitric acid to about 10 mg of brucine alkaloid. A vivid red color is produced. Dilute the red solution with a few drops of water and...

  7. 27 CFR 21.99 - Brucine alkaloid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Brucine alkaloid. 21.99... Brucine alkaloid. (a) Identification test. Add a few drops of concentrated nitric acid to about 10 mg of brucine alkaloid. A vivid red color is produced. Dilute the red solution with a few drops of water and...

  8. 27 CFR 21.99 - Brucine alkaloid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Brucine alkaloid. 21.99... Brucine alkaloid. (a) Identification test. Add a few drops of concentrated nitric acid to about 10 mg of brucine alkaloid. A vivid red color is produced. Dilute the red solution with a few drops of water and...

  9. Preventing human rights abuses in psychiatric establishments: the work of the CPT.

    PubMed

    Niveau, G

    2004-05-01

    The mission of the European Committee for the prevention of torture and inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment (CPT) is to visit all places where people are detained and deprived of their liberty by a public authority, in States which are signatories to the Convention. Within this context, the CPT has visited many closed psychiatric establishments. We have studied reports, which were made public concerning 78 psychiatric establishments visited by the CPT between 1990 and 2001. No act considered to be torture was reported by the CPT, but several cases of deliberate ill-treatment of patients are described. Many serious cases of dysfunction concerning staff, treatment, the use of seclusion and restraint as well as lack of adequate safeguards, were also noted by the CPT. The recommendations, comments and requests for information issued by the CPT are intended to promote the reform of these establishments in order to promote human rights, in the States visited. These recommendations as well as the CPT's annual reports, serve as reference standards for psychiatric practice, which respect human rights.

  10. Alkaloids with antioxidant activities from Aconitum handelianum.

    PubMed

    Yin, Tian-Peng; Cai, Le; Xing, Yun; Yu, Jing; Li, Xue-Jiao; Mei, Rui-Feng; Ding, Zhong-Tao

    2016-06-01

    A new C20-diterpenoid alkaloid handelidine (1) and twenty-seven known alkaloids (2-28) were isolated from the roots of Aconitum handelianum. Their structures were established on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analyses. The study indicated that denudatine-type C20-diterpenoid alkaloids with vicinal-triol system and benzyltetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloids exhibited significant antioxidant activities measured by three antioxidant test systems. The aconitine-type C19-diterpenoid alkaloids could serve as potential secondary antioxidants for their strong binding effects to metal ions.

  11. Structural and quantitative analysis of Equisetum alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Luise; Ernst, Ludger; Lubienski, Marcus; Papke, Uli; Schiebel, Hans-Martin; Jerz, Gerold; Beuerle, Till

    2015-08-01

    Equisetum palustre L. is known for its toxicity for livestock. Several studies in the past addressed the isolation and identification of the responsible alkaloids. So far, palustrine (1) and N(5)-formylpalustrine (2) are known alkaloids of E. palustre. A HPLC-ESI-MS/MS method in combination with simple sample work-up was developed to identify and quantitate Equisetum alkaloids. Besides the two known alkaloids six related alkaloids were detected in different Equisetum samples. The structure of the alkaloid palustridiene (3) was derived by comprehensive 1D and 2D NMR experiments. N(5)-Acetylpalustrine (4) was also thoroughly characterized by NMR for the first time. The structure of N(5)-formylpalustridiene (5) is proposed based on mass spectrometry results. Twenty-two E. palustre samples were screened by a HPLC-ESI-MS/MS method after development of a simple sample work-up and in most cases the set of all eight alkaloids were detected in all parts of the plant. A high variability of the alkaloid content and distribution was found depending on plant organ, plant origin and season ranging from 88 to 597mg/kg dried weight. However, palustrine (1) and the alkaloid palustridiene (3) always represented the main alkaloids. For the first time, a comprehensive identification, quantitation and distribution of Equisetum alkaloids was achieved.

  12. Effects of waterborne copper exposure on carnitine composition, kinetics of carnitine palmitoyltransferases I (CPT I) and mRNA levels of CPT I isoforms in yellow catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi-Liang; Luo, Zhi; Liu, Cai-Xia; Zheng, Jia-Lang; Zhu, Qing-Ling; Hu, Wei; Zhuo, Mei-Qin

    2015-11-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the effect of waterborne copper (Cu) exposure on carnitine concentration, carnitine palmitoyltransferases I (CPT I) kinetics, and expression levels of four CPT I isoforms in the liver, muscle and heart of yellow catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco. Yellow catfish were exposed to four waterborne copper (Cu) concentrations (2 (control), 24 (low), 71 (medium), 198 (high) μg Cu/l, respectively) for 6weeks. Waterborne Cu exposure increased maximal reaction rates (Vmax) in the liver and muscle, but not in the heart. Michaelis-Menten constants (Km) tended to increase in the liver, but decreased in the heart after Cu exposure. The contents of total carnitine (TC) and acylcarnitine (AC) in the liver, and free carnitine (FC) in the muscle increased with increasing waterborne Cu concentrations, while FC content in the muscle declined with the increase of Cu levels. Waterborne Cu exposure also significantly influenced carnitine composition and profiles in heart. The mRNA expression of CPT Iα1a, CPT Iα1b and CPT Iα2a in the liver, and CPT Iα1a, CPT Iα1b and CPT Iβ in the muscle as well as CPT Iα1a in the heart were up-regulated by Cu exposure. Additionally, correlations were observed in the expression levels of CPT I isoforms and Km for carnitine, and between CPT I isoform expression and CPT I activity. To our knowledge, for the first time, the present study provided evidence that waterborne Cu exposure could influence carnitine composition, CPT I kinetics and mRNA levels of four CPT I isoforms in yellow catfish, which served to increase our understanding of the mechanisms underlying lipid catabolism during Cu exposure.

  13. Tests of CP and CPT symmetry with positronium

    SciTech Connect

    Namba, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Nishihara, K.; Yamazaki, T.; Asai, S.

    2008-08-08

    The 3{gamma} decay of spin-aligned triplet positronium can be used to test CP (C = charge conjugation, and P = parity operation) invariance in the lepton sector. The angular correlation (s-circumflex {center_dot}k-circumflex {sub 1})(s-circumflex {center_dot}k-circumflex {sub 1}xk-circumflex {sub 2}) is used for this test, where s is the positronium spin and |k{sub 1}|>|k{sub 2}|>|k{sub 3}| are the {gamma} momenta.We designed a new detector to test this symmetry at the 10{sup -3} level. This detector consists of a magnet, a {beta}{sup +} tagging and o-Ps creation system, {gamma}-ray detectors, and a turntable. The detector construction is almost finished and data acquisition will begin in this spring.With a similar detector, the CPT (T = time reversal) symmetry can be also tested. In this case, the angular correlation (s-circumflex {center_dot}k-circumflex {sub 1}xk-circumflex {sub 2}) is used. This test will be started after the CP test is finished.

  14. New class of squalene-based releasable nanoassemblies of paclitaxel, podophyllotoxin, camptothecin and epothilone A.

    PubMed

    Borrelli, Stella; Christodoulou, Michael S; Ficarra, Ilaria; Silvani, Alessandra; Cappelletti, Graziella; Cartelli, Daniele; Damia, Giovanna; Ricci, Francesca; Zucchetti, Massimo; Dosio, Franco; Passarella, Daniele

    2014-10-06

    The present study reports the preparation of a novel class of squalene conjugates with paclitaxel, podophyllotoxin, camptothecin and epothilone A. The obtained compounds are characterized by a squalene tail that makes them able to self-assemble in water, and by a drug unit connected via a disulfide-containing linker to secure the release inside the cell. All the obtained compounds were effectively able to self-assemble and to release the parent drug in vitro. Disulfide-containing paclitaxel-squalene derivative showed a similar biological activity when compared to the free drug. Immunofluorescence assay shows that this squalene conjugate enters A549 cells and stain microtubule bundles. The results described herein pave the way for different classes of squalene-based releasable nanoassemblies.

  15. Impaired FANCD2 monoubiquitination and hypersensitivity to camptothecin uniquely characterize Fanconi anemia complementation group M.

    PubMed

    Singh, Thiyam Ramsing; Bakker, Sietske T; Agarwal, Sheba; Jansen, Michael; Grassman, Elke; Godthelp, Barbara C; Ali, Abdullah Mahmood; Du, Chang-hu; Rooimans, Martin A; Fan, Qiang; Wahengbam, Kebola; Steltenpool, Jurgen; Andreassen, Paul R; Williams, David A; Joenje, Hans; de Winter, Johan P; Meetei, Amom Ruhikanta

    2009-07-02

    FANCM is a component of the Fanconi anemia (FA) core complex and one FA patient (EUFA867) with biallelic mutations in FANCM has been described. Strikingly, we found that EUFA867 also carries biallelic mutations in FANCA. After correcting the FANCA defect in EUFA867 lymphoblasts, a "clean" FA-M cell line was generated. These cells were hypersensitive to mitomycin C, but unlike cells defective in other core complex members, FANCM(-/-) cells were proficient in monoubiquitinating FANCD2 and were sensitive to the topoisomerase inhibitor camptothecin, a feature shared only with the FA subtype D1 and N. In addition, FANCM(-/-) cells were sensitive to UV light. FANCM and a C-terminal deletion mutant rescued the cross-linker sensitivity of FANCM(-/-) cells, whereas a FANCM ATPase mutant did not. Because both mutants restored the formation of FANCD2 foci, we conclude that FANCM functions in an FA core complex-dependent and -independent manner.

  16. Design and synthesis of novel spin-labeled camptothecin derivatives as potent cytotoxic agents.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiao-Bo; Wu, Dan; Wang, Mei-Juan; Goto, Masuo; Morris-Natschke, Susan L; Liu, Ying-Qian; Wu, Xiao-Bing; Song, Zi-Long; Zhu, Gao-Xiang; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2014-11-15

    In our continuing search for natural product-based spin-labeled antitumor drugs, 20 novel spin-labeled camptothecin derivatives were synthesized via a Cu-catalyzed one pot reaction and evaluated for cytotoxicity against four human tumor cell lines (A-549, MDA-MB-231, KB, and KBvin). Eighteen of the target compounds (9a, 9b, 9d-9k, 9m-9t) exhibited significant in vitro antiproliferative activity against these four tested tumor cell lines. Compounds 9e and 9j (IC50 0.057 and 0.072μM, respectively) displayed the greatest cytotoxicity against the multidrug-resistant (MDR) KBvin cell line and merit further development into preclinical and clinical drug candidates for treating cancer including MDR phenotype.

  17. Search for Violation of CPT and Lorentz Invariance in Bs(0) Meson Oscillations.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agnew, J P; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Askew, A; Atkins, S; Augsten, K; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bazterra, V; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Bellantoni, L; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bhat, P C; Bhatia, S; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Borysova, M; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brock, R; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Buszello, C P; Camacho-Pérez, E; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Caughron, S; Chakrabarti, S; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapon, E; Chen, G; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cuth, J; Cutts, D; Das, A; Davies, G; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Deterre, C; DeVaughan, K; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Ding, P F; Dominguez, A; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fauré, A; Feng, L; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Garbincius, P H; Garcia-Bellido, A; García-González, J A; Gavrilov, V; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Gogota, O; Golovanov, G; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guillemin, T; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haley, J; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hogan, J; Hohlfeld, M; Holzbauer, J L; Howley, I; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Ilchenko, Y; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jayasinghe, A; Jeong, M S; Jesik, R; Jiang, P; Johns, K; Johnson, E; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Joshi, J; Jung, A W; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Katsanos, I; Kaur, M; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Kiselevich, I; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Lammers, S; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lei, X; Lellouch, J; Li, D; Li, H; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, H; Liu, Y; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lopes de Sa, R; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madar, R; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mansour, J; Martínez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Miconi, F; Mondal, N K; Mulhearn, M; Nagy, E; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nguyen, H T; Nunnemann, T; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Pal, A; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, Y; Petridis, K; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Pleier, M-A; Podstavkov, V M; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Prokopenko, N; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rominsky, M; Ross, A; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santos, A S; Savage, G; Savitskyi, M; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schott, M; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shaw, S; Shchukin, A A; Simak, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Soustruznik, K; Stark, J; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, M; Suter, L; Svoisky, P; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsai, Y-T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verkheev, A Y; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vokac, P; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weichert, J; Welty-Rieger, L; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yamada, R; Yang, S; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, W; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Youn, S W; Yu, J M; Zennamo, J; Zhao, T G; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L

    2015-10-16

    We present the first search for CPT-violating effects in the mixing of Bs(0) mesons using the full Run II data set with an integrated luminosity of 10.4  fb(-1) of proton-antiproton collisions collected using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We measure the CPT-violating asymmetry in the decay Bs(0)→μ(±)Ds(±) as a function of celestial direction and sidereal phase. We find no evidence for CPT-violating effects and place limits on the direction and magnitude of flavor-dependent CPT- and Lorentz-invariance violating coupling coefficients. We find 95% confidence intervals of Δa⊥<1.2×10(-12)  GeV and (-0.8<ΔaT-0.396ΔaZ<3.9)×10(-13)  GeV.

  18. FL118, a novel camptothecin analogue, overcomes irinotecan and topotecan resistance in human tumor xenograft models

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Xiang; Liu, Xiaojun; Zhong, Kai; Smith, Nicholas; Prey, Joshua; Li, Fengzhi

    2015-01-01

    Irinotecan and topotecan are the only camptothecin analogues approved by the FDA for cancer treatment. However, inherent and/or acquired irinotecan and topotecan resistance is a challenging issue in clinical practice. In this report, we showed that FL118, a novel camptothecin analogue, effectively obliterated human xenograft tumors that acquire irinotecan and topotecan resistance. Consistent with this finding, Pharmacokinetics studies indicated that FL118 rapidly clears from circulation, while effectively accumulating in tumors with a long elimination half-life. Consistent with our previous studies on irinotecan, FL118 exhibited ≥25 fold more effectiveness than topotecan at inhibiting cancer cell growth and colony formation; we further showed that although topotecan can inhibit the expression of survivin, Mcl-1, XIAP or cIAP2, its effectiveness is about 10-100 fold weaker than FL118. Lastly, in contrast to both SN-38 (active metabolite of irinotecan) and topotecan are substrates of the efflux pump proteins P-gp/MDR1 and ABCG2/BCRP, FL118 is not a substrate of P-gp and ABCG2. Consistently, sildenafil, a multiple efflux pump inhibitor, sensitized SN-38 much more than these of the ABCG2-selective inhibitor KO143 in growth inhibition of SW620 and HCT-8 cells. In contrast, both inhibitors showed no effect on FL118 efficacy. Given that both P-gp and ABCG2 express in SW620 and HCT-8 cells and FL118 is not a substrate for P-gp and ABCG2, this suggests that FL118 appears to bypass multiple efflux pump protein-induced resistance, which may contribute to FL118 overcoming irinotecan and topotecan resistance in vivo. These new findings provide renewed perspectives for further development of FL118 for clinical applications. PMID:26692923

  19. Design, synthesis, cytotoxic activity and molecular docking studies of new 20(S)-sulfonylamidine camptothecin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Song, Zi-Long; Wang, Mei-Juan; Li, Lanlan; Wu, Dan; Wang, Yu-Han; Yan, Li-Ting; Morris-Natschke, Susan L; Liu, Ying-Qian; Zhao, Yong-Long; Wang, Chih-Ya; Liu, Huanxiang; Goto, Masuo; Liu, Heng; Zhu, Gao-Xiang; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2016-06-10

    In an ongoing investigation of 20-sulfonylamidine derivatives (9, YQL-9a) of camptothecin (1) as potential anticancer agents directly and selectively inhibiting topoisomerase (Topo) I, the sulfonylamidine pharmacophore was held constant, and a camptothecin derivatives with various substitution patterns were synthesized. The new compounds were evaluated for antiproliferative activity against three human tumor cell lines, A-549, KB, and multidrug resistant (MDR) KB subline (KBvin). Several analogs showed comparable or superior antiproliferative activity compared to the clinically prescribed 1 and irinotecan (3). Significantly, the 20-sulfonylamidine derivatives exhibited comparable cytotoxicity against KBvin, while 1 and 3 were less active against this cell line. Among them, compound 15c displayed much better cytotoxic activity than the controls 1, 3, and 9. Novel key structural features related to the antiproliferative activities were identified by structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis. In a molecular docking model, compounds 9 and 15c interacted with Topo I-DNA through a different binding mode from 1 and 3. The sulfonylamidine side chains of 9 and 15c could likely form direct hydrogen bonds with Topo I, while hydrophobic interaction with Topo I and π-π stacking with double strand DNA were also confirmed as binding driving forces. The results from docking models were consistent with the SAR conclusions. The introduction of bulky substituents at the 20-position contributed to the altered binding mode of the compound by allowing them to form new interactions with Topo I residues. The information obtained in this study will be helpful for the design of new derivatives of 1 with most promising anticancer activity.

  20. The Catharanthus alkaloids: pharmacognosy and biotechnology.

    PubMed

    van Der Heijden, Robert; Jacobs, Denise I; Snoeijer, Wim; Hallard, Didier; Verpoorte, Robert

    2004-03-01

    The Catharanthus (or Vinca) alkaloids comprise a group of about 130 terpenoid indole alkaloids. Vinblastine is now marketed for more than 40 years as an anticancer drug and became a true lead compound for drug development. Due to the pharmaceutical importance and the low content in the plant of vinblastine and the related alkaloid vincristine, Catharanthus roseus became one of the best-studied medicinal plants. Consequently it developed as a model system for biotechnological studies on plant secondary metabolism. The aim of this review is to acquaint a broader audience with the recent progress in this research and with its exciting perspectives. The pharmacognostical aspects of the Catharanthus alkaloids cover botanical (including some historical), phytochemical and analytical data. An up-to-date view on the biosynthesis of the alkaloids is given. The pharmacological aspects of these alkaloids and their semi-synthetic derivatives are only discussed briefly. The biotechnological part focuses on alternative production systems for these alkaloids, for example by in vitro culture of C. roseus cells. Subsequently it will be discussed to what extent the alkaloid biosynthetic pathway can be manipulated genetically ("metabolic engineering"), aiming at higher production levels of the alkaloids. Another approach is to produce the alkaloids (or their precursors) in other organisms such as yeast. Despite the availability of only a limited number of biosynthetic genes, the research on C. roseus has already led to a broad scientific spin-off. It is clear that many interesting results can be expected when more genes become available.

  1. Ergot alkaloid transport across ruminant gastric tissues.

    PubMed

    Hill, N S; Thompson, F N; Stuedemann, J A; Rottinghaus, G W; Ju, H J; Dawe, D L; Hiatt, E E

    2001-02-01

    Ergot alkaloids cause fescue toxicosis when livestock graze endophyte-infected tall fescue. It is generally accepted that ergovaline is the toxic component of endophyte-infected tall fescue, but there is no direct evidence to support this hypothesis. The objective of this study was to examine relative and potential transport of ergoline and ergopeptine alkaloids across isolated gastric tissues in vitro. Sheep ruminal and omasal tissues were surgically removed and placed in parabiotic chambers. Equimolar concentrations of lysergic acid, lysergol, ergonovine, ergotamine, and ergocryptine were added to a Kreb's Ringer phosphate (KRP) solution on the mucosal side of the tissue. Tissue was incubated in near-physiological conditions for 240 min. Samples were taken from KRP on the serosal side of the chambers at times 0, 30, 60, 120, 180, and 240 min and analyzed for ergot alkaloids by competitive ELISA. The serosal KRP remaining after incubation was freeze-dried and the alkaloid species quantified by HPLC. The area of ruminal and omasal tissues was measured and the potential transportable alkaloids calculated by multiplying the moles of transported alkaloids per square centimeter of each tissue type by the surface area of the tissue. Studies were conducted to compare alkaloid transport in reticular, ruminal, and omasal tissues and to determine whether transport was active or passive. Ruminal tissue had greater ergot alkaloid transport potential than omasal tissue (85 vs 60 mmol) because of a larger surface area. The ruminal posterior dorsal sac had the greatest potential for alkaloid transport, but the other ruminal tissues were not different from one another. Alkaloid transport was less among reticular tissues than among ruminal tissues. Transport of alkaloids seemed to be an active process. The alkaloids with greatest transport potential were lysergic acid and lysergol. Ergopeptine alkaloids tended to pass across omasal tissues in greater quantities than across ruminal

  2. Hypothalamic Ceramide Levels Regulated by CPT1C Mediate the Orexigenic Effect of Ghrelin

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Sara; Martins, Luís; Jacas, Jordi; Carrasco, Patricia; Pozo, Macarena; Clotet, Josep; Serra, Dolors; Hegardt, Fausto G.; Diéguez, Carlos; López, Miguel; Casals, Núria

    2013-01-01

    Recent data suggest that ghrelin exerts its orexigenic action through regulation of hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase pathway, leading to a decline in malonyl-CoA levels and desinhibition of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A), which increases mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and ultimately enhances the expression of the orexigenic neuropeptides agouti-related protein (AgRP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY). However, it is unclear whether the brain-specific isoform CPT1C, which is located in the endoplasmic reticulum of neurons, may play a role in this action. Here, we demonstrate that the orexigenic action of ghrelin is totally blunted in CPT1C knockout (KO) mice, despite having the canonical ghrelin signaling pathway activated. We also demonstrate that ghrelin elicits a marked upregulation of hypothalamic C18:0 ceramide levels mediated by CPT1C. Notably, central inhibition of ceramide synthesis with myriocin negated the orexigenic action of ghrelin and normalized the levels of AgRP and NPY, as well as their key transcription factors phosphorylated cAMP-response element–binding protein and forkhead box O1. Finally, central treatment with ceramide induced food intake and orexigenic neuropeptides expression in CPT1C KO mice. Overall, these data indicate that, in addition to formerly reported mechanisms, ghrelin also induces food intake through regulation of hypothalamic CPT1C and ceramide metabolism, a finding of potential importance for the understanding and treatment of obesity. PMID:23493572

  3. Alkaloids from Hippeastrum equestre. Part I. Phamine, a new phenanthridone alkaloid.

    PubMed

    Döpke, W; Pham, L H; Gründemann, E; Bartoszek, M; Flatau, S

    1995-12-01

    From the bulbs of Vietnamese Hippeastrum equestre Herb. (Amaryllidaceae), besides the well known alkaloids lycorine, tazettine, and hippeastrine, a new alkaloid, phamine, has been isolated. Its structure was established by spectroscopic methods.

  4. Fish oil supplementation enhanced CPT-11 (irinotecan) efficacy against MCF7 breast carcinoma xenografts and ameliorated intestinal side-effects

    PubMed Central

    Hardman, W E; Moyer, M P; Cameron, I L

    1999-01-01

    The cancer chemotherapeutic efficacy of the topoisomerase I inhibitor, CPT-11 (irinotecan) is often limited by the induction of severe delayed diarrhoea. In animal studies, CPT-11 use is associated with histopathological damage to the mucosa of the small and large intestines. Results from the present study demonstrate that 60 mg CPT-11 per kg body weight (i.v. q4d × 6) halted the growth, but did not cause significant regression, of MCF7 human breast carcinoma xenografts in mice fed a diet containing 7% corn oil. However, when the diet of the MCF7-bearing mice was supplemented with 3% or 6% fish oil, the same CPT-11 treatment caused significant regression of the MCF7 xenograft. Histomorphometric analyses of intestinal mucosa of mice treated with CPT-11 and fed the diet containing 7% corn oil indicated that treatment with CPT-11 induced structural changes in the intestinal mucosa which persisted at least 5 days after the last dose of CPT-11. The intestinal mucosal architecture of mice that were treated with CPT-11 and fed the diets containing fish oil was largely unchanged from the architecture of the group of mice which did not receive CPT-11. These findings indicate that fish oil supplements may be a useful adjunct to CPT-11 treatment. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10507768

  5. Progress of pharmacological studies on alkaloids from Apocynaceae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; Cao, Jian-Xin; Yao, Yuan-Cheng; Xu, Sheng-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Alkaloid was a kind of biological active ingredient. There were various types of alkaloids in Apocynaceae. This paper reviewed the progress on alkaloids from Apocynaceae, which contained origin, structure, and pharmacological activity.

  6. Angustilobine and andranginine type indole alkaloids and an uleine-secovallesamine bisindole alkaloid from Alstonia angustiloba.

    PubMed

    Ku, Wai-Foong; Tan, Shin-Jowl; Low, Yun-Yee; Komiyama, Kanki; Kam, Toh-Seok

    2011-12-01

    A total of 20 alkaloids were isolated from the leaf and stem-bark extracts of Alstonia angustiloba, of which two are hitherto unknown. One is an alkaloid of the angustilobine type (angustilobine C), while the other is a bisindole alkaloid angustiphylline, derived from the union of uleine and secovallesamine moieties. The structures of these alkaloids were established using NMR and MS analysis. Angustilobine C showed moderate cytotoxicity towards KB cells.

  7. Four new fluorenone alkaloids and one new dihydroazafluoranthene alkaloid from Caulophyllum robustum Maxim.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Ling; Liu, Bing-Rui; Chen, Chien-Kuang; Wang, Jun-Ru; Lee, Shoei-Sheng

    2011-09-01

    Four new fluorenone alkaloids, caulophylline A-D (1-4), and one new dihydroazafluoranthene alkaloid, caulophylline E (5) were isolated from the roots of Caulophyllum robustum Maxim. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analysis. Among the isolated alkaloids, Caulophylline E showed good scavenging effects against DPPH radical with IC(50) of 39 μM.

  8. The alkaloids of Delphinium cashmirianum.

    PubMed

    Shamma, M; Chinnasamy, P; Miana, G A; Khan, A; Bashir, M; Salazar, M; Patil, P; Beal, J L

    1979-01-01

    Dephinium cashmirianum Royle (Ranunculaceae) has yielded the new base cashmiradelphine (12), together with the known alkaloids anthranoyllycoctonine (9), lycaconitine (15), avadharidine (17), lappaconitine (4), and N-deacetyllappaconitine (7). Pyridinium chlorochromate oxidation of lycoctonine furnished the new aldehyde lycoctonal (11). The arrhythmogenic and heart rate effects of several of these diterpenoidal alkaloids have been measured on the isolated guinea atria. Lappaconitine was arrhythmogenic at 10(-4)M concentrations. But in contrast to the reference drug aconitine, lappaconitine did not increase the heart rate. In anesthetized rabbits injected with lappaconitine, N-deacetyllappaconitine, and lappaconine up to 1 mg/kg, cardiac arrhythmia was quickly observed. Even up to 5 mg/kg, the other substances were non-arrhythmogenic.

  9. Alkaloids from Boophone haemanthoides (Amaryllidaceae).

    PubMed

    Nair, Jerald J; Rárová, Lucie; Strnad, Miroslav; Bastidad, Jaume; van Staden, Johannes

    2013-12-01

    In this study, the South African Amaryllid Boophone haemanthoides was examined for its phytochemical composition and cytotoxicity. In the process eight alkaloid structures, including the new compound distichaminol, were identified in bulb ethanolic extracts. Of the isolates, lycorine and distichamine exhibited strong activities against human acute lymphoblastic leukemia (CEM), breast adenocarcinoma (MCF7) and cervical adenocarcinoma (HeLa) cells with IC50S ranging from 1.8 to 9.2 microM.

  10. STI571 SENSITIZES BREAST CANCER CELLS TO 5-FLUOROURACIL, CISPLATIN AND CAMPTOTHECIN IN A CELL TYPE-SPECIFIC MANNER

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Jonathan T.; Ganguly, Sourik; Fiore, Leann S.; Holler, Chris J.; Park, Eun-Sil; Plattner, Rina

    2009-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that Abl kinases are highly active in invasive breast cancer cell lines, and contribute to survival in response to nutrient deprivation, invasion and proliferation. To determine whether an Abl kinase inhibitor, STI571 (Gleevec; imatinib mesylate) sensitizes breast cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents, we treated three breast cancer cell lines (BT-549, MDA-MB-231, and MDA-MB-468) that have active Abl kinases, with STI571 in combination with several conventional chemotherapeutic drugs frequently used to treat breast cancer, and assessed the effect on cell viability, proliferation, and apoptosis. We found that STI571 had synergistic effects with cisplatin in BT-549 and to some extent in MDA-MB-468 cells, STI571 synergized with camptothecin using an alternate dosing regimen in MDA-MB-231 cells, and STI571 synergistically sensitized MDA-MB-468 cells to paclitaxel and to high doses of 5-fluorouracil. Significantly, STI571 increased the ability of cisplatin to inhibit constitutive activation of PI3K/Akt, synergized with camptothecin to increase the stability of IκB in MDA-MB-231 cells, and in MDA-MB-468 cells, camptothecin and 5-fluorouracil inhibited STI571-dependent activation of STAT3. In other cell line/drug combinations, STI571 had additive or antagonistic effects, indicating that the ability of STI571 to sensitize breast cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents is cell type-dependent. Significantly, unlike cisplatin, paclitaxel, and camptothecin, mechloroethamine was strongly antagonistic to STI571, and the effect was not cell line-dependent. Taken together, these data indicate that the cellular milieu governs the response of breast cancer cells to STI571/chemotherapeutic combination regimens, which suggests that treatment with these combinations requires individualization. PMID:19427998

  11. Morphinane alkaloid dimers from Sinomenium acutum.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hui-Zi; Wang, Xiao-Ling; Wang, Hong-Bing; Wang, Yu-Bo; Lin, Li-Ping; Ding, Jian; Qin, Guo-Wei

    2008-01-01

    Two new morphinane alkaloid dimers, 2,2'-disinomenine (1) and 7',8'-dihydro-1,1'-disinomenine (2), and known 1, 1'-disinomenine (3), were isolated from ethanol extracts of stems of Sinomenium acutum. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic methods. The absolute configuration of alkaloids 1-3 was determined by direct comparison of their CD spectra with the known alkaloid sinomenine. The isolated alkaloids were tested for cytotoxicity against A549, P388, and HeLa cell lines, and 1 and 3 showed weak inhibition against A549 and Hela cells.

  12. Six new alkaloids from Melodinus henryi.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ke; Wang, Jun-Song; Luo, Jun; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2015-01-01

    A total of six new alkaloids, melodinhenines A-F (1-6), were isolated from Melodinus henryi. Melodinhenines A and B are new eburnan-vindolinine-type bisindole alkaloids and melodinhenines C-F are new quinolinic melodinus alkaloids. Their structures were elucidated through extensive spectroscopic methods including 2D NMR and HRESIMS analyses. The absolute configuration of 1 and 2 was determined using ECD exciton chirality method. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the determination of the absolute configuration of eburnan-vindolinine-type bisindole alkaloid using this method.

  13. Molecular Cloning, Heterologous Expression, and Functional Characterization of an NADPH-Cytochrome P450 Reductase Gene from Camptotheca acuminata, a Camptothecin-Producing Plant

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fei; Yang, Yun; Yang, Lixia; Zhang, Guolin; Luo, Yinggang

    2015-01-01

    Camptothecin (CAM), a complex pentacyclic pyrroloqinoline alkaloid, is the starting material for CAM-type drugs that are well-known antitumor plant drugs. Although many chemical and biological research efforts have been performed to produce CAM, a few attempts have been made to uncover the enzymatic mechanism involved in the biosynthesis of CAM. Enzyme-catalyzed oxidoreduction reactions are ubiquitously presented in living organisms, especially in the biosynthetic pathway of most secondary metabolites such as CAM. Due to a lack of its reduction partner, most catalytic oxidation steps involved in the biosynthesis of CAM have not been established. In the present study, an NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) encoding gene CamCPR was cloned from Camptotheca acuminata, a CAM-producing plant. The full length of CamCPR cDNA contained an open reading frame of 2127-bp nucleotides, corresponding to 708-amino acid residues. CamCPR showed 70 ~ 85% identities to other characterized plant CPRs and it was categorized to the group II of CPRs on the basis of the results of multiple sequence alignment of the N-terminal hydrophobic regions. The intact and truncate CamCPRs with N- or C-terminal His6-tag were heterologously overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant enzymes showed NADPH-dependent reductase activity toward a chemical substrate ferricyanide and a protein substrate cytochrome c. The N-terminal His6-tagged CamCPR showed 18- ~ 30-fold reduction activity higher than the C-terminal His6-tagged CamCPR, which supported a reported conclusion, i.e., the last C-terminal tryptophan of CPRs plays an important role in the discrimination between NADPH and NADH. Co-expression of CamCPR and a P450 monooxygenase, CYP73A25, a cinnamate 4-hydroxylase from cotton, and the following catalytic formation of p-coumaric acid suggested that CamCPR transforms electrons from NADPH to the heme center of P450 to support its oxidation reaction. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that

  14. Effect of Cellular Location of Human Carboxylesterase 2 on CPT-11 Hydrolysis and Anticancer Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yuan-Ting; Lin, Hsuan-Pei; Chen, Bing-Mae; Huang, Ping-Ting; Roffler, Steve R.

    2015-01-01

    CPT-11 is an anticancer prodrug that is clinically used for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Hydrolysis of CPT-11 by human carboxylesterase 2 (CE2) generates SN-38, a topoisomerase I inhibitor that is the active anti-tumor agent. Expression of CE2 in cancer cells is under investigation for the tumor-localized activation of CPT-11. CE2 is normally expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum of cells but can be engineered to direct expression of active enzyme on the plasma membrane or as a secreted form. Although previous studies have investigated different locations of CE2 expression in cancer cells, it remains unclear if CE2 cellular location affects CPT-11 anticancer activity. In the present study, we directly compared the influence of CE2 cellular location on substrate hydrolysis and CPT-11 cytotoxicity. We linked expression of CE2 and enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP) via a foot-and-mouth disease virus 2A (F2A) peptide to facilitate fluorescence-activated cell sorting to achieve similar expression levels of ER-located, secreted or membrane-anchored CE2. Soluble CE2 was detected in the medium of cells that expressed secreted and membrane-anchored CE2, but not in cells that expressed ER-retained CE2. Cancer cells that expressed all three forms of CE2 were more sensitive to CPT-11 as compared to unmodified cancer cells, but the membrane-anchored and ER-retained forms of CE2 were consistently more effective than secreted CE2. We conclude that expression of CE2 in the ER or on the membrane of cancer cells is suitable for enhancing CPT-11 anticancer activity. PMID:26509550

  15. Cellular Basis of Antiproliferative and Antitumor Activity of the Novel Camptothecin Derivative, Gimatecan, in Bladder Carcinoma Models1

    PubMed Central

    Ulivi, Paola; Zoli, Wainer; Fabbri, Francesco; Brigliadori, Giovanni; Ricotti, Luca; Tesei, Anna; Rosetti, Marco; De Cesare, Michelandrea; Beretta, Giovanni L; Corna, Elisabetta; Supino, Rosanna; Zunino, Franco

    2005-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the cellular/molecular basis of the activity of a novel lipophilic camptothecin, gimatecan (ST1481), against slowly proliferating cells, we performed a comparative study of topotecan and gimatecan in human bladder cancer models (HT1376 and MCR). Gimatecan was significantly more effective than topotecan in inhibiting the growth of HT1376 tumor, thus reflecting antiproliferative potency. In both HT1376 and MCR cells, gimatecan caused a persistent S-phase arrest, indicating an efficient DNA damage checkpoint. This response was consistent with a cytostatic effect, because no evidence of apoptosis was detected. In contrast to gimatecan, topotecan at equitoxic concentrations caused an early and persistent downregulation of topoisomerase I. Modulation of protein level could not be solely ascribed to the proteasome-mediated degradation of the enzyme because the proteasome inhibitor PS341 sensitized MCR but not HT1376 cells to camptothecins, suggesting alternative mechanisms of drug-induced topoisomerase I downregulation. Indeed, the two camptothecins caused a differential inhibition of topoisomerase I transcription, which is more marked in topotecan-treated cells. The HT1376 model was more sensitive to this immediate decrease of mRNA level. Our data document a marked antitumor activity of gimatecan against a bladder carcinoma model. A limited downregulation of topoisomerase I by gimatecan provides additional insights into the cellular basis of drug potency. PMID:15802020

  16. Low toxic and high soluble camptothecin derivative 2-47 effectively induces apoptosis of tumor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yao; Zhao, Hong-Ye; Jiang, Du; Wang, Lu-Yao; Xiang, Cen; Wen, Shao-Peng; Fan, Zhen-Chuan; Zhang, Yong-Min; Guo, Na; Teng, Yu-Ou; Yu, Peng

    2016-04-08

    The cytotoxic activity of camptothecin derivatives is so high that these compounds need to be further modified before their successful application as anti-cancer agents clinically. In this study, we reported the synthesis and biological evaluation of a novel camptothecin derivative called compound 2-47. The changes in structure did not reduce its activity to inhibit DNA topoisomerase I. Compound 2-47 induced apoptosis of many tumor cells including leukemia cells K562, Jurkat, HL-60, breast cancer cell BT-549, colon cancer cell HT-29 and liver cancer cell HepG2 with a half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 2- to 3-fold lower than HCPT as a control. In particular, 2-47 inhibited the proliferation of Jurkat cells with an IC50 of as low as 40 nM. By making use of Jurkat cell as a model, following treatment of Jurkat cells, compound 2-47 activated caspase-3 and PARP, resulting in a decreased Bcl-2/Bax ratio. These data showed that compound 2-47 induces Jurkat cell death through the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. In addition, compound 2-47 showed a decreased cytotoxic activity against normal cells and an improved solubility in low-polar solvent. For example, compound 2-47 solutes in CHCl3 130-fold higher than HCPT. Taken together, our data demonstrated that camptothecin derivative 2-47 notably inhibits the tumor cell proliferation through mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in vitro.

  17. Delineation of creosote-based DNAPLs using CPT-deployed laser induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggery, D.A. Jr.; Misquitta, N.J; Coll, F.R..

    1996-12-01

    This paper presents a case study of the first commercial use of cone penetrometer testing (CPT)/deployed laser induced fluorescence (LIF) to address the following objectives at a creosote DNAPL site. The objectives of the investigation using CPT/LIF were to: quickly and cost effectively delineate the horizontal and vertical extent of creosote DNAPL in soil/groundwater; delineate/differentiate creosote DNAPL constituents within the extent of DNAPL; delineate dissolved-phase versus free phase DNAPL compounds in the subsurface. The complexity of investigating the extent of creosote DNAPL magnifies the time and cost of the application of conventional investigative techniques. The application of CPT/LIF at the subject site allowed a comparison between CPT/LIF and more conventional investigative techniques. If the objectives were achieved in a shorter time-frame, and at a lesser cost than traditional methods, then the CPT/LIF method would be confirmed as a viable, field-scale technology for investigating appropriate wood-treating sites.

  18. CPT-based probabilistic and deterministic assessment of in situ seismic soil liquefaction potential

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moss, R.E.S.; Seed, R.B.; Kayen, R.E.; Stewart, J.P.; Der Kiureghian, A.; Cetin, K.O.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a complete methodology for both probabilistic and deterministic assessment of seismic soil liquefaction triggering potential based on the cone penetration test (CPT). A comprehensive worldwide set of CPT-based liquefaction field case histories were compiled and back analyzed, and the data then used to develop probabilistic triggering correlations. Issues investigated in this study include improved normalization of CPT resistance measurements for the influence of effective overburden stress, and adjustment to CPT tip resistance for the potential influence of "thin" liquefiable layers. The effects of soil type and soil character (i.e., "fines" adjustment) for the new correlations are based on a combination of CPT tip and sleeve resistance. To quantify probability for performancebased engineering applications, Bayesian "regression" methods were used, and the uncertainties of all variables comprising both the seismic demand and the liquefaction resistance were estimated and included in the analysis. The resulting correlations were developed using a Bayesian framework and are presented in both probabilistic and deterministic formats. The results are compared to previous probabilistic and deterministic correlations. ?? 2006 ASCE.

  19. Alkaloids of Nelumbo lutea (Wild.) pers. (Nymphaeaceae)

    PubMed

    Zelenski, S G

    1977-11-01

    A phytochemical investigation of an alcoholic extract of the petioles of Nelumbo lutea resulted in the identification of the alkaloids N-methylasimilobine, anonaine, and roemerine. The alkaloids nuciferine, armepavine, N-nornuciferine, and N-norarmepavine, previously previously reported in the whole plant, were also identified.

  20. Cytotoxic oxoisoaporphine alkaloids from Menispermum dauricum.

    PubMed

    Yu, B W; Meng, L H; Chen, J Y; Zhou, T X; Cheng, K F; Ding, J; Qin, G W

    2001-07-01

    Four new oxoisoaporphine alkaloids, daurioxoisoporphines A-D (1-4), were isolated from the rhizomes of Menispermum dauricum. The structures of these alkaloids were established by spectroscopic methods. The cytotoxic evaluation of 1 and 2 is reported against four cancer cell lines.

  1. Plant alkaloids of the polymethyleneamine series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogoza, Ludmila N.; Salakhutdinov, Nariman F.; Tolstikov, Genrikh A.

    2005-04-01

    The published data on the structures and biological activities of the plant alkaloids of the biogenic polymethyleneamine series, viz., putrescine (1,4-diaminobutane), spermidine (1,8-diamino-4 -azaoctane), and spermine (1,12-diamino-4,9-diazadodecane), are considered and systematised. The structures and biological activities of some synthetic analogues of these alkaloids are also presented.

  2. Glycoalkaloids and calystegine alkaloids in potatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potatoes contain two classes of alkaloids: the glycoalkaloids and the calystegines. The presence of glycoalkaloids in potatoes and their toxicity has been known for more than a century and much has been written about them. Discovery of the nortropane calystegine alkaloids is more recent, and the k...

  3. In vivo Cytotoxicity Studies of Amaryllidaceae Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Nair, Jerald J; Bastida, Jaume; van Staden, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    The plant family Amaryllidaceae is recognizable for its esthetic floral characteristics, its widespread usage in traditional medicine as well as its unique alkaloid principles. Few alkaloid-producing families rival the Amaryllidaceae in terms of the diversity of its structures as well as their wide applicability on the biological landscape. In particular, cytotoxic effects have come to be a dominant theme in the biological properties of Amaryllidacea alkaloids. To this extent, a significant number of structures have been subjected to in vitro studies in numerous cell lines from which several targets have been identified as promising chemotherapeutics. By contrast, in vivo models of study involving these alkaloids have been carried out to a lesser extent and should prove crucial in the continued development of a clinical target such as pancratistatin. This survey examines the cytotoxic effects of Amaryllidaceae alkaloids in vivo and contrasts these against the corresponding in vitro effects.

  4. Protein kinase Cη activates NF-κB in response to camptothecin-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Raveh-Amit, Hadas; Hai, Naama; Rotem-Dai, Noa; Shahaf, Galit; Gopas, Jacob; Livneh, Etta

    2011-08-26

    The nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) family of transcription factors participates in the regulation of genes involved in innate- and adaptive-immune responses, cell death and inflammation. The involvement of the Protein kinase C (PKC) family in the regulation of NF-κB in inflammation and immune-related signaling has been extensively studied. However, not much is known on the role of PKC in NF-κB regulation in response to DNA damage. Here we demonstrate for the first time that PKC-eta (PKCη) regulates NF-κB upstream signaling by activating the IκB kinase (IKK) and the degradation of IκB. Furthermore, PKCη enhances the nuclear translocation and transactivation of NF-κB under non-stressed conditions and in response to the anticancer drug camptothecin. We and others have previously shown that PKCη confers protection against DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Our present study suggests that PKCη is involved in NF-κB signaling leading to drug resistance.

  5. Effects of camptothecin derivatives and topoisomerase dual inhibitors on Trypanosoma cruzi growth and ultrastructure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas’ disease that is an endemic disease in Latin America and affects about 8 million people. This parasite belongs to the Trypanosomatidae family which contains a single mitochondrion with an enlarged region, named kinetoplast that harbors the mitochondrial DNA (kDNA). The kinetoplast and the nucleus present a great variety of essential enzymes involved in DNA replication and topology, including DNA topoisomerases. Such enzymes are considered to be promising molecular targets for cancer treatment and for antiparasitic chemotherapy. In this work, the proliferation and ultrastructure of T. cruzi epimastigotes were evaluated after treatment with eukaryotic topoisomerase I inhibitors, such as topotecan and irinotecan, as well as with dual inhibitors (compounds that block eukaryotic topoisomerase I and topoisomerase II activities), such as baicalein, luteolin and evodiamine. Previous studies have shown that such inhibitors were able to block the growth of tumor cells, however most of them have never been tested on trypanosomatids. Results Considering the effects of topoisomerase I inhibitors, our results showed that topotecan decreased cell proliferation and caused unpacking of nuclear heterochromatin, however none of these alterations were observed after treatment with irinotecan. The dual inhibitors baicalein and evodiamine decreased cell growth; however the nuclear and kinetoplast ultrastructures were not affected. Conclusions Taken together, our data showed that camptothecin is more efficient than its derivatives in decreasing T. cruzi proliferation. Furthermore, we conclude that drugs pertaining to a certain class of topoisomerase inhibitors may present different efficiencies as chemotherapeutical agents. PMID:24917086

  6. Encapsulation of 10-hydroxy camptothecin in supramolecular hydrogel as an injectable drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruixin; Shu, Chang; Wang, Wei; Wang, Xiaoliang; Li, Hui; Xu, Danke; Zhong, Wenying

    2015-07-01

    10-Hydroxy camptothecin (HCPT) has been proven to be a cell cycle-specific chemotherapeutic agent, which is a necessary choice to inhibit tumor residue growth and prevent tumor metastasis after surgery. But it suffers from light decomposition, poor solubility, relatively low bioavailability, and some side effects, which are the major obstacles toward its clinical use. Integration of hydrophobic HCPT with hydrophilic hydrogel is a facile approach to change the disadvantageous situation of HCPT. In this study, a novel supramolecular hydrogelator with improved synthetic strategy was triggered by chemical hydrolysis, and then self-assembled to hydrogel. Taking advantage of the high-equilibrium solubility of HCPT in hydrogelator solution, this hydrogel was utilized to load HCPT via encapsulation as an effective carrier. HCPT hydrogels were characterized by several techniques including transmission electronic microscopy, rheology, and UV spectroscopy. In vitro release experiment indicated HCPT hydrogel could maintain long term and sustained release of HCPT at high accumulated rate. 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay showed that HCPT hydrogel had an optimized anticancer efficacy. Besides, with prominent physical properties of carrier, HCPT hydrogel possessed satisfactory stability, syringeability, and recoverability, demonstrating itself as a potential localized injectable drug delivery system.

  7. Prospect for development of a pulsed CPT Raman Ramsey clock using atomic vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pati, Gour S.; Fatemi, Fredrik K.; Bashkansky, Mark; Shahriar, Selim

    2010-02-01

    The phenomenon of all-optical Ramsey interference using pulsed coherent population trapping (CPT) beams provides a new avenue for developing frequency standards using atomic vapor. In this study, we show that frequency narrowed Ramsey fringes can be produced in rubidium vapor without the effect of power broadening. We observed fringes of width as narrow as 1 kHz using a buffer-gas filled rubidium cell. A compact injection-locked laser (ILL) system was used to generate CPT beams. Studies also show that ac Stark effect on Ramsey fringes can be reduced, and higher frequency stability can be achieved in a clock application. The results are encouraging to propose an architecture for development of a pulsed CPT Ramsey clock. In this paper, we also provide related discussions on clock frequency stability, and our plans for future experiments.

  8. Capacitive power transfer (CPT) system design using a class E resonant converter circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kh., Kamarudin; Saat, Shakir; Yusmarnita, Y.; Ramli. M., S.; Sufiah, A. W. Siti

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a Capacitive Power Transfer (CPT) system design using a Class E resonant converter circuit. The Class E resonant converter circuit is used to produce a high frequency of alternate current. The purpose of this circuit is to transfer the power via capacitive coupling efficiently. A major advantage of Class E resonant converter circuit is low switching losses. To be specifically, the performance of CPT system at 1MHz of operating frequency and 12V of DC supply voltage is analyzed through experimental works. Finally, a prototype of a CPT system is successfully developed which produced 2mW output power through a capacitive plate size is 12cm × 12cm at 0.1cm of air gap distance.

  9. Search for Violation of $CPT$ and Lorentz Invariance in $${B_s^0}$$ Meson Oscillations

    DOE PAGES

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2015-06-12

    We present the first search for CPT-violating effects in the mixing of B0s mesons using the full Run II data set with an integrated luminosity of 10.4 fb-1 of proton-antiproton collisions collected using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We measure the CPT-violating asymmetry in the decay B0s → µ±D±s as a function of celestial direction and sidereal phase. We find no evidence for CPT-violating effects and place limits on the direction and magnitude of flavor-dependent CPTand Lorentz-invariance violating coupling coefficients. We find 95% confidence intervals of Δa⊥ < 1.2 × 10-12 GeV and (-0.8 < ΔaT -more » 0.396ΔaZ < 3.9) × 10-13 GeV.« less

  10. Endophytic fungal strains of Fusarium solani, from Apodytes dimidiata E. Mey. ex Arn (Icacinaceae) produce camptothecin, 10-hydroxycamptothecin and 9-methoxycamptothecin.

    PubMed

    Shweta, S; Zuehlke, S; Ramesha, B T; Priti, V; Mohana Kumar, P; Ravikanth, G; Spiteller, M; Vasudeva, R; Uma Shaanker, R

    2010-01-01

    Camptothecin and 10-hydroxycamptothecin are two important precursors for the synthesis of the clinically useful anticancer drugs, topotecan and irinotecan. In recent years, efforts have been made to identify novel plant and endophytic fungal sources of camptothecin and 10-hydroxycamptothecin. In this study we have isolated endophytic fungi strains from Apodytes dimidiata (Icacinaceae), a medium sized tree from the Western Ghats, India. The fungi were identified as Fusarium solani using both ITS rDNA sequencing and spore morphology. Two strains, MTCC 9667 and MTCC 9668 were isolated, both of which produced camptothecin and 9-methoxycamptothecin in their mycelia; one of the strains, MTCC 9668 also produced 10-hydroxycamptothecin, though in small amounts. The yields of camptothecin in MTCC 9667 and MTCC 9668 were 37 and 53 microg/100g, respectively, after 4 days of incubation in broth culture. The yields of 10-hydroxycamptothecin and 9-methoxycamptothecin in MTCC 9668 were 8.2 and 44.9 microg/100g, respectively. Further research in optimizing the culture conditions of these fungal strains might permit their application for the production of camptothecin and 10-hydroxycamptothecin.

  11. Enhancement and reduction by methylated oxypurines of the frequencies of chromatid aberrations induced by camptothecin in root-tip cells of Vicia faba.

    PubMed

    Kihlman, B A; Andersson, H C

    1992-10-01

    In root-tip cells of Vicia faba the frequencies of chromatid aberrations induced by 3-h treatments with 0.05 microM camptothecin were strongly modified when the treatments were carried out in the presence of caffeine at concentrations above 1 mM. Depending on the concentration of caffeine, the clastogenic effect of camptothecin was either enhanced or reduced. At concentrations between 1 and 6 mM, caffeine increased the camptothecin-induced chromosome damage, the strongest enhancement being obtained at 5 mM. A reduction of the chromosome damage was apparent at caffeine concentrations above 10 mM, and in the presence of 20 mM caffeine the clastogenic effect of camptothecin was almost completely suppressed. When present during the camptothecin treatment, theophylline, 8-chlorocaffeine and 1,3,7,9-tetramethyluric acid influenced the induced chromosome damage in a similar way as caffeine, although with varying efficiency. If the concentrations required to produce the two types of modifying effect are used as a criterion, 8-chlorocaffeine was the most effective and 1,3,7,9-tetramethyluric acid the least, whereas caffeine and theophylline were about equally effective.

  12. Indole Alkaloids from Alocasia macrorrhiza.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ling-Hua; Chen, Cheng; Wang, Hui; Ye, Wen-Cai; Zhou, Guang-Xiong

    2012-01-01

    Five new indole alkaloids, alocasins A-E (3-7), together with known hyrtiosin B (1) and hyrtiosulawesin (2) were isolated from Alocasia macrorrhiza (L.) SCHOTT; their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data. Compounds 1-7 were in vitro tested for cytostatic activity on human throat cancer (Hep-2), human hepatocarcinoma (Hep-G2), and human nasopharyngeal carcinoma epithelial (CNE) cell lines by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) method; compounds 2, 3, 6 and 7 showed mild antiproliferative activity against Hep-2 and Hep-G2 whereas compounds 2 and 4 showed gentle antiproliferative activity against CNE.

  13. Novel type of CPT violation for correlated Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen states of neutral mesons.

    PubMed

    Bernabéu, J; Mavromatos, N; Papavassiliou, J

    2004-04-02

    We discuss modifications to the concept of an "antiparticle," induced by a breakdown of the CPT symmetry at a fundamental level, realized within an extended class of quantum gravity models. The resulting loss of particle-antiparticle identity in the neutral-meson system induces a breaking of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen correlation imposed by Bose statistics. This is parametrized by a complex parameter associated with the contamination by the "wrong symmetry" state. The physical consequences are studied, and novel observables of CPT violation in phi factories are proposed.

  14. A Search for Lorentz Invariance and CPT Violation with the MINOS Far Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P.; Auty, D.J.; Ayres, D.S.; Backhouse, C.; Barr, G.; Barrett, W.L.; Bishai, M.; Blake, A.; Bock, G.J.; Boehnlein, D.J.; Bogert, D.; /Fermilab /Indiana U.

    2010-07-01

    We searched for a sidereal modulation in the MINOS far detector neutrino rate. Such a signal would be a consequence of Lorentz and CPT violation as described by the Standard-Model Extension framework. It also would be the first detection of a perturbative effect to conventional neutrino mass oscillations. We found no evidence for this sidereal signature and the upper limits placed on the magnitudes of the Lorentz and CPT violating coefficients describing the theory are an improvement by factors of 20-510 over the current best limits found using the MINOS near detector.

  15. Ramsey-CPT spectrum with the Faraday effect and its application to atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yuan; Tan, Bo-Zhong; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Yi; Gu, Si-Hong

    2015-06-01

    A method that obtains the Ramsey-coherent population trapping (CPT) spectrum with the Faraday effect is investigated. An experiment is implemented to detect the light polarization components generated from the Faraday effect. The experimental results agree with the theoretical calculations based on the Liouville equation. By comparing with the method without using the Faraday effect, the potential of this method for a CPT-based atomic clock is assessed. The results indicate that this method should improve the short-term frequency stability by several times. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11304362 and 11204351).

  16. Enantioselective synthesis of alkaloids from phenylglycinol-derived lactams.

    PubMed

    Amat, Mercedes; Llor, Núria; Griera, Rosa; Pérez, Maria; Bosch, Joan

    2011-04-01

    This review is focused on recent synthetic achievements and ongoing work in our laboratory using phenylglycinol-derived oxazolopiperidone lactams as starting materials for the enantioselective synthesis of piperidine-containing alkaloids: madangamines, 2,5-disubstituted decahydroquinoline and 1-substituted tetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloids, the indole alkaloids 20S- and 20R-dihydrocleavamine and quebrachamine, and indole alkaloids of the uleine and silicine groups.

  17. Effect of MDL-Type alkaloids on tall larkspur toxicosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Larkspur plants contain numerous norditerpenoid alkaloids which include the 7, 8-methylenedioxylycoctonine (MDL) -type alkaloids and the N-(methylsuccinimido) anthranoyllycoctonine (MSAL) -type alkaloids. The MSAL-type alkaloids are generally much more toxic (typically > 20x) than the MDL-type alka...

  18. Effect of MDL-type alkaloids on tall larkspur toxicosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Larkspur plants contain numerous norditerpenoid alkaloids which include the 7, 8-methylenedioxylycoctonine (MDL) -type alkaloids and the N-(methylsuccinimido) anthranoyllycoctonine (MSAL) -type alkaloids. The MSAL-type alkaloids are generally much more toxic (typically > 20x). Toxicity of many tal...

  19. Genetic variation in alkaloid accumulation in leaves of Nicotiana.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bo; Zhang, Fen; Zhou, Guo-jun; Chu, Guo-hai; Huang, Fang-fang; Wang, Qiao-mei; Jin, Li-feng; Lin, Fu-cheng; Yang, Jun

    2013-12-01

    Alkaloids are plant secondary metabolites that are widely distributed in Nicotiana species and contribute greatly to the quality of tobacco leaves. Some alkaloids, such as nornicotine and myosmine, have adverse effects on human health. To reduce the content of harmful alkaloids in tobacco leaves through conventional breeding, a genetic study of the alkaloid variation among different genotypes is required. In this study, alkaloid profiles in leaves of five Nicotiana tabacum cultivars and Nicotiana tomentosiformis were investigated. Six alkaloids were identified from all six genotypes via gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Significant differences in alkaloid content were observed both among different leaf positions and among cultivars. The contents of nornicotine and myosmine were positively and significantly correlated (R(2)=0.881), and were also separated from those of other alkaloids by clustering. Thus, the genotype plays a major role in alkaloid accumulation, indicating a high potential for manipulation of alkaloid content through traditional breeding.

  20. Comparative Study of Alkaloid Pattern of Four Bulgarian Fumaria species.

    PubMed

    Doncheva, Tsvetelina; Yordanova, Gabriela; Vutov, Vassil; Kostova, Nadezhda; Philipov, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    The alkaloid pattern of four Fumaria species (Fumaria kralikii, Fumaria rostellata, Fumaria schleicherii, Fumaria thureii) growing in Bulgaria was investigated by GC-MS and twenty isoquinoline alkaloids were determined. Phytochemical investigation of the alkaloid composition on Fumaria thuretii Boiss was made for the first time. The alkaloid profile of the species was compared at two levels, between different species and within two species from different habitats. Two chemotypical groups, based on the types of isoquinoline alkaloids were suggested. To group A belong species F. kralikii, F. rostellata (F. r. 1) and F. thuretii containing more than 50% spirobenzylisoquinoline alkaloids of the crude alkaloid mixtures. To group B belong species F. rostellata (F. r. 2) and F. schleicherii containing more than 40% protopine alkaloids and relatively high percentage phthaldeisoquinoline alkaloids (11-19%). In group A phthaldeisoquinoline alkaloids were not detected.

  1. Bromopyrrole Alkaloids from Okinawan Marine Sponges Agelas spp.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Naonobu; Kusama, Taishi; Kashiwada, Yoshiki; Kobayashi, Jun'ichi

    2016-01-01

    In our continuing study for structurally and biogenetically interesting natural products from marine organisms, Okinawan marine sponges Agelas spp. were investigated, resulting in the isolation of 18 unique alkaloids including five dimeric bromopyrrole alkaloids (1-5), ten monomeric bromopyrrole alkaloids (6-15), and three conjugates of monomeric bromopyrrole alkaloid and hydroxykynurenine (16-18). In this mini-review, the isolation, structure elucidation, and antimicrobial activities of these alkaloids are summarized.

  2. A novel DNA topoisomerase I inhibitor with different mechanism from camptothecin induces G2/M phase cell cycle arrest to K562 cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ning; Wu, Xi-Wei; Agama, Keli; Pommier, Yves; Du, Jun; Li, Ding; Gu, Lian-Quan; Huang, Zhi-Shu; An, Lin-Kun

    2010-11-30

    DNA topoisomerase I (Top1) is an essential nuclear enzyme and a validated target for anticancer agent screening. In a previous study, we found that indolizinoquinoline-5,12-dione derivatives show significant biological activity against several human cancer cell lines. To understand their mechanism of inhibition of cancer cell growth, one indolizinoquinoline-5,12-dione derivative, CY13II, was further studied as lead. Our present results indicate that CY13II shows more potent antiproliferative activity against K562 cells than camptothecin. Additionally, K562 cells were arrested in G2/M, and their growth rate decreased after treatment with CY13II at micromolar concentration. Biochemical Top1 assays indicate that CY13II exhibits a different inhibitory mechanism from camptothecin. Unlike camptothecin, CY13II specifically inhibits the catalytic cleavage activity of Top1 instead of forming the drug-enzyme-DNA covalent ternary complex.

  3. Study and Optimization of CPT Resonance Parameters in 87 Rb/Ar/Ne Microcells Aimed for Application in Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masian, Y.; Sivak, A.; Sevostianov, D.; Vassiliev, V.; Velichansky, V.

    The paper shows the presents results of studies of small-size rubidium cells with argon and neon buffer gases, produced by a patent pended technique of laser welding [Fishman et al. (2014)]. Cells were designed for miniature frequency standard. Temperature dependence of the frequency of the coherent population trapping (CPT) resonance was measured and used to optimize the ratio of partial pressures of buffer gases. The influence of duration and regime of annealing on the CPT-resonance frequency drift was investigated. The parameters of the FM modulation of laser current for two cases which correspond to the highest amplitude of CPT resonance and to the smallest light shifts of the resonance frequency were determined. The temperature dependences of the CPT resonance frequency were found to be surprisingly different in the two cases. A non-linear dependence of CPT resonance frequency on the temperature of the cell with the two extremes was revealed for one of these cases.

  4. A comparison of the effects of topical treatment of calcipotriol, camptothecin, clobetasol and tazarotene on an imiquimod-induced psoriasis-like mouse model.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jun; Dou, Wei; Zhao, Yi; Hu, Jinhong

    2014-02-01

    The interleukin-23/interleukin 17A (IL-23/IL-17A) cytokine axis plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. In this study, we report the effects of topical calcipotriol, camptothecin, clobetasol and tazarotene on the treatment of imiquimod (IMQ)-induced psoriasis-like inflammation, the development of which is dependent on the IL-23/IL-17A axis. IMQ-induced epidermal hyperplasia and inflammation in the BALB/c mouse ear were significantly inhibited following clobetasol treatment but not calcipotriol, camptothecin or tazarotene treatments. Real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that the mRNA levels of IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-22, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α in ear skin were significantly decreased by clobetasol. In addition, we observed that calcipotriol, camptothecin and tazarotene failed to show any inhibitory effects on the IL-23/IL-17A/IL-22 axis. We also found that clobetasol treatment inhibited the proliferation of γδ T cells and C-C chemokine receptor type 6 (CCR6) expression induced by IMQ. Calcipotriol, camptothecin and tazarotene not only failed to inhibit this proliferation but also enhanced retinoic acid-related orphan receptor γ (RORγ) expression in IMQ-induced psoriasis-like inflammation. In conclusion, we suggest that clobetasol induces the relief of IMQ-induced psoriasis-like inflammation in a mouse model but that calcipotriol, camptothecin and tazarotene cannot. Therefore, we suggest that more in-depth studies on pharmacological effects of tazarotene, camptothecin and calcipotriol should be carried out.

  5. The Genus Diphasiastrum and Its Lycopodium Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Halldorsdottir, Elsa Steinunn; Kowal, Natalia Magdalena; Olafsdottir, Elin Soffia

    2015-08-01

    The genus Diphasiastrum includes at least 23 species distributed primarily across the northern temperate and subarctic areas of the world. These plants produce an array of lycopodium alkaloids, and some species such as Diphasiastrum complanatum have been used in traditional medicine for ages for various conditions. Hybridization is common in this group of plants and they have always been a challenge for taxonomists and other scientists studying them. To date, 11 Diphasiastrum species have been reported to produce lycopodium alkaloids. In this review, reported alkaloids and their distribution patterns across these species along with taxonomical and bioactivity considerations are reviewed and discussed.

  6. 4-Quinolone alkaloids from Melochia odorata.

    PubMed

    Jadulco, Raquel C; Pond, Christopher D; Van Wagoner, Ryan M; Koch, Michael; Gideon, Osia G; Matainaho, Teatulohi K; Piskaut, Pius; Barrows, Louis R

    2014-01-24

    The methanol extract of Melochia odorata yielded three 4-quinolone alkaloids including waltherione A (1) and two new alkaloids, waltherione C (2) and waltherione D (3). Waltheriones A and C showed significant activities in an in vitro anti-HIV cytoprotection assay at concentrations of 56.2 and 0.84 μM and inhibition of HIV P24 formation of more than 50% at 1.7 and 0.95 μM, respectively. The structures of the alkaloids were established by spectroscopic data interpretation.

  7. 4-Quinolone Alkaloids from Melochia odorata

    PubMed Central

    Jadulco, Raquel C.; Pond, Christopher D.; Van Wagoner, Ryan M.; Koch, Michael; Gideon, Osia G.; Matainaho, Teatulohi K.; Piskaut, Pius; Barrows, Louis R.

    2014-01-01

    The methanol extract of Melochia odorata yielded three 4-quinolone alkaloids including waltherione A (1) and two new alkaloids, waltherione C (2) and waltherione D (3). Waltheriones A and C showed significant activities in an in vitro anti-HIV cytoprotection assay at concentrations of 56.2 and 0.84 μM, and inhibition of HIV P24 formation of more than 50% at 1.7 and 0.95 μM, respectively. The structures of the alkaloids were established by spectroscopic data interpretation. PMID:24392742

  8. Synthesis of morphine alkaloids and derivatives.

    PubMed

    Rinner, Uwe; Hudlicky, Tomas

    2012-01-01

    This review summarizes recent developments in the total synthesis of morphine alkaloids and some of the semisynthetic derivatives. The literature is covered for the period of 5 years after the publication of the last review in 2005. The syntheses that appeared in this period are covered in detail and are placed in the context of all syntheses of opiate alkaloids since the original one published by Gates in 1952. The introduction covers the historical aspects of total synthesis of these alkaloids. The synthesis of some of the medicinally useful derivatives is reviewed in the last section along with some of the methodology required for their preparation.

  9. Isoquinoline and isoindole alkaloids from Menispermum dauricum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoqi; Ye, Wencai; Zhao, Shouxun; Che, Chun-Tao

    2004-04-01

    Three isoquinoline alkaloids and an isoindole alkaloid, along with eight known compounds, were isolated from the roots of Menispermum dauricum (Menispermacese). The alkaloids were characterized as 7-hydroxy-6-methoxy-1(2H)-isoquinolinone, 6,7-dimethoxy-N-methyl-3,4-dioxo-1(2H)-isoquinolinone, 1-(4-hydroxybenzoyl)-7-hydroxy-6-methoxy-isoquinoline and 6-hydroxy-5-methoxy-N-methylphthalimide, on the basis of spectral evidence including 1D- and 2D-NMR and MS analyses.

  10. Gelsemium alkaloids, immunosuppressive agents from Gelsemium elegans.

    PubMed

    Xu, You-Kai; Liao, Shang-Gao; Na, Zhi; Hu, Hua-Bin; Li, Yan; Luo, Huai-Rong

    2012-09-01

    Bioassay-guided isolation of the stems of Gelsemium elegans has led to the isolation of two new Gelsemium alkaloids, 21-(2-oxopropyl)-koumine (1) and 11-methoxygelselegine (2), and two known alkaloids, koumine (3) and gelselegine (4). The structures of 1-2 were determined by spectroscopic (for both) and single-crystal X-ray diffraction (for 1) analysis. All compounds isolated were evaluated for their potential as immunosuppressive agents and the data suggested that Gelsemium alkaloids of different structural types possibly have potential as immunosuppressive agents.

  11. Racemic alkaloids from the fungus Ganoderma cochlear.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Long; Dou, Man; Luo, Qi; Cheng, Li-Zhi; Yan, Yong-Ming; Li, Rong-Tao; Cheng, Yong-Xian

    2017-01-01

    Seven pairs of new alkaloid enantiomers, ganocochlearines C-I (1, 3-8), and three pairs of known alkaloids were isolated from the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma cochlear. The chemical structures of new compounds were elucidated on the basis of 1D and 2D NMR data. The absolute configurations of compounds 1, 3-10 were assigned by ECD calculations. Biological activities of these isolates against renal fibrosis were accessed in rat normal or diseased renal interstitial fibroblast cells. Importantly, the plausible biosynthetic pathway for this class of alkaloids was originally proposed.

  12. Polycyclic Guanidine Alkaloids from Poecilosclerida Marine Sponges.

    PubMed

    Sfecci, Estelle; Lacour, Thierry; Amade, Philippe; Mehiri, Mohamed

    2016-04-09

    Sessile marine sponges provide an abundance of unique and diversified scaffolds. In particular, marine guanidine alkaloids display a very wide range of biological applications. A large number of cyclic guanidine alkaloids, including crambines, crambescins, crambescidins, batzelladines or netamins have been isolated from Poecilosclerida marine sponges. In this review, we will explore the chemodiversity of tri- and pentacyclic guanidine alkaloids. NMR and MS data tools will also be provided, and an overview of the wide range of bioactivities of crambescidins and batzelladines derivatives will be given.

  13. Marine Pyridoacridine Alkaloids: Biosynthesis and Biological Activities.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Sabrin R M; Mohamed, Gamal A

    2016-01-01

    Pyridoacridines are a class of strictly marine-derived alkaloids that constitute one of the largest chemical families of marine alkaloids. During the last few years, both natural pyridoacridines and their analogues have constituted excellent targets for synthetic works. They have been the subject of intense study due to their significant biological activities; cytotoxic, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, insecticidal, anti-HIV, and anti-parasitic activities. In the present review, 95 pyridoacridine alkaloids isolated from marine organisms are discussed in term of their occurrence, biosynthesis, biological activities, and structural assignment.

  14. Therapeutic Targeting of CPT-11 Induced Diarrhea: A Case for Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Swami, Umang; Goel, Sanjay; Mani, Sridhar

    2014-01-01

    CPT-11 (irinotecan), a DNA topoisomerase I inhibitor is one of the main treatments for colorectal cancer. The main dose limiting toxicities are neutropenia and late onset diarrhea. Though neutropenia is manageable, CPT-11 induced diarrhea is frequently severe, resulting in hospitalizations, dose reductions or omissions leading to ineffective treatment administration. Many potential agents have been tested in preclinical and clinical studies to prevent or ameliorate CPT-11 induced late onset diarrhea. It is predicted that prophylaxis of CPT-11 induced diarrhea will reduce sub-therapeutic dosing as well as hospitalizations and will eventually lead to dose escalations resulting in better response rates. This article reviews various experimental agents and strategies employed to prevent this debilitating toxicity. Covered topics include schedule/dose modification, intestinal alkalization, structural/chemical modification, genetic testing, anti-diarrheal therapies, transporter (ABCB1, ABCC2, BCRP2) inhibitors, enzyme (β-glucuronidase, UGT1A1, CYP3A4, carboxylesterase, COX-2) inducers and inhibitors, probiotics, antibiotics, adsorbing agents, cytokine and growth factor activators and inhibitors and other miscellaneous agents. PMID:23597015

  15. Augmenting CPT to Improve Sleep Impairment in PTSD: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Galovski, Tara E.; Mott, Juliette; Blain, Leah M.; Elwood, Lisa; Gloth, Chelsea; Fletcher, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Objective Despite the success of empirically supported treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), sleep impairment frequently remains refractory following treatment for PTSD. This single-site, randomized controlled trial examined the effectiveness of sleep-directed hypnosis as a complement to an empirically supported psychotherapy for PTSD (cognitive processing therapy; CPT). Method Participants completed either 3 weeks of hypnosis (n = 52) or a symptom monitoring control condition (n = 56) before beginning standard CPT. Multilevel modeling was used to investigate differential patterns of change to determine whether hypnosis resulted in improvements in sleep, PTSD, and depression. An intervening variable approach was then used to determine whether improvements in sleep achieved during hypnosis augmented change in PTSD and depression during CPT. Results After the initial phase of treatment (hypnosis or symptom monitoring), the hypnosis condition showed significantly greater improvement than the control condition in sleep and depression, but not PTSD. After CPT, both conditions demonstrated significant improvement in sleep and PTSD; however, the hypnosis condition demonstrated greater improvement in depressive symptoms. As sleep improved, there were corresponding improvements in PTSD and depression, with a stronger relationship between sleep and PTSD. Conclusion Hypnosis was effective in improving sleep impairment, but those improvements did not augment gains in PTSD recovery during the trauma-focused intervention. Public Health Significance: This study suggests that hypnosis may be a viable treatment option in a stepped-care approach for treating sleep impairment in individuals suffering from PTSD. PMID:26689303

  16. Extension of the CPT theorem to non-Hermitian Hamiltonians and unstable states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannheim, Philip D.

    2016-02-01

    We extend the CPT theorem to quantum field theories with non-Hermitian Hamiltonians and unstable states. Our derivation is a quite minimal one as it requires only the time-independent evolution of scalar products, invariance under complex Lorentz transformations, and a non-standard but nonetheless perfectly legitimate interpretation of charge conjugation as an antilinear operator. The first of these requirements does not force the Hamiltonian to be Hermitian. Rather, it forces its eigenvalues to either be real or to appear in complex conjugate pairs, forces the eigenvectors of such conjugate pairs to be conjugates of each other, and forces the Hamiltonian to admit of an antilinear symmetry. The latter two requirements then force this antilinear symmetry to be CPT, while forcing the Hamiltonian to be real rather than Hermitian. Our work justifies the use of the CPT theorem in establishing the equality of the lifetimes of unstable particles that are charge conjugates of each other. We show that the Euclidean time path integrals of a CPT-symmetric theory must always be real. In the quantum-mechanical limit the key results of the PT symmetry program of Bender and collaborators are recovered, with the C-operator of the PT symmetry program being identified with the linear component of the charge conjugation operator.

  17. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Safety Appendix to the 1983 CPT Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renfrew, Malcolm M., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Presents an appendix to the Committee on Professional Training (CPT) of the Division of Chemical Health and Safety of the American Chemical Society. The information is applicable to chemical health and safety policies and practices within the chemistry department of an academic institution. Includes lists of references with safety information. (JN)

  18. Rhabdomyolysis and Cardiomyopathy in a 20-Year-Old Patient with CPT II Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Vavlukis, M.; Eftimov, A.; Zafirovska, P.; Caparovska, E.; Pocesta, B.; Kedev, S.; Dimovski, A. J.

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To raise the awareness of adult-onset carnitite palmitoyltransferase II deficiency (CPT II) by describing clinical, biochemical, and genetic features of the disease occurring in early adulthood. Method. Review of the case characteristics and literature review. Results. We report on a 20-year-old man presenting with dyspnea, fatigue, fever, and myoglobinuria. This was the second episode with such symptoms (the previous one being three years earlier). The symptoms occurred after intense physical work, followed by a viral infection resulting in fever treated with NSAIDs. Massive rhabdomyolysis was diagnosed, resulting in acute renal failure necessitating plasmapheresis and hemodialysis, acute hepatic lesion, and respiratory insufficiency. Additionally, our patient had cardiomyopathy with volume overload. After a detailed workup, CPT II deficiency was suspected. We did a sequencing analysis for exons 1, 3, and 4 of the CPT II gene and found that the patient was homozygote for Ser 113 Leu mutation in exon 3 of the CPT II gene. The patient recovery was complete except for the cardiomiopathy with mildly impaired systolic function. Conclusion. Whenever a patient suffers recurrent episodes of myalgia, followed by myoglobinuria due to rhabdomyolysis, we should always consider the possibility of this rare condition. The definitive diagnose of this condition is achieved by genetic testing. PMID:24563797

  19. Coexistence of VHL Disease and CPT2 Deficiency: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Alfonso Massimiliano; Sciacco, Monica; Zovato, Stefania; Rizzati, Silvia; Colombo, Irene; Boaretto, Francesca; Moggio, Maurizio; Opocher, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is an inherited syndrome manifesting with benign and malignant tumors. Deficiency of carnitine palmitoyltransferase type II (CPT2) is a disorder of lipid metabolism that, in the muscle form, manifests with recurrent attacks of myalgias often associated with myoglobinuria. Rhabdomyolytic episodes may be complicated by life-threatening events, including acute renal failure (ARF). We report on a male patient who was tested, at 10 years of age, for VHL disease because of family history of VHL. He was diagnosed with VHL but without VHL-related manifestation at the time of diagnosis. During childhood, the patient was hospitalized several times for diffuse muscular pain, muscle weakness, and dark urine. These recurrent attacks of rhabdomyolysis were never accompanied by ARF. The patient was found to be homozygous for the mutation p.S113L of the CPT2 gene. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the coexistence of VHL disease and CPT2 deficiency in the same individual. Based on findings from animal models, the case illustrates that mutations in the VHL gene might protect against renal damage caused by CPT2 gene mutations. PMID:27034144

  20. Coexistence of VHL Disease and CPT2 Deficiency: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Alfonso Massimiliano; Sciacco, Monica; Zovato, Stefania; Rizzati, Silvia; Colombo, Irene; Boaretto, Francesca; Moggio, Maurizio; Opocher, Giuseppe

    2016-10-01

    von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is an inherited syndrome manifesting with benign and malignant tumors. Deficiency of carnitine palmitoyltransferase type II (CPT2) is a disorder of lipid metabolism that, in the muscle form, manifests with recurrent attacks of myalgias often associated with myoglobinuria. Rhabdomyolytic episodes may be complicated by life-threatening events, including acute renal failure (ARF). We report on a male patient who was tested, at 10 years of age, for VHL disease because of family history of VHL. He was diagnosed with VHL but without VHL-related manifestation at the time of diagnosis. During childhood, the patient was hospitalized several times for diffuse muscular pain, muscle weakness, and dark urine. These recurrent attacks of rhabdomyolysis were never accompanied by ARF. The patient was found to be homozygous for the mutation p.S113L of the CPT2 gene. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the coexistence of VHL disease and CPT2 deficiency in the same individual. Based on findings from animal models, the case illustrates that mutations in the VHL gene might protect against renal damage caused by CPT2 gene mutations.

  1. CPT-cGMP Is A New Ligand of Epithelial Sodium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hong-Long; Nie, Hong-Guang; Chang, Yongchang; Lian, Qizhou; Liu, Shan-Lu

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial sodium channels (ENaC) are localized at the apical membrane of the epithelium, and are responsible for salt and fluid reabsorption. Renal ENaC takes up salt, thereby controlling salt content in serum. Loss-of-function ENaC mutations lead to low blood pressure due to salt-wasting, while gain-of-function mutations cause impaired sodium excretion and subsequent hypertension as well as hypokalemia. ENaC activity is regulated by intracellular and extracellular signals, including hormones, neurotransmitters, protein kinases, and small compounds. Cyclic nucleotides are broadly involved in stimulating protein kinase A and protein kinase G signaling pathways, and, surprisingly, also appear to have a role in regulating ENaC. Increasing evidence suggests that the cGMP analog, CPT-cGMP, activates αβγ-ENaC activity reversibly through an extracellular pathway in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the parachlorophenylthio moiety and ribose 2'-hydroxy group of CPT-cGMP are essential for facilitating the opening of ENaC channels by this compound. Serving as an extracellular ligand, CPT-cGMP eliminates sodium self-inhibition, which is a novel mechanism for stimulating salt reabsorption in parallel to the traditional NO/cGMP/PKG signal pathway. In conclusion, ENaC may be a druggable target for CPT-cGMP, leading to treatments for kidney malfunctions in salt reabsorption. PMID:27019621

  2. Familial combined deficiency of muscle carnitine and carnitine palmityl transferase (CPT).

    PubMed

    Skard Heier, M; Dietrichson, P; Landaas, S

    1986-12-01

    Two patients, brother and sister, aged 19 and 16, with combined, partial deficiency of carnitine palmityltransferase (CPT) are reported. Both patients had recurrent exercise-related myoglobinuria. The brother had also experienced an episode of transient renal failure associated with myoglobinuria. Both had elevated CK and myoglobin in plasma between attacks. There was a normal production of lactate in ischaemic forearm exercise, but elevated levels of NH3, resulting in an increased NH3/lactate ratio; 48-h fasting caused no significant changes in cholesterol, triglycerides or glucose, no rise of CK, and a normal ketogenic response, indicating no hepatic enzyme deficiency. Muscle biopsy showed slight changes of myopathy in both patients, with scattered atrophic fibres, but no lipid accumulation or other specific changes. Biochemical analysis of muscle tissue revealed a reduction of carnitine to 48% and 40% and a reduction of CPT to 55% and 59% of normal values, which is similar to the findings in the only previous report of combined partial carnitine and CPT deficiency. The heterogeneity of the laboratory findings in CPT deficiencies and the value of the various diagnostic procedures in metabolic myopathies are discussed.

  3. Maps and documentation of seismic CPT soundings in the central, eastern, and western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holzer, Thomas L.; Noce, Thomas E.; Bennett, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Nine hundred twenty seven seismic cone penetration tests (CPT) in a variety of geologic deposits and geographic locations were conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) primarily between 1998 and 2008 for the purpose of collecting penetration test data to evaluate the liquefaction potential of different types of surficial geologic deposits (table 1). The evaluation is described in Holzer and others (in press). This open-file report summarizes the seismic CPT and geotechnical data that were collected for the evaluation, outlines the general conditions under which the data were acquired, and briefly describes the geographic location of each study area and local geologic conditions. This report also describes the field methods used to obtain the seismic CPT data and summarizes the results of shear-wave velocities measurements at 2-m intervals in each sounding. Although the average depth of the 927 soundings was 18.5 m, we estimated a time-averaged shear-wave velocity to depths of 20 m and 30 m, VS20 and VS30, respectively, for soundings deeper than 10 m and 20 m. Soil sampling also was selectively conducted in many of the study areas at representative seismic CPT soundings. These data are described and laboratory analyses of geotechnical properties of these samples are summarized in table 2.

  4. Order of Conners' CPT-II Administration within a Cognitive Test Battery Influences ADHD Indices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdodi, Laszlo A.; Lajiness-O'Neill, Renee; Saules, Karen K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of administration sequence on Conner's continuous performance test (CPT-II) scores in clients requesting psychological assessment. It was hypothesized that when administered at the end rather than beginning of a test battery, the test scores will show higher symptom severity. If present, order effects may cause the…

  5. Crystal Structure of the Geobacillus stearothermophilus Carboxylesterase Est55 and Its Activation of Prodrug CPT-11

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ping; Ewis, Hosam E.; Tai, Phang C.; Lu, Chung-Dar; Weber, Irene T.

    2007-01-01

    Several mammalian carboxylesterases were shown to activate the prodrug irinotecan (CPT-11) to produce SN-38, a topoisomerase inhibitor used in cancer therapy. However, the potential use of bacterial carboxylesterases, which have the advantage of high stability, has not been explored. We present the crystal structure of the carboxyesterase Est55 from Geobacillus stearothermophilus and evaluation of its enzyme activity on CPT-11. Crystal structures were determined at pH 6.2 and 6.8 and resolution of 2.0 and 1.58 Å, respectively. Est55 folds into three domains, a catalytic domain, an α/β domain and a regulatory domain. The structure is in an inactive form; the side chain of His409, one of the catalytic triad residues, is directed away from the other catalytic residues Ser194 and Glu310. Moreover, the adjacent Cys408 is triply oxidized and lies in the oxyanion hole, which would block the binding of substrate, suggesting a regulatory role. However, Cys408 is not essential for enzyme activity. Mutation of Cys408 showed that hydrophobic side chains were favorable, while polar serine was unfavorable for enzyme activity. Est55 was shown to hydrolyze CPT-11 into the active form SN-38. The mutant C408V provided a more stable enzyme for activation of CPT-11. Therefore, engineered thermostable Est55 is a candidate for use with irinotecan in enzyme-prodrug cancer therapy. PMID:17239398

  6. Hint of CPT Violation in Short-Baseline Electron Neutrino Disappearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giunti, Carlo; Laveder, Marco

    2011-12-01

    We analyzed the electron neutrino data of the Gallium radioactive source experiments and the electron antineutrino data of the reactor Bugey and Chooz experiments in terms of neutrino oscillations. We found a hint of a CPT-violating asymmetry of the effective neutrino and antineutrino mixing angles.

  7. Bound on Lorentz and CPT Violating Boost Effects for the Neutron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsworth, Ronald

    2003-01-01

    A search for a sidereal annual variation in the frequency difference between co-located Xe-129 and He-3 Zeeman masers sets a limit of approximately 10(exp -27) GeV on the coupling of the neutron to the time component of a possible background Lorentz and CPT violating tensor field.

  8. Piperidine alkaloids: Human and food animal teratogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Piperidine alkaloids are acutely toxic to adult livestock species and produce musculoskeletal deformities in neonatal animals. These teratogenic effects include multiple congenital contracture (MCC) deformities and cleft palate in cattle, pigs, sheep, and goats. Poisonous plants containing teratogen...

  9. Steroidal alkaloid toxicity to fish embryos.

    PubMed

    Crawford, L; Kocan, R M

    1993-02-01

    Embryos of two species of fish were evaluated for their suitability as model systems for steroidal alkaloid toxicity, the Japanese rice fish, medaka (Oryzius latipes) and the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Additionally, the equine neurotoxic sesquiterpene lactone repin, was also tested. A PROBIT program was used to evaluate the EC1, EC50 and EC99 as well as the associated confidence limits. The steroidal alkaloids tested were the Solanum potato glycoalkaloids alpha-chaconine, alpha-solanine, the aglyclones solanidine and solasodine and the Veratrum alkaloid, jervine. Embryo mortality, likely due to structural or functional abnormalities in the early development stages of the embryo, were the only response observed in both species. The rainbow trout exhibited a toxic response to chaconine, solasidine, repin and solanine but the medaka embryos were only affected by the compounds, chaconine and solanine. Rainbow trout may indeed serve as a good lower vertebrate model for studying the toxicity of steroidal alkaloids.

  10. Anxiolytic Activity of Diterpene Alkaloid Songorine.

    PubMed

    Nesterova, Yu V; Povet'eva, T N; Suslov, N I; Shults, E E; Ziuz'kov, G N; Aksinenko, S G; Afanas'eva, O G; Krapivin, A V; Kharina, T G

    2015-09-01

    Antianxiety action of diterpene alkaloid songorine was studied using Vogel conflict test. Songorine in a dose of 0.25 mg/kg demonstrated high anxiolytic activity comparable to that of phenazepam and produced no sedative effect.

  11. Antiprotozoal and antioxidant alkaloids from Alternanthera littoralis.

    PubMed

    Koolen, Hector H F; Pral, Elizabeth M F; Alfieri, Silvia C; Marinho, Jane V N; Serain, Alessandra F; Hernández-Tasco, Alvaro J; Andreazza, Nathalia L; Salvador, Marcos J

    2017-02-01

    Five alkaloids, in addition to hydroxytyrosol and uridine, were isolated from aerial parts of Alternanthera littoralis P. Beauv. Among the isolated compounds, alternamide A was an unusual tricyclic alkaloid with a bridged benzoazepine core. All isolated alkaloids have a catechol moiety, indicating a possible common biosynthetic route. Their structures were established by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy in combination with extensive tandem MS experiments by collisional induced dissociation (CID). The antiprotozoal activity of the isolated compounds was assayed against trypomastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi and amastigotes of Leishmania amazonensis. Alternamine A was the most active compound, reducing markedly the viability of both parasites. Antioxidant capacities evaluated by ORACFL assay showed that the isolated alkaloids (mainly alternamide B) contributed to the high activity recorded for the ethanolic crude extract; possibly, the catechol moiety present in all structures plays a central role in this result.

  12. Opiate alkaloids in Ascaris suum.

    PubMed

    Pryor, S C; Putnam, Jennifer; Hoo, Nanyamka

    2004-01-01

    The parasitic worm Ascaris suum contains the opiate alkaloids morphine and morphine-6-glucuronide as determined by HPLC coupled to electrochemical detection and by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The level of morphine in muscle tissue of female and male is 252 +/- 32.68, 1168 +/- 278 and 180 +/- 23.47 (ng/g of wet tissue), respectively. The level of M6G in muscle tissue of female and male is 167 +/- 28.37 and 92 +/- 11.45 (ng/g of wet tissue), respectively. Furthermore, Ascaris maintained for 5 days contained a significant amount of morphine, as did their medium, demonstrating their ability to synthesize the opiate alkaloid. The anatomic distribution of morphine was examined by indirect immunofluorescent staining and HPLC of various tissues dissected from male and female adult worms. Immunofluorescence revealed morphine in the subcuticle layers, in the animals' nerve chords and in the female reproductive organs. Morphine was found to be most prevalent in the muscle tissue and there is significantly more morphine in females than males, probably due to the large amounts in the female uterus. Morphine (10(-9) M) and morphine-6-glucuronide (10(-9) M) stimulated the release of NO from Ascaris muscle tissue. Naloxone (10(-7) M), and L-NAME (10(-6) M) blocked (P < 0.005) morphine-stimulated NO release from A. suum muscle. CTOP (10(-7) M) did not block morphine's NO release. However, naloxone could not block M6G stimulated NO release by muscle tissue, whereas CTOP (10(-7) M) blocked its release. These findings were in seeming contradiction to our inability to isolate a mu opiate receptor messenger RNA by RT-PCR using a human mu primer. This suggests that a novel mu opiate receptor was present and selective toward M6G.

  13. Alkaloids from Fissistigma latifolium (Dunal) Merr.

    PubMed

    Alias, Asmah; Hazni, Hazrina; Jaafar, Faridahanim Mohd; Awang, Khalijah; Ismail, Nor Hadiani

    2010-06-24

    A phytochemical study of the bark of Fissistigma latifolium (Annonaceae) yielded a new aporphine alkaloid, (-)-N-methylguattescidine (1), and eight known alkaloids: liriodenine (2), oxoxylopine (3), (-)-asimilobine (4), dimethyltryptamine (5), (-)-remerine (6), (-)-anonaine (7), columbamine (8) and lysicamine (9). The compounds were isolated using various chromatographic methods and structural elucidation was accomplished by means of spectroscopic methods, notably 1D-NMR ((1)H, (13)C, DEPT), 2D-NMR (COSY, HMQC, HMBC), UV, IR and MS.

  14. New furocarbazole alkaloids from Lonicera quinquelocularis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Dilfaraz; Khan, Shafiullah; Badshah, Syed; Ali, Hazrat; Ullah, Hamid; Muhammad, Zia; Woodward, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Two new furocarbazole alkaloids, 3-formyl-6,7-dimethoxy-furo[1,2]carbazole (1) and methyl-6,7-dimethoxy-furo[1,2]carbazole-3-carboxylate (2), along with two known carbazole alkaloids, 3-formyl-2-hydroxy-7-methoxycarbazole (3) and methyl 2,7-dimethoxycarbazole-3-carboxylate (4) were isolated from the ethyl acetate soluble fraction of Lonicera quinquelocularis. Their structures were established on the basis of spectroscopic analysis.

  15. Carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1A (CPT1A): a new tumor specific target in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zonetti, Maria Josè; Fisco, Tommaso; Polidoro, Chiara; Bocchinfuso, Gianfranco; Palleschi, Antonio; Novelli, Giuseppe; Spagnoli, Luigi G.

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional mechanisms epigenetically-regulated in tumoral tissues point out new targets for anti-cancer therapies. Carnitine palmitoyl transferase I (CPT1) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the transport of long-chain fatty acids for β-oxidation. Here we identified the tumor specific nuclear CPT1A as a product of the transcript variant 2, that doesn't retain the classical transferase activity and is strongly involved in the epigenetic regulation of cancer pro-survival, cell death escaping and tumor invasion pathways. The knockdown of CPT1A variant 2 by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), was sufficient to induce apoptosis in MCF-7, SK-BR3 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. The cell death triggered by CPT1A silencing correlated with reduction of HDAC activity and histone hyperacetylation. Docking experiments and molecular dynamics simulations confirmed an high binding affinity of the variant 2 for HDAC1. The CPT1A silenced cells showed an up-regulated transcription of pro-apoptotic genes (BAD, CASP9, COL18A1) and down-modulation of invasion and metastasis related-genes (TIMP-1, PDGF-A, SERPINB2). These findings provide evidence of the CPT1 variant 2 involvement in breast cancer survival, cell death escape and invasion. Thus, we propose nuclear CPT1A as a striking tumor specific target for anticancer therapeutics, more selective and effective as compared with the well-known HDAC inhibitors. PMID:26799588

  16. Design, Synthesis, and Biological Evaluations of Tumor-Targeting Dual-Warhead Conjugates for a Taxoid–Camptothecin Combination Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Novel tumor-targeting dual-warhead conjugates, 2 (DW-1) and 3 (DW-2), which consist of a next-generation taxoid, 1 (SB-T-1214), and camptothecin as two warheads, self-immolative disulfide linkers for drug release, biotin as the tumor-targeting moiety, and 1,3,5-triazine as the tripod splitter module, were designed and synthesized. The potency of 2 was evaluated against MX-1, MCF-7, ID8, L1210FR (BR+, biotin receptor overexpressed) and WI38 (BR–, normal) cell lines in the absence and presence of glutathione (GSH), which is an endogenous thiol that triggers drug release inside the cancer cells. With the GSH and resuspension protocol, 2 exhibited IC50 values of 3.22–9.80 nM against all BR+ cancer cell lines, and 705 nM against WI38. Thus, there was a two orders of magnitude higher selectivity to cancer cells. Also, a clear cooperative effect was observed for the taxoid–camptothecin combination when two drugs were delivered to the cancer cells specifically in the form of a dual-warhead conjugate. PMID:24901491

  17. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluations of tumor-targeting dual-warhead conjugates for a taxoid-camptothecin combination chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Vineberg, Jacob G; Zuniga, Edison S; Kamath, Anushree; Chen, Ying-Jen; Seitz, Joshua D; Ojima, Iwao

    2014-07-10

    Novel tumor-targeting dual-warhead conjugates, 2 (DW-1) and 3 (DW-2), which consist of a next-generation taxoid, 1 (SB-T-1214), and camptothecin as two warheads, self-immolative disulfide linkers for drug release, biotin as the tumor-targeting moiety, and 1,3,5-triazine as the tripod splitter module, were designed and synthesized. The potency of 2 was evaluated against MX-1, MCF-7, ID8, L1210FR (BR+, biotin receptor overexpressed) and WI38 (BR-, normal) cell lines in the absence and presence of glutathione (GSH), which is an endogenous thiol that triggers drug release inside the cancer cells. With the GSH and resuspension protocol, 2 exhibited IC50 values of 3.22-9.80 nM against all BR+ cancer cell lines, and 705 nM against WI38. Thus, there was a two orders of magnitude higher selectivity to cancer cells. Also, a clear cooperative effect was observed for the taxoid-camptothecin combination when two drugs were delivered to the cancer cells specifically in the form of a dual-warhead conjugate.

  18. Search for CPT and Lorentz Violation in B0-B0bar Oscillations with Dilepton Events

    SciTech Connect

    Collaboration, The BABAR; Aubert, B.

    2007-11-28

    We report results of a search for CPT and Lorentz violation in B{sup 0}-{bar B}{sup 0} oscillations using inclusive dilepton events from 232 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B Factory at SLAC. We find 2.8{sigma} significance, compatible with no signal, for variations in the complex CPT violation parameter z at the Earth's sidereal frequency and extract values for the quantities {Delta}a{sub {mu}} in the general Lorentz-violating standard-model extension. The spectral powers for variations in z over the frequency range 0.26 year{sup -1} to 2.1 day{sup -1} are also compatible with no signal.

  19. Hint of CPT violation in short-baseline electron neutrino disappearance data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giunti, Carlo; Laveder, Marco

    2010-12-01

    We analyzed the electron neutrino data of the Gallium radioactive source experiments and the electron antineutrino data of the reactor Bugey and Chooz experiments in terms of neutrino oscillations allowing for a CPT-violating difference of the squared masses and mixings of neutrinos and antineutrinos. We found that the discrepancy between the disappearance of electron neutrinos indicated by the data of the Gallium radioactive source experiments and the limits on the disappearance of electron antineutrinos given by the data of reactor experiments reveal a positive CPT-violating asymmetry of the effective neutrino and antineutrino mixing angles (with a statistical significance of about 3.5σ), whereas the squared-mass asymmetry is practically not bounded.

  20. Geophysical survey for cone penetrometer site, CPT-4, 200 West area

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, T.H.

    1993-11-01

    This report describes a geophysical survey performed at the Hanford Reservation. The objective of the survey was to locate subsurface obstructions that may affect cone penetrometer work at site CPT-4, adjacent to and west of borehole 299-W18-252, Figure 1. Based upon the results of the survey, possible ``drill sites`` within the zone, with the least likelihood of encountering identified obstructions, were identified.

  1. Actions of Piperidine Alkaloid Teratogens at Fetal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Teratogenic alkaloids are found in many species of plants including Conium maculatum L., Nicotiana glauca, Nicotiana tabaccum, and multiple Lupinus spp. Fetal musculoskeletal defects produced by alkaloids from these plants include arthrogyropisis, scoliosis, torticollis, kyposis, lordosis, and clef...

  2. Biological activity of alkaloids from Solanum dulcamara L.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Padma; Sharma, Bindu; Bakshi, Nidhi

    2009-01-01

    Alkaloids are well known for their antimicrobial activity. Though all natural alkaloids come from plants, not all plants produce alkaloids. Plants of the Solanaceae family are known for their high alkaloid content. Alkaloids are found in all plant parts like roots, stems, leaves, flowers, fruits and seeds. In the present study, those plant parts of Solanum dulcamara were selected which have been reported to produce a high content of a specific alkaloid: solanine (from unripe fruits), solasodine (from flowers) and beta-solamarine (from roots). These alkaloids were extracted from various parts of S. dulcamara by well-established methods and were screened for their antibacterial activity. Human pathogenic bacteria, viz., Enterobacter aerogenes, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, were selected for the study. All three alkaloids inhibited the growth of E. coli and S. aureus. However, no significant activity was observed against E. aerogenes. Minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration were also evaluated.

  3. Multicomponent Therapeutics of Berberine Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jiaoyang; Yan, Dan; Yang, Meihua; Dong, Xiaoping; Xiao, Xiaohe

    2013-01-01

    Although berberine alkaloids (BAs) are reported to be with broad-spectrum antibacterial and antiviral activities, the interactions among BAs have not been elucidated. In the present study, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was chosen as a model organism, and modified broth microdilution was applied for the determination of the fluorescence absorption values to calculate the anti-MRSA activity of BAs. We have initiated four steps to seek the optimal combination of BAs that are (1) determining the anti-MRSA activity of single BA, (2) investigating the two-component combination to clarify the interactions among BAs by checkerboard assay, (3) investigating the multicomponent combination to determine the optimal ratio by quadratic rotation-orthogonal combination design, and (4) in vivo and in vitro validation of the optimal combination. The results showed that the interactions among BAs are related to their concentrations. The synergetic combinations included “berberine and epiberberine,” “jatrorrhizine and palmatine” and “jatrorrhizine and coptisine”; the antagonistic combinations included “coptisine and epiberberine”. The optimal combination was berberine : coptisine : jatrorrhizine : palmatine : epiberberine = 0.702 : 0.863 : 1 : 0.491 : 0.526, and the potency of the optimal combination on cyclophosphamide-immunocompromised mouse model was better than the natural combinations of herbs containing BAs. PMID:23634170

  4. Search for Violation of $CPT$ and Lorentz Invariance in ${B_s^0}$ Meson Oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2015-06-12

    We present the first search for CPT-violating effects in the mixing of B0s mesons using the full Run II data set with an integrated luminosity of 10.4 fb-1 of proton-antiproton collisions collected using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We measure the CPT-violating asymmetry in the decay B0s → µ±D±s as a function of celestial direction and sidereal phase. We find no evidence for CPT-violating effects and place limits on the direction and magnitude of flavor-dependent CPTand Lorentz-invariance violating coupling coefficients. We find 95% confidence intervals of Δa⊥ < 1.2 × 10-12 GeV and (-0.8 < ΔaT - 0.396ΔaZ < 3.9) × 10-13 GeV.

  5. Search for Violations of Lorentz Invariance and CPT Symmetry in B_{(s)}^{0} Mixing.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Abellán Beteta, C; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Andreassi, G; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; d'Argent, P; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baker, S; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Bel, L J; Bellee, V; Belloli, N; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bertolin, A; Betti, F; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bifani, S; Billoir, P; Bird, T; Birnkraut, A; Bizzeti, A; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borgheresi, A; Borghi, S; Borisyak, M; Borsato, M; Boubdir, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Braun, S; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Buchanan, E; Burr, C; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carniti, P; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cavallero, G; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chatzikonstantinidis, G; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chrzaszcz, M; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collazuol, G; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dall'Occo, E; Dalseno, J; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Aguiar Francisco, O; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Dean, C-T; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Demmer, M; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dey, B; Di Canto, A; Di Ruscio, F; Dijkstra, H; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dufour, L; Dujany, G; Dungs, K; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Fazzini, D; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferrari, F; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fleuret, F; Fohl, K; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forshaw, D C; Forty, R; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Garsed, P J; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gavardi, L; Gazzoni, G; Gerick, D; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Girard, O G; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadavizadeh, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heister, A; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hongming, L; Hulsbergen, W; Humair, T; Hushchyn, M; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jawahery, A; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kecke, M; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Kenzie, M; Ketel, T; Khairullin, E; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Kirn, T; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Kozeiha, M; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Krzemien, W; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kuonen, A K; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Lemos Cid, E; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Liu, X; Loh, D; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lucchesi, D; Lucio Martinez, M; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Lusardi, N; Lusiani, A; Lyu, X; Machefert, F; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Maguire, K; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Manning, P; Mapelli, A; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martin, M; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massacrier, L M; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathad, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mauri, A; Maurin, B; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Melnychuk, D; Merk, M; Merli, A; Michielin, E; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Mitzel, D S; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monroy, I A; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, D; Müller, J; Müller, K; Müller, V; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nandi, A; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Niess, V; Nieswand, S; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, C J G; Osorio Rodrigues, B; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Otto, A; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Pappenheimer, C; Parker, W; Parkes, C; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perret, P; Pescatore, L; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Petruzzo, M; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pikies, M; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Piucci, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Poikela, T; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polyakov, I; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Price, J D; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Quagliani, R; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rama, M; Ramos Pernas, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Raven, G; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Dos Reis, A C; Renaudin, V; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Lopez, J A; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogozhnikov, A; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Ronayne, J W; Rotondo, M; Ruf, T; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santimaria, M; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrina, D; Schael, S; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmelzer, T; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schubiger, M; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Semennikov, A; Sergi, A; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Siddi, B G; Silva Coutinho, R; Silva de Oliveira, L; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, E; Smith, I T; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Stefkova, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Tayduganov, A; Tekampe, T; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Trabelsi, K; Traill, M; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Trisovic, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagnoni, V; Valat, S; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; van Veghel, M; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Volkov, V; Vollhardt, A; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Weiden, A; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wilkinson, G; Wilkinson, M; Williams, M; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Williams, T; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wraight, K; Wright, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yin, H; Yu, J; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zheng, Y; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zhukov, V; Zucchelli, S

    2016-06-17

    Violations of CPT symmetry and Lorentz invariance are searched for by studying interference effects in B^{0} mixing and in B_{s}^{0} mixing. Samples of B^{0}→J/ψK_{S}^{0} and B_{s}^{0}→J/ψK^{+}K^{-} decays are recorded by the LHCb detector in proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3  fb^{-1}. No periodic variations of the particle-antiparticle mass differences are found, consistent with Lorentz invariance and CPT symmetry. Results are expressed in terms of the standard model extension parameter Δa_{μ} with precisions of O(10^{-15}) and O(10^{-14})  GeV for the B^{0} and B_{s}^{0} systems, respectively. With no assumption on Lorentz (non)invariance, the CPT-violating parameter z in the B_{s}^{0} system is measured for the first time and found to be Re(z)=-0.022±0.033±0.005 and Im(z)=0.004±0.011±0.002, where the first uncertainties are statistical and the second systematic.

  6. Molecular pathways: tumor cells Co-opt the brain-specific metabolism gene CPT1C to promote survival.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Patrick T; Mak, Tak W

    2012-11-01

    The metabolic adaptations of cancer cells are receiving renewed attention as potential targets for therapeutic exploitation. Recent work has highlighted the importance of fatty acid catabolism through β-oxidation to cellular energy homeostasis. In this article, we describe recent preclinical studies suggesting that a gene usually expressed only in the brain, carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT)1C, promotes cancer cell survival and tumor growth. CTP1C confers rapamycin resistance on breast cancer cells, indicating that this gene may act in a pathway parallel to mTOR-enhanced glycolysis. Because of CPT1C's normally brain-restricted expression and the inability of most drugs to pass the blood-brain barrier, CPT1C may be an ideal candidate for specific small-molecule inhibition. We further speculate that concurrent targeting of CPT1C activity and glycolysis in tumor cells could be a highly effective anticancer approach.

  7. Microstructural Evolution of Inconel 625 and Inconel 686CPT Weld Metal for Clad Carbon Steel Linepipe Joints: A Comparator Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltin, Charles A.; Galloway, Alexander M.; Mweemba, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Microstructural evolution of Inconel 625 and Inconel 686CPT filler metals, used for the fusion welding of clad carbon steel linepipe, has been investigated and compared. The effects of iron dilution from the linepipe parent material on the elemental segregation potential of the filler metal chemistry have been considered. The results obtained provide significant evidence to support the view that, in Inconel 686CPT weld metal, the segregation of tungsten is a function of the level of iron dilution from the parent material. The data presented indicate that the incoherent phase precipitated in the Inconel 686CPT weld metal has a morphology that is dependent on tungsten enrichment and, therefore, iron dilution. Furthermore, in the same weld metal, a continuous network of finer precipitates was observed. The Charpy impact toughness of each filler metal was evaluated, and the results highlighted the superior impact toughness of the Inconel 625 weld metal over that of Inconel 686CPT.

  8. Development of Transcriptomic Resources for Interrogating the Biosynthesis of Monoterpene Indole Alkaloids in Medicinal Plant Species

    PubMed Central

    Góngora-Castillo, Elsa; Childs, Kevin L.; Fedewa, Greg; Hamilton, John P.; Liscombe, David K.; Magallanes-Lundback, Maria; Mandadi, Kranthi K.; Nims, Ezekiel; Runguphan, Weerawat; Vaillancourt, Brieanne; Varbanova-Herde, Marina; DellaPenna, Dean; McKnight, Thomas D.; O’Connor, Sarah; Buell, C. Robin

    2012-01-01

    The natural diversity of plant metabolism has long been a source for human medicines. One group of plant-derived compounds, the monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs), includes well-documented therapeutic agents used in the treatment of cancer (vinblastine, vincristine, camptothecin), hypertension (reserpine, ajmalicine), malaria (quinine), and as analgesics (7-hydroxymitragynine). Our understanding of the biochemical pathways that synthesize these commercially relevant compounds is incomplete due in part to a lack of molecular, genetic, and genomic resources for the identification of the genes involved in these specialized metabolic pathways. To address these limitations, we generated large-scale transcriptome sequence and expression profiles for three species of Asterids that produce medicinally important MIAs: Camptotheca acuminata, Catharanthus roseus, and Rauvolfia serpentina. Using next generation sequencing technology, we sampled the transcriptomes of these species across a diverse set of developmental tissues, and in the case of C. roseus, in cultured cells and roots following elicitor treatment. Through an iterative assembly process, we generated robust transcriptome assemblies for all three species with a substantial number of the assembled transcripts being full or near-full length. The majority of transcripts had a related sequence in either UniRef100, the Arabidopsis thaliana predicted proteome, or the Pfam protein domain database; however, we also identified transcripts that lacked similarity with entries in either database and thereby lack a known function. Representation of known genes within the MIA biosynthetic pathway was robust. As a diverse set of tissues and treatments were surveyed, expression abundances of transcripts in the three species could be estimated to reveal transcripts associated with development and response to elicitor treatment. Together, these transcriptomes and expression abundance matrices provide a rich resource for

  9. Simulation of the type of coralin alkaloid-DNA binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikov, K. G.; Koshlan, T. V.

    2015-05-01

    Interaction between a synthesized coralin protoberberine alkaloid and the DNA double helix of the calf's thymus in a salt solution is studied by optical absorption spectroscopy and spectropolarimetry. The dependence of the spectral characteristics of the alkaloid on a ratio between the DNA base pair concentration and the alkaloid molecule concentration is considered. The parameters of bonds between the coralin alkaloid and the DNA double helix are determined using modified McGhee-von Hippel equations.

  10. [Study on optimum extraction conditions of alkaloids from Pinellia ternate].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jianhong; Peng, Zhengsong; Mao, Zicheng; Wei, Shuhong

    2003-05-01

    The optimum extraction conditions of alkaloids from Pinellia ternate (Thunb.) Breit were studied by orthogonal test. The results showed that the highest extraction rate of the alkaloids could be obtained by smashing the material in 60 (sieve number) of fragmentation and socking the material in 2.575 mol/L ammonia water, extracting alkaloids with 18 times as much chlorolform at room temperature for 25 hours. The highest extraction rate of alkaloids was 0.0817%.

  11. Hemlock alkaloids from Socrates to poison aloes.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Tom

    2005-06-01

    Hemlock (Conium maculatum L. Umbelliferae) has long been known as a poisonous plant. Toxicity is due to a group of piperidine alkaloids of which the representative members are coniine and gamma-coniceine. The latter is the more toxic and is the first formed biosynthetically. Its levels in relation to coniine vary widely according to environmental conditions and to provenance of the plants. Surprisingly, these piperidine alkaloids have turned up in quite unrelated species in the monocotyledons as well as the dicotyledons. Aloes, for instance, important medicinal plants, are not regarded as poisonous although some species are very bitter. Nevertheless a small number of mostly local species contain the alkaloids, especially gamma-coniceine and there have been records of human poisoning. The compounds are recognized by their characteristic mousy smell. Both acute and chronic symptoms have been described. The compounds are neurotoxins and death results from respiratory failure, recalling the effects of curare. Chronic non-lethal ingestion by pregnant livestock leads to foetal malformation. Both acute and chronic toxicity are seen with stock in damp meadows and have been recorded as problems especially in North America. The alkaloids derive biosynthetically from acetate units via the polyketide pathway in contrast to other piperidine alkaloids which derive from lysine.

  12. Mitochondria: a promising target for anticancer alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Urra, Félix A; Cordova-Delgado, Miguel; Pessoa-Mahana, Hernan; Ramírez-Rodríguez, Oney; Weiss-Lopez, Boris; Ferreira, Jorge; Araya-Maturana, Ramiro

    2013-01-01

    A great number of alkaloids exhibit high potential in cancer research. Some of them are anticancer drugs with well-defined clinical uses, exerting their action on microtubules dynamics or DNA replication and topology. On the other hand, mitochondria have been recognized as an essential organelle in the establishment of tumor characteristics, especially the resistance to cell death, high proliferative capacity and adaptation to unfavorable cellular environment. Interestingly, many alkaloids exert their anticancer activities affecting selectively some functions of the tumor mitochondria by 1) modulating OXPHOS and ADP/ATP transport, 2) increasing ROS levels and mitochondrial potential dissipation by crosstalk between endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria, 3) inducing mitochondria-dependent apoptosis and autophagy, 4) inhibiting mitochondrial metabolic pathways and 5) by alteration of the morphology and biogenesis of this organelle. These antecedents show the relevance of developing research about the effects of alkaloids on functions controlled by tumor mitochondria, offering an attractive target for the design of new alkaloid derivatives, considering organelle- specific delivery strategies. This review describes mitochondria as a central component in the anticancer action of a set of alkaloids, in a way to illustrate the importance of this organelle in medicinal chemistry.

  13. Benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis in opium poppy.

    PubMed

    Beaudoin, Guillaume A W; Facchini, Peter J

    2014-07-01

    Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) is one of the world's oldest medicinal plants and remains the only commercial source for the narcotic analgesics morphine, codeine and semi-synthetic derivatives such as oxycodone and naltrexone. The plant also produces several other benzylisoquinoline alkaloids with potent pharmacological properties including the vasodilator papaverine, the cough suppressant and potential anticancer drug noscapine and the antimicrobial agent sanguinarine. Opium poppy has served as a model system to investigate the biosynthesis of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids in plants. The application of biochemical and functional genomics has resulted in a recent surge in the discovery of biosynthetic genes involved in the formation of major benzylisoquinoline alkaloids in opium poppy. The availability of extensive biochemical genetic tools and information pertaining to benzylisoquinoline alkaloid metabolism is facilitating the study of a wide range of phenomena including the structural biology of novel catalysts, the genomic organization of biosynthetic genes, the cellular and sub-cellular localization of biosynthetic enzymes and a variety of biotechnological applications. In this review, we highlight recent developments and summarize the frontiers of knowledge regarding the biochemistry, cellular biology and biotechnology of benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis in opium poppy.

  14. The alkaloids of the madangamine group.

    PubMed

    Amat, Mercedes; Pérez, Maria; Ballette, Roberto; Proto, Stefano; Bosch, Joan

    2015-01-01

    This chapter is focused on madangamines, a small group of complex diamine alkaloids isolated from marine sponges of the order Haplosclerida, and covers their isolation, characterization, biogenesis, biological activity, and synthesis. Structurally, madangamines are pentacyclic alkaloids with an unprecedented skeletal type, characterized by a common diazatricyclic core and two peripheral macrocyclic rings. The isolation of these alkaloids from Xestospongia ingens (madangamines A-E) and Pachychalina alcaloidifera (madangamine F) is described in detail. Physical and complete spectroscopic 1H and 13C NMR data are included. The proposed biogenesis of madangamines from ammonia, a functionalized three-carbon unit, and saturated or unsaturated linear long-chain dialdehydes, via partially reduced bis-alkylpyridine macrocycles, is discussed. The synthesis of alkaloids of the madangamine group has been little explored, with only one total synthesis reported so far, that of (+)-madangamine D. This review also describes several model synthetic approaches to the diazatricyclic ABC core of these alkaloids, as well as model studies on the construction of the (Z,Z)-unsaturated 11-membered E macrocycle common to madangamines A-E, the 13- and 14-membered D rings of madangamines C-E, and the all-cis-triunsaturated 15-membered D ring of madangamine A. Some members of this group have shown significant in vitro cytotoxicity against a number of cancer cell lines.

  15. The Double-Bond Configuration of Corynanthean Alkaloids and Its Impact on Monoterpenoid Indole Alkaloid Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Eckermann, Ruben; Gaich, Tanja

    2016-04-11

    Experimental evidence is provided for the coherence of the double-bond geometry and the occurrence of "secondary cyclizations" in the biosynthesis of monoterpenoid indole alkaloids. Biosynthetically, akuammiline, C-mavacurine, and Strychnos alkaloids are proposed to be derived from the corynanthean alkaloid geissoschizine, a key intermediate in the biosynthetic pathway of these monoterpenoid indole alkaloids. This process occurs by so-called "secondary cyclizations" from geissoschizine or its derivatives. Although corynanthean alkaloids like geissoschizine incorporate E or Z double bonds located at C19-C20, the alkaloids downstream in the biosynthesis exclusively exhibit the E double bond. This study shows that secondary cyclizations preferentially occur with the E isomer of geissoschizine or its derivatives. This is attributed to the flexibility of the quinolizidine system of the corynanthean alkaloids, which can adopt a cis or trans conformation. For the secondary cyclization to take place, the cis-quinolizidine conformation is required. Experimental evidence supports the hypothesis that the E double bond of geissoschizine induces the cis conformation, whereas the Z double bond induces the trans conformation, which prohibits secondary cyclization of the Z compounds.

  16. Development of an Alkaloid-Pyrone Annulation: Synthesis of Pleiomaltinine**

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Robert E.; Tan, Shin-Jowl; Kam, Toh-Seok

    2012-01-01

    Odd Couple Methodology for the synthesis of alkaloid-pyrones using a novel pyrone annulation of β–carbolines and indoles with 3-siloxy-4-pyrones is reported. The approach has enabled semisynthesis of the unprecedented alkaloid-pyrone pleiomaltinine from the plant-derived indole-alkaloid pleiocarpamine. PMID:22893619

  17. 21 CFR 119.1 - Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids... UNREASONABLE RISK § 119.1 Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids. Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids present an unreasonable risk of illness or injury under conditions of use recommended...

  18. 21 CFR 119.1 - Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids... UNREASONABLE RISK § 119.1 Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids. Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids present an unreasonable risk of illness or injury under conditions of use recommended...

  19. 21 CFR 119.1 - Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids... UNREASONABLE RISK § 119.1 Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids. Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids present an unreasonable risk of illness or injury under conditions of use recommended...

  20. 21 CFR 119.1 - Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids... UNREASONABLE RISK § 119.1 Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids. Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids present an unreasonable risk of illness or injury under conditions of use recommended...

  1. 21 CFR 119.1 - Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids... UNREASONABLE RISK § 119.1 Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids. Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids present an unreasonable risk of illness or injury under conditions of use recommended...

  2. Alkaloid profiles of Mimosa tenuiflora and associated methods of analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The alkaloid contents of the leaves and seeds of M. tenuiflora collected from northeastern Brazil were studied. Alkaloids were isolated by classical acid/base extraction procedures and by cation exchange solid phase extraction. The crude alkaloid fractions were then analysed by thin layer chromatogr...

  3. Two new amaryllidaceae alkaloids from the bulbs of Lycoris radiata.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Zhang, Xiao-Qi; Yin, Zhi-Qi; Wang, Ying; Ye, Wen-Cai

    2009-06-01

    Two new Amaryllidaceae alkaloids, named lycoranines A (1) and B (2), were isolated from the bulbs of Lycoris radiata. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analysis. Compound 2 was a new-type alkaloid, which provided a new insight into the biosynthesis of alkaloids in Amaryllidaceae plants.

  4. Ether bridge formation in loline alkaloid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Juan; Bhardwaj, Minakshi; Faulkner, Jerome R.; Nagabhyru, Padmaja; Charlton, Nikki D.; Higashi, Richard M.; Miller, Anne-Frances; Young, Carolyn A.; Grossman, Robert B.; Schardl, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Lolines are potent insecticidal agents produced by endophytic fungi of cool-season grasses. These alkaloids are composed of a pyrrolizidine ring system and an uncommon ether bridge linking carbons 2 and 7. Previous results indicated that 1-aminopyrrolizidine was a pathway intermediate. We used RNA interference to knock down expression of lolO, resulting in the accumulation of a novel alkaloid identified as exo-1-acetamidopyrrolizidine based on high-resolution MS and NMR. Genomes of endophytes differing in alkaloid profiles were sequenced, revealing that those with mutated lolO accumulated exo-1-acetamidopyrrolizidine but no lolines. Heterologous expression of wild-type lolO complemented a lolO mutant, resulting in the production of N-acetylnorloline. These results indicated that the non-heme iron oxygenase, LolO, is required for ether bridge formation, probably through oxidation of exo-1-acetamidopyrrolizidine. PMID:24374065

  5. An efficient synthesis of loline alkaloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cakmak, Mesut; Mayer, Peter; Trauner, Dirk

    2011-07-01

    Loline (1) is a small alkaloid that, in spite of its simple-looking structure, has posed surprising challenges to synthetic chemists. It has been known for more than a century and has been the subject of extensive biological investigations, but only two total syntheses have been achieved to date. Here, we report an asymmetric total synthesis of loline that, with less then ten steps, is remarkably short. Our synthesis incorporates a Sharpless epoxidation, a Grubbs olefin metathesis and an unprecedented transannular aminobromination, which converts an eight-membered cyclic carbamate into a bromopyrrolizidine. The synthesis is marked by a high degree of chemo- and stereoselectivity and gives access to several members of the loline alkaloid family. It delivers sufficient material to support a programme aimed at studying the complex interactions between plants, fungi, insects and bacteria brokered by loline alkaloids.

  6. Two new alkaloids from Narcissus serotinus L.

    PubMed

    Pigni, Natalia B; Berkov, Strahil; Elamrani, Abdelaziz; Benaissa, Mohammed; Viladomat, Francesc; Codina, Carles; Bastida, Jaume

    2010-10-14

    The Amaryllidaceae family is well known for the presence of an exclusive group of alkaloids with a wide range of biological activities. Narcissus serotinus L. is a plant belonging to this family and its geographical distribution is mainly located along the Mediterranean coast. In the present work, specimens collected near Casablanca (Morocco) were used to study the alkaloid content of this species. Starting with 350 g of the whole plant we used standard extraction and purification procedures to obtain fractions and compounds for GC-MS and NMR analysis. As well as five known alkaloids, we isolated two new compounds: 1-O-(3´-acetoxybutanoyl)lycorine and narseronine. The latter has been previously published, but with an erroneous structure.

  7. [Evaluation of antimicrobial activity of indol alkaloids].

    PubMed

    Rojas Hernández, N M

    1979-01-01

    In pursuing the study of the antimicrobial properties of alkaloids prepared from Cuban plants the activity of 10 indol alkaloids and 4 semisynthetic variables obtained from three plants--Catharanthus roseus G. Don., Vallesia antillana Wood and Ervatamia coronaria Staph, of the family Apocynaceae--growing in Cuba was assessed in vitro. The alkaloids and the variables used were catharantine, vindoline, vindolinine, perivine, reserpine, tabernaemontanine, tetrahydroalstonine, aparicine, vindolinic acid, reserpic acid and vindolininol. These were faced to 40 bacterial strains from the genera Salmonella, Shigella, Proteus, Escherichia, Pseudomonas, Staphylococcus and Corynebacterium as well as to fungi and yeasts from the genera Aspergillus, kCunnighamella, kCandida and Saccharomyces. The method involving cylindric sections in a double agar layer was applied and lectures were obtained at 24-48 hours of incubation at 25 degrees C for fungi and yeasts and 37 degrees C for bacteria. Inhibition zones are reported in millimeters.

  8. Diterpenoid alkaloids and flavonoids from Delphinium trichophorum.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chao-Zhan; Zhao, Zhong-Xiang; Xie, Si-Min; Mao, Ju-Hua; Zhu, Chen-Chen; Li, Xiao-Hui; Zeren-dawa, Bairi; Suolang-qimei, Kangsa; Zhu, Dun; Xiong, Tian-Qin; Wu, Ai-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    Five hetisane-type C20-diterpenoid alkaloids, trichodelphinines A-E, one delnudine-type C20-diterpenoid alkaloid, trichodelphinine F and three known flavonoids, quercetin, quercetin 3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, and quercetin 3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside-7-O-α-L-arabinopyranoside, were isolated from whole plants of Delphinium trichophorum Franch. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analysis, including HSQC, HMBC, (1)H-(1)H COSY, NOESY and X-ray crystallographic analysis, and from chemical evidence. The cytotoxic activities of the diterpenoid alkaloids were evaluated using the MTT method, and the IC50 values of their cytotoxicity against A549 cancer cells ranged from 12.03 to 52.79 μM.

  9. Rotational Investigation of Tropane Alkaloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocinero, Emilio J.; Lesarri, Alberto; Ecija, Patricia; Grabow, Jens-Uwe; Fernández, Jose A.; Castano, Fernando

    2010-06-01

    We report an investigation of the rotational spectrum of several tropane alkaloids using the new Balle-Flygare-type FT-MW spectrometer built at the University of the Basque Country. The initial work focused on the azabicycles of tropinone, scopine and scopoline, vaporized using heating methods. For tropinone the spectrum confirmed the presence of equatorial and axial conformers originated by the inversion of the N-methyl group, with the tropane motif adopting a distorted chair configuration. The determination of substitution and effective structures for the two conformers included the 13C, 15N and 18O isotopomers observed in natural abundance. The structures revealed the flexibility and structural changes associated to the N-methyl inversion, mostly a flattening at the nitrogen atom and a simultaneous rising of the carbonyl group in the axial form. The investigation of scopine gave an intense spectrum, but it was inconsistent with the structural models expected for this molecule. The carrier of the new spectrum was later identified as scopoline, generated in situ by an intramolecular reaction at the moderate temperatures of the nozzle. A single conformation was detected for scopoline, with an ether bridge seriously distorting the tropane motif. E. J. Cocinero, A. Lesarri, P. écija, J.-U. Grabow, J. A. Fernández, F. Castaño, in publication, 2010 E. J. Cocinero, A. Lesarri, P. Écija, J.-U. Grabow, J. A. Fernández, F. Castaño, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys.,in press, 2010

  10. Leucovernine and acetylleucovernine, alkaloids from Leucojum vernum.

    PubMed

    Forgo, Peter; Hohmann, Judit

    2005-11-01

    The fresh bulbs of Leucojum vernum provided seven tyrosine-derived alkaloids; two of them have not been reported before and are named leucovernine and acetylleucovernine. The five known alkaloids were N-demethylgalanthamine, hippeastrine, 9-O-demethylhomolycorine, 5alpha-hydroxyhomolycorine, and 11-hydroxyvittatine. These compounds have been isolated from this species for the first time. The structure determination was carried out by the combination of liquid-phase one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy and high-resolution mass spectrometry.

  11. Antitussive indole alkaloids from Kopsia hainanensis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Min-Jia; Yin, Chun; Tang, Chun-Ping; Ke, Chang-Qiang; Lin, Ge; Ye, Yang

    2011-06-01

    Three new indole alkaloids, named kopsihainins A-C (1-3), and two known compounds, kopsinine (4) and methyl demethoxycarbonylchanofruticosinate (5), were isolated from the stems of Kopsia hainanensis. Their structures were determined using extensive spectroscopic methods. The two main constituents 4 and 5 exhibited significant antitussive activity in a citric acid induced guinea pig cough model. The antitussive effect of 4 was demonstrated to interact with the δ-opioid receptor. This is the first report of antitussive effects of aspidofractinine type and chanofruticosinate type alkaloids.

  12. The expanding universe of alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    De Luca, V; Laflamme, P

    2001-06-01

    Characterization of many of the major gene families responsible for the generation of central intermediates and for their decoration, together with the development of large genomics and proteomics databases, has revolutionized our capability to identify exotic and interesting natural-product pathways. Over the next few years, these tools will facilitate dramatic advances in our knowledge of the biosynthesis of alkaloids, which will far surpass that which we have learned in the past 50 years. These tools will also be exploited for the rapid characterization of regulatory genes, which control the development of specialized cell factories for alkaloid biosynthesis.

  13. Alkaloids from Hippeastrum morelianum Lem. (Amaryllidaceae).

    PubMed

    Giordani, Raquel B; de Andrade, Jean P; Verli, Hugo; Dutilh, Julie H; Henriques, Amélia T; Berkov, Strahil; Bastida, Jaume; Zuanazzi, José Angelo S

    2011-10-01

    The Amaryllidaceae family has proven to be a rich source of active molecules. As part of an ongoing project, we report a phytochemical study of Hippeastrum morelianum (Amaryllidaceae), from which we have isolated two homolycorine-type alkaloids, the new 2α,7-dimethoxyhomolycorine (1) and the poorly described candimine (2), as well as six known alkaloids: tazettine, pretazettine, 3-epimacronine, haemanthamine, hamayne and trisphaeridine. For reference purposes, the NMR of the isolated compounds was unequivocally described, based on 2D NMR measurements including (1)H-(1)H COSY, (1)H-(1)H NOESY, HSQC and HMBC.

  14. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα) and PPAR gamma coactivator (PGC-1α) induce carnitine palmitoyltransferase IA (CPT-1A) via independent gene elements

    PubMed Central

    Song, Shulan; Attia, Ramy R.; Connaughton, Sara; Niesen, Melissa I.; Ness, Gene C.; Elam, Marshall B.; Hori, Roderick T.; Cook, George A.; Park, Edwards A.

    2010-01-01

    Long chain fatty acids and pharmacologic ligands for the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα) activate expression of genes involved in fatty acid and glucose oxidation including carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1A (CPT-1A) and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4). CPT-1A catalyzes the transfer of long chain fatty acids from acyl-CoA to carnitine for translocation across the mitochondrial membranes and is an initiating step in the mitochondrial oxidation of long chain fatty acids. PDK4 phosphorylates and inhibits the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) which catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA in the glucose oxidation pathway. The activity of CPT-1A is modulated both by transcriptional changes as well as by malonyl-CoA inhibition. In the liver, CPT-1A and PDK4 gene expression are induced by starvation, high fat diets and PPARα ligands. Here, we characterized a binding site for PPARα in the second intron of the rat CPT-1A gene. Our studies indicated that WY14643 and long chain fatty acids induce CPT-1A gene expression through this element. In addition, we found that mutation of the PPARα binding site reduced the expression of CPT-1A-luciferase vectors in the liver of fasted rats. We had demonstrated previously that CPT-1A was stimulated by the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC-1α) via sequences in the first intron of the rat CPT-1A gene. Surprisingly, PGC-1α did not enhance CPT-1A transcription through the PPARα binding site in the second intron. Following knockdown of PGC-1α with short hairpin RNA, the CPT-1A and PDK4 genes remained responsive to WY14643. Overall, our studies indicated that PPARα and PGC-1α stimulate transcription of the CPT-1A gene through different regions of the CPT-1A gene. PMID:20638986

  15. Alkaloid production by callous tissue cultures of Cereus peruvianus (Cactaceae).

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Arildo José Braz; Machado, Maria Fátima Pires da Silva

    2003-02-01

    The morphologically undifferentiated cells of nonregenerant callous tissue of Cereus peruvianus cultured in the original medium and in medium supplemented with tyrosine were used as an alkaloid source. Comparison of alkaloid production by C. peruvianus plants and by callous tissues indicated that alkaloid levels were almost twice as high in callous tissues as in shoots of C. peruvianus plants. The ratio of alkaloid concentration between mature plant and morphologically undifferentiated cells of callous tissue was 1:1.7. A relationship between culture medium containing tyrosine and alkaloid production was also observed in the callous tissues of C. peruvianus. Since increased alkaloid production may be induced by additional factors such as tyrosine, increasing levels of tyrosine or other conditions of the culture medium may be considered factors for inducing higher alkaloid production by C. peruvianus callous tissues.

  16. Therapeutic Potential of Steroidal Alkaloids in Cancer and Other Diseases.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qi-Wei; Chen, Mei-Wan; Cheng, Ke-Jun; Yu, Pei-Zhong; Wei, Xing; Shi, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Steroidal alkaloids are a class of secondary metabolites isolated from plants, amphibians, and marine invertebrates. Evidence accumulated in the recent two decades demonstrates that steroidal alkaloids have a wide range of bioactivities including anticancer, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antinociceptive, etc., suggesting their great potential for application. It is therefore necessary to comprehensively summarize the bioactivities, especially anticancer activities and mechanisms of steroidal alkaloids. Here we systematically highlight the anticancer profiles both in vitro and in vivo of steroidal alkaloids such as dendrogenin, solanidine, solasodine, tomatidine, cyclopamine, and their derivatives. Furthermore, other bioactivities of steroidal alkaloids are also discussed. The integrated molecular mechanisms in this review can increase our understanding on the utilization of steroidal alkaloids and contribute to the development of new drug candidates. Although the therapeutic potentials of steroidal alkaloids look promising in the preclinical and clinical studies, further pharmacokinetic and clinical studies are mandated to define their efficacy and safety in cancer and other diseases.

  17. Honatisine, a novel diterpenoid alkaloid, and six known alkaloids from Delphinium honanense and their cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    He, Yang Qing; Ma, Zhan Ying; Wei, Xiao Mei; Liu, Dong Jie; Du, Bao Zhong; Yao, Bing Hua; Gao, Li Ming

    2011-11-01

    A novel diterpene alkaloid named honatisine (1) has been isolated from the whole plants of Delphinium honanense, along with six known alkaloids, siwanine E (2), isoatisine (3), atisine (4), delcorinine (5), uraphine (6), and nordhagenine A (7). Their structures were deduced on the basis of their spectral data. All of them were evaluated by a SRB assay for their cytotoxicity, and compound 1 showed a significant cytotoxic activity (IC(50) =3.16 μM) against the MCF-7 cell line.

  18. The Alkaloid Profiles of Lupinus sulphureus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lupines are common plants found on the rangelands in the western United States. Lupines are known to contain alkaloids that can be toxic and teratogenic causing congenital birth defects (crooked calf disease). One such lupine, Lupinus sulphureus, occurs in parts of Oregon, Washington, and British ...

  19. Ergot alkaloids decrease rumen epithelial blood flow

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two experiments were conducted to determine if ergot alkaloids affect blood flow to the absorptive surface of the rumen of steers. Steers (n=8 total) were pair-fed alfalfa cubes at 1.5× NEM and received ground endophyte-infected tall fescue seed (E+) or endophyte-free tall fescue seed (E-) via rumen...

  20. Photochemical N-demethylation of alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Ripper, J A; Tiekink, E R; Scammells, P J

    2001-02-26

    Certain alkaloids were observed to undergo N-demethylation processes under photochemical conditions. Tropine, acetyltropine, tropinone, and atropine were cleanly N-demethylated upon treatment with tetraphenylporphin, oxygen, and light. Dextromethorphan also underwent a N-demethylation reaction, but reacted further to afford an imine. In contrast, 14-acyloxycodeinones underwent a photochemically induced tandem N-demethylation acyl migration.

  1. Dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloid toxicity, cytotoxicity, and carcinogenicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dehyro-pyrrolizidine alkaloid (PA)-containing plants compose about 5% of the world’s flowering plants and they commonly poison livestock, wildlife and humans. Previous work has produced considerable understanding of PA toxicity, species susceptibility, conditions and routes of exposure, toxin metab...

  2. Apoptosis-Inducing Effects of Amaryllidaceae Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Nair, Jerald J; van Staden, Johannes; Bastida, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    The Amaryllidaceae occupies a privileged status amongst medicinal plants in having delivered the Alzheimer's drug galanthamine to the clinical market. Following its resounding success, there have been several positive indicators for the emergence of an anticancer drug from the family due to the potent antiproliferative activities manifested by several of its alkaloid constituents. Of these, the phenanthridones such as pancratistatin hold most promise as potential chemotherapeutics having succumbed to various phases of clinical trials. Other cytotoxic targets of the Amaryllidaceae are to be found within the lycorane and crinane groups, as exemplified by crinine and lycorine. Although the molecular targets of these alkaloids still remain elusive, much effort has gone into understanding their mode of action in cancer cells. Recent findings have shown that the apoptotic pathway may be a key factor in cancer cell death instigated by Amaryllidaceae alkaloids. As such, this review seeks to: (a) examine the apoptotic effects of Amaryllidaceae alkaloids in cancer cells; (b) explore the molecular basis to these effects; and (c) provide a pharmacophoric rationale in support of these activities.

  3. New indole alkaloid from Peschiera affinis (Apocynaceae).

    PubMed

    Santos, Allana Kellen L; Machado, Luciana L; Bizerra, Ayla Marcia C; Monte, Francisco José Q; Santiago, Gilvandete M P; Braz-Filho, Raimundo; Lemos, Telma L G

    2012-06-01

    A new indole alkaloid of the pyridocarbazole type, named 6N-hydroxy-olivacine, and two known compounds, 2N-oxide-olivacine and olivacine, were isolated from roots of Peschiera affinis. The structures of the compounds were determined by spectroscopic {IR and extensive NMR (COSY, HMQC, HMBCand NOESY)} and EIMS analysis.

  4. Four new Amaryllidaceae alkaloids from Zephyranthes candida.

    PubMed

    Shitara, Nanase; Hirasawa, Yusuke; Hasumi, Shunsuke; Sasaki, Tadahiro; Matsumoto, Misaki; Wong, Chin Piow; Kaneda, Toshio; Asakawa, Yoshinori; Morita, Hiroshi

    2014-07-01

    Four new Amaryllidaceae alkaloids (1-4) possessing a homolycorine-type or a crinine-type skeleton have been isolated from the aerial part of Zephyranthes candida, and their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data. The stereochemistry was elucidated by combination of NOESY correlations and CD analyses.

  5. Ananas comosus L. Leaf Phenols and p-Coumaric Acid Regulate Liver Fat Metabolism by Upregulating CPT-1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Fan; Ouyang, Xiaoxi; Du, Lijun

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect and action mechanisms of pineapple leaf phenols (PLPs) on liver fat metabolism in high-fat diet-fed mice. Results show that PLP significantly reduced abdominal fat and liver lipid accumulation in high-fat diet-fed mice. The effects of PLP were comparable with those of FB. Furthermore, at the protein level, PLP upregulated the expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT-1), whereas FB had no effects on CPT-1 compared with the HFD controls. Regarding mRNA expression, PLP mainly promoted the expression of CPT-1, PGC1a, UCP-1, and AMPK in the mitochondria, whereas FB mostly enhanced the expression of Ech1, Acox1, Acaa1, and Ehhadh in peroxisomes. PLP seemed to enhance fat metabolism in the mitochondria, whereas FB mainly exerted the effect in peroxisomes. In addition, p-coumaric acid (CA), one of the main components from PLP, significantly inhibited fat accumulation in oleic acid-induced HepG2 cells. CA also significantly upregulated CPT-1 mRNA and protein expressions in HepG2 cells. We, firstly, found that PLP enhanced liver fat metabolism by upregulating CPT-1 expression in the mitochondria and might be promising in treatment of fatty liver diseases as alternative natural products. CA may be one of the active components of PLP. PMID:25197313

  6. Ananas comosus L. Leaf Phenols and p-Coumaric Acid Regulate Liver Fat Metabolism by Upregulating CPT-1 Expression.

    PubMed

    Xie, Weidong; Zhang, Shaobo; Lei, Fan; Ouyang, Xiaoxi; Du, Lijun

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect and action mechanisms of pineapple leaf phenols (PLPs) on liver fat metabolism in high-fat diet-fed mice. Results show that PLP significantly reduced abdominal fat and liver lipid accumulation in high-fat diet-fed mice. The effects of PLP were comparable with those of FB. Furthermore, at the protein level, PLP upregulated the expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT-1), whereas FB had no effects on CPT-1 compared with the HFD controls. Regarding mRNA expression, PLP mainly promoted the expression of CPT-1, PGC1a, UCP-1, and AMPK in the mitochondria, whereas FB mostly enhanced the expression of Ech1, Acox1, Acaa1, and Ehhadh in peroxisomes. PLP seemed to enhance fat metabolism in the mitochondria, whereas FB mainly exerted the effect in peroxisomes. In addition, p-coumaric acid (CA), one of the main components from PLP, significantly inhibited fat accumulation in oleic acid-induced HepG2 cells. CA also significantly upregulated CPT-1 mRNA and protein expressions in HepG2 cells. We, firstly, found that PLP enhanced liver fat metabolism by upregulating CPT-1 expression in the mitochondria and might be promising in treatment of fatty liver diseases as alternative natural products. CA may be one of the active components of PLP.

  7. Heterologous expression of human carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) II in yeast: A model for the molecular analysis of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation defects

    SciTech Connect

    Cavadini, P.; Invernizzi, F.; Baratta, S.

    1994-09-01

    The CPT enzyme system, which is composed of two distinct mitochondrial membrane-bound proteins (CPT I and CPT II), provides the mechanism whereby long-chain fatty acids are transferred from the cytosol to the mitochondrial matrix to undergo {beta}-oxidation. Here, we report the development of an expression system for investigating genotype/phenotype correlations in CPT II deficiency and, potentially, other mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation defects. To explore yeast as an expression system, we introduced a cDNA encoding the entire human CPT II precursor into Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Expression was programmed by using an inducible galactose operon promoter (GAL1). Following induction, human CPT II was expressed at high levels, with activity 4- to 16-fold greater than in human fibroblasts. Levels of expression paralleled those of respiration, being higher in cells grown on a nonfermentable carbon source than in those grown on glucose. Immunoprecipitation of pulse-labeled transformed cells demonstrated that human CPT II expressed in yeast was targeted to mitochondria with correct proteolytic processing of its 25-residue mitochondrial leader sequence. Preliminary results on the expression of a number of mutant CPT II alleles associated with different clinical phenotypes demonstrated the value of this system for examining the functional consequences of disease-causing mutations and investigating genotype/phenotype correlations in patients with CPT II deficiency.

  8. Insecticidal Constituents and Activity of Alkaloids from Cynanchum mongolicum.

    PubMed

    Ge, Yang; Liu, Pingping; Yang, Rui; Zhang, Liu; Chen, Hongxing; Camara, Ibrahima; Liu, Yiqing; Shi, Wangpeng

    2015-09-21

    Based on MS and NMR data and bioassay-guided tracing, three insecticidal alkaloids I, II and III from Cynanchum mongolicum were identified to be antofine N-oxide, antofine and tylophorine. Alkaloid I was more toxic than alkaloids II and III, but they were less active against Spodoptera litura than total alkaloids. The contact toxicity from these alkaloids against the aphid Lipaphis erysimi was significant, as the 24 h-LC50 values of alkaloids I, II, III and total alkaloids were 292.48, 367.21, 487.791 and 163.52 mg/L, respectively. The development disruption of S. litura larvae was tested, the pupation and emergence rates of S. litura decreased and the acute mortality of S. litura increased significantly by day 3 after being injected in their body cavity with 10-40 mg/L of total alkaloid. The ecdysone titer of treated S. litura larvae and prepupae declined with increasing alkaloid concentration. The alkaloids of Cynanchum mongolicum are potential insect growth inhibitors.

  9. The Structure-Activity Relationships of A-Ring-Substituted Aromathecin Topoisomerase I Inhibitors Strongly Support a Camptothecin-Like Binding Mode

    PubMed Central

    Cinelli, Maris A.; Morrell, Andrew E.; Dexheimer, Thomas S.; Agama, Keli; Agrawal, Surbhi; Pommier, Yves; Cushman, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Aromathecins are inhibitors of human topoisomerase I (Top1). These compounds are composites of several heteroaromatic systems, namely the camptothecins and indenoisoquinolines, and they possess notable Top1 inhibition and cytotoxicity when substituted at position 14. The SAR of these compounds overlaps with indenoisoquinolines, suggesting that they may intercalate into the Top1-DNA complex similarly. Nonetheless, the proposed binding mode for aromathecins is purely hypothetical, as an X-ray structure is unavailable. In the present communication, we have synthesized eight novel series of A-ring-substituted (positions 1-3) aromathecins, through a simple, modular route, as part of a comprehensive SAR study. Certain groups (such as 2,3-ethylenedioxy) moderately improve Top1 inhibition, and, often, antiproliferative activity, whereas other groups (2,3-dimethoxy and 3-substituents) attenuate bioactivity. Strikingly, these trends are very similar to those previously observed for the A-ring of camptothecins, and this considerable SAR overlap lends further support (in the absence of crystallographic data) to the hypothesis that aromathecins bind in the Top1 cleavage complex as interfacial inhibitors in a “camptothecin-like” pose. PMID:20630766

  10. Measurements of Direct CP Violation, CPT Symmetry, and Other Parameters in the Neutral Kaon System

    SciTech Connect

    Worcester, Elizabeth Turner

    2007-12-01

    The authors present precision measurements of the direct CP violation parameter, Re(ϵ'/ϵ), the kaon parameters, Δm and τS, and the CPT tests, Φ± and ΔΦ, in neutral kaon decays. These results are based on the full dataset collected by the KTeV experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory during 1996, 1997, and 1999. This dataset contains ~ 15 million K → π0π0 decays and ~ 69 million K → π+π- decays. They describe significant improvements to the precision of these measurements relative to previous KTeV analyses. They find Re(ϵ'/ϵ = [19.2 ± 1.1(stat) ± 1.8(syst)] x 10-4, Δm = (5265 ± 10) x 106 hs-1, and τS = (89.62 ± 0.05) x 10-12 s. They measure Φ± = (44.09 ± 1.00)° and ΔΦ = (0.29 ± 0.31)°; these results are consistent with CPT symmetry.

  11. Search for time-dependent CPT violation in hadronic and semileptonic B decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, T.; Sumisawa, K.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bay, A.; Belous, K.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bischofberger, M.; Bondar, A.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Brovchenko, O.; Browder, T. E.; Chang, M.-C.; Chang, P.; Chen, A.; Chen, P.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, I.-S.; Cho, K.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Fast, J. E.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hara, K.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Horii, Y.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hyun, H. J.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Iwashita, T.; Julius, T.; Kang, J. H.; Kapusta, P.; Kawasaki, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Ko, B. R.; Koblitz, S.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kumita, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, S.-H.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Libby, J.; Liu, C.; Liu, Z. Q.; Liventsev, D.; Louvot, R.; Matvienko, D.; McOnie, S.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Mori, T.; Muramatsu, N.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nakahama, Y.; Nakao, M.; Nakazawa, H.; Natkaniec, Z.; Ng, C.; Nishida, S.; Nishimura, K.; Nitoh, O.; Nozaki, T.; Ogawa, S.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Onuki, Y.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C. W.; Park, H. K.; Park, K. S.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Prim, M.; Ritter, M.; Röhrken, M.; Ryu, S.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, Y.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Schneider, O.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Seidl, R.; Senyo, K.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Sinha, R.; Smerkol, P.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tanaka, S.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Usov, Y.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Vinokurova, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, P.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamashita, Y.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.

    2012-04-01

    We report a new sensitive search for CPT violation, which includes improved measurements of the CPT-violating parameter z and the total decay-width difference normalized to the averaged width ΔΓd/Γd of the two Bd mass eigenstates. The results are based on a data sample of 535×106 BB¯ pairs collected at the Υ(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. We obtain Re(z)=[+1.9±3.7(stat)±3.3(syst)]×10-2, Im(z)=[-5.7±3.3(stat)±3.3(syst)]×10-3, and ΔΓd/Γd=[-1.7±1.8(stat)±1.1(syst)]×10-2, all of which are consistent with zero. This is the most precise single measurement of these parameters in the neutral B-meson system to date.

  12. Feynman propagator for the nonbirefringent CPT-even electrodynamics of the standard model extension

    SciTech Connect

    Casana, Rodolfo; Ferreira, Manoel M. Jr.; Santos, Frederico E. P. dos; Gomes, Adalto R.

    2010-12-15

    The CPT-even gauge sector of the standard model extension is composed of 19 components comprised in the tensor (K{sub F}){sub {mu}{nu}{rho}{sigma}}, of which nine do not yield birefringence. In this work, we examine the Maxwell electrodynamics supplemented by these nine nonbirefringent CPT-even components in aspects related to the Feynman propagator and full consistency (stability, causality, unitarity). We adopt a prescription that parametrizes the nonbirefringent components in terms of a symmetric and traceless tensor, K{sub {mu}{nu}}, and second parametrization that writes K{sub {mu}{nu}} in terms of two arbitrary four-vectors, U{sub {mu}} and V{sub {nu}}. We then explicitly evaluate the gauge propagator of this electrodynamics in a tensor closed way. In the sequel, we show that this propagator and involved dispersion relations can be specialized for the parity-odd and parity-even sectors of the tensor (K{sub F}){sub {mu}{nu}{rho}{sigma}}. In this way, we reassess some results of the literature and derive some new outcomes showing that the parity-even anisotropic sector engenders a stable, noncausal and unitary electrodynamics.

  13. Toxicosis by Plant Alkaloids in Humans and Animals in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Gonzalo J

    2015-12-11

    Due to its tropical location, chains of mountains, inter-Andean valleys, Amazon basin area, eastern plains and shores on both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, Colombia has many ecosystems and the second largest plant biodiversity in the world. Many plant species, both native and naturalized, are currently recognized as toxic for both animals and humans, and some of them are known to cause their toxic effects due to their alkaloid content. Among these, there are plants containing the hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids, neurotoxins such as the indolizidine alkaloid swainsonine and the piperidine alkaloids coniine and γ-coniceine and tropane alkaloids. Unfortunately, the research in toxic plants in Colombia is not nearly proportional to its plant biodiversity and the scientific information available is only very scarce. The present review aims at summarizing the scarce information about plant alkaloid toxicosis in animals and humans in Colombia.

  14. Toxicosis by Plant Alkaloids in Humans and Animals in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Gonzalo J.

    2015-01-01

    Due to its tropical location, chains of mountains, inter-Andean valleys, Amazon basin area, eastern plains and shores on both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, Colombia has many ecosystems and the second largest plant biodiversity in the world. Many plant species, both native and naturalized, are currently recognized as toxic for both animals and humans, and some of them are known to cause their toxic effects due to their alkaloid content. Among these, there are plants containing the hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids, neurotoxins such as the indolizidine alkaloid swainsonine and the piperidine alkaloids coniine and γ-coniceine and tropane alkaloids. Unfortunately, the research in toxic plants in Colombia is not nearly proportional to its plant biodiversity and the scientific information available is only very scarce. The present review aims at summarizing the scarce information about plant alkaloid toxicosis in animals and humans in Colombia. PMID:26690479

  15. Chlorinated alkaloids in Menispermum dauricum DC: root culture.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Y; Babiker, H A; Saisho, T; Furumoto, T; Inanaga, S; Kato, M

    2001-05-18

    Feeding experiments using (36)Cl showed that Menispermum dauricum root culture produces four alkaloids containing chlorine. They included the novel alkaloids dauricumine and dauricumidine as well as the known alkaloids acutumine and acutumidine. The structures of novel alkaloids were established by spectroscopic, crystallographic, and chemical methods. These four alkaloids were labeled with (36)Cl, isolated, and fed independently to root cultures. Mutual conversion between acutumine and acutumidine, and between dauricumine and dauricumidine by N-methylation and N-demethylation, was demonstrated. Moreover, dauricumine was converted to acutumine and acutumidine. Epimerization of acutumidine to dauricumidine or vice versa was not observed. These results suggest that dauricumine is the first chlorinated alkaloid formed in cultured M. dauricum roots. Skewed distribution of radioactivity derived from labeled dauricumine is proof that epimerization at C-1 proceeds at a lower rate than N-demethylation.

  16. Quinolizidine alkaloid biosynthesis: recent advances and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Bunsupa, Somnuk; Yamazaki, Mami; Saito, Kazuki

    2012-01-01

    Lys-derived alkaloids, including piperidine, quinolizidine, indolizidine, and lycopodium alkaloids, are widely distributed throughout the plant kingdom. Several of these alkaloids have beneficial properties for humans and have been used in medicine. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the biosynthesis of these alkaloids are not well understood. In the present article, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of Lys-derived alkaloids, especially the biochemistry, molecular biology, and biotechnology of quinolizidine alkaloid (QA) biosynthesis. We have also highlighted Lys decarboxylase (LDC), the enzyme that catalyzes the first committed step of QA biosynthesis and answers a longstanding question about the molecular entity of LDC activity in plants. Further prospects using current advanced technologies, such as next-generation sequencing, in medicinal plants have also been discussed. PMID:23112802

  17. Recent developments in the chemistry of quinazolinone alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Kshirsagar, U A

    2015-09-28

    Quinazolinones, an important class of fused heterocyclic alkaloids has attracted high attention in organic and medicinal chemistry due to their significant and wide range of biological activities. There are approximately 150 naturally occurring quinazolinone alkaloids known till 2005. Several new quinazolinone alkaloids (∼55) have been isolated in the last decade. Natural quinazolinones with exotic structural features and remarkable biological activities have incited a lot of activities in the synthetic community towards the development of new synthetic strategies and approaches for the total synthesis of quinazolinone alkaloids. This review is focused on these advances in the chemistry of quinazolinone alkaloids in the last decade. This article covers the newly isolated quinazolinone natural products with their biological activities and the recently reported total syntheses of quinazolinone alkaloids from 2006 to 2015.

  18. GC-MS investigation of tropane alkaloids in Datura stramonium.

    PubMed

    Philipov, Stefan; Berkov, Strahil

    2002-01-01

    Alkaloids, GS-MS, Datura stramonium The alkaloid spectrum in roots, leaves and seeds of Datura stramonium L. was investigated by GC-MS. Twenty-nine tropane alkaloids are detected. Twelve of them are new constituents for the species and the two tropane esters 3-(3'-acetoxytropoyloxy)tropane (21) and 3-(2'-hydroxytropoyloxy)tropane (26) are described for the first time.

  19. Two new morphinane alkaloids from Sinomenium acutum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Ling; Liu, Bing-Rui; Wang, Jun-Ru; Chen, Chien-Kuang; Qin, Guo-Wei; Lee, Shoei-Sheng

    2011-06-01

    Two new morphinane alkaloids, 1-hydroxy-10-oxo-sinomenine (1) and 4,5-epoxy-14-hydroxy sinomenine N-oxide (2), have been isolated from the stems of Sinomenium acutum. Their structures were established by various spectral analyses, especially 2D NMR experiments. The structure of 2 was confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The absolute configurations of 1 and 2 were deduced by comparison of CD spectra with the known alkaloid sinomenine (3). Compound 1 was tested for DPPH inhibition and gave IC(50) of 27.9 μM. Compound 2 was tested for neuroprotective effect and showed significant activity against β-amyloid(25-35)-induced oxidative injury (*P < 0.05) at 10 μM in PC-12 cells.

  20. Total synthesis of the Daphniphyllum alkaloid daphenylline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhaoyong; Li, Yong; Deng, Jun; Li, Ang

    2013-08-01

    The Daphniphyllum alkaloids are a large class of natural products isolated from a genus of evergreen plants widely used in Chinese herbal medicine. They display a remarkable range of biological activities, including anticancer, antioxidant, and vasorelaxation properties as well as elevation of nerve growth factor. Daphenylline is a structurally unique member among the predominately aliphatic Daphniphyllum alkaloids, and contains a tetrasubstituted arene moiety mounted on a sterically compact hexacyclic scaffold. Herein, we describe the first total synthesis of daphenylline. A gold-catalysed 6-exo-dig cyclization reaction and a subsequent intramolecular Michael addition reaction, inspired by Dixon's seminal work, were exploited to construct the bridged 6,6,5-tricyclic motif of the natural product at an early stage, and the aromatic moiety was forged through a photoinduced olefin isomerization/6π-electrocyclization cascade followed by an oxidative aromatization process.

  1. Biosynthesis and Regulation of Bioprotective Alkaloids in the Gramineae Endophytic Fungi with Implications for Herbivores Deterrents.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hongping; Xie, Longxiang; Zeng, Jie; Xie, Jianping

    2015-12-01

    Four kinds of bioprotective alkaloids-peramine, loline, ergot alkaloid, indole-diterpenes, produced by grass-fungal endophyte symbioses, are deterrents or toxic to vertebrate and invertebrate herbivores. Ergot alkaloids have pharmacological properties and widely are used clinically. The regulation of alkaloids biosynthesis is under intensive study to improve the yield for better agricultural and medicinal application. In this paper, we summarize the structure, related genes, regulation, and toxicity of alkaloids. We focus on the biosynthesis and the regulation network of alkaloids.

  2. Two new alkaloids from Capparis himalayensis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun-Qiu; Yang, Shi-Lin; Li, He-Ran; Xu, Li-Zhen

    2008-02-01

    Two new alkaloids, Capparin A (1) and B (2), along with seven known compounds 6-methoxyindoline-2,3-dione (3), wogonin (4), oroxylin A (5), kaempferol (6), apigenin (7), quercetin (8) and luteolin (9), were isolated from the whole plant of Capparis himalayensis. Their structures have been established on the basis of spectral methods and the structure of 1 was confirmed by X-ray crystallographic analysis.

  3. Muscarine, imidaozle, oxazole and thiazole alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhong

    2013-06-01

    Covering: July 2010 to June 2012. Previous review: Nat. Prod. Rep., 2011, 28, 1143-1191. Structurally diverse alkaloids containing five-membered heterocyclic subunits, such as imidazole, oxazole, thiazole, as well as their saturated congeners, are widely distributed in terrestrial and marine organisms and microorganisms. These naturally occurring secondary metabolites often exhibit extensive and pharmacologically important biological activities. The latest progress involving isolation, biological activities, chemical synthetic studies, and biosynthetic pathways of these natural products has been summarized in this review.

  4. Synthesis studies on the Melodinus alkaloid meloscine

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Ken S.; Antoline, Joshua F.

    2012-01-01

    The pentacyclic Melodinus alkaloid (±)-meloscine was synthesized in 19 chemical steps from 2-bromobenzaldehyde through a route featuring an allenyl azide cyclization cascade to deliver the core azabicyclo[3.3.0]octane substructure. Peripheral functionalization of this core included a Tollens-type aldol condensation to set the quaternary center at C(20) and a diastereoselective ring closing metathesis to forge the tetrahydropyridine ring. PMID:23316092

  5. New Perspectives in the Chemistry of Marine Pyridoacridine Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Plodek, Alois; Bracher, Franz

    2016-01-01

    Secondary metabolites from marine organisms are a rich source of novel leads for drug development. Among these natural products, polycyclic aromatic alkaloids of the pyridoacridine type have attracted the highest attention as lead compounds for the development of novel anti-cancer and anti-infective drugs. Numerous sophisticated total syntheses of pyridoacridine alkaloids have been worked out, and many of them have also been extended to the synthesis of libraries of analogues of the alkaloids. This review summarizes the progress in the chemistry of pyridoacridine alkaloids that was made in the last one-and-a-half decades. PMID:26821033

  6. Alkaloid patterns in some varieties of Datura stramonium.

    PubMed

    Berkov, Strahil; Zayed, Rawia; Doncheva, Tsvetelina

    2006-04-01

    A comparative GC-MS investigation of the alkaloid patterns of three varieties of Datura stramonium vars. stramonium, tatula and godronii, was carried out. Twenty-five tropane alkaloids were identified in the plant organs. Alkaloid patterns of the roots, leaves and seeds of the varieties grown at equal conditions in Bulgaria were very similar. In contrast, alkaloid pattern of D. stramonium var. stramonium, grown in Egypt, showed significant differences indicating that it is influenced more strongly by the environmental factors than genetic ones.

  7. Drug Delivery Systems and Combination Therapy by Using Vinca Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chun-Ting; Huang, Yen-Wei; Yang, Chih-Hui; Huang, Keng-Shiang

    2015-01-01

    Developing new methods for chemotherapy drug delivery has become a topic of great concern. Vinca alkaloids are among the most widely used chemotherapy reagents for tumor therapy; however, their side effects are particularly problematic for many medical doctors. To reduce the toxicity and enhance the therapeutic efficiency of vinca alkaloids, many researchers have developed strategies such as using liposome-entrapped drugs, chemical- or peptide-modified drugs, polymeric packaging drugs, and chemotherapy drug combinations. This review mainly focuses on the development of a vinca alkaloid drug delivery system and the combination therapy. Five vinca alkaloids (eg, vincristine, vinblastine, vinorelbine, vindesine, and vinflunine) are reviewed. PMID:25877096

  8. Plant alkaloids as drug leads for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ng, Yu Pong; Or, Terry Cho Tsun; Ip, Nancy Y

    2015-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative illness associated with dementia and is most prevalent among the elderly population. Current medications can only treat symptoms. Alkaloids are structurally diverse and have been an important source of therapeutics for various brain disorders. Two US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved acetylcholinesterase inhibitors for AD, galantamine and rivastigmine, are in fact alkaloids. In addition, clinical trials of four other extensively studied alkaloids-huperzine A, caffeine, nicotine, and indomethacin-have been conducted but do not convincingly demonstrate their clinical efficacy for AD. Interestingly, rhynchophylline, a known neuroprotective alkaloid, was recently discovered by in silico screening as an inhibitor of EphA4, a novel target for AD. Here, we review the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying AD, current treatment strategies, and therapeutic potential of several selected plant alkaloids in AD, highlighting their various drug targets and the key supportive preclinical and clinical studies. Future research should include more rigorous clinical studies of the most promising alkaloids, the further development of recently discovered candidate alkaloids, and the continual search for new alkaloids for relevant drug targets. It remains promising that an alkaloid drug candidate could significantly affect the progression of AD in addition to providing symptomatic relief.

  9. New Perspectives in the Chemistry of Marine Pyridoacridine Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Plodek, Alois; Bracher, Franz

    2016-01-26

    Secondary metabolites from marine organisms are a rich source of novel leads for drug development. Among these natural products, polycyclic aromatic alkaloids of the pyridoacridine type have attracted the highest attention as lead compounds for the development of novel anti-cancer and anti-infective drugs. Numerous sophisticated total syntheses of pyridoacridine alkaloids have been worked out, and many of them have also been extended to the synthesis of libraries of analogues of the alkaloids. This review summarizes the progress in the chemistry of pyridoacridine alkaloids that was made in the last one-and-a-half decades.

  10. Indole alkaloids from the leaves of Philippine Alstonia scholaris.

    PubMed

    Macabeo, Allan Patrick G; Krohn, Karsten; Gehle, Dietmar; Read, Roger W; Brophy, Joseph J; Cordell, Geoffrey A; Franzblau, Scott G; Aguinaldo, Alicia M

    2005-05-01

    The first seco-uleine alkaloids, manilamine (1) (18-hydroxy-19,20-dehydro-7,21-seco-uleine) and N4-methyl angustilobine B (2), were isolated from the (pH 5) alkaloid extract of Philippine Alstonia scholaris leaves together with the known indole alkaloids 19,20-(E)-vallesamine (3), angustilobine B N4-oxide (4), 20(S)-tubotaiwine (5), and 6,7-seco-angustilobine B (6). The structure of the alkaloids was established from MS and NMR experiments.

  11. Noninvasive spatially resolved kinetic study of hydrolyzable camptothecin antitumor drugs in vitro and in vivo by confocal scanning microspectrofluorometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chourpa, Igor; Charonov, Serguei; Kokota, Alexandre; Riou, Jean-Francois; Manfait, Michel

    1998-04-01

    Hydrolysis of the lactone ring of camptothecins (CPTs) leads to a loss of their antitumor activity. The non-hydrolyzable derivatives are also inactive. Thus, the state of the lactone ring during the drug interaction with biological partners is of a great interest. High performance liquid chromatography currently employed to study the lactone hydrolysis in free CPTs can not be applied to the drug- target complexes and in vivo measurements. We followed kinetics of the lactone hydrolysis in CPTs using hydrolysis- induced time-dependent evolution of their fluorescence spectra. Spectra were obtained from micro-volumes of the samples under the microscope of a computer-controlled confocal microspectrofluorometer (M51, DILOR, France). Spectral recording and treatment (filtering, decomposition into model spectra of the intact and hydrolyzed forms, etc.) were performed using a software package developed in our laboratory. Data obtained for a series of CPTs at very low concentrations, ca. 10-7 M, demonstrated a good reproducibility, even at basic pH, where the hydrolysis is fast. Then the kinetics studies were extended to CPTs in complexes with their potential biological targets, DNA and topoisomerase I, in vitro. The in vivo studies of the lactone status at the level of single living cancer cells treated with CPTs are actually in progress.

  12. Proteomic analysis of enriched lysosomes at early phase of camptothecin-induced apoptosis in human U-937 cells

    PubMed Central

    Parent, Nicolas; Winstall, Eric; Beauchemin, Myriam; Paquet, Claudie; Poirier, Guy G.; Bertrand, Richard

    2013-01-01

    A lysosomal pathway, characterized by partial rupture or labilization of lysosomal membranes and cathepsin activation, is evoked during camptothecin-induced apoptosis in human cancer cells, including human histiocytic lymphoma U-937 cells. These lysosomal events begin rapidly and simultaneously with mitochondrial permeabilization and caspase activation within 3 h after drug treatment. In this study, comparative and quantitative proteome analyses were performed to identify early changes in lysosomal protein expression/localization from U-937 cells undergoing apoptosis. In 2 independent experiments, among a total of more than 538 proteins putatively identified and quantitated by iTRAQ isobaric labeling and LC-ESI-MS/MS, 18 proteins were found to be upregulated and 9 downregulated in lysosomes purified from early apoptotic compared to control cells. Protein expression was validated by Western blotting on enriched lysosome fractions, and protein localization confirmed by fluorescence confocal microscopy of representative protein candidates, whose functions are associated with lysosomal membrane fluidity and dynamics. These include sterol-4-alpha-carboxylate 3-dehydrogenase (NSDHL), prosaposin (PSAP) and protein kinase C delta (PKC-δ). This comparative proteome analysis provides the basis for novel hypothesis and rationale functional experimentation, where the 3 validated candidate proteins are associated with lysosomal membrane fluidity and dynamics, particularly cholesterol, sphingolipid and glycosphingolipid metabolism. PMID:19393779

  13. Protein kinase C{eta} activates NF-{kappa}B in response to camptothecin-induced DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Raveh-Amit, Hadas; Hai, Naama; Rotem-Dai, Noa; Shahaf, Galit; Gopas, Jacob; Livneh, Etta

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Protein kinase C-eta (PKC{eta}) is an upstream regulator of the NF-{kappa}B signaling pathway. {yields} PKC{eta} activates NF-{kappa}B in non-stressed conditions and in response to DNA damage. {yields} PKC{eta} regulates NF-{kappa}B by activating I{kappa}B kinase (IKK) and inducing I{kappa}B degradation. -- Abstract: The nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) family of transcription factors participates in the regulation of genes involved in innate- and adaptive-immune responses, cell death and inflammation. The involvement of the Protein kinase C (PKC) family in the regulation of NF-{kappa}B in inflammation and immune-related signaling has been extensively studied. However, not much is known on the role of PKC in NF-{kappa}B regulation in response to DNA damage. Here we demonstrate for the first time that PKC-eta (PKC{eta}) regulates NF-{kappa}B upstream signaling by activating the I{kappa}B kinase (IKK) and the degradation of I{kappa}B. Furthermore, PKC{eta} enhances the nuclear translocation and transactivation of NF-{kappa}B under non-stressed conditions and in response to the anticancer drug camptothecin. We and others have previously shown that PKC{eta} confers protection against DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Our present study suggests that PKC{eta} is involved in NF-{kappa}B signaling leading to drug resistance.

  14. Dietary alkaloid sequestration in a poison frog: an experimental test of alkaloid uptake in Melanophryniscus stelzneri (Bufonidae).

    PubMed

    Hantak, Maggie M; Grant, Taran; Reinsch, Sherri; McGinnity, Dale; Loring, Marjorie; Toyooka, Naoki; Saporito, Ralph A

    2013-12-01

    Several lineages of brightly colored anurans independently evolved the ability to secrete alkaloid-containing defensive chemicals from granular glands in the skin. These species, collectively referred to as 'poison frogs,' form a polyphyletic assemblage that includes some species of Dendrobatidae, Mantellidae, Myobatrachidae, Bufonidae, and Eleutherodactylidae. The ability to sequester alkaloids from dietary arthropods has been demonstrated experimentally in most poison frog lineages but not in bufonid or eleutherodactylid poison frogs. As with other poison frogs, species of the genus Melanophryniscus (Bufonidae) consume large numbers of mites and ants, suggesting they might also sequester defensive alkaloids from dietary sources. To test this hypothesis, fruit flies dusted with alkaloid/nutritional supplement powder were fed to individual Melanophryniscus stelzneri in two experiments. In the first experiment, the alkaloids 5,8-disubstituted indolizidine 235B' and decahydroquinoline were administered to three individuals for 104 days. In the second experiment, the alkaloids 3,5-disubstituted indolizidine 239Q and decahydroquinoline were given to three frogs for 153 days. Control frogs were fed fruit flies dusted only with nutritional supplement. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analyses revealed that skin secretions of all experimental frogs contained alkaloids, whereas those of all control frogs lacked alkaloids. Uptake of decahydroquinoline was greater than uptake of 5,8-disubstituted indolizidine, and uptake of 3,5-disubstituted indolizidine was greater than uptake of decahydroquinoline, suggesting greater uptake efficiency of certain alkaloids. Frogs in the second experiment accumulated a greater amount of alkaloid, which corresponds to the longer duration and greater number of alkaloid-dusted fruit flies that were consumed. These findings provide the first experimental evidence that bufonid poison frogs sequester alkaloid-based defenses from dietary

  15. Monoterpene Indole Alkaloids from the Fruit of Tabernaemontana litoralis and Differential Alkaloid Composition in Various Fruit Components.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yang; Simonescu, Razvan; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2016-12-23

    Two new monoterpene indole alkaloids, isoakuammiline (1) and 18-hydroxypseudovincadifformine (2), and five known alkaloids, coronaridine (3), heyneanine (4), 3,19-oxidocoronaridine (5), tabersonine, and strictosidine, were identified from the fruit of Tabernaemontana litoralis. The structures of the alkaloids were determined using NMR and MS data analyses. While 18-hydroxypseudovincadifformine (2) showed a new hydroxylation pattern, isoakuammiline (1) revealed a novel skeleton for monoterpene indole alkaloids. In spite of the isolation of stemmadenine from the fruit tissues in other Tabernaemontana species, this vital biosynthetic precursor of iboga, aspidosperma, and pseudoaspidosperma skeletons was not found in T. litoralis.

  16. Remarks on the Renormalization Properties of Lorentz- and CPT-Violating Quantum Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Tiago R. S.; Sobreiro, Rodrigo F.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we employ algebraic renormalization technique to show the renormalizability to all orders in perturbation theory of the Lorentz- and CPT-violating QED. Essentially, we control the breaking terms by using a suitable set of external sources. Thus, with the symmetries restored, a perturbative treatment can be consistently employed. After showing the renormalizability, the external sources attain certain physical values, which allow the recovering of the starting physical action. The main result is that the original QED action presents the three usual independent renormalization parameters. The Lorentz-violating sector can be renormalized by 19 independent parameters. Moreover, vacuum divergences appear with extra independent renormalization. Remarkably, the bosonic odd sector (Chern-Simons-like term) does not renormalize and is not radiatively generated. One-loop computations are also presented and compared with the existing literature.

  17. Evaluation of LIN∥LIN CPT for Compact and High Performance Frequency Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breschi, E.; Mileti, G.; Kazakov, G.; Matisov, B.; Lammegger, R.; Windholz, L.

    2009-04-01

    We have investigated the lin∥lin CPT signal in the 87Rb D1 manifold when the atoms are contained in low pressure buffer gas cells. We predict the achievable clock frequency stability, basing our considerations on the signal-to-noise measurements. We show that a short-term stability of about 2 · 10-11 τ1/2 may be reached in a compact system using a modulated VCSEL, this value is mainly limited by the detection noise level and can be improved up to a factor 4 by using high frequency phase sensitive detection. Under the same experimental condition a challenging short-term stability of 1-3 · 10-13 τ1/2 can be achieved by using the PL ECDLs.

  18. A unified classification model for modeling of seismic liquefaction potential of soil based on CPT.

    PubMed

    Samui, Pijush; Hariharan, R

    2015-07-01

    The evaluation of liquefaction potential of soil due to an earthquake is an important step in geosciences. This article examines the capability of Minimax Probability Machine (MPM) for the prediction of seismic liquefaction potential of soil based on the Cone Penetration Test (CPT) data. The dataset has been taken from Chi-Chi earthquake. MPM is developed based on the use of hyperplanes. It has been adopted as a classification tool. This article uses two models (MODEL I and MODEL II). MODEL I employs Cone Resistance (q c) and Cyclic Stress Ratio (CSR) as input variables. q c and Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) have been taken as inputs for MODEL II. The developed MPM gives 100% accuracy. The results show that the developed MPM can predict liquefaction potential of soil based on q c and PGA.

  19. CPT site characterization for seismic hazards in the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liao, T.; Mayne, P.W.; Tuttle, M.P.; Schweig, E.S.; Van Arsdale, R.B.

    2002-01-01

    A series of cone penetration tests (CPTs) were conducted in the vicinity of the New Madrid seismic zone in central USA for quantifying seismic hazards, obtaining geotechnical soil properties, and conducting studies at liquefaction sites related to the 1811-1812 and prehistoric New Madrid earthquakes. The seismic piezocone provides four independent measurements for delineating the stratigraphy, liquefaction potential, and site amplification parameters. At the same location, two independent assessments of soil liquefaction susceptibility can be made using both the normalized tip resistance (qc1N) and shear wave velocity (Vs1). In lieu of traditional deterministic approaches, the CPT data can be processed using probability curves to assess the level and likelihood of future liquefaction occurrence. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. CPT coding patterns at nurse-managed health centers: data from a national survey.

    PubMed

    Vonderheid, Susan C; Pohl, Joanne M; Tanner, Clare; Newland, Jamesetta A; Gans, Dave N

    2009-01-01

    Nurse-managed health centers (NMHCs) play an important role in delivering health care services to a wide range of communities and often serve as our nation's safety net providers. Unfortunately, NMHCs struggle to remain in business for a variety of reasons, including underdeveloped business practices. Until now, NMHCs had only data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and the Medical Group Management Assocation for comparison with coding patterns in individual centers. This article is the first published report of national data for NMHCs that is available for comparison. Providers need to possess financial acumen to remain open for business. Assessment of CPT coding patterns is a key strategy to support long-term sustainability.

  1. Constraints on CPT violation from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe three year polarization data: A wavelet analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cabella, Paolo; Silk, Joseph; Natoli, Paolo

    2007-12-15

    We perform a wavelet analysis of the temperature and polarization maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) delivered by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe experiment in search for a parity-violating signal. Such a signal could be seeded by new physics beyond the standard model, for which the Lorentz and CPT symmetries may not hold. Under these circumstances, the linear polarization direction of a CMB photon may get rotated during its cosmological journey, a phenomenon also called cosmological birefringence. Recently, Feng et al. have analyzed a subset of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe and BOOMERanG 2003 angular power spectra of the CMB, deriving a constraint that mildly favors a nonzero rotation. By using wavelet transforms we set a tighter limit on the CMB photon rotation angle {delta}{alpha}=-2.5{+-}3.0 ({delta}{alpha}=-2.5{+-}6.0) at the one (two) {sigma} level, consistent with a null detection.

  2. Gauge propagator and physical consistency of the CPT-even part of the standard model extension

    SciTech Connect

    Casana, Rodolfo; Ferreira, Manoel M. Jr.; Pinheiro, Paulo R. D.; Gomes, Adalto R.

    2009-12-15

    In this work, we explicitly evaluate the gauge propagator of the Maxwell theory supplemented by the CPT-even term of the standard model extension. First, we specialize our evaluation for the parity-odd sector of the tensor W{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}}{sub {rho}}{sub {sigma}}, using a parametrization that retains only the three nonbirefringent coefficients. From the poles of the propagator, it is shown that physical modes of this electrodynamics are stable, noncausal and unitary. In the sequel, we carry out the parity-even gauge propagator using a parametrization that allows to work with only the isotropic nonbirefringent element. In this case, we show that the physical modes of the parity-even sector of the tensor W are causal, stable and unitary for a limited range of the isotropic coefficient.

  3. Genuine T, CP, CPT asymmetry parameters for the entangled B d system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabéu, José; Botella, Francisco J.; Nebot, Miguel

    2016-06-01

    The precise connection between the theoretical T, CP, CPT asymmetries, in terms of transition probabilities between the filtered neutral meson B d states, and the experimental asymmetries, in terms of the double decay rate intensities for Flavour-CP eigenstate decay products in a B-factory of entangled states, is established. This allows the identification of genuine Asymmetry Parameters in the time distribution of the asymmetries and their measurability by disentangling genuine and possible fake terms. We express the nine asymmetry parameters — three different observables for each one of the three symmetries — in terms of the ingredients of the Weisskopf-Wigner dynamical description of the entangled B d -meson states and we obtain a global fit to their values from the BaBar collaboration experimental results. The possible fake terms are all compatible with zero and the information content of the nine asymmetry parameters is indeed different. The non-vanishing [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] and [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] are impressive separate direct evidence of Time-Reversal-violation and CP-violation in these transitions and compatible with Standard Model expectations. An intriguing 2 σ effect for the Re( θ) parameter responsible of CPT-violation appears which, interpreted as an upper limit, leads to |{M}_{{overline{B}}^0{overline{B}}^0}-{M}_B{{{}{^0}}_B}{^0}|<4.0× 1{0}^{-5} eV at 95% C.L. for the diagonal flavour terms of the mass matrix. It contributes to the CP-violating [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] asymmetry parameter in an unorthodox manner — in its cos(Δ M t) time dependence —, and it is accessible in facilities with non-entangled B d 's, like the LHCb experiment.

  4. Kinetics of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I) in Chinese sucker (Myxocyprinus asiaticus) change with its development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cai-Xia; Luo, Zhi; Hu, Wei; Tan, Xiao-Ying; Zheng, Jia-Lang; Chen, Qi-Liang; Zhu, Qing-Ling

    2014-02-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the ontogeny and kinetic of CPT I in several tissues of the Chinese sucker Myxocyprinus asiaticus. To this end, liver, muscle and intestine tissues were examined at five various developmental stages of Chinese sucker: newly-hatched larvae, 68-day-old, 4-month-old, 1- and 2-year-old Chinese sucker, respectively. The total carnitine (TC) content in the liver increased from birth to 1-year-old Chinese sucker and then declined in the 2-year-old Chinese sucker. From the 68-day-old to the 1-year-old Chinese sucker, both free and total concentrations in muscle increased. Both acyl carnitine (AC) and TC concentrations in intestine were very variable at different stages. The ratio of AC to free carnitine (FC) in liver progressively increased from hatching to 4 months, and declined at the age of 1 year, and then increased by 2 years. In muscle, the highest and lowest ratios of AC/FC were observed at 68-days-old and 4 month-old Chinese sucker. The highest proportion of AC/FC in intestine was also observed at 68-day-old Chinese sucker. All the Chinese sucker larvae at hatching had a high value of the Michaelis constant (K(m)) for carnitine. Maximal velocity (V(max)) in intestine increased with age. V(max) in liver and muscle increased with age except a decrease at 4 months in liver and at 2 years in muscle. The FC concentration in the examined tissues at all developmental stages were less than the respective K(m), indicating that Chinese suckers require supplemental carnitine in their food to ensure that CPT I activity is not constrained by carnitine availability.

  5. Exploration of CPT violation via time-dependent geometric quantities embedded in neutrino oscillation through fluctuating matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zisheng; Pan, Hui

    2017-02-01

    We propose a new approach to explore CPT violation of neutrino oscillations through a fluctuating matter based on time-dependent geometric quantities. By mapping the neutrino oscillations onto a Poincaré sphere structure, we obtain an analytic solution of master equation and further define the geometric quantities, i.e., radius of Poincaré sphere and geometric phase. We find that the mixing process between electron and muon neutrinos can be described by the radius of Poincaré sphere that depends on the intrinsic CP-violating angle. Such a radius reveals a dynamic mechanism of CPT-violation, i.e., both spontaneous symmetry breaking and Majorana-Dirac neutrino confusion. We show that the time-dependent geometric phase can be used to find the neutrino nature and observe the CPT-violation because it is strongly enhanced under the neutrino propagation. We further show that the time-dependent geometric phase can be easily detected by simulating the neutrino oscillation based on fluctuating magnetic fields in nuclear magnetic resonance, which makes the experimental observation of CPT-violation possible in the neutrino mixing and oscillations.

  6. MBL-II-141, a chromone derivative, enhances irinotecan (CPT-11) anticancer efficiency in ABCG2-positive xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Honorat, Mylène; Guitton, Jérôme; Gauthier, Charlotte; Bouard, Charlotte; Lecerf-Schmidt, Florine; Peres, Basile; Terreux, Raphaël; Gervot, Héloïse; Rioufol, Catherine; Boumendjel, Ahcène; Puisieux, Alain; Di Pietro, Attilio; Payen, Léa

    2014-01-01

    ABCG2 is responsible for the multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype, and strongly modulates cancer outcomes. Its high expression at a number of physiological barriers, including blood-brain and intestinal barriers, impacts on drug pharmacokinetics parameters. We characterized MBL-II-141, a specific and potent ABCG2 inhibitor. Combination of 10 mg/kg MBL-II-141 with the anticancer agent CPT-11 completely blocked the growth of 90% freshly implanted ABCG2-positive tumors. Moreover, the same combination slowed the growth of already established tumors. As required for preclinical development, we defined the main pharmacokinetics parameters of MBL-II-141 and its influence on the kinetics of CPT-11 and its active metabolite SN-38 in mice. MBL-II-141 distribution into the brain occurred at a low, but detectable, level. Interestingly, preliminary data suggested that MBL-II-141 is well tolerated (at 50 mg/kg) and absorbed upon force-feeding. MBL-II-141 induced a potent sensitization of ABCG2-positive xenografts to CPT-11 through in vivo ABCG2 inhibition. MBL-II-141 strongly increased CPT-11 levels in the brain, and therefore would be a valuable agent to improve drug distribution into the brain to efficiently treat aggressive gliomas. Safety and other pharmacological data strongly support the reglementary preclinical development of MBL-II-141. PMID:25474134

  7. [Protective effects of d-chlorpheniramine maleate pre-treatment against acute side effects of Irinotecan(CPT- 11)].

    PubMed

    Misumi, Nobuhiro; Hiraike, Mikako; Nawata, Fusako; Hashimoto, Mirai; Tanigawa, Kayoko; Takase, Izumi; Nabeshima, Aya; Honda, Shinobu

    2011-07-01

    It is wellknown that cholinomimetic side effects, such as sedation, abdominal pain, nasal flow and watery eyes, may develop in patients in the early stage of Irinotecan (CPT-11) administration; however, there have been no investigations concerning methods for preventing the development of these side effects. To assess the protective effects of pre-treatment with d-CM on cholinomimetic side effects in the early stage after Irinotecan (CPT-11) administration, we prescribed d- Chlorpheniramine maleate (d-CM) to a group of patients prior to Irinotecan (CPT-11) administration. Twenty members from the group of non-d-CM-treated patients (n=39) and 4 members from the group of treated patients (n=20) complained of side effects. The pre-administration of d-CM significantly reduced the number of patients with side effects (p<0.05). The relative risk (RR) for the frequency of side effects was 0.39 (95% CI; 0.15-0.98), demonstrating that the frequency of side effects was significantly reduced. Based on theses findings, we concluded that the pre-administration of d-CM had protective effects against side effects that might develop in the early stage after Irinotecan (CPT-11) administration.

  8. Convection-enhanced delivery of nanoliposomal CPT-11 (irinotecan) and PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil) in rodent intracranial brain tumor xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Krauze, Michal T.; Noble, Charles O.; Kawaguchi, Tomohiro; Drummond, Daryl; Kirpotin, Dmitri B.; Yamashita, Yoji; Kullberg, Erika; Forsayeth, John; Park, John W.; Bankiewicz, Krystof S.

    2007-01-01

    We have previously shown that convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of highly stable nanoparticle/liposome agents encapsulating chemotherapeutic drugs is effective against intracranial rodent brain tumor xenografts. In this study, we have evaluated the combination of a newly developed nanoparticle/liposome containing the topoisomerase I inhibitor CPT-11 (nanoliposomal CPT-11 [nLs-CPT-11]), and PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil) containing the topoisomerase II inhibitor doxorubicin. Both drugs were detectable in the CNS for more than 36 days after a single CED application. Tissue half-life was 16.7 days for nLs-CPT-11 and 10.9 days for Doxil. The combination of the two agents produced synergistic cytotoxicity in vitro. In vivo in U251MG and U87MG intracranial rodent xenograft models, CED of the combination was also more efficacious than either agent used singly. Analysis of the parameters involved in this approach indicated that tissue pharmacokinetics, tumor microanatomy, and biochemical interactions of the drugs all contributed to the therapeutic efficacy observed. These findings have implications for further clinical applications of CED-based treatment of brain tumors. PMID:17652269

  9. Convection-enhanced delivery of nanoliposomal CPT-11 (irinotecan) and PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil) in rodent intracranial brain tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Krauze, Michal T; Noble, Charles O; Kawaguchi, Tomohiro; Drummond, Daryl; Kirpotin, Dmitri B; Yamashita, Yoji; Kullberg, Erika; Forsayeth, John; Park, John W; Bankiewicz, Krystof S

    2007-10-01

    We have previously shown that convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of highly stable nanoparticle/liposome agents encapsulating chemotherapeutic drugs is effective against intracranial rodent brain tumor xenografts. In this study, we have evaluated the combination of a newly developed nanoparticle/liposome containing the topoisomerase I inhibitor CPT-11 (nanoliposomal CPT-11 [nLs-CPT-11]), and PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil) containing the topoisomerase II inhibitor doxorubicin. Both drugs were detectable in the CNS for more than 36 days after a single CED application. Tissue half-life was 16.7 days for nLs-CPT-11 and 10.9 days for Doxil. The combination of the two agents produced synergistic cytotoxicity in vitro. In vivo in U251MG and U87MG intracranial rodent xenograft models, CED of the combination was also more efficacious than either agent used singly. Analysis of the parameters involved in this approach indicated that tissue pharmacokinetics, tumor microanatomy, and biochemical interactions of the drugs all contributed to the therapeutic efficacy observed. These findings have implications for further clinical applications of CED-based treatment of brain tumors.

  10. Humanized anti-hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) antibody suppresses innate irinotecan (CPT-11) resistance induced by fibroblast-derived HGF

    PubMed Central

    Kim, BoRa; Park, Byung Hee; Shin, Kum-Joo; Song, Seong-Won; Kim, Jung Ju; Kim, Hwan-Mook; Lee, Sang-Jin; Oh, Seung Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The growth factors derived from the microenvironment create an environment conducive to tumor growth and survival. HGF deprivation using neutralizing antibody enhanced chemosensitivity in colorectal cancer cells (CRC). We determined secreted HGF in fibroblast conditioned medium (CM). Combination treatment of anti-HGF antibody and irinotecan (CPT-11) directly enhanced CPT-11 sensitivity in CRC. We generated xenograft in NOD/SCID mice inoculating HCT-116 human colorectal cancer cells subcutaneously with or without fibroblast. We found that the combination of CPT-11 and anti-HGF antibody induced marked suppression of tumor development. These results suggest that HGF produced by fibroblast induce CPT-11 resistance, and that anti-HGF antibody abrogate such resistance in vivo. fibroblast-derived HGF is important determinant of chemoresistance. Anti-HGF monoclonal antibody treatment confirmed the importance of this growth factor for chemoresistance in CRC. These results present new options toward the early diagnosis of chemoresistance and suggest novel combinations of chemotherapy and anti-HGF agents to prevent or significantly delay the onset of therapy resistance. PMID:26090722

  11. Humanized anti-hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) antibody suppresses innate irinotecan (CPT-11) resistance induced by fibroblast-derived HGF.

    PubMed

    Woo, Jong Kyu; Kang, Ju-Hee; Kim, BoRa; Park, Byung Hee; Shin, Kum-Joo; Song, Seong-Won; Kim, Jung Ju; Kim, Hwan-Mook; Lee, Sang-Jin; Oh, Seung Hyun

    2015-09-15

    The growth factors derived from the microenvironment create an environment conducive to tumor growth and survival. HGF deprivation using neutralizing antibody enhanced chemosensitivity in colorectal cancer cells (CRC). We determined secreted HGF in fibroblast conditioned medium (CM). Combination treatment of anti-HGF antibody and irinotecan (CPT-11) directly enhanced CPT-11 sensitivity in CRC. We generated xenograft in NOD/SCID mice inoculating HCT-116 human colorectal cancer cells subcutaneously with or without fibroblast. We found that the combination of CPT-11 and anti-HGF antibody induced marked suppression of tumor development. These results suggest that HGF produced by fibroblast induce CPT-11 resistance, and that anti-HGF antibody abrogate such resistance in vivo. fibroblast-derived HGF is important determinant of chemoresistance. Anti-HGF monoclonal antibody treatment confirmed the importance of this growth factor for chemoresistance in CRC. These results present new options toward the early diagnosis of chemoresistance and suggest novel combinations of chemotherapy and anti-HGF agents to prevent or significantly delay the onset of therapy resistance.

  12. [A new alkaloid of Menispermum dauricum DC--dauriciline].

    PubMed

    Pang, X P; Chen, Y W; Li, X J; Long, J G

    1991-01-01

    A new phenolic dauricine-type alkaloid, named "dauriciline", was isolated from the rhizome of Menispermum dauricum DC. It is a pale yellow powder. Based on spectrometric analysis (UV.FAB-MS and 1HNMR) and chemical reaction the structure of the new alkaloid was elucidated as RR,7,7'-demethyldauricine (VI).

  13. Identification of the quinolizidine alkaloids in Sophora leachiana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sophora is a diverse genus representing herbs, shrubs, and trees that occurs throughout the world, primarily in the northern hemisphere. Sophora species contain a variety of quinolizidine alkaloids that are toxic and potentially teratogenic. However, there are no previous reports on the alkaloid c...

  14. Tall fescue seed extraction and partial purification of ergot alkaloids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many substances in the tall fescue/endophyte association (Schedonorus arundinaceus/Epichloë coenophiala) have biological activity. Of these compounds only the ergot alkaloids are known to have significant mammalian toxicity and the predominant ergot alkaloids are ergovaline and ergovalinine. Because...

  15. Leptopyrine, new alkaloid from Leptopyrum fumarioides L. (Ranunculaceae).

    PubMed

    Doncheva, Tsvetelina; Solongo, Amgalan; Kostova, Nadezhda; Gerelt-Od, Yadamsuren; Selenge, Dangaa; Philipov, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    A new type of isoquinoline alkaloid leptopyrine was isolated from the aerial parts of Leptopyrum fumarioides L. (Ranunculaceae) of Mongolian origin. The known alkaloids protopine and thalifoline were isolated for the first time from this the species. All structures were established by physical and spectral analyses.

  16. Evolution of alkaloid biosynthesis in the genus Narcissus.

    PubMed

    Berkov, Strahil; Martínez-Francés, Vanessa; Bastida, Jaume; Codina, Carles; Ríos, Segundo

    2014-03-01

    In an attempt to reveal the relationships between alkaloid biosynthesis and phylogeny, we investigated by GC-MS the alkaloid patterns of 22 species and 3 hybrids (from 45 locations) from seven main sections of the genus Narcissus (Amaryllidaceae). The results indicate that the first alkaloids to evolve in the genus Narcissus were of the lycorine- and homolycorine-type. The alkaloid pattern of the Nevadensis section supports its recent separation from the Pseudonarcissus section. The plants of Narcissus pallidulus (Ganymedes section) show a predominance of Sceletium-type compounds, which are quite rare in the Amaryllidaceae family. Two successful evolutionary strategies involving alkaloid biosynthesis and leading to an expansion in taxa and occupied area were determined. Firstly, a diversification of alkaloid patterns and a high alkaloid concentration in the organs of the large Narcissus species (in the Pseudonarcissus section) resulted in an improved chemical defence in diverse habitats. Secondly, both plant size and alkaloid biosynthesis were reduced (in the Bulbocodium and Apodanthi sections) relegated to dry pastures and rocky places.

  17. MULTICOMPONENT REACTIONS IN ALKALOID-BASED DRUG DISCOVERY

    PubMed Central

    Magedov, I. V.; Kornienko, A.

    2016-01-01

    Multicomponent reactions are emerging as a powerful tool in alkaloid-based drug discovery. This Highlight describes several recent (all published in 2011) examples of the employment of multicomponent reactions for the synthesis of biologically active alkaloids and their medicinally relevant analogues. PMID:27917001

  18. Binding of quinolizidine alkaloids to nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Schmeller, T; Sauerwein, M; Sporer, F; Wink, M; Müller, W E

    1994-09-01

    Fourteen quinolizidine alkaloids, isolated from Lupinus albus, L. mutabilis, and Anagyris foetida, were analyzed for their affinity for nicotinic and/or muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Of the compounds tested, the alpha-pyridones, N-methylcytisine and cytisine, showed the highest affinities at the nicotinic receptor, while several quinolizidine alkaloid types were especially active at the muscarinic receptor.

  19. Antiproliferative and Structure Activity Relationships of Amaryllidaceae Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Cedrón, Juan C; Ravelo, Ángel G; León, Leticia G; Padrón, José M; Estévez-Braun, Ana

    2015-07-30

    The antiproliferative activity of a set of seven natural Amaryllidaceae alkaloids and 32 derivatives against four cancer cell lines (A2780, SW1573, T47-D and WiDr) was determined. The best antiproliferative activities were achieved with alkaloids derived from pancracine (2), haemanthamine (6) and haemantidine (7). For each skeleton, some structure-activity relationships were outlined.

  20. Effects of Ergot Alkaloids on Bovine Sperm Motility In Vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ergot alkaloids are synthesized by endophyte-infected (Neotyphodium coenophialum) tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum (Schreb.) S.J. Darbyshire). Our objective was to determine direct effects of ergot alkaloids (ergotamine, dihydroergotamine and ergonovine) on the motility of bovine spermatozoa in vit...

  1. Alkaloids from Piper sarmentosum and Piper nigrum.

    PubMed

    Ee, G C L; Lim, C M; Lim, C K; Rahmani, M; Shaari, K; Bong, C F J

    2009-01-01

    Detailed chemical studies on the roots of Piper sarmentosum and Piper nigrum have resulted in several alkaloids. The roots of P. sarmentosum gave a new aromatic compound, 1-nitrosoimino-2,4,5-trimethoxybenzene (1). Piper nigrum roots gave pellitorine (2), (E)-1-[3',4'-(methylenedioxy)cinnamoyl]piperidine (3), 2,4-tetradecadienoic acid isobutyl amide (4), piperine (5), sylvamide (6), cepharadione A (7), piperolactam D (8) and paprazine (9). Structural elucidation of these compounds was achieved through NMR and MS techniques. Cytotoxic activity screening of the plant extracts indicated some activity.

  2. A new pyrroloquinazoline alkaloid from Linaria vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Hua, Huiming; Cheng, Maosheng; Li, Xian; Pei, Yuehu

    2002-10-01

    A new alkaloid, 1,2,3,9-tetrahydropyrrolo(2,1-b)quinazolin-1-carboxylic acid (1), together with eight known compounds, 7-hydroxy vasicine (2), benzyl alcohol beta-D-(2'-O-beta-xylopyranosyl)glucopyranoside (3), benzyl alcohol O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (4), benzyl alcohol O-beta-D-primveroside (5), 3,5-dimethyl-4-hydroxy benzaldehyde (6), gluco-syringic acid (7), syringin (8), and liriodendrin (9), were isolated from the plants of Linaria vulgaris. Their structures were established by spectroscopic methods.

  3. Enantioselective Total Synthesis of Tricyclic Myrmicarin Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Movassaghi, Mohammad; Ondrus, Alison E.

    2010-01-01

    An enantioselective gram-scale synthesis of a key dihydroindolizine intermediate for the preparation of myrmicarin alkaloids is described. Key transformations in this convergent approach include a stereospecific palladium–catalyzed N-vinylation of a pyrrole with a vinyl triflate, a copper–catalyzed enantioselective conjugate reduction of a β-pyrrolyl enoate, and a regioselective Friedel-Crafts reaction. The synthesis of optically active and isomerically pure samples of (4aR)-myrmicarins 215A, 215B, and 217 in addition to their respective C4a-epimers is presented. PMID:16178549

  4. New ester alkaloids from lupins (genus lupinus).

    PubMed

    Mühlbauer, P; Witte, L; Wink, M

    1988-06-01

    Esters of 13-hydroxylupanine and 4-hydroxylupanine with acetic, propionic, butyric, isobutyric, valeric, isovaleric, tiglic, benzoic, and TRANS-cinnamic acid have been synthesized and characterized by capillary gas-liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (EI-MS, CI-MS). In LUPINUS POLYPHYLLUS, L. ALBUS, L. ANGUSTIFOLIUS, and L. MUTABILIS we could identify new ester alkaloids (e.g. 13-propyloxylupanine, 13-butyryloxylupanine, 13-isobutyryloxylupanine, and 4-tigloyloxylupanine) besides the known esters, i.e. 13-acetoxylupanine, 13-isovaleroyloxylupanine, 13-angeloyloxylupanine, 13-tigloyloxylupanine, 13-benzoyloxylupanine, 13- CIS-cinnamoyloxylupanine nine, and 13- TRANS-cinnamoyloxylupanine.

  5. The effect of 7, 8-Methylenedioxylycoctonine -Type Diterpenoid Alkaloids on the Toxicity of Methyllycaconitine in Mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Larkspur plants contain numerous norditerpenoid alkaloids which include the 7, 8-methylenedioxylycoctonine (MDL-type) alkaloids and the N-(methylsuccinimido) anthranoyllycoctonine (MSAL-type) alkaloids. The MSAL-type alkaloids are generally much more toxic (typically > 20x). The toxicity of many t...

  6. CPT1{alpha} over-expression increases long-chain fatty acid oxidation and reduces cell viability with incremental palmitic acid concentration in 293T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jambor de Sousa, Ulrike L.; Koss, Michael D.; Fillies, Marion; Gahl, Anja; Scheeder, Martin R.L.; Cardoso, M. Cristina; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Geary, Nori; Langhans, Wolfgang; Leonhardt, Monika . E-mail: monika.leonhardt@inw.agrl.ethz.ch

    2005-12-16

    To test the cellular response to an increased fatty acid oxidation, we generated a vector for an inducible expression of the rate-limiting enzyme carnitine palmitoyl-transferase 1{alpha} (CPT1{alpha}). Human embryonic 293T kidney cells were transiently transfected and expression of the CPT1{alpha} transgene in the tet-on vector was activated with doxycycline. Fatty acid oxidation was measured by determining the conversion of supplemented, synthetic cis-10-heptadecenoic acid (C17:1n-7) to C15:ln-7. CPT1{alpha} over-expression increased mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid oxidation about 6-fold. Addition of palmitic acid (PA) decreased viability of CPT1{alpha} over-expressing cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Both, PA and CPT1{alpha} over-expression increased cell death. Interestingly, PA reduced total cell number only in cells over-expressing CPT1{alpha}, suggesting an effect on cell proliferation that requires PA translocation across the mitochondrial inner membrane. This inducible expression system should be well suited to study the roles of CPT1 and fatty acid oxidation in lipotoxicity and metabolism in vivo.

  7. Cardiovascular pharmacological effects of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jia-Qing

    2002-12-01

    Tetrandrine, dauricine, daurisoline and neferine are bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid derivatives isolated from Chinese traditional medicine and herbs. The cardiovascular pharmacological effects and the mechanism of actions of these compounds were reviewed. Tetrandrine isolated from Stephania tetrandra S Moore possesses antihypertensive and antiarrhythmic effects. The antihypertensive effects of tetrandrine have been demonstrated in experimental hypertensive animals and in hypertensive patients. Recent studies showed that in addition to its calcium antagonistic effect, tetrandrine interacted with M receptors. Modulation by M receptor is one of the pharmacological mechanisms of cardiovascular effects of tetrandrine. Dauricine and daurisoloine were isolated from Menispermum dauricum DC. The antiarrhythmic effects of dauricine have been verified in different experimental arrhythmic models and in cardiac arrhythmic patients. Dauricine blocked the cardiac transmembrane Na+,K+ and Ca2+ ion currents. Differing from quinidine and sotalol, which exhibited reverse use-dependent effect, dauricine prolonged APD in a normal use-dependent manner in experimental studies. The antiarrhythmic effect of daurisoline and neferine which is an alkaloid isolated from Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn, and their mechanisms of actions have also been studied. The antiarrhythmic effect of daurisoline is more potent than that of dauricine.

  8. Antifungal Indole Alkaloids from Winchia calophylla.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mei-Li; Chen, Jia; Sun, Meng; Zhang, Dong-Bo; Gao, Kun

    2016-05-01

    Ten indole alkaloids (1-10) were obtained from an antifungal extract of Winchia calophylla, of which two (2 and 4) were new. N(4)-Methyl-10-hydroxyl-desacetylakuammilin (2) was an akuammiline-type indole alkaloid. N(1)-Methyl-echitaminic acid (4) was an unusual zwitterion with a basic vincorine-type skeleton. This is the first report of 10 in W. calophylla. The structures of all of the compounds were determined based on spectroscopic data, and their bioactivities were assessed. Compound 1 showed potent activity against the plant pathogenic fungi of Penicillium italicum and Fusarium oxysporum f.sp cubens with IC50 s of 10.4 and 11.5 µM, respectively, and 3 inhibited Rhizoctonia solani with an IC50 of 11.7 µM. Compounds 2 and 4 showed weak cytotoxicity against the human leukemic cell line HL-60 in vitro with IC50 s of 51.4 and 75.3 µM, respectively. Compounds 1 and 2 displayed weak activity against acetylcholinesterase with IC50 s around 61.3 and 52.6 µM, respectively.

  9. The effect of isoquinoline alkaloids on opiate withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Capasso, A; Piacente, S; De Tommasi, N; Rastrelli, L; Pizza, C

    2006-01-01

    Our interest has been centered on isoquinoline alkaloids obtained from Argemone mexicana (Papaveraceae), Aristolochia constricta (Aristolochiaceae) and the opium alkaloid, papaverine. In this respect, the effect of these isoquinoline alkaloids was investigated on contractions induced by naloxone of isolated guinea pig ileum acutely exposed to morphine in vitro. The activity of these alkaloids was compared to the control compound, papaverine. Furthermore, the effect of these isoquinoline alkaloids was also determined on naloxone-precipitated withdrawal in isolated guinea pig ileum exposed to DAMGO (highly selective mu opioid receptor agonist) and U50-488H (highly selective kappa opioid receptor agonist) to test whether the possible interaction of isoquinoline alkaloids on opioid withdrawal involves mu- and/or kappa-opioid receptors. Isoquinoline alkaloids from A. mexicana (from 5 x 10(-6) to 1 x 10(-4) M), from A. constricta (1 x 10(-5) x 10(-5)-1 x 10(-4) M) as well as papaverine treatment (1 x 10(-7)-5 x 10(-6)-1 x 10(-6) M) before or after the opioid agonists were able of both preventing and reversing the naloxone-induced contraction after exposure to mu (morphine and DAMGO) or kappa (U50-488H) opiate receptor agonists in a concentration-dependent manner. Both acetylcholine response and electrical stimulation were also reduced by isoquinoline alkaloids and papaverine treatment as well as the final opiate withdrawal was still reduced. The results of the present study indicate that isoquinoline alkaloids as well as papaverine were able to produce significant influence on the opiate withdrawal in vitro and these compounds were able to exert their effects both at mu and kappa opioid agonists.

  10. Entropic information for travelling solitons in Lorentz and CPT breaking systems

    SciTech Connect

    Correa, R.A.C.; Rocha, Roldão da; Souza Dutra, A. de

    2015-08-15

    In this work we group four research topics apparently disconnected, namely solitons, Lorentz symmetry breaking, supersymmetry, and entropy. Following a recent work (Gleiser and Stamatopoulos, 2012), we show that it is possible to construct in the context of travelling wave solutions a configurational entropy measure in functional space, from the field configurations. Thus, we investigate the existence and properties of travelling solitons in Lorentz and CPT breaking scenarios for a class of models with two interacting scalar fields. Here, we obtain a complete set of exact solutions for the model studied which display both double and single-kink configurations. In fact, such models are very important in applications that include Bloch branes, Skyrmions, Yang–Mills, Q-balls, oscillons and various superstring-motivated theories. We find that the so-called Configurational Entropy (CE) for travelling solitons shows that the best value of parameter responsible to break the Lorentz symmetry is one where the energy density is distributed equally around the origin. In this way, the information-theoretical measure of travelling solitons in Lorentz symmetry violation scenarios opens a new window to probe situations where the parameters responsible for breaking the symmetries are arbitrary. In this case, the CE selects the best value of the parameter in the model.

  11. Test of Lorentz and CPT violation with short baseline neutrino oscillation excesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; Anderson, C. E.; Bazarko, A. O.; Brice, S. J.; Brown, B. C.; Bugel, L.; Cao, J.; Coney, L.; Conrad, J. M.; Cox, D. C.; Curioni, A.; Dharmapalan, R.; Djurcic, Z.; Finley, D. A.; Fleming, B. T.; Ford, R.; Garcia, F. G.; Garvey, G. T.; Grange, J.; Green, C.; Green, J. A.; Hart, T. L.; Hawker, E.; Huelsnitz, W.; Imlay, R.; Johnson, R. A.; Karagiorgi, G.; Kasper, P.; Katori, T.; Kobilarcik, T.; Kourbanis, I.; Koutsoliotas, S.; Laird, E. M.; Linden, S. K.; Link, J. M.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Y.; Louis, W. C.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Marsh, W.; Mauger, C.; McGary, V. T.; McGregor, G.; Metcalf, W.; Meyers, P. D.; Mills, F.; Mills, G. B.; Monroe, J.; Moore, C. D.; Mousseau, J.; Nelson, R. H.; Nienaber, P.; Nowak, J. A.; Osmanov, B.; Ouedraogo, S.; Patterson, R. B.; Pavlovic, Z.; Perevalov, D.; Polly, C. C.; Prebys, E.; Raaf, J. L.; Ray, H.; Roe, B. P.; Russell, A. D.; Sandberg, V.; Schirato, R.; Schmitz, D.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Shoemaker, F. C.; Smith, D.; Soderberg, M.; Sorel, M.; Spentzouris, P.; Spitz, J.; Stancu, I.; Stefanski, R. J.; Sung, M.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tayloe, R.; Tzanov, M.; Van de Water, R. G.; Wascko, M. O.; White, D. H.; Wilking, M. J.; Yang, H. J.; Zeller, G. P.; Zimmerman, E. D.; MiniBooNE Collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The sidereal time dependence of MiniBooNE νe and νbare appearance data is analyzed to search for evidence of Lorentz and CPT violation. An unbinned Kolmogorov-Smirnov (K-S) test shows both the νe and νbare appearance data are compatible with the null sidereal variation hypothesis to more than 5%. Using an unbinned likelihood fit with a Lorentz-violating oscillation model derived from the Standard Model Extension (SME) to describe any excess events over background, we find that the νe appearance data prefer a sidereal time-independent solution, and the νbare appearance data slightly prefer a sidereal time-dependent solution. Limits of order 10-20 GeV are placed on combinations of SME coefficients. These limits give the best limits on certain SME coefficients for νμ →νe and νbarμ →νbare oscillations. The fit values and limits of combinations of SME coefficients are provided.

  12. Test of Lorentz and CPT violation with short baseline neutrino oscillation excesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MiniBooNE Collaboration; Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; Anderson, C. E.; Bazarko, A. O.; Brice, S. J.; Brown, B. C.; Bugel, L.; Cao, J.; Coney, L.; Conrad, J. M.; Cox, D. C.; Curioni, A.; Dharmapalan, R.; Djurcic, Z.; Finley, D. A.; Fleming, B. T.; Ford, R.; Garcia, F. G.; Garvey, G. T.; Grange, J.; Green, C.; Green, J. A.; Hart, T. L.; Hawker, E.; Huelsnitz, W.; Imlay, R.; Johnson, R. A.; Karagiorgi, G.; Kasper, P.; Katori, T.; Kobilarcik, T.; Kourbanis, I.; Koutsoliotas, S.; Laird, E. M.; Linden, S. K.; Link, J. M.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Y.; Louis, W. C.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Marsh, W.; Mauger, C.; McGary, V. T.; McGregor, G.; Metcalf, W.; Meyers, P. D.; Mills, F.; Mills, G. B.; Monroe, J.; Moore, C. D.; Mousseau, J.; Nelson, R. H.; Nienaber, P.; Nowak, J. A.; Osmanov, B.; Ouedraogo, S.; Patterson, R. B.; Pavlovic, Z.; Perevalov, D.; Polly, C. C.; Prebys, E.; Raaf, J. L.; Ray, H.; Roe, B. P.; Russell, A. D.; Sandberg, V.; Schirato, R.; Schmitz, D.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Shoemaker, F. C.; Smith, D.; Soderberg, M.; Sorel, M.; Spentzouris, P.; Spitz, J.; Stancu, I.; Stefanski, R. J.; Sung, M.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tayloe, R.; Tzanov, M.; Van de Water, R. G.; Wascko, M. O.; White, D. H.; Wilking, M. J.; Yang, H. J.; Zeller, G. P.; Zimmerman, E. D.

    2013-01-01

    The sidereal time dependence of MiniBooNE νe and ν appearance data is analyzed to search for evidence of Lorentz and CPT violation. An unbinned Kolmogorov-Smirnov (K-S) test shows both the νe and ν appearance data are compatible with the null sidereal variation hypothesis to more than 5%. Using an unbinned likelihood fit with a Lorentz-violating oscillation model derived from the Standard Model Extension (SME) to describe any excess events over background, we find that the νe appearance data prefer a sidereal time-independent solution, and the ν appearance data slightly prefer a sidereal time-dependent solution. Limits of order 10-20 GeV are placed on combinations of SME coefficients. These limits give the best limits on certain SME coefficients for νμ→νe and ν→ν oscillations. The fit values and limits of combinations of SME coefficients are provided.

  13. Toward tests of QED and CPT with improved electron and positron g-factor measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novitski, Elise; Dorr, Joshua; Fogwell Hoogerheide, Shannon; Gabrielse, Gerald

    2013-05-01

    We describe progress toward improved measurements of the electron and positron g-factors using quantum jump spectroscopy between the lowest quantum states of either particle trapped in a 100 mK cylindrical Penning trap. In a new apparatus--designed for improved stability and a better geometry for cavity-assisted sideband cooling--we have trapped a single electron, driven and observed single cyclotron transitions, and trapped positrons in a loading trap. This should enable measurements of both g-factors with better than the 0.28 ppt precision of the best electron value (the most precise measurement of a fundamental property of an elementary particle), thereby improving the positron value by a factor of more than 15., These measurements, in combination with QED theory relating the electron g-factor to α, will improve on the most precise determination of α, the fine structure constant. The comparison of this value with an independent measurement of α is the most precise test of QED. The comparison of the e- and e+ g-factors will improve upon the best test of CPT symmetry in a lepton system. This work is supported by the NSF

  14. Studies of neutron-rich nuclei using the CPT mass spectrometer at CARIBU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, A.; Bertone, P. F.; Buchinger, F.; Caldwell, S.; Clark, J. A.; Crawford, J. E.; Deibel, C. M.; Gulick, S.; Lascar, D.; Levand, A. F.; Li, G.; Savard, G.; Segel, R. E.; Sharma, K. S.; Sternberg, M. G.; Sun, T.; Van Schelt, J.

    2011-09-01

    The nucleosynthetic path of the astrophysical r-process and the resulting elemental abundances depend on neutron-separation energies which can be determined from the masses of the nuclei along the r-process reaction path. Due to the current lack of experimental data, mass models are often used. The mass values provided by the mass models are often too imprecise or disagree with each other. Therefore, direct high-precision mass measurements of neutron-rich nuclei are necessary to provide input parameters to the calculations and help refine the mass models. The Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) facility of Argonne National Laboratory will provide experiments with beams of short-lived neutron-rich nuclei. The Canadian Penning Trap (CPT) mass spectrometer has been relocated to the CARIBU low-energy beam line to extend measurements of the neutron-rich nuclei into the mostly unexplored region along the r-process path. This will allow precise mass measurements (~ 10 keV/c2) of more than a hundred very neutron-rich isotopes that have not previously been measured.

  15. Search for T, CP, and CPT violation in B0-B0 mixing with inclusive dilepton events.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro Vazquez, W; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S Y; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Potter, C T; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; del Re, D; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Martinez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-06-30

    We report the results of a search for T, CP, CPT, and violation in B0-B0 mixing using an inclusive dilepton sample collected by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II factory. Using a sample of 232 x 10(6) BB pairs, we measure the T and CP violation parameter |q/p| - 1 = (-0.8 +/- 2.7(stat) +/- 1.9(syst) x 10(-3), and the CPT and CP parameters Imz = (13.9 +/- 7.3(stat) +/- 3.2(syst)) x 10(-3) and Delta Gamma x Rez = (7.1 +/- 3.9(stat) +/- 2.0(stat)) x 10(-3) ps(-1). The statistical correlation between the measurements of Imz and Delta Gamma x Rez is 76%.

  16. Ramsey spectroscopy of high-contrast CPT resonances with push-pull optical pumping in Cs vapor.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Mérolla, J-M; Guérandel, S; de Clercq, E; Boudot, R

    2013-05-20

    We report on the detection of high-contrast and narrow Coherent Population Trapping (CPT) Ramsey fringes in a Cs vapor cell using a simple-architecture laser system. The latter allows the combination of push-pull optical pumping (PPOP) and a temporal Ramsey-like pulsed interrogation. An originality of the optics package is the use of a single Mach-Zehnder electro-optic modulator (MZ EOM) both for optical sidebands generation and light switch for pulsed interaction. Typical Ramsey fringes with a linewidth of 166 Hz and a contrast of 33 % are detected in a cm-scale buffer-gas filled Cs vapor cell. This technique could be interesting for the development of high-performance and low power consumption compact vapor cell clocks based on CPT.

  17. TESTING FOR CPT VIOLATION IN B0s SEMILEPTONIC DECAYS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooten, R. Van

    2014-01-01

    A DØ analysis measuring the charge asymmetry Absl of like-sign dimuon events due to semileptonic b-hadron decays at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider has shown indications of possible anomalous CP violation in the mixing of neutral B mesons. This result has been used to extract the first senstivity to CPT violation in the B0s system. An analysis to explore further this anomaly by specifically measuring the semileptonic charge asymmetry, assl, in B0s decays is described, as well as how a variant of this analysis can be used to explore a larger set of CPT-violating parameters in the B0s system for the first time.

  18. Search for CPT and lorentz violation in B0-B[over ]0 oscillations with dilepton events.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lopes Pegna, D; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Vitug, G M; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Watson, J E; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Panduro Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, L; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Zheng, Y; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Losecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Biesiada, J; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Baracchini, E; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Castelli, G; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Roethel, W; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Miyashita, T S; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Neal, H

    2008-04-04

    We report results of a search for CPT and Lorentz violation in B(0)-B[over ](0) oscillations using inclusive dilepton events from 232 x 10(6) Upsilon(4S)-->BB[over ] decays recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B Factory at SLAC. We find 2.8sigma significance, compatible with no signal, for variations in the complex CPT violation parameter z at the Earth's sidereal frequency and extract values for the quantities Deltaa(micro) in the general Lorentz-violating standard-model extension. The spectral powers for variations in z over the frequency range 0.26 yr(-1) to 2.1 solar day(-1) are also compatible with no signal.

  19. General CPT-even dimension-five nonminimal couplings between fermions and photons yielding EDM and MDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo, Jonas B.; Casana, Rodolfo; Ferreira, Manoel M.

    2016-09-01

    In this letter, we examine a new class of CPT-even nonminimal interactions, between fermions and photons, deprived of higher order derivatives, that yields electric dipole moment (EDM) and magnetic dipole moment (MDM) in the context of the Dirac equation. The couplings are dimension-five CPT-even and Lorentz-violating nonminimal structures, composed of a rank-2 tensor, Tμν, the electromagnetic tensor, and gamma matrices, being addressed in its axial and non-axial Hermitian versions, and also comprising general possibilities. We then use the electron's anomalous magnetic dipole moment and electron electric dipole moment measurements to reach upper bounds of 1 part in 1020 and 1025 (eV) - 1.

  20. [A new alkaloid from Menispermum dauricum DC--N-desmethyldauricine].

    PubMed

    Pan, X P

    1992-01-01

    A new phenolic dauricine-type alkaloid together with the know dauricine were isolated from the rhizoma of Menispermum dauricum DC cultivated in Xianning district, Hubei province. Dauricine was obtained as the major alkaloid and was confirmed by comparison with authentic sample. The new alkaloid is an unstable white powder: Based on spectrometric analysis (UV, IR, FAB-MS and 1HNMR) and N-methylation which offered dauricine dimethiodide (V), the structure was elucidated as RR, N-desmethyldauricine (II), which was isolated for the first time from nature.

  1. Morphinane alkaloids with cell protective effects from Sinomenium acutum.

    PubMed

    Bao, Guan-Hu; Qin, Guo-Wei; Wang, Rui; Tang, Xi-Can

    2005-07-01

    One new morphinane alkaloid, sinomenine N-oxide (1), and one new natural occurring morphinane alkaloid, N-demethylsinomenine (2), together with six known alkaloids, 7,8-didehydro-4-hydroxy-3,7-dimethoxymorphinan-6-ol (3), sinomenine (4), sinoacutine (5), N-norsinoacutine, acutumine, and acutumidine, were isolated from the stems of Sinomenium acutum. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analysis and chemical methods. Compounds 2, 3, and 5 have protective effects against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell injury.

  2. Cytotoxic alkaloids from stems, leaves and twigs of Dasymaschalon blumei.

    PubMed

    Chanakul, Waraporn; Tuchinda, Patoomratana; Anantachoke, Natthinee; Pohmakotr, Manat; Piyachaturawat, Pawinee; Jariyawat, Surawat; Suksen, Kanoknetr; Jaipetch, Tharworn; Nuntasaen, Narong; Reutrakul, Vichai

    2011-10-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of the cytotoxic ethyl acetate extract from the stems of Dasymaschalon blumei (Annonaceae) led to the isolation of four aristololactam alkaloids, including the hitherto unknown 3,5-dihydroxy-2,4-dimethoxyaristolactam (1), as well as the three known compounds, aristolactam BI, goniopedaline, and griffithinam. Additionally, the cytotoxic extract from the combined leaves and twigs of the same plant yielded three known oxoaporphine alkaloids, oxodiscoguattine, dicentrinone, and duguevalline. The structures of aristolactams and oxoaporphine alkaloids were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic methods. All isolates were evaluated for cytotoxicity against a panel of mammalian cancer cell lines and a noncancerous human embryonic kidney cell Hek 293.

  3. γ-Lactam alkaloids from the flower buds of daylily.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takahiro; Nakamura, Seikou; Nakashima, Souichi; Ohta, Tomoe; Yano, Mamiko; Tsujihata, Junichiro; Tsukioka, Junko; Ogawa, Keiko; Fukaya, Masashi; Yoshikawa, Masayuki; Matsuda, Hisashi

    2016-07-01

    Four new alkaloids, hemerocallisamines IV-VII, were isolated from the methanol extract of flower buds of daylily. The chemical structures of the new compounds were elucidated on the basis of chemical and physicochemical evidence. The absolute stereochemistry of the hemerocallisamines IV-VI was elucidated by the application of the modified Mosher's method, HPLC analysis, and optical rotation. In the present study, the isolated alkaloids significantly inhibited the aggregation of Aβ42 in vitro. This is the first report about bioactive alkaloids with a γ-lactam ring from daylily. In addition, isolated nucleosides showed accelerative effects on neurite outgrowth under the non-fasting condition.

  4. The Amaryllidaceae alkaloids: biosynthesis and methods for enzyme discovery.

    PubMed

    Kilgore, Matthew B; Kutchan, Toni M

    2016-06-01

    Amaryllidaceae alkaloids are an example of the vast diversity of secondary metabolites with great therapeutic promise. The identification of novel compounds in this group with over 300 known structures continues to be an area of active study. The recent identification of norbelladine 4'-O-methyltransferase (N4OMT), an Amaryllidaceae alkaloid biosynthetic enzyme, and the assembly of transcriptomes for Narcissus sp. aff. pseudonarcissus and Lycoris aurea highlight the potential for discovery of Amaryllidaceae alkaloid biosynthetic genes with new technologies. Recent technical advances of interest include those in enzymology, next generation sequencing, genetic modification, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), and mass spectrometry (MS).

  5. A new cytotoxic carbazole alkaloid and two new other alkaloids from Clausena excavata.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wen-Wen; Zeng, Guang-Zhi; Song, Wei-Wu; Tan, Ning-Hua

    2013-07-01

    One new carbazole alkaloid, excavatine A (1), and two additional new alkaloids, excavatine B (2) and excavatine C (3), were isolated from the stems and leaves of Clausena excavata Burm.f. (Rutaceae). Their structures were determined on the basis of detailed spectroscopic analyses, especially 2D-NMR and HR-EI-MS data. Compounds 1-3 were tested for their cytotoxic activities against A549, HeLa, and BGC-823 cancer cell lines, and for their antimicrobial activities against Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus. Only 1 exhibited cytotoxicity against A549 and HeLa cell lines with the IC50 values of 5.25 and 1.91 μg/ml, respectively.

  6. Differential epigenetic and transcriptional response of the skeletal muscle carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1B (CPT1B) gene to lipid exposure with obesity.

    PubMed

    Maples, Jill M; Brault, Jeffrey J; Witczak, Carol A; Park, Sanghee; Hubal, Monica J; Weber, Todd M; Houmard, Joseph A; Shewchuk, Brian M

    2015-08-15

    The ability to increase fatty acid oxidation (FAO) in response to dietary lipid is impaired in the skeletal muscle of obese individuals, which is associated with a failure to coordinately upregulate genes involved with FAO. While the molecular mechanisms contributing to this metabolic inflexibility are not evident, a possible candidate is carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1B (CPT1B), which is a rate-limiting step in FAO. The present study was undertaken to determine if the differential response of skeletal muscle CPT1B gene transcription to lipid between lean and severely obese subjects is linked to epigenetic modifications (DNA methylation and histone acetylation) that impact transcriptional activation. In primary human skeletal muscle cultures the expression of CPT1B was blunted in severely obese women compared with their lean counterparts in response to lipid, which was accompanied by changes in CpG methylation, H3/H4 histone acetylation, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-δ and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α transcription factor occupancy at the CPT1B promoter. Methylation of specific CpG sites in the CPT1B promoter that correlated with CPT1B transcript level blocked the binding of the transcription factor upstream stimulatory factor, suggesting a potential causal mechanism. These findings indicate that epigenetic modifications may play important roles in the regulation of CPT1B in response to a physiologically relevant lipid mixture in human skeletal muscle, a major site of fatty acid catabolism, and that differential DNA methylation may underlie the depressed expression of CPT1B in response to lipid, contributing to the metabolic inflexibility associated with severe obesity.

  7. Photofragmentation mechanisms in protonated chiral cinchona alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Lucas, Bruno; Fayeton, Jacqueline; Scuderi, Debora; Alata, Ivan; Broquier, Michel; Barbu-Debus, Katia Le; Lepère, Valeria; Zehnacker, Anne

    2016-08-10

    The photo-stability of protonated cinchona alkaloids is studied in the gas phase by a multi-technique approach. A multi-coincidence technique is used to demonstrate that the dissociation is a direct process. Two dissociation channels are observed. They result from the C8-C9 cleavage, accompanied or not by hydrogen migration. The branching ratio between the two photo-fragments is different for the two pseudo-enantiomers quinine and quinidine. Mass spectrometry experiments coupling UV photo-dissociation of the reactants and structural characterization of the ionic photo-products by Infra-Red Multiple Photo-Dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy provide unambiguous information on their structure. In addition, quantum chemical calculations allow proposing a reactive scheme and discussing it in terms of the ground-state geometry of the reactant.

  8. Total Synthesis and Study of Myrmicarin Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Ondrus, Alison E.

    2010-01-01

    The myrmicarins are a family of air and temperature sensitive alkaloids that possess unique structural features. Our concise enantioselective synthesis of the tricyclic myrmicarins enabled evaluation of a potentially biomimetic assembly of the complex members via direct dimerization of simpler structures. These studies revealed that myrmicarin 215B undergoes efficient and highly diastereoselective Brønsted acid-induced dimerization to generate a new heptacyclic structure, isomyrmicarin 430A. Mechanistic analysis demonstrated that heterodimerization between myrmicarin 215B and a conformationally restricted azafulvenium ion precursor afforded a functionalized isomyrmicarin 430A structure in a manner that was consistent with a highly efficient, non-concerted ionic process. Recent advancement in heterodimerization between tricyclic derivatives has enabled the preparation of strategically functionalized hexacyclic structures. The design and synthesis of structurally versatile dimeric compounds has greatly facilitated manipulation of these structures en route to more complex myrmicarin derivatives. PMID:19585010

  9. Tetrahydroberberine, a pharmacologically active naturally occurring alkaloid.

    PubMed

    Pingali, Subramanya; Donahue, James P; Payton-Stewart, Florastina

    2015-04-01

    Tetrahydroberberine (systematic name: 9,10-dimethoxy-5,8,13,13a-tetrahydro-6H-benzo[g][1,3]benzodioxolo[5,6-a]quinolizine), C20H21NO4, a widely distributed naturally occurring alkaloid, has been crystallized as a racemic mixture about an inversion center. A bent conformation of the molecule is observed, with an angle of 24.72 (5)° between the arene rings at the two ends of the reduced quinolizinium core. The intermolecular hydrogen bonds that play an apparent role in crystal packing are 1,3-benzodioxole -CH2···OCH3 and -OCH3···OCH3 interactions between neighboring molecules.

  10. Synthesis and Anticancer Activity of Epipolythiodiketopiperazine Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Nicolas; Morrison, Karen C.; Kim, Justin; Hergenrother, Paul J.; Movassaghi, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    The epipolythiodiketopiperazine (ETP) alkaloids are a highly complex class of natural products with potent anticancer activity. Herein, we report the application of a flexible and scalable synthesis, allowing the construction of dozens of ETP derivatives. The evaluation of these compounds against cancer cell lines in culture allows for the first expansive structure–activity relationship (SAR) to be defined for monomeric and dimeric ETP-containing natural products and their synthetic cognates. Many ETP derivatives demonstrate potent anticancer activity across a broad range of cancer cell lines, and kill cancer cellsviainduction of apoptosis. Several traits thatbode well for the translational potential of the ETP class of natural products includeconcise and efficient synthetic access, potent induction of apoptotic cell death, activity against a wide range of cancer types, and a broad tolerance for modifications at multiple sitesthat should facilitate small-molecule drug development, mechanistic studies, and evaluation in vivo. PMID:23914293

  11. Heterocyclic Amaryllidaceae Alkaloids: Biosynthesis and Pharmacological Applications.

    PubMed

    Hotchandani, Tarun; Desgagne-Penix, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    Amaryllidaceae alkaloids (AAs), which are natural heterocyclic compounds, are isolated from Amaryllidaceae plants such as narcissus, snowdrop and spider lily. AAs have been extensively studied due to their multiple pharmacological properties. Nevertheless, knowledge of AA synthesis in plants is lacking and most genes encoding enzymes involved in their production remain unknown. AAs are structurally complex compounds which are challenging for total chemical synthesis that is economically viable. Therefore the understanding of AA biosynthesis could allow for the development of biotechnologies for the production of natural AAs or analogues, maintaining or improving their pharmacological properties. In this review, we describe the progress regarding the biosynthesis and pharmacological properties of AAs. The most recent developments in neurological, anti-cancer and anti-microbial bioactivities of heterocyclic AAs are covered.

  12. Quantitative determination of ergot alkaloids in biological fluids by radioimmunoassay.

    PubMed Central

    Kleimola, T T

    1978-01-01

    1 Cross-reactivity of ergot alkaloids with an antiserum produced against lysergic acid conjugated with human serum, albumin was utilized to develop a radioimmunoassay for ergotamine, dihydroergotamine, dihydroergotoxine, ergometrine and methylergometrine in biological fluids. The antisera showed no cross-reactivity with simpler indole structures. 2 A procedure for extraction and concentration of alkaloids in biological fluids was developed. 3 The assay is sensitive for 1.8 ng/ml ergotamine, 1.5 ng/ml dihydroergotamine, 2.2 ng/ml dihydroergotoxine, 0.7 ng/ml ergotmetrine and 0.5 ng/ml methylergometrine. 4 The assay is sufficiently sensitive to permit the measurement of urine and plasma ergot alkaloid levels and it is suitable for determination in cases where a known ergot alkaloid is used. PMID:687503

  13. Activity of pyrrolizidine alkaloids against biofilm formation and Trichomonas vaginalis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crotalaria genus belongs to the subfamily Papilionoideae comprising about 600 species spread throughout tropical, neotropical and subtropical regions. In this study, seeds of Crolatalaria pallida were used to the isolation of usaramine, a pyrrolizidine alkaloid. Thus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Stap...

  14. Effects of Psychotria colorata alkaloids in brain opioid system.

    PubMed

    Amador, T A; Elisabetsky, E; Souza, D O

    1996-01-01

    An ethnopharmacological survey showed that home remedies prepared with flowers and fruits of Psychotria colorata are used by Amazonian peasants as pain killers. Psychopharmacological in vivo evaluation of alkaloids obtained from leaves and flowers of this species showed a marked dose-dependent naloxone-reversible analgesic activity, therefore suggesting an opioid-like pharmacological profile. This paper reports an inhibitory effect of P. colorata flower alkaloids on [3H]naloxone binding in rat striata as well as a decrease in adenylate cyclase basal activity. The alkaloids did not affect [3H] GMP-PNP binding. These findings provide a neurochemical basis for the opioid-like activity previously detected in vivo and point to Psychotria alkaloids as a potential source of new bioactive opiate derivatives.

  15. Marine bromopyrrole alkaloids: synthesis and diverse medicinal applications.

    PubMed

    Rane, Rajesh; Sahu, Niteshkumar; Shah, Chetan; Karpoormath, Rajshekhar

    2014-01-01

    Marine organisms have been found to be a very rich source of bioactive molecules. Among marine organisms, sponges have been proven to be excellent producers of secondary metabolites. More than 5,300 compounds have been isolated from sponges with around 200 new molecules reported each year. Bromopyrrole alkaloids constitute a family of exclusively marine alkaloids and represent a fascinating example of the large variety of compounds formed by marine sponges which exhibit different biological activities such as antifeedent, anti-biofilm, anticancer, antiinflammatory, antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, analgesic, antiserotonergic, antiangiogenic, antihistaminic, chitinase inhibitor and actimyosin ATPase activator. More than 140 derivatives with different structures and biological activities, have been isolated from more than 20 different sponges. Most of these alkaloids share a key building block, pyrrole-imidazole with oroidin being their underlying structural motif. In this review detailed account of isolation and medicinal application of marine bromopyrrole alkaloids and their synthetic derivatives are discussed.

  16. Crinine-type alkaloids from Hippeastrum aulicum and H. calyptratum.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, Jean Paulo; Guo, Ying; Font-Bardia, Mercè; Calvet, Teresa; Dutilh, Jullie; Viladomat, Francesc; Codina, Carles; Nair, Jerald J; Zuanazzi, Jose A Silveira; Bastida, Jaume

    2014-07-01

    An ongoing search for alkaloids in the Amaryllidaceae species using GC-MS resulted in the identification of two crinine-type alkaloids, aulicine (1) and 3-O-methyl-epimacowine, (2) from the indigenous Brazilian species Hippeastrum aulicum and Hippeastrum calyptratum, respectively. In addition, two alkaloids, 11-oxohaemanthamine (3) and 7-methoxy-O-methyllycorenine (4) were both isolated from H. aulicum. Furthermore, we provide here complete NMR spectroscopic data for the homolycorine analogues nerinine (5) and albomaculine (6). The absolute stereochemistry of the 5,10b-ethano bridge in the crinine variants was determined by circular dichroism and X-ray crystallographic analysis, thus presenting the first direct evidence for the presence of crinine-type alkaloids in the genus Hippeastrum.

  17. Arginine decarboxylase as the source of putrescine for tobacco alkaloids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiburcio, A. F.; Galston, A. W.

    1986-01-01

    The putrescine which forms a part of nicotine and other pyrrolidine alkaloids is generally assumed to arise through the action of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC). However, we have previously noted that changes in the activity of arginine decarboxylase (ADC), an alternate source of putrescine, parallel changes in tissue alkaloids, while changes in ODC activity do not. This led us to undertake experiments to permit discrimination between ADC and ODC as enzymatic sources of putrescine destined for alkaloids. Two kinds of evidence presented here support a major role for ADC in the generation of putrescine going into alkaloids: (a) A specific 'suicide inhibitor' of ADC effectively inhibits the biosynthesis of nicotine and nornicotine in tobacco callus, while the analogous inhibitor of ODC is less effective, and (b) the flow of 14C from uniformly labelled arginine into nicotine is much more efficient than that from ornithine.

  18. Alkaloids with Different Carbon Units from Myrioneuron faberi.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ming-Ming; Zhang, Yu; Huang, Sheng-Dian; Di, Ying-Tong; Peng, Zong-Gen; Jiang, Jian-Dong; Yuan, Chun-Mao; Chen, Duo-Zhi; Li, Shun-Lin; He, Hong-Ping; Hao, Xiao-Jiang

    2015-11-25

    Three new Myrioneuron alkaloids, myrifamines A-C (1-3), with unique skeletons were isolated from Myrioneuron faberi. The absolute configuration of 1 was confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis, and the stereochemistry of the other two alkaloids was determined using a combination of ROESY experiments and calculated and experimental electronic circular dichroism spectra. Myrifamine C (3) is the first example of a symmetric dimer among the Myrioneuron alkaloids. Known alkaloids myrionamide (4) and schoberine (5) were also isolated, and experimental NMR and X-ray diffraction data suggest their structural revision. Compound 2 showed significant inhibitory activity toward the hepatitis C virus in vitro, with a therapeutic index (CC50/EC50) greater than 108.7.

  19. Microcalorimetry studies of the antimicrobial actions of Aconitum alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yan-bin; Liu, Lian; Shao, Wei; Wei, Ting; Lin, Gui-mei

    2015-08-01

    The metabolic activity of organisms can be measured by recording the heat output using microcalorimetry. In this paper, the total alkaloids in the traditional Chinese medicine Radix Aconiti Lateralis were extracted and applied to Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The effect of alkaloids on bacteria growth was studied by microcalorimetry. The power-time curves were plotted with a thermal activity monitor (TAM) air isothermal microcalorimeter and parameters such as growth rate constant (μ), peak-time (Tm), inhibitory ratio (I), and enhancement ratio (E) were calculated. The relationships between the concentration of Aconitum alkaloids and μ of E. coli or S. aureus were discussed. The results showed that Aconitum alkaloids had little effect on E. coli and had a potentially inhibitory effect on the growth of S. aureus.

  20. A comparison of the antimalarial activity of the cinchona alkaloids against Plasmodium falciparum in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wesche, D L; Black, J

    1990-06-01

    The effects of four major cinchona alkaloids: (-) quinine, (+) quinidine, (-)cinchonidine, and (+)cinchonine against Plasmodium falciparum FCQ-27/PNG were studied. The alkaloids were tested in vitro as either single alkaloids, racemic mixtures of stereoisomers, or as an equimolar combination of all four alkaloids. Results indicate (+)quinidine to be most effective and both (+)stereoisomers were more potent than the (-)stereoisomers. Inhibitory concentrations 50% (Ki) of racemic mixtures of stereoisomers were similar to those of the (+)stereoisomers alone. The Ki of four alkaloids in equimolar combination were similar to that of the (-) cinchonidine/(+)cinchonine racemic mixture. A total alkaloidal extract of Cinchona sp. was tested and compared with the pure alkaloids. HPLC analysis indicated that (+)cinchonine, (-)cinchonidine and (-)quinine were present in a ratio of approximately 1:1:2, respectively. The total alkaloid extract, with (-)stereoisomers predominating, was less effective than the four alkaloids in combination. The nature of the interaction between stereoisomers was investigated and appears to be one of addition.

  1. Computational Studies on Cinchona Alkaloid-Catalyzed Asymmetric Organic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Tanriver, Gamze; Dedeoglu, Burcu; Catak, Saron; Aviyente, Viktorya

    2016-06-21

    Remarkable progress in the area of asymmetric organocatalysis has been achieved in the last decades. Cinchona alkaloids and their derivatives have emerged as powerful organocatalysts owing to their reactivities leading to high enantioselectivities. The widespread usage of cinchona alkaloids has been attributed to their nontoxicity, ease of use, stability, cost effectiveness, recyclability, and practical utilization in industry. The presence of tunable functional groups enables cinchona alkaloids to catalyze a broad range of reactions. Excellent experimental studies have extensively contributed to this field, and highly selective reactions were catalyzed by cinchona alkaloids and their derivatives. Computational modeling has helped elucidate the mechanistic aspects of cinchona alkaloid catalyzed reactions as well as the origins of the selectivity they induce. These studies have complemented experimental work for the design of more efficient catalysts. This Account presents recent computational studies on cinchona alkaloid catalyzed organic reactions and the theoretical rationalizations behind their effectiveness and ability to induce selectivity. Valuable efforts to investigate the mechanisms of reactions catalyzed by cinchona alkaloids and the key aspects of the catalytic activity of cinchona alkaloids in reactions ranging from pharmaceutical to industrial applications are summarized. Quantum mechanics, particularly density functional theory (DFT), and molecular mechanics, including ONIOM, were used to rationalize experimental findings by providing mechanistic insights into reaction mechanisms. B3LYP with modest basis sets has been used in most of the studies; nonetheless, the energetics have been corrected with higher basis sets as well as functionals parametrized to include dispersion M05-2X, M06-2X, and M06-L and functionals with dispersion corrections. Since cinchona alkaloids catalyze reactions by forming complexes with substrates via hydrogen bonds and long

  2. Indole and beta-carboline alkaloids from Geissospermum sericeum.

    PubMed

    Steele, Jonathan C P; Veitch, Nigel C; Kite, Geoffrey C; Simmonds, Monique S J; Warhurst, David C

    2002-01-01

    The indole alkaloid geissoschizoline (1) and two new derivatives, geissoschizoline N(4)-oxide (2) and 1,2-dehydrogeissoschizoline (3), were obtained from the bark of Geissospermum sericeum together with the beta-carboline alkaloid flavopereirine (4). The in vitro antiplasmodial activity of these compounds was evaluated in chloroquine-resistant (K1) and chloroquine-sensitive (T9-96) Plasmodium falciparum. Their cytotoxicity was determined in a human (KB) cell line.

  3. Recent Progress in the Chemistry of Daphniphyllum Alkaloids †.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Amit Kumar; Hanessian, Stephen

    2017-03-08

    Daphniphyllum is an evergreen species known since 1826. After initial systematic investigations, more than 320 members of this family have been isolated, which comprise complex and fascinating structures. Unique azapolycyclic architectures containing one or more quaternary stereocenters render these alkaloids synthetically challenging. This review covers efforts toward the synthesis of Daphniphyllum alkaloids spanning the period from 2005 to the beginning of 2016, including reported biological activities as well as the isolation of new members of this genus.

  4. Unusual alkaloids of the highland species Astragalus cryptanthus Wedd. (Fabaceae).

    PubMed

    Echeverría, Javier; Espinoza, Sergio M; Niemeyer, Hermann M

    2017-01-01

    Two unusual caprolactam alkaloids, 3-(dimethylamino)hexahydro-2H-azepin-2-one and 3-(methylamino)-hexahydro-2H-azepin-2-one, were isolated from the aerial parts of Astragalus cryptanthus Wedd.; their structures were unambiguously determined based on data from extensive 1D and 2D NMR, GC-MS and FT-IR spectroscopic analyses. This is the first report of this alkaloid type in the genus Astragalus.

  5. Molecular genetics of alkaloid biosynthesis in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Dewey, Ralph E; Xie, Jiahua

    2013-10-01

    Alkaloids represent an extensive group of nitrogen-containing secondary metabolites that are widely distributed throughout the plant kingdom. The pyridine alkaloids of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) have been the subject of particularly intensive investigation, driven largely due to the widespread use of tobacco products by society and the role that nicotine (16) (see Fig. 1) plays as the primary compound responsible for making the consumption of these products both pleasurable and addictive. In a typical commercial tobacco plant, nicotine (16) comprises about 90% of the total alkaloid pool, with the alkaloids nornicotine (17) (a demethylated derivative of nicotine), anatabine (15) and anabasine (5) making up most of the remainder. Advances in molecular biology have led to the characterization of the majority of the genes encoding the enzymes directly responsible the biosynthesis of nicotine (16) and nornicotine (17), while notable gaps remain within the anatabine (15) and anabasine (5) biosynthetic pathways. Several of the genes involved in the transcriptional regulation and transport of nicotine (16) have also been elucidated. Investigations of the molecular genetics of tobacco alkaloids have not only provided plant biologists with insights into the mechanisms underlying the synthesis and accumulation of this important class of plant alkaloids, they have also yielded tools and strategies for modifying the tobacco alkaloid composition in a manner that can result in changing the levels of nicotine (16) within the leaf, or reducing the levels of a potent carcinogenic tobacco-specific nitrosamine (TSNA). This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the molecular genetics of alkaloid biosynthesis in tobacco, and discusses the potential for applying information accrued from these studies toward efforts designed to help mitigate some of the negative health consequences associated with the use of tobacco products.

  6. Detection and quantification of pyrrolizidine alkaloids in antibacterial medical honeys.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Luise; Beuerle, Till

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in antibacterial honey for wound care ranging from minor abrasions and burns to leg ulcers and surgical wounds. On the other hand, several recent studies demonstrated that honey for human consumption was contaminated with natural occurring, plant derived pyrrolizidine alkaloids.1,2-Unsaturated pyrrolizidine alkaloids are a group of secondary plant metabolites that show developmental, hepato-, and geno-toxicity as well as carcinogenic effects in animal models and in in vitro test systems. Hence, it was of particular interest to analyze the pyrrolizidine alkaloid content of medical honeys intended for wound care.19 different medical honey samples and/or batches were analyzed by applying a recently established pyrrolizidine alkaloid sum parameter method. 1,2-Unsaturated pyrrolizidine alkaloids were converted into the common necin backbone structures and were analyzed and quantified by GC-MS in the selected ion monitoring mode.All but one medical honey analyzed were pyrrolizidine alkaloid positive. The results ranged from 10.6 µg retronecine equivalents per kg to 494.5 µg retronecine equivalents/kg medical honey. The average pyrrolizidine alkaloid content of all positive samples was 83.6 µg retronecine equivalents/kg medical honey (average of all samples was 79.3 µg retronecine equivalents/kg medical honey). The limit of detection was 2.0 µg retronecine equivalents/kg medical honey, while the limit of quantification was 6.0 µg retronecine equivalents/kg medical honey (S/N > 7/1).Based on the data presented here and considering the fact that medical honeys can be applied to open wounds, it seems reasonable to discuss the monitoring of 1,2-unsaturated pyrrolizidine alkaloids in honey intended for wound treatment.

  7. Alkaloids from roots of Stemona sessilifolia and their antitussive activities.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin-Zhou; Zhu, Jian-Yu; Tang, Chun-Ping; Ke, Chang-Qiang; Lin, Ge; Cheng, Tin-Yan; Rudd, John A; Ye, Yang

    2009-02-01

    Protostemonamide ( 1), a new protostemonine-type alkaloid, and 12 known compounds were isolated from the roots of Stemona sessilifolia. Their structures were elucidated by 1 D and 2 D NMR spectral and other spectroscopic studies. The main alkaloidal constituents, protostemonine ( 2), stemospironine ( 4), and maistemonine ( 7), showed significant antitussive activity in a citric acid-induced guinea pig cough model following peripheral administration; stemonamine ( 11) had antitussive activity following i. c. v. administration.

  8. Furoquinoline alkaloids from the southern African Rutaceae Teclea natalensis.

    PubMed

    Tarus, Paul K; Coombes, Philip H; Crouch, Neil R; Mulholland, Dulcie A; Moodley, B

    2005-03-01

    The chloroform and ethyl acetate extracts of the leaves of Teclea natalensis have yielded two furoquinoline alkaloids, 6-[(2,3-epoxy-3-methylbutyl)oxy]-4,7-dimethoxyfuro[2,3-b]quinoline and 4,7-dimethoxy-6-[(3-methyl-2-butenyl)oxy]furo[2,3-b]quinoline, and the known alkaloids 4,7-dimethoxy-8-[(3-methyl-2-butenyl)oxy]furo[2,3-b]quinoline, flindersiamine and dictamnine.

  9. Testing CPT conservation using the NuMI neutrino beam with the MINOS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Auty, David John

    2010-03-01

    The MINOS experiment was designed to measure neutrino oscillation parameters with muon neutrinos. It achieves this by measuring the neutrino energy spectrum and flavor composition of the man-made NuMI neutrino beam 1km after the beam is formed and again after 735 km. By comparing the two spectra it is possible to measure the oscillation parameters. The NuMI beam is made up of 7.0%$\\bar{v}$μ, which can be separated from the vμ because the MINOS detectors are magnetized. This makes it possible to study $\\bar{v}$μ oscillations separately from those of muon neutrinos, and thereby test CPT invariance in the neutrino sector by determining the $\\bar{v}$μ oscillation parameters and comparing them with those for vμ, although any unknown physics of the antineutrino would appear as a difference in oscillation parameters. Such a test has not been performed with beam $\\bar{v}$μ before. It is also possible to produce an almost pure $\\bar{v}$μ beam by reversing the current through the magnetic focusing horns of the NuMI beamline, thereby focusing negatively, instead of positively charged particles. This thesis describes the analysis of the 7% $\\bar{v}$μ component of the forward horn current NuMI beam. The $\\bar{v}$μ of a data sample of 3.2 x 10{sup 20} protons on target analysis found 42 events, compared to a CPT conserving prediction of 58.3-7.6+7.6(stat.)-3.6+3.6(syst.) events. This corresponds to a 1.9 σ deficit, and a best fit value of Δ$\\bar{m}$322 = 18 x 10-3 eV2 and sin2 2$\\bar{θ}$23 = 0.55. This thesis focuses particularly on the selection of $\\bar{v}$μ events, and investigates possible improvements of the selection algorithm. From this a different selector was chosen, which corroborated the findings of the original selector. The

  10. Identification and determination of ergot alkaloids in Morning Glory cultivars.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Julia; Woźniakiewicz, Michał; Klepacki, Piotr; Sowa, Anna; Kościelniak, Paweł

    2016-05-01

    Seeds of plants from Ipomoea genera contain numerous ergot alkaloids, including psychoactive ergine and ergometrine, and are often abused as so-called "legal highs." In this work, an analytical method for determination of ergine and ergometrine, and identification of other alkaloids was developed, optimized, and validated. Three extraction techniques, ultrasound-assisted extraction in bath, or with sonotrode, and microwave-assisted extraction were evaluated, and it was concluded that ultrasonic bath is the most suitable technique for extraction of ergot alkaloids. The extraction method was later optimized using a Doehlert experimental design with response surface methodology and used together with the optimized LC-Q-TOF-MS method. The analytical procedure was validated in terms of recovery and matrix effect, repeatability, and intermediate precision. Limits of detection and quantification were 1.0 and 3.0 ng mL(-1), respectively, and were sufficient for determination of ergot alkaloids in Ipomoea seeds. The analysis revealed that from five kinds of seeds purchased from different vendors, only three contained ergot alkaloids. Concentration of alkaloids and their relative abundance was similar in samples representative for whole seeds packs; however, when single seeds were analyzed, significant discrepancies in ergine and ergometrine concentrations were detected.

  11. Chemistry and Biology of the Pyrrole-Imidazole Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Lindel, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    More than a decade after our last review on the chemistry of the pyrrole-imidazole alkaloids, it was time to analyze once more the developments in that field. The comprehensive article focusses on the total syntheses of pyrrole-imidazole alkaloids that have appeared since 2005. The classic monomeric pyrrole-imidazole alkaloids have all been synthesized, sometimes primarily to demonstrate the usefulness of a new method, as in the case of the related molecules agelastatin A and cyclooroidin with more than 15 syntheses altogether. The phakellin skeleton has been made more than 10 times, too, with a focus on the target structure itself. Thus, some of the pyrrole-imidazole alkaloids are now available in gram amounts, and the supply problem has been solved. The total synthesis of the dimeric pyrrole-imidazole alkaloids is still mostly in its pioneering phase with two routes to palau'amine and massadine discovered and three routes to the axinellamines and ageliferin. In addition, the review summarizes recent discoveries regarding the biological activity of the pyrrole-imidazole alkaloids. Regarding the biosynthesis of sceptrin, a pathway is proposed that starts from nagelamide I and proceeds via two electrocyclizations and reduction.

  12. Evaluation of Aconitum diterpenoid alkaloids as antiproliferative agents.

    PubMed

    Wada, Koji; Ohkoshi, Emika; Zhao, Yu; Goto, Masuo; Morris-Natschke, Susan L; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2015-04-01

    Little information has been reported on the antitumor effects of the diterpenoid alkaloid constituents of Aconitum plants, used in the herbal drug 'bushi'. This study was aimed at determining the antitumor activities of Aconitum C19-and C20-diterpenoid alkaloids and synthetic derivatives against lung (A549), prostate (DU145), nasopharyngeal (KB), and vincristine-resistant nasopharyngeal (KB-VIN) cancer cell lines. Newly synthesized C20-diterpenoid alkaloid derivatives showed substantial suppressive effects against all human tumor cell lines tested. In contrast, natural and derivatized C19-diterpenoid alkaloids showed only a slight or no effect. Most of the active compounds were hetisine-type C20-diterpenoid alkaloids, specifically kobusine and pseudokobusine analogs with two different substitution patterns, C-11 and C-11,15. Notably, several C20-diterpenoid alkaloids were more potent against multidrug-resistant KB subline KB-VIN cells. Pseudokobusine 11-3'-trifluoromethylbenzoate (94) is a possible promising new lead meriting additional evaluation against multidrug-resistant tumors.

  13. Tropane alkaloids and calystegines as chemotaxonomic markers in the Solanaceae.

    PubMed

    Pigatto, Aline G S; Blanco, Carolina C; Mentz, Lilian A; Soares, Geraldo L G

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the occurrence and distribution of tropane alkaloids and calystegines in genera of the family Solanaceae to identify patterns of distribution and make evolutionary inferences. A database of tropane alkaloids and calystegines occurrences was constructed from the results of a search of scientific websites and a hand search of periodicals. The terms "Solanaceae", "tropane alkaloids", and "calystegines" were used as index terms for a full-text article search unrestricted by date of publications. The number of occurrence and chemical diversity indices were calculated and cluster analysis and principal components analysis were performed. Overall, 996 occurrences were reported, 879 of tropane alkaloids (88.3%) and 117 of calystegines (11.7%). The calystegines were significantly more relevant than tropane alkaloids for characterization of distinct groups of genera on both analyses performed here. This corroborates the trend toward a chemical dichotomy observed on database analysis and somewhat reinforces the correlation between geographic distribution and occurrence of secondary metabolites, as the presence of calystegines alone (without tropane alkaloids) was only reported in genera that have South America as their center of diversity.

  14. Genetics, Genomics and Evolution of Ergot Alkaloid Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Young, Carolyn A.; Schardl, Christopher L.; Panaccione, Daniel G.; Florea, Simona; Takach, Johanna E.; Charlton, Nikki D.; Moore, Neil; Webb, Jennifer S.; Jaromczyk, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    The ergot alkaloid biosynthesis system has become an excellent model to study evolutionary diversification of specialized (secondary) metabolites. This is a very diverse class of alkaloids with various neurotropic activities, produced by fungi in several orders of the phylum Ascomycota, including plant pathogens and protective plant symbionts in the family Clavicipitaceae. Results of comparative genomics and phylogenomic analyses reveal multiple examples of three evolutionary processes that have generated ergot-alkaloid diversity: gene gains, gene losses, and gene sequence changes that have led to altered substrates or product specificities of the enzymes that they encode (neofunctionalization). The chromosome ends appear to be particularly effective engines for gene gains, losses and rearrangements, but not necessarily for neofunctionalization. Changes in gene expression could lead to accumulation of various pathway intermediates and affect levels of different ergot alkaloids. Genetic alterations associated with interspecific hybrids of Epichloë species suggest that such variation is also selectively favored. The huge structural diversity of ergot alkaloids probably represents adaptations to a wide variety of ecological situations by affecting the biological spectra and mechanisms of defense against herbivores, as evidenced by the diverse pharmacological effects of ergot alkaloids used in medicine. PMID:25875294

  15. Cytotoxicity studies of lycorine alkaloids of the Amaryllidaceae.

    PubMed

    Nair, Jerald J; van Staden, Johannes

    2014-08-01

    The plant family Amaryllidaceae is renowned for its unique alkaloid constituents which possess a significant array of structural diversity. Several of these alkaloids are known for their interesting biological properties, of which galanthamine and pancratistatin have acquired a privileged status due to their relevance in the pharmaceutical arena. In particular, galanthamine represents the first prescription drug emanating from the Amaryllidaceae after its approval by the FDA in 2001 for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Following on this commercial success there have been sustained projections for the emergence of an anticancer agent related to pancratistatin due to the potency, selectivity, low toxicity and high tolerability typifying targets of this series of alkaloids. The lycorine series of alkaloids have also garnered widespread interest as cytotoxic agents and were amongst the earliest of the Amaryllidaceae constituents to exhibit such activity. To date over 100 of such naturally-occurring or synthetically-derived alkaloids have been screened for cytotoxic effects against a number of cancer cell lines. This survey examines the cytotoxic properties of lycorine alkaloids, highlights the outcomes of structure-activity relationship orientated studies and affords plausible insights to the mechanistic rationale behind these effects.

  16. [ALKALOIDS OF PEGANUM HARMALA L. AND THEIR BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY].

    PubMed

    Vachnadze, V; Suladze, T; Vachnadze, N; Kintsurashvili, L; Novikova, J

    2015-06-01

    Peganum Harmala L., Peganасеае widely distributed in Georgia. On the basis of chemical analysis of the composition of alkaloids it was found out that the plant contains quinazoline derivatives, among which dominats alkaloid d, 1 peganine: С11Н12NО2, m.p. 198-99ºC (СН3ОН). UV, λmax 275 (lgε 3,95). In IR-spectrum (KBr) 1625 cm- (-N=C) 3200-370 (OH)cm-1 . Mass- spectrum: М+ 171(100%). It was studied the dynamics of accumulation for total alkaloids and d, l - peganine: in the budding phase the amount of alkaloids was - 3,71%, d, l - peganine 0,07÷0,09%; in the phase of mass flowering the sum of alkaloids - 4,51% ,d, l - peganine - 0,1÷0,13%; in the phase of ripeness total alkaloids - 3.92%; d,l - peganine - 0,08÷0,1. The study of specific pharmacological activity showed that the d,l - peganine similar to peganine at a dose of 30 mg/kg causes a decrease in heart rate by 30÷40 beats/min, which is characteristic for anticholinesterases, in parallel with this, a decrease in cholinesterase activity in blood serum has been observed.

  17. Identification, occurrence and activity of quinazoline alkaloids in Peganum harmala.

    PubMed

    Herraiz, Tomás; Guillén, Hugo; Arán, Vicente J; Salgado, Antonio

    2017-05-01

    Peganum harmala L. is a medicinal plant from the Mediterranean region and Asia currently used for recreative psychoactive purposes (Ayahuasca analogue), and increasingly involved in toxic cases. Its psychopharmacological and toxicological properties are attributed to quinazoline and β-carboline alkaloids. In this work three major quinazoline alkaloids were isolated from P. harmala extracts and characterized as peganine (vasicine), deoxypeganine (deoxyvasicine) and a novel compound identified by HPLC-DAD-MS and NMR as peganine β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1 → 6)-β-d-glucopyranoside (peganine glycoside). Peganine appeared in flowers and leaves in high levels; high amounts of deoxypeganine and peganine were found in immature and green fruits whereas peganine and peganine glycoside accumulated in high amount in dry seeds reaching up to 1 and 3.9% (w/w), respectively. Roots and stems contained low amount of quinazolines. Seeds extracts containing both quinazoline and β-carboline alkaloids potently inhibited human monoamine oxidase (MAO)-A. However, quinazoline alkaloids did not contribute to MAO inhibition that was due to β-carbolines, suggesting that MAO-related psychoactive or toxic actions do not arise from quinazolines. Quinazoline alkaloids were poor radical scavengers in the ABTS assay whereas seed extracts had good activity. Quinazoline alkaloids are known to exert bronchodilator and abortifacient actions, and could contribute to such effects reported in P. harmala.

  18. Beta-carboline and quinoline alkaloids in root cultures and intact plants of Peganum harmala.

    PubMed

    Zayed, Rawin; Wink, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Alkaloid profiles of root and shoot cultures, seedlings and mature plants were analysed by capillary GLC and GLC-MS. beta-Carboline alkaloids, such as harmine, harmaline dominate in normal and root cultures transformed by Agrobacterium rhizogenes, as well as in roots and fruits of the plant. In shoots, flowers and shoot cultures quinoline alkaloids such as peganine, deoxypeganine, vasicinone and deoxyvasicinone widely replace the beta-carboline alkaloids. In root cultures, the formation of beta-carboline alkaloids can be induced by methyljasmonate and several other elicitors indicating that these alkaloids are part of the reactive chemical defence system of Peganum harmala.

  19. Alkaloids and athlete immune function: caffeine, theophylline, gingerol, ephedrine, and their congeners.

    PubMed

    Senchina, David S; Hallam, Justus E; Kohut, Marian L; Nguyen, Norah A; Perera, M Ann d N

    2014-01-01

    Plant alkaloids are found in foods, beverages, and supplements consumed by athletes for daily nutrition, performance enhancement, and immune function improvement. This paper examined possible immunomodulatory roles of alkaloids in exercise contexts, with a focus on human studies. Four representative groups were scrutinized: (a) caffeine (guaranine, mateine); (b) theophylline and its isomers, theobromine and paraxanthine; (c) ginger alkaloids including gingerols and shogaol; and (d) ephedra alkaloids such as ephedrine and pseudoephedrine. Emerging or prospective alkaloid sources (Goji berry, Noni berry, and bloodroot) were also considered. Human in vitro and in vivo studies on alkaloids and immune function were often conflicting. Caffeine may be immunomodulatory in vivo depending on subject characteristics, exercise characteristics, and immune parameters measured. Caffeine may exhibit antioxidant capacities. Ginger may exert in vivo anti-inflammatory effects in certain populations, but it is unclear whether these effects are due to alkaloids or other biochemicals. Evidence for an immunomodulatory role of alkaloids in energy drinks, cocoa, or ephedra products in vivo is weak to nonexistent. For alkaloid sources derived from plants, variability in the reviewed studies may be due to the presence of unrecognized alkaloids or non-alkaloid compounds (which may themselves be immunomodulatory), and pre-experimental factors such as agricultural or manufacturing differences. Athletes should not look to alkaloids or alkaloid-rich sources as a means of improving immune function given their inconsistent activities, safety concerns, and lack of commercial regulation.

  20. Regulation of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-Iα) gene expression by the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC-1) isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Sadana, Prabodh; Zhang, Yi; Song, Shulan; Cook, George A.; Elam, Marshall B.; Park, Edwards A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivators (PGC-1) have important roles in mitochondrial biogenesis and metabolic control in a variety of tissues. There are multiple isoforms of PGC-1 including PGC-1α and PGC-1β. Both the PGC-1α and β isoforms promote mitochondrial biogenesis and fatty acid oxidation, but only PGC-1α stimulates gluconeogenesis in the liver. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-I) is a key enzyme regulating mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. In these studies, we determined that PGC-1β stimulated expression of the “liver” isoform of CPT-I (CPT-Iα) but that PGC-1β did not induce pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4) which is a regulator of pyruvate metabolism. The CPT-Iα gene is induced by thyroid hormone. We found that T3 increased the expression of PGC-1β and that PGC-1β enhanced the T3 induction of CPT-Iα. The thyroid hormone receptor interacts with PGC-1β in a ligand dependent manner. Unlike PGC-1α, the interaction of PGC-1β and the T3 receptor does not occur exclusively through the leucine-X-X-leucine-leucine motif in PGC-1β. We have found that PGC-1β is associated with the CPT-Iα gene in vivo. Overall, our results demonstrate that PGC-1β is a coactivator in the T3 induction of CPT-Iα and that PGC-1β has similarities and differences with the PGC-1α isoform. PMID:17239528

  1. Liquid chromatographic analysis of cinchona alkaloids in beverages.

    PubMed

    Horie, Masao; Oishi, Mitsuo; Ishikawa, Fusako; Shindo, Tetsuya; Yasui, Akiko; Ogino, Shuzo; Ito, Koichi

    2006-01-01

    A method for the determination of Cinchona extract (whose main components are the alkaloids cinchonine, cinchonidine, quinidine, and quinine) in beverages by liquid chromatography was developed. A beverage with an alcohol content of more than 10% was loaded onto an OASIS HLB solid-phase extraction cartridge, after it was adjusted to pH 10 with 28% ammonium hydroxide. Other beverages were centrifuged at 4000 rpm for 5 min, and the supernatant was loaded onto the cartridge. The cartridge was washed with water followed by 15% methanol, and the Cinchona alkaloids were eluted with methanol. The Cinchona alkaloids in the eluate were chromatographed on an L-column ODS (4.6 mm id x 150 mm) with methanol and 20 mmol/L potassium dihydrogen phosphate (3 + 7) as the mobile phase. Cinchona alkaloids were monitored with an ultraviolet (UV) detector at 230 nm, and with a fluorescence detector at 405 nm for cinchonine and cinchonidine and 450 nm for quinidine and quinine (excitation at 235 nm). The calibration curves for Cinchona alkaloids with the UV detector showed good linearity in the range of 2-400 microg/mL. The detection limit of each Cinchona alkaloid, taken to be the concentration at which the absorption spectrum could be identified, was 2 microg/mL. The recovery of Cinchona alkaloids added at a level of 100 microg/g to various kinds of beverages was 87.6-96.5%, and the coefficients of variation were less than 3.3%. A number of beverage samples, some labeled to contain bitter substances, were analyzed by the proposed method. Quinine was detected in 2 samples of carbonated beverage.

  2. Search for CPT and Lorentz Violation in B0-B0bar Oscillations with Inclusive Dilepton Events

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-09-26

    We report preliminary results of a search for CPT and Lorentz violation in B{sup 0}-{bar B}{sup 0} oscillations using an inclusive dilepton sample collected by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II B Factory. Using a sample of 232 million B{bar B} pairs, we search for time-dependent variations in the complex CPT parameter z = z{sub 0} +z{sub 1} cos ({Omega}{cflx t} + {phi}) where {Omega} is the Earth's sidereal frequency and {cflx t} is sidereal time. We measure Imz{sub 0} = (-14.1 {+-} 7.3(stat.) {+-} 2.4(syst.)) x 10{sup -3}, {Delta}{Lambda} x Rez{sub 0} = (-7.2 {+-} 4.1(stat.) {+-} 2.1(syst.)) x 10{sup -3} ps{sup -1}, Im z{sub 1} = (-24.0 {+-} 10.7(stat.) {+-} 5.9(syst.)) x 10{sup -3}, and {Delta}{Lambda} x Re z{sub 1} = (-18.8 {+-} 5.5(stat.) {+-} 4.0(syst.)) x 10{sup -3} ps{sup -1}, where {Delta}{Lambda} is the difference between the decay rates of the neutral B mass eigenstates. The statistical correlation between the measurements of Imz{sub 0} and {Delta}{Lambda} x Rez{sub 0} is 76%; between Imz{sub 1} and {Delta}{Lambda} x Rez{sub 1} it is 79%. These results are used to evaluate expressions involving coefficients for Lorentz and CPT violation in the general Lorentz-violating standard-model extension. In a complementary approach, we examine the spectral power of periodic variations in z over a wide range of frequencies and find no significant signal.

  3. Virtual-reality-based attention assessment of ADHD: ClinicaVR: Classroom-CPT versus a traditional continuous performance test.

    PubMed

    Neguț, Alexandra; Jurma, Anda Maria; David, Daniel

    2016-06-03

    Virtual-reality-based assessment may be a good alternative to classical or computerized neuropsychological assessment due to increased ecological validity. ClinicaVR: Classroom-CPT (VC) is a neuropsychological test embedded in virtual reality that is designed to assess attention deficits in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or other conditions associated with impaired attention. The present study aimed to (1) investigate the diagnostic validity of VC in comparison to a traditional continuous performance test (CPT), (2) explore the task difficulty of VC, (3) address the effect of distractors on the performance of ADHD participants and typically-developing (TD) controls, and (4) compare the two measures on cognitive absorption. A total of 33 children diagnosed with ADHD and 42 TD children, aged between 7 and 13 years, participated in the study and were tested with a traditional CPT or with VC, along with several cognitive measures and an adapted version of the Cognitive Absorption Scale. A mixed multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) revealed that the children with ADHD performed worse on correct responses had more commissions and omissions errors than the TD children, as well as slower target reaction times . The results showed significant differences between performance in the virtual environment and the traditional computerized one, with longer reaction times in virtual reality. The data analysis highlighted the negative influence of auditory distractors on attention performance in the case of the children with ADHD, but not for the TD children. Finally, the two measures did not differ on the cognitive absorption perceived by the children.

  4. Bovine lateral saphenous veins exposed to ergopeptine alkaloids do not relax

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ergot alkaloid ergovaline has demonstrated a persistent and sustained contractile response in several different vascular models. It was hypothesized that different alkaloids isolated from tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum) will contribute to this contractile response differently. The objective wa...

  5. Bovine lateral saphenous veins exposed to ergopeptine alkaloids do not relax

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ergot alkaloid, ergovaline has demonstrated a persistent binding and sustained contractile response in several vascular models. It was hypothesized that different alkaloids isolated from tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum) will contribute to this response differently. The objective was to compare ...

  6. Alkaloids of the Annonaceae: occurrence and a compilation of their biological activities.

    PubMed

    Lúcio, Ana Silvia Suassuna Carneiro; Almeida, Jackson Roberto Guedes da Silva; Da-Cunha, Emídio Vasconcelos Leitão; Tavares, Josean Fechine; Barbosa Filho, Jos Maria

    2015-01-01

    This chapter presents an overview of the chemistry and pharmacology of the alkaloids found in species of the Annonaceae family. The occurrence of alkaloids from Annonaceae species, as well as their chemical structures and pharmacological activities are summarized in informative and easy-to-understand tables. Within the Annonaceae family, the genera Annona, Duguetia, and Guatteria have led to many important publications. Valuable and comprehensive information about the structure of these alkaloids is provided. The alkaloids of the aporphine type represent the predominant group in this family. Many of the isolated alkaloids exhibit unique structures. In addition to the chemical structures, the pharmacological activities of some alkaloids are also presented in this chapter. Thus, the leishmanicidal, antimicrobial, antitumor, cytotoxic, and antimalarial activities observed for these alkaloids are highlighted. The chapter is presented as a contribution for the scientific community, mainly to enable the search for alkaloids in species belonging to the Annonaceae family.

  7. Exact Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation for a Dirac spinor in torsion and other CPT and Lorentz violating backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Goncalves, Bruno; Shapiro, Ilya L.; Obukhov, Yuri N.

    2009-12-15

    We discuss the possibility to perform and use the exact Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation (EFWT) for the Dirac spinor coupled to different CPT and Lorentz violating terms. The classification of such terms is performed, selecting those of them which admit EFWT. For the particular example of an axial vector field, which can be associated with the completely antisymmetric torsion, we construct an explicit EFWT in the case when only a timelike component of this axial vector is present. In the cases when EFWT is not possible, one can still use the corresponding technique for deriving the perturbative Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation, as is illustrated in a particular example in the Appendix.

  8. Cpt1a gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells as an early biomarker of diet-related metabolic alterations

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Rúa, Rubén; Palou, Andreu; Oliver, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Background Research on biomarkers that provide early information about the development of future metabolic alterations is an emerging discipline. Gene expression analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) is a promising tool to identify subjects at risk of developing diet-related diseases. Objective We analysed PBMC expression of key energy homeostasis-related genes in a time-course analysis in order to find out early markers of metabolic alterations due to sustained intake of high-fat (HF) and high-protein (HP) diets. Design We administered HF and HP diets (4 months) to adult Wistar rats in isocaloric conditions to a control diet, mainly to avoid overweight associated with the intake of hyperlipidic diets and, thus, to be able to characterise markers of metabolically obese normal-weight (MONW) syndrome. PBMC samples were collected at different time points of dietary treatment and expression of relevant energy homeostatic genes analysed by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Serum parameters related with metabolic syndrome, as well as fat deposition in liver, were also analysed. Results The most outstanding results were those obtained for the expression of the lipolytic gene carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a (Cpt1a). Cpt1a expression in PBMC increased after only 1 month of exposure to both unbalanced diets, and this increased expression was maintained thereafter. Interestingly, in the case of the HF diet, Cpt1a expression was altered even in the absence of increased body weight but correlated with alterations such as higher insulin resistance, alteration of serum lipid profile and, particularly, increased fat deposition in liver, a feature characteristic of metabolic syndrome, which was even observed in animals fed with HP diet. Conclusions We propose Cpt1a gene expression analysis in PBMC as an early biomarker of metabolic alterations associated with MONW phenotype due to the intake of isocaloric HF diets, as well as a marker of

  9. Dehydropyrrolizidine Alkaloid Toxicity, Cytotoxicity, and Carcinogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Stegelmeier, Bryan L.; Colegate, Steven M.; Brown, Ammon W.

    2016-01-01

    Dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloid (DHPA)-producing plants have a worldwide distribution amongst flowering plants and commonly cause poisoning of livestock, wildlife, and humans. Previous work has produced considerable understanding of DHPA metabolism, toxicity, species susceptibility, conditions, and routes of exposure, and pathogenesis of acute poisoning. Intoxication is generally caused by contaminated grains, feed, flour, and breads that result in acute, high-dose, short-duration poisoning. Acute poisoning produces hepatic necrosis that is usually confirmed histologically, epidemiologically, and chemically. Less is known about chronic poisoning that may result when plant populations are sporadic, used as tisanes or herbal preparations, or when DHPAs contaminate milk, honey, pollen, or other animal-derived products. Such subclinical exposures may contribute to the development of chronic disease in humans or may be cumulative and probably slowly progress until liver failure. Recent work using rodent models suggest increased neoplastic incidence even with very low DHPA doses of short durations. These concerns have moved some governments to prohibit or limit human exposure to DHPAs. The purpose of this review is to summarize some recent DHPA research, including in vitro and in vivo DHPA toxicity and carcinogenicity reports, and the implications of these findings with respect to diagnosis and prognosis for human and animal health. PMID:27916846

  10. Synthesis of Morphinan Alkaloids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Fossati, Elena; Narcross, Lauren; Ekins, Andrew; Falgueyret, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Vincent J J

    2015-01-01

    Morphinan alkaloids are the most powerful narcotic analgesics currently used to treat moderate to severe and chronic pain. The feasibility of morphinan synthesis in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae starting from the precursor (R,S)-norlaudanosoline was investigated. Chiral analysis of the reticuline produced by the expression of opium poppy methyltransferases showed strict enantioselectivity for (S)-reticuline starting from (R,S)-norlaudanosoline. In addition, the P. somniferum enzymes salutaridine synthase (PsSAS), salutaridine reductase (PsSAR) and salutaridinol acetyltransferase (PsSAT) were functionally co-expressed in S. cerevisiae and optimization of the pH conditions allowed for productive spontaneous rearrangement of salutaridinol-7-O-acetate and synthesis of thebaine from (R)-reticuline. Finally, we reconstituted a 7-gene pathway for the production of codeine and morphine from (R)-reticuline. Yeast cell feeding assays using (R)-reticuline, salutaridine or codeine as substrates showed that all enzymes were functionally co-expressed in yeast and that activity of salutaridine reductase and codeine-O-demethylase likely limit flux to morphine synthesis. The results of this study describe a significant advance for the synthesis of morphinans in S. cerevisiae and pave the way for their complete synthesis in recombinant microbes.

  11. Synthesis of Morphinan Alkaloids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Fossati, Elena; Narcross, Lauren; Ekins, Andrew; Falgueyret, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Vincent J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Morphinan alkaloids are the most powerful narcotic analgesics currently used to treat moderate to severe and chronic pain. The feasibility of morphinan synthesis in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae starting from the precursor (R,S)-norlaudanosoline was investigated. Chiral analysis of the reticuline produced by the expression of opium poppy methyltransferases showed strict enantioselectivity for (S)-reticuline starting from (R,S)-norlaudanosoline. In addition, the P. somniferum enzymes salutaridine synthase (PsSAS), salutaridine reductase (PsSAR) and salutaridinol acetyltransferase (PsSAT) were functionally co-expressed in S. cerevisiae and optimization of the pH conditions allowed for productive spontaneous rearrangement of salutaridinol-7-O-acetate and synthesis of thebaine from (R)-reticuline. Finally, we reconstituted a 7-gene pathway for the production of codeine and morphine from (R)-reticuline. Yeast cell feeding assays using (R)-reticuline, salutaridine or codeine as substrates showed that all enzymes were functionally co-expressed in yeast and that activity of salutaridine reductase and codeine-O-demethylase likely limit flux to morphine synthesis. The results of this study describe a significant advance for the synthesis of morphinans in S. cerevisiae and pave the way for their complete synthesis in recombinant microbes. PMID:25905794

  12. Novel Regulation of the Synthesis of α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic Acid (AMPA) Receptor Subunit GluA1 by Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1C (CPT1C) in the Hippocampus*

    PubMed Central

    Fadó, Rut; Soto, David; Miñano-Molina, Alfredo J.; Pozo, Macarena; Carrasco, Patricia; Yefimenko, Natalia; Rodríguez-Álvarez, José; Casals, Núria

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of AMPA-type receptor (AMPAR) abundance in the postsynaptic membrane is an important mechanism involved in learning and memory formation. Recent data suggest that one of the constituents of the AMPAR complex is carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C (CPT1C), a brain-specific isoform located in the endoplasmic reticulum of neurons. Previous results had demonstrated that CPT1C deficiency disrupted spine maturation in hippocampal neurons and impaired spatial learning, but the role of CPT1C in AMPAR physiology had remained mostly unknown. In the present study, we show that CPT1C binds GluA1 and GluA2 and that the three proteins have the same expression profile during neuronal maturation. Moreover, in hippocampal neurons of CPT1C KO mice, AMPAR-mediated miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents and synaptic levels of AMPAR subunits GluA1 and GluA2 are significantly reduced. We show that AMPAR expression is dependent on CPT1C levels because total protein levels of GluA1 and GluA2 are decreased in CPT1C KO neurons and are increased in CPT1C-overexpressing neurons, whereas other synaptic proteins remain unaltered. Notably, mRNA levels of AMPARs remained unchanged in those cultures, indicating that CPT1C is post-transcriptionally involved. We demonstrate that CPT1C is directly involved in the de novo synthesis of GluA1 and not in protein degradation. Moreover, in CPT1C KO cultured neurons, GluA1 synthesis after chemical long term depression was clearly diminished, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor treatment was unable to phosphorylate the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and stimulate GluA1 protein synthesis. These data newly identify CPT1C as a regulator of AMPAR translation efficiency and therefore also synaptic function in the hippocampus. PMID:26338711

  13. Diterpene alkaloids with an aza-ent-kaurane skeleton from Isodon rubescens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu; Yang, Jing; Wang, Wei-Guang; Li, Yan; Wu, Ji-Zhou; Pu, Jian-Xin; Sun, Han-Dong

    2015-02-27

    Two compounds belonging to a new group of diterpene alkaloids, kaurines A and B (1 and 2), and an alkaloid bearing a succinimide moiety (3) were obtained from Isodon rubescens. Their structures and absolute configurations were determined by spectroscopy and quantum-chemical computational (13)C NMR and ECD data analysis. These alkaloids differ from known diterpene alkaloids and diterpenoids and are presumably biosynthesized from ent-kaurane diterpenoids.

  14. Micelle assisted structural conversion with fluorescence modulation of benzophenanthridine alkaloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Ankur Bikash; Bhuiya, Sutanwi; Haque, Lucy; Tiwari, Richa; Das, Suman

    2017-01-01

    In this study we have reported the anionic surfactant (Sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS) driven structural conversion of two benzophenanthridine plant alkaloids namely Chelerythrine (herein after CHL) and Sanguinarine (herein after SANG). Both the alkaloids exist in two forms: the charged iminium and the neutral alkanolamine form. The iminium form is stable at low pH (< 6.5) and the alkanolamine form exists at higher pH (> 10.1). The fluorescence intensity of the alkanolamine form is much stronger than the iminium form. The iminium form of both the alkaloids remains stable whereas the alkanolamine form gets converted to the iminium form in the SDS micelle environment. The iminium form possesses positive charge and it seems that electrostatic interaction between the positively charged iminium and negatively charged surfactant leads to the stabilization of the iminium form in the Stern layer of the anionic micelle. Whereas the conversion of the alkanolamine form into the iminium form takes place and that can be monitored in naked eye since the iminium form is orange in colour and the alkanolamine form has blue violet emission. Such a detail insight about the photophysical properties of the benzophenanthridine alkaloids would be a valuable addition in the field of alkaloid-surfactant interaction.

  15. 6,7-diepicastanospermine, a tetrahydroxyindolizidine alkaloid inhibitor of amyloglucosidase

    SciTech Connect

    Molyneux, R.J.; Benson, M. ); Pan, Y.T.; Tropea, J.E.; Kaushal, G.P.; Elbein, A.D. )

    1991-10-15

    A tetrahydroxyindolizidine alkaloid, 6,7-diepicastanospermine, was isolated from the seeds of Castanospermum australe by extraction with methanol and purified to homogeneity using ion-exchange, preparative thin-layer, and radial chromatography. A very low yield of a pyrrolidine alkaloid, N-(hydroxyethyl)-2-(hydroxymethyl)-3-hydroxypyrrolidine, was also obtained by analogous methods. The purity of both alkaloids was established by gas chromatography of their trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivatives as better than 99%. The molecular weight of each alkaloid was established as 189 and 161, respectively, by mass spectrometry, and the structure of each was deduced from their {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectra. The structure of the pyrrolidine alkaloids which co-occur in C. australe. 6,7-Diepicastanospermine was found to be a moderately good inhibitor of the fungal {alpha}-glucosidase, amyloglucosidase and a relatively weak inhibitor of {beta}-glucosidase. It failed to inhibit {alpha}-glucosidase. It failed to inhibit {alpha}- or {beta}-galactosidase, {alpha}- or {beta}-mannosidase, or {alpha}-L-fucosidase. Comparison of its inhibitory activity toward amyloglucosidase with those of its isomers, castanospermine and 6-epicastanospermine, demonstrated that epimerization of a single hydroxyl group can produce significant alteration of such inhibitory properties.

  16. [A case of drug-induced interstitial pneumonia caused by S-1 and CPT-11 combination therapy for advanced colon cancer].

    PubMed

    Kuga, Yoshio; Tanaka, Tomotaka; Okanobu, Hideharu; Arita, Michinori; Yoshimi, Satoshi; Miwata, Tomohiro; Fujino, Hatsue; Moriya, Takashi; Ohya, Toshihide

    2011-03-01

    The patient was a 77-year-old woman admitted for nausea and abdominal pain. Computed tomography (CT) revealed advanced ascending colon cancer with liver metastasis. After operation, we started combination chemotherapy of S-1 and irinotecan (CPT-11); S-1(80 mg/m²) administered orally for consecutive days followed by 14 days rest.CPT -11 (100 mg/m²) was given as a 2-hour infusion on day 1 and 15. The patient complained of high fever and subsequent dyspnea with severe hypoxemia after the first course of combination chemotherapy of S-1 and CPT-11.CT scan showed diffuse interstitial lesions with ground glass opacity on both lungs. Steroid pulse therapy with oxygen therapy remarkably improved her symptoms, and abnormal findings on CT scan also resolved. Drug lymphocyte stimulation test was positive against S-1 and negative against CPT-11. These findings were consistent with S-1-induced lung injury. Drug -induced pneumonia needs to be considered in the differential diagnosis when patients treated with S-1 and CPT-11 combination therapy present high fever and dyspnea.

  17. [Evaluation of combination chemotherapy with 5-FU, CDDP and CPT-11 for human gastric carcinoma transplanted into nude mice - comparative study of in vivo chemosensitivity test].

    PubMed

    Kanamori, Noriaki; Fujii, Masashi; Kochi, Mitsugu; Kaiga, Teruo; Takahashi, Tohru; Takayama, Tadatoshi

    2007-06-01

    We performed in vivo chemosensitivity tests on human gastric carcinoma. To evaluate the efficacy of some combined chemotherapy for human gastric carcinoma maintained in the subcutaneous space in nude mice, we designed the following six experimental groups: 1) 5-FU group, 2) CDDP group, 3) CPT-11 group, 4) combined therapy group of 5-FU and CDDP, 5) combined therapy group of 5-FU and CPT-11, and 6) combined therapy group of CPT-11 and CDDP. An in vivo nude mice assay was performed. Histopathological changes of the tumors in nude mice, treated with anti-cancer agents,were also evaluated and compared to the results of the nude mice assay. Based on histopathological grading,the true positive rate of the nude mice assay was 0%, the true negative rate was 83.3%, and the accuracy rate was 83.3%. CPT-11 appeared to be highly efficacious when given in combination with CDDP in human gastric cancer cell lines. These results suggest that combination chemotherapy with CPT-11 and CDDP is clinically effective for gastric cancer patients.

  18. Identification and quantification of isoquinoline alkaloids in the genus Sarcocapnos by GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Suau, R; Cabezudo, B; Valpuesta, M; Posadas, N; Diaz, A; Torres, G

    2005-01-01

    Six cularine alkaloids, cularicine, O-methylcularicine, celtisine, cularidine, cularine and celtine, three isocularine alkaloids, sarcophylline, sarcocapnine and sarcocapnidine, and five non-cularine alkaloids, glaucine, protopine, ribasine, dihydrosanguinarine and chelidonine, were identified and quantified by GC-MS in nine taxa of the genus Sarcocapnos (Fumariaceae). The chemotaxonomic significance of the results is discussed.

  19. The serum concentrations of lupine alkaloids in orally-dosed Holstein cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Teratogenic alkaloid-containing Lupinus spp. cause significant losses to the cattle industry. Previous research has suggested that Holstein cattle clear toxic Delphinium alkaloids from their serum at a greater rate than beef cattle. The toxicokinetics of lupine alkaloids in Holsteins are not known...

  20. HPTLC and GC/MS Study of Amaryllidaceae Alkaloids of Two Narcissus Species.

    PubMed

    Shawky, Eman; Abou-Donia, Amina H; Darwish, Fikria A; Toaima, Soad M; Takla, Sarah S; Pigni, Natalia B; Bastida, Jaume

    2015-08-01

    In this article, we report on the alkaloid profile and dynamic of alkaloid content and diversity in two Narcissus plants at different stages of development. The alkaloid profile of the two Narcissus species was investigated by GC/MS and HPTLC. Fifty eight Amaryllidaceae alkaloids were detected, and 25 of them were identified in the different organs of N. tazetta and N. papyraceus. The alkaloid 3-O-methyl-9-O-demethylmaritidine is tentatively identified here for the first time from the Amaryllidaceae family, and four alkaloids (tazettamide, sternbergine, 1-O-acetyllycorine, 2,11-didehydro-2-dehydroxylycorine) are tentatively identified for the first time in the genus Narcissus. The different organs of the two species analyzed showed remarkable differences in their alkaloid pattern, type of biosynthesis, main alkaloid and number of alkaloids. Lycorine-type alkaloids dominated the alkaloid, metabolism in N. papyraceus, while alkaloids of narciclasine-, galanthamine- and homolycorine-types were found only in the species N. tazetta L.

  1. Pyrrolizidine alkaloid-derived DNA adducts as a common biological biomarker of pyrrolizidine alkaloid-induced tumorigenicity.

    PubMed

    Xia, Qingsu; Zhao, Yuewei; Von Tungeln, Linda S; Doerge, Daniel R; Lin, Ge; Cai, Lining; Fu, Peter P

    2013-09-16

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloid-containing plants are the most common poisonous plants affecting livestock, wildlife, and humans. The U.S. National Toxicology Program (NTP) classified riddelliine, a tumorigenic pyrrolizidine alkaloid, as "reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen" in the NTP 12th Report on Carcinogens in 2011. We previously determined that four DNA adducts were formed in rats dosed with riddelliine. The structures of the four DNA adducts were elucidated as (i) a pair of epimers of 7-hydroxy-9-(deoxyguanosin-N(2)-yl)dehydrosupinidine adducts (termed as DHP-dG-3 and DHP-dG-4) as the predominant adducts; and (ii) a pair of epimers of 7-hydroxy-9-(deoxyadenosin-N(6)-yl)dehydrosupinidine adducts (termed as DHP-dA-3 and DHP-dA-4 adducts). In this study, we selected a nontumorigenic pyrrolizidine alkaloid, platyphylliine, a pyrrolizidine alkaloid N-oxide, riddelliine N-oxide, and nine tumorigenic pyrrolizidine alkaloids (riddelliine, retrorsine, monocrotaline, lycopsamine, retronecine, lasiocarpine, heliotrine, clivorine, and senkirkine) for study in animals. Seven of the nine tumorigenic pyrrolizidine alkaloids, with the exception of lycopsamine and retronecine, are liver carcinogens. At 8-10 weeks of age, female F344 rats were orally gavaged for 3 consecutive days with 4.5 and 24 μmol/kg body weight test article in 0.5 mL of 10% DMSO in water. Twenty-four hours after the last dose, the rats were sacrificed, livers were removed, and liver DNA was isolated for DNA adduct analysis. DHP-dG-3, DHP-dG-4, DHP-dA-3, and DHP-dA-4 adducts were formed in the liver of rats treated with the individual seven hepatocarcinogenic pyrrolizidine alkaloids and riddelliine N-oxide. These DNA adducts were not formed in the liver of rats administered retronecine, the nontumorigenic pyrrolizidine alkaloid, platyphylliine, or vehicle control. These results indicate that this set of DNA adducts, DHP-dG-3, DHP-dG-4, DHP-dA-3, and DHP-dA-4, is a common biological biomarker of

  2. Effect of alkaloids isolated from Amaryllidaceae on herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Renard-Nozaki, J; Kim, T; Imakura, Y; Kihara, M; Kobayashi, S

    1989-01-01

    Studies were carried out on the effects of Amaryllidaceae alkaloids and their derivatives upon herpes simplex virus (type 1), the relationship between their structure and antiviral activity and the mechanism of this activity. All alkaloids used in these experiments were biosynthesized from N-benzylphenethylamine; the apogalanthamine group was synthesized in our laboratory; those which may eventually prove to be antiviral agents had a hexahydroindole ring with two functional hydroxyl groups. Benzazepine compounds were neither cytotoxic nor antiviral, but many structures containing dibenzazocine were toxic at low concentrations. It was established that the antiviral activity of alkaloids is due to the inhibition of multiplication and not to the direct inactivation of extracellular viruses. The mechanism of the antiviral effect could be partly explained as a blocking of viral DNA polymerase activity.

  3. Quinolizidine alkaloids from the curare adjuvant Clathrotropis glaucophylla.

    PubMed

    Sagen, Anne Lise; Gertsch, Jürg; Becker, Rita; Heilmann, Jörg; Sticher, Otto

    2002-12-01

    The bark of Clathrotropis glaucophylla (Fabaceae) is used as admixture of curare arrow poison by the Yanomami; Amerindians in Venezuela. A new quinolizidine alkaloid (QA), (-)-13alpha-hydroxy-15alpha-(1-hydroxyethyl)-anagyrine [(-)-clathrotropine], was isolated from the alkaloid extract of C. glaucophylla bark, together with eleven known QAs: (-)-anagyrine, (-)-thermopsine, (-)-baptifoline, (-)-epibaptifoline, (-)-rhombifoline, (-)-tinctorine, (-)-cytisine, (-)-N-methylcytisine, (-)-lupanine, (-)-6alpha-hydroxylupanine and (+)-5,6-dehydrolupanine. The isolation and structure elucidation were performed with the aid of chromatographic (TLC, HPLC and CC) and spectroscopic (UV and 1D/2D NMR) methods, and mass spectrometry. To our knowledge, this is the first time quinolizidine alkaloids have been isolated from an arrow poison ingredient. It is also the first report on Clathrotropis species being used for preparation of arrow poison.

  4. In vitro production of alkaloids: Factors, approaches, challenges and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Sayeed; Garg, Madhukar; Tamboli, Ennus Tajuddin; Abdin, M. Z.; Ansari, S. H.

    2013-01-01

    The wide diversity of plant secondary metabolites is largely used for the production of various pharmaceutical compounds. In vitro cell tissue or organ culture has been employed as a possible alternative to produce such industrial compounds. Tissue culture techniques provide continuous, reliable, and renewable source of valuable plant pharmaceuticals and might be used for the large-scale culture of the plant cells from which these secondary metabolites can be extracted. Alkaloids are one of the most important secondary metabolites known to play a vital role in various pharmaceutical applications leading to an increased commercial importance in recent years. The tissue culture techniques may be utilized to improve their production of alkaloids via somaclonal variations and genetic transformations. The focus of this review is toward the application of different tissue culture methods/techniques employed for the in vitro production of alkaloids with a systematic approach to improve their production. PMID:23922453

  5. Nonaqueous CE ESI-IT-MS analysis of Amaryllidaceae alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yulin; Chen, Zilin

    2013-03-01

    The Amaryllidaceae are widely distributed medical plants. Lycorine, lycoramine, lycoremine, and lycobetaine are the major active alkaloids in Amaryllidaceae plants. A nonaqueous CE ESI-IT-MS method for separation, identification, and quantification of the Amaryllidaceae alkaloids has been developed. The MS(1-3) behavior has been studied and the fragmentation pathways of main fragment ions have been proposed. The effects of several factors such as composition and concentration of buffer, applied voltage, composition, and flow rate of the sheath liquid, nebulizing gas pressure, flow rate, and temperature of drying gas were investigated. Under the optimal conditions, the linear concentration range of these compounds was wide with the correlation coefficient (R(2) ) >0.99. RSDs of migration time and peak areas were <10%. The LODs were <240 ng/mL. The proposed method can be successfully applied to the determination of the related alkaloids in the Lycoris radiata roots.

  6. beta-Carboline alkaloids: biochemical and pharmacological functions.

    PubMed

    Cao, Rihui; Peng, Wenlie; Wang, Zihou; Xu, Anlong

    2007-01-01

    beta-Carboline alkaloids are a large group of natural and synthetic indole alkaloids with different degrees of aromaticity, some of which are widely distributed in nature, including various plants, foodstuffs, marine creatures, insects, mammalians as well as human tissues and body fluids. These compounds are of great interest due to their diverse biological activities. Particularly, these compounds have been shown to intercalate into DNA, to inhibit CDK, Topisomerase, and monoamine oxidase, and to interact with benzodiazepine receptors and 5-hydroxy serotonin receptors. Furthermore, these chemicals also demonstrated a broad spectrum of pharmacological properties including sedative, anxiolytic, hypnotic, anticonvulsant, antitumor, antiviral, antiparasitic as well as antimicrobial activities. In this review, we summerized the biochemical and pharmacological functions of beta-carboline alkaloids.

  7. The role of biocatalysis in the asymmetric synthesis of alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Alkaloids are not only one of the most intensively studied classes of natural products, their wide spectrum of pharmacological activities also makes them indispensable drug ingredients in both traditional and modern medicine. Among the methods for their production, biotechnological approaches are gaining importance, and biocatalysis has emerged as an essential tool in this context. A number of chemo-enzymatic strategies for alkaloid synthesis have been developed over the years, in which the biotransformations nowadays take an increasingly ‘central’ role. This review summarises different applications of biocatalysis in the asymmetric synthesis of alkaloids and discusses how recent developments and novel enzymes render innovative and efficient chemo-enzymatic production routes possible. PMID:25580241

  8. Phytochemical and biological investigations of Amaryllidaceae alkaloids: a review.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yan; Qu, Dan; Zhang, Kai-Mei; Cang, Xiao-Xin; Kou, Zi-Nong; Xiao, Wei; Zhu, Jing-Bo

    2017-01-01

    Amaryllidaceae is a family that includes 75 genera and about 1100 species, which have a long history of medicinal use. Many plants have been proven to possess efficacy for neurological injury and inflammatory conditions. This article summarizes 357 Amaryllidaceae alkaloids, and cites 166 174 references over the last three decades. These alkaloids are classified into 14 skeleton types, and their abundant sources are also included. Modern pharmacology studies demonstrate that alkaloids that exclusively occur in Amaryllidaceae plant possess wide-ranging pharmacological actions, especially effects on the central nervous system, as well as antitumor, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory activities. Effective monomeric compounds from Amaryllidaceae screened for pharmacological activity in vivo and in vitro are also summarized.

  9. Mechanistic insights to the cytotoxicity of Amaryllidaceae alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Nair, Jerald J; Rárová, Lucie; Strnad, Miroslav; Bastida, Jaume; van Staden, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    With over 500 individual compounds, the Amaryllidaceae alkaloids represent a large and structurally diverse group of phytochemicals. Coupled to this structural diversity is the significant array of biological properties manifested by many of its members, of which their relevance in motor neuron disease and cancer chemotherapy has attracted considerable attention. To this extent, galanthamine has evolved into a successful commercial drug for Alzheimer's disease since its approval by the FDA in 2001. Concurrently, there have been several positive indicators for the emergence of an anticancer drug from the Amaryllidaceae due to the potency of several of its representatives as cell line specific antiproliferative agents. In this regard, the phenanthridones such as pancratistatin and narciclasine have offered most promise since their advancement into clinical trials, following which there has been renewed interest in the cytotoxic properties of these alkaloids. Given this background, this review seeks to highlight the various mechanisms which have been invoked to corroborate the cytotoxic effects of Amaryllidaceae alkaloids.

  10. Aza-tryptamine substrates in monoterpene indole alkaloid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyang-Yeol; Yerkes, Nancy; O’Connor, Sarah E.

    2009-01-01

    Biosynthetic pathways can be hijacked to yield novel compounds by introduction of novel starting materials. Here we have altered tryptamine, which serves as the starting substrate for a variety of alkaloid biosynthetic pathways, by replacing the indole with one of four aza-indole isomers. We show that two aza-tryptamine substrates can be successfully incorporated into the products of the monoterpene indole alkaloid pathway in Catharanthus roseus. Use of unnatural heterocycles in precursor directed biosynthesis, in both microbial and plant natural product pathways, has not been widely demonstrated, and successful incorporation of starting substrate analogs containing the aza-indole functionality has not been previously reported. This work serves as a starting point to explore fermentation of aza-alkaloids from other tryptophan and tryptamine derived natural product pathways. PMID:20064432

  11. Aza-tryptamine substrates in monoterpene indole alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyang-Yeol; Yerkes, Nancy; O'Connor, Sarah E

    2009-12-24

    Biosynthetic pathways can be hijacked to yield novel compounds by introduction of novel starting materials. Here we have altered tryptamine, which serves as the starting substrate for a variety of alkaloid biosynthetic pathways, by replacing the indole with one of four aza-indole isomers. We show that two aza-tryptamine substrates can be successfully incorporated into the products of the monoterpene indole alkaloid pathway in Catharanthus roseus. Use of unnatural heterocycles in precursor-directed biosynthesis, in both microbial and plant natural product pathways, has not been widely demonstrated, and successful incorporation of starting substrate analogs containing the aza-indole functionality has not been previously reported. This work serves as a starting point to explore fermentation of aza-alkaloids from other tryptophan- and tryptamine-derived natural product pathways.

  12. Hydrofocusing Bioreactor Produces Anti-Cancer Alkaloids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Valluri, Jagan V.

    2011-01-01

    microgravitation of an HFB do not need to maintain the same surface forces as in normal Earth gravitation, they can divert more energy sources to growth and differentiation and, perhaps, to biosynthesis of greater quantities of desired medicinal compounds. Because one can adjust the HFB to vary effective gravitation, one can also test the effects of intermediate levels of gravitation on biosynthesis of various products. The potential utility of this methodology for producing drugs was demonstrated in experiments in which sandalwood and Madagascar periwinkle cells were grown in an HFB. The conditions in the HFB were chosen to induce the cells to form into aggregate cultures that produced anti-cancer indole alkaloids in amounts greater than do comparable numbers of cells of the same species cultured according to previously known methodologies. The observations made in these experiments were interpreted as suggesting that the aggregation of the cells might be responsible for the enhancement of production of alkaloids.

  13. Dracunculus medinensis and Schistosoma mansoni contain opiate alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Zhu, W; Baggerman, G; Secor, W Evan; Casares, F; Pryor, S C; Fricchione, G L; Ruiz-Tiben, E; Eberhard, M L; Bimi, L; Stefano, G B

    2002-04-01

    The results of analysis, by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrochemical detection and by nano-electrospray-ionization, double quadrupole/orthogonal-acceleration, time-of-flight mass spectrometry, indicate that adult Dracunculus medinensis and Schistosoma mansoni both contain the opiate alkaloid morphine and that D. medinesis also contains the active metabolite of morphine, morphine 6-glucuronide. From these and previous observations, it would appear that many helminths are probably using opiate alkaloids as potent immunosuppressive and antinociceptive signal molecules, to down-regulate immunosurveillance responsiveness and pain signalling in their hosts.

  14. Microbial Factories for the Production of Benzylisoquinoline Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Narcross, Lauren; Fossati, Elena; Bourgeois, Leanne; Dueber, John E; Martin, Vincent J J

    2016-03-01

    Benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs) are a family of ∼2500 alkaloids with both potential and realized pharmaceutical value, including most notably the opiates such as codeine and morphine. Only a few BIAs accumulate readily in plants, which limits the pharmaceutical potential of the family. Shifting BIA production to microbial sources could provide a scalable and flexible source of these compounds in the future. This review details the current status of microbial BIA synthesis and derivatization, including rapid developments in the past 6 months culminating in the synthesis of opioids from glucose in a microbial host.

  15. Chemiluminescence detection of opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Francis, Paul S; Adcock, Jacqui L; Costin, Jason W; Purcell, Stuart D; Pfeffer, Frederick M; Barnett, Neil W

    2008-11-04

    A review with 98 references. The determination of the opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) alkaloids and their semi-synthetic derivatives has important applications in industrial process monitoring, clinical analysis and forensic science. Liquid-phase chemiluminescence reagents such as tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) and acidic potassium permanganate exhibit remarkable sensitivity and complementary selectivity for many P. somniferum alkaloids, which has been exploited in the development of a range of analytical procedures using flow analysis, high-performance liquid chromatography, capillary electrophoresis and microfluidic instrumentation.

  16. Antitussive stemoninine alkaloids from the roots of Stemona tuberosa.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li-Gen; Li, Kan Man; Tang, Chun-Ping; Ke, Chang-Qiang; Rudd, John A; Lin, Ge; Ye, Yang

    2008-06-01

    Investigation of the roots of Stemona tuberosa afforded five minor constituents, stemoenonine (1), 9a- O-methylstemoenonine (2), oxystemoenonine (3), 1,9a- seco-stemoenonine (4), and oxystemoninine (5), along with the known compound stemoninoamide (6). Their structures were elucidated by 1D and 2D NMR spectra and other spectroscopic studies. Alkaloids 1, 2, and 6, as well as the representative stemoninine-type alkaloid, stemoninine (7), were screened for antitussive activity in the citric acid-induced guinea pig cough model. Compounds 6 and 7 exhibited strong antitussive activity after oral and intraperitoneal administrations.

  17. Alkaloid-derived molecules in low rank Argonne premium coals.

    SciTech Connect

    Winans, R. E.; Tomczyk, N. A.; Hunt, J. E.

    2000-11-30

    Molecules that are probably derived from alkaloids have been found in the extracts of the subbituminous and lignite Argonne Premium Coals. High resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LCMS) have been used to characterize pyridine and supercritical extracts. The supercritical extraction used an approach that has been successful for extracting alkaloids from natural products. The first indication that there might be these natural products in coals was the large number of molecules found containing multiple nitrogen and oxygen heteroatoms. These molecules are much less abundant in bituminous coals and absent in the higher rank coals.

  18. New cyclopeptide alkaloid and lignan glycoside from Justicia procumbens.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hong; Chen, Li; Tian, Ying; Li, Bin; Dong, Jun-Xing

    2015-01-01

    This study reported a new cyclopeptide alkaloid, justicianene A (1), and a new lignan glycoside, procumbenoside H (2), isolated from Justicia procumbens. The structures of the new compounds were elucidated by means of spectroscopic analysis, including extensive 2D NMR studies and mass spectrometry. Cyclopeptide alkaloids were first observed from the genus Justicia. Compound 2 was cytotoxic against human LoVo colon carcinoma cells with an IC50 value of 17.908 ± 1.949 μM.

  19. Recent Advances in the Synthesis of Morphine and Related Alkaloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chida, Noritaka

    Morphine, an alkaloid isolated from the opium poppy, has been widely used as an analgesic, and has been a fascinating synthetic target of organic chemists. After the first total synthesis reported in 1952, a number of synthetic studies toward morphine have been reported, and findings obtained in such studies have greatly contributed to the progress of synthetic organic chemistry as well as medicinal chemistry. This review provides an overview of recent studies toward the total synthesis of morphine and related alkaloids. Work reported in the literature since 2004 will be reviewed.

  20. New 14-Membered Cyclopeptide Alkaloids from Zizyphus oxyphylla Edgew

    PubMed Central

    Kaleem, Waqar Ahmad; Nisar, Muhammad; Qayum, Mughal; Zia-Ul-Haq, Muhammad; Adhikari, Achyut; De Feo, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Two new 14-membered cyclopeptide alkaloids, Oxyphylline B (4) and Oxyphylline C (5), along with three known 13-membered cyclopeptide alkaloids, were isolated from stem and roots of Zizyphus oxyphylla Edgew. The compounds were tested for antibacterial activity. Oxyphylline B (4) showed comparatively better antibacterial activities against Escherichia coli (MIC, 5 μg/mL) than other compounds. This compound also exhibited weak antimicrobial activities against Staphylococcus aureus (MIC, 25 μg/mL), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MIC, 50 μg/mL) and Salmonella typhi (MIC, 50 μg/mL). PMID:23109868

  1. New 14-membered cyclopeptide alkaloids from Zizyphus oxyphylla Edgew.

    PubMed

    Kaleem, Waqar Ahmad; Nisar, Muhammad; Qayum, Mughal; Zia-Ul-Haq, Muhammad; Adhikari, Achyut; De Feo, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Two new 14-membered cyclopeptide alkaloids, Oxyphylline B (4) and Oxyphylline C (5), along with three known 13-membered cyclopeptide alkaloids, were isolated from stem and roots of Zizyphus oxyphylla Edgew. The compounds were tested for antibacterial activity. Oxyphylline B (4) showed comparatively better antibacterial activities against Escherichia coli (MIC, 5 μg/mL) than other compounds. This compound also exhibited weak antimicrobial activities against Staphylococcus aureus (MIC, 25 μg/mL), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MIC, 50 μg/mL) and Salmonella typhi (MIC, 50 μg/mL).

  2. Side-Effects of Irinotecan (CPT-11), the Clinically Used Drug for Colon Cancer Therapy, Are Eliminated in Experimental Animals Treated with Latex Proteins from Calotropis procera (Apocynaceae).

    PubMed

    de Alencar, Nylane Maria Nunes; da Silveira Bitencourt, Flávio; de Figueiredo, Ingrid Samantha Tavares; Luz, Patrícia Bastos; Lima-Júnior, Roberto César P; Aragão, Karoline Sabóia; Magalhães, Pedro Jorge Caldas; de Castro Brito, Gerly Anne; Ribeiro, Ronaldo Albuquerque; de Freitas, Ana Paula Fragoso; Ramos, Marcio Viana

    2017-02-01

    Intestinal mucositis (IM) is the critical side effect of irinotecan (CPT-11), which is the front-line drug used for the treatment of colorectal cancer. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of latex proteins (LP) from Calotropis procera to prevent IM and diarrhea in animals. Swiss mice were treated daily with saline or LP (1, 5, or 50 mg/kg, i.v.) 24 h prior to CTP-11 (75 mg/kg/4 days, i.p) and for additional 6 days. Animal survival, body weight variation, and diarrhea were registered. After animal sacrifice (day 7 post first injection of CPT-11), intestinal samples were collected to study morphology and inflammatory parameters. Animals given LP exhibited improved parameters (survival, body weight, and absence of diarrhea) as compared with the CPT-11 control. The severity of IM observed in animals given CPT-11 was reduced in animals treated with LP. Treatment with LP also prevented the reduction in the villus/crypt ratio promoted by CPT-11. The rise in MPO activity and pro-inflammatory cytokines, over-contractility of the smooth muscle, and diarrhea were all abrogated in LP-treated mice. Markedly reduced immunostaining intensity for COX-2, TNF-α, IL-1β, iNOS, and NF-κB was observed in the intestinal tissue of animals treated with LP. The side-effects of CPT-11 were eliminated by LP treatment in experimental animals and improved clinical parameters characteristic of IM All known biochemical pathogenesis. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. First observation of quantum interference in the process ϕ→KK→ππππ: A test of quantum mechanics and CPT symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KLOE Collaboration; Ambrosino, F.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bacci, C.; Beltrame, P.; Bencivenni, G.; Bertolucci, S.; Bini, C.; Bloise, C.; Bocchetta, S.; Bocci, V.; Bossi, F.; Bowring, D.; Branchini, P.; Caloi, R.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Capussela, T.; Ceradini, F.; Chi, S.; Chiefari, G.; Ciambrone, P.; Conetti, S.; de Lucia, E.; de Santis, A.; de Simone, P.; de Zorzi, G.; Dell'Agnello, S.; Denig, A.; di Domenico, A.; di Donato, C.; di Falco, S.; di Micco, B.; Doria, A.; Dreucci, M.; Felici, G.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrer, M. L.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fiore, S.; Forti, C.; Franzini, P.; Gatti, C.; Gauzzi, P.; Giovannella, S.; Gorini, E.; Graziani, E.; Incagli, M.; Kluge, W.; Kulikov, V.; Lacava, F.; Lanfranchi, G.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Leone, D.; Martini, M.; Massarotti, P.; Mei, W.; Meola, S.; Miscetti, S.; Moulson, M.; Müller, S.; Murtas, F.; Napolitano, M.; Nguyen, F.; Palutan, M.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passeri, A.; Patera, V.; Perfetto, F.; Pontecorvo, L.; Primavera, M.; Santangelo, P.; Santovetti, E.; Saracino, G.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Scuri, F.; Sfiligoi, I.; Sibidanov, A.; Spadaro, T.; Testa, M.; Tortora, L.; Valente, P.; Valeriani, B.; Venanzoni, G.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Versaci, R.; Xu, G.

    2006-11-01

    We present the first observation of quantum interference in the process ϕ→KK→ππππ, using the KLOE detector at the Frascati ee collider DAΦNE. From about 5×10 neutral kaon pairs both decaying to ππ pairs we obtain the distribution of Δt, the difference between the two kaon decay times, which allows testing the validity of quantum mechanics and CPT invariance: no violation of either is observed. New or improved limits on coherence loss and CPT violation are presented.

  4. Alkaloids and Phenolic Compounds from Sida rhombifolia L. (Malvaceae) and Vasorelaxant Activity of Two Indoquinoline Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Otemberg Souza; Teles, Yanna Carolina Ferreira; Monteiro, Matheus Morais de Oliveira; Mendes Junior, Leônidas das Graças; Agra, Maria de Fátima; Braga, Valdir de Andrade; Silva, Tânia Maria Sarmento; Souza, Maria de Fátima Vanderlei de

    2017-01-06

    The follow-up of phytochemical and pharmacological studies of Sida rhombifolia L. (Malvaceae) aims to strengthen the chemosystematics and pharmacology of Sida genera and support the ethnopharmacological use of this species as hypotensive herb. The present work reports phytoconstituents isolated and identified from aerial parts of S. rhombifolia by using chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. The study led to the isolation of scopoletin (1), scoporone (2), ethoxy-ferulate (3), kaempferol (4), kaempferol-3-O-β-d-glycosyl-6''-α-d-rhamnose (5), quindolinone (6), 11-methoxy-quindoline (7), quindoline (8), and the cryptolepine salt (9). The alkaloids quindolinone (6) and cryptolepine salt (9) showed vasorelaxant activity in rodent isolated mesenteric arteries.

  5. Synthesis and biological evaluation of 10,11-methylenedioxy-14-azacamptothecin.

    PubMed

    Elban, Mark A; Sun, Wenyue; Eisenhauer, Brian M; Gao, Rong; Hecht, Sidney M

    2006-08-03

    [reaction: see text] 10,11-Methylenedioxy-14-azacamptothecin, a potent analogue of the antitumor agent camptothecin (CPT), has been prepared via a key condensation between AB and DE ring precursors. The biological testing of this compound validated a strategy for modulation of the off-rate of camptothecin analogues from the topoisomerase-DNA-CPT ternary complex via structural modification.

  6. Alkaloids in the human food chain--natural occurrence and possible adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Koleva, Irina I; van Beek, Teris A; Soffers, Ans E M F; Dusemund, Birgit; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2012-01-01

    Alkaloid-containing plants are an intrinsic part of the regular Western diet. The present paper summarizes the occurrence of alkaloids in the food chain, their mode of action and possible adverse effects including a safety assessment. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids are a reason for concern because of their bioactivation to reactive alkylating intermediates. Several quinolizidine alkaloids, β-carboline alkaloids, ergot alkaloids and steroid alkaloids are active without bioactivation and mostly act as neurotoxins. Regulatory agencies are aware of the risks and have taken or are considering appropriate regulatory actions for most alkaloids. These vary from setting limits for the presence of a compound in feed, foods and beverages, trying to define safe upper limits, advising on a strategy aiming at restrictions in use, informing the public to be cautious or taking specific plant varieties from the market. For some alkaloids known to be present in the modern food chain, e.g., piperine, nicotine, theobromine, theophylline and tropane alkaloids risks coming from the human food chain are considered to be low if not negligible. Remarkably, for many alkaloids that are known constituents of the modern food chain and of possible concern, tolerable daily intake values have so far not been defined.

  7. [Effects of steaming and baking on content of alkaloids in Aconite Lateralis Radix (Fuzi)].

    PubMed

    Yang, Chang-lin; Huang, Zhi-fang; Zhang, Yi-han; Liu, Yu-hong; Liu, Yun-huan; Chen, Yan; Yi, Jin-hai

    2014-12-01

    To study the effect of steaming and baking process on contents of alkaloids in Aconite Lateralis Radix (Fuzi), 13 alkaloids were analyzed by UPLC-MS/MS equipped with ESI ion source in MRM mode. In steaming process, the contents of diester-diterpenoid alkaloids decreased rapidly, the contents of monoester-diterpenoid alkaloids firstly increased, reached the peak at 40 min, and then deceased gradually. The contents of aconine alkaloids (mesaconine, aconine and hypaconine) increased all the time during processing, while the contents of fuziline, songorine, karacoline, salsolionl were stable or slightly decreased. In baking process, dynamic variations of alkaloids were different from that in the steaming process. Diester-diterpenoid alkaloids were degraded slightly slower than in steaming process. Monoester-diterpenoid alkaloids, aconine alkaloids and the total alkaloids had been destroyed at different degrees, their contents were significantly lower than the ones in steaming Fuzi at the same processing time. This experiment revealed the dynamic variations of alkaloids in the course of steaming and baking. Two processing methods which can both effectively remove the toxic ingredients and retain the active ingredients are simple and controllable, and are valuable for popularization and application.

  8. First-in-human phase 1/2a trial of CRLX101, a cyclodextrin-containing polymer-camptothecin nanopharmaceutical in patients with advanced solid tumor malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Neidhart, Jeffrey D.; Ramanathan, Ramesh K.; Bassett, Dawn; Neidhart, James A.; Choi, Chung Hang J.; Chow, Warren; Chung, Vincent; Forman, Stephen J.; Garmey, Edward; Hwang, Jungyeon; Kalinoski, D. Lynn; Koczywas, Marianna; Longmate, Jeffrey; Melton, Roger J.; Morgan, Robert; Oliver, Jamie; Peterkin, Joanna J.; Ryan, John L.; Schluep, Thomas; Synold, Timothy W.; Twardowski, Przemyslaw; Davis, Mark E.; Yen, Yun

    2013-01-01

    Summary Patients with advanced solid malignancies were enrolled to an open-label, single-arm, dose-escalation study, in which CRLX101 was administered intravenously over 60 min among two dosing schedules, initially weekly at 6, 12, and 18 mg/m2 and later bi-weekly at 12, 15, and 18 mg/m2. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was determined at 15 mg/m2 bi-weekly, and an expansion phase 2a study was completed. Patient samples were obtained for pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) assessments. Response was evaluated per RECIST criteria v1.0 every 8 weeks. Sixty-two patients (31 male; median age 63 years, range 39-79) received treatment. Bi-weekly dosing was generally well tolerated with myelosuppression being the dose-limiting toxicity. Among all phase 1/2a patients receiving the MTD (n=44), most common grade 3/4 adverse events were neutropenia and fatigue. Evidence of systemic plasma exposure to both the polymer-conjugated and unconjugated CPT was observed in all treated patients. Mean elimination unconjugated CPT Tmax values ranged from 17.7 to 24.5 h, and maximum plasma concentrations and areas under the curve were generally proportional to dose for both polymer-conjugated and unconjugated CPT. Best overall response was stable disease in 28 patients (64 %) treated at the MTD and 16 (73 %) of a subset of NSCLC patients. Median progression-free survival (PFS) for patients treated at the MTD was 3.7 months and for the subset of NSCLC patients was 4.4 months. These combined phase 1/2a data demonstrate encouraging safety, pharmacokinetic, and efficacy results. Multinational phase 2 clinical development of CRLX101 across multiple tumor types is ongoing. PMID:23397498

  9. Histochemical investigation and kinds of alkaloids in leaves of different developmental stages in Thymus quinquecostatus.

    PubMed

    Jing, Haiting; Liu, Jing; Liu, Hanzhu; Xin, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Thymus quinquecostatus, with more medical value, is a kind of wild plants. In order to exploit and utilize this plant, we studied the species and locations of alkaloids in its leaves. In this paper, histochemical study of leaves at different developing stages was taken to localize the alkaloids. Meanwhile, the kinds and content of alkaloids in leaves were identified using GC-MS technique. It was found that there were two kinds of glandular trichomes, namely, peltate trichomes and capitate trichomes, on the surface of leaves, and their secretory cells could secrete alkaloids. Results showed that trichomes could secrete alkaloids as soon as the first pair of leaves formed, and there were altogether 18 kinds of alkaloids identified by GC-MS. Nearly all of these alkaloids of leaves at different developing stages were distinct from each other, except one, 3-methoxy-a-methyl-benzeneethanamine, persists at different developing stages with high concentration.

  10. Alkaloids from single skins of the Argentinian toad Melanophryniscus rubriventris (ANURA, BUFONIDAE): An unexpected variability in alkaloid profiles and a profusion of new structures.

    PubMed

    Garraffo, H Martin; Andriamaharavo, Nirina R; Vaira, Marcos; Quiroga, María F; Heit, Cecilia; Spande, Thomas F

    2012-12-01

    GC-MS analysis of single-skins of ten Melanophryniscus rubriventris toads (five collections of two toads each) captured during their breeding season in NW Argentina has revealed a total of 127 alkaloids of which 56 had not been previously detected in any frog or toad. Included among these new alkaloids are 23 new diastereomers of previously reported alkaloids. What is particularly distinguishing about the alkaloid profiles of these ten collections is the occurrence of many of the alkaloids, whether known or new to us, in only one of the ten skins sampled, despite two skins being obtained from each breeding site of the five populations. Many of the alkaloids are of classes known to have structures with branched-chains (e.g. pumiliotoxins and tricyclic structures) that are considered to derive from dietary mites. A large number of previously reported and new alkaloids are also of unclassified structures. Only a very few 3,5-disubstituted-indolizidine or -pyrrolizidine alkaloids are observed that have a straight-chain carbon skeleton and are likely derived from ant prey. The possible relationship of these collections made during the toad's brief breeding episodes to sequestration of dietary arthropods and individual alkaloid profiles is discussed.

  11. Comparison of Liquefaction Potential Index Values Obtained from Using SPT and CPT Data, A Case Study Tepebasi-Eskisehir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutlu, Sunay; Pekkan, Emrah; Tün, Muammer; Güney, Yücel

    2015-04-01

    Turkey is inside an area which is very active regarding earthquakes, it is merely related to Turkey's geological and tectonic location on Earth. Therefore, it is very important for studies to be conducted to prevent and maximize the reduction of the risk of earthquake damage may occur. Especially, determination of the dynamic properties of the soil and the local soil conditions is the most crucial study can be done for residential areas. Water saturated sand is a soil condition, which is most negatively affected by earthquakes. This type of soil becomes liquefied during the earthquakes, loses its strength and causes significant damage. Therefore, liquefaction analysis must be done before the earthquake happens and areas at risk should be determined. Then, rehabilitation works should be applied to those areas and thus it can prevent the damage due to liquefaction. The aim of this study is to determine and compare Eskişehir/Tepebaşı in regard of liquefaction potential of new alluvial units in the district by using Cone Penetration Test (CPT) and the SPT-N data. LPI values calculated by using 42 different CPT data and 53 different SPT-N data from boreholes. While liquefaction analysis is being processed, the SPT-N data was used in the method presented by Seed and Idriss (1971) and developed by Youd et al. (2001), the CPT data was used in the method developed by Wride Robertson (1998). Also, Eskişehir Fault Zone which may affect the study area have assumed that constitute the maximum horizontal ground acceleration of 0.3 g and this value was used on calculations. As earthquake magnitude in calculations, 02.20.1956 earthquake with 6.4 magnitude has been used. In result of this study both methods have been used for given area and liquefaction analysis has been done. Results of the analysis have been used to generate liquefaction risk maps in GIS environment. In addition, since groundwater levels are directly related to liquefaction, groundwater level models have been

  12. Genetic variation of piperidine alkaloids in Pinus ponderosa: a common garden study

    PubMed Central

    Gerson, Elizabeth A.; Kelsey, Rick G.; St Clair, J. Bradley

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Previous measurements of conifer alkaloids have revealed significant variation attributable to many sources, environmental and genetic. The present study takes a complementary and intensive, common garden approach to examine genetic variation in Pinus ponderosa var. ponderosa alkaloid production. Additionally, this study investigates the potential trade-off between seedling growth and alkaloid production, and associations between topographic/climatic variables and alkaloid production. Methods Piperidine alkaloids were quantified in foliage of 501 nursery seedlings grown from seed sources in west-central Washington, Oregon and California, roughly covering the western half of the native range of ponderosa pine. A nested mixed model was used to test differences among broad-scale regions and among families within regions. Alkaloid concentrations were regressed on seedling growth measurements to test metabolite allocation theory. Likewise, climate characteristics at the seed sources were also considered as explanatory variables. Key Results Quantitative variation from seedling to seedling was high, and regional variation exceeded variation among families. Regions along the western margin of the species range exhibited the highest alkaloid concentrations, while those further east had relatively low alkaloid levels. Qualitative variation in alkaloid profiles was low. All measures of seedling growth related negatively to alkaloid concentrations on a natural log scale; however, coefficients of determination were low. At best, annual height increment explained 19·4 % of the variation in ln(total alkaloids). Among the climate variables, temperature range showed a negative, linear association that explained 41·8 % of the variation. Conclusions Given the wide geographic scope of the seed sources and the uniformity of resources in the seedlings' environment, observed differences in alkaloid concentrations are evidence for genetic regulation of alkaloid

  13. Two new indolopyridoquinazoline alkaloidal glycosides from Ranunculus ternatus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Yang, Zhuang; Tian, Jing-Kui

    2007-08-01

    Two new indolopyridoquinazoline alkaloidal glycosides, 11-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl rutaecarpine (ternatoside C) and 11-O-alpha-L-rhamnosyl-(1-->6)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl rutaecarpine (ternatoside D) were isolated from the roots of Ranunculus ternatus. Their structures were determined on the basis of spectroscopic and chemical methods.

  14. Revised NMR data for incartine: an alkaloid from Galanthus elwesii.

    PubMed

    Berkov, Strahil; Reyes-Chilpa, Ricardo; Codina, Carles; Viladomat, Francesc; Bastida, Jaume

    2007-07-12

    Phytochemical studies on Galanthus elwesii resulted in the isolation of five alkaloids: incartine, hordenine, hippeastrine, 8-O-demethylhomolycorine and lycorine. The NMR data given previously for incartine were revised and completed by two-dimensional 1H-1H and 1H-13C chemical shift correlation experiments. In vitro studies on the bioactivity of incartine were carried out.

  15. Diterpenoid alkaloid toxicosis in cattle in the Swiss Alps.

    PubMed

    Puschner, Birgit; Booth, Marcia C; Tor, Elizabeth R; Odermatt, Arnold

    2002-02-01

    Between 1995 and 1999, several cattle of a group of 80 heifers died acutely on a pasture in the Swiss Alps. The animals were Found dead between July 9th and 15th eachyear. Only 1 animal was examined on post-mortem, and no significant lesions were found. Aconitum vulpera, A napellus, and Delphinium elatum were identified in the pasture. The presence of diterpenoid alkaloid-containing plants in the pasture, the rapid death of the animals, and the lack of pathologic lesions suggested diterpenoid alkaloid toxicosis as a cause of death. A multiresidue alkaloid screen using gas chromatography with a mass spectrometric detector was employed on rumen, abomasal, small intestine, and cecal contents from the I heifer. Deltaline, deltamine, and lycoctonine were identified. Aconitine was found in all gastrointestinal samples using a sensitive and highly specific liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry methodology for aconitine analysis. The findings ofditerpenoid alkaloids in the gastrointestinal contents confirmed exposure to Delphinium and Aconitum spp, possibly resulting in sudden death.

  16. The alkaloid profiles of Sophora nuttalliana and Sophora stenophylla

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sophora is a diverse genus in the family Fabaceae, comprised of herbs, shrubs, and trees that occurs throughout the world, primarily in the northern hemisphere. Species of Sophora are known to contain quinolizidine alkaloids that are toxic and potentially teratogenic. Two perennial herbaceous spec...

  17. Ochrocephalamine A, a new quinolizidine alkaloid from Oxytropis ochrocephala Bunge.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Na; Ran, Jian-Qiang; Li, Li-Jun; Zhao, Yu; Goto, Masuo; Morris-Natschke, Susan L; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Zhao, Bao-Yu; Tan, Cheng-Jian

    2016-11-16

    One dimeric matrine-type alkaloid, ochrocephalamine A (1), was isolated from the poisonous plant Oxytropis ochrocephala Bunge. Its structure was elucidated by spectroscopic data and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The insecticidal and cytotoxic activities of 1 were evaluated.

  18. Ergovaline, an endophytic alkaloid. 1. Animal physiology and metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ergovaline is an ergot alkaloid found in some endophyte-infected ryegrasses and has been implicated in the expression of ergotism-like symptoms of grazing livestock, as well as in the protection of the plant against invertebrate predation and abiotic stresses. These selection pressures have resulted...

  19. Isolation of a new carboline alkaloid from Trigonostemon lii.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongmei; Luo, Yanping; Zhao, Hongmei; Wu, Jichun; Chen, Yegao

    2016-01-01

    A new carboline alkaloid, 1-(7-methoxy-quinolinyl-4'-yl)-3,4-dihydro-β-carboline (1), was isolated from the leaves and twigs of Trigonostemon lii Y.T. Chang, together with three known ones, trigonostemonines C and D (2 and 3), and trigonoliimine A (4). Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analyses, including 2D-NMR techniques.

  20. Biosynthesis of the defensive alkaloid cicindeloine in Stenus solutus beetles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schierling, Andreas; Dettner, Konrad; Schmidt, Jürgen; Seifert, Karlheinz

    2012-08-01

    To protect themselves from predation and microorganismic infestation, rove beetles of the genus Stenus produce and store bioactive alkaloids like stenusine, 3-(2-methyl-1-butenyl)pyridine, and cicindeloine in their pygidial glands. The biosynthesis of stenusine and 3-(2-methyl-1-butenyl)pyridine was previously investigated in Stenus bimaculatus and Stenus similis, respectively. Both molecules follow the same biosynthetic pathway, where the N-heterocyclic ring is derived from l-lysine and the side chain from l-isoleucine. The different alkaloids are finally obtained by slight modifications of shared precursor molecules. The piperideine alkaloid cicindeloine occurs as a main compound additionally to ( E)-3-(2-methyl-1-butenyl)pyridine and traces of stenusine in the pygidial gland secretion of Stenus cicindeloides and Stenus solutus. Feeding of S. solutus beetles with [D,15N]-labeled amino acids followed by GC/MS analysis techniques showed that cicindeloine is synthesized via the identical pathway and precursor molecules as the other two defensive alkaloids.